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RCSD revolution? NEWS, PAGE 5

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Halloween 2012 Guide. EVENTS, PAGE 32

Elections 2012 PAGE 6

“Wall/Therapy” goes global. ART, PAGE 30

NOPE OCTOBER 24-30, 2012 • FREE • GREATER ROCHESTER’S ALTERNATIVE NEWSWEEKLY • VOL 42 NO 7 • NEWS. MUSIC. LIFE.

Feedback Send comments to themail@ rochester-citynews.com, or post them on our website, rochestercitynewspaper.com, our Facebook page, or our Twitter feed, @roccitynews. We edit selections for publication in print, and we don’t publish comments sent to other media.

You can help at Northeast Prep

Last June, I wrote a letter (“Support Plan for Northeast Prep”) anticipating the expanded school day taking place at the Douglass Campus and featured in the October 10 issue of City (“Fad or Fix: RCSD Gambles on Longer Days”). The letter described the vision of the trial program where community members provide enriching after-school experiences. Volunteers would teach a wide range of engaging minicourses like yoga, cooking, art, dance, sign language, computers, music, photography, drama, weightlifting, and chess. Tutors, mentors, and coaches would offer the kind of one-on-one support often missing from students’ academic and home lives. This year I have worked several after-school sessions. The students are there. The regular teachers are there. But so far, we are short much-needed volunteers. As discussed in the City article, Wegmans is recruiting a volunteer workforce of employees to help students, particularly with literacy needs. The program is progressing, and much appreciated. But Wegmans cannot do it alone. We still need the whole community to pitch in. So come spend some late afternoons at Douglass. Talk with kids. Read books. Play badminton. Dust off your algebra skills. Make theater costumes. Write poems. Improve your Spanish. Design web sites. Remember your American history. Take photos. Sing. Taste new foods. Build schools. Build neighborhoods. If I am there, see if you can win at chess. For more information, contact Ty Kelly, Director of Youth Development, at Ty.Kelly@wegmans.com DAVID KRAMER, BRIGHTON

Kramer is a Fellow at the Nazareth College Center for Public History.  City

OCTOBER 24-30, 2012

Otterness arrives

On our blog on the installation of the Tom Otterness sculptures at the Memorial Art Gallery: I don’t think that we as animal-lovers should make a big issue out of the Tom Otterness sculptures. True, Otterness did a horrible thing, but he did it once, many years ago, and has since expressed remorse. We should keep our sights on the big picture. (Frankly, I’m far more upset that there are no decent vegan options available at Max at the Gallery.) Here are some real problems that currently affect animals: We have a huge problem with pet overpopulation, particularly with cats. Breeders and pet stores sell the products of puppy mills. Local governments are passing breed-specific legislation, banning pit bulls and other so-called “vicious” breeds. Low-life thugs use dogs and roosters for fighting. And, of course, all of those problems pale in comparison to the single biggest problem facing animals: animal agriculture. Around nine BILLION animals are slaughtered each year in the US. These animals, while they are being raised, are generally treated quite horribly, and they also release enormous amounts of greenhouse gases that contribute more to global warming than does the transportation industry. And the manure causes environmental devastation on a more-local level. Tom Otterness is inconsequential to me, and we should save our moral outrage for other, more important issues. Anyone who wants to help animals should adopt from an animal shelter. If you can’t adopt, do foster care or volunteer in other ways. And, above all, go vegan. You can save roughly a hundred animals a year just by not eating them. Veganism is good for your health, good for the environment, and good for the animals. ALEX CHERNAVSKY

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News. Music. Life. Greater Rochester’s Alternative Newsweekly October 24-30, 2012 Vol 42 No 7 250 North Goodman Street Rochester, New York 14607-1199 themail@rochester-citynews.com phone (585) 244-3329 fax (585) 244-1126 rochestercitynewspaper.com Cover illustration by Aubrey Berardini Publishers: William and Mary Anna Towler Editor: Mary Anna Towler Asst. to the publishers: Matt Walsh Editorial department themail@rochester-citynews.com Features editor: Eric Rezsnyak News editor: Christine Carrie Fien Staff writers: Tim Louis Macaluso, Jeremy Moule Music editor: Willie Clark Music writer: Frank De Blase Calendar editor: Rebecca Rafferty Contributing writers: Kate Antoniades, Paloma Capanna, Casey Carlsen, Roman Divezur, George Grella, Susie Hume, Andy Klingenberger, Dave LaBarge, Kathy Laluk, Michael Lasser, James Leach, Ron Netsky, Dayna Papaleo, Rebecca Rafferty, David Yockel Jr. Editorial intern: Lillian Dickerson Art department artdept@rochester-citynews.com Art director/production manager: Matt DeTurck Designer: Aubrey Berardini Photographers: Frank De Blase, Matt DeTurck, Michael Hanlon Advertising department ads@rochester-citynews.com Advertising sales manager: Betsy Matthews Account executives: Tom Decker, Annalisa Iannone, William Towler Classified sales representatives: Christine Kubarycz, Tracey Mykins Operations/Circulation info@rochester-citynews.com Circulation manager: Katherine Stathis Distribution: Andy DiCiaccio, David Riccioni, Northstar Delivery, Wolfe News City Newspaper is available free of charge. Additional copies of the current issue may be purchased for $1, payable in advance at the City Newspaper office. City Newspaper may be distributed only by authorized distributors. No person may, without prior written permission of City Newspaper, take more than one copy of each weekly issue. City (ISSN 1551-3262) is published weekly by WMT Publications, Inc. Periodical postage paid at Rochester, NY (USPS 022-138). Send address changes to City, 250 North Goodman Street, Rochester, NY 14607. City is a member of the Association of Alternative Newsweeklies and the New York Press Association. Subscriptions: $35.00 ($30.00 for senior citizens) for one year. Add $10 yearly for out-of-state subscriptions: add $30 yearly for foreign subscriptions. Due to the initial high cost of establishing new subscriptions, refunds for fewer than ten months cannot be issued. Copyright by WMT Publications Inc., 2012 - all rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, photocopying, recording or by any information storage retrieval system without permission of the copyright owner.

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urban journal | by mary anna towler

old, broken, or unwanted gold, SELL ORTRADE Your diamonds, platinum, sterling silver or coins.

A divided country waits The debates are over, all but a handful of voters seem to have made up their mind, and President Obama and Mitt Romney are virtually tied. Regardless of who is elected, this troubling campaign could have a troubling ending, with the outcome not immediately known – and, perhaps, with one candidate winning the popular vote, the other the Electoral College. That we are such a divided nation is nothing new. But it is troubling that we are marching so steadily rightward. It was unsettling to read the tributes to George McGovern following his death on Sunday and realize how far we are moving from his liberal vision. He stood up against the Vietnam War, pushed for a government that helps those who cannot help themselves, supported abortion rights, helped democratize the Democratic Party. He was “ahead of his time,” his friend and former speechwriter Robert Shrum wrote

That we are such a divided nation is nothing new. But it is troubling that we are marching so steadily rightward.”

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on the Daily Beast this week. And although McGovern lost his presidential race by a landslide, as Shrum said, you can still see his influence. In electing a president on November 6, we’ll decide whether to try to build on that influence, or begin to wipe it out.

www.parsellschurch.org

Meantime, here in Rochester … Some of the best news I’ve seen out of the Rochester school district recently came last week at an informal meeting Superintendent Bolgen Vargas had with district teachers, parents, and students. Vargas’s message, as City’s Tim Macaluso wrote in his blog, is that the school district must “stop putting so much emphasis on intervention in the later grades,” trying to help failing students catch up. The district and the community, Vargas said, need to focus more strongly on the youngest children, pre-kindergarten through third grade. The district hasn’t ignored its youngest children. But it often seems to emphasize rescue efforts. For instance: a recent district initiative has been to do a better job identifying and helping high school students who are falling too far behind to graduate. It doesn’t take a PhD to know that by high school, the odds are heavily against those students. They’re likely to have done poorly for years. To expect teachers to help those students make up for lost learning is expecting too much. And, as Vargas noted, it’s expensive. As I urged not long ago, the district needs to end its practice of social promotion – passing children on to the next grade whether they’re academically ready or not. I know the rationale for social promotion: that children can’t be continually held back. The

age difference becomes emotionally harmful for children who aren’t promoted. Of course. So if a child isn’t reading at grade level, we should find out why, and get that child additional help. Right then. And yes, children learn at different rates. But we’ve let good principles like that become excuses for abrogating our responsibility to our children. We know whether a child is just a little immature, a little slow in grasping letters and numbers. We know how to allow for the beautiful individuality of children in a classroom and still have high standards. We know how to find out, when a child is behind, whether the child is suffering emotionally, has a learning disability, is hearing impaired…. And we know how to get help for that child. We also know how to help children whose parents are poorly educated; we know how to give them additional attention and education to compensate for what they’re not getting at home, what they’re already behind on when they enter school – if we get help to them early enough. But we have to have the will to do it – as educators and as a community. I don’t see any evidence that we have that will – and that we’re willing to spend the money and provide the talent it will require. We cannot help these children on the cheap.

rochestercitynewspaper.com

City 

[ news from the week past ]

Brooks, Slaughter debate

Congressional candidates Maggie Brooks and Louise Slaughter came out swinging in their first of two debates in the race for the 25th District. Slaughter, a Democrat, hammered at the many scandals that have occurred in county government during Brooks’ time as county executive, while the Republican Brooks continuously cast Slaughter as part of a dysfunctional federal government that is doing more to hurt than help the country. The questions covered a lot of ground, including poverty, taxes, health care, education, and women’s rights.

RIT’s downtown business hatchery

The Rochester Institute of Technology will create a Center for Urban Entrepreneurship in the former Rochester Savings Bank in downtown Rochester. Rochester Historic Ventures donated the building to RIT, which plans to convert the old bank into a multidisciplinary facility to promote business creation and economic development.

DOMA unconstitutional

A second federal appeals court struck down the Defense of Marriage Act as unconstitutional. The

UMI

three-judge panel at the 2nd US Circuit Court of Appeals said the law violates equal protection. The Supreme Court is widely expected to take up the issue.

News

New woes for Hickey Freeman

The future of another Rochester business icon is uncertain after the parent company of 113year-old Hickey Freeman filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection. New York-based HMX Group, Hickey Freeman’s parent company, showed debt of $50 million and assets amounting to less than $50,000 in its bankruptcy documents. The company employs about 500 workers, most of them in Rochester.

MUSIC | BY WILLIE CLARK

Exodus To Jazz goes on semi-hiatus

Citing low turnout for earlier shows in the season, promoter Jose DaCosta has announced that the Exodus To Jazz series is going on a semi-hiatus while the schedule is reconsidered. That means that the E.J. Strickland and Rene Marie concerts, originally scheduled for Saturday, October 27, and Thursday, November 15, respectively, are being postponed due to low advance ticket sales.

Clinton stumps for Slaughter, Hochul

In an appearance at the Main Street Armory, former President Bill Clinton told a crowd of about 2,000 people why they should vote for either Kathy Hochul or Louise Slaughter, incumbent Democrats facing tough re-election contests for their House seats. Clinton talked up Democratic accomplishments, such as tougher rules for Wall Street, student loan reform, and health-care reform.

Promoter Jose DaCosta should announce a scaled-down Exodus To Jazz schedule soon. Photo by MATT DETURCK

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“It really speaks to the fact that while I thought I put together a lineup I was pretty excited about, I guess I didn’t focus enough on educating people on who the artists were in a lot of cases,” DaCosta says, “or in making sure that the marketing or promotion surrounding each concert was at a sufficiently high level. As a result, the initial shows, the attendance was substantially below my expectations. “For me, the hiatus is an opportunity to step back and not only reassess my artist selection process, but to figure out what I can do to make more people aware of the shows and create more compelling choices,” he says.

DaCosta says he is working with the artists to determine which shows will be rescheduled, and a new, scaled-down schedule for this year’s season is expected to be announced soon. Exodus To Jazz, which is in its seventh season, is a music productions company that presents live concerts featuring internationally touring artists. Venues are the Hochstein School of Music, the Lutheran Church of the Reformation, and Water Street Music Hall. Information: exodustojazz.com

There’s been no shortage of studies and action plans over the years on how to improve student achievement in city schools. But most have been difficult to implement due to a lack of resources, and some would argue, the political will.

Cost of War ROCHESTER TOTALS —

The following people have been killed in the City of Rochester in recent weeks: -- Cameron Patterson, 19, Rochester -- Russell Prout, 29, Rochester Rochester Police Department SOURCE:

AFGHANISTAN TOTALS —

EDUCATION | BY TIM LOUIS MACALUSO

White’s revolution The Rochester school district is in a state of emergency and an aggressive agenda for change is urgently needed, says school board member Van White. This week White will present a talking paper, “We’re Beyond Reform, It’s Time for a Revolution,” to Superintendent Bolgen Vargas and the rest of the school board. The seven-page document calls for sweeping changes. For instance, White says he wants to restore reading teachers in elementary schools, return the district to neighborhood schools, and extend the school year by two weeks to a month during the summer. Some ideas, such as holding nonpartisan school board elections, are bolder. “Our board leaders are vetted by a big boss political system,” White says. “What value does that add to educational outcomes? Maybe in the past we’ve eliminated good, highly experienced people.” White also says he wants to create “Opportunity Zones” in the city’s poorest neighborhoods. And he says he wants to approach neighboring suburban superintendents about accepting children in grades K to 3 in their schools from the zones. And White’s calling on area colleges to create a high school on their campuses to accept students from the zones.

White says there is no better antidote to neighborhood decline than high- quality schools. But Opportunity Van White. FILE Photo Zones could help expedite breaking up the concentration of poverty in Rochester, White says. “At this rate it will take decades to break it up, and we can’t wait that long,” he says. There’s been no shortage of studies and action plans over the years on how to improve student achievement in city schools. But most have been difficult to implement due to a lack of resources, and some would argue, the political will. White will have to convince at least four board members to act on some of the ideas, which may not be easy. Some board members have opposed some of these ideas in the past. And he will also need allies in local and state government to implement his ambitious Opportunity Zones.

NEIGHBORHOODS | BY CHRISTINE CARRIE FIEN

Mural mystery Ann Braverman has pieces of the moon in her home. | The scraps were part of “The Bounty of the West Wind” mural that was on the back of the small retail plaza at the corner of East Avenue and Winton Road in southeast Rochester. | One side of the mural, created by local artist Krysia Mnick in 2003, depicted a woman with flowing hair; on the other was a series of racially diverse outstretched hands. | But the mural was falling apart, so the plaza owner recently had most of it painted over. Part of the section facing Winton is still there, but it, too, is deteriorating: a chipped moon hovers over a disintegrating blue landscape. | Braverman, a member of the Culver University East neighborhood group, says that part of the mural will probably be painted over, too. CUE may try to raise money to put up another mural at the same spot, she says. | A side note: part of the mural was behind a memorial garden planted for CUE’s founder, Margaret Dunlay. The garden was marked by a metal plaque, but the plaque was recently stolen. | “We feel terrible,” Braverman says.

2,140 US servicemen and servicewomen and 1,066 Coalition servicemen and servicewomen have been killed in Afghanistan from the beginning of the war and occupation to October 5. Statistics for Afghan civilian casualties are not available. American casualties from September 26 to October 3: -- Sgt. Thomas R. Macpherson, 26, Long Beach, Calif. -- Sgt. 1st Class Ryan J. Savard, 29, Sierra Vista, Ariz. -- Cmdr. Joel Del Mundo Tiu, 49, Manila, Philippines -- Spc. Brittany B. Gordon, 24, St. Petersburg, Fla. -- Sgt. Robert J. Billings, 30, Clarksville, Va. iraqbodycount. org, icasualties.org, Department of Defense SOURCES:

rochestercitynewspaper.com

City 

ELECTIONS 2012

««««

ELECTIONS | BY CHRISTINE CARRIE FIEN AND JEREMY MOULE

The case against

Brooks for Congress

Congressional candidate Maggie Brooks almost never refers to the “people” of Monroe County; they are “taxpayers,” even when the context seems to demand another noun. The subtle bit of messaging aligns with Brooks’ signature and much-touted accomplishment as county executive: freezing the property tax rate. Similarly, Brooks’ opponent in the 25th District race is never “Congresswoman Louise Slaughter.” Always, according to the Brooks campaign, she’s “entrenched Washington insider” Slaughter. The triple-modifier is savvy, considering that people’s opinion of Congress is generally somewhere below their affinity for skinny jeans and public bathrooms. What happens when unstoppable force Maggie Brooks (an affable, intelligent, confident, articulate local luminary) meets immovable object Louise Slaughter (an affable, intelligent, confident, articulate national figure)? For the first time in a good long while, one of these women will lose an election. The conventional wisdom had been that Slaughter, who typically faces only token opposition, would stay in Congress until she’s damn well ready to leave. But an ambitious, term-limited county executive and a redistricting process that handed Monroe its own Congressional seat have conspired to give the incumbent Slaughter her first real race in two decades. Brooks’ strategy so far has been to cast Slaughter as a tax-and-spend liberal, the face of the unpopular — though that seems to be changing — Affordable Care Act, a pasther-prime example of everything that’s wrong with an historically unpopular and paralyzed Congress. Meanwhile, Slaughter’s camp is milking the many scandals that have occurred in county government during Brooks’ time in office, though it’s clear from previous elections that the public doesn’t blame Brooks for those problems. The records of both candidates are fair game, of course, and when you peel back the layers, you see that although Brooks has accomplished some good things as county executive — for example, she’s embraced alternative fuel vehicles and energy conservation measures at county buildings — her history does not warrant a promotion. Even her signature property-tax accomplishment doesn’t stand up to scrutiny. Brooks has failed to address Monroe  City

OCTOBER 24-30, 2012

County’s structural budget problem, has done nothing to end the “ruling class” mindset of Republicans in the County Legislature, has continued the troubling use of local development corporations — pushing millions of dollars in debt off the county’s books — and has continued her predecessor’s habit of treating the City of Rochester as a poor relation. The bigger consideration, though, is Brooks’ place in the context of the next Congress. She says she has no desire to be a standard-bearer for the national Republican Party. But Brooks would almost certainly be powerless to buck a party in the grip of extremists clamoring to turn back the clock on women’s health and to destroy the social safety net for everyone but the fortunate few. Brooks opposes abortion rights except in the cases of rape, incest, and life and health of the mother; supports repealing the Affordable Care Act; opposes same-sex marriage; and demonstrates a lack of knowledge — or a

calculated evasiveness — on climate change and personhood legislation. Slaughter says a recent Rochester visit by House Speaker John Boehner on Brooks’ behalf is proof positive that Republicans expect Brooks to fall in line. “It means that she’s expected to vote with him,” Slaughter says. “This notion that she would not vote on the Ryan budget or vote for that Medicare [voucher plan], don’t believe it. They vote in lockstep over there.” For that reason and because of Brooks’ record as well the present political climate, Monroe County should not send Maggie Brooks to Congress. It’s important to look at Monroe’s property tax rate, not only because

Brooks talks about it so often, but because she’s made financial stewardship a structural issue in her campaign. It’s what she means, for the most part, when she says she wants to “bring Monroe County to Washington.”

It is true that in Brooks’ three terms as county executive, the property tax rate has not risen above $8.99 per $1,000 of assessed value. And that’s a reduction: from 2005 to 2007, the property tax rate was $9.10. But that doesn’t mean taxes haven’t gone up. They have. For starters, the property tax levy — the total amount the county collects in property taxes — has risen every year that Brooks has been in office. The current number is approximately $352 million. When Brooks took office in 2004, it was about $279 million. We’re not complaining about the increased levy — the county should take advantage of growth — but it is disingenuous of Brooks to say that taxes have not gone up. Another way Brooks has gotten around her promise to not raise taxes is by raising fees instead. An example: MCC chargebacks, a funding system that punishes Monroe’s poorest communities and goes against the principle of a community college as a place of inclusiveness, equality, and community buy-

in. The amount that residents in each town and the city pay depends on the number of MCC students who live there. And who do you think sends the most students to MCC? The City of Rochester. Former Democrat and Chronicle reporter Jill Terreri crunched the numbers in a 2011 story. When you combine the property tax rate with the service fees, she found that tax bills in Monroe County have gone up. In Rochester, she reported, “the combined bill went from $962 to $1,044” from 2007 to 2011. In Webster, “the combined bill went from $794 to $831,” to cite two examples. (The increases were based on a home assessed at $100,000.) And Brooks has not been able to find a permanent fix to the county’s ongoing budget shortfalls. The county’s 2012 budget book projects a cumulative gap of $106.2 million through 2014. (The book blames the gap mainly on the increasing costs of mandated services.) Brooks did propose a couple of different ways to address the problem. The first approach was an increase in the sales tax, which died a quick death. The second was the FAIR Plan, which took some of the sales-tax money traditionally given to the suburban school districts. The districts sued and won. As a result, the county is still paying back the initial $29 million — plus interest — it took from the school districts when it first implemented the FAIR Plan. But Monroe County cannot have a budget deficit; it must balance the budget each and every year. So how have we gotten there? One way is by selling or trying to sell things, including tax liens — a not uncommon practice by governments, including the City of Rochester — and the Edwards and Gateway buildings. (Brooks has included $2 million from the sale of those buildings in recent budgets, even though they haven’t yet sold.) And she has used other one-shot money sources, including stimulus funding, to close budget gaps. Brooks has also cut services, including ending the county’s contribution to the downtown police patrol, and cutting funding for the pre-trial release program, a short-term solution that could cost the county more money in the long run. The police cut is troubling on its surface, of course, but also because it’s a tacit acknowledgment that the county considers itself separate from the city, and not part of the “Community of Monroe,” even though suburbanites come downtown to eat, to catch concerts and other events at the Blue Cross Arena, to see theater, and for many other reasons. Another issue: child care. While the county has maintained the eligibility level for child care over the past few years, it has increased the parent co-pay to the maximum amount allowable by New York State, says Carrie Andrews, Democratic county

legislator and ranking minority member on the Lej’s Human Services Committee. It has also frozen enrollment in some child care programs, she says. As a result, if you look over the past decade, the county used to help more than 13,000 families annually with day care subsidies. That number is now between 7,500 and 8,000, Andrews says. And it’s not because of a lack of demand. The county, under Brooks, has also cut funding for indigent burials and for a program that helps runaway homeless youth. In some cases, while not technically cutting funding, the county has shuffled money around, Andrews says. When additional funding for the widely praised Nurse-Family Partnership Program became available through Medicaid, instead of growing the program, the county withdrew some of its own funding and replaced it with the Medicaid money, Andrews says. (The county’s chief financial officer, Scott Adair, said he couldn’t confirm Andrews’ claim about NFPP. He said he didn’t remember the county changing the funding stream.) Brooks regularly talks up the county’s support for Nurse-Family Partnership, a health program in which nurses pay regular home visits to low income, first-time mothers and their babies. Summary: Your tax bill has gone up. The county does not have a long-term plan to address yearly budget deficits. Services have been cut.

LDC’s are quasi-governmental bodies

typically formed for a singular purpose. The Civic Center Monroe County LDC, for example, was set up by the county to purchase the Civic Center parking garage. The LDC then contracted with a service provider to run day-to-day operations at the garage. For Brooks, LDC’s are innovative publicprivate partnerships that allow the county to do things — upgrade technology, for example — it couldn’t afford to do otherwise. But LDC’s are also unencumbered by competitive bidding requirements and are not “specifically required to comply with open meetings and Freedom of Information laws,” says the Center for Governmental Research. The rather unique powers afforded LDC’s create fertile ground for abuse, a concern that has been repeatedly raised by CGR and the State Comptroller’s Office. Monroe County has been using LDC’s to essentially keep operating. Here’s how it works: The county creates an LDC to buy an asset, like the Iola power plant. The LDC borrows money to buy the asset, and the county uses the money for operations. That practice has been criticized by the state comptroller as “backdoor borrowing.” It has also hidden stunning amounts of debt off the county’s books and out of the public eye. The total amount owed by Monroe

County-created LDC’s as of December 2011 was a whopping $333 million. A big chunk of that is debt accumulated by the Monroe Tobacco Asset Securitization Corporation, which the county set up to borrow against future tobacco settlement funds. (There’s a separate story to be told about what happens if that money doesn’t materialize — a very real concern.) “So there’s a lot of thin ice in my judgment that is holding the county afloat,” says Democratic County Legislator Paul Haney, a former budget director for the county. “If this is the background Maggie would take to Washington, I don’t see in her background any skills or interest in solving the financial legerdemain that goes on in the federal government.” Haney’s point is particularly salient considering that Brooks often touts her financial leadership as county executive. And Brooks lacks credibility to hammer Washington for overspending when countycreated LDC’s have racked up more than $330 million in debt. Monroe County’s use of LDC’s has been criticized in three audits this year by the State Comptroller’s Office. The comptroller examined Upstate Telecommunications Corporation, which was created to upgrade the county’s phones and computers; Monroe Newpower, which bought the Iola plant; and Monroe Security and Safety Systems, which received a $212 million public-safety contract from the county. The Monroe Security audit is particularly critical. It says that the process was rigged to favor a single vendor, Navitech. Navitech, as it turns out, is run by Monroe County’s former financial officer, Stephen Gleason. Because of the irregularities, the deal will cost the county millions more than it should have, the audit says. “County taxpayers are likely overpaying for public safety and security system and services, and will continue to do so over the 20-year life of this $212 million contract,” the audit says. Brooks says the comptroller’s wrong and that the deal will save money. Meanwhile, the state attorney general is also investigating Upstate Telecommunications and Monroe Security and Safety Systems, though no one’s sure what will come of those examinations. Technically, Monroe County is not responsible for LDC debt, because the LDC’s are independent entities. But it’s unlikely that the bondholders on that debt would be OK with losing millions of dollars should the LDC’s go belly-up, though it’s unclear what the ramifications would be for Monroe County. The Brooks team has dismissed the audits as flawed, baseless, and partisan; Comptroller Thomas DiNapoli is a Democrat. But that rebuttal seems simplistic and improbable. Even if there were evidence that DiNapoli is

somehow skewing the audits — and no such evidence exists — you’d have to believe that all of the auditors in the comptroller’s office are in cahoots to bring down Maggie Brooks, a Kennedy-level conspiracy. Summary: Brooks has used LDC’s to hide enormous debt. The use of LDC’s has, according to the state comptroller, cost county taxpayers. There are allegations of serious impropriety in at least one audit.

Brooks says she wants to go to Congress to help change the tone in

Washington. It’s an admirable ambition, and few would argue that Washington overall and Congress in particular would benefit from an infusion of congeniality. “I know how critical it is that you find common solutions to extreme challenges,” Brooks said during our interview with her. “Both sides need to take ownership of that. And the time is right to have some commonsense voices in Congress. I’m a big believer that you can change the dynamic of the public discourse in Congress one seat at a time. That’s why I’m running.” Brooks often says she believes in bipartisanship and that she’s known for reaching across the aisle. But how accurate is that claim? When you ask city officials about the citycounty dynamic, they say it’s mostly a passive relationship, like jointly funding the library system and the crime lab, or lobbying for state and federal funding together. City residents are also the biggest users of the social services provided by the county. One city official, who did not want to be identified, says the problem is that the county sees the city as a foreign nation and that any cooperation with the city is considered charity or foreign aid. That’s how you’re able to eliminate funding for the downtown police patrol, for example, without so much as telling the city ahead of time that you’re doing it. Another issue: the behavior of Republicans in the Monroe County Legislature. It’s not just that they squash almost every Democratic proposal to come their way — effectively denying representation of the city’s interests in county government — but that they feel perfectly justified in doing so. They’ve been in charge so long, they see themselves as a ruling class, and if one or two Democratic proposals get through every decade, well, then, that’s just the way it is. Brooks spokesperson Noah Lebowitz says it’s unfair to attack Brooks for the behavior of the Legislature, because the Lej is an independent branch of county government with separate powers. Nobody blames Governor Cuomo, a Democrat, when Republicans can’t pass continues on page 8 rochestercitynewspaper.com

City 

««««««««

ELECTIONS 2012

Case against Brooks continues from page 7

legislation in the Democratic-led State Assembly, Lebowitz says. But much of the legislation considered in the County Legislature comes from the Brooks administration, not individual legislators. And Brooks is much more than the highestranking Republican in Monroe County; she’s a rock star. If Brooks explicitly told Republican legislators to work more closely with Democrats, there’s little doubt they’d do it. Similarly, Brooks might have made a difference in the 2007-2008 public defender search, when Republicans ignored precedent and rammed through a favored candidate. But she chose not to intervene. Nor did she offer any leadership when county Republicans tried to rig the search to find a new MCC president during that same general timeframe. Lebowitz did provide several examples when asked to illustrate Brooks’ commitment to bipartisanship. Those include the county executive’s work on pension, Medicaid, and mandate reform through various state efforts, and her work on the Finger Lakes Regional Economic Development Council. She was president of the New York State Association of Counties and County Executives of America, and she joined New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg’s bipartisan pension reform movement last year. Lebowitz also cited the county’s bipartisan budget review commission, and legislation regarding protests at veterans’ funerals as local examples of Brooks’ bipartisanship. But the commission accomplished little, and a Republican put his name on the funeral legislation, which was introduced by a Democrat, before the GOP-led County Legislature approved it. It’s doubtful the legislation would’ve passed without the addition. Summary: Bipartisanship is rare in Monroe County.

There are broader implications to sending Maggie Brooks to Congress.

Monroe County would lose Representative Louise Slaughter’s influence and seniority, but the bigger issue is the alarming direction of the Republican Party. It’s unlikely that Brooks, as a freshman member of the House, would be able to do anything but follow the wishes of party leadership — or risk her political career. That’s troubling, given the extremists driving the Republican agenda. Brooks says she’d vote to repeal the Affordable Care Act, although she says she supports the parts of the law dealing with preexisting conditions and letting children stay on their parents’ policies longer.  City

OCTOBER 24-30, 2012

She says the ACA is a partisan plan and should be repealed so a new bill can be drafted with broader input — a bill that creates competition and keeps a real eye on cost. But like her counterparts at the national level, Brooks offers few specifics when asked what the ACA should be replaced with. And when making the case for repeal, Brooks also repeats some thoroughly debunked claims, like the Republican assertion that the ACA cuts $700 billion from Medicare. The fact-checking website PolitiFact confirms that “neither Obama nor his health care law literally cut funding from the Medicare program’s budget. Rather, the health care law instituted a number of changes to try to bring down future health care costs in the program.” And the reductions in reimbursements do not affect Medicare beneficiaries; they are aimed at insurance companies and hospitals. Brooks, by the way, says she does not support the Medicare voucher plan proposed by Republican vice presidential candidate Paul Ryan and would not have voted for the Ryan budget. Brooks says no one in the Republican leadership or in the Republican conference in the House has asked for her commitment to vote a certain way on anything. “I don’t want to go to Congress to become the standard-bearer for the Republican Party nationally,” she says. “I want to be in Congress to be a voice for this community. And I have to reflect the values of this community, and that’s everybody.” To illustrate her willingness to be independent, Brooks cites her opposition to House Republicans’ reauthorization of the Violence Against Women Act, “because it placed unnecessary restrictions on access to domestic violence services,” reports Liz Benjamin in her Capitol Tonight blog. But opposing something from the safety and distance of the county executive’s chair is much different than opposing it as a member of the House. And again, it’s difficult to believe Brooks would be able to chart her own path in a party that does not tolerate disloyalty. And that’s dangerous, since today’s Republican Party seems hell-bent on attacking women’s reproductive rights, attempting to destroy the social safety net — conveniently forgetting that in the days before Social Security and Medicare, many people actually did spend their “golden years” in poverty — and pushing draconian spending cuts that would inflict serious damage across a wide spectrum of the country. Summary: No matter her personal convictions, Maggie Brooks would have difficultly opposing the national Republican Party’s extremist agenda.

Congressional candidates Louise Slaughter (left) and Maggie Brooks debate in the WXXI studio. Photo by MATT DETURCK

National governance is about more than health care, of course. But when we

interviewed Brooks, she seemed reluctant to talk about some national issues — particularly ones that are important to progressives, like personhood legislation. VP candidate Ryan was a co-sponsor of the Sanctity of Human Life Act, which says that human life begins at fertilization and would criminalize abortion and, critics worry, some forms of birth control. When we interviewed Brooks, she said she didn’t know what personhood is, and that she’d want to study it before she gave an opinion. Brooks has a track record when it comes to LGBT issues. Back in 2008, under Brooks’ leadership, Monroe County appealed a court ruling that same-sex marriages performed outside New York must be recognized in the state. The county eventually dropped the appeal. Brooks said she’s a “traditional marriage person,” but that same-sex marriage isn’t as divisive an issue as it used to be. But she says civil unions, which she supports, provide same-sex couples equal benefits to those of marriage. They do not. Civil unions fail to offer many of the rights and protections given to married couples. Brooks’ most puzzling response came when asked about climate change: specifically whether or not climate change is real. Many Republicans openly express doubt about climate change and people’s role in it. “Dear, dear, dear,” she said in our interview. “Oh, I don’t know. Is it real? What do you mean? What does real mean? Our weather changes every year. Something’s real. Something’s changing the dynamic in our weather. When does Rochester, New York, go a whole winter without having a major snow season? I think there are a lot of things that impact our environment. “When you get into that whole climate change, there are people who are a lot smarter than me who can tell you if that’s real or not and what we need to do,” Brooks said. “It’s not something I’ve focused on, to be quite honest with you. I believe in good environmental stewardship. That’s probably my answer to all of that.” On foreign policy, Brooks said it’s important to maintain a strong defense, but that military action should be a last resort. She said she

supports the use of drones, and that the US has to finish what it started in Afghanistan. “We’re trying to get these countries to a point where they are no longer a threat,” Brooks said. “And as we have seen, we’re not there yet. We’re a long way from that. Nobody likes to see our troops overseas. Nobody likes to see us in military conflict. But we’re there and we’ve got a program and we need to follow that through to completion.” Brooks said President Obama has not been tough enough on countries like Iran. “I think generally as a country we’ve been very weak with our foreign policy,” she said. “I don’t think we’ve said to places like Iran, ‘We’re not going to tolerate you having nuclear capability.’ We don’t want to be the bully in the recreation yard, but we don’t want to get walked on, either. I don’t think people take us seriously.” (An October 2 article in the Atlantic lists several instances of Obama talking about Iran and nukes, including this quote from 2008, “We cannot allow Iran to get a nuclear weapon.”) But Brooks also talked about the importance of military spending as a job-retention strategy. “When you talk about taking money away, put the national defense part of it to the side,” she said. “You’re talking about the loss of hundreds of thousands of jobs — millions of jobs that support the defense industry. So it’s a very, very viable portion of our national economy. If you look here in Monroe County, there are probably 12 to 15 companies that do a lot of defense work and would be severely impacted if we were to look at draconian cuts to defense spending.” Summary: We respect Brooks’ intelligence and diligence, and the fact that she’s had a difficult job dealing with the county’s fiscal problems under severe restraints. But the scandals and cronyism during her administration are major concerns, as are Brooks’ beliefs on issues such as marriage equality. If voters elect Brooks, they’ll be trading an experienced, progressive legislator who has done much good for this region for a freshman whose biggest service would be falling in line with the increasingly conservative leadership of her party.

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ELECTIONS 2012 ENDORSEMENT | BY CHRISTINE CARRIE FIEN

Evaluating

Slaughter’s record

Democratic incumbent Louise Slaughter is one of the most liberal members of the House of Representatives, and proudly so. She’s quick-witted, a master zinger-slinger, and energetic. Her folksy populism marinates in an endearing Kentucky accent, but she can get down in the weeds, too — she’s a microbiologist — and discuss in minute detail the best circumstances to grow algae for conversion to gasoline, for example. Slaughter sits on several caucuses, is a member of the House Democratic Leadership, and a ranking member of the House Committee on Rules, a powerful committee that determines which bills make it to the floor and in what order. Slaughter has been a champion of women’s health and reproductive rights, which is particularly important in this present environment of mandatory ultrasounds, personhood amendments, and attacks on contraception. Slaughter supports Planned Parenthood and co-chairs the House Pro-Choice Caucus. In 1994, Slaughter co-authored the Violence Against Women Act, which provided protections for victims of domestic violence. The year before she helped get $500 million for breast cancer research at the National Institutes of Health. This year, Slaughter won passage of the Slaughter Amendment to the National Defense Authorization Act, which makes sure members of the Armed Forces are aware of their options for dealing with reprisals after reporting sexual harassment or assault. Slaughter is a vigorous and vocal advocate of the Affordable Care Act, famously recounting at a health-care summit a story of a constituent forced to wear her dead sister’s teeth because she couldn’t afford dentures — a story instantly mocked by Republicans. Health-care costs make up about 17 percent of the country’s gross domestic product, Slaughter says, and Congress had to do something to get costs under control. “It had to be done, for the economic health of the country,” she says. “Each of us pays about $1,000 a year more simply to cover the uncompensated costs of people who use the hospital who have no insurance. It’s the most humane thing to do to start with, but the byproduct of that is we’re going to save health care dollars.” The ACA is big on preventative care, Slaughter says, which will help cut costs. And it has more money for medical research, invests in electronic record-keeping, and is 10 City OCTOBER 24-30, 2012

set up to discourage over-testing of patients simply for the reimbursement. Slaughter says support for the ACA will grow as understanding of the law grows. “I think people don’t know what’s in there yet,” she says. “And I will say that Democrats are not good at sound bites.” In 2008, Slaughter won passage of the Genetic Information Non-Discrimination Act, which forbids discrimination by employers or health insurers based on people’s genetic predispositions to health conditions. And she continues to fight to keep antibiotics from being used on livestock. “There’s no good cure for [tuberculosis] right now because we’re seeing evolution of the bacteria,” Slaughter says. “Antibiotics have lost effectiveness. It’s one of the biggest scandals in the world.” Slaughter’s legislative track record is long, but being a lawmaker is about more

than writing and passing bills. Legislators have to know how to exert their muscle behind the scenes, as well. And Slaughter is good at that. In 2011, the Buffalo News called her “among the most creative legislators in Washington,” one has “become more tenacious as the terms roll by.” Slaughter called for stricter regulations of procurement policies for body armor and armored vehicles after reading in the New York Times that 80 percent of the Marines killed in Iraq from upper body wounds

could have survived if they had extra body armor. A study called for by Slaughter found that testing for the effectiveness of body armor was flawed, the Times story says. As a result, 16,000 pieces of body armor were recalled and replaced. “I don’t give up,” Slaughter says. “That’s the way I approach the job and always have. I finally convinced them that I wasn’t going to accept trash.” Slaughter says she’s also had whistleblowers tell her about problems with military helmets, and she’s going to look into that. Slaughter voted no on extending the Patriot Act’s roving wiretaps, no to allowing electronic surveillance without a warrant, no on intelligence gathering without civil oversight, yes to continuing military recruitment on college campuses, and yes on a 2003 bill to provide an emergency $78 billion for the wars in Iraq in Afghanistan, and she co-sponsored the Landmine Elimination and Victim Assistance Act: Slaughter is the author of the Reciprocal Market Access Act, which would improve reciprocal market access for United States domestic producers, and she has secured $25 million to continue fuel cell research. Her priorities for next term if she wins re-election, she says, include protecting intellectual property rights; passing fair trade legislation; strengthening the STOCK Act — a piece of Slaughter legislation that

passed in 2012 which prohibits Congress members and other top federal officials from insider stock trading; making it easier for farmers to get the labor they need; and trying to pass her Keep America Secure Act, which directs “the Department of Defense and the Department of Homeland Security to only purchase electronic components that are manufactured in the United States,” according to the Congressional record. Locally, Slaughter has been a strong supporter of an intermodal station and

high-speed rail for Rochester. “We’ve neglected rail in the United States,” she says. “We found out after 9/11 that it was about the only way we could travel, and it was so inconvenient here.” Slaughter calls high-speed rail one of her top priorities for Western New York. “The improvement of existing tracks and the creation of a third track dedicated to passenger rail will allow people to move efficiently back and forth across the Upstate region, improve commerce, generate new tourism opportunities, and spark revitalization of Western New York for a generation to come,” says Slaughter’s website. And the new downtown train station, which Slaughter got funding for, will help rebuild the distressed neighborhood around the station, she says. Slaughter has brought a tremendous amount of money back to the Rochester area

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YOU’RETOO! THE BEST, during her 13 terms in Congress. And the truth is, while it may be fashionable to rail against pork-barrel spending, the money can make important things happen. According to her campaign staff, Slaughter has secured more than $70 million for higher education and research and development in the Rochester area over the last few years, more than $160 million for transportation projects in Monroe County, and $66 million for Medicaid through the stimulus package. Some highlights: $15 million for the intermodal station, $400,000 for the Brooks Landing project in the 19th Ward, $225,000 for a renovation and expansion at the Strong Museum, $62.5 million for the University of Rochester’s laser lab, $440,000 to upgrade the Monroe County crime lab, and $5 million

for the University of Rochester’s Wilmot Cancer Center. Slaughter also helped secure about $1.5 million in public and private funding to dredge the Port of Rochester. Sediment in the port had built up to the point where some large ships couldn’t navigate the waterway. Previously, it had been announced that there was no money to dredge the port this year. Though some people have tried to make an issue of Slaughter’s age — she’s 83 — Slaughter says retiring never crossed her mind. “I don’t know what age people decide we should not be able to function any longer,” she says. “I come from a long line of mountain people, and they’re pretty strong and hardy folk. I think I’ve been blessed with a lot of those genes, because my health is very good.”

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Gillibrand

has earned second term Senator Kirsten Gillibrand and Manhattan attorney Wendy Long are graduates of Dartmouth. They’re not far apart in age, and they’re both working mothers. But the similarities between Gillibrand and Long, her Republican challenger, end there. Gillibrand, a Democrat, was sworn into the US Senate in January 2009, filling the seat once held by Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton. She won election to the seat in 2010, and is City’s choice in this year’s election over Long and Green Party candidate Colia Clark. Prior to joining the Senate, Gillibrand was a member of Congress, representing New York’s 20th District. She fulfilled a campaign promise to bring transparency to her position by being the first member of Congress to post her schedule and personal financial disclosures online. Gillibrand was a leader in the fight to repeal “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell,” the policy

banning openly gay people from military service. And she is an ardent supporter of President Kirsten Gillibrand. Obama’s Photo by MATT DETURCK Affordable Care Act. Long is a tough-talking conservative who earned her law degree from Harvard Law School. She helped create a nonprofit group to get Supreme Court Chief Justice John Roberts and Justice Samuel Alito confirmed. On her website, Long says Justice Clarence Thomas, for whom she clerked, is one of the “greatest living judges in America.” And she’s continues on page 12 rochestercitynewspaper.com City 11

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ELECTIONS 2012

Gillibrand

STATE LEGISLATURE | BY JEREMY MOULE

continues from page 11

endorsed by former US Senator Rick Santorum, one of the most conservative politicians in the country. In their only public debate, Gillibrand and Long clashed over abortion rights, access to contraception, and the natural gas extraction process known as fracking. Gillibrand said she agrees with Governor Andrew Cuomo that all the facts aren’t in about fracking yet, and that New Yorkers need to protect their highly-prized drinking water from possible toxins. Long said studies concerning fracking are conclusive and concerns about its dangers are a “myth.” The Green Party’s Colia Clark says high quality, free education from kindergarten

to graduate school should be a constitutional right. She opposes diverting public education Colia Clark. funds to Photo by MATT DETURCK charter schools, and supports a single-payer health-care system. She says she wants to stop the use of drones, legalize marijuana, and end the death penalty.

«««« ENDORSEMENT | BY JEREMY MOULE

Hochul over Collins The 27th Congressional District race is essentially about two things: health care and jobs. Incumbent Democratic Representative Kathy Hochul wants to keep the Affordable Care Act in place, though she’s said it could be improved. Her Republican challenger, business owner and former Eric County executive Chris Collins, wants to repeal the ACA. But he’s offered little in the way of an alternative other than tort reform. Hochul is the better choice. She’s got a handle on the problems facing farmers — agriculture is a major industry in the district — and tried, albeit unsuccessfully, to get House Republican leaders to put a new farm bill up for vote. Manufacturing is another major industry in the 27th, and Hochul is critical of the free trade agreements she says have cost the district jobs. She also backs a package of Democratic bills meant to bolster domestic manufacturing. Collins talks a lot about cutting government spending, but not how he’d do it. Similarly, he’s talked about the importance of agriculture, but the only specific he’s offered to help the industry is

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eliminating unspecified regulations. The 27th district is largely Republican: 40 percent of voters are registered Kathy Hochul. Photo PROVIDED with the GOP, compared to 32 percent for Democrats. And historically the district elects Republicans. But Hochul changed that when she won a special election to the seat in 2011. She successfully used a Republican budget plan developed by current vice presidential candidate Paul Ryan against her opponent. Specifically, she seized on the budget’s proposal to turn Medicare into a voucher plan. The 27th district begins in Erie County, which is really the district’s anchor, and extends into neighboring rural counties. It also includes small parts of the towns of Hamlin, Wheatland, Rush, and Mendon in Monroe County.

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12 City OCTOBER 24-30, 2012

O’Brien

should win Senate slugfest A preview of state races of local concern. Republican State Senator Jim Alesi’s decision not to seek re-election set off a savage political scramble that only gets uglier and more personal as the election gets closer. The race between Democrat Ted O’Brien and Republican Sean Hanna for the 55th Senate District is about local representation, but also about control of the Senate. The contest is extremely competitive and will play a key role in whether the Senate has a Republican or Democratic majority. O’Brien is well-liked and has a good reputation, but he is getting hammered by ads and mailers — many making misleading or outright false claims. Some of the most vicious — and untruthful — ads have been paid for by an anonymous group with a Virginia address that dead-ends at a process server firm. O’Brien’s got a couple of prominent environmental groups on his side, however, and they’ve gone after Hanna, who once served as regional director for the State Department of Environmental Conservation. EPL/Environmental Advocates of New York recently gave Hanna its Oil Slick award, criticizing Hanna’s environmental record. (Hanna’s fired back at the groups, which also include the state and national League of Conservation Voters, calling them lobbyists and extremists who give “true environmentalists” a bad name.) But beyond the sniping and mudslinging, there is substance to this race. Hanna’s winding down his first two-year term as a State Assembly member, and O’Brien has served in the Monroe County Legislature since 2004. O’Brien is the best choice to represent the 55th district, which starts in Irondequoit, takes in much of the city’s east side, and ends in the Ontario County town of Naples. He’s in tune with the concerns and needs of the district, is respected by Democrats and Republicans, and has consistently questioned county spending practices and the effect they have on property taxes. O’Brien also supports marriage equality, abortion rights, and a raise in the state’s minimum wage. Hanna and O’Brien say property taxes are straining local homeowners and that state requirements on local governments are driving that burden. They point to Medicaid as a prime example. Over time, state officials have expanded the program, passing more

Ted O’Brien. Photo by MATT DETURCK

and more of the cost to counties. Hanna says he wants the state to fund mandated programs. O’Brien says he wants the state to take over all Medicaid costs — most states do not pass those costs down to counties. Both candidates also support state policies and incentives to encourage job creation, though O’Brien supports legislation to strip tax subsidies from companies that move jobs out of the country. (Hanna voted against the legislation.) O’Brien also says that the statewide industrial development agency system hasn’t always used taxpayer resources wisely. Some aspects of Hanna’s record are troubling. In 2011, he voted against legislation legalizing same-sex marriage. Twice he’s voted against legislation to reduce greenhouse gas emissions in the state — he says that should be a federal issue since air pollution doesn’t respect state boundaries. But federal inaction has left states to fill the void. Hanna also voted against a bill to raise the minimum wage; the legislation passed the Assembly but the Senate never voted on it. The Senate and Assembly have considered and voted on legislation regarding fracking, so it’s important to note the candidates’ positions on the issue. Hanna says he supports fracking, if it’s safe. But he says he also wants to see the results of the State Department of Environmental Conservation’s environmental continues on page 14

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ELECTIONS 2012

O’Brien

ENDORSEMENT | BY JEREMY MOULE

continues from page 12

review of fracking before coming to a conclusion. He also says that the DEC will need to draft proper regulations. O’Brien says protecting the state’s freshwater resources needs to be the priority. But if state officials green-light the technique, then they also need to make sure DEC has enough resources to effectively monitor and regulate the industry, he says. Monroe County has two other contested Senate races that will help decide which party holds the majority in that chamber. In the 61st district, which is anchored in Erie County but includes Riga, Chili, and part of the city, incumbent Republican Michael Ranzenhofer faces a challenge from Democrat Justin Rooney. And in the 62nd district, which is focused mostly on Niagara and Orleans counties, incumbent Republican George Maziarz is opposed by Democrat Amy Hope Witryol and Green Party candidate Jonathon Benedict. Monroe County is also home to three Senate districts where the incumbent is uncontested: Republican Joe Robach in the 56th District, which includes Hamlin, Clarkson, Parma, Greece, Gates, part of the city, and the town of Brighton; Republican Patrick Gallivan in the 59th District, which includes Wheatland and Henrietta; and Republican Michael Nozzolio in the 54th District, which includes Webster. City is not endorsing one party over the other for control of the Senate. Republicans have failed to act on important issues, such as the minimum-wage increase. But when Democrats held the majority in 2009 and 2010, they were not effective leaders. While Democrats are expected to

keep the Assembly majority — just as in the Senate, the contorted, gerrymandered districts protect the majority party — Republicans are trying to grow the size of their conference. And there are several contested races. City is reserving its endorsement, except in one crucial, city-based district. In the 138th district, which includes a question mark-shaped section of the city as well as the towns of Gates and Chili, we’re endorsing Democrat Harry Bronson, who faces a challenge from Republican Peterson Vazquez. Bronson says he considers his vote in favor of the state’s marriage equality law as his most significant accomplishment, calling it a historical piece of civil rights legislation. Bronson is a long-time LGBT activist and worked on marriage equality and related issues well before he was elected to the Assembly. Bronson has backed important antidiscrimination legislation in the Assembly. 14 City OCTOBER 24-30, 2012

He voted for legislation to prohibit discrimination based on a person’s gender identity or expression, as well as a package of pay equity bills. Both passed the Assembly, but stalled in the Senate. Bronson has also backed important economic legislation like the minimumwage increase — which the Senate hasn’t passed — and the statewide tax cap. And he says he wants the state, counties, and local governments to work together to eliminate redundant business permitting programs. On fracking, Bronson says he supports a moratorium until sufficient regulations are put in place to safeguard water, the environment, and people. The DEC is right to take its time in its review of fracking, Bronson says, and he supports the state’s plans for a health assessment. He’s also voted in favor of classifying fracking waste fluid as hazardous waste. And he says state officials need to look at DEC staffing levels. Vazquez, a veteran and small business owner, says his priority is education and that prepared and successful students will encourage economic development. Specifically, he says extending the school day would boost student performance. A longer day would mean more time for teachers to spend with students, Vazquez says, and less time for students to hang out on the streets. It would also relieve many parents of the burden of finding after-school care and the costs associated with that care, he says. The idea of an extended school day is worth exploring, and Rochester schools Superintendent Bolgen Vargas has started those discussions. But Vazquez also says that school districts should stress abstinence and shouldn’t offer comprehensive sexual education. He says he wouldn’t try to circumvent the state’s marriageequality law, but that the law is not in line with his religious beliefs. And he’s been endorsed by the New York State Right to Life Committee. On a minimum-wage increase, Vazquez says he’d prefer to see a plan or initiative for economic growth. He says he’s not convinced that a minimum-wage increase makes sense on its own. Vazquez says he’s not opposed to hydraulic fracturing for natural gas, and that it has potential to create a lot of jobs. But safety is paramount, he says. Incumbent Democrat David Gantt had a resounding win in the 137th district primary — more than doubling the combined votes received by his two challengers. The district includes Gates and a chunk of the city. Gantt faces a general election challenge from Green Party candidate Drew Langdon.

Aldersley for County Legislature

Sean Hanna. Photo BY MATT DETURCK

Langdon says it’s important for voters to have an alternative. Langdon’s chief issue is worker-owned cooperative businesses. He says he wants the state to establish a program for loans and grants for workers trying to form a cooperative business. It would also help cooperatives purchase existing businesses, he says. The state could use revenues from its stock transfer tax —which are currently rebated to Wall Street — to replenish the fund, he says. Similarly, the state could take steps to encourage housing cooperatives, Langdon says. Democrat Randy Weaver and Republican Bill Nojay are running for an open seat in the 133rd Assembly District. Former Avon Mayor Richard Burke, who lost to Nojay in a Republican primary, is on the Conservative line. Weaver is a Steuben County legislator and a pharmacist who until recently owned his own pharmacy. Nojay is an attorney and conservative talk radio host. He’s also a former chair of the Rochester Genesee Regional Transportation Authority board. During his time in that position he pushed for a downtown transit center — an idea that later morphed into the failed Renaissance Square project, though Nojay had left the RGRTA board by that point. In the 135th district, which covers Webster, Penfield, Perinton, and East Rochester, incumbent Republican Mark Johns faces a challenge from Democrat David Koon. Johns unseated Koon, who represented the district for 14 years, in 2010. Johns is emphasizing his support for economic development programs and reduced state spending. Koon is focusing on similar issues, but also supports campaign finance reform. Incumbent Republican Stephen Hawley faces a challenge from Libertarian candidate Mark Glogowski in the 139th Assembly District. The only parts of Monroe County in that district are Hamlin, Sweden, and Clarkson. Incumbent Assembly members Bill Reilich, a Republican, and Democrat Joe Morelle are running unopposed for their seats.

Stephanie Aldersley. Photo PROVIDED

Democratic Legislator Stephanie Aldersley is looking to win the seat she once held for a decade. Aldersley was appointed to the Monroe County Legislature earlier this year to fill the vacancy created by the resignation of Vinnie Esposito. She’s running now to fill the remaining three years of Esposito’s term, and faces a challenge from Republican Joe Carbone. The winner will represent the 16th District, which covers part of Irondequoit. Aldersley represented the district for 10 years; she was term-limited out of the Legislature in 2007, but is now eligible to serve again. Carbone, a podiatrist, challenged Esposito in 2011 and lost by less than 10 percent of the vote. Voters should choose Aldersley. She shares her caucus’s concerns on issues like the county’s recurring deficits, its use of local development corporations, and the administration’s cuts to social services. On large, controversial issues — the county’s annual budget included — the Legislature’s votes are often split along party lines. And Republicans have used their majority to force through controversial measures, including appointing a new public defender and approving an administration proposal to cut funding for home lead inspections in the City of Rochester. Individual Republican legislators rarely break with their caucus, and there’s little evidence to suggest that Carbone would be an independent voice. Democrats reliably question the administration on spending and policies.

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“The minority does operate as kind of a watchdog on the administration,” Aldersley says, explaining that further Democrat losses could diminish the caucus’s oversight abilities. Later this year or early next year, the Legislature will vote on borrowing to move Monroe Community College’s downtown campus from the Sibley

building to the State Street Kodak campus. That measure requires a twothirds vote, meaning some Democrats would have to vote in favor. Aldersley says she’s undecided on the move. The caucus hasn’t received enough information, she says, and she’s worried the county may end up paying more for the Kodak buildings than they are worth.

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Dinolfo

seeks third term as clerk Incumbent Republican Cheryl Dinolfo and Democrat Susan Vandervoort are the candidates for Monroe County clerk — an office that probably shouldn’t require an election in the first place. Dinolfo was appointed clerk in April 2004 after former clerk Maggie Brooks became county executive. Dinolfo, widely seen as a Republican loyalist, was elected later in 2004, re-elected in 2008, and is now running for a third term. Dinolfo says she’s made the office’s services more convenient by staying open outside normal business hours and by expanding online access to many of the legal records the office manages. She says she’s also found ways to expand services. Vandervoort is a business manager for ComplexCare Solutions, a managed health-care company serving the Rochester and Buffalo areas. She says there are similarities between her current position and that of county clerk. In both jobs, success depends on providing excellent, cost-effective customer service, she says. Vandervoort says that if elected, she would reopen a downtown Department of Motor Vehicles office — a request she says she’s heard during the campaign. A Chili resident, Vandervoort ran for town supervisor twice; the second time she lost to Republican David Dunning by about 400 votes. She says that Monroe

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County Democratic Committee chair Joe Morelle asked her to challenge Dinolfo this year. Cheryl Dinolfo. While Photo by MATT DETURCK Dinolfo arguably has an advantage as the incumbent, Vandervoort is personable and ambitious. The county Susan Vandervoort. clerk’s office Photo PROVIDED requires a competent administrator — someone voters will likely find in both candidates. The clerk records mortgages, judgments, and liens. Accepting pistol permits, issuing hunting and fishing licenses, and supervising the DMV are also some of the clerk’s duties.

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16 City OCTOBER 24-30, 2012

The Flying Squirrel Community Space hosts a showing of “Detroit’s Native Son: From Z8ne Street Thug to Prison to Community Leader,” a new documentary film about the life of Yusef “Bunchy” Shakur. The film will be followed by a talk by Shakur at 6 p.m. on Monday, October 29. The event is at 285 Clarissa Street. Admission: $10.

Nazareth College presents “Letters Home” at 7 p.m.

on Friday, November 2. The performance is about letters written by soldiers serving in Afghanistan and Iraq. There will be a pre-performance discussion with William Massolia, artistic director and founder of Griffin Theatre Company, who adapted the letters for the stage. Using minimal props, the letters are performed as dramatic monologues. The event is at the Nazareth Arts Center. Tickets: $10 to $40. Call 389-2170.

Rally against drones

Rochester Against War holds a rally to protest the US from engaging in drone warfare at 5 p.m. on Wednesday, October 24. Activists will be handing

out information leaflets. The rally is on Wednesday, October 24, at Twelve Corners in Brighton.

RCSD seminar on urban youth The Rochester school district presents “Nurturing the Whole Child,” a seminar examining ways to support urban students in education, health, and socially from 8:30 a.m. to 1:45 p.m. on Saturday, November 3. The seminar will be led by Eddie Fergus-Acria, New York University deputy director for urban education. The event is at Edison Technical Campus, 655 Colfax Street, and is free and open to the public.

rochester, ny 14623 t: (585) 292.9940 find us on

THANK YOU FOR VOTING US

Author talks about life after prison

Soldiers’ letters on stage

CHARLIE HUNTER Wed, Oct. 31st

This week’s calls to action include the following events and activities. (All are free and open to the public, unless otherwise noted.)

Mon: 11am-11pm Tues. & Wed: 11am-Midnight Thurs. & Fri: 11am-2am Sat: 11am-2am • Sun: 12pm-10pm

lovincup.com

Correcting ourselves

The Best of Rochester 2012 special section included in the October 17 issue contained several errors. The correct web site for the Rochester Red Wings is RedWingsBaseball.com. The correct web site for Geva Comedy Improv is gevacomedyimprov. org. The correct spelling for Rachel Barnhart’s Twitter handle is @rachbarnhart.

Dining Road food

Brick-N-Motor is the latest addition to this

area’s thriving armada of food trucks, serving up vittles that you’d be lucky to find even at an eatery that didn’t have wheels on it. Owner/operator Paul Vroman, formerly executive chef at Max of Eastman Place, offers a burger at all times (a recent preparation featured aged cheddar, arugula, balsamic onion jam, and pickled autumn vegetables), as well as an inventive blackboard menu that’s both rotating and seasonal. I’m still thinking about the heavenly butternut squash gnocchi with porchetta, caramelized Brussels sprouts, and maple gastrique that I cozied up to the other day. Follow the truck’s tasty travels on Facebook and Twitter, or visit bricknmotortruck.com. A spicy tuna handroll, chef’s specialty rainbow roll, and nagiri (left to right) at Banzai Sushi & Cocktail Bar, now open in the South Wedge. Photo BY MATT DETURCK

Delicious fishes [ CHOW HOUND ] BY DAYNA PAPALEO

It seems as though a mere year is all that was necessary for the intersection of South Avenue and Gregory Street to establish itself as a potential hotbed of gastronomy. “I wanted to be part of that neighborhood,” says Piranha Sushi Bar chef and co-owner Nic Grammatico, who recently debuted his latest venture just doors down from young spots like Zeppa, Cheshire, and Hedonist Artisan Ice Cream. Partnering this time with his brother Matthew, Grammatico’s Banzai Sushi & Cocktail Bar brings not only raw fish to the South Wedge, but dim sum plus some nicely priced libations to wash everything down. Those familiar with Piranha’s maki creations should recognize some of the popular rolls that made the trip over to the bright and inviting new space, like the Surf and Turf ($13.50), here with seared beef and snow crab. But where Piranha’s menu demonstrates a Latin-Caribbean bent, Banzai’s influences are “Southeast Asian and Polynesian,” according to Grammatico. That inspiration pops up in maki like Red Curry Chicken ($6.50) as well as a spicy Kim Chee roll ($3.50), one of Banzai’s many vegetarian options. Salads and soups are among the offerings, and the dim sum includes crispy tempura ($6-$8) along with cloudlike steamed buns surrounding savory fillings like tofu, pork shoulder, or roast duck ($4.50-$6.50). The craft cocktails were conjured up by Banzai manager Nate Nickens; the current season is represented in the Kentucky Pumpkin Patch ($6), made with bourbon, butternut squash, and brown sugar, and I happily fished for the fresh pomegranate seeds

in the gorgeous tequila-and-Chambord-based Bite The Berry ($7). Besides wine and beer, Banzai also features a decent sake selection, but Grammatico is already thinking bigger. “We want to be Rochester’s first real sake bar,” he says, with plans for flights and tastings. Oh, and you night owls, B-shifters, and service-industry types will be thrilled to learn that Banzai serves sushi until 1 a.m. Thursday, Friday, and Saturday, meaning that your late-night eating choices have finally expanded beyond what goes into your Garbage Plate. Banzai Sushi & Cocktail Bar is located at 682 South Ave. It is open Monday-Wednesday 11:30 a.m.-2 a.m. (sushi served until 10 p.m.); Thursday-Saturday 11:30 a.m.-2 a.m. (sushi served until 1 a.m.); and Sunday 4 p.m.-2 a.m. (sushi served until 10 p.m.). Food prices range from $3.50 to $21. For more information, call 473-0345 or visit Banzai’s Facebook page.

C is for Community

Now open at 982 Monroe Ave., just in time for party and gift-giving season is Darn Good Cookie Co., which assembles and delivers cookie cakes and baskets as it provides job opportunities to clients of East House, a nonprofit rehab agency helping those with chronic mental illness and/or chemical dependency. Prices begin at $6.25 for a halfdozen, but you can also walk in and snatch up individual cookies in varieties like I Want Candy and Red Velvet White Chip — plus, of course, classics like chocolate chip, peanut butter, and oatmeal raisin — for $1 each. Give ‘em a call at 473-2181 or visit darngoodcookie.com.

Use your bean

Walworth artisans Dale and Ellen Montondo, who roast and grind the cacao beans, then fashion the results into microbatch confections under their Tocoti Chocolate label, will be hosting a chocolate seminar and tasting Saturday, November 3, 3:30-4:30 p.m. at Cocoa Bean Shoppe, 30 S. Main St., Pittsford. Tickets cost $3 and seating is limited; call 203-1618 for reservations, or visit cocoabeanshoppe.com.

Fear and beer

The Haunted Brewery at Custom BrewCrafters, 300 Village Square Blvd. in Honeoye Falls, will be open for especially scary business 5-9 p.m. on Saturday, October 27. For $15 you’ll get the tour, a free tasting card or pint of beer, and $5 off your food purchase at the Pint & Goblet Tavern. For more information, call 624-4386 or visit cbsbrewing.com..if you have the guts.

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Meal deals

Keep an eye out for the new batch of City Dining Cards, good through the end of 2013. [Editor’s note: City Dining Cards are unaffiliated with City Newspaper.] Essentially it’s 50 coupons, each good for $10 off at restaurants like Agatina’s, Nikko, Tapas 177, and the Wintonaire. And know that 5 percent of the $20 purchase price gets donated to local food banks. Visit citydiningcards.com for a complete list of participating restaurants, a bit of the fine print, and where to buy. Chow Hound is a food and restaurant news column. Do you have a tip? Send it to food@ rochester-citynews.com.

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Upcoming [ Jazz ] POSTPONED: Exodus to Jazz: E.J. Strickland; Rene Marie Originally scheduled for Saturday, October 27, and Thursday, November 15. New details TBA. exodustojazz.com

Music

[ Jazz ] 2013 Xerox Rochester International Jazz Festival Club Pass On sale, Friday, October 26. $174-$194. Festival takes place June 21-29. rochesterjazz.com [ Pop/Rock ] The Waiting Room Saturday, November 24. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N. Water St. 9 p.m. $10. 352-5600, waterstreetmusic.com.

Yellow Dubmarine

Thursday, October 25 Water Street Music Hall, 204 N. Water St. 9 P.M. | $10-$12 | 325-5600, waterstreetmusic.com [ TRIBUTE/REGGAE ] This Baltimore-based tribute band

gives a funky twist to some of the Beatles’ greatest hits. In September of last year the band released its only album, “Abbey Dub,” a reggae reimagining of the Fab Four’s final studio effort, “Abbey Road.” Since then, Dubmarine has toured extensively, wowing audiences members of every age bracket with its respectful reinterpretations of Beatles’ classics highlighted by graceful reggae grooves and a hoppin’ horn section. Recently, Yellow Dubmarine has been performing the Beatles’ 2000 compilation album, “1,” in its entirety, which features nearly every No. 1 single the original band ever released in the United States and United Kingdom. — BY DAVID YOCKEL, JR.

Melissa Etheridge Sunday, October 28 Auditorium Theatre, 875 E. Main St. 7:30 p.m. | $27.50-$102.50 | rbtl.org [ ROCK ] Melissa Etheridge isn’t a blues artist per se, but

dammit, she still packs a deep-seated wallop with her rough and raw vocal wail over her guitar’s cry for help. She’s been nominated for Juno Awards and ASCAP Awards as well as for numerous Grammys, and in fact has won twice. At age 51 she shows no indication of a wind down or a sit back. Instead she’s revved up the bus and launched a new tour promoting her 14th release, “4th Street Feeling.” Positively? Absolutely! — BY FRANK DE BLASE

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IN ROCHESTER’S EAST END 120 East Avenue 325-3663

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 24

Bruce Springsteen and The E Street Band Tuesday, October 30 Blue Cross Arena, 1 War Memorial Square 7:30 p.m. | $68-$101 | 758-5300, bluecrossarena.com [ ROCK ] Bruce Springsteen has had a hold on heartland

rock ‘n’ roll for six decades, and his grip shows no sign of loosening. The Long Branch, New Jersey, native has won 20 Grammy awards in his illustrious career, and with every album, his sound maintains its relevancy. This year’s “Wrecking Ball” (Springsteen’s 17th studio release) has garnered positive critical response while debuting at No. 1 in 16 different countries, proving that “The Boss” is still the boss. — BY DAVID YOCKEL, JR.

Zoo Bombs Sunday, October 28 Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. | $6-$8 | bugjar.com [ ROCK ] Tokyo’s tenacious trash-rock sensation Zoo

Bombs is one of those bands put on this earth to remind us which elements of rock ’n’ roll are essential, and which are not. Since 1994, this band has excised all the fat and fluff from rock music, concentrating on the raw heat and primal scream. You know how you have to spin a Blues Explosion or Screamin’ Jay Hawkins Record every now and then to remind and rewind? Well, you can add this band to your list of drugs. It’s Japanese rock ’n’ roll with shake appeal and savage soul from a time when monsters with DA’s roamed the earth, corrupting our youth, and dancing with our women. Humorous hip-hop duo Garden Fresh gets the ball rolling with B.C. Likes You. — BY FRANK DE BLASE

Rob Zombie played the Main Street Armory Tuesday, October 16, as part of the “Twins of Evil” Tour. PHOTO BY FRANK DE BLASE

Rolling around the Island of Misfit Toys [ review ] by frank de blase

The Main Street Armory loomed ominous beneath a moonless sky Tuesday, October 16, as thousands lined up for the benediction within. It was like a scene out of a movie as the soulless shuffled shoulder to shoulder past the bible beaters, buskers, and street-meat purveyors to the “Twins of Evil” circus inside with Rob Zombie and Marilyn Manson. Despite some technical issues between the talent and the venue, it was Zombie’s night as he commandeered the joint like his own Castle Frankenstein. He put on a positively brilliant show. Don’t get me wrong, Manson was good, too. It’s just that his darkness seems a little more serious and consuming. It’s a scandalous spectacle, with the man challenging decency and deity at every turn. But his brand of showbiz lacks Zombie’s irony and humor. Zombie roared out on stage with “Jesus Frankenstein,” and the stage set alone was straight out of my teenage dreams. Robots and flaming cauldrons, confetti, smoke and skeletons, all before projected loops of classic horror clips and stag reels. The set list only had two White Zombie nuggets, “More Human Than Human” and the crowd fave “Thunderkiss ’65,” and guitarist John 5 kicked out the jams at lightning

speed before morphing into Alice Cooper’s “School’s Out.” What a mob, what a crowd, what a scene, what a show. It was considerably more sophisticated and elegant at the Bow Ties CD-release shindig at Lovin’ Cup Friday night. Now with one female in the tenor slot and beyond, the group comes on more as a slick ensemble a la The Manhattan Transfer. The group was flawless before a packed room as it tackled conventional pieces like “Stardust” and stuff by the Fleetwoods, and never hiccupped in the face of more challenging arrangements like Queen’s “Bohemian Rhapsody” in its entirety. From there it was off to Sticky Lips Juke Joint to hear the odd yet comforting indie Americana of Hinkley. The band had one tune, a waltz really, that flowed so fractured and lovely that it reminded me of a little red wagon with one square wheel rolling around the Island of Misfit Toys. “Nobody wants a Charlie in the Box.” Well shit, I do. Finished up the heart of Saturday night at the Dinosaur kibitzing with bluesman Roger Kuhn over a slice of pumpkin pie the size of my head, while discussing how much we dig Lightning Hopkins as Joe Beard wailed from the bandstand.

[ Acoustic/Folk ] Interfaith Threshold Singers. Penfield Presbyterian Church, 1881 Jackson Road, Penfield NY. 241-3796. 6 p.m. Free. Jeremy Button Scottish Session. McGraw’s Irish Pub, 146 W Commercial St. 3489091. 7 p.m. Free. Rob & Gary Acoustic. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. 248-4825. 5:30 p.m. Free. Sammy Naquin and Big Easy Zydeco. Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. 8 p.m. $8-$12. [ Blues ] Blackened Blues. Temple Bar and Grille, 109 East Ave. 232-6000. 10 p.m. Free. Ezra & The Storm. Dinosaur Bar-B-Que, 99 Court St. 9 p.m. Free. Open Blues Jam w/The King Bees. The Beale New Orleans Grille and Bar-South Ave., 693 South Ave. 2714650. 7:30 p.m. Call for info. Paul Strowe. The BealeWebster, 1930 Empire Blvd. 216-1070. Call for info. [ Classical ] Live from Hochstein: Chamber Music for Flute & Piano. Hochstein Performance Hall, 50 N Plymouth Ave. 4544596. 12:10 p.m. Free. [ DJ/Electronic ] DJ Vs. VJ. A-Pub Live, 6 Lawrence St. 10 p.m. Call for info. [ Jazz ] Andy Stobie Finger Lakes Jazz Band. Ontario Beach Park, 4799 Lake Ave. 865-3320. 6 p.m. Call for info. Anthony Giannavola. Lemoncello, 137 West Commercial St. 385-8565. 6 p.m. Free. Gary Chudik. Prosecco Italian Restaurant, 1550 New York 332. 924-8000. 6 p.m. Call for info. Julie Delario Duo. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. 6625555. 6 p.m. Free. Margaret Explosion. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 7:30 p.m. Free. continues on page 20

avant garde to funk bop to big bands blues and beyond

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rochestercitynewspaper.com City 19

Music

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 24

Jazz musician Charlie Hunter plays a custom-made seven-string instrument that fuses four guitar strings with three bass-octave strings; he plays both sets simultaneously. PHOTO COURTESY Greg Aiello

Monster mash-up Charlie Hunter Wednesday, October 31 Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Drive 8 p.m. | $20 | lovincup.com [ PROFILE ] BY RON NETSKY

Charlie Hunter can pick up just about any guitar and make it sing. But what if a seasoned guitar player picks up Hunter’s ax? “It’s a problem,” says Hunter. “The technique is so different from guitar, it’s like trying to drive a gigantic semi in the Indy 500.” Hunter’s guitar is a custom-made, sevenstring hybrid. “The lower three strings are essentially bass strings and the higher four strings are essentially guitar strings,” says Hunter. “I’ve got most of the range of a bass and most of the range of a guitar.” It gets more complicated; the strings are not tuned in the usual order. The three bass strings are tuned to G, C, and F while the four guitar strings are tuned to C, F, Bb, and D. They go from low to high. With his Frankenstein-ian creation Hunter is capable of unleashing the funkiest of bass lines and the raunchiest of guitar licks simultaneously. Of course, his superhuman dexterity would merely be a curiosity without his knack for rhythmic solos as tasty as they are astounding. Hunter, who plays at Lovin’ Cup Halloween

night, grew up in Berkeley, California, in the 20 City OCTOBER 24-30, 2012

1970’s in a home where the music was always on. His mom had an ample supply of old blues records that she listened to non-stop. Guitar was in the air and Hunter absorbed it. When he started playing, it just felt right. “When I was a kid taking guitar lessons and I was practicing, it was like, whoa, man, this is fun. I get so much more back than I put in.” He learned how to play licks from songs on the radio by The Beatles, Jimi Hendrix, and others. By high school he was into blues and rockabilly, and playing gigs with adults. Hunter began studying the guitar chronologically, starting with the early players. “The styles of Eddie Lang and Charlie Christian made a lot more sense to me than John Scofield and Pat Metheny, the guys that were famous at the time,” says Hunter. “I went in that kind of direction — Joe Pass, Wes Montgomery, those kinds of players.” He never set out to play jazz. “I had an affinity for certain players and later on it was like, Oh, this is jazz,” says Hunter. “Or Charlie Parker; oh, that’s bebop. It was just more stuff to learn.” Hunter’s trademark technique of combining

the two instruments evolved out of playing a lot of bass and drums, and exploring guitar styles that emphasized the high and low notes. But with his seven-string, he goes further. “If you can imagine what a piano player does with two hands, it’s like that, but it’s

much more complicated because the duties are not so easily spread between the two hemispheres of the brain,” says Hunter. “You have to concentrate on your right hand, which is not only executing rhythmically but it’s also conceiving rhythmically. And your left hand is not only conceiving harmonically, but it’s also executing rhythmically. The fingers are working in teams and it’s infinitely more complex than just the technique of guitar or just the technique of bass,” he says. When Hunter began playing the hybrid he worked out one part at a time. “Now I just play the song and improvise,” says Hunter. “You just have to learn thousands of combinations between all the strings and your fingers and rhythmic combinations and fingering combinations. And then you improvise.” An important part of Hunter’s current sound is drummer Scott Amendola. After almost 20 years of playing together in various settings they work intuitively. Because Hunter essentially covers the guitar and bass roles that would be in a traditional trio, a drummer is all that’s needed for a full sound. Hunter’s latest CD, “Not Getting Behind Is The

New Getting Ahead,” is a concept album, painting a somewhat bleak portrait of the heartland of America. In the title track and other tunes like “Rust Belt,” “Ghost Mall,” and “Economy with Dignity” he attempts to “evoke some of the things you might see in your travels through the USA these days” through his bluesy music. “There Used To Be a Nightclub There” is about the sad economic fate of places to hear live music. Hunter started gigging in clubs at the age of 15 in his hometown of Berkeley. Three decades later all of the clubs are gone. Hunter himself is not immune to economic struggle. While being a famous jazz guitarist might appear to be an enviable position, the reality is not quite as alluring. “There’s no money in it,” says Hunter. “You’re driving all the time, you’re always away from your family [in his case his wife and two children] and you’re always trying to figure out how to make ends meet. If it wasn’t for having a deep calling and connection to this, I don’t know why anybody would do it.” The album’s wonderfully fresh sound is no accident; it was recorded in a manner 180 degrees from the standard contemporary session. Hunter and Amendola simply played together in the same room wearing no headphones. They achieved a natural acoustic sound by recording on an old-fashioned, twotrack, analog tape machine. It’s the next best thing to the excitement he feels at a live gig. “You’re always hoping that that magic comes,” says Hunter. “The audience has so much to do with it — how their energy is, how you can interact. If the magic wasn’t there I would definitely do something else, because this is a slog other than that.”

Martini Tasting Featuring The Swooners. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. 6 p.m. $20. Vince Ercolamento& Joe Chiappone Jazz Quartet. Murph’s Irondequoit Pub, 705 Titus Ave. 342-6780. 8 p.m. Free. [ Pop/Rock ] Witch Mountain w/Orodruin and Castle. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 8 p.m. $8-$10.

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 25 [ Acoustic/Folk ] Adventure Day. The Rabbit Room, 61 N. Main St. 582-1830. Call for info. Jim Lane. Murph’s Irondequoit Pub, 705 Titus Ave. 342-6780. 8 p.m. Free. Salsa Night. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. 9 p.m. $3-$5. [ Blues ] The Fakers. The Beale New Orleans Grille and Bar-South Ave., 693 South Ave. 271-4650. 7:30 p.m. Call for info. Halloween Bash w/Frankie & Jewels. The Avenue Pub, 522 Monroe Ave. 244-4960. 7 p.m. Call for info. Trilogy. The Beale New Orleans Grille and Bar-South Ave., 693 South Ave. 271-4650. 7:30 p.m. Call for info. Uncle Ralph Blues. Pane Vino Ristorante, 175 N. Water St. 232-6090. 8:30 p.m. Free. [ Classical ] Eastman at Washington Square Lunchtime Concerts. 1st Universalist Church, 150 S. clinton Ave. 274-1400. 12:15 p.m. Free. Fantastic Brass with Plymouth Brass Quintet. Hochstein Performance Hall, 50 N Plymouth Ave. 454-4596. 7 p.m. $5. RESTisNOISE John Cage Birthday Concert. Lutheran Church of the Reformation, 111 North Chestnut St. 454-3367. 8 p.m. Free. RPO: Debussy at 150. Kodak Hall at Eastman Theater, 60 Gibbs St. 7:30 p.m. Matthias Bamert, guest conductor. Stefan Arnold, piano. $15-$82. [ DJ/Electronic ] RIPROC Monster Mash-Up Halloween Costume Party. Dubland Underground, 315 Alexander St. 232-7550. 9 p.m. $5-$15. Thursday Night Shakedown. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 11 p.m. Free. Tiki Thursdays: Shotgun Music DJ. McGhan’s Pub, 11 W. Main St. 924-3660. 7:30 p.m. Free. Tilt-a-Whirl Drag Show. Tilt Nightclub & Ultralounge, 444 Central Ave. 232-8440. 11:15 pm & 12:30 am. $3. [ Jazz ] The D’Jagoners. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 7:30 p.m. Free. Gary Chudik. Prosecco Italian Restaurant, 1550 New York 332. 924-8000. 6 p.m. Call for info.

Taste it!

John Palocy Trio. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. 6625555. 6 p.m. Free. The Swooners. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. 2484825. 5:30 p.m. Free. Ted Nicolosi and Shared Genes. Roncones Italian Restaurant, 232 Lyell Ave. 458-3090. 6 p.m. Free. [ Hip-Hop/Rap ] Fright Jam: Cash Out ,Driicky Graham. Main Street Armory, 900 E. Main St. 232-3221. 8 p.m. $20-$25.

CHOCOLATE SEMINAR

Nov. 3rd • 3:30-4:30pm

With Local Chocolate Makers of

TOCOTI CHOCOLATES

CLASSICAL | Rochester Oratorio Society

My tastes lean toward the sacred in classical music, so this concert immediately caught my eye. The program includes [ Reggae/Jam ] “Messa di Gloria” by Puccini, “Gloria” from “Mass of the ChilNaked Grey w/34 Feet Deep. Sticky Lips BBQ Juke Joint, dren” by Rutter, and “Gloria” from the “Masque of Angels” 830 Jefferson Rd. 292-5544. by Argento. Italian Giacomo Puccini, you likely know, so why 8 p.m. $5. not open yourself also to British composer John Rutter (b. Reggae Thursday. Club NV, 123 Liberty Pole Way. 454-7230. 10 1945) and American composer Dominick Argento (b. 1927)? p.m. $5 before 11 pm. With tenor Grant Knox and baritone Mario Martinez performYellow Dubmarine w/My Plastic ing with the Webster Thomas High School Choir, you can be Sun. Water Street Music Hall, more certain of the divine than in the hereafter. 204 N. Water Street. 325-

LEARN MORE AT:

cocoabeanshoppe.com Open: Tue-Fri 10-6, Sat 10-3, Sun 11-3

Cocoa Bean Shoppe • 203-1618

20 South Main St • Village of Pittsford

5600. 9 p.m. $10-$12.

[ Pop/Rock ] Five Alarm Open Jam. Firehouse Saloon, 814 South Clinton. 319-3832. 9 p.m. Call for info. Jen Urban & The Box w/Plane Band. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 8:30 p.m. $6-$8. John Payton Project. Dinosaur Bar-B-Que, 99 Court St. 9 p.m. Free. La Jeder. Boulder Coffee Co. - Alexander St., 100 Alexander St. 454-7140. 7 p.m. Free. Victor & Penny. Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. 8 p.m. $6-$8.

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 26 [ Acoustic/Folk ] Jim Lane. The Pultneyville Grill, 4135 Mill St. (315) 589-4512. Call for info. Free. Pat Kane w/Liz & Mary session. McGraw’s Irish Pub, 146 W Commercial St. 348-9091. 5 p.m. Free. [ Blues ] Deborah Magone. Sully’s Brickyard Pub, 240 South Ave. 232-3960. 5:30 p.m. Call for info. Imaginary Band. The BealeWebster, 1930 Empire Blvd. 2161070. 7:30 p.m. Call for info. [ Classical ] Rochester Oratorio Society: Argento, Rutter, Puccini. Hochstein Performance Hall, 50 N Plymouth Ave. 454-4596. 7:30 p.m. $10-$20. RPO at SUNY Brockport. Brockport College, 350 New Campus Drive. 7:30 p.m. Paul Shewan, conductor. $8-$15. SUNY Geneseo Wind Ensemble and Thursday Night Jazz Ensemble Concert.Wadsworth Auditorium at SUNY Geneseo, 1 College Circle. 245-5516. 8 p.m. Free. [ DJ/Electronic ] Bang Fridays. ONE Nightclub and Lounge, 1 Ryan Alley. 5461010. Call for info. B-Sides Week 2: Halloween Party. Decibel Lounge., 45 Euclid St. 754-4645. 9:30 p.m. $5-$10. Chill Out Fridays Happy Hour. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. 5:30 p.m. Free.

Rochester Oratorio Society performs Friday, October 26, 7:30 p.m. at Hochstein School of Music & Dance, 50 N. Plymouth Ave. $10$25. 473-2234, ROSSings.org. — BY PALOMA A. CAPANNA DJ Bac Spin. Venu RestoLounge, 151 St. Paul St. 2325650. 8 p.m. Call for info. DJ Blake. 140 Alex Bar & Grill, 140 Alexander St. 256-1000. 10 p.m. Call for info. DJ Cedric. Vertex Nightclub, 169 North Chestnut St. 2325498. 10 p.m. $3-$8. Fresh Meat Fridays w/Samantha Vega, DJ Mighty Mic. Tilt Nightclub & Ultralounge, 444 Central Ave. 232-8440. 11:15 p.m. & 12:30 a.m. $4-$12. Latino Heat Fridays. Heat Nightclub, 336 East Ave. 8990620. 10 p.m. Call for info. Lube After Dark. Quaker Steak & Lube, 2205 Buffalo Rd. 6979464. 9:30 p.m. Free. Nola’s Halloween Weekend Bash ft. DJ Razor Ramon. Nola’s BBQ, 4775 Lake Ave. 6633375. 9 p.m. Call for info. Reggaeton w/DJ Carlos. La Copa Ultra Lounge, 235 W. Ridge Rd. 254-1050. 10 p.m. Free. [ Jazz ] Bobby DiBaudo Trio. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. 6625555. 6 p.m. Free. Cool Club Jazz. Lemoncello, 137 West Commercial St. 3858565. 7 p.m. Free. Fred Costello & Roger Eckers Jazz Duo. Charley Brown’s, 1675 Penfield Rd. 385-9202. 7:30 p.m. Free. Holiday Band. Pane Vino Ristorante, 175 N. Water St. 232-6090. 6:30 p.m. Free. Madeline Forster. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 8:30 p.m. Free. Sunny Brown Band. Prosecco Italian Restaurant, 1550 New York 332. 924-8000. 7 p.m. Call for info. Ted Nicolosi and Shared Genes. Aamaya Bar and Grill, 1900 Clinton Avenue South. 2413223. 6:30 p.m. Free. [ Reggae/Jam ] The Lawnmowers w/Boss Tweed. Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153

Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. 6 p.m. $5-$8. [ Pop/Rock ] Blanco Diablo. House of Guitars, 645 Titus Ave. 5443500. 6 p.m. Free. Brian Lindsay Band & Tombstone Hands. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. 9 p.m. $3-$5. Dave Viterna. Dinosaur Bar-BQue, 99 Court St. 10 p.m. Free. Eric Taylor. Boulder Coffee Co. – Park Ave., 739 Park Ave. 697-0235. Call for info. Free. Falling Forward w/The Gift of Ghosts. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N. Water Street. 3255600. 6:30 p.m. $10-$12. Fuel w/Velvet Elvis, Venrez, Bad Axis, and Sandlot Heroes. Main Street Armory, 900 E. Main St. 232-3221. 7:30 p.m. $15. Into the Now. Temple Bar and Grille, 109 East Ave. 232-6000. Call for info. Mesh. A-Pub Live, 6 Lawrence St. 10 p.m. Free before 11, $5 after. Mochester w/Earthtones. Johnny’s Irish Pub, 1382 Culver Rd. 224-0990. 5 p.m. Free. Mutter, AFR, and From the Skies. California Brew Haus, 402 Ridge Rd. West. 6211480. 9:30 p.m. Call for info. Pre-Halloween Party: Big Leg Emma. Sticky Lips BBQ Juke Joint, 830 Jefferson Rd. 2925544. 8 p.m. $10-$15. Rexx w/Mulu Lizi, Jen Urban & The Box. Tala Vera, 155 State St. 546-3845. 8 p.m. $5. Something Else. Nashvilles, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. 3343030. 9 p.m. Call for info. University of Rochester Annual Fall Drag Show. University of Rochester, River Campus. 8 p.m. $9. Welcome To My Nightmare w/Blanco Diablo, Rock-N-Roll Social Club. Pineapple Jack’s, 485 Spencerport Rd. 2475225. 9 p.m. Call for info. continues on page 22 rochestercitynewspaper.com City 21

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SURF/METAL | The Concrete Rivals

BROADWAY/POP | Idina Menzel

The Concrete Rivals’ sound combines the reverb-driven, gruff guitar work of 60’s surf rock and the speed and guts of inyour-face heavy metal. This Montpelier, Vermont, trio has been touring on the strength of its debut album, “Eat Their Weight in Snakes.” Justin Crowther of Seven Days, an independent Vermont publication, described the record as “Dick Dale and Slayer collaborating on a score for B-horror surf movie.” The band’s enthusiastic and exacting thrash n’ surf musical mentality is an impressive mix of early metal, standard surf, and prog-rock, as well as a criminally crooked sense of country. Tombstone Hands and Roarshark fill out the bill.

Broadway fans know Idina Menzel as the original Maureen in “Rent,” and as the definitive Elphaba in “Wicked.” TV fans know her as Shelby Corcoran, the biological mother or Rachel Berry and leader of a rival show choir on “Glee,” and she was also a featured player in the movie “Enchanted.” What the uninitiated need to know is that Menzel has a huge, gorgeous voice that should fill the Auditorium Theatre and induce shivers up and down your spine. I saw her in Syracuse a few years back and the set included musical-theater staples and cuts off of her pop-leaning album “I Stand.” It was all wonderful.

The Concrete Rivals perform Saturday, October 27, 9 p.m. at Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. $6-$8. 454-2966, bugjar.com. — BY DAVID YOCKEL, JR.

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 26 White Woods w/The Michael Vadala Trio, The Reactions, Right Turn Racer. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. $5-$7.

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 27 [ Acoustic/Folk ] The Crandalls. Tango Cafe, 389 Gregory St. 271-4930. 8 p.m. RSVP to 271-4930. $10. Ebb Tide. Flaherty’s Honeoye Falls, 60 W. Main St. 4977010. Call for info. Halloween Party w/Jumbo Shrimp. Johnny’s Irish Pub, 1382 Culver Rd. 224-0990. 8 p.m. Free. Lacey Lee w/Anna Vogel. McGraw’s Irish Pub, 146 W Commercial St. 348-9091. 6 p.m. Free. Tumbao. Tapas 177 Lounge, 177 Saint Paul St. 262-2090. 11 p.m. Free. [ Blues ] Cold Sweat. The Beale-Webster, 1930 Empire Blvd. 216-1070. 7:30 p.m. Call for info. Deep Blue. The Beale New Orleans Grille and Bar-South Ave., 693 South Ave. 2714650. 7:30 p.m. Call for info. Fred Vine. Greece Baptist Church, 1230 Long Pond Rd. 225-6160. 8 p.m. $17-$20. [ Classical ] Honeoye Falls Community Concert Band Fall Concert. HF-L District Auditorium, 619 Quaker Meeting House Rd. 7 p.m. Free. Nazareth College Choirs. Nazareth College Linehan Chapel, 4245 East Ave., 3892700. 3 p.m. Free. RIT Halloween Concert. Rochester Institute of Technology, 1 Lomb Memorial Dr. 3 p.m. Free. RPO: Debussy at 150. Kodak Hall at Eastman Theater, 60 Gibbs St. Saturday: 8

22 City OCTOBER 24-30, 2012

pm. Matthias Bamert, guest conductor. Stefan Arnold, piano. $15-$82. Yale Spizzwinks(?) a capella group. First Unitarian Church, 220 S Winton Rd. 271-9070. 7:30 p.m. $6-$15. [ Country ] Closing Time. Sticky Lips BBQ Juke Joint, 830 Jefferson Rd. 292-5544. 9 p.m. $3. Lonesome Crow. Nashvilles, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. 3343030. 9 p.m. Call for info. [ DJ/Electronic ] Barstool Blackout Tour Presents Foam. Main Street Armory, 900 E. Main St. 232-3221. 8 p.m. Call for info. DJ Big Reg. Venu Resto-Lounge, 151 St. Paul St. 232-5650. 10 p.m. Call for info. DJ Darkwave. Vertex Nightclub, 169 North Chestnut St. 2325498. 10 p.m. $3-$8. DJ Trancesend. Decibel Lounge., 45 Euclid St. 7544645. 10 p.m. $5. Ghostfeeder. California Brew Haus, 402 Ridge Rd. West. 621-1480. 5:30 p.m. $7. Halloween Party w/DJ Johnny. Flaherty’s Webster, 1200 Bay Rd. 671-0816. Call for info. Heads Will Roll: Halloween Bash w/Gonculator, DJ Too Chill. Dubland Underground, 315 Alexander St. 232-7550. 9:30 p.m. $10-$20. La Selva. Tilt Nightclub & Ultralounge, 444 Central Ave. 232-8440. 10 p.m. Call for info. Monster’s Ball. Heat Nightclub, 336 East Ave. 899-0620. Call for info. Octubre 27. Skylark Lounge, 40 South Union St. 270-8106. 10 p.m. $2. Saturday Night Halloween Bash. ONE Nightclub and Lounge, 1 Ryan Alley. 546-1010. 21+. Call for info.

Idina Menzel performs Saturday, October 27, 8 p.m. at the Auditorium Theatre, 875 E. Main St. $36-$125. rbtl.org. — BY ERIC REZSNYAK Wicked Halloween Party. Decibel Lounge., 45 Euclid St. 754-4645. 10 p.m. Call for info. Wolves & Witches. Whiskey River, 336 East Ave. Call for info. [ Jazz ] Halloween Party: Cousin Vinny. Corner Sports Bar, 122 Main St. East Rochester. 248-2040. 8 p.m. Free. Lovin’ Cup’s 4th Annual “Naughty or Nice” Halloween Bash w/The Greener Grass Band, The Swooners. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 2929940. 9 p.m. $3-$5. The Mambo Kings. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. 3 p.m. $10. [ Pop/Rock ] 2nd Annual Halloween Party. Scotland Yard Pub, 187 Saint Paul St. 730-5030. 8 p.m. Call for info. Arlen Roth. Bernuzio Uptown Music, 122 East Ave. 4736140. 5:30 p.m. $25-$30. Bug Jar’s Halloween Eve: The Tombstone Hands w/The Concrete Rivals, Roarshark. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 8 p.m. 21+. $6-$8. Dino BBQ Halloween Bash ft. Teagan & The Tweeds. Dinosaur Bar-B-Que, 99 Court St. 10 p.m. Free. Fever. Firehouse Saloon, 814 South Clinton. 319-3832. 9 p.m. $4. The Freeride Band. Jeffrey’s, 3115 E. Henrietta Rd. 4864937. 8 p.m. Call for info. Grouplove w/Ms Mr. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N. Water Street. 325-5600. 8 p.m. $20-$25. Halloween Costume Party Part One w/Anonymous Willpower, The Infrared Radiation Orchestra. Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. 9:30 p.m. $5-$7. Halloween Costume Show w/ Intrinsic, The Big, Cannonball

Kid, The DeVills. Tala Vera, 155 State St. 546-3845. 8 p.m. $5. Halloween Party w/Download. Nola’s BBQ, 4775 Lake Ave. 663-3375. 10 p.m. Call for info. Idina Menzel. Auditorium Theatre, 885 Main St. 8 p.m. $36-$125. JJ Lang. Pineapple Jack’s, 485 Spencerport Rd. 247-5225. 9:30 p.m. Call for info. Pelican’s Annual Halloween Bash ft. The Skycoasters. Pelican’s Nest, 566 River St. 663-5910. 7:30 p.m. Call for info. The Rochester Academy of Music & Arts Halloween Spooktacular!. Boulder Coffee Co. - Alexander St., 100 Alexander St. 4547140. 7 p.m. Free. The Taint. A-Pub Live, 6 Lawrence St. 10 p.m. Free before 11, $5 after. Triple Play. Hamlin Station Bar & Grill, 52 Railroad Ave. 9642010. 8:30 p.m. Call for info. University of Rochester Brass Choir 4th Annual Halloween Spooktacular. University of Rochester Strong Auditorium, River Campus. 8 p.m. Free.

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 28 [ Acoustic/Folk ] Brian Clancy. Temple Bar and Grille, 109 East Ave. 232-6000. 7 p.m. Free. Traditional Irish Music Session. Johnny’s Irish Pub, 1382 Culver Rd. 224-0990. 5 p.m. Free. [ Blues ] Four-4-Time. The Beale New Orleans Grille and Bar-South Ave., 693 South Ave. 2714650. 7:30 p.m. Call for info. [ Classical ] Arshak Andriasov. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 6 p.m. Free. Compline. Christ Church, 141 East Ave. 454-3878. 9 p.m. Donations accepted. Eastman At St. Michael’s: Eastman Chorale. St. Michael’s Church, 869 N. Clinton Ave. 325-4041. 2:30 p.m. Free.

[ Jazz ] Nazareth College Jazz Combo. Nazareth College Wilmot Recital Hall, 4245 East Avenue. 389-2700. 3 p.m. Free. [ Pop/Rock ] Chris Tomlin. Roberts Wesleyan College, 2301 Westside Dr. 594-6008. 7 p.m. $25-$35. Eric Taylor. Boulder Coffee Co. - Alexander St., 100 Alexander St. 454-7140. Call for info. Free. Hell’s Angels Halloween Party. Dinosaur Bar-B-Que, 99 Court St. 1 p.m. $15. Marcangelo Perricelli Band. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. 7 p.m. $3-$7. Melissa Etheridge. Auditorium Theatre, 885 Main St. 7:30 p.m. $27.50-$102.50. ZOOBOMBS w/Garden Fresh, B.C. Likes You!. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. $6-$8.

MONDAY, OCTOBER 29 [ Acoustic/Folk ] Fresh Squeezed Singer Songwriter. Lemoncello, 137 West Commercial St. 3858565. 7 p.m. Free. [ Blues ] Tony Giannavola. The Beale New Orleans Grille and BarSouth Ave., 693 South Ave. 271-4650. 7 p.m. Call for info.

[ DJ/Electronic ] The Very Spooky Return of Manic Monday’s ft. Miss T & Lady Z. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. 21+. Free. [ Pop/Rock ] Mark Gamsjager and the Lustre Kings. Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 2323230. 8 p.m. $6-$8.

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 30 [ Acoustic/Folk ] 5th Tuesday Members’ Showcase Concert ft. Bob White and the Wingers. Twelve Corners Presyterian Church, 1200 S. Winton Rd. 244-8585. 7:30 p.m. Call for info. Don Christiano: The Beatles Unplugged. Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. 8 p.m. Free. Suzanne Monroe. Lemoncello, 137 West Commercial St. 3858565. 7 p.m. Free.

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A UNIQUE NEIGHBORHOOD BAR! CLASSICAL | Mozart and Tchaikovsky: A Benefit for RocMusic We all gasp and complain each time we see statistics about the city schools, but what do we actually do to contribute to solutions? Enter Kevin Fitzgerald, Evan Meccarello, and local musicians for a concert to benefit RocMusic. This community-based, tuition-free program provides after-school music instruction, instruments, practice time, and ensemble and performance opportunities to children ages 5-18. For this fundraiser dynamic young conductors Fitzgerald and Meccarello will offer Mozart’s Symphony No. 31 (the “Paris Symphony”) and Symphony No. 35 (the “Haffner Symphony”), along with Tchaikovsky’s “Serenade for Strings.” Why not exceed the suggested donation and become part of the upbeat? Mozart and Tchaikovsky: A Benefit for RocMusic takes place Tuesday, October 30, 7:30 p.m. at Hochstein School of Music & Dance, 50 N. Plymouth Ave. $10 suggested donation. 4901559, RocMusic.org. — BY PALOMA A. CAPANNA [ Blues ] Bluesday Tuesday Blues Jam. P.I.’s Lounge, 495 West Ave. 8 p.m. Call for info. Teagan Ward. The Beale New Orleans Grille and Bar-South Ave., 693 South Ave. 2714650. 7 p.m. Call for info. [ Classical ] Tchaikovsky and Mozart: A Benefit for RocMusic. Hochstein Performance Hall, 50 N Plymouth Ave. 454-4596. 7:30 p.m. $10. [ Jazz ] Kyle Vock Duo. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. 662-5555. 6 p.m. Free. Mark Bader. Prosecco Italian Restaurant, 1550 New York 332. 924-8000. 6 p.m. Call for info. Tinted Image. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. 2484825. 5:30 p.m. Free Free. [ Pop/Rock ] Bruce Springsteen & The E Street Band. Blue Cross Arena, One War Memorial Square. 7585300. 7:30 p.m. $68-$101. Worm Quartet Album Release w/Devo Spice. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. $5-$7.

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 31 [ Acoustic/Folk ] Rob & Gary Acoustic. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. 248-4825. 5:30 p.m. Free. [ Blues ] Blackened Blues. Temple Bar and Grille, 109 East Ave. 2326000. 10 p.m. Free. Halloween: Natalie B Band. Dinosaur Bar-B-Que, 99 Court St. 9 p.m. Free. Open Blues Jam w/The King Bees. The Beale New Orleans Grille and Bar-South Ave., 693

South Ave. 271-4650. 7:30 p.m. Call for info. [ Classical ] FLCC Faculty Recital. Finger Lakes Community College, 3325 Marvin Sands Dr. 7 p.m. Free. Live from Hochstein: Chroma Piano Trio. Hochstein Performance Hall, 50 N Plymouth Ave. 454-4596. 12:15 p.m. Free. [ DJ/Electronic ] Fright Nite. TC Riley’s, 200 Park Point Dr. 272-9777. Call for info. The Lobby Presents: Hustlevania!. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 10 p.m. 21+. $3. Teen Set 45 Party. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. Midnight. Free Teen Set 45 Party. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. Midnight. Free. [ Pop/Rock ] 1st Annual Sticky Lips Halloween Party in the Pit ft.Epilogue, Children in Heat. Sticky Lips BBQ Juke Joint, 830 Jefferson Rd. 292-5544. 8 p.m. $5-$8. Bonerama. Nietzsche’s, 246 Allen St. (716) 886-8539. 8 p.m. $20. Halloween Bash Part Two: Bobby Henrie & The Goners. Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. 8:30 p.m. $5-$7. Stephen Kellogg & The Sixers w/Miggs. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N. Water Street. 3255600. 8 p.m. $18-$20. The Zombie Halloween Ball w/The Moon Zombies. Tala Vera, 155 State St. 546-3845. 8 p.m. $6.

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Faculty Artist Series: Michael Burritt, percussion. Eastman East Wing Hatch Recital Hall, 26 Gibbs St. 3 p.m. $10. National Opera Week Showcase Recital. Baptist Temple, 1101 Clover St. 473-3200. 4 p.m. $10-$15. Philharmonia/Sinfonia Concert. Hochstein Performance Hall, 50 N Plymouth Ave. 454-4596. 7 p.m. Free. Salon Concert Series: Rebecca Penneys, pianist, Mikhail Kopelman, violinist, Stefan Reuss, cellist. Rochester Academy of Medicine, 1441 East Ave. 2 p.m. $10-$30.

rochestercitynewspaper.com City 23

Theater

Art Exhibits

going through the grieving process of losing her husband. In addition to the narrator work, Safka sings a number of songs throughout the show. These, too, are raw. Her voice has changed with age, and at times her pitch approaches what I will term Dylan-esque. But the power and emotion she brought to her socially conscious songs, and the insightful lyrics she wrote for them, remain unchecked. In addition to the leads, the cast also features

Nick Faruch and Mandy Hassett in “Melanie and the Record Man,” now on stage at Blackfriars Theatre. PHOTO BY NIC MINETOR

Finding a personal peace “Melanie and the Record Man” Through October 28 Blackfriars Theatre, 795 E. Main St. $45 | 454-1260, bftix.org

drew Melanie fans from nine states and five countries. The show succeeds on multiple levels, not the least of which is spinning an engrossing story about an artist whom many have written off as a novelty act. As the title suggests, “Melanie and the Record

[ REVIEW ] BY ERIC REZSNYAK

“Melanie and the Record Man” is unquestionably a labor of love for Blackfriars Artistic Director John Haldoupis. The show — currently receiving its world premiere on the Blackfriars stage — tells the story of Melanie Safka, best known simply as Melanie, a folk singer who achieved national and international fame in the 1960’s and 1970’s. While most people remember her for her performance at the original Woodstock or her (unintentionally) career-defining song “Brand New Key” (you know, “I’ve got a brand new pair of roller skates…”), for Haldoupis Safka is a muse. He became entranced by her music and her lyrics at around age 14. He says he has “painted her music” ever since. That level of passion is obvious in every facet of “Melanie and the Record Man.” His set is fairly minimal for a Haldoupis creation, yet instantly evocative of the 60’s and infused with warm, feminine colors. The script, co-written by Haldoupis, Safka, and Katharine Fisher, is by turns emotional, funny, and hopeful. The handpicked cast is stacked with top local talent. Haldoupis threw himself completely into this production, and it paid off. While opening night had a few bobbles — most of which were already being addressed by the end of that weekend — it also saw a packed house that 24 City october 24-30, 2012

Man” is about more than Safka’s musical journey. It is built around the love story between Safka and her husband, Peter Schekeryk, her producer and manager of decades who died of a heart attack in 2010. The show features two actors — Mandy Hassett as Melanie and Nick Faruch as Peter — reenacting key scenes from their life together, as well as Safka herself, who functions as a narrator, telling her own story. As a seasoned musician and writer, Safka knows how to connect with an audience. After a few uncertain moments on opening night, she relaxed, opened up to the room, and laid her heart bare. “Melanie and the Record Man” covers the happy moments — Joan Baez sending her tea at Woodstock, her residency at a bizarre French theater, the enduring popularity of “Brand New Key” (a song she never wanted to release) — and the not-so-happy ones, too. Drug abuse, shady music-industry types, and money woes are fairly standard in almost any musician’s story. But by having Safka herself on stage, commenting frankly on her own willful ignorance about what was going on, the proceedings have a real emotional weight. Although there are many sweet, funny moments in the show — I loved the interactions between Safka and the younger version of herself — underscoring all of it are some very raw emotions. At various points on opening night, it was clear that Safka is still

Janine Mercandetti and Danny Hoskins in various incidental roles, Carl Del Buono and Robyn Fazio as back-up singers, and Safka’s son, Beau Jarred Schekeryk, playing guitar and providing additional musical support. Hassett is good as young Melanie, sometimes even great. On some of the songs her voice swallowed the entire room, but there were occasional pitch issues as well. Faruch delivers an impressive performance, especially strong in his singing. He is magnetic and charming, and he and Hassett share a great initial chemistry. Opening night included a few technical issues. The sound levels seemed off, there were some feedback problems at key moments, and the slickly produced opening video projections by Ron Heerkens Jr. wrapped with a clunky transition to the play itself. There are always kinks to work out with a new work. The larger issue was the play’s length: it ran for more than three hours. It’s a good show. It’s smartly written, moving, funny, and includes some great songs. But anyone’s attention is bound to wander after the three-hour mark. Haldoupis realizes this, and I’m told that 15 minutes have already been cut from the production, and they’re looking to excise even more. My immediate thoughts would be to take out the road-trip portion of the show — cute but unnecessary, and the driving allegory had already been hammered home — and I’m torn about the ending of the show, which on opening night essentially turned into a Melanie concert. Following a fantastic closing group number, with a smart change in backdrop, Safka returned to the stage and played a set of three or four of her songs. On the one hand, the group number was a perfect ending to the story. On the other, Safka’s performance was so good, so moving, and Blackfriars is such a perfect, intimate space for her music, that I would hate to lose any of it. I watched as cell phones, lighters, and even a few cellphones with images of lighters, were raised in the audience during “Lay Down (Candles in the Rain),” and I think I got a tiny glimpse of what it must have been like to be part of Woodstock, and the movements of the 60’s that defined Melanie’s career and life. For anyone who lived through that, and who still holds out hope for that kind of change, “Melanie and the Record Man” is more than Safka’s story. In a sense, it’s their story as well.

[ Opening ] “Susan Ferrari Rowley: New Directions” Artists Talk. Wed., Oct. 24, 6:30-8:30 p.m. Axom Gallery, 176 Anderson Ave., 2nd floor, 176 Anderson Ave., 2nd floor. 232-6030 x23. axomgallery.com. “Low Fidelity”. Oct. 25-Dec. 9. Tower Fine Arts Center Mainstage at The College at Brockport, 180 Holley Street. Through Dec. 9. Hours Mon-Fri 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Sun 1-4 p.m. Reception Oct 25, 4-6 p.m. 395-2805. brockport.edu/ finearts. The Art of J. Nevadomski and Allie Hartley. ongoing. Plastic, 650 South Ave. TueSat 11 a.m.-7 p.m. Reception Oct 26, 7 p.m. 563-6348. plasticforever.com. “Fantasy” by Kathy Clem. Oct. 26-Dec. 8. iGallery Kathy Clem, Anderson Arts Building, 250 N. Goodman St., Suite 312. Continues Nov 2-Dev 8. Mon-Fri 1-5 p.m. Reception Oct 26, 7-9 p.m. igallerykathyclem.com. “An Open Mind”. Oct. 26-Nov. 30. Through November 30. Our House Gallery, Veterans Outreach Center Inc., 459 South Ave. Reception Oct 26, 6-9 p.m. pittyloverescue@gmail.com. 2nd Annual Just a Little Freakshow. Oct. 27-Nov. 2. Grass Roots Gallery, suite 157, Hungerford Bldg, 1115 E. Main St., Suite 248. Oct 27, 8 p.m. costume party; Nov 2, 6 p.m. thegrassrootsgallery@ gmail.com. Closing Reception: “Finger Lakes: Above and Below” by Gloria Betlam. Sat., Oct. 27, 1:30 p.m. Livingston Arts Center, 4 Murray Hill Dr. Featuring poetry readings. 2439785. livingstonarts.org. “Asina/Familiar”. Oct. 29-Nov. 16. SPAS Gallery, RIT, Lomb Memorial Dr. Through Nov. 16. Mon-Fri 10 a.m.-4:30 p.m., Sat 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Reception Oct 29, 5-7 p.m., panel 7 p.m. 475-2884. [ Continuing ] 1975 is Haunted! 4 Year Anniversary Show. WednesdaysSundays. 1975 Gallery, 89 Charlotte St. Continues through Nov 17. Hours are Wed-Fri 12-8 p.m., Sat 12-7 p.m., Sun 12-5 p.m. Reception Oct 20, 7-10 p.m. 1975ish.com. “60 from the 60s”. TuesdaysSundays. George Eastman House, 900 East Ave. Through Jan 27. Tue-Sat 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Sun 11 a.m.-5 p.m. 271-3361. eastmanhouse.org. “Adriatic Coast and Home” photography by Steve Levinson. Through Jan. 7, 2013. Mill Art Center & Gallery, 61 N Main St. 624-7740. millartcenter.com. American Artist Emile Gruppe. Through Oct. 31. International Art Acquisitions, 3300 Monroe Ave. Through Oct 31. Mon–Fri 10 a.m.–9 p.m., Sat 10 a.m.–6 p.m., Sun 12-5 p.m. 264-1440. internationalartacquisitions.com.

“Anything Goes,” Exploratory Works by the Arena Art Group. Mondays-Saturdays. Black Radish Studio, 274 N. Goodman. Through November 17. Mon-Fri 10 a.m.-6 p.m., Sat 12-6 p.m. Reception Oct 5 6-10 p.m. 413-1278. blackradishstudio.com. “Art of the Book”. Through Dec. 9. Lower Link Gallery, Central Library, 115 South Ave. Through Dec. 9. 428-8053. libraryweb.org. “Dansville Friends and Artists”. Through Nov. 18, 10 a.m. My Sister’s Gallery, 505 Mt. Hope Ave. Through Nov 18. Hours 10 a.m.-8 p.m. 546-8400. EpiscopalSeniorLife.org. “The Balance” by Jiwon Han. Mondays-Fridays, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Arts & Cultural Council, 277 N. Goodman St. Through Oct 26. 473-4000. artsrochester.org. Brian O’Neill & David Dorsey. Tuesdays-Saturdays. Oxford Gallery, 267 Oxford St. Through Nov 24. Hours Tue-Fri 12-5 p.m., Sat 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Reception Oct 27 5:30-7:30 p.m. 271-5885. oxfordgallery. com. Brittany Ryan Exhibit. Through Oct. 27. JGK Galleries, 10 Vick Park A. Brittany Ryan’s sculptures and paintings will be showing through Oct 27. 7346581. jgkgalleries.com. Carla Bartow. Ongoing. Roc Brewing Co., 56 S. Union St. carlasswanktank.blogspot.com. 794-9798. rocbrewingco@ gmail.com. rocbrewingco.com. Cartoonist David Boyer. Through Oct. 27, 6-9 p.m. JGK Galleries, 10 Vick Park A. 734-6581. jgkgalleries.com. “Clouds in My Coffee.” Through Nov. 24. Starry Nites Café, 696 University Ave. Mon-Thu 7:30 a.m.-10 p.m., Fri 7:30 a.m.midnight, Sat 8 a.m.-midnight, Sun 9 a.m.-9 p.m. 271-2630. shoefactoryarts.com. “Creat Part 2” by Michael Slattery. Through Oct. 31. A.R.T.S. Gallery, 321 East Ave. Through Oct 31. Reception Oct 5 6-9 p.m. 726-9916. “Dansville Friends and Artists.” Through Nov. 18, 10 a.m.-8 p.m. My Sister’s Gallery, 505 Mt. Hope Ave. 546-8400. episcopalseniorlife.org. “Different Worlds.” WednesdaysSundays. Image City Photography Gallery, 722 University Ave. Through Oct 28. Wed-Sat 11 a.m.-7 p.m., Sun 12-4 p.m. Reception Oct 5, 5-9 p.m. 482-1976. imagecityphotographygallery. com. The Ecology of Food: Past, Present, Future. Through Dec. 5. Bertha V.B. Lederer Gallery, Brodie Hall, I College Dr. Through December 5. Talks Wednesdays 2:30-3:30 p.m. geneseo.edu/galleries. “Edges of Books”. MondaysFridays, 1-5 p.m. Cary Graphic Arts Collection, Lomb Memorial Dr. Through Dec 14. 475-3961. rit.edu.

ART | “ASINA/FAMILIAR” AT RIT SPAS GALLERY

Turkey may not be a country that is constantly on the minds of Americans, but we know it through familiar points of history and stories, including the Trojan War, Noah’s Ark landing on Mount Ararat, St. Nicholas (who became the bishop of Demre before becoming a child’s myth), and the home of a city that inspired a rather catchy tune by They Might Be Giants. Learn about modern Turkish society and culture — and the impact of aggressive modernization upon it — at Rochester Institute of Technology’s SPAS Gallery’s new exhibition, “Asina/ Familiar,” which opens with a reception and artist discussion on Monday, October 29, 5-7 p.m., and will remain on view through November 16. The reception will take place in the gallery and be followed by a 7 p.m. artists’ panel in Carlson Auditorium, Chester F. Carlson Center for Imaging Science. The show includes photography and video by contemporary Turkish artists, with works by Nancy Atakan, zgl Arslan, Ipek Duben, Gl Ilgaz, Iz ztat, Burcu Yagiz Yanatarol and Roberley Bell, professor in RITs School of Photographic Arts and Sciences. The SPAS Gallery is located on the third floor of RITs Frank E. Gannett Hall, and is open to the public Mondays-Fridays 10 a.m.-4:30 p.m. and by appointment on weekends. Admission is free. For more information, call 475-2884. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY Elizabeth Lyons Sculpture. Tuesdays-Sundays. Nazareth College Arts Center Gallery, 4245 East Ave. Through Oct 28. Tue-Thu 12-5 p.m., Fri-Sat 12-8 p.m., Sun 12-5 p.m. 3892093. artscenter.naz.edu. The Exquisite Corpse. Oct. 26-Nov. 29. Outside the Box Art Gallery, 6 North Main St. Continues through Nov. 29. Opening night 5-9 p.m. 3770132. outsidetheboxag.com. “Fabulous Fall” Exhibition. Through Nov. 4. Pat Rini Rohrer Gallery, 71 S Main St. 3940030. prrgallery.com. “Feathers, Fantasy, and Film” by Linda DeVeronica, Doris Britt, and Elaine Doe. Through Oct. 31. Books Etc., 78 W. Main St. Call for hours. 474-4116. books_etc@yahoo.com. “The Finger Lakes: Above and Below” by Gloria Betlam. Through Oct. 30. Livingston Arts Center, 4 Murray Hill Dr. 243-6785. “Golden Age” by Neal McDannel. Through Oct. 31. Equal=Grounds, 750 South Ave. Through October 31. gallery@ equalgrounds.com. “Imitating Life” featuring Tyrus Clutter/Sarah Morgan. Mondays-Saturdays, 1-4 p.m. Davison Gallery, Cultural Life Center, Roberts Wesleyan College, 2301 Westside Dr.

Continues through Nov 2. 594-6442. “In Company with Angels: Seven Rediscovered Tiffany Windows.” Wednesdays-Sundays. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. Wed-Sun 11 a.m.-5 p.m., Thu until 9 p.m. 276-8900. mag. rochester.edu. “It’s Hardly Noticeable” by John William Keedy. MondaysSaturdays. Community Darkroom Gallery, 713 Monroe Ave. Mon 9 a.m.-9:30 p.m., Tue-Thu 9 a.m.6:30 p.m., Fri 12-5 p.m.Sat 10 a.m.-5:30 p.m. 271-5920. geneseearts.org. Majestic Landscapes and Figures of Intrigue. TuesdaysSaturdays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Nan Miller Gallery, 3450 Winton Place. 292-1430. nanmillergallery.com. Man Crafts. Through Oct. 31, 6-9 p.m. Record Archive, 33 1/3 Rockwood St. Continues through Oct 31. man-crafts. com. recordarchive.com. “Me Pix: Picturing Ourselves in video and photography.” Wednesdays-Sundays, 1-5 p.m. Rochester Contemporary Arts Center, 137 East Ave. Through Nov 18. 461-2222. rochestercontemporary.org. “Near and Far: Landscapes” by Kurt Brownell. Through continues on page 26

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a.m.-7 p.m., Sat-Sun noon-5 p.m. blogs.rochester.edu/ hartnett.

Art Events [ Wed., October 24 ] “’Scapes Unlimited” Artist Talk. Wed., Oct. 24, 6:308:30 p.m. I-Square Visions, 693 Titus Ave. 738-0567.

THEATER | “Hermes”

In an age when the puppet masters behind global financial collapses pay fewer and fewer consequences and commit class warfare on everyone else, artists and writers will sometimes dream up a little retribution. Bennett Fisher’s “Hermes” is inspired in part by the role global investment banking and securities firm Goldman Sachs played in the current Greek economic collapse. Bread & Water Theatre will present the play, which follows four derivative traders seeking to benefit from the Greek financial meltdown, but their acts of greed and deceit bring unexpected consequences when they attract the attention of Hermes, Greek god of commerce, thieves, and fraud, who, according to B&WT’s provided info, “goads them into bolder action through slippery logic, tantalizing visions of immense wealth, and an occasional punch in the balls.” “Hermes” opens Friday, October 26, at 8 p.m. at 243 Rosedale St. The show will continue Fridays-Saturdays at 8 p.m., and Sundays at 2 p.m. through November 18. Tickets are $12 or $6 for students and seniors. To purchase tickets or learn more, call 271-5523 or visit breadandwatertheatre.org. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY

Art Exhibits Oct. 26. Williams-Insalaco Gallery at FLCC, 3325 Marvin Sands Dr. Mon-Thu 8:30 a.m.-9 p.m., Fri 8:30 a.m.5 p.m., Sat-Sun 12-5 p.m. 785-1369. gallery34@flcc. edu. “Neon Grey.” Through Nov. 1. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. THE LOBBY presents artwork by Matt Ely & Zach Dietl. lobbydigital@gmail.com. lobbydigital.com. “Painting Tuscany.” Through Dec. 1. Mill Art Center & Gallery, 61 N Main St. Through December 1. millartcenter.com. Penfield Art Association/ Legacy at Willow Pond 8th Annual Autumn Show. Closing reception Oct 26, 7-9 p.m. penfieldartassociation.com. “Pidicules” A Bachelor of Rine Arts Senior Exhibition by William Fleth. MondaysFridays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. West Side Gallery, SUNY Brockport, 180 Holley St. Through Nov 1. brockport.edu/finearts. “Radical Departure” by Jose Olivieri Rivera. Mercer Gallery at Monroe Communtiy College, 1000 E. Henrietta Rd. Continues through Nov 9. Hours are Mon-Thu 10 a.m.7 p.m., Fri 11 a.m.-4 p.m. monroecc.edu/go/mercer. Rochester Area Colored Pencil Club Juried Fall Art Show. Through Nov. 1. Barnes

and Noble, Pittsford Plaza. Through Nov 1. 278-7501. coloredpencilclub.org. “’Scapes Unlimited” Group Show. Through Nov. 1. ISquare Visions, 693 Titus Ave. Through November 1. Artist Talk Oct 24 6:30-8:30 p.m. 738-0567. “Selfish Portraits” by Quel Beast. Wednesdays-Sundays, 12-5 p.m. Nazareth College Colacino Gallery, 4245 East Ave. Through Oct 24. 3892093. artscenter.naz.edu. Strokes of Dopeness by Nereida Vazquez. Through Oct. 26. Tajze Wine and R&B Lounge, 139 State St. 4780159. “Susan Ferrari Rowley: New Directions”. Through Nov. 17. Axom Gallery, 176 Anderson Ave., 2nd floor, 176 Anderson Ave., 2nd floor. Through November 17. Artists’ Talk Oct 24 6:30-8:30 p.m. 2326030 x23. axomgallery.com. “This Gentleman Bamboo” by Dennis Burns. MondaysSaturdays. Ock Hee’s Gallery, 2 Lehigh St. Through Nov 24. Hours are Mon-Sat 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Reception Oct 20, 12-5 p.m. 624-4730. ockheesgallery.com. “Watermark” Photographs by Robin Germany. TuesdaysSundays, 5-7 p.m. Hartnett Gallery, Wilson Commons, University of Rochester, River Campus. Continues through Nov 4. Hours are Tue-Fri 11

26 City october 24-30, 2012

[ Thursday, October 25 ] Open Studio. Thursdays, 5:30 p.m. Pike Stained Glass Studios, Inc., 180 St. Paul Street, 2nd Floor. 546-7570. pikestainedglassstudios.com. [ Friday, October 26Sunday, October 28 ] Pop Up Weekend Artisan Fine Art Craft Show/Sale. Oct. 26-28. Old Pickle Factory, Pittsford. Fri 6-10 p.m., Sat-Sun 10 a.m.-5 p.m. 442-6114. ebotelho@ frontiernet.net. [ Saturday, October 27 ] Faith Lutheran Church Crafts Sale. Sat., Oct. 27, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Faith Lutheran Church, 2576 Browncroft Blvd. 381-3970 x16. faithyouth@ rochester.rr.com. Stella’s Halloween Party. Sat., Oct. 27, 6-10 p.m. Stella Art Gallery & Studio, 350 West Commercial St. stellaartgalleryandstudio. com.

Comedy [ Wed., October 24 ] Matt Bergman. Wed., Oct. 24, 7:30 p.m. Comedy Club, 2235 Empire Blvd. 6719080. thecomedyclub.us. [ Friday, October 26Saturday, October 27 ] Tom Simmons. Oct. 26-27, 7:30 & 10 p.m. Comedy Club, 2235 Empire Blvd. 6719080. thecomedyclub.us. [ Saturday, October 27 ] SEI Presents Random Acts. Sat., Oct. 27, 8:30 & 10 p.m. The Space, Hungerford Bldg, 1115 E. Main St., Suite 248. 209-0734. facebook.com/ SearchEngineImprov. [ Sunday, October 28 ] Carmen Vallone. Sun., Oct. 28, 7:30 p.m. Comedy Club, 2235 Empire Blvd. 6719080. thecomedyclub.us. [ Tuesday, October 30Sunday, November 4 ] Fall Back Comedy Fest. Oct. 30-Nov. 4. The Space, Hungerford Bldg, 1115 E. Main St., Suite 248. facebook.com/ SearchEngineImprov. [ Monday, October 29 ] Laughin’ Cup 2012 Show #3. Mon., Oct. 29, 8 p.m. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 12 of WNY’s best comics compete in the preliminary rounds for the third annual 2012 Laughin’ Cup title. 292-9940. lovincup.com.

Dance Events [ Saturday, October 27 ] Bollywood Music Night. Sat., Oct. 27, 7:30 p.m. Penfield High School Auditorium, 25 High School Dr., Penfield. Featuring the sweet melodious voice of Bollywood Playback singer B.R. Chaya. 248-5792. iccrochester.org. [ Saturday, October 27 ] Masquerade Ball 2012. Sat., Oct. 27, 8 p.m.midnight. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. Ages 21 and above. Please wear or purchase a mask. The dress code is cocktail attire. 461-5850. gps@ rochestercityballet.com. mag. rochester.edu. [ Thursday, October 25Sunday, October 28 ] “A Weekend in Guinea”. Oct. 25-28. Bush Mango Drum & Dance, 34 Elton St. 8209213. info@bushmango.org. bushmango.org/a-weekendin-guinea.

Kids Events [ Wed., October 24 ] The Red Party. Wed., Oct. 24, 4:30-7:30 p.m. ONE Nightclub and Lounge, 1 Ryan Alley. The City-sponsored Heart Coalition for a Drug Free Rochester and Safe Sex Inc. are inviting teen students to participate in a Red Party at the start of National Red Ribbon Week. 546-1010. cityofrochester. gov/truthaboutcityyouth. Spooky Golf. Wed., Oct. 24, 10-11 a.m. Greece Public Library, 2 Vince Tofany Blvd. Ages 3+. 225-8951. [ Wednesday, October 24-Sunday, October 28 ] Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus: Fully Charged. Oct. 24-28. Blue Cross Arena, One War Memorial Square. Wed-Fri 7 p.m., Sat 11:30 a.m., 3:30 & 7:30 p.m., Sun 1 & 5 p.m. 800-745-3000. ticketmaster.com. [ Saturday, October 27 ] Arts Festival for Families. Sat., Oct. 27, 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Greece Public Library, 2 Vince Tofany Blvd. Music, crafts, clowns, balloons, flower arranging, the Monroe County Sheriff’s Mounted Patrol, golf, food tasting. 225-8951. Musical Improvisation for Children. Sat., Oct. 27, 11:30 a.m. Central Library, Children’s Center, 115 South Ave. 428-8150. libraryweb. org. Play, Eat & Trick or Treat. Sat., Oct. 27, 11 a.m. Genesee Community College, 1 College Road. Featuring bounce houses, face painting, pumpkin painting, and indoor trick-or-treating. 343-0055. Pumpkin Decorating. Sat., Oct. 27, 12:30-4:30 p.m.

LITERATURE | Jewish Book Festival

Whether you’re of Jewish heritage or not, you’re bound to enjoy the offerings of the 20th Annual JCC Lane Dworkin Jewish Book Festival. Running from Sunday, October 28, through November 11, the festival will bring in 15 nationally and locally known authors representing a variety of literary genres. The festival starts with Randy Cohen presenting “Ticket to the Limit” on Sunday, October 28, at 7:30 p.m. in the JCC Auditorium (1200 Edgewood Ave.). As an entrepreneur, Cohen will describe the 10 principles he lives by, and how he developed his company from a tiny investment into TicketCity, voted one of the best places to work in Austin, Texas. Tickets cost $8-$11. On Monday, October 29, listen to Bruce Ferber, Emmynominated former head writer for “Home Improvement,” and David Javerbaum (pictured), former executive producer for “The Daily Show with Jon Stewart,” at “Men’s Comedy Night—Beer and Books.” At 7 p.m. at the Genesee Valley Club (421 East Ave.) the two talented comedians will discuss their books, “Elevating Overman” and “The Last Testament: A Memoir by God,” respectively. Tickets cost $25-$28. Later in the festival Jay Michaelson will speak on Thursday, November 8, at 7:30 p.m. in the JCC Auditorium (1200 Edgewood Ave.) on “God vs. Gay? The Religious Case for Equality.” Michaelson, a Bible scholar and activist who has been nominated for a 2012 Lambda Literary Award, will argue that the Bible does not prohibit homosexuality. He is the author of four books and more than 200 articles on the interrelation between religion, spirituality, sexuality, and law. Tickets cost $8-$11. For tickets to these events or for a full Book Festival schedule visit rjbf.org or call 461-2000. — BY LILLIAN DICKERSON Central Library, Children’s Center, 115 South Ave. 4288150. libraryweb.org. [ Saturday, October 27Sunday, October 28 ] Family Halloween Party. Oct. 27-28. The Strong National Museum of Play, 1 Manhattan Square. Sat 11 a.m.-4 p.m., Sun 1-4 p.m. 263-2700. thestrong.org. Trick-or-Treating in the Historic Village. Oct. 27-28, 12-5 p.m. Genesee Country Village & Museum, 1410 Flint Hill Rd. 538-6822. gcv. org. ZooBoo. Saturdays, Sundays, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Seneca Park Zoo, 2222 St. Paul St. 3367212. senecaparkzoo.org. [ Sunday, October 28 ] Family Fun Movie: Monsters, Inc. Sun., Oct. 28, 1:30 p.m. Central Library, Children’s Center, 115 South Ave. 4288150. libraryweb.org.

Trunk-or-Treat. Sun., Oct. 28, 4:30-6:30 p.m. Rush Church, 6200 Rush Lima Rd. Provides a safe atmosphere for families to bring their kids to come trick or treat. 5332170. [ Tuesday, October 30 ] Film and Program: “Dark Shadows” Tricks and Treats. Tue., Oct. 30, 2:45-4:45 p.m. Penfield Public Library, 1985 Baird Rd. Grades 9-12. 3408720 x4020. Hallow-Teen Psych Night V. Tue., Oct. 30, 7 p.m. Brighton Memorial Library, 2300 Elmwood Ave. Psychic readings; palm readings; make a spooky craft; enjoy treats. Come in costume for a chance to win gift cards and book prizes. 784-5300. brightonlibrary.org. Mysterious World of Spiders. Tue., Oct. 30, 7-8 p.m. Gates Public Library, 902 Elmgrove Rd. All ages. 247-6446.

Things that Go Bump. Tue., Oct. 30, 4-5:30 p.m. Helmer Nature Center, 154 Pinegrove Ave. Grades K-3. 336-3035. westirondequoit.org/helmer. htm. [ Wed., October 31 ] Children’s Scary Scavenger Hunt. Wed., Oct. 31, 11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Greece Public Library, 2 Vince Tofany Blvd. Ages 2 and up. Wear your costumes. 225-8951. A Merry, Not Scary, Halloween Party. Wed., Oct. 31, 10:1511:15 a.m. Gates Public Library, 902 Elmgrove Rd. Ages 1-5 with a caregiver. 247-6446. Toddler Trick-or-Treat. Wed., Oct. 31, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. The Strong National Museum of Play, 1 Manhattan Square. 263-2700. thestrong.org.

Lectures [ Wed., October 24 ] 10 Quick Tips to a Healthier You with MVP Healthcare Community Health Educator Cheryl Minchella. Wed., Oct. 24, 7 p.m. Irondequoit Library, Helen McGraw Branch, 2180 E. Ridge Rd. 336-6060. mcgrawbr@ libraryweb.org. Fashion Historian, Author John Tiffany Lecture. Wed., Oct. 24, 1:30 p.m. Genesee Community College, 1 College Road. 343-0055 x6616. dsutherland@genesee.edu. “Monticello Legacies: Jefferson, Slavery, and Race” with Annette Gordon-Reed. Wed., Oct. 24, 5 p.m. Rush Rhees Library, University of Rochester, River Campus. Hawkins-Carlson Room. rochester.edu/college/eng. The Real Good Catholic Girls with Angela Bonavoglia. Wed., Oct. 24, 5-6:30 p.m. Rush Rhees Library, University of Rochester, River Campus. rochester.edu/ college/wst/events. “The Three Reincarnations of Ireland” with Eoghan Corry. Wed., Oct. 24, 7:30 p.m. St. John Fisher College, 3690 East Ave. facebook.com/iaci. rochesterchapter. “The War of 1812: Songs and Stories from New York and Beyond,” a presentation by David Ruch. Wed., Oct. 24, 7:30 p.m. Geneva Historical Society, 543 South Main St. 315-789-5151. genevahistoricalsociety.com. [ Thursday, October 25 ] La Maison Francaise presents Tribute to Famed FrancoAmerican Singer Carole Fredericks. Thu., Oct. 25, 8 p.m. Nazareth College, 4245 East Ave. Shine: Celebrating the Life and Legacy of African-American Artist Carole Fredericks. Before the lecture, which will be in English, there will be a reception and book exhibit at 7 p.m. 389-2685. “Lost Identity: The Painful Legacy of the Native American

MUSIC/DANCE | Bollywood Music Night

Who didn’t have “Jai Ho” stuck in their head for weeks after watching “Slumdog Millionaire”? The upbeat rhythm, choral sections with shouting, and integration of English lyrics made for a catchy tune that America immediately embraced. On Saturday, October 27, the India Community Center will provide an opportunity for the public to experience Bollywood music and dance styles firsthand. At “Hindi Geetmala Bollywood Milestones,” B. R. Chaya (pictured) will perform Indian musical hits from the 1960’s to 2012. The performance will be appropriate for adults and children of all ages who enjoy music and dance. The event will take place at Penfield High School Auditorium, 25 High School Drive. Tickets cost $15-$25 and can be purchased at India Market, Spice Bazaar, Namaste, Amaya Restaurant, and at the door the day of the event. For more information, call Vasantha Ravindra at 248-5792 or visit iccrochester.org. — BY LILLIAN DICKERSON Boarding Schools”. Thu., Oct. 25, 7-9 p.m. Nazareth College Shults Center, 4245 East Ave. 742-1690. ganondagan.org/ programs/LectureSeries.html. The Presidential Election 2012 by Paul Brew. Thu., Oct. 25, 6:30-8 p.m. The Golden Gourd, 1st Floor 118 N. Main Street, Albion. 765-5943 [ Friday, October 26 ] Community Presentation by Michael Keene author of Murder, Mayhem & Madness. Fri., Oct. 26, 1 p.m. Legacy at the Fairways, 681 High St. Learn the stories behind Rochester’s first murder and other tales of crimes of passion, insanity and greed. 924-7043. [ Saturday, October 27 ] Improvisation without Inhibition with Alice Kay Kanack. Sat., Oct. 27, 1 p.m. Central Library, Kate Gleason Auditorium, 115 South Ave. Register. 428-8140. libraryweb.org. Staying Sharp. Sat., Oct. 27, 9 a.m. Hale Auditorium, Roberts Cultural Life Center, Roberts Wesleyan College, 2301 Westside Dr. 212-4011643. [ Tueday, October 30 ] The Fine Print: How Big Companies Use “Plain English” to Rob You Blind By David Cay Johnston. Tue., Oct. 30, 12:12-12:52 p.m. Central Library, Kate Gleason Auditorium, 115 South Ave. 428-8350. libraryweb.org. Opera Lecture Series: “Beginnings in the Baroque.”

Tuesdays, 1-2:30 p.m. Oasis, 259 Monroe Ave. 5 week class with Carol Crocca. 730-8800. oasisnet.org. Rock Gardening with Jerry Kral. Tue., Oct. 30, 7 p.m. Pittsford Community Library, 24 State Street, Pittsford. Master Gardener Jerry Kral will discuss rock gardening and give you a peak at his quarter-acre walk-through rock garden. 249-5481. townofpittsford.org/library.

Literary Events [ Wed., October 24 ] Scottsville Library Annual Used Book Sale. Through Oct. 24. The Scottsville Free Library, 28 Main Street, Scottsville. 18:30 p.m. 889-2023. [ Thursday, October 25 ] Author Talk & Book Signing Featuring Ross Talarico. Thu., Oct. 25, noon. Central Library, Kate Gleason Auditorium, 115 South Ave. 428-8375. libraryweb.org. [ Friday, October 26Sunday, October 28 ] The Friends of the Pittsford Library Fall 2012 Book Sale. Oct. 26-28. Pittsford Communtiy Library, 24 State St. Fri 5-8:30 p.m. Members Only, join at the door. Sat 10 a.m.5 p.m., Sun 10 a.m.-4 p.m. everything half price, closed for an hour, 5-6 p.m. fill a bar for $3. townofpittsford.org/library. [ Saturday, October 27 ] “Maritime Tales of Lake Ontario” by Susan Peterson continues on page 28 rochestercitynewspaper.com City 27

Classical

Literary Events

The original tale of “The Rape of Lucretia” was

Zachary Burgess, Siddarth Dubey, and Garrett Obrycki (left to right) in Eastman Opera Theatre’s “The Rape of Lucretia.” PHOTO BY KATE MELTON

Sins of the past “The Rape of Lucretia” By Eastman Opera Theatre Visual Studies Workshop, 31 Prince St. Thursday, October 25-Saturday, October 27, 7:30 p.m., Sunday, October 28, 2 p.m. | $10-$20 454-2100, esm.rochester.edu [ PREVIEW ] BY PALOMA CAPANNA

“I love Britten!” says Steven Daigle, chair of the voice and opera department at the Eastman School of Music, and director of the upcoming Eastman Opera Theatre production of “The Rape of Lucretia” by British composer Benjamin Britten (1913-1976). Daigle says, “It’s not that I have a handle on the opera. What I like is that it makes you ask questions. Britten is always making you think about questions, drawing you in to making intellectual choices and determinations off of what you see and hear, and to question how the theme of the piece relates to you and your own life.” Daigle’s production of the ancient tale will be set in the 21st century in the ritzy Hamptons 28 City october 24-30, 2012

area of Long Island. The opera was written by Britten in 1946 and Daigle describes it as having a “Victorian sensibility.” Daigle has been developing the concept of setting the opera in the Hamptons for more than five years, doing workshops of various scenes, and waiting for the right mix of students to come along. “The story of ‘The Rape of Lucretia’ is still fresh and vivid in our society,” says Daigle. “This idea of power and control, the oppression of women, religious institutions, and how they are supposed to protect people — all of this is still relevant today.” Daigle liked the idea of setting the opera in the Hamptons to take advantage of what he sees as the parallels between the ancient tale and the trappings of wealth, established families, politics, and the military. Daigle admires the way that Britten looked back to classical forms, such as the ancient tale of “The Rape of Lucretia,” and how he drew on older tales to parallel his own life. When Britten was writing, England was at war, church was very much part of his life, and he was a pacifist. “I try to be very conscious of the composer’s original intentions,” says Daigle. “I would hope that [Britten] would see the setting of this production as a way to access this piece by a modern audience.”

set in the 5th century B.C. in Rome, in the midst of a political power struggle. A group of soldiers are drinking and boasting of their wives. To evaluate the wives, the men surprise the wives in their homes, finding all but one of them cavorting with other men. Lucretia is spinning with her female servants, pining for her husband, Junius, to return. Lucretia’s virtue triggers the prince Tarquinius to test Lucretia, and, when she resists his advances, he forces himself upon her. Although Lucretia’s husband offers consolations, Lucretia’s sorrows overtake her, and she kills herself. Junius uses the crime by the price to ignite an uprising against the king. Britten turned “The Rape of Lucretia” into a chamber opera of eight characters, accompanied by an ensemble of 13 musicians, in two acts, lasting approximately two hours. The production is sung in English. With renovations going on at Eastman’s Kilbourn Hall, Daigle and musical director Benton Hess were forced to look at alternative venues. They selected the Visual Studies Workshop. Daigle says that seating limited to 120 at VSW will increase the intimacy of the setting and the powerful intensity of the story, and, he adds, Britten’s premiere was also mounted in a smaller, non-traditional space. Preparation for the production also included preparing the Eastman students of the cast to handle the powerful subjects of Britten’s opera. “The physicality of it is the most difficult part — we have a rape scene on stage,” says Daigle. “We have to be able to give that level of physical activity to where it makes the audience uncomfortable, but doesn’t go over that line. If you don’t have it mapped out, it can be that the emotions take over and you can forget that it’s artifice.” Daigle says that each student has his or her own way of working through the strong content; some like demonstration, some prefer discussion. “The students feel very much drawn to the story that we’re telling,” says Daigle. “We moved from a structural side into something that has organically grown. They’re willing to take more risks because the groundwork is there.” Two additional productions will be mounted by Eastman Opera Theatre this season, Handel’s “Orlando” (January 31February 3) and Weill’s “Street Scene” (April 4-7). Daigle’s discussion of the upcoming production circles back to the message of the story and the opera as one of “pain.” “There are multiple tragedies,” says Daigle. “We have to remember, ‘The Rape of Lucretia’ was created before the time of Christ, yet there’s the parallel to the Christ story — dying for sins. Lucretia sacrifices herself to get away from an evil in the world. The opera defines a tragedy and also a reaction to it.”

Gateley. Sat., Oct. 27, 10 a.m. Village Bookmarket, 207 East Main St., Palmyra. 315-597-0210. info@ VillageBookmarket.com. “Whispers to my heart: Emerging from the depths with God” Book Release Party with author Cindy Van Ostrand Blair. Sat., Oct. 27, 7-11 p.m. Gallery One Fine Arts, 2575 E. Henrietta Road. With special guest poets and musicians. 230-1081. [ Sunday, October 28 ] Poetry Reading: Claudia M. Stanek and Harold Dill. Sun., Oct. 28, 4 p.m. Books Etc., 78 W. Main St. 474-4116. books_etc@yahoo.com. [ Sunday, October 28Sunday, November 11 ] 20th Anniversary JCC Lane Dworkin Jewish Book Festival. Oct. 28-11. Events featuring Daniel Gordis, Delia Ephron, David Javerbaum, and Jay Michaelson. rjbf.org. 4612000. jccrochester.org. [ Monday, October 29 ] Screening: “Wag the Dog.” Mon., Oct. 29, 7 p.m. Writers and Books, 740 University Ave. Held as part of the Beyond Reading: The Boys on the Bus programming. 4732590 x104. wab.org.

Museum Exhibit [ Saturday, October 27Sunday, October 28 ] Lincoln’s Preliminary Emancipation Proclaimation. Oct. 27-28. Rochester Museum and Science Center, 657 East Ave. rmsc.org.

Recreation [ Wed., October 24 ] Relay for Life Greece. Wed., Oct. 24, 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Pine Brook Elementary School Gym, 2300 English Road. relayforlife.org/GreeceNY. Zumbathon for Pluta Cancer Center. Fri., Oct. 26, 6:30-9 p.m. The Midtown Athletic Club, 200 East Highland Dr. 461-2300. [ Friday, October 26 ] Celebrate Diversity! What’s Growing in Washington Grove? Fri., Oct. 26, 4-5 p.m. Cobbs Hill Park, 100 Norris Drive. Join City horticulturist Michael Warren Thomas for a tour of Washington Grove. cityofrochester.gov/ washingtongrove. Owl Prowl. Fri., Oct. 26, 7-9 p.m. Helmer Nature Center, 154 Pinegrove Ave. 3363035. westirondequoit.org/ helmer.htm. [ Friday, October 26Saturday, October 27 ] Ghost Walk: Chilling Tales from Rochester’s Past. Oct. 26-27. The first group departs at 6:30 p.m. from

the Lutheran Church of the Incarnate Word on the corner of East Avenue and Goodman Street and groups embark every 15 minutes until 9 p.m. 546-7029 x15. landmarksociety.org. Zombie Zoo. Fri., Oct. 26, 8 p.m. and Sat., Oct. 27, 8 p.m. Arrowhead Golf Course, 655 Gallup Rd. Cotton candy, popcorn, pretzels, hot cider, hard cider, beer, and much more!. 352-5500. [ Saturday, October 27 ] GVHC Hike. Sat., Oct. 27, 9 a.m. Meet at Mendon Ponds nature center lot. Moderate 4-5 mile park. 473-1869. gvhchikes.org. Halloween Extreme Bowling. Sat., Oct. 27, 3-5 p.m. AMF Empire Lanes, 2400 Empire Blvd. Lunch only $7 or lunch and bowling $15. 671-2556. “Make a Difference against Hunger” 5K walk/run. Sat., Oct. 27, 9 a.m. SUNY Brockport. 217-2433. brockportfoodshelf.org/ 5kRunWalk. [ Saturday, October 27Sunday, October 28 ] Corn Maze. Saturdays, Sundays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Genesee Country Village & Museum, 1410 Flint Hill Rd. 538-6822. gcv.org. [ Sunday, October 28 ] Al Sigl Community WalkAbout. Sun., Oct. 28. Eastview Mall. Registration 8:30 a.m., walk 9:30 a.m. 442-4102. alsigl.org. GVHC Hike. Sun., Oct. 28, 8 a.m. Meet at I-390 exit 11 park and ride lot. Strenuous 12 mile hike, Letchworth east side. 889-2724. gvhchikes.org. Pitty Love Rescue Community Pack Walk. Sun., Oct. 28, 10 a.m. genesee valley park, elmwood ave. (585) 683-5734. pittyloverescue@gmail.com. Rochester Orienteering Club Meet. Sun., Oct. 28, noon. At Oatka Creek Park, starting from the Oatka Creek Lodge. roc.us.orienteering.org.

Special Events [ Wed., October 24 ] Rochester Winos Wine and Food Pairing. Wed., Oct. 24, 6:30 p.m. TBones Steakhouse, 778 Penfield Road, Penfield. rochesterwinos.com. [ Thursday, October 25 ] Community Forum: “Another All Boys School?” Thu., Oct. 25, 6-8 p.m. Baobab Cultural Center, 728 University Ave. Dinner included. 563-2145. thebaobab.org. One World Goods 25th Anniversary Event. Thu., Oct. 25, 10 a.m.-9 p.m. One World Goods, Pittsford Plaza. owgoods.org. Women in Technology Leaders Roundtable. Thu., Oct. 25,

READ CITY ONLINE EVERY WEEK AT www.issuu.com/roccitynews

Dimitri House has been helping to feed and provide

emergency shelter for over 25 years in the City Of Rochester.

THEATER | “The Vampire Monologues”

This weekend only, Black Sheep Theatre will present its 2nd Annual Halloween Event, “An Evening of Thrills and Chills,” a selection of Halloween-inspired one-act plays, monologues, and poetic and dramatic readings, directed by Deborah Smola and Rob Hutter. This year’s featured event is the Rochester premiere of Wade Bradford’s “The Vampire Monologues,” a collection of soliloquies from the inhabitants of Morgenroth Mortuary, which doubles as a breeding ground for new vampires. The cast of characters includes Cunningham the Minion, who serves as the welcoming party for the “new bloods”; Morgenroth, the ancient vampire and part-time florist; and Aria, the 16-year-old baby vamp, who will tell the audience all about her introduction to “the life.”

Dimitri House, Inc. 102 N. Union Street Rochester, NY 14607 585-325-1796 dimitri-house.org

WE NEED YOUR HELP TO STOCK OUR EMERGENCY FOOD CUPBOARD. Our supplies are low and we would greatly appreciate your donations of non-perishable items. For more information or to set up a food drop off please contact us at 325-1796.

Together, we can continue to help those in need.

Also featured will be the one-act play “Morning Becomes Olestra,” in which a woman plots her husband’s death with the help of her vampire lover, and a one-act play by local playwright, Rob Hutter, “Say Yes to the Death,” a spoof of the popular TLC program, in which a bride goes looking for the perfect wedding gown with her dead mother in tow. Also enjoy dramatic readings from Stoker’s “Dracula,” Kafka’s “The Dream,” and Edgar Allan Poe will stop by to read some of his works. The adult-content of the show comes with a recommendation for ages 13 and over. The performances will be held at Black Sheep Theatre (274 North Goodman St, in the Village Gate, third floor, Suite D313), on Friday and Saturday, October 26-27 at 7:30 p.m., and Sunday, October 28 at 2 p.m. Tickets are $15, for more information, call 861-4816 or visit blacksheeptheatre.org.��� BY REBECCA RAFFERTY 7:30 a.m. Locust Hill Country Club, 2000 Jefferson Road. 394-0787 x3. [ Friday, October 26 ] 4th Annual Masquerade Party: Something Wicked This Way Comes. Fri., Oct. 26, 8-11 p.m. Writers and Books, 740 University Ave. Costume contest, food, games, readings. 473-2590 x107. wab.org. Fall Drag Show. Fri., Oct. 26, 8 p.m. University of Rochester, River Campus. Doors open at 7 p.m. 7276259. rochester.edu. NAACP Freedom Fund Dinner. Fri., Oct. 26, 6 p.m. Rochester Plaza Hotel, 70 State St. 773-4562. naacp.roc@gmail.com. rochesterplaza.com. One Year Anniversary of Highland Park Bodyworks. Fri., Oct. 26, 5:30-9 p.m. 249 Highland Ave. hpbodyworks.com. Zombie Walk/Wes Craven Double Feature. Fri., Oct. 26. Little Theatre, 240 East Ave. 9 p.m. Rocky Horror Picture

Zombies Walk with the Roc City Roller Derby from Java’s to Little; 10 p.m. “Nightmare on Elm St.” 11:30 p.m. “Scream.” thelittle.org. [ Friday, October 26Saturday, October 27 ] Haunted Jail & Cellblock Terror. Oct. 26-27, 6-9 p.m. Museum of Wayne County History, 21 Butternut St. 315946-4943. waynehistory.org. Mansion Mysteries: “Lights Out, Mr. E”. Fridays, Saturdays, 6:30 p.m. Sonnenberg Gardens and Mansion State Historic Park, 151 Charlotte St. 3944922. sonnenberg.org. Spirits of the Past Theatrical Tours. Fridays, Saturdays. Genesee Country Village & Museum, 1410 Flint Hill Rd. Tours depart every 10 minutes each night between 6 and 9:30 p.m. 538-6822. gcv.org. [ Friday, October 26Sunday, Octoer 28 ] Midnite Madness in Brockport. Oct. 26-28. continues on page 30 rochestercitynewspaper.com City 29

Art

Special Events Downtown Brockport. brockportny.org. Thought at Work Industrial Design Conference. Oct. 2628. Rochester Institute of Technology, 1 Lomb Memorial Dr. thoughtatwork.org.

They might be giants [ FEATURE ] BY REBECCA RAFFERTY

The newest manifestation of “Wall/Therapy” — the mural project that has resulted in more than a dozen large-scale works throughout downtown Rochester — has brought German street-art duo Herakut to Rochester to create an off-season mural at 218 Andrews Street. Herakut stayed in Rochester from October 13 through October 18 and completed a six-story image of a character for their international Giant Storybook Project, in which each wall they paint serves as a teaser for the children’s book they are planning to create with actor Jim Carrey. Herakut is made up of Hera (Jasmin Siddiqui) and Akut (Falk Lehmann), a duo that has been traveling the world to paint murals for many years, both separately and as a pair since 2004. Given their fantastical style, many people have been asking when the pair would do children’s work, says Dave Sheldon of Clandestine Management, a Californiabased company that manages the artists. “They had a story in mind already, and [were] putting some characters together, and said, why not try to create a children’s book about this?” Herakut decided to introduce some of the characters through their international mural-making. The Giant Storybook Project launched this year and will continue through the winter of 2013. The artists’ first connection with Carrey came when they were commissioned to create a piece for his backyard, says Caspar Martin, also of Clandestine Management. “They were both really inspired by the collaborative process. Jasmine and Falk have been working on this story for a while now, and working with Jim on expanding it,” he says. The Giant Storybook Project is planned to culminate with a print piece, says Akut. “We will make something like a graphic-novel illustration book,” and are creating as many murals as possible, which will be the ground for the illustration work, he says. “These murals are not necessarily going to be page-for-page illustrations in the book,” says Sheldon, “they are going to be inspirations for scenes.” During the painting process and after the work is finished, Akut painstakingly documents the murals, which will be digitally manipulated for such considerations as character uniformity. Though the pair possessed their street

names before uniting, it’s interesting to note the significance of their names when considering the way they work together. 30 City october 24-30, 2012

Hera, the name of a goddess, is the shaper of the images, and Akut, which is German for acute, is the detailer. After painting in Rochester, Herakut planned to paint two walls in San Francisco, then two more in Miami, one of which is six stories tall, a bit wider than the Rochester work. The largest wall they’ve painted thus far was in Mexico earlier this year, with a character whose eye was the size of the massive face on the character they have painted in Rochester. The heavily stylized character they painted in the St. Paul district is visible from afar, and captivating up close. A man stands cradling a tree in one hand, his own arms guided by silvery limbs emerging from an amorphous spirit that also manifests as a snarling lion’s head above his own. A deer stands beside the giant, wary and seemingly about to sprint away, and a squirrel has launched itself from the tree, shaking leaves loose. Spirit-serpents emerge from the silver mass to snap after the mammal. The man’s face has darkened around his eyes, and the work shimmers with potentially vicious power. “Our children’s book is about creative energy,” says Hera. The project encompasses small things, such as the languages that children make up, and the larger ways in which they create and dwell within their own worlds. The characters include a little girl, Lily, a creative teenager, Jay, and two giants “who are basically in charge of the world, of finding a balance there,” says Hera. The Rochester mural depicts one of the giants from the story. “His creative power is a bit more destructive than what a kid could come up with,” says Hera. “He’s at this point with his strength, his powers, with his size… You know, it can be really helpful, what he does, but also really destructive. That whole thing with playing with fire — his power is maybe taking over. That’s why you can see the creative spirit, that’s the silver creature around him, not only guiding him, but maybe already has taken over. We’ll add writing, we haven’t quite figured out the right words.” But, she says, it will be something along lines of, “You had better control your power before your power controls you.”

A Synthesis Collaborative update

In December, Dr. Ian Wilson, co-founder of Synthesis Collaborative and founder of “Wall/Therapy,” will travel to Haiti with a delegation from the Hope Haiti foundation, a Rochester-based non-

The new mural at 218 Andrews Street, by German street-art duo Herakut, is part of the continuing “Wall/ Therapy” initiative. This piece is also part of a global mural series that may turn into a graphic novel written by actor Jim Carrey. PHOTO BY MATT DETURCK

profit that supports healthcare systems in Borgne, Haiti. The team plans to evaluate the hospital in Borgne to assess its needs for diagnostic imaging and also evaluate process to figure out how best to implement the diagnostic imaging initiative called IMPACT, which stands for Improving Access to Care by Teleradiology. Wilson will also present on “Wall/Therapy” at TEDx on November 5 at Geva Theatre. Wilson has been following the work of Herakut for several years, and met the artists when he attended an art opening for their show in London in late May of this year. Wilson traveled with them to Bristol U.K. for Upfest, where they painted. In July, Wilson brought Hera’s brother-in-law, Case, to paint in Rochester during the summer “Wall/Therapy” initiative. When Wilson wanted to bring Herakut to Rochester in the off-season, local property owner Daniel Morgenstern was ready with another brick canvas on Andrews Street. The print project documenting “Wall/ Therapy,” sponsored by Partners + Napier, is projected to be complete by early December. This “augmented reality project” includes print media with links to digital content that explains the murals and articulates the common thread between the mural project and the medical philanthropy, says Wilson. For more information, visit wall-therapy.com

[ Saturday, October 27 ] The Barn Owl Grand Opening. Sat., Oct. 27, 11 a.m. The Barn Owl, 1807 Penfield Rd. Join us for naturecentered, family friendly activities, including crafts, a live bird program, door prizes, and more. 282-0620. thebarnowlonline.com. Craft and Gift Bazaar. Sat., Oct. 27, 9 a.m. 2732 Culver Rd. 752-4613. Fall Craft and Gift Bazaar. Sat., Oct. 27, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Blessed Kateri’s Parish, 2732 Culver Rd. Hand-made gifts as well as commercial venders. 752-4613. Halloween Costume Bash with Palmyra Pirates. Sat., Oct. 27, 7 p.m.-midnight. Palmyra’s American Legion Post 120. eriecanalpirates.com. The Haunted Brewery. Sat., Oct. 27, 5-9 p.m. Custom Brewcrafters, 300 Village Square Blvd., Honeoye Falls. cbsbrewing.com. Train Ride: Special Excursion Trip on the Livonia, Avon, & Lakeville Railroad. Sat., Oct. 27, 11 a.m. Boarding will take place at the Conesus Lake Sportsman’s Club located at 5883 Stone Hill Road in Lakeville. 5331431. rgvrrm.org. World’s Greatest Garage Sale. Sat., Oct. 27, 8 a.m.-3 p.m. The Fair & Expo Center, 2695 East Henrietta Rd. 334-4000. fairandexpocenter.org [ Saturday, October 27Sunday, October 28 ] 2012 Howl-O-Ween Fest and Pup Parade. Oct. 2728. Sat PetSaver Superstore in Brighton (2947 Monroe Ave), 242-0808; Sun PetSaver Superstore in Greece (1596 Ridge Road West) 621-0890. a.pgtb. me/19JJ4k. “The Phantom of the Opera” Screening with Live Organ Music. Sat., Oct. 27, 7:30 p.m. Wesley United Methodist Church, 2009 Dewey Ave. Doors at 6:30 p.m. 6630190. Pit Bull Community Outreach Event. Sat., Oct. 27, 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Kmart Plaza, 999 E. Ridge Rd. pittyloverescue.org. The Rochester T’ai Chi Ch’uan Center Open House. Sat., Oct. 27, 11 a.m.-noon and Mon., Oct. 29, 6-8 p.m. Rochester T’ai Chi Ch’uan Center, 80 Rockwood Place. 461-0130. rtccc.com. [ Sunday, October 28 ] “What Rochester’s Wearing” Fashion Show. Sun., Oct.

28, 5:30-8:30 p.m. Mario’s, 2740 Monroe Ave. 271-1111. rochesterymca.org/fashionshow.

JCC Rochester, 1200 Edgewood Ave. Thu 7 p.m., Sat 8 p.m., Sun 2 p.m. 461-2000. jcccenterstage.org.

[ Monday, October 29 ] Paranormal Reveal of the Phelps Art Center with Haunted ROC Paranormal. Mon., Oct. 29, 7 p.m. Phelps Art Center, 15 Church St., Phelps. hauntedrocparanormal.com. WXXI Screening: “As Goes Janesville”. Mon., Oct. 29, 7 p.m. Little Theatre, 240 East Ave. wxxi.org/communitycinema. [ Tuesday, October 30 ] Action for a Better Community Signature Luncheon. Tue., Oct. 30, 12-1:30 p.m. Hyatt Regency Rochester, 125 E. Main St. Keynote by Jeff Johnson. 325-5116. abcinfo.org. Bruce Springsteen PreConcert Party at Genesee Brew House. Tue., Oct. 30, 3 p.m. The Genesee Brew House, 25 Cataract St. To take advantage of drink specials and be entered to win a pair of concert tickets, guests are asked to bring a canned good or monetary donation for Foodlink. 5461030. geneseebeer.com/brewhouse.

Theater 20,000 Leagues Under The Sea. Wed., Oct. 31, 7 p.m. Geva Theatre Center, 75 Woodbury Blvd. 232-4382. gevatheatre.org. Back to the 80s.. the Totally Awesome Musical. FridaysSundays. A Magical Journey Through Stages, Auditorium Center, 875 E. Main St. Fri-Sat 7:30 p.m., Sun 2 p.m. 9357173. mjtstages.com/shows/ onstage.html. “Bad Seed.” Fridays-Sundays. School of the Arts, 45 Prince St. Through November 4. Fri 7 p.m., Sat 2 & 7 p.m., Sun 5 p.m. 3253434. sotarochester.org. “The Brockport ChainLetter Massacre.” Fridays, Saturdays, 7:30 p.m. Sweden Senior Center, 133 State St., Brockport. Through Nov 3. Doors at 7 p.m. 637-5656. “The (Curious Case of the) Watson Intelligence.” Thu., Oct. 25, 7 p.m. Geva Theatre Center, 75 Woodbury Blvd. 232-4382. gevatheatre.org. “Dog Sees God.” Oct. 26-28. Genesee Community College, 1 College Road. Genesee Center for the Arts at GCC. Thu-Sat 7:30 p.m., Sun 2 p.m. 345-6814. genesee.edu/ campuslife/arts/tickets/cfm. “An Evening of Thrills and Chills.” Oct. 26-28. Black Sheep Theatre, 274 N Goodman St., third floor, Studio D313. Fri-Sat 7:30 p.m., Sun 2 p.m. Includes “The Vampire Monologues,” “Morning Becomes Olestra,” “Say Yes to the Death,” and dramatic readings. Subject matter is not suitable for children under 13. 861-4816. tickets@blacksheeptheatre. org. blacksheeptheatre.org.

Theater Audition Motherhood: The Musical. Downstairs Cabaret at Winton Place, 3450 Winton Place. Make appointment for audition. admin@downstairscabaret.com. downstairscabaret.com.

Workshops THEATER | Festival of New Theatre

Although many of us know Geva Theatre for bringing classics like “Sweeney Todd” and “A Christmas Carol” to Rochester, the theater also hosts an annual Festival of New Theatre to showcase up-and-coming talent. From October 25 to November 4 four new works for stage and six short plays by young writers will be introduced to the public. Writers come from across the country, as well as Rochester’s backyard, including a Young Writer’s Showcase of 10-minute plays by Rochester teens. A new spin on an old classic, “The (Curious Case of the) Watson Intelligence” takes Sherlock Holmes’ sidekick and gives him a 21st century makeover. In Madeleine George’s play, which will run on Thursday, October 25, at 7 p.m., Watson is not only assistant to Holmes, he is an artificial intelligence computer, Jeopardy champion, and IT technician. When he falls in love, the question of love’s veracity comes into play, and is complicated by his own technology. In addition to traditional plays with live actors, a play held on Halloween will include puppetry and projections. On Wednesday, October 31 at 7 p.m. “20,000 Leagues Under The Sea” by Sean Daniels, Jon Ludwig, and Jason Hines will depict Jules Verne’s 1870 science-fiction classic with the help of a variety of effects to illustrate Captain Nemo’s “watery prison.” Other plays being performed include “Chat” by Tanya Barfield at 7 p.m. on Friday, November 2, and Sunday, November 4, and “Stop the Presses” by David Andreatta on Saturday, November 3, at 7 p.m. All plays will be held in the Nextstage at Geva Theatre (75 Woodbury Blvd.) and are free to attend. They will be presented informally, with script-in-hand format and followed by a discussion with the playwright (with the exception of the Young Writer’s Showcase, taking place on Saturday and Sunday, October 27-27, at 3 p.m.). Reservations required, limit of two tickets per person. Call 232-4382 or visit gevatheatre.org for more information. — BY LILLIAN DICKERSON “Freud’s Last Session.” Oct. 24-31. Geva Theatre Center, 75 Woodbury Blvd. Continues through Nov 11. Wed Oct 24Thu 7:30 p.m., Fri 8 p.m., Sat 4 & 8:30 p.m., Sun 2 p.m. (Sunday Salon) and 7 p.m., Tue 7:30 p.m., Wed Oct 31 2 & 7:30 p.m. 232-4382. gevatheatre.org. “Hermes.” Fridays-Sundays. Bread & Water Theatre, 243 Rosedale St. Through November 18. Fri-Sat 8 p.m., Sun 2 p.m. 271-5523. breadandwatertheatre.org. “Mad Forest.” Fridays-Sundays. Nazareth College Arts Center, 4245 East Ave. Through Oct 28. Fri-Sat 8 p.m., Sun 2 p.m. 3892170. artscenter.naz.edu. “Motherhood: The Musical”. Thursdays-Sundays. Downstairs

Cabaret at Winton Place, 3450 Winton Place. Previews Thu 7 p.m., Fri-Sat 8 p.m., Opening Sun 6 p.m., Ongoing schedule through Nov 18: Thu 7 p.m., Fri 8 p.m., Sat 5 & 8:30 p.m., Sun 3 p.m. 325-4370. downstairscabaret.com. “The Rape of Lucretia.” Oct. 2528. Visual Studies Workshop, 31 Prince Street. Eastman Opera Theatre. Thu-Sat 7:30 p.m., Sun 2 p.m. 454-2100. esm.rochester. edu/concerts/tickets.php. Shakespeare’s “The Tempest.” Thursdays-Sundays. MuCCC, 142 Atlantic Ave. Rochester Community Players. Through November 10. Thu-Sat 8 p.m., Sun 2 p.m. 244-0960. muccc.org. “Working, a musical.” Thursdays, Saturdays, Sundays.

[ Wed., October 24 ] Family Development Class: “Wise Choices.” Wed., Oct. 24, 12:30-2:30 p.m. Mental Health Association, 320 N Goodman St. For parents of school age children. Refreshments. Door prizes. 325-3145 x131. mharochester.org. [ Saturday, October 27 ] Bat House Builder’s Workshop. Sat., Oct. 27, 10 a.m.-noon. Sterling Nature Center, 15380 Jenzvold Rd. 315947-6143. snc@co.cayuga. ny.us. facebook.com/ sterlingnaturecenter. Integrative Approaches to Mental Health. Sat., Oct. 27, 8 a.m. Rochester General Hospital, Twig Auditorium, 1425 Portland Ave. 922-1484. Introduction to Nonviolence. Sat., Oct. 27, 10 a.m.3 p.m. Gandhi Institute for Nonviolence, 929 S. Plymouth Ave. 276-4962. gpayne2@ur.rochester.edu. gandhiinstitute.org. My Years with the Met. Sat., Oct. 27, 5-8:30 p.m. Nazareth College, 4245 East Ave. Meet and Greet and Master Class with renowned Metropolitan Opera coach Gildo DiNunzio,. showtix4u.com. [ Sunday, October 28 ] Forcing Bulbs and Branches for Winter-to-Spring Bloom. Sun., Oct. 28, 2 p.m. Wayside Garden Center, 124 Pittsford-Palmyra Rd. 223-1222 x100. trish@ waysidegardencenter.com. waysidegardencenter.com. [ Monday, October 29 ] Family Development Class: “It’s So Much Work to Be Your Friend.” Mon., Oct. 29, 12:30-2:30 p.m. Mental Health Association, 320 N Goodman St. For parents of school age children. Refreshments. Door prizes. 325-3145 x131. mharochester.org. [ Tuesday, October 30 ] Rock Gardening. Tue., Oct. 30, 7 p.m. Pittsford Community Library, 24 State Street, Pittsford. 249-5481. townofpittsford.org/library.

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rochestercitynewspaper.com City 31

Halloween

[ EVENTS ] COMPILED BY LILLIAN DICKERSON

Halloween is here once again, and this year it falls on a Wednesday. That means practically an entire week of spooky and/or sexy events. So grab your costume, grab your friends, and check out some of the offerings below. If we missed an event, please post it in the comments section of this article at rochestercitynewspaper.com or e-mail eric@rochester-citynews.com.

Wednesday, October 24 [Theater] “Evil Dead: The Musical.” Zombies! Blood! Bad jokes! A musical adapted from cult classics “Evil Dead 1,” “Evil Dead 2,” and “Army of Darkness.” 8 p.m. Free. Continues through Saturday, October 27. Ingle Auditorium, RIT campus, 1 Lomb Memorial Drive. events.rit.edu.

Thursday, October 25 [Haunted House] Haunted Hayrides of Greater Rochester. 35-minute hay wagon ride through the woods of the De Fisher Fruit Farms across 40 acres of thrills and terrors. 7 p.m.9:30 p.m. Continues through October 28. 3329 Eddy Road, Williamson. $15-$20. 423-2991, hauntedhayridesrochester.com. [Haunted House] Nightmare Manor. 7:30-9:30 p.m. Continues through October 31. Southtown Plaza, 3333 W. Henrietta Road. $13-$24. nightmaremanor.com. [Haunted House] Warehouse of Biowar. Walk-through maze that simulates society’s fragmented infrastructure in a postapocalyptic setting. 7-11 p.m. or later. Continues through October 31. 1290 University Ave. $12. cayoindustrial.com. [Music] Fright Jam — CA$H OUT, Driicky Graham. Pre-Halloween party with hip-hop/rap acts. 8 p.m. $20-$30. Main Street Armory, 900 E. Main St. 232-3221, rochestermainstreetarmory.com. [Party] Monster Mash-Up 6 Halloween Costume Party. Featuring music by BRO SAFARI, Papi Chulo, Mario Bee, and others. 9 p.m.-2 a.m. $5 cover for 21 and over, $15 for 18-20. Dub Land Underground, 315 Alexander St. 232-7550. [Special Event] “Night of the Living Wedge” Halloween Pub Crawl. Experience tricks and treats at every stop. $100 prize for best costume, raffles for gift certificates, giveaways. 7 p.m. in the South Wedge. southwedge.com. [Special Event] Savers Halloween Costume Catwalk. Fashion show showcasing top costume trends. 3 p.m. 1175 Marketplace Drive, Henrietta; 980 Ridge Road, Webster. 424-4487. savers.com. [Theater] “Evil Dead: The Musical.” See Wednesday listing. Ingle Auditorium, RIT, 1 Lomb Memorial Drive. 8 p.m. Free. events.rit.edu.

Friday, October 26 [Film] Horror Events at the Little Theatre. Zombie Walk with the

Roc City Roller Derby from Java’s to the Little Theatre (240 East Ave.) at 9 p.m. Theme: “Rocky Horror Picture Zombies.” Wes Craven Double Feature: “Nightmare on Elm Street” (10 p.m.) and “Scream” (11:30 p.m.). $5/film. thelittle.org. [Haunted House] Verhulst Haunted Hayride. Hayrides begin at dusk and last about 40 minutes. Last wagon leaves at 9:30 p.m. Not recommended for children 7 years and under. Continues through Sunday, October 28. 5161 W. Ridge Road, Spencerport. $15. 352-8484, verhulsthauntedhayride.com. [Haunted House] Haunted House of Rochester. Continues through October 31. 6:30-11 p.m. $12. 1592 Qualtrough Road. 671-2850, hauntedhouseofhorrors.com. [Haunted House] Nightmare Manor. See Thursday listing. Southtown Plaza, 3333 W. Henrietta Road. 7:30 p.m.-12:30 a.m. $13-$24. nightmaremanor. com. [Hayrides] Haunted Hayrides of Greater Rochester. See Thursday listing. 7-10:30 p.m. $15-$17. 3329 Eddy Road., Williamson. 423-2991, hauntedhayridesrochester.com. [Party] Writers & Books 4th Annual Masquerade Party: Something Wicked This Way Comes. Food, drinks, entertainment, prizes, and costume contests. 704 University Ave. 8-11 p.m. $12-$15. 4732590 ext. 105, wab.org. [Special Event] CAB and RIT Storytellers Present: Ghost Story Night. RIT Storytellers present some of their greatest stories, complete with s’mores to share. 9:30-11 p.m. SAU 4 Fireside Lounge, RIT Campus, 1 Lomb Memorial Drive. events.rit.edu. [Special Event] Ghost Walk 2012. Hosted by Landmark Society of Western NY. Doors open at 6:15 p.m. and tours end at 9 p.m. Start at Lutheran Church of the Incarnate Word (597 East Ave.). Tickets $12-$17 in advance. Continues on Saturday. Call 546-7029 x11, or visit landmarksociety.org. [Special Event] Halloween Obstacle Course Competition. Don your favorite costume and test out your fitness skills against an obstacle course. Kids’ course from 5-6 p.m., adult course 6-9 p.m. $10 admission, or $5 with a costume. Rochester Parkour Gym, 121 Lincoln Ave. 204-7537. rochesterparkour.com. [Special Event] Midnight Madness. Events start in downtown

32 City october 24-30, 2012

Brockport at 6 p.m. with the costume parade. Games, crafts, goodies, and discounts. brockportny.org. [Special Event] Spirits of the Past Theatrical Tours. Iconic tales of 19th century horror come alive in the historic Genesee Country Village (1410 Flint Hill Road, Mumford). Continues Saturday, October 27. Tours depart every 10 minutes 6-9 p.m. $14-$16. Reservations required: 5386822, gcv.org. [Special Event] Warehouse of Biowar. See Thursday listing. 7-11 p.m. or later. $12. 1290 University Ave. cayoindustrial.com. [Theater] “An Evening of Thrills and Chills.” Halloween-inspired one-act plays, monologues, poetry, and dramatic readings with an adult theme. Continues through Sunday. 7:30 p.m. Black Sheep Theatre (274 N. Goodman St., Village Gate). $15. 861-4816, blacksheeptheatre.org. [Theater] “Evil Dead: The Musical.” See Wednesday listing. 8 p.m. Free. Ingle Auditorium, RIT campus, 1 Lomb Memorial Drive. events.rit.edu.

Saturday, October 27 [Film] “Carrie.” Dryden Theatre, George Eastman House (900 East Ave.) 8 p.m. $6-$8. Continues Sunday, October 28. 271-3361, dryden.eastmanhouse.org. [Haunted House] Haunted Hayrides of Greater Rochester. See Thursday listing. 3329 Eddy Road, Williamson. 7-10:30 p.m. $18-$20. 423-2991, hauntedhayridesrochester.com. [Haunted House] Haunted House of Rochester. See Friday listing. 1592 Qualtrough Road. 6:30-11 p.m. $12. 671-2850, hauntedhouseofhorrors.com. [Haunted House] Nightmare Manor. See Thursday listing. Southtown Plaza, 3333 W. Henrietta Road. 7:30 p.m.-12:30 a.m. $13-$24. nightmaremanor.com. [Haunted House] Verhulst Haunted Hayride. See Friday listing. 5161 W. Ridge Road, Spencerport. Last wagon leaves at 9:30 p.m. $15. 352-8484, verhulsthauntedhayride.com. [Haunted House] Warehouse of Biowar. See Thursday listing. 1290 University Ave. 7-11 p.m. or later. cayoindustrial.com. [Music] Ghostfeeder at The California Brew Haus. Ring in Halloween with the eerie sounds of this electronica/alternative rock band. 402 W. Ridge Road. Doors 5:30 p.m. $7. All ages. 621-1480.

[Music] Halloween Bash with Gonculator and DJ Too Chill. Costume contest and prizes to live music provided by Gonculator and DJ Too Chill. Dub Land Underground, 315 Alexander St. 9:30 p.m. $10$20. 232-7550, facebook.com/ dublandunderground. [Music] Naughty or Nice Halloween Bash with the Greener Grass Band, The Swooners. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Drive. 9 p.m. $3-$5. 292-9940, lovincup.com. [Music] Halloween Bash with North Side Johnny. Live music at Shooters Sports Bar & Grill, 1226 Fairport Road. 10 p.m. 385-9777, shootersny.com. [Music] Halloween Costume Party, Part 1. Come dressed in your costume. Live music by The Infrared Radiation Orchestra and Anonymous Willpower. 9:30 p.m. $5-$7. Abilene Bar and Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230, abilenebarandlounge.com. [Music] Halloween Party with Jumbo Shrimp. Johnny’s Irish Pub, 1382 Culver Road. 8 p.m. No cover. 2240990, johnnysirishpub.com. [Music] Halloween Spooktacular Concert: “Welcome to My Nightmare” presented by the University of Rochester Brass Choir. Rock, metal, and pop arrangements for brass by musicians like Alice Cooper and Black Sabbath. Strong Auditorium, University of Rochester. 8 p.m. Free. 2735157, rochester.edu/calendar. [Music] Rochester Academy of Music & Arts Halloween Spooktacular. Music from Nevergreen, Me & the Boyz, and Hungness. Costume contest, candy, creepy games, and more. Boulder Coffee Co., 100 Alexander St. 7 p.m. Free. 454-7140, bouldercoffeeco.com. [Music] Skycoasters/Pelican’s Nest Annual Halloween Bash. Halloween party with free munchies all night, cash prize for best costume, and other giveaways. 9:30 p.m.-1:30 a.m. Pelican’s Nest Restaurant, 566 River St. 663-5910, pelicansnestrestaurant.com. [Music] Teagan & The Tweeds Dino BBQ Halloween Bash. Live music with Teagan & The Tweeds, and Dino prizes for best costumes. Dinosaur Bar-B-Que, 99 Court St. 10 p.m. 325-7090, dinosaurbarbque.com. [Party] Adult Halloween Party. Costumes encouraged, chocolate samplings, snacks. At Affaire de Chocolat, 1769 Penfield Road. 6-9 p.m. 387-9111. affairedechocolat.com. [Party] Freeride and Halloween Party. Jeffrey’s Bar, 3115 E. Henrietta Road. 9 p.m.-midnight. 486-4937. jeffreysbar.com. [Party] Halloween at Marshall St. Bar and Grill. Drink and food specials starting at 8 p.m.; giveaways for the best costumes.

81 Marshall St. 325-2191. marshallstreetbarandgrill.com. [Party] Halloween Bash at One Nightclub. Doors open 10 p.m. Featuring DJ Richie Salvaggio and DJ Kalifornia. 1 Ryan Alley. $5 cover. 546-1010. oneclublife.com. [Party] Halloween Bash Variety Show and Costume Party. If you have an act or a costume, join the Flying Squirrel Community Space (285 Clarissa St.). 7-11 p.m. Donations appreciated. 678-6870, thesquirrel.org. [Party] Lux Halloween Party. Costume contest, games, drink specials. Lux Lounge, 666 South Ave. 9 p.m. lux666.com. [Party] Monster’s Ball/Wolves & Witches/Ghosts and Goblins. Multivenue party at Heat Nightclub (336 East Ave.), Whiskey River (6 Lawrence St.), and Grotto (7 Lawrence St.) Festivities start at 9 p.m. $10 cover for 18 and over, $5 for 21 and over; grants admission to all venues. 899-0620, facebook. com/heatnightclub. [Party] Rochester Zumba Halloween Fundraiser. Jam out while doing some zumba Halloween-style. Costumes encouraged. Zudio Dance Fitness (2090 S. Clinton Ave.). 1-3 p.m. $10 suggested donation. 454-9405, facebook. com/events/125120104303602. [Party] Sea Breeze Volunteer Fire Association Halloween Costume Party. Costume contest and dancing with draft beer, wine, fountain drinks, and finger foods. Sea Breeze Volunteer Fire Association, 4657 Culver Rdoa. Doors open at 6 p.m., buffet dinner at 7 p.m. $25-$30. 831-7236. [Party] Skylark Octubre 27. DJ dance party with Muerto Motora, Mdot Coop, Thievin’ Stephen, and Lord Crow. Skylark Lounge, 40 S. Union St. 10 p.m.-2 a.m. 2708106. theskylarklounge.com. [Special Event] 2012 Howl-O-Ween Fest and Pup Parade. Pet parade and costume contest. Proceeds will benefit The American Cancer Society. PetSaver Superstore in Brighton, 2947 Monroe Ave. 1-3 p.m. $10. Continues Sunday, October 28 at the Greece store location. 242-0808, facebook. com/petsaver. [Special Event] 3rd Annual Rochester City Ballet Masquerade Ball. Evening of dance, masks, cocktail attire, wine, beer, and bistro fare. Hosted by the Good Pointe Society. 8 p.m.-midnight. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. $50-$60/person. 461-5850, rochestercityballet.com. [Special Event] Annual Fall Psychic Fair. $1/minute for readings; come in costume and get 10 percent off purchase. Continues Sunday, October 28. Psychic’s Thyme, 439 Monroe Ave. Noon-6 p.m. 4734230, psychicsthyme.com. [Special Event] English Country Dance Masquerade Ball. Presented by Country Dances of Rochester.

Dance review 4-5 p.m., potluck 5-6 p.m., ball 6-9:30 p.m. with music by Serendipity. Costumes/ masks encouraged. First Baptist Church of Rochester, 175 Allens Creek Road. $20. 328-3041, rochestercontra.com. [Special Event] Family Halloween Party. Come in costume and enjoy the hilarious antics of Hillby the Skinny German Juggling Boy. Continues Sunday, October 28. 11 a.m.-4 p.m. National Museum of Play, 1 Manhattan Square. Free$13. 263-2700, museumofplay.org. [Special Event] Ghost Walk 2012. See Friday listing. Doors open at 6:15 p.m. and tours end at 9 p.m. Tours start at Lutheran Church of the Incarnate Word (597 East Ave.). $17 advance. 546-7029 x11, landmarksociety.org. [Special Event] Halloween Costume Bash with Palmyra Pirates. Hors d’oeuvres, libations, and dance music by DJ Stinkeye the Pirate. Costumes welcome, but not required. Palmyra American Legion Post 120, 128 Cuyler St., Palmyra. 7 p.m.-midnight. $10. 315-5970011, eriecanalpirates.com. [Special Event] Halloween Youth Event at AMF Empire Lanes. Guessing games, costume contest, trick-or-treating, bowling. Lunch with pizza, donuts, apple cider, and soda. 2400 Empire Blvd. 3-5 p.m. $7/lunch only, $15/lunch and bowling. 671-2556, amf.com. [Special Event] Haunted Brewery Tour at Custom BrewCrafters. From 5-9 p.m. the brewery will be “bewitched” with mischief and mayhem. 300 Village Square Blvd, Honeoye Falls. $15, includes tour, free tasting card or pint of beer, and $5 off food purchases. 6244386. cbsbrewing.com. [Special Event] Pumpkins in the Park 5K and Kids Race. Riley Lodge, Cobbs Hill Park. 5K starts at 9 a.m., kids races start at 9:45 a.m. Don’t forget to wear a costume. Registration $18-$22. yellowjacketracing.com. [Special Event] Spirits of the Past Theatrical Tours. See Friday listing. Genesee Country Village, 1410 Flint Hill Road, Mumford. Tours depart every 10 minutes between 6-9 p.m. $14-$16, reservations required. 538-6822, gcv.org. [Special Event] Trick or Treating in the Village. Dress up in your Halloween costume and trickor-treat in the historic Genesee Country Village (1410 Flint Hill Road, Mumford). Activities including hay-bale maze, pumpkin painting, bouncy obstacle course. Noon-5 p.m. $5 for 16 and under, adults free. Continues Sunday, October 28. 538-6822, gcv.org. [Special Event] ZooBoo. Come in costume and stop at 15 trick-ortreat stations at the Seneca Park Zoo (2222 St. Paul St.). Interact with live performers and costumed characters. Continues Sunday, October 28. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. $7,

plus zoo admission. 336-7212, senecaparkzoo.org. [Theater] “An Evening of Thrills and Chills.” See Friday listing. 7:30 p.m. $15. Black Sheep Theatre, 274 N. Goodman St., Village Gate. 861-4816, blacksheeptheatre.org. [Theater] “Evil Dead: The Musical.” See Wednesday listing. 2 p.m. Free. Ingle Auditorium, RIT campus, 1 Lomb Memorial Drive. events.rit.edu.

Sunday, October 28 [Film] “Carrie.” Dryden Theatre, George Eastman House, 900 East Ave. 5 p.m. $6-$8. 271-3361, dryden.eastmanhouse.org. [Haunted House] Haunted Hayrides of Greater Rochester. See Thursday listing. 3329 Eddy Road, Williamson. 7-9:30 p.m. $15-$17. 423-2991, hauntedhayridesrochester.com. [Haunted House] Haunted House of Rochester. See Thursday listing. 1592 Qualtrough Road. 6:30-10 p.m. $12. 671-2850, hauntedhouseofhorrors.com. [Haunted House] Nightmare Manor. See Thursday listing. Southtown Plaza 3333 W. Henrietta Road. 7:30-9:30 p.m. $13-$24. nightmaremanor.com. [Haunted House] Verhulst Haunted Hayride. See Friday listing. 5161 W. Ridge Road, Spencerport. $15. 352-8484, verhulsthauntedhayride.com. [Haunted House] Warehouse of Biowar. See Thursday listing. 1290 University Ave. 7-11 p.m. or later. $12. cayoindustrial.com. [Music] Hells Angels Rochester 30th Annual Halloween Party. Live music featuring the Lustre Kings. $300 prize for best costume. Ages 21+. Dinosaur Barbeque, 99 Court St. 1-9 p.m. $15, includes beer and BBQ. Dinosaurbarbque.com. [Special Event] “Ghost Hunting 101 Course.” Learn how to prepare yourself for any ghost you might meet this Halloween. RIT Wallace Library, 1 Lomb Memorial Drive. 6 p.m. $25. Registration required: RochesterGhosts@gmail.com. reunioninn.com. [Special Event] 2012 HowlO-Ween Fest and Pup Parade. See Saturday listing. PetSaver Superstore in Greece, 1596 Ridge Road. 1-3 p.m. Registration $10, which includes a t-shirt, 5x7 photo, and goody bag. 621-0890, facebook.com/petsaver. [Special Event] Al Sigl Community WalkAbout. Family-friendly entertainment, costume contest, and prizes for individual walkers and teams. Eastview Mall, 7979 Pittsford-Victor Road. Registration at 8:30 a.m., walk at 9:30 a.m. 442-4102 ext. 8944. alsigl.org. [Special Event] Annual Fall Psychic Fair. $1/minute for readings. Come in costume and get 10 percent off your purchase. Noon-4 p.m. Psychic’s Thyme, 439 Monroe Ave. 473-4230, psychicsthyme.com. [Special Event] Family Fun Night. Family-friendly ride through the woods ending with a snack and cider. 3329 Eddy Road, Williamson. 4:30-6:15 p.m. $15-$17. 423-2991, hauntedhayridesrochester.com. [Special Event] Family Halloween Party. See Saturday listing. National Museum of Play, 1 Manhattan Square. 11 a.m.-

4 p.m. Free-$13. 263-2700, museumofplay.org. [Special Event] Halloween Drag Brunch. Hosts Aggy Dune, Kasha Davis, and a special guest. Costume contest. Edibles, 704 University Ave. Shows at noon & 2 p.m. Brunch buffet and show for $22.50, or $18.50 in advance. 271-4910, ediblesrochester.com. [Special Event] Pumpkin Express Halloween Train Ride Train will board in Waterloo at the intersection of Stark and Williams streets, proceed to Cayuga, and return. Halloween treat bags, activities, cider, and donuts. Costumes encouraged. Tours at noon & 3 p.m. $17. waterloorotary7120.org. [Special Event] Trick or Treating in the Village. See Saturday listing. Genesee Country Village, 1410 Flint Hill Road, Mumford. Noon-5 p.m. $5 for 16 and under, adults free. 538-6822, gcv.org. [Special Event] ZooBoo. See Saturday listing. Seneca Park Zoo, 2222 St. Paul St. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. $7, plus zoo admission. 3367212, senecaparkzoo.org. [Theater] “An Evening of Thrills and Chills.” See Friday listing. Black Sheep Theatre, 274 N. Goodman St., Village Gate. 2 p.m. $15. 861-4816, blacksheeptheatre.org.

Monday, October 29 [Haunted House] Warehouse of Biowar. See Thursday listing. 1290 University Ave. 7-11 p.m. or later. $12. cayoindustrial.com [Music] The Very Spooky Return of Manic Mondays. Miss T and Lady Z will be spinning an eclectic mix of 80’s themed tunes. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. Doors at 9 p.m., ages 21+. No cover. 454-2966. bugjar.com. [Special Event] Halloween Blood Drive at Geva Theatre (75 Woodbury Blvd.). Walk-ins welcome, or call 1-800-RED CROSS (733-2767) or visit redcrossblood.org to schedule an appointment. [Special Event] Mt. Hope Avenue Terror Tour. Witness history and local ghost stories come alive alongside the resting place of some of Rochester’s historic figures. Intersection of Mt. Hope Ave. and Reservoir Ave. 9 p.m. $15-$20. reunioninn.com.

Tuesday, October 30 [Haunted House] Warehouse of Biowar. See Thursday listing. 1290 University Ave. 7-11 p.m. or later. $12. cayoindustrial.com. [Special Event] Séance at Psychic’s Thyme. A short talk on Spiritualism followed by messages from departed loved ones, guides, and teachers. Hosted by Sisters of Medusa. 439 Monroe Ave. 7-9 p.m. $20, reservations required. 473-4230, psychicsthyme.com.

Wednesday, October 31 [Film] “The Wolf Man.” Dryden Theatre, George Eastman House, 900 East Ave. 8 p.m. $6-$8. 2713361, dryden.eastmanhouse.org. [Haunted House] Haunted House of Rochester. See Thursday listing. 1592 Qualtrough Road.

6:30 p.m. $12. 671-2850, hauntedhouseofhorrors.com. [Haunted House] Nightmare Manor. See Thursday listing. Southtown Plaza 3333 W. Henrietta Road. 7:30-10 p.m. $12. nightmaremanor.com. [Haunted House] Warehouse of Biowar. See Thursday listing. 1290 University Ave. 7-11 p.m. or later. $12. cayoindustrial.com. [Music] FLCC Faculty Recital Debut of New Music. Pianist and music professor David McGuire will debut his chamber piece “Bardo,” with a distinctly Halloween-theme. FLCC auditorium, 3325 Marvin Sands Drive, Canandaigua. 7 p.m. Free. 785-1385, flcc.edu. [Music] Halloween Bash Part 2. More prizes, surprises, and drink specials, with live music by Bobby Henrie and the Goners. Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 8:30 p.m. $5 for 21 and over, $7 under 21. 232-3230, abilenebarandlounge.com. [Music] Halloween Party in the Pit. Featuring live music by Epilogue, Children in Heat, Velvet Elvis, and The Sin Walkers. Costume contests and prizes. Sticky Lips Juke Joint, 830 Jefferson Road. Doors at 8 p.m. $5 over 21, $8 under 21. 2925544, stickylipsbbq.com. [Music] Natalie B. Band Halloween Party. Post-trick-or-treat party with Natalie B. Costumes are a must. Dinosaur Bar-B-Que, 99 Court St. 9 p.m. 325-7090, dinosaurbarbque.com. [Music] The Lobby presents “Hustlevania.” “Spooky,” soulful, funky, electro, hip-hop and more sounds will permeate the Bug Jar (219 Monroe Ave.) 10 p.m.-2 a.m. Local artist-made Halloween art décor, live horror make-up demo, free pizza from Dragonfly Tavern, and costume contest. Ages 21+. $3 cover charge. bugjar.com. [Music] The Zombie Halloween Ball. Chow down on tacos while listening to festive music by the Moon Zombies. Tala Vera, 155 State St. 8 p.m. Ages 18+. $6. 546-3845, tala-vera.com. [Music] Water Street Annual Halloween Bash. Costume contest, prizes, and live music by Steven Kellog and the Sixers, performing their last show as a band. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N. Water St. 8 p.m. $18-$20. 325-5600, waterstreetmusic.com. [Party] Halloween Night at Tapas 177. DJ Flex, live psychics, costume prizes, and free bar snacks. 177 St. Paul St. 10 p.m.-2 a.m. No cover. 262-2090, tapas177.com. [Party] Monster Ball. Music, food, and prizes. Best costume wins a cash prize. Lower 9 Clubhouse, 550 Bernard St. $5-$8. Must be at least 25 years old with ID. [Special Event] Bud Light Fright Nite. Halloween party with costume and dance contests. TC Riley’s, 200 Park Point Drive. 8 p.m. 2729777. tcrileysparkpoint.com. [Special Event] Lady in White Terror Tour. Hear accounts of Rochester’s own “Lady in White” while meandering alongside Lake Ontario. Across from the Reunion Inn, 4565 Culver Road. 7:30 p.m., 9 p.m. & 10:30 p.m. $15-$20. reunioninn.com.

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Film Times Fri October 26-Thur November 1 Schedules change often. Call theaters or check rochestercitynewspaper.com for updates.

Film

Brockport Strand 637-3310 89 Main St, Brockport HOTEL TRANSYLVANIA: 7, 9; also Sat-Sun 1, 3, 5; PARANORMAL ACTIVITY 4: 7:15, 9:15, also Sat-Sun 1:15, 3:15, 5:15; SILENT HILL: REVELATIONS: 7:15, 9:15; also Sat-Sun 1:15, 3:15, 5:15.

Canandaigua Theatres 396-0110 Wal-Mart Plaza, Canandaigua ALEX CROSS: 7:10, 9:10; also Fri-Sun 5:10; also Sat-Sun 1:10, 3:10; ARGO: 7, 9:15; also Sat-Sun 1:15; CHASING MAVERICKS: 7, 9:15; also Fri-Sun 4, Sat-Sun 1:15; FRANKENWEENIE: Sat-Sun 1, 3; FUN SIZE: 7, 9; also Fri-Sun 5; Sat-Sun 1, 3; HERE COMES THE BOOM: 7:10, 9:15; also Fri-Sun 5; also Sat-Sun 1, 3; HOTEL TRANSYLVANIA: 7, 9; also Fri-Sun 5; Sat-Sun 1, 3; PARANORMAL ACTIVITY 4: 7:15, 9:15; also Fri-Sun 5:15; also Sat-Sun 1:15, 3:15; PITCH PERFECT: 9:15; also Fri-Sun 4; SILENT HILL: REVELATIONS: 3D 7:15, 9:15, also Fri-Sun 5:15, also Sat-Sun 1:15, 3:15; SINISTER: 7:15, 9:20; also Fri-Sun 5:10, Sat-Sun 1, 3:05; TAKEN 2: 7:10, 9:10; also FriSun 5:10.

Cinema Theater 271-1785 957 S. Clinton St. PARANORMAN: Fri-Sun, Wed. 4:45; TROUBLE WITH THE CURVE: 7; WON’T BACK DOWN: 8:55.

Culver Ridge 16 544-1140 2255 Ridge Rd E, Irondequoit  ALEX CROSS: 1, 1:50, 4:05, 4:40, 6:45, 7:30, 9:25, 10; ARGO: 1:10, 4:15, 7, 9:45; CHASING MAVERICKS: 1:05, 4:10, 6:50, 10:10; CLOUD continues on page 36

The shrink as detective [ REVIEW ] by George Grella

“Alex Cross” (PG-13), directed by Rob Cohen Now playing

Having written, directed, and starred in a number of broad comedies, all proclaiming his ownership of the franchise, Tyler Perry surely qualifies as that darling of the cineastes, an auteur. Now, after playing the title character in all those Madea flicks, he takes on an entirely different role in an entirely different genre. He plays another title character in “Alex Cross,” based on a novel by James Patterson, an author even more prolific than Perry.

The movie is a thriller, a detective story that departs at least a little way from the usual contemporary form in presenting, instead of the familiar car chases and shootouts, at least a modicum of mystery and some actual crime solving. As in the Patterson novels, Alex Cross is not only a detective but also a psychiatrist, which means he brings a special combination of experience and insight to his job as a Detroit homicide cop. It also presumably makes him the ideal sleuth to track down a vicious serial killer who enjoys torturing his victims before dispatching them. The picture initially employs some puzzling misdirection, showing the successful apprehension of a criminal by the team of Alex Cross, his best friend and colleague Tommy Kane (Edward Burns), and Monica Ashe (Rachel Nichols). It also focuses on Cross’s blissful domestic life with his wife, children, and his mother, dwelling with considerable ersatz emotionalism on the sweet perfection of his marriage and his

Tyler Perry in the title role in “Alex Cross.” PHOTO COURTESY SUMMIT ENTERTAINMENT

family, a subject that eventually accounts for some of the disasters that follow. The narrative in effect interrupts itself with an apparently unrelated and extremely violent sequence showing an ultimate fighting match in a shabby abandoned building, where a lean, almost skeletal man (Matthew Fox) calling himself the Butcher of Sligo offers to fight against the large, muscular champion. His performance in the arena arouses a beautiful woman (Stephanie Jacobsen), who takes him back to her heavily guarded mansion for another sort of performance. A big mistake — he tortures her horribly and kills her and her bodyguards, which brings Alex Cross and his colleagues back into the plot. The grisly, apparently motiveless crime begins to make sense as Cross exercises his powers of deduction on the scant evidence, applying an ingenious and quite macabre method of opening the victim’s safe to find a trail of evidence. That trail leads him to a couple of enormously wealthy foreign businessmen planning to invest heavily in a splendid urban development for the blighted city of Detroit. Unlike the usual psychopath, this killer, whom the cops call Picasso because he leaves drawings at the scene of the crime, apparently follows a particular scheme, intending to murder the two top executives of the development company. Picasso resembles the rest of his cinematic brotherhood, however, in his uncanny ability to outwit the police at every turn, penetrate the

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Shock and flaw “Paranormal Activity 4” (R), directed by Henry Joost and Ariel Schulman Now playing

stoutest defenses, and defeat platoons of heavily armed security guards. Torturing and killing almost at will, he plays a cat-and-mouse game with Cross, eventually inspiring the detective to engage in his own irrational quest for bloody vengeance. Even when the quest apparently succeeds, Cross must solve yet another puzzle, a mystery behind the mystery, an act that fulfills his hunger for revenge. Although a psychiatrist seems just the right person to hunt a serial killer, Alex Cross indulges in very little analysis beyond a superficial and entirely predictable conversation with Picasso. Aside from his penchant for analyzing his colleagues and deducing all sorts of surprising information about them, he mostly behaves like the usual cop in the usual thriller, succeeding mostly through his courage, toughness, and his ability to withstand pain. A very big man with a correspondingly impressive presence, Tyler Perry sometimes almost comically appears to dwarf his fellow actors, who hardly distinguish themselves beyond the sentimental stereotyping that constitutes the emotional maturity of the movie. Perhaps unsurprisingly, the murderer himself provides the richest source of interest — cold, dedicated, fanatical, without the sexual obsessions that drive others of his ilk, Picasso seems almost superhuman in his physical and intellectual abilities, an appropriate match for Alex Cross and a worthy addition to the list of contemporary villains. Like it or not, the serial killer remains the favorite cinematic criminal of our time.

SPOILER ALERT! There will be a “Paranormal Activity 5” in... oh, I’m gonna guess exactly one year from now. The first three films in the “Paranormal Activity” franchise have banked a little north of a half-billion dollars worldwide, and in comparison with how much they cost to make, the gross is almost pure, uncut gravy. Oren Peli’s original “PA,” you may recall, became a surprise hit in 2009 a la “The Blair Witch Project,” thanks to a lean, ingenious foundfootage premise that delivered jolts from screwing with our tightly wound psyches rather than assaulting our eyes with torture and gore. The sequels followed the “If it ain’t broke” rule, finding inventive ways of sticking to the formula while telling the evolving story. Which brings us to the disappointingly utilitarian “Paranormal Activity 4,” a film strictly for those who’ve seen 1, 2, and 3. (But if you haven’t, then scram now, or learn some things the rest

Kathryn Newton in “Paranormal Activity 4.” PHOTO COURTSY PARAMOUNT PICTURES

of us already know.) “PA4” opens with a brief refresher of scenes from the end of “PA2,” with common-thread Katie (Katie Featherston) claiming her young nephew Hunter and padding off into the night in bare feet and blood-covered pajamas. Flash-forward five years to the fall of 2011, where we meet 15-year-old Alex (Kathryn Newton), who lives in suburban Henderson, Nevada, with her squabbling parents and little brother Wyatt (Aiden Lovekamp). Much of the footage in “PA4” is courtesy of the tech-friendly Alex, constantly connected to either her phone or her laptop. Alex begins to notice odd things happening after Wyatt befriends the boy across the street, a pint-sized weirdo named Robbie (Brady Allen) who bunks with Alex and her family after his single mother (wink!) is carted off in an ambulance. It’s Ben (Matt Shively), Alex’s thick-necked doofus of a maybeboyfriend, who sets up the stationary surveillance we now rely upon to provide the frights in the “PA” movies. And you can pretty much envision what happens: balls mysteriously bouncing down stairs, chairs suddenly moving, loud noises, kids talking to a seemingly empty room. Then those words appear on the screen: “Night No. 1, November 6, 2011.” It still sends a tiny chill up the spine as the film begins counting down to... something. Oh, I don’t know why I’m being so coy; “PA4” is the same as it ever was. The frights start escalating in frequency and violence, leading to an expected and slightly silly but nonetheless manic denouement of flying bodies, slamming doors, and terrifying faces as the film sets up the next chapter. Returning after of the success of “PA3,” co-directors Henry Joost and Ariel Schulman (they also made the polarizing documentary “Catfish”) maintain the status quo, but they

— presumably by way of screenwriter Christopher Landon — find a way to get much clever visual mileage out of the family’s Xbox 360, using its Kinect motion-sensor technology as a way to suss out demonic presences like Toby, who you may remember from “PA3” as young Katie’s not-so-imaginary friend. As central characters go, Joost and Schulman could have done much worse; Newton does an admirable job of anchoring “PA4” as the engaging, vulnerable Alex, skillfully offering up the natural teenage mix of curiosity and trepidation at an unfamiliar situation. Unlike the rest of her amateurish castmates, Newton almost prevents us from trying to poke fat holes in the film’s execution. For instance, why is no one ever allowed to finish an explanation? And how can you still hold onto your laptop when something is scaring the stuffing out of you? Trafficking in the economical notion that what you can’t see is far more frightening than what you can see, “PA4” is still able to deliver some spooky moments, and even a few funny ones, too. I’ve often wondered whether Peli envisioned this entire arc when he first created “PA1” or if he and his team are now kind of assembling the “PA” mythology on the fly. (I’m leaning toward the latter.) Less so than the possibly superfluous “PA3” — time will tell on that front — “PA4” really feels like a stepping stone, a way to make a quick buck before what will hopefully be positioned as the big finale. (Until a $50 million opening weekend, of course.) Don’t get me wrong; I’m still totally interested in seeing what happens with Katie, Hunter, and the ever-intriguing Toby. But “PA4” may be about as close as you can get to actually drawing blood from that dead horse.

WHORE’S GLORY

Friday, Oct. 26, 8 p.m. Following his documentary on Indonesian sulfur transporters, Michael Glawogger turns his lens on a different type of high-risk hard labor: prostitution. Glawogger travels the globe to document the trade with an unprecedented intimacy, providing a corrective to decades of romantic and melodramatic depictions of the “oldest profession.” (Chwala dziwkom, Michael Glawogger, Germany/Austria 2011, 110 min., German, French, English, Thai, Japanese, Spanish, Bengali, w/subtitles)

Photo courtesy Photofest

[ REVIEW ] BY DAYNA PAPALEO

CARRIE Movies for movie lovers, 6 nights a week. Labor

Saturday, Oct. 27, 8 p.m.; Sunday, Oct. 28, 5 p.m. Raised by her overbearing mother and harassed by other high school students, Carrie White (Sissy Spacek) begins to fall into despondency. As the abuse heightens, however, so do her latent supernatural powers. Culminating in a shocking and brilliantly directed climax, Carrie is undeniably one of the best film adaptations of a Stephen King novel. (Brian De Palma, US 1976, 98 min.)

Halloween

Film Info: 271-4090 l 900 East Avenue l Eastman House Café—stop in for a light dinner or dessert before the film. l Wi-Fi Hotspot l Sponsored by rochestercitynewspaper.com City 35

ATLAS: 12:50, 4:30, 8:10; FRAKENWEENIE: 3D 5:10, 10:05; 2D 1:30, 7:40; FUN SIZE: 2, 4:45, 7:15, 9:30; HERE COMES THE BOOM: 1:40, 4:50, 7:25, 9:55; HOTEL TRANSYLVANIA: 3D 4, 9:20; 2D 12:55, 6:40; LOOPER: 4:35, 9:40; PARANORMAL ACTIVITY 4: 1:15, 1:45, 4:20, 5:05, 6:55, 7:45, 9:35, 10:30; PITCH PERFECT: 1:20, 4:25, 7:10, 9:50; SILENT HILL: REVELATIONS: 3D 1:55, 4:55, 7:50, 10:25; 2D 1:25, 7:20; SINISTER: 1:35, 5, 7:35, 10:15; TAKEN 2: 2:05, 5:15, 7:55, 10:20.

Dryden Theatre 271-3361 9 East Ave *NOTE: Film times for Wed 10/24-10/31* BEING THERE: Wed 10/24 8, Sun 10/28 2; BAD RONALD/DON’T BE AFARID OF THE DARK: Thur 10/25 8; WHORE’S GLORY: Fri 10/26 8; CARRIE: Sat 10/27 8; Sun 10/28 5; BEHIND THE DOOR: Tue 10/30 8; THE WOLF MAN: Wed 10/31 8.

Film Previews Full film reviews available at rochestercitynewspaper.com.

Eastview 13 425-0420 Eastview Mall, Victor *NO FILM TIMES BY PRESS TIME*

Geneseo Theatres 243-2691 Geneseo Square Mall ALEX CROSS: 7:10, 9:10; also Sat-Sun 1:10, 3:10, 5:10; ARGO: 7; also Sat-Sun 1; CLOUD ATLAS: 7:30; also Sat-Sun 1, 4:15; HOTEL TRANSYLVANIA: 7, 9; also Sat-Sun 1, 3, 5; PARANORMAL ACTIVITY 4: 7:15, 9:15; also Sat-Sun 1:15, 3:15, 5:15; SILENT HILL: REVELATION: 3D 7:15, 9:15; also Sat-Sun 1:15, 3:15, 5:15; TAKEN 2: 9:10; also Sat-Sun 3:10, 5:10.

Greece Ridge 12 225-5810 176 Greece Ridge Center Dr. ALEX CROSS: 11:40 a.m., 2:10, 4:40, 7:10, 9:40; ARGO: 1, 4:20, 7:15, 10:05; CHASING MAVERICKS: 12:50, 4:10, 7:20, 10; CLOUD ATLAS: 11:40 a.m., 3:20, 7, 10:40; FRAKENWEENIE: 11:50 a.m., 2:05; FUN SIZE: Jonny Weston in the true story of late surfing icon Jay Moriarity and his quest to ride Northern California’s most dangerous wave. Canandaigua, Culver, Greece, Henrietta, Tinseltown CLOUD ATLAS (R): Assembling the creative forces of filmmakers Tom Tykwer (1998’s “Run Lola Run”) and siblings Lana and Andy Wachowski (the “Matrix” trilogy) gets you an ambitious adaptation of David Mitchell’s genre-spanning novel exploring the effects of individual actions throughout time. Starring Tom Hanks, Halle Berry, Jim Broadbent, and Hugo Weaving. Culver, Geneseo, Greece, Henrietta, Pittsford, Tinseltown PROJECT 5: HORROR: The Little’s annual Halloween celebration wraps up with a Wes Craven double feature on Friday consisting of 1984’s “A Nightmare on Elm Street” and 1996’s “Scream.” SILENT HILL: REVELATION (R): It’s the 3D sequel to the 2006 film adaptation of the survival horror video game, with a teenager learning the truth about her life in an alternate dimension. Starring Sean Bean, Radha Mitchell, and Malcolm McDowell. Brockport, Canandaigua, Culver, Geneseo, Greece, Henrietta, Tinseltown WHORES’ GLORY (2011): Austrian documentarian Michael Glawogger takes a look at the world’s oldest profession, journeying to Thailand, Bangladesh, and Mexico to chronicle the lives of prostitutes. Dryden (Fri, Oct 26, 8 p.m.)

[ OPENING ] BAD RONALD/DON’T BE AFRAID OF THE DARK (1974/1973): The first in this double feature of made-for-TV thrillers is about a teenage killer in hiding, trying to cope with the fact that a new family has moved into his house; while the second sees a housewife menaced by small goblins from a sealed fireplace in the mansion that she and her husband are restoring. Dryden (Thu, Oct 25, 8 p.m.) BEHIND THE DOOR (1919): This rare silent horror film, brought here through the courtesy of the Library of Congress, tells the story of an American naval officer consumed by the idea of revenge against the German submarine commander who brutalized his wife. Dryden (Tue, Oct 30, 8 p.m.) BEING THERE (1979): Peter Sellers’ last great role was as a Washington DC gardener who becomes a political insider when his simple observations about tending plants are mistaken for profound allegory. Co-starring Shirley Maclaine, Jack Warden, and Oscar winner Melvyn Douglas. Dryden (Wed, Oct 24, 8 p.m., and Sun, Oct 28, 2 p.m.) CARRIE (1976): Sissy Spacek plays the title character in Brian DePalma’s adaptation of Stephen King’s horror novel about a bullied young woman who unleashes her telekinetic powers. Featuring Piper Laurie, Amy Irving, and John Travolta. Dryden (Sat, Oct 27, 8 p.m., and Sun, Oct 28, 5 p.m.) [ CONTINUING ] CHASING MAVERICKS (PG): ALEX CROSS (PG-13): This Michael Apted and Curtis suspense thriller finds Tyler Hanson co-direct (?!) Gerard Perry picking up where Morgan Butler, Elisabeth Shue, and 36 City october 24-30, 2012

12:20, 2:35, 5, 7:30, 9:45; HERE COMES THE BOOM: 1:10, 4:15, 7:05, 9:35; HOTEL TRANSYLVANIA: 12, 2:15, 4:30, 6:50, 9:15; PARANORMAL ACTIVITY 4: 12:10, 2:30, 4:35, 5:15, 7:25, 8, 9:55, 10:30; SILENT HILL: REVELATIONS: 3D 2:45, 7:35; 2D 12:25, 5:05, 10:10; SINISTER: 11:45 a.m., 2:20, 4:55, 7:40, 10:20; TAKEN 2: 12:15, 2:40, 5:10, 7:50, 10:25.

Henrietta 18

5:10, 6:40, 7:40, 9:10, 10:10, 11:30; THE PERKS OF BEING A WALLFLOWER: 1:55, 4:25, 6:55, 9:25; PITCH PERFECT: 1:45, 4:35, 7:15, 9:55; SEVEN PSYCHOPATHS: 4:20, 9:30; SILENT HILL: REVELATIONS: 3D 12:50, 3:10, 5:30, 8, 10:30; 2D 1:50, 7:10, 12 a.m.; SINISTER: 12:05, 2:40, 5:15, 7:50, 10:35; TAKEN 2: 11:45 a.m., 2:15, 4:40, 9:35, 11:45.

The Little

424-3090 525 Marketplace Dr. ALEX CROSS: 11:50 a.m., 1:20, 2:20, 3:50, 4:50, 6:30, 7:30, 9:05, 10:05, 11:35; ARGO: 12, 1, 3, 4, 5:50, 6:50, 9:40; CHASING MAVERICKS: 1:30, 4:30, 7:20, 10:20; CLOUD ATLAS: 11:40 a.m., 3:20, 7, 8:50, 10:40, 11:05; FRAKENWEENIE: 12:55; FUN SIZE: 12:40, 3:05, 5:25, 7:55, 10:25, 11:55; HERE COMES THE BOOM: 11:45 a.m., 2:35, 5:05, 7:35, 10:15; HOTEL TRANSYLVANIA: 1:35, 4:15, 6:35, 8:55; LOOPER: 3:25, 6:25, 9:20; PARANORMAL ACTIVITY 4: 12:10, 1:40, 2:45, 4:10,

258-04 240 East Ave.  ARBITRAGE: 9; also Sat-Sun 3:20; ARGO: 7:10, 9:40; also Sat-Sun 1, 4:10; AS GOES JANESVILLE: Free, Mon 10/29 7; THE MASTER: 6:30 (except Fri 10/26), 9:20; also Sat-Sun 12:40, 3:30; THE PERKS OF BEING A WALLFLOWER: 6:40, 9:10; also Sat-Sun 12:30, 3:10; NIGHTMARE ON ELM STREET: 10/26 10; NYFQ: Sat 10/27 2; THE PHANTOM: Sat 10/27 10 a.m.; SAMSARA: 6:40; also Sat-Sun 12:10; SCREAM: Fri 10/26 11:35; SEACHING FOR SUGARMAN: 7 (No show on Fri 10/26, Mon 10/29), 9:30; also Sat-Sun 12, 4.

Freeman left off, as novelist James Patterson’s psychologist/ detective takes on Matthew Fox’s sinewy, crazy-eyed bad guy. With Edward Burns, Giancarlo Esposito, and Cicely Tyson. Canandaigua , Culver, Geneseo, Greece, Henrietta, Tinseltown ARBITRAGE (R): Richard Gere, Susan Sarandon, and Tim Roth star in the narrative feature debut of writer-director Nicholas Jarecki, a sleek thriller about a billionaire hedge-fund manager juggling heavy secrets and slippery lies. Little ARGO (R): Director Ben Affleck co-stars with John Goodman, Bryan Cranston, and Kyle Chandler in the once-classified true tale of a CIA exfiltration expert who hatches a daring plan to free six Americans hiding at the home of the Canadian ambassador during the 1979 Iran hostage crisis. Canandaigua , Culver, Geneseo, Greece, Henrietta, Little, Pittsford, Tinseltown END OF WATCH (R): Jake Gyllenhaal, Michael Peña, and Anna Kendrick lead the cast of this gritty drama from “Training Day” screenwriter David Ayer, which follows a couple of LAPD officers who make a routine traffic stop that lands them in the crosshairs of a drug cartel. Culver, Eastview FRANKENWEENIE (PG): This 3D stop-motion feature finds Tim Burton expanding on his 1984 short of the same name, with Catherine O’Hara, Martin Landau, Winona Ryder, and Christopher Lee helping to voice the story of a boy who must convince his neighbors that his reanimated pooch is still a good dog. Canandaigua, Culver, Greece, Henrietta, Tinseltown HERE COMES THE BOOM (PG13): Kevin James, Salma Hayek,

and Henry Winkler lead the cast of this comedy about a biology teacher who tries to raise muchneeded funds for his cashstrapped school by becoming a successful MMA fighter. Canandaigua, Culver, Greece, Henrietta, Tinseltown HOTEL TRANSYLVANIA (PG): The first animated feature from “Samurai Jack” creator Genndy Tartakovsky showcases the voice talents of Adam Sandler as good ol’ Dracula, now a hotelier working to keep his daughter (Selena Gomez) away from a charming backpacker (Andy Samberg). Brockport, Canandaigua, Culver, Geneseo, Greece, Henrietta, Pittsford, Tinseltown LOOPER (R): Joseph GordonLevitt reteams with his “Brick” writer-director Rian Johnson for this time-travel adventure about a hitman whose job killing people sent from the future puts him gun-to-face with his 55-yearold self (Bruce Willis). Featuring Jeff Daniels, Emily Blunt, and Paul Dano. Culver, Henrietta, Tinseltown THE MASTER (R): Paul Thomas Anderson’s follow-up to 2007’s “There Will Be Blood” is this intriguing mid-century drama with Philip Seymour Hoffman as a magnetic spiritual leader and the much-missed Joaquin Phoenix as an alcoholic WWII vet who becomes his right-hand man. Little PARANORMAL ACTIVITY 4 (R): “Catfish” directors Henry Joost and Ariel Schulman return for another stab at the surprisingly successful horror franchise, which looks to come full circle by revisiting the circumstances surrounding Katie and baby Hunter, gone missing after “PA2.” Brockport, Canandaigua, Culver, Geneseo, Greece, Henrietta, Pittsford, Tinseltown

Movies 10 292-5840 2613 W. Henrietta Rd. *NO FILM TIMES BY PRESS TIME*

Pittsford Cinema 383-1310 3349 Monroe Ave. ARGO: 1:40, 3:10, 4:20, 5:50, 7:20, 8:30; also Fri-Sat 10; Fri-Sun 12:30; CLOUD ATLAS: 1, 3, 4:30, 6:30, 8; also Fri-Sat 10; Fri-Sun 11:30 a.m.; HOTEL TRANSLYVANIA: 2:30, 4:40, 6:50; also Fri-Sat 9; Fri-Sun 12:20; PARANORMAL ACTIVITY 4: 1:20, 3:30, 5:40, 7:50; also Fri-Sat 10; THE PERKS OF BEING A WALLFLOWER: 2:10, 4:35, 7; also Fri-Sat 9:25; also Fri-Sun 11:45 a.m.; PITCH PERFECT: 2:10, 4:40, 7:10; also Fri-Sat 9:40; Fri-Sun 11:40 a.m.; TAKEN 2: 2:50, 5:15, 7:30; also Fri-Sat 9:45, Fri-Sun 12:40.

Tinseltown USA / IMAX 247-2180 2291 Buffalo Rd.  ALEX CROSS: 12, 1:15, 2:30, 3:45, 5, 6:20, 7:30, 8:55, PARANORMAN (PG): This stop-motion animation from the same artists responsible for “Coraline” tells the story of a young boy whose ability to communicate with the dead comes in handy as he tries to save his New England town from a witch’s curse. Featuring the voices of John Goodman, Anna Kendrick, Casey Affleck, and Elaine Stritch. Cinema THE PERKS OF BEING A WALLFLOWER (PG-13): Writerdirector Stephen Chbosky adapts his semi-autobiographical coming-of-age novel about an introverted and troubled freshman who is befriended by a pair of seniors. With Logan Lerman, Ezra Miller, and Emma Watson. Henrietta, Little, Pittsford PITCH PERFECT (PG-13): Anna Kendrick, Brittany Snow, and “Bridesmaids” scenestealer Rebel Wilson lead the cast of this musical comedy about a loner who joins her college’s all-girl singing group and competes against their male rivals in a campus competition. Canandaigua, Culver, Henrietta, Pittsford, Tinseltown SAMSARA (PG-13): From the people who brought you 1992’s “Baraka” comes what they describe as “a nonverbal, guided meditation,” filmed over five years in 25 countries and contemplating the varied worlds of sacred grounds, disaster zones, industrial complexes, and natural wonders. Little SEARCHING FOR SUGAR MAN (PG-13): This absorbing documentary explores what happened when two South African fans set out to discover the fate of their musical hero, enigmatic 1970’s singersongwriter Rodriguez. Little

10; ARGO: 12, 2:50, 5:40, 8:40; CHASING MAVERICKS: 1:10, 4:20, 7:10, 9:55; CLOUD ATLAS: 12:25, 4:15, 8; FRAKENWEENIE: 3D 2:15; 2D 11:55 a.m., 4:30; FUN SIZE: 12:20, 2:45, 5:05, 7:20, 9:45; HERE COMES THE BOOM: 11:55 a.m., 2:25, 4:55, 7:25, 9:55; HOTEL TRANSYLVANIA: 3D 2:55, 5:10, 10; 2D 12:30, 7:35; LOOPER: 6:55, 9:45; PARANORMAL ACTIVITY 4: IMAX 1, 3:15, 5:30, 7:45, 10; NON-IMAX: 12:15, 1:45, 2:30, 4, 4:45, 6:15, 7, 8:30, 9:15; PITCH PERFECT: 1:05, 4:05, 6:45, 9:35; SEVEN PSYCHOPATHS: 12:55, 3:55, 6:50, 9:30; SILENT HILL: REVELATIONS: 3D 2:35, 4:55, 7:20, 9:50; 2D 12:10; SINISTER: 1:20, 4:10, 7:05, 9:40; TAKEN 2: 12:05, 2:25, 4:50, 7:15, 9:40.

Webster 12 888-262-4386 2190 Empire Blvd. *NO FILM TIMES BY PRESS TIME*

SEVEN PSYCHOPATHS (R): Colin Farrell, Sam Rockwell, Woody Harrelson, and Christopher Walken are four of the title characters in “In Bruges” writer-director Martin McDonagh’s crime comedy about a struggling screenwriter who gets mixed up in the LA underworld after a gangster’s dog gets boosted. Henrietta, Tinseltown SINISTER (R): Ethan Hawke stars for director Scott Derrickson (“The Exorcism of Emily Rose”) in this thriller about a true-crime novelist who uses a mysterious box of Super 8 films to puzzle out how and why a family was murdered in his new home. Canandaigua, Culver, Greece, Henrietta, Tinseltown TAKEN 2 (PG-13): Liam Neeson returns in this action flick as loving family man/not-all-thatretired spook Bryan Mills, this time in Istanbul when he and ex-wife Famke Janssen are taken captive by a father (go-to Euro-baddie Rade Serbedzija) looking to avenge his Albaniankidnapper son’s death. Canandaigua, Culver, Geneseo, Greece Henrietta Pittsford, Tinseltown TROUBLE WITH THE CURVE (PG-13): Clint Eastwood leads the cast of this drama about an aging baseball scout with failing eyesight forced to team up with daughter Amy Adams on a recruiting trip. With John Goodman, Justin Timberlake, and Matthew Lillard. Cinema WON’T BACK DOWN (PG): Inspired by actual events, this drama stars Maggie Gyllenhaal and Viola Davis as a pair of determined mothers, one a teacher, working to transform their children’s failing innercity school. With Holly Hunter, Rosie Perez, and Ving Rhames. Cinema

Classifieds For information: Call us (585) 244-3329 Fax us (585) 244-1126 Mail Us City Classifieds 250 N. Goodman Street Rochester, NY 14607 Email Us classifieds@ rochester-citynews.com EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY

All real estate advertised in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act, which makes it unlawful, “to make, print, or publish, any notice, statement, or advertisement, with respect to the sale or rental of a dwelling that indicates any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin.” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under the age of 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertisement for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. Call the local Fair Housing Enforcement Project, FHEP at 325-2500 or 1866-671-FAIR. Si usted sospecha una practica de vivienda injusta, por favor llame al servicio legal gratis. 585-325-2500 - TTY 585-325-2547.

Apartments for Rent ART GALLERY AREA Writers & Books neighborhood. Bright, Large 1bdrm apartment, with study and high ceilings, laundry. Available now. $650/month+ utilities. 908510-0269 DOWNTOWN GIBBS/EASTMAN Theatre area. 1&2 bedrooms. Bright, cheerful, nice neighbors, laundry, convenient to everything. Available immediately. Priced from $595. Call 585-383-8888.

Shared Housing ALL AREAS - ROOMMATES. COM. Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http://www. Roommates.com. LARGE FURNISHED ROOM Quiet home. Utilities, Cable, off-streetparking included. On bus line. West Rochester. Call 585-328-2771. House has security. PITTSFORD Male furnished bedroom in an 8 room house, with male, direct tv. Deposit. $575 all.

Commercial/ Space Houses for Sale Office UofR/ AIRPORT AREA Brick, Dog on premises, smoker ok. 585586-0920.

HOMES FOR SALE Pittsford/ Bushnells Basin 3 Homes on fabulous 3 acre park-like yard. Beautifully updated, 1800’s large main house plus 2 smaller homes which are leased for $24,000 per year (Great In-Law Home). Owner must sell due to age & health 585383-8888

Land for Sale ATTENTION HUNTERS! 60 acres -$89,900 Must sell to settle bankruptcy! Hardwoods, fields, big stream, awesome views, ATV trails! Sothern zone, less than 3 ½ hrs NYC! Won’t last! (888) 701-7509 www.NewYorkLandandLakes.com FORT PLAIN FORT PLAIN, NY: 33.4 acres hilltop view $69,000. 9.3 acres panaramic views $22,000. 3.6 acres $13,000. Owner financing. Great Investment www. helderbergrealty.com CALL, Henry Whipple: 518-861-6541 HANDYMAN FARMHOUSE - 5 acres $69,900. Four bedrooms, two bath, solid!  Must sell due to bankruptcy.  Gorgeous Upstate NY setting just off Thruway!  Make offer!  (888)7017509.  www.NewYorkLandandLakes. com LAKE SALE: 6 acres on Bass Lake $29,900. 2 acres Pondfront $19,900. 8 acre Waterfront Home $99,900. 20 lake properties must go. Financing. www.LandFirstNY. com 888-683-2626

Mixed use building. 6,000 sq.ft. of stores/office plus 3 apartments. Owner must sell due to illness. Owner financing, no banks needed. 383-8888

Adoption ADOPT A wonderful life awaits your baby! We’ll provide warmth, msecurity, devoted extended family, opportunities and endless love. Expenses Paid. Anne & Marc 1-877-977-5411. www.anneandmarcadopt.com.

MASTER CHIMNEY & MASONRY See our ad under Home and Garden Professionals. Chimney Cleaning, Masonry Repairs, Foundation Repairs, Roof Leaks, Brick Steps Repaired. 585-734-8444

Ceilings & Drywall 100% ABSOLUTE DUST-FREE: Ceilings & walls. $25.00 Seniors; discount. Repaired, installed. Textured, swirled, sunburst. Water damage specialist. Insurance work. Free estimates. 45 years experience. 225-6590

CITY Newspaper presents

Mind Body Spirit

NEW YORK HUNTERS Base Camp Special 5 Acres w/1 room log cabin$19,995

TO ADVERTISE IN THE MIND BODY SPIRIT SECTION CALL CHRISTINE AT 244.3329 x23 OR EMAIL CHRISTINE@ROCHESTER-CITYNEWS.COM

FREE LIST! Over 100 land and camp bargains, large acreage, camps, and waterfront. Call 1-800229-7843

Paul Rooney, NYS licensed,

board certified acupuncturist Practicing in Rochester since 1997

585-720-0250

RochesterAcupuncture.com Most insurance policies cover 10 treatments per year at 50% per treatment.

473-6610 or 473-4357 23 Arlington St. NY D.O.T.#9657

KdMovingandStorage.com

Psychic’s Thyme

October 27th-28th Sat: noon-6pm, Sun: noon-4pm

16TH Annual

Fall Psychic Fair 439 Monroe Ave. 473-4230

FREE Admission, Door Prizes, Sales, $1 a minute Readings (20min. minimum)

$15-35

You pay what works best for you. No questions asked.

find us on

Big or small, we do them all

continues on page 38

Home Services

K-D Moving & Storage Inc.

Experience in office & household moving and deliveries

ADOPT: A kindergarten teacher’s heart’s desire is to adopt a baby; promises nurturing home of love, security, extended family. Expenses paid. Maria 1-855-5057357; www.mariaadopts.com

302 N. Goodman St., Suite 403 in Village Gate 585.287.5183 Find us on Rochestercommunityacupuncture.com

Teaching Children Positive Spirituality Fun Family Open House

Sun., Oct. 28, 1:00 to 3:00 p.m. Activities for children K-6 and their families Crafts, music, art, Reiki

Unity

Sunday Celebration 11 a.m. Music, Meditation and Message Children’s Program Please see our website for ongoing groups and events.

Christ Church Unity Church of the Daily Word.

We welcome you!

55 Prince St., Rochester, NY 14607 • www.unityrochester.org • 585-473-0910

rochestercitynewspaper.com City 37

> page 37

Call 585-305-5865

Automotive

CASH FOR CARS Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888-420-3808 www. cash4car.com (AAN CAN)

AAAA AUTO RECYCLING CASH4CARSROCHESTER.com Up to $500 for your junk cars, vans or trucks. Fast, Free Pick up. www.cash4carsrochester.com 585-482-2140

Education ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from home. *Medical, *Business, *Criminal Justice, *Hospitality, Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEC certified. Call 888-2018657www.CenturaOnline.com

ALWAYS BETTER Higher cash for your Junk Cars, Trucks and Vans. From $200-$800 or more for newer. Running or not. With free towing. Also free removal of any unwanted model in any condition.

The Emporium DINING CHAIRS (6) Empire style. Needlepoint seats $15 each 585473-4066

For Sale BENCH for yard / wood $15 585880-2903 BOOTS Size 6 1/2 Ladies or boys, lining inside, army green, good for horseback riding, also snow. 2 pair, rubber $7 each 585-8802903 585-544-4155

DOG & CAT HOUSES Kennels, porch steps, do it yourself kits. Quick assembly 585-752-1000 $49 Jim

black ink cartridges (big ones with more ink) Staples or Walmart Works well 585-880-2903 $49

FLAGS 3x5 for sale from various States and. countries.Used $8.00 each. Please call 585 259-9590

USED RIVAL SEAL-A-MEAL VS107-P Food Sealer Press with Hold Release and Bag 2 pack. $35 cash The fresh solution for food storage. Contact Mary mgrant@frontier.com

GERMAN SHEPHERD PLAQUE on chain carved head on real wood (said, BEWARE!) Nice girt. $15/ 585-880-2903 GRACO CAR SEAT, stroller system xcond. $19.99 585-225-5526 HEWLETT PACKARD COPIER, letters, pictures,uses color and

to view. Buy sell and Trade. www. nfcshows.com

Groups Forming DIFFERENT DRUMS GAY GIRLS GROUP. Liar Obama ruins U.S. economy, responsible for 8.3% unemployment rate, encourages class envy and racial division. Pits gay against straight. His record sucks. Worst president ever. Vote this American hating fraud out! 585-747-2699

Events GUN SHOW - Canandaigua, NY 10/27 Saturday 9-4 10/28 Sunday 9-3. Steamboat Landing 205 Lakeshore Drive, 85 tables

Home and Garden Professionals ERNEST W. PETERSON INC.

SUN WORLD CONSTRUCTION

DEPENDABLE INTERIOR & EXTERIOR PAINTING & STAINING

INSULATION SPECIALIST

for all your weatherizing needs.

Professional Painting Service, 35 Years’ Experience

Blown Fiberglass & Cellulose Spray foam • Energy audits

FULLY INSURED LEAD CERTIFIED

(585) 328-3832

585-287-0692

Michael Mincher Serving Monroe County since 1977

FALL/WINTER

CONTRACT SPECIALS Limited Contracts Available. • DISCOUNTED YARD CLEAN-UP W/SNOWPLOWING CONTRACT INCLUDED: starting at $350 • SNOWPLOWING CONTRACT: starting at $200 • SINGLE-STORY GUTTER CLEANING: starting at $45 • 2-STORY GUTTER CLEANING: starting at $75

FREE (No-Obligation) ESTIMATES

ALL PROPERTY MAINTENANCE 802-6934

www.AllPropertyMaintenanceNY.com

Trusted quality service since 1994!

Master Elite workmanship at wholesale pricing.

Handicap Renovations

Home Repair Specialist! • General Contracting • Roofs • Siding • Windows/Doors • Kitchens • Baths • Handicap Renovations • Repairs Big or Small

ALL WASHED UP • Gutter Cleaning • Window Cleaning • Power Washing FREE ESTIMATES FULLY INSURED

820-6431

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Home Improvements All Phases of Home Improvements • Bath • Kitchen • Basement • Windows/Doors • Roofing • Siding

10% OFF

Fully insured

Any Stairlift or Ramp Installed*

FULLY INSURED, FREE ESTIMATES

*special excludes all previous work.

703-7738

Call

414-3692

BOTTOM LINE PRICING - Owner On Every Job! TRUSTED & RECOMMENDED FOR 25+ YEARS

& MASONRY

FALL IS HERE!!!

-since 1983-

Where Art and Fine Gardening Meet Garden Maintenance • Pruning • Design Robert L. Wilcox • 474-6584 gardens9@rochester.rr.com

ROOFING & SIDING •

Residential Specialist

Installation & Repair Storm Damage Insurance Claims Complete Tear Off

Lucien Brisson • 943-3497 667 Emerson Street

38 City october 24-30, 2012

Clean your chimney for the upcoming burning season!

• Chimney Cleaning • Chimney Repairs • Brick Steps Repaired • Foundaon Repairs • Concrete Repairs & New Walks Installed • Chimney Painng • Chimneys Rebuilt • Chimney Re-lining

585-734-8444

Improvements for your home from foundations to roofs and everything in between, including: • Remodeling and Additions • Kitchens and Baths • Finished Basements • All types of flooring including radiant heat • Windows and Siding

• Garages, Patios, Decks & Pools • Handyman services for small jobs • Masonry and Concrete • Emergency repairs and storm damage - WE WORK WITH YOUR INSURANCE COMPANY

Fully Insured

AT TENTION

HOME SERVICE PROVIDERS

Did you know that City Newspaper Readers spent OVER $90 MILLION DOLLARS on home improvements in the LAST 12 MONTHS? Call Christine today to advertise

585-244-3329 ext. 23

Place your real estate ad by calling 244-3329 ext. 23 or rochestercitynewspaper.com Ad Deadlines: Friday 4pm for Display Ads Monday at noon for Line ads Jam Section 2 TROMBONE PLAYERS NEEDED to play with one of Rochester’s Finest Big Bands. Must read. (Great Charts). Able to rehearse every other Wednesday 585-442-7480 BASS PLAYER I don’t want to hang around in bars. I just want to play some twangy old rock’n’roll, ska, or New Wave. Who’s up for it? Craig at mooskamovers@aol.com BASSIST AVAILABLE: Electric, Acoustic. All styles. Mature, Reliable and Professional. Able to rehearse and open for gigs. Call 585-2609958 fstone@rochester.rr.com CALLING ALL MUSICIANS OF ALL GENRES the Rochester Music Coalition wants you! Please register on our website. For further info: www.rochestermusiccoalition.org info@rochestermusiccoalition.org 585-235-8412

CHRISTIAN ROCK - R & B Band is seeking a second lead / rhythm guitarist 585-355-4449 DRUMMER WITH JAZZ skills applied to R&B and funk, originals & covers. Evenings open, transportation. Working Western New York Contact Bobby 585328-4121 sitting heavyonsd@ yahoo.com EXP. DRUMMER Strong vocals to join (keyboard)/ (keyboard bass) who also sings lead. To form duo (Retro Pop/Dance/Jazz). Must be willing to shop the musical product around to get gigs 585-426-7241 GUITAR & KEYBOARDS, performing R&B, funk, covers & originals, vocals a plus. Be ready to learn & work. Preparing for studio Gigs. Contact Bobby 585-328-4121 MEET OTHER MUSICIANS any instrument, male singer- jam together- coffee house, private

MEN ENJOY SINGINING Fun with the Chorus of the Genesee, Sing, learn, perform, share laughs and libation! Guest night Tuesday at 7 PM. Stop in at 58 E Main St, Webster. Call 585-698-7784 ROCK STAR, MR. ROCHESTER, lead vocalist, is looking to form band (Classic Rock) with lead guitarist, bassist, drummer & rhythm guitars Covers & originals 585-473-5089 THE GREGORY KUNDE CHORALE is looking for male voices. Call for an audition now to join our fourteenth season! Info Line 377 7568 or visit our website www. gregorykundechorale.org WANTED: gospel baritone background singer(male). must

continues on page 40

TO ADVERTISE CONTACT CHRISTINE TODAY!

CALL 244-3329 X23 OR EMAIL CHRISTINE@ROCHESTER-CITYNEWS.COM

RochesterSells.com

Ryan Smith 585-201-0724

Ryan Smith

NYS Licensed Real Estate Salesperson 201-0724

WEBSTER WATERFRONT! Move-in and enjoy amazing views & spectacular sunsets from your private, bay front retreat with direct access to 120’ of frontage. Completely renovated in the last 6 yrs; over $200K in improvements! 4bdrm, 2 bath, Webster Schools, $329,900

A cooperative effort of City Newspaper and RochesterCityLiving, a program of the Landmark Society.

gigs, I play keys Call Martin 585-266-6337

Find your way home with

East Irond., 38 Lodge Dr. Quaint Cape Cod! Move in Ready! New roof 2011. Ryan Smith 585-201-0724

HomeWork

Search. Buy. Sell.

Maintenance-Free, Resort-Style Living! Desirable one-level open flr plan w/breathtaking views of Irondequoit Bay; pool, club house, tennis & boat docks on site. Totally renovated maple & granite kitchen, new appliances. Possible guest bdrm /office has full-size Murphy bed & storage built-ins; available w/or w/o furnishings, $175,000.

Opportunity on Elmdorf

209 Elmdorf Avenue Built in 1914, the house at 209 Elmdorf Avenue is a beautiful American Foursquare, yet another example of the charming details and quality craftsmanship that is found over and over again in the 19th Ward neighborhood. Elmdorf Avenue is a quiet street with well-maintained homes and an obvious pride of ownership. During a recent Saturday afternoon visit, neighbors could be seen busying themselves in their well-kept yards, tidying everything up before the long winter sets in. This block sits just beyond the 19th Ward’s prestigious Sibley Tract, convenient to neighborhood amenities like schools, churches, the Arnett Branch Library, and the commercial spine on Thurston Rd. A large generous porch welcomes you into the home, featuring tapered Craftsman style columns and a handsome beadboard ceiling. Enter through the front door and you pass through a handsome tile floored vestibule with a historic stamped tin wall lining. The hardwood floors throughout the house are of the narrow board “Rochester style” and are in very good shape. All of the woodwork is untouched original gumwood including crown moldings and beadboard everywhere you look. The living room features a large bay window and a small built-in bookcase with glass doors adjacent to the main staircase—a charming and cozy detail. The living room flows into a beautiful dining room, which features a coffered

ceiling, stained glass window, beadboard wainscoting and a recessed window seat. Off the dining room is an original butler’s pantry that provides ample storage for food and dishes. The updated kitchen has a stunning tin ceiling and access to the basement and side door as well as the back yard. A well-appointed half bath is off of the kitchen. As you ascend to the second floor you pass another handsome leaded glass window. The second floor landing features a built-in linen closet and provides access to three bedrooms, a full bathroom and a large unfinished attic. There is a spacious master bedroom with a large walk-in closet and access to a sleeping porch overlooking the generous back yard. The handsome floors and moldings continue throughout the second level. With just under 1500 square feet, 209 Elmdorf Ave. is listed at $79,900, ready and waiting for a new owner to move in and make this home truly shine. The house is eligible for the University of Rochester employee home ownership incentive program which provides a grant of $9,000. For more details visit www. rochester.edu/working/hr/benefits/housing/. For more information about the property, contact Ruth Cronkwright of Nothnagle Realtors at 585.259.2237. by Nick Delahanty-Swauger Nick is a Landmark Society volunteer.

Rose Gabriele, Associate Broker - 585-749-7064

RochesterNY.com ...Your Link to Local Real Estate

rochestercitynewspaper.com City 39

> page 39 be dedicated. please, call jean@(585)747-6705

Lost and Found LOST 14x20 inch canvas portrait man and tropical birds. Artwalk vicinity zips 14620, 14618, 14607. Reward. Margot Fass 733-0563

Looking For... BUYING FURS Stoles $65, Jackets $125, Coats $225. Paying Cash. 716-348-2823

Music Services BASS LESSONS Acoustic, electric, all styles. Music therory and composition for all

instruments. Former Berklee and Eastman Teacher. For more information, call 585-260-9958 PIANO LESSONS In your home or mine. Patient, experienced instructor teaching all ages, levels and musical styles. Call Scott: 585- 465-0219. Visit www. pianolessonsrochester.com

Miscellaneous FREE DENTAL CLEANING MCC Sophomore Dental Hygiene student looking for volunteer patients interested in complimentary dental cleaning. Must be 2+ years since last professional cleaning. Call 585314-0398 and leave a message for Leslie S. HAS YOUR BUILING SHIFTED OR SETTLED? Contact Woodford

Brothers Inc, for straightening, leveling, foundation and wood frame repairs at 1-800-OLD-BARN www. woodfordbros.com. “Not applicable in Queens county” MARRIAGE IN CRISIS: Have you had an affair? Want to come clean? We may be able to SAVE YOUR MARRIAGE! Contact 323860-6745 or marriage.crisis. help482@gmail.com MOVIE EXTRAS, Actors, Models Make up to $300/day. No Experience required. All looks and ages. Call 866-339-0331 *REDUCE YOUR CABLE BILL!* Get a 4-Room All-Digital Satellite system installed for FREE and programming starting at $19.99/ mo. FREE HD/DVR upgrade for new callers, CALL NOW. 1-800925-7945

SAWMILLS from only $3997MAKE MONEY & SAVE MONEY with your own bandmil Cut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship. FREE Info & DVD www.NorwoodSawmills. com/300N 1-800-578-1363 Ext.300N

Mind Body Spirit

Notices

Wanted to Buy

HEAT & EAT - you don’t have to choose! Find out if you may be eligible for SNAP – the new name for the Food Stamp Program. Call MCLAC NOEP at (585) 295-5624. Prepared by a project of Hunger Solutions New York, USDA/FNS & NYSOTDA. This institution is an equal opportunity provider

BUYING / SELLING BUYING/ SELLING- gold, gold-filled, sterling silver, silver plate, diamonds, fine watches (Rolex, Cartier, Patek Philippe)coins, paintings, furs, estates. Call for appointment 917-696-2024 JAY

NOW CASTING Had an affair? Want to come clean? A new television series may be able to SAVE YOUR MARRIAGE! Contact 323-860-6745 or marriage. crisis.help482@gmail.com

GOD GIFTED PSYCHIC Nicole Goodman Love Specialist, will provide happiness and peace of mind with your lover. Can solve allimpossible problems. Never fails. 1-866-524-6689 WANTED: 23 PEOPLE to lose 5-100lbs! Doctor recommended! Guaranteed! 585-288-7046

CASH FOR CARS! We Buy ANY Car or Truck ,Running or NOT! Damaged, Wrecked, Salvaged OK! Get a top dollar INSTANT offer today! 1-800-267-1591 WANTED: Will Pay up to $15.00 for High School Yearbooks 19001988. Any School/Any State. www.yearbookusa.com or 214514-1040

EMPLOYMENT / CAREER TRAINING

Employment AIRLINE CAREERS - Become an Aviation Maintenance Tech. FAA approved training. Financial aid if qualified – Housing available. Job placement assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 877-492-3059 AIRLINES ARE HIRING Train for hands on Aviation Career. FAA

approved program. Financial aid if qualified- Job Placement Assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance (866)296-7093 DRIVER - $0.01 increase per mile after 6 months. Choose your hometime; Weekly, 7/ON-7/OFF, 14/ON-7/OFF Requires 3 months recent experience. 800-414-9569 www.driveknight.com

$$$HELP WANTED$$$ Extra Income! Assembling CD cases from Home! No Experience Necessary! Call our Live Operators Now! 1-800405-7619 EXT 2450 http://www. easywork-greatpay.com (AAN CAN) IMMEDIATE HIRE Great personalities needed, Campaign work, Build your resume with real skills. Call today 585-310-1939 or emailRochesterField@gmail.com

MOVIE EXTRAS, Actors, Models Make up to $300/day. No Experience required. All looks and ages. Call 866-339-0331

Volunteers A SECOND THOUGHT Resale Shop in East Rochester is accepting applications for volunteer sale associates and online researchers. Shop benefits people with disabilities in Guatemala. Call (585) 340-2000. FOSTER PARENTS WANTED! Monroe County is looking for adults age 21 and over to consider opening their homes to foster children. Call 334-9096 or visit www. MonroeFosterCare.org. HERITAGE CHRISTIAN STABLES, a therapeutic horsemanship program for children and adults with developmental disabilities, is looking for volunteers to serve as horse leaders and side walkers. Call Kim Kennedy at (585)

340-2016 or email kkennedy@ heritagechristianservices.org HUNDREDS OF VOLUNTEERS ARE NEEDED to help make the Annual Joe Benet Memorial Kazoo Fest a great success. No previous volunteer experience is needed and volunteers may select their preferred Kazoo Fest location, as well as their preferred dates and times. A mandatory volunteer training is required for all new volunteers, which will be held on a date to be determined at the Camp Good Days’ Headquarters in Mendon, for those wishing to volunteer in the Rochester area. Anyone who would like information about volunteering at the Camp Good Days’ Kazoo Fest can contact Melissa Cappelluti at Camp Good Days, at 585-624-5555 or mcappelluti@campgooddays.org. More information and the Kazoo Fest Volunteer Form can also be found at www.campgooddays.org. ROCHESTER CARES is looking for volunteers interested in joining us to make a difference in Rochester!!

salon bella vita

SEEKING HAIRSTYLIST & NAIL TECHNICIAN Established Salon located in the heart of the Village of Pittsford is looking for a hard-working, creative Stylist & Nail Technician. We are a professional, established, nononsense salon. Our credits include the News Channel 8 anchor staff. PLEASE CALL 585-820-9062 TO SCHEDULE AN INTERVIEW.

One time and recurring volunteer opportunities with a wide range of organizations. www.rochestercares. org/calendar.php SCHOOL #12 999 South Ave. is looking for reading & math volunteers, English & Spanish. Training provided. Call Vicki 585461-4282 VOLUNTEER GROUP works with Local Non-Profits, Charity Works for Rochester, meets 3rd Thursday each Month 7:30PM Al Sigl Center, 1000 Elmwood Ave. Door 5 Lower level conference room 585-234-0187 VOLUNTEERS NEEDED for the Men’s Emergency Winter Shelter at Dimitri House. Please call us at 325-1796 for more information or to volunteer your time. VOLUNTEERS NEEDED to depict evangelistic opportunities by means of performing skits in a Church environment. Professional acting not a requirement. This is done in a small Church setting. Contact Pastor Ron @ 585-957-6155 WOMEN: ROCHESTER HABITAT is looking for women 18 years+ to help build a house with a single mother. Visit rochabitat.org or call 546-1470

Business Opportunities HELP WANTED!!! Make $1000 a week mailing brochures from home! FREE Supplies! Helping Home-Workers since 2001! Genuine Opportunity! No experience required. Start Immediately! www.mailing-usa. com (AAN CAN)

Career Training ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home. *Medical, *Business, *Criminal Justice, *Hospitality. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV authorized. Call 800-4819472 www.CenturaOnline.com

Actors Wanted ACTORS/MOVIE EXTRAS Needed immediately for upcoming roles $150-$300 /day depending on job requirements. No experience, all looks needed. 1-800-560-8672 for casting times /locations.

40 City october 24-30, 2012

Legal Ads [ LEGAL NOTICE BUCKINGHAM ASSET MANAGEMENT LLC ] Notice of Organization: Buckingham Asset Management LLC was filed with SSNY on September 17, 2012. Office: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. PO address which SSNY shall mail any process against the LLC served upon it: 259 Alexander St., Rochester, NY 14607. Purpose is to engage in any lawful activity. [ LEGAL NOTICE OTM I, LLC ] Notice of Organization: OTM I, LLC was filed with SSNY on September 14, 2012. Office: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. PO address which SSNY shall mail any process against the LLC served upon it: 135 Taylor Rd, Honeoye Falls, NY 14472. Purpose is to engage in any lawful activity. [ LEGAL NOTICE RAF FUND MANAGER, LLC ] Notice of Organization: RAF Fund Manager, LLC was filed with SSNY on September 10, 2012. Office: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. PO address which SSNY shall mail any process against the LLC served upon it: Lennox Tech Enterprise Center, 150 Lucius Gordon Drive, Suite 100, West Henrietta, NY 14586. Purpose is to engage in any lawful activity. [ LEGAL NOTICE THE ROCHESTER ANGEL FUND ] Notice of Organization: The Rochester Angel Fund, LLC was filed with SSNY on September 10, 2012. Office: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. PO address which SSNY shall mail any process against the LLC served upon it: Lennox Tech Enterprise Center, 150 Lucius Gordon Drive, Suite 100, West Henrietta, NY 14586. Purpose is to engage in any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] CORN HILL DEVELOPMENT, LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 2/24/12. Office in Monroe Co. SSNY design. Agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to The LLC 40 Adams St. Rochester, NY 14608. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] 10N2 ASSOCIATES LLC (LLC) filed Arts. of Org. with NY Secy. of State (SS) on 10/9/12. LLC’s office is in Monroe Co. SS is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS shall mail a copy of any process to 100 Cummings Center, Suite 333C, Beverly, MA 01915. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] 1665 PENFIELD ROAD

LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 9/26/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 75 Langpath Rd., Honeoye Falls, NY 14472. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] 2103 Maiden Lane, LLC was filed with SSNY on September 5, 2012. Office: Monroe County, SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. P.O. address which SSNY shall mail any process against the LLC served upon SSNY: 2103 Maiden Lane, LLC, PO Box 183, North Chili, New York 14514. Purpose is to engage in any lawful activity. Please direct all correspondence to the address below. [ NOTICE ] 5049 RIDGE ROAD LLC (LLC) filed Arts. of Org. with NY Secy. of State (SS) on 9/17/12. LLC’s office is in Monroe Co. SS is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS shall mail a copy of any process to LLC’s principal business location at 4477 Ridge Road West, Rochester, NY 14626. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] 8LEADS LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 8/15/12. Office in Monroe Co. SSNY design. Agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to C/O United States Corporation Agents, Inc. 7014 13th Ave. Ste. 202 Bklyn, NY 11228 Any lawful activity. Registered Agent: United States Corporation Agents, Inc. 7014 13th Ave. Ste. 202 Bklyn, NY 11228. [ NOTICE ] BLUE LAKE PROPERTIES, LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 9/24/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 75 Goodway Drive, Rochester, NY 14623. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] BRL SOLUTIONS, LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 9/13/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Brian R. Leavitt, 121 York Bay Trail, W. Henrietta, NY 14586. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] Burn Rubber Productions, LLC filed Art. of Org. with the New York Department of State on 7/25/2012. Its office is located in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent of the Company upon whom process against it may be served and a copy of any process shall be mailed to 37 Pond Valley Circle Penfield, NY

14526 The purpose of the Company is any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] CGS FABRICATION, LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 10/1/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 855 Publishers Pkwy, Webster, NY 14580. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] CGS WEBSTER MACHINING, LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 10/1/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 855 Publishers Pkwy, Webster, NY 14580. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] CloudSmartz, LLC (LLC) filed Arts. of Org. with NY Secy. of State (SS) on 9/18/2012. LLC’s office is in Monroe Co. SS is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS shall mail a copy of any process to LLC’s principal business location at 332 Jefferson Rd., Rochester, NY 14623. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] COLO BRANDS LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 6/19/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, P.O. Box 2091, NY, NY 10009. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] Elite Realty Investment Group, LLC filed an App. for Authority with the Dept. of State of NY on 9/11/2012. Jurisdiction: Utah and the date of its organization is: 5/2/2012. Office location in New York State: Monroe County . The Secretary of the State of NY (“SSNY”) is designated as agent upon whom process against it may be served, the address to which the SSNY shall mail a copy of such process is: 480 Meigs St., Rochester NY 14607. Address maintained in its jurisdiction is: 10421 South Jordan Gateway, Ste 600, South Jordan UT 84095. The authorized officer in its jurisdiction of organization where a copy of its Certificate of Formation can be obtained is: Director, Dept of Commerce, 160 East 300 South, Salt Lake City, UT 84111. The purpose of the company is: real estate. [ NOTICE ] Goodhand Computing Solutions LLC (LLC) filed Arts. of Org. with NY Secy. of State (SS) on September 27, 2012. LLC’s office is in Monroe County. SS is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS shall mail a copy of any process

to LLC’s principal business location at PO Box 30906, Rochester, NY 14603. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] hBARSCI LLC has filed Articles of Organization with the New York Secretary of State on August 10, 2012. Its principal place of business is located at14 Vantage Drive, Pittsford, New York in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent upon whom process may be served. A copy of any process shall be mailed to 14 Vantage Drive, Pittsford, New York, 14534. The purpose of the LLC is to engage in any lawful activity for which Limited Liability Companies may be organized under Section 203 of the New York Limited Liability Company Law. [ NOTICE ] Index No. 2011-10591 SUPREME COURT STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF MONROE Family First of NY Federal Credit Union, Plaintiff, vs. Estate of Georgea A. Black, a/k/a Georgea Black, Nadine Black, as Executrix; People of the State of New York; United States of America; Nadine Black, Individually, Defendants Pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale dated October 12, 2012 and entered herein, I, the undersigned, the Referee in said Judgment named, will sell at public auction in the front vestibule of the Monroe County Office Building, 39 West Main Street, Rochester, New York, County of Monroe, on November 27, 2012 at 11:00 a.m., on that day, the premises directed by said Judgment to be sold and therein described as follows: ALL THAT TRACT OR PARCEL OF LAND, situate in the Town of Greece, County of Monroe and State of New York, known as 305 Pearson Lane; Tax Account No. 059.07-1-21, described in Deed recorded in Liber 10044 of Deeds, page 501; lot size 80 x 150. Said premises are sold subject to any state of facts an accurate survey may show, zoning restrictions and any amendments thereto, covenants, restrictions, agreements, reservations, and easements of record and prior liens, if any, municipal departmental violations, and such other provisions as may be set forth in the Complaint and Judgment filed in this action. Judgment amount: $68768.0 plus, but not limited to, costs, disbursements, attorney fees and additional allowance, if any, all with legal interest. DATED: October 2012 Aaron Sperano, Esq., Referee LACY KATZEN LLP Attorneys for Plaintiff 130 East Main Street Rochester, New York 14604 Telephone: (585) 324-5767 [ NOTICE ] J. Alberts Medical Services, PLLC, Arts. of Org. filed with SSNY on 08/10/12 Off. Loc.: Monroe County, SSNY designated as agent of LLC

upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to: The PLLC, 1081 Long Pond Rd., Ste. 204, Rochester, NY 14626. Purpose: to engage in Medicine.

whom process against it may be served. SSNY may mail a copy of any process to LLC. 320 Bay Village Drive, Rochester, NY 14609. Purpose: any lawful purpose.

[ NOTICE ] KING PROPERTIES NY, LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 10/17/12. Office in Monroe Co. SSNY desig. agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 2255 Lyell Ave., Ste. 201, Rochester, NY 14606. Purpose: Any lawful purpose.

[ NOTICE ] Not. Of Form. Of J. Lee Management, LLC. Art. Of Org. filed with SSNY 8/17/12. County: Monroe. SSNY is designated Agent of LLC to whom process may be served. SSNY may mail a copy of any process to LLC, PO BOX 259 Spencerport, NY 14559. Purpose any lawful activity.

[ NOTICE ] Lead Pipe Productions LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 8/16/12. Office location Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: the LLC at 23 Maricrest Drive., Rochester, NY 14616. Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Legal Notice of Formation of LLC. Long Pond Road II, LLC (LLC) filed Arts. of Org. with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/10/2012. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process may be served and SSNY shall mail process to c/o Gerald F. Stack, Esq., Hiscock & Barclay, LLP, One Park Place, 300 South State Street, Syracuse, NY 13202. Purpose: any business permitted under law. [ NOTICE ] MILLENNIUM TECHNOLOGY GROUP LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 7/30/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Peter Ferrari, 6 Dover Ct., Rochester, NY 14624. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] Name of LLC: HOPE13, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State: 9/10/12. Office location: Monroe County. Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: 2 Fairview Heights, Rochester, NY 14613. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Not. of Form of SAGER DRIVE PROPERTIES, LLC Art. of org. filed Sec’ty State (SSNY) 9/5/12 Office Location: Monroe County SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served SSNY shall mail copy of process to 1241 University Ave. Rochester, NY 14607 [ NOTICE ] Not. of Form. of DRESCHER PROPERTIES, LLC. Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 9/18/12. Office location Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon

[ NOTICE ] Not. of Form. of Restoration Electrolysis, LLC. Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 8/30/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY may mail a copy of any process to LLC, 125 Sully’s Trail, Suite 5B, Pittsford, NY 14534. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Not. of Form. of RocOn Times, LLC. Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 9/13/12. Office location: Monroe County, SSNY designated as agent upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY may mail a copy of any process to LLC 366 University Ave, Rochester, NY 14607. Purpose: any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Notice is hereby given that a license, number not yet assigned, for a beer & wine license has been applied for by Fiamma, LLC dba Fiamma, 1308 Buffalo Rd, Rochester NY 14624, County of Monroe, Town of Gates, for a restaurant. [ NOTICE ] Notice is hereby given that a license, number not yet assigned, for a full on premise beer, wine & liquor license has been applied for by Kimble Enterprises LLC dba The Crab Shack, 749 E. Henrietta Rd, Rochester NY 14623, County of Monroe, Town of Brighton, for a restaurant. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Form. of 420 PEOPLE, LLC (the “LLC”). Art. of Org. filed with Secretary of the State of NY (SSNY) on 8/13/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, 21 W. Hill Estates, Rochester, NY 14626. Purpose: any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Form. of GRACE CHILD DEVELOPMENT CENTER, LLC (the “LLC”). Art. of Org. filed with Secretary of the State of NY (SSNY) on 8/27/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, 350 North St., Rochester, NY

14605. Purpose: any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Form. of SIN CITY, LLC (the “LLC”). Art. of Org. filed with Secretary of the State of NY (SSNY) on 8/13/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, 21 W. Hill Estates, Rochester, NY 14626. Purpose: any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Almar Affiliate Marketing, LLC, Art. Of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 9/26/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 136 Princess Drive, Rochester, NY 14623. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of BROCKPORT IMMEDIATE CARE LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 08/30/12. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 6565 4th Section Rd., Brockport, NY 14420. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of Catalano & Associates Research LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 8/29/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon who process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 22 Morningside Drive, Spencerport, NY 14559. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Celestial Light Show LLC. Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 9/13/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as process agent. Process Service address: 1900 Clinton Ave S #18046, Rochester, NY 14618. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of COBBLER’S CORNER OF HENRIETTA, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 9/14/2012. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 663 Hinchey Road, Rochester, NY 14624. Purpose: any lawful act [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of DanLin Farms, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/01/12. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 355 St. Joseph St.,

Rochester, NY 14617. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to David C. Pettig & Associates, P.C., 65A Monroe Ave., Pittsford, NY 14534. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of GREENE MEDIATION GROUP, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 8/22/2012. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 150 Hollyvale Drive, Rochester, NY 14618. Purpose: any lawful act [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of JJ ZEBs, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 8/6/2012. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 388 Mason Road, Fairport NY 14450. Purpose: any lawful act. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of Limited Liability Company (LLC). Name:WISEMEN ENTERPRISES LLC. Articles of Organization file with Secretary of State of New York on: 05/31/2012. Office location is Monroe County, New York. The Secretary of State of New York has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. The Secretary of State of New York shall mail a copy of any process to the LLC at 67 Elwood Dr., Rochester, NY 14623. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Limited Liability Company. 1. Name of the Limited Liability Company is RT Fitz LLC. 2. Articles of Organization were filed by Department of State of New York on July 6 2012. 3. County of office: Monroe 4. The company does not have a specific date of dissolution. 5. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent upon whom process against the Company may be served. The address to which process shall be mailed: 580 Colebrook Drive Rochester, NY 14617 6. Purpose: Any lawful purpose [ NOTICE ] NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY. NAME: 140 VINAL, LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 09/07/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY has be en designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to the LLC, 415 Murwood Lane,Webster, New York

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Legal Ads > page 41 14580. Purpose: For any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of MDMS Properties, LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 7/5/2012. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 194 Old English Dr., Rochester, NY 14616. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of MODEST WANDERER & CO. LLC. Art. Of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 09/12/12. Office in Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, 225 Dickinson Rd., Webster, NY 14580. Purpose: online retail. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of MORGAN HOLT RD LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/10/12. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 95 Allens Creek Rd., Rochester, NY 14618. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be

served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Evan & Fox, LLP at the princ. office of the LLC. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Pane Vino, LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 8/3/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 175 N. Water St., Rochester, NY 14614. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of SPEEDY MART, LLC. Articles o f Organization filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 9/12/12. Office location: Monroe County SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to principal business location: The LLC, 2749 Norton Street, Rochester, NY 14609. Purpose: any lawful activity [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of STEVE LADER PROPERTIES, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 09/18/12. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 1545 Mt. Read Blvd., Rochester, NY 14606. SSNY designated as agent

of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Steven Lader at the princ. office of the LLC, regd. agent upon whom and at which process may be served. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Timberlane Apartments, LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 8/30/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 700 Crossroads Bldg., 2 State St., Rochester, NY 14614. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Organization: The Little Speed Shop, LLC was filed with SSNY on December 27, 2010. Office: 500 Lee Rd. Building C Rochester, NY Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. PO address which SSNY shall mail any process against the LLC served upon it: 500 Lee Rd. Building C Rochester, NY 14606. Purpose is to engage in any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of JDL Warm Construction LLC. App. for Auth. filed Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 8/29/12. Off. loc.:

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Monroe County. LLC formed in Ohio (OH) on 12/31/08. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: National Corporate Research, Ltd., 10 E. 40th St., 10th Fl., NY, NY 10016, the registered agent upon whom process may be served. OH address of LLC: 1125 W 8th St., Ste. 100, Cincinnati, OH 45203. Arts. of Org. filed OH Secy. of State, 180 East Broad St., Columbus, OH 43215. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] SONG MAKERS AND PUBLISHING, LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 09/20/12. Office location: Monroe County, SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served,.. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, PO Box 60176, Rochester, NY 14606. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] SUPREME COURT COUNTY OF MONROE CITIMORTGAGE, INC., Plaintiff against RENEE M. FALZOLARE, et al Defendant(s). Pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered herein and dated May 29, 2007, I, the undersigned Referee will sell at public auction on the front steps of the Monroe County Office Building, 39 W. Main Street, Rochester, NY on the 15th day of November, 2012 at 10:00 AM premises situate in the Town on Greece, County of Monroe, State of New York, known and distinguished as Lot No. 121, as laid down on a map of Westwood Manor No. 6 addition a subdivision of the Conrad Baker Farm, Town of Greece, made by W. Fred Sullivan, surveyor and filed in the Monroe County Clerk’s Office in Liber 67 of Maps, at Page 36. Said Lot No. 121 is situate on the west side of Bakerdale Road and is of the dimensions as shown on said map. Said premises known as 268 BAKERDALE ROAD, ROCHESTER, NY Approximate amount of lien $ 85,746.49 plus interest & costs. Premises will be sold subject to provisions of filed judgment and terms of sale. Index Number 13884/06. THEODORE S. KANTOR, ESQ., Referee. Sweeney, Gallo, Reich & Bolz, LLP Attorney(s) for Plaintiff 95-25 Queens Blvd., 11th Floor Rego Park, NY 11374 [ NOTICE ] UNIUNI, LLC (LLC) filed Arts. of Org. with NY Secy. of State (SS) on 9/6/12. LLC’s office is in Monroe Co. SS is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS shall mail a copy of any process to LLC’s principal business location at 220 Winton Road South, Rochester, NY 14610. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Zarpentine Farms R & K, LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 8/15/12. Office location:

42 City october 24-30, 2012

Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Kimberly A. Francis, 1 Panarities Lane, Hilton, NY 14468. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of BIT PROPULSION LABORATORY, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 07/26/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Business Filings Inc., 187 Wolf Rd., Ste. 101, Albany, NY 12205, regd. agent upon whom and at which process may be served. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] Name: 525 BALLANTYNE ROAD LLC. Arts. Of Org. filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 09/06/2012. Office Location: Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to: C/ O 525 BALLANTYNE ROAD LLC, One East Main Street, 10th Floor, Rochester, New York 14614. Purpose: Any Lawful Purpose. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] Name: BLISSFUL BALANCE LLC. Arts. Of Org. filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 09/05/2012. Office Location: Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to: C/O BLISSFUL BALANCE LLC, One East Main Street, 10th Floor, Rochester, New York 14614. Purpose: Any Lawful Purpose. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY ] IDEAL APPEAL, LLC (“LLC”), has filed Articles of Organization with the NY Secretary of State (“NYSS”) on August 7, 2012 pursuant to Section 203 of the NY Limited Liability Company Law. The office of the LLC shall be located in Monroe County, NY. The NYSS is designated as the agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served, and the address to which the NYSS shall mail a copy of any process served on him against the LLC is P.O. Box 25092, Rochester, NY 14625. The purpose of the LLC is to engage in any lawful act or activity for which limited liability companies may be formed under the law. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY ] The name of the Limited Liability Company is Shooter’s SBG, LLC. The Articles of Organization were filed with the NY Secretary of State on September

12, 2012. The office of the Company is located in Monroe County, NY. The NY Secretary of State is designated as the agent of the Company upon whom process in any action or proceeding against it may be served, and the address to which the Secretary of State shall mail a copy of process in any action or proceeding against the Company served upon him or her is: 1080 Pittsford Victor Road, Suite 201, Pittsford, NY 14534. The purpose of the business of the Company is to engage in any lawful activity for which limited liability companies may be organized under the laws of the NY. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY ] The name of the Limited Liability Company is Shooter’s SBG Holdings, LLC. The Articles of Organization were filed with the NY Secretary of State on September 19, 2012. The office of the Company is located in the Monroe County, NY. The NY Secretary of State is designated as the agent of the Company upon whom process in any action or proceeding against it may be served, and the address to which the Secretary of State shall mail a copy of process in any action or proceeding against the Company served upon him or her is: 1080 Pittsford Victor Road, Suite 201, Pittsford, NY 14534. The purpose of the business of the Company is to engage in any lawful activity for which limited liability companies may be organized under the laws of the State of New York [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LLC O’Neill Real Estate, LLC has filed articles of organization with the New York Secretary of State on July 12, 2012. Its principal place of business is located at 849 Rush Scottsville Road, Rush, New York in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent upon whom process may be served. The post office address within or without this state to which the secretary of state shall mail a copy of any process against the LLC served upon him or her is Corporation Service Company, 80 State Street, Albany, New York, 12207. Corporation Service Company, 80 State Street, Albany, New York, 12207, is the registered agent of the limited liability company upon whom process against it may be served. The purpose of the LLC is to engage in any lawful activity for which Limited Liability Companies may be organized under Section 203 of the New York Limited Liability Company Law. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LLC ] Cognitive Innovations, LLC has filed articles of organization with the New York Secretary of State on September 26, 2012. Its

principal place of business is located at 219 Frankland Road, Rochester, New York in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent upon whom process may be served. A copy of any process shall be mailed to 219 Frankland Road, Rochester, New York 14617. The purpose of the LLC is to engage in any lawful activity for which Limited Liability Companies may be organized under Section 203 of the New York Limited Liability Company Law. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF PLLC ] Notice of Formation of Frank A Guercio CPA, PLLC. Arts. of Org. were filed with the Secretary of State of NY (SSNY) on July 13, 2012. office location is Monroe County, New York. The SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. The SSNY shall mail a copy of any process to the LLC at 1130 Crosspointe Lane Ste 4, Webster, New York 14580. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE OF SALE ] Index No. 2010-16220 SUPREME COURT STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF MONROE ESL Federal Credit Union, Plaintiff, vs. Robert E. Stout; Stella L. Dougherty, Defendants. Pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale dated September 15, 2011 and entered herein, I, the undersigned, the Referee in said Judgment named, will sell at public auction in the front vestibule of the Monroe County Office Building, 39 West Main Street, Rochester, New York, County of Monroe, on November 5, 2012 at 10:30 a.m., on that day, the premises directed by said Judgment to be sold and therein described as follows: ALL THAT TRACT OR PARCEL OF LAND, situate in the City of Rochester, bounded and described as follows: Known as Lot 5 of the Edward Vandenberg Subdivision, as laid down on a map of said subdivision dated December 19, 1938 and filed in the Monroe County Clerk’s Office in Liber 89 of Maps, page 13 on the 23rd day of January, 1939. Said Lot 5 is situate on the easterly side of Mildorf Street and is 47 feet wide front and rear and 108.61 feet deep on its southerly line and 108.44 feet on its northerly line. Tax Acct. No. 107.65-2-10 Property Address: 172 Mildorf Street, City of Rochester, New York Said premises are sold subject to any state of facts an accurate survey may show, zoning restrictions and any amendments thereto, covenants, restrictions, agreements, reservations, and easements of record and prior liens, if any, municipal departmental violations, and such other

provisions as may be set forth in the Complaint and Judgment filed in this action. Judgment amount: $54,627.04 plus, but not limited to, costs, disbursements, attorney fees and additional allowance, if any, all with legal interest. DATED: September 2012 William J. MacDonald, Esq., Referee LACY KATZEN LLP Attorneys for Plaintiff 130 East Main Street Rochester, New York 14604 Telephone: (585) 324-5767 [ NOTICE OF SALE ] Index No. 2012-3782 SUPREME COURT STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF MONROE ESL Federal Credit Union Plaintiff, vs. Donald J. Payne; Janice H. Rose; Casa Associates, LLC; Susan Payne, Defendants. Pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale dated October 15, 2012 and entered herein, I, the undersigned, the Referee in said Judgment named, will sell at public auction in the front vestibule of the Monroe County Office Building, 39 West Main Street, Rochester, New York, County of Monroe, on November 21, 2012 at 11:00 a.m., on that day, the premises directed by said Judgment to be sold and therein described as follows: ALL THAT TRACT OR PARCEL OF LAND, situate in the Town of Ogden, County of Monroe and State of New York, known as 18 Sheldon Drive, Spencerport, NY 14559, Tax Account No. 102.02-1-54, described in Deed recorded in Liber 10910 of Deeds, page 643; lot size 100 x 314. Said premises are sold subject to any state of facts an accurate survey may show, zoning restrictions and any amendments thereto, covenants, restrictions, agreements, reservations, and easements of record and prior liens, if any, municipal departmental violations, and such other provisions as may be set forth in the Complaint and Judgment filed in this action. Judgment amount: $192,576.34 plus, but not limited to, costs, disbursements, attorney fees and additional allowance, if any, all with legal interest. DATED: October 2012 Deborah Field, Esq., Referee LACY KATZEN LLP Attorneys for Plaintiff 130 East Main Street Rochester, New York 14604 Telephone:(585) 324-5767 [ TRENTON ] Take notice that in accordance with N.J.S.A. 39:10A-8 et. seq,. application has been made to the New Jersey Motor Vehicle Commision, Trenton, N.J. to receive title of 2007 Subaru Forester JF1SG65677H713287 Objections if any, should be made immediately in writing to Special Title Section / abandoned Vehicle Unit, PO Box 017, Trenton, N.J. 08666-0017

Fun [ news of the weird ] BY CHUCK SHEPHERD For September’s Digital Design Weekend at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London, artists Michiko Nitta and Michael Burton commissioned soprano Louise Ashcroft to sing, altering pitch and volume while wearing a face mask made of algae. According to the artists, since algae’s growth changes with the amount and quality of carbon dioxide it receives, Ashcroft’s voice, blowing CO2 against the algae, should vary the growth’s “taste” as to bitterness or sweetness. After the performance, the audience sampled the algae at various stages and apparently agreed. The artists said they were demonstrating how biotechnology could transform organisms.

The Entrepreneurial Spirit

— Jordan and Bryan Silverman’s start-up venture, Star Toilet Paper, distributes rolls to public restrooms in restaurants, stadiums and other locations absolutely free -- because the brothers have sold ads on each sheet. (Company slogan: “Don’t rush. Look before you flush.”) Jordan, with 50 advertisers enlisted so far, told the Detroit Free Press in August that he came up with the idea, of course, while sitting on the can at the University of Michigan library. — First-World Problems: After an international trade association reported that women bought 548 million pairs of shoes in 2011 (not even counting those used exclusively for sports), the manufacturer Nine West has decided to start its own cable TV channel with programing on “various aspects of footwear,” according to an August New York Times report. Programs will feature celebrities rhapsodizing about their favorite pair, women who hoard shoes (purchasing many more than they know they’ll ever wear even one time), tips on developing one’s stilettowalking skills and shoe closet designs.

It’s about a “conversation,” said a Nine West executive, “not about a shoe.” — Habersham Funding of Georgia and its competitors make their money by buying terminally ill clients’ life insurance policies for lump sums, then continuing to pay the policies’ premiums so that they collect as beneficiaries upon death. The companies’ business model therefore depends on those clients dying quickly; a client who outlives expectations turns the investment sour. Thus, according to an August report by the New York Times, the companies run extensive background checks on the illnesses and lifestyles of potential clients and employ sophisticated computer algorithms that predict, better than doctors can, how long a client will live. Supposedly, according to the report, the companies are nonchalant about erroneous predictions. No company, they claim, has an official policy of hoping for early death.

Least Competent Criminals — Pathetic: (1) Kalpeshkumar Patel, 40,

failed in June to carry out his longstanding threat to burn down the Chevron station in High Springs, Fla. After dousing his car with gasoline in front of the store, he realized he had no lighter or matches and had to ask several customers, without success, to help him out. He was arrested before he could do any damage. (2) Ignatius “Michael” Pollara, 46, and his mother, 70, were arrested following what police said was a 10-year shoplifting spree that might have spanned 50 states. They were nabbed in Fort Lauderdale, Fla., because, said sheriff’s Sgt. Rich Rossman, Pollara could not resist using a “rewards” card traced to him, which he used to get credit for some of the purchases he had switched for more expensive items.

[ LAST WEEK’S SOLUTION ON PAGE 37 ]

[ LOVESCOPE ] BY EUGENIA LAST ARIES (March 21-April 19): Avoid an involvement with a colleague or someone who can influence your professional future. Anyone who wants to keep you a secret is hiding something from you as well as others. Judge your relationships based on honesty, and you’ll recognize ulterior motives. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): You’ll be attracted to someone unusual or from a different cultural background. Explore the possibilities, but before you become too involved, make sure that you aren’t heading toward a dead end. Love is within reach if you choose someone who shares your beliefs and traditions.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Work will dominate your life. Don’t miss out on love because you are too busy to recognize that someone is showing an interest in you that isn’t strictly business. Size up your situation, and consider mixing business with pleasure. Passion is highlighted. CANCER (June 21-July 22): Your body language will attract a lot of attention. Love and romance, along with emotional highs will be yours if you participate in activities or events that are of an unusual nature. Discuss your plans, and you will find someone who wants to share your dreams. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Don’t

believe a smooth talker when it comes to affairs of the heart. Bide your time and listen carefully to what’s being promised. Keep moving and looking for someone who has more in common with you than the person just looking for a one-night stand. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Taking part in organized events or traveling for fun will lead to an interesting individual who can match you step for step when it comes to your future hopes and wishes. Love is in the stars, but you must reach out to the person who shares your goals. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Don’t let the past haunt you. If some-

one you can’t stop thinking about is standing in the way of your happiness, you must address your feelings and close the book on the one holding the key to your heart. Make an effort to deal with an old flame. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Live out your fantasies. Engage in unusual pastimes that are geared toward the type of entertainment you enjoy most. Don’t be afraid to discuss your desires with someone who is as experimental as you, and you will find the perfect balance among love, romance and commitment. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Tread carefully -- emotional

deception is apparent. Ask questions and find out exactly what’s being offered before you jump to conclusions. Ulterior motives are present. Personal and domestic changes, coupled with entertaining friends, will lead to a surprising revelation about someone you’ve known for some time. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Share your plans and you’ll have no trouble attracting a potential partner who wants to come along for the ride. Your charismatic, confident nature will bring suitable candidates ready to offer you as much as you are offering in return. Enjoy the moment, and build a solid future.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Not everyone will have good intentions when it comes to personal relationships. Protect your assets and your secrets for the time being. It’s better to stick to the people you know best and forego anyone trying to push you into a situation that is intimate without commitment. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Keep it simple when it comes to love. If someone wants to be by your side, you won’t need money in order to command attention. Enjoy the company of the person willing to spend time discovering who you are and what you have in common.

rochestercitynewspaper.com City 43

44 City october 24-30, 2012


October 24-30, 2012 - City Newspaper