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EVENTS: CLOTHESLINE FESTIVAL, FESTIVAL OF FOOD 20 DINING: RECONSIDERING LUNCH 11 THEATER REVIEW: “ANGELS IN AMERICA PART 2” 24 FILM: “KILLER JOE,” GREENTOPIA | FILM 30 URBAN JOURNAL: ROMNEY’S POWERFUL PITCH

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CROSSWORD, NEWS OF THE WEIRD 43 CITY’S 2012 SOUTH WEDGE-UCATION EVENT 44

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Greater Rochester’s Alternative Newsweekly

Vol 41 No 52

News. Music. Life.

Putting a face (and a race) to the divine is exclusionary by nature.” ART REVIEW, PAGE 19

Rochester’s underground justice system. NEWS, PAGE 8

State to intervene in RCSD. NEWS, PAGE 5

Cyclists urge sharing the road. NEWS, PAGE 4

Best of Rochester 2012: Final 4 revealed! FINAL BALLOT, PAGE 22

DEVELOPMENT | BY JEREMY MOULE | PAGE 6 | PHOTO BY MATT DETURCK

Industrial power play The former Kodak Park, now known as Eastman Business Park (pictured), is seen by local and state leaders as an economic development lynchpin for the Rochester region. The 1,200-acre site is evolving from Kodak’s film and chemical manufacturing hub to a cluster of renewable energy and advanced manufacturing companies. And that, say local business and government leaders, is what will keep the former Kodak Park a productive center of industry. But there’s a catch. One of the park’s key features, its dedicated power plant, needs to be upgraded

in order to meet upcoming federal and state environmental requirements. Kodak, which owns the business park and the power plant, is going through bankruptcy proceedings and it’s not clear that the company will have the millions of dollars needed for the upgrades. Government and economic development officials say they want the plant to keep operating, since it is an attractive feature for high-tech industries. So the scenario raises questions about who will, and who should fund the upgrades.


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We welcome your comments. Send them to themail@rochester-citynews. com, or post them on our website, rochestercitynewspaper.com, our Facebook page, or our Twitter feed, @ roccitynews. Comments of fewer than 350 words have a greater chance of being published, and we do edit selections for publication in print. We don’t publish comments sent to other media.

The need for guns

I grew up with guns. I owned a 22 pistol, and I was a good shot. My grandpa had a large frog pond, so I spent summers plinking frogs. When the top of their heads rose above the water, I would shoot them between the eyes, and Grandma would fix frog legs for dinner. When I was a Peace Corps Volunteer in Colombia, I was walking on a dark street when three young men recognized I was American. One of them shoved a pistol into my stomach, and said, “You damn gringo, I’m going to kill you.” Of course I was terrified, but in that split second I instinctively responded with a smile, and replied, “Come on, let me buy you guys a drink.” My assailant was disarmed by my response and put the gun away. In a nearby bar, we bought each other drinks and parted friends - handshakes all around. If I had carried a gun and had tried to reach for it, he would have shot me. Of course, he expected me to beg for my life. By responding with a smile, I defused his threat. In 2010 there were 12,996 murders in the US, 8775 by firearms. While some of the firearm murders would have taken place anyway, there is surely no question that if firearms were banned there would be fewer actual murders. Of course this is utopian. The Right to Keep and Bear Arms is in the Constitution because the colonists recognized the need for a citizen militia to prevent a seizure of power. In the 18th century, a wellregulated militia needed only muzzle-loading muskets and rifles. The Minutemen were more than a match for British regulars because they used better weapons and hunted deer with them (and maybe frogs). Since regular military units today have a far more varied arsenal, a case can be made that citizens need the right to bear AR-15s, Glocks, machine guns, bazookas, tanks, and even ground-to-air

missiles. But according to the Second Amendment the purpose of such weapons is for a well-regulated militia. The Second Amendment does not authorize citizens to keep and bear arms unless they belong to a well-regulated militia. If we can’t outlaw private gun ownership because of the Second Amendment, we can enforce it. If you want to own guns, you must be a member in good standing of a well-regulated militia, and that militia must be legally responsible for your access to weapons just as regular military units are. Don’t get me wrong! If you want to plink frogs with your 22, that’s just fine. But if someone pulls a gun on you, buy him a beer. BRUCE “PACHO” LANE, ROCHESTER

On Garrison Keillor’s Writers Almanac show on WXXI-FM, he read a brief piece by writer Molly Ivins that reminded me of your column (“Why Not Ban Guns?” Urban Journal): “I am not anti-gun. I’m proknife. Consider the merits of the knife. In the first place, you have to catch up with someone in order to stab him. A general substitution of knives for guns would promote physical fitness. We’d turn into a whole nation of great runners. Plus, knives don’t ricochet. And people are seldom killed while cleaning their knives.” KEN MAHER

Posted on rochestercitynewspaper.com The last time I checked, gun ownership was a protected constitutional right, rather like equal rights, the right to assemble, and the right to free speech. Each of these rights has led to violence and sometimes death. So why not suggest we end the right of free speech while we are at it? It would end all those troublesome arguments, protests, and political conventions that so often lead to violence. And that darned right to freely assemble; once again, it just leads to those violent parties, soccer games, protests, and political events that turn violent. And equal rights? Throw that out, too. After all, we’ve been bickering and fighting over those rights as well. You know, you may be on to something. Just think how safe and quiet it will be if no one is armed, or free to leave their homes, or speak to each other... DON MURPHY

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Brooks and the taxpayers

I applaud the Democrats in the County Legislature for introducing legislation prohibiting spending taxpayer dollars on advertisements featuring county elected officials. Not long ago, I received an e-mail from my neighborhood organization announcing a number of community events in the Highland Park Bowl. The announcement stated the events were “compliments of Maggie Brooks and Monroe County.” I asked the list facilitator: In what way were the events “compliments” of Executive Brooks? Did she contribute personal funds to the events? My query was forwarded to the county but I never received an answer. An honest statement would have said, “Park events were compliments of taxpayers.” This honesty would help build a sense of community and increase our appreciation for government by showing our taxes are put to good use.” I have continued to see Brooks’ name on buses, county vehicles, etc. Shameless self-promotion by politicians like Brooks is problematic; it contributes to the cynicism and alienation people feel about our government. Brooks should stop her self-promotion by attaching her name to every taxpayer-funded service and accomplishment. MARIA COLES, ROCHESTER

Coles is a volunteer with the Louise Slaughter campaign.

Brooks and the CSEA

It’s amazing what a little paid media will do (“Brooks’ Busy Week,” News). Do you think it’s a coincidence that the hard-working people of Monroe County are getting closer to a contract? Do you think being a Congressional candidate has anything to do with the workers getting a temporary agreement? Just sayin. And while I’m at it, here’s my two cents on the whole BrooksSlaughter deal. Brooks is a candidate who has given her soul to the radical House GOP and now she is trying to rationalize her extreme positions to moderate Monroe County voters. She is really in a pickle. STERLING COMFORT

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News. Music. Life. Greater Rochester’s Alternative Newsweekly September 5-11, 2012 Vol 41 No 52 250 North Goodman Street Rochester, New York 14607-1199 themail@rochester-citynews.com phone (585) 244-3329 fax (585) 244-1126 rochestercitynewspaper.com Publishers: William and Mary Anna Towler Editor: Mary Anna Towler Asst. to the publishers: Matt Walsh Editorial department themail@rochester-citynews.com Features editor: Eric Rezsnyak News editor: Christine Carrie Fien Staff writers: Tim Louis Macaluso, Jeremy Moule Music editor: Willie Clark Music writer: Frank De Blase Calendar editor: Rebecca Rafferty Contributing writers: Kate Antoniades, Paloma Capanna, Casey Carlsen, Roman Divezur, George Grella, Susie Hume, Andy Klingenberger, Dave LaBarge, Kathy Laluk, Michael Lasser, James Leach, Ron Netsky, Dayna Papaleo, Rebecca Rafferty, David Yockel Jr. Editorial intern: Alexandra Carmichael, Antoinette Ena Johnson, Anne Ritz Art department artdept@rochester-citynews.com Production manager: Max Seifert Designers: Aubrey Berardini, Matt DeTurck Photographers: Frank De Blase, Matt DeTurck, Michael Hanlon Photography Intern: Lauren Petracca Advertising department ads@rochester-citynews.com Advertising sales manager: Betsy Matthews Account executives: Tom Decker, Annalisa Iannone, William Towler Classified sales representatives: Christine Kubarycz, Tracey Mykins Operations/Circulation info@rochester-citynews.com Circulation Manager: Katherine Stathis Distribution: Andy DiCiaccio, David Riccioni, Northstar Delivery, Wolfe News City Newspaper is available free of charge. Additional copies of the current issue may be purchased for $1, payable in advance at the City Newspaper office. City Newspaper may be distributed only by authorized distributors. No person may, without prior written permission of City Newspaper, take more than one copy of each weekly issue. City (ISSN 1551-3262) is published weekly by WMT Publications, Inc. Periodical postage paid at Rochester, NY (USPS 022-138). Send address changes to City, 250 North Goodman Street, Rochester, NY 14607. City is a member of the Association of Alternative Newsweeklies and the New York Press Association. Subscriptions: $35.00 ($30.00 for senior citizens) for one year. Add $10 yearly for out-of-state subscriptions: add $30 yearly for foreign subscriptions. Due to the initial high cost of establishing new subscriptions, refunds for fewer than ten months cannot be issued. Copyright by WMT Publications Inc., 2012 - all rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, photocopying, recording or by any information storage retrieval system without permission of the copyright owner.


urban journal | by mary anna towler

Romney’s powerful pitch Now the attention is on Charlotte, and the Democrats are going to have to go some to stage a more successful convention than the Republicans did. Conventions may not do much to sway the general public, but they can help shape a campaign, laying out its general thrust. And they can fire up the people who will go back to their own states and work on voters there. That can influence elections, both for the presidency and for Congress, which this year will be crucial. However well the Democrats perform this week, Obama’s odds don’t seem good. The truth is, the economy is recovering far more slowly than anybody wants. And while there are success stories in some states, a lot of people are feeling a lot of pain. To that truth, Republicans are adding multiple fabrications (playing much looser with the facts than the Democrats, by numerous accounts). And as one Romney aide said, the campaign isn’t going to be dictated by fact checking. Even before the conventions, this campaign had sunk into dismaying negativity, with elected officials in both parties looking more like adolescent boys in a back-alley fight than statesmen doing the nation’s business. I was struck by Mark Leibovich’s article in the New York Times Magazine, “Feel the Loathing on the Campaign Trail,” and his fantasy of the Obamas inviting the Romneys to the White House, where they all sit around eating hot dogs, sharing personal stories and photographs, and getting to know one another. Leibovich, depressed by the current campaign, started sharing his fantasy with people at campaign stops. The pols politicized it; ordinary voters loved the thought. Like Leibovich, I’m depressed. Maybe speakers at the Dems’ convention will go positive, sticking to the facts and trusting voters to see the difference. But I doubt it. And maybe it wouldn’t matter. Maybe I’m giving voters more credit than we’re due. The truth is complicated. Crafting a successful future is complicated. In the end, I’m not sure all the media fact checking in the world will matter. Republicans are counting on voters’ gullibility, the need for simplicity, and I won’t be surprised if it pays off. While Romney is accused of being vague about what he would do as president, he’s probably being as specific as the average voter wants him to be. We may not know the “how” of his plans, but we can see the “what” pretty clearly, and he laid it out at the convention: In a Romney presidency, the country will start “taking full advantage of our

We may not know the ‘how’ of Mitt Romney’s plans, but we can see the ‘what’ pretty clearly.” coal, our gas, our oil, our nuclear, and our renewables.” He’ll “repeal Obamacare.” He’ll “protect the sanctity of life, honor the institution of marriage, and guarantee the freedom of religion.” He’ll “build an America so strong that no nation would dare test it.” “Every parent should have a choice, and every child should have a chance.” To help with the sale, Romney’s speechwriters have come up with catchy lines that will play well not just to hardcore conservatives but also to Democrats, moderate Republicans, and independents: “If you felt that excitement when you voted for Barack Obama four years ago, shouldn’t you feel that way now that he’s President Obama?” “President Obama promised to slow the rise of the ocean and to heal the planet. My promise is to help you and your family.” Barack Obama offered hope and change four years ago. Romney says he’ll give us the bright future that Obama has destroyed: “That future is our destiny. That future is out there. It is waiting for us. Our children deserve it, our nation depends upon it, the peace and the freedom of the world require it.” That is the kind of emotional appeal that helped propel Barack Obama to the presidency. It was effective then. It could be effective now. Meantime, various media are reporting that the Democrats convening in Charlotte are not as fired up as they were four years ago. They’d better wake up.

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[ news from the week past ]

Dome Arena for sale

The Monroe County Fair and Recreation Association will put the Dome Arena in Henrietta up for sale, reports the Democrat and Chronicle. The association will continue to hold county fair, the article says, and events scheduled for the rest of the year will still take place.

Insurance stats released

The Census Bureau released new state and county health-insurance statistics. In New York, 13.7 percent of people are uninsured, while in Monroe County the figure is 10 percent. Massachusetts had the lowest rate of uninsured residents in the country at 5.2 percent.

Draft audit criticizes LDC use

Monroe County officials denounced a state Comptroller’s Office draft audit report focusing on the county’s use of a local development corporation to upgrade its public safety communications equipment. The county released the draft report, which criticized the county’s handling of the bidding and contracting process. But county officials say the Comp-

troller’s Office is hostile to the LDC model.

News

Economic development update

The Finger Lakes Regional Economic Development Council released a progress report and a list of priority projects for further state investment. The priority projects include higher education research centers, housing projects, work force development programs, and assistance for small and startup businesses. The report is available at http://regionalcouncils.ny.gov/ content/finger-lakes, and the council is accepting comments on it.

CYCLING | BY JEREMY MOULE

Cyclists urge sharing the road

As a triathlete, Mary Eggers logs plenty of time on her bicycle. But after her friend, Fairport teacher Heather Boyum, was killed in July while riding in Penfield, Eggers had been hesitant to take to the road. It didn’t help that, shortly after the Boyum tragedy, another of Eggers’ friends was run off the road by a large truck. For several weeks, Eggers rode indoors on a trainer.

Sibley deal reached

The City of Rochester has agreed to sell the Sibley building downtown to a Winn Development company for $5 million. Not included in the deal, however, is the nearly $20 million in outstanding debt owed by the building’s current owner, Rochwil Associates. The debt will stay with Rochwil, but the city does not expect payment, says Mayor Tom Richards. The building will be converted to mixed use with retail, office space, and housing. The deal must be approved by City Council.

But Boyum’s tragic death inspired Eggers and several other area cyclists to start talking about staying safe on the roads. As interest grew, the approach shifted from a group discussion to a general meeting with presentations from speakers including MVP Health Care cycling team director Todd Scheske and Monroe County Sheriff Patrick O’Flynn. The meeting was last Thursday. Cyclists have the legal right to ride on roads — with some exceptions, like expressways — but they are obligated to ride single file, to ride with traffic, and to obey traffic signals and stop signs. Eggers says improving the road environment for cyclists may

A group of cyclists is trying to stress that cars and bikes can share roads. FILE Photo

come down to educating drivers, increasing awareness about the presence of cyclists on roads, and reminding cyclists to check their own behavior. “You hope that people are going to listen to the message and change their behavior,” Eggers says. Cyclists should also report experiences like being run off the road to law enforcement, she says. Many cyclists may just brushoff the incident and go back to riding, Eggers says, but police do want to know when drivers behave dangerously toward cyclists.

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A State Education Integrated Intervention Team, acting something like a state control board, will come to Rochester to work with school officials to develop and oversee a comprehensive district-wide improvement plan. Remedies range from developing plans to improve low-performing schools to closing problem schools.

EDUCATION | BY TIM LOUIS MACALUSO

EDUCATION | BY TIM LOUIS MACALUSO

State to intervene in RCSD

Teacher evals revamped

The Rochester school district is one of 70 public school districts in New York flagged as a “Focus School District” by the State Education Department, an unfavorable designation given to low-performing districts. Twenty-two Rochester schools have been classified as “Focus Schools” and 30 are “Priority Schools,” designations under the FSD umbrella. The new classifications are a result of the Obama administration’s revisions to the No Child Left Behind Act, and will mean greater oversight of Rochester’s schools, says Susan HasenauerCurtis, the district’s director of school innovation. A State Education Integrated Intervention Team, acting something like a state control board, will come to Rochester to work with school officials to develop and oversee a comprehensive district-wide improvement plan. “We have to take very specific steps toward improvement,” Hasenauer-Curtis says, explaining that the state will evaluate both the district as a whole and the Focus and Priority schools, she says. Remedies range from developing plans to improve low-performing schools to closing problem schools. The state announcement comes in the wake of diminished expectations for Rochester’s schools. The 2011 graduation rate of 49 percent could fall next year, said Superintendent Bolgen Vargas recently, as students grapple with new graduation requirements.

Focus Districts are persistently low performing that show no trend toward progress in English language arts and math, or low graduation rates for one or more special student groups. That refers to minority groups, lowincome students, English Susan Hasenauer-Curtis. PHOTO BY MATT DETURCK language learners, and students with disabilities. Districts are also classified as Focus Districts if they have multiple Priority Schools: schools with ELA and math scores falling into the lowest 5 percent statewide. Focus Schools, another classification, are those selected for intervention to improve student performance in specific areas. The designations are particularly troubling because even the much-lauded School of the Arts and one of the district’s new schools, Integrated Arts and Technology, have been identified as Focus Schools in need of attention. The state also recognizes high-performing schools, or Reward Schools, but none of Rochester’s schools earned the acknowledgement. A handful of Rochester’s schools are described by the SED as in “Good Standing,” which means they’re meeting expectations.

Cost of War AFGHANISTAN TOTALS

2107 US servicemen and servicewomen and 1,059 Coalition servicemen and servicewomen have been killed in Afghanistan from the beginning of the war and occupation to August 31. Statistics for Afghan civilian casualties are not available. —

American casualties from August 22 to 27: -- Pfc. Patricia L. Horne, 20, Greenwood, Miss. -- Sgt. Christopher J. Birdwell, 25, Windsor, Colo. -- Spc. Mabry J. Anders, 21, Baker City, Ore. -- Staff Sgt. Jessica M. Wing, 42, Alexandria, Va. iraqbodycount.org, icasualties.org, Department of Defense SOURCES:

The Rochester school district’s first attempt at a teacher evaluation plan for the 2012 to 2013 school year was rejected by the State Education Department. Revisions have been resubmitted, and Rochester Teachers Association President Adam Urbanski says he’s confident that this version will be approved. | The SED wanted to see greater clarification of the time limit for teachers to appeal their evaluations, Urbanski says. The other concern had to do with how students’ challenges, such as poverty and absenteeism, impact a teacher’s score. Though the SED agrees some allowances can be made, they’re limited, Urbanski says. | Evaluations began during the 2011 to 2012 school year for some teachers. The new evaluations apply to all New York State teachers and principals beginning this school year, and include student test scores as a component of a teacher’s evaluation.

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DEVELOPMENT | BY JEREMY MOULE

Industrial power play The former Kodak Park, now known as Eastman Business Park, is seen by local and state leaders as an economic development lynchpin for the Rochester region. The 1,200-acre site is evolving from Kodak’s film and chemical manufacturing hub to a cluster of renewable energy and advanced manufacturing companies. And that, say local business and government leaders, is what will keep the former Kodak Park a productive center of industry. But there’s a catch. One of the park’s key features, its dedicated power plant, needs to be upgraded in order to meet upcoming federal and state environmental requirements. Kodak, which owns the business park and the power plant, is going through bankruptcy proceedings and it’s not clear that the company will have the millions of dollars needed for the upgrades. The scenario raises questions about who will, and who should fund the upgrades. Government and economic development officials say they want the plant to keep operating, since it is an attractive feature for high-tech industries. Local business and government officials cast the complex as a regional economic development asset that will have effects beyond the City of Rochester’s borders. And it’s facing costs driven by government regulations. That’s a traditional argument for government involvement in an economic development project. In a recent draft document, the Finger Lakes Regional Economic Development Council says that “efforts to preserve and strengthen Eastman Business Park” remain the council’s top priority. It also says that preserving the complex’s internal utility systems — Eastman Business Park also has its own water system and other amenities — is essential. The council has formed a workgroup focusing solely on issues pertaining to the park. It’s significant that the council, a group of local business leaders and elected representatives, prioritizes the park. These regional councils, established by Governor Andrew Cuomo’s administration, are supposed to drive state economic development efforts. Kodak’s power plant consists of four coal-

powered boilers that can generate as much as 130 megawatts of power. To put that figure into perspective, a single megawatt can power hundreds of homes. The boilers also generate steam power, which business park tenants can use.  City

SEPTEMBER 5-11, 2012

Kodak plans to retire one of the boilers by the end of 2013, and another by the end of August 2017. “There would be less capacity, but adequate capacity to serve anticipated needs,” Kodak spokesperson Christopher Veronda wrote in an e-mail. “The two boilers remaining are the largest.” The remaining boilers would be upgraded to bring them into compliance. That means either repowering them with natural gas or installing new emissions controls. The power plant will have to comply with three sets of upcoming state and federal standards, including those set under the Clean Air Act. Those standards regulate particle pollution, a chemical that contributes to ground-level ozone, and a chemical that contributes to acid rain. Veronda says the cost to upgrade the Eastman Business Park power plant is uncertain because not all of the regulations are yet certain. At the end of August, a federal appeals court struck down an Environmental Protection Agency regulatory program for the three pollutants. The EPA can appeal the decision or develop a new regulatory plan, but either approach means uncertainty regarding future standards. State economic development officials and

Kodak representatives are discussing the power plant. It’s one topic in broader talks about Eastman Business Park. The state has also hired consultants — including environmental, legal, and engineering assistance — to address issues that could hinder the business park’s viability. Laura Magee, a spokesperson for Empire State Development, says the power plant is one of the issues under examination. The Kodak and Empire State Development spokespeople offered few details, however, about those talks. Magee says that ESD and its partners are examining ways to work with the private sector and government to ensure the park’s stability. When asked whether there are state programs or grants that could help finance the plant upgrades, Magee said in an e-mail that “ESD and its partners are examining its options now.” Veronda gave a similar response to questions about whether Kodak has identified funding for the upgrades. “Discussions are under way with a number of parties who all recognize the significance of Eastman Business Park to


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625 Culver Rd. at Atlantic Local business and government officials say Eastman Business Park is an asset that will have benefits beyond the City of Rochester’s borders. PHOTO BY matt deturck

the future well-being of the community,” he wrote in his e-mail. The state Public Service Commission has filed a statement with the federal bankruptcy court handling Kodak’s case. The commission asserts that its regulatory control over the complex’s utilities is not pre-empted by bankruptcy laws. The commission regulates issues including transfers of ownership or control, decisions to end service, and rates. In other words, the commission would have to sign off if Kodak decided to sell the plant or curtail service — although there’s no indication that Kodak plans to do either. The PSC filings also stress that the decision would have to consider the public interest, which would include the impact on the local economy. “The scope of the review could include factors such as the creation or elimination of jobs, any potential increase or decrease in property tax revenue, and the overall wellbeing of the community,” the filing says. Ultimately, the power plant is important

because of the types of businesses moving into Eastman Business Park.

Inexpensive, plentiful power is important for manufacturing operations; power costs are often cited by businesses as an impediment to operating in New York. But the plant and its accompanying grid are also important from a technology-testing standpoint. The plant played a role in New York Battery and Energy Storage Technology Consortium’s decision to locate a battery commercialization center at the park. NYBEST plans to invest $20 million into the center in the first phase of development. The plant, especially when combined with the complex’s grid, will allow battery developers to test utility-scale technology. And if NY-BEST succeeds and becomes a hotbed of battery research and development work, that could mean jobs for Rochester. The jobs and business potential are key reasons why there’s no doubt among many officials that the plant needs to be repowered.

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ROCHESTER’S

underground JUSTICE SYSTEM JUSTICE | BY CHRISTINE CARRIE FIEN

Whenever Rochester Police Chief James Sheppard is asked to explain this year’s surge in violent crime, he answers that many of the city’s altercations are the result of “ongoing disputes.” It’s a response that some people find wanting — after all, couldn’t most shootings, stabbings, and assaults be attributed to a dispute of some kind? People don’t shoot each other because they’re getting along, right? Sheppard’s explanation points to something deeper, however. The act of violence, the retaliation to that act, the unwillingness of witnesses to talk to police: it’s a closed system, but a system nonetheless. And it’s incredibly difficult for outsiders, including the police, to penetrate that system — which could help explain why police have made so few arrests over the course of this violent year. The parallel justice system functioning on the streets of Rochester is not effective and certainly not desirable, says Dominic Barter, director of training for the Brazilian Restorative Justice pilot projects. But people who distrust the traditional system view it  City

SEPTEMBER 5-11, 2012

as the only option to achieve some measure of justice. “There’s been a break in faith with the current justice system, which is important for all kinds of reasons,” Barter says. “If people start breaking away from the justice system, it reveals a larger split within society, and the giving up of hope that mainstream society will actually treat everybody as equal and take care of everyone.” Barter pioneered a form of restorative justice called restorative circles, which brings together the people involved in and impacted by a conflict — including community members — to promote understanding, selfresponsibility, and action. The process ends when the parties reach agreement on how the offending party can heal the rift with the person directly injured and with the wider community, which has also been damaged by the act, Barter says. Restorative circles and processes are used in schools, prisons, neighborhoods, and many other places, he says. Judges sometimes factorin offenders’ participation in a restorative

Restorative-justice advocate Dominic Barter: People who view themselves as victims feel vulnerable and want to “close that wound.” PHOTO BY MIKE HANLON

process when handing down their sentence, Barter says. In Rochester, progressive activists, including those who served on the committee to revamp the process for filing complaints against the police, called for restorative practices to help deal with the violence plaguing the inner city. Awareness of restorative practices is growing locally, Barter says. There are restorative programs at Monroe High School, Wilson Magnet, the University of Rochester, and the Rochester Police Department is doing a pilot program with young people in southwest Rochester. “There is a lot of movement in Rochester in restorative practices — in schools, in the police department, in the courts,” says Janelle Duda, assistant director for the Center of Public Safety Initiatives at the Rochester

Institute of Technology. “This is absolutely the time for this.” Rochester responded to the last two big spikes in violent crime with police

crackdowns. Zero Tolerance essentially flooded the city with cops. And Police Chief Sheppard says a big part of Operation Cool Down — the current initiative — is proactive policing. He’s unapologetic about stopping people for minor offenses —for not having a bell on your bicycle, for example — to try to get guns off the street. Barter says he supports the intensity of the response, but he’s concerned about unequal enforcement. It’s a fear shared by many local activists and civil libertarians, as well as some community leaders. “Are there other communities where people are not treated the same way?” Barter


says. “If there are, then even as you do justice, you’re creating an experience of injustice. Why am I stopped for riding a bicycle without a bell in this neighborhood and not in that neighborhood?” But blaming the police is too easy, he says, because law enforcement is empowered and sanctioned by the community it serves. And people need to understand that all conflict belongs to the community as a whole, Barter says, even if the conflict manifests between select members only. “It’s not a shooting that happens in the Crescent, where I don’t live,” he says. “It’s a shooting that happens in Rochester, where I live. So it’s mine. It’s my conflict. I have a responsibility in this thing that is happening.” And that, he says, is the essence of restorative justice. Barter says he knows there’s temptation

to dismiss restorative justice as a bleedingheart approach to criminal justice. But he says it’s actually a much more robust response than the traditional criminal justice system, because offenders must face up to their actions when they confront the people they hurt. “We put the person who committed this act really on the spot,” Barter says. “They’re really exposed. Restorative justice is not the soft option.” In Barter’s system — restorative circles — the offender and the victim meet in a location that’s significant to the community. Barter says the space should inspire respect and symbolically convey to the participants the importance of what’s about to take place. The participants also choose the other people they want to participate in the circle — people indirectly affected by what’s happened. “They need that third member of the community, the invisible participant in every conflict,” Barter says. “They need those people to say, ‘Hey, it may work for you to carry on squabbling like this, but it doesn’t work for us. We need you to work this out.’ “That’s why it’s not bleeding heart,” he says, “because it’s actually initiated by community members who are dissatisfied, ironically, with the weakness of just locking someone up. A lot of people say, ‘I want him to be in the circle because I want him to feel real pain. The real pain is what happened to my life as a consequence of what he did. If he’s locked up, he never has to look at me.’” The circle tries to get to the meaning behind what happened, Barter says. The victim gets to ask why, and the offender has

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RIT’s John Klofas: A restorative process can introduce continuity and consistency in young people’s lives. PHOTO BY matt deturck

an opportunity to apologize — though that doesn’t always happen, Barter says. “There’s a very big place for that kind of thing” in Rochester, says John Klofas, professor of criminal justice at RIT. “It fundamentally deals with the difficulty victims have when things are really sort of torn asunder. It really restores the victims, because they get a choice of an active role in this, and I think that’s very important. And the person who commits these acts has to really confront their position in the community, the effect of what they’ve done on the community, and their role in the community moving forward.” The circle ends when both parties agree on how the offender can make restitution. Duda, from the Center of Public Safety Initiatives, says the agreement can be something as simple as the offender agrees to pay to replace something he broke, or agrees to help clean up the mess he made. “I think it’s a lot more difficult process for an offender to go through,” she says. “He’s directly told, ‘This is what you did, and this is what will make it right.’” In the worst cases, offenders may never be able to do enough to physically compensate their victims, but the process does help victims heal and to regain some of the power they lost when they were victimized. Duda and Klofas say that data on restorative

justice does not exist to the depth necessary to fairly evaluate the concept. But they say the research that does exist is promising. A study commissioned by the British government showed that the more serious the act, the more effective restorative justice is, Barter says. “Superficially you could say that means that a gang shooting in a community is

likely to produce a more cohesive, restorative process than petty theft because there’s more buy-in,” he says. But that doesn’t tell the whole story, Barter says, recalling an incident at a school that used a restorative circle after one student snatched another’s pencil from her pencil case. It seems ridiculous to call a circle for such a minor thing, he says, until you learn that the pencil case was the student’s last gift from her now-deceased parents. “So, is it still a pencil?” Barter says. “It’s not the act; it’s the symbolic value that act has. It’s the significance of what we do to each other, not actually what we do that really impacts our lives.” The restorative processes used in Brazil have reduced offenders’ participation in prison rebellions, he says. And because of their cooperation in the process, the offenders are more likely to earn a place in the few education programs the prisons offer, Barter says. RIT’s Klofas says having a restorative process available can introduce continuity into a young person’s life. Many small acts are either dismissed or ignored by the criminal justice system, he says, and the young person skates by sans consequences until his record builds up and then the hammer comes down. Having a restorative system means there’s consistency, Klofas says: action equals consequence.

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Barter says those kinds of insults go right to a person’s pride and generally cannot go unanswered. “What has been violated when someone looks at you funny?” he says. “My dignity. My power. My authority. My value to the community has been diminished by what you’ve done. That’s a nonnegotiable value. “I agree with them. That’s an injustice. And not responding to injustice is dangerous. It sends a message that no one counts, nothing matters. No community. No social cohesion.” Barter says he’s learned that one of the things victimhood is about is recovering power. People can’t stand feeling vulnerable and powerless to control their own wellbeing, he says. “Suddenly I’m reminded that something can come in from left field and take away my ability to take care of myself,” Barter says. “There’s an immense sense of vulnerability, and there’s a corresponding energy to close that wound.” Victimhood can occur as a sudden shock, he says, or as a gradual, creeping sense of disenfranchisement: there’s something about you that makes you less worthwhile than others in the community. Restorative circles try to use that shock, that energy that goes into craving punishment and vengeance to create a change in behavior, Barter says. “The change in behavior happens because empathy occurs,” he says. “It might seem strange to think of vengeance as being an attempt to create empathy, but if you look at it in terms of proportional pain, that’s what it’s really about. ‘I want you to know how I feel,’ is what people often say as they are hurting others. ‘You’ll learn not to do that again,’ is something that people often say to justify violence imposed on other people. ‘I want you to get a taste of what it was like to be me.’” Barter says he doesn’t see a victim’s thirst for vengeance as a bad thing, necessarily. “I just want to dialogue with them about what will create that sense of what they’re calling closure,” he says. “That sense of changed behavior, the sense that this person lived to know what it felt like. It’s very unusual that someone continues to believe that more pain is going to resolve pain.”

For more Tom Tomorrow, including a political blog and cartoon archive, visit http://thismodernworld.com

Urban Action This week’s calls to action include the following and activities. (All are free and open to the public, unless otherwise noted.)

Film on genocide and justice

The Rochester Committee on Latin America presents the film “Granito: How to Nail a Dictator” at 7 p.m. on Wednesday, September 5. The film looks back at an event involv-

ing genocide and then returns to the present to bring a malevolent dictator to justice. The film will be shown at Downtown Presbyterian Church, 121 North Fitzhugh Street.

Training for literacy volunteers The Rochester Jewish Coalition for Literacy offers training to new and current literacy volunteers at 7 p.m. on Wednesday,

September 12. The training will be led by Sara Shaw, director of school programs for the Strong Museum, and held at the museum, One Manhattan Square. To register: kbuscetto@jewishrochester.org or call Kirsten at 4610490, Ext. 8639.


Dining Lunchbox fare doesn’t have to be humble, but

The pork tonkatsu bento box from Monroe Avenue’s Plum Garden is just one of the exotic box-lunch options available in Rochester. PHOTO BY MATT DETURCK

Pack your lunch [ ROUND-UP ] BY JAMES LEACH

In 1978, I was 8 years old, and I spent most of August pestering my mother for the one item that I was sure would make me happy: a “Star Wars” lunchbox. Instead I ended up with a “Land of the Lost” lunchbox with luridly colored scenes from the television show stamped into its lid. I did everything that 8-year-old ingenuity suggested to destroy it. I didn’t think much about why that hated lunchbox was so durable. When I started spending summers with family in the coal belt of West Virginia I encountered the cheery lunchbox’s indestructible cousin, the dinner bucket. The heavy-duty aluminum container my uncle carried down into the mines was bulkier than mine, and the Thermos was either a separate thing made of steel or a flat plastic container full of Campbell’s chunky soup or Dinty Moore beef stew. The bucket had two trays nested one atop the other and locked together with clasps on either side. Roughly kidneyshaped, it could easily be clipped onto a work belt. When the bucket came home empty at the end of a shift it looked like it had been to hell and back – blackened with coal dust and dirt, often with a ding or a bright, new scratch in its surface.

The lunchbox – both the gaudy ones for school and the sober, durable ones for grown-ups -- are American icons. But Americans didn’t invent the lunchbox, or even perfect it. Wherever people work away from home, either in the factory or the field, they always devise ways of bringing lunch along with them. You can certainly brown bag it, or grab a sub or sandwich. But in the spirit of back-to-school season, here are some more exotic, ethnic takes on the to-go lunch that you can find around Rochester. Lunch is a light meal, the province of

schoolkids and folks with leisure. Where I grew up, people called it dinner and it was the principal meal of the day – protein and starch-heavy, the sort of food to replenish you from a morning of hard work and sustain you for the rest of the afternoon. At its simplest, lunch away from home looks like the English ploughman’s fare: meat, cheese, pickles, bread and ale. But if you come a bit up the ladder and try to include hot food you encounter the Chinese rice plate, heavily sauced, often salty leftover meat and vegetables in sauce served atop a substantial portion of steamed rice packed into a two-layer aluminum box called a fan ho.

it does have to be filling. In India, particularly in Mumbai, around lunchtime every day thousands of mostly-illiterate dabba-wallahs fan out across the cities picking up, delivering, and returning more than 200,000 tiffins – again, multilayered, multicompartment aluminum containers. Inside those tiffins are curries, rice or idly, vegetables, raita, naan, and the ubiquitous daal, each element in its own compartment. Spread out on an elaborate plate, such a lunch is called thali, and it’s as much a way of eating as it is the plate on which it is served. According to chef Shabber Chowdury at Amaya (1900 S. Clinton Ave., 241-3223, amayabarandgrill.com), which offers a bottomless thali lunch served on a giant brass plate that will make you feel like a Mughal lord. Thali-style dining has its origins in concerns about the cross-contamination inevitable when everyone eats from a communal dish. Each diner is served a separate dish and then transfers this portion to the mound of rice at the center of his own plate. Served on a thali, such a lunch looks like a miniature feast. Served from a multilevel tiffin, it’s like a series of small presents or a box of chocolates for those who crave savory dishes and curries over sweets, a way of bringing home to the office. The most refined lunchbox is also the most

You aren’t likely to find a fan ho in Rochester, but you can try out this typical Chinese lunch at Han Noodle (687 Monroe Ave., 242-7333, hannoodlebar.com). According to co-owner Tony Ko, the rice plate served at his restaurant is pretty typical. Compared to more refined Chinese dishes, it’s not pretty to look at, often not much more than a plate of beef with black-bean sauce with scallions or slices of stir-fried chicken, and carrots in a bright yellow curry sauce ladled on top of starchy rice. But it sure is filling. Ko told me that in modern industrial cities in China, the rice plate now comes in styrofoam containers, picked up – often by contract – from a lunch truck that pulls up outside an office or factory, or even brought right to an employee’s desk. But before e-mail and text messaging made such coordinated food service possible, workers often brought their own carefully marked fan ho with them to work, dropping them off in communal kitchens in the morning where they would be stacked one atop the other in gigantic steamers and then picked up during the noon-time dinner break. Six hours after my most recent curry chicken rice plate, I was still going strong and had to be reminded by my family that they needed to eat.

familiar. Developed as a way of feeding spectators at kabuki dramas or sumo matches about 300 years ago, the bento box is a fixture on almost every Japanese restaurant menu. Looking like a highly lacquered and decorated version of a school lunch tray, the bento box is an elegant lunchbox for a more civilized time. Pork tonkatsu (a breaded, fried pork chop) or pork sukiyaki (pork stir fried with scallions) are two of the many protein choices on offer at Plum Garden (3349 Monroe Ave., 381-8730), where chef Takamizu fills out the compartments in his bento boxes with bloodred tuna rolls, California rolls, a bit of pickled cucumber to add a savory element, a salad with ginger dressing, miso soup and steamed rice, to make a lunch that would sustain even the hungriest of samurai. Fan Zhang, manager of Plum Garden, noted that her restaurant serves Shokado-style bento boxes, where rice is served on the side rather than as an integral part of the box. But Makunouchi bento – where the rice is usually served underneath the protein -- is the more popular lunchtime choice of those packing their own bento to take to work, picking one up to take back to the office, or sliding through a cafeteria line at school (bento is school lunch in Japan). What’s your favorite take-out lunch options in Rochester? Comment on this article at rochestercitynewspaper.com. rochestercitynewspaper.com City 11


Upcoming [ Pop/Rock ] Bruce Springsteen & The E Street Band Tuesday, October 30. Blue Cross Arena, 1 War Memorial Square. 7:30 p.m. $101. 758-5300, bluecrossarena.com.

Music

[ Classical ] RPO: Harold Arlen: Over the Rainbow Friday, November 2Saturday, November 3. Kodak Hall at Eastman Theatre, 26 Gibbs St. 8 p.m. $15-$82. 454-2100, rpo.org. [ DJ/Electronic ] Midnight Society Sunday, November 4. Main Street Armory. 900 E. Main St. Tickets TBD. 232-3221, rochestermainstreetarmory.com.

The Wombats

Monday, September 10 Water Street Music Hall | 204 N. Water St. 7 p.m. | $9.41-$10 | 325-5600, waterstreetmusic.com [ ROCK ] After a platinum-selling 2007 debut that

boasted one of the catchier singles of that year (who can forget “Let’s Dance To Joy Division”?), The Wombats took three and a half years to release a follow-up, 2011’s “This Modern Glitch.” On the new release some of the Liverpool band’s rougher edges have been sanded down, but its knack for writing addictive alt-pop remains intact. The trio brings its live show back to North American shores this month. Fellow Brits Morning Parade open the show. — BY ANDY KLINGENBERGER

sKoOba, Arehouse Thursday, September 6 Dubland Underground, 315 Alexander St. 10 p.m. | $5-$15, 18+ | 232-7550 [ Ambient Electronic/ DJ ] When you step into

sKoOba’s realm, prepare to be transported to a vaguely otherworldly place that somehow feels familiar. His work is reminiscent of video-game music, most especially so in the upbeat tracks. SKoOba makes no secret of video games being an inspiration, but unlike some artists like Crystal Castles that use identifiable samples from games, this music has a vague not-quite-right feeling. It’s like an itch your mind can’t quite scratch, and very danceable. Buffalo’s Arehouse is a DJ/producer that brings the dubwub-wub and a healthy dose of house, and if his many mixes on Soundcloud are any indication, he should be laying it down pretty heavy. — SUZAN PERO

WHAT ARE YOU DOING TODAY?

CHECK OUT THE NEW DAILY CHOICES AT

ROCHESTERCITYNEWSPAPER.COM Every morning City Newspaper’s calendar editors give their picks for the most interesting events of the day, everything from concerts to exhibits, theater shows to festivals!

12 City SEPTEMBER 5-11, 2012


WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 5

Turtle Hill Folk Festival Friday, September 7-Sunday, September 9 Rotary Sunshine Camp, Five Points Road, Rush 234-5044, goldenlink.org/festival.html [ FOLK ] For three days, the Golden Link Folk

Singing Society presents its annual festival with offerings ranging from concerts to workshops to dances to barbeques. Pitch a tent for field camping at just $10/person for adults and children over 12. Join in a campfire sing-around and instrumental jams. Celebrate Woody Guthrie’s 100th birthday. Every workshop and demonstration is as interesting as “Songs from Both Sides of the Pond — How Songs Change from Great Britain to New England.” — BY PALOMA A. CAPANNA

Wallace Roney Saturday, September 8 Lutheran Church, 111 N. Chestnut St. 8 p.m. | $25-$42 | ExodusToJazz.com [ JAZZ ] Trumpeter Wallace Roney has played with a

“Who’s Who” of jazz, including Tony Williams, Art Blakey, Elvin Jones, Herbie Hancock, McCoy Tyner, and Sonny Rollins. He’s also enriched the work of pop stars like Carole King and Joni Mitchell. But perhaps most important is his relationship with the late Miles Davis. After hearing Roney at a 1983 Carnegie Hall performance, Davis was so impressed that mentored the young player. Eight years later, at the Montreux Jazz Festival, Davis chose Roney to play some of his parts in a recreation of his early 1960’s collaborations with Gil Evans. Roney plays superb straightahead jazz, but doesn’t hesitate to cross over into funk and more. — BY RON NETSKY

The Goods were among the bands that played Tuesday, August 28, at the Pro Jam at Skylark Lounge. file PHOTO

Chocolate shrapnel [ review ] by frank de blase

The Pro Jam is a well-oiled circus that sets up its tent at alternating venues each Tuesday night. Last week’s hang ’n’ bang was at Skylark Lounge before a full house. The beauty of this jam is it truly jams musicians together that would never think to play with one another otherwise. The common denominator is a sort of funk/ soul comfort zone that is slowly eroding as jazz, blues, and rock cats get up, get down, and show out. I predict this thing is going to outgrow everywhere it goes. Someday soon, when ape-like creatures with digital watches are rummaging through the artifacts and wreckage of our civilization, the music of Synthetica will serve as a fitting backdrop. Synthetica is a blast of pearlesque dissonance, of controlled chaos, of understated beauty. I was moved. I parked in back of the Little Theatre Café Thursday night so I could inhale a brownie the size of my head without freaking out other patrons and hitting them with chocolate shrapnel, but also to listen to the band unencumbered by sight. In fact, I’ve opted for a black square in lieu of a photo for this week’s column so you can contemplate the visuals that the duo conjured for yourself.

Synthetica — made up of Eric the Taylor and Sonam — paint in wide sonic strokes from a collision of swirling electronica and analog punctuation. Taylor manned the laptop and Sonam, in a sort of call and response, plugged in organic sounds and passages from an impressive arsenal that littered the floor like a Gypsy garage sale. Taylor’s wall of sound was as soothing as it was unnerving as it occasionally threatened to take off. Sonam riffed, mixing a cast of tones and characters from recorders, conch shells, congas, cymbals, a busted accordion, and a trumpet. It had me dreaming of Bix Beiderbecke thumb-wrestling with Lenny Bruce in the Vatican as a chorus of swimsuit models sang Sophie Tucker tunes in pig Latin. Alas, there were no vocals (none with words, anyway) so the pictures you saw in your head (if you had, ahem, shut up long enough to listen) were different from the placid Polaroids that this duo planted in mine. You might call this outfit weird and abstract, but by not adhering to conventional structures, Synthetica’s layers and passages conveyed some of the most beautiful sounds I’ve heard.

[ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ] Jim Lane. Lemoncello, 137 West Commercial St. 3858565. 7:30 p.m. Free. Marty Roberts. Schooner’s Riverside Pub, 70 Pattonwood Dr. 342-3030. 6 p.m. Call for info. Rob & Gary Acoustic. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. 248-4825. 5:30 p.m. Free. [ BLUES ] Buford Duo. Dinosaur BarB-Que, 99 Court St. 9 p.m. Free. [ DJ/ELECTRONIC ] DJ Adam. Nashvilles, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. 334-3030. Call for info. DJ Dorian. TC Riley’s, 200 Park Point Dr. 272-9777. Call for info. Teen Set 45 Party. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. Midnight. Free. Y Not Wednesday w/DJ ET. Venu Resto-Lounge, 151 St. Paul St. 232-5650. Call for info. [ JAZZ ] Cornet Shorty’s Open Jazz Jam. Tala Vera, 155 State St. 546-3845. 8 p.m. $5. Johnny Matt Band. Ontario Beach Park, 4799 Lake Ave. 865-3320. 6 p.m. Call for info. Margaret Explosion. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 7:30 p.m. Free. Tinted Image. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. 662-5555. 6 p.m. Free. [ KARAOKE ] Italian American Karaoke. Italian American Community Center, 150 Frank Dimino Way. 5948882. 7:30 p.m. Free. Karaoke at Mayfield’s Pub. Mayfield’s Pub, 669 N Winton Rd. 288-7199. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke at Sanibel Cottage. Sanibel Cottage, 1517 Empire Blvd. 671-9340. 6 p.m. Free. Karaoke at California Brew Haus. California Brew Haus, 402 Ridge Rd. West. 621-1480. 9 p.m. Free. continues on page 14

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Music

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 5 Karaoke w/Mark. Flipside Bar & Grill, 2001 E Main St. 2883930. 9 p.m. Free. [ OPEN MIC ] Open Acoustic Mic Night w/Mandy. Shorts Bar & Grill, 35 N. Main St. 388-0136. 9 p.m. Free. Open Mic w/Steve West. Muddy Waters Coffee HouseGeneseo, 53 Main St. 2439111. 7 p.m. Free. [ REGGAE/JAM ] Medicine Wednesdays w/ Thunder Body. Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. 9:30 p.m. $6-$10. [ POP/ROCK ] Here for Now w/Regret the Hour. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. $6-$8. Jet W Lee, Intrinsic. California Brew Haus, 402 Ridge Rd. West. 621-1480. 7:30 p.m. Call for info.

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 6

After a near-miss with record execs, Geneva/Waterloo musician Corey Bates returned east and founded rock band Cruelty Free. PHOTO BY FRANK DE BLASE

Let it be Cruelty Free w/The Meddling Kids Saturday, September 8 Lovin Cup, 300 Park Point 9 p.m. | $3-$5 | lovincup.com Crueltyfreemusic.com [ PROFILE ] By Frank De Blase

After years bumping around the music business, Cruelty Free’s Corey Bates doesn’t push it or try too hard anymore. He’s content to let go and let it be. Through career ups and downs on both coasts, the singer-guitarist no longer questions his intentions or those of his music. “I used to say, ‘Am I over thinking this a bit?’” says Bates, before realizing that asking that the question answers the question. Some of this songwriter’s best material came from lean times and little forethought. That’s not to say Cruelty Free is mindless pop, but often a good song comes out of a relaxed effort. The song “Alternate Lifestyle” helped put Cruelty Free on the map. After haphazardly hooking up with song-placement folks, “Alternate Lifestyle” caught the ears of the bigwigs in comedian Dane Cook’s camp, and they promptly licensed the song to go on Cook’s “Tourgasm” tour CD released by Rhino Records. 14 City SEPTEMBER 5-11, 2012

That’s quite a trip considering the how and where the song was conceived. “So I was sleeping on my drummer’s floor,” Bates says. “And he lived out near the Santa Monica Mountains, which are really beautiful. I had this green truck and all I really could afford to do was play my guitar and write. At night I’d drive out to the Santa Monica Mountains and stay out there until like 1 a.m. and write with a flashlight and a guitar. One of the songs was ‘Alternate Lifestyle.’” After a couple of near-misses with the majors

(Bates was in Neve when that band got signed to Columbia Records) and playing with just about everyone he could, Bates, who was originally from the Geneva/Waterloo area, came back east, which brings us to the Cruelty Free we know today, with bassist Brian Eberts and drummer Rob Bodley. Though a lot of the songs that appear on the band’s “Collection” album have two guitars, lean times and lean tones have the band maxed out as a trio. But it totally works. Bates’ guitar is thick and full of lush chords and energy. This is where the hooks are born. And though Bates knows his way around the neck, he defers to the melody as well as the sub-strata support from Eberts and Bodley. Once the trio put the effort into being effortless, it all flowed.

“We just said, You know, we’re a rock band,” Bates says. “We love rock, we just have to let it happen. Before it was, ‘What do I want this to do? What don’t I want it to do?’ Now we just let it happen. We just do it.” Though pegging Cruelty Free a 90’s band would have chronological limitations and implications, it’s not entirely inaccurate. The decade itself didn’t finish what it set out to do, according to Bates. “There’s a good argument that we’re coming back into [90’s music],” he says. “Because we kind of went through a mini80’s…the glam thing, the shred thing… We just want to do the rock thing.” In addition, Cruelty Free would like to do more of the touring thing. It already makes routine jaunts to New York City, as well as playing in Rochester and its fringes. But the push for more gigs is tempered by Bates’ relaxed attitude about the music. “I think I had more sarcasm before,” he says. “I was raised in a religious home so I wrote a lot about being a recovering guilt addict. Now I’m really into songs that are just fun. I feel like everything’s getting lighter.” And the rest of the band follows suit with this eased-up, more collaborative approach. A new album is anticipated by the end of the year. “We just get in there and bang it out,” Bates says.

[ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ] Curley Taylor. Sticky Lips BBQ Juke Joint, 830 Jefferson Rd. 292-5544. 7:30 p.m. $15. GP and Jim. Lemoncello, 137 West Commercial St. 3858565. 7:30 p.m. Free. Jim Lane. Murph’s Irondequoit Pub, 705 Titus Ave. 342-6780. 8 p.m. Free. Ron Pope. Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. 8 p.m. $12$15. [ BLUES ] Steve West. The Rabbit Room, 61 N. Main St. 5821830. Call for info. Free. [ DJ/ELECTRONIC ] DJ Keeyo. TC Riley’s, 200 Park Point Dr. 272-9777. Call for info. DJ Matt. Nashvilles, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. 334-3030. Call for info. DJ Sal DeSantis. Center Cafe, 150 Frank Dimino Way. 5948882. 7 p.m. Call for info. Karaoke at Panorama. Panorama Night Club & Sports Bar, 730 Elmgrove Rd. 247-2190. 9 p.m. Free. Skooba, Arehouse. Dubland Underground, 315 Alexander St. 232-7550. 10 p.m. $5$15. Thursday Night Shakedown.. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 11 p.m. Free. Tiki Thursdays: Shotgun Music DJ. McGhan’s Pub, 11 W. Main St. 924-3660. 7:30 p.m. Free. Tilt-a-Whirl Drag Show.. Tilt Nightclub & Ultralounge, 444 Central Ave. 232-8440. 11:15 pm & 12:30 am. $3. [ JAZZ ] Bobby DiBaudo Duo. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. 662-5555. 6 p.m. No Fast Food w/Phil Haynes, Dave Liebman, and Drew Gress. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park


Point Dr. 292-9940. 8 p.m. $18-$20. Soul Express. Pane Vino Ristorante, 175 N. Water St. 232-6090. 8:30 p.m. Free. Steve Grills. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 7:30 p.m. Free. The Swooners. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. 248-4825. 5:30 p.m. Free. [ KARAOKE ] Karaoke at Center Cafe. Center Cafe, 150 Frank Dimino Way. 594-8882. 7 p.m. Free. Karaoke at Willow Inn. Willow Inn, 428 Manitou Rd. 3923489. 8 p.m. Free. Karaoke at Pineapple Jack’s. Pineapple Jack’s, 485 Spencerport Rd. 247-5225. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke.at Brickwood Grill. Brickwood Grill, 250 Monroe Ave. 730-8230. 9 p.m. Call for info. Karaoke Night w/Debbie Randyn. Pittsford Pub, 60 N. Main St. 586-4650. 9:30 p.m. Free. Karaoke w/George. Temple Bar and Grille, 109 East Ave. 232-6000. 8 p.m. Free. Karaoke w/DJ Delight. Anchor Sports Bar & Grill, 270 Miracle Mile Dr. 272-9333. 8 p.m. Karaoke w/Shotgun Music. McGhan’s Pub, 11 W. Main St. 924-3660. Call for info. Free. Karaoke w/Summer Bob. Shorts Bar & Grill, 35 N. Main St. 388-0136. 10 p.m. Free. [ OPEN MIC ] Open Mic at Towpath Cafe. Towpath Cafe, 6 N. Main St. 377-0410. 6:30 p.m. Free. Open Mic w/Mark Herrmann. California Brew Haus, 402 Ridge Rd. West. 621-1480. Call for info. Open Mic w/Steve Piper. Flipside Bar & Grill, 2001 E Main St. 288-3930. 9 p.m. Free. Open Mike w/Mark Herrmann. California Brew Haus, 402 Ridge Rd. West. 621-1480. 8 p.m. Free. [ REGGAE/JAM ] Reggae Thursday. Club NV, 123 Liberty Pole Way. 454-7230. 10 p.m. $5 before 11 pm. [ POP/ROCK ] Diemonds w/Handsome Jack, Rational Animals, and Nasty Habit. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 7:30 p.m. $6-$8. Fools. Dinosaur Bar-B-Que, 99 Court St. 9 p.m. Gypsyland. Tala Vera, 155 State St. 546-3845. 8 p.m. $5. Metric. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N. Water Street. 325-5600. 8 p.m. $28-$30. Mike & Sergi. O’Loughlin’s, 5980 Saint Paul Blvd. 2667047. 7 p.m. Free.

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 7 [ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ] Bryan Rason. Starry Nights Cafe, 696 University Ave. 271-2630. 8 p.m. Free.

4 0 T H A N N UA L

Rochester Antiquarian Book Fair

Rare, Collectible & Scholarly Books • Prints, Ephemera, Maps & Photographica

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 8, 2012 • 10AM - 5PM at Minett Hall, Monroe County Fairgrounds (corner of Calkins & East Henrietta Rd.)

Admission: $5 • For $2 Discount, Present this Ad at the door. FREE Admission with Student ID Onsite Raffle: Win Tickets to Mary Poppins courtesy of the RBTL For More Information: Rochesterbooksellers.wordpress.com or 585•325•2050 ELECTRONICA | Metric

Begin with Coldplay, remove Chris Martin, add Jenny Lewis sound-alike lead vocalist/keyboardist Emily Haines along with a bit of 80’s new wave, and you have a starting point for Canadian-American quartet Metric. Unless you’re from up north or deep into soundtracks, this could be one of the best groups you’ve never heard of. Metric’s latest CD, “Synthetica,” sounds like a product from a band in its prime that’s been on the verge of making the big time for years. Listen to the bombastic “Youth Without Youth” or the lovely “The Void” and you’ll hear why this group dominated the 2010 Juno Awards. A digital download of “Synthetica” is included with your ticket purchase. Half Moon Run opens the show. Metric plays Thursday, September 6, 8 p.m. at Water Street Music Hall, 204 N Water St. $28-$30. Waterstreetmusic.com. — BY ROMAN DIVEZUR Dave North. McGraw’s Irish Pub, 146 W Commercial St. 348-9091. 8 p.m. Free. Dave McGrath. Schooner’s Riverside Pub, 70 Pattonwood Dr. 342-3030. Call for info. Jim Lane. Murph’s Irondequoit Pub, 705 Titus Ave. 342-6780. 8 p.m. Free. Rochester Irish Festival. Camp Eastman, 1558 Lakeshore Blvd. Call for info. $8-$20. Sisters of Murphy, Callanach, and Barry’s Crossing. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 2929940. 7:30 p.m. $3-$5. Turtle Hill Folk Festival. Rotary Sunshine Campus, 809 Five Points Rd. Various. See website for fill line up. [ BLUES ] Billy Joe & The Blues Gypsies. Six Pockets, 716 E. Ridge Rd. 266-1440. 6 p.m. Free. Rhythm Dogs. Dinosaur BarB-Que, 99 Court St. 10 p.m. [ COUNTRY ] Cold Cross Creek. Nashvilles, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. 3343030. 9 p.m. Call for info. [ DJ/ELECTRONIC ] Bang Fridays. ONE Nightclub and Lounge, 1 Ryan Alley. 546-1010. Call for info. Call for info. Chill Out Fridays Happy Hour. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. 5:30 p.m. Free. DJ Bac Spin. Venu RestoLounge, 151 St. Paul St. 2325650. 8 p.m. Call for info.

DJ Blake. 140 Alex Bar & Grill, 140 Alexander St. 2561000. 10 p.m. Call for info. DJ Cedric. Vertex Nightclub, 169 North Chestnut St. 2325498. 10 p.m. $3-$8. Fresh Meat Fridays w/ Samantha Vega, DJ Mighty Mic. Tilt Nightclub & Ultralounge, 444 Central Ave. 232-8440. 11:15 p.m. & 12:30 a.m. $4-$12. Lube After Dark.. Quaker Steak & Lube, 2205 Buffalo Rd. 697-9464. 9:30 p.m. Free. Reggaeton w/DJ Carlos. La Copa Ultra Lounge, 235 W. Ridge Rd. 254-1050. 10 p.m. Free. [ JAZZ ] Artisan Jazz Trio. Lemoncello, 137 West Commercial St. 385-8565. 7 p.m. Free. The Bowties. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 8:30 p.m. Free. Funknut w/Greg Townson. Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. 6 p.m. $4-$6. Mark Cassara Trio. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. 662-5555. 6 p.m. Soul Express. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. 248-4825. 7:30 p.m. Free. Ted Nicolosi and Shared Genes. The Pultneyville Grill, 4135 Mill St. (315) 5894512. 7 p.m. Free. [ KARAOKE ] Karaoke w/Cody. Nashvilles, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. 3343030. 5 p.m. Free. continues on page 16

Bar & Lounge

SPECIAL SHOWS!!! Wed. Sept 5 & 12 LIVE REGGAE with

“THUNDER BODY” Thurs. Sept 6

RON POPE BAND Sat. Sept 8

“THE ISOTOPES” Fri. Sept 14 The One and Only

DEKE DICKERSON Followed by Brooklyn’s

JESSY CAROLINA & THE HOT MESS BIG SHOW • Sat. Sept 22

JONATHAN EDWARDS Tix on Sale Now!! 153 LIBERTY POLE WAY•232-3230

www.abilenebarandlounge.com

rochestercitynewspaper.com City 15


FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 7 Karaoke at Pineapple Jack’s. Pineapple Jack’s, 485 Spencerport Rd. 247-5225. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke by Dan & Sherri. Barnard Restaurant & Party House, 360 Maiden Ln. 6631250. 8 p.m. Free. Karaoke w/DJ Delight. Anchor Sports Bar & Grill, 270 Miracle Mile Dr. 272-9333. 8 p.m. Karaoke w/Summer Bob. Shorts Bar & Grill, 35 N. Main St. 388-0136. 10 p.m. Free. [ POP/ROCK ] Barry Manilow. Blue Cross Arena, One War Memorial Square. 758-5300. 7:30 p.m. $9.99-$119.99. The Billionaires. Captain Jack’s Goodtime Tavern, 8505 Greig St. 315-4839570. 9 p.m. Call for info. Cancer Benefit: Beneath Hell’s Sky, Final Decline, Intox. California Brew Haus, 402 Ridge Rd. West. 621-1480. 7 p.m. $10. Greener Grass Band. A-Pub Live, 6 Lawrence St. 10 p.m. Free before 11; $5 after. The Imaginary Band. Argyle Grill at Eagle Vale Golf Club, 4344 Nine Mile Point Rd. 377-2452. Call for info. John Akers, Mojo Monkeyz. Johnny’s Irish Pub, 1382 Culver Rd. 224-0990. 7 p.m. Free. Jon Bell. Boulder Coffee Co. Alexander St., 100 Alexander St. 454-7140. 8 p.m. Free. Mochester. Nola’s BBQ, 4775 Lake Ave. 663-3375. 6 p.m. Call for info. Moon Zombies. Tala Vera, 155 State St. 546-3845. 8 p.m. $5. Oz’s Birthday Show ft. Warblade, Order of The Dead. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. Call for info. The Sim Redmond Band. Sticky Lips BBQ Juke Joint, 830 Jefferson Rd. 292-5544. 8 p.m. $10-$12. Ugly Junk. McGhan’s Pub, 11 W. Main St. 924-3660. 9 p.m. Call for info. Widow Maker. Pelican’s Nest, 566 River St. 663-5910. 10 p.m. Call for info.

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 8 [ Acoustic/Folk ] Dave McGrath. Captain Jack’s Goodtime Tavern, 8505 Greig St. 315-483-9570. 1 p.m. Free. Fandango in the Tango presents: Chris Wilson, Scott Regan. Tango Cafe, 389 Gregory St. 271-4930. 8 p.m. Call for info. Lincoln Cromwell, Kit Fallon, Hugh Mater. McGraw’s Irish Pub, 146 W Commercial St. 348-9091. 7 p.m. Free. Madeleine Snyder. Basin Bean, 616 Pittsford-Victor Rd. 249-9310. 2 p.m. Call for info. 16 City SEPTEMBER 5-11, 2012

POP/SOFT ROCK | Barry Manilow

There’s death, taxes, and Barry Manilow. Manilow’s career has simply been decades of atmospheric success. In 1978, five of his albums were on the bestselling charts simultaneously. He has owned the Adult Contemporary charts for almost 40 years as a performer and producer, working with greats such as Bette Midler and Dionne Warwick, as well as writing songs for musicals, films, and TV commercials. He’s won two Emmys, three American Music Awards, a Tony, a Grammy, and was inducted into the Songwriter’s Hall of Fame in 2002. He was the headliner at the Las Vegas Hilton for almost five years. He’s done it all. But now he is getting back to basics. Last summer’s “15 Minutes” marked the Brooklyn boy’s first release of original songs in more than 10 years. It debuted at No. 7 on the Billboard 200 album chart. Like I said: death, taxes, and Manilow. Barry Manilow and the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra perform Friday, September 7, 7 p.m. at Blue Cross Arena, 1 War Memorial Square. $16-$135. 758-5300, bluecrossarena.com. — BY DAVID YOCKEL, JR. The Prickers w/Axis Armada. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N. Water Street. 325-5600. 8 p.m. $10-$15. Rochester Irish Festival. Camp Eastman, 1558 Lakeshore Blvd. Call for info. $8-$20. [ BLUES ] Gap Mangione New Blues Bland. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. 248-4825. 7:30 p.m. Free. John Cole Blues Band. Dinosaur Bar-B-Que, 99 Court St. 10 p.m. [ COUNTRY ] Zac Brown Band. Darien Lake PAC, 9993 Allegheny Rd. 599-4641. 7 p.m. $29.50. [ DJ/ELECTRONIC ] DJ Big Reg. Venu RestoLounge, 151 St. Paul St. 2325650. 10 p.m. Call for info. DJ Darkwave. Vertex Nightclub, 169 North Chestnut St. 232-5498. 10 p.m. $3-$8. DJ Trancesend. Decibel Lounge., 45 Euclid St. 7544645. 10 p.m. $5. La Selva. Tilt Nightclub & Ultralounge, 444 Central Ave. 232-8440. 10 p.m. Call for info. Life in Color E.N.D. Tour. Main Street Armory, 900 E. Main St. 232-3221. 7 p.m. $50$75.

Riptide: RiprocBoat Cruise. Port of Rochester, 4699 Lake Ave. 6:30 p.m. $20-$25. [ JAZZ ] Captain Marvel. Lemoncello, 137 West Commercial St. 385-8565. 7:30 p.m. Free. Connie Demming. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 8:30 p.m. Free. Ted Nicolosi and Shared Genes. Jasmine’s Asian Fusion, 657 Ridge Rd. 2161290. 6:30 p.m. Free Thousands of One. Sticky Lips BBQ Juke Joint, 830 Jefferson Rd. 292-5544. 8 p.m. $8-$10. The White Hots. The Pultneyville Grill, 4135 Mill St. (315) 589-4512. Call for info. [ KARAOKE ] Karaoke at 140 Alex. 140 Alex Bar & Grill, 140 Alexander St. 256-1000. 10:30 p.m. Free. Karaoke At The Lube. Quaker Steak & Lube, 2205 Buffalo Rd. 697-9464. 9:30 p.m. Free. Kick-Ass Karaoke. Temple Bar and Grille, 109 East Ave. 232-6000. 10 p.m. Free. [ POP/ROCK ] 50/50, Tommy Brunett, Catch 22. The Brew House, 25 Cataract St. 2 p.m. Free, ticket required.


Agony Hill. A-Pub Live, 6 Lawrence St. 10 p.m. Free before 11; $5 after. Broiled Fish. Hamlin Station Bar & Grill, 52 Railroad Ave. 964-2010. 8:30 p.m. Call for info. Cancer Benefit: Westside Drive, Aggressive Betty, Steel Kingdom. California Brew Haus, 402 Ridge Rd. West. 621-1480. 7 p.m. $10. Cruelty Free, The Meddling Kids. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. 9 p.m. $3-$5. Double the Trouble. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 2929940. 6 p.m. Free. Education Reform. Boulder Coffee Co. - Alexander St., 100 Alexander St. 454-7140. 8 p.m. Free. Galileo Band. Nola’s BBQ, 4775 Lake Ave. 663-3375. 6 p.m. Call for info. The Isotopes. Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. 9:30 p.m. $5-$7. Joywave w/KOPPS (Album Release), Admirers, & Fowls. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. $8-$10. Mike & Sergei. Schooner’s Riverside Pub, 70 Pattonwood Dr. 342-3030. 7 p.m. Call for info. Mouth Full. Tala Vera, 155 State St. 546-3845. 8 p.m. $5. Ransomville. Nashvilles, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. 334-3030. 9 p.m. Call for info.

Right Turn Racer. Firehouse Saloon, 814 South Clinton. 319-3832. 21+. Call for info. $4. The Shakin’ Bones. Johnny’s Irish Pub, 1382 Culver Rd. 224-0990. 8 p.m. Free. Shameless Henry. Captain Jack’s Goodtime Tavern, 8505 Greig St. 315-4839570. 9 p.m. Call for info. The Tombstone Hands. TC Riley’s, 200 Park Point Dr. 272-9777. 8 p.m. Free. Wayward Son. The Glengarry Inn @ Eagle Vale, 4400 Fairport 9 Mile Point Rd. 598-3820. 8 p.m. Free. DJ/ House | Robb G/Skanntron

If ever you wanted to get down on a boat, this is most certainly your time to do it. Sailing out of the Port of Rochester, RIPROC has taken over the Harbor Town Belle for this one night foray into maritime revelry. Prepare to take your own three-hour tour (hopefully no one as annoying as Gilligan will be onboard) and check out Toronto’s Robb G making the first stop promoting his new “Get Slayed!” EP before he goes north to do a crosscountry tour of Canada. He brings an eclectic mix of house and techno, and will likely dance harder than you just to set the bar. DJs Skanntron, Keto, and Mic See will also be there with a mix of dub and other highly danceable tracks to get the party started while people get the bar warmed up and sort out there sea legs from there dancing feet. The party goes down Saturday, September 8, departing the Port of Rochester, 4699 Lake Ave., at 6:30 p.m. 6:30 p.m. | $20-$25, 18+. riprocboatcruise.com. — SUZAN PERO

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 9 [ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ] Dave North. Temple Bar and Grille, 109 East Ave. 2326000. 7 p.m. Free. Rochester Irish Festival. Camp Eastman, 1558 Lakeshore Blvd. Call for info. $8-$20. [ JAZZ ] Artisan Jazz Trio. Towpath Cafe, 6 N. Main St. 3770410. 4 p.m. Free. Bill Slater Solo Piano. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. 248-4825. Call for info. Free. El Rojo Jazz. Lemoncello, 137 West Commercial St. 3858565. 5 p.m. Free. Joe Santora and Curtis Kendrick. The Pultneyville

Grill, 4135 Mill St. (315) 5894512. Call for info. Tinted Image. Pane Vino Ristorante, 175 N. Water St. 232-6090. 6 p.m. Free. [ POP/ROCK ] Alysia Groth CD Release Party. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. 2 p.m. Free. Divided by Zero. Captain Jack’s Goodtime Tavern, 8505 Greig St. 315-4839570. 3 p.m. Free. Household Pest. Pelican’s Nest, 566 River St. 6635910. 5 p.m. Call for info. Instead of Sleeping w/ Silverfish, Inneriot. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. $6-$8. The Perinton Concert Band, The Fairport Fire Department Band. Center Stage at Center Park, 1100 Ayrault Rd. 2235050. 6 p.m. Free. Primordial w/Macabre, While Heaven Wept, Cormorant, and Blood Ceremony. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N. Water Street. 325-5600. 4 p.m. $25-$30. Timeline. Schooner’s Riverside Pub, 70 Pattonwood Dr. 342-3030. 2 p.m. Call for info.

MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 10 [ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ] The Crawdiddies. Record Archive, 33 1/3 Rockwood St. 7 p.m. Free.

[ DJ/ELECTRONIC ] Manic Mondays DJs. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 11 p.m. Free. [ JAZZ ] Amanda Ashley. Lemoncello, 137 West Commercial St. 385-8565. 8 p.m. Free. Bob DiBaudo Band. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. 248-4825. 5:30 p.m. Free. Mark Bader. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. 662-5555. 5:30 p.m. Free. Watkins & The Rapiers. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 7:30 p.m. Free. [ KARAOKE ] Karaoke w/Walt O’Brien. Flipside Bar & Grill, 2001 E Main St. 288-3930. 9 p.m. Free. [ POP/ROCK ] Trevor Wilson and Vocal Ensemble w/The Sleep Soundlies, Jenna Giuliani. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. $6-$8. The Wombats. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N. Water Street. 325-5600. 8 p.m. $.94-$10.

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 11 [ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ] Joe Mooney. McGraw’s Irish Pub, 146 W Commercial St. 348-9091. 7 p.m. Free. continues on page 18

rochestercitynewspaper.com City 17


TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 11 [ COUNTRY ] Gordie Tentrees & Hill County News. Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 2323230. 8 p.m. $6-$8. [ DJ/ELECTRONIC ] DJ Kathy. Nashvilles, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. 334-3030. Call for info. Call for info. [ JAZZ ] Jim Nelson. Lemoncello, 137 West Commercial St. 3858565. 7 p.m. Free. Tinted Image. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. 248-4825. 5:30 p.m. Free. [ KARAOKE ] Karaoke at Pineapple Jack’s. Pineapple Jack’s, 485 Spencerport Rd. 247-5225. 9 p.m. Call for info. Karaoke at 140 Alex. 140 Alex Bar & Grill, 140 Alexander St. 256-1000. 10:30 p.m. Free. Karaoke w/DJ Vee. TC Riley’s, 200 Park Point Dr. 272-9777. Call for info. Call for info. [ OPEN MIC ] Golden Link Singaround. Twelve Corners Presyterian Church, 1200 S. Winton Rd. 244-8585. 7:30 p.m. Free. Open Mic Night. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. 8:30 p.m. Free. Open Mic w/String Theory. Johnny’s Irish Pub, 1382 Culver Rd. 224-0990. 8 p.m. Free. [ REGGAE/JAM ] ROC-City Pro-Am Jam. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 2929940. 9 p.m. Free. [ POP/ROCK ] Turbo Fruits w/Harmonica Lewinski, Josh Netsky. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. $10-$12.

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 12 [ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ] Dady Brothers. Johnny’s Irish Pub, 1382 Culver Rd. 2240990. 8 p.m. Free. Jim Lane. Lemoncello, 137 West Commercial St. 3858565. 7:30 p.m. Free. Rob & Gary Acoustic. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. 248-4825. 5:30 p.m. Free. Trad Session with Patricia Carey & Cathy McGrath. McGraw’s Irish Pub, 146 W Commercial St. 348-9091. 7 p.m. Free. [ BLUES ] Nick Moss. Dinosaur Bar-BQue, 99 Court St. 9:30 p.m. [ DJ/ELECTRONIC ] AWOLNATION w/Imagine Dragons, Zeale. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N. Water Street. 325-5600. 8 p.m. $20-$23. DJ Adam. Nashvilles, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. 334-3030. Call for info. DJ Keyyo. TC Riley’s, 200 Park Point Dr. 272-9777. Call for info. 18 City SEPTEMBER 5-11, 2012

GARAGE ROCK | Turbo Fruits

Jonas Stein (guitars and vocals) formed this Nashville quartet while his other band, Be Your Own Pet, was slowly coming to an end. Stein, and an early incarnation of Turbo Fruits (which included Be Your Own Pet drummer John Eatherly) released its self-titled debut through Thurston Moore’s Ecstatic Peace! record label in 2007. When Be Your Own Pet dissolved few short months later, Stein put all of his effort into his new project, and over the next couple of years, released a second album, tinkering with the group’s line-up until it became the fearsome four-piece it is today. These silly Southerners blend punk, surf, and psychedelic power-pop into a musclebuilding supersonic smoothie that has impressed critics as well as fellow musicians. The Guardian likened the group’s sound to “Creedence Clearwater Revival played at hardcore punk tempos.” Turbo Fruits perform Tuesday, September 11, 8 p.m. at the Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. $8-$12. 454-2966, bugjar.com. — BY DAVID YOCKEL, JR. Teen Set 45 Party. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. Midnight. Free. Y Not Wednesday w/DJ ET. Venu Resto-Lounge, 151 St. Paul St. 232-5650. Call for info. [ JAZZ ] El Rojo Jazz. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. 662-5555. 6 p.m. Free. Greece Jazz Band. Ontario Beach Park, 4799 Lake Ave. 865-3320. 6 p.m. Call for info. Margaret Explosion. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 7:30 p.m. Free. Rick Holland Evan Dobbins Little Big Band. Tala Vera, 155 State St. 546-3845. 8 p.m. $5. [ KARAOKE ] Italian American Karaoke. Italian American Community Center, 150 Frank Dimino Way. 594-8882. 7:30 p.m. Free. Karaoke at Mayfield’s Pub. Mayfield’s Pub, 669 N Winton Rd. 288-7199. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke at Sanibel Cottage. Sanibel Cottage, 1517 Empire Blvd. 671-9340. 6 p.m. Free. Karaoke at California Brew Haus. California Brew Haus, 402 Ridge Rd. West. 6211480. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke w/Mark. Flipside Bar & Grill, 2001 E Main St. 2883930. 9 p.m. Free.

[ OPEN MIC ] Open Acoustic Mic Night w/Mandy. Shorts Bar & Grill, 35 N. Main St. 388-0136. 9 p.m. Free. Open Mic w/Steve West. Muddy Waters Coffee HouseGeneseo, 53 Main St. 2439111. 7 p.m. Free. [ HIP-HOP/RAP ] Tony Nelson w/Poetry for Thieves, Epilogue. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 8 p.m. $3 before 9 pm, $5-$7 after. [ REGGAE/JAM ] Medicine Wednesdays w/Thunder Body. Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. 9:30 p.m. $6-$10.


Art

The Memorial Art Gallery is currently hosting “In Company with Angels,” a traveling exhibition of seven restored Tiffany windows. PHOTO PROVIDED

Guardians of the great and glorious “In Company with Angels” Through October 28 Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. 276-8900, mag.rochester.edu Wednesday-Sunday 11 a.m.-5 p.m., Thursday until 9 p.m. | $5-$12 [ REVIEW ] BY REBECCA RAFFERTY

The shapes and scopes of our cities are constantly shifting around us, and at times, great losses occur with a callous lack of consideration toward preserving valuable aspects of art and history. Transition is inevitable, and it’s often left to grass-roots groups to become the guardians of these potential casualties. Such is the case with seven eight-foot-tall stained-glass windows depicting angels from the biblical Book of Revelation, created by the studio of American glass master Louis Comfort Tiffany. The windows were displaced from their original home in a Cincinnati church

in the 1960’s, lost in storage, re-found and restored, and are the fragile focus of the current exhibit at the Memorial Art Gallery. Though sacred in subject, this exhibition sheds light on the history of the specific windows and of stained glass in America, the technique and aesthetics involved with the medium, and restoration efforts. Commissioned by the New Church Society, or Swedenborgians — a Christian sect developed from the writings of Swedish scientist and theologian Emanuel Swedenborg — the windows were presented to the Church of New Jerusalem in Cincinnati in 1903. Visitors to the exhibit learn that when the city of Cincinnati demolished the church in 1964 to make way for an expressway, parishioners stepped in and bought the windows back from the city for $50,000, and stored them in basements, garages, and sheds for almost 40 years. In 1989, a branch of the Swedenborgian Church purchased the works for a retreat center, which was never built, and the angels spent another

decade in storage until their rediscovery in 2001. The windows are now owned by a congregation in Pennsylvania. Restoration efforts began in 2004 courtesy of an anonymous donation. The windows were relatively unharmed, so the process mainly involved removing the accumulated grime from more than 1,500 individual pieces of glass. It took seven restorers a year and a half to dismantle the pieces and layers, clean and repair them, and reassemble the windows. The exhibit includes a short documentary video that chronicles the restoration process. The show also features a timeline regarding the history of the windows, beginning in 1688 with the birth of Emanuel Swedenborg, and highlighting the founding of the New Church by his followers, the creation of the windows by Tiffany Studios, and the loss, restoration, and touring of the windows. Also provided is information contextualizing the angelic subjects, who metaphorically represent seven early congregations in Asia Minor: Ephesus, Smyrna, Pergamos, Thyatira, Sardis, Philadelphia, and

Laodicea, which were located in cities in what is now western Turkey. Provided information states that in

the Book of Revelation, God praises each church “for a particular strength, warns each of a failing to overcome, and promises each a gift if it succeeds.” Tiffany and his designers depicted the angels in tunics, robes, and Roman armor “to convey a sense of Biblical antiquity,” and each holds a physical symbol of the divine gifts. Etched inscriptions on the lower panels of each window name the angel and quote the promises from the verses. Though enjoyed in the secular realm, stained glass was always a natural fit for depicting sacred imagery. The powerful light of day entering and illuminating a church without piercing glass served as a metaphor for some of God’s, ahem, grace, penetrating Mary’s womb while her, uh, purity remained, er, intact. “In the late 19th and early 20th centuries, Tiffany designs were in great continues on page 20 rochestercitynewspaper.com City 19


Guardians

though putting a face (and a race) to the divine is exclusionary by nature.

continues from page 19

Objects from the MAG’s collection

One of the restored Tiffany windows now on view at Memorial Art Gallery. PHOTO PROVIDED

demand for American churches,” according to curatorial info, but an estimated 50 percent of Tiffany’s church windows have been lost, according to the curatorial information. Tiffany invented more than 5,000 varieties of glass colors, textures, and patterns, and developed techniques of layering several sheets, which resulted in “subtle gradations of luminous color and depth,” and pulling and twisting molten glass to created irregular folds to simulate fabric. Viewers of the windows will encounter countless examples of Tiffany’s technical prowess, including the delicate faces of the angels, created by hand-applying brushed-on pigment. The imagery of the powerfully beautiful, mostly androgynous angels is stunning, graceful, and inspiring, 20 City september 5-11, 2012

displayed in the exhibit include such glass objects as a Roman perfume bottle and bowl, and Tiffany Studios candlesticks and vases. A short distance away, eight Tiffany lamps on loan from the collection of Jeffrey Metzger and Robin Hamilton show off a range of styles and techniques produced for the secular realm. Another section of the exhibit sheds light on Pike Stained Glass Studios, Inc., a locally-owned 104year-old family firm whose founder worked for Tiffany. On loan from Pike are stunningly detailed watercolor renderings that reveal design stages for stained-glass windows, glass samples, and glass-making tools. In a separate, darkened room, the warmly glowing windows are encased in tall wooden boxes, lit from within and standing freely in a semi-circle, positioned as they would be in the apse of a church. The sparse presentation allows for meditative study of Tiffany’s skillful detailing and techniques, which viewers learned about in the previous room. A list of notable historic Swedenborgians includes Andrew Carnegie, George Inness, William Blake, Edgar Allan Poe, Walt Whitman, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Harriet Beecher Stowe, and Abraham Lincoln. Though not a Swedenborgian, Tiffany “shared the New Church belief that the natural world reveals traces of the spiritual,” per the provided statement. Swedenborgians believe in a loving God who, according to curatorial info, “sets human beings on a path to spiritual perfection,” and that the human experience prepares us to live as angels, who continue to grow after leaving this life, and who also contribute to daily life on earth. Swedenborg taught that “inwardly, a person is in company with angels, though unaware.” A series of related lectures at MAG and tours of the exhibit, as well as of the Pike Glass studios and the Third Presbyterian Church, accompany this exhibit. For more information, visit mag.rochester. edu, and check out our calendar at rochestercitynewspaper.com.

Art Exhibits [ OPENINGS/EVENTS ] Pike Glass Open Studio. Thursdays, 5:30 p.m. Pike Stained Glass Studios, Inc 180 St. Paul Street, 2nd Floor. RSVP: 546-7570, vohara@frontiernet.net. “Adriatic Impressions and Places of Faith.” Fri Sep 7, 5-9 p.m. Image City Photography Gallery, 722 University Ave. 482-1976. imagecityphotographygallery. com Annual Faculty Show. Fri Sep 7, 5-7 p.m. Nazareth College Arts Center Gallery, 4245 East Ave. 389-2700 AVoM First Friday Art Show. Fri Sep 7, 6-9 p.m. Art and Vintage on Main, 101 Main St. Featuring AC Tucker and others. artandvintageonmain. com Brian Oglesbee Photography. Fri Sep. 7, 6-9 p.m. Spectrum Gallery at Lumiere Photo, 100 College Ave. 4614447. lumierephoto.com “Face to Face.” Fri Sep 7, 6-10 p.m. Black Radish Gallery, 274 N. Goodman. 413-1278. blackradishstudio. com “Feathers, Fantasy, and Film.” Fri Sep. 7, 6 p.m. Books Etc 78 W. Main St. Work by Linda DeVeronica, Doris Britt, and Elaine Doe. 474-4116. books_etc@yahoo.com First Friday Art Walk at Arete Gallery Wellness Center. Fri Sep 7, 6-9 p.m. Art & Arete’ Gallery Wellness Center, 663 N. Winton Rd. 286-9086. aretegallery.com Frans Wildenhain 1950-75: Creative and Commercial American Ceramics at MidCentury.” Fri Sep. 7, 5-7 p.m. RIT Bevier Gallery, 90 Lomb Memorial Dr Booth Building 7A. rit.edu/wild Green: What Does it Mean? Fri Sep 7, 6-9 p.m. The Shoe Factory Art Co-op, 250 N. Goodman St. shoefactoryarts. com Hand to Hand: Pottery instructor show and open house. Fri Sep. 7, 6 p.m. Genesee Center for the Arts and Education, 713 Monroe Ave. 244-1730. geneseearts. org Kuma Gama Opening. Fri Sep. 7, 5-9 p.m. Kuma Gama Studio, Hungerford Bldg, 1115 E. Main St Door 2, Suite 228. codykroll.com Michael P. Slattery solo show. Fri Sep. 7, 6-9 p.m. Aviv Cafe, 321 East Ave. 2321136 NYFSG 5th Annual Art Exhibition. Fri Sep. 7, 710 p.m. Steve Carpenter Gallery & Art Center, 175 Anderson Ave. 758-1410. nyfigurestudyguild.com Paula and Berthe Santirocco “Inspiration and Imagination.” Fri Sep. 7, 5-9 p.m. Arts & Cultural Council, 277 N.

ART | New Shows Opening

With the onset of the academic year, our sweet little college town’s art exhibition offerings have just about doubled. Just in time for chillier weather, return indoors and check out some art. Here are some of the shows that open this week; for more information on art openings, visit our calendar at rochestercitynewspaper. com. All events are free to attend and take place 6-9 p.m. unless otherwise noted. On Friday, September 7, Steve Carpenter Gallery & Art Center (176 Anderson Ave.) will hold a reception for the New York Figure Study Guild’s 5th Annual Art Exhibition, featuring more than 80 works by masters at depicting the human form. The reception takes place 7-10 p.m., and the show remains up through September 14. On Sunday, September 9, 3-6 p.m., four of the participating artists will work from a live model before a gallery of spectators in “A Figure in Time: Artists at Work.” For more information, call visit nyfigurestudyguild.com. A reception for “Eve’s Garden: The Lost Creation” (pictured) will take place Saturday, September 8, 5-8 p.m., at Axom Gallery (176 Anderson Ave., 2nd floor). The exhibition of paintings and prints by Keith Howard will remain on view through September 29, and the artist’s talk will take place September 18, 6-8:30 p.m. For more information, visit axomgallery.com Spectrum Gallery at Lumiere Photo (100 College Ave.) will present photographs by Brian Oglesbee on Friday, September 7, featuring images from three bodies of work, including his “Aquatique” water series, “Figure Foliage,” and “Street-Light.” The show remains on view through September 29. For more information, call 461-4447, or visit lumierephoto.com. Nazareth College (4245 East Ave.) will host receptions for two new shows on Friday, September 7. The Arts Center Gallery will present the Annual Faculty Show through September 19, and the Colacino Gallery, also located in the Arts Center, will host “Selected Work, Models, & Verses” by Jim Quinn, with highlights the artist’s work from the past 20 years. Both receptions take place 5-7 p.m. For more information, call 389-5073, or visit artscenter. naz.edu. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY Goodman St. 473-4000. artsrochester.org “Personal Expressions by Artists Julianna Furlong Williams.” Fri Sep. 7, 79 p.m. Mercer Gallery at Monroe Communtiy College, 1000 E. Henrietta Rd. monroecc.edu/go/mercer

“Photographs from Tuscany” with Michael Smith and Paula Chamlee. Fri Sep. 7, 6-9 p.m. ARTISANworks, 565 Blossom Road. 288-7170. artisanworks.net “Selected Works, Models & Verses,” a Jim Quinn exhibition. Fri Sep. 7, 5-


7 p.m. Nazareth College Colacino Gallery, 4245 East Ave. 389-5073. naz.edu The Single Origin Project. Fri Sep. 7, 6-9 p.m. Joe Bean Coffee Roasters, 1344 University Ave. Combining fashion and coffee. 3195279. joebeanroasters.com “things that are still” by Heather Swenson and Jenny Magruder. Fri Sep. 7, 69 p.m. Equal=Grounds, 750 South Ave. gallery@ equalgrounds.com Anderson Alley Artists Second Saturday Open House. Sat Sep 8, 12-4 p.m. Anderson Alley Building, 250 N. Goodman St. andersonalleyartists.com “Eve’s Garden: The Lost Creation” by Keith Howard. Sat Sep. 8, 5-8 p.m. Axom Gallery, 176 Anderson Ave 2nd floor, 176 Anderson Ave 2nd floor. 232-6030 x23, axomgallery.com. 232-6030 x23. axomgallery.com Sign-Language Museum Tour. Sat Sep. 8, 11 a.m. George Eastman House, 900 East Ave. 271-3361. eastmanhouse.org Clothesline Festival. Sep 8-9. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. Sat 10 a.m.-6 p.m Sun 10 a.m.-5 p.m. 276-8900. clothesline. rochester.edu A Figure in Time. Sun Sep 9, 3-6 p.m. Steve Carpenter Gallery & Art Center, 175 Anderson Ave. Figure study demos by four artists. 7581410. nyfigurestudyguild. com [ CONTINUING ] Axom Gallery, 176 Anderson Ave 2nd floor, 176 Anderson Ave 2nd floor. “Eve’s Garden: The Lost Creation” by Keith Howard. Mon-Fri 10 a.m.-5 p.m Sat 12-5 p.m. 232-6030 x23. axomgallery. com Books Etc 78 W. Main St. “Feathers, Fantasy, and Film” by Linda DeVeronica, Doris Britt, and Elaine Doe. Through Oct. 31. Call for hours. 474-4116. books_ etc@yahoo.com Bridge Art Gallery University of Rochester Medical Center, 300 Crittenden Blvd. “The Road Less Traveled.” Call for hours. 275-3571. omhpromotion@gmail.com Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. “Rough Truth: Caricatures by Alison Cowles.” Mon-Sun 8 p.m.- 2 a.m. 454-2966. lobbydigital.com Coach Street Clay, 39 Coach St. “Darwinian Encounters: An Exhibition of Work by Lynne Hobaica.” Call for hours. 474-3103. coachstreetclay.com Genesee Co-op Federal Credit Union, 395 Gregory St. The Work of Alan Stewart. MonWed 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; Thu-Fri

LUNCH

MONDAY- SATURDAY OUTSIDE DINING in our Sunken Courtyard BELGIAN CUISINE with an AMERICAN TWIST

IN ROCHESTER’S EAST END 120 East Avenue 325-3663

SPECIAL EVENT | Festival of Food

It’s like Christmas for local foodies: the annual Festival of Food, put on by regional food pantry Foodlink, is back on Monday, September 10, 6-9 p.m. Food and festivals go hand in hand in Rochester, but Festival of Food isn’t your average funnel cakes or kettle-corn stands. More than 100 area restaurants, farms, vineyards, breweries, bakeries, and specialty food purveyors will set up booths at the Public Market (280 N. Union St.). They’ll offer samples of their food and drink, and it’s basically a night of grazing and people gazing. I’ve had fantastic roast pork, pate, inventive ice-cream flavors, beautiful petit fours, and savory ravioli. These are some of the best food makers of Rochester all brought together for your sampling enjoyment. Who knows, you may find your new favorite restaurant. Tickets to Festival of Food cost $40 in advance, or $50 at the door. Proceeds go to benefit Foodlink, a member organization of Feeding America that distributes more than 13 million pounds of food to 450 human service agencies. For more information or to buy a ticket visit foodlinkny.org or call 328-3380 x132. — BY ERIC REZSNYAK 10 a.m.-6 p.m. 461-2230. genesee.coop George Eastman House, 900 East Ave. “Lost Birds: Sculptures by Todd McGrain.” Through Oct 21: “Ideas in Things.” | Through Sep 16: “See: Untold Stories.” | Ongoing: “Cameras from the Technology Collection,” and “The Remarkable George Eastman.” | Tue-Sat 10 a.m.5 p.m Thu 10 a.m.-8 p.m Sun 1-5 p.m. 271-3361. eastmanhouse.org High Falls Fine Art Gallery, 60 Browns Race. 5th Annual Rochester Art Supply Invitational Art Show. Wed-Fri 11 a.m.-5:30 p.m.; Sat Noon-5:30 p.m.; Sun 1-5 p.m. 325-2030. centerathighfalls.org International Art Acquisitions, 3300 Monroe Ave. Original Bauhaus style Still Life paintings by Peruvian artist Roberto Salas. Mon-Fri 10 a.m.-9 p.m.; Sat 10 a.m.-6 p.m.; Sun Noon-5 p.m. 264-1440. internationalartacquisitions. com I-Square Visions, 693 Titus Ave. “Sights & Sounds,”

by Jed Curran, Paul Dodd, Peter Monacelli, Steve Piper, and Scott Regan. Mon-Thu 10 a.m.-2 p.m. 943-1941 Link Gallery at City Hall, 30 Church St. “Jazz: The Spirit of the Moment: Photographs by Jim Allen.” Mon-Fri 9 a.m.-5 p.m. 271-5920. cityofrochester.gov Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. “In Company with Angels: Seven Rediscovered Tiffany Windows.” Wed-Sun 11 a.m.-5 p.m Thu until 9 p.m. 276-8900. mag.rochester. edu Mill Art Center & Gallery, 61 N Main St. “Industrial Blues” Landscape Photography by Gunther Cartwright. MonFri & Sat 11 a.m.-3 p.m Fri 11 a.m.-8 p.m. 624-7740. millartcenter.com My Sister’s Gallery, 505 Mt. Hope Ave. “…of life and light,” watercolor paintings and sketchbook drawings by Kristin Malone. Daily 10 a.m.-8 p.m. 546-8439 Nazareth College Arts Center Gallery, 4245 East Ave. Annual Faculty Show. Tuecontinues on page 22

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rochestercitynewspaper.com City 21


Hurricane Katrina.” Mon-Fri 10 a.m.-4 p.m. 395-2787. brockport.edu Williams Gallery at First Unitarian Church, 220 S Winton Rd. “Branching Out,” work by Rochester Area Fiber Artists. MonFri 10 a.m.-2 p.m. and 4:30-8 p.m. 271-9070. rochesterunitarian.org

FESTIVAL | M&T Bank Clothesline Festival

The grounds may be undergoing a substantial remodeling, but the M&T Bank Clothesline Festival will still be taking place Saturday and Sunday, September 8-9, at the Memorial Art Gallery (500 University Ave.). Clothesline is one of the premier arts and crafts festivals in the region, with more than 400 artists from 40 counties in New York State. You’ll find everything from woodwork to photography to ceramics to paintings for sale as you walk around the MAG grounds. Take the time to check out the progress on the Centennial Sculpture Park being built outdoors to honor the gallery’s 100th anniversary. Admission to the festival also includes free family art activities, free admission to the gallery’s exhibits (including the new Tiffany stained-glass show in the Grand Gallery), and a variety of music and dance performances taking place throughout both days. New this year is an after-hours party on Saturday at 6:30 p.m., with Nik and the Nice Guys performing rock and pop tunes. Food will also be available for purchase, with vendors including Sticky Lips Pit BBQ, Jon-John’s Bakery, Pittsford Farms Dairy, Simply Crepes, and others. The festival runs Saturday 10 a.m.-6 p.m. and Sunday 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Tickets cost $5, children 10 and under free. Tickets include admission to the Saturday Clothesline After Hours event; you can also buy tickets for that show only for $3. Note that, due to construction around the MAG and the Neighborhood of the Arts, parking and traffic will be tricky. Check mag. rochester.edu/clothesline/ for parking and shuttle-bus details, or for more information on the festival. — BY ERIC REZSNYAK

Art Exhibits

Commercial American Ceramics at Mid-Century.” Hours vary by gallery. rit. edu/wild Rochester Contemporary Arts Center, 137 East Ave. “Whose Space? Our Space!”/ Evinn Neadow. Wed-Sun 1-5 p.m Fri 1-10 p.m. 461-2222. rochestercontemporary.org Starry Nites Café, 696 University Ave. “Clouds in My Coffee.” Mon-Thu 7:30 a.m.-10 p.m Fri 7:30 a.m.-midnight, Sat 8 a.m.midnight, Sun 9 a.m.-9 p.m. 271-2630. shoefactoryarts. com Tower Fine Arts Center, SUNY Brockport, 180 Holley St. “Telling Their Stories: The Lingering Legacy of

Thu & Sun 12-5 p.m Fri-Sat 12-8 p.m. 389-2700 Nazareth College Colacino Gallery, 4245 East Ave. “Selected Works, Models & Verses,” a Jim Quinn exhibition. Wed-Sun 12-5 p.m. 389-5073. naz.edu Pat Rini Rohrer Gallery, 71 S Main St. “The Back Forty,” Retrospective of work by Pat Rini Rohrer. Mon-Tue 10 a.m.-6 p.m.; Wed-Fri 10 a.m.-8 pm.; Sat 10 a.m.-6 p.m.; Sun 12:30-4 p.m. 394-0030. prrgallery.com RIT Bevier Gallery, 90 Lomb Memorial Dr Booth Building 7A. Also in NTID Dyer Arts Center. Frans Wildenhain 1950-75: Creative and 22 City september 5-11, 2012

[ CALL FOR ARTWORK ] Call for Art: I Want My Mona Lisa: Tribute to a Renaissance Icon. Deadline Sep 22. Call for artwork relating to show’s title for September 7-26 exhibit. Next theme: “Tone it Down a Notch: Minimal Art.” Deadline October 20. More information and more calls for art at shoefactoryarts. com. Call for Art: “Landmarks of Wayne County.” Must be delivered to Wayne County Council for the Arts October 5 or 6. Adult & Youth categories; photos must be taken within Wayne Country between October 1, 2011 and September 30, 2012. Information: 315-331-4593, waynearts.wordpress.com. Call for Art Proposals for New Roz Steiner Art Gallery at Genesee Community College. Individuals and groups working in all media are welcome to submit proposals. Submit bio, resume, digital JPEG samples to GCC Art Department Office, Art Gallery Committee, Genesee Community College, One College Road, Batavia, NY 14020. The new gallery will be ready for exhibitions beginning in early 2011. For more info, email hsjones@ genesee.edu. Call for Emerging Film- and Videomakers. Ongoing. Submit films and videos to the monthly New York Filmmakers Quarterly screening series at the Little Theatre. Films of maximum 30 minutes must have been produced in New York State in the last two years. For more information, email emergingfilmmakers@yahoo. com. Call for Submissions: Art-Roc-NY Showcase 2013. Early submissions by September 29, final submissions due November 10. For info and entries, email info@jgkgalleries.com. Central Library Offers Exhibit Opportunities for Artists at Lower Link Gallery. Space currently available free of charge. Applications available at libraryweb. org; call 428-8051 for more information. Sonnenberg Photo Contest. Deadline October 1. Photos

We’re racing toward

THE FINISH LINE!

T O L L A

B L A N I

F

During the month of August THOUSANDS of Rochesterians cast their votes in our online Primary Ballot. The Final 4 in each of the 101 categories that make up Best of Rochester 2012 are listed to the right.

PLEASE NOTE: City Newspaper had no say in the selection of the Final 4; these were determined solely by the people, places, and things that received the most votes in our Primary Ballot.

TO FILL OUT YOUR ANSWERS FOR THE FINAL BALLOT, EITHER: TAKE THE SURVEY ONLINE BY CLICKING “BEST OF ROCHESTER” AT

ROCHESTERCITYNEWSPAPER.COM

AND : THEN

Check back with City Newspaper on Wednesday, October 17, for our “Best of Rochester” issue and find out who YOU picked to be named Best of Rochester 2012.

OR Circle your favorites on the ballot to the right, write your name and address on the line below it, and mail the page to: Best of Rochester 2012 c/o City Newspaper, 250 N. Goodman St., Rochester, NY 14607

continues on page 25 rochestercitynewspaper.com City 23


Hurricane Katrina.” Mon-Fri 10 a.m.-4 p.m. 395-2787. brockport.edu Williams Gallery at First Unitarian Church, 220 S Winton Rd. “Branching Out,” work by Rochester Area Fiber Artists. MonFri 10 a.m.-2 p.m. and 4:30-8 p.m. 271-9070. rochesterunitarian.org

FESTIVAL | M&T Bank Clothesline Festival

The grounds may be undergoing a substantial remodeling, but the M&T Bank Clothesline Festival will still be taking place Saturday and Sunday, September 8-9, at the Memorial Art Gallery (500 University Ave.). Clothesline is one of the premier arts and crafts festivals in the region, with more than 400 artists from 40 counties in New York State. You’ll find everything from woodwork to photography to ceramics to paintings for sale as you walk around the MAG grounds. Take the time to check out the progress on the Centennial Sculpture Park being built outdoors to honor the gallery’s 100th anniversary. Admission to the festival also includes free family art activities, free admission to the gallery’s exhibits (including the new Tiffany stained-glass show in the Grand Gallery), and a variety of music and dance performances taking place throughout both days. New this year is an after-hours party on Saturday at 6:30 p.m., with Nik and the Nice Guys performing rock and pop tunes. Food will also be available for purchase, with vendors including Sticky Lips Pit BBQ, Jon-John’s Bakery, Pittsford Farms Dairy, Simply Crepes, and others. The festival runs Saturday 10 a.m.-6 p.m. and Sunday 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Tickets cost $5, children 10 and under free. Tickets include admission to the Saturday Clothesline After Hours event; you can also buy tickets for that show only for $3. Note that, due to construction around the MAG and the Neighborhood of the Arts, parking and traffic will be tricky. Check mag. rochester.edu/clothesline/ for parking and shuttle-bus details, or for more information on the festival. — BY ERIC REZSNYAK

Art Exhibits

Commercial American Ceramics at Mid-Century.” Hours vary by gallery. rit. edu/wild Rochester Contemporary Arts Center, 137 East Ave. “Whose Space? Our Space!”/ Evinn Neadow. Wed-Sun 1-5 p.m Fri 1-10 p.m. 461-2222. rochestercontemporary.org Starry Nites Café, 696 University Ave. “Clouds in My Coffee.” Mon-Thu 7:30 a.m.-10 p.m Fri 7:30 a.m.-midnight, Sat 8 a.m.midnight, Sun 9 a.m.-9 p.m. 271-2630. shoefactoryarts. com Tower Fine Arts Center, SUNY Brockport, 180 Holley St. “Telling Their Stories: The Lingering Legacy of

Thu & Sun 12-5 p.m Fri-Sat 12-8 p.m. 389-2700 Nazareth College Colacino Gallery, 4245 East Ave. “Selected Works, Models & Verses,” a Jim Quinn exhibition. Wed-Sun 12-5 p.m. 389-5073. naz.edu Pat Rini Rohrer Gallery, 71 S Main St. “The Back Forty,” Retrospective of work by Pat Rini Rohrer. Mon-Tue 10 a.m.-6 p.m.; Wed-Fri 10 a.m.-8 pm.; Sat 10 a.m.-6 p.m.; Sun 12:30-4 p.m. 394-0030. prrgallery.com RIT Bevier Gallery, 90 Lomb Memorial Dr Booth Building 7A. Also in NTID Dyer Arts Center. Frans Wildenhain 1950-75: Creative and 22 City september 5-11, 2012

[ CALL FOR ARTWORK ] Call for Art: I Want My Mona Lisa: Tribute to a Renaissance Icon. Deadline Sep 22. Call for artwork relating to show’s title for September 7-26 exhibit. Next theme: “Tone it Down a Notch: Minimal Art.” Deadline October 20. More information and more calls for art at shoefactoryarts. com. Call for Art: “Landmarks of Wayne County.” Must be delivered to Wayne County Council for the Arts October 5 or 6. Adult & Youth categories; photos must be taken within Wayne Country between October 1, 2011 and September 30, 2012. Information: 315-331-4593, waynearts.wordpress.com. Call for Art Proposals for New Roz Steiner Art Gallery at Genesee Community College. Individuals and groups working in all media are welcome to submit proposals. Submit bio, resume, digital JPEG samples to GCC Art Department Office, Art Gallery Committee, Genesee Community College, One College Road, Batavia, NY 14020. The new gallery will be ready for exhibitions beginning in early 2011. For more info, email hsjones@ genesee.edu. Call for Emerging Film- and Videomakers. Ongoing. Submit films and videos to the monthly New York Filmmakers Quarterly screening series at the Little Theatre. Films of maximum 30 minutes must have been produced in New York State in the last two years. For more information, email emergingfilmmakers@yahoo. com. Call for Submissions: Art-Roc-NY Showcase 2013. Early submissions by September 29, final submissions due November 10. For info and entries, email info@jgkgalleries.com. Central Library Offers Exhibit Opportunities for Artists at Lower Link Gallery. Space currently available free of charge. Applications available at libraryweb. org; call 428-8051 for more information. Sonnenberg Photo Contest. Deadline October 1. Photos

We’re racing toward

THE FINISH LINE!

T O L L A

B L A N I

F

During the month of August THOUSANDS of Rochesterians cast their votes in our online Primary Ballot. The Final 4 in each of the 101 categories that make up Best of Rochester 2012 are listed to the right.

PLEASE NOTE: City Newspaper had no say in the selection of the Final 4; these were determined solely by the people, places, and things that received the most votes in our Primary Ballot.

TO FILL OUT YOUR ANSWERS FOR THE FINAL BALLOT, EITHER: TAKE THE SURVEY ONLINE BY CLICKING “BEST OF ROCHESTER” AT

ROCHESTERCITYNEWSPAPER.COM

AND : THEN

Check back with City Newspaper on Wednesday, October 17, for our “Best of Rochester” issue and find out who YOU picked to be named Best of Rochester 2012.

OR Circle your favorites on the ballot to the right, write your name and address on the line below it, and mail the page to: Best of Rochester 2012 c/o City Newspaper, 250 N. Goodman St., Rochester, NY 14607

continues on page 25 rochestercitynewspaper.com City 23


Theater

Carl Del Buono as Prior Walter in “Angels in America,” currently at the Geva Nextstage. PHOTO COURTESY METHOD MACHINE

Why does the world keep on turning? “Angels in America Part II: Perestroika” By Method Machine Through September 9 Geva Theatre Nextstage, 75 Woodbury Blvd. Tickets start at $25 | 232-4382, gevatheatre.org [ REVIEW ] BY ERIC REZSNYAK

Method Machine’s production of “Angels in America” — which it started earlier this year with the first part, “Millennium Approaches” — is the second staged version I’ve seen of Tony Kushner’s epic, Pulitzer Prize-winning drama. I originally saw it nearly a decade ago, put on by a company in Virginia that had built an entirely new theater in part so that it could pull off all of the play’s stunts and special effects. For his version, Method Machine Director David Henderson made it clear from the getgo that he wasn’t even going to attempt the pyrotechnics. He was going to trust in the magic of the theater to bring to life a soaring angel, a roof cracking in half, fiery tomes, a diorama come to life, and the kingdom of heaven itself. Having seen both approaches, 24 City september 5-11, 2012

I found that all the visual frippery ended up distracting from the heavy emotional lifting being done on stage. By focusing on the play itself, and relying on the audience’s ability to be drawn into the magical realism of Kushner’s story, the Method Machine production succeeds much more often than not in living up to the ambitious goals of this important piece of 20th century theater. “Perestroika” picks up right where “Millennium Approaches” left off — and if you didn’t see Part 1 back in the spring, get a recap before coming, because there’s no “Previously on ‘Angels in America’” clip package to ease you in, or a brief in the program to get you up to speed. (Note that Method Machine will present both parts of “Angels in America” on Sunday, September 9.) The year is 1986 and Prior Walter has recently been diagnosed with HIV/AIDS and abandoned by his partner, Louis. In his fragile physical and emotional state, Prior is visited by an angel — an actual, honestto-you-know-what angel — who demands that he become a modern-day prophet and spread a very important message to humanity: stop progressing because people are screwing up everything. As Prior wrestles literally and figuratively with angels, Louis finds comfort in

the arms of a closeted coworker, Joe, a Republican Mormon lawyer. Joe’s emerging homosexuality snaps his wife Harper’s already flimsy tether, sending her into an elaborate fantasy world, and has also spurred his mother, Hannah, to sell her home in Utah to move to New York to help her son. Also involved in the story are a fictionalized version of notorious lawyer Roy Cohn and Belize, a close friend of Prior’s and the nurse attending Roy as he dies from AIDS. As previously mentioned, this stripped-down

take on “Angels in America” (as stripped down as a 3.5-hour play can be, anyway) allows the audience to focus on the story, the acting, and the language. Regarding the latter, “Perestroika” isn’t as beautifully crafted as “Millennium Approaches,” which was polished into a gem. “Perestroika” still has some wonderful scenes and lines, but it’s unquestionably more indulgent and at times feels a bit scattered. The frequent scene changes add to the start-stop quality of the play, but there are sections that are absolutely riveting. The dual scene in which Prior gets his instructions from the Angel, while simultaneously recounting the experience to Belize, is flawlessly executed, and the final scenes with Roy Cohn and his spectral visitor

are genuinely moving despite the seemingly unsympathetic characters involved. Almost the entire company from “Millennium Approaches” returns for Part II, with the exception of Erin-Kate Howard, who steps into the roles and robes of the Angel. Howard is magnificent in the role, intense, terrifying, yet beautiful, and she has mastered some very complicated dialogue, finding real emotional nuance in the promises of doom and destruction. Other standouts in the cast include Carl Del Buono as Prior, who anchors the show with his totally believable, fully realized performance; David Jason Kyle, who makes the ostensibly unlikable Louis oddly charming and relatable; and Marcy J. Savastano as Harper, who finds hope and strength even as every piece of her falls apart. Ironically, the show’s main weakness is when it tries to add the visual flair that director Henderson tried to avoid. Both parts of this “Angels” production attempted to deploy video projections at key points, and they never really worked. This time it was flapping angel wings and the glowing symbol meant to represent God that barely made an impression. This is a case where the director should have trusted his vision, the story, and the talented actors on stage, all of whom did a better job conveying Kushner’s concept of God than any projection ever could. Leaving the show, a friend and I discussed the continued relevance of the play — very much set in the 1980’s, and inextricably linked with the AIDS epidemic — in the 21st century. While it’s true that, for many, the disease is no longer the death sentence it once was, AIDS still continues to devastate millions of people worldwide. And it only takes a look at the Republican Party’s current platform to confirm that Prior’s line toward the end — about being “citizens” — is still as crucial today as it was 20 years ago. It’s too narrow to think about “Angels in America” as a play about AIDS, or gay people, or even religion. It’s so much bigger than that. The idea of “progress,” about what it is and what it does and where we’re going, will always be important for humanity to consider, to say nothing of trying to figure out why we do the things we do to people we supposedly love. Every time I see or read “Angels in America” I get something new from it; it’s like an American version of “Don Quixote.” Method Machine’s production uncovered even more layers of an already complicated portrait, and it’s something that should be seen and appreciated.


lunch menu hAPPY HOUR DINNER

stop in for our delectable

Art Exhibits

SERVED 11:30AM-2PM

must be taken at Sonneberg Gardens and not have been published elsewhere. For information, visit sonnenberg.org.

4-7PM @ THE BAR (1/2 PRICE DRINKS)

Comedy [ Thursday, September 6-Saturday, September 8] Greg Warren. Sep. 6-8. Comedy Club, 2235 Empire Blvd. Thu 7:30 p.m., FriSat 7:30 9 p.m. 671-9080. thecomedyclub.us [ Tuesday, September 11 ] Laugh Riot Underground: Stand-Up Comedy Showcase. Dub Land Underground, 315 Alexander St. laughriotcomedy.com. 9-11 p.m.

Dance [ Wednesday, September 5-Friday, September 7 ] Monica Bill Barnes Dance Residency. Through Sep. 7. Various locations and times at SUNY Brockport. 3952153. brockport.edu/finearts

Festivals [ Friday, September 7 ] 17th Annual Turkish Festival. Turkish Society of Rochester, 677 Beahan Rd. Fri 5-9 p.m., Sat-Sun noon-9 p.m. Dancing, music, food, activities. 266-1980. tsor.org 2012 Rochester Irish Festival. Camp Eastman, 1558 Lakeshore Blvd. Fri 311 p.m., Sat noon-11 p.m., Sun noon-6 p.m. 766-2144. rochesteririshfestival.com 30th Annual Macedon Center Community Lumberjack Festival. Macedon Center Fireman’s Field, Canandaigua Rd. Competitions, workshops, kids’ activities, craft sale. Gates open 8 a.m. each morning, events last into evening. 315-986-3732. macedoncenterfire.org [ Saturday, September 8-Sunday, September 9] India Day. 1-6 p.m. India Community Center, 2171 Monroe County Line Rd. Food, dances, henna, kite flying, pony rides, bouncy house. Jose 2441760, Sanjay 755-2551. iccrochester.org Rochester Pagan Pride Day. 10 a.m.-6:30 p.m. Genesee Valley Park. Admission to RPPD is the donation of a non-perishable canned food item to go to Aids

EVENINGS AT 5PM

FESTIVALS | India Day/Turkish Festival

August was absolutely jam-packed with festivals every weekend, but we’re not done with summer just yet, Rochester. Celebrate ethnic and cultural diversity this weekend with two more festivals. Check out the 17th annual Turkish Art & Folk Festival, held at 677 Beahan Road in Chili, Friday, September 7-Sunday, September 9. Enjoy foods such as dolma, kebabs, and baklava, as well as traditional dancing, kids’ activities, arts & crafts, and a Sufi music presentation. Festival hours are Friday 5-9 p.m., Saturday and Sunday noon-9 p.m., and admission is free. For more information, call 2661980, or visit tsor.org. On Saturday, September 8, 1-6 p.m., visit the India Community Center (2171 Monroe County Line Road, Macedon) for the 2012 India Day festivities. The event is free and open to the public, and includes kite flying, a bouncy house, pony rides, henna, and Indian food, dress, music, and dance. For more information, call Jose at 244-1760, or Sanjay at 755-2551, or visit iccrochester.org. —BY REBECCA RAFFERTY Care Rochester, Inc. rochesterpaganpride.org 17th Annual Turkish Festival. Turkish Society of Rochester, 677 Beahan Rd. Fri 5-9 p.m., Sat-Sun noon-9 p.m. Dancing, music, food, activities. 266-1980. tsor.org 2012 Rochester Irish Festival. Camp Eastman, 1558 Lakeshore Blvd. Fri 311 p.m., Sat noon-11 p.m., Sun noon-6 p.m. 766-2144. rochesteririshfestival.com 30th Annual Macedon Center Community Lumberjack Festival. Sep. 8-9. Macedon Center Fireman’s Field, Canandaigua Rd. Competitions, workshops, kids’ activities, craft sale. Gates open 8 a.m. each morning, events last into evening. 315-986-3732. macedoncenterfire.org. Mendon Station Festival. Mendon Station Park, 1371 Pittsford-Mendon Road. Sat noon-7 p.m., Sun noon-5 p.m. mendonfoundation. com/2012 [ Monday, September 10-Wednesday, September 12 ] Greentopia Festival. Sep. 1016. High Falls neighborhood

289 alexander st 585 454 5000 • open tues-sat

BenedettosRochester.com

Find us on

and more locations. Films, music, innovation, ecofest. 287-5560. greentopiafest. com

Kids Events [ Wednesday, September 5 ] Time for Tots. 10:15-11:15 a.m. Gates Public Library, 902 Elmgrove Rd. Ages 1-55 with a caregiver. 247-6446. [ Friday, September 7 ] Film Fridays. 10 a.m.-noon. Gates Public Library, 902 Elmgrove Rd. Call for movie details. 247-6446 [ Saturday, September 8] Astronaut Mission: The Future. 1 p.m. Rochester Museum and Science Center, 657 East Ave. 2711880. rmsc.org [ Saturday, September 8-Sunday, September 9] Literature Live: Nutbrown Hare. The Strong National Museum of Play, 1 Manhattan Square. Sat 11 a.m.-4 p.m., Sun 1-4 p.m. continues on page 26 rochestercitynewspaper.com City 25


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Are you A Cancer Survivor

With Trouble Sleeping? We are seeking cancer survivors who are having difficulty falling or staying asleep for a study testing two methods for reducing sleep problems and fatigue. How may you benefit

All participants will receive a behavioral treatment for sleep problems, at no charge, either as part of the study or after. Half of the participants will receive a drug called armodafinil that may be helpful in reducing daytime tiredness and fatigue.

Eligibility (partial list)

• Be between the ages 21 and 75 • Have finished radiation treatments and/or chemotherapy • Insomnia began or got worse with the onset of cancer or treatment

Please call Jenine Hoefler (585) 276-3559 or Joseph Roscoe, Ph.D. (585) 275-9962 at the University of Rochester James P. Wilmot Cancer Center for more information about this research study

Kids Events 263-2700. museumofplay. org [ Tuesday, September 11 ] Teen Book Group. 5:30-6:30 p.m. Gates Public Library, 902 Elmgrove Rd. Grades 7 to 12. 247-6446

Lectures [ Wednesday, September 5 ] Man or Monster? Prophet or Madman? Reconsidering General William Tecumseh Sherman. 7 p.m. Genesee Community College, Conable Technology Building, 1 College Rd. 343-0055 x6616. dsutherland@ genesee.edu. civilwaratgcc. wordpress.com [ Thursday, September 6] “Conesus Lake History Through Antique Photos” with Douglas Morgan. 7:30 p.m. Mendon Community Center, 167 N. Main St. townofmendon.org Photography Lecture: “Photographs from Tuscany” with Michael Smith and Paula Chamlee. 6 p.m. George Eastman House, 900 East Ave. 271-3361. eastmanhouse.org A Plant-Based Diet: Eating for Health and Happiness. 7-9 p.m. JCC Rochester, 1200 Edgewood Ave. With Ted Barnett, M.D. Food samples and recipes by Carol Barnett. 461-2000. rochesterveg@gmail.com. rochesterveg.org [ Friday, September 7Sunday, September 9 ] Fourth IEEE International Games Innovation Conference. Sep. 7-9. The Strong National Museum of Play, 1 Manhattan Square. 263-2700. thestrong.org [ Saturday, September 8] Board Excellence Seminar. 8:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m. Become an effective Board member. Presentations by 4 speakers active in nonprofits. Cornell Cooperative Extension. rwn.org Scleroderma Educational Forum. 12:30-4 p.m. University of Rochester Medical Center, Ryan Case Method Room, School of Medicine & Dentistry Building, 601 Elmwood Ave. 800-722-4673. facebook. com/SFTriState [ Sunday, September 9 ] “The Art of Compassion” by Jerry Alonzo. 9:50 a.m. Downtown Presbyterian Church, 121 N. Fitzhugh

26 City september 5-11, 2012

LECTURE | International Games Innovation Conference

Time to get your game on — at least academically speaking. The 4th Annual International Games Innovation Conference is hitting the National Museum of Play this week, bringing with it three days of programming likely to appeal to the programmers among us. Keynote speakers include Seamus Blackley, co-creator of the Xbox and president of Innovative Leisure; Ian Bogost (pictured), professor at Georgia Tech and founding partner of Persuasive Games; Anthony Salcito, vice president for Microsoft Education; and Vincent John Vincent, co-CEO, president, and co-founder of GestureTek, Inc. This is a conference for those interested in how video games get made, and how the industry works. There is also student lunch-speaker series, including talks on how to break into the fabled world that is the video-game industry. The International Games Innovation Conference takes place Friday, September 7-Sunday, September 9 at the Strong National Museum of Play, 1 Manhattan Square. Registration costs between $50 and $600, with ticket discounts for college students. For more information call 263-2700 or visit icheg.org. – WILLIE CLARK St. 325-4000. office@ downtownpresbyterian.org [ Monday, September 10 ] Five Physicians Explain “Why I Eat a Plant-Based Diet.” 7 p.m. Rochester Academy of Medicine, 1441 East Ave. Fall kickoff for Heartbeats for Life. 2348750. rochesterveg@gmail. com. rochesterveg.org Heart Arrhythmias: Medication, Interventions, or Medical Devices? with Parag P. Patel, MD. 7:15 p.m. JCC Rochester, 1200 Edgewood Ave. 544-1565. mendedheartsrochester.org Live-n-Learners. 2-3 p.m. Gates Public Library, 902 Elmgrove Rd. Enjoy a travelog experience looking at Scandinavia with Tom DeClaire. 247-6446 [ Tuesday, September 11 ] “The Economics of Arts” with Dr. Roger McCain. 3-4:30 p.m. Carlson Auditorium (building 76, room 1125), RIT campus. In association with the Frans Wildenhain exhibit. 475-2879. rit.edu/ wild

My Dear Brother: A Seneca Family in the Civil War Years. 7 p.m. Greece Town Hall, 1 Vince Tofany Blvd. The story of Civil War General Ely Parker and his remarkable family of Tonawanda Senecas. A program of the New York Council for the Humanities By Deborah Holler. 2257221 [ Wednesday, September 12 ] Kodak History Lecture. 6:30 p.m. George Eastman House, 900 East Ave. With optics expert Martin Scott. 271-3361. eastmanhouse. org Opera Guild Lecture Series: “Heroic Women in Opera.” 7-9 p.m. Fairport Library, 1 Village Landing. With Agneta D. Borgstedt. 223-9091. mercuryoperarochester.org

Literary Events [ Friday, September 7 ] Writer’s Group. 10 a.m.noon. Wood Library, 134 North Main St. 394-1381. woodlibrary.org


[ Saturday, September 8] 2012 Rochester Antiquarian Book Fair. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. The Fair & Expo Center, 2695 East Henrietta Rd. 325-2050. rochesterbooksellers. wordpress.com “Ghosts and Hauntings of the Finger Lakes” by Patti Unvericht. 2 p.m. Books Etc., 78 W. Main St. 4744116. books_etc@yahoo. com

[ Tuesday, September 11 ] Books Sandwiched In: “Rather Outspoken: My Life in the News.” 12:12-12:52 p.m. Central Library, Kate Gleason Auditorium, 115 South Ave. Reviewer: Don Alhart. 4288350. libraryweb.org Unitarian Universalist Book Club: “A.D. New Orleans After the Deluge” by Josh Neufeld. 6:30 p.m. Lift Bridge Book Shop, 45 Main St. 637-2260. jhoffman@ liftbridgebooks.com

Museum Exhibits [ Through Thursday, September 13 ] Quilts & Samplers. The Rochester Historical Society, Rundel Memorial Building, 2nd floor, 115 South Ave. 428-8470, rochesterhistory. org. Tue-Wed 10 a.m.-3 p.m Thu 11 a.m.-3 p.m. $3-$5, free to members.

With the approach of autumn, it’s time to think of cozy activities, like curling up with some good reads. If you’re in the market for new-to-you novels, or want to expand your collection of timeless tomes, the event of the year approaches. The 2012 Rochester Antiquarian Book Fair will take place Saturday, September 8, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. at Minnett Hall at the Dome Arena (2695 E. Henrietta Road). This year’s exhibitors hail from Vermont, Canada, New Jersey, Massachusetts, Minnesota, Indiana, and all over New York State, and include bookstores as well as private booksellers. Admission is free, and there will be an on-site raffle for free tickets to an October theatrical production of “Mary Poppins,” donated by the Rochester Broadway Theatre League. For more information, call 325-2050, or visit rochesterbooksellers.wordpress.com. —BY REBECCA RAFFERTY

Recreation [ Thursday, September 6] Junior Builders’ Golf Tournament. 10:30 a.m. Victor Hills Golf Club, 1397 Brace Rd. Benefits Mary Parkes Asthma Center. Call for details. 924-2176. Stargazing under the Stars. 8-10 p.m. Rothfuss Park, 1648 Five Mile Line Rd. Bring your lawn chair, blanket, and flashlight and learn all about the night sky as you listen to Don Hall, retired director of the Strasenburgh Planetarium. 340-8720 x4020. [ Saturday, September 8] Genesee Valley Greenway Bike Ride. 10 a.m. Genesee Valley Greenway, PO Box 42 Meet at 10:00 a.m. at the trail head in Canawaugus Park on River Road (Rte 251) in Scottsville for a 1 1/2 hour, 14 mile slow paced ride south to Rt. 5 in Avon and back. Bring water. Helmet required. Ride Leader: Richard DeSarra. 585-461-5363. fogvg.org Genesee Valley Hiking Club: Bay Park West. 11 a.m. Meet at 660 Bay front South, Irondequoit. Moderate/hilly 4-5 mile

hike. 544-3387. gvhchike. org History Walk in Penfield. 9 a.m. Tour of Smith Cemetery on Gloria Drive. 340-8655 Mount Hope Cemetery Tour: Lost Secrets. 12:30 p.m. Mount Hope Cemetery, 1133 Mt. Hope Avenue. 461-3494. fomh.org [ Saturday, September 8-Sunday, September 9] Amazing Maize Maze Grand Opening. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Long Acre Farms, 1342 Eddy Rd Farm opens 9 a.m. with gemstone painting, sweet cone shop, and farm market. Tickets include the maze and back 40, hayrides and cow train rides. 315986-4202. longacrefarms. com [ Sunday, September 9 ] Beginner Birder Trip: Charlotte and Badgerow Park. 8 a.m. Meet in northeast corner of the Charlotte Park parking lot beside the Genesee River outlet. Extra spotting scopes would be helpful. Bob 329-3583, John 671-9639. rochesterbirding.com Genesee Valley Hiking Club Hike. 1 p.m. Meet at Durant Golf Course lot. Moderate

FRIDAY

[ Monday, September 10 ] Adults Who Love YA Book Club. 6-7 p.m. Wood Library, 134 North Main St. Are you over the age of 18 but still love Young Adult fiction? That’s OK, we do too. Join Teen Librarian, Kelley Blue, and Adult Services Librarian, Ron Kirsop as we discuss the best titles in YA literature. For the first meeting bring a YA book or title that you would like the group to read. A title will be selected and we will discuss it at our next meeting. 3941381. woodlibrary.org Ideas-n-Authors. 7-8 p.m. Gates Public Library, 902 Elmgrove Rd. Adult book discussion is on War Horse by Michael Morpurgo. 2476446 Moving Beyond Racism Book Group: “The New Jim Crow” by Michelle Alexander. 78:30 p.m. Barnes & Noble, 3349 Monroe Ave. 2888644. mbrbookinfo@aol. com

LITERATURE | Rochester Antiquarian Book Fair

FIRST

[ Sunday, September 9 ] Poetry Reading: Colleen Powderly and Nancy ChalkerTenant. 4 p.m. Books Etc., 78 W. Main St. 474-4116. books_etc@yahoo.com

First Friday Citywide Gallery Night

September 7 • 6-9pm FirstFridayRochester.org

2 Chic Boutique Betsy Philips A.R.T.S Gallery at Aviv Cafe Create by Michael Slattery

The Crafting Social Open Studio The Shoe Factory Art Co-op Green: What Does It Mean?

Arete' Gallery Local Artists Art and Vintage on Main (AVoM) Greentopia

T H I S M O N T H O N LY: haighworks Studio It Was Either Here or There

AXOM Gallery Exhibition Space Eve's Garden: The Lost Creation Black Radish Studio Face to Face Gallery at The Arts and Cultural Council Inspiration and Imagination Hungerford Urban Artisans (HUA) Hungerford Urban Artisans (HUA) Image City Photography Gallery PLACES OF FAITH and ADRIATIC IMPRESSIONS JGK Galleries Green Rochester Contemporary Art Center (RoCo) Whose Space? Our Space! Spectrum Gallery Photographs by Brian Oglesbee Stella Art Gallery & Studio Mother Nature's Closet

Sponsored by

SteadFast Tattoo Fotografies SEPTEMBER 7 HIGHLIGHTS:

• Whose Space? Our Space! and RoCo Upstairs open studios at RoCo • Open Studio at The Crafting Social • Opening Reception at A.R.T.S. Gallery at Aviv Cafe • Local Artists at Arete' Gallery • Fotografies at Steadfast Tattoo • Face to Face at Black Radish Studio • Greentopia at Art and Vintage on Main (AVoM) • Green at JGK Galleries • It Was Either Here or There at haighworks studio • Eve's Garden: The Lost Creation at AXOM Gallery Exhibition Space

Sponsored by:

continues on page 27 rochestercitynewspaper.com City 27


Recreation 4-5 mile hike. 254-4047. gvhchike.org Morning Flights on the Intrepid. 7-10 a.m. Genesee Country Village & Museum, 1410 Flint Hill Rd. 2948218. gcv.org Rochester Orienteering Club 4-12km Trail Challenge. 10 a.m. Webster Park. roc.us.orienteering.org/ trailchallenge.shtml Rohrbach’s Ellison Park Cyclocross Race. 10 a.m.4:15 p.m. Ellison Park. ellisoncyclocross.com [ Wednesday, September 12 ] Senior Sojourn. 11 a.m.noon. Cumming Nature Center, 6472 Gulick Rd. Easy-paced hike. 374-6160. rmsc.org

Special Events [ Wednesday, September 5 ] Board Gamers. Wood Library, 134 North Main St. Unplugged Gamers Wanted. Bring your board games and play with like-minded board game enthusiasts. 3941381. woodlibrary.org Legacy Birthday Luncheon. 11:30 a.m. Legacy at the

Fairways, 681 High St. 9247043 Vineyard Public Tours. Casa Larga Vineyards, 2287 Turk Hill Rd. 11 a.m., 1 & 3 p.m. 223-4210 x2. casalarga.com [ Thursday, September 6] National History Day Contest Information Session. 10 a.m. Henrietta Public Library, 455 Calkins Rd. Students in grades 6-12 encouraged to enter projects based on an annual theme into a series of competitions, from local to national level. 359-7092 Open Houses at Kanack School of Music. Thursdays, Fridays, 5-8 p.m. and Saturdays, 9 a.m.-noon. The Kanack School of Music, 2077-2079 South Clinton Ave. 244-6910. kanackschool@gmail.com. kanackschoolofmusic.com The Sherut Project “First Stop”. 7-9 p.m. Pomodoro, 3400 Monroe Ave. The Sherut Project seeks to engage a new generation of the Rochester Jewish community, ages 25 to 45, through meaningful dialogue and action. 461-0490. dzarkowsky@ jewishrochester.org. mypomodoro.com South Wedge Farmers Market. 4-7 p.m. 100

28 City september 5-11, 2012

Alexander St. at S. Clinton. swfarmersmarket.org Vineyard Public Tours. Casa Larga Vineyards, 2287 Turk Hill Rd. 11 a.m., 1 & 3 p.m. 223-4210 x2. casalarga. com [ Friday, September 7 ] Vineyard Public Tours. Casa Larga Vineyards, 2287 Turk Hill Rd. 11 a.m., 1 & 3 p.m. 223-4210 x2. casalarga.com ZooBrew. 5:30-9 p.m. Seneca Park Zoo, 2222 St. Paul St. Ages 21+ only. Food, adult beverages, music by Last Minute Blues Band. senecaparkzoo.org [ Saturday, September 8] Dave Matthews Laser. 9:30 p.m. Rochester Museum and Science Center, 657 East Ave. 271-1880. rmsc.org Finger Lakes Natural Living Fair. 11:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Onanda Park, 4965 West Lake Rd. 703-4676. fingerlakesfair.com Gathering of Gardeners Symposium. 8 a.m.-4 p.m. Rochester Museum and Science Center, 657 East Ave. 461-1000 x225. gatheringofgardeners.com Hang Around Victor Day. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Village of Victor. 738-9025. hangaroundvictorday@aol. com

Open Houses at Kanack School of Music. Thursdays, Fridays, 5-8 p.m. and Saturdays, 9 a.m.-noon. The Kanack School of Music, 2077-2079 South Clinton Ave. 244-6910. kanackschool@gmail.com. kanackschoolofmusic.com Plant Sale. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. George Eastman House, 900 East Ave. 271-3361. eastmanhouse.org Rochester’s White Party AIDS Benefit. 6:30 p.m. Century Club, 566 East Ave. 5457200. rochesterswhiteparty. com Screening of “This Is Not A Film” by Jafar Panahi. 8 p.m. George Eastman House, 900 East Ave. 271-3361. eastmanhouse.org URMC Announce 4th Annual Women’s Health Screening Fair. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Rochester Public Market, 280 N. Union St. cityofrochester.gov Vineyard Public Tours. Casa Larga Vineyards, 2287 Turk Hill Rd. 11 a.m., 1 & 3 p.m. 223-4210 x2. casalarga.com [ Sunday, September 9 ] Benefit for The Perinton Food Shelf. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Green Lantern Inn, One East Church St. This benefit affair features all kinds of miniatures by vendors from all over with new and interesting

offerings. All proceeds going to The Perinton Food Shelf. Dollhouse raffle. 223-2613. lnt@frontgiernet.net Garage Sales and Super Fleas. 8 a.m.-2 p.m. Rochester Public Market, 280 N. Union St. cityofrochester.gov Vineyard Public Tours. Casa Larga Vineyards, 2287 Turk Hill Rd. 11 a.m., 1 & 3 p.m. 223-4210 x2. casalarga. com. [ Tuesday, September 11 ] Good Luck / Short Courses. 11, 7 p.m. Good Luck, 50 Anderson Ave. Greentopia event with films & food. 340-6161. inspiredtable. restaurantgoodluck.com September 11 Remembrance Ceremony. Tue., Sep. 11, 8-9 a.m. Monroe Community College, 1000 E. Henrietta Rd. 292-2534. monroecc. edu. Vineyard Public Tours. Casa Larga Vineyards, 2287 Turk Hill Rd. 11 a.m., 1 & 3 p.m. 223-4210 x2. casalarga. com.

Sports [ Saturday, September 8] Dirtcar Racing. 7 p.m. Canandaigua Motorsports

Park, 2820 County Rd. 10. 394-0961. canandaiguamotorsportspark.com Enter the Beast: Roc City Roller Derby 2012 League Season Opener. 6-9 p.m. The Fair & Expo Center, 2695 East Henrietta Rd. Doors open at 5 p.m. 334-4000. rocderby.com [ Tuesday, September 11 ] The Hillside Community Shield Match. Sahlen’s Stadium, 460 Oak St. 4:30 p.m. High School Match, 7:30 p.m. College Match. 256-7852. ssiriann@hillside. com

Theater “Americana Enigma: The 9/11 Play.” Tue., Sep. 11, 7 p.m. MuCCC, 142 Atlantic Ave. 244-0960. muccc.org “Angels in America, Part II: Perestroika.” Sep. 6-9. Geva Theatre Center, 75 Woodbury Blvd. Thu 7 p.m., Fri-Sat 7:30 p.m., Sun 2 p.m. encore performance of Part I, Sun 7 p.m. Part II. 232-4382. gevatheatre.org “Cabaret.” Sep. 5-8. MerryGo-Round Playhouse, 6877 East Lake Rd. Wed Sep 5 2 & 7:30 p.m., Thu 7:30 p.m., Fri-Sat 8 p.m. Call


for tickets. 315-255-1785. merry-go-round.com “Heartland: A Mystery.” Sep. 6-8, 7:30 p.m. MuCCC, 142 Atlantic Ave. Continues through September 15. $10$15. 234-1254. muccc.org “Love, Loss, and What I Wore.” Sep. 6-9. Blackfriars Theatre, 795 E. Main St. Continues through September 16. Thu 7:30 p.m., Fri-Sat 8 p.m., Sun 7 p.m. 454-1260. blackfriars. org “Widowers’ Houses.” Sep. 79. Black Sheep Theatre, 274 N Goodman St., third floor, Studio D313. Continues through September 29. FriSat 7:30 p.m., Sun 2 p.m. 861-4816 “You Can’t Take it With You.” Sep. 11-12, 7:30 p.m. Geva Theatre Center, 75 Woodbury Blvd. Continues through October 7. 2324382. gevatheatre.org

Auditions Audition for “The Odd Couple.” Wed Sep. 5, 6:308:30 p.m. Geneva Theatre Guild. Fellowship hall, Presbyterian Church, 24 Park Place, Geneva. gtglive. org Audition for “What’s the Capitol of Bolivia?” Thu., Sep. 6, 6-8:15 p.m. Working Class Theatre Company. 469-4176. workingclasstheatre.net Auditions: Flower City Ballet 7th Annual Nutcracker Production. Sun., Sep. 9. Flower City Ballet, 250 Cumberland St., Sute 250. Ages 10-14 at 1-2:15 p.m., Ages 15+ at 2:30-4 p.m. 325-2114. flowercityballet. com Auditions for “Campaign Capers.” Thu., Sep. 6, 4-6 p.m. RAPA, 727 E. Main St. Ages 7-13. 325-3366, register Auditions for “Dearly Departed.” Wed Sep. 5, 7 p.m. Penfield Community Center, 1985 Baird Rd. The Penfield Players. Roles available for 8 women and 6 men ages 20-70. 315-5242368. penfieldplayers.org Auditions for “Spamalot.” Wed Sep. 5, 7 p.m. Thomas C Armstrong Middle School, 6076 Ontario Center Rd. (Route 350) in Ontario. Ages 15+. NACShows@AOL. com Auditions “Sound of Music.” Sep. 8-9, 1-3 p.m. Cobblestone Arts Center, 1622 New York 332. Best Foot Forward Children’s Theatre. Ages 4-16. 3890220. bestfootforwardkids. com

FESTIVAL of LANTERNS A T RI B U T E TO CLAUDE BR AG D O N

In the Historic Maplewood

Rose Garden

SAT. SEPT 15TH at Sunset FREE and open

to the hearts and souls of all. 7:30pm Drum Circle & Native American Flute Performance

8:00pm Rochester Oratorio Choir RECREATION | Ellison Park Cyclocross Race

747 PARK AVENUE, ROCHESTER, NY 585.244.2585 129 S. MAIN STREET, CANANDAIGUA, NY 585.396.2585 154 THE COMMONS, ITHACA, NY 607.273.2585

Artistic Lanterns illuminated by Solar Power

Although it has been around since 2008, this year the Rohrbach’s Ellison Park Cyclocross Race will expand to cover two days of bike racing and beer in Rochester’s Ellison Park (off Blossom Road) on Saturday and Sunday, September 8-9. Cyclocross combines road cycling and mountain biking. Cyclists compete on 1.5- to 2-mile circuits that include obstacles that may require the rider to dismount to continue. This event — the first stop on this year’s International Cycling Union international race calendar — will feature men and women racers coming from across the globe. Professionals will take to the course each afternoon, while amateurs have a go in the morning. In addition to the racing, food will be available from Good Smoke BBQ, beers from local breweries Rohrbach’s, ROC Brewing, and Genesee Brewery, and there will be children’s activities available. Spectators can watch the event for free, and a shuttle bus will run noon-5 p.m. both days taking people from the parking lot on Blossom to the race site on North Landing Road. For more information visit ellisoncyclocross.com. — BY ERIC REZSNYAK

Workshops [ Tuesday, September 11 ] Bits & Bytes: Microsoft PowerPoint. 4-5:30 p.m. Wood Library, 134 North Main St. Learn the basics and ask questions about Microsoft PowerPoint. 3941381. woodlibrary.org Crêpe-making classes. 6:308:30 p.m. Simply Crêpes Canandaigua, 101 South Main St., Canandaigua. 208-5486. simplycrepes. com/events September Night School: iPad. 6:30-8 p.m. Wood Library, 134 North Main St. This training explores the basics of using an Apple iPad by highlighting functions, organizational components, syncing features, iCloud services, and applications. 394-1381. woodlibrary.org

[ Wednesday, September 12 ] September Night School: Google Drive. 6:30-8 p.m. Wood Library, 134 North Main St. Google Drive (formerly known as Google Docs) is a cloud based, word processing, spreadsheet creating, and presentation editing platform that you can use on any computer. 394-1381. woodlibrary.org

rochestercitynewspaper.com City 29


Film Times Fri September 7-Thur September 13 Due to the holiday many schedules were not available before press time. Schedules change often. Call theaters or check rochestercitynewspaper.com for updates.

Film

Brockport Strand 637-3310 89 Main St, Brockport THE AVENGERS: 7:15; BRAVE: Sat-Sun 1, 3, 5; THE CAMPAIGN: 7:15, 9:15; THE WORDS: 7, 9; also Sat-Sun 1, 3, 5.

Deep in the dark heart of Texas [ REVIEW ] By George Grella

Canandaigua Theatres 396-0110 Wal-Mart Plaza, Canandaigua THE AVENGERS: 7:15; also Sat-Sun 1; BOURNE LEGACY: 7; BRAVE: Fri 5, Sat-Sun 1, 3, 5; THE CAMPAIGN: 9:25; also Sat-Sun 5; DARK KNIGHT: 7:15; DIARY OF A WIMPY KID: Fri 5; Sat-Sun 1, 3; THE EXPENDABLES: 7:15, 9:20; also Fri-Sun 5:10; also SatSun 1, 3:05; HOPE SPRINGS: 7, 9; also Fri-Sun 5; also SatMon 1, 3; LAWLESS: 7, 9:15; also Fri-Sun 4; also Sat-Sun 1; THE ODD LIFE: 7, 9; also Fri-Sun 5; also Sat-Sun 1, 3; PARANORMAN: Sat-Sun 1, 3; THE POSSESSION: 7:10, 9:10; also Fri-Sun 5:10; also Sat-Sun 1:10, 3:10; PREMIUM RUSH: 7:10, 9:10; also FriSun 5:10; SPARKLE: 4; THE WORDS: 7, 9; also Fri-Sun 5; Sat-Sun 1, 3.

“Killer Joe” (NC-17), directed by William Friedkin Now playing

Though the dreaded NC-17 rating usually frightens producers and directors, it apparently didn’t deter William Friedkin, whose work includes not only such classics as “The Exorcist” and “The French Connection,” but also the daring and highly unpopular “Cruising.” His new film, “Killer Joe,” most likely earned its rating not for the usual causes, i.e., excessive and graphic sexual content — though it also features a fair share of that particular element

Cinema Theater 271-1785 957 S. Clinton St. MOONRISE KINGDOM: 7; also Sat-Sun 4:45; BEASTS OF THE SOUTHERN WILD: 8:35. continues on page 32

— but for its terrific violence (and these ratings people call themselves Americans!). Initially the movie, based on a play by Tracy Letts, looks like a parody of those horror flicks of the sort that employ a rural locale and perverted rustics. It opens in one of those ferocious Southwestern thunderstorms, where a young guy races through the rain to, yes, a trailer park, where he pounds frantically on the door of one of the homes, until a sexy woman, naked from the waist down, lets him in, whereupon they scream about her nudity. The young man is Chris Smith (Emile Hirsch) and the woman is his stepmother, Sharla (Gina Gershon); their quarrel awakens his father, Ansel (Thomas Haden Church), beginning another sort of parody, a grotesque Texas version of a family situation comedy. Chris’s desperation stems from a $6,000 debt he owes a drug dealer, which he plans to repay by joining with Ansel in murdering his mother, Ansel’s exwife whom everybody hates, for her $50,000 life insurance policy. After some persuasion, Ansel,

Matthew McConaughey in “Killer Joe.” PHOTO COURTESY VOLTAGE PICTURES

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who is even dumber than Chris, and the greedy Sharla agree to go along with the scheme. To do the job, Chris knows of a Dallas detective named Joe Cooper (Matthew McConaughey), the Killer Joe of the title, who does a sideline in contract hits. Once McConaughey enters the action the whole movie belongs to Killer Joe, one of the most unsettling bad guys in recent cinema. Dressed in black, wearing a Stetson, shod in ostrich-leather cowboy boots — it is Texas, after all — he moves slowly and carefully, speaking with a soft, precise deliberation. He exudes an intimidating air of absolutely calm and confident menace that contrasts wonderfully with the dim confusion of his would-be employers. When the Smiths explain that they cannot come up with the advance he requires, he asks for Ansel’s nubile, slow-witted daughter Dotty as a “retainer.” Despite some minimal qualms, Ansel agrees to pimp his daughter in to pay for the killing of her mother. The seduction scene that follows this decision reveals the strangely perverse nature of Killer Joe, a mixture of sick carnality with a kind of weirdly romantic eroticism. Unsurprisingly, the ostensibly simple, straightforward assignment goes horribly wrong in complicated ways for a variety of reasons, most of them deriving from some greedy, stupid people outsmarting themselves. The working out of the scheme also involves a good deal of pure brutality, with a couple of


A repurpose-driven life [ REVIEW ] BY DAYNA PAPALEO

Greentopia | FILM Tuesday, September 11-Sunday, September 16 Greentopiafestival.com

terrible beatings and a particularly bizarre and bloody climactic sequence that looks a lot like some low-rent version of a Shakespeare play. The stylized conflicts of the average blockbuster, with people throwing each other all over the scenery, thanks to the magic of special effects, in no way resemble the very real, very bloody business of one character viciously beating another into insensibility. Aside from McConaughey’s performance, the rest of the cast generally behaves with conviction, often displaying an exaggeration that intensifies his understatement. With his large, clumsy physique and his slow, heavy voice, Thomas Haden Church portrays stupidity perhaps better than any current Hollywood actor, though why a sexpot like Gina Gershon’s Sharla would marry him remains a mystery. Appearing in more scenes than any of the other actors and actually exhibiting an ounce or two of nobility, Emile Hirsch’s increasingly hysterical Chris soon, however, grows tiresome and repetitive. Except for the numerous scenes set inside Ansel’s trailer, “Killer Joe” seldom displays the stagey, enclosed look of so many filmed plays. It employs a number of other settings, all of them in thematic tune with the trailer park and its grubby, sordid, sometimes criminal context — closed-up shops, strip joints, biker bars, abandoned factories. This is not the mythic movie Texas of the open range and the limitless horizon, but, like it or not, the Texas of today.

Greentopia’s second year finds the sustainability celebration expanding to include a full-blown film festival. Under the care of Linda Moroney, festival director by day and documentarian by night, Greentopia | FILM features four nights of primarily nonfiction films, all focusing on various aspects of the increasingly crucial need for us earthlings to reduce, reuse, recycle, and rethink. Kicking off Tuesday, September 11, with the “Short Courses” program at Good Luck (50 Anderson Ave.), Greentopia | FILM will go on to present more than a dozen short films and feature-length documentaries at various locations, including Forest Cinema, the Classical Revival building at 35 State Street that’s been repurposed for use as a screening venue. Read on for a look at a handful of films, then visit greentopiafestival.com for more information. You may want to memorize the stunning images in “The Last Reef,” because if we don’t act quickly, that irreplaceable undersea splendor could become a thing

A scene from the documentary “Detropia.” PHOTO COURTESY Loki Films

of the past during our lifetimes. Shot in Palau, Vancouver Island, Mexico, The Bahamas, and French Polynesia, the vivid 3D spectacular takes us on a tour of the planet’s coral reefs, likening the ecosystems to bustling little cities where different species all find a way to live in harmony with the reef, a living thing in itself. But our storied carelessness with the environment is causing the reefs to vanish five times faster than the rain forests. The good news? They’re resilient. Man’s job? Get it together already. (Wednesday, September 12, 6 p.m., Tinseltown) Detroit’s reputation as a punchline to jokes about awful places can’t mask the serious facts: In the last 80 years Detroit has gone from the world’s fastest-growing city to the fastest-shrinking city in America, with the one-time Motor City losing 30 percent of its manufacturing jobs in the past decade. The unfocused but beautifully shot elegy “Detropia” views the decline of Detroit through the eyes of residents fiercely proud of their home but unable to stop the slide. Even Detroit’s leadership seems shellshocked as they cut necessary services like bus lines, potentially preventing the city’s employed from getting to work. Young people are snapping up discounted space, but the influx may be too late to save this once-great city. (Wednesday, September 12, 6 p.m.; and Thursday, September 13, 8 p.m., Little Theatre) The scene that unfolds in the absorbing fly-on-the-wall documentary “The Waiting Room” is one that plays out all over the country, as people cool their heels for hours waiting for medical attention. This particular snapshot is in Oakland, where we see a young girl bravely cope with the pain of a throat infection and we watch as a teenage gunshot victim succumbs to his wounds. Yes, it’s an emergency department, but these are not always emergencies; “The Waiting Room” is teeming with the

uninsured, a largely minority population of those without preventive health care. We also meet the tireless caregivers, their dedication embodied by Cynthia Thompson, a no-nonsense spitfire in pink paisley glasses and durable lipstick. She’s a star, and, more importantly, a hero. (Wednesday, September 12, 6:15 p.m., Nazareth; and Friday, September 14, 7 p.m., Little Theatre) To hear Tony Geraci recount a school-age kid’s first encounter with a real peach is less heartbreaking than it is mindblowing. Geraci is the inspiring “Cafeteria Man,” the former food superintendent of Baltimore City Schools, where he launched a crusade to revamp the lunch program from pizza and meatloaf to include farmfresh ingredients, even incorporating an education aspect to show his young clients that real food doesn’t come from a factory. And despite what should be a slam-dunk of a mission, Geraci comes up against the usual bureaucratic red tape and naysayers. The children and their parents couldn’t be happier; the adults, Geraci admits, are “the hardest part of my job.” (Wednesday, September 12, 6:45 p.m.) The recipient of Greentopia | FILM’s first Fork in the Road Award is “Bidder 70,” a moving testament to one person’s commitment to change. It tells the story of Tim DeChristopher, whose attendance at a 2008 Bureau of Land Management auction ended in a courageous act of civil disobedience in an effort to save a chunk of Utah wilderness from oil exploration. We get to know DeChristopher during a prolonged legal process that saw the auction effectively nullified by the Department of the Interior, and we watch other activists doing their peacefully disruptive part to preserve the environment, in the words of Dr. King, “openly, lovingly, and with a willingness to accept the penalty.” (Friday, September 14, 6:45 p.m., Forest Cinema)

BACK TO SCHOOL

Thursday, Sept. 6, 8 p.m.; Sunday, Sept. 9, 5 p.m. If Rodney Dangerfield’s scene-stealing turn in Caddyshack proved the stand-up veteran deserved Hollywood’s respect, this huge-grossing, one-liner-filled comedy confirmed he was a bona-fide star. Here, a nouveau-riche Dangerfield accompanies his son to a stuffy university to gain the education — and respect — he never had. Highlights include cameos by Sam Kinison, Robert Downey Jr., and the late literary legend Kurt Vonnegut. (Alan Metter, US 1986, 96 min.)

TRASH DANCE Movies for movie lovers, 6 nights a week. Class Clowns

Friday, Sept. 7, 8 p.m. Trash collecting. Unglamorous? Think again. Follow choreographer Allison Orr as she persuades and prepares two dozen trash collectors to participate in her dazzling garbage truck “dance” routine. The inspiring final performance — on an airport runway for thousands of spectators — is not to be missed. (Andrew Garrison, US 2012, 65 min., Digital Projection)

Labor

Film Info: 271-4090 l 900 East Avenue l Eastman House Café—stop in for a light dinner or dessert before the film. l Wi-Fi Hotspot l Sponsored by rochestercitynewspaper.com City 31


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A scene from “The Odd Life of Timothy Green.” PHOTO COURTESY Disney Enterprises Inc

Culver Ridge 16 544-1140 2255 Ridge Rd E. Irondequoit  *NO FILM TIMES BY PRESS TIME*

Dryden Theatre

When did you first learn the value of a good mechanic?

271-3361 9 East Ave *NOTE: Film times for Wed 9/5-Wed 9/12* FROM HERE TO ETERNITY: Wed 9/5 8, Sun 9/9 2; BACK TO SCHOOL: Thur 9/6 8, Sun 9/9 5; TRASH DANCE: Fri 9/7 8; THIS IS NOT A FILM: Sat 9/8 8; WHY CHANGE YOUR WIFE?: Tue 9/11 8; THE MAN WITH THE GOLDEN ARM: Wed 9/12 8.

Eastview 13 425-0420 Eastview Mall, Victor *NO FILM TIMES BY PRESS TIME*

Geneseo Theatres

Our Certified ASE technicians do precision car repair...Which means we get it right the first time. Because quality is our top priority, customer trust and satisfaction are very important to us.

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243-2691 Geneseo Square Mall THE AVENGERS: 7:15; BRAVE: Sat-Sun 1, 3, 5; THE CAMPAIGN: 9; THE EXPENDABLES 2: 7:15, 9:20; HOPE SPRINGS: 7, 9; also Fri-Sun 5; also Sat-Sun 1,

Film Previews Full film reviews available at rochestercitynewspaper.com. [ OPENING ] BACK TO SCHOOL (1986): This lowbrow comedy classic stars Rodney Dangerfield as a nouveau riche businessman who enrolls in college to up his wimpy son’s social cred. With Robert Downey Jr., Sam Kinison, and Kurt Vonnegut as himself. Dryden (Thu, Sep 6, 8 p.m., and Sun, Sep 9, 5 p.m.)

3; THE ODD LIFE: 7; also SatSun 1, 3, 5; PARANORMAN: Sat-Sun 1, 3, 5; THE POSSESSION: 7:10, 9:10; also Sat-Sun 1:10, 3:10, 5:10; THE WORDS: 7, 9; also Sat-Sun 1, 3, 5.

Greece Ridge 12 225-5810 176 Greece Ridge Center Dr. *NO FILM TIMES BY PRESS TIME*

Henrietta 18

Movies 10 292-5840 2613 W. Henrietta Rd. *NO FILM TIMES BY PRESS TIME*

Pittsford Cinema 383-1310 3349 Monroe Ave. *NO FILM TIMES BY PRESS TIME*

Tinseltown USA / IMAX

424-3090 525 Marketplace Dr. *NO FILM TIMES BY PRESS TIME*

247-2180 2291 Buffalo Rd.  *NO FILM TIMES BY PRESS TIME*

The Little

Vintage Drive In

258-04 240 East Ave.  CELESTE & JESSE FOREVER: 7 (no showing on Wed 9/12), 9:20; also Sat-Sun 1:30, 4:10; FAREWELL MY QUEEN: Fri-Mon 6:30; also Sat-Sun 1; HOPE SPRINGS: Fri-Tue 9:30; Sat-Sun 3:30; KILLER JOE: 7:20, 9:40; also SatSun 1:40, 4; THE QUEEN OF VERSAILLES: 6:50, 9; also Sat-Sun 1:20, 3:50; ROBOT AND FRANK: 6:40, 8:45; also Sat-Sun 1:10, 3:40.

226-9290 1520 W Henrietta Rd. All shows Fri-Mon. *NO FILM TIMES BY PRESS TIME*

THE COLD LIGHT OF DAY (PG13): Henry Cavill, Sigourney Weaver, and Bruce Willis star in the latest from “JCVD” director Mabrouk El Mechri, a Spain-set spy thriller about a regular guy who gets caught up in a conspiracy involving his father’s secret job. FROM HERE TO ETERNITY (1953): Eight Academy Awards went to this starstudded adaptation of James Jones’ epic novel about a group of troubled soldiers stationed in Hawaii in the

months leading up to the attack on Pearl Harbor. With Montgomery Clift, Deborah Kerr, Burt Lancaster, and Frank Sinatra. Dryden (Wed, Sep 5, 8 p.m., and Sun, Sep 9, 2 p.m.)) LUCKY (NR): Rochester’s own Christopher Wilmot produced this moving drama about a 10-year-old South African orphan who encounters big-city apathy along with a feisty Indian woman who reluctantly comes to his aid. ROBOT AND FRANK (PG-13): Frank Langella stars in this

Webster 12 888-262-4386 2190 Empire Blvd. *NO FILM TIMES BY PRESS TIME*


high-concept comedy as a former jewel thief given a robot by his kids (James Marsden and Liv Tyler), who intended that it be used to help their lonely father with housekeeping and not latenight burglaries. Little THIS IS NOT A FILM (2011): Iranian filmmaker Jafar Panahi co-directed this documentary that looks at a day in his life under house arrest, awaiting the result of his appeal of a six-year prison sentence and 20-year ban on making movies. Dryden (Sat, Sep 8, 8 p.m.) TRASH DANCE (2012): Filmmaker Andrew Garrison follows choreographer Allison Orr as she joins city sanitation workers on their daily routes to listen, learn, and ultimately convince them to collaborate in a unique dance performance, with garbage trucks. Dryden (Fri, Sep 7, 8 p.m., and Sun, Sep 2, 2 p.m.) THE WORDS (PG-13): Bradley Cooper stars in this romantic drama as a writer who is hiding the secret that his successful novel was actually penned by someone else. With Dennis Quaid, Zoe Saldana, and Jeremy Irons. Brockport, Canandaigua, Geneseo WHY CHANGE YOUR WIFE? (1920): This silent comedy of manners from Cecil B. DeMille stars Gloria Swanson as a frumpy woman whose self-betterment attracts the attention of her exhusband. Dryden (Tue, Sep 4, 8 p.m.) [ CONTINUING ] 2016: OBAMA’S AMERICA (PG): Just in time for the election is this one-sided documentary by conservative author Dinesh D’Souza that wonders exactly how awful things will be in four years if President Obama is still living in the White House.  THE APPARITION (PG-13): Ashley Greene (“Twilight”) and Sebastian Stan (“Captain America”) star in this thriller about a young couple who learn that they are being haunted by an entity accidentally conjured through a university parapsychology experiment. THE AVENGERS (PG-13): Writerdirector Joss Whedon marshals Iron Man, Thor, Captain America, and the rest of Nick Fury’s Avenger Initiative to save the planet from Loki and his minions. With Robert Downey, Jr., Chris Hemsworth, Mark Ruffalo, and everyone else. Brockport, Canandaigua, Geneseo BEASTS OF THE SOUTHERN WILD (PG-13): The winner of the Grand Jury and Cinematography Prizes at Sundance 2012 is Benh Zeitlin’s bayou fable centered around 6-year-old Hushpuppy (newcomer Quvenzhané Wallis), on a mission to find her mom after environmental changes cause her dad to fall ill... and unleash a gaggle of prehistoric creatures. Cinema THE BOURNE LEGACY (PG-13): “Michael Clayton” director Tony Gilroy (he’s written all

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the 21st century “Bourne” installments) directs Jeremy Renner as he steps into the leading role of this successful franchise to play CIA operative Aaron Cross, helping a new cast of characters clean up Jason Bourne’s mess. With Edward Norton, Rachel Weisz, and Albert Finney. Canandaigua BRAVE (PG): Finally, a Pixar heroine: Kelly Macdonald (HBO’s “Boardwalk Empire”) voices Merida, a willful Scottish princess who must rely on her archery skills to undo a curse brought about by her reckless defiance. With Billy Connolly, Emma Thompson, and, of course, John Ratzenberger. Brockport, Canandaigua, Geneseo THE CAMPAIGN (R): Will Ferrell headlines the latest from “Austin Powers” director Jay Roach as a four-term North Carolina congressman whose fall from grace leaves him vulnerable to opposition by a naive challenger (Zach Galifianakis). Featuring Brian Cox, John Lithgow, and Dan Aykroyd. Brockport, Canandaigua, Geneseo CELESTE AND JESSE FOREVER (R): Rashida Jones co-wrote the script for this romantic comedy in which she plays a half of a divorcing couple

who are having a difficult time letting go. With Andy Samberg, Elijah Wood, and Emma Roberts. Little THE DARK KNIGHT RISES (PG13): The what? Never heard of it. Canandaigua DIARY OF A WIMPY KID: DOG DAYS (PG): The third film in the franchise combines the third and fourth books in the series for a look at the hilarity and lesson-learning that ensues when Greg’s plans for the summer go awry. Canandaigua THE EXPENDABLES 2 (R): Sylvester Stallone, Jason Statham, Jet Li, Dolph Lundgren, Randy Couture, Terry Crews, Liam Hemsworth, Bruce Willis, Arnold Schwarzenegger, Chuck Norris, and JeanClaude Van Damme. ‘Nuff said. Canandaigua, Geneseo FAREWELL, MY QUEEN (R): Diane Kruger plays Marie Antoinette in Benoît Jacquot’s historical fiction about the relationship between the doomed queen and her reader (Léa Seydoux) during the tumult of July 1789. Little HIT AND RUN (PG-13): Dax Shepard wrote, co-directed, and stars in this comedy about a former getaway driver, now in witness protection, whose past is after him. With Kristen Bell,

Tom Arnold, and Bradley Cooper. HOPE SPRINGS (PG-13): Oscar winners Meryl Streep and Tommy Lee Jones star in this romantic comedydrama as a long-married couple who attend an intense counseling retreat to work on their relationship. With Steve Carell, Jean Smart, and Elisabeth Shue. Canandaigua, Little ICE AGE: CONTINENTAL DRIFT (PG): The latest installment of this popular animated franchise follows mammoth Manny, saber-toothed Diego, and sloth Sid on another adventure that probably never happened. Featuring the voices of Ray Romano, John Leguizamo, and Denis Leary. KILLER JOE (NC-17): William Friedkin’s first film in six years is a violent black comedy about a young man (Emile Hirsch, “Into the Wild”) who hires a hitman (Matthew McConaughey) to kill his mother for the insurance money. With Thomas Haden Church, Juno Temple, and Gina Gershon. Little LAWLESS (R): The third collaboration between “The Proposition” director John Hillcoat and sometimescreenwriter Nick Cave features Shia LaBeouf, Tom

Hardy, Gary Oldman, and Guy Pearce in the fact-based tale of three bootlegging brothers in Prohibition-era Virginia who run afoul of greedy lawmen. Canandaigua MADAGASCAR 3: EUROPE’S MOST WANTED (PG): The gang finds itself in Monte Carlo on its way back to NYC, where the animals join up with a traveling circus making the rounds of Europe’s capital cities. Featuring the voices of Ben Stiller, Jada Pinkett Smith, and Chris Rock. MOONRISE KINGDOM (PG13): Wes Anderson’s first live-action film since 2007’s “The Darjeeling Limited” is also his first period piece, romantic 60’s-era whimsy in which two young teens run off together, prompting a town-wide search party. With Bill Murray, Frances McDormand, Bruce Willis, and Edward Norton. Cinema THE ODD LIFE OF TIMOTHY GREEN (PG): This comedydrama from writer-director Peter Hedges (“Dan in Real Life”) stars Jennifer Garner and Joel Edgerton (“Warrior”) as a childless couple who bury their hopes in a box and are understandably surprised when a 10-year-old knocks on the door claiming to be their son. Canandaigua, Geneseo

THE OOGIELOVES IN THE BIG BALLOON ADVENTURE (G): So it’s Schluffy’s birthday, and when J. Edgar loses the last five magical balloons in Lovelyloveville, our titlular heroes set out to save the party. Featuring the voices of Cloris Leachman, Chazz Palminteri, and Cary Elwes. PARANORMAN (PG): This stop-motion animation from the same artists responsible for “Coraline” tells the story of a young boy whose ability to communicate with the dead comes in handy as he tries to save his New England town from a witch’s curse. Featuring the voices of John Goodman, Anna Kendrick, Casey Affleck, and Elaine Stritch. Canandaigua, Geneseo THE POSSESSION (PG-13): This supernatural thriller stars Jeffrey Dean Morgan and Kyra Sedgwick as the parents to a young girl who buys an antique box at a garage sale, unaware that the collectible houses an ancient evil spirit. Canandaigua, Geneseo PREMIUM RUSH (PG-13): The latest from David Koepp (2008’s “Ghost Town”) is an action flick starring Joseph Gordon-Levitt as a Manhattan bike messenger in possession of an envelope that attracts the interest of a

dirty cop (Michael Shannon). Canandaigua TO ROME WITH LOVE (R): Writer-director Woody Allen continues his globetrotting ways, this time touching down in The Eternal City for another comedy about the intertwined romantic adventures of various Caucasians. With Judy Davis, Jesse Eisenberg, Ellen Page, and Allen himself. SPARKLE (PG-13): Whitney Houston’s final film role is as the matriarch in this 1960’sset drama about three sisters who form a girl group and become Motown sensations, only to have fame drive a wedge into the once-closeknit family. Starring Jordin Sparks, Derek Luke, and Cee-Lo Green. Canandaigua TOTAL RECALL (PG-13): Colin Farrell, Jessica Biel, and Kate Beckinsale star in Len Wiseman’s loose adaptation of a Philip K. Dick short story about a frustrated factory worker whose harmless virtual escapism leads to a revelation that makes him a hunted man.

Classifieds For information: Call us (585) 244-3329 Fax us (585) 244-1126 Mail Us City Classifieds 250 N. Goodman Street Rochester, NY 14607 Email Us classifieds@ rochester-citynews.com EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY

All real estate advertised in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act, which makes it unlawful, “to make, print, or publish, any notice, statement, or advertisement, with respect to the sale or rental of a dwelling that indicates any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin.” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under the age of 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertisement for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. Call the local Fair Housing Enforcement Project, FHEP at 325-2500 or 1-866-671-FAIR. Si usted sospecha una practica de vivienda injusta, por favor llame al servicio legal gratis. 585-325-2500 - TTY 585-325-2547.

34 City september 5-11, 2012

K-D Moving & Storage Inc.

Shared Housing

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PITTSFORD Male furnished bedroom in an 8 room house, with male, direct tv. Deposit.

$575 all. Dog on premises, smoker ok. 585-586-0920.

Houses for Rent HALF HOUSE Kitchen, living, dining, 3 bedrooms, hardwood, off street parking. Convenient Greece schools, mall, bus. Need health conscious occupant. Health business is other half of house. No smoking, pets due to Multiple Chemical Sensitivities. $1200/ month. 585-787-6954

Houses for Sale HOMES FOR SALE Pittsford/ Bushnells Basin 3 Homes on fabulous 3 acre park-like yard. Beautifully updated, 1800’s large main house plus 2 smaller homes which are leased for $24,000 per year (Great In-Law Home). Owner must sell due to age & health 585-3838888

Land for Sale ABANDONED FARM! 5 acres $69,000.  Nice old farmhouse, barns, awesome view!  Beautiful Upstate NY setting!  Call (888) 701-7509. COURT ORDERED FARM SALE SEPTEMBER 15TH!! 4 acres $16,900.  10 acres - $24,900.  20 acres - $34,900.  23 parcels available for pennies on the dollar! Gorgeous upstate NY setting! $30K in discounts this weekend ONLY! Views, streams, hunting! Financing available! Call for FREE info packet! (888) 905-8847


Place your real estate ad by calling 244-3329 ext. 23 or rochestercitynewspaper.com Ad Deadlines: Friday 4pm for Display Ads Monday at noon for Line ads Commercial/ Office Space

apartments. Owner must sell due to illness. Owner financing, no banks needed. 383-8888

UofR/ AIRPORT AREA Brick, Mixed use building. 6,000 sq.ft. of stores/office plus 3

HomeWork A cooperative effort of City Newspaper and RochesterCityLiving, a program of the Landmark Society.

Vacation Property OCEAN CITY MARYLAND Best selection of affordable rentals.

continues on page 36

Find your way home with SOLD

RochesterSells.com

This Ranch was sold in 5 days with multiple offers! Call Ryan @ 585-201-0724 to find out how to sell your home today!

A Rochester Ranch

2180 Highland Avenue Ryan Smith 585-201-0724

Ryan Smith

NYS Licensed Real Estate Salesperson 201-0724

Search. Buy. Sell.

FOR SALE: 4 Tyler Terrace, Ogden. Quiet country house for sale, 4 bedrooms and 2.5 baths on .9 acres, located just 15 minutes from downtown Rochester. Listed at $174,900, call Dave Walsh at ReMax Realty Group at 269-4068 to set up an appointment to see it.

Schmackpfeffer Realty 585-259-5474 Phone wschmack@gmail.com

311-313 Kenwood Ave super clean 2 family, 19th ward. 20-22 Rosalind nice 2 family 19th ward. 23-25 Melrose nice 2 family 19th ward 420-422 Magnolia, 4-6 Fuller, 63-65 Elgin 2 families 19th ward. 455 Post 7 family 19th ward.

Set back from Highland Avenue on the edge of the City, this lovely Ranch home is a rare mid-century find in a city that’s filled mostly with American Foursquares, Queen Annes, and a few Craftsman Bungalows. 2180 Highland Avenue offers a perfect package for anyone looking for single floor living, a suburban size yard and a convenient location. Complemented by a large front lawn, mature trees, and attractive landscaping, the property has great curb appeal. Once inside, one immediately appreciates the livability and comfort of the home, as well as the easy flow of space created by the semi-open floor plan. The wide central entry features a coat closet, new tile floor and opens to the private living spaces (the bedrooms and bath) on one side and the public living spaces (kitchen, dining room, living room) on the other. From the tiled entry, original hardwood floors spread to the rest of the home. The focal point of the spacious living room is a floor-to-ceiling stone-faced fireplace—a classic mid-century touch. Built-in bookcases flank the fireplace. A large picture window—a prerequisite in any Ranch home—lets in loads of natural light, making the space feel even more open. Situated at the front of the house, the living room flows directly into an open pantry area (with countertop and leaded glass cabinets) and the dining room. This room too blurs the division between indoors and out with a pair of French doors

that open to a large, fully fenced backyard, complete with a lovely cedar deck and a fabulous cedar hot tub. Off the dining room is the spacious eatin kitchen, which provides access to the basement (plenty of storage space), a pantry, a convenient powder room, and a side entrance. The side entrance opens to a breezeway that connects the house to the two-car garage. At the other end of the house is a linen closet, an updated full bath and three bedrooms, each with a decent-sized closet and two windows. In addition to the house’s charm and livability, the property’s location can’t be beat. Highland Ave. provides easy access to both I-490 and I-590, as well as downtown or Brighton’s Twelve Corners. Just minutes away by car, nearby city amenities include Cobbs Hill Park, the North Winton Village, East Avenue, and the Upper Monroe neighborhood. Listed at $149,900 with approximately 1200 square feet, 2180 Highland Avenue is a comfortable and inviting home, perfect for a young family or retirees looking to downsize. Visit rochestercityliving.com/property/R190352 to see more photos or contact Nothnagle agent Mark Siwiec at 585.461.6375. by Caitlin Meives Caitlin is the Preservation Planner with The Landmark Society.

291 Sherman 2 family 10th ward 30 Ave A 2 family 14621.

rochestercitynewspaper.com City 35


Home and Garden Professionals & MASONRY

FALL IS HERE!!! Clean your chimney for the upcoming burning season!

-since 1983-

Where Art and Fine Gardening Meet

Home Services

• Chimney Cleaning • Chimney Repairs • Brick Steps Repaired • Foundaon Repairs • Concrete Repairs & New Walks Installed • Chimney Painng • Chimneys Rebuilt • Chimney Re-lining

Garden Maintenance • Pruning • Design Robert L. Wilcox • 474-6584 gardens9@rochester.rr.com

585-734-8444

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Call

820-6431

Improvements for your home from foundations to roofs and everything in between, including: • Remodeling and Additions • Kitchens and Baths • Finished Basements • All types of flooring including radiant heat • Windows and Siding

414-3692

BOTTOM LINE PRICING - Owner On Every Job!

AT TENTION

HOME SERVICE PROVIDERS

Did you know that City Newspaper Readers spent OVER $90 MILLION DOLLARS on home improvements in the LAST 12 MONTHS? Call Christine today to advertise

585-244-3329 ext. 23

36 City september 5-11, 2012

> page 35 Full/ partial weeks. Call for FREE brochure. Open daily. Holiday Real Estate. 1-800-638-2102. Online reservations: www.holidayoc.com

100% ABSOLUTE DUST-FREE Ceilings & walls. $25.00 Seniors Discount. Repaired, Installed. Textured, Swirled, Sunburst. Water damage specialist. Insurance work. Free es�mates. 45 years experience.

American Plaster & Drywall

585-225-6590

MASTER CHIMNEY & MASONRY See our ad under Home and Garden Professionals. Chimney Cleaning, Masonry Repairs, Foundation Repairs, Roof Leaks, Brick Steps Repaired. 585-734-8444

Ceilings & Drywall 100% ABSOLUTE DUST-FREE: Ceilings & walls. $25.00 Seniors; discount. Repaired, installed.

Textured, swirled, sunburst. Water damage specialist. Insurance work. Free estimates. 45 years experience. 225-6590

Adoption ♥ADOPT:♥ A Beautiful Home, Laughter, Love, Art, Music, Many Opportunities, Stay-home Mom waits for 1st baby. Expenses paid Elaine ♥1-800-561-9323♥ ADOPT: A dazzling world of fun, endless opportunities, and unconditional love await your baby of baby of any race/ ethnicity. Expenses paid. Jared/ Jezi 888-980-1392 www. anadoptionwish.com ADOPT: A financially secure, energetic, happily married couple will cherish your child forever. Little one, we love you already!


Rent your apartment special third week is

Place your ad by calling 244-3329 ext. 23 or rochestercitynewspaper.com Ad Deadlines: Friday 4pm for Display Ads Monday at noon for Line ads

FREE Expenses Paid: Lisa/Brian 1-888939-8399 www.Lbadopt.info

For Sale

well maintained; is in excellent condition. 315-626-2998

ADOPT: A happily married couple seeks to adopt. We’ll provide your baby with love, laughter, education, security. Wonderful extended family nearby. EXPENSES PAID. www. annieandnickadopt.info 888964-4269

27’ HUNTER SAILBOAT Year: 1980, Current Price: US$ 9,900. Located in Fair Haven, NY. Hull Material: Fiberglass, Engine/ Fuel Type: Single diesel. Can be viewed at Yacht World YW# 75936-2250771. The owner has just added a new roller furler (2012). Another nice freshwater, solid pocket cruiser. This is a great boat for the week long or weekend cruiser. She is also a nice day sailor. She has been

CRIB: / Play Pen $27 585-4905870

PREGNANT? CONSIDERING ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions 866-413-6293 (Void in Illinois) (AAN CAN)

DOG & CAT HOUSES Kennels, porch steps, do it yourself kits. Quick assembly 585-752-1000 $49 Jim FLAGS 3x5 for sale from various States and. countries.Used $8.00 each. Please call 585 259-9590 GARBAGE CANS with lids, heavy duty plastic with handles 3

Automotive ALWAYS BETTER Higher cash for your Junk Cars, Trucks and Vans. From $200-$800 or more for newer. Running or not. With free towing. Also free removal of any unwanted model in any condition. Call 585-305-5865

count $20 all 585-880-2803 GARDEN, HORSE PINWHEELS (2) stick in ground. also Daisy Pinwheel 585-880-2903 585-544-4155 GRACO CAR SEAT, stroller system x-cond. $39.99 585-225-5526 METAL FOLDING CHAIRS (2) $12. for pair 585-490-5870

NEW MATTRESS SETS 5070% off Retail, SERTA MANUFACTURED FACTORYDIRECT. Queen and other sizes available. Simply the best deal in town. Call 585-752-1434 PALM TREE 5’ tall $25 585-4905870

WALL UNIT 11 shelves 52”h x 92”L x 15”w $35 585-4905870 WOOD GARDEN FIGURE 2 girls, 1 dog. Stands in garden $10 all 2 1/2 ft tall 585-880-2903

continues on page 39

CITY Newspaper presents

Workshops TO ADVERTISE IN THE WORKSHOPS SECTION CALL CHRISTINE AT 244.3329 x23 OR EMAIL CHRISTINE@ROCHESTER-CITYNEWS.COM

CASH FOR CARS Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888-420-3808 www. cash4car.com (AAN CAN)

SUMMER SPECIAL For new students!

Education

$10 per person for a drop in class on Thursday Night’s Beginner Class at 6:50pm. Singles or Couples welcome!

P LY M O U T H S P I R I T UA L I S T C H U R C H

ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from home. *Medical, *Business, *Criminal Justice, *Hospitality, Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEC certified. Call 888-201-8657www. CenturaOnline.com

Together We Are One

2 9 V I C K PA R K A RO C H E S T E R , N Y

GROUP AND PRIVATE LESSONS FOR ALL SKILL LEVELS

Sunday Services 10:30 AM All Message Service & Free Spiritual Healing Third Weds ~ 7 PM ~ Séances ~ Classes ~ Gallery Reading ~

The Emporium

For more information and schedules www.plymouthspiritualistchurch.org Robin Higgins, Pastor ~ Phone: 585.271.1470

DINING CHAIRS (6) Empire style. Needlepoint seats $15 each 585473-4066

3450 WINTON PLACE ROCHESTER, NY 14623 585-292-1240

Gift Certificates Available

WWW.FADSROCHESTER.COM

UP STATE AEROSPORTS Your Source for Adventure!

Tande� Han� Glidin�

NOW WELCOMING

USHPA Certified Instructors

RESIDENTS OF ALL AGES! Modern & Upscale Gym & Yoga Studio Lush Courtyard & Fireside Lounge Controlled Building Access Pets Welcome* Senior Discount Available

737-9894 $920/mo

*restrictions apply

YOUR Lifestyle!

h&hw included

Mention this for 1 MONTH FREE

Situated in the heart of the East Side, only minutes from your office, Eastview Mall, I-490 & the Thruway.

limited time offer!

Open 7 Days a Week!

WWW.THEVILLAGEEAST.COM

ONE THE VILLAGE | (GPS: Use 105 Turk Hill Rd.) VICTOR, NEW YORK 14564

SOCIAL DANCING FOR EVERYONE! with ESTHER BRILL

Louisiana Cajun & Zydeco: Oct. 2-23 Intro to Social Swing Dance: Oct. 30-Nov. 20 Wedding Dance Private Lessons Fun, relaxed classes Lively & expert dance instruction With or without a partner. No experience necessary!

Contact Esther with your questions: ebrill@frontiernet.net 585 721-8684 www.EstherBrillPartnerDance.com

FREE TRIAL

OPEN HOUSE, Saturday, Sept. 8th 5:30pm-8:30pm

CLASS SCHEDULE 5:30: Waltz 6:00: Cha Cha 6:30: Fox Trot

7:00: Salsa 7:30: Tango 8:00: Swing

Discover a New Path to Fun, Health & Happiness Special offers through August 11th.

1060 University Ave | 271-6840 | Livehappyrochester.com

thevillage@coniferllc.com | 585-223-2673

rochestercitynewspaper.com City 37


CITY Newspaper presents

Mind Body Spirit

The Universe is Calling September 13 Unity World Day of Prayer

Paul Rooney, NYS licensed,

Quiet space and healing opportunities Open to the public noon-7 p.m., free

board certified acupuncturist Practicing in Rochester since 1997

585-720-0250

Details on our website Events page.

RochesterAcupuncture.com find us on

Unity

Most insurance policies cover 10 treatments per year at 50% per treatment.

A TEN WEEK COURSE IN PRACTICAL PHILOSOPHY Wednesdays, beginning September 12, 2012 From 7-9:30pm at the AAUW Mansion 494 East Ave. Rochester – Free Parking Tuition $100, Enrollments to P.O. Box 525, Pittsford, NY 14534, or enroll in person, first night of class between 6:30pm-6:50pm

SCHOOL OF APPLIED PHILOSOPHY YOU ARE WISER THAN YOU KNOW 585-288-6430 www.practical-philosophy.org

INTERACTIVE, EXPERIENTAL and INFORMAL Not for profit. Non Sectarian. Provisional Charter: NYS ED. Dept.

Christ Church Unity Church of the Daily Word.

We welcome you!

Fearful Flyers Course • Skills to reduce anxiety, fears, phobias. • Learn about air traffic safety controls, airplane technology and weather effects. • Complete tour of airport facilities.

Starting on Sept. 19th

For information, please call Judy Willis at (585) 461-0810 “2012 has been our best year yet. We ended March on a high note with a record breaking week of 175 treatments!! Our ad in CITY Newspaper continues to draw in new patients and has played a vital role in the growth of our business over the last 3 years. We are looking forward to another successful year!”

- Janeane ROCHESTER COMMUNITY ACUPUNCTURE

10 hours of instruction by Stress Management Consultant Judith J. Willis. Hosted by Greater Rochester Int. Airport.

Don’t put this off any longer, make flying “just something you do.”

Affiliated with United Synagogue of Conservative Judaism

High Holydays 5773 September 16-18, 25-26

Rabbi Shamai Kanter

Cantor Ilana Boin

For tickets, call Estelle 334-5647 � TICKETS REQUIRED � No charge � Suggested Donation � $95/ages 30-64 � $60 senior citizen/young adult. No donation expected for students or children. All guests offered honors � Ticket donation applied towards membership � Fully egalitarian service and honors

3249 E. Henrietta Rd. Henrietta, NY

TO ADVERTISE CALL CHRISTINE AT 244.3329 x23 OR EMAIL CHRISTINE@ROCHESTER-CITYNEWS.COM

38 City september 5-11, 2012

Please see our website for ongoing groups and events.

55 Prince St., Rochester, NY 14607 • www.unityrochester.org • 585-473-0910

SUSTAINABLE HAPPINESS Holidays come and go. Clothes wear out. Bank accounts go up and down. But, philosophy lasts a lifetime. This course, Practical Philosophy, reveals how wisdom leads to happiness and freedom. It shows how to live more consciously with greater purpose, and teaches how to harness the power of attention and realize one’s potential. Join us as we help you discover these time-tested principles.

Sunday Celebration 11 a.m. Music, Meditation and Message Children’s Program

info@bethamrochester.org www.bethamrochester.org


Rent your apartment special third week is

FREE Asking $950. Call 585-8891202

> page 37

Jam Section

Lost and Found

2 TROMBONE PLAYERS NEEDED to play with one of Rochester’s Finest Big Bands. Must read. (Great Charts). Able to rehearse every other Wednesday 585-442-7480

FOUND 2 small poodle mix dogs, 1 brown, 1 white, at 12 Corners on 7/14. Very friendly. (917) 502-6780

BASS PLAYER I don’t want to hang around in bars. I just want to play some twangy old rock’n’roll, ska, or New Wave. Who’s up for it? Craig at mooskamovers@aol.com

Miscellaneous

CALLING ALL MUSICIANS OF ALL GENRES the Rochester Music Coalition wants you! Please register on our website. For further info: www.rochestermusiccoalition. org info@rochestermusiccoalition. org 585-235-8412 DRUMMER WITH JAZZ skills applied to R&B and funk, originals & covers. Evenings open, transportation. Working Western New York Contact Bobby 585328-4121 sitting heavyonsd@ yahoo.com GUITAR & KEYBOARDS, performing R&B, funk, covers & originals, vocals a plus. Be ready to learn & work. Preparing for studio Gigs. Contact Bobby 585328-4121 MEET OTHER MUSICIANS any instrument, male singer- jam together- coffee house, private gigs, I play keys Call Martin 585266-6337 MEN ENJOY SINGINING Fun with the Chorus of the Genesee, Sing, learn, perform, share laughs and libation! Guest night Tuesday at 7 PM. Stop in at 58 E Main St, Webster. Call 585-698-7784 UPRIGHT BASS, German, new strings and bow. Beautiful tone.

24/7 EMERGENCY RESPONSE $1/day Living alone? You could fall! Deaths from falls can be avoided. Helps a button push away. Lifewatch 1-800-207-4078 DONATE A CAR DONATE A CAR- HELP HOMELESS PETS! Free Next-Day Towing. Tax Deductible. Non- Runners OK. Receive $1,000 Grocery Coupons. Call National Animal Welfare Foundation 1-888-333-3848 FREE DENTAL CLEANING MCC Sophomore Dental Hygiene student looking for volunteer patients interested in complimentary dental cleaning. Must be 2+ years since last professional cleaning. Call 585314-0398 and leave a message for Leslie S. HAS YOUR BUILING SHIFTED OR SETTLED? Contact Woodford Brothers Inc, for straightening, leveling, foundation and wood frame repairs at 1-800-OLDBARN www.woodfordbros. com. “Not applicable in Queens county”

Music Services PIANO LESSONS In your home or mine. Patient, experienced instructor teaching all ages, levels and musical styles. Call Scott: 585- 465-0219. Visit www.scottwrightmusic.com

Mind Body Spirit READY TO LOSE WIEGHT up to 30lbs/mo.,Just gain ENERGY,or have optimum SPORT NUTRITION,to improve your training/performance? Call Nancy 585-288-7046

Wanted to Buy BUYING / SELLING BUYING/ SELLING- gold, gold-filled, sterling silver, silver plate, diamonds, fine watches (Rolex, Cartier, Patek Philippe)coins, paintings, furs, estates. Call for appointment 917-696-2024 JAY CASH FOR CARS! We Buy ANY Car or Truck ,Running or NOT! Damaged, Wrecked, Salvaged OK! Get a top dollar INSTANT offer today! 1-800-267-1591 WANTED: Will Pay up to $20.00 for High School Yearbooks 1900-1988. Any School/Any State. www.yearbookusa.com or 214-514-1040

*REDUCE YOUR CABLE BILL!* Get a 4-Room All-Digital Satellite system installed for FREE and programming starting at $19.99/ mo. FREE HD/DVR upgrade for new callers, CALL NOW. 1-800925-7945

CHECK OUT

EMPLOYMENT / CAREER TRAINING

Employment AIRLINES ARE HIRING Train for hands on Aviation Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified- Job Placement Assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance (866)296-7093

COMBINED INSURANCE is looking for agent and sales management candidates. New Agent Training Subsidy Bonus Program, training, benefits, leads. Contact Marisa at 315-7443266, Marisa.Hammerquist@ Combined.com EOE DRIVERS - FULL OR PARTTIME $0.01 increase per mile after 6 months. Choose your hometime; Weekly, 7/ON- 7/ OFF, Requires 3 months recent experience. 800-414-9569 www.driveknight.com

go to and click on

“CLASSIFIEDS”

easywork-greatpay.com (AAN CAN)

continues on page 40

Seeks caring Companion Caregivers to assist the elderly in-home Part-time, varied hours. Driver License & vehicle required; Primary need Eastern Monroe and Northern Ontario Counties Visit www.happierathome.org Or call (585)234-0439

DRIVERS HIRING EXPERIENCED / INEXPERIENCED TANKER DRIVERS! Earn up to $.51/mile! New Fleet Volvo Tractors! 1 M Year OTR Exp. Req.-Tanker Training Available. Call Today: 877-882-6537 www. OakleyTransport.com

ATTENTION VETERANS!

HELP WANTED!! Extra income! Mailing Brochures from home! Free supplies! Genuine opportunity! No experience required. Start immediately! www.themailingprogram.com

THE NAVY IS LOOKING FOR VETERANS. Those individuals who have served honorably in any branch of the Armed Forces, (i.e., the Navy, Army, Marines, Air Force or Coast Guard) and who want to continue their military career.

$$$HELP WANTED$$$ Extra Income! Assembling CD cases

Hiring?

ONLINE CLASSIFIEDS

ROCHESTERCITYNEWSPAPER.COM

from Home! No Experience Necessary! Call our Live Operators Now! 1-800-4057619 EXT 2450 http://www.

CLASS A DRIVERS: SIGN ON BONUS Paid Holidays, Vacation, & More. Weekly Pay. Direct Deposit. REGIONAL with Home Time. 2 Years T/T EXP. 800524-5051 www.gomcilvaine. com

CITY NEWSPAPER’S

Fast and easy-to-use! • Find what you’re looking for with new categories! • Clickable links to business websites • and many more features!

Place your ad by calling 244-3329 ext. 23 or rochestercitynewspaper.com Ad Deadlines: Friday 4pm for Display Ads Monday at noon for Line ads

BENEFITS OF SERVICE INCLUDE: NO BOOT CAMP! A competitive salary Work only one weekend a month and two weeks per year College Stipend (MGIBSR for students) Advancement Exchange and Commissary privileges Life insurance TRICARE Reserve Select Retirement Opportunities for travel

QUALIFICATIONS FOR SERVICE INCLUDE: GET THE RESULTS YOU NEED AT ABOUT HALF THE PRICE OF OTHER PAPERS! Call Christine at

244-3329 ext. 23

Must pass a MEPS physical May have to retake the ASVAB test Must be able to complete 20 years of service before age 60 If you, or someone you know, is a Veteran and would like the opportunity to serve in the United States Navy,

Call 1-800-242-3736 or email Jobs_pittsburgh@navy.mil

today!

CITY

CITY

America’s Navy: A Global Force For Good rochestercitynewspaper.com City 39


Legal Ads [ LEGAL NOTICE THE STEAM POLICE, LLC ]

EMPLOYMENT / CAREER TRAINING adults age 21 and over to consider opening their homes to foster children. Call 334-9096 or visit www.MonroeFosterCare.org.

> page 39

Volunteers A SECOND THOUGHT Resale Shop in East Rochester is accepting applications for volunteer sale associates and online researchers. Shop benefits people with disabilities in Guatemala. Call (585) 340-2000. FOSTER PARENTS WANTED! Monroe County is looking for

HERITAGE CHRISTIAN STABLES, a therapeutic horsemanship program for children and adults with developmental disabilities, is looking for volunteers to serve as horse leaders and side walkers. Call Kim Kennedy at (585) 340-2016 or email kkennedy@ heritagechristianservices.org

GENERAL MANAGER

Durham School Services, a nationwide leader in pupil transportation, is seeking a General Manager to provide operational leadership to our Rochester, NY center to achieve excellence in the areas of safety, employee relations, customer service and financial performance. The position requires: • College degree or equivalent experience • Experience managing a large driver workforce • Excellent communication skills Please apply online at www.durhamschoolservices.com under the “Join Our Team” section. E.O.E.

LIFEGUARDS & SWIM INSTRUCTORS The Bay View Family YMCA is looking for experienced life guards and swim instructors to work a variety of shi�s. Day, night and weekend shi�s available.

Apply online at www.rochesterymca.org/bayview or call Anne Hossenlopp at 341-3218 for details Equal Opportunity Employer

THE BAY VIEW FAMILY YMCA 1209 Bay Rd., Webster, NY 14580 www.rochesterymca.org/bayview 585-671-8414 40 City september 5-11, 2012

ROCHESTER CARES is looking for enthusiastic volunteers who are interested in joining us to make a difference in the Rochester community Also looking for those interested in helping us in a leadership capacity. Check out our calendar online for more information: www. rochestercares.org/calendar.php VOLUNTEER GROUP works with Local Non-Profits, Charity Works for Rochester, meets 3rd Thursday each Month 7:30PM Al Sigl Center, 1000 Elmwood Ave. Door 5 Lower level conference room 585-234-0187 VOLUNTEERS NEEDED to depict evangelistic opportunities by means of performing skits in a Church environment. Professional acting not a requirement. This is done in a small Church setting. Contact Pastor Ron @ 585-957-6155 WOMEN: ROCHESTER HABITAT is looking for women 18 years+ to help build a house with a single mother. Visit rochabitat. org or call 546-1470

Business Opportunities A REWARDING CAREER that lets you earn money while helping others! Want to be your own boss, set your own hours? Independent Consultants needed for Restaurant.com. Unlimited Earning Potential. No previous sales experience req’d. Tools & full training provided. Learn more at http://sales. restaurant.com/nan. REACH 5 MILLION hip, forwardthinking consumers across the U.S. When you advertise in alternative newspapers, you become part of the local scene and gain access to an audience you won’t reach anywhere else. http://www.altweeklies.com/ads (AAN CAN) START NOW! Open Red Hot Dollar, Dollar Plus, Mailbox, Discount Party, Discount Clothing, Teen Store, Fitness Center from $51,900 Worldwide! WWW.DRSS16.COM 1-800-518-3064

Actors Wanted ACTORS/MOVIE EXTRAS Needed immediately for upcoming roles $150-$300 /day depending on job requirements. No experience, all looks needed. 1-800560-8672 for casting times /locations.

Notice of Organization: The Steam Police, LLC was filed with SSNY on August 17, 2012. Office: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. PO address which SSNY shall mail any process against the LLC served upon it: 1028 Castle Bridge Crossing, Webster, NY 14580. Purpose is to engage in any lawful activity. [ LEGAL NOTICE HIGHLAND PLANNING LLC ] Notice of Organization: HIGHLAND PLANNING LLC was filed with SSNY on 08/09/12. Office: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. PO address which SSNY shall mail any process against the LLC served upon her: 17 Mulberry Street Rochester, NY 14620. Purpose is to engage in any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] 5018 Ridge Road LLC (LLC) filed Arts. of Org. with NY Secy. of State (SS) on August 9, 2012. LLC’s office is in Monroe County. SS is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS shall mail a copy of any process to LLC’s principal business location at 4477 Ridge Road West, Rochester, NY 14626. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] ARCADIAN SOLUTIONS LLC (LLC) filed Arts. of Org. with NY Secy. of State (SS) on July 23, 2012. LLC’s office is in Monroe County. SS is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS shall mail a copy of any process to LLC’s principal business location at 537 French Rd., Rochester, NY 14618. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Articles of Organization with respect to 700 Basket Road, LLC a New York Limited Liability Company, were filed with the Secretary of State of New York on August 8, 2012. The County in New York State where its office is located is Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as

agent of 700 Basket Road, LLC upon whom process against it may be served, and the post office address to which the Secretary of State shall mail a copy of any process against 700 Basket Road, LLC served upon him or her is5 Harvest Walk, Webster, NY 14580. There are no exceptions adopted by the Company, or set forth in its Operating Agreement, to the limited liability of members pursuant to Section 609(a) of the Limited Liability Company Law of the State of New York. 700 Basket Road, LLC is formed for the purpose of managing, leasing, and operating apartment projects, office buildings, retail and wholesale commercial spaces and other real estate. [ NOTICE ] Articles of Organization with respect to Campbell CPA Consulting, PLLC, a New York Professional Limited Liability Company, were filed with the Secretary of State of New York on August 13th 2012. The County in New York State where its office is located is Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent of Campbell CPA Consulting, PLLC upon whom process against it may be served, and the post office address to which the Secretary of State shall mail a copy of any process against Campbell CPA Consulting, PLLC served upon him or her is 152 Selborne Chase; Fairport, NY 14450. There are no exceptions adopted by the Company, or set forth in its Operating Agreement, to the limited liability of members pursuant to Section 609(a) of the Limited Liability Company Law of the State of New York. Campbell CPA Consulting, PLLC is formed for the purpose of providing consulting services to hospitals, healthcare networks and/or physicians to further the delivery of quality healthcare and patient outcomes while maximizing return on investment. [ NOTICE ] Beaver Properties, LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 7/27/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent

upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 6 Halstead Rise, Fairport, NY 14450. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] EMPIRE COMICS, LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 6/11/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, Attn: Anthony Furfferi, 293 Mt. Ridge Circle, Rochester, NY 14616. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] EMPIRE CUSTOM FABRICATION LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 7/31/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 243 Reed Rd., Scottsville, NY 14546. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] Flying Baby Pictures, LLC has filed articles of organization with the New York Secretary of State on August 21, 2012 with an effective date of formation of August 21, 2012. Its principal place of business is located at 18 Fernstone Lane, Penfield, New York in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent upon whom process may be served. A copy of any process shall be mailed to 18 Fernstone Lane, Penfield, New York 14526. The purpose of the LLC is to engage in any lawful activity for which Limited Liability Companies may be organized under Section 203 of the New York Limited Liability Company Law. [ NOTICE ] JDP LANDS, LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 6/18/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Dean Brightly, 555 Redman Rd., Hamlin, NY 14464. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] KEVIN WETMORE, PLLC, a domestic PLLC, Arts. of Org. filed with

the SSNY on 6/27/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the PLLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The PLLC, 254 Culver Road, Rochester, NY 14607. Purpose: Law [ NOTICE ] Lily Lu Organix LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 7/13/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 14 Spyglass Hill, Fairport, NY 14450. Purpose: Any lawful activities [ NOTICE ] Not. Of Form. of Freemantle Insurance Agency, LLC, Art. Of Org. filed with SSNY 6/8/12. County: Monroe. SSNY is designated Agent of LLC to whom process may be served. SSNY may mail a copy of any process to LLC, 642 Kreag Rd, Ste 207, Pittsford, NY 14534. Purpose any lawful activity [ NOTICE ] Not. of Form. of North Island Media, LLC Art. Of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 8/1/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY may mail a copy of any process to LLC. 731 Sugarcreek Tr. Webster, NY 14580. Purpose: any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Not. of Form. of Red Setter Enterprises, LLC. Arts. Of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State on 7/9/12. Office location Monroe County. Secy. Of State (SSNY) designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the principal business address of the LLC: 192 Rhinecliff Drive, Rochester, NY 14618. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Not. of Form. of Tikari Properties LLC. Art of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 7/23/12. Off. LocMonroe Cnty. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY may mail process to the LLC, PO Box 26593, Roch.,N. Y. 14626. Purpose: Any lawful activity.


Legal Ads [ NOTICE ] Notice is hereby given that a license, number not yet assigned, for a full on premise beer, wine & liquor license has been applied for by Angus House & Lounge LLC dba Angus House & Lounge, 2126 5 Mile Line Road, Penfield NY 14526, County of Monroe, for a restaurant and bar. [ NOTICE ] Notice is hereby given that a license, number not yet assigned, for a full on premise beer, wine & liquor license has been applied for by Meda Ethiopian Restaurant Inc dba Meda Ethiopian Restaurant , 302304 University Ave., Rochester NY 14605, County of Monroe, for a bar / restaurant. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of 1558 WHEN LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 07/31/12. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 2479 Browncroft Blvd., Rochester, NY 14625. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Avon Self Storage Assoc., LLC at the princ. office of the LLC. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of 3755 WEST HENRIETTA ROAD, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State on 8/14/12. Office location: Monroe County. Principal business address: 3755 West Henrietta Road, Rochester, New York 14623. Secy. of State designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. Secy. of State shall mail process to: 3755 West Henrietta Road, Rochester, New York 14623. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] NOTICE OF FORMATION of BLACKBOOK COD, LLC (“LLC”) Art. of Org. filed with NY Secretary of State (“NYSOS”) on 4/11/2011, pursuant to Limited Liability Company Law Section 203. Office location: Monroe County. NYSOS designated as agent for LLC upon whom process against it may be served. NYSOS shall mail copy of process served to: 4 San Rafael

Drive, Rochester, NY 14618. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of C. MICHAEL REIMRINGER, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 8/15/2012. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 67 Sperry Drive, Henrietta, NY 14467. Purpose: any lawful act [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Charles Point Sodus LLC. Articles of Organization filed with the Secretary of State of New York on July 17, 2012. Office location County of Monroe, SSNY has been designated as the agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to 5500 West Ridge Road, Spencerport, NY 14559. Purpose: any lawful act. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of CPDevelopment, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 6/18/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o The LLC, 250 Ramo Drive, Rochester, NY 14606. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of DHD VENTURES CAPITAL, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 7/31/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, c/o Sammy Feldman, 3445 Winton Place, Ste. 228, Rochester, NY 14623. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] NOTICE OF FORMATION of DURHAM GROUP HOLDINGS LLC (“LLC”) Art. of Org. filed with NY Secretary of State (“NYSOS”) on 10/28/2011, pursuant to Limited Liability Company Law Section 203. Office location: Monroe County. NYSOS designated as agent for LLC upon whom

process against it may be served. NYSOS shall mail copy of process served to: 101 Sully’s Trail Bldg. 20, Pittsford, NY 14534. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Dwyer Young + Wright Architectural LLC amended to Dwyer Architectural LLC. Arts. of Org. filed Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 2/14/12. Off. loc.: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of PLLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The PLLC, 1344 University Ave., Ste. 140, Rochester, NY 14607. Purpose: practice the profession of architecture. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of EREGISTRATIONSERVICES LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 4/9/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 235 Park Ave, Rochester, NY 14607. Purpose: any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of FINGER LAKES FIELD HOCKEY, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State on 8/7/12. Office location: Monroe County. Principal business address: 60 Park Circle Drive, Fairport, New York 14450. Secy. of State designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. Secy. of State shall mail process to: 60 Park Circle Drive, Fairport, New York 14450. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] NOTICE OF FORMATION of GCWNY LLC (“LLC”) Art. of Org. filed with NY Secretary of State (“NYSOS”) on 7/24/2012, pursuant to Limited Liability Company Law Section 203. Office location: Monroe County. NYSOS designated as agent for LLC upon whom process against it may be served. NYSOS shall mail copy of process served to: 31 Sutton Place, Pittsford, NY 14534. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of IH HOLDING 2, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with

Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 08/16/12. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 180 Charlotte St., Rochester, NY 14607. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of JACK M. DORKHOM, DMD, PLLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 06/22/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of PLLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, P.O. Box 156, Pittsford, NY 14534. Purpose: Dentistry. [ NOTICE ] NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY. NAME: 2517 EAST 63rd ST. LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 08/14/12. The latest date of dissolution is 12/31/2062. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to the LLC, c/o Joseph Nacmias, 5 Goldman Road, Monroe, New York 10950. Purpose: For any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY. NAME: EMUNAH PROPERTIES AT ROCHESTER, LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 06/12/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to the LLC, 1911 Avenue L, Brooklyn, New York 11230. Purpose: For any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Local Vinacular LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State on 7/25/12. Office location: Monroe County. Sec. of State designated agent of LLC

upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to the principal business address: 785 Whittier Rd., Spencerport, NY 14559. Purpose: all lawful purposes.

designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity.

[ NOTICE ]

[ NOTICE ]

Notice of Formation of Lu Hang Realty, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 7/31/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, c/o Sammy Feldman, 3445 Winton Place, Ste. 228, Rochester, NY 14623. Purpose: any lawful activity.

NOTICE OF FORMATION of NEW YORK INCOME PARTNERS III, LLC (“LLC”) Art. of Org. filed with NY Secretary of State (“NYSOS”) on 9/6/2011, pursuant to Limited Liability Company Law Section 203. Office location: Monroe County. NYSOS designated as agent for LLC upon whom process against it may be served. NYSOS shall mail copy of process served to: 3445 Winton Place Suite 228, Rochester, NY 14623. Purpose: any lawful activities.

[ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of MATRIX INSIGHTS LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 04/24/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, 4715 Clover St., Honeoye Falls, NY 14472. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of MORGAN POND STREET LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 07/23/12. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 1170 Pittsford Victor Rd., Pittsford, NY 14534. SSNY

[ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of PIZZA STOP GREECE, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 08/15/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Corporation Service Co., 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207, regd. agent upon whom and at which process may be served. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of RALEIGH STREET RENTAL LLC. Arts. of

Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 05/02/12. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 2 Robin Dr., Rochester, NY 14618. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o US Corp. Agents, Inc., 7014 13th Ave., Ste. 202, Brooklyn, NY 11228, regd. agent upon whom and at which process may be served. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Revolution Construction, LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 6/18/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 195 West Hill Estates, Rochester, NY 14626. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] NOTICE OF FORMATION of ROCHESTER SEALTEK, LLC (“LLC”) Art. of Org. filed with NY Secretary of State (“NYSOS”) on 4/11/2011, pursuant to Limited Liability Company Law Section 203. Office location: Monroe County. NYSOS designated as agent for LLC upon whom process against it may be served. NYSOS shall mail copy of process served to: 840 Rock Beach Road, Rochester,

NY 14617. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] NOTICE OF FORMATION of SPRING PINES PARCEL 6 LLC (“LLC”) Art. of Org. filed with NY Secretary of State (“NYSOS”) on 6/20/2011, pursuant to Limited Liability Company Law Section 203. Office location: Monroe County. NYSOS designated as agent for LLC upon whom process against it may be served. NYSOS shall mail copy of process served to: 70 Quail Lane, Rochester, NY 14624. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] NOTICE OF FORMATION of TEC MEDICAL/SURGICAL PRODUCTS, LLC (“LLC”) Art. of Org. filed with NY Secretary of State (“NYSOS”) on 6/16/2011, pursuant to Limited Liability Company Law Section 203. Office location: Monroe County. NYSOS designated as agent for LLC upon whom process against it may be served. NYSOS shall mail copy of process served to: 23 Summit Oaks, Pittsford, NY 14534. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Thai Time Cuisine, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 7/31/12. Office location:

cont. on page 42

A report of unclaimed amounts of money or other property has been made to the State Comptroller and that a listing of names of persons appearing to be entitled is on file and open to the public inspection at Community Bank, N.A. Such held amounts of money or other property will be paid or delivered to proven entitled parties by Community Bank, N.A through October 31. On or before November 10, any remaining unclaimed monies or other properties will be paid or delivered to the State Comptroller.

NOTICE OF NAMES OF PERSONS APPEARING AS OWNERS OF UNCERTAIN UNCLAIMED PROPERTY HELD BY COMMUNITY BANK, N.A. 45-49 COURT STREET CANTON NY 13617-0509 The persons whose names and last known addresses are set forth below from the records of the above named banking organization to be entitled to unclaimed property consisting of cash amounts of fifty dollars or more.

AMOUNTS HELD OR OWING FOR THE PAYMENT OF NEGOTIABLE INVESTMENTS, CERTIFIED CHECKS OR DEPOSITS AGNES NODINOS 1570 EAST AVE APARTMENT 502, ROCHESTER STEPHEN STROBRIDGE AND ANNE STROBRIDGE 38 BLACKWATER TRAIL, FAIRPORT NEIL V DLIMA 23 PAMELA LN, ROCHESTER ROBERT KEWIN & BARBARA KEWIN 43 BELLTOWER LN, PITTSFORD rochestercitynewspaper.com City 41


Legal Ads > page 41 Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, c/o Sammy Feldman, 3445 Winton Place, Ste. 228, Rochester, NY 14623. Purpose: any lawful activity [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Timberlane SM, LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 7/26/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 349 W. Commercial St., Ste. 3100, East Rochester, NY 14445. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of Wind9 Properties LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 5/16/2012. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against

it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 1617 Heard Drive, Maple Glen, PA 19002. Purpose: any lawful act. [ NOTICE ] Notice of the formation of a Limited Liability Company (LLC) named Ultimate Auto Spot LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with Secretary of State of NY (SSNY) on June 28, 2012. Office location is Monroe County, New York. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. The SSNY shall mail a copy of any process to the LLC at 1820 Lexington Ave, Rochester, NY 14606. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Radassess, LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 8/15/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The

LLC, 294 Burnett Rd., Webster, NY 14580. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] SEYREK SEALERS, LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 5/16/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 750 Lee Rd., Rochester, NY 14606. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] Takis & Ath LLC (LLC) filed Arts. of Org. with NY Secy. of State (SS) on 8/6/2012. LLC’s office is in Monroe Co. SS is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS shall mail a copy of any process to LLC’s principal business location at 42 E. Main St., Webster, NY 14580. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] The Sign Maker LLC located in Monroe County, Filed Arts. of

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Org. on 07/02/12 for the purpose of making signs. NY Sec’y of State has been designated as agent for the LLC upon whom process against it may be served and a copy of any process shall be mailed to 194 Colonial Rd., Rochester, NY 14609 [ NOTICE ] TRI CAPITAL SOLUTIONS, LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 6/27/12. Office in Monroe Co. SSNY desig. agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to PO Box 26248, Rochester, NY 14626. Purpose: Any lawful purpose. Principal business location: 10230 South Street Rd., Leroy, NY 14482. [ NOTICE ] Universal Property Solutions, LLC (LLC) filed Arts. of Org. with NY Secy. of State (SS) on 8/10/2012. LLC’s office is in Monroe Co. SS is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS shall mail a copy of any process to LLC’s principal business location at 518 Plank Rd., Webster, NY 14580. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] VAN-GO REAL ESTATE SERVICES, LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 7/9/12. Office in Monroe Co. SSNY desig. agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 212 Valley Rd., Rochester, NY 14618, which is also the principal business location. Purpose: Any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] WATERMAN TICKETS, LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 4/8/11. Office in Monroe Co. SSNY design. Agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to The LLC P.O. Box 137 West Henrietta, NY 14586: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] WG HOMES LLC (LLC) filed Arts. of Org. with NY Secy. of State (SS) on 7/18/12. LLC’s office is in Monroe Co. SS is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS shall mail a copy of any process to LLC’s principal business location at

42 City september 5-11, 2012

200 Weymouth Drive, Rochester, NY 14625. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] Name: ONE SIMON 4 TO GO LLC. Arts. Of Org. filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 08/02/2012. Office Location: Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to: C/O ONE SIMON 4 TO GO LLC, 111 Parce Avenue, Suite 2, Fairport, New York 14450. Purpose: Any Lawful Purpose. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] Notice of Formation of MACJAX PLAYROOM, LLC. Articles of Organization filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 8/16/12. Office location: Monroe County SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to principal business location: The LLC, 77 Bradford Road, Pittsford, NY 14534. Purpose: any lawful activity [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF 250 PIXLEY ROAD LLC ] The name of the Limited Liability Company is 250 PIXLEY ROAD LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the New York Secretary of State on 8/1/2012. The office of the LLC is in Monroe County. The New York Secretary of State is designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. The Secretary of State shall mail a copy of such process to 18 Dolman Dr., Rochester, NY 14624. The LLC is organized to engage in any lawful activity for which an LLC may be formed under NY LLC Law. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF BLU BAR & GRILL LLC ] The name of the Limited Liability Company is BLU Bar & Grill LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the New York Secretary of State on 8/3/2012. The office of the LLC is in Monroe County. The New York Secretary of State is designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it

may be served. The Secretary of State shall mail a copy of such process to 18 Dolman Dr., Rochester, NY 14624. The LLC is organized to engage in any lawful activity for which an LLC may be formed under NY LLC Law. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY ] Notice of formation of Pro-Prospecting LLC. Art. of Org. filed by Sec. of State of NY (SSNY) on 8/2/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. NYSS shall mail process to: PO Box 321, North Chili, NY 14514. Purpose: Any lawful act or activity. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LLC ] HR Logic & Solutions, LLC has filed articles of organization with the New York Secretary of State on August 1, 2012. Its principal place of business is located at 60 Saginaw Drive, Suite 100, Rochester, New York in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent upon whom process may be served. A copy of any process shall be mailed to 60 Saginaw Drive, Suite 100, Rochester, New York 14623. The purpose of the LLC is to engage in any lawful activity for which Limited Liability Companies may be organized under Section 203 of the New York Limited Liability Company Law. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF THE LABADI GROUP, LLC ] The name of the limited liability company (“LLC”) is THE LABADI GROUP, LLC. The Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State on August 3, 2012. The office of the LLC is to be in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. The address to which the Secretary of State shall mail a copy of any process against the LLC served upon him is: Forsythe, Howe, O’Dwyer, Kalb & Murphy, P.C., One Chase Square, Suite 1900, Rochester, NY 14604, Attn: William R. Alexander, Esq. The LLC is organized to engage in any lawful

activity for which an LLC may be formed under Section 203 of the Limited Liability Company Law. [ READING ELECTRIC RENEWABLES, LLC ] Notice of filing of Application for Authority of limited liability company (LLC). Name of foreign LLC is Reading Electric Renewables, LLC. The Application for Authority was filed with the Sec. of State of New York (SSNY) on 7/27/12. Jurisdiction: Pennsylvania. Formed: 9/17/09. County: Monroe. SSNY is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to: James D. Kurtz, 4700 Pottsville Pike, Reading, PA 19605. The address of the office required to be maintained in Pennsylvania is its registered agent: James D. Kurtz, 4700 Pottsville Pike, Reading, PA 19605. The name and address of the authorized officer in Pennsylvania where the Articles of Organization are filed is: Secretary of State of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, Department of State, Corporation Bureau, 401 North Street, Room 206, PO Box 8722, Harrisburg, PA 17105. Purpose: any and all lawful activities. [ SUMMONS AND NOTICE ] Index No. 201111666 STATE OF NEW YORK SUPREME COURT MONROE COUNTY AMERICAN TAX FUNDING, LLC, Plaintiff, vs. MICHELE HOFER; CHARLES COSTA; O’HEANEY ASSOCIATES; The heirs-at-law, next of kin, distributees, executors, administrators, assignees, lienors, creditors, successorsin- interest and generally all persons having or claiming under, by or through FRANK J. MERKEL, by purchase, inheritance, lien or otherwise of any right, title or interest in and to the premises described in the complaint herein, and all creditors thereof, and the respective wives, or widows of his, if any, all of whose names and addresses are unknown to Plaintiff; FIA CARD SERVICES, NATIONAL

ASSOCIATION F/ K/A BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. (USA); NEW YORK STATE DEPARTMENT OF TAXATION AND FINANCE; COUNTY OF MONROE AND “JOHN DOE #1” THROUGH “JOHN DOE #100”, Defendants. TO THE ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANTS: YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED to answer the Complaint in the above-entitled foreclosure action, and to serve a copy of your answer on the plaintiff’s attorney within thirty (30) days after the service of this Summons, exclusive of the day of service or within thirty (30) days after completion of service where service is made in any other manner than by personal service within the State. The United States of America, if designated as a defendant in this action, may answer or appear within sixty (60) days of service hereof. In case of your failure to appear or answer, judgment will be taken against you by default for the relief demanded in the Complaint. Monroe County is designated as the place of trial. The basis of venue is the location of the subject tax parcel. Dated: July 17, 2012 TO THE ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANTS: The foregoing summons is served upon you by publication, pursuant to an Order of Honorable Richard A. Dollinger, a Justice of the Supreme Court, dated August 10, 2012, and filed with supporting papers in the Monroe County Clerk’s Office. This is an action to foreclose certain tax liens (the “Tax Lien”) covering the property known as 158 Carter Street, City of Rochester, New York and identified as Tax Account No. 106.26-254 (the “Tax Parcel”). The relief sought is the sale of the Tax Parcel at public auction in satisfaction of the tax lien. In case of your failure to appear, judgment may be taken against you in the sum of $3,567.11, together with interest, costs, disbursements and attorney’s fees of this action, and directing the public sale of the Tax Parcel. Anthony J. Iacchetta PHILLIPS LYTLE LLP Office and Post Office Address 1400 First Federal Plaza Rochester, New York 14614 Tel. No. (585) 238-2000


Fun [ news of the weird ] BY CHUCK SHEPHERD In August, the federal Drug Enforcement Administration dropped all charges against a doctor who has been at the center of a prescription-drug fraud case because, said prosecutors, they have too much evidence against him and not enough space to store it. The U.S. attorney in northern Iowa said her office needs to clear out the 400,000 paper documents and two terabytes of electronic data (the latter of which under current technology takes up little space but in DEA’s antiquated computer system hogs 5 percent of the agency’s worldwide electronic storage). The accused, Dr. Armando Angulo, has lived since 2004 in Panama, which will not extradite him. (He remains under indictment on state charges in Florida.)

The Litigious Society

— If Megan Duskey’s parents had been with her that night in 2010, they perhaps would have insisted she (dressed as the comic book hero Silver Spectre) not try to slide down the railing during the Halloweenthemed ball at Chicago’s Palmer House Hilton hotel, but she did slide down, and she fell four floors to her death. Nonetheless, in July 2012, the parents filed a $500,000 lawsuit against Hilton and other entities, claiming that the death of Ms. Duskey at age 23 was the hotel’s and the sponsors’ fault. — In July, a California appeals court reinstated police officer Enrique Chavez’s lawsuit against the Austrian gun manufacturer Glock for its “unsafe” design. Chavez is now paralyzed from the waist down because his 3-year-old son got hold of the gun and accidentally fired it, hitting his dad. Chavez, in violation of police policies, had left the gun loaded underneath the front seat of his car, and his son, whom Chavez had not belted into a child seat, was free to explore while Dad drove. The gun is regarded as of safe design by dozens, if not hundreds, of police departments, and the LAPD disciplined Chavez over the incident.

Democracy in Action

— Didier Peleman, 41, is a major-party candidate for the city council in Ghent, Belgium, and, like most, has champions and detractors. Though he has been active in “community work” for 11 years, Peleman is candid about a mental disability that noticeably slows down his speaking and writing and which some voters fear impedes his reasoning ability. His Flemish Christian Democrats Party said it is important that people with disabilities challenge constraints. — A July battle in the House of Representatives pitted austerity-driven members striving to cut $72 million in spending on NASCAR against North Carolina House members determined to keep the money in. (Most NASCAR teams are headquartered in the state, as is the Charlotte Motor Speedway and the NASCAR Hall of Fame.) More than a third of the money would go to the National Guard for sponsoring driver Dale Earnhardt Jr. The North Carolina legislators believe military recruitment will suffer unless the race-car connection is maintained.

Perspective

Problems of the First World: Third World teenagers often must deal with conscription, sweatshop labor and life as street beggars, but in affluent New York City (according to a June report in The New York Times), a major anxiety of teen and almost-teen girls is having to endure sleepaway summer camp with hairy legs. Said celebrity makeup designer Bobbi Brown, “If she’s going to be in a bunk with all these girls,” and “insecure” about lip or leg hair, “You do whatever you can do to make her feel good.” (Seemingly drawing on the Times story, Uni K Waxing of New York City announced a July-only special -- with girls 15 and under receiving a 50 percent discount on bikini-waxing.)

[ LAST WEEK’S SOLUTION ON PAGE 36 ]

[ LOVESCOPE ] BY EUGENIA LAST ARIES (March 21-April 19): Have fun with friends, and love will develop with someone you meet along the way. Everyone wants to be with someone who is fun to be with. A makeover or new image will attract attention you haven’t been getting recently. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): What you believe in and the community you belong to will make a difference to the partner you attract. Let your intelligence, morals and ethics lead the way to a solid, loving and long-lasting relationship. Tradition and cultural acceptance will count when it comes to love. GEMINI (May 21-June 20):

Don’t expect too much from others when it comes to personal relationships. Take your time and get to know whomever you meet before you take a leap of faith and decide to venture into an intimate encounter. CANCER (June 21-July 22): Don’t limit the possibilities when it comes to love and romance. Nothing is perfect, and to reject someone for trivial reasons will lead to loneliness. Consider the good qualities that are being offered by someone, and rethink what’s important to you. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Don’t be too quick to share your feel-

ings. Be reserved — especially dealing with affairs of the heart. Your adaptability will attract all sorts of partners, but not all will demonstrate a true picture of background, likes, dislikes or status. Proceed with caution. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Put your heart on the line. Give a detailed description of what you are looking for in a partner; either a dating service or someone you know will introduce you to a near-perfect partner. Love is on the rise, and lifestyle changes are on the way. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Don’t give out too much personal

information. Listen and observe, making sure you have an interest in someone before you divulge what you want and who you are. Unsuitable partners will mimic what you like and dislike, giving you a false sense of hope. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): A passionate approach will bring an affectionate response. Show your versatility and creativity, and you will attract someone eager to discover a way of life that is unique to you and the partners you choose. Good fortune and a great relationship are within reach. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Don’t let love cost you. You don’t

have to prove anything to anyone. Keep what you have to offer simple and truthful. As soon as you try to be someone you are not, you will face criticism and rejection. Be who you are, and you’ll attract the right person. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): You’ve got all the bases covered when it comes to love, romance and making a commitment. Lay out your plans for the future, and you will attract someone as practical and eager to reach similar goals as you. You’ll be able to embrace new responsibilities together. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18):

Don’t invite trouble. Keep your thoughts and feelings a secret until you feel comfortable sharing with someone who may be a match for you. Your strength will come through your observance and individuality, not your vulnerability. Play it safe romantically, and you won’t be sorry. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Express your desires when it comes to love. Find out where you stand before you move forward with someone who is unsure or not right for you. Love is waiting for you. Look for someone who has similar interests and goals, and you will share a special union.

rochestercitynewspaper.com City 43


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September 5-11, 2012 - CITY Newspaper