Shield Magazine | Volume 22 | Issue 2 | SPRING 2022

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SHIELD MEDIA VOLUME 22 // ISSUE 2

R U I N

M O T I O N

MOVING THROUGH COLLEGE WITH ENERGY & EXCELLENCE

Theindependent independent The studentpublication publicationofof student RochesterUniversity University Rochester


A LETTER from the editor WHEN ATTENDING A UNIVERSITY,

GABBY EUBANKS Editor in Chief

But as I move forward on my own journey after

YOU MAY FEEL AS THOUGH YOU ARE

college, I know that all I have gone through at RU

eternally climbing uphill, just living week to

will motivate me into my future. Within this issue, you will read how experiences

week to get through your discussion boards and quizzes, papers and exams. Midterms and finals are

at RU can both broaden your horizons and

checkpoints in time, and then before you know it,

motivate you to keep going. Wherever you are in your college journey

the semester is over. As we rapidly approach the end of this

— whether you are just starting the process as a

semester, one fact is certain, life keeps moving. The

freshman or finally reaching the finish line as a

articles in this issue all reflect that though there may

senior — remember to persevere. Know that you

be difficulties, life always keeps moving forward.

will keep progressing in life. Keep moving forward

In stressful moments, you might find it difficult

to wherever your path may take you. I am graduating this spring, and I’m trying to

to enjoy the journey and focus on your progress rather than on your failures. But try to remember

remember that this is not just an end, but also a

the end goal so that you can keep yourself

beginning. So for the remainder of your time at Rochester

motivated and strive to do the best that you can. In my own time at RU, I admit that I also

University, whether that is years or mere days in

have been caught up in worrying and living from

the future, don’t forget to keep moving forward

assignment to assignment with my checklist

down your path and understand that with endings,

becoming my calendar.

there are also beginnings.

MISSION statement » Shield Media is the independent student media of Rochester University. As such, we are committed to engaging in thoughtful dialogue over issues relevant to our culture. Shield Media relates to our audience by providing them with bold stories that are intended to entertain, inform and stimulate. 2 // SPRING

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» Shield Media participates in Rochester University’s faith-based mission, and believes that, as ethically minded journalists, we have a responsibility to engage each story with open-mindedness, compassion and nuance.

» Along with Rochester University’s Department of Mass Communication, Shield Media prepares young professionals for work in media-related fields by teaching and honing their skills in writing, reporting, graphic design, broadcasting, videography and photography.

» Shield Media is a student and not a college publication. Views expressed are diverse, and of course, do not correspond to all views of RU’s board, administration, faculty, staff, students or other constituency.


HELLO

CONTENTS 05 // 06

Soccer Sisters: Sibling rivalry spices up WHAC

07 // 08

Modern nationalism and its effect on our world

09

Church building purchase adds space for growth

10 // 13

Furry Friends: Students share Leader Dog love

14 // 15

Theology of Business: Pinchback brings passion & purpose to new role

16 // 18 Warrior Wire: Teammates. Friends. Brothers. 19 Inspo

ON THE COVER Motion photo by CHUT TERSNAP on Unsplash.com Bella Ames. Photo by Hayley McQuade. Danielle Castillo with Dux . Photo by Georgii Reshotka. Amelia Calkin with Bear. Photo by Christian Frazier. Cannon Campbell & Andrew Kline. Photo by Elliot Jones. SHIELDMEDIA.ORG // 3


THIS IS US

SHIELD MEDIA TEAM EDITORS Gabby Eubanks

EDITOR IN CHIEF

Olivia King

ONLINE EDITOR

Christian Frazier

CHIEF OF PHOTOGRAPHY

Hayley McQuade

CHIEF OF DESIGN

Paige Steele

SOCIAL MEDIA DIRECTOR

Olivia Pannecouk

EVENT COORDINATOR & CHIEF OF PROMOTIONS

Jake Feldman

CONTENT ASSISTANT

Tamera Robinson

CONTENT ASSISTANT

Georgii Reshotka

ASSISTANT PHOTOGRAPHER

Amelia Calkin

SOCIAL MEDIA ASSISTANT

Stephen Figueroa

MULTIMEDIA MANAGER

Trenton Fagan

MULTIMEDIA ASSISTANT

TEAM MEMBERS Charles Aldrich

James Fisher

Brandon Byrd

Angel Formicola

Dylan Campbell

Jasmine Moore

Danielle Castillo

Josh Richardson

Luke Chapman

Emma Saddler

Christian Corey

James Thompson

Layla Cypher

ADVISERS Lora Hutson Darren McCullough 4 // SPRING

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MENTORS Elliot Jones | Photography Liz Fulton | Design


S O C CE R

SIST E R S

SIBLING RIVALRY SPICES UP WHAC COMPETITION

Bella Ames // Photo by Hayley McQuade

he Ames sisters find themselves on opposite sides of the soccer field now that all three are competing for WHACmember universities. Bella Ames, a freshman planning to major in business or accounting, plays and serves as a captain for Rochester University’s women’s soccer team. Oldest sister, Molly, is a senior who plays at Indiana Tech University. Middle sister, Gabby, is a junior who competes for Madonna University. The sisters’ love for soccer began at early ages and continued as they moved into travel soccer, where they became used to practicing everyday and the constant traveling. Bella and her two older sisters all played at Romeo High School. Molly and Gabby played together for a year on the varsity squad, and Bella competed with Gabby during Gabby’s last year on varsity. Bella said when the college sport recruitment process began, the sisters knew they could play together for one university or split up. Both Molly’s coach at Indiana Tech and Gabby's coach at Madonna wanted all three of the sisters to play for their programs, but the sisters had other plans. “I seriously would not have done it any other way,” Bella said. “Seeing my sisters after games is so much fun. There are times on the field where we

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start talking smack to one another or physically start throwing arms—because we are sisters, we can.” Bella remembers playing against Molly in the fall, “We instantly started aggressively competing against each other and we joked around a lot to get into each other’s heads. There is nothing like getting to be so competitive against someone on the other team and it being totally O.K. to do so.” The sibling rivalry has also spread to the three teams. Bella said, “Our teams know that we are related, so we all have a great time playing each other.” Molly said the sister rivalry is “always something to look forward to.” Choosing which university to attend and soccer team to compete for was overwhelming for Bella, but she said having her sisters by her side made it easier because the decisions she faced had already been experienced by her sisters. “Whenever I get overwhelmed or just tired of practice everyday, I call them and they remind me that we are all in this together. It just makes me feel a lot better knowing that they feel the same way as I do,” Bella said. Already serving as a captain in only her first year, Bella said she is really enjoying competing for RU. “I love playing on this team! These girls help

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Molly Ames

Bella Ames

“Our teams know that we are related, so we all have a great time playing each other.”

B E L L A

A M E S

motivate me every day to show up and stand out. My team here is the most fun and filled with the best girls.” The soccer sisters continue to support each other in all that they do — especially playing soccer. “Playing a sport is a lot of commitment and I am just happy we all get to experience it together, not only at the collegiate level but ever since we were little,” Bella said. HAYLEY MCQUADE Chief of Design

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Gabby Ames


MODERN NATIONALISM AND ITS EFFECT ON OUR WORLD

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he Pledge of Allegiance, the American flag, the Star-Spangled Banner, the American bald eagle, the July 4th holiday. You recognize all of these symbols as commemorations of our American heritage. But how do these symbols and others that exist in every corner of our society determine our national identity? How does our collective national identity and the related ideologies affect our mindset as citizens and our will as a nation? Dr. Keith Huey, professor of religion, and Dr. David Greer, professor of history, want students to critically think about the implications of national identity and to be curious about what it is and how it affects our world. Thus, they launched a class this semester called “History, Faith and Culture: A Survey of Modern Nationalism.” The topic of nationalism is increasingly relevant to the world that we live in and aspects of it exist in areas that you may never have even realized. This is what I have learned as a student in the Modern Nationalism class. My fellow students and I are given more questions than answers when understanding even the basic premise of what nationalism is, much less what all of its implications are. You may have a basic understanding of what nationalism is and you may have your own connotations that pertain to the word, but in many cases, it is not a well-received concept. This has many historically based reasons but nationalism is interwoven into the history and formation of the modern world.

Here’s an example: Think back to when you were in high school. If you were in the American K-12 education system, you’ll remember reciting the Pledge of Allegiance on a consistent basis. “Every Monday, we would say the Pledge of Allegiance to start off our week,” said Mikayla Hubbard, a senior interdisciplinary studies major. “It was never really explained to us why we said it — just that it was a part of our routine in the first hour and that it was expected that we would participate and that it ‘set the tone for the week.’ ” But you may be asking yourself, why do we have students do that? Why do we sing the national anthem before sporting events? What does all of this mean and does it really matter? National identity has many implications for how society functions as well as how nations interact with each other. Learning about the history, characteristics and implications of nationalism is important when understanding the various traditions and social norms within American society. Also, national identity is often utilized in history to create the perception of a group of people. Within a nationalistic society, it is important to understand how our view of identity reflects reality. Studying nationalism broadens your perspectives and your understanding of how nations interact with one another. “Some people simply cannot see beyond the borders of our own SHIELDMEDIA.ORG // 7


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Dr. David Greer

country,” Huey said. Both Huey and Greer have traveled and experienced many different nationalistic identities throughout Europe and share the sentiment that being able to understand the national identities of other countries and of America is crucial to understanding both ourselves and other cultures. The professors acknowledge that nationalism has the ability to unify people and promote community and inclusivity, but Greer said, “There’s a lot of toxic expression of nationalism.” Nationalism has been used historically to justify many terrible things, just as it has been used to create community. “There are elements of nationalism that are inclusive, and can encourage inclusivity, but there are other forms that are very much exclusionary,” Greer said. The benefits of using nationalism, other than to create national unity, are yet to be determined, as well as whether or not society would be at a loss without it. Greer said, “I wrestle with the question of whether the absence of national identity has a detrimental nature to society.” Weighing the reality of the pros and cons of the effects of nationalism must be taken into account and to what extent are we willing to sacrifice for the sake of national identity. Huey asks: “What is so important that you would kill someone for a national identity?” Additionally, an aspect of creating an ideal national identity requires forgetting the negative 8 // SPRING

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Dr. Keith Huey

aspects of the nation. “You have to forget certain things, and there are times when it is not ethical to forget,” Huey said. This raises the question of what is worth giving up for the sake of national identity? Nationalism is a relevant concept today because it can help understand how our collective identity is formed, which then factors into many international issues. By understanding nationalism and learning about its history, we can begin to understand how collective identities interact with one another. Next time you sing the national anthem or say the Pledge of Allegiance, think about the deeper meaning of those actions. GABBY EUBANKS Editor in Chief


C H U R C H B U I L D I N G P U R CH A SE AD D S SPACE F OR G R OW TH

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his spring, Rochester University completed the purchase of the adjacent Rochester Church of Christ building, which will give the university 45,000 square feet of space for classrooms, offices and event space, including a large auditorium that seats up to 800 people. The university purchased the building for $2.13 million, and it includes a long-term, facilities-use agreement with the Rochester Church of Christ congregation. RU students have already utilized the new facility this spring as Chapel transitioned to the church auditorium at the beginning of the spring semester. In an interview with the Christian Chronicle, Tom Rellinger, executive vice president and chief financial officer, said, “It’s the best possible scenario to add educational space we needed for the price. We also pick up 15 offices for faculty and staff. We couldn’t come close to that for the price.” The university owns the building with shared spaces with the Rochester Church. The church will use the building on Sunday mornings and Wednesday

JAKE FELDMAN Content Assistant

nights and will retain some permanent spaces for offices and storage rooms. The purchase has been described by both university and church leaders as mutually beneficial. RU expands its property and assets, while simultaneously helping the congregation eliminate its mortgage on the building. Rochester Church treasurer Burt Rutledge told the Chronicle that the sale gives the congregation freedom. “We want to meet our community ministry partners out in the world, not get locked in to ministry being in the building.” The university will begin building construction this summer for offices and classrooms in addition to loading them with furniture and technology. In an email on April 5 to employees, Rellinger wrote, “We will begin modifications, repairs and upgrades to the facility immediately in hopes of having the facility online for educational purposes for the fall. The facility will allow us to schedule 240 students into eight classrooms, in addition to the auditorium.” SHIELDMEDIA.ORG // 9


Amelia Calkin & Bear

“Dux is chill. He’s a laid back little man.” - Danielle Castillo

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Danielle Castillo & Dux


FURRY FRIENDS RU STUDENTS SHARE LEADER DOG LOVE: ONE’S A PUPPY RAISER & ONE’S A GUIDE DOG USER

DANIELLE CASTILLO Staff Writer

On our campus, two students, both members of the Shield Media team, have dogs from Leader Dogs for the Blind, which is a nonprofit organization based just down the road in Rochester Hills. Amelia Calkin, a sophomore mass communication major, is raising Bear, a 10-month-old yellow Labrador retriever who hopefully will become a future Leader Dog. Danielle Castillo, a sophomore mass communication major, owns Dux, a 4-year old black Labrador who helps Danielle safely navigate her surroundings.

AMELIA CALKIN Social Media Assistant

How would you describe your dog’s personality? AC: “Bear is very much a people person. He loves meeting new people and new dogs. He’s very energetic and loves to play with his toys. Watch out though because he’s very sneaky and fast!” DC: “Dux is chill. He’s a laid back little man. I could count on both hands the number of times I’ve heard him bark. His favorite thing to do is sit in my lap and gnaw on a frozen Kong toy. He loves to make friends when he’s not on duty and eat cheese.”

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What challenges have you faced with your dog? AC: “His barking! I’ve learned that he barks when I’m not giving him attention, and at school, it’s difficult to keep his barking to a minimum and not disturb other residents while also getting homework and other tasks done. Another challenge has been trying to stick to Leader Dog guidelines as far as how to train him, what he can and can’t do, what toys he can and can’t play with, etc.” DC: “The hardest part of traveling with a Leader Dog is interference from the public. As a visually impaired individual, I rely on my Labrador to keep me safe while we wander around. When he gets distracted, he’s not focused on looking for curbs, stairs or moving vehicles.” What surprised you when you first got paired with your dog? AC: “When I first got the email that they had him available for me, they told me that he was going to be one of the ‘featured dogs’ on their website. I learned he was one of the sponsorship dogs that people could donate money to partner him with a visually impaired person.” DC: “The most surprising thing to me was the sheer amount of work that goes into it. As a dog who is seen in public, it’s my responsibility to keep him looking and behaving in a presentable manner. At that point, I hadn’t 12 // SPRING

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had a dog before and only knew what I’d read. No amount of reading could have prepared me for that.” What’s your favorite thing about your dog? AC: “My favorite thing about Bear is being able to say he’s mine (for the time being of course). Having a family dog is one thing, but having a dog that I care for on my own, has been the best thing ever.” DC: “Dux prevents me from getting hit by a truck. I don’t particularly like or trust cars. Whenever I’m walking with my ninja stick (white cane), I’m using my own senses to determine if it’s safe or not. I can use traffic patterns but having him judging my decision is really comforting.” What’s the worst thing about having a Leader Dog? AC: “My social life has been limited because of this program. I can only go out for a certain amount of time if he’s not with me because I can’t leave him for long periods of time.” DC: “As a working dog, he has to be taken outside on a schedule so both of us know what to expect from each other. Since I can’t see all that well, I can’t let him loose in the yard to do his thing. We go on leash, which isn’t a problem when it’s nice out, but I dislike waiting for him in our Michigan winters!”

How has having a dog from this program changed your life? AC: “This program has provided me with challenges I never thought I’d face before, but it also has provided me with opportunities I never thought I would have. I’ve loved having


Do people treat you differently when you have your dog with you? AC: “I wouldn’t say people treat us differently, but they definitely notice us. When I have Bear with me, more people will come up to me that I’ve never talked to and say, “Hi,” and ask to pet him or give him compliments. DC: “Yes. We get more attention, both positive and negative. People love seeing dogs and I’ve noticed people are more willing to approach you if you’ve got a dog by your side as opposed to the white cane, which people try to stay away from.” What’s some advice you have for someone who may be interested in raising a Future Leader Dog? him in my life for the past few months and I can’t wait to see how he helps others in the future. It’s especially changed my life knowing that what I’m doing will benefit visually impaired people.” DC: “Absolutely. I got him when I was 17 and that’s

AC: “It’s a lot of work and it can get very stressful at times because you’re responsible for a living creature with goals and needs to be met, which makes it more than just having a dog as a pet. I can honestly say that if

this is something you want to do, do it because you’ll get the experience of a lifetime!”

Did you ever think you would be paired with a Leader Dog? DC: “When I was growing up, my parents didn’t treat me any differently from my sighted siblings and friends. We rode bikes around the neighborhood and stayed outside past dark. I knew I couldn’t read books or signs, but I thought everyone saw this way. I was 13 when I pieced it together. Only then, at my request, did I begin learning blind travel skills, such as crossing streets by sound and using the white cane. As soon as I realized I’d qualify for a guide dog, I began researching — 14-year-old me had spreadsheets of all the guide dog schools in the states (and some outside). I knew I wanted to be paired with one. It was just a matter of turning 16.” What should people do when they see your dog on campus? AC: “It depends on when you see us. When he wears his jacket, he’s working and in training. Most of the time, it’s off, so he’s just a dog. Regardless of whether or not he’s wearing his jacket, I need to make sure he sits and is calm in order to be rewarded and pet. Once he sits, though, pet away!” DC: “This will differ depending on the time. When Dux and I are walking around and he has his harness on, he’s on the job whether he’s sitting under a desk or crossing a road. But if you want to pet him, just ask. Dux loves meeting people! Depending on our schedule, I may remove his harness and let him make friends.” SHIELDMEDIA.ORG // 13

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the age where most people start gaining their independence via getting a car. Dux is my car of sorts. He helps me get places I wouldn’t feel comfortable walking alone. I don’t need to rely as much on others to help me get around. I only wish he could learn to read menus.”


THEOLOGY OF BUSINESS

R

“God stirs your heart and it’s just not possible to say no”

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PAIGE STEELE Social Media Manager

ebekah Pinchback, registrar and marketing adjunct professor at Rochester University for 14 years, was selected from a competitive pool in Fall 2021 to serve as the new director of RU’s School of Business, the largest division on campus with 226 students. While serving as registrar, Pinchback might have seemed mostly hidden away in the registrar’s office, but she was an integral part of the university’s everyday academic operations. Now, she said she is excited to start shaping the School of Business for the future. Currently, the school has six majors: accounting, information systems, management, nonprofit management, sports management and strategic leadership. The school is launching six new majors in the fall: esports and gaming administration, digital marketing, financial planning, human resource management, public administration and health care management. Pinchback said the school is also adding three business clubs, and it has submitted an application for a master’s degree in sport leadership, which will be the business school’s first master’s degree upon approval. In the fall, the business school will also be moving to the Rochester Church of Christ building recently purchased by the university. Pinchback explained that she hopes to create a tighter knit community within the department as the classrooms and offices for the faculty will all be in one place, allowing for more genuine connections between professors and students. “We’re on a major trajectory of growth, and I’m excited and passionate to lead this great group of faculty and students as we move into the future. We are working hard to build a new brand for the School of Business,” Pinchback said.

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P I N C H B A C K B R I N G S PA S S I O N & PURPOSE TO NEW ROLE AS DIRECTOR OF BUSINESS SCHOOL


THEOLOGY OF BUSINESS

The business world of the past is one of men in black suits, cut-throat competition, and a laser focus on dollar signs, but Pinchback envisions something different for today’s business world and for Rochester University. Pinchback wants to set students up for success by helping them see the business world through a new lens — a lens of theology. “​​Work should be meaningful and contribute to human flourishing,” she said. In 2019, Pinchback began working on her doctorate in business administration at Anderson University in Indiana. “I love this doctoral program. It’s been transformative in every way,” she said. In this program, Pinchback was introduced to the idea of the theology of business. Now she is leading the School of Business in developing its own vision of that. “I want students to see how business and ministry work together academically and professionally,” Pinchback said. “This generation pushes back and shakes things that need to be shaken. They are hungry to do work that matters, which is an exciting opportunity for the future of business. Our faculty are on the front line of helping students cultivate a passion for justice and service within our business discipline. It feels special and important.”

FAITH & FAMILY

For Pinchback, her faith is a major part of who she is and has always been a driving force for her decisions. For 20 years, Pinchback has been married to her husband, Ben, and during this time, they have adopted five children. Their oldest son was adopted domestically, and the youngest four started out as foster children that the couple then adopted. The youngest three are biological siblings. “God stirs your heart and it’s just not possible to say no,” she said. The couple have spoken to other couples and even at conferences for those interested in adoption. For Pinchback, her children are at her core; they’re her drive for everything she does. She said the RU community is also part of her family, and she is passionate to lead the School of Business. “I know I can bring heart and energy to this position. I know I can help us grow.” In addition to growth, Pinchback wants to help RU students achieve their potential and move confidently into their future roles as leaders in their communities. “I want students to realize their work has meaning. Helping them realize that is my ministry,” she said. SHIELDMEDIA.ORG // 15


Wa r r ior Wire ANDREW KLINE & CANNON CAMPBELL

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T E A M M A T E S . F R I E N D S . B R O T H E R S .

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ndrew Kline and Cannon Campbell started at Rochester University as freshmen in 2016. Both are guards for the men’s basketball team. When the duo started at RU, the institution was still known as Rochester College and the Garth Pleasant Arena wasn’t built. The team’s home games were at Rochester High School, and the Warriors weren’t a part of the Wolverine Hoosier Athletic Conference yet. Both students decided to take advantage of eligibility extensions granted because of the COVID pandemic and returned for their sixth year at RU. Andrew will graduate this spring with a double major in accounting and strategic leadership with a minor in sports management. He was a guard on the men’s basketball team and is from Clarkston, Michigan. Cannon will graduate this spring with a triple major in business administration, psychology and sports management. He was a guard on the RU men’s basketball team and hails from Clarksville, Tennessee.

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Andrew

Cannon

It is easy to say I chose Rochester for basketball, but it was certainly more than that. I love the area. I love what the school stands for and I love how personal the education experience is. Having the chance to know my professors personally was a big deal for me. I enjoyed knowing that if I had any questions, I would be able to get a hold of them and they would be more than willing to help. Even with that, basketball was the driving force of most decisions I made my entire life, and Rochester University was no exception. Coach Garth Pleasant built a tradition of excellence within this basketball program, and Dr. Klint Pleasant taking it over was no set back. I knew Rochester was the team for me the first time I stepped on campus and participated in one of their loud, aggressive and honestly intimidating, open gyms. It was the first school in the area that I felt was challenging me to play my hardest the second I touched the court. The rest of my career was no different. I was pushed by my coaches, teammates and peers to be the best I could be both on the court and off it. I will always be grateful to this school and this program for what it taught me about sacrifice and the true joy from when those sacrifices pay off. I will never forget my time here, the professors I learned from, the coaches that pushed me to be better, and most definitely, the teammates that made all six years so memorable. As I move on to the next stage of my life, I will always cherish what Rochester University did for me.

Coming to Rochester University was one of the best decisions I’ve ever made. Being from Tennessee, when I first got the letter from Rochester, I just tossed it to the side, never really entertaining the idea of moving to Michigan. But after I came on a visit later that spring, the rest was history. I didn’t really know what I was looking for, but something about Rochester just felt right. When my freshman year started, I was rightfully a little nervous being so far from home, but I soon found a new family in my basketball teammates and coaches. I felt like they truly cared, and this family atmosphere seemed to extend through the whole campus as well. I owe so much to Rochester University and the basketball team especially, because they have shaped me from the scrawny little kid I was when I first stepped onto campus into who I am today. I’ve met some of my best friends here, people I will call family for life. All the relationships and memories I’ve made, the lessons I’ve learned, and the ups and downs have been indescribably valuable. I never in a million years thought I’d go to Rochester, much less spend six years here, but I’d do it all over again. Sometimes it feels like I’ve been here forever, and sometimes it feels like just yesterday I was stepping on campus for the first time. Wherever you are in your journey, I urge you to stop and enjoy the present. It’ll be over before you know it. I’ve got a lot of love for you Rochester.

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