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EVENTS: FRANS WILDENHAIN EXHIBIT, SPOKES & INK 20 THEATER REVIEW: 2012 SHAW FESTIVAL 18 RESTAURANT REVIEW: ZEPPA BISTRO

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FILM: “THE BOURNE LEGACY,” PROJECT 5 28 URBAN JOURNAL: CAN CITY SCHOOL SYSTEM WORK?

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CROSSWORD 39

sirens and sailors • train • brave combo • glimmerglass festival • loverboy • and M O R E M U S I C , PA G E 1 0

august 22-28, 2012 Free

Greater Rochester’s Alternative Newsweekly

Vol 41 No 50

News. Music. Life.

This way no one dies of this same cure again.” NEWS, PAGE 6

Shaming tax dodgers. NEWS, PAGE 4

Blood on the brain. NEWS, PAGE 5

Yogurt, Lake Ontario, and cow patties. NEWS, PAGE 6

Best of Rochester Primary: LAST WEEK to vote. DETAILS, PAGE 27

MUSIC | BY FRANK DE BLASE | PAGE 12 | ILLUSTRATION BY AUBREY BERARDINI

Hip-hop in Rochester: turn the beat around As boisterous and bombastic as hip-hop tends to be, it is still a genre preceded by public misperception, generalization, and out-and-out dismissal. As with any genre of music, the ears of those outside its fan base are often assailed by topical, shallow misrepresentations of the form. Minds get made up, hasty conclusions get drawn. Not only does this leave the listener unchallenged and unengaged, it hurts artists that possess true talent, insight, and soul. They’re left holding the bag, to apologize, and languish in the underground. Rochester is ripe with these artists; positive, innovative talents who mirror our society, raise

awareness, or merely entertain with their verbal dexterity and skill. Yet as diverse as our overall music scene is, ignorance and fear make the already uphill battle for artistic recognition that much steeper. In an effort to clear up, explain, and discuss hip-hop as music, as social commentary, and as an American folk art, City Newspaper invited a number of Rochester hip-hop artists to share their views in a kind of local hip-hop summit. While in no way a definitive take on hip-hop in Rochester, what follows is a frank, unapologetic conversation we hope will spawn more debate and discussion.


SO HERE’S OUR TWITTER

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Feedback Send comments to themail@rochestercitynews.com, or post them on our website, rochestercitynewspaper.com, our Facebook page, or our Twitter feed, @roccitynews. We edit selections for publication, and we don’t publish comments sent to other media.

Get involved in anti-frack efforts

In July, I traveled to Washington with a busload of other local people for a rally to help convince our government to protect its people for the devastating assault on public health and safety that is called hydrofracking. This national effort drew about 5000 people. Ten years ago, when I went to DC to protest against the looming Iraq war, the Mall was filled with 300,000 people. It could be argued that the Iraq war was a less immediate threat to Americans than the destruction of our drinking water by hydrofracking, which affects potentially millions of people. Nothing impacts human health more immediately and profoundly than access to clean, potable water. We are literally fighting for our lives against a giant polluted wave of greed, money, and ignorance that is the gas industry. It makes no sense to go on about the war on drugs and the war on terror if we allow our own corporations to kill us. If we are to put the fear of God into those charged with protecting us, we need to have more than 5000 people. Get involved. JOHN KASTNER, ROCHESTER

was when he said: “The hearing is not the issue. It’s the surviving after having been heard that’s the issue.” We can get the disadvantaged to speak up, but without a plan to help both the advantaged and disadvantaged, we cannot progress. Somehow we need to make kindness and caring “sexy” and “cool” again so that people will do it. Luckily, caring and kindness are self-seeding. The more you show it, the better you feel and the more you want to continue doing it. Rochester is indeed lucky to have such a wonderful man as one of her citizens. We need more people like Rev. McMickle, who are not afraid to discuss these politically charged issues, who are not interested in laying blame, but want to look at the reality of the situation and speak openly and honestly about what needs to be done to change direction. JAN DUFFIELD, FORDWICH, ONTARIO, CANADA

Guns and rights

On a reader’s comment linking violence in movies, on TV, and in video games to gun violence (Feedback): The impact of violent movies, TV shows, and video games on “sick individuals” is open for debate. But what is not debatable is that James Holmes was a lawabiding citizen who acquired his guns legally. As did Seung-Hui Cho of Virginia Tech infamy. So do we sit around debating who or what is more to blame while the body count rises? CHAIM DELOY

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While visiting the Finger Lakes from Ontario, Canada, I saw the headlines: “All this money and students can’t read: what?!” (I’m a teacher) and “Organic Farmers Continue Fight with Monsanto” (we’re farmers), so I decided to pick up the paper. Turns out the most interesting article by far was the interview with Rev. Marvin McMickle. That man certainly has his head screwed on correctly. He speaks so eloquently and passionately about societal problems, which are pretty much the same in our rural Ontario community. We don’t have race problems, yet I see white students daily exhibiting the same “hopeless” behavior as the young black male population in the US. In my opinion, the most interesting point the Reverend made

Posted on rochestercitynewspaper.com The gun-nuts interpret the Second Amendment as seemingly the MOST important amendment and believe that it should apply to everyone no matter what the case. Really, it should be a privilege to have a gun after you have proved that you aren’t a crazy person, or even just someone who has any idea what they’re doing. That it took me a year to get a driver’s license, yet I could buy a gun without any training is ludicrous. HAVAHD ST

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Mt. Morris’s good old socialist

I was glad to see the name of Francis Bellamy in the caption below the photo of Mt. Morris storefronts at the head of the article “The Mt. Morris Miracle” (July 18). That lets old socialists like me write in to remind readers

that Bellamy was more than the writer of the Pledge of Allegiance. In this fractured time in our country, mention of the author of the Pledge is a grand opportunity to remind some and inform others that Bellamy, born in Mt. Morris, was a socialist. “Socialist” has not always been a dirty word in these United States, and it shouldn’t be today. DENNIS WIENK, ROCHESTER

Romney vs. Obama

How about discussions about what government is not capable of providing? (“Romney and Ryan,” Urban Journal). Obama made more promises in 2008 than any presidential nominee EVER (over 500). Look at his biggest promises: To cut the deficit in half; he has nearly tripled it. To be a unifier; things are undeniably more divisive. Health care reform; premiums are already up between 8 and 9 percent, more than a million have lost their insurance provider, doctors hate it, most of America doesn’t want it, not to mention it was rammed through after no one read it. And the economy! All we have heard is excuses. This is a bloated, unreliable mess of a government, with arrogance to boot. Democrats are giving away other people’s money and then acting as if they are generous and caring because of it. It’s not generosity when it’s not your money. CHI

Posted on rochestercitynewspaper.com The “most right-wing presidential administration in modern American history”? After four disastrous years of the most extreme far-left regime in history, that sounds like progress! J.A.M.

Posted on rochestercitynewspaper.com We just had the most radical administration in our history – the Bush Catastrophe. Obama as some extreme left-winger? Right – like he borrowed his health bill plan from that Marxist think tank, the Heritage Foundation. And he even mimicked Romney there. It’s to the right of Nixon’s health plan – but I guess Nixon was a radical left-winger, too. And don’t get me started on that Commie dupe, Eisenhower. I mean, just look at his marginal tax rates. Or how about that radical left-winger, Ronald Reagan. Obama borrowed his nuclear weapons sensibilities from Ronnie. TROLL WHISPERER

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News. Music. Life. Greater Rochester’s Alternative Newsweekly August 22-28, 2012 Vol 41 No 50 250 North Goodman Street Rochester, New York 14607-1199 themail@rochester-citynews.com phone (585) 244-3329 fax (585) 244-1126 rochestercitynewspaper.com Publishers: William and Mary Anna Towler Editor: Mary Anna Towler Asst. to the publishers: Matt Walsh Editorial department themail@rochester-citynews.com Features editor: Eric Rezsnyak News editor: Christine Carrie Fien Staff writers: Tim Louis Macaluso, Jeremy Moule Music editor: Willie Clark Music writer: Frank De Blase Calendar editor: Rebecca Rafferty Contributing writers: Kate Antoniades, Paloma Capanna, Casey Carlsen, Roman Divezur, George Grella, Susie Hume, Andy Klingenberger, Dave LaBarge, Kathy Laluk, Michael Lasser, James Leach, Ron Netsky, Dayna Papaleo, Rebecca Rafferty, David Yockel Jr. Editorial intern: Alexandra Carmichael, Antoinette Ena Johnson, Anne Ritz Art department artdept@rochester-citynews.com Production manager: Max Seifert Designers: Aubrey Berardini, Matt DeTurck Photographers: Frank De Blase, Matt DeTurck, Michael Hanlon Photography Intern: Lauren Petracca Advertising department ads@rochester-citynews.com Advertising sales manager: Betsy Matthews Account executives: Tom Decker, Annalisa Iannone, William Towler Classified sales representatives: Christine Kubarycz, Tracey Mykins Operations/Circulation info@rochester-citynews.com Circulation Manager: Katherine Stathis Distribution: Andy DiCiaccio, David Riccioni, Northstar Delivery, Wolfe News City Newspaper is available free of charge. Additional copies of the current issue may be purchased for $1, payable in advance at the City Newspaper office. City Newspaper may be distributed only by authorized distributors. No person may, without prior written permission of City Newspaper, take more than one copy of each weekly issue. City (ISSN 1551-3262) is published weekly by WMT Publications, Inc. Periodical postage paid at Rochester, NY (USPS 022-138). Send address changes to City, 250 North Goodman Street, Rochester, NY 14607. City is a member of the Association of Alternative Newsweeklies and the New York Press Association. Subscriptions: $35.00 ($30.00 for senior citizens) for one year. Add $10 yearly for out-of-state subscriptions: add $30 yearly for foreign subscriptions. Due to the initial high cost of establishing new subscriptions, refunds for fewer than ten months cannot be issued. Copyright by WMT Publications Inc., 2012 - all rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, photocopying, recording or by any information storage retrieval system without permission of the copyright owner.


urban journal | by mary anna towler

The City School District: Can this system work? “Who is in charge of America’s urban schools? Everyone and no one. We Americans love divided government. Distrustful of power, we established a constitution with three branches of government, each designed to check the power of the others. “We have done the same thing with our schools. What could be more important than our children? Who can we trust to be in charge? We have diffused power over schools to state legislatures, to school districts, to the federal government, to state and federal courts, and de facto to education professionals and teacher unions. Diffused power is great for preserving stability; it makes change almost impossible.” There you have the beginning of “What School Boards Can Do,” a book by Donald R. Adams, president of the Center for Reform of School Systems and a former Houston school board president. “Diffused power… makes change almost impossible”: You’re looking at the Rochester school district. I don’t bring up the Adams quote to make another pitch for mayoral control. We’ll never get it. And Adams isn’t pushing mayoral control; he’s pushing for stronger school boards and stronger superintendents, working as a team. Is that possible here? I don’t want to exaggerate the latest disagreements between school board members and Superintendent Bolgen Vargas – whom they selected only four months ago – but frankly, those disagreements are troubling. Some board members are furious that Vargas has hired a strong critic of the district, former Rochester Deputy Mayor Patty Malgieri, as his chief of staff. That flack will probably blow over, but it brings up an important issue: the role of the school board. By law, the superintendent reports to the school board, and the board is literally in charge of nearly everything. It approves purchasing the textbooks and the curriculum used in the schools, for instance. It approves the hiring of every teacher and principal – an unrealistic job, given the district’s size. It does not, however, have authority over the people hired for the superintendent’s “cabinet”: the top administrators. That includes Malgieri. That’s not the only disagreement the board has had with Vargas. He wanted to close School 16, which badly needs costly repairs. Vargas says the district has too many buildings

Should the school board be involved in choosing who will train teachers? Should it overrule the superintendent on school closings?” for its population, and he’s conducting a study to recommend how to downsize. The board overruled him on School 16, though, so the repairs will be made. Last year, when he was interim superintendent, the board fought him over closing School 6. And earlier this month, two board members lashed out at Vargas for not following through on one of their directives: hiring staff from a community-based program to train city teachers in cultural sensitivity and in increasing parent involvement. Should the board be involved in such things as choosing who will train teachers? Should it overrule the superintendent on school closings? Legally it can. But should it? The Rochester school board’s challenges won’t get any easier. Money will become increasingly tight. That will put even more pressure on the district to spend every dollar effectively. Could a strong school board and a strong superintendent, acting as a team, pull that off? Could a strong team close down selected schools despite the protests of parents and teachers? Could it resist the pressure to hire (or not hire) specific people and use specific programs? Could it find a way to make sure that ineffective teachers and principals are helped to improve – and are removed from the district if they don’t? Right now, too many special interests, large and small, are pulling in too many directions, thwarting (and sometimes driving out) superintendents. This board could pull itself together and work with Vargas. But it will have to focus on the things that matter – on policy and goals, not every detail. And if its seven disparate members can’t do that, somebody will have to develop a strong, cohesive majority that can.

rochestercitynewspaper.com

City 


[ news from the week past ]

Bipartisan legislation lowers market fee

Monroe County Legislator Willie Joe Lightfoot, a Democrat, and Republican Legislator Tony Micciche introduced legislation that would reduce permit fees for prepared food vendors at farmers markets. Under the current county Health Department permit system, a vendor could pay between $700 and $1,400 per season. The legislation, which was set to be considered on Tuesday night, would lower the fee to $170 per season.

Sibley says no ferry

Harper Sibley, who tried to revive interest in a Rochester-Toronto ferry service, has abandoned the idea. Sibley didn’t say why he changed his mind, but earlier this year said it was difficult finding a boat at the right price.

Kodak’s patent problems

The buzz around Eastman Kodak’s patent sale continues. After the company released a statement indicating it might not sell its patents, reports surfaced of a consortium of com-

panies including Apple, Google, and Samsung forming to buy the patents for $150 million to $250 million. Most recently, a New York hedge fund asked for a probe of the patent sale out of concern for the integrity of the bidding process.

News

City, fire union end squabble

The City of Rochester has reached an agreement with its firefighters union over the Two Percent Fund. The fund is money paid to the city by out of state insurance companies, and is currently valued at $6.95 million. The city and the union have been involved in a longterm legal dispute over the use of that money. Per the agreement, some of the money will be used to buy firefighter turnout gear, breathing equipment, laundry and linen services for firefighters, and new uniform shirts. Money will also pay for the repair of fire stations, to buy new emergency station generators, and to construct a building “dedicated to the benefit of all active firefighters,” says a press release from the city.

ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT | by jeremy moule

Shaming tax dodgers

Ward’s Natural Science has earned a dubious distinction: it’s one of the inaugural inductees into the Corporate Tax Dodgers Hall of Shame.

A coalition of labor and social justice groups recently inducted Ward’s Natural Science’s parent company into its Corporate Tax Dodgers Hall of Shame. This is the plaque for the “award.” Photo PROVIDED

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The Hall of Shame, which is a satirical website, was created by the Getting Our Money’s Worth Coalition, which is made up of labor and progressive activist groups from across the state. The website is meant to draw attention to companies that receive tax breaks but either fail to create jobs or create low-paying jobs, says a coalition press release. (Ward’s Hall of Shame entry is online at gettingourmoneysworth.org/fingerlakes-vwr-international/) Ward’s parent company, VWR International, shut down a warehouse in Erie County after its tax breaks expired, the coalition says. Then it hired part-time workers at its Monroe County operation. Last year, the Monroe County Industrial Development Agency gave VWR tax incentives for a $2.3 million expansion of its Henrietta warehouse. VWR also pledged

to maintain its current level of employment in Monroe County and to even add positions. A review by the state Authorities Budget Office, however, found that neither Ward nor COMIDA broke the law. COMIDA did not appear to condition the Monroe County tax breaks on Ward’s relocating jobs from Erie County, the report says. Instead, it looks like one subsidiary company created jobs while another continued to reduce its work force, the report says. But the coalition says that Ward’s parent company continues to benefit from taxpayer subsidies even though, when its Erie and Monroe County work forces are combined, it has actually cut jobs. That’s why the coalition inducted the company into the Hall of Shame, it says.


When people think of brain damage, they usually imagine a catastrophic event that kills people or leaves them in a coma. But blows to the head can injure the brain in ways that aren’t always apparent.

MEDICINE | by Tim Louis Macaluso

POLITICS | BY CHRISTINE CARRIE FIEN

Blood on the brain Head injuries bring roughly 1.7 million people to the nation’s emergency rooms every year. During his early years in emergency medicine, Dr. Jeffrey Bazarian worried about these patients and the severity of their injuries. He says he couldn’t even be sure if someone had a concussion. The technology has improved, Bazarian says, but he’s not satisfied. Bazarian, an associate professor at the University of Rochester Medical Center, has been on a 15-year search for a blood test to serve as an objective marker to determine if a patient has a concussion or brain injury — the way an X-ray identifies fractures. A blood test would be economical and easy to administer right after the injury, when information-gathering is vital. And it could reduce exposure to unnecessary radiation from other technologies like CAT scans. After numerous studies — including developing the nation’s first emergency room traumatic brain injury registry at Strong Memorial Hospital — Bazarian says he is close to his goal. But he says that what he has learned along the way concerning blows to the head may be just as important. When people think of brain damage, they usually imagine a catastrophic event

that kills people or leaves them in a coma, Bazarian says. But blows to the head can injure the brain in ways that aren’t always apparent, he says. “The injury might be subtle, but it’s there,” Dr. Jeffrey Bazarian. Photo BY MATT DETURCK Bazarian says. A test developed in the mid 2000’s called diffusion tensor imaging detects slight swelling of axons — the long fibers that transmit neural signals. The swelling occurs when the axons are overly stretched, he says. In two recent studies involving athletes, Bazarian and his colleagues showed that even though no concussions were detected in most of the athletes, the DTI scans showed brain damage correlating with the number of times they were hit. The long-term ramifications are significant, especially for professional athletes, soldiers, and other people who may experience lowlevel, repetitive head blows, Bazarian says.

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Primary decision soon Attorney Van White says his clients, John Lightfoot and Jose Cruz, should learn in the next couple of days whether they can stay on the ballot for State Assembly. Lightfoot and Cruz hope to take on incumbent Assembly member David Gantt in a Democratic primary next month, but the validity of their petitions is being challenged in state Supreme Court by Gantt supporter Ruth Brooks-Ward. | Justice John Ark had White and Christopher Thomas, attorney for Brooks-Ward, back in court on Tuesday to answer a couple of questions regarding Lightfoot’s petitions. No new questions were raised about Cruz’s petitions, White says. Also attending was county attorney Bill Taylor. | One of the questions had to do with the timing of a certain objection, White says. Ark also wanted to know which of Lightfoot’s signatures had been ruled on by the county Board of Elections, White says. The board has ruled that both Lightfoot’s and Cruz’s petitions are valid, but some of Brooks-Ward’s objections are outside the board’s jurisdiction. | White says he’s encouraged by the way things are going. | “At least Mr. Lightfoot returned to argue another day,” he says.

Cost of War AFGHANISTAN TOTALS —

2097 US servicemen and servicewomen and 1,049 Coalition servicemen and servicewomen have been killed in Afghanistan from the beginning of the war and occupation to August 17. Statistics for Afghan civilian casualties are not available. American casualties from August 8 to 15: -- Capt. Matthew P. Manoukian, 29, Los Altos Hills, Calif. -- Gunnery Sgt. Ryan Jeschke, 31, Herndon, Va. -- Staff Sgt. Sky R. Mote, 27, El Dorado, Calif. -- Staff Sgt. Scott E. Dickinson, 29, San Diego, Calif. -- Cpl. Richard A. Rivera Jr., 20, Ventura, Calif. -- Lance Cpl. Gregory T. Buckley, 21, Oceanside, N.Y. -- Pfc. Andrew J. Keller, 22, Tigard, Ore. iraqbodycount. org, icasualties.org, Department of Defense SOURCES:

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EDUCATION | BY TIM LOUIS MACALUSO

ENVIRONMENT | BY JEREMY MOULE

Iffy results for incentive pay

Yogurt, Lake Ontario, and cow patties

The Rochester school district has paid thousands of dollars in extra income to teachers through programs designed to test incentive pay. The state and federal governments are investing in the programs — one in its third year and another set to launch in the fall — to test a key component of education reform: Does incentive pay lead to improvements in student outcomes? But the results so far have been mixed. The extra income teachers have earned has mostly been for time spent in professional development. Goals set for improvements in student achievement, however, have fallen short. One program, the East High School teacher incentive agreement, completed its second school year last June. Teachers at East established six school-wide goals that had to be met to earn the additional pay. The goals were supposed to be challenging, but attainable. For example, one of the academic goals for teachers was to increase graduation rates from 42 percent to 50 percent for East students who began ninth grade in September 2008 and graduated in June 2012. Another goal: increasing the percentage of students passing the English language Regents exam from 69 to 85 percent for students who graduated in 2012. Teachers could have earned a maximum of $1,650 if they met their academic goals and $800 for professional development goals. But none of East’s teachers met the academic goals, says Susan HasenauerCurtis, the district’s director of school innovation. About 34 teachers did receive $800 for completing 24 hours of professional development instruction and 73 received about $1,350 after completing at least 36 hours of instruction. The second initiative, the Teacher Incentive Fund, is a multiple schools, five-year program that gets under way this fall. Both teachers and principals are participating, and the goal is to earn a “highly effective” rating on their next professional evaluation. But the program has a twist. In one group of 10 schools, the teachers and principals will be rewarded with extra pay — about 10 percent of the school’s average median salary — if they meet their goal. The teachers also had to agree to allow classroom observations as they taught. In another group of 10 schools, the teachers and principals have the same goal, but they will not be rewarded even if they succeed.  City

august 22-28, 2012

Rewarding workers for exceptional performance is a tactic commonly practiced in the private sector, often to motivate employees. Education reformers have also touted the benefits of incentive pay in public schools as a way to increase teacher morale, saying that highly effective teachers should be rewarded with perks and bonuses. Average or mediocre performance shouldn’t be rewarded, reformers say. But Professional development can be demanding for teachers, says Susan the current system Hasenauer-Curtis, the city school district’s director of school innovation. Photo BY MATT DETURCK treats average and high performers But the programs pursued by the the same, they say. district take a different approach, says Teachers unions haven’t embraced the idea of higher teacher pay for higher student Hasenauer-Curtis. Emphasizing professional development should help teachers in the performance, particularly if the model links classroom, which, in turn, should have a specific teachers to their students’ academic positive effect on students, progress. They say it’s difficult to identify And the programs’ professional which teacher caused an improvement in development goals shouldn’t be minimized, a student’s performance, since students because teachers have to commit large sometimes work with multiple teachers, chunks of time outside of the classroom, she coaches, and other caring adults. A football coach’s emotional support, for example, may says. And some teachers have made multiple commitments to professional development, be what motivated a student to spend more including pursuing advanced degrees. time studying for a math test, they say. The programs are also collaborative and The district’s experiment in incentive consensual, Hasenauer-Curtis says. At least pay for teachers was initiated by former 80 percent of the teachers in the participating Superintendent Jean-Claude Brizard, schools agreed to commit to the programs. who viewed the programs as integral to And teachers participate as a group instead of district reform. competing against each other. But Brizard pushed for programs that Still, despite millions in funding, it’s directly tied teacher incentive pay to student unclear if the programs will lead to higher performance on standardized tests. The student achievement. Urbanski doesn’t Rochester Teachers Association pushed back. sound optimistic, though he says it may be “He didn’t get it,” says RTA President too early to tell. Adam Urbanski. “That approach “If they [student test scores] don’t improve, presumes that teachers are just holding maybe the money should go to improving back, withholding excellent teaching, the lives of families, after-school programs for which is nonsense.” children, and improving children’s readiness That kind of thinking is one of the reasons for learning,” he says. “This way no one dies of why incentive pay doesn’t work, he says. this same cure again.” “This assumes that teachers are the problem,” Urbanski says. “Teachers are the solution.”

New York’s yogurt boom may have an unseen byproduct: cow poop. The yogurt boom could be a muchneeded boost for the state’s dairy farmers. As companies increase yogurt production, they’ll need more milk. Governor Andrew Cuomo sees such potential that, during a state yogurt summit last week, he promised to loosen a key set of dairy industry environmental regulations. Dairy farmers say that the proposed changes would make it easier for them to expand their herds. Dairy farmers have long complained about a specific state permit that they need to get if they have more than 200 cattle. The concentrated animal feeding operations permit requires farmers to develop plans preventing nutrient pollution runoff. Cuomo wants to raise that threshold to 300 cattle, which would exempt more dairy farms from the requirement. Politicians, businesspeople, and some citizens across the state are clamoring for the state to eliminate regulations that they say stifle growth. Many voices, then, welcomed the governor’s promise to dairy farmers. In this case, however, the change may provide some small measure of relief for farmers, but it could exacerbate environmental problems elsewhere. The CAFO permit is a preventive measure meant to limit nutrient runoff from livestock farms; in the case of dairy farms, those nutrients come from cow poop. Nutrient pollution has been a persistent problem for the Genesee River and the near-shore area of Lake Ontario. Many of the permitted CAFOs are within the Genesee River watershed, particularly the section that lies within Wyoming, Genesee, and Livingston counties. And many more are located within the Lake Ontario basin, the area where water ultimately drains into the lake. Ontario Beach Park and Durand-Eastman beach already close frequently, and nutrientdriven algae blooms are often a factor. Exempting additional farms from the CAFO permit has the potential to exacerbate Lake Ontario’s near-shore algae problems.


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For more Tom Tomorrow, including a political blog and cartoon archive, visit http://thismodernworld.com

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august 22-28, 2012

This week’s calls to action include the following events and activities. (All are free and open to the public, unless otherwise noted.)

Charter school public meeting

The Rochester school board will hold a public hearing at 6 p.m. on Thursday, August 23, on the renewal of the charter application for the Rochester Academy Charter School. The proposed renewal extends the dates of operation from January 15, 2013, to June 30, 2017. The application would permit the school to expand, accommodating grades K-12 by the 2016-2017 school year. The hearing is at the district’s central office, 131 West Broad Street.

Protest the Ryan budget

Metro Justice will rally against the Ryan budget and in support of Medicare as it currently exists

at noon on Monday, August 27. The organizers also plan to ask the City of Rochester to divest its financial interests from JP Morgan Chase. The event is in front of the Chase Bank, downtown at 1 Chase Square.

Stop the drones rally

Several anti-war groups will rally against the United States’ use of drones in attacks on foreign countries from 5 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. on Wednesday, August 22, at Twelve Corners Park in Brighton.

Peace Corps information

The Peace Corps will hold Wednesday office hours in Rochester from Wednesday, August 22, through Wednesday, December 12. Peace Corps recruiter Dove Russo will be available to provide information about the Peace Corps. The event is at Monroe Commu-

nity College, Rochester AmeriCorps, Damon City Campus, 226 East Main Street. Information: (716) 251-6058.


Dining with a starchy scoop, beautifully toasted rounds of crostini brushed with olive oil and herbs and served alongside a ramekin of finely ground and seasoned pork topped with a cute half-moon of pure lard. The pork was remarkably mild and instantly addictive, particularly when paired with slices of pickled onions and a bit of housemade mustard — salty, meaty, spicy and crunchy all in one bite. You would expect that the former chef at Max Chophouse would have a dab hand at meat, and you won’t be disappointed here. While you can find strip steaks and rib-eyes on the menu, as well as a very promisingsounding burger, it’s clear that Lindahl loves his skirt steak ($19). Served gloriously rare atop a pile of crispy skin-on frites and finished with drizzles of chimichurri and a tamarind-heavy housemade steak sauce that’s reminiscent of A-1 on steroids, the sliced steak is nearly fork tender, juices soaking the fries below and creating a savory pool of gravy on the plate. The portion that looks modest at first glance is anything but. Polenta fries (pictured left) and steak frites (pictured right) from Zeppa Bistro.

If shock and awe is more your speed, PhotoS BY MIKE HANLON

The new reliable Zeppa Bistro 315 Gregory St. Tuesday-Thursday 5-10 p.m., Friday-Saturday 5-11 p.m. 563-6241, zeppabistro.com [ REVIEW ] BY JAMES LEACH

“Reliable.” In a hyperbolic age when anything short of hosanas and accolades is the equivalent of damnation, reliable has become a dirty word. It’s not. Reliable, along with other disfavored words like “steady,” “dependable,” and “workmanlike,” are strong, noble words, describing people who work hard, deliver what they say they will deliver, and do it consistently day after day. Reliable is one of the best words I can think of to describe a restaurant, or the chef who’s running the kitchen. And it’s exactly the word I would use to describe Zeppa Bistro on Gregory Street and its executive chef and coowner, Seth Lindahl. Open for a little more than half a year, Zeppa Bistro has become a reliable choice in the South Wedge. A restaurant that’s as good for a Wednesday night bowl of pasta as it is for a special occasion or a weekend splurge, it has already attracted a faithful following of

regulars. And as word of chef Lindahl’s $30 prix fixe menu offered on Thursday evenings gets out, the ranks of regulars are sure to grow, every portion of creamy pork rillettes or plate of pan-seared scallops with pineapple salsa winning over new converts. Offering what Lindahl describes as California cuisine with French and Italian influences, Zeppa’s menu reads like a catalog of American fine-dining classics from the past 20 years. There’s steak frites and caprese salad, iceberg wedges and seafood fra diavolo, and that reliable (there’s that word again) standby the roasted beet salad with spicy nuts and goat cheese. There are few surprises on Zeppa’s menu, but there’s nothing wrong with that because everything Lindahl sends out the kitchen door is technically perfect — cooking that is a credit to his culinaryschool training. Order two of the same entrée and both of them will come out looking identical, every element carefully cooked, plated, and presented just-so. It’s an admirable accomplishment, and one that not many restaurants can manage consistently. What sets Zeppa apart from most other restaurants offering contemporary American cuisine is that Lindahl doesn’t take shortcuts, ever. He makes every item on the menu (including the feather-light buttery dinner

rolls that start your meal) from scratch, using fresh, local and sustainably farmed ingredients from suppliers like John Bolton, Full Moon Farms, the Lively Run Goat Dairy, and the Good Food Collective. I have no idea what that does to Lindahl’s food costs, but it surely means that he treats every leaf of lettuce and every patty-pan squash, every tiny baby carrot and round of goat cheese like it’s made out of pure gold (or at least silver), lavishing such attention on them that such humble items as the vegetable side that comes with your entrée become show-stoppingly good. Start with a plate of polenta fries atop a

ragout of sauteed mushrooms finished with taleggio and anointed with truffle oil ($8). You’ve seen this dish before, but Lindahl’s touch with the mushrooms coaxes every bit of flavor out of the tiny, brown criminis, and renders the shiitakes meaty while enhancing their natural bacony aroma. The dish almost doesn’t need the drizzle of truffle oil to perk up the ‘shrooms, but you will be glad that it is there. The polenta, as well done as it is, seems almost like a crispy afterthought, an edible alternative to the knife for pushing mushrooms onto your fork. The pork rillettes, part of a prix fixe menu that I enjoyed on a previous visit, also came

then the sheer size of the citrus-herbcrusted Atlantic cod ($17) will surely give you bragging rights with your dining companions. In essence, this is not much more than an updated version of cod broiled with bread crumbs and lemon, but the secret is in how you broil it and what’s in those crumbs. Lemon and orange zest, a bit of thyme, maybe some oregano or basil, and some garlic are layered atop a snowy white thick fillet of cod cooked until the flesh comes apart in leaves like a thick book. As good as the fish was, the seasonal vegetable medley full of roasted corn, squash, sugar-snap peas, and cauliflower (garnished with a single, gorgeously caramelized baby carrot) and finished with truffle butter stopped conversation at my table dead, prompting my companion to close her eyes and savor each bite. Normally I don’t save room for dessert, but when our server told me that there were fresh doughnuts on the menu, I changed my policy. Lindahl offers two different kinds of doughnuts — a chocolate fry-cake that he tops with homemade vanilla icecream and a yeast doughnut enriched with cinnamon, glazed, and served atop fresh peach compote. Of the two, the cinnamon doughnut was my favorite. It was served hot from the fryer, still cooking the peaches on which it was resting. But the midnight-black chocolate option, raked through a nearly yellow puddle of ice cream, was no slouch either, a perfectly reliable ending to an entirely wonderful meal. rochestercitynewspaper.com

City 


Upcoming [ DJ/Electronic ] Riproc Riptide Boat Cruise w/Robb G, Skanntron, Keto, Mic See Saturday, September 8. Port of Rochester. 6:30 p.m. $20. riprocboatcruise.com.

Music

[ Pop/Gospel ] Jason & deMarco Saturday, September 29. St. Luke and St. Simon Cyrene Church, 17 S. Fitzhugh St. 7 p.m. Free, registration encouraged. 546-7730. jdrocconcert. eventbrite.com. [ Blues/Jazz ] Joe Bonamassa Friday, November 16. Auditorium Theater, 885 E. Main St. 8 p.m. $51.50-$81.50. 222-5000. rbtl.org.

The Front Bottoms Thursday, August 23 Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 8 p.m. | $10-$12 | 454-2966, bugjar.com

It can be hard to make songs fun, enjoyable, and catchy, all while weaving in a lyrical narrative. But for New Jersey’s The Front Bottoms, it comes as natural as the group’s blend of acoustic rock-pop stylings. Lyrically, The Bottoms put forth real, relatable stories, and while the sound and presentation at times seems simple, there’s an undeniable nature for the songs to take you with them, just begging you to sing along. It’s great summer music — it took a long time before the group’s most recent album was taken out of my CD player. This band is teetering on a breakthrough, and if it isn’t everywhere in a few years, it won’t be for lack of talent or effort. — BY WILLIE CLARK [ Pop/Rock ]

Fairport Music & Food Festival Saturday, August 25 Liftbridge Lane, Fairport Noon-10 p.m. | $10-$15 (kids under 12 free) | fairportmusicfestival.com

This fun-filled day will feature more than 20 musical acts performing on three stages, and even a river boat. Look for familiar names like Jumbo Shrimp, MoChester, Tommy Brunett, Brass Taxi, The Deep Blue Dream, Carbon Leaf, Deborah Magone, Violet Mary, and The Campbell Brothers, among others. In between sets you can grab grub from more than 20 area restaurants. Proceeds from the day will be collected and go to the Golisano Children’s Hospital. — BY ANNE RITZ [ VARIOUS ]

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Wednesday, August 22

Larry Garlington Saturday, August 25 Vibe Lounge, Village Gate, 302 N. Goodman St. 8 p.m. | $10 | 442-8423

Keyboard player Larry Garlington has spent the last four years crafting his debut CD, “Crossing Jordan.” Now that it’s out he’s ready to celebrate with a CD release party. Garlington did all the writing and arranging along with his musical partner, trumpeter extraordinaire Herb Smith. While the CD features local musicians along with nationally known players like drummer Ulysses Owens and trombonist Wycliffe Gordon, the live show at the Vibe Lounge will feature a 10-piece band. — BY RON NETSKY [ Jazz ]

Act Live, Quadir Lateef Friday, August 24 Dubland Underground, 315 Alexander St. 10 p.m. | $10, 21+ | 232-7550

It is unfortunate, but local promotion group Act Live will be leaving us shortly to go to the fabled land of NYC. Before it goes, it’s throwing a blowout party, bringing all the artists it’s been working with lately to show us what we’ll be missing. While the headline artist is Buffalo hip-hop artist Quadir Lateef, there will be plenty of other local acts to enjoy. In the usual Dubland style there will be acts downstairs and DJs upstairs, including DJs Tim Tones and Optimus Prime. There will also be Beat Frequency Showcases, which will include Covert, Sam.I.Am the Son, and D-Rock. — SUZAN PERO [ Electronic/Hip Hop ]

Loverboy performed Wednesday, August 15, at CMAC. photo by FRANK DE BLASE

Sign of the apocalypse [ review ] by frank de blase

I can honestly say that I’m not a Loverboy fan. I know all of the band’s songs, though, thanks to the mind-numbing rotation it got on the radio back in the 1980’s. By the time the band hit the bigs, I had discovered punk rock by way of new wave, and was too cool for the mainstream school. So imagine my surprise when the band rocked my ass Wednesday, August 15, at CMAC. Looking their age and happy as hell to be onstage, the members of Loveroby were unapologetically retro and fun. And though Mike Reno will never shoehorn his ass into those tight red leather pants again, the man still has all the crayons in his voice box. He sounded great. And then there was Pat Benatar. Dear Pat: it was great seeing you the other night, although your handlers wouldn’t let me anywhere near the stage with a camera. Look, I know you’re pushing 60, but girlfriend, I still think you’re beautiful. I noticed you’ve rearranged some songs to accommodate your voice and you’ve shaved off a few of the notes previously enjoyed only by dogs, but you still sound amazing. And your

hubby swings a mean guitar and comb — I mean, how about that snow-white pompadour? I could’ve taken some pretty pics of both of you, trust me. But thanks to your over-protective management, we’re forced to look at a pic of Loverboy instead. Sorry. Love, Frank. Thursday night at the Bug Jar I got to catch a cool set and the debut performance from Kohler. After the young band got up and running — and dialed back a little of the icepick-to-the-eardrum tone — it exhibited some tight grooves and clever riffs that swirled in the frenetic angst and fury. Tons of potential here. Hip-hop at the Dinosaur. I know, it’s a sure sign of the apocalypse, right? But I’m telling you, Sophistafunk tore it up Thursday night. I couldn’t sit still as I tore into my ribeye. Just keyboards, drums, and vocals, this band had the joint jumping. It was fangoddamn-tastic. I even witnessed my first mouth solo when the keyboardist orally emitted a bunch of clicks and snaps that was part African bushman of Namibia slang, part beatbox. It started raining frogs soon after.

[ Acoustic/Folk ] JIM LANE. Lemoncello, 137 West Commercial St., 3858565; lemoncello137.com. Free. 7:30 p.m. MARTY ROBERTS. Schooner’s Riverside Pub, 70 Pattonwood Dr., 3423030; shumwaymarine. com/schooners.shtml Call for info. 7 p.m. PAT KANE. McGraw’s Irish Pub, 146 W Commercial St., 348-9091; mcgrawsirishpub. com. Free. 7 p.m. RED WANTING BLUE W/MR. BONELESS, THE REACTIONS. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave $6$8. 9 p.m. ROB & GARY ACOUSTIC. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr, 248-4825; woodcliffhotelspa.com. Free. 5:30 p.m. TEAGAN WARD. Marge’s Lakeside Inn, 4909 Culver Rd., 323-1020; margeslakesideinn.com. Free. 6 p.m. 21+ [ Blues ] OPEN BLUES JAM W/THE KING BEES. The Beale New Orleans Grille and Bar-South Ave., 693 South Ave., 2714650; bealestreetcafe.com. Call for info. 7:30 p.m. [ DJ/Electronic ] DJ ADAM. Nashvilles, 4853 W Henrietta Rd., 334-3030; nashvillesny.com. Call for info. DJ KEYYO. TC Riley’s, 200 Park Point Dr., 272-9777; tcrileysparkpoint.com. Call for info. TEEN SET 45 PARTY. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave Free. Midnight. Y NOT WEDNESDAY W/DJ ET. Venu Resto-Lounge, 151 St. Paul St., 232-5650; venurochester.com. Call for info. [ Jazz ] ART ST HALARIE DUO. Pier 45, 1000 N. River St., 8654500; pier45attheport.com. Call for info. EL ROJO JAZZ. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St., 6625555; bistro135.net Free. 6 p.m. continues on page 14

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THE STATE OF HIP-HOP IN ROCHESTER INTERVIEW | BY FRANK DE BLASE

CITY: What does the Rochester hip-hop scene have to offer? James Niche:

As boisterous and bombastic as hip-hop tends to be, it is still a genre preceded by public misperception, generalization, and out-and-out dismissal. As with any genre of music, the ears of those outside its fan base are often assailed by topical, shallow misrepresentations of the form. Minds get made up, hasty conclusions get drawn. Not only does this leave the listener unchallenged and unengaged, it hurts artists that possess true talent, insight, and soul. They’re left holding the bag, to apologize, and languish in the underground. Rochester is ripe with these artists; positive, innovative talents who mirror our society, raise awareness, or merely entertain with their verbal dexterity and skill. Yet as diverse as our overall music scene is, ignorance and fear make the already uphill battle for artistic recognition that much steeper. In an effort to clear up, explain, and discuss hip-hop as music, as social commentary, and as an American folk art, City

We have a high concentration of artists here: rappers, artists, promoters, beat makers. It’s been going on for a long time, but I think it’s really been going on for the past five or six years. A lot of the artists have made a name for themselves outside of town. Why the past five or six years? What happened? Niche: I think because of recording. Access to

studios got easier. Before, in the early 2000’s, you needed a good chunk of change to get in the studio, to get it pressed. Now with the internet, you’ve got home-studio musicians all over the place. When I started ACT LIVE in 2007, I said, “Wow, there’re a lot of musicians putting stuff out there and no one’s doing anything with it.” These were young kids, 20 or 21 who hadn’t been on the road, didn’t understand about music marketing. They hadn’t done internships at studios, but they had a record and they were great artists. I think there’s been a lot more creativity in the scene too, a lot of niches. Mooney Faugh: Creativity begets more creativity. Nick Cialdella: I see a lot of collaborations. Faugh: Yeah, we’re doing more stuff with bands. DJ Ease: There was the underground scene at Java’s, before everybody was recording records. Guys like Mooney, M. Coop, and Hassaan Mackey before they were making records. Faugh: We’d see guys like Hassaan with bands like Filthy Funk. That influenced us. 12 City august 22-28, 2012

Newspaper invited a number of Rochester hip-hop artists to share their views in a kind of local hip-hop summit. Among those who sat down for our roundtable interview were James Niche, founder of local music production-promotion company ACT LIVE; Subsoil rapper Mooney Faugh; Nick Cialdella, MC and hiphop promoter at Water Street Music Hall; MC Moses Rockwell; turntablist DJ Ease; beatmaker Thievin’ Stephen; and Gunpoets vocalist-rapper Jayhigh. (Rapper Hassaan Mackey was also invited, but was unable to attend.) While in no way a definitive take on hip-hop in Rochester, what follows is a frank, unapologetic conversation we hope will spawn more debate and discussion. If you have thoughts on the local hip-hop scene, post them on this article at rochestercitynewspaper.com.

Ease: We’ve

always had artists, but they had to leave town — I moved out of Rochester eight, nine years ago. I think Hassaan might be the exception. He was the first one to have a record out. Discolobos pressed it on Fish and Crown. How does the hip-hop artist’s struggle compare to a rock band’s struggle? Jayhigh: It’s kind of like punk rock, DIY,

how we throw together independent shows. Coming from Ithaca, it was very interesting to see that element come into hip-hop culture here, because it’s kind of based in the rock world. And everyone has a team or a movement and the internet makes it spread like wildfire. The good and the bad? Faugh: Yes. It’s like when punk rock was at

its peak. People didn’t want to have punkrock shows. Hip-hop has been stigmatized in

PHOTOS | BY MATT DETURCK

see it. But it’s a tiny, tiny percentage. I’m sure if someone was killed at a karaoke bar you wouldn’t fear karaoke. But the music somehow gets viewed as a threat.

Faugh: Alcohol is more of a

a similar way. We couldn’t get hip-hop into venues in 2006. After Red got shut down and Milestones’s hip-hop night got shut down it was tough not to get grouped or generalized. Was this — is this — due to a racial or social disconnect? Faugh: For the outsiders, yes. There is

some aggression in hip-hop. There is some connection, but no causation. It’s not like they never did a violent act before and then did it at a hip-hop show. There is an aggressive, violent aspect to some hip-hop and some violent people may come out to

threat than the music. Cialdella: I said the same thing after the Bug Jar shooting. [Editor’s note: This is in reference to the death of Deavoughn D. HernandezRuffin, who was shot to death outside of the club after a fight broke out during a hip-hop show at the Monroe Avenue venue on June 18.] Other venues are following suit, they’re scared. Niche: Of course there’s violence in music. There’s violence in all kinds of art. Not even 24 hours after the shooting, the paper was just pounding hip-hop, hip-hop, hip-hop. Talk about key words. Then you had the police chief over and over with “rap battles” and “battle rap.” Faugh: As if they got in a fight over the music. Niche: This was an isolated incident that was sensationalized. How do you distance yourselves from this? Faugh: The music should do it. But how does the music’s message reach those who don’t hear the music in the first place? Niche: We gathered everyone at the Liberty


Pole the Sunday following [the shooting incident] and demonstrated to the press that we don’t stand for this. We made up banners with the victim and his daughter on it. We made sure that everyone down there was sending a positive message. We weren’t there to protest anything or to blame anybody. We were there to show we were moving on and doing something positive with our abilities as a group. Does mainstream hip-hop help or hurt people’s perception of underground hip-hop? Ease: Yeah, it hurts. I’m a DJ that plays

both — I’ll play a hip-hop party in Vegas and then the most underground party in Rochester. And I got called out, “Oh DJ Ease, he’s a commercial DJ.” So I got called out to a battle. I came out on top skill-wise, but it was a circus. So it hurts your credibility with your peers as well? Faugh: Some hip-hop artists look down on

Subsoil because we have a band — like it’s a gimmick.

Once upon a time having a DJ in a band was considered a gimmick Faugh: Yeah, now it’s opposite. Is hip-hop commenting on culture, or is it creating culture? Niche: I think initially hip-hop commented

on the culture. You had MCs getting on the mic, commenting on the culture, feeding off what was going on. Now, I think you’ve got a music that’s pushing a certain culture. You’ve got people in offices that are very smart, they know exactly what message they’re sending. They know exactly what they’re doing with this music and they’re promoting consumerism, misogyny, all these ideas that are common in hip-hop, and therefore in youth culture today. It seems like a vicious cycle. How do you break out of it? Faugh: The artists that don’t want to be a

part of that message, like ourselves, we’re trying to craft it the other way, to push the culture the other way. We’re saying this is what the culture is about — expression and unity — and here’s where they want to take it, and we don’t want to let them take it there. We get to decide and say what hiphop is now. Jayhigh: I think, as I’ve gotten older, I’m starting to realize the key is to have camaraderie between the artists. So people see that hip-hop can be a catalyst for stopping violence in Rochester. Violence in Rochester has been so pervasive for so long that the hip-hop community can take it on and actually get some press. We’re unified, and it’s like, we’re artists from a culture that creates violence from lyrics or from our lifestyle — or the idea of the lifestyle — but we can also stop it. That’s possible.

Thus becoming a positive influence on the culture, the fans, and emerging artists. Breaking the commercial mold. Cialdella: This is an

opportunity where we can really curb those trends. Ease: I’ll play in a night lub and people want to hear “Call Me Maybe,” and I just can’t. Not only is it a terrible song, but this music is rammed down their throat every day. Thievin’ Stephen: There’s no other explanation for so many artists in Rochester sounding like they’re from Atlanta. Ease: Yeah, if it weren’t for local radio playing nothing but that. Faugh: There are other outlets. Such as? Ease: Artists have to realize you can be true

to yourself and still make it with things like YouTube. Is what you do entertainment or social commentary? Faugh: Both. Satire is fun, but it’s good

to be impressive. If it’s interesting and a social commentary I go with it, but if it’s tongue-in-cheek, a drug reference, or sex, I’ll use that too. Do you feel any responsibility as to your content? Faugh: No, people should know how to

use art. If you like parts of it and use it for your life, if you don’t like parts of it, you dismiss it. That’s your job. I have to package it in some way that’s palatable or I’d just be rambling and people wouldn’t give a shit. Cialdella: I used to try to write to entertain and I’d get extreme writer’s block. So it’s got to be something that’s playing in my life.

But hip-hop arose from the black experience. Stephen: So did rock and jazz. Why doesn’t there seem to be any local female MCs? Where are the ladies? Faugh: That’s a good question. It’s

probably because of all the misogynistic bullshit. It’s a man’s world. But there is a new wave coming up. Ease: They’re not respected. They’ve got to deal with the producer hitting on them. We definitely need females. Jayhigh: It seems with the female MCs, they always seem to be forced to have some male bravado.

to think that, but the control is with the fans, the people. Our duty is to reflect the world so that the people will love that and participate. Faugh: Or it’s pointless. People complain when I post events on FB and I tell them, “But this is an event in the real world.” Moses Rockwell: The success of the scene has a lot to do with how we relate to each other — the artists specifically. Sometime the MCs don’t support each other because there’re so many of us. Everybody wants to be the “it” thing. And if you don’t have a competitive spirit you get distanced from it. Everyone wants to be the prom king, I just want to dance.

How can the Rochester hip-hop scene grow? Faugh: We need more venues. Niche: We live in a pretty conservative

city.

Conservative or lazy? Niche: We just don’t have a lot of events

that are diverse. Jayhigh: They think artists have all the power. It’s pretty grandiose

Is hip-hop still a black thing? Are white artists trespassing? Faugh: To me it isn’t. It doesn’t

make any sense. Calling me a white rapper is like saying black doctor. That may be offensive to some people. I’m here to stop generalizations altogether. You can’t say hip-hop is violent even though some violent people are attracted to it. You can’t say hip-hop is art for black people even though some black people like hip-hop. rochestercitynewspaper.com City 13


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OUTDOOR DECK ALL SUMMER! UNCLE RALPH’S STEAKOUT & BBQ EVERY SUNDAY 5-9PM

B O S CO PRODUCTIONS PRESE NTS :

DAVE MCGRATH Friday, Aug. 31st from 6pm-9pm

Wednesday, August 22 [ Karaoke ] ITALIAN AMERICAN KARAOKE. Italian American Community Center, 150 Frank Dimino Way, 594-8882; iaccrochester.org Free. 7:30 p.m. KARAOKE AT PINEAPPLE JACK’S. Pineapple Jack’s, 485 Spencerport Rd., 247-5225; facebook.com/PineappleJacks Call for info. 9 p.m. KARAOKE AT MAYFIELD’S PUB. Mayfield’s Pub, 669 N Winton Rd., 288-7199 Free. 9 p.m. KARAOKE AT SANIBEL COTTAGE. Sanibel Cottage, 1517 Empire Blvd., 671-9340; sanibelcottage.net Free. 6 p.m. KARAOKE AT CALIFORNIA BREW HAUS. California Brew Haus, 402 Ridge Rd. West, 621-1480 Free. 9 p.m. KARAOKE W/MARK. Flipside Bar & Grill, 2001 E Main St., 2883930 Free. 9 p.m. [ Open Mic ] OPEN ACOUSTIC MIC NIGHT W/MANDY. Shorts Bar & Grill, 35 N. Main St., 388-0136; shortsfairport.com. Free. 9 p.m. OPEN MIC JAM. Boulder Coffee Co. – Park Ave., 739 Park Ave., 697-0235; bouldercoffeeco. com. Free. 7:30 p.m. OPEN MIC JAM. Boulder Coffee Co. - Alexander St., 100 Alexander St., 454-7140; bouldercoffeeco.com. Free. 8 p.m. OPEN MIC W/STEVE WEST. Muddy Waters Coffee HouseGeneseo, 53 Main St., 2439111; mwcoffeehouse.com. Free. 7 p.m. [ Reggae/Jam ] ANTIOQUIA. Tala Vera, 155 State St., 546-3845; tala-vera. com. $5. Wed., Aug. 22, 8 p.m. THUNDER BODY. Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way, 232-3230; abilenebarandlounge.com. $6$10. 9:30 p.m. [ Pop/Rock ] COUNT BLASTULA. Dinosaur Bar-B-Que, 99 Court St. dinosaurbarbque.com. Free. 9 p.m. JB & COMPANY. Nola’s BBQ, 4775 Lake Ave., 663-3375; nolasweb.com. Call for info. 6 p.m. THE PUBLIC MARKET BAND. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave Free. 7:30 p.m.

Thursday, August 23 ROCHESTERCITYNEWSPAPER.COM

facebook.com/CITYNEWSPAPER twitter.com/ROCCITYNEWS youtube.com/ROCCITYNEWS

14 City august 22-28, 2012

EVERY THURSDAY

TODD EAST from 6-9pm

COME HAVE A GOOD TIME!

[ Acoustic/Folk ] BRAVE COMBO. George Eastman House, 900 East Ave $5-$12. 6 p.m. CARAVAN OF THIEVES W/THE PICKPOCKETS. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr., 292-9940; lovincup.com. $10. 8 p.m. DAVE MCGRATH. Schooner’s Riverside Pub, 70 Pattonwood Dr., 342-3030; shumwaymarine. com/schooners.shtml Call for info. 7 p.m. JIM LANE. Murph’s Irondequoit Pub, 705 Titus Ave., 342-6780; Free. 8 p.m.

POLKA/WORLDBEAT | Brave Combo

This quirky quintet has been wowing audiences in one incarnation or another for more than 30 years. Brave Combo’s music incorporates a number of different dance styles, including polka, salsa, merengue, and ska. But the list goes on and on. The group has been a staple in the Texas music scene for decade, but recognized and respected worldwide, winning Grammy Awards in 1999 and 2005 and appearing in a number of feature films and television series, most notably a 2004 episode of “The Simpsons” at creator Matt Groening’s personal request. This tenacious troupe is on a mission to expand the musical horizons of their listeners, and while the songs have a sense of humor about them, don’t be fooled. These guys are serious. This is part of the Eastman House’s 2012 Garden Vibes series. Brave Combo performs Thursday, August 23, 6-8 p.m. at the gardens of the George Eastman House, 900 East Ave. $5-$12. 271-3361, eastmanhouse.org. — BY DAVID YOCKEL, JR. OLD-TIME JAM. Bernuzio Uptown Music, 122 East Ave., 473-6140; bernuzio.com. Call for info. 6:30 p.m. [ Blues ] EZRA & THE STORM. Dinosaur Bar-B-Que, 99 Court St. dinosaurbarbque.com. Free. 9 p.m. UNCLE RALPH BBQ BLUES. Pane Vino Ristorante, 175 N. Water St., 232-6090; panevinoristorante. com. Free. 8:30 p.m. [ DJ/Electronic ] 18+ THURSDAYS. ONE Nightclub and Lounge, 1 Ryan Alley, 5461010; oneclublife.com. Free before 11, $3-$10 after. 10 p.m. DJ DORIAN. TC Riley’s, 200 Park Point Dr., 272-9777; tcrileysparkpoint.com. Call for info. DJ MATT. Nashvilles, 4853 W Henrietta Rd., 334-3030; nashvillesny.com. Call for info. DJ SAL DESANTIS. Center Cafe, 150 Frank Dimino Way, 5948882; iaccrochester.org Call for info. 7 p.m. KARAOKE AT PANORAMA. Panorama Night Club & Sports Bar, 730 Elmgrove Rd., 247-2190 Free. 9 p.m. THURSDAY NIGHT SHAKEDOWN. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. Free. 11 p.m. TIKI THURSDAYS: SHOTGUN MUSIC DJ. McGhan’s Pub, 11 W. Main St., 924-3660; Free. 7:30 p.m. TILT-A-WHIRL DRAG SHOW. Tilt Nightclub & Ultralounge,

444 Central Ave., 232-8440; facebook.com/Tiltnightclub. $3. 11:15 pm & 12:30 am. [ Jazz ] DEBORAH BRANCH. Lemoncello, 137 West Commercial St., 3858565; lemoncello137.com. Free. 6 p.m. EPILOGUE. Tala Vera, 155 State St., 546-3845; tala-vera.com. $5. 8 p.m. 21+ JOHN PALOCY TRIO. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St., 6625555; bistro135.net. Free. 6 p.m. LA DOLCE NIGHT: MIKE KORNRICH BAND. Casa Larga Vineyards, 2287 Turk Hill Rd., 223-4210; casalarga.com. $15. 5:30 p.m. THE SWOONERS. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr, 248-4825; woodcliffhotelspa. com. Free. 5:30 p.m. TED NICOLOSI AND SHARED GENES. Rocones Italian Restaurant, 232 Lyell Ave., 458-3090; italianrestaurantrochester.com. Free. 6 p.m. [ Karaoke ] KARAOKE AT CENTER CAFE. Center Cafe, 150 Frank Dimino Way, 594-8882; iaccrochester. org. Free. 7 p.m. KARAOKE AT WILLOW INN. Willow Inn, 428 Manitou Rd., 392-3489 Free. 8 p.m. KARAOKE AT PINEAPPLE JACK’S. Pineapple Jack’s, 485 Spencerport Rd., 247-5225; facebook.com/PineappleJacks Free. 9 p.m.


KARAOKE.AT BRICKWOOD GRILL. Brickwood Grill, 250 Monroe Ave., 730-8230; brickwoodgrill. com. Call for info. 9 p.m. KARAOKE NIGHT W/DEBBIE RANDYN. Pittsford Pub, 60 N. Main St., 586-4650; pittsfordpub.net Free. 9:30 p.m. KARAOKE W/GEORGE. Temple Bar and Grille, 109 East Ave., 232-6000; templebarandgrille. com. Free. 8 p.m. KARAOKE W/DJ DELIGHT. Anchor Sports Bar & Grill, 270 Miracle Mile Dr., 272-9333; anchorsportsbar.com. 8 p.m. KARAOKE W/SHOTGUN MUSIC. McGhan’s Pub, 11 W. Main St., 924-3660 Free. Call for info. KARAOKE W/SUMMER BOB. Shorts Bar & Grill, 35 N. Main St., 388-0136; shortsfairport. com. Free. 10 p.m. [ Open Mic ] OPEN MIC AT TOWPATH CAFE. Towpath Cafe, 6 N. Main St., 377-0410; towpathcafe.com. Free. 6:30 p.m. OPEN MIC JAM. Boulder Coffee Co. – Park Ave., 739 Park Ave., 697-0235; bouldercoffeeco. com. Free. 7:30 p.m. OPEN MIC JAM. Boulder Coffee Co. - Alexander St., 100 Alexander St., 454-7140; bouldercoffeeco.com. Free. 8 p.m. OPEN MIC W/STEVE PIPER. Flipside Bar & Grill, 2001 E Main St., 288-3930 Free. 9 p.m. OPEN MIKE W/MARK HERRMANN. California Brew Haus, 402 Ridge Rd. West, 621-1480 Free. 8 p.m. [ Reggae/Jam ] REGGAE THURSDAY. Club NV, 123 Liberty Pole Way, 4547230; clubnvroc.com. $5 before 11 pm. 10 p.m. [ Pop/Rock ] AMY MONTROSE. Sully’s Brickyard Pub, 240 South Ave., 232-3960; sullysbrickyardpub. com. Call for info. Thurs., Aug. 23, 7 p.m. THE BACKSLIDERS. The Rabbit Room, 61 N. Main St., 5821830; thelowermill.com. Free. 6 p.m. BE RIGHT BACK. Pelican’s Nest, 566 River St., 663-5910; pelicansnestrestaurant.com. Call for info. 7 p.m. BRUCE JACKSON EIGHT DAYS A WEEK. Brockport Welcome Center, 11 Water St., 637-1000 Free. 7 p.m. DAN & RACHAEL. Boulder Coffee Co. - Alexander St., 100 Alexander St., 454-7140; bouldercoffeeco.com. Free. 8 p.m. THE FRONTBOTTOMS W/DUMB ANGEL, I’M HAPPIEST WHEN. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave $10$12., 8 p.m. MR. MUSTARD. O’Loughlin’s, 5980 Saint Paul Blvd, 2667047 Call for info. 7 p.m. MY PLASTIC SUN W/COYOTE CAMPUS, BAD SOUND. Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way, 232-3230; abilenebarandlounge.com. $5$7. 8:30 p.m.

PATRONE, MANCUSO, & SAMPAGNARO. Brighton Restaurant, 1881 East Ave., 271-6650; thebrightonrestaurant.com. Free. 8 p.m.

Friday, August 24 [ Acoustic/Folk ] JIM LANE. Hooligan’s Eastside Grill, 809 Ridge Rd., 671-7180; facebook.com/HOOLIGANS. EASTSIDE Free. 5 p.m. JUMBO SHRIMP. Johnny’s Irish Pub, 1382 Culver Rd., 2240990; johnnysirishpub.com. Free. 8 p.m. [ Blues ] EZRA & THE STORM. The BealeWebster, 1930 Empire Blvd, 216-1070; bealestreetcafe. com. Call for info. 7:30 p.m. SHADES OF BLUE. Lemoncello, 137 West Commercial St., 3858565; lemoncello137.com. Free. 7 p.m. STEVE GRILLS. Sticky Lips BBQ Juke Joint, 830 Jefferson Rd., 292-5544; stickylipsbbq.com. $3. 9:30 p.m. TRILOGY. The Beale New Orleans Grille and Bar-South Ave., 693 South Ave., 2714650; bealestreetcafe.com. Call for info. 7:30 p.m. [ DJ/Electronic ] ACT LIVE PRESENTS: BOOGIE DOWN TO BROOKLYN! (ROCHESTER FAREWELL EVENT). Dubland Underground, 315 Alexander St., 232-7550; dublandunderground.wordpress. com. $10. 10 p.m. 21+ BANG FRIDAYS. ONE Nightclub and Lounge, 1 Ryan Alley, 5461010; oneclublife.com. Call for info. CHILL OUT FRIDAYS HAPPY HOUR. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr., 292-9940; lovincup. com. Free. 5:30 p.m. DJ BAC SPIN. Venu RestoLounge, 151 St. Paul St., 2325650; venurochester.com. Call for info. 8 p.m. DJ BLAKE. 140 Alex Bar & Grill, 140 Alexander St., 2561000; 140alex.com. Call for info. 10 p.m. DJ CEDRIC. Vertex Nightclub, 169 North Chestnut St., 232-5498; facebook.com/ vertexnightclub $3-$8. 10 p.m. EDM TAKEOVER W/ MANUFACTURED SUPERSTARS, BADBOYBIL. Main Street Armory, 900 E. Main St., 232-3221; rochestermainstreetarmory.com. $35-$40. 7 p.m. FRESH MEAT FRIDAYS W/ SAMANTHA VEGA, DJ MIGHTY MIC. Tilt Nightclub & Ultralounge, 444 Central Ave., 232-8440; facebook.com/Tiltnightclub $4$12. 11:15 p.m. & 12:30 a.m. LUBE AFTER DARK. Quaker Steak & Lube, 2205 Buffalo Rd., 697-9464; quakersteakandlube.com/ Rochester_NY Free. 9:30 p.m. REGGAETON W/DJ CARLOS. La Copa Ultra Lounge, 235 W. Ridge Rd., 254-1050; lacopaultralounge.com. Free. 10 p.m.

[ Jazz ] ANDY CALABRESE TRIO. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St., 662-5555; bistro135.net Free. 6 p.m. ART ST HALARIE SOLO PIANO. Pier 45, 1000 N. River St., 865-4500; pier45attheport. com. Call for info. SOUL EXPRESS. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr, 2484825; woodcliffhotelspa.com. Free. 7:30 p.m. TED NICOLOSI AND SHARED GENES. Hedges Restaurant, 1290 Lake Rd., 265-3850; hedgesninemilepoint.com. Free. 7 p.m. UPTOWN GROOVE. Brighton Restaurant, 1881 East Ave., 271-6650; thebrightonrestaurant.com. Free. 8 p.m. [ Karaoke ] KARAOKE AT PINEAPPLE JACK’S. Pineapple Jack’s, 485 Spencerport Rd., 247-5225; facebook.com/PineappleJacks Free. 9 p.m. KARAOKE AT NASHVILLES. Nashvilles, 4853 W Henrietta Rd., 334-3030; nashvillesny. com. Free. 9:30 p.m. KARAOKE BY DAN & SHERRI. Barnard Restaurant & Party House, 360 Maiden Ln., 6631250 Free. 8 p.m. KARAOKE W/DJ DELIGHT. Anchor Sports Bar & Grill, 270 Miracle Mile Dr., 2729333; anchorsportsbar.com. Call for info. 8 p.m. KARAOKE W/SUMMER BOB. Shorts Bar & Grill, 35 N. Main St., 388-0136; shortsfairport. com. Free. 10 p.m.

PLAN TO ATTEND! GRILLING & SMOKING

DEMONSTRATION

Sat. Aug. 25, 11am-3pm • Learn new techniques in grilling & smoking • Sample some of our gourmet barbeque sauces & spices

See the complete line of Weber Grills & Smokers

MILEAGE MASTER “The Grillmaster’s Mecca” LP Gas • Parts • Service M-F 8-5 pm, Sat 9-4 pm

2488 Browncroft Blvd. • 586-1870

Rochester’s Only

We have a great selection of wood chips... hickory, mesquite, apple, cherry, pecan, and Jack Daniels.

[ Hip-Hop/Rap ] OPERATION SAVE A LIFE. River City Church-Auditorium Theater Lower Level, 875 East Main St., 222-5000 Call for info. 6:30 p.m. [ Pop/Rock ] DEANNA LYNN. Boulder Coffee Co. – Park Ave., 739 Park Ave., 697-0235; bouldercoffeeco. com. Free. 8 p.m. DREAM JOB. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr., 292-9940; lovincup.com. $3-$5., 9 p.m. HASSAN CHOP W/HIGHWAY JONES. Nola’s BBQ, 4775 Lake Ave., 663-3375; nolasweb. com. Call for info. 6 p.m. THE HIT MEN W/TERRY BUCHWALD. The Fair & Expo Center, 2695 East Henrietta Rd., 334-4000; fairandexpocenter.org. $30. soundchecktickets.com. 7 p.m. LOWKEY. Tala Vera, 155 State St., 546-3845; tala-vera.com. Call for info. 8 p.m. NEVERGREEN W/MOCHESETER. Dubland Underground, 315 Alexander St., 232-7550; dublandunderground. wordpress.com. $5. 8 p.m. RAGEFEST - NIGHT OF THE LIVING COVERS. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N. Water Street, 325-5600; waterstreetmusic. com. Free. 6:30 p.m. SIX PAK. Dinosaur Bar-B-Que, 99 Court St.dinosaurbarbque. com. Free. 10 p.m. continues on page 16 rochestercitynewspaper.com City 15


Friday, August 24 SOMETHING ELSE. A-Pub Live, 6 Lawrence St. Free before 11, $5 after. 10 p.m. SURGE. Pelican’s Nest, 566 River St., 663-5910; pelicansnestrestaurant.com. Free. 10 p.m. TRAIN W/MAT KEARNEY, ANDY GRAMMER. CMAC, 3355 Marvin Sands Drive, 758-5300; cmacevents.com. $30-$55. 7 p.m. TURNOVER & YOUNG STATUES W/PJ BOND, DOSES, SCHOLAR, CALIFORNIA C TICKETS. Dubland Underground, 315 Alexander St., 232-7550; dublandunderground. wordpress.com. $10. 5 p.m. UNLIMITED. Captain Jack’s Goodtime Tavern, 8505 Greig St., 315-483-9570; captainjacksgoodtimetavern. com. Call for info. 9 p.m. THE WALLPAPER W/ THE ABSOLUTES, DREAM GIRLS, AND RIGHT TURN RACER. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. $6-$8. 9 p.m.

Saturday, August 25 [ Acoustic/Folk ] ACHE. Tapas 177 Lounge, 177 Saint Paul St., 262-2090; tapas177.com. Free. 11 p.m. C’EST BON CAJUN DANCE BAND. Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way, 232-3230; abilenebarandlounge.com. $6$8. 10 p.m. JIM LANE. Schooner’s Riverside Pub, 70 Pattonwood Dr., 3423030; shumwaymarine.com/ schooners.shtml Free. 1 p.m. PAUL STROWE W/TWO FOR THE ROAD. Bayside Pub, 279 Lake Rd., 323-1224; baysidepubwebster.com. Call for info. 3 p.m. KATIE POWDERLY W/THE SILVER THREADS. Tango Cafe, 389 Gregory St., 271-4930; tangocafedance.com. Call for info. 8 p.m. TRUE BLUE. McGraw’s Irish Pub, 146 W Commercial St., 348-9091; mcgrawsirishpub. com. Free. 7:30 p.m. [ Blues ] THE FAKERS. The Beale New Orleans Grille and Bar-South Ave., 693 South Ave., 2714650; bealestreetcafe.com. Call for info. 7:30 p.m. JOE BEARD. Dinosaur Bar-B-Que, 99 Court St.dinosaurbarbque.com. Free. 10 p.m. THE NATALIE B BAND. The Beale-Webster, 1930 Empire Blvd, 216-1070; bealestreetcafe.com. Call for info. 7:30 p.m. [ Country ] JB & COMPANY. Sticky Lips BBQ Juke Joint, 830 Jefferson Rd., 292-5544; stickylipsbbq. com. $3. 10 p.m. [ DJ/Electronic ] DJ BIG REG. Venu RestoLounge, 151 St. Paul St., 2325650; venurochester.com. Call for info. 10 p.m.

pelicansnestrestaurant.com. Call for info. 5 p.m. SMALL TOWN. Schooner’s Riverside Pub, 70 Pattonwood Dr., 342-3030; shumwaymarine. com/schooners.shtml Call for info. 3 p.m. WEST FEST FT. ANCHORAGE NEBRASKA, INUGAMI, COMEDOWN, PINK ELEPHANT, AND CHEETAH WHORES. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave $6-$8. 8 p.m.

Monday, August 27

POP/ROCK | Train

Hardcore / Metal | Ragefest 2012

With its new CD “California 37” in tow, Train kicked off a tour that brings the band to CMAC this week. The Grammy-winning band sports a portfolio of hits that includes the ever-popular “Hey, Soul Sister,” “Drops of Jupiter (Tell Me),” “Calling All Angels,” and, going all the way back to 1998, “Meet Virginia.” Lest you think that a competitor of Constellation Brands is sponsoring the concert, Train has started its own wine company with the names of their songs becoming the names of the wines. With Train’s singer Pat Monahan having a history of doing Robert Plant in a Led Zeppelin cover band, perhaps their next act will be to sing as they uncork “Stairway to Heaven.” With special guests Mat Kearney and Andy Grammer.

The man got you down? Then head over to Ragefest. This event, spread over two nights, includes more than 20 local hardcore and metal bands armed with three chords and a dream. Friday’s show is free and has the groups doing covers of some of their favorite tunes. Saturday’s line-up packs original material. Sirens & Sailors (pictured) is fresh off a tour and headlines the concert. That quintet is filming a video for “Mirror For My Medusa” (among other songs) on Saturday. Sirens & Sailors says you better learn the words. See the website for band listings and additional information.

Train performs Friday, August 24, 7 p.m. at CMAC, 3355 Marvin Sands Drive, Canandaigua. $25-$55. 800-7453000, CMACEvents.com. — BY PALOMA A. CAPANNA DJ DARKWAVE. Vertex Nightclub, 169 North Chestnut St., 232-5498; facebook.com/ vertexnightclub $3-$8. 10 p.m. DJ MATT. Nashvilles, 4853 W Henrietta Rd., 334-3030; nashvillesny.com. Call for info. DJ TRANCESEND. Decibel Lounge., 45 Euclid St., 754-4645; decibellounge.com. $5. 10 p.m. LA SELVA. Tilt Nightclub & Ultralounge, 444 Central Ave., 232-8440; facebook.com/ Tiltnightclub Call for info. 10 p.m.

[ Karaoke ] KARAOKE AT 140 ALEX. 140 Alex Bar & Grill, 140 Alexander St., 256-1000; 140alex.com. Call for info.10 p.m. KARAOKE AT THE LUBE. Quaker Steak & Lube, 2205 Buffalo Rd., 697-9464; quakersteakandlube.com/ Rochester_NY Free. 9:30 p.m. KICK-ASS KARAOKE. Temple Bar and Grille, 109 East Ave., 232-6000; templebarandgrille. com. Free. 10 p.m. Free.

[ Jazz ] 2012 FULL MOON CONCERT SERIES: NOSTALGIC REUNION. Smith Warren Post 367 American Legion, 61 Main St., 889-9156; smithwarren367.org Free. 7 p.m. AMANDA ASHLEY TRIO. Johnny’s Irish Pub, 1382 Culver Rd., 224-0990; johnnysirishpub. com. Free. 8 p.m. ART ST HALARIE SOLO PIANO. Pier 45, 1000 N. River St., 865-4500; pier45attheport. com. Call for info. LARRY GARLINGTON CD RELEASE PARTY. Vibe Lounge, 302 North Goodman St., 442-8423 $10. 8 p.m. MADELINE FORSTER. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St., 6625555; bistro135.net . Call for info. Free. NORMAN TIBBILS TRIO. Lemoncello, 137 West Commercial St., 385-8565; lemoncello137.com. Free. 8 p.m. WESTVIEW PROJECT. Brighton Restaurant, 1881 East Ave., 271-6650; thebrightonrestaurant.com. Free. 8 p.m.

[ Pop/Rock ] THE BLASTOFFS W/THE TOMBSTONE HANDS, PHILO BEDDOE. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. $5. Sat., 9 p.m. 21+ FAIRPORT MUSIC & FOOD FESTIVAL. $10-$15 fairportmusicfestival.com., noon GEORGE HOGAN. Hamlin Station Bar & Grill, 52 Railroad Ave., 964-2010; hamlinstation.net Call for info. 8:30 p.m. GHOSTFEEDER. California Brew Haus, 402 Ridge Rd. West, 621-1480 $5-$7. 8 p.m. HEMI CUDA. A-Pub Live, 6 Lawrence St. Free before 11, $5 after. 10 p.m. JOHNNY SMOKE. Nola’s BBQ, 4775 Lake Ave., 663-3375; nolasweb.com. Call for info. 6 p.m. ME & THE BOYZ W/PINK CADILLAC. Captain Jack’s Goodtime Tavern, 8505 Greig St., 315-483-9570; captainjacksgoodtimetavern. com. Call for info. 1 p.m. MO JO MONKEYZ. Schooner’s Riverside Pub, 70 Pattonwood Dr., 342-3030; shumwaymarine.

16 City august 22-28, 2012

Ragefest 2012 takes place Friday, August 24-Saturday, August 25, starting at 4:30 p.m. at Water Street Music Hall, 204 N Water St. $10-$12. waterstreetmusic.com. — BY ROMAN DIVEZUR com/schooners.shtml Call for info. 7:30 p.m. MOCHESTER. Brickwood Grill, 250 Monroe Ave., 730-8230; brickwoodgrill.com. Call for info. 10 p.m. MY PANACEA. Tala Vera, 155 State St., 546-3845; tala-vera. com. $5. 7 p.m. 21+ RAGESFEST 2012 W/SIRENS & SAILORS, STORM THE BAY, AND YOUR OWN REFLECTION. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N. Water Street, 325-5600; waterstreetmusic.com. $10$12. 4:30 p.m. SPELLBOUND BY THE LAKE: DAVID OSMOND. Canandaigua Country Club, 1 Fallbrook Park, 394-4370; canandaiguacc. com. $100-$125. 6 p.m. THIRD DEGREE. Pelican’s Nest, 566 River St., 663-5910; pelicansnestrestaurant.com. Call for info. 10 p.m. ROCHESTER INDIE ACOUSTIC SHOWCASE: MAUDLIN MALADIES, HOTEL REVERIE, and DREAMS FROM GIN. Spot Coffee, 200 East Ave., 613-4600; spotcoffee.com. Free. 7 p.m.

Sunday, August 26 [ Acoustic/Folk ] FIDDLERS OF THE GENESEE. Sodus Bay Lighthouse, 7606 N. Ontario St Free. 2 p.m. TRADITIONAL IRISH MUSIC SESSION. Johnny’s Irish Pub, 1382 Culver Rd., 224-0990; johnnysirishpub.com. Free. 5 p.m. TRACE WILKINS. Temple Bar and Grille, 109 East Ave., 2326000; templebarandgrille.com. Free. 7 p.m.

[ Blues ] FUNKY BLU ROOTS. Captain Jack’s Goodtime Tavern, 8505 Greig St., 315-483-9570; captainjacksgoodtimetavern. com. 3 p.m. [ Jazz ] ARTISAN JAZZ TRIO. Towpath Cafe, 6 N. Main St., 377-0410; towpathcafe.com. Free. 2 p.m. BILL SLATER. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr, 2484825; woodcliffhotelspa.com. Call for info. RICH THOMPSON TRIO CD RELEASE PARTY. The Bop Shop, 1460 Monroe Ave., 271-3354; bopshop.com. Call for info. 3 p.m. RYAN BARCLAY JAZZ ENSEMBLE. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr., 292-9940; lovincup.com. Call for info. 7 p.m. UPTOWN GROOVE. Pane Vino Ristorante, 175 N. Water St., 232-6090; panevinoristorante. com. Free. 5 p.m. WORA. Lemoncello, 137 West Commercial St., 385-8565; lemoncello137.com. Free. 5 p.m. [ Pop/Rock ] DAVE CHRISHOLM, CHRIS ZIEMBA DUO. Spot Coffee, 200 East Ave., 613-4600; spotcoffee.com. Free. 8 p.m. ELVIS LIVES! W/CINDY MILLER. Center Stage at Center Park, 1100 Ayrault Rd., 223-5050; perinton.org Free. 7:30 p.m. JEFF COSCO AND THE BANDITO BULLETS. Nola’s BBQ, 4775 Lake Ave., 663-3375; nolasweb. com. Call for info. 5 p.m. POLLUTED MOON. Pelican’s Nest, 566 River St., 663-5910;

[ Country ] WAYNE HANCOCK. Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way, 232-3230; abilenebarandlounge.com. $15-$20. 8:30 p.m. [ DJ/Electronic ] MANIC MONDAYS DJS. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave Free. 11 p.m. [ Jazz ] GAP MANGIONE SOLO PIANO. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr, 248-4825; woodcliffhotelspa.com. Free. 5:30 p.m. MARK BADER. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St., 662-5555; bistro135.net Free. 5:30 p.m. MUSICIAN SHOWCASE. Lemoncello, 137 West Commercial St., 385-8565; lemoncello137.com. Free. 7:30 p.m. [ Karaoke ] KARAOKE W/WALT O’BRIEN. Flipside Bar & Grill, 2001 E Main St., 288-3930 Free. 9 p.m. [ Pop/Rock ] YOSEMITE W/DARWIN, KENNEDY JASON. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave $6-$8. 8:30 p.m.

Tuesday, August 28 [ Acoustic/Folk ] JIM LANE. Schooner’s Riverside Pub, 70 Pattonwood Dr., 3423030; shumwaymarine.com/ schooners.shtml Free. 6 p.m. [ Blues ] TEAGAN WARD. The Beale New Orleans Grille and Bar-South Ave., 693 South Ave., 2714650; bealestreetcafe.com. Call for info. 7 p.m. [ DJ/Electronic ] DJ KATHY. Nashvilles, 4853 W Henrietta Rd., 334-3030; nashvillesny.com. Call for info. [ Jazz ] ANDREW MARKS. Lemoncello, 137 West Commercial St., 3858565; lemoncello137.com. Free. 6:30 p.m. EROS GUITAR DUO. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St., 6625555; bistro135.net Free. 6 p.m. TINTED IMAGE. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr, 2484825; woodcliffhotelspa.com. Free. 5:30 p.m. [ Karaoke ] KARAOKE AT PINEAPPLE JACK’S. Pineapple Jack’s, 485 Spencerport Rd., 247-5225; facebook.com/PineappleJacks Call for info. 9 p.m.


KARAOKE AT 140 ALEX. 140 Alex Bar & Grill, 140 Alexander St., 256-1000; 140alex.com. Free. 10:30 p.m. KARAOKE W/DJ VEE. TC Riley’s, 200 Park Point Dr., 272-9777; tcrileysparkpoint.com. Call for info. [ Open Mic ] GOLDEN LINK SINGAROUND. Twelve Corners Presyterian Church, 1200 S. Winton Rd., 244-8585; twelvecorners.org Free. 7:30 p.m. OPEN MIC NIGHT. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr., 292-9940; lovincup.com. Free. 8:30 p.m.Free. OPEN MIC W/STRING THEORY. Johnny’s Irish Pub, 1382 Culver Rd., 224-0990; johnnysirishpub. com. Free. 8 p.m. [ Pop/Rock ] MENTORS W/EAT THE TURNBUCKLE, ROTTEN, AND RATIONAL ANIMALS. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave $8-$10. 9 p.m. 21+

Wednesday, August 29 [ Acoustic/Folk ] ACOUSTIC OPEN JAM HOSTED BY THE DRUIDS. The Rabbit Room, 61 N. Main St., 5821830; thelowermill.com. Free. 7:30 p.m. JIM LANE. Lemoncello, 137 West Commercial St., 3858565; lemoncello137.com. Free. 7:30 p.m. JUMBO SHRIMP. Marge’s Lakeside Inn, 4909 Culver Rd., 323-1020; margeslakesideinn.com. Free. 6 p.m. 21+ PAUL STROWE. Schooner’s Riverside Pub, 70 Pattonwood Dr., 342-3030; shumwaymarine. com/schooners.shtml Call for info. 7 p.m. ROB & GARY ACOUSTIC. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr, 248-4825; woodcliffhotelspa.com. Free. 5:30 p.m. [ Blues ] BEALLE STREET BAND. Dinosaur Bar-B-Que, 99 Court St.dinosaurbarbque.com. Free. 9 p.m. OPEN BLUES JAM W/THE KING BEES. The Beale New Orleans Grille and Bar-South Ave., 693 South Ave., 271-4650; bealestreetcafe.com. Free. 7:30 p.m. [ DJ/Electronic ] DJ ADAM. Nashvilles, 4853 W Henrietta Rd., 334-3030; nashvillesny.com. Call for info. DJ KEYYO. TC Riley’s, 200 Park Point Dr., 272-9777; tcrileysparkpoint.com. Call for info. TEEN SET 45 PARTY. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave Free. Midnight. Y NOT WEDNESDAY W/DJ ET. Venu Resto-Lounge, 151 St. Paul St., 232-5650; venurochester.com. Call for info. [ Jazz ] LINDSEY HOLLAND. Tala Vera, 155 State St., 546-3845; talavera.com. $5. 8 p.m.

wedge-ucated? have you been

OPERA/BROADWAY | Glimmerglass Festival

This weekend is that Hail Mary pass of summer. What better way to spend it than at the Glimmerglass Festival? Thursday night’s offering is “Armide,” a French baroque opera, depicting a warrior princess torn between love and vengeance. Friday night’s offering is the ever-upbeat “The Music Man,” with its 76 trombones. And Saturday night’s offering is Verdi’s massive opera “Aida,” about an Ethiopian princess thrown into slavery in Egypt, and her struggle for freedom at the hands of a military commander, torn between his love for Aida and his loyalty to the Pharaoh. The grounds of Glimmerglass and the surrounding Otsego Lake area provide a weekend getaway or a day-trip opportunity, complete with venues that offer packed picnic lunches and dinners. The Glimmerglass Festival continues through Saturday, August 25 at 7300 State Highway 80, Cooperstown. Tickets cost $26-$132; $10-$25 for ages 18 and under. 607-5472255, glimmerglass.org. — BY PALOMA A. CAPANNA THE SWOONERS. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St., 662-5555; bistro135.net Free. 6 p.m. THE WESTVIEW PROJECT. Pier 45, 1000 N. River St., 8654500; pier45attheport.com. Call for info. [ Karaoke ] ITALIAN AMERICAN KARAOKE. Italian American Community Center, 150 Frank Dimino Way, 594-8882; iaccrochester.org Free. 7:30 p.m. KARAOKE AT PINEAPPLE JACK’S. Pineapple Jack’s, 485 Spencerport Rd., 247-5225; facebook.com/PineappleJacks Call for info. 9 p.m. KARAOKE AT MAYFIELD’S PUB. Mayfield’s Pub, 669 N Winton Rd., 288-7199 Free. 9 p.m. KARAOKE AT SANIBEL COTTAGE. Sanibel Cottage, 1517 Empire Blvd., 671-9340; sanibelcottage.net Free. 6 p.m. KARAOKE AT CALIFORNIA BREW HAUS. California Brew Haus, 402 Ridge Rd. West, 621-1480 Free. 9 p.m. KARAOKE W/MARK. Flipside Bar & Grill, 2001 E Main St., 2883930 Free., 9 p.m. [ Open Mic ] OPEN ACOUSTIC MIC NIGHT W/MANDY. Shorts Bar & Grill, 35 N. Main St., 388-0136; shortsfairport.com. Free. 9 p.m. OPEN MIC JAM. Boulder Coffee Co. – Park Ave., 739 Park Ave., 697-0235; bouldercoffeeco. com. Free. 7:30 p.m.

OPEN MIC JAM. Boulder Coffee Co. - Alexander St., 100 Alexander St., 4547140; bouldercoffeeco.com. Free. 8 p.m. OPEN MIC W/STEVE WEST. Muddy Waters Coffee HouseGeneseo, 53 Main St., 2439111; mwcoffeehouse.com. Free. 7 p.m. [ Reggae/Jam ] THUNDER BODY. Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way, 232-3230; abilenebarandlounge.com. $6-$10. 9:30 p.m. [ Pop/Rock ] CLOCKMEN W/CAVALCADE, THE DEVILLS, AND THE RED LION. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave $5-$7. 9 p.m. KELLY CLARKSON, THE FRAY. CMAC, 3355 Marvin Sands Drive, 758-5300; cmacevents.com. $35-$75. 7 p.m. ROCKSTAR ENERGY UPROAR FESTIVAL W/SHINEDOWN, GODSMACK, STAIND. Darien Lake PAC, 9993 Allegheny Rd., 599-4641; godarienlake. com. $20-$85. 1 p.m. THE TOWN PANTS. Johnny’s Irish Pub, 1382 Culver Rd., 224-0990; johnnysirishpub. com. Free. 8 p.m.

PRESENTED BY

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 13 • 5-8 P.M. Throughout the South Wedge business district.

SOUTH WEDGE merchants will offer up ridiculous offers on food, goods, and services. Deals are still coming in, but will include:

$3.00 $9.99 $1.50 Sweet Surprise, box of goodies from Premier Pastry

bike light set from Full Moon Vista

Mexican "mush" and chips from John's Tex Mex

And many more offers to come! For a continually updated list of offers visit the South Wedge-ucation Facebook page.

CITY is also bringing in some of the city’s top arts & cultural organizations with ridiculous offers of their own, including: Rochester Fringe Festival, Geva Theatre, ImageOut Lesbian & Gay Film and Video Festival, Rochester Contemporary Art Center, George Eastman House/Dryden Theatre, Rochester Philharmonic Orchestra, Water Street Music Hall, the Bug Jar, Abilene, Writers & Books, TheatreROCs, and more to come!

is FREE and open to everyone! AREA COLLEGE STUDENTS are especially encouraged to come down, as they will get a free swag bag (with valid ID/while supplies last).

For more information please visit www.rochestercitynewspaper.com

THANKS TO OUR SPONSORS

rochestercitynewspaper.com City 17


Theater

The people of Harlem in “Ragtime,” currently playing at the 2012 Shaw Festival. PHOTO BY EMILY COOPER

Shaw’s syncopated season 2012 Shaw Festival Through October 28 Niagara-on-the-Lake, Ontario, Canada $24-$110 | 800-511-7429, shawfest.com [ REVIEW ] BY MICHAEL LASSER

America’s characteristic sound is restless and just off the beat, especially in the loose, driving textures of ragtime, jazz, and the blues, shrewdly borrowed by the musical chameleons of Tin Pan Alley. The U.S.A. in the 20th century came to be syncopation’s natural habitat. This summer, though, the Shaw Festival, just over the border in Niagara-on-theLake, Ontario, has picked up on it. Although four of the five plays I recently saw there are British, and despite their being purposely out of whack in some way, differences in tone, manner, and purpose keep them from lining up with one another — a kind of serendipitous syncopation. I went to “Ragtime” (in the Festival Theatre, through October 14) without much eagerness, because I was seeing librettist Terrence McNally, composer Stephen Flaherty, and lyricist Lynn Ahrens’ 18 City august 22-28, 2012

1996 musical for the third time. But aside from “The Crime of the Century” and “Buffalo Nickel Photoplay, Inc.,” two disappointing production numbers that lacked the comic flamboyance they need, the production is absolutely smashing. It fills the stage with color and movement, yet is also true to the darker spirit of the E.L. Doctorow novel from which it comes. The score’s rambunctious rhythms punctuate three syncopated stories that exemplify the uplifting optimism of becoming American, as well as the rage of America’s racial tragedy. They interweave against a background of explosive social change as the 20th century arrives: Father and Mother, living more-or-less contentedly in New Rochelle; Tateh and his daughter, desperate Jews newly arrived from Latvia; and Coalhouse Walker, Jr. and his beloved Sarah, AfricanAmericans whose search for dignity triggers the violence that presages an age of technological wonder and horror. Such figures as J. P. Morgan, Emma Goldman, and Booker T. Washington also appear to articulate a world view that is, ironically, only a decade from extinction. Patty Jamieson’s performance as Mother is her richest and most nuanced

in 16 years at Shaw. Jay Turvey brings to Tateh a sweetness of character along with determination and drive. At the play’s emotional center, though, are the prideful, ambitious Coalhouse, majestically performed by Thom Allison, and Sarah, played tenderly by the lovely Alana Hibbert. Director Jackie Maxwell has shaped this emotionally varied, thematically diverse play masterfully. Sue LePage’s set of industrial scaffolding is expansive yet ominous, while her elegant costumes, especially for the women, exemplify the period. Alan Brodie’s lighting evokes the play’s shifting atmosphere. Githa Sowerby is virtually unknown today, yet in her time, she was George Bernard Shaw’s friend, a well-known feminist reformer, and an admired playwright. “A Man and Some Women” (in the Court House Theatre, through September 22), the third of her plays revived by the Shaw since 2004, is a powerful domestic drama in which affections wither because respectable women, denied the freedom to support themselves, are forced into dependence. In such circumstances, Sowerby argues, souls shrivel and love dies.

Richard Shannon has foregone his desire to join a scientific expedition because he accepted the burden of supporting his mother, wife, and two unmarried sisters. With the mother’s death, assumptions long dormant suddenly surface. Only Shannon knows that things will be worse rather than better, but he is prepared to meet his obligations. Complicating his life is his love for his cousin Jessica, a New Woman who is self-sufficient and thus capable of a true, loving relationship with a man. When Shannon determines to leave his wife, Jessica must choose whether to accept him or insist on her independence — for his sake as well as hers. Although the plot is familiar, conventional assumptions about responsibility and independence receive a thorough shaking. Sowerby’s keen intelligence and sharp writing take nothing for granted. The play’s characters are finely drawn, and a sense of crisis builds surely and intensely. Alisa Palmer’s direction is sharp yet patient, and the excellent cast creates a sense of inevitably interwoven with the shocks that unhinge the family. Graeme Somerville is decent, driven, and loving as Shannon. Kate Hennig plays one unmarried sister with cold resentment while Sharry Flett plays the other with rueful honesty about her uselessness. Marla McLean’s Jessica is warm but insistently honest in her perception of what is real and good. Shaw’s “Misalliance” (in the Royal George Theatre, through October 27) sets up a series of “misalliances” involving couples mismatched for romance, marriage, politics, business, adventure — everything, it seems, except sex, especially after Lina Szczepanowska arrives at the home of self-made millionaire John Tarleton and his family, courtesy of a very funny plane crash. By the end, every relationship is properly arranged, rearranged, or discarded. The play is one of the best examples of Shaw’s nonstop talk, a series of duets, trios, and quartets that work their way brilliantly through matters of head and heart. The second act is more smartly done than the first because it has a lot more drive as things come to a head. Director Eda Holmes felt a misguided need to move the play from 1910 to 1962, because both were times of great change. Although she ticks off the


similarities in a program note, a list isn’t a reason. As with synonyms, the differences are what matter. The result is instant — and useless — anachronism that clutters up an already busy play. Thom Marriott as Tarleton, the alwaysadmirable Peter Krantz as the fatherin-law-to-be of Tarleton’s daughter, and Tara Rosling as Lina lead the cast with strong comic performances. Garry Essendine is Noel Coward’s parody of himself. In “Present Laughter” (in the Festival Theatre, through October 28) Coward has spun an accelerating farce-like story around a theatrical star whose egomania is funny rather than horrid, even though he has a genius for complicating his life as well as the lives of those who care about him. The story, such as it is, involves an almost ex-wife, a loyal secretary, a worshipful (if hysterical) aspiring playwright, a friend’s wife who wants to seduce him, an unflappable valet, and a talentless ingénue. It’s the kind of frothy filigree that requires perfection from director and cast. It doesn’t get it here. Director David Schurmann has broadened and thus flattened the play’s delectable mix of farce and high wit. The one thing Essendine (played by Steven Sutcliffe) must be is suave, and it’s the one thing he isn’t. His looking in the mirror whenever the doorbell rings becomes tiresome and reveals little. Jonathan Tan’s excessive clowning as playwright Roland Maule, though very funny, makes him a buffoon whose role in Coward’s comic construction disappears. Where the excess is brilliant is in William Schmuck’s design for Essendine’s “Moderne” apartment.

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Playwright Terence Rattigan’s reputation is on the rise after years of neglect. That’s good news. But “French without Tears” (in the Royal George Theatre, through September 15), the play that first brought him notice in 1936, is slight and dated. With the exception of Schmuck’s costumes for Robin Evan Willis, the production lacked charm, wit, and sexiness. It was so boring that it soon became hard even to guess what a stronger company might have made of it.

rochestercitynewspaper.com City 19


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Art Exhibits [ OPENING ] Art & Vino: Paintings by Allison J. Nichols & Photography by Lisa Hughes. Veritas Wine Bar, 217 Alexander St. 6-9 p.m. veritaswinebar. “Branching Out,” work by Rochester Area Fiber Artists Fri Aug 24. Williams Gallery at First Unitarian Church, 220 S Winton Rd. 5-8 p.m. 271-9070, rochesterunitarian.org. “Follow Me to the Garden,” works by Lori Farr Fri Aug 24. 2 Chic Boutique, 151 Park Ave. 5-8 p.m. 271-6111, 2chicboutique.com. Irondequoit Art Club Show Fri Aug 24. Chapel Oaks at Saint Ann’s Community, 1550 Portland Ave. 1-3 p.m. 697-6600, irondequoitartclub.org. “Sights & Sounds,” by Jed Curran, Paul Dodd, Peter Monacelli, Steve Piper, and Scott Regan Fri Aug 24. I-Square Visions, 693 Titus Ave., Irondequoit. 7-9 p.m. 943-1941. “In Company with Angels: Seven Rediscovered Tiffany Windows” Sat Aug 25. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. 8-11 p.m. $25, advance tickets required. 276-8939, mag.rochester.edu. Music by the Fabulous Bright Clouds, Concentus Women’s Chorus, and Bogs Visionary Orchestra. Angel card readings, food and drink available for purchase. “101 | 101,” work by A. C. Tucker Sat Aug 25. Art and Vintage on Main, 101 Main St., East Rochester. 6-10 p.m. artandvintageonmain.com. [ CONTINUING ] 1570 Gallery at Valley Manor 1570 East Ave. Through Aug 24: “Gift of the Rose” by Peggy Martinez. Mon-Fri 9 a.m.-5 p.m. and weekends by appt. 7701923. 2 Chic Boutique 151 Park Ave. Opening Aug 24: “Follow Me to the Garden,” works by Lori Farr. Wed-Thu 11 a.m.-7 p.m., Fri 11 a.m.-6 p.m., Sat 11 a.m.-5 p.m. 271-6111, 2chicboutique.com. Art and Vintage on Main 101 Main St., East Rochester. Opens Aug 25: “101 | 101,” work by A. C. Tucker. For information: artandvintageonmain.com. Arts & Cultural Council Gallery 277 N Goodman St. Through Aug 30: “Member Showcase 2012.” Mon-Fri 10 a.m.-4 p.m. 473-4000, artsrochester.org. A.R.T.S. Gallery at Aviv Café 321 East Ave. Through Sep 4: “Bonding Time” by Watercolorist Sherry Davis. Fri 6-11 p.m., Sun 8 a.m.-1 p.m. 729-9916. Artisans’ Loft 4135 Mill St, Pultneyville. Ongoing: “Dream Sails...and More” by David Chamberlain; “Waterscapes” by Lee Hanford; “Trees and More” by Rocky Greco. Fri 1-3 & 6-8, Sat 1-4 p.m. & 6-8 p.m., Sun 1-4 p.m. 315-589-5000 Baobab Cultural Center 728 University Ave. Continuing: Harlem Girls Quilting Circle. ThuFri 5:30-9 p.m., Sat 2-4 p.m. 563-2145, thebaobab.org. Black Radish Studio Village Gate, D Entrance, 274 N. Goodman St. Through Aug 31: “Nineteen forty-seven,” a Pakistani art show and cultural event. Mon-Fri

20 City august 22-28, 2012

ART | Frans Wildenhain Exhibit

You don’t have to be a student enrolled in the School for American Crafts to benefit from Rochester Institute of Technology’s focus on design and crafts. A new exhibit held at two galleries within the Henrietta campus celebrates the school’s collection of a prominent Bauhaus ceramicist, and co-founder of what became the School for American Crafts, in “Frans Wildenhain 1950-75: Creative and Commercial American Ceramics at Mid-Century.” The exhibit includes roughly 150 gorgeous midcentury ceramic works by the artist, displayed through October 2 in two galleries: RIT Bevier Gallery in Booth Building, 7A, and at NTID Dyer Arts Center in the Lyndon Baines Johnson Building, 52 Lomb Memorial Dr. The Bevier Gallery is open weekdays 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m., Mondays-Thursdays 7-9 p.m., Saturdays 1-4:30 p.m., and Sundays 2-4:30 p.m. The Dyer Arts Center is open Mondays-Thursdays 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m., Fridays 9 a.m.7:30 p.m., and Saturdays 1-3:30 p.m. The exhibit is free and open to the public, but if you visit during weekdays before 5 p.m. grab a visitor parking pass from the RIT Welcome Center. Though the opening reception for the exhibit doesn’t take place until Friday, September 7, 5-7 p.m. in the Bevier Gallery, this week you can partake of a book signing event for the exhibition catalog written by the show’s organizer, Bruce Austin, with photos by A. Sue Weisler. The book signing takes place at Phillips Fine Art (248 East Ave., 232-8120) on Friday, August 24, 6:30-9 p.m. The month of September is filled with more events related to the show, including book signings, lectures, an art pottery appraisal event, and a closing reception. For more information, visit rit.edu/wild. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY 9 a.m.-6 p.m., Sat 12-6 p.m. blackradishstudio.com. Bridge Art Gallery University of Rochester Medical Center, 300 Crittenden Blvd. Through Oct 19: “The Road Less Traveled.” Call for hours. 275-3571, omhpromotion@gmail.com Bug Jar 219 Monroe Ave. Through Oct 3: THE LOBBY Presents: “Rough Truth: Caricatures by Alison Cowles.” Mon-Sun 8 p.m.2 a.m. 454-2966, bugjar.com, lobbydigital.com Chapel Oaks at Saint Ann’s Community 1550 Portland Ave. Through Aug 31: Irondequoit Art Club Show. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. daily. 697-6600, irondequoitartclub.org. Coach Street Clay 39 Coach Street, Canandaigua. Through Sep 15: “Darwinian Encounters: An Exhibition of Work by Lynne Hobaica.” Call for hours. 4743103, coachstreetclay.com. Community Darkroom Gallery 713 Monroe Ave. Through Aug 31: “We Are Ten,” A Black and White Photo Exhibition by Wilson Commencement Academy Photo Club. Mon 9 a.m.-9:30 p.m.; Tue-Thu 9 a.m.-6:30 p.m.; Fri

12-5 p.m.; Sat 10 a.m.-5:30 p.m. 271-5920, geneseearts.org. Cumming Nature Center Hurst Gallery 6475 Gulick Rd., Naples. Through Sep 2: “Dragonflies & Damselflies” photo exhibit. WedFri 9 a.m.-3:30 p.m., Sat-Sun 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m. $3 requested donation, $10 for families. 3746160, rmsc.org. A Different Path Gallery 27 Market St., Brockport. Through Aug 25: “Curious Bits,” by M.E. Hall and William Schmidt. Wed-Fri 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Sat 10 a.m.-6 p.m., Sun 10 a.m.-4 p.m. 637-5494, differentpathgallery.com. The Firehouse Gallery @ Genesee Pottery, 713 Monroe Ave. Through Aug 23: “Proof of Residence: The Work of Andrew Cho and Melinda Friday.” Mon-Fri 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; Sat noon-4 p.m. 244-1730, geneseearts.org. Friendly Home’s Memorial Gallery 3165 East Ave. Through Aug 31: “Something For All Seasons” by Pamela LoCicero. Daily 10 a.m.-5 p.m. 381-1600, friendlyhome.org. Gallery @ Equal=Grounds 750 South Ave. Through Aug 31: “Bloomed: New Work by Beth


Bloom.” Tue-Fri 7 a.m.-Midnight, Sat-Sun 10 a.m.-Midnight. gallery@equalgrounds.com. Genesee Co-op Federal Credit Union 395 Gregory St. Through Sep 30: The Work of Alan Stewart. Mon-Wed 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; ThuFri 10 a.m.-6 p.m. 461-2230, genesee.coop. George Eastman House 900 East Ave. Through Sep 30: “Lost Birds: Sculptures by Todd McGrain.” | Through Oct 21: “Ideas in Things.” | Through Sep 16: “See: Untold Stories.” | Ongoing: “Cameras from the Technology Collection,” and “The Remarkable George Eastman.” | Tue-Sat 10 a.m.5 p.m., Thu 10 a.m.-8 p.m., Sun 1-5 p.m. $4-$12. 2713361, eastmanhouse.org Gilded Square Picture Framing & Gallery 714 University Ave. Continuing: “Framed” artwork by Keith Uhrich & Michelle Michael. Tue-Fri 11 a.m.-5 p.m., Sat 11 a.m.-3 p.m. 461-2808, gildedsquare.com. Grass Roots Gallery Hungerford Building, Suite 157, 1115 E. Main St. Continuing: “Celebrating Local Art.” Visit site for hours. thegrassrootsgallery.com. High Falls Fine Art Gallery 60 Browns Race. Through Sep 2: “Neil Montanus: A Career Retrospective.” Wed-Fri 11 a.m.-5:30 p.m.; Sat Noon-5:30 p.m.; Sun 1-5 p.m. 325-2030, centerathighfalls.org. Image City Photography Gallery 722 University Ave. Through Sep 2: “Portfiolio Show.” Wed-Sat 11 a.m.-7 p.m.; Sun noon-4 p.m. 482-1976, imagecityphotographygallery.com. International Art Acquisitions 3300 Monroe Ave. Through Aug 31: Graphic Works by British artist Henry Moore. Mon-Fri 10 a.m.-9 p.m.; Sat 10 a.m.-6 p.m.; Sun Noon-5 p.m. 264-1440, internationalartacquisitions.com. I-Square Visions 693 Titus Ave., Irondequoit. Through Sep 6: “Sights & Sounds,” by Jed Curran, Paul Dodd, Peter Monacelli, Steve Piper, and Scott Regan. Mon-Thu 10 a.m.-2 p.m. 943-1941. Joe Bean Coffee Roasters 1344 University Ave., Suite 110. Through Aug 31: “Distilling the Flipside,” Art by Heather McKay using alternative processes. Mon-Wed 7:30 a.m.-7:30 p.m., Thu 7:30 a.m.-9 p.m., Fri 7:30 a.m.-10 p.m., Sat 9 a.m.-10 p.m., Sun 9 a.m.-4 p.m. 319-5279, joebeanroasters.com. Link Gallery at City Hall 30 Church St. Through Sep 10: “Jazz: The Spirit of the Moment: Photographs by Jim Allen.” MonFri 9 a.m.-5 p.m. 271-5920, cityofrochester.gov. Memorial Art Gallery 500 University Ave. Aug 26-Oct 28: “In Company with Angels: Seven Rediscovered Tiffany Windows.” Wed-Sun 11 a.m.-5 p.m., Thu until 9 p.m., $5-$12. Thu night reduced price: $6 from 5-9 p.m. 276-8900, mag.rochester.edu. Mill Art Center & Gallery, 61 N Main St, Honeoye Falls. Through Oct 13: “Industrial Blues” Landscape Photography by Gunther Cartwright. Mon-Fri & Sat 11 a.m.-3 p.m., Fri 11 a.m.-8 p.m. Free. 624-7740, millartcenter.com. My Sister’s Gallery The Episcopal Church Home, 505 Mt. Hope Ave. Aug 28-Oct 7: “…of life and

light,” watercolor paintings and sketchbook drawings by Kristin Malone. | Through Aug 24: “A Colored Pencil Sampler” by Rochester Area Pencil Club. Daily 10 a.m.-8 p.m. 546-8439. Nan Miller Gallery 3450 Winton Place. Continuing: “Gallery Favorites.” Mon-Sat 10 a.m.-5 p.m. 292-1430, nanmillergallery. com. Ock Hee’s Gallery 2 Lehigh St. Through Aug 25: “The Inner World of Dario Tazziolo.” MonSat 11 a.m.-5 p.m. 624-4730, ockhee@frontiernet.net. Orange Glory Café 240 East Ave. Continuing: “Genesee Fever” Paintings by Rachel Dow. Mon-Fri 11 a.m.-3 p.m. 232-7340.

Our House Art Gallery Veterans Outreach Center, 783 South Ave. Through Aug 24: “Serving our Veterans Through Art: A Fundraising Exhibit.” Tue 5-7 p.m., or by appt. 295-7804, veteransoutreachcenter.org. Outside the Box Art Gallery Suite 104, The Box Factory, 6 N. Main St., Fairport. Through Aug 31: Steve Oosterling. Call for details. 377-0132 Owl House 75 Marshall St. Continuing: “New Works of Art by the Illustrious Carla Bartow.” Tue-Sun 11 a.m.-4 p.m. & 5-10:30 p.m. 360-2920, owlhouserochester.com. Oxford Gallery 267 Oxford St. Through Aug 25: “Summer Exhibit: James Strohmeier.” Tue-Fri

Noon-5 p.m; Sat 10 a.m.-5 p.m. 271-5885, oxfordgallery.com. Pat Rini Rohrer Gallery 71 S Main St, Canandaigua. Through Sep 15: “The Back Forty,” Retrospective of work by Pat Rini Rohrer Mon-Tue 10 a.m.-6 p.m.; Wed-Fri 10 a.m.-8 pm.; Sat 10 a.m.-6 p.m.; Sun 12:30-4 p.m. 394-0030, prrgallery.com. Record Archive 33 1/3 Rockwood St. Through Aug 31: “Meddle Up Your Glass Presents: Breaking Glass Part I.” Mon-Sat 10 a.m.-9 p.m., Sun noon-5 p.m. alayna@ recordarchive.com. RIT Bevier Gallery 90 Lomb Memorial Drive. Booth Building, 7A. Also in NTID Dyer Arts Center. Through Oct 2: Frans Wildenhain 1950-75: Creative and

Commercial American Ceramics at Mid-Century.” Hours vary by gallery, check: rit.edu/wild. Rochester Contemporary Arts Center 137 East Ave. Through Sep 23: “Whose Space? Our Space!”/ Evinn Neadow. Wed-Sun 1-5 p.m., Fri 1-10 p.m. 461-2222, rochestercontemporary.org. $1. Rochester Regional Community Design Center Hungerford Complex/E. Main Business Park. Door 3B. Continuing: “Corn Hill: What’s Next?” Mon-Fri 8:30 a.m.5:30 p.m. 271-0520, rrcdc.com. Roz Steiner Art Gallery Genesee Community College, 1 College Rd., Batavia. Through Aug 27: “Document: The Italian American Family Album” by Tom MacPherson. Call for hours. 343-

0055 x6448, genesee.edu. Sacred Heart Cathedral 296 Flower City Park. Through Sep 3: Exhibit honoring Bishop Matthew Clark. 6 a.m.-6 p.m. daily. cathedralcommunity.org. Sage Art Center UR River Campus. Through Aug 31: Photo exhibit by Thomas Evans, curated by Jessica Holmes. Mon-Thu 9 a.m.-11p. m., Fri 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Sat-Sun 2-6 p.m. 273-5995, rochester.edu/ college/AAH/facilities/sage The Shoe Factory Art Co-op 250 N. Goodman St., Studio 212. Though Aug 29: “Crow Show.” First Fri 6-9 p.m., Second Sat 12-4 p.m., Wed 12-5 p.m. studio212@shoefactoryarts.com, shoefactoryarts.com. continues on page 22

rochestercitynewspaper.com City 21


Art Exhibits

ART EVENT | Spokes & Ink

Calling all bike lovers, art enthusiasts, or those who just love a festival atmosphere. On Saturday, August 25, the Spokes & Ink event will celebrate cycling enthusiasts as well as bikeinspired art. The Genesee Center for the Arts & Educationsponsored event will be held noon-6 p.m. on Monroe Avenue, between Oxford and Rutgers. Throughout the day, there will be a poster show and sale of bicycle-inspired art. Several bands will play live music all day, and you can purchase Genesee beer to go with your favorite Rochester dishes, including food from Le Petit Poutine, DogTown, and Simply Crepes. You’ll also have your chance to win your own creative prizes during raffles; win items from Even Odd Creative and a Ramon Santiago print courtesy of SC Fine Art Gallery & Ramon Santiago Studio. For the kids, there will be a tent with many different activities, like sports, games, health and wellness activities, art, music, and more. For more information on Spokes & Ink visit geneseearts. org/spokesandink. — BY ANNE RITZ

Spectrum Gallery at Lumiere Photo, 100 College Ave. Through Aug 31: “Tropical Photographs of El Yunque National Rainforest” by Bruno Chalifour. Mon-Fri 9 a.m.-6 p.m., Sat 10 a.m.-2 p.m. 461-4447, lumierephoto.com. Starry Nites Café 696 University Ave. Aug 26-Nov 24: “Clouds in My Coffee.” | Through Aug 25: “Fly Me to the Moon: Celestial Bodies at Starry Nites Café.” Mon-Thu 7:30 a.m.-10 p.m., Fri 7:30 a.m.-midnight, Sat 8 a.m.-midnight, Sun 9 a.m.-9 p.m. 271-2630, starrynitescafe.com, shoefactoryarts.com. Stella Art Gallery & Studio 350 West Commercial St., East Rochester. Through Aug 31: “Feminine Mystique: The Female Figure in Acrylic, Oil, and Watercolor by Stephen Harkola.” Thu 9 a.m.-4 p.m., Fri 9 a.m.-9 p.m., Sat noon-9 p.m. stellaartgalleryandstudio.com. The Sunflower Bake Shop 750 Elmgrove Rd. Through Aug 31: Rochester Artisans Exhibit & Sale: “Sunflowers!” Tue-Fri 7 a.m.-6 p.m., Sat 10 a.m.-4 p.m. 831-1629. Wayne County Council for the Arts 108 W. Miller St., Newark. Continuing: “Art and Floral Tea Tables.” Thu-Sat 12-3 p.m., and by appt. 315-331-4593, info@ wayne-arts.com, waynearts. wordpress.com. Williams Gallery at First Unitarian Church, 220 S Winton Rd. Aug 23-Oct 1: “Branching Out,” work by Rochester Area Fiber

Artists. Mon-Fri 10 a.m.-2 p.m. and 4:30-8 p.m. 271-9070, rochesterunitarian.org Wyoming County Gallery 31 S Main St, Perry. Continuing: “Home,” work by Jay Brooks. Wed 9 a.m.-6 p.m.; Thu-Fri 11 a.m.-7 p.m.; Sat 10 a.m.-3 p.m. 237-3517, artswyco.org. [ CALL FOR ARTWORK ] Call for Art: Green: What Does it Mean? Deadline Aug 25. Call for artwork relating to show’s title for September 7-26 exhibit. Next theme: “I Want My Mona Lisa: Tribute to a Renaissance Icon.” deadline September 22. More information and more calls for art at shoefactoryarts.com. Call for Art: Golf Balls on Parade. Submit your design by September 20. For information: thebigparade.com. Call for Art: “Mother Nature’s Closet.” Deadline Aug 31. Exhibit and fashion show of natural or recycled clothing and accessories to open September 7. Next call for haunted themed artwork, due September 29 for October 5 show. More information at stellaartgalleryandstudio.com. Call for Quilts. Deadline September 1. Donate quilts to 6th Annual Quilt Auction, fundraiser for Women Helping Girls, a program of the Greater Rochester Area Branch of the American Association of University Women. For information, call Patricia Thompson at 671-2589 or Melanie Blank at 872-0059.

Call for Submissions: Art-RocNY Showcase 2013. Early submissions by September 29, final submissions due November 10. For info and entries, email info@jgkgalleries.com. Donate Artwork to Evening at Auction to benefit Boys and Girls Club in Geneva. To be held September 21. Contact margaret. bernay@hws.edu or kvaughn@ hws.edu for more information. Hispanic Heritage Art Competition. Deadline August 27. Acceptable entries should represent one of the 23 Latin American countries. Artists chosen will be featured in Link Gallery at City Hall. For more info, visit cityofrochester. gov/hhm or facebook.com/ hispanicheritagerochester.

Art Events

Ave. 473-2590, wab.org. 6:308:30 p.m. Free. Ages 11-18. [ Thursday, August 23Saturday, August 25 ] Paul Hooper/Pam Wertz. Comedy Club, 2235 Empire Blvd., Webster. 671-9080, thecomedyclub.us. Thu 7:30 p.m., Fri-Sat 7:30 & 10 p.m. $9-$12. [ Saturday, August 25 ] Village Idiots Improv Comedy. Village Idiots Pillar Theater, Village Gate, 1st floor, 274 North Goodman St., #D106. 7979086, improvVIP.com. 7:30 & 9:30 p.m. $5. Every Saturday through August 25. Wine Toast Comedy Roast. Pick-ups in various locations in Geneva. 1-800-536-8123, grapevinecountrytours.com. Call for hours. $100, register.

[ Saturday, August 25 ] Annual Summer Time Art Trail. Five locations in Orleans County. For map: artistsoftheoak.com/ event.html. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Free. Spokes & Ink Bike and Poster Fest. Genesee Cetner, 713 Monroe Ave & Church of Blessed Sacrament parking lot (across from Genesee Center). 2441730, geneseearts.org. 12-6 p.m. Free. Bikes, art, music, local small businesses, food & beer.

[ Sunday, August 26 ] The Funniest Person in Rochester Contest: Semi Finals. Comedy Club, 2235 Empire Blvd., Webster. 671-9080, thecomedyclub.us. 6 & 8:30 p.m. $7.

Comedy

Dance Participation

[ Wed., August 22 ] Young Comedians’ Open Mic. Writers and Books, 740 University

[ Wed., August 22 ] The “Bad Dancer” Class. Flower City Ballet Studio, 2nd floor, suite

[ Tuesday, August 28 ] Laugh Riot Underground: Stand-Up Comedy Showcase. Dub Land Underground, 315 Alexander St. laughriotcomedy.com. 9-11 p.m. Free. Every Tuesday.

Do you have sunspots? If you experience red or skin colored scaly growths caused by the sun you may qualify for an investigational study for actinic keratosis. Qualified participants will receive: Investigational medication Study related skin evaluations by a study doctor Compensation for travel

IF INTERESTED IN PARTICIPATING, PLEASE CONTACT: THE RESEARCH OFFICE at SKIN SEARCH, 100 WHITE SPRUCE BLVD., ROCHESTER, NY 14623

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22 City august 22-28, 2012

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250, Post Office, 250 Cumberland St. onedanceco@gmail.com. 89:45 p.m. $8, cash only at door. Wednesdays through August 29. Int/Adv Contemporary Modern. Flower City Ballet Studio, 2nd floor, suite 250, Post Office, 250 Cumberland St. onedanceco@ gmail.com. 9-10:45 a.m. $8, cash only at door. Mon, Wed, Fri through August 31.

FESTIVAL | Greek Festival

If you have yet to indulge in the perfect summer getaway, this weekend set your sails for Greece by way of Rochester. The Greek Orthodox Church of the Holy Spirit, located at 835 South Ave., will host its annual Greek Festival. The festival features authentic activities that call to mind the coast of the Mediterranean. Musical performances by Greek bands as well as dance performances will be held throughout the day. No day in Greece would be complete without sampling delicious dishes, and favorites like spanakopita and souvlaki dinners will be available — just make sure to save room for the baklava sundaes. The festival will be held Thursday, August 23, 11 a.m.-10 p.m.; Friday and Saturday, August 24-25, 11 a.m.-11 p.m.; and Sunday, August 26, 11 a.m.-8 p.m. Parking will be available in the Highland Hospital garage next to the church Thursday and Friday after 5 p.m. and Saturday and Sunday all day. For a full list of events and more information, visit highlandgreekfest.com or call 271-3150. — BY ANNE RITZ

[ Thursday, August 23 ] Beg/Int Contemporary Modern. Flower City Ballet Studio, 2nd floor, suite 250, Post Office, 250 Cumberland St. onedanceco@ gmail.com. 9-10:45 a.m. $8, $70 for 10 classes. Cash only at door. Tue & Thu through August 30. [ Friday, August 24 ] Int/Adv Contemporary Modern. Flower City Ballet Studio, 2nd floor, suite 250, Post Office, 250 Cumberland St. onedanceco@ gmail.com. 9-10:45 a.m. $8, cash only at door. Mon, Wed, Fri through August 31.

for 10 classes. Cash only at door. Tue & Thu through August 30. [ Wed., August 29 ] The “Bad Dancer” Class. Flower City Ballet Studio, 2nd floor, suite 250, Post Office, 250 Cumberland St. onedanceco@gmail.com. 89:45 p.m. $8, cash only at door. Wednesdays through August 29. Int/Adv Contemporary Modern. Flower City Ballet Studio, 2nd floor, suite 250, Post Office, 250 Cumberland St. onedanceco@ gmail.com. 9-10:45 a.m. $8, cash only at door. Mon, Wed, Fri through August 31.

Festivals [ Thursday, August 23 ] “Say ‘shalom’ to Summer,” an end of summer bash for all ages. Meridian Park, 2025 Winton Road S. 461-0490, jewishrocheter.org. 6:30 p.m. Crafts, ice cream social, movies.

midway is open until midnight. $10, children under 12 admitted free, other special days and rates apply. Visit web for more info. [ Saturday, August 25 ] Fairport Music & Food Festival. Liftbridge Lane along historic Eric Canal. fairportmusicfest. com. Noon-dark. $10-$15, ages 12 and under free. All proceeds benefit Golisano Childrens Hospital at Strong. The Savior’s Chapel Summer Fun Fest. 595 English Rd. 621-1899, thesaviorschapel.org. Noon-5 p.m. Purchase Tickets at the door, call for information. Games and activities.

Kids Events

[ Monday, August 27 ] Int/Adv Contemporary Modern. Flower City Ballet Studio, 2nd floor, suite 250, Post Office, 250 Cumberland St. onedanceco@ gmail.com. 9-10:45 a.m. $8, cash only at door. Mon, Wed, Fri through August 31.

[ Thursday, August 23Sunday, August 26 ] 9th Annual Greek Fest. Greek Orthodox Church of the Holy Spirit, 835 South Ave. highlandgreekfest.com. Thu 11 a.m.-10 p.m., Fri-Sat 11 a.m.11 p.m., Sun 11 a.m.-8 p.m. Admission is free.

[ Wed., August 22 ] Dream Big. Greece Public Library, 2 Vince Toffay Rd. 723-2488, greecelibrary.org. 11 a.m.-noon. Free, register. Ages 3+ Lego Club. Greece Public Library, 2 Vince Toffay Rd. 723-2488, greecelibrary.org. 6:30-8:30 p.m. Free. Steps to a Healthy Planet. Scottsville Free Library, 28 Main St., Scottsville. 889-2023. 7 p.m. and Mumford Library, 883 George St., Mumford. 538-6124. Free, register. Ages 7-12.

[ Tuesday, August 28 ] Beg/Int Contemporary Modern. Flower City Ballet Studio, 2nd floor, suite 250, Post Office, 250 Cumberland St. onedanceco@ gmail.com. 9-10:45 a.m. $8, $70

[ Thursday, August 23Monday, September 3 ] The New York State Fair. 581 State Fair Blvd., Syracuse. nysfair.org. Gates open at 8 a.m., buildings are open 10 a.m.-10 p.m.,

[ Thursday, August 23 ] Owls of the Night. Greece Public Library, 2 Vince Toffay Rd. 7232488, greecelibrary.org. 6:30-8 p.m. Free, register. Teen program: lecture and pellet dissection.

[ Friday, August 24 ] Children’s Safety Event. Victor Fire Department, 34 Maple Ave., Victor. community@ftr. com, frontier.com/community. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Free. [ Saturday, August 25 ] It’s Magic of Course! Mumford Library, 883 George St., Mumford. 538-6124. 6:30 p.m. Free, register. Ages 7-12. Little Buddies film screening: “A Cat in Paris.” Little Theatre, 240 East Ave. 258-0444, thelittle.org. 10 a.m. $5 [ Saturday, August 25Sunday, August 26 ] Literature Live: Peter Rabbit. The Strong National Museum of Play, 1 Manhattan Square. 2632700, museumofplay.org. Sat 11 a.m.-4 p.m., Sun 1-4 p.m. Included in museum admission: $11-$13. [ Tuesday, August 28 ] Evening Craft Series for Tweens. Gates Public Library, 902 Elmgrove Rd. 247-6446. 6-80 p.m. Free. Ages 8-13. Craft project is “Magic Scratch” and it can be completed in an hour’s time. All materials for the craft are provided free of charge, registration is required. Family Game Night. Wood Library, 134 North Main St., Canandaigua. 394-1381. 6-8 p.m. Free, register. Bring your own book. continues on page 24

rochestercitynewspaper.com City 23


Kids Events

NEWS BLOG Politics, people, events, & issues

w w w. r o c h e s t e r c i t y n e w s p a p e r . c o m COMMENTING ON THE STATE OF ROCHESTER & BEYOND

[ Tueday, August 28 & Thursday, August 30 ] Welcome to Kindergarten Storytime. Brighton Memorial Library, 2300 Elmwood Ave. 7845361, brightonlibrary.org. Tue 10 a.m., Thu 7 p.m. Free, register.

Lectures [ Wed., August 22 ] Managing Blood Pressure and Cholesterol with MVP Healthcare Community Health Educator Cheryl Minchella. Irondequoit Public Library McGraw Branch, 2180 E. Ridge Rd. 336-6060, mcgrawbr@libraryweb.org. 7 p.m. Free, register. [ Thursday, August 23 ] Potato Growers Meeting: Varieties, Insect & Disease Control. Williams Farm, 5077 Russell Rd, Marion. 313-8796. 5:30-8:30 p.m. $5-$10, register. [ Friday, August 24 ] “Dressing for Tea: 1890s-1920s Clothing & Customs.” Brighton Memorial Library, 2300 Elmwood Ave. 784-5300, brightonlibrary. org. 2 p.m. Free. [ Saturday, August 25 ] Early Baseball with Joe Territo. Greece Public Library, 2 Vince Toffay Rd. 723-2488, greecelibrary.org. 2-3 p.m. Free. “Faith and Politics: The Spiritual Journeys of Amy Post” with Nancy A. Hewitt. 1816 Farmington Quaker Meetinghouse Museum, 160 County Rd. 8, Farmington. 315-598-4387, farmingtonmeetinghouse.org. 1:30 p.m. Free.

Are you A Cancer Survivor

With Trouble Sleeping? We are seeking cancer survivors who are having difficulty falling or staying asleep for a study testing two methods for reducing sleep problems and fatigue. How may you benefit

All participants will receive a behavioral treatment for sleep problems, at no charge, either as part of the study or after. Half of the participants will receive a drug called armodafinil that may be helpful in reducing daytime tiredness and fatigue.

Eligibility (partial list)

• Be between the ages 21 and 75 • Have finished radiation treatments and/or chemotherapy • Insomnia began or got worse with the onset of cancer or treatment

Please call Jenine Hoefler (585) 276-3559 or Joseph Roscoe, Ph.D. (585) 275-9962 at the University of Rochester James P. Wilmot Cancer Center for more information about this research study 24 City august 22-28, 2012

[ Monday, August 27 ] Bee Wellness Lecture Focusing on Mites. Cornell Cooperative Extension, 249 Highland Ave. rochesterbeekeepers.com. 7 p.m. Free. Rochester Soldiers at Second Bull Run with Bob Marcotte. Brighton Memorial Library, 2300 Elmwood Ave. 784-5300, brightonlibrary. org. 7 p.m. Free. [ Monday, August 27Monday, September 3 ] Golden Jubilee Week of Celebration: “Preserving the Next Generation.” Northside Chruch of Christ, 634 Hudson Ave. northsidecoc.homestead.com. Various times and speakers. Free. [ Tuesday, August 28 ] Civil War Re-enactor John Sdoia: Facts & Artifacts from the Civil War. Brighton Memorial Library, 2300 Elmwood Ave. 784-5300, brightonlibrary.org. 2 p.m. for families with school-aged children, 6 p.m. adults. Free.

Literary Events [ Wed., August 22 ] NXT Chapter: A 20 to 30 something book club. Wood Library, 134 North Main St., Canandaigua. 394-1381. 67:30 p.m. Free, register. Bring your own book. Titles Over Tea: “The Folded Earth” by Anuradha Roy. Barnes & Noble Greece, 330 Greece

LECTURE | “Dressing for Tea”

I don’t know about you, but when I need an afternoon snack, my eyes barely leave the glowing screen in front of me long enough for me to crack open a ginger beer and stick my hand in a bag of popcorn. But there was a time when it was customary to put on nicer clothing and gather in a sunny parlor or shady area outdoors to have tea and biscuits, enjoy conversation and gossip, and take a break during the afternoon. Well, maybe this ritual wasn’t normal for every level of the social strata, but doesn’t it sound nice? It’s as close to a siesta as Anglo culture ever got, I suppose. Fans of the hit Brit television series “Downton Abbey” will delight in the lecture “Dressing for Tea: 1890’s-1920’s Clothing & Customs,” offered on Friday, August 24, at Brighton Memorial Library (2300 Elmwood Ave.). The 2 p.m. event is presented by the Costume Resource Center at the Theodore Roosevelt Inaugural Site, and will include displays of antique clothing and the opportunity to try on vintage hats and learn about proper tea-time traditions. The program is free; call 784-5300 or visit brightonlibrary.org for more information. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY Ridge Center Dr. 227-4020, bn.com. 7 p.m. Free. [ Thursday, August 23 ] History Reading Group: Juan Peron and Post WWII Argentia. Writers and Books, 740 University Ave. 473-2590, wab.org. 7 p.m. $3. [ Friday, August 24 ] Book Signing: “Frans Wildenhain 1950-75: Creative and Commercial American Ceramics at Mid-Century.” Phillips Fine Art, 248 East Ave. 232-8120. 6:30-9 p.m. Free. Poetry Reading: John Roche: “the joe poems: the continuing saga of joe.” Greenwood Books, 123 East Ave. 325-2050. 7 p.m. Free.

Museum Exhibits [ Through Thursday, September 13 ] Quilts & Samplers. The Rochester Historical Society, Rundel Memorial Building, 2nd floor, 115 South Ave. 428-8470, rochesterhistory.org. Tue-Wed 10 a.m.-3 p.m., Thu 11 a.m.-3 p.m. $3-$5, free to members. [ Thursday, August 23 ] Opening: “Prehistory: Bones and Arrows.” Museum of Wayne County History, 21 Butternut St., Lyons. 315-946-4943, waynehistory.org. 7 p.m. Free admission, donations appreciated.

Recreation [ Wed., August 22 ] Identification Series: Ferns. RMSC Cumming Nature

Center, 6475 Gulick Rd., Naples. 374-6160, rmsc.org. 10 a.m.-noon. $3 requested donation, $10 for families. Owl Prowl. Sterling Nature Center, 15380 Jenzvold Rd., Sterling. 315-947-6143. 7 p.m. Free. The program will start with a discussion inside, followed by a night hike in search of owls. [ Thursday, August 23 ] Nature Hike: Pulaski Park. Meet in the northeast section of the park, at the corner of Avenue D and Carter St. cityofrochester. gov/fclg. 6 p.m. Free. [ Friday, August 24 ] First Quarter Moon over the Swamp. Thousand Acre Swamp Sanctuary, off Jackson Rd., Penfield. Marie Heerkens 7738911. 8 p.m. Free. Leaders will provide telescopes, your own binoculars or telescope is welcome. Bring flashlight. [ Saturday, August 25 ] Birding Trip: Montezuma National Wildlife Refuge. Meet at Bushnell’s Basin park and ride, off Rte 96 sound of exit 17 from I-490. Dominic S. 223-7353, Mike T. 425-7849. 10 a.m. Free. Pack lunch. An Evening of Longball and Storytelling. Ganondagan State Historic Site, 1488 State Rte. 444, Victor. 7-9:30 p.m. Suggested donation of $5-$10/ family. Longball game followed by storytelling around bonfire. Bring picnic dinner if you wish. GVHC Hike. Meet at end of Boxart St. off Lake Ave. Pam N. 224-5140, gvhchikes.org. 1


p.m. Free. Easy/moderate 5 mile hike, Turning Point Park. Rochester Orienteering Club Meet. Powder Mills Park. roc. us.orienteering.org. 10 a.m. $8 per entry/group. Vino & The Beasts 5K Run and Obstacle Course. 623 Lerch Road, Geneva. 315-719-1218, beastmodeathleticsbma.com. 4 p.m. $60. Complementary tastings. Wilderness Walk (Vigorous Pace). RMSC Cumming Nature Center, 6475 Gulick Rd., Naples. 374-6160, rmsc. org. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. $10 per person, including members. [ Saturday, August 25Sunday, August 26 ] Morning Flights on the Intrepid. Genesee Country Village & Museum, 1410 Flint Hill Rd., Mumford. 294-8218, gcv.org. 7-10 a.m. $17.50-$20. Call for reservations. [ Sunday, August 26 ] Birding Trip: Durand Eastman Park. Meet in the Lake Shore Blvd. parking lot between Zoo Rd and Log Cabin Rd. Bob H. 924-3874, Shirley S. 385-3907. 8a.m. Free. GVHC Hike. Meet at Whiting Rd. lot, Webster. John C. 254-4047, gvhchikes.org. 1 p.m. Free. Moderate 3-4 mile hike, Whiting Rd. nature preserve. Mount Hope Cemetery Tour. North Gatehouse opposite Robinson Dr. 1133 Mt. Hope Ave. 461-3494, fomh.org. 2 p.m. $5, members & children under 16 free. Every Sunday through Oct 28. [ Monday, August 27 ] 18th Annual Pro Ad Golf Tournament & A-Games. Brook-Lea Country Club, 891 Pixley Rd. 4420200 x208, adcouncilroch.org. 9 a.m. registration, 10 a.m. shotgun start. Golf: $145-$165 individual, $555-$635 foursome. A-Games: $62.50-$67.50 individual, $250$270 foursome.Register. Irish Children’s Program Golf Tournament and Dinner. Shadow Pines Golf Course, 600 Whalen Rd., Penfield. irishchildrensprogram.com. Check in 11 a.m., shotgun start at noon. Dinner 6 p.m. Individual $95, foursome $380, dinner only $35, register. Richard Guon Memorial Golf Tournament. Irondequoit Country Club, Pittsford. 325-7760 x3232, don@rbtl.org. Call for times. $325 individual player, $125 dinner only, register. [ Tuesday, August 28 ] Guided Bike Ride: Genesee Valley Park Neighborhood Trails. Meet at Genesee Valley Pool parking lot, 131 Elmwood Ave. cityofrochester. gov/fclg. 6 p.m. Free.

Special Events [ Daily through November 21 ] Vineyard Public Tours. Casa Larga, 2287 Turk Hill Rd., Fairport. 585-223-4210 x2. 11 a.m., 1 & 3 p.m. $5-$7. [ Thursday, August 23 ] Ice Cream Fundraiser for House of Mercy. Frontier Communications,

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THEATER | “The Living Canvas”

This weekend, join the Downstairs Cabaret for a performance that celebrates the human body. On Friday, August 24, and Saturday, August 25, Chicago’s critically acclaimed “The Living Canvas: Eureka!” will take the stage. The performance highlights the beauty and expression of the human form through performance art and photography. Creative lighting, sound, and multimedia imagery are projected on to human canvases to create a sense of body acceptance. The performance will take place at Downstairs Cabaret’s location at 3450 Winton Place. Performances will be held Friday at 10 p.m. and Saturday at 5 p.m., 8 p.m., and 10 p.m. General admission tickets are $26-$29. For tickets and more information, visit downstairscabaret.com or call 325-4370. — BY ANNE RITZ 180 South Clinton Ave. community@ftr.com. 1-3 p.m. $5. La Dolce Nights with Mike Kornrich Band. Casa Larga, 2287 Turk Hill Rd., Fairport. 585-2234210 x2. 5:30-8:30 p.m. $15. Public Hearing on Results of the Commission to Examine the Police Civilian Review Board. City Council Chambers, City Hall, 30 Church St. cityofrochester. gov. 5:30 p.m. The public does not have to sign up in advance to speak and members of the community are encouraged to attend regardless if they do or do not wish to speak. South Wedge Farmers Market. 100 Alexander St. at S. Clinton. swfarmersmarket.org. 4-7 p.m. Free admission. Through Oct 18. [ Friday, August 24 ] Cobblestone Arts Center Annual Fundraiser: Summer Olympics. Cobblestone Arts Center, 1622 Rte. 332, Farmington. 398-0220, cobblestoneartscenter.com. Noon2 p.m. Picnic, music, games, performance at noon, art for sale, raffles, refreshments available. New York Wine & Food Classic competition. New York Wine & Culinary Center, 800 S Main St., Canandaigua. jennifercooper@ nywgf.org. 5 p.m. $30, register. [ Friday, August 24Sunday, August 26 ] Garage Sale to Benefit Needy in Rochester. Basement of St. Michael’s of Rochester Church, 124 Evergreen St. svdpusa.org. Fri 10 a.m.-6 p.m., Sat 9 a.m.-4 p.m., Sun 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Free admission. Women’s Adventure Program. Camp Good Days & Special Times, 1332 Pittsford Mendon Rd., Mendon. 624-5555, campgooddays.org. Free of charge for women dealing with cancer. Register.

[ Friday, August 24Thursday, August 30 ] Project 5 Film Screenings. Little Theatre, 240 East Ave. 2580444, thelittle.org. Visit site for schedules, prices, film trailers, and synopses. [ Saturday, August 25 ] 2nd Annual Wine & Microbrew Tasting Cruise. Board at Steamboat Landing, 205 Lakeshore Dr., Canandaigua. pralid.org/event.html. Cruises at 2:30, 4:45, or 7 p.m. $45, register. A-List VIP Cocktail Cruise. Fairport loading dock on Erie Canal. 746-2576, rochesteralist.com. 4:30-5:30 p.m. Tickets $26, must be purchased in advance. Cruise into the Fairport Music Festival with live blues, Rohrbach beer tasting, hors ‘deouvres, and gelato sampling on-board along with a full service cash bar. Edgerton Model Railroad Room Open. Edgerton Community Center, 41 Backus St. 428-6769, edgertonmodelrailroadclub.com. 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Free. Finger Lakes Cheese Summer Open House. Finger Lakes Cheese Trail. flcheesetrail.com. Information at website. Free. Saturday Night Laser Show: Radiohead. Rochester Museum and Science Center, 657 East Ave. 271-1880, rmsc.org. 9:30 p.m. $6-$7, no children under age 5. Soil to Spoon: All You Can Eat Pancake Banquet. Springdale Farms, 700 Colby St., Spencerport. 473-2120 x3. $3. With special guest Assemblyman Hawley. [ Saturday, August 25Sunday, August 26 ] Stone Tool Craftsman Show. Letchworth State Park, Castile.

Potential Acne Subjects Would you like to participate in a research trial for facial acne? Potential subjects must be 12-40 years old and have 20 active acne bumps on the face. Call Skin Search NOW to find out more about this exciting study. Enrollment closes soon. Subjects who qualify will receive study medication, along with compensation for time and travel.

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Special Events 493-3625. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. $8 parking fee. [ Sunday, August 26 ] AIDS Red Ribbon Ride Closing Celebration. Genesee Valley Park, 131 Elmwood Ave. 2104150, AIDSRedRibbonRide.org. 5:30-7 p.m. Brighton Farmers Market. Brighton High School, 1150 Winton Rd. S. brightonfarmersmarket.com. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Each Sunday through October 28. Free admission. Community Garage Sales & Super Fleas. Rochester Public Market, 280 N. Union St. cityofrochester. gov/publicmarket. 8 a.m.-2 p.m. Through Oct 14. East Avon Flea Market. 1520 West Henrietta Road, Avon. eastavonfleamarket.com. 7 a.m.2 p.m. Free admission. Sundays through October. The Village Knitting Circle. Books Etc., 78 W. Main St., Macedon. 474-4116, books_etc@yahoo. com. 1 p.m. Free [ Monday, August 27 ] Rally to Ask for the City of Rochester’s Divestment from JP Morgan Chase. Downtown Chase Bank, at 1 Chase Square. metrojustice.org. Noon. Free. Summer Winemaker Dinner: Worldly Approach to Wine Seminar. Casa Larga, 2287 Turk Hill Rd., Fairport. 585-223-4210 x2. 6 p.m. $45-$55, register. [ Tuesday, August 28 ] Westside Farmers Market. St. Monica Church parking lot, 831 Genesee St. westsidemarketrochester.com. 4-7:30 p.m. Free admission. Tuesdays through October 16.

Sports [ Wednesday, August 22Friday, August 24 ] Rochester Redwings vs. Lehigh

THEATER/MUSIC | Sankofa Theater Festival

A celebration of African-American heritage and history in the arts, the annual Sankofa Theater Festival presents “Bringing the Community Together” this week. The event will showcase local playwrights, stage performers, and musicians in a three nights of theater and jazz. The MultiUse Community Center (MuCCC, 142 Atlantic Ave.) will host works such as “Love, Uncle Kane” by Laura Thomas, “Back Yard Stories from 1018” by C. Kirkland Rivers, “The Shadows of Our Faces: A Matter of Latino Identity” by the Rochester Latino Theatre Company, and many more. Each night features a different set of works. The Sankofa Festival runs Thursday-Saturday, August 23-25, with performances at 7:30 p.m. Advanced tickets are available at Mood Makers Books for $12.50, three-night passes are $35, and door price is $16. For more information call 271-7010 or visit muccc.org. — BY ANTOINETTE ENA JOHNSON Valley IronPigs. Frontier Field, 1 Morrie Silver Way. redwingsbaseball.com. 7:05 p.m. $7-$12. [ Friday, August 24Saturday, August 25 ] 2nd Annual USRowing Diversity Invitational. Fri 6:30-9 p.m. Community welcome event aboard the Mary Jemison, meet at Staybridge Suites dock, 1000 Genesee St. Sat 9:30 a.m. opening ceremonies: Genesee Valley Park, 131 Elmwood Ave.,

10 a.m. races. ccminorityrowing. com. Fri $10, Sat free. [ Saturday, August 25 ] Dirtcar Racing. Canandaigua Motorsports Park, 2820 County Rd. 10, Canandaigua. 394-0961, canandaiguamotorsportspark. com. 7 p.m. $12, ages 16 and under free.

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through September 2. RAPA East End Theatre, 727 E Main St. Thu 7 p.m., Fri-Sat 8 p.m., Sun 2 p.m. $39-$45. 4208338, thecalamarisisters.com. “Cabaret.” Wed Aug 22-Aug 29. Continues through Sep 8. Merry-Go-Round Playhouse, 6877 East Lake Rd., Auburn. Wed Aug 22-Thu 7:30 p.m., Fri-Sat 2 & 8 p.m., Mon 7:30 p.m., Tue-Wed Aug 29 2 & 7:30 p.m. Call for tickets. 315255-1785, merry-go-round. com. “GetAway Cabaret.” Thu Aug 23-Aug 29. Continues through Sep 2. Bristol Valley Theater, 151 South Main St., Naples. Thu-Sat 8 p.m., Sun 2 p.m., Wed Aug 29 2 p.m. $10-$25. 374-6318, bvtnaples.org. “The Living Canvas: Eureka!” Fri Aug 24-Aug 25. Downstairs Cabaret at Winton Place, 3450 Winton Place. Fri 10 p.m., Sat 5, 8 & 10 p.m., Sun 3 p.m. $26-$29. 325-4370, downstairscabaret.com. “Metal Quest: The First Emperor.” MuCCC, 142 Atlantic Ave. 7:30 p.m. Pay what you will, suggested $6. 244-0960, muccc.org, metalquest1@ gmail.com. A presentation on metal artwork by Olivia Kim will precede the show as well as a talk about Chinese history. Rochester Fringe Play Reading of “Mauritius.” Wed Aug 29. Blackfriars Theatre, 795 E. Main St. 3 p.m. Free, donations accepted. 5202940,rocfringprs@gmail.com. Sankofa Evening of Theatre & Jazz Fest. Thu Aug 23-Aug 25. MuCCC, 142 Atlantic Ave. 7:30 p.m. Thu $14-$18, Fri-Sat $12-$16, three night package $30. 244-0960, muccc. org, 271-7010, moodckr@ frontiernet.net.

Auditions [ Wednesday, August 22Thursday, August 23 ] “Back to the 80’s.” Stages, 875 E. Main St. By appointment. Calling singers, dancers, actors in grades 7-12. Visit site and download forms: mjtstages. com/auditions.html. [ Saturday, August 25 ] “The Nutcracker.” Rochester City Ballet Studios, 1326 University Ave. Ages 5-6 9:45 a.m., ages 7-8 11 a.m., ages 912 12:30 p.m. 461-5850 x112, dtretter@rochestercityballet. com. [ Tuesday, August 28 ] Genesee Valley Orchestra & Chorus: New members audition. Location by appointment. 7 p.m. 223-9006, info@ gvoc.org. [ Tuesday, August 28 & Thursday, August 30 ] “The Lone Star Love Potion.” Green Community Center, 3 Vince Tofany Blvd. 7 p.m. Casting calls for 3 males (age 40-60), 3 females (age 40-60), and 1 female (age 20-30). 594-0573. [ Wed., August 29 ] “What’s the Capitol of Boliva?” Working Class Theatre Company. Webster Public Library, 980 Ridge Rd. 6-8:15 p.m. Needed: 4 men (20s-70s) and 2 women (20s-50). 6430836. workingclasstheatre.net.

Workshops [ Wednesday, August 22Wednesday, August 29 ] Workshops. Mental Health Association, 320 N Goodman St. 325-3145 x 131. Wed 8/22 6-8 p.m. Family Development Class: “The Motivation Breakthrough.” For parents of children of all ages. Sat 8/25 noon-2:30 p.m.

Education Advocacy Presentation: “Don’t Wait until September: Advocating for Success and Understanding School Supports.” Lunch and a presentation on understanding the laws regarding general and special education for your child. For parents and caregivers of children of any age. Mon 8/27 12:30-2:30 p.m. Family Development Class: “Did You Hear What I Said?” For parents of children up to 18 years old. Tue 8/28 12:30-2:30 p.m. Family Development Class: “Nothing Works.” Teaching your children to behave in socially acceptable ways. For parents of children of children 5 to 12 years old. Wed 8/29 6-8 p.m. Family Development Combined Class: “It’s Great to Be Me” and “I’m Not Everybody.” For parents of preteens and teens. Free. Refreshments. Door prizes. [ Thursday, August 23 ] Comics Night Out. Books Etc., 78 W. Main St., Macedon. 4744116, books_etc@yahoo.com. 6:30 p.m. Free. Please bring your own laugh/applause meters. Geothermal Solutions for Commercial and Industrial Buildings. Pathstone Headquarters, 400 East Ave. 262-2870, hrotter@ceinfo. org. 7:45 a.m. registration and breakfast, 8:15 a.m. presentations, 10 a.m. tour of installation at Medical Arts Building. Free, register. [ Friday, August 25 ] Praise, Worship, and Music Workshop. Open Arms Church, 740 Marshall Rd, off Chili Ave. 426-0862. 2-5 p.m. Free. [ Sunday, August 26 ] Fallscaping: Designs and Tasks. Wayside Garden Center, 124 Pittsford Palmyra Rd., Macedon. 223-1222, x100, trish@waysidegardencenter. com. 2 p.m. Register.


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Film Times Fri August 24-Thur August 30 Schedules change often. Call theaters or check rochestercitynewspaper.com for updates.

Film

Brockport Strand 637-3310 89 Main St, Brockport THE CAMPAIGN: 5:15, 7:15, 9:15; also Fri-Sun 1:15, 3:15; HIT AND RUN: 5:10, 7:10, 9:10; also FriSun 1:10, 3:10; PARANORMAN: 5, 7, 9; also Fri-Sun 1, 3.

Canandaigua Theatres 396-0110 Wal-Mart Plaza, Canandaigua BOURNE LEGACY: 1:15, 4, 7, 9:30; THE CAMPAIGN: 5:15, 7:15, 9:15; DARK KNIGHT: 1,4, 7:15; DIARY OF A WIMPY KID: 1; THE EXPENDABLES 2: 1, 3:05, 5:10, 7:15, 9:20; HIT AND RUN: 1:10, 3:10, 5:10, 7:10, 9:10; HOPE SPRINGS: 1, 3, 5, 7, 9; ICE AGE: 3; THE ODD LIFE: 1, 3, 5, 7, 9; PARANORMAN: 3D 3, 9; 2D 1, 5, 7; PREMIUM RUSH: 1:10, 3:10, 5:10, 7:10, 9:10; SPARKLE: 1:15, 4, 7, 9:15.

Cinema Theater 271-1785 957 S. Clinton St. BEST EXOTIC: 7; also Sat-Sun 4:15; YOUR SISTER’S SISTER: 9:05.

Culver Ridge 16 544-1140 2255 Ridge Rd E, Irondequoit BOURNE LEGACY: 1:05, 4:05, 7:05, 10:10; THE CAMPAIGN: 12:05, 2:20, 4:30, 6:40, 9:25; DARK KNIGHT: 12:45, 4:15, 8:05, 9:20; DIARY OF A WIMPY KID: 12:10, 2:35, 4:50, 7:20, 9:35; THE EXPENDABLES 2: 12, 2:30, 5, 7:30, 10; HIT AND RUN: 12:25, 2:50, 5:15, 7:55, 10:20; HOPE SPRINGS: 12:20, 2:45, 5:10, 7:45, 10:25; ICE AGE: 11:55 a.m., 2:15, 4:35, 7; THE ODD LIFE: 11:45 a.m., 2:25, 4:55, 7:35, 10:05; PARANORMAN: 3D 4:45, 9:40; 2D 11:50 a.m., 2:10, 7:15; PREMIUM RUSH: 12:15, 2:40, 5:10, 7:40, 10:30; SPARKLE: 12:30, 1, 4, 4:40, 6:45, 7:25, 9:30, 10:15; STEP UP: 3D 4:25, 9:45; 2D 1:10, continues on page 30

28 City august 22-28, 2012

Bourne again and again [ REVIEW ] by George Grella

“The Bourne Legacy” (PG-13), directed by Tony Gilroy Now playing

Following “Identity,” “Supremacy,” and “Ultimatum,” the latest picture in the highly successful Bourne franchise, “The Bourne Legacy,” follows the established formula fairly closely, but also adds a good deal to the collection and even to its genre. Unlike most of the summer spectaculars, many adapted from comic books and aimed directly at a young audience, “The Bourne Legacy” resembles something like a motion picture for a more mature group, with a

level of sophistication slightly higher than that of, say, the Spider-Man crowd. To begin with, although the movie overflows with numerous action sequences of every imaginable kind, instead of employing the familiar straight-ahead, bang-bang plotting, it proceeds elliptically, so that for much of its length the action prevents complete understanding. Appropriately, the characters themselves seem as cryptic as the plot — and in fact, a couple of them openly confess their confusion about the events they find themselves involved in and the circumstances that surround them. Most blockbusters, after all, carefully avoid dabbling in mystery or constructing puzzles. After beginning with its protagonist diving into a lake in the frozen wilderness of Alaska, the movie maneuvers rapidly and suddenly all over the globe, showing a number of apparently disconnected and generally enigmatic events. In the United States, it jumps from that location to an intelligence operation in Maryland, then to Washington, D.C., then to various places in Europe and Asia,

Jeremy Renner in “The Bourne Legacy.” PHOTO COURTESY UNIVERSAL PICTURES

finally reaching its violent climax in Manila. As the locations change and more and more characters enter the plot, the events and people gradually connect in some meaningful ways. As the scenes change, a number of mysterious, violent incidents occur, which only after a considerable time come to make sense. Several people apparently linked to a secret American intelligence or counterespionage agency suddenly collapse and die in different cities all over the world; a drone aircraft — the new weapon of choice in blockbuster action flicks — fires a missile at a cabin in Alaska; a sniper assassinates a journalist in London; a scientist in a laboratory suddenly walks away from his work, pulls a pistol, and systematically murders his colleagues. The cause and significance of these strange events require explanations that, again, emerge in fragments, as if the world of the film actually existed without any continuity or meaning, but only as a series of discrete moments, brief, disordered perceptions in the mind of its protagonist. The temporal context changes along with the countless movements from place to place, so that instead of something like a back story, explanatory hints emerge from conversations and memories of various characters. The unusual emphasis on obscure action and vague references and the technique of an almost continuous montage challenge the characters as much as the audience, so that the viewer only gradually comes to understand what is happening and why.


Declaration of independents [ REVIEW ] BY DAYNA PAPALEO

Project 5 Friday, August 24-Thursday, August 30 Little Theatre, 240 East Ave.

In keeping with both the previous films in the series and the title of Robert Ludlum’s original novel, which started it all, one of the key themes in “The Bourne Legacy” involves the question of identity. Jeremy Renner plays the protagonist, who uses many names and, in flashbacks, demonstrates different personalities; in fact, along with the audience, he never really knows who he is, but finds meaning in his remarkable physical and mental resourcefulness. A stellar cast also separates the movie from others of its kind, with Edward Norton as the chief villain of the piece, the director of a powerful and vicious government agency — as usual, organizations like the CIA behave quite badly in the film — and such accomplished actors as Albert Finney and Joan Allen appearing in surprisingly short moments. Stacy Keach, David Strathairn, and Scott Glenn play larger supporting parts, all of them almost as evil as Norton. Beyond all the fascinating technique and the remarkable use of innumerable locations, the movie also employs the familiar stuff of its form. It displays an impressive mastery of contemporary technology, both as subject and method, explodes with all the necessary fireworks, features several gun battles, some really impressive stunts, and an extended climactic chase, on foot, in automobiles, and in motorcycles through the congested streets of Manila. In addition to its entertaining methods, “The Bourne Legacy” remains a blockbuster in the best sense of the term.

When the Little Theatre first opened in 1929, its mission was to show “art films that appeal to the intelligent and sophisticated,” and more than 80 years later it still strives to do just that. Yeah, there was that brief porn interlude in the 1960’s, but who hasn’t had one of those? These days, however, the harsh reality is that for every movie that plays at the Little, approximately 1 zillion just won’t. Happily, the Project 5 series enables the Little to showcase films that might otherwise fly under the radar for logistical reasons entirely unrelated to their quality. So read on for a peek at a handful of films showing as part of the latest Project 5, which will also debut hometown boy Matt Ehlers’ clever promo short “Mime Flyer,” then visit the thelittle.org for the full screening schedule. A minimalist mash-up of sleek Kubrickian future and slimy Jodorowskyish past, Canadian writerdirector Panos Cosmatos’ eye-popping

“The Color Wheel” is part of the 2012 Project 5, screening this coming week at the Little.

debut feature “Beyond the Black Rainbow” has “midnight movie” written all over it. Set in 1983, a creepy doctor (Michael Rogers) engages in a battle of wills with the mute young woman (Eva Allan) he’s allegedly helping, him observing her from a safe, walled distance in deference to her deadly power. Claustrophobic close-ups and spooky electronic music set the mood for this ambitious film — that blindingly achromatic flashback is beyond trippy — which unfolds at a willfully slow pace and possibly raises more questions than it answers. (Saturday, August 25, 9:30 p.m., and Thursday, August 30, 9:30 p.m.) Back before the phrase “independent film” became a buzzy marketing term, “The Color Wheel” is what they meant. Bold, frustrating, and often very funny, the second feature by Alex Ross Perry deploys the road-trip motif for a study of the complicated relationship between two equally directionless siblings. Perry and his co-scripter Carlen Altman play Colin and JR, who bicker their way through a mission to retrieve JR’s stuff from the home of her pompous ex. Despite the occasional flat line delivery, the characters are refreshingly and recognizably flawed, and the penultimate scene, featuring an unbroken monologue by JR, contains such subtle shifts in tone that its coda comes as a total shock. This is one of the best films of my year. (Saturday, August 25, 7 p.m., and Sunday, August 26, noon.) “Falling Uphill,” the promising first feature by Rochester native Richard J. Bosner, seems like something you’ve seen before: heartsick boy loves oblivious girl and only has a small window of time to confess his feelings. But it’s quickly apparent that this story, in which the quarter-life crisis meets the financial crisis, comes from a very personal place. Writer-director Bosner wisely sketches his unpredictable characters in shades of

gray that don’t automatically hint at a happily-ever-after. Jessiqa Pace gives the film’s standout performance, taking her manic Sara from intolerable to sympathetic on an honest path. (And we believe that Ari Kanamori’s Robert would overlook her pathological peskiness in favor of her energy.) Meanwhile, San Francisco finally looks lived-in rather than postcard-perfect. (Tuesday, August 28, 7 and 9:15 p.m.) The generically named but absorbing documentary “The Jeffrey Dahmer Files” isn’t so much about the late serial killer as it is those who were left in his notorious wake. Opting for respectful over salacious, director Chris James Thompson speaks to three key people in the case — a doctor from the medical examiner’s office, a neighbor, a cop — and chronicles their recollections of dealing with Dahmer and his crimes, weaving through the interviews unsettlingly banal reenactments of Dahmer going about his days riding the bus, swilling beer, and buying an awful lot of bleach. Shedding light into the mind of Dahmer is not the idea here; it serves as a powerful reminder that victimization never stops with the actual victims. (Saturday, August 25, 1:30 p.m., and Sunday, August 26, 7 p.m.) High-level drug dealers, help me out here: isn’t there a more efficient way to test a parcel of cocaine than by jamming a switchblade into it? That’s always how they do it in movies like the new camp classic “Miami Connection,” an unintentionally hilarious 1987 flick about criminal ninjas, bikers, and the heroic deeds of a terrible band called Dragon Sound, who all know martial arts. Everything truly ridiculous about the 80’s is on proud display, and the nearly incomprehensible plot allows for some of the worst acting you will ever witness, as well as the priceless suggestion to “write another tae kwon do song.” (Friday, August 24, 10:30 p.m.)

PHOTO COURTESY CINEMA CONSERVANCY

48 HRS.

Thursday, Aug. 23, 8:30 p.m. After making his film debut in this action comedy, Eddie Murphy became one of the biggest box-office draws of the ’80s. He’s hilarious as a convict recruited to help catch a killer, but this is a buddy comedy in the truest sense. The casting of Nick Nolte as his gruff partner brings out the very best in Murphy. (Walter Hill, US 1982, 96 min.)

THE SUGARLAND EXPRESS Movies for movie lovers, 6 nights a week. Odd Couples

Friday, Aug. 24, 8 p.m., and Sunday, Aug. 26, 2 p.m. Goldie Hawn and William Atherton are petty larcenists in hot pursuit of the child they were forced to give up. But the stakes grow higher as they take a trooper hostage and become outlaw celebrities. Recipient of the Best Screenplay Award at Cannes, and shot just one year before Spielberg rose to international fame with Jaws. (Steven Spielberg, US 1974, 110 min.)

Spielberg

Film Info: 271-4090 l 900 East Avenue l Eastman House Café—stop in for a light dinner or dessert before the film. l Wi-Fi Hotspot l Sponsored by rochestercitynewspaper.com City 29


6:50; TED: 12:35, 4:20, 6:55, 9:50; TOTAL RECALL: 12:55, 4:10, 7:10, 9:55.

Dryden Theatre 271-3361 9 East Ave *NOTE: Film times for Wed 8/22Wed 8/29* BLONDE VENUS: Wed 8/22 8; 48 HOURS: Thur 8/23 8:30; THE SUGARLAND EXPRESS: Fri 8/24 8, Sun 8/26 2; MISS BALA: Sat 8/25 8, Sun 8/26 5; TALK ABOUT A STRANGER: Tue 8/28 8; THE DEVIL IS A WOMAN: Wed 8/29 8.

Eastview 13 425-0420 Eastview Mall, Victor BOURNE LEGACY: 12:20, 4, 7, 10; BRAVE: 11:50 a.m., 2:15, 4:45; THE CAMPAIGN: 12:40, 3, 5:20, 7:10, 7:55, 9:40, 10:20; DARK KNIGHT: 12, 4:10, 8; DIARY OF A WIMPY KID: 12:30, 2:45, 5, 7:20, 9:45; THE EXPENDABLES 2: 12:45, 4:20, 7:40, 10:10; HIT AND RUN: 12:25, 2:50, 5:15, 7:50, 10:15; HOPE SPRINGS: 12:15, 2:40, 5:05, 7:35, 10:05; ICE AGE: 11:55 a.m., 2:25, 5:25; THE ODD LIFE: 11:45 a.m., 2:20,

Film Previews Full film reviews available at rochestercitynewspaper.com. [ OPENING ] 48 HRS. (1982): Eddie Murphy’s feature-film debut teamed him with Nick Nolte in Walter Hill’s odd-couple action flick about a wisecracking criminal on temporary parole to help a cop solve a murder. Dryden (Thu, Aug 23, 8:30 p.m.) THE APPARITION (PG-13): Ashley Greene (“Twilight”) and Sebastian Stan (“Captain America”) star in this thriller about a young couple who learn that they are being haunted by an entity accidentally conjured through a university parapsychology experiment. Henrietta, Tinseltown BLONDE VENUS (1932): This preCode drama features Marlene Dietrich as a wife and mother who returns to her stage career to pay for her husband’s medical expenses, only to embark on an affair with Cary Grant’s adoring millionaire. Dryden (Wed, Aug 22, 8 p.m.) FAREWELL, MY QUEEN (R): Diane Kruger plays Marie Antoinette in Benoît Jacquot’s historical fiction about the relationship between the doomed queen and her reader (Léa Seydoux) during the tumult of July 1789. Little, Pittsford HIT AND RUN (PG-13): Dax Shepard wrote, co-directed, and stars in this comedy about a former getaway driver, now in witness protection, whose past is after him. With Kristen Bell, Tom Arnold, and Bradley Cooper. Brockport, Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece, Henrietta, Tinseltown MISS BALA (2011): Loosely based on actual incidents, this Mexican drama tells the story of a beauty pageant contestant who gets mixed up with a drug cartel.

4:55, 7:25, 9:55; PARANORMAN: 3D 12:05; 2D 2:35, 5:10, 7:30, 9:50; PREMIUM RUSH: 12:10, 2:30, 4:50, 7:15, 9:35; SPARKLE: 12:35, 4:05, 6:55, 10:25; TOTAL RECALL: 7:45, 10:30.

Geneseo Theatres 243-2691 Geneseo Square Mall THE CAMPAIGN: 3:15, 5:15, 7:15, 9:15; DIARY OF A WIMPY KID: 1; THE EXPENDABLES 2: 1, 3:05, 5:10, 7:15, 9:20; HIT AND RUN: 1:10, 3:10, 5:10, 7:10, 9:10; HOPE SPRINGS: 1, 3, 5, 7, 9; THE ODD LIFE: 1, 3, 5, 7, 9; PARANORMAN: 3D: 3, 9; 2D 1, 5, 7.

Greece Ridge 12 225-5810 176 Greece Ridge Center Dr. BOURNE LEGACY: 1:10, 4:20, 7:20, 10:20; THE CAMPAIGN: 12:50, 3:10, 5:25, 7:55, 10:25; DARK KNIGHT: 12:45, 4:15, 7:50; DIARY OF A WIMPY KID: 12, 2:30, 4:50, 7:10; THE EXPENDABLES 2: 12:30, 3, 5:30, 8, 10:30; HIT AND RUN: 12, 2:25, 5, 7:25, 10:05; HOPE SPRINGS: 12:10, 2:40, 5:10, 7:35, 10; ICE AGE: Dryden (Sat, Aug 25, 8 p.m., and Sun, Aug 26, 5 p.m.) PREMIUM RUSH (PG-13): The latest from David Koepp (2008’s “Ghost Town”) is an action flick starring Joseph Gordon-Levitt as a Manhattan bike messenger in possession of an envelope that attracts the interest of a dirty cop (Michael Shannon). Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Greece, Henrietta, Tinseltown THE SUGARLAND EXPRESS (1974): Steven Spielberg directs Goldie Hawn and William Atherton in this drama about a woman who springs her husband from prison then kidnaps a Texas patrolman on the way to retrieve their baby from foster care. Dryden (Fri, Aug 24, 8 p.m., and Sun, Aug 26, 2 p.m.) TALK ABOUT A STRANGER (1952): This film noir stars future Mrs. Reagan Nancy Davis as the mom to a likable but volatile young boy out to prove that his new, reclusive neighbor killed his dog. Dryden (Tue, Aug 28, 8 p.m.) [ CONTINUING ] BEASTS OF THE SOUTHERN WILD (PG-13): The winner of the Grand Jury and Cinematography Prizes at Sundance 2012 is Benh Zeitlin’s bayou fable centered around 6-year-old Hushpuppy (newcomer Quvenzhané Wallis), on a mission to find her mom after environmental changes cause her dad to fall ill... and unleash a gaggle of prehistoric creatures. Little THE BEST EXOTIC MARIGOLD HOTEL (PG-13): Dame Judi Dench leads a stacked cast in this ensemble piece about a gaggle of British seniors who travel to India in search of exotic sights, discount medical care, and inexpensive retirements. Co-starring Bill Nighy, Tom Wilkinson, and Dame Maggie Smith. Cinema

30 City august 22-28, 2012

12:40, 2:55, 5:20; THE ODD LIFE: 12:15, 2:45, 5:15, 7:45, 10:15; PARANORMAN: 3D 2:35; 2D 12:20, 4:55, 7:15, 9:35; PREMIUM RUSH: 12:05, 2:20, 4:40, 7:30, 9:45; SPARKLE: 1, 4, 7:05, 9:55; TED: 7:40, 10:10; TOTAL RECALL: 9:40.

Henrietta 18 424-3090 525 Marketplace Dr. 2016 OBAMA’S AMERICA: 12:20, 2:35, 4:50, 7:05, 9:20; THE APPARATION: 1:15, 3:25, 5:35, 7:45, 10:10, 11:35; BOURNE LEGACY: 1, 3:05, 4:05, 6:10, 7:10, 9:15, 10:15, 11:25; BRAVE: 1:10, 4:25; THE CAMPAIGN: 12:25, 3, 5:15, 7:25, 9:40, 11:45; DARK KNIGHT: 12:50, 4:30, 8:05; DIARY OF A WIMPY KID: 1:20, 4; EK THA TIGER: 12:30, 3:35, 6:40, 9:50; THE EXPENDABLES 2: 12:10, 1:45, 2:45, 4:20, 5:20, 6:55, 7:55, 9:30, 10:25, 11:55; HIT AND RUN: 12:15, 2:55, 5:30, 8, 10:30, 11:30; HOPE SPRINGS: 11:35, 4:10, 6:35, 9:10; ICE AGE: 12:35; THE ODD LIFE: 1:30, 4:15, 6:50, 9:25; PARANORMAN: 3D 5:10, 10; 2D 12:05, 2:40, 7:35; PREMIUM RUSH: 12, 2:35, 5:05, BRAVE (PG): Finally, a Pixar heroine: Kelly Macdonald (HBO’s “Boardwalk Empire”) voices Merida, a willful Scottish princess who must rely on her archery skills to undo a curse brought about by her reckless defiance. With Billy Connolly, Emma Thompson, and, of course, John Ratzenberger. Eastview, Henrietta THE CAMPAIGN (R): Will Ferrell headlines the latest from “Austin Powers” director Jay Roach as a four-term North Carolina congressman whose fall from grace leaves him vulnerable to opposition by a naive challenger (Zach Galifianakis). Featuring Brian Cox, John Lithgow, and Dan Aykroyd. Brockport, Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece, Henrietta, Pittsford, Tinseltown DIARY OF A WIMPY KID: DOG DAYS (PG): The third film in the franchise combines the third and fourth books in the series for a look at the hilarity and lessonlearning that ensues when Greg’s plans for the summer go awry. Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece, Henrietta, Tinseltown THE EXPENDABLES 2 (R): Sylvester Stallone, Jason Statham, Jet Li, Dolph Lundgren, Randy Couture, Terry Crews, Liam Hemsworth, Bruce Willis, Arnold Schwarzenegger, Chuck Norris, and Jean-Claude Van Damme. ‘Nuff said. Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece, Henrietta, Tinseltown, Vintage HOPE SPRINGS (PG-13): Oscar winners Meryl Streep and Tommy Lee Jones star in this romantic comedy-drama as a long-married couple who attend an intense counseling retreat to work on their relationship. With Steve Carell, Jean Smart, and Elisabeth Shue. Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece, Little, Henrietta, Pittsford, Tinseltown

7:30, 9:55, 11:50; SPARKLE: 12:40, 1:40, 3:30, 4:35, 6:20, 7:20, 9:05, 10:05, 11:40; TED: 7, 9:45; TOTAL RECALL: 6:30, 9:35.

The Little 258-04 240 East Ave. BEASTS OF THE SOUTHERN WILD: 7:20, 9:20; also Sat-Sun 12:10, 3:10; FAREWELL MY QUEEN: 6:50, 9:10; also Sat-Sun 12:30, 2:50; HOPE SPRINGS: 6:40, 8:50; also Sat-Sun 12:40, 3:20; PROJECT 5: See Little website for shows and info; RUBY SPARKS: 7:10, 9:40; also Sat-Sun 12:20, 3.

Movies 10 292-5840 2613 W. Henrietta Rd. HUNGER GAMES: 11:25 a.m., 2:25, 5:30, 8:35; MADASGAR 3: 3D 11:20 a.m., 1:55, 4:25, 7, 9:25; 2D 11:55 a.m., 2:40, 4:55, 7:40, 9:55; MAGIC MIKE: 11:35 a.m., 2:05, 4:30, 7:10, 9:40; MEN IN BLACK 3: 11:50 a.m., 2:30, 5, 7:35, 10:05; PROMETHEUS: 11:15 a.m., 2, 4:45, 7:30, 10:10; SAVAGES: 12, 2:55, 7:05, 10; SNOW WHITE: 11:45 a.m., 2:45, 5:35, 8:25; THAT’S MY BOY: ICE AGE: CONTINENTAL DRIFT (PG): The latest installment of this popular animated franchise follows mammoth Manny, saber-toothed Diego, and sloth Sid on another adventure that probably never happened. Featuring the voices of Ray Romano, John Leguizamo, and Denis Leary. Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Greece, Henrietta, Tinseltown THE INTOUCHABLES (R): Toothy Dustin Hoffman lookalike François Cluzet (2008’s “Tell No One”) stars in this feelgood French import as a wealthy paraplegic who hires a charismatic Senegalese hustler from the projects as his caretaker. Little, Tinseltown MADAGASCAR 3: EUROPE’S MOST WANTED (PG): The gang finds itself in Monte Carlo on its way back to NYC, where the animals join up with a traveling circus making the rounds of Europe’s capital cities. Featuring the voices of Ben Stiller, Jada Pinkett Smith, and Chris Rock. Movies 10 MAGIC MIKE (R): The prolific Steven Soderbergh returns with a rather un-Soderberghy comedy that features Channing Tatum as the title character, an experienced stripper who shows a new guy the ropes while he contemplates his own non-gyrating future. Co-starring Alex Pettyfer and Matthew McConaughey. Movies 10 MEN IN BLACK 3 (PG-13): Barry Sonnenfeld reteams with Will Smith and Tommy Lee Jones for this three-quel, which finds Smith’s Agent J traveling back to the 1960’s to stop an alien from assassinating Agent K (Josh Brolin). With Emma Thompson. Movies 10 MOONRISE KINGDOM (PG-13): Wes Anderson’s first liveaction film since 2007’s “The Darjeeling Limited” is also his first period piece, romantic

11:30 a.m., 2:10, 4:50, 7:25, 10:15; THE WATCH: 11:40, 2:15, 4:40, 7:20, 9:45.

Pittsford Cinema 383-1310 3349 Monroe Ave. BOURNE LEGACY: 2, 4:55, 7:50; THE CAMPAIGN: 1:25, 3:30, 5:25, 7:40, 9:45; DARK KNIGHT: 12:40, 4:25, 8:10; FAREWELL MY QUEEN: 12:10, 2:30, 4:50, 7:10, 9:30; HOPE SPRINGS:12, 2:20, 4:40, 7, 9:20; MOONRISE KINGDOM: Fri-Mon 2:45, 7:30; THE ODD LIFE: 12:10, 2:35, 5, 7:25, 9:50; PARANORMAN: 3D 4:30, 8:50, 2D 12, 2:10, 6:40; RESTLESS HEART: Starting Tue 8/28 1:30, 4:10, 6:50, 9:30; TO ROME WITH LOVE: Fri-Mon12:15, 5, 9:45; SPARKLE: Fri-Mon 2, 4:45, 7:20, 9:55.

Tinseltown USA / IMAX 247-2180 2291 Buffalo Rd. 2 for 1 Double feature: MOONRISE KINGDOM/TO ROME WITH LOVE: 12:30, 5, 9:30; 2016 OBAMA’S AMERICA: 11:50 a.m., 2:10, 4:30, 7:15, 9:35; THE APPARATION: 12:20, 2:50, 5:05, 7:30, 9:45; BOURNE LEGACY: 60’s-era whimsy in which two young teens run off together, prompting a town-wide search party. With Bill Murray, Frances McDormand, Bruce Willis, and Edward Norton. Little, Pittsford, Tinseltown THE ODD LIFE OF TIMOTHY GREEN (PG): This comedydrama from writer-director Peter Hedges (“Dan in Real Life”) stars Jennifer Garner and Joel Edgerton (“Warrior”) as a childless couple who bury their hopes in a box and are understandably surprised when a 10-year-old knocks on the door claiming to be their son. Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece, Henrietta, Pittsford, Tinseltown PARANORMAN (PG): This stopmotion animation from the same artists responsible for “Coraline” tells the story of a young boy whose ability to communicate with the dead comes in handy as he tries to save his New England town from a witch’s curse. Featuring the voices of John Goodman, Anna Kendrick, Casey Affleck, and Elaine Stritch. Brockport, Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece, Henrietta, Pittsford, Tinseltown PROMETHEUS (R): Ridley Scott returns to sci-fi territory with this loose prequel to 1979’s “Alien” in which a crew of scientists seek the origins of humanity but instead discover a threat that could cause the extinction of the human race. With Noomi Rapace, Charlize Theron, and Michael Fassbender. Movie 10 TO ROME WITH LOVE (R): Writerdirector Woody Allen continues his globetrotting ways, this time touching down in The Eternal City for another comedy about the intertwined romantic adventures of various Caucasians. With Judy Davis, Jesse Eisenberg, Ellen Page, and Allen himself. Pittsford, Tinseltown

11:45 a.m., 2:55, 6:10, 9:25; THE CAMPAIGN: 11:55 a.m., 2:05, 4:20, 7:10, 9:30; DARK KNIGHT: IMAX 12:15, 3:30, 6:45, 10; NON-IMAX: 8:15; DIARY OF A WIMPY KID: 12:10, 2:35, 5:10, 7:35; THE EXPENDABLES 2: 11:40 a.m., 1, 2:15, 3:40, 5, 6:20, 7:40, 9, 10:15; HIT AND RUN: 12:15, 2:45, 5:15, 7:45, 10:15; HOPE SPRINGS: 12, 2:30, 4:55, 7:20, 9:45; ICE AGE: 3D 2:45; 2D 12, 5:30; THE INTOUCHABLES: 1:15, 4:15, 7, 9:40; THE ODD LIFE: 11:45 a.m., 2:20, 4:50, 7:25, 9:55; PARANORMAN: 3D 2:25, 4:45, 7:05; 2D 12:05, 9:40; PREMIUM RUSH: 12:25, 3, 5:20, 7:50, 10:10; SPARKLE: 12:50, 4, 7, 9:50; TOTAL RECALL: 10:05.

Vintage Drive In 226-9290 1520 W Henrietta Rd. SCREEN 1: THE EXPENDABLES 2: 8:35; TOTAL RECALL: 10:20; SCREEN 2: PARANORMAN: 8:35; DIARY OF A WIMPY KID: 10:10; SCREEN 3: HIT AND RUN: 8:35; TED: 10:15; SCREEN 4: THE CAMPAIGN: 8:35; THE WATCH: 10.

RUBY SPARKS (R): Jonathan Dayton and Valerie Faris follow up 2006’s “Little Miss Sunshine” with this romantic fantasy about a novelist (Paul Dano) whose infatuation with a character he created brings her to life. Co-starring Antonio Banderas, Annette Bening, and screenwriter Zoe Kazan as Ruby. Little SPARKLE (PG-13): Whitney Houston’s final film role is as the matriarch in this 1960’s-set drama about three sisters who form a girl group and become Motown sensations, only to have fame drive a wedge into the once-close-knit family. Starring Jordin Sparks, Derek Luke, and Cee-Lo Green. Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Greece, Henrietta, Pittsford, Tinseltown STEP UP: REVOLUTION (PG-13): The fourth film in the successful “Step Up” series takes place in Miami, where the daughter of a wealthy businessman sparks with a young man from a dance crew, then some bad stuff happens but everything probably turns out OK. Culver TED (R): This profane comedy from “Family Guy” creator Seth McFarlane envisions what happens when one of those moviemaking clichés — the talking stuffed animal — grows up along with the boy who wished him into existence. Starring Mark Wahlberg, Mila Kunis, and McFarlane himself as the voice of Ted. Culver, Greece, Henrietta TOTAL RECALL (PG-13): Colin Farrell, Jessica Biel, and Kate Beckinsale star in Len Wiseman’s loose adaptation of a Philip K. Dick short story about a frustrated factory worker whose harmless virtual escapism leads to a revelation that makes him a hunted man. Culver, Eastview, Greece, Henrietta, Tinseltown, Vintage


Classifieds For information: Call us (585) 244-3329 Fax us (585) 244-1126 Mail Us City Classifieds 250 N. Goodman Street Rochester, NY 14607 Email Us classifieds@ rochester-citynews.com EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY

All real estate advertised in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act, which makes it unlawful, “to make, print, or publish, any notice, statement, or advertisement, with respect to the sale or rental of a dwelling that indicates any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin.” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under the age of 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertisement for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. Call the local Fair Housing Enforcement Project, FHEP at 325-2500 or 1-866-671-FAIR. Si usted sospecha una practica de vivienda injusta, por favor llame al servicio legal gratis. 585-325-2500 - TTY 585-325-2547. year (Great In-Law Home). Owner must sell due to age & health 585-383-8888

Shared Housing

ALL AREAS - ROOMMATES.COM. Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http://www.Roommates.com.

Houses for Rent HALF HOUSE Kitchen, living, dining, 3 bedrooms, hardwood, off street parking. Convenient Greece schools, mall, bus. Need health conscious occupant. Health business is other half of house. No smoking, pets due to Multiple Chemical Sensitivities. $1200/ month. 585-787-6954

Commercial/ Office Space UofR/ AIRPORT AREA Brick, Mixed use building. 6,000 sq.ft. of stores/office plus 3 apartments. Owner must sell due to illness. Owner financing, no banks needed. 383-8888

Vacation Property OCEAN CITY MARYLAND Best selection of affordable rentals. Full/ partial weeks. Call for FREE brochure. Open daily. Holiday Real Estate. 1-800-638-2102. Online reservations: www.holidayoc.com

Houses for Sale Home Services HOMES FOR SALE Pittsford/ Bushnells Basin 3 Homes on fabulous 3 acre park-like yard. Beautifully updated, 1800’s large main house plus 2 smaller homes which are leased for $24,000 per

MASTER CHIMNEY & MASONRY See our ad under Home and Garden Professionals. Chimney Cleaning, Masonry Repairs, Foundation Repairs, Roof Leaks, Brick Steps Repaired. 585-734-8444

Ceilings & Drywall 100% ABSOLUTE DUST-FREE: Ceilings & walls. $25.00 Seniors; discount. Repaired, installed. Textured, swirled, sunburst. Water damage specialist. Insurance work. Free estimates. 45 years experience. 225-6590

Adoption ADOPT: A dazzling world of fun, endless opportunities, and unconditional love await your baby of baby of any race/ ethnicity. Expenses paid. Jared/ Jezi 888-980-1392 www.anadoptionwish.com ADOPT: A happily married couple seeks to adopt. We’ll provide your baby with love, laughter, education, security. Wonderful extended family nearby. EXPENSES PAID. www. annieandnickadopt.info 888-9644269 ADOPT: A wonderful life awaits your baby! We’ll provide warmth, security, devoted extended family, opportunities and endless love. Expenses Paid. Anne & Marc 1-877-977-5411. www. anneandmarcadopt.com. PREGNANT? CONSIDERING ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions 866-4136293 (Void in Illinois) (AAN CAN)

Automotive ALWAYS BETTER Higher cash for your Junk Cars, Trucks and Vans. From $200-$800 or more for newer. Running or not. With free towing. Also free removal of any unwanted model in any condition. Call 585-305-5865

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CASH FOR CARS Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888-420-3808 www. cash4car.com (AAN CAN)

DIRECT. Queen and other sizes available. Simply the best deal in town. Call 585-752-1434

Attorneys

USED GARDEN FIGURES 2 girls, 1 dog. Stand in garden $10 all 585-880-2903. 2 1/2’ tall, 1 pole plant hanger $5 585-880-2903

PALM TREE 5’ tall $25 585-4905870

ATTORNEY JAMES D. HARTT Represents victims of employment discrimination statewide. James also handles criminal cases. Call Attorney James D. Hartt today to set up your free initial telephone consultation. (585) 490-7100 This is an attorney ad

WALL UNIT 11 shelves 52”h x 92”L x 15”w $35 585-490-5870

Jam Section BASS PLAYER I don’t want to hang around in bars. I just want to play some twangy old rock’n’roll, ska, or New Wave. Who’s up for it? Craig at mooskamovers@aol.com

Education ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from home. *Medical, *Business, *Criminal Justice, *Hospitality, Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEC certified. Call 888-2018657www.CenturaOnline.com

CALLING ALL MUSICIANS OF ALL GENRES the Rochester Music Coalition wants you! Please register on our website. For further info: www.rochestermusiccoalition.org info@rochestermusiccoalition.org 585-235-8412

For Sale

DRUMMER WITH JAZZ skills applied to R&B and funk, originals & covers. Evenings open, transportation. Working Western New York Contact Bobby 585-3284121 sitting heavyonsd@yahoo.com

CRIB: / Play Pen $27 585-4905870 FLAGS 3x5 for sale from various States and. countries.Used $8.00 each. Please call 585 259-9590

GUITAR & KEYBOARDS, performing R&B, funk, covers & originals, vocals a plus. Be ready to learn & work. Preparing for studio Gigs. Contact Bobby 585-3284121 MEET OTHER MUSICIANS any instrument, male singer- jam together- coffee house, private gigs, I play keys Call Martin 585-2666337 MEN ENJOY SINGINING Fun with the Chorus of the Genesee, Sing, learn, perform, share laughs and libation! Guest night Tuesday at 7 PM. Stop in at 58 E Main St, Webster. Call 585-698-7784 UPRIGHT BASS, German, new strings and bow. Beautiful tone. Asking $950. Call 585-889-1202

Lost and Found FOUND 2 small poodle mix dogs, 1 brown, 1 white, at 12 Corners on 7/14. Very friendly. (917) 502-6780 LOST 14x20 inch canvas portrait man and tropical birds. Artwalk vicinity zips 14620, 14618, 14607. Reward. Margot Fass 733-0563

continues on page 32

GARBAGE CANS with lids, heavy duty plastic with handles 3 count $20 all 585-880-2803 GARDEN ROCKS big, small $10 880-2903, 544-4155 GARDEN, HORSE PINWHEELS (2) stick in ground. also Daisy Pinwheel 585-880-2903 585-544-4155 GRACO CAR SEAT, stroller system x-cond. $39.99 585-225-5526 METAL FOLDING CHAIRS (2) $12. for pair 585-490-5870 NEW MATTRESS SETS 5070% off Retail, SERTA MANUFACTURED FACTORY-

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rochestercitynewspaper.com City 31


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24/7 EMERGENCY RESPONSE $1/day Living alone? You could fall! Deaths from falls can be avoided. Helps a button push away. Lifewatch 1-800-2074078 CANADA DRUG CENTER Safe and affordable medications. Save up to 90% on your medication needs. Call 1-888-432-1479 ($25.00 off your first prescription and free shipping) DONATE A CAR DONATE A CAR- HELP HOMELESS PETS! Free Next-Day Towing. Tax Deductible. Non- Runners OK. Receive $1,000 Grocery Coupons. Call National Animal Welfare Foundation 1-888-333-3848

*REDUCE YOUR CABLE BILL!* Get a 4-Room All-Digital Satellite system installed for FREE and programming starting at $19.99/mo. FREE HD/DVR upgrade for new callers, CALL NOW. 1-800-925-7945

Music Services PIANO LESSONS In your home or mine. Patient, experienced instructor teaching all ages, levels and musical styles. Call Scott:

Together We Are One

2 9 V I C K PA R K A RO C H E S T E R , N Y

Sunday Services 10:30 AM

Improvements for your home from foundations to roofs and everything in between, including: • Garages, Patios, Decks & Pools • Handyman services for small jobs • Masonry and Concrete • Emergency repairs and storm damage - WE WORK WITH YOUR INSURANCE COMPANY

Miscellaneous

HAS YOUR BUILING SHIFTED OR SETTLED? Contact Woodford Brothers Inc, for straightening, leveling, foundation and wood frame repairs at 1-800-OLD-BARN www.woodfordbros.com. “Not applicable in Queens county”

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> page 31

SUMMER IS HERE!!! • Chimney Cleaning • Chimney Repairs • Brick Steps Repaired • Foundaon Repairs • Concrete Repairs & New Walks Installed • Chimney Painng • Chimneys Rebuilt Fully Insured

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All Message Service & Free Spiritual Healing Third Weds ~ 7 PM ~ Séances ~ Classes ~ Gallery Reading ~ For more information and schedules www.plymouthspiritualistchurch.org Robin Higgins, Pastor ~ Phone: 585.271.1470


Place your real estate ad by calling 244-3329 ext. 23 or rochestercitynewspaper.com Ad Deadlines: Friday 4pm for Display Ads Monday at noon for Line ads 585- 465-0219. Visit www. scottwrightmusic.com

Wanted to Buy BUYING / SELLING BUYING/ SELLING- gold, gold-filled,

sterling silver, silver plate, diamonds, fine watches (Rolex, Cartier, Patek Philippe)coins, paintings, furs, estates. Call for appointment 917-696-2024 JAY

HomeWork A cooperative effort of City Newspaper and RochesterCityLiving, a program of the Landmark Society.

CASH FOR CARS! We Buy ANY Car or Truck ,Running or NOT! Damaged, Wrecked, Salvaged OK! Get a top dollar INSTANT offer today! 1-800-267-1591

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RochesterSells.com

This Ranch was sold in 5 days with multiple offers! Call Ryan @ 585-201-0724 to find out how to sell your home today!

Magnificent McCord on Melrose 222 Melrose Street

Ryan Smith 585-201-0724

Ryan Smith

NYS Licensed Real Estate Salesperson 201-0724

Search. Buy. Sell.

FOR SALE: Two family home. 4 Regent St. Walk to stores & shops from this side by side home on a quiet street in the Park Ave area. $204,900, call Dave Walsh at ReMax Realty Group at 269-4068 to set up an appointment to see it.

Schmackpfeffer Realty 585-259-5474 Phone wschmack@gmail.com

Package Four 2 families and one three family. Seven (7) unit apartment building, 19th Ward. Package one single, one double, one triple, one four. Package five singles, one double. Package a single, three, one four. Package two doubles, one single.

In the heart of the 19th Ward, among streets of solidly built Foursquare houses, lies a two block anomaly of homes more at place on Seneca Parkway or Dorchester Road. Many of these homes on Melrose Street and Rugby Avenue were built in the late 1920s and were designed by prominent architects of the time, Gordon Bull, Carl Traver, Leander McCord, and others. The striking Tudor Revival at 222 Melrose Street is attributed to Leander McCord, a designer without whom, many of the city’s finest early 20th century residences would not have been built. Many of McCord’s signature design elements remain intact at 222 Melrose and can be seen both inside and out as a result of the last 35 years of caring ownership. An original meandering flagstone path leads you through the elaborate gardens, which ebb and flow around the entire property. Extensive leaded glass windows with wood storms, immaculate stucco, striking stonework, half timbering, and a charming two car garage all catch the eye on your way to the arched walnut front door. Entering through a leaded glass door from the intricately tiled vestibule, your eye is drawn up the grand staircase, with its large newel posts, to the arched ceiling and window at the landing. Oversized walnut molding, paired with quarter-sawn oak floors with intricate walnut inlay, permeates the entire house. At the rear of the foyer is a spacious powder room, with its original herringbone

patterned tile. The large living room to the right possesses eight windows in all, along with an arched window seat flanked by two floor-to-ceiling built-in bookcases. A walnut fireplace with tiled hearth completes the room. Through a set of leaded glass French doors the sunroom wows with more inlaid floors, a grand arched window and connection to the tastefully enclosed rear porch. The dining room is a tour-de-force of inlaid floors, walnut woodwork, arched windows, picture frame molding, and a sideboard alcove. Through the swinging door is a good sized kitchen which features some original cabinetry, a large pantry, and a striking breakfast nook. The second floor includes three bedrooms and a charming seafoam green tiled bath. The master bedroom includes his and hers closets flanking a window seat. Other original features include a linen closet, laundry shoot, and built-in armoires in the bedrooms. The attic includes ample storage, full bath, and a large well-lit bedroom beneath the topsyturvy angles of the roof. For more information contact realtor Darryl Gronsky at (585) 389-4052. Listed at $169,000, this well-maintained 2,444 square foot home, with original architectural features intact, is a rare find that won’t last long. by Christopher Brandt Christopher is a Landmark Society volunteer and a Leander McCord fanatic.

20-22 Rosalind 2 family 19th ward. 75 Berlin single family 14621 area.

rochestercitynewspaper.com City 33


CITY Newspaper presents

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EMPLOYMENT / CAREER TRAINING

Employment ACTORS/MOVIE EXTRAS Needed immediately for upcoming roles $150-$300 /day depending on job requirements. No experience, all looks needed. 1-800-560-8672 for casting times /locations. AIRLINES ARE HIRING Train for hands on Aviation Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified- Job Placement Assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance (866)296-7093 CLASS A DRIVERS SIGN ON BONUS Paid Holidays, Vacation, & More. Weekly Pay. Direct Deposit. REGIONAL with Home Time. 2 Years T/T EXP. 800-524-5051 www. gomcilvaine.com DRIVERS- Choose your hometime: Weekly, 7/ON- 7/OFF, 14/ON- 7/OFF. Full or Part-time. $0.01 increase per mile after 6 months. Requires 3 months recent experience. 800-4149569 www.driveknight.com FOREMEN: to lead utility field crews. Outdoor physical work, many positions, paid training, $17/hr.

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and part time positions available. Qualified applicants must be NYS Licensed with AART credentialing. Minimum one year experience required. Interested candidates can fax, email or mail resumes to: Rochester Mobile X-Ray, 200 Buell Rd., Suite #14, Rochester, NY 14624. 585-436-5340 tmoore@diagnosticxray.com

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[ CARMA ENTERPRISES I, LLC ] The name of the Limited Liability Company is Carma Enterprises I, LLC . Articles of Organization were filed with the New York Secretary of State on 7/12/2012. The office of the LLC is in Monroe County. The New York Secretary of State is designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. The Secretary of State shall mail a copy of such process to 1130 Peck Rd., Hilton, NY 14468. The LLC is organized to engage in any lawful activity for which an LLC may be formed under NY LLC Law. [ NOTICE ] 5018 Ridge Road LLC (LLC) filed Arts. of Org. with NY Secy. of State (SS) on August 9, 2012. LLC’s office is in Monroe County. SS is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS shall mail a copy of any process to LLC’s principal business location at 4477 Ridge Road West, Rochester, NY 14626. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] ARCADIAN SOLUTIONS LLC (LLC) filed Arts. of Org. with NY Secy. of State (SS) on July 23, 2012. LLC’s office is in Monroe County. SS is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS shall mail a copy of any process to LLC’s principal business location at 537 French Rd., Rochester, NY 14618. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] BRISTOL BEVERAGE COMPANY LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 5/25/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 3 Claret Dr., Fairport, NY 14450. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] EMPIRE CUSTOM FABRICATION LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 7/31/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 243 Reed Rd., Scottsville, NY 14546. General Purposes.

[ NOTICE ] Juice For Skin, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State (NYSOS) on 5/16/2012, pursuant to Limited Liability Company Law Section 203. Office location: Monroe County. NYSOS designated as agent upon whom process against it may be served and a copy of any process will be mailed to The LLC, 3349 Monroe Ave. #233, Rochester, NY 14618. The purpose of the LLC is any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] KEVIN WETMORE, PLLC, a domestic PLLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 6/27/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the PLLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The PLLC, 254 Culver Road, Rochester, NY 14607. Purpose: Law [ NOTICE ] Lily Lu Organix LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 7/13/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 14 Spyglass Hill, Fairport, NY 14450. Purpose: Any lawful activities [ NOTICE ] Name of LLC: The BCE Group, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State: 7/5/12. Office location: Monroe County. Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: 263 North Ave., Webster, NY 14580. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Not. Of Form. of Freemantle Insurance Agency, LLC, Art. Of Org. filed with SSNY 6/8/12. County: Monroe. SSNY is designated Agent of LLC to whom process may be served. SSNY may mail a copy of any process to LLC, 642 Kreag Rd, Ste 207, Pittsford, NY 14534. Purpose any lawful activity [ NOTICE ] Not. of Form. of North Island Media, LLC Art. Of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 8/1/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY may mail a copy of any process to LLC. 731 Sugarcreek Tr. Webster, NY 14580.

Purpose: any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Not. of Form. of Red Setter Enterprises, LLC. Arts. Of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State on 7/9/12. Office location Monroe County. Secy. Of State (SSNY) designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the principal business address of the LLC: 192 Rhinecliff Drive, Rochester, NY 14618. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Not. of Form. of Six Three Four Nouvelle LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with Sec’y Of State of NY (SSNY) 7/09/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to: The LLC, PO Box 363, Webster, NY 14580. Purpose any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Not. of Form. of Tikari Properties LLC. Art of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 7/23/12. Off. Loc-Monroe Cnty. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY may mail process to the LLC, PO Box 26593, Roch.,N. Y. 14626. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice is hereby given that a license, number not yet assigned, for a full on premise beer, wine & liquor license has been applied for by Dwight Caesar dba Island’s Bar & Lounge, 1508 Dewey Ave. Rochester, NY 14615, County of Monroe, for a bar & restaurant. [ NOTICE ] Notice is hereby given that a license, number not yet assigned, for a full on premise beer, wine & liquor license has been applied for by BLU BAR & GRILL LLC dba BLU BAR & GRILL, 250 Pixley Rd, Rochester NY 14624, County of Monroe, for a restaurant. [ NOTICE ] Notice is hereby given that a license, number not yet assigned, for restaurant beer & wine license has been applied for by Big Silz LLC dba Salvatores’s Pizzerias, 195 North Ave, Webster NY 14580, County of Monroe, for a restaurant.

[ NOTICE ] Notice is hereby given that license, number 3148981, has applied for a class change :to a full on premise beer, wine & liquor license for Rochester Wood Fired Inc dba Napa Wood Fired Pizzeria, 573 S, Clinton Ave, Rochester NY 14620, County of Monroe, for a restaurant. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of 1558 WHEN LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 07/31/12. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 2479 Browncroft Blvd., Rochester, NY 14625. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Avon Self Storage Assoc., LLC at the princ. office of the LLC. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of 3755 WEST HENRIETTA ROAD, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State on 8/14/12. Office location: Monroe County. Principal business address: 3755 West Henrietta Road, Rochester, New York 14623. Secy. of State designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. Secy. of State shall mail process to: 3755 West Henrietta Road, Rochester, New York 14623. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of 482 JOSEPH CIRCLE, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 7/9/2012. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 482 Joseph Circle, Webster, NY 14580. Purpose: any lawful act [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Charles Point Sodus LLC. Articles of Organization filed with the Secretary of State of New York on July 17, 2012. Office location County of Monroe, SSNY has been designated as the agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to 5500 West Ridge Road, Spencerport, NY 14559. Purpose: any lawful act.

[ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of CPDevelopment, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 6/18/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o The LLC, 250 Ramo Drive, Rochester, NY 14606. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of DHD VENTURES CAPITAL, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 7/31/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, c/o Sammy Feldman, 3445 Winton Place, Ste. 228, Rochester, NY 14623. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of EREGISTRATIONSERVICES LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 4/9/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 235 Park Ave, Rochester, NY 14607. Purpose: any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of FINGER LAKES FIELD HOCKEY, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State on 8/7/12. Office location: Monroe County. Principal business address: 60 Park Circle Drive, Fairport, New York 14450. Secy. of State designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. Secy. of State shall mail process to: 60 Park Circle Drive, Fairport, New York 14450. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of HMD ENTERTAINMENT, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 07/12/12. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 57 Rensselaer Dr., Rochester, NY 14618. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Corporation Service Co., 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207-2543. Purpose: Any lawful activity.

cont. on page 38

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36 City august 22-28, 2012


rochestercitynewspaper.com City 37


Legal Ads > page 35 [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of Julianna Salon & Spa LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 6/25/2012. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 31 Scottsville Road, Rochester, NY 14611. Purpose: any lawful act [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Lifestyle Builders, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Sec’y of State of NY (“SSNY”) on 06/25/12. Office location Monroe County. the SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. The SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at 21 Crossbow Dr. Penfield, NY 14526. Purpose any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY. NAME: 3091 ECD, LLC. Articles

of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 05/16/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to the LLC, 705 Maple Street, Rochester, New York14611. Purpose: For any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Local Vinacular LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State on 7/25/12. Office location: Monroe County. Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to the principal business address: 785 Whittier Rd., Spencerport, NY 14559. Purpose: all lawful purposes. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Lu Hang Realty, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 7/31/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against

it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, c/o Sammy Feldman, 3445 Winton Place, Ste. 228, Rochester, NY 14623. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of MATRIX INSIGHTS LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 04/24/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, 4715 Clover St., Honeoye Falls, NY 14472. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of MORGAN POND STREET LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 07/23/12. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 1170 Pittsford Victor Rd., Pittsford, NY 14534. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office.

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Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of ONE STOP BREW SHOP LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 7/5/2012. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o William S. Ruby, Esq., 70 Linden Oaks, Suite 300, Rochester, NY 14625. Purpose: any lawful act [ NOTICE ] NOTICE OF FORMATION OF R.L.S. Enterprises LLC art. Of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) April 23, 2012. Office location: Monroe county. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 50 Lee Rd Ext Rochester, NY 14606. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of RALEIGH STREET RENTAL LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 05/02/12. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 2 Robin Dr., Rochester, NY 14618. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o US Corp. Agents, Inc., 7014 13th Ave., Ste. 202, Brooklyn, NY 11228, regd. agent upon whom and at which process may be served. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Roc Hoop-La-La, LLC. Arts. of Org, filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 3/5/2012. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o United States Corporation Agents, Inc., 7014 13th Ave, Suite 202, Brooklyn, NY 11228. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Thai Time Cuisine, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 7/31/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, c/o Sammy Feldman, 3445 Winton Place, Ste. 228,

38 City august 22-28, 2012

Rochester, NY 14623. Purpose: any lawful activity [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Unified Gold Heart Taekwondo LLC (the LLC) filed Articles of Organization with the Secy. of the State of NY (SSNY) on 06/26/2012. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: THE LLC, 2117 Buffalo Road #265, Rochester, NY 14624. Purpose: any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of WELLINGTON WAY LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 07/12/12. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 150 Willow Ridge Trail, Rochester, NY 14626. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: To own real estate. [ NOTICE ] Notice of the formation of a Limited Liability Company (LLC) named Ultimate Auto Spot LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with Secretary of State of NY (SSNY) on June 28, 2012. Office location is Monroe County, New York. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. The SSNY shall mail a copy of any process to the LLC at 1820 Lexington Ave, Rochester, NY 14606. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] PLINK LLC. Arts. of Org. were filed with the New York Sec’y of State (SSNY) on May 30, 2012. Office location: Monroe Co. The SSNY has been designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. The SSNY shall mail a copy of any process to the LLC: 2117 Buffalo Rd., #411, Rochester, NY 14624. Purpose: Any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] SEYREK SEALERS, LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 5/16/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 750 Lee Rd., Rochester, NY 14606. General Purposes.

[ NOTICE ] Takis & Ath LLC (LLC) filed Arts. of Org. with NY Secy. of State (SS) on 8/6/2012. LLC’s office is in Monroe Co. SS is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS shall mail a copy of any process to LLC’s principal business location at 42 E. Main St., Webster, NY 14580. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Techne Web Services, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 6/14/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon which process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 71 Chardonnay Drive, Fairport, NY 14450. Purpose of LLC: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] The Sign Maker LLC located in Monroe County, Filed Arts. of Org. on 07/02/12 for the purpose of making signs. NY Sec’y of State has been designated as agent for the LLC upon whom process against it may be served and a copy of any process shall be mailed to 194 Colonial Rd., Rochester, NY 14609 [ NOTICE ] TRI CAPITAL SOLUTIONS, LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 6/27/12. Office in Monroe Co. SSNY desig. agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to PO Box 26248, Rochester, NY 14626. Purpose: Any lawful purpose. Principal business location: 10230 South Street Rd., Leroy, NY 14482. [ NOTICE ] Universal Property Solutions, LLC (LLC) filed Arts. of Org. with NY Secy. of State (SS) on 8/10/2012. LLC’s office is in Monroe Co. SS is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS shall mail a copy of any process to LLC’s principal business location at 518 Plank Rd., Webster, NY 14580. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] VAN-GO REAL ESTATE SERVICES, LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 7/9/12. Office in Monroe Co. SSNY desig. agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 212 Valley

Rd., Rochester, NY 14618, which is also the principal business location. Purpose: Any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] WG HOMES LLC (LLC) filed Arts. of Org. with NY Secy. of State (SS) on 7/18/12. LLC’s office is in Monroe Co. SS is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS shall mail a copy of any process to LLC’s principal business location at 200 Weymouth Drive, Rochester, NY 14625. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] 1994 Jaguar XJ12 vin #SAJMM1340RC678934, (John Gantin) will be sold at auction on Thursday Sept. 3rd at 10:00 am @ Silver Star Auto, 941 Ridge Rd. Webster NY [ NOTICE ] MOLAIRE CONSULTING LLC. Art. Org. filed with Sec’y of State of NY (SSNY) 6/28/2012. Office Location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 16 Cardogan Square, Rochester, NY 14625. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] Fairport Asset Management REO, LLC filed Application for Authority with the New York Department of State on July 2, 2012. Its office is located in Monroe County. Secretary of State has been designated as agent of the Company upon whom process against it may be served and a copy of any process shall be mailed to 230 CrossKeys Office Park, Fairport, New York 14450. The purpose of the Company is any lawful business. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] Name: ONE SIMON 4 TO GO LLC. Arts. Of Org. filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 08/02/2012. Office Location: Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to: C/O ONE SIMON 4 TO GO LLC, 111 Parce Avenue, Suite 2, Fairport, New York 14450. Purpose: Any Lawful Purpose.

[ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF 250 PIXLEY ROAD LLC ] The name of the Limited Liability Company is 250 PIXLEY ROAD LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the New York Secretary of State on 8/1/2012. The office of the LLC is in Monroe County. The New York Secretary of State is designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. The Secretary of State shall mail a copy of such process to 18 Dolman Dr., Rochester, NY 14624. The LLC is organized to engage in any lawful activity for which an LLC may be formed under NY LLC Law. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF BLU BAR & GRILL LLC ] The name of the Limited Liability Company is BLU Bar & Grill LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the New York Secretary of State on 8/3/2012. The office of the LLC is in Monroe County. The New York Secretary of State is designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. The Secretary of State shall mail a copy of such process to 18 Dolman Dr., Rochester, NY 14624. The LLC is organized to engage in any lawful activity for which an LLC may be formed under NY LLC Law. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY ] Notice of formation of Pro-Prospecting LLC. Art. of Org. filed by Sec. of State of NY (SSNY) on 8/2/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. NYSS shall mail process to: PO Box 321, North Chili, NY 14514. Purpose: Any lawful act or activity. [ NOTICE OF SALE ] Index No. 2010-11620 SUPREME COURT STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF MONROE ESL Federal Credit Union, Plaintiff Daniel W. Taylor, New York State Commissioner of Taxation, ESL Federal Credit Union, HSBC Bank Nevada, N.A..; “Niva”,Defendants. Pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale dated October 14, 2011 and entered herein, I, the undersigned, the Referee in said Judgment named, will sell at public auction in


Legal Ads the front vestibule of the Monroe County Office Building, 39 West Main Street, Rochester, New York, County of Monroe, on August 30, 2012 at 10:00 a.m., on that day, the premises directed by said Judgment to be sold and therein described as follows: ALL THAT TRACT OR PARCEL OF LAND, situate in the Town of Greece, County of Monroe, State of New York, being a part of Great Lot Fourteen (14) bounded and described as follows: Beginning at a point in the center line of Long Pond Road at a distance of one thousand five hundred forty-two and thirtyfour hundredths feet (1,542.34) southerly from the center line of English Road; thence (1) easterly at an angle, in the southeast quadrant of eightynine degrees, fifty-four minutes ten seconds (89º 54’ 10”) a distance of four hundred sixteen and sixty hundredths feet (416.60) to a point; thence (2) southerly at an angle in the southwest quadrant of ninety degrees five minutes and fifty seconds (90º 05’ 50”) a distance of ninety feet (90.00) to a point; thence (3) westerly at an angle in the northwest quadrant of eighty-nine degrees fifty-four minutes ten seconds (89º 54’ 10” a distance of four hundred sixteen and sixty hundredths feet (416.60) to a point; thence (4) northerly at an angle in the northeast quadrant of ninety degrees five minutes and fifty seconds (90º 05’ 50”) along the center line of Long Pond Road, a distance of ninety feet (90) to the point of beginning. Said premises is also known as Lot 1 of the Wolpert Subdivision as the same is shown on a map filed in the Monroe County Clerk’s Office in Liber 252 of Maps, Page 98; Tax Account No. 059.03-2-50.2; Property Address: 942 Long Pond Road, Town of Greece, New York Said premises are sold subject to any state of facts an accurate survey may show, zoning restrictions and any amendments thereto, covenants, restrictions, agreements, reservations, and easements of record and prior liens, if any, municipal departmental violations, and such other provisions as may be set forth in the Complaint and Judgment filed in this

action. Judgment amount: $57,936.60 plus, but not limited to, costs, disbursements, attorney fees and additional allowance, if any, all with legal interest. DATED: July 2012 Leonard Rosner, Esq., Referee LACY KATZEN LLP Attorneys for Plaintiff 130 East Main Street Rochester, New York 14604 Telephone: (585) 3245767 [ NOTICE OF SALE ] Index No. 201111927 SUPREME COURT STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF MONROE ESL Federal Credit Union, Plaintiff, Sandra Jean Bettis; Terrence J. Amann; Discover Bank Defendants. Pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale dated July 23, 2012 and entered herein, I, the undersigned, the Referee in said Judgment named, will sell at public auction in the front vestibule of the Monroe County Office Building, 39 West Main Street, Rochester, New York, County of Monroe, on September 5, 2012 at 10:00 a.m., on that day, the premises directed by said Judgment to be sold and therein described as follows: ALL THAT TRACT OR PARCEL OF LAND, situate in the Town of Chili, County of Monroe and State of New York, known as 3646 Chili Avenue, Rochester, NY 14624, Tax Account No. 145.18-3-34, described in Deed recorded in Liber 8084 of Deeds, page 426; lot size 107 x 175. Said premises are sold subject to any state of facts an accurate survey may show, zoning restrictions and any amendments thereto, covenants, restrictions, agreements, reservations, and easements of record and prior liens, if any, municipal departmental violations, and such other provisions as may be set forth in the Complaint and Judgment filed in this action. Judgment amount: $111,405.91 plus, but not limited to, costs, disbursements, attorney fees and additional allowance, if any, all with legal interest. DATED: August 2012 Joseph G. Fritsch, Jr., Esq., Referee LACY KATZEN LLP Attorneys for Plaintiff 130 East Main Street Rochester, New York 14604 Telephone: (585) 324-5767

[ READING ELECTRIC RENEWABLES, LLC ] Notice of filing of Application for Authority of limited liability company (LLC). Name of foreign LLC is Reading Electric Renewables, LLC. The Application for Authority was filed with the Sec. of State of New York (SSNY) on 7/27/12. Jurisdiction: Pennsylvania. Formed: 9/17/09. County: Monroe. SSNY is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to: James D. Kurtz, 4700 Pottsville Pike, Reading, PA 19605. The address of the office required to be maintained in Pennsylvania is its registered agent: James D. Kurtz, 4700 Pottsville Pike, Reading, PA 19605. The name and address of the authorized officer in Pennsylvania where the Articles of Organization are filed is: Secretary of State of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, Department of State, Corporation Bureau, 401 North Street, Room 206, PO Box 8722, Harrisburg, PA 17105. Purpose: any and all lawful activities. [ SUMMONS AND NOTICE ] Index No. 201016080 STATE OF NEW YORK SUPREME COURT MONROE COUNTY AMERICAN TAX FUNDING, LLC, Plaintiff, vs. K M GEORGE; LAND TRUST NUMBER 1151298 U/D/T DATED DECEMBER 21, 1998, D.T. EARLY, TRUSTEE; KIM MARIE COCO, EXECUTRIX OF THE ESTATE OF JOSEPH J. COCO A/K/ A JOSEPH COCO; THE BANK OF NEW YORK, AS TRUSTEE UNDER THE POOLING AND SERVICING AGREEMENT DATED AS OF MAY 31, 1996 SERIES 1996B; DISCOVER BANK; METRO PORTFOLIOS, INC.; NEW YORK STATE DEPARTMENT OF TAXATION AND FINANCE; COUNTY OF MONROE and “JOHN DOE #1” THROUGH “JOHN DOE #100”, Defendants. TO THE ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANTS: YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED to answer the Complaint in the above-entitled foreclosure action, and to serve a copy of your answer on the plaintiff’s attorney within thirty (30) days

after the service of this Summons, exclusive of the day of service or within thirty (30) days after completion of service where service is made in any other manner than by personal service within the State. The United States of America, if designated as a defendant in this action, may answer or appear within sixty (60) days of service hereof. In case of your failure to appear or answer, judgment will be taken against you by default for the relief demanded in the Complaint. Monroe County is designated as the place of trial. The basis of venue is the location of the subject premises. Dated: June 29, 2012 TO THE ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANTS: The foregoing summons is served upon you by publication, pursuant to an Order of Honorable Richard A. Dollinger, a Justice of the Supreme Court, dated July 25, 2012, and filed with supporting papers in the Monroe County Clerk’s Office. This is an action to foreclose certain tax liens (the “Tax Lien”) covering the property known as 115 Lydia Street, City of Rochester, New York and identified as Tax Account No. 047.62-1-49.004 (the “Premises”). The relief sought is the sale of the Premises at public auction in satisfaction of the tax lien. In case of your failure to appear, judgment may be taken against you in the sum of $5,958.25, together with interest, costs, disbursements and attorney’s fees of this action, and directing the public sale of the Premises. Anthony J. Iacchetta PHILLIPS LYTLE LLP Office and Post Office Address 1400 First Federal Plaza Rochester, New York 14614 Tel. No. (585) 238-2000

Fun

[ LAST WEEK’S SOLUTION ON PAGE 32 ]

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40 City august 22-28, 2012

August 22-28, 2012 - CITY Newspaper  

Cover: Hip-hop in Rochester: turn the beat around | News: Iffy results for incentive pay | Dining Review: Zeppa Bistro | Theater: 2012 Shaw...

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