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EVENTS: SPOKES & INK, ROC CITY TATTOO EXPO 21 RESTAURANT REVIEW: SCOTLAND YARD PUB

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ART REVIEW: “IN THE LOOP” AT ROCHESTER CONTEMPORARY 20 FILM: “FRIGHT NIGHT,” “ANOTHER EARTH” 26 URBAN JOURNAL: ROCHESTER’S NEXT SCHOOL BOARD

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CROSSWORD 35

Lyle Lovett

Bullet Boys

AUGUST 24-30, 2011 Free

BB King

Routine Involvements

Shooter Jennings

Greater Rochester’s Alternative Newsweekly

Vol 40 No 50

The Meta Accord

and more music, page 10

News. Music. Life.

It was petty and stupid, maybe, but it wasn’t something God-awful.’” NEWS, PAGE 6

ITT is ‘burb bound. NEWS, PAGE 4

East End garage: no more free night parking. NEWS, PAGE 5

City’s South Wedge-ucation sophomore edition. DETAILS, PAGE 10

Best of Rochester 2011: primary voting begins! DETAILS, PAGE 17

MUSIC FEATURE | BY FRANK DE BLASE | PAGE 12 | PHOTO BY FRANK DE BLASE

The scene abides: live music in Rochester Rochester’s music scene is thriving. No, really. This isn’t merely the fingers-crossed wish of someone trying to justify his job or his very existence. When it comes to live music, this dirty little town along the mighty Genesee has got it good. On any given Saturday night there are easily a dozen bands or artists —local and national — playing on stages big, medium, and small. Of course there’s the tug of war associated with art and commerce’s shotgun matrimony, but those who play and those who book live music here believe in what they do. And they believe there’s an audience for it, too.

Clubs like the Penny Arcade in Charlotte have shut their doors. Clubs like The White Rabbit on Monroe Avenue are fighting to stay open, and live music venues in general frequently struggle to simply get by. Yet there are new kids on the block too, like the all-encompassing Lovin’ Cup in Park Point by RIT, the downtown roots-rock hot spot Abilene, and The Main Street Armory, which has amped up the size and amount of shows it brings to town in recent months.


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august 24-30, 2011

Mail Send comments to themail@ rochester-citynews.com or The Mail, City Newspaper, 250 North Goodman Street, Rochester 14607, with your name, address, and daytime telephone number. Letters must be original, we don’t publish letters sent to other media, and we edit for clarity and brevity.

the Constitution belonged to was, “He relinquished everything to save the Republic.” It took shared sacrifice then to form this country and make it free; it will take shared sacrifice again to keep it strong and to stay the greatest country in the world.

Politics, pledges and sacrifice

Welfare’s cost

David Frantz says that politicians should keep their pledges (“Government and our Mistrust,” The Mail, August 10) — specifically that the Tea Party politicians should keep their pledge to never raise taxes. But who did they pledge this to? To one private citizen, Grover Norquist, who heads a group of millionaires and billionaires. How does this small group of people have so much power over Congress? Lots of money! Frantz is worried that if the Republicans renege on this promise, their credibility will be shot, and yet he feels the Democrats should abandon their promise to protect the safety nets that our country’s most vulnerable people depend on. That’s a cause that is much more honorable and worthwhile than tax reduction. Frantz says compromise is not what we should expect from our elected officials, that it shows untrustworthiness. And yet according to most reports, the inability to compromise was a big factor in the downgrading of the US credit rating. According to Frantz, the reason some people need government social programs is because they won’t “get off their dead asses and get a job.” Unemployment is almost 10 percent in this country, so where are these “dead asses” going to get jobs? And haven’t the Republicans told us that tax cuts create jobs? Well, after 10 years of Bush tax cuts, where ARE these jobs? The president is not asking for rich people to hand out their money on the street corners, to just give it away. He’s asking for shared sacrifice. He’s asking corporations who earn billions of dollars each year to pay their fair share in taxes. Yes, there’s a need for some cuts, but like any budget, we also need revenue coming in. After all is said and done, the wealthy will still be rich, but more important, the country will be better off. The motto of the Cincinnati, a society that many Revolutionary war officers and signers of

ED AUSTIN, ALBION

If David Frantz got off his “dead ass” and did some research (The Mail, August 10), he would learn that able-bodied welfare recipients are required to do 30 or 35 hours a week of work or work-related activities. Those considered disabled are required to get treatment for the disability. At times, disabled people are pressured to apply for Social Security. Frantz might also learn that “degenerative” spending “on social services and welfare” has little to do with the poor. The last time Monroe County published a comprehensible budget was 2005. I don’t think things have changed that much. The total county budget was $950 million. The social services portion was $520 million. Of this, grants to the poor totaled $88 million, about 17 percent of the social services budget and less than 10 percent of the total county budget. Two hundred million dollars went to Medicaid, and $232 million went to programs. BOB INGRAM, ROCHESTER

Ingram is an organizer for Empower.

Saving the schools

In case you missed it, the same weekend Congress tortured us with an eleventh-hour default standoff, thousands of parents, teachers, and education leaders gathered for a call to action on educational policy. Organizers of the Save Our Schools weekend met over four days for events that included workshops, a congress, and a march of about 5000 people. We came to address not just an education crisis, but current government policy that shows a profound lack of judgment about and respect for the field of education. No one argues that public schools are fine the way they are. What’s being protested is how policies like “No Child Left Behind” and “Race to the Top” are attracting privatization monies that systematically demonize teacher unions and shut out parent and teacher voices in tackling

what should be our shared goal of improving schools. (Read about the co-location sagas playing out in New York City schools under mayoral control. Watch the newly released film “The Inconvenient Truth Behind Waiting for Superman” that is a response to the “Waiting for ‘Superman’” film that recently swept the country.) As David Cohen, a teacher from California, writes: “Would you force reforms on the military and ignore the opinions of career officers? Would you try to change practices in hospitals but ignore the input of nurses and doctors?” Taxpayers beware: educational policy must be smarter than this. “Race Over the Cliff” threatens our public schools by using high-stakes testing to aim shrinking resources toward corporate charters, whose testing results are just as variable as those of public schools. Current reforms invite educational profiteering and such simplistic actions as replacing staff with cheaper, barely trained Teach for America young people. If what we want are highly qualified teachers, we won’t get this by dismissing experienced teachers for new ones whose training consists of five-week crash courses before being placed in their first jobs. Would you want your children — especially if they had learning challenges — to serve as guinea pigs for well-meaning but highly inexperienced and unqualified teachers? These reform examples are hypocritical “solutions” to problems that deserve deeper, more sustained kinds of work than that. On that sweltering weekend in Washington, parents, teachers, and educational leaders came together to remind policy makers that quick-fix reforms are no substitute for quality change. If Americans want to get serious about improving schools, then we must recognize that there are no shortcuts. It takes time to build a quality teaching force and time to cultivate deep student learning. Let’s work together to make all schools great and available to all. To sample that weekend, watch: http://www.dailykos.com/ story/2011/08/01/1001747/Perhaps-the-best-speech-at-SaveOur-Schools-March-Saturday. ELIZABETH F. HALLMARK, ROCHESTER

Hallmark is a curriculum consultant with schools and is on the faculty of the University of Rochester’s Warner School of Education.

News. Music. Life. Greater Rochester’s Alternative Newsweekly August 23-30, 2011 Vol 40 No 50 250 North Goodman Street Rochester, New York 14607-1199 themail@rochester-citynews.com phone (585) 244-3329 fax (585) 244-1126 rochestercitynewspaper.com Publishers: William and Mary Anna Towler Editor: Mary Anna Towler Asst. to the publishers: Matt Walsh Editorial department themail@rochester-citynews.com Features editor: Eric Rezsnyak News editor: Christine Carrie Fien Staff writers: Tim Louis Macaluso, Jeremy Moule Music editor: Willie Clark Music writer: Frank De Blase Calendar editor: Rebecca Rafferty Contributing writers: Kate Antoniades, Paloma Capanna, Casey Carlsen, Emily Faith, George Grella, Susie Hume, Kathy Laluk, Michael Lasser, James Leach, Ron Netsky, Dayna Papaleo, Rebecca Rafferty, Todd Rezsnyak, Ryan Whirty Editorial intern: Alexandra Carmichael, Melissa Goldin, Deb Schleede Art department artdept@rochester-citynews.com Production manager: Max Seifert Designers: Aubrey Berardini, Matt DeTurck Photographers: Frank De Blase, Matt DeTurck, Michael Hanlon Advertising department ads@rochester-citynews.com Advertising sales manager: Betsy Matthews Account executives: Tom Decker, Annalisa Iannone, William Towler Classified sales representatives: Christine Kubarycz, Tracey Mykins Operations/Circulation info@rochester-citynews.com Circulation Assistant: Katherine Stathis Distribution: Andy DiCiaccio, David Riccioni, Northstar Delivery City Newspaper is available free of charge. Additional copies of the current issue may be purchased for $1, payable in advance at the City Newspaper office. City Newspaper may be distributed only by authorized distributors. No person may, without prior written permission of City Newspaper, take more than one copy of each weekly issue. City (ISSN 1551-3262) is published weekly by WMT Publications, Inc. Periodical postage paid at Rochester, NY (USPS 022-138). Send address changes to City, 250 North Goodman Street, Rochester, NY 14607. City is a member of the Association of Alternative Newsweeklies and the New York Press Association. Subscriptions: $35.00 ($30.00 for senior citizens) for one year. Add $10 yearly for out-of-state subscriptions: add $30 yearly for foreign subscriptions. Due to the initial high cost of establishing new subscriptions, refunds for fewer than ten months cannot be issued. Copyright by WMT Publications Inc., 2011 - all rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, photocopying, recording or by any information storage retrieval system without permission of the copyright owner.


urban journal | by mary anna towler

Choosing the members of the next school board I can’t think of a more important group of local elected officials right now than the Rochester school board. Not only do their actions affect thousands of children, but you know what would help this city most? To have schools so terrific that city residents wouldn’t think of sending their children anywhere else — and people would move into the city to get their children into those schools. It’s the school board that hires a superintendent to run the schools, to marshal the resources to educate the children in this high-poverty district. Every school board I’ve covered wanted the district to succeed. Every board member has been passionate about Rochester’s children — particularly its poorest. Every few years, the board’s membership has changed. Every few years, a superintendent has left and the board has hired a new one. And the new superintendents come up with new curricula, new visions, new ways to organize schools. And yet the district continues to struggle with low test scores and low graduation rates. So here we are again, less than three weeks away from a Democratic primary for school board and other offices — the election, for most races in the city. (Given the voter registration imbalance, it’s nearly impossible for anyone but a Democrat to get elected.) This particular election comes as the school board begins yet another search for a new superintendent. What qualities do we want in the people who will choose that person? What vision? And what do we want in a new superintendent? Another Jean-Claude Brizard? Brizard with better communication skills? Brizard’s polar opposite? So many things are nagging at me right now, but let me focus on one: the question of consistency, in school board vision, in a superintendent’s vision. All school board members and all superintendents want students to do well in school, to graduate from high school, and to go on to a productive life. The lack of consistency comes in how a superintendent thinks he or she can get us there. Looking back on the past several decades, I’m struck by how many changes we’ve imposed on the district’s children and staff. All based on a superintendent’s vision. We have closed schools — sometimes because enrollment in those schools had declined, but sometimes because a superintendent — and the state — thought the change would improve education.

What do we want in a new superintendent? Another Jean-Claude Brizard? Brizard with better communication skills? Brizard’s polar opposite?” We have taken junior-senior high schools apart and turned some of them into middle schools. And then, a few years later, under a new superintendent, we have put them back together again. Right now, we’re making a third change, taking seventh and eighth grades out of some of the junior-senior highs and putting them into elementary schools. Moving children around, moving staff, closing schools, opening new schools: all of this is disruptive and expensive. It’s worth it if it improves children’s education. But so far, with few exceptions, the changes have done little. For instance: the district is closing small schools within Franklin High School and opening new ones. This is the second time the district has done this, in this very school. It didn’t help the first time. Why do we think it will the second? And by the way, we are preparing to spend $325 million on something called the Facilities Modernization Program, to renovate 12 Rochester schools. Some of that work is necessary so that elementary schools can accommodate seventh and eighth grades. Will those changes help the children? Is it worth the expense? I was a supporter of Jean-Claude Brizard, but frankly I thought some of his school reorganization plan was just nuts. Big-picture consistency, then, is one thing I’ll be thinking about as the next school board interviews people who want to be our new superintendent: We’ll have more on the superintendent search as it gets underway — and we encourage your comments. (Next week, we’ll share our thoughts about the school board candidates.)

rochestercitynewspaper.com

City 


[ news from the week past ]

Bredes dies

Nora Bredes, director of the University of Rochester’s Susan B. Anthony Center for Women’s Leadership, died of complications from breast cancer. Bredes was a Suffolk County legislator before moving to Rochester. When asked about the state of women’s rights in a 2006 interview with City, Bredes said, “What’s confusing about this time in our history about women’s equality is that we’ve come so far since Susan B. Anthony.” The problem is that while the rights are there, there is still what she called the “ancient prejudices.” Bredes was 60.

Contractor registry stalls

A proposal from Democratic county legislators for a countywide homeimprovement contractor registry was sent to the county administration to study its costs. It’s a tactic Republicans often use to bury Democratic legislation. The proposal would direct the county Weights and Measures division to establish and maintain the registry, and would impose fines on contractors who do substandard jobs or are paid for work they don’t do.

Doorley proposes advisory board

torney candidate Sandra Doorley presented a plan for a citizen advisory board. The board, which would advise her as DA, would consist of clergy, nonprofit representatives, law-enforcement representatives, victims support groups, and business and labor representatives.

News

How to pick a mayor

City Council President Lovely Warren has submitted new legislation to deal with future vacancies in the mayor’s office. Warren’s original legislation called for a special election in almost all cases. The new legislation calls for a special election for half the year and a primary and general election the other half, depending on when the vacancy occurs. The legislation must be approved by City Council, and will go to a public vote in November.

City Hall vs. the RFD union

City Hall is warning of possible firefighter layoffs and firehouse closures following a long legal battle with the city firefighters union over the city’s use of state fire insurance fees. The city is facing a more than $4-million payout to the union.

Democratic district at-

ITT (pictured in background) will move from the Hawkeye Site building in the city to Rochester Technology Park in Gates. Photo by MATT DETURCK

DEVELOPMENT | BY JEREMY MOULE

ITT headed to the ‘burbs Taxpayers will help ITT Space Systems relocate from the city to the suburbs. ITT will move its headquarters from the Hawkeye Site building on St. Paul Street to Rochester Technology Park in Gates in late 2012. The company plans to spend $12.9 million to renovate and equip its new headquarters. Last week, the County Industrial Development Agency granted ITT sales tax breaks on that investment: a $425,000 benefit. And the state economic development agency, Empire State Development, is tossing in a $1.9-million grant.

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august 24-30, 2011

“The concern was keeping them in Monroe County,” says Judy Seil, COMIDA’s executive director. ITT seriously considered moving out of state, she says. ITT’s decision to stay will preserve 600 local jobs tied to the headquarters, Seil says. The company employs approximately 1,200 workers across three sites locally, and pays an average annual salary of $89,458. But the move will also mean another empty commercial building in the city. Carlos Carballada, the city’s commissioner of neighborhood

and business development, says city officials tried to keep ITT in Rochester. They worked with the company to find a new site, he says, but none of the city’s offerings fit ITT’s needs. What’s important, Carballada says, is that the company will remain local. “Even though perhaps we would prefer that we don’t have some of this movement, we want to make sure that all of us work together to maintain those businesses because they mean jobs,” he says.


“There’s no research that shows that standardized testing does anything beneficial for students. It stresses vastly different skill requirements than those students really need to be successful. It’s a vicious circle of ignorance.” [ DAN DRMACICH ]

Cost of War 4,474 US servicemen and servicewomen, 318 Coalition servicemen and servicewomen, and approximately 102,212 to 111,724 Iraqi civilians have been killed in Iraq from the beginning of the war and occupation to August 19. No American servicemen or servicewomen were reported killed after July 17. IRAQ TOTALS —

1,744 US servicemen and servicewomen and 939 Coalition servicemen and servicewomen have been killed in Afghanistan from the beginning of the war and occupation to August 19. Statistics for Afghan civilian casualties are not available. American servicemen and servicewomen killed from August 10 to 16: -- Hospitalman Riley Gallinger-Long, 19, of Cornelius, Ore. -- Sgt. Edward J. Frank II, 26, of Yonkers, N.Y. -- Sgt. Jameel T. Freeman, 26, of Baltimore, Md. -- Spc. Patrick L. Lay II, 21, of Fletcher, N.C. -- Spc. Jordan M. Morris, 23, of Stillwater, Okla. -- Pfc. Rueben J. Lopez, 27, of Williams, Calif. -- 2nd Lt. Joe L. Cunningham, 27, of Kingston, Okla. -- Master Sgt. Charles L. Price III, 40, of Milam, Texas -- Sgt. Matthew A. Harmon, 29, of Bagley, Minn. AFGHANISTAN TOTALS —

EDUCATION | BY TIM LOUIS MACALUSO

PARKING | BY CHRISTINE CARRIE FIEN

Wanted: a scrappy school board

No more free parking

The Coalition for Justice in Education — an umbrella organization composed of activist groups concerned with education — has done something unusual for a Rochester school board primary. CJE has created a political platform for its education reforms, and has endorsed candidates who are most likely to lobby for those reforms, says Dan Drmacich. The chair of CJE and former principal of School Without Walls says that candidates Mary Adams, Howard Eagle, Wallace Smith, and Willa Powell share the group’s vision, and they’ve demonstrated a willingness to aggressively promote its ideas, even in the face of strong opposition. Powell is an incumbent, while Eagle, Adams, and Smith are running together on the Community Education Task Force slate. Tenacious board members are key to CJE’s mission, Drmacich says, because CJE’s brand of reform veers dramatically from the current trend. For instance, he says, the coalition is opposed to high-stakes standardized testing. “There’s no research that shows that standardized testing does anything beneficial for students,” Drmacich says. “It stresses vastly different skill requirements than those students really need to be successful. It’s a vicious circle of ignorance.”

He says that proponents of highstakes testing have led an assault on teaching that is destroying the profession. And worse, he says, it’s making learning uninteresting. CJE also opposes Dan Drmacich. PHOTO BY MATT DETURCK the “unfair and inequitable funding of urban education” and the “racial and economic segregation of students in Monroe County.” Short of a nationwide war on poverty, Drmacich says, societal ills associated with poverty, such as lead-paint poisoning, poor health and nutrition, drug use, and drug-related violence will continue to thwart student performance. School board members must be far more aggressive in lobbying county, state, and federal lawmakers, the Board of Regents, and State Education Department officials to address these issues, he says. “We need a mass desegregation of our schools,” Drmacich says. “I realize that for [former mayor] Bill Johnson, that was the kiss of death when he ran for county executive. But county officials have to step up.”

Night parking at the East End garage used to be free, but since August 1, people have had to pay $2 to use the East End garage after 5:30 p.m. The monthly parking rate has also risen from $66 to $70, and the event charge went from $2 to $5. | The 1,282-space garage is owned by the Rochester Cultural Center Commission. | “It’s the lowest priced municipal garage in the city,” says James Vazzana, chair of the commission. “We have to bring it up, because revenues are down and the cost to maintain the garage is off the boards.” | The garage is almost 30 years old, says commission member Arnie Rothschild, and needs significant work. | Certain groups, including RPO season ticket holders, have been given a year before they have to start paying the new or higher fees. And Rothschild said that meetings were held with the East End Business Association and others to keep them informed of the changes. | The East End garage at 475 East Main is prime parking for people attending events at the Eastman Theatre, Eastman School of Music, Little Theatre, and other businesses and attractions in the area.

iraqbodycount.org, icasualties.org, Department of Defense SOURCES:

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City 


INTERVIEW | BY CHRISTINE CARRIE FIEN

Tom Richards on Rochester’s top issues The Paetec sale to Windstream and what it means for the Midtown project downtown, the continuing fallout over the arrest of activist Emily Good while she was recording a police traffic stop, and the political gamesmanship over the massive school district renovation project are three of the biggest stories in Rochester right now. Paetec was the project that was supposed to kick the redevelopment of downtown into high gear. The state provided $55 million to tear down Midtown and prepare the site for Paetec’s world headquarters. But over time, the shrinking size of the project and Paetec CEO Arunas Chesonis’s apparent reluctance to fully commit caused some to wonder if the project would happen at all. Then came the news a few weeks ago that the telecommunications company Windstream intends to buy Paetec, leaving the downtown project in serious doubt. The video of Emily Good’s arrest went viral and attracted national media attention. It also triggered a pair of police investigations: the first is into the circumstances of Good’s arrest, and the second is an investigation into whether police retaliated by ticketing cars belonging to Good supporters at a meeting after her arrest. The events have also triggered a review of the police oversight system, led by Police Chief James Sheppard and City Council member Adam McFadden. Good is planning to sue the city. Facilities Modernization is a $1.2billion project to renovate and modernize city schools. The project has experienced numerous delays and now seems to be in the middle of a power struggle between City Hall and the school district. City officials are concerned that by doing the bonding for the project — the school district cannot borrow money on its own — the annual debt payments on the bonds will be added to the amount the city must give the school district every year. That annual payment is called Maintenance of Effort, and it is a state law. A legislative solution stalled in Albany, and now city officials say they will no longer do routine bonding for the school district until a resolution is found. That means that if a roof collapses on a school, for example, the school district must pay for the repair out of its operating budget. Mayor Tom Richards spoke recently about Paetec, the police department, and the school district project, and the following is an edited version of that interview: CITY: Have you spoken to the Windstream people? What’s your sense about them going ahead with the Midtown project? Richards: They were cordial. They said they

haven’t made any decisions about this stuff: it’s months away. What I asked from them is a  City

august 24-30, 2011

fair chance to show that it is in their interest to come here, and they said they’d give me that. The driving force is going to be how much employment survives here. If they have a significant amount of employment, we have a shot at this. Then it becomes a matter of making sure people realize this downtown location can be competitive with any other option they have. And it can be. That’s part of why we spent all the time and effort to get to this point. We’re going to have here in a year the premier location in the city. There will be streets and infrastructure in place, and there will be an almost 2,000-car underground garage underneath it. And we will have removed the impediment to development, which was this old, cobbled-together building full of asbestos. So I’m not going to panic over this, just because there’s some heat on it right now. We’re making decisions here that are going to be with us for a long time. And if Windstream says no? The casino idea doesn’t seem to die.

I still think that we want to do things in that site that will bring people downtown, and all the studies we’ve done and all the looking we’ve done says that’s a combination of commercial activity, business activity, and residences. I’m not sure that’s the right place for a casino. I don’t know that putting a casino in the middle of downtown is necessarily what my vision of downtown is. Midtown is going to shape the nature and substance of downtown. So it’ll be one kind of downtown if we do the things I just discussed down there — or for that matter, a performing arts center. It’ll be another kind of downtown if you put a casino there. And before there are casinos other than Native-American casinos, it’s got to pass the State Legislature two years in

Rochester Mayor Tom Richards: the fallout from the arrest of activist Emily Good shows how the Internet can blow a small incident out of proportion. file photo

a row and go through a constitutional amendment. So that’s an interesting discussion, but it’s entirely theoretical at the present time. The police department is getting a lot of attention. Is there a problem with the RPD, or are people just focused on the department right now?

Has the police department all of a sudden changed its behavior and created this problem? No. What we have learned with Emily Good is how a little incident can become a big incident because of the Internet. With all due respect to this incident, even if it was wrong, it was not a major incident. It was, “OK, maybe the guy used bad judgment.” But he didn’t rough anybody up, he didn’t swear at them… It doesn’t prove that the police are racially profiling people, which now the discussion is centered around. But what about afterward, when the police ticketed Good supporters in what seems like an act of retaliation?

That’s a different story. That may indicate to me that there was a breach in discipline, if that’s true. Now I’m going to reserve judgment on that, because that’s my job. But even if it was a breach in discipline, it wasn’t the worst thing anybody ever did. It was petty and stupid, maybe, but it wasn’t something God-awful. We really have three separate issues here. One is, did this officer exercise appropriate judgment with respect to charging this woman with obstructing governmental

administration under those circumstances? Fair issue. It’s being investigated. Second issue is, did the police behave in a way that was retaliatory with respect to giving people parking tickets? That also deserves to be dealt with, and in some sense could be considered more serious. But neither one of them demonstrates that the police department is running around beating people up or doing God-awful things. The third issue that has brought into the middle of it is, does the police department racially profile people? Neither of those other two incidents proves that. But the issue of whether or not the police department is engaged in racial profiling is a fair issue, and it’s fair for people to question it. It’s an issue everywhere in this country, and it’s caused by the circumstances we find ourselves in. The bulk of the crime committed in our community is committed by young black men on young black men. I wish it wasn’t true, but it is. And so how does the police department aggressively police that issue without racially profiling people? It’s a tough issue, and I’m sorry for the police department that it’s a tough issue, but they’ve got to deal with it. I’m not letting anybody off the hook just because it’s tough. But I’m not going to get anywhere with the police department, and I don’t think the city or the community is going to get anywhere if we confuse these issues. We don’t get an honest response to it. The reason that the officers stopped that car the night of Emily Good’s arrest is because it was occupied by people known to them to be members of a gang and known to have


3 9 T H A N N UA L

Rochester Antiquarian Book Fair

Rare, Collectible & Scholarly Books • Prints, Ephemera, Maps & Photographica And new this year, a Book Binding Demonstration

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 10, 2011 • 10AM - 5PM guns. And people in that neighborhood want us to stop those people. Is that racial profiling? I don’t know. It’s profiling people who are known to be engaged in criminal activity who happen to be black. And in that neighborhood, most of the people are black who are engaged in that behavior. That’s a little bit of the problem I have with the Emily Goods of the world: they treat this thing as though it were occurring on the moon — as though we weren’t in the environment in which we’re in. We’ve had some instances in this city in which police made mistakes arresting or stopping young black men and they shouldn’t have done it. The irony is, this isn’t one of them. For some reason though, Emily Good’s arrest and the arrest of County Legislator Willie Lightfoot for DWI have really sparked with people. (Lightfoot pleaded guilty, but maintains his innocence.)

Here’s another problem we have with this: the city does have civilian review. Now people may not be satisfied with it, and we’re going to go through a process of reviewing it. It certainly takes too long. But we do have civilian review, and many communities don’t. And you don’t have to complain to the police department; you can go directly to the Center for Dispute Settlement. And it’ll take a while, but you can actually force that issue to the point where the police can be compelled to explain themselves. They chose not to do that. They say, “I don’t have any confidence in the system.” But my answer to that is, “You didn’t try.” But that’s OK. Emily Good has a right to bring a lawsuit. But that means that when we investigate this, she refuses to cooperate. So the only side of the story we got is the cops’. Second of all, lawsuits don’t reform the police department; they generate money. And they take years to resolve themselves. I can’t wait for that. If there’s something wrong in the police department, I have to deal with that now. I get many more complaints about not enough police action: “Why aren’t you chasing these guys on the corner? Why don’t you stop them?” City Hall and the school district are involved in a standoff over borrowing for the Facilities Modernization Program, and whether it adds to the amount the city is required to give the school district every year. State legislation was supposed to settle this, but that’s mired in politics. Is there a non-legislative solution?

Possibly, in the sense that it’s the State Education Department’s interpretation of the law that’s

causing the problem. So if they would be prepared to change their interpretation, then that should fix the problem. Their original interpretation would’ve added $29 million a year to the Maintenance of Effort. And I said, “That’s ridiculous. Do you mean to tell me that when [the state] passed Facilities Modernization, they intended to increase the MOE?” The State Education Department said, “No, but that’s what we think it says, so go get it fixed.” But didn’t State Assembly member Joe Morelle say he had a letter from State Ed. that supposedly settled all this?

What Morelle got them to say at least is, “Well, look, at least the part that the state reimburses, we won’t add that to the MOE.” Because remember, the state reimburses more than 80 percent of the debt service on the project. So that’s what he got fixed. But that still left us with $2.3 million a year [on top of the $119 million the city gives the school district every year through the MOE]. For 15 years, that’s almost $40 million. Honest to God, I don’t believe anybody intended this. I don’t think that when the state put the [original] Facilities Modernization bill together, it had any intention to impact the MOE. But it has turned out to be opportunistic for some people, and that’s what has created the problem. So what’s the likelihood that State Ed. will change its interpretation again? You and City Council have said the city will not do any more borrowing for the school district until this situation is resolved. That could be devastating to the school district.

The only reason we did what we did is if there isn’t any pressure on this issue, it won’t get solved. I suppose the chances are relatively low that the State Education Department will change its interpretation again. But they’ve already done it once. If they don’t, then we need to get a legislative fix. We’ll go back and make sure people get a chance to fully understand it and do the right thing. That means a solution that works. I don’t care if it comes from Santa Claus. People need to calm down here. What we need to stop doing is playing games with each other. This is no way to run a railroad. It is silly for the school district and the city to be jockeying all the time over this issue.

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Barbara Dean Stewart 1942-2011 Barbara Dean Stewart was born in Rochester on 9-17-42 and died in the Brightonian Nursing Home on 8-5-11. She graduated from Fairport High School and attended Cornell University at age 17. During her High school years she attended the Eastman School of Music's preparatory program and learned to play the flute and the piano. She also learned tennis from Peter Lyman, who later was the number one player in Rochester in tennis and squash and became the head coach at the U of R. At Cornell she earned a degree in Sociology and then went to Simmons Library School. Barbara then went to work at the Cornell Law Library where she met her first husband, James Stewart. They were married in 1964 and lived on the West Coast, where James was in the navy. While stationed in Oceanside, California, Barb played flute in the San Diego Community Orchestra. There were two children of the marriage, Allison born in 1965 and Whitney born in 1967. The family moved back to Rochester in 1968. Barb became active in the promoting of the Rochester Chamber Orchestra for several years. She also took up the game of squash racquets and helped to run programs for women and children at a time when neither was overly represented in the sport. At one point she was the Rochester Women's City Champion. Barb founded the "Kazoophony", a group of musicians, mostly classically trained, who played popular and classical music on the kazoo. She had a NY agent and the group played all over the country - from Las Vegas, Spokane and Denver, to West Virginia, NYC and St. Lawrence University. Her husband, James, was the MC, who succeeded Simon Pontin, a very well known WXXI personality. The group performed at Peter Schickele's Xmas show in 1978 in NYC as the pre-show warm-up group. Barb played soprano kazoo in the Kazoophony quartet and sang several numbers - the most entertaining one was a Mozart aria (Queen of the Night) where she aimed to hit a very high note, and purposely missed on the high side - her range was very high! The group disbanded in the 1980s. Barbara was divorced in March of 1985. Barb's younger daughter, Whitney, graduated from Phillips Academy at Andover and Yale University, where she received a degree in French/Film Studies. She now works as a freelance chef and food stylist in the New York City area. Barb's older daughter, Allison, graduated from Pittsford HS and Barnard College and earned a PHD in English at NYU. Allison currently works for Standard Chartered Bank as the NY editor of Economic Research.

MONDAY – SATURDAY

rochestercitynewspaper.com

City 


THE 5TH ANNUAL

Ontario Barn Festival

Saturday, September 3rd • 11am-7pm Featuring live music, arts & crafts, wine tasting and much more! See website for details.

Ontario Barn Vineyards is your new weekend wine tasting destination www.OntarioBarnVineyards.com • 513 Whitney Rd • Ontario, NY 14519 Between County Line & Lincoln Rd, 1 mile South of Rt. 104

For more Tom Tomorrow, including a political blog and cartoon archive, visit http://thismodernworld.com

Urban Action This week’s calls to action include the following events and activities. (All are free and open to the public, unless otherwise noted.)

Quakers and women’s rights

The 1816 Farmington Meetinghouse Museum will hold an open house from noon to 4:30 p.m. on Saturday, August 27. Carol Faulkner, professor of history at Syracuse University, will talk about “Lucretia Mott, Quakers, and Women’s Rights,” her new biography of Lucretia Mott, one of the organizers of the Seneca

Correcting ourselves

Convention. Her talk will be at 2 p.m. The event will be held at 187 County Road 8.

are advised, since there may be poison ivy. For more information: (315) 256-2130.

Nature walk in Ganargua Creek Meadow

Labor Day parade

The Genesee Land Trust will sponsor a “Butterfly and Wildflower” nature walk at Ganargua Creek Meadow Preserve from 10 a.m. to noon on Saturday, August 27. The walk will be led by the Rochester Butterfly Club and it will be mostly level and easy. Long pants and appropriate footwear

The Rochester Labor Council, AFL-CIO, will host a Labor Day parade on Monday, September 5. It begins at the intersection of Alexander Street and East Avenue, walking to the Liberty Pole, turning on Main Street, and continuing to Plymouth Avenue. Organizers recommend getting to the parade route by 10 a.m.

In last week’s cover story on emerging artists in Rochester, we erroneously reported that Marisa Krol founded Hearts & Crafts Indie Market with Lisa Barker. Barker actually founded the event, and Krol joined her later on.

 City

august 24-30, 2011


Dining garlic edge that’s a nice change from the salty-hot flavor profile of typical Buffalo wings. In order to get the full impact, though, plan to get messy: the garlic slices don’t naturally stick to the wings, so you’ll have to scoop a few up with your finger and pile ‘em on before shoving that drumette into your mouth. Order your third beer while you wait for

Scotland Yard Pub features a unique take on chicken wings with its “dragon wings” (pictured left). Right: the pub’s “dragon” pizza PHOTOS BY MIKE HANLON

There be dragons Scotland Yard Pub 187 St. Paul St. 730-5030, scotlandyardpub.com Monday-Wednesday 4 p.m.-1 a.m., Thursday-Saturday 4 p.m.-2 a.m. [ REVIEW ] BY JAMES LEACH

Do you have a favorite pub? A place you come back to every Friday night? A place that your feet just automatically lead you to at the end of a hard week? Now, have you ever toyed with the idea of actually owning your favorite watering hole? That’s exactly the opportunity that presented itself to Terry Owen, Kyle O’Brien, and Pat McMahon earlier this year. Sam Paniccia, one of the three brothers who own Scotland Yard Pub on St. Paul Street, approached regulars Owen, O’Brien, and McMahon and offered them a collective 50 percent share of the business. The three accepted, and on June 1 they became partners in the pub that had been their hangout for the past two years. One would think that new owners, or at least new partners would mean that big changes are in the works for Scotland Yard, but the only changes the partners are

intending to make are in the way the pub markets itself: they want to use social media and social networking to let more people know about the pub that they love. There’s a lot to like about Scotland Yard, particularly if you happen to work downtown. On a Friday afternoon it is one of the more convenient pubs to get to, and with its extralong bar there’s a good bet that you’ll be able to find a seat. Service at the bar is quick and efficient, and although the beer selection is currently a bit limited — it does, however, always carry at least one of the beers produced by local micro-brewery Three Heads — that’s one of the handful of things the new partners are working to address in the near future. Take a seat, grab a brew, and take a look around. The pub features a nicely located pool table, an elevated and cozy space for darts, and a scattering of comfy chairs near the front door. On a hot summer evening, the lofty ceilings keep the place cool, and the low light levels are perfect for chilling out. Snag the friendly bartender on his second pass through and order another round while you look at the menu. As with all good pubs, Scotland Yard offers an assortment of the usual fried appetizers, as well as an array

of sandwiches and salads to choose from. But what distinguishes Scotland Yard from the competition is that it also offers pizzas pulled from a wood-fired oven at the rear of the dining room. Pay close attention to the menu here, because everything that comes out of that oven is worth trying. Start with a quesadilla stuffed with fire-

roasted vegetables ($9). Peppers (hot and sweet), mushrooms, onions, and zucchini are all well-cooked, but not oozing so much juice as to ruin the crunch of the tortilla in which they are enclosed, along with a generous quantity of jack and cheddar cheeses. Served with salsa and sour cream, a basket full of grilled veg quesadilla is an undisputed bargain and a good way to take the edge off while you deliberate over the rest of your meal. Scotland Yard is also somewhat famous for its wings, and justifiably so. Sam Paniccia developed his own sauce for wings that adds both sweet soy sauce and paper-thin garlic slices to the traditional hot-sauce-and-butter recipe. The resulting “dragon wings” ($9 for 10 wings; $15 for 20) have a nice sweet and sour bite to them, along with fairly decent heat and a

your pizza to be delivered. Scotland Yard makes a darned good pizza — thin crusted with a bit of char around the edges. The crust is crunchy, and on one visit almost cracker-thin, but nonetheless stiff enough to hold a full load of toppings. It’s better than average, and the toppings might put it in an even higher echelon. You could get a “classic” pizza with Italian sausage, pepperoni, and mozzarella layered over red sauce ($11), or a “carnivore” that combines all of that with chorizo, ham, and bacon (a pretty much guaranteed winner in combination with beer and wings, $12). But there are other things worth your attention. The signature Scotland Yard pizza ($12), a combination of goat cheese, artichoke hearts, and good prosciutto on a base of roasted garlic, olive oil, and the trinity of parmesan, asiago, and mozzarella is a solid choice — an antipasto platter served on a carta de musica. And the barbecued chicken pizza ($10) adds a bit of smoky, spicy chipotle to the barbecue sauce and substitutes cheddar for smoked gouda cheese. The addition of bacon to the mix is much appreciated, because, let’s face it, everything is better with a little bit of bacon. The only thing that disappointed on two visits was the Scotland Yard burger ($9). Aside from the cute conceit of a “kilt” of crusty melted cheddar cheese, it was a pretty much ordinary burger served on a gigantic French bread roll that overwhelmed whatever beefy flavor might have been in the meat. It wasn’t bad, and the fries served alongside it — nicely done steak fries with a spicy coating — were tasty (although I’d actually ordered sweet-potato fries to appease my dining companion). But compared to the pizza and quesadilla it was a bit of a letdown in an otherwise pleasant meal. Fortunately, I still had my third pint in which to drown my sorrows.

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City 


Upcoming [ R&B ] Nappy Roots w/Who’s Bad — The Ultimate Michael Jackson Tribute Band Saturday, September 24. Monroe Community College, 1000 E. Henrietta Road. 7 p.m. $10-$18. monroecc.edu.

Music

[ Pop/Rock] Taking Back Sunday Wednesday, November 2. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N. Water St. 7:30 p.m. $23-$25. 546-3887. waterstreetmusic.com. [ American Songbook ] Thanks For The Memories: A Tribute To Bing Crosby & Bob Hope Sunday, November 20. Auditorium Theatre, 885 E. Main St. 2 & 7 p.m. $35-$45. 222-5000. rbtl.org.

BB King

Friday, August 26 CMAC, 3355 Marvin Sands Drive, Canandaigua 7 p.m. | $50-$75.20 | cmacevents.com [ BLUES ] You may not know this, but BB King doesn’t

play any chords. The legendary guitarist is the king of the singing string with a fluid vibrato and tone so thick, he doesn’t need those other strings. At 86, King is still going strong. Born in Mississippi in 1925, King eventually moved to Memphis, where he bought his first guitar for $15. Folks first caught wind of him on Sonny Boy Williamson’s radio show in 1948. He’s shown no signs of stopping, even though he’s been on his “farewell tour” since 2006. Buddy Guy also performs. — BY FRANK DE BLASE

The Meta Accord Friday, August 26 Monty’s Krown, 875 Monroe Ave. 10 p.m. | $5 | 271-7050 [ JAZZ/FUSION ] This progressive, funky quartet actually

played its very first show before ever rehearsing together. But these gentlemen of jazz have really made a name for themselves in Rochester over the past couple of years. Their instrumental compositions are chock full of energy and the band exhibits a knack for finding seriously danceable grooves within its free-flowing, improvisational platform. It brings this fast and fresh sound to the Krown on Friday, a venue that usually houses darker acts. So go check out The Meta Accord and brighten up your life. — BY DAVID YOCKEL JR.

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10 City august 24-30, 2011


Wednesday, August 24 [ Acoustic/Folk ] Rob & Gary Acoustic. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. 381-4000. 5:30-8:30 p.m. Free. [ Blues ] Make The Record Night. Quaker Steak and Lube, 2205 Buffalo Rd. 585.697.9464. 5p.m. Free.;

Fairport Music & Food Festival Saturday, August 27 Main and Lift Bridge Lane, Fairport Noon | $10-$15 | fairportmusicfestival.com [ VARIOUS ] With a lift bridge, a towpath, and the

mighty Erie Canal crossing under historic Main Street, the Village of Fairport provides a lovely New Englandlike backdrop for its 7th annual Fairport Music & Food Festival. Attendees will find something to satisfy everyone’s musical preference, with three main stages featuring more than 20 of the Rochester area’s finest bands, including The Campbell Brothers, Big Eyed Phish, and Tommy Brunett. Local restaurants will participate in “A Taste of Fairport,” which allows festivalgoers to purchase samples of their signature dishes. This is a family-friendly event with plenty of kids’ activities, and children under 12 get in free. Proceeds will go to benefit the Golisano Children’s Hospital at Strong. — BY ROMAN DIVEZUR

1916 Wednesday, August 24 Water Street Music Hall, 204 N. Water St. 8 p.m. | $7-$10 | waterstreetmusic.com [ Celtic/Rock ] For those of you always looking for

a little taste of the Emerald Isle right here at home, Rochester’s own 1916 (named for the year of the Easter Uprising in Ireland) brings a local flair to the evergrowing Celtic rock genre. The band offers a take on traditional songs and reels, as well as its own original tunes. Although the band formed in 2008, it has already opened for national acts like Enter the Haggis. — BY WILLIE CLARK

Shooter Jennings played Party in the Park on Thursday, August 18. PHOTO BY FRANK DE BLASE

Off your seat, on your feet [ review ] by frank de blase

I’m all about the outlaw country. I believe in its message, I believe in its stubborn adherence, I believe in its bloodline. I first heard Wayne “The Train” Hancock and Hank Williams III and I felt a sense of relief; the musical tumor that is Nashvegas was benign. A lot of this has to do with bloodline. Hank III, even Justin Townes Earle have it in their genes. So does Shooter Jennings. But the question is, why don’t I connect with Jennings’s sound? Jennings headlined the final Party in the Park of the year last Thursday, August 18, to a packed crowd. There were most definitely Jennings fans peppered throughout, most jammed up against the stage full of wildeyed sing-along enthusiasm. It had all the makings of a great show. Jennings, however, came off rather flat — charming and intense, but musically flat. His chosen tempo was a valley with no peaks, no dynamics. It was rather rivet-less. I’ve seen him four times now, and in looking back he’s never really resonated with me. I want to like him, but there’s just not any edge or apparent danger. His band was tight and tonally cool, but the overall mood was frankly a bit dull. The Bop Shop’s 14 Fridays series brought the heat to get you off your

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seat with an outstanding show from the all-female Cajun band C’est Bon. With Cajun and zydeco, a little can go a long way; this is not subtle music. It’s revved up both musically and rhythmically with a butt load of energy and stamina. The ladies of C’est Bon traded off vocals over the pump of the button accordion and the strident march of the bass. It was passionate, immediate, sexy, and cool. I slipped over after that to the Public Market as Audio Influx was making way for Mosaic Foundation for the Band on Bricks series. Mosaic has had significant line-up shifts since I first caught wind of the band about two years ago. Whereas a lot of reggae is represented by jam bands as one of only a number of things they do, Foundation is most pure and most righteous in its adherence to the Studio One vibe. Great music for a hot summer night. Again with the house-party music. I caught Dave Stoll, a singer/guitarist form Lockport, at a backyard party Saturday night. Stoll and his guitar conjured up Lead Belly and Sonny Boy Williamson before shifting to Dylan. The music was hotter than the mini-bonfire we surrounded. Keep your eyes peeled for this cat.

[ Classical ] Classical Blue Jeans #2: An Evening with Rami Vamos. Wegmans Market Cafe, 345 Eastern Blvd, Canandaigua. lakemusicfestival.org. 6 p.m. $50, $25 for children under 18. [ Country ] Kenny Chesney w/Billy Currington and Uncle Kracker. CMAC, 3355 Marvin Sands Dr, Canandaigua. 800-7453000, livenation.com. 7 p.m. $32.50-$85. [ DJ/Electronic ] DJ Wizz the Waxx Kutta. Triple Deuces Bar & Grill, 151 St Paul St. tripledeucesbargrill. com. 10:30 p.m. Call for tix. Bad Wolf: 50s & 60s Vinyl Bop. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 454-2966, bugjar.com. 10 p.m. Free. DJ. Westside Sports Bar & Grill, 1600 Lyell Ave. 4587888. 9 p.m. Call for tix. DJ. One, 1 Ryan Alley. 5461010. 10 p.m. Free. DJ Babi Katt/Dancehall Reggae. Blueroom, 293 Alexander St. 730-5985. 10 p.m. $5 after 11 p.m. DJ Cosmo. Bay Bar & Grill, 372 Manitou Rd, Hilton. 392-7700. 10 p.m. Free. DJ Fat Daddy Buck. Roost, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. 3211170. 8:30 p.m. Free. DJs Jared & Mario B. Venu Resto-Lounge, 151 St Paul St. 232-5650. 9 p.m. $5. DJs NaNa & PJ. Vertex, 169 N Chestnut St. 232-5498. 10 p.m. $3-$8. [ Jazz ] Jordan Lawson Quartet w/ Peach Preserves. Tala Vera, 155 State St. tala-vera.com. 8 p.m. $3. continues on page 13

FREE AND OPEN TO EVERYONE! THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 15 • 5-8PM

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SCENE A THE

IDES story and photos By Frank De Blase

ochester’s music scene is thriving. No, really. This isn’t merely the fingers-crossed wish of someone trying to justify his job or his very existence. No, when it comes to live music, this dirty little town along the mighty Genesee has got it good. On any given Saturday night there are easily a dozen bands or artists —local and national — playing on stages big, medium, and small. You’ve got no excuse if you’re sitting at home. Of course there’s the tug of war associated with art and commerce’s shotgun matrimony, but those who play and those who book live music here believe in what they do. And they believe there’s an audience for it, too. This audience to a large extent may be oblivious to the hard work and ulcers that go into making this scene the scene that it is. Competition for the consumer’s entertainment dollar may be fierce — and getting suburban asses off the couch may be a chore — but here in Rochester there is a venue for virtually every style of music. Want to bang your head? Try Montage Music Hall. Got the blues? Head on over to the Dinosaur Bar-B-Que. Want to catch the next indie craze on the road? Go to Water Street Music Hall. Dig the underground scene? Look no further than the Bug Jar or Dub Land Underground. And there are Rochester musicians playing and representing all those styles: garage rock with bands like The Absolutes and The Ohm; reggae-soul with Audio Influx; rock ’n’ roll with The Hi-Risers; jazz with The Westview Project; reggae with Giant Panda Guerilla Dub Squad; instrumental dub with Roots Collider; big rock with Boneyard or Rainline or Methanol; pure pop with Walri and Sports; blues with Joe Beard or Steve Grills and the Roadmasters. The list is endless.

12 City august 24-30, 2011


Wednesday, August 24

Sure, these clubs and artists come and go with the rotation of trends — the star-maker machine can be a meat grinder at times — but like a snake shedding its skin, this is all simply part of a healthy scene’s life cycle. According to promoter Jeff Springut, the music scene in Rochester “is better than most people think.” Springut has been on this rollercoaster for decades, operating Red Creek on Jefferson Road from 1970 to 1997, and going on to promote events like Party in the Park, the Big Rib Fest, The Park Ave Summer Arts Festival, and various other events. His ear is to the ground.

Local promoter Jeff Springut at a recent Party in the Park concert. He says that the recent $2 admission fee has not impacted attendance.

“I think people — in this town in particular — play down the assets of this town for some reason,” he says. “We don’t believe in ourselves as much as we should.” Clubs like the Penny Arcade in Charlotte have shut their doors. Clubs like The White Rabbit on Monroe Avenue are fighting to stay open, and live music venues in general frequently struggle to simply get by. Yet there are new kids on the block too, like the all-encompassing Lovin’ Cup in Park Point by RIT, the downtown roots-rock hot spot Abilene, and The Main Street Armory, which has amped up the size and amount of shows it brings to town in recent months. The cycle of death and rebirth doesn’t end there: many bands that get started have the life expectancy of a hemophiliac in a shark tank. Still, the drive to create, promote, and share music persists. The scene abides. continues on page 14

Paradigm Shift. Pomodoro Grill & Wine Bar, 1290 University Ave. 271-5000. 7:30 p.m. Free. Robert Chevrier. Pomodoro Monroe Ave, 3400 Monroe Ave. 586-7000. 6:30 p.m. Free. Tony Gianavola. Beale Street Cafe, 693 South Ave. 271-4650. 6-9 p.m. Free. [ Karaoke [ Karaoke. Roost, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. 321-1170. 9:30 p.m. Free. Karaoke. Southpaw Brew Pub, 315 Gregory St. 303-2234. 8:30 p.m. Free. Karaoke. Elite Bar & Grill, 398 W Main St. 527-8720. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke. Pineapple Jacks, 485 Spencerport Rd. 247-5225. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke. Jose & Willy’s, 20 Lake Shore Dr, Canandaigua. 3947960. 8:30 p.m. Free. Karaoke. Monty’s Korner, 363 East Ave. 263-7650. 9.30 p.m. Free. Karaoke. Applebee’s-Fairport, 585 Moseley Rd, Fairport. 425-4700. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke. Mayfields Pub, 669 Winton Rd N. 288-7199. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke. Sanibel Cottage, 1517 Empire Blvd, Webster. 671-9340. 6 p.m. Free. Karaoke Night. Lemoncello, 137 W Commercial St, E Rochester. 385-8565, lemoncello137.com. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke w/Jimmy C’s Music Machine ft. Johnny Rocker. Sully’s Pub, 242 South Ave. sullyspubonline.com. 8:30 p.m. Free. Karaoke w/Mark. Flipside Bar & Grill, 2001 E Main St. 288-3930. 8:30 p.m. Free. [ Open Mic ] Acoustic Open Mic. Pub 511, 511 E Ridge Rd. 266-9559. 8 p.m. Free. Open Jam w/Big Daddy Blues Band. Deweys, 1380 Lyell Ave. 254-4707. 9:30 p.m. Free. Open Jam w/Justin Gurnsey. Jukebox, 5435 Ridge Rd W, Spencerport. 352-4505. 10 p.m. Free. Open Mic. Boulder Coffee CoSouth Wedge, 100 Alexander St. 454-7140, bouldercoffeeco.com. 8 p.m. Free. Open Mic. Dr’s Inn Grill & Tap Room, 1743 East Ave. 2710820. 5 p.m. Free. Open Mic w/Jam Shack Music. Stoneyard Bar & Grill, 1 Main St, Brockport. 637-3390. 9 p.m. Free. Open Mic w/Steve West. Muddy Waters Coffee House-Geneseo, 53 Main St, Geneseo. 243-9111. 7-10 p.m. Free. [ Pop/Rock ] 1916 w/Special Guests, Velvet Elvis, and Dive. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N Water St. waterstreetmusic.com. 8 p.m. $7-$10. Count Blastula. Dinosaur Bar-BQue, 99 Court St. 325-7090. 9 p.m. Free. The Orient Express. wegmans. com. 7 p.m. Free. continues on page 15

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continues from page 13

On a national level Rochester is often the

“We have to funnel through a lot of Rochester,” says Donaldson. “It drives you to red-headed stepbrother, passed over for bigger bands,” says Water Street owner John Chmiel. want to do more.” markets like Buffalo, Toronto, or New York “We have to find the bands that are willing to City. Regarding a show’s potential success, try to work with us instead of the ones that sit That is the energy that lit Danny Deutsch’s promoters frequently roll the dice. there going, ‘Make it happen for me.’” fuse to open Abilene three and a half years “I look at it like legalized gambling,” Teresa has been watching bands make it ago. Deutsch jerked suds and booked bands says Cat Bauer, talent buyer at Water Street happen for 12 years as co-owner of The Bug at the long-gone and legendary club Scorgies Music Hall. “It’s always a crap shoot. You Jar on Monroe Avenue. He’s seen it all come on Andrews Street in the late 1970’s and can never tell because no matter what you’ve and go, and come and go, and so on. early 1980’s. National artists like The Dead done in the past with the band, the following “There are ups and downs,” he says. Boys, The Ramones, The Cramps, and Jim year there might be other things that effect “There’s no question. I think times change. Carroll rolled through town and shared the it; they might be touring too much, there There’s always a changing of the guard every stage with a solid set of Rochester scenesters might be too many things going on in town 10 years or so. Now with [Rob] Filardo like New Math, The Antoinettes, The that night, they don’t have a new record, the gone…he really held together that garage Presstones, Personal Effects, and The Bowery weather might be bad…” scene for so long.” Before stepping out of the Boys. The drinking age was 18 at the time, But in general, Bauer says that business at limelight, Rob Filardo ran GaragePop Records which Deutsch believes helped to foster a the club is up. “We’re doing a little bit more and played in a number of the label’s acts, greater scene. both locally and nationally than last year,” she including The Thundergods, Duke Galaxy “I think when you’re 17 or 18 you’re says. “We’re getting more and more agents and the Pipeliners, The Quitters, The Veins, certainly more rebellious,” he says. “You’re calling because their bands like the room and The Priests, and The White Devils. It was the more hungry.” But Deutsch says the scene want to come back.” mid-90’s and it was a healthy, burgeoning today is just as solid and getting better. “Rochester’s definitely a B market,” says scene. But as it faded, new bands and subPerhaps tummies are rumbling once again. Scott Donaldson of the Main Street Armory. scenes came to light. Every genre has a core “There’s so much good, original talent Mike O’Leary left Milestones after becoming DonaIdson’s family has run the venue on East “burnt out” on live music − although he somecollection of groups. in this town,” he says. “From the rockabilly Main Street since 2004. He also has the added times books acts at his new business, Temple. “Now you’ve got bands like Sports, guys like Jim Via [Krypton 88 guitarist] to advantage of viewing the scene from behind Joywave, The Pheromones, Auld Lang Syne,” the scene with Walri, Auld Lang Syne, Audio The Stranglers (with Blondie’s Clem Burke the drums as a member of local heavy rock says Teresa. And that’s not to mention bands Influx…. They are players that just… I mean, on drums), and Gene Ween have all hit the outfit Velvet Elvis. “It’s not a huge city. The of every conceivable genre banding together, they don’t care about the money — they want Lovin’ Cup stage in the past few years. only stuff that seems to come through is super promoting one another, riding each other’s to get paid, of course — but they’re playing The Bug Jar’s Bob “Bobby T” Teresa takes mainstream stuff.” The Armory is rapidly coattails, and sharing the stage. Yet bands like because they love it and they’re good and the same stance, though perhaps with a little becoming a heavy hitter on the scene, brining Velvet Elvis want more exposure. they’re respectful of the music.” more seasoned caution. “Personally, I would acts like The Pixies and Judas Priest (the latter “There are clubs to play,” says Sometimes love just ain’t enough. Many take a hit,” he says. “But we’re being careful band’s only non-arena show on its upcoming Donaldson. “But there are only so many local music fans still mourn the loss of because we want to stay here as a business and tour) to town this fall. clubs to play. We actually took some time Milestones, an awesome venue on East keep the entertainment coming through.” The Party In The Park series continues to off because we felt like were over-saturating Avenue that served as a beacon for live music grow with a steady flow of national bands too, ourselves. We want to start touring the East before it closed its doors in 2007. Owner While the uphill battle to get national acts despite a new $2 admission fee put in place to Coast.” That in turn may turn more eyes Mike O’Leary says he had had enough. to town and on stages of any size rages offset production costs for the city. According and ears back to Rochester. “I was burnt out dealing with the bands,” on, there is no end to locally based bands; to Springut this hasn’t impacted attendance; “That’s the good thing about being a says O’Leary while bellied up to the bar of bands that can help make or break a show he says that this year’s concerts averaged 5000 band in with their added draw while at the same to 7000 people at the Riverside Festival Site time reaping the benefits of on Court and Exchange streets. exposure to a larger audience. “Musically it’s grown. Attendance wise Water Street Music Hall counts er the it’s about the same,” Springut says. “There’s music venues ov on the local bands’ networking in Rochester’s s ge an City ch , g in 00 st definitely room to grow. We’ll continue to e year 20 me intere and footworking skills. Bands nue count. In th ve ere have been so e Th th in bers e m in nu cl keep our eyes peeled for quality entertainment . Those tably a de and 200 venues hustle tickets, print and hang 0 decade, most no 15 st n pa ee tw er be th at to get people downtown in the summer.” had ei d music events of those venues up flyers, bomb all manner of Newspaper liste 05 nearly 100 20 By It’s considered a good practice by some . the number of 03 10 20 r 20 social media, and just generally lar shows. In to decline afte gu d re te ar ed st st ho er not to book talent with your heart. Don 00 there were , or no long pimp the whole affair in order 150. Back in 20 changed names d , an ed 0 os 12 cl n ee Alcott, director of first impressions at Lovin’ or more. By ty was betw to get paid. Some musicians may ng once a week ni nues listed in Ci ea ve m ic — us s m ow Cup, has heard that more than once. He lar sh venues with regu consider it pay-for-play. nearly 40 music doesn’t always listen. the mid-20s. to d pe As a musician, “I don’t like ber had drop m nu at th 10 20 “I prefer booking what I like,” he says. that in 2011. Places to sell tickets for people to ill holding strong st e ic “Not because what I like is the best, but I ar us es M nu ge ve ta Hall, Mon see someone else’s band,” says news, as many er Street Music at W think it means a lot to be able to share with It’s not all bad e nlik , co ic un us r m ts. Othe Donaldson. However, as a promoter en focused on string of concer people. It’s sharing an experience. Some have always be me to a steady ho ill st e , and Johnny’s ar et he sees the logic. “It’s a doubler, re g Ja b, Beale St Pu s acts I book somewhat selfishly. I mean, you n’ to Hall, and the Bu or N n, ow well. edged sword,” he says. like Monty’s Kr music shows as might take a hit, but you still get this amazing ventional venues d have regular an ng ro st “It’s a way to get your foot in the g in ill runn experience where you get to see your favorite Irish Pub are st door,” Water Street’s Bauer says. “You LEEDE H SC artist on your tiny little stage.” Bands like — BY DEB get X amount of dollars per ticket you indie darlings Dean & Britta, punk legends sell. They share the risk.” 14 City august 24-30, 2011


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Thursday, August 25 his new establishment, East Avenue’s Temple Bar and Grille, which incidentally books live entertainment on occasion. Traveling bands that were ideal for Milestones’ medium-sized capacity had begun to dry up when O’Leary decided to bail. “And the local bands,” he says. “You can’t blame these kids. They weren’t making any money, there was no local support…they just couldn’t do it. So it turned into cover bands around town.” O’Leary is part of the group of East End merchants that books the East End Festival that happens on three Fridays in June, July, and August. Lately the festival has taken a turn back to original music as opposed to cover bands on the event’s five stages scattered about the downtown neighborhood — whether fans like it or not. “I don’t know that it’s necessarily that the climate is becoming more accepting,” O’Leary says. “We’re kind of forcing it down people’s throats.” Promoter Jeff Springut is a bit more laissez-faire with a kind of “book-it-and-theywill-come” maxim.” “People’s eyes are opening up,” he says. And Springut’s booking savvy is keeping them open. At a recent Party In The Park show, Springut paired pedal-steel madman Robert Randolph with Austin, Texas, guitarist Gary Clark, Jr., a relative unknown. By the time Clark was finished with his incendiary set, hands were in the air and jaws were on the pavement. All because Springut — and the audience — took a chance. “I think you just have to be willing to take a chance,” says Alcott from Lovin’ Cup. “And if you’re really passionate about music, especially live music, you never stop working. I’m constantly e-mailing or hitting the streets, hanging up posters, talking to everybody, ‘Hey, I’ve got a big show. Come see the show.’” The passion burns bright on both ends. Truthfully, bands would play and clubs would still book them (perhaps to a lesser extent) if there were little or no money to be made. Some have come close to proving this point. But it’s a labor of love and they’re all music fans. “That makes it fun,” says the Bug Jar’s Teresa, who admits he is really only frustrated by one thing: “Last call.”

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[ Acoustic/Folk ] Essence of Rhythm presents: Salsa Night! Lovin’ Cup, Park Point @ RIT. lovincup.com. 9 p.m. $3-$5. John Akers & Elvio Fernandes. Easy on East, 170 East Ave. 3256490. 8 p.m. Free. Live Band Thursdays. Blueroom, 293 Alexander St. 730-5985. 8 p.m. Free. Mark Fantasia. Village Pub, Chili Center Plaza. 889-4547. 9 p.m. Free. Nancy Perry. Mythos Cafe, 77 Main St, Brockport. 637-2770. 6 p.m. Free. Paul Strowe. Cottage Hotel, 1390 Pittsford-Mendon Rd, Mendon. 624-1390. 7-10 p.m. Free. Reggae Night. Elite Bar & Grill, 398 W Main St. 527-8720. 9 p.m. Call for tix. Session w/John Ryan. McGraw’s Irish Pub, 146 W Commercial St, East Rochester. mcgrawsirishpub. com, 764-0991. 7:30 p.m. Free. Songwriter Series Open Mic w/Lisa Carman. Towpath Cafe, 6 N Main St, Fairport. liascarman.com. 7 p.m. Free. [ Blues ] John Rybak + Friends @ Boulder Coffee. Boulder Coffee Alexander. southcentralgroove@ hotmail.com. 7 p.m. Free. Pro-Blues Jam w/ Rochester Blues Review. PI’s Lounge, 495 West Ave. 235-1630. 8 p.m.midnight. Free.

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[ Classical ] Family Concert: Wolfgang Amadeus Schmutzinberry. Finger Lakes Gallery and Frame, 175 South Main St, Canandaigua. lakemusicfestival. org. 7:30 p.m. Free. [ Country ] Lynyrd Skynyrd w/ the Doobie Brothers. CMAC, 3355 Marvin Sands Dr, Canandaigua. cmacevents.com. 7:30 p.m. $23.50-$66. [ DJ/Electronic ] DJ Big Reg. Liquid, 169 St Paul St. 325-5710. 9:30 p.m. Free. DJ Biggie. McKenzie’s Irish Pub, 3685 W Henrietta Rd. 334-8970. 9 p.m. Call for tix. DJ Matt. Roost, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. 321-1170. 7:30 p.m. Free. DJ Mike Dailor. Vertex, 169 N Chestnut St. 232-5498. 10 p.m. $3-$8. DJs Designer Junkies, Etiquette, Ginnis. One, 1 Ryan Alley. 5461010. 10 p.m. $3. Elektrodisko. Vertex, 169 N Chestnut St. facebook.com/ vertexnightclub. 10 p.m. Free before 11:30 p.m. Funknut & Mario Bee. Dub Land Underground, 315 Alexander St. dublandunderground. wordpress.com. 10 p.m. $5 21+, $15 unders. continues on page 16 rochestercitynewspaper.com City 15


Thursday, August 25 Mostly 80’s Night. Hatter’s Pub, 5 W Main St, Webster. 8721505. 6 p.m. Call for tix. Soul Sides Record Listening Party. Good Luck, 50 Anderson Ave. 340-6161. 9 p.m. Free. Thursday Night Shakedown. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 454-2966, bugjar.com. 11 p.m. Free. Tiki Thursdays: Shotgun Music DJ. McGhan’s, 11 W Main St, Victor. 924-3660. 7:30 p.m. Free. Tilt-a-Whirl Drag Show. Tilt Night Club, 444 Central Ave. 2328440, tiltroc.com. 11:15 p.m. & 12:30 a.m. $3. [ Jazz ] Joe Santora Trio w/Emily Kirchoff. Michael’s Valley Grill, 1694 Penfield R, Penfield. 383-8260. 7 p.m. Free. Live Jam w/Eastman School Students. Triple Deuces Bar & Grill, 151 St Paul St. 232-3888. Thu 6 p.m., Fri 5 p.m. Free. Russell Scarbrough’s SOUL-JAZZ Big Band. Tala Vera, 155 State St. rscarbro@gmail.com. 8 p.m. $5. The Russell Scarbrough Big Band. Tala Vera, 155 State St. tala-vera. com, 546-3945. 8 p.m. $5. Todd East. Pane Vino, 175 N Water St. panevinoristorante.com, 232-6090. 8:30 p.m. Call for info. Wine & Jazz Happy Hour-David Spiner. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. 248-4861. 5:30-8:30 p.m. Free. [ Karaoke ] Karaoke. Panorama Night Club, 730 Elmgrove Rd. 247-2190. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke. Goody Goodies, 6108 Loomis Rd, Farmington. 7422531. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke. Pineapple Jacks, 485 Spencerport Rd. 247-5225. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke. Jukebox, 5435 Ridge Rd W, Spencerport. 352-4505. 7:30 p.m. Free. Karaoke. Applebee’s-Penfield, 1955 Empire Blvd, Webster. 787-0570. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke. GridIron Bar & Grill, 3154 State St, Caledonia. 5384008. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke Idol. Center Cafe, 150 Frank DiMino Way. 594-8882. 7 p.m. Free. Karaoke w/DJ Smooth. Clarissa’s, 293 Clarissa St. 454-2680. 8:30 p.m. Free. Karaoke w/George, King of Karaoke. Temple Bar & Grille, 109 East Ave. 232-6000. 8 p.m. Free. Karaoke w/Summer Bob. Shorts Bar & Grill, 35 N Main St, Fairport. 585-388-0136. 10 p.m. Free. Karaoke w/Tim Burnette. Sevens, Rt 96, Farmington. 924-3232. 8-11 p.m. Free. [ Open Mic ] Open Blues Jam w/Alex D & Jimmie Mac. PJ’s Lounge, 499 West Ave. 436-9066. 9 p.m. Free. Shade Grown Coffee House and Open Mic Night: No Child Left Inside. Montezuma Audubon Center 2295 State Route 89 Savannah 6:30 p.m. Free. montezuma@audubon.org.

Open Jam. Pub 511, 511 E Ridge Rd. 266-9559. 8 p.m. Free. Open Jam w/Beau Ryan & Amanda Ashley. Firehouse Saloon, 814 Clinton Ave S. 244-6307. 9 p.m. Free. Open Mic. Towpath Cafe, 6 N Main St, Fairport. 377-0410. 6:30 p.m. Free. Open Mic w/Jed Curran & Steve Piper. Flipside Bar & Grill, 2001 E Main St. 288-3930. 8 p.m. Free. Songwriter’s Open Mic. Towpath Cafe, 6 N Main St, Fairport. 3770410. 7 p.m. Free. [ Pop/Rock ] Be Glad & Dunn. Westside Sports Bar & Grill, 1600 Lyell Ave. 4587888. 9 p.m. Call for tix. Come Honor w/ Alberto Alaska, & There I Say is Lightning. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. bugjar.com. 8:30. $5/$7. Dirty Bourbon Blues Band. Dinosaur Bar-B-Que, 99 Court St. 325-7090. 9:30 p.m. Free. Jeff Elliott. Irondequoit Ale House, 2250 Hudson Ave. 5445120. 5 p.m. Free. Jimmy Lane. Six Pockets, Ridge Hudson Plaza. 266-1440. 7 p.m. Free. Sans Ego. California Brew Haus, 402 Ridge Rd W. 621-1480. 8 p.m. $5-$7. Train, Maroon 5 w/Gavin DeGraw. New York State Fair. nysfair.org. 7:30 p.m. $35-$45.

Friday, August 26 [ Acoustic/Folk ] Lincoln Cromwell w/The Scattery Islanders. McGraw’s Irish Pub, 146 W Commercial St, East Rochester. mcgrawsirishpub.com, 764-0991. 5 p.m. Call for into. Ralph Louis. Rochester Plaza Hotel, 70 State St. rochesterplaza.com. 6 p.m. Free. Ted Nicolosi and Shared Genes. Bistro 135, 135 W Commercial St,, East Rochester. 662-5555, Bistro135.net. 6 p.m. Free. Tom Gravino. Tandoor of India, 376 Jefferson Rd. 427-7080. 7 p.m. Free. Woody. Lift Bridge Book Shop, 45 Main St, Brockport. 6372260. 6 p.m. Free. [ Blues ] B.B. King & Buddy Guy. CMAC, 3355 Marvin Sands Dr, Canandaigua. 800-745-3000, cmacevents.com. 7 p.m. $25$65. Billy Joe & the Blues Gypsies w/Dave Riccioni. Six Pockets, Ridge Hudson Plaza. 266-1440. 6-9 p.m. Free. Gap Mangione New Blues Band. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. 248-4861. 7:30 p.m.-Midnight. Free. The John Bolger Band. Beale Street Cafe, 693 South Ave. 271-4650. 7-11 p.m. Free. [ Classical ] Alexandra Calvert, Steven Seigart. Twelve Corners Presbyterian Church. twelvecorners.org. 7 p.m. Free. Festival Series #3: A Crime of Passion: The Kreutzer Sonata. Zion Fellowship, 5188 Bristol Road, Canandaigua. lakemusicfestival.org. 7:30 p.m. $60 Patron, $35 GA, $10 student.

16 City august 24-30, 2011

John Ballings. Hedges, 1290 Lake Rd, Webster. 265-3850. 6:30 p.m. Free. [ Country ] David Pronko. Sandra’s Saloon, 276 Smith St. 546-5474. 9:30 p.m. Free. [ DJ/Electronic ] DJ. Coach Sports Forum, 19 W Main St, Webster. 872-2910. 9 p.m. Call for tix. DJ Cedric. Vertex, 169 N Chestnut St. 232-5498. 10 p.m. $3-$8. DJ Dream. Nola’s BBQ, 4775 Lake Ave. 663-3375. 10 p.m. Call for tix. DJ Fat Daddy Buck. Roost, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. 321-1170. 8:30 p.m. Free. DJ GI. Liquid, 169 St Paul St. 3255710. 10 p.m. Free-$5. DJ Mosart212. Lovin’ Cup, Park Point @ RIT. 292-9940. 6 p.m. Free. Jon Herbert, RipRoc. One, 1 Ryan Alley. 546-1010. 10 p.m. $3. Reggaeton w/DJ Carlos. La Copa Ultra Lounge, 235 W Ridge Rd. 254-1050. 10 p.m. Call for tix. Salsa Night w/DJ Javier Rivera. Tango Cafe, 389 Gregory St. 4750249. 9 p.m. $5. What A Drag w/Samantha Vega, Kyla Minx & Pauly. Tilt Night Club, 444 Central Ave. 232-8440, tiltroc.com. 11:15 p.m. & 12:30 a.m. $4-$12. [ Hip-Hop/Rap ] Good Fridays. Westside Sports Bar & Grill, 1600 Lyell Ave. 458-7888. 10 p.m. $10. [ Jazz ] Barry Tee Trio. Pomodoro Monroe Ave, 3400 Monroe Ave. mypomodoro.com, 586-7000. 7 p.m. Free. Bobby Dibaudo Trio. Bistro 135, 135 W Commercial St,, East Rochester. bistro135.net, 6625555. 6:30 p.m. Call for into. DjanGoners. Geneseo Village Park. geneseoconcerts.com. 7 p.m. Free. Joe Santora Trio w/Emily Kirchoff. Michael’s Valley Grill, 1694 Penfield R, Penfield. 3838260. 7 p.m. Free. Johnny Matt Band w/Jon Seiger. Wegmans-Eastway, 1955 Empire Blvd, Webster. 6718290. 5:30 p.m. Free. Luca Foresta and the Electro Kings. Pane Vino, 175 N Water St. panevinoristorante.com, 232-6090. 8 p.m. Call for info. Methodical Methods Presents: The Summer Music Series at The Srathallen Hotel. Strathallen Hotel - 550 East Avenue. methodicalmethods@gmail. com. 8 p.m. Free. Oxford Train. Tala Vera, 155 State St. tala-vera.com, 5463945. 8 p.m. $3. Ryan T Carey. Thali of India, 3259 S Winton Rd. 427-8030. 7-9 p.m. Free. Sanfoka evening of Theater and Jazz. MuCCC, 142 Atlantic Ave. muccc.org. 7:30 p.m. $12-$15. The Po Boys Brass Band w/String of Pearls. Abilene, 153 Liberty Pole Way. abilenebarandlounge. com. 6 p.m. $3 after 9:30, or Free with canned goods donation.

[ Karaoke ] Karaoke. Village Pub, Chili Center Plaza. 889-4547. 9 p.m. Call for tix. Karaoke. Goody Goodies, 6108 Loomis Rd, Farmington. 7422531. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke. Pineapple Jacks, 485 Spencerport Rd. 247-5225. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke w/Bobby C. Ciao Baby’s BBQ Steak & Seafood, 421 River St. 621-5480. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke w/Summer Bob. Shorts Bar & Grill, 35 N Main St, Fairport. 585-388-0136. 10 p.m. Free. Karaoke w/Tina P. Norton’s Pub, 1730 N Goodman St. 266-3570. 9 p.m. Free. [ Open Mic ] Open Mic. Rochester Institute of Technology-Java Wally’s, 90 Lomb Memorial Dr. 475-2562. 9 p.m. Free. [ Pop/Rock ] Coup D’Villes. Dinosaur Bar-BQue, 99 Court St. 325-7090. 10 p.m. Free. Figure Eight. California Brew Haus, 402 Ridge Rd W. 6211480. 10 p.m. $5-$7. Guy Smiley. Pelican’s Nest, 566 River Street. 663-5910. 10 p.m.2 a.m. Call for info. Left on Red & This Other Life in Outdoor Show. Church of the Epiphany, 3285 Buffalo Rd., Gates. brownpapertickets.com, 247-4190. 7 p.m. $15 adv $20 doors. Benefit Concert for Water for Sudan. Ne-Yo and Cee Lo Green. New York State Fair. nysfair.org. 7:30 p.m. $45-$55. RageFest 2011. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N Water St. waterstreetmusic.com. 5 p.m. $12-$15. For full lineup see website. Sam Deleo. Perlo’s Italian Grill, 202 N Washington St, East Rochester. 248-5060. 6:3010:30 p.m. Free. Shattered Envy and friends. Montage Music Hall, 50 Chestnut Plaza. frontgatetickets. com. 8 p.m. $8. Something Else. A-Pub Live, 6 Lawrence St. 269-9655. 10 p.m. $5. The Sound Remains The Same(Led Zeppelin tribute) w/The Druids(Grateful Dead tribute). Public Market, 280 N Union St. 428-6907. 6 p.m. Free. West Fest: Anchorage Nebraska, The Bad Kids, Grandfather, Neurolepsy, Rational Animals, Birds and Mines, Sonar Mail, & Comedown. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. bugjar.com. 6:30 p.m. $8/$10. [ R&B ] Old School R&B. Elite Bar & Grill, 398 W Main St. 527-8720. 9 p.m. Call for tix. Soul On Tap. Johnny’s Irish Pub, 1382 Culver Rd. johnnysirishpub. com, 224-0990. 8 p.m. Free. Soul at the Cup. Lovin’ Cup, Park Point @ RIT. 292-9940. 9 p.m. Call for tix.

Saturday, August 27 [ Acoustic/Folk ] Gerard Weber and Ted McGraw. McGraw’s Irish Pub, 146 W

METAL | Bullet Boys

I’ve always dug the hair-metal bands that, whether it was due to their on- or off-stage sleaze factor or true adherence to hard rock, never got sucked into the mainstream gas chamber. Formed in 1987 by ex-Ratt guitarist Marq Torien, The Bullet Boys played it loud and fast — there was more metal than hair. In its late 80’s/early 90’s prime, the band released two albums before succumbing to the revolvingdoor line-up so many bands can’t avoid. Torien remains and so does the metal. Hair-metal revivalists Nasty Habit opens. Bullet Boys perform Saturday, August 27, 8 p.m. at Montage Music Hall, 50 N. Chestnut St. $10. themontagemusichall.com. — BY FRANK DE BLASE Commercial St, East Rochester. mcgrawsirishpub.com, 7640991. 5 p.m. Call for info. Latin Band. Tapas 177 Lounge, 177 St Paul St. 262-2090. 11 p.m. Free. Michael W. Lasota. Boulder Coffee Co-South Wedge, 100 Alexander St. mwlasota@gmail. com. 8 p.m. Free. Tom Gravino. Thali of India, 3259 S Winton Rd. 355-8206. 7 p.m. Free. Unplugged Dinner Music Series. Lovin’ Cup, Park Point @ RIT. 292-9940, lovincup.com. 6 p.m. Free. [ Blues ] Bill Brown. Brown Hound Bistro, 6459 Rt 64, Naples. 374-9771. 7 p.m. Free. Deep Blue. Beale Street Cafe, 693 South Ave. jaweyl@ rochester.rr.com. 7:30 p.m. Gap Mangione & The New Blues Band. Pier 45, 1000 N River St. 865.4500, pier45attheport.com. 7 p.m. Call for info. Joe Beard. Dinosaur Bar-B-Que, 99 Court St. 325-7090. 10 p.m. Free. [ Classical ] John Ballings. Hedges, 1290 Lake Rd, Webster. 265-3850. 6:30 p.m. Free. [ Country ] Lyle Lovett and His Large Band. CMAC, 3355 Marvin Sands Dr, Canandaigua. cmacevents. com. 7 p.m. $50-$65. [ DJ/Electronic ] Big Dance Party w/DJ Jon Herbert. Tilt Night Club, 444 Central Ave. 232-8440, tiltroc. com. 10 p.m. $3. DJ. Goody Goodies, 6108 Loomis Rd, Farmington. 7422531. 9 p.m. Free.

DJ. Straight Home Inn Bar & Grill, 688 Lexington Ave. 458-0020. 9 p.m. Free. DJ Big Reg. Venu Resto-Lounge, 151 St Paul St. 232-5650. 7 p.m. Free. DJ Darkwave. Vertex, 169 N Chestnut St. 232-5498. 10 p.m. $3-$8. DJ Fat Daddy Buck. Roost, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. 321-1170. 8:30 p.m. Free. DJ Mirage. Blueroom, 293 Alexander St. 730-5985. 10 p.m. Call for tix. DJ Wiz. Liquid, 169 St Paul St. 325-5710. 9:30 p.m. Free-$5. DJs Richie Salvaggio, Kalifornia. One, 1 Ryan Alley. 546-1010. 10 p.m. Free-$10. Rave the 90’s. Tilt Night Club, 444 Central Ave. tiltroc.com, 2328440. 9 p.m. 21-$6, unders-$12. [ Jazz ] Bob DiBaudo. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. 2484861. 7:30 p.m.-Midnight. Free. East End Jazz Boys. Havana Moe’s, 125 East Ave. 3251030. 9 p.m. Free. Ernesto Trio. Pomodoro Monroe Ave, 3400 Monroe Ave. mypomodoro.com, 586-7000. 7 p.m. Free. Jazz Cafe. Monty’s Korner, 363 East Ave. 263-7650. 7:30 p.m. Free. Jazz at Jazzy’s. Jasmine’s Asian Fusion, 657 Ridge Rd, Webster. 216-1290. 8:30-11 p.m. Free. Joe Santora Trio w/Emily Kirchoff. Michael’s Valley Grill, 1694 Penfield R, Penfield. 383-8260. 7 p.m. Free. Madeline Forster. Bistro 135, 135 W Commercial St,, East Rochester. bistro135.net, 6625555. 7 p.m. Call for info.


Marcus Roberts Trio at Brook Farm. Brook Farm (2870 West Lake Rd. Skaneateles NY 13152). (315)685-7418. 7:30 p.m. $20-$26. Sanfoka evening of Theater and Jazz. MuCCC, 142 Atlantic Ave. muccc.org. 7:30 p.m. $12-$15. Ted Nicolosi and Shared Genes. Glengarry Inn at Eagle Vale, 4400 Nine Mile Point Road, Rt 250 Fairport NY. 598-3820, EagleVale.com. 6:30 p.m. Free. The Westview Project with Doug Stone, sax. Grill at Strathallan, 550 East Ave. 461-5010, strathallan.com. 8:30 p.m. Free. [ Karaoke ] Karaoke. The Galley Restaurant, 94 S Union St, Spencerport. 352-0200. 8 p.m. Free. Karaoke. 140 Alex, 140 Alexander St. 256-1000. 10:30 p.m. Free. Karaoke. Pineapple Jacks, 485 Spencerport Rd. 247-5225. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke. Straight Home Inn Bar & Grill, 688 Lexington Ave. 4580020. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke. Temple Bar & Grille, 109 East Ave. 232-6000. 10 p.m. Free. Karaoke. Straight Home Inn Bar & Grill, 688 Lexington Ave. 4580020. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke At The Lube. Quaker Steak and Lube, 2205 Buffalo Rd. 697.9464. 9:30 p.m. Free. Karaoke w/Andy & Kim. Norton’s Pub, 1730 N Goodman St. 2663570. 10 p.m. Free. [ Open Mic ] Drum Joy: Drumming Circle. Christ Church Unity, 55 Prince St. 615-8296, tonermanny@ frontiernet.net. 1-3 p.m. Free. [ Pop/Rock ] 50/50. Pelican’s Nest, 566 River Street. 663-5910. 10 p.m.-2 a.m. Call for info. Bee Eater 10th Anniversary Reunion w/ BML & The Blastoffs. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. bugjar. com. 9 p.m. $7-$9. Bullet Boys 80’s Grand Slam. Montage Music Hall, 50 Chestnut Plaza. themontagemusichall.com. 8 p.m. $10. Fairport Music Festival. Main Street, Fairport. fairportmusicfestival.com. noon. $10-$15, children 12 and under free. See fairportmusicfestival. com for full line up. Flour City Knuckleheads, Jonathan Frizzelle, Big Brain & The Drug Cartel. Monty’s Krown Lounge, 875 Monroe Ave. flourcityknuckleheads@gmail. com. 9 p.m. Free. Mike & Sergei and SisterSister w/Mr. Mustard the Beatles.Period. Corner Sports Bar, 122 Main St, East Rochester. 248-2040. 4 p.m. Free. Pietzcshe Nietzsche. Abilene, 153 Liberty Pole Way. abilenebarandlounge.com. 8 p.m. $4. RageFest 2011. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N Water St. waterstreetmusic.com. 5 p.m. $12-$15. Selena Gomez & The Scene w/Christina Grimmie. nysfair. org. 7 p.m. $38-$48.

ALT-COUNTRY | Lyle Lovett and His Large Band

Boasting a career that spans more than 30 years, has produced 13 albums, netted him four Grammys, and one marriage to Julia Roberts, Lyle Lovett often seems more well known for having a strange head of hair, or for that whirlwind marriage, than his music. Despite — or perhaps in part because of — his attention-getting persona, Lovett is touring on the success of his most recent album, 2009’s “Natural Forces,” which peaked at No. 8 on the Billboard U.S. Country chart. Influencing a large number of performers to come after him, the “Cowboy Man” brings his country twang and untamed hair to CMAC this weekend. Lyle Lovett and His Large Band performs Saturday, August 27, 7 p.m. at CMAC, 3355 Marvin Sands Drive, Canandaigua. $50-$75. cmacevents.com. — BY ANDY KLINGENBERGER Shaded Passion. Anchor Sports Bar & Grill-Marketplace. 2729333. 10 p.m. $3. Smooth Talkers. Johnny’s Irish Pub, 1382 Culver Rd. johnnysirishpub.com, 2240990. 8 p.m. Free. Tainted Minds. A-Pub Live, 6 Lawrence St. 269-9655. 10 p.m. $5. Veluxe. Genesee Center for the Arts & Education, 713 Monroe Avenue. 244-1730. 4 p.m. Free

Sunday, August 28 [ Acoustic/Folk ] Celtic Music. Temple Bar & Grille, 109 East Ave. 232-6000. 7 p.m. Free. The Red Stick Ramblers. Abilene, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230, abilenebarandlounge.com. 7:30 p.m. Call for info. Traditional Irish Music Session. Johnny’s Irish Pub, 1382 Culver Rd. johnnysirishpub. com, 224-0990. 5 p.m. Free. [ Classical ] Classical - Eastman at St. Michael’s. St Michael’s Church, 869 N Clinton Ave. 325-4040. 2:30 p.m. Free. Festival Series #4: Season Finale. Zion Fellowship, 5188 Bristol Road, Canandagua. lakemusicfestival.org. 7:30 p.m. Free. Going for Baroque Organ Recital. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. 276-8900. 1 & 3 p.m. Free w/admission. [ DJ/Electronic ] DJ. Westside Sports Bar & Grill, 1600 Lyell Ave. 458-7888. 9 p.m. Call for tix.

DJ Rasta Spoc/Old-School Reggae. Blueroom, 293 Alexander St. 730-5985. 10 p.m. $5 after 11 p.m. Old School DJ. Clarissa’s, 293 Clarissa St. 454-2680. 8 p.m. Free. Rave the 90’s. Tilt Night Club, 444 Central Ave. facebook. com/Tiltnightclub. 9 p.m. $6$15. 18+. [ Hip-Hop/Rap ] R&B HipHop Spring Edition. Cafe Underground Railroad, 480 W Main St. 235-3550. 8 p.m. $5-$10. [ Jazz ] Open Jazz Jam with Troup Street Band. Beale Street Cafe, 693 South Ave. 271-4650. 6-9 p.m. Free. The Swooners. Pane Vino, 175 N Water St. panevinoristorante. com, 232-6090. 5 p.m. Call for info. [ Karaoke ] Karaoke. Jose & Willy’s, 20 Lake Shore Dr, Canandaigua. 394-7960. 8:30 p.m. Free. Karaoke w/Brad London. Willow Inn, 428 Manitou Rd. 3923489. 9 p.m. Free. [ Open Mic ] Acoustic Sunday w/Fred Goodnow. Brown Hound Bistro, 6459 Rt 64, Naples. 374-9771. 11 a.m. Free. Open Country Jam. Sandra’s Saloon, 276 Smith St. 5465474. 4-8 p.m. Free. Open Jam w/Bodega Radio. Jukebox, 5435 Ridge Rd W, Spencerport. 352-4505. 5 p.m. Free. continues on page 18 rochestercitynewspaper.com City 17


The b e s t is on

meal

a l l we e k

Sunday, August 28

S u n d ay s

Troup Street Jazz Jam Session. Beale Street Cafe, 693 South Ave. 271-4650, bealestreetcafe. com. 6 p.m. Free.

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FIND US ON

Are you A Cancer Survivor

With Trouble Sleeping? We are seeking cancer survivors who are having difficulty falling or staying asleep for a study testing two methods for reducing sleep problems and fatigue. How may you benefit

All participants will receive a behavioral treatment for sleep problems, at no charge, either as part of the study or after. Half of the participants will receive a drug called armodafinil that may be helpful in reducing daytime tiredness and fatigue.

Eligibility (partial list)

• Be between the ages 21 and 75 • Have finished radiation treatments and/or chemotherapy • Insomnia began or got worse with the onset of cancer or treatment

Please call Jenine Hoefler (585) 276-3559 or Joseph Roscoe, Ph.D. (585) 275-9962 at the University of Rochester James P. Wilmot Cancer Center for more information about this research study

[ Pop/Rock ] 3 Doors Down w/Saving Abel, SafetySuit. New York State Fair. nysfair.org. 7:30 p.m. $30-$40. MOW 4 VOA. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N Water St. rjaffarian@ voawny.org. 2 p.m. $7.00. MoChester at Hooligan’s Eastside Grill Annual Pig Roast. TC Hooligans-Webster, Webster Woods Plz, Webster. mochestermusic@gmail.com. 3PM. Call for info. Tattoo Fest Final Night featuring Malformed, Neotheist, & Abdicate. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. bugjar.com. 9 p.m. $5-$7. [ R&B ] Atlas. Pelican’s Nest, 566 River Street. 663-5910. 5-10 p.m. Call for info.

Monday, August 29 [ Acoustic/Folk ] Dave McGrath & Guests. Rehab Lounge , 510 Monroe Ave. 4429165. 6 p.m. Free. Irish Waltzes. McGraw’s Irish Pub, 146 W Commercial St, East Rochester. 348-9091, mcgrawsirishpub.com. 6-7 p.m. Free. John Mcconnell. Dinosaur BarB-Que, 99 Court St. 325-7090. 9 p.m. Free. Slow Learner’s Session. McGraw’s Irish Pub, 146 W Commercial St, East Rochester. 348-9091, mcgrawsirishpub. com. 7-9 p.m. Free. The Root Hogs & Crue Pie. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. bugjar. com. 8:30 p.m. $5-$7. [ DJ/Electronic ] DJ TW. Roost, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. 321-1170. 7:30 p.m. Free. Manic Mondays DJs. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 454-2966. 11 p.m. Free. [ Jazz ] Happy Hour-Brad Batz. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. 248-4861. 5:30-8:30 p.m. Free. [ Karaoke ] Karaoke. Roost, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. 321-1170. 9:30 p.m. Free. Karaoke w/Walt O’Brien. Flipside Bar & Grill, 2001 E Main St. 2883930. 9 p.m. Free. [ Open Mic ] Open Jam w/Refreshunz. Clarissa’s, 293 Clarissa St. 2323430. 8 p.m. Free.

Tuesday, August 30 [ Acoustic/Folk ] Jeff Elliott. Norton’s Pub, 1730 N Goodman St. 266-3570. 5-8 p.m. Free. Johnny Bauer. Cottage Hotel, 1390 Pittsford-Mendon Rd, Mendon. 624-1390. 7-10 p.m. Free. Singer’s Session with Joe Moore. McGraw’s Irish Pub, 146 W Commercial St, East Rochester. 348-9091. 8:30-10 p.m. Free. 18 City august 24-30, 2011

ALTERNATIVE | Routine Involvements

Routine Involvements hasn’t even been together for a year, but this trio has already turned its raw, basement rehearsals into a smooth, steady stream of vibrant, melodic hooks mixing many different musical styles such as shoegaze, hardcore, and punk. Also playing at this show is There I Say Is Lightning, an extremely literate, underground indie outfit that has a raw, intimidating sound, reminiscent of some early Modest Mouse. It also throws in some psychedelic guitar play once in a while, as well as hints of folk and bluegrass. Archimedes and Jenna Giuliani fill the bill. Routine Involvements performs Tuesday, August 30, 8 p.m. at Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. $5-$7. 454-2966, bugjar.com. — BY DAVID YOCKEL JR. Teagan Ward. Beale Street Cafe, 693 South Ave. 2714650. 7-10 p.m. Free. [ Classical ] Auditions: Rochester Oratorio Society. Asbury First United Methodist Church, 1050 East Ave. 473-2234. Barbershop Harmony. Harmony House, 58 E Main St., Webster. chorusofthegenesee.org. 7 p.m. Free. Open practices/try outs. [ DJ/Electronic ] DJ Fat Daddy Buck. Roost, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. 321-1170. 8:30 p.m. Free. [ Jazz ] Happy Hour-Tinted Image. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. 248-4861. 5:308:30 p.m. Free.

Open Mic w/String Theory. Johnny’s Irish Pub, 1382 Culver Rd. 224-0990, johnnysirishpub. com. 8 p.m. Free. [ Pop/Rock ] Don Christiano - With A Little Help from My Friends: The Beatles Unplugged. Abilene, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230, abilenebarandlounge.com. 8 p.m. Egg Man’s Traveling Carnival. Hatter’s Pub, 5 W Main St, Webster. 872-1505. 6 p.m. Call for tix. Journey w/Foreigner, Night Ranger. New York State Fair. nysfair.org. 7:30 p.m. $55-$65. Routine Involvements, There I Say is Lightning, Archimedes & Jenna Giuliani. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. bugjar.com. 9 p.m. $5-$7.

[ Karaoke ] Karaoke. 140 Alex, 140 Alexander St. 256-1000. 10:30 p.m. Free. Karaoke. Pineapple Jacks, 485 Spencerport Rd. 247-5225. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke. McKenzie’s Irish Pub, 3685 W Henrietta Rd. 334-8970. 8 p.m. Free. Karaoke. Westside Sports Bar & Grill, 1600 Lyell Ave. 458-7888. 9 p.m. Call for tix.

Wednesday, August 31

[ Open Mic ] Golden Link Singaround. Twelve Corners Presbyterian Church, 1200 S Winton Rd. goldenlink. org. 7:30 p.m. Free. Open Jam w/ Too Tall. Dinosaur Bar-B-Que, 99 Court St. 3257090. 9 p.m. Free. Open Mic Night. Lovin’ Cup, Park Point @ RIT. 292-9940, lovincup.com. 8:30 p.m. Free. Open Mic w/Rapier Slices. Clarissa’s, 293 Clarissa St. 4542680. 7-11 p.m. $3-$5.

[ DJ/Electronic ] DJ Wizz the Waxx Kutta. Triple Deuces Bar & Grill, 151 St Paul St. tripledeucesbargrill.com. 10:30 p.m. Call for tix. Bad Wolf: 50s & 60s Vinyl Bop. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 4542966, bugjar.com. 10 p.m. Free. DJ. Westside Sports Bar & Grill, 1600 Lyell Ave. 458-7888. 9 p.m. Call for tix. DJ. One, 1 Ryan Alley. 546-1010. 10 p.m. Free.

[ Classical ] Auditions: Rochester Oratorio Society. Asbury First United Methodist Church, 1050 East Ave. 473-2234. Special Event: Solo Recital with Jon Nakamatsu, piano. First Presbyterian Church (97 E. Genesee St. Skaneateles NY, 13152). (315)685-7418. 8 p.m. $25.


DJ Babi Katt/Dancehall Reggae. Blueroom, 293 Alexander St. 7305985. 10 p.m. $5 after 11 p.m. DJ Cosmo. Bay Bar & Grill, 372 Manitou Rd, Hilton. 392-7700. 10 p.m. Free. DJ Fat Daddy Buck. Roost, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. 321-1170. 8:30 p.m. Free. DJs Jared & Mario B. Venu RestoLounge, 151 St Paul St. 2325650. 9 p.m. $5. DJs NaNa & PJ. Vertex, 169 N Chestnut St. 232-5498. 10 p.m. $3-$8. [ Jazz ] Paradigm Shift. Pomodoro Grill & Wine Bar, 1290 University Ave. 271-5000. 7:30 p.m. Free.

Robert Chevrier. Pomodoro Monroe Ave, 3400 Monroe Ave. 586-7000. 6:30 p.m. Free. Tony Gianavola. Beale Street Cafe, 693 South Ave. 271-4650, bealestreetcafe.com. 6 p.m. Free. [ Karaoke ] Karaoke. Roost, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. 321-1170. 9:30 p.m. Free. Karaoke. Southpaw Brew Pub, 315 Gregory St. 303-2234. 8:30 p.m. Free. Karaoke. Elite Bar & Grill, 398 W Main St. 527-8720. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke. Pineapple Jacks, 485 Spencerport Rd. 247-5225. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke. Jose & Willy’s, 20 Lake Shore Dr, Canandaigua. 3947960. 8:30 p.m. Free.

Karaoke. Monty’s Korner, 363 East Ave. 263-7650. 9.30 p.m. Free. Karaoke. Applebee’s-Fairport, 585 Moseley Rd, Fairport. 4254700. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke. Mayfields Pub, 669 Winton Rd N. 288-7199. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke. Sanibel Cottage, 1517 Empire Blvd, Webster. 671-9340. 6 p.m. Free. Karaoke - Karaoke Night. Lemoncello, 137 W Commercial St, E Rochester. 385-8565, lemoncello137.com. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke w/Jimmy C’s Music Machine ft. Johnny Rocker. Sully’s Pub, 242 South Ave. sullyspubonline.com. 8:30 p.m. Free.

Karaoke w/Mark. Flipside Bar & Grill, 2001 E Main St. 2883930. 8:30 p.m. Free. [ Open Mic ] Acoustic Open Mic. Pub 511, 511 E Ridge Rd. 266-9559. 8 p.m. Free. Open Jam w/Big Daddy Blues Band. Deweys, 1380 Lyell Ave. 254-4707. 9:30 p.m. Free. Open Jam w/Justin Gurnsey. Jukebox, 5435 Ridge Rd W, Spencerport. 352-4505. 10 p.m. Free. Open Mic. Boulder Coffee CoSouth Wedge, 100 Alexander St. 454-7140, bouldercoffeeco.com. 8 p.m. Free. Open Mic. Dr’s Inn Grill & Tap Room, 1743 East Ave. 271-0820. 5 p.m. Free.

Open Mic w/Jam Shack Music. Stoneyard Bar & Grill, 1 Main St, Brockport. 637-3390. 9 p.m. Free. Open Mic - Open Mic w/Steve West. Muddy Waters Coffee House-Geneseo, 53 Main St, Geneseo. 243-9111. 7-10 p.m. Free.

Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. bugjar. com. 9 p.m. $5-$7. 21+. Oxford Train w/Melia. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N Water St. waterstreetmusic.com. 8:30 p.m. $5-$7, unders surcharge extra. The Invictas. Ontario Beach Park, 4800 Lake Ave. wegmans.com. 7 p.m. Free. Vitamin X. Dinosaur Bar-B-Que, 99 Court St. 325-7090. 9 p.m. Free.

[ Pop/Rock ] BLUTO Rocks the Lube! Quaker Steak and Lube, 2205 Buffalo Rd. rich@blutorocks.com. 6 p.m. Email for details. Classic Rock 70’s BLUTO style for Bike Night. Bobby T. & Erik Anders’ Double Birthday All the Way! w/ White Bison, Chillum, Erik Anders & Abandoned Buildings Club. Bug

ROCHESTER MARKET DISTRICT MERCHANTS AWAKEN

8 Public Market | 261-5659 or 764-8007

BOULDER @ THE MARKET 1 Public Market | 232-5282

CABLE REST. EQUIPMENT 144 Railroad St | 454-7494

CARLSON METRO CTR YMCA 444 East Main Street | 325-2880

JUAN & MARIA’S EMPANADA STOP Public Market

FLOWER CITY PRODUCE

20-22 Public Market | 423-0994

FLOWER CITY STORAGE FRIENDS OF THE PUBLIC MARKET www.marketfriends.org

HARMAN FLOORING CO. 29 Hebard St | 546-1221

JAVA'S

55 Public Market | 325-5282

OBJECT MAKER

Railroad St | 244-4933

ROHRBACH BREWING CO. 97 Railroad St | 546-8020

THE GOURMET WAFFLER 31 Edmonds St | 461-0633

WILKES PRODUCTIONS

9 Public Market | 423-1966

This Week’s Health Tip from MVP Health Care

Grill sliced fruits and veggies. Brush cut surfaces lightly with olive oil and grill for a several minutes on both sides. Serve warm grilled fruit with a scoop of low-fat frozen yogurt. For more information on how to live well, visit www.mvphealthcare.com rochestercitynewspaper.com City 19


Art

“Curve,” by local artist Jim Mott, is part of the “In the Loop” exhibition at Rochester Contemporary. PHOTO PROVIDED

People in the periphery “State of the City: In the Loop” Through September 25 Rochester Contemporary ART center, 137 East Ave. 461-2222, rochestercontemporary.org Wed-Sun 1-5 p.m., Fri 1-10 p.m. | $1 [ REVIEW ] BY REBECCA RAFFERTY

Rochester Contemporary’s annual “State of the City” exhibit brings together artists from different backgrounds to consider upstate cities with regards to their histories, shifts, and futures. This year’s edition spotlights Rochester’s Inner Loop, the controversial, nearly 50 year old roadway that has provided a high-speed commute, but truncated many city streets, isolated many neighborhoods, and contributed to a decline in Rochester’s population. In a looping news spot from WROC entitled “Living with the Loop,” people on the street and politicians alike discuss the “moat” of a roadway, and some advocate filling in less-traveled parts of it. In this exhibition, artists and institutions from different backgrounds respond to and explore ways of experiencing the ring highway by employing landscape paintings, photo essays, interactive videos, psychogeographic projects, and mixed-media sculpture to consider and discuss Downtown Rochester’s urban highways. Although this exhibit covers many interesting aspects of the topic, some viewers were surprised to find limited discussion regarding the Loop’s direct impact on the people of the city. 20 City august 24-30, 2011

Local painter Jim Mott is known for his national Itinerant Artist Project, in which he exchanges the hospitality of strangers for paintings made during his visit, and contributed dozens of moody and nuanced paintings to this exhibit. Mott’s images are semi-impressionistic, some in particular are expertly vague, building familiar shapes into scenes of quiet beauty or into epic vistas, such as the view of downtown from the Ford Street Bridge. According to Mott’s statement, this show includes a few dozen small-panel paintings from his 2010-2011 ROC-ART project, “a local version of the IAP that has involved my living and working in other people’s homes in and around Rochester — a sort of personal ‘Inner Loop’ of my own. Those painting ‘stops’ that happened to be within a few blocks of the Inner Loop were included. The ROCART work and the new series have informed each other at many points, and I see them as intersecting strands of a greater, ongoing creative conversation with my home town.” Some of Mott’s works convey a street or lawn under cover of darkness. “Although only a few night scenes or small details made it into the show,” says Mott in his artist statement, “night is where my relationship with the Inner Loop started and maybe finishes.” The artist traversed the Loop on many research nightdrives with his wife. “We made several circuits, stopping here and there to sketch, take reference photos, and look around. We were both moved by little things, such as a solitary lost flip-flop, a discarded whiskey bottle, dandelions gone delicately to seed along a grassy border, the way the lights blinking on construction zone barriers mimicked the flash of fireflies.”

The same level of nuance was on the minds

of local experimental artists Paul Bartow and Richard Metzgar, who collaborated with artist and filmmaker Jim Downer and artist Greg Stewart to create an installation study of the Loop. During the journey to chosen collection sites along the Loop, cameras rolled to record the scenes, a drawing mechanism on wheels shifted with the motion of the automobile and made marks on a paper, and specimens from each site were gathered. The installation consists of these videos, recorded road noise and wind, the drawing mechanism and resultant drawing, and clinically displayed images of collected plants and detritus in groups that correlate to different collection sites. Yet the artists offer no conclusions regarding their cache. The team’s statement explains that the installation consisting of “environmental sampling in the form of video, specimen photographs, and non-human drawing is a glimpse into the space of the Inner Loop from the perspective of the human and non-human.” But can humancreated tools — in this case the video recorder and drawing mechanism — and collected items presented in a clinical way, all in efforts to examine a roadway that is a manifestation of the human intellect truly present information from a “nonhuman” perspective? The perspective on the Loop offered by The

Landmark Society of Western New York is one of contextualizing the roadway with regards to history and social implications, including the impact on the city layout and therefore the communities of Rochester. The information is presented as layered graphics, maps, and informational text put together by artists and

designers Eric Bridle, Lisa Feinstein, and Matté. The visual context for the construction of the Inner Loop and the effect it had on surrounding neighborhoods is presented in many layers of archival images, newspaper stories, plat maps, and relevant documents, the complexity reflecting the nature of this topic. Each of the four pieces in the Landmark Society’s installation, ‘Looking into the Loop,’ is framed by a reclaimed window from a home near the Loop. Ithaca artist Mark Edward Grimm provides a semi-surreal, live perspective of Rochester police working in and around the Inner Loop. In viewing “Police Code,” visitors are invited to mount a platform that places you amid speakers and screens that broadcast live feeds from police radio-scanners, generate programmed imagery and sounds triggered by the officers’ words caught by voice-recognition technology, and the grainy video from a surveillance camera pointed at you. Activity was low each time I visited the exhibit, but listening to the flat-toned voices of the unwitting Rochester police was dramatized by intermittently sounding chimes and alarms for the words “suspicious,” “white,” “officer,” “female,” and “injury.” The words themselves circle one another and link on a screen, and the installation is meant to provide a cacophonous crescendo when the CPU of the computer hits 95 percent of its processing power, and resets the code to start a new “performance.” There are many ways to think about this work; we might consider the hidden layer of existence of law-enforcement officers, or the divide between the watchers and those being watched, searched for, and spoken about. Dutch artist Cary Markerink visualizes the

absence of the Loop in his photographs by literally cutting it out of each of nine scenes. A huge section of each rectangle has been removed, underscoring what a presence the roadway has. “The Inner Loop as a physical and mental boundary is the starting point of my project,” says Markerink in his artist statement. “The landscapes photographed show the road as a boundary or division between the buildings on both sides, while the street images show the demography of the users,” he says. The work is meant to reveal the separation caused by the Loop between the different areas, and give a visual basis for discussions about reuse. Markerink also created an interactive element by offering postcard-sized reproductions of these images and asking viewers to replace the missing Loop with hopes, dreams, and plans for better developing the space. The adjacent wall bears postcard-sized image of the works; the prevalence of selfconscious, joking responses to the call is telling of our lack of vision for, or faith in, this place.


Art Exhibits [ OPENING ] Works by Darren Brennessel, Caitlin Yarsky, and Thomas A. Fox Fri Aug 26. Lux Lounge, 666 South Ave. 6-9 p.m. 232-9030, lux666.com. [ CONTINUING ] 2 Chic Boutique 151 Park Ave. Through Aug 31: Photographic Art of Wendy Sacks. Wed-Thu 11 a.m.-7 p.m., Fri 11 a.m.-6 p.m., Sat 11 a.m.-5 p.m. 271-6111, 2chicboutique.com. Arts & Cultural Council Gallery 277 N Goodman St. Through Sep 2: Member Exhibition Show. Mon-Fri 10 a.m.-4 p.m. 4734000, artsrochester.org. Artisan Coffeehouse 2 Main St., Scottsville. Through Aug 31: Historical Exhibition to Celebrate the Village of Scottsville. Mon-Fri 6 a.m.-5 p.m., Sat-Sun 7:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m. 771-7682, café@ beautifulvalley.net. Artisan Works 565 Blossom Rd. Through Aug 28: “Masters/ Subjects,” New Paintings by Joseph Accorso. | Third Sundays: Park Avenue Dance Company, 3 p.m. Fri-Sat 11 a.m.-6 p.m., Sun Noon-5 p.m. $8-$12. 288-7170, artisanworks.net. Baobab Cultural Center 728 University Ave. Through Aug 27: Art by Jim Pappas, Jack White, and Eddie Davis. Thu-Fri 5:30-9 p.m., Sat 2-4 p.m. 563-2145, thebaobab.org. Booksmart Studio 250 N. Goodman St. Through Sep 25: “Thou Art…Will Give,” photography by Eric T. Kunsman. Mon-Fri 9 a.m.-6 p.m.; Sat 10 a.m.-4 p.m. 1-800-761-6623, booksmartstudio.com. Boulder Coffee Co. 100 Alexander St. Through Sep 12: “Sights & Sounds,” Caitlin Yarsky’s paintings based on local musicians. MonWed 7 a.m.-9 p.m., Thu 7 a.m.10 p.m., Fri 7 a.m.-midnight, Sat 8 a.m.-11 p.m., Sun 8 a.m.-9 p.m. 454-7140. Chait Fine Art Gallery 234 Mill St. Through Aug 26: “The Whole is Equal to the Sum of Its Parts,” works by Antonia Orlando. By appointment. 454-6730, schait@ chaitstudios.com. Community Darkroom Gallery 713 Monroe Ave. Through Aug 27: “Adopting a History,” a photographic exhibit featuring the work of Kelly Watson. Mon 9 a.m.-9:30 p.m.; Tue-Thu 9 a.m.-6:30 p.m.; Fri 12-5 p.m.; Sat 10 a.m.-5:30 p.m. 271-5920, geneseearts.org. Creative Wellness Center 320 N Goodman St, Suite 201. Through Aug 31: “James Sturtevant: Energy Emerging.” Mon-Fri 9 a.m.-4 p.m. 325-3145 x142, mhcrochester.org. Crocus Clay Works Gallery Hungerford Building Door #2, Suite 225, 1115 E. Main St. Through Aug 27: “Adornments & Adorables,” Fiber Art & Jewelry by Casey Wright & Amanda Preske. Tue-Wed 5-8 p.m., Sat 10 a.m.-3 p.m., or by appointment. 4698217, crocusclayworks.com. Dryer House Gallery 72 W Main St., Victor. Through Sep 13: “Blue” group exhibition by Rochester Artisans Group. TueSat 11 a.m.-6 p.m., Sun 9 a.m.-4 p.m. 869-5217. Finger Lakes Gallery & Frame 36 S. Main St., Canandaigua. Through

ART | “SIGHTS & SOUNDS”

“In the past few years I have come to discover that this city is practically busting at the seams with talent and creativity,” says young painter Caitlin Yarsky, whose first solo show, “Sights & Sounds,” (pictured) opened last week at Boulder Coffee (100 Alexander St.). “The amazing musicians I have befriended in Rochester have inspired me to paint a series of large-scale portraits based on their music.” Such musicians as Timothy Dick, The Dads, Garden Fresh, Amos Rose of Walri, and The Windsor Folk Family are portrayed as a mixed bag of tweed- and lace-wearing darkcircus and Euro-gypsy folk, revealing Yarsky’s love of rollicking adventure, myth, and mystery. The featured musicians played at the August 12 exhibition opening. Yarsky’s work will be on display through September 12, and you can view the pieces while the café is open MondayThursday 7 a.m.-11 p.m., Friday 7 a.m.-midnight, Saturday 8 a.m.-midnight, and Sunday 8 a.m.-11 p.m. You can reach the café for information at 454-7140 or visit bouldercoffeeco.com. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY Aug 31: “Scapes II” with Joel Krenis, Gil Maker, Steve MalloyDesormeaux, Don Menges, Sheila & Pete Nelson, Lois Trieb, and George Wallace. Mon-Wed 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; Thu 10 a.m.-8 p.m.; Fri 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; Sat 10 a.m.-4 p.m. 396-7210. The Firehouse Gallery @ Genesee Pottery, 713 Monroe Ave. Through Aug 26: “Curio,” works by Lynne Hobaica and Allison Craver. Mon-Fri 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; Sat noon-4 p.m. 244-1730, geneseearts.org. FourWalls Gallery 179 Atlantic Ave. Through Aug 31: “Anticipation,” photography showcase with Deanna Johnson, Ryan Palma, Chris Cardwell, and Patrick Prioleau. Thu-Fri 3-6 p.m., Sat 1-3 p.m. 442-7824, fourwallsartgallery@ gmail.com. French Quarter Café 176 S. Goodman St. Through Sep 24: Creative Hue presents “Taste of the ARTS” exhibit. Wed-Thu 11 a.m.-3 p.m. & 5-9 p.m., Fri 11 a.m.-9 p.m., Sat 1-9 p.m. 413-1151, thefqc.com, creativehueartistcollective. blogspot.com. Friendly Home’s Memorial Gallery 3165 East Ave. Through Aug 31: “Warm Weather Visions,” work by Elizabeth Liano. Daily 10 a.m.-5 p.m. 381-1600, friendlyhome.org. Gallery @ Equal=Grounds 750 South Ave. Through Aug 31: “Juxtaposed: Artworks for Energetic Contemplation,” works by Kristen Harvey and Melissa Townsend. Tue-Fri 7 a.m.-Midnight, Sat-Sun 10 a.m.-Midnight. gallery@ equalgrounds.com.

Gallery Salon & Spa 780 University Ave. Through Aug 31: “One Woman Show” featuring Allison Nichols. Tue-Thu 11 a.m.-8 p.m., Fri 11 a.m.-7 p.m., Sat 9:30 a.m.-3 p.m. 271-8340, galleryhair.com. George Eastman House 900 East Ave. Through Sep 18: “Norman Rockwell Behind the Camera” and “Americana: Hollywood and the American Way of Life.” TueSat 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Thu 10 a.m.-8 p.m., Sun 1-5 p.m. $4-$10. 2713361, eastmanhouse.org Grass Roots Gallery Hungerford Building, Suite 157, 1115 E. Main St. Through Aug 31: “bART Without Orders,” works by Colleen Virdi and Stephen Lindsey. Visit site for hours. thegrassrootsgallery.com. High Falls Fine Art Gallery 60 Browns Race. Through Sep 4: “Text and Texture” and “Imagination” solo show by Paul Young. Wed-Fri 11 a.m.5:30 p.m.; Sat Noon-5:30 p.m.; Sun 1-5 p.m. 325-2030, centerathighfalls.org. Image City Photography Gallery 722 University Ave. Through Sep 4: “Portfolio Show 2011.” Wed-Sat 11 a.m.-7 p.m.; Sun noon-4 p.m. 482-1976, imagecityphotographygallery.com. International Art Acquisitions 3300 Monroe Ave. Through August 31: “Mardi Gras,” an original oil on canvas floral celebration by Linda Kall. Mon-Fri 10 a.m.9 p.m.; Sat 10 a.m.-6 p.m.; Sun Noon-5 p.m. 264-1440, internationalartacquisitions.com. Italian American Community Center 150 Frank Dimino Way. continues on page 22 rochestercitynewspaper.com City 21


FILM | WXXI COMMUNITY CINEMA SERIES

WXXI’S Community Cinema screenings return this month with films from PBS’ Independent Lens, kicking off on Sunday, August 28, with “Peace Unveiled,” (pictured) a film about three Afghan women who fought for women’s rights as the U.S. military swept in to remake their country. The screening takes place 2-4 p.m. at WXXI Studios (280 State St.) and will be followed by a panel discussion aimed to encourage dialogue and action around important and timely social issues. Future screenings in the series include “Deaf Jam” on October 16, about a deaf teen’s exploration of American Sign Language poetry; “We Still Live Here” on November 13, which tells the story of the Wampanoag nation’s return to their native language; “Hell and Back Again” on April 15, which reveals the devastation of the war in Afghanistan on the life of 25-year-old Sergeant Nathan Harris; and “Strong!” on May 6, about the struggles of a female weightlifting champion. The screenings are free and no reservations are required. To learn more, call 258-0200 or visit wxxi.org/ communitycinema. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY

Art Exhibits Through Aug 31: Local Photos by Sheridan Vincent. Mon-Fri 8 a.m.-5 p.m. 594-8882, www. iaccrochester.org Link Gallery at City Hall 30 Church St. Through Sep 12: “La Crisis En Silencio: Rural Mexico’s Silent Crisis,” photography by Joseph Sorrentino. Mon-Fri 9 a.m.-5 p.m. 271-5920, cityofrochester.gov. Little Theatre Café 240 East Ave. Through Sep 16: “Torrell Arnold. Sun 5-8 p.m. Mon-Thu 5-10 p.m.; Fri-Sat 5-11 p.m. 2580403, thelittle.org. Lovin’ Cup 300 Park Point Drive. Through Aug 31: “Every Photo is a Metaphor: A unique look at the photography of Scott Stewart by silk screen artist Harold Ross Copp.” Mon 10 a.m.-11 p.m.; Tue-Wed 10 a.m.-12 a.m.; ThuFri 10 a.m.-2 a.m.; Sat 9 a.m.-2 a.m.; Sun 9 a.m.-11 p.m. 2929940, lovincup.com. Lower Link Gallery @ Central Library 115 South Ave. Through Aug 31: “Celebrating Diversity,” work by Margaret Miyake. MonFri 9 a.m.-6 p.m. 428-8305. Lux Lounge 666 South Ave. Opens Aug 26: Works by Darren Brennessel, Caitlin Yarsky, and Thomas A. Fox. Mon-Thu 5 p.m.-2 a.m.; Fri 4:30-2 a.m.; Sat-Sun 9 p.m.-2 a.m. 2329030, lux666.com. MCC Mercer Gallery 1000 E. Henrietta Rd. Through Sep 4: 35th Student Art Exhibition. MonThu 10 a.m.-7 p.m.; Fri 10 a.m.5 p.m. 292-2021. Memorial Art Gallery 500 University Ave. Through Sep 25: 63rd Rochester-Finger Lakes

Exhibition. | Lockhart Gallery, Through Sep 18: “Alfonsas Dargis: Two Decades of Paintings and Prints (1950-1970).” | In Lucy Burne Gallery: Through Oct 12: “Faculty Show.”Wed-Sun 11 a.m.-5 p.m., Thu until 9 p.m., $4$10. Thu night reduced price: $6 from 5-9 p.m. 276-8900, mag. rochester.edu. Mill Art Center & Gallery, 61 N Main St, Honeoye Falls. Through Sep 13: “Scapes,” with Chris Kogut, Rick Mearns, Gil Maker, Don Menges, John Solberg, George Wallace, and Paul Yarnall. Mon-Fri & Sat 11 a.m.-3 p.m., Fri 11 a.m.-8 p.m. Free. 624-7740, millartcenter.com. My Sister’s Gallery The Episcopal Church Home, 505 Mt. Hope Ave. Through Sep 17: “Through Baker’s Lense,” photography by Julie Baker. Daily 10 a.m.-8 p.m. 546-8439. Nan Miller Gallery 3450 Winton Place. Through Sep 6: Pop-artist Romero Britto and “Kurt W. Pfeiffer: Recent Paintings.” MonSat 10 a.m.-5 p.m. 292-1430, nanmillergallery.com. Nazareth College Colacino Gallery 4245 East Ave. Through Aug 27: “Entropy,” a Richart Sillick exhibtion. Wed-Sat 5-8 p.m. 3892532, naz.edu. Orange Glory Café 240 East Ave. Through Aug 31: “Words & Lines,” a season of realizations/ collaborations between Justyn Iannucci & Ryan Sutherland. Mon-Fri 11 a.m.-3 p.m. 2327340. Pat Rini Rohrer Gallery 71 S Main St, Canandaigua. Through Sep 17: “Celebrating the Artists of the Finger Lakes.” Mon-Tue 10 a.m.6 p.m.; Wed-Fri 10 a.m.-8 pm.;

22 City august 24-30, 2011

Sat 10 a.m.-6 p.m.; Sun 12:30-4 p.m. 394-0030, prrgallery.com. Patricia O’Keefe Ross Gallery St. John Fisher College, 3690 East Ave. Through Sep 9: “A Celebration of the Centenary of Collage, 1911/12 to 2011/12.” Mon-Thu 9 a.m.-4 p.m., Fri 9 a.m.-noon. sjfc.edu. Rochester Contemporary Arts Center 137 East Ave. Through Sep 25: “State of the City: In the Loop.” | In the Lab Space, Through Sep 25: “Subterranean Surrogates” by Paul Dodd. Wed-Sun 1-5 p.m., Fri 1-10 p.m. 461-2222, rochestercontemporary.org. $1. Roz Steiner Art Gallery 1 College Rd., Batavia. Through Sep 3: “Kuchera Art: The Joy of Doing,” by John Kuchera. Call for hours. 343-0055 x6448, genesee.edu. The Shoe Factory Co-op 250 N. Goodman St., Studio 212. Through Aug 31: “6 by 6 FEET: Extra Large Art!” Wed-Sat 12-5 p.m. studio212@shoefactoryarts. com, shoefactoryarts.com Spectrum Gallery at Lumiere Photo, 100 College Ave. Through Sep 11: “Ralph Gibson: Photographs.” Mon-Fri 9 a.m.-6 p.m., Sat 10 a.m.-2 p.m. 4614447, lumierephoto.com. The Strong’s National Museum of Play One Manhattan Square. Through Nov 20: “The Fine Art of Airigami: Once Upon a Time” by Larry Moss and Kelly Cheatle and “Whimsical Art Trail.” Mon-Thu 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Fri-Sat 10 a.m.-8 p.m., Sun 12-5 p.m. 263-2700, thestrong.org. $10-12. Stomping Grounds 492 Exchange St., Geneva. Through Sep 17: “Abandonment Issues,” photography by Kevin Schoonover. Mon-Sat 10 a.m.-6 p.m. 315-2200922, flyingwhalestudios.com. Williams Gallery 220 S Winton Rd. Aug 26-Oct 3: “April in Paris, Autumn in New York,” by John Wiesenthal. Mon-Fri 9 a.m.-2 p.m. 271-9070, rochesterunitarian.org, artistsbreakfastgroup.com. Wood Library 134 North Main St., Canandaigua. Aug 27-31: “Crandall: The Understudy.” Sun noon-4 p.m., mon 11 a.m.-2 p.m., Tue 10 a.m.-noon. 3941381 x306. Wyoming County Gallery 31 S Main St, Perry. Through Oct 14: “Here & Now: Contemporary Works by Arena Art Group Members.” Wed 9 a.m.-6 p.m.; Thu-Fri 11 a.m.-7 p.m.; Sat 10 a.m.-3 p.m. 2373517, artswyco.org. Zak’s Avenue 661 South Ave. Through October 31: “Campbell Kids Original Illustrations.” MonSat 11 a.m.-7 p.m., Sun 12-4 p.m. 360- 2095, zaksavenue.com. [ CALL FOR ARTWORK ] Art at the Armory: The Show and Sale of Nature-themed Fine Art. Deadline Aug 31. Call for artists of all fine art media: apply now by visiting artatthearmory.com or call 223-8369 to request an application packet. Exhibit and sale to take place November 12-13. Call for Artists: “Exposed! The Nude Self.” Deadline August 27 for September 9-30 show. Visit shoefactoryarts.com for more information. Call to Artists: Artrageous Affair. Deadline August 31 for October

event; help the Breast Cancer Coalition of Rochester by donating an ARTrageous piece of artwork. For info, email amy@ bccr.org or call 473-8177. Fall Festival at the Funny Farm. Festival September 17-18 at Gentles’ Farm Market. Call for vendors; for info visit studio34beads.com.

Art Events [ Saturday, August 27 ] Artisan’s Faire. Wayne County Historical Society Museum, 21 Butternut St, Lyons. 315-9464943, waynehistory.org. 10 a.m.4 p.m. Free admission. Artists of the Oak Art Trail. Art trail: multiple locations in Orleans County, with different artists. 5896715, artistsoftheaok.com. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Free admission. Dinner in the Vineyard. Inspire Moore Winery, 197 N Main St., Naples. cuisineculturenow.wordpress. com, cuisineculturenow@gmail. com. 4-11:30 p.m. $85, register. An all local handmade culinary experience. Spokes & Ink: A Bike & Poster Party. Monroe Ave. between Oxford and Rutgers. 244-1730, geneseearts.org. 12-6 p.m. Free admission.

Comedy [ Friday, August 26 ] 3 Guys Walk Into A Bar Presents: 3 Girls Walk Into A Bar. Boulder Coffee Co-South Wedge, 100 Alexander St. 454-7140. 8-10 p.m. $5. Village Idiots: Director’s Cut. Village Idiots Comedy Improv, 274 N Goodman St, VIP Studio D312. 797-9086, improvvip.com. 8 p.m. $5. [ Friday, August 26Saturday, August 27 ] Orlando Jones. Comedy Club, 2235 Empire Blvd, Webster, NY 14580. 671-9080, thecomedyclub.us. Fri-Sat 7:30 & 10 p.m. $15. Phil Selman. Last Laff Bar & Grill, 4768 Lake Ave. 663-5233, lastlaff.net. 8 & 10 p.m. $10. [ Saturday, August 27 ] Village Idiots. Village Idiots Comedy Improv, 274 N Goodman St, VIP Studio D312. 797-9086, improvvip.com. Improv Movie 8 p.m., Last Idiot Standing 10 p.m. $8. [ Sunday, August 28 ] Comedy Open Mic. Boulder Coffee Co-South Wedge, 100 Alexander St. 454-7140, bouldercoffeeco. com. 8 p.m. Free. The 2011 Funniest Person in Rochester Contest. Comedy Club, 2235 Empire Blvd. 671-9080, thecomedyclub.us, chetwild.com. 6 & 8:30 p.m. $5. [ Monday, August 29 ] Open Mic Night Comedy. Boulder Coffee Co. at Brooks Landing. 287-JAVA. 7-9 p.m. Free.

Dance Participation [ Sunday, August 28 ] Neutral Ground’s 2011 Rock and Roll Dance and Picnic. Webster Arboretum, 1700 Schlegel Rd.,

SPECIAL EVENT | ROC CITY TATTOO EXPO

All kinds of people get tattoos — some get a nary-shown bit of ink on a whim, others spend a long time planning, researching, and designing large-scale or interconnected ink works. Some people are after that old-school Sailor Jerry style, or epic traditional Japanese Irezumi; others want more modern or personal pieces. Whatever type you are, you’re sure to find something to your liking at Love Hate Tattoo’s third annual International Roc City Tattoo Expo, which takes place Friday, August 26-Sunday, August 28, at the Hyatt Regency (125 E. Main St.). More than 100 artists from around the world will be present during the expo, offering you the opportunity to get inked by a world-class artist without the cost of travel. There will be daily contests and raffles, and vendors of all manner of tattoo paraphernalia, including tat-style artwork for those who dig the style, but prefer their flesh canvas left blank. The event’s hours are Friday 1-11 p.m., Saturday noon-11 p.m., and Sunday noon-6 p.m. Admission is $10 per day or $25 for a three-day pass. For more information on the event and visiting artists, call 800-233-1234 or visit roccitytattooexpo.com. —BY REBECCA RAFFERTY Webster. 671-5839. 1-8 p.m. $15, $25 two people. Entertainment by DJ Ernie Capone. Euchre, cards and games provided. Bring dish to pass, no alcohol.

Festivals [ Thursday, August 25Monday, September 5 ] The NYS Fair. NYS Fairgrounds, 581 State Fair Blvd., Syracuse. nysfair.org. Various hours. Various prices for admission/ events. Music, entertainment, competitions, vendors. [ Saturday, August 27 ] Fairport Music and Food Festival. Fairport Village. fairportmusicfest. com. 12 p.m.-dusk. $10-$15.

Kids Events [ Wednesday, August 24 ] Watch the World: Wednesday Afternoon at the Movies: “Wall-E.” Central Library, 115 South Ave. 428-8150. 2:30 p.m. Free. [ Wednesday, August 24Thursday, August 25 ] “Working” Auditions. Stages, Auditorium Center, 3rd Floor, 875 E. Main St. 935-7173, mjtstages.com. Call for hours. Free. Grades 7-12. [ Thursday, August 25 ] Drama Club. Parma Public Library, 7 West Ave, Hilton. 392-8350. 4-5 p.m. Free. All Ages. [ Saturday, August 27 ] Little Buddies: “Fantastic Mr. Fox.”

Little Theatre, 240 East Ave. 2580400, thelittle.org. 10 a.m. $5. RAPA Fall Registration. RAPA East End Theatre, 727 E Main St, Rochester, NY 14605. 3253366, rapaonline.us. Tue & Thu 3-6:30 p.m., Sat 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Free. No Aug 27. [ Sunday, August 28 ] “Kid Stuff” Concert featuring Peter and the Wolf. Christ Church, 141 East Ave. adhoc-music.org. 7:30 p.m. Free, donations appreciated. Auditions for Rochester Children’s Theatre Music Video. Nazareth College Arts Center, 4245 East Ave. 385-0510, rochesterchildrenstheatre. org. 3-5 p.m. Performers will not be compensated for their participation. Free. Rochester City Ballet Auditions: “The Nutcracker.” Rochester City Ballet, 1326 University Ave. 461-5850, rochestercityballet. com. Ages 5-6 register 9:30 a.m., audition 10:30 a.m.; ages 7-8 register 11:30 a.m., audition noon; ages 9-12 register 1:30 p.m., audition 2 p.m. Free. Performances Nov 25-27. [ Monday, August 29 ] Welcome to Kindergarten Storytime. Brighton Memorial Library, 2300 Elmwood Ave. 7845300, brightonlibrary.org. 10 a.m. Free, register. [ Tuesday, August 30 ] Junior Friends of the Library. Chili Library, 3333 Chili Ave. 889-2200 x 321, chililibrary.org. 6-7 p.m. Free. Grades 6-12.


Lego Club. Henrietta Public Library, 455 Calkins Rd. 3597092. 1-1:45 p.m. Free, register. Ages 6-12. Practice ACT Test. Brighton Memorial Library, 2300 Elmwood Ave. 784-5300, brightonlibrary. org. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Free, register. [ Wednesday, August 31 ] Open Auditions for 2011-2012 ESLT Children’s Choir. The Spiegel Community Center, 35 Lincoln Ave., Pittsford. empirestatelyrictheatre.org. 5-8 p.m. Free. Children should come prepared to sing a song of their choice (accompaniment will be available). Watch the World: Wednesday Afternoon at the Movies: Ratatouille. Central Library, 115 South Ave. 428-8150. 2:30 p.m. Free.

Lectures [ Thursday, August 25 ] Death, Dying and the Gifts of Hospice Presented by International Hospice Expert Bob Kane. Webster Public Library, 980 Ridge Rd, Webster. webstercomfortcare.org. 6 p.m. Free. Four Walls: A Volunteer’s Experience in Nicaragua. Brighton Memorial Library, 2300 Elmwood Ave. 784-5300, brightonlibrary. org. 7 p.m. Free. [ Saturday, August 27 ] Open House & Lecture. 1816 Farmington Quaker Meetinghouse, 160 County Road 8, Farmington. 315-598-4387, farmingtonmeetinghouse.org. Open house 12-4:30 p.m., talk 2 p.m. Free. “Lucretia Mott, Quakers, and Women’s Rights” by Carol Faulkner. [ Tuesday, August 30 ] History of the Finger Lakes with Preston Pierce. FLCC Geneva Campus Center, 63 Pulteney St. 785-1000, onestop@flcc.edu. 6-8:50 p.m. $132/credit hour, $396/3-credit course, register. Tuesday evening course, register by 8/26.

Literary Events [ Thursday, August 25 ] Book Group: Classics: “On the Road” by Jack Kerouac. Barnes & Noble Greece, 330 Greece Ridge Center Dr. 227-4020, bn.com. 7 p.m. Free.

NY. 506-2746, Lafo8296@gmail. com. Doors 6 p.m., show 7 p.m. $8. 13+ w/guardian/16+ w/ID. [ Friday, August 26 ] Space Trash Over the Swamp. Thousand Acre Swamp Sanctuary, 1581 Jackson Rd, Penfield. Marie Heerkens 4259561 or Sue Pixley 586-6677. 7:30 p.m. Free. Leaders will provide telescopes; your own telescope or binoculars are welcome. Bring flashlight.

SPECIAL EVENT | SPOKES & INK: A BIKE AND POSTER PARTY

Cycling culture is on the rise in Rochester, with discussion of installing bike lanes, and an increase in residents putting their health and environment to the forefront during their commute by going by two wheels instead of four. On Saturday, August 27, noon-6 p.m., head down to Monroe Avenue, between Oxford and Rutgers, for the much anticipated Spokes and Ink Bike and Poster Party. The event will be held at Blessed Sacrament Church’s parking lot and the Genesee Center for the Arts and Education. Presented by the Genesee Center, City Newspaper, DogTown, and other local businesses and organizations, the event will feature a celebration of bikes, music, local food, and Rochester-brewed beer. A variety of Roc City artists have created cycling-celebrating posters, which will be sold for $20 a pop at the festival. Lock up your pony at one of the plentiful bike racks, learn more about R Community Bikes, and make your own spoke card at the Genesee Center’s tabletop letterpress. For more information, call 244-1730 or visit geneseearts.org/spokesandink. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY Open Mic: Summer Kona: Pure Kona in the Summer. Flying Squirrel, 285 Clarissa St. flyingsquirrel.rocus.org. 8-11 p.m. Free. [ Sunday, August 28 ] Poetry Reading: Alzheimer’s and the End of History. Flying Squirrel, 285 Clarissa St. 442-5432, flyingsquirrel.rocus.org. 5-7 p.m. Free. Featuring New Orleans poet Bill Lavender reading from his new book Memory Wing.

Shop, 45 Main St, Brockport. 637-2260, liftbridgebooks.com. 6:30 p.m. Free. [ Wednesday, August 31 ] Book Group: Titles over Tea: “A Month of Sundays” by John Updike. Barnes & Noble Greece, 330 Greece Ridge Center Dr. 2274020, bn.com. 7 p.m. Free.

Recreation

[ Monday, August 29 ] Book Discussion: Mystery Book Group: “A Thin Dark Line” by Tami Hoag. Barnes & Noble Pittsford, 3349 Monroe Ave. 586-6020. 7-8 p.m. Free.

[ Wednesday, August 24 ] MAC Birding Hike. Montezuma Audubon Center, 2295 State Route 89, Savannah. 315-3653588, montezuma@audubon.org. 8-10 a.m. $3-$5, $15/family.

[ Tuesday, August 30 ] Writing Class: Lifting Spirits Writers Guild. Lift Bridge Book

[ Thursday, August 25 ] Zumbathon. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N Water St, Rochester,

Yianni’s Casual Italian Dining

FULL SERVICE BAR

EARLY BIRD SPECIALS

[ Saturday, August 27 ] 5th Annual Matt St. James 5K Run/Walk. Roberts Wesleyan College, 2301 Westside Dr. mattstjamesrun.eventbrite.com, jscribani@gmail.com, sully033@ yahoo.com. 10 a.m. $15 by 8/20, $20 after, register. Autumn Migration Sensation. Montezuma Audubon Center, 2295 State Route 89 Savannah. 315-365-3588, montezuma@ audubon.org. 2-3:30 PM. $3-$5, $15 family. Beginner Bird Trip: Montezuma National Wildlife Refuge. Meet at Bushnell’s Basin park & ride, exit number 27 from I-490. Kimberly 503-2534, John 671-9639. 2 p.m. Free. Extra spotting scopes and FRS radios would be helpful. Butterfly and Wildflower Walk. Ganargua Creek Meadow Preserve, Wilkinson Rd. 2562130, geneseelandtrust.org. 10 a.m.-noon. Free. Charlie’s Old Goat Trail Run. Ganondagan State Historical Site, 1488 State Rt 444, Victor. ganondagan.org. 10 a.m. $25. GVHC Hike. Dryer Rd. Park, Victor. Kristin 750-5547, gvhchikes.org. 10 a.m. Free. Moderate 7 mile hike, Ganondagan. Heritage Christian Legacy Mile & 5K. Monroe Community College, 1000 E. Henrietta Rd., Brighton. legacymileand5K.kintera.org. 7:30 a.m. registration, $20, register. Mount Hope Cemetery Tour. Mount Hope Cemetery, 791 Mount Hope Ave. 461-3494, fomh.org. 1 p.m. Free. Plastic Bat Bash Softball Tournament. Frontier Field, 1 Morrie Silver Way. 454-1001. Check in 8 a.m., first ga.m.e at 9 a.m. $250 per team, register. To benefit Hillside Family of Agencies. Participants must be 21 years old. Rochester Triathlon. Durand Eastman Park.

rochestertriathletes.com. 7 a.m. $55-$75, register. Serendipity Walk. Cumming Natue Center, 6472 Gulick Rd., Naples. 374-6160, rmsc.org. 11 a.m.-2 p.m. $3. [ Sunday, August 28 ] Cure for Childhood Cancer 2011 Poker Run. Rush Creekside Inn, 6071 E. Henrietta Rd., Rush. 533-9181, ourcharityevents.com. 10 a.m.-noon registration. $15 per bike/car, $5 per passenger. GVHC Dog Hike. Greece canal park, Elmgrove Rd., by Millennium lodge. Bill S. 3145266, gvhchikes.org. 10 a.m. Free. Easy/slow 1.5 hour hike. GVHC Hike. Greece canal park, Elmgrove Rd., by Millennium lodge. Bill S. 314-5266, gvhchikes.org. 10 a.m. Free. Easy/slow 1.5 hour dog hike. GVHC Hike. Powder Mills Park, park rd, lot next to Rand lodge. John C. 254-4047, gvhchikes. org. 1 p.m. Free. Moderate/hilly 5 mile hike. [ Monday, August 29 ] 2011 Richard Guon Memorial Golf Tournament. Irondequoit Country Club, 4045 East Ave. 325-7760 x3232 or don@rbtl.org. Call for information. $350, dinner only $125, register. Rochester Networking Golf Outing. Brookwoods Country Club, 2101 Country Club Lane, Ontario. rochesteralist.com, netgolf@ rochesteralist.com. 7 a.m. $40$50, register. [ Wednesday, August 31 ] Local Birding Trip. Montezuma Audubon Center, 2295 State Route 89 Savannah. 315-3653588, montezuma@audubon. org. 8-11 a.m. $5-$10/adult, $30 family.

Special Events [ Wednesday, August 24 ] 2011 Foodlink Farmers’ Market. Washington Square Park, 80 Woodbury Blvd. nsmalarz@ foodlinkny.org. 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Free. Annual Educator’s Day: Eat, Play, Live: The Haudenosaunee Way. Ganondagan State Historical Site, 1488 State Rt 444, Victor. ganondagan.org. 9 a.m.-4 p.m. $60-75, register. August Happy Hour for the Rochester Improvement Society. Abilene, 153 Liberty Pole Way.

jonitkinmusic@gmail.com. 5:307:30 p.m. Free, drink specials. Cobblestone School’s Walk-up Outdoor Theater. Cobblestone School, 10 Prince St. sterzart@ hotmail.com. Dusk (about 8 p.m.). Free. Kid Friendly Movie. Pop Swap. Record Archive, 33 1/3 Rockwood St. 244-1210, recordarchive.com. 5-8 p.m. Free. Shop, swap, and sell music, movies, and stuff from your trunk. Sessions for Adult and Continuing Education Candidates. Bausch & Lomb Center, Rochester Institute of Technology, Lomb Memorial Dr. 475-2229, 866-260-3950, rit.edu/ adult-ed. 5-7 p.m. Free, register. [ Thursday, August 25 ] A Nature Tour of South Africa. Burrough’s Audubon Nature Club, 301 Railroad Mills Rd., Victor. Sandra and Jon Dombrowski, 4252380. 6 p.m. Free. Catholic Family Center’s Healthy Sisters’ Soup & Bean Works Sampling. Parkleigh, 215 Park Ave. cfcrochester.org. 12-3 p.m. Free. New Line of Rice Mixes. Country Fair and Prize Winning Pies Luncheon. Hurd Orchards, Rt 104 W & Monroe-Orleans County Line Rd, Holley. 638-8838, hurdorchards.com. 12:30 p.m. $25-$35, register. Geneseo Farmers’ Market. Lower Center St., Geneseo. geneseofarmersmarket@gmail. com. 4-7 p.m. Free. South Wedge Farmers Market. Boulder Coffee Co-South Wedge, 100 Alexander St. info@swfarmersmarket.org, swfarmersmarket.org. 4-7 p.m. Free. Thursday Teas. Sonnenberg Gardens & Mansion State Historic Park, 151 Charlotte St, Canandaigua. 394-4922, sonnenberg.org. 12:30 or 3 p.m. $8-$20, register. Big Tax Check-Up Days. Jackson Hewitt, 1780 E.Ridge Rd. 2669050, jacksonhewitt.com. Call for hours. Free. [ Friday, August 26 ] Cobblestone Arts Center for Students with Disabilities 2nd Annual Summer Fun Festival 2011. Cobblestone Arts Center, 1622 Rte 332, Farmington. 398-0220, cobblestoneartscenter.com. 12-2 p.m. Donations accepted. End of Summer Block Party. Fair & Expo Center, 2695 East Henrietta continues on page 24

BOA Editions Celebrates 35 Years! Saturday, September 17, 2011:

10AM-12PM: Poetry Workshop with long-time BOA poet Michael Waters. Midtown Athletic Club. $50.00. Space is limited. To enroll, please call Midtown Athletic Club at 585.461.2300

Sunday, September 18, 2011:

HOURS: Breakfast, Lunch & Dinner Monday - Saturday: 8am - 9pm Sunday Breakfast Only: 8am - 1pm

120 Pixley Road | Rochester, NY 14624 | 585-426-1900 Located near the intersection of Pixley and Buffalo Road across from The Garden Factory

BOA Editions’ Annual Dine and Rhyme: An Evening of Poetry, Food, and More! 3PM: Poetry Reading & Book Signing featuring Aracelis Girmay, Keetje Kuipers, and Michael Waters. Gallery Auditorium, Memorial Art Gallery. 6PM: Reception, Dinner, and Silent Auction. Good Luck Restaurant. For prices and advance reservations please contact Melissa Hall at 585.546.3410 ext 11 or Hall@boaeditions.org

yiannis-restaurant.com

rochestercitynewspaper.com City 23


RECREATION | ROCHESTER TRIATHLON

With the end of summer comes the end of walks along the beach, park visits, and swimming. If you’re like me, exercise leaves your daily routine as quickly as 90-degree days flee us come fall and winter. We all have one more chance to enjoy the beach, the park, and to get a great workout before August ends. The Rochester Triathlon debuts on Saturday, August 27. This event will give you a chance to exercise outdoors so you can feel less guilty about hibernating in a few months. A triathlon consists of three grueling races in one. Athletes must go from swimming to biking and then end by running to the finish line, all without much of a break. The Rochester Triathlon is hosted by the Rochester Area Triathletes and will take place in gorgeous Durand Eastman Park. It will be a sprint-distance run suitable for both new or experienced triathletes. The swimming portion will take place in Lake Ontario, the biking will be in Durand Eastman Park, and the running portion will take place in the woods of the park as well as along the shore of Lake Ontario. The race is $55, plus a $10 fee for non-USA Triathlon racers. All participants must register for the race at rochestertriathletes.com. — BY ALEXANDRA CARMICHAEL

Special Events Rd. 334-4000, fairandexpocenter. org. 5:30 p.m. Free. Night Market. Public Market, 280 N Union St. 428-5990, cityofrochester.gov. 5-10 p.m. Free admission. Music, food vendors, beer & wine garden. Roc City Mustangz Bowling Tournament to Benefit Breast Cancer Research Foundation. Sunset Lanes, 1317 Chili Ave. roccitymustangz.com. 7 p.m. $15/bowler, $60/team, register. Strike Out Breast Cancer. Sunset Lanes, 1317 Chili Ave. roccitymustangz@yahoo.com, roccitymustangz.com. 7-10 p.m. $15, register. [ Friday, August 26Sunday, August 28 ] Humane Society of Livingston County Garage Sale. 2077 Lakeville Rd., Avon (Rte. 15). Karen 266-2714, Marianna 3460097, Darlene 924-7931. 9 a.m.3 p.m. Free admission. Roc City Tattoo Expo 2011. Hyatt Regency Rochester, 125 E Main St. 800-233-1234, roccitytattooexpo.com. Fri 1-11 p.m., Sat 12-11 p.m., Sun 12-6 p.m. $10/day, $20/full pass. [ Saturday, August 27 ] 30th Anniversary Winemaker’s Dinner. Hunt Country Vineyards, 4021 Italy Hill Rd., Branchport. 800-946-3289, Andy@ HuntWines.com, huntwines. com/harvest. 7-10 p.m. $100 individual, $175 couple, register. 3rd Annual Lo(w) Falls Film Fest. Flying Squirrel, 285 Clarissa St.

678-6870, thesquirrel.org. 711:30 p.m. Free. Anniversary Winemaker’s Dinner. Hunt Country Vineyards, 4021 County Road 32, Branchport. 800-946-3289, huntwines. com. 7-10 p.m. $100, $175 per couple, register. Cuisine Culture Dinner in the Vineyard. Inspire Moore Vineyard, 197 N. Main St., Naples. cuisineculturenow. wordpress.com. Call for information. $87, register, currently sold out. Five course locally sourced dinner, pottery sale, dancing. Fresh from the Market: Canandaigua Farmers’ Market. New York Wine & Culinary Center, 800 S Main St., Canandaigua. 394-7070, info@ nywcc.com. 9 a.m.-noon. $50, registration required. GrandSlam Day Awards Ceremony. Fire Hall, 8364 Bay St., Sodus Point. 800-5276510, waynecountytourism. com. 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Free. Raffles, prizes, food. Grown & Sexy Girls Night Out Cares. The R.O.A.R Club, 233 Mill St. 905-8547, grownandsexygirlsnightout. com. 5-9 p.m. Donations start at $20, register. Proceeds benefit the Susan G Komen For The Cure, breast cancer fund. Nightfall Music. Rochester Museum and Science Center, 657 East Ave. 271-1880, rmsc. org. 8 p.m. $5-$7. Seneca Wine Tour. Hotel Clarence, 108 Fall St., Seneca Falls. info@senecafalls.com. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. $20.

24 City august 24-30, 2011

The Village Well Discussion Series. Mocha Center, 107 Liberty Pole Way. Judith Bauman 420-1400 x24, jbauman@ mochacenter.org. 3-5 p.m. Free. The Vineyard International Exchange Program. 951-5435778, search Haiti Alaboroflove on facebook. 12-8 p.m. Haiti talent showcase and benefit concert at 4 p.m. Donations accepted. Wine and Words: “A New York State of Wine.” Writers & Books Gell Center of the Finger Lakes, South Bristol. 473-2590 x107,wab.org. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. $39-$43, register. [ Saturday, August 27Sunday, August 28 ] New Age Healing and Psychic Faire. Red Rock Ponds RV Resort, 16097 Canal Rd., Holley. For info or appointments: 3010275. 12-5 p.m. Free admission, healings/readings $20. Smoke, Flames, and Courage Expo. Port of Rochester and Ontario Beach Park. 428-5990, cityofrochester.gov. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Free admission. Stone Tool Craftsman Show. Letchworth State Park, off Rt. 390, Castile. 493-3625. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Free. Highbanks Recreation Area. Atlatl Competition. [ Sunday, August 28 ] Birding Field Trip: Durand Eastman Park. Meet in Lake Shore Blvd. lot between Zoo & Log Cabin Rd.s. Richard 381-2189 and Amy Kahn 756-8660. 8 a.m. Free. Brighton Farmers’ Market. Brighton High School parking lot, 1150 Winton Road S., Rochester 14618. info@ brightonfarmersmarket.org. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Free. Gay Wedding Expo. Carey Lake Victorian Banquet Hall, 959 Penfield Rd. (Route 441), Macedon. samelovesamerights.com/Events/ rochestergayweddingexpo.html. 1-4 p.m. Free admission, $5 suggested donation, register. Greatest Community Garage Sales and Super Fleas. Public Market, 280 N Union St. 428-5990, cityofrochester.gov. 8 a.m.-2 p.m. Free admission. Honeybee Program and Honey Extraction. Cumming Natue Center, 6472 Gulick Rd., Naples. 374-6160, rmsc.org. 1-4 p.m. $3. Rochester Civil Rights Front Meeting. Equal Grounds Coffee House, 750 South Ave. civilrightsfront.wordpress.com, rochestercrf@gmail.com. 5 p.m. Free. Roddin’ for Red: Cruise-in Benefit against Cancer. Ginegaw Park, Walworth. roddinforred.blogspot. com. 11 a.m.-5 p.m. $10 Sticky Lips BBQ, catered 1-4 p.m. Raffles, silent auction. WXXI Community Cinema: Peace “Unveiled.” WXXI, 280 State St. 258-0200, wxxi.org/ communitycinema. 2-4 p.m. Free. Wildlife Defenders Speak on Conservation, Safety and Prevention Practices. Cumming Natue Center, 6472 Gulick Rd., Naples. 374-6160, rmsc.org. 1-4 p.m. $4. [ Monday, August 29 ] Emerging Filmmaker Series: Benefit for ROC City Skate Park.

Little Theatre, 240 East Ave. 2580400, thelittle.org. 9:15 p.m. $5. Literacy Volunteers of Rochester preview session. Literacy Volunteers of Rochester, 1600 South Ave. 473-3030, literacyrochester.org. 6:30 p.m. Free. Pervert Trivia Night. 140 Alex, 140 Alexander St. 140alex.com. 9 p.m. Free. Trivia Night. The Old Toad, 277 Alexander St. theoldtoad.com. 9:30 p.m. Free. [ Tuesday, August 30 ] Film: “Invictus.” Brighton Memorial Library, 2300 Elmwood Ave. 784-5300, brightonlibrary. org. 6:30 p.m. Free. Trivia. Dicky’s, 791 Meigs St. 730-8310. 8 p.m. Free. Westside Farmer’s Market. St. Monica Church 831 Genesee St. westsidemarketrochester@gmail. com. 4-7:30 p.m. Free. [ Wednesday, August 31 ] 2011 Foodlink Farmers’ Market. Washington Square Park, 80 Woodbury Blvd. nsmalarz@ foodlinkny.org. 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Free. Adult Professional Studies: Information Meeting. Meridian Center, 400 Meridian Center Blvd., Suite 220. 594-6210, DAPS@ roberts.edu. 6-7 p.m. Free. Cobblestone School’s Walk-up Outdoor Theater. Cobblestone School, 10 Prince St. sterzart@ hotmail.com. Dusk (about 8 p.m.). Free. Kid Friendly Movie. Free Popcorn. Soda, water Available. Free Parking. Film: The Conspirator. Brighton Memorial Library, 2300 Elmwood Ave. 784-5300, brightonlibrary. org. 6:30 p.m. Free. Rochester Winos Wine and Food Pairing. Joey’s Pasta House, 1789 Penfield Rd. rochesterwinos.com. 6:30 p.m. registration, tasting 79:30 p.m. $30-$35, register.

Sports [ Saturday, August 27 ] Longball Game & Storytelling. Ganondagan State Historical Site, 1488 State Rt 444, Victor. ganondagan.org. 7-9 p.m. $5, $15/family, register. Ultimate Wrestling Exit 42 II. Phelps Community Center, 8 Banta St., Phelps. 315-3136922, ultimatewrestling.us. Doors 6:30 p.m., bell time 7 p.m. $10-$12. [ Tuesday, August 30Wednesday, August 31 ] Rochester Red Wings vs. Pawtucket Red Sox. Frontier Field, 1 Morrie Silver Way. redwingsbaseball.com. 7:05 p.m. $6.50-$11.50.

Theater

“Bathing in Bette.” Through Aug 28. Downstairs Cabaret at Winton Place, 3450 Winton Place. Thu 7 p.m., Fri-Sat 8 p.m., Sun 3 p.m. $21-$24. 325-4370, downstairscabaret.com. The Complete Works of William Shakespeare, Abridged. Wed Aug 24-Aug 28. Webster Veterans Memorial Park on North Ave., between Main St. and Rte 104. 8:30 p.m. Free. 643-0836, workingclasstheatre.

THEATER | “COMPLETE WORKS OF WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, ABRIDGED”

William Shakespeare’s plays are still constantly produced on stage and screen. They have been recreated by some of our favorite actors in hundreds of renditions, and we have all come across them in our high school English classes. But have you ever seen all of Shakespeare’s works performed in a single sitting? With all characters done by three actors? And some burlesque added in? This week Rochester’s Working Class Theatre will stage “The Complete Works of William Shakespeare, Abridged.” The piece is part satire, part homage, and all hilarious. Three actors will bring you all 37 plays in less than 100 minutes. Those who know the plays by heart will appreciate the misunderstood plotlines and puns, while those who struggled through the Shakespeare units in school will finally get their revenge as the plays are comically hacked apart. Performances will take place at Webster Veterans Memorial Park on North Avenue from Wednesday, August 24, to Sunday, August 28. The show will be performed for free under the stars at 8:30 p.m. each night. Be sure to bring beach chairs or blankets. For more information visit workingclasstheatre.net. — BY ALEXANDRA CARMICHAEL net. Bring your beach chairs and picnic blankets. “Do Black Patent Leather Shoes Really Reflect Up?” Wed Aug 24-Sep 10. Merry-Go-Round Playhouse, 6877 East Lake Rd., Auburn. Wed Aug 24-Thu 7:30 p.m., Fri-Sat 2 & 8 p.m., Mon 7:30 p.m., Tue-Wed Aug 31 2 & 7:30 p.m. $30-$41. 315-255-1785, merry-goround.com. “Girl Talk: The Musical.” Through Aug 27. Geva Theatre Center, 75 Woodbury Blvd. Mon-Fri 7 p.m., Sat 3 & 7 p.m. $49. 232-4382, gevatheatre.org. Murder Mystery Dinner Cruises. Thu Aug 25. 400 Packett’s Landing, Fairport. 6:30-9:30 p.m. $50, register. 223-9470, colonialbelle.com. Sankofa Performing Arts Theatre Festival. Fri Aug 26-Aug 27. MuCCC, 142 Atlantic Ave. Curtis Rivers, 7:30 p.m. $12.50-$16 or $25 for two-night pass. 271-7010; Diane Sheffield, libra18722008@aol.com. There will be 3 one-act plays and jazz performances each night. Summer Education Program Benefit Cabaret. Wed Aug 24. Downstairs Cabaret Theatre 2, 172 W Main St. 7 p.m. $10-$20. 325-4370, downstairscabaret.com.

Center, 3 Vince Tofany Blvd. 815-9439. 7 p.m. Free. Report to Room D. Men ages 50+ and women ages 40-60.

Theater Auditions

[ Sunday, August 28 ] Rochester Children’s Theatre Sweet House Auditions. Nazareth College Arts Center, 4245 East Ave., Rochester, NY. 3850510, rct1@frontiernet.net, rochesterchildrenstheatre.org. 3-5 p.m. children ages 10+, 6-9 p.m. adults. Free. Prepare 32 bars of 2 uptempo pop/rock songs. Adults by appointment only and are paid positions. Daytime availability for touring during Oct-Nov 2011 and April 2012. Rochester City Ballet “The Nutcracker”. Rochester City Ballet, 1326 University Ave. 461-5850, rochestercityballet. com. Ages 5-6 register 9:30 a.m., audition 10:30 a.m.; ages 7-8 register 11:30 a.m., audition noon; ages 9-12 register 1:30 p.m., audition 2 p.m. Free. Performances Nov 25-27. The Mystery Of Irma Vep (A Penny Dreadful Comedy). Blackfriars Theatre, 795 E Main St, Rochester, NY 14607. 4541260. 6 p.m. Free. Looking for two males to play numerous roles (both female and male), and should be in their 20’s-40’s. Cold readings at the audition, but you can contact Blackfriars prior to obtain a reading script.

[ Thursday, August 25 ] “Sex Please, We’re Sixty” Greece Paint Players. Greece Community

[ Monday, August 29 ] Auditions for “An Evening of One Acts.” Christ the Good


Shepherd Church, 1000 N. Winton Road. 415-4747, everyonetheatre.com. 7 p.m. Free. Everyone’s Theatre Company Inc. [ Monday, August 29Tuesday, August 30 ] Auditions for TYKEs. Jewish Community Center, 1200 Edgewood Ave, Rochester, NY. TYKEs@rochester.rr.com. 7 p.m. Free. Actors should be 18years-old or older and need only attend one evening, not both. Bring a headshot and resume if available, and be prepared with an up-tempo song and sheet music appropriate for children’s theatre (accompanist provided). No monologue is required.

Additionally, TYKEs is looking for young men ages 12- to 15years-old to play Charlie in Willy Wonka as well as physically agile, acrobatic actors who can sing for Go, Dog. Go! [ Ongoing ] Traveling Cabaret Seeks Male Performer. Call for appointment. 234-6677.

Workshops [ Wednesday, August 24 ] Create Your Own Garden Hypertufa. Tallulah’s Fancy at the Lower Mill, 61 N Main St., Honeoye Falls. 455-6720, talulahsfancy. com. 5:30-6:30 p.m. $20 class, $10 materials, register. Bring two

containers that will nest loosely with considerable space between them to allow you to create a mold for your hypertufa planter. Developing Your Spirit Portrait. Oggi Domani Salon, 3400 Monroe Ave., Pittsford. 427-8110, PurpleDoorSoulSource.com. 79 p.m. $25, register. Additional optional class 8/31, 7-9 p.m., $15. “Keep Me Comfortable: Pain Assessment and Treatment for Persons with Dementia.” The Summit at Brighton, Creative Arts Room, 2000 Summit Circle Dr. 1-800-272-3900, alz.org/ rochesterny. 6:30-8:30 p.m. Free. [ Thursday, August 25 ] Comics Night Out. Books Etc, 78 W Main St, Rte 31, Macedon.

474-4116, books_etc@yahoo. com. 7-9 p.m. Free. “Family Dynamics.” Clare Bridge of Perinton, 159 Sully’s Trail. 1-800-272-3900, alz. org/rochesterny. 1-3 p.m. Free, register. [ Friday, August 26 ] Intention Management. Oggi Domani Salon, 3400 Monroe Ave., Pittsford. 427-8110, PurpleDoorSoulSource.com. 7-9 p.m. $25, register. [ Saturday, August 27 ] Authentic Movement. Physikos, Village Gate Square, 302 N. Goodman Street, 2nd fl (above Salena’s), Rochester, NY 14607. 721-4220, physikosmovement.com. 9:30

a.m.-noon. $35, register. [ Saturday, August 27Sunday, August 28 ] Family Rain Barrel Workshops. Rochester Museum and Science Center, 657 East Ave. 697-1942, rmsc.org. 1-2 p.m. $15, register. [ Monday, August 29 ] Hands-on Vegan Appetizers. Tops Cooking School, 3507 Mt Read Blvd. 663-5449, topsmarkets.com. 7-9 p.m. $25, register.

[ Wednesday, August 31 ] Create Your Own Garden Hypertufa. Tallulah’s Fancy at the Lower Mill, 61 N Main St., Honeoye Falls. 455-6720, talulahsfancy.com. 5:30-6:30 p.m. $20 class, $10 materials, register. Bring two containers that will nest loosely with considerable space between them to allow you to create a mold for your hypertufa planter.

[ Tuesday, August 30 ] Financial Literacy Workshops. ESL Headquarters, 225 Chestnut Street. 336-1000. 6 p.m. Free.

CITY Newspaper presents

Mind Body Spirit TO ADVERTISE IN MIND BODY SPIRIT CALL CHRISTINE AT 244.3329 x23 or email: Christine@rochester-citynews.com

rochestercitynewspaper.com City 25


Film Times Fri Aug 26 – Thu Sep 1 Schedules change often. Call theaters or visit rochestercitynewspaper.com for updates.

Film

Brockport Strand 637-3310 89 Main St, Brockport CONAN THE BARBARIAN: 7, 9:15; also Sat-Sun 1:15, 4; DON’T BE AFRAID OF THE DARK: 7:15, 9:20; also Sat-Sun 1, 3:05, 5:10; FRIGHT NIGHT: 9:35; SPY KIDS: ALL THE TIME IN THE WORLD: 6:15, 8; also Sat-Sun 1, 2:45, 4:30.

The vampire next door

Canandaigua Theatres 396-0110 Wal-Mart Plaza, Canandaigua 30 MINUTES OR LESS: 5:15, 9:20; also Fri-Sun 3:15; THE CHANGE-UP: 8:45; COLUMBIANA: 5:10, 7:15, 9:15; also Fri-Sun 1, 3:05; CONAN THE BARBARIAN: 4, 7, 9:15; also Fri-Sun 1:15; DON’T BE AFRAID OF THE DARK: 5:10, 7:15, 9:20; also Fri-Sun 1, 3:05; FRIGHT NIGHT (3D): 5:10, 7:10, 9:10; also Fri-Sun 1:10, 3:10; HARRY POTTER & THE DEATHLY HALLOWS II: 7; also Fri-Sun 1; THE HELP: 4, 7:15; also Fri-Sun 1; OUR IDIOT BROTHER; 5:15, 7:15, 9:15; also Fri-Sun 1:15, 3:15; RISE OF THE PLANET OF THE APES: 4, 7, 9:15; also Fri-Sun 1:15; THE SMURFS: 5, 7; also Fri-Sun 1, 3; SPY KIDS: ALL THE TIME IN THE WORLD: 5, 7, 8:45; also Fri-Sun 1, 3.

[ REVIEW ] BY George Grella

“Fright Night” (R), directed by Craig Gillespie Now playing

With his characteristic penchant for vatic pronouncements, Marshall McLuhan once wrote that every age makes of the previous age a work of art. Although the statement demands a certain amount of salt, it still explains a good deal of the nostalgia that surrounds various decades and even the tendency of the film industry to repeat the past, in the form of remakes. The 1980’s hardly qualify as a classic period, but a great many particular cinematic forms, themes, and tendencies,

Cinema Theater 271-1785 957 S. Clinton St. BUCK: Fri-Sun 2:45; CAPTAIN AMERICA: Fri-Sat 4:20; TRANSFORMERS: DARK OF THE MOON: 7.

Culver Ridge 16 544-1140 2255 Ridge Rd E, Irondequoit  30 MINUTES OR LESS: 5:15, 10:15; CAPTAIN AMERICA: FIRST AVENGER: 1:35, 4:40, 7:25, 10:10; CONAN THE BARBARIAN: 2:15; also in 3D continues on page 28

especially in science fiction and horror, emerged in that decade and now and then, like hibernating groundhogs, appear to be reemerging in our time. The most recent and perhaps most faithful remake of a picture from the 1980’s, “Fright Night” updates most of the original material but also reflects some of the atmosphere of a generation ago. Combining the teen pic with the horror flick, it avoids the usual parade of decapitations, dismemberments, and disembowelments that ensanguine that familiar partnership. The picture generates its menace and terror more through its particular situation rather than through merely piling up horrors and corpses. As in the original, young Charley Brewster (Anton Yelchin) senses something sinister about the handsome new next-door neighbor, Jerry Dandridge (Colin Farrell), who appears to have charmed Charley’s mother, Jane (Toni Collette). When students in his high school start disappearing — somehow not troubling the authorities in any way — Charley’s obnoxious geek

Colin Farrell in the remake of “Fright Night.” PHOTO COURTESY DREAMWORKS

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Batavia | Brockport | Canandaigua | Elmira Palmyra | Rochester: Canal Street | Culver @ Main Lake Avenue | Warsaw | Webster

26 City august 24-30, 2011

of a friend, Ed (Christopher Mintz-Plasse), immediately thinks a vampire prowls their Las Vegas subdivision, feeding on the residents. Charley soon verifies his own suspicions about Dandridge, but faces the usual problem of trying to convince everyone else, including his mother and his girlfriend Amy (Imogen Poots) of the existence of the vampire. Dandridge plays a catand-mouse game with Charley, taunting him with the promise of seducing both his mother and his girl. Both women finally believe Charley when the vampire, unable to enter the Brewster house uninvited, simply burns it down and pursues the fleeing trio at high speed, trying to kill them all. As in the original, Charley seeks the help of a professional vampire hunter, Peter Vincent (David Tennant), a magician who performs on stage in a Las Vegas casino. Unlike the prissy, timid has-been played by Roddy McDowell in the first movie, this Peter Vincent, clad in black leather like a Gothic rocker, is an annoying, flamboyant charlatan, boasting about his sexual conquests and sucking up booze like a fiend himself. Like his predecessor, Vincent refuses to help the kid, telling him that vampires don’t exist, that the menace, like his own act, is merely an illusion. In keeping with current cinematic practices, the script withholds its terrific climactic confrontation, proceeding instead through a series of violent encounters between the monster and the young people. Though no more inventive than those of the first “Fright Night,” those


All the marbles [ REVIEW ] BY DAYNA PAPALEO

“Another Earth” (PG-13), directed by Mike Cahill Now playing

battles involve a great deal more in the way of actual physical damage, accompanied by quantities of blood — one character, transformed into a vampire, fights his intended victims despite losing an arm and suffering an axe blow to his neck that simply ruins the position of his head. Though he lacks the suave manner of Chris Sarandon’s Jerry Dandrige, Colin Farrell, buffed like a bodybuilder, sinister, creepy, with a sneering condescension, makes a most acceptable vampire. Tubby, flabby and extraordinarily irritating, Christopher Mintz-Plasse, whoever he is, cannot hold a candle or a cross to Stephen Geoffreys, the first Evil Ed. Gratifyingly, “Fright Night” continues some of the great traditions of the vampire film, employing the age-old devices of garlic, the cross, holy water, and the old reliable, the stake through the heart. In a nice touch, in the opening scenes Charley helps his mother, a real estate agent, load her car with the equipment of her trade, including signs on wooden stakes, and we all know that one of those stakes will come in handy before the movie ends, and by Dracula, it does. Despite the modernization, “Fright Night” retains at least one retrogressive connection to its predecessor, a teenage protagonist who would rather spy on his neighbor than have sex with his beautiful (and willing) girlfriend, which amounts to a total denial of adolescent hormonal reality and perhaps an allusion to the Reagan-era advice, “Just say no.”

For as long as they’ve been making movies, they’ve been making movies that consider whether sentient life exists elsewhere in the universe. Just who or what might be out there remains one of humankind’s last great mysteries, inspiring more than a century’s worth of filmmakers to explore all theoretical angles, from friendly green spacemen to bony, bloodthirsty aliens, some of whom look like ET and some of whom resemble us. And some of whom might actually be us; that’s the underlying premise of Mike Cahill’s imperfect yet interesting Sundance hit “Another Earth,” a thought-provoking entry into the science-fiction genre that plays frustratingly fast and loose with the science part of the equation in service to a gorgeously rendered fiction about that elusive second chance. When we first meet Rhoda (Brit Marling), the willowy 17-year-old with an enviable tumble of blonde hair is partying on the cusp of what looks to be a bright future. Rhoda is slated to study

Brit Marling in “Another Earth.” photo courtesy Fox Searchlight Pictures

astrophysics at MIT, so it’s not surprising that she might be preoccupied with the sudden appearance of a previously undiscovered planet on her drive home, one that ends in tragedy as the drunken, distracted teen plows into the car of John Burroughs (William Mapother, “In the Bedroom”), killing his pregnant wife and young son. Flash-forward four years: Rhoda is being released from prison, and some Branson-esque impresario is sponsoring a contest to travel to the new planet, its composition close enough to ours to earn it the name Earth 2. “Another Earth” watches as the introverted Rhoda attempts to piece her life together, both with an anonymous maintenance job at the local high school (Wes Anderson fans will recognize Kumar Pallana as Purdeep, this film’s clichéd Wise Minority) and an eloquent contest entry detailing why she, as a convicted felon, might be the perfect choice for a journey to the modern-day frontier. Rhoda also sets out to apologize to Burroughs but can’t find the words in the presence of the dazed, brooding widower and begins working for him as a house cleaner. Now, assuming this isn’t your first moving picture, you can of course foresee the trajectory that the relationship between these two lonely, bruised souls will take, even as you hold your breath for Rhoda’s inevitable confession. Hovering ominously, promisingly in the background is Earth 2, which appears to be a carbon copy of Earth, right down to its doppelgänger population. (Putting this scene in the trailer totally undermined the spine-chillingness of the revelation.) Earth 2 offers our characters an opportunity to ponder the existential questions, like what one might say upon meeting oneself or how to handle a chance for the ultimate do-over. Unfortunately, also hovering in the background are

the shaky physics of it all, which do not exactly hold up under scrutiny. Why did it take so long for someone to notice this massive planet in our orbit? And how is it able to get so near without actually crashing into us? A third-act twist in the space-time continuum is beyond convenient, though by that time you’re either on board or you’re not. But seriously: you go to Earth 2 and meet Earth 2 You; won’t that f**k everything up? Cahill and co-writer Marling don’t address this, and there’s no enforceable law that says they have to. Earth 2 is yet another in a storied line of MacGuffins, its presence propelling the unfolding conflict between Rhoda and Burroughs. The spare, contemplative script wisely explains away his failure to recognize her, and as their bond gradually develops, we become quite emotionally invested in a construct that seemed farfetched at the outset of “Another Earth.” For that we can thank Marling and Mapother, who bring to their performances a delicacy and humanness that transcends any nagging unbelievability. Due most likely to her gender, beauty, and relative youth, Marling has been getting the lion’s share of attention for her contributions on both sides of the camera, but I’m truthfully more impressed with Cahill, who handles cinematography and editing duties here as well. While the handheld camerawork can get a bit show-offy at times, “Another Earth” is unnecessarily lovely, the colors alternating between otherworldly steelblues and the autumnal desaturation of coastal Connecticut. Cahill shot on low-resolution digital (no doubt helping to keep the budget to a mere, shocking $200,000), and the raw, poetic feel of the images only works to amplify the ache as everyone wonders what’s next.

Photo courtesy Photofest

Photo courtesy Photofest

FAST TIMES AT RIDGEMONT HIGH

Friday, Aug. 26, 8 p.m., and Sunday, Aug. 28, 4 p.m. Fast Times broke the mold for the teen sex comedy genre by privileging human comedy over crude laughs. Jennifer Jason Leigh leads the cast as a sexually inexperienced teen seeking guidance from best friend Phoebe Cates, while her brother Judge Reinhold navigates the world of fast food. Stoned surfer Sean Penn barely graduates, and Forest Whitaker rips up the football field. (Amy Heckerling, US 1982, 90 min.)

REAL GENIUS Movies for movie lovers, 6 nights a week. Back to Back to the ’80s

Saturday, Aug. 27, 8 p.m., and Sunday, Aug. 28, 7 p.m. A group of whiz kids are unknowingly working on a top-secret weapon for the CIA, but find themselves more concerned with pranks, partying, and a slowly developing political conscience. Val Kilmer anchors this cult classic, which blends a keen insight into the teen mind with genuinely hilarious coming-of-age comedy. (Martha Coolidge, US 1985, 108 min.)

Film Info: 271-4090 l 900 East Avenue l Eastman House Café—stop in for a light dinner or dessert before the film. l Wi-Fi Hotspot l Sponsored by rochestercitynewspaper.com City 27


5:10, 7:50, 10:35; COWBOY AND ALIENS: 2, 7:35; CRAZY, STUPID, LOVE: 1:30, 4:10, 6:50, 9:30; FINAL DESTINATION 5 (3D): 2:05, 4:30, 6:45, 9:20; FRIGHT NIGHT: 4:20, 9:25; also in 3D 2:45, 5:20, 7:55, 10:30; HARRY POTTER & THE DEATHLY HALLOWS II: 1:25, 4:15, 7:05, 9:55; THE HELP: 1:20, 4:25, 8; ONE DAY: 2:25, 5, 7:45, 10:25; RISE OF THE PLANET OF THE APES: 2:10, 4:35, 7:10, 9:45; THE SMURFS: 1:55, 4:50, 7:15; also in 3D 9:40; SPY KIDS: ALL THE TIME IN THE WORLD: 4, 9:15; also in 3D 1:50, 7.

DON’T BE AFRAID OF THE DARK: 2:10, 4:40, 7:20, 10; FINAL DESTINATION 5 (3D): 5:05, 10:10; FRIGHT NIGHT: 1:45; also in 3D 4:45, 7:45, 10:15; GLEE (3D): 2:25, 7:50; HARRY POTTER & THE DEATHLY HALLOWS II: 1:35, 4:30, 7:25, 10:20; THE HELP: 1:30, 4:35, 8; ONE DAY: 1:40, 4:20, 7:10, 9:55; OUR IDIOT BROTHER: 1:50, 4:10, 7, 9:50; RISE OF THE PLANET OF THE APES: 2, 4:55, 7:30, 10:05; THE SMURFS: 1:55, 4:25, 6:55, 9:35; SPY KIDS: ALL THE TIME IN THE WORLD: 2:15, 7:15; also in 3D 4:50, 9:30.

Dryden Theatre

Geneseo Theatres

271-3361 900 East Ave *NOTE: Film times for Wed 8/24-Wed 8/31* THE BLUE BIRD: Wed 8/24 8; THE BRIDGE ON THE RIVER KWAI: Thu 8; FAST TIMES AT RIDGEMONT HIGH: Fri 8; REAL GENIUS: Sat 8; FAST TIMES AT RIDGEMONT HIGH/REAL GENIUS: Sun 4; HEAVEN CAN WAIT: Tue 8; GREAT DAY IN THE MORNING: Wed 8/31 8.

243-2691 Geneseo Square Mall CONAN THE BARBARIAN: 7, 9:15; also Fri-Sun 4; DON’T BE AFRAID OF THE DARK: 7:15, 9;20; also Fri-Sun 1, 3:05, 5:10; FRIGHT NIGHT (3D): 7:10, 9:10; also Fri-Sun 1:10, 3:10, 5:10; THE HELP: 7:15; also FriSun 1, 4; OUR IDIOT BROTHER: 7:15, 9:15; also Fri-Sun 1:15, 3:15, 5:15; RISE OF THE PLANET OF THE APES: 8:45; also Fri-Sun 1:30; SPY KIDS: ALL THE TIME IN THE WORLD: 7, 9:45; also Fri-Sun 1, 3, 5.

Eastview 13 425-0420 Eastview Mall, Victor 30 MINUTES OR LESS: 4:15, 9:40; CAPTAIN AMERICA: FIRST AVENGER: 1:25, 6:50; COLUMBIANA: 2:20, 5, 7:40, 10:25; CONAN THE BARBARIAN: 2:05, 5:10, 7:55, 10:30;

Film Previews Full film reviews available at rochestercitynewspaper.com. [ OPENING ] THE BLUE BIRD (1918): Maurice Tourneur directs this adaptation of the play by Maurice Maeterlinck, in which two kids are spirited away to a fantasy land of animals and fairies on a quest to find the Blue Bird of Happiness. Dryden (Wed, Aug 24, 8 p.m.) THE BRIDGE ON THE RIVER KWAI (1957): David Lean directs Alec Guinness and William Holden in this seminal war movie about a group of British POWs charged with building a bridge for their Japanese captors as the Allies race to destroy it. Dryden (Thu, Aug 25, 8 p.m.) COLOMBIANA (PG-13): Zoe Saldana (“Avatar”) stars for “Transporter 3” director Olivier Megaton in this action flick about an assassin looking to settle the score with the drug lord who executed her parents. With Michael Vartan. Canandaigua, Eastview, Tinseltown, Webster THE DEVIL’S DOUBLE (R): New Zealand’s Lee Tamahori (“Die Another Day”) directs Dominic Cooper (“Mamma Mia”) in this biographical thriller as Latif Yahia, the unassuming man whose job it was to pretend to be Saddam Hussein’s psycho son Uday. Pittsford DON’T BE AFRAID OF THE DARK (R): Katie Holmes and Guy Pearce star in this Guillermo del Toro-scripted remake of the TV horror movie about a young girl

Greece Ridge 12 225-5810 176 Greece Ridge Center Dr. 30 MINUTES OR LESS: 3, 5:20, 7:35, 9:50; CONAN THE BARBARIAN: 1:50; also

terrorized by killer creatures after she goes to live with her father and his new girlfriend. Brockport, Canandaigua, Eastview, Geneseo, Tinseltown, Vintage, Webster FANTASTIC MR. FOX (PG): Nominated for two Oscars, this is Wes Anderson’s adorable stopmotion piece about a fox who decides to pull off the proverbial one last job against a trio of formidable farmers. Featuring the voices of George Clooney, Meryl Streep, and Bill Murray. Little FAST TIMES AT RIDGEMONT HIGH (1982): “When it comes down to making out, whenever possible, put on Side One of ‘Led Zeppelin IV.’” Dryden (Fri, Aug 26, 8 p.m., and Sun, Aug 28, 4 p.m.) HEAVEN CAN WAIT (1978): Warren Beatty stars in his own screwball remake of “Here Comes Mr. Jordan” as a dead football player who returns to Earth in the body of a recently murdered millionaire. With Jack Warden, James Mason, and Julie Christie. Dryden (Tue, August 30, 8 p.m.) OUR IDIOT BROTHER (R): Paul Rudd isn’t really an idiot; he just plays the title character in this Jesse Peretz comedy about a hippieish stoner opposite Elizabeth Banks, Zooey Deschanel, and Emily Mortimer as his frustrated sisters. Canandaigua, Eastview, Geneseo, Pittsford, Tinseltown, Webster REAL GENIUS (1985): A very young Val Kilmer stars in this very 80’s comedy about a group of teen brainiacs unwittingly working on a top-secret weapon for the CIA. Also, partying.

28 City august 24-30, 2011

in 3D 4:30, 7:15, 10; FINAL DESTINATION 5 (3D): 2:30, 5, 7:25, 9:45; FRIGHT NIGHT: 2:25; also in 3D 5:10, 7:45, 10:20; HARRY POTTER & THE DEATHLY HALLOWS II: 9:30; THE HELP: 1:30, 4:40, 8; ONE DAY: 1:35, 4:15, 7, 9:40; RISE OF THE PLANET OF THE APES: 2:10, 4:45, 7:20, 9:55; THE SMURFS: 2, 4:25, 6:50; SPY KIDS: ALL THE TIME IN THE WORLD: 1:40, 7:10; also in 3D 4:05, 9:35.

Henrietta 18 424-3090 525 Marketplace Dr. 30 MINTUES OR LESS: 12:45, 2:55, 5:25, 8, 10:20; also Fri-Sat 12:15 a.m.; CAPTAIN AMERICA: THE FIRST AVENGER: 1:20, 7:20; also Fri-Sat 11:40; CONAN THE BARBARIAN: 1:05, 4:05, 7:05, 9:45; also Fri-Sat midnight; also in 3D 1:50, 5:05, 8:05, 10:45; COWBOYS AND ALIENS: 4:30, 10:35; CRAZY, STUPID, LOVE: 12:55, 3:40, 6:30, 9:35; FINAL DESTINATION 5 (3D): 1:10, 4:45, 7:25, 9:50; also Fri-Sat 12:05 a.m.; FRIGHT NIGHT: 4:10, 9:30; also Fri-Sat 11:55; also in 3D 2:35, 5:10, 7:55, 10:30; HARRY POTTER & THE DEATHLY HALLOWS II: 12:25, 6:25; THE HELP: 12:35, 3:45, 7, 10:10; MIDNIGHT IN PARIS: 1:30, 4:20, 6:50, 9:25; ONE DAY: 1, 3:35, 6:45, 9:20; RISE OF THE PLANET OF THE APES: 1:40, 4:50, 7:50, 10:40; also Fri-Sat 12:15 a.m.; THE SMURFS: 12:50, 6:35; also in

Dryden (Sat, Aug 27, 8 p.m., and Sun, Aug 28, 7 p.m.) [ CONTINUING ] 30 MINUTES OR LESS (R): “Zombieland” director Ruben Fleischer returns with this manic comedy about a stoner pizza-delivery boy (Jesse Eisenberg) forced to rob a bank by two violent knuckleheads (Danny McBride and Nick Swardson). With Aziz Ansari and Fred Ward. Canandaigua, Eastview, Greece, Henrietta, Pittsford, Tinseltown, Webster BUCK (PG): This documentary tells the true story of Buck Brannaman, who overcame an abusive childhood to find his calling in horsemanship; he’s one of the inspirations for Nicholas Evans’ fiction bestseller “The Horse Whisperer.” Cinema CAPTAIN AMERICA: THE FIRST AVENGER (PG-13): Chris Evans stars as Steve Rogers, classified as unfit for military service in 1942 until a super-secret military project transforms him into Captain America and sends him up against Hitler’s lackey Red Skull (Hugo Weaving). With Tommy Lee Jones and Dominic Cooper. Cinema, Eastview, Henrietta THE CHANGE-UP (R): Ryan Reynolds and Jason Bateman star in this raunchy comedy from director David Dobkin (“The Wedding Crashers”) about a fun-loving bachelor who gets all Freaky-Friday with a family man. Co-starring Leslie Mann, Olivia Wilde, and Alan Arkin. Canandaigua, Tinseltown, Vintage

3D 3:50, 9:10; SPY KIDS: ALL THE TIME IN THE WORLD: 12:30, 2:50, 7:35; also in 3D 5:15, 10.

The Little 258-0400 240 East Ave.  ANOTHER EARTH: 7, 9:10; also Sat-Sun 12:40, 2:50; THE DEBT: Wed-Thu 7:10, 9:40; THE HELP: 6:30, 9:30; also Sat-Sun 12, 3; MIDNIGHT IN PARIS: 9:20 (no Wed-Thu); also Sat-Sun 3:10; LITTLE BUDDIES: FANTASTIC MR. FOX: Sat 10 a.m.; ONE DAY: 6:40, 9; also Sat-Sun 12:20, 2:40; SARAH’S KEY: 6:50, 9:20; also Sat-Sun 12:10, 2:30; TERRI: 7 (no Wed-Thu); also Sat-Sun 12:30.

Pittsford Cinema 383-1310 3349 Monroe Ave. 30 MINUTES OR LESS: Fri-Tue 9:10; ANOTHER EARTH: FriTue 4:20; BRIDESMAIDES: 4, 8:55; CRAZY, STUPID, LOVE: 1:30, 4:10, 7, 9:30; THE DEBT: Wed-Thu 1:20, 4, 6:30, 9; THE DEVIL’S DOUBLE: 12:20, 2:40, 5:10, 7:40, 10:10; HARRY POTTER & THE DEATHLY HALLOWS II: 1:40, 6:30; THE HELP: 12:30, 3:35, 6:40, 9:40; MIDNIGHT IN PARIS: 1:45, 6:50; ONE DAY: 2:10, 4:40, 7:10, 9:35; OUR IDIOT BROTHER: 1:20, 3:25, 5:40, 7:50, 10; RISE OF THE PLANET OF THE APES: 12:25, 2:45, 5, 7:30, 9:50; SARAH’S KEY: 2:20, 4:50, 7:20, 9:45.

CONAN THE BARBARIAN (R): Hot man-slab Jason Momoa, most recently seen in “Game of Thrones,” plays the title character in this reboot of Robert E. Howard’s pulp fiction about Conan’s adventures across the continent of Hyboria as he avenges the murder of his father. Featuring Ron Perlman and Rose McGowan. Brockport, Canandaigua, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece, Henrietta, Tinseltown, Vintage, Webster CRAZY, STUPID, LOVE. (PG-13): This romantic comedy from the directors of “I Love You, Phillip Morris” stars Steve Carell as a newly single dad navigating the dating scene with the help of cocky bachelor Ryan Gosling. Co-starring Emma Stone, Julianne Moore, and Marisa Tomei. Henrietta, Pittsford FRIENDS WITH BENEFITS (R): Mila Kunis and Justin Timberlake star in director Will Gluck’s follow-up to ���Easy A,” which asks whether two insanely attractive pals can incorporate sex into their relationship and still remain just friends. Co-starring Patricia Clarkson, Richard Jenkins, and Woody Harrelson. Vintage HARRY POTTER AND THE DEATHLY HALLOWS: PART 2 (PG-13): There’s gonna be a showdown! Canandaigua, Eastview, Greece, Henrietta, Pittsford, Tinseltown, Webster THE HELP (PG-13): The eagerly awaited adaptation of Kathryn Stockett’s bestseller is an ensemble drama set in 1960’s Mississippi about the relationships between white households and the AfricanAmerican women who work for

Tinseltown USA / IMAX 247-2180 2291 Buffalo Rd.  30 MINUTES OR LESS: 12:15, 2:40, 5:05, 7:15, 9:30; THE CHANGE-UP: 3:40, 9:45; COLUMBIANA: 11:55 a.m., 2:30, 5:05, 7:40, 10:15; CONAN THE BARBARIAN: 1; also in 3D 4, 7:05, 10:05; COWBOYS AND ALIENS: 12:45, 7; DON’T BE AFRAID OF THE DARK: 11:50 a.m., 2:20, 4:50, 7:25, 9:55; FINAL DESTINATION 5: 3:45, 8:45; also in 3D 2:55, 5:25, 7:50, 10:10; FRIGHT NIGHT (3D): 11:50 a.m., 2:25, 5, 7:35, 10:10; GLEE (3D): 12:25; HARRY POTTER & THE DEATHLY HALLOWS II: 12:50, 3:50, 6:50, 9:50; also in IMAX 3D 12:05, 3:05; THE HELP: 11:45 a.m., 1:20, 3, 4:40, 6:20, 8, 9:40; ONE DAY: 1:30, 4:15, 6:55, 9:35; OUR IDIOT BROTHER: 12:10, 2:45, 5:15, 7:45, 10; RISE OF THE PLANET OF THE APES: 12, 1:10, 2:30, 5, 6:15, 7:30, 10; THE SMURFS: 11:45 a.m., 2:15, 4:45, 7:20, 9:50; SPY KIDS: ALL THE TIME IN THE WORLD: 11:55 a.m., 2:35, 4:55, 7:10, 9:25; TRANSFORMERS: DARK OF THE MOON: 6:15, 9:35.

DARK: 8:25; FRIENDS WITH BENEFITS: 10:05; FRIGHT NIGHT: 8:25; RISE OF THE PLANET OF THE APES: 10:10; THE SMURFS: 9:55; SPY KIDS: ALL THE TIME IN THE WORLD: 8:25.

Webster 12

226-9290 1520 W Henrietta Rd. THE CHANGE-UP: 10:15; CONAN THE BARBARIAN: 8:25; DON’T BE AFRAID OF THE

888-262-4386 2190 Empire Blvd. 30 MINUTES OR LESS: 1:30, 3:30, 5:55, 8:30, 10:30; also Sat-Sun 11 a.m.; COLUMBIANA: 2;10, 4:40, 7:30, 10; also Sat-Sun 11:30 a.m.; CONAN THE BARBARIAN (3D): 2:20, 5:10, 7:40, 10:10; also Sat-Sun 11:45 a.m.; DON’T BE AFRAID OF THE DARK: 12:30, 3, 5:30, 8, 10:20; also Sat 10:10 a.m.; FRIGHT NIGHT (3D): 12:10, 2:50, 5:20, 7:50, 10:15; HARRY POTTER & THE DEATHLY HALLOWS: 1:15, 4:05, 7:05, 9:50; also Sat 10:20 a.m.; THE HELP: 12:45, 3:45, 7, 10:05; ONE DAY: 1:45, 4:15, 7:15, 9:45; also Sat 10:45 a.m.; OUR IDIOT BROTHER: 1, 3;15, 5:45, 8:15, 10:25; also Sat-Sun 10:30 a.m.; RISE OF THE PLANET OF THE APES: 2, 4:30, 7:20, 9:55; also Sat-Sun 11;15 a.m.; THE SMURFS: 12:20, 5, 9:30; also in 3D 2;30, 7:10; SPY KIDS: ALL THE TIME IN THE WORLD: 2:40, 7:25; also Sun 10 a.m.; also sensoryfriendly Sat 10 a.m., also in 3D 12, 4:50, 9:40.

them. With Emma Stone, Viola Davis, and Bryce Dallas Howard. Canandaigua, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece, Henrietta, Little, Pittsford, Tinseltown, Webster MIDNIGHT IN PARIS (PG-13): Time for your yearly Woody Allen film; this one, set in the City of Light, is a time-hopping comedy about the dueling illusions of love and art starring Owen Wilson, Rachel McAdams, Marion Cotillard, and Kathy Bates as Gertrude Stein. Henrietta, Little, Pittsford ONE DAY (PG-13): Anne Hathaway and Jim Sturgess star for Danish filmmaker Lone Scherfig (“An Education”) in this love story that observes as two people meet on the same day over a period of 20 years. Co-starring Patricia Clarkson. Eastview, Greece, Henrietta, Little, Pittsford, Tinseltown, Webster RISE OF THE PLANET OF THE APES (PG-13): Oscar nominee/ soap star/college student James Franco headlines this origin story set in modern day that reveals how scientists might be to blame for ultimate simian supremacy. With Freida Pinto and John Lithgow. Canandaigua, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece, Henrietta, Pittsford, Tinseltown, Vintage, Webster SARAH’S KEY (PG-13): Kristin Scott-Thomas stars in this French film about a modernday journalist who finds her life becoming entwined with the story of a young girl whose family was torn apart during the notorious Vel’ d’Hiv Roundup of 1942. Little, Pittsford

THE SMURFS (PG): Neil Patrick Harris stars in the big-screen adaptation of the kids’ cartoon, a blend of live-action and animation that follows our little blue heroes — just three apples high! — as they unwittingly tumble from their world into ours. Featuring the voices of Hank Azaria, Katy Perry, and Jonathan Winters. Canandaigua, Eastview, Greece, Henrietta, Tinseltown, Vintage, Webster SPY KIDS 4: ALL THE TIME IN THE WORLD (PG): The fourth installment of Robert Rodriguez’s family-flick series stars Jessica Alba as a retiredoperative-turned-working-mother when she’s brought back on duty to save the world from a baddie (Jeremy Piven) intent on stopping time. Brockport, Canandaigua, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece, Henrietta, Tinseltown, Vintage, Webster TERRI (R): Azazel Jacobs follows up his acclaimed indie “Momma’s Man” with this bittersweet comedy about the friendship between an overweight teenage loner (Jacob Wysocki, in his feature debut) and his assistant principal (the invaluable John C. Reilly). Little TRANSFORMERS: DARK OF THE MOON (PG-13): Hopefully there’s more than meets the eye in Michael Bay’s third chapter of the battle for whatever among some robots and some other robots and a bunch of people. Starring Shia LaBoeuf, Josh Duhamel, and John Turturro. Cinema, Tinseltown

Vintage Drive In


Classifieds For information: Call us (585) 244-3329 Fax us (585) 244-1126 Mail Us City Classifieds 250 N. Goodman Street Rochester, NY 14607 Email Us classifieds@ rochester-citynews.com EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY

All real estate advertised in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act, which makes it unlawful, “to make, print, or publish, any notice, statement, or advertisement, with respect to the sale or rental of a dwelling that indicates any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin.” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under the age of 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertisement for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. Call the local Fair Housing Enforcement Project, FHEP at 325-2500 or 1-866-671-FAIR. Si usted sospecha una practica de vivienda injusta, por favor llame al servicio legal gratis. 585-325-2500 - TTY 585-325-2547. ROOMS FOR RENT Available September 1st. Neighborhood of the Arts. Biking/Walking distance to Farmer’s Market and East End. Utilities included. email for A SPACIOUS 1BR luxury details: jewelheart@mac.com apartment in Victorian Mansion in NOTA district. Hardwood floors, bay window, AC. Huge kitchen marble counter, tile floors, stainless fridge. Large BR with double closets. Whirlpool tub. Hot water included. Off-site parking, FOR RENT OR SALE ON LAND laundry Avail now. $825+ 585CONTRACT/ROCHESTER: Nice 241-0085 3 bedroom, 1 bath home with PARKLAWN APTS Large one washer/dryer hookups. $595/mo. bedroom. $830 includes Call Cornerstone 607-936-1945. heat & hw. Off street parking. See our complete listings at www. homesbycornerstone.com Convenient to Park Avenue shops, restaurants and salons. Special - first month free to qualified applicants. 585-271-7597

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Houses for Rent

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418 La Grange Ave

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Houses for Sale

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Vacation Property

OCEAN CITY, MARYLAND Best selection of affordable rentals. Full/ partial weeks. Call for FREE brochure. Open daily. Holiday Real Estate. 1-800638-2102. Online reservations: www.holidayoc.com

Adoption A BABY IS OUR DREAM We’re Steve and Kelly, a loving couple who’s longing to adopt! We care about you. Please call 1-800982-3678 Expenses paid. ADOPT Adoring couple longs to adopt & give unconditional love, security to your newborn. MADDY & SCOTT 1-800-8847431 Exp. Pd. ADOPT: A devoted married couple wishes to adopt baby; promises unconditional love, security, extended family, strong values. Confidential. Expenses paid. Barb and Pete 1-888-516-3402. www. barbandpeteadopt.com ADOPT: A happily married couple wishes so much to adopt baby. Will provide endless love, happiness, and security.

Expenses paid. Please call Joann/ John 1-877-455-6444 PREGNANT? CONSIDERING ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions 866-413-6293 (Void in Illinois) (AAN CAN)

Auctions AAA AUCTION Ed Fenzl Wooden Shoe Auctioneers 600+ items: Stickley table, vintage posters, collectable glass, jewelry, household 4pm 8/29/2011, 50 Wallace, Auburn Pictures/Info: www.woodenshoeauction.com ANTIQUE LOVERS TAKE NOTE BRIMFIELD, MA 5,000 Dealers of Antiques & Collectibles. Visit

www.brimfield.com For info on 20 individual show openings. Sept. 6-11, 2011

Automotive AAAA AUTO RECYCLING Up to $500 for your junk cars, vans and trucks. Always Free Towing. 482-2140 AAAA** DONATION Donate Your Car, Boat or Real Estate. IRS Tax Deductible. Free PickUp/Tow. Any Model/Condition. Help Under Privileged Children Outreach Center 1-800-4197474. (AAN CAN) ALWAYS BETTER Higher cash for your Junk Cars, Trucks and Vans. From $260-$800 or more for newer. Running or not. With

continues on page 31

The nicest $60k house you ever saw. The nicest $60k house you will ever see. It’s waiting for you, City reader! Look: http://ap23-house.s3. amazonaws.com/192_page1.htm AVON - 1602 West Henrietta Road Great opportunities for work and home. Wonderful 4 bdrm 2ba home with first flr master ste, family room w/ skylights, cherry kitchen w/ stainless countertops, walk out basement ready for pool players and a 36'x48' metal outbuilding with 3 phase electric and 12' overhead doors. Convenient to 390. Holly Harvey, Assoc. Broker. ReMax First, 585-414-4845

BANK FORECLOSURE! FLORIDA WATERFRONT CONDOS! SW Coast! Brand new upscale 2 bedroom, 2 bath, 1,675sf condo. Only $179,900! (Similar unit sold for $399,900) Prime downtown location on the water! Buy before 9/23/11 & get $8,000 in flex money! Call now 1-877-888-7571, X 51 COZY CABIN on 5 Acres $19,995. Beautiful woodlands. Our best deal ever! Call 800229-7843 Or visit www. landandcamps.com.

198 ERNST ST.

Charm of “Yesteryear” with today’s practicality: New roof, windows, furnace! Updated kitchen and bath plus a three car garage. You still have time to enjoy Summer refreshments in your own enclosed porch & BBQ-ing in the back yard. $67,000. Patricia Kulaga 368-7119. 292-8500 PC# 02354

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Place your real estate ad by calling 244-3329 ext. 23 or rochestercitynewspaper.com Ad Deadlines: Friday 4pm for Display Ads Monday at noon for Line ads > page 29 free towing. Also free removale of any unwanted model in any condition. Call 585-305-5865 CA$H 4 CAR$ Up to $500 for your junk cars, vans and trucks. Always Free Towing. 482-9988 CASH FOR CARS Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888-4203808 www.cash4car.com (AAN CAN) DONATE VEHICLE RECEIVE $1000 GROCERY COUPONS. NATIONAL ANIMAL WELFARE FOUNDATION SUPPORT NO KILL SHELTERS HELP HOMELESS PETS FREE TOWING, TAX DEDUCTIBLE, NON-RUNNERS ACCEPTED 1-866-912-GIVE

Education HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA! Graduate in just 4 weeks!!! FREE Brochure. Call NOW! 1800-532-6546 Ext. 97 www. continentalacademy.com (AAN CAN)

For Sale 11 QUART STAINLESS Steel Stock Pot. Still in sealed package. Great for lobsters, soups, stews, sacues & more $15 Lori 585-820-5611 BABY WALKER with swing out trays, play toys $10 585-8802903 DOG & CAT HOUSES Kennels, porch steps, do it yourself kits. Quick assembly 585-752-1000 $49 Jim

THINK MOVE BREATHE DANCE HEAL SEARCH STRETCH STRENGTHEN RELAX

MIND BODY SPIRIT

EXERCISE SKI MACHINE $40, Irondequoit, 585-746-8756

Jam Section

MOVING Will sacrifice antique -oak dressers, tables, chairs, mirror, picture, bamboo chair, porch steps, quality pot & pans, bar stools, large maple dresser, oriental rug, china cups, desk (mahogany). Also tools,duffle bags, suitcases, dog-kennel & house) new & used),lamps Jim 585 752 1000 or email jkress47@yahoo.com

BRIAN MARVIN Lead Vocalist, looking to join a band. Rock Star, Mr. Rochester, 255 Pearl St. 585-473-5089

PICTURE OF VENUS 4 1/2’ long, large in frame $45 585880-2903

CALLING ALL MUSICIANS OF ALL GENRES - the Rochester Music Coalition wants you! Please register on our website. For further info: www. rochestermusiccoalition.org. info@rochestermusiccoalition. org. 585-235-8412

SWINGING SHUTTER WOOD DOOR(1) ONLY ONE. Like in Cowboy movies, 5’ 5” tall, 2’ 2” wide (pantry, closet) Hangs middle of door frame. $15 585880-2903 TRICYCLE small, red $7 585880-2903 VACUUM SEALER - KENMORE “Seal n Save” still in box, never used $40 Lori 585-820-5611

Groups Forming PROBLEMS WITH Organized Religion? Try some unorganized! Disorganized. For meeting information www.tarr.biz

HomeWork A cooperative effort of City Newspaper and RochesterCityLiving, a program of the Landmark Society.

CALLING ALL MUSICIANS OF ALL GENRES - the Rochester Music Coalition wants you! Please register on our website. For further info: www.rochestermusiccoalition. org. info@rochestermusiccoalition. org. 585-235-8412

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$50 - $5,000

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Rare Brick Beauty Near Park Ave.

35 Vick Park A

Built in 1875 during the Victorian era, the Italianate style house at 35 Vick Park A stands out among the wood-framed houses built on the former property of the Vick Seed Company during this time period. With its stately red brick exterior, it more closely resembles the larger houses lining East Avenue. Over the long course of its existence, this home has had several cosmetic updates inside and out; however, its previous owners have kept the sophisticated façade intact. The parade of original features in this home begins as soon as you walk through the front door. The entryway boasts original penny tile floor and pristine crown molding. Once inside, gleaming oak hardwood floors lead into the spacious living room. The front facing bay window lights up this unique space and all of the living room windows, in true Victorian fashion, stretch all the way down to the floor. This well-designed space is perfect for entertaining but can also function well as a sanctuary for a quiet night at home. The dining room boasts plenty of space for a large set of formal dining furniture. A door that originally led outside has been converted into a large window, giving the room light exposure from another angle. Another notable update is the recently remodeled kitchen. Matching cherry floors and cabinets, Corian countertops with ceramic tile backsplash, new crown molding

and modern appliances provide a welcome taste of modernity amidst the classic style of the home. The kitchen also offers ample space for a breakfast table or butchers block. Directly off of the spacious eating area, a powder room has also been added. There is plenty of space for a growing family on the second floor, including four potential bedrooms, a serene sitting area at the top of the steps, and a full bath. Another rare and wonderful find in this home is a second floor, cedar-walled laundry room. All of the rooms in this home boast immaculate hardwood floors. The rear bedroom, which is currently set up as the master suite, stands out with recently installed wide-plank pine floors. The backyard is beautifully landscaped, matching the traditional look and feel of the rest of the home. A professionally designed gazebo extends off the kitchen, offering a great place to sip coffee or tea before heading out to the varied delights of the Park, East, and University Avenues corridor. 35 Vick Park A has approximately 2,210 square feet of living space and is listed at $299,990. For more information visit http:// rochestercityliving.com/property/R155794 or contact Norma Fennell at 585-943-2701. by Peter Smith Peter lives and works in Rochester and is a Landmark Society volunteer.

[ See Page 25 of this week’s issue ]

TO ADVERTISE CALL CHRISTINE AT 244.3329 x23 rochestercitynewspaper.com City 31


I’m very pleased with the calls I got from our apartment rental ads, and will continue running them. Your readers respond — positively!” - M. Smith, Residential Management > page 31 GUITAR PLAYER NEEDED Must be available evenings. Must have equipment and transportation. Please no freelancers. Originals and Covers. Bobby 585-3284121 Sitting Heavy Productions 585-234-1324, rbullock3@ rochester.rr.com LEAD GUITAR PLAYER Needed now for established industrial metal cover band. Heated, secure practice space. No rental or utility fees. Call 585-6215488 PERFORMANCE AUDIO EQUIPMENT — 38-piece set of quality performance equipment including multiple amps, microphones, pre-amps, stands and much more. Not sold separately. $1290. Call 585259-6934. THE CHORUS OF THE GENESEE (CoG) has openings in all voice parts. The CoG performs a wide variety of musical styles from barbershop to Broadway, to patriotic and religious. Men of all ages. Contact Ed Rummler at 585385-2698.

Looking For... BUYING COINS Gold, Silver & ALL Coins, Stamps, Paper Money, Entire Collections worth $5,000 or more. Travel to your home. CASH paid. Call Marc 1800-488-4175

lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship. FREE Info & DVD www.NorwoodSawmills. com/300N 1-800-578-1363 Ext.300N VIAGRA 100MG and CIALIS 20 mg!! 40 Pills +4 Free on $99.00. #1 Male Enhancement, Discreet Shipping. Only $2.70/pill. Buy The Blue Pill Now! 1-888777-9242 (AAN CAN)

Music Services BASS LESSONS Acoustic, electric, all styles. Music therory and composition for all instruments. Former Berklee and Eastman Teacher. For more information, call 413-1896 LOVE THE VIOLIN? Classical/ Suzuki VIolin and FIddle style instruction. For children, parental involvement is requested. Learning with friend welcome. Call 442-6068Brighton. PIANO LESSONS In your home or mine. Patient, experienced instructor teaching all ages, levels and musical styles. Call Scott: 585- 465-0219. Visit www.scottwrightmusic.com YOUTH NEEDED For Choir Services. Plus drummers, keyboard and guitar player. Call Pastor Taylor 585-3173537

Miscellaneous

Notices

ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE From home. *Medical, *Business, *Paralegal, *Accounting, *Criminal Justice. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. Call 888-2018657 www.CenturaOnline.com

FOOD STAMPS stretch your food budget. Call MCLAC NOEP at (585) 295-5624 to find out if you may be eligible for Food Stamps. Prepared by a project of Hunger Solutions New York, USDA/FNS & NYSOTDA. This institution is an equal opportunity provider

HAS YOUR BUILING SHIFTED OR SETTLED? Contact Woodford Brothers Inc, for straightening, leveling, foundation and wood frame repairs at 1-800-OLDBARN www.woodfordbros. com. “Not applicable in Queens county” SAWMILLS from only $3997MAKE MONEY & SAVE MONEY with your own bandmil Cut

TO ADVERTISE IN OUR

HOME & GARDEN PROFESSIONALS SECTION CALL CHRISTINE AT

244.3329 x23 32 City august 24-30, 2011

EMPLOYMENT / CAREER TRAINING

Employment

Volunteers

ACTORS/MOVIE EXTRAS Needed immediately for upcoming roles $150-$300/day depending on job requirements. No experience, all looks. 1800-560-8672 A-109. For casting times/locations. (AAN CAN)

A HORSE’S FRIEND Work with children & Horses, in a local urban program where kids “Saddle Up For Success” 585-503-4087 ahorsesfriend@yahoo.com

AIRLINES ARE HIRING Train for high paying Aviation Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified- Job Placement Assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance (866)296-7093 ASSISTANT to the President - Assist in the execution of duties for the Office of the President and board chair. Ability to perform independently. Excellent writing skills, organizational ability, and sensitivity to issues of confidentiality. Bachelor’s Degree or equivalent experience at executive level. EEOC Resumes to: humanresources@team. uwrochester.org UWGR, HR Depart. 75 College Avenue, Rochester NY 14607 DRIVERS-WEEKLY HOMETIME for most lanes. Up to 42cpm! Daily or weekly pay. No forced dispatch to NYC or Canada. CDL-A, 3 months recent experience. 800-414-9569 www.driveknight.com HANDYMAN - PART-TIME, light electric, light plumbing, carpentry, painting, drywall. 750-0826 $$$HELP WANTED$$$ Extra Income! Assembling CD cases from Home! No Experience Necessary! Call our Live Operators Now! 1-800-4057619 EXT 2450 http://www. easywork-greatpay.com (AAN CAN) PAID IN ADVANCE Make $1,000 a Week mailing brochures from home! Guaranteed Income! FREE Supplies! No experience required. Start Immediately! www.homemailerprogram.net (AAN CAN) VACCINE VOLUNTEERS NEEDED Consider taking part in HIV vaccine research studies at the University of Rochester Medical Center. A pre-ventive HIV vaccine can help STOP the global AIDS crisis. If you are HIV negative, healthy and age 18-50, YOU may qualify. Vaccines are synthetic and it is IMPOSSIBLE to get HIV from the vaccine. Being in a study is more like donating blood. Participants will be paid an average of $750. For more information, visit www. rochestervictoryalliance.org. To learn if you qualify, or to schedule an appointment, call (585) 756- 2329 (756-2DAY).

ADOPTED ADULTS WANTED! Adoption Resource Network at Hillside is looking for a few adults who were adopted to volunteer for the AdoptMent program. AdoptMent matches adult adoptees with children who are somewhere in the adoption process. AdoptMent youth and adults meet as a group and individually for one hour a week from September until June. Training and support are provided. If you are interested, please call or email Shari Bartlett at 585-350- 2529, sbartlet@ hillside.com. ARE YOU PREGNANT? Participate in a study to help you become healthier during and after pregnancy. Don’t Wait! Please visit: www.emomsroc.org CENTER FOR YOUTH is looking for households to serve as Host Homes to house 12-18 year old for 1 -14 nights of care. Adults must be caring, respectful and an interest in helping teens. Must pass a thorough background check. Call 473-2464 X 112 for information. COMPEER’S “50 PROMISED” CAMPAIGN is underway! Volunteers needed to mentor youth experiencing parental incarceration. Spend rewarding time each month doing fun activities. Vehicle needed, training/support provided. Laura Ebert/Compeer lebert@compeer. org 585-546-8280 Ext-117 FOSTER PARENTS WANTED! Monroe County is looking for adults age 21 and over to consider opening their homes to foster children. Call 334-9096 or visit www.MonroeFosterCare.org. LITERACY VOLUNTEERS OF ROCHESTER Has several 1 hour preview sessions scheduled for anyone interested in becoming a tutor. No prior teaching experience is required. For info call Shelley Alfieri at 585-473-3030 MEALS ON WHEELS Needs Volunteers! Do you have an hour and a smile? Deliver meals

during lunchtime to homebound neighbors. Interested? Call 7878326 to help. NEW FIBRO SUPPORT Group is seeking volunteers for all positions, long-term & short-term Call Brenda 585-341-3290 YMCA OMBUDSMAN VOLUNTEERS NEEDED! LIFESPAN If you are a good listener, like resolving problems and want to protect the rights of older individuals in long term care, Call 585-244-8400 Ext. 178 THE LUPUS FOUNDATION OF GENESEE VALLEY welcomes volunteers to help weekly, monthly or once a year. We match your interests with our projects. Each volunteer makes a difference. Call 585-288-2910. VOLUNTEERS NEEDED To assist with praise and worship. Living Waters Fellowship is a Christ centered nondenominational church in the early stages of development. Individuals, groups, and

musicians are welcomed. Call 585-957-6155. VOLUNTEERS OF AMERICA Have time after getting your children off to school? Help out with general office work or retail processing. Help us continue serving those in need. 585-6471150 visit www.voawny.org. VOLUNTEERS OF AMERICA Is recruiting committed individuals to help with monthly birthday parties for homeless children, afterschool clubs at the Children’s Center and to sort books for the E-Bay sales division. 585-647-1150 for or visiit www.voawny.org.

Business Opportunities HUGE PROFIT POTENTIAL Untapped market helping pets. Earn 10k mo on 40k inv. Setup/ Training provided 803-3275050

SUBSTANCE ABUSE PROGRAM “Excellent Career Opportunity Close to Home” The Fort Drum, New York, Army Substance Abuse Program is Seeking: • Licensed Professional Counselors • Licensed Masters/Clinical Social Workers • Mental Health Counselors • Marriage and Family Therapists and Psychologists with Substance Abuse Certification, to join their team in supporting mission readiness to Soldiers, Civilians, Family members, and Retirees of the 10th Mountain Division and Fort Drum Community. These jobs offer recruitment incentives. Interested candidates may find further information about the positions and apply at www.cpol.us.army.mil or www.usajobs.gov (refer to vacancy announcement # NEBN11651844R). Non-status applicants (individuals outside the area of consideration) should view the vacancy announcements for external candidates at http://medcell.army.mil.

ADVERTISING SALES OPPORTUNITY SEEKING ONE OUTSTANDING SALES PROFESSIONAL. MUST BE ASSERTIVE, OUTGOING, SMART, IMAGINATIVE AND CONFIDENT. SALES EXPERIENCE AND PROVEN RECORD OF SALES ACHIEVEMENT A MUST. NEWSPAPER/MEDIA SALES A DEFINITE PLUS. SALARY PLUS COMMISSION PLUS BENEFITS.

SEND RESUME TO: Betsy Matthews, City Newspaper, 250 N. Goodman St., Rochester, NY 14607 OR EMAIL TO: bmatthews@rochester-citynews.com


Legal Ads [ LEGAL NOTICE ] J.A.A.M. PROPERTY MANAGEMENT LLC, a domestic Limited Liability Company (LLC) filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on August 1, 2011. NY office location: MONROE County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of any process against the LLC served upon him/her to THE LLC, 37 MARKET STREET, BROCKPORT, NEW YORK 14420. General purposes. [ LEGAL NOTICE ] Notice of Application for Authority of Bell and Howell BCC LLC filed with the Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 6/17/11. The LLC was formed in DE 6/7/11. Office loc.: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against may be served. The principal business loc. is 75 Josons Dr., Rochester, NY 14623. The address SSNY shall mail copy of process to is 3791 S. Alston Ave., Durham, NC 27713 . The office address required to be maintained in DE is 203 NE Front St., Ste. 101, Milford, DE 19963. Cert. of formation filed with DE Sec. of State, Dept. of State, Div. of Corporations, P.O. Box 898, Dover, DE 19903. [ LEGAL NOTICE ] Notice of Application for Authority of Bell and Howell, LLC. The ficticious name under which the LLC will do business in NY is Bell and Howell (DE), LLC filed with the Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 6/20/11. The LLC was formed in DE 05/24/11 Office loc.: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 3791 S. Alston Ave., Durham, NC 27713 . The required office address to be maintained in DE is 203 NE Front St., Ste. 101, Milford, DE 19963. Cert. of formation filed with DE Sec. of State, Dept. of State, Div. of Corporations, P.O. Box 898, Dover, DE 19903. [ LEGAL NOTICE ] Notice of formation: Stoneleigh Ventures LLC. Articles of Organization filed with SSNY 7/13/2011.

Location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to: C/ O Stoneleigh Ventures LLC, 78 Stoneleigh Ct., Rochester, NY 14618. No specific dissolution date. Purpose: Any lawful purpose [ LEGAL NOTICE ] Runway Earth, LLC (“LLC”) filed Arts. of Org. with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on August 15, 2011. Office Location: Monroe County. SSNY designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o the LLC, 11 Sand Brook Road, Pittsford, New York 14534. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ LEGAL NOTICE LEXINGTON MACHINING LLC ] Notice of Organization: Lexington Machining LLC was filed with SSNY on 7/27/11. Office: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. PO address which SSNY shall mail any process against the LLC served upon him: 677 Buffalo Rd., Rochester, NY 14611. Purpose is to engage in any lawful activity. [ LEGAL NOTICE OTTER POINT LLC ] Notice of Organization: Otter Point LLC was filed with SSNY on 6/16/11. Office: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. PO address which SSNY shall mail any process against the LLC served upon him: 8 Charleston Dr., Mendon, NY 14506. Purpose is to engage in any lawful activity. [ LEGAL NOTICE TRAVELNETWORKING, LLC ] Notice of Organization: Travelnetworking, LLC was filed with SSNY on 6/23/11. Office: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. PO address which SSNY shall mail any process against the LLC served upon him: 16 West Main Street, Rochester, NY 14614. Purpose is to engage in any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Apsara Beauty Enhancement,LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y

of State (SSNY) 6/ 9/11. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 34 Chesham Way, Fairport, NY 14450. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] 1214-1216 East Main Street LLC Filed Articles of Organization with NYS on 6/9/2011. Its principal office is in Monroe County, New York. The Principal business location is 1214 – 1216 East Main Street, Rochester, NY 14609. The Secretary of State has been designated as its agents And post office address to which the Secretary of State shall Mail a copy of any process against it is c/o 1214-1216 East Main Street, Rochester, NY 14609. Purpose: Any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] 2870 Buffalo Road Real Estate Holdings, LLC (LLC) filed Arts. of Org. with NY Secy. of State (SS) on 8/10/2011. LLC’s office is in Monroe Co. SS is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS shall mail a copy of any process to LLC’s principal business location at 2870 Buffalo Road, Rochester, NY 14624. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] 383 Park Avenue LLC Filed Articles of Organization with NYS on 6/9/2011. Its principal office is in Monroe County, New York. The Principal business location is 383 Park Avenue, Rochester, NY 14607. The Secretary of State has been designated as its agents And post office address to which the Secretary of State shall Mail a copy of any process against it is c/o 383 Park Avenue, Rochester, NY 14607. Purpose: Any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] 4506 CULVER ROAD, LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 6/3/2011. Office in Monroe Co. SSNY desig. agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to PO Box 67760, Rochester, NY 14617. Purpose: Any lawful purpose. Principal business

location: 4506 Culver Rd., Rochester, NY 14622. [ NOTICE ] 6 Vinyard Hill LLC Filed Articles of Organization with NYS on 6/9/2011. Its principal office is in Monroe County, New York. The Principal business location is 6 Vinyard Hill, Fairport, NY 14450. The Secretary of State has been designated as its agents And post office address to which the Secretary of State shall Mail a copy of any process against it is c/o6 Vinyard Hill LLC, 6 Vinyard Hill, Fairport, NY 14450. Purpose: Any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] 885 Long Pond Pizza, LLC (LLC) filed Arts. of Org. with NY Secy. of State (SS) on 8/10/2011. LLC’s office is in Monroe Co. SS is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS shall mail a copy of any process to LLC’s principal business location at 65 Mitchell Rd., Pittsford, NY 14534. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Articles of Organization with respect to 2973 West Henrietta Road, LLC, a New York Limited Liability Company, were filed with the Secretary of State of New York on July 13, 2011. The County in New York State where its office is located is Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent of 2973 West Henrietta Road, LLC upon whom process against it may be served, and the post office address to which the Secretary of State shall mail a copy of any process against 2973 West Henrietta Road, LLC served upon him of her is 35 Shaker Mill, Rochester, New York 14612. There are no exceptions adopted by the Company, or set forth in its Operating Agreement, to the limited liability of members pursuant to Section 609(a) of the Limited Liability Company Law of the State of New York. 2793 West Henrietta Road, LLC is formed for the purpose of owning and leasing commercial real estate. [ NOTICE ] BOUNDARY FENCE OF ROCHESTER, LLC, a domestic Limited

Liability Company (LLC), filed with the Sec of State of NY on 7/1/11. NY Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of any process against the LLC served upon him/ her to The LLC, Attn: Managing Member, 595 Trabold Rd., Rochester, NY 14624. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] BRIGHTLY FARMS LAND COMPANY, LLC, a domestic Limited Liability Company (LLC), filed with the Sec of State of NY on 7/11/11. NY Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of any process against the LLC served upon him/ her to The LLC, 1769 Redman Road, Hamlin, NY 14464. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] CALVARY APPLIED TECHNOLOGIES, LLC, a domestic Limited Liability Company (LLC), filed with the Sec of State of NY on 7/20/11. NY Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of any process against the LLC served upon him/her to The LLC, 45 Hendrix Rd., W. Henrietta, NY 14586. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] Comet Informatics, LLC (LLC) filed Arts. of Org. with NY Secy. of State (SS) on 8/10/2011. LLC’s office is in Monroe Co. SS is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS shall mail a copy of any process to LLC’s principal business location at 640 Kreag Rd. Ste 300, Pittsford, NY 14534. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] CROWN POINT RE CONSULTING, LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 7/28/2011. Office in Monroe Co. SSNY desig. agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 2255 Lyell Ave., Rochester, NY

14606. Purpose: Any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] DENMARK REAL ESTATE COMPANY, LLC (LLC) filed Arts. of Org. with NY Secy. of State (SS) on 7/15/2011. LLC’s office is in Monroe Co. SS is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS shall mail a copy of any process to LLC’s principal business location at 32 Quail Lane, Rochester, NY 14624. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] JP EQUIPMENT LEASING, LLC (LLC) filed Arts. of Org. with NY Secy. of State (SS) on 7/15/2011. LLC’s office is in Monroe Co. SS is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS shall mail a copy of any process to LLC’s principal business location at 32 Quail Lane, Rochester, NY 14624. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity [ NOTICE ] KEADY LANDSCAPING, LLC (LLC) filed Arts. of Org. with NY Secy. of State (SS) on 7/15/2011. LLC’s office is in Monroe Co. SS is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS shall mail a copy of any process to LLC’s principal business location at 32 Quail Lane, Rochester, NY 14624. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] LAKEVIEW DOODLES LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 7/20/2011. Office in Monroe Co. SSNY desig. agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to PO Box 16250, Rochester, NY 14616. Purpose: Any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] New England Village Townhouses, LLC Filed Articles of Organization with NYS on 6/22/2011. Its principal office is in Monroe County, New York. The Principal business location is 2315 English Road, Rochester, NY 14616. The Secretary of State has been designated as its agents And post office address to which the Secretary of State shall Mail a copy of

any process against it is c/o New England Town Homes, LLC, 2315 English Road, Rochester, NY 14616. Purpose: Any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] NEXTGEN COLLECTIONS, LLC. The name of the Foreign Limited Liability Company is: NEXTGEN COLLECTIONS, LLC. App. for Authority filed with the Dept. of State of NY on 8/4/2011. Jurisdiction: California and the date of its organization is: May 2, 2011. Office location in New York State: Monroe County . The Secretary of the State of NY (“SSNY”) is designated as agent upon whom process against it may be served, the address to which the SSNY shall mail a copy of such process is: Wayne B. Cooper, Attorney at Law, Thirty Oakland Avenue, San Anselmo, CA 94960. Address maintained in its jurisdiction is: Thirty Oakland Avenue, San Anselmo, CA 94960. The authorized officer in its jurisdiction of organization where a copy of its Certificate of Formation can be obtained is: California Secretary of State, 1500 11th St., Sacramento, CA 95814. The purpose of the company is: any lawful act. [ NOTICE ] Not. of Form. of THE SUNNY LAW FIRM, LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State of New York (SSNY) 7/6/11. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY may mail a copy of process to LLC. 369 W. Squire Dr. #6, Rochester, NY 14623. Purpose: any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Not. of Form. of YOLO VENTURES, LLC, Art. of Org. filled Sec’y of State (SSNY) 7/26/11. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY may mail a copy of any process to LLC. 813 Coventry Drive, Webster, NY 14580. Purpose: any lawful purpose [ NOTICE ] Notice is hereby given that a license, number not yet assigned, for a full on premise beer,

wine & liquor license has been applied for by Dooch’s Rubino’s Inc dba, Rubino’s, 24 E. Main St, Webster, NY 14580, County of Monroe, Village of Webster, for a restaurant and OTB Parlor. [ NOTICE ] Notice is hereby given that a license, number not yet assigned, for a full on premise beer, wine & liquor license has been applied for by Greater Rochester Area Branch American Association of University Women, Inc. dba Greater Rochester Area Branch American Association of University Women Inc., 494 East Avenue, Rochester, NY 14607, County of Monroe, City of Rochester, for a club.. [ NOTICE ] Notice is hereby given that a license, number not yet assigned, for a full on premise beer, wine & liquor license has been applied for by EL AGAVE MEXICAN GRILL INC, Inc. dba EL AGAVE MEXICAN GRILL, 2820 West Henrietta Road, Rochester, NY 14623, County of Monroe, Town of Brighton, for a restaurant. [ NOTICE ] Notice is hereby given that a license, number not yet assigned, for a full on premise beer &wine license has been applied for by LYNN’S DIM SUM LLC, Inc. dba Golden Port Dim Sum, 105 East Ave, Rochester, NY 14604, County of Monroe, City of Rochester for a restaurant. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Authorization of PITTSFORD PLAZA SPE, LLC (LLC). Application for Authority filed with NY Secy. of State (SSNY) on 8/12/11. Office location: Monroe County, NY. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 8/8/11. Principal business location: 1265 Scottsville Rd, Rochester, NY 14624. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to CT Corporation System, 111 Eighth Avenue, NY, NY 10011 which is also the registered agent of the LLC upon whom

cont. on page 34

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Legal Ads > page 33 process may be served. DE address of LLC: The Corporation Trust Company, Corporation Trust Center, 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Certificate of Formation filed with DE Secy. of State, 401 Federal St., Suite 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of 103 CASTLE RD., LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 07/22/11. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: Mark M. Guggino, 5503 W. Henrietta Rd., W. Henrietta, NY 14586. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Real estate holding. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of 2900 MONROE AVE., LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 2/26/99. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 1050 E. Ridge Rd., Rochester, NY 14621. Latest date on which the LLC may dissolve is 2/26/2059. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, 65-A Monroe Ave., Pittsford, NY 14534. Purpose: Commercial real estate. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of 3500 EAST AVE., LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 3/4/99. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 1050 E. Ridge Rd., Rochester, NY 14621. Latest date on which the LLC may dissolve is 3/31/2059. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, 65-A Monroe Ave., Pittsford, NY 14534. Purpose: Commercial real estate. [ NOTICE ] NOTICE OF FORMATION OF A LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY. The name of the limited liability company is Guiding E.D.G.E. Consulting LLC (“LLC”). Articles of Organization filed with Secretary of State

34 City august 24-30, 2011

of NY (“SSNY”) on 06/27/2011. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of any process to The LLC, 60 Mahogany Run, Pittsford, New York 14534. Purpose: To engage in any lawful activity. Principal business location: 60 Mahogany Run, Pittsford, New York 14534. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of B.T. Wood Group, LLC. Art. Of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 7/29/11. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 211 Spruce Ave. Rochester, NY 14611. Purpose: Any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of BACCOS LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 4/29/2011. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 465 East Moreno Dr., Rochester, NY 14626. Purpose: any lawful act [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Binici Arms Co., LLC. Art. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State (SSNY) on 7/25/11. Location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated Agent of LLC to whom process may be served. SSNY may mail a copy of any process to: 1580 Westfall Rd. Rochester NY 14618. Purpose any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of DEWEY CENTER, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 07/12/11. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 2771-2781 Dewey Ave., Rochester, NY 14616. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, 95 Longford Rd., Rochester, NY 14615. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Ellie’s Gluten Free

Bakery LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 6/28/11. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 65 Terrace Hill Dr., Penfield, NY 14526. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Final Drop LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 2/24/2011. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 225 Norman Rd., Rochester, NY 14623. Purpose: Any lawful activity. The LLC does not have a specific date of dissolution. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of GARBER REALTY NY, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 07/12/11. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 3955 Henrietta Rd., Henrietta, NY 14467. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Corporation Service Co., 80 State St., Albany, NY 122072543. Purpose: Own and lease real estate. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of KJPB PROPERTIES, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 8/10/2011. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 10 Rollins Crossing, Pittsford, NY 14534. Purpose: any lawful act [ NOTICE ] NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY. NAME: AMAZON & ASSOCIATES, LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 04/28/11. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served.

SSNY shall mail a copy of process to the LLC, 14 Hallmont Circle, Suite B, Penfield, New York 14526. Purpose: For any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of LLC. Lyons Logistics, LLC (LLC) filed Arts. of Org. with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 7/20/11. Office location: Monroe County. Principal business location: 75 North Main Street, Fairport, NY 14450. SSNY designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process may be served and SSNY shall mail process to c/o Jeffrey B. Andrus, Esq., Hiscock & Barclay, LLP, One Park Place, 300 South State Street, Syracuse, NY 132022078. Purpose: any business permitted under law. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Michelle’s Catering Company, LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 8/4/11. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to Bansbach Zoghlin, PC, 31 Erie Canal Dr., Ste. A, Rochester, NY 14626. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of MOBILE AUTOMOTIVE SERVICE LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 3/2/2011. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 116 Abbott St., Rochester NY 14606. Purpose: any lawful act. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of RECINO REALTY LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 7/14/2011. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 2813 St. Paul Blvd., Rochester, NY 14617. Purpose: any lawful act [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of SalSells, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the

Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/3/2010. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 40A Grove St., Pittsford, NY 14534. Purpose: any lawful act [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of SPAMPIV, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Sec’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 06/14/11. Office location: Monroe County, SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 4 Jewelberry Drive, Webster, NY 14580. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of ST. PAUL PROPERTIES II, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 07/27/11. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 2750 Monroe Ave., Rochester, NY 14618. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of TIPPING POINT PUBLIC RELATIONS LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 7/28/2011. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 277 Alexander St., Ste. 100, Rochester, NY 14607. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, 254 LaSalle Dr., Webster, NY 14580. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] OLED TECHNOLOGIES LLC (LLC) filed Arts. of Org. with NY Secy. of State (SS) on 8/1/2011. LLC’s office is in Monroe Co. SS is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS shall mail a copy of any process to LLC’s principal business location at 1645 Lyell Avenue, Suite 140, Rochester NY 14606. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity.


Legal Ads [ NOTICE ] PRSE, LLC, a domestic Limited Liability Company (LLC), filed with the Sec of State of NY on 6/16/11. NY Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of any process against the LLC served upon him/ her to The LLC, 3349 Monroe Ave., Ste. 328, Rochester, NY 14472. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] Vanderlinde Farm, LLC (LLC) filed Arts. of Org. with NY Secy. of State (SS) on 7/14/2011. LLC’s office is in Monroe Co. SS is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS shall mail a copy of any process to LLC’s principal business location at 28 Knollwood Dr. Rochester, NY 14618. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] Name: BRYANT DESIGN STUDIOS LLC. Arts. Of Org. filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 08/05/2011. Office Location: Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to: C/O BRYANT DESIGN STUDIOS LLC, One East Main Street, 10th Floor, Rochester, New York 14614. Purpose: Any Lawful Purpose. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF CONSTANCE CARE MANAGEMENT, LMSW, PLLC ] Articles of Organization filed with Secretary of State of NY (“SSNY”) on 07/13/2011. Office in Monroe County. SSNY designated agent of PLLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to CONSTANCE CARE MANAGEMENT, LMSW, PLLC, C/O CONSTANCE CRAIG, 179 WEST BROOK RD., PITTSFORD, NY 14534. Purpose: practice the profession of Licensed Master Social Work. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF KOSK PROPERTIES LLC ] Articles of Organization filed with

Secretary of State of NY (“SSNY”) on 07/15/2011. Office in Monroe County. SSNY designated agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to KOSK PROPERTIES LLC, C/O OLIVE McCALMAN, 81 GOETHALS DR., ROCHESTER, NY 14616. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY ] DGH PROPERTY HOLDINGS, LLC has filed Articles of Organization with the Secretary of State on August 2, 2011. It’s office is located in Monroe County, New York. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent upon whom process against it may be served and a copy of any process will be mailed to: The LLC, 198 Buffalo Road, Rochester, NY 14611. It’s business is to engage in any lawful activity for which limited liability companies may be organized under Section 203 of the New York Limited Liability Company Act. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY ] The name of the Limited Liability Company (LLC) is CCH Properties, LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (“SSNY”) on July 28, 2011, Office location is Monroe County, New York. The SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. The SSNY shall mail a copy of any process to the LLC at 120 Kaywood Drive, Rochester, New York 14626. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY ] The name of the Limited Liability Company (LLC) is AHPR Properties, LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (“SSNY”) on July 28, 2011, Office location is Monroe County, New York. The SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. The SSNY

shall mail a copy of any process to the LLC at 120 Kaywood Drive, Rochester, New York 14626. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY ] The name of the Limited Liability Company (LLC) is CKL Properties, LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (“SSNY”) on July 28, 2011, Office location is Monroe County, New York. The SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. The SSNY shall mail a copy of any process to the LLC at 120 Kaywood Drive, Rochester, New York 14626. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY ] The name of the Limited Liability Company (LLC) is WMGG Properties, LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (“SSNY”) on July 28, 2011, Office location is Monroe County, New York. The SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. The SSNY shall mail a copy of any process to the LLC at 120 Kaywood Drive, Rochester, New York 14626. [ NOTICE OF SALE ] Index No. 201010751 SUPREME COURT STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF MONROE ESL Federal Credit Union, Plaintiff, vs. Kenneth S. Palumbo; Stacy L. Vaiana, a/ k/a Stacy Palumbo; Capital One Bank; ESL Federal Credit Union, Defendants. Pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale dated February 16, 2011 and entered herein, I, the undersigned, the Referee in said Judgment named, will sell at public auction in the front vestibule of the Monroe County Office Building, 39 West Main Street, Rochester, New York, County of Monroe, on September 8, 2011 at 10:00 a.m., on that day, the premises directed by said Judgment to be sold and therein described

as follows: ALL THAT TRACT OR PARCEL OF LAND, situate in the Town of Greece, County of Monroe and State of New York, known and described as Lot Number 46 of the Picturesque Acres Subdivision Section Number 5, as shown on a map of said subdivision filed in the Monroe County Clerk’s Office on March 2, 1962, in Liber 153 of Maps, at page 5. Said Lot Number 46 fronts 90 feet on the south side of El Mar Drive in said subdivision, is the same width in rear and 150 feet in depth throughout, all as shown on said map. The grantor herein also conveys to the grantee the right to use El Mar Drive, Picturesque Drive, and Marie Elaina Drive as a means of ingress and egress to and from Mt. Read Boulevard, which streets are shown on the maps of Picturesque Acres Subdivision, Sections Nos. 5, 3, 2 and 1, filed in the Monroe County Clerk’s Office which said streets the grantor reserves the right to dedicate to the Town of Greece, New York. Tax Account No. 060.05-1-4 Property Address: 220 El Mar Drive, Town of Greece, New York Said premises are sold subject to any state of facts an accurate survey may show, zoning restrictions and any amendments thereto, covenants, restrictions, agreements, reservations, and easements of record and prior liens, if any, municipal departmental violations, and such other provisions as may be set forth in the Complaint and Judgment filed in this action. Judgment amount: $83,910.08 plus, but not limited to, costs, disbursements, attorney fees and additional allowance, if any, all with legal interest. DATED: August 2011 Aaron J. Sperano, Esq., Referee LACY KATZEN LLP Attorneys for Plaintiff 130 East Main Street Rochester, New York 14604 Telephone: (585) 324-5767

Fun [ rehabilitating mr. wiggles ] BY neil swaab

[ LAST WEEK’S SOLUTION ON PAGE 31 ]

rochestercitynewspaper.com City 35


36 City august 24-30, 2011

SOUTH WEDGE area businesses & restaurants


August 24-30 2011 - CITY Newspaper