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Truancy tests RCSD’s credibility [ NEWS, PAGE 6 ]

Campaign mystery mail [ NEWS, PAGE 4 ]

City’s 2012 South Wedge-Ucation [ OFFERS, PAGE 33 ]

Best of Rochester 2012 [ DETAILS, PAGE 23 ]

SEPTEMBER 12-18, 2012 • FREE • GREATER ROCHESTER’S ALTERNATIVE NEWSWEEKLY • VOL 42 NO 1 • NEWS. MUSIC. LIFE.

Feedback We welcome your comments. Send them to themail@ rochester-citynews.com, or post them on our website, rochestercitynewspaper.com, our Facebook page, or our Twitter feed, @roccitynews. Comments of fewer than 350 words have a greater chance of being published, and we do edit selections for publication in print. We don’t publish comments sent to other media.

‘The Best’ accessibility

On a simplistic level, candidates running for election supply rudimentary information for voters so they can make an educated decision and choose the person best suited for the job. If I cannot gain access to what a candidate is selling, I’m not going to buy it. The same holds true with The Best of Rochester primary ballot selection. On the surface, The Best of Rochester is a fun way to support local businesses by telling its readers that these businesses were voted The Best by consumers visiting those establishments. It gives the impression that the winners are the best Rochester has to offer. I look forward to filling out the primary ballot for the choice of The Best of Rochester. I enjoy supporting city vendors. Unfortunately, some vendors will not be getting my vote – not because they are not a great music venue, or do not have the best hamburgers, or do not provide trendy boutique clothing. It is because they are not wheelchair accessible and I’m a wheelchair user. I cannot access their establishment. There have been several inaccessible city businesses that I have not been able to access this summer. One offers a service I won in a raffle. I ended up giving the certificate to an able-bodied friend. The next two, a phenomenal music venue and a brand-new boutique, operate in locations that were “grandfathered in.” In the case of the music venue, I got my money back for the ticket I had purchased. Although I did purchase earrings from the  City

boutique, it was outside the store on the sidewalk. The boutique owner tried her best to accommodate me, but I think Rochester can do better. Surely, the City of Rochester can provide reasonably accessible options to new businesses and their potential customers who use wheelchairs. In the meantime, it would be fantastic if the final Best of ballot consisted of locations that wheelchair users can actually visit. Most inaccessible city businesses do not even supply a temporary or portable ramp or an entrance without steps, an accessible path, and a doorway wide enough for a wheelchair user to enter. Shouldn’t The Best of Rochester final selection reflect the businesses that go the extra mile to provide service to all customers inside the store? The winners should reflect businesses that actually act upon the spirit of the Americans with Disabilities Act, the civil rights act that was enacted in 1990 to prevent discrimination against persons with disabilities who want to access public accommodations and commercial facilities. And by extension, the City of Rochester should assist these small businesses to become the very best that Rochester should be offering. TERESA CARROLL, ROCHESTER

Should we, could we ban guns?

Regarding “Why Not Ban Guns?” (Urban Journal): We tried banning alcohol, and that led to the rise of the crime lords and the murder of innocent citizens. The “war” on drugs, terror, and poverty led to government programs that haven’t made us safer or reduced drug use or its terrible consequences. And we still have people in poverty 40 years after the “Great Society” vision of President Johnson. Both Chicago and New York City have gun bans that prevent law-abiding citizens from possessing

SEPTEMBER 12-18, 2012

that firearm. Neither city has effectively reduced the violence when a determined person wants a gun. Shutting down gun shops, gun shows, and firearm manufacturers will only repeat the failures of prohibition. Wishing for a utopian society where guns don’t exist except in the hands of the police or military is a waste of a time. Not all police or the military are squeaky clean. Look at all the abuse cases in the newspapers or on TV. Look at the reports of the Mexican police and military selling their USsupplied firearms to drug lords and terrorist gangs. Maybe what’s needed is a return to some age-old morals. Maybe society has to change and insist that we don’t lie, cheat, steal, or kill our neighbors. Maybe we should crack down on the corrupt politicians, bankers, lawyers, and business “elite.” Maybe society has to set a better example first. That’s a lot of work, and it’s much easier to sit in front of the TV, computer, or Twitter and worry who’s been bounced from the dancing contest or the loser house. Come to think of it, maybe that’s what “they” want. JEFF SLOWIK, FAIRPORT

Why not just ban all guns altogether? Let me cite a few reasons. 1) Why not ban free speech so that all those people who have terrible ideas would no longer be heard? What constitutes a terrible idea? How about going against the Constitution? The Second Amendment does talk about the need for a militia to resist the worst of government. But read exact wording says “the right of the people to keep and bear arms shall not be infringed.” Seems as if the framers were being pretty specific, not about the type of guns (like muskets versus semiautomatics) but about the rights of common people to put food on their table or protect themselves from any threat.

2) Here’s a great analogy to Ms. Towler’s proposed gun ban: let’s make drugs illegal. Then there wouldn’t be any drugs available either, right? Forget about those pesky cartels in Mexico. They’d never sell drugs here in this country. The “War on Drugs” is over 100 years old. Anyone see an imminent victory? 3) New York City has the toughest gun laws in the nation, followed by New York State. But who obeys laws? Only law-abiding citizens. Those daily city shootings would continue because most of the people killing each other are doing so with illegal guns. Maybe after 100 years of a total ban, there would be no illegal guns. I’d have more faith in finding the tooth fairy or some unicorns or even the treasure of the Sierra Madre. 4) Hunters and targetshooting sportsmen and women would have to find some other hobby? New York State makes a lot of money from selling hunting licenses and from assorted taxes on ammo, equipment, etc. A good deal of that money goes to pay for conservation-related programs. “Are those pleasures worth the cost of the repeated carnage - on streets, in homes, in offices, by mentally stable and mentally ill alike?” What if all law-abiding sportsmen surrendered their guns and target shooting was no longer allowed yet the carnage continued? (See Point 2 or 3.) 5) Rational discussions about gun bans generally miss the target. If someone has the mindset to do damage to others, there’s little that can stop them. Instead of a gun, a car could certainly take out a crowd of people. Perhaps a law like the one that compels health-care providers to report child abuse could work in the mental-health arena. But I think right most psychiatrists and NP’s are likely reporting to law enforcement if someone says they plan to harm themselves or others. Until someone does say just that, there’s not much recourse.

6) This is a vexing problem. As a legal, lawabiding long gun owner, I’m sickened whenever one of these individuals uses a gun in pursuit of their demons. However, suggesting more feel-good laws that do nothing is a waste of time. This may be akin to asking “which came first, the chicken or the egg?” Around and around we go and never get anywhere close to the tail we so vigorously chase. BOB FISCHL, HONEOYE FALLS

Wasn’t the movie theater shooting a “gun free zone”? How did taking guns away from the law-abiding people make them safer? And having the police protect us worked out so well in New York City, where all nine bystanders shot were shot by police. Do we take away their guns too? And will Bloomberg give up his armed security guards? Or are some people more deserving of protection than others? LANCER

Posted on rochestercitynewspaper.com

Joe Biden’s ‘chains’ comment

On a reader’s web comment on a News Blog post: Bart speaks baloney. Biden spoke the truth when he said that getting rid of Obama’s health-care reform would “put you back in chains” – as he spelled out, the old chains of health-insurance companies refusing claims, leaving millions more unable to afford health care. Of the four top candidates, Biden’s the only one who tells the whole truth. GIL FRENCH, ROCHESTER

News. Music. Life. Greater Rochester’s Alternative Newsweekly September 12-18, 2012 Vol 42 No 1 250 North Goodman Street Rochester, New York 14607-1199 themail@rochester-citynews.com phone (585) 244-3329 fax (585) 244-1126 rochestercitynewspaper.com On the cover: Illustration by Matt DeTurck Publishers: William and Mary Anna Towler Editor: Mary Anna Towler Asst. to the publishers: Matt Walsh Editorial department themail@rochester-citynews.com Features editor: Eric Rezsnyak News editor: Christine Carrie Fien Staff writers: Tim Louis Macaluso, Jeremy Moule Music editor: Willie Clark Music writer: Frank De Blase Calendar editor: Rebecca Rafferty Contributing writers: Kate Antoniades, Paloma Capanna, Casey Carlsen, Roman Divezur, George Grella, Susie Hume, Andy Klingenberger, Dave LaBarge, Kathy Laluk, Michael Lasser, James Leach, Ron Netsky, Dayna Papaleo, Rebecca Rafferty, David Yockel Jr. Art department artdept@rochester-citynews.com Production manager: Max Seifert Designers: Aubrey Berardini, Matt DeTurck Photographers: Frank De Blase, Matt DeTurck, Michael Hanlon Advertising department ads@rochester-citynews.com Advertising sales manager: Betsy Matthews Account executives: Tom Decker, Annalisa Iannone, William Towler Classified sales representatives: Christine Kubarycz, Tracey Mykins Operations/Circulation info@rochester-citynews.com Circulation Manager: Katherine Stathis Distribution: Andy DiCiaccio, David Riccioni, Northstar Delivery, Wolfe News City Newspaper is available free of charge. Additional copies of the current issue may be purchased for $1, payable in advance at the City Newspaper office. City Newspaper may be distributed only by authorized distributors. No person may, without prior written permission of City Newspaper, take more than one copy of each weekly issue. City (ISSN 1551-3262) is published weekly by WMT Publications, Inc. Periodical postage paid at Rochester, NY (USPS 022-138). Send address changes to City, 250 North Goodman Street, Rochester, NY 14607. City is a member of the Association of Alternative Newsweeklies and the New York Press Association. Subscriptions: $35.00 ($30.00 for senior citizens) for one year. Add $10 yearly for out-of-state subscriptions: add $30 yearly for foreign subscriptions. Due to the initial high cost of establishing new subscriptions, refunds for fewer than ten months cannot be issued. Copyright by WMT Publications Inc., 2012 - all rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, photocopying, recording or by any information storage retrieval system without permission of the copyright owner.

urban journal | by mary anna towler Summer tomato salad • 6

One nation indivisible? For diehard Republicans and Democrats, the political conventions probably provided a lot of excitement. But I’m left with a real sense of unease, and not just about the economy or the outcome of the November election. I’m really, really worried about where we’re headed for the foreseeable future – and whether we can manage to govern ourselves. Watching both conventions, you couldn’t help feeling that you were looking at people from two different countries. The difference – in age, in ethnicity, in philosophy – was stark. And unfortunately, the conventions were simply a reflection of America: in a very real sense, we’re living in two different universes. This isn’t new, obviously. There were strong divisions at the nation’s founding. And we fought a civil war over our divisions. Nor is this the only time that deep divisions have been strengthened – and radicalized – by highly partisan, often loopy media. Right now, though, I’m not finding much solace in history. In our better moments, we have come together – enough of us that government could get things done, anyway. I don’t see that happening any time soon. As I mentioned in a blog last week, you can find some depressing insight into all this in Ryan Lizza’s “The Obama Memos: The Making of a Post-PostPartisan Presidency,” a New Yorker article from late January. “Congress is polarized largely because Americans live in communities of likeminded people who elect more ideological representatives,” Lizza wrote. “Obama’s rhetoric about a nation of common purpose and values no longer fits this country: there really is a red America and a blue America.” And, Lizza said: “Polarization also has affected the two parties differently. The Republican Party has drifted much farther to the right than the Democratic Party has drifted to the left.” The divisions we’re seeing in Washington, then, aren’t just a political game. As Ramesh Ponnuru noted on a recent Morning Edition on NPR, there are “deep-seated differences between the parties on a lot of the issues.” Neither party, Ponnuru warned, seems inclined to set aside those differences. If Obama wins, he’ll feel that he has a mandate for his policies. And Democrats may assume that Republicans will start cooperating after a Romney loss because

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In our better moments in history, we have come together. I don’t see that happening any time soon.” they think their obstruction has been based on politics, not principle. But, said Ponnuru, they’re wrong. The Republicans he talks to, he said, believe what they say, deeply. If Romney loses, Ponnuru predicted, Republicans will feel it was because he was too moderate. And if they control one or both house of Congress, they’ll believe just as strongly as Obama that they have a mandate to follow through on what they’ve said. So unless one party wins both the White House and strong control of Congress, we’re in for more gridlock. We’re still nearly two months away from the election. At the conventions, both parties were preaching to the choir. Maybe the debates will influence voters, but there seem very few voters willing to be influenced. Most of us decided long ago which choir we’re in. So much is at stake in this election. If Republicans win big enough to do what they say they’ll do, they’ll approach the economy in a vastly different way than Democrats will. They’ll cut taxes on the wealthy and corporations, ramp up defense spending, weaken environmental regulations, ignore the signs of climate change, get rid of the Affordable Care Act, weaken Medicaid, start privatizing Medicare, appoint more Supreme Court Justices like Antonin Scalia, worsen our relationship with China, embrace more military interventions abroad, and begin the process of Constitutional Amendments banning abortion and limiting marriage to heterosexual couples. And if observers like Ramesh Ponnuru and Ryan Lizza are correct, a Republican president and a Republican Congress will be doing exactly what many Americans want them to do. We have a lot more challenges than the divisions in Washington.

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[ news from the week past ]

Pol’s son charged

William Reilich Jr., son of Monroe County Republican Committee chair Bill Reilich, was charged with unemployment fraud, reported the Democrat and Chronicle. Reilich Jr. is accused of collecting $7,700 worth of unemployment benefits while working for Monroe County. In a statement, Bill Reilich said he’s disappointed in his son’s actions, but he’ll support his son’s decision to return to gambling addiction treatment. He also said that his son has made full restitution.

More Kodak cuts

Eastman Kodak will lay off 1,000 employees before the end of 2012 on top of the 2,700 employees the company has already laid off this year, says a report by the Wall Street Journal. The job cuts are expected to save the company $330 million, and some experts say more cuts are likely to follow. The company is also replacing CFO Antoinette McCorvey with Rebecca Roof, director of the company handling the Kodak bankruptcy restructuring.

Golisano Children’s Hospital, a 245,000 square foot, eight-story building on Crittenden Boulevard. The $145-million project includes a 60-bed Neonatal Intensive Care Unit and 52 pediatric rooms. A pediatric surgery unit is also planned.

News

Weak jobs report

The Department of Labor issued a sobering jobs report for August. The nation’s economy added only 96,000 jobs last month, down from the 141,000 added in July. Though unemployment fell slightly from 8.3 to 8.1 percent last month, economists say the dip is due to the growing number of Americans who have stopped looking for work.

POLITICS | BY JEREMY MOULE

Campaign mystery mail Some voters in the 55th State Senate District have received campaign mailers ripping Democratic candidate Ted O’Brien for failing to take ethics training required as a member of the Monroe County Legislature. The mailers are factually wrong. O’Brien did take the training and he’s got the documentation to prove it. But the mailings highlight a bigger issue beyond misstatements and garden-variety campaign mudslinging: they exploit flaws in New York State’s campaign finance laws that allow groups and individuals to attack candidates while the attackers remain anonymous.

Wait, what…?

City of Rochester employees driving city-owned vehicles committed at least 119 red-light violations over the last 18 months, reported the Democrat and Chronicle. The violators may be disciplined, the report says, but because of union contracts, they will not have to pay the customary fine.

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Democratic State Senate candidate Ted O’Brien has been targeted by a shadow group. FILE PHOTO

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In this case, the mailings say that they were paid for by an entity called Common Sense. But the Virginia address on the mailings belongs to CT Corporation, a firm that serves as a registered agent for businesses. The Common Sense website, www.commonsenseprinciples.com, says nothing about who’s behind the organization, just that it’s a small-government group inspired by Thomas Paine’s “Common Sense” pamphlet. The site appears to be devoted to attacking a handful of Democratic candidates for New York State Senate.

“Real organizations tell you who they are,” says Susan Lerner, executive director of Common Cause New York. And Common Sense probably won’t have to report its donors because it seems to be sticking to issue ads, which don’t directly encourage viewers to vote for or against a specific candidate. “The unknown organization that is behind this ad doesn’t have to tell the public anything,” Lerner says. O’Brien’s opponent in the Senate race, Republican Sean Hanna, has continues on page 6

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Author Noah Andre Trudeau says that in the rush to get to “the big story” — the assassination — writers and historians tend to gloss over the crucial last few weeks of Lincoln’s life. Trudeau is trying to fill in that gap for his upcoming book and, he says, Rochester residents might be able to help.

HISTORY | BY CHRISTINE CARRIE FIEN

DEVELOPMENT | BY CHRISTINE CARRIE FIEN

Looking for Lincoln It’s hard to imagine that any part of President Abraham Lincoln’s life remains unexamined. If he’s not the most writtenabout president, the Great Emancipator certainly must be high on the list. But Noah Andre Trudeau, author of several books about the Civil War, says that in the rush to get to “the big story” — the assassination — writers and historians tend to give short shrift to the crucial last few weeks of Lincoln’s life. Trudeau is trying to fill in that gap in his upcoming book and, he says, Rochester residents might be able to help. At the invitation of General Ulysses S. Grant, Lincoln left Washington to visit City Point, Virginia — now Hopewell — on March 23, 1865. City Point was the Union Army’s headquarters during the Siege of Petersburg. Lincoln returned to Washington on April 9, and was shot on April 14, 1865. The time at City Point is significant, Trudeau says, because the Civil War was ending and Lincoln’s role as president was undergoing a fundamental shift. “I think, in a way, we’ve missed one of the greatest stories of his presidency,” Trudeau says. “He transformed himself from a war president to a Reconstruction

Skepticism on Sibley deal

president, and I think the essential change happens during the visit. I think when he comes back to Washington, he’s not the same president he was when he left.” You know who. FILE PHOTO How does Rochester fit in? The 1st New York Light Artillery Regiment, Battery L, which was organized in Rochester, was in Petersburg while Lincoln was at nearby City Point. In fact, Rochester resident Major George Breck, who was in charge of the regiment, spotted Lincoln on a train as Breck made his way back to Petersburg from leave. Trudeau says he believes there’s more information about Lincoln’s activities from March 23 to April 9 buried in family collections, maybe in the form of diaries or letters. If you have information to share with Trudeau, go to www.lincoln1865.com

Some City Council members are concerned that the proposal to sell the Sibley building to an entity to be formed by Winn Development might be too similar to the deal that has trapped the building and the city in limbo for years. | Mayor Tom Richards has announced an agreement to sell the Sibley building for $5 million to the company for retail, offices, and housing. | But at a meeting last week, Council members — who must sign off on the deal — said the proposal is overly complex and seems to give too much discretion to the mayor. The deal would allow the mayor to adjust the interest rate and “other terms and conditions” of an outstanding $3.1-million loan that Winn has agreed to take responsibility for. | That the building would be sold to a company formed by Winn — and not Winn itself — raised warning signs for some Council members. | The building is currently owned by Rochwil Associates, a limited liability corporation that owes the city more than $20 million, but has no resources to pay that debt, Richards says. | Council members said they want to make sure the city isn’t walking into a similar situation if the Winn entity can’t make a go of the building.

Cost of War AFGHANISTAN TOTALS —

2114 US servicemen and servicewomen and 1,057 Coalition servicemen and servicewomen have been killed in Afghanistan from the beginning of the war and occupation to September 7. Statistics for Afghan civilian casualties are not available. American casualties from August 27 to September 3: -- Spc. Kyle R. Rookey, 23, Oswego, N.Y. -- Staff Sgt. Jeremie S. Border, 28, Mesquite, Texas -- Staff Sgt. Jonathan P. Schmidt, 28, Petersburg, Va. -- Lance Cpl. Alec R. Terwiske, 21, Dubois, Ind. -- Pfc. Shane W. Cantu, 20, Corunna, Mich. iraqbodycount.org, icasualties.org, Department of Defense. SOURCES:

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EDUCATION | BY TIM LOUIS MACALUSO

Truancy tests RCSD’s resolve The Rochester school district kicked off the new school year with what officials say is a serious crackdown on attendance and truancy. The new effort, which is loosely based on a program used successfully in other New York school districts, will involve the broader community. Officials say that poor attendance and high truancy rates are at least partly to blame for the Rochester district’s consistently low graduation rate, and there have been many unsuccessful efforts over the years to address these issues. Many students miss so much instruction that they cannot perform at grade level in core subjects without remedial help. But solving the problems has been extremely difficult, and efforts are often complicated by the district’s shoddy recordkeeping. Some schools have students on the rolls who no longer live within the district. And officials recently discovered that a sophisticated attendance software program automatically records students as present, unless teachers manually change the status. Mayor Tom Richards says getting accurate attendance numbers is crucial to the credibility of the district’s new truancy program. “We’re never going to get people to help us and participate if we’re not credible,” he says. Truancy is generally defined as 20 or more

unexcused or unexplained absences in a school year. Anita Murphy, the Rochester district’s deputy superintendent, says that on any given day, about 3,000 students or 10 percent of the district’s nearly 30,000 students may be absent. And she says that as many as 50 percent of students may be truant over the course of a school year, meaning they may have missed at least 20 days for unexplained reasons. The new program is loosely based on what district officials call the “Yonkers Model,” a comprehensive approach to chronic truancy designed by Karl Bertrand, president of Program Design and Development, a consulting firm to public schools and municipalities. Rochester officials met with Bertrand, who provided them with a report showing dramatic results in the Yonkers and Mt. Vernon school systems. The Yonkers Model assumes that school districts cannot solve truancy problems on their own, and that city and county services are integral to the approach. Before launching the Rochester program, school officials met with social  City

SEPTEMBER 12-18, 2012

service providers, as well as county and city officials, says Superintendent Bolgen Vargas. Rochester’s new program initially focuses on grades K to 3 to give officials time to develop it, and to quickly correct any problems that arise. The first step is to implement careful and consistent attendancetaking, Murphy says. Specific steps will be taken when students miss school. For instance, after a student misses three consecutive days, a letter will go home to his or her parents. After five days, district officials will The new truancy program is not meant to criminalize anyone, says Anita Murphy, deputy superintendent of Rochester schools. PHOTO BY LAUREN PETRACCA visit the student’s home. Intervention continues to form of child neglect or abuse to CPS. White recalls the failure of a previous increase with the goal of finding out why the That includes educational neglect, which truancy effort between the district and student isn’t in school. in the Yonkers Model can trigger an the city. “The whole point is figuring out what investigation by the agency. Rochester’s “We had a truancy resolution back with the problem is and getting kids the help school officials have historically been [former superintendent] Manny Rivera for they need,” Murphy says. “The United Way reluctant to use this approach. spending $1 million with the Rochester is going to provide us with a list of agencies That’s partly because some parents may Police Department,” White says. But the that can provide services to families once simply not understand how important plan got bogged down in a dispute over we’ve figured out the problem.” attendance is, especially for students in the who paid for the police officers, he says, Another option, though lower grades, says Superintendent Vargas. and a confrontation over the Maintenance Superintendent Bolgen Vargas says it’s a Vargas was one of the state’s superintendents of Effort Law. The MOE requires the city last resort, is contacting Child Protective who pushed the Legislature to make to provide the district with about $119.2 Services when parents neglect to send kindergarten attendance mandatory in New million in annual funding. their children to school. York. The law was approved earlier this year. And White questions the district’s An important note: the district’s new Children need to be reading at grade management capabilities, since the problems procedures, called the “Attendance and level by the time they reach third grade, with attendance and truancy have been Absenteeism Rules and Responsibility” have Vargas says. Poor attendance in the lower known for years. He says he began hearing not yet been reviewed by the school board, so grades impedes developing reading skills, he parents’ complaints more than a decade some steps may change. says, and worse, it establishes a pattern of ago: a child hadn’t been to school for days, poor attendance. but nobody from the district contacted the Some members of the school board are But successful truancy reduction programs parents to let them know. concerned about involving CPS in the new like the Yonkers Model rely heavily on taking “This is not rocket science,” White says. truancy effort. A program that is perceived forceful action sooner, with continuous “They’ve got ‘X’ number of kids who aren’t as too punitive or as criminalizing parents follow-up on students and their families in their seats. This is not about poverty, and or students may not succeed, says board once the problem has been identified. The it’s not a matter of personnel or technology member Van White, because many minority programs require rigorous management and availability. The problem is the job isn’t communities are already skeptical of these coordination between many organizations, getting done.” institutions. which board member White says has been a But Murphy says criminalization is not problem for the district in the past. the intent of the program. “People live and work in silos,” he “The whole point is to get kids to come says. “The walls are built on things to school, not criminalize them,” she says. like confidentiality that say they can’t Still, district officials, including communicate with the people working in teachers are required by law to report any other silos.”

Mystery mail continues from page 4

A mailer sent out by Common Sense. FILE PHOTO

repudiated the mailings and said that he and his campaign had nothing to do with them. Neither he nor his campaign have any connection to the Common Sense group, Hanna said. Common Sense was also active in 2010 when it targeted six Democratic candidates for State Senate. The Watertown Daily Times reported on a flier that Common Sense mailed out and said the flier’s targets mirrored those of the State Senate Republican Campaign Committee. That piece also took the form of an issue ad, and the state’s campaign finance database shows no filings from Common Sense. State ethics reform legislation enacted in 2011 was supposed to address the issue-ad loophole. It required the Board of Elections to draft new regulations that included reporting requirements for any person or organization funding an issue ad. Those regulations still haven’t been finalized and even if they were, they’d be too late to do any good this year, says Bill Mahoney, research coordinator for New York Public Interest Research Group. And Lerner says that the draft regulations as currently written are still too weak and would continue to exempt issue ads.

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For more Tom Tomorrow, including a political blog and cartoon archive, visit http://thismodernworld.com

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Urban Action This week’s calls to action include the following and activities. (All are free and open to the public, unless otherwise noted.)

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The North Winton Village Association meets at 5 p.m. on Wednesday, September 12, to discuss residents’ concerns about East High School students. The city school district’s chief of staff, Patricia Malgieri, will be at the meeting, which is at the association’s office, 1933 East Main Street.

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Ontario-St. Lawrence teleconference

The International St. Lawrence River Board of Control holds a teleconference regarding this year’s water levels for Lake Ontario and the St. Lawrence Seaway at 7 p.m. on Tuesday, September 18. The board deals with issues related

to shared waterway borders. Residents can join the conversation. Call toll free 1-(877)-413-4814, and enter access code 3121346.

Talk on church and technology

The Asbury First United Methodist Church hosts the Rev. Nadia Bolz-Weber to discuss “Millennial Culture, Authority, and Technology in the Service of the Gospel” at 7 p.m. on Wednesday, September 12. Bolz-Weber will talk about using technology to reach people who are often overlooked by the church. The event is at 1050 East Avenue. Cost: $10.

Presentation on Rochester’s economy

The Rochester Downtown Development Corporation presents “The State of Rochester’s Economy” from 11:45 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. on Thursday, Sep-

tember 27. Gary Keith, economist with M&T Bank, and Kent Gardner, director of research at the Center for Governmental Research will discuss the local economy. The event is at the Hyatt Regency Rochester, 125 East Main Street. Tickets: $45 for RDDC members, $50 for non-members. Reservations: 546-6920 or rddc@rddc.org.

Future of middle class discussed

RIT hosts economic expert Jeff Faux to discuss the findings in his latest book, “The Servant Economy: Where America’s Elite is Sending the Middle Class.” The event is at 4 p.m. on Tuesday, September 18, in James E. Booth Hall. A book discussion will follow, led by Vincent Serravallo, RIT associate professor of sociology, and Bill Johnson, professor of society-public policy.

Dining Saturday until 1 a.m. Lunch served MondayFriday until 3 p.m., dinner served 4:30-10 p.m., Friday-Saturday until 11 p.m. Food prices range from $5.95 to $24.95. For more information, call 270-5460 or visit tratarochester.com.

Taco time

The multilevel dining room (left) and the caprese burger (right) at TRATA. PHOTOs BY MATT DETURCK

Go big [ CHOW HOUND ] BY DAYNA PAPALEO

I stopped mid-sentence, absorbed by one of those across-a-crowded-room moments. My friend Jen saw where my attention was now directed, and she was a little intrigued as well. Our eyes followed this super-sexy heap of buttermilk fried chicken, fluffy whipped potatoes, and an ethereal biscuit ($15.95) as it made its way to one lucky diner perched at the big bar anchoring the first floor of TRATA, also known as (and an acronym for) The Restaurant At The Armory. The patron in question noticed our slack jaws and even kindly offered us a taste, but we demurred, content with our generous portion of juicy chicken fingers ($7.95) served with whole-grain honey mustard. But as I took a refreshing pull off of my fruity Lambic Bellini ($5.50), I silently plotted my next visit. Perhaps one of the more inspired repurposings of a local structure, TRATA occupies three floors of the former Culver Road Armory, now a mixed-use space that also houses an art gallery along with professional offices. It’s the latest venture from restaurateur Charlie Fitzsimmons, who shuffled talent like chef Aaron Bolton and general manager Allie Greco from his highend Black & Blue eateries over to TRATA, which Greco describes as “casual upscale.” Surprisingly elegant despite The Armory’s utilitarian roots, TRATA incorporates the exposed brick and rustic woods into its multilevel layout. The restaurant can seat more than 300 people, and features a cozy second-floor lounge area, a soon-to-open rooftop beer

garden, and expansive windows that overlook Cobbs Hill Park. And the food? “Contemporary American,” says Greco. “Anyone can find something they like.” TRATA serves up its take on timeless comforts like pigs in a blanket ($6.95) and loaded fries ($11.95) and deliciously towering burgers done six different ways ($11.95). But our country’s proverbial melting pot is especially evident in inventive appetizers like a quesadilla that fills housemade tortillas with duck confit, gruyere, dried cranberries, and sage mascarpone ($9.95). A couple of soups and a handful of salads round out the small plates; I was totally smitten with a vivid green Brussels sprouts salad, which tosses the poached-then-chilled leaves with sweet cherry tomatoes, smoky bacon, crispy truffled shallots, and an asiago-lemon vinaigrette ($7.95). The entrées offer playful twists on classic tastes as well; a thick-cut yellow-fin tuna steak is seared with black and pink peppercorns and bedded down on “an old-school noodle casserole” ($24.95), while twin 4 oz. beef tenderloins, a mushroom and puff pastry napoleon, and sherry-porcini cream evoke a deconstructed Wellington ($18.95). The wine and beer lists are both extensive and informative (and that 4 oz. draft is a smart option), while the nicely priced craft-cocktail menu incorporates top-shelf liquors, beers, housemade mixers, and fresh herbs and fruits. And by the way, I was able to get back for that fried chicken. It was worth waiting for. TRATA is located at 145 Culver Road. It is open Sunday-Thursday 11 a.m.-midnight; Friday-

Say “¡Hola!” to the roomy outpost of Itacate in the former location of Los Amigos at 1859 Penfield Road. The flagship stand inside the Buffalo Road Arrowmart gas station remains open, as the new space enables the Abarca family to build on its popular taco and burrito offerings with traditional dishes illustrating Mexico’s culinary diversity. The Yucatan Peninsula in the south is represented by Grilled Pollo En Axiote ($9), chicken bathed in a bright blend of achiote paste, orange, garlic, and cumin, while the northeast city of Tampico gets a nod in Carne Asade a la Tampiqueña ($13.50), skirt steak marinated in lime juice and spices and served with a cheese enchilada, poblano rajas, grilled queso fresco, and guacamole. A liquor license is in the works, too. Itacate is open MondaySaturday 11:30 a.m.-10 p.m. Call 586-8454 or visit itacate.net.

Fair fare

As part of its annual fundraiser, the Greater Rochester Celiac Support Group will host a Gluten-Free Food Fair at Monroe Community College on Saturday, September 22, 11:30 a.m.-3 p.m. The event will feature samplings of gluten-free goods, educational workshops, as well as a bake-off in which local companies compete with their best gluten-free products. Visit rochesterceliacs.org for further info.

Openings

Our own Genesee Brewery, one of the largest and oldest continually operating breweries in the United States, recently opened the Genesee Brew House at 25 Cataract St. on the St. Paul Street campus. The Brew House features interactive exhibits, multimedia content, a gift shop, and a pub-style restaurant. For more details call 263-9200 or visit geneseebrewhouse.com. Named in honor of the year — and located on the site — that Susan B. Anthony was arrested for casting her then-illegal vote, profits from the new 1872 Café at 431 W. Main St. will go toward Spiritus Christi Church’s community outreach efforts. Call 730-7687 for more information. The successful and yummy Monte Alban Mexican Grill has expanded yet again, opening a third location at routes 441 and 250 in the space that housed The Duchess for 20 years. Visit montealbangrill.com for further details.

rochestercitynewspaper.com

City 

[ FEATURE ] BY ERIC REZSNYAK

Show

time t took dancers jumping off buildings for people to finally “get” the magnitude of the inaugural First Niagara Rochester Film Festival. “Another festival?” is a common refrain in Rochester. It can be hard to get excited about a new project when the area is already so flush with celebrations of everything from Turkish culture and lumberjacks to the environment and local restaurants (all festivals taking place within the current week). But at the February press conference officially announcing the Rochester Fringe Festival all it took was footage of Bandaloop, a world-renowned aerial dance troupe that performs vertical routines while suspended on the sides of buildings, for people to realize that Fringe was not just “another festival” — it has the makings to be a very big deal. Dancers, dangling from ropes, swinging, leaping, twirling against a bright blue sky: that’s not something Rochester has ever seen before. The group is one of the headliners of the premier edition of the Fringe, and will twice perform excerpts from its piece “Bound(less)” on the side of the 21-story One HSBC Plaza. And it’s only one of the dozens of acts that will be taking over downtown as the Rochester Fringe Festival makes its debut in more than 20 venues from Wednesday, September 19, through Sunday, September 23. The event will showcase a mix of local and national performers putting on 180-plus shows over five days, covering visual art, theater, dance, comedy, magic shows, film, music, and family-friendly fare. Organizers have been working on the festival for nearly four years, and the project is backed by a Who’s Who of Rochester’s cultural elite. The road to the festival hasn’t always been easy to navigate, and the festival has its challenges. But Fringe is finally here, and Rochester better get ready. 10 City SEPTEMBER 12-18, 2012

As the Rochester Fringe Festival readies for curtain up, find out what it is, and what not to miss

Erica Fee, producer of the Rochester Fringe Festival, is a UR graduate who went on to act, direct, and produce in the UK theater scene. “I knew that it would be fulfilling to marry my experiences as a Rochesterian and the skills I had acquired overseas,” she says. PHOTO BY MATT DETURCK

If flying dancers aren’t enough reason to

take Rochester Fringe seriously, consider the festival’s pedigree. It was initially the brainchild of University of Rochester President Joel Seligman, who in 2008 started having informal meetings with various cultural groups, politicians, businesses, and other potential

stakeholders for what was then being referred to as a summer arts festival to take place in downtown Rochester. Eventually the festival became its own nonprofit entity, and its board of directors now includes Mark Cuddy of Geva Theatre Center, Grant Holcomb of the Memorial Art Gallery, Ruby Lockhart of

Garth Fagan Dance, and Heidi Zimmer-Meyer of the Rochester Downtown Development Corporation, as well as representatives from George Eastman House, RIT, Eastman School of Music, and other organizations. In 2009, Erica Fee — a UR graduate who carved out a successful theater career acting, directing, and producing in London and at the Edinburgh Fringe Festival — was brought onto the project, and eventually named festival producer. Along with board chair Justin Vigdor, Fee is widely regarded as the major force behind making Rochester Fringe a reality. (“The key reason we have a Fringe festival is Erica,” says UR’s Seligman.) One of the challenges facing the Rochester Fringe Festival is explaining to audiences exactly what “Fringe” means. When you hear Greek Festival, you know you’re getting “Opa!” and spanakopita. When you think about Jazz Festival, at the very least you know you’re going to get a range of music. But Fringe? Not so obvious. The allure of a Fringe festival can be best explained by Paul Burgett, vice president of the University of Rochester and a member of the Rochester Fringe Festival board. Two years ago, as he and his wife were touring the South Pacific, they had a stop in Adelaide, Australia, home to Adelaide Fringe, the second-largest Fringe festival in the world. (There are more than 200 Fringe festivals worldwide; the first — and still largest — is the Edinburgh Fringe in Scotland, founded in 1947.) When Burgett arrived in Adelaide, the festival “was in full blossom,” he says, “and I was absolutely captivated by what was going on. The streets were alive with all kinds of performers — jugglers, musicians, actors, performers, magicians. People on 15-foot unicycles, art shows in galleries along the mall. We were there for four to five days, and I was just mesmerized, awestruck by all the activity. The streets were teeming with happy people, and the city was full of energy, excitement, and surprises.” More specifically, Festival Producer Fee explains that Fringe means, “a multidisciplinary,

multiday festival that is not curated by a centralized artistic board,” she says. After Rochester Fringe established itself as a nonprofit organization, it reached out to a variety of arts and cultural organizations and community leaders. It signed up more than 20 venues, ranging from traditional performance spaces like Geva Theatre Center and Blackfriars Theatre to smaller stages like The Little Café and Writers & Books and quirkier spaces like Black Radish Studio and Java’s. The participating venues booked their acts themselves, based on artist submissions that came in through the Fringe Festival’s website this spring. The festival’s participatory aspect was perhaps

lost on Rochester at first — the idea that area performers could actually have their work be part of this enterprise. But eventually, people got it, and Fee says the website was flooded with submissions — she was still getting pitches six weeks out from the festival — with more than 180 fully fledged acts looking to get booked. That “far exceeded” the organizers’ expectations for Year 1, Fee says. Those submissions varied greatly. Some were new shows by local artists, like Method Machine’s play “The Gay Fiancée.” Others were edgy, existing works looking for a wider audience, like Kimberly Niles’ “The Isle of Dogs.” Some of the submissions came from out-of-towners, like Chicago-based musical comedian Matt Griffo or the Fringe circuit favorite, “The Event.” And taking advantage of the area’s rich academic scene, many of the productions are original collaborations between local college departments and arts groups, such as the intriguing “Astro Dance” by choreographer Thomas Warfield, RIT/NTID Dance Company, and the Thomas Golisano College of Computing and Information Sciences. [See the article on page 19 for City Newspaper’s critics’ picks for the best bets at the Fringe Festival.] After the submissions arrived at the festival, they were routed to the individual venues at which the artists hoped to perform. Kris Ashley, who handled the Fringe booking for Rochester Area Performing Arts on East Main Street, says that RAPA’s East End Theatre received around 75 submissions — second only to Geva, she says. For her, the process of deciding what made it into their Fringe offerings included reading the applications, going through artist websites or videos, and, in several dozen cases, giving the artists a tour of RAPA’s recently overhauled theater spaces. Ashley says her primary concern was the quality of the acts, and whether they fit the RAPA mission, which includes family-friendly and educational offerings. The final schedule at

University of Rochester President Joel Seligman got the Fringe Festival ball rolling back in 2008. “What attracted me more than anything was a very strong belief that great cities need great art,” he says. file PHOTO

RAPA includes a variety of dance pieces, some theater, and even a night of very adult comedy. The festival’s programming process has not

been without its detractors. Certain venues not directly involved in the festival have organized their own non-Fringe “fringe” series of events. (Ironically, that’s how the Edinburgh Fringe Festival itself began.) Some artists objected to having to pay to participate in the festival, and others complained that the programming features some out-of-town artists, or isn’t “fringe” enough. “A Fringe festival doesn’t mean that you’re on the fringes of society,” Fee says. “You don’t have to be in the fringes of society or the fringes of art to participate in a Fringe festival. Sure, you can do edgy work. You can also do a revival of a Shakespeare play. One of the most successful shows of the Edinburgh Fringe was called ‘Shakespeare for Breakfast.’ It’s at 9:30 a.m., it’s improv, most of the audience is over 70 years old. But I’ll tell you right now, you show up and you can hardly get a seat.” As for artists having to pay to be involved, “Fringe festivals by nature all have registration fees,” Fee says. “You perform at the Toronto Fringe Festival, you have a $750 registration fee. I think that our registration fee of $100 to $150 is a very, very good bargain. And the fact that we’re taking such a low percentage of

ticket sales — 10 percent of them come back to us. With New Orleans Fringe, I think it’s a 50-50 split. Most Fringe fests take far over 10 percent, and if they don’t take that, they have a huge registration fee upfront. We’ve tried to keep that super competitive.” Regarding the criticism that the festival includes artists from outside Rochester: “I’m not going to pander to a xenophobic approach to the arts,” Fee says. “The venues have programmed themselves. The venues have decided what they want in their own venues. If they want a group coming in from San Francisco, and that group wants to come to Rochester to perform, more power to them.” “The majority of our acts are from Western New York,” says Fee. “This is absolutely a reflection of our community. But I think we are allowed to have outsiders come into the community and succeed. I think it creates a real cross-pollination of ideas, too. I think it’s fantastic for Rochester-based artists to work alongside artists from other communities. Not only do they learn from the artists, the artists from other communities learn from Rochester. We want a festival that is exciting, entertaining, enthralling. And we don’t care where they come from in the end.”

whole array of activities. The other festivals in town offer what they offer — usually a specific offering. Fringe Festival offers a much broader array of entertainment and activities than, I think, our other excellent festivals.” As for helping people understand exactly what “Fringe” means to Rochester, “It’s very much about educating the community about what a Fringe festival is about,” says Fee. “You can see many shows and exhibits within a short period. You can really feel enriched. You can laugh, you can cry, you can watch dance, whatever, all within that period. You can really judge for yourself. You can watch new work, you can watch revivals. You can make your own Fringe, as we say. It’s a smorgasbord of the arts.” To ensure that as many people as possible stuff themselves at that artistic smorgasbord, the festival has deliberately kept ticket costs low. Most shows cost $10 to $15, and seats for the highest-priced headliner, geek-hero comedian Patton Oswalt, run $15 to $55. There are also dozens of free performances throughout the week, including a gospel showcase on Gibbs Street on Sunday, and assorted street performers and other acts performing around the festival footprint.

With more than 150 shows taking place at 21

While people may not still fully understand

different venues, the range of acts involved in the first Rochester Fringe is larger in number and more diverse than any of the organizers say they had hoped for. “I don’t think anyone on the board thought there would be more than 100 different performances. That’s extraordinary,” says Geva’s Mark Cuddy. “And there’s such an eclectic range, a melding of high-brow and low-brow. There are populist events and yet some serious work and some comedy, as well as classical music. It’s really the range. And I’m hoping that people in our community that don’t think of themselves as cultural attendees will attend something, or several somethings, or just come on downtown to have a good time and check it out, and realize, ‘Oh, it’s OK, I fit in.’ I’m hoping we grow audiences for the rest of the year. We’re only going to do that if we do something really wonderful this one week and get really turned on.” “There will be something for everybody, I think,” says UR’s Paul Burgett. “Rochester is a festival town. In May we have the Lilac Festival, built around the magnificent lilacs in Highland Park. Memorial Art Gallery has Clothesline, built around the artistic efforts of 400-plus artists. The Corn Hill Festival is a quintessential American urban festival of vendors, some entertainment, but mostly vendors selling their wares. But Fringe Festival is not about selling products, it’s about entertaining, educating, exciting the festivalgoer with a panoply of activities, from Bandaloop to Harlem Gospel Choir to just a

Fringe, organizers believe that once audiences experience it, they’ll get it. “I’ve been saying all along that the explosion will actually happen after the first year, because people will go, ‘Oh! That’s what that is,’” says Cuddy. “The first year is, let’s just get through it, put on a really good first-year festival. And then people will understand what the possibilities are, and we’ll really get rolling.” And just as that Bandaloop footage at the first press conference really captured the room’s attention, Fee is looking for a similar experience for Rochester en masse when the troupe actually performs. “I think that when we have the community together watching Bandaloop dance on the side of HSBC Plaza, I hope the penny drops,” Fee says. “I hope people realize that yes, we’re right here, right now, and we can make a difference. I hope people recognize the potential of Rochester and the potential, not just for this festival… I think that Fringe festivals can really bring about a huge sea change in the performing arts. I hope that what we find here is, artists can really be edgy, not just during the festival, but they can try new things out year round, and that people are accepting of those things.”

SEE OUR FRINGE

CRITICS

PICKS! PAGE 19

rochestercitynewspaper.com City 11

Upcoming [ CLASSICAL ] U.S. Marine Band Sunday, October 7. Kodak Hall at Eastman Theatre, 60 Gibbs St. Ticket request via mail SASE to: Marine Band Tickets, Eastman Theatre Box Office, 433 E. Main St. 14604. 3 p.m. marineband.usmc.mil.

Music

[ HOLIDAY ] Trans-Siberian Orchestra Wednesday, December 5. Blue Cross Arena, 1 War Memorial Square. 7:30 p.m. $32.75-$60.75. 758-5300. bluecrossarena.com. [ POP/ROCK ] Green Day Sunday, January 13. Blue Cross Arena, 1 War Memorial Square. Time and price TBA. 758-5300. bluecrossarena.com.

Devil Makes Three

Saturday, September 15 Water Street Music Hall, 204 N. Water St. 9 p.m. | $13-$15 | 325-5600, waterstreetmusic.com [ Folk Punk] Raise a glass, raise your foot, and

get ready to throw down with the stomping, roaring threesome that is Devil Makes Three. Guitar, string bass, and the occasional banjo create a bluegrass sound and vibe that roars and soars with rhythm that will bring you to your feet. The group may be rooted in tradition, but it’s fresh enough to be worthy of your dancing embrace. Brown Bird opens up the night. — BY WILLIE CLARK

Festival of Lanterns Saturday, September 15 Maplewood Rose Garden, Maplewood Drive at Seneca Parkway 7:30 p.m. | Free | 458-3460, rossings.org [ AMERICANA ] On September 15, as the sun goes

down, Claude Bragdon-inspired lanterns will light up at the Maplewood Rose Garden and music will take to the air. It’s part of the Maplewood Neighborhood Association’s “Historic Maplewood Home Tour.” At 7:30 p.m., music begins with a drum circle and a Native American flutist. At 8 pm, the lanterns, suspended from trees surrounding the main gazebo, will be illuminated, and Resonanz vocal ensemble will sing selections from the “Rochester Songbook.” The event is a “21st century rendition of Bragdon’s 1915 Festival of Song and Light,” according to Cheryl Lenhard, one of the event coordinators. — BY PALOMA A. CAPANNA

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120 East Avenue 325-3663

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 12

Exposed Music Fest California Brew Haus, 402 Ridge Road W. Friday, September 14-Saturday. September 15 6 p.m. | $10-$12 | exposedfestival.com [ HARD ROCK/METAL] For the past three years, the

Exposed Music Festival has helped bridge the gap, not only between band and fan, but band and band. This year’s Rochester installment features local rockers like Bleed The Messiah, Low Flying Planes, and One Fate Remains with bands from all over the Northeast and Canada. While these bands form new coattail friendships, here’s your chance to find your new favorite. — BY FRANK DE BLASE

Hed PE Thursday, September 13 Montage Music Hall, 50 Chesnut St. 7:30 P.M. | $17/$20 | 413-1642 [ HARDCORE/PUNK ] These Huntington Beach hardcore

rockers have been performing their brand of “g-punk” — a fusion of punk-rock and hip-hop — since their formation in 1994. This “gangstafied” genre has also been known to incorporate heavy metal, rap rock, and reggae, claiming artists like the Beastie Boys, Black Sabbath, and Bob Marley as major influences. The band has endured a number of line-up changes over the years, but the nucleus of Mark Young, aka “Mawk” (bass), Doug Boyce, better known as DJ Product © 1969 (turntables), and Jared Gomes (vocals) has been intact since the very beginning. Gomes’s unique vocal style blends melodic tones, raucous raps, as well as the obligatory guttural death growls.

Metric played Water Street Music Hall on Thursday, September 6. PHOTO BY FRANK DE BLASE

Hollywood squares [ review ] by frank de blase

With a set up and light show that threatened to blow the doors off Water Street Music Hall last Thursday night, Canadian new wave/electronica band Metric positively rocked the house to a near-sold-out crowd and rabid audience. Anticipation was high for this show, the buzz emitting from unlikely sources as the crowd was a cross section of tastes, ages, and sex. Metric picks up where New Wave left off when it opted for disco cheese or simply disintegrated into bubblegum. But it wasn’t all machine. Metric is a rock band that blends guitar, bass, vocals, and real drums amidst the swirling storm of sonics, exquisite chaos, loops, and effects. Those effects derailed the band briefly during its song “Lost Kitten,” when one of the loops or a drum trigger failed. The light show was spectacular, resembling something like the set of “Hollywood Squares” or one of those Japanese video games that causes seizures. Beneath these lights the band comes off understated, looking more like stock rock ’n’ rollers

than the Gary Numan disciples you might expect. The Crawdiddies have arisen from the ashes of the weekly Son House Night over at Beale Street, and from the soul of dobro slinger Gordon Munding. The band celebrated the release of its “Soul of a Man” CD Monday night to a big crowd at the Record Archive with a two rollicking sets featuring songs from its country-blues-based canon. The band shifted gears nicely from Mississippi John Hurt lowdown dirt and denim to some swank T-Bone Walker gabardine sophistication. The edge that Munding exhibited through his take on House’s lonesome refrain in the past has been replaced by the gentle ease and haunt of singer Heather Taylor, who seconds on the flute. This dame can sing. She has a deep vibrato that comes off more as a purr as she wails salty and sweet. The whole band has a genuine casualness to it, which ultimately gets under collars and skin until you can’t resist any longer.

— BY DAVID YOCKEL, JR.

[ Acoustic/Folk ] Dady Brothers. Johnny’s Irish Pub, 1382 Culver Rd. 2240990. 8 p.m. Free. Jim Lane. Lemoncello, 137 West Commercial St. 3858565. 7:30 p.m. Free. Rob & Gary Acoustic. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. 248-4825. 5:30 p.m. Free. Trad Session with Patricia Carey & Cathy McGrath. McGraw’s Irish Pub, 146 W Commercial St. 348-9091. 7 p.m. Free. [ Blues ] Nick Moss. Dinosaur Bar-BQue, 99 Court St. 9:30 p.m. Open Blues Jam w/The King Bees. The Beale New Orleans Grille and Bar-South Ave., 693 South Ave. 2714650. 7:30 p.m. Call for info. [ DJ/Electronic ] AWOLNATION w/Imagine Dragons, Zeale. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N. Water Street. 325-5600. 8 p.m. $20-$23. [ Jazz ] El Rojo Jazz. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. 6625555. 6 p.m. Greece Jazz Band. Ontario Beach Park, 4799 Lake Ave. 865-3320. 6 p.m. Call for info. Margaret Explosion. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 7:30 p.m. Free. Rick Holland Evan Dobbins Little Big Band. Tala Vera, 155 State St. 546-3845. 8 p.m. $5. Vince Ercolamento& Joe Chiappone Jazz Quartet. Murph’s Irondequoit Pub, 705 Titus Ave. 342-6780. 8 p.m. Free. [ Hip-Hop/Rap ] Tony Nelson w/Poetry for Thieves, Epilogue. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 8 p.m. $3 before 9 pm, $5-$7 after. [ Pop/Rock ] Pseudo Youth. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N. Water Street. 325-5600. 9 p.m. $5. continues on page 14

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rochestercitynewspaper.com City 13

Music

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 13

money from my music to keep doing this. If it were free, I don’t know how I’d earn a living. To counter that, the real politics of the way things happen is people hear your music for free in all manner of ways, even when you are selling it. How do you keep the simplicity in your music in the face of non-simple song structures or instrumentation?

Vetiver is a San Francisco-based folk-rock project led by Andy Cabic (second from left). PHOTO PROVIDED

Deliver the Vetiver Vetiver Thursday, September 13 Lovin’ Cup 300 Park Point Place 8 p.m. | $18-$20 | lovincup.com subpop.com/artists/vetiver [ INTERVIEW ] By Frank De Blase

The principle ingredients in Vetiver’s mix complement and counter one another, creating a splendid sparkle. It’s a tonal blend of simple pop sugar over a more serious folkrock stock. By definition, that kind of puts the San Francisco band on the crowded indie shelf in the hip aisle. But Vetiver extends into its own territory by adopting an innocence to the seriousness and some intellectual weight to the fun. Founded in the Bay Area in 2002 by songwriter Andy Cabic, the band — which includes drummer and Rochester homeboy Otto Hauser — began releasing albums in 2004. First they came out on indie labels like DiCristina, later on its own imprint, Gnomonsong Recordings, and now it’s with Sub Pop, which released the band’s latest, 2011’s “The Errant Charm.” Cabic called us from San Francisco, home of the Beats and spotty cell-phone reception. An edited transcript of our conversation follows. CITY: What’s new in Vetiver’s world? ANDY CABIC: Not much going on lately. I’ve

been home in San Francisco since touring for 14 City SEPTEMBER 12-18, 2012

the last record. I’ve been laying low here. It feels like it’s been a good many years of nonstop playing and working on records. So I’ve been working on other projects, writing for another record, kind of enjoying being home for a while. Are you wood-shedding with the rest of the band?

Everyone in the band lives in different places. It’s not a regular thing for the live line-up to get together, except when we have tours scheduled. Does touring take away from songwriting, or do you write on the road?

Touring is hard for me to get into the rhythm where I feel productive. I definitely get into a rhythm when that happens. And leaving to go on tour shakes me out of it. So it did take some of the focus out of that. But it led to different strategies and ways of working. So I’m enjoying being home, but I can’t wait to see everybody. We haven’t been in the northeast in a while. With music racing to keep up with technology and consumerism, what’s your preferred way to deliver Vetiver to the collective bloodstream?

Personally I like listening to vinyl usually, and often one side at a time. So to me, that format has a lot of resonance. But I don’t think there’s any one way of going about it that’s better than another. I need to earn

One thing that has happened in making records is that I usually give myself a decent amount of time to make them. Sometimes I start them with a clear idea where it is headed. But what winds up happening is that I revisit the songs in production in stages as the record’s getting made. Sometimes I’ll track more things and sometimes things will just fall away that are unnecessary. It just comes from taking time, stepping away, and coming back to it, realizing what isn’t essential and getting rid of it. What is the process?

In the writing and recording aspect, typically it’s myself and Tom Monahan, who has engineered and produced most of the records. We have a long friendship and working relationship. Usually it starts with the two of us discussing what’s going to happen and sifting through songs I have, notes I have. Each record is different after that part, in terms of which musicians come in. One album kind of leads to the next. Is the Vetiver we know the Vetiver you planned?

I had no plan. I had moved to San Francisco and started writing songs again. I had limited resources. An acoustic guitar — I didn’t even have an electric guitar. The first songs were acoustic. Then I found some string players and that gave it a chamber-folk-pop quality to it. So you had somewhat of a plan?

I just wanted the project to be a catchall for anything I was interested in. I just wanted to make it so I could do whatever I wanted, which has sort of come true. But there’s still a certain sound or style people have come to expect, and I’m happy to find a medium ground between pushing it and keeping things familiar.

[ Acoustic/Folk ] Bluegrass Jam. Bernuzio Uptown Music, 122 East Ave. 473-6140. 7 p.m. Call for info. The Dady Brothers. Sticky Lips BBQ Juke Joint, 830 Jefferson Rd. 292-5544. 8 p.m. $8-$10. Jim Lane. Murph’s Irondequoit Pub, 705 Titus Ave. 342-6780. 8 p.m. Free. Vetiver. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. 8 p.m. $18-$20. [ Blues ] The Mighty High & Dry. The Beale New Orleans Grille and BarSouth Ave., 693 South Ave. 2714650. 7:30 p.m. Call for info. [ DJ/Electronic ] Spititual Rez. Dubland Underground, 315 Alexander St. 232-7550. 10 p.m. $5-$15. [ Jazz ] Aimee Cyrille, Diego Figuieredo. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. 276-8900. 7:30 p.m. $20. Deborah Branch. Lemoncello, 137 West Commercial St. 3858565. 6 p.m. Free. John Palocy Trio. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. 6625555. 6 p.m. Free. Jazz Faculty Concert. Eastman East Wing Hatch Recital Hall, 26 Gibbs St. 8 p.m. Free. Steve Grills. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 7:30 p.m. Free. The Swooners. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. 2484825. 5:30 p.m. Uptown Groove. Pane Vino Ristorante, 175 N. Water St. 232-6090. 8:30 p.m. Free. [ Pop/Rock ] Five Alarm Open Jam. Firehouse Saloon, 814 South Clinton. 3193832. 9 p.m. Call for info. John Payton Project. Dinosaur BarB-Que, 99 Court St. 9 p.m. Free. Serge & Friends w/Drew Moore & Steve Melcher. The Rabbit Room, 61 N. Main St. 582-1830. 6 p.m. Free. Sisters of Murphy. Johnny’s Irish Pub, 1382 Culver Rd. 224-0990. 8 p.m. Free. Soil w/Hed P.E. Montage Music Hall, 50 Chestnut St. 232-1520. 7:30 p.m. $18. This Life w/Ocupanther. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 8:30 p.m. $5-$7. Tommy Emmanuel. Hochstein Performance Hall, 50 N Plymouth Ave. 454-4596. 7:30 p.m. $35.

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 14 [ Acoustic/Folk ] Jessy Carolina and the Hot Mess w/Deke Dickerson. Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. 7 p.m. $8-$15. My Sweet Patootie. Harmony House, 58 East Main St. 8 p.m. $17-$20. Pat Kane. McGraw’s Irish Pub, 146 W Commercial St. 3489091. 7 p.m. Free. [ Blues ] Billy Joe & The Blues Gypsies. Six Pockets, 716 E. Ridge Rd. 266-1440. 6 p.m. Free.

Blue Tomorrow. The BealeWebster, 1930 Empire Blvd. 2161070. 7:30 p.m. Call for info. Jony James Blues Band. Dinosaur Bar-B-Que, 99 Court St. 10 p.m. Free. Trilogy. The Beale New Orleans Grille and Bar-South Ave., 693 South Ave. 271-4650. 7:30 p.m. Call for info. [ Classical ] Greentopia Classical Series. 61 Commercial St. See website for full line up. Free. Le Guitare Ancien et Nouveau: Sujean Kim, violin; Christopher Wilke, lute, theorbo and historical guitars. Nazareth College Wilmot Recital Hall, 4245 East Avenue. 389-2700. 7:30 p.m. Free. Wave Functions II: New Music for Organ. Christ Church, 141 East Ave. 454-3878. 7:30 p.m. Free. World Music Series - Raga Rendezvous: Lalgudi Vijayalakshmi and Kala Ramnath, violin duo. Eastman East Wing Hatch Recital Hall, 26 Gibbs St. 8 p.m. $15. [ Jazz ] The Bowties. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 8:30 p.m. Free. Fred Costello & Roger Eckers Jazz Duo. Charley Brown’s, 1675 Penfield Rd. 385-9202. 7:30 p.m. Free. Marco. Pane Vino Ristorante, 175 N. Water St. 232-6090. Call for info. Free. NiteFall. Lemoncello, 137 West Commercial St. 385-8565. 8 p.m. Free. The Swooners. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. 662-5555. 6 p.m. Free. Ted Nicolosi and Shared Genes. The Pultneyville Grill, 4135 Mill St. (315) 589-4512. 7 p.m. Free. Tinted Image. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. 2484825. 7:30 p.m. Free. [ Hip-Hop/Rap ] GZA/Genius w/Killer Mike, Sweet Valley, and Bear Hands. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N. Water Street. 325-5600. 7 p.m. $25-$28. [ Pop/Rock ] Brian Lindsay Band. Sticky Lips BBQ Juke Joint, 830 Jefferson Rd. 292-5544. 8:30 p.m. $3. Darwin w/The Wonderland House Band. Tala Vera, 155 State St. 546-3845. 8 p.m. $5. Earthquake Party w/Routine Involvements, Green Dreams, Pink Elephant, and CLAM!. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. Limited entry for unders. $6-$8. Exposed Music Festival. California Brew Haus, 402 Ridge Rd. West. 621-1480. Friday-8 pm, Saturday 5 pm. $10-$12. GatorFace. Nola’s BBQ, 4775 Lake Ave. 663-3375. 10 p.m. Call for info. Greentopia Festival. Various locations. See website for full music schedule. Free. Heaviest Thing (Final Show). Montage Music Hall, 50 Chestnut St. 232-1520. 8 p.m. Call for info. Into the Now. Temple Bar and Grille, 109 East Ave. 232-6000. Call for info. continues on page 16

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FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 14 Mr. Mustard w/The Earthtones. Johnny’s Irish Pub, 1382 Culver Rd. 224-0990. 5 p.m. Free. Park Point Concert Series: The Skycoasters W/Teagan And The Tweeds. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. 6 p.m. Free. Push. Pelican’s Nest, 566 River St. 663-5910. 10 p.m. Free. Small Town. Shamrock Jack’s, 4554 Culver Rd. 323-9310. Call for info. Something Else. A-Pub Live, 6 Lawrence St. 10 p.m. Free before 11, $5 after. The Surge. Captain Jack’s Goodtime Tavern, 8505 Greig St. 315-483-9570. 9 p.m. Call for info. Women of Faith: Celebrate What Matters. Blue Cross Arena, One War Memorial Square. 888-49FAITH. Friday- 7 pm, Saturday-9 am. $99-$109.

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[ Acoustic/Folk ] The Devil Makes Three w/Brown Bird. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N. Water Street. 325-5600. 9 p.m. $13-$15. The Druids 20th Anniversary Party. The Rabbit Room, 61 N. Main St. 582-1830. 8 p.m. $10-$25. Even Steven. McGraw’s Irish Pub, 146 W Commercial St. 348-9091. 8 p.m. Free. Gordon Bok w/Phil Marshall. Cafe Veritas at First Unitarian Church, 220 Winton Road South. 7:30 p.m. $10-$18. Guy Forsyth w/Petal Shop. Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. 7:30 p.m. $12$18. Marty Roberts. Flaherty’s Webster, 1200 Bay Rd. 671-0816. Call for info. Songwriters in the Round 11th Anniversary Show. Tango Cafe, 389 Gregory St. 271-4930. 8 p.m. Call for info. Strawbs (acoustic) w/John Wesley Harding. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. 8 p.m. $20$25. Tony Padilla. Tapas 177 Lounge, 177 Saint Paul St. 262-2090. 11 p.m. Free. [ Blues ] The Deborah Magone Band. McKenzie’s, 3686 West Henrietta Rd. 334-8970. 9 p.m. Call for info. Deep Blue. The Beale New Orleans Grille and Bar-South Ave., 693 South Ave. 271-4650. 7:30 p.m. Call for info. Industrial Blues Band. The BealeWebster, 1930 Empire Blvd. 2161070. 7:30 p.m. Call for info. Joe Beard. Sticky Lips BBQ Juke Joint, 830 Jefferson Rd. 2925544. 9 p.m. $3. John Cole Blues Band. Johnny’s Irish Pub, 1382 Culver Rd. 2240990. 8 p.m. Free. Mama Hart Band. The Landing Bar and Grille, 30 Fairport Village Landing. 425-7490. 10 p.m. Free. Steve Grills & The Roadmasters. Dinosaur Bar-B-Que, 99 Court St. 10 p.m. Free.

JAZZ | Cyrille Aimee w/Diego Figueiredo

If Cyrille Aimee’s beautiful voice and inventive scat singing isn’t enough for you, you might want to focus on the endless chord inversions and gorgeous melodic runs Diego Figueiredo plays on his classical guitar. But Aimee and Figueiredo complement each other so magnificently that you won’t stand a chance of picking one over the other. You’ll just be transfixed as they breeze through classics like “That Old Devil Moon,” “A Night In Tunisia,” and “Bye Bye Blackbird.” Cyrille Aimee w/Diego Figueiredo perform Thursday, September 13, 7:30 p.m. at the Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. $20. 276-8900, mag.rochester.edu. — BY RON NETSKY

Reggae/House/Electronic | Spiritizual Rez

DJ Sita will start off the evening with a heavy electronic dub mix, which will be followed up by the far more house leanings of DJ Rufus Gibson. Sita has been at it locally for 10 years and it shows with the smooth mixes. Rufus Gibson is down from Buffalo and has a very chill house set. If you are in the need for some reggae, Spiritual Rez has your fix as the main act. In from Boston and getting ready to drop debut album, “Apocalypse Whenever,” these Berklee graduates sound like they migrated from someplace far more Caribbean than the distinctly less-than-tropical Northeast. The band has a swinging mix of reggae and funk that will no doubt have you swaying along like a palm tree. Spiritual Rez, Rufus Gibson, DJ Sita perform Thursday, September 13, 10 p.m. at Dubland Underground, 315 Alexander St. $5-$15, 18+. 232-7550. — BY SUZAN PERO Tastin’ the Blues:Steve Grills and the Roadmasters. Penfield Amphitheater, 3100 Atlantic Ave. 340-8663. noon. Free. [ Classical ] Festival of Lanterns. Maplewood Rose Garden. 7:30 p.m. Free. Greentopia Classical Series. 61 Commercial St. See website for full line up. Free. [ Country ] Double Cross. Nashvilles, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. 334-3030. 9 p.m. Call for info. [ DJ/Electronic ] DeeDee’s Wild College Party. Tilt Nightclub & Ultralounge, 444 Central Ave. 232-8440. 10 p.m. 21+ free from 10-11; 2 for 1 admission all night with college ID. Call for info.

[ Jazz ] Connie Demming. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 8:30 p.m. Free. Fred Costello & Roger Eckers Jazz Duo. Charley Brown’s, 1675 Penfield Rd. 385-9202. 7:30 p.m. Free. The Gateswingers. Tower Fine Arts Center, SUNY Brockport, 180 Holley St. 395-2787. 7:30 p.m. $10-$15. Madeline Forster. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. 6625555. 6:30 p.m. Free. Norman Tibbils Solo Guitarist. Lemoncello, 137 West Commercial St. 385-8565. 8 p.m. Free. Special Blend. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. 2484825. 7:30 p.m. Free.

Ted Nicolosi and Shared Genes. The Glengarry Inn @ Eagle Vale, 4400 Fairport 9 Mile Point Rd. 598-3820. 7 p.m. Free. The White Hots. The Pultneyville Grill, 4135 Mill St. (315) 589-4512. Call for info. [ Pop/Rock ] 50/50 -Styx/Reo Tribute Show. Pelican’s Nest, 566 River St. 663-5910. 10 p.m. Free. Cherry Bomb. Brickwood Grill, 250 Monroe Ave. 730-8230. 10 p.m. Call for info. Exposed Music Festival. California Brew Haus, 402 Ridge Rd. West. 621-1480. Friday-8 pm, Saturday 5 pm. $10-$12. Forget Me in Vegas. Montage Music Hall, 50 Chestnut St. 2321520. 7 p.m. Call for info. Greentopia Festival. Various locations. See website for full music schedule. Free Hamlin Music Fest & Car Show. Hamlin Station Bar & Grill, 52 Railroad Ave. 964-2010. 12:30 p.m. $5. Ritual of Odds w/ Neotheist, Malformed, and Beneath Hell’s Sky. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. Limited entry for unders. Call for info. Kiss w/Motley Crue. Darien Lake PAC, 9993 Allegheny Rd. 5994641. 7 p.m. $36-$157. Knight Patrol. Anchor Sports Bar & Grill, 270 Miracle Mile Dr. 2729333. 9 p.m. Call for info. Master Thieves. 58 Main, 58 N. Main St. 585-637-2383. 2 p.m. $10. Mike & Sergei. TC Riley’s, 200 Park Point Dr. 272-9777. 8 p.m. Free. My Panacea w/Order 66. Tala Vera, 155 State St. 546-3845. 7 p.m. 21+. $5. Oceans of Insects. Skylark Lounge, 40 South Union St. 270-8106. 9 p.m. 21+. $5. Polluted Moon. A-Pub Live, 6 Lawrence St. 10 p.m. Free before 11, $5 after. Soul Shaker. Captain Jack’s Goodtime Tavern, 8505 Greig St. 315-483-9570. 9 p.m. Call for info. Thruway Throwdown/Cancer Benefit for Baily ft.The Action!, BSide Basterds. Firehouse Saloon, 814 South Clinton. 319-3832. 10 p.m. 21+. Call for info. Women of Faith: Celebrate What Matters. Blue Cross Arena, One War Memorial Square. 888-49FAITH. Friday- 7 pm, Saturday-9 am. $99-$109.

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 16 [ Acoustic/Folk ] John Dady. Temple Bar and Grille, 109 East Ave. 232-6000. 7 p.m. Free. [ Classical ] Faculty Artist Series - ChienKwan Lin, saxophone. Eastman East Wing Hatch Recital Hall, 26 Gibbs St. 3 p.m. $10. [ Jazz ] Bill Slater Solo Piano. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. 248-4825. Call for info. The Conlon Brothers. Boulder Coffee Co. - Brooks Landing,

ROOTS/JAZZ | Jessy Carolina and the Hot Mess

Jessy Carolina’s songbook might be old, but it certainly ain’t lame. The Brooklyn-based singer-percussionist (does washboard count?) and her band, the Hot Mess, parties like it’s 1929. After all, somebody’s got to carry that torch, and Carolina’s got the smokin’ hot pipes to back it up. For this show, the troupe lines up as a svelte quartet, with the horn section of Satoru (sousaphone, trumpet, trombone, coronet) and Mario (sax, clarinet) taking turns playing bass lines. Jerron, a fine vocalist himself, holds down the rhythm part on banjo and piano if there’s one in the house. It’s all good fun and a legit (not campy) attempt to rekindle some great tunes.

30 YEARS OF

Jessy Carolina and the Hot Mess perform Friday, September 14, at 10 p.m. at Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. $8-$10. 232-3230, abilenebarandlounge.com. — BY ROMAN DIVEZUR

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JAZZ | Glenn Miller Orchestra

You know the songs: “In the Mood,” “Tuxedo Junction,” “Don’t Sit Under the Apple Tree (With Anyone Else But Me),” “(I’ve Got a Gal) In Kalamazoo,” and so many others. But did you know that the Glenn Miller Orchestra is still touring and playing them? Miller believed that a band should have its own personality, and his band did in spades. Miller died in 1944 at the age of 40 when his transport plane disappeared over the English Channel during World War II. But his orchestra was reorganized in 1956 and has been on the road — playing 300 gigs a year — ever since.

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The Glenn Miller Orchestra performs Saturday, September 15, 7:30 p.m. at the Hale Auditorium, Roberts Wesleyan College, 2301 Westside Drive. $20-$28. roberts.edu, 594-6008. — BY RON NETSKY 960 Genesee St. 697-0236. 4:30 p.m. Free. Diverse Threads. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. 7 p.m. $3. El Rojo Jazz. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. 662-5555. 6 p.m. Joe Santora and Curtis Kendrick. The Pultneyville Grill, 4135 Mill St. (315) 589-4512. Call for info. Mark Cassara. Pane Vino Ristorante, 175 N. Water St. 232-6090. 6 p.m. Free. Standard Deviations: Paul Smoker, trumpet; Bill Dobbins, piano. Nazareth College Wilmot Recital Hall, 4245 East Avenue. 389-2700. 3 p.m. Free.

[ Pop/Rock ] Jukebox the Ghost w/Maps & Atlases, The Demos. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N. Water Street. 325-5600. 8 p.m. $12-$18. MoChester. Captain Jack’s Goodtime Tavern, 8505 Greig St. 315-483-9570. 3 p.m. Call for info. Skeletionwitch w/Sarcous, Havoc, and Howl. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. $11$13. Surge. Pelican’s Nest, 566 River St. 663-5910. 5 p.m. Free. continues on page 18 rochestercitynewspaper.com City 17

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[ Acoustic/Folk ] The Honeycutters. Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. 8 p.m. $10. [ Jazz ] Jeff Slutsky. Lemoncello, 137 West Commercial St. 385-8565. 7 p.m. Free. Mark Bader. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. 662-5555. 5:30 p.m. The Morgan Street Stompers. Green Lantern Inn, One East Church St. 381-7603. 6:30 p.m. RSVP 729-6555. $12. Soul Express. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. 2484825. 5:30 p.m. Free. Tony Giannavola. The Beale New Orleans Grille and Bar-South Ave., 693 South Ave. 271-4650. 7 p.m. Call for info. Watkins & The Rapiers. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 7:30 p.m. Free. [ Pop/Rock ] The Blind Owl Band. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. $5-$7.

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 18 [ Acoustic/Folk ] Open Jam w/Jim Lane. Hooligan’s Eastside Grill, 809 Ridge Rd. 671-7180. 7 p.m. Free. Wye Oak w/Callers, Archimedes. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. Limited entry for unders. $10-$12. [ Blues ] Bluesday Tuesday Blues Jam. P.I.’s Lounge, 495 West Ave. 8 p.m. Call for info. Pete Anderson w/Don Christiano. Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. $10-$15. Teagan Ward. The Beale New Orleans Grille and Bar-South Ave., 693 South Ave. 271-4650. 7 p.m. Call for info. [ Jazz ] Jim Nugent. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. 662-5555. 6 p.m. Free. Steve Bartolotta. Lemoncello, 137 West Commercial St. 3858565. 7:30 p.m. Free. Tinted Image. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. 2484825. 5:30 p.m.

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[ Acoustic/Folk ] Jim Lane. Lemoncello, 137 West Commercial St. 3858565. 7:30 p.m. Free The Milk Carton Kids w/Brendan Hines. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. Partially seated show. Limited entry for unders. $13-$17. Rob & Gary Acoustic. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. 248-4825. 5:30 p.m. Free. [ Blues ] Ezra & The Storm. Dinosaur BarB-Que, 99 Court St. 9 p.m. Free. Open Blues Jam w/The King Bees. The Beale New Orleans Grille and Bar-South Ave., 693 South Ave. 271-4650. 7:30 p.m. Call for info.

ROCK | Jukebox the Ghost

Jukebox the Ghost’s most recent album, “Safe Travels,” is the band’s third, and it showcases the outfit’s penchant for quirky pop that falls somewhere in the Ben Folds spectrum. That might be an easy comparison, but the album is replete with enough piano riffs and sing-along hooks to sate even the most jaded consumers of pop music. The New York-viaPhiladelphia trio is set to embark on a nearly 10-week-long tour that will send it to the West Coast and back again in support of “Safe Travels,” which was released this past June. Brooklyn’s Maps & Atlases — great performers in their own right — and local band The Demos both open the show. Jukebox the Ghost performs Sunday, September 16, 8 p.m. at Water Street Music Hall, 204 N. Water St. $12-$18. 325-5600, waterstreetmusic.com. — BY ANDY KLINGENBERGER

ROCK | Wye Oak

Baltimore duo Wye Oak take its moniker from the honorary state tree of Maryland, a 460-year-old white oak that was destroyed in a thunderstorm in 2002. The pair’s melodic noise pop might not share that namesake’s longevity, but the pair emulates its constant growth with each subsequent release; the most recent album, last year’s “Civilian,” found the pair at tits most urgent and accessible, with the title track being used on the soundtracks to multiple television shows and movies. Brooklyn band Callers, as well as Rochester’s own Archimedes, open the show. Wye Oak performs Tuesday, September 18, 8 p.m. at the Bug Jar | 219 Monroe Ave. $10-$12. 454-2966, bugjar.com. — BY ANDY KLINGENBERGER Reverend Raven and The ChainSmokin’ Alter Boys. Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. 8 p.m. $8-$10. [ Classical ] Alan Mathias. Smith Warren Post 367 American Legion, 61 Main St. 889-9156. 5 p.m. Free. Double Bass Faculty Recital, Colin Corner, Principal Bass, RPO. Hochstein Recital Hall, 50 Plymouth Ave N. 454-4596. 7:30 p.m. Free. [ Jazz ] Date Night. Tala Vera, 155 State St. 546-3845. 8 p.m. $5. Jack Allen. Ontario Beach Park, 4799 Lake Ave. 865-3320. 6 p.m. Call for info.

Margaret Explosion. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 7:30 p.m. Free. Ted Nicolosi and Shared Genes. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. 662-5555. 5:30 p.m. Free. Vince Ercolamento& Joe Chiappone Jazz Quartet. Murph’s Irondequoit Pub, 705 Titus Ave. 342-6780. 8 p.m. Free. [ Pop/Rock ] The Town Pants. Johnny’s Irish Pub, 1382 Culver Rd. 2240990. 8 p.m. Free.

Show

time

Best bets at the Rochester Fringe Fest

The inaugural First Niagara Fringe Festival will feature more than 100 shows at 20-plus venues over five days, September 19-23. It’s a staggering grouping of arts and cultural opportunities, and it can be difficult to know where to start. City Newspaper’s chief cultural critics have combed through the schedule and picked out their “best bets” for the festival; you’ll find them below. But these are just a smattering of the events going on throughout the festival. Go through the full festival guide, also included in this issue of City, or find the full schedule at rochesterfringe.com. Find out what looks interesting to you and make your own Fringe. During the festival, head to rochestercitynewspaper.com for our critics’ daily dispatches at the Entertainment Blog. We’ll have reviews, more previews, and our thoughts on what shows are the best of the fest. Make sure to leave your own reviews in the comments section.

Michael Lasser’s Picks

One review of “The Bicycle Men” called it “a genial spoof.” So is this going to be one of those things that’s much funnier when you’re having a fourth beer with friends and making up a musical at 3 in the morning? But a naïve Yank who gets stuck while biking through France also conjures up the possibility of a demented Henry James (though without anything resembling a sense of humor). If the play’s oddball characters and surreal puppets avoid the trap of self-consciousness, this silly musical could be a treat. The Fringe says it’s appropriate for ages 16 and up. (Wednesday 9/19 8:30-9:30 p.m., Thursday 9/20 6-7 p.m., Friday 9/21 7:308:30 p.m., and Saturday 9/22 1:30-2:30 p.m. at Geva Theatre Nextstage. Tickets cost $15.) When “Casey Jones Costello Sings the Great American Songbook,” audiences will encounter a college student who looks even younger than his years, but who sings these songs his grandparents still know with affection and sincerity. His voice is pleasant and his singing style unadorned. You will also understand every single word in these incomparable songs of sentiment and wit by such masters of the craft as Irving Berlin, Lorenz Hart, Yip Harburg, Cole Porter, Ira Gershwin, and Johnny Mercer. This may be one of the few Fringe performances where simple honest sentiment prevails. (Friday 9/21 5-6 p.m. and Saturday 9/22 7-8 p.m. at Java’s. Free admission.) The ancient Sumerian epic “Gilgamesh” includes a Flood story that predated and influenced the Old Testament’s Noah story. More importantly, it is one of the first tragic tales in which a king worthy of his quest seeks immortality and, of course, fails. The gods toy with him as they do with all humans. Into that world struts a single 21st century actor playing nearly two dozen parts with his sense of irony intact. “Charlie Bethel’s Gilgamesh” offers up a jaundiced take on one of the humankind’s most extraordinary sagas. (Saturday 9/22 3 p.m. and Sunday 9/23 8 p.m. at Geva Theatre Nextstage. Tickets cost $15.) Don’t yawn, don’t shift in your seat, don’t

[ PREVIEW ] BY CITY FEATURES STAFF

like this anymore! (Saturday 9/22 2 p.m. and Sunday 9/23 12:30 p.m. at RAPA’s East End Theatre. Tickets cost $5-$10.) “Love at First Waltz” (a sublime title that has already got me swaying) brings together BIODANCE, a locally based modern-dance company, and Resonanz, a 40-voice touring choir from within the Rochester Oratorio Society. In the middle of the 19th century, the waltz was controversial; in the early 20th, syncopation (by way of ragtime) was equally raffish. But each soon became the defining popular music of its time. Their composers — Johannes Brahms, George and Ira Gershwin, Cole Porter, and more — started on the fringe but we moved them into the mainstream. One of the music’s natural habitats is a cabaret, and so it will be here. (Sunday 9/23 6:30-7:30 p.m. at RAPA’s East End Theatre. Tickets cost $8-$12.)

Rebecca Rafferty’s Picks

Flower City Vaudeville PHOTO PROVIDED

even goddam blink, because you might miss an entire play from “44 Plays for 44 Presidents.” Each president beginning with George — and including Zachary, Millard, Ulysses, Rutherford, Chester, Calvin, and Barack — is the subject of a two-minute play. Like a lot of the presentations in the Fringe Festival, this one is also self-billed as “hilarious” and “irreverent.” The performers are young professionals from the Geva Theatre Conservatory. (Saturday 9/22 8-10 p.m. and Sunday 9/23 3-5 p.m. at Geva Theatre Nextstage. Ticket cost $15.) Vaudeville was the most important form of American show business until the Great Depression, Talkies, and radio combined to bury it in the 1930’s. Until then, every town big enough to have a theater had daily eight-act bills featuring everything from animal acts to comics to song-and-dance men. A touring star like Nora Bayes or Sophie Tucker would come to town for a week and take an entire floor of the best hotel. “Flower City Vaudeville,” a local troupe, emphasizes the novelty acts and the comedy, rather than the songs and the soft shoe. It appears to be vaudeville with a smattering of circus tossed in, but how do you resist people who ride a unicycle, juggle, and play the washboard? They don’t do show biz

There are some unknowns in human existence that might never be answered. But that doesn’t mean we won’t eternally ask questions about our purpose (or lack thereof), the nature of death, and the slippery slope of human cognition. Core Project Chicago’s “The Dust” will explore these themes of death, fate, memory, and man through dance, poetry, experimental music, and visual art. The performance is recommended for all ages. (Sunday 9/23 5-6 p.m. at RAPA’s East End Theatre. Tickets cost $8-$10. A free workshop for ages 14+ will take place Friday 9/21 7:45 p.m. For more information, visit rapatheatre.org.) Ever wonder what would happen if two unlikely people from history met up? No time machine is required to rewrite history in the play, “Howard & Emily,” because the title characters connect post-mortem. The shades of pseudo-morbid Emily Dickinson and arcane-obsessed Howard Philips (H.P.) Lovecraft share the stage, unaware of each other at first, their lines comprised of quotes from their writings and letters, before the two eventually fall in love to the sweet serenade of period music. Add one Doktor Bronislaw Kielbasa-Funk, a Polish acolyte of Freud who has fallen into ill-repute, and whose life is severely altered by what he witnesses. Recommended for ages 15 and older. (Friday 9/21 8-9 p.m. and Saturday 9/22 4-5 p.m. at Writers & Books. Tickets cost $10.) RIT’s visual arts will be represented throughout Fringe at various locations, including Gallery r (100 College Ave.), where you can view Cat Ashworth’s video installation, “Bee Eye.” Visitors may enter the hexagonshaped structure and be immersed in the sights and sounds of the honeybee, and explore the artist’s perspective on the fragile and crucial

Lost in the Funhouse: Revolution PHOTO PROVIDED

honeybee-human relationship. While there, check out the showcase of works by RIT undergraduates and graduate students from RIT’s College of Imaging Arts and Sciences, many of which are interactive and encourage audience participation. And at the Little Theatre Café (240 East Ave.), visitors can view a showcase of CIAS alum works in the fine arts, illustration, and photography. (All shows are free and take place throughout the Fringe Festival, and are recommended for all ages.) Does your shirt just sit there on your back, keeping you warm and presentable, but otherwise bored? Should we expect a little bit more? I mean, this is the future, right? On Friday, The Little Theatre will host RIT’s Wearable Technology Show, which will feature the convergence of aesthetics and technology in surprising and silly ways. Learn what flying birds, fireflies, invisibility, and blinking lights have to do with adornments. RIT student creators will be on hand to explain the technology and answer questions from the audience. (Friday 9/21 6-6:45 p.m. at Little 1. Admission is free.) The title of Rochester Museum and Science Center’s artsy presentation about the passage of time, “Lost in the Funhouse: Revolution,” calls up images of tripping clumsily through cosmos and this confounding existence. I’m intrigued by the promise of projected planetarium star maps and videos, live computer music, field recordings, and spoken words, all combined to discuss how the shifting of seasons, solar and lunar cycles, and celestial mechanics affects us physically and psychologically. (Thursday 9/20 6-7 p.m., Saturday 9/22 8-9 p.m., Sunday 9/23 6-7 p.m. at RMSC’s Strasenburgh Planetarium. Admission is $8, program is recommended for ages 5+.) RIT is practically dominating the visual-arts aspect of the Fringe Festival, and on Saturday, members of the institute’s community will take over the surface of a downtown church. RIT continues on page 20

rochestercitynewspaper.com City 19

Show

time

Best bets at the Rochester Fringe Fest

Professor of Digital Design Marla Schweppe and students will project “crazy, fairy tale graphics” (according to provided info) on the exterior of Christ Church (141 East Ave.) in an enigmatic and imaginative, temporary transformative project titled “Dragon’s Lair.” (Saturday 9/22 9-9:30 p.m. at Christ Church. Free to spectators of all ages.)

Casey Carlsen’s Picks

It’s not often that dance and science mesh this closely. “AstroDance” is an astrophysics/dance project funded by National Science Foundation and conceived and choreographed by RIT faculty Thomas Warfield that represents concepts of gravitational physics interpreted Day of Dance: Kristi Faulkner Dance PHOTO COURTESY Cherylynn Tsushima through dance. Phew! Heavy. The enterprise is an RIT collaboration involving the National danced to music ranging from Brazilian Girls Institute for the Deaf, the B. Thomas Golisano to Carl Orff. (Saturday 9/22 1-2 p.m. at George College of Computing and Information Eastman House Terrace Garden. Free admission.) Sciences, and the College of Science. (Saturday Finally, Day of Dance offers an opportunity 9/22 6 p.m. at Little Theatre 1. Admission is free.) to see a number of different groups perform PUSH Physical Theatre is technically astride on two separate days. The first day brings the fence between dance and theater, but I am Next Best Thing, Kristi Faulkner Dance, I always eager to include them under the umbrella am Cooper, and Geomantics Dance Theater of dance. I find their work riveting in its feats of (led by Richard Haisma, this company is physical prowess as well as insightful and deeply worth catching). On the second day, enjoy the humorous in content. My 9-year-old alternates concert dance of Juxtapose, the tap of Cheryl between gasping and chuckling appreciatively Johnson (also see her in the highly entertaining when attending their performances. HusbandBill Evans and Company: Modern Dance, and-wife team Darren and Heather Stevenson Modern Tango and Contemporary Dance founded the company in Rochester in 2000 performances) and the percussive dance of out of a desire to “push” the boundaries of Brouhaha. I’m curious about Areadance from traditional theater. During Fringe, the company New York City, premiering Britney Falcon’s will perform two new pieces: “The Evolution newest modern dance work. (Saturday 9/22 of Aviation” and “The Natural World.” Take 12:15-3:15 p.m., Sunday 9/23 noon-3 p.m. at the kids. (Friday 9/21 6-7 p.m. and Saturday RAPA’s East End Theatre. Suggested donation $5.) 9/22 10:30-11:30 p.m. at TheatreROCS at Xerox Auditorium. Tickets cost $15.) Two solo dance performances immediately Big name comedian Patton Oswald headlines caught my eye on the Fringe schedule. I the comedy portion of the Fringe Festival. recommend both of them. Heather Roffe, Possibly best known for his roles in “The an alumni of Garth Fagan Dance, a current King of Queens” and the voice of Remy member of Futurpointe Dance, and one of in “Ratatouille,” Oswald has also appeared the most talented, consistent and professional everywhere from “The Fairly Odd Parents” dancers in Rochester today, performs “Spection to “Community” to “Grand Theft Auto.” An — Intro/Retro.” The show features selections accomplished stand-up comedian and writer from her more recent choreography set to (he most recently penned “Zombie Spaceship music ranging from Aretha Franklin to tango to Wasteland”) and with five comedy albums Meredith Monk. (Saturday 9/22 4:30-5:30 p.m., under his belt — and just as many stand-up Sunday 9/23 6:30-7:30 p.m. at Geva Theatre specials — Oswald will bring the geek-friendly Nextstage. Tickets cost $15.) laughs. (Saturday 9/22 8 p.m. at Kodak Hall at Relatively new to the Rochester Dance Eastman Theater. Tickets cost $15-$55.) scene is Mariah Maloney Dance. Maloney is a Braving the long, long hike from Auburn former member of the renowned Trisha Brown is The Great Chernesky, a musical maelstrom Dance Company. This summer her company blending folky strumming with humor, wit, performed her choreography at the prestigious and humorous wit. Chernesky’s most recent Jacob’s Pillow Dance Festival. During Fringe, album, “Spilled Brews & Busted Stools,” just she will appear in a solo set to traditional Irish music. Her company will present a 14-member hit earlier this month, so you can expect just ensemble piece she created inspired by Baroque as much when he comes to Java’s as part of Fringe. His Davey Crocket raccoon hat will choral compositions and an edgy female sextet

Willie Clark’s Picks

20 City SEPTEMBER 12-18, 2012

continues from page 19

probably be there, too. (Friday 9/21 8 p.m. at Java’s. Free admission.) Sure, ukuleles have become sort of a thing now: a smaller and higher-pitched answer to those loud and lavishing guitars that used to be all the rage. Oliver Brown and His Extraordinary Ukuleles blends this mystical sea-shanty instrument with humorous song topics ranging from Shakespeare to the wonders of the peanutbutter sandwich. He’s also had a song appear on “Sesame Street,” so take that credential for what you will. (Friday 9/21 7-8 p.m. at Bernuzio’s Uptown Music. Tickets cost $5.) Dear Dexter (and yes, the group takes the name from the serial-killer show you’re probably thinking about) will bring some acoustic-laden rock ‘n’ roll to the Fringe Fest. The group, fronted by Jason Morgan, is shifting and growing. But Morgan’s central vocals and songwriting cement the group strongly in alternative-rock territory, while retaining the intimacy acoustic instruments allow. (Thursday 9/20 9:30 p.m., Saturday 9/22 5 p.m. at Java’s. Free admission.) And sometimes you just need to have fun. Comedic hip-hop duo Garden Fresh, made up of Professor Fizizizt and Tha Dome, takes the style and ground that hip-hop makes as soil and creates something else: a polite, fiscally responsible rap group that is as profound as it is hysterical. You won’t find alcohol-promoting jams here (instead the group praises water with songs like… “Water”) or rap-battling egos (see; “Sitting Politely”). (Friday 9/21 and Saturday 9/22 9:30 p.m. at Bernunzio’s Uptown Music. Tickets cost $5.) Writing a good song and writing a good story aren’t really that different. Weaving these two art forms together at the seams, Howie Lester is equal parts musician and storyteller, bringing in influences from just about every road-faring and wandering people you could imagine. Blues, gypsy, klezmer, Cajun, and other roots traditions all rolled into one ball

Patton Oswald PHOTO PROVIDED

made of storytelling yarn in his performance, “The Arkansas Traveler Meets Mulla Nasrudin.” (Saturday 9/22 10 p.m. at the Little

Café. Free admission.)

Paloma Capanna’s Picks

The Eastman School of Music students creating “Hide the Moon,” an original adaptation of Oscar Wilde’s “Salome,” are billing the event by the emotions infatuation, loathing, fear, and lust. Who doesn’t want an hour of high drama? The student group, led by Andrew Pramuk, are infusing drama, music, movement, and original arrangements to tell the Biblical tale of Salome requesting the head of John the Baptist on a platter for her dance of the seven veils. There will be actors as musicians and musicians as actors in a show that Pramuk describes on Kickstarter as “theater like a rock concert.” (Wednesday 9/19 8:30-9:30 p.m., Saturday 9/22 10:30-11:30 p.m. at RAPA’s East End Theatre. Admission is free.) Raise your parasols to the skies as the voices of the Harlem Gospel Choir descend upon the Fringe Festival and lead you home to that place of “Hallelujah!” After 26 years of touring the world, performing for presidents and royalty, and alongside legendary musicians from Sonny Bono to Josh Groban, who hasn’t heard of this group? Its 65 members range in age from 17 to 70, touring in a simple configuration of nine singers, keyboard, and drums. Come out to sway to songs like “Oh Happy Day” or dance in the aisles to songs like “When the Saints Come Marching In.” Rochester gospel sensations The Campbell Brothers open. (Friday 9/21 8 p.m. at Kodak Hall at Eastman Theatre. Tickets cost $10-$40.) Not performing in Fringe? You can still participate. Multimedia artist and ESM student Peter Ferry brings a solo percussion performance to the festival, including his work “Nostalgia Project.” The musical piece was written especially for Ferry by ESM graduate Matt Evans. You can go to nostalgia.cias.rit.edu to listen to a bit of the work and then submit a photo of your own that evokes feelings of nostalgia. Evans previously performed with ESM’s new music group OSSIA, and was awarded a 2012-13 post-graduate fellowship to work with Bang on a Can. He also works with So Percussion, Nexus, and Ensemble Signal. (Thursday 9/20 6-7 p.m., Saturday 9/22 1-2 p.m. at Hatch Recital Hall, ESM. Tickets cost $5.) Improvisation upon the church organ is not a new thing. But, for Fringe, here comes a triple-improv of church organ, dance, and images. Set in historic Christ Church, “Spirits Within” will involve Stephen Kennedy on the organ, dancers from FuturPointe, and multimedia displays projected onto the dancers from RIT Professor Marla Schweppe and 3Ddigital-design students. Kennedy is director

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Hide the Moon PHOTO COURTESY Gerry Szymanski

of music and organist at Christ Church and is an instructor of sacred music at ESM. FuturPointe fuses Caribbean, African, Latin, Reggae, and urban dance. Schweppe uses her theatrical background to create a virtual stage, animatronics, and more. (Thursday 9/20 9:30 p.m., Friday 9/21 8 & 9 p.m., Saturday 9/22 8 p.m. at Christ Church. Tickets cost $10.) Esther Rogers has written and will direct “Death of (An) Artist” as a multi-disciplinary work that involves improvisation. Actors, musicians, and dancers will use elements from a script with interactive improvisation to ask “Who killed Artist?” while exploring the boundaries of each one’s individual art forms. Rogers is trained as a classical cellist and teaches at the Rochester Contemporary School of Music. With questioning the boundaries of one’s discipline being en vogue, this work seems perfectly suited for Fringe. (Friday 9/21 8-9 p.m., Sunday 9/23 8-9 p.m. at RAPA’s East End Theatre. Tickets cost $10-$12. Free workshop Friday 9/21 9:15-10 p.m. for ages 12+)

8 p.m. and Saturday 9/22 4:30-4:50 p.m. at Manhattan Square Park. Admission is free.) If you’ve ever seen her at a drag brunch, as part of the Big Wigs, or acting in a local theater production, you know that Kasha Davis is a born entertainer. She sings, she dances, she tips a box of wine with style and pizzazz. And now Davis is back with her own one-woman show, “There’s Always Time for a Cocktail.” Straight outta the suburbs, Davis will beguile audiences with the story of how little Eddie Popil of Scranton, PA, grew up to become an international celebrity housewife. Expect music, heartfelt drama, and party games. Recommended for ages 13 and up. (Thursday 9/20 10 p.m., Saturday 9/22 9 p.m., Sunday 9/23 5 p.m. at TheatreROCS at Xerox Auditorium. Tickets cost $15.) A favorite of Fringe festivals around the world, John Clancy’s “The Event” is one of those plays you’re not supposed to talk about too much for fear of giving it all away. So I won’t. All I’ll say is that it’s a very meta work that will make you simultaneously sit back, lean forward, and think even as your head pops off. Recommended for ages 14 and up. (Wednesday 9/19 7-8 p.m., Friday 9/21 6-7 p.m. at Geva Theatre Nextstage. Tickets cost $15.)

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Eric Rezsnyak’s Picks

The headliner act that made everyone go “Ooooooooo!” at the press conference, Bandaloop will undoubtedly be the most eye-popping experience at the inaugural Fringe Festival. This world-renowned aerial dance troupe performs vertical routines while suspended from climbing ropes. It has danced on the sides of the Seattle Space Needle, New York Stock Exchange, and the fjords of Stavanger, Norway. In Rochester it will present excerpts from “Bound(less)” on the side of the 21-story One HSBC Plaza at 100 Chestnut Street. On Thursday night, head down to the adjacent Manhattan Square Park with a mat or reclining chair, and check out free family-friendly activities in the park, along with food and drink. (A more family-friendly Bandaloop performance will take place Saturday afternoon, without the additional activities in the park.) (Thursday 9/20

“There’s Always Time for a Cocktail” PHOTO PROVIDED

For something a little more adult, A Night of Laughs will bring in comedic talent from

New York City, Chicago, Los Angeles, and Philadelphia. Among the performers are Chicago comedian/musician Matt Griffo, character comedians Joe Liss and John Rubano (both of Second City), sketch comedian Kirsten O’Brien and Evan Zelnick, and others. The whole thing is hosted by NYC burlesque bombshell Kitty Cockpit, and I heard a rumor that there will be pizza (but don’t quote me on that). Recommended for ages 17 and up. (Friday 9/21 9:30-11:30 p.m. at RAPA’s East End Theatre. Tickets cost $12. Free workshop for ages 17+ Friday 6:15-7:15 p.m.) rochestercitynewspaper.com City 21

Art Exhibits [ OPENINGS/EVENTS ] [ Thursday, September 13 ] Brittany Ryan: Sculptures and Paintings. 7-9 p.m. JGK Galleries, 10 Vick Park A. 734-6581. jgkgalleries.com “Industrial Blues” Landscape Photography by Gunther Cartwright. Mill Art Center & Gallery, 61 N Main St. millartcenter.com “…of life and light,” watercolor paintings and sketchbook drawings by Kristin Malone. 5-7 p.m. My Sister’s Gallery, 505 Mt. Hope Ave. 546-8439 Open Studio. 5:30 p.m. Pike Stained Glass Studios, Inc. 180 St. Paul Street, 2nd Floor. Visit the 104 year old Pike Stained Glass Studio while the Tiffany exhibit is open at the Memorial Art Gallery, where we are also featured. 546-7570. pikestainedglassstudios.com “Visual Music” by Burton Kramer. 5-7 p.m. University Gallery, James R. Booth Hall, RIT, Lomb Memorial Dr. 475-2404. jleugs@ rit.edu [ Friday, September 14 ] Groaing Man Art & Music Party. 6 p.m.-midnight. ARTISANworks, 565 Blossom Road. $10. Mark Groaning’s 50th birthday celebration. Music, art, treats. 585-2887170. groaningman.com “Home is Where the Art Is.” 7-10 p.m. 1975 Gallery, 89 Charlotte St. 1975ish.com “In Company with Angels” Guided Tour. 2 p.m. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. Included in admission: $5-$12. 276-8900. mag.rochester.edu “It’s Hardly Noticeable” by John William Keedy. 7-9 p.m. Community Darkroom Gallery, 713 Monroe Ave. 271-5920. geneseearts.org Second Annual Irondequoit Artists’ Show. 6-9 p.m. I-Square Visions, 693 Titus Ave. 738-0567 Writers and Books/JGK Galleries Poetry & Art Collaboration. 6 p.m. JGK Galleries, 10 Vick Park A. $10-$12. Sixteen poets will recite work written in response to artwork by Brittany Ryan. 7346581. jgkgalleries.com [ Saturday, September 15 ] Celebration of Women, Creativity, Strength, & Courage Celebration: Honoring Susan B. Anthony. 124 p.m. Arete’ Gallery Wellness Center, 663 N. Winton Rd. Artists painting on the front lawn, food, beverages, paint your very own piece of art on canvas to bring home, and Rachael Ranalletta will be offering readings. 286-9086. aretegallery.com “NY Views” by Judy Soprano. 3-6 p.m. Finger Lakes Gallery and Frame, 175 S. Main St. 3967210. galleryandframe.com “Of Land and Sea” by Kevin T. Murphy and Craig Wilson. 6-8 p.m. Wayne County Council for the Arts, 108 W. Miller St. 315-331-4593. waynearts. wordpress.com 22 City september 12-18, 2012

DANCE | Upstate NY Latin Dance Fest

There are few things sexier and more passionate than Latin dancing. If you’re a fan of the salsa, mambo, cha cha or bachata, you’ll want to check out the Upstate NY Latin Dance Fest, presented by Essence of Rhythm Latin Dance Co. and Imagen Magazine. The event starts Thursday, September 13, and runs through Sunday, September 16. Thursday 9 p.m.-2 a.m. head to a pre-festival salsa clasica at Flat Iron Café (561 State St.), with a free salsa lesson and dancing. Friday night, 9 p.m.-3 a.m., things move to Visual Studies Workshop Auditorium (31 Prince St.), with dance performances by national and international dance professionals and students followed by open dancing. Dance workshops will take place Saturday and Sunday 9 a.m.-6 p.m. at VSW. The classes are open to beginners up to advanced dancers and cover salsa, mambo, zouk, kizomba, cha cha, and other styles. Saturday night another party will take place 9 p.m.3 a.m., and the event closes out with a Sunday night after-party at Flat Iron Café 8 p.m.-midnight. Tickets for the event run from $15 for show/party passes to $135 for a full weekend pass. For more information or tickets call 749-6006 or visit rhythmsociety.org. — BY ERIC REZSNYAK Trollbeads Glass Artisan & Special Event. 1 p.m. Parkleigh, 215 Park Avenue. A unique glass demonstration and exhibition of art inspired jewelry. Trollbeads glass artist, Sarah Johnston, will demonstrate how glass beads are made. Make sure to stop by for special promotional and gift with purchase offers! 800-333-0627. parkleigh.com [ Sunday, September 16 ] Artists Row. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Rochester Public Market, 280 N. Union St. marketfriends.org “Belinda Bryce: Modular Pictures.” 12-5 p.m. Ock Hee’s Gallery, 2 Lehigh St. ockheesgallery.com [ Tuesday, September 18 ] Artist’s Talk: “Eve’s Garden: The Lost Creation” by Keith Howard. 6-8:30 p.m. Axom Gallery, 176 Anderson Ave. 2nd floor, 176 Anderson Ave. 2nd floor. 2326030 x23. axomgallery.com [ CONTINUING ] Art and Vintage on Main, 101 Main St. 101 | 101 by AC Tucker. Through Oct. 5. artandvintageonmain.com Arts & Cultural Council, 277 N. Goodman St. Paula and Berthe Santirocco “Inspiration and Imagination”. Mondays-Fridays,

10 a.m.-4 p.m. 473-4000. artsrochester.org Aviv Cafe, 321 East Ave. Create by Michael P. Slattery. Through Oct. 3. Call for hours. 729-9916 Axom Gallery, 176 Anderson Ave. 2nd floor. “Eve’s Garden: The Lost Creation” by Keith Howard. Mondays-Saturdays. Mon-Fri 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Sat 12-5 p.m. 2326030 x23. axomgallery.com Black Radish Gallery, 274 N. Goodman. “Face to Face”. Mondays-Saturdays. Mon-Fri 10 a.m.-6 p.m., Sat noon-6 p.m. 413-1278. blackradishstudio.com Books Etc., 78 W. Main St. “Feathers, Fantasy, and Film” by Linda DeVeronica, Doris Britt, and Elaine Doe. Through Oct. 31. Call for hours. 474-4116. books_etc@yahoo.com Bridge Art Gallery University of Rochester Medical Center, 300 Crittenden Blvd. “The Road Less Traveled.” Through Oct. 19. Call for hours. 275-3571. omhpromotion@gmail.com Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. “Rough Truth: Caricatures by Alison Cowles.”. Through Oct. 3. Mon-Sun 8 p.m.- 2 a.m. 4542966. lobbydigital.com Coach Street Clay, 39 Coach St. “Darwinian Encounters: continues on page 24

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Check back with City Newspaper on Wednesday, October 17, for our “Best of Rochester” issue and find out who YOU picked to be named Best of Rochester 2012. rochestercitynewspaper.com City 23

ART EVENT | Artist Row

Get to meet some of Rochester’s working visual artists with the 8th Annual Artist Row event Sunday, September 16, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. at the Rochester Public Market (280 N. Union St.). Artist Row will feature more than 150 local artists showing off and selling their wares in a variety of media, everything from ceramics to jewelry, paintings to photography, fiber arts to sculpture. It’s a great place to pick up a new piece of décor or artistic gifts for the fast-approaching holiday season, or just to see local creative talent in action. In addition to the visual artists, Artist Row will host community organizations as well as live performances by area musicians, dancers, and singers. Plus, snap up some of your favorite Public Market food fare. Admission to Artist Row is free. The event is put on by Friends of the Public Market. For more information check marketfriends.org/artistrow.html. — BY ERIC REZSNYAK

Art Exhibits An Exhibition of Work by Lynne Hobaica.” Through Sep. 15. Call for hours. 474-3103. coachstreetclay.com Davison Gallery, Cultural Life Center, Roberts Wesleyan College, 2301 Westside Dr. “Reflections”. MondaysSaturdays. Mon-Fri 11 a.m.-5 p.m., Sat 1-4 p.m. 594-6442 A Different Path Gallery, 27 Market St. Current Visual Explorations 2012. Through

Sep. 29. An exhibition of photobased, computer-generated prints: when and where analog meets digital. A visual reflection on the impact of digital technology on vision and creation by Bruno Chalifour and Howard Koft, NY Artists’ Guild co-founders. 637-5494 Equal=Grounds, 750 South Ave. “things that are still” by Heather Swenson and Jenny Magruder. Through Sep. 30. Tue-Fri 7 a.m.-Midnight, Sat-Sun 10 a.m.Midnight. gallery@equalgrounds. com

Genesee Co-op Federal Credit Union, 395 Gregory St. The Work of Alan Stewart. MondaysFridays. Mon-Wed 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; Thu-Fri 10 a.m.-6 p.m. 461-2230. genesee.coop George Eastman House, 900 East Ave. “Lost Birds: Sculptures by Todd McGrain.” TuesdaysSundays. Through Oct 21: “Ideas in Things.” | Through Sep 16: “See: Untold Stories.” | Ongoing: “Cameras from the Technology Collection,” and “The Remarkable George Eastman.” | Tue-Sat 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Thu 10 a.m.-8 p.m., Sun 1-5 p.m. 2713361. eastmanhouse.org Hartnett Gallery, Wilson Commons, University of Rochester, River Campus. “To Toy With the Attic” Paintings by Alessandra Sulpy. Tuesdays-Sundays. Thu-Fri 11 a.m.-7 p.m., Sat-Sun 12-5 p.m. blogs.rochester.edu/hartnett High Falls Fine Art Gallery, 60 Browns Race. 5th Annual Rochester Art Supply Invitational Art Show. Wednesdays-Sundays. Wed-Fri 11 a.m.-5:30 p.m.; Sat Noon-5:30 p.m.; Sun 1-5 p.m. 325-2030. centerathighfalls.org Image City Photography Gallery, 722 University Ave. “Adriatic Impressions and Places of Faith.” Wednesdays-Sundays. Wed-Sat 11 a.m.-7 p.m.; Sun noon-4 p.m. 482-1976. imagecityphotographygallery.com International Art Acquisitions, 3300 Monroe Ave. Original Bauhaus style Still Life paintings by Peruvian artist Roberto Salas. Through Sep. 30. Mon-Fri 10 a.m.-9 p.m.; Sat 10 a.m.-6 p.m.; Sun Noon-5 p.m. 264-1440. internationalartacquisitions.com Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. “In Company with Angels: Seven Rediscovered Tiffany Windows.” WednesdaysSundays. Wed-Sun 11 a.m.-5 p.m., Thu until 9 p.m. 276-8900. mag.rochester.edu

Mercer Gallery at Monroe Communtiy College, 1000 E. Henrietta Rd. “Personal Expressions by Artists Julianna Furlong Williams.” MondaysFridays. Mon-Thu 10 a.m.-7 p.m., Fri 11 a.m.-4 p.m. monroecc.edu/go/mercer Mill Art Center & Gallery, 61 N Main St. “Industrial Blues” Landscape Photography by Gunther Cartwright. MondaysSaturdays. Mon-Fri & Sat 11 a.m.-3 p.m., Fri 11 a.m.-8 p.m. 624-7740. millartcenter.com My Sister’s Gallery, 505 Mt. Hope Ave. “…of life and light,” watercolor paintings and sketchbook drawings by Kristin Malone. Through Oct. 7. Daily 10 a.m.-8 p.m. 546-8439 Nazareth College Arts Center Gallery, 4245 East Ave. Annual Faculty Show. Tuesdays-Sundays. Tue-Thu & Sun 12-5 p.m., Fri-Sat 12-8 p.m. 389-2700 Nazareth College Colacino Gallery, 4245 East Ave. “Selected Works, Models & Verses,” a Jim Quinn exhibition. Wednesdays-Sundays. Wed-Sun 12-5 p.m. 389-5073. naz.edu Oxford Gallery, 267 Oxford St. “Water Work” featuring Chris Baker, Barbara Fox, and Roland ‘Chip’ Stevens. TuesdaysSaturdays. Tue-Fri noon-5 p.m., Sat 10 a.m.-5 p.m. 271-5885. oxfordgallery.com Pat Rini Rohrer Gallery, 71 S Main St. “The Back Forty,” Retrospective of work by Pat Rini Rohrer. Through Sep. 15. MonTue 10 a.m.-6 p.m.; Wed-Fri 10 a.m.-8 pm.; Sat 10 a.m.-6 p.m.; Sun 12:30-4 p.m. 394-0030. prrgallery.com RIT Bevier Gallery, 90 Lomb Memorial Dr., Booth Building 7A. Also in NTID Dyer Arts Center. Frans Wildenhain 195075: Creative and Commercial American Ceramics at MidCentury.” Through Oct. 2. Hours vary by gallery. rit.edu/wild

FILM | Latino Film Festival

Our hometown is rich with film festivals, each seeking to provide perspective on different experiences through the international language of art. The second installment of the Latino Film Festival will take place Saturday, September 15, 1-11 p.m., at St. John Fisher College (3690 East Ave.). Admission is free, and the line-up includes “Viva Cuba,” a story about two children whose friendship is threatened by their parents’ differences; “Santo Domingo Blues,” a documentary about singer-songwriter Luis Vargas and Bachata, the guitar blues of Santo Domingo; “Borinqueneers,” about the only all-Hispanic unit in U.S. Army history; “Un Cuento Chino,” (pictured) about the unlikely encounter between a bitter Buenos Aires native and a mysterious Chinese man; and a social with music and food following the screenings. For more information, call 234-7660, or visit prfestival.com/filmfest.html. —BY REBECCA RAFFERTY Rochester Contemporary Arts Center, 137 East Ave. “Whose Space? Our Space!”/ Evinn Neadow. WednesdaysSundays. Wed-Sun 1-5 p.m., Fri 1-10 p.m. 461-2222. rochestercontemporary.org The Shoe Factory Art Co-op, 250 N. Goodman St. Green: What Does it Mean?. Through Sep. 26. First Fri 6-9 p.m., Second Sat 12-4 p.m., Wed 12-5 p.m. studio212@shoefactoryarts.

com. shoefactoryarts.com Spectrum Gallery at Lumiere Photo, 100 College Ave. Brian Oglesbee Photography. TuesdaysSaturdays. Tue/Thu 9 a.m.-6 p.m., Wed/Fri/Sat 10 a.m.-2 p.m. 461-4447. lumierephoto.com Starry Nites Café, 696 University Ave. “Clouds in My Coffee.”. Through Nov. 24. Mon-Thu 7:30 a.m.-10 p.m., Fri 7:30 a.m.-midnight, Sat 8 a.m.-midnight, Sun

FRANS WILDENHAIN 1950-75: CREATIVE AND COMMERCIAL AMERICAN CERAMICS AT MID-CENTURY EXHIBITION AUGUST 20-OCTOBER 2, 2012 BEVIER GALLERY AND DYER ARTS CENTER AT RIT CAMPUS for more information visit WWW.RIT.EDU/WILD

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9 a.m.-9 p.m. 271-2630. shoefactoryarts.com Steve Carpenter Gallery & Art Center, 175 Anderson Ave. NYFSG 5th Annual Art Exhibition. Through Sep. 15, 1-4 p.m. 7581410. nyfigurestudyguild.com Tower Fine Arts Center, SUNY Brockport, 180 Holley St. “Telling Their Stories: The Lingering Legacy of Hurricane Katrina.” MondaysFridays. Mon-Fri 10 a.m.-4 p.m. 395-2787. brockport.edu Williams Gallery at First Unitarian Church, 220 S Winton Rd. “Branching Out,” work by Rochester Area Fiber Artists. Mondays-Fridays. Mon-Fri 10 a.m.-2 p.m. and 4:30-8 p.m. 2719070. rochesterunitarian.org [ CALL FOR ARTWORK ] Call for Art: I Want My Mona Lisa: Tribute to a Renaissance Icon. Deadline Sep 22. Call for artwork relating to show’s title for September 7-26 exhibit. Next theme: “Tone it Down a Notch: Minimal Art.” Deadline October 20. More information and more calls for art at shoefactoryarts.com. Call for Art: “Landmarks of Wayne County.” Must be delivered to Wayne County Council for the Arts October 5 or 6. Adult & Youth categories; photos must be taken within Wayne Country between October 1, 2011 and September 30, 2012. Information: 315-3314593, waynearts.wordpress.com. Call for Art Proposals for New Roz Steiner Art Gallery at Genesee Community College.

Individuals and groups working in all media are welcome to submit proposals. Submit bio, resume, digital JPEG samples to GCC Art Department Office, Art Gallery Committee, Genesee Community College, One College Road, Batavia, NY 14020. The new gallery will be ready for exhibitions beginning in early 2011. For more info, email hsjones@genesee.edu. Call for Emerging Film- and Videomakers. Ongoing. Submit films and videos to the monthly New York Filmmakers Quarterly screening series at the Little Theatre. Films of maximum 30 minutes must have been produced in New York State in the last two years. For more information, email emergingfilmmakers@yahoo.com. Call for Submissions: Art-RocNY Showcase 2013. Early submissions by September 29, final submissions due November 10. For info and entries, email info@jgkgalleries.com. Central Library Offers Exhibit Opportunities for Artists at Lower Link Gallery. Space currently available free of charge. Applications available at libraryweb.org; call 428-8051 for more information. Sonnenberg Photo Contest. Deadline October 1. Photos must be taken at Sonneberg Gardens and not have been published elsewhere. For information, visit sonnenberg.org.

Comedy [ Wednesday, September 12 ] Stand Up Comedy Open Mic. 7:30 p.m. Boulder Coffee Co., 739 Park Ave. Sign up at 7. Show starts 7:30. 697-0235 [ Thursday, September 13Saturday, September 15 ] Ben Bailey/Dario Joseph. Sep. 1315. Comedy Club, 2235 Empire Blvd. Thu 7:30 p.m., Fri-Sat 7:30 & 9 p.m. $9-$12. 671-9080. thecomedyclub.us [ Friday, September 14 ] After Bedtime with Jimmy LeChase and Friends. 8 p.m. The Space, Hungerford Bldg, 1115 E. Main St., Suite 248. $5. afterbedtimeshows.com [ Tuesday, September 18 ] Laugh Riot Underground: Stand-Up Comedy Showcase. Tuesdays, 9-11 p.m. Dub Land Underground, 315 Alexander St. laughriotcomedy.com [ Wednesday, September 19 ] Stand Up Comedy Open Mic. 7:30 p.m. Boulder Coffee Co., 739 Park Ave. Sign up at 7. Show starts 7:30. 697-0235

Dance [ Thursday, September 13Sunday, September 16 ] Upstate NY Latin Dance

Festival. Visual Studies Workshop, 31 Prince St. $15$135, register. Various times and locations. 770-8572. rhythm-society.org [ Friday, September 14 ] LehrerDance. 7:30 p.m. Spurrier Dance Studio, University of Rochester, River Campus. $5$10; Tickets can be purchased at the Common Market in Wilson Commons. 273-5150 [ Sunday, September 16 ] Tap Dance Jam Session w/ Live Music. 2 p.m. Tango Cafe, 389 Gregory St. Rochester’s GrooveDogs deliver ‘cool’ jazz animated by the dauntless dynamic tap dance artistry of Cheryl Johnson. Bring your dancing shoes. 271-4930. tangocafedance.com [ Wednesday, September 12 ] Lindy Jam: Weekly Swing Dance. Wednesdays, 8:45 p.m. Tango Cafe Dance Studio (3rd Floor Ballroom), 389 Gregory St. Admission is free if it’s your first time. 271-4930. lindyjam. com [ Wednesday, September 19 ] Lindy Jam: Weekly Swing Dance. Wednesdays, 8:45 p.m. Tango Cafe Dance Studio (3rd Floor Ballroom), 389 Gregory St. Admission is free if it’s your first time. 271-4930. lindyjam. com

Festivals [ Through Sunday, September 16 ] Greentopia Festival. High Falls neighborhood and more locations. Films, music, innovation, ecofest. 287-5560. greentopiafest.com [ Friday, September 14Saturday, September 15 ] Finger Lakes Cork & Fork. Rodman Lott & Sons Farm, Rte 414. Fri 6-9 p.m., Sat 11 a.m.-5 p.m. $20-$50. Showcases 60 local farms, food producers, wineries and restaurants. fingerlakescorkandfork.com [ Friday, September 14Sunday, September 16 ] Irondequoit Oktoberfest. FridaysSundays. Camp Eastman, 1558 Lakeshore Blvd. 336-6070. irondequoit.org [ Saturday, September 15 ] Annual Tastin’ the Blues. 12-4 p.m. Penfield Amphitheater and Kiwanis Stage. Free. Chili judging, beer sampling, blues music, and cruise car display. 340-8655. penfield.org Native American Heritage Day. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Letchworth State Park, 1 Letchworth State Park. Dance, athletic and craft demonstrations, and food. 4933625 North Winton Village Festival of the Arts. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. East Main St. and Winton Rd. Arts, crafts, food, prizes, and live music. 259-5529

[ Saturday, September 15Sunday, September 16 ] Finger Lakes Fiber Arts Festival. Hemlock Fairgrounds, 1 Fair Street. Sat 10 a.m.-5 p.m, Sun 10 a.m.-4 p.m. $5. Fiber art vendors, awards, demos, equipment, book sales. gvhg.org Harvest Celebration of Food and Wine. Keuka Lake Wine Trail, Penn Yan. Sat 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Sun 11 a.m.-5 p.m. $19-$25. 800-4404898. fingerlakeswinecountry.com Palmyra Canaltown Days. Palmyra. Sat 10 a.m.-6 p.m., Sun 10 a.m.4 p.m. Arts, crafts, activities, food. palmyracanaltowndays.org [ Sunday, September 16 ] 15th Annual German Festival. 12:30-4:30 p.m. Lucas Vineyards, 3862 County Road 150. $5, 12 and under free. 607532-4825. lucasvineyards.com 17th Annual Purple Foot Festival. 11 a.m.-6 p.m. Casa Larga Vineyards, 2287 Turk Hill Rd. $10-$15, under age 21 free. 223-4210. casalarga.com

Kids Events [ Saturday, September 15 ] Astronaut Mission: The Future. 1 p.m. Rochester Museum and Science Center, 657 East Ave. 271-1880. rmsc.org [ Saturday, September 15Sunday, September 16 ] Trains Weekend. The Strong National Museum of Play, 1 continues on page 26

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FESTIVAL | Greentopia

Greentopia returns to Rochester this week, transforming the High Falls area to a hub focused on the future of green living, working, and play. The entire seven-day festival features films, music, a green business expo, and an eco festival. Celebrate sustainability at the business-to-business conference, Greentopia Innovation, which will take place Friday, September 14, at Rochester Plaza Hotel (70 State St.). A host of leaders in green biz from Rochester and beyond will speak on a wide range of business and innovation topics. Breakfast, lunch, and happy hour are included. The cost to attend is $125 (50 percent off for students). Register for the conference at greentopiafestival.com/innovation. The new Greentopia Music series will run Saturday and Sunday, September 15-16, in and around High Falls. On the Ecofest Main Stage, catch acts including the Driftwood Sailors, This Other Life, Amanda Lee Peters, Deep Blue Dream, and El Rojo Jazz. A classical series curated by the Ying Quartet will feature three one-hour shows at the Norry Trolly Barn Raw Space (the former Jillian’s). Pieces to be performed include “Tarantella,” a world premiere by Jeff Tyzik (Saturday 2-3 p.m.), a family concert Sunday 11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. with Gibbs & Main; and an afternoon on Debussy and nature Sunday 1-2 p.m. The free Greentopia Ecofest will also take place Saturday and Sunday around High Falls. The event includes organic and locavore foods, an alternative-fuel vehicle show, “From the Ground” fashion show, demonstrations, a wine pavilion, kids’ zone, more than 150 vendors, and art & garden installations. The festival runs 10 a.m.-7 p.m. on Saturday and 11 a.m.-5 p.m. on Sunday. For more information on all Greentopia events, visit greentopiafestival.com. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY

Kids Events Manhattan Square. Sat 11 a.m.–4 p.m., Sun 1 p.m.–4 p.m. 263-2700. thestrong.org [ Monday, September 17 ] Family Movie: The Parent Trap. 2 p.m. Brighton Memorial Library, 2300 Elmwood Ave. Snacks are welcome. 784-5300. brightonlibrary.org K-2 Book Club. 4-4:45 p.m. Seymour Library, 161 East Ave. Registration required. 637-1050 Toddler Book Club: All Aboard! The Strong National Museum of Play, 1 Manhattan Square. 10:30 a.m., 11:30 a.m. & 12:30 p.m. 263-2700. thestrong.org [ Tuesday, September 18 ] Craft Series for Tweens. 6:307:30 p.m. Gates Public Library, 902 Elmgrove Rd. Ages 8-13. The craft will be “Fall Tissue Wreath,” and can be completed in an hour’s time. Register. 2476446 26 City september 12-18, 2012

[ Wednesday, September 19 ] B.R.A.T.S: Brilliant Readers Active in Teen Service. 7-8:15 p.m. Seymour Library, 161 East Ave. Grades 6-8. 637-1050 Library Club. 4-5 p.m. Seymour Library, 161 East Ave. Grades 3-5. Registration required. 6371050 Pirate Party. 4 p.m. Gates Public Library, 902 Elmgrove Rd. All ages. Registration required. 2476446

Lectures [ Wednesday, September 12 ] Kodak History Lecture. 6:30 p.m. George Eastman House, 900 East Ave. With optics expert Martin Scott. 271-3361. eastmanhouse.org Opera Guild Lecture Series: “Heroic Women in Opera.” 7-9 p.m. Fairport Library, 1

[ Thursday, September 13 ] “Crafting Modernism(s): American Studio Ceramics in the Post-War Period.” 4-5:30 p.m. Carlson Auditorium, RIT Campus, Lomb Memorial Dr. With Dr. Jonathan Clancy of Sotheby’s Institute of Art. rit.edu/wild “Napoleon in Egypt: The Beginning of Egyptology” with Dr. Robert Brier. 7:30 p.m. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. $5. 276-8900. archaeological.org A Plant-Based Diet: Eating for Health and Happiness. 7-9 p.m. JCC Rochester, 1200 Edgewood Ave. With Ted Barnett, M.D. Food samples and recipes by Carol Barnett. 461-2000. rochesterveg@gmail.com. rochesterveg.org Shannon Lecture Series: “The Dance of the Fertile Universe: Chance and Destiny Embrace” with George V. Coyne S.J. 7 p.m. Nazareth College Shults Center, 4245 East Ave. 389-2728. cbochen4@naz.edu [ Friday, September 14 ] “Scientific Evolution: A Challenge to American Society” with George V. Coyne S.J. 1:30 p.m. Nazareth College Linehan Chapel, 4245 East Ave. 389-2728. cbochen4@ naz.edu [ Sunday, September 16 ] Glass Artists Valerie O’Hara of Pike Stained Glass Studios, Inc. 2 p.m. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. Included in admission: $5-$12. 276-8900. mag.rochester.edu [ Monday, September 17 ] Speaker: Arild Remmereit. 6:30 p.m. Tower Fine Arts Center, SUNY Brockport, 180 Holley St. 395-2496. brockport.edu [ Tuesday, September 18 ] “Archeology and the Second Battle of Sackets Harbor: Why the Militia Deserves Its Due,” by Matthew Kirk. 7:30 p.m. Geneva Historical Society, 543 South Main St. 315-789-5151. info@ genevahistoricalsociety.com. genevahistoricalsociety.com “Rochester War Plants During World War II” with Bob Marcotte. 7:30 p.m. Mountain Rise United Church, 2 Mountain Rise. 2233989. perintonhistoricalsociety.org “The Servant Economy: Where America’s Elite is Sending the Middle Class” with Jeff Faux. 4 p.m. Webb Auditorium, James E. Booth Hall, RIT Campus, Lomb Memorial Dr. 475-7052. rhira@ mail.rit.edu [ Wednesday, September 19 ] A Conversation on Race: A Process of Discovery. 6:308:30 p.m. Pittsford Communtiy Library, 24 State St. Free, register. 249-5481 Opera Guild Lecture Series: “Wegner’s Parsifal.” 79 p.m. Fairport Library, 1 Village Landing. With Peter Dundas. 223-9091. mercuryoperarochester.org

Literary Events [ Wednesday, September 12 ] Brockport Wtriter’s Forum: Peter Benson. 8 p.m. Campus Center, SUNY Brockport, 180 New Campus Dr. [ Wednesday, September 12-Thursday, September 13 ] Contemporary Book Discussion Group: “Clara and Mr. Tiffany” by Susan Vreeland. Irondequoit Library, Helen McGraw Branch, 2180 E. Ridge Rd. Wed 7 p.m., Thu 3 p.m. 336-6060 Reading & Discussion: “Making Sense of the Civil War.” 1 p.m. Penfield Community Center, 1985 Baird Rd. 340-8655. penfield.org Women Who Love to Read: “Little Bird of Heaven” by Joyce Carol Oates. 7 p.m. Lift Bridge Book Shop, 45 Main St. 637-2260. liftbridgebooks.com [ Thursday, September 13 ] Annie & Joe’s Eclectic Book Club: “The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn” by Mark Twain. 6:30 p.m. Lift Bridge Book Shop, 45 Main St. 6372260. liftbridgebooks.com Author Signing: “The Playbook for Dads: Parenting Your Kids in the Game of Life” by Jim Kelly. 6 p.m. Barnes & Noble, Greece, 330 Greece Ridge Center Dr. 2274020. bn.com Book Signing: “Frans Wildenhain 1950-75: Creative and Commercial American Ceramics at Mid-Century.” 11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. Shop One2, Global Village, RIT Campus, Lomb Memorial Dr. rit.edu/wild Books Sandwiched In. 12:1212:52 p.m. Central Library, Kate Gleason Auditorium, 115 South Ave. “Keynes Haynek: The Clash That Defined Modern Economics” by Nicholas Wapshott. Reviewer: David L. Fiedler. 428-8350. libraryweb. org The Greater Rochester Russell Set. 7 p.m. Writers and Books, 740 University Ave. Tim Madigan on “Teaching Bertrand Russell” The Challenge for the 21st Century.” $3 to nonmembers. tmadigan@rochester.rr.com. wab.org Just Poets: “Le Mot Juste” & Open Mic. 7 p.m. Barnes and Noble, Pittsford Plaza. 586-6020 Readers Theater: “Romeo and Juliet.” 6:30 p.m. Books Etc., 78 W. Main St. 474-4116. books_ etc@yahoo.com Reading and Book Signing: “A Writer’s Life” by Joe Milutis. 7-9 p.m. Visual Studies Workshop, 31 Prince Street. 442-8676. vsw.org [ Tuesday, September 18Wednesday, September 19 ] Book Discussion: “When the Emperor Was Divine” by Julie Otsuka. 1:30-3 p.m. Brighton Memorial Library, 2300 Elmwood Ave. Tue 1:30-3 p.m., Wed 7-8:30 p.m. 784-5300. brightonlibrary.org

LIT/ART | Eat, Pray, Love Gala/Art and Poetry at JGK Gallery

Rochester’s literary culture hub, Writers & Books, will hold two bashes this weekend in celebration of the written word. On Friday, September 14, head over to JGK Gallery (10 Vick Park A), for a night of Art and Poetry. The event takes place at 6 p.m., and features readings by 16 Rochester poets who have written works in response to California artist Brittany Ryan, whose paintings and sculptures will be on display in the gallery. Admission is $12 or $10 for W&B members. For more info, call 473-2590 or visit wab.org. On Saturday, September 15, at 7 p.m., Writers & Books will host its Eat, Pray, Love Gala at Century Club of Rochester (566 East Ave.). Enjoy live music, performances by local youth writers, a silent auction including items from authors Elizabeth Gilbert, Debra Dean, and Ann Patchett, as well as Italian, Indian, and Indonesian fare. Recommended attire is tropical elegance and Indian summer. Tickets to the gala are $100. An optional patron reception will take place 6-7 p.m., featuring wine and other goodies, at $150 per patron. For registration or more information, call 473-2590 x106 or email alexasf@wab.org. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY [ Wednesday, September 19 ] American Wars: “Destiny of the Republic” by Candice Millard. 7 p.m. Barnes & Noble, Greece, 330 Greece Ridge Center Dr. 227-4020. bn.com Graphic Novel Group: “My Friend Dahmer” by Derf Backderf. 6:30 p.m. Lift Bridge Book Shop, 45 Main St. 637-2260. liftbridgebooks.com History Book Club: “Presidential Courage: Brave Leaders and how they changed America” by Michael R. Beschloss. 7-9 p.m. Wood Library, 134 North Main St. 394-1381. woodlibrary.org Reading Jane (and Other Female Authors). 3:30 p.m. Books Etc., 78 W. Main St. 474-4116. books_ etc@yahoo.com

Gulick Rd. Easy-paced hike. 3746160. rmsc.org Roc Cirque presents Whirly Wednesday. 7 p.m. Genesee Valley Park, Elmwood Ave. Live DJs are playing during the session to help you stay moving. Extra hoops and poi are available. 683-5734 Upper St. Helena Hike.10 a.m. Letchworth State Park, 1 Letchworth State Park. Bring a lunch. 493-3625

Museum Exhibits

[ Friday, September 14 ] Public Star Party. 8:30-10 p.m. Mendon Ponds Park near Scout camping area on Hopkins Point Rd. 703-9876. rochesterastronomy.org

[ Through Thursday, September 18 ] Quilts & Samplers. The Rochester Historical Society, Rundel Memorial Building, 2nd floor, 115 South Ave. 4288470, rochesterhistory.org. Tue-Wed 10 a.m.-3 p.m Thu 11 a.m.-3 p.m. $3-$5, free to members.

Recreation [ Wednesday, September 12 ] Senior Sojourn. 11 a.m.-noon. Cumming Nature Center, 6472

[ Thursday, September 13 ] Highland Park Talk and Tour. 7 p.m. Highland Park, 171 Reservoir Ave. Given by City Water Bureau representative regarding waterworks in the park. Meet in front of Conservatory. highlandparkconservancy.org

[ Saturday, September 15 ] Genesee Valley Hiking Club: Big Woods Preserve. 11 a.m. Meet where Hold Rd. meets Lake Rd., Webster. Moderate/strenuous 7-9 mile hike. 323-1911. gvhchikes.org Geology at Mount Hope Cemetery. 12:30 p.m. Mount Hope Cemetery, 1133 Mt. Hope Avenue. 461-3494. fomh.org continues on page 28 rochestercitynewspaper.com City 27

Recreation

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Rochester Birding Trip: Montezuma National Wildlife Refuge. 2 p.m. Meet at Bushnell’s Basin park & ride lot. Richard 381-2189, Kimberly 503-2534. rochesterbirding.com Rochester Cycling Alliance’s Bike the Bridges. 9-10:30 a.m. Starts at Genesee Valley Park and ends at High Falls. rochestercyclingalliance.org Rochester Orienteering Club: National Orienteering Day. Highland Park, 171 Reservoir Ave. $8, free for first time participants. Begin between noon and 2 p.m. roc. us.orienteering.org Rochester Walk to Defeat ALS (Lou Gehrig’s Disease). 10 a.m. Ontario Beach Park, 4799 Lake Ave. Fundraiser. 866-499-7257. alsaupstateny.org [ Saturday, September 15Sunday, September 16 ] Third Annual Swain Sportsmen’s Festival. Swain Resort. Sat 7 a.m.-dusk, Sun 7 a.m.-3 p.m. $4 one day spectator pass, $15-$25 archery passes. swain.com

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[ Sunday, September 16 ] Fungi with Fun Guys. 2 p.m. The Thousand Acre Swamp Sanctuary, 1581 Jackson Road. 773-8911 Rochester Kidney Walk. Frontier Field, 1 Morrie Silver Way. Registration 7:30 a.m., walk 9 a.m. Fundraiser. kidneywalk.org [ Monday, September 17 ] A Heart for Ben Golf Tournament Benefit. noon. Ravenwood Golf Club, 929 Lynaugh Rd. $95, $190 twosome, $380 foursome, $37 banquet only at 7 p.m. 415-4345 [ Wednesday, September 19 ] Edible Plant Walk. 10 a.m. Letchworth State Park, 1 Letchworth State Park. 493-3625 Roc Cirque presents Whirly Wednesday. 7 p.m. Genesee Valley Park, Elmwood Ave. Live DJs are playing during the session to help you stay moving. Extra hoops and poi are available. 683-5734

Special Events [ Wednesday, September 12 ] AMA | Rochester Fall Networking. 5:30 p.m. Monroe’s Restaurant, 3001 Monroe Avenue. 645-2924 Roc Nerd Nite. 7 p.m. Veritas Wine Bar, 217 Alexander St. Featuring “Intellectual Gathering or Excuse to Drink: An Explanation of Nerd Nite” with Paul Powers, resident nerd; “Shostakovich’s Truth and Consequences: A Composer’s (Encoded) Art of Survival” with Lara Sipols, RPO Violinist; and “The Tomato: An Exploration of the Modern Food System Through the Tomato” by Chris Hartman, Founder, Good Food Collective.” facebook.com/ nerdniterochester. nerdnite. com 28 City september 12-18, 2012

SPECIAL EVENT | South Wedge-Ucation

The South Wedge is one of the coolest, hippest neighborhoods in Rochester, filled with unique shops and eateries (and people). And Rochester is filled with lots of cool, hip arts and cultural organizations. Mash the two of them together, throw in almost 50 incredible deals on goods, food, and services, and you’ve got City Newspaper’s South Wedge-Ucation event, taking place Thursday, September 13, and presented by Visit Rochester. Come down to the South Wedge neighborhood (South Avenue at Gregory Street is a good place to start) 5-8 p.m. and take advantage of ridiculous deals from more than 40 area merchants. Retailers like Plastic, Thread, Echo Tone Music, Historic Houseparts, Magix, and Needle Drop Records will hook you up with deep discounts on select merchandise. Tango Café, Glover’s Barber Shop, Surface Salon, Now and Zen, and Telltale Tattoo will have deals on dance lessons, haircuts, and gift certificates for tattoos. And if you’re looking for food, we humbly recommend that you fast for the day before heading out. There is a crazy amount of great food and drink offers, from wood-fired pizzas at Napa, $1 mini scoops of ice cream at Hedonist, BOGO carrot-cake cupcakes at Cheesy Eddie’s, and a $2.50 sampler plate at Peppa Pot. Seriously, that’s just the beginning. City is also bringing down more than a dozen of the area’s leading arts & cultural organizations, which will have info tables and discounts of their own. Head down to the lot in front of Historic Houseparts (540 South Ave.) to meet folks from George Eastman House, Geva Theatre, ImageOut, Rochester Fringe Festival, the Bug Jar, Abilene, TheaterROCS, Rochester Philharmonic Orchestra, Writers & Books, and other organizations. South Wedge-Ucation is TOTALLY FREE and open to the general public. If you’re an area college student, you should especially make sure to come out — students with a valid college ID get a FREE swag bag (while supplies last) filled with all kinds of stuff. For more information head to the City tent at Historic Houseparts, the Facebook event page, or check rochestercitynewspaper.com. — BY ERIC REZSNYAK [ Thursday, September 13 ] Happy Birthday RMSC. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Rochester Museum and Science Center, 657 East Ave. Free admission, party hats, birthday cake, and seedling trees to all visitors. 271-1880. rmsc.org Rochester Birding Society General Meeting. 7:30 p.m. Rivers Run, 50 Fairwood Dr. rochesterbirding. com [ Friday, September 14 ] 5th Annual ImageOut Festival Fair. 6:30-9 p.m. Rochester Museum and Science Center, 657 East Ave. Free. imageout.org Film and Dialogue: “The Economics of Happiness.” 7 p.m. Baobab Cultural Center,

728 University Ave. 563-2145. thebaobab.org [ Saturday, September 15 ] 2nd Annual Latino Film Festival. 111 p.m. St. John Fisher College, 3690 East Ave. 234-7660. prfestival.com 4th Annual “Hat”titude Event. 9 a.m.-noon. Radisson Hotel Riverside, 120 E. Main St. $25. Annual fundraiser to benefit The Community Place of Greater Rochester. Shop, music, breakfast, and guest speaker. 234-2025. ephiphanyevents13@ yahoo.com Craft Sale Plus. 9 a.m.-4 p.m. United Church of Christ, 570 Klem Rd., Webster. 671-3757. uccwebster.org

DeeDee’s Wild College Party. 10 p.m. Tilt Nightclub & Ultralounge, 444 Central Ave. 21+ free admission from 10-11 p.m., 18+ welcome. 232-8440. facebook. com/Tiltnightclub Eat, Pray, Love Gala. 7 p.m. Century Club, 566 East Ave. $100, register. 473-2590. wab. org Festival of Lanterns. 7:30 p.m. Maplewood Rose Garden, Corner of Lake Ave and Driving Park. Drum circle, Native American flutist, 8 p.m. lanterns illuminated and Resonanz emsemble will perform. 473-2234. rossings.org Friends of the Montezuma Wetland Complex Annual Meeting and Wild Wings Program. 13:30 p.m. Montezuma National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Center, 3395 US Route 20 East. $3-$5. 315-568-5987 x229. Tasha_ Daniels@fws.gov From Grape to Glass: Downtown Brockport Fall Wine Walk. 6-9 p.m. Main Street Brockport. $20. brockportny.org From the Ground: The Next Green Season Fashion Show. 5:309:30 p.m. 61 Commercial St. at Browns Race in High Falls. Preparty for sponsors and VIP guests 5:30 p.m., general admission 7 p.m. greentopiafest.com Genesee County Master Gardeners Fall Garden Gala. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Cornell Cooperative Extension of Genesee County, 420 East Main St. Plant sale featuring outdoor and indoor plants, mums, chance auction, free soil pH testing and gardening advice by certified Master Gardeners. 343-3040 x132. genesee.shutterfly.com Historic Maplewood Home Tour. 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Five homes in the Maplewood Neighborhood. $8$10. 458-3460. maplewood.org Kids Reaching Hearts Through Performing Arts Charity Banquet. 6-10:30 p.m. India Community Center, 2171 Monroe County Line Rd. $35-$50. Dinner and cultural show. 218-9258. iccrochester.org “Listen to the Reed” Life and Poetry of Rumi. 6:30-8:30 p.m. American Association of University Women, 494 East Ave. $30, adults only. RSVP: Send check to ICAN, 68 Oakdale Dr. Presentation, poetry recitation, dance, music, food. Crafts, books, music for sale. shahinmonshipour@yahoo.com Lobsterfest in the Village. 5-9 p.m. Genesee Country Village & Museum, 1410 Flint Hill Rd. $150, register. 538-6822. gcv.org WXXI Open House. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. WXXI, 280 State St. wxxi.org [ Saturday, September 15Sunday, September 16 ] 36th Annual Depression Glass Show & Sale. Rochester Museum and Science Center, 657 East Ave. Sat 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Sun 11 a.m.-4:30 p.m. $5 admission. 544-3315. dgclub@rochester. rr.com Women of Faith “Celebrate What Matters” tour. Blue Cross Arena, One War Memorial Square. $89$109, register. Fri 7-10 p.m., Sat 9 a.m.-5 p.m. 315-331-7338. womenoffaith.com/events/ rochester/

[ Sunday, September 16 ] Fall Foliage by Trolley and Train. 11 a.m.-5 p.m. New York Museum of Transportation, 6393 E. River Rd. $5-$8. 533-1113. nymtmuseum.org LVRRHS Open to Public. 1-3 p.m. Lehigh Valley Railroad Historical Society Station Museum, 8 E. High St. Free admission. 2898022. lvrrhs.org Zombies Care: A Family Friendly Zombie Walk. 9:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. From Hungerford Building, 1115 E. Main St., loading docks near door 2, to Public Market. Cider, donuts, and make-up tips. 305-9107. samplesoap.org [ Monday, September 17 ] DEAR Open House at Penfield Recreation. 10 a.m. Penfield Community Center, 1985 Baird Rd. Meet and greet instructors and facilitators of the upcoming fall programs, enjoy free coffee and doughnuts. Participate in fun and informative free lectures and demonstrations. $4 picnic lunch. 340-8655 [ Tuesday, September 18 ] Mineral Monthly Meeting. Tue., Sep. 18, 7:30-9:30 p.m. Brighton Town Hall, 2300 Elmwood Ave. 288-5683. minarelvp@rasny.org [ Wednesday, September 19 ] AMA | Rochester Are You Talking to Me? 7:30 a.m. Monroe Golf Club, 155 Golf Avenue. 645-2924 Fine Tastings for Al Sigl Community of Agencies. 5:30 p.m. Locust

[ Monday, September 17Friday, September 21 ] 2012 J/24 Works Championship. 10:30 a.m. Rochester Yacht Club. chair@2012j24worlds.com

Theater

THEATER | “Heartland”

When a series of senseless murders are committed by a psychopath-at-large, macho fool Skeet decides to take the law into his own hands. He’s seeking to save the day, sure, but also salvage some of his lost status in his small Midwestern town. Unfortunately, the killer may be closer to home than Skeet imagines. This is the plot of the psychological thriller “Heartland,” a play by Kevin Heelan, which is being staged at the MuCCC (142 Atlantic Ave.) for one final week. Follow the murder mystery on Thursday, September 13, through Saturday, September 15, at 7:30 p.m. each night. Tickets are $10 in advance and $15 at the door. For reservations, call 234-1254, and for more information, visit muccc.org. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY Hill Country Club, 2000 Jefferson Road. 442-4102 x 8944. alsigl. org/fine-tastings

Sports [ Saturday, September 15 ] Courage Bowl VIII. 7 p.m. St.

John Fisher College, 3690 East Ave. $5-$7. 624-5555. campgooddays.org Dirtcar Racing. 7 p.m. Canandaigua Motorsports Park, 2820 County Rd. 10 . 394-0961. canandaiguamotorsportspark.com

“The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee.” Sep 12-19. MerryGo-Round Playhouse, 6877 East Lake Rd Continues through Sep 29. $35-$42. Wed Sep 12-Thu 7:30 p.m., Fri-Sat 2 & 8 p.m., Mon 2 p.m., Tue-Wed Sept 19 2 & 7:30 p.m. 315‑255‑1785. merry-go-round.com Beyond the Fringe at MuCCC. Sep. 19-23. MuCCC, 142 Atlantic Ave. Wed 8 p.m., Thu-Fri 7 p.m., Sat 2 p.m., Sun 7 p.m. Some time slots open and available to performers. Contact for more information. bookinginfo@muccc. org. muccc.org “Heartland.” Sep. 13-15, 7:30 p.m. MuCCC, 142 Atlantic Ave. Continues through September 15. 234-1254. muccc.org “Love, Loss, and What I Wore.” Sep. 14-15. Blackfriars Theatre, 795 E. Main St . Fri 3 p.m., Sat 7 p.m. $25. 454-1260. bftix.org “A Night in the Slammer, A Day in the Clink.” Sep 14-16. Museum of Wayne County History, 21 Butternut St. Fri 8 p.m., Sat 5, 6 & 8 p.m., Sun noon. $15-$20. 315946-4943. waynehistory.org “Title of Show.” Sep 14-16. Blackfriars Theatre, 795 E. Main St. Continues through September

30. Fri-Sat 8 p.m., Sun 2 p.m. $27. 454-1260. bftix.org “Widowers’ Houses.” Sep 1416. Black Sheep Theatre, 274 N Goodman St. third floor, Studio D313. Continues through September 29. Fri-Sat 7:30 p.m. Sun 2 p.m. 861-4816 “You Can’t Take it With You.” Sep. 12-19. Geva Theatre Center, 75 Woodbury Blvd . Through Oct 7. Wed Sep 12-Thu 7:30 p.m., Fri 2 p.m., Opening night Sat 8 p.m., Sun 2 & 7 p.m., Tue 6 p.m., Wed Sep 19 7:30 p.m. Tickets start at $25. 232-4382. gevatheatre.org

Auditions [ Saturday, September 15Sunday, September 16 ] A Christmas Carol. Geva Theatre Center, 75 Woodbury Blvd. Sat 9 a.m.-1 p.m. & 2-6 p.m., Sun 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Ages 5-13. RSVP for audition. 232-1366

Workshops [ Wednesday, September 12 ] September Night School: Google Drive. 6:30-8 p.m. Wood Library, 134 North Main St. Google Drive (formerly known as Google Docs) is a cloud based, word processing, spreadsheet creating, and presentation editing platform that you can use on any computer. 394-1381. woodlibrary.org

Celebrate the End of the Summer Harvest. 6-8 p.m. Cornell Cooperative Extension of Monroe County, 249 Highland Ave. $30, register. With Chef Bradley Butler, Executive Chef at the Maplewood Estates. 461-1000. mycce.org/ monroe Family Development Class: “How to Say NO to Your Child.” 6-8 p.m. Mental Health Association, 320 N Goodman St. Ideas for setting family rules and expectations. Techniques for staying firm when children try to negotiate. For parents of toddlers to teens. Free. Refreshments. Door prizes. 325-3145 x 131. mharochester.org [ Wednesday, September 19 ] Family Development Class: “Wise Choices.” 12:30-2:30 p.m. Mental Health Association, 320 N Goodman St. A humorous approach in helping to identify some strategies for handling the challenges presented by our children as they grow up and away. For parents of children of all ages. Free. Refreshments. Door prizes. 325-3145 x131. mharochester.org

[ Monday, September 17 ] A Cornucopia of Cooking:

rochestercitynewspaper.com City 29

Film Times

Fri September 14-Thu September 20 Schedules change often. Call theaters or check rochestercitynewspaper.com for updates.

Film

Cinema Theater 271-1785 957 S. Clinton St. *NO FILM TIMES BY PRESS TIME*

Culver Ridge 16 544-1140 2255 Ridge Rd E, Irondequoit  2016 OBAMA’S AMERICA: 1:20; THE AVENGERS: 9:30; BOURNE LEGACY: 1:35, 7:05; THE CAMPAIGN: 2:25, 5:15, 7:55, 10:35; DARK KNIGHT: 1:10, 4:45, 8:10; THE EXPENDABLES: 4:35, 10:05; FINDING NEMO: 3D 1:15, 2:15, 4, 5, 6:40, 7:40, 10:15; 2D 1:45, 4:40, 7:10; HOPE SPRINGS: 1:30, 3:55; LAST OUNCE: 2:10, 5:05, 7:35, 10:20; LAWLESS: 1:50, 4:50, 7:30, 10:10; THE ODD LIFE: 2:05, 4:55, 7:25, 10; PARANORMAN: 1:55, 4:15; THE POSSESSION: 2, 4:25, 6:45, 9:35; RAIDERS OF THE LOST ARK: 1:40, 4:20, 7, 9:40; RESIDENT EVIL: RETRIBUTION: 3D 1:25, 4:10, 6:50, 7:20, 9:25, 9:55; 2D 4:40, 6:20, 7:50, 8:55, 10:25; SPARKLE: 9:45; THE WORDS: 2:20, 5:10, 7:45, 10:30.

Dryden Theatre

Stories within stories [ REVIEW ] by George Grella

“The Words” (PG-13), written and directed by Brian Klugman and Lee Sternthal Now playing

Although throughout its history the cinema has offered numerous examples of films about artists of all sorts, writers seem the least congenial subjects for the camera. Composers, musicians, painters, sculptors, actors, dancers, even filmmakers themselves provide rich visual material for any director. The actual methods and practices of creation in the graphic, plastic, and performing arts are intrinsically fascinating,

271-3361 9 East Ave *NOTE: Film times for Wed 9/12-9/19* THE MAN WITH A GOLDEN ARM: Wed 9/12 8; LORD LOVE A DUCK: Thur 9/13 8; THE LIPS: Fri 9/14 8; UNFORGIVEN: Sat 9/15 8; Sun 9/16 2; THE WRATH OF THE GODS: Tue 9/18 8; SOME CAME RUNNING: Wed 9/19 8.

Eastview 13 425-0420 Eastview Mall, Victor 2016 OBAMA’S AMERICA: 1:35, 4:25, 7:25, 9:45; BOURNE LEGACY: 1:05, 4:05, 7:05, 10:05; THE CAMPAIGN: 7:35, continues on page 32

and American film handles the concept of sheer process with remarkable skill. Writers, however, present a difficult challenge for any director; simply put, the act of writing is not at all glamorous or colorful. Most of it consists of long, lonely hours spent scratching one’s head and looking vaguely into the middle distance, searching for a word, hoping for an idea. Once in a while a film will illustrate a story coming to life — one of the best sequences in “The World According to Garp” shows a series of images from which the title character weaves an eccentric, touching narrative — but few movies sustain such moments for any significant length. In “The Words,” a picture entirely about writers and writing, a series of stories that overlap, intersect, and merge into each other provides the framework for an essentially interior and even meditative cinematic essay. The movie employs several different methods of telling its story, and ingeniously, in the best Modernist manner, even in effect invites the

Bradley Cooper and Zoe Saldana in “The Words.” PHOTO COURTESY CBS FILMS

audience to participate in the completion of its narratives. It begins with an author, Clay Hammond (Dennis Quaid) reading parts of his novel to a large and rapt audience, then moves smoothly into a visualization of his fiction, a work about a struggling young writer, Rory Jansen (Bradley Cooper), enduring the familiar blizzard of rejection slips from agents and publishers, who for one reason or another will not accept his novel. He finds a manuscript in an old briefcase that he and his wife buy in Paris and, not really knowing why, decides to copy it verbatim on his computer. When his wife (Zoe Saldana) reads it, she insists that he submit it to the agency where he works in the mailroom; the agent loves it, the book, “Window Tears,” becomes a grand critical and commercial success, winning prizes, earning a great deal of money, and guaranteeing publication of his previously rejected work. When the film shifts back to Hammond’s reading, another character, simply identified as The Old Man (Jeremy Irons), enters the story; he stalks Rory, finally accosting him in Central Park, and identifies himself as the real author of “Window Tears.” He tells Rory yet another story, explaining the context of his own creation and the loss of the manuscript, reminiscent of an actual event in Hemingway’s life. Consumed by guilt, Rory tries desperately to make amends, but The Old Man wants nothing from him

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Internal heart drive [ REVIEW ] BY DAYNA PAPALEO

“Robot & Frank” (PG-13), directed by Jake Schreier Now playing

beyond the need to disburden himself of his past and perhaps to read him an unwritten book of pain and sorrow. Moving through various levels of fiction, alternating between Clay Hammond’s reading, the dramatization of Rory Jansen’s life, the further dramatization of The Old Man’s youth, the movie suggests some of the many options in the working out of the main narrative. Hammond even invites a lovely graduate student groupie (Olivia Wilde) to finish the novel herself, ending the picture with an ironic ambiguity entirely appropriate to its confusions of fictional life and real life. True to its title, “The Words” concentrates a good deal of attention on words and their relation to reality, with a number of discussions of the subject, resulting quite naturally in a certain talkiness. Its deft handling of a complex subject and a convoluted narrative, however, avoids any descent into boring literary lectures. The performances vary oddly, with Dennis Quaid providing a strangely prissy delivery of his perfectly acceptable lines. Surprisingly, Bradley Cooper handles the complicated situation of a man whose dreams come true, but feels devoured by his guilty knowledge that he deserves none of his success; on the other hand, his scenes with Zoe Saldana ooze a mushy sweetness. Bitter, defeated, profane, Jeremy Irons does a remarkable job as The Old Man, a terrific piece of work in a supporting role that also somehow explains the meanings of the movie.

When we imagine what the future might look like, the pictures that enter our heads typically come straight from the movies. What we don’t usually think about is that before, say, “The Fifth Element” breaks out, before the unitards and the hover cars, there will be small, gradual changes. A translucent phone here, a robot health aide there; that’s “the near future” found in the charmingly resonant “Robot & Frank,” a genre mash-up of buddy flick, heist caper, love story, and whatever they call those movies where a senior citizen finds their twilight raison d’être. You’ll notice I didn’t mention science fiction; sure, the film showcases some nifty gadgets, but “Robot & Frank” is primarily concerned with the gorgeously fallible circuitry of the human heart. In the midst of a mesmerizing third act that should yield an Oscar before too long, Frank Langella stars as Frank, who we first meet as he’s breaking into a house... his own house, we learn, as he puzzles over photos of him and his

Frank Langella in “Robot & Frank.” PHOTO COURTESY SAMUEL GOLDWYN FILMS

family. The 70-something Frank, who lives alone in a cluttered but quaint house in the Hudson Valley town of Cold Spring, is in the early stages of Alzheimer’s disease; he can’t remember details about his kids or the closing of a beloved restaurant, but the former cat burglar can still pick a lock, and his muscle memory allows for some smooth shoplifting. The high points of his days seem to be his trips to the library, where he flirts with Jennifer (Susan Sarandon), the pretty, patient librarian. Frank’s dementia has left him angry and defensive when dealing with his frustrated son Hunter (James Marsden), who makes the 10-hour round trip on a weekly basis despite family obligations of his own. Hunter’s solution? A robot; more specifically, the astronaut-looking VGC-60L (with the creepily calm tones of Peter Sarsgaard), who Hunter envisions will help his dad care for himself. This part you can write yourself: crabby old man butts heads with bossy computer over his love of Cap’n Crunch and his disdain for exercise until they find some common ground. In this particular case, it’s an aptitude for illegal behaviors combined with a lack of morals, though in only one of them it’s by factory design. Planning robberies provides Frank with the mental jump-start he needs, and the film provides us with the perfect (if cartoonishly one-dimensional) mark in the form of Jake (Jeremy Strong), Jennifer’s wealthy, condescending boss who is intent on doing away with printed material. “Robot & Frank” (honestly, what a lazy title) tags along with Robot and Frank as the former carries out his duties in service to the latter, who has convinced Robot that the stimulation of B&E is exactly what he needs to maintain his positive health

trajectory. Cue close calls, familial strife, a tenacious sheriff (the eternally underappreciated Jeremy Sisto), and a revelation that is shocking, hearttugging, and entirely earned. Langella is one of those guys who has seemingly been around forever, a decorated stage actor who didn’t really hit his cinematic stride until 60; it was once his swarthy good looks began silvering with age that directors were able to see him as something other than the bad guy. (Case in point: The man has played Dracula, Skeletor, AND Nixon.) Appearing in nearly every scene here — and often opposite an expressionless robot — Langella never once hits a false note. Of course this otherwise strapping septuagenarian would be dispirited by his increasingly debilitating condition, but he’s also by turns salty, petulant, loving, manipulative, and wise. You can take the man out of the fight, but good luck taking the fight out of the man. Fortunately, Langella is also one of those guys who raises the games of everyone nearby; even the breathy, blank Liv Tyler as Frank’s anti-robot daughter, a globetrotting activist guilted into visiting her father, almost seems like a master thespian in his presence. (And Marsden is excellent; he’s finally starting to grow on me.) Sarandon is nicely understated as the pivotal Jennifer, and she enjoys very sweet — and refreshingly age-appropriate — chemistry with Langella. Shot over an efficient 20 days, “Robot & Frank” is the first feature from director Jake Schreier and screenwriter Christopher D. Ford, former classmates at NYU who have resisted the Hollywood impulse to make cute fluff about a retiree and a robot, instead crafting a warm, truthful film about raging against the dying of the LED.

Photo courtesy Photofest

UNFORGIVEN

Saturday, Sept. 15, 8 p.m.; Sunday, Sept. 16, 2 p.m.

This violent, dust-choked Western revitalized a genre everyone took for dead. It begins with a set-up we think we’ve seen before: retired gunslinger Will Munny (Clint Eastwood) leaves his hog farm for one last job, avenging a prostitute badly disfigured by a john whom the sheriff (Gene Hackman) has no interest in punishing. Ultimately, Eastwood and screenwriter David Webb Peoples affirm the Western as a complex vehicle for untangling the legacies of vigilantism, sexism, racism, and institutional rot. Winner of four Academy Awards®, including Best Picture. (Clint Eastwood, US 1992, 131 min.)

SOME CAME RUNNING Wednesday, Sept. 19, 8 p.m.

Movies for movie lovers, 6 nights a week. 20th Anniversary!

When bitter war veteran Dave Hirsch (Frank Sinatra) returns to his Indiana hometown, he befriends gambler Bama (Dean Martin) and must deal with the clingy floozy Ginny (Shirley MacLaine) and his socially climbing brother Frank (Arthur Kennedy). It's a powerful cinematic experience that stands as one of the most emotionally devastating films of the 1950s. (Vincente Minnelli, US 1958, 137 min.)

Sinatra

Film Info: 271-4090 l 900 East Avenue l Eastman House Café—stop in for a light dinner or dessert before the film. l Wi-Fi Hotspot l Sponsored by rochestercitynewspaper.com City 31

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10:15; DARK KNIGHT: 1, 4:35, 8:05; DIARY OF A WIMPY KID: 1:25, 4; FINDING NEMO: 3D 1:10, 2:10, 4:10, 5:10, 7:40, 10:10; 2D 1:40, 4:40; HOPE SPRINGS: 6:55, 9:40; LAST OUNCE: 1:50, 4:20, 7:10, 9:35; THE ODD LIFE: 1:20, 4:15, 7:20, 9:50; PARANORMAN: 1:15; THE POSSESSION: 1:45, 4:45, 7:45, 10:20; RESIDENT EVIL: RETRIBUTION: 3D 2, 5, 7, 8, 9:30,10:30 2D 4:30, 7:30, 10; THE WORDS: 1:30, 4:50, 7:15, 9:55.

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Geneseo Theatres 243-2691 Geneseo Square Mall THE CAMPAIGN: 9; THE EXPENDABLES 2: 9; FINDING NEMO: 3D 7, 9; also Sat-Sun 1, 3, 5; HOPE SPRINGS: 7; also Sat-Sun 1, 3, 5; THE ODD LIFE: 7; also Sat-Sun 1, 3, 5; PARANORMAN: Sat-Sun 1; THE POSSESSION: 7:10, 9:10; also SatSun 1:10, 3:10, 5:10; RESIDENT EVIL: RETRIBUTION: 7:10, 9:10; also Sat-Sun 1:10, 3:10, 5:10; THE WORDS: 7, 9; also Sat-Sun 3, 5.

Greece Ridge 12 225-5810 176 Greece Ridge Center Dr. BOURNE LEGACY: 4, 10:05; THE CAMPAIGN: 10:20; THE COLD LIGHT OF DAY: 9:30; THE EXPENDABLES 2: 2:35, 5:15, 7:50, 10:25; FINDING NEMO: 3D 1:15, 1:45, 4:10, 6:45, 7:15, 9:50; 2D 2:25, 5, 7:45;HOPE SPRINGS: 4:20, 9:25; LAST OUNCE: 2, 4:30, 7:10, 9:35; LAWLESS: 1:55, 4:45, 7:25,

Film Previews Full film reviews available at rochestercitynewspaper.com. [ OPENING ] ARBITRAGE (R): Richard Gere, Susan Sarandon, and Tim Roth star in the narrative feature debut of writerdirector Nicholas Jarecki, a sleek thriller about a billionaire hedge-fund manager juggling heavy secrets and slippery lies. Little, Pittsford FINDING NEMO 3D (PG): Well, that seems unnecessary. Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Greece, Henrietta, Pittsford, Tinseltown GREENTOPIA | FILM: Visit greentopiafestival.com for more information about this collection of primarily nonfiction films, all focusing on various aspects of the ways in which we earthlings should reduce, reuse, recycle, and rethink. THE LIPS (2010): This Argentinean blend of fact and fiction explores the developing bond between three female government workers as they provide medical assistance to impoverished villagers. Dryden (Fri, Sep 14, 8 p.m.) LORD LOVE A DUCK (1966): Roddy McDowall and Tuesday Weld lead the cast of this teen-culture satire about a naïve nerd who tries to impress a hot high schooler by helping her overcome her trashy roots and become popular. Dryden (Thu, Sep 13, 8 p.m.) THE MAN WITH THE GOLDEN ARM (1955): Otto Preminger directs Frank Sinatra in this thencontroversial drama about a heroin addict who gets clean in prison but 32 City september 12-18, 2012

10:15; THE ODD LIFE: 1:20, 4:05, 6:55; THE POSSESSION: 2:05, 4:25, 7:40, 10:10; RESIDENT EVIL: RETRIBUTION: 3D 1:35, 2:40, 5:10, 7, 8, 10:30; 2D 2:10, 4:40, 7:30, 10; THE WORDS: 2:15, 4:50, 7:20, 9:45.

Henrietta 18

Sat-Sun 4; KILLER JOE: 9:30; also Sat-Sun 1:40, 4:10; also Sat-Sun and Tue-Wed 7:10; THE QUEEN OF VERSAILLES: 6:50 (except Thursday 9/20); also Sat-Sun 1:20, also Fri 9:20; ROBOT AND FRANK: 6:40, 8:45; also Sat-Sun 1:10, 3:40; SLEEPWALK WITH ME: 6:30, 9; also Sat-Sun 1:30, 3:50; THE WEIGHT OF THE NATION: Mon 9/17 7.

424-3090 525 Marketplace Dr. 2016 OBAMA’S AMERICA: 7:50, 10:25; BARFI: 1:15, 4:10, 7, 10; BOURNE LEGACY: 12:40, 3:40, 6:45, 9:50; THE CAMPAIGN: 12:15, 2:25, 4:50, 7:35, 9:45, 11:50; THE COLD LIGHT OF DAY: 9:05, 11:30; DARK KNIGHT: 12:55, 4:30, 8:05; THE EXPENDABLES 2: 1:55, 4:40, 7:10, 9:40, 12 a.m.; FINDING NEMO: 3D 12:30, 1, 2, 3:05, 3:35, 4:35, 5:40, 7:20, 9:55; 2D 12, 1:30, 2:35, 4:05, 5:10, 6:40; LAST OUNCE: 12:10, 2:40, 5:15, 7:45, 10:20; LAWLESS: 1:20, 4, 6:55, 10:05; THE ODD LIFE: 6:20, 9:10; PARANORMAN: 3D 12:25, 3, 7:55; 2D 5:25, 10:15; THE POSSESSION: 12:35, 2:50, 5:05, 7:30, 10:30, 11:40; PREMIUM RUSH: 9:15,11:35; RESIDENT EVIL: RETRIBUTION: 3D 1:10, 3:45, 6:15, 9, 11:25; 2D 12:20, 1:50, 2:45, 5:20, 7:05, 8, 10:35, 11:55; TED: 4:25, 9:30; TOTAL RECALL: 6:30, 9:35; THE WORDS: 12:05, 2:30, 5, 7:25, 10:10.

383-1310 3349 Monroe Ave. ARBITRAGE: 12:30, 2:50, 5:20, 7:40; also Fri-Sat 10; THE BOURNE LEGACY: 2:45, 7:50; THE COLD LIGHT OF DAY: 5:40; also Fri-Sun 12:35; FINDING NEMO: 3D: 2:10, 4:35, 7; also Fri-Sat 9:25; 2D Fri-Sun 11:45 a.m.; HOPE SPRINGS: 2:30, 4:50, 7:10; also Fri 9:30; Fri-Sun 12:10; LAWLESS: 2:15, 4:50, 7:25; also Fri-Sat 10; LUCKY: 2:30, 4:40, 7:15; also Fri-Sat 9:35; Fri-Sun 12:15; THE ODD LIFE: 1:50, 4:20, 6:45; also Fri-Sat 9:10; ROBOT & FRANK: 2:35, 4:45, 7:05; also Fri-Sat 9:15; Fri-Sun 12: 25; THE WORDS: 3, 5:15, 7:30; also Fri-Sat 9:15; Fri-Sun 12:45.

The Little

Tinseltown USA / IMAX

Movies 10 292-5840 2613 W. Henrietta Rd. *NO FILM TIMES BY PRESS TIME*

Pittsford Cinema

258-04 240 East Ave.  ARBITRAGE: 7, 9:10; also Sat-Sun 1, 3:30; CELESTE & JESSE FOREVER:

247-2180 2291 Buffalo Rd.  2016 OBAMA’S AMERICA: 12:25, 5:05, 9:45; BOURNE LEGACY: 12:35,

struggles with his demons back in the real world. With Kim Novak and Darren McGavin. Dryden (Wed, Sep 12, 8 p.m.) RESIDENT EVIL: RETRIBUTION (R): Some more stuff happens in the fifth installment of this tenacious action franchise. Brockport, Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Greece, Henrietta, Tinseltown SLEEPWALK WITH ME (NR): Writerdirector Mike Birbiglia adapted his acclaimed one-man stage show about an aspiring comedian in denial about his girlfriend, his career, and his sleepwalking disorder, which becomes more dangerous as he grows more anxious. Little UNFORGIVEN (1992): Clint Eastwood’s Best Picture winner is a classic and complex one-last-job story about a retired gunslinger looking to punish a crime that Sheriff Gene Hackman won’t. With Morgan Freeman and Richard Harris. Dryden (Sat, Sep 15, 8 p.m., and Sun, Sep 16, 2 p.m.) THE WRATH OF THE GODS (1914): This early silent feature tells the tale of a shipwrecked American sailor who falls for a cursed Japanese beauty. Dryden (Tue, Sep 18, 8 p.m.)

THE CAMPAIGN (R): Will Ferrell headlines the latest from “Austin Powers” director Jay Roach as a four-term North Carolina congressman whose fall from grace leaves him vulnerable to opposition by a naive challenger (Zach Galifianakis). Featuring Brian Cox, John Lithgow, and Dan Aykroyd. Culver, Eastview, Greece, Henrietta, Tinseltown, Vintage CELESTE AND JESSE FOREVER (R): Rashida Jones co-wrote the script for this romantic comedy in which she plays a half of a divorcing couple who are having a difficult time letting go. With Andy Samberg, Elijah Wood, and Emma Roberts. Little THE COLD LIGHT OF DAY (PG-13): Henry Cavill, Sigourney Weaver, and Bruce Willis star in the latest from “JCVD” director Mabrouk El Mechri, a Spain-set spy thriller about a regular guy who gets caught up in a conspiracy involving his father’s secret job. Greece, Henrietta, Pittsford, Tinseltown HOPE SPRINGS (PG-13): Oscar winners Meryl Streep and Tommy Lee Jones star in this romantic comedy-drama as a long-married couple who attend an intense counseling retreat to work on their relationship. With Steve Carell, Jean Smart, and Elisabeth Shue. Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Greece, Pittsford, Tinseltown KILLER JOE (NC-17): William Friedkin’s first film in six years is a violent black comedy about a young man (Emile Hirsch, “Into the Wild”) who hires a hitman (Matthew McConaughey) to kill his mother for

[ CONTINUING ] 2016: OBAMA’S AMERICA (PG): Just in time for the election is this one-sided documentary by conservative author Dinesh D’Souza that wonders exactly how awful things will be in four years if President Obama is still living in the White House. Culver, Eastview, Henrietta, Tinseltown

3:40, 6:50, 9:55; THE CAMPAIGN: 12:50, 3, 5:10, 7:20, 9:30; THE COLD LIGHT OF DAY: 2:45, 7:25; DARK KNIGHT: 1, 4:30, 8; THE EXPENDABLES: 1:30, 4:15, 7:05, 9:40; FINDING NEMO: 3D 2, 3:45, 4:50, 6:45, 7:30, 9:30, 10:05; 2D 12:45; HOPE SPRINGS: 1, 3:30, 6:45, 9:15; LAST OUNCE: 1:05, 3:55, 7:10, 9:40; LAWLESS: 1:10, 3:55, 7:15, 10; THE ODD LIFE: 1:25, 4:10, 6:50, 9:25; PARANORMAN: 3D 2:55, 5:15, 7:35, 9:55; 2D 12:35; THE POSSESSION: 12:55, 3:15, 5:35, 7:55, 10:15; RAIDERS OF THE LOST ARK: 1:15, 4, 7, 9:45; RESIDENT EVIL: RETRIBUTION: IMAX: 12:20, 2:45, 5:15, 7:45, 10:15; 3D 4, 9; 2D 1:30, 6:30; THE WORDS: 12:30, 2:55, 5:20, 7:45, 10:10.

Vintage Drive In 226-9290 1520 W Henrietta Rd. All shows Fri-Mon. SCREEN 1: THE POSSESSION: 8:05; THE EXPENDABLES 2: 9:35; SCREEN 2: PARANORMAN: 8:05; THE AVENGERS: 9:35; SCREEN 3: HIT AND RUN: 8:05; THE CAMPAIGN: 9:45; SCREEN 4: LAWLESS: 8:05; PREMIUM RUSH: 10:00.

Webster 12 888-262-4386 2190 Empire Blvd. *NO FILM TIMES BY PRESS TIME*

the insurance money. With Thomas Haden Church, Juno Temple, and Gina Gershon. Little LUCKY (NR): Rochester’s own Christopher Wilmot produced this moving drama about a 10-yearold South African orphan who encounters big-city apathy along with a feisty Indian woman who reluctantly comes to his aid. Pittsford THE ODD LIFE OF TIMOTHY GREEN (PG): This comedy-drama from writer-director Peter Hedges (“Dan in Real Life”) stars Jennifer Garner and Joel Edgerton (“Warrior”) as a childless couple who bury their hopes in a box and are understandably surprised when a 10-year-old knocks on the door claiming to be their son. Brockport, Canandaigua, Eastview, Greece, Henrietta, Pittsford, Tinseltown PARANORMAN (PG): This stopmotion animation from the same artists responsible for “Coraline” tells the story of a young boy whose ability to communicate with the dead comes in handy as he tries to save his New England town from a witch’s curse. Featuring the voices of John Goodman, Anna Kendrick, Casey Affleck, and Elaine Stritch. Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Henrietta, Tinseltown, Vintage THE POSSESSION (PG-13): This supernatural thriller stars Jeffrey Dean Morgan and Kyra Sedgwick as the parents to a young girl who buys an antique box at a garage sale, unaware that the collectible houses an ancient evil spirit. Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Greece, Henrietta, Tinseltown, Vintage

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1 PREMIER PASTRY (433 South Ave.): A Sweet Surprise, a box of goodies for $3 (limit 1 per customer) 2 MELLOW MADNESS TATTOO PARLOR (435 South Ave.) Get a bonus 50 percent on gift certificates purchased noon-8 p.m. 3 JOHN'S TEX MEX (489 South Ave.) $1.50 empanadas, $1.50 Mexican "mush" and chips, $1.50 Tecate beers 4 NATHANIEL SQUARE STORE (495 South Ave.) $1 off six-packs regularly priced $6 or more 5 PERIOD BATH SUPPLY COMPANY (528 South Ave.) Buy-one-get-one-free select soaps 6 HISTORIC HOUSEPARTS (540 South Ave.) 50 percent off select merchandise 7 CHOWDER UP SEAFOOD TRUCK (mobile food truck) FREE 4 oz. clam chowder w/purchase of lobster roll, crab sandwich, seafood burrito, soft seafood taco, or jambalaya skewer 8 ROC CITY SAMMICH (mobile food truck, parked in the House Parts lot at 540 South Ave.) ALL Roc City Sammiches for $5, plus FREE side of deep-fried pickles 9 ECHO TONE MUSIC (571 South Ave.) $29.99 Diamond Head ukuleles (assorted colors) 10 CHEESY EDDIE'S (602 South Ave.) Buy one carrot-cake cupcake, get one FREE (limit a TOTAL of 4 cupcakes per customer) 11 SOLERA (647 South Ave.) Select glasses of wine for $4 12 PLASTIC (650 South Ave.) 50 percent off select merchandise 13 THREAD (654 South Ave.) Discounted fashions for $10 or $15 14 OPEN FACE (651 South Ave.) Half-off half-and-half cookies, $1 home-brewed gourmet-flavored water 15 TELLTALE TATTOO (656 South Ave.) Buy a $100 tattoo gift certificate for only $50, and get entered to win a $200 tattoo gift certificate. Plus: live D.J. 16 MAGIX (653 South Ave.) 50 percent off select merchandise and FREE cupcake with any purchase 17 FULL MOON VISTA (661 South Ave.) Bike light set for $9.99 (regularly $20; while supplies last) 18 NOW AND ZEN (658 South Ave.) 50 percent off select items 19 SURFACE SALON (661 South Ave.) $7 haircuts for men, $15 haircuts for women (walk-ins only). Plus, wax one eyebrow, wax the other for FREE 20 LE PETIT POUTINE (mobile food truck) $3 poutine (traditional and vegetarian/gluten free) 21 LUX LOUNGE (666 South Ave.) $1 PBRs and $2 Atomic Wedgie shots (21 and over only) 22 ZAK’S AVENUE (661 South Ave.) 40 percent to 50 percent off select merchandise 23 SOUTH WEDGE SPIRITS AND WINE (661 South Ave.) Three-glass mini wine box for $6; FREE wine tasting and select pints for $10 or less! (21 and over only) 24 COFFEE CONNECTION (681 South Ave.) Half-off large coffees and $1 off any coffee beans by the pound 25 MISE EN PLACE (683 South Ave.) Buy 1 meatball, get 1 free ($1.50); $1.50 pommes frite with chili cheese; $3.75 jumbo chili cheese dogs 26 HEDONIST (674 South Ave.) $1 mini scoops of Hedonist Ice Cream and 25 cent chocolate medallions 27 HARRY G’S (678 South Ave.) Full-sized subs at half price 28 PEPPA POT RESTAURANT (133 Gregory St.) $2.50 Peppa Pot sampler (rice, meat or veggies, fried plantains) 29 BAUMAN’S BARBERSHOP (697 South Ave.) $6 haircuts 30 GLOVER'S BARBER SHOP (700 South Ave.) $8 haircuts 31 SOUTH WEDGE SHOP (732 South Ave.) 50 percent off South Wedge pint glasses 32 CAVERLY'S IRISH PUB (741 South Ave.) $2.50 pints of Dundee Oktoberfest or Saranac Pumpkin Ale (21 and over only) 33 LITTLE VENICE PIZZA (742 South Ave.) $1.50 cheese or $2 pepperoni pizza slices 34 EQUAL GROUND (750 South Ave.) Buy one drink (hot or cold), dessert, or ice cream and get the second (equal or lesser value) FREE 35 NEEDLE DROP RECORDS (304 Gregory St.) 40 percent off used LP’s (excluding consignment stock) and 20 percent off all new LP’s 36 ZEPPA BISTRO (315 Gregory St.) Half-off any draft beer selection 37 TAP & MALLET (381 Gregory St.) $3 pints of seasonal draft beer (21 and over only) 38 TANGO CAFE (389 Gregory St.) FREE dance lessons every 20 minutes, and $1.25 empanadas 39 GENESEE CO-OP CREDIT UNION (395 Gregory St.) FREE credit-union membership ($10 value) 40 BOULDER COFFEE CO. (100 Alexander St.) $1 medium brewed coffees 41 NAPA WOODFIRED PIZZA (573 S. Clinton Ave.) $3 wood-fired 6" pizzas: Margherita, Simply Red with pepperoni, or Simply White CITY CITY NEWSPAPER T-SHIRTS (Star Alley) $5 2012 SW-U t-shirts and information

CITY IS ALSO BRINGING IN SOME OF THE CITY'S TOP ARTS & CULTURAL ORGANIZATIONS WITH RIDICULOUS OFFERS OF THEIR OWN! BE SURE TO CHECK ROCHESTERCITYNEWSPAPER.COM FOR A LIST OF OFFERS FROM THE ARTS & CULTURAL ORGANIZATION.

Area college students

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THANKS TO OUR SPONSORS

34 rochestercitynewspaper.com City 33

Classifieds For information: Call us (585) 244-3329 Fax us (585) 244-1126 Mail Us City Classifieds 250 N. Goodman Street Rochester, NY 14607 Email Us classifieds@ rochester-citynews.com EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY

All real estate advertised in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act, which makes it unlawful, “to make, print, or publish, any notice, statement, or advertisement, with respect to the sale or rental of a dwelling that indicates any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin.” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under the age of 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertisement for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. Call the local Fair Housing Enforcement Project, FHEP at 325-2500 or 1-866-671-FAIR. Si usted sospecha una practica de vivienda injusta, por favor llame al servicio legal gratis. 585-325-2500 - TTY 585-325-2547.

Shared Housing

Shared Housing

ALL AREAS - ROOMMATES. COM. Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http://www.Roommates.com.

PITTSFORD Male furnished bedroom in an 8 room house, with male, direct tv. Deposit. $575 all. Dog on premises, smoker ok. 585-586-0920.

Houses for Sale FORECLOSURES - THE CLIFFS AT WALNUT COVE - LenderOwned nHomes, Asheville NC, Jack Nicklaus Golf Course, Starting $625,000. Only 3 Remain. Call 864.723.0035 or visit www.AshevilleTownhomes. com. HOMES FOR SALE Pittsford/ Bushnells Basin 3 Homes on fabulous 3 acre park-like yard. Beautifully updated, 1800’s large main house plus 2 smaller homes which are leased for $24,000 per year (Great In-Law Home). Owner must sell due to age & health 585-3838888

Real Estate Auctions AUCTION 83-ACRE VERMONT ESTATE Incredible Historic Home, Guest House, Pool, Many Custom Features 4 Hours from NYC Sunday, Sept. 30 @

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Land for Sale ABANDONED FARM! 5 acres $69,000.  Nice old farmhouse, barns, awesome view!  Beautiful Upstate NY setting!  Call (888) 701-7509.

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MASTER CHIMNEY & MASONRY See our ad under Home and Garden Professionals. Chimney Cleaning, Masonry Repairs, Foundation Repairs, Roof Leaks, Brick Steps Repaired. 585-734-8444

COURT ORDERED FARM SALE SEPTEMBER 15TH!! 4 acres $16,900.  10 acres - $24,900.  20 acres - $34,900.  23 parcels available for pennies on the dollar! Gorgeous upstate NY setting! $30K in discounts this weekend ONLY! Views, streams, hunting! Financing available! Call for FREE info packet! (888) 905-8847

continues on page 36

Commercial/ Office Space UofR/ AIRPORT AREA Brick, Mixed use building. 6,000 sq.ft. of stores/office plus 3 apartments. Owner must sell due to illness. Owner financing, no banks needed. 383-8888

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HomeWork Find your way home with SOLD

A cooperative effort of City Newspaper and RochesterCityLiving, a program of the Landmark Society.

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This Ranch was sold in 5 days with multiple offers! Call Ryan @ 585-201-0724 to find out how to sell your home today!

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Gleaming on Gorsline

134 Gorsline Street 455 POST AVE. is a solid 7 unit apartment building with an asking price of $184,900 generating $39,360 income from rents. Great property for investors. Possible additional income.

Schmackpfeffer Realty 585-259-5474 wschmack@gmail.com

Gorsline Street is a charming single block near Maplewood Park in northwest

each with large closets. A three-season sleeping porch is accessed through one

Rochester. The house at 134 Gorsline displays the pride of ownership so typical of Historic Maplewood homes: every surface gleams, every banister is restored, every piece of hardware is authentic. The house has blossomed under tender loving care, and awaits the fortunate next owner.

bedroom. In the bathroom is original black and white tile on floor and walls, plus a new pedestal sink.

The columned front porch leads to the original wood front door. In the foyer are some of the house’s many windows topped with leaded glass panels. Narrow “Rochesterstyle” oak floors are everywhere except the kitchen with its wide-planked maple floors. To the right of the foyer is the living room, where a deep window seat faces the street. Wood pocket doors (they work!) separate the living room from the formal dining room, where a bank of windows has a sill deep enough for plants to rest. The eat-in kitchen has modern elements – tile backsplash, dramatic lighting, good organization – while retaining the large pantry’s built-in cabinets and window. A rear porch was replaced by the powder room beyond the original exterior door. Built in 1910, the house seems much larger than its 1,646 square feet. That may be due to the tall ceilings, abundant natural light, and extra potential living space in the huge attic and clean, dry basement. A generous second floor landing opens on to four bedrooms,

The sleeping porch overlooks the back yard and large wood deck with built-in planters. In the front of the house, mature peonies and hydrangea line the porch. The annual Historic Maplewood Home & Garden Tour is this Saturday, September 15, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Five distinctive homes showcase the neighborhood’s architectural significance and quality of life. Listed in the National and State Registers of Historic Properties, Historic Maplewood was built by early Eastman Kodak officers, entrepreneurs and civic leaders a hundred years ago. Tour tickets are available in advance for $10 ($8 seniors) at Parkleigh, Peppermill Restaurant, Dark Horse Coffee and Creative Hands, or on the day of the Tour for $12 at headquarters: the Claude Bragdondesigned Maplewood YMCA On your way to the tour, drive by 134 Gorsline St. to see this charming home for yourself. It is listed for $94,900 through Sharon Gersey, ReMax Realty Group, 756-7480. For more photos, visit rochestercityliving.com/property/R190764. by Elizabeth Teall Elizabeth Teall is a Landmark Society volunteer.

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Automotive ALWAYS BETTER Higher cash for your Junk Cars, Trucks and Vans. From $200-$800 or more for newer. Running or not. With free towing. Also free removal of any unwanted model in any condition. Call 585-305-5865 CASH FOR CARS Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888-4203808 www.cash4car.com (AAN CAN)

Education ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from home. *Medical, *Business, *Criminal Justice, *Hospitality, Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEC certified. Call 888201-8657www.CenturaOnline. com SUCCESS SECRETS REVEALED Learn about success secrets “they” don’t want you to know about! Call now for free CD (585) 244-0017

The Emporium DINING CHAIRS (6) Empire style. Needlepoint seats $15 each 585-473-4066

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ATTENTION

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Did you know that City Newspaper Readers spent OVER $90 MILLION DOLLARS on home improvements in the LAST 12 MONTHS? Call Christine today to advertise

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36 City september 12-18, 2012

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FREE DOG & CAT HOUSES Kennels, porch steps, do it yourself kits. Quick assembly 585-752-1000 $49 Jim FLAGS 3x5 for sale from various States and. countries.Used $8.00 each. Please call 585 259-9590 GARDEN ROCKS big, small $10 880-2903, 544-4155 GARDEN, HORSE PINWHEELS (2) stick in ground.$12 also Daisy Pinwheel $3 585-8802903 585-544-4155 GRACO CAR SEAT, stroller system x-cond. $39.99 585225-5526 HORSE HALTER / Black & white New $15. clips. Horse Leather bridle with western bit $20 585-800-2903 METAL FOLDING CHAIRS (2) $12. for pair 585-490-5870

Rochester Museum & Science Center, 657 East Ave. Fri. & Sat Sept. 21st & 22nd, 10am - 4pm. China, glass, linens, art, jewelry, furs, collectables. Donations Welcome Sept. 19th & 20th 10am - 4pm SAVE THE DATE Multi Family Garage Sale! Saturday, October 6 8am-2pm. School #12 999 South Avenue. Kids and adults clothing, toys, books, household items and much more! Come purchase some great items while supporting our city school! Donations accepted; call Pamela Bailie at 546-1158 or email: pamelaanddaniel@frontiernet. net for details.

Groups Forming DIFFERENT DRUMS GAY GIRLS GROUP. Liar Obama ruins U.S. economy, responsible for 8.3% unemployment rate, encourages calls envy and racial division. Pits gay against straight. His record sucks. Worst president ever. Vote this American hating fraud out! 585-747-2699

Jam Section 2 TROMBONE PLAYERS NEEDED to play with one of Rochester’s Finest Big Bands. Must read. (Great Charts). Able to rehearse every other Wednesday 585-442-7480

BASS PLAYER I don’t want to hang around in bars. I just want to play some twangy old rock’n’roll, ska, or New Wave. Who’s up for it? Craig at mooskamovers@aol.com CALLING ALL MUSICIANS OF ALL GENRES the Rochester Music Coalition wants

Place your ad by calling 244-3329 ext. 23 or rochestercitynewspaper.com Ad Deadlines: Friday 4pm for Display Ads Monday at noon for Line ads you! Please register on our website. For further info: www. rochestermusiccoalition.org info@rochestermusiccoalition. org 585-235-8412 DRUMMER WITH JAZZ skills applied to R&B and funk, originals & covers. Evenings open, transportation. Working

Western New York Contact Bobby 585-328-4121 sitting heavyonsd@yahoo.com GUITAR & KEYBOARDS, performing R&B, funk, covers & originals, vocals a plus. Be ready to learn & work.

continues on page 38

CITY Newspaper presents

Workshops TO ADVERTISE IN THE WORKSHOPS SECTION CALL CHRISTINE AT 244.3329 x23 OR EMAIL CHRISTINE@ROCHESTER-CITYNEWS.COM

PALM TREE 5’ tall $25 585490-5870 WALL UNIT 11 shelves 52”h x 92”L x 15”w $35 585-4905870

SUMMER SPECIAL

WOOD GARDEN FIGURE 2 girls, 1 dog. Stands in garden $10 all 2 1/2 ft tall 585-880-2903

For new students!

$10 per person for a drop in class on Thursday Night’s Beginner Class at 6:50pm. Singles or Couples welcome!

Garage and Yard Sales FANTASTIC GARAGE SALE

GROUP AND PRIVATE LESSONS FOR ALL SKILL LEVELS

Sunday Mass at St. Michael’s Church We welcome back the St. Michael's Singers to the 4 p.m. Mass on Sunday, Sept. 16 Music selections will include:

David Willcocks: Lord of the Dance John Ferguson: Who is This? Anton Bruckner: Os Justi

3450 WINTON PLACE ROCHESTER, NY 14623 585-292-1240

Gift Certificates Available

WWW.FADSROCHESTER.COM

ADULT ADD/ADHD

TELE-READING GROUP

Starts 9/20/12 for 10 weeks.

NO CHARGE

Ron Mitchell, Life Coach.

585-473-0624

www.creative-life-coachingfor-balanced-life.com Did you know that 1 in 20 people have ADHD?

SOCIAL DANCING FOR EVERYONE! with ESTHER BRILL

Louisiana Cajun & Zydeco: Oct. 2-23 Intro to Social Swing Dance: Oct. 30-Nov. 20 Wedding Dance Private Lessons Fun, relaxed classes Lively & expert dance instruction With or without a partner. No experience necessary!

Contact Esther with your questions: ebrill@frontiernet.net 585 721-8684 www.EstherBrillPartnerDance.com

Free Parking at St. Michael’s Church

Corner of Clinton & Clifford

St. Michael’s Singers

Anne Laver Music Director/Organ Alicia Messenger, cantor rochestercitynewspaper.com City 37

I’m very pleased with the calls I got from our apartment rental ads, and will continue running them. Your readers respond — positively!” - M. Smith, Residential Management > page 37

MEN ENJOY SINGINING Fun with the Chorus of the Genesee, Sing, learn, perform, share laughs and libation! Guest night Tuesday at 7 PM. Stop in at 58 E Main St, Webster. Call 585698-7784

Preparing for studio Gigs. Contact Bobby 585-328-4121 MEET OTHER MUSICIANS any instrument, male singer- jam together- coffee house, private gigs, I play keys Call Martin 585-266-6337

UPRIGHT BASS, German, new strings and bow. Beautiful

tone. Asking $950. Call 585889-1202

Wanted to Buy CASH FOR CARS! We Buy ANY

Miscellaneous

Car or Truck ,Running or NOT! Damaged, Wrecked, Salvaged OK! Get a top dollar INSTANT offer today! 1-800-267-1591 WANTED: Will Pay up to $20.00 for High School Yearbooks 1900-1988. Any School/Any State. www.yearbookusa.com or 214-514-1040

24/7 EMERGENCY RESPONSE $1/day Living alone? You could fall! Deaths from falls can be avoided. Helps a button push away. Lifewatch 1-800-2074078

DONATE A CAR DONATE A CAR- HELP HOMELESS PETS! Free Next-Day Towing. Tax Deductible. Non- Runners OK. Receive $1,000 Grocery Coupons. Call National Animal Welfare Foundation 1-888333-3848

CITY Newspaper presents

Mind Body Spirit TO ADVERTISE CALL CHRISTINE AT 244.3329 x23 OR EMAIL CHRISTINE@ROCHESTER-CITYNEWS.COM

Callan-Harris Physical Therapy Returns the Favor…

COMMUNITY WELLNESS FAIR Friday, Oct. 5th, 2-6pm • 1328 University Ave. Free Fitness Classes • Info on Juzo® Compression Stockings for Leg Health Posture Screenings • Keys to a Healthy Lifestyle Image Consultant • Chance Auc�on

482-5060

Proceeds benefit the American Cancer Society

$15-35

You decide what you can afford. No questions asked.

The Universe is Calling Explore "Where Science and Spirituality Meet" With Suzanne Giesemann, former Navy Commander Sept. 19th, 7 p.m., free www.LoveAtTheCenter.com

302 N. Goodman St., Suite 403 in Village Gate 585.287.5183 • Find us on

Rochestercommunityacupuncture.com

Fearful Flyers Course • Skills to reduce anxiety, fears, phobias. • Learn about air traffic safety controls, airplane technology and weather effects. • Complete tour of airport facilities.

Starting on Sept. 19th

For information, please call Judy Willis at (585) 461-0810

10 hours of instruction by Stress Management Consultant Judith J. Willis. Hosted by Greater Rochester Int. Airport.

Don’t put this off any longer, make flying “just something you do.”

38 City september 12-18, 2012

Unity

Sunday Celebration 11 a.m. Music, Meditation and Message Children’s Program Please see our website for ongoing groups and events.

Christ Church Unity Church of the Daily Word.

We welcome you!

55 Prince St., Rochester, NY 14607 • www.unityrochester.org • 585-473-0910

“2012 has been our best year yet. We ended March on a high note with a record breaking week of 175 treatments!! Our ad in CITY Newspaper continues to draw in new patients and has played a vital role in the growth of our business over the last 3 years. We are looking forward to another successful year!”

- Janeane ROCHESTER COMMUNITY ACUPUNCTURE

Rent your apartment special third week is

Place your ad by calling 244-3329 ext. 23 or rochestercitynewspaper.com Ad Deadlines: Friday 4pm for Display Ads Monday at noon for Line ads

ready to ship. FREE Info & DVD www.NorwoodSawmills. com/300N 1-800-578-1363 Ext.300N

Mind Body Spirit

EMPLOYMENT / CAREER TRAINING

Music Services

READY TO LOSE WIEGHT up to 30lbs/mo.,Just gain ENERGY,or have optimum SPORT NUTRITION,to improve your training/performance? Call Nancy 585-288-7046

FREE FREE DENTAL CLEANING MCC Sophomore Dental Hygiene student looking for volunteer patients interested in complimentary dental cleaning. Must be 2+ years since last professional cleaning. Call 585-314-0398 and leave a message for Leslie S. HAS YOUR BUILING SHIFTED OR SETTLED? Contact Woodford Brothers Inc, for straightening, leveling, foundation and wood frame

repairs at 1-800-OLD-BARN www.woodfordbros.com. “Not applicable in Queens county” *REDUCE YOUR CABLE BILL!* Get a 4-Room All-Digital Satellite system installed for FREE and programming starting at $19.99/mo. FREE HD/DVR upgrade for new callers, CALL NOW. 1-800-925-7945 SAWMILLS from only $3997MAKE MONEY & SAVE MONEY with your own bandmil Cut lumber any dimension. In stock

PIANO LESSONS In your home or mine. Patient, experienced instructor teaching all ages, levels and musical styles. Call Scott: 585- 465-0219. Visit www.pianolessonsrochester.com

continues on page 40

Seeks caring Companion Caregivers to assist the elderly in-home Part-time, varied hours. Driver License & vehicle required; Primary need Eastern Monroe and Northern Ontario Counties Visit www.happierathome.org Or call (585)234-0439

ATTENTION VETERANS! THE NAVY IS LOOKING FOR VETERANS. Those individuals who have served honorably in any branch of the Armed Forces, (i.e., the Navy, Army, Marines, Air Force or Coast Guard) and who want to continue their military career.

BENEFITS OF SERVICE INCLUDE: NO BOOT CAMP! A competitive salary Work only one weekend a month and two weeks per year College Stipend (MGIBSR for students) Advancement Exchange and Commissary privileges Life insurance TRICARE Reserve Select Retirement Opportunities for travel

QUALIFICATIONS FOR SERVICE INCLUDE: Must pass a MEPS physical May have to retake the ASVAB test Must be able to complete 20 years of service before age 60 If you, or someone you know, is a Veteran and would like the opportunity to serve in the United States Navy,

Call 1-800-242-3736 or email Jobs_pittsburgh@navy.mil America’s Navy: A Global Force For Good rochestercitynewspaper.com City 39

I’m very pleased with the calls I got from our apartment rental ads, and will continue running them. Your readers respond — positively!” - M. Smith, Residential Management EMPLOYMENT / CAREER TRAINING

Employment AIRLINES ARE HIRING Train for hands on Aviation Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified- Job Placement Assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance (866)296-7093 AIRLINES ARE HIRING Train for hands on Aviation Career. FAA

approved program. Financial aid if qualified- Job Placement Assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance (866)296-7093 CLASS A DRIVERS: SIGN ON BONUS Paid Holidays, Vacation, & More. Weekly Pay. Direct Deposit. REGIONAL with Home Time. 2 Years T/T EXP. 800-5245051 www.gomcilvaine.com

Is seeking an ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT to provide support to Executive Vice President Must be energetic, amicable and highly organized with ability to work independently and with a team. This position requires excellent writing skills including, and includes writing newsletters, articles and general correspondence, as well as experience planning and coordinating special events. Candidate must possess: Minimum of 5 years clerical/administrative responsibility, two of which must have been in an administrative role. College-level course work may be substituted for up to two years of administrative office experience.

For more information or to apply, please visit

www.lifetimeassistance.org EOE

LIFEGUARDS & SWIM INSTRUCTORS The Bay View Family YMCA is looking for experienced life guards and swim instructors to work a variety of shi�s. Day, night and weekend shi�s available.

Apply online at www.rochesterymca.org/bayview or call Anne Hossenlopp at 341-3218 for details Equal Opportunity Employer

THE BAY VIEW FAMILY YMCA 1209 Bay Rd., Webster, NY 14580 www.rochesterymca.org/bayview 585-671-8414 40 City september 12-18, 2012

> page 39 DRIVER $0.01 increase per mile after 6 months. Quarterly bonuses. Annual Salary $45K to $60K. CDL-A, 3 months current OTR exp. 800-414-9569 www. driveknight.com

HELP WANTED!! Extra income! Mailing Brochures from home! Free supplies! Genuine opportunity! No experience required. Start immediately! www. themailingprogram.com

EARN $500 A DAY Airbrush & Media Makeup Artists For: Ads TV - Film – Fashion Train & Build Portfolio in 1 week Lower Tuition for 2012 AwardMakeupSchool. com

$$$HELP WANTED$$$ Extra Income! Assembling CD cases from Home! No Experience Necessary! Call our Live Operators Now! 1-800-4057619 EXT 2450 http://www.

DIGITAL PRINTING TECHNICIAN Cattaraugus Allegany BOCES SEE WEBSITE FOR DETAILS APPLY ON-LINE AT

WWW.CABOCES.ORG EOE/AA

easywork-greatpay.com (AAN CAN)

Contact Claudia at 262-7044 or cgill@cfcrochester.org.

Volunteers

FOSTER PARENTS WANTED! Monroe County is looking for adults age 21 and over to consider opening their homes to foster children. Call 334-9096 or visit www.MonroeFosterCare.org.

A SECOND THOUGHT Resale Shop in East Rochester is accepting applications for volunteer sale associates and online researchers. Shop benefits people with disabilities in Guatemala. Call (585) 3402000. CAMP GOOD DAYS Volunteers are needed to help with all aspects of Tour de Teddi on Saturday, September 29, 2012. To learn more and sign up to volunteer for this fun and exciting event, please contact Nicole Jones at Camp Good Days, 585-624-5555 or njones@campgooddays.org. CATHOLIC FAMILY CENTER is seeking volunteers to help with phones, filing and simple computer work at several sites in Rochester. If you have at least eight hours a week to serve, we would love to speak with you!

HERITAGE CHRISTIAN STABLES, a therapeutic horsemanship program for children and adults with developmental disabilities, is looking for volunteers to serve as horse leaders and side walkers. Call Kim Kennedy at (585) 340-2016 or email kkennedy@ heritagechristianservices.org ROCHESTER CARES is looking for enthusiastic volunteers who are interested in joining us to make a difference in the Rochester community Also looking for those interested in helping us in a leadership capacity. Check out our calendar online for more information: www.rochestercares. org/calendar.php VOLUNTEER GROUP works with Local Non-Profits, Charity Works for Rochester, meets 3rd Thursday each Month 7:30PM Al Sigl Center, 1000 Elmwood Ave. Door 5 Lower level conference room 585-234-0187 VOLUNTEERS NEEDED to depict evangelistic opportunities by means of performing skits in a Church environment. Professional acting not a requirement. This is done in a small Church setting. Contact Pastor Ron @ 585-9576155 WOMEN: ROCHESTER HABITAT is looking for women 18 years+ to help build a house with a single mother. Visit rochabitat.org or call 546-1470

Business Opportunities A REWARDING CAREER that lets you earn money while helping others! Want to be your own boss, set your own hours? Independent Consultants needed for Restaurant.com. Unlimited Earning Potential. No previous sales experience req’d. Tools & full training provided. Learn more at http://sales.restaurant.com/nan. REACH 5 MILLION hip, forwardthinking consumers across the U.S. When you advertise in alternative newspapers, you become part of the local scene and gain access to an audience you won’t reach anywhere else. http://www.altweeklies.com/ads (AAN CAN)

Actors Wanted ACTORS/MOVIE EXTRAS Needed immediately for upcoming roles $150-$300 /day depending on job requirements. No experience, all looks needed. 1-800-5608672 for casting times /locations.

Legal Ads [ LEGAL NOTICE THE STEAM POLICE, LLC ] Notice of Organization: The Steam Police, LLC was filed with SSNY on August 17, 2012. Office: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. PO address which SSNY shall mail any process against the LLC served upon it: 1028 Castle Bridge Crossing, Webster, NY 14580. Purpose is to engage in any lawful activity. [ LEGAL NOTICE ] USA Construction & Demolition LLC (“LLC”) filed Arts. of Org. with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on August 28, 2012. Office Location: Monroe County. SSNY designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served SSNY shall mail process to: c/o Phillips Lytle LLP, 1400 First Federal Plaza, Rochester, New York 14614. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ LEGAL NOTICE HIGHLAND PLANNING LLC ] Notice of Organization: HIGHLAND PLANNING LLC was filed with SSNY on 08/09/12. Office: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. PO address which SSNY shall mail any process against the LLC served upon her: 17 Mulberry Street Rochester, NY 14620. Purpose is to engage in any lawful activity. [ MERSEREAU LAW OFFICE, PLLC ] Notice of the formation of the above named Professional Limited Liability Company (“PLLC”) Articles of Organization filed with the Department of State of NY on 8/10/2012. Office Location: County of Monroe. . The Secretary of State of NY (“SSNY”) has been designated as agent of the PLLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of any such process served to: The LLC, 9 Farmingham Dr., Penfield, NY 14526. Purpose: the practice of Law. [ NOTICE ] 1979 Catalina Model 38 HIN# CTYM0025M79I, Dan Taylor, date of sale 09/29/12 10am Voyager Boat Sales [ NOTICE ] 5018 Ridge Road LLC (LLC) filed Arts. of Org. with NY Secy. of State (SS) on August 9, 2012. LLC’s office is in Monroe County. SS is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS shall mail a copy of any process to LLC’s principal business location at 4477 Ridge Road West, Rochester, NY 14626. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Articles of Organization with respect to 700 Basket Road, LLC a New York Limited Liability Company, were filed with the Secretary of State of New York on August 8, 2012. The County

in New York State where its office is located is Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent of 700 Basket Road, LLC upon whom process against it may be served, and the post office address to which the Secretary of State shall mail a copy of any process against 700 Basket Road, LLC served upon him or her is5 Harvest Walk, Webster, NY 14580. There are no exceptions adopted by the Company, or set forth in its Operating Agreement, to the limited liability of members pursuant to Section 609(a) of the Limited Liability Company Law of the State of New York. 700 Basket Road, LLC is formed for the purpose of managing, leasing, and operating apartment projects, office buildings, retail and wholesale commercial spaces and other real estate. [ NOTICE ] Articles of Organization with respect to Campbell CPA Consulting, PLLC, a New York Professional Limited Liability Company, were filed with the Secretary of State of New York on August 13th 2012. The County in New York State where its office is located is Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent of Campbell CPA Consulting, PLLC upon whom process against it may be served, and the post office address to which the Secretary of State shall mail a copy of any process against Campbell CPA Consulting, PLLC served upon him or her is 152 Selborne Chase; Fairport, NY 14450. There are no exceptions adopted by the Company, or set forth in its Operating Agreement, to the limited liability of members pursuant to Section 609(a) of the Limited Liability Company Law of the State of New York. Campbell CPA Consulting, PLLC is formed for the purpose of providing consulting services to hospitals, healthcare networks and/or physicians to further the delivery of quality healthcare and patient outcomes while maximizing return on investment. [ NOTICE ] Beaver Properties, LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 7/27/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 6 Halstead Rise, Fairport, NY 14450. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] EMPIRE COMICS, LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 6/11/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, Attn: Anthony Furfferi, 293 Mt. Ridge Circle, Rochester, NY 14616. General Purposes.

[ NOTICE ] EMPIRE CUSTOM FABRICATION LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 7/31/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served.

SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 243 Reed Rd., Scottsville, NY 14546. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] Flying Baby Pictures, LLC has filed articles of organization with the New York Secretary of State on August 21, 2012 with an

effective date of formation of August 21, 2012. Its principal place of business is located at 18 Fernstone Lane, Penfield, New York in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent upon whom process may be served. A copy of any

process shall be mailed to 18 Fernstone Lane, Penfield, New York 14526. The purpose of the LLC is to engage in any lawful activity for which Limited Liability Companies may be organized under Section 203 of the New York Limited Liability Company Law.

[ NOTICE ] JDP LANDS, LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 6/18/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Dean

Brightly, 555 Redman Rd., Hamlin, NY 14464. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] KEVIN WETMORE, PLLC, a domestic PLLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 6/27/12. Office location:

cont. on page 42

THE CANANDAIGUA NATIONAL BANK AND TRUST COMPANY NOTICE OF NAMES OF PERSONS APPEARING AS OWNERS OF CERTAIN UNCLAIMED PROPERTY HELD BY THE FOLLOWING PERSON APPEAR FROM OUR RECORDS TO BE ENTITLED TO UNCLAIMED PROPERTY CONSISTING OF CASH AMOUNTS OF FIFTY DOLLARS OR MORE: BERTINO, LUCAS 304 WESTMINSTER RD APT 2 ROCHESTER NY 14607-3233 COPENHAGEN, BEVERLY 1087 CANE PATCH WEBSTER NY 14580-1871 LAMPHIER, ALAN PO BOX 275 S LINCOLN ST BUNKER HILL IN 46914-9044 ADAMS, ADRIANNA 20 CAMELOT CT CANANDAIGUA NY 14424-2532 ADAMS, PHILIP 753 JOHN GLENN BLVD WEBSTER NY 14580-9109 ADAMS, RAY 20 CAMELOT CT CANANDAIGUA NY 14424-2532 ALVARADO, JONATHAN APT 8 279 JOSEPH AVE ROCHESTER NY 14605-1902 AUK DESIGN LLC 7839 MAIN ST FISHERS NY 14453-9800 BALICKI, HELEN 5555 PURDY RD LOT 75 CANANDAIGUA NY 14424-7912 BALICKI, REECE 76 PURDY RD CANANDAIGUA NY 14424 BEMENT, KRISTIN 5398 BIRDIE LN CANANDAIGUA NY 14424-7991 BEMENT, PARKER 5398 BIRDIE LN CANANDAIGUA NY 14424-7991 BEMENT, TYLER 5398 BIRDIE LN CANANDAIGUA NY 14424-7991 BENHAM, GREY 4215 MIDDLE CHESHIRE RD CANANDAIGUA NY 14424-8324 BIRMINGHAM, DANIEL 21 BARNUM ST ROCHESTER NY 14609-7029 BRAUN, TESSA 1608 EDGEWOOD AVE ROCHESTER NY 14618-5412 BROOMFIELD, AMBER 202 BROWNCROFT BLVD ROCHESTER NY 14609-7842 BROOMFIELD, JORDAN 202 BROWNCROFT BLVD ROCHESTER NY 14609-7842 BRZUSTOWICZ, MARY 450 OAKDALE DR ROCHESTER NY 14618-1133 BUMPUS, AIDAN 264 BRISTOL ST CANANDAIGUA NY 14424-1621 CASIRA, JACQUELYN 10 SUFFOLK ST FAIRPORT NY 14450-2510 CASIRA, LINDA 10 SUFFOLK ST FAIRPORT NY 14450-2510 CHEN, FU-DAUL 7928 OAK BROOK CIR PITTSFORD NY 14534-9505 CICCONE, ANDREW 32 W CRAIG HILL DR ROCHESTER NY 14626-3420 CICCONE, RYAN 32 W CRAIG HILL DR ROCHESTER NY 14626-3420 CONNELL, AUDRA 1921 STABLEGATE DR CANANDAIGUA NY 14424-8160 CONNELL, HEIDI 6 HUNTERS RDG IONIA NY 14475 CONNELL, MADISON 1921 STABLEGATE DR CANANDAIGUA NY 14424-8160 CONNELL, ROBERT 6 HUNTERS RDG IONIA NY 14475 COOK, PATRICIA 120 N MAIN ST CANANDAIGUA NY 14424-1258 COOKSEY, CHERYL 369 PUTTER CIR WINTER HAVEN FL 33881-8750 COTTELEER, JOSEPH 64 ONTATRIO ST HONEOYE FALLS NY 14472-1122 DAVIS, AIDEN 30 COACHLIGHT CIR FARMINGTON NY 14424-9316 DAVIS, GREGORY 30 COACHLIGHT CIR FARMINGTON NY 14424-9316 DERUE, JULIE 352 GIBSON ST CANANDAIGUA NY 14424-1345 DERUE, TYLER 352 GIBSON ST CANANDAIGUA NY 14424-1345 DERYCKE, JASON 7316 SACHEM TRL VICTOR NY 14564-8952

DERYCKE, MARK 7316 SACHEM TRL VICTOR NY 14564-8952 DERYCKE, THERESA 7316 SACHEM TRL VICTOR NY 14564-8952 DIEGUEZ, ELOY MEIRA 450 OAKDALE DR ROCHESTER NY 14618-1133 DOLENCE, DAVID 106 HUBBELL ST CANANDAIGUA NY 14424-1350 DOLLINGER, ELLEN 386 ANTLERS DR ROCHESTER NY 14618-2102 DOLLINGER, PETER 777 CANAL VIEW BLVD ROCHESTER NY 14623-2825 DOOHAN-KOSINSKI, SUSAN 742 SOMERSET DR WEBSTER NY 14580-2663 FASCE, DONALD 32 OLD MEADOW CT LIVONIA NY 14487-9767 FASCE, THOMAS 32 OLD MEADOW CT LIVONIA NY 14487-9767 FRENCH, MELISSA 4855 CHIPMUNK DR CANANDAIGUA NY 14424-8842 FULLMER, ALEXANDER 6942 LEE RD CANANDAIGUA NY 14424-9325 FULLMER, SUSAN 3062 OAKMOUNT RD BLOOMFIELD NY 14469-9325 FULLMER, WAYNE 3062 OAKMOUNT RD BLOOMFIELD NY 14469-9325 GALLATIN, LILLIAN 12 KENDALL ST CLIFTON SPRINGS NY 14432-1014 GALLATIN, MORGAN 2 HIBBARD AVE CLIFTON SPRINGS NY 14432-1011 GIRL SCOUTS OF WESTERN NEW YORK INC TROOP 60902 1020 JOHN ST WEST HENRIETTA NY 14586-9757 GOOD, AUSTIN PO BOX 502 FISHERS NY 14453-0502 GRASSO, ROSETTA 4215 MIDDLE CHESHIRE RD CANANDAIGUA NY 14424-8324 HIGLEY, MARK 56 CATHERINE ST CANANDAIGUA NY 14424-1814 HOYT, KAY 587 MILL ST VICTOR NY 14564-8993 HUTTER, JENNIFER 277 BONNIE BRAE AVE ROCHESTER NY 14618-2130 JACKMAN, FAITH 8 FALCON DR WEST HENRIETTA NY 14586-9732 JACKMAN, KIM 8 FALCON DR WEST HENRIETTA NY 14586-9732 KARAOGUZ-BUMPUS, KARA 264 BRISTOL ST CANANDAIGUA NY 14424-1621 KAY, ROBERT PO BOX 537 BLOOMFIELD NY 14469-0537 KEENE, ELLEN 18 BOXWOOD LN FAIRPORT NY 14450-3773 KHURI, FUAD 703 N ALPINE DR BEVERLY HILLS CA 90210-3305 KROCHALIS, SAVANNAH 81 WYNDHAM RD IRONDEQUOIT NY 14609-3246 LANDRY, JOHN 358 THORNBUSH DR VICTOR NY 14564-8912 LAW, MICHAEL H 3373 ELMWOOD AVE ROCHESTER NY 14610-3425 LAW, MICHAEL R 3373 ELMWOOD AVE ROCHESTER NY 14610-3425 LEE, RICHARD 1136 BELMONT DR FARMINGTON NY 14425-8985 LEWIS, ROBERT 269 MILBURN ST ROCHESTER NY 14607-3423 LIVERGOOD, LEVINA C/O LESLIE WELCH 224 REEVES RD HENRIETTA NY 14467-9721 MARREO, BERNARDO APT B9J 501 SENECA MANOR DR ROCHESTER NY 14621-1611 MARRERO, RICARDO APT B9J 501 SENECA MANOR DR ROCHESTER NY 14621-1611 MATHEWS, ALICIA 568 ONTARIO DR ONTARIO NY 14519-9342

MATHEWS, JIM 568 ONTARIO DR ONTARIO NY 14519-9342 MATHEWS, KRYSTA 568 ONTARIO DR ONTARIO NY 14519-9342 MCAULEY, DEBORAH 129 MONROE PKWY ROCHESTER NY 14619-1959 MCCLELLAND, NEAL 58 HOWELL ST CANANDAIGUA NY 14424-1237 MCGORY, ALEXANDRIA PO BOX 761 NAPLES NY 14512-0761 MEYER, MICHAEL 63 LAKESIDE BLVD HILTON NY 14468-8930 MONICA HOUSING LTD. 30 MILLBANK ST ROCHESTER NY 14619-1959 MOORE, JOANNE 118 FLORENCE AVE ROCHESTER NY 14616-4637 MOORE, THOMAS 118 FLORENCE AVE ROCHESTER NY 14616-4637 MORRIS,SHIRLEY 4662 COUNTY RD 16 CANANDAIGUA NY 14424-8911 MUEHE, MARTIN 3476 COUNTY RD 16 CANANDAIGUA NY 14424-2443 MUEHE, MATTHEW 48 N MAIN ST CANANDAIGUA NY 14424-1446 NESMITH, MELISSA 21 BARNUM ST ROCHESTER NY 14609-7029 PARSELLS, GRETCHEN 243 E MAIN ST APT 1 PENN YAN NY 14527-1603 PARSELLS, WILLIAM 243 E MAIN ST APT 1 PENN YAN NY 14527-1603 PASCIAK, DONALD 5761 WISHING WELL LN FARMINGTON NY 14425-9365 PELLETT, GLADYS 1087 CANE PATCH WEBSTER NY 14580-1871 PIZARRO, JULIA 2660 CHILI AVE APT 10 6 ROCHESTER NY 14624-4101 POWELL, GEORGE 40 WILCOX LN APT 201 CANANDAIGUA NY 14424-1244 PRATOWSKI, ASHLEE 7316 SACHEM TRL VICTOR NY 14564-8952 RIZZO, KELLYE 3714 COUNTY RD13 SHORTSVILLE NY 14548-9713 RIZZO, KEITH 21 PIONEER RD SHORTVILLE NY 14548-9303 RIZZO, MICHAEL 21 PIONEER RD SHORTVILLE NY 14548-9303 ROBERTS, MARTHA 1895 HIGHLAND AVE ROCHESTER NY 14618-1138 ROBERTS, SARAH 126 BRANFORD RD ROCHESTER NY 14618-1744 ROSA, NICHOLAS 287 GALAHAD DR ROCHESTER NY 14623-5507 ROWLES, ZACHARY 5143 COLLETT RD SHORTSVILLE NY 14548-9612 SCHRADER, BETTY 2160 COUNTY RD 28 CANANDAIGUA NY 14424-8015 SCHRADER, KAYLA 405 LAKESHORE DR CANANDAIGUA NY 14424-2366 SICHAK, DANIEL 63 LAKESIDE BLVD HILTON NY 14468-8930 STAIRS, THOMAS 233 WEST AVE CANANDAIGUA NY 14424-1514 TAY HOUSE MEMORIAL FUND TROOP 19 269 MILBURN ST ROCHESTER NY 14607-3423 VARVEL, JOSEPH 106 HUBBELL ST CANANDAIGUA NY 14424-1350 WELCH, LESLIE 224 REEVES RD HENRIETTA NY 14467-9721 WHITMORE, JEAN 287 GALAHAD DR ROCHESTER NY 14623-5507 WIJAYAPALA, TRACY 8 SHIRLEY ST SHORTSVILLE NY 14548-9327 WILLIAMS, DANIEL 21 BARNUM ST ROCHESTER NY 14609-7029

A report of Unclaimed Property has been made to the Comptroller of the State of New York, Pursuant to Section 301 of the Abandoned Property Law. A list of the names contained in such notice is on file and open to public inspection at the principal office of the bank, located at 72 South Main Street, Canandaigua NY 14424, where such abandoned property is payable. Such abandoned property will be paid on or before October 31 next to persons establishing to its satisfaction their right to receive the same. In the succeeding November, and on or before the tenth day thereof, such unclaimed property will be paid to the Comptroller of the State of New York, and shall there-upon cease to be liable therefore. rochestercitynewspaper.com City 41

Legal Ads > page 41 Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the PLLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The PLLC, 254 Culver Road, Rochester, NY 14607. Purpose: Law [ NOTICE ] Not. Of Form. of Freemantle Insurance Agency, LLC, Art. Of Org. filed with SSNY 6/8/12. County: Monroe. SSNY is designated Agent of LLC to whom process may be served. SSNY may mail a copy of any process to LLC, 642 Kreag Rd, Ste 207, Pittsford, NY 14534. Purpose any lawful activity [ NOTICE ] Not. of Form. of North Island Media, LLC Art. Of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 8/1/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY may mail a copy of any process to LLC. 731 Sugarcreek Tr. Webster, NY 14580. Purpose: any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Not. of Form. of Red Setter Enterprises, LLC. Arts. Of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State on 7/9/12. Office location Monroe County. Secy. Of State (SSNY) designated as agent of LLC

upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the principal business address of the LLC: 192 Rhinecliff Drive, Rochester, NY 14618. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Not. of Form. of Sluey and Saint, LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 8/3/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY may mail a copy of any process to LLC.19 Cobblestone Crossing, Penfield, NY 14526. Purpose: any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of 1558 WHEN LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 07/31/12. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 2479 Browncroft Blvd., Rochester, NY 14625. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Avon Self Storage Assoc., LLC at the princ. office of the LLC. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of 3755 WEST HENRIETTA ROAD, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State on 8/14/12. Office location: Monroe County. Principal

business address: 3755 West Henrietta Road, Rochester, New York 14623. Secy. of State designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. Secy. of State shall mail process to: 3755 West Henrietta Road, Rochester, New York 14623. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] NOTICE OF FORMATION of BLACKBOOK COD, LLC (“LLC”) Art. of Org. filed with NY Secretary of State (“NYSOS”) on 4/11/2011, pursuant to Limited Liability Company Law Section 203. Office location: Monroe County. NYSOS designated as agent for LLC upon whom process against it may be served. NYSOS shall mail copy of process served to: 4 San Rafael Drive, Rochester, NY 14618. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of C. MICHAEL REIMRINGER, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 8/15/2012. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 67 Sperry Drive, Henrietta, NY 14467. Purpose: any lawful act [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of

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Charles Point Sodus LLC. Articles of Organization filed with the Secretary of State of New York on July 17, 2012. Office location County of Monroe, SSNY has been designated as the agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to 5500 West Ridge Road, Spencerport, NY 14559. Purpose: any lawful act. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of CPDevelopment, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 6/18/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o The LLC, 250 Ramo Drive, Rochester, NY 14606. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of DHD VENTURES CAPITAL, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 7/31/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, c/o Sammy Feldman, 3445 Winton Place, Ste. 228, Rochester, NY 14623. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] NOTICE OF FORMATION of DURHAM GROUP HOLDINGS LLC (“LLC”) Art. of Org. filed with NY Secretary of State (“NYSOS”) on 10/28/2011, pursuant to Limited Liability Company Law Section 203. Office location: Monroe County. NYSOS designated as agent for LLC upon whom process against it may be served. NYSOS shall mail copy of process served to: 101 Sully’s Trail Bldg. 20, Pittsford, NY 14534. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Dwyer Young + Wright Architectural LLC amended to Dwyer Architectural LLC. Arts. of Org. filed Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 2/14/12. Off. loc.: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of PLLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The PLLC, 1344 University Ave., Ste. 140, Rochester, NY 14607. Purpose: practice the profession of architecture. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of FINGER LAKES FIELD HOCKEY, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State on 8/7/12. Office location: Monroe County. Principal business address: 60 Park Circle Drive, Fairport, New York 14450. Secy. of State designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. Secy. of State shall mail process to: 60 Park Circle Drive, Fairport, New York 14450. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] NOTICE OF FORMATION of GCWNY LLC (“LLC”)

42 City september 12-18, 2012

Art. of Org. filed with NY Secretary of State (“NYSOS”) on 7/24/2012, pursuant to Limited Liability Company Law Section 203. Office location: Monroe County. NYSOS designated as agent for LLC upon whom process against it may be served. NYSOS shall mail copy of process served to: 31 Sutton Place, Pittsford, NY 14534. Purpose: any lawful activities.

[ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of MATRIX INSIGHTS LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 04/24/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, 4715 Clover St., Honeoye Falls, NY 14472. Purpose: Any lawful activity.

[ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of IH HOLDING 2, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 08/16/12. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 180 Charlotte St., Rochester, NY 14607. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity.

[ NOTICE ] NOTICE OF FORMATION of NEW YORK INCOME PARTNERS III, LLC (“LLC”) Art. of Org. filed with NY Secretary of State (“NYSOS”) on 9/6/2011, pursuant to Limited Liability Company Law Section 203. Office location: Monroe County. NYSOS designated as agent for LLC upon whom process against it may be served. NYSOS shall mail copy of process served to: 3445 Winton Place Suite 228, Rochester, NY 14623. Purpose: any lawful activities.

[ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of JACK M. DORKHOM, DMD, PLLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 06/22/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of PLLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, P.O. Box 156, Pittsford, NY 14534. Purpose: Dentistry. [ NOTICE ] NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY. NAME: 2517 EAST 63rd ST. LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 08/14/12. The latest date of dissolution is 12/31/2062. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to the LLC, c/o Joseph Nacmias, 5 Goldman Road, Monroe, New York 10950. Purpose: For any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY. NAME: EMUNAH PROPERTIES AT ROCHESTER, LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 06/12/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to the LLC, 1911 Avenue L, Brooklyn, New York 11230. Purpose: For any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Lu Hang Realty, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 7/31/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, c/o Sammy Feldman, 3445 Winton Place, Ste. 228, Rochester, NY 14623. Purpose: any lawful activity.

[ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of PIZZA STOP GREECE, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 08/15/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Corporation Service Co., 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207, regd. agent upon whom and at which process may be served. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of RESTORATION COUNSELING OF ROCHESTER LCSW, PLLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 08/30/12. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of PLLC: 95 Allens Creek Rd., Bldg. 1, Ste. 323, Rochester, NY 14618. SSNY designated as agent of PLLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the PLLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity

[ NOTICE ] NOTICE OF FORMATION of SPRING PINES PARCEL 6 LLC (“LLC”) Art. of Org. filed with NY Secretary of State (“NYSOS”) on 6/20/2011, pursuant to Limited Liability Company Law Section 203. Office location: Monroe County. NYSOS designated as agent for LLC upon whom process against it may be served. NYSOS shall mail copy of process served to: 70 Quail Lane, Rochester, NY 14624. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] NOTICE OF FORMATION of TEC MEDICAL/ SURGICAL PRODUCTS, LLC (“LLC”) Art. of Org. filed with NY Secretary of State (“NYSOS”) on 6/16/2011, pursuant to Limited Liability Company Law Section 203. Office location: Monroe County. NYSOS designated as agent for LLC upon whom process against it may be served. NYSOS shall mail copy of process served to: 23 Summit Oaks, Pittsford, NY 14534. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Thai Time Cuisine, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 7/31/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, c/o Sammy Feldman, 3445 Winton Place, Ste. 228, Rochester, NY 14623. Purpose: any lawful activity [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Timberlane SM, LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 7/26/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 349 W. Commercial St., Ste. 3100, East Rochester, NY 14445. Purpose: any lawful activities.

[ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Revolution Construction, LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 6/18/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 195 West Hill Estates, Rochester, NY 14626. Purpose: any lawful activities.

[ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of Wind9 Properties LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 5/16/2012. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 1617 Heard Drive, Maple Glen, PA 19002. Purpose: any lawful act.

[ NOTICE ] NOTICE OF FORMATION of ROCHESTER SEALTEK, LLC (“LLC”) Art. of Org. filed with NY Secretary of State (“NYSOS”) on 4/11/2011, pursuant to Limited Liability Company Law Section 203. Office location: Monroe County. NYSOS designated as agent for LLC upon whom process against it may be served. NYSOS shall mail copy of process served to: 840 Rock Beach Road, Rochester, NY 14617. Purpose: any lawful activities.

[ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of MS Brockport LLC. Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 8/14/12. Office location: Monroe County. LLC formed in CA on 8/9/12. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: Stephen M. Fenster, Schwartz and Fenster, Warner Center, 21700 Oxnard St., Ste. 1160, Woodland Hills, CA 91367. CA and principal business addr.: 101

Hodencamp Rd., Ste. 200, Thousand Oaks, CA 91360. Cert. of Org. filed with CA Sec. of State, 1500 11th Ave., Sacramento, CA 95814. Purpose: all lawful purposes. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of Tatonka Contractors, LLC. App. for Auth. filed Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 1/4/12. Office location: Monroe County. LLC formed in Colorado (CO) on 1/5/06. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 1352 Salt Rd., Webster, NY 14580. CO address of LLC: Tatonka Contractors, LLC, 14555 Quail Run Rd., Hudson, CO 80642. Cert. of Form. filed CO Secy. of State, 1700 Broadway, Denver, CO 80290. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of the formation of a Limited Liability Company (LLC) named Ultimate Auto Spot LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with Secretary of State of NY (SSNY) on June 28, 2012. Office location is Monroe County, New York. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. The SSNY shall mail a copy of any process to the LLC at 1820 Lexington Ave, Rochester, NY 14606. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Radassess, LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 8/15/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 294 Burnett Rd., Webster, NY 14580. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] STONEWOOD BUILDERS, LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 8/29/12. Office in Monroe Co. SSNY desig. agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to PO Box 97, North Chili, NY 14514. Purpose: Any lawful purpose. Principal business location: 8 Kings Way, Rochester, NY 14624. [ NOTICE ] T-Mobile USA is proposing to modify an existing wireless telecommunications facility located on an existing building located at 150 Highland Avenue, Rochester, Monroe County, NY. The modifications will consist replacing 6 antennas (2 per sector) on existing pipes on the rooftop at varying heights, with the uppermost at a center height of 106-feet above ground level. Any interested party wishing to submit comments regarding the potential effects the proposed facility may have on any historic property may do so by sending such comments to: Project 61125258-SF c/o EBI Consulting, 21 B Street, Burlington, MA 01803,

Legal Ads or via telephone at (781) 273-2500. [ NOTICE ] Takis & Ath LLC (LLC) filed Arts. of Org. with NY Secy. of State (SS) on 8/6/2012. LLC’s office is in Monroe Co. SS is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS shall mail a copy of any process to LLC’s principal business location at 42 E. Main St., Webster, NY 14580. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] The Sign Maker LLC located in Monroe County, Filed Arts. of Org. on 07/02/12 for the purpose of making signs. NY Sec’y of State has been designated as agent for the LLC upon whom process against it may be served and a copy of any process shall be mailed to 194 Colonial Rd., Rochester, NY 14609 [ NOTICE ] TRI CAPITAL SOLUTIONS, LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 6/27/12. Office in Monroe Co. SSNY desig. agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to PO Box 26248, Rochester, NY 14626. Purpose: Any lawful purpose. Principal business location: 10230 South Street Rd., Leroy, NY 14482. [ NOTICE ] Universal Property Solutions, LLC (LLC) filed Arts. of Org. with NY Secy. of State (SS) on 8/10/2012. LLC’s office is in Monroe Co. SS is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS shall mail a copy of any process to LLC’s principal business location at 518 Plank Rd., Webster, NY 14580. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] VAN-GO REAL ESTATE SERVICES, LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 7/9/12. Office in Monroe Co. SSNY desig. agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 212 Valley Rd., Rochester, NY 14618, which is also the principal business location. Purpose: Any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] WATERMAN TICKETS, LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 4/8/11. Office in Monroe Co. SSNY design. Agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to The LLC P.O. Box 137 West Henrietta, NY 14586: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] Discover Hardwood Flooring and Design, LLC filed Arts. of Org. with NY Dept. of State (SSNY) on 6/7/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom procdss my be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to the LLC, 354 Noridge Drive, Rochester, NY 14622. Purpose: Any lawful Activity

[ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] Name: ONE SIMON 4 TO GO LLC. Arts. Of Org. filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 08/02/2012. Office Location: Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to: C/O ONE SIMON 4 TO GO LLC, 111 Parce Avenue, Suite 2, Fairport, New York 14450. Purpose: Any Lawful Purpose. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] Notice of Formation of MACJAX PLAYROOM, LLC. Articles of Organization filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 8/16/12. Office location: Monroe County SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to principal business location: The LLC, 77 Bradford Road, Pittsford, NY 14534. Purpose: any lawful activity [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF 250 PIXLEY ROAD LLC ] The name of the Limited Liability Company is 250 PIXLEY ROAD LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the New York Secretary of State on 8/1/2012. The office of the LLC is in Monroe County. The New York Secretary of State is designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. The Secretary of State shall mail a copy of such process to 18 Dolman Dr., Rochester, NY 14624. The LLC is organized to engage in any lawful activity for which an LLC may be formed under NY LLC Law. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF BLU BAR & GRILL LLC ] The name of the Limited Liability Company is BLU Bar & Grill LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the New York Secretary of State on 8/3/2012. The office of the LLC is in Monroe County. The New York Secretary of State is designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. The Secretary of State shall mail a copy of such process to 18 Dolman Dr., Rochester, NY 14624. The LLC is organized to engage in any lawful activity for which an LLC may be formed under NY LLC Law. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY ] Notice of formation of ProProspecting LLC. Art. of Org. filed by Sec. of State of NY (SSNY) on 8/2/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. NYSS shall mail process to: PO Box 321, North Chili, NY 14514. Purpose: Any lawful act or activity. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LLC ] HR Logic & Solutions,

LLC has filed articles of organization with the New York Secretary of State on August 1, 2012. Its principal place of business is located at 60 Saginaw Drive, Suite 100, Rochester, New York in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent upon whom process may be served. A copy of any process shall be mailed to 60 Saginaw Drive, Suite 100, Rochester, New York 14623. The purpose of the LLC is to engage in any lawful activity for which Limited Liability Companies may be organized under Section 203 of the New York Limited Liability Company Law. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF THE LABADI GROUP, LLC ] The name of the limited liability company (“LLC”) is THE LABADI GROUP, LLC. The Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State on August 3, 2012. The office of the LLC is to be in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. The address to which the Secretary of State shall mail a copy of any process against the LLC served upon him is: Forsythe, Howe, O’Dwyer, Kalb & Murphy, P.C., One Chase Square, Suite 1900, Rochester, NY 14604, Attn: William R. Alexander, Esq. The LLC is organized to engage in any lawful activity for which an LLC may be formed under Section 203 of the Limited Liability Company Law. [ READING ELECTRIC RENEWABLES, LLC ] Notice of filing of Application for Authority of limited liability company (LLC). Name of foreign LLC is Reading Electric Renewables, LLC. The Application for Authority was filed with the Sec. of State of New York (SSNY) on 7/27/12. Jurisdiction: Pennsylvania. Formed: 9/17/09. County: Monroe. SSNY is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to: James D. Kurtz, 4700 Pottsville Pike, Reading, PA 19605. The address of the office required to be maintained in Pennsylvania is its registered agent: James D. Kurtz, 4700 Pottsville Pike, Reading, PA 19605. The name and address of the authorized officer in Pennsylvania where the Articles of Organization are filed is: Secretary of State of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, Department of State, Corporation Bureau, 401 North Street, Room 206, PO Box 8722, Harrisburg, PA 17105. Purpose: any and all lawful activities. [ SUMMONS AND NOTICE ] Index No. 2011-11666 STATE OF NEW YORK SUPREME COURT MONROE COUNTY AMERICAN TAX FUNDING, LLC, Plaintiff,

vs. MICHELE HOFER; CHARLES COSTA; O’HEANEY ASSOCIATES; The heirs-at-law, next of kin, distributees, executors, administrators, assignees, lienors, creditors, successors-in- interest and generally all persons having or claiming under, by or through FRANK J. MERKEL, by purchase, inheritance, lien or otherwise of any right, title or interest in and to the premises described in the complaint herein, and all creditors thereof, and the respective wives, or widows of his, if any, all of whose names and addresses are unknown to Plaintiff; FIA CARD SERVICES, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION F/K/A BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. (USA); NEW YORK STATE DEPARTMENT OF TAXATION AND FINANCE; COUNTY OF MONROE AND “JOHN DOE #1” THROUGH “JOHN DOE #100”, Defendants.TO THE ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANTS: YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED to answer the Complaint in the aboveentitled foreclosure action, and to serve a copy of your answer on the plaintiff’s attorney within thirty (30) days after the service of this Summons, exclusive of the day of service or within thirty (30) days after completion of service where service is made in any other manner than by personal service within the State. The United States of America, if designated as a defendant in this action, may answer or appear within sixty (60) days of service hereof. In case of your failure to appear or answer, judgment will be taken against you by default for the relief demanded in the Complaint. Monroe County is designated as the place of trial. The basis of venue is the location of the subject tax parcel. Dated: July 17, 2012 TO THE ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANTS: The foregoing summons is served upon you by publication, pursuant to an Order of Honorable Richard A. Dollinger, a Justice of the Supreme Court, dated August 10, 2012, and filed with supporting papers in the Monroe County Clerk’s Office. This is an action to foreclose certain tax liens (the “Tax Lien”) covering the property known as 158 Carter Street, City of Rochester, New York and identified as Tax Account No. 106.26-2-54 (the “Tax Parcel”). The relief sought is the sale of the Tax Parcel at public auction in satisfaction of the tax lien. In case of your failure to appear, judgment may be taken against you in the sum of $3,567.11, together with interest, costs, disbursements and attorney’s fees of this action, and directing the public sale of the Tax Parcel. Anthony J. Iacchetta PHILLIPS LYTLE LLP Office and Post Office Address 1400 First Federal Plaza Rochester, New York 14614 Tel. No. (585) 2382000

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44 City september 12-18, 2012


September 12-18, 2012 - CITY Newspaper