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Rochester’s ‘abnormal’ poverty. NEWS, PAGE 5

Restaurant review: Nikko. DINING, PAGE 13

Chip monk: B.C. Likes You. MUSIC, PAGE 16

JCC’s “Relatively Speaking.” THEATER REVIEW, PAGE 26

THE FIRST PART OF A SERIES, PAGE 8

DECEMBER 11-17, 2013 • FREE • GREATER ROCHESTER’S ALTERNATIVE NEWSWEEKLY • VOL 43 NO 14 • NEWS. MUSIC. LIFE.


Feedback Send comments to themail@ rochester-citynews.com, or post them on our website, rochestercitynewspaper.com, our Facebook page, or our Twitter feed, @roccitynews. For our print edition, we select comments from all three sources, and we do edit those selections.

Urban planning

Kudos to City Newspaper for its trenchant analysis of issues relating to the future of our regional core (“Planning a Downtown: Rochester Pictures Its Future,” News). These issues deserve strong community input, with respect paid to the conclusions. Our planning and zoning director notes that “we have to serve three categories: workers, residents, and tourism.” These categories should not be considered mutually exclusive. Rather, these categories should reinforce each other, making downtown more desirable for workers, residents, and tourists alike. Doing this will enhance the tax base. Seeking tax base first will actually undercut tax base growth, by truncating the appeal in each of these categories. Today’s concepts of “new urbanism” evoke the relative self-sufficiency of olden villages, where people worked and lived within an easy walk of each other, in an environment appealing to all. Downtown Rochester has this potential, if only it offered a warmer, more human feel than the straight lines, hard surfaces, and over-illumination that define today’s downtown emotional experience. Older buildings may offer the requisite ambience, as City been foresightedly noting for many decades, as exemplified in the placemaking buildings pictured. The Cook’s Opera House could once have been restored into an ornate, acoustically excellent 1,000seat downtown theater for about $2 million. Contrast that with the 2 CITY

DECEMBER 11-17, 2013

stated $90 million cost for a downtown roadhouse theater today. South Water Street, a winding cobblestone street between those two demolished buildings, was an appealing alternative to the normal straight city streets. As noted, the core of this 19th-century riverside complex was destroyed to make way for a box of a convention center, which did not have to be located right there. A place for people to congregate was provided, while simultaneously removing a reason for people to come to downtown in the first place. City landmark laws even today would not have protected this wonderful complex, given a municipal mindset to demolish. The City Code establishes that preservation will not happen on its own merits, but shall conform to external plans for the site. This rather defeats the purpose of landmark legislation. Other good and important place-makers are routinely at risk today unless this unfortunate loophole is closed in the City Code. City policy ought to be cherishing and protecting its worthy landmarks, instead of destroying them or allowing abutting projects to diminish the landmark experience. DOUGLAS A. FISHER

Biking it

I’m an avid motorcyclist (it is the main part of my identity as a human being), and am also a bicyclist – whenever I can’t ride my motorcycle, I take my bicycle – and this is a fascinating look into a few bicyclists’ lives (“Hot Wheels”). Very similar to a look into the lives of lifestyle-motorcyclists. Rochester’s bicyclists, pedestrians, and motorcyclists are indeed treated as second-class citizens here. We need more accommodations and respect toward those three classes of commuters/people. BRIAN MILBURN

News. Music. Life. Greater Rochester’s Alternative Newsweekly December 11-17, 2013 Vol 43 No 14 250 North Goodman Street Rochester, New York 14607-1199 themail@rochester-citynews.com phone (585) 244-3329 fax (585) 244-1126 rochestercitynewspaper.com facebook.com/CityNewspaper twitter.com/roccitynews On the cover: Illustration by Matt DeTurck Publishers: William and Mary Anna Towler Editor: Mary Anna Towler Asst. to the publishers: Matt Walsh Editorial department themail@rochester-citynews.com Features editor: Eric Rezsnyak News editor: Christine Carrie Fien Staff writers: Tim Louis Macaluso, Jeremy Moule Music editor: Willie Clark Music writer: Frank De Blase Calendar editor: Rebecca Rafferty Contributing writers: Paloma Capanna, Casey Carlsen, Roman Divezur, George Grella, Jim Kempkes, Laura Rebecca Kenyon, Andy Klingenberger, Dave LaBarge, Kathy Laluk, Adam Lubitow, Nicole Milano, Ron Netsky, Dayna Papaleo, Suzan Pero, Rebecca Rafferty, David Raymond, David Yockel Jr. Editorial interns: Trevor Lewis, Colin McCoy Art department artdept@rochester-citynews.com Art director/production manager: Matt DeTurck Designers: Aubrey Berardini, Mark Chamberlin Photographers: Mark Chamberlin, Frank De Blase, Michael Hanlon Photography intern: Larissa Coe Advertising department ads@rochester-citynews.com Sales operations: Matt Walsh New sales development: Betsy Matthews Account executives: Nancy Burkhardt, Tom Decker, Christine Kubarycz, William Towler Classified sales representatives: Christine Kubarycz, Tracey Mykins Operations/Circulation kstathis@rochester-citynews.com Circulation manager: Katherine Stathis Distribution: Andy DiCiaccio, David Riccioni, Northstar Delivery, Wolfe News City Newspaper is available free of charge. Additional copies of the current issue may be purchased for $1 each at the City Newspaper office. City Newspaper may be distributed only by authorized distributors. No person may, without prior written permission of City Newspaper, take more than one copy of each weekly issue. City (ISSN 1551-3262) is published weekly by WMT Publications, Inc. Periodical postage paid at Rochester, NY (USPS 022-138). Address changes: City, 250 North Goodman Street, Rochester, NY 14607. Member of the Association of Alternative Newsweeklies and the New York Press Association. Annual subscriptions: $35 ($30 senior citizens); add $10 for out-of-state subscriptions. Refunds for fewer than ten months cannot be issued. Copyright by WMT Publications Inc., 2013 - all rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, photocopying, recording or by any information storage retrieval system without permission of the copyright owner.


URBAN JOURNAL | BY MARY ANNA TOWLER

Cops and the Edison 3 Rochester’s next police chief, expected to be named later this month, will walk into an extraordinarily tough job: fighting crime and improving police-community relations. At the same time. Over the past couple of weeks, we’ve gotten vivid examples of how hard that will be. There’ve been almost daily reports of shootings, fights, and stabbings. Reining in that violence was a key issue during Mayorelect Lovely Warren’s campaign, and she talked about getting more guns off the streets and cracking down on street-corner drug sales. But Warren also talked about the need for better relations between Rochester police and the community, about the need to build the community’s trust in the RPD. Distrust of the police is a long-standing problem in Rochester, and it flared up again Thanksgiving week. The morning before Thanksgiving, police arrested three Edison Tech students who were standing on Main Street downtown, waiting with several other teenagers for a bus to take them to a basketball scrimmage. To many Rochesterians, the arrests were shocking, a further indication of racial profiling in the RPD. But few things involving police actions are simple. Here’s what the students and their coach say happened, according to reports by the Democrat and Chronicle and television stations: The teenagers were waiting for the bus where their coach had told them to wait. A Rochester police officer told them to leave, and despite their attempt to explain why they were there, they were put in handcuffs. As they were being arrested, the media reports say, their coach, Jacob Scott, drove up in his car, got out, asked the police why the students were being arrested, and explained why they were there. The officer threatened to arrest the coach, and the teenagers were taken to jail, booked, fingerprinted, and later released when their families posted bail. Here’s the story from the police reports: Officer Eliud Rodriguez, on duty at the corner of Main and Clinton, watched “a group of seven to nine males” standing in front of the S&S Grocery (a few feet west of that intersection) for five to 10 minutes. He saw pedestrians having to walk around the group, and he saw “at least two” customers who had to walk through the middle of the group to leave the store. According to the police reports, Rodriguez first called out to the teenagers, asking them to move, and when they didn’t, he walked to the boys, told them they couldn’t continue to block the store entrance, and again asked them to leave.

Was the boys’ failure to move so serious that the officer needed to handcuff them and take them to jail?” When one teenager said they were waiting for a bus, the officer told him they had to wait at the bus stop farther west on that block. When the group failed to leave, the arrests began. Also according to the police reports, the owner of the S&S Grocery and one of his employees say they had asked the teenagers to leave and they had refused. And Police Chief James Sheppard told the Democrat and Chronicle that he thinks the arrest was justified. “He suggested,” D&C reporters Jon Hand and James Johnson wrote, “that there might be more to the event than has come to light.” The students’ arrest creates one more difficult situation for the police department. It isn’t against the law to be on Main Street, regardless of your age, and it seems clear that the teenagers were indeed waiting for a bus to take them to a scrimmage. The police reports contain no indication that the boys mouthed off or did anything illegal. Yes, if they were blocking the entrance to a store, they should have moved. And yes, technically, even if they weren’t blocking the entrance, if a police officer told them to move, they should have moved. Context is important, too: Main Street has been a frequent trouble spot, with students congregating and fighting. And downtown business leaders have pleaded for police and government officials to get control of the street. If we ask police officers to watch crowds of teenagers and try to make sure they don’t cause trouble, at what point do we want them to step in? continues on page 11

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CITY 3


[ NEWS FROM THE WEEK PAST ]

New master’s program

Undergraduate students interested in photography, preservation, and curatorial careers will soon be able to pursue a master’s degree offered jointly by the University of Rochester and the George Eastman House. The master’s program will be the only degree of its kind offered in the US.

Teachers, parents fight new curriculum

Teachers, parents, students, and education activists in communities across New York and the country organized a national “Day of Action” to rally against recently implemented reforms that they say are harming public education. The protest in Rochester was held at the NYSUT offices and involved about a dozen speakers.

Mall madness

The Monroe County Industrial Development Agency set a public hearing on a tax- incentive package for The Marketplace, better known as Marketplace Mall. The mall’s owners plan to demolish the former Bon Ton and DSW to build space for a new anchor tenant. The public hearing is at 11 a.m. on December 16, at Henrietta Town Hall.

4 CITY

City alleges sneaky charges

News

Mayor Tom Richards sent a letter to Monroe County Executive Maggie Brooks and County Legislature leaders addressing what he called “unannounced charges to city taxpayers” in Brooks’ 2014 budget proposal. The charges include a doubling of the amount that Rochester pays to house city prisoners awaiting arraignment in the county jail, Richards wrote, and a charge for maintaining traffic control devices.

Medley’s big bill

The East Irondequoit school board voted to slap Medley Centre’s developer, a firm owned by Scott Congel, with a penalty payment of approximately $4 million for missing an investment milestone, say media reports. Congel reportedly argued for a smaller penalty.

Rochester’s drug war

City Council member Adam McFadden held a public forum to discuss open-air drug markets in Rochester’s neighborhoods. McFadden has proposed creating drug-free zones in the city, which would prohibit loitering in defined areas for the purpose of selling drugs.

DECEMBER 11-17, 2013

Morgan Management’s proposed apartment complex for 933 University Avenue. PHOTO BY HANLON ARCHITECTS

PRESERVATION | BY CHRISTINE CARRIE FIEN

Eastman House sues over apartments The George Eastman House has filed a lawsuit in an attempt to prevent construction of an apartment complex on University Avenue in the East Avenue Preservation District. The paperwork was filed Monday in state Supreme Court. The Eastman House is asking the court to reverse or nullify decisions made by City of Rochester boards that allowed the project to proceed, and to permanently halt the project. Eastman House Director Bruce Barnes said in a December 6 letter to Eastman House members that the 99-unit apartment complex proposed by Morgan Management would cause irreversible damage to the national

landmark. The complex would be 20 feet from the Eastman House’s property line. “Despite our determined efforts, city agencies have allowed the project to proceed without regard to our landmark, our neighborhood, or the East Avenue Preservation District,” Barnes said. The city’s Preservation Board is scheduled to vote on the project’s final required approval on Wednesday night, but the Eastman House has asked the court to keep the city from taking any further action on the project. Barnes and the Eastman House have opposed the project from the outset, saying that the building would

harm the view from the Eastman House property, and that the complex is not permitted under the planned development district which was created in 2011. The lawsuit names Robert Morgan of Morgan Management, the City of Rochester’s director of planning and zoning, the city’s Planning Commission and Preservation Board, as well as the Monroe Voiture No. 111 Memorial Home, which owns the University Avenue property. Supporters of the Morgan proposal say that the developer has done everything asked of it to mitigate concerns; the design has gone through several revisions.


What’s most distressing about the report’s findings is the extreme concentration of poverty in Rochester, and the deep barriers to social and economic progress it poses. When compared to other cities, Rochester’s concentration of poverty is profound.

Cost of War The following people have been killed in the City of Rochester in recent weeks: -- Kemari Hodricks, 18, Rochester.

ROCHESTER TOTALS —

Rochester Police Department

SOURCE:

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POVERTY | BY TIM LOUIS MACALUSO

Rochester’s ‘abnormal’ poverty Rochester is the fifth poorest city in the country out of the 75 largest metro areas and the second poorest out of comparably sized cities, according to a sobering new report from the Rochester Area Community Foundation and ACT Rochester. But what’s most distressing about the report’s findings is the extreme concentration of poverty in Rochester, and the deep barriers to social and economic progress it poses. When compared to other cities, Rochester’s concentration of poverty is profound. “It’s abnormal,” says Edward Doherty, vice president of the Rochester Area Community Foundation and author of the report. “This is not a reflection of the typical urban environment.” There are roughly 161,000 people living below the federal poverty level in the nine-county Rochester region. But that statistic may be low, considering that the federal guidelines are so low that many human service professionals find them impractical. For example, a single person earning $11,490 annually — just above the poverty line — would make $5.53 an hour, or about what babysitters earn. The big problem is that 66 percent of the region’s poor reside in Monroe County and most are families with children living in the City of Rochester. And while the region’s white population has a lower poverty rate than the

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Doherty refers to research by David Rusk published in Rusk’s book “Cities without Suburbs.” When a city loses 20 percent of its population or more, has a minority Edward Doherty. population of 30 PROVIDED PHOTO percent or more, and a significant citysuburb income gap, the combination all but dooms a central city socially and economically, according to Rusk. When this occurs, transformative change becomes more costly and increasingly more difficult, Doherty says. This is especially evident in Rochester’s schools, he says. Improving the educational outcomes of a district where 88 percent of its students live below the poverty level — even with a budget of three-quarters of a billion dollars — is going to be difficult, he says. Doherty says the report shows that there needs to be a community conversation that puts everything on the table, including taboo subjects like metro government. “We really have to change something, he says.

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national average, the poverty rate for African Americans and Hispanics is significantly higher. Rochester’s high concentration of poverty is a product of a historical mix of factors, Doherty says. A great in-migration of African Americans who generally didn’t benefit from the area’s early manufacturing boom, unregulated urban sprawl that attracted middle-class families away from the city, lack of low-income suburban housing, and loss of low-skilled jobs with Rochester’s big employers have all contributed to the city’s high poverty rate, he says. And those trends helped to pack the poor into highly segregated African American and Hispanic neighborhoods, he says. The report cites a Brookings Institution study showing that Rochester has 27 neighborhoods distinguished by poverty rates of 40 percent or higher. What troubles Doherty most, he says, are the missed opportunities to reverse course. When it comes to sprawl and housing, for example, local and state policies that could have mitigated the concentration of poverty were never developed, he says. “I think we are remarkably resistant to change,” he says. And he says he hopes the report will encourage residents, politicians, and community leaders to take action before it’s too late.

2,292 US servicemen and servicewomen and 1,105 Coalition servicemen and servicewomen have been killed in Afghanistan from the beginning of the war and occupation to December 9. Statistics for Afghan civilian casualties are not available. No American casualties were reported after November 17.

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CITY 5


DEVELOPMENT | BY JEREMY MOULE

Legal wrangling complicates Pittsford project Redeveloping the former Monoco Oil site at 75 Monroe Avenue in the Village of Pittsford was never going to be an easy task. The site’s industrial history meant that complex and expensive cleanup work would be necessary before it could be reused. And its location at a major gateway into the village meant that any proposed development would be heavily scrutinized. A Mark IV Development-affiliated company, Pittsford Canalside Properties, purchased the property a few years ago and it’s now deep into the cleanup work; it has removed 48,000 tons of potentially contaminated soil from the site, says the state Department of Environmental Conservation. Chris DiMarzo, Mark IV’s chief operating officer, says the company has invested millions of dollars into the cleanup. But Mark IV wouldn’t invest that kind of money if it didn’t expect the site to pay off down the line. Ultimately, the development company wants to build 167 apartment units and a restaurant on the site; they call the project Westport Crossing. But there’s a problem: many residents and some village officials say the project doesn’t fit with Pittsford’s architectural and historic character. They object to the size of the buildings and the project’s layout. As a result of the controversy, the project is advancing in something of an uneasy state. The developer continues to pursue the village and state approvals it needs, but at the same time, two court cases have the potential to alter the project’s trajectory. “It’s a pretty complicated scenario all around,” says Pittsford Mayor Bob Corby. The problems started after a November 2012 decision by the village board to issue special permits for the project — a decision that split board members. (Corby and former board member Paula Sherwood voted against the permits. They said the plan didn’t fit the village’s character.) Ultimately, a citizens’ group filed a lawsuit challenging the special permit approvals. A subsequent approval by the village planning board led to the second lawsuit, when the developer filed to try to stop an appeal of the planning board’s decision. Monroe County Supreme Court Justice John Ark will hear arguments in both cases on December 12. Decisions probably won’t come right away. Mark IV’s DiMarzo says the village board’s original decision to issue the special permits is sound. And the company still expects to have final approvals for its plans within a few months, to break ground on the 6 CITY

DECEMBER 11-17, 2013

project this spring, and to have the new buildings occupied in 2015, he says. “I am confident that the village leadership acted professionally and made their decision with all of the facts in front of them,” DiMarzo says. The Friends of Pittsford Village citizens’ group is behind the lawsuit to get the special

permits for Westport Crossing annulled. But the case’s details have less to do with the actual project than how the village board made its decision to approve the permits. Alan Knauf, the group’s attorney, says the board met with the developer in closed sessions to discuss financial aspects of the project. The developer presented the financial information to justify the number of apartment units in the project, he says. But many of the residents’ concerns and objections — especially traffic impacts and architectural compatibility — stem directly from the project’s size. Since village board members considered the financial information as they decided whether to approve the special permits, Knauf says, the public should have been able to review and comment on that information. But village officials withheld it, arguing that making the information public could have damaged Mark IV professionally, says the lawsuit. A ruling in favor of the Friends group could mean that Pittsford Canalside Properties has to reapply for the special permits. It could also render the other pending lawsuit moot, Knauf says. The village planning board approved the developer’s preliminary site plan in July, which was the next big step for the project after receiving the special permits. But that action set the stage for the second legal challenge. At the heart of the lawsuit is a village law that lets any “applicant or interested person” appeal a planning board decision via the village Board of Trustees. And one week after the planning board approved Westport Crossing’s preliminary site plan, Friends of Pittsford Village and two residents, Justin Vlietstra and Michael Reynolds, filed an appeal. They say the plan approved by the planning board varies too much from the plan approved

The 75 Monroe Avenue site before developers started cleanup work, and during that work. FILE PHOTOS

by the village board in that the developer moved and enlarged buildings and changed the site’s layout. The permits regulate certain aspects of the project, including placing restrictions on the number and size of buildings. In response, Pittsford Canalside Properties is suing the village to prevent it from applying the local law allowing the appeal. The company is also asking the judge to strike down the law, arguing that state law, which lays out a process for residents to challenge a board decision in court, overrides the local law. If Justice John Ark does rule on this lawsuit and sides with the developer, the decision may prevent future local-level appeals in Pittsford. But it could also add another complication — and more tension — to the situation with Westport Crossing. Mayor Corby and some members of the village board say that the plan approved by the planning board doesn’t meet the criteria

established by the village board, and that the developer is in violation of its permits. So if Pittsford Canalside Properties prevails in court, the village board could end up suing the planning board, Corby says. The project also needs additional approvals from the village board, Corby says, including the extension of a sewer district. “I can’t imagine that we would approve expanding the sewer district to facilitate a project that is in violation of our own special permit,” Corby says. And Knauf says his clients, Friends of Pittsford Village, may sue if the site plan receives final approval, which is the next step in the village approval processes. “When and if that happens, we can respond to that,” DiMarzo says The developer is scheduled to appear before the village board on December 16 for final site plan review.


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CITY 7


SHATTERING THE STIGMA HEALTH CARE | BY TIM LOUIS MACALUSO

or much of the last century, the subject of mental health has been locked away in the public psyche, to be dragged out only after tragic events seize national attention: the student who walks into school with a loaded gun, the mother who drowns her children in the bathtub, or the veteran who kills his family and then commits suicide after months of coping with post-traumatic stress. But after years of being viewed somewhat disjointedly from physical health, mental health is finally being seen as equally important. Advances in medications and therapeutic approaches have made most mental illnesses treatable, experts say. But promoting good mental health is a complex, multifaceted challenge, especially in lower-income communities where many individuals may not have health insurance and access can be difficult. “In general, we have a good array of mentalhealth services in Monroe County,” says Patricia

This is the first installment of a two-part series on mental health attitudes, research, and available services in the Rochester region.

8 CITY

DECEMBER 11-17, 2013

Woods, president and CEO of the Mental Health Association’s Monroe County office. “Where we’re weakest is in prevention. The system is designed to have you get very sick first, and then we’ll treat you. It mirrors in many ways the physical health system.” To address this, researchers at the University of Rochester Medical Center are pioneering new ways to deliver mental-health services. While many people still visit a professional in the traditional clinical office setting, URMC has been creating treatment models built on a reverse premise: that mental health professionals need to bring treatment to the people. Many of URMC’s mental-health professionals are getting out of the medical center’s offices and venturing into the Rochester community. Dr. Eric Caine, chair of the URMC’s Department of Psychiatry and a national specialist on suicide prevention, refers to this new model as an “alternate mental health system.” Instead of running a community clinic, he says, the community is the clinic. This first installment of a two-part series examines the state of mental health treatment in Rochester, what’s being done to provide quality services to large numbers of people who need help but aren’t getting it, and how new research may encourage healthier communities across the country.

Mental illness is increasingly widespread in the US,

affecting roughly one in five adults every year, according to the National Alliance on Mental Illness. Nearly 46 million adults had a diagnosable mental illness in 2011, with depression and anxiety topping the list, according to NAMI. But not everyone seeks or receives treatment. In a 2007 study, the US Centers for Disease Control found that only 38 percent of people with serious psychological disorders had received treatment that year. Getting people into treatment has been hampered historically by the stigma surrounding mental illness. It is not only feared, but it also has an uncanny ability to co-exist with other health disorders. Most troubling is the mistaken belief that mentally ill individuals are violent, dangerous, and poised to erupt without notice or cause, when research clearly shows that’s not true. People


suffering from mental illness are much more likely to be victims of violent crime than perpetrators. The biggest challenge that professionals face is reaching individuals with severe and persistent mental disorders — schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, debilitating depression — since a mix of poverty and social stigma act as formidable barriers. “The very nature of mental-health services delivery is challenging right now,” says URMC’s Caine. “If someone has money and insurance, they’ll say ‘I’m going to go see a therapist.’ But it turns out that a lot of people don’t have money. And even those who do have insurance, it doesn’t cover a lot.” Added to this is the intricate nature of some mental illnesses. Individuals with severe mental illness may become paranoid or hallucinatory. Why would they seek help from a person they believe might hurt them? “When it comes to mental disorders, there are a lot of individuals and families that are proactive and work collaboratively,” Caine says. “But then there are many more patients who don’t want to involve their families and burn their bridges with family and friends. This is the area where there is really a lot of need.” Usually they end up getting bounced around from the justice system to the health care system, Caine says. “They go from the street to the emergency department,” he says. “We’ll set them up with an outpatient appointment, but they go back to the street, and then they wind up in jail. And back and forth they go. It’s been very clear for some time that we needed to think in new ways about this challenge.” The result is that high concentrations of people with severe mental disorders end up in court, often clogging up the justice system. That’s why many clinicians will tell you that jails and prisons are often a community’s biggest distributors of pharmaceuticals. “The courthouse is filled with people who are highly stressed when you think about it,” Caine says. People are there for domestic violence, divorce, child abuse, substance abuse, and other issues. They may not be severely sick in terms of schizophrenia or bipolar disorder, but if they had received treatment sooner, Caine says, they might not be there.

“THE SYSTEM IS DESIGNED TO HAVE YOU GET VERY SICK FIRST, AND THEN WE’LL TREAT YOU.” -PATRICIA WOODS

“And we don’t want to see them get to the point where they’re in the emergency room, either,” he says. “I mean, emergency rooms are capable of addressing some really important things, but it can also point to the failure of not intervening earlier.” Dr. Steven Lamberti says the individuals

who lack access or aren’t willing to accept treatment — and end up cycling in and out of emergency rooms and the courts — usually don’t improve. And the cycling is an enormous drain on limited funding. Lamberti, a psychiatrist and professor who oversees URMC’s schizophrenia research, is also the director of the Strong Ties Community Support Program. The program uses a team of psychiatrists, psychologists, nurses, social workers, and therapists to provide comprehensive treatment to individuals with severe mental illness in Rochester. One of the group’s specialties is a mobile treatment approach that Lamberti helped to develop, which often involves a combination of community outreach and acting as a liaison with the criminal courts. “It’s important not to have the criminal justice system and the mental-health system crash,” Lamberti says, since both systems are

OPPOSITE: We need to do a better job promoting mental wellness, not just treating illness, says Ann Marie White, URMC assistant professor in psychiatry. PHOTO BY MARK CHAMBERLIN ABOVE RIGHT: Emergency rooms and the courts are the most costly and ineffective way to treat people with severe mental disorders, says URMC’s Dr. Steven Lamberti. PHOTO BY MARK CHAMBERLIN

already stressed. But avoiding this requires understanding the mechanics of both systems, he says. “Why do some people get caught up in the revolving door of hospital-to-street-tojail-to-hospital again?” he says. “And how do we use the best parts of both systems to break this?” Key to breaking the cycle is developing alliances between courts and mental-health professionals, he says. Lamberti uses the example of a homeless veteran who has a psychotic break with reality and is arrested for acting out. “He goes before the judge who tells him he has been arrested for a mental-health misdemeanor and ‘You could serve a year in jail or you could go for treatment,’” Lamberti says. Even though the person chooses treatment, Lamberti says, he misses his appointments and then becomes what the courts refer to as “noncompliant.” The courts tend to view the patient as a troublemaker, he says, rather than focus on the illness or the rigidity of the criminal justice system. Starting in 1995, URMC’s psychiatric department began identifying these types of barriers to treatment and researching ways to remove them. Lamberti’s group found that a team approach consisting of representatives from the justice system and the health community is needed. In addition to establishing clear routes of communication, Lamberti says he often found that patients require extra followthrough on what are frequently basic needs. For example, ensuring that court-ordered treatment is provided could mean going out into the community and literally locating patients, picking them up, and driving them to their appointments. Unlike the typical managed-care approach which provides treatment when the patient

shows up for a scheduled visit, Lamberti’s approach removes barriers primarily by not making assumptions. For example, he doesn’t assume the patient will remember the appointment or have transportation. “We hold people accountable,” he says. “We’re not being soft on crime; it’s being hard on the disease. When they accept treatment, it’s a long-term commitment with monitoring.” Word spread about the URMC’s work, and the research team began getting inquiries from other municipalities, police, and emergency rooms seeking information and training. The research has been spun off into a business and soon the Rochester Forensic Assertive Community Treatment model or R-FACT will be available on DVD and workshops for training purposes. URMC Associate Professor Catherine Cerulli’s training in law and mental health

converged as she began her research in the ‘90’s on intimate and domestic partner violence. While there had been considerable research on the mental health of incarcerated offenders, less was known about the mental health of victims. Cerulli says she was interested in knowing whether survivors of domestic abuse who feel healthier physically and mentally would make better choices in their lives, particularly around personal safety. In 1999, Cerulli started the nation’s first mental-health clinic located at a court site for victims of domestic violence. In keeping with the URMC Department of continues on page 10 rochestercitynewspaper.com

CITY 9


Mental illness continues from page 9

UPCOMING EARLY DEADLINES For the issue of December 25, 2013 Display and classified-display ads and all editorial: 4pm Thursday, December 19th Classified line ads: Noon Friday, December 20th Offices will be closed on Wednesday, December 25 in observation of Christmas Day

For the issue of January 1, 2014 Display and classified-display ads and all editorial: 4pm Thursday, December 26th Classified line ads: Noon Friday, December 27th Offices will be closed on Wednesday, January 1 in observation of New Year’s Day

For events to be included in our editorial NYE guide: Submit entertainment-based events by Noon Thursday, December 12th

Psychiatry’s mission of pushing clinical services out into the community, Cerulli says she saw that the courts — not mental health clinics — customarily deal with victims of violence. People coming to courts seeking protection orders, divorce filings, and custody of children are in what Cerulli calls a “help-seeking mode.” She recognized that it was a window of opportunity. “What we often fail to realize is if you are a victim of violence and you’ve been physically, sexually, and emotionally abused with increasing frequency and severity, your mental health is sometimes seriously harmed by the perpetrator,” Cerulli says. She began her research by surveying hundreds of domestic-violence victims in Monroe County Family Court. Her team asked victims if they thought they had a mental-health disorder. Did they feel depressed or have symptoms of posttraumatic stress? Not only did most victims confirm having mental-health disorders, many said they were so severe that they were having difficulty functioning. Then they asked victims, “If you had mental-health services available here at court, would you utilize them?” What Cerulli’s research revealed is that even though the courts are not the ideal prevention tool against domestic violence, providing on-the-spot mental-health services to victims could help prevent intergenerational cycles of violence. Cerulli says the demand for services in the court clinic far exceeds its capacity, so she is working with the Centers for Disease Control to create a suicide prevention curriculum that will be offered to domestic violence hotlines. “We believe that crisis and domestic violence hotline workers can be suicide prevention specialists,” she says. “So we’ve partnered with the national hotline in Texas where we’ve planned to launch this curriculum in two weeks. And we’ll be studying it to see not only whether the advocates gain knowledge to change attitudes, but most importantly, change [suicidal] behaviors.” A third area of research, which is led by

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10 CITY DECEMBER 11-17, 2013

the URMC’s Ann Marie White, an assistant professor in psychiatry, involves the cultivation of what some might call neighborhood therapists. Her office is responsible for mentalhealth promotion in the community at a time when many of Rochester’s neighborhoods are beset by violence. “What we do is stealth mental health,” she says.

“ WE’RE NOT BEING SOFT ON CRIME; IT’S BEING HARD ON THE DISEASE.” -DR. STEVEN L AMBERTI

A task force consisting of the URMC, Monroe County Office of Health, and the Finger Lakes Health System was created to convene with other leaders in different areas of mental health. The task force meets with representatives of schools, churches, community centers, and the justice system to help determine how the URMC and its partner agencies could be most effective, since they are not typically first responders. White says the “Natural Helpers” program began in 2009 with a small grant. The program was based on earlier UR research focused on promoting good mental health, developing resiliency, and preventing violence by working with neighborhood barbers, priests, and small business owners. But White’s team went one step further. “We wanted to talk to the ‘Miss Connies’ on the block — the aunties, grandmas, and grandpas,” she says. “What happened to these people? Are they still there? How do they want to support one another? Do they even want to support each other?” The concept behind Natural Helpers, White says, is to reinvigorate “neighborhood networks” — conversations that once took place over the backyard fence or in the driveway while working on the car. “We worked with individuals in the community as equal partners,” she says. “We created a natural helper learning collaborative where they became helpers in a structured research way.” The helpers learned how to exchange ideas and knowledge in a way that can’t occur in a clinical setting or an institution, White says. The Natural Helpers process wouldn’t have gotten past square one, she says, if it wasn’t built on familiar faces and trusting relationships. “They would say things like, ‘Oh, there’s this house on the street where there’s some really questionable things going on.’ Then someone else would say, ‘I know someone who would really like to live in this neighborhood if they could only find a place.’” As soon as the house became available, White says, they had new neighbors ready to move in.

“Sometimes they would do the soft handoff and they would say to someone who needs help, ‘You need to go see this person because they are people you can trust,” White says. “That person who needs help has this trusting relationship with the natural helper, and they’ll do what they told them to do.” Reducing gun violence is especially pertinent to White’s research. The goal of Natural Helpers is to infuse communities with positive mental health that makes resolving disputes through violence less prevalent. But White resists the general public’s tendency to lump gun violence with mental illness. “We really have to take these cases individually and not use them as another sound bite, because the two really don’t go together,” White says. “And it only further stigmatizes people with mental illnesses.” There is a temptation, White says, to find a way of applying Big Data and analytics to identify the extremely small number of individuals who might commit some kind of horrifically violent act, and then intervene with preventive measures. But it’s extremely difficult to predict who will commit such crimes, White says, or which treatments would prevent them. White prefers taking what she calls the longterm view and to elevate the general health of a whole community. “Yes, it’s true that one person can do a lot of harm with a gun, a word, with their fist, or even with a gesture that’s repeated over time,” White says. “But a community that’s concerned with safety needs to have a balanced approach, one that includes positive mental health and one that is focused on prevention as well — not just the reactive. We really need to be investing upstream.” In the next installment, we’ll take a closer look at some of the personal experiences of individuals supporting a loved one with a mental-health disorder or managing their own illness.


Cops and the Edison 3

RING IN THE NEW YEAR WITH US!

continues from page 3

And if teenagers refuse to obey a reasonable request by a police officer, what do we want the officer to do? Shrug his shoulders and walk away? But the context of these arrests is broader than that. These were teenagers, and teenagers don’t always make mature judgments. Was their failure to move so serious that the officer needed to handcuff them and take them to jail? Did it warrant creating an arrest record for these three boys? Also part of the context: the longstanding tension between the police and some parts of the community, particularly the black community. Did the police assume that because the teenagers were black, they might cause problems? All of us in the Rochester community need to confront the issue of black teenagers downtown. We need a solution – and it can’t be to simply remove the kids. They have as much right to be on Main Street as anybody. They also have as much responsibility as anybody to behave properly. And it’s the behavior problem that we haven’t figured out how to deal with. But finding a way to deal with fights and intimidation is one thing. Dealing with kids waiting for a bus to go to a basketball scrimmage is another. Even if the teenagers disobeyed the officer, was arrest the only recourse? In one respect, the arrest of these three teenagers is an isolated incident. But it made news because of its context, and because of concerns about racial profiling. It may very well further increase the lack of trust that parts of the community have in the RPD. And it is highlighting, once again, the need for public-safety policies that are effective not just short term but also long term. And that will have to be based on policies and actions that the full community trusts and respects. During her campaign, Lovely Warren pledged exactly that approach: “a tough, holistic response that addresses the root causes of crime, while also cracking down on criminals and gun-related violence,��� she said in her public-safety issue paper – “innovative policing, targeted interventions, and common-sense reforms that foster improved relations between residents and police.” Can she, her police chief, and the RPD pull that off in a city wracked by blackon-black violence and burdened by one of the biggest concentrations of poverty in the nation? Can they do it despite financial challenges that will limit the department’s budget?

The police chief is only one of the key officials Warren will be naming as she builds her administration. At the moment, it feels like this may be one of the most important.

Leaving me speechless

Sheriff Patrick O’Flynn wants a $37,000 raise – as County Executive Maggie Brooks insists that the county is so strapped for money that it will need to cut $1.3 million in day-care funding and that it needs to up the fees on businesses and residents in this high-poverty city. Two things: 1) This is another example of the county treating the city and its residents as The Other. The county, like the city, has money problems. But as it tries to deal with them, the county is backing away from the Morin-Ryan Community of Monroe philosophy. This isn’t the first time the county has done it. And it won’t be the last. 2) This is another example of county Republican leaders doing something because they can. County Legislature Democrats are, essentially, powerless. It sure would be nice to see resistance from some Republicans with a heart (or, at the least, from some Republicans who recognize that if the city and its residents fail, the suburbs will, too).

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Mandela

Flags were at half-staff all over New York on Friday as a tribute to Nelson Mandela. It was not an empty gesture; during the long struggle to rid South Africa of apartheid, many New Yorkers – like people all over the world – were inspired by Mandela and other South African anti-apartheid leaders, joining the fight for an end to apartheid and for Mandela’s release from prison. It was a broad, sustained, international effort that reached into the halls and offices of universities, governments, and businesses, including those in Rochester. Mandela’s contributions went far beyond his enormous efforts for the people of his own country. In his fight for justice, Mandela set an example, by his willingness to risk both prison and death and, after being freed, by his insistence on forgiveness and reconciliation. He lived a long, long life, dying last week at 95. But while his death wasn’t unexpected, the news was still a jolt. And at the moment, it feels like the world’s moral fabric has developed a very large hole.

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 11


URBAN ACTION This week’s calls to action include the following events and activities. (All are free and open to the public, unless otherwise noted.)

Meeting on public safety

For more Tom Tomorrow, including a political blog and cartoon archive, visit www.thismodernworld.com

12 CITY DECEMBER 11-17, 2013

The Rochester Police Department will hold “Policing in the Spirit of Service,” a public meeting to gain input on how to better serve the community with professionalism, courtesy, and sensitivity. There will be discussions concerning police and citizen behaviors that will enhance the policing and safety experience. The meeting will be held at 6 p.m. on Thursday, December 12, at the Outreach Community Center, 447 Genesee Street.

NOFA-NY conference

The Northeast Organic Farming Association-NY will hold its winter 2014 conference, “Preserving the Past, Seeding the Future,” on Friday, January 24, to Sunday, January 26. The conference is designed to provide education, assistance, and support concerning organic food and farming. This year’s conference includes workshops on everything from starting a small farming business to learning more about new developments in grain growing. The conference will be held in Saratoga Springs. Registration is required. For registration, a complete schedule of workshops, costs, and directions: www.nofanyconference.org.

Public meetings on rec center activities

The City of Rochester’s Department of Recreation and Youth Services will hold open house events at three locations on Thursday, December 12. The public is invited to learn about recreation programs, volunteer opportunities, and to provide feedback on current offerings. The locations are the Thomas Ryan Community Center, 530 Webster Avenue; Roxie Ann Sinkler Recreation Center, 75 Grover Street; and the Carter Street Community Center, at 500 Carter Street. All three open houses are at 6 p.m.


Dining ($16) manages to be virtuous and hedonistic all at once; it’s got lobster, salmon, and crunchy bits of tempura inside white rice, topped with escolar and umami-rich miso mayonnaise, then torched. Keep in mind that Nikko slashes $4 off its rolls (as well as a few bucks off drinks) for happy hour, Tuesday through Friday 4:30-6:30 p.m., at the bar.

Left: beef tenderloin carpaccio with a Fancy Pants cocktail; right: Tiki Torch roll with the Hammock cocktail. Both from Nikko. PHOTOS BY MARK CHAMBERLIN

Out of sight Nikko 1 CAPRON ST. 454-2908, RESTAURANTNIKKO.COM DINNER: TUESDAY-THURSDAY 5-10 P.M., FRIDAY-SATURDAY UNTIL 11 P.M. [ REVIEW ] BY DAYNA PAPALEO

When a new restaurant hits the scene, the first adjective that often gets tossed around is “trendy,” and that’s not exactly a compliment. Because while being of-the-moment is cool and all, that moment won’t last forever. There will always be someplace newer, and those so-called foodies will wander off to chase the proverbial dragon. At that point a restaurant has to find its permanent niche, and two years after its opening, Nikko seems to have settled into a truly tasty groove. Oodles of restaurants have come and gone in Rochester since Nikko’s debut, so you’d be forgiven for forgetting about it. Nikko can be found downtown by Geva Theatre Center, at the corner of Capron Street and that little tendril of South Avenue under the entrance to 490 East. “We’re centrally located, I’d like to think,” says Marco Muoio, who co-owns Nikko with

Mark Chiarenza, “but we’re kind of out of sight, out of mind.” Or you may remember Nikko as that place with the ambitious menu consisting of sushi along with various Asian- and Italian-inspired dishes. This is still somewhat accurate. “What it’s evolved into is almost comfort food with quite a bit of technique behind it and using premium ingredients,” says Muoio. “We found that doing more approachable dishes but adhering to the standards that we’ve set from Day 1 is what’s been successful.” “Comfort food” was precisely what I was

thinking as I tucked into a luscious plate of duck confit and pierogies ($18), the tender pasta filled with potato, onion, and bacon, and mingled with meaty shreds of duck, expertly trimmed heirloom baby carrots (still with their tiny tops!), thinly sliced brussels sprouts, and a plate-lickingly good duck demi-glace. I also blissed out over a velvety orecchiette carbonara ($24), the rib-sticking richness mellowed by salty pancetta and roasted cauliflower florets, then gilded with a perfect soft-boiled egg. The “little ears” also anchored another pasta special, a deliciously simple dish of tender roast pork, creamy white beans, and escarole, kissed with garlic bread

crumbs then kicked with crushed red pepper, lest anyone get too comfy. The toast point that accompanied the elegant beef tenderloin carpaccio ($15) was sized more like a surfboard, but I ain’t complainin’; that just meant more real estate on which to arrange the accoutrements, which included piquant horseradish and an intense hard cows’ milk cheese of Swiss origin called Belper Knolle. A decadent smoked blue-cheese fritter nearly stole the show in the baby spinach salad ($13), served with a tiny quail egg, an airy brioche crouton, and a deftly seasoned bacon-sherry vinaigrette. The gorgeously plated slow-roasted pork belly entrée ($16) was also a study in contrasts: succulent pig, earthy truffled cauliflower, and a sassy fennel and apple salad. Though it may seem incongruous, the light, clean maki at Nikko are actually a lovely way to begin a meal. (Or end one; I’m not the boss of you.) The Jolly Green Giant roll ($9) is really just a tubular salad, an unfussy composition of tempura sweet potato, avocado, and cucumber in brown rice. Eel lovers should appreciate Snake and Eggs ($15), which wraps tamago (that’s the Japanese egg omelet), scallion, and cucumber with brown rice and tops it with smoky-sweet barbecued eel. And the Tiki Torch

Executive chef Max Spittler has been a part of Nikko from the beginning, and it’s clear that he and his staff take great care with all aspects of the food, from its thoughtful construction to its expert preparation, precise seasoning, and meticulous plating. (That seasoning thing might seem like a given, but too many other places are lacking.) Service is totally on point as well; twice I had the same excellent server, the easygoing Dominique, who is like a ninja in an apron, replacing silverware, refilling water, and delivering plates in the most unobtrusive fashion. The dining experience can be a little leisurely, but it’s nice not to feel rushed. Muoio is serious about Nikko’s wine program, with a globally sourced selection. But I’m serious about good craft cocktails, and the Nikko list does not make it easy to choose. The refreshing Fancy Pants ($9) mixes peach brandy with elderflower liqueur and passionfruit juice then finishes with a splash of champagne, while the Reap What You Sow ($10) went down a little too easy, the taste of ripe blackberries well-balanced by white tequila, thyme, and fresh citrus. That said, The Hammock ($10) might have been my favorite, notes of caramelized banana hitting your nose just before a blend of bourbon, walnut liqueur, and black-walnut bitters slide down your throat. Rebecca Nucelli is Nikko’s pastry chef, and her irresistible desserts have definite roots in Italy. I remember hearing words like “crostata” and “cannoli,” but I had already decided upon a salted-caramel tart ($8), its inherent sweetness mitigated by whole hazelnuts, dark chocolate, and a couple quenelle-shaped dollops of vanilla whipped cream. Her dense, sinful peanutbutter semifreddo ($7; think of it as a frozen mousse) was garnished with caramel and chocolate sauces, a couple of strawberry halves, and two chewy coconut macaroons. I might not pair two assertive flavors like peanut butter and coconut, but then again, I also probably wouldn’t dare to marry Japanese and Mediterranean on a menu. That’s why I’m more than happy to leave these things to the professionals.

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 13


Upcoming [ POP/ROCK ]

Reign ft. Adrianna Noone, ELUR Saturday, January 11.

Main Street Armory, 900 East Main St. $15-$25. 7 p.m. 2323221. rochestermainstreetarmory.com [ DJ/ELECTRONIC ]

Tyler Sherritt Thursday, January 23. Pearl Nightclub. 329 East Ave. $40 (three show pack). TBA. theedmvibes.com

Music

[ DJ/ELECTRONIC ]

Ugly Disco Saturday, March 8. Rochester Riverside

Convention Center. $40. 8 p.m. 123 E Main St., rrcc.com

Natalie Cole Holiday Spectacular

SUNDAY, DECEMBER 15 KODAK HALL AT EASTMAN THEATRE, 60 GIBBS ST. 4 P.M. | $45-$95 | ROCHESTERJAZZ.COM

[ R&B ] Over the last four decades Natalie Cole has won nine Grammy Awards. Though she is undoubtedly one of the greatest soul singers of all time, she has also recorded seven albums of Christmas music. The daughter of Nat King Cole (who was no slouch in the holiday music genre; think chestnuts roasting), Cole is bound to deliver a feast of Christmas classics. But she’ll also sing some tunes from her latest album, “Natalie Cole en Español,” and the audience just might not let her leave the stage it she doesn’t throw in a few of her own soul classics. — BY RON NETSKY

Robert Randolph and the Family Band SATURDAY, DECEMBER 14 WATER STREET MUSIC HALL, 204 NORTH WATER ST. 8 P.M. | $25 | WATERSTREETMUSIC.COM [ FUNK ] Steel master Robert Randolph tempers the sour

of his music’s hellbent fury with sweet salvation. This ain’t no ‘Can I get an amen?’ Gospel schlock either. Randolph is a righteous barn-burner. With his new album, “Lickety Split” in tow, Randolph returns this time with a little Rochester in its blood. Former Giant Panda Guerilla Dub Squad keyboardist, Aaron Lipp joined the Family Band after hooking up with them through — believe it or not — Craigslist. Boston soul-shouter Jesse Dee opens the show.

— BY FRANK DE BLASE

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WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 11 [ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ]

Rob & Gary Acoustic.

Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. 248-4825. woodcliffhotelspa.com. 5:30 p.m. Free. Tickle Your Inkus. Sticky Lips BBQ Juke Joint, 830 Jefferson Rd. 585-2925544. stickylipsbbq.com. 6:30 p.m. Free. [ BLUES ]

Sauce Boss. Dinosaur Bar-B-

Declan Ryan TUESDAY, DECEMBER 17 THE BUG JAR 219 MONROE AVE. 9 P.M. | $6-$8 | BUGJAR.COM [ POP/ROCK ] Back in November 2012, Declan Ryan

(a nice Irish boy from the neighborhood) told City he was planning to go in a more electric direction with his already eclectic material. In assembling the troops, Ryan lamented “I want to get some more people involved in it, but it seems that everybody that’s really talented is either crazy or busy.” Flash forward to this holiday season and you’ll find Ryan in Jolly Dick and his Carnivores, whose single “Krampus” is a beautiful ode to Krampus, who punishes naughty brats to the delight of contrarians and anti-Santites around the world. Ryan arranged the music  — a descent into sci-fi madness set to a big Easy funeral dirge and punctuated by the tortured wails of the damned  — and in doing so has helped pen a brilliant and immediate holiday classic. You better not pout, you better not cry… — BY FRANK DE BLASE

Lower Town Trio  FRIDAY, DECEMBER 13 LOVIN’ CUP, 300 PARK POINT DRIVE 9 P.M. | $3-$5 | LOVINCUP.COM [ POP/ROCK ] The Quakes from Buffalo was one of the best American bands that ever played British psychobilly, and former Quakes stand-up drummer, Chris Van Cleve, now beats the tubs for Buffalo’s Lower Town Trio. LTT is accelerated and intense but not as breakneck and roughneck. You’ll still dig it, you’ll still want to dance. Bare bone, rocking, and cool. — BY FRANK DE BLASE

Que, 99 Court St. 325-7090. dinosaurbarbque.com. 9:30 p.m. Free.

Moistboyz performed at Lovin’ Cup on Monday, December 9. PHOTO BY FRANK DE BLASE

[ CLASSICAL ]

A la Henry, a la Iggy

Irish Christmas in America ft. Lumiere. First Baptist Church

of Fairport, 92 South Main St. Fairport. 223-1194. 7:30 p.m. $15-$20.

[ REVIEW ] BY FRANK DE BLASE

I love seeing bands play at The Beale on South Avenue, as they shoehorn themselves onto the windowsill the restaurant calls a stage. I braved the asschapping cold this past Thursday to catch Genesee Johnny and the River Rats. The last time I remember seeing Johnny, it was solo, foot-stompin’ Delta style with a crosssection of Muddy Waters and Mississippi John Hurt and so on. It was the same thing this time around, except Johnny had a band this time around to stomp and flesh out the man’s finger-picked, lo-fi slide and electrified country blues. As it was also Son House night at the joint, musicians got up to add to the jam, including Washboard Dave. Dave’s rag-tag assembly of pots and pans and assorted cymbals and things that he whacks at with thimble-covered fingers gave the show the feel of a garage sale come to life. Friday night was a blast at Abilene — unless you were under 6’5”. The Hi-Risers completely sardined the joint to the delight to those who could jockey for a look-see, and all who could hear. I imagine the

crowd was no big deal for guitarist Greg Townson as he just returned from a gig in Mexico City with Los Straitjackets where the band drew 50,000 rabid fans. That’s 50,000, baby. It’s hard to get out to get down on a cold Monday night, but thankfully I did just that to catch one of the best shows I’ve seen in a long, long time. Pennsylvania punkers Moistboyz packed Lovin’ Cup and painted the walls with the enthusiastic crowd’s brains. It was an incredibly tight set of angry, breakneck sing-along, anthem-esque rock. Shirtless singer Dickie Moist — a la Henry, a la Iggy — was a tantrum personified as he seethed and raged and wallowed about the stage, all the while defiantly chain smoking cigarettes. The band, which also included guitarist Dean Ween (Ween) and bassist Nick Oliveri (Queens of the Stone Age), played tight and furious, without overshadowing its reckless energy, false starts and all. And with MDG at the board the sound was incredibly big and loud. It made me moist…

Live from Hochstein: A Cup of Good Cheer with Madrigalia.

Hochstein Performance Hall, 50 N Plymouth Ave. 4544596. hochstein.org. 12:10 p.m. Free. [ DJ/ELECTRONIC ]

DJ Reign and Ladies Night. Captain’s Attic, 37 Charlotte St. 546-8885. Call for info. DJ Adam. Nashvilles, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. Henrietta. 3343030. nashvillesny.com. Call for info. Ladies Nite: High Heels and Mini Skirts New Wave Wednesdays. Club Clarissas,

293 Clarissa St. 232-3430. 10 p.m. 21+. Call for info. Teen Set 45 Party. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. Free. Why Not Wednesday. Eclipse Bar & Grill, 374 Thurston Rd. 502-922-6567. 10 p.m. Call for info. Y Not Wednesday w/DJ ET. Plush, 151 St. Paul St. 2325650. venurochester.com. Call for info. continues on page 17

EASTMAN SCHOOL OF MUSIC PRESENTS MusicLine:

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WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 11 EASTMAN PHILHARMONIA CHAOWEN TING, CONDUCTOR Tchaikovsky Romeo and Juliette Overture-Fantasy, Mozart Piano Concerto No. 24 in C minor, K. 491 and Shostakovich Symphony No. 1 in F minor, Op. 10 Kodak Hall at Eastman Theatre, 8 pm Free WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 11 EASTMAN PHILHARMONIA Chaowen Ting, conductor Tchaikovsky Romeo and Juliette

Overture-Fantasy, Mozart Piano Concerto No. 24 in C minor, K. 491 and Shostakovich Symphony No. 1 in F minor, Op. 10 Kodak Hall at Eastman Theatre, 8 pm Free

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 13 EASTMAN WIND ORCHESTRA Jared Chase, conductor Music of Shostakovich, Rossini-Respighi and more Kodak Hall at Eastman Theatre, 8 pm Free

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 12 NEW JAZZ ENSEMBLE Dave Rivello, director Music of Schneider, McNeely, Schmidt, Pierson, Sturm, Rowles, and Rivello Kilbourn Hall, 8 pm Free

SUNDAY, DECEMBER 15 RIJF AND EASTMAN SCHOOL OF MUSIC PRESENT AN AFTERNOON WITH NATALIE COLE A holiday special matinee concert Kodak Hall at Eastman Theatre, 4 pm Tickets at rochesterjazz.com or (585) 454-2060

EASTMAN JAZZ CAFÉ Featuring Pat Bianchi, jazz organist Sproull Atrium in the Miller Center, 7 pm Tickets $10

HONORS CHAMBER MUSIC RECITAL Featuring chamber ensembles selected by chamber music faculty members through a preliminary audition Hatch Recital Hall, 8 pm Free MONDAY, DECEMBER 16 REPERTORY SINGERS AND WOMEN’S CHORUS Music of Britten, Gjeilo and more Kilbourn Hall, 8 pm Free

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 15


Music B.C. got the itch to go solo in 2008, and also to write his own material. He says it came down to wanting to take a chance. “I was always a drummer, and I always kind of followed along — which I like, because I never felt like a leader,” he says. “So I was totally cool with giving the responsibility to somebody else, and just kind of playing whatever they liked. But then I was like, ‘I want to try writing my own stuff.’ Why not, you know? I had ideas, and I wanted to see what happened.” The idea of being a follower, not a leader,

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B.C. Likes You HTTP://BCLIKESYOU.BANDCAMP.COM [ FEATURE ] BY LEAH CREARY

Robert Mostyn, better known as B.C., is a regular presence on the Rochester scene, but he makes music that is noticeably different from the output of most other local acts. He’s part of a genre, and musical movement, called chiptune. Chiptune can be defined, in the words of B.C., as “music made with retro video game systems.” (In B.C.’s case, he composes on a Nintendo Gameboy system.) If you read those last few sentences and are baffled by the entire concept of chiptune, you’re not alone. “The main question when people hear my stuff is, ‘What game is that from?’” says B.C. “And the thing you have to explain to them is, I wrote that. I wrote all of it.” He continues, “I’m not taking the sounds from games; I’m not ‘sampling.’ The videogame system is the instrument, and you just write on it. It’s almost like writing electronic music on a computer. You hear a sound in a game you like and you try to get it — you try to find it.” Rochester is home to a group called Rochester Chip, which is currently run by B.C. and another local chiptune artist, Nick Maynard. The two members book all of the chiptune shows throughout the area, including the upcoming ChipFest on Saturday, December 14, at RIT. After this ChipFest, B.C. and Maynard will hand over the reins to two

new leaders, but both plan to continue to be involved in the group. B.C. says that Rochester has an active chiptune community thanks to venues like the Bug Jar and the students at RIT, who he describes as being “the perfect audience” for chiptune. Speaking of college, that’s where B.C. got his

entertainer pseudonym. He was a freshman, and though small in stature, he was 18 years old. He entered the bathroom one night and heard two guys in his dorm talking about him. That’s when he was referred to as “brainchild” for the very first time. Due to his youthful looks, both of his peers thought he was a highly intelligent 14-year-old who had been admitted to college early. “Brainchild” was later shortened to B.C., and the “Likes You” part was added in 2003 or 2004, before he even began his solo venture. B.C. added that last part of his name to get a message across that is common to both his music and personality: “It comes from the mentality of just wanting everyone to have fun and be positive. And hey, even if you don’t like my music, we can probably still be buds,” he says. B.C. has spent most of his musical career not as a solo act, but rather playing the drums, and other background instruments, for various local bands — most recently and notably for the chiptune act Revegineers. He has experimented with playing several different genres throughout the years, ranging from punk-hardcore, to indie rock, to alt-country.

seems to be a theme in B.C.’s musical career. This theme is apparent not only through his decision to blend into various bands as a drummer, but also through the characters he chooses to write about. That is made particularly apparent in his EP “Unsung Heroes,” which he released in 2012. The EP is a tribute to secondary characters from some of his favorite books, video games, and movies, such as Mono from the video game “Shadow of the Colossus” and Bean from “Ender’s Game.” Does that preference for writing about those secondary characters have anything to do with a general avoidance of the spotlight? “Yeah, there’s a little psychology in there,” he says. “That’s probably what it is.” “My first EP that I wrote in 2008 was not chiptune — it was just guitar and vocals, and it was songs about my life and feelings,” B.C. says. “And I was like, I like it, but this doesn’t feel fun. It wasn’t fun to me.” B.C. admits that he often chooses to write about characters whose stories reflect his own inner-life. “That song ‘Bean’ [on ‘Unsung Heroes’] is about a secondary character from ‘Ender’s Game’…he’s so ambitious, which is something that rings true with me.” B.C. say he’s not a “huge believer” in inspiration; for him, writing music is work. “My Monday nights, from 8 p.m. to 10 p.m. or 11 p.m., are dedicated just to writing music, even when I don’t want to… And that’s for anything creative that I do. I have to sit down and do it.” That kind of drive has recently taken B.C. to some exciting places. He is currently working on writing original music for a Brooklyn-based independent video-game company. He is also releasing a brand new digital-only EP at December’s ChipFest, completely for free, full of songs about the British TV phenomenon “Doctor Who.” Overall, B.C. just wants his listeners to have a good time. “There are times when people come up to me after a show…and they’ll just start talking about the characters in my songs and they’ll know more than I do. And it’s just so fun to nerd out,” he says. “Just to get the chance to do that.”


WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 11 [ JAZZ ]

Anthony Giannavola. Lemoncello, 137 West Commercial St. East Rochester. 385-8565. lemoncello137.com. 6:30 p.m. Free. Special Blend. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. East Rochester. 662-5555. bistro135. net. 6 p.m. Freeh.

Meet the Artist Concert Series!

[ HIP-HOP/RAP ]

ELDAR

Word of Mouth Wednesday’s w/DJ Private Eye. Dubland

Underground, 315 Alexander St. 232-7550. dublandunderground. wordpress.com. 10 p.m. 21+. $5.

Tues. Feb 11th • 7pm CLASSICAL | EASTMAN PHILHARMONIA, WOMEN’S CHORUS/REPERTORY SINGERS

[ POP/ROCK ]

Amanda Ashley. Cottage Hotel of Mendon, 1390 PittsfordMendon Rd. Mendon. 624-1390. cottagehotelmendon.com. Second Wednesday of every month, 9 p.m. Call for info. Blue Lazerz. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. Call for info. Bobby Henrie and The Goners. Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. abilenebarandlounge.com. 8:30 p.m. $5.

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 12 [ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ] Bluegrass Jam. Bernunzio’s Uptown Music, 112 East Ave. 6:30 p.m. Call for info. Jim Lane. Murph’s Irondequoit Pub, 705 Titus Ave. Irondequoit. 342-6780. 8 p.m. Free. Peg Dolan. McGraw’s Irish Pub, 146 W Commercial St. East Rochester. 348-9091. mcgrawsirishpub.com. 7 p.m. Free. [ BLUES ]

Nightfall. The Beale, 693 South

Ave. 271-4650. thebealegrille. com. 7:30 p.m. Call for info. [ CLASSICAL ]

Homer Marple and The Carolers.

The Shops On West Ridge, 3200 W Ridge Rd. 368-0670. theshopsonwestridge.net. 2 p.m. Call for info.

Eastman at Washinton Square Lunchtime Concerts. firts

univeralist church, 150 s. clinton ave. 274-1400. 12:15 p.m. Free. RPO: Bach’s Magnificat. Kodak Hall at Eastman Theater, 60 Gibbs St. Thursday: 7:30 p.m., Saturday: 8 p.m. $15-$92.

Sometimes, right in the thick of the holiday season, we all could do with a little break and just relax. As part of your strategy, why not slip quietly into the back row for a lovely pair of concerts by students of the Eastman School of Music? On December 11, the Eastman Philharmonia will be led by conductor Chaowen Ting in works of Tchaikovsky (the “Romeo and Juliette Overture-Fantasy”), Mozart, and Shostakovich.  Ting, an ESM doctoral student in conducting, was a conducting fellow for the RPO last season and has lead orchestras in Honduras, Romania, and Russia. On December 16, the Eastman Women’s Chorus and Repertory Singers will perform works to include Britten’s “Ceremony of Carols” and Ola Gjeilo’s “Gloria.”  

Party Monster Thursdays. ONE

Nightclub and Lounge, 1 Ryan Alley. 546-1010. oneclublife.com. 10 p.m. 18+. Call for info. DJ Matt. Nashvilles, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. Henrietta. 3343030. nashvillesny.com. Call for info. Karaoke at Panorama. Panorama Night Club & Sports Bar, 730 Elmgrove Rd. 2472190. 9 p.m. Free.

BONERAMA

Wed. March 26th • 7:30pm Tickets: $20 Greece Olympia High School Auditorium

Tickets can be purchased online at www.jazz901.org and by calling 585-966-2660

Eastman Philharmonia performs Wednesday, December 11, 8 p.m., at Eastman Theatre, 60 Gibbs St., free, esm.rochester.edu. Eastman Women’s Chorus and Repertory Singers perform Monday, December 16, 8 p.m. at Kilbourn Hall, 26 Gibbs Street, free, esm.rochester.edu. — BY PALOMA CAPANNA Mark Oliver. Pearl Nightclub, 349 East Ave. 757-752-8370. 10 p.m. $15. Thirsty Thursday’s. TC Riley’s, 200 Park Point Dr. 272-9777. tcrileysparkpoint.com. 10 p.m. Call for info. Thursday Night Shakedown. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 11 p.m. Free. Tiki Thursdays: Shotgun Music DJ. McGhan’s Pub, 11 W. Main

St. Victor. 924-3660. 7:30 p.m. Free.

Tilt-a-Whirl Drag Show.. Tilt

Nightclub & Ultralounge, 444 Central Ave. 232-8440. facebook. com/Tiltnightclub. 11:15 p.m. & 12:30 a.m. $3. For the Love Thursdays. Love Nightclub, 45 Euclid St. 2225683. 10 p.m. 18+. $3-$12. [ JAZZ ]

[ DJ/ELECTRONIC ]

Tickets: $25 Athena Performing Arts Center

Bossa Nova Jazz Thursdays ft. The Charles Mitchell Group.

Espada Brazilian Steak, 274 N. Goodman St. Village Gate. 4730050. espadasteak.com. 6 p.m. Free. The D’Jangoners. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 7:30 p.m. Free.

John Palocy Trio. Bistro

135, 135 W. Commercial St. East Rochester. 662-5555. bistro135.net. 6 p.m. Free. Mike Kaupa. Monroe’s Restaurant, 3001 Monroe Avenue. 348-9104. 6 p.m. Call for info. Phat Cats. Pane Vino Ristorante, 175 N. Water St. 232-6090. panevinoristorante. com. 8 p.m. Free.

The Joe Santora Trio w/Curtis Kendrick & Emily Kirchoff.

Michael’s Valley Grill, 1694 Penfield Rd. (585) 383-8260. michaelsvalleygrill.com. Free. Rhythm Dogs. Dinosaur Bar-BQue, 99 Court St. 325-7090. dinosaurbarbque.com. 9 p.m. Free. Ryan from El Rojo Jazz. Lemoncello, 137 West Commercial St. East Rochester. 385-8565. lemoncello137.com. 6 p.m. Free. continues on page 18

Jazz Thursdays ft. The David Detweiler Trio. The Food Bar at Wegmans, 3195 Monroe Ave. 248-8685. 5 p.m. Free.

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 17


THURSDAY, DECEMBER 12 The Swooners. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. 2484825. woodcliffhotelspa.com. 5:30 p.m. Free. Ted Nicolosi and Shared Genes. Roncone’s, 232 Lyell Ave. 4583090. ItalianRestaurantRochester. com. 6 p.m. Free. [ HIP-HOP/RAP ]

Hot Barz YBE Over Due.

Obsession Bar & Grill, 564 Chili Ave. 436-9042. Call for info. [ POP/ROCK ]

Bury Me a Lion w/Fish God. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 8:30 p.m. $6-$8. Counterparts w/Skylar. Dubland Underground, 315 Alexander St. 232-7550. dublandunderground. wordpress.com. 5 p.m. $10. Eddie Clendening and the Blue Ribbon Boys ft. Jasoon Smay, Mike Graham. Abilene Bar &

Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. abilenebarandlounge. com. 9 p.m. $6. Five Alarm Open Jam. Firehouse Saloon, 814 S. Clinton Ave. 3193832. thefirehousesaloon.com. 9 p.m. Call for info.

Holiday Party: Harmonica Lewinski w/The Amy Montrois Trio. Sticky Lips BBQ Juke Joint,

830 Jefferson Rd. 585-2925544. stickylipsbbq.com. 8 p.m. $5-$10. Inner Planets. Skylark Lounge, 40 South Union St. 270-8106. theskylarklounge.com. 9 p.m. Call for info.

Serge & Friends w/Steve & Drew. The Rabbit Room, 61 N.

Main St. Honeoye Falls. 5821830. thelowermill.com. 6 p.m. Call for info.

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 13 [ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ] Babak Elahi. Boulder Coffee Co., 100 Alexander St. 454-7140. bouldercoffeeco.com. 8 p.m. Call for info.

Friday Night Live w/Dino, Jeff Cosco. Richmond’s Tavern, 21

Richmond Street. 270-8570. richmondstavern.com. 4 p.m. Call for info. John Akers w/Earthtones. Johnny’s Irish Pub, 1382 Culver Rd. 224-0990. johnnysirishpub. com. 5 p.m. Free. Missy Wall Album Release. Boulder Coffee Co., 739 Park Ave. 697-0235. bouldercoffeeco. com. 8 p.m. Call for info. Old Divide. Sticky Lips BBQ Juke Joint, 830 Jefferson Rd. 585292-5544. stickylipsbbq.com. 9:30 p.m. $4. Pan de Oro. Havana Cabana, 289 Alexander St. 232-1333. havanacabanaroc.com. 10 p.m. Call for info.

Pat Kane’s Christmas Sing-along. McGraw’s Irish Pub, 146 W

Commercial St. East Rochester. 348-9091. mcgrawsirishpub. com. 7 p.m. Free. Ralph Louis. Rochester Plaza Hotel, 70 State St. 546-3450. rochesterplaza.com. 6 p.m. Free. 18 CITY DECEMBER 11-17, 2013

HOLIDAY | CONNIE DEMING

One of Connie Deming’s fondest memories while growing up was participating in family sing-alongs of Christmas songs at her home in Massachusetts. But it was a concertgoer’s enthusiastic reaction towards Deming’s rendition of a holiday tune that caused the Rochester-based singer-songwriter to decide on releasing a Christmas album.  The resulting album, “Heavenly Night Heavenly Day,” is a mixture of traditional favorites and original compositions including several a capella numbers with percussionist Josh Daby. Deming is holding a CD release party with special guests Phil Marshall and Gary Holt to help celebrate the release. Connie Deming performs on Saturday, December 14, 8:30 p.m.at the Little Theatre, 240 East Ave., free, thelittle.org.  — BY ROMAN DIVEZUR The Ruddy Well Band w/The Good Trip Band ft. Angelo Rose.

Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. abilenebarandlounge.com. 6 p.m. $5. Rusty Kettle. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 8:30 p.m. Free. Vintage. Lemoncello, 137 West Commercial St. East Rochester. 385-8565. lemoncello137.com. 7 p.m. Free. [ BLUES ]

Big Mike & The Motivators. Smokin’ Joe’s Bar & Grill, 425 Lyell Ave. Call for info. Gap Mangione New Blues Band. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa,

199 Woodcliff Dr. 248-4825. woodcliffhotelspa.com. 7:30 p.m. Free. Midnight Cruisers. The Beale, 1930 Empire Blvd. Webster. 2161070. thebealegrille.com. 7 p.m. Call for info. Third Degree. The Beale, 693 South Ave. 271-4650. thebealegrille.com. 7:30 p.m. Call for info. [ CLASSICAL ]

Perinton Concert Band: Holiday Greetings. Minerva DeLand Auditorium, 140 Hulburt Rd. 234-2585. 7:30 p.m. Free.

Homer Marple and The Carolers.

The Shops On West Ridge, 3200 W Ridge Rd. 368-0670. theshopsonwestridge.net. 2 p.m. Call for info. Trumpet Duo Recital. Music at Saint Anne Church, 1600 Mount Hope Ave. 271-3260. ourladyoflourdessaintanne.org. 7:30 p.m. $10.

Organ Recital. First Baptist Church of Penfield, 1862 Oenfield Rd. Penfield. 586-2876. fbpenfield.org. 7:30 p.m. Free, donations accepted. Phil Keaggy w/Michael Card. Hale Auditorium, Roberts Cultural Life Center, Roberts Wesleyan College, 2301 Westside Dr. 888222-1048. 7:30 p.m. $22-$28. Rochester Gay Men’s Chorus: Come Wassail Away. Hochstein

Performance Hall, 50 N Plymouth Ave. 454-4596. hochstein.org. 8 p.m. $6-$17. [ COUNTRY ]

The Smokin’ Hogan Band.

Sandra’s Saloon, 276 Smith St. 585-285-6786. 9 p.m. Free. [ DJ/ELECTRONIC ]

On the House Fridays. ONE

Nightclub and Lounge, 1 Ryan Alley. 546-1010. oneclublife.com. 21+. Call for info. Chill Out Fridays Happy Hour. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. lovincup.com. 5:30 p.m. Free. DJ Bac Spin. Plush, 151 St. Paul St. 232-5650. venurochester. com. 8 p.m. Call for info. DJ Blake. 140 Alex Bar & Grill, 140 Alexander St. 2561000. 140alex.com. 10 p.m. Call for info. DJ Energon. Vertex Night Club, 169 N. Chestnut St. 232-5498. 10 p.m. $3-$8.

Fresh Meat Fridays w/Samantha Vega, DJ Mighty Mic. Tilt

Nightclub & Ultralounge, 444 Central Ave. 232-8440. facebook. com/Tiltnightclub. 11:15 p.m. & 12:30 a.m. $4-$12.


Case Sale

Lube After Dark. Quaker Steak & Lube, 2205 Buffalo Rd. 6979464. quakersteakandlube.com/ Rochester_NY. 9:30 p.m. Free. Make Em Sweat Fridays: Make Em Dance Edition ft. DJ 6:30, Nick Kage. Club Network, 420

Central Ave. 232-1390. 10 p.m. Guys free until 10:30 p.m., girls free until 11:30 p.m. 21+.

Photo Shoot Fridaze ft. Ghetto Blasta. T Jay’s Lounge, 622 Lake Ave. 21+. Ladies free until 11 p.m. Call for info. $10. Reggaeton w/DJ Carlos. La Copa Ultra Lounge, 235 W. Ridge Rd. 254-1050. lacopaultralounge. com. 10 p.m. Free.

Facelife Fridays ft. Aggy Dune, Ambrosia Salad, Darienne Lake, and Kasha Davis. 140 Alex Bar

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& Grill, 140 Alexander St. 2561000. 140alex.com. 11 p.m. & midnight. Call for info. Trancesend and Victor Gig. Love Nightclub, 45 Euclid St. 2225683. 10 p.m. 21+, 18+ after 2 a.m. $6-$20. [ JAZZ ]

Champagne & The Swoon Daddies. Bistro 135, 135 W.

Commercial St. East Rochester. 662-5555. bistro135.net. 6 p.m. Free.

Fred Costello & Roger Ekers Jazz Duo. Charley Brown’s,

1675 Penfield Rd. 385-9202. charleybrownspenfield.com. 7:30 p.m. Free. Matthew Sieber Ford Trio. Tapas 177 Lounge, 177 St. Paul St. 262-2090. tapas177.com. 4:30 p.m. Free.

The Joe Santora Trio w/Curtis Kendrick & Emily Kirchoff. Michael’s Valley Grill, 1694 Penfield Rd. (585) 383-8260. michaelsvalleygrill.com. Free.

Ted Nicolosi and Shared Genes. Glengarry Inn at Eagle Vale, 4400 Nine Mile Point Road, Rt 250. Fairport. 598-3820. EagleVale. com. 7 p.m. Free. [ HIP-HOP/RAP ] Subsoil. Temple Bar and Grille, 109 East Ave. 2326000. templebarandgrille.com. 10 p.m. Free. [ POP/ROCK ]

The Beautiful Ending, Armed with Valor, Eyesalve, Safety Off, and Thoroughbred. Firehouse

Saloon, 814 S. Clinton Ave. 3193832. thefirehousesaloon.com. 9 p.m. Call for info. Dark Hollow. Dinosaur Bar-BQue, 99 Court St. 325-7090. dinosaurbarbque.com. 10 p.m. Free.

Nashvilles 80s Night ft. Hall Pass. Nashvilles, 4853 W

Henrietta Rd. Henrietta. 3343030. nashvillesny.com. 9 p.m. Call for info. Parkerhouse Road. Montage Music Hall, 50 Chestnut St. 2321520. themontagemusichall.com. 8 p.m. Call for info. continues on page 20

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 19


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FRIDAY, DECEMBER 13 Plan B. Pineapple Jack’s, 485 Spencerport Rd. Gates. 247-5225. facebook.com/ PineappleJacks. Call for info. Push. Nola’s Restaurant & Nightclub, 4775 Lake Ave. 6633375. nolasweb.com. 10 p.m. Call for info. Rockabilly Rumble w/Krypton 88, Lower Town Trio. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. lovincup.com. 9 p.m. $3-$5.

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4554 Culver Rd. 323-9310. shamrockjack.com. Call for info. Tommy Brunnett, Remedy. Finger Lakes Casino & Racetrack, 5857 Rt. 96. Farmington. 924-3232. fingerlakesracetrack.com. Call for info. Women of Faith. Blue Cross Arena, One War Memorial Square. 758-5300. bluecrossarena.com. Friday: 7 p.m., Saturday: 9 a.m. womenoffaith.com. $99-$109.

Yeyowulf Album Release w/ The Weight We Carry, Burn Everything, Cycles, and Rhema. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 7:30 p.m. $5-$10.

1900 S. Clinton Ave. • 241-3223 Located in Tops Brighton (Loehmann’s) Plaza

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SATURDAY, DECEMBER 14 [ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ]

The 23 Psaegz w/The Pickpockets, Mr. Boneless, and John Valenti. Bug Jar, 219

Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. $7-$9. Acoustic Brew. Flaherty’s Webster, 1200 Bay Rd. Webster. 671-0816. flahertys.com. Call for info. Christmas Ceilidh Band. Greece Baptist Church, 1230 Long Pond Rd. 225-6160. 8 p.m. $17-$20. Frankie & Jewels. Hamlin Station Bar & Grill, 52 Railroad Ave. Hamlin. 964-2010. hamlinstation. net. 8:30 p.m. Call for info. Jim Lane. Mama Lor’s Cafe, 1891 Ridge Rd. Webster. 545-4895. mamalorscafe.com. 6 p.m. Free. Jon Akers. Flaherty’s Honeoye Falls, 60 W. Main St. Honeoye Falls. 497-7010. flahertys.com. Call for info. Ryan & Rayce. McGraw’s Irish Pub, 146 W Commercial St. East Rochester. 348-9091. mcgrawsirishpub.com. 7 p.m. Free. Sofrito. Havana Cabana, 289 Alexander St. 232-1333. havanacabanaroc.com. 10 p.m. Call for info. [ BLUES ]

Big Mike & the Motivators. Finger Lakes Casino & Racetrack, 5857 Rt. 96. Farmington. 9243232. fingerlakesracetrack.com. Call for info. Cold Sweat. The Beale, 1930 Empire Blvd. Webster. 216-1070. thebealegrille.com. 7 p.m. Call for info. Luca Foresta & Electro Kings. The Beale, 693 South Ave. 2714650. thebealegrille.com. 7:30 p.m. Call for info. 20 CITY DECEMBER 11-17, 2013

JAZZ | EASTMAN NEW JAZZ ENSEMBLE

Specializing in music of the last two decades, the Eastman School of Music’s New Jazz Ensemble is one of the most innovative college jazz bands anywhere. This week’s concert features the world premiere of director/conductor Dave Rivello’s “Re-Imagining The World,” which involves the band singing as well as playing. Also on the bill are challenging compositions by prominent Eastman alums Maria Schneider and Russ Schmidt, and former Eastman band director Fred Sturm. The Eastman New Jazz Ensemble performs Thursday, December 12, 8 p.m. at Kilbourn Hall, 26 Gibbs St., free, esm.rochester.edu. — BY RON NETSKY [ CLASSICAL ]

Connie Deming Album Release Show. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 8:30 p.m. Free.

Finger Lakes Concert Band Holiday Celebration.

Hochstein at Canandaigua, 435 East Street. Canandaigua. 396-3778. hochstein.org/ canandaigua. 7:30 p.m.

The Lyric Chorale: Wolcum Yole!. St. Louis Church, 60 South Main St. Pittsford. lyricchorale. org. 7:30 p.m. $12-$18.

Musica Spei “ “O How Glorious: The Christmas Story through Song”. St. Anne

Church, 1600 Mt. Hope Ave. 241-9761. 8 p.m. $10.

Rochester Gay Men’s Chorus: Come Wassail Away. Hochstein

Performance Hall, 50 N Plymouth Ave. 454-4596. hochstein.org. 8 p.m. $6-$17. RPO: Bach’s Magnificat. Kodak Hall at Eastman Theater, 60 Gibbs St. Thursday: 7:30 p.m., Saturday: 8 p.m. $15-$92.

Spectrum Creative Arts: Merry & Bright Concert. St. Paul’s

Evangelical Lutheran Church, 28 Lincoln St. Pittsford. 586-0580. Call for info. [ DJ/ELECTRONIC ]

Blue Label Saturdays ft. DJ Andy Fade and DJ Bobby Base. Flat

Iron Café, 561 State St. 4544830. flatironcafe.net. Call for info. DJ Big Reg. Plush, 151 St. Paul St. 232-5650. venurochester. com. 10 p.m. Call for info. DJ Blake. 140 Alex Bar & Grill, 140 Alexander St. 256-1000. 140alex.com. 10 p.m. Call for info. DJ Darkwave. Vertex Night Club, 169 N. Chestnut St. 232-5498. 10 p.m. $3-$8.

Jameson Alexander, Rob Morley. Love Nightclub, 45 Euclid St. 222-5683. 10 p.m. 21+, 18+ after 2 a.m. $6-$20. La Selva. Tilt Nightclub & Ultralounge, 444 Central Ave. 232-8440. facebook.com/ Tiltnightclub. 10 p.m. Call for info. Music is for Life Food Drive. Love Nightclub, 45 Euclid St. 222-5683. 10 p.m. Canned food donations encouraged. Free until midnight, $5 after. 21+ until 2 a.m., 2 a.m.- 4 a.m. :$10 (21+), $20 (18-20). Poke Dem Saturdays ft. Team Lion Paw, The Money Green Theme, Nick Kage, and Wavey.

Trinities Restaurant, 36 W. Main St. 319-4047. 10 p.m. $5-$10. Saturday Night Ladies Night. BLU Bar & Grill, 250 Pixley Rd. 247-0079. blurochester.com. 9 p.m. Call for info. [ JAZZ ]

Fred Costello & Roger Ekers Jazz Duo. Charley Brown’s,

1675 Penfield Rd. 385-9202. charleybrownspenfield.com. 7:30 p.m. Free. The White Hots. Pultneyville Grill, 4135 Lake Rd. Pultneyville. 315589-4512. pultneyvillegrill.com. 6:30 p.m. Call for info. Madeline Forster. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. East Rochester. 662-5555. bistro135. net. 6:30 p.m. Free. Mike Pappert. Lemoncello, 137 West Commercial St. East Rochester. 385-8565. lemoncello137.com. 7 p.m. Free.

The Joe Santora Trio w/Curtis Kendrick & Emily Kirchoff. Michael’s Valley Grill, 1694 Penfield Rd. (585) 383-8260. michaelsvalleygrill.com. Free.


Soul On Tap. Dinosaur Bar-BQue, 99 Court St. 325-7090. dinosaurbarbque.com. 10 p.m. Free. Special Blend. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. 2484825. woodcliffhotelspa.com. 7:30 p.m. Free. Ted Nicolosi and Shared Genes. Jasmine’s Asian Fusion, 657 Ridge Rd. Webster. 216-1290. JasmineAsianFusion.com. 6:30 p.m. Free. Two for the Road. Pane Vino Ristorante, 175 N. Water St. 2326090. panevinoristorante.com. 6:30 p.m. Free. [ R&B ]

Robert Randolph & The Family Band w/Jesse Dee. Water Street

Music Hall, 204 N. Water St. 3255600. waterstreetmusic.com. 8 p.m. $25. [ POP/ROCK ]

2013 Christmas Bash ft. Absolution Project, Setiva, Million Miles From Broadway, Beneath Hells Sky, and The Mondayz. Main Street Armory,

900 E. Main St. 232-3221. rochestermainstreetarmory.com. 8 p.m. $7-$10. 5 Head. Sticky Lips BBQ Juke Joint, 830 Jefferson Rd. 585292-5544. stickylipsbbq.com. 10 p.m. Free. 7 Sense. Johnny’s Irish Pub, 1382 Culver Rd. 224-0990. johnnysirishpub.com. 8 p.m. Free. The Abominable Snowband. The Winton Bar and Grill, 196 Winton Rd N. (585) 654-9606. 8 p.m. Free. Dog House. T.C. Hooligans, 134 Greece Ridge Center Dr. 2257180. 9 p.m. Call for info. The Emersons w/!ATTENTION!. Skylark Lounge, 40 South Union St. 270-8106. theskylarklounge. com. 10 p.m. $4. Hunu? Holiday Benefit Concert. Zeppa Auditorium, German House, 315 Gregory St. 5636241. 8 p.m. $10. Inside Out. Richmond’s Tavern, 21 Richmond Street. 270-8570. richmondstavern.com. 8 p.m. Call for info. Intrepid Travelers. Boulder Coffee Co., 100 Alexander St. 454-7140. bouldercoffeeco.com. 8 p.m. Call for info. Jumbo Shrimp. TP’s Irish Pub, 916 Panorama Trail. 385-4160. 9 p.m. Free.

Mr. Mustard Beatles Holiday Party. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point

Dr. 292-9940. lovincup.com. 8 p.m. $3-$5.

Stone Soul Foundation, Pseudo Youth, Enemy Down, and Halcyon Insanity. Firehouse

Saloon, 814 S. Clinton Ave. 3193832. thefirehousesaloon.com. 8 p.m. Call for info. Tangent. Pineapple Jack’s, 485 Spencerport Rd. Gates. 247-5225. facebook.com/ PineappleJacks. Call for info.

Toys for Tots Night ft. FreeRide. McKenzie’s Irish Pub, 3685 W. Henrietta Rd. 334-8970. mckenziesirishpub.com. Call for info.

Women of Faith. Blue Cross Arena, One War Memorial Square. 758-5300. bluecrossarena.com. Friday: 7 p.m., Saturday: 9 a.m. womenoffaith.com. $99-$109.

SUNDAY, DECEMBER 15

Tequila Sundays ft. DJ Andy Fade. Flat Iron Café, 561 State

St. 454-4830. flatironcafe.net. 10 p.m. Call for info. [ R&B ]

Natalie Cole. Kodak Hall at Eastman Theater, 60 Gibbs St. 4 p.m. $45-$95.

[ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ]

Celtic Music Sundays. Temple

Bar and Grille, 109 East Ave. 232-6000. templebarandgrille. com. 7 p.m. Free. Chris Burley. The Shops On West Ridge, 3200 W Ridge Rd. 3680670. theshopsonwestridge.net. 2 p.m. Call for info. Fandango at the Tango. Tango Cafe, 389 Gregory St. 271-4930. tangocafedance.com. 7:30 p.m. Free, donations accepted Tango Cafe, 389 Gregory St. 271-4930. tangocafedance.com. 7:30 p.m. Free, donations accepted.

Rochester Academy of Music & Arts Seventh Anniversary Recital. Carmen Clark Ldge,

777 Westfall Rd. 506-9437. RochesterMusicLessons.com. 10 a.m. Free.

Joey Lanzone’s Birthday Bash ft. Hades Mining Co., Aimee Heroin, I Can’t Stop Wondering, Controlled by Fear, and Eating Animals. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe

Bethel’s Christmas Gala: An Advent Celebration. Bethel

Christian Fellowship, 321 East Ave. 232-1136. bethelcf.com. 3 p.m. Featuring The Robert Shewan Chorale, Young School of Irish Dance, Bonita Boyd Flute Trio, and many others. Free.

Brighton Symphony Orchestra Holiday Concert. Twelve

Rochester Contemporary School of Music Holiday Concert. Lovin’

Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 2929940. lovincup.com. 3 p.m. Free.

Wayland w/JJ Lang, Heatseeker, and Stovepipe Jones. Pineapple

Jack’s, 485 Spencerport Rd. Gates. 247-5225. facebook.com/ PineappleJacks. 7 p.m. Call for info.

[ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ]

Rochester Guitar Club: Song Circle. Asbury First United

Methodist Church, 1050 East Ave. 271-1050. Third Monday of every month, 7 p.m. Call for info. [ JAZZ ]

Roger Eckers Little Big Band.

Green Lantern Inn, One East Church St. Fairport. 381-7603. 6:30 p.m. $12.

Ted Nicolosi and Shared Genes.

Corners Presbyterian Church, 1200 S. Winton Rd. 244-8585. twelvecorners.org. 3 p.m. Call for info. Compline. Christ Church, 141 East Ave. 454-3878. christchurchrochester.org. 9 p.m. Free, donations accepted.

Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. East Rochester. 662-5555. Bistro135.net. 6 p.m. Free. Watkins & The Rapiers. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 7:30 p.m. Free.

Concentus : A Winter’s Night Holiday Concert. Asbury First

Gorguts w/Origin, Nero Di Marte, Obsessor. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe

United Methodist Church, 1050 East Ave. 271-1050. 3 p.m. $5-$10.

The Lyric Chorale: Wolcum Yole!. Perinton Presbyterian

Church, 6511 Pittsford Palmyra Rd. 223-1203. lyricchorale.org. 2:30 p.m. $12-$18.

• Exceptional Service

360 Culver Road | 271-0610 Mon.-Fri. 9-6, Sat. 9-5, Sun. 11-3

Ave. 9 p.m. $5-$7.

MONDAY, DECEMBER 16 Rochester Crozer Divinity School, 1100 South Goodman St. 3409643. crcds.edu. 4 p.m. Free.

• Beautiful Centerpieces • Ornaments Galore • Unusual Gifts

[ POP/ROCK ] Wayland. House of Guitars, 645 Titus Ave. 544-3500. houseofguitars.com. 1 p.m. Free.

[ CLASSICAL ]

Bells on the Hill. Colgate

For the Holidays

Flower City Ballet PRESENTS

T ch a i ko v s k y ’s

THE

Nutcracker Featuring

THE SYRACUSE CITY BALLET & GUESTS School of the Arts

45 Prince Street • Rochester, NY 14607

December 21st & 22nd 3:00pm

Adults $20, Seniors $16, Child $10

Tickets available online at

www.flowercityballet.com At the studio, call 325-2114 At the door ($2 additional charge)

[ POP/ROCK ] Ave. 9 p.m. $15-$17.

TUESDAY, DECEMBER 17 [ BLUES ]

Bluesday Tuesday Blues Jam.

P.I.’s Lounge, 495 West Ave. 8 p.m. Call for info.

[ COUNTRY ]

Open Mic hosted by The Mike Snow Band. Sandra’s Saloon,

276 Smith St. 585-285-6786. 4 p.m. Free.

[ DJ/ELECTRONIC ] Boasy Sundaze. Club Clarissas, 293 Clarissa St. 232-3430. Call for info. Drink and Drag Sundays. ONE Nightclub and Lounge, 1 Ryan Alley. 546-1010. oneclublife.com. 8 p.m. 18+. Call for info.

[ POP/ROCK ]

The Branch Davidians w/House Majority, Declan Ryan, and Tim Avery. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave.

9 p.m. $6-$8. Epilogues. Boulder Coffee Co., 100 Alexander St. 454-7140. bouldercoffeeco.com. 8 p.m. Call for info.

Ship Wrecked Sunday’s ft. DJ Trancesend. Captain’s Attic, 37

Charlotte St. 546-8885. 21+. Call for info. rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 21


Dance between the dancers falls away and we see only a couple madly in love. Jeune is to be commended on his sensual caresses; I shivered when he ran a hand oh-so-lightly down Rogers’ thigh. At one point she lays her head in his hands, at another he rests his head on her chest. They are partners, equals. They are there for each other. I especially enjoyed the unique lifts Fagan choreographed for the duet. In one, Rogers has one leg wrapped around Jeune’s shoulder and another around his waist as he spins her. “I tried to make the canoodling as fresh as I could,” Fagan says. Pennewell’s third piece for the company,

Members of Garth Fagan Dance; the company performed last week at Nazareth College Arts Center. PHOTOS BY JAMIE GERMANO

Ample evidence of success Garth Fagan Dance [ REVIEW ] BY CASEY CARLSEN

and he assured me that I would find his piece “No Evidence of Failure,” originally a solo set on veteran performer Natalie Rogers, more nuanced and tighter. He told me I would like it. I loved it.

Rochesterians are graced by having a dance company with the stature and international reputation of Garth Fagan Dance living and performing in our city. I feel especially privileged at having the ongoing opportunity to annually see fresh work, discuss it with Fagan and his protégé Norwood “P.J.” Pennewell, and analyze it through writing. The more I am exposed to the Fagan Technique, the more moved I am at the subtleties and intricacies of Fagan’s own particular language of expression through movement. Like re-reading a favorite poet, patterns and delicacies emerge that I had hitherto not noticed. Furthermore, the personality of each of the troupe’s dancers — and their individual personalities and aptitudes, which Fagan astutely highlights — are springing to the forefront, like hidden patterns zinging out of a Magic Eye book. Garth Fagan Dance’s home season, which took place December 3-8 at Nazareth College Arts Center, brought the presentation of two new pieces — one choreographed by Fagan and one by Pennewell. I had seen both during the First Niagara Rochester Fringe Festival earlier in the fall, but they were still works in progress then and I was curious to see what changes had been wrought during the intervening three months. I spoke to Fagan the week before the December performances

Fagan created the work as a tribute to the “modern woman”; a woman he sees as a loving partner, but also an independent woman of strength. “Women have always had to multitask, but today’s woman even more so,” Fagan says. “Their lives have become more complex, but Natalie’s character embodies that woman who recognizes that she does not come second place.” Fagan refers to his dance company as his “family,” and spoke generously about Rogers, whom he considers a daughter. In fact, Fagan lost an infant daughter decades ago, but envisions that she would have grown to become the strong, positive woman he recognizes in Rogers. Rogers began with the company in 1989, and worked as Fagan’s assistant during his choreographing of Broadway’s “The Lion King” that earned Fagan a prestigious Tony Award. Rogers won a Bessie herself for her dancing, and then took seven years off to raise her own daughter. Watching Rogers dance now, one would never guess she had ever left the stage. As a dancer, Rogers possesses the confidence, technical prowess, and resonating emotional depth that is rare to find in younger dancers. There is an introspective, spiritual quality to her work that seems to stem from some deep inner place of contemplation. Her dancing feels

GARTHFAGANDANCE.ORG

22 CITY DECEMBER 11-17, 2013

like meditation in motion. Like a yogi, she holds difficult poses for inordinate lengths of time. Yet, even in her stillness there is movement emanating from her body — limbs, feet, fingers, torso, head all straining outward, outward, casting fine lines of energy. It’s like the branches of a tree reaching toward the sun. The big change in “No Evidence of Failure”

since Fringe is the addition of a duet with Vitolio Jeune, a company member since 2009. Jeune’s youthful vitality and unbridled energy provide a welcome juxtaposition to the quieter, more centered energy of Rogers. Before Jeune enters, Rogers appears a sort of modern warrior woman, a force with which to contend. She gazes intently at the audience, works herself into a furor of whirling arm rotations, sharp leg and arm movements and quick leaps before achieving a challenging one-legged pose in which her other leg extends above her shoulder — usually a position that is only held for a few seconds. This is her work. Only briefly does Rogers ever pause to rest, this in a sweet mimed movement in which she reclines her head onto her cradled arms before jumpstarting back into work mode. When Jeune enters, Rogers is offstage. He searches for her in a frenzy of passion, all eagerness and testosterone, a constant sheen of sweat flying from his head. Bob Marley’s “No Woman, No Cry” alerts us that they are lovers. She reappears, they embrace and begin a duet delicious in its display of playful passion. The two-decade age difference

“Gin,” has also undergone some changes since it premiered at the Fringe Festival. Like “No Evidence of Failure,” it was well received by both audiences and reviewers during the company’s annual run at The Joyce Theatre in Manhattan last month. The work, inspired by the mechanical workings of a cotton gin, is tighter now than it had been in September. Still, at 25 minutes it still seemed to run a bit long. Maybe that is part of the point, however; certain phrases of movement that Pennewell describes as “swatches” are introduced and then brought back later in different combinations, much like the variations in a piece of jazz, or the motions of the machine referenced in the piece’s title. I cannot fathom the pressure of having to choreograph for Fagan’s company. Pennewell, with the company since 1978, another Bessie winner, and Fagan’s rehearsal director, is the only one to have done so besides Fagan himself. But Pennewell meets the challenge. This piece embraces the style of the company but introduces some nice flourishes of his own. “Gin” is nicely divided into solos, duets, and group performances. I loved the power evoked when he has six or seven dancers emerging suddenly in formation from the wings. On the other hand, his duets are compelling; I liked the pairing of Charity Metzger with Jeune. The solo work of Sade Bully, Shanon Castle, and Nicolette Depass particularly stood out. Pennewell possesses a keen sense of humor. The audience applauded the slightly ribald nature of the section with Jeune, Winton Rice, and Anjue David in their show of playful competition and friendly ribbing as they challenged each other to jump higher and turn faster. Pennewell is finding his footing as a choreographer.


Art Exhibits [ OPENING ] AsIs Gallery, Sage Art Center, Wilson Blvd. Senior Exhibition. Through Dec 24. Reception Dec 12, noon-1 p.m. sageartcenter. com/asis-gallery/. A Different Path Gallery, 27 Market St. Brockport. Annual Mixed Media Exhibit. Through Dec 21. Sherry Tulloch, Elizabeth Britton-Barry, Katherine Weston. Reception Dec 13, 6-9 p.m. 637-5494. differentpathgallery.com. Richard Aerni Studio, The Hungerford Bldg. 1115 E. Main St. #106. Annual Studio Open House and Sale. 34th Annual Studio Open House and Sale, featuring ceramics by Richard

Aerni and Carolyn Dilcher-Stutz; Ink Drawings and Clay Sculpture by Kurt Feuerherm; Blown Glass by Peter Secrest; Felted Clothing by Jae Hee Lee; and Jewelry by Lise Bouvet. 429-0211. richard@richardaerni.com. richardaerni.com. [ CONTINUING ] Arts & Cultural Council for Greater Rochester, 277 N. Goodman St. Holiday Art Sale. Through Dec 21. Ten new artists each week for three weeks in December will offer their work for sale to the public in our gallery. 473-4000. artsrochester.org. Aviv Café, 321 East Ave. AKA Peaceful Heart: Sumi-e and Prints by Dennis W. Burns. Through Dec 31. 729-9916. bethelcf.com/aviv.

Axom Gallery, 176 Anderson Ave., 2nd floor. “Celebrating Beauty: Regional Landscape Paintings.” Works by Four Contemporary Painters: Connie Ehindero, Paul Garland, Kurt Moyer, Rick Muto. Through Jan 4. Wed-Sat 12-5 p.m. 232-6030 x23. axomgallery.com. Baobab Cultural Center, 728 University Ave. Frank Frazier and Friends. Frank Frazier, Minerva Diaz, Rory Tequan Morgan, Janice Thacker, Shenna Vaughn. thebaobab.org. thebaobab.org. Black Radish Studio, 274 N. Goodman. Michael Wedge: “Metropolis.” Through Dec 30. 413-1278. blackradishstudio. com. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. The Lobby Presents: “Storyteller” by

Topher Martin. Through Feb 5. 8 p.m.-2 a.m. lobbydigital.com. Cary Graphic Arts Collection, Lomb Memorial Dr. “Manifold Greatness: The Creation and Afterlife of the King James Bible.” Through Dec 13. Mon-Fri 9 a.m.-noon. 4753961. library.rit.edu/cary. Community Darkroom Gallery, 713 Monroe Ave. “Visual Discourse” Photography by Community Darkroom Photographers.. Through Jan 10. Mon 9 a.m.-9:30 p.m., Tue-Thu 9 a.m.-6:30 p.m., Fri noon-5 p.m., Sat 10 a.m.-5:30 p.m. 271-5920. geneseearts.org. A Different Path Gallery, 27 Market St. Brockport. Hope in My Pocket. Through Dec 30. Katherine Weston, Sherry Tulloch, and Kaitlin Roney exhibit a variety of art inspired by work and research

benefiting the treatment of children’s brain cancer. Reception Dec 13, 6-9 p.m. There will be small tokens available in exchange for donations to the organization at the opening reception. 637-5494. differentpathgallery.com. The Episcopal Church Home, 505 Mt. Hope Ave. “Camera Rochester Holiday Show.” Through Jan 5. Daily 10 a.m.-8 p.m. 546-8400. cotton@EpiscopalSeniorLife.org. episcopalseniorlife.org. Friendly Home’s Memorial Gallery, 3165 East Ave. “A Collection of Thoughts and Dreams” by Christine Sisak and Diane Tank. Through Dec 30. Daily 10 a.m.-5 p.m. 385-0298. friendlyhome.org. Fuego Coffee Roasters, 167 Liberty Pole Way. Images From the New Nature. Drawings, paintings,

and sculpture by Robert Frank Abplanalp. 315-244-2415. thinklikeme@gmail.com. Genesee Center for the Arts and Education, 713 Monroe Ave. WinterCraft. Through Dec 21. Mon-Wed 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Thu 10 a.m.-9:30 p.m., Fri 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Sat noon-5 p.m. 244-1730. geneseearts.org. George Eastman House, 900 East Ave. Through Dec 17: Sweet Creations Gingerbread House Display. Through Dec 18: Tabletop Tree Display and silent auction. Through Jan 12: “The History of Space Photography” and “Astro-Visions.” Through Feb 16: “Lossless.” Tue-Sat 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Sun 11 a.m.-5 p.m. 2713361. eastmanhouse.org. continues on page 24

THE COMMUNION OF SAINTS

CITY Newspaper presents

TALKING TO GOD AND GRANDMA | BY MARY GRACE

Mind Body Spirit

The Holidays are a difficult time for those suffering from the loss of a loved one. Help and healing can be found in this new, inspirational guidebook. Learn how those who are grieving (especially Catholics) can stay connected with family and friends in heaven through The Communion of Saints. For more information, or to order, go to: www.giftsofgraceministry.org | Price; $18.95.

TO ADVERTISE CALL CHRISTINE AT 244.3329 x23 OR EMAIL CHRISTINE@ROCHESTER-CITYNEWS.COM

Books also available at: The Purple Door, 3259 Winton Rd. South, Win-Jeff Plaza. Mythic Treasures, Village Gate Square, 274 Goodman Street.

See “Literary Events” page for author’s upcoming book signings and presentations on December 15th & 18th.

FREE TRIAL OPEN HOUSE Sat., Dec. 14th • 5:30pm-8:30pm

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rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 23


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FILM | HOLIDAY FILMS AT THE DRYDEN

While I enjoy watching the same classic Christmas movies on TV every year, there’s always something missing: a big screen. That’s where the Dryden Theatre (900 East Ave.) comes in. This holiday season, make watching holiday classics an even better time by seeing them in the theater, the way they were meant to be seen. Start out with the subversive “A Christmas Story” this Friday, December 13, at 8 p.m., and also Sunday, December 15, at 2 p.m. I’ve probably watched this movie 100 times, and it remains hilarious with each viewing. If comedies aren’t your thing, “It’s a Wonderful Life” will be playing next Saturday and Sunday, December 21 and 22. Get your tickets early for this annual screening, as it typically sells out. The Dryden is part of the George Eastman House, located at 900 East Ave. Movie tickets run $6-$8. Visit dryden. eastmanhouse.org for more information. — BY TREVOR LEWIS

Art Exhibits Hartnett Gallery, Wilson Commons, University of Rochester, River Campus. “Deconstructing Scapes” by Zahra Nazari. Through Jan 19. Tue-Fri 11 a.m.-7 p.m., Sat-Sun noon-5 p.m. blogs.rochester. edu/hartnett. Image City Photography Gallery, 722 University Ave. Holiday Show 2013. Through Dec 22. Mon-Sat 11 a.m.7 p.m., Sun 12-4 p.m. imagecityphotographygallery. com. International Art Acquisitions, 3300 Monroe Ave. “Nutcrackers.” Through Dec 31. The holiday experience is celebrated in Sam Paonessa’s original oil on canvas “Nutcracker” series. Mon-Fri 10 a.m.-9 p.m., Sat 10 a.m.-6 p.m., Sun 12-5 p.m. 264-1440. internationalartacquisitions.com. Link Gallery at City Hall, 30 Church St. “See Us Now...Greater Rochester’s Asian-American Community” Exhibition. Through Jan 27. Mon-Fri 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Reception Dec 16, 5:307:30 p.m. by invitation, RSVP required. 208-8614. info@ apaaroc.org. cityofrochester.gov. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. Scott Matyjaszek. thelittle.org. Lower Link Gallery, Central Library, 115 South Ave. Art of the Book. Artist Books and Altered Books. 428-8053. libraryweb.org/artofthebook. Main Street Artists’ Gallery & Studio, 1115 E Main St. Main Street Artists’ First Friday open studio show and sale. First Friday 4-9 p.m. will kick off a month-long exhibit of works by Linda M. Cala of East Rochester. Jazz by Ralph DeBergalis &

Co. will be performed. Work by other members of the Main Street Artists will also be on display and for sale. 233-5645. mainstreetartistsgallery.com. Main Street Arts, 20 W Main St., Clifton Springs. “Fabulous Fibers.” Through Dec. WedSun 11 a.m.-7 p.m. 315-4620210. mstreetarts@gmail.com. mainstreetartsgallery.com. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. Lockhart Gallery through Dec 13: “Connoisseurs Around the Corner: Gifts of Art from MAG’s Founding Family.” Grand Gallery through Dec 29: “Memory Theatre.” Wed-Sun 11 a.m.–5 p.m., Thu 11 a.m.-9 p.m. 276-8900. mag.rochester.edu. Mercer Gallery at Monroe Communtiy College, 1000 E. Henrietta Rd. Luis Alberto Decurgez. Through Dec 14. Mon-Thu 10 a.m.-7 p.m., Fri 11 a.m.-4 p.m. 292-3121. monroecc.edu/go/mercer. Mill Art Center & Gallery, 61 N Main St. Honeoye Falls. “Art Crescendo.” Through Feb 15. Monday 11 a.m.-3 p.m., Tue 2-5 p.m., Wed 11 a.m.-5 p.m., Thu 11 a.m.-8 p.m., Fri 11 a.m.-3 p.m., Sat 11 a.m.-3 p.m. 6247740. millartcenter.com. Nan Miller Gallery, 3450 Winton Place. Albert Paley maquettes. Tue-Sat 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Six dynamic Albert Paley maquettes (small studies) designed for his most ambitious sculpture installation, Paley on Park Avenue. Also on display are Paley’s furniture designs, introducing mix-media pieces by Red Wolf, as well as new original works by Canadian artists Adam Colangelo and Eduard Gurevich. 292-1430. nanmillergallery.com. Ock Hee’s Gallery, 2 Lehigh St. Ock Hee’s Choices. Through

Dec 28. Work by fine jewelry designers: Loraine Cooley, LeAnne Marquis, Cathy Thomas, Jan Kellner, Linda Lawrence. Mon-Sat 11 a.m.-5 p.m., Sun 12-5 p.m. 624-4730. Orange Glory Café, 240 East Ave. Watson Art Show? This! Mon-Fri 11 a.m.-3 p.m. A collection of drawings, prints, & collages by Watson, a Rochester illustrator. 232-7340. Outside the Box Art Gallery, Bldg 9, The Canal Works, 1000 Turk Hill Rd. “Winter Reflections.” Through Jan 31. Sun-Mon 8 a.m.-5 p.m., Tue-Wed 8 a.m.-10 p.m., Thu-Sat 8 a.m.-11 p.m. 645-2485. outsidetheboxag.com. Oxford Gallery, 267 Oxford St. Annual Holiday Exhibit. Through Jan 11. 271-5885. oxfordgallery.com. Pat Rini Rohrer Gallery, 71 S Main St. Canandaigua. Holidays at the Gallery. Through Jan 6. 3940030. prrgallery.com. Record Archive, 33 1/3 Rockwood St. Altered States of Rochester: A Neo-colorist series of paintings by Darren Thomas Brennessel. recordarchive.com. Rochester Contemporary Arts Center, 137 East Ave. 23rd Annual Members Exhibition. 461-2222. info@ rochestercontemporary.org. Rosalie “Roz” Steiner Art Gallery, Genesee Community College, One College Rd. Lee Hoag: “The Alchemy of Objects.” Through Dec 20. facebook.com/ gccgallery. Ross Gallery of the Skalny Welcome Center at St. John Fisher, 3690 East Ave. “Arena @ Fisher.” Through Dec 17. MonFri 9 a.m.-4 p.m. sjfc.edu. Rush Rhees Library, University of Rochester, River Campus. Travel Stories: 19th Century--Present. Through Dec 27. 275-4477.; “Nurturing Inquiry.” Rare Books and Special Collections Department. Through Feb 28. Mon-Fri 9 a.m.-5 p.m. 2754477. rochester.edu. The Shoe Factory Art Co-op, 250 N Goodman St. O Come All Ye Art Lovers! Holiday gallery exhibit featuring local artists. Open First Fridays, 6-9 p.m. Second Saturdays, 12-4 p.m., and Wednesdays, 12-5 p.m. 7320036. shoefactoryarts.com. Skylark Lounge, 40 South Union St. Adult Art Show. 270-8106. theskylarklounge.com. Spectrum Gallery, 100 College Ave. The Pittsford Art Group. Through Dec 27. Tue-Fri 9 a.m.-6 p.m., Sat 10 a.m.-2 p.m. spectrumgalleryroc.com. Starry Nites Café, 696 University Ave. Bruce Bozman: Island Color. 271-2630. shoefactoryarts@ gmail.com. starrynitescafe.com. Tap & Mallet, 381 Gregory St. Dudes Night Out Presents: Dudes on Tap. 473-0503. tapandmallet.com. The Tea Pottery, 1115 E Main St., suite 420 door #2. Maggi Bartlett: Handbound Books and Paper Creations. Through Dec. 31. 469-8217. tpotter51@ hotmail.com. University Gallery, James R Booth Hall, RIT, Lomb Memorial Dr. “Memories, Observations, Experiences, Obsessions,” Toby Thompson Memorial Exhibit. Through Dec 14. Mon-Fri 9 a.m.5 p.m., Sat 10 a.m.-2 p.m. 4752404. jleugs@rit.edu.


University of Rochester, River Campus. Chester Carlson and 75 years of Xerography. Through Jan 1. Carlson Science and Engineering Library. 275-4461. mengel@library.rochester.edu. rochester.edu. Valley Manor, 1570 East Ave. “Drawing From Life...An Eccelctic Show.” Through Dec. Reception Nov 8, 6-8 p.m. 442-6450. Visual Studies Workshop, 31 Prince Street. “Of the Ordinary.” Through Dec 14. 442-8676. vsw.org. Wayne County Council for the Arts, 108 W Miller St. Newark. Holiday Artisan Sale. Through Dec 21. Thu-Sat 12-3 p.m. waynearts. wordpress.com. Williams-Insalaco Gallery at FLCC, 3325 Marvin Sands Dr. Alumni Biennial Exhibition: The Art, Music, and Poetry of Rand Darrow. 785-1369. flcc.edu.

Art Events [ THU., DECEMBER 12 ] Talulah’s Fancy & Friends. 4-9 p.m. The Lower Mill, 61 N. Main St. Shop handmade gifts 5821830. thelowermill.com. [ FRI., DECEMBER 13 ] Rochester Arc + Flame Center Holiday Show and Sale. Dec. 1314. Roc Arc & Flame Center, 125 Fedex Way Fri 5-10 p.m., Sat 10

a.m.-4 p.m. Live demonstrations of glass flame artists, welders, and blacksmiths. Affordable artwork and ornaments created by Rochester artisans 349-7110. rocafc.com. [ SAT., DECEMBER 14 ] Brainery Holiday Bazaar. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Rochester Brainery, Village Gate, 274 N Goodman St. Presented By Yelp Shops Local. Explore gifts from Rochester’s best locally owned businesses and artisans while enjoying complimentary cocktails, beers, and entertainment. Free admission 730-7034. bit.ly/ BraineryHolidayBazaar. Grand Opening and Holiday Sale. 10 a.m.-4 p.m Local artists Kala Stein and Alysha Baier are opening their new clay studio and gallery. Briarcliff Square/ 8732 Main Street, Honeoye. SatSun Dec 14-15, 21-22. Evening reception, December 14, 6-8 p.m baierpottery@gmail.com, kalastein@mac.com. More Fire Glass Studio Annual Holiday Sale. 12-4 p.m More Fire Glass Studio, 80 Rockwood Place Sale and glass blowing demonstrations Free 242-0450. morefireglass.com. Second Saturdays Open Studios. Second Saturday of every month Anderson Alley Building, 250 N. Goodman St. andersonalleyartists.com.

Comedy [ THU., DECEMBER 12 ] Dan St. Germain. Dec. 12-14. Comedy Club, 2235 Empire Blvd Webster Thu 7:30 p.m., Fri-Sat 7:30 & 10 p.m $9-$12 671-9080. thecomedyclub.us. [ FRI., DECEMBER 13 ] Geezers of Anarchy. 8 p.m. The Space Theater and Gallery, 1199 E Main St. This all-sketch comedy show touches the fullarray of life’s experiences--from a newborn who has it all to a mother who’s losing all she has. and everything in between. Music, movies and mayhem because Left for Dead are the Geezers of Anarchy. $8 at the door, $5 for seniors (and we think everyone’s a senior). 561762-0977. jeri@mindpulseinc. com.

Dance Events [ SAT., DECEMBER 14 ] The Christmas Shoes. 3 & 7 p.m. Roberts Wesleyan College, 2301 Westside Dr Mossa School of Dance $8-$12 594-6008. mossadance.com. Mossa School of Dance Presents. 3 & 7 p.m. Davison Gallery, Cultural Life Center, Roberts Wesleyan College, 2301 Westside Dr A story of loss, of love, and a mother’s dedication

to her children against all odds $8-$12. 594-6442. Western New York Ballet and Odasz Dance Theatre: The Nutcracker. Dec. 14-15. Spencerport High School Arts Center, 2707 Spencerport Rd., Spencerport. Sat 7 p.m., Sun 2 p.m $10-$15 4720474. lodasz@wnyballet.com. Romancing the Dance. 3 p.m. School of the Arts, 45 Prince St Featuring Rhythm Society, Dance Encounters, African Caribbean Dance Ensemble, Dunwoody Dance, Tango Cave and many more $7. 249-0354. [ SUN., DECEMBER 15 ] Annual Holiday Party. Dec. 15. Harmony House, 58 East Main St . Webster With C’est Bon Cajun Dance Band. 4:25 p.m. Cajun Dance lesson with Donna Fraser, 5-8 p.m. performance $12, register 727-4119. rochesterzydeco.com. Bethel Christian Fellowship’s Christmas Gala w/Yahweh Ballet. 3 & 6 p.m. 321 East Ave 232-1136. acswebnetworks.com. [ MON., DECEMBER 16 ] Bellies ‘N Beaus Square Dance. Dec. 16. For details, contact Bob Hager at 227-1894 or rhager2@rochester.rr.com squaredancingrochester.org. Egyptian Style Belly Dance. 7 p.m. Rochester Brainery, Village Gate, 274 N Goodman St. $15 730-

7034. info@rochesterbrainery. com. rochesterbrainery.com. [ TUE., DECEMBER 17 ] Stardust Open Ballroom Dance Series. 7:30 p.m. Edgerton Community Center, 41 Backus St Big Band era live music $3 admission 4286755. cityofrochester.gov/ ballroomdanceseries.

Festivals [ THU., DECEMBER 12 ] Annual Holiday Open House. Dec. 12. Businesses in North Winton Village will be open at different hours, and offering music, refreshments, door prizes. More information at. northwinton.org. [ FRI., DECEMBER 13 ] “It’s a Wonderful Life” at Seneca Falls. Dec. 13-15. Gingerbread contest, film screening, cook-off, craft fair, more. Town of Seneca Falls therealbedfordfalls.com. [ SAT., DECEMBER 14 ] Christmas with Santa. Springdale Farm, 700 Colby St. Breakfast seatings at 9, 10, 11 a.m. and noon. Guests may enjoy a pancake and sausage breakfast, a visit with Santa and Mrs. Claus, children’s crafts, a petting zoo, a nativity scene, and more. Children under age 2 are free but must sit on a parent’s lap $8, register springdalefarm.org.

East Rochester Christmas Festival. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. At four locations throughout the village. Music and caroling, children’s stories, food and item vendors, games and crafts, Santa and Mrs. Claus, sales and giveaways by local merchants, horsedrawn carriage tours, and bus transportation between the various sites Free erchamber. org.

Kids Events [ WED., DECEMBER 11 ] Milk & Cookies featuring a Holiday Sing-Along event. 5 p.m. All area Doodlebugs doodlebugs.com. [ THU., DECEMBER 12 ] Art and Story Stroll. 11 a.m. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. Ages 2-5 with accompanying adult are invited to enjoy an hour-long story reading and art viewing experience led by Creative Workshop children’s art instructor Suzanne Kolodziej free. 2768900. mag.rochester.edu. [ FRI., DECEMBER 13 ] Eddie the Elk and the Twelve Days of Christmas. 1 & 3 p.m Rochester Museum and Science Center, 657 East Ave. No shows December 22 Included in museum admission: $11-$13 271-4320. rmsc.org. continues on page 27

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 25


GIFTS FOR EVERYONE

Theater again), who leaves her in the course of the play, is more of a plot device than a character — it stuck with me. This was mainly because of the fraught relationship between Doreen and Carla, but also because May stocks their dialogue with many genuinely witty, character-driven lines. Both actresses are excellent: Kerry Young gives Doreen just enough humanity and likeability to mitigate her amazing sense of entitlement, and Allison Roberts does the slow burn very effectively.

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CALL FOR HOLIDAY HOURS Brittany Lynn Wolff, Vicki Casarett, and Tim McCormack in the “Honeymoon Motel” segment of “Relatively Speaking,” now at the JCC. PHOTO BY STEVE LEVINSON

Family entertainment “Relatively Speaking” THROUGH DECEMBER 22 JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER, 1200 EDGEWOOD AVE. $18-$26 | 461-2000, JCCROCHESTER.ORG [ REVIEW ] BY DAVID RAYMOND

The JCC CenterStage’s new production is “Relatively Speaking,” a program of one-act plays, recently presented on Broadway, by writers better known for their work in the movies: Ethan Coen, Elaine May, and Woody Allen. Does anything tie them together? Well, each of them contains a generous sprinkling of wisecracks, as you might expect. And each of them contains characters who are related to each other, and generally making life hell for each other (hence the title — they had to call it something). “Talking Cure” was the 19th century name for psychoanalysis before there was psychoanalysis, and also the name of the first play, written by Ethan Coen of “Fargo,” “No Country for Old Men,” and “Inside Llewyn Davis” fame, and directed by Kerry Young. Its first few scenes present several sessions between a fatuous analyst (played by 26 CITY DECEMBER 11-17, 2013

Gregory Ludek) and a quick-witted, rather scary postal worker named Larry who may actually have gone postal (Jeff Siuda, who does quick-witted and scary very well). It’s a typical who’s-the-crazy-one-now dialogue, given a lift by Coen’s snappy, profane banter, which seems to prove that talking doesn’t cure anything. The final scene is a flashback between Larry’s parents (Brittany Lynn Wolff and Brian Ziemann) that makes very clear who the crazy one is and where he got it. “George is Dead” are the first words spoken by the main character in Elaine May’s play, centered around an utterly self-absorbed socialite named Doreen (Kerry Young). George has just died in Aspen, and Doreen has absolutely no idea how to handle it, so she runs to her childhood friend Carla (Allison Roberts), a long-suffering type with a record of cleaning up other people’s messes. They’re not relatives but might as well be: Carla’s mother was Doreen’s nanny and was devoted to the rich girl, at Carla’s emotional expense. Carla manages to get George’s body back to New York and arrange a funeral, and...well, she gets her revenge in the last line. This is the “big” play in the triple bill, and despite its faults — it goes on a little too long, and Carla’s husband (Gregory Ludek

If Woody Allen weren’t so facile a writer, I’d swear that he wrote “Honeymoon Motel” in 1965, kept it in a drawer, and dusted it off 45 years later for “Relatively Speaking.” There was a time when you could find three or four examples of this kind of lighthearted audience-pleaser (not always by Neil Simon) running on Broadway in any season; nowadays it’s all on TV and wrapped up in 21 minutes with commercials. Being rather oldschool, I like seeing this kind of play on stage again, though I imagine if Woody Allen’s name weren’t on, there wouldn’t be much interest. The jokes are the usual Allen staples about sex, death, the Torah, psychoanalysis, and Chinese food. The plot they decorate is risqué but predictable: it’s the one about the older man (Tim McCormack) stealing a much younger woman (Brittany Lynn Wolff) from the wedding — and from his stepson (Brian Ziemann). The illicit couple is soon tracked down at their tacky motel room by his vengeful wife (Vicki Casarett), the would-be bride’s parents (Ludek and Connie Neer), the rabbi (Don Bartalo), and the analyst (Jeff Siuda), and then the fighting and the zingers begin. Peace is restored with the arrival of a philosophical pizza delivery man (Danny Kincaid Kunz). It’s good thing a lot of Allen’s jokes land, because “Honeymoon Motel” is hardly a masterpiece of construction. One character (a guy named Eddie played by Morey Fazzi) seems to have no particular reason for being there, and there are a couple of odd, dull patches. But when it’s funny, it’s very funny, and it is entertainingly performed. This play has more physical comedy than the other two, and the cast (especially McCormack) handles it skilfully, under the direction of David Munnell (he also directed “George is Dead”). I don’t know if it was intentional, but it’s amusing to have Siuda play the crazy guy in “The Talking Cure” and the analyst in “Honeymoon Motel” — and to have Ziemann and Wolff, the crazed parents in the Coen play, return as the young couple in Allen’s.


KIDS | “THE WIZARD OF OZ”

Lions, and tigers, and… ah, you know where I’m going with this. What you may not know is that Rochester Children’s Theatre is putting on a production of “The Wizard of Oz” at the Nazareth College Arts Center (4245 East Ave) starting this Saturday, December 14. Whether or not you’ve seen the classic movie, you’ll want to catch see the Land of Oz and all its famous characters in play form, as it’s a totally different experience. Shows take place this Saturday and Sunday at 2 p.m., and continue December 20-22. The December 22 show will be interpreted for the hard of hearing. Tickets range from $17 to $20. Visit naz.artscenter. edu or rochesterchildrenstheatre.org for the tickets and additional information. — BY TREVOR LEWIS

Creative Arts, 3300 Monroe Ave. Free. 855-444-0201. spectrumcreativearts.org. Meet the Jolly Good Fellow. Dec. 14-15. The Strong National Museum of Play, 1 Manhattan Square. Tell your holiday wishes to the Jolly Good Fellow, the museum’s old-fashioned Santa, and then view an extremely rare, signed copy of the beloved Clement Moore poem “A Visit from St. Nicholas.” Sat 11 a.m.-4 p.m., Sun 1-4 p.m Included in museum admission $13.50, free to kids under 2 and members 263-2700. museumofplay.org The Wizard of Oz. Nazareth College Arts Center, 4245 East Ave Through Dec 22. Sat-Sun 2 p.m., Fri Dec 20, 7 p.m $17-$20 389-2170. artscenter.naz.edu.

Many of us feel far too strapped for time to make a big, positive impact on our community, but when we put our heads together, we can always find a way. ROC the Day, which takes place on Wednesday, December 11, is a 24hour online event that invites all residents of the Greater Rochester nine-county region to give to the nonprofit of his or her choice. All of the money donated between 12 a.m. and 11:59 p.m. on Wednesday, December 12, will help local people and area nonprofit organizations. Many of the area’s nonprofits are holding events and demonstrations, too, so search “Roc the Day” in our calendar at rochestercitynewspaper.com for specific events. New this year: ROC the Day gift cards. Give your favorite people a gift card which they can re-gift to their favorite ROC the Day organization (they have until January 31 to re-gift). Visit roctheday.org for more information, or to donate. To give over the phone, call 1-800-242-0238. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY

Kids Events [ SAT., DECEMBER 14 ] An American Girl Holiday Celebration. 11 a.m. Lift Bridge Book Shop, 45 Main St Ages 7-12 $5, register liftbridgebooks.com. Breakfast with Santa. 8:30, 10 & 11:30 a.m Seneca Park Zoo,

2222 St. Paul St $3-$12, register 336-7212. senecaparkzoo.org. Children’s Day. 11:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Books Etc., 78 W. Main St Macedon Every child or young person will receive a free book 474-4116. books_etc@yahoo. com. Family Storybook Creative Workshop. Second Saturday of every month, 10 a.m. Spectrum

GIFT CARDS available for the Holidays

1290 University Ave near Culver 271-5000 | 3400 Monroe Ave across from Pittsford Plaza 586-7000 Lunch: Mon–Fri 11:30am–3:00pm • Dinner: Mon–Thurs 4:30–10pm, Fri & Sat 4:30–11pm, Sun 4:30–9pm • www.mypomodoro.com

Lectures [ THU., DECEMBER 12 ] “Focus 45” Lunchtime Lecture. 12:15 p.m. George Eastman House, 900 East Ave. Nancy Kauffman, Motion Picture Archivist for Stills, Poster, and Paper Collection. “Film Stills: Beyond the Glamour Shot” Included in museum admission: $5-$12 271-3361. eastmanhouse.org. Rochester Birding Talk. 7:30 p.m. Brighton Town Hall, 2300 Elmwood Ave. How We Use Technology To Study Feeding Behavior with David Bonter. Free. 585-331-6822. ddallen3@yahoo. com. rochesterbirding.com. Series of Uncommon Voices: Lisa Scottoline. 7:30 p.m. Downtown United Presbyterian Church, 121 N. Fitzhugh Street Sponsored by Nazareth College and Alan Cameros. $15. 325-4000.

Literary Events

SPECIAL EVENT | ROC THE DAY

Gourmet pastas, wood-fired pizzas, steaks, seafood & original entrées Live music every Friday & Saturday night

[ WED., DECEMBER 11 ] Irondequoit Public Library Contemporary Book Discussion Group: “The Night Circus” by Erin Morgenstern. Dec. 11-12. Irondequoit Library, Helen McGraw Branch, 2180 E. Ridge Rd Wed 7 p.m., Thu 3 p.m Free 336-6060. libraryweb.org.

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For more information, please call (585) 273-4700, or email us at: mindbody@urmc.rochester.edu

[ THU., DECEMBER 12 ] Bertrand Russell Forum. 7 p.m. Writers and Books, 740 University Ave Walter Uhrman on “A Wider Appreciation of the Fine Arts” $3, free to members wab.org. International Literature Book Club. 8:30 p.m. The Daily Refresher, 293 Alexander St. Swedish author Stig Dagerman’s “Island of the Doomed” Free. 978-9343. chad.post@rochester. edu. thedailyrefresher.com. Poems for Lunch. noon. Central Library, 115 South Ave. Kitty Jospe, offers a selection of poems and guides a discussion about them. Free 428-8375. carol.moldt@libraryweb.org. libraryweb.org. Pure Kona Open Mic Poetry Series. 7-10 p.m. The Greenhouse Café, 2271 E. Main St. 270-8603. ourcoffeeconnection.org. [ FRI., DECEMBER 13 ] Book Sale. Dec. 13-14, 9 a.m.-6 p.m. Gates Public Library, 902 Elmgrove Rd. 234-9190. Poetry & Pie Night. 7-9 p.m. Dual Book Release Poetry reading continues on page 28 rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 27


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SPORTS | FROZEN FRONTIER

As the landscape of Rochester turns icy and gray, we bid our memories of catching a Red Wings game at Frontier Field farewell until the summer. But wait, not quite yet: beginning this week, The Rochester Americans and Rochester Red Wings will host the Frozen Frontier games, a 10-day outdoor hockey festival held at the frozen-over Frontier Field. On Friday, December 13, the Amerks will face off with the Cleveland-based Lake Erie Monsters in the first-ever outdoor game in Amerks franchise history. This game will take place at 7 p.m. on an improvised ice-rink set up in the field. The only way for non-season seat holders of the Amerks and Red Wings to guarantee themselves tickets to these events is to purchase an All-Access Package, which includes tickets to all Frozen Frontier events, an official Frozen Frontier winter cap, and one ticket voucher for both an Amerks (2013/14 season) and Red Wings (2014 season) game. This All-Access Package, valued at $175 (200 level), can be purchased for $60 (limited view), $80 (100 level), or $110 (200 level). In addition to seven games held December 13-20, the field will host open-skate sessions, ice skating with Mr. and Mrs. Claus, and a moonlit skate on December 20. Section V Rivalry Days will be held December 21-22. For more information, call 454-5335, or visit frozenfrontier2013.com. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY

Literary Events

Recreation

by Rachel McKibbens, author of Into The Dark and Emptying Field (Small Doggies), and Jacob Rakovan, author of The Devil’s Radio (Small Doggies). Free pie served between readers. Contact poetryandpienight@gmail.com for location.

[ FRI., DECEMBER 13 ] It’s a Wonderful Life 3K. 6 p.m. Hosted by Camp Daydreams. Register at the Sibley Building, 228 E. Main St. Walk and sing to the Liberty Pole $15-$20, register 461-2324. mail@ campdaydreams.org.

[ SAT., DECEMBER 14 ] Book Signing: “Juke Box Hero: My Five Decades in Rock ‘n’ Roll” by Lou Gramm. Dec. 14. Dec 14: 2 p.m. at Barnes & Noble, 3349 Monroe Ave. and 6 p.m. at Barnes & Noble, 330 Greece Ridge Center Dr. Dec 21: 5 p.m. at House of Guitars, 645 Titus Ave bames@ipgbook.com. [ SUN., DECEMBER 15 ] Annual Holiday Local Author Extravaganza. 2-4 p.m. Lift Bridge Book Shop, 45 Main St Please join us for our Annual Holiday Author event. liftbridgebooks.com. Book Reading & Signing: “The Communion of Saints, Talking to God and Grandma” by Mary Grace. 2-4 p.m. Lift Bridge Book Shop, 45 Main St. 766-9318. giftsofgraceministry.org. “Catching Meggie the Runaway Shetland Sheepdog” by Jenny Lloyd. 12-3 p.m. Lollypop Farm, 99 Victor Road. Fairport (585) 223-1330. jlloyd@ brockport.edu. lollypop.org.

[ SAT., DECEMBER 14 ] 1000 Acre Swamp Holiday Hike. 10 a.m.-noon. The Thousand Acre Swamp Sanctuary, 1581 Jackson Road Meet at the packing lot of Don Mack Building, 1587 Jackson Rd Free, register 340-8655. penfield.org. 39th Annual Letchworth/Silver Lake Chrismas Bird Count. Dec. 14. Letchworth State Park, 1 Letchworth State Park . Castile Call Douglass Bassett at 4933625 for territory assignment 493-3625. GVHC Event. Noon: Northampton Park, Hubbell Rd. off Rte. 31, Ogden. Strenuous 6-8 mile hike Free 323-1911. 1 p.m.: High Acres Trails, Perinton Parkway. Easy/leisurely 3.5 mile hike Free 755-8323. gvhchikes.org. GVHC Hike. Dec. 14. 2300 East Main St. at Merchant Rd. Christmas light walk, Browncroft neighborhood Free 482-0549. gvhchikes.org. “It’s a Wonderful Run” 5K. 4:40 p.m. Start at Bridge St.

[ SUN., DECEMBER 15 ] GVHC Event. 10 a.m. Crescent Trail, Rte. 31. Moderate/hilly 5 mile hike Free 201-0065. gvhchikes.org. Rochester Christmas Bird Count. Dec. 15. 671-5690. rochesterbirding.com. [ TUE., DECEMBER 17 ] Moonlight Snowshoe. 7 p.m. Helmer Nature Center, 154 Pinegrove Ave. Just for adults! A peaceful staff led snowshoe walk on the trails on the night of the full moon. Basic instruction, guided walk & refreshments will be provided. Weather permitting $5-$7 336-3035.

Special Events [ WED., DECEMBER 11 ] 2013 SPAS Holiday Auction. 5 p.m. Rochester Institute of Technology, 1 Lomb Memorial Dr. The auction will be held in the lobby of building 7B, Gannett Hall rit.edu. Boobies & Bells Burlesque. 9:30 p.m. Skylark Lounge, 40 South Union St VIP includes front seating, meet, greet & pictures with the girls $5, VIP table reservations for $10 270-8106. theskylarklounge.com. Christmas at Rochester Christian Church Ministires. Dec. 11-23, 6-9 p.m. Rochester Christian Church Ministires, 3177 Lyell Rd., Gates. Each show is about 20 mins and runs continuously from 6-9 p.m. each night. Free 247-4444. rccm.org. Geneva Historical Society Holiday Open House. 4-6 p.m. Geneva Historical Society, 543 South Main St 315-789-5151. genevahistoricalsociety.com. Holiday Wine Dinner. 6:30 p.m. Strathallan, 550 East Ave. Char Steak & Lounge. RSVP 2417100. charsteakandlounge.com. Neighborhood Input Sought on Center City Master Plan Update. 5:30-7 p.m. Manhattan Square Park Lodge, 353 Court St 4287761. cityofrochester.gov. Used Fiction Book Sale and LP Giveaway. Through Dec. 31. Central Library, 115 South Ave. Through Dec 31. Mon-Fri 9 a.m.5 p.m., Thu 11 a.m.-7 p.m., Sat noon-4 p.m., Sun 1-4 p.m. Free admission. 428-8350. Rebecca. Fuss@libraryweb.org. [ THU., DECEMBER 12 ] Cesar Cruz 2014 Calendar Release Party. 5-9 p.m. Boulder Coffee Co., 100 Alexander St. Music by DJ ZIO ‘The Mixed Genre Dj.’ Calendars available for a purchase price of $10. Some Proceeds will go to the American Cancer Society. Free 454-7140. bouldercoffeeco.com. City of Rochester Recreation and Youth Services Public Meetings to Obtain Feedback. 6 p.m. Thomas P. Ryan Community Center, 530 Webster Ave., Roxie Ann Sinkler Recreation Center, 75 Grover St., and Carter Street Community Center, 500 Carter St 428-6755. cityofrochester.gov.


Deck the Halls with Writers, Bloggers, and Yelpers. 5:30 p.m. Havana Cabana, 289 Alexander Street. Mingle with area bloggers and writers, share ideas, and find out more about the Rochester Blogger Network. $5 admission. rochesterbloggernetwork. blogspot.com. 746-2576. havanacabanaroc.com. Holiday Homecoming Celebration. 5 p.m. George Eastman House, 900 East Ave. $3-$12. 271-3361. eastmanhouse.org. [ FRI., DECEMBER 13 ] 2013 Holiday Spectacle of Lights. 5-9 p.m Camp Eastman, 1558 Lakeshore Blvd Irondequoit Benefits the Golisano Children’s Hospital. Holiday light displays, entertainment and activities $10 per car 336-6085. parksandrec@ irondequoit.org. irondequoit.org. Christmas Sale. Dec. 13-14, 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Cobblestone Arts Center, 1622 New York 332 389-0220. cobblestonesrtscenter.com. Community Holiday Party. 6 p.m. The Lower Mill, 61 N. Main St. Free admission 582-1830. thelowermill.com. Genetaska Women’s Club Bake Food Sale and Raffle. Dec. 1315. Irondequoit Public Library, Evans Branch, 45 Cooper Rd Fri 1:3-5:30 p.m., Sat 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Proceeds will benefit the Wounded Warrior Project. Free admission. 704-3963. aholland@ libraryweb.org. James Inman. 8 p.m. Holiday Inn, Rochester Airport, 911 Brooks Ave. With MC Vinnie Paulino $10. 328-6000. jokefactorycomedyclub.com. St. Vincent de Paul Sale. Dec. 13-14, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. St. Michael’s Church, 869 N. Clinton Ave. Free admission 338-2330. communitywishbook.com/ StVincentDePaulSociety.html. Yuletide in the Country. 5 p.m Genesee Country Village & Museum, 1410 Flint Hill Rd Mumford Tours are booked in groups of 20 and depart every 15 minutes beginning Fri 5 p.m. and Sat-Sun 1:15 p.m $15-$22, register 538-6822. gcv.org. [ SAT., DECEMBER 14 ] Alternative Music Film Festival. 7 p.m. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. The documentary “Marley” will be shown. Those close to Bob Marley discuss his life, his music and his legacy $10. 276-8900. mag.rochester.edu. Annual Blue Star Mothers Army/ Navy Game Fundraiser. 2 p.m. Buffalo Wild Wings, 780 Jefferson Rd. Free, some games require donation 313-3662. auhnavy@ gmail.com. Carol with the Coils. 2 p.m Rochester Museum and Science Center, 657 East Ave. See the “singing” Tesla coils and a performance of “Carol of the Coils” Included in museum admission: $11-$13 271-4320. rmsc.org. Creative Workshop Open House. 11 a.m. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. Learn about winter art classes and 2014 art day school sessions at the Gallery’s Creative Workshop free. 276-8900. mag.rochester.edu. Holiday Cookie & Goodies Sale. 9:30 a.m.-1 p.m. Trinity Reformed Church, 909 Landing Rd North. 381-5330. TrinityReformedChurch@frontier. com. trcroc.org.

Wow, Daddy! Santa Claus must REALLY like Mommy!!

RECREATION | CHRISTMAS BIRD COUNT

While many birds have already migrated to warmer places for the course of the bleak season, there are plenty of tough ones who’ll stick it out through the winter with us. Learn more about our area’s wee winter wildlife and help assess their numbers with one of the upcoming Christmas bird counts.

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The 39th Annual Letchworth Silver Lake Christmas Bird Count will take place all day on Saturday, December 14, at Letchworth State Park in Castile. If you’re interested in participating, call Douglass Bassett at 493-3625 before the day of the event for a territory assignment. And on Sunday, December 15, the 110th Rochester Christmas Bird Count (which is the 114th annual count for the National Audubon Society) will take place all day in a 15-mile radius centered at Dewey Avenue and Stone Road in Greece. Visit birding.aba.org and select Genesee to find a list of numbers of area leaders to call for more information. Inexperienced observers will be teamed up with the more experienced.

NFL GAME DAY SPECIAL: 24 wings and a pitcher for $25

Progressive Bingo

The tally will take place 7:30-9 p.m., after a 6 p.m. dinner (bring money) held at the Charbroil Restaurant at the corner of Island Cottage Road and Edgemere Drive.

Thursdays at 9pm Now accepting reservations

If you can’t get out to count birds in the field, you can watch your feeder for some time during the day, and then phoning in your count to one of the leaders. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY Holiday Make Up Event. 4 p.m. Devil May Care Boutique, 775 Park Ave. Join Devil May Care and Kouture at 775 Park Ave for wine, shopping and complimentary make up applications by Chanel rep, Claire Kenna. Free to the public. 585256-1777. rosie@dmclingerie. com. dmclingerie.com. Holiday Pet Expo Adoptapalooza. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. The Garden Factory, 2126 Buffalo Rd Free admission 247-6236. gardenfactoryny.com. Holiday Wine Release Party. noon. Long Acre Farms, 1342 Eddy Rd. Purchase a glass of wine or beer to enjoy while you shop. Free. 315-986-4202. longacrefarms.com. Holly Trolly Rides. New York Museum of Transportation, 6393 E. River Rd. Rides operate every half-hour, starting at 11:30 a.m., and are included with admission to the museum (open 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.). Included in museum admission: $4-$5 533-1113. nymtmuseum.org 11 a.m.-5 p.m New York Museum of Transportation, 6393 E. River Rd $4-$5 533-1113. nymtmuseum.org. Inspire Yoga’s Annual Christmas Tea. 12-4 p.m. Inspire Yoga, 1802 Penfield Rd. Raffle for unlimited yoga passes, live music provided by Penfield High school, art show and sale with PS Enjoy Your Life and wonderful treats

provided by local bakers 2499642. inspirepenfield.com. North Pole Express Trains. 12 & 3 p.m Arcade & Attica Roadroad, 278 Main St., Arcade $14, rsvp. Polar Express Train Ride. Dec. 14. Medina Railroad Museum, 530 West Ave. Departures at 2:15, 3:30, 4:45, and 6 p.m $24-$45, register 798-6106. railroadmuseum.net. ReCraft the Holidays EcoBazaar, Swap & Sustainable Saturday. Ongoing, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Rochester Greenovation, 1199 East Main St. Free admission 288-7564. events@ rochestergreen.com. Small Business Holiday Shopping Bazaar. 3 p.m. Bush Mango Drum & Dance, 34 Elton St. Mixing, mingling and shopping with local small businesses. Door prizes, raffles and refreshments. Free 420-8699. traciadedeji@ gmail.com. bushmango.org. Soulstice Artisan Market 4th Birthday. 6-9 p.m. Soulstice Artisan Market, 632 North Winton Rd. Live music and snacks, Santa Claus may even pay a visit 370-0076. soulsticeartisanmarket.com. Wigilia. 5 p.m. St. John Fisher College, Cleary Auditorium, 3690 East Ave. Wigilia is the traditional Christmas Eve dinner celebration in Poland $15-$35, free for continues on page 30

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SPECIAL EVENT | BOOBIES & BELLS BURLESQUE

The holidays are a source of a great deal of fun, but a lot of stress comes with them as well. If the stressful times have gotten to you, why not relax with some scantily clad women, meatballs, and beer? That’s exactly what you’ll get to do if you go to the Boobies & Bells Burlesque event at Skylark Lounge (40 S. Union St.) Wednesday, December 11, at 9:30 p.m. The event features the ladies of the Sirens & Stilettos Cabaret, with Miss Ruby Sparkles, Evie Delilah, Miss Sassie Sin, and other performers. You must be 21 or older to attend. Admission is $5. Visit the event page on Facebook for more details. — BY TREVOR LEWIS

Special Events children 6 and under 248-0152. info@polishheritagerochester.org. polishheritagerochester.org. [ SUN., DECEMBER 15 ] Christmas Gala Ball. Dec. 15. Sonnenberg Gardens and Mansion State Historic Park, 151 Charlotte St . Canandaigua Black tie or better attire $45-$55, register 394-4922. sonnenberg.org. Holiday Market. 10 a.m. Double Tree Hotel, 1111 Jefferson Road. Free. 244-2040. info@beyondthe-bump.com 10 a.m.-2 p.m Holidays at the Market. 9 a.m.-3 p.m Rochester Public Market, 280 N. Union St. 428-6907. Holly Trolly Rides. New York Museum of Transportation, 6393 E. River Rd $4-$5. 533-1113. nymtmuseum.org. Star Wars Spectacular. Dec. 15. Rochester Museum and Science Center, 657 East Ave. Included in admission: $11-$13 697-1942. rmsc.org. [ MON., DECEMBER 16 ] “Alive and Well,” a Documentary About Huntington’s Disease. 7-9 p.m. Little Theatre, 240 East Ave. Q&A panel discussion to follow the screening. gathr.us/ screening/6490. $10 thelittle. org. [ TUE., DECEMBER 17 ] Annual Holiday Luncheon at Penfield Recreation. noon. Penfield Community Center, 1985 Baird Rd Penfield Adults age 55+ are invited. Enjoy homemade lunch, dessert, and entertainment $6, register 3408655 x6. penfieldrec.org. Holiday Concert and Show. 12:302 p.m. Cobblestone Arts Center, 1622 New York 332. 398-0220. cobblestoneartscenter.com. Holiday Party. 7:30 p.m. Perinton Historical Society & Fairport Museum, 18 Perrin St Fairport

30 CITY DECEMBER 11-17, 2013

Chris Bensch: “Decking the Halls to Shopping Malls: American Traditions and How They Grew” Free admission 223-3989. iperintonhistoricalsociety.org. Tuesday Taco Trivia. 9-11 p.m. Temple Bar and Grille, 109 East Ave. 232-6000. templebarrochester@gmail. com. templebarandgrille.com.

Sports [ FRI., DECEMBER 13 ] Frozen Frontier. Dec. 13-22. Frontier Field, 1 Morrie Silver Way Games schedules for December 13-15, 21-22. Game times vary $10-$175 454-1001. frozenfrontier2013.com. [ SAT., DECEMBER 14 ] Roc City Roller Derby: Home Team Championship. 6 p.m. Dome Fair & Expo, 2695 E. Henrietta Rd . Henrietta Doors at 5 p.m $5-$20 rocderby.com.

Theater 10-Minute Play Festival. Finger Lakes Community College, 3325 Marvin Sands Dr. Stage 14. Fri 12:10 p.m. Free 7851623. flcc.edu. “A Bright Room Called Day.” Todd Theatre, University of Rochester, River Campus International Theatre Program. Thu Dec 5-Sat 8 p.m., Sun 3 p.m. Wed Dec 11-Fri 8 p.m., Sat 6 p.m $7-$13. 275-4088. rochester.edu/theatre. “A Christmas Carol High School.” Penfield Community Center, 1985 Baird Rd Penfield Penfield’s Young Open and Honest Players. Fri-Sat 7 p.m. $5-$10 340-8655 x6. penfieldrec.org. “A Christmas Carol.” Through Dec. 28. Geva Theatre Center, 75 Woodbury Blvd. Through December 28. Wed Dec 11-Thu 7 p.m., Fri 7:30 p.m., Sat 2 & 7:30 p.m., Sun noon (Audio Described Performance) and 4:30 p.m., Tue-Wed Dec 18, 7

p.m. Tickets start at $25 2324382. gevatheatre.org. Good Rockin’ Live: A Salute to Sun Records. Downstairs Cabaret at Winton Place, 3450 Winton Place Thu 7 p.m., Fri 8 p.m., Wed Dec 18 at 7 p.m. Good Rockin’ Christmas (rockabilly arrangements of xmas songs) Sat 4 & 8 p.m., Sun 3 p.m $23-$33 325-4370. downstairscabaret.com. How The Grinch Stole Christmas! The Musical. Auditorium Theatre, 885 E. Main St. Tue-Thu 7:30 p.m., Fri 8 p.m., Sat 2 & 8 p.m., Sun 1 & 6:30 p.m Varied. 2225000. mail@rbtl.org. rbtl.org. “It’s a Wonderful Life.” A Magical Journey Through Stages, Auditorium Center, 875 E. Main St. Fri 7:30 p.m., Sat 2 & 7:30 p.m., Sun 2 p.m $13 935-7173. mjtstages.com. “It’s a Wonderful Life” A Live Radio Play. Blackfriars Theatre, 795 E. Main St Through Dec 22. Fri-Sun Dec 13-15 at 8 p.m., Fri Dec 20 at 8 p.m., Sat-Sun Dec 21-22 at 2 p.m $28.50-$36.50 454-1260. bftix.org. “Mrs. Bob Cratchit’s Wild Christmas Binge.” Black Sheep Theatre, 274 N Goodman St., third floor, Studio D313. Fri-Sat Dec 6-7 and 13-14 at 7:30 p.m., Sun Dec 8 at 2 p.m $16-$20 861- 4816. “Parfumerie.” MuCCC, 142 Atlantic Ave. Through Dec 21. Fri Dec 13, 8 p.m., Sat 2 & 8 p.m., Sun 2 p.m. Thu Dec 19-Fri 8 p.m., Sat 2 & 8 p.m $15-$20 screenplaysonstage@gmail.com. muccc.org. “Relatively Speaking”. Through Dec. 22. JCC Rochester, 1200 Edgewood Ave. Through Dec 22. Sat Dec 7, 8 p.m., Sun 2 p.m. Thu Dec 12, 7 p.m., Sat 8 p.m., Sun 2 p.m., Thu Dec 19, 7 p.m., Sat 8 p.m., Sun 2 p.m $18-$26 244-0600. jcccenterstage.org. “The Santaland Diaries”. Through Dec. 22. Blackfriars Theatre, 795 E. Main St Through Dec 22. Fri-Sat Dec 14-15 at 2 p.m., Thu Dec 19 at 7:30 p.m., Fri-Sat Dec 21-22 at 8 p.m $28.50-$36.50 454-1260. bftix.org. “Shrek, the Musical.” School of the Arts, 45 Prince St. Through Dec 15. December 13 and 14 at 7 p.m., Dec 15 at 2 p.m., Dec 15 at 5 p.m $5-$9 242-7682 x1551. sotarochester.org. “Sister Strikes Again: Late Nite Catechism 2.” Geva Theatre Center, 75 Woodbury Blvd Through Dec 15. Wed Dec 11-Thu 7:30 p.m., Fri 7 p.m., Sat 2:30 & 7 p.m., Sun 3 p.m Tickets start at $38 232-4382. gevatheatre.org. “The Wizard of Oz.” Nazareth College Arts Center, 4245 East Ave. Through Dec 22. Dec 14-15, 2 p.m. Dec 20 7 p.m. Dec 2122, 2 p.m $17-$20. 389-2170. ROCChildrensTheatre@gmail. com. rochesterchildrenstheatre. org.

Theater Audition [ WED., DECEMBER 11 ] 2 Pages/2 Voices. Through Jan. 3, 2014. Writers and Books, 740 University Ave. Each play must be no more than 2 pages and contain no more than 2 characters, and include the word “fox” Submissions due January 3, 2014. Winning plays announced January 16. Performances January 27, 8 p.m wab.org.


[ MON., DECEMBER 16 ] “Arsenic & Old Lace.” 7 p.m. Ivan F. Hilfiker Auditorium, 2578 Genesee St., Geneseo. 507-5582. chrisbeyer67@gmail.com. geneseocommunityplayers.org.

LIVE MUSIC Fri & Sat

Workshops

[ FRI., DECEMBER 13 ] Family Development Class: “It’s So Much Work to Be Your Friend.” 10 a.m.-noon. Mental Health Association, 320 N Goodman St. For parents of school-age children Free, RSVP 325-3145 x131. mharochester.org. [ SAT., DECEMBER 14 ] Geneva Historical Society Costume Workshop. 10 a.m.noon. Geneva Historical Society, 543 South Main St How to create 1920s “flapper-style” accessories $20, register 315-789-5151. genevahistoricalsociety.com. [ SUN., DECEMBER 15 ] Rochester’s Rich History Series: 5th Annual Victorian Tea. 2-3 p.m. Central Library, Kate Gleason Auditorium, 115 South Ave. Free, register 428-8307. libraryweb.org. [ MON., DECEMBER 16 ] Family Development Class: “Nothing Works.” 12:30-2:30 p.m. Mental Health Association, 320 N Goodman St. For parents of children ages 5-12 Free, RSVP 325-3145 x131. mharochester.org.

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[ WED., DECEMBER 11 ] A Cornucopia of Cooking. 6-8 p.m. Cornell Cooperative Extension of Monroe County, 249 Highland Ave Dec 11: A Lighter Take on Holiday Desserts with Chef Mary Beth Brinkerhoff $30 each class, register 461-1000 x257. cce.cornell.edu/monroe. Fairy Garden. 6:30-8 p.m. Gallea’s Tropical Greenhouse, 2832 Clover St., Pittsford. Children accompanied with paying adult are free $65, register 586-3017. galleas.com. Family Development Class: “Will My Child Still Love Me?” 12:30-2:30 p.m. Mental Health Association, 320 N Goodman St. For parents of toddlers to 5-yearolds Free, RSVP 325-3145 x131. mharochester.org. Family Development Class: “Wise Choices.” Ongoing, 12:30-2:30 p.m. Mental Health Association, 320 N Goodman St. For parents of school-age children Free, RSVP 325-3245 x131. mharochester.org. Teching and Sexting. 12:30 p.m. Rochester Chapter of the Red Cross, 50 Prince St. Free 241-4400.

[ TUE., DECEMBER 17 ] Family Development Class: “You Make a Difference.” 12:30-2:30 p.m. Mental Health Association, 320 N Goodman St. For parents of children up to 5 years old Free, RSVP 325-3145 x131. mharochester.org.

GETLISTED get your event listed for free e-mail it to calendar@rochestercitynews.com. Or go online to rochestercitynewspaper.com and submit it yourself!

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 31


Movies Theaters Searchable, up-to-the-minute movie times for all area theaters can be found at rochestercitynewspaper.com, and on City’s mobile website.

Film

Brockport Strand 93 Main St, Brockport, 637-3310, rochestertheatermanagement.com

Canandaigua Theatres 3181 Townline Road, Canandaigua, 396-0110, rochestertheatermanagement.com

Cinema Theater 957 S. Clinton St., 271-1785, cinemarochester.com

Culver Ridge 16 2255 Ridge Rd E, Irondequoit  544-1140, regmovies.com

Dryden Theatre 900 East Ave., 271-3361, dryden.eastmanhouse.org

Eastview 13 Eastview Mall, Victor 425-0420, regmovies.com

Geneseo Theatres Geneseo Square Mall, 243-2691, rochestertheatermanagement.com

Greece Ridge 12 176 Greece Ridge Center Drive 225-5810, regmovies.com

Henrietta 18 525 Marketplace Drive 424-3090, regmovies.com

The Little 240 East Ave., 258-0444 thelittle.org

A different New Jersey “Out of the Furnace”

(R), DIRECTED BY SCOTT COOPER NOW PLAYING [ REVIEW ] BY GEORGE GRELLA

An odd prologue sets the tone and establishes the central subject of “Out of the Furnace.” Harlan DeGroat (Woody Harrelson), a rural drug dealer and gang leader, anonymous at that point in the film, watches a movie at a drive-in theater, complains of feeling nauseated, then when his girlfriend expresses concern, shoves a hot dog down her throat and bangs her head against the car window. When

Movies 10 2609 W. Henrietta Road 292-0303, cinemark.com

Pittsford Cinema 3349 Monroe Ave., 383-1310 pittsford.zurichcinemas.com

Tinseltown USA/IMAX 2291 Buffalo Road 247-2180, cinemark.com

Webster 12 2190 Empire Blvd., 888-262-4386, amctheatres.com

Vintage Drive In 1520 W Henrietta Rd., Avon 226-9290, vintagedrivein.com

Film Previews on page 34

another man intervenes, DeGroat beats him brutally, hops in his car, and takes off. The shocking, explosive violence and its hint of sadism run in a bloody stream throughout the picture. Set in a grimy steel town, it shows the difficult lives of a couple of young men, Russell Baze (Christian Bale) and his younger brother Rodney (Casey Affleck). Russell works at the steel mill, while Rodney, suffering posttraumatic stress after four tours of duty in Iraq, spends his time drinking and gambling, occasionally making money in bare-knuckle boxing bouts organized by the town bookie, John Petty (Willem Dafoe). The central action of the movie involves those boxing matches, the means by which Rodney hopes to pay off his gambling debts and try to make a new start. He persuades the reluctant Petty to arrange a high-stakes match in an area of rural New Jersey where DeGroat runs all the criminal activity. Because he cannot control his rage, Rodney almost wins a bout he’s supposed to

Christian Bale in “Out of the Furnace.” PHOTO COURTESY RELATIVITY MEDIA

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lose, absorbing a horrible beating in the process. After that, DeGroat exacts a vicious revenge on both Rodney and Petty. The treatment of his brother represents only one in a series of harsh blows that Russell suffers, including imprisonment for a fatal automobile accident, the death of his father, and the loss of Lena (Zoe Saldana), the woman he loves. When the police chief (Forest Whitaker) confesses his impotence to deal with the people in the Appalachian country controlled by DeGroat, Russell resolves to seek justice on his own. The picture’s plot moves in odd jumps and pauses. For instance, after Russell’s accident, with no explanation, no arrest or trial, it shows him in prison, enduring an existence only a little less cruel and brutal than the life he led before. It also depends heavily on a series of silences, interrupted occasionally by laconic dialogue and cryptic asides. The director employs a great many establishing shots — of the smoky steel mill, the shabby, cramped working-class neighborhoods, the empty countryside — to fill in the spaces in the plot and the mostly unspoken exchanges of its people. Paradoxically enhanced by its persistent darkness and understatement, the movie simply overflows with a particularly distressing brutality. Difficult to watch, the bare-knuckle boxing matches provide a kind of mirror for all the bloody beatings and shootings that intensify the picture’s overwhelming atmosphere of


Christmas stars “Black Nativity” (PG), DIRECTED BY KASI LEMMONS NOW PLAYING

“The Last Days on Mars” (PG-13), DIRECTED BY RUAIRI ROBINSON SCREENING JANUARY 4-5 AT THE DRYDEN [ REVIEW ] BY ADAM LUBITOW

bleakness and despair. Its people suffer in silence, their inner feelings emerging mostly in moments of physical pain and bloodshed. The outstanding cast meshes perfectly with the somber and depressing tone of the movie: in keeping with its action and meaning, everybody underplays with a remarkable consistency. In small roles, Forest Whitaker as the local police chief and Willem Dafoe suggest a genuine humanity within the confines of relatively limited characters. The dominant figures in the film, naturally, are the protagonist Russell Baze and his antagonist Harlan DeGroat, convincingly played by Christian Bale and Woody Harrelson. As a scary, vicious thug who clearly enjoys the hell out of hurting people, Harrelson performs with a real sense of evil. He’s a man anyone would hate, and for good reason; he makes a most acceptable villain. Christian Bale behaves with remarkable restraint and control, a totally credible portrayal of a sad, decent man who must take action against the evil world around him. Among its other revelations, “Out of the Furnace” provides a very different picture of New Jersey from the usual media images. It’s not the state of Chris Christie or Tony Soprano, but a blood-soaked slice of rural America populated by gangsters, rednecks, drug dealers and users, people cooking up meth and viewing every outsider with a leering hostility, where even the police fear to act. Not exactly the Garden State.

Every so often, movie-studio executives suddenly seem to wake up and realize that white people aren’t the only ones who go see movies, and that black audiences in particular are an underserved market. That results in periods like the current holiday season, which sees the release of a whopping three Christmas-themed releases targeted toward African-American audiences. It’s an occurrence that shouldn’t be rare in this day and age, but somehow still is. “Black Nativity” is the second film in the festive triptych (following “The Best Man Holiday” and preceding “Tyler Perry’s A Madea Christmas,” which comes out this Friday), and it boasts a cast that’s full of Oscar luminaries. Unfortunately, despite their best efforts, the film isn’t much more than a heaping helping of holiday sap.

The cast of “Black Nativity.” PHOTO COURTESY

FOX SEARCHLIGHT PICTURES

“Black Nativity” is loosely inspired by poet Langston Hughes’ 1961 play, which was a straightforward musical retelling of the classic Nativity story, with an all-black cast. The film, on the other hand, creates a plot following teenager Langston (Jacob Latimore) as he’s sent by his struggling single mother, Naima (Jennifer Hudson), to stay with his grandparents in Harlem for the holidays while she plans their next steps. Up until this point, the Reverend Cornell Cobbs (Forest Whitaker) and his wife, Aretha (Angela Bassett), haven’t played a role in their grandson’s life, and they remain cagey about what transpired between his mother and them that led to the severing of ties. But they do their best to make him feel welcome, and with their guidance Langston gradually learns the value of faith, family, and forgiveness. The film remains a musical, telling its story through a mix of gospel standards and new R&B-leaning songs by Raphael Saadiq. His songs are effective, but hardly memorable. The performances are fine for the most part. Jacob Latimore acquits himself well, in a role that’s a bit of a blank slate. Whitaker is effective as the distant Cornell, and he’s completely believable when he’s called upon to start sermonizing. Bassett is an unexpected choice as Aretha. She’s quite good, but the role is all sweet and nurturing, and doesn’t really call for any of the strength she naturally brings to any part she plays. Hudson is at her best when she’s singing, and spends the rest of her screen time looking vaguely stricken. Tyrese Gibson is charismatic as a small-time crook who crosses paths with Langston and imparts a few life lessons. The film suffers from uneven direction from Kasi Lemmons, who at this point seems to have almost completely squandered the potential shown in her directorial debut, the atmospheric 1997

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Based on the childhood experiences of narrator, writer, and radio personality Jean Shepard, the holiday trials and tribulations of Ralphie (Peter Billingsley) and the rest of the Parker clan have entertained audiences for decades. Bound and determined to convince his parents he needs a Red Ryder BB gun, he continually bucks everyone’s allegations that he’ll shoot his eye out. Along the way, he encounters bullies, a frozen flagpole mishap, a questionable lamp, and a memorable Christmas dinner. (Bob Clark, US 1983, 93 min., 35mm)

Southern Gothic fable, “Eve’s Bayou.” Her script admirably attempts to tackle some common issues facing the black community, but the result would be more effective and moving if it didn’t hinge on a contrived climax (featuring what has to be the most understanding police officer in all of New York City) that’s so silly, sappy and ham-fisted that it verges on laughable. Despite mostly skipping theaters and

receiving a quiet release on Video On Demand, I had hopes that “The Last Days On Mars” might turn out to be an undiscovered gem. It has impressive production values, an audience-friendly, sci-fi thriller premise, a talented cast including Liev Schreiber, Olivia Williams, Elias Koteas, and Tom Cullen, and received a world premiere at this year’s Cannes Film Festival. All good inidicators. And for the first 20 minutes or so, I felt confident I was right. The film takes place during the final 19 hours of the six-month Aurora Mars Mission, whose crew is searching for signs of life on the Red Planet. The opening section sets the mood effectively, with the crew isolated and antsy to get back home. But then, one of the astronauts breaks protocol to go off and investigate a “microscopic anomaly,” which turns out to be a bacteria that infects the blood and causes once-dead crew members to come back to angry, bloodthirsty life. That’s right: space zombies! From there, the film turns into another “Alien” rip-off (with a bit of the David Tennant-era “Doctor Who” episode, “The Waters of Mars,” thrown in for good measure), as the crew is picked off one by one. An “Alien” retread can be effective if done well, but director Ruairi Robinson’s incomprehensibly shot action sequences don’t help matters. The cast does what it can, but there’s only so much to be wrought from limp, clichéd genre material.

BOXCAR BERTHA Wednesday, December 18, 8 p.m. Barbara Hershey and David Carradine sizzle on screen as a pair of train-hopping outlaws in this second directorial effort from Martin Scorsese. The film follows Bertha, an orphaned farm-girl, and Big Bill Shelly, a radical union leader, as they fight against an evil railroad conglomerate and the oppressive society of the American South. Despite carrying many “low brow” hallmarks of exploitation cinema, Boxcar Bertha boldly and intelligently confronts the prominent class and racial tensions of the 1930s. (Martin Scorsese, US 1972, 88 min, 35mm)

Film Info: 271-4090 | 900 East Avenue | Eastman House Café—stop in for a light dinner or dessert before the film. | WIFI Hot Spot rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 33


Film Previews

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[ OPENING ] ANCHORMAN 2: THE LEGEND CONTINUES (PG-13): Ron Burgundy and the rest of the Channel 4 news team return, ready to take New York, and the first 24-hours news channel, by storm. Starring Will Ferrell, Paul Rudd, Steve Carell, Christina Applegate, and Kristen Wiig. Brockport, Canandaigua, Geneseo, Pittsford CAMILLE CLAUDEL, 1915 (2013): Juliette Binoche stars in this dramatic biopic of French sculptor Camille Claudel, who was confined by her family to a mental asylum for most of her life. Dryden (Sat, Dec 14, 8 p.m.) CHAMPAGNE (1928): A wealthy champagne tycoon teaches his spoiled daughter a lesson by forcing her into workingclass life in Alfred Hitchcock’s screwball-melodrama. Dryden (Thu, Dec 12, 8 p.m.) A CHRISTMAS STORY (1983): This comedy classic follows the Yuletide misadventures of a young boy named Ralphie, as he furthers his quest to get a Red Ryder BB gun for Christmas. Dryden (Fri, Dec 13, 8 p.m.; Sun, Dec 15, 2 p.m.) DEATH RACE 2000 (1975): A nationally televised auto race requires participants to mow down innocent pedestrians in this dystopian cult classic from producer Roger Corman. Starring David Carradine and Sylvester Stallone. Dryden (Wed, Dec 11, 8 p.m.) THE HOBBIT: THE DESOLATION OF SMAUG (PG-13): In the second installment of Peter Jackson’s epic trilogy, hobbit Bilbo Baggins continues his quest to help a group of dwarves reclaim their homeland, and confronts a mighty dragon in the process. Brockport, Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece, Henrietta, Pittsford, Tinseltown, Webster HOME ALONE (1990): A young boy defends his home against a pair of inept burglars after his family accidentally leaves him behind when they go on vacation. Starring Macaulay Culkin, Joe Pesci, Daniel Stern, and Catherine O’Hara. Movies 10 HOW THE GRINCH STOLE CHRISTMAS (2000): Ron Howard’s adaptation of the beloved Dr. Seuss story stars Jim Carrey as the crotchety creature with a contempt for Christmas. Little (Sat, Dec 14, 9:30 a.m. & 11 a.m.) ITALIANAMERICAN (1974): Director Martin Scorsese interviews his parents about their family history and their experiences as immigrants, moving from Sicily to New York City. Alibene (Thu, Dec 12, 6:30 p.m.) OUR NIXON (2013): This documentary examines the legacy of President Nixon through archival footage shot by his closest aides, and Watergate co-conspirators. Dryden (Tue, Dec 17, 8 p.m.)

SLEEPING BEAUTY (NR): Moscow’s Bolshoi ballet performs the popular fairy tale about a curse that befalls a young princess Little (Sun Dec 15, Noon; Tue, Dec 17, 6:30 p.m.) TYLER PERRY’S A MADEA CHRISTMAS (PG-13): Madea gets roped into helping a friend pay her daughter a visit in the country. Hijinks ensue. Starring Tyler Perry, Kathy Najimy, Chad Michael Murray, and Larry the Cable Guy. Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Greece, Tinseltown, Webster [ CONTINUING ] 12 YEARS A SLAVE (R): Chiwetel Ejiofor stars in this film based on the true story of Solomon Northup, a free black man kidnapped and sold into slavery. Also starring Michael Fassbender, Sarah Paulson, Brad Pitt, and Benedict Cumberbatch. Canandaigua, Little, Pittsford, Tinseltown THE BEST MAN HOLIDAY (R): In this follow-up to 1999’s “The Best Man,” a group of college friends reunites for Christmas after 15 years apart. Starring Taye Diggs, Morris Chestnut, Terrence Howard, Nia Long, and Sanaa Lathan. Culver, Greece, Tinseltown BLUE JASMINE (PG-13): In Woody Allen’s latest, Cate Blanchett stars as a NY socialite who returns to San Francisco to reconnect with her sister after going through a life crisis. With Alec Baldwin, Peter Sarsgaard, and Louie C.K. Tinseltown THE BOOK THIEF (PG-13): A young girl is sent to live with a foster family in WWII Germany in this adaptation of Markus Zusak’s popular novel. Starring Geoffrey Rush and Emily Watson. Canandaigua, Geneseo, Little, Pittsford, Tinseltown DALLAS BUYERS CLUB (R): Matthew Mcconaughey is earning Oscar buzz for his performance in this true story about a straight cowboy who organizes an illegal underground network to get HIV meds to patients, after he tests positive for the disease. With Jared Leto and Jennifer Garner. Little, Pittsford DELIVERY MAN (PG-13): Vince Vaughn stars as a man who learns that due to a mixup at the fertility clinic, his donations 20 years prior have resulted in him being the father of 533 children. Also starring Cobie Smulders and Chris Pratt. Culver, Eastview, Greece, Tinseltown DON JON (R): Joseph GordonLevitt makes his big screen debut as writer/director with this comedy about a ladies man who finds that real-life ladies have difficulty competing with the ones in his pornos. With Scarlett Johansson, Julianne Moore, and Tony Danza. Movies 10 FREE BIRDS (PG): In this animated adventure, two turkeys travel through time in an attempt to get their kind taken off the Thanksgiving menu for good. Starring Owen Wilson, Woody Harrelson, Amy Poehler, and George Takei. Canandaigua FROZEN (PG): A young princess goes on an epic journey to find her sister, whose powers

have trapped their kingdom in an eternal winter in this animated Disney musical. With the voices of Kristen Bell, Idina Menzel, Jonathan Groff, and Josh Gad. Brockport, Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece, Pittsford, Tinseltown GRAVITY (PG-13): Sandra Bullock and George Clooney play astronauts who becomes stranded in space after a shuttle accident, in Alfonso Cuarón’s sci-fi thriller. Cinema, Eastview, Tinseltown HOMEFRONT (R): Jason Statham stars in this stars as a retired DEA agent who moves his family to a small town, only to run afoul of a local meth druglord played by James Franco. With Winona Ryder and Kate Bosworth. Canandaigua, Culver, Greece, Tinseltown THE HUNGER GAMES: CATCHING FIRE (PG-13): The middle chapter of The Hunger Games finds an uprising against the Capitol beginning as a result of the events in the first film. Starring Jennifer Lawrence, Josh Hutcherson, Woody Harrelson, Donald Sutherland, and Philip Seymour Hoffman. Brockport, Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece, Pittsford, Tinseltown JACKASS PRESENTS: BAD GRANDPA (R): The Jackass gang is back for this hidden camera road trip movie, starring Johnny Knoxville as a very unconventional grandfather. Cinema, Culver LAST VEGAS (PG-13): Four old friends travel to Las Vegas together to throw a bachelor party for the last of them to finally get married. Starring Michael Douglas, Robert De Niro, Morgan Freeman, and Kevin Kline. Culver, Eastview, Tinseltown OUT OF THE FURNACE (R): See full review on page 32. Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece, Little, Pittsford, Tinseltown PHILOMENA (PG-13): Judi Dench stars in this drama about a journalist (Steve Coogan) who helps an elderly woman search for her son, who she was forced to put up for adoption decades earlier. Little, Pittsford PRISONERS (R): An all-star cast heads up this thriller about a group of parents who take matters into their own hands after their daughters are kidnapped. Starring Jake Gyllenhaal, Hugh Jackman, Viola Davis, Terrence Howard, Maria Bello, and Paul Dano. Movies 10 THOR: THE DARK WORLD (PG13): The heroic Norse god is back, battling to save the world from a shadowy enemy intent on its destruction. Starring Chris Hemsworth, Tom Hiddleston, Natalie Portman, Idris Elba, and Christopher Eccleston. Culver, Eastview, Greece, Tinseltown THE WIZARD OF OZ (G): The beloved classic films gets a fancy new 3D conversion, so expect a lot of winged monkeys flying at your face. Movies 10


Classifieds For information: Call us (585) 244-3329 Fax us (585) 244-1126 Mail Us City Classifieds 250 N. Goodman Street Rochester, NY 14607 Email Us classifieds@ rochester-citynews.com EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY

All real estate advertised in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act, which makes it unlawful, “to make, print, or publish, any notice, statement, or advertisement, with respect to the sale or rental of a dwelling that indicates any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin.” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under the age of 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertisement for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. Call the local Fair Housing Enforcement Project, FHEP at 325-2500 or 1-866-671-FAIR. Si usted sospecha una practica de vivienda injusta, por favor llame al servicio legal gratis. 585-325-2500 - TTY 585-325-2547.

Apartments for Rent

Shared Housing

GATES/GREECE BORDER 2BR, 1.5BA. Pleasant townhouse community. A/C, laundry hookup. Lots of closet space. Small pets ok. Available now. $700+ 451-5877

ALL AREAS - ROOMMATES. COM. Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http://www.Roommates.com.

Vacation Property

$5,000 for newer cars. www. cash4carsrochester.com 585482-2140

SEBASTIAN, FLORIDA Affordable custom factory constructed homes $45,900+, Friendly community, No Real Estate or State Income Taxes, minutes to Atlantic Ocean. 772-581-0080, www.beachcove.com. Limited seasonal rentals

Home Services MASTER CHIMNEY & MASONRY See our ad under Home and Garden Professionals. Chimney Cleaning, Masonry Repairs, Foundation Repairs, Roof Leaks, Brick Steps Repaired. 585-734-8444

Automotive AAAA AUTO RECYCLING And Fast Cash for your cars, vans and trucks. Up to $800. Free towing. Any condition. Up to

ALWAYS BETTER Higher cash for your Junk Cars, Trucks and Vans. From $200-$800 or more for newer. Running or not. With free towing. Also free removal of any unwanted model in any condition. Call 585-305-5865 CASH 4 CARS TRUCKS AND VANS. Up to $800 running or not, more for newer models. We’ll be there in 30 minutes. 585-482-9988 www. cash4carsrochester.com HARLEY DAVIDSON 2006 ULTRA CLASSIC EXCELLENT CONDITION 15,000 miles asking $10,000 716-440-0880

Auctions AUCTIONS: Buy or sell at AARauctions.com. Contents of homes, businesses, vehicles and real estate. Bid NOW! AARauctions.com Lights, Camera, Auction. No longer the best kept secret.

We placed an ad in City Newspaper advertising the availability of two office suites in my office building at 55 Canterbury Road in the City. The response was excellent. One of the two available spaces was leased within days, and we have active interest in the other space.” - DOUGLAS C. BURKHARDT, FIRST REALTY COMPANY

For Sale

wood. (says, beware!) Nice gift $20.00 585-880-2903

BABY STROLLER $7 585-4905870

KITCHEN TABLE Round, glass. 41” diameter 31”t all with chrome frame $49 585-4905870

BEANIE BABIES (TY) 1997, 1998 Light blue Elephant (Peanuts), Twigs, Squealer, Iggy and Rainbow with the mixed up name tags. & more! $4 - $8 585-880-2903 All $49.99 BOOK CASE dark mahogany 30” wide, 71” tall, 12” deep, 5 shelves $49 585-490-5870 DOG & CAT HOUSES Kennels, porch steps, do it yourself kits. Quick assembly 585-752-1000 $49 Jim EXERCISE BIKE Heavy duty excellent condition $42 585490-5870

LARGE JEWELRY COLLECTION All kinds, old & new, retro, vintage, cameo’s, brooches, beads & more. Great pieces for jewelry designers too, 585360-2895 MODEL CARS Classic 58, 59 & 60 Chevys. Dealer promotional cars, convertibles and hardtops. $21.00 each Call Jim 585-663-6082 PORCELAIN FIGURINE (German Shepherd) for 50’s or 60’s $25 585-880-2903

continues on page 36

GERMAN SHEPHERD sign on chain. Carved head on real

TO ADVERTISE IN OUR

HOME & GARDEN PROFESSIONALS SECTION

CALL CHRISTINE AT

244.3329 x23 OR EMAIL

CHRISTINE@ROCHESTER-CITYNEWS.COM SEE PAGE 36 OF THIS WEEK’S ISSUE

www.firstrealtyrochester.com

Find your way home with TO ADVERTISE CONTACT CHRISTINE TODAY!

CALL 244-3329 X23 OR EMAIL CHRISTINE@ROCHESTER-CITYNEWS.COM

181 Mount Vernon Ave. Great Charming Little Victorian. Large Lot, Garage, Garden. 2bdrm, 1ba. Updated Kitchen, HW floors throughout, Fresh paint throughout. Wood-burning stove. Basement has high ceiling, can be used as workshop/studio. Walking distance to Highland Park. $119,900

1481 Bushwood Circle, Webster:

$389,900, 5 beds, 3.5 baths, 2890 ft2, 2.5 car garage, in-law apt, in-ground pool, treed yard with a stream, etc.... A must see - Call Ryan @ 585-201-0724, Re/Max Realty Group 218-6802.

Ryan Smith 585-201-0724

Prudential Discover Real Estate Jeannine Meilman 585-503-5968

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rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 35


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Basement Remodeling Bathrooms Kitchens Additions Windows Siding Decks Fireplaces Painting 585-313-1940 brian54@rochester.rr.com Brian Donovan

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585-244-3329 ext. 23

36 CITY DECEMBER 11-17, 2013

> page 35 USED TV FOR SALE —Sharp 13” Color with remote. 14 years young with remote. $20 cash and carry. Message phone Mary 585/413-0827 WOODEN HANGERS FOR COATS: 12 wood hangers for coats. 12 wood, 2 plastic 1 for hanging pants. All $15 585880-2903

Jam Section

any level & any age ok. I play keyboards - organ B3 Style Call 585-266-6337 Martino NEEDED MULTI INSTRUMENT MUSICIANS Bass, guitars, keys, horns. Must have equipt. & transportation & be avail. evenings. Bobby 585-328-4121 THE GREGORY KUNDE CHORALE is looking for male voices. Call for an audition now to join our fourteenth season! Info Line 377 7568 or visit our website www. gregorykundechorale.org

CALLING ALL MUSICIANS OF ALL GENRES the Rochester Music Coalition wants you! Please register on our website. For further info: www. rochestermusiccoalition.org info@rochestermusiccoalition. org 585-235-8412

VOCALIST that can lead & background with other vocalists that do the same. Avail evenings, transportation, R & B, Funk, Jazz, Pop, Blues......Bobby 585-328-4121 Experienced please.

KEYBOARD PLAYER needed to play with one of Rochester’s finest Big Bands. Great charts able to rehearse a few Weds. during the months of (April-November) effective 04/15/2014 585-442-7480

Music Services

MEET OTHER MUSICIANS. Jam & Play out, call & say hello,

PIANO LESSIONS In your home or mine. Patient, experienced instructor teaching all ages, levels and musical styles. Call


Place your real estate ad by calling 244-3329 ext. 23 or rochestercitynewspaper.com Ad Deadlines: Friday 4pm for Display Ads Monday at noon for Line ads Scott: 585- 465-0219. Visit www.scottwrightmusic.com

Miscellaneous DONATE YOUR CAR to Wheels For Wishes, benefiting MakeA-Wish. We offer free towing and your donation is 100% tax deductible. Call 917-336-1254 Today! HAS YOU BUILDING SHIFTED OR SETTLED? Contact Woodford Brothers Inc, for straightening, leveling, foundation and wood frame repairs at 1-800-OLDBARN. www.woodfordbros. com. “Not applicable in Queens county” SAWMILLS from only $4897.00- MAKE & SAVE MONEY with your own bandmillCut lumber any dimension. In

stock ready to ship. FREE Info/ DVD:  www.NorwoodSawmills. com 1-800-578-1363 Ext.300N

Looking For... FREE YARN NEEDED! Please donate your yarn to Sunday Circle knitting hats scarves and mittens for the poor. Arrange pickup. Call and leave message 585/413-0827

Pets WANTED: SMALL BLACK DOG, female, poodle mix, for adoption Looking for new companion. Call 585-865-9779

HomeWork A cooperative effort of City Newspaper and RochesterCityLiving, a program of the Landmark Society.

Wanted to Buy CASH FOR COINS! Buying ALL Gold & Silver. Also Stamps & Paper Money, Entire Collections, Estates. Travel to your home. Call Marc in NYC 1-800-9593419

Welcome to Corn Hill’s Greenwood Street

K-D Moving & Storage 15 Greenwood Street Inc. Located on the banks of the Genesee, with the downtown skyline just overhead is Rochester’s oldest residential neighborhood: the Third Ward, otherwise known today as the Corn Hill neighborhood.

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473-6610 or 473-4357 23 Arlington St. NY D.O.T.#9657

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MIND BODY SPIRIT

THINK • MOVE • BREATHE DANCE • HEAL • SEARCH STRETCH • STENGHTHEN

TO ADVERTISE CALL CHRISTINE AT 244.3329 x23 See Page 23 of this week’s issue

Made up of a diverse community of over 2,000 neighbors, the urban village looks quite different than it did in the mid-1960s. With the construction of I-490 cutting through the north portion of Corn Hill, urban renewal threatened to take what was left of the neighborhood. Thanks to a handful of passionate neighbors who formed a neighborhood association, their efforts preserved what has become one of Rochester’s most thriving neighborhoods. The freshly painted stucco-clad cottage at 15 Greenwood Street is a charmer of a home. Thought to have initially been built around 1870 as a multiple-family residence, today it functions as a spacious yet intimate single family home. Loosely considered a “shotgun” layout, the home wastes little of its 1,632 square feet with unused space. The front entry opens to stairs, with the living room/parlor to the left. Just beyond the living room is the large dining room. Two double-hung windows allow for plenty of light. And one of the two porches is off the dining room—a wonderful outdoor sitting area! Left of the dining room is a room that’s currently used as an office, but could also function as a den or additional bedroom. And beyond the dining room is the spacious kitchen, complete with a morning room that could easily transition into additional workspace and an enviable half

bath. Off the kitchen is a rear door to a private backyard patio and garden. The second floor landing is gracious in size and features entry to the second porch. To the front of the house is the master bedroom, with a private full bath. To the rear of the home is the second bedroom and full bath, easily separated to become your very own guest suite. The new owner needn’t worry about updates that bog new home buyers down: the furnace, roof and central air conditioning have recently been updated. The basement even has a custom temperature-controlled wine cellar! In addition to the wonderful pedestrian-friendly sidewalks and a variety of Victorian mansions sharing lot lines with working-class cottages, the Corn Hill neighborhood is famous for its two annual events – the Corn Hill Arts Festival in July and the Holiday Tour of Homes in December. The active neighborhood association (www.cornhill.org) ensures a tightlywoven community and access to downtown and Corn Hill Landing is just steps away. 15 Greenwood recently received a price reduction, now listed at $160,000. For additional information, contact Cindy Blair of Magellan, Inc. at 585-802-8022. by Jason Roberts Jason is chair of The Landmark Society’s annual House & Garden Tour and major-domo of the Good Home Steward, found at facebook. com/GoodHomeSteward.

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 37


CITY NEWSPAPER’S

Rochester Worships 2013 Mary Magdalene Church 1008 Main Street, East Rochester, NY 14445

Christmas Eve Mass Schedule:

4:00 Family Mass with Navity Play

Regular Sunday Mass Schedule 10:00 am Sunday morning

Mary Magdalene Church is an inclusive church in the Catholic Tradi on. All are Welcome to Our Communion Table and to full par cipa on in sacramental life.

Like us on Facebook!

Rev Denise Donato: revdonatod@gmail.com marymagdalenechurch.org

The Spiritualist Church of Divine Inspiration Holiday ServiceSchedule: Christmas Service Sunday, December 15, 2013 - 10:30 AM (Bring A Dish to Pass) New Years Eve Service Burning and Releasing Ceremony Tuesday, December 31, 2013 7:00 PM Tile Ceremony

(Affirming Our Intentions for the New Year)

Sunday, January 5, 2014 - 10:30 AM

27 Appleton Street Rochester, NY 14611 585-328-8908 www.churchofdivineinspiration.com 38 CITY DECEMBER 11-17, 2013


CITY NEWSPAPER’S

Rochester Worships 2013

Legal Ads [ LEGAL NOTICE ] Shorewater Group V, LLC (“LLC”) filed Arts. of Org. with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on November 13, 2013. Office Location: Monroe County. SSNY designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 1761 S.E. 7th Street, Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33316. Purpose: any lawful activity.

A spirit of joy, A place of welcome

Christmas Eve 7pm

Children’s Time | Choir Anthems | Carols by Candlelight

[ LEGAL NOTICE ] Shorewater Group VI, LLC (“LLC”) filed Arts. of Org. with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on November 13, 2013. Office Location: Monroe County. SSNY designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 1761 S.E. 7th Street, Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33316. Purpose: any lawful activity.

121 N. Fitzhugh St. | 585.325.4000 | downtownpresbyterian.org

THERE’S A PLACE FOR YOU AT... 25 Westminster Road Rochester NY 14607

across from Eastman House

585-271-2240 www.stpaulsec.org

[ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of PARAGON MARINE LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/28/13. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 303 Colorado Dr., Webster, NY 14580. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity.

COME TO OUR HOUSE FOR CHRISTMAS!

THE SIGHTS, THE SOUNDS, THE CELEBRATION CHRISTMAS EVE December 24th Children’s Service & Holy Communion, 3:30 p.m. Family Service & Holy Communion, 5:30 p.m. (Child care available) Christmas Carols & Anthems, 10:30 p.m. Festive Holy Communion, 11 p.m. CHRISTMAS DAY December 25th • Carols & Holy Communion, 10 a.m. FIRST SUNDAY OF CHRISTMAS December 29th • Lessons & Carols & Holy Communion, 10 a.m.

[ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of PAZ GROUP, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/12/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Corporation Service Co., 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207, regd. agent upon whom and at which process may be served. Purpose: Any lawful activity.

Join us for Worship every Sunday at 8 & 10 a.m.

with your Presbyterian neighbors Calvary St. Andrews Presbyterian Parish

68 Ashland St Rochester 14620 585.325.4950 calvarystandrews.org In the heart of the South Wedge Christmas Eve 7:00pm Joyous Christmas Pageant and Communion 9:00pm Candlelight Christmas Lessons & Carols Christmas Day 10:00am Celebration Communion

Dewey Avenue Presbyterian Church

2009 Dewey Ave, Rochester 14615 (in the chapel of Wesley United Methodist Church) 585.254.1140 • www.dapconline.org Christmas Eve 6:00pm Potluck 7:30pm Lessons and Carols

Brighton Presbyterian Church

1775 East Ave, Rochester 14610 585.473.5876 • Brightonpresby.org Christmas Eve 6:00pm Candlelight Service

Laurelton United Presbyterian Church

335 Helendale Rd, Rochester 14609 585.482.9200 Christmas Eve 7:00pm Candlelight Service Downtown Presbyterian Church Dec. 21-22 6:30-8:30pm 121 N Fitzhugh St, Rochester 14614 Live manger on front lawn of 585.325.4000 church with live animals. Join us for www.downtownpresbyterian.org holiday goodies & refreshments Christmas Eve 7:00pm Carols, Chancel Choir, Children’s Time, Trinity Emmanuel Candlelighting 9 Shelter Street, Rochester 14611 Lakeside Presbyterian Church 585.235.5967 75 Stutson St, Rochester 14612 Advent Vespers: Dec. 11 & 18 585.663.0644 (Communion) 6:30pm Christmas Eve Christmas Cantata Dec. 15, 11am 7:30pm Candle Lighting Service with Webster Presbyterian Church New Life Presbyterian Church & Webster Church of God By Faith 243 Rosedale St, Rochester 14620 New Year’s Eve Watchnight 585.473.1240 Service for Peace in the City 11pm Christmas Eve 7:00pm Candle Lighting Service

Third Presbyterian Church

4 Meigs Street, Rochester, 14607 585.271.6513 www.thirdpresbyterian.org Christmas Eve 4:30pm Festival of the Nativity 8:00pm Communion Service 11:00pm Lessons and Carols broadcast on 91.5 FM and WXXI.org

South Presbyterian Church

4 E Henrietta Rd, Rochester 14620 585.271.5078 • SouthPC.org In the heart of Collegetown Christmas Eve 7:00pm Candlelight Celebration, Carols & Communion Noonday Prayer Service Tuesdays 12:15-12:45

Rochester, NY 14615. Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Golden View Ranch, LLC, Arts of Org filed with SSNY on 11/13/13. Off. Loc.: Monroe County, SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to: The LLC, 2888 SwedenWalker Rd., Brockport, NY 14626. Purpose: to engage in any lawful act. [ NOTICE ] H&H Automotive, LLC (LLC) filed Arts. of Org. with NY Secy. of State (SS) on 4/15/2013. LLC’s office is in Monroe Co. SS is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS will mail a copy of any process to LLC’s principal business location at 358 Lighthouse Rd., Hilton, NY 14468. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Home Pros Contracting, LLC was filed with SSNY on September 25, 2013. Office: Monroe County, SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. P.O. address which SSNY shall mail any process against the LLC served upon SSNY: Home Pros Contracting, LLC, PO Box 24913, Rochester, New York 14624. Purpose is to engage in any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Mister Cat Records LLC (LLC) filed Arts. of Org. with NY Secy. of State (SS) on 1/8/2013. LLC’s office is in Monroe Co. SS is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS will mail a copy of any process to LLC’s principal business location at PO Box 25622, Rochester, NY 14625. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity.

[ NOTICE ]

[ NOTICE ]

57 ERIE, LLC, a domestic LLC, filed with the SSNY on 11/12/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to The LLC, 39 State St., Brockport, NY 14420. General Purpose.

Name of Foreign LLC: D K Pinnakle Enterprises LLC. Auth. filed with NY Dept. of State: 9/25/13. Office loc.: Monroe Co. LLC formed in MI: 6/27/13. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o Business Filings Inc., 187 Wolf Rd., Ste. 101, Albany, NY 12205. MI addr. of LLC: 5281 Silverstone Dr., Comstock Park, MI 49321. Cert. of Org. filed with Director, Dept. of Licensing & Regulatory Affairs, PO Box 30054, Lansing, MI 48909. Purpose: any lawful act.

[ NOTICE ] 7MASS DEVELOPMENT, LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 8/21/13. Office in Monroe Co. SSNY design. Agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to The LLC 314 Knickerbocker Ave

cont. on page 41

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 39


I’m very pleased with the calls I got from our apartment rental ads, and will continue running them. Your readers respond — positively!” - M. Smith, Residential Management

EMPLOYMENT / CAREER TRAINING Employment

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NY FIELD SERVICES Is currently looking for Field Inspectors to cover Monroe County. Qualifications: Professional Appearance - Good Work ethic - Well organized - Clean Background. You Must Have The Following: Reliable Vehicle/Laptop w/ Wireless Internet at Home/GPS/

EARN $500 A DAY Airbrush & Media Makeup Artists For: Ads - TV - Film - Fashion Train & Build Portfolio in 1 week.

Digital Camera/iPhone, iPad or iPod Please call Lauren: 631.698.0505 x203 or email: recruiting@nyfieldservices.com PAID IN ADVANCE!!! Make up to $1000 a week mailing brochures from home! Helping home workers since 2001! Genuine opportunity! No experience required. Start immediately! www.processbrochures.com (AAN CAN)

Hiring? GET THE RESULTS YOU NEED AT ABOUT HALF THE PRICE OF OTHER PAPERS!

SEEKING PTs, PTAs, OTs, COTAs and SLPs to work in SNF settings for full-time, part-time and per diem positions. Submit resumes & salary requirements to careers@betterhealthcare. com SKILLED SEAMSTRESS Are you a skilled seamstress wanting to work from home? To Your Measure needs you to make and tailor women’s custom pants. Call (585)473-6023 or email info@ToYourMeasure.com

Volunteers BECOME A DOCENT at the Rochester Museum & Science Center Must be an enthusiastic

communicator, Like working with children. Learn more at http://www.rmsc.org/Support/ Volunteer Or call 585-6971948 BRIGHTEN A LIFE. Lifespan’s The Senior Connection program needs people 55+ to volunteer to make 2 friendly phone calls / 2 visits each month to an older adult Call Katie 585-244-8400 x 152 FOSTER PARENTS WANTED! Monroe County is looking for adults age 21 and over to consider opening their homes to foster children. Call 334-9096 or visit www. MonroeFosterCare.org.

To advertise in our

EMPLOYMENT SECTION call Christine at

244-3329 ext. 23 today!

CITY

HABITAT FOR CATS — Help Trap-Neuter-Return cats on Tuesdays, in East Rochester, for an important grant project. Impact the number of ownerless cats living outside. All training provided. 585-7874209 or habitat4cats@yahoo. com! HERITAGE CHRISTIAN STABLES, a therapeutic horsemanship program for children and adults with developmental disabilities, is looking for volunteers to serve as horse leaders and side walkers. Call Kim Kennedy at (585) 3402016 or email kkennedy@ heritagechristianservices.org LITERACY VOLUNTEERS OF ROCHESTER needs adult tutors to help adults who are waiting to improve their reading, writing, English speaking, or math skills. Call 473-3030, or check our website at www. literacyrochester.org SCHOOL #12 999 South Ave. is looking for reading & math volunteers, English & Spanish. Training provided. Call Vicki 585-461-4282 ST. JOSEPH’S HOUSE invites volunteers to live and work at our soup kitchen/shelter. This is essential, rewarding, hard work. Call Tim @ 314-1962

Business Opportunities START A HOME BASED BUSINESS. Part-time or FullTime. Serious inquires only. 585-271-3243

Career Training

Altec has TECHNICIAN OPENINGS to repair mobile hydraulic aerial equipment at customer sites. Work from home with company service vehicle. Exp required in same or related field (ex. aerials, tractors, cranes, dozers, GSE). Stable company with 80+ years of success. Apply at www.altec.com or send resume to hrrecruiter@altec.com or call 205-307-2083.

40 CITY DECEMBER 11-17, 2013

AIRLINE CAREERS- begin here - Get trained as FAA certified Aviation Technician. Housing and Financial aid for qualified students. Job placement assistance. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance 877492-3059 (AAN CAN)


Legal Ads > page 39 [ NOTICE ] Not.of Form. of 2Hearts Desire, LLC. Art. of Org. filed with SSNY on 1022-2013. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to: C/O 2Hearts Desire ,LLC, 33 Starwood Dr, Rochester, NY 14625. Purpose:any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice is hereby given that a license, number not yet assigned, for a beer & wine license has been applied for by HOAGIE’S DELI-PIZZA INC dba, Hoagie’s DeliPizza,1615 Scottsville Rd., Rochester, NY 14624, County of Monroe, Town of Chili for a restaurant. [ NOTICE ] Notice is hereby given that a license, number not yet assigned, for a full on premise beer, wine & liquor license has been applied for by TarNick Inc. dba Bluewater Seafood & Steakhouse, 716. East Ridge Road, Rochester, NY 14621, County of Monroe, for a restaurant. [ NOTICE ] Notice is hereby given that a license, number not yet assigned, for a full on premise beer, wine and liquor license has been applied for by THE ANGRY GOAT PUB, INC dba, The Angry Goat Pub, 938 Clinton Ave. S., Rochester, NY 14620, County of Monroe, City of Rochester for a bar/ restaurant. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Jorgen LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 10/3/2013. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 95 Alton Way, West Henrietta, NY 14586. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Luxe Rust LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) October 3,2013. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 30 Shadow Pines Dr. Penfield, NY 14526 . Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of 33 Birch Crescent, LLC

Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) on October 21, 2013. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 63 Belmont St. Rochester, New York . Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of 921 PPR, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/12/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 7450 Pittsford Palmyra Rd., Fairport, NY 14450. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of AL’S MAINTENANCE LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/28/2013. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 328 Jordan Ave., Rochester, NY 14606. Purpose: any lawful act. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Aurora Research & Consulting, LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 10/10/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 34 Still Pond Way W. Henrietta NY 14586. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of BRICK ROAD LLC, filed with the Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/8/2013, County office location: Monroe, SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to The LLC, 34 Solmar Drive, Rochester, NY 14624. Purposes: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of CORRECTIVE DYNAMICS LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/16/2013. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 3177 Latta Rd., #113, Rochester, NY 14612. Purpose: any lawful act.

[ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of DR. MICHAEL BANG, DDS, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/02/13. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of PLLC: 2300 Buffalo Rd., Ste. 300, Rochester, NY 14624. SSNY designated as agent of PLLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the PLLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Dentistry. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of East Henrietta 2755, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State on 11/22/13. Office location: Monroe County. Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: 590 Salt Rd., Suite 5, Webster, NY 14580, principal business address. Purpose: all lawful purposes. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of EJE Newcomb LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State on 10/31/13. Office location: Monroe County. Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: Michael A. Newcomb, 4 Schoen Place, Pittsford, NY 14534, principal business address. Purpose: all lawful purposes. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of JML HOUSING, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/31/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 16 Ericsson Street, Rochester, NY 14610. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ]

agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of Life Script Mental Health Counseling Services. PLLC. Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 09/16/2013. Office Location: Monroe County. Principle office of PLLC: 202 Dickinson Road, Webster, NY 14580. United States Corporation Agents, Inc (7014 13th Ave. Brooklyn, NY 12228) designated agent of PLLC upon whom process against it may be served. Registered agent shall mail process to the PLLC at the address of its principle office. Purpose: Mental Health Counseling. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of LIFE SOLUTIONS PSYCHOTHERAPY LCSW, PLLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 08/15/13. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of PLLC: 559 MacIntosh Dr., Rochester, NY 14626. SSNY designated as agent of PLLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the PLLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of limited liability company (LLC). Name: S.A. EDWARDS PROPERTIES LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Sec. of State of N.Y. (SSNY) on October 11, 2013. Office location: Monroe. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to: The LLC, 61 East Street, Fairport, New York 14450. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ]

Notice of Formation of K Holdings, LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 10/15/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 333 Hollenbeck St., Rochester, NY 14621. Purpose: any lawful activities.

Notice of Formation of Michael A. Guarino, Attorney At Law PLLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 10/22/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of PLLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 108 Triple Diamond Way, Webster, NY 14580. Purpose: to practice the profession of Law.

[ NOTICE ]

[ NOTICE ]

Notice of Formation of LAWRENCE PARK, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/26/13. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 7 Lawrence St., Rochester, NY 14607. SSNY designated as

Notice of Formation of MLS HOLDINGS, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/1/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail

process to: The LLC, c/o Sammy Feldman, 3445 Winton Place, Ste. 228, Rochester, NY 14623. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of MVPS PRODUCTIONS, LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 7/31/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 18 Helmsford Way, Penfield, NY 14526. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of North Ridge 405, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State on 11/22/13. Office location: Monroe County. Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: 590 Salt Rd., Suite 5, Webster, NY 14580, principal business address. Purpose: all lawful purposes. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Northpoint Automotive & Marine, LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 11/13/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 70 Cliff St., Rochester, NY 14608. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Rabbit Moon LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 11/27/2013. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 99 Van Voorhis Ave. Rochester NY 14617 Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Ridge Road 5247, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State on 11/22/13. Office location: Monroe County. Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: 590 Salt Rd., Suite 5, Webster, NY 14580, principal business address. Purpose: all lawful purposes. [ NOTICE ] NOTICE OF FORMATION of Ridgewood Medical Health, PLLC (“PLLC”) Art. of Org. filed with NY Secretary of State (“NYSOS”) on 9/30/2013, pursuant to Limited Liability Company Law

Section 1203. Office location: Monroe County. NYSOS designated as agent for PLLC upon whom process against it may be served. NYSOS shall mail copy of process served to: 2081 W Ridge Rd Ste 205, Rochester, NY 14626. Purpose: Medicine and any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of SIBLEY REDEVELOPMENT PHASE III LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/29/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: National Corporate Research, Ltd., 10 E. 40th St., 10th Fl., NY, NY 10016, the registered agent upon whom process may be served. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of SIBLEY REDEVELOPMENT PHASE IV LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/29/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: National Corporate Research, Ltd., 10 E. 40th St., 10th Fl., NY, NY 10016, the registered agent upon whom process may be served. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of SNIDERMANS LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/30/13. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 519 Joseph Ave., Rochester, NY 14605. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of SOLOMON’S CHOICE, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/08/13. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 1769 Redman Rd., Hamlin, NY 14464. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Stone Street Pub, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed

with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/13/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, c/o Sammy Feldman, 3445 Winton Place, Ste. 228, Rochester, NY 14623. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of TEMIDA, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/4/13. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 1146 Pittsford Mendon Center Road, Honeoye Falls, NY 14472. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Tipping Point Communications, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/6/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 277 Alexander Street, Rochester, NY 14607. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Upstate Wireless Communications, LLC Arts. Of Org. filed with Sec’y of State (SSNY) on 08/22/23. Office Location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to LLC’s principal business location at 268 Sandringham Rd, Rochester, NY 14610. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Westfall Management LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/23/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 630 East Ave., Rochester, NY 14607. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of Rochester Rattlers, LLC. Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 11/14/13. Office location: Monroe County. LLC formed in MA on

11/12/13. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. MA and principal business address: 20 Guest St., Boston, MA 02135. Cert. of Org. filed with MA Sec. of the Commonwealth, One Ashburton Pl., 17th Fl., Boston, MA 02108. Purpose: all lawful purposes. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of Unither Manufacturing LLC. Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 9/23/13. Office location: Monroe County. LLC formed in DE on 5/23/13. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011. DE address of LLC: c/o The Corporation Trust Co., 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. [ NOTICE ] of Formation of Ontario Properties of NY LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 10/28/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 1456 E River Rd Rochester, NY 14623. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Paul Novak Media LLC (LLC) filed Arts. of Org. with NY Secy. of State (SS) on 1/2/2013. LLC’s office is in Monroe Co. SS is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS will mail a copy of any process to LLC’s principal business location at 651 Cumberland Way, Webster, NY 14580. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] PROCTOR ROAD INVESTMENTS LLC App. for Auth. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 3/26/2012. LLC was organized in DE on 12/19/2011. Office in Monroe Co. SSNY desig. as agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY to mail copy of process to 2255 Lyell Ave., Ste. 201, Rochester, NY 14606. Required office at 874 Walker Rd., Ste. C, Dover, DE 19904. Cert. of Org. filed with SSDE, 401 Federal St., Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: Any lawful purpose.

cont. on page 42

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 41


Legal Ads > page 41 [ NOTICE ] PROPARARE LLC App. for Auth. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 11/6/2013 LLC was organized in DE on 4/9/2012. Office in Monroe Co. SSNY desig. as agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY to mail copy of process to 2255 Lyell Ave., Rochester, NY 14606. Required office at 1201 Orange St., Ste. 600, Wilmington, DE 19801. Cert. of Org. filed with SSDE, 401 Federal St., Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: Any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] PSD, LLC has filed articles of organization with the New York Secretary of State on November 19, 2013. Its principal place of business is located at 768 Clinton Avenue South, Rochester, New York in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent upon whom process may be served. A copy of any process shall be mailed to 768 Clinton Avenue South, Rochester, New York 14620-1402. The purpose of the LLC is to engage in any lawful activity for which Limited

Liability Companies may be organized under Section 203 of the New York Limited Liability Company Law. [ NOTICE ] THE GROOMER’S OUTLET, LLC, a domestic LLC, filed with the SSNY on 9/11/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to The LLC, Attn: LLC Manager, 3160 E. Henrietta Rd., Henrietta, NY 14460. General Purpose. [ NOTICE ] UMO PROPERTIES LLC filed Articles of Organization with the New York Department of State on 9/27/13. Its office is located in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent of the Company upon whom process against it may be served and a copy of any process shall be mailed to 620 Park Ave #190 Rochester, New York 14607. The purpose of the Company is any lawful business. [ NOTICE ] Wicked Good Sugar LLC filed Arts. of Org. with Sec’y of State (SSNY) on

October 23, 2013. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of any process to P.O. Box 354, Penfield, NY 14526. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] WMH, LLC, a domestic LLC, filed with the SSNY on 10/24/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to The LLC, 2280 E. Ave., Rochester, NY 14610. General Purpose. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] Notice of Formation of Fred’s Auto Repair, LLC. Articles of Organization filed with Secy. Of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/4/2013. Office location: Monroe County SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to principal business location: The LLC, 9 Oakwood Lane, Scottsville, NY 14546. Purpose: any lawful activity

Adult Services

[ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF BTMPM, LLC ] BTMPM, LLC (the “LLC”) filed Articles of Organization with NY Secretary of State (SSNY) 11/22/13. Office location: Monroe County, NY. Principal business location: 1265 Scottsville Rd, Rochester, NY 14624. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to CT Corporation System, 111 Eighth Avenue, NY, NY 10011 which is also the registered agent upon whom process may be served. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY ] The name of the Limited Liability Company (LLC) is CERC-MS Properties, LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (“SSNY”) on November 22, 2013. Office location is Monroe County, New York. The SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. The SSNY shall mail a copy of any process to the LLC at 16 E. Main St., Suite 420, Rochester, NY 14614. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY ] The name of the Limited Liability Company (LLC) is CERC-LW Properties, LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (“SSNY”) on November 22, 2013. Office location is Monroe County, New York. The SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. The SSNY shall mail a copy of any process to the LLC at 16 E. Main St., Suite 420, Rochester, NY 14614. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY ] The name of the Limited Liability Company (LLC) is CERC-TL Properties, LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (“SSNY”) on November 22, 2013. Office location is Monroe County, New York. The SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon

42 CITY DECEMBER 11-17, 2013

whom process against it may be served. The SSNY shall mail a copy of any process to the LLC at 16 E. Main St., Suite 420, Rochester, NY 14614. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY ] The name of the Limited Liability Company (LLC) is CERC-HL Properties, LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (“SSNY”) on November 22, 2013. Office location is Monroe County, New York. The SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. The SSNY shall mail a copy of any process to the LLC at 16 E. Main St., Suite 420, Rochester, NY 14614. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY ] The name of the Limited Liability Company (LLC) is CERC-DH Properties, LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (“SSNY”) on November 22, 2013. Office location is Monroe County, New York. The SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. The SSNY shall mail a copy of any process to the LLC at 16 E. Main St., Suite 420, Rochester, NY 14614. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY ] The name of the Limited Liability Company (LLC) is CERC-2L Properties, LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (“SSNY”) on November 22, 2013. Office location is Monroe County, New York. The SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. The SSNY shall mail a copy of any process to the LLC at 16 E. Main St., Suite 420, Rochester, NY 14614. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LLC ] East Ridge CDE Properties, LLC has filed articles of organization with the New York Secretary of State on November 27, 2013 with an effective date of

formation of November 27, 2013. Its principal place of business is located at 27 Center Crossing, Fairport, New York in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent upon whom process may be served. A copy of any process shall be mailed to 27 Center Crossing, Fairport, New York 14450. The purpose of the LLC is to engage in any lawful activity for which Limited Liability Companies may be organized under Section 203 of the New York Limited Liability Company Law. [ Notice of Formation of NORTON AUTOMOTIVE CENTER, LLC ] Art. of Organization filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 10/08/13. Office of location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent if LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to: 45 Exchange Blvd. Ste 713, Rochester, NY 14614 . Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF Roc Rooms & Rentals LLC ] Articles of Organization with Secretary of State of NY on 4/30/2008. Office in Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC at 1048 South Ave, Rochester, NY 14620. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE OF SALE ] Index No. 2013-2055 SUPREME COURT STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF MONROE ESL Federal Credit Union Plaintiff, vs. Estate of Ronald J. Nothnagle, Peter J. Nothnagle, as Executor and Individually; Suzanne Steiner; People of the State of New York; United States of America, Defendants. Pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale dated November 8, 2013 and entered herein, I, the undersigned, the Referee in said Judgment named, will sell at public auction in the front vestibule of the Monroe County Office Building, 39 West Main Street, Rochester, New York, County of Monroe, on January 8, 2014 at 10:30 a.m., on that day, the premises directed by said Judgment to be sold and therein described as follows: ALL THAT TRACT OR PARCEL OF LAND, situate in the Town of Webster, County of Monroe and State of New York, known as 261 Park Lane Drive, Webster, NY 14580; Tax

Account No. 078.06-271 described in Deed recorded in Liber 9177 of Deeds, page 529. Said premises are sold subject to any state of facts an accurate survey may show, zoning restrictions and any amendments thereto, covenants, restrictions, agreements, reservations, and easements of record and prior liens, if any, municipal departmental violations, and such other provisions as may be set forth in the Complaint and Judgment filed in this action. Judgment amount: $68,605.32 plus, but not limited to, costs, disbursements, attorney fees and additional allowance, if any, all with legal interest. DATED: November 2013 Todd J. W. Wisner, Esq., Referee LACY KATZEN LLP Attorneys for Plaintiff 130 East Main Street Rochester, New York 14604 Telephone: (585) 324-5767 [ NOTICE OF SALE ] Index No. 2013-6629 SUPREME COURT STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF MONROE ESL Federal Credit Union, Plaintiff vs. Rodney B. Malone; Royce Malone; Amanda Malone, Defendants. Pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale dated November 12, 2013 and entered herein, I, the undersigned, the Referee in said Judgment named, will sell at public auction in the lobby of the Monroe County Clerk’s Office located at 39 West Main Street, Rochester, New York, County of Monroe, on January 14, 2014 at 11:00 a.m., on that day, the premises directed by said Judgment to be sold and therein described as follows: ALL THAT TRACT OR PARCEL OF LAND, situate in the Town/Village of East Rochester, County of Monroe and State of New York, known as 322 East Elm Street, East Rochester, NY 14445; Tax Account No. 152.231-49, described in Deed recorded in Liber 10613 Page 502; lot size 40 x 121.Said premises are sold subject to any state of facts an accurate survey may show, zoning restrictions and any amendments thereto, covenants, restrictions, agreements, reservations, and easements of record and prior liens, if any, municipal departmental violations, and such other provisions as may be set forth in the Complaint and Judgment filed in this action. Judgment amount: $96,147.49 plus, but not limited to, costs, disbursements, attorney fees and additional allowance, if any, all with legal interest. DATED: November 2013

Daniel Mastrella, Esq., Referee LACY KATZEN LLP Attorneys for Plaintiff 130 East Main Street Rochester, New York 14604 Telephone: (585) 324-5767 [ NOTICE OF SALE ] SUPREME COURT COUNTY OF MONROE M&T Bank s/b/m M&T Mortgage Corporation, Plaintiff, -againstJoseph P. Ferrari a/k/a Joseph Ferrari; Marian Ferrari a/k/a Marian C. Ferrari, et al., Defendant(s). Pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale dated 9/21/2013 and entered thereafter. I, the undersigned Referee will sell at public auction in the County Office Building, 39 West Main Street, Rochester, County of Monroe, New York on January 6, 2014 at 09:00AM, premises known as 3375 Brockport-Spencerport Road, Ogden, NY 14559. All that certain plot piece or parcel of land, with the buildings and improvements erected, situate, lying and being in the Town of Ogden, County of Monroe and State of New York, SBL No. 86.03-2-19. Approximate amount of judgment is $103,099.33 plus interest and costs. Premises will be sold subject to provisions of filed Judgment Index# 2012-3898. John M. Scatigno, Esq., Referee Schiller & Knapp, LLP 950 New Loudon Road Latham, NY 12110 Attorneys for Plaintiff 1065582 12/4, 12/11, 12/18, 12/25/2013 [ NOTICE OF SALE ] SUPREME COURT COUNTY OF MONROE WELLS FARGO BANK, NA, Plaintiff, against Dorothy M. Coleman, et al., Defendant(s). Pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale duly dated 10/24/2013 I, the undersigned Referee will sell at public auction at the Front Steps Of The Monroe County Office Building, 39 West Main Street, City of Rochester, State of New York on 01/13/2014 at 10:00AM, premises known as 94 Adrian Road, Rochester, NY 14622 All that certain plot piece or parcel of land, with the buildings and improvements erected, situate, lying and being in the Town of Irondequoit, County of Monroe and State of New York, SBL No.: 62.19-354. Approximate amount of judgment $87,796.62 plus interest and costs. Premises will be sold subject to provisions of filed Judgment Index# 2012-13710. Michael A. Burger, Esq., Referee Gross, Polowy & Orlans, Attorney for Plaintiff, P.O. Box 540, Getzville, NY 14068 Dated: November 14, 2013 1070836


Fun [ NEWS OF THE WEIRD ] BY CHUCK SHEPHERD

Recurring Themes

— Among America’s most prolific “fathers” (in this case, perhaps better considered “egg-fertilizers”) are Nathaniel Smith, age 39, who claimed on TV’s “Divorce Court” in September that he is the father of 27, and the late Samuel Whitney, whose grown stepdaughter Lexie Woods learned that he claimed 54 before he died in July at age 87. Smith (known in Dayton, Ohio, as “Hustle Simmons”) insisted that he is a fine father (doesn’t smoke or drink, keeps contact with most of the kids, has “only” 21 child-support orders out), and besides, he told WHIO-TV, “I know of people who have even more than me.” (Among Whitney’s belongings, said Woods, were a “pile” of birth certificates and a stash of maximum-strength Viagra. “He was a likable man, a ladies’ man.”) — Latest Collateral Damage: (1) In October, a 28-year-old man, reeling from a domestic argument in Port Richey, Fla., put a gun to his head and, against his girlfriend’s pleas, fired. As a neighbor across the street stood on her porch, the suicide bullet left the victim’s head and made three wounds on the neighbor’s leg, sending her to the hospital. (2) About a week later, on the Norwegian island of Vesteroy, a moose hunter missed his target but hit an obscured cottage in the distance, wounding a man in his 70s as he answered nature’s call. He was airlifted to Ullevaal University Hospital in Oslo. — In November, barely two weeks after a small plane carrying 10 skydivers left no survivors when it crashed on the way to an exhibition near Brussels, Belgium, nine skydivers were able to dive for safety when two planes headed for a tandem jump collided near Superior, Wis. News stories did not address how

experienced skydivers escaped one plane but not the other. — Animal Sacrifice -- in America: In September, Orthodox Jewish communities once again staged traditional kaparot, in which chickens are killed in a prescribed way for the purpose of “transferring” a believer’s latest sins over to the chicken (whose death banishes the sins). (In many such ceremonies, the chickens are donated for food, but protesters in Los Angeles criticized rogue practitioners who simply tossed carcasses into the trash.) In November, Miami-Dade County animal services found a severely injured chicken with a family’s 4-by-6 photograph protruding from its chest, having been haphazardly “implanted,” along with a note containing several hand-written names, apparently a casualty of local Santeria services. — Some Americans still believe that stock market sales are typically made human-to-human, but the vast majority of buys and sells now are made automatically by computers, running pattern-detecting programs designed to execute millions of trades, in some cases, less than one second before rival computer programs attempt the same trades. In September, a Federal Reserve Board crisis involved, at most, seven milliseconds’ time. The Fed releases market-crucial news typically at exactly 2 p.m. Washington, D.C., time, tightly controlled, transmitted by designated news agents via fiber optic cable. On Sept. 18, somehow, traders in Chicago reportedly beat traders elsewhere to deal an estimated $600 million worth of assets -- when theoretically, access to the Fed’s news should have been random. (In other words, the drive to shave milliseconds off the “speed of light” has become quite profitable.)

[ LAST WEEK’S SOLUTION ON PAGE 37 ]

[ LOVESCOPE ] BY EUGENIA LAST ARIES (March 21-April 19): Expand your interests and explore new places, and you will make new acquaintances that have a potential to turn into long-lasting friendships -- or more. Your enthusiasm will attract the type of partners that can keep up with you or admire you for your energetic personality. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): When it comes to love, a proactive approach will attract someone equally as strong. Show your courageous, no-nonsense side. Participate in functions that are conducive to finding love and showing what you have to offer. Don’t hold back. If you see someone you want, make a move.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Your unpredictable approach to life and love will capture hearts, but before you let your flirtatious side take over, think of the consequences. You don’t want to mislead someone who is likely to take a possessive and smothering approach to love. Be discrete and tactful. CANCER (June 21-July 22): Socialize, communicate and, most of all, get involved in activities or events that are somewhat unusual. Attracting someone from a different background will lead to a most unusual but exceptional relationship. Opposites can attract and bring the best out in each other.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Party and have fun. The more adventurous and active you are, the easier it will be to find love. Emotions are on the rise, so speak up, share your thoughts and feelings, and you will end up with someone who thinks you are special. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Join a group or network, and you will meet someone who grabs your attention. Someone will embellish in order to impress you. Don’t walk away. Give whoever interests you a chance to win your heart. You’ll be surprised by the outcome. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Emotions will be difficult to control.

Use your intelligence to help you deal with matters of jealousy, aggressive action and anger. Poor choices are apparent when it comes to love relationships. Slow down and guard against being treated inappropriately. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Put a bounce in your step, a twinkle in your eye and romance in your life. You’ll attract partners willing to meet you halfway and share all sorts of exciting new adventures. Travel, engaging in social events or trying something you’ve never done before will lead to new beginnings. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Your heart will lead you in one direction and your head in

another. Don’t step backwards, thinking someone from your past has changed. Deception and disillusionment are bound to take you down a path that will end in regret. Have fun, but don’t trust everyone you meet. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): You’ll find it difficult to deal with people showing unpredictable emotional tendencies. Back away before you are sucked in to a situation that has too much baggage deal with. Focus on stable, well-adjusted partners you can treat as your equal. Avoid a co-dependent relationship. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Enjoy the acquaintances you

meet through work. Don’t hesitate to call up someone you haven’t seen in a long time to find out what’s up. Being active will encourage relationships to evolve into something that allows you to experiment emotionally, physically and mentally. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Do for others and they will do for you. Getting involved in a cause or helping a friend will lead to an unexpected encounter with someone looking for the same things as you. Follow your heart and use charm, and you will find someone looking for romance and a long-term relationship.

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44 CITY DECEMBER 11-17, 2013


December 11-17, 2013 - City Newspaper