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 City

NOVEMBER 2-8, 2011


urban journal | by mary anna towler

Parsells Avenue Community Church invites you to a free community

EROI (Eastman Rochester Organ Initiative)

The Occupiers versus the selling of America The closer we get to the presidential election, the more worried I get — not just about the election outcome but also about what’s happening to the country. And what’s happening is being laid out in stark relief, in the data coming out of Washington, in the reaction to the Occupy movement, in the actions and attitude of political leaders. We’re a segregated nation: segregated by race, ethnicity, and geography, and we’re growing increasingly segregated by income and political philosophy. And while that is happening, the influence of money is growing in politics. The result could very well be a nation more oligarchy than democracy. You saw the statistics on income last week, from the Congressional Budget Office: The top 1 percent of Americans have gotten dramatically richer. Middleincome and poor Americans have lost ground. And the gap between the rich and the not-rich has gotten wider. The Occupy protesters, along with quite a few journalists, have been trying to wake us up to all this — with some success. Forty-three percent of the respondents in a recent New York Times-CBS poll said they agree with the views of the Occupiers; only 27 percent said they disagree. Sixty-six percent of the respondents said they believe wealth distribution in the US should be more equitable. But the Occupy protesters and the journalists don’t run the country. The people who do (and the people who don’t yet, but want to) have an entirely different view. Far from worrying about our wealth disparity, they’re perfectly happy with it. If we deserved to be rich, apparently, we would be. (The protesters, says Herman Cain, are “jealous.”) In an enlightening Times article last month, reporters Nelson Schwartz and Eric Dash reported on their interviews with Wall Street bankers about the Occupy protest. They were told that the protesters are a fringe group, that they’re “just bitter about their own economic fate,” and that rather than protest, they should be grateful to the financial industry. One money manager said he was “disappointed that members of Congress from New York, especially Senator Charles E. Schumer and Senator Kirsten Gillibrand, had not come out swinging for an industry that donates heavily to their campaigns,” Schwartz and Dash wrote. “‘They need to understand who their constituency is,’ he said.”

Wall Street knows that the US government has been bought and paid for, by itself and other big-money interests.”

PIPE ORGAN CONCERT

Sunday November 6th • 4PM Please join us for a special recital on the rare and newly re-discovered historic 1925 Skinner Co.-Opus 560 organ Parsells Avenue Community Church

(Listed in the National Register of Historic Places)

345 Parsells Avenue • Rochester (Off Culver Road) Visit our website for photos and audio:

www.parsellschurch.org

Uh huh. As Wall Street knows, the US government has been bought and paid for, by itself and other big-money interests. Will the Occupy movement have any lasting effect? Winter’s coming on, which will make things hard for the protesters in much of the country. Wall Street and the others don’t have to sit outside in the cold to press their influence. Phone calls, strolls through the halls of the Capitol, nice big checks: those’ll do the job. Maybe Occupy and other movements can rally Americans through the internet. Maybe concern will grow, and in next year’s election, voters will end money’s grip on elected officials. Maybe we’ll all come together. The Washington Post’s Eugene Robinson is hopeful. “If Americans were to realize they’ve been the victims of Republican-style redistribution — stealing from the poor to give to the rich — the whole political atmosphere might change,” he wrote last week. But then there are our other divisions. We’re united in name only. Much of the time, and on many of the important issues, we are poles apart — and distrustful. And intolerant, dismissive of any viewpoint but our own. Can this kind of populace be pulled together? We certainly have common interests. But even in the best of times, in this country, our differences can overwhelm our similarities. And this isn’t the best of times. And the country’s moneyed interests will be able to spend whatever it takes to buy whatever they want in Washington. And the Supreme Court has made it easier for them to do that. Winter or no winter, the Occupiers need to keep Occupying.

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City 


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Feedback We welcome your comments. Send them to themail@ rochester-citynews.com, or post them on our website, rochestercitynewspaper.com, our Facebook page, or our Twitter feed, @roccitynews. We edit selections for publication in print.

Otterness and MAG

The Memorial Art Gallery’s commission for sculpture by Tom Otterness resulted in protests from critics upset that as a young artist, he shot a dog and filmed its death. And our coverage of the controversy brought a flood of comments. Among them are these edited samples. In the late 1970’s, to celebrate her 50th birthday, Jackie Owens gathered a bunch of friends, collected as much as $100 from each and with the proceeds, commissioned an artist to design an anti-war billboard to be posted overlooking the Rochester Inner Loop. The billboard company at first refused to install the image showing a corpse on a slab. Eventually, the poster was erected but shown for only a short time. In the early 1980’s, to protest the proliferation of nuclear devices, artists throughout the city lay down on sidewalks and traced each others’ body outlines in chalk, to illustrate how many of our neighbors and friends would be dead should nuclear war not be relegated to the trash bin of history. In 1991, Dawson Gallery with the help of a few dedicated public and private citizens installed a largescale outdoor sculpture exhibit in Highland Park. Visitors were invited to stroll through the gardens and admire the sculpture at absolutely no cost. The sculptures were on view for three months before being returned to their makers nationwide. The event was never repeated. Nathan Lyons was the genius behind Montage ’93, a citywide art happening. Exhibits and art performances took place throughout downtown Rochester, in

nearly every museum, vacant building, and parking lot, and attracted the attention of national and international art admirers. Although the event was a huge success, it was never repeated. These events and others like them held the possibility of putting Rochester squarely in the cross-hairs of a unique art-community identity, just as more recently, with extravagant city support, the Jazz Festival has stamped us with pride of place and the financial boon that accompanies great creativity. Instead, we argue now over the qualities of an artist who makes bronze versions of Teletubbies, and the most creative idea we come up with is yet more lumps of metal placed on the grass. This is all so discouraging. SHIRLEY M. DAWSON

There are many artists willing to work on a project like this. Why select one who is capable of making such a completely amoral mistake? You don’t just accidentally disregard life and then say: “Hey, I was young and stupid; sorry about that. Now on to talking about the deep moral implications of my most recent art piece.” KRISLYN DILLARD

Focusing on Otterness and his action 34 years ago does nothing to stop animal cruelty. For example, it sheds no light on the daily abuse of millions of animals — particularly in the area of factory farming — and what role each of us has in this. And as an artist and someone who values the role art plays in our society, I’m deeply concerned about the far-reaching implications of this controversy. While I appreciate the dialogue it has brought forth, I would encourage the MAG to not give in to any of the protestors’ demands. I don’t want museum staff and board members to start making decisions about buying and exhibiting art based on a need to avoid controversy. One of the roles of art is to raise difficult questions and

challenge societal conventions. Museums provide a much needed public venue for this. If museums no longer fulfill this role, we will be left with the equivalent of motel-room paintings. I encourage others who feel as I do to speak out and show their support for the MAG. TANYA SMOLINSKY

The photos of his model and the rendering of the proposed sculptures showed the centerpiece to consist of a simplistic happy face stuck on top of a cone-like body with disproportionate limbs. This is the best artist MAG can find? The proposed statues rival even the poorest quality cartoon figures. I do like Mr. Otterness’s concept for the series of sculptures, though, and have a suggestion that would solve the dilemma: pay him for his idea, and commission a more talented artist to actually do the sculpting. CHRIS GLANTZ, PITTSFORD

Reading about the concept of a female figure sculpting a male figure, I envisioned something lifelike, and it sounded intriguing. I was dismayed to turn the page and to be confronted with “sculpture” which appears to be in the genre of the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade. Do these cartoon figures, disconnected from each other, represent the best that contemporary sculptors can create? DAVID W. SOULE, PENN YAN

There was no sane reason to tie a dog to a fence, shoot it, then film the dog’s tortured death. Nice guy; I’m sure he’s changed quite a bit. And if he has, why wouldn’t he contribute to helping animals instead of mentioning that gee, he’s been thinking about the episode for 34 years? SAM W.

I love the deer that roam the woods. It’s like art right outside my window, yet I know that every November, people have a right to get a hunting license to kill those beautiful animals. The “art” over many a fireplace


is a deer head with a full rack. Just yesterday, I read a report about the chambered nautilus, which has been fished to near extinction so that women can wear artistic jewelry made from the pearlescent shells. And those soft, calf ’s-leather gloves you love… you know they kill the calf to make those beautiful accessories, right? Do we insist the manufacturer apologize before we’re willing to buy its products? CATHY ANDERSON, IRONDEQUOIT

If Otterness was so inspired by Susan B. Anthony and her impact on championing women’s rights, how could MAG accept his proposal, which portrays an infantilized female whose only focus is on creating/finding a perfect male companion? Anthony challenged the status quo of women as property with few rights. MAG, like Wegmans or Macy’s, runs like any business, providing consumers what they ask for. It’s time to cease being consumers and propagators of the very violence that we oppose. JOHN CARBONARO

Otterness’s dog shooting “art” project at age 25 was certainly a reprehensible act. But I agree that his multi-decade repudiation of that act removes any disqualification of him for a MAG commission. And I also agree that MAG shouldn’t be timid and give in to every minor criticism thrown its way. However, I can’t help but hope that Otterness’s critics succeed. His proposed pieces don’t rise to the standard of existing outdoor sculpture in this area or any other that I’d like to spend time in. This was the best proposal that was submitted to MAG? Really? Damn. That certainly doesn’t speak highly of something: The state of sculpture in America. The drawing power of MAG for the best sculptors. The quality of the selection process. Something is seriously messed up, man. STEVE MURPHY

I’m so tired of this perceived code amongst “artists” that we must accept every thing being thrown at us so long as it is recognized as brilliant by the cool kids. Are you kidding me? It’s like an entire community of people with arrested development at best, utterly pretentious at any rate. I don’t care if Otterness has sculpted monuments that make the Gods weep, the MAG is a business run on funding from private members. If they choose to alienate anyone with a conscience for the sake of appearing hip to the “notice me, notice me” art community, that’s their choice. It’s the choice of the members to walk away. LISA SKAVIENSKI

We have so many REAL, on-going problems that it’s a shame to get distracted by non-issues. We have a huge problem with pet overpopulation. Breeders and pet stores sell the products of puppy mills. Local governments are passing breed-specific legislation, banning pit bulls and other so-called “vicious” breeds. And if that’s not bad enough for you, there’s animal agriculture: around nine billion animals are slaughtered each year in the US. (And by the way, why are there no vegan options on the menu for the restaurant that’s inside the MAG?). If you want to help animals, then adopt homeless pets from shelters or rescue groups (not from breeders or pet stores), make sure all your pets are spayed/neutered, and stop eating animals and animal products. ALEX CHERNAVSKY

The thing that is beginning to take over my ire at the inclusion of this guy’s sculpture is the attitude of Grant Holcomb about it: an “in-your-face” refusal to back away from what must certainly be called a massive protest. HJ CRAVER

I’m surprised we haven’t heard from Fisher-Price about this. They’ll be pretty angry about this guy stealing their designs for people. I have an F-P family camper at home, and

News. Music. Life. Greater Rochester’s Alternative Newsweekly November 2-8, 2011 Vol 41 No 8 250 North Goodman Street Rochester, New York 14607-1199 themail@rochester-citynews.com phone (585) 244-3329 fax (585) 244-1126 rochestercitynewspaper.com On the cover: Photo illustration by Matt DeTurck Publishers: William and Mary Anna Towler Editor: Mary Anna Towler Asst. to the publishers: Matt Walsh Editorial department themail@rochester-citynews.com Features editor: Eric Rezsnyak News editor: Christine Carrie Fien Staff writers: Tim Louis Macaluso, Jeremy Moule Music editor: Willie Clark Music writer: Frank De Blase Calendar editor: Rebecca Rafferty Contributing writers: Kate Antoniades, Paloma Capanna, Casey Carlsen, Roman Divezur, George Grella, Susie Hume, Andy Klingenberger, Dave LaBarge, Kathy Laluk, Michael Lasser, James Leach, Ron Netsky, Dayna Papaleo, Rebecca Rafferty, David Yockel Jr. Editorial intern: Eric LaClair, Deb Schleede Art department artdept@rochester-citynews.com Production manager: Max Seifert Designers: Aubrey Berardini, Matt DeTurck Photographers: Frank De Blase, Matt DeTurck, Michael Hanlon Advertising department ads@rochester-citynews.com Advertising sales manager: Betsy Matthews Account executives: Tom Decker, Annalisa Iannone, William Towler Classified sales representatives: Christine Kubarycz, Tracey Mykins Operations/Circulation info@rochester-citynews.com Circulation Assistant: Katherine Stathis Distribution: Andy DiCiaccio, David Riccioni, Northstar Delivery City Newspaper is available free of charge. Additional copies of the current issue may be purchased for $1, payable in advance at the City Newspaper office. City Newspaper may be distributed only by authorized distributors. No person may, without prior written permission of City Newspaper, take more than one copy of each weekly issue. City (ISSN 1551-3262) is published weekly by WMT Publications, Inc. Periodical postage paid at Rochester, NY (USPS 022-138). Send address changes to City, 250 North Goodman Street, Rochester, NY 14607. City is a member of the Association of Alternative Newsweeklies and the New York Press Association. Subscriptions: $35.00 ($30.00 for senior citizens) for one year. Add $10 yearly for out-of-state subscriptions: add $30 yearly for foreign subscriptions. Due to the initial high cost of establishing new subscriptions, refunds for fewer than ten months cannot be issued. Copyright by WMT Publications Inc., 2011 - all rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, photocopying, recording or by any information storage retrieval system without permission of the copyright owner.

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City 


[ news from the week past ]

County budget proposal out

Monroe County Executive Maggie Brooks proposed a $1.1-billion budget for 2012 that keeps the tax rate flat at $8.99 per $1,000 of assessed value. In response, Democrats said that Monroe County residents will pay more in taxes through increases in charge-backs, which are fees charged directly to residents of a town for a county service.

Superintendent search firm hired, committee formed

The city school board voted to contract with the search firm Ray and Associates to help identify candidates for the permanent superintendent position. The decision was made over the objections of some local education-activist groups. The board also appointed eight people to serve as advisors to the search. They are: Jack Cannon, CEO of Cannon Industries; Carlos Carballada, city commissioner; Loretta Scott, City Council member; Emeterio Otero, dean at Monroe Community College; and RCSD parents Giancarlo Giannini, Felix Jacobs, Kimberly McKinsey-Mabry, and Victoria Robertson.

Plan to diversify RFD

able to take a firefighter entrance examination being given early next year. The goal is to try to increase diversity in the RFD. And City Council President Lovely Warren, City Council member Adam McFadden, and Fire Chief John Caufield will visit African American and Latino churches to inform minority communities about careers in firefighting.

News ACTIVISM | BY JEREMY MOULE

The fight for Washington Square

City seeks pay if Paetec pulls out

Though Paetec’s stockholders approved Windstream’s purchase of the company, state and federal regulatory approvals are still needed. And City of Rochester officials are pressing the state agencies to include compensation to Rochester if Windstream abandons the Midtown project.

Vargas warns of $41 million gap

RCSD Interim Superintendent Bolgen Vargas says the district faces a $41-million budget gap next school year caused by rising transportation, employee, and building expenses. Vargas proposed a combination of cost-cutting measures and a plan to lobby state lawmakers to increase funding to the district.

Rosemary Rivera speaks to Occupy Rochester activists last Friday. Photo by mIKE HANLON

Only city residents will be

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Occupy Rochester presented a letter to Mayor Tom Richards yesterday, inviting the mayor to participate in one of Occupy’s daily general assembly meetings. A handful of Occupiers was supposed to meet with Richards at City Hall yesterday to discuss the occupation of Washington Square Park, but plans changed. “We feel that discussion should be done openly and in the presence of the General Assembly,” the letter says. “We cannot possibly represent truly the positions of all involved parties with a small delegation as was requested.” Occupy Rochester has also asked Richards to dismiss the charges against Occupiers who have been arrested, though it’s not clear Richards has that power. Occupy Rochester has established a permanent presence in Washington Square Park, though it’s not the way group members originally planned. Occupiers tried to spend the night in Washington Square last Friday, with the goal of establishing an around-the-clock occupation there. But the attempt ended in 32 arrests. City officials say park hours are

being strictly enforced for safety and sanitary reasons. The group has been maintaining a presence in the park from 5 a.m. to 11 p.m. When Washington Square closes at 11 p.m., several Occupiers march on the sidewalk around the park. Some occupiers say around-the-clock occupation is crucial to provide an alwaysopen forum where anyone can drop in for discussion or workshops. “It allows for a constant progressive social space,” says occupier Colin O’Malley, organizing director for Metro Justice. The occupiers also want to signal that they aren’t going away. “We feel the other venues that we’ve had to air our grievances, we’re shut out of: Congress, the executive, the halls of power,” says occupier Brian Lenzo. “We feel ignored, and so we go to the spaces we know: our campuses, our public parks, and our city’s streets.” Occupy Rochester plans to march on City Hall at 4 p.m. Wednesday, though that plan may change. Regardless, there will be some form of action on Wednesday.


Cost of War “We’re there to talk about what they’re feeling. When a tragedy like a death of a student happens, it brings up all kinds of feelings. It may evoke memories of a grandmother who died or the death of a favorite aunt.” [ Audrey Cummings ]

EDUCATION | BY TIM LOUIS MACALUSO

PUBLIC HEALTH | BY JEREMY MOULE

Special team responds to crises in schools

City, county at odds over lead funds

As news broke that a student had been killed in an accident at School 33, a team of specially trained volunteers from the city school district was dispatched to console children and adults. Some students were near the site when the accident occurred earlier this year and were showing signs of stress, says Gladys Bonnie Rubenstein, Gladys Pedraza-Burgos, and Audrey Cummings Pedraza-Burgos, the Photo by mike hanlon district’s chief of youth development and that these events can have a profound family services. impact on students’ emotional health and “Trauma is felt by just about everyone academic performance. in the school when something like this Pedraza-Burgos heads the district’s happens,” she says. “It can’t be treated like crisis intervention team: a core group a normal event where everybody just goes of about 20 counselors, social workers, back to whatever they were doing.” teachers, and psychologists professionally Every year in school districts across the trained in grief counseling. They respond country, students, teachers, and school to emergency calls 24 hours a day, staff have to cope with the unexpected: a much like volunteer firefighters. When student dies in a car accident, a teacher an incident occurs, group members dies from a sudden illness. Studies show continues on page 16

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Members of City Council and County Legislature Democrats are calling on County Executive Maggie Brooks to restore money for lead inspections in Rochester. Brooks’ 2012 proposed budget contains $220,000 to fund lead inspections through the end of the city’s fiscal year. The funding, about $440,000 annually, ends after that. | Last year marked the first uptick in reported child lead-poisoning cases in 10 years. | “The county’s going to be eliminating its contribution at the worst possible time,” says Legislator Carrie Andrews. | County officials say the increase is minor and doesn’t indicate a trend. | In 2010, the county eliminated a program that required landlords to perform safety assessments, including lead testing, before housingassistance recipients moved in. The program was ineffective, says county spokesperson Noah Lebowitz. | Although the county ended the program, it did promise to give the city one more year of funding, so city officials could improve the certificate of occupancy inspections, Lebowitz says. | City and county staff, along with community advocates, are discussing ways to more efficiently and effectively detect and abate lead, he says.

4,482 US servicemen and servicewomen, 318 Coalition servicemen and servicewomen, and approximately 103,253 to 112,822 Iraqi civilians have been killed in Iraq from the beginning of the war and occupation to October 28. American casualties from October 17 to 25: -- Pfc. Steven F. Shapiro, 29, Hidden Valley Lake, Calif. -- Capt. Shawn P. T. Charles, 40, Hickory, N.C. -- Sgt. 1st Class David G. Robinson, 28, Winthrop Harbor, Ill. IRAQ TOTALS —

AFGHANISTAN TOTALS

1,822 US servicemen and servicewomen and 957 Coalition servicemen and servicewomen have been killed in Afghanistan from the beginning of the war and occupation to October 28. Statistics for Afghan civilian casualties are not available. American casualties from October 19 to 26: -- 1st. Lt. Ashley I. White, 24, Alliance, Ohio -- Sgt. 1st Class Kristoffer B. Domeij, 29, San Diego, Calif. -- Pfc. Christopher A. Horns, 20, Colorado Springs, Colo. -- Sgt. Paul A. Rivera, 26, Round Rock, Texas -- Sgt. John A. Lyons, 26, Seaside Park, N.J. —

iraqbodycount. org, icasualties.org, Department of Defense SOURCES:

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City 


ELECTIONS | BY JEREMY MOULE AND CHRISTINE CARRIE FIEN

County exec: the race that wasn’t Democrats in the County Legislature would be surprised, if not astonished, to hear that — at least according to Monroe County Executive Maggie Brooks — the majority of their proposals get through the Legislature. “I’m not sure what she means by that,” says Democratic Minority Leader Ted O’Brien. “If she’s talking about administrative referrals, like accepting a grant from the University of Rochester, 90 percent or more are passed unanimously. In terms of referrals initiated by Democrats, the record is abysmal. We can’t get referrals through.” In fact, we can remember less than a handful of Democratic proposals passing during eight years of Brooks’ leadership. Most are killed in committee or banished to bureaucratic hell, never getting more than perfunctory discussion. The referral spin was the biggest “Oh, come on, Maggie,” moment we had interviewing the county executive. Brooks faces Democrat Sandra Frankel, longtime

supervisor of the Town of Brighton, in her third, and last, run for the county’s top job. The county executive is limited to three terms. The Brooks-Frankel contest should’ve been a barn-burner: two high-profile and well-respected local pols, both arguably at or near the top of their games. But somehow, we feel cheated. Maybe it’s money: our rockstar county executive bleeds cash, and even a resurrected JFK might have trouble keeping

up. Maybe it’s apathy: Frankel’s campaign seems to have suffered from a peculiar ennui right from the start. Whatever the cause or combination of causes, you can’t help but feel the community deserved better. Frankel, who probably would’ve cruised to re-election in Brighton had she not jumped into the county executive race, has focused on the ethical lapses in the Brooks administration. She’s paid special attention to questionable business expenses charged by the former airport director — the “cigars and strip clubs” scandal — and the allegations of favoritism in a local development corporation deal. She’s promised to open up county authorities and LDCs and to create stronger oversight. Election-year scandals are a rare gift from the political gods, but Frankel hasn’t been able to capitalize. Nothing sticks to the likeable Brooks.

Brooks has painted Frankel as a taxand-spend Democrat, citing tax increases in Brighton during Frankel’s tenure, as well as Frankel’s own salary increases. She’s also repeatedly pounded her promise not to raise the tax rate: a message that does seem to resonate with voters, even though Brooks has found crafty ways to raise money. One example: MCC charge-backs, which are essentially user fees for people who attend the college. Such tactics allow Brooks to stick to the letter, if not the spirit of her promise. In separate interviews, Brooks and Frankel spoke on a wide range of issues facing the county, including property taxes, spending priorities, MCC’s future, and the use of economic-development incentives. The following are edited versions of those conversations.

Maggie Brooks CITY: What are you most proud of over your two terms as county executive?

Brooks: When I took this job in 2004, we immediately established three priorities: tax stability, job creation, and quality of life. And under that quality of life umbrella was establishing a new relationship with the City of Rochester because at the time, there really was not a strong relationship between the city and the county. Fast-forward eight years later, I’m proud of our record of results in those areas. The tax rate has been stable since 2004: it’s actually lower than when I took office. Job creation: Government doesn’t create jobs, the private sector does, but through our assistance programs we’ve supported about 1,000 companies. I don’t think it matters what I say about our quality of life. It’s really what others have said. Our quality of life has been nationally recognized on a number of different levels. People appreciate that Monroe County’s a good place to live, work, and raise a family. How is your relationship with city government? It didn’t seem so great after the collapse of Renaissance Square.

Monroe County Executive Maggie Brooks: “Aren’t we past this archaic, destructive mantra that the county doesn’t support the city?” Photo by matt deturck  City

NOVEMBER 2-8, 2011

That was kind of a media perception that it wasn’t so hot after Ren Square. I guess I didn’t characterize it as that. When I took office, there was not a huge relationship between the city and the county. I really focused on changing that.

My very first project I proposed as county executive was a massive redevelopment project in downtown Rochester: Ren Square. So right out of the gate I said to the City of Rochester, “You’re my priority.” Since that time I think I’ve enjoyed great relationships with Bob Duffy and the new mayor. I think sometimes the media tries to portray conflict because it’s more exciting than when we all get along. But the reality is you don’t base a relationship on one project or one anything. It’s a historical track record. We’ve done a lot with the city the last eight years. A lot of our incentives have been used in the city to help create jobs within the city boundaries. A lot of our public-safety initiatives have focused on the city. So we really are more partners today than we were eight years ago. Is it really fair to say you’ve kept the property tax rate flat when you’ve increased other fees and instituted MCC charge-backs — essentially a user fee for people who go there?

I think it is a fair characterization. Either you lower the rate or you don’t, and the rate is lower than when we took office. We hear it all the time: people want us to consolidate, they want us to collaborate. If you look at those “below-the-line” continues on page 10


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City 


Maggie Brooks continues from page 8

charges like MCC, (named for where they appear on your tax bill), those are all our collaborations within the community. And putting them below the line has been a way to pay for them. Some people would like to say that every time we consolidate a service, the county pays for it. The 911 system is kind of an example of that. We bear the cost, but it’s a collaboration that we should be proud of. Without those below-the-line charges, every town would have to have a Board of Elections, every town would have to have its own 911 center. Those are things we’ve taken on as a responsibility for the community, but we don’t necessarily have the ability to pay for them. The county can’t pay for everything. The MCC below the line is actually a user fee for communities that have students at MCC. They’re paying based on the number of students who attend. But how can you compare MCC chargebacks with the 911 system or the Board of Elections? Chili residents aren’t charged based on how many times they call 911, and Penfield residents don’t pay more if they happen to have more people who vote.

I still think it’s fair and equitable. It still gives anyone in this community access to affordable education. It helps us sustain our commitment and our investment to MCC. So you can say, “It’s different than these other things.” I think all of those things represent our collective goal of funding things that enhance quality of life in a creative way. Let me use the public safety training facility as an example. Some would say that they are disproportionately paying, from a town perspective, for services that are used mainly by the City of Rochester Police Department. If you look at what we do there, the bulk of that benefits the RPD. So you can make the same comparison. I think instead of trying to divide and conquer and saying, “Perinton is paying this. And the City of Rochester is disproportionately paying for MCC…” These are things that our community has said are priorities that we need to pay for. The county also eliminated funding for downtown police.

Actually, no. We shifted it. The reality is that the police department had been provided security at Frontier Field, which is a county facility. Under the previous mayor, the city decided it was not going to do that anymore, so what 10 City NOVEMBER 2-8, 2011

we did is say, “OK, we need to take some of that money. If we’re going to have to pay for security at Frontier, we’re going to have to shift some of those dollars.” (RPD officers are still assigned to Frontier. They are paid by the Greater Rochester Sports Authority — the entity that oversees the operation of Frontier Field, according to city spokesperson Gary Walker.) There was a lot that went into this calculation of $350,000 being shifted to other areas of public safety within the county budget. Some of that offset the city’s commitment to the crime lab — we received some of it, not all of it. Some of that was Frontier Field dollars. Some of that was money the city owed for some of the bookings that we do in the city lockup. It’s a very complex issue. We still have a huge investment in public safety downtown when you look at things like the crime lab. That investment has actually grown. To say that we eliminated money for downtown patrol is not a fair statement to the county. Aren’t we past this archaic, destructive mantra that the county doesn’t support the city? I think practice has shown that’s not the case. What are your guiding principles for economic development?

I go out and listen to businesses. I ask the question: “Why are you here?” And businesses will tell me three things every time: access to a highly skilled workforce — and I think that really speaks to the level of higher education that we have here. I think it speaks to the intellectual property, the spirit of innovation and entrepreneurship that we have. The second thing is quality of life. That is short commute times, affordable housing stock, quality of our schools, arts and culture. And thirdly are incentives. People can say that incentives shouldn’t be a priority when we’re helping business, but the reality is that companies have a choice. And sometimes they will choose to go elsewhere unless we can level the playing field. Unless we can say to a company, “We want your jobs. We want your presence in Monroe County, so we’re going to help you in any way that we can.” Do you really believe that the state comptroller’s audit of Upstate Telecommunications Corporation was politically motivated? That seems a stretch: that the office would spend time, energy, and money just to damage your reputation. Does the report contain anything of value?

We’ve had dozens of audits. Audits in a


Friday

Happy Hour large company are part of annual practice. That’s a good thing. It protects everybody. But I think it’s highly unusual that eight years after UTC was implemented, the comptroller suddenly decides to do an audit: uncharacteristically releases a scathing press release with the audit, and a draft of the audit was leaked. There were just some unique things that happened with his particular audit that made me question the timing and the motivation. This happened eight years ago. Not one legislator, Democratic or otherwise, has raised one issue with this program — even when I ran in 2007. If this was such a horrible thing, why wasn’t it raised then? Oh, because I didn’t have an opponent. So why waste it? You hear the Democrats talk about, “$8 million taxpayer dollars wasted.” Those are not dollars wasted. Those are projected dollars. That money hasn’t been spent, and that’s where the disagreement is. The comptroller says, “We disagree with your projections.” So we’re trying to work with them to reconcile where the difference is. Here’s what I say about UTC: it’s a public-private partnership that in the private sector would be applauded. In government, it’s investigated. It’s helped us purchase phone systems and state-of-theart computer systems. We would not be able to do this without this partnership. Let’s just look at the big picture: airport, Water Authority, UTC — whatever else they’ve thrown in there. To me, the whole concept of scandal is a manufactured concept by the Democrats. These phrases: “big rigging, culture of corruption” — all manufactured by the Democratic Party and the Democratic leadership during a campaign season. You’ve resisted calls by Democrats to establish an independent office of public integrity, similar to the city’s office.

The office of public integrity in the city truly is a spin-off for people who leave the Rochester Police Department. City administration signs their paychecks. How do you police an organization that you’re beholding to for your livelihood? We have an independent office that is run by two individuals who have a tremendous record of law enforcement integrity in this community. Eugene Welch: look at his track record with the state police and law enforcement. Don Chesworth used to be a district attorney here. (Attorneys Welch and Chesworth comprise the Brooks-established Independent Accountability Counsel.) They are truly an independent entity. I don’t pay their salaries. We have a

To me, the whole concept of scandal is a manufactured concept by the Democrats.” m aggie brooks

contractual relationship with them, but they are not located in our office. So I think our model is better. To say that we don’t have an office of public integrity is a lie, because we do. We have a whistleblower hotline. We have an ethics program for employees at all of our entities. So I’m very comfortable with the policing mechanism for county government. The idea that if you have an office of public integrity that miraculously you’ll never have another issue is ridiculous. Some people are critical of the county’s use of LDCs: the fact that the same people — loyal Republicans — keep appearing on their boards and that the LDCs have limited transparency and accountability.

You know, people forget — and probably it’s selective memory — I have led by example in this state in making our LDCs and our authorities ethical and compliant with state law. Even before there was a Public Authorities Reform Act (passed by the state in 2009), we implemented ethics requirements for all of our authorities and LDCs. All of their meetings are open to the public. All of their annual reports and all of their minutes and notes are public documents. We’ve done our job. We’ve gone above and beyond. We put all these rules and restrictions in place so that they are open, transparent, and accessible. I don’t know what more you can do. Every LDC is created with the authority and the approval of the Monroe County Legislature. So every LDC has gotten the sign-off of an elected representative. Every time there is a contractual alteration in an LDC, it comes back to the MCL. So again, these are public entities. They’re not working behind closed doors. We get results using this model, whether it’s energy savings, technology savings, public safety communications savings. The taxpayers are the winners in this structure. My opinion? Public-private partnerships will be the salvation of government, because continues on page 12

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we can’t continue to do what we do at the government level with the level of funding and resources we have. You could only raise taxes so much. What’s the latest on MCC’s new downtown campus?

The misconception is that there was a pot of money as part of Renaissance Square that’s just sitting there, waiting to be spent. There is no money for MCC. When MCC decides where it’s going to go, I have to take that proposal to the Legislature, and they have to approve the

borrowing of the money for that campus. And the county borrowing triggers the state portion, because it’s 50-50. The budget is $72 million. That doesn’t mean it needs to be $72 million. It would be nice if it was less. And to be honest, it can’t be much more, because I think the community’s tolerance for spending money on public projects is less than it was when MCC was part of Ren Square. We’re gun shy in this community about public projects: look at what’s happened. And people see Midtown now, kind of sitting there, kind of on hold. And that

makes everybody a little more nervous about leaping into something. But at the end of the day, it’s got to be about the future of students and the future of MCC. My job is to support MCC in that process. I think MCC is very appropriately taking its time. We don’t want to rush forward on something and get it wrong. I’d rather take a little extra time and have MCC get it right.

Sandra Frankel Why did you decide to run for county executive?

As I looked at the condition of Monroe County government and the impact that it had on our community, it was clear that many of the problems facing Monroe County were not dissimilar to what I had inherited when I first took office as Brighton town supervisor. I love our community and want it to be the very best place to live, work, and raise a family and thought that I could make a difference for our county just as I had done in Brighton. I thought it was worth the risk to move forward and run for Monroe County executive with the intent of opening county government, making it more transparent and accessible, and more inclusive. We need to end the scandals, the mismanagement, the lack of oversight, the illegal activity, the waste of precious taxpayer dollars. I have the experience, commitment, and passion to do that for our entire county. You’ve focused a lot on the county’s use of local development corporations. Are they a bad thing?

Local development corporations serve an appropriate purpose, particularly for economic development. But when LDCs are used to simply shift traditional county operations and functions into a private entity where the public loses oversight ability and transparency, that becomes a problem and a real concern. It is really undermining access to information, proper review, and oversight and opens the door to abuse or worse. Within county government and the entities it has created, a pattern has emerged with a litany of scandals. If it were a one-time incident, you could say an individual or two went down the wrong path. There is a clear pattern with a number of the same people moving from one organization to another: this tight network of political pals and political insiders controlling and manipulating these entities. 12 City NOVEMBER 2-8, 2011

Democrat Sandra Frankel, longtime supervisor of the Town of Brighton, on her run for Monroe County executive: “We’ve got the work force, we’ve got the focus, and we’ve got the resources to support a significant expansion of our economy.” Photo by matt deturck

You see that the county executive’s performance shows poor management, mismanagement, a lack of oversight, and a lack of accountability. What would be your plan for the county?

One issue is restoring integrity. From my perspective that means an expectation of performance of the highest caliber. To that end I would hire the best and the brightest

people who have professional expertise and competence. One of the most important things we must do is create jobs. And to do that we have to take affirmative and aggressive steps to grow the economy. That means incentives and support for startups, small and medium-sized businesses here in our community, as well as recruiting industries and business to our area that can build on our strengths.


We’ve got the work force, we’ve got the focus, and we’ve got the resources to support a significant expansion of our economy. But to do that we have to have everybody working together, having identified where we want to go and how we’re going to get there: so having the county executive work more closely with the business community, labor, our educational institutions. I would be a strong advocate and partner in the effort with the city and the entire community. We’ve got to have a cohesive plan that identifies particular industries that our area wants to pursue and recruit and to grow here. And the investments through tax breaks need to focus on the types of industries and business that will create new, good jobs. Do you think the county’s current economic development system is working?

It’s encouraging that our region is beginning to rebound with a growth in jobs. But if you look at the specific areas where those jobs are being created, by and large they’re in our surrounding counties. Regional development is critically important for all of us, but we also need jobs in Monroe County. Some of that includes reform of COMIDA, so that the tax incentives that we make available really go to recruit businesses to this area that have a choice of locating anywhere in the state, in the country, perhaps in the world; that we reform the policies of COMIDA so that they are tied to real job creation, with enforcement; and that if there are crosstown moves it isn’t simply to move from one location to another, but rather because there’s going to be real job growth, and that job growth requires a different location. And then work with the city and our suburban communities to have in place the infrastructure that will make new development available, to make areas shovel ready, and to encourage adaptive reuse of vacant buildings. There’s also an issue of defining what types of businesses will not be eligible, and enforcement of policies that COMIDA has established. We had a hotel in Brighton that applied for COMIDA tax abatements and exemptions. The intent was to create one new job. We didn’t know what kind of job that would be, but one new job. And the value of the tax breaks was approximately $250,000. We challenged that. At the end of the day, the hotel property owner withdrew the COMIDA application and decided to go forward and make whatever improvements were planned anyway. COMIDA can play a valuable role in recruiting, retaining, and helping business to grow. But the practices that COMIDA has followed are a giveaway to anyone who walks in the door. That’s not sound policy. You’ve said that when you became Brighton supervisor, you got the town out of a pretty

substantial structural deficit and that it required “significant belt-tightening and tough decisions.” What did you do and what was your process?

When I first took office, I brought in a really terrific finance director. And when I say that I would hire the best and the brightest, that’s without regard to political party affiliation. The finance director I appointed was a Republican [Ken Rohr, who is now a Fairport village trustee]. I appointed people who were experts and who had a commitment to public service and to serving the people of the community, not serving political friends. We started to take a hard look at the budget and quickly discovered that the 1992 fiscal year would have ended in a shortfall if we didn’t take immediate steps to reverse that. One of the things I had promised during the campaign, which I fulfilled, was rolling my salary back, eliminating the perks of the supervisor’s car and cell phone. But beyond that, I froze spending, eliminated redundant positions, and our unions agreed to freeze their salaries with the intent of being made whole when we resolved the financial problem. I got cooperation from everyone. We also had to raise taxes because our predecessors had overestimated revenues, underestimated expenses, used one-time revenues for ongoing operating expenses, and had spent the fund balance down to almost nothing.

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What did you learn that would be valuable to the county budget process?

Being open, transparent, and accessible is an essential part of developing a budget for public service. I established a budget review task force with volunteers from the community who have expertise — in finance, banking, organizational management, law, and other relevant areas — to provide feedback and guidance through the budget development process. I would establish a budget advisory council for the county that would be a permanent council and would provide perspectives on the budget development process and on the budget itself. I also would submit the budget to the County Legislature no later than October so that the Legislature would have time to review and consider the budget before making any changes and taking action. And so that the public would have an opportunity to consider the priorities, and to express their views on what the budget proposes for the coming year. And so that the voters would be informed going into the election in November. Functions have been shifted to the county services-to-localities line, and that levy has gone up tremendously. And I will say that much of that is Monroe Community College, which is a gem that the community supports. The cost of Monroe Community College is not distributed equitably across continues on page 14

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the county. By moving it to that line, they also changed the funding base and it is now based on a formula related to the number of students who enroll from your particular municipality. The way that translates is that the places that have a lower income base will likely have more students attending. The places that can least afford it are paying the most. From my point of view, Monroe Community College is an asset that benefits the entire county, not just the particular students who happen to attend. County Executive Brooks often touts her pledge to keep the property tax rate flat. What would be your approach to property taxes?

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The rate is flat but the levy has gone up seven times in seven years: above the rate of inflation. My intent would be to keep taxes flat. I believe there is a substantial amount of waste in county government based on what we know today. And there is likely more to be found: for example, a county office building leased for several hundred thousand dollars a year when that building is nearly vacant. That’s pure waste. And then you’ve got the use of taxpayer dollars to pay the cost to LDCs, where there’s waste. There are things that we can do in the short term, but we also need to take a longer view and look at how we’re going to be more cost-effective. One of the things we did in Brighton, and this is a small example, but our predecessors were leasing most every vehicle. We looked at that and decided that we would be better off purchasing the vehicles, keeping them well-maintained, and increasing the mileage limit before we would surplus the vehicles. We eliminated the interest costs that come with leasing and we kept the cars longer. Which areas of the budget deserve more funding, and which could be cut?

I can give you an example of a couple of areas that I think are important to address. One is funding for lead inspection. There is talk that those funds might be reduced or cut. We had seen a continuing decline in lead-poisoning cases among children. That trend was very positive. Most recently there was an uptick in lead poisoning. We’ve got to make sure that doesn’t happen; that we continue to invest in short-term, costeffective approaches like lead inspections. It also creates jobs: not just for the lead inspectors, but for the building trades who are involved with the repairs that may be needed for the remediation of lead paint and painting to encapsulate it. Another is investment in early childhood day care: early childhood education with sufficient slots for income-eligible children in day care programs. We know from

The county executive’s performance shows poor management, mismanagement, a lack of oversight, and a lack of accountability.” SANDR A FRA NKE L

research that Head Start is effective in helping kids be more successful when they enter school and that bodes well for their progress going forward. You also have the benefit of the parents being able to continue to work and to move themselves up and help them move to better-paying jobs and progressing in their occupations and careers. If the slots are cut, then parents may have to quit their jobs and that puts an additional economic burden on society. Areas that are ripe for trimming have to do with the issuance of consultant fees for revolving door employment, for rental of properties that aren’t really needed by the county, for abuses as a result of lack of administrative oversight, and implementation of sound fiscal policies. Where should the MCC downtown campus go? And you’ve asked for a realistic timetable on the decision. What is realistic?

I would like to see a decision on a downtown campus within the next year at the latest. Monroe Community College needs an appropriate place downtown: we need to provide appropriate space for continuing education that is accessible and appropriate and affordable. I favor the area around Sibley’s and Midtown, but obviously the details of the studies that have been done need to be reviewed. I think that for downtown development, having a vibrant area in the center of downtown in that Sibley’s-downtown area would be a tremendous boost.


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immediately report to the team supervisor for a briefing, and a plan is developed for members to deploy to the scene. “There’s a specific protocol we follow,” Pedraza-Burgos says. “We’ve spent many hours developing this.” Though each situation is different, in most cases, the district’s communications department alerts parents to what’s happening. Ideally, parents and students shouldn’t learn about the tragedy through news reports, say district officials and the crisis intervention team. Team members tell parents to watch for changes in their children’s behavior as a result of the crisis, such as not eating, difficulty sleeping, or being afraid to return to school. “If we don’t deal with the socialemotional concerns, the problems will come out behaviorally with students,” says Bonnie Rubenstein, director of counseling for city schools. Crisis team members usually set up a command center at the school where an event has occurred. They meet with principals and teachers to help identify who may need help, and then go to classrooms to provide counseling. “We’re there to talk about what they’re feeling,” says Audrey Cummings, the district’s director of social work and psychology. “When a tragedy like a death of a student happens, it brings up all kinds of feelings. It may evoke memories of a grandmother who died or the death of a favorite aunt.” The team also provides support to teachers, district staff, and family members of those involved in the crisis. Their work can last from a day to several weeks. “Grief and loss is an ongoing issue for the district, partly because of its sheer size,” Pedraza-Burgos says. “That, and the way we handle it, are probably what set us apart from most other districts.”

Feedback continues from page 5

the toy people look EXACTLY like these sculptures. TONY

I have a great admiration for Tom Otterness. It is not by accident that he was chosen to install his sculptures at our Memorial Art Gallery. Rochester needs a miracle. We would all agree with that. Through him we will once again be on the world map in ways unimaginable to us right now. To me he is a healer and a teacher of what is possible in the face of modern-day stoning and adversity. INGA SONGBIRD

People are always looking for apologies, forgetting, of course, the etymology of the word: a defense or justification. Otterness has defined his transgression as “indefensible” and so it is. Requests for reparations in the form of donations, for example, are akin to a never-ending blackmail. Since the controversy will never be allowed to recede, what I would like to see is an acceptance of this

For DA, Doorley is best qualified

Monroe County currently has one of the most respected and effective district attorneys in recent history, Mike Green. His reputation as an effective litigator and administrator has reached beyond New York to the White House where he has been tapped to be a federal judge, a position which carries a lifetime appointment. Mike has tapped Sandra Doorley, his first assistant district attorney, to run for District Attorney. Her experience and professionalism should be enough to convince even the most die-hard Republican that she’s more than qualified to fill this position, Mike’s confidence in her abilities should seal the deal. How then can the most recent poll numbers be explained? Is money once again determining the direction Monroe County will be taking when this election is over? Is the Republican

period by Otterness on his website as part of his whole self, and a discussion of how he now sees the balance between art and ethics. Perhaps even a dialog or roundtable with other artists. Which is our higher purpose: to punish Otterness or to learn from his experience? SRW

I was at MAG looking at art and overheard a patient and knowledgeable security person talk with an apparently upset patron about the controversy. All the while I am taken by the room full of art around me: a room full of real impaled insects. We live in a society of ongoing immense cruelty to animals, but some humans have singularized the issue down mostly to the treatment of pets, and within that, mostly dogs. How many animals are killed to feed a pet dog for a year? How many owners would consider the vegetarian route for their dogs? Would anyone so much as blink if MAG regularly served veal at their social funcparty’s $300,000 backing of a candidate with no experience going to mean the least qualified will win? I think we owe Mike Green more than that. I am sure it came as no surprise to her committee that Sandra Doorley did not get the endorsement of the police union. After all, she sent four of its members to jail. But is the pursuit of corruption enough to deny her the nod? I would argue that cleaning out the ranks so that the remaining members are able to do their jobs without impunity might be a worthwhile service. When November 8 rolls around, we will find out if justice is truly for sale, because if Sandra Doorley’s opponent is victorious the people of Monroe County will have sold out. MICHAEL DONOGHUE

Brooks’ ‘Teflon’

What is it about “Teflon Maggie” Brooks getting

tions? Of if they had great art depicting livestock? What if the presumed heinous artist had instead been a run-of-the-mill, irresponsible owner and facilitated the birth of many unwanted puppies? Or been a run-of-the-mill, drink-toomuch driver and had run over a few dogs? Or simply liked to blow off steam by going out hunting? The outrage over this isolated incident should generate some serious discussions. TED

An art museum should not be placed in the position of defending an artist’s character. They should be able to defend the character of the art. Let’s be honest: all verbal explanations of the intent of the two 13-foot sculptures aside, the figures are not worthy or to the quality one would expect from the MAG — period! It is unfortunate that the MAG and the committees decided to put the Gallery in this unfortunate position. ONTARIO1

a pass on every scandal, investigation, and issue of wrong-doing? My observation is that it’s based on sexist thinking. In conversations with business people, men and women alike, too many think that the 56-year-old Brooks is “just a nice girl.” (Is this code for “simpleton?”) They believe that she doesn’t know what the “bad people” she hired and pays so well are doing. Would they ever say this about a man? As the proud uncle of young women who deserve respect, I am disturbed and offended by this Maggie “fairytale.” I expect a leader to take full responsibility for herself and her administration at all times. I’m voting for Sandy Frankel. She knows what goes on and has made Brighton an honest, fullyfunctioning place to live, work, go to school, and do business. ERIC KLINE, ROCHESTER


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Superintendent search meeting

The newly formed Superintendent Search Committee of the Rochester City School District will hold its first meeting at 5:30 p.m. on Wednesday, November 9. The meeting is at central office, 131 West Broad Street.

Learn about the Qur’an

Nazareth College’s Center for Interfaith Studies will present “Islam and the Challenge of Modernity: Understanding the Qur’an in a Contemporary Context,” a dinner talk on Wednesday, November 9. M.Ashraf Adeel, professor of philosophy and Qur’anic studies at Kutztown University; Vivienne SM Angeles, professor of religious studies at La Salle University; and Scott Alexander, director of 18 City NOVEMBER 2-8, 2011

Catholic-Muslim Studies at Catholic Theological Union, Chicago, are the speakers. The event will be held from 2 to 8:30 p.m. at Nazareth’s Otto Shults Community Center, 4245 East Avenue. Reservations: $21, general public; $16, students.

and John Ghertner, from the Greater Rochester Coalition for Immigration Justice. The meeting is at 6 p.m. on Friday, November 4, at Rochester Friends Meeting House, 84 Scio Street.

Local doc about immigrant workers

Rochester Educators for Obama 2012 will hold a planning meeting at 10 a.m. on Saturday, November 5, at the Rhythm Society Urban Wellness Studio, 90 Bittner Street. Women for Obama 2012 will hold a planning meeting at 6:30 p.m. on Monday, November 7, in the upstairs meeting room at Spot Coffee, 200 East Avenue.

St. John Fisher College will host the first screening of the documentary film “After I Pick the Fruit,” about immigrant farm workers in Wayne County. The film follows five immigrant women farm workers in Mexico and Sodus, NY. The film will be shown at 6 p.m. on Thursday, November 3, in Basil Hall.

Understand the immigration debate

The Rochester Chapter of Social Welfare Action Alliance will hold “A Right to be Here,” a discussion with Wally Ruehle, immigration law specialist from the Legal Aid Society of Rochester;

Rochester for Obama meetings

Discussion about death-camp memoir Moving Beyond Racism Book Club will meet at 7 p.m. on Monday, November 7, to discuss “Night” by Elie Wiesel. The book is a memoir about the author’s final year in Auschwitz. The group will meet at Barnes and Nobles, Pittsford Plaza.


Dining

Pictured left: breaded veal cutlet with potato salad and cranberries; pictured right: duck breast and leg confit, pecan wild rice, and concord grape jus, both from Richardson’s Canal House. PHOTO BY MIKE HANLON

The little things Richardson’s Canal House 1474 Marsh Road, Pittsford 248-5000, richardsonscanalhouse.net Lunch: Tue-Fri 11:30 a.m.-2 p.m.; Dinner: Mon-Sat 5-10 p.m. [ REVIEW ] BY JAMES LEACH

Little things matter. The light in the dining room. The spacing of the tables. Whether the butter that comes with the bread is brick-hard or creamy smooth. Whether the consomme is crystal clear or cloudy. Whether silverware is replaced. And whether everything from the center of the plate out is perfect. These little things add up. One thing off and the meal is still good. Two, it’s probably still fine. But when everything comes together, when the service is flawless and the food tasty and well-presented, a meal goes from satisfying to memorable. I had such a meal recently at Richardson’s Canal House on a rainy October evening. Under the ownership of Austrianborn restaurateur Johannes Mueller since November 2002, Richardson’s is the beneficiary of its owner’s 30-plus years of experience in the restaurant industry. Trained in Germany, Mueller spent the first part of his career traveling Europe and the world working in hotels, restaurants, and even cruise ships, honing his management skills. He brought that experience with him to Rochester in 1986, and since then he has either worked at or owned some of the biggest names in this area’s restaurant firmament, including Rio Bamba and Rooney’s. Mueller

is a shrewd judge of talent, and some true culinary rising stars have worked in his kitchens, including Keith Myers (now owner of the Flour City Bread Company) and his current executive chef Matthew Hudson. Together, Mueller and Hudson make magic — with a little help from Mueller’s mom. In the late fall every year, Richardson’s offers a special Oktoberfest menu — something Mueller has done since he owned Rooney’s and sponsored biannual “Austrian weeks” featuring guest chefs and special menus highlighting Austria’s cuisine. Since Mueller’s move to Bushnell’s Basin, the guest chefs have dropped away, the special menu is offered only in October, and there’s been one more important change. Instead of recipes derived from several different chefs, Mueller’s mother often comes over from Austria to visit and give the kitchen staff what he describes as a “refresher” course in Austrian food around Mueller’s kitchen table. On a particularly chilly evening with rain

lashing the windows and a fire shimmering in the grate, I started off a long and indulgent meal with a simple bowl of beef consomme with herbed crepes ($6). The broth was crystal clear but intensely beefy, delivering a potent and pleasing combination of salty and sweet. The crepes, which had clearly been slid into the soup just as it left the kitchen, soaked up almost no broth, remaining delightfully firm, herbaceous, and toothsome. It’s worth pointing out that this is quite a trick: introducing a starch to a hot broth almost always clouds the soup unless it is done extremely carefully.

I followed that with a foray into the regular menu, ordering a plate of spaghetti squash carbonara ($8). I’m a fan of both spaghetti squash and bacon, so mixing the two together seemed like an inspired idea. The combination of creamy eggs, cheese, and thick chunks of smoky bacon paired remarkably well with the squash, which added just the right amount of moisture to the dish to keep it creamy and delectably rich (too often carbonara turns into scrambled eggs and spaghetti with bacon because lesser cooks fail to master the temperamental interaction of heat and eggs). Our entrees took us from Italy back to

Austria: goulash ($22) and sauerbraten ($21). Goulash has gotten a bad name over the years. How many of us associate it with that foul staple of cafeteria lunches across the nation? Austrian goulash is an entirely different dish: beef braised in a gravy of paprika, garlic, black pepper, and potatoes, often served over freshly made spaetzle. It is as rich and complex as its American cousin is insipid and onedimensional. Matt Hudson’s interpretation of Mother Mueller’s recipe is superlative comfort food. The humble chuck roast is braised until it melts, enriching the thick broth around it while also allowing the spices to penetrate the meat to the point that even the interior has that distinctive paprika hue and savor. Served with a small bowl of white cabbage salad — shredded cabbage and bits of crispy rendered speck in a tangy dressing — the combination of flavors and textures is a joy to play with and admits of almost infinite variations.

At first glance, the sauerbraten was simply overwhelming. The plate was covered with slices of slow-braised brisket dressed with a raisin sauce alongside a huge pile of pickled red cabbage (distant and superior cousin of sauerkraut) and three potato croquettes that were perfectly identical. The dish was an exegesis on the beneficial interaction of fruit, vinegar, meat, and long, slow roasting — the very definition of sweet and sour. By the end of the meal, when only the tiniest bit of beef and none of the cabbage or potatoes remained, I was forced to admit that the portion was just right, and unfortunately not enough for lunch the next day. Center-of-the-plate items at Richardson’s are amazing, but so is the stuff on the periphery. The breads that come out before drinks or appetizers, produced by pastry chef Anne Marie Williamson, are almost a meal in themselves. A simple herb bread with a pretzel-like crust and a cake-like interior was my favorite, but others at the table fell in love with a crusty sourdough loaf studded with cheese and herbs. The sturdy and flavorful wild rice enriched with pecans supporting a whole duck-leg confit changed my view of wild rice forever. The smooth, creamy baba ganoush underneath a medium-rare lamb sirloin was so nicely spiced that bites of meat seemed naked without it. And even the vegetable sides, which amount to colorful tasteless garnishes at other restaurants, were delectable here. Everything was cooked justso to bring out the best in flavor and texture. Little things make a huge difference. rochestercitynewspaper.com City 19


Upcoming [ Pop/Rock ] 100.5 The Drive’s Mistletoe Show w/O.A.R. Thursday, December 8. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N Water St. 7 p.m. $25-$35. 546-3887, waterstreetmusic.com. [ Classical] RPO Gala Holiday Pops Friday, December 16-Sunday, December 18. Eastman Theatre-Kodak Hall, 60 Gibbs St. Fri 8 p.m., Sat 2 & 8 p.m., Sun 2 p.m. $15-$75. 454-2100, rpo.org [ Gospel ] Bobby Jones Gospel Thanksgiving Celebration Friday, November 18. Main Street Armory, 900 E. Main St. 8 p.m. $35-$65. 232-3221, rochestermainstreetarmory.com.

Trio Solisti

Tuesday, November 8 Kilbourn Hall, 26 Gibbs St. 8 p.m. | $10-$20 | 274-1110, ESM.rochester.edu [ CLASSICAL ] When Trio Solisti comes to town, it

will be to play music fit for an Archduke — specifically Archduke Rudolph of Austria, the royalty to whom Beethoven dedicated his Piano Trio in B-flat Major, Op. 97, known as “the Archduke Trio.” Accolades abound for the musicians of Trio Solisti. Jon Klibonoff, piano, counts among his treasures a silver medal from the Gina Bachauer International Piano Competition. Alexis Pia Gerlach, cello, performed as a soloist with Paul Taylor Dance on a month-long performance tour of India. And Maria Bachmann, violin, is also the director of the Telluride MusicFest. — BY PALOMA A. CAPANNA

Anvil Sunday, November 6 Montage Music Hall, 50 Chestnut St. 8 p.m. | $15 | frontgatetickets.com [ METAL ] Anvil’s is a Cinderella story in slow motion.

Though now considered legendary and cited as a major influence by heavy metal’s big four — Metallica, Megadeth, Anthrax, Slayer — the Toronto-based Anvil never really got its due. That is until ex-roadie/fan of the band Sacha Gervasi, now a filmmaker, looked up the group. The resulting “Anvil: The Story of Anvil” is an intimate, heartwarming, and heartbreaking look at a band that simply would not quit. Now with the movie buzz behind the band to some extent, it’s back to slugging it out on club stages. — BY FRANK DE BLASE

20 City NOVEMBER 2-8, 2011

Music


Wednesday, November 2

The Flaming Lips played Main Street Armory on Tuesday, October 25. PHOTO BY FRANK DE BLASE

Far East Movement Friday, November 4 Gordon Field House, RIT 8 p.m. | $13-$26 | rit.edu/fa/fieldhouse [ HIP HOP/POP ] This L.A. electropop/hip-hop group

has toured with Lady Gaga, Lil Wayne, and N*E*R*D, seen its track “Girls on the Dancefloor” go viral on YouTube, and embraced technology, staying interactive with fans on the internet. But you might best know FM from its double-platinum-selling Billboard No. 1 hit single “Like a G6.” Every once in a while a song like this comes along and blows the pants off the industry. Mike “Cooler Than Me” Posner opens. — BY ROMAN DIVEZUR

Mary Gauthier Tuesday, November 8 Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Drive 8 p.m. | $18-$22 | bopshop.com [ SINGER/SONGWRITER ] Mary Gauthier was 35 when

she penned her first tune. The long road to composition started more as a road to perdition when, at age 15, she stole her parents’ car and split her hometown of Baton Rouge for elsewhere. She ended up with a hard life littered with drug abuse, alcoholism, petty crime, and stints in halfway houses. Her music is a powerful and dark acoustic noir with an underlying brutality, and a staggering lyrical eloquence. It teeters precariously between sin and redemption and romantic notions about both. Her guitar is simple and plaintive and she stares down the mic with a sort of weary beat-poet recitation and haunting resolve. — BY FRANK DE BLASE

A way-cooler Popemobile [ review ] by frank de blase

Up until last week I had never experienced anything quite like The Flaming Lips. That’s because up until last week I had never experienced The Flaming Lips. With what can only be described as celestial pageantry, the band blew my doors off when it played Main Street Armory on Tuesday, October 25. I’ll never hear the band again without re-imagining the visual overload it rained down on its equally eclectic crowd. Rockers, hippies, hipsters, ravers, plushies, and guys named Doug sang along and interpreted the music in a number of ways. The show began with a naked woman — pixilated into a certain degree of modesty — dancing on the giant screen, eventually opening her legs to give birth to the band. Head Lip Wayne Coyne rolled out atop the audience in his giant bubble, like he was in a way-cooler Popemobile. There was fog, giant balloons filled with confetti, confetti canons, lasers, and an overall sense that psychedelic interpretations of music don’t have to be dispensed at the expense of the music itself. And as I’ve been hearing a lot of complaints about sound lately, the Lips, though loud and swimming in a sea of sonic melodrama, kept a decent handle on it. This show was breathtaking. I got home with my head buzzing and confetti in my shorts.

I’m not really the Broadway type, but this past week’s “Million Dollar Quartet” show at The Auditorium Theatre was spectacular. As a musician, I cringe when actors portray musicians (Scarlett Johansson: thanks for the downloads, but stay away from the Tom Waits). And as huge fan of Sun Records-era rockabilly, I hate when it gets gentrified and hung exclusively on Elvis Presley’s shoulders. With this show equal time was given to all the acts involved in Sun’s post-black-artist legacy. (The big names, anyway — R.I.P. Billy Lee Riley.) And the actors were downright fantastic and alarmingly accurate in their portrayals for the most part. Jerry Lee Lewis came off a bit cartoonish, but Derek Keeling gave me chills as Johnny Cash, and Cody Slaughter — a mere 20 years old — is the closest thing I’ve ever heard to the King. It’s still staggering how important this music was in its stark innocence and honesty. Finished Saturday night at The Bug Jar, walking in as The Tombstone Hands searched for the end of “Bonanza.” Next up The Pheromones covered a bunch of Ramones hits dressed as the Queens fab four and renaming themselves the Phe Ramones. A night full of Sun Records and The Ramones — it was like crawling back into the womb. And there was more leftover pasta when I got home

[ Acoustic/Folk ] Dave McGrath @ The Cottage Hotel of Mendon. Cottage Hotel, 1390 Pittsford-Mendon Rd, Mendon. dave@davemcgrath. com. 7 p.m. Free. Happy Hour - Rob & Gary Acoustic. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. woodcliffhotelspa.com. 5:30 p.m. Free.  Reggae Lounge w/Roots Ronny Stackman. Abilene, 153 Liberty Pole Way. abilenebarandlounge.com, 232-3230. 9:30 p.m. Free.  Tommy Gravino. Rio Tamatlan, 5 Beeman St, Canandaigua. 394-9380. 6:30 p.m. Free. Salsa w/Shelia dancing during the performance. [ Classical ] RPO: Music of the Americas, Jeff Tyzik conductor. Tower Fine Arts Center Mainstage, 180 Holley Street, Brockport. brockport.edu/ finearts. 7:30 p.m. $15 GA, $10 seniors, $8 Brockport alumni, faculty,  [ DJ/Electronic ] DJ Wizz the Waxx Kutta. Triple Deuces Bar & Grill, 151 St Paul St. tripledeucesbargrill. com. 10:30 p.m. Call for tix.  Bad Wolf: 50s & 60s Vinyl Bop. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 454-2966, bugjar.com. 10 p.m. Free.  DJ. One, 1 Ryan Alley. 5461010. 10 p.m. Free.  DJ Babi Katt/Dancehall Reggae. Blueroom, 293 Alexander St. 730-5985. 10 p.m. $5 after 11 p.m.  DJ Cosmo. Bay Bar & Grill, 372 Manitou Rd, Hilton. 3927700. 10 p.m. Free.  DJs Jared & Mario B. Venu Resto-Lounge, 151 St Paul St. 232-5650. 9 p.m. $5.  DJs NaNa & PJ. Vertex, 169 N Chestnut St. 232-5498. 10 p.m. $3-$8.  [ Jazz ] Chet Catallo and Friends. Sticky Lips BBQ Juke Joint, 830 Jefferson Road 14623. stickylipsbbq. com. 9 p.m. Free.  continues on page 23

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rochestercitynewspaper.com City 21


Music

The Pixies’s current tour takes the legendary indie-rock band to cities it has never played, including Rochester. PHOTO PROVIDED

Here comes your band The Pixies w/Surfer Blood Wednesday, November 2 Main Street Armory, 900 E. Main St. 7 p.m. | $42.50-$50 | ticketfly.com pixiesmusic.com [ INTERVIEW ] By Frank De Blase

Whether it’s grunge or alternative or indie rock, or anything found within that thoughtprovoking twilight, you can probably blame it on The Pixies. Countless bands within that broad spectrum and beyond — from Nirvana (Kurt Cobain once said that “Smells Like Teen Spirit” was just another Pixies rip-off) and The Jesus and Mary Chain to more contemporary acts like Franz Ferdinand and Death Cab For Cutie — have all paid homage to The Pixies. Formed in Boston in 1986, The Pixies grabbed attention with its punk energy and unconventional juxtaposition of musical dynamics and tones. That tension-release structure so many songs invoke today? The Pixies. Soft whisper to an intense shriek? Again, The Pixies. Hooks without giving into pop’s sugary compromise? Pixies, Pixies, Pixies. The band released five albums before splitting up in 1993. Assorted side projects, like bassist Kim Deal’s The Breeders, front 22 City NOVEMBER 2-8, 2011

man Black Francis’s Frank Black and The Catholics, guitarist Joey Santiago’s The Martinis, and drummer David Loverling’s studio work, kept the artists busy while die-hard Pixies fans had to survive on compilations and b-side releases. The band reunited in 2003, and at this point has been together longer than it was the first time around. Meanwhile The Pixies’s pivotal third album, 1989’s “Doolittle,” with the two hit singles “Here Comes Your Man” and “Monkey Gone To Heaven,” surpassed its own cult status by being certified gold in 1995. “Doolittle” turned 20 years old in 2009, and the band has been celebrating that anniversary for two years now, playing the album from front to back on its most recent tour. The “Lost Cities” tour has had the band playing cities it never played before, including the Flower City. Pixies fans of Rochester rejoice: here comes your band. Guitarist Joey Santiago checked in to answer a few silly questions. Here’s an edited transcript of what was said.

“Doolittle” definitely flows when you listen to it on record. But how does it play out live?

CITY: What prompted the band to do “Doolittle” front to back on the current tour? Joey Santiago: Well, other bands were doing

No fancy production, no fancy playing. You know, it’s cut and dry, that’s it. It’s the same thing with The Velvet Underground and all those great bands, like The Stooges.

this format, and it was the 20th anniversary.

Yeah, it flows. The sequence definitely flows well. Were you willing to perhaps alter the individual arrangements to help it along if the album sequence didn’t translate live?

No, because those arrangements are what made us The Pixies. You know, side A would taper off, what are you going to do on side B? You’ve got to bang it again so it’s got a nice flow. The tour features some elaborate audio and visuals.

Yeah, it’s awesome. It takes pressure off of us. We don’t have to do anything really other than playing. You guys were never really known for windmills and back flips…

I mean, we do some schtick on stage. And by schtick I mean mistakes. Why do you think “Doolittle” is still relevant 20 years later?

Would you still consider The Pixies on the fringe?

Sure. We’re still kind of quirky. And you’re playing for a scene you created.

I don’t know. Some people say that. I mean, we got influenced by other people like The Velvet Underground, The Stooges…even Gregorian chant. Sure, but bands like Nirvana owe a lot to The Pixies.

Yeah, if you read any of their old press it always mentions us. Has the sound changed at all from when the band got back together in the early 2000’s up to now?

It still sounds the same. I’ve got the same guitar. What were some of the initial obstacles you encountered as you re-grouped?

Just sounding good. It was a matter of sounding like we did before. And we’d forget the parts sometimes. But it’s muscle memory at this point. Anything new going get slipped in at this concert?

Nothing really. I might attempt a back flip…


White Swans THE BOP SHOP

Wednesday, November 2 Chris Teal’s Open Jam. Tala Vera, 155 State St. tala-vera.com, 5463945. 8 p.m. $3, free w/dinner.  Norman Tibbils. Lemoncello, 137 W Commercial St, E Rochester. lemoncello137.com. 6 p.m. Free.  Paradigm Shift. Pomodoro Grill & Wine Bar, 1290 University Ave. 271-5000. 7:30 p.m. Free.  Robert Chevrier. Pomodoro Monroe Ave, 3400 Monroe Ave. 586-7000. 6:30 p.m. Free.  Soul Express. Bistro 135, 135 W Commercial St,, East Rochester. bistro135.net, 662-5555. 6 p.m. Free.  The Chris Teal Trio Jazz Jam. Tala Vera, 155 State St. tala-vera.com, 546-3945. 8 p.m. $3, or free w/dinner.  The Margaret Explosion. Little Theatre Cafe, 240 East Ave. thelittle.org. 7:30 p.m. Free.  Tony Gianavola. Beale Street Cafe, 693 South Ave. bealestreetcafe. com. 6 p.m. Free.  [ Karaoke ] Karaoke. Southpaw Brew Pub, 315 Gregory St. 303-2234. 8:30 p.m. Free.  Karaoke. Elite Bar & Grill, 398 W Main St. 527-8720. 9 p.m. Free.  Karaoke. Pineapple Jacks, 485 Spencerport Rd. 247-5225. 9 p.m. Free.  Karaoke. Jose & Willy’s, 20 Lake Shore Dr, Canandaigua. 3947960. 8:30 p.m. Free.  Karaoke. Monty’s Korner, 363 East Ave. 263-7650. 9.30 p.m. Free.  Karaoke. Applebee’s-Fairport, 585 Moseley Rd, Fairport. 4254700. 9 p.m. Free.  Karaoke. Mayfields Pub, 669 Winton Rd N. 288-7199. 9 p.m. Free.  Karaoke. Sanibel Cottage, 1517 Empire Blvd, Webster. 671-9340. 6 p.m. Free.  Karaoke Night. Lemoncello, 137 W Commercial St, E Rochester. 385-8565, lemoncello137.com. 9 p.m. Free.  Karaoke w/Jimmy C’s Music Machine ft. Johnny Rocker. Sully’s Pub, 242 South Ave. sullyspubonline.com. 8:30 p.m. Free.  Karaoke w/Mark. Flipside Bar & Grill, 2001 E Main St. 288-3930. 8:30 p.m. Free.  [ Open Mic ] Acoustic Open Mic. Pub 511, 511 E Ridge Rd. 266-9559. 8 p.m. Free.  Open Jam w/Big Daddy Blues Band. Deweys, 1380 Lyell Ave. 254-4707. 9:30 p.m. Free.  Open Jam w/Justin Gurnsey. Jukebox, 5435 Ridge Rd W, Spencerport. 352-4505. 10 p.m. Free.  Open Mic. Boulder Coffee CoSouth Wedge, 100 Alexander St. 454-7140, bouldercoffeeco.com. 8 p.m. Free.  Open Mic. Dr’s Inn Grill & Tap Room, 1743 East Ave. 2710820. 5 p.m. Free.  Open Mic w/Jam Shack Music. Stoneyard Bar & Grill, 1 Main St, Brockport. 637-3390. 9 p.m. Free. 

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ROCK | Chamberlin

After opening for Grace Potter and The Nocturnals in June of this year, Vermont’s Chamberlin brings its roots-rock back to Water Street Music Hall, this time as the headliner. The band recently released a five-song EP made up completely of covers ranging in scope from Kanye West to Passion Pit to Foster the People, the proceeds of which go to benefit communities in Vermont that were impacted by Hurricane Irene. Fleet Foxes are an apt, if not easy band comparison, but Chamberlin is unafraid to go electric when the situation calls for it. Wildlife opens the show. Chamberlin performs Thursday, November 3, 8 p.m. at Water Street Music Hall, 204 N. Water St. $8. waterstreetmusic.com. — BY ANDY KLINGENBERGER Open Mic w/Steve West. Muddy Waters Coffee House-Geneseo, 53 Main St, Geneseo. 243-9111. 7-10 p.m. Free.  [ Pop/Rock ] Exhumed w/ Goatwhore. Montage Music Hall, 50 Chestnut Plaza. frontgatetickets.com, themontagemusichall.com. 7 p.m. $15.  Roz & The Rice Cakes w/ Buckets, Drippers. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. bugjar.com. 9 p.m. $6-$8.  Taking Back Sunday w/The Maine, Bad Rabbits. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N Water St. waterstreetmusic. com. 7 p.m. $23 adv, $25 doors.  The Pixies. Main Street Armory, 900 E Main St. 232-3221, rochestermainstreetarmory. com. 6 p.m. $42.50-$50.00. 

Thursday, November 3 [ Acoustic/Folk ] Chamberlin w/Wildlife. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N Water St. waterstreetmusic. com. 8 p.m. $8.  Chris Wilson Songwriter Showcase. Tala Vera, 155 State St. tala-vera.com, 5463945. 8 p.m. Free.  Dubtonic Kru w/Qshan Deya. Lovin’ Cup, Park Point @ RIT. lovincup.com, 2929940. 9 p.m. $10 GA, $8 student.  John Akers & Elvio Fernandes. Easy on East, 170 East Ave. 325-6490. 8 p.m. Free. 

Johnny Bauer. Jeffrey’s, 3115 E. Henrietta Rd., Henrietta. jeffreysbar.com, 486-4973. 8 p.m. Call for info.  Live Band Thursdays. Blueroom, 293 Alexander St. 730-5985. 8 p.m. Free.  Nancy Perry. Mythos Cafe, 77 Main St, Brockport. 637-2770. 6 p.m. Free.  Paul Strowe. Cottage Hotel, 1390 Pittsford-Mendon Rd, Mendon. 624-1390. 7-10 p.m. Free.  Randy McStine. Boulder Coffee Co-South Wedge, 100 Alexander St. bouldercoffeeco.com. 8 p.m. Free.  Reggae Night. Elite Bar & Grill, 398 W Main St. 527-8720. 9 p.m. Call for tix.  Session w/John Ryan. McGraw’s Irish Pub, 146 W Commercial St, East Rochester. mcgrawsirishpub. com, 764-0991. 7:30 p.m. Free.  WXXI OnStage Taping: Funknut, The Prickers. WXXI, 280 State St. wxxi.org/onstage, 258-0200. 7 p.m. Free, reservation required.  [ Blues ] Mysterious Blues Band. Sticky Lips BBQ Juke Joint, 830 Jefferson Road 14623. stickylipsbbq.com. 9 p.m. Free.  Pro-Blues Jam w/ Rochester Blues Review. PI’s Lounge, 495 West Ave. 235-1630. 8 p.m.midnight. Free.  The Fakers. Beale Street Cafe, 693 South Ave. bealestreetcafe. com. 7 p.m. Free.  [ Classical ] Eastman Opera Theatre: Sondheim’s Assassins. Eastman School of Music-Kilbourn Hall, 26 Gibbs St. esm.rochester. edu. 7:30 p.m. $10-$20, continues on page 24

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rochestercitynewspaper.com City 23


Thursday, November 3 discounts to UR/student ID holders. Holiday Harmony Chorus. Brighton Reformed Church Fellowship Lodge (building behind church) 805 Blossom Road(near Winton) Rochester NY. 831-6975, rocharmony@yahoo.com. 7 p.m. Free. [ DJ/Electronic ] DJ Big Reg. Liquid, 169 St Paul St. 325-5710. 9:30 p.m. Free.  DJ Biggie. McKenzie’s Irish Pub, 3685 W Henrietta Rd. 3348970. 9 p.m. Call for tix.  DJ Mike Dailor. Vertex, 169 N Chestnut St. 232-5498. 10 p.m. $3-$8.  DJ Sal DeSantis. Center Cafe, 150 Frank DiMino Way. iaccrochester.org, 594-8882. 7 p.m. Call for info.  DJs Designer Junkies, Etiquette, Ginnis. One, 1 Ryan Alley. 5461010. 10 p.m. $3.  Elektrodisko. Vertex, 169 N Chestnut St. facebook.com/ vertexnightclub. 10 p.m. Free before 11:30 p.m.  Mostly 80’s Night. Hatter’s Pub, 5 W Main St, Webster. 8721505. 6 p.m. Call for tix.  RIPROC presents Solidisco. Dub Land Underground, 315 Alexander St. dublandunderground.wordpress. com. 10 p.m. $5.00 cover / $10 additional @ the door if you are under 21. Soul Sides Record Listening Party. Good Luck, 50 Anderson Ave. 340-6161. 9 p.m. Free.  Thursday Night Shakedown. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 454-2966, bugjar.com. 11 p.m. Free.  Tiki Thursdays: Shotgun Music DJ. McGhan’s, 11 W Main St, Victor. 924-3660. 7:30 p.m. Free.  Tilt-a-Whirl Drag Show. Tilt Night Club, 444 Central Ave. 2328440, tiltroc.com. 11:15 p.m. & 12:30 a.m. $3.  [ Jazz ] Artisan Jazz Trio. Lemoncello, 137 W Commercial St, E Rochester. lemoncello137. com. 6 p.m. Free.  Jazz/Wine Happy Hour w/The Swooners. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. woodcliffhotelspa.com. 5:30 p.m. Free.  Joe Santora Trio w/Emily Kirchoff. Michael’s Valley Grill, 1694 Penfield R, Penfield. 383-8260. 7 p.m. Free.  Live Jam w/Eastman School Students. Triple Deuces Bar & Grill, 151 St Paul St. 232-3888. Thu 6 p.m., Fri 5 p.m. Free.  The Djangoners. Little Theatre Cafe, 240 East Ave. thelittle. org. 7:30 p.m. Free.  The John Palocy Trio (Jazz Dawgs). Bistro 135, 135 W Commercial St,, East Rochester. bistro135.net, 662-5555. 6:30 p.m. Free.  The Swooners. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. woodcliffhotelspa.com. 5:30 p.m. Free.  24 City NOVEMBER 2-8, 2011

POP | Maureen McGovern w/RPO

As the Occupy movement stakes their tents across the country, what better music to spin than the songs of the 60’s and early 70’s? Paul Simon, Joni Mitchell, Bob Dylan, Jimmy Webb — and Maureen McGovern, songstress responsible for hits like the Oscar-winning “The Morning After.” McGovern will be singing them all when she appears with the Rochester Philharmonic Orchestra this weekend. McGovern’s career spans more than 40 years of song, theater, cinema, television, radio, and songwriting. McGovern’s latest CD, “The Long and Winding Road,” found its title and a track from the Lennon & McCartney song. Even if you know the music of this era by heart, it takes on a deeper, fuller sound with a live orchestra. Nostalgia, undoubtedly included, at no extra charge. Maureen McGovern performs with the RPO Friday, November 4-Saturday, November 5, 8 p.m. at Kodak Hall at Eastman Theatre, 60 Gibbs St. $15-$77. 454-2100, rpo.org. — BY PALOMA CAPANNA [ Karaoke ] Karaoke. Panorama Night Club, 730 Elmgrove Rd. 2472190. 9 p.m. Free.  Karaoke. Goody Goodies, 6108 Loomis Rd, Farmington. 742-2531. 9 p.m. Free.  Karaoke. Pineapple Jacks, 485 Spencerport Rd. 2475225. 9 p.m. Free.  Karaoke. Jukebox, 5435 Ridge Rd W, Spencerport. 352-4505. 7:30 p.m. Free.  Karaoke. Applebee’s-Penfield, 1955 Empire Blvd, Webster. 787-0570. 9 p.m. Free.  Karaoke. GridIron Bar & Grill, 3154 State St, Caledonia. 538-4008. 9 p.m. Free.  Karaoke. Center Cafe, 150 Frank DiMino Way. 594-8882. 7 p.m. Free.  Karaoke. Brickwood Grill, 250 Monroe Ave. brickwoodgrill. com, 730-8230. 9 p.m. Call for info.  Karaoke w/DJ Smooth. Clarissa’s, 293 Clarissa St. 454-2680. 8:30 p.m. Free.  Karaoke w/George, King of Karaoke. Temple Bar & Grille, 109 East Ave. 232-6000. 8 p.m. Free.  Karaoke w/Summer Bob. Shorts Bar & Grill, 35 N Main St, Fairport. 388-0136. 10 p.m. Free.  Karaoke w/Tim Burnette. Sevens, Rt 96, Farmington. 924-3232. 8-11 p.m. Free. 

Karaoke with Oltra Entertainment. Anchor Bar Marketplace. anchorsportsbar. com, 272-9333. Call for info. [ Open Mic ] First Thursdays Open Mic. Theatre 101, 101 Main Street, Mt. Morris. theatre101@live.com. 7 p.m.; performers sign in beginning at 6:30. Free. Open Blues Jam w/Alex D & Jimmie Mac. PJ’s Lounge, 499 West Ave. 436-9066. 9 p.m. Free.  Open Jam. Pub 511, 511 E Ridge Rd. 266-9559. 8 p.m. Free.  Open Jam w/Beau Ryan & Amanda Ashley. Firehouse Saloon, 814 Clinton Ave S. 244-6307. 9 p.m. Free.  Open Mic. Towpath Cafe, 6 N Main St, Fairport. 377-0410. 6:30 p.m. Free.  Open Mic w/Jed Curran & Steve Piper. Flipside Bar & Grill, 2001 E Main St. 288-3930. 8 p.m. Free.  Rochester Ukulele Support Group. Bernunzio Uptown Music, 122 East Ave. 473-6140, bernunzio.com. 7 p.m. Free.  [ Pop/Rock ] Dubtrio w/Roots Collider, Blackened Blues. Montage Music Hall, 50 Chestnut Plaza. frontgatetickets.com, themontagemusichall.com. 7:30 p.m. $10.  Jeff Elliott. Irondequoit Ale House, 2250 Hudson Ave. 544-5120. 5 p.m. Free.  continues on page 41


Welcome to the magic kingdom [ INTRODUCTION ] BY ERIC REZSNYAK

Once upon a time (about two months ago) thousands of Rochesterians sat in front of magic boxes and selected their favorite people, places, and things in Greater Rochester. Our elves, imps, and fairies — especially the fairies — got to work counting the votes and now we can share their secrets: the Best of Rochester 2011. City Newspaper’s Best of Rochester issue continues to grow in popularity every year, and it’s always exciting for us to see how much readers get into it. This year’s readers’ poll was a real nail-biter. A few of the categories came down to the wire (fewer than 10 votes separated first from second place in at least one race), and the campaigning was particularly passionate in several categories (you guys really take your cupcakeries seriously). Please note that the winners in the 100 categories in our readers’ poll are solely decided by the voters — City Newspaper had no say in the results. If you disagree with the top honors post your favorites on this article at rochestercitynewspaper.com. City’s writers did have their say in our critics’ picks. This year our writers shared their favorite food, trends, arts collaborations, and insider tips, everything from zucchini fries to moderndance collectives. Then turn to page XX for funny outtakes from our readers’ poll primary ballot, with which some people have entirely too much fun. This year, one responder filled it out entirely in character as Hurricane Irene. And to think, we worried that a fairy-tale-themed issue might be too out there…

INSIDE

26 30 33 34 36 39 40

RESTAURANTS

SHOPPING

MEDIA

LOCAL COLOR

ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT

NIGHTLIFE BEST ANSWERS & CREDITS

rochestercitynewspaper.com City 25


READERS’ CHOICES

For a list of the FINAL FOUR NOMINEES in each category, check out “Best Of Rochester” online at: rochestercitynewspaper.com

26 City BEST OF ROCHESTER 2011


BEST FAST-FOOD TREND: gourmet food trucks Food trucks have been trending nationally for a while now — Food Network has aired two seasons of “The Great Food Truck Race,” a reality show devoted to them. Now it seems like Rochester is starting to get hip to the benefits of mobile kitchens. The Taco Kitchen had a too-brief run last year, and the The Gourmet Waffler has gone into hibernation for the season Comfort food on the go from Le Petit Poutine. (owners promise it will be back PHOTO BY MATT DETURCK next spring with an expanded savory menu). But two new additions to the scene seem to be gaining traction. Le Petit Poutine, which serves the Canadian comfort food in its title (French fries and cheese curds doused in gravy), made many fans at City Newspaper’s South Wedge-ucation event in September, running out of supplies not once but twice, with massive lines waiting patiently for the warm, salty goodness served in those adorable brown take-out boxes. Meanwhile, Snow Daze got its start this summer, serving organic icy creations at festivals and markets out of a renovated 1964 Shasta camper trailer. (It too will return in the spring, but in the meantime its proprietors have started the cold-weather business Holesome Donuts, serving gourmet hot chocolates and multi-grain donuts with spiced sugars.) You can follow both Le Petit Poutine and Snow Daze/Holesome Donuts on Facebook, and they’re usually set up Saturdays at the Rochester Public Market. If there are any other local food trucks out there, drop us a line. We are both hungry and lazy at the City offices, and cannot resist food on wheels. — BY ERIC REZSNYAK

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BEST AGONIZING DELICIOUSNESS: wasabi shumai The yummy wasabi shumai at Plum House (686 Monroe Ave., 442-0778, plumhouserochester.com) are served in an adorable bamboo steamer. Take the lid off, and the first thing you notice is the lovely hue of the dumpling dough, rendered pale green by the wasabi. (Or, more accurately, the food coloring added to the wasabi mixture in the West.) You can also make out little bits of the filling peeking up at you; it’s pork, with some minced water chestnut. And you can see the steam rising up, so you use your chopsticks to poke a couple of air holes in them, hoping to minimize the possibility of third-degree burns on the roof of your mouth. But you can’t wait. And it doesn’t matter anyway, because as you begin chewing, any discomfort you may feel from the temperature of the shumai is forgotten once the torrid heat of the wasabi barrels its way into your sinuses and out your nostrils in flames, much like a dragon. At that point you may be frantically gulping for air as you wave your hand in front of your open mouth, the universal sign for “For f**k’s sake, what have I done?” Oh, and don’t even bother chasing the shumai with a cold drink; there’s nothing you can do about that kind of suffering. Except have another. — BY DAYNA PAPALEO

BEST UPSCALE CAMPING FOOD: Beach Fire S’mores Usually when I go out for a nice dinner, the last thing I want is anything of the make-your-own variety. I want to be wowed by the decisions of the chef, not given ingredients and told to do the work myself (I do that in my kitchen every other night of the week, thank you). That said, there’s something charmingly nostalgic about the Beach Fire S’Mores ($5.95) served for dessert at The Crab Shack (749 E. Henrietta Road). (Note: we’re talking about the local, Danieleowned establishment, not the similarly named chain.) After the work involved in cracking into the restaurant’s namesake crustaceans for dinner, you may be hesitant to order yet another dish that requires your dedicated involvement. But you’d be missing out — not only on something that tastes so ooey-gooey good, but also on the opportunity to giddily act like a kid again as you carefully roast marshmallows over an open flame in an upscale public setting. The Crab Shack classes the classic treat up by providing graham crackers pre-dipped in lusciously sweet continues on page 28 rochestercitynewspaper.com City 27


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milk chocolate, skewered marshmallows, and a decorative sterno flame somewhat akin to a witch’s cauldron. While it’s possible that this dessert may be aimed at families dining in the restaurant, I can attest to the fact that it’s just as fun and scrumptious for the adults. — BY SUSIE HUME

BEST UNHEALTHY HEALTH FOOD: zucchini fries If you’re like me, you secretly believe that everything is better fried (though you’d never admit it aloud for fear of sounding either piggish or unappreciative of the finer culinary arts). Calamari? Gross. Fried calamari? Delicious, buttery, crispy, chewy ringlets. Cheese? Yum. Mozzarella sticks? Hell, yes. Twinkies? Snack food eaten by kiddies. Fried Twinkies? Yummy treat shoved guiltily into my mouth at every fair and festival whilst proclaiming, “Well, I guess I have to try them once.” Then there is the pinnacle of all fried food — the fried vegetable — or what I like to call unhealthy health food, because you can The zucchini fries at Wegmans’ Food Bar deceive yourself that you’re eating right as you check one in Pittsford. PHOTO BY MATT DETURCK (or more) servings of vegetables off your recommended daily intake. And, for me, the king of all unhealthy health food is the zucchini fries ($4) served at the Wegmans-owned Food Bar (3195 Monroe Ave, next to the Pittsford Wegmans). Fans of Tastings, another Wegmans eatery that formerly existed where Food Bar now resides, may remember the zucchini fries as one of the restaurant’s signature appetizers. To create the deliciously misleading treat, zucchini is julienned and then coated in a cornmeal blend before it hits the fryer. The result is ultra-crispy on the outside and tender on the inside, where the zucchini whites and seeds have melted into a heavenly, appealingly mushy mixture. To top it off, Food Bar serves the dish with a garlic-parmesan aioli for dipping which, while delicious in its own right, is really there to keep you from thoroughly burning your mouth as you stuff the right-from-thefryer strips ferociously down your gullet. — BY SUSIE HUME

BEST LATE-NIGHT DELIVERY: Big Deal Pizzeria & Grill In the wee hours one particular evening there was a knock at my door, followed by muffled voices, then quiet. Curious, I padded downstairs, only to find my boyfriend cozied up to what was clearly a bacon cheeseburger. The sultry scent tendrils wafting from that bodacious sandwich beckoned to me from across the room, and since I was up anyway, we made it a threesome. “Where dis fum?” I mumbled between big, juicy bites, wondering who could possibly be roaming the streets to distribute piping-hot grub at 1:30 a.m. Turns out it came from Big Deal (475 Monroe Ave., 5442144, bigdealpizza.com), and it delivers — I am not making this up — until 4 a.m. on Thursday, Friday, and Saturday. (Though, technically, I guess it would be Friday, Saturday, and Sunday.) Yeah, Big Deal is located in one of the city’s nightlife districts, making it convenient for scavenging barhoppers to stumble in and grab a slice (or wings, or a plate, or a sub) to soak up a night’s worth of booze. But after midnight you also got your B-shift workers, night owls, and service-industry people who just want to kick back at the end of the day and have some decent comfort food dispatched to their homes. And the next morning, if the early bird is lucky, she gets some pretty fresh leftovers. — BY DAYNA PAPALEO

BEST BANG FOR YOUR BUCK: Dollar Oyster Tuesdays It’s rare to encounter a person who is ambivalent about eating raw oysters; either you’re completely repulsed by such slimy, rubbery evil, or you’re just short of obsessed with the humble mollusk’s briny charm, its admittedly off-putting texture a small price to pay for enjoying something so pure and unadulterated that it was actually alive mere seconds before it slipped down your throat. If, like me, you fall into the latter camp, then you’ll want to take advantage of the plump assortment offered as part of Dollar Oyster Tuesdays at Lento (274 N Goodman St, 271-3470, lentorestaurant.com), especially now that the traditional oyster harvest season is in full swing. Of course, those who prefer to adulterate their oyster have options, like the classic shallot mignonette or a splash of Tabasco. And at a buck a bivalve, you can slurp to your heart’s content, maybe even having enough cash left over to pair your bounty with a dry Riesling or some chilled vodka, or perhaps some of Lento’s luscious duck-fat frites. (No, duck-fat frites are not a customary companion to raw oysters, but you’re there anyway; why not indulge?) Besides an emphasis on local and seasonal products, Lento has also made it its mission to offer only sustainably caught seafood, so even though you may be staring at a gluttonous pile of half-shells at the end of your meal, you were being responsible in at least one aspect. — BY DAYNA PAPALEO 28 City BEST OF ROCHESTER 2011


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Batavia | Brockport | Canandaigua | Elmira | Palmyra Warsaw | Webster | Rochester | 214 Lake Ave | Culver @ Main

Shop our stores. Explore our mission. To schedule a donation pick-up: www.voawny.org • 585-647-1150

rochestercitynewspaper.com City 29


READERS’ CHOICES

For a list of the FINAL FOUR NOMINEES in each category, check out this article online at www.rochestercitynewspaper.com 30 City BEST OF ROCHESTER 2011


BEST GOOD-DEED READS: Brighton Library book store Big libraries often have stores that sell de-accessioned books. Town and branch libraries usually have a couple of book sales each year, but not stores that sell books day in and day out. The Dorothy and Jack Pitlick Store of the Friends of the Brighton Memorial Library is an exception. It’s an old-fashioned neighborhood bookstore in miniature, except its books are used and its income goes to support the library, located on Elmwood Avenue a half mile west of Twelve Corners. The store is open 27 hours a week, spread over all seven days. Though it isn’t a lot bigger than a walk-in closet, its brightly lit walls of shelves filled with a thousand books at a time belie its outof-the-way location at the rear of the library’s reading room. Books are constantly coming in and going out, managed by a staff of more than two dozen volunteers, including the eponymous Dorothy Pitlick, herself a passionate reader, who oversees the enterprise. She takes great pleasure from the people who drop off an armful of books, leave with another armful to read, and remark, “I shouldn’t have, but I had to have them.” Hard to resist when the hard covers go for a buck and the paperbacks for 50 cents. About two-thirds of the books are fiction, but there are also collections of general non-fiction, history, biography, and cookbooks. Recently, in five minutes of browsing, I found novels by Paul Theroux and Philip Roth, along with the unlikely “Elvis in the Morning” by the even more unlikely William F. Buckley; a history of Abraham and Mary Lincoln’s marriage; and Kenneth Clark’s “Civilisation” for those who never got around to it. Down on a bottom shelf, I also found “Adam Bede,” “Heart of Darkness,” a biography of poet May Sarton, and the poems of Robert Burns. That’s an armful of hardbacks for nine bucks. — BY MICHAEL LASSER

BEST GAMER PARADISE: Game Craze

Sure, you may be able to buy games anywhere, but do you know where to buy things that show off how much you love games? I’m talking about the things that separate the elite from the n00bs, the Pokemasters from the trainers, the snipers from the snipees, those who live and breathe games instead of those that just play them. The list of fandom service offered by regional retail chain Game Craze could go on and on. I’ve found car accessories, board games, belts, patches, puzzles, Christmas ornaments, and even items I couldn’t find on eBay. If you like games, chances are you’ll find something Find old-school video games and systems you’ll love here. at local chain Game Craze. file photo Although it sells new games and video-game systems, Game Craze’s main claim to fame is its impressive used game and system collection. Looking far and wide for Superman 64? Wake up one morning and decide you want an original NES, with games to boot? I’ve seen accessories at Game Craze that I’ve never seen anywhere outside of retro gaming exhibits. Game Craze now has seven locations in the greater Rochester area, so that no matter where in the city you live you can get your game on. Item and game availability varies by store, and merchandise can move quickly, which is why I stop in as often as I can to check things out.

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BEST INDOOR EXTREME-SPORTS DESTINATION: University Avenue As a Rochester native, I have grown accustomed to putting warm-weather pastimes aside and taking up the ever-popular winter hobby of hibernation. Who needs real action when you can kick back on the couch and play PS3? If, like me, you have grown bored of scaling walls as Nathan Drake, or landing huge gaps as Tony Hawk, consider bringing that action to life and get some much-needed winter exercise in the process. With four unique indoor sports complexes all within walking distance of one another, University Avenue may be the best place to head for some extreme indoor fun. At 1044 University Ave. you can find the Rochester Action Sports Park (r-a-s-p.com), the largest indoor skate park in the Rochester area, allowing BMX and mountain bikes, skateboards, continues on page 8

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inline skates, and scooters. If you want to look down on the crowd below, but don’t want to do so while flying through the air on a skateboard, located right in the same building is Rock Ventures (rockventures.net). This huge indoor climbing wall and ropes course will surely keep you entertained for hours — unless you’re afraid of heights. If you want something a little more traditional, located next door at 1046 University Ave. is Hot Shots (hotshotsvball.com), an indoor volleyball complex with both sand and hard courts. Even though it might be freezing outside, you can still hit the sand courts for some indoor beach volleyball, and if you really want to pretend you are on the beach, pick up a margarita or a bite to eat at the complex’s bar and grill. Finally, if you’re sick of getting your butt whipped at Call of Duty and want some real-life first-person-shooter action, hit up N’vasion Paintball (nvp-paintball. com) also at 1046 University Ave. — BY ERIC LACLAIR

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BEST TOY STORES FOR GROWN-UPS: Plastic and Pandaman Toys for adults! No, not that kind. I’m talking about those pophappy, geek-core, don’t-let-the-toddler-chew-it collectible designer vinyl figurines. The trend is bigger in larger cities, such as San Francisco, New York, or Miami, where bigwig vinyl company Kidrobot has stores. But it is catching on in Rochester, as two fans have opened sweet little shops that offer the figurines. Plastic (650 South Ave., plasticforever.com) has been open for more than a year and recently moved from its Elton Street location to the South Wedge. Owner Deana Costanza carries collectible vinyl toys, DIY vinyl blanks that you can paint yourself, apparel, works by local artists (including a very cool figure painted to resemble Some of the colorful items Doctor Who), and more. Many people get into the toys because it’s sold at Plastic. an affordable way to collect the work of artists they adore who are PHOTO provided in the pop-surrealist, low-brow movement, the likes of which can be found in Juxtapoze and Hi-Fructose art magazines. Plastic has regular DIY painting nights. The newer shop in town is Pandaman Toys (439 Monroe Ave., 420-8965, pandamantoys. com), which opened in October near Pixel Preserve and The Park Bench. Owner Beth Small has created a retail café that also offers limited-edition Nikes, apparel, 90’s nostalgia items, DIY nights, video-game tournaments, DJs, and local and out-of town artists including Nathan Hamill (yes, Mark’s son), who is the designer of the Bellicose Bunny line of toys. The price point for most figurines is $40 or less, with the exception of in-demand limitededition pieces. I couldn’t resist taking home a Tokidoki “Unicorno” figurine, which now perches on my keyboard in all of its cheerful, rainbow-colored glory. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY

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Fri. 1-7pm, Sat. 10am-6pm, Sun. 10am-4pm On the grounds of Granger Homestead in Canandaigua 295 North Main Street • (585) 394-1472 • www.grangerhomestead.org

rochestercitynewspaper.com City 33


READERS’ CHOICES

For a list of the FINAL FOUR NOMINEES in each category, check out “Best Of Rochester” online at: rochestercitynewspaper.com

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34 City BEST OF ROCHESTER 2011

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BEST PLACE TO EAVESDROP IN CITY HALL: stairwells Every journalist has shortcuts: ways we’ve learned to subvert systems designed to keep us at arm’s length. This network of back doors is kind of like the Marauder’s Map in the Harry Potter books and movies. Example: rather than wade through a swamp three corporate-communications people deep to get to a certain official, I used to wait along his bike route, which I knew he kept regular as rain. And I can’t tell you — literally — the things I’ve overheard in stairwells. The often bunker-like environment seems to compel people to spill their secrets, as if they expect the blitzkrieg to commence at any moment. And the sound carries. Quite by accident one day I discovered that if you stand in the stairwell landings on the second and third floors at City Hall, you can hear almost everything going on in the conference rooms just beyond the wall. It makes me laugh a little when City Council members kick me out of a meeting — executive sessions aren’t open to the public or the media — when, if I wanted to, I could take five steps and hear the whole thing. Not that I ever do. It would, of course, be an egregious ethical violation. (I can’t make you believe me, but it is the truth.) Another strategy, if you’ve got the time: hang around and chat up the security guards. They seem bored. And they know everything. Mischief managed. — BY CHRISTINE CARRIE FIEN

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BEST SOLVED MYSTERY: the case of the missing mayor People lose car keys, glasses, pens, homework, and cell phones all of the time. But the residents of East Rochester managed to lose track of their mayor. In mid-September, 13 WHAM ran a report, “The Case of the Missing Mayor,” detailing the scenario. Mayor Jason Koon, who took office in 2007, had missed five out of 12 meetings between September 2010 and September 2011, it said. He also hadn’t been seen much around Village Hall. And Republican members of the town-village board made a point of saying that they were concerned about the absences. But Koon, who has two young children, says he missed the meetings because of “family stuff,” or because he was out of town. He is still living in the village and he does go into his office, he says. The mayor’s job is part-time and he often is in the office after staff has gone home. Koon, a Democrat, says that village Republicans made a fuss about his absence as a political move. He isn’t running for reelection and says he isn’t sure why the minor controversy would help Republicans. He decided not to run for reelection so he could spend more time with his family and children. “I feel like I’ve missed a lot of their lives these past four years,” Koon says.

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READERS’ CHOICES

36 City BEST OF ROCHESTER 2011


BEST CLASSICAL VIBE: Eastman BroadBand It is rare that I get lost when listening to classical music because I’m most often doing so for City Newspaper — writing a review, preview, or feature with my left brain analyzing and my right hand writing. But on October 5, 2011, for two hours, I was completely swept up in the musical performance of Eastman BroadBand during its open rehearsal. The performers were eight students at Eastman School of Music, namely Cherry Tsang and Jacob Ertl, piano; Deidre Huckabay, flute; Andrew Brown, clarinets; Hanna Hurwitz, violin; Mariel Roberts, cello; Damon Martinez and Stuart Gerber, percussion. BroadBand has 31 members, and also includes guest soloists and alumni with professional music careers. This open rehearsal was no small amount of pressure for the students, and they carried it off with apparent ease. Four of the composers of works on the program were present. Ricardo ZohnMuldoon, a 2011 finalist for the Pulitzer Prize in Music. Carlos Sanchez-Gutierrez, a Guggenheim and Fulbright Fellow. David Liptak, with three decades of teaching and works on CDs like “American Masters.” And Juan Trigos, whose work is self-described as “obsessive use of polyrhythmic and polyphonic interlocking musical events.” Trigos’ description is your clue that BroadBand performs contemporary works. By definition, “new” or “contemporary” music gets less attention and less attendance than it deserves from fans of classical music, even though ESM is consistently graduating new musicians who have gone on to found award-winning new music groups like Alarm Will Sound, So Percussion, and Break of Reality. There’s no question that what I was hearing with BroadBand was the next group of great, new musicians that will be leaving Eastman with the raw talent, discipline, and passion for new music that will continue to make new music the future of classical music. — PALOMA CAPANNA

BEST MUSICAL TURN-AROUND: Main Street Armory It can be hard to establish yourself as a musician in any city’s music scene. You have to navigate promoters, fans, and venues — and that’s all before you even produce a single note. Take that same mentality and extrapolate it and you have an idea of the pressures of launching an entire venue. You need space, a stage, sound, lighting, and you have to hope you can get people to play, and even more people to come out. And in a city with an already established music scene, that can be a tall order. Just a few years ago it would have been easy to Modest Mouse is one of the major acts that doubt the Main Street Armory on East Main Street. has played the resurgent Main Street Armory It was a pigeon-shit-filled property that seemingly in recent years. PHOTO provided nobody wanted. Now it is bringing in a wide stream of acts that have outgrown the club scene, and those that in other markets could fill stadiums. And along the way it is strengthening the Rochester music scene. The Armory’s schedule has steadily grown since its first concert in 2006, but this year it seemed to explode. It went from a contending venue for some of the best live music in Rochester to one of the largest players in Rochester’s live-music scene. Acts that have played its stage include Modest Mouse, O.A.R., Flogging Molly, and Korn, and this year alone we’ve seen (or will see) Primus, The Pixies, the Dropkick Murphys, Judas Priest, and the Flaming Lips. Sure, it may not have the best acoustics — it is a giant castle, after all, but the sound seems to be improving all the time. And it certainly started as an outlier. But if this year has proven anything, it’s that the Armory is here to stay, and music in Rochester is the better for it. — BY WILLIE CLARK

BEST PROMISING ARTISTIC PARTNERSHIP: RoCo and RCDC An October 8 collaboration spearheaded by Rochester Contemporary Dance Collective and hosted by Rochester Contemporary Art Center was an unexpected performance gem, and a call continues on page 14 rochestercitynewspaper.com City 37


to stage more such interrelated arts events in the future. That evening there was a level of audience involvement, and an air of excitement and spontaneous creation in the downtown gallery that is not often felt in Rochester. Dancers from various local groups drifted amongst spectators, regrouping in front of different installations in the gallery’s current “Scapes” exhibit to react to the art through movement — some improvised, some carefully thought through. “Scapes” addresses connections between natural landscapes and human form through use of digital media and exhibits the art work of Jamie Hahn, Sterz, Christina Laurel, Jason Bernagozzi, and Debora Bernagozzi. Heather Roffe, one of the founders and directors of Futurpointe Dance Theater as well as a member of RCDC’s Board of Directors, performed with her company at the event. “I hope to organize further collaborations with visual art and to incorporate even more sound art or music in the future,” she says. “Dance is simultaneously visual, aural, emotional, mental, and kinesthetic, so it lends itself well to dialogues and pairings with other art forms.” Other dancers and companies participating in the on-site event were Richard Haisma/ Geomantics, Nanako Horikawa, Whitney Denesha, Missy Pfohl Smith/Biodance, Sarah Cooldige, Mariah Maloney, Treeline Dance/Jenny Showalter, Rose Beauchamp, Mone Dance Company/Nikita Mone, and Charmese O’Callaghan. “With this event we worked toward a set-up where dancers responded to the visual arts with a unique program that we hope to pursue again soon,” says Bleu Cease, executive director and curator of Rochester Contemporary. — BY CASEY CARLSEN

BEST ANONYMOUS ARTWORK: Make Moves Son THE SONGS OF LEIBER AND STOLLER Friday, November 18th, 7:30 p.m. Saturday, November 19th, 7:30 p.m. Sunday, November 20th, 2:00 p.m. MCC Theatre, Building 4, Brighton Campus

c Chris Tarquinio

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READERS’ CHOICES

For a list of the FINAL FOUR NOMINEES in each category, check out “Best Of Rochester” online at: rochestercitynewspaper.com

rochestercitynewspaper.com City 39


CITY Newspaper’s “Best of Rochester 2011” Photo Credits Photos & Photo-Illustrations: Matt DeTurck [ FUNNY STUFF ] BY BEST OF ROCHESTER VOTERS

We love our readers, especially during the Best of Rochester Readers Poll. Counting the thousands of responses can get pretty grueling, but every year our smart, funny readers surprise and amuse us with some of their witty zingers (and sometimes with their unintentionally hilarious mistakes). Below you’ll find a collection of some of this year’s chuckle-worthy answers to the open-ended Primary Ballot. There were many more that we couldn’t print…

Just so you know, this is precisely why we keep this category

Is that you, Irene?

“My grandparents had a yard sale. It went alright”; “The Great Cross Word Disappearance!”; “The story about how ROCHESTER IS SUPER AWESOME”; “UR buys half of the city, plans to take over the world”; “When I rescued a bunch of people from a group of gypsies outside of Java’s”; “When my hair caught on fire that one time”; “Why the hell University Ave is still under construction”; “The mystery hairless rodent under the lady’s house” (2 votes); “The Naked Man” (4 votes). (Best News Story Ignored)

(Best Cheap Eats)

Better living through chemistry “My Uncle Bill. That guy’s so hopped up on drugs there’s no way he doesn’t have visions of the future.” (Best Local Visionary)

Ba-dum-bump! “Lou Gramm, “Double Vision.” (Best Local Visionary)

“Geek,” not “Greek” “Aladdin’s” (9 votes). (Best Geek-Friendly Business)

Too soon. “Amy Winehouse.” (Best Ribs)

We’ll take that challenge “I have to say, I make a peach cupcake w/ brown sugar frosting that will make most people weep with joy.” (Best Cupcakes)

Everyone’s a critic “Best Cupcakes? What am I, 6?”; “Cupcakes are so over”; “Cupcakes suck”; “Must Rochester be 10 years behind major cities?” (Best Cupcakes)

We would hate to see Irene on caffeine.

“DEAD ATLANTIC OCEAN SALMON.”

Does Juan know about this?! “Tony and Maria’s Empanada Stop”; “Jose and Maria’s Empanada Stop” (Best Cheap Eats)

Less than zero “Saying ‘fancy restaurant’ makes me feel like a hillbilly. Black & Blue is good for when I want a steak and to pretend I’m a character in a Bret Easton Ellis novel.” (Best Fancy Restaurant)

The enduring spirit of adventure “Too old to bother trying new places.” (Best

Watch out ladies, Part 3 “Through their bedroom window.” (Best Place to Spot a Local Celebrity)

Costuming Provided by: The Lyons Central School District Theatre Department

Your wording is better than ours

INTRODUCTION

“City destroys perfectly good Midtown”; “Peace out, Jean Claude”; “The ‘Chesonis’ Hole”; “The Adventures of Emily Good and the 12-Inch Police”; “The RCSD superintendent texts his resignation.” (Best Local News Story)

How did we miss this? “Norman the Donkey in the city.” (2 votes) (Best Local News Story)

Crafty lady “Nicole’s Downhome Boondoggle Emporium.” (Best Jewelry Store)

This seems counterproductive “Eat free pizza while you run first of the month night at Planet Fitness.” (Best Fitness Class)

New Restaurant)

Chaos theory “This is a trick question, we are nowhere near the ocean. Eating seafood here is chaos in the making.” (Best Seafood)

Oh, right! THAT one! “That annoying sports guy with the voice”; “That broad with the cans on that show with the dude”; “That girl on that show”; “That hot blonde one”; “That smokin’ babe on Channel 10.” (Best Newsperson)

Watch out, ladies

City Newspaper Features Editor Eric Rezsnyak concurs “I wish Kylie Minogue came here.” (Best Concert)

What’s in a name? “Black Frairs”; “Black Friers”; “Black Fryers”; “Black Giatrr”; “Blackbox”; “Boo.” (Best Local

“Sparklemotion.” (Best Local Theater Company)

“Whichever one my friend Phil is in at the moment.” (Best Local Theater Company)

“Building shaped like a penis or Batman!”

Is that the red or the white?

(Best Local Landmark)

“Pompous Ass Winery.” (Best Regional Winery)

Watch out, ladies, Part 2

Ouch. “Find an artist at any local shelter.” (Best Place to Buy Local Art)

of-Towner)

Without a slice of melon it’s not brunch

It would be pretty awesome…

That’s great. But what’s his name?

“On top of a flaming water tower, shooting eye-lasers at flying sharks. That would be pretty awesome.” (Best Place to Spot a Local

“I’ve been known to nibble on a few potato chips on my couch during the brunch hours.”

Sabra Wood, Marlene Beckmann LO C AT I O N: Mt. Hope Cemetery M A K E U P : Rebecca Rafferty A S S I S TA NT: Katie Kumler A D D I  MODELS:

T I O N A L CO S T U M I N G P R OV I D E D BY:

Christine Kubarycz, Kate Stathis MEDIA

Paul Allen A S S I S TA N T S: Katie Kumler, Rachel Ludwig, Anna McCabe MODEL:

LOCAL COLOR

Sabra Wood LO C AT I O N: Lunsford Park, Corn Hill A S S I S TA N T S : Katie Kumler, Anna McCabe TAG A LO N G P U P PY: Hammond McCabe MODEL:

ARTS & ENTERTA INMENT

Albert Abonado LO C AT I O N: Downtown United Presbyterian Church MODEL:

A R M O R & W E A P O N RY CO U RT E SY:

Hillary McShea LO C AT I O N : Highland Park H A I R & M A K E U P: C.Noelle Susice S E T D E CO RATO R S : Adam Lubitow, Rachel Ludwig, Anna McCabe A S S I S TA NT: Katie Kumler MODEL:

Special Thanks To: Aubrey Berardini, Christine & Paul DeTurck, Stephen Dorobiala, Michael Gamilla, Sharon & Bruce Lubitow, Rebecca Rafferty, Max Seifert

Outtakes, behind-the-scenes photos & more online at: rochestercitynewspaper.com

(Best Place for Brunch)

Huh? “I think his name is Steven, with a ‘ph.’” (Best Local Photographer)

40 City BEST OF ROCHESTER 2011

SHOPPING

NIGHTLIFE

Take a bow

Celebrity)

Dan McFee LOC AT I O N: Memorial Art Gallery E X T R A S : Dan Kingsley, Katie Kumler, Rachel Ludwig, Brian Marsh MODEL:

We question your commitment to this survey

“IRENE HATE COFFEE. IRENE LOVE SALTWATER.” (Best Coffee)

“Main bartender at Lento -- he really knows how to make unusual flavor combinations work! And, I love his use of fresh herbs.” (Best Bartender)

RESTAURANTS

The Steel Source (thesteelsource.com) A S S I S TA NT: Kevin Gustina

(Best Place for a Date)

“To my basement. They aren’t from here, who’s gonna know they’re missing? Muuuaahahhhhhh.” (Best Place to Take an Out-

Katie Kumler LO C AT I O N: Warner Castle, Highland Park H A I R & M A K E U P : C.Noelle Susice D R E S S P R OV I D E D B Y: Amy Seifert MODEL:

Theater Company)

“Wherever the roofies take us.”

Do those things look remotely alike?

Assistant: Adam Lubitow

THE END


Thursday, November 3 Jimmy Lane. Six Pockets, Ridge Hudson Plaza. 2661440. 7 p.m. Free.  Mixolydian. Rabbit Room Restaurant, 61 N Main St, Honeoye Falls. thelowermill. com. 7 p.m. Free.  The Vacant Lots w/Abandoned Buildings Club. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. bugjar.com. 8:30 p.m. $7-$9. 

Friday, November 4 [ Acoustic/Folk ] Dave North Trio w/The Lilting Banshees. McGraw’s Irish Pub, 146 W Commercial St, East Rochester. mcgrawsirishpub. com, 764-0991. 5 p.m. Free.  Jim Lane. 58 Main, 58 Main St, Brockport. 637-2383. 6 p.m. Free.  Lords of the Highway, 40 Rod Lightning, and The Lower Town Trio. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. bugjar.com. 9 p.m. $6-$8.  Ralph Louis. Rochester Plaza Hotel, 70 State St. rochesterplaza.com. 6 p.m. Free.  The Mosaic Foundation. Sticky Lips BBQ Juke Joint, 830 Jefferson Road 14623. stickylipsbbq.com. 9:30 p.m. Free.  Tom Gravino. Tandoor of India, 376 Jefferson Rd. 427-7080. 7 p.m. Free.  [ Blues ] Billy Joe & the Blues Gypsies w/Dave Riccioni. Six Pockets, Ridge Hudson Plaza. 2661440. 6-9 p.m. Free.  Gap Mangione New Blues Band. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. woodcliffhotelspa.com. 7:30 p.m. Trilogy. Beale Street Cafe, 693 South Ave. bealestreetcafe. com. 7 p.m. Free.  [ Classical ] Eastman Opera Theatre: Sondheim’s Assassins. Eastman School of Music-Kilbourn Hall, 26 Gibbs St. esm.rochester.edu. 7:30 p.m. $10-$20, discounts to UR/student ID holders. John Ballings. Hedges, 1290 Lake Rd, Webster. 265-3850. 6:30 p.m. Free.  Rochester Flute Association presents Flutist Amy Porter in concert. Nazareth CollegeWilmot Recital Hall, 4245 East Ave. rfaonline.org, 234-4RFA. 7:30 p.m. $12. Women of Faith. Blue Cross Arena, 100 Exchange Blvd. bluecrossarena.com, womenoffaith.com. 10 a.m. See website for ticket pricing packages. [ Country ] David Pronko. Sandra’s Saloon, 276 Smith St. 5465474. 9:30 p.m. Free.  [ DJ/Electronic ] DJ. Coach Sports Forum, 19 W Main St, Webster. 872-2910. 9 p.m. Call for tix. 

DJ Cedric. Vertex, 169 N Chestnut St. 232-5498. 10 p.m. $3-$8.  DJ Dream. Nola’s BBQ, 4775 Lake Ave. 663-3375. 10 p.m. Call for tix.  DJ GI. Liquid, 169 St Paul St. 325-5710. 10 p.m. Free-$5.  DJ Mosart212. Lovin’ Cup, Park Point @ RIT. 292-9940. 6 p.m. Free.  Jon Herbert, RipRoc. One, 1 Ryan Alley. 546-1010. 10 p.m. $3.  Lube After Dark. Quaker Steak and Lube, 2205 Buffalo Rd. 697.9464. 9:30 p.m. Free. Reggaeton w/DJ Carlos. La Copa Ultra Lounge, 235 W Ridge Rd. 254-1050. 10 p.m. Call for tix. 

Salsa Night w/DJ Javier Rivera. Tango Cafe, 389 Gregory St. 475-0249. 9 p.m. $5.  What A Drag w/Samantha Vega, Kyla Minx & Pauly. Tilt Night Club, 444 Central Ave. 232-8440, tiltroc.com. 11:15 p.m. & 12:30 a.m. $4-$12.  [ Hip-Hop/Rap ] Far East Movement w/Mike Posner. Rochester Institute of Technology-Gordon Field House, 149 Lomb Memorial Dr. rit.edu. 8 p.m. $13 RIT Student, $16 RIT Faculty/Alumni/Staff, $26.  [ Jazz ] Bill Tiberio, Bill Welch and Bill Welch Band. Trinities

Restaurant, 36 West Main Street, Executive Bldg. 3194047. 7 p.m. Free. Fred Costello & Roger Eckers Duo. Charley Brown’s Restaurant, 1675 Penfield Rd. fredcostello.com, 385-9292. 7:30 p.m. Call for info.  Jazz and Beyond w/ Paul Gasper and Andy Calabrese. Tala Vera, 155 State St. tala-vera.com, 5463945. 8 p.m. $5.  Joe Santora Trio w/Emily Kirchoff. Michael’s Valley Grill, 1694 Penfield R, Penfield. 383-8260. 7 p.m. Free.  Johnny Matt Band w/Jon Seiger. Wegmans-Eastway,

4th Biannual

1955 Empire Blvd, Webster. 671-8290. 5:30 p.m. Free. Madeline Forster. Little Theatre, 240 East Ave. thelittle.org. 8:30 p.m. Free.  Methodical Methods Presents: The Summer Music Series at The Srathallen Hotel. Strathallen Hotel - 550 East Avenue. methodicalmethods@gmail. com. 8 p.m. Free. Ryan T Carey. Thali of India, 3259 S Winton Rd. 427-8030. 7-9 p.m. Free.  Ted Nicolosi and Shared Genes. Glengarry Inn at Eagle Vale, 4400 Nine Mile Point Road, Rt 250 Fairport NY. 5983820, EagleVale.com. 6:30 p.m.

Tinted Image. Bistro 135, 135 W Commercial St,, East Rochester. bistro135.net, 662-5555. 8 p.m. Free.  Zack & Lacey. Lemoncello, 137 W Commercial St, E Rochester. lemoncello137.com. 9 p.m. Free.  [ Karaoke ] Karaoke. Goody Goodies, 6108 Loomis Rd, Farmington. 742-2531. 9 p.m. Free.  Karaoke. Pineapple Jacks, 485 Spencerport Rd. 2475225. 9 p.m. Free.  Karaoke w/Bobby C. Ciao Baby’s BBQ Steak & Seafood, 421 River St. 621-5480. 9 p.m. Free.  continues on page 42

Cra�s + Art

November 5 10am-5pm Free Admission and Free Parking

Come and shop over 80 of Rochester’s coolest indie art + cra designers at the Main Street Armory

The first 50 shoppers receive a free swag bag filled with handmade items from our arsts! Plus, we’ll have hourly prize giveaways!

Bring toiletries for Sample Soap and receive a free raffle cket!

Challenging the boundaries between art and cra

While you’re here, check out the art exhibit, open during show hours.

MaydayUnderground.Wordpress.com rochestercitynewspaper.com City 41


Sometimes our food doesn’t have to speak for itself.

Friday, November 4

“Area’s best-kept culinary secret” - SETH LINDAHL, CHEF AT MAX CHOPHOUSE

“Best meal under $10.00” 3 TIME NOMINEE (CITY NEWSPAPER)

“Best vegetarian options” 3 TIME NOMINEE (CITY NEWSPAPER)

“Top 25 food experiences you must have in Rochester before you move or die” (ROCHESTER D&C)

Bar and Restaurant

LIVE MUSIC JOHNNY BAUER

THURSDAY, NOV. 3RD @ 8PM

JEFF BLOOM

SATURDAY, NOV. 5TH @ 9PM

DAVID MCGRATH

THURSDAY, NOV. 10 @ 8PM

JOHN COLE BLUES BAND SATURDAY, NOV. 12 @ 9PM

Karaoke - Tuesdays @ 7pm Open Mic - Wednesdays @ 7pm CELEBRATING

YEARS!

691 Monroe Avenue (across from Oxford St.)

DogTownHots.com

271.6620

Dogtown - The Offical Page

DON’T MISS THE GAME!! Come down to Jeffrey’s and watch all the hottest NFL games with us!

OPEN DAILY 11AM to 2AM

3115 E. Henrietta Rd, Henrietta, NY 14467

585 486 4937 • www.JeffreysBar.com

Karaoke w/Summer Bob. Shorts Bar & Grill, 35 N Main St, Fairport. 388-0136. 10 p.m. Free.  Karaoke w/Tina P. Norton’s Pub, 1730 N Goodman St. 266-3570. 9 p.m. Free.  [ Open Mic ] Acoustic/ Open Mic Night. Quaker Steak and Lube, 2205 Buffalo Rd. 697.9464. 9 p.m. Free. Different performer each week! Open Mic is the last Friday of every month!  Open Mic. Rochester Institute of Technology-Java Wally’s, 90 Lomb Memorial Dr. 475-2562. 9 p.m. Free.  [ Pop/Rock ] Cold Steel Tested. California Brew Haus, 402 Ridge Rd W. 621-1480. 9:30 p.m. $5-$7.  Dubstate Fridays: House on a Spring w/Aqueous. Dub Land Underground, 315 Alexander St. 232-7550. 10 p.m. $5 21+, $10 unders.  Maureen McGovern: A Long and Winding Road. Eastman TheatreKodak Hall, 60 Gibbs St. rpo.org, 454-7311. 8 p.m. $15-$77. Pocket Vinyl. Boulder Coffee CoSouth Wedge, 100 Alexander St. bouldercoffeeco.com, 454-7140. 8 p.m. Call for info.  Sam Deleo. Perlo’s Italian Grill, 202 N Washington St, East Rochester. 248-5060. 6:3010:30 p.m. Free.  Something Else. Anchor Bar Marketplace. anchorsportsbar. com, 272-9333. Call for info. Call for info.  Soul Risin’ w/The Deep Blue Dream. Lovin’ Cup, Park Point @ RIT. lovincup.com, 292-9940. 9 p.m. $5 GA, $3 student.  Speed Governor w/Patrons of Sweet, Ian Downey is Famous, and Autoverse. Monty’s Krown Lounge, 875 Monroe Ave. pat@ autoversemusic.com. 9 p.m. $3.  The Colorblind James Experience w/This Other Life. Abilene, 153 Liberty Pole Way. abilenebarandlounge.com, 2323230. 6 p.m. $7.  The Movement w/The Supervillain. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N Water St. waterstreetmusic.com. 8 p.m. $7 adv, $12 doors.  Vital Remains. Montage Music Hall, 50 Chestnut Plaza. frontgatetickets.com, themontagemusichall.com. 8 p.m. $7.  WXXI OnStage Taping: Cruelty Free, Violet Mary. WXXI, 280 State St. wxxi.org/onstage, 2580200. 7 p.m. Free, reservation required.  [ R&B ] Old School R&B. Elite Bar & Grill, 398 W Main St. 5278720. 9 p.m. Call for tix. 

Saturday, November 5 [ Acoustic/Folk ] Connie Deming. Little Theatre Cafe, 240 East Ave. thelittle. org. 8:30 p.m. Free.  42 City NOVEMBER 2-8, 2011

Pop/R&B | Smokey Robinson

Was there ever a better pop songwriter than the man who wrote “The Tracks of My Tears,” “My Girl,” and “I Second That Emotion”? Was there a better soul singer than the man who sang “Ooo Baby Baby,” “The Agony And The Ecstasy” and “Cruisin’”? Not in my book. Best of all, a half-century after he burst on to the scene with The Miracles, Smokey Robinson’s still got it. His performance at the 2009 Rochester International Jazz Festival was two hours of non-stop pleasure. He’ll take the stage at Kodak Hall Sunday for a good cause; all proceeds benefit Lifetime Assistance Inc. Smokey Robinson performs Sunday, November 6, 7 p.m. at Kodak Hall, Eastman Theatre, 60 Gibbs St. $55-$125. 454-2100, lifetimeassistance.org. — BY RON NETSKY Daryl Fleming and The Public Domain w/ Dolfish, Oxford Train, and The Branch Davadians. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. bugjar.com. 9 p.m. $7-$9.  Falls Road. McGraw’s Irish Pub, 146 W Commercial St, East Rochester. mcgrawsirishpub.com, 7640991. 8 p.m. Free.  Latin Band. Tapas 177 Lounge, 177 St Paul St. 2622090. 11 p.m. Free.  Patty Larkin. Rochester Christian Reformed Church, 2750 Atlantic Avenue, Penfield. goldenlink.org. 7:30 p.m. $22 GA, $10 students, free for kids 12 and under.  Steve Bartolotta. Pittsford Pub, 60 S. Main St., Pittsford. 586-4650, pittsfordpub.net. 9 p.m.-midnight. Free.  Ted McGraw. McGraw’s Irish Pub, 146 W Commercial St, East Rochester. mcgrawsirishpub.com, 7640991. 5:30 p.m. Free.  Tom Gravino. Thali of India, 3259 S Winton Rd. 355-8206. 7 p.m. Free.  Unplugged Dinner Music Series. Lovin’ Cup, Park Point @ RIT. 292-9940, lovincup. com. 6 p.m. Free.  [ Blues ] Bill Brown. Brown Hound Bistro, 6459 Rt 64, Naples. 374-9771. 7 p.m. Free.  Gap Mangione New Blues Band. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. woodcliffhotelspa. com. 7:30 p.m. Third Degree. Beale Street Cafe, 693 South Ave. bealestreetcafe.com. 7:30 p.m. Free. 

[ Classical ] An Evening with Michael Landrum and Friends. Roberts Wesleyan Cultural Life Center, 2301 Westside Dr. roberts.edu. 7:30 p.m. Free.  Eastman Opera Theatre: Sondheim’s Assassins. Eastman School of Music-Kilbourn Hall, 26 Gibbs St. esm.rochester.edu. 7:30 p.m. $10-$20, discounts to UR/student ID holders. Flute Fair 2011-Rochester Flute Association. Calkins Road Middle School, 1899 Calkins Road, Pittsford. rfaonline. org, 234-4RFA. 8:30 a.m. See website for full details. John Ballings. Hedges, 1290 Lake Rd, Webster. 265-3850. 6:30 p.m. Free.  Rochester Contemporary School of Music “On the Road” Showcase and “Instrument Playground”. Marketplace Mall-In Front of Bon-Ton. rochestercontemporaryschool. com. 12 p.m. Free.  Women of Faith. Blue Cross Arena, 100 Exchange Blvd. bluecrossarena.com, womenoffaith.com. 9 a.m. See website for ticket pricing packages. [ DJ/Electronic ] Big Dance Party w/DJ Jon Herbert. Tilt Night Club, 444 Central Ave. 232-8440, tiltroc. com. 10 p.m. $3.  DJ. Goody Goodies, 6108 Loomis Rd, Farmington. 7422531. 9 p.m. Free.  DJ. Straight Home Inn Bar & Grill, 688 Lexington Ave. 4580020. 9 p.m. Free.  DJ Big Reg. Venu RestoLounge, 151 St Paul St. 2325650. 7 p.m. Free. 


DJ Darkwave. Vertex, 169 N Chestnut St. 232-5498. 10 p.m. $3-$8.  DJ Mirage. Blueroom, 293 Alexander St. 730-5985. 10 p.m. Call for tix.  DJ Wiz. Liquid, 169 St Paul St. 325-5710. 9:30 p.m. Free-$5.  DJs Richie Salvaggio, Kalifornia. One, 1 Ryan Alley. 546-1010. 10 p.m. Free-$10.  [ Jazz ] East End Jazz Boys. Havana Moe’s, 125 East Ave. 3251030. 9 p.m. Free.  Fred Costello & Roger Eckers Duo. Charley Brown’s Restaurant, 1675 Penfield Rd. fredcostello.com, 3859292. 7:30 p.m. Call for info.  Jazz Cafe. Monty’s Korner, 363 East Ave. 263-7650. 7:30 p.m. Free.  Jazz at Jazzy’s. Jasmine’s Asian Fusion, 657 Ridge Rd, Webster. 216-1290. 8:30-11 p.m. Free.  Joe Santora Trio w/Emily Kirchoff. Michael’s Valley Grill, 1694 Penfield R, Penfield. 383-8260. 7 p.m. Free.  Jon Seiger & The Allstars. Bistro 135, 135 W Commercial St,, East Rochester. bistro135.net, 662-5555. 6 p.m. Free.  Luca Foresta & Electro Kings. Lemoncello, 137 W Commercial St, E Rochester. lemoncello137.com. 9 p.m. Free.  Music with Friends ft. Annie Wells, Bill Welch & Friends. Asbury United Methodist Church, 1050 East Ave. Liz Barto-263-3323, ext. 212. 7 p.m. $10.  Stringplicity. Little Theatre Cafe, 240 East Ave. thelittle. org. 8:30 p.m. Free.  [ Karaoke ] Karaoke. The Galley Restaurant, 94 S Union St, Spencerport. 352-0200. 8 p.m. Free.  Karaoke. 140 Alex, 140 Alexander St. 256-1000. 10:30 p.m. Free.  Karaoke. Pineapple Jacks, 485 Spencerport Rd. 2475225. 9 p.m. Free.  Karaoke. Straight Home Inn Bar & Grill, 688 Lexington Ave. 458-0020. 9 p.m. Free. 

MJ

Karaoke. Temple Bar & Grille, 109 East Ave. 232-6000. 10 p.m. Free.  Karaoke. Straight Home Inn Bar & Grill, 688 Lexington Ave. 458-0020. 9 p.m. Free.  Karaoke At The Lube. Quaker Steak and Lube, 2205 Buffalo Rd. 697.9464. 9:30 p.m. Free. Karaoke w/Andy & Kim. Norton’s Pub, 1730 N Goodman St. 266-3570. 10 p.m. Free.  Olympia Karaoke W/ Andy. Olympia Restaurant 2380 Lyell Ave. 429-6231. 9:30 p.m. Free. [ Open Mic ] Bug Jam with the Poets II. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. bugjar. com, 454-2966. 5 p.m. Call for info.  [ Pop/Rock ] 3rd Annual Rochester Invasion w/Burn This City, NIGHTMARES, Storm the Bay, Taken to Heart, Badon Hill, Kraken, and Pull the Pin.The Villager, 245 South Main Street, Canandaigua. neverfadingpromotions@gmail. com. 9 p.m. $10 adv, $13 doors, $5 FLCC students w/ID.  Dave Bernabo and Host Skull. Visual Studies Workshop, 31 Prince Street. vsw.org. 7 p.m. $5.  Drum Expo 2011 Drum Clinics/ Performances. House of Guitars, 645 Titus Ave. houseofguitars. com, 544-3500. See website for full lineup. Call for info.  Jeff Bloom. Jeffrey’s, 3115 E. Henrietta Rd., Henrietta. jeffreysbar.com, 486-4973. 9 p.m. Call for info.  Josh Nelson Project. Temple Beth El, 139 S Winton Rd. 4731770, www.tberochester.org. 7:30 p.m. $18 for adults, $9 for ages 18 and under. Maureen McGovern: A Long and Winding Road. Eastman Theatre-Kodak Hall, 60 Gibbs St. rpo.org, 454-7311. 8 p.m. $15-$77. Mayhem. Montage Music Hall, 50 Chestnut Plaza. frontgatetickets.com, themontagemusichall.com. 8 p.m. $20.  Mr. Mustard. Old Toad, 277 Alexander St. theoldtoad.com, 232-2626. 8 p.m. Call for info. 

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Respite. Boulder Coffee CoSouth Wedge, 100 Alexander St. bouldercoffeeco.com, 454-7140. 7:30 p.m. Free.  Ruby Shooz. Anchor Bar Marketplace. anchorsportsbar. com, 272-9333. Call for info. Call for info.  Something Else. A-Pub Live, 6 Lawrence St. 262-2063. 10 p.m. $5.  Steve Bartolotta. Pittsford Pub, 60 S. Main Street, Pittsford. pittsfordpub.net, 586.4650. 9 p.m. Call for info.  The Brian Lindsay Band. Sticky Lips BBQ Juke Joint, 830 Jefferson Road 14623. stickylipsbbq.com. 10 p.m. Free.  The Knyghts of Fuxx w/Cousin Al and the Fuzz. Abilene, 153 Liberty Pole Way. abilenebarandlounge. com, 232-3230. 9:30 p.m. $4.  Walri w/Cuddle Magic, Josh Netsky Band. Lovin’ Cup, Park Point @ RIT. lovincup.com, 2929940. 9 p.m. $5 GA, $3 student.  [ R&B ] Soundwave. Trinities Restaurant, 36 West Main Street (Executive Bldg. 319-4047. 9 p.m. $5. 

Sunday, November 6 [ Acoustic/Folk ] Celtic Music. Temple Bar & Grille, 109 East Ave. 232-6000. 7 p.m. Free.  Drumcliffe Irish Arts 2nd Annual ShamROCK Hooley Fundraiser w/ Jumbo Shrimp, 1916, and Drumcliff School of Irish Dance. Main Street Armory, 900 E Main St. rochestermainstreetarmory.com. 1:30 p.m. $12.  John Dady. McGraw’s Irish Pub, 146 W Commercial St, East Rochester. mcgrawsirishpub.com, 764-0991. 7 p.m. Free.  [ Blues ] Open Blues Jam w/Nate Coffee. Beale Street Cafe, 693 South Ave. bealestreetcafe. com. 7 p.m. Free.  [ Classical ] Eastman Opera Theatre: Sondheim’s Assassins. Eastman School of Music-Kilbourn Hall, 26 Gibbs St. esm.rochester.edu: 2 p.m. $10-$20, discounts to UR/student ID holders. continues on page 44

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Sunday, November 6 Flute Fantasies. St Mary’s Church, 15 St Mary’s Pl. 266-7030. 2:30 p.m. Free.  Going for Baroque Organ Recital. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. 276-8900. 1 & 3 p.m. Free w/admission.  Music at Incarnate Word: Vespers with Abendmusik recital featuring the Eastman Collegium Viol Consort. The Lutheran Church of the Incarnate Word, 597 East Avenue, Rochester NY 14607. 244-6065. 7:00 p.m. Vespers, recital at 7:45 p.m. Freewill offering.  Rochester Philharmonic Youth Orchestra Concert: “Musical Passions”. Hochstein Performance Hall, 50 N Plymouth Ave. rpyo@rpo.org. 3:00 p.m. $10 Adult; $5 Students and Seniors.

The Bop Shop presents: Mary Gauthier. Lovin’ Cup, Park Point @ RIT. lovincup.com, 292-9940. 8 p.m. $18 adv, $22 doors.  [ Classical ] Barbershop Harmony. Harmony House, 58 E Main St., Webster. chorusofthegenesee. org. 7 p.m. Free. Open practices/try outs.  [ DJ/Electronic ] SIN Night. TC HooligansGreece, Greece Ridge Ctr. tchooligans.com, 225-7180. 9 p.m. Call for info. 

FOLK | Breakfast in Fur

[ DJ/Electronic ] DJ Rasta Spoc/Old-School Reggae. Blueroom, 293 Alexander St. 730-5985. 10 p.m. $5 after 11 p.m.  Old School DJ. Clarissa’s, 293 Clarissa St. 454-2680. 8 p.m. Free. 

I’ve spent a good portion of the past few years lamenting the end of Page France, despite the fact that by the time I’d discovered its music the band was already defunct. New Paltz’s Breakfast in Fur goes a long way in filling that personal void on its first, self-titled EP, released on 10” vinyl earlier this year. The band creates easygoing, textured songs thick with off-kilter percussion supporting Dan Wolfe’s breathless vocals. It’s most readily described as psych-folk, but like all genres, it’s impossible to pin the band into a single category.

[ Hip-Hop/Rap ] R&B HipHop Spring Edition. Cafe Underground Railroad, 480 W Main St. 235-3550. 8 p.m. $5-$10. 

Breakfast in Fur performs Tuesday, November 8, 9 p.m. at the Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. $6-$8. bugjar.com. — BY ANDY KLINGENBERGER

[ Jazz ] 3rd Annual Snazzy Jazzy. Temple Sinai. 506-9050. 3:30 p.m. $50. Greg Chako Jazz Duo. Lemoncello, 137 W Commercial St, E Rochester. lemoncello137.com. 6 p.m. Free.  Madeline Forster. Little Theatre Cafe, 240 East Ave. thelittle. org. 8:30 p.m. Free.  [ Karaoke ] Karaoke. Jose & Willy’s, 20 Lake Shore Dr, Canandaigua. 394-7960. 8:30 p.m. Free.  Karaoke w/Brad London. Willow Inn, 428 Manitou Rd. 3923489. 9 p.m. Free. 

Monday, November 7 [ Acoustic/Folk ] All Night Ramblers Cajun Band. Java Joe’s Public Market Cafe, 1 Public Market, Near Union St. Entrance. 232-5282 or www.rochestercajunzydeco.com. 10 a.m. Free. Barb Ryman. Boulder Coffee CoSouth Wedge, 100 Alexander St. bouldercoffeeco.com, 454-7140. 8 p.m. Free.  Dave McGrath & Guests. Rehab Lounge , 510 Monroe Ave. 4429165. 6 p.m. Free.  Deborah Branch, Piano. Lemoncello, 137 W Commercial St, E Rochester. lemoncello137.com. 5:30 p.m. Free.  Irish Waltzes. McGraw’s Irish Pub, 146 W Commercial St, East Rochester. 348-9091, mcgrawsirishpub.com. 6-7 p.m. Free.  Slow Learner’s Session. McGraw’s Irish Pub, 146 W Commercial St, East Rochester. 348-9091, mcgrawsirishpub.com. 7-9 p.m. Free. 

[ Open Mic ] Acoustic Sunday w/Fred Goodnow. Brown Hound Bistro, 6459 Rt 64, Naples. 374-9771. 11 a.m. Free.  Open Country Jam. Sandra’s Saloon, 276 Smith St. 546-5474. 4-8 p.m. Free.  Open Jam w/Bodega Radio. Jukebox, 5435 Ridge Rd W, Spencerport. 352-4505. 5 p.m. Free.  Troup Street Jazz Jam Session. Beale Street Cafe, [ Classical ] 693 South Ave. 271-4650, Greece Community bealestreetcafe.com. 6 p.m. Free.  Orchestra. Fleming Point Retirement Community, 720 [ Pop/Rock ] Latta Rd., 14621. RSVP to 1st Sunday Hardcore Showcase: Yvonne Weilert, 262-4090. The Teeth, School Shootings, 7:30 p.m. Free.  Virgins, Still Rings True, and Rust Empire. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. [ DJ/Electronic ] bugjar.com. 9 p.m. $5-$7.  Manic Mondays DJs. Bug Jar, Anvil. Montage Music Hall, 50 219 Monroe Ave. 454-2966. Chestnut Plaza. frontgatetickets. 11 p.m. Free.  com, themontagemusichall. [ Jazz ] com. 8 p.m. $15.  4 Year Anniversary Party [ R&B ] w/Soul Express. Bistro 135, Smokey Robinson. Eastman 135 W Commercial St,, East Theatre-Kodak Hall, 60 Gibbs Rochester. lemoncello137. St. lifetimeassistance.org. 7 com. 5:30 p.m. Free.  p.m. $55-$125.  44 City NOVEMBER 2-8, 2011

Jerry Falzone. Little Theatre Cafe, 240 East Ave. thelittle.org. 7:30 p.m. Free.  Westview Project. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. woodcliffhotelspa.com. 5:30 p.m. Free.  [ Karaoke ] Karaoke w/Walt O’Brien. Flipside Bar & Grill, 2001 E Main St. 288-3930. 9 p.m. Free.  [ Open Mic ] Open Jam w Refreshunz. Clarissa’s, 293 Clarissa St. 2323430. 8 p.m. Free.  [ Pop/Rock ] The Loom w/Christopher Paul Stelling, Gin & Bonnets, and Holy Smith! Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. bugjar.com, 4542966. 8:30 p.m. $6-$8. 

Tuesday, November 8 [ Acoustic/Folk ] Jeff Elliott. Norton’s Pub, 1730 N Goodman St. 266-3570. 5-8 p.m. Free.  Johnny Bauer. Cottage Hotel, 1390 Pittsford-Mendon Rd, Mendon. 624-1390. 7-10 p.m. Free.  Singer’s Session with Joe Moore. McGraw’s Irish Pub, 146 W Commercial St, East Rochester. 348-9091. 8:30-10 p.m. Free.  Steve Bartolotta. Lemoncello, 137 W Commercial St, E Rochester. lemoncello137.com. 7 p.m. Free.  Ted Nicolosi and Shared Genes. Bistro 135, 135 W Commercial St,, East Rochester. 662-5555, Bistro135.net. 6 p.m. Free. The Bluegrass Brothers. Boulder Coffee CoSouth Wedge, 100 Alexander St. bouldercoffeeco.com, 4547140. 8 p.m. Free. 

[ Jazz ] Big Band Ballroom Dance Series w/live music. Edgerton Community Center, 41 Backus St. cityofrochester. gov/ballroomdanceseries. 7:30 p.m. $3. See website for full line up.  Tinted Image. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. woodcliffhotelspa.com. 5:30 p.m. Free.  [ Karaoke ] Karaoke. 140 Alex, 140 Alexander St. 256-1000. 10:30 p.m. Free.  Karaoke. Pineapple Jacks, 485 Spencerport Rd. 247-5225. 9 p.m. Free.  Karaoke. McKenzie’s Irish Pub, 3685 W Henrietta Rd. 334-8970. 8 p.m. Free.  [ Open Mic ] All About the Song: The Songwriter’s Open Mic hosted by Jim Bowers. Merchants Grill, 881 Merchants Rd. merchantgrill.com, 482-2010. 8 p.m. Free. Sign-up begins at 7:30 p.m.  Golden Link Singaround. Twelve Corners Presbyterian Church, 1200 S Winton Rd. goldenlink. org. 7:30 p.m. Free.  Open Mic Night. Lovin’ Cup, Park Point @ RIT. 292-9940, lovincup.com. 8:30 p.m. Free.  Open Mic w/Rapier Slices. Clarissa’s, 293 Clarissa St. 454-2680. 7-11 p.m. $3$5.  Open Mic w/String Theory. Johnny’s Irish Pub, 1382 Culver Rd. 224-0990, johnnysirishpub.com. 8 p.m. Free.  [ Pop/Rock ] Breakfast in Fur w/Pearl White Ghosts, The Dads. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. bugjar.com, 4542966. 9 p.m. $6-$8.  Don Christiano - With A Little Help from My Friends: The Beatles Unplugged. Abilene, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 2323230, abilenebarandlounge. com. 8 p.m.  Egg Man’s Traveling Carnival. Hatter’s Pub, 5 W Main St, Webster. 872-1505. 6 p.m. Call for tix.  Set It Off w/City Lights. Flying Squirrel, 285 Clarissa St. thesquirrel.org, 678-6870. 4 p.m. Call for info.  [ R&B ] Forward Movement. Tala Vera, 155 State St. tala-vera.com, 546-3945. 8:30 p.m. $5. 

Wednesday, November 9 [ Acoustic/Folk ] Dave McGrath @ The Cottage Hotel of Mendon. Cottage Hotel, 1390 PittsfordMendon Rd, Mendon. dave@ davemcgrath.com. 7 p.m. Free.  Jim Lane. Norton’s Pub, 1730 N Goodman St. 266-3570. 8 p.m. Free.  Rob & Gary Acoustic. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. woodcliffhotelspa.com. 5:30 p.m. Free.  Tommy Gravino. Rio Tamatlan, 5 Beeman St, Canandaigua. 394-9380. 6:30 p.m. Free. Salsa w/Shelia dancing during the performance.  [ Blues ] Tik Tok. Abilene, 153 Liberty Pole Way. abilenebarandlounge.com, 232-3230. 8:30 p.m. $5.  [ Classical ] Music after 1900- Request Concert. Eastman School of Music-Ciminelli Lounge. 26 Gibbs St. ko.eunmi@gmail. com. 8:30p.m. Free. [ DJ/Electronic ] DJ Wizz the Waxx Kutta. Triple Deuces Bar & Grill, 151 St Paul St. tripledeucesbargrill. com. 10:30 p.m. Call for tix.  Bad Wolf: 50s & 60s Vinyl Bop. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 454-2966, bugjar.com. 10 p.m. Free.  DJ. One, 1 Ryan Alley. 5461010. 10 p.m. Free.  DJ Babi Katt/Dancehall Reggae. Blueroom, 293 Alexander St. 730-5985. 10 p.m. $5 after 11 p.m.  DJ Cosmo. Bay Bar & Grill, 372 Manitou Rd, Hilton. 392-7700. 10 p.m. Free.  DJs Jared & Mario B. Venu Resto-Lounge, 151 St Paul St. 232-5650. 9 p.m. $5.  DJs NaNa & PJ. Vertex, 169 N Chestnut St. 232-5498. 10 p.m. $3-$8.  [ Jazz ] John Greeno Jazz Trio. Lemoncello, 137 W Commercial St, E Rochester. lemoncello137.com. 6 p.m. Free.  Paradigm Shift. Pomodoro Grill & Wine Bar, 1290 University Ave. 271-5000. 7:30 p.m. Free.  Rick Holland Evan Dobbins Little Big Band. Tala Vera, 155 State St. tala-vera.com, 5463945. 8 p.m. Free.  Robert Chevrier. Pomodoro Monroe Ave, 3400 Monroe Ave. 586-7000. 6:30 p.m. Free.  The Margaret Explosion. Little Theatre Cafe, 240 East Ave. thelittle.org. 7:30 p.m. Free.  The Swooners. Bistro 135, 135 W Commercial St,, East Rochester. bistro135.net, 6625555. 6 p.m. Free.  Tony Gianavola. Beale Street Cafe, 693 South Ave. 2714650, bealestreetcafe.com. 6 p.m. Free.

[ Karaoke ] Karaoke. Southpaw Brew Pub, 315 Gregory St. 303-2234. 8:30 p.m. Free.  Karaoke. Elite Bar & Grill, 398 W Main St. 527-8720. 9 p.m. Free.  Karaoke. Pineapple Jacks, 485 Spencerport Rd. 247-5225. 9 p.m. Free.  Karaoke. Jose & Willy’s, 20 Lake Shore Dr, Canandaigua. 394-7960. 8:30 p.m. Free.  Karaoke. Monty’s Korner, 363 East Ave. 263-7650. 9.30 p.m. Free.  Karaoke. Applebee’s-Fairport, 585 Moseley Rd, Fairport. 425-4700. 9 p.m. Free.  Karaoke. Mayfields Pub, 669 Winton Rd N. 288-7199. 9 p.m. Free.  Karaoke. Sanibel Cottage, 1517 Empire Blvd, Webster. 671-9340. 6 p.m. Free.  Karaoke Night. Lemoncello, 137 W Commercial St, E Rochester. 385-8565, lemoncello137.com. 9 p.m. Free.  Karaoke w/Jimmy C’s Music Machine ft. Johnny Rocker. Sully’s Pub, 242 South Ave. sullyspubonline.com. 8:30 p.m. Free.  Karaoke w/Mark. Flipside Bar & Grill, 2001 E Main St. 2883930. 8:30 p.m. Free.  [ Open Mic ] Acoustic Open Mic. Pub 511, 511 E Ridge Rd. 266-9559. 8 p.m. Free.  Open Jam w/Big Daddy Blues Band. Deweys, 1380 Lyell Ave. 254-4707. 9:30 p.m. Free.  Open Jam w/Justin Gurnsey. Jukebox, 5435 Ridge Rd W, Spencerport. 352-4505. 10 p.m. Free.  Open Mic. Boulder Coffee Co-South Wedge, 100 Alexander St. 454-7140, bouldercoffeeco.com. 8 p.m. Free.  Open Mic. Dr’s Inn Grill & Tap Room, 1743 East Ave. 2710820. 5 p.m. Free.  Open Mic w/Jam Shack Music. Stoneyard Bar & Grill, 1 Main St, Brockport. 637-3390. 9 p.m. Free.  Open Mic w/Steve West. Muddy Waters Coffee House-Geneseo, 53 Main St, Geneseo. 243-9111. 7-10 p.m. Free.  [ Pop/Rock ] Spacelords. Sticky Lips BBQ Juke Joint, 830 Jefferson Road 14623. stickylipsbbq. com. 9 p.m. Free.  The Features. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N Water St. waterstreetmusic.com. 7:30 p.m. $5 adv, $7 doors.  The Mumfords, Utopia Park w/Sunset Magnetic. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. bugjar.com, 454-2966. 9 p.m. $6-$8. 


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Art Exhibits [ OPENING ] Rochester Art Club Fall Show and Sale Wed Nov 2. Barnes and Noble Gallery 3349, Monroe Ave, Pittsford. 7-9 p.m. 586-6020, barnesandnoble.com. Finger Lakes Photography Guild Show Thu 3. Nov Wood Library, 134 North Main St., Canandaigua. 6:30-8:30 p.m. 394-1381 x306. “My Journey into Quilting” by Terry Noonan Thu Nov 3. My Sister’s Gallery, The Episcopal Church Home, 505 Mt. Hope Ave. 5-7 p.m. 546-8439. “Olivia Kim: Realism Rediscovered” and “Stephen Spratnjak: a 1000-piece work” Thu Nov 3. SUNY Geneseo Lederer Gallery, 1 College Circle, Brodie Hall. 5-7 p.m. 243-6785 “Annual Holiday Sale” featuring Maggi Bartlett and Michelle Wescott Fri-Sun Nov 4-6. Crocus Clay Works Gallery, Hungerford Building Door #2, Suite 225, 1115 E. Main St. Fri 5-9 p.m., Sat-Sun 10 a.m.-4 p.m. 469-8217, crocusclayworks.com. “Art Related” featuring Craig Schutte, Jordan Rubin, Ben Rubin, and Sydney Schutte Fri Nov 4. Record Archive, 33 1/3 Rockwood St. 5-9 p.m. alayna@ recordarchive.com. Beyond the Racks: Cordell Cordaro Fri Nov 4. 2 Chic Boutique, 151 Park Ave. 5-8 p.m. 271-6111, 2chicboutique.com. “Corn Hill: What’s Next?” Fri Nov 4. Rochester Regional Community Design Center, Hungerford Complex/E. Main Business Park. Door 3B. 6-9 p.m. 271-0520, rrcdc.com. Galleria delle Arti Wed Nov 2. Italian American Community Center, 150 Frank Dimino Way. 7-9 p.m. 594-8882, iaccrochester.org “In the Shadow of the Park,” paintings by Abbe Czajkowski Fri Nov 4. Chait Fine Art Gallery, 234 Mill St. 5-9 p.m. 454-6730, schait@chaitstudios.com. “Judd Williams: Sandpapers” Fri Nov 4. Phillips Fine Art, 248 East Ave. 6:30-9:30 p.m. 232-8120. Lisette Dana and The Main Street Artists Fri Nov 4. The Hungerford, Door 2,1115 E. Main St. 5-9 p.m. 233-5645. November Pairings featuring Sophia Amm, Liz Britton-Berry,

ART | Craft Shows

Hand-crafted items make great gifts, and learning to craft is a great pastime. If either of these ideas pique your interest, you’re in luck, as it is undeniably craft-show season in Rochester. Here are a few shows to add to your calendars over the next few weeks. The 20th Annual Labors of Love Craft and Food Fair will take over Brighton’s Atonement Lutheran Church (1900 Westfall Road) on Saturday, November 5, 9:30 a.m.-4 p.m. Admission is free. The Weavers’ Guild of Rochester will host its Holiday Sale of Fine Arts and Crafts Friday, November 4, through Sunday, November 6, at the Carmen Clark Lodge, Brighton Town Park, 777 Westfall Road. If you want to pair your crafting with food, join the Macedon Center United Methodist Church, 1160 Macedon Center Rd., on Saturday, November 5, at 10 a.m. for its annual Fall Frolic Craft Sale and Luncheon. The Irondequoit Community Center (154 Pinegrove Ave.) will host its Craft Show & Sale on Saturday, November 5, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Also on Saturday, November 5, will be the 2nd Annual Mayday Underground Arts and Crafts Show (pictured) 10 a.m.-5 p.m. at the Main Street Armory (900 E. Main St.). The second annual Arts & Crafts Bazaar will be held at the Bethel Christian Fellowship, 321 East Ave., on Saturday, November 12-Sunday, November 13 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Free admission. Finally, from Friday, November 18, through Sunday, November 20, the RMSC Women’s Council will host its 41st Annual Holiday Bazaar Arts and Crafts Sale at the Museum and Science Center (657 East Ave). Admission is $5, and there will be nearly 200 artists and craftspeople displaying and selling their work. — BY ERIC LACLAIR Liz Durand, Denise Fabrizio, Alice Gold, Michael Harris, Constance Mauro, and Wendy Menzie Fri Nov 4. Black Radish Gallery, Village Gate, D Entrance, 274

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46 City november 2-8, 2011

Goodman St., Studio 212. 5-9 p.m. studio212@shoefactoryarts. com, shoefactoryarts.com “Perspectives: Near & Far” Fri Nov 4. Image City Photography Gallery, 722 University Ave. 5-9 p.m. 482-1976, imagecityphotographygallery.com. Pistachio Press Grand Opening FriSat Nov 4-5 Booksmart Studio, 250 N. Goodman St. Fri 6-10 p.m., Sat 12-5 p.m. 1-800-7616623, booksmartstudio.com. “Positive Negatives,” photographs by David Johnson Fri Nov 4. Community Darkroom Gallery, 713 Monroe Ave. 7 p.m. 2715920, geneseearts.org. “Puffery” MFA Thesis Exhibition by Whitney Warne Fri Nov 4. Hungerford Building, door 1, suite 258, 1115 E. Main St. 6-9 p.m. Repeats Nov 11 6-9 p.m. whitney.warne@gmail.com. “What’s on Your Plate? Whimsical and Wonderful Artwork by Jennifer Richter” Fri Nov 4. Gallery @ Equal=Grounds, 750 South Ave. 79 p.m. gallery@equalgrounds.com. “It’s Only a Medium” featuring Barron Naegel and Liz Brownell Sat Nov 5. Phelps Art Center, 15 Church St., Phelps. 5-7 p.m. 315548-2095, phelpsartcenter.com. A Photographic Celebration Sat Nov 5. New York Wine and Culinary Center, 800 South Main St., Canandaigua. 7-10 p.m. 3947070, nywcc.com. Webster Art Club Wed Nov 9. Webster Public Library, 980 Ridge Rd., Webster. 6:30 p.m. 872-7075 [ CONTINUING ] 1975 Gallery at the Public Market, 280 Union St. North, Floor 3 above Flour City Bakery. Through Nov 5: “By the Pale Moonlight.” By appt. 1975ish.com 2 Chic Boutique 151 Park Ave. Nov 4-30: Beyond the Racks: Cordell Cordaro. Wed-Thu 11 a.m.-7 p.m., Fri 11 a.m.-6 p.m., Sat 11 a.m.-5 p.m. 271-6111, 2chicboutique.com. Arts & Cultural Council Gallery 277 N Goodman St. Nov 930: Four Artists: Cook, Keyser, Notides-Bensing, Sacks. | Through Nov 3: Continuing: “The Coastal Series” by Jean K Stephens. Mon-Fri 10 a.m.-4 p.m. 473-4000, artsrochester.org. Baobab Cultural Center 728 University Ave. Through Nov 30: “Magnificent Africa III.” Thu-Fri 5:30-9 p.m., Sat 2-4 p.m. 5632145, thebaobab.org.

Barnes and Noble Gallery 3349 Monroe Ave, Pittsford. Through Dec 3: Rochester Art Club Fall Show and Sale. Mon-Sat 9 a.m.10 p.m.; Sun 9 a.m.-9 p.m. 5866020, barnesandnoble.com. Black Radish Gallery Village Gate, D Entrance, 274 N. Goodman St. Nov 4-30: November Pairings featuring Sophia Amm, Liz Britton-Berry, Liz Durand, Denise Fabrizio, Alice Gold, Michael Harris, Constance Mauro, and Wendy Menzie. Mon-Fri 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Sat 12-5 p.m. arenaartgroup.com Books Etc. 78 W. Main St., Macedon. Through Dec 30: “Where the Journey Begins,” the work of Kelly Ayer, D. Brent Walton, and Bev Owen. Wed-Sun Noon-5 p.m. 474-4116, books_ etc@yahoo.com. Booksmart Studio 250 N. Goodman St. Nov 4-5: Pistachio Press Grand Opening. MonFri 9 a.m.-6 p.m.; Sat 10 a.m.-4 p.m. 1-800-761-6623, booksmartstudio.com. Bug Jar 219 Monroe Ave. Through Nov 30: THE LOBBY Presents: “Kurt Ketchum: (2BCON’T).” Mon-Sun 8 p.m.- 2 a.m. 454-2966, bugjar.com. B.T. Roberts Memorial Hall Gallery at Roberts Wesleyan College 2301 Westside Drive. Through Dec 15: “Landscapes: Having Eyes to See” by Dr. Brian Babcock. Mon-Fri 10 a.m.-5 p.m. 594-6800, nes.edu. Central Library 115 South Ave. Through Dec 4: “The Art of the Book.” Mon 12-8 p.m., Tue-Fri 10 a.m.-6 p.m., Sat 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Sun 1-5 p.m. 428-7300. Chait Fine Art Gallery 234 Mill St. Nov 4-25: “In the Shadow of the Park,” paintings by Abbe Czajkowski. By appointment. 4546730, schait@chaitstudios.com. Community Darkroom Gallery 713 Monroe Ave. Opens Nov 4: “Positive Negatives,” photographs by David Johnson. Mon 9 a.m.9:30 p.m.; Tue-Thu 9 a.m.6:30 p.m.; Fri 12-5 p.m.; Sat 10 a.m.-5:30 p.m. 271-5920, geneseearts.org. Crocus Clay Works Gallery Hungerford Building Door #2, Suite 225, 1115 E. Main St. Nov 4-26: “Annual Holiday Sale.” Tue-Wed 5-8 p.m., Sat 10 a.m.-3 p.m., or by appointment. 4698217, crocusclayworks.com. Davison Gallery at Roberts Wesleyan College 2301 Westside Drive. Through Nov 11: “Matter

and Color,” paintings and sculptures by Gloria Betlem and Ruth Geos. Mon-Fri 11 a.m.-5 p.m.; Sat 1-4 p.m. 594-6442, roberts.edu/davisongallery. Dickys Bar Corner of Meigs and Caroline Streets. Through Nov 22: Work by Christopher Maley. Call for hours. 730-8310. A Different Path Gallery 27 Market St., Brockport. Nov 427: “Offerings,” an exhibition of mixed media artwork by Jappie King Black. Wed-Fri 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Sat 10 a.m.-6 p.m., Sun 10 a.m.-4 p.m. 637-5494, differentpathgallery.com. Fusion Salon 333 Park Ave. Ongoing: “RetroGrade” with St. Monci and Hannah Betts. Mon & Tue 9 a.m.-8 p.m., Thu Noon-8 p.m., Fri 9a.m.-6 p.m., Sat 9 a.m.-4 p.m. 271-8120, fusionsalonnewyork.com. Gallery @ Equal=Grounds 750 South Ave. Nov 4-30: “What’s on Your Plate? Whimsical and Wonderful Artwork by Jennifer Richter.” Tue-Fri 7 a.m.-Midnight, Sat-Sun 10 a.m.-Midnight. gallery@equalgrounds.com. George Eastman House 900 East Ave. Through Nov 13: Transitions-Rochester. | Through Feb 19: “The Unseen Eye: Photographs from the W.M. Hunt Collection. Tue-Sat 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Thu 10 a.m.-8 p.m., Sun 1-5 p.m. $4-$12. 2713361, eastmanhouse.org Gilded Square Picture Framing & Gallery 714 University Ave. Continuing: “Framed” artwork by Keith Uhrich & Michelle Michael. Tue-Fri 11 a.m.-5 p.m., Sat 11 a.m.-3 p.m. 461-2808, gildedsquare.com. Grass Roots Gallery Hungerford Building, Suite 157, 1115 E. Main St. Continuing: “Just a Little Freak Show,” works by Mary Bohan Sather, Casey Falco, Aaron Humby, Stephen Lindsay, Kari Roberts Petsche, and Colleen Virdi. Visit site for hours. thegrassrootsgallery.com. Hartnett Gallery University of Rochester, Wilson Commons. Through Nov 20: “Echo Sonata” by Rosalyn Engelamn. Tue-Fri 11 a.m.-7 p.m.; Sat-Sun Noon-5 p.m. 275-4188, blogs.rochester. edu/Hartnett. High Falls Fine Art Gallery 60 Browns Race. Through Nov 4: Rochester Art Supply Invitational, “Scapes II” by Bracket Exposures, and “The


Small Show.” Wed-Fri 11 a.m.5:30 p.m.; Sat Noon-5:30 p.m.; Sun 1-5 p.m. 325-2030, centerathighfalls.org. Image City Photography Gallery 722 University Ave. Through Nov 27: “Perspectives: Near & Far.” Wed-Sat 11 a.m.-7 p.m.; Sun noon-4 p.m. 482-1976, imagecityphotographygallery.com. International Art Acquisitions 3300 Monroe Ave. Through Nov 30: “Sandstone” series by Linda Kall. Mon-Fri 10 a.m.9 p.m.; Sat 10 a.m.-6 p.m.; Sun Noon-5 p.m. 264-1440, internationalartacquisitions.com. Italian American Community Center 150 Frank Dimino Way. Through Nov 30: Galleria delle Arti. Mon-Fri 8 a.m.-5 p.m. 5948882, www.iaccrochester.org JGK Galleries 10 Vick Park A. Through Nov 26: Richard Lang Chandler. Tue, Thu & Fri 11 a.m.-4 p.m., Sat 12-3 p.m., Mon & Wed by appt. 734-6581, jgkgalleries.com. Little Theatre Café 240 East Ave. Through Nov 11: Clare Mann. Through Oct 14: Anthony Cerulli. Sun 5-8 p.m. Mon-Thu 5-10 p.m.; Fri-Sat 5-11 p.m. 2580403, thelittle.org. Memorial Art Gallery 500 University Ave. Through Jan 15: “Extreme Materials 2.” | Lucy Burne Gallery: Through Nov 12: “Adult Student Show.” Wed-Sun 11 a.m.-5 p.m., Thu until 9 p.m., $5-$12. Thu night reduced price: $6 from 5-9 p.m. 276-8900, mag.rochester.edu. Mill Art Center & Gallery, 61 N Main St, Honeoye Falls. Through Nov 26: “The Magic Rabbit Wildcard” by Jenny Pope. | Through Nov 13: “Gramma’s Cameras” by Lori Horton. MonFri & Sat 11 a.m.-3 p.m., Fri 11 a.m.-8 p.m. Free. 624-7740, millartcenter.com. MCC Forum at R Thomas Flynn Center, 1000 E. Henrietta Rd. Through Dec 18: “Artists in Unlikely Places.” Call for hours. 292-2021. MCC Mercer Gallery 1000 E. Henrietta Rd. Through Nov 18: “The Nature of Form: Beauty and Trauma” by Anne Punzi. | Through Dec 31: The Magnet Project. Mon-Thu 11 a.m.-6 p.m.; Fri 11 a.m.-4 p.m. 292-2021, monroecc.edu/go/mercer/ More Fire Glass Studio 80 Rockwood Pl. Through Nov 11: “Connotations: New Sculptural Works” by Elizabeth Luons, Mahine Rattonsey, and Jennifer Schinzing. Mon-Fri 11 a.m.-4 p.m. or by appt. 242-0450, morefireglass.com. My Sister’s Gallery The Episcopal Church Home, 505 Mt. Hope Ave. Opens Nov 3: “My Journey into Quilting” by Terry Noonan. Daily 10 a.m.-8 p.m. 546-8439. Nan Miller Gallery 3450 Winton Place. Nov 6-Jan 3: “Beauty and Grace: The Female Form.” | Through Nov 5: “Visual Tastings.” Mon-Sat 10 a.m.-5 p.m. 2921430, nanmillergallery.com. Nazareth College Arts Center Gallery 4245 East Ave. Through Nov 6: “We Are Stories…if my children should ask,” The art of Shawn Dunwoody and Dr. David Anderson. Wed-Sun 1-8 p.m. 389-5073, naz.edu. continues on page 48

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ART | EXHIBIT OPENINGS

The holidays are approaching more quickly that I want to acknowledge, but you can count on a little help from your local art scene for gift ideas, not to mention the typical showcases of talent and thought-provoking exhibits. The following are a just a few of the shows opening this week that might strike your fancy, but you know the bountiful art offerings extend far beyond this. Visit firstfridayrochester.org for a great list of venues participating in this month’s gallery night, and check our online events calendar at rochestercitynewspaper.com for more receptions and exhibits. All receptions and exhibits are free unless otherwise noted.

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On Friday, November 4, Arena Art Group will kick off its new series of invitational exhibits at the new Black Radish Gallery (Village Gate, D entrance, 274 N. Goodman St., blackradishstudio.com), which will feature works by Sophia Amm, Liz Britton-Berry, Liz Durand, Denise Fabrizio, Alice Gold, Michael Harris, Constance Mauro, and Wendy Menzie. The reception will take place 6-10 p.m. and the exhibit will remain on display through November 30. Rachael Hetzel of Pistachio Press and Eric Kunsman of Booksmart Studios (250 N. Goodman St. booksmartstudios. com) are launching A Work in Progress Gallery, as well as a collaborative retail space within Booksmart, which will offer locally made letterpress goods, demos, and workshops, artist residencies, poetry readings, writing workshops by Nina Alvarez, artist book collabs, and exhibits. An opening party is planned for Friday, November 4, 6-10 p.m., and on Saturday, November 5, Pistachio Press will offer hands-on demos and workshop tours from noon to 5 p.m. Upstairs, the Shoe Factory Art Co-op (250 N. Goodman St. #212, 732-0036, shoefactoryarts.com) will present “Once Upon a Coffee Table: Fine Art Furnishings” (pictured) with a reception 6-10 p.m. Handcrafted tables and other functional art will remain on display through November 26. Over at the Hungerford, Crocus Clay Works (1115 E. Main St., Door 2, Suite 223, 469-8217, crocusclay.com) will host “Holiday Show,” featuring Maggi Bartlett and Michelle Wescott, with hand-made books and quilted creations. The reception will take place 5-9 p.m. on Friday, and will be open again Saturday and Sunday 10 a.m.-4 p.m. The exhibit will remain on display through November 26. Don’t forget to check out the lovely ceramic wares and the rest of the open galleries and studios while you’re in the building. The Gallery @ Equal Grounds (750 South Ave., gallery@ equalgrounds.com) will feature “What’s on Your Plate? Whimsical and Wonderful Artwork by Jennifer Richter,” 7-9 p.m., featuring shadow boxes and papier maché “diva” mermaids, and the show will remain up through the month of November. Two solo exhibits will open at SUNY Geneseo’s Bertha V.B. Lederer Gallery this week (Brodie Hall, 1 College Circle, Geneseo, 2436785). “Realism Rediscovered” by Oliva Kim and “A 1000-piece work” by Stephen Spretnjak will open November 3 and remain on display through December 10. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY rochestercitynewspaper.com City 47


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48 City november 2-8, 2011

Art Exhibits Oxford Gallery 267 Oxford St. Through Nov 26: “Paying Homage,” paintings and drawings by Thomas Insalaco. Tue-Fri Noon-5 p.m; Sat 10 a.m.-5 p.m. 271-5885, oxfordgallery.com. Pat Rini Rohrer Gallery 71 S Main St, Canandaigua. Through Nov 5: “Autumn Highlights” MonTue 10 a.m.-6 p.m.; Wed-Fri 10 a.m.-8 pm.; Sat 10 a.m.-6 p.m.; Sun 12:30-4 p.m. 394-0030, prrgallery.com. Phelps Art Center 15 Church St., Phelps. Through Jan 7: “It’s Only a Medium” featuring Barron Naegel and Liz Brownell. ThuSat 1-4 p.m. 315-548-2095, phelpsartcenter.com. Phillips Fine Art 248 East Ave. Nov 4-29: “Judd Williams: Sandpapers.” Tue-Fri Noon-6 p.m.; Sat Noon-5 p.m. or by appt. 232-8120. Record Archive 33 1/3 Rockwood St. Nov 4-30: “Art Related” featuring Craig Schutte, Jordan Rubin, Ben Rubin, and Sydney Schutte. Mon-Sat 10 a.m.-9 p.m., Sun noon-5 p.m. alayna@ recordarchive.com. Rochester Contemporary Arts Center 137 East Ave. Through Nov 13: “Scapes.” | In the Lab Space, “Ethereality” by Christina Laurel. Wed-Sun 1-5 p.m., Fri 1-10 p.m. 461-2222, rochestercontemporary.org. $1. Rochester Regional Community Design Center Hungerford Complex/E. Main Business Park. Door 3B. Opens Nov 4: “Corn Hill: What’s Next?” Mon-Fri 8:30 a.m.5:30 p.m. 271-0520, rrcdc.com. Roz Steiner Art Gallery 1 College Rd., Batavia. Through Nov 7: “Quinceanera” by Yolanda Daliz and Anita Welych. Call for hours. 343-0055 x6448, genesee.edu. Rush Rhees Library Rare Books and Special Collections University of Rochester River Campus, Rush Rhees Library, Wilson Blvd. Through Jan 5: “Kenneth Patchen.” Mon-Fri 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Sat 11 a.m.-3 p.m. 475-6766. Sage Art Center UR River Campus. Nov 4-11: “ThreeLegged Race: The Art of Collaboration.” Mon-Thu 9 a.m.-11p.m., Fri 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Sat-Sun 2-6 p.m. 273-5995, rochester.edu/college/AAH/ facilities/sage The Shoe Factory Co-op 250 N. Goodman St., Studio 212. Nov 4-26: “Once Upon a Coffee Table: Fine Art Furnishings.” Wed-Sat 12-5 p.m. studio212@ shoefactoryarts.com, shoefactoryarts.com Spectrum Gallery at Lumiere Photo, 100 College Ave. Through Nov 20: “Virginia Saunders: Visions and Dreams.” Mon-Fri 9 a.m.-6 p.m., Sat 10 a.m.-2 p.m. 461-4447, lumierephoto.com. The Strong’s National Museum of Play One Manhattan Square. Through Nov 20: “The Fine Art of Airigami: Once Upon a Time” by Larry Moss and Kelly Cheatle and “Whimsical Art Trail.” Mon-Thu 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Fri-Sat 10 a.m.-8 p.m., Sun 12-5 p.m. 263-2700, thestrong.org. $10-12. SUNY Geneseo Lederer Gallery 1 College Circle, Brodie Hall. Through Dec 3: “Olivia Kim: Realism Rediscovered” and

ART/FILM | David Johnson “Positive Negatives”

On Thursday, November 3, The Little Theatre and Community Darkroom will present “Positive Negatives,” a documentary about photographer David Johnson, Ansel Adams’ first African-American student at the California School of Fine Arts in San Francisco. Johnson’s work recorded Fillmore Street jazz clubs in San Francisco during the 1940’s, 50’s, and 60’s and the civil-rights movement in San Francisco, the NAACP registration drives, and the march on Washington. His subjects include important civil-rights leaders, Langston Hughes, and musical icons. The film will screen at 7:30 p.m. and tickets cost $12 ($8 for members). A talkback with Johnson himself will immediately follow the screening. For more information, call 258-0444, or visit thelittle.org. On Friday, November 4, the Community Darkroom Galleries at Genesee Center for the Arts & Education (713 Monroe Ave., geneseearts.com) will host an opening of “The Photography of David Johnson,” and you can meet the artist in person at the 7 p.m. reception, which is free to attend, and will feature music by Paradigm Shift. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY “Stephen Spratnjak: a 1000piece work.” Tue-Thu 12:30-3:30 p.m., Fri-Sat 1-5 p.m. 243-6785 SUNY Geneseo Lockhart Gallery McClellan House, 26 Main St., Geneseo. Through Dec 3: “New York State Revolutionary War Sites: The Pastels of J. Erwin Porter.” Mon-Thu 12:30-3:30 p.m.; Fri-Sat 12:30-5:30 p.m. geneseo.edu. Tower Fine Arts Center @ SUNY Brockport 180 Holley St. Through Dec 4: Department of Art Alumni Exhibition. Mon-Fri 10 a.m.-4 p.m. 395-ARTS, brockport.edu. Visual Studies Workshop 31 Prince St. Through Nov 13: “Transitions-Rochester.” Thu 5-8 p.m., Sat-Sun noon-5 p.m. 4428676, vsw.org. Webster Public Library 980 Ridge Rd., Webster. Nov 6-Dec 3: Webster Art Club. Call for hours. 872-7075. Williams Gallery 220 S Winton Rd. Through Nov 14: “Telling Our Story” Creative Hue Artist Collective. Mon-Fri 9 a.m.-2 p.m. 271-9070, rochesterunitarian.org Wood Library 134 North Main St., Canandaigua. Nov 3-Dec 17: Finger Lakes Photography Guild Show. Sun noon-4 p.m., Mon 11 a.m.-2 p.m., Tue 10 a.m.-noon. 394-1381 x306. [ CALL FOR ARTWORK ] 2012 Stage Door Project: Designing “A Raisin in the Sun.” Deadline November 7. Offered to high school students who have an interest in the design opportunities of theatrical

production. For information, call 232-1366 x 3035 or email eevans@gevatheatre.org. Art at the Armory: The Show and Sale of Nature-themed Fine Art. Deadline November 5. Call for artists of all fine art media: apply now by visiting artatthearmory.com or call 2238369 to request an application packet. Exhibit and sale to take place November 12-13. Call for Art from THE LOBBY. Deadline November 14 for December 2 show at Bug Jar. Variations on the theme, “Remote Control.” Information at lobbydigital.com. Call for Art from The Shoe Factory Art Co-op. Deadline November 12 for December show, “The Greatest Gift of All.” Visit shoefactoryarts.com for information.

Art Events [ Friday, November 4 ] Fine Craft Show Preview Party. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. 276-8910, mag. rochester.edu. 7-9 p.m. $45, register. First Friday Citywide Gallery Night. Various. firstfridayrochester.org. 6-9 p.m. Free. [ Friday, November 4Sunday, November 6 ] Weavers Guild of Rochester 2011 Holiday Sale of fine Arts & Crafts. Brighton Town Park Lodge, 777 Westfall Rd. weaversguildofrochester.org. Fri 12-8 p.m., Sat-Sun 10 a.m.-5


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p.m. Free admission. Enjoy live music by Pat Carey and Abe’s Lily. [ Saturday, November 5 ] Fall Frolic Craft Sale & Luncheon. Macedon Center United Methodist Church, 1160 Macedon Center Rd. 315-986-2687, cjrothfuss@ rochester.rr.com. 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Free admission. Irondequoit Community Center Craft Show and Sale. Irondequoit Community Center, 154 Pinegrove Ave. irondequoit.org. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Free admission. Labors of Love Craft and Food Fair. Atonement Lutheran Church, 1900 Westfall Rd., Brighton. 4421018, atonementrochester.org. 9:30 a.m.-4 p.m. Free admission. Mayday Underground Crafts + Art. Main Street Armory, 900 E Main St. maydaycraft@aol.com. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Free. Our Lady of Mercy Craft Show and Sale. Our Lady of Mercy High School Gymnasium, 1437 Blossom Rd. 288-2610. 10 a.m.4 p.m. Free. Stew in the Studio presented by Cuisine Culture. 39 Coach St., Canandaigua. cuisineculturenow@ gmail.com. 4, 6 & 8 p.m. $37.50. Pottery + Food in Action. [ Saturday, November 5Sunady, November 6 ] 11th Annual Fine Craft Show. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. 276-8900, mag. rochester.edu. Sat 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Sun 10 a.m.-4 p.m. $10. [ Sunday, November 6 ] Artisan Show and Sale. CP Rochester, 3399 Winton Road South. 334- 000 x1321, events@cprochester.org. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Free.

Comedy [ Wednesday, November 2-Monday, November 7 ] Fall Back Comedy Fest ‘11. The Space Theater, Hungerford Building, 1115 East Main St., Door 2, Floor 2. 269-4673, thespacerochester.com. Various times. Call for details. [ Thursday, November 3Saturday, November 5 ] Gemini/Brandon Dyer. Comedy Club, 2235 Empire Blvd, Webster. 671-9080, thecomedyclub.us. Thu 7:30 p.m., Fri-Sat 7:30 & 10 p.m. $9. [ Friday, November 4 ] Search Engine Improv Presents Monsssstrocity. The Space, 1115 E. Main, Suite 248. Contact@ searchengineimprov.com. 9-11 p.m. $8 online, $10 door. [ Friday, November 4Saturday, November 5 ] JJ Ramierez. Last Laff Bar & Grill, 4768 Lake Ave. 663-5233, lastlaff.net. 8 & 10 p.m. $10.

Dance Events [ Wed., November 2 ] Ganondagan Spirit Dancers. Wood Library, 134 N Main St, Canandaigua. 394-1381, woodlibrary.org. 7-9 p.m. Free. [ Friday, November 4 ] Present Tense Dance 20th Anniversary Concert. Aquinas

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COMEDY | Fall Back Comedy Fest

Whether you like sketch comedy, stand-up, or improv, the Fall Back Comedy Festival is sure to have something that will leave you laughing. Dedicated to putting the spotlight on up-andcoming comedians and comedy troupes, the new festival will take over The Space (Hungerford Building, 1115 E. Main St.), for five days of laughs, running Wednesday, November 2, through Sunday, November 6. The festival kicks off Wednesday with two evening shows dedicated to improvisation by Massachusetts’ Harold Night improv troupes, at 7 p.m. and 8:45 p.m. Thursday will put our hometown at the forefront of the festival with Rochester Showcase night starting at 6:30 p.m. The weekend will be filled with workshops, stand-up shows, improv, and sketch comedy all day Saturday, as well as after-parties on Friday and Saturday night. The festival will wrap up Sunday morning with a final workshop at 10 a.m. and a farewell brunch at 1 p.m. Tickets are available for single shows as well as full week passes and range from $5-$70. For a full schedule of shows or to purchase tickets, visit fallbackcomedyfest.com. — BY ERIC LACLAIR Institute, 1127 Dewey Ave. 305 4619, presenttensedance.org. 7:30 p.m. $12-$15.

Festivals [ Through Wed., November 16 ] 19th Annual Lane Dworkin Rochester Jewish Book Festival. Jewish Community Center, 1200 Edgewood Ave. 461-2000 x237, rjbf.org. Visit site for details.

Kids Events [ Thursday, November 3-Friday, November 4 ] “Seussical the Musical, Jr.” Jefferson Road School, 15 School Lane, Pittsford. 398-0220, bestfootforwardkids.com. 6:30 p.m. $8, children under 5 free. [ Friday, November 4 ] Harley Book Fair with “Biscuit” series author, Alyssa Capucilli. Harley School, 1981 Clover Rd. 442-1770, harleyschool.org. 2:30-4:30 p.m. Free. [ Saturday, November 5 ] “Mufaro’s Beautiful Daughters” Dallas Children’s Theatre. Nazareth College Arts Center, 4245 East Ave. 389-2170, boxoffice.naz.edu. 2 & 4 p.m. $11-$17. 4 p.m. show interpreted for the deaf and hard of hearing. 2011 Rochester Children’s Book Festival. Monroe Community College, 1000 E. Henrietta Rd., Brighton. rochesterchildrensbookfestival.

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org. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Free admission.

Lectures [ Wed., November 2 ] “The Faces of Immigration: How our Unjust and Broken System Destroys Lives, and What We Can Do About It.” Downtown Presbyterian Church, 121 N Fitzhugh St. interconnect_mott@ frontiernet.net. 7 p.m. Free. [ Thursday, November 3 ] 2011 Native American Lecture Series: “Healing & Balance in the Haudenosaunee Culture.” Nazareth College Arts Center, 4245 East Ave. 742-1690, ganondagan.org/programs/ LectureSeries. 7-9 p.m. $20$30, register. Room A13. Caroline Werner Gannett Project: Fred Ritchin, “After Photography.” Rochester Institute of TechnologyWebb Auditorium, 1 Lomb Memorial Dr. 475-2057, cls3740@ rit.edu, cwgp.org. 8-10 p.m. Free. Wish You Were Here Photography Lecture: Benjamin Lowy. George Eastman House, 900 East Ave. benjaminlowy.com. 6 p.m. Included with museum admission: $5-12. [ Friday, November 4 ] Church Women Uniteds World Community Day “Living Our Faith, Unlocking Action.” Greece Baptist Church, 1230 Long Pond Rd. 3422790. 9:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. $3. Dialogue on Human Rights: A Right to Be Here. Friends Meeting House, 84 Scio continues on page 49 rochestercitynewspaper.com City 49


Lectures St. 395-5509, swaa@ swaarochester.org. 6 p.m. Free. Panel Discussion: “Collecting Craft Art.” Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. 276-8900, mag.rochester.edu. 6-7 p.m. $10 includes admission to Craft Show. [ Tuesday, November 8 ] “Moving Millions: How Coyote Capitalism Fuels Global Immigration” with Jeffrey Kaye. Rochester Institute of Technology, Golisano Hall Auditorium, 20 Lomb Memorial Drive, Building 70, Room 1400. 475-7052, rhira@mail.rit.edu. 4 p.m. Free.

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2 Chic Boutique Beyond the Racks A Work in Progress Gallery at Booksmart Studio Pistachio Press Grand Opening A.R.T.S Gallery at Aviv Cafe Bubbles from Heaven ACTucker Art Gallery Art Studio & Gallery Anderson Arts Building Day of the Dead celebration Chait Fine Art In the Shadow of the Park Crocus Clay Works Holiday Show Galvin/Davis Studio/Gallery Open Studio with Chas and Tom Genesee Center for the Arts Photography of David Johnson Greenwood Books Poetry Readings Hungerford Urban Artisans (HUA) Studio stroll at the Hungerford Image City Photography Gallery Perspectives: Near & Far Jembetat Tribal Art Gallery and Cafe Art of the Dogon JGK Galleries Paintings by Richard Lang Chandler Phillips Fine Art Sandpapers by Judd Williams Rochester Art Club The Rochester Art Club Rochester Contemporary Art Center (RoCo) Scapes and Christina Laurel

50 City november 2-8, 2011

Spectrum Gallery Visions and Dreams Stella Art Gallery & Studio Introspect The Crafting Social Open Studio The Gallery@Equal=Grounds What’s on your plate? The Shoe Factory Art Co-op Once Upon a Coffee Table Writers & Books Wide Open Mic NOVEMBER 4TH HIGHLIGHTS:

[ Wed., November 9 ] “Exploring the Literary ‘Lived Experience’ of the Civil War” with Norm Gayford. Genesee Community College, Lima Campus Center, 7285 Gale Road on Rte. 15A. 582-1226, genesee.edu/Lima. 7 p.m. Free. “The Art and Science of Book Restoration and Bookbinding” by Fred Jordan. Barnes & Noble Pittsford, 3349 Monroe Ave. 2442505. 7:30 p.m. Free. End of Life Care Conference. Jewish Community Center, 1200 Edgewood Ave. 461-2000 x214, jccrochester.org. 8:30 a.m.-3:45 p.m. $20, register. Opera Lecture: Prayer in Opera. Italian American Community Center, 150 Frank Dimino Way. 594-8882. 7:30 p.m. Free, register. With Chuck Lundeen.

Literary Events [ Thursday, November 3 ] Book Discussion: Beyond Reading: Dracula. Geva Theatre Center, 75 Woodbury Blvd. 232-4382, gevatheatre.org. 6:30 p.m. discussion, 7:30 p.m. show. Mention Writers & Books for 20% discount on ticket. Ages 15+. [ Friday, November 4 ] Poetry Reading: “Before Jazz” by Rick Petrie. Writers & Books, 740 University Ave. 473-2590, wab. org. 7 p.m. Free. [ Saturday, November 5 ] Poetry Reading: Bug Jam with Poets and Musicians. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. John Roche jfrgla@ rit.edu. 5:00-9:30 p.m. Free. [ Sunday, November 6 ] Poetry Reading: Joy Underhill and Holly Hunter. Books Etc, 78 W Main St, Rt 31, Macedon. 4744116, books_etc@yahoo.com. 4-5:30 p.m. Free.

DANCE | Present Tense Dance

Rochester-based Present Tense Dance has hosted performances and workshops throughout the northeast since 1991. On Friday, November 4, the troupe will put on a special performance celebrating its 20th anniversary. More than 30 Present Tense dancers have performed with the company over the past 20 years, and have mastered the art and repertory provided to them by Artistic Director Anne Harris Wilcox. Friday’s performance starts at 7:30 p.m. at the Aquinas Institute (1127 Dewey Ave.) and will feature highlights from the Present Tense repertory, as well as the premiere of two new works. The new pieces are “Magnum Opus,” a comical look at the creative process, and “Reunion,” a structured improvisation about reconnection. Tickets cost $12-$15. For more information or to purchase tickets, visit presenttensedance.org. — BY ERIC LACLAIR Step It Up to Cure Pancreatic Cancer 5K Walk. University of Rochester, Wilson Blvd. stepituptocurepc.org. 1:30 p.m. $5-$25.

Special Events [ Wed., November 2 ] Geneva Historical Society Museum Annual Dinner and Silent Auction. Belhurst Castle, Geneva. 315-789-5151, genevahistoricalsociety.com. 6 p.m. Call for details. National Veterans Job Expo 2011. Rochester Riverside Convention Center, 123 E Main St. rrcc.com. 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Free. [ Thursday, November 3 ] “After I Pick the Fruit,” A documentary film following the lives of 5 migrant farmworker women. St John Fisher College, 3690 East Ave. nancyghertner@ gmail.com, afteripickthefruit.com. 6 p.m. Free. Held in Basil 135. [ Thursday, November 3-Friday, November 4 ] The Community Place Senior Center’s Rummage Sale. 145 Parsells Avenue. 288-0021 x173. Call for info.

• Scapes & Christina Laurel at RoCo • Poetry Readings: Tony Leuzzi at Greenwood Books • Holiday Show at Crocus Clay Works • Open Studio at The Crafting Social • Art of the Dogon at Jembetat Tribal Art Gallery and Cafe • Introspect at Stella Art Gallery & Studio • Paintings by Richard Lang Chandler at JGK Galleries • Bubbles from Heaven at A.R.T.S Gallery at Aviv Cafe

[ Tuesday, November 8 ] Book Discussion: Books Sandwiched-in Fall 2011. Central Library, 115 South Ave. 4288350. 12:12-12:52 p.m. Free. “Bossypants” by Tina Fey.

T H I S M O N T H O N LY:

[ Saturday, November 5 ] GVHC Hike. Turning Point Park, end of Boxart St, off Lake Ave. Pam N. 224-5140, gvhchikes. org. 1 p.m. Free. Moderate 5 mile hike.

[ Friday, November 4 ] Cobblestone School Harvest Dinner at The Rabbit Room. The Rabbit Room, 61 N. Main St. Honeoye Falls. 582-1830, thelowermill.com. 6:30-9 p.m. $75, RSVP. Rochester Activists for Animal Rights Vegetarian Fundraiser. Flying Squirrel, 285 Clarissa St. raar.rocus.org. 7-10 p.m. $8-$10 suggested donation.

[ Sunday, November 6 ] GVHC Hike. Mendon Ponds park beach, off Douglas Rd. John C. 254-4047, gvhchikes.org. 1 p.m. Free. Moderate/hilly 5 mile hike.

[ Friday, November 4Sunday, November 6 ] Lamberton Conservatory Celebrates 100 Years of Highland’s Parks. Lamberton

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Recreation

Conservatory, Highland Park, 180 Reservoir Ave. 753-7270, monroecounty.gov/parks. 10 a.m.-9 p.m. Free admission. [ Saturday, November 5 ] Canandaigua Christkindl Market Dinner Dance. Granger Homestead, 295 N Main St, Canandaigua. 394-1472. 5:3010 p.m., food stations open 6:15-7:30 p.m., dance to the Skycoasters 7-10 p.m. $25, RSVP. Coffee Connection Open House. Coffee Connection, 681 South Ave. ourcoffeeconnection.org, projectempower.org. 8 a.m.-7 p.m. Free. ESWA Karaoke and Dance Party Benefit. Downtown United Presbyterian Church. sthomps1@rochester.rr.com. 5-9 p.m. Suggested donation: $5/person, $7.50/family. Fall Dinner Dance. St. Mary’s Ukranian Orthodox Church, 3176 St. Paul Blvd., Irondequoit. 748-4202. Doors 6 p.m., dinner 7 p.m. $8 dance, $20 dinner and dance, RSVP by 11/2. Greece Historical Society: Native American Day. Greece Town Hall, 1 Vince Toffany Blvd, Rochester, NY 14612. 225-7221, greecehistoricalsociety.net. 10 a.m.-noon. Free. Hervey Ely House Holiday Bazaar. Hervey Ely House, 138 Troup St., Corn Hill. bhenning1@rochester.rr.com. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Free. [ Monday, November 7 ] Incarcerated Youth Program: “My dream is that someone will listen to us and hear our dreams. My dream is to make 21.” Downtown Community Forum, 15 St Mary’s Place. nyslc.org. 7-9 p.m. Free.


[ Tuesday, November 8 ] Greece Historical Society: Seabreeze Memories. Greece Town Hall, 1 Vince Toffany Blvd, Rochester, NY 14612. 225-7221, greecehistoricalsociety.net. 7 p.m. Donations appreciated. Ladies’ Night Out to Benefit Crisis Nursery Center. 3300 Monroe Ave. 235-5750, crisisnursery75@gmail. com. 6:30-8:30 p.m. Call for information. [ Wed., November 9 ] “Out of this World” Book Fair. Hillel Community Day School, 191 Fairfield Dr. 271-6877, office@hillelschool.org. 6:157:30 p.m. Free admission.

Sports [ Sunday, November 6 ] Amerks vs. Syracuse. Blue Cross Arena, 100 Exchange Blvd. amerks.com. 6:05 p.m. $12-$18.

Theater

“All the Great Books (abridged).” Fri Nov 4-Nov 13. Geneva Theatre Guild. Geneva Community Center, 160 Carter Rd. Fri-Sat 8 p.m., Sun 2 p.m. $10-$12. 315-946-6686, gtglive.org. “Disenchanted: Bitches of the KIngdom” Preview Wed Nov 9-Nov 13. Downstairs Cabaret Theatre, 20 Windsor St. Nov 9 7 p.m. $20. 325-4370, downstairscabaret.com. “Disney Spectacular... Wishing upon a Star.” Sat Nov 5. GatesChili Middle School, 1 Spartan Way. 2 & 6:30 p.m. $7. 8892290, gatescommtheater@ gmail.com. “Dracula.” Through Nov 13. Geva Theatre Center, 75 Woodbury Blvd. Wed Nov 2Thu 7:30 p.m., Fri 8 p.m., Sat 4 & 8:30 p.m., Sun 2 & 7 p.m., Tue-Wed Nov 9 7:30 p.m. Tickets start at $25.232-4382, gevatheatre.org. “Flamin’ Amy & Steve.” Wed Nov 2-Nov 3. Downstairs Cabaret Theatre, 20 Windsor St. 7 p.m. $21. 325-4370, downstairscabaret.com. Gilbert and Sullivan’s “The Mikado.” Fri Nov 4-Nov 13. Off-Monroe Players. Salem United Church of Christ, 60 Bittner St. Fri-Sat 8 p.m., Sun 2 p.m. Free, donations appreciated. 232-5570, offmonroeplayers.org. “The Grapes of Wrath.” Wed Nov 9-Nov 13. SUNY GeneseoAlice Austin Theater, Brodie Hall. Wed-Sat 8 p.m., Sun 3 p.m. $8. 245-5833, bbo. geneseo.edu. “Late Night Catechism.” Wed Nov 2-Nov 27. Geva Theatre Center, 75 Woodbury Blvd. Opening night: Wed Nov 2 7 p.m., performances Thu-Fri 7 p.m., Sat 3 & 7 p.m., Sun 3 p.m., Wed Nov 9 7 p.m. Tickets start at $35. 232-4382, gevatheatre.org. “Mr. Marmalade” Thu Nov 3-Nov 6. Harlequins Student Theatre Organization. Tower Fine Arts Center Mainstage, 180 Holley St., College at Brockport. Thu-Sat 7:30 p.m.,

KIDS | VIDEO GAME MANIA

The weather outside is becoming frightful, so grab the kids and head over the The Strong this weekend for Video Game Mania at the National Museum of Play. On Saturday, November 5, 11 a.m.-4 p.m., and Sunday, November 6, noon-4 p.m., kids can battle for high scores, participate in a tournament on rows of various video-game consoles, and check out games invented by students and faculty at RIT. Adults can get all nostalgic in the Retro Room Lounge, where video games from the 1970’s and 1980’s will be featured. On Sunday, beginning at 5:30 p.m., game-developer talks and guided tours will be offered. All activities are included with general admission fees, which are $13 for adults, $12 for seniors, $11 for children ages 2-15, and free to children under the age of 2. The Strong is located at 1 Manhattan Square. For more information, call 263-2700 or visit museumofplay.org. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY Sun 2 p.m. $8-$15. 395-2787, brockport.edu/finearts. “Mufaro’s Beautiful Daughters” Sat Nov 5. Dallas Children’s Theatre. Nazareth College Arts Center, 4245 East Ave. 2 & 4 p.m. $11$17. 4 p.m. show interpreted for the deaf and hard of hearing. 389-2170, boxoffice.naz.edu. “The Mystery of Irma Vep (A Penny Dreadful Comedy).” Through Nov 12. Blackfriars Theatre, 795 E Main St. Thu 7:30 p.m., Fri-Sat 8 p.m. $17$27. 454-1260, bftix.com. “The New Faces of America.” Thu Nov 3. FLCC, Stage 13 on the second floor, 3325 Marvin Sands Dr., Canandaigua. 12:30 p.m. Free. 785-1623, flccconnects.com. “One More for My Baby.” Through Nov 5. Downstairs Cabaret at Winton Place, 3450 Winton Place. Thu 7 p.m., Fri 8 p.m., Sat 4 & 8:30 p.m. $29-$39. 3254370, downstairscabaret.com. “Polaroid Stories.” Through Nov 20. Bread & Water Theatre, 243 Rosedale St. Fri-Sat 8 p.m., Sun 2 p.m. $6-$12. 271-5523, breadandwatertheatre.org. “The Real Me.” Wed Nov 9. MuCCC, 142 Atlantic Ave. 7 p.m. Free. 244-0960, muccc.org. “Seussical the Musical, Jr.” Thu Nov 3-Nov 4. Jefferson Road School, 15 School Lane, Pittsford. $8, children under 5 free. 3980220, bestfootforwardkids.com. 6:30 p.m. “Sex Please, We’re Sixty.” Fri Nov 4-Nov 20. Greece Paint Players. Golden Ponds Restaurant & Party House, 500 Long Pond Rd. Fri-Sat 6:30 p.m., Sun 3 p.m. $27, RSVP. Includes dinner, show, tax and gratuity. 225-2419. “Stray.” Fri Nov 4-12 Working Class Theatre Company. Spotlight Theatre 3 Railroad

St. Fairport. Fri-Sun 7:30 p.m. $10. 643-0836, info@ workingclasstheatre.net. “Strictly Murder.” Fri Nov 4-Nov 19. Penfield Players. Penfield Community Recreation Center, 1985 Baird Rd, Penfield. Fri-Sat 8 p.m. $12-$15. 340-8655, penfieldplayers.org. “Swamp Angel.” Fri Nov 4-Nov 12. RAPA East End Theatre, 727 E Main St. 7:30 p.m. $12-$15. 325-3366, rapaonline.us. William Shakespeare’s “The Merchant of Venice.” Through Nov 19. Rochester Community Players. MuCCC, 142 Atlantic Ave. Thu-Sat 8 p.m., Sun 2 p.m. $5-$15. 244-0960, muccc.org. “You Only Shoot the Ones You Love.” Fri Nov 4-Nov 6. Downstairs Cabaret Theatre, 20 Windsor St. Fri-Sat 8 p.m., Sun 3 p.m. $21. 325-4370, downstairscabaret.com.

Theater Auditions [ Saturday, November 5 ] Irondequoit Theatre Guild “Got Talent?” St. Thomas Apostle, 4536 St. Paul Blvd., Irondequoit. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Free. Lisa at 4265534, Debbie at 266-4574. [ Monday, November 7Tuesday, November 8 ] “Foggerty’s Fairy,” a farce by W.S. Gilbert. Christ the Good Shepherd Church, 1000 N. Winton Road. 7 p.m. Free. 232-5570, offmonroeplayers.org.

rochestercitynewspaper.com City 51


Film Times Fri Nov 4-Thu Nov 10 Schedules change often. Call theaters for updates.

Film

Cinema Theater 271-1785 957 S. Clinton St. CONTAGION: Fri-Sun 4:30; HIGHER GROUND: 8:35; RESTLESS: 7.

Culver Ridge 16 544-1140 2255 Ridge Rd E, Irondequoit 50/50: 5:05, 10:30; DOLPHIN TALE: 2:10; DREAM HOUSE: 2:25, 7:50; FOOTLOOSE: 1:40, 4:35, 7:25, 10:35; THE IDES OF MARCH: 2:05, 4:40, 7:15, 9:40; IN TIME: 1:45, 2:15, 4:15, 5:10, 6:50, 7:45, 9:30, 10:40; PARANORMAL ACTIVITY 3: 1:35, 2:35, 3:45, 4:55, 6:40, 7:55, 9:25, 10:05; PUSS IN BOOTS: 3:40, 5, 9:20, 10:25; also open-captioned 1:20, 6:35; also in 3D 1:50, 2:20, 4:20, 7:10, 7:40, 9:55; REAL STEEL: 1:25, 4:25, 7:20, 10:10; THE RUM DIARY: 2, 4:50, 7:35, 10:20; SARAH’S KEY: 1:55, 4:30, 7:05, 9:50; TOWER HEIST: 1:30, 4:05, 7, 9:35; A VERY HAROLD & KUMAR 3D CHRISTMAS: 2:30, 4:45, 5:15, 7:30, 8, 9:45, 10:15.

Eastview 13 425-0420 Eastview Mall, Victor 50/50: 9:30; FOOTLOOSE: 1:45, 4:25, 7:35, 10:15; THE IDES OF MARCH: 1:55, 4:20, 6:55; IN TIME: 2:05, 4:40, 7:55, 10:30; MONEYBALL: 1:35, 4:35, 7:40, 10:35; PARANORMAL ACTIVITY 3: 1:25, 3:55, 7:15, 9:45; PUSS IN BOOTS: 1:30, 4, 4:30, 6:50, 9:20, 9:50; also in 3D 2, 2:30, 5, 7:20, 8, 10:20; REAL STEEL: 1:20, 4:15, 7:05, 9:55; THE RUM DIARY: 1:15, 4:05, 7:10, 10:25; THE THREE MUSKETEERS (3D): 4:55, 10:05; TOWER HEIST: 1:50, 4:45, 7:30, 10:10; A VERY HAROLD & KUMAR 3D CHRISTMAS: 1:40, 2:10, 4:10, 7, 7:45, 10.

The wicked wizards of Wall Street [ REVIEW ] BY George Grella

“Margin Call” (R), directed by J. C. Chandor Now playing

The new movie “Margin Call” achieves a surprising success in handling the formidable challenges inherent in making a film about a subject both abstract and complex. The picture deals with some of the people, events, and decisions that created the economic disasters of 2008 and the subsequent Great Bush Recession, focusing on the machinations of one giant financial house over something like 24 hours.

Greece Ridge 12 225-5810 176 Greece Ridge Center Dr. FOOTLOOSE: 1:20, 4, 7:05, 9:55; THE IDES OF MARCH: 1:50, 4:35, 7, 9:25; IN TIME: 1:45, 4:55, 7:30, 10:10; PARANORMAL ACTIVITY 3: 2:25, 5:10, 7:55, 10:15; PUSS IN continues on page 54

The picture begins with a series of drastic firings involving 80 percent of the work force of a large financial company, apparently the result of previous losses. After 19 years with the firm, Eric Dale (Stanley Tucci), the head of the risk department, receives his pink slip in the usual brusque, businesslike, heartless manner from a particularly nasty hatchet woman. Just before he leaves, he gives a disk to Peter Sullivan (Zachary Quinto), one of his subordinates, warning him to be careful. Working late, on his computer Sullivan scopes out the numbers and formulas on the disk — the picture never shows exactly what they constitute or what they mean — and justifiably panics, calling a coworker, Seth Bregman (Penn Badgley), and a high-level executive, Will Emerson (Paul Bettany), to return to the office and examine his data. The data reveals that the firm has wildly overinvested its assets in all sorts of stocks, bonds, mortgages, etc. — again the precise nature of these bad investments never emerges — and now faces imminent

Zachary Quinto in “Margin Call.” PHOTO COURTESY BEFORE THE DOOR PICTURES

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disaster. Sullivan estimates that the losses will total more than the value of the firm itself. His information immediately galvanizes several layers of executives and managers, who in turn summon the whole board of directors to figure out a way to deal with the crisis. The desperate, late-night conference of all big shots reveals something of the methods and beliefs of the Wall Street insiders. The biggest of the big bosses, John Tuld (Jeremy Irons), asks for explanations in the simplest possible manner and words of one syllable, presumably because he needs to know nothing in order to command a huge financial house and perhaps to help a hopelessly confused audience to comprehend the meaning of the problem. After a lot of tense discussion and determined resistance from one of the few relatively honest men, Sam Rogers (Kevin Spacey), Tuld and his underlings settle for the most obvious solution, to sell all their bad investments for the highest price they can command. That decision, Sam Rogers points out, involves a fatal breach of ethics that will make the company and its people pariahs on Wall Street. The action the directors approve involves instructing all their traders and brokers to lie about their motives and falsify the value of the company’s holdings to convince their contacts all over the world to buy, buy, buy. It also means that the bosses must find a few sacrificial lambs to blame for the crisis, so they calmly fire Bregman and

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Manic expression [ REVIEW ] BY DAYNA PAPALEO

“Pianomania” (NR), directed by Robert Cibis and Lilian Franck Screens Friday and Sunday at the Dryden

“Take Shelter” (R), written and directed by Jeff Nichols Coming soon

another, much more highly placed executive, Sarah Robertson (Demi Moore), who happily terminated Eric Dale’s career at the beginning of the movie — karma at work, perhaps. Despite the essential vagueness of the central material and the complicated jargon of financial wheeler-dealers, “Margin Call” maintains its atmosphere of tension and uneasiness throughout. Constricted by its 24-hour time frame and its single main setting of a lower Manhattan skyscraper, the movie too often resembles a stage play; its frequent shots of two actors conversing, and the script’s tendency to address the audience through some lectures characters deliver to each other occasionally slow down the action. “Margin Call,” however, depends heavily on its fine cast to convey the meaning and urgency of its themes. The consistent coldness of the characters’ reactions to the subject and each other very nicely suggests the heartless approach of big money people to the human consequences of their actions. A couple of the more appealing people in the film — Eric Dale and Sam Rogers — articulate the subtext beneath all the financial manipulation and arcane jargon, the essentially Marxist contention that they accomplish no real work, construct nothing solid or permanent, but make their enormous salaries by buying and selling the empty symbols of wealth, the paper that occupies the attentions of the gamblers, crooks, and whores who largely populate Las Vegas and Wall Street.

In 2008 Rochester audiences seemed to fall under the spell of one particular movie star, a dusky, nine-foot-long beauty called L1037. The acclaimed documentary that chronicled the life of this Steinway concert grand from forest to stage played to billions of people (give or take billions) in its handful of presentations at the Dryden that year, and “Note By Note: The Making of Steinway L1037” returns this Saturday for a long-awaited encore, this time with director Ben Niles in tow for a Q&A following the screening. Now, you probably wouldn’t diagnose this musiccrazy town as having been in the throes of pianomania back then, but I might, and with apologies for such blatant corniness. It’s only because I could really use a segue. A fitting companion piece to “Note By Note,” the absorbing “Pianomania” is

Stefan Knüpfer in “Pianomania.”

PHOTO

COURTESY FIRST RUN FEATURES

another one of those documentaries that focuses on an important job that gets done even though very few stop to think about the skilled individual who devotes his time and energy to doing it. So meet Stefan Knüpfer, a boyish, bespectacled piano technician with Steinway & Sons. Knüpfer is Steinway’s man in Vienna, in charge of fine-tuning the pianos played by the world-class musicians who visit Mozart’s later-life stomping grounds. And I do mean “fine-tuning”; we watch as Knüpfer meticulously caters to the precision musical demands of classical-music luminaries like Lang Lang, Alfred Brendel, and Pierre-Laurent Aimard, with much of “Pianomania” devoted to Knüpfer’s quest to get the sound exactly right for Aimard as he prepares to record Bach’s “The Art of Fugue” in Vienna’s Konzerthaus. As Steinway’s clients put Knüpfer through his paces, often with a tonal specification no more explicit than “magic,” it’s hard not to be a little awed by Knüpfer’s professional patience while he makes the tiniest of adjustments, barely detectable to our lay-ears, upon instruments that are nonetheless at the mercy of conditions like humidity and temperature. And each piano has its own unique tone, which Knüpfer must keep mentally catalogued to meet the requirements of the various musicians. Directors Robert Cibis and Lilian Franck don’t give us too many personal details on their subject — we know he has a cute dog as well as a wife who bakes a decent cheesecake — but we do get glimpses into his amiable personality and seeming makeit-happen unflappability, even in the face of requests that are nearly impossible to inarticulate and possibly impossible period. Unsurprisingly a gifted pianist in his own right, albeit one with no wish for the limelight (“I can get off stage when the public comes in,” Knüpfer says), the Master Tuner derives obvious pleasure from the classic job well done, and witnessing his wide-eyed delight as he

brainstorms outrageous possibilities for piano and violin with the musical comedy duo of Aleksey Igudesman and Richard Hyung-ki Joo is a treat for us as well. “Pianists are mostly dissatisfied,” Knüpfer confides to us of his challenging clients, but their eventual satisfaction takes the form of admiration and a little bit of wonder at the calm, attentive man who consistently manages to construct that crucial bridge between science and art. “You got a good life, Curtis,” Dewart

(Shea Whigham, “Boardwalk Empire”) tells his friend at the beginning of the tense psychological drama “Take Shelter.” And to observe Curtis LaForche (“Revolutionary Road” Oscar nominee Michael Shannon), we would agree; good job, nice home, loving family. But Curtis has been plagued by eerily apocalyptic visions as well as sheet-drenching nightmares, and they’re severe enough, and real enough, for him to fear for his family’s safety along with his own sanity. Samantha (Jessica Chastain, “Tree of Life”) knows something is up with her laconic husband, though it isn’t until he becomes obsessed with building out their tornado cellar that she grasps the gravity of the problem. Writer-director Jeff Nichols (you should rent his fantastic debut feature, 2007’s “Shotgun Stories”) has crafted a powerful, subversive parable for the way we live now, juggling our continually percolating dread over finances, health, marriage, along with just about anything else our minds are free to fixate on. Reteaming with his “Shotgun Stories” director, Shannon extends his invaluable streak thanks to a controlled performance shot through with effective rumbles of unhinged thunder. The earthy Chastain is a perfect foil for Shannon and his looming physicality, as is Kathy Baker, who makes the most of one lovely, sad scene as Curtis’s schizophrenic mother. And that ending is a polarizing doozy.

PIANOMANIA

Friday, Nov. 4, 8 p.m., & Sunday, Nov. 6, 5 p.m. Stefan Knüpfer, Steinway & Sons’ chief technician and Master Tuner in Vienna, is dedicated to the task of pairing world-class instruments with world-famous pianists. A humorous and surprisingly suspenseful peek into the heated clash of wills between a genius craftsman and the renowned artists who rely on his talent. (Robert Cibis, Lilian Franck, Austria/Germany, 2009, 93 min., German w/subtitles.)

DIARY OF A LOST GIRL Movies for movie lovers, 6 nights a week. New Release!

Tuesday, Nov. 8, 8 p.m. Louise Brooks is the “lost girl” displaced by a hateful stepmother and a lascivious shop assistant into the hellish world of a girl’s reformatory. Brooks’s innocence and sensuality are thoroughly exploited by Pabst’s bravura direction, which explores sex, sadism, and unlikely redemption through a cynically moral viewpoint. Live piano accompaniment by Philip C. Carli. (G.W. Pabst, Germany 1929, 104 min.)

Silent Tuesdays

Film Info: 271-4090 l 900 East Avenue l Eastman House Café—stop in for a light dinner or dessert before the film. l Wi-Fi Hotspot l Sponsored by rochestercitynewspaper.com City 53


BOOTS: 1:30, 3:50, 4:50, 6:40, 9, 10; also in 3D 2, 2:30, 4:20, 7:10, 7:40, 9:30; REAL STEEL: 1, 3:55, 6:50, 9:45; THE RUM DIARY: 1:35, 4:25, 7:15, 10:05; TOWER HEIST: 1:10, 2:20, 4:10, 5, 7:20, 7:50, 9:50, 10:20; A VERY HAROLD & KUMAR 3D CHRISTMAS: 2:10, 4:30, 8, 10:30.

Henrietta 18 424-3090 525 Marketplace Dr. 50/50: 1:20, 7:10; COURAGEOUS: 12:30, 3:55, 7:15; DOLPHIN TALE: 1:55; FOOTLOOSE: 12:40, 3:45, 6:35, 9:15; THE IDES OF MARCH: 10:15; IN TIME: 12:10, 1:25, 2:40, 4:15, 5:15, 6:55, 7:55, 9:35, 10:35; MONEYBALL: 3:50, 9:40; PARANORMAL ACTIVITY 3: 1:10, 3:20, 5:35, 7:45, 9:55, midnight; PUSS IN BOOTS: 12:25, 3, 4:30, 5:30, 8, 9:30, 10:30; also open-captioned 2, 7; also in 3D 1:30, 2:30, 4, 5, 6:30, 7:30, 9, 10, 11:30; RA ONE (3D): 12:05, 3:25, 6:45, 10:10; REAL STEEL: 1:15, 4:25, 7:25, 10:25; THE RUM DIARY: 1:45, 4:40, 7:40, 10:45; THE THREE MUSKETEERS (3D): 1:35; TOWER HEIST: 12:35, 1:40, 3:10, 4:10, 4:50, 5:40, 6:40, 7:20, 8:10, 9:10, 9:50, 10:40, 11:40; A VERY HAROLD & KUMAR 3D CHRISTMAS: 12:15, 2:50, 4:20, 5:20, 6:50, 7:50, 9:20, 10:20, 11:50.

The Little 258-0400 240 East Ave. 50/50: 7:10 (no Thu), 9:35; also

Film Previews

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54 City november 2-8, 2011

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[ OPENING ] ANONYMOUS (PG-13): German action auteur Roland Emmerich directs this historical thriller about a power struggle in the Elizabethan court that addresses the theory that Edward de Vere, 17th Earl of Oxford, was the true author of Shakespeare’s works. Little, Pittsford CARMEN (1918): The first success in the storied career of director Ernst Lubitsch is this adaptation of the tragic tale of a Spanish cavalryman who falls under the seductive spell of a Gypsy girl. Dryden (Sun, Nov 6, 2 p.m.) DIARY OF A LOST GIRL (1929): G.W. Pabst directs Louise Brooks in this adaptation of the controversial German novel about a disgraced young woman sent to live in a reformatory for wayward girls. Dryden (Tue, Nov 8, 8 p.m.) LITTLE ODESSA (1994): The debut film from talented writer-director James Gray (“We Own The Night”) is a drama about a hitman for the Russian mob (the great Tim Roth) who reconnects with his estranged family in Brighton Beach, Brooklyn. Dryden (Wed, Nov 2, 8 p.m.) MY AFTERNOONS WITH MARGUERITTE (NR): From French filmmaker Jean Becker (“Conversations With My Gardener”) comes this feel-good comedy about a lonely, illiterate lug (Gérard Depardieu) who

Sat-Sun 12:30, 3; ANONYMOUS: 6:30, 9:15; also Fri-Sat 12, 3:10; THE INCONVENIENT TRUTH BEHIND WAITING FOR SUPERMAN: Thu 6:30; MARGIN CALL: 6:40, 9; also Sat-Sun 12:20, 2:50; MEGUNICA: Thu 7; MY AFTERNOONS WITH MARQUERITTE: 6:50, 8:50; also Sat-Sun 12:20, 2:50; RUM DIARY: 7, 9:35; also Sat-Sun 12:10, 2:40.

Movies 10 292-5840 2613 W. Henrietta Rd. 7AM TAMIL: 2:40, 6, 9:20; BUCKY LARSON: 2:25, 4:55, 7:35, 10:10; CAPTAIN AMERICA: 4:40, 10; THE CHANGE-UP (cc): 2, 7:25; CRAZY STUPID LOVE: 2:05, 7:15; DON’T BE AFRAID OF THE DARK: 4:45, 9:55; FRIGHT NIGHT (3D): 9:50; THE LION KING: 2:30; also in 3D 5:05, 7:10, 9:20; THE MIGHTY MACS: 2:15, 5, 7:20, 9:40; RA ONE (3D): 2:45, 6:30; RISE OF THE PLANET OF THE APES: 2:10, 4:35, 7:05, 9:35; SAVING PRIVATE PEREZ: 2:20, 4:50, 7:30, 10:05; THE SMURFS: 1:55, 4:30, 7, 9:30.

Pittsford Cinema 383-1310 3349 Monroe Ave. ANONYMOUS: 1:10, 4, 6:50; also Fri-Sat 9:40; FOOTLOOSE: 2:30, 4:35, 7; also Fri-Sat 9:25; THE HELP: 1:30; THE IDES OF MARCH: 2:40, 5:10, 7:30; also Fri-Sat 9:50; also Fri-Sun 12:20; IN TIME: 2, 4:35, 7; also Fri-Sat 9:25; MARGIN CALL: 2:15, 4:40, 7:10; also Fri-Sat 9:30; also Fri-Sun noon;

bonds with a well-read older lady (nonagenarian Gisèle Casadesus) on a park bench. Little NATIONAL VELVET (1945): This family classic stars 12-year-old Elizabeth Taylor as Velvet Brown, a Sussex schoolgirl determined to enter her wild but gifted horse in England’s Grand National Steeplechase. Dryden (Thu, Nov 3, 8 p.m.) NOTE BY NOTE: THE MAKING OF STEINWAY L1037 (2007): The most requested film in Dryden history is this engrossing documentary set against the crafting of a single Steinway, chronicling the piano through every step of its construction. Dryden (Sat, Nov 5, 8 p.m.) PIANOMANIA (2009): This documentary follows Stefan Knüpfer, Steinway & Sons’ chief technician and master tuner in Vienna, as he strives to pair stateof-the-art instruments with worldclass players. Dryden (Fri, Nov 4, 8 p.m., and Sun, Nov 6, 5 p.m.) TOWER HEIST (PG-13): Ben Stiller, Eddie Murphy, and Téa Leoni lead the cast of this action comedy from “Rush Hour” director Brett Ratner about a group of working stiffs plotting to rob the wealthy businessman (Alan Alda) who defrauded them in a Ponzi scheme. Brockport, Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece, Henrietta, Pittsford, Webster A VERY HAROLD AND KUMAR 3D CHRISTMAS (R): After his stint in the Obama administration, Kal Penn reunites with John Cho as our favorite stoners, this time

MONEYBALL: 4:30, 7:15; also FriSat 10; PUSS IN BOOTS: 4:20; also Fri-Sun 12:05; also in 3D 2:10, 6:30; also Fri-Sat in 3D 8:40; THE RUM DIARY: 2:20, 5, 7:40; also Fri-Sat 10:10; also Fri-Sun 11:50 a.m.; THE THREE MUSTKETEERS: 4:50; also Fri-Sun 12:10; TOWER HEIST: 3, 5:25, 7:50; also Fri-Sat 10:15; also Fri-Sun 12:35.

Webster 12 888-262-4386 2190 Empire Blvd. 50/50: 1; DOLPHIN TALE: 1:45, 7:20; FOOTLOOSE: 2:40, 5:10, 7:40; also Fri-Sat 10:25; also Sat 11:50 a.m.; THE IDES OF MARCH (cc): 3, 8:15; IN TIME: 12:10, 2:50, 5:20, 7:50; also Fri-Sat 10:20; MONEYBALL (cc): 12, 5:30; also Fri-Sat 10:35; PARANORMAL ACTIVITY 3: 12:45, 3:15, 5:55, 8:30; also Fri-Sat 10:30; also Sat-Sun 10:30 a.m.; PUSS IN BOOTS: 12:20, 2:30, 4:50, 7:15; also Fri-Sat 9:40; also Sat-Sun 10 a.m. (Sat sensory-friendly); also in 3D 1:30, 3:45, 6:15; also Fri-Sat in 3D 9; also Sat-Sun in 3D 11:15 a.m.; REAL STEEL: 4:15, 7:10; also Fri-Sat 10; also Sat-Sun 10:15 a.m.; THE RUM DIARY: 12:30, 4:05, 7:05; also Fri-Sat 10:10; THE THREE MUSKETEERS: 4:40; also Fri-Sat 9:50; also Sat-Sun 10:45 a.m.; TOWER HEIST: 2, 4:30, 7; also Fri-Sat 9:30; also Sat-Sun 11:30 a.m.; A VERY HAROLD & KUMAR 3D CHRISTMAS: 1:15, 3:30, 5:45, 8; also Fri-Sat 10:15; also Sat-Sun 11 a.m.; THE WAY: 2:15, 5, 7:30; also Fri-Sat 10:05; also Sat-Sun 11:40 a.m.

trying to save the holiday after burning down Harold’s fatherin-law’s prized Christmas tree. Featuring, of course, Neil Patrick Harris. Culver, Eastview, Greece, Henrietta, Webster [ CONTINUING ] IN TIME (PG-13): Justin Timberlake, Amanda Seyfriend, and Cillian Murphy star in the latest from writer-director Andrew Niccol, high-concept sciencefiction set in a future where the wealthiest live the longest and one young man goes on the run from a corrupt police force who believe he murdered a rich man for his time. Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece, Henrietta, Pittsford, Webster PUSS IN BOOTS (PG): Antonio Banderas voices the title character in this “Shrek” prequel, which pits the swashbuckling feline against those amoral thugs Jack and Jill, voiced by Billy Bob Thornton and Amy Sedaris. Also featuring the pipes of Salma Hayek and Zach Galafianakis. Brockport, Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece, Henrietta, Pittsford, Webster THE RUM DIARY (R): This adaptation of the novel by the late Hunter S. Thompson stars Johnny Depp as a roving Eisenhower-era journalist who lands in Puerto Rico and gets mixed up with the expatriate community, including the dangerous girlfriend of a crooked businessman (Aaron Eckhart). Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Greece, Henrietta, Little, Pittsford, Webster


Classifieds For information: Call us (585) 244-3329 Fax us (585) 244-1126 Mail Us City Classifieds 250 N. Goodman Street Rochester, NY 14607 Email Us classifieds@ rochester-citynews.com EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY

All real estate advertised in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act, which makes it unlawful, “to make, print, or publish, any notice, statement, or advertisement, with respect to the sale or rental of a dwelling that indicates any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin.” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under the age of 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertisement for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. Call the local Fair Housing Enforcement Project, FHEP at 325-2500 or 1-866-671-FAIR. Si usted sospecha una practica de vivienda injusta, por favor llame al servicio legal gratis. 585-325-2500 - TTY 585-325-2547. Eastman, Park and East Avenue! $510+ 585-210-2473

Apartments for Rent

12-CORNERS BRIGHTON 2bdrm. Half-house 3 floors + basement. Water incl. Washer/ Dryer connection. W/W carpet, Large Kitchen, Dining Room & Living Room, Small Yard $925+ 585-210-2473 EAST END Conveniently located, 1-bedroom apartment in a house. W/W carpet. Parking available. Water included. Some pets accepted. Near: Downtown,

HUGE 3Bdrm/2bath Off Park Avenue tons of space/storage! Off street parking, w pool/patio grilling area. Newly finished hardwood floors, carpets in bedrooms. w/d h/up $1400/ mo includes: Dishwasher, disposal,snow plowing and water included Josh 585-9759226 PARK NEAR EAST Gorgeous 1st floor, 1 or 2bdrm. Den, Large Kitchen, Heated Sun Porch, Laundry. Private/Quiet. No pets,

Non-smokers. $765+ utilities. Ready Now. 484-770-8095 STUDIO APARTMENT $450 per month, includes utilities. 54 Edmond Street. Close proximity to downtown and 490. NonSmokers, Security deposit $350. Contact John at 585748-7139

Shared Housing ALL AREAS - ROOMMATES. COM. Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http://www.Roommates.com.

Houses for Rent LOOKING FOR Single Family Home. 2-3bdrms with basement. Rent-to-own or Owner will finance wanted. Call 784-0404

Houses for Sale HOMES FOR SALE Pittsford/ Bushnells Basin 3 Homes on fabulous 3 acre park-like yard. Beautifully updated, 1800’s large main house plus 2 smaller homes which are leased for $24,000 per year (Great In-Law Home). Owner must sell due to age & health 585-383-8888 SINGLE FAMILY HOUSE 3bdrm. New windows, siding, roof. Only 5yrs old. 852 North Street. $29,900/BO, tenant pays $700/ mo 943-3497

Real Estate Auctions AUCTION Real Estate Unreserved 31 Federal St. N, Perry, NY PICTS ww.31federalstn. epropertysites.com Open House Saturday 11/5/2011, 11am Ed Fenzl, Wooden Shoe Auctioneers REMAX Properties 315-4369813

Land for Sale NY LAND SALE 33 acres on bass lake $39,900. 5 acres borders sandy creek forest with deer creek $19,900. 40 new properties. www.LandFirstNY.com Call: 1888-683-2626

Secure, Dry, Clean. $65 single, $110 double. Call 484-7708095

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CONDOS FOR SALE FLORIDA CONDO FORECLOSURE! Sarasota/ Bradenton. Brand new upscale 2 bedroom, 2 bath, 1,675sf coastal waterfront condo only $199,900! (Similar unit sold for $399,900) 1st class

A TRULY HAPPY COUPLE with so much love to share hopes to give your precious newborn a lifetime of happiness. Michael and Eileen 1-877-955-8355 babyformichaelandeileen@ gmail.com

continues on page 57

NY STATE LAND Liquidation Sale ends this Month! *Large Acreage *Waterfront *Lots w/ Camps *TOP HUNTING LANDS!! Over 150 tracts. ALL BARGAINS! Call 800-229-7843 Or visit www. LandandCamps.com

Commercial/ Office Space INVESTMENT PROPERTY 2 Apartments, 2 Store/Office fronts. All separate utilities. 2 car garage. Extra lot. $65,000. 667 Emerson Street. Call 943-3497 UofR/ AIRPORT AREA Brick, Mixed use building. 6,000 sq.ft. of stores/office plus 3 apartments. Owner must sell due to illness. Owner financing, no banks needed. 383-8888

Storage Space for Rent GARAGES FOR RENT Park near East. Auto or personal storage.

NOW OPEN LIVE ROCHESTER HISTORY THE MOST EXCITING NEW/OLD DOWNTOWN APARTMENTS BUILT 1840-RENOVATED 2011 HEAT INCLUDED • TOWNHOUSES AND FLATS STOP BY FOR AN APPLICATION 312 STATE STREET M-F 9-6, SAT 9-1

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Place your real estate ad by calling 244-3329 ext. 23 or rochestercitynewspaper.com Ad Deadlines: Friday 4pm for Display Ads Monday at noon for Line ads > page 55 ADOPT A caring couple wish to adopt newborn baby. Our home is filled with LOVE, laughter, and creativity. Please call Liz and Anthony 1-800-359-6937. www.LizAnthonyAdopt.com

ALWAYS BETTER Higher cash for your Junk Cars, Trucks and Vans. From $260-$800 or more for newer. Running or not. With free towing. Also free removale of any unwanted model in any condition. Call 585-305-5865

HomeWork A cooperative effort of City Newspaper and RochesterCityLiving, a program of the Landmark Society.

CA$H 4 CARS Up to $500 for your junk cars, vans and trucks. Always Free Towing. 482-9988

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ADOPT: A happily married couple would be thrilled to become parents. We’ll provide lifetime of love, laughter, security. Expenses paid. Pat/ Dave 1-877-332-2860/ www,patanddaveadopt.com/ patanddaveadopt@yahoo.com ADOPT: LOVING home filled with happiness & security awaits your baby. Expenses paid. Lidia, 1888-206-2505 ADOPTION Young, happily married couple wishes to adopt a baby into a secure, loving home. Expenses paid. Please call 1855-382-3678. Open, loving arms await! ADOPTION: A promise to You Devoted, loving couple pledges lifetime of love for your newborn. Call Patti/Danny toll-free for profile; 855-692-2291. Expenses Paid. Baby1adoption@gmail.com http://www.adoptiononline.com/ members/692.cfm PREGNANT? CONSIDERING ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions 866-413-6293 (Void in Illinois) (AAN CAN)

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Canterbury is Calling You 221 Canterbury Road This lovely 1918, 3,3073 square foot home is a must see! The stucco exterior is complimented by graceful architectural lines and landscaping. A hosta lined sidewalk leads to the original beveled glass front door, which opens to an entrance vestibule with original tile floor. Your first impression when stepping into the front hall is that of light and space. Windows everywhere! Straight ahead is a graceful staircase and arched entryway to the kitchen. The living room, to the right, is spacious with Arts and Crafts style floor molding, gumwood trim, and a gas fireplace for chilly Rochester winter evenings. A wall of windows at the rear of the room gives great light to a cozy sitting area with a window seat and dining nook. There is a newly remodeled half bath and door to the basement in the hall between this great space and the kitchen. The spacious dining room is left of the main hall and the original butler’s pantry is passed through on the way to the kitchen. This pantry, with original cabinets, offers 1918 charm with a great deal of space to store 2011 items. The kitchen is a unique wonder! A back wall of two story windows opens the room to the sky! This newly renovated room offers efficient work space and gleaming stainless appliances. It is a wonderful space in which to spend time cooking or enjoying a meal. In winter you will be in the snow, but

warm and in summer you can enjoy the sun, but be cool in the air conditioning. The rear stairs lead to a lofted office space overlooking the kitchen—with the same two story window view. This office has its own full bath. The upstairs bedrooms have an unusually large amount of closet space. A front bedroom has two closets, one a walk-in. The newly renovated master bath is elegant and luxurious with heated floors, a vanity with terrazzo counter top and lighting underneath, soaking tub, and glass enclosed shower. The upstairs trim is gumwood, the doors have original glass knobs and the hall has a large built in linen closet. 221 Canterbury, on a 50’x147’ lot, is among a variety of early 20th century, architecturally significant homes on a lovely tree lined city street in the Park Avenue neighborhood. It is close to restaurants, shops and the I- 490 exits to Culver Rd. and Monroe Ave. The furnace, hot water heater and AC are new. This home is listed at $279,900. To see this city treasure, visit rochestercityliving.com/property/R168714 or contact Nothnagle Realtor Michael Faucher at 585-756-7282 or mfaucher@nothnagle.com. by Sharon Pratt Sharon is the Museums and Education Associate at The Landmark Society.

rochestercitynewspaper.com City 57


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For Sale BABY WALKER with swing-out trays, play toys $10 585-8802903

CURTAINS (pictures of horses, hounds on fox hunt, hook kind, 84” long, 2 pair $40 Green white, brown 585-880-2903 DOG & CAT HOUSES Kennels, porch steps, do it yourself kits. Quick assembly 585-752-1000 $49 Jim EXERCISE SKI MACHINE $35, Irondequoit, 585-746-8756 GERMAN SHEPHERD PICTURE In wood frame . 13.5” x 22” 585-880-2903 $12

CITY Newspaper presents

Mind Body Spirit TO ADVERTISE IN MIND BODY SPIRIT CALL CHRISTINE AT 244.3329 x23 or email: Christine@rochester-citynews.com

58 City november 2-8, 2011

HOME SALE: Like New Sharper Image Steel Juicer $35, Laptop briefcase $30, sapphire & silver crucifix $40, paper cutter $9. Mary mgrant@frontier.com. MOVING Will sacrifice antique -oak dressers, tables, chairs, mirror, picture, bamboo chair, porch steps, quality pot & pans, bar stools, large maple dresser, oriental rug, china cups, desk (mahogany). Also tools,duffle bags, suitcases, dog-kennel & house) new & used),lamps

Jim 585 752 1000 or email jkress47@yahoo.com SWINGING SHUTTER WOOD DOOR(1) ONLY ONE. Like in Cowboy movies, 5’ 5” tall, 2’ 2” wide (pantry, closet) Hangs middle of door frame. $15 585880-2903 TV 24” Diagonal (not Flat screen) $150. SONY Playstation w/1 memory card $60 Mini, compact stereo system $60 Kerosene heater $125. Make me a reasonable offer 585-507-6896

VARIOUS ITEMS Subwoofer $50, Music & computer CD’s $2 ea Must sell 585-507-6896

Garage and Yard Sales ESTATE ART SALE Sunday Nov. 6th 10am - 5pm over 50 oils, limited edition Giclees and prints, jewelry, cookie jars, clothing & more 439 Beach Ave Charlotte

continues on page 60


Rent your apartment special third week is

FREE

Place your ad by calling 244-3329 ext. 23 or rochestercitynewspaper.com Ad Deadlines: Friday 4pm for Display Ads Monday at noon for Line ads

EMPLOYMENT / CAREER TRAINING

Employment AIRLINES ARE HIRING Train for high paying Aviation Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified- Job Placement Assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance (866)296-7093 $$$HELP WANTED$$$ Extra Income! Assembling CD cases from Home! No Experience Necessary! Call our Live Operators Now! 1-800405-7619 EXT 2450 http://www. easywork-greatpay.com (AAN CAN) PAID IN ADVANCE Make $1,000 a Week mailing brochures from home! Guaranteed Income! FREE Supplies! No experience required. Start Immediately! www.homemailerprogram.net (AAN CAN) PART-TIME RECEPTIONIST For busy downtown Veterinary Hospital. Afternoons and Saturday morning. Please apply in person 9am-4pm M-F, Midtown Vetrinary Hospital, 85 University Ave. No phone calls please. TOP PAY On Excellent Runs! Regional Runs, Steady Miles, Frequent Hometime, New Equipment. Automatic Detention Pay! CDL-A, 6 mo. Experience required. EEOE/AAP 866-3224039 www.Drive4Marten.com VACCINE VOLUNTEERS NEEDED Consider taking part in HIV vaccine research studies at the University of Rochester Medical Center. A pre-ventive HIV vaccine can help STOP the global AIDS crisis. If you are HIV negative, healthy and age 18-50, YOU may qualify. Vaccines are synthetic and it is IMPOSSIBLE to get HIV from the vaccine. Being in a study is more like donating blood. Participants will be paid an average of $750. For more information, visit www. rochestervictoryalliance.org. To learn if you qualify, or to schedule an appointment, call (585) 7562329 (756-2DAY).

Volunteers ARE YOU PREGNANT? Participate in a study to help you become healthier during and after pregnancy. Don’t Wait! Please visit: www.emomsroc.org NEW FIBRO SUPPORT Group is seeking volunteers for all

positions, long-term & short-term Call Brenda 585-341-3290 YMCA SCHOOL #12 999 South Ave. is looking for reading & math volunteers, English & Spanish. Training provided. Call Vicki 585461-4282 VOLUNTEER FOR WILDLIFE! Plant trees at Montezuma National Wildlife Refuge (Route 20, Seneca Falls). Nov. 5 & Nov.

8, 9 AM to 1 PM. Equipment & lunch provided. Individuals & groups welcome! Call 315/5685987 to sign up. VOLUNTEERS NEEDED To assist with praise and worship. Living Waters Fellowship is a Christ centered non-denominational church in the early stages of development. Individuals, groups, and musicians are welcomed. Call 585-957-6155.

Career Training AVIATION MAINTENANCE /AVIONICS Graduate in 14 Months. FAA Approved; Financial aid if qualified job placement assistance. Call National Aviation Academy Today! 800-292-3228 or NAA.edu

3450 WINTON PLACE ROCHESTER, NY 14623 585-292-1240

WWW.FADSROCHESTER.COM

edu 800-243-9300 Consumer\ Information: www.ntts.edu/ programs/disclosures

VETERANS CAREER TRAINING TRAINING-Use your post 9/11 G I benefits to become a professional

We Are Upsizing!

3 Sales & 2 Management positions available. Leads provided, full comprehensive benefits package, first year $40,000-50,000

Contact Ed Hanna (716) 998-8478 Ed.Hanna@combined.com

ADVERTISING SALES OPPORTUNITY SEEKING ONE OUTSTANDING SALES PROFESSIONAL. MUST BE ASSERTIVE, OUTGOING, SMART, IMAGINATIVE AND CONFIDENT. SALES EXPERIENCE AND PROVEN RECORD OF SALES ACHIEVEMENT A MUST. NEWSPAPER/MEDIA SALES A DEFINITE PLUS. SALARY PLUS COMMISSION PLUS BENEFITS.

SEND RESUME TO: Betsy Matthews, City Newspaper, 250 N. Goodman St., Rochester, NY 14607 OR EMAIL TO: bmatthews@rochester-citynews.com

One of the largest Child Care Provider’s in the Rochester area is **7 Locations!!**

HIRING!

Lead Teacher Positions: Minimum

Child Development Associate (CDA) required

Bus Driver Positions: CDL license with P and S endorsement required.

Apply online at generations-care.com or contact us at 585.254.8160 x 304

SERVICES

2011 NATIONAL VETERANS JOB EXPO SPONSORED BY

WHEN: WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 2, 2011, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. WHERE: ROCHESTER RIVERSIDE CONVENTION CENTER 123 E. Main Street, Rochester, NY Meet Local and National Employers with Career Opportunities

Male Dance Instructors needed to fill one full time and one part time position. Dance experience prefforable, but will train the right candidate. Call Fred Astaire Dance Studio at 292-1240 to schedule interview today!

tractor trailer driver. National Tractor Trailer School, Liverpool, Buffalo NY branch www.ntts.

For All Veterans, Military Personnel, Guard and Reservists.

Bring proof of veteran status.

Free Admission. Free Parking at the South Avenue Ramp Garage. Bring your ticket to the event to be validated. Veterans Outreach Center, Inc., The Resource Center, 457 South Avenue, Rochester, New York 14620 Phone: 585-546-4250 • Fax: 585-546-5978 • Toll Free: 1-866-906-8387 www.veteransoutreachcenter.org

We need experienced drivers Kelly Services® is hiring temporary drivers for FedEx Ground®, a small-package ground delivery company serving business and residential customers across North America. Minimum six months experience driving like-sized commercial vehicle within last three years required. One year commercial driving experience strongly preferred. • 21 years or older • Motor Vehicle Record Check • Drug screen, background checks, and physical • Customer service skills Apply Today! Apply in person Monday - Friday, 10am-4pm 225 Thruway Park, West Henrietta, NY or apply via email to tempupny@yahoo.com EOE rochestercitynewspaper.com City 59


Legal Ads > page 58

Jam Section CALLING ALL MUSICIANS OF ALL GENRES - the Rochester Music Coalition wants you! Please register on our website. For further info: www. rochestermusiccoalition.org. info@rochestermusiccoalition. org. 585-235-8412 CALLING ALL MUSICIANS OF ALL GENRES - the Rochester Music Coalition wants you! Please register on our website. For further info: www. rochestermusiccoalition.org. info@rochestermusiccoalition. org. 585-235-8412 EXPERIENCED DRUMMER to rehearse & perform with group - originals & covers. No freelance, one unit only. Available evenings, transportation & equipt. Bobby 585-328-4121 GUITAR PLAYER NEEDED Must be available evenings. Must have equipment and transportation. Please no freelancers. Originals and Covers. Bobby 585-3284121 Sitting Heavy Productions 585-234-1324, rbullock3@ rochester.rr.com MUSICIANS, Soundman, Bands, Rappers, Singers, All styles Contact 585-285-8426 PERFORMANCE AUDIO EQUIPMENT — 38-piece set of quality performance equipment including multiple amps, microphones, pre-amps, stands and much more. Not sold separately. $1290. Call 585259-6934. SING MULTI MUSICIANS NEEDED. must have equipt. & transportation. Avail Eves & weekends. Seeking guitarist & keyboardsits. No freelancers Bobby 585-328-4121. e-mail rlbullock3@yahoo.com THE CHORUS OF THE GENESEE (CoG) has openings in all voice parts. The CoG performs a wide variety of musical styles from barbershop to Broadway, to patriotic and religious. Men of all ages. Contact Ed Rummler at 585385-2698.

Looking For... BUYING COINS Gold, Silver & ALL Coins, Stamps, Paper Money, Entire Collections worth $5,000 or more. Travel to your home. CASH paid. Call Marc -1800-488-4175

Music Services PIANO LESSONS In your home or mine. Patient, experienced instructor teaching all ages, levels and musical styles. Call Scott: 585- 465-0219. Visit www.scottwrightmusic.com

60 City november 2-8, 2011

Miscellaneous ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE From home. *Medical, *Business, *Paralegal, *Accounting, *Criminal Justice. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. Call 888-2018657 www.CenturaOnline.com BACKHOE: 1969 Case 580 CK Backhoe, Excellent Condition! 40hp Diesel Construction King Extend-hoe, $5,500/BO 585727-4849 DID YOU USE THE OSTEOPOROSIS DRUG FOSAMAX (Alendronate)? If you experienced a femur fracture (upper leg), you may be entitled to compensation. Contact Attorney Charles Johnson 1800-535-5727 JOHN DEERE 2001 John Deere 4600, 4X4, Cab, Loader, Diesel, Priced to sell $5500 contact me for details at ferd92ks@msn. com / 347-748-1285 SAWMILLS from only $3997MAKE MONEY & SAVE MONEY with your own bandmil Cut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship. FREE Info & DVD www.NorwoodSawmills. com/300N 1-800-578-1363 Ext.300N VIAGRA 100MG and CIALIS 20mg!! 40 Pills +4 FREE only $99.00. #1 Male Enhancement, Discreet Shipping. Only $2.70/pill. Buy The Blue Pill Now! 1-888-7979022

Notices HEAT & EAT you don’t have to choose! Food Stamps can free up dollars to pay your energy bills. Find out if you may be eligible. Call MCLAC NOEP at (585) 295-5624. Prepared by a project of Hunger Solutions New York, USDA/FNS & NYSOTDA. This institution is an equal opportunity provider.

Mind Body Spirit HIGHLAND PARK BODYWORKS NOW OFFERING PILATES, Yoga, Massage and acupuncture. Your first mat class is free!! 249 Highland Ave. (585) 242-9642 WWW.HPBODYWORKS.COM SUPPORTIVE HEALING Masters level Art Therapist offering holistic mind- body therapy to adolescents and adults. Call Nora Doebrich at 58-2699167 to schedule consultation. supportivehealing.blogspot.com YOGA WITH NORA Specializing in Prenatal and Vinyasa style yoga. Offering group classes and private instruction. yogawithnora@ymail.com norasyoga.blogspot.com

[ LEGAL NOTICE ] Notice of formation of M 5 PROPERTIES, LLC, Arts. Of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State on 10/13/11. Off. loc.: Monroe Co. Sec. of State designated as agent of LLC upon whom process may be served and shall mail process to: 105 West Church Street, Fairport, NY. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] AT&T Mobility, LLC is proposing to modify an existing wireless telecommunications facility on an existing 557-foot guyed tower located at 333 Colfax St, Rochester, NY. The modified facility will consist of the addition of three LTE antennas and three RRUs at a centerline height of 150-feet above ground level. Any interested party wishing to submit comments regarding the potential effects the modified facility may have on any historic property may do so by sending such comments to: Project 6114119AMG c/o EBI Consulting, 21 B St, Burlington, MA 01803, or via telephone at (585) 815-3290. [ NOTICE ] AT&T Mobility, LLC is proposing to modify an existing wireless telecommunications facility on a building at 1001 Lake Avenue, Rochester, Monroe County, NY. The modified facility will consist of the addition of 3 antennas and 6 RRUs at a centerline height of 78 feet above ground level. Associated equipment will be located within the existing ground-level equipment shelter. Any interested party wishing to submit comments regarding the potential effects the modified facility may have on any historic property may do so by sending such comments to: Project 6113219-AMG c/o EBI Consulting, 21 B Street, Burlington, MA 01803 or via telephone at (585) 815-3290. [ NOTICE ] Bach Payroll, LLC (LLC) filed Arts. of Org. with NY Secy. of State (SS) on 9/26/2011. LLC’s office is in Monroe Co. SS is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS shall mail a copy of any process to LLC’s principal business location at 1260 Creek Street, Webster, NY 14580. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity [ NOTICE ] DENOTTIA DEVELOPMENT LLC, a domestic Limited Liability

Company (LLC), filed with the Sec of State of NY on 10/3/11. NY Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of any process against the LLC served upon him/her to William Denottia, 4186 Canal Rd., Spencerport, NY 14559. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] Fitch Wrap LLC (“LLC”) filed Arts. of Org. with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on October 11, 2011. Office Location: Monroe County. SSNY designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o Phillips Lytle LLP, 1400 First Federal Plaza, Rochester, New York 14614. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] GATES FAMILY MEDICINE, LLC (LLC) filed Arts. of Org. with NY Secy. of State (SS) on 9/23/2011. LLC’s office is in Monroe Co. SS is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS shall mail a copy of any process to LLC, 2870 Buffalo Rd., Rochester, NY 14624. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Genesee Medical Staffing, LLC, filed Articles of Organization with NY Department of State on September 20, 2011. Its office is located in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent of the company upon whom process against it may be served and a copy of any process shall be mailed to 128 Country Wood Landing, Rochester NY 14626. Purpose: Any lawful act. [ NOTICE ] HI-QUAL STORAGE & MANAGEMENT, LLC, a domestic Limited Liability Company (LLC), filed with the Sec of State of NY on 9/7/11. NY Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of any process against the LLC served upon him/her to Ray A. Drouin, 152 E. Ridge Rd., Rochester, NY 14621. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] Honeoye Capital Group, LLC has filed articles of organization with the New York Secretary of State on September 16, 2011. Its principal place of business is located at 125 Canal Landing Boulevard, Rochester,

New York in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent upon whom process may be served. A copy of any process shall be mailed to 125 Canal Landing Boulevard, Rochester, New York 14626. The purpose of the LLC is to engage in any lawful activity for which Limited Liability Companies may be organized under Section 203 of the New York Limited Liability Company Law. [ NOTICE ] JACOMB, LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 9/27/11. Office in Monroe Co. SSNY desig. agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 740 Driving Park, Ste. G, Rochester, NY 14613. Purpose: Any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] KAPITI HOLDINGS, LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 7/6/2011. Office in Monroe Co. SSNY desig. agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 2255 Lyell Ave., Rochester, NY 14606, which is also the principal business location. Purpose: Any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] MindRaz LLC (LLC) filed Arts. of Org. with NY Secy. of State (SS) on 10/11/2011. LLC’s office is in Monroe Co. SS is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS shall mail a copy of any process to LLC’s principal business location at c/o Boylan Code LLP, The Culver Road Armory 145 Culver Rd., Rochester, NY 14620. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Name of LLC: 762 Brooks Avenue, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State: 9/19/11. Office location: Monroe Co. Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: 762 Brooks Ave., Rochester, NY 14619. Purpose: any lawful act. [ NOTICE ] Not. of Form. of Pure Image Tattoo, LLC, Art. of Org. filed with Dept. of State (DOS) 10/19/11. Office location: Monroe County. DOS designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. DOS may mail copy of any process to LLC, 112 N Main St, Fairport, NY, 14445. Purpose: Any lawful purpose.

[ NOTICE ] Notice of Form. of FACIEN, LLC (the “LLC”). Art. of Org. filed with Secretary of the State of NY (SSNY) on 9/30/11. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, 10 Dartford Rd, Rochester, NY 14618. Purpose: any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of 833 PORTLAND LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/24/11. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 833 Portland Ave., Rochester, NY 14621. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, 41 Pebble Hill Rd., Fairport, NY 14450. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of a Limited liability Company (LLC) Name JDI SUPPLIES LLC. Articles of Organization filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 8/29/20011 Office location: Monroe County, SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to, 3 Larkspur Lane, Fairport, NY 14450. Any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Amitas Properties, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State on 9/2/11. Office location: Monroe County. Secy. of State designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. Secy. Of State shall mail process to the principal business address of the LLC: 1 Crownwood Cir, Pittsford, NY 14534. Purpose:any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of ANDREW T. BRACCI, DMD, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/07/11. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of PLLC: 65 Cobble Creek Rd., Victor, NY 14564. SSNY designated as agent of PLLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the PLLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Dentistry. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of BEDROC Martial Arts, L.L.C. Art. of Org. filed Sec. of State (SSNY)

6/23/2011. Office location Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to 33 Walbar St., Rochester, NY 14609. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Centsational Interiors, LLC. Art. Of Org. filed Sec’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 8/30/11. Office location: Monroe County, NY. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to: The LLC, 30 Triple Diamond Way, Webster, NY 14580. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Cheryl Scheer Jewelers LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 9/21/11. Office location: Monroe Co. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 303 Allers Creek Rd., Rochester, NY 14618. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of DEALERGARDEN, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/18/11. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, c/o Walter E. Baur IV, 120 West Main St., Webster, NY 14580. Purpose: any lawful activity [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of DELISH BAKERY, L.L.C. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/5/2011. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 266 Park Ave., Rochester, NY 14607. Latest date on which the LLC may dissolve is 10/5/2041. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of DEWEY CENTER, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 07/12/11. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 2771-2781 Dewey Ave., Rochester, NY 14616. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY


Legal Ads shall mail process to the LLC, 95 Longford Rd., Rochester, NY 14615. As amended by Cert. of Correction filed with SSNY on 08/04/11, the process addr. is: 95 Langford Rd., Rochester, NY 14615. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Durgasai Holdings, LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 9/12/11. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 1 S. Washington St., Ste. 410, Rochester, NY 14614. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Durgasai Properties, LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 9/12/11. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 1 S. Washington St., Ste. 410, Rochester, NY 14614. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Durgasai Real Estate, LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 9/15/11. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 1 S. Washington St., Ste. 410, Rochester, NY 14614. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of EAGLE CREEK OUTLET, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 9/16/11. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, c/o Todd Clicquennoi, 1286 Dewey Ave., Rochester, NY 14613. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of GRHS, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State on 10/25/11. Office location: Monroe County. Principal business address: 125 Lattimore Rd., Rochester, NY 14620. Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o GRHS Foundation, Inc., 1425 Portland Ave., Rochester, NY 14621, Attn: Corporate Counsel. Purpose: operation of

an Ambulatory Surgery Center. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Kazimir Enterprises, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State on 9/27/11. Office location: Monroe County. Sec. of State designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: 649 Long Pond Rd., Greece, NY 14612. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of KEY MAN RISK LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/12/11. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 683 Pittsford Victor Rd., Pittsford, NY 14534. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Joseph A. Fiorie at the princ. office of the LLC. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of KSMT, LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 9/21/11. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 128 Lynx Ct., Fairport, NY 14450. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY: BAMBINO SLUGGER, LLC filed Articles of Organization with the Secretary of the State of New York on August 30, 2011. The office of the limited liability company shall be located in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as the agent of the limited liability company upon whom process against it may be served and the Secretary of State shall mail a copy of any process served upon him or her c/o 51 Hyacinth Lane, Fairport, New York 14450 [ NOTICE ] NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY: BARKLEY REAL PROPERTY HOLDINGS, LLC filed Articles of Organization with the Secretary of the State of New York on August 30, 2011. The office of the limited liability company shall be located in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as the agent of hthe limited liability company upon whom process against it may be served and the Secretary of State shall mail a copy

of any process served upon him or her c/o 51 Hyacinth Lane, Fairport, New York 14450 [ NOTICE ] NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY. NAME: 516 JAY STREET, LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 06/02/11. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to the LLC, 134 Gillett Road, Spencerport, New York 14559. Purpose: For any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of MaxtonApp, LLC. Arts. Of Org. filed with Secy. of State of N.Y (SSNY) on 9/22/11. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 1059 Cherry Hill Lane, Webster, NY 14580. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of MediHealth Consulting Services, LLC. Art. Of Org. filled with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/04/2011. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of any process to: 15 Hallmont Circle, Penfield, NY 14526. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of MIRDEN PROPERTIES LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/4/2011. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 2813 St. Paul Blvd. Rochester NY 14617. Purpose: any lawful act. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of NOW AND ZEN OF ROCHESTER, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 9/28/11. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o The LLC, 102 Suburban Court, Apt #7, Rochester, NY 14620. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Ragona Scientific LLC

Art. of Org. filed with Sec’y of State (SSNY) 9/27/11 Office location: Monroe County SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to LLC, 1 Wenham Ln. Pittsford, NY 14534 Purpose: any lawful activity [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Sailing Scientific LLC Art. Of Org. filed with Sec’y of State (SSNY) 9/26/11 Office location: Monroe County SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to LLC, 1 Wenham Ln. Pittsford, NY 14534 Purpose: any lawful activity [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of SAWGRASS PONDS, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/4/2011. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 333 Metro Park, Rochester, NY 14623. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of Silvertouch LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 7/13/2011. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 1863 Scottsville-Mumford Rd., Scottsville, NY 14546. Purpose: any lawful act [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of The Alexander Hamilton Institute for the Study of Western Civilization - West, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 08/25/11. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 21 W. Park Row, Clinton, NY 13323. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: To promote the study of freedom, democracy, and capitalism. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Union Transportation, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State on 9/13/11. Office location: Monroe County. Principal business address: 3484 South Union St., North Chili, NY 14514. Sec. of State designated agent of LLC

upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011. Purpose: all lawful purposes. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of USH, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State on 9/13/11. Office location: Monroe County. Principal business address: 3484 South Union St., North Chili, NY 14514. Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011. Purpose: all lawful purposes. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of WJO HOLDINGS, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 9/20/2011. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 2 Longbow Circle, Spencerport NY 14559. Purpose: any lawful act [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of YOUR BEST MOVE LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/13/11. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: c/o Margot C. Long, 21 S. Church St., Honeoye Falls, NY 14472. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. Of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Phillips 369, LLC (LLC) filed Arts. of Org. with NY Secy. of State (SS) on 9/22/2011. LLC’s office is in Monroe Co. SS is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS shall mail a copy of any process to LLC’s principal business location at 630 Van Alstyne Road, Webster, NY 14580. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] REDFOOT PROPERTIES, LLC, a domestic Limited Liability Company (LLC), filed with the Sec of State of NY on 10/11/11. NY Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of any process against the LLC served upon him/her to Lora Ann Rothfuss, 1108

Everwild View, Webster, NY 14580. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] SOCIALLY GOOD BUSINESS LLC, a domestic Limited Liability Company (LLC), filed with the Sec of State of NY on 9/22/11. NY Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of any process against the LLC served upon him/her to The LLC, 31 E. Main St. Ste. 2011, Rochester, NY 14614. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] THE BERNARD INSURANCE AGENCY, LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 6/16/2011. Office in Monroe Co. SSNY design. Agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to Corporation Service Company 80 State St. Albany, NY 12207. Registered Agent: Corporation Service Company 80 State St. Albany, NY 12207 Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] THE GROOMER’S OUTLET, LLC, a domestic Limited Liability Company (LLC), filed with the Sec of State of NY on 9/9/11. NY Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of any process against the LLC served upon him/her to The LLC, Attn: LLC Manager, 3160 E. Henrietta Rd., Henrietta, NY 14460. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] THREE STAR PROPERTIES, LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 9/27/11. Office in Monroe Co. SSNY desig. agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 257 Olde Harbour Trail, Rochester, NY 14612, which is also the principal business location. Purpose: Any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] TRU ON MONROE, LLC (LLC) filed Arts. of Org. with NY Secy. of State (SS) on 10/5/2011. LLC’s office is in Monroe Co. SS is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS shall mail a copy of any process to LLC, 105 Troup St., Rochester, NY 14608. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity.

[ NOTICE ] WATERMARK VENTURES, LLC, a domestic Limited Liability Company (LLC), filed with the Sec of State of NY on 9/23/11. NY Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of any process against the LLC served upon him/her to The LLC, 1288 Scottsville Rd., Rochester, NY 14624. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] WGM DESIGNS, LLC, a domestic Limited Liability Company (LLC), filed with the Sec of State of NY on 10/3/11. NY Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of any process against the LLC served upon him/her to Jason P. Scott, 59 Egret Dr., Henrietta, NY 14586. General Purposes [ NOTICE OF ACTION FOR PUBLICATION ] IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE SIXTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR PINELLAS COUNTY, FLORIDA Case No.: 08-163FD-09 Division: Family SHAWN CRADDOCK, Petitioner, and REINALDO PACHECO LORENZI, JR., Respondent TO: Reinaldo Pacheco Lorenzi, Jr., 410 Grand St., New York, New York 10002-3646 YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action for Step-Parent Adoption has been filed against you. You are required to serve a copy of your written defenses, if any, to this action on Scott T. Orsini, of The Orsini & Rose Law Firm, Petitioner’s attorney, whose address is P.O. Box 118, St. Petersburg, Florida 33731, within 28 days from the first date of publication, and file the original with the clerk of this court at Pinellas County Courthouse, 545 1st Ave. N., St. Petersburg, Florida 33756, either before service on Petitioner’s attorney or immediately thereafter; otherwise a default will be entered against you for the relief demanded in the AMENDED petition. WARNING: Rule 12.285, Florida Family Law Rules of Procedure, requires certain automatic disclosure of documents and information. Failure to comply can result in sanctions, including dismissal or striking of pleadings. DATED this 18 day of October, 2011. KEN BURKE CLERK CIRCUIT COURT,

315 Court Street, Clearwater, Pinellas County, FL 337565165 BY: /s/SUSAN C. MICHALOWSKI, Deputy Clerk [ NOTICE OF APPLICATION OF AUTHORITY OF LLC ] GHLDS #6, LLC (“LLC”) filed Application for Authority with the NY Secretary of State (“NYSS”) on October 13, 2011. LLC’s jurisdiction is Texas and was organized on July 1, 2011. LLC’s office is located in Monroe County and the NYSS is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. NYSS shall mail a copy of any process to c/o Boylan Code, LLP 145 Culver Rd., Ste 100, Rochester, NY 14620. The address of the LLC’s registered office in Texas is 10107 Quaker Ave, Ste 100, Lubbock, TX 79424. The LLC’s Certificate of Formation was filed with the Secretary of State, PO Box 13697, Austin, TX 78711. LLC’s purpose is to engage in any lawful activity. [ NOTICE OF APPLICATION OF AUTHORITY OF LLC ] Collett Woods, LLC (LLC) filed Application for Authority with NY Secy. of State (SS) on 9/30/2011. LLC’s jurisdiction is Delaware and was organized on 9/16/2011. LLC’s office is in Monroe Co. SS is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS shall mail a copy of any process to 16 W. Main St., Ste 700, Rochester, NY 14614. LLC’s registered office in Delaware is 615 S. DuPont Highway, Dover, DE 19901 and the name of its registered agent at such address is National Corporate Research, Ltd. LLC’s purpose is to engage in any lawful activity. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] Culver Norton Real Estate LLC filed Articles of Organization with the New York Department of State on February 23, 2011. Its office is located in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent of the Company upon whom process against it may be served and a copy of any process shall be mailed to 1304 Ridge Rd, Rochester, NY 14621. The purpose of the Company is any lawful activity. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] Jackson Road LLC filed Articles of Organization with the New York

cont. on page 62

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Legal Ads > page 61 Department of State on March 25, 2011. Its office is located in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent of the Company upon whom process against it may be served and a copy of any process shall be mailed to 1304 Ridge Rd, Rochester, NY 14621. The purpose of the Company is any lawful activity. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] Notice of formation of Fifteen Bolton LLC Arts. Of Org. filed with the Secretary of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/06/2011. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Fifteen Bolton LLC C/O Rekha Jain, Esq., 18 Roxbury Lane, Pittsford, NY 14534. Purpose: any lawful act. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION FAITH ESTATES LLC ] Articles of Organization filed with Secretary of State of NY (“SSNY”) on 09/14/2011. Office in Monroe County. SSNY designated agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process FAITH ESTATES LLC, C/O JAMES OLAS, 101 COPPERWOOD WAY, SUITE M, OCEANSIDE, CA 92058. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF GREEN SHEPHERD, LLC ] The name of the Limited Liability Company is Green Shepherd, LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the New York Secretary of State on 0/25/2011. The office of the LLC is in Monroe County. The New York Secretary of State is designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. The Secretary of State shall mail a copy of such process to 67 Redwood Rd.,, Rochester, NY 14615. The LLC is organized to engage in any lawful activity for which an LLC may be formed under NY LLC Law. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY (LLC) ] Name: Tellmorr International Translation Services, LLC. Articles of Organization filed by the secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 9/28/2011. Office location: Monroe County Purpose: for any lawful activities. SSNY designated as agent of

62 City november 2-8, 2011

LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to the LLC at 155 Benson Road, Victor, NewYork 14564 [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY ] Meliora Research LLC has filed Articles of Organization with the Secretary State on October 4, 2011. Its office is located in Monroe County, New York. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent upon whom process against it may be served and a copy of any process will be mailed to the LLC, 622 Harvard Street, Rochester, NY 14607. Its business is to engage in any lawful activity for which limited liability companies may be organized under Section 203 of the Limited Liability Company Act. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY ] NANDU CHEMDEVICE, LLC (“LLC”), has filed Articles of Organization with the NY Secretary of State (“NYSS”) on 8/23/11 pursuant to Section 203 of the NY Limited Liability Law. The office of the LLC shall be located in Monroe County, NY. The NYSS is designated as the agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served, and the address to which the NYSS shall mail a copy of any process served on him against the LLC is 15 SUTTON POINT, PITTSFORD, NY 14534. The purpose of the LLC is to engage in any lawful act or activity for which limited liability companies may be formed under the law. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY ] Notice of formation of Westminster Consulting, LLC. Articles of Organization filed with the New York Secretary of State on October 5, 2011. The office of the LLC is in Monroe County . The New York Secretary of State is designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. The Secretary of State shall mail a copy of such process to 222 Westminster Road, Rochester, New York 14607. The LLC is organized to engage in any lawful activity for which an LLC may be formed under the NY LLC law.

[ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY ] Notice of formation of Yaeger Properties, LLC. Articles of Organization filed with the New York Secretary of State on August 19, 2011. The office of the LLC is in Monroe County . The New York Secretary of State is designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. The Secretary of State shall mail a copy of such process to 2658 Lake Road, Hilton, New York 14468. The LLC is organized to engage in any lawful activity for which an LLC may be formed under the NY LLC law. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] Notice of formation of Overlooking The River LLC Arts. Of Org. filed with the Secretary of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/07/2011. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Overlooking The River C/O Rekha Jain, Esq., 18 Roxbury Lane, Pittsford, NY 14534. Purpose: any lawful act. [ NOTICE OF ORGANIZATION ] Notice of formation of limited liability company (LLC). Name: CAA East LLC (the Company). Articles of Organization filed with the Secretary of State of NY (SSNY) on 07/07/11. NY office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the Company may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of any such process to: 1415 Monroe Avenue, Rochester, NY 14618. The Company is to be managed by one or more managers. No members of the Company shall be liable in their capacity as members of the Company for debts, obligations or liabilities of the Company. No member of the Company, solely by reason of being a member, is an agent of the Company for the purpose of its business, and no member shall have the authority to act for the Company solely by virtue of being a member. Purpose/character of the Company: any and all lawful activities. [ NOTICE OF SALE ] Index No. 2011-2186 STATE OF NEW YORK SUPREME COURT COUNTY OF MONROE ESL FEDERAL CREDIT UNION, Plaintiff -vsKAREN L. GIBEAULT

f/k/a KAREN L. VOTRY, ARROW FINANCIAL SERVICES LLC; NEW YORK STATE COMMISSION OF TAXATION AND FINANCE, Defendants. Pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale dated September 29, 2011 and entered herein, I, the undersigned, the Referee in said Judgment named, will sell at public auction in the front vestibule of the Monroe County Office Building, 39 West Main Street, Rochester, New York, County of Monroe, on November 16, 2011 at 2:00 P.m., on that day, the premises directed by said Judgment to be sold and therein described as follows: ALL THAT TRACT OR PARCEL OF LAND, situate in the City of Rochester, formerly in Greece, County of Monroe and State of New York, shown on a certain map entitled “Amended and Supplemental Map No. 2 of Winans Terrace in the Town of Greece, Monroe County, New York, property of Van Guilder Realty Company”, dated September 20, 1910, filed in Monroe County Clerk’s Office October 11, 1910 in Liber 23 of Maps, page 13, surveyed by Joseph E. Thomas, Civil Engineer, and on said map designated as Lot Nos. 46 and 47 in Section “B” of said map, situate on the westerly side of Lake Avenue Boulevard, forming a plot fronting 50 feet on said boulevard, and extending westerly of the same width 116 feet in depth, on its northerly line 115.44 feet in depth on its southerly line, to the easterly boundary line of Lot 54 in Section “B” as shown on said map, be the said several dimensions more or less. Tax Acct. No. 060.681-23; Property Address: 3279 Lake Avenue, City of Rochester, Monroe County, New York Said premises are sold subject to any state of facts an accurate survey may show, zoning restrictions and any amendments thereto, covenants, restrictions, agreements, reservations, and easements of record and prior liens, if any, municipal departmental violations, and such other provisions as may be set forth in the Complaint and Judgment filed in this action. Judgment amount: $60,699.46 plus, but not limited to, costs, disbursements, attorney fees and additional allowance, if any, all with legal interest .DATED: October 2011 Loren H. Kroll, Esq., Referee LACY KATZEN

LLP Attorneys for Plaintiff 130 East Main Street Rochester, New York 14604 Telephone: (585) 324-5767 [ NOTICE OF SALE ] Index No. 2011-2601 SUPPREME COURT STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF MONROE ESL Federal Credit Union, Plaintiff, vs. Douglas Frasch, a/k/a Douglas R. Frasch Geri Ann Frasch; Mark Spychalski Lumber Company, Inc., d/b/a/ Stockham Lumber Co.; Capital One Bank USA, NA; FIA Card Services, N.A., Defendants. Pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale dated October 11, 2011 and entered herein, I, the undersigned, the Referee in said Judgment named, will sell at public auction in the front vestibule of the Monroe County Office Building, 39 West Main Street, Rochester, New York, County of Monroe, on November 29, 2011 at 9:15 a.m., on that day, the premises directed by said Judgment to be sold and therein described as follows: Tax Account No. 113.04-1-8.211 Property Address: 6419 Lake Road, Town of Sweden, Monroe County, New York Said premises are sold subject to any state of facts an accurate survey may show, zoning restrictions and any amendments thereto, covenants, restrictions, agreements, reservations, and easements of record and prior liens if any, municipal departmental violations, and such other provisions as may be set forth in the Complaint and Judgment filed in this action. Judgment amount: $217,466.45 plus, but not limited to, costs, disbursements, attorney fees and additional allowance, if any, all with legal interest. DATED: ____ 2011 _____ John F. Speranza, Esq., Referee LACY KATZEN LLP Attorneys for Plaintiff 130 East Main Street, Rochester, New York 14604 Telephone: (585)324-5767 1. Subject Premises Description All that tract or parcel of land, situate in the Town of Sweden, County of Monroe and State of New York, being part of Lot 7, Section 5, Town 3 of the Triangular Tract and bounded and described as follows: Beginning at a point in the west line of the right of way of Lake Road (Route 19) which point is the southeast corner of lands conveyed to Regent Properties, Inc. by warranty deed recorded in Monroe


Legal Ads County Clerk’s Office in Liber 3968 of Deeds at page 531, said point also lying on the north line of Lot 7; thence south 89° 37’ 36” west a distance of 1954.81 feet to a point; thence south 01° 26’ 16” east a distance of 300 feet to a point; thence south 71° 20’ 03” west a distance of 2867.56 feet to a point; thence south 00° 36’ 59” east a distance of 95.75 feet to a point, said point being the southwest corner of Lot 7; thence north 89° 35’ 45” east along the south line of Lot 7 a distance of 1180.00 feet to a point; thence north 00° 24’ 15” west a distance of 379.94 feet to a point; thence north 71° 20’ 03” east a distance of 1013.44 feet to a point; thence north 89° 37’ 36” east a distance of 2565.11 feet to the west line of the Lake Road right of way; thence northerly along the west line of the Lake Road right of way and its various courses to the point or place of beginning. Excepting all that tract or parcel of land, situate in the Town of Sweden, County of Monroe, State of New York being a part of Town Lot 7, Section 5, Town 3 of the Triangle Tract and more particularly described as follows: Commencing from the point in the centerline of improvements of Lake Road which is distant northerly 238.1 feet, more or less, from the intersection of the centerline of Lake Road with the centerline of Reed Road; thence south 88° 59’ 14” west, a distance of 60.00 feet to a point in the westerly appropriation line of said Lake Road, it being the point of beginning; thence (1) northerly along the westerly line of Lake Road along a curve to the right having a radius of 7579.49 feet a distance of 247.85 feet to a point of intersecting with the northerly line of Town Lot 7; thence (2) south 89° 35’ 11” west along the northerly line of Town Lot 7 a distance of 880.00 feet to a point; thence (3) south 01° 56’ 58” east a distance of 247.84 feet to a point thence (4) north 89° 35’ 11” east a distance of 880.00 feet to the point of beginning and containing 5.0051 acres of land. All as shown on the map title Hale Subdivision by Cowie, Van Lare PC dated August 7, 1989 drawing number 89071. Also, Excepting all that tract or parcel of land, being part of Town Lot 7 in the Town of Sweden,

County of Monroe, State of New York, being more particularly described as follows: Beginning at the southwest corner of Town Lot 7, said point being northwest corner of lands now or formerly of Michael Pierce (tax parcel 128.020-01-021); thence N 00° 36’ 59” W, along the westerly line of Town Lot 7, a distance of 95.75 feet to a point; thence N 71° 20’ 03” E, along the southerly line of lands now or formerly of Jack Arend (tax parcel 113.040-01-005.8) and lands now or formerly of Kathleen Spath (tax parcel 113.040-01-057), a distance of 2867.56 feet to a point; thence S 01° 26’ 16” E, a distance of 297.17 feet to a point; thence S 89° 37’ 36” W, along lands of Colby (tax parcel 113.040-01-008.1) a distance of 585.74 feet to a point; thence S 71° 20’ 03” W, along lands now or formerly of Colby, a distance of 1013.44 feet; thence S 00° 24’ 15” E, a distance of 379.94 feet to a point on the southerly boundary of Town Lot 7 also being the northerly line of lands of Chris D. Zorn, said point being 136.84 feet easterly of the northwest corner of lands of Zorn; thence S 89° 35’ 45” W, a distance of 1180.00 feet to the point and place of beginning . [ NOTICE OF SALE ] Index No. 2011-5000 SUPREME COURT STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF MONROE ESL Federal Credit Union, f/k/a Eastman Savings and Loan Association, Plaintiff, vs. Mary L. Frisbie; James Conner; Malika Conner; Sadiq Conner; Dawn Conner, Defendants. Pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale dated October 11, 2011 and entered herein, I, the undersigned, the Referee in said Judgment named, will sell at public auction in the front vestibule of the Monroe County Office Building, 39 West Main Street, Rochester, New York, County of Monroe, on November 16, 2011 at 2:30 p.m., on that day, the premises directed by said Judgment to be sold and therein described as follows: ALL THAT TRACT OR PARCEL OF LAND, situate in the City of Rochester, County of Monroe, and State of New York, known and distinguished as Lot #150, as laid down on an amended map of Beacon Heights, made by L.E. Foster, being a subdivision of a part of Lot #74 of the Otis Farm, as shown on a map filed in the Monroe County Clerk’s Office

in Liber 33 of Maps, at Page 14. Said Lot #150 is situate on the east side of Glide Street and is 42.5 feet wide and 147.5 feet deep. Also all that other piece or parcel of land situate in the City of Rochester and known and distinguished as the south one-half (1/2) of Lot #151 of the Beacon Heights Tract, as amended, as filed in Monroe County Clerk’s Office in Liber 33 of Maps, at Page 14. Said south one-half (1/2) of Lot #151 is situate on the east side of Glide Street, formerly Virginia Avenue, consists of a parcel of land about 21.25 feet wide and about 147.5 feet deep by reference to said map. Tax Acct. No. 105.39-2-54 Property Address: 1014 Glide Street, City of Rochester, New York Said premises are sold subject to any state of facts an accurate survey may show, zoning restrictions and any amendments thereto, covenants, restrictions, agreements, reservations, and easements of record and prior liens, if any, municipal departmental violations, and such other provisions as may be set forth in the Complaint and Judgment filed in this action. Judgment amount: $41,420.17 plus, but not limited to, costs, disbursements, attorney fees and additional allowance, if any, all with legal interest. DATED: October 2011 William G. Pixley, Esq., Referee LACY KATZEN LLP Attorneys for Plaintiff 130 East Main Street Rochester, New York 14604 Telephone: (585) 324-5767 [ NOTICE OF SALE ] Index No. 2010-11620 SUPREME COURT STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF MONROE ESL Federal Credit Union, Plaintiff vs. Daniel W. Taylor, New York State Commissioner of Taxation, ESL Federal Credit Union, HSBC Bank Nevada, N.A..; “Niva”, Defendants. Pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale dated October 14, 2011 and entered herein, I, the undersigned, the Referee in said Judgment named, will sell at public auction in the front vestibule of the Monroe County Office Building, 39 West Main Street, Rochester, New York, County of Monroe, on November 29, 2011 at 9:30 a.m., on that day, the premises directed by said Judgment to be sold and therein described as follows: ALL THAT TRACT OR PARCEL OF LAND, situate in the Town of Greece, County

of Monroe, State of New York, being a part of Great Lot Fourteen (14) bounded and described as follows: Beginning at a point in the center line of Long Pond Road at a distance of one thousand five hundred forty-two and thirtyfour hundredths feet (1,542.34) southerly from the center line of English Road; thence (1) easterly at an angle, in the southeast quadrant of eightynine degrees, fifty-four minutes ten seconds (89º 54’ 10”) a distance of four hundred sixteen and sixty hundredths feet (416.60) to a point; thence (2) southerly at an angle in the southwest quadrant of ninety degrees five minutes and fifty seconds (90º 05’ 50”) a distance of ninety feet (90.00) to a point; thence (3) westerly at an angle in the northwest quadrant of eightynine degrees fifty-four minutes ten seconds (89º 54’ 10” a distance of four hundred sixteen and sixty hundredths feet (416.60) to a point; thence (4) northerly at an angle in the northeast quadrant of ninety degrees five minutes and fifty seconds (90º 05’ 50”) along the center line of Long Pond Road, a distance of ninety feet (90) to the point of beginning. Said premises is also known as Lot 1 of the Wolpert Subdivision as the same is shown on a map filed in the Monroe County Clerk’s Office in Liber 252 of Maps, Page 98; Tax Account No. 059.03-2-50.2; Property Address: 942 Long Pond Road, Town of Greece, New York Said premises are sold subject to any state of facts an accurate survey may show, zoning restrictions and any amendments thereto, covenants, restrictions, agreements, reservations, and easements of record and prior liens, if any, municipal departmental violations, and such other provisions as may be set forth in the Complaint and Judgment filed in this action. Judgment amount: $57,936.60 plus, but not limited to, costs, disbursements, attorney fees and additional allowance, if any, all with legal interest. DATED: October 2011 Leonard Rosner, Esq., Referee LACY KATZEN LLP Attorneys for Plaintiff 130 East Main Street Rochester, New York 14604 Telephone: (585) 324-5767

Fun [ rehabilitating mr. wiggles ] BY neil swaab

[ LAST WEEK’S SOLUTION ON PAGE 57 ]

rochestercitynewspaper.com City 63


64 City november 2-8, 2011

November 2-8, 2011 - CITY Newspaper  

Cover: Best of Rochester 2011 | News: County executive race | Review: Richardson's Canal House | Music: The Pixies | Movies: "Margin Call",...

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