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EVENTS: HOLIDAY GROUP SHOWS, MADRIGAL FEST, “THE CITY IS ASLEEP AND DREAMING” 25 FILM: “ANNA KARENINA,” “KILLING THEM SOFTLY” 36 CROSSWORD, NEWS OF THE WEIRD 47

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Greater Rochester’s Alternative Newsweekly

News. Music. Life.

B U IL D IN G M O D E R N A TI O N

Gift ideas for finicky foodies. DINING, PAGE 15

African-American prints at Nazareth College Arts Center. ART REVIEW, PAGE 24

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LONGER HOURS

RPO: why we should let Remmereit go. URBAN JOURNAL, PAGE 3

PARENT/TEACHER CONNECTIONS

IZ

SUPERINTENDENT

SCHOOL BOARD RELATIONS

NEWS, PAGE 6

Vol 42 No 13

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See College Town’s future Barnes & Noble.

2013 AND BEYOND

NIGHTLIFE, PAGE 30

AND MORE MUSIC, PAGE 16

TECHNOLOGY

I’ve always been into figure drawing. I also like movies and drinking beer.”

INTERVIEW | BY TIM LOUIS MACALUSO | PAGE 8 | ILLUSTRATION BY MATT DETURCK

Vargas’s grand plan for the RCSD Rochester school district Superintendent Bolgen Vargas hasn’t made sweeping declarations about increasing the district’s graduation rate or raising test scores, the standard promises of most new superintendents. From his first days in office, Vargas has insisted that the district cannot fix its many problems alone. He has turned to parents, as well as the political and business communities for help implementing a plan that converts many of the district’s low-performing schools into middle class-like schools. He says it’s the only way to stop the decline in student population as

more city families move to the suburbs or enroll their children in charter schools. Vargas has tackled major obstacles like increasing the district’s attendance rate. He’s made reading proficiency a high priority for students, teachers, and parents. And he’s steering the district toward a redesigned, longer school year that offers students more time in the classroom, an emerging trend in urban districts around the country. In a recent interview, Vargas discussed his grand plan for the Rochester city school district.


 City

DECEMBER 5-11, 2012


The Meta-Center of Chicago urban journal | by mary anna towler

Let Remmereit go I’ve been really, really pleased with the Rochester Philharmonic’s concerts since Arild Remmereit became music director. The orchestra has performed beautifully, and I’ve enjoyed and appreciated the new-toRochester music that Remmereit has introduced. I’ve been impressed with his injection of poetry readings into the concerts. From what I hear, he has done wonderful community outreach. And I wish this could have worked out differently. But I’m not joining the “Save Arild” movement. Based on what I’ve been able to learn from both sides, I think the RPO board did the only thing it could do: voted to terminate his contract. Few of us know the full story; I certainly do not. This is a sensitive personnel issue, and anyone who has been involved in management knows that out of respect to everyone involved, you don’t make the details public. The people who do know the full story are the members of the RPO’s board and honorary board. And as is the case in many conflicts, board members with the same first-hand knowledge have reached different conclusions. I’ve heard passionate discussions from people on both sides – all of whom, I believe, are trying to do what’s best for an orchestra they love. Here’s what I’ve concluded, though, from what I do know: 1) The problem is more than just a “personality problem” between Remmereit and the RPO’s CEO, Charlie Owens, though at first that may have seemed to be the case. That wouldn’t be surprising. The music director is in charge of the music; the CEO is in charge of the budget. If both are strong people doing their job, there’s an innate tension between the two, the music director wanting more music (more rehearsals, for instance; more musicians) and the CEO charged with balancing the books (even during a recession; even in a town in which a major donor, Kodak, is in bankruptcy). But according to a board statement released on Saturday, the problems were widespread – tension between Remmereit “and members of the RPO staff, board, and orchestra.” The RPO’s management isn’t perfect. I’ve heard from several formerly substantial donors who are upset about their own treatment and about development efforts. But there were no reports of organization-wide problems prior to Remmereit’s arrival. 2) The board has tried, for more than a year, to set things right. Initially, board leaders tried to remedy the situation themselves. But, they say, the problem grew worse, and the board brought in a consultant to identify what was causing it.

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Many supporters seem to have heard only one side of this conflict. I’ve heard two, and I believe the board did the right thing.” The consultant advised the board on ways to “heal” the organization, to use board president Betsy Rice’s words. The board laid out expectations for Remmereit for improvement. That was in June. Now, five months later, board leaders say, the problems remain. And the board majority is convinced that the situation is irreparable. The majority board members have taken a lot of heat for their decision, so it’s important to note that they didn’t just throw up their hands in exasperation. They sought input from RPO musicians – and from the RPO’s Pops conductor, Jeff Tyzik, and its education and outreach conductor, Michael Butterman, and from conductor-laureate Christopher Seaman. Tyzik has issued a statement expressing support for the board. So has one of the orchestra’s top benefactors, the Elaine P. and Richard U. Wilson Foundation, calling the decision to terminate Remmereit “difficult” but “necessary.” Foundation chair Deborah Wilson is also an RPO board member. Clearly, Remmereit has a strong following. And maybe, in the end, we’ll learn that his supporters were right. But many of those supporters seem to have heard only one side of this conflict. I’ve heard two sides, and I believe the board did the right thing. Sadly, at the moment, the conflict is hurting no one more than the musicians themselves. While individual conductors can do great things with an orchestra – can bring out strengths and lead it to new musical heights – it is the musicians, not the conductor, who are the most important. You’ll find links to the statements by the RPO board, Tyzik, and the Wilson Foundation with this story online.

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City 


Feedback Send comments to themail@ rochester-citynews.com, or post them on our website, rochestercitynewspaper.com, our Facebook page, or our Twitter feed, @roccitynews. We edit selections for publication in print, and we don’t publish comments sent to other media.

Catholics and and women

In choosing to profile a Catholic priest (“Women of a Lesser God,” News), City had its pick of many outstanding local examples. Yet you selected the Rev. Roy Bourgeois, who likens the male priesthood to “racial segregation.” Tim Macaluso’s mini-hagiography of Father Bourgeois fails to ask crucial questions. For example, Jesus Christ shattered the socio-cultural taboos of first-century Palestine, including dining with notorious sinners and cleansing lepers. His association with women in that society scandalized the patriarchy. Yet when it came to His apostles, Christ chose all men. Is Jesus “sexist”? God could have incarnated in any form but He “became man.” Priests model Christ in persona Christi and His bride is the Church. Two thousand years of constant teaching, inspired tradition, and scripture led Pope John Paul II in 1994 to confirm infallibly that “the Church has no authority whatsoever to confer priestly ordination on women” (Ordinatio Sacerdotalis 4). Is that Pope – a great champion of social justice – sexist? Is God sexist for giving the gift of child bearing only to women? This natural distinction parallels the supernatural fact of the male priesthood. The article amply covers “sexism, racism, and homophobia,” which we all oppose. But Mr. Macaluso also failed to ask, among other things, whether Father Bourgeois:  Worries about the effects on women of the more than 50 million abortions in this country in the past 40 years – and counting;  As a defender of “conscience,” is concerned about the federal mandate that forces Catholic hospitals, schools,  City

and other nonprofits (such as soup kitchens) to provide insurance covering things like contraception, sterilization, and abortion-inducing drugs that violate their consciences – and the First Amendment. These are the kinds of questions that a journalist truly interested in facts would ask. Father Bourgeois evidently believes that the priesthood is the only worthwhile vocation; how sad – and sexist! Here’s a future story idea: How about profiling some of our many beautiful, faithful nuns? Thankfully, women – both lay and religious – continue to play key roles in today’s Catholic Church. JOHN REFERMAT, PENFIELD

If Roy Bourgeois doesn’t like the rules of the Roman Catholic Church he is free to go. There are other denominations that ordain women and gays where he would feel more at home. As a Catholic, I have no problems with the church and neither do many others, and I don’t want people like Bourgeois trying to change it. The same goes for nosy liberals, non-Catholics, and other petulant agitators. Don’t you have better things to do than trying to impose your “values” on my church? Go and lecture someone else, or better yet mind your own business. BART

Posted on rochestercitynewspaper.com

many of the problems that we see in today’s society: teachings on the sanctity of life (the intrinsic evil of abortion), chastity, love for your neighbor, fidelity to one’s spouse, stewardship of God’s creation, etc. I understand that being a Catholic holds me to a much higher moral standard than, say, a moral relativist. Whereas I choose to maintain a faithful marriage with my spouse, the moral relativist might feel that even though he or she is married, it seems ok to have extramarital affairs. Whereas I will fight for the sanctity of all life, from conception to natural death, the moral relativist might believe that killing a baby in the womb or euthanizing an adult is acceptable. To believe that the Church must change to adapt to today’s society to become or remain relevant is a wild assertion. MAC ATTACK

Posted on rochestercitynewspaper.com Mac: You claim that you believe being a Catholic holds you to a much higher moral standard than say a moral relativist. I wonder whether it was this higher moral standard or moral relativism that was at work when the Vatican signed the Lateran Pact of 1929 with Mussolini’s fascist government, or the Concordat with Nazi Germany in 1933. EDMUND FRANCIS JR.

I believe the Catholic Church will begin excommunicating women for stating they are of equal worth and dignity. Honestly, look at some of the posts here that discuss upholding the devaluing of women. Catholicism will soon join the ranks of the terms racism and sexism. DONNIEAU SNYDER

Posted on rochestercitynewspaper.com Moral relativism is one of the primary reasons why our society has so many problems. Just picking up a newspaper or reading online news will reveal the plethora of societal problems. The teachings of the Catholic Church address

DECEMBER 5-11, 2012

Posted on rochestercitynewspaper.com I am a young Catholic woman, and I have no problem with the Church’s teaching regarding women ordination. I have read books and articles on both sides of the argument and after much thought and prayer have come to the conclusion that the Church knows what it’s doing and is following the path of Christ in this and all its teachings. And the Church is totally relevant today. Nothing gives me more peace and joy than my Catholic faith. And I have a large number of young friends who feel the same way. Two women friends

have recently followed their vocation to be nuns. And three young men are pursuing their vocation to the priesthood at Becket Hall. ANN

Posted on rochestercitynewspaper.com

Readers on Grella on ‘Lincoln’

I have always admired George Grella’s unquestionable skills as a film reviewer. The level of intellect and historical perspective demonstrated in his analysis of all things cinematic is truly impressive. A line in his review of “Lincoln,” however, was disturbing for its blatant liberal bias. Speaking of the president’s effort to pass the 13th Amendment, Mr. Grella states that “the Congress, dominated by a coalition of conservative Republicans, for a number of reasons, most of them racist, resisted mightily (sound familiar?).” This statement is fallacious on two levels. First, it was predominately southern Democrats who fought viciously against the passage of the Amendment to abolish slavery. The blatant omission of this fact reeks of intent to deceive the reader. Second, the parenthetical attempt to equate the racism of the past with the current political landscape is both immature and inaccurate. What the left never wishes to acknowledge is that the resistance to President Obama (and for that matter the resistance to many liberal policies) is borne not of racism, but in honest – and equally moral – ideological differences. Were Obama white, he and his fellow Democrats would face every bit the same opposition. Those who continue to assert that race is the primary (or even a substantial) source of modern political conflict are more interested in justifying liberal policy and ideology than they are in pursuing truth. MIKE GILBERT, ROCHESTER

I was relieved to read the post by Gerry W., “Republicans’ History,” (Feedback, on George Grella’s review of

“Lincoln”). It is refreshing to know that folks like him are still calling attention to the true history of our political parties. Before the defenders on the Left blurt out “that was a long time ago” or the usual in-the-face-of-facts and hate-Bush psycho-babble, I’m going to add to Mr. W’s post: Within the last 100 years, it is the Democratic Party that has jailed people based solely on their ethnic background (World Wars). It was a Democratic president who jailed women for exercising their right to protest (voting). It was the wife of a Democratic senator (Tipper Gore) that led to a group that formally sought to obstruct artistic expression (Parents Music Resource Center). It was a Democratic Congress that hauled corporate officers to the Hill, threatening them to stop making public the accounting charges associated with the Affordable Care Act. It is the Democrats who continue to find ways to restrict choice and standards in education, energy, and commerce (2008 to present). With the lone exception of a women’s right to kill a fetus at anytime during her pregnancy, the aim of the Democrat has always been and continues to be the restriction of liberty and keeping the populace as dumb and dependent on government as possible. To the extent you value liberty, you only need to look where citizens have always looked: to the Republican Party. M ABRAHAM

Posted on rochestercitynewspaper.com Gerry W. pans Grella’s “Lincoln” movie review (Reader Feedback) while referencing the commendable GOP civil-rights record dating to that era. The view of GOP civil-rights support in recent times, however, is much less robust. In that regard, the GOP is a little like the town of Bethlehem: something wonderful happened there once, but that was a long time ago. JIM BLATT, PITTSFORD

News. Music. Life. Greater Rochester’s Alternative Newsweekly December 5-11, 2012 Vol 42 No 13 250 North Goodman Street Rochester, New York 14607-1199 themail@rochester-citynews.com phone (585) 244-3329 fax (585) 244-1126 rochestercitynewspaper.com Publishers: William and Mary Anna Towler Editor: Mary Anna Towler Asst. to the publishers: Matt Walsh Editorial department themail@rochester-citynews.com Features editor: Eric Rezsnyak News editor: Christine Carrie Fien Staff writers: Tim Louis Macaluso, Jeremy Moule Music editor: Willie Clark Music writer: Frank De Blase Calendar editor: Rebecca Rafferty Contributing writers: Paloma Capanna, Casey Carlsen, Roman Divezur, George Grella, Susie Hume, Andy Klingenberger, Dave LaBarge, Kathy Laluk, Michael Lasser, James Leach, Adam Lubitow, Ron Netsky, Dayna Papaleo, Suzan Pero, Rebecca Rafferty, Deb Schleede, David Yockel Jr. Editorial intern: Lillian Dickerson Art department artdept@rochester-citynews.com Art director/production manager: Matt DeTurck Designer: Aubrey Berardini Photographers: Frank De Blase, Michael Hanlon Advertising department ads@rochester-citynews.com Advertising sales manager: Betsy Matthews Account executives: Tom Decker, Annalisa Iannone, William Towler Classified sales representatives: Christine Kubarycz, Tracey Mykins Operations/Circulation info@rochester-citynews.com Circulation manager: Katherine Stathis Distribution: Andy DiCiaccio, David Riccioni, Northstar Delivery, Wolfe News City Newspaper is available free of charge. Additional copies of the current issue may be purchased for $1, payable in advance at the City Newspaper office. City Newspaper may be distributed only by authorized distributors. No person may, without prior written permission of City Newspaper, take more than one copy of each weekly issue. City (ISSN 1551-3262) is published weekly by WMT Publications, Inc. Periodical postage paid at Rochester, NY (USPS 022-138). Send address changes to City, 250 North Goodman Street, Rochester, NY 14607. City is a member of the Association of Alternative Newsweeklies and the New York Press Association. Subscriptions: $35.00 ($30.00 for senior citizens) for one year. Add $10 yearly for out-of-state subscriptions: add $30 yearly for foreign subscriptions. Due to the initial high cost of establishing new subscriptions, refunds for fewer than ten months cannot be issued. Copyright by WMT Publications Inc., 2012 - all rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, photocopying, recording or by any information storage retrieval system without permission of the copyright owner.


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City 


[ news from the week past ]

RPO dismisses Remmereit

The Rochester Philharmonic Orchestra’s board abruptly decided to terminate music director Arild Remmereit’s contract. The exact reasons behind the board’s vote are unclear, but the issue has caused a firestorm of controversy in the city’s music and cultural community. Remmereit is in the second year of a four-year contract.

critics say the DEC should’ve waited for the results of a state study on the potential health impacts of fracking before coming out with the new regs. The DEC is accepting comments on the revised rules through 5 p.m. on January 11. Last week, the DEC also finalized regulations on water withdrawals over 100,000 gallons per day. Those regulations take effect on April 13.

News

Mayor wants to speed-up projects

Redesigning school time

The Rochester school district has been selected to participate in the Time Collaborative, a three-year pilot program that lengthens the school day and year for some students. The program, which starts next fall, increases the nearly 4,000 students in Rochester already enrolled in schools with longer days to about 20,000.

Fracking review extended

The State Department of Environmental Conservation released a revised version of its proposed regulations for high-volume hydraulic fracturing. The move gives the DEC a 90-day extension to finalize the regulations. Some environmental groups and fracking

Rochester Mayor Tom Richards wants the city to borrow approximately $29 million for major infrastructure and capital projects that were planned for future years. Richards wants to do the borrowing now while the interest rates are so low. The money would be used to finish construction on Manhattan Square Park, to repair hazardous sidewalks, to make major road enhancements to Thurston Road and Portland Avenue, to increase the pace of demolition of vacant and deteriorated buildings, and other projects. City Council should vote on the legislation this month.

The latest design of the College Town Barnes & Noble. IMAGE PROVIDED DEVELOPMENT | BY CHRISTINE CARRIE FIEN

B&N design changes Upper Mount Hope neighbors have succeeded in getting changes to the design of the Barnes & Noble store that will be part of the massive College Town project. College Town, which was initiated by the University of Rochester, will be built on 16 acres on the west side of Mount Hope between Elmwood Avenue and Crittenden Boulevard. Groundbreaking is expected next spring on the $100 million project, which includes a hotel and conference center, offices, grocery store, and street-level retail with apartments above. Barnes & Noble, which will be the UR’s official campus bookstore,

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will be built at the corner of Elmwood and Mount Hope. Dan Hurley, president of the Upper Mount Hope Neighborhood Association, says neighbors weren’t happy with the bookstore’s design when it was unveiled by the project’s developer in October. “It really seemed to set everybody off,” Hurley says. “It just looked really plain. It didn’t have the ‘gateway’ look to it, like the one they showed several months back. Actually, somebody compared it to Erie Harbor.” (Erie Harbor is a new housing complex on Mount Hope. The design, especially the color scheme, has divided many in the community.)

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The Barnes & Noble building has been redesigned to add depth, texture, and other features to make it more attractive. It’s an improvement, Hurley says, but the design committee working on the project wants even more changes. He talks about making the windows bigger, adding more embellishments, and just making the store more of a presence on its prominent corner. Also in regard to College Town, the Upper Mount Hope group is working to standardize alternative parking rules to keep people from monopolizing on-street parking. “The goal is to remove as many cars as we can from the streets,” Hurley says.

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The city has a high concentration of people living in poverty, which is the population most likely to receive burial assistance payments. And the fee — called a “chargeback” — would be determined in part by where the deceased lived. “Clearly, this chargeback is a slap in the face to the poor in the community.” [ CARRIE ANDREWS ]

City socked again chargebacks to fund several areas of the budget. And the amount that the county raises through basic property taxes continues to increase. That amount is going up by $2 million in 2013, thanks to growth in the tax base. Legislature Democrats say the administration is using chargebacks to disguise what would otherwise be tax increases. But county spokesperson Justin Feasel said in a written statement that in the case of the plowing fee, Democrats are attacking a solution that serves drivers and protects taxpayers while ignoring the root cause of budget growth: unfunded state mandates. “Their partisan attacks ring especially hollow considering this is a group that votes against flat property taxes each and every year,” Feasel said. Most Members of the Democratic caucus usually vote against Brooks’s budget proposals. Democrats’ complaints about the indigent burials chargeback parallels the criticisms lodged against the Monroe Community College chargebacks. In MCC’s case, the amount property owners pay is based on the number of MCC students who live in their community. The indigent burials chargeback would be based on where the deceased lived. Both chargebacks also take into account the taxable value of properties from community to community.

The following people have been killed in the City of Rochester in recent weeks. -- Jamar J. Washington, 32, Rochester. ROCHESTER TOTALS —

Rochester Police Department SOURCE:

AFGHANISTAN TOTALS —

2,161 US servicemen and servicewomen and 1,073 Coalition servicemen and servicewomen have been killed in Afghanistan from the beginning of the war and occupation to December 3. Statistics for Afghan civilian casualties are not available. American casualties from November 18 to 26: -- Cpl. Christopher M. Monahan Jr., 25, Island Heights, N.J.

POLITICS | BY JEREMY MOULE

A new fee to cover the cost of indigent burials included in County Executive Maggie Brooks’s 2013 budget proposal would disproportionately affect city residents, says Carrie Andrews, Democratic Minority Leader in the Monroe County Legislature, and is “offensive and reprehensible.” The city has a high concentration of people living in poverty, which is the population most likely to receive burial assistance payments. And the fee — called a “chargeback” — would be determined in part by where the deceased lived. “Clearly, this chargeback is a slap in the face to the poor in the community,” she says. Chargebacks are fees for specific county services charged to taxpayers on a community by community basis. The county has been increasingly using chargebacks to balance its budget. The indigent burial fee is one of two new chargebacks in the county’s 2013 budget proposal. The other applies solely to suburban property owners, who’d be charged $15 per $100,000 in assessed property value to cover the $5 million cost of contracting with towns to plow county roads. Brooks has proposed a $1.2 billion budget with a property tax rate of $8.99 per $1,000 assessed value — the same rate that’s been in place for several years. But during that same period, the county has implemented

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If the county budget passes, suburban residents will get hit with an added charge for plowing.

FILE PHOTO

Last week, Feasel said county officials were still determining the indigent burial and MCC chargeback rates for communities. The county started funding its contribution to Monroe Community College through chargebacks in the 2008 budget. Under the 2013 budget proposal, the county is contributing $18.4 million to MCC, a $500,000 increase from 2012. At least twice as many MCC students live in the City of Rochester than in any single town in Monroe County. The County Legislature will hold a public hearing on the 2013 budget proposal at 5:30 p.m. on Thursday, December 6, at the County Office Building, 39 West Main Street. It’ll vote on the proposal at its December 11 meeting.

rochestercitynewspaper.com

City 


VA RGAS’S

GRAND PLAN fOR THE RCSD INTERVIEW | BY TIM LOUIS MACALUSO

Rochester school district Superintendent Bolgen Vargas rarely talks about increasing the district’s graduation rate or raising test scores, the standard promises of most new superintendents. From his first days in office as interim superintendent, Vargas has instead approached the district’s many problems from the outside in: unabashedly declaring that nothing will get fixed if the district has to do it alone. Unlike his predecessor, Jean-Claude Brizard, who focused his attention on raising expectations for principals and teachers, Vargas has turned to parents, as well as the political and business communities. Vargas says he wants all of the city’s schools to offer a balanced diet of academics, arts, music, and sports — resembling what a suburban school offers parents and students. But replicating that kind of environment means longer schools days, Vargas says, and more academic support for most students. The challenge for urban school districts like Rochester’s is creating middle-class environments without the benefit of additional funding or consistently strong family support. And there is no off-the-shelf model. At Northeast College Preparatory High School, for example, some teachers have agreed to work flexible schedules to staff the longer hours. And Wegmans vice chair Paul Speranza has tried to build a stable  City

DECEMBER 5-11, 2012

of volunteer tutors to help students at Northeast Prep. After a recent public meeting, a parent compared the district to a carton of broken eggs. “Some superintendents have tried to put the eggs back together,” she said. “Vargas is trying to make something with the broken eggs.” It’s an astute observation. Vargas spends little time talking about the impact of grinding poverty on most city students. Instead, he tends to frame discussions in terms of what city students can do, if they have help. But that’s not to say Vargas isn’t trying to fix the district’s long dysfunctional systems. He immediately zeroed in on overhauling district attitudes about attendance, arguing that graduation rates will never improve if students are not in school. And he’s attacked the district’s abysmal recordkeeping practices. He also launched a campaign aimed at parents promoting the importance of reading among the district’s youngest students. Reading proficiency by third grade, like boosting attendance, is a cornerstone of Vargas’s approach to improving student achievement. In both instances, it’s to his credit that he’s been able to enlist the support of political, business, and community

leaders. In this respect, Vargas’s roots in the community, which date back to his experience serving on the city school board in the mid 1990’s, are evident. And he’s been able to draw on support from a wide range of leaders — from Adam Urbanski, president of the Rochester Teachers Association, and Mayor Tom Richards, to business leaders like Wegmans’ Speranza. Richards, for example, recently pushed some reticent City Council members to approve financial support for the district’s clampdown on chronic truants. And Speranza has played a key role in helping Vargas launch one of his signature efforts: expanding school days and lengthening the school year in city schools. But Vargas has encountered some serious problems, too, and there are indications that more could be brewing. His decision to hire former deputy mayor Patricia Malgieri as his chief of staff shocked many of his strongest supporters. Malgieri had been one of the district’s sharpest critics, a point that didn’t sit well with many school board members, as well as RTA leader Urbanski. Vargas’s decision to ignore the request of some board members to include input from the NEAD Freedom School in his effort to expand school days was considered by some to be confrontational and subversive. And an argument between Vargas and board members Van White and Mary Adams at a public meeting showed a temperament and

decision-making style that still concerns some board members. And after much fanfare, the tutoring program Wegmans has been trying to create to support Northeast College Prep’s expanded hours has not gone smoothly. Training volunteer tutors has progressed slowly, and Vargas recently had to turn to the school board to approve more than $200,000 to pay instructors to do the work that volunteer tutors were supposed to do. But Vargas vigorously defends Wegmans’ efforts. More than 20 volunteers are working with Northeast Prep’s students and more are in the pipeline, he says. He adds that 10 paid employees from Hillside Work-Scholarship Connection, a program funded largely by Wegmans, are also providing tutoring services to the school. Vargas plans to expand the school days at eight more schools next fall. Considering that the district faces a serious budget gap, the plan raises questions about staffing, logistics, and funding. Vargas has enlisted the help of the National Center for Time and Learning, an educational consulting outfit that helps districts realign their resources and staff, to help implement his plans. In a telephone interview, school board President Malik Evans was dismissive of concerns about funding for Northeast Prep’s longer school days. He said he always knew the program would need additional financial support. In a separate phone interview, board member Willa Powell said she doesn’t


blame Vargas for unfulfilled commitments of the district’s outside partners. But making sweeping changes in how the district functions on such unsure footing does concern her. The board takes the blame for these decisions when they don’t work, she said. “When these superintendents leave, we’re left with the debris,” she said. In another example, Vargas recently presented board members with a complete evaluation of all of the district’s schools and buildings. Calling it a master plan for the second phase of the city school’s modernization plan, Vargas recommended closing five schools. And he called for spending $625 million over the next 10 years remodeling other existing schools. The board had no input into the plan, Powell said, noting that the massive $1.2 billion construction program evolves with each change in superintendent. Most board members acknowledge that Vargas has taken the superintendent’s job at a time when the State Education Department is pushing major changes through the entire system: new teacher evaluations, a common core curriculum that every school has to at least meet, and fixing priority and focus schools or face intervention from the state. (Priority schools are those the state has identified as persistently low in achievement, and they’ve received numerous improvement grants with no significant results. Focus schools are those where the state has identified specific student groups, such as English language learners, who are not meeting proficiency standards. Focus schools can become priority schools.) In a recent interview, Vargas discussed his plans for expanded learning, schools modernization, and neighborhood schools. He strongly defends the efforts at Northeast College Prep and calls the partnership with Wegmans a success. The following is an edited version of that discussion.

C I T Y: You’ve talked about expanding the school day at eight more city schools. Is that still the plan and what’s the status? Vargas: Yes. We had a meeting in November with an organization called the National Center for Time and Learning to assist us with this through a grant with the Ford Foundation. We are in the process of getting the proposal together. Between now and March 2013, we want to have the people who are going to be involved — the teachers, principals, and

central office folks — look at this, including seeing what changes need to be made to the [teachers’] contract to make this work. We are looking at the school-based living contract, which in this case would mean allowing teachers to have a flexible schedule. We no longer believe that all teachers need to show up at the same time. In the 21th century, if we’re going to do expanded learning in an affordable way, we’re going to have to call for more flexibility in the system to meet the needs of students. To make this kind Vargas proposed major improvements for East High School in his facilities master plan. PHOTO BY MATT DETURCK of change in the teachers’ contract, approach. For example, when people don’t you need to reach an agreement signed up [to volunteer] for tutoring, with about 80 percent of teachers in the we had a four-page application that impacted schools?

Yes, but we have confidence that we can work collaboratively with the Rochester Teachers Association to do it. Which schools are you considering for longer days? And how did you select them?

The eight schools are 3, 9, 10, 19, 23, 34, 45, and 46. And maybe Monroe High School. We wanted to make sure we’re working with a mix of schools with an emphasis on priority schools. But we also wanted to include focus schools: those in danger of getting on the priority schools list because once a school ends up on that list, we have to engage an extraordinary amount of effort to turn that school around. We are taking proactive and preventive measures at the same time we are reacting to the needs of the priority schools. Schools 3 and 9 are priority schools, and our goal here is to get them off of that list through improved student performance. Schools 10 and 19 are focus schools, and we’re trying to make sure they don’t get to the point of becoming priority schools. We have School 23 in there, which is in good standing. But we believe every school can improve. Northeast College Preparatory has expanded hours, and Wegmans has been trying to support that effort by creating an auxiliary team of volunteer tutors. But they haven’t recruited many. Has Wegmans retreated, in part, on their effort?

Actually, they have not. The challenge that we are facing is a need to be flexible in our

we put them through. Now we’ve downsized that to just one page front and back. But that’s just a small example of what I mean when I say this isn’t a matter of just changing the time schedule. The entire system needs to change in the sense that it has to be more flexible and responsive. And we need to be clear about what kind of support we need to give students and teachers. And what kind of flexibility we need. I have one answer for people who criticize the tutoring program: last year we had zero volunteers. Now we have some [20]. We have to put things in context. This district has talked for a very long time about getting outside support, but we don’t have the Patricia Malgieri, Vargas’s pick for chief of staff. infrastructure in place to respond PHOTO BY MATT DETURCK when people are knocking on our door. We had an application form that was worse than the one we use of them unfortunately don’t have a parent for applying for a job here. It asks for who went to college, for example. Having a three references, but we didn’t necessarily tutor who can guide you and help prepare go back and check those references. you is important. We are learning. But the greater Here’s another example: a lot of the contribution that Wegmans is making is their children have said they want more music willingness to work with us. And there are and art. But you can’t just expand the lessons we can learn from them. They are hours and expand the art, sports, music, experts in customer service. extracurricular activities, without expanding tutoring and mentoring. Is it necessary for city students to have Time and Learning, the company a tutor? And how important is that to the that was here last week, talked about a expanded hours at Northeast Prep?

It is essential for our children because many

continues on page 10 rochestercitynewspaper.com

City 


continues from page 9

addressed through flexible schedules for teachers.

When this is done correctly, teachers love it because of the [work hours] flexibility. And students love it, too. Let’s say I’m a student and I’m taking an AP [advanced placement] class. I can do it because I have someone to tutor me if I need it. No longer do I have to worry about who is going to help me. One of the things you will find nationwide is that students are taking more AP courses. But

Eight more city schools will have longer school days next year. FILE PHOTO

school in Massachusetts. They surveyed the staff’s and students’ interests. A number of kids wanted to learn more about karate, and there was a teacher there who knew martial arts. So that teacher started a club at the school. What I’m trying to say is that we are trying to create a more middle class-like school. But our students need more time and support. I could take you to a school in Mendon or the school where I used to work in Greece. And what you will find are kids getting ready to put on a winter musical, just like they do at School of the Arts. But at Northeast College Prep, we’re not there yet. But if you survey those kids, some of them will tell you that they would love to be engaged in a similar thing. But if you don’t have a band or a voice class, how are you going to put on a musical? So you need to look at the entire offering of resources available in each city school. That’s what we’re engaged in right now, seeing if we can redirect our resources. You’ve talked a lot about increasing art, music, and sports in city schools. But some people argue that the focus should be on core academics.

I was at Monroe High School the other day and met a group of kids. They said they were going to lunch. Now as an adult, I’m thinking “9:30 in the morning, and you’re going to lunch?” 10 City DECEMBER 5-11, 2012

Then I met a group of adults and I asked, “Isn’t it a little early in the school day to be going to lunch?” And they told me, “No, lunch is served at 9:45. The students go home at 1 p.m.” That’s the district we have today. Now here I am talking to them about expanding the school day. But you have kids along with parents and the rest of the community who have grown up in this system, and they’ve gotten used to something Paul Speranza, Wegmans’ vice chair. PHOTO PROVIDED that doesn’t make sense. I wish it was as easy as turning a switch and I could say, “Now we are going do things in urban America, the support for students differently.” But it’s going to have to be a hasn’t been there. We’ve done great in signing trajectory over time. kids up for AP courses, but anyone can do What we’re trying for our students is that. The question is: are we helping them what any middle-class school does for its achieve? And we believe that achievement students with art, music, and sports. It’s will come with the support. a given. It comes naturally. I’ve done the research and there’s hardly a school in It’s been reported that a problem with the suburbs throughout the county that expanded hours at Northeast College Prep doesn’t have art and music. is that students aren’t staying. You’re trying You’ve said that some of the labor issues involved with expanded hours can be

to mobilize support for them, but they’re not even there.

That’s true. But let’s say you’re 16 or 17 and

you’re used to leaving school at a certain time and hanging out. Are we going to change that tomorrow? No, but we believe it can be done. Students at School 9, which also has extended hours, are staying. And at Northeast College Prep, we believe about 75 percent of the students are staying longer. You’re recommending closing at least five schools. And you’re also projecting a budget gap of about $33 million for next year. Do you plan to cut teachers?

We’re looking at everything, but we’re in the very early stage. We’re looking first at what we need [in terms of teachers] for implementation of the common core curriculum. How much is that going to cost us? And if we want to add art, music, sports, and other types of extracurricular activities, what do we need for that? The budget gap was projected at $33 million, but that was before the pension increase came up. Teacher retirement costs are increasing by more than 37 percent next year. Potentially our gap could be $44 million. We were projecting receiving a 3 percent increase from the state, [but] that was before Hurricane Sandy. A lot of resources may have to go down to the New York City region, so state resources may fall as a result. And now we have to be more cautious. You dipped into the reserve last year, so that’s less of an option, right?

Actually, our reserve fund is solid, but the reserve fund is meant for emergency situations. Last year, we used it because we wanted to bring more stability to the district. And we didn’t want to put the district through two consecutive years of disruption. We’re looking at all of our resources, including our contracts with outside agencies. One of our highest priorities has been to provide more support for students. But the question is: how are we going to do that? We have to spend our dollars differently. One way to do that was to look at what we were paying outside providers [for tutoring services] because it was very expensive, and rather ineffective and inefficient. We are now serving more students than ever before through our [inside] tutoring services. I took a lot of heat for that. But the amount of dollars we used to pay to outside tutoring is a classic example of how, if we establish


Your GIFT GIVING Headquarters our priorities, we can better align our resources. You’ve just presented a draft proposal to spend roughly $625 million for the second phase of schools modernization. But why do some schools like East High appear in both the first phase of work and now in the proposal for the second phase? Are the funds for the first phase running low?

That’s an important question. If you go to East, the work that was first planned was on the outside. But if you go inside, you can see that there is deterioration. [East is] an enormous undertaking. And when it is finished, it should be [comparable] to a brand new building. We will have invested about $80 million total. We are also a new team, and we’re finding glitches [in the first phase]. By glitches, I mean we want our schools to be air conditioned. If we want to go to a longer school year and summer learning, we have to make some changes. We want to make sure that our schools are modernized so that we can run all these programs at any time of year. The district has more than 60 schools and buildings. How many will it have in 10 years, based on your proposal?

We will have 46 buildings. And all of them will be up to date and ready to deliver the full range of educational services for children in the 21st century. What we mean by that is they have the technology, the kitchens, and so on. You get questioned about neighborhood schools in nearly every public meeting. Where is this issue going?

We’re using a systemic approach to a very complex problem. We believe we have to start with registration. We have one of the most complex registration systems of any school district. Right now, if you live in Charlotte or off Lexington Avenue, for example, you may have to take three buses just to get to where the placement center is located to register your kid. That’s crazy. I was talking to a person who lives in Brighton who said you don’t even have to show up in person to register your kid. You can call and they take your information over the phone and send you the papers. They make it very easy. We hope to get to the point where you can go into one of the city’s Neighborhood Service Centers near where you live and register your kid.

But the problem is more than that: we have neighborhood schools that aren’t really neighborhood schools. It’s not just about the buildings, it’s about the services and the programs offered in those schools. And implementing the common core curriculum is going to feed into this. Right now we don’t have a common core that goes across the district. We have all kinds of programs and services in different places. If you’re a student who wants to be in a musical, how many schools do you have available to you? Maybe School of the Arts can accommodate you, but by the way, you have to audition. What we have in place now began with Magnet schools, specialized schools. The theory was people from all over will want this school and chose it for its special programs. This is not unique to Rochester; it’s typical of urban America. But what we ended up with in most cases was choice without quality. Right now choice in this district means we ask parents to select seven schools [by preference]. But that’s not even a choice. We’ve been operating this thing in a way that defies common sense. What percentage of parents uses the bus system to transport their children across town so the children don’t have to walk through unsafe neighborhoods to get to school?

We know that a lot of families choose a school that is outside their neighborhood for that reason. We don’t know how many, but it’s a lot. I hear about it all the time. But it’s not the only reason. Some parents choose for safety. Some choose a school because it’s the one they went to. And some chose a school where they used to live, but they’ve moved. But they don’t want to uproot their kid out of that school. So the issue has a level of complexity. There’s a system problem here, but there’s also something paradoxical about it. People say they want a neighborhood school, but they will send their kid somewhere else. And it’s not their fault; there are a lot of things in the district that need to be realigned. And that’s not going to happen overnight. How many schools are under populated?

All of them for the most part, except School of the Arts. And School 58 has a waiting list. When I first came here, people kept telling me that we needed to rent space. I said no, we have too much space now. And I proved that. When we had to move continues on page 12

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Most city students and their teachers need more time, says Vargas. FILE PHOTO

School 16, we moved the school into Freddie Thomas. Advocates say if you want a good neighborhood, you need a good neighborhood school. They say that choice has diminished neighborhoods by encouraging transiency and instability.

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12 City DECEMBER 5-11, 2012

I support a quality school for every neighborhood. Schools ought to be like [public] water. If you drink water in Mississippi, guess what? You’re not concerned. If you drink water in New York, it’s the same thing. It’s not like being in some countries, where it might be safe in one location and dangerous in another. The vision here is for all of our schools to be middle class-like. When you talk about why parents choose a school, the literature will tell you one thing is undeniable from the East Coast to the West Coast in America: it’s the quality of the school that matters most. For example, Wilson Foundation is located in the same neighborhood as School 2 and School 4. I was on the board when we introduced the International Baccalaureate program at Wilson, and there were 28 families that immediately applied to send their kids to that school on Genesee Street. At the time, it was a fairly challenging street. Families from Penfield and other districts throughout the county were attracted to an internationally recognized curriculum. A middle-class family out in the county today can look at School X and

School Y, and they’re about the same. In the district, we can’t say that. Last year, School 10 had one day of library services, while School 50 had it five days a week. So what I’m saying is you can’t blame the person for wanting to choose a school that is not in the neighborhood where they live. The decision might be based on safety concerns, but the primary factor, the number-one factor is quality. City officials are extremely concerned about losing population, particularly middle-class families. What are you doing to try to keep those families?

Oh, they tell me all the time, “If I don’t get my kid into one of these three schools, I’m leaving.” And I say, “What is it about these three schools?” And they have a very strong argument and I have a very weak argument. Let me put it in a simpler way. I keep talking about this art thing, but let’s say you are living across the street from Monroe, but you want to go to a school that has its own football team, which Monroe doesn’t have. What would you do? It’s about opportunity and quality. I had a person recently ask me how my first year was going. And I told her the good news is that so many of the problems are low-hanging fruit. The bad news is they’ve caused so many [additional] problems that I lose sleep.


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Urban Action This week’s calls to action include the following events and activities. (All are free and open to the public, unless otherwise noted.)

Mayor, chief seek solutions to violence

Rochester Mayor Tom Richards and Police Chief Jim Sheppard will host “Voice of the Citizen: Seeking Solutions to Violence,” a series of public forums throughout the city. The meetings are intended to seek input from the public for developing a comprehensive strategy to reduce violence. The meetings are from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. on Tuesday, December

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11, in the southwest at the Frederick Douglass Resource Center, 36 King Street; Tuesday, January 15, in the northeast at Carter Street Community Center, 500 Carter Street; Tuesday, January 29, in the northwest at Edgerton Stardust Ballroom, 41 Backus Street; and on Tuesday, February 5, in the southeast at Cobbs Hill Park, Lake Riley Lodge, 100 Norris Drive.

Colgate president on new Jim Crow

The Downtown United Presbyterian Church will commemorate Human Rights Day with a talk by Marvin McMickle, president of Colgate Rochester

Crozer Divinity School on Monday, December 10. McMickle will discuss Michelle Alexander’s book “The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness.” There will be a potluck at 5 p.m. and McMickle’s presentation is at 7 p.m. at 121 North Fitzhugh Street.

Film examines water

The Unitarian Universalist Church of Canandaigua will present the documentary film “Water — A Right or Privilege?” at 7 p.m. on Friday, December 7. The film will be shown at 3024 Cooley Road in Canandaigua.

The November 28 issue’s preview on classical holiday music had an incorrect date for Michael Unger’s concert at Memorial Art Gallery. It will take place on Sunday, December 16.


Dining and Germany. You’ll find a deli case full of meats and cheeses, plus traditional foods like pierogi and pelmeni, smoked fish and pâtés, pickles and sauerkraut. There’s also a showcase of beautiful baked goods as well as a bunch of different sweets, no-brainers since wafer cookies and filled candies with the word “vodka” on the wrapper need very little translation. (1694 Penfield Road; 385-2040, europadeliny.com)

For the griller

Lombardi’s in Fairport is Italian-food heaven, with everything from plentiful pastas and meats (left) to cookware and espresso makers (right). PHOTOS BY MIKE HANLON

Present day: where to shop for foodies [ CHOW HOUND ] BY DAYNA PAPALEO

If you’re anything like me, you’ve begun your holiday shopping but you’ve had a tough time actually committing to any purchases thus far. (Except, perhaps, a few for yourself; turns out I was really good this year!) Between all those frazzled shoppers and all those gifting possibilities, the experience can be overwhelming. You need a game plan, something that could streamline the process. Is there a common denominator among the people on your list? Yup. They all eat food, and many of them prepare the stuff, too. So here’s what I hope is a handy guide to several local businesses who should be able to help you find the perfect presents for your nearest and dearest, as well as your office’s Secret Santa assignment and that nice mailman. Oh, and anyone who you think might be getting you a gift, because you definitely do not want to look like a chump during what is reportedly the most wonderful time of the year. If you have other suggestions for local food-oriented gifts feel free to leave them in the comments section of this article at rochestercitynewspaper.com.

For the Italophile

A sort of epicurean wonderland, Lombardi’s Gourmet Imports and Specialties is packed

to the rafters with everything a person might need to craft a show-stopping Italian meal, from olives and cheeses for the antipasto to San Marzano tomatoes and gorgeous artisanal pastas to ethereally sweet torrone to the espresso beans for the post-feast ristretto. Lombardi’s also carries the necessary kitchen tools as well, like Microplane graters, bakeware, Le Creuset, and an entire wall of espresso makers. The Portmeirion collector on your list probably already covets Lombardi’s selection of pottery, tableware, and linens, but anyone with less specific tastes, as well as those far away, would be totally tickled by one of Lombardi’s creative gift baskets. (124 N. Main St., Fairport; 388-1330, lombardisgourmet.com)

For the baker

Chances are pretty good that by December 25 the baker on your gift list will be all baked out. But just give ‘em a few days, and they’ll be back in the kitchen measuring, mixing, icing, and praising you for remembering them with a little something from Niblack Foods. This mini warehouse space is crammed with all manner of spices, extracts, sugars, and flours — like spelt, buckwheat, chickpea, and quinoa — as well as cardboard cake rounds and boxes for that professional touch. Besides that, Niblack carries enough teas, jams, beans, nuts, grains,

hot sauces, and dried herbs to delight the nonbakers on your list as well. (900 Jefferson Road, Building 6; 292-0790, niblackfoods.com)

For the home chef

It seems a little obvious to bring up Cooks’ World in a piece about holiday shopping, but mention the place to a cooking enthusiast and watch them swoon with visions of Kitchenaid stand mixers and All-Clad cookware. Just past Cooks’ World’s ingredients section — which includes a number of King Arthur flour blends not always available at retail — is a gaggle of aprons, some almost too lovely for splatter. And every good cook needs a great knife, so Cooks’ World offers an impressive selection, with names like Wüsthof, Victorinox, and Global, as well as sharpening services, because few things are more dangerous than a dull blade. (2179 Monroe Ave.; 271-1789, cooksworld.com)

For the gastronaut

The gastronaut likes to venture out of his or her food comfort zone, and nothing screams “challenge” more than being unable to understand the language on a label. The Cyrillic alphabet is in full effect at Europa Deli, which specializes in fare from the Slavic countries; think places like Russia, Ukraine, and Bulgaria, as well as Poland

You’ve probably passed by Mileage Master a hundred times and wondered what it is they do. Originally specializing in propane conversions for trucks, Mileage Master now does grills, along with anything else you could ever want to prepare food outside, like a variety of wood chips, barbecue sauces, cookbooks, and a ton of different grilling accessories, from covers to pizza stones. But if there’s a hardcore grilling fan at the tippytop of your list, they would undoubtedly love a Big Green Egg, a silly name for a serious ceramic charcoal cooker with design roots in ancient Japanese technology. (2488 Browncroft Blvd., 586-1870)

For the aspiring pro

A restaurant kitchen isn’t always full of gleaming, name-brand cookware; the folks on the line are typically using sturdy, affordable equipment that can stand up to a daily beating. That’s what you’ll find at Rochester Store Fixture, a restaurant supply place that’s also open to the public. Founded in 1938, RSF has it all: stockpots, cast-iron pans, utensils, flatware, cake stands, sheet trays, pastry bags, thermometers, scales — in other words, if RSF doesn’t have it, you may not actually need it. (707 North St.; 546-6706, rochesterstorefixture.com)

For the snacker

As a bridge-mix fiend, I try to suss out the best Rochester has to offer, which is why I’m dropping Christmas hints about The Nut House to anyone who will listen. Sure, there are other confectionery offerings, such as cordials, truffles, licorice, gummies, and sponge candy, along with dried fruits and nuts, available unadorned or drenched in chocolate. The Nut House also offers kosher treats as well as tins, platters, trays, and baskets for hasslefree gift-giving, or just for self-congratulatory munching on the drive home for being such a thoughtful person. (1520 Monroe Ave.; 2449510, thenuthouseonline.com) Chow Hound is a food and restaurant news column. Do you have a tip? Send it to food@ rochester-citynews.com. rochestercitynewspaper.com City 15


Upcoming [ Pop/Rock ] Teen Music Fest: Starring Zendaya & Hosted by Kendall & Logan Sunday, December 30. Blue Cross Arena, 1 War Memorial Square. $37.50-$67.50. 6 p.m. 758-5300. bluecrossarena.com.

Music

[ Pop/Rock ] Midge Ure (From Ultravox) Sunday, January 13. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N. Water St. $20-$25. 8 p.m. 352-5600. waterstreetmusic.com. [ Pop/Rock ] Third Day w/Colton Dixon, Josh Wilson. Sunday, February 24. Roberts Wesleyan College Voller Athletic Center, 2301 Westside Drive. $25.35-$75.35. 7 p.m. roberts.edu.

Hit the Lights

Tuesday, December 11 The Club at Water Street, 204 N. Water St. 6:30 p.m. | $10 | 325-5600, waterstreetmusic.com [ POP/PUNK ] Since its inception in 2003, Hit the

Lights has assembled a solid fan base all over the world on the back an incessant touring schedule, sharing stages with such internationally acclaimed acts as New Found Glory and Paramore. The outfit’s infectious brand of pop-and-punk-infused indie rock has led to the release of four EPs, one split album, and three full-length studio LPs. Their most recent collection, 2012’s “Invicta,” has been met with positive critical reviews and debuted in the Billboard Top 200 upon its January release. — BY DAVID YOCKEL, JR.

Ill Nino Thursday, December 6 Montage Music Hall, 50 Chestnut St. 7 p.m. | $10 | themontagemusichall.com [ METAL ] Now on the hardcore-leaning Victory

records, New Jersey metal mavens Ill Nino play classic chugga-chugga-squeal metal garnished with vocals that go from minor melody trance to a guttural birth. What sets the band apart — way apart — is its waycool Santana-esque Latin breakdowns. It’ll give you whiplash. Arcanium opens. — BY FRANK DE BLASE

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WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 5 [ Acoustic/Folk ] Benjamin Sheridan. Sticky Lips BBQ Juke Joint, 830 Jefferson Rd. 292-5544. 9 p.m. Free. Rob & Gary Acoustic. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. 248-4825. 5:30 p.m. Free.

Rochester Chip Fest

Extended Family performed Saturday, December 1, at Tala Vera. PHOTO BY FRANK DE BLASE

Saturday, December 8 SAU Cafeteria at RIT, 1 Lomb Memorial Drive 5 p.m. | $15 (free with RIT I.D.) | 475-2509

Look, ma, no hands

[ ELECTRONIC ] The Rochester Chip Fest is a day-long

[ review ] by frank de blase

music festival that features artists who implement sound chips from retro computers and old video-game systems to create new, original music. The entertainment will also include visual artists, interactive workshops, and more. NYC-based 8-bit aficionado Joshua Davis, a.k.a. Bit Shifter, is among the acts slated to perform. Davis employs Nanoloop technology and handheld Nintendo Game Boy consoles in the manufacturing of a low-bit, high-energy electronic sound. — BY DAVID YOCKEL, JR.

Blackened Blues Saturday, December 8 Dubland Underground, 315 Alexander St. 10 p.m. | $10-$20 | 232-7550 [ DUB-HOP ] Blackened Blues started with two

brothers, one a rapper in Atlanta, one a bass player in Brooklyn. Since coming to Rochester, they’ve spared no time pulling together a band from various projects currently bouncing around in the depths of Dubland. For this funky brew, you require one dash Subsoil, two pinches Roots Collider, and a little poetic flair. It’s got all the funky rhythms you would expect, but with some lyrically appealing rapping thrown on top, and even some occasional highlights of sax and scratching. It’s surprisingly smooth. — BY SUZAN PERO

Scott’s Piano Studio

When it comes to hip hop, I usually let my curiosity — or my ignorance — be my guide. But I didn’t need to suspend my comprehension as much as I thought I might at Lovin’ Cup Thursday night for Roc The Town 3.0. It was a non-stop barrage of MCs working it out over DJ Tim Tones’ turntables. Artists like Show Money, Los Monroe, Dungen, JD Riggz, and Moses Rockwell utilize a style that flies in the face of conventional music; whereas the beat is behind the music in rock, these dudes rap behind the beat, sometimes way behind. Call it slowmotion syncopation. It physically feels weird, especially when it manifests into a foot tap, hip shake, or head bob. It’s fascinating, captivating, and unavoidable with its subsonic rumble and quake. The joint was packed with the converted and convinced who interacted and participated with the MCs. I’d like to see some genre-busting with this scene and humbly bring its attitude, innovation, and style to something like the ROC City Pro Jam and help blow minds up and doors off. Tally ho’d into Tala Vera Saturday night for a small yet enthusiastic throng

[ Blues ] Buford & Smokin’ Section. Dinosaur Bar-B-Que, 99 Court St. 9 p.m. Free. Open Blues Jam w/The King Bees. The Beale New Orleans Grille and Bar-South Ave., 693 South Ave. 2714650. 7:30 p.m. Call for info.

captivated by the jamsters in Extended Family. The thing is, Extended Family keeps extending — new drummer in back, two new female vocalists on the front end, and an audible revolution taking place from within. What’s particularly fun to watch is front man/ guitarist Geoff Dale (I swear sometimes the guy has three heads) as his role in the proceedings is slowly defined and reveals itself to him. He is by no means floundering, but seems to like creating music with this bunch so much, he takes on a sort of “Look, Ma, no hands” approach. Remember when music — or anything — used to get you that excited? My excitement fuse lit, next I stopped over to Monty’s Krown where Jellyroot was laying down an effortless power-pop set. Guitarist Chris Baerman was on fire, releasing a flaming torrent of hot licks into the sky. This is about the fifth time I’ve caught the band live and I’m getting familiar with the tunes. I’ve got to say, it’s an added thrill to anticipate what comes next as these guys paint the walls lyrically with big ol’ hooks.

[ Classical ] Live from Hochstein: Holiday Music for Horns. Hochstein Performance Hall, 50 N Plymouth Ave. 454-4596. 12:10 p.m. Free. [ DJ/Electronic ] DJ Adam. Nashvilles, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. 334-3030. Call for info. Call for info. DJ Dorian. TC Riley’s, 200 Park Point Dr. 272-9777. Call for info. Call for info. Teen Set 45 Party. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. Midnight. Free. Y Not Wednesday w/DJ ET. Plush, 151 St. Paul St. 2325650. Call for info. Call for info. [ Jazz ] Gary Chudik. Prosecco Italian Restaurant, 1550 New York 332. 924-8000. 6 p.m. Call for info. Margaret Explosion. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 7:30 p.m. Free. Tinted Image. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. 6625555. 6 p.m. Free. Vince Ercolamento& Joe Chiappone Jazz Quartet. Murph’s Irondequoit Pub, 705 Titus Ave. 342-6780. 8 p.m. Free. continues on page 19

Scott’s Piano Studio & Friends Present

“Sounds of the Season” A Holiday Concert

Sunday, December 16th, 2:00PM Rochester Christian Reformed Church 2750 Atlantic Ave., Penfield NY 14526 Adults: $10 • Children under 12: $5 To reserve your tickets, contact: Scott Wright at saw1music@gmail.com or 465-0219

All proceeds benefit

at URMC rochestercitynewspaper.com City 17


Music Honky-tonk hero Bill Kirchen Honky-Tonk Holiday Show

chorus. I’d always done songs where you do your little bit and get out of the way.

Friday, December 7 Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Place 8 p.m. | $18-$20 | lovincup.com

But you don’t overdo it. You never steamroll the song.

[ INTERVIEW ] By Frank De Blase

The high point of a Bill Kirchen show is the tour of guitar-hero riffs the guitar hero takes the crowd on in the middle of “Hot Rod Lincoln,” a rock ’n’ roll rave-up Kirchen recorded in 1972 as a member of Commander Cody and His Lost Planet Airmen. Riffs from The Beatles, The Ventures, Merle Haggard, Albert Collins, Link Wray, The Sex Pistols, Jimi Hendrix, and countless others are shoe-horned in with Kirchen’s own lightning-fast contribution. Kirchen is the master of the Telecaster, the “kang” of twang. When he’s not traversing the endless black ribbon across the country with his trio, Kirchen is the go-to guy for pros in the know, like Nick Lowe and Elvis Costello. His mixture of rock ’n’ roll, boogie woogie, hardcore country, honky-tonk, and rockabilly make him a godfather of the Americana idiom. Kirchen simply calls it “dieselbilly.” There’s no spandex or cape, no x-ray vision. Kirchen prefers the Clark Kent approach and balks at the word “hero,” even though the cat renders riffs faster than a speeding bullet, and can jump tall… you get the picture. Kirchen is currently touring with his show “Bill Kirchen’s Honky Tonk Christmas,” has another album in the can, and looks forward to playing cello on his porch…eventually. He called to explain. An edited transcript of the conversation follows. CITY: In the pantheon of the guitar heroes, where do you fit in? Bill Kirchen: I’m kind of a reluctant — I

hate to say the word — guitar hero. I’ve just thought of myself as a journeyman.

But with “Hot Rod Lincoln,” you’re the father of one of rock ’n’ roll’s most signature riffs.

When we cut that record, I don’t think I could have got through the rhythm part of a whole Chuck Berry song without stopping. I wasn’t like an all-around cat back then, I’d been trying to play Doc Watson flat-picking so I had a good right hand. I guess I just always served the song. It’s only been the last 10 years that I’ve been doing trios and agreed to do solos that last more than just one 18 City DECEMBER 5-11, 2012

I love melody, I’m a melody guy. I don’t have the most blazing chops. I’ve been in bands with both Danny Gatton and Redd Volkaert, and let me tell you, those guys can play circles around me in some ways. But I like what I do and have value up there with my own picking style and sense of melody. What do you have work at?

I struggle with technique still. My mind hears things my fingers can’t do. I tend to do my practicing on stage. I’d be better served if I stayed at home and worked on guitar. But I tend to use music when I’m at home as relaxation, or to learn new songs. I never get out the scale book. I think if I did, I wouldn’t have to work around the holes in my technique. That’s what’s most difficult for me; playing what I hear. What first lit your fuse?

I didn’t grow up as a rock ’n’ roll kid, I grew up a classical nerd listening to Broadway show tunes. At home there was some folk music in the house we used to hear on Canadian radio growing up in Michigan. I liked folk music, but I wasn’t focused on the guitar at all. I listened to some rock ’n’ roll in high school. I remember seeing James Burton with Ricky Nelson on “The Adventures of Ozzie and Harriet.” Then I kind of backed into it through folk music. I learned to play the banjo from Pete Seeger records. The next thing I discovered Mississippi John Hurt — that’s kind of who I wanted to be when I grew up. I went to the Newport Folk Festival in ’64 and ’65, where I got to see Mississippi John Hurt, Son House, Skip James… I also got to see Mike Bloomfield light up the stage. I also got to see Dylan go electric in ’65. Contrary to the myth that developed after the fact, he wasn’t booed; everybody loved it. He already had “Subterranean Homesick Blues” out with electric guitar on it, so it wasn’t a surprise. Then I hooked up with the Cody bunch and got the crash course. Has Fender ever approached you to do a signature model?

Nah, I’m too old. They want the young heavymetal Strat players. I went over there once with the Telecaster I’d played for 40 years. When I retired it, it had a hole about half an inch deep

Many music fans consider Bill Kirchen a guitar legend for his scorching solos, like the one in “Hot Rod Lincoln.” He merely considers himself a “journeyman.” PHOTO BY FRANK DE BLASE

by the bridge where I used to rest my little finger. The paint’s gone, it’s got rounded edges, and I said, “Look you guys, this is how you relic a Tele, you wussies.”

Prayer” or “Faded Love” on my cello. Right now I don’t even have one. Someday I’m going to get me a cello. And I’d love to play with Bob Dylan.

What’s it like working with someone like Elvis Costello?

What are they going to say about Bill Kirchen?

I don’t know if Elvis knows how hard it is to learn his tunes. I’m used to Merle Haggard songs, but it opens up my ears to work with someone of his caliber. What’s something you haven’t done yet that’s on the horizon?

Re-learning how to play the cello. I’m 64 now so I thought at this point I’d be sitting on my back porch playing “Maidens

I know exactly what they’re going to say. They’re going to go, “Who?” And then maybe one guy in some remote colony will go, “Oh yes, Bill Kirchen. He invented a style called ‘dieselbilly.’” You know what I hope they’ll say? I want them to go back and listen to one of my tunes and say, “Wow, it sounds like he was having fun.”


WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 5 [ Karaoke ] Italian American Karaoke. Italian American Community Center, 150 Frank Dimino Way. 594-8882. 7:30 p.m. Free. Karaoke at Mayfield’s Pub. Mayfield’s Pub, 669 N Winton Rd. 288-7199. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke at Sanibel Cottage. Sanibel Cottage, 1517 Empire Blvd. 671-9340. 6 p.m. Free. Karaoke at California Brew Haus. California Brew Haus, 402 Ridge Rd. West. 6211480. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke w/Mark. Flipside Bar & Grill, 2001 E Main St. 2883930. 9 p.m. Free. [ Open Mic ] Open Acoustic Mic Night w/ Mandy. Shorts Bar & Grill, 35 N. Main St. 388-0136. 9 p.m. Free. Open Mic Jam Boulder Alexander St.. Boulder Coffee Co. Alexander St., 100 Alexander St. 454-7140. 8 p.m. Open Mic w/Steve West. Muddy Waters Coffee HouseGeneseo, 53 Main St. 2439111. 7 p.m. Free. [ Pop/Rock ] Abominable Snow Band: Christmas Party. Johnny’s Irish Pub, 1382 Culver Rd. 2240990. 6 p.m. Free. Bowla Cheats w/Upstate. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N. Water Street. 325-5600. 8:30 p.m. $5-$7. Johnny B & The MVPs. Tala Vera, 155 State St. 546-3845. 8 p.m. $5. Kashka w/Seth Faergolzia, A Victory for Upfish, Ben Morey. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. $6-$8. Tom Waits Tribute: Frank’s Wild Years Revisited. Finger Lakes Community College, 3325 Marvin Sands Dr. 7 p.m. $2. Trans-Siberian Orchestra. Blue Cross Arena, One War Memorial Square. 758-5300. 7:30 p.m. $32.75-$60.75.

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 6 [ Acoustic/Folk ] Amy Montrois. Johnny’s Irish Pub, 1382 Culver Rd. 2240990. 7 p.m. Free. Holiday Benefit for Habitat for Humanity: 8 Beat Measure, The Decibelles. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. 8 p.m. $5. Jim Lane. Murph’s Irondequoit Pub, 705 Titus Ave. 342-6780. 8 p.m. Free. [ Blues ] Catl w/The Pickpockets, Jenna Giuliani. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 8:30 p.m. $7-$9. Night Fall. The Beale New Orleans Grille and Bar-South Ave., 693 South Ave. 2714650. 7:30 p.m. Call for info.

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CLASSICAL | Musica Spei

Did you ever wonder when a popular carol originated? Musica Spei’s holiday concert, titled “Evermore and Evermore: Carols Then and Now,” is going to give you the answers. Musica Spei specializes in sacred a cappella music of the Renaissance, and program selections include the likes of Franco-Flemish composers Orlande de Lassus (c1532-1594) and Johannes Ockeghem (c1410-1497), Spaniard Cristobal de Morales (c1500-1553), and more. These special concerts will also utilize church organists so that the audience can easily participate in a sing-along of more “modern” carols, inspired by the original works. Musica Spei performs Thursday, December 6, 7:30 p.m. at St. Paul’s Evangelical Lutheran Church, 28 Lincoln Ave., Pittsford. (Another concert will take place December 7 at St. Peter’s Episcopal Church in Dansville.) Free-will offering ($10 suggested). 731-7149, wp.MusicaSpei.org. — BY PALOMA A. CAPANNA [ Classical ] Eastman at Washington Square Lunchtime Concerts. 1st Universalist Church, 150 S. Clinton Ave. 274-1400. 12:15 p.m. Free. Eastman Ranlet Series: Ying Quartet. Eastman East Wing Hatch Recital Hall, 26 Gibbs St. 8 p.m. $10-$20. Musica Spei: Evermore and Evermore: Carols Then and Now. St. Paul’s Evangelical Lutheran Church, 28 Lincoln St. (585) 586-0580. 7:30 p.m. Free will offering.

[ Jazz ] Gary Chudik. Prosecco Italian Restaurant, 1550 New York 332. 924-8000. 8 p.m. Call for info. NightTrane Trio. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. 6625555. 6 p.m. Free. The Public Market Band. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 7:30 p.m. Free. Sonny Brown Band. The Rabbit Room, 61 N. Main St. 5821830. Call for info. The Swooners. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. 2484825. 5:30 p.m. Free.

[ DJ/Electronic ] CT’s Party Bus. Grotto, 7 Lawrence St. 739-5377. Call for info. DJ Matt. Nashvilles, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. 334-3030. Call for info. Call for info. DJ Sal DeSantis. Center Cafe, 150 Frank Dimino Way. 5948882. 7 p.m. Call for info. Karaoke at Panorama. Panorama Night Club & Sports Bar, 730 Elmgrove Rd. 2472190. 9 p.m. Free. Thursday Night Shakedown.. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 11 p.m. Free. Tiki Thursdays: Shotgun Music DJ. McGhan’s Pub, 11 W. Main St. 924-3660. 7:30 p.m. Free. Tilt-a-Whirl Drag Show.. Tilt Nightclub & Ultralounge, 444 Central Ave. 232-8440. 11:15 pm & 12:30 am. $3.

[ Karaoke ] Karaoke at Center Cafe. Center Cafe, 150 Frank Dimino Way. 594-8882. 7 p.m. Free. Karaoke at Willow Inn. Willow Inn, 428 Manitou Rd. 3923489. 8 p.m. Free. Karaoke at Pineapple Jack’s. Pineapple Jack’s, 485 Spencerport Rd. 247-5225. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke.at Brickwood Grill. Brickwood Grill, 250 Monroe Ave. 730-8230. 9 p.m. Call for info.

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continues on page 20

rochestercitynewspaper.com City 19


THURSDAY, DECEMBER 6

Punk Rock Christmas. Tala Vera, 155 State St. 546-3845. 8 p.m. $5.

Karaoke Night w/Debbie Randyn. Pittsford Pub, 60 N. Main St. 586-4650. 9:30 p.m. Free. Karaoke w/George. Temple Bar and Grille, 109 East Ave. 2326000. 8 p.m. Free. Karaoke w/DJ Delight. ,. 8 p.m. Karaoke w/Shotgun Music. McGhan’s Pub, 11 W. Main St. 924-3660. Call for info. Free. Karaoke w/Summer Bob. Shorts Bar & Grill, 35 N. Main St. 3880136. 10 p.m. Free.

SATURDAY, DECEMBER 8

[ Open Mic ] Open Mic. The Bistro at Towpath Cafe, 6 North Main St. 377-0140. 7 p.m. Open mic with Jeremy Carter. Free. Open Mic at Towpath Cafe. Towpath Cafe, 6 N. Main St. 377-0410. 6:30 p.m. Free. Open Mic Jam Boulder Park Ave.. Boulder Coffee Co. – Park Ave., 739 Park Ave. 697-0235. 7:30 p.m. Free. Open Mic w/Steve Piper. Flipside Bar & Grill, 2001 E Main St. 288-3930. 9 p.m. Free. Open Mike w/Mark Herrmann. California Brew Haus, 402 Ridge Rd. West. 621-1480. 8 p.m. Free. Spot Coffee Open Mic. Spot Coffee, 200 East Ave. 6134600. 7 p.m. Call for info. [ R&B ] Forward Movement. Tala Vera, 155 State St. 546-3845. 8 p.m. 21+. Call for info. [ Reggae/Jam ] Open Jam w/Too Tall. Dinosaur Bar-B-Que, 99 Court St. 9 p.m. Free. Preach Freedom, Connect. Sticky Lips BBQ Juke Joint, 830 Jefferson Rd. 292-5544. 8 p.m. $8-$10. Reggae Christmas w/DJ Ras Courtney, DJ Freak-A-Nature. Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. 6 p.m. Free 21+, $5 unders. Reggae Thursday. Club NV, 123 Liberty Pole Way. 454-7230. 10 p.m. $5 before 11 pm. [ Pop/Rock ] Five Alarm Open Jam. Firehouse Saloon, 814 South Clinton. 319-3832. 9 p.m. Call for info. Ill Nino w/Arcanium. Montage Music Hall, 50 Chestnut St. 232-1520. 7 p.m. $10-$12.

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 7 [ Acoustic/Folk ] Big Blue House. Lemoncello, 137 West Commercial St. 3858565. 8:30 p.m. Free. Dave North. McGraw’s Irish Pub, 146 W Commercial St. 348-9091. 8 p.m. Free. Frankie and Jewels’s Acoustically Speaking. 140 Alex Bar & Grill, 140 Alexander St. 256-1000. 6 p.m. Call for info.

CLASSICAL | Ying Quartet

PUNK/ROCK | It’s a Punk Rock Christmas

The Ying Quartet takes to the stage at Hatch Recital Hall of the Eastman School of Music this week. The performance features 3 Bs, but at this concert, it’s Beethoven, Bartok, and American composer Kenji Bunch. The Grammy-winning ensemble has been a quartet-in-residence at the Eastman School of Music since 1997. Members are Janet Ying, violin; Phillip Ying, viola; David Ying, cello; and, since 2010, Ayano Ninomiya, first violin. Given the intimate size of Hatch Recital Hall and the popularity of the Ying Quartet, tickets are likely to sell out prestissimo. (The December 2 concert was sold out to subscription ticket holders of the Eastman-Ranlet Concert Series.)

It’s almost Christmas and what better way to ring in the holidays than by supporting your local music scene. On Pearl Harbor Day, Tala Vera features a line-up of four great bands. The Gowns are a stealthy bunch that’s somehow eluded the radar. Lead singer Greg Hassett has a double black belt in songwriting that leans toward the melodic side of punk and his Gowns are tight. Pink Elephant (pictured) is loud and aggressive and blows you away with its twin-guitar assault. Instrumental surf rockers RoarShark takes you to the beach just don’t expect them to sing, while stuck-in-detention garage band Bad Kids adds extra snarl to this show.

The Ying Quartet performs Thursday, December 6, 8 p.m. at Hatch Recital Hall, Eastman School of Music, 433 E. Main St. $10-$20. 454-2100, ESM.Rochester.edu. — BY PALOMA A. CAPANNA Jim Lane. Murph’s Irondequoit Pub, 705 Titus Ave. 342-6780. 8 p.m. Free Jim Lane. 58 Main, 58 N. Main St. 585-637-2383. 8:30 p.m. Free. John Akers w/Acoustic G. Johnny’s Irish Pub, 1382 Culver Rd. 224-0990. 5 p.m. Free. Peg Dolan and “The Fiddler”. Barry’s Old School Irish, 2 W. Main St.,. 535-5258. 7 p.m. Free. Ralph Louis. Rochester Plaza Hotel, 70 State St. 546-3450. 6 p.m. Free. This Other Life. Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. 6 p.m. Call for info. Uptown Staff Holiday Concert. Bernuzio Uptown Music, 122 East Ave. 473-6140. 7 p.m. Call for info. [ Blues ] Dan Schmitt. The Beale New Orleans Grille and Bar-South Ave., 693 South Ave. 2714650. 7:30 p.m. Call for info. The Filthy McNastys. Sticky Lips BBQ Juke Joint, 830 Jefferson Rd. 292-5544. 8:30 p.m. $3 Sticky Lips BBQ Juke Joint, 830 Jefferson Rd. 292-5544. 8:30 p.m. $3. Steve Grills and the Roadmasters. Trinities Restaurant, 36 W. Main St. 585 319 4047. 7 p.m. Free. [ Classical ] Christmas Prism: Shout the Glad Tidings. Third Presbyterian Church, 4 Meigs St. 271-6513. 7:30 p.m. $20.

20 City DECEMBER 5-11, 2012

Eastman School Symphony Orchestra, Eastman-Rochester Chorus. Kodak Hall at Eastman Theater, 60 Gibbs St. 8 p.m. Free. [ Country ] Cold Cross Creek. Nashvilles, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. 3343030. 9 p.m. $5-$7. [ DJ/Electronic ] Bang Fridays. ONE Nightclub and Lounge, 1 Ryan Alley. 5461010. Call for info. Call for info. Chill Out Fridays Happy Hour. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. 5:30 p.m. Free. DJ Bac Spin. Plush, 151 St. Paul St. 232-5650. 8 p.m. Call for info. DJ Blake. 140 Alex Bar & Grill, 140 Alexander St. 256-1000. 10 p.m. Call for info. DJ Cedric. Vertex Nightclub, 169 North Chestnut St. 2325498. 10 p.m. $3-$8. DJ Energon. Vertex Nightclub, 169 North Chestnut St. 2325498. 10 p.m. $3-$8. Fresh Meat Fridays w/Samantha Vega, DJ Mighty Mic. Tilt Nightclub & Ultralounge, 444 Central Ave. 232-8440. 11:15 p.m. & 12:30 a.m. $4-$12. he Manhattan Project w/JIMKATA • Gonculator • Papi Chulo, DJ Keto, Skanntron, and DJ Conjur. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N. Water Street. 325-5600. 9 p.m. $5-$15. Latino Heat Fridays. Heat Nightclub, 336 East Ave. 8990620. 10 p.m. Call for info. Lube After Dark.. Quaker Steak & Lube, 2205 Buffalo Rd. 6979464. 9:30 p.m. Free.

It’s A Punk Rock Christmas takes place Friday, December 7, 8 p.m. at Tala Vera, 155 State St. $5. tala-vera.com. — BY ROMAN DIVEZUR Reggaeton w/DJ Carlos. La Copa Ultra Lounge, 235 W. Ridge Rd. 254-1050. 10 p.m. Free. [ Jazz ] Bobby DiBaudo Trio. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. 6625555. 6 p.m. Free. Fred Costello & Roger Eckers Jazz Duo. Charley Brown’s, 1675 Penfield Rd. 385-9202. 7:30 p.m. Free. Friday Jazz at Immanuel: Bill Welch Band. Immanuel Baptist Church, 815 Park Ave. 4737664. 7 p.m. $10 (free will donation for local mission). Ted Nicolosi and Shared Genes. The Pultneyville Grill, 4135 Mill St. (315) 589-4512. 7 p.m. Free. Tinted Image. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. 662-5555. 6 p.m. Free Tinted Image. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. 248-4825. 7:30 p.m. Free. Uptown Groove. Prosecco Italian Restaurant, 1550 New York 332. 924-8000. 7 p.m. Call for info. The Westview Project with Doug Stone, sax. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 258-0400. 8:30 p.m. Free. [ Karaoke ] Karaoke w/Cody. Nashvilles, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. 3343030. 5 p.m. Free. Karaoke at Pineapple Jack’s. Pineapple Jack’s, 485 Spencerport Rd. 247-5225. 9 p.m. Free.

Karaoke at Flaherty’s Webster. Flaherty’s Webster, 1200 Bay Rd. 671-0816. 9 p.m. Call for info. Karaoke by Dan & Sherri. Barnard Restaurant & Party House, 360 Maiden Ln. 6631250. 8 p.m. Free. Karaoke w/Krazy George. Scotland Yard Pub, 187 Saint Paul St. 7305030. 10 p.m. Call for info. Karaoke w/Summer Bob. Shorts Bar & Grill, 35 N. Main St. 3880136. 10 p.m. Free [ Pop/Rock ] Bill Kirchen. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. 8 p.m. $18-$20. Compromise. California Brew Haus, 402 Ridge Rd. West. 621-1480. Call for info. Dave Viterna Band. Dinosaur Bar-B-Que, 99 Court St. 10 p.m. Free. Household Pest. Pineapple Jack’s, 485 Spencerport Rd. 247-5225. 10 p.m. Call for info. The Lobby Presents: A Tribute to the Clash. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 8 p.m. 21+. $7. Midnight City. TC Riley’s, 200 Park Point Dr. 272-9777. 6 p.m. Call for info. MoChester. A-Pub Live, 6 Lawrence St. 10 p.m. Free before 11, $5 after. Music by Aaron Henby. The Bistro at Towpath Cafe, 6 North Main St. 377-0410. 7 p.m. Come join Aaron Henby at the Bistro at Towpath Cafe. Free. Nasty Trast. Montage Music Hall, 50 Chestnut St. 2321520. 8 p.m. Call for info.

[ Acoustic/Folk ] Christmas Ceilidh Band. Greece Baptist Church, 1230 Long Pond Rd. 225-6160. 8 p.m. $17-$20. Everheart. McGraw’s Irish Pub, 146 W Commercial St. 3489091. 8 p.m. Free. Jon Akers. Flaherty’s Honeoye Falls, 60 W. Main St. 4977010. Call for info. Lovin’ Cup Unplugged Dinner Music Series: Peg Dolan. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 2929940. 6 p.m. Free. Peg Dolan and “The Fiddler!”. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. 6 p.m. Free. Singer/Songwriters in the Round: Scott Regan, Connie Deming, Jed Curran, andLisa Bigwood. Cafe Veritas at First Unitarian Church, 220 Winton Road South. 7:30 p.m. $5$10. Tumbao. Tapas 177 Lounge, 177 Saint Paul St. 262-2090. 11 p.m. Free. [ Blues ] Deep Blue. The Beale-Webster, 1930 Empire Blvd. 216-1070. 7:30 p.m. Call for info. Gap Mangione New Blues Bland. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. 248-4825. 7:30 p.m. Free. John Cole Blues Band. Dinosaur Bar-B-Que, 99 Court St. 10 p.m. Free. Last Note. Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. 9:30 p.m. $4-$6. Luca Foresta. The Beale New Orleans Grille and Bar-South Ave., 693 South Ave. 2714650. 7:30 p.m. Call for info. Mama Hart Band. The Landing Bar and Grille, 30 Fairport Village Landing. 425-7490. 10 p.m. Free. [ Classical ] Family Christmas Gala. Roberts Wesleyan College, 2301 Westside Dr. 888.222.1048. 7:30 p.m. $8. Finger Lakes Concert Band Holiday Concert. Hochstein at Canandaigua, 435 East Street. 396-3778. 7:30 p.m. $5. RPO: Handel’s Messiah. Kodak Hall at Eastman Theater, 60 Gibbs St. 7:30 p.m. Eric Townell, guest conductor. Rochester Oratorio Society; Sarah Hibbard, soprano. Stephanie Lauricella, mezzosoprano. Jeffrey Halili, tenor. Lawrence Craig, bass. $15$79. [ Country ] Benefit Concert for Center for Youth Services ft. Hunu?. The German House Theater, 315 Gregory St. 442-6880. 8 p.m. $10.


Goodness. Sticky Lips BBQ Juke Joint, 830 Jefferson Rd. 292-5544. 9 p.m. $3. Shotgunn Wedding. Nashvilles, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. 3343030. 9 p.m. $5-$7. [ DJ/Electronic ] DJ Big Reg. Plush, 151 St. Paul St. 232-5650. 10 p.m. Call for info. DJ Darkwave. Vertex Nightclub, 169 North Chestnut St. 2325498. 10 p.m. $3-$8. DJ Trancesend. Decibel Lounge., 45 Euclid St. 7544645. 10 p.m. $5. La Selva. Tilt Nightclub & Ultralounge, 444 Central Ave. 232-8440. 10 p.m. Call for info.

Roc Chip Fest. Rochester Institute of Technology, 1 Lomb Memorial Dr. 5 p.m. SAU Cafeteria. Free for RIT students, $15 GA. [ Jazz ] Chet Catallo and Band. House of Guitars, 645 Titus Ave. 5443500. 1 p.m. Free. Fred Costello & Roger Eckers Jazz Duo. Charley Brown’s, 1675 Penfield Rd. 385-9202. 7:30 p.m. Free. GRR Band. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 8:30 p.m. Free. Hot Street. Prosecco Italian Restaurant, 1550 New York 332. 924-8000. 7 p.m. Call for info.

Bar & Lounge

Madeline Forster. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. 6625555. 6 p.m. Free. Ted Nicolosi and Shared Genes. Glengarry Inn at Eagle Vale, 4400 Nine Mile Point Road, Rt 250. 598-3820. 7 p.m. Free.

[ R&B ] Sister Sparrow & The Dirty Birds w/Hollis Brown, AudioInflux. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N. Water Street. 325-5600. 7 p.m. Free. WDKX Holiday Step Jam. Blue Cross Arena, One War Memorial Square. 758-5300. 1 p.m. $8.50.

[ Karaoke ] Karaoke at 140 Alex. 140 Alex Bar & Grill, 140 Alexander St. 256-1000. 10:30 p.m. Free. Karaoke At The Lube. Quaker Steak & Lube, 2205 Buffalo Rd. 697-9464. 9:30 p.m. Free. Kick-Ass Karaoke. Temple Bar and Grille, 109 East Ave. 2326000. 10 p.m. Free.

[ Pop/Rock ] AFR w/Pollock, Beneath Hell’s Sky. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. 21+. $5. Amanda Lee Peers & The Driftwood Sailors CD Release Party. House of Guitars, 645 Titus Ave. 544-3500. 6 p.m. Free.

Bangarang. A-Pub Live, 6 Lawrence St. 10 p.m. Free before 11, $5 after. Drowning Valley. Boulder Coffee Co. - Alexander St., 100 Alexander St. 454-7140. 8 p.m. Free. George Hogan. Hamlin Station Bar & Grill, 52 Railroad Ave. 9642010. 8:30 p.m. Call for info. Last Minute, Right Turn Racer, and The Greener Grass Band. The Firehouse Saloon, 814 S. Clinton Ave. 5853193832. 8 p.m. A rocking good time with Last Minute, Right Turn Racer and The Greener Grass Band. $4. MoChester. Brickwood Grill, 250 Monroe Ave. 730-8230. 10 p.m. Call for info.

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SATURDAY, DECEMBER 8 Sonic Inception. California Brew Haus, 402 Ridge Rd. West. 621-1480. 9 p.m. Call for info. Taran. Pineapple Jack’s, 485 Spencerport Rd. 247-5225. 10 p.m. Call for info. Teagan & The Tweeds. Johnny’s Irish Pub, 1382 Culver Rd. 224-0990. 8 p.m. Free. Turning Colors w/Son Bully, Solstice Dream. Tala Vera, 155 State St. 546-3845. 8 p.m. $5. Warehouse w/Rexx. Montage Music Hall, 50 Chestnut St. 232-1520. 8 p.m. $5-$7. The Yummies, Anderson Stingrays, Envious Disguise, Keaton, and The Emersons. Monty’s Krown, 875 Monroe Ave. 271-7050. 10 p.m. $3-$5.

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SUNDAY, DECEMBER 9 [ Blues ] Four-4-Time. The Beale New Orleans Grille and Bar-South Ave., 693 South Ave. 2714650. 7 p.m. Call for info. [ Classical ] The Argos Trio. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. 2768900. 7:30 p.m. Call for info. Brighton Symphony Holiday Concert. Brighton Town Hall, 2300 Elmwood Ave. 490-9351. 3 p.m. Free. A Christmas Tapestry ft. Greece Choral Soceity, Greece Symphony Orchestra, St. Charles Sanctuary Choir. St. Charles Borromeo Church, 3003 Dewey Ave. 663-3230. 7 p.m. Free (donations accepted). Compline. Christ Church, 141 East Ave. 454-3878. 9 p.m. Free (donations accepted). Family Christmas Gala. Roberts Wesleyan College, 2301 Westside Dr. 888.222.1048. 7:30 p.m. $8 Family Christmas Gala. Roberts Wesleyan College, 2301 Westside Dr. 888.222.1048. 3 p.m. $8. Finger Lakes Camerata. Finger Lakes Community College, 3325 Marvin Sands Dr. 3 p.m. Call for info. RPO: OrKIDStra for the Holidays. Kodak Hall at Eastman Theater, 60 Gibbs St. 2 p.m. Brett Mitchell, conductor. Genesee Valley Children’s Choir, Amy Cochrane, director. $10-$15. [ Jazz ] Bill Slater Solo Piano (Brunch). Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. 248-4825. Call for info. Free. Day Break. Prosecco Italian Restaurant, 1550 New York 332. 924-8000. 5:30 p.m. Call for info. [ Hip-Hop/Rap ] Wiz Khalifa. Blue Cross Arena, One War Memorial Square. 758-5300. 7:30 p.m. $32.50$42.50.

22 City DECEMBER 5-11, 2012

HOLIDAY | Center For Youth Services Benefit Concert

Alt-country rockers Hunu? will host a benefit concert at the German House with proceeds going to Center For Youth Services. Several members of the band are former members of local group Colorblind James Experience. This event is a memorial to Colorblind James, a.k.a. Chuck Cuminale, who was a music writer for City Newspaper and worked at the center until he died in July 2001. This annual concert is sponsored by the Bop Shop and reunites many past and present movers and shakers of Rochester’s music scene. Special guests including Ron Stackman, Stan Merrell, Beth Brown, Tom Kohn, Dick Storms, Buzzo, The Buddhahood, The Margaret Explosion, and others will perform their favorite Christmas tunes. The show takes place Saturday, December 8, 8 p.m. at the German House, 315 Gregory St. $10. bopshop.com. — BY ROMAN DIVEZUR [ Pop/Rock ] DRI w/Abdicate, Bleed The Messiah, and Pipe. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 8 p.m. 21+. $20. Sea of Treachery w/Tonight We Feed. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N. Water Street. 325-5600. 4:30 p.m. $10-$12. A Very Old Toad Christmas ft. Mr. Mustard. The Old Toad, 277 Alexander St. 232-2626. 6 p.m. $5.

MONDAY, DECEMBER 10 [ Acoustic/Folk ] The Voice(s) - A Capella Competition! Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. 8 p.m. Free. [ Classical ] Tuba Mirum Holiday Concert. Ciminelli Formal Lounge – Eastman School of Music, Gibbs Street. 6 p.m. Free. [ DJ/Electronic ] Manic Mondays Dance Night. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 11:30 p.m. Free. [ Jazz ] Bobby DiBaudo Band. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. 248-4825. 5:30 p.m. Free. Mark Bader. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. 662-5555. 5:30 p.m. Free. Watkins & The Rapiers. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 7:30 p.m. Free.

[ Karaoke ] Karaoke w/Walt O’Brien. Flipside Bar & Grill, 2001 E Main St. 288-3930. 9 p.m. Free. [ Open Mic ] Open Mic w/Dave McGrath. Johnny’s Irish Pub, 1382 Culver Rd. 224-0990. 7 p.m. Free. [ Pop/Rock ] EXPIRE w/Malfunction , VICE, Forked Tongues, and Night Terror. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 7 p.m. $10-$12.

TUESDAY, DECEMBER 11 [ Acoustic/Folk ] Adam Clark w/Colossus, Violet Honey. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. $5-$7. Steve Lyons. Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. 8 p.m. Free. [ Blues ] Bluesday Tuesday Blues Jam. P.I.’s Lounge, 495 West Ave. 8 p.m. Call for info. Teagan Ward. The Beale New Orleans Grille and Bar-South Ave., 693 South Ave. 2714650. 7 p.m. Call for info. [ DJ/Electronic ] DJ Kathy. Nashvilles, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. 334-3030. Call for info. Call for info.


[ Jazz ] Gary Chudik. Prosecco Italian Restaurant, 1550 New York 332. 924-8000. 6 p.m. Call for info. Margaret Explosion. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 7:30 p.m. Free. Rick Holland Evan Dobbins Little Big Band w/Captain Marvel. Tala Vera, 155 State St. 546-3845. 8 p.m. $5. Soul Express. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. 662-5555. 6 p.m. Free. Vince Ercolamento & Joe Chiappone Jazz Quartet. Murph’s Irondequoit Pub, 705 Titus Ave. 342-6780. 8 p.m. Free.

PUNK/THRASH | D.R.I.

Along with bands like Suicidal Tendencies and Corrosion of Conformity, D.R.I. (Dirty Rotten Imbeciles) helped usher in thrash elements to the hardcore scene. Formed on May 2, 1982, around 4 p.m., according to the band’s website, D.R.I. has released seven albums, steadily shifting from hardcore punk to thrash, earning it the title the fastest band in the world. Abdicate, Bleed The Messiah, and Pipe also perform. D.R.I. performs Sunday, December 9, 8 p.m. at Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. $20. bugjar.com. — BY FRANK DE BLASE Lingerie Party Ladies Night. Nathaniel’s Pub, 251 Exchange Boulevard. 232-8470. 10 p.m. Call for info. [ Jazz ] Mark Bader. Prosecco Italian Restaurant, 1550 New York 332. 924-8000. 6 p.m. Call for info. Ted Nicolosi and Shared Genes. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. 662-5555. 6 p.m. Free Tinted Image. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. 2484825. 5:30 p.m. Free. [ Karaoke ] Karaoke at Pineapple Jack’s. Pineapple Jack’s, 485 Spencerport Rd. 247-5225. 9 p.m. Call for info. Karaoke at 140 Alex. 140 Alex Bar & Grill, 140 Alexander St. 256-1000. 10:30 p.m. Free. Karaoke w/DJ Vee. TC Riley’s, 200 Park Point Dr. 272-9777. Call for info. Call for info. Karaoke with Tina P.. Wintonaire, 628 Winton Road North. 730-8350. 9 p.m. Free. [ Open Mic ] Golden Link Singaround. Twelve Corners Presbyterian Church, 1200 S. Winton Rd. 244-8585. 7:30 p.m. Free. Open Mic Night. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. 8:30 p.m. Free Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. 8:30 p.m. Free. Open Mic w/String Theory. Johnny’s Irish Pub, 1382 Culver Rd. 224-0990. 8 p.m. Free. [ Reggae/Jam ] The Roc City Pro Jam. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 2929940. 9 p.m. Free.

[ Pop/Rock ] Hit the Lights w/A Loss for Words. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N. Water Street. 3255600. 6:30 p.m. $10.

WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 12 [ Acoustic/Folk ] Rob & Gary Acoustic. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. 248-4825. 5:30 p.m. Free. [ Blues ] Mojo Monkeyz. Sticky Lips BBQ Juke Joint, 830 Jefferson Rd. 292-5544. 9 p.m. Free. Open Blues Jam w/The King Bees. The Beale New Orleans Grille and Bar-South Ave., 693 South Ave. 271-4650. 7:30 p.m. Call for info. Sauce Boss. Dinosaur Bar-BQue, 99 Court St. 9:30 p.m. Free.

[ Karaoke ] Italian American Karaoke. Italian American Community Center, 150 Frank Dimino Way. 594-8882. 7:30 p.m. Free. Karaoke at Mayfield’s Pub. Mayfield’s Pub, 669 N Winton Rd. 288-7199. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke at Sanibel Cottage. Sanibel Cottage, 1517 Empire Blvd. 671-9340. 6 p.m. Free. Karaoke at California Brew Haus. California Brew Haus, 402 Ridge Rd. West. 6211480. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke w/Mark. Flipside Bar & Grill, 2001 E Main St. 2883930. 9 p.m. Free. [ Open Mic ] Open Acoustic Mic Night w/ Mandy. Shorts Bar & Grill, 35 N. Main St. 388-0136. 9 p.m. Free. Open Mic Jam Boulder Alexander St.. Boulder Coffee Co. - Alexander St., 100 Alexander St. 454-7140. 8 p.m. Open Mic w/Steve West. Muddy Waters Coffee House-Geneseo, 53 Main St. 243-9111. 7 p.m. Free. [ Pop/Rock ] The Abominable Snowband. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. 9 p.m. Free. Warrior Soul w/Heatseeker. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. 21+. Call for info.

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rochestercitynewspaper.com City 23


Art with one breast bared, confronting the viewer with the titular question. Kerry James Marshall was trained in classical art history and technique, says Ronnen, but he found a lack of black representation (or a wealth of misrepresentation) in the cannon or western art. His etchings are created after traditional styles: in particular “Untitled (Handsome Man)” is a work akin to Rembrandt’s portraits of grandeur, dignity, and stillness of gaze. Marshall is “referencing major artist printmakers,” says Ronnen, “but he’s made the subjects in his own image.” Like Puryear and some other artists in the

“Coup de Grâce” by Alison Saar is included in the “Contemporary African American Printmakers” exhibit currently at Nazreth College. PHOTO PROVIDED

Piecing together what is left “Contemporary African American Printmakers” Presented by Deborah Ronnen Fine Art Through December 21 DEC. 22-30 BY APPT. (CALL 218-9124) & DECEMBER 31 5:30-11 P.M. Nazareth College Arts Center Gallery, 4245 East Ave. 389-5073, naz.edu Wednesday, Thursday, Sunday noon-5 p.m.; Friday-Saturday noon-8 p.m. [ REVIEW ] by Rebecca Rafferty

African-American artists, like women artists or gay artists, often find themselves in the dubious position of representing a group with their work, whether or not it is their intent to do so. For the current exhibit up at Nazareth College Arts Center Gallery, curator Deborah Ronnen wanted to provide a look at what African-American artists are doing in the printmaking process today, and was interested in including artists who address their ethnicity in their work. The resulting exhibit includes 13 artists, represents a wide variety of printmaking techniques, and provides a sensitive and nuanced look at a very complicated identity. We don’t often consider it this way, but the term “African-American” groups 24 City december 5-11, 2012

a diverse set of people based on outward appearances, and perhaps united foremost by their shared fates of stolen legacies and the ongoing denial of an equal standing in the present. The works in the show reflect on family histories, on self-generated futures, and on inner worlds shared with ambassador audiences. Ronnen has included work by three winners of MacArthur Foundation “Genius” grants, including Martin Puryear’s understated “Black Cart,” which greatly resembles his sculptures in simplicity of form, complexity of subject, and that tar-black coating that casts a shadow on certainty. The exhibit presents a spectrum of the ways artists treat contemporary black identity, whether it’s telling their histories, reclaiming histories in which they were left out, or reinventing reality from very inspired scratch. For example, the show includes two of Radcliffe Bailey’s collages based around tintypes of women in Victorian garb from family albums. For Bailey, race and pride in personal ancestry are the direct and central message. Similarly, the nearby prints by Mickalene Thomas, who currently has an exhibit at Brooklyn Museum, depict beautiful, confident, powerful black women, including first lady “Michelle O.” In “Why Can’t We All Just Sit Down and Talk It Over,” a regal woman lounges

show, Alison Saar isn’t known first and foremost for her work in printmaking. The sculptor will frequently create postsculptural studies of her 3D works, which is not common, but allows her to further meditate on the concepts she’s working with. For example, Saar’s work “Inheritance” is after a sculptural work by the same title, with very similar imagery of a young Atlas-esque figure standing with a massive cloth bundle on her head. The work, as with others in the show, alludes to Saar’s mother, who had to shoulder the weight of her household at a tender age. Different effects are expressed in the different dimensional versions of the work. While in the print, the figure stands in the heavy shadow of the bundle, in the sculpture, the weight and bulk of the bundle are more evident, says Ronnen. The show also crucially tackles the persistent “us vs. them” race-relations questions that plague our culture. The works of Dread Scott — an artist who took his name from the subject of the iconic Supreme Court case that failed to “grant” citizenship to black people — silently ask us to consider the inequity involved in reaping the rewards of labor. Superimposed over a smiling Hattie McDaniel (the first African-American to receive an Academy Award, but for playing the role of a caricature servant in “Gone With the Wind”) is text that asks, “If white people didn’t invent the air, what would we breathe?” This piece is flanked by two nearly identical works that ask why it is that “we” feel threatened by “them” and vice versa. Despite the stark, pointed nature of these works, there are slow, unfolding elements involved in which viewers realize they are being confronted by two sets of huge eyes in black-on-gray ink, and also that the viewer is mirrored in the dark space of the image.

Equally challenging is the rarely-shown-

together suite of four prints by Kara Walker, who is best known for her black silhouette work which, like the prints here, are emotionally charged with racial and sexual tension. I was most struck by the print “Cotton,” in which a black woman is depicted tumbling into a vat of downy, oversized cotton blossoms, revealing what a master the artist is at created loaded, dichotomous imagery. Trenton Doyle’s florescent, screenprinted wallpaper and colorful etchings depict a terrifying self-created mythic saga, complete with an epic battle between the Mounds and the Vegans, an allegory with an eventual outcome of subduing the oppressor and making them see beyond black and white. Similarly, the Artists of Gee’s Bend have pieced together their own world from scraps. The story of several women, all descended from slaves, who like their mothers and grandmothers create vibrant, unique quilts from scraps of garments, is told through video, personal statements, and unique etchings made collaboratively by the women and master printers, originally for a show at the Whitney Museum of American Art. Several of the prints are in this show, resembling improvised flags from made-up nations, each stitch, texture, and fold of fabric preserved through the unique process of pressing the quilts into copper plates treated with beeswax. Learning the moving history behind these accidental art objects is definitely worth spending time with this segment of the exhibit. Perhaps the most understated and yet brilliantly effective work in the show is by young artist Jennie C. Jones, whose “The Components” suite is made up of three tall, narrow, minimalist screen prints. A central image of silver, overlapping strings on white is flanked by what appear to be two black rectangles with hints of hot color. Jones’s aim is to connect the often-overlooked contributions of African-American musicians to minimal work, and her work certainly awards intrepid viewers. A quick glance at the prints suggests flat, black, simple subjects, but those who approach and spend a little time sink into the depth of a shimmering, surprise starfield, glimpse the universe, and detect the fullness. The strings of the center work reveal countless, impossibly tiny hatchmarks, come alive in the imagination with vibrating bass beats. Jones’s minimal art, like someone who is a stranger to us, is deceptively complex, and poetically chides us for dismissing what we can only see fully with intent and focus.


BOOKENDS

Art Exhibits [ Opening ] 1st Annual ArtOut! featuring new works by Henry Avignon III. Fri., Dec. 7, 6-9 p.m. East Avenue Inn & Suites, 384 East Ave eastaveinn. com. 22nd Annual Members Exhibition. Thu., Dec. 6, 6-10 p.m. and WednesdaysSundays Rochester Contemporary Arts Center, 137 East Ave. Through Jan 13. Wed-Sun 1-5 p.m. Reception and special announcement Thursday Dec 6, 6-10 p.m., First Friday reception Friday, Dec 7, 6-10 p.m. Closed to the public for Holidays: Dec 26-28. 461-2222. rochestercontemporary.org. “...and to All a Good Night!” Art Exhibit. Dec. 7-8 and Wednesdays, 12-5 p.m The Shoe Factory Art Co-op, 250 N. Goodman St. Through Dec 19. Receptions Dec 7 5-10 p.m., Dec 8 11 a.m.-5 p.m shoefactoryarts.com. “Beautiful Ruins” by Paula Peters Marra. Dec. 7Jan. 31. Equal=Grounds, 750 South Ave. gallery@ equalgrounds.com. “A Circle of Friends: New Work by Five Full-Time, Long-Time Artists.” Fri., Dec. 7, 5-9 p.m., Dec. 8-9, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. and Dec. 10-24. Hungerford Building, 1115 E. Main St. Suite 106. Through Dec 24 by appt. Opening party Dec 7 429-0211. richard@richaraerni.com. richardaerni.com. “Creative Process: from ideation to realization.” Dec. 7-Jan. 4. Gallery r, 100 college ave Through Jan 4. Reception Dec 7 6-9:30 p.m 256-3312. galleryr99@ gmail.com. Eleventh Annual Faculty and Student Exhibit and Sale. Fri., Dec. 7, 6-9 p.m. and Dec. 7-22. Studio 34 Creative Arts Center and Gallery, 34 Elton St. Through Dec 22. Reception Dec 7 737-5858. Expressions of the Civil War. Tuesdays-Saturdays, 5 p.m. New Deal Gallery, 4 Livingston County Campus In recognition of the 150th Anniversary. Hours: Tue, Wed, Fri 1-4 p.m., Thu 17:30 p.m., Sat 11 a.m.-3 p.m. After November 12: Closed Tuesdays. 243-6785. livingstonarts.org. Faith Journey: Paintings by Richmond Futch. Fri., Dec. 7, 6-9 p.m. Baobab Cultural Center, 728 University Ave. thebaobab.org. The Grass Roots Holiday Celebration. Fri., Dec. 7, 69 p.m. Grass Roots Gallery, suite 157, Hungerford Bldg, 1115 E. Main St., Suite 248 grassrootsgallery@gmail.com. thegrassrootsgallery.com. continues on page 26

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ART | Holiday Group Shows

In case the influx of commercials and ads haven’t tipped you off, we’re full swing into the holiday shopping season. Whether you want to support local and handmade art, you’re looking for a unique gift for that special someone, or you just don’t want to brave the purgatory known as the mall, go check out this week’s holiday group art shows, and celebrate the shopping-est season with your community. Here are a few choice selections, but keep an eye on our calendar at rochestercitynewspaper.com for more events in this vein. The annual Members Show at Rochester Contemporary Art Center (137 East Ave.) takes place December 6-January 13, and includes hundreds of artworks for every taste. The opening reception takes place Thursday, December 6, 6-10 p.m., at which you can hear a special announcement about the future of RoCo at 8 p.m. The gallery will also be open for First Friday on December 7 6-10 p.m. Admission is $1 for non-members. Dozens of back-to-back artists’ talks will take place December 8-9. For more information, call 461-2222, or visit rochestercontemporary.org. The Rochester Arc & Flame Center (125 Fedex Way) will host a Holiday Open House, Show, and Sale on Friday, December 7, 5-10 p.m., and Saturday, December 8, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Admission is free, and the event will feature local artisans selling unique handmade items, in-house instructors demonstrating glass blowing, glass-bead making, glass fusing, metal welding, and blacksmithing. For more information, call 349-7110 or visit rocafc.com. Studio 34 Creative Arts Center and Gallery (34 Elton St.) will host its 11th Annual Holiday Open House, featuring a faculty and student exhibit, studio tours, demos of glass blowing, and more on Friday, December 7, 5-9 p.m. Admission is free; for more info, call 737-5858, or visit studio34jewelryartslearningcenter.com. Black Radish Studio (274 N. Goodman St., Ste. 501) will host “Le Petit Black Radish,” a small-format art exhibition and local vendor sale, December 7-31. The opening reception and vendor sale takes place Friday, December 7, 6-10 p.m., and will feature more than thirty artists from around the country, with matted and unmatted 5”x7” works available for buyers to take home, same day, for less than $75. Admission is free. For more information, call 413-1278. Cat Clay Studio (Hungerford Building, 1115 E. Main St., Suite 225) will present a holiday show with sweet handmade works by Maggi Bartlett and Amy Brand (pictured), as well as new ceramic work by Melinda Friday, Marie Verlinde Nye, and Sabra Wood, December 7-22, with receptions taking place on Friday, December 7, 5-9 p.m., and Saturday, December 8, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Admission is free. For more information, call 764-9055, or visit catclay.com. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY rochestercitynewspaper.com City 25


Art Exhibits Holiday Show with Maggi Bartlett & Amy Brand. Fri., Dec. 7, 5-9 p.m., Sat., Dec. 8, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. and Dec. 9-22. Cat Clay, 1115 E. Main Street, Suite 225 Opening Parties: Dec 7 5-9 p.m. & Dec 8 10 a.m.–4 p.m. Continues through December 22nd. Featuring Melinda Friday, Marie Verlinde Nye & Sabra Wood. 414-5643. catclay.com. Julia Rabkin Photography Exhibit. Fri., Dec. 7, 6-9 p.m. Caroline Gallery, 159 Caroline St 260-7607 Fri., Dec. 7, 69 p.m. The Caroline Gallery, 159 Caroline St 967-2191. juliarabkin.com. Pittsford Art Group Holiday Show. Dec. 5-28 and Dec. 6-7. Spectrum Gallery at Lumiere Photo, 100 College Ave. Through Dec 28. Opening Reception Thu 6-8 p.m., First Friday 6-9 p.m 461-4447. lumierephoto.com. Roc The Casbah: A Tribute to the Clash. Dec. 7-Jan. 31, 8 p.m.-2 a.m. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. THE LOBBY PRESENTS. Vintage Propaganda from the Collection of Jim Malley (Mercury Posters) and Clayton Cowles illustrations of The Clash $7 opening night only. Steven Lee-Davis. Fri., Dec. 7, 6-9 p.m. and Dec. 7-28. Genesee Center for the Arts

and Education, 713 Monroe Ave. Printing and Book Arts Center. Through Dec 28. Reception Dec 7 244-1730. geneseearts.org. “Visualizing Vacancy” by Laura Minor. Fri., Dec. 7. Visual Studies Workshop, 31 Prince Street Free. (585) 442-8676. vsw.org. “VOYAGEz” artworks by Zanne Brunner. MondaysSaturdays I-Square Visions, 693 Titus Ave. Through Jan 10. Mon-Thu 10 a.m.-2 p.m., Sat 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Reception Dece 15, 7-9 p.m brunner@gmail.com. [ Continuing ] 1975 Gallery, 89 Charlotte St “A Celebration of Growth” Art Gala by GlobeMed. Through Dec. 15. paperless.ly/101b1B3. 1975ish.com. A.R.T.S. Gallery, 321 East Ave “Joy in the Atmosphere” by Richmond Futch. Through Dec. 31. 729-9916. Art/Music Library Gallery, University of Rochester River Campus Phillia Yi. Through Jan. 18, 2013 and Thu., Dec. 6, 4:30-6:30 p.m. rochester.edu. Art and Vintage on Main, 101 Main St. “Lost Infinity” the works of Brett Maurer and Matthew Tully Dugan. ongoing. artandvintageonmain.com.

Axom Gallery, 176 Anderson Ave., 2nd floor, “Kurt Moyer: New Arcadia,” A Solo Exhibition of Paintings. Wednesdays-Saturdays, 12-5 p.m. and Fri., Dec. 7, 6-9 p.m Through Jan 12 232-6030 x23. axomgallery.com. Books Etc., 78 W. Main St. “Catching Dreams.” Through Jan. 13, 2013. Featuring the work of Bonnie Evangelista, Becky Harris and Chris Horn Free. 474-4116. books_etc@ yahoo.com. Cary Graphic Arts Collection, Lomb Memorial Dr “Edges of Books.” Mondays-Fridays, 1-5 p.m Through Dec 14. 4753961. rit.edu. Community Darkroom Gallery, 713 Monroe Ave. “Kaleidoscope.” Through March 2, 2013. 271-5920. Davison Gallery, Cultural Life Center, Roberts Wesleyan College, 2301 Westside Dr Senior Showcase. Through Dec. 15. Reception Dec 8, 46 p.m 594-6442. roberts.edu. Equal=Grounds, 750 South Ave. 6th annual Rochester AIDS Memorial Quilt. Through Dec. 7. equalgrounds.com. Friendly Home’s Memorial Gallery, 3165 East Ave. “Watercolor World” by Sylvie Culbertson. Through Dec. 31, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. 385-0298. friendlyhome.org. Genesee Co-op Federal Credit Union, 395 Gregory St. The

Faces in Wood by Charles Jaffe. Through Dec. 31. Through end of Dec. MonWed 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Thu-Fri 10 a.m.-6 p.m. 461-2230. melissa@genesee.coop. George Eastman House, 900 East Ave. “60 from the 60s.” Tuesdays-Sundays Through Jan 27. Sweet Creations Gingerbread House Display/Festival of Trees. Through Dec. 12. Tue-Sat 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Sun 11 a.m.5 p.m $5-$12. 271-3361. eastmanhouse.org. Hartnett Gallery, Wilson Commons, University of Rochester, River Campus University of Rochester Studio Art Faculty Exhibition. Through Dec. 9. Tue-Fri 11 a.m.-7 p.m., Sat-Sun noon-5 p.m Free. 275-4188. blogs. rochester.edu/hartnett. iGallery Kathy Clem, Anderson Arts Building, 250 N. Goodman St., Suite 312. “Fantasy” by Kathy Clem. Through Dec. 8. Mon-Fri 1-5 p.m igallerykathyclem.com. Image City Photography Gallery, 722 University Ave. Holiday Show 2012. Through Dec 23. MonSat 11 a.m.-7 p.m., Sun 12-4 p.m. Reception Dec 7 5-9 p.m. 482-1976. imagecityphotographygallery. com. International Art Acquisitions, 3300 Monroe Ave. “American

Landscape” by Marcella Gillenwater. Through Dec. 31. Mon-Fri 10 a.m.-9 p.m., Sat 10 a.m.-6 p.m., Sun noon-5 p.m 264-1440. internationalartacquisitions. com. JGK Galleries, 10 Vick Park A Holiday Event. TuesdaysThursdays, Saturdays Through Dec 24. Tue, Thu, and Sat 11 a.m.–3 p.m., Wed 4:307:30 p.m. Unique artistically crafted gift items 734-6581. jgkgalleries.com. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. “The Heirloom,” Art by Mara Ahmed. Through Dec. 7. Free. thelittle.org. Lockhart Gallery at SUNY Geneseo, 28 Main St “From the Permanent Collection: Then and Now.” Through Dec 10. Tue-Thu 12:30-3:30 p.m., Fri-Sat 1-5 p.m 2455813. geneseo.edu/galleries. Lower Link Gallery, Central Library, 115 South Ave. “Art of the Book.” Through Dec. 9. 428-8053. libraryweb.org. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. Through Feb 17 “Changing Hands: Art Without Reservation 3” Contemporary Native North American Art. Lockhart Gallery: “Framing Edo: Masterworks from Hiroshige’s One Hundred Famous Views.” Wed-Sun 11 a.m.-5 p.m., Thu until 9 p.m $5-$12. 2768900. mag.rochester.edu.

Mill Art Center & Gallery, 61 N Main St “Adriatic Coast and Home” photography by Steve Levinson. Through Jan. 7, 2013. 624-7740. millartcenter.com. My Sister’s Gallery, 505 Mt. Hope Ave. “Nature Scapes: Far and Near,” photographs by Lois A. Trieb. Through Jan 6. Reception Dec 7 5-7 p.m 546-8400. episcopalseniorlife.org. Nazareth College Arts Center Gallery, 4245 East Ave. Deborah Ronnen Fine Art Presents “Contemporary African American Printmakers.” WednesdaysSundays Through Dec 21. Sun 12-5 p.m., Wed-Thu 12-5 p.m., Fri-Sat 12-8 p.m. By appt Dec 22-30. Dec 31 5:30-11 p.m. 3895073. New Deal Gallery, 4 Livingston County Campus The Faces of Michael Teres and Leslie Heen. Tuesdays-Saturdays, 7 p.m. Hours: Tue, Wed, Fri 1-4 p.m., Thu 1-7:30 p.m., Sat 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Closed Tuesdays. 243-6785. livingstonarts.org. Ock Hee’s Gallery, 2 Lehigh St. “Spirit & Essence” with Dan Malczewski & Peter Secrest. Through Dec. 31. Mon-Sat 11 a.m.-5 p.m., Sun noon-5 p.m. Reception Dec 1. 624-4730. ockheesgallery. com.

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Outside the Box Art Gallery, 6 North Main St Holiday Open House. Through Dec. 24, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. 6452485. outsidetheboxag@ gmail.com. facebook.com/ outsidetheboxag. Oxford Gallery, 267 Oxford St. Annual Holiday Exhibit. Tuesdays-Saturdays Continues through Jan 5. Tue-Fri noon-5 p.m., Sat 10 a.m.-5 p.m 2715885. oxfordgallery.com. Pat Rini Rohrer Gallery, 71 S Main St Holidays at the Gallery. Through Jan 6. 3940030. prrgallery.com. Phillips Fine Art, 248 East Ave. Celestial Songs: Sculpture by Tarrant Clements. Tuesdays-Saturdays Through Dec 22. Tue-Fri noon-6 p.m., Sat noon-5 p.m 232-8120. Roc Brewing Co., 56 S. Union St Carla Bartow. ongoing. Opening Fri Oct 19, 7-10 p.m. carlasswanktank. blogspot.com. 794-9798. rocbrewingco@gmail.com. rocbrewingco.com. Rosalie “Roz” Steiner Art Gallery, Genesee Community College, One College Rd Dale Inglett. Through Jan 3. 343-0055 x6490. gallery@ genesee.edu. genesee.edu/ St. John Fisher College, 3690 East Ave Rochester Art Club Retrospective Exhibition. Through Dec 20 in the Patricia O’Keefe

Ross Gallery of the Skalney Center. Honoring deceased memebers of the RAC. rochesterartclub.org. Tower Fine Arts Center Mainstage at The College at Brockport, 180 Holley Street “Low Fidelity.” Through Dec. 9. Hours Mon-Fri 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Sun 1-4 p.m. 3952805. brockport.edu/finearts. Visual Studies Workshop, 31 Prince Street “Pitch Man” Hank Willis Thomas. Thursdays-Sundays Through Dec 9. Thu 5-8 p.m., FriSun 12-3 p.m (585) 4428676. vsw.org. West Side Gallery, SUNY Brockport, 180 Holley St. “Human Nature: Interpretations of the Seasons” Mixed Media Drawings by Torey Hamlin. Mondays-Fridays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m Free. brockport.edu/ finearts. Williams-Insalaco Gallery at FLCC, 3325 Marvin Sands Dr “Imaginations: Space and Time, Drawings and Paintings by Debra Stewart.” Through Dec 20. Mon-Thu 8:30 a.m.9 p.m., Fri 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m., Sat-Sun noon-5 p.m. 7851369. naegelbr@flcc.edu. The Yards, 50-52 Public Market “Continental Breakfasts: a three year photographic collaboration.” Tuesdays, Thursdays, Saturdays, 10 a.m.-

2 p.m Photos by Lisa Barker and Anna Peters Wehking. Through Jan 12 attheyards@gmail.com. continentalbreakfasts. wordpress.com. Visual Studies Workshop, 31 Prince Street Visualizing Vacancy. Fri., Dec. 7, 6 p.m., Sat., Dec. 8, noon and Sun., Dec. 9, noon. An MFA thesis Exhibition by Laura Minor. In the Siskind Gallery 4428676. vsw.org.

Art Events [ WED., DECEMBER 5 ] 4th annual Holiday Boutique. 6-9 p.m. Cobblestone Creek Country Club, 100 Cobble Creek Rd., Victor. All proceeds benefit the Victor/Farmington Food Cupboard. Admission: $10 and one can of food. 8695056. pinestonerlp@aol.com. [ THU., DECEMBER 6 ] Ganondagan at the Gallery. Dec. 6. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. Enjoy an exclusive tour by G. Peter Jemison, a special multi-media presentation and a stimulating evening of conversation. Enjoy food and drink, and stay for entertainment by Iroquois social dancers $20-$100. 276-8900. ganondagan.org. [ FRI., DECEMBER 7 ] 11th Annual Holiday Open House. 5-9 p.m. Studio 34 Creative Arts Center and

Gallery, 34 Elton St. Featuring faculty and student exhibit. Tour studios and watch demonstrations of glass blowing, New Age Metals, chain maille, and more. 7375858. 20th Annual Anderson Alley Artists Holiday Gala. 5-10 p.m. Anderson Alley Building, 250 N. Goodman St andersonalleyartists.com. Annual Holiday Sale. Dec. 7-8. Anderson Alley Building, 250 N. Goodman St Studio #203. Fri 5-9 p.m., Sat 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Featuring the work of Resident Artists Sharon Jeter, Marisa Krol, and Carol Bohan, and special guest artist Robbie of Lost Girl Metalworks. andersonalleyartists.com. Arts & Crafts Show and Sale. 6 p.m. Vineyard Community Space, 836 South Clinton Ave First Friday Opening from 6-9 pm includes live music from the Bearfoot Brothers, MD Woods & Viento. ALSO Arts, Crafts and HENNA on SATURDAY from 12-5 pm. Artists and Crafts people include: Juni Moon, Ruth Christianson, Julia Eddy, Amber James, John Kiss III, Diane Mullaney, Dorothy Ross, Noah Scheuerman, Nicholas Smythe, Alex and Lisa Bogs, Gisele Zeigler, Ruth Broxup, Becca Christianson, Rachel Dow Free. 342-8429. info@ monroeparkvineyard.org.

The City is Asleep and Dreaming. 6-10 p.m. National Bank building, 35 State St. firstfridayrochester.org. Constance Mauro Studio Holiday Sale. Dec. 7-8. Hungerford Building, 1115 E. Main St. Fri 6-9 p.m., Sat 12-4 p.m. Featuring Gypsy Stoneware by Sand Fessler and ornaments by Margaret Henry. Studio #236 thehungerford.com. First Friday City Wide Gallery Night. first Friday of every month, 6-9 p.m. firstfridayrochester.org. Hungerford Urban Artists Holiday Show. Dec. 7-8. Hungerford Building, 1115 E. Main St. Fri 6-9 p.m., Sat 10 a.m.-4 p.m 414-5643. thehungerford.com. JIll Gussow’s Studio Show and Sale. Dec. 7-8. Anderson Alley Building, 250 N. Goodman St Richard Margolis’ Studio, 4th floor, #9. Fri 5-10 p.m., Sat 11 a.m.-5 p.m 473-0070. andersonalleyartists.com. Main Street Artists’ First Friday open studio show and sale. 5-9 p.m. Hungerford Building, 1115 E. Main St. Studio 458. Featured artist for December: Suzi ZeftingKuhn. Music by Mike and Mel of Violent Mary. 233-5645. mainstreetartistsgallery.com. Special Large Movie Screening Party: “Fantasy” by Kathy Clem. 6-9

p.m. iGalleryKathyClem, Anderson Arts Building, 250 North Goodman Street, Suite 312. 764-5589. igallerykathyclem.com. A Studio 364 Christmas. 6-9 p.m. Hungerford Building, 1115 E. Main St. thehungerford.com. [ SAT., DECEMBER 8 ] “All That Glitters” Holiday Trunk Show. 11 a.m.-4:30 p.m. I-Square Visions, 693 Titus Ave. Featuring Jacqueline Salsbury and Lisa Rouse. The Days the Artists Spoke Members Exhibition Artists’ Talks. Dec. 89, 1-6 p.m. Rochester Contemporary Arts Center, 137 East Ave. $1. 461-2222. rochestercontemporary.org. Holiday Craft Show. 9 a.m.-4 p.m. St. Stanislaus Church, 1124 Hudson Ave Crafters needed. $50 crafter fee, free admission to visitors. 4677427. Special Holiday Gala Party: “Fantasy” by Kathy Clem. 11 a.m.-5 p.m. iGalleryKathyClem, Anderson Arts Building, 250 North Goodman Street, Suite 312. Artist Talk and iPad Painting Demonstration at 2 p.m 7645589. igallerykathyclem.com. Spencerport Lions Club 16th Holiday Craft Show. 9 a.m.3:30 p.m. Terrgy Taylor School continues on page 28

rochestercitynewspaper.com City 27


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[ FRI., DECEMBER 7 ] Uncle Lina Sketch Comedy Show. Dec. 7-8, 7:30 p.m. Bread & Water Theatre, 243 Rosedale St. $5-$7. 271-5523. BreadandWaterTheatre.org. [ SAT., DECEMBER 8 ] Nuts & Bolts Ho Ho Holiday Jam. 8 p.m. Downstairs Cabaret Theatre Center, 540 E. Main St $10. 334-8973. bit.ly/TsOaMQ. [ TUE., DECEMBER 11 ] Laugh Riot Underground: Stand-Up Comedy Showcase. 9-11 p.m. Dub Land Underground, 315 Alexander St. Free. laughriotcomedy.com.

Dance Events [ WED., DECEMBER 5 ] “Great Russian Nutcracker” Moscow Ballet. 7:30 p.m. Auditorium Theatre, 885 Main St $55.50$104.50. 800-745-3000. ticketmaster.com. [ THU., DECEMBER 6 ] Geneseo Dance Ensemble. Dec. 6-9. SUNY Geneseo, 1 College Rd. Alice Austin Theatre. Thu-Sat 8 p.m., Sun 2 p.m $10. 245-5833. geneseo.edu/bbo. [ SAT., DECEMBER 8 ] Inikori Dance Studio Open House. 5:30-8:30 p.m. Inikori Dance Studio, 1060 University Ave. Free, RSVP. inikoridance. com/openhouse.htm. Saturday Night Club Dance Party. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Tango Cafe, 389 Gregory St. $5-$10. 271-4930. tangocafedance.com. [ TUE., DECEMBER 11 ] Stardust Ballroom Dance Series. 7:30 p.m Edgerton Community Center, 41 Backus St $3. 4286769. cityofrochester.gov/ ballroomdanceseries.

Kids Events [ WED., DECEMBER 5 ] Paint Me a Story. 10-11 a.m. Greece Public Library, 2 Vince Tofany Blvd. Ages 2+. Free, register. 225-8951. 28 City december 5-11, 2012

ART EVENT | The City is Asleep and Dreaming

The gorgeous architecture of the vacant National Bank, set in downtown Rochester at 35 State Street, was the backdrop for the University of Rochester’s student-run indie arts festival, Art Awake, in 2010. The underused space will again serve as the staging for an arts event on Friday, December 7, when more than a dozen artists transform it for the site-specific exhibition, “The City is Asleep and Dreaming.” Rochester artists Evelyne Leblanc-Roberge and Jason Bernagozzi organize the series of exhibitions in order to “help develop a public dialogue about the transitioning identity of the city of Rochester and provoke a reimagination of what public space is and what it could be,” per provided information. The show takes place 6-10 p.m. and will include 18 visual, dance, and performance artists from Western and Central New York, each addressing concepts surrounding the act of transformation while operating within a public space that appears to be frozen in time. The event is free to attend. For more information, visit firstfridayrochester.org. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY [ THU., DECEMBER 6 ] Family Bop Til You Drop, Christmas Style. 10-10:30 a.m. Greece Public Library, 2 Vince Tofany Blvd. [ SAT., DECEMBER 8 ] Acorn Adventures. 10-11:30 a.m. Helmer Nature Center, 154 Pinegrove Ave 3363035. westirondequoit.org/ helmer.htm. Christmas with Santa. Springdale Farm, 700 Colby St., Spencerport. Breakfast seatings 9, 10, 11 a.m. & noon. $8. 349-2090. springdalefarm.org. Dino Days. Sundays Rochester Museum and Science Center, 657 East Ave. Included in museum admission $11-$13. 271-1880. rmsc.org. Eddie the Elk and the Twelve Days of Christmas. Sundays, 3 p.m Rochester Museum and Science Center, 657 East Ave. Included in museum admission $11-$13. 2711880. rmsc.org. Girls and Their Dolls. 1011:30 a.m. Greece Public Library, 2 Vince Tofany Blvd. Free, register. 225-8951. Literature Live: “The Grinch.” Dec. 8-9. The Strong National Museum of Play, 1 Manhattan Square Included in museum admission $11-$13. 2632700. museumofplay.org. Nature Explorers. 12:302:30 p.m. Helmer Nature

Center, 154 Pinegrove Ave 336-3035. westirondequoit. org/helmer.htm. Polar Express Train Rides. Sundays, 3:30, 4:40 & 5:55 p.m Medina Depot, 530 West Ave., Medina. $23-$45. 798-6106. railroadmuseum.net. Science Saturday: Have to Have a Habitat. 11 a.m. & 12:30 p.m. Rochester Museum and Science Center, 657 East Ave. Included in admission: $11$13. rmsc.org. Toddler Dance Party. 10:3011 a.m. Henrietta Public Library, 455 Calkins Rd Ages 18 months to 4 years and caregivers. Free. 3597092. [ SUN., DECEMBER 9 ] Kids Menorah Workshop. 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Home Depot, 770 Jefferson Rd Free, RSVP. 271-0330. chabad@ chabadrochester.com. [ TUE., DECEMBER 11 ] Gates Graphic Novel Group. 5:30-6:30 p.m. Gates Public Library, 902 Elmgrove Rd. Grades 7-12. 247-6446. Kids’ Workshop: Peanut Butter Pine Cone Bird Feeder. 2-4 p.m. Wayside Garden Center, 124 Pittsford-Palmyra Rd Free. 223-1222 x100. trish@ waysidegardencenter.com. waysidegardencenter.com.


Teen Tolkien Tuesdays. 68 p.m Wood Library, 134 North Main St. Tolkien movie marathon to get you ready for the premier of The Hobbit movie. Recommended for 13+, but call for feature details. Grades 6-12 Free. 3941381. woodlibrary.org. Trim A Tree For Wildlife. 3:30 p.m. Helmer Nature Center, 154 Pinegrove Ave Grades K-6 are welcome to join us for a holiday decorating workshop. $6. 336-3035. westirondequoit. org/helmer.htm.

Lectures [ WED., DECEMBER 5 ] Lecture on William Seward by Walter Stahr. 7 p.m. Genesee Community College, 1 College Road 5853430055. civilwaratgcc. wordpress.com. “The Right to the Common” with Michael Hardt. 7 p.m. Warren Hunting Smith Library, Hobart and William Smith Colleges, Pultney St hws.edu/ academics/fisher_center. “Sanctifying American Landscape: Hindu Settlers and Unsettlers” with Corrine Dempsey. 5-6:30 p.m. Rochester Institute of Technology, 1 Lomb Memorial Dr. rit.edu/news. [ THU., DECEMBER 6 ] Building Our Media: a critical discussion series on independent media. 7-9 p.m Flying Squirrel Community Space, 285 Clarissa St. Rochester.Indymedia.org. Sons of Old Monroe: The NY volunteer Infantry. Dec. 6. St John’s Lutheran Church, 800 East Ridge Rd Brian Bennett, presenter Free to members, guests $1. 336-7269. [ FRI., DECEMBER 7 ] Chocolate Talk & Tasting: The Geography of Chocolate. 6:30-7:30 p.m. The Cocoa Bean Shoppe, 20 S. Main St., Pittsford. $3, RSVP. 2031618. cocoabeanshoppe.com. “Making Sense of the Civil War.” 10 a.m. Penfield Community Center, 1985 Baird Rd. Breakfast at 9:30 a.m. $5. Free. 340-8655. penfield.org. Maria Klawe: “Gender and Games: Why it Matters.” 1 p.m. Rochester Institute of Technology, 1 Lomb Memorial Dr. rit.edu/news. [ SUN., DECEMBER 9 ] Louis Comfort Tiffany. 2:30 p.m. Penfield Public Library, 1985 Baird Rd. Don Hall, retired director of the Strasenburgh Planetarium and a Tiffany expert, will discuss Louis Comfort Tiffany as both an artist and a business man Free, register. 340-8720. penfieldlibrary.org. [ MON., DECEMBER 10 ] Human Rights Day in Rochester. Dec. 10.

READ CITY ONLINE EVERY WEEK AT www.issuu.com/roccitynews

HOLIDAY

KIDS | Family Theater Roundup

Winter is an excellent time to introduce children to the wonders of theater. When it’s too chilly outside to frolic and play, there’s a host of fun to be experienced indoors with the help of lights, costumes, and some imagination. Watch Horton the Elephant and his little friend Jojo come to life onstage as they fight to save the small speck of dust on which the Whos live. Nazareth College Arts Center (4245 East Ave.) and Rochester Children’s Theatre will present “Seussical, the Musical” on Saturday, December 8, at 2 & 7 p.m., and Sunday, December 9, at 2 p.m. Tickets cost $20$25 and can be purchased at the Arts Center Box Office, by calling 389-2170, or at boxoffice.naz.edu. The show continues through Sunday, December 16.

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Experience six-time Emmy Award-winning author/illustrator Mo Willems’ musical “Knuffle Bunny: A Cautionary Musical,” (pictured) adapted from his book “Knuffle Bunny: A Cautionary Tale.” Parents and children alike will sympathize with Trixie and her woes as she leaves her beloved stuffed bunny at the laundromat one day. TYKEs (Theatre Young Kids Enjoy) will present the show Saturday, December 8 at 2 p.m., and Sunday, December 9, at 11 a.m. and 2 p.m. at the JCC Hart Theatre, 1200 Edgewood Ave. Tickets cost $15. 461-2000, tykestheatre.org. Don’t forget Geva Theatre Center (75 Woodbury Blvd.) will also be continuing “A Christmas Carol” through December 23. Performances this weekend include Friday, December 7, at 7:30 p.m., Saturday, December 8, at 2 p.m. and 7:30 p.m., and Sunday, December 9, at noon and 4:30 p.m. Tickets cost $25-$42.50. 232-4382. gevatheatre.org. — BY LILLIAN DICKERSON Downtown United Presbyterian Church, 121 N. Fitzhugh Street 5 p.m. potluck, 7 p.m. program. Keynote Speaker: Dr. Marvin McMickle. Theme: Michelle Alexander’s bestselling book: “The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness..” Free. 3254000. interconnect_mott@ frontiernet.net. [ TUE., DECEMBER 11 ] Lewiston Mudbalers: War of 1812. 6:30-7:30 p.m. Greece Public Library, 2 Vince Tofany Blvd. Free, register. 2258951.

Literary Events [ WED., DECEMBER 5 ] Pure Kona Open Mic. 7:30 p.m. Acanthus Cafe, 337 East Ave Free. 319-5999. Rochester Public Library’s Annual Holiday Fiction Used Book Sale. Mondays-Fridays

Give us a call today! 200 EAST AVE • 613-4600

Bausch & Lomb Public Library Building, 115 South Ave. Through Dec 31. MonFri 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Thu 11 a.m.-7 p.m 428-8322. libraryweb.org. [ THU., DECEMBER 6 ] Author book signing, Q&A: “Tyler Florence Fresh.” 5 p.m. Wegmans, 1955 Empire Blvd., Webster. Book Signing and Holiday Sale. 4-6 p.m. Episcopal SeniorLife Communities, 505 Mt. Hope Ave. Dennis Wienk, translator of the book “Five Women” will sign books 5468439 x3716. abmiller@ episcopalseniorlife.org. Books Sandwiched-In: “11/22/63” by Stephen King. 12:10 p.m. Brighton Memorial Library, 2300 Elmwood Ave. Free. 7845300. brightonlibrary.org. continues on page 30 rochestercitynewspaper.com City 29


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The low-brow art low down [ PREVIEW ] BY REBECCA RAFFERTY

When I think of what makes a hip art scene, “franchise” isn’t a word that readily comes to mind, or seems like very much of a good idea. But when I learned of the international, growing phenomenon of hosting themed figure-drawing nights in artists’ studios and subcultural centers under the Dr. Sketchy’s Anti-Art School label, I had to admit that this was a very special case. The local manifestation of Dr. Sketchy’s, hosted at rotating venues and presented by illustrator Greg Caggiano, is about to reach its fourth iteration with an event on Saturday, December 15. Dr. Sketchy’s was founded in 2005 by artists Molly Crabapple and A.V. Phibes, set in a dive bar in Brooklyn, and was the answer to the question of what figure drawing looks like when tackled by artists who adore the body but are bored by strict tradition. The events, in which “artists draw glamorous underground performers in an atmosphere of boozy conviviality” (per the official Dr. Sketch’s statement), are held today in many cities across the country, and Caggiano has presented them in Rochester since the spring of 2012. Caggiano is a 2008 graduate of RIT’s illustration program, and works as an illustrator and printer at local t-shirt company Hide The Bodies (check it: HTBkicksass.com). “We have such a thriving art community here in Rochester that real niche things can exist,” says Caggiano. “I’ve always been into figure drawing. I also like movies and drinking beer.” Since it’s an enterprise that combines all those loves, Dr. Sketchy’s sounded like a grand time. “Why don’t we draw people dressed like LeLu and Corbin Dallas, play drinking games, and win prizes?,” he says. Dr. Sketchy’s events are three-hour evenings held once every-other month, featuring a different theme each time. Typically, about three models, scantily dressed in character costumes, freeze for a maximum of 20 minutes per pose. In addition, contests are held throughout the evening, such as the best left-handed drawing, and best upside-down drawing, and artists compete for prizes that include original art and quirky objects. Pizza is always provided, and the soundtrack matches the theme of the show. One past Dr. Sketchy event in Rochester was a Nicktoons throwback night. “If you were a child of the 90’s, it

A work from a Lynch-themed Dr. Sketchy’s AntiArt School Rochester event. PHOTO PROVIDED

is likely that Nickelodeon cartoons were very dear to you,” says Caggiano. “We celebrated that by drawing [models dressed as] Helga Pataki from ‘Hey, Arnold,’ Quailman from ‘Doug,’ and the cast of ‘AHH! Real Monsters.’” Admission to each event is $10, and participants should bring their own art supplies in any media of their choosing. The events are BYOB, and cameras are strictly forbidden (but be aware that a sanctioned Dr. Sketchy’s photographer documents the events, and pictures end up on the internet.) The December 15 event, to be held 710 p.m. at Art and Vintage on Main (101 Main St., East Rochester), is called “Dr. Sketchy’s IV: XXXMAS” and will have a holiday fetish theme. Well-loved Rochester fixtures will be present, such as Jimmy from Lux Lounge in the role of Santa, DJ Snacks, and others. “One of our models is attempting a pretty dangerous feat that to my knowledge has never been publicly performed in Rochester,” says Caggiano. For more information, visit the Dr. Sketchy’s Rochester Facebook page, and “like” it to receive updates. Don’t forget to provide feedback and suggest themes for future events — someone suggested “Twin Peaks” and one month later, Caggiano hosted a David Lynch-themed event. And if you’re interested in being a paid model for the event, send a message on the Facebook page and get the details. For more details on Dr. Sketchy in general, check out drsketchy.com.

Five Women Book Signing and Holiday Sale. 4 p.m. The Episcopal Church Home, 505 Mt. Hope Ave. Free. 546-8400. EpiscopalSeniorLife.org. Homeschool Nonfiction Book Club. 10:30 a.m. Penfield Public Library, 1985 Baird Rd. Ages 11-16. This month read Chew on This: Everything You Don’t Want to Know About Fast Food by Eric Schlosser and Charles Wilson. Free. 340-8720. penfieldlibrary.org. [ FRI., DECEMBER 7 ] Book Signing, Reading, and Open Mic: “Instant Poetry (Just Add Words!)” by “Laughing” Larry Berger. 7-10 p.m. Barnes and Noble, RIT’s park point, 100 Park point Dr 4246766. poeticconversations. blogspot.com/. Book Thieves Holiday Book Sale. Dec. 7-9. Writers and Books, 740 University Ave Fri 6-9 p.m., Sat 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Sun 11 a.m.-3 p.m wab.org. First Fridays/Wide Open Mic. first Friday of every month, 7-9 p.m. Writers and Books, 740 University Ave wab.org. NaNoWriMo Celebration & Open Mic. 7-9 p.m. Writers and Books, 740 University Ave You made it! Come celebrate with food and drinks and unwind after a long but rewarding month. We will be offering a free class on editing and online publishing. There will be an open mic on the same night that writers are encouraged to participate in. Free. wab. org. NaNoWriMo Wrap Party. 7-9 p.m. Writers and Books, 740 University Ave Free and open to writers of all ages wab.org. Poetry Reading: Christine Noble. 5-7 p.m. A Different Path Gallery, 27 Market St. 637-5494. adifferentpathgallery.com 5 p.m. A Different Path Gallery, 27 Market St. Free. 3959833. facebook.com/ADifferen tPathGalleryFallWinterReading Series?fref=ts. [ SAT., DECEMBER 8 ] Book Talk: “Bleeding the Vein” by T. G. Arsenault. 2 p.m. Books Etc., 78 W. Main St. 474-4116. books_etc@yahoo. com. [ SUN., DECEMBER 9 ] Annual Local Author Extravaganza. 2-5 p.m. Lift Bridge Book Shop, 45 Main St liftbridgebooks.com. Spirituality and Philosophy. 1:30 p.m. Books Etc., 78 W. Main St. Free. 474-4116. books_etc@yahoo.com. [ MON., DECEMBER 10 ] Author Visit: Gwyn Perry. 6:30-7:30 p.m. Wood Library, 134 North Main St. 3941381. woodlibrary.org.


[ TUE., DECEMBER 11 ] An Evening of Spoken Word. 7 p.m. Smith Opera House, 82 Seneca St., Geneva Free. thesmith.org. Lift Bridge Writers’ Group. 6:30 p.m. Lift Bridge Book Shop, 45 Main St Free. 6372260. liftbridgebooks.com. Wayne Writers Guild. 7:30 p.m. Books Etc., 78 W. Main St. 474-4116. books_etc@ yahoo.com.

Museum Exhibit [ WED., DECEMBER 5 ] A T. rex Named Sue. Through Jan. 6, 2013. Rochester Museum and Science Center, 657 East Ave. $11-$13. 2714320. rmsc.org. [ TUE., DECEMBER 11 ] Baby It’s Cold Outside! Thursdays The Rochester Historical Society, Rundel Memorial Building, 2nd floor, 115 South Ave. Through Mar 14. Tue-Wed 10 a.m.-3 p.m., Thu 11 a.m.-3 p.m. An exhibit of beautiful cold weather clothing $3-$5, members free. 428-8470. rochesterhistory.org.

Recreation [ WED., DECEMBER 5 ] Open Ice Skating. ongoing. Manhattan Square Park Ice Rink. Daily 12-1:30 p.m., 1:50-3:20 p.m. Adults Only daily 3:40-5:10 p.m., 5:30-7 p.m. (Fri-Sat til 8:50 p.m.). 428-7541. cityofrochster. gov/skating. [ SAT., DECEMBER 8 ] GVHC Hike. 9 a.m. Powder Mills Park rand lodge lot, moderate/strenuous 6 mile hike. 227-3180. gvhchikes. org. Old Growth Forest Visit: Cabin Bank Woods. 10 a.m. Letchworth State Park, 1 Letchworth State Park Bring lunch, will carpool. $8 parking fee. 493-3625. Rochester Birding Trip: Conesus Lake Area. 8 a.m. Meet at Vitale Park on Rte 20A in Lakeville. 243-0316. rochesterbirding.com. Saturday Snowshoeing. 1-3 p.m Helmer Nature Center, 154 Pinegrove Ave $3-$5. 336-3035. westirondequoit. org/helmer.htm. [ SUN., DECEMBER 9 ] GVHC Hike. 1 p.m. Harris Beach lot, 99 Garnsey Rd., moderate/strenuous 5 mile hike, crescent trail. 2479237. gvhchikes.org.

Special Events [ WED., DECEMBER 5 ] 19th Annual Dickens Christmas Festival. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. The Shops on West Ridge, 3200 W. Ridge Rd. Through Jan 1 Free admission. 3680670. shopsonwestridge.com. continues on page 32 rochestercitynewspaper.com City 31


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Geeks Who Drink Pub Quiz. 8 p.m. Scotland Yard Pub, 187 Saint Paul St Free. 7305030. scotlandyardpub.com. Highland Park Winter Farmers Market. 3 p.m Cornell Cooperative Extension of Monroe County, 249 Highland Ave Free. highlandwintermarket.com. Monthly Meeting of the Rochester Nordic Ski Club. 7 p.m. Brighton Town Park Lodge, 777 Westfall Rd rochesternordic.org. RDDC Vision-Future Luncheon. 11:45 a.m.-1:30 p.m. Rochester Riverside Convention Center, 123 E Main St Featuring County Executive Maggie Brooks and Mayor Tom Richards. $45-$50, RSVP. 546-6920. rddc@rddc.org. [ THU., DECEMBER 6 ]

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Annual Christmas Social. 6:30-8:30 p.m. Oneroom Schoolhouse, Harry Allen Park, Honeoye Falls. townofmendon.org. Annual Holiday Homecoming Celebration. 5-8 p.m. George Eastman House, 900 East Ave. Refreshments, live music, a visit from Santa, bring your camera. Included in museum admission $5-$12, $3 for kids. 2713361. eastmanhouse.org. Fiberant Arts & Framing Open House. 6-9 p.m. 2157 Penfield Rd., Penfield. 3887778. French Night. 6:30 p.m. Books Etc., 78 W. Main St. Free. 474-4116. books_etc@ yahoo.com. Holiday Shopping Fair. 14:30 p.m. Chapel Oaks, St. Ann’s Community, 1550 Portland Ave 697-6601. Inspirational Film Series: “Stand Up!” 6:30 p.m. Lightheart Institute, 21 Prince St. $12. lightheart. com. Portrait Day. 1-9 p.m. Wood Library, 134 North Main St. Fundraiser for Library; photo portraits by Peter Blackwood. $75 plus print fees. 3941381. woodlibrary.org. Reshaping Rochester Awards Luncheon and Urban Observations Lecture. noon. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. Gala Luncheon and Presentation for winners of the Betty Strasenburgh, Robert Macon and Directors Awards for outstanding contributions to the Rochester Community. Annual Urban Observations Lecture presented by Garth Fagan. $50, RSVP. 2710520. rrcdc.org. [ FRI., DECEMBER 7 ] “13WHAM Spectacle of Lights.” Sundays, 5:30-9:30 p.m Camp Eastman, 1558 Lakeshore Blvd. Proceeds benefit the Golisano Children’s

Hospital. Admission: $5 per car per entry, buses extra. Tickets available at Irondequoit Town Hall. irondequoit.org. City Hall Atrium Tree Lighting Ceremony. 11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. City Hall, 30 Church St. Mayor Richards lights the tree in the Atrium of City Hall. Performances by Rochester City School District’s Enrico Fermi School No. 17 chorus and the School of the Arts Choir. A special visit from Santa. Free. cityofrochester. gov. Family Shabbat Chanukah Dinner. 4:20 p.m. Kessler Family Chabad Center, 1037 Winton Rd RSVP. 271-0330. chabadrochester.com/ signup. Handmade Holiday Art Sale. 4-10 p.m. Spot Coffee, 200 East Ave. Free admission. 613-4600. spotcoffee.com. Holiday Open House Show and Sale. 5-10 p.m. The Rochester Arc and Flame Center, 125 Fedex Way. 349-7110. rocafc.com. Penfield Holiday Activities and Santa’s All-You-Can-Eat Pancake Dinner. 6-8 p.m. Penfield Community Center, 1985 Baird Rd. $4-$6 or $12 for family of four or more. 340-8655. Rochester Amateur Radio Association: InfraGard. 7 p.m. Henrietta Fire Hall, 3129 E. Henrietta Rd 2108910. ken@w2krh.com. Third Annual Madrigal Feaste. 6:30 p.m. R. Thomas Flynn Campus Center Building, 1000 E. Henrietta Rd $15. monroecctickets.com. Yuletide in the Country. Sundays Genesee Country Village & Museum, 1410 Flint Hill Rd. Fri 5-8:30 p.m., Sat-Sun 1:30-7:30 p.m. Tours are $22/$18 members with $3 off for reservations made for Friday, Nov. 30. A exquisite dinner buffet catered by D& R Depot is available for $30/$16 youth 4-16 2948218. gcv.org. [ SAT., DECEMBER 8 ] The Big Green Egg Cookout. 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Gallea’s Greenhouse, 2832 Clover St. Bring canned goods to benefit Pittsford Food Cupboard. joe@galleas.com. Big Sale. 9 a.m.-2 p.m. 127 Railroad St. Art, books, clothes, handmade soap, zines, more facebook.com/ smugtownmushrooms. Christmas Around the World on the Lake Ontario Wine Trail. Dec. 8-9, 125 p.m. Long Acre Farms, 1342 Eddy Rd. 7 stops along the trail and each will feature food and/or wine pairings from different countries. $10/person or

2/$15. 315-986-4202. lakeontariowinetrail.com. Gala Community-Wide Lighting Ceremony at Downtown Menorah. 7 p.m. Washington Square Park. Other lighting times: Sun 5:30 p.m., Mon-Thu 4 p.m., Fri 3 p.m., Sat 5:45 p.m chabadrochester.com. Holley Trolley Rides. Sundays, 11 a.m.-4 p.m New York Museum of Transportation, 6393 E. River Rd Through Dec 16. Meet Santa and Mrs. Claus on Sunday, December 2, 2-4 p.m $4-$5. 533-1113. nymtmuseum.org. Menorah Lighting. 8 p.m. Wilson Commons, University of Rochester River Campus. 503-9224. Sonnenberg’s Holiday Home Tour. 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Homes in Canandaigua. $22-$25. 394-4922. sonnenberg.org. Star Show: Curiosity on Mars. 1 p.m. Rochester Museum and Science Center, 657 East Ave. Also Mon Oct 8, 1 p.m $3-$7. 271-1880. rmsc.org. Webster Cash Mob. 1 p.m. Nest Things, 11 West Main St Find us on Facebook at Webster Cash Mob for more info any. 670-9385. Wigilia (Christmas Eve) Dinner Celebration. 5 p.m. St. John Fisher College, Cleary Auditorium, 3690 East Ave Wigilia is the traditional Christmas Eve dinner celebration in Poland. $30 member/$35 non-member, ages 718 $15, 6 and under Free. 248-0512. polishheritagerochester.org. [ SUN., DECEMBER 9 ] 4th Annual Day out with Santa. 9 a.m. Holiday Inn & Suites, 800 Jefferson Road Free pictures with Santa Complimentary Gift for each child Free pony rides Free airbrush Face painting Meet your children’s favorite TV characters. Free. 4759190. cisrochester@gmail. com. Ceremony of Remembrance for Children of Any Age Who Have Died. 6:30 p.m. Church of the Transfiguration, 50 West Bloomfield Rd Harpist, singer, chldren’s names read, candlelighting, poetry, slideshow, light refreshments. RSVP by 12/4 with photo Free. 889-2574. childrenneverforgotten@ gmail.com. Gothic Cathedral Tour. 2 p.m. St. Michael’s Church, 869 N. Clinton Ave Donations accepted. 3254041. sfxcrochester.org. Holidays at the Market. 9 a.m.-3 p.m Rochester Public Market, 280 N. Union St. cityofrochester. gov/publicmarket. continues on page 34


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A.R.T.S Gallery at Aviv Cafe Lisa Lagatella and Students Anderson Arts Building 20th Annual Holiday Gala Art and Vintage on Main (AVoM) Lost Infinity - A multimedia exhibition AXOM Gallery Exhibition Space New Arcadia - Oil Paintings by Kurt Moyer Bernunzio Uptown Music Holiday Concert at Uptown Music Black Radish Studio Le Petit Black Radish at Clay Holiday Show with Maggi Bartlett & Amy Brand Chartreuse Studios Rainforest: Serigraphs by Betty Murtagh Constance Mauro Studio Holiday Sale at Studio 236 Hungerford Bldg. Creative Wellness Coalition December 2012 Flora-J Designs Rock your Holidays Gallery r The Creative Process: Ideation to Realization Genesee Center for the Arts Wintercraft & Wood Engravings Hungerford Urban Artisans (HUA) Open Studio First Friday Image City Photography Gallery Holiday Show 2012 JGK Galleries Holiday Event LESSONS at the LOFT First Friday December Open House Military History Society Military Music Physikos Movement Studio What Makes Dance Dance?

Rochester Contemporary Art Center (RoCo) 22nd Annual Members Exhibition RoCo Upstairs • First Friday @ RoCo Upstairs Spot Coffee • What Once Was, What Now Is Studio 34 Creative Arts Center and Gallery 11th Annual Holiday Open House and Exhibit The Crafting Social • Open Studio The Gallery@Equal=Grounds Beautiful Ruins by Paula Peters Marra The Shoe Factory Art Co-op …and to All a Good Night! Writers & Books National Novel Writing Month Wrap Party! T H I S M O N T H O N LY: East Avenue Inn & Suites • Art Out! iGalleryKathyClem • Fantasy The Caroline • Gallery Opening - Photography of Julia Rabkin The city is Asleep and Dreaming The City is Asleep and Dreaming: December DECEMBER 7 HIGHLIGHTS: • 22nd Annual Members Exhibition at Rochester Contemporary Art Center (RoCo) • Maggi Bartlett & Amy Brand at Cat Clay • The Creative Process at Gallery r • Open Studio at Crafting Social • New Arcadia by Kurt Moyer at Axom • Lisa Lagatella and Students at A.R.T.S Gallery • What Makes Dance Dance? at Physikos Movement • Open Studio First Friday at HUA • Lost Infinity at AVoM • Le Petit Black Radish at Black Radish • …and to All a Good Night! at The Shoe Factory

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Long Season Winter Famers’ Market. 1-4 p.m Brookside Community Center, 220 Idlewood Rd Cost of goods. swfarmersmarket.org. Sunday Cinema at the Library: “A Christmas Story.” 2 p.m. Central Library, Kate Gleason Auditorium, 115 South Ave. All ages. Free. 428-7300. libraryweb.org. [ MON., DECEMBER 10 ] Fifth Annual Public Menorah Lighting. 6 p.m. Four Corners in Pittsford Village, Village of Pittsford. Free. 385-2097. jewishpittsford.com. Pittsford Menorah Lighting Ceremony. 6 p.m. Pittsford Village 4 Corners. 2866147. jewishpittsford.com. XRX Pioneer Club Holiday Luncheon. 11:30 a.m. Lodge on the Green, 2888 Ridgeway Ave. Band & auction following lunch. Bring donations for Dimitri House & Sister Regis Food Ministry, White Elephand Auction Item + personal items for military members and a can of food for poor. $14-$18, RSVP. 347-4983. xeroxpioneerclub.org. [ TUE., DECEMBER 11 ] East Side Winter Market. 3-6 p.m 2555 Baird Rd, Penfield. 348-9022. mbartolotta001@rochester. rr.com. Holiday Networking Event. 5-7 p.m. Pomodoro Grill, 3400 Monroe Ave. Benefits Bivona Child Advocacy Center. Bring unwrapped gift for Toys for Tots. RSVP. Free admission. lori@ peoplepluspeopleny.com. Voice of the Citizen Series: Seeking Solutions to Violence. 6-8 p.m. Frederick Douglass Resource Ctr., 36 King St cityofrochester.gov.

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[ WED., DECEMBER 12 ] 12-12-12 A Celebration of the 12 Days Before Christmas. Dec. 12-23, 10 a.m.-8 p.m. Casa Larga, 2287 Turk Hill Road 2234210 x2. casalarga.com. Roc the Day. Dec. 12. Visit roctheday.org or call 800242-0248, choose a local organization to support, and donate.

Theater “A Christmas Carol” presented by Kim Tenreiro. Wood Library, 134 North Main St. Fri., Dec. 7, 79:30 p.m. and Sat., Dec. 8, 2-4:30 p.m. One-woman show. $10. 394-1381. woodlibrary.org. “A Christmas Carol.” Geva Theatre Center, 75 Woodbury Blvd Through Dec 23. Wed Dec 5-Thu 7 p.m., Fri 7:30 p.m. Sat 2 & 7:30 p.m., Sun noon &

SPECIAL EVENT | Sonnenberg Holiday Home Tour

Take a break from the madness of holiday shopping to enjoy looking at some beautiful historic homes in Canandaigua. Sonnenberg Gardens and Mansion State Historic Park will host its Holiday Home Tour on Saturday, December 8, 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Visitors have the option of driving themselves or making stops on a free shuttle bus. The mansion, located at 151 Charlotte St., will also be open to the public, and carolers from Canandaigua Middle School will perform at 2 p.m. and visitors can munch on cookies and punch. The tour will feature seven different stops, including the 1st Congregational Church on North Main Street, a home located in a wooded area across from Sonnenberg’s rock garden on East Street, a 14-room home near Sonnenberg’s driveway at Gibson Street, a 1845 Federal Style home on Park Place, a 1938 Colonial Revival home at on Park Street, a 1830 Federal Style home on Gibson Street, and a locally built home from 1887 on Dungan Street. Tickets to the tour cost $22-$25 and can be purchased at Sonnenberg’s Gardener’s Cottage, most Canandaigua National Banks, Sweet Expressions, Renaissance Goodie II, The Furniture Doctor, online at sonnenberg. org, or by calling 394-4922. — BY LILLIAN DICKERSON 4:30 p.m., Tue-Wed Dec 12 7 p.m Tickets start at $25. 232-4382. gevatheatre.org. Holiday One Acts. A Magical Journey Through Stages, Auditorium Center, 875 E. Main St Fri 7:30 p.m., Sat 2 & 7:30 p.m., Sun 2 p.m 935-7173. mjtstages.tix. com. Hornets’ Nest: “Next Fall.” Geva Theatre Center, 75 Woodbury Blvd Mon., Dec. 10, 7 p.m. Free, register. 232-4382. gevatheatre.org. “It’s a Wonderful Life” A Live Radio Play. Blackfriars Theatre, 795 E. Main St Through Dec 22. Fri -Sat 8 p.m., Sun 2 p.m $27. 4541260. bftix.org. “Knuffle Bunny: A Cautionary Musical.” JCC Rochester, 1200 Edgewood Ave. TYKEs. Through Dec 9. Saturdays, 2 p.m. and Sundays, 11 a.m. & 2 p.m. $15. 461-2000. jccrochester.org. Lend a Hand Have a Laugh. MuCCC, 142 Atlantic Ave Dec. 6-8, 8 p.m. and Sun., Dec. 9, 2 p.m. A staged reading of a collection of comedic and dramatic one acts to benefit those displaced by hurricane

Sandy Free, donations accepted. 527-0884. muccc.org. “Mauritius.” Tower Fine Arts Center, SUNY Brockport, 180 Holley St. Through Dec 8. Thu-Sat 7:30 p.m., Sun 2 p.m $8-$15. 395-2487. brockport.edu/finearts. Motherhood: The Musical. Downstairs Cabaret at Winton Place, 3450 Winton Place Thu 7 p.m., Fri 8 p.m., Sat 5 & 8:30 p.m $26-$39. 325-4370. downstairscabaret.com. “Necessary Targets” stage reading. Dansville Public Library, 200 Main St. Wed., Dec. 5, 5 p.m. Two American women, a psychiatrist and a writer, travel to Bosnia to help women refugees confront their memories of war. Free. 585 335 6720. jillian5757@yahoo.com. “Peter Pan.” School of the Arts, 45 Prince St Fridays, 7 p.m., Saturdays, 2 & 7 p.m. and Sundays, 5 p.m. Continues through Dec 9 $5-$9. 324-3535. Rochester Fringe Play Reading of “Love Song.” The Harley School, 1981


Clover St Sat., Dec. 8, 7 p.m. 520-2940. rocfringprs@gmail.com. “Seussical, the Musical.” Nazareth College Arts Center, 4245 East Ave Sat 2 & 7 p.m., Sun 2 p.m $16$25. 389-2170. artscenter. naz.edu. “Sister’s Christmas Catechism.” Geva Theatre Center, 75 Woodbury Blvd Wed Dec 5-Thu 7:30 p.m., Fri 7 p.m., Sat 2:30 & 7 p.m., Sun 3 p.m., Tue-Wed Dec 12 7:30 p.m. Tickets start at $35. 232-4382. gevatheatre.org. “A Tuna Christmas.” RAPA, 727 E. Main St Thu., Dec. 6, 7:30 p.m., Fri., Dec. 7, 7:30 p.m., Sat., Dec. 8, 7:30 p.m., Sun., Dec. 9, 2 p.m., Greater Rochester Repertory Companies (GRRC). $15-$25. 3253366. rapatheatre.org. “A Visit from St. Nicholas or The Night Before Christmas. Black Sheep Theatre, 274 N Goodman St., third floor, Studio D313 Fridays, Saturdays, 7:30 p.m. and Sundays, 2 p.m. Through Nov 9 $15. 861-4816. tickets@blacksheeptheatre. org. “Yayati.” India Community Center, 2171 Monroe County Line Rd Kalidas. Fri dinner show 6 p.m. social hour, 7 p.m. show; Sat 7 p.m. social time, 7:30 p.m. show; Sun 2 p.m $10-$50. 473-3842. facebook.com/ kalidastheater.

Workshops [ WED., DECEMBER 5 ] The More the Merrier: The Benefits of Supplemental Group Instruction. 10 a.m. Denton Cottier & Daniels, 349 West Commercial St Ever want to add a group class to your music studio? Tasha George-Hinnant presents on research in practice of supplemental group instruction and methodologies. Free, RSVP. 586-3020. [ THU., DECEMBER 6 ] Demonstrating Effectiveness: Training to Help Nonprofits Attract Resources. 9 a.m.-noon. Arts & Cultural Council, 277 N. Goodman St $120 for two sessions, $60 for members, register. 4734000 x206. dsemple@ artsrochester.org. artsrochester.org. Pop, Classical, Technology, & the Studio: Lessons in the 21st Century. 9:30 a.m. Denton Cottier & Daniels, 349 West Commercial St Free. 586-3020. [ SAT., DECEMBER 8 ] Individual Sound Therapy Sessions. Dec. 8-9, 125 p.m. Gossamer Wood Healing and Retreat Center,

Open House THURSDAY, DECEMBER 6TH 6-9PM

Fiberant Arts & Framing Personal Service, Frames, Matting

SPECIAL EVENT | Madrigal Feast

Who doesn’t love the combination of dinner and a show? Partake in the delights of both in one sitting at Monroe Community College’s 3rd Annual Madrigal Feast. On Friday, December 7, pretend to be a lord or lady for the evening and put on your best old English accent. Medieval musicians and singers will entertain throughout the night while you feast away on traditional food. Music and culinary delights will not be the only things to keep you occupied, however. Be prepared for a variety of games and skits throughout the night. If you’re feeling particularly festive, come decked out in your most refined Renaissance garb. The feast starts at 6:30 p.m. at Forum 3-130 in the Warshof Conference Center of the MCC Flynn Campus Center, Building 3, Parking Lot M. Tickets cost $15. For more information, contact the Office of Student Life and Leadership Development at 292-2000 ext. 2534. Purchase tickets at monroecctickets.com. — BY LILLIAN DICKERSON 2235 County Road 28, Canandaigua. $25 for 30 minutes. 442-8141. ushah@frontier.com. The Meta Center of Chicago Weather and Energy Workshops. Dec. 8-9, 2 p.m. Main Street Armory, 900 E. Main St. 2 day workshop with Dr. Delbert Blair on 2012 Mayan Prophecies. $15-$25. 232-3221. rochestermainstreetarmory. com. [ SUN., DECEMBER 9 ] Mushrooms 101. 1 p.m. 127 Railroad St. Get to know the magical world of our fungal friends. learn basic fungal biology, anatomy and the ecology. Learn how mushrooms and other fungi exist in our lives and how we can incorporate them in our everyday living. bring a notebook and utensil to take notes, we will have some turkey tail mushroom tea brewing. feel free to bring a dish to pass as well. snacks are fun! Donations accepted. facebook.com/ smugtownmushrooms.

2157 Penfield Rd • Rts 441 & 250

(Wegmans plaza, next to JoAnn Fabrics)

388.7778

WHAT ARE YOU DOING TODAY?

CHECK OUT THE NEW DAILY CHOICES AT

ROCHESTERCITYNEWSPAPER.COM Every morning City Newspaper’s calendar editors give their picks for the most interesting events of the day, everything from concerts to exhibits, theater shows to festivals!

[ TUE., DECEMBER 11 ] Family Development Class: “Nothing Works.” 12:30-2:30 p.m. Mental Health Association, 320 N Goodman St. For parents of children ages 5-12. Free, register. 325-3145 x131. mharochester.org. Fight Like a Girl with Rita Parker. 7-8:30 p.m. Brighton Memorial Library, 2300 Elmwood Ave. Ages 13+ Free, register. 7845300. brightonlibrary.org. [ WED., DECEMBER 12 ] Family Development Class: “Wise Choices.” 6-8 p.m. Mental Health Association, 320 N Goodman St. For parents of children of all ages. Free, register. 3253145 x131. mharochester. org.

GETLISTED get your event listed for free e-mail it to calendar@rochestercitynews.com. Or go online to rochestercitynewspaper.com and submit it yourself!

[ MON., DECEMBER 10 ] Family Development Class: “Did You Hear What I Said?” 12:30-2:30 p.m. Mental Health Association, 320 N Goodman St. For parents of school age children. Free, register. 325-3145 x131. mharochester.org.

rochestercitynewspaper.com City 35


Film Times Fri December 7-Thur December 13 Schedules change often. Call theaters or check rochestercitynewspaper.com for updates.

Film

Brockport Strand 637-3310 89 Main St, Brockport BREAKING DAWN: 7, 9:30; also Sat-Sun 1, 4; FLIGHT: 7, 9:35; also Sat-Sun 1:15, 4; RISE OF THE GUARDIANS: 7, 9; also Sat-Sun 1, 3, 5.

From Russia, with love and tragedy

Canandaigua Theatres 396-0110 Wal-Mart Plaza, Canandaigua BREAKING DAWN: 7, 9:30; also Fri-Sun 4, Sat-Sun 1; END OF WATCH: 9:40; also Fri-Sun 4; FLIGHT: 7; also Sat-Sun 1:15; KILLING THEM SOFTLY: 7:10, 9:10; also Fri-Sun 5:10, Sat-Sun 1:10, 3:10; LIFE OF PI: 3D 7, 9:30; 2D Fri-Sun 4, Sat-Sun 1:15; LINCOLN: 7:15; also Fri-Sun 4:15, Sat-Sun 1:15; PLAYING FOR KEEPS: 7, 9; also Fri-Sun 5, Sat-Sun 1, 3; RED DAWN: 7:10, 9:30; also Fri-Sun 4:10, Sat-Sun 1:10; RISE OF THE GUARDIANS: 7, 9; also Fri-Sun 5; Sat-Sun 1, 3; SKYFALL: 7, 9:40; also Fri-Sun 4; Sat-Sun 1; WRECK-IT RALPH: 7, 9; also Fri-Sun 5, Sat-Sun 1, 3.

[ REVIEW ] by George Grella

“Anna Karenina” (R), directed by Joe Wright Now playing

Leo Tolstoy’s great novel “Anna Karenina,” has been adapted to the screen more than 20 times, a testimony to the power and appeal of its story of a passionate, desperate, and eventually, doomed love. Its extraordinary longevity in media that Tolstoy could not have imagined testifies to an enduring fascination for generations of audiences who would probably never read the very long, very rich, very Russian novel. It has also provided a dramatic vehicle for some of the most stunning

Cinema Theater 271-1785 957 S. Clinton St. PERKS OF BEING A WALLFLOWER: Sat-Sun 4:30; THE SESSIONS: 8:30; TAKEN 2: 7.

Culver Ridge 16 544-1140 2255 Ridge Rd E, Irondequoit  ARGO: 1, 4:35, 7:35, 10:30; BREAKING DAWN: 12:40, 1:10, 4:20, 4:50, 7, 7:30, 10, 10:35; THE COLLECTION: 1:30, continues on page 38

and important female stars of their particular times, perhaps most memorably Greta Garbo and Vivien Leigh. Directed by Joe Wright and written by Tom Stoppard, the latest interpretation of the work includes all the familiar characters and of course maintains some fidelity to Tolstoy’s vision. It also, however, translates the story into an unusual and often dazzling visual examination of the behavior of the Russian privileged classes in the late 19th century, an epic love story conducted against a background of aristocratic tradition and a rigid, if tacit, set of rules, something like a tremendously magnified version of a Jane Austen novel. Anna Karenina (Keira Knightley), the beautiful young wife of dull, pious government minister Alexei Karenin (Jude Law), journeys from St. Petersburg to Moscow to help her philandering brother, Oblonsky (Matthew Macfadyen), repair his marriage and convince his wife, Dolly (Kelly Macdonald), to forgive him. While there, she attends a splendid ball, where she meets

Keira Knightley in “Anna Karenina.” PHOTO COURTESY FOCUS FEATURES

the handsome, dashing Count Vronsky (Aaron Taylor-Johnson); they both feel an immediate attraction which quickly grows into passion. Vronsky pursues her back to St. Petersburg and the couple embarks on a torrid love affair that ultimately destroys Anna’s marriage and earns her the obloquy of her social class. The script touches on some of the other characters and actions of the novel, especially Oblonsky’s friend Levin, an enlightened member of the country gentry who repudiates the false manners of Moscow society for the simple goodness of rural life. Levin’s life in effect intersects with Anna’s in another way, since Kitty (Alicia Vikander), the young woman he loves, at first believes that Vronsky will marry her. The film rather obviously contrasts Levin’s values with the behaviors of the aristocracy to provide some kind of counterpart to both Anna’s reckless infatuation and the triviality of her world. But Anna’s grand passion necessarily dominates the story, the love of a kind, intelligent, even noble woman for an essentially shallow young man, a love that exists without need for explanation, consuming her spirit and transforming her life. She abandons her past, her family, all that she knows and holds dear, for the sake of that consummation, becoming in a way greater for her sacrifice and her suffering. Beyond the familiar story, the real joy of “Anna Karenina” derives from its visual conception, which combines a highly mannered

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Capitalist punishment “Killing Them Softly” (R), written and directed by Andrew Dominik Now playing

and stylized, even affected, use of a 19th-century theater in which much of the action takes place. At times its stage opens up into a splendid location scene, at others the sets look purposely fake and flat, while characters observe the action from the wings as if to emphasize the stylization; the settings move in a kind of constant, lovely, and surprising metamorphosis. The most striking visual moments occur in some astonishing and sometimes wonderful set pieces. In Oblonsky’s office all the clerks stamp an endless series of documents in unison, looking very like a droll number from some Broadway musical while unaccountably, musicians playing their instruments stroll among them. Perhaps most stunning, at the ball where Anna and Vronsky meet, the dancers move in elegant, graceful arabesques in a formal ritual of courtship; the other dancers occasionally pause and freeze while the lovers perform a complicated series of movements and gestures. Some of the wonder of the story lies in its inherent sense of fatality, literature’s recognition that the only lasting loves are the failed loves, the unrequited loves, the doomed loves. To paraphrase the novel’s opening sentence, one of the most famous in all of fiction, happy loves are all alike and generally uninteresting, while unhappy loves are all unhappy in their own fascinating way: where, after all, would the art of the novel be without such grand infidelities, such devastating passions, such unhappy loves?

Well, the good news is that it looks as though writer-director Andrew Dominik is starting to shave off a little time between films. His underseen but stunning sophomore effort, “The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford,” came out seven years after his acclaimed 2000 debut “Chopper” (a/k/a the movie that gave us the boring gift of Eric Bana), but it’s only taken Dominik five years to release his third and latest film, “Killing Them Softly.” The less-good news is that this odd little mob noir is a bit of a misfire, albeit a fascinating one, with several blazing performances in service to a perhaps unnecessarily ambitious script that rather needlessly suggests that organized crime is another form of free enterprise. What sets the gossamer plot of “Killing Them Softly” into motion is, not surprisingly, greed; the skittish Frankie (Scoot McNairy, “Argo”) and

Brad Pitt in “Killing Them Softly.” PHOTO COURTESY THE WEINSTEIN COMPANY

the sweaty Russell (Ben Mendelsohn, “Animal Kingdom”) are a couple of small-time crooks hired by a low-level gangster to rob a card game hosted by Markie Trattman (Ray Liotta, looking quite Shatner-esque). They’re playing the hunch that Trattman will be the one to take the fall, since he orchestrated the knockover of one of his own card games before. Dominik paces the heist flawlessly; two jittery scumbags pointing guns at a room full of wiseguys, every one of the marks looking as though he’s about to go for his own piece. At the end of this wickedly tense scene, I realized that I had been holding my breath. So in swaggers Brad Pitt, Dominik’s Jesse James, as Jackie Cogan, a calm and collected enforcer imported by the mob (blink and you’ll miss Sam Shepard as the powerful Dillon) to deal with the multi-faceted problem. Jackie is getting his marching orders through an unnamed lawyer (a perfectly cast Richard Jenkins), just another middlemanagement type stymied by bosses who won’t loosen their purse strings. (“Total corporate mentality,” he complains.) And even though Jackie’s job has been made much easier by Russell’s big, bragging mouth, he needs to bring in a little assistance. Cue James Gandolfini, hitting some “Soprano” notes as Mickey, a miserable, boozing hit man who may or may not be able to pull it together and fulfill his contract. Shot in a New Orleans still showing the effects of Hurricane Katrina, “Killing Them Softly” appears to be set in Boston, judging from the Southie accents as well as the source material, 1974’s “Cogan’s Trade,” by attorneyturned-crime-novelist George V. Higgins. It’s Dominik who updated the story’s time period to 2008, juxtaposing the violence and lawlessness against that

fall’s financial crisis and the waning days of the presidential campaign. (Familiar voices can be heard speechifying in the background of various scenes.) What does it all mean? I’m not too sure; maybe Dominik is trying to make a point about how capitalism thrums through every social strata, and that the love of money really is the root of all evil. But this isn’t exactly news. And the characters, unfortunately, give us very little to hang our hats on, which is kind of crucial on an empathy level but nearly impossible in this unapologetically amoral milieu. But it’s absolutely not the fault of the actors — and they are all men, save for one lone hooker — each of whom are outstanding. Dominik shoots them in a series of virtuoso duets, all the better for us to appreciate the action and reaction: McNairy and Mendelsohn trying to keep their greasy heads above water, Pitt and Jenkins haggling over the business of murder, Gandolfini and Pitt dealing with Mickey’s martini-fueled self-pity, and especially the low-key confrontation between McNairy and Pitt as the former weighs his extremely limited options. Dominik gets a little show-offy at times with film speeds and camera effects that seem slightly obvious (and using them during those gusts of operatic violence hints at glorification) but things look wonderfully scuzzy thanks to gifted Australian cinematographer Greig Fraser, who also shot the very different “Bright Star” and “Let Me In” along with the imminent “Zero Dark Thirty.” And then there’s Pitt, who, like George Clooney, is having more and more difficulty slipping into a role. Don’t get me wrong; he’s a talented guy and charismatic as hell, but he can’t hide the fact that he gleams like a shiny new penny even when he’s trying for tarnish.

YOUNG FRANKENSTEIN

Friday, Dec. 7, 8 p.m., and Sunday, Dec. 9, 2 p.m.

Mel Brooks followed up his anarchic Western parody Blazing Saddles with something even better: a spot-on spoof of the great Universal horror pictures of the 1930s. Cowriter Gene Wilder stars as the embarrassed grandson of the infamous Victor Frankenstein. From the supporting cast that includes Madeline Kahn, Peter Boyle, and Cloris Leachman as the fearsome Frau Blücher (insert horse whinny here) to the period-perfect B&W cinematography, Brooks creates a brilliant pastiche, and one of the funniest films of the 1970s. (Mel Brooks, US 1974, 105 min.)

Photo courtesy Photofest

[ REVIEW ] BY DAYNA PAPALEO

POSSESSION

Tuesday, Dec. 11, 8 p.m.

Movies for movie lovers, 6 nights a week. Mel Brooks

Returning home from a business trip, Mark (Sam Neill) discovers that his wife Anna (Isabelle Adjani) wants a divorce. Full of hate and bitterness, their lives spiral violently out of control, as both turn to new lovers ... one of which may not be human. An intense, hellish vision of a dysfunctional relationship, Possession is a long-lost cult classic that’s been taking the cinematheque world by storm. Cut by a third upon its original U.S. release, we’ll be screening a newly struck 35mm print that restores the director’s original vision. (Andrzej Zulawski, France/Germany 1981, 127 min.)

Special Presentation

Film Info: 271-4090 l 900 East Avenue l Eastman House Café—stop in for a light dinner or dessert before the film. l Wi-Fi Hotspot l Sponsored by rochestercitynewspaper.com City 37


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5:05, 7:50, 10:40; END OF WATCH: 12:55, 4:30, 7:05, 9:40; FLIGHT: 12:25, 4:05, 7:15, 10:25; KILLING THEM SOFTLY: 1:25, 5, 7:45, 10:10; LIFE OF PI: 3D 12:35, 7:20, 10:15; 2D 4:15; LINCOLN: 12:30, 4:40, 7:55; PLAYING FOR KEEPS: 1:20, 4:45, 7:40, 10:05; RED DAWN: 1:05, 3:55, 6:55, 9:35; RISE OF THE GUARDIANS: 3D 1:15, 4:55, 7:25, 9:55; 2D 12:45, 4:25, 6:50, 9:25; SKYFALL: 12:20, 12:50, 3:30, 4, 6:40, 7:10, 9:50, 10:20; WRECKIT RALPH: 1:35, 4:10, 6:45, 9:30.

Dryden Theatre

Not the same old Rochester selection. FLEXIBLE SPENDING ACCOUNT Coming Due by Year End

Use it or Lose it!

2929 MONROE AVE • 442-0123 • Appointments Suggested

271-3361 900 East Ave *NOTE: Film times for Wed 12/5-Wed 12/12. THE PURPLE ROSE OF CAIRO: Wed 12/5 8; DAVID COPPERFIELD: Thur 12/6 8; YOUNG FRAKENSTEIN: Fri 12/7 8, Sun 12/9 2; CHRISTMAS HOLIDAY: Sat 12/8 8; POSSESSION: Tue 12/11 8; THE LAST PICTURE SHOW: Wed 12/12 8.

Eastview 13 425-0420 Eastview Mall, Victor BREAKING DAWN: 12:40, 1:30, 4:20, 7, 7:30, 10:40; THE COLLECTION: 4:35, 10:20; END OF WATCH: 4:25, 9:50; FLIGHT: 4:05, 7:15, 10:25; KILLING THEM SOFTLY: 12:35, 4:55, 7:20, 9:45; LIFE OF PI: 3D 1:05, 4:10, 7:05, 10:05; 2D 12:25; LINCOLN: 12:30, 1:10, 4:30, 6:50, 8, 10:10; PLAYING FOR KEEPS: 12:55, 4:45, 7:35, 9:55; RED DAWN: 1:15, 7:40; RISE OF THE GUARDIANS: 3D 4:15, 2D 1:25, 5, 7:45, 10:15; SKYFALL: 12:20, 1:20, 4, 4:40, 7:10, 7:50, 10:30; WRECK-IT RALPH: 1:35, 4:50, 7:25, 10.

Geneseo Theatres

The Clinical Research Center needs healthy male and post-menopausal or surgically sterile female volunteers to participate in a pharmaceutical research study. You must be 18-55 years old. You must not be taking any over-the-counter or prescription medications. This study requires smokers and non-smokers to participate. If you are a smoker you MUST smoke at least 20 or more cigarettes a day. You WILL be allowed to smoke cigarettes during your confinement period at our clinic. However, you have to smoke outside under our supervision. You are not allowed to smoke in our facility. The study will compensate up to $1200. You will receive free laboratory tests, physical exam, and an ECG. If you are healthy and interested in participating in this study, please call our recruiters at 1-716-885-3580 ext 205 and ask for study #2212 Part 1. 38 City december 5-11, 2012

243-2691 Geneseo Square Mall BREAKING DAWN: 7, 9:30; also Sat-Sun 1, 4; LIFE OF PI: 3D 7, 9:30; 2D Sat-Sun 1:15, 4; PLAYING FOR KEEPS: 7, 9; also Sat-Sun 1, 3, 5; RISE OF THE GUARDIANS: 3D Sat-Sun 1, 3, 5; 2D 7, 9;

Film Previews Full film reviews available at rochestercitynewspaper.com. [ OPENING ] CHRISTMAS HOLIDAY (1944): This adaptation of a W. Somerset Maugham novel is a noir thriller featuring Deanna Durbin as a femme fatale who tries to rebuild her life after marrying a dangerously unstable man (Gene Kelly?!). Dryden (Sat, Dec 8, 8 p.m.)

SKYFALL: 7, 9:40; also SatSun 1, 4; WRECK-IT RALPH: 7, 9; also Sat-Sun 1, 3, 5.

Greece Ridge 12 225-5810 176 Greece Ridge Center Dr. BREAKING DAWN: 12:30, 1, 3:40, 4:20, 7, 7:30, 9:45, 10:15; END OF WATCH: 2, 4:35, 7:40, 10:30; FLIGHT: 4:45, 10:25; KILLING THEM SOFTLY: 2:10, 4:40, 7:45, 10:20; LIFE OF PI: 3D 12:45, 4:10, 7:10, 10:10; LINCOLN: 12:05, 3:20, 4:30, 6:50, 8, 10:05; PLAYING FOR KEEPS: 2:20, 5, 7:20, 9:40; RED DAWN: 2:05, 7:50; RISE OF THE GUARDIANS: 3D 1:55, 2D 2:30, 5:05, 7:35, 10; SKYFALL: 12:20, 3:30, 6:40, 9:55; WRECK-IT RALPH: 3D 4:45, 9:50; 2D 2:15, 7:25.

Henrietta 18 424-3090 525 Marketplace Dr. ARGO: 11:10 a.m., 2:05, 4:55, 7:50, 10:45; BREAKING DAWN: 11:20 a.m., 2:15, 3:10, 5, 7:45, 9:20, 10:30; THE COLLECTION: 11:45 a.m., 1:55, 4:05, 6:15, 8:25, 10:50; END OF WATCH: 11:15 a.m., 1:50, 4:30, 7:05, 9:45; FLIGHT: 12:15, 3:35, 6:45, 10:10; KILLING THEM SOFTLY: 11:40 a.m., 2:25, 4:50, 7:15, 9:55; LIFE OF PI: 3D 12:30, 3:25, 6:20, 9:25; 2D 1:30, 4:25, 7:20, 10:25; LINCOLN: 11:30 a.m., 12:20, 3:40, 6, 7, 10:20; PLAYING FOR KEEPS: 11:25 a.m., 2, 4:35, 7:10, 9:50; RED DAWN: 11:55 a.m., 2:40, 5:35, 7:55, 10:15; RISE OF THE GUARDIANS: 3D 12:35, 3:15, 5:45, 8:10, 10:35; 2D 11:35 a.m., 2:10, 4:45, 7:25; SKYFALL: 12, 1, 3:20, 4:20, 6:30, 7:30, 9:40; TALAASH: 12:10, 3:30, 6:50, 10; WRECK-IT RALPH: 3D 4:15; 2D 11:05 a.m., 1:40, 6:55, 9:35.

The Little 258-0400 240 East Ave.  ARGO: 7, 9:30; also SatSun 12:30, 3:30; ANNA KARENINA: 6:30 (except Wed 12/13), 9:10; also Sat-Sun 12:15, 3; HITCHCOCK: 6:45, 9; also Sat-Sun 12:45, 3:45;

DAVID COPPERFIELD (1935): It’s Charles Dickens by way of director George Cukor, with the classic orphan’s tale brought to life by Freddie Bartholomew, Basil Rathbone, Lionel Barrymore, Elsa Lanchester, and W.C. Fields. Dryden (Thu, Dec 6, 8 p.m.) HITCHCOCK (R): Anthony Hopkins takes on the title role in this biopic that uses the filming of 1960’s

LIFE OF PI: 7:10 (Except Mon 12/10), 9:40; also Sat-Sun 1, 4; LINCOLN: 6:15, 9:20; also Sat-Sun 12, 3:15.

Movies 10 292-0303 2613 W. Henrietta Rd. *No film times by press time*

Pittsford Cinema 383-1310 3349 Monroe Ave. ANNA KARENINA: 1:30, 4:20, 7:10; also Fri-Sat 10; ARGO: 2:20, 5, 7:40; HITCHCOCK: 2:40, 5, 7:20; also FriSat 9:40; Fri-Sun 12:20; BREAKING DAWN: 1:35, 4:15, 7; also Fri-Sat 9:40; KILLING THEM SOFTLY: 3:10, 5:30, 7:50; also Fri-Sat 10:10; SatSun 12:50; LIFE OF PI: 3D 7:30; Fri-Sat 10:20; 2D 1:50, 4:40; LINCOLN: 1:40, 4:50, 8; RISE OF THE GUARDIANS: 3D Fri-Sat 9:10; 2D 2:10, 4:30, 6:50; SKYFALL: 1, 4:05, 7:15; also Fri-Sat 10:20.

Tinseltown USA / IMAX 247-2180 2291 Buffalo Rd.  ARGO: 1, 4:05, 7:10, 10:05; BREAKING DAWN: 11:30 a.m., 12:15, 1:15, 2:15, 3:15, 4:15, 5:15, 6:15, 7:15, 8:15, 9:15, 10:15; THE COLLECTION: 12:35, 2:50, 5:05, 7:25, 9:40; END OF WATCH: 11:35 a.m., 2:15, 4:55, 7:35, 10:10; FLIGHT: 12:10, 3:25, 6:30, 9:35; KILLING THEM SOFTLY: 11:55 a.m., 2:25, 4:55, 7:30, 10; LINCOLN: 11:45 a.m., 3:15, 6:45, 10; PLAYING FOR KEEPS: 11:30 a.m., 2:10, 4:50, 7:30, 10:05; RED DAWN: 11:50 a.m., 2:15, 4:40, 7:05, 9:30; RISE OF THE GUARDIANS: 3D 2:45, 7:50; 2D 12, 5:20, 10:15; SKYFALL: IMAX 12:30, 3:45, 7, 10:10; NON-IMAX: 1:30, 2:40, 4:40, 5:55, 8, 9:10; WRECK-IT RALPH: 3D 2:10, 9:55; 2D 11:35 a.m., 4:45, 7:20.

Webster 12 888-262-4386 2190 Empire Blvd. *No film times by press time*

“Psycho” as a backdrop for a love story between the Master of Suspense and wife Alma Reville (Helen Mirren). Co-starring Scarlett Johansson, Danny Huston, and Jessica Biel. Little, Pittsford THE OTHER SON (PG-13): This French drama from writer-director Lorraine Levy tells the story of two young men, one Israeli and one Palestinian, who discover


they were accidentally switched at birth. PLAYING FOR KEEPS (PG13): Gerard Butler stars in this romantic comedy as a former sports star who starts coaching his kid’s team as a way to get his life together. Horny soccer moms ensue. With Jessica Biel, Catherine Zeta-Jones, and Uma Thurman. Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece, Henrietta, Tinseltown POSSESSION (1981): This long-lost cult classic, restored to filmmaker Andrzej Zulawski’s original vision, stars Isabelle Adjani and Sam Neill as a dysfunctional couple whose marriage disintegrates as they turn to new lovers, one of whom may not be entirely human. Dryden (Tue, Dec 11, 8 p.m.) THE PURPLE ROSE OF CAIRO (1985): Mia Farrow and Jeff Daniels lead the cast of Woody Allen’s romantic fantasy about a movie character who walks off the screen and into the life of a lonely housewife in 1930’s New Jersey. Dryden (Wed, Dec 5, 8 p.m.) YOUNG FRANKENSTEIN (1974): Mel Brooks’ broad spoof of the early Universal horror classics stars cowriter Gene Wilder as the famous doctor’s grandson, who inherits the castle and begins his own experiments. With Marty Feldman, Teri Garr, Cloris Leachman, and Peter Boyle. Dryden (Fri, Dec 7, 8 p.m., and Sun, Dec 9, 2 p.m.) [ CONTINUING ] ANNA KARENINA (PG-13): This opulent adaptation of the Tolstoy classic, from director Joe Wright and Oscar-winning screenwriter Tom Stoppard, stars Keira Knightley as one of literature’s best-known adulteresses, married to Jude Law’s aristocrat but consumed by an affair with Aaron Taylor-Johnson’s dashing cavalry officer. Little, Pittsford ARGO (R): Director Ben Affleck co-stars with John Goodman, Bryan Cranston, and Kyle Chandler in the once-classified true tale of a CIA exfiltration expert who hatches a daring plan to free six Americans hiding at the home of the Canadian ambassador during the 1979 Iran hostage crisis. Culver, Henrietta, Little, Pittsford, Tinseltown THE COLLECTION (R): This sequel to the 2009 horror flick “The Collector” calls upon the only man to have escaped from a serial killer to rescue his next victim

from the psycho’s fortified hideout. Culver, Eastview, Henrietta, Tinseltown END OF WATCH (R): Jake Gyllenhaal, Michael Peña, and Anna Kendrick lead the cast of this gritty drama from “Training Day” screenwriter David Ayer, which follows a couple of LAPD officers who make a routine traffic stop that lands them in the crosshairs of a drug cartel. Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Greece, Henrietta, Tinseltown FLIGHT (PG-13): Robert Zemeckis’s first live-action film since 2000’s “Cast Away” is a drama with Don Cheadle, John Goodman, and Denzel Washington as an airline pilot who saves a flight from crashing, only to have the ensuing investigation into the equipment malfunction reveal something troubling. : Brockport, Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Greece, Henrietta, Tinseltown KILLING THEM SOFTLY (R): Brad Pitt and his “Assassination of Jesse James...” director Andrew Dominik reteam for this crime flick about a gangland enforcer investigating a heist pulled off during a Mobcontrolled poker game. With Richard Jenkins, Ray Liotta, and James Gandolfini. Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Greece, Henrietta, Pittsford, Tinseltown LIFE OF PI (PG): Ang Lee continues his unpredictable streak with an eye-popping adaptation of Yann Martel’s acclaimed novel, now a 3D adventure about a young man who survives a shipwreck and finds himself on a lifeboat with an orangutan, a hyena, an ailing zebra, and a Bengal tiger. Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece, Pittsford, Henrietta LINCOLN (PG-13): Daniel Day-Lewis channels our 16th President for Steven Spielberg, focusing on the last few months of the Great Emancipator’s life, which includes the Union’s victory in the War Between The States and the abolition of slavery. Co-starring Tommy Lee Jones, Jared Harris, and Sally Field. Canandaigua, Culver, Little, Eastview, Greece, Henrietta, Pittsford, Tinseltown THE PERKS OF BEING A WALLFLOWER (PG-13): Writer-director Stephen Chbosky adapts his semiautobiographical comingof-age novel about an introverted and troubled freshman who is befriended by a pair of seniors. With Logan Lerman, Ezra Miller, and Emma Watson. Cinema

RED DAWN (PG-13): North Korea replaces the Soviet Union as the bad guy in this remake of the 80’s classic (was it really?) about a bunch of teenagers who band together to save their town from invading forces. With Chris Hemsworth, Josh Peck, and Jeffrey Dean Morgan. Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Greece, Henrietta, Tinseltown RISE OF THE GUARDIANS (PG): Hugh Jackman, Alec Baldwin, and Isla Fisher provide some of the voices for this animated adventure about what happens when Jack Frost joins up with Santa Claus, The Tooth Fairy, and others to prevent an evil spirit from taking over the world. Brockport, Culver, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece, Henrietta, Pittsford, Tinseltown THE SESSIONS (R): From writer-director Ben Lewin comes this drama starring John Hawkes as a man in an iron lung who hires a professional sex surrogate (Helen Hunt) to help him lose his virginity. Co-starring William H. Macy. Cinema SKYFALL (PG-13): Bond 23 brings back Daniel Craig as 007, now directed by Oscar winner Sam Mendes and trying to prevent bad guy Javier Bardem from taking down Judi Dench’s M. With Ben Whishaw, Ralph Fiennes, and Albert Finney. Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece, Henrietta, Pittsford, Tinseltown THE TWILIGHT SAGA: BREAKING DAWN, PART 2 (PG-13): Honestly, if you need a description, you’re not interested. Brockport, Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece, Henrietta, Pittsford, Tinseltown WRECK-IT RALPH (PG): John C. Reilly, Sarah Silverman, and Jane Lynch provide a few of the voices in this animated comedy about a video-game bad guy who dreams of becoming a hero, even if it means upending the status quo at the arcade. Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece, Henrietta, Tinseltown

BACCO’S RISTORANTE SERVING DINNER Tuesday - Saturday HOLIDAY PARTIES! Make your reservations now for a truly memorable experience.

Special menus for all celebrations. GIFT CERTIFICATES Your host Giovanni La Gamba

www.baccosristorante.com R eser vations R ecommended

263 Park Ave. | 442-5090 (private parking in the back)

rochestercitynewspaper.com City 39


Classifieds For information: Call us (585) 244-3329 Fax us (585) 244-1126 Mail Us City Classifieds 250 N. Goodman Street Rochester, NY 14607 Email Us classifieds@ rochester-citynews.com

immediately. Priced from $595. Call 585-383-8888. MONROE /ALEXANDER AREA Studio, 2nd floor, quiet building. Includes appliances, coin laundry, $440 includes all. 330-0011 or 671-3806

Shared Housing ALL AREAS - ROOMMATES. COM. Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http://www.Roommates.com.

EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY

All real estate advertised in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act, which makes it unlawful, “to make, print, or publish, any notice, statement, or advertisement, with respect to the sale or rental of a dwelling that indicates any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin.” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under the age of 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertisement for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. Call the local Fair Housing Enforcement Project, FHEP at 325-2500 or 1-866-671-FAIR. Si usted sospecha una practica de vivienda injusta, por favor llame al servicio legal gratis. 585-325-2500 - TTY 585-325-2547. December 1st. Rent is $650+ RG&E Call 414-4718

Apartments for Rent

2BDRM APARTMENT Upstairs unit. Off-street parking and Attic for daytime use. Available

DOWNTOWN GIBBS/EASTMAN Theatre area. 1&2 bedrooms. Bright, cheerful, nice neighbors, laundry, convenient to everything. Available

LARGE FURNISHED ROOM Quiet surrounding. Utilities, Cable, off-street-parking included. On bus line, near bus stop. West Rochester. Call 585328-2771. House has security.

Houses for Sale HOMES FOR SALE Pittsford/ Bushnells Basin 3 Homes on fabulous 3 acre park-like yard. Beautifully updated, 1800’s large main house plus 2 smaller homes which are leased for $24,000 per year (Great In-Law Home). Owner must sell due to age & health 585-3838888

Sunday Mass at St. Michael’s Church

Celebrate Advent at St. Michael's Church Sunday December 9, 4PM Sung Mass

Music for the Second Sunday of Advent Malcolm Archer: Prayer for the Blessing of Light Anton Bruckner: Virga Jesse Charles V. Stanford: Benedictus in C Free Parking at St. Michael’s Church

Corner of Clinton & Clifford

St. Michael’s Singers

Anne Laver Music Director/Organ Alicia Messenger, cantor 40 City december 5-11, 2012

Commercial/ Office Space UofR/ AIRPORT AREA Brick, Mixed use building. 6,000 sq.ft. of stores/office plus 3 apartments. Owner must sell due to illness. Owner financing, no banks needed. 383-8888

Expenses paid.  Private.  Legal.  Jenny 1-866-751-3377

name tags. & more! $4 - $8 585-880-2903 All $49.99

PREGNANT? CONSIDERING ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families Nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions 866-4136293.

BOOK ENDS of races horses with jockey’s carved in wood, Christmas gift. $25 585-8802903

Automotive

Home Services MASTER CHIMNEY & MASONRY See our ad under Home and Garden Professionals. Chimney Cleaning, Masonry Repairs, Foundation Repairs, Roof Leaks, Brick Steps Repaired. 585-734-8444

Ceilings & Drywall 100% ABSOLUTE DUST-FREE: Ceilings & walls. $25.00 Seniors; discount. Repaired, installed. Textured, swirled, sunburst. Water damage specialist. Insurance work. Free estimates. 45 years experience. 225-6590

Adoption ADOPT Loving and stable home for your baby. Beautiful life, much love to share. Devoted, married couple. Expenses paid. Call for information, Gina/ Walt: 1-800-315-6957 ADOPT: Kindergarten teacher longs to give your precious baby endless love, secure home, large extended family, bright future. 

ALWAYS BETTER Higher cash for your Junk Cars, Trucks and Vans. From $200-$800 or more for newer. Running or not. With free towing. Also free removal of any unwanted model in any condition. Call 585-305-5865 CASH FOR CARS Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888-4203808 www.cash4car.com (AAN CAN) FOR SALE 4 Blizzak Winter Tires on Alloy wheels for Mazda RX-8 or similar $250. btowler@ rochester-citynews.com

Education ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from home. *Medical, *Business, *Criminal Justice, *Hospitality, Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEC certified. Call 888-2018657www.CenturaOnline.com

For Sale BEANIE BABIES (TY) 1997 Light blue Elephant (Peanuts), Twigs, Squealer, Iggy and Rainbow with the mixed up

BRONZE COLOR metal horse, nice size 13” long, 10” high with engraved saddle, horse lover gift $30 585-880-2903 DOG & CAT HOUSES Kennels, porch steps, do it yourself kits. Quick assembly 585-752-1000 $49 Jim FLAGS 3x5 for sale from various States and. countries.Used $8.00 each. Please call 585 259-9590 GERMAN SHEPHERD Plaque on chain. Carved head on real wood. (said, beware!) Nice gift $20.00 585-880-2903

Events GUN SHOW *Knights of Columbus Hall- December 89, 2012* 2735 Union Road Cheektowaga, N.Y. $5 admission fee. Public Hours: Sat 9-4 and Sun. 9-3. Buy- sell- trade! www. nfcshows.com

Groups Forming DIFFERENT DRUMS GAY GIRLS GROUP. Liar Obama ruins U.S. economy, responsible for 8.3% unemployment rate, encourages class envy and racial division. Pits gay against straight. His record sucks. Worst president ever. Vote this American hating fraud out! 585-747-2699

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CITY NEWSPAPER’S

ONLINE CLASSIFIEDS Fast and easy-to-use! • Find what you’re looking for with new categories! • Clickable links to business websites • and many more features!

go to

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Place your real estate ad by calling 244-3329 ext. 23 or rochestercitynewspaper.com Ad Deadlines: Friday 4pm for Display Ads Monday at noon for Line ads Lost and Found

Reliable and Professional. Able to rehearse and open for gigs. Call 585-260-9958 fstone@ rochester.rr.com

LOST 14x20 inch canvas portrait man and tropical birds. Artwalk vicinity zips 14620, 14618, 14607. Reward. Margot Fass 733-0563

CALLING ALL MUSICIANS OF ALL GENRES the Rochester Music Coalition wants you! Please register on our website. For further info: www. rochestermusiccoalition.org info@rochestermusiccoalition. org 585-235-8412

Looking For... XMAS Wool/Flannel Army Blanket donations needed! Gift new blankets to “Sunday Circle” knitters/crocheters to decorate for poor patients of R.P.C. Contact Mary at mgrant@ frontier.com.

Jam Section 2 TROMBONE PLAYERS NEEDED to play with one of Rochester’s Finest Big Bands. Must read. (Great Charts). Able to rehearse every other Wednesday 585-442-7480 BASSIST AVAILABLE: Electric, Acoustic. All styles. Mature,

CHRISTIAN ROCK - R & B Band is seeking a second lead /

DRUMMER WITH JAZZ skills applied to R&B and funk, originals & covers. Evenings open, transportation. Working Western New York Contact Bobby 585-328-4121 sitting heavyonsd@yahoo.com EXP. DRUMMER Strong vocals to join (keyboard)/ (keyboard bass) who also sings lead. To form duo (Retro Pop/Dance/ Jazz). Must be willing to shop

continues on page 42

GET THE RESULTS YOU NEED AT ABOUT HALF THE PRICE OF OTHER PAPERS!

CITY

244-3329 ext. 23 today!

T O A D V E RT I S E I N O U R

HOME & GARDEN PROFESSIONALS SECTION

C A L L C H R I S T I N E AT

A cooperative effort of City Newspaper and RochesterCityLiving, a program of the Landmark Society.

rhythm guitarist 585-355-4449

Hiring? Call Christine at

HomeWork

244.3329 x23

S E E PA G E 4 2 O F T H I S W E E K ’ S I S S U E

Find your way home with TO ADVERTISE CONTACT CHRISTINE TODAY!

A Bungalow Built for You 302 Winchester Street The lovely Craftsman style bungalow at 302 Winchester Street was built in 1907 and is located on a quiet street in the northwest part of the city. With most of its original gumwood trim either intact or lovingly restored, this 1200 square foot home offers a connection to an era when craftsmanship was king.

of the room is open and would be easy to furnish since there aren’t a lot of doorways to decorate around. Out the front door is another gem—a fully enclosed porch that can easily double as a family room or office. The color scheme is reminiscent of an Adirondack lodge while still being fresh.

Upon entering the back door and walking into the newly remodeled kitchen there is an open pantry directly in front of you that could come in very handy when bringing home groceries – you can start putting the cereal and peanut butter away as soon as you’re inside. If there aren’t any groceries to unload, you can walk right into the main kitchen work area, which features new appliances and enough space for multiple cooks. Topping off the room is a surprisingly large area for a family-size kitchen table or work station.

On the second floor, the newly remodeled bathroom is tidy and clean, and each of the three bedrooms has decent closet space. The master bedroom has a storage area that runs the length of the room. The attic is crawlspace and accessible only by ladder in the hallway, à la Christmas Vacation (Chevy Chase will not be available to help bring the lighted snowmen down this year).

CALL 244-3329 X23 OR EMAIL CHRISTINE@ROCHESTER-CITYNEWS.COM

Here to work for you! Nino Vitale Real Estate Agent

Proudly serving the Rochester area.

CALL: 315-729-2005

The dining room to your left, as well as the rest of the house, retains the original wood flooring that has been refinished to show off its true beauty. Large windows and unpainted wood trim—continued throughout the rest of the home—add warmth and charm to the room. As you turn and enter the living room, the showpiece of the home is right in front of you: framing the entryway, two untouched, decorative columns with display cases below that dare you not to fill them with all that delicate glassware your Aunt Ruth left you in her will. The rest

The 3.5 car garage and shed supply plenty of storage and a yard with more than enough room for a play set and big dog is a bonus in a city home. The patio offers comfortable summer seating. To find out more about 302 Winchester, visit rochestercityliving.com/property/ R196350 or contact Catherine Wyble of Keller Williams Realty at 585-758-8400 or CathyWyble@yahoo.com. by Roberta Ryan Roberta and her husband Ted Colucci are happy city residents who live in the Northeast section of Rochester.

email: ninovitale33@gmail.com web: vincent-associates.com

rochestercitynewspaper.com City 41


Home and Garden Professionals SNOW PLOW

CONTRACT SPECIALS For a limited time.

• SNOW PLOWING CONTRACT: STARTING AT $200 • YARD CLEAN-UP W/SNOWPLOWING CONTRACT: STARTING AT $350

TRUSTED & RECOMMENDED FOR 25+ YEARS

Improvements for your home from foundations to roofs and everything in between, including: • Remodeling and Additions • Kitchens and Baths • Finished Basements • All types of flooring including radiant heat • Windows and Siding

• GUTTER CLEANING: STARTING AT $45

• Garages, Patios, Decks & Pools • Handyman services for small jobs • Masonry and Concrete • Emergency repairs and storm damage - WE WORK WITH YOUR INSURANCE COMPANY

FREE ESTIMATES

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Affordable

Home Improvements All Phases of Home Improvements

Basement Renovations Bathrooms Kitchens Additions Windows Siding Decks Fireplaces Painting

• Bath • Kitchen • Basement • Windows/Doors • Roofing • Siding

Fully insured

414-3692

585-313-1940 brian54@rochester.rr.com Brian Donovan

BOTTOM LINE PRICING - Owner On Every Job!

SUN WORLD ERNEST W. PETERSON INC. CONSTRUCTION DEPENDABLE INTERIOR & EXTERIOR

INSULATION SPECIALIST

for all your weatherizing needs. Blown Fiberglass & Cellulose Spray foam • Energy audits

(585) 328-3832

Michael Mincher Serving Monroe County since 1977 Trusted quality service since 1994!

Master Elite workmanship at wholesale pricing.

Home Repair Specialist! • General Contracting • Roofs • Siding • Windows/Doors • Kitchens • Baths • Handicap Renovations • Repairs Big or Small

10% Discount on Full Roofing Jobs Specializing in All Roofing types, including Metal Roof Installations! *special excludes all previous work.

FULLY INSURED, FREE ESTIMATES

703-7738

PAINTING & STAINING

Professional Painting Service, 35 Years’ Experience FULLY INSURED LEAD CERTIFIED

MEET OTHER MUSICIANS any instrument, male singer- jam together- coffee house, private gigs, I play keys Call Martin 585-266-6337

Big Dog Problem; Small Dog Problem

No Problem! Combine obedience & behavior training to create a great relationship with your dog. It’ll make life easier for both of you.

585-319-5813 www.coachingcanines.com

585-287-0692 & MASONRY

WINTER IS ON ITS WAY! Clean your chimney for the upcoming burning season!

K-D Moving & Storage Inc.

• Chimney Cleaning • Chimney Repairs • Brick Steps Repaired • Foundaon Repairs • Concrete Repairs & New Walks Installed • Chimney Painng • Chimneys Rebuilt • Chimney Re-lining

585-734-8444

MEN ENJOY SINGING Fun with the Chorus of the Genesee, Sing, learn, perform, share laughs and libation! Guest night Tuesday at 7 PM. Stop in at 58 E Main St, Webster. Call 585698-7784 R & B SOUL BANDS seek employment, experienced groups, already performing, seek new jobs. Contact Bobby 585328-4121 ROCK STAR, MR. ROCHESTER, lead vocalist, is looking to form band (Classic Rock) with lead guitarist, bassist, drummer & rhythm guitars Covers & originals 585-473-5089 THE GREGORY KUNDE CHORALE is looking for male voices. Call for an audition now to join our fourteenth season! Info Line 377 7568 or visit our website www. gregorykundechorale.org

Music Services BASS LESSONS Acoustic, electric, all styles. Music therory and composition for all instruments. Former Berklee and Eastman Teacher. For more information, call 585-2609958

continues on page 44

MIND BODY SPIRIT

THINK • MOVE • BREATHE DANCE • HEAL • SEARCH STRETCH • STENGHTHEN

TO ADVERTISE CALL CHRISTINE AT 244.3329 x23

Fully Insured

ATTENTION

HOME SERVICE PROVIDERS

Did you know that City Newspaper Readers spent OVER $90 MILLION DOLLARS on home improvements in the LAST 12 MONTHS? Call Christine today to advertise

585-244-3329 ext. 23

42 City december 5-11, 2012

EXPERIENCED FEMALE JAZZ Vocalist looking for a pianist or a small group to perform music from the 30’s to today, with a Mad Men era emphasis! Serious musicians only. 2335551 EXPERIENCED LEAD VOCALS Seeks employment. Pat experience Inkspots, Platters, Drifters, James Brown among many. Leroy Harris. Contact Bobby 585-328-4121 Specialties, classics, R&B Soul.

www.AllPropertyMaintenanceNY.com

Call

> page 41 the musical product around to get gigs 585-426-7241

Experience in office & household moving and deliveries

Big or small, we do them all

473-6610 or 473-4357 23 Arlington St. NY D.O.T.#9657

KdMovingandStorage.com

See Page 22 of this week’s issue


EMPLOYMENT / CAREER TRAINING

Employment AIRLINE CAREERS - Become an Aviation Maintenance Tech. FAA approved training. Financial aid if qualified – Housing available. Job placement assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 877-492-3059 AIRLINES ARE HIRING Train for hands on Aviation Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified- Job Placement Assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance (866)296-7093

AN INTERNATIONAL COMPANY Expanding in your area seeks serious individuals interested in pt/ft business opportunity call 570 856 1315 or e-mail nansk55@gmail.com or visit www. goherbalife.com/decnorm/en-US DRIVER $0.01 increase per mile after 6 months. Choose your hometime. $0.03 Quarterly Bonus. Requires 3 months recent experience. 800-414-9569 www. driveknight.com $$$HELP WANTED$$$ Extra Income! Assembling CD cases from Home! No Experience Necessary! Call our Live Operators

Now! 1-800-405-7619 EXT 2450 http://www.easywork-greatpay.com (AAN CAN)

Volunteers A SECOND THOUGHT Resale Shop in East Rochester is accepting applications for volunteer sale associates and online researchers. Shop benefits people with disabilities in Guatemala. Call (585) 3402000. CATHOLIC FAMILY CENTER needs volunteers to help people apply for citizenship. The commitment is 2.5 hrs per mth one evening a month. Training is provided. For more information call Nate at (585) 546-7220 ex 4854. FOSTER PARENTS WANTED! Monroe County is looking for adults age 21 and over to consider opening their homes to foster children. Call 334-9096 or visit www.MonroeFosterCare.org. HERITAGE CHRISTIAN STABLES, a therapeutic horsemanship program for children and adults with developmental disabilities, is looking for volunteers to serve as horse leaders and side walkers. Call Kim Kennedy at (585)

340-2016 or email kkennedy@ heritagechristianservices.org HORSE SANTUARY in Pavilion, NY requests volunteers during holiday season. Volunteers must love animals. Call Chris at (585) 584-8210 for more information. LITERACY VOLUNTEERS OF ROCHESTER needs adult tutors to help adults who are waiting to improve their reading, writing, English speaking, or math skills. Call 473-3030, or check our website at www.literacyrochester.org ROCHESTER CARES is looking for volunteers interested in joining us to make a difference in Rochester!! One time and recurring volunteer opportunities with a wide range of organizations. www. rochestercares.org/calendar.php SCHOOL #12 999 South Ave. is looking for reading & math volunteers, English & Spanish. Training provided. Call Vicki 585461-4282 UNITED WAY Volunteer Fundraiser needed. Verification Phone Calling & Data Management. Strong interpersonal skills; attention to detail; strong verbal and written communication skills. Call 242-6547

VOLUNTEERS ARE STILL NEEDED to help make the Annual Joe Benet Memorial Kazoo Fest a great success. No previous volunteer experience is needed and volunteers may select their preferred Kazoo Fest location, as well as their preferred dates and times. Anyone who would like information about volunteering at the Camp Good Days’ Kazoo Fest can contact Melissa Cappelluti at Camp Good Days, at 585-624-5555 or mcappelluti@campgooddays. org. More information and the Kazoo Fest Volunteer Form can also be found at www. campgooddays.org VOLUNTEERS NEEDED for the Men’s Emergency Winter Shelter at Dimitri House. Please call us at 325-1796 for more information or to volunteer your time. VOLUNTEERS NEEDED to depict evangelistic opportunities by means of performing skits in a Church environment. Professional acting not a requirement. This is done in a small Church setting. Contact Pastor Ron @ 585-9576155 WOMEN: ROCHESTER HABITAT is looking for women 18 years+ to

help build a house with a single mother. Visit rochabitat.org or call 546-1470

Business Opportunities HELP WANTED!!! MAKE $1000 A WEEK mailing brochures from home! FREE Supplies! Helping Home Workers since 2001! Genuine Opportunity! No Experience required. Start Immediately! START NOW OPEN RED HOT DOLLAR, DOLLAR PLUS, MAILBOX, DISCOUNT PARTY, $10 CLOTHING STORE, TEEN STORE, FITNESS CENTER FROM $51,900 WORLDWIDE! WWW.DRSS16.COM 1-800-5183064

Career Training ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home. *Medical, *Business, *Criminal Justice, *Hospitality. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV authorized. Call 800-481-9472 www. CenturaOnline.com

rochestercitynewspaper.com City 43


Legal Ads [ LEGAL NOTICE ]

> page 42 PIANO LESSONS In your home or mine. Patient, experienced instructor teaching all ages, levels and musical styles. Call Scott: 585- 465-0219. Visit www.pianolessonsrochester.com

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Notice of Formation of Limited Liability Company 1. Name of the Limited Liability Company is Zolala, LLC. 2. Articles of Organization were filed by Department of State of New York on October 16, 2012. 3. County of office: Monroe 4. The Company does not have a specific date of dissolution. 5. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent upon whom process against the Company may be served. The address to which process shall be mailed: 656 Kayleigh Drive, Webster, NY 14580 [ LEGAL NOTICE ] Notice of formation of SBG Properties LLC. Arts. Of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State on 11/19/12.. Off. loc.: Monroe Co. Sec. of State designated as agent of LLC upon whom process may be served and shall mail process to: 15 Sunleaf Drive, Penfiled, NY. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ LEGAL NOTICE VG CAPITAL GROUP LLC ] Notice of Organization: VG Capital Group LLC was filed with SSNY on July 20, 2012. Office: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. PO address which SSNY shall mail any process against the LLC served upon it: c/o Nixon Peabody LLP, 1300 Clinton Square, Rochester, NY 14604. Purpose is to engage in any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] 3800 RIDGE ROAD WEST LLC (LLC) filed Arts. of Org. with NY Secy. of State (SS) on 11/13/12. LLC’s office is in Monroe Co. SS is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS shall mail a copy of any process to LLC’s principal business location at 4477 Ridge Road West, Rochester, NY 14626. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Articles of Organization of limited liability company. Beat the Wave, LLC (LLC) were filed with the Department of State on November 9, 2012. Monroe County is the county within which it will have its office; its principal business

44 City december 5-11, 2012

address is 103 River Street, Rochester, New York 14612. Its purpose is to serve, or provide services to foreign parents and their high school and college age students who attend educational institutions in the United States within the metropolitan area of Rochester, New York. The LLC has designated the Secretary of State of New York as its agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. 103 River Street, Rochester, New York 14612 is the post office address to which the Secretary of State shall mail a copy of any process against the LLC [ NOTICE ] BROOKDALE RENTALS LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 8/21/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 11 Brookdale Rd., Brockport, NY 14420. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] CORNWALL ROCHESTER NY, LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 10/31/12. Office in Monroe Co. SSNY desig. agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 2255 Lyell Ave., Rochester, NY 14606,which is also the principal business location. Purpose: Any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] EAGLE RENTALS LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 8/21/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 11 Brookdale Rd., Brockport, NY 14420. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] First Residential Properties, LLC has filed Art. Of Org. with the Sec’y of State on 11/1/12. Office Location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 144 Village Landing #192, Fairport, NY 14450. Purpose: Any lawful purpose.

[ NOTICE ] Index No. 2011-14282 SUPREME COURT STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF MONROE ESL Federal Credit Union, Plaintiff vs. The Estate of Robert James Campbell, a/k/a Robert J. Campbell; Any persons who are heirs or distributees of Robert James Campbell, a/k/a Robert J. Campbell, Deceased, and all persons who are widows, grantees, mortgagees, lienors, heirs, devisees, distributees, successors in interest of such of them as may be deceased, and their husbands, wives, heirs, devisees, distributees and successors of interest all of whom and whose names and places of residence are unknown to Plaintiff; United States of America; People of the State of New York; Board of Managers of the Scarborough House Condominium; Matthew Korytko; New York State Department of Taxation and Finance; “John Doe” and/or “Mary Roe”, Defendants. Pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale dated October 22, 2012 and entered herein, I, the undersigned, the Referee in said Judgment named, will sell at public auction in the front vestibule of the Monroe County Office Building, 39 West Main Street, Rochester, New York, County of Monroe, on December 19, 2012 at 11:00 a.m., on that day, the premises directed by said Judgment to be sold and therein described as follows: ALL THAT TRACT OR PARCEL OF LAND, situate in the City of Rochester, County of Monroe and State of New York, known as 1000 East Avenue, Unit 106, Rochester, NY 14607; Tax Account No. 122.37-1-2./106, described in Deed recorded in Liber 10047 of Deeds, page 66. Said premises are sold subject to any state of facts an accurate survey may show, zoning restrictions and any amendments thereto, covenants, restrictions, agreements, reservations, and easements of record and prior liens, if any, municipal departmental violations, and such other provisions as may be set forth in the Complaint and Judgment filed in this action. Judgment amount: $42,134.50

plus but not limited to, costs, disbursements, attorney fees and additional allowance, if any, all with legal interest. DATED: November 2012Dean J. Fero, Esq., Referee LACY KATZEN LLP Attorneys for Plaintiff 130 East Main Street Rochester, New York 14604 Telephone: (585 324-5767 [ NOTICE ] KALPIN’S AUTO CARE LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 10/15/12. Office in Monroe Co. SSNY design. Agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to The LLC 62 Lagrange Ave. Rochester, NY 14613 Any lawful activity. Registered Agent: Nicholas Kalpin 62 Lagrange Ave. Rochester, NY 14613. [ NOTICE ] MANAGED SERVICES TEAM LLC (LLC) filed Arts. of Org. with NY Secy. of State (SS) on 11/13/12. LLC’s office is in Monroe Co. SS is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS shall mail a copy of any process to LLC’s principal business location at 72 Cascade Drive, Rochester, NY 14614. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Not. of Form. of Blue Wave Properties, LLC. Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 9/17/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 19 Eaglesfield Wy, Fairport, NY 14450. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ]

designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served SSNY shall mail copy of process to 1241 Universtiy Ave Rochester, NY 14607. Any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of AMERIGLIDE OF ROCHESTER, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/18/2012. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 48 Mt. Hope Avenue, Rochester, NY 14620. Purpose: any lawful act [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Atimesa Studios LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 9/17/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Salil Athalye, 7 Brewster Lane, Pittsford, NY 14534, also the registered agent.. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Brody Brighton Holdings, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/16/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The Company, 92 River Rd., Summit, NJ 07901, also the principal office address. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ]

Not. of Form. of Local Seasons LLC. Art. of Org. filed with SSNY 10/24/2012. County: Monroe. SSNY designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of any process to LLC. 2160 Turk Hill Rd., Fairport, NY 14450. Purpose: any lawful activities.

Notice of formation of Brown Simmons LLC. Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY)10/18/2012. Office Location: Monroe county. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to: 21 Lawndale Terrace, Rochester, NY 14609. Purpose: Any lawful activities.

[ NOTICE ]

[ NOTICE ]

Notice of Formation Design Builders of Monroe County LLC. Articles of org. filed Sec’ty State (SSNY) 9/5/12 Office Location Monroe County SSNY

Notice of formation of BURRIS CONSULTING, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/17/2012. Office location, County of


Legal Ads Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 48 Clearview Dr., Spencerport, NY 14559. Purpose: any lawful act. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Clemente Greece Holdings, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/16/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The Company, 92 River Rd., Summit, NJ 07901, also the principal office address. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of CRANBERRY CASUALS LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 04/04/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o U.S. Corp. Agents, Inc., 7014 13th Ave., Ste. 202, Brooklyn, NY 11228, regd. agent upon whom and at which process may be served. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of domestic professional service limited liability company (PLLC) Name: RICHARDSON ARCHITECTURE, PLLC. Articles of Organization filed with Secretary of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/19/12. Office location: Monroe County. Principal Office of PLLC: 597 Shady Glen Circle, Webster, NY 14580. SSNY designated as agent of PLLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to the PLLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: to engage in any and all business for which PLLCs may be formed under the New York PLLC Law. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of JA PROPERTY HOLDINGS, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/7/2012. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 64 E. Boulevard, Rochester, NY 14610.

SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the princ. office of the LLC. Purpose: Owning and managing real estate. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of KULIG, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/11/2012. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o William S. Ruby, Esq., 70 Linden Oaks, Suite 300, Rochester, NY 14625. Purpose: any lawful act [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of L&B Fabricators, LLC. Arts of Org. filed with Secy. Of State of N.Y. (SSNY) on 10/31/12. Office Location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 16 W. Main St., STE 246, Rochester, NY 14614. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of Limited Liability Company (LLC). Name: TACS, LLC. Articles of Organization filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on October 22, 2012. Office location, Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to: 728 East Ave., Brockport, NY 14420. Purpose: any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ]

LLC: 2479 Browncroft Blvd., Rochester, NY 14625. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of One Way Enterprises I LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 9/27/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to One Way Enterprises, 8376 Merriman Rd., Bergen, NY 14416. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Owen Webster Holdings, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/16/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The Company, 92 River Rd., Summit, NJ 07901, also the principal office address. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Queued LLC. Art. of Org. filed SSNY on 9/27/12. Office: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY may mail copy of any process to LLC: 190 Presque St. Rochester, NY 14609 Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ]

Notice of Formation of MAXIM MINI MART LLC. Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 9/17/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to the LLC : 264 Clifford Ave., Rochester, NY 14621 Purpose: any lawful activities.

Notice of Formation of RAM NY, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/06/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Mark S. Rosen, The Solomon Organization, 92 River Rd., Summit, NJ 07901. Purpose: Any lawful activity.

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[ NOTICE ]

Notice of Formation of MFP 126 CAYUGA STREET LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/16/12. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of

Notice of Formation of RCS Property Holdings, LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 10/15/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent

of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 1400 St. Paul St., Rochester, NY 14621. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of RCS Real Estate, LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 10/15/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 1400 St. Paul St., Rochester, NY 14621. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of ROCHESTER APARTMENT MANAGEMENT, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/06/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Mark S. Rosen, The Solomon Organization, 92 River Rd., Summit, NJ 07901. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of ROCHESTER MANAGING MEMBER, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/15/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Mark S. Rosen, The Solomon Organization, 92 River Rd., Summit, NJ 07901. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Rose Dream Homes LLC. Arts. of Org. filed Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/19/12. Off. loc.: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o Robert G. Lamb, Jr., Esq., 1 East Main St., 510 Wilder Bldg., Bldg. 1, Rochester, NY 14614. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of ROW HOUSE LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY

(SSNY) on 10/22/12. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: J. Loftus, 69 Cascade Dr., Rochester, NY 14614. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of SO ROCHESTER INVESTORS, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/16/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Mark S. Rosen, The Solomon Organization, 92 River Rd., Summit, NJ 07901. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of SOIL STABILIZATION TECHNOLOGIES, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/07/12. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 36 Draffin Rd., Hilton, NY 144689708. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Monroe Fluid Technology, Inc. at the princ. office of the LLC. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of SOLEADO, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/16/12. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 363 East Ave., Rochester, NY 14604. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, 292 Fair Oaks Ave., Rochester, NY 14618. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of Thrombophilic Consultants LLC. Art. of Org. filed with the Sec of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/1/12. Office location, County of Monroe. United States Corporation Agents, Inc. has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served and mailed to: c/o United States Corporation Agents,

Inc. 7014 13th Av., Ste. 202 Brooklyn, NY, 11228 . Purpose: any lawful act. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Vista Golf Properties, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/15/12. Off. loc.: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, c/o Sammy Feldman 3445 Winton Place, Ste. 228, Rochester, NY 14623. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Vista Golf, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/15/12. Off. loc.: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, c/o Sammy Feldman 3445 Winton Place, Ste. 228, Rochester, NY 14623. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of WESTSIDE DRIVE LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/1/2012. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 5656 Chili Riga Center Road, Churchville, NY 14428. Purpose: any lawful act [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Whittermore Point Holdings, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/7/12. Off. loc.: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, c/o Sammy Feldman, 3445 Winton Place, Ste. 228, Rochester, NY 14623. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of AdvizeX Partners I, LLC. Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 10/17/12. Office location: Monroe County. LLC formed in DE on 9/20/11. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon

whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to the principal business address: 9724 Wolf Creek Dr., Irving, TX 75063-5032. DE address of LLC: 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: any and all lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of Canal Front Capital Management, LLC. Application for Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 7/26/12. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. bus. addr.: 10 Little Acorn Cir., Pittsford, NY 14534. LLC formed in DE on 11/14/11. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: Canal Front Capital Management, LLC, 10 Little Acorn Cir, Pittsford, NY 14534, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. DE addr. of LLC: c/o Business Filings Inc., 108 West 13th St.,Wilmington, DE 19801. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of HCP SH ELP2 PROPERTIES, LLC. Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/22/12. Office location: Monroe County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 10/17/12. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Corporation Service Co., 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207-2543. DE addr. of LLC: 2711 Centerville Rd., Ste. 400, Wilmington, DE 19808. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State, 401 Federal St., Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of Simplifile LC. Fictitious name: Simplifile E-Recording LLC. Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/6/12. Office location: Monroe County. LLC formed in Utah (UT) on 6/26/02. SSNY designated as agent

of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 4844 North 300 West, Ste. 202, Provo, UT 84604, also the principal office address and the address to be maintained in UT. Arts of Org. filed with the UT Division of Corporations and Commercial Code, 160 East 300 South, P.O. Box 146705, Salt Lake City, UT 841146705. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of THE BERRY COMPANY, LLC. Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/24/12. Office location: Monroe County. LLC formed in Colorado (CO) on 11/16/11. Princ. office of LLC: 160 Inverness Dr. West, Ste. 400, Englewood, CO 80112. NYS fictitious name: BERRCO ADVERTISING, LLC. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Corporation Service Co., 80 State St., Albany, NY 122072543. Arts. of Org. filed with CO Dept. of State, 1700 Broadway, Denver, CO 80290. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of True Wireless, LLC. Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 11/8/12. NYS fictitious name: True Wireless, LLC of Texas. Office location: Ontario County. Princ. bus. addr.: 3124 Brother Blvd., #104, Bartlett, TN 38133. LLC formed in TX on 7/8/08. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o National Registered Agents, Inc. (NRAI), 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, registered agent upon whom process may be served. TX addr. of LLC: c/o NRAI, 1021 Main St., Ste. 1150, Houston, TX 77002. Cert. of Org. filed with TX Sec. of State, P.O. Box 13697, Austin, TX 78711. Purpose: all lawful purposes. [ NOTICE ] QUINZI PROPERTIES LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 10/10/12. Office in Monroe Co. SSNY design. Agent

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Legal Ads > page 45 of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to Peter Quinzi 822 McKinley St. East Rochester, NY 14445 Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] STUDIO QI, LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 10/25/12. Office in Monroe Co. SSNY design. Agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to C/O Shanshan Qi 710 Winton Rd S. Rochester, NY 14618. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Registered Agent: Shanshan Qi 710 Winton Rd S. Rochester, NY 14618. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION Crosby Abstracting Services, LLC ] NOTICE OF FORMATION Crosby Abstracting Services, LLC Articles of Organization filed with Sec’y of State (SSNY) on 11/14/12. Office

location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to c/o the Company, 14 Red Lion Road, Henrietta, NY 14467. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF 2111 EMPIRE BLVD LLC ] The name of the Limited Liability Company is 2111 Empire Blvd LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the New York Secretary of State on 7/9/2012. The office of the LLC is in Monroe County. The New York Secretary of State is designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. The Secretary of State shall mail a copy of such process to 849 Lehigh Station Road, West Henrietta, NY 14586. The LLC is organized to engage in any lawful activity for which an LLC may be formed under NY LLC Law.

[ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF 36 JEFF, LLC ] The name of the Limited Liability Company is 36 Jeff, LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the New York Secretary of State on 5/8/2008. The office of the LLC is in Monroe County. The New York Secretary of State is designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. The Secretary of State shall mail a copy of such process to PO Box 25454, Rochester, NY 14623. The LLC is organized to engage in any lawful activity for which an LLC may be formed under NY LLC Law. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF Back of 1075, LLC ] The name of the limited liability company (“LLC”) is Back of 1075, LLC. The Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State on October 23, 2012. The office of the LLC is to be in Monroe

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County. The street address of the limited liability company’s office is 1023 Buffalo Road, Rochester, NY 14624. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. The address to which the Secretary of State shall mail a copy of any process against the LLC served upon him is: 183 East Main St., Suite 1400, Rochester, New York 14604. The LLC is organized to engage in any lawful activity for which an LLC may be formed under Section 203 of the Limited Liability Company Law. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF CLOVERLAND DEVELOPMENT COMPANY, LLC ] The name of the limited liability company (“LLC”) is CLOVERLAND DEVELOPMENT COMPANY, LLC. The Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State on December 31, 2010. The office of the LLC is to be in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. The address to which the Secretary of State shall mail a copy of any process against the LLC served upon him is: 183 East Main St., Suite 1400, Rochester, New York 14604. Attn: James T. Townsend, Esq. The LLC is organized to engage in any lawful activity for which an LLC may be formed under Section 203 of the Limited Liability Company Law. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY ] CARPETNOMICS OF WNY, LLC (“LLC”), has filed Articles of Organization with the NY Secretary of State (“NYSS”) on November 2, 2012 pursuant to Section 203 of the NY Limited Liability Company Law. The office of the LLC shall be located in Monroe County, NY. The NYSS is designated as the agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served, and the address to which the NYSS shall mail a copy of any process served on him against the LLC is 83 Dessie Heights, West Henrietta, NY 14586. The purpose

46 City december 5-11, 2012

of the LLC is to engage in any lawful act or activity for which limited liability companies may be formed under the law. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY ] The name of the Limited Liability Company (LLC) is Rochester Brainery LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of NY (SSNY) on October 22, 2012. Office location is Monroe County, New York. The SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. The SSNY shall mail a copy of any process to theLLC at 119 Sylvester Street, Rochester, NY 14621. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LLC ] Barbara and Michael Hanna Family, LLC has filed articles of organization with the New York Secretary of State on October 23, 2012. Its principal place of business is located at 21 McCoord Woods Drive, Fairport, New York in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent upon whom process may be served. A copy of any process shall be mailed to 21 McCoord Woods Drive, Fairport, New York 14450. The purpose of the LLC is to engage in any lawful activity for which Limited Liability Companies may be organized under Section 203 of the New York Limited Liability Company Law. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF PITWEB CMM, LLC ] The name of the Limited Liability Company is PITWEB CMM, LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the New York Secretary of State on 11/13/2012. The office of the LLC is in Monroe County. The New York Secretary of State is designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. The Secretary of State shall mail a copy of such process to 7 Mount Eagle Drive, Penfield, NY 14526. The LLC is organized to engage in any lawful activity for which an LLC may be formed under NY LLC Law.

[ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF PLLC ] Greater Rochester Breast Surgery, PLLC has filed articles of organization with the New York Secretary of State on November 2, 2012. Its principal place of business is located at 2235 South Clinton Avenue in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent upon whom process may be served. A copy of any process shall be mailed to 2235 South Clinton Avenue, Rochester, New York 14618. The purpose of the PLLC is to practice the profession of medicine and the providing of medical services. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF SMOKE SIGNALS PERFORMANCE PRODUCTS LLC ] The name of the Limited Liability Company is Smoke Signals Performance Products LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the New York Secretary of State on 8/1/2012. The office of the LLC is in Monroe County. The New York Secretary of State is designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. The Secretary of State shall mail a copy of such process to 18 Dolman Dr., Rochester, NY 14624. The LLC is organized to engage in any lawful activity for which an LLC may be formed under NY LLC Law. [ NOTICE OF SALE ] Index No. 201115044 SUPREME COURT STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF MONROE ESL Federal Credit Union f/k/a Eastman Savings and Loan Association Plaintiff, vs. James C. McCoy a/k/a James McCoy; City of Rochester; New York State Department of Taxation and Finance TCD-Child Support Enforcement Section; Beneficial New York, Inc.; People of the State of New York o/b/o The City Court of Rochester; Winston Brown, Defendants. Pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale dated October 22, 2012 and entered herein, I, the undersigned, the Referee in said Judgment named, will sell at public auction in the front vestibule

of the Monroe County Office Building, 39 West Main Street, Rochester, New York, County of Monroe, on January 7, 2013 at 10:00 a.m., on that day, the premises directed by said Judgment to be sold and therein described as follows: ALL THAT TRACT OR PARCEL OF LAND, situate in the City of Rochester, County of Monroe and State of New York, known as 159 Woodbine Avenue, Rochester, NY 14619; Tax Account No. 120.651-5, described in Deed recorded in Liber 8068 of Deeds, page 190. Said premises are sold subject to any state of facts an accurate survey may show, zoning restrictions and any amendments thereto, covenants, restrictions, agreements, reservations, and easements of record and prior liens, if any, municipal departmental violations, and such other provisions as may be set forth in the Complaint and Judgment filed in this action. Judgment amount: $33,156.93 plus, but not limited to, costs, disbursements, attorney fees and additional allowance, if any, all with legal interest. DATED: November 2012 Leticia D. Astacio, Esq., Referee LACY KATZEN LLP Attorneys for Plaintiff 130 East Main Street Rochester, New York 14604 Telephone: (585) 324-5767 [ NOTICE OF SALE ] SUPREME COURT COUNTY OF MONROE Antonio Masci and Iginio Masci, Plaintiffs vs. David Oliver, et al, Defendants. Pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale duly dated November 13, 2012, I, the undersigned Referee, will sell at a public auction at the front vestibule of the Monroe County Office Building, 39 West Main Street, Rochester, New York, on December 27, 2012 at 9:00 a.m., premises known as 1133-1135, 1139-1141, 11431145 and 1147-1149 Shoecraft Road, Webster, New York 14580. Described as follows: All that tract or parcel of land situate in the Town of Webster, County of Monroe and State of New York, being part of Town Lot 48, Section 13, Range 4, known as Lots 230, 231 and 232

of Shoecraft Farms as shown on a map of said subdivision made and filed in the Monroe County Clerk’s Office in Liber 258 of Maps at page 22 and 23. Also, all that tract or parcel of land situate in the Town of Webster, County of Monroe and State of New York, being part of Town Lot 48, Section 13, Range 4, known as LotR153A of the Shoecraft Farms Subdivision, as shown on a map of said subdivision made and filed in the Monroe County Clerk’s Office in Liber 278 of Maps at page 8. Approximate amount of judgment: $672,439,97, plus interest, disbursements, fees and costs from the date of the Referee’s Report, October 17, 2011. Premises will be sold subject to provisions of filed Judgment Index Number 2011-5941. John J. Considine, Esq., Referee Charles J. Genese, Attorney at Law Post Office Box 688 Webster, New York 14580 [ NOTICE OF STRATEGIC CHANGE & INNOVATION, LLC ] Strategic Change & Innovation, LLC was filed with SSNY on 10/05/12. Office: Monroe County, SSNY designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process may be served. P.O. address which SSNY shall mail any process against the LLC served upon SSNY: 315 Highland Ave., Rochester, NY 14620. Purpose is to engage in any lawful activity. [ NOTICE OF ZYAIR PROPERTIES, LLC ] Zyair Properties, LLC was filed with SSNY on 09/14/12. Office: Monroe County, SSNY designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process may be served. P.O. address which SSNY shall mail any process against the LLC served upon SSNY: 133 Rosemary Drive, Rochester, NY 14621. Purpose is to engage in any lawful activity.


Fun [ news of the weird ] BY CHUCK SHEPHERD

The Litigious Society

— Samuel Cutrufelli, 31, filed a lawsuit in October in Sacramento County, Calif., claiming that Jay Leone, 90, “negligently” shot him. Cutrufelli had burglarized Leone’s home in Greenbrae, unaware that Leone was home. When Leone reached for one of his stashed handguns, Cutrufelli shot him in the jaw and then pulled the trigger point-blank at Leone’s head, but was out of bullets. Leone then shot Cutrufelli several times, which Cutrufelli apparently felt was entirely unnecessary. — In October, the former captain of the Italian cruise ship Costa Concordia (on which 32 people died after it ran aground in January 2012) filed a lawsuit against Costa Cruises for “wrongfully” firing him. Francesco Schettino is awaiting trial for manslaughter, accused of sending the ship dangerously close to shore on a personal lark, and was also charged with abandoning ship, since he was spotted in a lifeboat in the midst of passengers’ escape. (Schettino said he wound up in the lifeboat only because he “slipped” and fell in.) — China’s legal system apparently is growing to resemble America’s. A wellcovered (but incompletely sourced) story from Chinese media in October reported that Mr. Jian Feng won the equivalent of $120,000 in a lawsuit against his wellto-do wife for deceiving him and subsequently giving birth to what Feng thought was an ugly baby. Feng discovered that his wife had had cosmetic surgery -- and thus was not, genetically, the beauty that he married but, in reality, plain-looking.

Ironies

— Amateur!: In October, a federal appeals court overturned the bribery conviction of a City of Chicago zoning inspector -- on the grounds that the bribes he was convicted of taking were too small to be covered by

federal law. Dominick Owens, 46, was convicted of taking two bribes of $600 each to issue certificates of occupancy, but the law applies only to bribes of $5,000 or more. (Also in October, Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel disbanded the city’s ethics board after a 25-year run in which it never found an alderman in violation -- even though, during that time, 20 aldermen were convicted of felonies.) — The government’s Health Canada agency announced in October that Avmor Ltd. had agreed to recall one lot of its Antimicrobial Foaming Hand Soap -- because it was contaminated with microbes. (The recall did not disclose whether the danger was due to too many microbes overwhelming the soap or due to the inability of the antimicrobial soap to kill any microbes at all.) — Karma: (1) Tyller Myers, 19, was killed in a collision near Norwalk, Ohio, in September when he ran a stop sign and was rammed by a tractor-trailer. Afterward, police found three stolen stop signs in Myers’ truck. (2) A 21-year-old man was killed crossing a highway at 5 a.m. in Athens, Ga., in September. Police said he had just dined-and-dashed out of a Waffle House restaurant and into the path of a pickup truck. — The Will of God: Devoted Catholic David Jimenez, 45, had been praying regularly to a large crucifix outside the Church of St. Patrick in Newburgh, N.Y., having become convinced that it was responsible for eradicating his wife’s ovarian cancer. He even got permission from the church to spruce up the structure, as befit its power. Then, during a cleaning in May 2010, the 600-pound crucifix came loose and fell on Jimenez’s leg, which had to be amputated. From a holy object of worship to precipitator of a lawsuit: Jimenez’s $3 million litigation against the archdiocese goes to trial in January.

[ LAST WEEK’S SOLUTION ON PAGE 44 ]

[ LOVESCOPE ] BY EUGENIA LAST ARIES (March 21-April 19): Love and romance will have its ups and downs. Frustrations and limitations will develop within relationship dealings with potential partners. Problems with people you thought you had something in common with will arise. Don’t let disappointment jade you. Single is good for now. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Visiting places you haven’t been for some time will bring people from your past back into your life. Don’t be secretive about reconnecting, and you will have a chance to establish an interesting relationship with potential to grow

into something lasting. Romantic opportunity is apparent. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Overreacting when dealing with love will be your downfall. If you come on too strong or you don’t keep your word, you will find it difficult to backtrack. Don’t meddle and keep your thoughts and feeling honest and out in the open to avoid being misinterpreted. CANCER (June 21-July 22): Engage in unique forms of entertainment and you will meet someone special. Don’t be afraid to share your feelings with someone who strikes you as being as sensitive and caring as you are.

You can build a foundation for a long-term relationship. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Ease into conversations with diplomacy and care not to hurt someone’s feelings. Being noncommittal is your best bet, especially if someone is trying to get you to admit to something or get you to make a promise you will not keep. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Travel and communication will highlight your romantic life. All you have to do is be receptive and make yourself available. Spontaneity and choosing to forget your troubles while focusing on having a good time will lead to a connection.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Look forward and forget about anyone from your past trying to talk you into getting back together. You need a change of scenery along with the chance to meet someone who can offer you something fresh and different from any relationship you had in the past. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Follow your intuition when it comes to love and romance. A change of pace is needed, and taking time out to relax and get to know someone better will not be a waste of time. You are ready to make a commitment. SAGITTARIUS (Nov 22-Dec 21): A

change in your personal life will leave you feeling confused. Look at the positive, not the negative aspect of what’s unfolding. Someone you least expect will come to your rescue. Before you reveal your true feelings, consider if ulterior motives are present. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): You’ll recognize familiarities between someone you meet now and someone you used to be in love with. Take your time, but definitely make plans to get to know this person better. A strong bond will develop that has the potential to go the distance. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18):

Don’t take anyone or anything for granted when an emotional relationship is involved. You will face a difference of opinion that can put a wedge between you and someone you are attracted to physically. A shift regarding the type of person you gravitate toward will take place. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): You’ve got all the right moves when it comes to love, romance and turning a relationship that interests you into a long-term devotion. Love is in the stars, and connecting with someone who shares interests is a plus. Speak freely regarding future plans.

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48 City december 5-11, 2012


December 5-11, 2012 - City Newspaper