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EVENTS: “THE NUTCRACKER,” MEN OF THE STRIP 23 RESTAURANT REVIEW: ESAN THAI 13 FILM: “DALLAS BUYERS CLUB,” “CATCHING FIRE” 30 URBAN JOURNAL: VARGAS’S BOLD PLAN

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AND MORE MUSIC, PAGE 14

Greater Rochester’s Alternative Newsweekly

Vol 43 No 12

News. Music. Life.

Did we really need a Black Friday? Every year it seems to get worse.” FEEDBACK, PAGE 2

Love me, love my city. COMMUNITY, PAGE 4

Historical Society tries to right itself. HISTORY, PAGE 5

OSSIA gives ESM students the business. CLASSICAL, PAGE 22

Sister act: Geva’s “Catechism” returns. THEATER REVIEW, PAGE 26

EDUCATION | BY TIM LOUIS MACALUSO & MARY ANNA TOWLER | PAGE 8 | PHOTO BY MARK CHAMBERLIN

Vargas’s plea to higher ed Bolgen Vargas may be remembered as the superhero who figured out a way to reverse 30 years of declining student performance in the Rochester City School District. Or he could be remembered as another name on a long list of wellmeaning superintendents ultimately bested by an ossified bureaucracy. After two years leading the school district, Vargas said that he has come to a stark conclusion: the district is broken so badly that it can’t be fixed from within.

Blocking much needed reforms is a bureaucracy that’s “stuck,” he said, under its own weight. At a school board committee meeting last week, Vargas presented members with both an admission and a proposal. He told members that the district’s personnel have so many conflicting, often competing interests that no superintendent can overhaul the bureaucracy effectively. And he proposed turning as many of Rochester’s schools as feasible over to local colleges to run by 2015.


Feedback We welcome your comments. Send them to themail@rochester-citynews. com, or post them on our website, rochestercitynewspaper.com, our Facebook page, or our Twitter feed, @ roccitynews. For our print edition, we select comments from all three sources; those of fewer than 350 words have a greater chance of being published, and we do edit selections for publication in print. We don’t publish comments sent to other media.

Deadline nears for comments on LNG rules

Even though fracking has not yet been approved in New York State, the gas industry, apparently with the aid of our Department of Environmental Conservation, is going full steam ahead with plans for building fracking infrastructure. The DEC has released a draft regulatory impact statement containing defective rules for permitting the construction of liquid natural gas facilities – LNG – and truck transport of LNG. LNG storage facilities have been illegal in New York State since one exploded in 1973, killing 40 people. That law remains in effect. The DEC rules lack references to scientific data, do not comply with state law, and usurp authority that belongs to the state Department of Transportation. In other fracking news, the state Health Department was supposed to be conducting a health impact study on the effects of fracking, but no such study has been done. The state health commissioner, Dr. Nirav Shah, is offering instead a mere review of the unpublished revised DEC environmental impact statement citing studies that are either incomplete or not yet begun. Governor Cuomo says no further studies are needed. Governor Christie of New Jersey has rejected LNG terminals as not consistent with his state’s commitment to renewable energy. Evidently he was more impressed with Hurricane Sandy than Governor Cuomo was. If we are going to keep fracking out of New York State, we need to remind our governor of his promise to make New York State a leader in the development of renewable energy. He also promised to make energy decisions for New 2 CITY

NOVEMBER 27 - DECEMBER 3, 2013

York based on science and not on lobbyist propaganda. Science does not currently favor fossil fuels, including natural gas. The DEC has extended the public comment period on the LNG rules until December 4. Learn how you can write factbased, coherent comments at nyagainstfracking.org. JOHN KASTNER

Black Friday is now Black Thanksgiving

K-mart announces opening at 8 a.m. on November 28, and a multitude of other stores announce opening at various times during that day. Come on, folks: this is Thanksgiving Day (forever now known as Black Thanksgiving). A day given to thanks and gratitude for all our blessings. I am concerned about the greed and avaricious nature of many in our business community and large corporations. Our seasonal holiday advertisements now start before Halloween. Did we really need a Black Friday? Every year it seems to get worse. People going out in the middle of the night – this year the day before – foraging and behaving like unruly mobs, and creating dangerous situations. Is the accumulation of stuff, and it is just stuff, really that important? Many have to give up this special day of thanks to save their jobs. Let’s take back this special time of year. Instead of accumulating stuff for self and others, help a family in need, volunteer at a homeless shelter. Instead of gifts, make a donation to a favorite charity. You will have a joyful holiday, a stress-free holiday, and will have time to have gratitude for all your blessings. TONY PERRI

Investigating Monroe’s LDC’s

Tom DiNapoli, state comptroller, has said that LDCs are ripe for fraud and abuse because they do not have to go through the same procurement process as the government (“Dems Call for Local Development Corp Reforms,” News Blog). While we have to wait for the review of all the evidence to see if this investigation is politically motivated or a serious breach of the

public trust, we do know that there is a history of favoritism with this county administration. Keeping property taxes level while adding to future pension costs may look better on paper than in reality. PHIL

Prayer and government

“America is fast on its way to becoming a secular, Godless society” (“Greece Goes to Court,” reader Feedback): This may be the one factually accurate statement in the reader’s entire letter. The percentage of our population that are nonbelievers is about 20 percent and growing fast. There are at least two reasons this is a good thing: 1) Non-believers generally defend the rights of citizens to worship without letting one denomination impose doctrine or dominate others. This makes the public square neutral ground where all citizens, whether from a majority religion, a minority religion, or no religion at all, can participate equally. 2) In most religious traditions, notions of morality are static, with no self-correction mechanism. Thus when certain positions become untenable (slavery for example, which is specifically endorsed in Exodus 21), the correction is difficult and contentious. By decoupling morality from ancient myths, non-believers are able to rationally and objectively advance our moral understanding. The fact that more Americans are becoming non-believers definitely has me giving thanks this coming holiday season. DAN COURTNEY

That the writer sneers at people of the opposite view underscores the problem. By having any public prayers forced upon all attendees at a Town Board meeting, every citizen present who is not enslaved by the author’s Santa Claus “thinking” is marginalized to a second-class citizen. America was established as a “secular” nation in the sense that freedom of religion entails freedom from religion. You can still have your religious displays on private property, including homes, churches, and any land that is not paid for by all taxpayers. BILL FORWARD

News. Music. Life. Greater Rochester’s Alternative Newsweekly November 27 - December 3, 2013 Vol 43 No 12 250 North Goodman Street Rochester, New York 14607-1199 themail@rochester-citynews.com phone (585) 244-3329 fax (585) 244-1126 rochestercitynewspaper.com facebook.com/CityNewspaper twitter.com/roccitynews Publishers: William and Mary Anna Towler Editor: Mary Anna Towler Asst. to the publishers: Matt Walsh Editorial department themail@rochester-citynews.com Features editor: Eric Rezsnyak News editor: Christine Carrie Fien Staff writers: Tim Louis Macaluso, Jeremy Moule Music editor: Willie Clark Music writer: Frank De Blase Calendar editor: Rebecca Rafferty Contributing writers: Paloma Capanna, Casey Carlsen, Roman Divezur, George Grella, Jim Kempkes, Laura Rebecca Kenyon, Andy Klingenberger, Dave LaBarge, Kathy Laluk, Adam Lubitow, Nicole Milano, Ron Netsky, Dayna Papaleo, Suzan Pero, Rebecca Rafferty, David Raymond, David Yockel Jr. Editorial interns: Trevor Lewis, Colin McCoy Art department artdept@rochester-citynews.com Art director/production manager: Matt DeTurck Designers: Aubrey Berardini, Mark Chamberlin Photographers: Mark Chamberlin, Frank De Blase, Michael Hanlon Photography intern: Larissa Coe Advertising department ads@rochester-citynews.com Sales operations: Matt Walsh New sales development: Betsy Matthews Account executives: Nancy Burkhardt, Tom Decker, Christine Kubarycz, William Towler Classified sales representatives: Christine Kubarycz, Tracey Mykins Operations/Circulation kstathis@rochester-citynews.com Circulation manager: Katherine Stathis Distribution: Andy DiCiaccio, David Riccioni, Northstar Delivery, Wolfe News City Newspaper is available free of charge. Additional copies of the current issue may be purchased for $1 each at the City Newspaper office. City Newspaper may be distributed only by authorized distributors. No person may, without prior written permission of City Newspaper, take more than one copy of each weekly issue. City (ISSN 1551-3262) is published weekly by WMT Publications, Inc. Periodical postage paid at Rochester, NY (USPS 022-138). Address changes: City, 250 North Goodman Street, Rochester, NY 14607. Member of the Association of Alternative Newsweeklies and the New York Press Association. Annual subscriptions: $35 ($30 senior citizens); add $10 for out-of-state subscriptions. Refunds for fewer than ten months cannot be issued. Copyright by WMT Publications Inc., 2013 - all rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, photocopying, recording or by any information storage retrieval system without permission of the copyright owner.


URBAN JOURNAL | BY MARY ANNA TOWLER

Vargas’s bold plan Want to read something that will break your heart? Sitting on my desk at work is a hefty group of reports collected over the years, including numerous ones produced by the Rochester school district. Among them is a survey of initiatives designed to provide a better education for the district’s poorest, African American children: a new school, reduced class sizes, reading specialists, a school-choice transfer program, expansion of the Urban-Suburban program, better cooperation with community agencies, upgrading school facilities, a school on a university campus that accepted Rochester students…. Want to know when that report was written? 1969. Since then, the city’s poverty rate has increased. The number of schools with predominantly poor African American or Hispanic children has skyrocketed. The drop-out rate is way up. Student achievement rates are in the toilet. We’ve tried one reform after another, cycled through one superintendent after another, cycled through numerous school boards. And things have only gotten worse. I have to admit: when I first heard about Superintendent Bolgen Vargas’s plan to have colleges and universities manage some Rochester schools, I reacted the way many critics did. Here we go again. Why does Vargas think a university could do a better job than experienced district staff? And why did he float the idea publicly before he had a single university president signing on? But after an hour and a half with Vargas, I’ve changed my mind. We ought to do this. Clearly, the district’s primary problem is its high concentration of poverty. Teachers and principals cannot, by themselves, counter the forces that that poverty creates in students’ neighborhoods and home lives. But the district can do a better job than it’s doing. Standing in the way: a bureaucratic culture that Vargas calls “overwhelming.” In his discussion with us last week – reported at length in this issue – Vargas was adamant: poverty is no excuse for failing to do things like track student absences. Vargas ticked off example after example of bureaucratic resistance and apathy: classes in which attendance is seldom taken, textbooks that don’t get delivered to the right classroom. An internal audit conducted when JeanClaude Brizard was superintendent found

Vargas was adamant: Rochester students’ poverty is no excuse for failing to do things like track student absences. similar problems in the administrative offices: checks written to vendors before payment was authorized, poor tracking of teacher absences, failure to make sure that new technology was compatible with the district’s existing equipment. In his discussion with us, Vargas wasn’t placing blame. And you can see how, particularly in a large district, this kind of culture can take root and grow. Nor does it help when state and federal officials create an atmosphere of hostility, belittling teachers and principals who, in Vargas’s words, “struggle every day to do extraordinary things under difficult circumstances.” But school district leaders can be supportive and, at the same time, have accountability. Vargas’s college takeover plan isn’t a miracle cure. It won’t affect the concentrated poverty that so burdens the district. And there will be resistance to changing the district’s bureaucratic culture. But that culture has to change. And having institutions from outside the district step in – institutions with experience in management – can help. They don’t have the resources to take over more than a few of the district’s 60-plus schools. But they can set an example by cutting through the bureaucracy and injecting stronger accountability at those few. That will help the children in those schools. It can lead to changes throughout the district. And it can help restore public faith in the district. This district needs help, and Vargas is asking for it. It would be unconscionable for area colleges and universities to refuse him. The “partnership” programs that some of the institutions have with the district are important, but they’re not enough. The presidents of every one of the region’s colleges and universities ought to be on the phone this week, setting an appointment with Vargas. And the presidents of the two biggest private institutions, the University of Rochester and the Rochester Institute of Technology, ought to be first in line.

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CITY 3


[ NEWS FROM THE WEEK PAST ]

CityGate gets incentives

The board of the Monroe County Industrial Development Agency approved an incentive package for the CityGate project. It includes a 20 year, $22.1 million tax agreement. Anthony J. Costello and Son Development is building CityGate, which will include residential and retail, on the former Iola campus at East Henrietta and Westfall Roads.

The dept. of fat chances

Democrats in the Monroe County Legislature called for a committee of legislators to take over an internal probe into two county-linked local development corporations. Upstate Telecommunications Corporation and Monroe Safety and Security Systems LDC are under investigation by the attorney general’s office. The Legislature’s Republican majority responded with a strong indication that it wouldn’t support the Dems’ proposal.

Warren leaves Council

Rochester Mayor-elect Lovely Warren has resigned her seat on City Council. Warren has been on Council for six years, and has been that body’s president since

2010. City Council now has 30 days to select a replacement. That person will have to live in the northeast quadrant of the city — the quadrant that Warren represented during her time on Council.

News

Police chief out

Rochester Police Chief James Sheppard will retire at the end of the year. Sheppard has been a major presence in the community since taking over following the abrupt departure of former chief David Moore in 2010. He has made numerous appearances all over the city in an effort to improve police-community relations. But there have been setbacks, too, including a parking-ticket “fixing” scandal, and perceived favoritism for police officers caught on camera running red lights.

HAHAHAHA

The buzz is that rock star Jon Bon Jovi, who has ties to the company that owns the Toronto Maple Leafs, might want to buy the Buffalo Bills. And other reports name Canadian telecom giant Rogers Communications as a potential suitor. Bills officials said little, except that current owner Ralph Wilson is committed to keeping the team in Buffalo.

Tanya Mooza Zwahlen, Ana Liss, and Laura Fox started Rochester Love Notes, a blog intended to highlight what Rochesterians love about their community. PHOTO BY BILL SCHWAPPACHER

COMMUNITY | BY JEREMY MOULE

Love me, love my city Rochesterians often have a rocky relationship with their city. It’s passionate and nurturing, but it can also be upsetting or frustrating. In other words, it’s love in all of its beautiful, complicated glory. And it’s a kind of love that three local women — Laura Fox, Tanya Mooza Zwahlen, and Ana Liss — say deserves to be documented. They’ve started a blog, Rochester Love Notes (rochesterlovenotes. blogspot.com), to help do that. The project draws on a similar effort in Philadelphia: Philly Love Notes. Rochester, their website says, “is a girl who doesn’t realize she’s hot.”

And it encourages Rochesterians, current and former, to contribute “love notes and reflections that highlight her strange allure.” Mooza Zwhalen says the blog is a way to show how and why people cherish Rochester. And Liss says she hopes the site can help dispel the myth that mid-sized cities like Rochester lack opportunities for young, educated people. The handful of submissions posted to the blog so far focus on a wide range of topics: Rochester’s history, natural beauty, cultural opportunities, neighborhoods, and potential.

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But love is also about flaws, and partners know each other’s shortcomings intimately. One writer talks about his or her attraction to Rochester despite some of the city’s grittier elements. Another references the community’s economic and social disparities. A few notes reference Rochester winters. “I think love is supposed to be challenging,” Fox says. “It is conflicted.” Anyone wishing to contribute a note — and the blog’s organizers encourage photos, too — can submit to lovenotesrochester@ gmail.com.


The Historical Society’s annual rent is set at $48,000, but earlier this year, it informed library officials that it couldn’t make the payments. The society hasn’t made a rent payment since April, and there’s no deadline set for the payments to resume.

HISTORY | BY CHRISTINE CARRIE FIEN

CHILD CARE | BY JEREMY MOULE

Historical Society works on finances The Rochester Historical Society continues to struggle financially, and is currently living rent-free at Rochester Public Library’s Rundel building on South Avenue. But a plan is in place that will hopefully help, says society President Patrick Malgieri. It includes a commitment from board members to donate $100,000 to the society over three years. The society’s annual rent is set at $48,000, but earlier this year, it informed library officials that it couldn’t make the payments. The society hasn’t made a rent payment since April, and Malgieri says there’s no plan yet for the payments to resume. “We’ve told the library that we want very much to honor the obligations that we undertook when we signed the lease,” he says. “And if the opportunity presents itself, then we very much want to do that. The library has been a good partner in working with us through this situation.” RPL Director Patricia Uttaro says she expects some sort of resolution to the rent issue by January 2014. The society’s lease at the library expires in June. The society’s collection includes important pieces from Rochester’s history, including photographs, portraits of Rochester residents,

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letters, and architectural drawings. The bulk of the collection is kept at Rundel. Malgieri says that the collection is in no danger RHS President Patrick as a result of the Malgieri. PHOTO BY society’s financial LARISSA COE pressures because deaccessioning is a comprehensive process that requires multiple approvals. It must also meet established criteria, he says. And state law says you can’t use funding acquired from deaccessioning for general operations, Malgieri says. In addition to the $100,000 commitment from board members, the society has asked its general membership to give more, he says, and it is reaching out to key people in the community for support. The society is also exploring partnerships with other Rochester institutions, Malgieri says, but the specifics aren’t yet clear.

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AFGHANISTAN TOTALS —

2,292 US servicemen and servicewomen and 1,105 Coalition servicemen and servicewomen have been killed in Afghanistan from the beginning of the war and occupation to November 25. Statistics for Afghan civilian casualties are not available. American casualties from November 13 to November 17: -- Staff Sgt. Alex A. Viola, 29, Keller, Texas iraqbodycount. org, icasualties.org, Department of Defense

SOURCES:

When Monroe County Executive Maggie Brooks presented her 2014 budget proposal recently, she said that the county would provide more funding for child day care subsidies than the state requires. And as a result, she said, no families currently receiving subsidies would lose their slots. | But Brooks chose her words carefully. She didn’t say that the county plans to increase the funding, just that it would provide more than the minimum requirement. And a local children’s advocate, Dr. Jeff Kaczorowski of the Children’s Agenda, said that the budget proposal actually decreases the subsidies by approximately $1.3 million. The county’s support would drop from $7.4 million this year, he said, to $6.1 million in 2014 under the proposed budget. | The budget document says that in 2014, the subsidies will provide day care slots for about 6,580 children. But the money contained in the cut could fund an additional 485 slots, Kaczorowski says. | The county is also getting about $725,000 less in state day care subsidies this year, Kaczorowski says. The bulk of subsidy funding comes from the state. | The County Legislature’s Human Services Committee was expected to discuss the subsidy funding on Tuesday.

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6 CITY

NOVEMBER 27 - DECEMBER 3, 2013

The right code for a changing city The building stands startlingly close to the road — an oversized blue billboard for people living across McArdle Street in northwest Rochester. Faded signs advertise the structure’s various lives: Aries Precision Products, Keene Transmission, Metropolitan Granite & Marble. Its parking lot backs up to a chain-link fence with a line of large trucks on the other side — so close you could almost touch them. The property at 15 McArdle Street has a bit of an identity crisis. It’s zoned residential and is in a residential neighborhood, but has never, as far as anyone knows, been used for housing. And due to the design of the building and the property’s long history as an industrial parcel, it almost certainly never will be. It’s one of hundreds of “neither this nor that” properties in Rochester — a condition created when the city updated its code in 2003. The long, slow bleed of people and industry had left Rochester with a surplus of commercial and industrial properties. The danger is desperate property owners may end up renting or selling for less-thandesirable uses, says Marcia Barry, the city’s director of planning and zoning. Or the building could sit vacant indefinitely. So in 2003, the city “downzoned” hundreds of these properties, including 15 McArdle, to a residential designation. Officials also built flexibility into the code, essentially acknowledging that while these properties are technically residential, you’re probably never going to see a house there. These “nonconforming use provisions” also give the city and the neighborhood some control over the use of the property. The situation was thrown into sharp relief recently when the owner of 15 McArdle applied to rezone the property from residential back to manufacturing. Although the property had always been used for industrial-manufacturing, many neighbors opposed the rezoning because, Barry says, they worried about opening the door for uses that are not necessarily compatible with a residential street. “Some buildings are so surrounded by residential, you want a ‘sleepy’ use in there,” Barry says. “It’s respecting the neighborhood that the buildings are in. All that the [residential] district recognizes is that you’re in a neighborhood that is more residential than it is manufacturing.” The situation has city officials wondering if it’s time to take another look at the code, she says. If manufacturing is poised to make some sort of comeback — as some people believe it is, albeit in a different form — should the city adapt the code to be better prepared?

“McArdle is part of a bigger picture,” Barry says. “If indeed manufacturing is going to be returning and we want to have much more of an incentive for it, are there things we should be doing with these properties? It makes us recognize that if indeed we’re starting to get very low-key sorts of manufacturing uses, whether there might be a ‘manufacturing light’ that we might need to be considering.” The city has manufacturing zones, for example, off Winton Road and off Mt. Read — two very different areas, yet they are governed by the same rules under the same zoning regulations. It’s not clear what the owner of 15 McArdle wants to do with the property. City Council member Carla Palumbo, who represents northwest Rochester, says that the owner goes back and forth between selling the property and looking for tenants. The owner thought the property would be more marketable as a manufacturing parcel than as a residential parcel, Barry says. But the city is working with him, she says, to keep the property’s zoning intact. He has a right to operate it as an industrial use, she says, but the reality is that he’s in a city neighborhood, with a relatively narrow street and children playing outside. “It’s a building that has good bones, and there’s a variety of things that he can put in there with our nonconformity provisions,” Barry says. “We just want him to be assured that he is not without hope. There is a future for this building.” If a building has been continuously occupied, as 15 McArdle has been, the city evaluates potential new uses to determine the impact they might have on the neighborhood. The building at 15 McArdle was previously a tool and die operation, so an equal-intensity use might be warehousing, Barry says, or manufacturing equipment repair. If a property goes vacant for more than nine months, Barry says, the new


15 McArdle Street in northwest Rochester. PHOTOS BY MARK CHAMBERLIN

occupant would need either a special permit or a use variance; the latter has a higher bar. This allows for a public hearing process, she says, and lets the city regulate the business by setting appropriate conditions on its operation. It also allows the city to do a broader analysis of market conditions, the viability of the property, and other factors that might be contributing to the vacancy, Barry says. What you don’t want to do is make the properties unmarketable and unusable, she

says. That’s bad financially, socially, and aesthetically, she says. “One of the things that we have to acknowledge in Rochester is that the market hasn’t come back to all neighborhoods of the city,” Barry says. “Where parts of the city are thriving and they’re getting all kinds of uses and property values are increasing and whatever, in other parts of the city it’s a little bit slower to reoccupy buildings.” And having mixed uses adds diversity to a

neighborhood, she says, which, historically, is part of the appeal of urban living. “If you look at old city neighborhoods, they all had a little corner store,” Barry says. “You don’t want to wipe that out.” She says that the 2003 code changes were done to protect the city in a time when it was losing population and business. So the question becomes, is the time right to revisit the code once again? There are uses that the code doesn’t even address because they didn’t exist in 2003. Another option is to sit tight until

stronger indicators of an economic bounceback emerge, Barry says. “Zoning code is something you continually look at, because the market does change and times do change and neighborhoods transform,” she says. “Areas that were struggling at one time are now starting to show signs of being restored. “We depend on our residential zoning to stabilize the city,” Barry says. “So we want to make sure that there’s a good chemistry between any commercial and residential use.”

rochestercitynewspaper.com

CITY 7


Vargas'S

to higher ed EDUCATION

BY TIM LOUIS MACALUSO AND MARY ANNA TOWLER

PHOTOS

BY MARK CHAMBERLIN

olgen Vargas may be remembered as the superhero who figured out a way to reverse 30 years of declining student performance in the Rochester City School District. Or he could be remembered as another name on a long list of wellmeaning superintendents ultimately bested by an ossified bureaucracy. After two years leading the school district, Vargas said that he has come to a stark conclusion: the district is broken so badly that it can’t be fixed from within. Blocking much needed reforms is a bureaucracy that���s “stuck,” he said, under its own weight. At a school board committee meeting last week, Vargas presented members with both an admission and a proposal. He told members that the district’s personnel have so many conflicting, often competing interests that no superintendent can overhaul the bureaucracy effectively. And he proposed turning as many of Rochester’s schools as feasible over to local colleges to run by 2015. Vargas said he acknowledges that the concentration of poverty in Rochester creates serious challenges for students and families. But that doesn’t excuse a deeply-embedded district culture that pardons its own managerial failures, he said. In an interview last week, an impassioned Vargas repeated some familiar themes. District officials are running out of time to turn around the long-ailing school system, he said, and a state takeover looms unless sweeping changes are made. Vargas refuted reports that he proposed his college-run schools idea without having first getting support from the colleges’ senior 8 CITY

management. He said he has been in private talks with senior-level officials of several area colleges and that some are interested. Though he confirmed that one official was Anne Kress, president of Monroe Community College, he would not elaborate on the others or what they discussed. And before going any further, he said he needed to present the idea to the city school board. Vargas said urgency is the driving factor in his decision to approach the colleges, and he cited numerous examples of managerial problems that are deeply rooted in a culture that defies change. And he listed daunting examples of government worker complacency, lack of common sense and initiative, and an ossification of old habits that wouldn’t be tolerated by most private sector employers. And though there have been countless proposals for fixing the district over the years, Vargas is convinced that the colleges are best suited to help improve city schools. In addition to having programs devoted to education, health, and management, Vargas said, the colleges are similar institutions with shared interests. Vargas has been concerned about the growing number of charter schools in Rochester and their adverse impact on the district’s enrollment. And he told school board members that the colleges that run city schools would have a financial advantage over new charter schools.

NOVEMBER 27 - DECEMBER 3, 2013

While the charter schools only receive the state’s per pupil aid, he said, the colleges would benefit from federal, state, and local funding. And they could access the district’s building improvement funds, Vargas said. Any plans to take over city schools would require the approval of the Rochester school board and the State Education Department, and the institutions would be given the full authority of the superintendent over the participating schools. Vargas said there isn’t one off-the-shelf model for what a school would be like under college control. He said his message to the senior management at the colleges is: everything is on the table, including labor agreements.

But this is where things start to get dicey. For one, salaries, benefits, and due process — managing employee corrective actions and terminations — negotiated in union contracts cannot be changed. And the colleges may have second thoughts when they see how cumbersome and difficult it can be to fire an ineffective teacher. And there are other concerns. Some of the area’s colleges have their own managerial challenges. And some of their education faculty members are outspoken opponents of certain federal and state-mandated requirements such as standardized testing and the new teacher evaluations. Why would they agree to take responsibility for education regulations they oppose?


Can you be more specific about what you mean by the bureaucracy?

city schools? What examples, research, or advice did you rely on that made you think this is a good idea?

But at the very least, Vargas’s proposal will cause some of his critics to question why he hasn’t negotiated more favorable union contracts himself. And is he simply deferring the tough job of a management shakeup to other entities? Vargas flips those questions around. Instead of saying he has all of the answers, he has asked for help. Asking the college community for assistance in solving a problem that has impacted the entire region for years is the right thing to do, he said. The following is an edited version of City’s interview with Bolgen Vargas. CITY: What drove your decision to propose that area colleges should manage

Vargas: The number-one driver for this is the sense of urgency. We don’t have time to lose. And after two years on this job, I came to the conclusion that the bureaucracy is so overwhelming. You hear that even from our colleges and universities, who tell me it is very difficult to do business with us. We have to change that. We have to be a more flexible, more responsive organization to the needs of our students and families. In terms of examples and research, there’s a long history of colleges running K-12 schools. In the SUNY system you have the Lab Schools that were run by them. SUNY Geneseo had a Lab School. And today you find college-run schools across the nation. You find them in New York City, which is probably the best example. And now Buffalo is working with Johns Hopkins University. This is not a new idea. We have 19 colleges in the Rochester community, all with rich capacities that could help us tackle some really difficult challenges. Their interests and our interests are interconnected. They keep saying that our students have to spend a lot of time in remediation, and they do. So what if we were to do the work of educating students well early? And they could help us do that, and if they did, that money that they invest in remediation could go to better use. You’re talking about Lab Schools, but aren’t their teachers and principals hired by the college or university? And that’s not what you’re talking about.

Here’s what I’m proposing. The teachers would be part of the current [Rochester school district] work force. The college or university would have that pool [of employees] to work with. And the same thing is true for the principals. They would either come from the current work force or the traditional way we recruit principals. Or the colleges and the universities may have principals in their systems that want to be part of something innovative.

We are constantly recruiting new principals because we have people who retire or move away, and we would give the colleges the same latitude. The state law allows the college or university to take full responsibility for managing the schools. Let’s create an example. We’ll call it School 79 and say that you’ve got 40 teachers, a principal, and a vice principal. Johns Hopkins takes it over. Do they inherit the staff or do they pick their own staff? Will the staff come from the RCSD, and will people have to apply? Is the principal at School 79 out of a job, and must he or she re-apply?

It could be all of the above. The first thing that the university and I need to do is enter into an agreement. Johns Hopkins’ president could say to me: “Here are the parameters. And by the way, I don’t like the current union contract. It’s too inflexible.” Adam [Urbanski, Rochester Teachers Association president] and I negotiated a contract that allows me to say to [Johns Hopkins’] president that there are only three things that I cannot negotiate: salary, benefits, and due process. Adam will say to you, understandably so, that there is flexibility. I could come to him and take advantage of that. But I have a bureaucracy that is entrenched and I’ve had difficulty moving us toward taking advantage of that flexibility even though there are great benefits. Adam will tell you that the contract is revolutionary [because it does offer some flexibility]. But it’s kind of like having a lot of wealth and resources, but not utilizing them well. What I’m saying is: for whatever reason, the bureaucracy is stuck.

All I can tell you is that despite their needs, our students have had the least amount of instruction [and the highest need in the region] for a very long time. It took me two years to expand the time, and by some accounts that was fast. It took me 15 months to get [free] parking for parents downtown [at central office]. If we want them to be engaged with us, it’s important to make things easier for them, particularly when we have families who are struggling to put bread on the table. You’re talking about a bureaucracy as if that’s a bunch of people and we don’t have to think about who they are. Where is the obstruction coming from? Is it coming from teachers, principals, central office, or everywhere? Who is not taking advantage of the flexibility in the contract that you referred to earlier?

To answer that would require taking a half an hour to explain the culture of the organization. Even the most visible problems are invisible to that bureaucracy. What do I mean by visible things? Visible things are the least amount of instructional time for our students, making sure that our children have the right textbooks in their hands in September — not in late October. Making sure that our children have art, music, drama, sports, and extracurricular activities. When you go to some of our buildings, there’s not even a welcome sign for parents. And we’ve been talking about parental engagement for how long? Just to change the sign to say “Welcome” is a struggle. It’s not that the people are bad people. But if you were to raise the question and ask, “Why is this so hard?” they’ll tell you, “This is the way we’ve always done it for a very long time, and this is how we will continue to do it.” continues on page 10 rochestercitynewspaper.com

CITY 9


Vargas's plea continues from page 9

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10 CITY NOVEMBER 27 - DECEMBER 3, 2013

I was at Wilson [Commencement Academy] and Patty [Malgieri, chief of staff ] was with me and I say that because she witnessed it, too. It’s not like I’m going crazy. I look over and see a significant amount of textbooks in the library. I could tell they were classroom textbooks for biology. This was in October, close to November. So I ask: “What are all of these books doing here?” I have my meetings with parents, and I hear all of this concern about textbooks. The person said to me that the textbooks were supposed to be delivered to the biology class. And I say we are about two months into the school year. Why don’t the children have their textbooks? Did they just get here? The person tells me, “No, they’ve been here for some time, but we don’t have a textbook clerk.” I said, “Are you kidding me?” What’s wrong with getting 20 kids to bring them down to the class? Do you see now what I mean when I say we are stuck? Let me give you another example. An education institution should know how many students come to school every day. When I first arrived, I couldn’t even get that. Some of our teachers and administrators were like, “Well, that’s how we do business here.” It took [Rochester mayor] Tom Richards to help me with this. He said that the city would help us with the truancy problem with a couple of conditions. He said at the end of the day, we need to know for sure how many kids aren’t there and who they are. And if we say they are there, we need to know for sure that they are. When you have a system that doesn’t even take attendance as seriously as it should, you have serious problems. I had one principal who had a number of students that hadn’t come to school for a year or more, but still wanted us to allocate more dollars for their budget. And I said, “We will when we find the kids.” There was a day last spring when 25 percent of teachers weren’t there, and we put out a note that day saying “25 percent of you aren’t here today. What’s going on?” I said to people, I want to understand this. When 25 percent of the work force isn’t there, this system can’t work. We can’t have 3,000 kids not attending school on a given day. And we can’t have 25 percent of the work force not there. Believe me, poverty isn’t an excuse for an institution like the district to say that we can’t count or keep track of the students who are not there. I’m not trying to blame anyone, but I think we have a system that for too long developed a culture that reached a certain comfort level. Yes, we have teachers and principals that are working hard every day, who struggle every

day to do extraordinary things under difficult circumstances. But we have a culture in place that doesn’t in my view support students, families, teachers, or the people who work there. But what makes you think that the colleges would be able to negotiate contracts with better terms? It’s not as if they don’t have bureaucracies of their own.

They have less layers. I have 64 campuses. They [colleges and universities] have expertise, knowledge, and resources. They have a track record running a similar educational institution. Remember they have accounting, medical, nutrition, and food services, too. Take the University of Rochester; imagine the tutoring services they could provide. Imagine if students had a card to their libraries. And by the way, they wouldn’t have to spend an extra dollar to run the school because the financing would be provided by us. And they have the power to do better fund raising. Keep in mind that there are people who aren’t willing to invest in us, but they will invest in the UR. The opportunities are enormous. They also have the Warner School of Education where they train teachers, and guess what? I have a significant shortage of teachers in math, science, and chemistry. I have teachers in essential areas that don’t have the required certifications. They can help us by making sure that we have a well-trained, highly skilled work force. Go into more detail about the financing, because you’re saying that this won’t cost the colleges and universities anything.

With charter schools, the only money that follows the student is state aid. In this case, the state, local, and federal dollars will follow. And the colleges will have the capacity to do their own independent fund raising, approaching foundations, and applying for their own grants. The colleges and universities will also have the capital money or building aid, which is enormous. By 2022, we [RCSD]will be spending over a billion dollars. And there is accountability built into this. The colleges and institutions will enter into a five-year contract with some clear parameters.

And those parameters have to include how they will meet the needs of our students, as measured by student achievement. Would there be any restrictions to prevent the colleges and institutions from doing what charters are often accused of doing, such as creaming the best students off the top and getting rid of kids who don’t function well or misbehave?

We have students with special needs, and not all of our schools are equipped to handle that, so we will be very specific about how those concerns will be addressed. Also, we have a bilingual program, so we won’t insist that they have one unless their plan was to call for that. A lot depends on the mission of the school. What is the purpose of the school? If the mission is to create a very technically rich school with emphasis on math and science, and they want to use capital funding to redesign their school, we would consider that. Or let’s say they tell me that they don’t want anything to do with our curriculum department and they want to write their own curriculum; they could do that as long as it is approved by the state. And let me just say that there won’t be one plan. If I get five colleges, there may be five different agreements and plans, because the mission for the schools may differ. For example, the U of R may say we want to take Wilson because we want to help strengthen that neighborhood, which is part of our community. But could they kick kids out who are not special-needs kids and are just misbehaving, disruptive, and not doing the work?


Critics would say that the due process piece is what holds up corrective actions and it can take two years to fire an ineffective teacher. Why would the colleges agree to that?

That’s not necessarily true. For example, I was presented with a number of teachers and principals with tenure recommendations who never had a single evaluation. The number-one goal here is strengthening the management of the system to prevent things like this from happening. Adam will tell you that you can do all of this right now, and he’s right. And I am perplexed by that; why don’t we do it? And that’s where the colleges and universities can do a good job; after all, they trained many of the people who hold these jobs.

It fascinates me that we hear this about charter schools all the time. But there are ways under the law that we [traditional public schools] kick kids out, too. When you suspend kids, you are kicking them out. Now there are situations under the law when you have to suspend kids. So yes, the colleges and universities will be able to, the same way we can. And by the way, the commissioner and the board of education will not let me enter into an agreement that allows them to kick kids out illegally. Education at the elementary and high school level is a right, not a privilege. Even when you kick a kid out, you still have to provide instruction. Right now we have about 1,800 students every year who are in prison and we still provide them with instruction. The district will work with any college just like we have to work with any of our schools. Would the colleges and universities have the right to fire a principal or teacher the same way they do now under existing contracts with the teachers union and the supervisors union?

Yes. So they wouldn’t have more leeway. You’re not saying they are out from under the union contracts. What about seniority? Isn’t that built into the contracts?

It is, but there are ways that the district and college can work together. The bumping right [that accompanies seniority], that’s something I have expressed an interest in changing with the union. This bumping of teachers from one building to the next creates instability, and we need a stable environment.

When you made your presentation to the board, you said that you had talked with the senior management of some of these schools and they showed interest. But a recent Democrat and Chronicle article implied that other than Anne Kress, president of Monroe Community College, many administrators at the other institutions didn’t sound like they knew anything about this.

The facts are that I had discussions with several college leaders and I’ve been trying to meet with more. I can’t talk to all 19 at once. But before this thing went too far, I also needed to present the idea to my board. If the board had said that this is not a good idea, then why bother going further? It’s not that I’m trying not to be transparent here, but there have been private conversations that I’ve had that haven’t been made public because while they may want to work with us, they also have similar challenges to work through. They have boards, too. And this is only the exploratory stage. School board member Cynthia Elliott raised a question that a lot of people are going to ask: Are you saying that this district can’t manage and can’t educate its students? And are you abdicating your responsibility and shifting it to some other entity?

It is my realization that we need help, and we need all the help we can get. And colleges and universities could provide some of the best help, because they are very strong institutions. At the end of the day, I’m doing everything I can to change the bureaucracy. I’m not criticizing or blaming anyone. But I am, along with my team, trying to change it. We’re trying to work with the entire community to challenge this system to be more flexible and responsive to the needs of our children, to break away from being stuck. Are we surrendering? No; we’re asking for help. continues on page 12 rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 11


Vargas's plea continues from page 11

Will you pick the schools that will participate?

So many of our schools need help; it’s not like I have just a few. I wish all 19 colleges would show up, and if they did, I would give them the list: “Here it is, help us.” But I wouldn’t be open to someone saying, “Let me take School of the Arts.” What kind of help is that to us?

SEEKS SPRING INTERNS

&

Would issues like seniority and selecting the schools require 80 percent of the teachers in those schools to approve the college’s plan before it can go forward? (Some changes can be made to the RTA contract if 80 percent of teachers at a given school agree.)

Ideally, we would prefer that. But remember, the law allows the superintendent to take several different approaches to improve failing schools. I prefer not to close schools with the whole thing of phasing out and phasing in new schools. But I have to come up with solutions. I can’t just say that is a bad idea and I don’t want to do it. The law allows for me to apply the transformational model, and I’m committed to the transformational model, which permits me to engage the colleges and universities as outside partners. I want to be clear that is my preferred approach. But at the end of the day, if people don’t agree to the transformational model, I can’t go to the [state education] commissioner and say “I don’t have a solution.” He’ll tell me, you still have other alternatives. [One alternative: the turnaround approach requires firing and replacing at least half of the current professional staff]. I had a situation last summer over a summer learning program where only 70 percent of the teachers agreed to the plan. Adam was helpful in helping me get to the 80 percent. But I say to people, please don’t put me in a situation where I have to make that decision [to use the turnaround approach]. I’m willing to work with teachers and principals who don’t want to work in a particular school. The system is large enough where they can go into another school. I want to collaborate on the solutions to our problems. That’s in my nature. But at the end of the day, collaboration is not sufficient if it can’t change anything. We can collaborate all day long and never get to where we need to be.

For more Tom Tomorrow, including a political blog and cartoon archive, visit www.thismodernworld.com

URBAN ACTION This week’s calls to action include the following events and activities. (All are free and open to the public, unless otherwise noted.)

Greece board openings

Greece Town Supervisor-elect Bill Reilich is seeking people interested in serving on several town boards. The vacancies are a result of term expirations, which occur on December 31. Applications are being accepted for the Greece Planning Board, Board of Zoning Appeals, Histor-

ic Preservation Commission, Tree Council, Traffic Advisory Committee, and the Youth Board. Interested Greece residents should send a letter and resume no later than December 10 to Mr. Bill Reilich, Supervisor-elect, 1 Vince Tofany Boulevard, Rochester, NY, 14612.

be dropped off at 259 Monroe Avenue from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday. Information: 545-7200.

Food pantry needs donations

Trillium Health (formerly AIDS Care) food cupboard needs non-perishable items such as soup, mac and cheese, and instant rice. Items can

CITY NEWS BLOG

POLITICS, PEOPLE, EVENTS, & ISSUES

rochestercitynewspaper.com/BLOGS/NEWSBLOG COMMENTING ON THE STATE OF ROCHESTER & BEYOND 12 CITY NOVEMBER 27 - DECEMBER 3, 2013


Dining

Som tom (spicy papaya salad) (left); tom yum chicken soup (middle); chicken satay skewers with peanut sauce (right), all from Esan Thai on Park Avenue. PHOTOS BY MARK CHAMBERLIN

Where Rochester, Bangkok, and New York meet Esan Thai 696 PARK AVE. 271-2271, ESANPARKAVE.COM MONDAY-THURSDAY 11:15 A.M.-9:30 P.M.; FRIDAY-SATURDAY 11:15 A.M.-10:30 P.M. [ REVIEW ] BY LAURA REBECCA KENYON

There are streets in Manhattan that have yet to be completely overtaken by chain restaurants, though they are further and fewer between than they were 10 years ago. These patches of resistance are little, rabbit-warren-like spaces, crammed with wood-grain Formica two-tops and tiny black chairs. They’re dimly lit and decorated with tchotchkes reflecting the cuisine served: a skyline of Barcelona in a tapas joint, a small statue of Ganesh in an Indian buffet, a delicate arrangement of bamboo in a Chinese dim-sum house. Cooking scents perfume the air: cilantro, or onion, or curry, or schmaltz. In the winter, you avoid sitting by the windows because their poor weather stripping lets in the cold from outside. In the summer, you angle yourself toward the air conditioner precariously perched into the window above the main entrance. Outside, empty cardboard boxes are piled up by the curb, next to bulging Hefty bags filled with trash. Maybe it’s not romantic, but it’s the New York that I loved and lived in before moving to the Greater Rochester area 12 years ago. A born and bred downstater, I wasn’t quite sure I’d be able to make the transition to Upstate New York life (nor the transition from single to married; from having no children to being a stepparent to two).

On my first visit to the area, my thenfiancé — now husband — took me to Park Avenue for dinner. It was night: streetlights shone amber, and many of the storefronts twinkled with Christmas lights strung in the windows. The buildings, only a few stories tall, reminded me of the West Village. Cars were parked bumper to bumper on the streets. And just like home, there were a jangle of tiny, independently run restaurants, including Esan Thai, where we enjoyed dinner. Oddly, I hadn’t been back to Esan until recently — though, obviously, it had left quite an impression. In some aspects, it still reminds me of those tiny, NYC restaurants. It is independently run, small, and a green-and-white awning shades its doorways. Inside, the walls are painted ocher and bear art that references Thailand, like the black tapestry woven with golden thread that depicts a royal riding party on elephants. A cavalcade of empty produce boxes are stacked up by the kitchen entrance and leafy plants decorate the dining room. The food is not as satisfying as I remember it. But the reason for that may lie in Esan’s history. By owner Bounkong Douangratdy’s

estimates, Esan has been in Rochester for nearly 20 years. That would make it one of the first, if not the first, Thai restaurants in the area. Back then “nobody knew about Thai food,” says Douangratdy. The first stateside Thai restaurant had opened only 35 years earlier, and there wasn’t a Food Network or Eater.com to make it a national trend. Our craving and demand for spicy foods wasn’t well established, either. Today, ready-to-eat bowls of pad Thai are available at grocery stores, and recent news of a possible

Sriracha shortage caused panic in foodie circles. That kind of culinary climate simply didn’t exist 20 years ago. As a result, Esan’s menu catered to palates more familiar with Buffalo wings and garbage plates than funky fish sauces, salty dried shrimp, and fiery chilies. That early hesitation and caution is still reflected in many of Esan’s dishes. The drunken master noodles ($9.50-$12.95, depending upon your protein choice) combine wide rice noodles with bean sprouts, onions, tomatoes, and Thai basil. There’s an appealing chew and bounce to the noodles, and the beef and vegetables are all very tender, but there isn’t much of a textural contrast. The dish is noted as a spicy item, though my tongue remained untingled. The taste of the pat Thai with shrimp ($9.50) is like an echo of the flavors associated with the dish. Though you can tell what the intent was, what’s being received is faded and muted. Again, the rice noodles have a lively, spongy chew, but my shrimp was mealy. The combination satay platter ($6.75 for three beef and three chicken skewers) is simple and straightforward, with a slightly sweet and unadorned peanut sauce. Iceberg lettuce in the fresh shrimp spring rolls ($3.25) lends a pleasing crisp lightness, and is perked up by the warm licorice flavors inherent in Thai basil. Its accompanying sauce is salty, nutty, and sweet — and tastes pretty good with the beef and chicken satay, too. The colorfully named Hell beef ($11.50) is marinated in chili paste before being fried. Though tender and appealing — it is fried meat — the flavors are surprisingly tame. (Maybe “purgatory beef ” would be more apt description?)

What I later learned from Douangratdy is that if you want extra hot, herbal, or sour flavors, you need to ask for them. Esan will spice up your dish on a scale of one (“little hot”) to six stars (“nuclear”). Chili heads can go beyond the nuclear option and ask for “Thai hot.” A concern about seafood allergies means that dried shrimp, a staple in many Thai dishes, are generally omitted — so ask for those too, and for extra vegetables and herbs. You can further customize your dish with condiments on the table — fish sauce with chilies and a chili garlic sauce — but your best bet is to tell your server what you’re looking for. Armed with this knowledge, I’d like to give the drunken master noodles and pat Thai another try, and see if the Hell beef will trick me into thinking it came from Hell’s Kitchen. The som tom ($6.50) ordered with three-stars spiciness (“very hot”) provides an addictive make-your-nose-run, reach-forthe-water-glass kind of heat. Contrasting the cool crunch of finely julienned green papaya, the salad is the perfect appetizer, whetting the appetite for the rest of the meal. The beef prigkhin ($9.50), ordered with six stars of spiciness, is that much more fiery. The beef is tender — this is a strength at Esan — the green beans are snappy, and the ginger provides a nice zing. Not many eateries can endure for nearly two decades. Both Douangratdy and Esan’s patrons should be commended for running and backing a restaurant long enough to become an institution. That kind of fortitude and support is scare in NYC, and I’m thankful for a Rochester food scene where it’s prevalent.

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 13


Upcoming [ POP/ROCK ] Counterparts Thursday, December 12. Dubland Underground, 315 Alexander St. $10. 5 p.m. 232-7550.

Music

[ CLASSICAL ]

RPO: Cirque Returns Friday, January 10-Saturday, January

11. Kodak Hall at Eastman Theatre, 26 Gibbs St. $15-$92. 8 p.m. 454-2100. rpo.org [ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ]

The Avett Brothers Thursday, March 6. RIT Gordon Field

House. One Lomb Memorial Dr. $35-$49.50. 7 p.m. rittickets.com

Vampire Weekend

SUNDAY, DECEMBER 1 MAIN STREET ARMORY, 900 EAST MAIN ST. 7 P.M. | $35-$40 | ROCHESTERMAINSTREETARMORY.COM [ POP/ROCK ] On its latest release “Modern Vampires of the City,” Vampire Weekend adheres strictly to the either/ or songwriting process of music-based or lyric-based composition, with no creative or blended grey area. It’s impossible to tell which song was rendered in whichever discipline, but honestly, when you deal with a band of subtly, a mysterious lyrical story line, and dynamic depth, who cares about the chicken or the egg? — BY FRANK DE BLASE

DJ Hollywood FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 29 VINYL NIGHTCLUB, 291 ALEXANDER ST., 10 P.M. | 21+ [ DJ/ELECTRONIC ] Clubbers, party goers and good-time

seekers in general never seem to get enough retro in their dance floor diets. On Thanksgiving weekend — a time for “spirited” reunions and family-induced decompression sessions — this fact should hold especially true. The Beatclan regularly rocks eclectic party jams from the 70’s, 80’s and 90’s for their crowds at Vinyl. For this special Black Friday event, they’ll be bringing in Las Vegas’ DJ Hollywood, who will put his own spin on the old school sound.. Attendees are encouraged to wear kooky retro outfits from any of the aforementioned decades. 70’s Afro wig, 80’s parachute pants and 90’s Nirvana t-shirt simultaneously, perhaps? What’s stopping you? The present? DJ Sweets will also perform. — BY JIM KEMPKES

MARKET CAFE A Taste of the Mediterranean

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HALAL TRASH PLATE You Gotta Try One! 311 East Ridge Rd, in Irondequoit

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WEDENSDAY, NOVEMBER 27 [ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ]

Acoustic Open Jam hosted by The Moonlighterrs. The Rabbit

Room, 61 N. Main St. Honeoye Falls. 582-1830. thelowermill. com. 7:30 p.m. Call for info. Ebb Tide. Flaherty’s Honeoye Falls, 60 W. Main St. Honeoye Falls. 497-7010. flahertys.com. Call for info. Rob & Gary Acoustic. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. 248-4825. woodcliffhotelspa.com. 5:30 p.m. Free.

Thanksgiving Eve Show w/ Frankie & Jewels. Avenue

98 PXY Jingle Jam ft. Fall Out Boy  

Pub, 522 Monroe Ave. 2444960. 7 p.m. Call for info.

The Djangoners played the Little Theatre Café on Thursday, November 21. PHOTO PROVIDED

TUESDAY, DECEMBER 3 BLUE CROSS ARENA, 1 WAR MEMORIAL SQUARE 5 P.M. | $39.25-$76.25 | BLUECROSSARENA.COM [ POP/ROCK ] Fall Out Boy has certainly traveled far into pop and rock territory since it’s post hardcore beginnings in Wilmette, Illinois back in the early oughts. After the release of four successful albums, the band announced a hiatus for its members to pursue side projects and production endeavors in 2009. The band resurfaced earlier this year with the release of “Save Rock and Roll.” Looking at the rock landscape, it looks like it could use some saving. This is a job for Fall Out Boy… Emblem3, Tegan and Sara, New Politics, Cash Cash, and Midnight Red round out the bill. — BY FRANK DE BLASE

Eastman Jazz Ensemble WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 4 KILBOURN HALL, 26 GIBBS ST. 8 P.M. | FREE | ESM.ROCHESTER.EDU [ JAZZ ] The interests of Bill Dobbins, director of

the Eastman Jazz Ensemble, span a wide swath of the history of jazz, but there is no doubt that his major passion is the work of Duke Ellington. So, it’s no surprise (but quite a treat) that the second half of the ensemble’s December concert will consists of nine Ellington/Strayhorn arrangements of selections from Tchaikovsky’s Nutcracker Suite. The band will also premiere new pieces by jazz majors Gabe Condon and Greg Chako and play works by Stewart Fischer, Manny Albam and Bob Brookmeyer. — BY RON NETSKY

[ BLUES ]

Djang-gone

Imaginary Band Thanksgiving Celebration. The Beale, 1930

Empire Blvd. Webster. 2161070. thebealegrille.com. Call for info.

[ REVIEW ] BY FRANK DE BLASE

The Little Theatre Café has always struck me as temporal twilight, a layover in a caffeinated limbo if you will, on your way to or from cinematic bliss. While in this holding pattern and holding a cup of hot joe, you can dig any number of bands on the artistic fringe as they punch out acoustic or lightly amplified sets of electrified eclecticity. It’s momentary, fleeting, and beautiful in its brevity. Folks come from the reaches to dig the tunes. Most are passing through. The café isn’t what you’d necessarily call a destination. But last Thursday it was crowded with fans of local gypsy-jazz sensations The Djangoners. Sure, some were there on their way to one the Little’s assorted left-ofHollywood offerings, but the majority of the crowd that packed the house was there start to finish for two sets of the quartet’s thrills, trills, and, augmented fills. The sound centered around the material of gypsy-jazz guitar godfather, Django Reinhardt. When you ponder the fact that Reinhardt did what he did with just two fingers on his fret hand — the other two digits were rendered useless in a fire — it’s

staggering. But honestly very few guitarists, or those in the supporting fiddle and bass roles, have mastered the style’s syncopation, jump, and zing as well as the Djangoners. At the band’s core is Bobby Henrie, a six-string-slingin’ southpaw wunderkind raised on bluegrass and red-hot rockabilly. Watching this man play on his upside-down guitar is a study in the style’s confounding elegance and complicated simplicity. Fivestring fiddle player (and maker) Eric Aceto offered up a similar blur of bowed notes that countered the melody when not countering it or harmonizing with it. His brother and rhythm guitarist Harry Aceto was absent, leaving Ithaca guitarist Dave Davies — no, not that Dave Davies, Kinks fans — to add the percussive chop, charm, and trombone. You might think that last piece would be a bit out of place, but in reality it just added to the parade. Dog-house bassist Brian Williams kept the bottom end thumping and hips twitching as he served up his trademark locomotive swing. You can see The Djangoners at The Little Theatre Café every Thursday in December. See a movie too, if you’re so inclined.

[ DJ/ELECTRONIC ]

DJ Reign and Ladies Night. Captain’s Attic, 37 Charlotte St. 546-8885. Call for info. DJ Adam. Nashvilles, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. Henrietta. 3343030. nashvillesny.com. Call for info. Ladies Nite: High Heels and Mini Skirts New Wave Wednesdays. Club Clarissas,

293 Clarissa St. 232-3430. 10 p.m. 21+. Call for info. Love & Thanks. Love Nightclub, 45 Euclid St. 222-5683. 10 p.m. Canned food donation takes $1 off admission. Free - $12.

Retro Game Night ft. DJ Cedric. Vertex Night Club, 169

N. Chestnut St. 232-5498. Call for info. Teen Set 45 Party. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. Free.

TeenSet 45 Pre-Thanksgiving Blast ft. El Destructo, DJ MaryKate, TeenSet 45. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. Call for info.

Thanksgiving Cretin Hop ft. DJ Tanner, Marky Sinatra. Skylark

Lounge, 40 South Union St. 270-8106. theskylarklounge. com. 10 p.m. 21+. Free. continues on page 17

EASTMAN SCHOOL OF MUSIC PRESENTS MusicLine:

585-274-1100

facebook.com/ConcertsAtEastman

TUESDAY, DECEMBER 3 FACULTY ARTIST SERIES – ROBERT MORRIS, COMPOSER Piano, Winds, River: Music of Robert Morris Hatch Recital Hall, 8 pm Tickets $10 general public at the door, free to U/R ID Holders WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 4 EASTMAN JAZZ ENSEMBLE Bill Dobbins, director Kilbourn Hall, 8 pm Free

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 6 EASTMAN-ROCHESTER CHORUS AND EASTMAN SCHOOL SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA William Weinert and Lee Wright, conductors Brahms Alto Rhapsody, Dvorak Te Deum, Op. 103, Rouse Karolju Kodak Hall at Eastman Theatre, 8 pm Free

SUNDAY, DECEMBER 8 FACULTY ARTIST SERIES – ALAN HARRIS, CELLO Music of Martinu, Mendelssohn, and Fauré Featuring Mikhail Kopelman, violin; Bonita Boyd, flute; and Barry Snyder, piano Hatch Recital Hall, 3 pm Tickets $10 general public at the door, free to U/R ID Holders

ROCHESTER INTERNATIONAL JAZZ FESTIVAL AND THE EASTMAN SCHOOL OF MUSIC PRESENT

AN AFTERNOON WITH NATALIE COLE

SUNDAY, DECEMBER 15 A Special 4PM Holiday Celebration! Tickets available at rochesterjazz.com (585) 454-2060 rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 15


Music

ROCHES T E R A N D B E Y O N D.

John Sebastian found massive fame with The Lovin’ Spoonful, a band that at one time was compared to The Beatles. Now he performs solo in a show featuring both his music and his stories. PHOTO PROVIDED

C I T Y N E W S PA P E R

BLOGS Believing in magic NEWS Education Politics Environment

MUSIC Jazz Reviews Local Shows

An Evening of Music and Conversation with John Sebastian SATURDAY, DECEMBER 7 CAFÉ VERITAS, FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH, 220 S. WINTON ROAD 7:30 P.M. | $25-$28 | CAFEVERITAS.ORG

ENTERTAINMENT Video Games TV

ROCHESTERCITYNEWSPAPER.COM

facebook.com/CITYNEWSPAPER twitter.com/ROCCITYNEWS youtube.com/ROCCITYNEWS

[ INTERVIEW ] BY RON NETSKY

It was one of the great moments of the 1960’s. While helping out backstage at the Woodstock Festival, John Sebastian was asked to perform a song to stall for time. Midway through “Darling Be Home Soon,” he was so taken with the half-million young people in front of him that he slipped out of the song’s narrative, making one word plural: “Go — and beat your crazy heads against the sky...,” he sang. The euphoria of that moment came a year after Sebastian had left The Lovin’ Spoonful, one of the top bands of the

16 CITY NOVEMBER 27 - DECEMBER 3, 2013

1960’s. With the Spoonful, he’d written and sung Top 10 hits like “Daydream,” “Do You Believe In Magic,” and “Nashville Cats.” He’ll be singing his classics and reminiscing about his life in music when he performs at Café Veritas on Saturday, December 7. We reached Sebastian recently by phone at his Woodstock home. An edited transcript of the interview follows. CITY: Your father was a great classical harmonica player. How did that affect you? John Sebastian: When you listen to

somebody play an instrument for sometimes six, eight hours a day — that’s what the demands on a classical virtuoso are — it does point you in a direction, if you have any inclination. The other thing that was very important is, I understood that my father was the greatest virtuoso on his instrument in the world, but not

necessarily a rich guy. Not necessarily successful in the common American measurement. And that music is to be done only if the joy is there. But then it becomes a very hard job. After the Spoonful years, I would come across people who were very musically talented but because of their background they had no measuring stick for what musicians really do all day, or they thought the degree of success would be commensurate with their effort — a lot of things that are American values. All of a sudden, it ain’t necessarily so. Your mother wrote radio shows. What was she like?

It was like having baby Tina Fey in radio: transgressive humor right on the edge of acceptability, but very funny. As time went on she evolved as a writer until she was writing about a Renaissance woman and doing research in the Laurentian library. continues on page 18


Meet the Artist Concert Series!

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 27 Thanksgiving Eve Spectacular. ONE Nightclub

ELDAR

Tues. Feb 11th • 7pm

and Lounge, 1 Ryan Alley. 546-1010. oneclublife.com. 21+. Call for info. Why Not Wednesday. Eclipse Bar & Grill, 374 Thurston Rd. 502922-6567. 10 p.m. Call for info. Y Not Wednesday w/DJ ET. Plush, 151 St. Paul St. 232-5650. venurochester.com. Call for info.

Tickets: $25 Athena Performing Arts Center

BONERAMA

Wed. March 26th • 7:30pm Tickets: $20 Greece Olympia High School Auditorium

Tickets can be purchased online at www.jazz901.org and by calling 585-966-2660

[ JAZZ ]

Anthony Giannavola. Lemoncello, 137 West Commercial St. East Rochester. 385-8565. lemoncello137.com. 6:30 p.m. Free. Bob Sneider Jazz Trio. Angus House & Lounge, 2126 Five Mile Line Rd. Penfield. 2182005. angushouseandloung. com. 7 p.m. Free. Ferrante & Furioso. Landing Strip Grill, 1280 Scottsville Rd. 2359856. 9 p.m. Call for info. Margaret Explosion. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 7:30 p.m. Free. Mark Cassara. Pane Vino Ristorante, 175 N. Water St. 2326090. panevinoristorante.com. Call for info. The Swooners Album Release. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. East Rochester. 662-5555. bistro135.net. 6 p.m. Free. [ HIP-HOP/RAP ]

The Biggest Night of the Year ft. Sophistafunk, Subsoil. Sticky Lips BBQ Juke Joint, 830 Jefferson Rd. 585-2925544. stickylipsbbq.com. 9 p.m. $5-$10.

Word of Mouth Wednesday’s w/DJ Private Eye. Dubland

Underground, 315 Alexander St. 232-7550. dublandunderground. wordpress.com. 10 p.m. 21+. $5.

[ REGGAE/JAM ] Thunder Body. Zeppa Auditorium, German House, 315 Gregory St. 563-6241. 8 p.m. $15. [ POP/ROCK ]

7 Sense. TP’s Irish Pub, 916

Panorama Trail. 385-4160. 9 p.m. Free. B_Free. Flaherty’s Webster, 1200 Bay Rd. Webster. 671-0816. flahertys.com. Call for info.

Cosco Gladstone & Cosco Reunion ‘13. Richmond’s

Tavern, 21 Richmond Street. 270-8570. richmondstavern. com. 9 p.m. $10. Gene Romano. Towpath Café, 6 N. Main St. Box Factory Bldg. Fairport. 377-0410. towpathcafe. com. Call for info. Harmonica Lewinski. Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. abilenebarandlounge. com. 10 p.m. $5-$8.

Jason Smay, Eddie Clendening, and Mike Graham’s Rockabilly Turkey Party. Marge’s Lakeside

Inn, 4909 Culver Rd. 323-1020. margeslakesideinn.com. 7 p.m. 21+. Free.

POP/ROCK | CHRIS TRAPPER

Buffalo native Chris Trapper began his career as the frontman of pop trio The Push Stars before evolving into a modern-day troubadour. Trapper has grown his fan base the old-fashioned way: one gig at a time by engaging audiences and crafting exquisite tunes. Trapper’s music has been regularly placed on the silver screen and played by local radio station WBER. This show is a fundraiser concert for WBER that finds Trapper with a brand spankin’ new CD — “Technicolor” — and fresh off a UK tour with Colin Hay (remember Men At Work?). Nick Young opens. Chris Trapper performs on Saturday, November 30, 9 p.m. at the Little Theatre, 240 East Ave. $25, wber.org. — BY ROMAN DIVEZUR Night before Thanksgiving bash ft. Download. Nola’s Restaurant & Nightclub, 4775 Lake Ave. 6633375. nolasweb.com. 9 p.m. Call for info. Peter Sapia. Temple Bar and Grille, 109 East Ave. 232-6000. templebarandgrille.com. Call for info. Free. Temple Bar and Grille, 109 East Ave. 232-6000. templebarandgrille.com. Call for info. Free.

Your Holiday Hangover ft. Simplelife, Extended Family.

Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. lovincup.com. 8 p.m. Free. Smooth Talkers. Johnny’s Irish Pub, 1382 Culver Rd. 224-0990. johnnysirishpub. com. 8 p.m. Free. T-Day Party. McKenzie’s Irish Pub, 3685 W. Henrietta Rd. 3348970. mckenziesirishpub.com. Call for info. Teagan & The Tweeds. Dinosaur Bar-B-Que, 99 Court St. 3257090. dinosaurbarbque.com. 10 p.m. Free.

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 28 [ BLUES ] Nightfall. The Beale, 693 South Ave. 271-4650. thebealegrille. com. 7:30 p.m. Call for info.

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 29 [ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ] Black Rock Zydeco. Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. abilenebarandlounge. com. 6 p.m. $6-$10.

The Bop Shop’s Black Friday Bash ft. Wammo. Lovin’ Cup,

300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. lovincup.com. 9 p.m. $3-$5. Chris Burley w/Hilton Brass. The Shops On West Ridge, 3200 W Ridge Rd. 368-0670. theshopsonwestridge.net. 2 p.m. Call for info.

Do you have osteoarthritis knee pain?

Do you have trouble sleeping?

If you answered “yes” to these questions, you may qualify for research being conducted at the University of Rochester. The purpose is to investigate whether improving sleep can improve the immune system and reduce pain. • Participants must be 50–75 years of age and in generally good physical and psychological health. • No study medications are involved • Study participants receive up to $400 for study participation.

For more information, please call (585) 273-4700, or email us at: mindbody@urmc.rochester.edu

Peg Dolan & Sharon McHargue w/Mike Pepper. McGraw’s

Irish Pub, 146 W Commercial St. East Rochester. 348-9091. mcgrawsirishpub.com. 6 p.m. Free. Ralph Louis. Rochester Plaza Hotel, 70 State St. 546-3450. rochesterplaza.com. 6 p.m. Free.

Record Store Day Black Friday ft. Knuckles Sullivan, Wammo & Friends, Hamell On Trial, and Maybird. The Bop Shop, 1460

Monroe Ave. 271-3354. bopshop. com. 1 p.m. Free. [ BLUES ]

Everheart. The Beale, 1930

Empire Blvd. Webster. 216-1070. thebealegrille.com. Call for info. continues on page 19

[ DJ/ELECTRONIC ] Cultr Club. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 11 p.m. Free. For the Love Thursdays. Love Nightclub, 45 Euclid St. 2225683. 10 p.m. 18+. $3-$12. rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 17


Believing in Magic continues from page 16

You grew up in Greenwich Village. What was it like when you walked into Washington Square in the early 1960’s?

It would be full of people surrounding the fountain. People would gather in vaguely musical groups to play together. There would be a bluegrass neighborhood on one side and then all the guys who wished they were Lightnin’ Hopkins, and then the guys with the matching shirts who were thinking about the Kingston Trio. There were doo-wop singers and old Italian guys with mandolins and guitars. As you would walk through you would get all these musical flavors. Where did you gravitate?

I was with the Lightnin’ Hopkins guys. You were in the Even Dozen Jug Band with greats like Maria Muldaur, and the Mugwumps with Cass Elliot and Denny Doherty. Did you have any idea that all of you would be successful?

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We were kind of following instructions. [Legendary producer] Paul Rothchild was pivotal in making this happen. I got back from a camp-counseling job when Stephen Grossman called and said, “Hey, we’re in a jug band and you’re the harmonica player.” I said, “What’s jug-band music?” Because I had been following Lightnin’ Hopkins around. I didn’t get into it because of money or fame, I got into it because Paul Rothchild, said, hey, you’d be great in this. Then we’d go off and smoke a joint and talk about the possibilities. But we did play Carnegie Hall. When I told my dad the gigs we were getting he had this quizzical look on his face, like, What the hell? It’s not well known, but you played bass on Bob Dylan’s “Bringing it All Back Home.”

Bob and I had a nice friendship based on meeting in Gerde’s Folk City basement and playing harmonicas together. Retrospectively, I think he might have been looking for the core of a rock & roll band that he would lead. Once I got the Spoonful going we were out on Long Island in a God-forsaken, unheated hotel that we were using as a rehearsal room. I got a call from Bob. [Dylan voice] “Hey, yeah, I was thinkin’ maybe you could come out and play bass on a thing and we could think

about a thing.” I said, “You know, Bob, unfortunately, I’ve kinda committed to these three guys I’m working with to do a band.” That put a crimp in our friendship. In the mid-1960’s The Lovin’ Spoonful was compared to The Beatles. Was that intimidating?

Nah; that was delicious. At the time I thought, holy crap — two guys that both write this good — I’m out-classed! Eventually those kind of comparisons came from them when we played the Marquee Club in London. That night we had John Lennon, George, Ringo, Keith Moon, two members of the Yardbirds… Our road manager told us before we went on stage. We said, “Fuckin’ don’t tell us that!” You wrote classics like “Darling Be Home Soon” and “Rain on the Roof.” How personal were these songs?

I thought I was writing personally but I was really writing ideally. My relationship at the time wasn’t particularly smooth. Life was kind of starting to jostle me around a little. But those kinds of things don’t necessarily come from reality. That’s a universally held misconception: you see the beautiful girl, you write the beautiful song. It’s more the way Bruce Springsteen describes: “I’m pissed off at my dad, I’m pissed off at my girl, I’m writing all the songs, the audience is loving it. I find a great girl, I get married, I resolve problems with my father, I keep writing, people hate it.” In 1976, you had an out-of-nowhere No. 1 hit with “Welcome Back.”

I was so wildly unpopular, Warner Brothers was trying to pretend I wasn’t there. I had made the TV theme for “Welcome Back, Kotter” and people were calling from the mid-West saying, “I have to have this theme song!” And there was no record. So I went back in the studio and elongated it so it could be a record. What was it like to play for a halfmillion people at the Woodstock Festival?

I had been playing for intimate audiences since the collapse of the Spoonful. Oddly enough, that was an intimate audience. Sometimes you get an audience of 300 people that’s very hard to move, and sometimes you get an intimate audience that’s huge.


FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 29

DJ Blake. 140 Alex Bar & Grill, 140 Alexander St. 2561000. 140alex.com. 10 p.m. Call for info. DJ Energon. Vertex Night Club, 169 N. Chestnut St. 232-5498. 10 p.m. $3-$8. DJ Hollywood. Vinyl Night Club, 291 Alexander St. 325-7998. 9 p.m. 21+. Call for info.

Gap Mangione New Blues Band. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa,

199 Woodcliff Dr. 248-4825. woodcliffhotelspa.com. 7:30 p.m. Free. King Bees. The Beale, 693 South Ave. 271-4650. thebealegrille. com. 7:30 p.m. Call for info.

DJ Night w/Arcadia 2003 10 Year Reunion. Nola’s Restaurant

& Nightclub, 4775 Lake Ave. 663-3375. nolasweb.com. Call for info.

[ CLASSICAL ]

RPO: The Nutcracker. Kodak Hall at Eastman Theater, 60 Gibbs St. Various times. $10-$92.

Electric Boogaloo ft. DJ Buddy, Jake. Skylark Lounge, 40 South Union St. 270-8106. theskylarklounge.com. 10 p.m. 21+. $2.

[ COUNTRY ]

Free Ride w/Uncle Fran’s Band. Nashvilles, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. Henrietta. 334-3030. nashvillesny.com. 9 p.m. Call for info. [ DJ/ELECTRONIC ]

After Gobble Party. Tilt Nightclub

& Ultralounge, 444 Central Ave. 232-8440. facebook.com/ Tiltnightclub. 10 p.m. $10-$15. On the House Fridays. ONE Nightclub and Lounge, 1 Ryan Alley. 546-1010. oneclublife.com. 21+. Call for info. Chill Out Fridays Happy Hour. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. lovincup.com. 5:30 p.m. Free. DJ Bac Spin. Plush, 151 St. Paul St. 232-5650. venurochester. com. 8 p.m. Call for info.

DJ/ELECTRONIC | THE DEER TRACKS

Swedish bands frequently charm the ears of English-speaking folks, and Gefle, Sweden natives The Deer Tracks are no exception. The nifty electronica duo deconstructs traditional electro-pop by mixing in a wider range of influences and mid-tempo beats that are both atmospheric and trippy. Imagine a post-disco Eurocentric dance party at Grandma’s log cabin, deep in the Scandinavian woods. I’m digging tunes like “Ram Ram,” and lead singer Elin Lindfors reminds me of Paris Hilton. Check it out and see. Sparx & Yarms and Kurt Andrew open. The Deer Tracks performs on Sunday, December 1, 9 p.m. at The Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave., $6-$8, bugjar.com. — BY ROMAN DIVEZUR

Fresh Meat Fridays w/Samantha Vega, DJ Mighty Mic. Tilt

Nightclub & Ultralounge, 444 Central Ave. 232-8440. facebook. com/Tiltnightclub. 11:15 p.m. & 12:30 a.m. $4-$12. Lube After Dark. Quaker Steak & Lube, 2205 Buffalo Rd. 6979464. quakersteakandlube.com/ Rochester_NY. 9:30 p.m. Free.

Make Em Sweat Fridays: Make Em Dance Edition ft. DJ 6:30, Nick Kage. Club Network, 420

Central Ave. 232-1390. 10 p.m. Guys free until 10:30 p.m., girls free until 11:30 p.m. 21+.

Photo Shoot Fridaze ft. Ghetto Blasta. T Jay’s Lounge, 622 Lake Ave. 21+. Ladies free until 11 p.m. Call for info. $10. Reggaeton w/DJ Carlos. La Copa Ultra Lounge, 235 W. Ridge Rd. 254-1050. lacopaultralounge. com. 10 p.m. Free.

Facelife Fridays ft. Aggy Dune, Ambrosia Salad, Darienne Lake, and Kasha Davis. 140 Alex Bar & Grill, 140 Alexander St. 2561000. 140alex.com. 11 p.m. & midnight. Call for info. Trancesend and Victor Gig. Love Nightclub, 45 Euclid St. 2225683. 10 p.m. 21+, 18+ after 2 a.m. $6-$20.

Two for the Road. Pane Vino Ristorante, 175 N. Water St. 2326090. panevinoristorante.com. 6:30 p.m. Free. The White Hots. Lemoncello, 137 West Commercial St. East Rochester. 385-8565. lemoncello137.com. 7 p.m. Free. [ R&B ]

James Brown Tribute. Finger [ JAZZ ]

Bob Sneider Trio. Bistro 135,

135 W. Commercial St. East Rochester. 662-5555. bistro135. net. 6 p.m. Free.

Fred Costello & Roger Ekers Jazz Duo. Charley Brown’s,

1675 Penfield Rd. 385-9202. charleybrownspenfield.com. 7:30 p.m. Free. Funknut. Dinosaur Bar-BQue, 99 Court St. 325-7090. dinosaurbarbque.com. 10 p.m. Free. Matthew Sieber Ford Trio. Tapas 177 Lounge, 177 St. Paul St. 262-2090. tapas177.com. 4:30 p.m. Free.

The Joe Santora Trio w/Curtis Kendrick & Emily Kirchoff.

Michael’s Valley Grill, 1694 Penfield Rd. (585) 383-8260. michaelsvalleygrill.com. Free. The Russell Fielder Trio. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 8:30 p.m. Free.

Lakes Casino & Racetrack, 5857 Rt. 96. Farmington. 9243232. fingerlakesracetrack. com. Call for info Finger Lakes Casino & Racetrack, 5857 Rt. 96. Farmington. 924-3232. fingerlakesracetrack.com. Call for info. The Mid Month Mixer. Captain’s Attic, 37 Charlotte St. 546-8885. 5pointentertainment.com. 8 p.m. $10-$15. [ POP/ROCK ]

Eric “the” Taylor. Natural Oasis Café, 288 Monroe Ave. 3251831. naturaloasisny.com. 7:30 p.m. Free.

Friday Night Live ft. Jeff Cosco. Richmond’s Tavern, 21

Richmond Street. 270-8570. richmondstavern.com. 6 p.m. Call for info. continues on page 20

Soul On Tap w/Rob Gioia Experience. Johnny’s Irish

Pub, 1382 Culver Rd. 2240990. johnnysirishpub.com. 5 p.m. Free.

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1/2 PRICE APPETIZERS MONDAY-THURSDAY 3pm-6pm SUNDAY-THURSDAY AFTER 9pm WITH ANY PURCHASE DINE IN ONLY, EXCLUDES CHICKEN WINGS, STILL’S SAMPLER, CAJUN SHRIMP, BLACKENED AHI TUNA

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 29 The LPs. Smokin’ Joe’s Bar &

Grill, 425 Lyell Ave. Call for info.

Record Store Day Black Friday ft. Anonymous Willpower, Danielle Ponder, and Eddie Clendening. Record Archive, 33 1/3 Rockwood St. noon. Free.

Record Store Day Black Friday ft. Uncl Rog, The Beatle, Joe E & The Jam Factory, Teagan & The Tweeds, Foot & Mouth Disease

House of Guitars, 645 Titus Ave. 544-3500. houseofguitars.com. Call for info. Free.

Routine Involvements w/Chris Padgett, The Reactions. Bug Jar,

219 Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. $7-$9. Something Else. Wall Street Bar & Grill, 330 East Ave. 585-3195696. 9 p.m. 21+. $5. Start Making Sense. Sticky Lips BBQ Juke Joint, 830 Jefferson Rd. 585-292-5544. stickylipsbbq. com. 10 p.m. $12-$15. Walt O’Brien. Towpath Café, 6 N. Main St. Box Factory Bldg. Fairport. 377-0410. towpathcafe. com. 7 p.m. Call for info. Women of Faith. Blue Cross Arena, One War Memorial Square. 758-5300. bluecrossarena.com. Friday: 7 p.m., Saturday: 9 a.m. womenoffaith.com. $99-$109.

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 30 THEDISTILLERY.COM

THE MOST DIVERSE COLLECTION OF ORNAMENTS IN ROCHESTER!

[ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ] Candela. Tapas 177 Lounge, 177 St. Paul St. 262-2090. tapas177. com. 11 p.m. Free. In The Loop. Flaherty’s Webster, 1200 Bay Rd. Webster. 6710816. flahertys.com. Call for info. Jim Lane. Prosecco Italian Restaurant, 1550 New York 332. Farmington. 924-8000. 7 p.m. Free. Nancy Perry. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 8:30 p.m. Free. Rustle and Bromley. Boulder Coffee Co., 100 Alexander St. 454-7140. bouldercoffeeco.com. 8 p.m. Call for info. Ryan & Rayce. McGraw’s Irish Pub, 146 W Commercial St. East Rochester. 3489091. mcgrawsirishpub.com. 7 p.m. Free. True Blue. Flaherty’s Honeoye Falls, 60 W. Main St. Honeoye Falls. 497-7010. flahertys.com. Call for info. [ BLUES ]

The Fakers. The Beale,

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20 CITY NOVEMBER 27 - DECEMBER 3, 2013

693 South Ave. 271-4650. thebealegrille.com. 7:30 p.m. Call for info. Joe Beard. Dinosaur Bar-BQue, 99 Court St. 325-7090. dinosaurbarbque.com. 10 p.m. Free. [ CLASSICAL ]

RPO: The Nutcracker. Kodak Hall at Eastman Theater, 60 Gibbs St. Various times. $10-$92.

[ COUNTRY ] Double Cross. Nashvilles, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. Henrietta. 3343030. nashvillesny.com. 9 p.m. Call for info.

[ DJ/ELECTRONIC ]

Blue Label Saturdays ft. DJ Andy Fade and DJ Bobby Base. Flat Iron Café, 561 State

St. 454-4830. flatironcafe.net. Call for info. DJ Big Reg. Plush, 151 St. Paul St. 232-5650. venurochester. com. 10 p.m. Call for info. DJ Blake. 140 Alex Bar & Grill, 140 Alexander St. 2561000. 140alex.com. 10 p.m. Call for info. DJ Darkwave. Vertex Night Club, 169 N. Chestnut St. 232-5498. 10 p.m. $3-$8. DJ Flex Masquerade Party. Skylark Lounge, 40 South Union St. 270-8106. theskylarklounge. com. 9 p.m. 21+. $3. DJ NoNo. Finger Lakes Casino & Racetrack, 5857 Rt. 96. Farmington. 924-3232. fingerlakesracetrack.com. Call for info Finger Lakes Casino & Racetrack, 5857 Rt. 96. Farmington. 924-3232. fingerlakesracetrack.com. Call for info. Jameson Alexander, Rob Morley. Love Nightclub, 45 Euclid St. 222-5683. 10 p.m. 21+, 18+ after 2 a.m. $6-$20. La Selva. Tilt Nightclub & Ultralounge, 444 Central Ave. 232-8440. facebook.com/ Tiltnightclub. 10 p.m. Call for info.

Poke Dem Saturdays ft. Team Lion Paw, The Money Green Theme, Nick Kage, and Wavey.

Trinities Restaurant, 36 W. Main St. 319-4047. 10 p.m. $5-$10. Saturday Night Ladies Night. BLU Bar & Grill, 250 Pixley Rd. 247-0079. blurochester.com. 9 p.m. Call for info. [ JAZZ ]

Dave Mancini & Friends.

Downstairs Cabaret Theatre Center, 540 E. Main St. 3254370. downstairscabaret.com. 8 p.m. $10.50-$21.

Fred Costello & Roger Ekers Jazz Duo. Charley Brown’s,

1675 Penfield Rd. 385-9202. charleybrownspenfield.com. 7:30 p.m. Free. Lap Giraffe. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. East Rochester. 662-5555. bistro135.net. 6 p.m. Free.

The Joe Santora Trio w/Curtis Kendrick & Emily Kirchoff.

Michael’s Valley Grill, 1694 Penfield Rd. (585) 383-8260. michaelsvalleygrill.com. Free. Roses & Revolutions. Pane Vino Ristorante, 175 N. Water St. 2326090. panevinoristorante.com. 6:30 p.m. Free. Special Blend. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. 248-4825. woodcliffhotelspa.com. 7:30 p.m. Free. The White Hots. Pultneyville Grill, 4135 Lake Rd. Pultneyville. 315589-4512. pultneyvillegrill.com. 6:30 p.m. Call for info. [ R&B ]

The Galileo Band. Sticky Lips

BBQ Juke Joint, 830 Jefferson Rd. 585-292-5544. stickylipsbbq. com. 10 p.m. Free.

DJ/ELECTRONIC | AFTER GOBBLE PARTY

DJ Flex’ breakbeat-oriented La selva night will return to Tilt nightclub this Thanksgiving weekend for the fourth annual After Gobble Party. You won’t find a better place to work off those extra holiday calories than Tilt’s epic dance floor. This installment will feature an enhanced sound system for a world-class sonic experience. The bass bins will surely rattle when headliner, DJ Spinz of Toronto, properly rinses the place out. La selva don, DJ Flex, will warm up the main room from 10 ‘til midnight. Also featured are Risik and Vicetron. La selva presents After Gobble Party on Friday, November 29, 10 p.m., Tilt Nightclub, 444 Central Ave., $10-$15, 18+. — BY JIM KEMPKES [ HIP-HOP/RAP ] Rich Homie Quan. Main Street Armory, 900 E. Main St. 2323221. rochestermainstreetarmory. com. 8 p.m. $20-$50.

Women of Faith. Blue Cross Arena, One War Memorial Square. 758-5300. bluecrossarena.com. Friday: 7 p.m., Saturday: 9 a.m. womenoffaith.com. $99-$109.

[ POP/ROCK ]

SUNDAY, DECEMBER 1

Amends EP Release w/Runaway Brother, Ages, Ghost Stories, Barbarossa, Hideout, and Misled. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe

Ave. 7:30 p.m. $5-$12. Chris Trapper. Little Theatre, 240 East Ave. 9 p.m. $25.

Enter The Haggis w/The YellowJackets. Water Street

Music Hall, 204 N. Water St. 3255600. waterstreetmusic.com. 8 p.m. $10. Ernie Capone. Hamlin Station Bar & Grill, 52 Railroad Ave. Hamlin. 964-2010. hamlinstation.net. 8:30 p.m. Call for info. Five-0. Nola’s Restaurant & Nightclub, 4775 Lake Ave. 6633375. nolasweb.com. 10 p.m. Call for info. Knight Patrol. Montage Music Hall, 50 Chestnut St. 232-1520. themontagemusichall.com. 8 p.m. Call for info. Mike Pappert. Towpath Café, 6 N. Main St. Box Factory Bldg. Fairport. 377-0410. towpathcafe. com. 7 p.m. Call for info. Mutter. California Brew Haus, 402 W. Ridge Rd. 621-1480. 10 p.m. $5-$7. Out On The Tiles. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. lovincup.com. 9 p.m. $5-$7. Redeye Jack. TP’s Irish Pub, 916 Panorama Trail. (585) 385-4160. 9 p.m. Free. Teagan & The Tweeds. Johnny’s Irish Pub, 1382 Culver Rd. 2240990. johnnysirishpub.com. 8 p.m. Free.

[ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ]

Celtic Music Sundays. Temple

Bar and Grille, 109 East Ave. 2326000. templebarandgrille.com. 7 p.m. Free. Fandango at the Tango. Tango Cafe, 389 Gregory St. 271-4930. tangocafedance.com. 7:30 p.m. Free, donations accepted

Hammered Dulcimer Holiday Concert. Penfield Public Library, 1985 Baird Rd. 3408720. penfieldlibrary.org. 2:30 p.m. Free. To Zamir CD Release Project. The Kanack School of Music, 2077-2079 South Clinton Ave. 2 p.m. Free. [ CLASSICAL ]

Compline w/Candlelight Concert. Christ Church,

141 East Ave. 454-3878. christchurchrochester.org. 8:30 p.m. Free, donations accepted. Joe Blackburn, organ. George Eastman House, 900 East Ave. 3 p.m. Call for info.

Merry Christmas Sing-Along with The Rochester Low Brass Choir. First Baptist Church of Fairport, 92 South Main St. Fairport. 585671-6856. 7 p.m. Free, cash/ food donations appreciated). RPO: The Nutcracker. Kodak Hall at Eastman Theater, 60 Gibbs St. Various times. $10-$92.


[ COUNTRY ]

JB & Company. Smokin’ Joe’s Bar & Grill, 425 Lyell Ave. Call for info.

Open Mic hosted by The BroncoVic Band. Sandra’s

Saloon, 276 Smith St. 285-6786. 4 p.m. Free. [ DJ/ELECTRONIC ] Boasy Sundaze. Club Clarissas, 293 Clarissa St. 232-3430. Call for info.

The Deer Tracks w/Sparx & Yarms, Kurt Andrew. Bug

Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. $6-$8. Drink and Drag Sundays. ONE Nightclub and Lounge, 1 Ryan Alley. 546-1010. oneclublife.com. 8 p.m. 18+. Call for info.

Ship Wrecked Sunday’s ft. DJ Trancesend. Captain’s Attic, 37 Charlotte St. 5468885. 21+. Call for info.

Tequila Sundays ft. DJ Andy Fade. Flat Iron Café,

561 State St. 454-4830. flatironcafe.net. 10 p.m. Call for info. [ JAZZ ]

Bill Slater Solo Piano. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. 248-4825. woodcliffhotelspa. com. Call for info. Free.

Rochester’s 13th Annual World AIDS Day Benefit Concert. Third

Presbyterian Church, 4 Meigs St. 271-6513. thirdpresbyterian.org. 7 p.m. $5-$10. [ POP/ROCK ]

13th Annual World AIDS Day Benefit Concert. Third

POP/ROCK | RECORD STORE DAY BLACK FRIDAY

This Friday, of course, is Black Friday, and for most of us, that means a time to avoid stores for fear of being trampled. Music enthusiasts will be pleased to know that they too can participate in the madness this year, minus the whole being trampled part. Local record stores are participating in Record Store Day Black Friday, complete with great deals, limited releases, and performances from some fantastic bands. Bop Shop’s Black Friday celebration will include in-store performances from the likes of Maybird, Knuckles Sullivan, and Hammel On Trial. Record Archive will also hold a celebration of their own, where you can see Anonymous Willpower, Danielle Ponder, Eddie Clendening, and more. After all of that, close out your night with Bop Shop’s Black Friday Bash at Lovin’ Cup, featuring Wammo of Asylum Street Spankers.  Record Store Day Black Friday is on November 29, 1 p.m., at the Bop Shop, 1460 Monroe Ave., bopshop.com, and noon, Record Archive, 33 Rockwood St., recordarchive.com, and most local record stores. Free. — BY LEAH CREARY

Presbyterian Church, 4 Meigs St. 271-6513. thirdpresbyterian.org. 7 p.m. $5-$10.

TUESDAY, DECEMBER 3

Vampire Weekend w/Ms Mr, AMINAL. Main Street Armory,

[ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ]

MONDAY, DECEMBER 2

Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. abilenebarandlounge. com. 8 p.m. Free. Rob & Gary Acoustic. The Titus Tavern, 692 Titus Ave. 270-5365. titustavern.com. 7 p.m. Call for info.

900 E. Main St. 232-3221. rochestermainstreetarmory.com. 7 p.m. $35-$40.

[ CLASSICAL ]

Guest artist recital - Lars Mlekusch, saxophone.

Ciminelli Formal Lounge – Eastman School of Music, Gibbs Street. 8 p.m. Free.

Penfield Symphony Orchestra: Happy Holidays. Penfield High

School, 25 High School Dr. Penfield. 7:30 p.m. $12-$14.

[ DJ/ELECTRONIC ] 90’s Night. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. 21+. Free.

Call of Booty Strip Ops ft. Nick Kage, Selecta Preece. Louie’s

Cordial’s Lounge, 392 Lyell Ave. 254-2844. Call for info $15-$20. Magic City Monday’s. Louie’s Cordial’s Lounge, 392 Lyell Ave. 254-2844. 7 p.m. $5 before 10 p.m. [ JAZZ ]

Kyle Vock Duo. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. East Rochester. 662-5555. bistro135. net. 6 p.m. Free.m

Don Christiano-The Beatles Unplugged. Abilene Bar &

[ BLUES ]

Bluesday Tuesday Blues Jam. P.I.’s Lounge, 495 West Ave. 8 p.m. Call for info. Teagan Ward. The Beale, 693 South Ave. 271-4650. thebealegrille.com. 7:30 p.m. Call for info. [ DJ/ELECTRONIC ]

2 Reason Tuesdays w/DJ Zio.

Nathaniel’s Pub, 251 Exchange Boulevard. 232-8470. Call for info. Free. DJ Ghetto Blaster. Club Clarissas, 293 Clarissa St. 232-3430. Call for info. DJ Kathy. Nashvilles, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. Henrietta. 3343030. nashvillesny.com. Call for info. Pete Wentz DJ Set. Dubland Underground, 315 Alexander St. 232-7550. dublandunderground.wordpress. com. 11 p.m. Call for info.

Tuesday Americano w/Bobby Base. Flat Iron Café, 561 State St. 454-4830. flatironcafe.net. Call for info. [ JAZZ ]

FOR THE HOLIDAYS Locallyy grown!

• Christmas Trees • Wreaths • Amaryllis • Centerpieces

• Poinsettias • Paperwhites • Greens/Pine Rope

Free Delivery for Christmas Trees Within 5 Miles

LOCATED NEAR ELLISON PARK • OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK

485 LANDING ROAD NORTH • 482-5372 *installation not included

Norman Tibbils. Lemoncello, 137 West Commercial St. East Rochester. 385-8565. lemoncello137.com. 6:30 p.m. Free. Penfield Rotary Big Band Swing Dance. Penfield Community

Center, 1985 Baird Rd. Penfield. 340-8655. 7:30 p.m. $1. Roses & Revolutions. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. 248-4825. woodcliffhotelspa. com. 5:30 p.m. Free. [ POP/ROCK ]

98PXY Jingle Jam ft. Fall Out Boy, Emblem3, New Politics. Blue Cross Arena, One War Memorial Square. 758-5300. bluecrossarena.com. 5 p.m. $39.25-$76.25.

Paxtor w/Sky People, Sara Marie. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave.

9 p.m. $6-$8.

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 21


Classical and throughout the US and is a founding member of the Zzyzx Quartet and the Project Fusion saxophone quartet. Evans says that the workload is “not unmanageable, but does give a taste of what I’ll have to do when I venture out into the world and I’m in a community that doesn’t have a new music scene.”

New-music ensemble OSSIA is an entirely student-run group based out of the Eastman School of Music. PHOTO BY JOHN SCHLIA

Sustained success OSSIA MONDAY, DECEMBER 2 KILBOURN HALL, 26 GIBBS ST. 8 P.M. | FREE | OSSIANEWMUSIC.ORG [ FEATURE ] BY PALOMA CAPANNA

OSSIA has been a student-run ensemble at the Eastman School of Music since the mid-1970’s. Chances are, even if you’ve heard of it or gone to one of its concerts, you haven’t been behind the scenes to learn that it is more than just an ensemble — it’s an incubator in arts management. With our eye on the state of the classical music economy, we met up with Matt Evans, this year’s president of OSSIA, to ask him how to sustain a successful classical music organization in the most challenging of classical genres: new music. Ask Eastman School of Music student Evans why he plays new music, and his argument is a slam dunk. “I play saxophone and I don’t play a lot of jazz,” says Evans. “The saxophone was a late bloomer. Since

it came about in the late 1800’s, all the repertoire is new. I am a new-music native based on the instrument I play.” Evans became involved in OSSIA when his quartet was asked to play in an OSSIA concert. It was an opportunity to cross over into the world of “new music” among classical musicians, a place where Evans hadn’t yet explored. In just one OSSIA concert, Evans was hooked, and now, two years and several job descriptions later, he serves as the group’s president. “OSSIA is the only ensemble in the music school that is really completely student run,” says Evans. In addition to performing, OSSIA’s board members handle day-to-day activities, board development, recruiting student performers, the commissioning of student composers to write new works, an international composition competition, and other duties. The responsibilities are a busy fit for Evans, who is currently completing his DMA in saxophone performance and literature and his MA in music theory pedagogy at ESM. Evans also performs internationally

22 CITY NOVEMBER 27 - DECEMBER 3, 2013

One aspect of OSSIA that is enviable, compared to the vast majority of classical groups, is that OSSIA has foundation funding through the Eastman School of Music Howard Hanson Fund. OSSIA is required to prepare an annual budget and go through a budget-approval process with ESM, but students are spared the rigors of budgeting based on fundraising and ticket sales. All of OSSIA’s concerts are free and open to the public. OSSIA is in its 17th season, with a fourconcert cycle that was determined last year, each concert having works selected around a theme. “If you have a theme or an idea for a concert, let us know,” says Evans. “We’re trying also to think about ways to engage the Eastman community. There are a lot of students not going to our concerts.” Even the advertising for OSSIA concerts falls to its members. Evans says OSSIA’s marketing campaign usually involves social media, including Facebook and Twitter, and entries are posted on institutional and personal levels. “The feed gets filled up daily,” says Evans. Indeed, when looking up credentials for Evans and others at OSSIA, “views” on YouTube is part of the modern bragging rights of post-performance advertising. Evans also puts an interesting spin onto the public-relations side of running OSSIA. “We have an obligation to present why the music we select should be listened to, especially because we put on music that’s not being heard anywhere else,” he says. Evans points out that OSSIA “does some pretty hard repertoire.” There’s a real purpose to those selections. According to Evans, OSSIA fills a niche at ESM. He says the name means “the musical alternative.” Evans says, “OSSIA asks questions like, What is the alternative? What can we hear on a very high level in the halls of ESM that otherwise wouldn’t get programmed? Are we reaching our audience? What can we bring to the community? And can we offer experiences for the students at the school?” For board member Daniel Pesca, OSSIA has offered an opportunity not only to learn about the functions of a music organization, but also to work as a commissioned composer. Last spring, before Pesca became a board member, he responded to and

won OSSIA’s call for new works. Pesca’s composition “Examples of Confusion” will be part of the December 2 concert. “The title is taken from a short story by Lydia Davis, and its structure also reflects that the short story is actually a series of 15 interchanged miniatures, which are interconnected and mutually dependent on each other,” says Pesca, who is in his second year of his doctoral studies at ESM. “Examples of Confusion” is approximately nine minutes long, and is written for an ensemble of nine players of high-register wind instruments, piano, and percussion. Pesca says, “It has a clear, ringing, bright sound because of the range of the instruments. It is specific and unique instrumentation. I don’t know of another piece with this kind of instrumentation.” And within the sliver of new music, there is an even smaller sliver of new-music scores that look anything but conventional, twostaff, five-line scores. “You get a score where there is immaculate detail; you get another that features a lot of improvisation and you have to make it into something rather than simply execute it,” says Evans. Look no further than one of the pieces on the upcoming OSSIA concert to make the comparison between Pesca’s piece and the types of other scores new-music performers can encounter. Among the pieces on the program for the December concert is “Mikrophonie I” by Karlheinz Stockhausen (1928-2007). The score is written in German, and ensemble members had first to translate it before sitting down to rehearse and discuss it. In addition to tam-tam players, the work requires “an arsenal of people handling electronics and microphones,” according to Evans. He says “it is meant to be a different listening experience every time it is performed.” Both Evans and Pesca consider OSSIA a vital part of developing their skills to advance within the new-music section of the classicalmusic world. Pesca says, “It’s a very good way to start along that path to have experiences like this. With each ensemble you learn particular things. It adds to my craft as a composer. And it also adds to my experience on working with musicians in a collaborative setting on how to communicate with players and the conductor in a respectful and productive way, so that everyone feels valued.” As Evans puts it, “The very word ‘musician’ is synonymous with ‘teacher’ and ‘entrepreneur.’ As a musician, no matter where you go you have to create your own worth. You move into a community. You have to let people know that what you are doing is important and you have to draw them in. It’s a thrill when you’re on stage and it goes well.”


Art Exhibits [ OPENING ] A Different Path Gallery, 27 Market St. Brockport. “Hope in my Pocket.” Through Dec 30. Katherine Weston, Sherry Tulloch, and Kaitlin Roney exhibit a variety of art inspired by work and research benefiting the treatment of children’s brain cancer. Reception Dec 13, 6-9 p.m. There will be small tokens available in exchange for donations to the organization at the opening reception. 637-5494. differentpathgallery.com. Axom Gallery, 176 Anderson Ave., 2nd floor. “Celebrating Beauty: Regional Landscape Paintings by AXOM Gallery Artists.” Dec. 4-Jan. 4. Through Jan 4. Reception Dec 7, 5-8 p.m 2326030 x23. axomgallery.com. Image City Photography Gallery, 722 University Ave. Holiday Show 2013. Through Dec 22. Mon-Sat 11 a.m.-7 p.m., Sun 12-4 p.m. Receptions Nov 29, 5-8:30 p.m. and Dec 6, 5-9 p.m. imagecityphotographygallery.com. Ock Hee’s Gallery, 2 Lehigh St. Ock Hee’s Choices. Through Dec 28. Work by fine jewelry designers: Loraine Cooley, LeAnne Marquis, Cathy Thomas, Jan Kellner, Linda Lawrence. Mon-Sat 11 a.m.-5 p.m., Sun 12-5 p.m. Reception Nov 30, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. 624-4730. Outside the Box Art Gallery, Bldg 9, The Canal Works, 1000 Turk Hill Rd. “Winter Reflections.” Through Jan 31. Sun-Mon 8 a.m.-5 p.m., Tue-Wed 8 a.m.-10 p.m., Thu-Sat 8 a.m.-11 p.m. Reception Dec 1, 1-4 p.m. 6452485. outsidetheboxag.com. The Shoe Factory Art Co-op, 250 N. Goodman St. O Come All Ye Art Lovers!. Holiday gallery exhibit featuring local artists. Art gift basket raffle. 732-0036. shoefactoryarts@gmail.com. shoefactoryarts.com. [ CONTINUING ] 1975 Gallery, 89 Charlotte St. “Union Junction: Work from The Yards Residency.” Through Dec 7. Works by Davya Brody, Shawnee R M Hill, Nate Hodge, and Dylan Staib. 1975ish.com. A.R.T.S. Gallery, 321 East Ave. “Picture This” Part 2. Through Nov 30. A Collection of Mix Media Paintings in a Collage Form, by local artist: Andrew Hakes, Debbie Ingerick, Joshua Lopez, and Richmond Futch Jr. 729-9916. Baobab Cultural Center, 728 University Ave. Frank Frazier and Friends. Frank Frazier, Minerva Diaz, Rory Tequan Morgan, Janice Thacker, Shenna Vaughn. thebaobab.org.; George K. Arthur Photographic exhibit. thebaobab.org. Barnes & Noble, 3349 Monroe Ave. Rochester Art Club’s Fall Art Show. Through Dec 1. 586-6020. rochesterartclub.org. Bertha V.B. Lederer Gallery, Brodie Hall, I College Dr. “Pulled Resources: Custom, An Alfred University Foundation Project.” Through Dec 7. Tue-Thu 12:303:30 p.m., Fri-Sat 1-5 p.m. 2455813. hawkins@geneseo.edu. geneseo.edu/galleries. Black Radish Studio, 274 N. Goodman. Cordell Cordaro. Through Nov 30. 413-1278. blackradishstudio.com. Books Etc., 78 W. Main St. Macedon. “End of Summer.”.

ART | SECOND STORIE INDIE MARKET/FOLK ART GUILD FESTIVAL OF CRAFTS

Celebrate local folk art this weekend by checking out two special arts and crafts sales taking place in Rochester. The Rochester Folk Art Guild will host its Annual Holiday Festival of Crafts, a three-day event designed to showcase the work of the guild’s skilled artisans and craftsmen. The guild’s work is rustic and evocative of the Finger Lakes region, with a particular emphasis this year on the earthen and autumnal styles. There will be hand-woven rugs, custom designed clothing, fine wooden furniture, as well as a selection of unique hand-crafted pottery. The festival will run Friday and Saturday, November 29-30, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. and Sunday, December 1, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. and will be held at The Harley School (1981 Clover St.). Admission is $2. For more information call 554-3539 or visit folkartguild.org. For more crafty opportunities, on Saturday, November 30, Second Storie will hold its annual Indie Market at the Visual Studies Workshop Auditorium (31 Prince St.). The event will run 10 a.m.-6 p.m. and will feature a plethora of handmade crafts from local art vendors. As an added bonus, Le Petit Poutine, Hello Arepa, and Joe Bean Coffee trucks will be on hand in case you need a food and caffeine break in between your browsing. For more information visit secondstorie.com. — BY COLIN MCCOY Through Nov 30. Work by Gretchen Schulz, D. Brent Walton and Gary Combs. 474-4116. books_etc@yahoo.org. Cary Graphic Arts Collection, Lomb Memorial Dr. “Manifold Greatness: The Creation and Afterlife of the King James Bible.” Through Dec 13. 4753961. skgtwc@rit.edu. library. rit.edu/cary. Community Darkroom Gallery, 713 Monroe Ave. “Visual Discourse” Photography by Community Darkroom Photographers.. Through Jan 10. Mon 9 a.m.-9:30 p.m., TueThu 9 a.m.-6:30 p.m., Fri noon5 p.m., Sat 10 a.m.-5:30 p.m. 271-5920. geneseearts.org. Creative Wellness Coalition Gallery, 320 N Goodman St, Suite 201. “Painting Big” Group Show. 325-3145 x144. mharochester.org. Crossroads Coffeehouse, 752 S. Goodman St. The Artwork of Bethany Williams and Allie Hartley. 244-6787. xroadscoffeehouse.com. Dichotomy Rochester, 371 Park Ave. “Dead Not Buried.” Through Nov 30. Themed works by Matte, Carolyn Ellinger, and Allie Hartley. dichotomyrochester@ gmail.com. facebook.com/ dichotomyrochester‎. A Different Path Gallery, 27 Market St. Brockport. “A Little Twisted: An Exploration of the Self.” BFA Painting Exhibit by Karen Nelson. Wed-Fri 11 a.m.-noon,

Sat-Sun noon-4 p.m. 637-5494. adifferentpathgallery.com. The Episcopal Church Home, 505 Mt Hope Ave. “Camera Rochester Holiday Show.” Through Jan 5. Daily 10 a.m.-8 p.m. 546-8400. cotton@EpiscopalSeniorLife.org. episcopalseniorlife.org. Friendly Home’s Memorial Gallery, 3165 East Ave. “A Collection of Thoughts and Dreams” by Christine Sisak and Diane Tank. Through Dec 30. Daily 10 a.m.-5 p.m. 385-0298. friendlyhome.org. Fuego Coffee Roasters, 167 Liberty Pole Way. Images From the New Nature. Drawings, paintings, and sculpture by Robert Frank Abplanalp on display at Fuego coffee roasters. 315-244-2415. thinklikeme@gmail.com. Gallery R, 100 College Ave. Jessica Lieberman: Becoming Visible. Through Nov 27. 2563312. galleryr99@gmail.com. galleryr.cias.rit.edu. Geisel Gallery, Bausch & Lomb Place, One Bausch & Lomb Place. The Tomte Series. Through Dec 12. Swedish-American acrylic paintings reflecting bold contemporary Scandinavian colors and Swedish traditions by Nils R. Caspersson. 3386617. jgeisel@frontier.com. thegeiselgallery.com. Genesee Center for the Arts and Education, 713 Monroe Ave. WinterCraft. Through Dec 21. Mon-Wed 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Thu continues on page 24 rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 23


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24 CITY NOVEMBER 27 - DECEMBER 3, 2013

ART | MORE FIRE GLASSBLOWING DEMO/SALE

More Fire Glass Studio will hold its annual holiday sale this weekend, and also provide a glimpse into the mesmerizing process of glass blowing. The sale will showcase the work of the studio’s skilled artists, and will feature everything from vases to jewelry to glass sculptures. In particular the sale will feature some of the work of studio founder and director Elizabeth Lyons, whose glasswork has been featured in several magazines and publications. There will also be demonstrations throughout the weekend, where visitors will get a chance to witness some of the work and techniques that go into creating the beautiful finished glass pieces. The event will run Friday, November 29, through Sunday, December 1, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. at More Fire Glass Studio (80 Rockwood Place). Visit morefireglass.com or call 242-0450 for more information. — BY COLIN MCCOY

Art Exhibits 10 a.m.-9:30 p.m., Fri 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Sat noon-5 p.m. 244-1730. geneseearts.org. Genesee Community College, Lima Campus, 7285 Gale Rd. “The Finger Lakes Paintings” by Gloria Betlem. Through Dec 4. Mon-Thu 9 a.m.-9 p.m., Fri 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Reception Nov 6, 7-9 p.m. 582-1226. BSMcAdoo@genesee.edu.; George Eastman House, 900 East Ave. Through Dec 17: Sweet Creations Gingerbread House Display. Through Dec 18: Tabletop Tree Display and silent auction displayed throughout house. Also holiday wreath display and auction through Dec 1. Through Jan 12: “The History of Space Photography” and “Astro-Visions.” Tue-Sat 10 a.m.5 p.m., Sun 11 a.m.-5 p.m. 2713361. eastmanhouse.org. I-Square Visions, 693 Titus Ave. Irondequoit. Third Annual Irondequoit Artists’ Exhibition. Through Dec 6. Featuring 24 artists. zannebrunner@gmail.com. International Art Acquisitions, 3300 Monroe Ave. “Bountiful Harvest.” Through Nov 30. Celebrate the fruits of your year with original tablescapes by Monteiro Prestes and Sam Paonessa. Mon-Fri 10 a.m.9 p.m., Sat 10 a.m.-6 p.m., Sun noon-5 p.m. 264-1440. internationalartacquisitions.com. Link Gallery at City Hall, 30 Church St. “Rock, Fabric, Scissors.” Through Dec 9. Featuring Nancy Valle, Jilll Gussow, and Lynne Feldman. Mon-Fri 9 a.m.-5 p.m. 2715920. cityofrochester.gov. Lockhart Gallery at SUNY Geneseo, 28 Main St. “Black: A Graphic Signifier.” Through Dec 7. Tue-Thu 12:30-3:30 p.m., Fri-Sat 1-5 p.m. 2455813. hawkins@geneseo.edu. geneseo.edu/galleries.

Lower Link Gallery, Central Library, 115 South Ave. Art of the Book. Artist Books and Altered Books. 428-8053. libraryweb.org/artofthebook. Main Street Arts, 20 W Main St., Clifton Springs. “Fabulous Fibers.” Through Dec. WedSun 11 a.m.-7 p.m. As part of the exhibition, RAFA will also host a trunk show and fashion show on Friday, December 6, 5–8 p.m. at the gallery during the Clifton Springs Festival of Lights. 315-462-0210. mstreetarts@gmail.com. mainstreetartsgallery.com. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. Lockhart Gallery through Dec 13: “Connoisseurs Around the Corner: Gifts of Art from MAG’s Founding Family.” Grand Gallery Through Dec 29: “Memory Theatre.” Wed-Sun 11 a.m.–5 p.m., Thu 11 a.m.-9 p.m. 276-8900. mag.rochester.edu. Mercer Gallery at Monroe Communtiy College, 1000 E. Henrietta Rd. Luis Alberto Decurgez Exhibit. Through Dec 14. Mon-Thu 10 a.m.-7 p.m., Fri 11 a.m.-4 p.m. 292-2021. monroecc.edu/go/mercer. Mill Art Center & Gallery, 61 N Main St. Honeoye Falls. “Art Crescendo.” Through Feb 15. Mon 11 a.m.-3 p.m., Tue 2-5 p.m., Wed 11 a.m.-5 p.m., Thu 11 a.m.-8 p.m., Fri 11 a.m.-3 p.m., Sat 11 a.m.-3 p.m. 6247740. millartcenter.com. Nazareth College Arts Center Gallery, 4245 East Ave. “Larry Merrill: Tree as Photograph.” Through Dec 8. Sun and TueThu noon-5 p.m., Fri-Sat noon8 p.m. 389-5073. artsceneter. naz.edu. New Deal Gallery, 4 Livingston County Campus. Mount Morris. Expressions of the Civil War. In recognition of the 150th Anniversary. Wed, Fri 1-4 p.m., Thu 1-7:30 p.m., Sat 11 a.m.-3 p.m. 243-6785. livingstonarts.org.

Orange Glory Café, 240 East Ave. Watson Art Show? This! Mon-Fri 11 a.m.-3 p.m. A collection of drawings, prints, & collages by Watson, a Rochester illustrator. 232-7340. Outside the Box Art Gallery, Bldg 9, The Canal Works, 1000 Turk Hill Rd. Four For Steampunk Exhibit. Through Nov 30. Featuring the ‘steampunk’ works of Ann Bavis, Ruthie Cummings, Nancy Radzik, and Nicole Rogers. Tue-Wed & Fri noon3 p.m., Thu noon-630 p.m., Sat 10 a.m.-4 p.m. 645-2485. outsidetheboxag.com. Oxford Gallery, 267 Oxford St. Annual Holiday Exhibit. Through Jan 11. 271-5885. oxfordgallery.com. Pat Rini Rohrer Gallery, 71 S Main St. Canandaigua. Holidays at the Gallery. Through Jan 6. 3940030. prrgallery.com. Rosalie “Roz” Steiner Art Gallery, Genesee Community College, One College Rd. Lee Hoag: “The Alchemy of Objects.” Through Dec 20. facebook.com/gccgallery. Ross Gallery of the Skalny Welcome Center at St John Fisher, 3690 East Ave. “Arena @ Fisher.” Through Dec 17. Mon-Fri 9 a.m.4 p.m. sjfc.edu. Rush Rhees Library, University of Rochester, River Campus. Travel Stories: 19th Century-Present. Through Dec 27. 275-4477. The Shoe Factory Art Co-op, 250 N Goodman St. Featuring artwork by local artists. Open First Fridays, 6-9 p.m. Second Saturdays, 12-4 p.m., and Wednesdays, 12-5 p.m. 7320036. shoefactoryarts.com. Spectrum Gallery, 100 College Ave. Land(Landscapes)Scapes: An Exhibition Of Photographs By Joan Lyons. Through Nov 30. Tue-Fri 9 a.m.-6 p.m., Sat 10 a.m.-2 p.m. spectrumgalleryroc.com. Starry Nites Café, 696 University Ave. Bruce Bozman: Island Color. 271-2630. shoefactoryarts@ gmail.com. starrynitescafe.com. Tap & Mallet, 381 Gregory St. Dudes Night Out Presents: Dudes on Tap. 473-0503. tapandmallet.com. University Gallery, James R Booth Hall, RIT, Lomb Memorial Dr. “Memories, Observations, Experiences, Obsessions,” Toby Thompson Memorial Exhibit. Through Dec 14. Mon-Fri 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Sat 10 a.m.-2 p.m. 475-2404. jleugs@rit.edu. University of Rochester, River Campus. Chester Carlson and 75 years of Xerography. Through Jan 1. Carlson Science and Engineering Library. 275-4461. mengel@library.rochester.edu. rochester.edu. Valley Manor, 1570 East Ave. “Drawing From Life...An Eccelctic Show.” Through Dec. 442-6450. Visual Studies Workshop, 31 Prince Street. “Of the Ordinary.” Through Dec 14. 442-8676. vsw.org. Webster Public Library, 980 Ridge Rd. Webster. The Webster Art Club Fall Art Show. Through Nov 30. 872-7075. madunmor@rochester.rr.com. Websterlibrary.org. Williams-Insalaco Gallery at FLCC, 3325 Marvin Sands Dr. Alumni Biennial Exhibition: The


For the Holidays

Art, Music, and Poetry of Rand Darrow. 785-1369. flcc.edu.

Call for Artwork [ WED., NOVEMBER 27 ] Call for Art. Ongoing. Main Street Arts, 20 W. Main St., Clifton Springs The gallery is currently seeking artists working in all media. Please include the following in your email: - 3 to 5 jpeg images of current work Artist statement - CV/Resume Kindly indicate whether you are submitting available work or work that is representative 315-4620210. mstreetarts@gmail.com. mstreetarts@gmail.com. Call for artist! Ecobazaar at Greenovation. Through Dec. 14. Rochester Greenovation, 1199 East Main St. For more information about the event and tabling please contact Paola Macas Betchart. pbetchart@ rochestergreen.org $25 table fee, register 288-7564. facebook. com/events/482069281908313. Call for Artists. Ongoing. 4614447. spectrumgalleryroc.com. Call for Artists to Interview for TV. Ongoing. Show: The Art of rctv-15 201-292-7937. team@ foreveraryes.com. Call to Artists. Through Dec. 31. The Shoe Factory Art Coop is seeking artists from the Rochester region to exhibit their work at Starry Nites Café shoefactoryarts.com. Calling All Local Artists. Ongoing. Lori’s Natural Foods, 900 Jefferson Rd Artists wanted to participate in our consignment program. Email a bit about you and your work 424-2323. stephanie@lorisnatural.com. lorisnatural.com. Go Art. Ongoing. The GeneseeOrleans Regional Arts Council is seeking artists interested in exhibiting their work in four galleries 343-9313. info@goart. org. goart.org. New York Filmmakers Quarterly. Ongoing. Films must have been produced within NYS in the past 2 years. No fee. No honorarium. Max length 30 minutes. To be screened at Little Theatre last Wednesdays and Saturdays in January, April, July, and October. Send DVD screener + cover letter with 1 sentence bio and one sentence film description to Karen vanMeenan, Programmer, New York Filmmakers Quarterly, Little Theatre, 240 East Ave., Rochester NY 14604. Notification by email within 8 weeks of receipt emergingfilmmakers@yahoo. com. Submissions now open for the third season of The PiTCH at Finger Lakes Musical Theatre Festival. Through Dec. 1. Ten projects will be selected to “pitch” over the course of the third 10-week season, running from June 19-Aug. 30, 2014 fingerlakesmtf.com.

Art Events [ WED., NOVEMBER 27 ] Maggi Bartlett: Handbound Books and Paper Creations. Through Dec. 31. The Tea Pottery, 1115 E. Main St., suite 420 door #2. Through Dec 31. Reception Nov 1, 6 p.m 469-8217. tpotter51@ hotmail.com. [ FRI., NOVEMBER 29 ] Artist Open House and Holiday Sale. Nov. 29-Dec. 1. Flying

• Beautiful Centerpieces • Ornaments Galore • Unusual Gifts

• Exceptional Service

COMEDY | MUCCC BENEFIT

We’re in that time of year where cold medicine is flying off the shelves, but don’t forget about another important medicine: laughter. There will be a chance for plenty of it this Saturday, November 30, at MuCCC (142 Atlantic Ave.) during the 2nd Annual A Benefit Show for MuCCC’s Benefit, Benefiting MuCCC. The show features an ensemble cast in a witty revue, with a mix of short funnies and theater classics. While there aren’t many specifics known about the performances, MuCCC’s website guarantees you’ll laugh, and also warns that tears of joy are a real possibility. What more do you need? Reception and silent auction and raffles start at 7 p.m., with the show starting at 8 p.m. Tickets cost $10-$15. Visit muccc.org or call 244-0960. — BY TREVOR LEWIS Whale Studios, 143 William St. Fri 5-8 p.m., Sat 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Sun 11 a.m.-4 p.m 315-719-1499. flyingwhale@rochester.rr.com. FlyingWhaleStudios.com. Folk Art Guild Holiday Festival of Crafts. Nov. 29-Dec. 1. The Harley School, 1981 Clover St Fri-Sat 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Sun 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Admission is $2, or free with an invitation available to print out at website. Plenty of free parking 442-1770. folkartguild.org. More Fire Glass Studio Annual Holiday Sale. Nov. 29-Dec. 1, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. More Fire Glass Studio, 80 Rockwood Place Sale and glass blowing demonstrations Free 242-0450. morefireglass.com. [ SAT., NOVEMBER 30 ] Irondequoit Art Club’s Holiday Art & Craft Sale 2013. Nov. 30-Dec. 7. Irondequoit Public Library, Evans Branch, 45 Cooper Rd Sat No 30, 10 a.m.-4:45 p.m. (opening party), Mon Dec 2-Thu Dec 6, 10 a.m.-8:45 p.m., Sat Dec 7, 10 a.m.-4 p.m Free admission 787-4086. bshrestha@rochester.rr.com. irondequoitartclub.org. Second Storie Market. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Visual Studies Workshop, 31 Prince Street Free Event. 4428676. secondstorie@gmail.com. secondstorie.com. Winter Wonderland Christmas Arts & Crafts Show. Nov. 30Dec. 1. Clarion hotel and Indoor Waterpark, 8250 Park Rd., Batavia. Sat 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Sun 10 a.m.-4 p.m 317-4046. akentertainny@aol.com.

Comedy [ FRI., NOVEMBER 29 ] Bob DiBuono. Nov. 29-30. Comedy Club, 2235 Empire Blvd Webster Fri-Sat 7:30 & 10 p.m $9-$12 671-9080. thecomedyclub.us.

[ SAT., NOVEMBER 30 ] Second Annual, A Benefit Show for MuCCC’s Benefit, Benefitting MuCCC. 8 p.m. MuCCC, 142 Atlantic Ave Doors open at 7pm for reception and silent auctions/raffles. Cash bar $10-$15, $15 per couple in advance muccc.org.

360 Culver Road | 271-0610 Mon.-Fri. 9-6, Sat. 9-5, Sun. 11-3

THE 20TH ANNUAL

PA R K AV E N U E

HOLIDAY OPEN HOUSE Thursday, December 5 5:00pm–9:00pm

Stroll beautiful Park Avenue and enjoy the cheerful sight of twinkling lights and "open house” hospitality at more than 80 Park Avenue businesses including special discounts, free samples, complimentary refreshments, prize drawings, and more.

Dance Events [ WED., NOVEMBER 27 ] Lindy Jam: Weekly Swing Dance. 8:45 p.m. Tango Cafe Dance Studio (3rd Floor Ballroom), 389 Gregory St., Rochester, NY Lindy Jam is a weekly swing dance on Wednesday nights, 8:45-11pm, hosted by Groove Juice Swing. Friendly atmosphere. Beautiful ballroom. Free beginner dance lesson at 9pm. No partner or experience necessary. Admission is free if it’s your first time!. $4 (or free if it’s your first time!). 2714930. lindyjam.com. [ THU., NOVEMBER 28 ] Dance Lab East. 10 p.m. Skylark Lounge, 40 South Union St 80s new wave music for the future (on vinyl) and visual effects 99 cents. 270-8106. theskylarklounge.com. [ FRI., NOVEMBER 29 ] “The Nutcracker” with the Rochester Philharmonic Orchestra. Nov. 29-Dec. 1, 2 & 7 p.m. Kodak Hall at Eastman Theater, 60 Gibbs St $10-$75. 454-2100. rpo.org. Thanksgiving Dance Weekend. 7:30 p.m. Country Dancers of Rochester, 1124 Culver Rd. Get ready for this year’s Thanksgiving Dance Festival. This weekend event will feature live music from Maivish and Tunescape along with professional calling by Adina Gordon and Katy Heine. Grab your friends and family member for some heart thundering contra dances, elegant English country continues on page 26

OPENING CEREMONY

5 : 0 0 p m - Pa r k Av e n u e G r e e n | B a r r i n g t o n S t. • Lighting of a tree and Menorah • RIT’s Eight Beat Measure will perform prior to the arrival of Santa Claus by horse drawn wagon to light the tree with Mayor Thomas Richards • A Presentation will be made to the Congregation Light of Israel in memory of Gavi Springut with a holiday donation from Park Avenue Merchants and Residence Associations. & MORE EVENTS THROUGHOUT THE NIGHT! • Visit with Santa – 600 Park Avenue • Come see the exciting GlowCity light display and pick up your complimentary glow stick or glow necklaces from PAMA and candy cane from Stever's Candies • $2.00 photos with Santa to Benefit Rochester City School Without Walls - Media Arts Club • Exciting entertainment groups • Horse-Drawn Wagon Rides – various boarding points along Park Avenue • Hot Roasted Chestnuts • Ice Sculpture Demonstration • See Costume Characters from Characters for Kids • See local sport team mascots

SPECIAL THANKS TO OUR SPONSORS

Cheshire Audio Visual, Inc., CMI Communications, GlowCity, Pepsi Cola Bottling Corporation, WDVI -100.5 The Drive and WVOR – 102.3 Sunny P A R K AV E N U E M E R C H A N T SPONSORS F O R WA G O N S

O U R A P P R E C I AT I O N T O O U R A D D I T I O N A L PA RT N E R S

Park Avenue Pub & Restaurant, Jines Restaurant, Park Ave Salon & Day Spa, Magnolia’s Deli & Café, Stever’s Candies, Inc., and Northfield Designer Goldsmiths

City Newspaper, City of Rochester, k2 Communications, Walker Media Services, The Rochester Group and Mountain Ash Tree Farms.

AND THANKS ARE EXTENDED TO All the Park Avenue Merchant Association members who contributed certificates and products. A s p e c i a l t h a n k y o u to The Rochester Group for their support.

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 25


Theater

Campus Wilson Commons 5039224. rochester.edu.

DANCE | “THE NUTCRACKER”

A Rochester holiday tradition returns as the Rochester Philharmonic Orchestra, Rochester City Ballet, and the Bach Children’s Chorus come together to produce “The Nutcracker” this weekend.

Colleen Moore as Sister in “Sister Strikes Again! Late Nite Catechism 2.”

PHOTO COURTESY GEVA

THEATRE CENTER

Comedy in good faith “Sister Strikes Again! Late Nite Catechism 2” THROUGH DECEMBER 15 GEVA THEATRE NEXTSTAGE, 75 WOODBURY BLVD. TICKETS START AT $38 232-4382, GEVATHEATRE.ORG [ REVIEW ] BY DAVID RAYMOND

The character of the funny nun has been around at least since Chaucer, and is here to stay as a staple of pop culture. You’ve seen her in “The Sound of Music,” “The Flying Nun,” numerous variations on “Nunsense”, etc., etc. My own upbringing was about as unRoman Catholic as can be imagined, so I can’t honestly share in nostalgia for schools where nuns ruled and patent-leather shows reflected up. But if you see your past through RC-tinted glasses, or just find ladies in habits amusing, you are definitely in the target audience for “Sister Strikes Again! Late Nite Catechism 2”, which opened in mid-November on Geva’s Nextstage and will run until we see white smoke from the Vatican… I mean, through December 15. This play — a jokey jogtrot through some details of the Roman Catholic catechism, led by a character known simply as “Sister” — is the second in a successful franchise of shows written by Maripat Donovan, who has also performed in the shows. Geva’s “Late Nite Catechism 2” performance features Colleen Moore as Sister; she also played the role in last year’s production of “Sister’s Christmas Catechism.” (There are quite a few of these “Catechism” shows out there, judging from

the program; I hope “Late Nite Catechism Las Vegas” makes its way here eventually. ) Moore makes a delightful old-school nun, as she cheerfully instructs “publics” (the publicschool educated, as opposed to the “parochials”) in the intricacies of the Faith. This catechism class apparently takes place in the present day —a photograph of a smiling President Obama decorates the bulletin board. The accessories on stage, however, are from the 1950’s or 60’s, including one of those green friezes above the blackboard with dotted white lines and examples of cursive letters, and a laughably gauche color filmstrip and projector. (Audience participation is the backbone of this show, so if you are not careful, Sister may ask you to provide the “beep” before each change of picture.) The effect is not satire, but respectful kidding. To be honest, I wouldn’t really call “Late Nite Catechism 2” a play; it’s more an extended stand-up act. As such, even this “public” has to admit it is pretty entertaining and very skillfully performed. (And pretty short: 90 minutes, including an intermission.) Colleen Moore does her nun thing with a skill that easily masks how difficult it can be to individually engage with audience members, and which keeps this show afloat. There were quite a few “parochials” in the audience at the performance I attended, which made her job easier, I’m sure. As played by Moore, Sister has an infectious smile and a friendly air; you will not be encountering Christopher Durang’s ferocious Sister Mary Ignatius at Geva. The more depraved among us might wish that we were, but I must also admit it is hard to be too critical of a play that offers you a copy of the Ten Commandments to take home with you.

26 CITY NOVEMBER 27 - DECEMBER 3, 2013

If you and your family have yet to experience this classic tale, this is the year to go. Seriously, go order tickets right now. Every Rochesterian needs to see this show at least once. If you have seen it before, there will still be some freshness for you, as RCB artistic director Jamey Leverett has added new choreography to certain scenes. There will also be a fresh crop of local children in the show dancing as snowflakes, mice, and other characters. Performances of the RPO/RCB/BCC collaboration run from Friday, November 29, through Sunday, December 1, at Kodak Hall at Eastman Theatre (60 Gibbs St.). Shows take place at 2 p.m. and 7 p.m. each day. Tickets range from $10 to $92. Visit rpo.org or rochestercityballet.org, or call 454-2100 for more information. — BY TREVOR LEWIS

Dance Events dances, and couples dances in between Full weekend $55, student w/ ID $45. See website for more pricing options (315) 521-1440. thanksgiving@ cdrochester.org. cdrochester.org. [ SAT., NOVEMBER 30 ] Ukrainian American Sports Club Dinner Dance. 5-11 p.m. St. Mary’s Ukranian Orthodox Church Hall, 3176 St. Paul Blvd., Irondequoit. Music will be provided by Classic Melodies for international music and the Brick Band for classic rock and country music $20-$25, dance only $5 748-4202. West African Drumming and Dance Classes with Fana Bangoura. Drumming: Saturdays, 10:30 a.m.-noon at the Baobab (728 University Ave.). Dance: Sundays, from 2-3:30 .p.m at DancEncounters (215 Tremont St.) $10-$15. 503-679-3372. kerfala. bangoura@gmail.com. mounafanyi.org. [ SUN., DECEMBER 1 ] English Country Dancing. 6:30 p.m. First Baptist Church of Rochester, 175 Allens Creek Rd English Country Dancing, live music, called dances. $7-$8, under 17 free with adult. 2442468. fbcrochester.net. Fandango at the Tango. 7 p.m. Tango Cafe, 389 Gregory St. 2714930. tangocafedance.com. [ TUE., DECEMBER 3 ] Garth Fagan Dance. Dec. 3-8. Nazareth College Arts Center, 4245 East Ave Tue 7:30 p.m., Wed-Fri 8 p.m., Sat 2 & 8 p.m., Sun 2 & 7:30 p.m $40-$55 3892170. artscenter.naz.edu.

[ WED., DECEMBER 4 ] Dime-a-Dance. Dec. 4-5, 7:30 p.m. Rose L. Strasser Studio, Hartwell Hall, SUNY Brockport, 180 Holley St., Brockport Donations welcom. brockport. edu/finearts.

Festivals [ WED., NOVEMBER 27 ] Gala Community-Wide Lighting Ceremony at Downtown Menorah. 5:30 p.m. Washington Square Park, S. Clinton Avenue at Washington Square. Chanukah party following at Bausch & Lomb Wintergarden 271-0330. chabadrochester.com. [ SAT., NOVEMBER 30 ] 2nd Annual Beauty at its Best Winter-Fest. 9 a.m.-6 p.m. Snips Hair Care Plus, 1945 East Ridge Rd. Arts, crafts, Santa, baked goods, live DJ, holiday photo shoot 544-8082. Christmas with Santa. Springdale Farm, 700 Colby St. Breakfast seatings at 9, 10, 11 a.m. and noon. Guests may enjoy a pancake and sausage breakfast, a visit with Santa and Mrs. Claus, children’s crafts, a petting zoo, a nativity scene, and more. Children under age 2 are free but must sit on a parent’s lap $8, register springdalefarm.org. [ TUE., DECEMBER 3 ] Candlelight Night Celebration. 4-9 p.m. Village of Pittsford. Tree lighting 5:30 p.m. in Schoen Place, at 6:15 at Four Courners, and 7 p.m. in Northfield Commons 381-7640. villageofpittsford.org. Menorah Lighting. 6:30 p.m. University of Rochester, River

[ WED., DECEMBER 4 ] Hanukah Party. Dec. 4. Temple Beth El, 139 S Winton Rd Creative types can make their own menorah with supplies of their choice, from lollipops to Legos, to enter into Temple Beth El’s Menorah Mania contest. Menorah Mania contestants can bring their creations to the party and enter to win prizes. Once the final candle on the menorah at 139 Winton Road South is lit at 6 pm on Wednesday, the community is invited to enjoy live music and sing-a-longs, a dinner of brisket and latkes, cookie decorating and the gallery of menorahs. Children will have the chance to partake in a PJ Library-sponsored story and song at 5:30, plus crafts, building and dreidel games after dinner Register 473-1770. tberochester.org.

Kids Events [ WED., NOVEMBER 27 ] Storytime with Mike. Barnes & Noble, 330 Greece Ridge Center Dr. 9:30 & 10:30 a.m Free. 227-4020. bn.com. [ FRI., NOVEMBER 29 ] Storytelling with Mike. 10:30 a.m. Barnes & Noble, 330 Greece Ridge Center Dr. Free. 227-4020. bn.com. [ SAT., NOVEMBER 30 ] Practice ACT. 10 a.m. Brighton Memorial Library, 2300 Elmwood Ave. Open to students in grades 9-12 784-5300. brightonlibrary.org. Recreation Center Special Programming. Nov. 30. The Avenue D Recreation Center, 200 Avenue D., will host a field trip to Rochester Museum and Science Center. Please pre-register by Wednesday at 5 p.m. by calling 428-7934 Bus transportation will depart from the center at 1 p.m. and return at 3 p.m. The Flint Street Recreation Center, 271 Flint St. will host a free family roller skating party from 1 to 3 p.m. The Ryan Community Center, 530 Webster Ave., will host free family roller skating party from 3 to 5 p.m. The Adams Street Pool, 85 Adams St., will host the inaugural Splash Bash Thankswimming Celebration, an aquatic reenactment of the traditional story of the first Thanksgiving, followed by a free family swim with snacks and beverages. Activities run from 1 to 3 p.m. Please preregister by 5 p.m. Wednesday at 5 p.m. by calling 428-7456 cityofrochester.gov. Santa Train Rides. 1:30 & 3:30 p.m. Village of Victor. Be sure to bring your camera for a picture with Santa and Mrs. Claus, who will be along for the ride. Lapsitters (2 years of age and younger) no ticket required $17 742-8037. friendsoftherailroad@gmail.com. friendsoftherailroad.org. Story Time with the Sewards. 1 p.m. The Seward House Museum, 33 South St., Auburn. A special program for schoolaged children and their families Free, RSVP. 315-252-1283. sewardhouse.org/. [ TUE., DECEMBER 3 ] WDKX Warm Up Parties. 4 p.m. South Avenue Center, 999 South Ave. Event at 5 p.m. Ages 6-10, accompanied by a parent/


guardian. The longer you dance, shake, step, the better your chance to win beahealthyhero.org.

Lectures [ SUN., DECEMBER 1 ] What’s Up: Michael Lasser on “Popular Songs of 1913 and the Changing Role of Women as Seen Through Songs.” 2 p.m. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. Included in gallery admission: $5-$12 2768900. mag.rochester.edu. [ MON., DECEMBER 2 ] Holiday Decorating from Nature. 7 p.m. Penfield Public Library, 1985 Baird Rd. From wreaths, garlands and table arrangements, to outdoor landscape decorations, we will discuss easy and inexpensive ways to create beautiful displays Free, register 340-8720. penfieldlibrary.org. [ TUE., DECEMBER 3 ] Aaron Belkin on the Militarization of American Culture. 10-11 a.m. Rush Rhees Library, University of Rochester, River Campus facebook.com/ events/177380299124065/.

Exploring the Celtic Mysteries. 7 p.m. Rochester Brainery, Village Gate, 274 N Goodman St. $15 730-7034. info@ rochesterbrainery.com. rochesterbrainery.com. Kodak Contributions to Space Photography. 6 p.m. George Eastman House, 900 East Ave. With Brad Paxton $3-$6 2713361. eastmanhouse.org. “Letters I Couldn’t Print” Luncheon with Edith Lank. noon. Gate House, Village Gate, 274 N. Goodman St $22-$25 7213221. mharris1@rochester. rr.com. [ WED., DECEMBER 4 ] Skalny Lecture: Michal Galas. 7:30 p.m. University of Rochester, River Campus Lecture on “Progressive Synagogues in Poland as Centers of Patriotic Teaching” At Sloan Auditorium in Goergen Hall Free. 275-9898. rochester. edu/skalny. Symposium: 3D Digital Archaeology: Reconstruction, Analysis, and Conservation of Cultural Heritage.. 12-6 p.m. University of Rochester, River Campus University of

Rochester, Eisenberg Rotunda of Schlegel Hall. Lunch is included Free, register rlp@me.rochester. edu. rochester.edu/college/ aths/3D-digital-archaeology.

Literary Events [ WED., NOVEMBER 27 ] Read with Seymour: “Nothing Daunted” by Dorothy Wickenden. 11 p.m. Seymour Library, 161 East Ave., Brockport Free. 6371050. seymourlibraryweb.org. [ THU., NOVEMBER 28 ] Pure Kona Open Mic Poetry Series. 7-10 p.m. The Greenhouse Café, 2271 E. Main St. 270-8603. ourcoffeeconnection.org. [ MON., DECEMBER 2 ] Game of Thrones: The Graphic Novel. 7 p.m. Writers and Books, 740 University Ave Game of Thrones discussion $3-$5 4732590. wab.org. [ TUE., DECEMBER 3 ] Book Signing: “Wine and Culture: Vineyard to Glass” with Robert Ulin. 5-9 p.m. Pittsford Wine and Spirits, 3 Schoen Place, Pittsford Free rit.edu/news.

Lift Bridge Writers’ Group. 6:30 p.m. Lift Bridge Book Shop, 45 Main St Free. 637-2260. liftbridgebooks.com. R-SPEC meeting. First Tuesday of every month, 7 p.m. Writers of speculative fiction meet once a month to discuss craft Free. r-spec.org. [ WED., DECEMBER 4 ] The Writer’s Voice: Russell Banks. 7:30 p.m. Temple B’rith Kodesh, 2131 Elmwood Ave. Free 3952451. brockport.edu/wforum.

Museum Exhibit [ WED., NOVEMBER 27 ] Alien Worlds and Androids Exhibition. Through Dec. 22, 9 a.m. Rochester Museum and Science Center, 657 East Ave. Through Dec 22 $11-$13. 2711880. rmsc.org. Little Builders. Through Jan. 5, 2014. The Strong National Museum of Play, 1 Manhattan Square Through Jan 5. Mon-Thu 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Fri-Sat 10 a.m.-8 p.m., Sun noon-5 p.m. Closed Nov 28 and Dec 25 $13, free to members and kids under 2 2632700. museumofplay.org.

Recreation [ WED., NOVEMBER 27 ] Ice Skating. Through March 31, 2014. Genesee Valley Sports Comeplex, 131 Elmwood Ave. The rink season will run through March 2014 (closing date TBA). Open skate schedule: Sun 2:30-3:45 p.m., Mon-Fri noon-1:15 p.m., Fri (16+) 1011:15 p.m., Sat 5-6:15 p.m. Adult skate Tue-Thu 10:3011:45 a.m $2-$7.50 428-7889. cityofrochester.gov/gvpsc/. Indoor Rowing. Pittsford Indoor Rowing Center, 2800 Clover Street, Pittsford. Through Dec 16. Mondays & Wednesday, 5:45-7:15 p.m. Saturdays, 9:4511:15 a.m. All Levels: Learn to Row, Intermediate Row and Competitive Row $90-$250 for 6 weeks geneseewaterways.org. [ THU., NOVEMBER 28 ] GVHC Hike. 8:30 a.m. Mendon Ponds Park, Douglas Road . Mendon Sterenuous 5+ mile hike, Mendon Ponds east Esker trail Free 750-8937. gvhchikes. org. Thanksgiving Community Yoga. 7 a.m Sanford Street Yoga, 237

Sanford St., Side Entrance, II Floor. Special Thanksgiving Community Yoga is offered at a symbolical fee of $5 for all including families and children. The classes take place Thursday, Friday, Saturday and Sunday. Yoga begins on the hour from 7 a.m. Last class begins at 4 p.m $5. 461-8336. studioartcorporation@hotmail. com. [ FRI., NOVEMBER 29 ] GVHC Hike. 10 a.m. Meet in Irondequoit Town Hall rear lot, Titus Blvd. Moderate/hilly 6 mile hike, Durand west side Free 475-0923. gvhchikes.org. [ SAT., NOVEMBER 30 ] GVHC Hike. 10 a.m. Tryon Park, Tryon Park Rd. Strenuous/hilly 5 mile hike Free 489-3764. gvhchikes.org. Owl Prowl. 7 p.m. Sterling Nature Center, 15380 Jenzvold Rd The program will start with a discussion inside, followed by a night hike in search of owls Free 315-947-6143. snc@ co.cayuga.ny.us. facebook. com/sterlingnaturecenter. continues on page 27

Festival of Trees At the

Granger Homestead 295 N. Main St. Canandaigua, NY 585-394-1472

Nov. 8th - Dec. 8th Mon, Wed, Sun: 1-5pm Thurs & Fri: 1-7pm Saturdays & Nov. 29th: 11am-5pm Closed Thanksgiving Day

Silent Auction of Trees, Wreaths, Jewelry & Seasonal Decorations, Gift Shop Adults: $5, Seniors & Members: $4, $1 Students K-12, under age 5 no charge www.grangerhomestead.org

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 27


SPECIAL EVENT | ROC BEARD BOUNTY

A wise man once said “with great beard comes great responsibility.” OK, so a wise man never really said that, but there’s still a lot of truth to it. For example, if you possess a great beard, it’s your responsibility to compete in the ROC Beard Bounty at Lovin’ Cup (300 Park Point Dr.) on Tuesday, December 3. The Beard Bounty has numerous categories for people with beards of all shapes and sizes. Seriously, there’s even a pencil-thin mustache category. And there are chances for women with fake beards and mustaches to compete as well. Even if you don’t have awesome facial hair, come to cheer on the people who do. Doors open at 5:30 p.m., and the competition begins at 6:15 p.m. A $15 donation is required to compete, and a $5 donation is suggested if you’re there to observe, with all donations going to the American Cancer Society and Roswell Park Cancer Institute. Visit rocbeardbounty.org for more info. — BY TREVOR LEWIS

Recreation Saturday Snowshoeing. 1-3 p.m. Helmer Nature Center, 154 Pinegrove Ave $3-$5, first time member use free 336-3035. westirondequoit.org/helmernc. [ SUN., DECEMBER 1 ] GVHC Hike. 10 a.m. Ellison Park, Blossom Rd. Moderate 4-5 mile hike Free 544-3387. gvhchikes.com. Niagara River Birding Trip. 7 a.m. The Rochester Birding Association teams up with the Buffalo Ornithological Society to look for special gulls and waterfowl. Can you pick out the rarities? Meet in Charlotte parking lot at 7 a.m. or at Old Fort Niagara parking lot at 9 a.m. Bring passport, beverages, and snacks. Dress warmly. Free 671-5690. ddallen3@yahoo. com. rochesterbirding.com. Old Growth Forest Visit: Bishop Woods and Dark Woods. 10 a.m. Letchworth State Park, 1 Letchworth State Park . Castile Bring lunch, meet at Visitor Center for car pool $8 parking fee 493-3625.

Special Events [ WED., NOVEMBER 27 ] Bringing Conscious Back. 5:30 p.m. Phillis Wheatley Public Library, 33 Dr. Samuel McCree Way Screening of “110 Morningside” a documentary that promotes unity in the community for today’s youth by using spoken word and music. Featuring Last Poet Abiodun Oyewole, legendary Godfather of hip hop. Director, Nicholle La Vann will have Q&A after the film to promote

dialogue. Performances by Rochester’s own musical artists Shana King and Matthew Corey. Light Refreshements will be served Free 428-8212. filmstressfilmz@gmail.com. Festival of Trees. Through Dec. 8. Granger Homestead, 295 North Main St. Silent auction through Dec 8 394-1472. grangerhomestead.org. Geeks Who Drink Pub Quiz. 8 p.m. Scotland Yard Pub, 187 Saint Paul St Free. 730-5030. scotlandyardpub.com. Hannukah Menorah Lighting. 4:30 p.m. City Hall, 30 Church St. Mayor Thomas S. Richards will join Rabbi Yitzi Hein to light a Hannukah menorah at City Hall cityofrochester.gov. [ THU., NOVEMBER 28 ] Lincoln Tours. 1 & 3 p.m. Seward House Historic Museum, 33 South St., Auburn. 315-2521283. sewardhouse.org. Max at the Gallery Tapas Night. 5-8 p.m. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. Live music, wine, beer, tapas for purchase Included in admission: $2.50$6. 276-8900. mag.rochester. edu. Stammtisch. Every other Thursday, 5:30 p.m. Roc Brewing Co., 56 S. Union St 794-9798. rocbrewingco@gmail.com. rocbrewingco.com. Thanksgiving Wedge Waddle. 10 a.m. Star Alley Park, 662 South Ave First Annual community event: a 3 mile walk/waddle/ run through the South Wedge. Registration starts at 9:30 a.m. Prizes for the best costumes (pet or human). Dogs, strollers, wagons, and all are welcome Free. yoga36@gmail.com. baswa.org.

28 CITY NOVEMBER 27 - DECEMBER 3, 2013

[ FRI., NOVEMBER 29 ] 2013 Holiday Spectacle of Lights. Nov. 29-30, 5-9 p.m. Camp Eastman, 1558 Lakeshore Blvd Irondequoit Benefits the Golisano Children’s Hospital. Holiday light displays, entertainment and activities $10 per car 336-6085. parksandrec@irondequoit.org. irondequoit.org. The Dollop Book of Frosting cookbook signing with Heather Saffer, winner of Food Network’s Cupcake Wars. 10:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Barnes & Noble, 3349 Monroe Ave. Free 586-6020. JillBrowningPR@gmail.com. Flying Whale Studios & Friends Artist Open House & Holiday Sale. Nov. 29-Dec. 1. Flying Whale Studios, 143 William St. Fri 5 p.m., Sat 9 a.m., Sun 11 a.m Free. 315-719-1499. flyingwhale@rochester.rr.com. Holiday Laser. 11 a.m. & 4:30 p.m. Rochester Museum and Science Center, 657 East Ave. $6-$7 271-1880. rmsc.org. Theatre of Dreams: A Holiday GIFT Market in the City. Nov. 29-Dec. 8. Blackfriars Theatre, 795 E. Main St Through December 8. Store hours are every day from 2-8 p.m. To benefit Blackfriars Theatre. MasterCard, Visa, and Discover are accepted at the event at no additional charge $5 admission 454-1260. blackfriars.org. Third Annual Scooby-Doo Movie Marathon. 10:30 a.m. Brighton Memorial Library, 2300 Elmwood Ave. Free 784-5300. brightonlibrary.org. The White Haven Tree of Remembrance. Nov. 29-Jan. 12, 10 a.m. White Haven Memorial Park, 210 Marsh Rd. Place an ornament on the Tree of Remembrance. Be sure to remove ornament no later than Sunday, January 12 Free 586-5250. whitehavenmemorialpark.com. [ SAT., NOVEMBER 30 ] 70s Laser/The Beatles in Laser. Rochester Museum and Science Center, 657 East Ave. 70s laser at 8 p.m., Beatles laser at 9:30 p.m $6-$7 271-1880. rmsc.org. Breakfast with St. Nick. 9:30 a.m. Genesee Country Village & Museum, 1410 Flint Hill Rd Mumford $12, RSVP 538-6822. gcv.org. East Side Winter Farmer’s Market. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Indoors at 2555 Baird Rd., Penfield. Dec 1, 10 a.m. Soap-making basics (rsvp). Dec 15 Breakfast with Santa, 9-11:30 a.m. ($7-$12) eastside. activities@rochester.rr.com. Electronic Recycling Event to Benefit Needy in Rochester. Last Saturday of every month, 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Electronics can be dropped off behind Annunciation Church, 1754 Norton Street (use Clark Avenue entrance), on the last Saturday of each month, and Thursday mornings by appointment. pschaad@ rochester.rr.com. 338-2330. Hatucation. 6 p.m. The German House Theater, 315 Gregory St. Get educated on hats $25. 4426880. upallnightpresents.com. Preparing for the Holidays the 19th-Century Way. 10 a.m. Genesee Country Village & Museum, 1410 Flint Hill Rd Mumford Share in this age-old experience $6.50-$8.50 5386822. gcv.org. Red Cross Craft Show. 9:30 a.m. NYS Armory Geneseo, 34

Avon Rd. The show benefits the American Red Cross Services to the Armed Forces Program and will feature 85 local crafters $2$5 243-7595. redcross.org/ny/ dansville. Roc The Arts. noon. ROC City Wellness, 1598 Penfield Rd. A sale that will offer unique gifts from local crafters Free admission (585) 210-2412. stephanie@penfieldmassage. com. roccitywellness.com. Shortsville Railroad Station Museum Holiday Open House. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Lehigh Valley Railroad Historical Society Station Museum, 8 E. High St Santa Claus will be on hand to visit with children. Balloon artists will provide entertainment. The station museum will be decorated for the holidays and will have operating model train displays. Snacks, beverages, and gift items will be sold at the station Free admission, donations welcome 289-9149. lvrrhs.org. Small Business Saturday. 9 a.m.-3 p.m. In the Public Market Neighborhood, near Rohrbach Brewery, 97 Railroad St. Rohrbach Brewing Co., Type High Letterpress, Black Button Distillery, Smugtown Mushrooms. Shop Small!. rohrbachs.com 10 a.m. The Lower Mill, 61 N. Main St. Serving lunch from 11:30 a.m.-2 p.m Free 582-1830. thelowermill.com. [ SUN., DECEMBER 1 ] 2nd Annual Holiday Shopping Party. 1-4 p.m. Veritas Wine Bar, 217 Alexander St. We’ve got ceramics, posters, jewelry, beautiful handcrafted cutting boards, and more. Enjoy great drink specials while you shop and cookies from Baker Street Bakery Free admission 2622336. amy@veritaswinebar. com. veritaswinebar.com. Brighton Winter Farmers’ Market. 1 p.m Brookside Community Center, 220 Idlewood Rd. Indoor farmers market featuring a wide variety of locally-grown fruits, vegetables, dairy, meat, eggs, honey, maple syrup, baked goods, jams, much more. Live music 269-8918. info@ brightonfarmersmarket.org. brightonfarmersmarket.org. The Can-Orah Event. 3 p.m. Pittsford Community Library, 24 State St Pittsford Menorah constructed of canned foods to be donated to local food banks, followed by Pittsford Menorah Lighting ceremony at village four corners 286-6147. jewishpittsford.com. Healing Holiday Retreat. 11 a.m.4 p.m. Select therapists to offer Swedish massage, aromatherapy, Reiki, foot reflexology and medical intuition. The Reiki Healing Center, 1939 Bennett Rd., Victor Register 545-8252. Holidays at the Market. 9 a.m.-3 p.m Rochester Public Market, 280 N. Union St. 428-6907. Holly Trolly Rides. New York Museum of Transportation, 6393 E. River Rd $4-$5. 533-1113. nymtmuseum.org. Penfield Farmers’ Market. 9 a.m.1 p.m. Grossmans Garden & Home, 1801 Fairport Nine Mile Point Rd . Penfield 377-1982 x224. grossmans.com. Russian Conversation Hour. 1 p.m. Colie’s Cafe, 657 Park Ave. Meet for an informal Russian conversation for all levels from

THEATER | “JACKIE”

Fifty years ago, one of the most tragic and scrutinized events in our country’s history occurred when President John F. Kennedy was assassinated while riding in a motorcade through Dallas. While there are many accounts of what happened, from many different people, none may be as important as the point of view of Kennedy’s wife, Jacqueline, who was riding beside him when he was shot. Her recollections have been turned into a one-woman play titled “Jackie,” which will be running this weekend at two different venues. InFusion Action Theatre will present local actress Nancy Fancher in Nobel Prize-winning author Elfriede Jelinek’s “Jackie,” directed by Darryll D. Rudy. See the show Friday, November 29, at MuCCC (142 Atlantic Ave.) at 7:30 p.m., or Sunday, December 1, 1 p.m. at the Little Theatre Café (240 East Ave.) Tickets cost $20 for each show. Go to muccc.org and thelittle.org for more info. — BY TREVOR LEWIS beginners to native speakers Free. 330-389-4983. facebook. com/coliescafe. Winter 2013 Village Gate Toy Show and Collectibles Sale. 10 a.m. Village Gate Square, 274 N. Goodman St. More than 100 tables of antique and collectible toys will be exhibited throughout the one day event Free 442-9061. villagegatesquare.com. [ MON., DECEMBER 2 ] Thinkin’ & Drinkin’: The Bug Jar’s Trivia Night. First Monday of every month, 8-9 p.m. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 21+. Prizes: $20 / $10 / $5 bar tabs for the first, second, and third place teams. Doors at 7:30 p.m Free. bugjar.com. [ TUE., DECEMBER 3 ] Digital Rochester Festivus. 5:30 p.m. Rochester Museum and Science Center, 657 East Ave. $5, free to members digitalrochester.com. Economic Growth Series Event: Vision ~ Future Luncheon with the County Executive and Rochester’s Mayor. 11:45 a.m. Rochester Riverside Convention Center, 123 E Main St A joint RDDC & Rochester Rotary Event $45-$50 546-6920. rddc.org. Holiday Garage Sale. Dec. 3-4, 8 a.m.-4 p.m. Nazareth College, 4245 East Ave. Victorian art & frames, landscape paintings, jewelry, telescopes, cut crystal, purses, scarves, vintage cook books, items from around the world, and much more. Proceeds benefit Naz Center for International Education Free admission 482-0375. phans2@ naz.edu. Roc Beard Bounty Competition. 5:30 p.m. Lovin’ Cup, 300

Park Point Dr. Raise funds for American Cancer Society 2929940. rocbeardbounty.org. Tuesday Taco Trivia. 9-11 p.m. Temple Bar and Grille, 109 East Ave. 232-6000. templebarrochester@gmail.com. templebarandgrille.com. [ WED., DECEMBER 4 ] Holiday Gathering at the Lamberton Conservatory. 5:30-7:30 p.m. 180 Reservoir Ave. Sponsored by the Highland Park Conservancy and the Monroe county Parks Department. Lights, refreshments, music and conversation 753-7270. Men of the Strip. 8 p.m. Zeppa Auditorium, German House, 315 Gregory St. $20-$40 563-6241. menofthestrip.com.

Theater “A Christmas Carol.” Through Dec. 28. Geva Theatre Center, 75 Woodbury Blvd. Through December 28. Previews Wed Nov 27 & Fri Nov 29, 7:30 p.m., Sat 2 & 7:30 p.m., Sun 2 p.m. (open captioned performance) & 7 p.m., Tue 7 p.m. Opening night Wed Dec 4, 7 p.m Tickets start at $25 232-4382. gevatheatre.org. “Good Rockin’ Live: A Salute to Sun Records.” Downstairs Cabaret at Winton Place, 3450 Winton Place Fri-Sat 4 & 8 p.m., Sun 3 p.m., Tue 7:30 p.m. performance SOLD OUT $23-$33 325-4370. downstairscabaret.com. A Holiday of Song, Dance & Comedy: Traveling Cabaret. Gates Town Hall, 1605 Buffalo Rd $1 donation 247-6100 x236. Hornets’ Nest Playreading Series: “Gidion’s Knot.” Geva Theatre Center, 75 Woodbury Blvd Dec 2, 7 p.m Free, register 232-4382. gevatheatre.org.


“Jackie.” InFusion Action Theatre. MuCCC Theatre, 142 Atlantic Ave. November 29, 7:30 p.m. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. December 1, 1 p.m. $20 insight743@yahoo. com. Moscow Ballet’s Great Russian Nutcracker. Wed., Dec. 4, 7:30 p.m. Auditorium Theatre, 885 E. Main St. $30.50-$105 2225000. mail@rbtl.org. rbtl.org. A Mother’s Prayer “God’s Correction.”. Auditorium Theatre, 885 E. Main St. Nov 30, 6 p.m $5-$7 203-7403. rbtl.org. “Sister Strikes Again: Late Nite Catechism 2.” Through Dec. 15. Geva Theatre Center, 75 Woodbury Blvd. Through Dec 15. Wed Nov 27, 7:30 p.m. Fri 7 p.m., Sat 2:30 & 7 p.m., Sun 3 p.m., Tue-Wed Dec 4, 7:30 p.m. Wed Dec 4-Thu 7:30 p.m., Fri 7 p.m., Sat 4 & 8 p.m. Sun 3 p.m., Tue-Wed Dec 11, 7:30 p.m. Wed Dec 11-Thu 7:30 p.m., Fri 7 p.m., Sat 2:30 & 7 p.m., Sun 3 p.m Tickets start at $38 232-4382. gevatheatre.org. “Take Me Home.” Downstairs Cabaret Theatre, 20 Windsor St Fri 8:30 p.m., Sat 5 & 8:30 p.m., Sun 6 p.m $26-$33. 3254370. downstairscabaret.com.

Theater Audition [ WED., NOVEMBER 27 ] “Love in the Style of Will.” Through Jan. 31, 2014. MuCCC, 142 Atlantic Ave. Actors and directors wanted for Valentine’s show featuring romantic scenes from Shakespeare. justin.rielly@ gmail.com.

Workshops [ WED., NOVEMBER 27 ] Adult Craft Club. 7 p.m. Seymour Library, 161 East Ave., Brockport Free, register 637-1050. seymourlibraryweb.org. Family Development Class: “The First Years Last Forever.” 6-8 p.m. Mental Health Association, 320 N Goodman St. For parents of children up to 5 years old Free, RSVP 325-3245 x131. mharochester.org. Family Development Class: “Wise Choices.” Ongoing, 12:30-2:30 p.m. Mental Health Association, 320 N Goodman St. For parents of school-age children Free, RSVP 325-3245 x131. mharochester.org. [ THU., NOVEMBER 28 ] Rochester Makerspace Open Nights. 6-10 p.m. Rochester Makerspace, 850 St. Paul St. #23 Bring a project to work on or something to show others, help work on the space, or just get to know the venue Free. 210--0075. rochestermakerspace.org. Thanksgiving Family Yoga Class. 9:30 a.m. Balance Acupuncture, 152 W. Commercial St., East Rochester Come enjoy a 60 min Open Vinyasa/ Flow class, suitable for yogis of all levels and ages, including expectant mothers. Take a moment to reflect and give thanks during the busy holiday. All proceeds benefit the Society of the Protection and Care of

Holidays atGallea’s! est.1957

SPECIAL!

Fresh Fraser Fir Wreaths

COOKOUT! C

24-26” diameter

Saturday, S Sa tu Dec. 7th • 11am- 4pm

Watch us GRILL • SMOKE • BAKE TASTE the Difference! See Special Cooking Techniques! SPECIAL EVENT | MEN OF THE STRIP

Jeff Timmons, part of the late 90’s boy band 98 Degrees, comes to Rochester next week as part of the new male revue Men of the Strip. In addition to some new material, Timmons will also be performing some throwbacks from his 98 Degrees days. The choreography for the group is done by Glen Douglas Packard, who has worked with Pink, Usher, Ricky Martin, and Michael Jackson. But seriously: six packs and bulging pecs. That’s why you’re going. There will be plenty of shirts being ripped off in Chippendales style. Men of the Strip will perform Wednesday, December 4, 8 p.m. at The German House (315 Gregory St.). Tickets will be between $20 and $40. For more information visit menofthestrip.com. — BY COLIN MCCOY Children (providing outreach and counseling to children and family’s in Monroe County who have experienced trauma) Donation-based 269-9167. yogawithnora@ymail.com. yogawithnora.net. [ SAT., NOVEMBER 30 ] Christmas Crafts. 10 a.m. Genesee Country Village & Museum, 1410 Flint Hill Rd Mumford $4 per craft or five for $15 $6.50-$8.50 538-6822. gcv.org. Role Playing Gamer’s Club. 10 a.m. Seymour Library, 161 East Ave., Brockport Ages 13+ Free. 637-1050. seymourlibraryweb. org. Small Business Saturday Yoga Class. 11:15 a.m.-noon. Beyond Center for Yoga, 67 Main Street, 3rd floor, Brockport. Take a break from your local shopping spree and hit your mat $5 with canned good donation 4660239. Beyond2Yoga@gmail. com. brockportyogapilates.com/ workshops. [ SUN., DECEMBER 1 ] Mushrooms 101. Dec. 1. Smugtown Mushrooms, 127 Railroad St. Check site for time smugtownmushrooms.com. [ MON., DECEMBER 2 ] Community Labyrinth Walk. 7-9 p.m. First Unitarian Church, 220 S Winton Rd Free, donations accepted 392.3601. rochesterunitarian.org. Finistère (feen-s-te-air): a Cooking Class. 6 p.m. Max of Eastman Place, 25 Gibbs St. Proceeds to benefit InterVol’s life-saving programs $65 9221997. nick.gordon@intervol.org. maxofeastmanplace.com. Interior Design Tricks & Tips. 6:30 p.m. Rochester Brainery, Village Gate, 274 N Goodman St. $15 730-7034. info@rochesterbrainery.com. rochesterbrainery.com. Make Your Own Aromatherapy Stocking Stuffers. 6:30 p.m. Rochester Brainery, Village Gate,

274 N Goodman St. $25 7307034. info@rochesterbrainery. com. rochesterbrainery.com. [ TUE., DECEMBER 3 ] Buddhist Book Discussion Group. 7 p.m. Amitabha Foundation, 11 South Goodman St. By donation. 451-7039. NY@ amitabhafoundation.us. amitabhafoundation.us. Family Development Class: “Teenage Drugs, Sex, and Violence (Part 1 of 2).” 5-7 p.m. Mental Health Association, 320 N Goodman St. For parents of pre-teens and teens. A light dinner will be served Free, RSVP 325-3245 x131. mharochester.org. Story Planning 101. 7 p.m. Rochester Brainery, Village Gate, 274 N Goodman St. $15 730-7034. info@ rochesterbrainery.com. rochesterbrainery.com.

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[ WED., DECEMBER 4 ] Family Development Class: “Winning at Parenting.” 12:302:30 p.m. Mental Health Association, 320 N Goodman St. For parents of school-age children Free, RSVP 325-3245 x131. mharochester.org. Screen Printing 101: Holiday Edition. 6:30 p.m. Rochester Brainery, Village Gate, 274 N Goodman St. $22 730-7034. info@rochesterbrainery.com. rochesterbrainery.com. The Suicide Epidemic Seminar. 7 p.m. Zion Fellowship, 5188 Bristol Rd. Attend a one hour training seminar to help you better understand suicide and equip you to intervene and help save a life Free 394-7450. nickcostello.org.

GETLISTED get your event listed for free e-mail it to calendar@rochestercitynews.com. Or go online to rochestercitynewspaper.com and submit it yourself!

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 29


Movies Theaters Searchable, up-to-the-minute movie times for all area theaters can be found at rochestercitynewspaper.com, and on City’s mobile website.

Film

Brockport Strand 93 Main St, Brockport, 637-3310, rochestertheatermanagement.com

Canandaigua Theatres 3181 Townline Road, Canandaigua, 396-0110, rochestertheatermanagement.com

Cinema Theater 957 S. Clinton St., 271-1785, cinemarochester.com

Culver Ridge 16 2255 Ridge Rd E, Irondequoit  544-1140, regmovies.com

Dryden Theatre 900 East Ave., 271-3361, dryden.eastmanhouse.org

Eastview 13 Eastview Mall, Victor 425-0420, regmovies.com

Geneseo Theatres Geneseo Square Mall, 243-2691, rochestertheatermanagement.com

Greece Ridge 12 176 Greece Ridge Center Drive 225-5810, regmovies.com

Henrietta 18 525 Marketplace Drive 424-3090, regmovies.com

The Little 240 East Ave., 258-0444 thelittle.org

Movies 10 2609 W. Henrietta Road 292-0303, cinemark.com

Pittsford Cinema 3349 Monroe Ave., 383-1310 pittsford.zurichcinemas.com

Tinseltown USA/IMAX 2291 Buffalo Road 247-2180, cinemark.com

Webster 12 2190 Empire Blvd., 888-262-4386, amctheatres.com

Vintage Drive In 1520 W Henrietta Rd., Avon 226-9290, vintagedrivein.com

Film Previews on page 32

AIDS and the cowboy “Dallas Buyers Club”

publicity states, reveals additional qualities in a strong, apparently still developing talent. (R), DIRECTED BY JEAN-MARC VALLÈE McConaughey plays Ron Woodroof, a good NOW PLAYING ol’ Texas boy (like the actor) back in the 1980’s, who works as an electrician and a part-time [ REVIEW ] BY GEORGE GRELLA rodeo bull rider in Dallas. Ron is a hellraiser — he drinks a lot, snorts cocaine, gambles, His recent work in film displays quite an and parties with his buddies and a number of impressive versatility for the very active and attractive young women in his trailer (of course). generally underrated Matthew McConaughey. When he suffers a serious electrical shock on In “The Lincoln Lawyer,” “Magic Mike,” and the job, the doctors in the hospital inform him “Killer Joe,” for example, he plays extremely that his blood tests show that he has AIDS, that different characters — a slick defense attorney, they believe his life span is 30 days, and helpfully a sleazy strip club owner, a soft-spoken, polite suggest he put his affairs in order. hetman/deputy sheriff. His latest picture, “Dallas Woodroof naturally refuses to accept the Buyers Club,” “inspired by true events,” as the diagnosis, checks himself out of the hospital, and sinks into denial, resuming his reckless, hardpartying ways. He cannot ignore the calendar, however, and as he weakens, starts visiting the library to conduct some research on this new, devastating disease. When he learns of a trial of a new drug, AZT, he manages to bribe an orderly to steal Matthew McConaughey and Jennifer Garner in “Dallas Buyers Club.”

quantities for his own use, which lands him back in the hospital. His theft of AZT underlines some of the important issues the picture raises, an inquiry into the practices of the medical community in general and into its treatment of AIDS in particular. One of the doctors who treats Ron, Eve Saks (Jennifer Garner), objects to the precipitous introduction of a new, untested medication simply to benefit the pharmaceutical companies and the doctors running the hospital. At the risk of her career, she argues strongly against the decisions of her colleagues and ultimately becomes Ron’s friend and supporter. Ron’s research finally leads him on a desperate mission to Mexico, where a physician whose license has been revoked for his radical treatments in the States tells him of the danger of high doses of AZT and prescribes a regimen of herbal supplements and protein. That mission changes Ron’s life and leads to his establishment of the club of the film’s title. Ron embarks on a career of smuggling the supplements across the border, and inspired by newspaper stories of similar organizations, forms a “club,” whose members pay dues but receive his medications free. His Dallas Buyers Club opens up a whole new world to Ron and the gay transvestite Rayon (Jared Leto) who becomes his partner and eventually his friend. Hundreds of people line up outside his makeshift office to join,

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30 CITY NOVEMBER 27 - DECEMBER 3, 2013


Feeling the burn “The Hunger Games: Catching Fire” (PG-13), DIRECTED BY FRANCIS LAWRENCE NOW PLAYING [ REVIEW ] BY ADAM LUBITOW

indicating the extent of both homosexuality and the terrible curse of AIDS in his own community. Searching for scientists who will supply him, he travels to Japan, Israel, and Holland, assuming other identities with the slickness of an experienced con man. Instead of flashing those killer abs, Matthew McConaughey lost a great deal of weight for his role, beginning the movie as a skinny cowboy and growing more emaciated as his condition worsens; beyond the physical transformation, however, he convincingly plays a doped-up, hell-raising fool whose illness actually makes him a better man, eventually learning to accept and even love his gay friend. As Rayon, Jared Leto undergoes his own transformation, playing a most attractive, crossdressing homosexual, with wit, charm, and a good deal of pathos. Together, the actors accomplish one of the best dual performances of the year, a remarkable piece of work. As a docudrama, the movie offers something of an indictment of all the entities that try to shut down the club — the medical community, the pharmaceutical industry, the Border Patrol, the FDA, even the IRS, indicating a kind of obtuse recalcitrance, mostly motivated by venality, in the refusal to accept any alternative approaches to the scourge of the disease. Ron Woodroof ’s efforts, along with those of sympathizers and determined fellow sufferers, helped bring about changes in the treatment of AIDS, lengthening and even saving lives.

It’s a difficult task crafting a successful middle chapter of an established story. On one hand, the tedious work of establishing the world in which the tale is set has been done; but on the other, without the benefit of a proper conclusion, you run the risk of delivering a less-than-satisfying experience for the audience. “The Hunger Games: Catching Fire” skillfully avoids the dreaded sophomore slump thanks to a smart script and first-rate direction from new franchise helmer Francis Lawrence (“I Am Legend”). The first film ended with heroine Katniss Everdeen (Jennifer Lawrence) manipulating the totalitarian Capitol into allowing both her and her fellow District 12 tribute, Peeta (Josh Hutcherson), to be declared winners of the 74th Annual Hunger Games, when only one of them was meant to survive. “Catching Fire” picks up several months later, as Katniss and Peeta are embarking on a Victor’s Tour, traveling to each district to celebrate their victory in the games. In the time since the

Jennifer Lawrence as Katniss Everdeen in “The Hunger Games: Catching Fire.” PHOTO COURTESY LIONSGATE

games, it’s become increasingly obvious that the love between Katniss and Peeta that so captivated the public (and led to the bending of the games’ rules) was only for show, and that Katniss’ true affections lie with her childhood friend, Gale (Liam Hemsworth). Before they set out, President Snow (Donald Sutherland, utterly chilling) pays Katniss a visit, explaining that she had better get with the lovey-dovey eyes or face the consequences. It seems that her defiance has been an inspiration to the impoverished districts, and has inadvertently ignited a movement of open rebellion against the Capitol’s rule. Snow needs the couple to serve as a distraction, so the public focuses on them and not the real problems of the world. Unfortunately for Snow, Katniss has become a symbol of revolution against the Capitol, and her presence only riles up the plebs even more. Hoping to counteract this development, and under the advisement of a new gamesmaker, Plutarch Heavensbee (Philip Seymour Hoffman), Snow announces that the 75th Hunger Games will be an All-Stars Edition, in which tributes will be selected from the pool of existing victors. Suddenly, Katniss and Peeta find themselves once again thrust into the arena to fight for their lives. In “Catching Fire,” Francis Lawrence, along with writers Simon Beaufoy and Michael Arndt (adapting Suzanne Collins’ novel), have crafted an enormously entertaining blockbuster entertainment that doesn’t insult the intelligence of the audience. The source material was a fertile ground of intriguing ideas that it didn’t always necessarily exploit to their fullest potential, but Beaufoy and Arndt turn the film into a rather sharp examination of the politics of fear. They expand upon the world of Panem in intriguing ways and focus on the political machinations, or as Heavensbee puts it, “moves and countermoves,” that eventually lead to all-out war. The film takes its time letting

things develop — it’s nearly 90 minutes into the film before we even get to the games, and it’s slightly disappointing when we do, as the lead-up is so enthralling. Lawrence keeps things moving, and the nearly two-and-a-half hour running time practically flies by. He has a clearer eye for action than Gary Ross (the first film’s director), as well as the luxury of a drastically increased budget, and his staging of the games feels like a definite upgrade. Jennifer Lawrence is great as Katniss. She’s an actress capable of portraying a gravity beyond her years, and she’s a strong anchor for the rest of the film. I can’t imagine anyone better portraying the arc Katniss goes through; from the reluctant symbol of the uprising to…well, the film’s final shot makes it clear that she’s not quite so reluctant anymore. Sadly, her love interests are less compelling, though they make more of an impression than in the first film. This is, however, likely at least partially by design. It’s Katniss’ story, and her focus is on the survival of her and her family; as she tells Gale early on, she has little room for anything else in her life. The backburnering of the romance storyline is a rather refreshing contrast to certain other young-adult series. The rest of the tributes are given much more screentime this time around, and they’re filled out with a wonderful collection of character actors like Jeffrey Wright, Amanda Plummer, and Lynn Cohen, and they do a lot with the roles. I had some doubts about the casting of Sam Claflin, since he’s not exactly how I pictured Finnick Odair when I read the novels, but he won me over in his very first scene with Lawrence. By returning to the arena of the Hunger Games, “Catching Fire” can’t help retaining a slight hint of sequel-itis, but with the next installment promising to serve up something entirely new, 2014 can’t come soon enough.

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 31


Film Previews

Full film reviews available at rochestercitynewspaper.com. [ OPENING ] THE 2013 INTERNET CAT VIDEO FILM FESTIVAL (NR): If last weekend jus wuz not enough, heers dis yeers crop of kat videos 4 ur viewin pleasure. Dryden (Fri, Nov 29, 8 p.m.; Sun, Dec 1, 2 p.m.) 20,000 LEAGUES UNDER THE SEA (1954): Jules Verne’s novel gets adapted in this classic adventure film about a high tech submarine, the Nautilus, commanded by the enigmatic Captain Nemo. Starring Kirk Douglas, James Mason, and Peter Lorre. Dryden (Sat, Nov 30, 8 p.m.) THE BARKER (1928): Douglas Fairbanks Jr. stars in this part-talkie, part silent film as a young man who defies his father’s wish for him to become a lawyer, and joins a carnival instead. Dryden (Tue, Dec 3, 8 p.m.) BLACK NATIVITY (PG): A young teen travels to New York City to spend Christmas with his estranged relatives in this contemporary adaptation of the stage musical by Langston Hughes. Starring Forest Whitaker, Angela Bassett, Jennifer Hudson, Tyrese Gibson, and Mary J. Blige. Culver, Greece, Henrietta, Webster THE BOOK THIEF (PG-13): A young girl is sent to live

with a foster family in WWII Germany in this adaptation of Markus Zusak’s popular novel. Starring Geoffrey Rush and Emily Watson. Henrietta, Little, Pittsford FROZEN (PG): A young princess goes on an epic journey to find her sister, whose powers have trapped their kingdom in an eternal winter in this animated Disney musical. With the voices of Kristen Bell, Idina Menzel, Jonathan Groff, and Josh Gad. Brockport, Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece, Henrietta, Pittsford, Webster HOMEFRONT (R): Jason Statham stars in this stars as a retired DEA agent who moves his family to a small town, only to run afoul of a local meth druglord played by James Franco. With Winona Ryder and Kate Bosworth. Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Greece, Henrietta, Webster OLDBOY (R): Spike Lee directs this remake of Chan-wook Park’s cult classic film, about a man who seeks vengeance after being kidnapped and held hostage for 20 years. Starring Josh Brolin, Samuel L. Jackson, and Elizabeth Olsen. Henrietta PHILOMENA (PG-13): Judi Dench stars in this drama about a journalist (Steve Coogan) who helps an elderly woman search for her son, who she was forced to put up

For information: Call us (585) 244-3329 Fax us (585) 244-1126 Mail Us City Classifieds 250 N. Goodman Street Rochester, NY 14607 Email Us classifieds@ rochester-citynews.com EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY

All real estate advertised in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act, which makes it unlawful, “to make, print, or publish, any notice, statement, or advertisement, with respect to the sale or rental of a dwelling that indicates any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin.” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under the age of 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertisement for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. Call the local Fair Housing Enforcement Project, FHEP at 325-2500 or 1-866-671-FAIR. Si usted sospecha una practica de vivienda injusta, por favor llame al servicio legal gratis. 585-325-2500 - TTY 585-325-2547.

32 CITY NOVEMBER 27 - DECEMBER 3, 2013

for adoption decades earlier. Little, Pittsford SEVEN BRIDES FOR SEVEN BROTHERS (1954): A new bride attempts to help her husband’s brothers find wives of their own, in Stanley Donen’s classic, Technicolor musical. Dryden (Wed, Nov 27, 8 p.m.) [ CONTINUING ] 12 YEARS A SLAVE (R): Chiwetel Ejiofor stars in this film based on the true story of Solomon Northup, a free black man kidnapped and sold into slavery. Also starring Michael Fassbender, Sarah Paulson, Brad Pitt, and Benedict Cumberbatch. Canandaigua, Culver, Henrietta, Little, Pittsford, Webster ABOUT TIME (R): When a young British man learns he can time travel back through his life, he uses it to improve to romantic prospects. With Rachel McAdams and Bill Nighy. Cinema THE BEST MAN HOLIDAY (R): In this follow-up to 1999’s “The Best Man,” a group of college friends reunites for Christmas after 15 years apart. Starring Taye Diggs, Morris Chestnut, Terrence Howard, Nia Long, and Sanaa Lathan. Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Greece, Henrietta, Webster BLUE IS THE WARMEST COLOR (NC-17): Winner of the Palme

d’Or at Cannes, this French drama follows a passionate love affair between two young women. Little CAPTAIN PHILLIPS (PG-13): Paul Greengrass directs the true story of Richard Phillips, the captain of a cargo ship attacked by Somali pirates in 2009. Starring Tom Hanks and Catherine Keener. Canandaigua, Cinema CLOUDY WITH A CHANCE OF MEATBALLS 2 (PG): The sequel to the animated adaptation of the popular children’s picture book, this time involving an island of food/animal hybrids. With the voices of Bill Hader, Anna Faris, James Caan, Kristen Schaal, Andy Samberg, and Neil Patrick Harris. Canandaigua, Cinema, Culver DALLAS BUYERS CLUB (R): Matthew Mcconaughey is earning Oscar buzz for his performance in this true story about a straight cowboy who organizes an illegal underground network to get HIV meds to patients, after he tests positive for the disease. With Jared Leto and Jennifer Garner. Little, Pittsford DELIVERY MAN (PG-13): Vince Vaughn stars as a man who learns that due to a mixup at the fertility clinic, his donations 20 years prior have resulted in him being the father of 533 children. Also starring Cobie Smulders and Chris Pratt. Brockport, Culver,

Eastview, Geneseo, Greece, Henrietta, Pittsford, Webster ENDER’S GAME (PG-13): Based on the popular scifi novel, where a military academy prepares young trainees to defend Earth against a hostile alien race. Eastview, Henrietta FREE BIRDS (PG): In this animated adventure, two turkeys travel through time in an attempt to get their kind taken off the Thanksgiving menu for good. Starring Owen Wilson, Woody Harrelson, Amy Poehler, and George Takei. Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece, Henrietta, Webster GRAVITY (PG-13): Sandra Bullock and George Clooney play astronauts who becomes stranded in space after a shuttle accident, in Alfonso Cuarón’s sci-fi thriller. Culver, Eastview, Henrietta, Webster THE HUNGER GAMES: CATCHING FIRE (PG-13): The middle chapter of The Hunger Games finds an uprising against the Capitol beginning as a result of the events in the first film. Starring Jennifer Lawrence, Josh Hutcherson, Woody Harrelson, Donald Sutherland, and Philip Seymour Hoffman. Brockport, Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece, Henrietta, Pittsford, Webster JACKASS PRESENTS: BAD GRANDPA (R): The Jackass gang is back for this hidden

camera road trip movie, starring Johnny Knoxville as a very unconventional grandfather. Canandaigua, Culver, Geneseo, Greece, Henrietta KILL YOUR DARLINGS (R): Daniel Radcliffe portrays Allen Ginsberg in this true story of obsession, drugs, poetry, and murder set in the early days of the Beat movement. With Dane DeHaan, Ben Foster, Michael C. Hall, Jennifer Jason Leigh, and David Cross. Little LAST VEGAS (PG-13): Four old friends travel to Las Vegas together to throw a bachelor party for the last of them to finally get married. Starring Michael Douglas, Robert De Niro, Morgan Freeman, and Kevin Kline. Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece, Webster THOR: THE DARK WORLD (PG13): The heroic Norse god is back, battling to save the world from a shadowy enemy intent on its destruction. Starring Chris Hemsworth, Tom Hiddleston, Natalie Portman, Idris Elba, and Christopher Eccleston. Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece, Henrietta, Pittsford, Webster WADJDA (NR): The first film shot entirely in Saudi Arabia tells the story of a young girl determined to raise enough money to buy a bicycle, even as society tells her it’s wrong. Cinema

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Place your real estate ad by calling 244-3329 ext. 23 or rochestercitynewspaper.com Ad Deadlines: Friday 4pm for Display Ads Monday at noon for Line ads Apartments for Rent GATES/GREECE BORDER 2BR, 1.5BA. Pleasant townhouse community. A/C, laundry hookup. Lots of closet space. Small pets ok. Available now. $700+ 451-5877

Shared Housing ALL AREAS - ROOMMATES. COM. Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http://www.Roommates.com. CLEAN FURNISHED ROOM Quiet surrounding. Utilities, Cable, off-street-parking included. On bus line, near bus stop. West Rochester. Call 585328-2771. House has security. Call anytime.

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ALWAYS BETTER Higher cash for your Junk Cars, Trucks and Vans. From $200-$800 or more for newer. Running or not. With free towing. Also free removal of any unwanted model in any condition. Call 585-305-5865

MASTER CHIMNEY & MASONRY See our ad under Home and Garden Professionals. Chimney Cleaning, Masonry Repairs, Foundation Repairs, Roof Leaks, Brick Steps Repaired. 585-734-8444

Adoption ADOPTION: Childless, loving couple pray to adopt. Stay at home mom, successful dad, great dogs & devoted grandparents. Legally allowed expenses paid. Bill & Debbie 800-311-6090 PREGNANT? THINKING OF ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families Nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions. 866-413-6293. Void in Illinois/New Mexico/ Indiana (AAN CAN)

HARLEY DAVIDSON 2006 ULTRA CLASSIC EXCELLENT CONDITION 15,000 miles asking $10,000 716-4400880

Auctions AUCTIONS: Buy or sell at AARauctions.com. Contents of homes, businesses, vehicles and real estate. Bid NOW! AARauctions.com Lights, Camera, Auction. No longer the best kept secret.

continues on page 34

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Indoor Comfort, Outdoor Privacy

46 Dorothy Avenue 46 Dorothy Avenue is a classic early 20th century urban home. Built in 1926 in what was then a new development not far from Kodak Park, this property offers comfortable interior space and exterior privacy, all on a compact urban lot.

the dinner table at dusk and dark. The original hardwood floor remains intact. The updated kitchen is small but efficient with a dishwasher, a disposal and a breakfast bar. But it’s the marble tiled floor that makes this room something special.

From the sidewalk this home welcomes the visitor through the graceful curve over the front stoop. The curve is echoed in the dormer and the curve of the large front bay window. Inside, a small foyer leads to the spacious living room. Light streams in from the five bay windows and invites you to sit down in the sunlight and enjoy a quiet conversation. Next to the brick fireplace with wood mantle, a bookcase with leaded glass doors holds family books or special treasures. The original unpainted crown molding, baseboards, and window and door trim adds a distinctive finishing touch to this room and throughout the rest of the house.

In the front foyer, a leaded glass pocket door separates the stairs to the second floor from the first floor living space. Upstairs are three ample bedrooms with closets and a full bath. Stairs lead to the unfinished attic, which is well lit by a large dormer and side windows. Here is space for one, possibly two more bedrooms or an office. And downstairs the finished basement with a wet bar and half bath says “Let’s have a party.”

Off the living room is a room that may have been the sun room in 1926, but could be used as a child’s playroom, office, or cozy den today. Sliding doors lead to a backyard deck and patio. The fully fenced yard and landscaping give complete outdoor privacy. The one and a half car garage is fully insulated and wired for electricity. Back inside the house, the dining room has space for family and friends to gather at a convivial meal. Daylight floods the room through three windows overlooking the backyard and a central chandelier lighting

The property is situated in the Maplewood neighborhood whose motto is “Historic Maplewood - a Family Place.” It’s a diverse area of large and small homes and includes Kodak Park. There is easy access to bus transportation, stores and recreation (Maplewood and Seneca Parks are nearby). WIth 1,444 square feet and an efficient layout, 46 Dorothy Avenue offers plenty of indoor space, outdoor privacy, and convenience – all for $89,500. Taxes are $3,312. To see this home call John Devery at 585-737-9175. by Lea Kemp Lea is Librarian/Archivist at Rochester Museum & Science Center.

- DOUGLAS C. BURKHARDT, FIRST REALTY COMPANY

www.firstrealtyrochester.com rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 33


> page 33

For Sale BABY STROLLER $7 585-4905870 BEANIE BABIES (TY) 1997, 1998 Light blue Elephant (Peanuts), Twigs, Squealer, Iggy and Rainbow with the mixed up name tags. & more! $4 - $8 585-880-2903 All $49.99 BOOK CASE dark mahogany 30” wide, 71” tall, 12” deep, 5 shelves $49 585-490-5870

BOOK ENDS of race horses with jockey’s carved in wood, gift. $15. 585-880-2903

EXERCISE BIKE Heavy duty excellent condition $42 585490-5870

CHRISTMAS DECORATIONS hand corcheted white stars 3 1/2” x 3 1/2” 20 for $10 or .50 each 585-663-6983

GERMAN SHEPHERD Plaque on chain. Carved head on real wood. (says, beware!) Nice gift $20.00 585-880-2903

CURTAIN INSULATED LINING 16 yards x 44” white $20.00 585-663-6983

KITCHEN TABLE 3/8 Thick round glass top table. 40” diameter. 41” high. $49 585490-5870

CURTAIN MATERIAL cotton blend, 16 yards x 44 in - off white $20 585-663-6983 DOG & CAT HOUSES Kennels, porch steps, do it yourself kits. Quick assembly 585-752-1000 $49 Jim

LARGE JEWELRY COLLECTION All kinds, old & new, retro, vintage, cameo’s, brooches, beads & more. Great pieces for jewelry designers too, 585-3602895 ROYAL PORTABLE TYPEWRITER with carrying case 585-383-0405 SKIS CROSS CONTRY non-wax 72” length $10.00 585-6636983

KITCHEN TABLE Round, glass. 41” diameter 31”t all with chrome frame $49 585-4905870

USED TV FOR SALE —Sharp 13” Color with remote. 14 years young with remote. $20 cash and carry. Message phone Mary 585/413-0827

VACUUM CLEANER, Simplicity, purchased July 2013 for $230 / Best Offer 585-865-9779

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WOODEN HANGERS FOR COATS: 12 wood hangers for coats. 12 wood, 2 plastic 1 for hanging pants. All $15 585880-2903

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34 CITY NOVEMBER 27 - DECEMBER 3, 2013


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charts able to rehearse a few Weds. during the months of (April-November) effective 04/15/2014 585-442-7480 MEET OTHER MUSICIANS. Jam & Play out, call & say hello, any level & any age ok. I play keyboards - organ B3 Style Call 585-266-6337 Martino NEEDED MULTI INSTRUMENT MUSICIANS Bass, guitars, keys, horns. Must have equipt. & transportation & be avail. evenings. Bobby 585-328-4121 THE GREGORY KUNDE CHORALE is looking for male voices. Call for an audition now to join our fourteenth season! Info Line 377 7568 or visit our website www. gregorykundechorale.org VOCALIST that can lead & background with other

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Music Services PIANO LESSIONS In your home or mine. Patient, experienced instructor teaching all ages, levels and musical styles. Call Scott: 585- 465-0219. Visit www.scottwrightmusic.com

Miscellaneous ARE YOU BORED OR LONELY, looking to start a new relationship or maybe just meet a new friend, then you should try Livewire. It’s fun, it’s FREE,

it’s Livewire. No gimmicks, no subscription fees just a fun way to meet new people. Call now. (585)333-3003 DONATE YOUR CAR to Wheels For Wishes, benefiting MakeA-Wish. We offer free towing and your donation is 100% tax deductible. Call 917-336-1254 Today! HAS YOU BUILDING SHIFTED OR SETTLED? Contact Woodford Brothers Inc, for straightening, leveling, foundation and wood frame repairs at 1-800-OLDBARN. www.woodfordbros. com. “Not applicable in Queens county” MEN’S LIFESTYLE MEDICATIONS FDA Approved - USA Pharmacies. Remote TeleMedicine Physician. Safe • Secure • Discreet. Calls Taken 7 days per week Call ViaMedic: 888-786-0945 Trusted Since 1998 (AAN CAN) SAWMILLS from only $4897.00- MAKE & SAVE MONEY with your own bandmill- Cut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship. FREE Info/DVD:  www. NorwoodSawmills.com 1-800578-1363 Ext.300N

Place your ad by calling 244-3329 ext. 23 or rochestercitynewspaper.com Ad Deadlines: Friday 4pm for Display Ads Monday at noon for Line ads

EMPLOYMENT / CAREER TRAINING

Employment AIRLINE CAREERS begin here– Get FAA approved Aviation Maintenance Technician training. Financial aid for qualified students– Housing available.Job placement assistance. Call AIM 866-296-7093 EARN $500 A DAY Airbrush & Media Makeup Artists For: Ads - TV - Film - Fashion Train & Build Portfolio in 1 week. www. AwardMakeupSchool.com (AAN CAN) HELP WANTED make extra money in our free ever popular homemailer program, includes valuable guidebook! Start immediately! Genuine! 1-888292-1120 www.easyworkfromhome.com (AAN CAN) MEDICAL DOCTOR/ ADDICTIONOLOGIST PT/8 hours a week and the schedule to be determined. Provides coverage in the absence of the Medical Director of the clinic and is responsible for peer reviews and H&P’s as needed. Requirements: Current/

Valid NYS MD license; X-license & Board Certified. We are willing to mentor the right candidate who is willing to pursue an X-license and

shows interest in the alcohol and substance abuse field. Please send resume to: CONIFER PARK ATTN:

continues on page 36

Start Your Career With ConServe!

Debt Counselor & Bilingual Debt Counselor Openings

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200 Cross Keys Office Park, Fairport 14450 For more information and to apply:

www.conserve-arm.com Click the “ConServe Careers” tab

ConServe is an EOE & Drug-Free Workplace ce

VIAGRA 100MG 40 pills+/4 free, only $99.00. Save Big Now, Discreet shipping. Call 1-800-374-2619 Today! (AAN CAN)

Looking For... FREE YARN NEEDED! Please donate your yarn to Sunday Circle knitting hats scarves and mittens for the poor. Arrange pickup. Call and leave message 585/413-0827 GAY OR BISEXUAL MEN WANTED Over 18? SUNYBrockport and Trillium Health are conducting a study on attitudes, beliefs, values, and norms toward various health risks among gay and bisexual men in the Rochester area. $10 gift card for the interview. Call Karen at (585) 329-1160.

Wanted to Buy CASH FOR COINS! Buying ALL Gold & Silver. Also Stamps & Paper Money, Entire Collections, Estates. Travel to your home. Call Marc in NYC 1-800-9593419

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 35


I’m very pleased with the calls I got from our apartment rental ads, and will continue running them. Your readers respond — positively!” - M. Smith, Residential Management EMPLOYMENT / CAREER TRAINING Human Resources 79 Glenridge Rd. Glenville, NY 12302. Fax: (518)952-8345 e-mail: coniferhr@ libertymgt.com or go to Coniferpark. com to fill out an application.

Background. You Must Have The Following: Reliable Vehicle/ Laptop w/Wireless Internet at Home/GPS/Digital Camera/iPhone, iPad or iPod Please call Lauren: 631.698.0505 x203 or email: recruiting@nyfieldservices.com

NY FIELD SERVICES Is currently looking for Field Inspectors to cover Monroe County. Qualifications: - Professional Appearance - Good Work ethic - Well organized - Clean

OT/PT/SLP’s! Relocate to CNY. Immed. openings (FT/PT) avail. to provide therapy services for children in a variety of locations. Excellent salary/benefits or contracted rate. Email resume

> page 35

to home@3circlestherapy.com or call (315) 820-8014 (message) PAID IN ADVANCE!!! Make up to $1000 a week mailing brochures from home! Helping home workers since 2001! Genuine opportunity! No experience required. Start immediately! www.processbrochures.com (AAN CAN) SEEKING PTs, PTAs, OTs, COTAs and SLPs to work in SNF settings for full-time, part-time and per

diem positions. Submit resumes & salary requirements to careers@ betterhealthcare.com

Volunteers A SECOND THOUGHT Resale Shop in East Rochester is accepting applications for volunteer sale associates and online researchers. Shop benefits people with disabilities in Guatemala. Call (585) 340-2000.

BECOME A DOCENT at the Rochester Museum & Science Center Must be an enthusiastic communicator, Like working with children. Learn more at http://www. rmsc.org/Support/Volunteer Or call 585-697-1948 BRIGHTEN A LIFE. Lifespan’s The Senior Connection program needs people 55+ to volunteer to make 2 friendly phone calls / 2 visits each month to an older adult Call Katie 585-244-8400 x 152

HABITAT FOR CATS — Help Trap-Neuter-Return cats on Tuesdays, in East Rochester, for an important grant project. Impact the number of owner-less cats living outside. All training provided. 585-787-4209 or habitat4cats@yahoo.com! HERITAGE CHRISTIAN STABLES, a therapeutic horsemanship program for children and adults with developmental disabilities, is looking for volunteers to serve as horse leaders and side walkers. Call Kim Kennedy at (585) 340-2016 or email kkennedy@ heritagechristianservices.org

Nurse Practitioner – Substance Abuse: FT or PT,

experienced, Nurse Practitioner to provide care to the patients served in Hope Haven. Minimum of 2 years’ experience, completion of an approved Nurse Practitioner program, state licensure as an NP.

Altec has TECHNICIAN OPENINGS to repair mobile hydraulic aerial equipment at customer sites. Work from home with company service vehicle.

Qualified candidates may submit resumes to:

Exp required in same or related field (ex. aerials, tractors, cranes, dozers, GSE).

United Memorial Medical Center, Human Resources, 127 North Street, Batavia, NY 14020, (585) 344-7432 or Fax (585) 344-7345 e-mail: rlong@ummc.org EOE www.ummc.org for full job description.

FOSTER PARENTS WANTED! Monroe County is looking for adults age 21 and over to consider opening their homes to foster children. Call 334-9096 or visit www.MonroeFosterCare.org.

Stable company with 80+ years of success. Apply at www.altec.com or send resume to hrrecruiter@altec.com or call 205-307-2083.

Employment Opportunies Are you looking for a career that offers variety? Do you want to feel like you make a difference every day? Then the FutureYou program at Heritage Chrisan Services is a great place to start. Hours include evenings, overnight and weekends. We offer outstanding benefits for full-me and part-me employees.

Apply online today at

www.futureyoucareers.org

Great career opportunies are just a click away. For more informaon call (585) 340-2079 Heritage Chrisan Services is an equal opportunity employer

LITERACY VOLUNTEERS OF ROCHESTER needs adult tutors to help adults who are waiting to improve their reading, writing, English speaking, or math skills. Call 473-3030, or check our website at www.literacyrochester. org SCHOOL #12 999 South Ave. is looking for reading & math volunteers, English & Spanish. Training provided. Call Vicki 585-461-4282

Business Opportunities START A HOME BASED BUSINESS. Part-time or FullTime. Serious inquires only. 585271-3243

SERVICES

Driver

You deliver the packages. We deliver the funds.

Seasonal Drivers Needed Kelly Services® is hiring experienced drivers for FedEx Ground®. Great opportunity, great pay. Inquire in Person Mon-Fri 9am-5pm 225 Thruway Park West Henrietta, NY EOE

36 CITY NOVEMBER 27 - DECEMBER 3, 2013


Legal Ads [ LEGAL NOTICE ]

[ NOTICE ]

Shorewater Group V, LLC (“LLC”) filed Arts. of Org. with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on November 13, 2013. Office Location: Monroe County. SSNY designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 1761 S.E. 7th Street, Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33316. Purpose: any lawful activity.

7MASS DEVELOPMENT, LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 8/21/13. Office in Monroe Co. SSNY design. Agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to The LLC 314 Knickerbocker Ave Rochester, NY 14615. Any lawful activity.

[ LEGAL NOTICE ]

Custom Built Wine Cellars, LLC (LLC) filed Arts. of Org. with NY Secy. of State (SS) on 7/9/12. LLC’s office is in Monroe Co. SS is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS will mail a copy of any process to LLC’s principal business location at 50 Woodgreen Dr., Pittsford, NY 14534. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity.

Shorewater Group VI, LLC (“LLC”) filed Arts. of Org. with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on November 13, 2013. Office Location: Monroe County. SSNY designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 1761 S.E. 7th Street, Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33316. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of PARAGON MARINE LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/28/13. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 303 Colorado Dr., Webster, NY 14580. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of PAZ GROUP, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/12/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Corporation Service Co., 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207, regd. agent upon whom and at which process may be served. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] 1492 Properties LLC (LLC) filed Arts. of Org. with NY Secy. of State (SS) on 5/24/13. LLC’s office is in Monroe Co. SS is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS will mail a copy of any process to LLC’s principal business location at 1492 East Ave., Rochester, NY 14610. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] 57 ERIE, LLC, a domestic LLC, filed with the SSNY on 11/12/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to The LLC, 39 State St., Brockport, NY 14420. General Purpose.

[ NOTICE ]

[ NOTICE ] EAST COAST ENTERTAINMENT, LLC, a domestic LLC, filed with the SSNY on 10/22/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 384 East Ave., Rochester, NY 14607. General Purpose. [ NOTICE ] Golden View Ranch, LLC, Arts of Org filed with SSNY on 11/13/13. Off. Loc.: Monroe County, SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to: The LLC, 2888 Sweden-Walker Rd., Brockport, NY 14626. Purpose: to engage in any lawful act. [ NOTICE ] LIGHTHOUSE TATTOO LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 7/11/13. Office in Monroe Co. SSNY desig. agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 742 South Ave., Apt. 2, Rochester, NY 14607, which is also the principal business location. Purpose: Any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Not.of Form. of 2Hearts Desire, LLC. Art. of Org. filed with SSNY on 1022-2013. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to: C/O 2Hearts Desire ,LLC, 33 Starwood Dr, Rochester, NY 14625. Purpose:any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice is hereby given that a license, number not yet assigned, for a restaurant

beer & wine license has been applied for by TLW GROUP INC. dba, Triple Crown Sports Bar & Grill, 1733 Norton Street, Rochester, NY 14609, County of Monroe, for a bar & restaurant.

LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to Till Fritzsching, 29 Old Stone Road Rochester, NY 14615. Purpose: any lawful activities.

[ NOTICE ]

[ NOTICE ]

Notice of Formation of Jorgen LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 10/3/2013. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it maybe served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 95 Alton Way, West Henrietta, NY 14586. Purpose: any lawful activities.

Notice of Formation of Aurora Research & Consulting, LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 10/10/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 34 Still Pond Way W. Henrietta NY 14586. Purpose: any lawful activities.

[ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Luxe Rust LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) October 3,2013. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 30 Shadow Pines Dr. Penfield, NY 14526 . Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of 33 Birch Crescent, LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) on October 21, 2013. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 63 Belmont St. Rochester, New York . Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of 921 PPR, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/12/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 7450 Pittsford Palmyra Rd., Fairport, NY 14450. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of AL’S MAINTENANCE LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/28/2013. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 328 Jordan Ave., Rochester, NY 14606. Purpose: any lawful act. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of AOTEK, LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 10/08/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of

[ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Bad Boyz LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/8/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 630 East Ave., Rochester, NY 14607. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of BRICK ROAD LLC, filed with the Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/8/2013, County office location: Monroe, SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to The LLC, 34 Solmar Drive, Rochester, NY 14624. Purposes: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of CORRECTIVE DYNAMICS LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/16/2013. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 3177 Latta Rd., #113, Rochester, NY 14612. Purpose: any lawful act. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of EJE Newcomb LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State on 10/31/13. Office location: Monroe County. Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: Michael A. Newcomb, 4 Schoen Place, Pittsford, NY 14534, principal business address. Purpose: all lawful purposes. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Greece Ridge Storage

LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/8/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 630 East Ave., Rochester, NY 14607. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Integrated Sonics, LLC. Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 09/11/13 Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process 50 Park Circle Rd, Rochester, NY 14623. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of JBCY LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/9/2013. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 202 Chestnut Hill Dr., Rochester, NY 14617. Purpose: any lawful act. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of JML HOUSING, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/31/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 16 Ericsson Street, Rochester, NY 14610. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Joywave Industries LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/9/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 125 Ledgewood Dr., Rochester, NY 14615. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of K Holdings, LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 10/15/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 333 Hollenbeck St., Rochester, NY 14621. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of Life Script Mental Health Counseling

Services. PLLC. Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 09/16/2013. Office Location: Monroe County. Principle office of PLLC: 202 Dickinson Road, Webster, NY 14580. United States Corporation Agents, Inc (7014 13th Ave. Brooklyn, NY 12228) designated agent of PLLC upon whom process against it may be served. Registered agent shall mail process to the PLLC at the address of its principle office. Purpose: Mental Health Counseling. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of LIFE SOLUTIONS PSYCHOTHERAPY LCSW, PLLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 08/15/13. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of PLLC: 559 MacIntosh Dr., Rochester, NY 14626. SSNY designated as agent of PLLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the PLLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of limited liability company (LLC). Name: S.A. EDWARDS PROPERTIES LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Sec. of State of N.Y. (SSNY) on October 11, 2013. Office location: Monroe. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to: The LLC, 61 East Street, Fairport, New York 14450. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY. NAME: HAKARAT HATOV PROPERTIES AT ROCHESTER, LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 07/09/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to the LLC, 1911 Avenue L, Brooklyn, New York 11230. Purpose: For any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of LZ Vending LLC. Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 09/10/2013. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 29 Treetop Drive, Fairport, NY, 14450. Purpose: any lawful activities.

[ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Michael A. Guarino, Attorney At Law PLLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 10/22/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of PLLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 108 Triple Diamond Way, Webster, NY 14580. Purpose: to practice the profession of Law. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of MLS HOLDINGS, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/1/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, c/o Sammy Feldman, 3445 Winton Place, Ste. 228, Rochester, NY 14623. Purpose: any lawful activity.

1203. Office location: Monroe County. NYSOS designated as agent for PLLC upon whom process against it may be served. NYSOS shall mail copy of process served to: 2081 W Ridge Rd Ste 205, Rochester, NY 14626. Purpose: Medicine and any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of S&J Carthage Properties LLC. Articles of Organization filed with the Secretary of State of NY (SSNY) on 08/26/2013. Office location: Monroe County. Principal office of LLC: 95 Belmont St., Rochester, NY 14620. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the address of its principal office. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ]

Notice of Formation of MMI Enterprises, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/10/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Anthony A. DiNitto, Esq., 8 Silent Meadows Drive, Spencerport, NY 14559. Purpose: any lawful activity.

Notice of Formation of SIBLEY REDEVELOPMENT PHASE IV LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/29/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: National Corporate Research, Ltd., 10 E. 40th St., 10th Fl., NY, NY 10016, the registered agent upon whom process may be served. Purpose: any lawful activity.

[ NOTICE ]

[ NOTICE ]

Notice of Formation of MVPS PRODUCTIONS, LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 7/31/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 18 Helmsford Way, Penfield, NY 14526. Purpose: any lawful activities.

Notice of Formation of SNIDERMANS LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/30/13. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 519 Joseph Ave., Rochester, NY 14605. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity.

[ NOTICE ]

[ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of PENNANT OUTDOOR LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/11/13. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 79 Madison Ave., 7th Fl., NY, NY 10036. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Scott Edward Aufenanger at the princ. office of the LLC. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] NOTICE OF FORMATION of Ridgewood Medical Health, PLLC (“PLLC”) Art. of Org. filed with NY Secretary of State (“NYSOS”) on 9/30/2013, pursuant to Limited Liability Company Law Section

[ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of SOLOMON’S CHOICE, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/08/13. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 1769 Redman Rd., Hamlin, NY 14464. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Stone Street Pub, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/13/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY

cont. on page 38

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 37


Legal Ads > page 37 designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, c/o Sammy Feldman, 3445 Winton Place, Ste. 228, Rochester, NY 14623. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Tipping Point Communications, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/6/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 277 Alexander Street, Rochester, NY 14607. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Upstate Wireless Communications, LLC Arts. Of Org. filed with Sec’y of State (SSNY) on 08/22/23. Office Location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to LLC’s principal business location at 268 Sandringham Rd, Rochester, NY 14610. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Westfall Management LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/23/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 630 East Ave., Rochester, NY 14607. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of garageman’s lien and sale 7:30

am 12/12/2013 Craig Autometrics 10 Winthrop St. Rochester NY of 1988 BMW WBABB2306J8855800 owner Andrea L. Mccadden [ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of CZM MANAGEMENT LLC Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/16/13. Office location: Monroe County. LLC formed in Florida (FL) on 09/27/13. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Corporation Service Co., 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207-2543. FL addr. of LLC: 1201 Hays St., Tallahassee, FL 32301. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of FL, Clifton Bldg., 2661 Executive Center Circle, Tallahassee, FL 32301. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of Phelan Construction, LLC. Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 9/10/13. Office location: Monroe County. LLC formed in MA on 7/7/08. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o National Registered Agents, Inc., 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. MA and principal business address: 323 Washington St., Suite 1, Westwood, MA 02090. Cert. of Org. filed with MA Sec. of State, One Ashburton Pl., Boston, MA 02108. Purpose: all lawful purposes. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of Rochester Rattlers, LLC. Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 11/14/13. Office location: Monroe County. LLC formed in MA on 11/12/13. NY Sec. of State designated

agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. MA and principal business address: 20 Guest St., Boston, MA 02135. Cert. of Org. filed with MA Sec. of the Commonwealth, One Ashburton Pl., 17th Fl., Boston, MA 02108. Purpose: all lawful purposes. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of Unither Manufacturing LLC. Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 9/23/13. Office location: Monroe County. LLC formed in DE on 5/23/13. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011. DE address of LLC: c/o The Corporation Trust Co., 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. [ NOTICE ] of Formation of Ontario Properties of NY LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 10/28/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 1456 E River Rd Rochester, NY 14623. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] PROCTOR ROAD INVESTMENTS LLC App. for Auth. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 3/26/2012. LLC was organized in DE on 12/19/2011. Office in Monroe Co. SSNY desig. as agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY to mail copy

Adult Services

of process to 2255 Lyell Ave., Ste. 201, Rochester, NY 14606. Required office at 874 Walker Rd., Ste. C, Dover, DE 19904. Cert. of Org. filed with SSDE, 401 Federal St., Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: Any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] PROPARARE LLC App. for Auth. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 11/6/2013 LLC was organized in DE on 4/9/2012. Office in Monroe Co. SSNY desig. as agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY to mail copy of process to 2255 Lyell Ave., Rochester, NY 14606. Required office at 1201 Orange St., Ste. 600, Wilmington, DE 19801. Cert. of Org. filed with SSDE, 401 Federal St., Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: Any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] PSD, LLC has filed articles of organization with the New York Secretary of State on November 19, 2013. Its principal place of business is located at 768 Clinton Avenue South, Rochester, New York in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent upon whom process may be served. A copy of any process shall be mailed to 768 Clinton Avenue South, Rochester, New York 14620-1402. The purpose of the LLC is to engage in any lawful activity for which Limited Liability Companies may be organized under Section 203 of the New York Limited Liability Company Law. [ NOTICE ] THE GROOMER’S OUTLET, LLC, a domestic LLC, filed with the SSNY on 9/11/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to The LLC, Attn: LLC Manager, 3160 E. Henrietta Rd., Henrietta, NY 14460. General Purpose. [ NOTICE ] UMO PROPERTIES LLC filed Articles of Organization with the New York Department of State on 9/27/13. Its office is located in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent of the Company upon whom process against it may be served and a copy of any process shall be mailed to 620 Park Ave #190 Rochester, New York 14607. The purpose of the Company is any lawful business. [ NOTICE ] Wicked Good Sugar LLC filed Arts. of Org. with

38 CITY NOVEMBER 27 - DECEMBER 3, 2013

Sec’y of State (SSNY) on October 23, 2013. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of any process to P.O. Box 354, Penfield, NY 14526. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] WMH, LLC, a domestic LLC, filed with the SSNY on 10/24/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to The LLC, 2280 E. Ave., Rochester, NY 14610. General Purpose. [ NOTICE ] XLNQ LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with SSNY on 05/31/2013. Office location: Monroe county. SSNY is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at 85 Friel Road, Rochester, NY 14623. Purpose: Any lawful activity [ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] Lock 32 Brewing Company, LLC. Art of Org. files with Sec’y. of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/15/2013. Office Location: Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC 10 Scheon Place, Pittsford, NY 14534. Pupose: Any lawful activity [ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] Name: EXIT 24 BAND LLC. Arts. Of Org. filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 10/15/2013. Office Location: Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to: C/O EXIT 24 BAND LLC, One East Main Street, 10th Floor, Rochester, New York 14614. Purpose: Any Lawful Purpose. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] Notice of Formation of Fred’s Auto Repair, LLC. Articles of Organization filed with Secy. Of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/4/2013. Office location: Monroe County SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to principal business location: The LLC, 9 Oakwood Lane, Scottsville, NY 14546. Purpose: any lawful activity

[ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] TRINITY ROADSIDE ASSISTANCE LLC filed Articles of Organization with the Secretary of State (SSNY) on 7/17/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to the LLC, PO Box 608, Webster, NY 14580. Purpose: Any lawful activities. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY ] Notice of formation of Camman Acres, LLC. Articles of Organization filed with the New York Secretary of State on August 27, 2013. The office of the LLC is in Monroe County. The New York Secretary of State is designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. The Secretary of State shall mail a copy of such process to 9593 Ridge Road, Brockport, New York 14420. The LLC is organized to engage in any lawful activity for which an LLC may be formed under the NY LLC law. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY ] The name of the limited liability company is Roberts Media Solutions LLC. The Articles of Organization were filed with the NY Secretary of State on October 18, 2013. The office of the LLC is located in Monroe County. The NY Secretary of State is designated as the agent of the LLC upon whom process may be served. The address to which a copy of the process served shall be sent is 107 Westland Avenue, Rochester NY 14618. The LLC is managed by a manager. The purpose of the LLC is any lawful business. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF NORTON AUTOMOTIVE CENTER, LLC ] Art. of Organization filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 10/08/13. Office of location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent if LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to: 45 Exchange Blvd. Ste 713, Rochester, NY 14614 . Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF Roc Rooms & Rentals LLC ] Articles of Organization with Secretary of State of NY on 4/30/2008. Office

in Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC at 1048 South Ave, Rochester, NY 14620. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE OF SALE ] Index No. 2013-6296 SUPREME COURT STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF MONROE ESL Federal Credit Union, Plaintiff, vs. Andrew F. Mazzucco; Discover Bank; ESL Federal Credit Union, Defendants. Pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale dated November 6, 2013 and entered herein, I, the undersigned, the Referee in said Judgment named, will sell at public auction in the front vestibule of the Monroe County Office Building, 39 West Main Street, Rochester, New York, County of Monroe, on December 12, 2013 at 10:30 a.m., on that day, the premises directed by said Judgment to be sold and therein described as follows: ALL THAT TRACT OR PARCEL OF LAND, situate in the Town of Gates, County of Monroe and State of New York, known as 36 Emilia Circle, Rochester, NY 14606; Tax Account No. 103.201-29 described in Deed recorded in Liber 8610 of Deeds, page 465; lot size 47.49 x 172.68. Said premises are sold subject to any state of facts an accurate survey may show, zoning restrictions and any amendments thereto, covenants, restrictions, agreements, reservations, and easements of record and prior liens, if any, municipal departmental violations, and such other provisions as may be set forth in the Complaint and Judgment filed in this action. Judgment amount: $77,482.08 plus, but not limited to, costs, disbursements, attorney fees and additional allowance, if any, all with legal interest. DATED: November 2013 Matthew J. Fero, Esq., Referee LACY KATZEN LLP Attorneys for Plaintiff 130 East Main Street Rochester, New York 14604 Telephone: (585) 324-5767 [ NOTICES ] Notice of Formation of SIBLEY REDEVELOPMENT PHASE III LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/29/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: National Corporate Research, Ltd., 10 E. 40th St., 10th Fl., NY, NY 10016, the registered

agent upon whom process may be served. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ SUMMONS ] STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT BRANCH SAWYER COUNTY CASE NO: 13-CV-145 Case Classification: 30405 BETH AND DUANE MEYER N2699 County Road W. New London WI, 54961 Plaintiffs, v. CELINE M. ERNST P.O. Box 278 Cazenovia, NY 13035 Defendant: THE STATE OF WISCONSIN TO EACH PERSON NAMED ABOVE AS DEFENDANT: YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that the Plaintiff named above has filed a lawsuit or other legal action against you. The Complaint, which is attached, states the nature and basis of the legal action. Within twenty (20) days of receiving this summons, forty-five (45) days if you are the State of Wisconsin, an insurance company, or if the cause of action is founded in tort, sixty (60) days if you are the United States of America, you must respond with a written Answer, as that term is used in Chapter 802 of the Wisconsin Statutes, to the Complaint. The Court may reject or disregard an Answer that does not follow the requirements or the Statutes. The Answer must be sent or delivered to the Court and the Plaintiff’s attorney whose addresses follow: Sawyer County Courthouse Attn: Clerk of Courts 10610 Main St., Suite 74 Hayward, WI 54843 Christopher S. Snyder Epiphany Law, LLC 4211 North Lightning Drive Appleton, MI 54913. You may have an attorney help of represent you. If you do not provide a proper Answer within the specified time frame above, the Court may grant Judgment against you for the award of money or other legal action requested in the Complaint, and you may lose your right to object to anything that is or may be incorrect in the Complaint. A Judgment may be enforced as provided by law. A Judgment awarding money may become a lien against any real estate you own now or in the future, and may also be enforced by garnishment or seizure of property. Datds the 20th day of August 2013. Epiphany Law, LLC Attorneys for Plaintiffs Christopher S. Snyder State Bar No. 1081506 A Member of the Firm Epiphany Law, LLC 4211 N. Lightning Drive, Appleton, WI 54913 Telephone: 920.996.0000 Fax: 920.996.0001


Fun [ NEWS OF THE WEIRD ] BY CHUCK SHEPHERD After its launch was delayed for a month by the Madison, Wis., city attorney, the Snuggle House was cleared and scheduled to open on Nov. 15 to provide in-bed, pajama-clad “intimate, non-sexual touch(ing)” for $60 an hour. “So many people,” said assistant manager Emily Noon, “don’t have a significant other in their lives” and “just need to be held” (including, she said, the elderly and hospice patients, who are part of the target clientele). The city’s delay was, a spokesman said, to assure that Snuggle House had protocols for dealing with “risky” situations in which a customer refuses to take “no sex” for an answer. (Snuggle House has prominent surveillance cameras and panic buttons for the staff.)

Oh, Dear!

— Among the underreported catastrophes caused by Hurricane Sandy in the New York-New Jersey area in October 2012 was the tragedy that befell the 27,000-case WineCare storage cellar in Manhattan. Though it claimed to have lost only about 5 percent of its inventory when waters from the Hudson River flooded its supposedly secure warehouse, that number apparently did not count the many preserved bottles whose labels washed off, dramatically reducing the value of customers’ toweringly priced grape and forcing WineCare into bankruptcy court, according to a New York Times report in July. — The California genetic testing company 23andMe was recently awarded a patent for a computer program that lets parents, by running probabilities through the known relevant cell and DNA variables (of over 240 conditions and traits), predict their “perfect” baby. Of course, the program can provide only the percentage likelihoods, and a company spokeswoman, anticipating a backlash against the concept of “designer babies,” rejected the idea that 23andMe would work with fertility clinics.

— In July, just days after the one-year anniversary of the spree killing of 12 people at the Century 16 Theaters in Aurora, Colo., Cassidy Delavergne was arrested after he entered the NCG Trillium theaters in Grand Blanc Township, Mich., wearing full body armor and carrying a loaded gun and a fake CIA badge (and alarming some but not all bystanders). Delavergne explained that he wore the equipment only because he did not want to leave it in his car while he watched the movie -- and thought the badge might alleviate other patrons’ fears. — Update: Person-to-person fecal transplants have been mentioned here several times for the bizarre but therapeutic idea that gastrointestinal illness results from an imbalance between healthy and unhealthy gut bacteria -- and that a transplant of healthier antigens may relieve the sickness. But what happens if no “compatible” donor is available? Emma Allen-Vercoe and her team at Canada’s University of Guelph are thus creating artificial gut bacteria (“robogut”) under demanding control conditions, for implantation. (Allen-Vercoe grumbled to Popular Science in August that the most disagreeable part of the job is disposing of excess sludge -- the process for which causes “the whole building” to “smell like poop.”) — Weird SportsCenter: (1) A Brazilian minor-league soccer match in September ended in a 2-2 tie only because, with minutes left, the trainer for one team stepped to the goal and cleared two quick tie-breaking shots that his players could not have reached in time. “It was our only chance,” he said later. (The referee allowed play to continue.) (2) She Got Game: Bringing her basketball skills to an October five-on-five contest in Thimphu, the queen of Bhutan, 23, scored 34 points with 3 rebounds and 4 assists, and talked up basketball’s imminent rise in the Asian kingdom to a New York Times reporter. The queen said she, and the king, play almost every day.

[ LAST WEEK’S SOLUTION ON PAGE 35 ]

[ LOVESCOPE ] BY EUGENIA LAST ARIES (March 21-April 19): Don’t make a fuss if someone doesn’t show you the attention you are expecting. Step back and carefully observe whoever interests you. You may be better off to keep looking for someone able to love as strongly and passionately as you. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): You can do no wrong in the romance department. Get out, mingle and have fun, and you will not be alone for long. You’ll be sending the right signals and attracting partners that can match you step for step. Prepare to meet your destiny.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): You’ll attract someone who is looking for a short fling. Be careful not to be gullible and believe everything you are told. Slow down and refrain from getting involved with anyone trying to move too fast, especially if it’s a co-worker. CANCER (June 21-July 22): A serious attitude will attract interest when it comes to love, commitment and a long-term future with someone. Let your intentions, likes and dislikes be known, and you will discover someone who feels the same way. A match made in heaven is waiting for you.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Talk less, offer more and be willing to compromise if you want to find love. Don’t expect personal relationships to run smoothly. Go into any relationship that interests you with the intention of working through whatever baggage comes along with the partner you choose. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Just follow your heart, and you will end up with someone who is just as accommodating, loving and interested in a long and arduous relationship. Love and romance are on the rise, and discovering someone who shares your goals is in the stars

if you participate in something you enjoy. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Walk away from anyone showing interest who is involved with someone else. You will attract two-timers. If you aren’t careful, you will be charmed into a situation that will make it difficult to find that special someone. Pick partners who are 100 percent single. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Opportunity knocks and love enters. You will have no problem attracting someone special. Your secretive game play will ensure that whomever you end up with will be willing and able to match

your checkmate from beginning to end. Let the love flow but the mystery continue. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): You are heading down a slippery slope when it comes to love. Don’t suggest you love someone unless you do. Attracting a partner who doesn’t share the same values as you will not end well and may cost you your reputation. Avoid work-related affairs. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Being a little pushy when it comes to love will come across as attractive and sensual. Your confidence and charisma will capture plenty of attention and choice. Don’t take too long to

choose or try to keep too many partners dangling. Know what you want and seal the deal. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): You’ll attract a bully or overly possessive partner if you aren’t careful. If you play the role of a pushover, you will be taken advantage of. Don’t be afraid to be the one picking instead of the one being picked. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): The more you do for others, the more noticeable you will become to someone just as giving as you. Equality, passion and desire must be at the top of your list of what you want from someone you are going to share your life with.

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40 CITY NOVEMBER 27 - DECEMBER 3, 2013


November 27 - December 3, 2013 - City Newspaper