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Greater Rochester’s Alternative Newsweekly

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Vol 43 No 3

AND MORE MUSIC, PAGE 12

News. Music. Life.

Frustrated by our seemingly endless stream of conflicts, the artist finds refuge in his work.” ART REVIEW, PAGE 24

The reinvention of Kodak Park DEVELOPMENT, PAGE 8

GOP’s Latino love. POLITICS, PAGE 5

FRINGE FEST: Reviews, Photos, Best of the Fest. SPECIAL SECTION, INSIDE

Inside Downtown 2013 Official Guide. INSIDE

REPRODUCTIVE RIGHTS | BY TIM LOUIS MACALUSO | PAGE 6 | PHOTO BY MARK CHAMBERLIN

The holy war next door The images of dismembered fetuses seem to sear into the sidewalk in the 100 block of University Avenue. Anti-abortion advocates, some carrying signs, others holding religious objects like crucifixes and rosary beads stand on both sides of the entrance to Planned Parenthood’s Rochester office. When a blue pickup truck pulls out of the lot, a protestor yells at the driver and passenger, “If you had an abortion, you just murdered your baby.” The

startled driver says that they were only there for a medical exam and birth control. “From people who kill babies?” the protester says. “Why would you go to a place that kills babies for that?” Such exchanges — and much worse — are common outside Planned Parenthood’s facility. Officials at Planned Parenthood say that they are used to the demonstrations. But it’s not just the facility and its clients that are affected.


Feedback We welcome your comments. Send them to themail@ rochester-citynews.com, or post them on our website, rochestercitynewspaper.com, our Facebook page, or our Twitter feed, @roccitynews. For our print edition, we select comments from all three sources; those of fewer than 350 words have a greater chance of being published, and we do edit selections for publication in print. We don’t publish comments sent to other media.

RIT is partnering with RCSD

Reporter Tim Louis Macaluso is right: RIT should be partnering with the City School District to improve educational results (“How About Partnering With the District?” News). In fact, we have been partnering with them for years, and will continue to do so, even as we partner with Uncommon Schools in the development of a new charter high school. Our RIT Science and Technology Entry Program provides academic enrichment and college and career exploration to 7-12 grade students. Our Middle College program offers college readiness skills to academically eligible 9th through 12-graders; our Rochester City Scholars Program covers full tuition for financially eligible City School District graduates who are admitted as freshman to fulltime study in baccalaureate programs at RIT. Since its inception in 2010, 74 scholars have come to RIT, 81 percent are still in the program, and 42 percent have earned a 3.0 grade point average or higher. The first class of scholars is expected to graduate in May 2014. Our move to support development of a charter school comes from our experiences with these programs and our strong belief that we need to do more. I wish we had four times as many City Scholars, 2 CITY

but frankly, not enough city students are getting the academic preparation to graduate with the necessary grades, let alone succeed in the academically rigorous university setting. It’s true, we have a vested interest. Universities need a stronger pipeline of future students who are prepared for college. Until higher education contributes constructively to righting the K-12 ship, it will continue to founder and the futures that await our urban youth will continue to dim. To say, as Macaluso did, that this partnership “does not rise to the level of being innovative” shows a misunderstanding of how unique such a partnership is, even at the national level. And it underestimates our commitment, which includes participation from our faculty and students as well access for these students to the university’s classrooms, laboratories, and other facilities. Uncommon Schools’ Rochester Prep has a proven track record of improving learning results for its students. We want – and need – to support that. Rather than quibbling over where a student is enrolled, we must find ways to cultivate academic success among children who live within the city of Rochester. BILL DESTLER

Destler is president of the Rochester Institute of Technology

Tap and Table on our review

I am sorry that Ms. Kenyon didn’t enjoy her time at my restaurant, and I do not feel that the overall article is a fair assessment of the food (Dining Review: Tap and Table). We put a strong emphasis on serving world-class beer and pairing it with the dishes on our menu. We make recommendations for a beer with every dish. There is a hugely diverse range of flavors in craft beer and we

SEPTEMBER 25 - OCTOBER 1, 2013

feel they enhance the meal. This is a major part of what sets Tap and Table apart from other restaurant experiences. I wish Ms. Kenyon had explored this area that is obviously an important part of our identity. While there was no mention of the service in the article, I hope that Ms. Kenyon enjoyed my staff. They provide a knowledgeable, friendly and professional experience. I receive many compliments in this area. Our goal is not “reinvent and reimagine,” as Ms. Kenyon suggests. We prepare dishes with the finest ingredients that are available at the time and strive to keep the food simple and elegant. We hope that the quality and essence of the ingredients are able to shine through. While Ms. Kenyon may believe that we do not “fully reflect Rochester and its surroundings’ unique food bounty,” readers can enjoy a locally sourced food experience that is made possible through our current relationships with the following New York farms: Seven Bridges Farm (Lima), Bolton Farms (Hilton), Cayuga Produce (Cayuga), Lively Run Goat Dairy (Interlaken), Oink and Gobble (Interlaken), Pittsford Dairy (Pittsford), Red Jacket Orchards (Geneva) Mason Farms (Williamson), Old Ridge Farms (Williamson), Grassland Farms (Ovid), and Lagoner Farms (Williamson) JOE MCBANE

McBane is the owner of Tap and Table.

Do black teachers make a difference?

Regarding your “Classroom Chaos” article: The consensus for some time now, including that of the dozen ministers mentioned in the article, is that one of the more attainable solutions to improving the dismal graduation rates and “out of control” behavior

of city school students is to increase the number of African-American teachers, especially males. That’s either common sense or an assumption, and if the later, how safe an assumption? For one thing, more and more of non-white teachers are born or raised or live in the suburbs and may have little in common with their students other than the color of their skin. I once asked a popular black teacher at Franklin High School, who has since died, what difference he felt his race and gender had on his students; his response: “Ask my students.” Seems to me there should enough data now supporting this assumption; how are kids performing and acting with primarily African-American (male) teachers? Otherwise, assumptions abound. JIM GRAHAM

Racism’s status

I first thought Mary Anna Towler’s “Slim Progress on Racism” was a satirical piece (Urban Journal). Slim progress? Really? We have a black president, a black attorney general, and roughly 20 percent of the federal workforce is black while only 14 percent of the US population is black. Forty-plus percent of all federal entitlements go to black Americans – three times the rate that go to whites and five times the rate that go to Hispanics. I laughed out loud when Towler referenced “the assault” on voting rights. You need an ID to drive a car, cash a check, take out a library book, and buy a beer, but requiring an ID from someone if they want to vote is racist? Yes, racism still exists in our country today, but not Jesse and Al’s version of racism from yesteryear. Today’s racism has created an atmosphere that makes it ok for blacks to “expect” (and receive) better treatment than whites and to receive compensation without

obligation. It’s also created a massive population of selfloathing white Americans (the mainstream media, politicians, actors, musicians, professors, and in many cases our own children and grandchildren) who are taught to be ashamed for sins they did not commit (slavery, bigotry, etc). Towler didn’t mention the white kid on the bus who was nearly trampled to death; three black teenagers have been charged. Or how about the World War II (white) vet who was beaten to death and blacks have been charged? Or the Australian baseball player in Oklahoma who police say was killed by black kids because they were bored? Articles like Towler’s are not only completely false, they are also counterproductive. I’d like to think blacks who suffered the tragedy of slavery would equally be offended by the reverse racism that exists in our society today. I believe that they only wanted to be free and be able to have the same opportunities that every other American has. Unfortunately, Jesse Jackson, Al Sharpton, and Obama don’t want equality for blacks. They want a leg up, a free pass, a guarantee of success, happiness, etc. Our Constitution clearly states that all people have the right to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. This is not a guarantee of happiness, riches, etc. It’s a guarantee of the right to pursue it, and your success or failure falls entirely on your shoulders, based on your work ethic, ingenuity, intellect, etc. Slavery would never have ended if not for the brave (and just) actions of millions of white Americans, many of whom paid the ultimate price for the freedom that black Americans enjoy today. There are no more debts to be paid or reparations to be had. Slim progress? No, massive progress that basically has eliminated racism as it was once known. TOM BAGLIO

News. Music. Life. Greater Rochester’s Alternative Newsweekly September 25 - October 1, 2013 Vol 43 No 3 250 North Goodman Street Rochester, New York 14607-1199 themail@rochester-citynews.com phone (585) 244-3329 fax (585) 244-1126 rochestercitynewspaper.com Publishers: William and Mary Anna Towler Editor: Mary Anna Towler Asst. to the publishers: Matt Walsh Editorial department themail@rochester-citynews.com Features editor: Eric Rezsnyak News editor: Christine Carrie Fien Staff writers: Tim Louis Macaluso, Jeremy Moule Music editor: Willie Clark Music writer: Frank De Blase Calendar editor: Rebecca Rafferty Contributing writers: Paloma Capanna, Casey Carlsen, Roman Divezur, George Grella, Andy Klingenberger, Dave LaBarge, Kathy Laluk, Adam Lubitow, Ron Netsky, Dayna Papaleo, Suzan Pero, Rebecca Rafferty, David Yockel Jr. Editorial interns: Trevor Lewis, Colin McCoy Art department artdept@rochester-citynews.com Art director/production manager: Matt DeTurck Designers: Aubrey Berardini, Mark Chamberlin Photographers: Mark Chamberlin, Frank De Blase, Michael Hanlon Photography intern: Larissa Coe Advertising department ads@rochester-citynews.com Sales operations: Matt Walsh New sales development: Betsy Matthews Account executives: Nancy Burkhardt, Tom Decker, Christine Kubarycz, William Towler Classified sales representatives: Christine Kubarycz, Tracey Mykins Operations/Circulation kstathis@rochester-citynews.com Circulation manager: Katherine Stathis Distribution: Andy DiCiaccio, David Riccioni, Northstar Delivery, Wolfe News City Newspaper is available free of charge. Additional copies of the current issue may be purchased for $1, payable in advance at the City Newspaper office. City Newspaper may be distributed only by authorized distributors. No person may, without prior written permission of City Newspaper, take more than one copy of each weekly issue. City (ISSN 1551-3262) is published weekly by WMT Publications, Inc. Periodical postage paid at Rochester, NY (USPS 022-138). Send address changes to City, 250 North Goodman Street, Rochester, NY 14607. City is a member of the Association of Alternative Newsweeklies and the New York Press Association. Subscriptions: $35.00 ($30.00 for senior citizens) for one year. Add $10 yearly for out-of-state subscriptions: add $30 yearly for foreign subscriptions. Due to the initial high cost of establishing new subscriptions, refunds for fewer than ten months cannot be issued. Copyright by WMT Publications Inc., 2013 - all rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, photocopying, recording or by any information storage retrieval system without permission of the copyright owner.


Powerballs

URBAN JOURNAL | BY MARY ANNA TOWLER

The gun carnage grows. How much do we care? Is there anything left to be said about guns and violence? Charles Blow got it right in the Times following the terror in the Washington Navy Yard last week. “Another mass shooting,” Blow wrote. “Another round of shock, sadness, and outrage. Another pitched discussion about rights and responsibilities, mental illness and background checks. And then nothing.” And then nothing. Americans own vastly more guns than the people of any other country – “simply too many guns in this country,” Blow wrote, “to ever ensure that some portion will not fall into the hands of the criminally inclined or the violently insane.” And Blow doesn’t mention other categories of gun users: the child who gets hold of a parent’s gun and fires it by accident or in play, for instance, or the adult who is neither violently insane nor criminally inclined but who – because of anger-management issues or too much alcohol – momentarily loses control and fires his weapon. Or the teenager who ends his personal pain by turning a gun on himself. Since the Navy Yard shooting, much of the media commentary has focused on mental illness. Certainly this country needs to give much more attention to mental health – not just because a small minority of people afflicted with mental illness become violent, but because too many people suffer from it and we need much more research and much more affordable treatment. As important as that issue is, though, narrowing the discussion to mental illness diverts our attention from the broader problem. And that is the lack of adequate gun-control laws. As Blow says, there are simply too many guns in this country. The resulting violence is a terrible public health menace. We know what we should do about it. But we have let gun manufacturers, the NRA, and an exaggerated fear of crime paralyze us into inaction. In his Times article, Blow notes a troubling change in the United States: the reason people say they own a gun. According to a Pew Research Center poll, Blow says, hunting is no longer the main reason for gun ownership. It’s self protection. Many gun owners have convinced themselves that they are not

Narrowing the discussion to mental illness diverts our attention from the real problem: the lack of adequate gun-control laws.”

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safe in their own homes unless they own a gun – and that if they carry guns wherever they go, they’ll be able to step in and prevent tragedies like the ones in Aurora, Colorado. And Newtown, Connecticut. And Washington, DC. And gun-rights radicals go after legislators who support even the mildest restrictions on gun ownership. A tragedy like the Washington Navy Yard shootings “ought to be a shock to us all as a nation and as a people,” President Obama said in his tribute to the Navy Yard victims on Sunday. “It ought to obsess us. It ought to lead to some sort of transformation. That’s what happened in other countries when they experienced similar tragedies.” But, he said, “sometimes I fear there’s a creeping resignation that these tragedies are just somehow the way it is, that this is somehow the new normal.” “No other advanced nation endures this kind of violence – none,” said Obama. “Here in America, the murder rate is three times what it is in other developed nations. The murder rate with guns is 10 times what it is in other developed nations. And there is nothing inevitable about it. It comes about because of decisions we make or fail to make. And it falls upon us to make it different.” So far, though, we haven’t developed the will to make it different. “Our hearts are broken – again,” said Obama. “And we care so deeply about these families. But the question is, do we care enough?” Apparently not. And at this point, I can’t imagine that we ever will. If the slaughter of 20 little children in a Connecticut elementary school last year didn’t spur us to action, I can’t imagine what will.

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[ NEWS FROM THE WEEK PAST ]

Ministers intervene for Hardaway

The United Christian Leadership Ministry is coming to Brenda Hardaway’s defense. Hardaway was arrested and charged after a hostile encounter with a Rochester police officer last month. She was subsequently indicted by a grand injury on six charges, including two felonies. The UCLM, a coalition of local ministers, says it will file a judicial complaint against State Supreme Court Justice Francis Affronti for raising Hardaway’s bail. The group also wants City Council to investigate the incident, which went viral in a YouTube video and shows an RPD officer striking Hardaway in the head, and has started a petition for a US Department of Justice investigation.

COMIDA board’s busy day

The Monroe County Industrial Development Agency board approved incentives for two E. J. Del Monte Corp. hotel projects, for an expansion at the Genesee brewery, and for Fee Brothers to add more warehouse space. One of the Del Monte hotels is in Greece, the other will

be part of College Town on Mt. Hope Avenue. The COMIDA board also approved incentives for the expansion of a multi-use building in a Greece office park and for NOHMS Technology, a lithium sulfur battery technology development company in Eastman Business Park.

News

EPA proposes power plant rules

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency proposed regulations that would rein in carbon emissions from new power plants, via the Clean Air Act. In a press release, EPA also said it’ll start working with state, tribal, local government, industry, and labor officials, as well as nonprofits to establish carbon pollution standards for existing power plants. Congressional Republicans have vowed to fight the new standards.

Fewer tests

City students will have fewer standardized tests to contend with this school year. Superintendent Bolgen Vargas and Rochester Teachers Association president Adam Urbanski reached an agreement to eliminate most locally created tests. State-mandated tests are still required.

The enslaved population of the Cotton Belt by county, 1860 census. Full map at www.rochestercitynewspaper.com. PHOTO PROVIDED

POLITICS | BY TIM LOUIS MACALUSO

The slavery effect White Southerners living in the former Cotton Belt are more likely to have negative attitudes toward African Americans than other Southerners, according to a new University of Rochester study. And they are more likely to be Republican and to express opposition to social and economic justice policies such as affirmative action, the study says. Researchers Avidit Acharya, Matthew Blackwell, and Maya Sen say that the study provides quantitative evidence of the longlasting effects of slavery on political attitudes in the South.

VANESSA

The research doesn’t suggest that slavery is the root cause of racism in contemporary America. But it does show that there is a link between the cotton plantation economy of the Old South — and its reliance on slave labor — and stronger racial bias in the region. And the repression of black Americans after emancipation encouraged the persistence of these attitudes. The researchers conducted a county-by-county analysis of census data and opinion surveys of more than 39,000 Southern whites. The “slavery effect” accounts for up to a 15

percent difference in political parties. About 30 percent of whites in former plantation areas identify as Democrats, compared to 40 percent to 45 percent in counties where slaves were less than 3 percent of the population. The South, in political terms, might look similar to the North if it hadn’t been for the South’s dependence on slavery, according to the study. The study also showed that there was a correlation between racial violence and economics in the Cotton Belt. Post-slavery lynching rates were highest in the Cotton Belt compared to other parts of the South.

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Republican Party policies would benefit the Latino community and their values often align, says Peterson Vazquez. Some Latino voters may reject the GOP because of misunderstandings about its positions, he says, and he wants to make sure that voters understand the GOP’s position on complex issues like the minimum wage.

POLITICS | BY JEREMY MOULE

EDUCATION | BY TIM LOUIS MACALUSO

GOP’s Latino love

Reign of error

Political parties at all levels, including in Monroe County, are reaching out to Latinos — an increasingly influential voting bloc. Over the summer, former New York State Assembly candidate Peterson Vazquez founded the Latino National Republican Coalition of Monroe County. It’s a local affiliate of the Latino National Republican Coalition, which aims to build GOP support among conservative Latinos and also focuses on getting them to run for office. Monroe County’s Latino population grew from 39,065 in 2000 to 54,005 in 2010, according to census data. The community’s voting power has grown as well, though it leans Democratic. But Vazquez says that Republican Party policies would benefit the Latino community and that their values often align. Some Latino voters may reject the GOP because of myths and misunderstandings about its positions, he says, and he wants to make sure that voters understand the Republican position on complex issues like the minimum wage. “It’s not that a Republican candidate, for example, doesn’t want to solve the issue of poverty,” Vazquez says. “We just have different views.” Vazquez says that he also sees an opportunity to increase the broader public’s

awareness and engagement in the electoral and political processes, as well as to increase understanding of the origins and positions Peterson Vazquez. PHOTO BY LARISSA COE of parties. Those efforts could be bipartisan and geared toward younger voters, he says, so when people cast a vote, they understand why they’re casting it. “We have to educate everybody, not just the Latino community,” Vazquez says. The Latino National Republican Coalition of Monroe County is holding a launch event at 8 a.m. on Friday, October 4, at Georgie’s Bakery and Cafe, 857 South Clinton Avenue. State Assembly member Peter Lopez, a Republican from the Village of Schoharie, will be the guest speaker and state Republican Committee chair Ed Cox is attending as a guest. Tickets are $15 and available at www.lnrcmc.org/donate.

It’s a gross understatement to say that Diane Ravitch is a lightning rod for politicians, teachers, and education reformers. Once a marshal of former President George W. Bush’s No Child Left Behind education law, she later rejected NCLB and the reform model it energized as completely wrong. | Charter school and education reform advocates say that Ravitch is nothing more than a postliberal hack whose main agenda is to defend unions and to protect incompetent teachers. | But Ravitch is hardly an excuse-maker for teachers and unions. She does, however, anger many by pointing to the country’s often lessthan-lucid understanding of concentrated poverty and institutional racism. And she dares to challenge the market approach to solving these problems. | Salon’s Sara Scribner interviewed Ravitch about her new book: “Reign of Error: The Hoax of the Privatization Movement and the Danger to America’s Public Schools.” In the interview, Ravitch talks about Teach for America’s teachers, education reform leader Michelle Rhee, and the new curriculum called Common Core. | Mostly what Ravitch describes is a government and business partnership that’s pulling apart public education in urban centers without addressing the source of failure in those communities: poverty.

Cost of War AFGHANISTAN TOTALS —

2,277 US servicemen and servicewomen and 1,101 Coalition servicemen and servicewomen have been killed in Afghanistan from the beginning of the war and occupation to September 23. Statistics for Afghan civilian casualties are not available. American casualties from September 13 to September 20: -- Staff Sgt. Randall R. Lane, 43, Indianapolis, Ind. -- Sgt. William D. Brown III, 44, Franklin, N.C. -- Spc. James T. Wickliffchacin, 22, Edmond, Okla. iraqbodycount. org, icasualties.org, Department of Defense

SOURCES:

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CITY 5


REPRODUCTIVE RIGHTS | BY TIM LOUIS MACALUSO

The holy war next door

Martha Malone (left) holding a rosary. Lynda Hunt (middle) and Mary Jost (right) are long-time anti-abortion protesters.

Aided by August’s scorching heat, the sienna- and iodine-colored images of dismembered fetuses seem to sear into the sidewalk in the 100 block of University Avenue. Anti-abortion advocates, some carrying signs, others holding religious objects like crucifixes and rosary beads stand on both sides of the entrance to Planned Parenthood’s Rochester office. When a blue pickup truck pulls out of the lot, a protestor yells at the driver and passenger, “If you had an abortion, you just murdered your baby.” The startled driver says that they were only there for a medical exam and birth control. “From people who kill babies?” the protester says. “Why would you go to a place that kills babies for that?” Such exchanges — and much worse — are common outside Planned Parenthood’s facility. Almost every week, regardless of the weather or the time of year, as many as a dozen anti-abortion advocates gather at the facility’s borders to protest. Officials at Planned Parenthood say that they are used to the demonstrations. But it’s not just the facility and its clients that are affected. Neighbors, including some residents of the pricey Grove Place neighborhood, have to live with the demonstrations taking place right outside their doorways. The protests are also just blocks away from the YMCA and the Eastman School of Music. Customers of businesses from University Avenue to East Main Street regularly pass by the sometimes-volatile scene. Even children, teachers, and parents from School 58, one of the city district’s most popular schools, were, until recently, at 6 CITY

SEPTEMBER 25 - OCTOBER 1, 2013

risk of viewing the disturbing photos. (The school is undergoing construction and is currently vacant.) Attitudes toward the anti-abortion protesters

from nearby residents and business owners range from extreme anger to indifference. Some say that they are exhausted by the protesters and don’t want to rile them. One resident who has lived in the Grove Place neighborhood for several years says she’s fearful that she might hit one of the protesters when she backs out of her driveway. Some residents say that while they don’t like the protests, they understand that the protestors are exercising their rights. One resident new to the neighborhood says that she doesn’t agree with the protestors’ views on abortion or women’s rights. They have right to protest, she says, but “What about our rights as homeowners? Don’t we have a say in this?” An owner of a newly built town house says that she was aware of the protests

PHOTOS BY MARK CHAMBERLIN

before she bought the property. She and her husband moved from the suburbs to be near the city’s nightlife and downtown restaurants. She has no regrets about purchasing the town home, she says, but she might feel differently if she had small children. Grove Place resident Jim Martin says that the protests are part of the urban landscape, and that they aren’t as bad as they used to be “This might seem strange to someone used to living in the quiet of the suburbs, but this is the city,” he says. “Ninety-nine percent of them are not a problem. They’ve got a point of view they believe in fervently. Most of the time all they do is pray. Sometimes on Saturday mornings they’ll sing Ave Maria. How can you be upset about that?” Two local real estate brokers, who asked not to be identified, say that even though they’re not required to disclosure the situation, they might tell potential buyers to proceed cautiously. It might not be easy to re-sell the property, they say, even though Grove Place is considered a highly desirable neighborhood in the city. There are many options for buyers looking in the $200,000 to $300,000 price range, they say, that won’t come with protestors attached. Some businesses have also been adversely impacted by the protests. One employee of a business close to Planned Parenthood says that some customers with young children won’t come when the protesters are out because of the graphic images displayed.

Planned Parenthood officials say that they

have tried to be good neighbors, but that there’s only so much they can do. “We can do what is in our control,” says Planned Parenthood spokesperson Erin Cabral. “We do our best to communicate with our neighbors. If we know something is going to happen, we want to limit the chaos for them.” When the national anti-abortion group Operation Save America held a conference in Rochester in late July, officials at Planned Parenthood expected them to join forces with local anti-abortion protesters. So they alerted neighbors about the possibility for largerthan-usual protests, Cabral says. Planned Parenthood doesn’t encourage counter-protesting, she says. The main objective is to manage their business effectively, Cabral says, which includes providing a safe environment for clients and employees. But that has taken decades and has involved long and complicated legal responses. “They [protesters] are not allowed to block access, they can’t be in our driveway, and they can’t trespass,” Cabral says. During heated public demonstrations in the early 1990’s, some protesters tried to physically block access to Planned Parenthood. A federal district court injunction attempted to strike a balance between the protesters’ First Amendment rights and the rights of women and reproductive service providers in Western New York. The injunction created a buffer zone


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Protestor Martha Malone holds a picture of Jesus with an aborted fetus. PHOTO BY MARK CHAMBERLIN

PSYCHIC’S THYME preventing protesters from being any closer than 15 feet from doors, driveways, and walkways to Planned Parenthood’s Rochester office. But the injunction also allowed up to two protesters at a time, often referred to as “sidewalk counselors,” to access the sidewalks within the buffer zone. A new injunction issued in July 2000 removed all access to the sidewalk closer than 15 feet from Planned Parenthood or any other reproductive-related medical facility in Western New York. It remains in place today. But protestors are permitted to use a megaphone one day a week. On Thursdays they can be heard rallying against Planned Parenthood, and calling to people in the parking lot. They often peer through bushes along the fence as clients and others get in and out of their cars. Added to the scene are the drivers along University Avenue. Some honk their horns in support of the protesters, while others flip their middle finger and curse. “We’re not going away,” says longtime protester, Mary Jost. “We’re in a battle. We’re in a war to save lives.” Jost is the director of Focus Pregnancy Help Center, located just a few doors away from

Planned Parenthood. The nonprofit collects used children’s clothing, toys, books, and sometimes food and baby formula to donate to pregnant mothers.

Jost, like many of the protesters, is a devout Roman Catholic who says life begins at conception. Planned Parenthood kills human life, she says, while her organization confirms and celebrates human life. The focus center provides free pregnancy tests, Jost says, and counseled more than 1,000 pregnant women last year — trying to convince them to have their babies. “We provide emotional support,” she says. “If you have a problem, we’ll try to solve it.” Jost says that many mothers return to the focus center to show her their baby or toddler. They thank her for talking them out of the abortion, she says. “They show me the child that they almost didn’t have,” she says. “People don’t realize that when you have an abortion, you kill generations of people. And they would be members of your own family.” Jost is not apologetic for the disruption that the demonstrations may cause nearby residents and businesses. She says she wouldn’t want continuous demonstrations outside her home or business, but “I would never live near a place that performs abortions.”

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DANCING FOR A CAUSE! October 6th at 3:00 PM Join us as we enjoy Dancing, Hors d'oeuvres, & Drinks. Participate in the Silent Auction. Tickets are $20.00 each. Proceeds to benefit; Embrace Your Sisters

who provide emergency financial support for people with breast cancer

This event is open to the public. 3450 WINTON PLACE ROCHESTER, NY 14623 585-292-1240

WWW.FADSROCHESTER.COM

$15-35

You pay what works best for you. No questions asked. 302 N. Goodman St., Suite 403 in Village Gate 585.287.5183 Find us on Rochestercommunityacupuncture.com

rochestercitynewspaper.com

CITY 7


DEVELOPMENT

|

BY JEREMY MOULE

PHOTOGRAPHY

|

BY MARK CHAMBERLIN

THE PARK AND RESURRECTION

Natcore technician Wendy Ahearn in a clean room in the company's facility at Eastman Business Park.

ochester scored a win a couple of years ago when New Jerseybased Natcore Technologies moved its solar cell research and development work to Eastman Business Park. Eastman, which is the former Kodak Park, beat out several competitors in the company’s nationwide site search. And recently, state and Natcore officials announced that the company plans to expand at the park. The company’s decisions show that Rochester is a serious contender when it comes to attracting and retaining promising tech companies. Natcore’s innovations in solar cell materials and production could eventually mean cheaper, more efficient cells. The company’s choices have also meant jobs for the region. Natcore has six research and development employees at Eastman Business Park and plans to hire another five or six employees soon, says Natcore President and CEO Chuck Provini. And all of the engineers, scientists, and research and development workers hired by the company have been Kodak employees. “One of the things that we noticed with the Kodak people that work with us, they’ve got a basic instinct to look at something that’s in the laboratory and if they cannot see a direct path to commercialization, they throw it out,” Provini says. “They focus on ‘What do we have? Do we see a direct path to commercialization? And let’s follow that path,’ which was a great help for us.” A few years ago, Kodak executives decided to remake the former Kodak Park into a 8 CITY

SEPTEMBER 25 - OCTOBER 1, 2013

multi-tenant technology and industrial center; Natcore is one of approximately 50 businesses in the park. The executives realized that the park’s infrastructure, equipment, and expertise could attract companies in several growing industries, officials say. But efforts to remake the park stumbled last year when Kodak filed for bankruptcy. Now that Kodak has emerged from Chapter 11, company and economic development officials see renewed promise for the park. They say that it’s fertile ground for technological innovation — the kind that will lead to a new generation of American manufacturing and more jobs for Rochester. Currently, about 6,500 people work at Eastman Business Park. Initially, Natcore planned to work with Kodak to jointly manufacture flexible

solar cells in roll form, Provini says. The partnership seemed logical because of Kodak’s experience with coating flexible materials, he says. Photo and motion picture film is, after all, a base material layered with light-sensitive chemicals.

They ran into some obstacles, however, and the initial plan didn’t work out, though Provini says that Natcore is still pursuing the technology. But during that process, Natcore officials discovered a tremendous facility in Eastman Business Park, Provini says. The company now leases 20,000 square feet in a Kodakowned building in the park. Some 16,000 square feet to 17,000 square feet of Natcore’s facility is clean room space; comparable facilities would have cost the company about $30 million to build, Provini says. “We would never be in a position to build a clean room like that,” he says. “So what we have as a small company now is a wonderful, state-of-the-art R&D facility that we could never afford to have.” The company also has access to other specialized infrastructure, including a de-ionized water supply, steam, and toxic waste disposal infrastructure. And the facility is equipped with important basics, like phone lines. The result: the company has been able to focus on its research and development work, Provini says. The money that it would have had to spend outfitting a facility instead goes into buying tools and equipment, he says, and hiring. Kodak Park, as many still call it, has long been a vital part of the local economy. It’s been a place for generations of Rochesterians to find jobs — though gone

are the days when you could walk from your high school graduation and into a wellpaying job at the park. The jobs now tend to be more specialized. Workers at Kodak and the park’s other companies bring home $550 million a year in wages. And the park also pumps millions of property tax dollars into the Rochester, Greece, and Monroe County governments. The 16-million-square-foot complex starts in the City of Rochester at the intersection of Lake Avenue and West Ridge Road. Some local economic development officials call it a megasite, and the park’s marketing materials refer to it as “a city within a city.” When Kodak opened the site to outside tenants, the company also rebranded the park as Eastman Business Park. The idea was born out of necessity, officials say, since the shrinking company had increasing amounts of vacant space, even after demolishing approximately 6 million square feet of buildings. Kodak occupies 9 million square feet in Eastman Business Park, and the park has between 1 million and 1.5 million square feet of vacant space and approximately 150 acres to 175 acres of developable land, says Michael Alt, director of Eastman Business Park. Some park property has been sold off, including a 625,000 square foot building to LiDestri Foods in 2009. The company operates a manufacturing and product development facility there.


“I THINK CERTAINLY WE’RE MOVING AWAY FROM CRISIS MODE AND WE’RE NOW IN GROWTH MODE.” MARK PETERSON, PRESIDENT AND CEO OF GREATER ROCHESTER ENTERPRISE

Eastman Business Park Director Michael Alt.

Other space has been leased to companies like UniPixel. The company makes touch screen sensors in the same building where Kodak makes its motion picture film. Alt says he expects that UniPixel’s production will grow as Kodak’s film production declines, which means that over time, the building’s use will change. The uncertainty caused by Kodak’s bankruptcy was an obstacle to progress at the park, Alt says, because it kept some potential tenants from committing. But the company’s emergence from bankruptcy last month resolved several of those issues, he says. In a settlement with New York State, Kodak agreed to set aside $49 million for an environmental trust fund. In return, the state said it wouldn’t hold any tenant other than Kodak liable for historic pollution at the site. The bankruptcy court also gave Kodak the all-clear to sell the park’s complex utilities system to Illinois-based Recycled Energy Development. “I think certainly we’re moving away from crisis mode and we’re now in growth mode,” says Mark Peterson, president and CEO of Greater Rochester Enterprise. But at least one issue remains unsettled:

Who will own Eastman Business Park in the future? And that question doesn’t have a simple answer. As part of the company’s agreement with the state, Kodak committed to

maintaining a substantial presence at the park. But Kodak is now a company focused on providing printing and technology services to other companies. It’s not a real estate developer or broker. Alt says that Kodak doesn’t have a clear plan to remain a landlord or become a tenant. Rather, it plans to “play the opportunities that become available to us,” he says, regarding ownership of the park. Company officials are working with local leaders, visiting other industrial sites, and networking with industrial developers, Alt says. “Everybody is interested in creating the best site in the Northeast, if not the country,” he says. “We’re really in uncharted waters. There’s no roadmap that you can take from other facilities this size because it’s just such a unique facility.” But local economic development officials are more direct. A couple of days before the Finger Lakes Regional Economic Development Council’s August meeting, Kodak received court approval of its bankruptcy exit plan. During the meeting, council co-chair and University of Rochester President Joel Seligman said that the council’s vision of transferring the park to a new developer is “now achievable.” The council’s purpose is to guide state economic development investments and incentives for the region. (Seligman was a member of Kodak’s Board of Directors until the company emerged from bankruptcy.) Greater Rochester Enterprise’s Peterson, who also serves on the regional council, says that the ideal arrangement is to sell the park to a single developer who would make money by promoting the park and bringing in new tenants. Some companies, developers, and investment firms specialize in industrial parks and are experts at running them, he says. And a dedicated, deep-pocketed developer would be able to continue investing in park infrastructure such as roads and railroad spurs, he says.

“There’s no doubt that the path going forward is more heavy utilization of the Eastman Business Park and more businesses in it,” Peterson says. “The question is, is it going to be done piecemeal or wholesale in one unit? And the market’s going to dictate what’s actually going to happen.” For now, Kodak and economic development officials have identified and targeted three

industries that they want to attract to the park: • Functional films, which are thin, flexible materials coated to make things like circuits, touch screen sensors, or battery components. Eastman Business Park has a commercialization center for the films and is home to several businesses built around the technology. • Energy storage, or in layman’s terms, batteries, fuel cells, and solar technologies. Natcore falls into this category, as does NOHMS, a company developing advanced lithium battery technology. The park is also home to a battery commercialization center operated by NY-BEST, a consortium of businesses, utilities, universities, and government officials focused on advancing energy storage technology. • Biomaterials, a category that includes biochemical companies like the DuPont subsidiary Genencor; Novomer, which makes polymers out of carbon dioxide waste streams; and biofuels operations like Sweetwater Energy, which is led by Paetec founder Arunas Chesonis. (All of those companies have a presence in the park.) Those three industries build on Kodak’s history as essentially a materials science and chemical manufacturing company. They use the same lab, manufacturing, and industrial equipment and infrastructure that Kodak traditionally used. Businesses at the park are essentially taking Kodak’s processes and adapting them for their needs, Peterson says. And officials say that by offering companies access to people with knowledge of the equipment and the commercialization process, they can attract and retain high-tech companies.

Greater Rochester Enterprise President and CEO Mark Peterson.

And by locating in the Rochester area, the companies can also draw on the experience and knowledge of former Xerox and Bausch and Lomb employees, as well as experts at the University of Rochester and Rochester Institute of Technology. “If we were just offering space, we probably couldn’t compete,” says Alt, the park’s director. “We want to offer the ability to solve your technical problem and then give you one of the best places in the US to do your manufacturing.” For the third consecutive year, the Finger Lakes Regional Economic Development Council has listed the park as its top priority, which means that the park and its tenants get some welcome extra attention from the state. That can include assistance with regulatory compliance or tax credits for companies moving into the park. In a statement issued in response to several questions, Empire State Development officials say that they want to attract research, development, and advanced manufacturing facilities, including start-ups and large companies to Eastman Business Park. With the company’s bankruptcy resolved, state and local officials can put their efforts toward attracting new businesses, the statement says. “This will require a tremendous amount of focus, creativity, and effort,” say ESD officials.

rochestercitynewspaper.com

CITY 9


URBAN ACTION This week’s calls to action include the following events and activities. (All are free and open to the public, unless otherwise noted.)

Book group meeting

The Moving Beyond Racism Book Group will meet at 7 p.m. on Monday, October 7, to talk about “The Round House” by Louise Erdrich. The story is about a Native American woman who is raped in the vicinity of a sacred round house, and how a single act of violence has lasting consequences. The event will be held at Barnes & Noble in Pittsford Plaza. It’s not necessary to read the book in advance.

For more Tom Tomorrow, including a political blog and cartoon archive, visit www.thismodernworld.com

LGBT history on film

The University of Rochester will present the pro-

10 CITY SEPTEMBER 25 - OCTOBER 1, 2013

ducer’s premiere of the documentary film “Shoulders to Stand On.” The film, which will be shown on Sunday, September 29, explores the roots and origins of Rochester’s LGBT movement and community. Tickets: $40. The film will be shown at the Dryden Theatre at the George Eastman House. Doors open at 3 p.m. and the screening is at 4 p.m.

Films on social justice in Mexico

Rochester Committee on Latin America will present “Chiapas: Behind the Resistance,” two documentary films about social and ecological justice in Chiapas, Mexico beginning at 7 p.m. on Wednesday, October 2. “A Darker Shade of Green” looks at how indigenous communities in Chiapas

and Acre are threatened with losing their land. “Broken Branches, Fallen Fruit” examines the forces that drive immigration to the US. The films will be shown at the Downtown United Presbyterian Church, 121 North Fitzhugh Street.

Panel on Occupy Wall Street

The Flying Squirrel Community Space will host “Translating Anarchy: The Anarchism of Occupy Wall Street,” a panel discussion with Mark Bray and Nathan Schneider on social movements. The writers and activists will discuss their books about the rise of the Occupy movement, and how anarchists and others shaped the goals and spirit of the movement. The event is at 5 p.m. at 285 Clarissa Street.


Dining Custom BrewCrafters has expanded and is now known as CB Craft Brewers, but some things stay the same: the Autumn Festival of Ales returns Saturday, October 5, 1-5 p.m. at the Fireman’s Field, 321 Monroe St., Honeoye Falls. Attendees can expect food, beer, live music, beer, a chili-cookoff fundraiser for Mercy Flight, and beer. Advance tickets are $30; for further information, visit cbcraftbrewers.com or call 624-4386. The 24th Annual Harvest Festival at Keuka Lake’s Hunt Country Vineyards goes down October 5 and 6, with cooking demos, wine tastings, haywagon tours, a grapestomping contest, and specialty vendors all on the docket, along with a menu of Finger Lakes-centric foods. Admission to the festival is free; visit huntwines.com for more details, or call 800-946-3289. Semifinal voting begins October 1 for the Nature’s Plate Award, a people’s choice contest spearheaded by The Nature Conservancy to spotlight the Finger Lakes’ greenest restaurants, the ones who understand the relationship between our dining choices and our planet. Search “Nature’s Plate” at nature.org to get involved.

A slice of carrot cake from Paternico's Bakery on Winton Road. PHOTO BY MARK CHAMBERLIN

Openings

The sweet spot [ CHOW HOUND ] BY DAYNA PAPALEO

If you’re not already happy when you cross the threshold, walking into a bakery can instantly put a person in a good mood. The atmosphere is typically homey, the smells are always heavenly, and the display cases are packed with vivid nibbles that are almost too pretty to eat — but there ain’t no way you’re leaving emptyhanded. Paternico’s Bakery is one of those places: the sun streaming in on a recent early autumn afternoon bathed the welcoming space in a golden glow, and oodles of Italian cookies, many with those irresistibly swirly tufts of colorful frosting, competed for my attention with such offerings as key lime pie, red velvet cake, and pumpkin-pecan cheesecake, as well as cannoli shells patiently waiting to be filled with pastry cream or sweetened ricotta. Maybe you’ve indulged in some goodies from Paternico’s before; Steve and Sheri Paternico operated the business out of their home for 18 years, selling through word of mouth and at the Rochester Public Market before planting roots at their new North Winton Road location. So why take the plunge now? “I don’t know; maybe I’m a little crazy,” Steve says with a laugh. Though it’s fair to assume that

mixing butter, sugar, flour, and eggs is a bit less stressful than the law-enforcement career from which he retired in 2011. The goods at Paternico’s are made from family recipes that have been perfected over the years, along with new formulas that the Paternicos have tweaked to their tastes. Steve and Sheri are hoping to get back to the Public Market soon, but before then Paternico’s will celebrate its grand opening on Saturday, September 28, with deals and samples. And anyone hoping to learn a few of Paternico’s sweet secrets might be interested in Steve’s class at Vella Culinary Center on Monday, November 11; visit rochesterculinary.com for the details. Paternico’s Bakery is located at 272 N. Winton Road. It is open Tuesday-Friday 10 a.m.-6 p.m.; and Saturday-Sunday 9 a.m.-3 p.m. For more information, call 288-1199, or visit paternicosbakery.com.

Fusion infusion

The interior of the newly opened Shui Asian Fusion (236 University Ave., 546-6525)

shows absolutely no trace of the seemingly bombed-out KFC that once preceded it; it’s a charming, tranquil spot that provides a fitting

backdrop for Shui’s pan-Asian menu, one with a decided emphasis on Thai flavors. You’ll find an interesting selection of starters (I particularly dug the khao neow gai [$5.50], which stuffed chicken and vegetables in sticky rice then wrapped everything in banana leaf) along with a roster of classic dishes like papaya salad, panang curry, pad thai, and much more. There are also a few traditional Chinese restaurant options that allow you to choose the sauce and the protein, including tofu, and weekday lunch deals that won’t break the bank. Want more information? Visit Shui Asian Fusion’s Facebook page.

Quick bites

Saturday, October 5, the Good Food Collective will host A Good Night, a celebration of local food that will raise money for GFC’s social advocacy projects, which help to make fresh produce available to those who might not be able to afford it otherwise. The event, to be held from 6-10 p.m. in the Zeppa Auditorium at 315 Gregory St., will feature finger foods with local beer and wine pairings, a cash bar, and live music. Tickets are $25 (kids under 12 free); visit thegoodfoodcollective.com to learn more.

At this rate, by 2015 we will each have our very own self-serve frozen yogurt shop. Until then, however, we’re gonna have to share new places like the national chain Yogurt City (3300 West Henrietta Road, 413-1552, yogurtcity.com), and Yotini Frozen Yogurt Bar (2105 Five Mile Line Road, Penfield, 6625327), locally owned by the Vacchetto family and found on both Facebook and Twitter. They’re carving shawarma over at Sultan Lebanese Restaurant & Bakery, now open at 1659 Mount Hope Ave. Besides spitroasted meats, Sultan offers vegetarianfriendly favorites like falafel and tabouli, as well as manakeesh, pizza’s Levantine cousin. Call 241-0082 for more information.

Closings

Fujiya Japanese Restaurant is closed, having

merged with its sister business, Bento-Ya, located at 2007 Empire Blvd. Meda Ethiopian Restaurant and Bar, formerly at 302 University Avenue, is closed after less than a year in business. Longtime West Henrietta Road fixture Arigato Japanese Steakhouse has closed. Farewell to Flipside Bar & Grill, closed after nine popular years at 2001 East Main Street. Chow Hound is a food and restaurant news column. Do you have a tip? Send it to food@ rochester-citynews.com.

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 11


Upcoming [ POP/ROCK ]

Nashville Pussy Tuesday, October 22. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. $12-$16. 9 p.m. 454-2966. bugjar.com. [ POP/ROCK ]

The Mowgli’s Saturday, November 16. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N. Water St. $9.41-$13. 8 p.m. 352-5600. waterstreetmusic.com [ THEATER/SOUL ]

Once Upon a Dream starring The Rascals Wednesday, November 20. Auditorium Theatre, 885 East Main St. $42.50-$78. 7:30 p.m. 222-5000. rbtl.org

Larry Ochs/Don Robinson Duo

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 30 BOP SHOP RECORDS, 1460 MONROE AVE. 8 P.M. | $15 | 271-3354, BOPSHOP.COM [ JAZZ ] If the avant-garde is your cup of tea, you won’t want to miss saxophonist Larry Ochs and drummer Don Robinson in a duo performance at the Bop Shop. Ochs, a founder of Rova Saxophone Quartet, and Robinson, a top player on the San Francisco jazz scene, have been playing together in a variety of larger ensembles since 1991. 22 years of playing together has paid off; Ochs and Robinson read each other with nearly telepathic sympatico. — BY RON NETSKY

Brass without Boundaries SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 29 FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH, 220 WINTON ROAD SOUTH 7:30 P.M. | $5-$20 | FIRSTMUSE.ORG [ CLASSICAL ] Brass instruments usually don’t get much

chance to shine on a chamber-music program, other than the occasional Hindemith sonata or (if you’re a trumpeter) the Saint-Saëns Sextet. The First Unitarian Church will rectify this with the first concert of the season in its chamber-music series, First Muse. The shining will be done by a trio of Rochester Philharmonic Orchestra brass players: assistant principal horn Byron Johns, principal trombone Mark Kellogg on euphonium, and tuba player Craig Sutherland. — BY DAVID RAYMOND

EIGHTH ANNUAL

EVENING OF WINE AND JAZZ!

PRESENTED BY GREECE COMMUNITY BROADCASTING INC.

Thursday, Nov. 7th • Tickets: $25 On sale October 7th Held at the Waterside Room of Pier 45 at the Port of Rochester Featuring wine and beer tasting, chocolate sampling, great gourmet food, live jazz by Jive Street Five, a silent auction and more.

More info at JAZZ901.ORG 12 CITY SEPTEMBER 25 - OCTOBER 1, 2013

Music


WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 25 [ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ]

Acoustic Open Jam hosted by The Druids. The Rabbit Room,

61 N. Main St. Honeoye Falls. 582-1830. thelowermill.com. 7:30 p.m. Call for info. Dave McGrath. Dinosaur Bar-B-Que, 99 Court St. 3257090. dinosaurbarbque.com. 9 p.m. Free. FullSet. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. lovincup. com. 8 p.m. $20.

Grand Canyon Rescue Episode SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 28 ABILENE, 153 LIBERTY POLE WAY 9:30 P.M. | $5-$8 | ABILENEBARANDLOUNG.COM [ ROOTS-ROCK ] As its name suggests, this Rochester-

based sextet boasts a sound that is as wide-ranging as it is deep. The “Great” Grand Canyon Rescue Episode is an American music adventure, as it gives its audience a taste of every flavor of roots-rock imaginable. GCRE’s five (yes, five) contributing songwriters delve into everything from folk balladry and stompin’ bluegrass numbers, to harmonic country twang and blazing rock anthems. The band’s 2011 debut full-length album “Dirt Road Highway” is exactly what it sounds like: a high-energy, fast-paced tour down the dusty, nostalgic annals of Americana. — BY DAVID YOCKEL, JR.

The Sadies SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 28 THE BUG JAR, 219 MONROE AVE. 8 P.M. | $15 | BUGJAR.COM [ ROCK ] Toronto-based band The Sadies has been

on the scene for almost two decades, and its music has gone through several phases throughout those years. The band itself believes that it has “developed, even perfected, a style of music that is uniquely [its] own” — made apparent through ever-changing influences and frequent experimentation within varied genres. With a strong knack for experimentation and absolutely no fear of change, The Sadies has created staying power within the fickle, and always developing, music scene. — BY LEAH CREARY

Live & Local Acoustic Showcase ft. Eric Pukos, Meg Williams, Camille Tharp, and Alex Tonas. Water Street

Dazed and satisfied

Music Hall, 204 N. Water St. 325-5600. waterstreetmusic. com. 8:30 p.m. $5. Teagan Ward. Sticky Lips BBQ Juke Joint, 830 Jefferson Rd. 585-292-5544. stickylipsbbq. com. 6:30 p.m. Free.

[ REVIEW ] BY ROMAN DIVEZUR

[ DJ/ELECTRONIC ]

Intronaut performed Sunday, September 22, at Montage Music Hall. PHOTO PROVIDED

The first time I saw The Fevertones was during an impromptu set at the Rochester Public Market, so it was high time that I caught the band at a proper gig. Singersongwriter Emma Lane opened up Friday night’s show at the Bug Jar with a solo acoustic set. I couldn’t tell if Emma Lane was one word or two, but the Hilton native was charismatic with stars in her eyes as she announced plans to record in Nashville. After a quick changeover, The Fevertones took the stage and dug deep into its dustbowl-era songbook of original tunes. By the time the quartet rolled into its third and fourth numbers, the growing crowd was feeling it too. This young outfit (sans drummer) was spirited and snappy, comprised of upright bass, fiddle, harmonica, guitar, and trombone. These kids sure have old souls. White Woods rounded out the night. The triple ax jingle jangle of this alt-country quintet had the audience dancing in harmony with its barnburner “I’m Your Man.” I caught folk singers Lucy Kaplansky and Lisa Bigwood at Café Veritas on

Saturday. Lisa Bigwood’s performance was enjoyable and she had great chemistry with the packed house. Manhattan-resident Lucy Kaplansky mixed originals with deeply personal covers of artists, including Townes Van Zandt. Kaplansky owned the night with songs like Eliza Gilkyson’s piano tune “Sanctuary.” Both ladies left me feeling serenaded, made only better by the warm and peaceful ambience of Café Veritas. On Sunday night my earplugs and I headed to Montage Music Hall to check out Los Angeles-based prog metal outfit Intronaut. I accidentally stumbled upon the group’s album “Habitual Levitations” a couple of weeks ago and dug it. This was an early show and I caught the band midset, but from what I saw, Intronaut was flawless. The back end of Danny Walker (drums) and Joe Lester (bass) crushed it. There never seemed to be a moment of silence; the space between songs was filled with smoke and noise. Intronaut shifted gears between stormy and ethereal so many times that I felt dazed. It left me satisfied.

DJ Reign and Ladies Night. Captain’s Attic, 37 Charlotte St. 546-8885. Call for info. DJ Adam. Nashvilles, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. Henrietta. 3343030. nashvillesny.com. Call for info. Ladies Nite: High Heels and Mini Skirts New Wave Wednesdays. Club Clarissas,

293 Clarissa St. 232-3430. 10 p.m. 21+. Call for info. Teen Set 45 Party. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. Free. Why Not Wednesday. Eclipse Bar & Grill, 374 Thurston Rd. 502-922-6567. 10 p.m. Call for info.

Wild Out Wednesdays hosted by Kenney, ft. Legion of Doom.

Louie’s Cordial’s Lounge, 392 Lyell Ave. 254-2844. 10 p.m. 21+. $10. Y Not Wednesday w/DJ ET. Plush, 151 St. Paul St. 2325650. venurochester.com. Call for info. [ JAZZ ]

Anthony Gianovola.

Lemoncello, 137 West Commercial St. East Rochester. 385-8565. lemoncello137.com. 6:30 p.m. Free. continues on page 15

EASTMAN SCHOOL OF MUSIC PRESENTS WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 25 EASTMAN SCHOOL SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA AND EASTMAN PHILHARMONIA, NEIL VARON, CONDUCTOR, MATTHEW VALVERDE, TENOR Kodak Hall at Eastman Theatre, 8 PM Free THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 26 RHYTHM AND COLOR: ORGAN MUSIC FROM 1952-2012 BY MARTIN HERCHENRÖDER Christ Church, 8:30 PM Tickets $10 from rochesterfringe.com or at the door

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 27 FIRST NIAGARA ROCHESTER FRINGE FESTIVAL – MICHAEL BURRITT AND FRIENDS with John Beck, Ivan Trevino, Zachary Burritt, percussionists and Chien-Kwan Lin, saxophone Kilbourn Hall, 7 PM Tickets $10 from rochesterringe.com or at the door ORGAN CONCERT BY DAVID HIGGS, NATHAN LAUBE, AND DOUGLAS REED Asbury First United Methodist Church, 8 PM Tickets $15 general public, $10 for U/R ID holders at the door

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 28 FIRST NIAGARA ROCHESTER FRINGE FESTIVAL – FRINGE FINGERS SPECTACULAR Featuring more than 100 fingers from the studio of Professor Tony Caramia Kilbourn Hall, 3 PM Tickets $10 from rochesterfringe.com or at the door SPIRITS WITHIN Stephen Kennedy, organ; Maria Schweppe, projections Christ Church, 7 PM, 8 PM, 9 PM, and 10 PM Tickets $10 from rochesterfringe.com or at the door

ORGAN AND CHAMBER ORCHESRA CONCERT BY PETER PLANYAVSKY, EDOARDO BELLOTTI, HANS-OLA ERICSSON, AND NATHAN LAUBE Third Presbyterian Church, 8 PM Tickets $15 general public, $10 for U/R ID holders at the door SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 29 ORGAN RECITAL BY JON GILLOCK Sacred Heart Cathedral, 2:30 PM Tickets $15 general public, $10 for U/R ID holders at the door TUESDAY, OCTOBER 1 JAZZ STUDIES AND CONTEMPORARY MEDIA

SHOWCASE, BILL DOBBINS, DIRECTOR Kilbourn Hall, 8 PM Free WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 2, FACULTY ARTIST SERIES – RUSSELL MILLER, PIANO, JULIA BROXHOLM, SOPRANO Music of Bach-Siloti, Schumann, and Lori Laitman’s The Soul Fox (NY premiere) Hatch Recital Hall, 8 PM Tickets $10 general public, free to U/R ID holders

facebook.com/ConcertsAtEastman

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 13


Cycling on a personal level

“MOST USER FRIENDLY

Music

BIKE SHOP” Right place, – CITY NEWSPAPER

Great Service • The Best Advice No Pressure • No “Attitude”

Experienced Mechanic/Wheelbuilder

right time

Bicycle Store and Repair Center

Steve Katz

Find us on

1757 Mt. Hope Ave (next to Rowe) 473-3724 • freewheelersbikes.com Bar & Lounge

inge! r F e h t nge of i r F e On Th Fri Sept 27: R-549 CHUCK MEAD

f ro nde Fou

B

& HIS GRASSY-KNOLL BOYS

Sat Sept 28:

MIKE BROWN & JOANNA BARBERA then GRAND CANYON RESCUE EPISODE

Tues Oct 1:

THE BARNYARD STOMPERS Wed Oct 2:

“THE ABILENE RAMBLE” with the

MIGHTY HIGH & DRY

Thurs Oct 3:

VICTOR & PENNY Fri Oct 4:

SELWYN BIRCHWOOD the WOMACK

with

FAMILY BAND Sun Oct 20: LEO & ANTHONY of the SAW DOCTORS 153 LIBERTY POLE WAY•232-3230

Rumi’s

www.abilenebarandlounge.com

M E DITE R RAN EAN G R I LL

Spero che l’amore sia per sempre

JOIN US! Friday September 27th to have your fortune revealed to you by

Marina Melikhova

Reservations Recommended

2735 Monroe Ave. | Rochester, NY

585.242.7864 Mon-Thu: 11-9pm • Fri: 11-10pm Sat: 10-10pm • Sun: 10-9pm

RUMISGRILLCAFE.COM 14 CITY SEPTEMBER 25 - OCTOBER 1, 2013

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 28 LOVIN’ CUP, 300 PARK POINT DRIVE 9 P.M. | $10-$12 | LOVINCUP.COM, 2929940 [ PROFILE ] BY RON NETSKY

Some of us remember the time as if it were yesterday. Sitting in the bedroom of a friend’s home in the mid-1960’s, taking the brand new record from the album cover with the five hip-looking guys on it, and playing “Projections” by The Blues Project. A few years later we were putting the needle down on the hot new album by the first great rock Steve Katz played with influential bands The Blues Project, Blood, Sweat & Tears, and American Flyer. band with horns: Blood, Sweat & Tears. Now he’s touring solo — and loving it. PHOTO PROVIDED A common denominator in both bands was guitarist-singer Steve Katz. He’ll be playing some of both groups’ tunes and Being at the epicenter of hip in the 1960’s, couldn’t have heard a note but I got the job.” reminiscing about his experiences over five Katz witnessed the counter-cultural changes Kalb’s band was The Blues Project. decades in music at Lovin’ Cup on Saturday. first hand. “When I first went down there Katz spent most of his youth in New York Eventually, keyboardist Al Kooper and Katz left I was going to beatnik coffee houses,” says City. At 15 one record — “Robert Johnson: the band. Kooper planned to move to England Katz. “There were still people wearing berets, King of the Delta Blues Singers” — and one and decided he would raise money for the move playing bongos, and reading poetry. It was really book — Sam Charters’ “The Country Blues” by gathering his musical pals for a gig at the Café fantastic. I loved the poetry and the smells of — changed his life. “I was totally immersed in Au Go Go. But the audience didn’t show up, so empanadas and falafels on the street. Then the country blues,” says Katz. Kooper stayed. smells became marijuana, patchouli oil, and By his late teens, his family had moved to The consolation prize: that group of incense; the hippies came in.” Queens, but Katz found the gravitational pull musicians put together a band called Blood, It wasn’t long before he hooked up of Greenwich Village irresistible. Folk legend Sweat & Tears. Katz remembers the magic of musically with friends he met in Washington Dave Van Ronk was conducting hootenannies Fred Lipsius’ horn arrangements. at the Gaslight Café and Katz had to be there. Square, friends like Maria Muldaur, John “It was the first rehearsal at the Café Au Go Sebastian, David Grisman, Stefan Grossman, He began studying guitar with Van Ronk and Go,” says Katz. “When I sang ‘Morning Glory’ and Joshua Rifkin. another folk legend, Reverend Gary Davis. and the horns came in on the chorus… I’m “Some of us were into country blues “One of the first things I learned from standing there, the horns are behind me and the and some were into bluegrass and old-timey Van Ronk was ‘Candyman,’” says Katz. whole thing lifts from the verse to the chorus. music,” says Katz, “so we thought, is there “Dave taught it to me back-picking style. It was like, oh my God… It was the most some way we can play music together? We Then I went to see Rev. Davis and he incredible feeling I ever had.” ended up jamming on jug-band music.” They said, I’m going to show you this song, There’s a lot more for Katz to cover at formed the Even Dozen Jug Band and made ‘Candyman,’ but he taught me a style Lovin’ Cup. After he left BS&T, his next group, an album on Electra Records. where the thumb was not going in reverse. American Flyer, was produced by The Beatles’ Katz’s next chapter came when another I became a ‘Candyman’ expert.” producer George Martin. And Katz himself Katz will be playing “Candyman” at Lovin’ Van Ronk student, Danny Kalb, walked into produced two excellent albums for Lou Reed: Fretted Instruments, the store where he was Cup along with newer tunes like “Kettle Of “Rock n Roll Animal” and “Sally Can’t Dance.” teaching. Kalb said rhythm guitarist Artie Fish,” a song about those halcyon days in He recently spent three years touring with Traum was on vacation; would Katz like to Greenwich Village. a new incarnation of BS&T, but Katz spends audition for his band? “It was amazing,” says Katz. “I used to most of his time at his Connecticut home “This was after Dylan went electric, so go to Van Ronk’s apartment and Bob Dylan working with his wife on their pottery business. everybody started picking up an electric guitar,” would be sleeping on the couch while I was When he goes on the road these days, it’s just says Katz. “I said I don’t play electric. He said taking my lesson. One time I went up there him, his guitar and his stories. that’s OK, we’ll get a pickup for your guitar. But and Dylan wasn’t on the couch. He came in “It’s so much fun not to work with other when I plugged it in it was so loud, it sounded toward the end of my lesson with his new musicians for the first time in my life. It has a awful, so I turned it down to zero. When we album on Columbia. He said, ‘Look at this, freedom to it. I don’t have to worry if I add an were done he said, ‘I really like the way you the strings are backwards.’ You know, on his extra bar to a song. The drummer’s not going to played; you played some tasty things.’ He first album they reversed the photograph.” look at me like I’m crazy,” he says.


WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 25 Margaret Explosion. Little

Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 7:30 p.m. Free. MVT w/Lap Giraffe. Temple Bar and Grille, 109 East Ave. 2326000. templebarandgrille.com. 10 p.m. Free. Nate Rawls Band. Ontario Beach Park, 4799 Lake Ave. geneseelighthouse.org. 6 p.m. $2. The Swooners. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. East Rochester. 662-5555. bistro135. net. 6 p.m. Free. [ KARAOKE ]

Italian American Karaoke. Italian

American Community Center, 150 Frank Dimino Way. 5948882. iaccrochester.org. 7:30 p.m. Free. Karaoke at Mayfield’s Pub. Mayfield’s Pub, 669 N. Winton Rd. 288-7199. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke at Sanibel Cottage. Sanibel Cottage, 1517 Empire Blvd. Webster. 671-9340. sanibelcottage.net. 6 p.m. Free. Karaoke w/Cyd Scarlett. Jose & Willy’s, 20 Lakeshore Drive. Canandaigua. 905-0222. Joseandwillys.com. 8:30 p.m. Karaoke Wednesdays. Flat Iron Café, 561 State St. 454-4830. flatironcafe.net. Call for info. Karaoke w/Mark. Flipside Bar & Grill, 2001 E. Main St. 288-3930. 9 p.m. Free. [ OPEN MIC ]

Open Acoustic Mic Night w/ Mandy. Shorts Bar & Grill, 35

N. Main St. Fairport. 388-0136. shortsfairport.com. 9 p.m. Free. Open Mic at Jeffrey’s. Jeffrey’s, 3115 E. Henrietta Rd. Henrietta. 486-4937. 7 p.m. Call for info.

Open Mic Jam Boulder Alexander St.. Boulder Coffee

Co., 100 Alexander St. 4547140. bouldercoffeeco.com. 8 p.m. Open Mic w/Steve West. Muddy Waters Coffee House, 53 Main St. Geneseo. 2439111. mwcoffeehouse.com. 7 p.m. Free. [ R&B ]

Food Truck Rodeo ft. The Coupe De’ Villes. Rochester

Public Market, 280 N. Union St. 5 p.m. Free. [ HIP-HOP/RAP ]

Word of Mouth Wednesday’s w/DJ Private Eye. Dubland

Underground, 315 Alexander St. 232-7550. dublandunderground.wordpress. com. 10 p.m. 21+. $5. [ POP/ROCK ]

Holly Kay. Irondequoit Library,

Helen McGraw Branch, 2180 E. Ridge Rd. 336-6060. 7 p.m. Call for info. Rochester Fringe Festival. See website for full festival schedule. rochesterfringe.com.

The Tontons w/The Branch Davidians, Go Exploring, and Darwin. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe

Ave. 9 p.m. $7-$9.

BLUES | BUDDY GUY

Chicago blues pioneer Buddy Guy is 77 years old and still on stage schoolin’ fools and kickin’ ass. He’s a legend that lives up to the title. The call-and-response style he has with his guitar is provocative and evocative. The man will make you move. Turned on by Muddy Waters, Guy landed in Chicago in 1957 and fell in with cats like Magic Sam and Otis Rush. Stevie Ray Vaughan and Eric Clapton are clearly disciples. The Grammy Award-winning Guy was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2005. Not bad for a poor kid from Louisiana who got his start on a two-string diddley bow. Buddy Guy plays Sunday, September 29, 7 p.m. at Water Street Music Hall, 204 N. Water St. $45-$50. waterstreetmusic.com. — BY FRANK DE BLASE

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 26 [ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ] Evan Prewitt. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 7:30 p.m. Free. Jim Lane. Murph’s Irondequoit Pub, 705 Titus Ave. Irondequoit. 342-6780. 8 p.m. Free. John Akers, Erik Welsh. Pane Vino Ristorante, 175 N. Water St. 232-6090. panevinoristorante. com. 8 p.m. Free. Peg Dolan . McGraw’s Irish Pub, 146 W Commercial St. East Rochester. 348-9091. mcgrawsirishpub.com. 7 p.m. Free.

Salsa Night presented by Essence of Rhythm. Lovin’ Cup,

300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. lovincup.com. 8 p.m. $5-$10.

Thirsty Thursday’s w/Frankie and Jewels. Avenue Pub, 522

Monroe Ave. 244-4960. 7 p.m. Call for info. [ BLUES ] Don Scott. Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. abilenebarandlounge. com. 9 p.m. $5-$8. Nightfall. The Beale, 693 South Ave. 271-4650. thebealegrille. com. 7:30 p.m. Call for info.

Pale Green Stars CD Release Party. Dinosaur Bar-B-Que,

Spectrum of Sound Aspects of Organ Music Since 1940. See

website for full festival schedule. esm.rochester.edu/organ/eroi.

Music in the Library! with Philip Lawrence Borter and Duo. Seymour Library, 161

East Ave., Brockport. 6371050. seymourlibraryweb.org. 7 p.m. Refreshments will be served. Free.

RPO Opening Weekend: Mahler’s First Symphony. Kodak Hall at Eastman Theater, 60 Gibbs St. 8 p.m. $15-$92. [ DJ/ELECTRONIC ]

Party Monster Thursdays.

ONE Nightclub and Lounge, 1 Ryan Alley. 546-1010. oneclublife.com. 10 p.m. 18+. Call for info. DJ Matt. Nashvilles, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. Henrietta. 3343030. nashvillesny.com. Call for info. Fracture, Bittle. Dubland Underground, 315 Alexander St. 232-7550. dublandunderground. wordpress.com. 10 p.m. $5-$15. Karaoke at Panorama. Panorama Night Club & Sports Bar, 730 Elmgrove Rd. 2472190. 9 p.m. Free. Thirsty Thursday’s. TC Riley’s, 200 Park Point Dr. 272-9777. tcrileysparkpoint.com. 10 p.m. Call for info. continues on page 16

99 Court St. 325-7090. dinosaurbarbque.com. 9 p.m. Free. [ CLASSICAL ]

Eastman Rochester Organ Initiative Festival 2013: rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 15


THURSDAY, SETPEMBER 26

[ BLUES ]

Blackened Blues. Temple Bar

and Grille, 109 East Ave. 2326000. templebarandgrille.com. 10 p.m. Free. Cold Sweat. The Beale, 693 South Ave. 271-4650. thebealegrille.com. 7:30 p.m. Call for info. Mansfield Avenue. The Beale, 1930 Empire Blvd. Webster. 2161070. thebealegrille.com. 7:30 p.m. Call for info. Significant Other. Dinosaur Bar-B-Que, 99 Court St. 3257090. dinosaurbarbque.com. 10 p.m. Free.

Thursday Night Dance Craze Contest W/Floorwax. Lux

Lounge, 666 South Ave. 232-9030. lux666.com. Last Thursday of every month, 10 p.m. Free.

Thursday Night Shakedown. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 11 p.m. Free. Tiki Thursdays: Shotgun Music DJ. McGhan’s Pub, 11

W. Main St. Victor. 924-3660. 7:30 p.m. Free. Tilt-a-Whirl Drag Show.. Tilt Nightclub & Ultralounge, 444 Central Ave. 232-8440. facebook. com/Tiltnightclub. 11:15 p.m. & 12:30 a.m. $3. [ JAZZ ]

John Palocy Trio. Bistro 135,

135 W. Commercial St. East Rochester. 662-5555. bistro135. net. 6 p.m. Free. Mike Kaupa. Monroe’s Restaurant, 3001 Monroe Avenue. 348-9104. 6 p.m. Call for info. Ryan from El Rojo Jazz. Lemoncello, 137 West Commercial St. East Rochester. 385-8565. lemoncello137.com. 6 p.m. Free. Tabletop Three. The Rabbit Room, 61 N. Main St. Honeoye Falls. 582-1830. thelowermill. com. 7 p.m. Call for info.

Ted Nicolosi and Shared Genes. Roncone’s, 232

Lyell Ave. 458-3090. ItalianRestaurantRochester. com. 6 p.m. Free Roncone’s, 232 Lyell Ave. 458-3090. ItalianRestaurantRochester.com. 6 p.m. Free. Vince Ercolamento Jazz Trio. The Brighton on East, 1881 East Ave. (585) 271-6650. thebrightonrestaurant.com. 7 p.m. Free. [ KARAOKE ]

Karaoke at Willow Inn. Willow Inn, 428 Manitou Rd. Hilton. 392-3489. 8 p.m. Free. Karaoke at Brickwood Grill. Brickwood Grill, 250 Monroe Ave. 730-8230. brickwoodgrill.com. 9 p.m. Call for info. Karaoke at Pineapple Jack’s. Pineapple Jack’s,

485 Spencerport Rd. Gates. 247-5225. facebook.com/ PineappleJacks. 9 p.m. Free.

Karaoke Night w/Debbie Randyn. Pittsford Pub, 60 N.

Main St. Pittsford. 586-4650. thepittsfordpub.com. 9:30 p.m. Free. Karaoke w/DJ Smooth. Club Clarissas, 293 Clarissa St. 2323430. Call for info. Karaoke w/George. Temple Bar and Grille, 109 East Ave. 2326000. templebarandgrille.com. 8 p.m. Free. Karaoke w/Shotgun Music. McGhan’s Pub, 11 W. Main St. Victor. 924-3660. Free. Karaoke w/Summer Bob. Shorts Bar & Grill, 35 N. Main St. Fairport. 388-0136. shortsfairport.com. 10 p.m. Free.

ROCK | RED JUMPSUIT APPARATUS

Despite parting ways with its record label, Florida-based Red Jumpsuit Apparatus continues to release material and is still going strong in part due to its social-media outreach. The quintet flirts with Christian themes, infuses pop to hardcore music, and packs an emotive lyrical punch that is common among groups of its ilk. The result has earned Red Jumpsuit Apparatus more than 1 million likes on Facebook in addition to a coveted Top 40 hit (“Face Down”). Lead singer Ronnie Winter’s screams will make you smile as the rest of this model modern-day rock band creates cohesive and raucous energy. With War Generation, Eversay, The September Campaign, Battle Beneath, and FORTE. Red Jumpsuit Apparatus performs Friday, September 27, 5 p.m. at Montage Music Hall, 50 Chestnut St. $15-$17. ticketfly.com. — BY ROMAN DIVEZUR Karoake w/Cyd Scarlett. Victor

Village Inn, 34 East Main Street. Victor. 925-5025. 8:30 p.m. Call for info. [ OPEN MIC ]

Open Mic Jam Boulder Park Ave.. Boulder Coffee Co.,

739 Park Ave. 697-0235. bouldercoffeeco.com. 7:30 p.m. Free. Open Mic w/Steve Piper. Flipside Bar & Grill, 2001 E. Main St. 288-3930. 9 p.m. Free. Spot Coffee Open Mic. SPoT Coffee, 200 East Ave. 6134600. spotcoffee.com. 7 p.m. Call for info. [ POP/ROCK ]

Five Alarm Open Jam. Firehouse Saloon, 814 S. Clinton Ave. 3193832. thefirehousesaloon.com. 9 p.m. Call for info. Haewa. Sticky Lips BBQ Juke Joint, 830 Jefferson Rd. 585292-5544. stickylipsbbq.com. 9 p.m. $5.

Har Mar Superstar w/Admirers, Reputante, and Lizzo. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 8 p.m. $8-$10.

Mushroomhead w/One Eyed Doll, Ionia, Aggressive Betty, Setiva, and The Silence Broken.. Montage Music Hall,

50 Chestnut St. 232-1520. themontagemusichall.com. 7 p.m. $15. Rochester Fringe Festival. See website for full festival schedule. rochesterfringe.com.

16 CITY SEPTEMBER 25 - OCTOBER 1, 2013

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 27 [ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ] Blue Jimmy. Sticky Lips BBQ Juke Joint, 830 Jefferson Rd. 585-292-5544. stickylipsbbq. com. 9:30 p.m. $5.

An Evening of Music to benefit Brockport Ecumenical Food Shelf. St. Luke’s Brockport, 14

State St. Brockport. 637-6650. stlukesbrockport.org. 7:30 p.m. Freewill offering. Jim Lane. 58 Main, 58 N. Main St. Brockport. 637-2383. 58main.com. 8 p.m. Free. John Akers w/Shades of Grey. Johnny’s Irish Pub, 1382 Culver Rd. 224-0990. johnnysirishpub. com. 5 p.m. Free. John Wort Hannam. Rochester Christian Reformed Church, 2750 Atlantic Ave. Penfield. rochestercrc.org. 7:30 p.m. $10-$18. Johnny Bauer. Cottage Hotel of Mendon, 1390 Pittsford-Mendon Rd. Mendon. 624-1390. cottagehotelmendon.com. 9 p.m. Call for info. Mike Pepper. McGraw’s Irish Pub, 146 W Commercial St. East Rochester. 348-9091. mcgrawsirishpub.com. 6 p.m. Free. Nancy Perry. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 8:30 p.m. Free. Ralph Louis. Rochester Plaza Hotel, 70 State St. 546-3450. rochesterplaza.com. 6 p.m. Free. Vintage. Lemoncello, 137 West Commercial St. East Rochester. 385-8565. lemoncello137.com. 7 p.m. Free.

[ CLASSICAL ]

Eastman Rochester Organ Initiative Festival 2013: Spectrum of Sound Aspects of Organ Music Since 1940. See

website for full festival schedule. esm.rochester.edu/organ/eroi. [ COUNTRY ]

Chuck Mead and the Grassy Knoll Boys. Abilene Bar &

Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. abilenebarandlounge. com. 10 p.m. $15-$20. [ DJ/ELECTRONIC ]

On the House Fridays. ONE

Nightclub and Lounge, 1 Ryan Alley. 546-1010. oneclublife. com. 21+. Call for info.

Black & White Affair ft. DJ Gweedo, DJ Zio. ONE Nightclub

and Lounge, 1 Ryan Alley. 5461010. oneclublife.com. 21+. Call for info. Chill Out Fridays Happy Hour. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. lovincup.com. 5:30 p.m. Free. DJ Bac Spin. Plush, 151 St. Paul St. 232-5650. venurochester. com. 8 p.m. Call for info. DJ Blake. 140 Alex Bar & Grill, 140 Alexander St. 256-1000. 140alex.com. 10 p.m. Call for info. DJ Energon. Vertex Night Club, 169 N. Chestnut St. 232-5498. 10 p.m. $3-$8. DJ Mi-T-Mo. Richmond’s Tavern, 21 Richmond Street. 270-8570. richmondstavern.com. 9 p.m. Free.

Fresh Meat Fridays w/Samantha Vega, DJ Mighty Mic. Tilt Nightclub & Ultralounge, 444 Central Ave. 232-8440. facebook.com/Tiltnightclub. 11:15 p.m. & 12:30 a.m. $4$12.

Lights, Camera, Action ft. Ghetto Blasta, DJ 6:30. Club Network, 420 Central Ave. 232-1390. Call for info. Lube After Dark. Quaker Steak & Lube, 2205 Buffalo Rd. 6979464. quakersteakandlube.com/ Rochester_NY. 9:30 p.m. Free.

Make Em Sweat Fridays: Make Em Dance Edition ft. DJ 6:30, Nick Kage. Club Network, 420

Central Ave. 232-1390. 10 p.m. Guys free until 10:30 p.m., girls free until 11:30 p.m. 21+. Reggaeton w/DJ Carlos. La Copa Ultra Lounge, 235 W. Ridge Rd. 254-1050. lacopaultralounge. com. 10 p.m. Free.

The Salad Bar Revue hosted by Ambrosia Salad, DJ Solid Bear. 140 Alex Bar & Grill,

140 Alexander St. 256-1000. 140alex.com. 11:30 p.m. & 1 a.m. Call for info. [ JAZZ ]

Fred Costello & Roger Ekers Jazz Duo. Charley Brown’s,

1675 Penfield Rd. 385-9202. charleybrownspenfield.com. 7:30 p.m. Free. Marco Amadio. Pane Vino Ristorante, 175 N. Water St. 2326090. panevinoristorante.com. 6:30 p.m. Free. Rhythm Dogs. Smokin’ Joe’s Bar & Grill, 425 Lyell Ave. 8:30 p.m. Call for info. Rich Thompson Trio. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. East Rochester. 662-5555. bistro135. net. 6 p.m. Free. Stephane Wrembel w/Kamlo. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. lovincup.com. 9 p.m. $20.

Ted Nicolosi and Shared Genes. Pultneyville Grill, 4135

Lake Rd. Pultneyville. (315) 589-4512. PultneyvilleGrill.com. 7 p.m. Free. [ KARAOKE ]

Karaoke w/Cody. Nashvilles,

4853 W Henrietta Rd. Henrietta. 334-3030. nashvillesny.com. 5 p.m. Free. Karaoke at Flaherty’s Webster. Flaherty’s Webster, 1200 Bay Rd. Webster. 671-0816. flahertys. com. 9 p.m. Call for info.

Karaoke at Pineapple Jack’s. Pineapple Jack’s,

485 Spencerport Rd. Gates. 247-5225. facebook.com/ PineappleJacks. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke by Dan & Sherri. Barnard Restaurant & Party House, 360 Maiden Ln. 6631250. 8 p.m. Free. Karaoke w/Cyd Scarlett!. Norton’s Pub, 1730 N. Goodman St. 266-3570. 10 p.m. Karaoke w/Krazy George. Scotland Yard Pub, 187 Saint Paul St. 730-5030. scotlandyardpub.com. 10 p.m. Call for info. Karaoke w/Summer Bob. Shorts Bar & Grill, 35 N. Main St. Fairport. 388-0136. shortsfairport.com. 10 p.m. Free. [ OPEN MIC ]

Open Mic Night. Mooseberry

Café, 2555 Baird Rd. Penfield. 348-9022. mooseberrycafe.com. 6 p.m. Call for info. [ REGGAE/JAM ]

Spiritual Rez w/Subsoil, Personal Blend. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N. Water St. 325-5600. waterstreetmusic. com. 8:30 p.m. $10.

[ POP/ROCK ]

The Bygone Few w/ Thoroughbred. Firehouse Saloon, 814 S. Clinton Ave. 319-3832. thefirehousesaloon.com. 8 p.m. Call for info.

Cherry Bomb. Nashvilles, 4853

W Henrietta Rd. Henrietta. 3343030. nashvillesny.com. 9 p.m. Call for info. Dirt Child. TP’s Irish Pub, 916 Panorama Trail. 385-4160. 9 p.m. Free. Five-0. Nola’s Restaurant & Nightclub, 4775 Lake Ave. 6633375. nolasweb.com. 10 p.m. Call for info.

Green Party Show: Pony Hand w/House Majority, Blue Lazerz.

Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. Receive $2 back if you sign up to vote. $7-$9. Happy Hour with Jeff Cosco. Richmond’s Tavern, 21 Richmond Street. 270-8570. richmondstavern.com. 5 p.m. Call for info Richmond’s Tavern, 21 Richmond Street. 270-8570. richmondstavern.com. 5 p.m. Call for info.

Joan Osborne w/Roses and Revolutions. The German House Theater, 315 Gregory St. 4426880. upallnightpresents.com. 8 p.m. $30.50-$35.

MoChester “Lost and Found” CD Release Show. Memorial Art

Gallery, 500 University Ave. 2768900. mochester.com. 6:30 p.m. $10-$12. Radio Nation Band. Finger Lakes Casino & Racetrack, 5857 Rt. 96. Farmington. 924-3232. fingerlakesracetrack.com. Call for info. Red Jumpsuit Apparatus. Montage Music Hall, 50 Chestnut St. 232-1520. themontagemusichall.com. 5 p.m. $15-$17. Rochester Fringe Festival. See website for full festival schedule. rochesterfringe.com. Wild Ride. Pelican’s Nest, 566 River St. 663-5910. pelicansnestrestaurant.com. 10 p.m. Call for info. Women of Faith. Blue Cross Arena, One War Memorial Square. 758-5300. bluecrossarena.com. Friday: 7 p.m., Saturday: 9 a.m. womenoffaith.com. $99-$109.

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 28 [ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ] Caliente. Tapas 177 Lounge, 177 St. Paul St. 262-2090. tapas177. com. 11 p.m. Free.

Folk Songs by People You Didn’t Know Sing Folk Songs ft. Allen Hopkins, Bonnie Abrams, Bill Destler, and Al Power.

Downtown United Presbyterian Church, 121 N. Fitzhugh Street. 325-4000. 7 p.m. $10-$50. Grand Canyon Rescue Episode. Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. abilenebarandlounge.com. 9:30 p.m. $5-$8. Jim Lane. Pint & Goblet Tavern, continues on page 18


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Practical Strategic Planning WITH

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Learn the importance of having a solid plan, how to create great vision, and how to use this strategic plan to drive business and improve customer service.

JOIN US FOR THIS

Free Event

on Monday Sept. 30th from 5:30–8:30pm

Carlson Metro Center YMCA

For info, or to RSVP, call 263-4269

Future Events

Monday Oct. 28th - Finance Monday Nov. 25th - Small Business Marketing

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 17


FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 27 300 Village Square Blvd. Honeoye Falls. 624-4386. cbsbrewing.com/visiting-cbsbrewing-company/pint-goblet/. 6 p.m. Free. John Akers. TP’s Irish Pub, 916 Panorama Trail. 385-4160. 9 p.m. Free. Mike Pullano. McGraw’s Irish Pub, 146 W Commercial St. East Rochester. 348-9091. mcgrawsirishpub.com. 7 p.m. Free. True Blue. Cottage Hotel of Mendon, 1390 Pittsford-Mendon Rd. Mendon. 624-1390. cottagehotelmendon.com. 9 p.m. Call for info. [ BLUES ]

Deborah Magone. Richmond’s

Shui

Asian Fusion

FREE Tasting Event Pad Thai Noodles • Curries • and More!

Sunday, September 29 | 3-5pm 236 University Ave | 546.6525 Open 7 days a week 5 Star Restaurant on

Find us on

Tavern, 21 Richmond Street. 270-8570. richmondstavern. com. 10 p.m. Call for info. Eric and the Bluesbirds. The Beale, 693 South Ave. 271-4650. thebealegrille.com. 7:30 p.m. Call for info. The Imaginary Band. The Beale, 1930 Empire Blvd. Webster. 2161070. thebealegrille.com. 7:30 p.m. Call for info. Joe Beard. Dinosaur Bar-BQue, 99 Court St. 325-7090. dinosaurbarbque.com. 10 p.m. Free.

Steve Katz: An Evening of Story and Song. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park

Point Dr. 292-9940. lovincup. com. 9 p.m. $10-$12. Teagan & The Tweeds. Johnny’s Irish Pub, 1382 Culver Rd. 224-0990. johnnysirishpub. com. 8 p.m. Free. [ CLASSICAL ]

Eastman Rochester Organ Initiative Festival 2013: Spectrum of Sound Aspects of Organ Music Since 1940. See

website for full festival schedule. esm.rochester.edu/organ/eroi.

MODERN INDIAN FLAVORS

Bar & Grill

RPO Opening Weekend: Mahler’s First Symphony. Kodak Hall at Eastman Theater, 60 Gibbs St. 8 p.m. $15-$92. [ COUNTRY ]

Please join us as we celebrate

Amaya’s 2nd Anniversary SATURDAY, SEPT. 28TH at 5:00PM Complementary exclusive Indian Wine tasting and hors d’oeuvres Raffles to benefit Daystar for Medically Fragile Children, Inc.

1900 S. Clinton Ave. • 241-3223

Amayabarandgrill.com 18 CITY SEPTEMBER 25 - OCTOBER 1, 2013

ShotGunn Wedding. Nashvilles,

4853 W Henrietta Rd. Henrietta. 334-3030. nashvillesny.com. 9 p.m. Call for info. [ DJ/ELECTRONIC ]

Blue Label Saturdays ft. DJ Andy Fade and DJ Bobby Base.

Flat Iron Café, 561 State St. 454-4830. flatironcafe.net. Call for info. DJ Big Reg. Plush, 151 St. Paul St. 232-5650. venurochester. com. 10 p.m. Call for info. DJ Blake. 140 Alex Bar & Grill, 140 Alexander St. 256-1000. 140alex.com. 10 p.m. Call for info. DJ Darkwave. Vertex Night Club, 169 N. Chestnut St. 232-5498. 10 p.m. $3-$8. DJ Trancesend. Love Nightclub, 45 Euclid St. 2225683. 10 p.m. $5.

POP/ROCK | DARWIN DEEZ

For Darwin Deez, a sense of whimsy goes a long way. Frontman Darwin Smith in particular is but one part of the quirky image the band is striving for/achieves. Smith’s hipster perm, hippie headband, and astoundingly long neck above which that curly mop hangs all serve to convey an indelible image that meshes well with the band’s alarmingly catchy pop roots. It’s a wonder songs from the band’s eponymous debut never became more ubiquitous than being featured in a few random commercials. On the band’s latest effort, 2013’s “Songs For Imaginative People,” Deez takes a step forward, softening a bit of the catchiness with altered song structures and dimmer lyrics to obtain a more mature sound, while retaining the jangly guitars early fans are sure to recognize.  Darwin Deez plays Saturday, September 28, 5 p.m. at the Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. Skirts and The Big are also slated to perform. $10-$15. Bugjar.com. — BY DAVE LABARGE La Selva. Tilt Nightclub & Ultralounge, 444 Central Ave. 232-8440. facebook.com/ Tiltnightclub. 10 p.m. Call for info. Poke Dem Saturdays ft. Team Lion Paw, The Money Green Theme, Nick Kage, and Wavey. Trinities Restaurant, 36 W. Main St. 319-4047. 10 p.m. $5-$10. Saturday Night Ladies Night. BLU Bar & Grill, 250 Pixley Rd. 247-0079. blurochester.com. 9 p.m. Call for info.

September Babies ft. Legion of Doom, Nick Kage. Obsession Bar

& Grill, 564 Chili Ave. 436-9042. Call for info. [ JAZZ ]

The Fornieri Brothers. Pane Vino Ristorante, 175 N. Water St. 2326090. panevinoristorante.com. 6:30 p.m. Free. Fred Costello & Roger Ekers Jazz Duo. Charley Brown’s,

1675 Penfield Rd. 385-9202. charleybrownspenfield.com. 7:30 p.m. Free. Madeline Forster w/Bill Dobbins. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. East Rochester. 662-5555. bistro135.net. 6:30 p.m. Free. Midnight City. Lemoncello, 137 West Commercial St. East Rochester. 385-8565. lemoncello137.com. 7 p.m. Free. Ted Nicolosi and Shared Genes. Jasmine’s Asian Fusion, 657 Ridge Rd. Webster. 216-1290. JasmineAsianFusion.com. 6:30 p.m. Free.

The White Hots. Pultneyville Grill, 4135 Lake Rd. Pultneyville. 315-589-4512. pultneyvillegrill.com. 7 p.m. Call for info. [ KARAOKE ]

Karaoke at 140 Alex.

140 Alex Bar & Grill, 140 Alexander St. 256-1000. 140alex.com. 10:30 p.m. Free. Karaoke w/Cyd Scarlett!. Norton’s Pub, 1730 N. Goodman St. 266-3570. 10 p.m. Kick-Ass Karaoke. Temple Bar and Grille, 109 East Ave. 232-6000. templebarandgrille.com. 10 p.m. Free. [ R&B ] Shine. Sticky Lips BBQ Juke Joint, 830 Jefferson Rd. 585292-5544. stickylipsbbq.com. 10 p.m. Free. [ REGGAE/JAM ]

Mosaic Foundation, Zongo Junction. Dubland

Underground, 315 Alexander St. 232-7550. dublandunderground. wordpress.com. 10 p.m. $7. [ POP/ROCK ]

The Chairs. California Brew

Haus, 402 W. Ridge Rd. 6211480. 8 p.m. $5-$7.


Darwin Deez w/Skirts, The Big. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe

Ave. 6 p.m. $10-$15. Download. Nola’s Restaurant & Nightclub, 4775 Lake Ave. 6633375. nolasweb.com. 9 p.m. Call for info. Ernie Capone. Hamlin Station Bar & Grill, 52 Railroad Ave. Hamlin. 964-2010. hamlinstation.net. 8:30 p.m. Call for info. The Isotopes, BML. Pineapple Jack’s, 485 Spencerport Rd. Gates. 247-5225. facebook. com/PineappleJacks. 9 p.m. Call for info.

Goeff Harder and the Moonlighters. Flaherty’s

Honeoye Falls, 60 W. Main St. Honeoye Falls. 497-7010. flahertys.com. Call for info. Johnny B and The MVPs. Flaherty’s Webster, 1200 Bay Rd. Webster. 671-0816. flahertys. com. Call for info.

Keaton, Sexy Teenagers, and The Results. Firehouse Saloon,

814 S. Clinton Ave. 319-3832. thefirehousesaloon.com. 9 p.m. 21+. $6. Octane. Pelican’s Nest, 566 River St. 663-5910. pelicansnestrestaurant.com. 10 p.m. Call for info. Orient Express Band. Finger Lakes Casino & Racetrack, 5857 Rt. 96. Farmington. 924-3232. fingerlakesracetrack.com. Call for info. Rochester Fringe Festival. See website for full festival schedule. rochesterfringe.com.

The Sadies w/The Pickpockets, Bogs Visionary Orchestra. Bug Jar, 219

Traditional Irish Music Session. Johnny’s Irish Pub,

The Seabreezers EP Release Party. Skylark Lounge, 40

Walking on Sunshine ft. Jim Lane. Ontario Beach Park, 4799

Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. Limited entry for unders. $13-$15.

South Union St. 270-8106. theskylarklounge.com. 10 p.m. $4.

Seven Witches w/Vicious Rumors, Power Theory. Montage Music Hall, 50 Chestnut St. 2321520. themontagemusichall. com. 7:30 p.m. $10-$12. Two Or Less. Brickwood Grill, 250 Monroe Ave. 730-8230. brickwoodgrill.com. 10 p.m. Call for info. Women of Faith. Blue Cross Arena, One War Memorial Square. 758-5300. bluecrossarena.com. Friday: 7 p.m., Saturday: 9 a.m. womenoffaith.com. $99-$109.

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 29 [ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ]

Celtic Music Sundays. Temple

Bar and Grille, 109 East Ave. 232-6000. templebarandgrille. com. 7 p.m. Free. Fandango at the Tango. Tango Cafe, 389 Gregory St. 271-4930. tangocafedance.com. 7:30 p.m. Free, donations accepted Tango Cafe, 389 Gregory St. 271-4930. tangocafedance.com. 7:30 p.m. Free, donations accepted.

1382 Culver Rd. 224-0990. johnnysirishpub.com. 5 p.m. Free.

Lake Ave. geneseelighthouse. org. 9:30 a.m. 271-2897 ext.1610. Call for info. [ BLUES ]

Buddy Guy. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N. Water St. 3255600. waterstreetmusic.com. 7 p.m. $46-$50. Salmon Creek Blues Boys. Pultneyville Grill, 4135 Lake Rd. Pultneyville. 315-589-4512. pultneyvillegrill.com. 4 p.m. Call for info. [ CLASSICAL ]

Eastman Rochester Organ Initiative Festival 2013: Spectrum of Sound Aspects of Organ Music Since 1940. See

website for full festival schedule. esm.rochester.edu/organ/eroi.

Musicale: Sun Min Kim, DMA, piano, Eastman School of Music. George Eastman House, 900 East Ave. 3 p.m. Free w/ museum admission.

Pegasus: The Virtuoso Orchestra. Downtown United

Presbyterian Church, 121 N. Fitzhugh Street. 325-4000. 4 p.m. $10-$75.

[ DJ/ELECTRONIC ] Boasy Sundaze. Club Clarissas, 293 Clarissa St. 232-3430. Call for info. Drink and Drag Sundays. ONE Nightclub and Lounge, 1 Ryan Alley. 546-1010. oneclublife. com. 8 p.m. 18+. Call for info.

Ship Wrecked Sunday’s ft. DJ Trancesend. Captain’s Attic, 37

Charlotte St. 546-8885. 21+. Call for info.

Tequila Sundays ft. DJ Andy Fade. Flat Iron Café, 561 State St. 454-4830. flatironcafe.net. 10 p.m. Call for info.

Manic Monday Retro Dance ft. Miss Z.. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe

Ave. 9 p.m. Free.

Henrietta Rd. Henrietta. 3343030. nashvillesny.com. Call for info.

[ JAZZ ]

Tuesday Americano w/Bobby Base. Flat Iron Café, 561 State

Alphonso Williams. Bistro 135,

135 W. Commercial St. East Rochester. 662-5555. bistro135. net. 6 p.m. Free. Larry Ochs, Don Robinson Duo. The Bop Shop, 1460 Monroe Ave. 271-3354. bopshop.com. 8 p.m. $15. Watkins & The Rapiers. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 7:30 p.m. Free.

[ JAZZ ]

Clarissa’s Jam Night w/Terrance Bruce. Club Clarissas, 293

Clarissa St. 585-232-3430. clarissasjazz.com. 7 p.m. Free. POP/ROCK

Al Murphy, Dave Richeone.

Smokin’ Joe’s Bar & Grill, 425 Lyell Ave. 6:30 p.m. Call for info. Felicia Sloin. JCC Rochester, 1200 Edgewood Ave. 2 p.m. $5.

Grieves w/Moses Rockwell, Benny Beyond. Bug Jar, 219

Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. $10-$14.

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 30 [ DJ/ELECTRONIC ]

Magic City Monday’s. Louie’s Cordial’s Lounge, 392 Lyell Ave. 254-2844. 7 p.m. $5 before 10 p.m.

DJ Kathy. Nashvilles, 4853 W

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 1 [ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ] Jon Lewis. Towpath Café, 6 N. Main St. Box Factory Bldg. Fairport. 377-0410. towpathcafe.com. Every other Tuesday, 5 p.m. Free. [ BLUES ]

Bluesday Tuesday Blues Jam.

P.I.’s Lounge, 495 West Ave. 8 p.m. Call for info.

St. 454-4830. flatironcafe.net. Call for info. [ JAZZ ]

Charlie Mitchell Group. Flipside Bar & Grill, 2001 E. Main St. 288-3930. 8 p.m. Free. Penfield Rotary Big Band Swing Dance. Penfield Community

Center, 1985 Baird Rd. Penfield. 340-8655. 7:30 p.m. $1. Ted Nicolosi and Shared Genes. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. East Rochester. 662-5555. bistro135.net. 6 p.m. Free. [ POP/ROCK ]

The Bursting with Love Revue.

The Titus Tavern, 692 Titus Ave. 270-5365. titustavern.com. 7 p.m. Call for info. A Skylit Drive. Dubland Underground, 315 Alexander St. 232-7550. dublandunderground. wordpress.com. 6 p.m. $12.

[ DJ/ELECTRONIC ]

2 Reason Tuesdays w/DJ Zio. Nathaniel’s Pub, 251 Exchange Boulevard. 232-8470. Call for info. Free. DJ Ghetto Blaster. Club Clarissas, 293 Clarissa St. 232-3430. Call for info.

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 19


Classical

Conductor Laureatue Christopher Seaman (pictured) will join 13 guest conductors to lead the Rochester Philharmonic Orchestra through its 2013-14 classical offerings. PHOTO BY GELFAND-PIPER

More than filling the gap Get to know the guest conductors for the RPO’s 2013-14 season [ FEATURE ] BY PALOMA CAPANNA

When I first realized that the 2013-2014 season for the Rochester Philharmonic Orchestra would consist of 13 guest conductors plus one concert with Conductor Laureate Christopher Seaman (March 6 & 8), I worried about plunging ticket sales and musicians without an anchor. But then I got to thinking about the opportunity this would create for the audience to sample leading conductors of the world, and for the musicians to anchor into each other while welcoming the guest conductors. It was with these two, completely different thoughts in mind that I undertook to interview the entire line-up of guest conductors in a three-day marathon. My reaction upon finishing the last interview is to be sure to tell you that — even if you never have before — it’s time for you to buy season tickets. There isn’t a single RPO concert this season that you will want to miss. What can I say about the 13 guest conductors as a whole? They are all men. They are all self-confident and they directly answered every question I asked. They all have a clear sense of how they want to approach the podium, the musicians, and the audience. They are all well-credentialed, and their resumes include multiple spots as guest conductors. It is going to be a thrilling season, and I hope that you will join City Newspaper as we cover the RPO for the 2013-2014 season (look for reviews of each main-season classical concert at rochestercitynewspaper.com). If there is any one thing that each and every guest conductor had to say, it was high praise for the RPO and its ability to tackle some of the greatest symphonic works ever written.

20 CITY SEPTEMBER 25 - OCTOBER 1, 2013

Guest conductor: Jun Märkl WEBSITE: JUNMARKL.COM BORN: MUNICH, GERMANY CURRENT HOME: FLORENCE, ITALY RPO CONCERT DATES: SEPTEMBER 26 & 28 PROGRAM: MAHLER, MENDELSSOHN, AARON JAY KERNIS (B. 1960) GUEST SOLOIST: JENNIFER KOH, VIOLIN

“It was the Americans who first really appreciated Mahler,” says conductor Jun Märkl. “It took a long time before he became as popular in Europe as he was in the States.” Märkl describes Mahler as being “clear in colors, vivid, extremely emotional” and using “stories as the background for his compositions.” He adds, “Maybe too much so, but he’s dealing with feelings.” As to the upcoming performance of the Mendelssohn Violin Concerto in E-minor, Märkl calls it “one of the most beautiful violin concertos ever written.” “It is very classical in form,” he says. “It has an early romantic feeling. It is a tender, sophisticated piece that the audience will love.” Märkl prepares not only by studying scores; he has been to Mendelssohn’s house to “soak up” the tradition and style, and to reflect upon the composer’s Jewish heritage and its role in placing him “on the outside of his homelands in Germany/Austria.” And then, Märkl pulls his thoughts through the filter of his own life, consciously, of being German-Japanese and being “a little outside society” and “having to find my own way.” Märkl adds, “The outsiders see it better than those on the inside. And, even though they long to belong, they refuse to belong 100 percent.” It is not only core Germanic repertoire through which Märkl exhibits his strengths. He is also attracted to Debussy, Ravel, and Messiaen, having served as music director for the Orchestre National de Lyon (2005-2011), recorded a nine-CD set of the complete orchestral works of Debussy, and received the prestigious Chevalier de l’Ordre des Arts et des Lettres from the French Ministry of Culture.

Guest conductor: Bernhard Gueller WEBSITE: GUELLER.COM BORN: STUTTGART, GERMANY CURRENT HOME: HALIFAX, NOVA SCOTIA, CANADA RPO CONCERT DATES: OCTOBER 17 & 19 PROGRAM: BRAHMS, BARTÓK, JENNIFER HIGDON GUEST SOLOIST: JONATHAN BISS, PIANO

Conductor Bernhard Gueller comes to the RPO to conduct a program chosen by the orchestra, which he calls “quite substantial,” “difficult,” and “big.” “I’m quite interested to see how your audience will react,” says Gueller. “How conservative is your audience?” It is an appropriate question, and the same one I had the first time I walked into the Eastman Theater to review a concert with Hungarian composer Béla Bartók on the program. Gueller calmly says, “It’s not a piece one has to be afraid of. It is tonal, wonderful, very melodic, rhythmically very interesting. It is based on Hungarian melodies and folk tunes.” Gueller started his musical career as a cellist and played in orchestras for more than 20 years before changing to conducting. He enjoys the connections he makes through youth orchestras. “It’s very fresh,” says Gueller. “They are hungry to learn. I can remember, myself, how exciting it was the first time I played the Beethoven 5th Symphony.” During his conducting career, Gueller has been music director/principal conductor of the Nuremberg Symphony Orchestra (Germany) and the Cape Town Philharmonic Orchestra (South Africa). Gueller led the Cape Town Philharmonic Orchestra on behalf of the continent of Africa in the 16th International Festival of Music in the Canary Islands.


Guest conductor: Larry Rachleff

Guest conductor: Christoph Campestrini

Guest conductor: Junichi Hirokami

Guest conductor: Nir Kabaretti

WEBSITE: HTTP://SELDYCRAMERARTISTS.COM/

WEBSITE: CHRISTOPHCAMPESTRINI.COM

WEBSITE: TENNANTARTISTS.COM/JUNICHI-HIROKA-

WEBSITE: NIRKABARETTI.COM

BIO_RACHLEFF.HTML

BORN: LINZ, AUSTRIA

MI/INDEX.PHP

BORN: ISRAEL

BORN: ISRAEL

CURRENT HOME: FLORENCE, ITALY

BORN: TOKYO, JAPAN

CURRENT HOME: FLORENCE, ITALY

CURRENT HOME: HOUSTON, TEXAS

RPO CONCERT DATES: NOVEMBER 7 & 9

CURRENT HOME: FLORENCE, ITALY

RPO CONCERT DATES: NOVEMBER 21 & 23

RPO CONCERT DATES: OCTOBER 24 & 26

PROGRAM: STRAVINSKY, MOZART, TCHAIKOVSKY

RPO CONCERT DATES: NOVEMBER 14 & 16

PROGRAM: KEVIN PUTS (B. 1972), BEETHOVEN,

PROGRAM: COPLAND, BARBER, ASTOR PIAZZOLLA,

GUEST SOLOIST: BARRY SNYDER, PIANO

PROGRAM: RACHMANINOFF, STRAUSS, HINDEMITH

SAINT-SAENS

GUEST SOLOIST: ERIK BEHR, OBOE (RPO PRINCI-

GUEST SOLOIST: EDWARD ARRON, CELLO

MANUEL DE FALLA

Larry Rachleff really makes the case for composer Samuel Barber’s “The School for Scandal” as being one of the century’s “most significant compositions.” He points out that it’s a “very early piece” for Barber, written when he was only 21 years old, and yet it already reflected Barber’s “compositional craft and language.” Rachleff says Barber’s work is “all-American,” reflecting “the 1930’s, the jazz influence, the mix of incisive rhythms and colorful orchestrations.” Rachleff describes Copland’s “Appalachian Spring” as “25 minutes of the most powerful connection.” He expanded on why we share that experience, listening to Copland’s music, comparing it to Russians hearing Rachmaninoff or Germans hearing Bruckner. “With Copland, we know where he walked in Tanglewood in the summer and what jazz clubs he went to in Manhattan. Copland, Ives, Barber, and Gershwin were all soulful composers who were richly connected to the American experience.” “This kind of program requires an enormous range from the orchestra,” says Rachleff, “the flavors of Copland, the rhythms of Barber, the style of Piazzolla, and the wild aroma of Falla.” As a champion of public-music education, Rachleff sees that responsibility continuing into our job as the public to attend concerts. “Yes, there are war horses,” says Rachleff, “but we must find a way to be motivated by our own unique connection to the dramatic message of the piece.”

From Austria to Julliard, Columbia, and Yale, and then on to more than 100 orchestras on five continents, conductor Christoph Campestrini looks for the depth in every work. “It is important to know it stylistically and it is equally important to feel it; you must juxtapose both,” says Campestrini. With the RPO, he’ll take on an interesting program that includes a work written by Stravinsky, inspired by Tchaikovsky, and a major work of Tchaikovsky. “This is a double bonus,” says Campestrini. “You have a great composer of the 20th century, looking at a great composer of the 19th century, being performed in the 21st century. It’s all layers. It’s all part of one great tradition and cultural heritage of gorgeous musical and artistic concepts.” Campestrini finds it “most gratifying to reach a communion of emotion as one with the musicians and to communicate that to the audience” and he credits the RPO with the “innate ability to plunge into the emotional message right away, paired with the technical ability to execute the work.” He previously conducted the RPO in 2012.

PAL OBOE)

Although conductor Junichi Hirokami was not available to participate in these interviews by press time, we can take from his website his studies of conducting, piano, musicology, and viola at the Tokyo College of Music. He also had the opportunity to collaborate with legendary Russian pianist Vladimir Ashkenazy, including a tour of Japan with the NHK Symphony Orchestra (Tokyo). Since 2008, he has been the chief conductor of the Kyoto Symphony Orchestra (Japan).

Nir Kabaretti is a man of the world. He was born in Israel, studied in Vienna, has lived also in Madrid, calls Florence his current home, and is based part-time in the United States, where he is the music & artistic director of the Santa Barbara Symphony. He speaks Hebrew, German, Spanish, Italian, and English. Kabaretti calls it “fulfilling” to live his life on three continents every year. Kabaretti considers it a “plus” to “speak the language,” “to read in the way they wrote it,” and to “get into the head” of the composers. He considers this true whether he is interpreting the composition or he is selecting works for audiences. “What we would program in the United States is probably not what we would program in Tokyo or Argentina,” he says. “It helps to know the milieu where you are working.” Kabaretti conducted the RPO as part of the “Summer Serenades at Hochstein” series in 2012. He considers the RPO “up to any challenge.” Kabaretti says he is “extremely excited” to prepare musically and mentally for the upcoming performance, and he hopes to work with the RPO to bring the audience a performance that is “relevant to today, specific to the composer, and unique in its delivery.” continues on page 26

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 21


Art Exhibits [ OPENING ] Before Your Quiet Eyes, 439 Monroe Ave. Tom Foster Water Colors and Other Works. Through Oct 31. Reception with poetry reading Sep 28, 7-10 p.m. 5637851. bfyque@aol.com. Image City Photography Gallery, 722 University Ave. Simply Myanmar. Through Oct 27. Works by Chris Kogut, Dick Bennet, Hope DellaStua, Bob Pierce, and Terri Sipone. Reception Oct 4, 5-9 p.m. 482-1976. imagecityphotographygallery.com. International Art Acquisitions, 3300 Monroe Ave. “In the Mood.” Through Oct 31. Mon-Fri 10 a.m.-9 p.m., Sat 10 a.m.-6 p.m., Sun noon-5 p.m. Work by Malcolm Liepke and Jurgen Gorg. 264-1440. internationalartacquisitions.com. Maplewood Family YMCA, 25 Driving Park Avenue. Irondequoit Art Club. Through Oct 31. Hours: weekdays, 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Reception and Maplewood Y Craft Show Oct 12, 9 a.m.-3 p.m. 64-3600. irondequoitartclub.org. Morgan-Manning House, 151 Main St. Group Art Show. Sharon Allen, Al Cretney, Brenda Cretney, Amy Disalvo, Alicia Fink, Debra Fisher, Richart Hart, Jennifer Hecker, Hellen Hull, Julie Jensen, Jappie King Black, Maurice Knebel, Leslie Kofron, Richard Kron, Ed Lehman, Donna Mancuso, Patricia Roach, Kaitlin Roney, Susan Scholl, Helen Smagorinsky, Bill Stewart, Lisa Szkolnik, Pam Ward, and Shamra Westbrook. Fri meet the artists reception 7-9 p.m., $10. Sat 10 a.m.-2 p.m. free and open to public. 637-6864. Nazareth College Arts Center Gallery, 4245 East Ave. “In Process: Emerging Artists in Metalsmithing and Jewelry.” Through Oct 25. Sun and TueThu, noon-5 p.m., Fri-Sat, noon-8 p.m. Reception Sep 27, 5-7 p.m. 389-5073. artscenter.naz.edu. Nazareth College Colacino Gallery, 4245 East Ave. “Residuum.”

FESTIVAL | APPLEUMPKIN FESTIVAL

Unfortunately, appleumpkins are not a real thing (I know, this crushed my hopes and dreams, too). Regular old apples and pumpkins will have to sate our fall produce needs. But the AppleUmpkin Festival IS real, and is taking place this Saturday and Sunday, September 28-29, in the historic Gaslight Village in Wyoming, NY. With plenty of vendors, live music and dance performances, and a good old-fashioned baking contest, this is a great opportunity to get away from the normalcies of city/suburb life and step into an old-timey environment, plus to celebrate those aforementioned fall treats. The festival runs 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday and Sunday, and it’s free to get in. Check out appleumpkin.com for more information. — BY TREVOR LEWIS Through Oct 25. Wed-Sun, noon5 p.m. A collaboration between photographer Ann Lovett and artist/educator Mary Hafeli. Reception Sep 27, 5-7 p.m. 3895073. artscenter.naz.edu. [ CONTINUING ] 1975 Gallery, 89 Charlotte St. “Adventures in Technicolor” by St. Monci. Through Sep 28. 1975ish.com. Arts & Cultural Council for Greater Rochester, 277 N. Goodman St. Recent Paintings by Douglass Coffey. Through Sep 27. Mon-Fri 10 a.m.-4 p.m. 473-4000. artsrochester.org. Baobab Cultural Center, 728 University Ave. Frank

Frazier and Friends. Frank Frazier, Minerva Diaz, Rory Tequan Morgan, Janice Thacker, Shenna Vaughn. thebaobab.org.; George K. Arthur Photographic exhibit. thebaobab.org. Black Radish Studio, 274 N. Goodman. Another Bright Idea! by Kevin Fitch. Through Sep 28. 413-1278. blackradishstudio.com. Books Etc., 78 W. Main St. Macedon. “Whales, Windmills and Wonders.” Through Sep 30. Highlights the work of John Domm, Terry Patti, and Marie Starr. 474-4116. books_etc@ yahoo.com.

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Bridge Art Gallery University of Rochester Medical Center, 300 Crittenden Blvd. “Play.” urmc. rochester.edu. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. NEON GREY II: Renee Latragna + Brittany Williams. Through Sep 30. 8 p.m.-2 a.m. lobbydigital.com. Cary Graphic Arts Collection, Lomb Memorial Dr. “Manifold Greatness: The Creation and Afterlife of the King James Bible.” Through Dec 13. Mon-Fri 9 a.m.-noon. 475-3961. library.rit. edu/cary. Central Library, 115 South Ave. Survivors of Sexual Assault installation by Sharon Locke. Through Sep 28. 428-8150. pprsr.org. Community Darkroom Gallery, 713 Monroe Ave. “Social Reportage: Raw.” Through Nov 2. Mon 9 a.m.-9:30 p.m., Tue-Thu 9 a.m.6:30 p.m., Fri noon-5 p.m., Sat 10 a.m.-5:30 p.m. Photographic essays touching on poverty, homelessness, and social issues in an urban setting. By Arlene Hodge and students. 244-1730. geneseearts.org. Crossroads Coffeehouse, 752 S. Goodman St. The Artwork of Bethany Williams and Allie Hartley. 244-6787. xroadscoffeehouse.com. A Different Path Gallery, 27 Market St. Brockport. Large Format Photography, Painting, and Other Media. Through Sep 28. With John Kosbeth, Maureen McMahon, et al. 637-5494. adifferentpathgallery.com. Firehouse Gallery at Genesee Pottery, 713 Monroe Ave. History in the Making VIII. Through Nov 3. Ceramic traditions, contemporary objects. 244-1730. geneseearts.org. Gallery R, 100 College Ave. Panoramic Photographs of the 2012 Rochester Festival Season. Through Sep 29. 256-3312. galleryr99@gmail.com. Geisel Gallery, Bausch & Lomb Place, One Bausch & Lomb Place. “Solos, Duetts, and Concertos,”

paintings and sculpture by David Chamberlain. Through Oct 29. Reception Mon-Fri 7 a.m.-7 p.m., Sat 8 a.m.-2 p.m. Oct 3, 5-7 p.m. davidchamberlainstudios.com. Genesee Community College, 1 College Road. Batavia. “Life and Limb: The Toll of the American Civil War” from The National Library of Medicine. Through Oct 26 in the Alfred C. O’Connell Library. 343-0055. genesee.edu. George Eastman House, 900 East Ave. The Gender Show. Through Oct 13. Tue-Sat 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Sun 11 a.m.-5 p.m. 271-3361. eastmanhouse.org. Grass Roots Gallery, suite 157, Hungerford Bldg, 1115 E. Main St., Suite 248. “The American Worker” by Phil Pantano.. Through Sep 27. thegrassrootsgallery@gmail.com. I-Square Visions, 693 Titus Ave. Irondequoit. Recent Oil Paintings uniquely capturing scenes of Irondequoit, by local artist, Howard Beatty. Through Sep 26. Artist talk Sep 26, 7-9 p.m. ZanneBrunner@gmail.com. International Art Acquisitions, 3300 Monroe Ave. “Rhythm in the Line of Black and White” by Enrico Embroli. Through Sep 30. Mon-Fri 10 a.m.-9 p.m., Sat 10 a.m.-6 p.m., Sun 12-5 p.m. Also on view are Marc Chagall, Marsha Hammel and Beatriz Castaneda. 264-1440. Link Gallery at City Hall, 30 Church St. “Our Hispanic Community.” Through Oct 21. Photographs from a 1983 project by artists Marilyn Anderson, Leslie Locketz, and Ira Srole, and art by Latino Youth from the Rochester City School District. Mon-Fri 9 a.m.-5 p.m. 325-6669. gmoseson@rocheseter.rr.com. cityofrochester.gov. Little Theatre, 240 East Ave. Jose Rivera. Through Oct 11. thelittle.org. Livingston Arts Center, 4 Murray Hill Dr. Mt. Morris. New Deal Gallery: “Under the Influence: New Deal Painters And Their Artistic Influences.” Through October 5. 243-6785.

Main Street Arts, 20 W. Main St., Clifton Springs. “Landscape: Subject and Stimuli.” 315-4620210. mstreetarts@gmail.com. mainstreetartsgallery.com. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. Creative Workshop Living Memory Alumni Show: Part 2. Through Oct 24. 2768900. mag.rochester.edu.; “Connoisseurs Around the Corner: Gifts of Art from MAG’s Founding Family.” Lockhart Gallery through Dec 13. 2768900. mag.rochester.edu. Mental Health Association, 320 N Goodman St. “Luminaria” Art lighting the path to wellness. Creative Wellness Coalition. 3253145 x144. Mercer Gallery at Monroe Communtiy College, 1000 E. Henrietta Rd. Alumni Show: Chris Mostyn and Rick Nickel. Through Oct 4. Mon-Thu 10 a.m.-7 p.m., Fri 11 a.m.-4 p.m. 292-3121. monroecc.edu/go/mercer/. Mill Art Center & Gallery, 61 N Main St. Honeoye Falls. “Paintings of Local Buildings” by Mitchell J. Lurye. Through Nov 9. Reception Sep 12, 6-8 p.m. millartcenter.com.; “Celebrate Our Surroundings.” Benefit for The Finger Lakes Museum. 6247740. millartcenter.com. My Sister’s Gallery, 505 Mt. Hope Ave. “Live in Joy With Color” by Charlotte Barnard. A display of heartfelt creations in watercolor, polymer and yarn. Through Oct 27. Reception Sep 26, 4:30-6:30 p.m. 546-8400. cotton@episcopalseniorlife.org. EpiscopalSeniorLife.org. Ock Hee’s Gallery, 2 Lehigh St. “Bird is the Word.” Through Oct 19. Mon-Sat 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Alan Singer, Arthur Singer, Kurt Feuerherm, Eunice Hur, Belinda Bryce, & Jerry Alonzo. 624-4730. ockheesgallery.com. Oxford Gallery, 267 Oxford St. “Frame of Reference” Group Show. Through Nov 2. Reception Nov 28, 5:30-8 p.m. 271-5885. oxfordgallery.com. Pat Rini Rohrer Gallery, 71 S Main St. Canandaigua. “Focus


on the Finger Lakes.” Through Sep 29. Mon-Sat 10 a.m.-6 p.m., Sun 12:30-4 p.m. 394-0030. prrgallery.com.; “The Jim Erdle Tractor Collection.” Through Sep 30. 394-0030. prrgallery.com. Record Archive, 33 1/3 Rockwood St. Stormymade: Garden of Earthly Delights by Margaret Storms. recordarchive. com. Rochester Contemporary Arts Center, 137 East Ave. State of the City: Street-ish. Through Sep 28. Wed-Sun 1-5 p.m. 461-2222. info@rochestercontemporary.org. rochestercontemporary.org. Rosalie “Roz” Steiner Art Gallery, Genesee Community College, One College Rd. Kathleen Sherin: “Defying Gravity.” Through Nov 1. An exhibition of prints containing drypoint, collagraphic carborundum printing and monoprint techniques. genesee. edu/campuslife/arts/gallery/. Ross Gallery of the Skalny Welcome Center at St. John Fisher, 3690 East Ave. DRAW Presents “My Space.” Through Oct 4. MonFri 9 a.m.-4 p.m. 385-8023. Rush Rhees Library, University of Rochester, River Campus. Memorial Art Gallery: 100 Years of Art for the Community. Through Sep 30, 2013. mag. rochester.edu. The Shoe Factory Art Co-op, 250 N. Goodman St. Mona Oates and Wen-Hua Chen. Wed 12-5 p.m. shoefactoryarts.com. Spectrum Gallery, 100 College Ave. “Transmutations” Photographic Works by Carl Chiarenza. Also at Axom Gallery, 176 Anderson Ave., Suite 303. Through Oct 12. 232-6030 x23, axomgallery.com, or 461-4447, lumierephoto.com. Starry Nites Café, 696 University Ave. “Sunrise to Moonset,” by Valerie Berner. Through Sep 28. Open daily and nightly. 271-2630. starrynitescafe.com. Tap & Mallet, 381 Gregory St. Dudes Night Out Presents: Dudes on Tap. Reception Sep 18, 7 p.m. 473-0503. tapandmallet.com.

[ FRI., SEPTEMBER 27 ] Vanessa Hollingshead/Sean Morton. Sep. 27-28, 8 p.m. Joke Factory Comedy Club, 911 Brooks Avenue $10. 328-6000. jokefactorycomedyclub.com.

Dance Events [ THU., SEPTEMBER 26 ] Salsa Social 3 Year Anniversary. 8 p.m. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. $5 before 11 p.m., $10 after 292-9940. lovincup. com. SPECIAL EVENT | VERTEX LATE RISER’S ALTERNATIVE & GOTHIC GARAGE SALE

The really bad thing about garage sales is that they always take place during the day. What about those of us who like to sleep in? The answer is finally here, as Vertex (169 N. Chestnut St.) is hosting the Late Riser’s Alternative & Gothic Garage Sale. Don’t let the name scare you off. You don’t have to be a My Chemical Romance-obsessed vampire to get enjoyment out of this event. There will be artwork, clothing, and jewelry being sold, among other items. There will also be some tasty treats on hand, as BBQ and refreshments will be served. The event takes place Sunday, September 29, and runs 5-10 p.m. For more information, check out the event page on Facebook. — BY TREVOR LEWIS Tower Fine Arts Center, SUNY Brockport, 180 Holley St. Department of Art Faculty Exhibition. Through Oct 13. 395-2787. brockport.edu/ finearts. Wayne County Council for the Arts, 108 W. Miller St. Newark. “Then & Now,” Drawings by Neal McDannel. Through Sep 27. ThuSun noon-3 p.m., and by appt. waynearts.wordpress.com. Williams-Insalaco Gallery at FLCC, 3325 Marvin Sands Dr. “The Seneca Family Sculpture: History and Process.” Through Nov 11. Mon-Thu 8:30 a.m.-9 p.m., Fri 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m., Sat-Sun noon-5 p.m. 785-1369. flcc.edu.

Festivals [ WED., SEPTEMBER 25-SAT., SEPTEMBER 28 ] First Niagara Rochester Fringe Festival. Through Sep. 28. Various locations downtown Various prices rochesterfringe.com. MuCCC Fest. Through Sep. 28. MuCCC, 142 Atlantic Ave. muccc.org. [ SAT., SEPTEMBER 28-SUN., SEPTEMBER 29 ] AppleUmpkin Festival. Sep. 28-29, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Gaslight Village, Wyoming NY appleumpkin.com. Naples Grape Festival. Sep. 28-29, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Naples Village, State Route 21 naplesgrapefest.org.

Comedy

Kids Events

[ WED., SEPTEMBER 25 ] Flower City Improv. 8 p.m. Joke Factory Comedy Club, 911 Brooks Avenue $5. Buy 1, get 1 with student ID. (585( 328-6000. flowercityimprov@gmail.com. Russell Peters. 7:30 p.m. Auditorium Theatre, 885 E. Main St. $38.50-$98.50. 222-5000. mail@rbtl.org. rbtl.org.

[ WED., SEPTEMBER 25 ] Teen Movie Makers. 7 p.m. Seymour Library, 161 East Ave., Brockport Grades 6-12 Free. 637-1050. seymourlibraryweb. org.

[ THU., SEPTEMBER 26 ] Kris Shaw. Sep. 26-28. Comedy Club, 2235 Empire Blvd Webster Thu 7:30 p.m., Fri-Sat 7:30 & 10 p.m $9-$12. 671-9080. thecomedyclub.us.

[ THU., SEPTEMBER 26 ] Tween Tech Lab. 4:15-5 p.m. Henrietta Public Library, 455 Calkins Rd Free, register. 3597092. [ FRI., SEPTEMBER 27 ] Free Family Fun Night. 7 p.m. Lift Bridge Book Shop, 45 Main St liftbridgebooks.com.

School Civil War Day. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Genesee Country Village & Museum, 1410 Flint Hill Rd Mumford $6-$10.50. 2948215. gcv.org.

Lectures [ WED., SEPTEMBER 25 ] “Building the Ice Cream Empire” Symposium on Leadership and Community Life. 5-7 p.m. SUNY Geneseo, 1 College Rd. Key Note Speaker: Jerry Greenfield, Co-founder, Ben & Jerry’s Homemade, Inc. and President, Ben & Jerry’s Foundation $25, register. bit.ly/GCCHumphrey/. “Christ’s Love in Action” by Sister Simone Campbell. 7 p.m. Asbury First United Methodist Church, 1050 East Ave $10-$12, register 456-1470. “Deaf Ethnicity: For and Against,” A Lecture on Deaf Culture by Harlan Lane.. 7 p.m. Rush Rhees Library, University of Rochester, River Campus library.rochester.edu/ neillyseries. Dogs 10: Reading Your Dogs’s Behavior & Basic Training.. 6:30 p.m. Rochester Brainery, Village Gate, 274 N Goodman St. Enhance your communication with your dog by gaining a deeper understanding of dog body language. $15. 730-7034. info@rochesterbrainery.com. rochesterbrainery.com. Energy Efficiency in Older Buildings. 6-8 p.m. Avon Town Hall, 23 Genesee St., Avon 2437550. The Women’s Equality Act: What’s Next. 7 p.m. Downtown United Presbyterian Church, 121 N. Fitzhugh Street Free. 218-9207. info@rochesternow.org. [ THU., SEPTEMBER 26 ] ‘Academically Adrift: Limited Learning on College Campuses’ with Richard Arum. 4 p.m. Rochester Institute of Technology, 1 Lomb Memorial Dr. rit.edu. Digital Rochester Welcomes Google. 7:30-9:30 a.m. Mario’s, 2740 Monroe Ave. Paige Winter, Senior Account Manager,

AdWords, Google, Inc., will share insights and success stories from Google AdWords advertising campaigns with particular focus on the impact of Google’s new enhanced capabilities $20-$30, register. 271-1111. digitalrochester.com. “For God and Home and Native Land: Haudenosaunee Women and Temperance” with Thomas J. Lappas. 7 p.m. Nazareth College Shults Center, 4245 East Ave. $5-$15. 742-1690. ganondagan.org/events. Neighbor Next Door Series: “Understanding Alzheimer’s Disease.” 7 p.m. Penfield Public Library, 1985 Baird Rd. Free, register. 340-8720. jmathis@ libraryweb.org. penfieldlibrary.org. New York Insureance Funding for Autism Seminar. 6-8 p.m. Center for Autism and Related Disorders, 6 N. Main St., Suite 110, Fairport. s.price@centerforautism.com. centerforautism.com. PBS Travel TV host Rick Steves. 7 p.m. Hochstein Music Hall, 50 N. Plymouth Ave. Join WXXI for a special presentation from America’s leading authority on European travel, Rick Steves. Steves, host of PBS’s “Rick Steves Europe,” will speak, share pictures from his travels in Europe, and take your questions $25. 258-0200. membership@wxxi.org. What’s Cooking with Debbie. 1:30 p.m. Quail Summit, 5102 Parrish Street Extension, Canandaigua. Free, RSVP. 396-1010. quailsummit.com. [ FRI., SEPTEMBER 27 ] Strategy, Leadership & the Soul: 21st Century Resilience with Jennifer Sertl. 8-11 a.m. Monroe Golf Club, 155 Golf Ave $75, register. 586-3440. mharochester.org. [ SAT., SEPTEMBER 28 ] Ancient African Sacred Knowledge, Stolen From the Books in Stone. 4-6 p.m. Frederick Douglass Community Resource Center, continues on page 24

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Art

Lectures

Wrinkles in time “Transmutations: Photographic Works by Carl Chiarenza” THROUGH OCTOBER 12 AXOM GALLERY, 176 ANDERSON AVE., SUITE 303 232-6030 X23, AXOMGALLERY.COM WEDNESDAY-SATURDAY NOON-5 P.M., AND BY APPOINTMENT | FREE AND SPECTRUM GALLERY AT LUMIERE PHOTO, 100 COLLEGE AVE. 461-4447, SPECTRUMGALLERYROC.COM TUESDAY-FRIDAY 10 A.M.-6 P.M., SATURDAY 10 A.M.-2 P.M. | FREE [ REVIEW ] BY REBECCA RAFFERTY

Of the transmission of experience through art, poet Robert Frost wrote, “No tears in the writer, no tears in the reader. No surprise in the writer, no surprise in the reader.” Though renowned photographer Carl Chiarenza creates abstract works that are purposefully open to viewers’ interpretations, the crystallized emotional experience of the artist is present in his works and resonates powerfully within each image. In honor of Chiarenza’s 78th birthday, Axom Gallery and Spectrum Gallery are co-presenting a look at his prolific oeuvre, the result of decades of playing amid the environs of his subconscious mind. “Transmutations” is a selection of Chiarenza’s work pulled from a body curated by photography historian Robert Hirsch for an exhibition that took place at the University of Buffalo’s Anderson Gallery in late 2012. The show chronicles Chiarenza’s photography since the pivotal year of 1979, when he shifted from documentary-style photography to creating photographic images entirely within a studio setting, creating collages from scraps of various materials and photographing them with Polaroid-type film. In fact, the last image that Chiarenza shot outdoors, “Rockland 2,” is included in the Spectrum Gallery portion of the show. When the artist was teaching a workshop in Maine in 1979, he spotted and snapped a few pieces of warped plywood. Though his artistic approach changed drastically after he made this image, his familiar aesthetic sensibility is present in the serpentine curve of the boards, the bright highlights along the edges of the textured wood, and the lush, dark abyss tugging at the viewer’s focus. Chiarenza’s images are rife with stark chiaroscuro and a rich scale of silvers set

against a void, hinting at moonscapes or landscapes painted by moonlight. What the artist accomplishes by catching light in the crinkles and folds of layered cast-off materials is astounding. The photographs suggest tangible elements of this

world — at Spectrum Gallery, in “Woods 529,” delicately rendered trunks and branches emerge glittering from manifold creases in a papery surface, revealing the artist’s mastery of generating forms from tiny piles of rubbish. At Axom Gallery, a crisp envelope lip in one work “Untitled #126” is part of Carl Chiarenza’s photograph show now on becomes the clear sky display at both Axom Gallery and Spectrum Gallery. PHOTO PROVIDED above dark mountains, and in another, patterned The series, which includes “Don Quixote paper resembles a tree-dotted, snowy hill 190,” currently on display at Axom, and rising over a lake that gleams with a gently “Peace Warrior (Don Quixote) 188,” at swaying band of moonlight. But the images Spectrum, offers abstracted figures made from are also territories of the numinous. Staring torn, twisted, crumpled, and folded bits of into these worlds, I feel the peace of looking metal and fiber, and depicts them in shabby on from far away, unencumbered by the armor, holding makeshift weapons, trudging silent dramas of any unknowable inhabitants along or in vigilant stances. Though the found there. There is beauty, and the pull of figures resemble soldiers in their names and mystery, and the passage of time. But this is garb, they are bereft of any sense of violence only one interpretation. and seem like evolved beings. Similarly, At Axom Gallery, the moody image, the figures in Chiarenza’s Samurai series, “Untitled #126,” is comprised of carefully represented in this exhibition by “Samurai arranged bits of gleaming and fibrous 329,” at Axom, wear worn protective burdens, material that are transformed into a layered, but are often haloed and surrounded by cavernous space, where time has wrinkled the a whisper of wings, confronting us with a shimmering, wet stone, and veins of precious countenance entirely inscrutable. metal run throughout. Nearby, “Untitled Though retired from teaching art and art #11” contrasts many differently patterned history, Chiarenza hasn’t retired from creating. materials, and moving back away from it, He’s making a new kind of picture these days, the abstract forms become perhaps sparkling by cutting some of his older photographs city lights, below rolling hills, below striated and using the pieces to make collages — contrails crisscrossing a dark sky. this time, the work will remain physical collages of photographs instead of becoming Also included in the show are a few works photographs of collages. Chiarenza has sent from Chiarenza’s “Peace Warrior” series, two works in this new series to locations in which he created in response to his despair New York City, and the artist plans to show over the United States’ declaration of war on his new work in Rochester next year. Iraq more than a decade ago. The artist says it’s unusual for him to create representational Spectrum Gallery will host A Conversation with works, and images with a specific purpose in Carl Chiarenza on Tuesday, October 1, at 7 p.m. mind. Having seen many wars in his nearly eight decades of life, Chiarenza is frustrated by our seemingly endless stream of conflicts, and finds refuge in his work.

24 CITY SEPTEMBER 25 - OCTOBER 1, 2013

36 King St. $10-$20 for lecture, $20-$30 for lecture & dinner 2874348. karchie72@yahoo.com. Roger Campbell on Natural Health. 2 p.m. Books Etc., 78 W. Main St Macedon. Free. 474-4116. books_etc@yahoo.com. Tourette Fall Symposium. 9-11:30 a.m. UR Medical Center, 300 Crittenden Blvd. Adults and children ages 9 and up welcome Free. 752-6190. info@ rochestertourette.org. [ SUN., SEPTEMBER 29 ] “General Józef Zachariasz Bem (1794-1850): Son of Poland, Hero of Hungary” by Louis I. Nagy. 4:30 p.m. University of Rochester, River Campus, LeChase Hall, Genrich-Rusling Room Free. 2759898. rochester.edu. Skalny Center Lecture: Four-thirty Tea. 3-4:30 p.m. University of Rochester, River Campus Free. 276-1952. rochester.edu/skalny. Translating Anarchy: The Anarchism of Occupy Wall Street. 5 p.m. Flying Squirrel Community Space, 285 Clarissa St. With writer and organizer Mark Bray flyingsquirrel.rocus.org. United by Faith: A Jewish-Muslim Dialogue Series. 10 a.m. Turkish Cultural Center, 2692 Dewey Ave. Free. 453-0533. [ MON., SEPTEMBER 30 ] A Beginner’s Guide to Meditation. 6:30 p.m. Rochester Brainery, Village Gate, 274 N Goodman St. $15. 730-7034. info@ rochesterbrainery.com. rochesterbrainery.com. [ TUE., OCTOBER 1 ] “Ethiopia’s Students with Hearing Loss” with Catherine Beers and Mary Grace Hamme. 11 a.m. St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, 25 Westminster Rd Evening meeting at 7 p.m.: ask the audiologists 271-2240. hlaa-rochester-ny.org. “Modern Writing: The Most Important Tool for Writing a Blog, a Book, and Everything in Between” with Evan Dawson. 10 a.m. Finger Lakes Community College, 3325 Marvin Sands Dr 785-1389. flcc.edu. Social Media and the Job Search. 7 p.m. Penfield Public Library, 1985 Baird Rd. Free. 3408720. jmathis@libraryweb.org. penfieldlibrary.org. State of Rochester’s Economy.. 11:45 a.m. Hyatt Regency Rochester, 125 E. Main St $45$50, RSVP. rddc.org. [ WED., OCTOBER 2 ] Chiapas: Behind the Resistance. 7 p.m. Downtown United Presbyterian Church, 121 N. Fitzhugh Street Filmmakers and photojournalists Orin Langelle and Bill Jungels will show their documentary films, A Darker Shade of Green and Broken Branches, Fallen Fruit, that explore social and ecological justice issues in Chiapas, Mexico, that affect us all Free. 325-4000. rocla.us. Confederate General Robert E. Lee’s War Career and Post War Career with Derek Maxfield and tom Schobert. 7 p.m. Genesee Community College, Conable Technology Building, 1 College Rd Batavia. Free. 343-0055 x6616. dsutherland@genesee.edu. Serve, Honor, Support Symposium. 8 a.m. R. Thomas Flynn Campus Center Building,


Poetry Reading: Stephen Lewandowski and Bill Pruitt. 4 p.m. Books Etc., 78 W. Main St Macedon Free. 474-4116. books_etc@yahoo.com.

LIT | DINE & RHYME

“I rip and I rhyme, I rhyme and I rip, this is the way that Dylan spits.” That’s an example of a bad rhyme. If you want to hear some good rhymes, then check out BOA Editions’ 16th Annual Dine & Rhyme event, taking place this Sunday, September 29. The event will feature readings by award-winning poet LiYoung Lee, who will be accompanied by David Whetstone on the sitar (the instrument Ravi Shankar made famous). You can also bring copies of Lee’s books to get signed. The readings take place at the Gallery Auditorium in the Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. After the readings, head over to Good Luck Restaurant (50 Anderson Ave) for a reception, dinner, and silent auction. Reading begins at 3 p.m., and reception begins at 5 p.m. Tickets range from $25 for the reading, and $125 for the reading and reception. Go to boaeditions.org for more information. — BY TREVOR LEWIS 1000 E. Henrietta Rd $25, veterans free 347-1275. Stacey. Coons-Talbott@cdsmonarch.org. monroecc.edu. “Seven Principles for Changing At-Risk Behavior and Cultivating Resiliency Among Youth” with Dr. Carl Bell. Oct. 2-3. Mt. Olivet Baptist Church, 141 Adams St. Community forum on Oct 2, 6-8 p.m., Provider workshop on Oct 3, 9:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m mharochester.org.

Literary Events [ WED., SEPTEMBER 25 ] Brownbag Book Discussion: “The End of Your Life Book Club” by Will Schwalbe. noon. Central Library of Rochester, Rundel Auditorium, 115 South Ave Refreshments provided. Brown bag lunches welcome Free. 428-8375. carol.moldt@ libraryweb.org. libraryweb.org. Literary Talks: The Neilly Series. 7:30 p.m. Rush Rhees Library, University of Rochester, River Campus Sep 25: Harlan Lane, Nov 13: Johanna Skibsrud Free. 275-4461. library.rochester.edu/ neillyseries/. Read with Seymour: “Still Alice” by Lisa Genova. 11 a.m. Seymour Library, 161 East Ave., Brockport Free. 637-1050. seymourlibraryweb.org. Young Adult Book Club: “The Scorpio Races” by Maggie Stiefvater. 6:30 p.m. Lift Bridge Book Shop, 45 Main St liftbridgebooks.com. [ THU., SEPTEMBER 26 ] “Heroes in the Attic: The Untold Story of Two Civil War Soldiers.” 7-8:30 p.m. Henrietta Public Library, 455 Calkins Rd Free, register. 359-7092. History Reading Group: Tenochtitlan. 7-8:30 p.m. Writers and Books, 740

University Ave Hosted by Steve Huff Free. 473-2590. wab.org. Undergraduate/Faculty Reading Series Poetry Reading. 5 p.m. Rochester Institute of Technology, 1 Lomb Memorial Dr. RIT Student Alumni Union Reading Room. September 26 Poets: Catherine Faurot, Visiting Asst. Professor of English (Creative Writing), and Nicholas Eckerson, 4th year Interdisciplinary Studies student Free 475-2252. robert.glick@ rit.edu. [ SAT., SEPTEMBER 28 ] Literary Reading: M.J. Iuppa and Christine Noble. 5-7 p.m. A Different Path Gallery, 27 Market St., Brockport Free. 637-5494. differentpathgallery. com. Poetry and Pie Night. 7-9 p.m. Poetry reading by NYC’s Leah Umansky, author of Domestic Uncertainties, and à la mode poet David R. Forman. No cover. Free pie served between readers. Contact poetryandpienight@gmail.com for location. Poetry Reading by Adam Sinesiou. 8 p.m. Before Your Quiet Eyes, 439 Monroe Ave. Adam Sinesiou is a teacher from School of the Arts. This event will be sign language interpreted Free. 5637851. bfyque@aol.com. Shanya Beasley: Author of ‘Becoming A Woman.’ 6-7:30 p.m. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N. Water St. $20, register 325-5600. waterstreetmusic. com/event/shanya-beasley/. [ SUN., SEPTEMBER 29 ] BOA’s 16th Annual Dine & Rhyme. Sep. 29. Poetry reading and book signing at 3 p.m. at Memorial Art Gallery. Reception, dinner, and silent auction at 5 p.m. at Good Luck Restaurant RSVP. 546-3410 x11. hall@boaeditions.org.

[ TUE., OCTOBER 1 ] Books Sandwiched In. noon. Central Library, Kate Gleason Auditorium, 115 South Ave. “Lean In: Women, Work, and the Will to Lead” by Sheryl Sandberg, reviewed by Sandy Parker, President and CEO, Rochester Business Alliance Free 428-8350. Rebecca.Fuss@libraryweb.org. libraryweb.org. Lift Bridge Writers’ Group. 6:30 p.m. Lift Bridge Book Shop, 45 Main St Free. 637-2260. liftbridgebooks.com. R-SPEC meeting. First Tuesday of every month, 7 p.m. Writers of speculative fiction meet once a month to discuss craft Free. r-spec.org. Reading the World Conversations. 6 p.m. Rush Rhees Library, University of Rochester, River Campus Sep 24: French author Jean-Marie Blas de Robles discusses “Where Tigers Are at Home” Oct 1: Danish Author Simon Fruelund and translator K. E. Semmel discuss “Milk and Other Stories” Free. 319-0823. openletterbooks.org.

Museum Exhibit [ WED., SEPTEMBER 25 ] “Off to the Theatre.” Through Nov. 15. Museum of Wayne County History, 21 Butternut St Through Nov 15. Preview night August 22, 7:30 p.m. Screening of the 1925 film “Phantom of the Opera” Free 315-946-4943. waynehistory.org. [ FRI., SEPTEMBER 27 ] Alien Worlds and Androids Exhibition. Sep. 27-Dec. 22, 9 a.m. Rochester Museum and Science Center, 657 East Ave. Through Dec 22 $11-$13. 2711880. rmsc.org. [ SAT., SEPTEMBER 28 ] Little Builders. Sep. 28-Jan. 5. The Strong National Museum of Play, 1 Manhattan Square Through Jan 5. Mon-Thu 10 a.m.5 p.m., Fri-Sat 10 a.m.-8 p.m., Sun noon-5 p.m. Closed Nov 28 and Dec 25 $13, free to members and kids under 2 263-2700. museumofplay.org. Museum Day Live. 10 a.m. Rose Hill Mansion, 3373 New York 96A, Geneva Visitors who present their Museum Day Live ticket will get free admission to Rose Hill Mansion Free 315-789-3848. [ WED., OCTOBER 2 ] Ontario County Genealogical Society presents “Stories in Stone.” 7 p.m. Ontario County Historical Society Museum, 55 North Main St., Canandaigua About the work being done to update cemetery records in Ontario County. Public welcome. Refreshments to be served Free. 394-4975. ocgsny.net.

Recreation [ SAT., SEPTEMBER 28 ] Birding Trip: Montezuma National Wildlife Refuge. 10 a.m. Looking for waterfowl and migrating shorebirds at the refuge. Meet in Bushnell Basin “Park n Ride,” off Route 96 just south of Exit number 27 from I-490 Free. 425-7849. ddallen3@yahoo.com. rochesterbirding.com.

GVHC Event. 9:30 a.m. Meet at Tinseltown lot, 2291 Buffalo Rd., easy/moderate 1.5 hour walk, Leroy Village $1 carpool. 4820549. gvhchikes.org. A History Hunt Road Rally for Charity. noon. Trinity Episcopal Church, 3450 West Ridge Road, Greece. Registration at noon, returning to Trinity at 6 p.m. for awards, pizza, salads & desserts. $30 per car, register 225-4366. spacyga@rochester. rr.com. Public Tour of South Section of Mount Hope Cemetery. Mount Hope Cemetery, 1133 Mt. Hope Ave. $5, members and kids under 16 free 461-3494. fomh.org. Rose Hill Mansion Food & Wine Celebration. 5 p.m. Geneva Historical Society, 543 South Main St. Enjoy hors d’oeuvres and wine from area restaurants $30, registration required 315-789-5151. info@ genevahistoricalsociety.com. genevahistoricalsociety.com. “rUNDEAD” Zombie Run. Sep. 28. Darien Lake Theme Park, 9993 Allegheny Rd. 5K to benefit Special Olympics of NY. $50-$60, register darienlake.com. Step Up For Kids 5K Run/Walk. 9 a.m. Monroe Community College, 1000 E. Henrietta Rd. $12-$40. 315-548-3232. cacfingerlakes@ fltg.net. monroecc.edu. Stop the Trafficking, End the Cycle 5K Run/Walk. 8 a.m. Meridian Centre Park, 2025 Winton Road South 7 a.m. registration $23, register. 7304556. shad_262@yahoo.com. Third Annual Rochester, NY NF Walk. 8:30 a.m. Perinton Park, 99 O’Connor Rd., Fairport. Participants will walk the 5K route, followed by a raffle, food, and fun. Fund Neurofibromatosis Research through the Children’s Tumor Foundation. nfwalk.org. Walk in the Park for Mercy Flight Central. Sep. 28. White Haven Memorial Park, 210 Marsh Rd. Registration 2-3 p.m., walk 3-4 p.m., food, music fun 3-5 p.m $15-$20, children 12 and under free. 586-8232. whitehavenmemorialpark.com. Walk to Defeat ALS. 10:30 a.m. Ontario Beach Park, 4799 Lake Ave. 866-499-7257. alsaupstateny.org. Walk to End Alzheimer’s. 10 a.m. Mendon Ponds Park, Douglas Road. Mendon Registration at 9 a.m Raise funds. 760-5400. alz. org/rochesterny. Walk/Run for Homeless 5K. 8 a.m. Success Center Transitional House, 6264 Buerman Rd. $20, register. 315-483-8080. sarah. vonderohe@waynecap.org. [ SUN., SEPTEMBER 29 ] 11th annual Family First Penfield 5K Challenge. Sep. 29. Penfield Community Center, 1985 Baird Rd Penfield. Registration 8 a.m., race 9 a.m $25, register. 3408655. penfield.org. GVHC Event. noon. Meet behind Bed Bath and Beyond, Turk Hill Road @ Rte. 96. Strenuous/hilly 14 mile hike, Victor trails Free. 455-1932. gvhchikes.org noon. Northampton Park, Hubble Rd., Ogden. Moderate 6 mile hike free. 315-1441. gvhchikes.org. Public Tour of North Section of Mount Hope Cemetery. 2 p.m Mount Hope Cemetery, 1133 Mt. Hope Avenue. $5, members and kids under 16 free 4613494. fomh.org.

EXHIBITION | “ALIENS AND ANDROIDS”

We’ve all asked the question at some point: are we alone? Then somebody near you says “I’m right here,” and you give an angry rebuttal on how you were talking about alien life. If the concept piques your interest, the Rochester Museum and Science Center has the exhibit you’ve been waiting for. “Alien Worlds and Androids” explores if we are truly alone by showcasing the works of scientists looking for alien life. It also examines the robots and androids that are so popular in Hollywood films, and some will even be there in the form of full-size models (C-3PO and Iron Manm just to name a few). The exhibition opens Friday, September 27, is free with regular museum admission, and will run through December 22, so there are plenty of opportunities to make it. The RMSC is located at 657 East Ave. Go to rmsc.org for more information. — BY TREVOR LEWIS Walking on Sunshine. 9:30 a.m. Ontario Beach Park, 4799 Lake Ave. Form a team and raise money and awareness for Mary Cariola Children’s Center 271-2897 x1610. lrosenbaum@ marycariola.org. crowdrise.com/ walkingonsunshine. [ TUE., OCTOBER 1 ] Pacesetters Walk. 6:30 p.m. Meet in parking lot for Merchant Rd. Plaza, bring flashlights 2499507 6:30 p.m. Meet in lot of the Merchant Road Plaza 249-9507.

Special Events [ WED., SEPTEMBER 25 ] East House 2013 Celebration of Hope & Recovery Luncheon. 11:30 a.m. Rochester Riverside Convention Center, 123 E Main St With Patrick J. Kennedy $55, $120 with VIP reception, register 238-4816. easthouse.org. Food Truck Rodeo. 5-9 p.m. Rochester Public Market, 280 N. Union St. Free admission. cityofrochester.gov. Hitchcock on Stage & Screen: “Vertigo.” 6:30 p.m. Little Theatre, 240 East Ave. WXXI and the Little team up with Geva for a Hitchcock Film Series followed by panel discussions. Each screening at 6:30 p.m $7 for one ticket or a $25 punch card for all four. thelittle.org. Rochester Business Networking Event. 7:30-9 a.m. Bonadio and Company, 171 Sullys Trail Free, register. rochester-tipclubseptember2013.eventbrite.com/. Scottsville Midweek Farmers’ Market. 4-7 p.m Smith Warren Post 367 American Legion, 61 Main Street in Scottsville 8893981. kmemccall@aol.com. [ THU., SEPTEMBER 26 ] Great Decisions: Egypt. noon. Seymour Library, 161 East Ave., Brockport Registration

necessary Free 637-1050. seymourlibraryweb.org. MCC Alumni Cooking Demonstration, Tasting, and Wine Pairing. 6-8 p.m. R. Thomas Flynn Campus Center Building, 1000 E. Henrietta Rd $17, register. 262-1500. monroecc.edu/go/alumni. South Wedge Farmers’ Market. 4 p.m Boulder Coffee Co., 100 Alexander St. 4 p.m Free. 2698918. swfm.org. [ FRI., SEPTEMBER 27 ] Celebrate Day 366. 11 a.m.1 p.m. Cobbs Hill Park, 100 Norris Drive Free. 546-4930. perinatalnetwork.net. Entrepreneurial Leadership Summit. 1-5 p.m. Rochester Institute of Technology, 1 Lomb Memorial Dr. Free, register RITeLead.com. Women’s Council Fantastic Findings Garage Sale. Sep. 2728. Rochester Museum and Science Center, 657 East Ave. Fri 10 a.m.-4 p.m., Sat 10 a.m.2 p.m rmsc.org. [ SAT., SEPTEMBER 28 ] Amaya’s 2nd Anniversary. 5 p.m. Amaya Bar and Grill, 1900 S. Clinton Ave. Enjoy a complimentary exclusive Indian wine tasting and hors d’oeuvres 241-3223. AmayaBarAndGrill. com. Canandaigua Farmer’s Market. 8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m Pavilion on Mill Street, one block east of Main St., Canandaigua canandaiguafarmersmarket.com. Living for Jesus Singles Seminar. 8:45 a.m.-4 p.m. Joy Community Church, 890 N. Goodman St. $30 after 2880030. visitus@joycc.info. joycc. info. Medina Railroad Museum Wine Trains. Medina Railroad continues on page 27

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 25


RPO’s 2013-14 season continues from page 21

Guest conductor: James Feddeck

Guest conductor: Hugh Wolff

Guest conductor: Fabien Gabel

Guest conductor: Michael Morgan

WEBSITE: OPUS3ARTISTS.COM/ARTISTS/

WEBSITE: HUGHWOLFF.COM

WEBSITE: OPUS3ARTISTS.COM/ARTISTS/FABI-

WEBSITE: OEBS.ORG/PAGE/MICHAEL.HTM

JAMES-FEDDECK

BORN: PARIS, FRANCE

EN-GABEL

BORN: WASHINGTON, D.C.

BORN: ISRAEL

CURRENT HOME: BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS

BORN: PARIS, FRANCE

CURRENT HOME: OAKLAND, CALIFORNIA

CURRENT HOME: FLORENCE, ITALY

RPO CONCERT DATES: JANUARY 16 & 18

CURRENT HOME: PARIS, FRANCE

RPO CONCERT DATES: FEBRUARY 6 & 8

RPO CONCERT DATES: DECEMBER 12 & 14

PROGRAM: BEETHOVEN, LILI BOULANGER

RPO CONCERT DATES: JANUARY 30 & FEBRUARY 1

PROGRAM: ELLINGTON, GERSHWIN, JOSEPH

UPCOMING PROGRAM: J.S. BACH,

ALONG WITH: ROCHESTER ORATORIO SOCIETY,

PROGRAM: DEBUSSY, RAVEL, SAINT-SAËNS,

SCHWANTNER (B. 1943), FLORENCE PRICE

OTTORINO RESPIGHI

ERIC TOWNELL, DIRECTOR

STRAVINSKY

GUEST SOLOIST: JOYCE YANG, PIANO

ALONG WITH: EASTMAN CHORALE, WILLIAM WEINERT, DIRECTOR

Guest conductor James Feddeck will come into Rochester to conduct the “Magnificat” by J.S. Bach. What else could you need to know? Some works are simply so seminal in the history of Western classical music as to define the conductor. Feddeck, however, identified his challenge as delivering an audience experience in the modern concert hall that is as intimate as it would have been when originally presented in a church or royal court setting. Feddeck says, “I am facilitating the orchestra and singers to come together to create something greater than either by itself. There is an extraordinary feeling that comes from a true collaborative process for a performance like this — a unification of forces that brings this about.” Feddeck is a sponge, having pursued multiple majors at Oberlin and “loving all music and styles and periods and performing them all.” On this same program, Feddeck will take to the harpsichord for the J.S. Bach Orchestra Suite No. 3 in D Major, so that the performance will be in the way it was conceived. “The evolution of a conductor as being at the front of an orchestra was a rather late concept,” says Feddeck. “At the time this music was written, the conductor was not that figurehead leading at the front; he was, instead, leading from within.”

Hugh Wolff was born in Paris, spent his primary school years in London, was Harvard educated, and did graduate studies in Paris. He started as a composer and a pianist, and in college he progressed into conducting when students, eager to put on concerts, needed “somebody waving his arms.” Wolff talks of theory, history, and composition, and he finds studying orchestral scores to be “fascinating” in their layers and details. Although Wolff has spent more than 30 years primarily as a conductor, he points out he doesn’t play an orchestral instrument. He has, however, sung in all the big choral pieces, including the Beethoven Ninth Symphony, which he will be conducting in the upcoming RPO program. He is also a pianist and a composer. Wolff’s approach will be to send the parts ahead to the RPO and the Rochester Oratorio Society, with his notes, to save time. “With an orchestra as good as the RPO, no part will be challenging,” says Wolff, who engages in guest conducting all over the world, traveling from week to week.

GUEST SOLOIST: PHILIPPE QUINT, VIOLIN

“I’m French and the RPO asked me to build a program with my roots,” says conductor Fabien Gabel about his upcoming concert with the RPO, titled “An Evening in Paris” and featuring works of Debussy, Ravel, SaintSaens, and…Stravinsky? “Stravinsky lived in Paris,” Gabel says. He had his biggest successes there. He composed his masterworks in Paris — ‘Le Sacred u printemps’ (‘Rite of Spring’), Petrushka, ‘L’oiseau de feu’ (‘The Firebird’).” It is the “Firebird Suite” that will be on the RPO program. Gabel spoke to rehearsals as being a critical part of his strategic approach to concerts in the role of guest conductor. “Rehearsals can define it,” he says. “It is not possible to play the same piece the same way twice. Everywhere I go, even if I have already conducted a piece several times, I treat it as if it were my first.” And, yet, Gabel suggests that giving the musicians “some freedom” is precisely what can bring success to the performance of a well-known piece like Debussy’s “Prélude à l’après-midi d’un faune” (“Afternoon of a Faun”). Gabel says, “You can’t give a nice beginning to this work with a gesture. It has to be organic. It is a very difficult part for the flutist to play, and I have to let her start and find her inspiration.”

“Ellington is in a class by himself,” says Michael Morgan, who will be conducting the RPO in an all-American concert. “It takes some extra musicians. It takes some extra expense. But ‘Harlem’ is a great work by Ellington and it is basically unknown.” Even Morgan apparently conducted a number of other Ellington pieces before he discovered “Harlem,” but he has fought for the budget to put on this work ever since. Morgan feels similarly about the Gershwin piano concerto that is on the program. “It is a masterpiece, but it doesn’t get its due,” says Morgan. “Gershwin has a reputation for being a pops composer, even after he wrote the opera ‘Porgy and Bess.’ He had a very hard time being taken seriously.” The way Morgan talks about Ellington and Gershwin, you would think that every American would have a natural ability to perform works by American composers. “Certain styles, we hear and are around, and it’s like osmosis. An American orchestra is going to be well-suited for this program of American music.” You also have Price, who Morgan says was “a hero to everybody as a composer and an arranger of spirituals for orchestras and singers at a time when women barely had a voice.” And you have Schwantner, whose work puts great music behind the best speeches by Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and others, “elevating both things to new heights,” he says. continues on page 30

26 CITY SEPTEMBER 25 - OCTOBER 1, 2013


every 30 minutes $8-$10. 5331113. nymtmuseum.org. Vertex Late Riser’s Alternative & Gothic Garage Sale. 5-10 p.m. Vertex Night Club, 169 N. Chestnut St. Clothing, jewelry, artwork, eclectic collections, Halloween stuff 232-5498. vertexggs@hotmail.com. [ MON., SEPTEMBER 30 ] “The Graduates.” 7 p.m. Little Theatre, 240 East Ave. Free. thelittle.org.

FILM | ALFRED HITCHCOCK CLASSIC FILMS SERIES

If you’re scared of the shower, random bird attacks, or you are quick to make grisly assumptions about your neighbor’s wife’s sudden disappearance, you’ve probably watched a lot of Alfred Hitchcock films. If you haven’t watched any Hitchcock films, then you are in for quite the treat over the next few weeks. The Little Theatre (240 East Ave.) is hosting the Alfred Hitchcock Classic Films Series every Wednesday from September 25 through October 16. Four of Hitchcock’s most iconic films will be shown, and there will be a talk-back session following the films. The films in order of their showing are “Vertigo” (September 25), “The 39 Steps” (October 2), “The Birds” (October 9), and “Rear Window” (October 16). The movies begin at 6:30 p.m. Admission for each film is $7, or you can pay $25 for all four and also receive a ticket to another movie of your choice. Visit thelittle.org for more information. — BY TREVOR LEWIS

Special Events Museum, 530 West Ave. $45, $55 first class 798-6196. railroadmuseum.net. Mount Albion Historic Ghost Walk. 5-9 p.m. Mount Albion Cemetery, 14925 Route 31 East. Tours are 1 hour, and leave every 15 minutes. Albion High School Arts Dept students provide dramatic tours and musical entertainment of some of Albion’s most famous residents that are buried in Mount Albion Cemetery. Meet Sanford Church, Roswell Burrows, William Barlow, Grace Bedell, and more $5, register 589-2087. sstarkweather@ albionk12.org. albionk12.org. New York State of Mind. 6:30 p.m. New York Wine & Culinary Center, 800 South Main St $150, register 394-7070. nywcc.com. Reel Rock Film Festival. 7:30 p.m. Ingle Auditorium at RIT, 1 Lomb Memorial Drive The RIT Rock Climbing Club and The North Face, Victor host the Reel Rock Film Festival. Enjoy climbing and adventure films $5 RIT students, $7 general public 475-4121. rittickets. com. “The Rocky Horror Picture Show.” 11:45 p.m. Cinema Theatre, 957 S. Clinton Ave. $5. 271-1785. cinemarochester@ gmail.com. “A Seneca Encounter with LaSalle.” 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Ganondagan State Historic Site, 1488 New York 444 3 p.m. re-enactment $3-$5. 742-1690. ganondagan.org. Support the Girls. 6 p.m. A fundraiser sponsored by Jennifer Roeszies for Breast Cancer awareness. Stock Exchange Restaurant, 28 E. Main St 454-4120.

Toss4Dystonia Cornhole Tournament. 11 a.m. Frontier Field, 1 Morrie Silver Way $30. 800-377-3978. ddurrer@ dystonia-foundation.org. redwingsbaseball.com. Walk to Defeat ALS. 10:30 a.m. Ontario Beach Park, 4799 Lake Ave 866-499-7257. alsaupstateny.org Walk to Defeat ALS. 10 a.m. Ontario Beach Park, 4799 Lake Ave Free. 315-413-0121. alsaupstateny.org. [ SUN., SEPTEMBER 29 ] 3rd Annual Opening & Gandhi Birthday Celebration. 2 p.m. Gandhi Institute for Nonviolence, 929 S. Plymouth Ave. Free. 463-3266. gandhiinstitute.org. Brighton Farmers’ Market. 9 a.m.-1 p.m Brighton High School, 1150 Winton Rd S Brighton Green at the Market, 9 a.m.-1 p.m. 9/8 Sustainable Transportation, 10/13 Recycling vs. Zero Waste… What’s the Difference?. 242-5046. brightonfarmersmarket.org. Greatest Community Garage Sales and Super Fleas. Sep. 29. Rochester Public Market, 280 N. Union St. 8 a.m.2 p.m cityofrochester.gov/ publicmarket. Historic Restoration Open House. 1-4 p.m. 975 University Ave. Penfield Farmers’ Market. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Grossmans Garden & Home, 1801 Fairport Nine Mile Point Rd . Penfield 3771982 x224. grossmans.com. RECreate Wellness. 10 a.m.noon. Penfield Community Center, 1985 Baird Rd Penfield 340-8655. penfieldrec.org. Tracking Fall Foliage by Trolley and Train. 11 a.m.-5 p.m New York Museum of Transportation, 6393 E. River Rd Departures

[ TUE., OCTOBER 1 ] “Latino Americans.” 6:30 p.m. Little Theatre, 240 East Ave. Free. thelittle.org. Holocaust Survivor Rochelle Dreeben. Oct. 1-3. Oct 1, 7 p.m. at The College at Brockport, Seymour Union Ballroom, and Oct 3, 6:30 p.m. at Temple Sinai, 363 Penfield Rd liftbridgebooks.com. Westside Farmers Market. 4-7:30 p.m Westside Farmers Market, 831 Genesee St. 436-8999. westsidemarketrochester@ gmail.com. westsidemarketrochester.com.

Theater “All Your Questions Answered.” Through Oct. 13. Geva Theatre Center, 75 Woodbury Blvd Through Oct 13. Sun Sep 29, 3 p.m., Wed Oct 2, 7 p.m. Tickets start at $19. 232-4382. gevatheatre.org. “The brothers Grimm Spectaculathon!” MuCCC, 142 Atlantic Ave $5-$10. muccc. org. “Bun In The Oven: Contractions with the Calamari Sisters.” Through Oct. 6. Auburn Public Theater, 8 Exchange St Through Oct 6. Thu 7 p.m., Fri 8 p.m., Sat 2 & 8 p.m., Sun 2 p.m $31.50-$35 315-2536669. auburnpublictheater.org. “Family Secrets.” Downstairs Cabaret at Winton Place, 3450 Winton Place Thu 7 p.m., Fri 8 p.m., Sat 3 & 8 p.m $26-$33. 325-4370. downstairscabaret. com. “Goddamn! An Anti-Sermon.” MuCCC, 142 Atlantic Ave A one-man mumblestravaganza on religion and the metamorphosis from screwedup religious kid to screwed-up irreligious adult. Performed by Solomon Blaylock. Mature audiences only $5. muccc.org. “Hank Williams: Lost Highway.” Through Oct. 5. Merry-GoRound Playhouse, 6877 East Lake Rd Through Oct 5. Wed Sep 25, 2 & 7:30 p.m., Thu 7:30 p.m., Fri-Sat 8 p.m., Mon 2 p.m., Tue-Wed Oct 2, 2 & 7:30 p.m. $22-$50. 315‑255‑1785. fingerlakesmtf. com. In Your Face Players. Impact Theatre, 1180 Canandaigua St., Palmyra Free admission. 315597-3553. impactdrama.com. “Pomme is French for Apple.” Downstairs Cabaret Theatre, 20 Windsor St Thu 7 p.m., Fri 8 p.m., Sat 5 & 8:30 p.m., Sun 3 p.m $25. 325-4370. downstairscabaret.com. Standing By, Standing Up: Bullying Prevention and Bystander Empowerment. Maplewood Community Library, 1111 Dewey Ave. Actor Tim Collins depicts four young men challenged by bullying.

Free. 428-8220. margaret. paige@libraryweb.org. maplewoodcommunitylibrary. org. There’s No Business Like Showbusiness-Musical Revue. Hale Auditorium, Roberts Cultural Life Center, Roberts Wesleyan College, 2301 Westside Dr $15 888-2221048. boxoffice@roberts.edu.

Theater Audition [ SAT., SEPTEMBER 28 ] Rochester Lyric Opera. Sep. 28-29. Baptist Temple, 1101 Clover St For the 2013-2014 season. Adult singers, college-age and older, high school singers grades 9-12. Sat-Sun 2-5 p.m $25 registration fee 738-5995. susannaadams@ rochesterlyricopera.org. rochesterlyricopera.org. [ WED., OCTOBER 2 ] Christmas Carol High School. 4 p.m. Penfield Community Center, 1985 Baird Rd Penfield Young Open & Honest Players 340-8664.

Workshops [ WED., SEPTEMBER 25 ] After the Fire Class: Coffee & Chocolate. 7 p.m Joe Bean Coffee Roasters, 1344 University Ave. Explore the roasting process and flavor profiles of cacao and coffee; class includes single origin chocolate & coffee pairings $25. 319-5279. kturiano@joebeanroasters.com. joebeanroasters.com. Family Development Class: Improving Parent-Child Relationships. 12:30-2:30 p.m. Mental Health Association, 320 N Goodman St. Free, RSVP. 32531445 x131. mharochester.org. [ THU., SEPTEMBER 26 ] Making Fresh Mozzarella at Home. 7 p.m. Rochester Brainery, Village Gate, 274 N Goodman St. $20. 730-7034. info@rochesterbrainery.com. rochesterbrainery.com. New York Insurance Funding for Autism Seminar. 6 p.m. Center for Autism and Related Disorders, 6 N. Main St., Suite 110, Fairport. Free. s.price@centerforautism. com. centerforautism.com. Nexus Nights. 7 p.m Joe Bean Coffee Roasters, 1344 University Ave. Explorations in food and beverage with a splash of science Free Event. 319-5279. kturiano@joebeanroasters.com. joebeanroasters.com. Robert Liberace. 7-9 p.m. School of the Arts, 45 Prince St Demonstration of classic portraiture on copper. Free. 2335645. rochesterartclub.org. [ FRI., SEPTEMBER 27 ] Editorial Bootcamp. Sep. 27-29. Rochester Plaza Hotel, 70 State St Conference September 27-28, 8 a.m.-6 p.m.; Editorial Bootcamp September 29, 9 a.m.-3 p.m 248-0318. communicationcentral.com/2013/events/2013conference/. Strategy, Leadership & the Soul: 21st Century Resilience. 8 a.m. Monroe Golf Club, 155 Golf Ave Jennifer Sertl, founder and president of Agility 3R, will present a threehour workshop $75 includes continental breakfast and copy of book co-authored by Sertl - Strategy, Leadership and the Soul. 325-3145 x128.

THEATER | MUCCC FEST

The Rochester Fringe Festival is still going on, but there’s more than that going on over at the Multi-use Community Culture Center. In addition to being an official Fringe venue this year, MuCCC is also putting on MuCCC Fest. It runs through Saturday, September 28, and features a wide variety of performances to check out. Some of the highlights include “From Stillness to Motion,” which takes place at 7 p.m. on Wednesday, September 25, and features Carrie Schreiner, a mannequin model who has modeled for big names such as Macy’s and Estee Lauder. Those with a passion for dance and/or modeling should give this one a look. Also on the MuCCC Fest schedule are Meredith Powell presents The Brothers Grimm Spectacularathon! Thursday, September 26, 8 p.m.; the music show Richard Storms: Flash! Lites! On Friday, September 27, 9 p.m.; a Scottish ceilidh Saturday, September 28, 5 p.m.; and many more shows. Head to muccc.org for show and ticket information. — BY TREVOR LEWIS erogers@mharochester.org. mharochester.org. [ SAT., SEPTEMBER 28 ] “Beat-the-Bullies” Workshop. 2 p.m. Rochester Kung Fu and Fitness, 2496 West Ridge Road. Teaches kids not how to fight but to be aware and confident, and to deter bullies before the challenge children Free. 4130835. greecekungfu.com. Fett Svin BBQ Pit Masters. 122:30 p.m. The Culinary Center at Vella, 237 Pittsford-Palmyra Rd $69, register. 421-9362. vellaculinarycenter.com. Learn to Make Your Own Jewelry: Bracelets and Earrings. 1 p.m. Central Library, 115 South Ave. Free, register 428-8138. www3.libraryweb.org/form. aspx?ekfrm=483745. Martial Arts Demonstration. 12:30 p.m. Seymour Library, 161 East Ave., Brockport All ages Free. 637-1050. seymourlibraryweb.org. Oktoberfest in the Finger Lakes. Sep. 28-29. New York Wine & Culinary Center, 800 South Main St. The two-day class will culminate in an evening celebration on the 29th with family, friends, live music, Oktoberfest food & seasonal beers. The all-inclusive price per student for both days is $295, which includes one extra dinner ticket as well as free beer stein. An individual ticket to the Oktoberfest dinner is $50. 394-7070. nywcc.com. [ MON., SEPTEMBER 30 ] Citizens Bank Buisiness Developemtne Series for the Market District Business Association. Sep. 30. Carlson MetroCenter YMCA, 444 E Main St. 5:30-8:30 p.m RSVP. jay@ rochesterymca.org.

Family Development Class: It’s So Much Work to Be Your Friend. 6-8 p.m. Mental Health Association, 320 N Goodman St. Free, RSVP. 325-3145 x131. mharochester.org. [ TUE., OCTOBER 1 ] Family Developement Class: Parenting the ADD/ADHD Child. 12:30-2:30 p.m. Mental Health Association, 320 N Goodman St. Free, RSVP. 325-3145 x131. mharochester.org. Home Brewing Techniques Class. 7 p.m Joe Bean Coffee Roasters, 1344 University Ave. Discuss and practice in-depth techniques for pour-over and full-immersion coffee brewing methods $25. 319-5279. kturiano@joebeanroasters. com. joebeanroasters.com/ classes. Screen Printing 101. 6:30 p.m. Rochester Brainery, Village Gate, 274 N Goodman St. $22. 730-7034. info@ rochesterbrainery.com. rochesterbrainery.com. Selling Impact. 9 a.m.-noon. Arts & Cultural Council for Greater Rochester, 277 N. Goodman St. Training session to held nonprofits attract resources $40$80, register. 473-4000 x206. artsrochester.org.

GETLISTED get your event listed for free e-mail it to calendar@rochestercitynews.com. Or go online to rochestercitynewspaper.com and submit it yourself!

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 27


Movies Theaters Searchable, up-to-the-minute movie times for all area theaters can be found at rochestercitynewspaper.com, and on City’s mobile website.

Film

Brockport Strand 93 Main St, Brockport, 637-3310, rochestertheatermanagement.com

Canandaigua Theatres 3181 Townline Road, Canandaigua, 396-0110, rochestertheatermanagement.com

Cinema Theater 957 S. Clinton St., 271-1785, cinemarochester.com

Culver Ridge 16 2255 Ridge Rd E, Irondequoit  544-1140, regmovies.com

Dryden Theatre 900 East Ave., 271-3361, dryden.eastmanhouse.org

Eastview 13 Eastview Mall, Victor 425-0420, regmovies.com

Geneseo Theatres Geneseo Square Mall, 243-2691, rochestertheatermanagement.com

Greece Ridge 12 176 Greece Ridge Center Drive 225-5810, regmovies.com

Henrietta 18 525 Marketplace Drive 424-3090, regmovies.com

The Little 240 East Ave., 258-0444 thelittle.org

Movies 10 2609 W. Henrietta Road 292-0303, cinemark.com

Pittsford Cinema 3349 Monroe Ave., 383-1310 pittsford.zurichcinemas.com

Tinseltown USA/IMAX 2291 Buffalo Road 247-2180, cinemark.com

Webster 12 2190 Empire Blvd., 888-262-4386, amctheatres.com

Vintage Drive In 1520 W Henrietta Rd., Avon 226-9290, vintagedrivein.com

Film Previews on page 30

Holden Caulfield in New Hampshire “Salinger”

readers. That book, the film informs us, has sold the astonishing number of 60 million (PG-13), DIRECTED BY SHANE SALERNO copies all over the world, and continues to NOW PLAYING sell 250,000 a year, speaking to ever more generations of young people, for whom it [ REVIEW ] BY GEORGE GRELLA holds a special significance. The picture proceeds in a most familiar The new documentary on J. D. Salinger, timed contemporary pattern, moving back and forth to appear close to the publication of a new through Salinger’s long life — he died at 91 in biography, should revitalize interest — if that 2010 — with dozens of interviews with friends, were needed — in one of the most admired family, fellow writers, critics, biographers, writers of the last half of the 20th century. former lovers, and passionate fans, including Ever since the publication of his most famous several movie actors. It repeats a number of the work, “The Catcher in the Rye,” in 1951, known facts about the reclusive figure, who Salinger, unlike any other literary figure, withdrew from the world to live in the small inspired something very like a cult among his town of Cornish, New Hampshire, and though he continued to write, refused to publish his work. That paradox in part accounts for much of the mystery and perhaps the appeal of this strange, brilliant, complicated figure. His affluent family lived on Park Avenue in Manhattan, sent him to prep schools, where he The documentary “Salinger” explores the reclusive author (pictured).

performed poorly enough to be expelled, until his father enrolled him at Valley Forge Military Academy, of all places, which formed both his character and his literary ambitions. He later studied with the famous Whit Burnett and began sending short stories to several of the many magazines that published fiction back in the 1930’s, and hung around with a gang of writers and editors, chiefly A. E. Hotchner, one of the most prominent talking heads in the movie. Although some of his work was published, he sought above all to be accepted by The New Yorker, whose editors systematically rejected his submissions. His wealth enabled him to mingle with what was known as high society in those days, where he met and fell in love with the beautiful Oona O’Neill, daughter of Eugene O’Neill, who ultimately married Charlie Chaplin. He enlisted in the army in 1942 and served in the Battle of the Bulge, surviving 299 days in combat and consequently suffering a nervous breakdown. The experience of war, the personal encounter with a concentration camp, and his work in the denazification of post-war Germany, according to those who knew him, created his most famous character, Holden Caulfield of “Catcher,” and in a sense, created Salinger as well. All the people interviewed, especially those engaged with literature, admire the man, his work, and his extraordinary integrity, but most confess their own bafflement over his

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Crimes of the heart “Prisoners” (R), DIRECTED BY DENIS VILLENEUVE NOW PLAYING

“Ballin’ at the Graveyard” DIRECTED BY BASIL ANASTASSIOU AND PAUL KENTOFFIO OPENS FRIDAY AT THE LITTLE [ REVIEW ] BY ADAM LUBITOW

self-exile and his silence. The personal reactions suggest another, not entirely surprising and not entirely attractive aspect of a writer obsessed with innocence and children — romantic attachments to young girls, the most famous of whom of course is the writer Joyce Maynard. The picture’s revelations include the fact of his amazing and quite illegal marriage in Germany to a young Nazi, whom he divorced a short time after bringing her to America. The delicious irony of The New Yorker repeatedly rejecting his stories several years before he became closely identified with the magazine indicates the not-uncommon obtuseness of editors. The utter foolishness of one publisher refusing “The Catcher in the Rye,” which almost immediately became a remarkable best seller, praised by critics everywhere, should comfort any writers experiencing the usual difficulty in finding a place for their work. “Salinger” provides a great deal of previously undisclosed information, which shows the diligence and creativity of its researchers; it also promises that the author stipulated that certain stories and novels, including the whole saga of his famous Glass family and a work on Buddhism, will appear on selected dates. The film may also introduce a major author to a new generation and confirms his place in American literature; it’s an important study of an important figure, who spoke to and for millions of readers (I am one of them).

With the release of Denis Villeneuve’s chilly, David Fincher-esque procedural “Prisoners,” this year’s Oscar season has officially begun. Boasting several award-worthy performances from its A-list stars, a twisty plot, gorgeous cinematography, and an epic length, the film seems like exactly the sort of thing the Academy loves to reward. Still, the dark, often unpleasant subject matter and tone of the film may end up scaring away voters when ballots come around. “Prisoners” is set in a blue-collar suburban Pennsylvania neighborhood (though, oddly, filmed in Georgia). As the film begins two families are getting together for Thanksgiving dinner, as is their tradition. Keller Dover (Hugh Jackman), his wife, Grace (Maria Bello, “A History of Violence”), and their teenage son and 6-year-old daughter walk down the block to the home of Franklin (Terrence Howard, “Lee Daniels’ The Butler”), Nancy (Viola

Jake Gyllenhaal and Hugh Jackman in “Prisoners.” PHOTO COURTESY WARNER BROS. PICTURES

Davis, “The Help”), and their daughters. After dinner, the two youngest girls go outside to play, but never return. It isn’t long before the families panic and the police are involved, but the girls seem to have vanished without a trace. Detective Loki (Jake Gyllenhaal) is assigned to the case, and turns up a suspect, Alex (Paul Dano, “There Will Be Blood”), a mentally challenged young man who is found driving an old RV the girls were last seen playing near. But with insufficient evidence, the police are forced to turn him loose. Finding that the investigation isn’t moving quickly enough, and knowing that the longer the girls are missing, the less likely thy will be found alive, Keller takes it upon himself to get some answers. His desperation leads him to kidnap Alex and hold him hostage. As Loki continues his quest for the truth, Keller begins to brutally torture Alex for information about the whereabouts of his daughter. The script (which made it onto the Black List, an industry list of the best unproduced screenplays) does a good job filling out the complexities in a story that might otherwise have turned into another vigilante-justice genre exercise. Alex has exhibited just enough suspicious behavior to make it seem possible that he may be guilty. A father driven to extremes, Keller Dover is a showy role, and Jackman sinks his teeth in, tapping into some of that Wolverine berserker rage. It’s a performance that’s always threatening to go over the top, but somehow manages to never cross that line. Terrence Howard (providing the silenced conscience of the movie) and Viola Davis play secondary roles, but capably convey the moral dilemma their characters face as they eventually learn of Keller’s actions. Melissa Leo is also quite good in the crucial role of Alex’s protective mother. Villeneuve loads the film with an almost unbearable sense of dread. The constant tension makes for a thrilling, but exhausting viewing experience. “Prisoners” is not

without its problems. The first two thirds of the film are masterful, but when the film finally gets around to providing a solution to its central mystery, it doesn’t quite live up to the build-up that preceded it. The film is also long — more than two-and-a-half hours. I was always enthralled, but became more conscious of the length as the running time wore on… and on. Roger Deakins, the cinematographer behind “Skyfall” and nearly all of the Coen Brothers’ films, turns in typically masterful work. He makes the gray dreariness of the late-fall-into-winter setting somehow always look beautiful. Produced in Upstate New York, the

documentary “Ballin’ at the Graveyard” posits that every city has one particular basketball court that everyone wants to play on, and functions as a hub in the subculture of urban pickup basketball. The film focuses on one such court, in Albany’s Washington Park, known as the Graveyard. Director Basil Anastassiou, himself a frequent participant in the pick-up games that occur there, along with his co-director Paul Kentoffio, let us observe the players, allowing us to get a sense of the community that has been built up around the court. Some of these men have been playing ball there for decades. They demonstrate the complex rules of life at the Graveyard, including how to decide who’s got next and the fine art of trash-talking. We learn about some of the players’ lives off the court, but not until a self-contained segment late in the film that presents all of their backstories one after another. It’s an odd structural choice, and one that deprives the film of a central narrative thrust for the audience to latch onto. But “Ballin’ at the Graveyard” works as an effective, even moving portrait of a location and the strong personalities who inhabit it. The opening night showings of “Ballin’ at the Graveyard” on Friday will include a Q&A with the directors as well as several players from the film.

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 29


RPO’s 2013-14 season

Film Previews

Full film reviews available at rochestercitynewspaper.com.

continues from page 26

Guest conductor: Michael Christie

Guest conductor: Thomas Wilkins

Guest conductor: Michael Francis

WEBSITE: MICHAELCHRISTIEONLINE.COM/MC/

WEBSITE: OMAHASYMPHONY.ORG/

WEBSITE: CAMI.COM/?WEBID=2013

BORN: BUFFALO, NEW YORK

MUSIC_DIRECTOR.ASP

BORN: AYLESBURY, BUCKINGHAMSHIRE,

CURRENT HOME: MINNEAPOLIS, MINNESOTA

BORN: NORFOLK, VIRGINIA

ENGLAND

RPO CONCERT DATES: APRIL 10 & 12

CURRENT HOME: OMAHA, NEBRASKA

CURRENT HOME: ETON, BERKSHIRE, ENGLAND

PROGRAM: HOWARD HANSON

RPO CONCERT DATES: MAY 22 & 24

RPO CONCERT DATES: MAY 29 & 31

PROGRAM: SHOSTAKOVICH, JIM BECKEL (B. 1948),

RPO PROGRAM: WALTON, GUSTAV HOLST

Conductor Michael Christie will be the one to take the RPO to Carnegie Hall next spring to perform Howard Hanson’s lyrical opera “Merry Mount.” But first, he’ll deliver it to the home crowd. Christie is from Buffalo. Hanson (1896-1981) was director of Eastman School of Music 1924-1964, and his “Merry Mount” was commissioned by the Metropolitan Opera in 1933. Christie has been studying Hanson’s portfolio of works and considers the lyric opera to “use up all the colors that Stravinsky brought to the beginning of the 20th century, and then add the reverence and grandeur of America. There are big, sweeping build-ups. It’s such a different American voice. There was Copland and Bernstein, and Hanson was just as individual.” The work will be a not-insubstantial challenge. Christie anticipates added rehearsals, and a need to ensure the stamina of the orchestra and the vocalists for this 90-minute work. He credits the RPO and ESM for taking “such an enormous cast of characters to Carnegie.” “The Merry Mount” apparently involves a “really big chorus plus individual characters and an orchestra.” Listening to Christie, who has conducted American operas and concert operas for more than 20 years, one gets the impression that he is comfortable with big — big scores, big groups of musicians and vocalists, and big sound. Perhaps it has something to do with the view he can catch in between conducting engagements around the United States, as he pilots his own single-engine, four-seat, Mooney airplane.

ALEXANDER ARUTIUNIAN SOLOIST: DOUGLAS PROSSER, TRUMPET (RPO PRINCIPAL TRUMPET)

As soon as he says, “Hello,” there is a certain laid-back quality that comes across from conductor Thomas Wilkins that makes you want to pour a cup of coffee and sit down to chat with him. He begins the conversation by reflecting on his largess about life coming into focus for a work as big as the Shostakovich Tenth Symphony. Wilkins has known he wanted to be a conductor since he was 8 years old and first heard a live symphony concert. He was captivated by the sound, and by the man standing in front who he called “the first participant in the creation of the sound.” By seventh grade, he made it to the podium before a student ensemble, where it “didn’t go well,” but he felt the encouragement of his teacher, and continued to find others with a guiding hand as he went through his studies at Shenandoah University and then the New England Conservatory of Music. Wilkins sees being a high-profile conductor as an opportunity to serve as God’s hand to shape the world around him, one individual at a time. And it may be that the story he tells that will most resonate with us is that of a college student who came up to him after a concert, asking what it meant that she had found herself in tears at the end of a Copland piece, when she had only attended the concert as a course requirement.

30 CITY SEPTEMBER 25 - OCTOBER 1, 2013

Conductor Michael Francis could just as easily be a narrator or actor from the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art. It’s not just that he’s English. He’s a natural storyteller, which makes his presence at the podium for the RPO season finale particularly sweet. He’ll be conducting two significant works that reflect stories, William Walton’s “Suite from Henry V” and Gustav Holst’s “The Planets.” Francis describes the “Henry V Suite” as “really strong,” and it’s worth noting that it has been used in everything from a 1946 LP with Laurence Olivier narrating to the 1989 movie “Henry V,” starring Kenneth Branagh. Our conversation on “The Planets” is more involved. A work in seven movements, written between 1914 and 1916, it cycles through the astrological concept of the influence of the planets upon the psyche. “The timing for Holst was so poignant,” says Francis. “The terrible war, the end of the Golden Era, a time shown in ‘Downton Abbey,’ and a sense of innocence eroded.” Francis’ preparation is a journey of “finding the human qualities behind the music.” What does it mean? What does it tell us? Francis notes that there is a “tremendous psychology” on how a conductor communicates with the orchestra. “They are a collective of people. They may have played the work before and with a better conductor. There are the technical details,” says Francis. After a pause, he continues, “And then, there is the overall vision of the piece I bring to the podium, while giving the musicians the permission to fill in the gaps.”

[ OPENING ] BAGGAGE CLAIM (PG-13): Paula Patton plays a flight attendant who takes advantage of her job to fly across the country revisiting her exes and hunt for a date in time for her sister’s wedding. With Djimon Hounsou, Taye Diggs, Derek Luke, Adam Brody, and Tia Mowry. Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Greece, Henrietta, Tinseltown, Webster BALLIN’ AT THE GRAVEYARD (NR): Produced in Upstate NY, this documentary examines the subculture of urban pickup basketball at Albany’s Washington Park. Little CARMEN (Opera): Georges Bizet’s popular opera, about the tragic love affair between a soldier and a gypsy woman, is performed by Handa Opera on an outdoor stage on Sydney Harbour. Little (Sun, Sep 29, 12 p.m.; Tue, Oct 1, 6:30 p.m.) CLOUDY WITH A CHANCE OF MEATBALLS 2 (PG): The sequel to the animated adaptation of the popular children’s picture book, this time involving an island of food/ animal hybrids. With the voices of Bill Hader, Anna Faris, James Caan, Kristen Schaal, Andy Samberg, and Neil Patrick Harris. Brockport, Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece, Henrietta, Pittsford, Tinseltown, Vintage, Webster DON JON (R): Joseph Gordon-Levitt makes his big screen debut as writer/ director with this comedy about a ladies man who finds that real-life ladies have difficulty competing with the ones in his pornos. With Scarlett Johansson, Julianne Moore, and Tony Danza. Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece, Henrietta, Pittsford, Tinseltown, Webster ENOUGH SAID (PG-13): Julia Louis Dreyfus plays a divorced woman who begins dating a new man (James Gandolfini), only to discover that he’s her new friend’s ex-husband in this romantic-comedy from Nicole Holofcener. With Catherine Keener and Toni Collette. Little, Pittsford THE GRADUATES (NR): This bilingual documentary follows six Latino and Latina students across the country and examines the state of modern education. Little (Mon, Sep 30, 7 p.m.) THE GOLDEN BED (1925): Cecil B. DeMille’s silent film about a femme fatale who lures unsuspecting men to their deaths. Dryden (Tue, Oct 1, 8 p.m.) A LEAGUE OF THEIR OWN (1992): Penny Marshall’s popular comedy about the first all-female professional baseball league. Starring Geena Davis, Tom Hanks, Madonna, and Rosie O’Donnell. Dryden (Thu, Sep 26, 8 p.m.) NOTHING BUT A MAN (1964): An itinerant railroad worker settles down and marries school teacher, only to face discrimination from his white neighbors in 1960s small-town America. Dryden (Fri, Sep 27, 8 p.m.) RUSH (R): Ron Howard’s film about the true story of the 1970s rivalry between Formula One racers James Hunt and Niki Lauda. Starring Chris Hemsworth, Daniel Brühl, and Olivia Wilde. Culver, Eastview, Greece, Henrietta, Pittsford, Tinseltown, Webster THE TIN DRUM (1979): A 3-year-old boy in pre-WWII Germany vows to


never get any older, and uses his toy drum to protest against Hitler’s rise to power in this acclaimed, surreal drama. Dryden (Wed, Sep 25, 8 p.m.) VERTIGO (1958): In one of Alfred Hitchcock’s greatest films, James Stewart plays a retired San Francisco detective who becomes dangerously obsessed with the wife of an old college friend. Also starring Kim Novak. Little (Wed, Sep 25, 6:30 p.m.) [ CONTINUING ] AUSTENLAND (PG-13): Keri Russell stars in this romantic comedy about a woman who finds love at a theme park based on the writings of Jane Austen. With Bret McKenzie, Jennifer Coolidge, and Jane Seymour. Pittsford BATTLE OF THE YEAR (PG-13): Josh Holloway (“Lost”) plays a former basketball coach who accepts a job coaching a dance crew hoping to win an international dance tournament. Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece, Henrietta, Tinseltown, Webster BLUE JASMINE (PG-13): Woody Allen employs a situation that initially resembles Tennessee Williams’ “A Streetcar Named Desire,” and filters it through his own imagination, creating a sad, only occasionally comic story out of some familiar material. Little, Pittsford THE CONJURING (R): Based on the true story of paranormal investigators Lorraine and Ed Warren (Vera Farmiga and Patrick Wilson), who assist a

family threatened by a demonic presence in their home. With Lili Taylor and Ron Livingston. Canandaigua, Movies 10 DESPICABLE ME 2 (PG): A former supervillain is recruited by the Anti-Villain League to spy on a dangerous new super criminal in this animated sequel. With the voice talents of Steve Carell, Kristen Wiig, Russell Brand, and Ken Jeong. Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview ELYSIUM (R): Matt Damon stars in this sci-fi action film from director Neill Blomkamp (“District 9”), about a future where Earth is in ruins while the rich and powerful reside on a manmade space station called Elysium. Also starring Jodie Foster and William Fichtner. Eastview, Henrietta THE FAMILY (R): This actioncomedy, from director Luc Besson, stars Robert De Niro as a former mafia boss who’s forced to go into witness protection with his family. Also starring Michelle Pfeiffer, Tommy Lee Jones, and Dianna Agron. Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece, Henrietta, Tinseltown, Vintage, Webster FAST & FURIOUS 6 (PG-13): The sixth installment of the streetracing action film series. Expect fast (and potentially furious) cars, which may or may not explode in epic fashion. Starring Vin Diesel, Paul Walker, Dwayne Johnson, Michelle Rodriguez, Luke Evans, and Tyrese Gibson. Movies 10

GENERATION IRON (PG-13): This documentary examines the world of professional bodybuilding, following seven competitors in the Mr Olympia competition. Narrated by Mickey Rourke. Tinseltown GROWN UPS 2 (PG-13): Adam Sandler, Chris Rock, Kevin James, and David Spade all return in this sequel about a group of overgrown man-children. Also starring Salma Hayek and Maya Rudolph. Culver, Movies 10, Vintage THE HEAT (R): A by-the-book FBI agent teams up with a coarse Boston cop to bring down a drug lord in this buddy comedy from director Paul Feig (“Bridesmaids”). Starring Sandra Bullock and Melissa McCarthy. Movies 10 INSIDIOUS: CHAPTER 2 (PG-13): Fresh off the success of “The Conjuring,” director James Wan returns to the saga of the haunted Lambert family. Starring Patrick Wilson, Rose Byrne, and Barbara Hershey. Brockport, Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece, Henrietta, Tinseltown, Vintage, Webster INSTRUCTIONS NOT INCLUDED (PG-13): A freewheeling playboy mends his ways when a baby he never knew he had shows up on his doorstep. But six years later, the birth mother surfaces wanting custody of the young girl. Henrietta LEE DANIELS’ THE BUTLER (PG-13): Forest Whitaker stars in this true story, about a butler who served eight American presidents over

the course of three decades. Also starring Oprah Winfrey, Terrence Howard, Alan Rickman, Jane Fonda, Robin Williams, and John Cusack. Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Greece, Henrietta, Little, Pittsford, Tinseltown, Webster MONSTERS UNIVERSITY (G): This prequel to Pixar’s “Monsters, Inc.” shows us the origins of Mike and Sulley’s friendship, which dates all the way back in their college days. Culver THE MORTAL INSTRUMENTS: CITY OF BONES (PG-13): A young girl learns that she’s descended from a long line of demon hunters in this adaptation of the popular young adult book series. Starring Lily Collins, Lena Headey, and Jonathan Rhys Meyers. Henrietta, Tinseltown NOW YOU SEE ME (PG-13): A team of illusionists use their talents to perpetrate a series of heists targeting corrupt business leaders. Starring Jesse Eisenberg, Michael Caine, Morgan Freeman, Mark Ruffalo, Woody Harrelson, and Isla Fisher. Movies 10 ONE DIRECTION: THIS IS US (PG): This concert film (inexplicably directed by Morgan Spurlock) follows the popular boy band on their tour around the world. Scream, squeal, faint, etc, etc. Webster PACIFIC RIM (PG-13): When enormous monsters rise from the sea, humankind fights back by building giant robot warriors to defend the world in this sci-fi action film from director Guillermo

For information: Call us (585) 244-3329 Fax us (585) 244-1126 Mail Us City Classifieds 250 N. Goodman Street Rochester, NY 14607 Email Us classifieds@ rochester-citynews.com EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY

All real estate advertised in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act, which makes it unlawful, “to make, print, or publish, any notice, statement, or advertisement, with respect to the sale or rental of a dwelling that indicates any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin.” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under the age of 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertisement for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. Call the local Fair Housing Enforcement Project, FHEP at 325-2500 or 1-866-671-FAIR. Si usted sospecha una practica de vivienda injusta, por favor llame al servicio legal gratis. 585-325-2500 - TTY 585-325-2547.

del Toro (“Pan’s Labyrinth”). Starring Charlie Hunnam, Idris Elba, Ron Perlman, and Charlie Day. Movies 10 PARANOIA (PG-13): An entrylevel employee at a powerful corporation is forced to spy on the leader of a rival company. Starring Liam Hemsworth, Harrison Ford, and Gary Oldman. Vintage PERCY JACKSON: SEA OF MONSTERS (PG): The continued epic adventures of Percy, the son of Poseidon, who now must journey across the sea of monsters to find the mythical Golden Fleece. Starring Logan Lerman, Stanley Tucci, Anthony Head, and Nathan Fillion. Canandaigua, Eastview, Greece PLANES (PG): An animated spinoff of “Cars,” this time about a little plane who dreams of being a racer. With the voices of Dane Cook, Teri Hatcher, Julia LouisDreyfus, John Cleese, Anthony Edwards, and Val Kilmer. Greece, Henrietta, Tinseltown PRISONERS (R): See review on page 29. Brockport, Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece, Henrietta, Pittsford, Tinseltown, Vintage, Webster RIDDICK (R): Vin Diesel returns to his role as anti-hero convict Riddick, as he battles a planet full of alien predators. With Karl Urban and Katee Sackhoff. Culver, Greece, Henrietta, Tinseltown, Webster SALINGER (PG-13): See review on page 28. Pittsford

THANKS FOR SHARING (R): This romantic dramedy, three men hope to find love while facing their shared affliction of sex addiction. Think of it as “Shame” lite. Starring Mark Ruffalo, Gwyneth Paltrow, Tim Robbins, Josh Gad, and Pink(!).Little, Pittsford WE’RE THE MILLERS (R): A smalltime pot dealer hires strangers to pose as his family in order to not arouse suspicion while making his way across the Mexican border with a shipment. Starring Jason Sudeikis, Jennifer Aniston, Emma Roberts, and Ed Helms. Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Greece, Henrietta, Tinseltown, Vintage, Webster THE WIZARD OF OZ: AN IMAX 3D EXPERIENCE (G): The beloved classic films gets a fancy new 3D conversion, so expect a lot of winged monkeys flying at your face. Tinseltown THE WORLD’S END (R): Simon Pegg and Nick Frost reunite with director Edgar Wright in this comedic tale of a group of old friends who reunite for a nostalgic pub crawl, but end up fighting to save the world. Culver, Henrietta YOU’RE NEXT (R): Horror fans have been waiting for this film’s arrival in theaters for a while now. While it’s not the gamechanging savior of the horror genre that early reviews hinted at (“Cabin in the Woods,” oddly also released by Lionsgate, was closer in that regard), it is an absolute blast. Vintage

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Place your real estate ad by calling 244-3329 ext. 23 or rochestercitynewspaper.com Ad Deadlines: Friday 4pm for Display Ads Monday at noon for Line ads KITCHEN TABLE 3/8 Thick round glass top table. 40” diameter. 41” high. $49 585-490-5870 LARGE JEWELRY COLLECTION All kinds, old & new, retro, vintage, cameo’s, brooches, beads & more. Great pieces for jewelry designers too, 585-360-2895 OLD FASHIONED GUM BALL MACHINE. Works $10 585-3830405 USED TV FOR SALE —Sharp 13” Color with remote. 14 years young with remote. $20 cash and carry. Message phone Mary 585/413-0827 VCR - Emerson, records, no remote. Nice. 585-880-2903 $25

Jam Section CALLING ALL MUSICIANS OF ALL GENRES the Rochester Music Coalition wants you! Please register on our website. For further info: www.rochestermusiccoalition. org info@rochestermusiccoalition. org 585-235-8412 CHRISTIAN ROCK - R & B Band is seeking a lead / rhythm guitarist 585-355-4449

DRUMMER Experienced Young Drummer available. Influences are Led Zep, Rush, Pink Floyd, Foo Fighters. Looking for Guitar, Bass and Vocals. Contact through: http://www.youtube. com/user/Chaztize7 KEYBOARD PLAYER needed to play with one of Rochester’s finest Big Bands. Great charts able to rehearse a few Weds. during the months of (AprilNovember) effective 04/15/2014 585-442-7480

HomeWork A cooperative effort of City Newspaper and RochesterCityLiving, a program of the Landmark Society.

Music Services PIANO LESSIONS In your home or mine. Patient, experienced instructor teaching all ages, levels and musical styles. Call Scott: 585- 465-0219. Visit www.scottwrightmusic.com

NEEDED MULTI INSTRUMENT MUSICIANS Bass, guitars, keys, horns. Must have equipt. & transportation & be avail. evenings. Bobby 585-328-4121 THE GREGORY KUNDE CHORALE is looking for male voices. Call for an audition now to join our fourteenth season! Info Line 377 7568 or visit our website www. gregorykundechorale.org

continues on page 34

K-D Moving & Storage Inc.

VOCALIST that can lead & background with other vocalists that do the same. Avail evenings, transportation, R & B, Funk, Jazz, Pop, Blues......Bobby 585-3284121 Experienced please.

Next-to-New Sale

Experience in office & household moving and deliveries

MONROE AVENUE AT OXFORD STREET

Big or small, we do them all

BLESSED SACRAMENT AUDITORIUM Thursday & Friday, Oct. 3 & 4, 9am-8pm Saturday, Oct. 5, 9am-12noon ROCHESTER’S ORIGINAL NEXT-TO-NEW SALE: Clothing, furniture, appliances, kitchen items, jewelry, books, games, toys, numerous other items. Home-made chili, sauerkraut and baked goods for sale. Come for lunch or supper!

www.SouthEastRochesterCatholics.org

473-6610 or 473-4357 23 Arlington St. NY D.O.T.#9657

KdMovingandStorage.com

Find your way home with TO ADVERTISE CONTACT CHRISTINE TODAY!

CALL 244-3329 X23 OR EMAIL CHRISTINE@ROCHESTER-CITYNEWS.COM

Canandaigua Lake; Newly renovated ranch with 25' feet of frontage and a dock. Turn key, everything is included! $219,900 Call Ryan @ 201-0724 or visit RochesterSells.com for more info. Re/Max Realty Group.

Twenties Triumph on Trafalgar 148 Trafalgar Street Boasting a rich heritage as one of Rochester’s largest residential neighborhoods, the 19th Ward, with its towering trees and impressive homes, enjoyed its heyday from 1910 to 1930 when it emerged as a streetcar community. Fine homes filled with natural woodwork, hardwood floors, leaded and stained glass were built to accommodate doctors, professors and skilled laborers. Today there are still many shining examples of this earlier time of craftsmanship, comfort and elegant living. One has only to walk up the driveway and enter the eastern brick portico of 148 Trafalgar Street to take a trip back to the luxury of 1920. Transitioning from present to past, pass through a tiled entryway adorned with a double layer of original leaded glass and pull open the gumwood door. Allow yourself to be enveloped in the buttery warmth of the foyer’s original parquet floors. To the left, a gleaming colonnade draws the visitor’s attention to the wide wooden entryway to the living room. Stained glass windows and modern recessed lighting illuminate built-in bookshelves, an original working fireplace with gumwood mantelpiece, and the loveliest parquet hardwood in the house with an intricate diamond weave border. Heading to the front of the house, look up to see a decorative wooden spoke-and-wheel design embellishing the entryway to the enclosed porch with its three walls of windows—a perfect sunroom, media room, or rec room.

Ryan Smith 585-201-0724

This abundance of glass is mirrored to the right of the foyer in the lovely leaded glass pocket

doors leading to the dining room. Gorgeous tulip leaf lighting decorates the four corners of the coffered ceiling. An ornate chandelier provides just the right amount of lighting for elegant dining or relaxing on the padded window seat. At the back of the house is the large eat-in kitchen, with tiled countertops, unique woodpaneled walls, and, tucked off to the side, a first floor laundry. Venture out the door to the backyard and imagine having a barbeque on the wooden deck after parking your car in the detached two-car garage. From the foyer, proceed upstairs past the colorful drop-pendant stained glass window. You’ll find four bedrooms and a full bath. Each of the bedrooms features hardwood floors, closet, ceiling fan and baseboard heating. Located just down the street from Joseph C. Wilson Magnet Commencement Academy, 148 Trafalgar Street is also within walking distance of the Arnett Branch Library, two elementary schools, and Aberdeen Square Park. Also nearby are Genesee Valley Park, the University of Rochester, downtown Rochester, the airport, and Interstate 390. Offered by Oktay Kocaoglu of Nothnagle Realtors, 148 Trafalgar Street has 1,976 square feet of space and is listed at $159,900. For more information, contact Oktay at 585507-6541. by Janet Collinge Janet is celebrating 20 years in the Neighborhood of the Arts.

Ryan Smith

NYS Licensed Real Estate Salesperson

201-0724 RochesterSells.com

Search. Buy. Sell. rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 33


I’m very pleased with the calls I got from our apartment rental ads, and will continue running them. Your readers respond — positively!” - M. Smith, Residential Management > page 33

Miscellaneous **GUN SHOW - CHEEKTOWAGA KNIGHTS OF COLUMBUS**2735 Union Rd. Cheektowaga, NY 90 TABLES! Saturday 09/28 9AM4PM & Sunday 09/29 9AM-3PM. Next Show 10/06/13 @ Alexander Fireman’s Rec Hall www. nfgshows.com HAS YOU BUILDING SHIFTED OR SETTLED? Contact Woodford Brothers Inc, for straightening, leveling, foundation and wood frame repairs at 1-800-OLDBARN. www.woodfordbros. com. “Not applicable in Queens county” HAS YOU BUILDING SHIFTED OR SETTLED? Contact Woodford Brothers Inc, for straightening, leveling, foundation and wood

frame repairs at 1-800-OLDBARN. www.woodfordbros. com. “Not applicable in Queens county” KILL BED BUGS & THEIR EGGS! Buy a Harris Bed Bug Kit. Complete Treatment Program. Odorless, Non-Staining. Available online at homedepot.com (NOT IN STORES) SAWMILLS from only $4897.00MAKE & SAVE MONEY with your own bandmill- Cut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship. FREE Info/DVD:  www. NorwoodSawmills.com 1-800578-1363 Ext.300N

Looking For... FREE YARN NEEDED! Please donate your yarn to Sunday Circle knitting hats scarves and mittens for the poor. Arrange

pickup. Call and leave message 585/413-0827

Mind Body Spirit ELLEN SINGLETON God-Gifted Psychic. Helps relationships, stops divorce, cheating,solves severe problems. Free 15-minute reading. (832) 8849714 (AAN CAN) NEED TO LOSE WEIGHT? Need more energy? Go herbal! Herbalife uses desert botanicals! all natural products for weight loss, healthy aging, heart health, energy and much more! visit herbapeace.com for more info and to order or call (585)880-2726 for your personal wellness coach VIAGRA 100MG 40 pills+/4 free, only $99.00. Save Big Now, Discreet shipping. Call 1-800374-2619 Today! (AAN CAN)

Religion COME AND EXPERIENCE Healing by Faith and Prayer. Perinton Community Center, Fairport, NY. God’s Prayer Ministries. Noon2pm, Every Sunday Pastor Taylor 585-317-3537.

Wanted to Buy CASH FOR COINS! Buying ALL Gold & Silver. Also Stamps & Paper Money, Entire Collections, Estates. Travel to your home. Call Marc in NYC 1-800-959-3419 WANTED: Pre-1975 Superhero Comic Books, sports, non sports cards, toys, original art & celebrity memorabilia especially 1960’s. Collector/Investor, paying cash. Call Mike: (800)273-0312, mikecarbo@gmail.com

MIND BODY SPIRIT

THINK • MOVE • BREATHE DANCE • HEAL • SEARCH STRETCH • STENGHTHEN

TO ADVERTISE CALL CHRISTINE AT 244.3329 x23 See Page 7 of this week’s issue

EMPLOYMENT / CAREER TRAINING

Employment

Volunteers

AIRLINE CAREERS begin here– Get FAA approved Aviation Maintenance Technician training. Financial aid for qualified students– Housing available.Job placement assistance. Call AIM 866-296-7093

A SECOND THOUGHT Resale Shop in East Rochester is accepting applications for volunteer sale associates and online researchers. Shop benefits people with disabilities in Guatemala. Call (585) 340-2000.

COOKS WANTED Part time cook wanted who has the experience working for a catering company. Catering weddings, receptions, and many other special events.. Please send your resume to sjplunkett@ gmail.com

BOOK LOVERS needed to sort and price donated books for resale at Downtown Library bookstore. Proceeds benefit library programs. Training provided. 585-428-8322 or Kate.Antoniades@libraryweb.org. BRIGHTEN A LIFE. Lifespan’s The Senior Connection program needs people 55+ to volunteer to make 2

CORREIA’S GENERAL CONTRACTING Sales & Project Manager. Average first year $55$60K. Recession proof industry. No experience necessary / Will train. Top rep in 2012 made over $200K. TO APPLY CALL: 315-257-9104 or send resume to; athompson@ roofally.com CRST offers the Best Lease Purchase Program! SIGN-ON BONUS. No Down Payment or Credit Check. Great Pay. Class-A CDL required. Owner Operators Welcome! Call 866-239-0292 DENTIST Anthony L. Jordan Health Corporation (AJHC), Rochester, NY. Provide preventative, general dentistry, problem focused dentistry and oral surgery services to AJHC patients Send resume to K. Ramadhan, Sr Dir, Human Resources, AJHC, 82 Holland St, Rochester, NY 14605. DRIVERS - HIRING EXPERIENCED / INEXPERIENCED TANKER DRIVERS! Earn up to $.51/mile! New Fleet Volvo Tractors! 1 Year OTR Exp. Req.Tanker Training Available. Call Today: 877-882-6537 www. OakleyTransport.com DRIVERS HOME WEEKLY & BIWEEKLY EARN $900- $1200/WK BC/BS Med & Major Benefits. No Canada, HAZMAT or NYC! SMITH TRANSPORT 877-705-9261 HELP WANTED! make extra money in our free ever popular homemailer program,includes valuable guidebook! Start immediately! Genuine! 1-888292-1120 www.easyworkfromhome.com (AAN CAN) SATTELLITE DISH INSTALLERS Subcontractor position - trucks and tools required - Excellent Pay- Call 888-313-8504 or 706-733-0988 To see if you quality THE LIMITED In Eastview Mall is hiring a Part Time Management Associate with flexible availabilty including weekends. Responsibilities include Leadership and Direction to 20+ associates, Selling, Operational and Financial compliance. To apply visit: www. thelimited.com/careers THE LIMITED Is hiring Floorset/ Visual Associates for Eastview/ Marketplace Malls. Responsibilities include executing floorset/ merchandise standards. Required Availability: Mon/Tues 7pm-3am and Flexible Wed-Sun. To apply visit: www.thelimited/careers.

34 CITY SEPTEMBER 25 - OCTOBER 1, 2013

BECOME A DOCENT at the Rochester Museum & Science Center Must be an enthusiastic communicator, Like working with

children. Learn more at http://www. rmsc.org/Support/Volunteer Or call 585-697-1948

SERVICES

YOU DELIVER THE PACKAGES. WE DELIVER THE FUNDS. Temporary Drivers Needed! Who doesn’t love working in a dynamic environment while earning extra money? We’ve got both waiting for you in one great opportunity with an industry-leading company. Kelly Services ® is hiring temporary drivers for FedEx Ground®, a small-package ground delivery company serving business and residential customers across North America. You could be hired immediately if you meet these requirements: • 21 years or older • Strong customer service skills • Minimum of six months experience driving like-sized commercial vehicle within the last three years • One year commercial driving experience preferred though CDL not required As a Kelly® employee, you’ll receive weekly electronic pay, a service bonus plan, benefit options, and more. If you’ve got the drive, we want to hear from you. Don’t miss out. Inquire in Person: Mon-Fri 10am-4pm 225 Thruway Park, West Henrietta, NY resumes: tempupny@yahoo.com An Equal Opportunity Employer


Rent your apartment special third week is

FREE

Place your ad by calling 244-3329 ext. 23 or rochestercitynewspaper.com Ad Deadlines: Friday 4pm for Display Ads Monday at noon for Line ads

EMPLOYMENT / CAREER TRAINING friendly phone calls / 2 visits each month to an older adult Call Katie 585-244-8400 x 152

e-mail dfrink@lifespan-roch.org for more information

FOSTER PARENTS WANTED! Monroe County is looking for adults age 21 and over to consider opening their homes to foster children. Call 334-9096 or visit www.MonroeFosterCare.org.

LITERACY VOLUNTEERS OF ROCHESTER needs adult tutors to help adults who are waiting to improve their reading, writing, English speaking, or math skills. Call 473-3030, or check our website at www.literacyrochester.org

HABITAT FOR CATS — Help TrapNeuter-Return cats on Tuesdays, in East Rochester, for an important grant project. Impact the number of owner-less cats living outside. All training provided. 585-7874209 or habitat4cats@yahoo.com!

MEALS ON WHEELS Needs Volunteers for :Meal delivery. Clerical work and answering phones, scheduling volunteers to deliver routes. For more information visit our website at www.vnsnet.com or call 787-8326.

HERITAGE CHRISTIAN STABLES, a therapeutic horsemanship program for children and adults with developmental disabilities, is looking for volunteers to serve as horse leaders and side walkers. Call Kim Kennedy at (585) 340-2016 or email kkennedy@ heritagechristianservices.org

SECOND YEAR MCC DENTAL STUDENT eeking patients who would like complimentary cleaning. This is FREE in exchange for your time! Contact Tina B. 585-9028009 or emailtinahygiene@gmail. com

LIFESPAN’S OMBUDSMAN PROGRAM is looking for volunteers to advocate for individuals living in long-term care settings. Please contact call 585.287.6378 or

Business Opportunities START A HOME BASED BUSINESS. Part-time or Full-

Time. Serious inquires only. 585271-3243

Career Training AIRLINE CAREERS- begin here - Get trained as FAA certified

Advanced Manufacturing/Machining Teacher Cattaraugus Allegany BOCES Olean CTE Center See Website for Details Apply on-line at

WWW.CABOCES.ORG EOE/AA

Aviation Technician. Housing and Financial aid for qualified students. Job placement assistance. Call Aviation

Institute of Maintenance 877492-3059 (AAN CAN)

DEPUTY SHERIFF ROAD PATROL Application Deadline: September 27, 2013 Exam Date: Saturday, November 16, 2013 Applications available online at: www.monroecounty.gov Or in person at The County Office Bldg., 39 West Main Street, Suite 210 Candidates must: Be at least 19 years old on test date, possess: High School Diploma or GED. Valid NYS driver license. Have no felony convictions. Pass a physical agility, medical exam, psychological test and background investigation. Be of good moral character. Be in good physical condition. Show genuine interest in this rewarding career. The Monroe County Sheriff’s Department is an equal opportunity employer.

Tired of Aending Job Fairs That Do Not Lead to Career Opportunies? Let us help you find a full or part me career, supporng individuals with developmental disabilies. Our employees enjoy flexible schedules, excellent benefits, paid training, tuion reimbursement, generous paid me off and a supporve work environment. Visit our website for more informaon at:

www.lifemeassistance.org EOE

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 35


Legal Ads [ NOTICE ] BRIEF SYNOPSIS OF DETERMINATION AND FINDINGS PURSUANT TO ARTICLE 2 OF THE NEW YORK STATE EMINENT DOMAIN PROCEDURE LAW The Rochester Genesee Regional Transportation Authority (“RGRTA”) shall acquire certain parcels of real property by eminent domain for the construction and operation of the Main Street Campus Improvement Project (the “Project”), a development project that will improve RGRTA’s operations at its existing campus in the City of Rochester, County of Monroe and State of New York. Copies of the determination and findings will be forwarded upon written request without cost. PROPERTY TO BE ACQUIRED RGRTA is proposing to improve operations at its existing Campus. The Project will include renovations to and expansion of the existing Operations Building; construction of a new Maintenance Warehouse Building; developing new indoor and outdoor bus parking spaces and staging areas for buses waiting for maintenance; construction of a new Service Building; providing a new employee parking area to replace the parking displaced by the new Maintenance Warehouse Building and Service Building; and other site improvements. The Project will require RGRTA to acquire twenty-one (21) parcels of private property on Hayward Avenue and Chamberlain Street and will require the City of Rochester to de-map a portion of Hayward Avenue. The properties which shall be acquired or condemned are identified by the following Tax Map Parcel Numbers: 107.61-3-37 107.69-1-32 107.69-1-33 107.69-1-34 107.69-1-36.001 107.61-3-36 107.61-3-35 107.69-1-19 107.69-1-20 107.61-3-34 107.61-3-33 107.69-1-21 107.69-1-37 107.69-1-22 107.61-3-32 107.69-1-23 107.61-3-31 107.61-3-30 107.61-3-29 107.69-1-38 107.69-1-39. PROCEDURAL HISTORY Section 1299-ii of the Public Authorities Law authorizes RGRTA to acquire or condemn real property to carry out its purposes pursuant to the Eminent Domain Procedure Law (“EDPL”). In accordance with Article 2 of the EDPL, RGRTA conducted a public hearing on May 29, 2013 to determine the need to obtain the necessary real property interests required

for the construction and operation of the Project. Notices of the public hearing were published as required under the EDPL. Property owners and other interested parties also were given advance notice of the hearing by mail. At the hearing site, copies of the maps of the property interests to be acquired by RGRTA were posted and made available to the public. All oral and written comments received during the public hearing, and in the written submission period, have been reviewed, made part of the record and given due consideration. PUBLIC NEED, USE AND PURPOSE The current configuration of RGRTA’s campus, which was constructed in 1974, results in a number of challenges to RGRTA’s operations, primarily related to inadequate bus storage and staging space and bus servicing capacity. These parking and service-capacity constraints in turn result in inefficient operations at the campus that also adversely affect the nearby residential neighborhood. Moreover, RGRTA is aiming to increase ridership each year, which will require a larger fleet over the long term. With anticipated future growth, RGRTA will have further difficulties accommodating additional fleet at its Campus in its current configuration. Therefore, RGRTA is proposing an overall reconfiguration of the East Main Street Campus to facilitate more efficient and safe operations currently and in the future. RGRTA finds that the Project will greatly improve bus servicing and maintenance capabilities at the campus with the new Service and Maintenance Buildings and expanded Operations Building. It will also greatly improve bus parking and storage at the campus by providing an adequate number of designated bus parking spaces for the fleet and by substantially increasing the number of parking spaces located indoors. These changes will improve operational efficiencies and decrease operational costs by eliminating the need to search for and shift buses from undesignated parking spaces throughout the day. Designated parking spaces will also reduce the risk of bus-to-bus and car-to-bus accidents. These changes will also allow for sidewalks and pedestrian crossings thereby providing for safe pedestrian circulation within the campus. In addition, the changes will reduce any impact of RGRTA’s operations on the nearby residential community by reducing the need for earlymorning bus starts during cold weather, the need for overnight bus servicing, and the number of buses parked at the eastern and southern perimeters of the campus.

36 CITY SEPTEMBER 25 - OCTOBER 1, 2013

In addition, the new perimeter landscaping and higher perimeter wall will create a new buffer between the campus and the surrounding residential neighborhood. Overall, these improvements will make RGRTA’s Main Street Campus operations more efficient, less intrusive, and better able to accommodate future growth in bus operations. LOCATION AND REASONS FOR SELECTION The proposed location for the Project is preferable to an alternative location because it is adjacent to RGRTA’s existing campus and is more compatible with existing RTS operations and route structures. In addition, RGRTA considered alternatives where varying amounts of land would be acquired. During the course of its evaluations, RGRTA determined that it could not meet its operational needs within the footprint of its existing campus because several critical needs would not be able to be met. RGRTA also considered acquiring only 1.4 acres of land, but again the area was not large enough to accommodate all the needed functions, including providing adequate employee parking. ENVIRONMENTAL AND LOCALITY EFFECTS The Project will not have a significant adverse impact on the environment or the community, and any adverse impacts that will occur can be mitigated. The land to be disturbed for purposes of development of the Project is located in an urban area occupied by residential structures and yards, which will be demolished and removed as part of the Project. The building and construction of the Project will be performed as quickly and efficiently as possible. Construction activity generally will be limited to daylight hours. The contractors undertaking construction activities will implement appropriate measures to avoid or minimize excessive noise, vibration, air quality impacts, and impacts from stormwater run off and erosion. Upon completion of the construction of the Project, there will not be any significant adverse impacts to the Project site or to any areas adjacent thereto, including adjacent and nearby residential areas, associated with mobile source emissions or stationary source emissions. The Project will not significantly change the number or timing of vehicle trips arriving at or departing from the Campus and will not change the numbers of buses entering and exiting the Campus or their schedules. Therefore, no significant changes to existing traffic conditions are anticipated as a result of the Project. Project-generated noise levels will be well below the FTA impact

threshold levels, indicating that the Project will not result in significant adverse noise impacts at nearby noisesensitive uses. Further, the small change in vehicle trips will not affect existing noise levels at the Campus entrance. Moreover, the Project includes several improvements that will reduce presently existing noise impacts to the surrounding neighborhood including expansion of indoor bus storage that will reduce noise associated with the early morning cold bus starts; increase in servicing capacity to allow servicing to be completed much earlier in the evening; and installation of a new 10-foothigh pre-cast, decorative concrete wall around the perimeter of the expanded campus that will improve security and create a visual and noise buffer between the campus and the surrounding neighborhood. Given its location, the Project will not result in any impacts to water resources. As with existing conditions, stormwater discharged from the Project site will enter a combined sewer that is treated at the City of Rochester’s sewage treatment plant and, thus, no significant adverse impacts to groundwater are expected. Further, as part of the Project, drainage structures, primarily located along the eastern boundary of the Campus, will be replaced as will the storm sewer piping, catch basins and trench drain. The Project will not have a significant adverse impact on historic or archeological resources. The New York State Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation (“SHPO”) confirmed that there are no State/National Register eligible/listed properties on or within the immediate vicinity of the Project site; thus the Project will not affect any historic properties. The Project will involve subsurface disturbance on the residential properties west of the existing campus that have been identified as potentially archaeologically sensitive. Therefore, Phase IB archaeological testing will be conducted in these areas to test for the presence or absence of archaeological resources. The archaeological testing will be implemented when RGRTA has control of the properties, in advance of construction of the Project on those portions of the site. The Phase IB surveys will be undertaken in compliance with applicable standards and guidelines for archaeological surveys, including those promulgated by the SHPO, New York Archaeological Council, and the U.S. Secretary of the Interior. At any locations where archaeological resources are encountered, additional archaeological study will be undertaken in consultation with the SHPO. This will

include determining the National Register eligibility of any resources or sites encountered. If any sites are determined to be eligible for the National Register, then mitigation measures would be implemented for those sites, which could include avoidance or data recovery prior to any project construction at those locations The Project site is not in an area encompassed by agricultural uses, nor is it known to have been devoted to such uses previously. Further, the Project site is not known to be used for recreational purposes, nor is it known to be used as an open space by the community, nor does the Project site contain any views deemed important to the community and, thus, development of the Project will not have any detrimental effect on such views. Moreover, the Project site and associated area is not located in a statutorily defined “critical environmental area” under New York law, nor is the Project site designated or proposed as a “critical habitat” in accordance with federal law. The project will not result in any impacts to threatened or endangered species. There will be minimal impacts to the local infrastructure, including public safety, solid waste and energy. The Project will not create a material conflict with the community’s current land use plans or goals. The Project will continue the present transportation use of the existing Campus site. The twenty-one (21) residential properties that are part of the Project site will be acquired and converted from residential use to transportation use. The enlarged campus will continue the same transportation use that presently exists adjacent to an existing residential neighborhood. Although, the Campus site is being enlarged, the larger campus is proposed to accommodate the existing level of use; no increase in the transportation activities is proposed. As a result, the transportation uses on the enlarged campus will be similarly compatible with the surrounding residential neighborhood. In fact, the improvements proposed as part of the Project, ranging from installation of a new wall, to moving bus servicing indoors, as well as the adequate provision of employee parking on campus, will serve to improve the quality of life in the surrounding neighborhood. The Project will not result in significant adverse impacts to visual and aesthetic conditions. The Project would not result in any significant adverse socioeconomic impacts, including such impacts that would disproportionately effect low-income and minority populations.

DETERMINATION The foregoing represents the RGRTA’s Determination and Findings under Section 204(B) of the Eminent Domain Procedures Law. The parcels identified above are needed to construct and operate the Project RGRTA is satisfied that, as required under Section 204(B) of the Eminent Domain Procedures Law : (1) the public use, benefit, or purpose of the project has been established in the record; (2) the approximate location of the proposed public project has been established and an explanation of the reasons for the selection of that location has been provided; and (3) the general effect of the proposed project on the environment and the residents of the localities in which the project will be located has been comprehensively examined. Accordingly, RGRTA finds that the necessary justification exists to proceed to condemn the parcels identified above. Copies of the determination and findings will be forwarded upon written request without cost. [ NOTICE ] Community Forensic Interventions, LLC (LLC) filed Arts. of Org. with NY Secy. of State (SS) on 9/4/13. LLC’s office is in Monroe Co. SS is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS will mail a copy of any process to LLC’s principal business location at P.O. Box 391, Penfield, NY 14526. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] HOWARD ROAD PROPERTIES, LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 7/25/2013. Office in Monroe Co. SSNY desig. agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 51 Howard Rd., Rochester, NY 14624, which is also the principal business location. Purpose: Any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Juvatek Technology Group, LLC has filed articles of organization with the New York Secretary of State on August 16, 2013 with an effective date of formation of August 16, 2013. Its principal place of business is located at 7825 PittsfordPalmyra Road, Fairport, New York in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent upon whom process may be served. A copy of any process shall be mailed to 7825 Pittsford-Palmyra Road, Fairport, New York 14450. The purpose of the LLC is to engage in any lawful activity for which Limited Liability Companies may be

organized under Section 203 of the New York Limited Liability Company Law. [ NOTICE ] KHG Insurance Agency, LLC has filed articles of organization with the New York Secretary of State on August 23, 2013 with an effective date of formation of August 23, 2013. Its principal place of business is located at 68 Muriel Drive, Rochester, New York in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent upon whom process may be served. A copy of any process shall be mailed to 68 Muriel Drive, Rochester, New York 14612. The purpose of the LLC is to engage in any lawful activity for which Limited Liability Companies may be organized under Section 203 of the New York Limited Liability Company Law. [ NOTICE ] LEGAL NOTICE Notice of Formation of Limited Liability Company 1) Name: Blueprint Educational Consulting Services, LLC. 2) Articles of Organization were filed by Department of State of New York on November 5, 2012. 3) County: Monroe. 4) The Company does not have a specific date of dissolution. 5) the Secretary of State has been designated as an agent upon whom process against the Company may be served. The address to which the process shall be mailed: 62 Notre Dame Drive. Rochester, NY 14623. 6) Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] LNQ LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with SSNY on 04/30/2013. Office location: Monroe county. SSNY is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at 85 Friel Road, Rochester, NY 14623. Purpose: Any lawful activity [ NOTICE ] MELMAR LAND HOLDINGS, LLC, a domestic LLC, filed with the SSNY on 8/12/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Mark Freemesser, 1405 Long Pond Rd., Rochester, NY 14626. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] MORFF, LLC has filed articles of organization with the New York Secretary of State on August 12, 2013 with an effective date of formation of August 12, 2013. Its principal place of business is located at 251 Mystic Lane, Rochester,

New York in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent upon whom process may be served. A copy of any process shall be mailed to 251 Mystic Lane, Rochester, New York 14623. The purpose of the LLC is to engage in any lawful activity for which Limited Liability Companies may be organized under Section 203 of the New York Limited Liability Company Law. [ NOTICE ] Name of LLC: Smoochy Brands, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State: 8/15/13. Office loc.: Monroe Co. Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o Business Filings Inc., 187 Wolf Rd., Ste. 101, Albany, NY 12205, regd. agt. upon whom process may be served. Purpose: any lawful act. [ NOTICE ] Not. of Form. of All Season Services LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with SSNY 8/22/13. Office: Monroe County. SSNY designated Agent of LLC to whom process may be served. SSNY may mail a copy of any process to LLC, 127 N Ridgelawn Drive, Rochester, NY 14617. Purpose any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Not. of Form. of Dichotomy Rochester, LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 06/04/2013. Office Location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom processes against it may be served. SSNY may mail copy of any process to 371 Park Ave Rochester, NY 14607. Purpose: any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Notice is hereby given that a license, number not yet assigned, for a full on premise beer, wine & liquor license has been applied for by San Yu Food Inc dba, Shanghai Restaurant, 2920 W. Henrietta Rd, Rochester, NY 14623, County of Monroe, Town of Henrietta for a restaurant. [ NOTICE ] Notice is hereby given that a license, Serial Number pending, for beer, liquor, and wine has been applied for by the undersigned* to sell beer, liquor, and wine at retail in a restaurant under the Alcoholic Beverage Control Law at 270 Miracle Mile Dr., T/O Henrietta, Rochester, NY 14623 in Monroe County for on premises consumption. *Papaya Properties LLC DBA Papaya Asian Kitchen & Bar


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[ NOTICE ]

Notice of Conversion of Lehigh Station Associates, a partnership, to Lehigh Station Associates, LLC. Certificate filed with NY Dept. of State on 7/22/13. Office location: Monroe County. Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to the principal business address: Lecesse Development Corp., 75 Thruway Park Dr., West Henrietta, NY 14586, Attn: Salvador Lecesse. Purpose: all lawful purposes.

Notice of Formation of 1176 LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 7/23/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 1142 Mt. Hope Ave., Rochester, NY 14620. Purpose: any lawful activities.

[ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of KJN Health & Fitness LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) Nov. 21, 2012. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 60 Almay Road, Rochester, NY 14616. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Pushyourdata LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) August 13, 2013. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 863 Rolins Run Webster, NY 14580 . Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of ROCHESTER ED CONSULTING LLC. Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) on 06/26/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 68 Georgian Court Road, Rochester, NY 14610. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of #2B2 LLC. Arts. Of Org. filed with Sec’y. of State (SSNY) 9/6/2007. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY design. as agent upon whom process against may be served. SSNY shall mail process served to: PO Box 10314, Rochester, NY 14610. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of 111 WEST AVENUE, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 8/14/2013. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 863 Trimmer Road, Spencerport, NY 14559. Purpose: any lawful act.

[ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of 2005 BRIGHT HEN ROAD LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 4/10/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 90 Goodway Drive, Rochester, NY 14623. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of 6F6 LLC. Arts. Of Org. filed with Sec’y. of State (SSNY) 5/28/2010. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY design. as agent upon whom process against may be served. SSNY shall mail process served to: PO Box 10314, Rochester, NY 14610. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of C3C LLC. Arts. Of Org. filed with Sec’y. of State (SSNY) 9/4/2007. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY design. as agent upon whom process against may be served. SSNY shall mail process served to: PO Box 10314, Rochester, NY 14610. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ]

Articles of Organization filed Secretary of State (SSNY) 7/15/2013. Office Location: Monroe County. SSNY Designated as agent of LLC upon who process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 35 Wenham Lane Pittsford, NY 14534. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of DOXY.ME LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 8/21/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, c/o Sammy Feldman, 3445 Winton Place, Ste. 228, Rochester, NY 14623. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of DSDJ, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 7/9/2013. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 91 Baneberry Way, Hilton NY 14468. Purpose: any lawful act. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of E5E LLC. Arts. Of Org. filed with Sec’y. of State (SSNY) 10/2/2009. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY design. as agent upon whom process against may be served. SSNY shall mail process served to: PO Box 10314, Rochester, NY 14610. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ]

Notice of Formation of Course Gems, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 8/20/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o the LLC, Damon Morey LLP, Attn: William F. Savino, Esq., 200 Delaware Ave., Ste. 1200, Buffalo, NY 14202. Purpose: any lawful activity.

Notice of Formation of EAST MOUNTAIN SUNRISE, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 09/16/13. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 25 Farm Field Ln., Pittsford, NY 14534. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Corporation Service Co., 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207. Purpose: Any lawful activity.

[ NOTICE ]

[ NOTICE ]

Notice of formation of CREATIVE CREPES LLC. Art. Of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 3/12/2013. Office in Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, 661 South Ave. Apt 406 Rochester, NY 14620. Purpose: Creperie

Notice of Formation of F & H Development, LLC, Art. Of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 7/17/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 4 Old Ivy Circle Rochester, NY 14624. Purpose: any lawful Activities.

[ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of CSB Solutions LLC

[ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Family First Holdings, LLC. Arts.of Org. filed

with NY Dept. of State on 5/31/13. Office location: Monroe County. United States Corporation Agents, Inc. designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. United States Corporation Agents, Inc. shall mail process to the principal business address of the LLC: 18 Timber Ln, Fairport, NY 14450. Purpose: any lawful activity.

Properties, LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 7/30/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 33 University Ave., Rochester, NY 14605. Purpose: any lawful activities.

[ NOTICE ]

Notice of Formation of INTELLOPS NEW YORK, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 08/13/13. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 120 Moxon Dr., Rochester, NY 14612. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Registered Agents Inc., 90 State St., Ste. 700, Office 40, Albany, NY 12207, regd. agent upon whom and at which process may be served. Purpose: Hold/own real estate.

Notice of Formation of FSI 2005 BRIGHT HEN ROAD LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 4/18/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 90 Goodway Drive, Rochester, NY 14623. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of FSI ADAMS CENTER LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 4/10/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 90 Goodway Drive, Rochester, NY 14623. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of G7G LLC. Arts. Of Org. filed with Sec’y. of State (SSNY) 4/27/2011. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY design. as agent upon whom process against may be served. SSNY shall mail process served to: PO Box 10314, Rochester, NY 14610. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Grovetown Associates LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State (SSNY) 08/30/2013. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 121 University Avenue, Rochester, NY 14605. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of HARVEST MOON PROPERTIES, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 08/30/13. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 359 San Gabriel Dr., Rochester, NY 14610. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Integrity Turnkey

[ NOTICE ]

[ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of MANZLER COTTAGE LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 08/28/13. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 14 Eden Field Rd., Penfield, NY 14526. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Mars Distilling LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 7/16/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 225 Barrington St., Rochester, NY 14607. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of MT. HOPE OPS, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 9/12/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 21 Vineyard Hill, Fairpoint, NY 14450. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of NORTH AMERICAN REALTY TRUST LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 09/12/13. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 902 Broadway, 6th Fl., NY, NY 10010. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, Attn:

Don Trooien at the princ. office of the LLC. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Odyssey Product Development Consulting, LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 7/24/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 10 Brookshire Lane, Penfield, NY 14526. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of PITTFORD OPS, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 9/12/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 21 Vineyard Hill, Fairpoint, NY 14450. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of Purple Properties, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 8/15/2013. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 165 Turk Hill Park, Fairport, NY 14450. Purpose: any lawful act. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of RIT Innovation Hot Spot, LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 8/7/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 154 Lomb Memorial Dr., Rochester, NY 14623. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of ROC CITY ROYALS LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 8/19/2013. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, PO Box 16778, Rochester, NY 14612. Purpose: any lawful act. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of SHINY ASSETS, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 08/15/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Corporation Service

Co., 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207, regd. agent upon whom and at which process may be served. Purpose: Any lawful activity.

Ave., Ste. 1200, Buffalo, NY 14202. Purpose: any lawful activity.

[ NOTICE ]

Notice of Formation of Tap Semiotic LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State on 7/9/13. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 186 Raeburn Avenue, Rochester, NY 14619. SSNY designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: Adam Rains at the princ. office of the LLC. Purpose: all lawful purposes.

Notice of Formation of Sibley II Affliate Leveraged Lender LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 8/7/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: National Corporate Research, Ltd., 10 E. 40th St., 10th Fl., NY, NY 10016, the registered agent upon whom process may be served. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Sibley Redevelopment Phase I LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 8/7/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: National Corporate Research, Ltd., 10 E. 40th St., 10th Fl., NY, NY 10016, the registered agent upon whom process may be served. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Sibley Redevelopment Phase II NMTC LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 8/7/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: National Corporate Research, Ltd., 10 E. 40th St., 10th Fl., NY, NY 10016, the registered agent upon whom process may be served. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of SINGH MART LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY. Art of Org. filed with Secretary of State (SSNY) on July 31st of 2013, Office location: Monroe County, InCorp Services, Inc. is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 1 Commerce Plaza, 99 Washington Ave, Suite 805-A, Albany, NY 12210. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Tailwind Innovation, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 8/21/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o The LLC, Damon Morey LLP, Attn: Richard F. Gioia, Esq., 200 Delaware

[ NOTICE ]

[ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of The Lost Borough Brewing LLC. Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 7/18/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 33 Capri Drive, Rochester, NY 14624. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of YP & YL ROCHESTER 2, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 09/12/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Corporation Service Co., 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207, regd. agent upon whom and at which process may be served. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation: Invenio Recruiting, LLC. Art. of Org. filed with Sec’y. of State of NY (SSNY) on 8/19/2013. Office Location: Monroe County SSNY has been designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 263 Village Lane, Rochester, NY 14610 Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Qual. of Aspect Management LLC, with a fictitious name of Aspect Management Marketing Services, LLC, Auth. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 6/10/13. Office loc.: Monroe County. LLC org. in SC 7/16/03. SSNY desig. as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of proc. to PO Box 23727, Columbia, SC 29224. SC off. addr.: Graham Miller, 405 Oak Brook Dr., Columbia, SC 29223. Art. of Org. on file: SSSC, 1205 Pendleton St., Columbia, SC 29201. Purp.: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of ACC OP (Park Point) LLC.

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[ NOTICE ]

App. for Auth. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 9/12/13. Office location: Monroe County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 9/9/13. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, the registered agent upon whom process may be served. DE address of LLC: 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Arts. of Org. filed with DE Secy. of State, 401 Federal St., Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes.

STRAIGHT EDGE FAMILY WOODWORKING LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY, a domestic LLC, filed with the SSNY on 6/26/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 1229 Crown Point Dr., Webster, NY 14580. General Purposes.

[ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of CLAIRVUE/COTOPS HAMLIN NY LLC. App. for Auth. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 8/20/13. Office location: Monroe County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 8/9/13. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o The LLC, 505 Main St., Hackensack, NJ 07601. DE address of LLC: c/o United Corporate Services, Inc., 874 Walker Road, Ste. C, Dover, DE 19904. Arts. of Org. filed with DE Secy. of State, Townsend Bldg., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: any lawful activity.

[ NOTICE ] SUPREME COURT – COUNTY OF MONROE HSBC BANK, USA, N.A., Plaintiff against MARY A. SCHEEL, RICHARD M. SCHEEL, et al Defendant(s). Pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered on April 8, 2013. I, the undersigned Referee will sell at public auction at the Front Vestibule of the Monroe County Office Building, 39 West Main Street, City of Rochester, N.Y. on the 11th day of October, 2013 at 1:00 p.m. Said premises known as 14 Piping Rock Run, Perinton, N.Y. 14450. Tax account number: SBL # : 167.03-1-43. Approximate amount of lien $ 284,479.62 plus interest and costs. Premises will be sold subject to provisions of filed judgment and terms of sale. Index No. 17819-

09. Paul A. Guerrieri, Esq., Referee. McCabe, Weisberg, & Conway Attorney(s) for Plaintiff 145 Huguenot Street - Suite 210 New Rochelle, New York 10801 (914) 636-8900 [ NOTICE ] Tax Serf Enterprises LLC , Arts of Org filed with the NY Sec. of State (SSNY) on 7/24/13. Office in Monroe County. SSNY designated as an agent of the LLC upon whom process may be served, SSNY shall mail copy to: USCA, Inc., 7014 13th Ave Suite 202, Brooklyn, NY 11228. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] TWIN HORN LLC filed Articles of Organization with the New York Department of State on 8/6/2013. Its office is located in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served and a copy of any process shall be mailed to The LLC, 10 Muirfield Ct., Pittsford, NY 14534. The purpose of the Company is any lawful act. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] Learning Stone, LLC (LLC) filed Arts. of Org.

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with NY Secy. of State (SS) on 7/29/2013. LLC’s office is in Monroe Co. SS is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS will mail a copy of any process to LLC’s principal business location at 9 Tuxford Rd., Pittsford, NY 14534. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] Notice of formation of EvenOdd, LLC (LLC) by way of conversion from a partnership f/k/a EvenOdd Creative. Cert. of Conversion filed with NY Secy. of State (SS) on 8/13/2012. LLC’s office is in Monroe Co. SS is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS will mail a copy of any process to LLC’s principal business location at 32 Delaware St., Rochester, NY 14607. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] THE DALLE GROUP LLC filed Articles of Organization with NY Dept of State (SSNY) on August 8, 2013. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served and a copy of any process shall be mailed to 133 Cabot Road, Rochester, NY 14626. Purpose: Any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] Victor Asset Acquisition, LLC filed Application for Authority with the New York Department of State on August 29, 2013. Its office is located in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent of the Company upon whom process against it may be served and a copy of any process shall be mailed to 230 Crosskeys Office Park, Fairport, NY 14450. The purpose of the Company is any lawful business. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY ] The name of the limited liability company is Heidi Wolf LLC. The Articles of Organization were filed with the NY Secretary of State on August 12, 2013. The office of the LLC is located in Monroe County, New York State. The NY Secretary of State is designated as the agent of the LLC upon whom process against may be served. The address to which a copy of the process served shall be mailed is 4 Commercial Street 2nd Floor, Rochester, NY 14614. The LLC is managed by a manager. The purpose of the LLC is any lawful business. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY ] The name of the LLC is Blue Sky Media Solutions LLC. The Articles of

38 CITY SEPTEMBER 25 - OCTOBER 1, 2013

Organization were filed with the NY Secretary of State on September 9, 2013. The LLC’s office is located in Monroe County, New York State. Process may be serviced on the NY Secretary of State. A copy of the process served shall be mailed to 919 S. Winton Rd, Suite 314, Rochester NY 14618. The LLC is manager-managed. The purpose of the LLC is any lawful business. [ NOTICE OF SALE ] SUPREME COURT COUNTY OF MONROE WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A., Plaintiff, against HERIBERTO HERNANDEZ, et al., Defendant(s). Pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale duly dated 1/2/2013 I, the undersigned Referee will sell at public auction at the front steps of the Monroe County Office Building, 39 West Main Street, City of Rochester, State of New York on 10/15/2013 at 10:00AM, premises known as 1090 Atlantic Avenue, Rochester, NY 14609 All that certain plot piece or parcel of land, with the buildings and improvements erected, situate, lying and being in the City of Rochester, formerly Town of Brighton, County of Monroe and State of New York, SBL NO. 107.81-2-38. Approximate amount of judgment $60,855.27 plus interest and costs. Premises will be sold subject to provisions of filed Judgment Index# 8321/12. Thomas P. Rheinstein, Esq., Referee Gross, Polowy & Orlans, Attorney for Plaintiff, P.O. Box 540, Getzville, NY 14068 Dated: August 12, 2013 1054597 [ NOTICE OF SALE ] SUPREME COURT – COUNTY OF MONROE JPMORGAN CHASE, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, Plaintiff against KATRINA E. SMITH, et al Defendant(s). Pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered on August 9, 2013. I, the undersigned Referee will sell at public auction at the Monroe County Office Bldg., 39 West Main Street, Rochester, N.Y. on the 7th day of October, 2013 at 10:00 a.m. Said premises known as 146 Camberley Place, Penfield, N.Y. 14526. Tax account number: SBL # : 140.091-75.43. Approximate amount of lien $ 144,200.43 plus interest and costs. Premises will be sold subject to provisions of filed judgment and terms of sale. Index No. 17124-09. Nathan Allen Van Loon, Esq., Referee. McCabe, Weisberg, & Conway Attorney(s) for Plaintiff 145 Huguenot Street - Suite 210 New Rochelle, New York 10801 (914) 636-8900

[ NOTICE OF SALE ] SUPREME COURT COUNTY OF MONROE WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A., Plaintiff, against JOHN A. ONDERDONK A/K/A JOHN ONDERDONK, et al., Defendant(s). Pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale duly dated 7/25/2013 I, the undersigned Referee will sell at public auction at the Front Steps Of The Monroe County Office Building, 39 West Main Street, City Of Rochester, NY on 10/21/2013 at 10:00AM, premises known as 3038 Union Street, Town of Ogden, Rochester, NY 14624 All that certain plot piece or parcel of land, with the buildings and improvements erected, situate, lying and being in the Town of Ogden, County of Monroe and State of New York, SBL NO. 131.02-2-24. Approximate amount of judgment $160,771.71 plus interest and costs. Premises will be sold subject to provisions of filed Judgment Index# 2012-13962. James Bell, Esq., Referee Gross, Polowy & Orlans, Attorney for Plaintiff, P.O. Box 540, Getzville, NY 14068 Dated: August 14, 2013 1055455 [ SUMMONS AND NOTICE ] Index No. 2013-864 STATE OF NEW YORK SUPREME COURT MONROE COUNTY AMERICAN TAX FUNDING, LLC, Plaintiff, vs. LAMONT ANTHONY BARTON, JR.; SHEILA GRIFFIN; LINDA BARTON, if living, or if she be dead, her husband, heirs-at-law, next of kin, distributees, executors, administrators, assignees, lienors, creditors, successors-in interest and generally all persons having or claiming under, by or through said LINDA BARTON, by purchase, inheritance, lien or otherwise of any right, title or interest in and to the premises described in the complaint herein, and all creditors thereof, and the respective husbands, or widowers of hers, if any, all of whose names and addresses are unknown to plaintiff; CATHERINE GRIFFIN;MARY GRIFFIN; JAMES O. BARTON, JR.; THE PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK; DAIMLERCHRYSLER SERVICES NORTH AMERICA LLC D/B/A DAIMLERCHRYSLER SERVICES NORTH AMERICA D/B/A CHRYSLER FINANCIAL SERVICES; JACOBSTEIN FOOD SERVICE, LLC; EMPIRE PORTFOLIOS, INC.; MIDLAND FUNDING LLC D/B/A IN NEW YORK AS MIDLAND FUNDING OF DELAWARE LLC; COUNTY OF MONROE and “JOHN DOE #1” THROUGH “JOHN DOE #100”, Defendants. TO THE ABOVE NAMED

DEFENDANTS: YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED to answer the complaint in the above-entitled foreclosure action, and to serve a copy of your answer on plaintiff’s attorney within thirty (30) days after the service of this summons, exclusive of the day of service or within thirty (30) days after completion of service where service is made in any other manner than by personal service within the State. The United States of America, if designated as a defendant in this action, may answer or appear within sixty (60) days of service hereof. In case of your failure to appear or answer, judgment will be taken against you by default for the relief demanded in the complaint. Monroe County is designated as the place of trial. The basis of venue is the location of the subject premises. Dated: August 28, 2013 TO THE ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANTS: The foregoing summons is served upon you by publication, pursuant to an Order of Honorable Richard Dollinger, a Justice of the Supreme Court, dated September 4, 2013, and filed with supporting papers in the Monroe County Clerk’s Office. This is an action to foreclose tax liens covering the premises known as 229 Elmdorf Avenue, City of Rochester, New York and identified as Tax Account Number: 120.81-2-54 (“Tax Parcel”). The relief sought is the sale of the subject property at public auction in satisfaction of the tax liens. In case of your failure to appear, judgment may be taken against you in the sum of $5,884.65, together with interest, costs, disbursements and attorneys’ fees of this action, and directing the public sale of the Tax Parcel. Anthony J. Iacchetta Phillips Lytle LLP Office and Post Office Address 1400 First Federal Plaza Rochester, New York 14614 Tel. No. (585) 2382000 [ SUPPLEMENTAL SUMMONS ] Index No. 13496/2012 SUPREME COURT OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF MONROE Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. Plaintiff, -against- Christina Vega, if living and if any be dead, any and all persons who are spouses, widows, grantees, mortgagees, lienor, heirs, devisees, distributees, or successors in interest of such of the above as may be dead, and their spouses, heirs, devisees, distributees and successors in interest, all of whom and whose names and places of residences are unknown to Plaintiff, Tony Nguyen, Bank of America, NA, HSBC Bank Nevada, NA ASI Direct Merchant Credit Car, Capital One Bank, Palisades Collection, LLC AAO HSBC, Midland Funding LLC, New York

State Department of Taxation and Finance, United States of AmericaInternal Revenue Service, Defendants. Plaintiff designates Monroe County as the place of trial. Venue is based upon the County which the Mortgage premises is situated. TO THE ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANT(S): YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED to answer the Complaint in this action and to serve a copy of your Answer or, if the Complaint is not served with this Summons, to serve a Notice of Appearance on the attorneys for the plaintiff within twenty (20) days after service of this Summons, exclusive of the day of service (or within thirty (30) days after service is complete if this Summons is not personally delivered to you within the State of New York). In case of your failure to appear or answer, judgment will be taken against you by default for the relief demanded in the Complaint. NOTICE OF NATURE OF ACTION AND RELIEF SOUGHT THE OBJECT of the above captioned action is to foreclose a Mortgage to secure $42,166.00 and interest, recorded in the Office of the Clerk of the County of MONROE on May 26,2005, in Book 19687, Page 155, covering premises known as 1503 Jay Street, Rochester, NY 14611. The relief sought in the within action is a final judgment directing the sale of the premises described above to satisfy the debt secured by the Mortgage described above. NOTICE YOU ARE IN DANGER OF LOSING YOUR HOME If you do not respond to this Summons and Complaint by serving a copy of the answer on the attorney for the Mortgage company who filed this foreclosure proceeding against you and filing the answer with the court, a default judgment may be entered and you can lose your home. Speak to an attorney or go to the court where your case is pending for further information on how to answer the Summons and protect your property. Sending a payment to your Mortgage company will not stop this foreclosure action. YOU MUST RESPOND BY SERVING A COPY OF THE ANSWER ON THE ATTORNEY FOR THE PLAINTIFF (MORTGAGE COMPANY) AND FILING THE ANSWER WITH THE COURT.Dated: Williamsville, New York July 16, 2013By: Stephen J. Wallace, Esq. Frenkel, Lambert, Weiss, Weisman & Gordon, LLP Attorneys for Plaintiff 53 Gibson Street Bay Shore, New York 11706 (631) 969-3100 Our File No.:01057030-FOO FILED: MONROE COUNTY CLERK 2013 SEPT 11


Fun [ NEWS OF THE WEIRD ] BY CHUCK SHEPHERD In the public libraries of Seattle (as in most public libraries), patrons are not allowed to eat or sleep (or even appear to be sleeping) or be shirtless or barefoot or have bad body odor or talk too loudly -- because other patrons might be disturbed. However, in Seattle, as the Post-Intelligencer reported in September, librarians do permit patrons to watch hard-core pornography on public computers, without apparent restriction, no matter who (adult or child) is walking by or sitting inches away at the next screen (although librarians politely ask porn-watchers to consider their neighbors). Said a library spokesperson: “(P)atrons have a right to view constitutionally protected material no matter where they are in the building, and the library does not censor.”

Cultural Diversity

— Japan and Korea seem to be the birthplaces in the quest for youthful and beautiful skin, with the latest “elixir” (as usual, based on traditional, centuries-old beliefs) being snail mucus -- applied by specially bred live snails that slither across customers’ faces. The Clinical Salon in central Tokyo sells the 60-minute Celebrity Escargot Course session for the equivalent of about $250 and even convinced a London Daily Telegraph reporter to try one in July. (Previously, News of the Weird has informed readers of Asian nightingale-feces facials and live-fish pedicures.) — Unclear on the Concept: Among people earnestly devoted to palmistry (the foretelling of the future by “expert” examination of the inner surface

of the hand), a few in Japan have resorted to what seems like cheating: altering their palm lines with cosmetic surgery. According to a July Daily Beast dispatch from Tokyo, Dr. Takaaki Matsuoka is a leading practitioner, preferring an electric scalpel over laser surgery in that the latter more often eventually heals over, obviously defeating the purpose. He must be careful to add or move only the lines requested by the patient (e.g., “marriage” line, “romance” line, “money-luck” line, “financial” success line).

Squirrels Gone Wild

Smithsonian magazine detailed in August the exhaustive measures that military officials have taken to finally block relentless Richardson’s ground squirrels from tunneling underneath Malmstrom Air Force Base in Montana and interfering with the Minuteman III intercontinental ballistic missiles on 24/7 standby. For example, officials had to use trial-and-error to plant underground screens deeper into the ground than the squirrels cared to dig. A day after that report was published, a bus driver in Gothenburg, Sweden, crashed into a tree (with six passengers requiring hospital treatment) after swerving to avoid a squirrel in the road. On the same day, a New York Times reporter disclosed that his own news monitoring for 2013 revealed that squirrels have caused 50 power outages in 24 states in the U.S. since Memorial Day after invading electric company substations.

[ LAST WEEK’S SOLUTION ON PAGE 34 ]

[ LOVESCOPE ] BY EUGENIA LAST ARIES (March 21-April 19): Don’t fight the inevitable when it comes to love. Go with your heart, and you’ll work out the little kinks as you go along. Nothing in life is perfect, but what you share with someone can be close enough to make you happy. Embrace the rush of love. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Share the way you feel and what your intentions are. So much can be sorted out if you ask questions. Love is on the rise, and a serious commitment can be made. Do your best to entice the one you love with your best offer. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): You may be interested in someone

you work with, but if the person you want to be with is already attached, you must restrict making a move that has the potential to ruin your reputation or cost you your job. Don’t flirt with danger. CANCER (June 21-July 22): Get out and attend functions that are diverse and will introduce you to people from all walks of life. The chance to indulge in activities and events that sponsor different cultures will bring you in touch with someone unique and alluring. Love is in the stars. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Passion will be your middle name, but unfortunately, it will be

coupled with trouble. Together, that can lead to a provocative situation that ends up costing you emotionally and financially. Don’t put your reputation at risk. Keep your distance from anyone who takes advantage of your generosity. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Participate and join in on the fun. Getting out and socializing will lead to love. A blind date or meeting someone at a convention or through a reputable dating service will work well for you as long as you don’t let your emotions take over. Slow down -- true love takes time. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): You’ll be tempted to take a backward

step when it comes to love. Remember the reason why the relationship didn’t work the first time around. Control issues are likely to arise along with indulgences that were not easy to deal with in the past. Look before you leap. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Good fortune and personal gains will come with the right relationship. Sharing your goals with someone as unique as you will enable you to build a wonderful, long-lasting relationship that enhances what you are both trying to achieve. Love and commitment are in the stars. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Fickleness will be the culprit

that makes a relationship difficult for you. An inability to be monogamous or to be honest regarding your true feelings is likely to lead to an emotional roller coaster ride when it comes to love relationships. Don’t make promises you don’t intend to keep. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): You will attract equality when it comes to your personal relationships. Your confidence will attract partners who can match you every step of the way. The person who has the most in common with you and similar life goals will go the distance. Together you will find satisfaction and happiness.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Steer clear of anyone trying to railroad you into a commitment. You need time to discover friendship and to experiment with love before you make a promise that will tie you up mentally, physically and financially. Be honest as to what you have to offer. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Display your passion along with whatever else you have to offer, and you will attract partners ready to meet you halfway. Don’t let distance deter you from choosing the right partner. Someone closer may not be as into you. Make your choice based on love, not convenience.

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 39


40 CITY SEPTEMBER 25 - OCTOBER 1, 2013


September 25 - October 1, 2013 - City Newspaper