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CITY CITY CITY CITY CITY CITY SALES HELP WANTED We’re seeking one outstanding sales professional to help us grow more! Media / newspaper / advertising sales experience a must. Telemarketing, classified and online sales experience a definite plus. Salary plus commission plus benefits.

SEND RESUME TO: Betsy Matthews, CITY Newspaper, 250 N. Goodman St., Rochester, NY 14607 OR EMAIL: bmatthews @rochester-citynews.com OR CALL: 585-244-3329 ext. 27 2 CITY

AUGUST 21-27, 2013


AUDIO

Feedback We welcome your comments. Send them to themail@rochester-citynews. com, or post them on our website, rochestercitynewspaper.com, our Facebook page, or our Twitter feed, @ roccitynews. For our print edition, we select comments from all three sources; those of fewer than 350 words have a greater chance of being published, and we do edit selections for publication in print. We don’t publish comments sent to other media.

Detroit and us

Mary Anna Towler correctly equates Detroit’s bankruptcy with Rochester’s plight (“Lessons from Detroit,” Urban Journal). She’s right when she writes, “the warning signs are there.” The main reasons are stifling regulations and high taxes. I was in the metal distribution business for 42 years. I sold to and bought from profitable businesses such as Graflex, Taylor Instrument, Ritter, Bernzomatic, and Hickock in the Rochester area. I valued their business. They now reside on the Boulevard of Broken Business. I agree with the proposal of tax exemptions for start-up businesses in certain areas. But why stop there? A tax break should be given to all businesses in the Rochester area. And a 2 percent across-theboard tax cut should be given to all individual taxpayers. This would be an example of less is more. SAM PALERMO

This comparison is ridiculous. Rochester has one of the lowest unemployment rates in the country. The region’s population has grown by over 100,000 in the last 20 years, and we’ve gained over 100,000 jobs since the beginning of Kodak’s decline. The inner city has serious problems, but you cannot even come close to how bad it is in Detroit. If this was Detroit, the mansions on East Ave (where I live) would be vacant wrecks. Kodak managed its decline by retraining and financially supporting many of its laid-off workers. Though they brutally bungled their future through shortsightedness, they did handle the downsizing well. And this changed our economy for the better.

SOUND

SOLUTIONS We have always been a hightech city, not a rust-belt city; this is an important difference from other cities like Detroit and Cleveland. As for B&L, we’re losing a company that has been badly mismanaged over the last 20 years, but most of the jobs are staying here. From a history perspective it’s sad, but economically? Not so much. MARTIN EDIC

Plastics and Ontario

Now we can add plastics to pharmaceuticals, invasive species, phosphorous, sewage, manmade toxins, and Climate Change to the challenges of the Great Lakes (“Plastics Plague Ontario, Too,” News). But that’s probably not enough, there will be some who’ll want to add fracking waste to wastewater treatment plants that empty into our Great Lakes. Hard to believe we could screw up the largest fresh water system in the world so quickly. FRANK J. REGAN

Most of the water in Lake Ontario has passed through all of the other Great Lakes - Ontario is at the end of the chain. It can’t be the case that all pollutants now in Lake Ontario have entered the lake from it’s minor tributaries and watershed. If Lake Erie has the highest concentration of microplastics, they should look at the content of microplastics in the Niagara River. STAN

Testing the tests

Warning to all parents: Common Core is an untested curriculum being driven by the Obama education department into all states (“Rochester Students Fare Poorly on New State Tests,” News). The reason students did not do well and teachers are rebelling is simple: this new standard has been poorly developed; it focuses way too much time on testing and data gathering. One of the basics is to frustrate students with material they cannot figure out on their own. Kindergarteners are being asked to develop educational concepts they are not ready (mature enough) to handle. The state and federal government are mandating both the curriculum and classroom techniques under threat of firing

teachers if they object or attempt to inform parents what is being required. The Core Curriculum is just another way this administration is trying to overwhelm us and take control of (in this case) what our children are learning. Please take the time to understand what Common Core is and how it is affecting your children. You can sign a petition to stop this insanity at www. fixnyschools.com. BILL BROWN

More of a concern than test scores should be the “new curriculum” that is being introduced (“The Test Score Rage: Rhetoric Vs. Reform,” Urban Journal). It is written, developed, and implemented by people who are young, idealistic go-getters with PhDs, but who have little or no public school classroom experience. What they do have are hefty salaries, funded by College Board, Pearson, ETS, and other educational consulting and testing companies in an incestuous relationship with the Departments of Education. In 2011, New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman launched an investigation against Pearson to determine if Pearson had acted improperly to influence New York state education officials. The chief honcho of Common Core, David Coleman, now works for College Board. When students do poorly on standardized tests, there may be rage, but there is also money to be made by selling curriculum, test prep materials, enrichment materials, remedial materials, teacher training seminars... and the companies like College Board, Pearson, ETS are there to do just that. The problem is that selling materials and profiting by also providing and then grading the tests seems like a conflict of interest. To paraphrase Hamlet: something’s rotten in New York education. City Newspaper has long advocated for improving public education in Rochester. However, rather than focusing on distractions like test scores and charter schools, take the mythological advice from Watergate’s Deep Throat: Follow the money. SOUTH OF THE THRUWAY

News. Music. Life. Greater Rochester’s Alternative Newsweekly August 21-27, 2013 Vol 42 No 50 250 North Goodman Street Rochester, New York 14607-1199 themail@rochester-citynews.com phone (585) 244-3329 fax (585) 244-1126 rochestercitynewspaper.com Publishers: William and Mary Anna Towler Editor: Mary Anna Towler Asst. to the publishers: Matt Walsh Editorial department themail@rochester-citynews.com Features editor: Eric Rezsnyak News editor: Christine Carrie Fien Staff writers: Tim Louis Macaluso, Jeremy Moule Music editor: Willie Clark Music writer: Frank De Blase Calendar editor: Rebecca Rafferty Contributing writers: Paloma Capanna, Casey Carlsen, Roman Divezur, George Grella, Susie Hume, Andy Klingenberger, Dave LaBarge, Kathy Laluk, Michael Lasser, Adam Lubitow, Ron Netsky, Dayna Papaleo, Suzan Pero, Rebecca Rafferty, Deb Schleede, David Yockel Jr.

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Art department artdept@rochester-citynews.com Art director/production manager: Matt DeTurck Designers: Aubrey Berardini, Mark Chamberlin Photographers: Mark Chamberlin, Frank De Blase, Michael Hanlon Photo intern: Matt Burkhartt Advertising department ads@rochester-citynews.com Advertising sales manager: Betsy Matthews Account executives: Nancy Burkhardt, Tom Decker, William Towler Classified sales representatives: Christine Kubarycz, Tracey Mykins Operations/Circulation kstathis@rochester-citynews.com Circulation manager: Katherine Stathis Distribution: Andy DiCiaccio, David Riccioni, Northstar Delivery, Wolfe News City Newspaper is available free of charge. Additional copies of the current issue may be purchased for $1, payable in advance at the City Newspaper office. City Newspaper may be distributed only by authorized distributors. No person may, without prior written permission of City Newspaper, take more than one copy of each weekly issue. City (ISSN 1551-3262) is published weekly by WMT Publications, Inc. Periodical postage paid at Rochester, NY (USPS 022-138). Send address changes to City, 250 North Goodman Street, Rochester, NY 14607. City is a member of the Association of Alternative Newsweeklies and the New York Press Association. Subscriptions: $35.00 ($30.00 for senior citizens) for one year. Add $10 yearly for out-of-state subscriptions: add $30 yearly for foreign subscriptions. Due to the initial high cost of establishing new subscriptions, refunds for fewer than ten months cannot be issued. Copyright by WMT Publications Inc., 2013 - all rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, photocopying, recording or by any information storage retrieval system without permission of the copyright owner.

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CITY 3


[ NEWS FROM THE WEEK PAST ]

Bonuses raise questions

A proposed $1.9 million payout bonus to Eastman Kodak CEO Antonio Perez and more than $1 million in bonuses for top executives has caught the attention of the US Justice Department. Kodak is nearing the end of its Chapter 11 bankruptcy ordeal and the US Bankruptcy Court received a lengthy document challenging the payouts. The company is facing numerous last-minute objections to its reorganization.

King pushes for state takeover

New York State Education Commissioner John King is pushing for a bill that would allow the Board of Regents to take control of school districts with a history of low student achievement or financial problems. King didn’t name the districts that he’s considering for such a dramatic step, but the comment caused many to question whether he’s referring to Rochester.

Firm lowers Monroe’s credit rating

Moody’s Investors Service lowered Monroe County’s bond rating, which could mean higher borrowing

costs. The company said that the new rating “reflects a significant weakening in the county’s financial position, with a structurally imbalanced operating budget dependent on nonrecurring revenues and reliance on cash flow borrowing to maintain operations.” The county’s chief financial officer said he is disappointed in Moody’s actions.

News ENVIRONMENT | BY JEREMY MOULE

More good news for sturgeon

Valeant denies layoffs

Senator Chuck Schumer said that Valeant Pharmaceuticals, the new parent company of Bausch + Lomb, plans no additional layoffs for B+L’s local operations. Schumer said that Valeant CEO Michael Pearson has also committed to adding 25 to 50 new research and development jobs.

Schumer takes on tankers

Senator Chuck Schumer wants energy companies to stop using a specific type of tanker car, known as DOT-111, to ship crude oil and ethanol by rail. Schumer said he’s asked the Federal Railway Administration to develop requirements for train and oil companies to upgrade or replace the cars. A design flaw often causes the cars to tear apart if they derail, Schumer said.

Louis Divincenti, a veterinarian with University of Rochester and Seneca Park Zoo, weighs a young lake sturgeon from a zoo exhibit. PHOTO BY MATT BURKHARTT

WANT TO WRITE

FOR CITY? CITY is looking for freelance writers to cover a wide variety of topics.

Approximately 10 years ago, federal, state, and university scientists took a gamble and reintroduced lake sturgeon into the Genesee River. They believed that the river’s water quality and pollution levels had improved enough that the fish could survive, grow, and ultimately reproduce. And so far, they’ve been right. The fish are growing at good rates, fueled in part by diets of high-fat fly larvae and zebra mussels from the river bottom, says Jeff Wyatt, a University of Rochester professor and chief veterinarian for the Seneca Park Zoo. “It’s all good news: that’s the bottom line,” Wyatt says. Wyatt and other researchers are also taking blood samples from the fish and testing them for heavy metals, pesticides, and PCBs. They’re comparing them to samples from sturgeon in the unpolluted Oswegatchie River in the northern part of the state. And the early results of that work are positive. The testing shows that

Previous writing experience is appreciated, but not required. We're looking for people who can write interesting, factually accurate copy and nail deadlines.

If interested, send a resume, writing samples, and a cover letter detailing the kinds of articles you'd like to write to: eric@rochester-citynews.com • NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE 5♣

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AUGUST 21-27, 2013

cadmium and mercury blood levels in the local sturgeon match the levels found in the Oswegatchie fish, Wyatt says. Researchers are awaiting results of blood tests for approximately 200 other substances, he says. The fish will be healthier if they aren’t exposed to the heavy metals or to the other substances the researchers are testing for. But the results also show that the lake and river are healthier, too. The Genesee River and the Rochester Embayment – a recessed area of the lake between Parma and Webster – are known to have large amounts of contaminated sediment. But the tests on the bottom-dwelling sturgeon may actually show that new sediment is encapsulating the old, contaminated sediment, which is a positive development, Wyatt says.

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It’s unclear, however, whether the Senecas are looking exclusively at Henrietta to build a casino. A spokesperson for the Seneca Nation says that other Rochester sites might be in play. She also says that she doesn’t know why the Seneca Nation set its sights on Henrietta, though the Thruway exit may be a factor.

DEVELOPMENT | BY JEREMY MOULE AND TIM LOUIS MACALUSO

EDUCATION | BY TIM LOUIS MACALUSO

Senecas eyes Rochester for a casino Is the Seneca Nation of Indians ready to roll the dice on Henrietta? Late Tuesday morning, the Seneca Nation sent out a press release saying that it had retained a Flaum Management subsidiary to “organize and coordinate gaming and hospitality development in the Town of Henrietta.” The announcement caught some Henrietta officials by surprise. Town Board member Bill Mulligan says he knew something was coming, but doesn’t have details on what the Senecas are pursuing. He says he’ll keep an open mind about a potential casino proposal, just as he would any application to the town. Jack Moore, a Town Board member who’s challenging incumbent Supervisor Michael Yudelson in a Republican primary, also says he doesn’t know the details. He says he’s “in the middle of the road” until he gets specifics, such as a proposed location and plan for a casino. Yudelson could not be immediately reached. It’s unclear, however, whether the Senecas are looking exclusively at Henrietta. Susan Asquith of Travers Collins, the Buffalo-based public relations firm working with the Seneca Nation, says she doesn’t know if Henrietta is the only location in

the Rochester area under consideration. She also says that she doesn’t know why the Seneca Nation set its sights on Henrietta, though the FILE PHOTO Thruway exit may be a factor. And there are locations in Henrietta that have been mentioned as possible casino sites. Among them: vacant land on East Henrietta Road north of I-390, several hundred acres of former Kodak land near East River Road owned by developer Dutch Summers, the Flaum-owned plaza at South Winton and Brighton-Henrietta Town Line roads, and a Wilmorite-owned site at Hylan Drive and Calkins Road. Asquith says that while the Senecas are looking at a casino, there are no specific plans for a broader development. Meaning it’s unclear if a proposed casino project would include a hotel and restaurants.

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Music interlude Rochester schools Superintendent Bolgen Vargas promised city students and parents that he would increase the district’s offerings in arts, music, and sports. How well that is working depends on who you ask. | District officials say that the upcoming school year’s programs in arts and music in particular will be more widely and evenly distributed to all schools. But some music teachers say that leaves them with hardly enough time to teach. | For example, kindergarteners through fourth graders had 60 minutes of instruction per week last year in some schools. But in the fall they’ll have roughly 35 minutes. That includes transition time — the time it takes students to get from one class to the next. | And some music teachers split their schedule with art teachers with 10 weeks on and 10 weeks off. Music teachers say that isn’t enough time to prepare for many of the music events that students like to participate in like band or choir. | At a school board meeting earlier this week, Vargas vowed to find a solution after hearing that ensembles that involve public performances would be limited as a result of the new schedule.

Cost of War The following people have been killed in the City of Rochester in recent weeks: -- Willie Little, 59, Rochester

ROCHESTER TOTALS —

Rochester Police Department

SOURCE:

AFGHANISTAN TOTALS —

2,263 US servicemen and servicewomen and 1,100 Coalition servicemen and servicewomen have been killed in Afghanistan from the beginning of the war and occupation to August 19. Statistics for Afghan civilian casualties are not available. American casualties from August 6 to August 11: -- Staff Sgt. Octavio Herrera, 26, Caldwell, Idaho -- Sgt. Jamar A. Hicks, 22, Little Rock, Ark. -- Spc. Keith E. Grace Jr., 26, Baytown, Texas iraqbodycount. org, icasualties.org, Department of Defense

SOURCES:

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MAYOR PAGE 11 CITY COUNCIL

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BY CHRISTINE CARRIE FIEN

ONE CITY, TWO VISIONS WARREN vs. RICHARDS The Lovely Warren who walked to the front of the room in early May to ask her fellow Democrats to support her bid for mayor is not the same Lovely Warren who’s on the campaign trail today. There has been an observable transformation. Those first rough, nervous steps have been replaced by confident strides. Candidate Warren says she knows what the City of Rochester needs, and that she’s in the singular position to deliver it. Warren’s opponent, incumbent Mayor Tom Richards, is a steady hand. His deliberate demeanor and formidable intellect immediately put you at ease. To his supporters, his message isn’t flashy, but there’s a reassuring sense that the city is in good hands and that everything is going to be OK. Warren and Richards will face off in a September 10 Democratic primary election. Richards, the party’s endorsed candidate, also has the endorsements of the Independence and Working Families parties, so he goes on to the November

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general election even if he loses the primary. Warren has no other endorsements. Also in the general election will be mayoral hopeful Alex White, who’s running on the Green Party line. Warren surprised a lot of people when she announced her bid. This could be the last election for the 70-year-old Richards, so Warren, who is president of City Council, might’ve had an easier race if she waited four years. But, she says, Rochester can’t wait that long; the needs are too great. The gap between the city’s haves and its havenothings grows every day, she says. Warren speaks of two Rochesters, one with exciting projects like College Town on Mount Hope and the 19th Ward’s Brooks Landing. And then, she says, there’s the other Rochester, which is seventh in the nation for child poverty and first in the state for incarcerating young AfricanAmerican males. “Technically, we have a third-world country right here in our city,” Warren says. “This race is not about me, and it’s not

about Tom. This race, for me, is about our community. I believe that at this point in our city, we need a mayor who can lift all tides. Who can function in both worlds. Who has the skills and the background and the education to manage the city and to work with companies and businesses. But we also need a mayor who understands what’s happening in that other city, and who can relate to those people and uplift them.” Warren’s actions to improve the predicament of residents of that other Rochester include insisting that affordable housing be part of College Town, making sure the Midtown developer lives up to promises regarding the employment of women and minorities on the project, reaching out to minority residents to help diversify the Rochester Police Department, and founding Operation Transformation, a program that helps African-American males who have dropped out of school by providing GED preparation and career training. Richards is lower key and cautious about making sweeping statements, even if it

would be politically advantageous, because, he says, quick fixes are an illusion. The reality, though lacking sex appeal, is that no one person can turn around the failing city school district or stop gang shootings. The city faces a long road of incremental improvement, Richards says, through hard work, community commitment, forward thinking, and investment. “Everybody talks about all those things that they want to do, as do I, but the assumption is that we’re going to be able to do it,” he says. “And I know it’s boring and people don’t want to start there, but [finances] is what will do you in. And so that problem has to be solved.” “I think we have to start from the proposition that Lovely and I come from different circumstances, and I don’t deny that,” Richards says. “I don’t think it’s true that she’s in a better position to reach both populations. In fact, I think what you will see in this campaign is I will have a much broader base of support than she does, across the spectrum. I don’t deny there is a


difference there, but I don’t feel that has kept me from doing what I need to do. What I don’t do and won’t do is pander, and sometimes people don’t like that. People have to make a judgment about who brings to this particular point in time in Rochester the ability to do the most for the city.” People often point out that Rochester is faring better financially than other upstate cities, and Richards’ actions have certainly played a key role. Richards and the city’s four employee unions agreed to a self-funded health insurance program that is expected to save the city up to $13.4 million over three years. He offered a one-time early retirement incentive that reportedly saved the city millions and avoided layoffs, and adjusted the Lovely Warren. FILE PHOTO borrowing for capital projects to take advantage of low interest rates, which schools” program that re-imagines schools should save the city millions of dollars. as neighborhood centers. Richards has also significantly improved Warren’s critics point out that the City Hall’s relationship with the school mayor runs the city, not the school district, district, even accompanying district officials and that more charters are coming and on outings to round up truant students. will keep coming to Rochester, with And his leadership was critical to achieving or without the city’s help. Rochester unprecedented diversity in the police and schools Superintendent Bolgen Vargas is fire departments. already planning to substantially expand Richards points to his endorsements by instructional time in the school district, the Working Families Party and the Empire and the district has free, universal preState Pride Agenda as examples of his kindergarten offered at 56 locations expansive base. Extensive interviews with both candidates around the city. And the worry about charters is that they recently covered some of the most pressing issues facing the City of Rochester, including cherry-pick students while simultaneously draining resources from the city school the state of the city school district, the city’s district, which critics say could potentially financial stability, economic development, lead to a school system that serves only and public safety. What follows is an edited the most disadvantaged, most challenged version of those discussions. students, without the means to do so.

Warren on education

Warren has made schools, specifically the dismal state of the Rochester school district, the cornerstone of her campaign. She rolled out a comprehensive education plan that includes bringing more highquality charter schools to Rochester, expanding access to high-quality early education, and launching a “beacon

In Warren’s words: I want charters to complement the system, and not take it over. I see charter schools as being helpers. It is my hope that we protect children, and not a system. What we’re doing by not educating our children is we’re feeding the criminal justice system. That’s a heartbreaker. And we’ve accepted that as the norm. How many years have we been trying to fix a broken system? Things haven’t gotten better. They’ve gotten worse. And to be honest

Tom Richards. FILE PHOTO

with you, like in anything, the best way to fix something is to introduce some competition. Let me be clear: some charters are bad. But the difference is, if you don’t get it right, you’re able to shut them down. Every four to five years, they have to re-certify. So it’s OK for us to say, “Middle-class families, you can put your house up for sale and move to the suburbs. And you can give your child a quality education. But poor families who can’t afford to that? You have to function and stay in this broken system and make it work.” That’s what we’re telling them. Income should not decide whether your child gets a quality education or not. And by protecting a system and saying, “Oh, we’re not going to introduce charter schools because it’s going to take out the good children…,” well, what do you say to middle-class families who are putting their houses for sale? “Oh, you can’t leave. If you put up your house for sale and move your child to the suburbs to a better school system, it leaves all the other poor children behind?”

Richards on education

Richards has the unenviable task of, if not defending, at least speaking up for the

Rochester school district. Charters are a reality, Richards says, and he’s not opposed to them. But the Rochester school district will continue to serve thousands of students into the foreseeable future, he says, and the city can’t just forget about it. Richards supports Superintendent Vargas’s efforts to focus on basics like attendance and making sure that students are reading at grade level. He also supports Vargas’s plan to extend the school day, and says that the city’s recreation centers and libraries can be aligned with the extended-day model. The counter arguments here almost write themselves. How can Richards argue for stability, critics ask, in a system that has performed so poorly for so long? A graduation rate consistently below 50 percent and a college readiness rate around 5 percent for black males calls for a revolution, they say, not stability. And the entire community is understandably frustrated. Rochester gives more money to its school district than Buffalo, which is a larger city with a larger school district, and it spends more than many other cities in New York to educate each child. Yet Rochester’s results are consistently among the worst in the state. But the city also has one of the highest child poverty rates in the country. In Richards’ words: We’re not going

to succeed if we keep changing superintendents every two years, change the program every two years, moving these kids around all the time. We’ve got to get some stability in the system, and as mayor of the city, I didn’t pick the superintendent, but I think it’s my job to, as best I can, support that system. That doesn’t mean I agree with everybody. This is a big, complicated system. You don’t bail out on them as soon as you have a disagreement. What I’ve tried to do is pick those things that as mayor and as the city, we can do to influence the outcome. continues on page 8

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CITY 7


TWO VISIONS continues from page 7

Tom Richards. STILLS BY MATT DETURCK

We’ve helped to get the facilities modernization [a construction project to update the district’s school buildings] going. We’re in the process of changing a lot of the ways the rec centers operate in order to align them with that. We need to get people into universal pre-k. We can help with that. We need to extend the school day. That doesn’t mean twice as much time sitting in your seat. It means putting back into the system more academic time but also the rest of the things that got squeezed out of the system. It’s a tragedy what’s happened there. The school day got shorter and shorter for various reasons. And requirements got bigger and bigger because [state officials are dissatisfied with the performance of the school districts.] We can fix that, and I can help them fix that.

Warren on jobs and economic development

The centerpiece of Warren’s economic and community development plan is to get permission from the state to create a Rochester-based Industrial Development Agency. For too long, city residents have watched their money given away in the form of incentives to developers, Warren says, while being all but shut out of the jobs that the projects create. Those incentives are currently awarded — some would say too freely — by COMIDA, which requires people seeking incentives to exclusively use local labor on construction jobs, though applicants can get a waiver. The problem, Warren says, is that COMIDA defines local labor as workers from the ninecounty region. A Rochester IDA would tie incentives to the employment of Rochester residents. For a developer to receive incentives, Warren says, an established percentage of workers would have to live in the city.

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Warren’s plan also calls for the implementation of a Rochester Opportunity Agenda. The agenda would “build a coordinated, citywide work force system aimed at both providing city residents with the skills they need for gainful employment, and employers with a pool of well-qualified and motivated employees,” the plan says. Other components of the plan include supporting minority and women-owned businesses, and encouraging small business and entrepreneurship. In Warren’s words: I believe that the focus has been on trying to attract large companies instead of helping small companies grow here. One of the things in my economic development is rapid financing. You have these small businesses that want to grow, and just because of their inability to finance that new development, are holding back. So we could assist them. We have businesses that want to build. We may not get a company that comes in and gives us 500 jobs. But you may have 50 companies that give 10. You accomplish the same thing. We need to say, “We’re here to support you, and we’re willing to train the people,” working with MCC to train people to fill that skill-set void that we have. Community colleges across the country are doing something called stacking, where you don’t necessarily have to do an associate’s program. But you can get into a skilled trade or develop some skills — a certificate program where you stack the certificates until you get an associate’s degree. Say, in optics: you need certain types of skills to be employed in that. And in Rochester, optics is a really big thing. We could train people to go into that field, put them into some businesses, and then help those businesses grow. If you’re able to give people an opportunity at a good, quality job, you’re able to open up the market for residents to purchase homes and live in the city.

Richards on jobs and economic development

Richards does not support a Rochester IDA. The economics of Rochester are tied to the economics of the region, Richards says, so to focus exclusively inward would doom the city to failure. Richards says he wants to position Rochester as one of the good choices for business and developers, and to encourage people with the wherewithal to invest in the city. His strategy is built around diversity, development and job growth, and opportunities for city residents. College Town, Midtown, the Flats at Brooks Landing, and the numerous housing projects around the city have created hundreds of construction jobs, Richards says, and millions in investment. The workers on those first three projects are largely city residents, Richards says, and at least 20 percent are women and minorities. A lot of people are taking credit for the recently achieved diversity in the police and fire departments. But the truth is, if one person alone could’ve fixed that, the problem would’ve been solved long ago. It took the efforts of Richards, Warren, City Council member Adam McFadden, other members of City Council, and the departments themselves to finally boost minority participation in public safety jobs. Responding to critics who say that the city gives away too much to rich developers, such as the recent sale of Midtown tower to high-profile local developers for $2, Richards says that the decision to award incentives is not based on the personal wealth of individual developers, but on the benefits the projects would bring to the city. And without incentives, he says, many of these projects wouldn’t get done. In Richards’ words: We totally have

forgotten the fact that Midtown has gone

through a bankruptcy, has gone through three owners, was owned by a distresseddebt hedge fund in New York City, was 80 percent vacant. The tower had been closed for five years; was full of asbestos. Now that we’ve cleaned it up, all of a sudden: “We’re in nirvana.” But we’re not. The value of the City of Rochester is not in the dirt. It’s what you do with the dirt. The Midtown tower project is a $54 million project to which we’ve attracted $44 million worth of private money. And even the money the city puts into it is loans that have to be paid back. So what’s important here is not whether you get a dollar or for that matter $500,000 for the dirt. What matters is what you get in terms of development. So you get hundreds of people downtown, you get the downtown area cleaned up and made attractive for others to invest around it and participate in it. That’s what you’re looking for. And it’s the multiplier that counts. If you focus on the dirt, we’re dead. Quite frankly, the dirt isn’t worth anything if you can’t do something with it. And that’s a particularly urban issue, because the cost of development in the city is much more intense than in the suburbs. The premise [of critics] is that something will be done if we don’t do anything; that $54 million will emerge from someplace, they’ll pay all their taxes, and life will be good. Where the hell have you been for the last two decades? It’s not going to happen.

Warren on finances

Everyone is looking at Detroit these days and wondering whether Rochester might someday find itself in a similar situation. Warren says that Detroit’s bankruptcy is the legacy of decades of mismanagement and corruption, and that none of that applies to Rochester, which has an excellent bond rating


Lovely Warren. STILLS BY MATT DETURCK

and a balanced budget. What Rochester can learn from Detroit, she says, is that you can’t put off dealing with your problems. Rochester also can’t rely on the state for assistance to fill its yearly budget gap. Pleas to increase state aid to achieve parity with Syracuse and Buffalo have consistently fallen on deaf ears. Warren says that Rochester needs to think about things differently. It needs to attract new businesses, she says, and she will go across the country to recruit businesses and to promote the city. It needs to work with small businesses to help them grow, she says. And Rochester also needs to create an alternative education system so families stay in the city, Warren says. In Warren’s words: The Number 1 reason

why people leave our city is because of our school district. They’re just not going to pay property taxes and private school tuition. You can’t blame them. The property-tax system is antiquated because we have failed to do what needs to be done for the children in our city in providing alternatives to education. I believe that Rochester is a great city to live in for families, but when you have suburbs that are just as great as the city, people who have the ability to live out there will do that. But overall, it’s a state issue that I think the governor and the legislature need to look at and see how we are really going to finance these cities in the future. But we can’t wait until they figure out what they want to do. I’m going to go after businesses. I’m going to go after trying to stop the skill-set deficiency in our city. I’m going to travel across this country and be very active as the mayor and say, “Come to my city. I’m going to give you the opportunity to grow here.” And do things that ordinarily a mayor would not necessarily do.

Richards on finances

Richards says that there are similarities between Rochester and Detroit in that each city has seen a serious depletion of its financial bedrock. For Detroit, it’s the automobile industry. In Rochester, it’s manufacturing. Richards has taken steps such as spreading out a portion of the city’s pension costs in order to avoid cutting services. That’s important, he says, because before a city crumbles economically, its social and cultural fabric begins to tear. Example: By the time Detroit declared bankruptcy, 40 percent of its streetlights weren’t working. Richards says that settling union contracts as they come up and maintaining a good credit rating so the city can continue to borrow money at low interest rates are important to Rochester’s financial health, and he has done both. Richards says he expects the budget deficit to be smaller in the upcoming fiscal year, thanks to a number of factors including higher sales tax receipts and increased hiring in the fire department to reduce overtime. The selffunded health care program also kicks in, Richards says, which will save millions. But there’s no doubt, he says, that cities can no longer survive using property tax as their main source of revenue. And sooner or later, Richards says, Albany is going to have to face up to that fact. In Richards’ words: First of all, we need to

accept responsibility for managing a certain amount of this ourselves. What we don’t want to do is get in a situation where [Albany] can excuse not doing something with us because we didn’t take care of ourselves. An example is the agreement we made with the unions with respect to health care. And we just financed $34 million between rolling over some debt and taking some new debt in, and we were able to do it for

less than a percent. If we can keep that up, then we have the capacity here to invest in our city. Detroit, when they went bad, was paying about 8 percent on some of this stuff they financed. That’s nuts. A couple of things could help us. One is to bring some balance into the state aid so that the state recognizes its obligation to urban areas through some kind of even per-capita distribution. They do that for school districts now. The same thing could be true in the way in which municipalities like ours are expected to aid schools. We give the school district $119 million. I’m not begrudging that. It’s just the impact that’s the problem, because it takes 60 percent of our real estate property tax, and it’s tough to manage everything else without it. The way in which we provide policing services, fire services, recreation services, library services: you could change the mechanism by which you funded that. Along the way, we’ll have to make value judgments about where we put our money. But I don’t subscribe to the process that it’s simply a matter of “we’re going to cut our way to success.” We’re not. When you make these judgments, you forget that there’s a cost to anything you do. If I don’t replace 20 policemen or I close a firehouse, there’s a cost there. It’s harder to calculate. So when people give these lectures in Albany about what you should do, I’m saying: “Wait a minute. You’re only looking at half the proposition here. I’m not in business to make money. I’m in business to provide services to people.” So that calculus has to get into our conversation at our level, and at the state level as well.

Warren on public safety

Policing is a perpetual issue in urban areas. In Rochester, one of the liveliest discussions

is around the organization of the police department. Many people, including Warren, want the city to expand the current structure from two full sections and a smaller downtown station to something more closely resembling Rochester’s old seven-section police operation. The reorganization was supposed to save money, but the savings are hard to document because the RPD has also expanded its ranks since the reorganization. Critics say the change also hurt the RPD’s relationship with the neighborhoods, literally and symbolically. Many speak of a time when beat officers would stop and play basketball, for example, with neighborhood children. But it can be difficult to separate nostalgia from the official record. Warren says that needs vary in every sector of the city, and customized policing models are needed. You can’t do that, she says, with the current structure. Warren is one of three Council members who voted against the downtown police substation, which opened in July. Some neighborhoods are clamoring for police presence, she says, and are told that the issue must be studied. Yet the downtown station opened without a comprehensive study, she says. Residents of Rochester’s most troubled neighborhoods often say that everyone knows the location of the drug houses, the open-air drug markets, and the corners where dealers hustle. Yet these illegal enterprises continue to thrive. Warren says that the residents of these communities are perceived as powerless and voiceless; therefore their needs aren’t given high priority. In Warren’s words: You take those issues on, as mayor. You say: “Listen, I want law and order in my city. If there’s a drug house or if there are open-air drug markets going on, I’m telling you upfront that we’re going to be continues on page 10

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10 CITY AUGUST 21-27, 2013

aggressive. We’re going to be law-abiding, but we’re going to be aggressive.” Not, “I’m going to bust down your door and knock you upside the head.” But “I’m going to go after the criminals in our city.” You’re going to have some complaints about it, but once you start to deal with the problem legally and efficiently and effectively, the neighborhoods and neighbors start to feel empowered. And they start to want to take back their community. And they start to want to work with you. The way our system works now, because they have to just respond to 911 calls, it’s hard for police to have any down time to walk the beat and say “hi.” Some of our neighborhoods never see a police officer. Some people see police officers all the time; other places never see a police officer until something happens. If you go to more of a quadrant model, you’re still going to be responding to 911 calls, but I think that you’ll be able to get officers into situations where they can have some down time to get out of the car.

Richards on public safety

Richards has resisted calls to add police sections. More sections would be expensive, he says, and technology has reduced the need for actual buildings. Every squad car is essentially a mobile command center. Richards also says that people tend to romanticize the old way of doing things, and that crime in the city was at its highest under the seven-section model. And, he says, police-community relations were worse back then, too. Nevertheless, Richards has agreed to study the organization of the police department because, he says, the issue of how people perceive their relationship with the police is important. Money for the study is included in this year’s budget, though at last check, a company hadn’t yet been hired. A great deal of thought and planning went into the new downtown police substation, Richards says. Fifty-thousand people come downtown each day, he says, and the city must put its resources where the people are.

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And the city shouldn’t rush into a situation that would take tens of millions of dollars to establish and many years and much anguish to dismantle if it didn’t accomplish what it was supposed to accomplish, Richards says. The situation around drug houses and drug sales in the neighborhoods is complex, he says, and partly a consequence of the changes in the drug culture. Ten years ago, dealers were selling heroin on the corner. If you get caught for that, Richards says, you’re going to jail. Today, the people on the corner are selling marijuana, which can be a misdemeanor, depending on the amount. So the consequences and the impact of those arrests are low. In Richards’ words: We have this goofy

system in New York where we’ve pretty much decriminalized marijuana for a lot of good reasons. But if it’s OK to have it, but it’s not OK to sell it, what’s the system? The police are in this impossible situation. The other thing in this issue is the knife edge we have to walk between moving people along and civil liberties. And for that matter, racial profiling. So how do we deal with that problem? It seems to me what we’re trying to do — and there’s a pretty intense effort under way — is to see if we can’t use the tools we have today that are better than they used to be in terms of identifying who the bad guys really are. If we can use our information process to focus more narrowly on the people who are in fact violent or willing to be violent, rather than stop everybody on the corner, we can act in a way that begins to focus on the real source of the problem. But it’s not against the law to stand on the corner. And the same people — I understand why; I’m not being critical — but the same people saying, “We all know where it is,” you ask, “Well, where is it? And are you willing to say so?” “Well, no.” The economics are underneath it. Why are those young men on the corner? They’re not getting rich. They’re doing it because they don’t have other opportunities. Either they don’t have them or they’re not conditioned to take advantage of them. Whatever it is, this seems to them to be the best opportunity.

ONLINE VIDEOS Excerpts of video interviews with Warren and Richards are on our website:

ROCHESTERCITYNEWSPAPER.COM


DEMOCRATIC PRIMARY ELECTION ENDORSEMENTS

BY CITY’S EDITORIAL STAFF

FOR ROCHESTER MAYOR TOM RICHARDS This year’s mayoral election could be a turning point for Rochester. Like many other cities, this one faces serious, escalating problems and shrinking resources. And the candidates for mayor – incumbent Tom Richards, City Council President Lovely Warren, and Green Party candidate Alex White – offer different paths to Rochester’s future. Richards and Warren compete in a Democratic primary on September 10, and the winner of that contest will face White in the November general election. And given the lopsided Democratic registration in the city, the winner of next month’s primary will be a heavy favorite. The two Democrats offer voters a particularly clear choice, not because Richards is an older white man and Warren is a young black woman but because they have a different approach to governing the city. Richards isn’t talking about new directions or major new initiatives. Warren is. Unquestionably, both Richards and Warren have a deep love of the city and a commitment to it. Both have the same goal: a vibrant, financially healthy city in which all residents have attractive, safe neighborhoods, the opportunity for good jobs, and successful schools for their children. The differences in how they would lead the city toward those goals, plus Richards’ experience, knowledge, and pragmatism, lead us to endorse Richards.

Lovely Warren

A City Council member for nearly six years and president for nearly four, Warren is knowledgeable, determined, and confident. As the representative of the northeast Council district, she serves some of the city’s poorest neighborhoods – areas with high unemployment, high crime rates, and tragically low student achievement. She is fiercely passionate about the needs of the residents of those neighborhoods, and about the city’s responsibility to address them. And she has done more than talk about them. On Council, she has pushed for

affordable housing and for employment opportunities for minority city residents, and she personally went to inner-city churches to recruit minority residents for the fire department. During this campaign, she has been both eloquent and charismatic, speaking movingly about the reality that there are two Rochesters: the Rochester of tech startups, trendy restaurants, and safe, thriving neighborhoods, and the Rochester in which tens of thousands of poor people live, with frequent violence, street-corner drug trades, little hope of a job, and dead-end education. We have no doubt that as mayor, Warren would be a forceful advocate for initiatives she believes will improve the lives and the future of all Rochesterians. (Readers can study her recommendations on her website, lovelyformayor.com; read excerpts of an interview with Warren elsewhere in this issue, and see video excerpts on our website.) Warren has proposed some innovative initiatives to reduce unemployment among minority residents, including the use of social impact bonds, which get private investment to help fund expensive social-service initiatives. We’re concerned, though, that Warren is naïve about the cost and feasibility of some of her proposed initiatives, and about the potential effect of some of the others. Many of them would rely on grants, an uncertain and short-term funding source. Warren says the Richards administration has focused too strongly on attracting and building large businesses, that small businesses can be a key to Rochester’s future, and that she could do more to attract and help them. But she seems to underestimate the obstacles to success in small business and in creating new entrepreneurs. She wants to create a Rochester Industrial Development Agency to let the city require that a percentage of publicly funded construction jobs go to minority city residents. But we think Richards is right when he worries that a separate city IDA could lead to increased competition between the city and its suburbs

when what we need is more regional economicdevelopment efforts. Warren wants city government to become heavily involved in education, helping the school district recruit teachers, for instance. She wants city government to recruit charter-school operators, and she wants to provide hiring bonuses to attract excellent new teachers not only at traditional public schools but also at charter schools. This kind of support could further weaken traditional public schools, hurting the Mayor Tom Richards: an experienced, progressive pragmatist. FILE PHOTO neediest, most vulnerable inner-city children. city services such as recreation centers and In the areas of both employment and education, Warren is eloquent when she talks neighborhood libraries, insisting that when about Rochester’s problems. She is less strong cities let financial pressure force them to nibble away at key quality-of-life amenities, they when it comes to having realistic ways to contribute to their own demise. attack them. While government officials in some parts Equally significant, Warren has less of the country blame public employees for experience than Richards in key areas such financial problems, Richards has worked with as finance and management – essential for a employee groups to find ways to reduce labor mayor in a city with Rochester’s challenges. costs rather than threatening them or trying to slash salaries and benefits. Richards has been less adventurous than the two previous mayors (Johnson on the A former corporate executive turned public ferry, Duffy on mayoral control). We have servant and government administrator, seen no big-idea announcements from Richards is knowledgeable; experienced in him. But his knowledge and no-nonsense business, law, and government; realistic; pragmatism have helped build confidence thoughtful, and deeply honorable. And he among developers, and we have seen is a pragmatic government official with a steady, step-at-a-time business investment: strong progressive streak. individual companies moving downtown He has guided the city as it copes with from the suburbs, new restaurants opening a declining tax base, keeping costs under in neighborhoods, new apartments and control while he tries to protect government services and encourage business and residential continues on page 16 development. He has worked hard to preserve

Tom Richards

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 11


DEMOCRATIC PRIMARY ELECTION ENDORSEMENTS

BY CITY’S EDITORIAL STAFF

FOR ROCHESTER SCHOOL BOARD WHITE • CRUZ • LUCAS As unimaginable as it seems, the state of Rochester’s schools is worsening. Only 5 percent of city students in grades 3 through 8 were proficient in English on recent state exams. Academic performance of black and Latino males is the lowest of any major urban district in the US except Detroit’s, according to a report released earlier this year. And only a few of Rochester’s 60 schools are not on the state’s list of failing institutions. Chronic instability, a result of multiple changes in superintendents, senior staff, and direction, has caused confusion among an already vulnerable population. It’s often not until late summer when some students know what programs are available to them and some teachers know where they’ll be teaching. Some parents aren’t even sure about which school their children will attend. Against this all-too-familiar backdrop, three school board incumbents – Cynthia Elliott, Van White, and Jose Cruz – will try to hold on to their seats in the September 10 Democratic primary. Understandably, they have a lot of challengers, some more qualified than others: Candice Lucas, Howard Eagle, Ronald Hall, Tim McCauley, Liz Hallmark, Ernest Flagler, and Donald Hardaway. (The winners of the Democratic primary will face Green Party candidate Lori Thomas and Republican Mia Hodgins in the November general election.) Many of the district’s most entrenched problems existed long before the incumbents took office. And each incumbent speaks about the plight of city families and students with compassion and urgency. The district has many hard-working teachers and students, and they don’t get the attention and credit they deserve. But the overall picture is as dire as it can get. Challengers argue that the incumbents have approved budgets and policies, hired superintendents, and agreed to generous labor agreements nearly absent of accountability. In recent interviews with City, challengers said most of the current board has been ineffectual. And they ask why voters would support the

12 CITY AUGUST 21-27, 2013

status quo. It’s a fair question, and one that we at City asked ourselves. Is it fair to blame the incumbents for all of the district’s ills? No; the district’s problems are complex, and they’re exacerbated by the effects of the extreme poverty in which many Rochester students live. During the last school year, nearly 30 percent of elementary students were absent on Van White. FILE PHOTO any given day. And many teachers have complained for years about the high level of students’ emotional and behavioral problems. But recommending whom voters should send to the board to confront these problems is not made any easier by a board that lacks strong leadership and focus, has a record of infighting, and is frequently at odds with its superintendents. The current board brought in Superintendent Bolgen Vargas to replace Jean-Claude Brizard with a great deal of enthusiasm, but tensions soon developed. Since then, fortunately, board members have taken some steps to improve that relationship. And while they wrestled with Vargas over school closings, they’ve supported his strategy of expanding the school day. In addition, a more constructive relationship with the mayor and City Council has emerged. In the future, however, the work of the school board is going to get a lot tougher. The ground under the district has shifted, and anyone from custodian to board member who doesn’t see this probably shouldn’t be there. Any new board member will quickly discover that Vargas is caught in a whirlpool of statedriven initiatives — guiding a sluggish

Jose Cruz. PHOTO BY MARK CHAMBERLIN

$1.2 billion schools modernization project, introducing a more rigorous statewide curriculum, and implementing controversial teacher evaluations. The next board can only expect more pressure from charter schools and an interventionist state education commissioner, John King, who won’t flinch at removing failing schools from the board’s control. The next board will also face an even more skeptical community of parents, teachers, residents, and civic leaders. For these reasons, City struggled with its endorsements for school board. While we agree that the current board needs to improve, few of the challengers seem to up to the job. Most of them lack the skills and understanding to oversee a district the size of Rochester’s and address the serious problems it faces. Nor is there time to spare for newcomers to learn how to work effectively with other board members and guide Superintendent Vargas. The wrong mix of personalities could result in board members wasting time fighting with each other when the situation desperately calls for synergy between the board and superintendent.

Candice Lucas. PROVIDED PHOTO

It’s with some reluctance that City endorses incumbents Van White and Jose Cruz, as well as challenger Candice Lucas. The three have also received the Democratic Party’s endorsement. The decision to endorse those three over incumbent Cynthia Elliott and challenger Liz Hallmark wasn’t easy. Both have many strengths. But overall, White, Cruz, and Lucas seem the better choices.

The endorsed candidates Van White

There are many sides to White. There’s the civil rights attorney, the former Monroe County assistant district attorney, the city’s crime czar under Mayor William Johnson, the WDKX talk-radio personality, and the politician serving on the school board since 2007. While White is a long-time Democrat, he’s never been a party favorite. His natural


independent streak makes him likeable to some people and off-putting to others. During his time on the board, he has been ambitious, proposing far more policies and initiatives than most of his colleagues. For instance, he proposed creating a School of the Arts on the west side of the city and hiring reading teachers, and he has continually focused on the need to improve graduation rates. He pushed successfully for better tracking of students nearing graduation and helping those needing extra support. For the most part, White’s been able to work amicably with his colleagues, parents, and community leaders. But White has plenty of detractors. His critics say he’s a tireless self-promoter, and they sometimes question his sincerity. And he’s been one of Superintendent Bolgen Vargas’s most ardent opponents, which has at times created tension. In his defense, White says that he fights for principles that he believes in, and not for his personal advancement. And while Vargas was not his first choice to replace former Superintendent Jean-Claude Brizard, White says he respects the superintendent and wants him to succeed. We’re endorsing White because he has arguably been the strongest member of the current board. He is not afraid to challenge or question the administration, but his approach is usually constructive and thoughtful. And he is deeply concerned about the educational needs of minority children, particularly black and Latino males.

Jose Cruz

In some ways, Cruz is the quintessential politician: personable and committed. He understands government, and he often talks eloquently about the importance of participation and civic responsibility. He is vice president of the board and chairs the policy development and review committee. Critics say Cruz is not a fan of long or challenging meetings, often more interested in the mechanics than the substance. And he is often seen in board meetings with his head down checking emails and texting, leaving some people with the impression that he’s not listening or is uninterested. But Cruz can be an effective diplomat, something that he showed last year when the board discussed making condoms available to students, one of the district’s most heavily debated issues in years. During multiple public meetings, Cruz nimbly fielded questions and comments from dozens of students, parents, healthcare workers, and teachers.

He has rarely been publicly critical of his colleagues, and he’s been one of Superintendent Vargas’s strongest supporters. Cruz is smart, steady, and competent. He also fills an important role: he is a well-recognized leader of Rochester’s large Latino community. It’s not unusual to hear Cruz translating at board meetings for parents and family members where language and culture are often obstacles to understanding and full participation. And he makes time to mentor and support younger Latinos about their careers or political ambitions.

Candice Lucas

Director of the Cancer Services Program at the University of Rochester’s Community Health Center, Lucas has a history of working with diverse groups of people and would bring important management experience to the board. She has two children in city schools, and most recently, she served as president of the district’s parent council, an advisory group of parents and legal guardians of children in the district. The group meets regularly with the superintendent and board members on a wide range of issues affecting students, families, and academic achievement. That has given Lucas a first-hand knowledge of the district’s operations, finances, and problems. Throughout much of Lucas’s campaign, she has stressed that increased parent engagement is one of the keys to improving student outcomes. She is not the first person to make this point. But in her work on the council, she has been able to elevate the conversation, helping to establish stronger lines of communication between parents, teachers, and administrators. If she can reach out to the community and help parents become more engaged in their children’s education while holding the administration accountable for its responsibilities to parents, she could be a valuable addition to the board.

The other candidates Cynthia Elliott

In her two terms on the board, Elliott pushed for greater diversification of the district’s teaching staff and fought for new teaching materials that were less Eurocentric in their images and messages. And it would be hard to

find a Rochesterian with more passion and a stronger commitment to its poorest children. She provides a strong voice to a community that is too often underrepresented. During much of her tenure, however, Elliott has often been harsh and combative with some of her colleagues and superintendents. She had a testy relationship with former Superintendent Manny Rivera and a worse one with JeanClaude Brizard. But in the last year and half, a different, more engaging Elliott emerged. She communicates in a more constructive manner, and she is respectful even when she hasn’t agreed with others. For example, Elliott and board vice president Jose Cruz worked together on the district’s condom availability program. Elliott opposed the program, but she expressed her opposition in a way that was considerate, and she encouraged parents and community members on both sides of the controversial issue to do the same. Elliott says she is concerned with stabilizing the district, pulling it back from the constant changes in leadership and management styles.

Liz Hallmark

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A graduate of the University of Rochester Warner School of Education, Hallmark is an adjunct professor at the UR and Nazareth College, where she trains new teachers. And providing more support and better training for district teachers is one of Hallmark’s main concerns. Hallmark, who has worked as an artist teaching in city schools, says there is no one on the board with direct classroom experience. This encourages a disconnection between board policies and what is happening on the ground, she says. While she doesn’t oppose assessments for students, she’s extremely concerned about the state and national obsession with high stakes testing, which she says is corrupting education. She says the district could better use the arts to keep students interested in core subjects such as reading. But Hallmark can appear a bit academic and cerebral, and we question whether as a board member she would be assertive enough to build coalitions and push her ideas successfully.

Howard Eagle

As a Rochester teacher and a leader of the education activist group Community continues on page 17

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 13


DEMOCRATIC PRIMARY ELECTION ENDORSEMENTS

BY CITY’S EDITORIAL STAFF

FOR ROCHESTER CITY COUNCIL HAAG • MILLER • ORTIZ • SCOTT • CONKLIN Rochester’s current City Council is not a group of introverts. Whereas a few previous Councils had one or two members who seemed barely engaged — indeed, barely coherent at times — this nine-member body can be downright rowdy behind semiclosed doors. Some observers say that this is one of the better Councils that the City of Rochester has had. A particular strength is that in their day jobs, many members specialize in fields that are especially useful to a city grappling with Matt Haag. FILE PHOTO Dana Miller. FILE PHOTO serious crime, housing, and financial issues. competitive. Washington is better known and If the issue is finances, for example, you’d could make a good showing in the primary. probably look to Council member Carolee But the incumbents are better qualified Conklin, who is the city’s former deputy treasurer. If it’s technology, you might turn to and have the experience both in government and in their professional lives that will be Council member Dana Miller, who spent 34 important and useful to Rochester in a time years at Xerox in management and technical of declining resources but great need. positions, including software development. Conklin and Miller are two of the five at-large Council members up for re-election this year. The others are Jackie Ortiz, Matt Haag, and Loretta Scott. They are being challenged in a Democratic primary by the Rev. Marlowe Washington, pastor of Christ Community Church of Rochester; local business people Anthony Giordano and Lisa Jacques; and Ann Lewis, a former special education teacher in the Rochester If you’re not plugged into the workings school district. The top five vote-getters of city government, it’s hard to evaluate in the September 10 primary win and go members of Council. Most legislation on to face Green Party candidates Andrew originates from the mayor’s office, so Langdon, David Atias, and Dorothy Paige in few Council members have signature November’s general election. accomplishments to point to. (All registered voters in the city can vote The Council members themselves say for five candidates in this election; the four that one of the main ways you should district council seats will be on the ballot two grade them is by their impact on legislation years from now.) — the questions they ask, the changes Giordano, Lewis, and Jacques lack they push for. Member Matt Haag, for name-recognition and will find it hard to be example, was a longtime holdout on the

The endorsed candidates Matt Haag

14 CITY AUGUST 21-27, 2013

Jackie Ortiz. PROVIDED PHOTO

transit center. He wouldn’t vote for it until the transportation authority took greater responsibility for security in and around the station — which the authority eventually agreed to do. Haag earns high marks from people inside city government. They say he’s one of the most thoughtful, engaged Council members, does his homework, and has a real impact on legislation. Haag is also a regular presence at neighborhood meetings around the city. Haag co-piloted the process that resulted in a citywide moratorium on hydraulic fracturing — an initiative led by Council member Loretta Scott — and took part in the overhaul of the way complaints against the police are handled. Many activists are still unhappy with the process, wanting a completely independent review board. But it’s indisputable that the system has improved. People pursuing complaints against the police are now assigned an advocate to help them through the process. Haag also made the Rochester Housing Authority aware that its policies didn’t include protections for transgender people. Those protections are now in place.

Loretta Scott. PHOTO BY MARK CHAMBERLIN

Dana Miller

Council Vice President Miller is thoughtful and knowledgeable about the operation of the city, its history, and its challenges. At times he seems a bit isolated on Council, but he was able to convince enough members to support him for the vice presidency — ousting a reluctant Elaine Spaull. Some people accuse Miller of serial equivocation, but others say it would be a mistake to confuse Miller’s calm, deliberate manner and approach for politics or ambivalence. Miller’s supporters say he is a quiet visionary and that Brooks Landing in the 19th Ward — which includes student housing, stores, and a hotel — would’ve never happened without Miller’s vision and persistence. The project was a decade in the making. Miller formed an ad hoc committee that brought wireless to City Hall. It’s spotty now, but the goal is to have it throughout the building. And he has been trying to convince national chains to invest in the city’s depressed neighborhoods. Most of the businesses in these corridors are small stores like groceries and barbershops, and they aren’t sufficient to build a thriving neighborhood.


Jackie Ortiz

Young and ebullient, Ortiz is easy to like. It’s taken awhile for her to find her footing on Council, though, and Ortiz admits to being pulled between the demands of Council and her business — she owns a State Farm agency on Alexander Street. At-large seats are tricky, too, because without a defined territory, Council members have to set their own priorities, and inexperienced representatives can be overwhelmed. Ortiz has been outspoken on the subjects of the city’s sale of tax liens and

Carolee Conklin. FILE PHOTO

on land banks — a newly created entity that will help the city dispose of vacant and abandoned property. Sources say she also pokes the administration on neighborhood issues. Despite a slow start, Ortiz seems to have found her sea legs. If we think of her first four years as an investment, we should expect to see an accomplished second term.

given her background. And she was part of the important effort to increase diversity in the police and fire departments, visiting churches in the black community to spread the word about job opportunities in those fields. Scott also instituted a requirement to identify the number of jobs created for every proposal for capital project funding that comes to Council.

Carolee Conklin

Conklin is the personification of institutional knowledge. She knows where the bodies are buried, and she could draw you a detailed map. She’s the city’s former deputy treasurer, former Monroe County deputy clerk, and former city clerk. Everything this publication wrote in its 2003 endorsement of Conklin remains true: “bright, experienced, innovative, effective, blunt, and colorful. Conklin knows the city as well as anyone in government. She does her homework, almost always knows what she’s talking about, and isn’t afraid to say what she thinks.” Example: When former Mayor Bob Duffy insisted that his Zero Tolerance police crackdown was good for the city, Conklin made sure that the audience at the Council meeting knew that the program was also good for police pensions. Conklin’s colleagues say she can’t be beat when it comes to legacy, history, and understanding of the city’s operations, particularly finances. Conklin has historically been a committed critic of the city school district — some would say she’s gone overboard in that regard — but she surprised everyone this year when she voted in favor of the district’s budget for the first time in almost a decade. She said she wanted to support what she sees as signs of hope in the district, including recent hires made by Superintendent Bolgen Vargas.

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Loretta Scott

Scott doesn’t lack institutional knowledge, having worked for the City of Rochester for 30 years, including serving as commissioner of the then Department of Parks, Recreation, and Human Services. Institutional knowledge is critical to this Council, insiders say, because the body is still feeling the loss of longtime veteran members several years ago. Scott led the effort to get Council to pass a citywide hydrofracking moratorium at a time when the issue didn’t seem to be on the administration’s radar. The criticism heard most about Scott is that she’s not out in the community enough. But she frequently questions the administration on parks and recreation issues, which makes sense

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Ann Lewis

asked that questions be e-mailed to her, but she did not respond to them. In her campaign literature, Lewis says she wants to establish Rochester “as the hub of green technology,” to provide family literacy activities for city residents, and to work continues on page 16

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COUNCIL

MAYOR

with business and labor to provide more vocational internships for youth.

condominiums, the completion of another stage of Midtown Plaza’s replacement, the beginning of work on College Town. He has worked with labor unions and contractors to create a Project Labor Agreement to provide job training, union membership, and jobs for city residents on public construction projects like Midtown and the school district’s buildings modernization program. Richards understands fully the complex roots of urban education’s problems, and he has become a supportive partner for the school district, a change from the open criticism of former Mayor Duffy. And while he doesn’t oppose charter schools, he says that given the instability the school district has experienced, City Hall needs to support the district and its superintendent and to do what is within the mayor’s power to help the district help its children. And so, rather than propose assistance for charter schools, as Warren is doing, Richards is focused on aligning the operation of the city’s recreation centers with that of the school district to support the district’s longer-day initiative. These are all nuts-and-bolts, administrative points. Layered over them, for us, is Richards himself: a dedicated, nononsense but deeply humanitarian person who speaks of his job as mayor as “a calling,” a term that implies something far beyond an ordinary career or a political plum. This was not a second career that he had planned on. Comfortably retired from the presidency of RG&E and RGS Energy Group, he could have spent the rest of his life doing something far less stressful. But when Bob Duffy won his first term as mayor, Richards was persuaded to serve as the city’s corporation counsel. He served there so effectively that when Duffy resigned abruptly during his second term to join the Cuomo administration, Richards filled in as deputy mayor, then ran for mayor in a special election and won. And now, apparently as happy in politics as New York’s Michael Bloomberg is, he is running for his first full term. These are challenging times for Rochester: for its neighborhoods, its downtown, its business and industrial base, its finances, its schools. Richards has been a strong, effective leader. He was the right person at the right time when he filled in for Bob Duffy two years ago, and he is absolutely the right person now.

continues from page 15

Anthony Giordano

has done little campaigning, but his literature contains generally broad proposals like putting more police on the streets and creating a year-round jobs program for youth. Giordano is a recurrent candidate for elected office in Rochester, and although well-intentioned, he lacks the knowledge required to serve.

The Rev. Marlowe Washington

says the current Council isn’t doing enough to help the city through its extended transition from a manufacturing-based economy to whatever comes next. Too many of the city’s poor are being left behind, he says. Washington proposes creating zones of distressed neighborhoods and singling them out for intense public-private investment — a souped-up version, essentially, of the city’s Focused Investment program. FIS does not address the systemic causes of poverty, Washington says. He also favors a return to neighborhood police precincts. Washington clearly has a following in this community, but didn’t make a strong enough case to unseat the incumbents.

Lisa Jacques

is focused foremost on the city’s small businesses. She says city government is overly punitive of small business, while being overly solicitous of national chains on such issues as hours of operation and permitted inventory. City officials rebut those accusations, but acknowledge that the perception exists. Jacques has also been a critic of the public money that goes to developers of private projects. She has been particularly critical of the sale of Midtown Tower to a Buckingham Properties-Morgan Management partnership for $2. Buckingham-Morgan plans to redevelop the tower for housing and commercial use. Jacques works hard advocating for small business, but her tone is sometimes overly harsh. It’s not clear she’d be able to work cooperatively with other Council members.

continues from page 11

Continued coverage throughout the election season at: 16 CITY AUGUST 21-27, 2013


SCHOOL BOARD continues from page 13

Education Task Force, Eagle knows about a lot about education and the city school district. He has run unsuccessfully for the school board several times and is campaigning with candidate Ronald Hall as a slate in this primary. Eagle wants the district to shift its priorities toward rebuilding the foundation of education — reading, writing, and math. And he has spoken out repeatedly against the district’s policy of social promotion. Though Eagle understands many of the problems the district faces and is passionate about city students, he is also at times vitriolic and hurtful. It’s often not what Eagle says but how unconstructively he delivers his message that makes it difficult to see how he could contribute to the board’s work. The remaining candidates are obviously concerned about Rochester’s children and the state of the school district. But they lack the depth of knowledge and understanding of the school district’s challenges that Rochester needs.

Ernest Flagler

A longtime Rochester firefighter, this is Flagler’s second run for school board. Among his concerns are school safety, improving communication between parents and school officials, and building a better pathway for students who are not college-bound to pursue a trade or entrepreneurial ambitions. Though Flagler is personable and extremely likeable, his lack of operational and budget management experience is a drawback.

Ronald Hall

A manager for marketing and special events with a major retailer (he requested

that we not name the company), Hall is a former board member of Genesee Community Charter School, which his children attend. Much of the thrust of his campaign consists of an attack on the current board and school district. For instance, he says students and teachers aren’t being prepared for success, that many of the district’s problems stem from a lack of leadership and accountability, and that the board is largely to blame due its passive management and oversight. But he offers few workable alternatives.

Donald Hardaway Bright and ambitious, Hardaway teaches health and physical education at Monroe Community College. Few candidates speak with as much frustration and disgust about the city school board and Superintendent Bolgen Vargas as Hardaway, or with as much concern about students who graduate poorly prepared. But other than advocating for charter schools and calling for the resignation of the board and Vargas, he has offered few ideas for improving the district.

Tim McCauley

McCauley is a marketing specialist, past president of the Black Business Association, and has volunteered as a Scoutmaster, fundraiser, and choir director. McCauley says he would like to use his experience working in the community to help mobilize stronger community involvement with the city school district. Like the other candidates, he is concerned about the district’s low graduation rate, and he is particularly concerned about the high number of children classified as needing special-education services.

ONLINE ESSAYS Essays by each of the candidates for City Council and school board – with the exception of Ann Lewis, Anthony Giordano, Van White and Donald Hardaway who failed to submit one – are on our website:

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URBAN ACTION This week’s calls to action include the following events and activities. (All are free and open to the public, unless otherwise noted.)

Looking for landmarks

The Landmark Society of Western New York is seeking help from the region’s African-American community to identify landmarks. The goal is to find sites of important events and activities to that community, which could include a park, corner store, school, or factory. The Landmark Society will hold meetings to gather public input. The meetings are from 5:15 p.m. to 6:45 p.m. on Thursday, August 22, at the Arnett Library, 310 Arnett Blvd; and from 6:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. on Wednesday, September 11, at Holy Rosary Apartment Complex, 414 Lexington Avenue. Information: www. landmarksociety.org.

18 CITY AUGUST 21-27, 2013

Animal rights film Health and Animal Rights Advocates of women of color Upstate New York and the Rochester Area Vegetarian Society will co-sponsor a showing of “Peaceable Kingdom: The Journey Home,” a film by Tribe of Heart on Thursday, August 22. The film examines the experiences of a group of farmers, an animal rescuer, and a police officer struggling with how animals should be treated. The film will be shown at 5:30 p.m. at the Pittsford Public Library, 24 State Street. It will be followed by a discussion period.

ROCLA picnic

The Rochester Committee on Latin America will hold a picnic from 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. on Thursday, August 29, to celebrate ROCLA’s 40 years of commitment to social justice in Latin America. The event will be held at the Tay House Lodge in Cobbs Hill Park. Please bring a dish to pass.

Trillium Health will hold its annual “Call to Women of Color Social Gathering” from 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. on Saturday, August 24. The main purpose of the event is to raise awareness about HIV and other health disparities among women of color. There will be food, entertainment, and confidential HIV testing and counseling. The event will be held at the Roadhouse in Genesee Valley Park. Trillium Health was formerly known as AIDS Care.


Dining

Left: ice-cream "sushi" (vanilla ice cream roll covered in toasted coconut); right: roasted quail salad with raspberries and pepper-crusted goat cheese, both from Bamba Bistro. PHOTOS BY MARK CHAMBERLIN

Hiding in plain sight Bamba Bistro 282 ALEXANDER ST. 244-8680, BAMBABISTRO.COM, @BAMBA_BISTRO LUNCH: MONDAY-FRIDAY 11:30 A.M.-2 P.M. DINNER: MONDAY-THURSDAY 5-10 P.M., FRIDAY-SATURDAY UNTIL 11 P.M. [ REVIEW ] BY DAYNA PAPALEO

I write about restaurants and I work in a restaurant, so it should come as no shock that most of my conversations with others (and, if I’m being truthful, with myself) revolve around the local dining scene. Earlier this year, I became kind of obsessed with Bamba Bistro, located in a little brick castle on the fringes of the East End. I had never been there, and no one in my vast and fearsome network of informants could give me any dish on the place, because they hadn’t been there either. Yet someone is clearly dining at Bamba, otherwise it wouldn’t have stayed open for so long. So who goes there? And what do they know that I don’t? “We have a big repeat customer base,” says Christine Wright, general manager at Bamba, “but we don’t seem to be reaching many new customers. Special events are what keep us

going right now, to be honest; if it wasn’t for them, it would be very difficult.” Bamba opened 10 years ago in place of the decidedly more upscale Rio Bamba, when the late Robert H. Hurlbut became the sole owner after being a silent partner in Rio Bamba. “He bought Bamba Bistro because he wanted to give back to Rochester,” says Wright. “He didn’t want it to be just for the stuffy and the elite; he wanted it to be for everybody.” And though the vibe may be relaxed, the food — which boasts Italian, French, and Asian influences — is not. “Fine dining in a casual atmosphere” is how Wright describes Bamba. The elegant building has housed restaurants since the mid-1940’s, but was originally constructed as a single-family home in 1880 by a doctor as a wedding present for his daughter. A stately staircase greets you at the entrance, followed by a big, robust bar as you veer to the right. The main dining room is relatively new construction, added on in the 1970’s and featuring a series of swooping archways over dark wood furniture that is beginning to show its age. There are several constants on the Bamba

menu, which changes along with the seasons, and my visits straddled spring and summer. The outstanding French gnocchi ($11/$18)

is Bamba’s signature dish, and it is unlike the ricotta, potato, and semolina incarnations to which you may be accustomed. Made from the same pâte à choux dough that typically finds its way to an éclair, the French gnocchi are lightly sautéed after a quick boil then served with peas, mushrooms, and summer squash in a subtle garlic sauce redolent of earthy, voluptuous truffle. French gnocchi is not as filling as its denser cousins, and the smaller size made for a superb shared starter. The duck wings ($7/$12) are a winner, too, fried and tossed in what was billed as “sweet and sour sauce” but seemed to be more along the complex lines of hoisin. The popular Chinese condiment also served as a dipping sauce for the fresh spring rolls, the contents of which change daily. One fragile composition starred crabmeat, noodles, carrots, cucumber, and fresh herbs ($7), the clean yet unassuming flavors a good vehicle for the surprisingly spicy hoisin. Squid fans should appreciate Bamba’s take on calamari ($11), the lightly battered and beautifully tender pieces served in a piquant, tomatoey puttanesca, with roasted red peppers and slow-cooked onions, as well as capers and kalamata olives that provided necessary brininess. Unfortunately, an utter lack of salt ruined an otherwise promising grilled chicken and baby bok choy soup, which was packed with protein

and vegetables but somehow made it to my table without seasoning. Happily, however, a grilled quail salad ($8/$12) was on deck, the poultry piping hot, perfectly prepared, and bedded down in crisp watercress and frisée with a scattering of plump raspberries and blueberries, plus two small hemispheres of pepper-crusted goat cheese, which I cozied up to the quail in order to take the chill off of them. The raspberry vinaigrette also seemed slightly underseasoned, the vinegar a little too assertive, but if you like pretending to be a giant, tiny quail legs are crucial. Bamba’s classic crab cake ($12) is unique in that it’s shaped into a tallish cylinder rather than the traditional patty, meaning less surface area for crust aficionados but more unadulterated seafood for crab lovers. You can taste a hint of lemon among the delicate blue crabmeat, which gets a bit of crunch from cornmeal and is accompanied by micro greens and remoulade, a classy, decadent relative of Thousand Island dressing. And by now you’ve probably noticed that I’m not a big entrée girl, but I adored the expertly frenched pork chop ($25), the hot juices mingling with the sweetness of the caramelized onion sauce and the bitter broccolini, which had been kissed with crushed red pepper and paper-thin slivers of garlic. The excellent service at Bamba is attentive without being obtrusive; your silverware is frequently replaced, your water is kept full, and your napkin is folded when you get up from your table. And after a year in the Bamba kitchen, Chef Rick O’Hearn is now at the helm. (When asked what he has in store for the fall menu, the Caledonia native played coy: “Surprises.”) Meanwhile, as Hurlbut’s son, Robert W. Hurlbut, dives into his new ownership role (“He says he’s having fun,” according to Wright) Bamba maintains its popular Lucky Hour weekdays 4-7 p.m. and recently instituted a Dine & Dash program that features appetizers not found on the usual menu. I didn’t sample anything from a wine list that appeared to be both comprehensive and reasonably priced, but I began one visit with a lovely cocktail known simply as Fresh ($8), made from Tanqueray Rangpur gin, lemongrass simple syrup, strawberries, and champagne. As for the other end of the meal, I’m usually wary of a descriptor that contains quotation marks, but the coconut “sushi” ($7) was a satisfying dessert, both basic and brilliant: housemade vanilla ice cream rolled in toasted coconut and drizzled with harmonizing chocolate and caramel sauces. The ice cream was almost too hard to get a spoon through, but it was worth it. And on the upside, the freezer at Bamba Bistro kicks ass. rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 19


Upcoming [ POP/ROCK ] The Sadies Saturday, September 28. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. $15. 9 p.m. 454-2966. bugjar.com.

Music

[ DJ/ELECTRONIC ] Funkagenda Friday, October 18. Main Street Armory, 900 East Main St. $15. 7 p.m. 232-3221. rochestermainstreetarmory.com [ POP/ROCK ]

The London Souls Tuesday, October 22. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N. Water St. $TBA. 8 p.m. 352-5600. waterstreetmusic.com

GRR! FRIDAY, AUGUST 23 ABILENE BAR & LOUNGE, 153 LIBERTY POLE WAY 6 P.M. | ABILENEBARANDLOUNGE.COM [ JAZZ/BLUES ] Geoff Tesch (guitars), Ron Broida (bass), and Robin Whiteman (vocals) are the soulful collective, GRR! The trio got major exposure during this year’s Xerox Rochester International Jazz Festival as it performed every night at the Little Theatre. Audiences are raving about a highenergy blend of jazz, blues, swing, and folk, that is always peppered with humor, and a touch of the supernatural. You’ve got to see it for yourself. — BY DAVID YOCKEL JR.

Goo Goo Dolls SATURDAY, AUGUST 24 DARIEN LAKE PERFORMING ARTS CENTER 7:30 P.M. | $27-$79.50 | DARIENLAKE.COM [ ROCK ] When it comes to bands that resonate in my

brain, I don’t go gaga over the Goo Goo Dolls. I mean no disrespect. I like the Dolls when I hear the band’s tunes on the radio. The Buffalo, NY troubadours are the 1-in1-million inspirational story for anyone with a hockeysounding last name that has three chords and a dream. When Rzeznik, Takac, Malinin, and company moved away from their punk roots, they struck gold with “A Boy Named Goo,” one of the biggest alternative albums of the 90’s. The Goo Goo Dolls followed it up with 14 Top 10 singles, including “Iris.” Add the band’s still-handsome looks to the set list and this show feels like cougar’s night out. With Matt Nathanson. — BY ROMAN DIVEZUR

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WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 21 [ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ] Dady Brothers. Johnny’s Irish Pub, 1382 Culver Rd. 2240990. johnnysirishpub.com. 8 p.m. Free.

Hankerin’ Harry & The Honky Tonk Revival. Sticky Lips BBQ

West Fest FRIDAY, AUGUST 23 BUG JAR, 219 MONROE AVE. 9 P.M. | $5-$6 | BUGJAR.COM [ ALTERNATIVE ] Why not check out five indie bands

that are putting the rock back into Roc City? The third annual West Fest is a two-day concert organized by Dusty West, lead singer of grunge outfit Anchorage, Nebraska and impresario of Eat Here Records. West calls the eponymously titled event, “the thing he works on the hardest every year.” Day 1 includes guitar-anddrum duo Routine Involvements. The pair’s shows are gritty and syncopated. There I Say is Lightening is profound, wrapped in depth and honed by plenty of gigs. Envious Disguise (pictured) is a young band that is fresh off a tour. Three-piece A Dead Love Society takes its cues from Muse. While The Fevertones began as punk but has veered towards street-performer Americana. — BY ROMAN DIVEZUR

Adrian Lux FRIDAY, AUGUST 23 MAIN STREET ARMORY, 900 E. MAIN ST. 8 P.M. | $15-$25 | ROCHESTERMAINSTREETARMORY.COM [ ELECTRONIC ] If you’re in the more for a bit more of

a euro-flavor, look no farther than Adrian Lux. Swooping in from Sweden and dropping the beat on us, Adrian Lux swings between much more euro-dance music and an almost emo-sounding indie-rock mix, although still with the techno beat on top. It’s no surprise he’s already been nominated for a Grammy. — BY SUZAN PERO

Juke Joint, 830 Jefferson Rd. 585-292-5544. stickylipsbbq. com. 6:30 p.m. Free. Jim Lane. Schooner’s Riverside Pub, 70 Pattonwood Dr. 3423030. shumwaymarine.com/ schooners.shtml. 6 p.m. Free. Lane & Ott. Schooner’s Riverside Pub, 70 Pattonwood Dr. 342-3030. shumwaymarine.com/ schooners.shtml. 7 p.m. Call for info. Michael Hunter. Richmond’s Tavern, 21 Richmond Street. 270-8570. richmondstavern. com. 8:30 p.m. Free.

Dropkick Murphys played Scion’s Bonzai music festival, which took place Saturday, August 17, at Main Street Armory. PHOTO BY WILLIE CLARK

Nothing but a good time

[ COUNTRY ]

[ REVIEW ] BY LEAH CREARY

As the summer comes to a close, the time for music festivals is winding down as well. On Saturday, radio station The Zone 94.1 squeezed in its annual Scion’s Bonzai, a music festival celebrating radio-friendly modern rock. “Keep in mind that we only came here to have a good fucking time with you!” yelled Kaleo Wassman, vocalist for the band Pepper, as I entered the Main Street Armory. The room felt like a frat house, complete with plastic cups littering the floor, shirtless guys in backwards baseball caps roaming about with done-up girls on their arms, and the stench of cheap beer lingering in the stale, sweat-infused air. It seemed as though everyone in attendance shared Wassman’s sentiments: they were only there to have a good time. And with eight hours of acts such as Sick Puppies, Panic! At the Disco, and Crash Kings, that mission was sure to be accomplished. Following Pepper was Reel Big Fish, a true highlight of the night. The muchcelebrated ska band put on an impressive display of musicianship, featuring a solid brass section and an energetic, magnetic

frontman. At first listen, the band may appear to be silly or inane. But the lyrical childishness is saved by a clear understanding of the way music works, with structures and melodies that feel as classic as any Phil Spector song and frequent, jazz-influenced trumpet solos from the supremely talented John Christianson. The main event of the night was Celticrock band Dropkick Murphys. The band opened with the relatively new “The Boys Are Back,” and I found it impossible not to tap my feet to the beat of the drums, or to move my body in some way. It seemed that my fellow concert-goers felt the same exact way. As I stood in the back of the Armory, a young girl standing next to me pumped her fist in the air, head-banged, and marched in place to the music. Set apart from the rowdy pit, she celebrated her love for the band in her own way. It’s easy to peg Murphys as being a Boston-bred tough-guy favorite, but Saturday it was apparent that the music can reach that niche as well as it can reach that dancing teenaged girl or the young kid in the Green Day t-shirt who watched the band, flanked by his parents.

Kenny Chesney w/Eli Young Band, Kacey Musgraves. CMAC, 3355 Marvin Sands Drive. Canandaigua. 7585300. cmacevents.com. 7 p.m. $32.50-$85. [ DJ/ELECTRONIC ]

DJ Reign and Ladies Night.

Captain’s Attic, 37 Charlotte St. 546-8885. Call for info. DJ Adam. Nashvilles, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. Henrietta. 3343030. nashvillesny.com. Call for info. DJ Cedric. Vertex Night Club, 169 N. Chestnut St. 232-5498. Third Wednesday of every month. Call for info.

Ladies Nite: High Heels and Mini Skirts New Wave Wednesdays. Club Clarissas,

293 Clarissa St. 232-3430. 10 p.m. 21+. Call for info. Teen Set 45 Party. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. Free. Why Not Wednesday. Eclipse Bar & Grill, 374 Thurston Rd. 502-922-6567. 10 p.m. Call for info. Y Not Wednesday w/DJ ET. Plush, 151 St. Paul St. 2325650. venurochester.com. Call for info. continues on page 23

COME “HIGH FIVE” LOVIN’CUP ON MAKIN’ IT 5 YEARS!

08-30-13 • 7pm-2am • 300 PARK POINT DRIVE

GET YOUR DRINK ON NEW YORK STATE STYLE! TAP TAKEOVER FROM ALL LOCAL NYS BREWERIES

HIGH FIVE

PERFORMANCES BY: The Niche, Greg Townson of the Hi-Risers, Teagan and the Tweeds, The Teressa Wilcox Band, and “The Family Band” - Old School FOLLOWED BY an all star/all night Jam with many more Fab Rochester Musicians WWW.LOVINCUP.COM • rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 21


Music Enterprising new classical ensembles are

Unconventional classical-music ensemble A Far Cry will bring the spirit of Bohemia to the Skaneateles Festival August 28-31. PHOTO COURTESY YOON S. BYUN

A far cry from the usual [ PREVIEW ] BY DAVID RAYMOND

2013 Skaneateles Festival THROUGH AUGUST 31 VARIOUS VENUES IN SKANEATELES SKANFEST.ORG

Since it began in 1980 with two chamber music concerts in the town of the same name, the Skaneateles Festival has grown and prospered, attracting music lovers from all over New York State with its pleasing combination of a relaxed, summery atmosphere and lofty musical artistry. Skaneateles Festival is a mecca for regional musicians — its artistic directors since 2005 have been the Eastman School of Music’s Elinor Freer and David Ying — and its guest artists this year include such stars as Anonymous 4 and violinist Hilary Hahn, who has been a frequent festival performer since she was a teenager. Concerts take place in local churches and other venues through the small but lovely town, which is located roughly 90 minutes east of Rochester. The festival traditionally winds up with a largerscale outdoor concert at Brook Farm, whose large porch can accommodate

a small orchestra and whose lawn can accommodate a large and happy audience. Like other venerable summer festivals such as Mostly Mozart and Glimmerglass, the Skaneateles Festival has learned the value of reinventing itself. It has added ancillary family-friendly events such as this summer’s musical nature walk, hosted social events like a Musical Happy Hour at Anyela’s Vineyards, provided an educational component to help audiences better appreciate the music, and offered interesting programming outside the classical mainstream. For example, earlier this month at the festival, Hahn appeared with the jazz pianist Donal Fox in a program reinterpreting music of J.S. Bach in the context of jazz improvisation. This is the kind of thinking that attracts exciting artists — and excited audiences. Among those exciting artists is next

week’s artists-in-residence, the 17-member string orchestra A Far Cry. The group’s three Skaneateles concerts have a theme, “Bohemian Triumph,” bringing together music by a number of Bohemian composers of the 18th, 19th, and 20th centuries. Asked to name a Bohemian/Moravian/ Czech composer, most people respond “Antonin Dvorak”…and then pause. But in

its various configurations over the centuries, this area of Eastern Europe has produced more than its share of excellent and innovative composers. Johann Wenzel Anton Stamitz (1717-1757) and Karl Stamitz (17451801), craftsmen of the nascent symphony and sonata, were admired by Mozart. Brahms thought very highly of Dvorak, and apparently Dvorak thought highly of Josef Suk; he was Suk’s father-in-law. In the early 20th century, Czech composers like Gideon Klein, Hans Krasa, and Erwin Schulhoff were respected members of the European avant-garde, comparable to Prokofiev or Hindemith. But their music, influenced by jazz and often overtly political, was proscribed by the Nazis as “degenerate,” and all three died in concentration camps in the early 1940’s. A Far Cry’s Bohemian programs also include two romantic-era masterpieces: Dvorak’s String Quintet in E-flat, and one of the greatest works in the chamber music repertoire, Schubert’s Quintet in C. (True, Schubert was Viennese — but his father was Moravian, so he fits in well enough in this Bohemian company.) The series winds up with Suk’s Serenade for Strings, as lovely a work as I can imagine listening to outdoors on a summer evening.

popping everywhere lately, and A Far Cry is one of the most enterprising, morphing in its concerts from a chamber ensemble to a string orchestra and ranging across repertoire from the early Baroque to the day before yesterday. Founded in 2007, the Boston-based group consists of 17 musicians who operate as a collective. As far as the name, A Far Cry viola player Sarah Darling explains, “When we were looking for a name, we steered more toward the realm of band names than ‘fillin-the-blank Italian instrument chamber orchestra,’ and some of the options were pretty out there,” she says. “A Far Cry was casually suggested in the name brainstorm, then dropped. But after some marinating time, it ended up being the name that held our attention. We like it because it epitomizes the fact that we’re ‘a far cry’ from the norm. But the idea of the ‘cry’ is also nice, and within the group, we call ourselves the Criers.” The group’s unique, fluid orchestration requires an equally unique, fluid approach. For each piece on a program, A Far Cry has a group of principal players — a centralized string quintet — that is responsible for the primary artistic interpretation, Darling says. The groups are made of different members for each new work. “They are responsible for guiding the group through the process of preparation and to call the major shots,” Darling says. “We’ve written a series of rules that allow everyone to contribute to that process, without undercutting what the principals are doing.” When it came to the programming for the Skaneateles Festival, “We tried to make the point that the Bohemian spirit flowed between centuries, from Viennesestyle classicism through the lushness of the romantic period into the stark realities of the 20th century,” Darling says. “Gideon Klein, for example, was a spectacular young Moravian composer whose life was cut short in the concentration camps of the second World War — in fact, his ‘Partita’ was the last piece he finished, and comes straight from Terezin [a concentration camp].” Darling continues, “But before we get to that part of the story, there was a huge amount of lovely, generous Bohemian music from earlier days. We’re excited to tackle the Suk Serenade, which has been on our radar forever. And then there are the nutty early ‘Baroque Bohemians’ like Heinrich Biber, whose ‘Battalia,’ a musical depiction of 18th century gentleman’s warfare, has to be heard to be believed. We can’t wait to bring this music to Skaneateles.”


WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 21 [ JAZZ ]

Lap Giraffe. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. East Rochester. 662-5555. bistro135.net. 6 p.m. Free. Rhythm Dogs. Dinosaur Bar-B-Que, 99 Court St. 3257090. dinosaurbarbque.com. 9 p.m. Free. Rob & Gary Acoustic. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. 248-4825. woodcliffhotelspa. com. 5:30 p.m. Free. [ KARAOKE ]

Italian American Karaoke.

Italian American Community Center, 150 Frank Dimino Way. 594-8882. iaccrochester.org. 7:30 p.m. Free. Karaoke at Mayfield’s Pub. Mayfield’s Pub, 669 N. Winton Rd. 288-7199. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke at Sanibel Cottage. Sanibel Cottage, 1517 Empire Blvd. Webster. 671-9340. sanibelcottage.net. 6 p.m. Free. Karaoke w/Cyd Scarlett. Jose & Willy’s, 20 Lakeshore Drive. Canandaigua. 905-0222. Joseandwillys.com. 8:30 p.m. Karaoke Wednesdays. Flat Iron Café, 561 State St. 454-4830. flatironcafe.net. Call for info. Karaoke w/Mark. Flipside Bar & Grill, 2001 E. Main St. 288-3930. 9 p.m. Free. [ OPEN MIC ]

Open Acoustic Mic Night w/ Mandy. Shorts Bar & Grill, 35

N. Main St. Fairport. 388-0136. shortsfairport.com. 9 p.m. Free. Open Mic at Jeffrey’s. Jeffrey’s, 3115 E. Henrietta Rd. Henrietta. 486-4937. 7 p.m. Call for info.

Open Mic Jam Boulder Alexander St.. Boulder Coffee

Co., 100 Alexander St. 454-7140. bouldercoffeeco.com. 8 p.m. Open Mic w/Steve West. Muddy Waters Coffee House, 53 Main St. Geneseo. 2439111. mwcoffeehouse.com. 7 p.m. Free.

COUNTRY | REBA

Reba McEntire is one of the undisputed queens of modern country music. She’s been churning out hits since the late 1980’s and she’s still going strong. You’ve probably heard her version of the prostitution classic “Fancy,” her amazing duet about a cheating spouse “Does He Love You,” or the moving “Somebody.” And those are just a few of the favorites on my iPod. Reba has also segued successfully into acting, with roles in films (remember “Tremors”?), Broadway, and a long-running, self-titled sitcom. Simply put, Reba McEntire is an American treasure, a country classic, and just basically amazing. Reba performs Sunday, August 25, 7:30 p.m. at the Grandstand at the New York State Fair, outside Syracuse. Tickets cost $35-$55. For more information visit nysfair.org. — BY ERIC REZSNYAK

THURSDAY, AUGUST 22 [ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ] Jim Lane. Murph’s Irondequoit Pub, 705 Titus Ave. Irondequoit. 342-6780. 8 p.m. Free. Old Timey Jam. Bernunzio’s Uptown Music, 112 East Ave. 6:30 p.m. Call for info.

Thirsty Thursday’s w/Frankie and Jewels. Avenue Pub, 522

[ HIP-HOP/RAP ]

Monroe Ave. 244-4960. 7 p.m. Call for info. Tim Avaram. The Rabbit Room, 61 N. Main St. Honeoye Falls. 582-1830. thelowermill.com. 7 p.m. Call for info.

Word of Mouth Wednesday’s w/DJ Private Eye. Dubland

Trindad & Tabogo Steel Drum Band. Pelican’s Nest,

Underground, 315 Alexander St. 232-7550. dublandunderground. wordpress.com. 10 p.m. 21+. $5.

566 River St. 663-5910. pelicansnestrestaurant.com. 7 p.m. Free.

[ REGGAE/JAM ]

[ BLUES ] Nightfall. The Beale, 693 South Ave. 271-4650. thebealegrille.com. 7:30 p.m. Call for info.

Personal Blend w/Upward Groove. Water Street Music

Hall, 204 N. Water St. 3255600. waterstreetmusic.com. 8:30 p.m. $5-$7.

[ POP/ROCK ] Atlas. Ontario Beach Park, 4799 Lake Ave. geneseelighthouse.org. 7 p.m. Free.

Erica Russo w/Eyeway, Emma Lane, and Cu-Cu. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. $6-$8.

Don Mancuso & Friends. Nola’s

Restaurant & Nightclub, 4775 Lake Ave. 663-3375. nolasweb. com. 4 p.m. Call for info. Ruby Shooz, Pat Kane. McGraw’s Irish Pub, 146 W Commercial St. East Rochester. 348-9091. mcgrawsirishpub.com. 7 p.m. Free.

[ DJ/ELECTRONIC ]

Party Monster Thursdays. ONE

Nightclub and Lounge, 1 Ryan Alley. 546-1010. oneclublife. com. 10 p.m. 18+. Call for info. DJ Matt. Nashvilles, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. Henrietta. 3343030. nashvillesny.com. Call for info. Karaoke at Panorama. Panorama Night Club & Sports Bar, 730 Elmgrove Rd. 247-2190. 9 p.m. Free. Thirsty Thursday’s. TC Riley’s, 200 Park Point Dr. 272-9777. tcrileysparkpoint.com. 10 p.m. Call for info.

Thursday Night Shakedown.

Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 11 p.m. Free.

Tiki Thursdays: Shotgun Music DJ. McGhan’s Pub, 11

W. Main St. Victor. 924-3660. 7:30 p.m. Free. Tilt-a-Whirl Drag Show.. Tilt Nightclub & Ultralounge, 444 Central Ave. 232-8440. facebook. com/Tiltnightclub. 11:15 p.m. & 12:30 a.m. $3. [ JAZZ ]

Deborah Branch. Lemoncello,

137 West Commercial St. East Rochester. 385-8565. lemoncello137.com. 6 p.m. Free. John Palocy Trio. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. East Rochester. 662-5555. bistro135. net. 6 p.m. Free. Mike Kaupa. Monroe’s Restaurant, 3001 Monroe Avenue. 348-9104. 6 p.m. Call for info.

Sankofa Evening of Theatre & Jazz Festival. MuCCC, 142

Atlantic Ave. 7:30 p.m. $12-$30. Soul Express. Pane Vino Ristorante, 175 N. Water St. 2326090. panevinoristorante.com. 8 p.m. Free. The Swooners. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. 2484825. woodcliffhotelspa.com. 5:30 p.m. Free. continues on page 24

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 23


THURSDAY, AUGUST 22

The Salad Bar Revue hosted by Ambrosia Salad, DJ Solid Bear. 140 Alex Bar & Grill, 140

[ KARAOKE ]

Alexander St. 256-1000. 140alex. com. 11:30 p.m. & 1 a.m. Call for info.

Karaoke at Center Cafe.

7 p.m. Free.

Karaoke at Willow Inn. Willow

Inn, 428 Manitou Rd. Hilton. 392-3489. 8 p.m. Free. Karaoke at Brickwood Grill. Brickwood Grill, 250 Monroe Ave. 730-8230. brickwoodgrill.com. 9 p.m. Call for info.

[ JAZZ ]

Champagne & The Swoon Daddies. Bistro 135, 135

W. Commercial St. East Rochester. 662-5555. bistro135.net. 6 p.m. Free. Grrr!. Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. abilenebarandlounge.com. 6 p.m. Call for info. Marco Amadio. Pane Vino Ristorante, 175 N. Water St. 2326090. panevinoristorante.com. 6:30 p.m. Free.

Karaoke at Pineapple Jack’s. Pineapple Jack’s,

485 Spencerport Rd. Gates. 247-5225. facebook.com/ PineappleJacks. 9 p.m. Free.

Karaoke Night w/Debbie Randyn. Pittsford Pub, 60 N.

Main St. Pittsford. 586-4650. thepittsfordpub.com. 9:30 p.m. Free. Karaoke w/DJ Smooth. Club Clarissas, 293 Clarissa St. 2323430. Call for info. Karaoke w/George. Temple Bar and Grille, 109 East Ave. 2326000. templebarandgrille.com. 8 p.m. Free. Karaoke with DJ Tina P. Richmond’s Tavern, 21 Richmond Street. 270-8570. richmondstavern.com. 9 p.m. Call for info. Karaoke w/Shotgun Music. McGhan’s Pub, 11 W. Main St. Victor. 924-3660. Free. Karaoke w/Summer Bob. Shorts Bar & Grill, 35 N. Main St. Fairport. 388-0136. shortsfairport. com. 10 p.m. Free. Karoake w/Cyd Scarlett. Victor Village Inn, 34 East Main Street. Victor. 925-5025. 8:30 p.m. Call for info. [ OPEN MIC ]

5 Alarm Open Jam. ,. 9 p.m. Call

for info.

Open Mic at Towpath Cafe. ,. 6:30 p.m. Free.

Open Mic Jam Boulder Park Ave.. Boulder Coffee Co.,

739 Park Ave. 697-0235. bouldercoffeeco.com. 7:30 p.m. Free. Open Mic w/Steve Piper. Flipside Bar & Grill, 2001 E. Main St. 2883930. 9 p.m. Free. Spot Coffee Open Mic. SPoT Coffee, 200 East Ave. 6134600. spotcoffee.com. 7 p.m. Call for info. [ REGGAE/JAM ] The Goods. Dinosaur Bar-BQue, 99 Court St. 325-7090. dinosaurbarbque.com. 9 p.m. Free. [ POP/ROCK ]

Dave McGrath Trio. Schooner’s

Riverside Pub, 70 Pattonwood Dr. 342-3030. shumwaymarine. com/schooners.shtml. 7 p.m. Call for info. Five Alarm Open Jam. Firehouse Saloon, 814 S. Clinton Ave. 319-3832. thefirehousesaloon.com. 9 p.m. Call for info.

The Inner Planets w/Twisted Vibes. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 8:30 p.m. $5-$7.

Nimrod Wildfire. Sticky

Lips BBQ Juke Joint, 830 Jefferson Rd. 585-292-5544. stickylipsbbq.com. 9 p.m. Free.

INDIE | HIGHNESS

When Eric Richter (guitar/vocals), Brent Eyestone (guitar), Brandon Evans (bass), Graham Scala (guitar), and Ryan Parris (drums) came together, they all brought strong musical pedigrees, and varying aesthetic approaches. The result was Highness — an amalgam of musicians with different stylistic backgrounds, but one thing in common: untapped potential. The quintet mixes the melodic underpinnings of 90’s emo with the aggression of punk and metal, the ambience of post-rock, and the passion of post-hardcore. The resulting pastiche is expansive and inspiring.

Sankofa Evening of Theatre & Jazz Festival. MuCCC, 142

Atlantic Ave. 7:30 p.m. $12-$30. Soul Shaker. Captain Jack’s Good Time Tavern, 8505 Greig St. Sodus. 483-9570. captainjacksgoodtimetavern. com. 9 p.m. Call for info Captain Jack’s Good Time Tavern, 8505 Greig St. Sodus. 483-9570. captainjacksgoodtimetavern.com. 9 p.m. Call for info. [ KARAOKE ]

Highness performs Wednesday, August 28, 9 p.m. at Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. $7-$9. bugjar.com. — BY DAVID YOCKEL JR. This Life. 1872 Café, 431 W. Main St. 730-7687. 1872cafe. com. 6:30 p.m. Free.

FRIDAY, AUGUST 23 [ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ]

Ciarin’s Pride w/Ted McGraw. McGraw’s Irish Pub, 146 W Commercial St. East Rochester. 348-9091. mcgrawsirishpub. com. 5 p.m. Free. Jim Lane. 58 Main, 58 N. Main St. Brockport. 637-2383. 58main.com. 8 p.m. Free. Ralph Louis. Rochester Plaza Hotel, 70 State St. 546-3450. rochesterplaza.com. 6 p.m. Free. Rochester Puerto Rican Festival 2013. Frontier Field, 1 Morrie

Silver Way. redwingsbaseball. com. noon. See website for full festival schedule. prfestival.com. $5-$25. [ BLUES ]

The Fakers. The Beale,

693 South Ave. 271-4650. thebealegrille.com. 7:30 p.m. Call for info.

Gap Mangione New Blues Band . Woodcliff Hotel & Spa,

199 Woodcliff Dr. 248-4825. woodcliffhotelspa.com. 7:30 p.m. Free. Genesee Johnny. The Beale, 1930 Empire Blvd. Webster. 2161070. thebealegrille.com. 7:30 p.m. Call for info. Salmon Creek Blues Boys. Pultneyville Grill, 4135 Lake Rd. Pultneyville. 315-589-4512. pultneyvillegrill.com. 7 p.m. Call for info. Shades of Blue. Lemoncello, 137 West Commercial St. East Rochester. 385-8565. lemoncello137.com. 7 p.m. Free.

24 CITY AUGUST 21-27, 2013

[ COUNTRY ]

The Morgan Twins. Sticky Lips

BBQ Juke Joint, 830 Jefferson Rd. 585-292-5544. stickylipsbbq. com. 9:30 p.m. $8. [ DJ/ELECTRONIC ] Adrian Lux. Main Street Armory, 900 E. Main St. 232-3221. rochestermainstreetarmory.com. 8 p.m. $15-$25. On the House Fridays. ONE Nightclub and Lounge, 1 Ryan Alley. 546-1010. oneclublife.com. 21+. Call for info. Chill Out Fridays Happy Hour. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. lovincup.com. 5:30 p.m. Free. DJ/Karaoke w/Coyote Cody. ,. 9:30 p.m. Call for info. DJ Bac Spin. Plush, 151 St. Paul St. 232-5650. venurochester. com. 8 p.m. Call for info. DJ Blake. 140 Alex Bar & Grill, 140 Alexander St. 256-1000. 140alex.com. 10 p.m. Call for info. DJ Energon. Vertex Night Club, 169 N. Chestnut St. 232-5498. 10 p.m. $3-$8. DJ Mi-T-Mo. Richmond’s Tavern, 21 Richmond Street. 270-8570. richmondstavern.com. 9 p.m. Free.

Fresh Meat Fridays w/Samantha Vega, DJ Mighty Mic. Tilt

Nightclub & Ultralounge, 444 Central Ave. 232-8440. facebook. com/Tiltnightclub. 11:15 p.m. & 12:30 a.m. $4-$12. Lube After Dark. Quaker Steak & Lube, 2205 Buffalo Rd. 6979464. quakersteakandlube.com/ Rochester_NY. 9:30 p.m. Free. Reggaeton w/DJ Carlos. La Copa Ultra Lounge, 235 W. Ridge Rd. 254-1050. lacopaultralounge. com. 10 p.m. Free.

Karaoke w/Cody. Nashvilles, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. Henrietta. 334-3030. nashvillesny.com. 5 p.m. Free. Karaoke at Flaherty’s Webster. Flaherty’s Webster, 1200 Bay Rd. Webster. 671-0816. flahertys. com. 9 p.m. Call for info. Karaoke at Pineapple Jack’s. Pineapple Jack’s,

485 Spencerport Rd. Gates. 247-5225. facebook.com/ PineappleJacks. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke by Dan & Sherri. Barnard Restaurant & Party House, 360 Maiden Ln. 6631250. 8 p.m. Free. Karaoke w/Cyd Scarlett!. Norton’s Pub, 1730 N. Goodman St. 266-3570. 10 p.m. Karaoke w/Krazy George. Scotland Yard Pub, 187 Saint Paul St. 730-5030. scotlandyardpub.com. 10 p.m. Call for info. Karaoke w/Summer Bob. Shorts Bar & Grill, 35 N. Main St. Fairport. 388-0136. shortsfairport. com. 10 p.m. Free. [ OPEN MIC ]

Open Mic Night. Mooseberry Café, 2555 Baird Rd. Penfield. 348-9022. mooseberrycafe.com. 6 p.m. Call for info. [ R&B ]

Bridget Kelly, K. Michelle. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N. Water St. 325-5600. waterstreetmusic. com. 10:30 p.m. $20-$30. [ POP/ROCK ]

The Allman Brothers Band w/ Steve Winwood. Darien Lake

PAC, 9993 Allegheny Rd. Darien. 599-4641. godarienlake.com. 6:30 p.m. $29.50-$65. Dark Hollow. Dinosaur Bar-BQue, 99 Court St. 325-7090. dinosaurbarbque.com. 10 p.m. Free.

Happy Hour with Jeff Cosco. Richmond’s Tavern, 21 Richmond Street. 270-8570. richmondstavern.com. 5 p.m. Call for info. Household Pest. Pelican’s Nest, 566 River St. 663-5910. pelicansnestrestaurant.com. 10 p.m. Free. Infrared Radiation Orchestra, Anonymous Willpower Double CD Release Party. Lovin’ Cup,

300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. lovincup.com. 9 p.m. $3-$5. Mojo Monkeyz. Schooner’s Riverside Pub, 70 Pattonwood Dr. 342-3030. shumwaymarine. com/schooners.shtml. 7 p.m. Call for info. Sinzibukwud. Johnny’s Irish Pub, 1382 Culver Rd. 224-0990. johnnysirishpub.com. 8 p.m. Free. Tryst w/Mesh. Nola’s Restaurant & Nightclub, 4775 Lake Ave. 663-3375. nolasweb.com. 6 p.m. Call for info.

West Fest Day I: The Fevertones, Routine Involvements, A Dead Love Society, There I Say is Lightning, and Envious Disguise.

Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. Limited entry for unders. $5-$6. Wheeler Station. Finger Lakes Casino & Racetrack, 5857 Rt. 96. Farmington. 924-3232. fingerlakesracetrack.com. Call for info.

SATURDAY, AUGUST 24 [ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ] Jim Lane. Schooner’s Riverside Pub, 70 Pattonwood Dr. 3423030. shumwaymarine.com/ schooners.shtml. 2 p.m. Free. Johnny Bauer. Jeremiah’s Tavern, 2200 Buffalo Rd. Gates. 2470022. jeremiahstavern.com. 9 p.m. Call for info.

Lovin Cup Unplugged Dinner Music Series: Kinloch Nelson. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. lovincup.com. 6 p.m. Free. Noel Leon. Tapas 177 Lounge, 177 St. Paul St. 262-2090. tapas177.com. 11 p.m. Free. Paul Strowe. Bayside Pub, 279 Lake Rd. Webster. 323-1224. baysidepubwebster.com. Call for info.

Rochester Puerto Rican Festival 2013. Frontier Field, 1 Morrie

Silver Way. redwingsbaseball. com. noon. See website for full festival schedule. prfestival.com. $5-$25. Ryan & Rayce. McGraw’s Irish Pub, 146 W Commercial St. East Rochester. 348-9091. mcgrawsirishpub.com. 7 p.m. Free. [ BLUES ]

Dan Schmitt. The Beale,

693 South Ave. 271-4650. thebealegrille.com. 7:30 p.m. Call for info. Deborah Magone. House of Guitars, 645 Titus Ave. 544-3500. houseofguitars.com. 1 p.m. Free. Ezra & The Storm. Sticky Lips BBQ Juke Joint, 830 Jefferson Rd. 585-292-5544. stickylipsbbq. com. 10 p.m. Free. The Imaginary Band. The Beale, 1930 Empire Blvd. Webster. 2161070. thebealegrille.com. 7:30 p.m. Call for info.

Joe Beard. Dinosaur Bar-BQue, 99 Court St. 325-7090. dinosaurbarbque.com. 10 p.m. Free. [ COUNTRY ]

Zac Brown Tribute Band. Nashvilles, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. Henrietta. 334-3030. nashvillesny.com. 9 p.m. Call for info. [ DJ/ELECTRONIC ]

Blue Label Saturdays ft. DJ Andy Fade and DJ Bobby Base. Flat Iron Café, 561 State

St. 454-4830. flatironcafe.net. Call for info. DJ Big Reg. Plush, 151 St. Paul St. 232-5650. venurochester.com. 10 p.m. Call for info. DJ Blake. 140 Alex Bar & Grill, 140 Alexander St. 256-1000. 140alex.com. 10 p.m. Call for info. DJ Darkwave. Vertex Night Club, 169 N. Chestnut St. 2325498. 10 p.m. $3-$8. DJ Trancesend. Decibel Lounge, 45 Euclid St. 7544645. decibellounge.com. 10 p.m. $5. La Selva. Tilt Nightclub & Ultralounge, 444 Central Ave. 232-8440. facebook.com/ Tiltnightclub. 10 p.m. Call for info.

Poke Dem Saturdays ft. Team Lion Paw, The Money Green Theme, Nick Kage, and Wavey. Trinities Restaurant,

36 W. Main St. 319-4047. 10 p.m. $5-$10. Saturday Night Ladies Night. BLU Bar & Grill, 250 Pixley Rd. 247-0079. blurochester. com. 9 p.m. Call for info. [ JAZZ ]

Cool Club Jazz Trio.

Lemoncello, 137 West Commercial St. East Rochester. 385-8565. lemoncello137.com. 7 p.m. Free. Frank’s Rat Pack. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. East Rochester. 662-5555. bistro135.net. 6 p.m. Free.

Sankofa Evening of Theatre & Jazz Festival. MuCCC, 142

Atlantic Ave. 7:30 p.m. $12$30. Special Blend. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. 2484825. woodcliffhotelspa.com. 7:30 p.m. Free. The White Hots. Pultneyville Grill, 4135 Lake Rd. Pultneyville. 315-589-4512. pultneyvillegrill.com. 7 p.m. Call for info. [ KARAOKE ]

Karaoke at 140 Alex. 140 Alex Bar & Grill, 140 Alexander St. 256-1000. 140alex.com. 10:30 p.m. Free. Karaoke w/Cyd Scarlett!. Norton’s Pub, 1730 N. Goodman St. 266-3570. 10 p.m. Kick-Ass Karaoke. Temple Bar and Grille, 109 East Ave. 2326000. templebarandgrille.com. 10 p.m. Free.


[ HIP-HOP/RAP ] Bedroc. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N. Water St. 3255600. waterstreetmusic.com. 6:30 p.m. $10-$12. [ POP/ROCK ]

80s Night Benefit for the Seva Challenge ft. The Ronald Reagans. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park

Point Dr. 292-9940. lovincup. com. 9 p.m. $25. Chimaira w/The Browning. Montage Music Hall, 50 Chestnut St. 232-1520. themontagemusichall.com. 6:30 p.m. $15. Download w/@-Syllable. Nola’s Restaurant & Nightclub, 4775 Lake Ave. 663-3375. nolasweb. com. 6 p.m. Call for info.

Fairport Music and Food Festival. ,. noon. Liftbridge

Lane, Fairport. See website for full festival schedule. fairportmusicfestival.com. $10-$15. Five-0. Pelican’s Nest, 566 River St. 663-5910. pelicansnestrestaurant.com. 10 p.m. Free.

Goo Goo Dolls w/Matt Nathanson. Darien Lake PAC,

9993 Allegheny Rd. Darien. 5994641. godarienlake.com. 7:30 p.m. $20-$65. Katie & Alex. Johnny’s Irish Pub, 1382 Culver Rd. 2240990. johnnysirishpub.com. 8 p.m. Free. The Kid Kurry Band. Finger Lakes Casino & Racetrack, 5857 Rt. 96. Farmington. 924-3232. fingerlakesracetrack.com. Call for info. Me & The Boyz. Captain Jack’s Good Time Tavern, 8505 Greig St. Sodus. 483-9570. captainjacksgoodtimetavern.com. 9 p.m. Free.

The Michael Vadala Trio w/ Small Houses, Upward Groove, Lap Giraffe, and Cammy Enaharo. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe

SUNDAY, AUGUST 25 [ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ]

Celtic Music Sundays. Temple Bar and Grille, 109 East Ave. 232-6000. templebarandgrille. com. 7 p.m. Free.

Celtic Music Sundays: Mike Edwards Duo. Temple Bar and

Grille, 109 East Ave. 232-6000. templebarandgrille.com. 7 p.m. Free. Dan Styles The Band Of One. The Titus Tavern, 692 Titus Ave. 2705365. titustavern.com. 6 p.m. Call for info. Dave McGrath Trio. Captain Jack’s Good Time Tavern, 8505 Greig St. Sodus. 483-9570. captainjacksgoodtimetavern.com. 3 p.m. Call for info. Fandango at the Tango. Tango Cafe, 389 Gregory St. 271-4930. tangocafedance.com. 7:30 p.m. Free, donations accepted Tango Cafe, 389 Gregory St. 271-4930. tangocafedance.com. 7:30 p.m. Free, donations accepted.

Johanna Warren w/Nick Young, Will Veeder. Bug Jar, 219

Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. $6-$8. Lane & Ott. Bayside Pub, 279 Lake Rd. Webster. 323-1224. baysidepubwebster.com. Call for info.

Rochester Puerto Rican Festival 2013. Frontier Field, 1 Morrie

Silver Way. redwingsbaseball. com. noon. See website for full festival schedule. prfestival.com. $5-$25. [ BLUES ]

Blues BBQ Bashes ft. Chris Duarte. Abilene Bar & Lounge,

153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. abilenebarandlounge.com. 6 p.m. $10-$15.

[ DJ/ELECTRONIC ] Boasy Sundaze. Club Clarissas, 293 Clarissa St. 232-3430. Call for info. Drink and Drag Sundays. ONE Nightclub and Lounge, 1 Ryan Alley. 546-1010. oneclublife.com. 8 p.m. 18+. Call for info.

Ave. 8 p.m. Limited entry for unders. $6-$8. MoChester. Firehouse Saloon, 814 S. Clinton Ave. 319-3832. thefirehousesaloon.com. 9 p.m. 21+. $5. Nerds In Denial. House of Guitars, 645 Titus Ave. 544-3500. houseofguitars.com. 6 p.m. Free.

St. 454-4830. flatironcafe.net. 10 p.m. Call for info.

The Resonance w/Dirty Pennies. Richmond’s Tavern,

[ JAZZ ]

21 Richmond Street. 2708570. richmondstavern.com. 9 p.m. Free. Sisters of Murphy. Skylark Lounge, 40 South Union St. 2708106. theskylarklounge.com. 9 p.m. Call for info. Small Town w/Jim Lane. Schooner’s Riverside Pub, 70 Pattonwood Dr. 342-3030. shumwaymarine.com/schooners. shtml. 2 p.m. Call for info. Triple Play. Hamlin Station Bar & Grill, 52 Railroad Ave. Hamlin. 964-2010. hamlinstation.net. 8:30 p.m. Call for info. Woodstone. Captain Jack’s Good Time Tavern, 8505 Greig St. Sodus. 483-9570. captainjacksgoodtimetavern.com. 1 p.m. Call for info.

Ship Wrecked Sunday’s ft. DJ Trancesend. Captain’s Attic, 37

Charlotte St. 546-8885. 21+. Call for info.

Tequila Sundays ft. DJ Andy Fade. Flat Iron Café, 561 State

Bill Slater. Woodcliff Hotel &

Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. 248-4825. woodcliffhotelspa.com. Call for info. Free. Joe Santora Trio. Pultneyville Grill, 4135 Lake Rd. Pultneyville. 315-589-4512. pultneyvillegrill. com. 4 p.m. Call for info. POP/ROCK

50s/60s Family Fun in the Sun Sunday ft. Shama Lama. ,. 3 p.m.

Henrietta Amphitheater, Veterans Memorial Park. Call for info. The Fools. Schooner’s Riverside Pub, 70 Pattonwood Dr. 3423030. shumwaymarine.com/ schooners.shtml. 3 p.m. Call for info. Greg Townson. Marge’s Lakeside Inn, 4909 Culver Rd. 323-1020. margeslakesideinn.com. 4 p.m. Call for info.

Johnny Bauer & Great Escape. Main Street Armory,

900 E. Main St. 232-3221. rochestermainstreetarmory.com. 5 p.m. Call for info. Karma. Pelican’s Nest, 566 River St. 663-5910. pelicansnestrestaurant.com. 5:30 p.m. Free.

Ke$ha w/ Mike Posner, Semi Precious Weapons. CMAC,

3355 Marvin Sands Drive. Canandaigua. 758-5300. cmacevents.com. 7:30 p.m. $20-$49.50.

Traditional Irish Music Session. Johnny’s Irish Pub, 1382 Culver Rd. 224-0990. johnnysirishpub. com. 5 p.m. Free.

[ OPEN MIC ]

Golden Link Singaround.

Twelve Corners Presbyterian Church, 1200 S. Winton Rd. 244-8585. twelvecorners.org. 7:30 p.m. Free. Open Mic Night. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. lovincup.com. 8:30 p.m. Free Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. lovincup.com. 8:30 p.m. Free. Open Mic w/String Theory. Johnny’s Irish Pub, 1382 Culver Rd. 224-0990. johnnysirishpub. com. 8 p.m. Free. [ POP/ROCK ]

Sons of Synergy. The Titus

MONDAY, AUGUST 26

Tavern, 692 Titus Ave. 2705365. titustavern.com. 7 p.m. Call for info.

[ JAZZ ]

Underwater Tiger w/Poetry for Thieves. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe

Alphonso Williams. Bistro 135,

135 W. Commercial St. East Rochester. 662-5555. bistro135. net. 5:30 p.m. Free. [ OPEN MIC ]

Dave McGrath Open Mic. Johnny’s Irish Pub, 1382 Culver Rd. 224-0990. johnnysirishpub. com. 8 p.m. Free. Open Jam at Thirsty Frog. Thirsty Frog, 511 East Ridge Rd. 7305285. 1thirstyfrog.com. 9 p.m. Call for info.

TUESDAY, AUGUST 27 [ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ]

Don Christiano-The Beatles Unplugged. Abilene Bar &

Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. abilenebarandlounge. com. 8 p.m. Free. Jim Lane. Schooner’s Riverside Pub, 70 Pattonwood Dr. 3423030. shumwaymarine.com/ schooners.shtml. 6 p.m. Free. Jon Lewis, Molly MacIntyre. Towpath Café, 6 N. Main St. Box Factory Bldg. Fairport. 377-0410. towpathcafe.com. 5 p.m. Call for info. [ BLUES ]

Bluesday Tuesday Blues Jam. P.I.’s Lounge, 495 West Ave. 8 p.m. Call for info. Teagan Ward. The Beale, 693 South Ave. 271-4650. thebealegrille.com. 7 p.m. Call for info. [ JAZZ ]

Charlie Mitchell Group. Flipside

Bar & Grill, 2001 E. Main St. 2883930. 8 p.m. Free. Kyle Vock Duo. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. East Rochester. 662-5555. bistro135. net. 6 p.m. Free Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. East Rochester. 662-5555. bistro135. net. 6 p.m. Free. Roses & Revolutions. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. 248-4825. woodcliffhotelspa. com. 5:30 p.m. Free. Ryan from El Rojo Jazz. Lemoncello, 137 West Commercial St. East Rochester. 385-8565. lemoncello137.com. 6 p.m. Free.

Ave. 9 p.m. $6-$8.

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 28 [ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ] Jumbo Shrimp. Marge’s Lakeside Inn, 4909 Culver Rd. 323-1020. margeslakesideinn.com. 6 p.m. Call for info. Marty Roberts. Schooner’s Riverside Pub, 70 Pattonwood Dr. 342-3030. shumwaymarine. com/schooners.shtml. 7 p.m. Call for info. Rob & Gary Acoustic. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. 248-4825. woodcliffhotelspa. com. 5:30 p.m. Free.

SEEKS FALL INTERNS

[ BLUES ]

Big Mike & The Motivators.

Dinosaur Bar-B-Que, 99 Court St. 325-7090. dinosaurbarbque. com. 9 p.m. Free.

Food Truck Rodeo ft. Significant Other. Rochester Public Market, 280 N. Union St. 5 p.m. Free. [ JAZZ ]

&

Anthony Gianovola. Lemoncello, 137 West Commercial St. East Rochester. 385-8565. lemoncello137.com. 6 p.m. Free. Jim E Leggs. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. East Rochester. 662-5555. bistro135.net. 6 p.m. Free. [ HIP-HOP/RAP ]

Word of Mouth Wednesday’s w/DJ Private Eye. Dubland

Underground, 315 Alexander St. 232-7550. dublandunderground. wordpress.com. 10 p.m. 21+. $5. [ POP/ROCK ]

Highness w/City of Caterpillars.

Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. $7-$9. Don Mancuso & Friends. Nola’s Restaurant & Nightclub, 4775 Lake Ave. 663-3375. nolasweb. com. 4 p.m. Call for info. Ruby Shooz. Ontario Beach Park, 4799 Lake Ave. geneseelighthouse.org. 7 p.m. Free.

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 25


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Art form, and the strangely emotional tug of details such as texture and patina.

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Welcome to

Barry’s work has undeniable gravitas.

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Left to right: “Sebby” and “The Weight” are two sculptures included in “Pour Quality,” a showcase of works by Gareth Fitzgerald Barry that is currently on view at Axom Gallery. PHOTOS PROVIDED

Heavy mettle “Pour Quality: Sculpture and Photographs by Gareth Fitzgerald Barry” THROUGH AUGUST 24 AXOM GALLERY, 176 ANDERSON AVE., SUITE 303 232-6030 X23, AXOMGALLERY.COM FRIDAY & SATURDAY NOON-5 P.M., AND BY APPOINTMENT | FREE [ REVIEW ] BY REBECCA RAFFERTY

ENJOY OUTDOOR SEATING Overlooking the Cour tyard

ALL SUMMER LONG Weekday Happy Hour Specials 302 N. Goodman St. • 256.5980 Village Gate, Rochester

26 CITY AUGUST 21-27, 2013

I’m fascinated by the way people like Gareth Fitzgerald Barry view the world. The recent RIT graduate and emerging artist works for Atlas Builders, a construction company subsidized by the government to revitalize the inner-city landscape with new single-family housing. It’s easy to see where his field of work has influenced his art — Barry often works with steel, iron, and concrete elements — but he’s also got a keen awareness of how to transform the seemingly mundane objects around us into quietly poignant works, pulling overlooked bits of beauty into the light by cleverly rearranging subtle elements such that they may be suddenly seen anew. A dozen of his sensitive sculptural works, as well as a selection of still photographs from his “Blurring Lines” video, are currently being shown at Axom Gallery. Axom Gallery is tucked off the chic entrance of the office and studio space shared by artist Rick Muto and his wife,

Robin, an interior designer. With their support, their daughter, Margot, curates shows in the bright and airy gallery. Before entering the exhibition space, visitors encounter a few of Barry’s smaller sculptures set on tabletops, and an array of film stills from his 10-minute video. “Blurring Lines” follows a continuous bright yellow paint-drip line that crosses King Street, a “serendipitously created accident” from the leaky truck of the Monroe County Stripers, who paint the traffic lines on our roads. In the video, Barry has layered the voice of Martin Luther King Jr. speaking about events leading up to the Civil Rights Movement and piano music played by Nina Simone with imagery of this meandering line, and the environment where it is found. You can watch the entirety of the video on the artist’s website, but included in the entrance of the space are stills, showing bright paint against the faded grays and browns of the city, in details of drips, or expanses of the trailing lines. The work is a good introduction to Barry’s fascination with finding secret stories in the details that most of us overlook. “It is my intention to create something from what most of us call nothing, to draw attention to things that have been forgotten, neglected, and underappreciated, and bring them to the fore-front,” says Barry in a provided artist’s statement. This is evident in his sculptural works, which whether diminutive or substantial in size, bring attention to the tension of weight and

Margot Muto felt this, and responded. “The beauty of running your own gallery is that you can use it as an opportunity to share with the public the art that moves you deeply,” she says. “The sophistication of Gareth’s design sensibility and his relationship as a maker with his material stood out the minute I was confronted with his work.” Barry knows his materials, and imbues them with his own “poetic sensibility,” she says. “This kind of sophistication is rare to see coming from a recent undergraduate.” One of the most immediately impactful works in the show is “The Weight,” a tall structure of a curved steel I-beam on a cement base, which with a length of rusted chain, supports a large, rough angle of what once might have been driftwood, now cast in iron. The beam seems to bend under the weight of its burden, creating a palpable tension. This tension extends to the organic form, trapped in a forced-petrified state, and its precarious-feeling, heavy dangle. In a separate corner, “Iron Wallabees” lay on the floor, a cast pair of men’s shoes with well-worn impressions left by an individual owner. The weighty material quietly alludes to the simple, glorious pleasure of removing one’s shoes at the end of a long day. “Tall Grass and Cat Tails” is a nearly flat, tall column of immortalized organic matter fixed to one wall of the space, the bumps and stalks of the plants swathed in a bright orange rust. Despite its roughness, there is a certain elegance to the piece, and it’s easy to envision stumbling upon it at the end of a narrow hallway, or amid lush life affixed to a garden wall. Barry’s organic capturing continues with “Cracked Shell,” what looks to be one hemisphere of an ostrich shell or even the dome of a skull, cast in iron and affixed to a rough wood block. The form has a cracks running through its thick surface, and the textured interior shimmers as though this vessel remembers the precious cargo it once held. Axom Gallery will host a closing reception for Barry’s exhibit on Saturday, August 24, 6-9 p.m. This is the last day of the exhibit and the artist will be present.


DANCE | ROCHESTER SALSA CRUISE

So you think you can dance? MVA Productions and Rhythm Society NY think you can step it up, and shake your groove thing on a boat (that’s some next-level balance and dexterity shenanigans, right there). On Saturday, August 24, 6-9 p.m., take the party to the water and cruise Lake Ontario on the 80-foot Harbor Town Belle. The event will offer dancing, drinks, and mingling to the sultry sounds of salsa, meringue, bachata, and more. You must be 18 years of age to cruise, and 21 or older to drink. An after party will be held 10 p.m.-2 a.m. at Boulder Coffee’s 960 Genesee St. location. Get your sea legs ready and register, as tickets are limited. The cost to participate is $30 per person, or $50 per couple. Call 340-7177 or email rhythm_society@yahoo.com for more information. Visit Rhythm Society (758 South Ave.) in person or rhythmsociety.org to purchase tickets. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY

Art Exhibits [ OPENING ] Axom Gallery, 176 Anderson Ave., 2nd floor. “Pour Quality” by Gareth Fitzgerald Barry. Through Aug 24. Wed-Sat 12-5 p.m. and by appt. Closing reception Aug 24, 6-9 p.m. 232-6030. axomgallery.com. Bodywork Kneaded Popup gallery, 5 West Main St., Honeoye Falls. Photo exhibition: “Life in remote places: A fragile balance” by Kris Dreessen. Aug 21 & 23, 6-9 p.m. 802-2405. bodywork. kneaded@gmail.com. Cary Graphic Arts Collection, Lomb Memorial Dr. Manifold Greatness: The Creation and Afterlife of the King James Bible, exhibition opening. Through Dec 13. Reception Sep 13, 5-8 p.m. Curator Steven Galbraith will give a lecture at 5 p.m. 475-3961. skgtwc@rit.edu. library.rit.edu/ cary. Pat Rini Rohrer Gallery, 71 S Main St. Canandaigua. “Focus on the Finger Lakes.” Through Sep 29. Mon-Sat 10 a.m.-6 p.m., Sun 12:30-4 p.m. 3940030. prrgallery.com. Ross Gallery of the Skalny Welcome Center at St. John Fisher, 3690 East Ave. DRAW Presents “My Space.” Through Oct 4. Mon-Fri 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Reception Sep 13, 6:30-9 p.m. 385-8023. Wayne County Council for the Arts, 108 W. Miller St. Newark. “Then & Now,” Drawings by Neal McDannel. Through Sep 27. Thu-Sun noon-3 p.m., and by appt. Reception Aug 24, 4:30-6:30 p.m. waynearts. wordpress.com. [ CONTINUING ] Acanthus Café, 337 East Ave. “Bestest of Friends.”

New artwork by Kristine A. Greenizen. 319-5999. acanthuscafe.com. Arts & Cultural Council for Greater Rochester, 277 N. Goodman St. Member Showcase 2013. Through Aug 29. 473-4000. artsrochester. org. A.R.T.S. Gallery, 321 East Ave. “Painting the Promise” Mixed Media Paintings by Richmond Futch Jr. Through Aug 31. 729-9916. Axom Gallery, 176 Anderson Ave., 2nd floor. “Pour Quality” by Gareth Fitzgerald Barry. Through Aug 24. Wed-Sat 12-5 p.m. and by appt. Closing reception Aug 24, 6-9 p.m. 232-6030. axomgallery. com. Baobab Cultural Center, 728 University Ave. Frank Frazier and Friends. Frank Frazier, Minerva Diaz, Rory Tequan Morgan, Janice Thacker, Shenna Vaughn. thebaobab. org. Black Radish Studio, 274 N. Goodman. Another Bright Idea! by Kevin Fitch. Through Sep 28. 413-1278. blackradishstudio.com. Books Etc., 78 W. Main St. Macedon. “Whales, Windmills and Wonders.”. Through Sep 30. Highlights the work of John Domm, Terry Patti, and Marie Starr. 474-4116. books_ etc@yahoo.com. Bridge Art Gallery University of Rochester Medical Center, 300 Crittenden Blvd. “Play.” urmc. rochester.edu. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. NEON GREY II: Renee Latragna + Brittany Williams. Through Sep 30. 8 p.m.-2 a.m. lobbydigital.com. City Hall, 30 Church St. A Beautiful Place to Rest: Rochester’s Mount Hope

Cemetery. Through September 16. The photography of David C. Gaudioso. 4287426. cityofrochester.gov/ mthope/175/. Community Darkroom Gallery, 713 Monroe Ave. “Gramma’s Cameras II,” Photography by Lori Horton Ball. Through Aug 31. Mon 9 a.m.-9:30 p.m., Tue-Thu 9 a.m.-6:30 p.m., Fri 12-5 p.m., Sat 10 a.m.-5:30 p.m. 271-5920. geneseearts. org. Crossroads Coffeehouse, 752 S. Goodman St. The Artwork of Bethany Williams and Allie Hartley. 244-6787. xroadscoffeehouse.com. A Different Path Gallery, 27 Market St. Brockport. “A Little Twisted: An Exploration of the Self.” BFA Painting Exhibit by Karen Nelson. Wed-Fri 11 a.m.-noon, SatSun noon-4 p.m. 637-5494. adifferentpathgallery.com. Equal=Grounds, 750 South Ave. “Pins and Paper,” new work by Allison Snyder-Nichols. 242-7840. gallery@equalgrounds.com. equalgrounds.com. Friendly Home’s Memorial Gallery, 3165 East Ave. “Watercolor World” by Sybie Culbertson. Through Sep 2. Daily 10 a.m.-5 p.m. friendlyhome.org. Gallery One Fine Arts, 2575 E. Henrietta Rd. “A Soft Sculpture Quilt Exhibit” by Frances Hare. Through Sep 1. 249-0354. franceshare@yahoo.com. Geisel Gallery, Bausch & Lomb Place, One Bausch & Lomb Place. “Side Streets & Back Alleys” An exhibition featuring the photographs of Patricia Wilder. Through Aug 30. artsrochester.org. George Eastman House, 900 East Ave. The Gender Show. Through Oct 13. TueSat 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Sun 11 a.m.-5 p.m. 271-3361. eastmanhouse.org. I-Square Visions, 693 Titus Ave. Irondequoit. “TerRaku.” A ceramic Art Exhibition of terracotta & raku clay works. Through Aug 30. Mon-Fri 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Closing reception Aug 30, 7-9 p.m. with music by Rockin’ Red & Tony Valle. zannebrunner@gmail.com. Image City Photography Gallery, 722 University Ave. Portfoloio Showcase 2013. Through Sep 1. WedSat 11 a.m.-7 p.m., Sun noon-4 p.m. 482-1976. imagecityphotographygallery. com. International Art Acquisitions, 3300 Monroe Ave. “Classic to Contemporary” Through Aug 31. Mon-Fri 10 a.m.-9 p.m., Sat 10 a.m.-6 p.m., Sun 12-5 p.m. 264-1440. Link Gallery at City Hall, 30 Church St. A Beautiful Place to Rest: Rochester’s Mt. Hope Cemetery. Through Sep 16. 271-5920. cityofrochester.gov. Livingston Arts Center, 4 Murray Hill Dr. Mt. Morris. New Deal Gallery: “Under the Influence: New Deal Painters And Their Artistic Influences.” Through October 5. 243-6785. LuLuLemon Athletica, 3040 Monroe Ave. “Your Body” Anatomy Drawings by Carla Bartow. 271-1427. lululemon. com.

Lux Lounge, 666 South Ave. The Art of J. Nevadomski and Allie Hartley. 232-9030. lux666.com. Main Street Arts, 20 W. Main St., Clifton Springs. Main Street Art Grand Opening: “Locality.” Through Aug 30. Two floors of artwork from over 30 local artists, live music, and catering by Warfield’s Restaurant and Bakery. 315462-0210. mstreetarts@gmail. com. mainstreetartsgallery. com. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. Lockhart Gallery, through Aug 25: Mortal: A Portfolio of Woodcuts by Kiki Smith. Grand Gallery, through Sep 8: 64th Rochester-Finger Lakes Exhibition. Wed-Sun 11 a.m.–5 p.m. Thu 11 a.m.9 p.m. Creative Workshop, through Sep 19: Faculty Show. Admission free during workshop hours. 276-8959. mag.rochester.edu. Mental Health Association, 320 N Goodman St. “Luminaria” Art lighting the path to wellness. Creative Wellness Coalition. 325-3145 x144. Mill Art Center & Gallery, 61 N Main St. Honeoye Falls. “Celebrate Our Surroundings.” Benefit for The Finger Lakes Museum. 624-7740. millartcenter.com. My Sister’s Gallery, 505 Mt. Hope Ave. “Seeing Through Our Eyes,” artwork by residents. Through Sep 15. Daily 10 a.m.-8 p.m. 546-8439 x3716. abmiller@ episcopalseniorlife.org. New Deal Gallery, 4 Livingston County Campus. Mount Morris. Expressions of the Civil War. In recognition of the 150th Anniversary. The Faces of Michael Teres and Leslie Heen. Photographer Michael Teres and painter Leslie Heen team up for an exhibit in Apartment One. Wed, Fri 1-4 p.m., Thu 1-7:30 p.m., Sat 11 a.m.-3 p.m. 243-6785. livingstonarts.org. Ock Hee’s Gallery, 2 Lehigh St. “Buddhist & Asian Art.” Through Aug 24. Mon-Sat 11 a.m.-5 p.m. 624-4730. ockheesgallery.com. Our House Gallery of Veterans Outreach Center, 783 South Ave. Unity but not Uniformity: Veterans, Art, and Growth. Through Aug 30. Tue 5-7 p.m., Fri 1-3 p.m. 295-7836. The Owl House, 75 Marshall St. Bradely Butler Art Opening. 360-2920. owlhouserochester. com. Oxford Gallery, 267 Oxford St. “Summer Session.” Through Sept 7. Tue-Fri, noon-5 p.m., Sat 10 a.m.-5 p.m. 271-5885. oxfordgallery.com. Record Archive, 33 1/3 Rockwood St. Stormymade: Garden of Earthly Delights by Margaret Storms. With music by Precious Kindred. recordarchive.com. Rochester Contemporary Arts Center, 137 East Ave. State of the City: Street-ish. Through Sep 28. Wed-Sun 1-5 p.m. 461-2222. info@ rochestercontemporary.org. rochestercontemporary.org. Rush Rhees Library, University of Rochester, River Campus. Memorial Art Gallery: 100 Years of Art for the

FESTIVAL | NEW YORK STATE FAIR

The Great New York State Fair in Syracuse kicks off on Thursday, August 22, and continues through Monday, September 2, featuring a host of concerts, competitions, daily parades, midway rides and games, agricultural and livestock competitions, monster truck rallies, dance, sports, a circus, and much more. Before you head to the fairgrounds (581 State Fair Blvd., Syracuse), visit nysfair.org for complete schedules and more information. Gates open at 8 a.m. each day, and the buildings are open 10 a.m.-10 p.m. The midway will be open 10 a.m.-midnight, except on Labor Day (Monday, September 2), when it will close at 10 p.m. Admission to the Fair is $6 per day in advance, or $10 at the gate. Six-Day Frequent Fairgoer admission books are available for $30 at the State Fair Box Office. Grandstand event ticket prices vary; more information at etix.com or by calling 800514-3849 or nysfair.org. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY Community. Through Sep 30, 2013. mag.rochester.edu. The Shoe Factory Art Co-op, 250 N. Goodman St. Mona Oates and Wen-Hua Chen. Wed12-5 p.m. shoefactoryarts. com. Spectrum Gallery, 100 College Ave. “Sunshine and Shadows,” Paintings by Carol Acquilano. Through Aug 31. Tue-Fri 9 a.m.-6 p.m., Sat 10 a.m.-2 p.m. spectrumgalleryroc.com. Spencer Hill Gallery, 10503 North Rd., Corning. Footloose: A Showcase of 12 X 12s by 21 Artists. Through Sep 14. Participating Rochester artists: Scot Bennett, Douglas Giebel, Nancy Jurs, Lanna Pejovic, Peter Pincus, Masha Ryskin, and Sabra Wood. spencerhillgallery.com. Starry Nites Café, 696 University Ave. “Sunrise to Moonset,” by Valerie Berner. Through Sep 28. Open daily and nightly. 271-2630. starrynitescafe.com. Tap & Mallet, 381 Gregory St. “It’s a Funny Story” Illustrations by Aarom Humby. 473-0503. tapandmallet.com. The Firehouse Gallery at Genesee Pottery, 713 Monroe Ave. “Potentiality” by Hannah Thompsett. Through Aug 30. 244-1730. geneseearts.org.

Call for Artwork [ WED., AUGUST 21 ] Call for Art! Ongoing. Main Street Arts, 20 W. Main St., Clifton Springs The gallery is currently seeking artists working in all media. Please include the following in your email: - 3 to 5 jpeg images of current work - Artist statement - CV/Resume Kindly indicate whether you are submitting available work or work that is representative 315-462-

0210. mstreetarts@gmail.com. mstreetarts@gmail.com. Call for Artists. Ongoing. 4614447. spectrumgalleryroc. com. Cayuga Naturally 2013 Photo Contest. Through Oct. 7. Sterling Nature Center, 15380 Jenzvold Rd Photos must have been taken in Cayuga County between 10/1/12 and 09/30/13. Submit to Sterling Nature Center by Oct 7, 2013 315-947-6143. snc@ co.cayuga.ny.us. facebook. com/sterlingnaturecenter. Elements of Expression: Words & Images. Through Sep. 30. Outside the Box Art Gallery, Bldg 9, The Canal Works, 1000 Turk Hill Rd. Dates of exhibit: Oct 18-Nov 15 6452485. outsidetheboxag.com. Go Art! Ongoing. The GeneseeOrleans Regional Arts Council is seeking artists interested in exhibiting their work in four galleries 343-9313. info@ goart.org. goart.org. New York Filmmakers Quarterly. Ongoing. Films must have been produced within NYS in the past 2 years. No fee. No honorarium. Max length 30 minutes. To be screened at Little Theatre last Wednesdays and Saturdays in January, April, July, and October. Send DVD screener + cover letter with 1 sentence bio and one sentence film description to Karen vanMeenan, Programmer, New York Filmmakers Quarterly, Little Theatre, 240 East Ave., Rochester NY 14604. Notification by email within 8 weeks of receipt emergingfilmmakers@yahoo. com. Schmoovies Call for Entries. Through Sep. 12. Submit short movies by Aug 12 continues on page 28

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 27


Call for Artwork

Children’s Center, 115 South Ave. Free. 428-8150. libraryweb.org.

at 11:59 p.m. Event to be held Monday, Sep 9 305-3692. wayne@ rochestermoviemakers.org.

[ THU., AUGUST 22 ] Gumshoe McMonocle and the Strange Case of Rumpelsomething.. 7 p.m. Irondequoit Public Library, Evans Branch, 45 Cooper Rd Grades K and up Free. 3366062. aholland@libraryweb. org.

Art Events [ THU., AUGUST 22 ] Showcase: Marusca Gatto’s Fusion Glass Creations. 6-9 p.m. Soulstice Artisan Market, 632 North Winton Rd. Free. 370-0076. soulsticeartisanmarket.com.

Comedy [ WED., AUGUST 21 ] Mike Dambra. Aug. 21-24. Comedy Club, 2235 Empire Blvd Webster Thu 7:30 p.m., Fri-Sat 7:30 p.m. & 10 p.m $9-$12. 671-9080. thecomedyclub.us. [ FRI., AUGUST 23 ] Improv Comedy Battles. 9:30 p.m. Village Idiots Improv Comedy, 274 Goodman St. N. $5. 797-9086. VIP@ improvVIP.com. [ SAT., AUGUST 24 ] Improv Comedy Battle. 7:30 p.m. Village Idiots Improv Comedy, 274 Goodman St. N. $5. 797-9086. VIP@ improvVIP.com. [ TUE., AUGUST 27 ] Comedy Open Mic. 7:30-10:30 p.m. Acanthus Café, 337 East Ave. 7 p.m. sign up. Host: Woody Battaglia 902-2010. woodybattaglia@gmail.com. acanthuscafe.com.

Dance Events [ WED., AUGUST 21 ] Lindy Jam: Weekly Swing Dance. 8:45 p.m. Tango Cafe Dance Studio (3rd Floor Ballroom), 389 Gregory St., Rochester, NY Lindy Jam is a weekly swing dance on Wednesday nights, 8:4511pm, hosted by Groove Juice Swing. Friendly atmosphere. Beautiful ballroom. Free beginner dance lesson at 9pm. No partner or experience necessary. Admission is free if it’s your first time!. $4 (or free if it’s your first time!). 2714930. lindyjam.com. [ THU., AUGUST 22 ] Dance Lab East. 10 p.m. Skylark Lounge, 40 South Union St 80s new wave music for the future (on vinyl) and visual effects 99 cents. 270-8106. theskylarklounge. com. [ SAT., AUGUST 24 ] Fandango at the Tango. 7 p.m. Tango Cafe, 389 Gregory St. 271-4930. tangocafedance.com. Salsa Cruise. 6-9 p.m. Party on the Harbor Town Belle. Dancing, drinks, music, mingling $30, $50 per couple, register. therochestersalsacruise. eventbrite.com. West African Drumming and Dance Classes with Fana Bangoura. Drumming: Saturdays, 10:30 a.m.noon at the Baobab (728 University Ave.). Dance: Sundays, from 2-3:30 .p.m at DancEncounters (215

THEATER | SANKOFA EVENINGS OF THEATRE AND JAZZ

The 6th Annual Sanfoka Evening of Theatre & Jazz Fest, which features a cross-section of theatrical artists from the Rochester community, will be presented by Mood Makers Books Theatre 1 Project, Mood Makers Books, and Rochester Playwrights in Residence at MuCCC (142 Atlantic Ave.) on Thursday, August 22, through Saturday, August 24. On Thursday, a staging of Robert Djed Snead’s full-length gospel drama, “The Devoted Disciples,” will take place, followed by an opening night reception. Three one-act plays will be presented on Friday and Saturday nights, followed by a jazz set each night by Paradigm Shift. The Friday lineup includes “Shades of Color” by Liberia author & poet, Aken V. Wariebi; “The Tiny Coqui Wins the Race,” adapted from a Puerto Rican folktale by Annette Ramos and written & directed by Delores Jackson-Radney; and “Mi Casa Es Su Casa,” staged by The Rochester Latino Theatre Company, written by Jose Casado, and directed by Annette Ramos. Saturday night’s event features plays by three AfricanAmerican women that deal with history, friendship, truth, deception, and intrigue. The works include “Reflections on Hagins Place,” by family historian & storyteller Robin Nowell; “Win Win the Play,” by novelist Marsha Jones; and “The Overnight,” by playwright & director Laura Thomas. All Sankofa events take place at MuCCC. Tickets for opening night are $14 in advance or $18 at the door, and Friday or Saturday night $12 in advance or $16 at the door. A threenight theatre package is available for $30. Tickets can be purchased at Mood Makers Books in the Village Gate (274 N. Goodman Street). For additional information contact Curtis K. Rivers at 271-7010 or moodckr@frontiernet.net or visit muccc.org. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY Tremont St.) $10-$15. 503679-3372. kerfala.bangoura@ gmail.com. mounafanyi.org. [ SUN., AUGUST 25 ] English Country Dancing. 6:30 p.m. First Baptist Church of Rochester, 175 Allens Creek Rd English Country Dancing, live music, called dances. $7$8, under 17 free with adult. 244-2468. fbcrochester.net.

Festivals [ THU., AUGUST 22-MON., SEPTEMBER 2 ] New York State Fair. Aug. 22Sep. 2, 8 a.m.-10 p.m. 581 State Fair Blvd., Syracuse. Concerts, competitions, daily parades, midway rides and games, agricultural and livestock competitions, monster truck rallies, dance, sports, a circus, and much more $10 admission. 1-800514-3849. nysfair.org. [ SAT., AUGUST 24 ] Fairport Music and Food Festival. noon. Village of

28 CITY AUGUST 21-27, 2013

Fairport, Lift Bridge Lane The 9th annual Fairport Music & Food Festival is being held Saturday, August 24th, in the village of Fairport, on Lift Bridge Lane, from noon until 10. This is a day-long, family oriented celebration of music and food, with all proceeds benefiting the Golisano Children’s Hospital. A number of local and regional bands will perform, and there are crafts, entertainment, and fun activities for the kids $10$15, 12 and under free. 7030957. fairportmusicfest.com.

Kids Events [ WED., AUGUST 21 ] Books & Bites. 6:30-7:30 p.m. Henrietta Public Library, 455 Calkins Rd Ages 12+ Free, register. 359-7092. Storytime with Mike. Barnes & Noble, 330 Greece Ridge Center Dr. 9:30 & 10:30 a.m Free. 227-4020. bn.com. Wednesday Afternoon at the Movies: Kung Fu Panda 2. 2:30-4 p.m. Central Library,

[ FRI., AUGUST 23 ] 16th Annual Maze Preview Weekend. Every 3 days, 10 a.m.-8 p.m. Long Acre Farms, 1342 Eddy Rd Cost varies 315-986-4202. getlost@longacrefarms.com. longacrefarms.com. Family Fridays. 12-4 p.m Rochester Museum and Science Center, 657 East Ave. 8/23: Tech at Your Fingertips, 8/30: Sports Science Included in museum admission $11-$13. 2711880. rmsc.org Friday Make and Take Craft. 1-5 p.m Central Library, Children’s Center, 115 South Ave. Ages 3+ Free. 428-8150. libraryweb.org. Storytelling with Mike. 10:30 a.m. Barnes & Noble, 330 Greece Ridge Center Dr. Free. 227-4020. bn.com. [ SAT., AUGUST 24 ] AutismUp KiteFlite Festival and Expo 2013. 10 a.m. Rothfuss Park, 1648 Five Mile Line Rd., Penfield. The ultimate family fundraising festival with proceeds supporting the expansion of AutismUp’s unique education programs for our members living with autism in our community Free. 233-7475. bciardi@ autismup.org. [ SUN., AUGUST 25 ] Family Day. 1-4 p.m. Loyal Order of Moose Lodges, 3808 State Route 31, Palmyra. 315-597-6046. mooseintl.org. [ MON., AUGUST 26 ] College Essay Workshop. 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Brighton Memorial Library, 2300 Elmwood Ave. Register. 7845300. brightonlibrary.org. [ WED., AUGUST 28 ] Wednesday Afternoon at the Movies: Coraline. 2:30-4 p.m. Central Library, Children’s Center, 115 South Ave. Free. 428-8150. libraryweb.org.

Lectures [ WED., AUGUST 21 ] How to be Successful In Network Marketing. 7 p.m. Rochester Brainery, Village Gate, 274 N Goodman St. $15. 730-7034. info@ rochesterbrainery.com. rochesterbrainery.com. The Icarus Sessions. Third Wednesday of every month, 7 p.m. Hanlon-Fiske Studios, 34 Elton St. Ten or fifty or a hundred people come together and follow the simple rules of the Icarus Session. You have 140 seconds to talk about the art you are working on, what inspires you, what’s holding you back, whatever! You meet, connect, support each other, and then go back into the world, ready to make a ruckus Free. 705-6581.

Unique Bobbins with Kenn Van Dieren. 7 p.m. Irondequoit Library, Helen McGraw Branch, 2180 E. Ridge Rd Free, register. 336-6060. mcgrawbr@libraryweb.org. [ THU., AUGUST 22 ] Finger Lakes Artist Lecture: Loraine Cooley. 7 p.m. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. Included in gallery admission: $2.50-$6. 276-8900. mag.rochester. edu. The Shade Lovers Garden. 7 p.m. Penfield Public Library, 1985 Baird Rd. Mary Jo Lane, owner of MJ Creative Gardens will describe why shade is not just for hostas anymore Free, register. 340-8720. penfieldlibrary.org. [ MON., AUGUST 26 ] Breastfeeding. 6:30 p.m. Rochester Brainery, Village Gate, 274 N Goodman St. $15. 730-7034. info@ rochesterbrainery.com. rochesterbrainery.com. Medicare 101. 6 p.m. Monroe Branch Library, 809 Monroe Ave 428-8202. libraryweb. org. [ TUE., AUGUST 27 ] The Gardens of Europe. 7 p.m. Penfield Public Library, 1985 Baird Rd. With Joyce Roeder Free, register 340-8720. penfieldlibrary.org. Learn About Letchworth Series. 7 p.m. Letchworth State Park, 1 Letchworth State Park . Castile Invasive Species In and Around Letchworth State Park by Meg Janis $8 parking fee. 493-3625. Maximizing Muscle Performance. 6:30 p.m. Rochester Brainery, Village Gate, 274 N Goodman St. $15. 730-7034. info@ rochesterbrainery.com. rochesterbrainery.com. Pinterest for Small Business & Bloggers. 7 p.m. Rochester Brainery, Village Gate, 274 N Goodman St. $15. 730-7034. info@rochesterbrainery.com. rochesterbrainery.com. [ WED., AUGUST 28 ] Theology On Tap. 7 p.m. Johnny’s Irish Pub, 1382 Culver Rd. “Being a Christian in Everyday Life: Living the Good News in the World” with Dr. Damian Zynda, Th.D., Christian Formation Director, Church of the Transfiguration Free. 3283228 x1218. sloughlin@dor. org. johnnysirishpub.com. Tips for Packing Healthy School Lunches. 6:30 p.m. Rochester Brainery, Village Gate, 274 N Goodman St. $15. 730-7034. info@ rochesterbrainery.com. rochesterbrainery.com.

Literary Events [ WED., AUGUST 21 ] Book Discussion: “When the Killing’s Done” by T.C. Boyle. Through Aug. 21. Brighton Memorial Library, 2300 Elmwood Ave. Tue 1:30-3 p.m., Wed 7-8:30 p.m Free. 784-5300. brightonlibrary.org. Pure Kona Poetry Readings. 7 p.m. Acanthus Café, 337 East Ave. 7/3: Chris Shelton 7/10: Karen Beck 7/17: Colleen Powderly 7/24: Sheila Evans

7/31: Michael Ketchek. Free. 319-5999. acanthuscafe.com. [ THU., AUGUST 22 ] History Reading Group. 7-8:30 p.m. Writers and Books, 740 University Ave Free. 4732590. wab.org. [ SUN., AUGUST 25 ] History Reading Group: “Bismarck and the German Empire” by Erich Ecyk. 2-3:30 p.m. Lift Bridge Book Shop, 45 Main St 637-2260. liftbridgebooks.com. [ TUE., AUGUST 27 ] Lift Bridge Writers’ Group. 6:30 p.m. Lift Bridge Book Shop, 45 Main St Free. 6372260. liftbridgebooks.com. [ WED., AUGUST 28 ] Young Adult Book Club: “Will Grayson, Will Grayson” by John Green. 6:30 p.m. Lift Bridge Book Shop, 45 Main St 6372260. liftbridgebooks.com.

Museum Exhibit [ WED., AUGUST 21 ] Boardwalk Arcade. Through Sep. 8. The Strong National Museum of Play, 1 Manhattan Square Mon-Thu 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Fri-Sat 10 a.m.-8 p.m., Sun noon-5 p.m. Opening Weekend Celebration July 6, 11 a.m.-4 p.m. and July 7, 1-4 p.m $13, free to members and kids under 2 263-2700. museumofplay.org. “Fashions Inspired by Downton Abbey” and “Celebrating 100 Years of Door-to-door Postal Service in Fairport.” Through Sep. 15. Perinton Historical Society & Fairport Museum, 18 Perrin St Fairport Through Sep 15. Sun & Tue 2-4 p.m., Thu 7-9 p.m., Sat 9-11 a.m Free admission. 223-3989. info@ perintonhistoricalsociety.org. perintonhistoricalsociety.org. PGA Championship History Exhibit. Through Sep. 2. Rochester Museum and Science Center, 657 East Ave. Through September 2. Mon-Sat 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Sun 11 a.m.-5 p.m Included in admission: $11-$13. 2711880. rmsc.org. [ THU., AUGUST 22 ] “Off to the Theatre.” Aug. 22-Nov. 15. Museum of Wayne County History, 21 Butternut St Through Nov 15. Preview night August 22, 7:30 p.m. Screening of the 1925 film “Phantom of the Opera” Free 315-946-4943. waynehistory.org.

Recreation [ WED., AUGUST 21 ] Historic Landscape Garden Tours. George Eastman House, 900 East Ave. Tue-Sat noon & 3:30 p.m., Sun 3:30 p.m Included in admission: $5-$12. 271-3361. eastmanhouse.org. Owl Prowl. 7 p.m. Sterling Nature Center, 15380 Jenzvold Rd Free. 315947-6143. snc@co.cayuga. ny.us. facebook.com/ sterlingnaturecenter. [ FRI., AUGUST 23 ] Sounds of a Summer Night and Pot Luck Dinner. 6-8 p.m. BANC Sanctuary, 301


Railroad Mills Road, Victor. Following a pot luck dinner, naturalists Bill O’Neil and Martha Zettel will present a program about night creatures which vocalize in summer, such as bats and singing insects. After the talk, there will be a short guided walk in the sanctuary so that we can hear them ourselves. Bring your place settings, a dish to pass, and a flashlight for the walk. Wear clothing that will protect you from mosquitoes 264-1704. bancny.org. [ SAT., AUGUST 24 ] August Woodland Walks. 10:30 a.m. Take a naturalist-led walk in the nature center woodlot with naturalist Ron Walker. Hiking boots and binoculars are recommended. Meet at the Flint Hill village admission area to begin your adventure Free with museum admission, $4.50-$5.50 for walk only 538-6822. gcv.org. Birder Trip: Montezuma National Wildlife Refuge. 10 a.m. Meet at Bushnell’s Basin “Park and Ride” lot. Pack lunch, bring spotting scopes and FRS radios if you have them 223-7353. rochesterbirding.com. Ferns. 10 a.m. The Thousand Acre Swamp Sanctuary, 1581 Jackson Road Hand lens helpful Free. 773-8911. GVHC Hike. 8:15 a.m. Mendon Ponds Nature Center, Douglas Rd. Strenuous 11 mile hike Free. 750-8937. gvhchikes. org 1 p.m. Greece Canal Park, Elmgrove Rd., Greece. Moderate 4-5 mile hike Free. 323-1911. gvhchikes.org. Identification Series Walk: Beaver Facts and Habitat. 10 a.m.-noon. Cumming Nature Center, 6472 Gulick Rd. $3, $10 nonmembers, register. 374-6160. rmsc.org. Lost Secrets. 12:30 p.m. Mount Hope Cemetery, 1133 Mt. Hope Avenue $7, free to members. 461-3494. fomh. org. Nature Walk with Bob Cooper: Alasa Farms. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Cracker Box Palace Farm Animal Sanctuary, 6450 Shaker Rd Wear sturdy footwear and bring binoculars geneseelandtrust.org. Public Tour of South Section of Mount Hope Cemetery. Mount Hope Cemetery, 1133 Mt. Hope Avenue Meet: Cemetery Office, South entrance opposite the Distillery restaurant.The tour consists of a two hour leisurely walk through the south section covering approximately 1–1 ½ miles on paved roads and even terrain. Learn about 19th and 20th century Rochesterians including Rufus Sibley co-founder of Sibley, Lindsay, and Curr department store, Frank Gannett, founder of the Democrat and Chronicle, James Vick founder of Vicks Nursery, and others $5, members and kids under 16 free 461-3494. fomh.org. Trip to Ganargua Creek Meadow Preserve. 10 a.m. Meet at the Creek-side entrance, 727 Wilkinson Rd, Macedon. Wear long pants and appropriate footwear, as there is poison ivy. Allow two hours plus travel time for this field trip. Optional: bring lunch and folding chair and join us

SPECIAL EVENT | PARIS FLEA

Picture leaving work for the evening, and before grabbing a bite and a bubbly with friends, strolling down Main Street for a some chic shopping in the breezy, late summer air. Or setting off on a weekend afternoon to scour a market of wares from Rochester’s top designers and dealers. You can make this a reality by attending The Paris Flea: An Occasional Market in the City, which will be held Friday, August 23, through Saturday, August 31, as a unique benefit for Blackfriars Theatre (795 E. Main St.). Organizers of the sale promise that the event, which is designed by Blackfriars Artistic Director John Haldoupis, will have a decidedly theatrical flair and will transform the theater to a Parisian outdoor market. Admission to The Paris Flea is $5. The market will be open 2-7 p.m. daily, except Monday. The August event is one of two seasonal markets planned. This fall, look for the organization’s second sale, Theatre of Dreams: A Holiday Market in the City, which will commence Thanksgiving weekend. For more information, call 454-1260, or visit blackfriars.org. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY for a brown bag lunch 3838168. bancny.org. [ SUN., AUGUST 25 ] 3rd Annual Kidney Cares of WNY Walk. 8:30 a.m. Seneca Park, 2222 St. Paul St. By donation. eventbrite.com/ event/7345078327. Birder Trip: Durand Eastman Park. 8 a.m. Meet in Lake Shore Blvd. lot between Zoo and Log Cabin Roads 9243874. rochesterbirding.com. Guided Shorebird Walk. 8 a.m. Montezuma National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Center, 3395 US Route 20 East Register. 315-568-5987. friendsofmontezuma.org. GVHC Hike. 7 a.m. I-490 exit 27, Bushnell’s Basin. Very strenuous/hilly 7 mile hike, Gannett Hill $3 carpool. 7211175. gvhchikes.org. Public Tour of North Section of Mount Hope Cemetery. 2 p.m Mount Hope Cemetery, 1133 Mt. Hope Avenue Except May 12 see Special Events. Meet: North Gatehouse opposite Robinson Dr. This tour consists of a two hour leisurely walk of approximately one mile on paved roads and uneven terrain. Subjects covered include local history, famous people (including Susan B. Anthony and Frederick Douglass), horticulture, geology, architecture, symbolism, and more $5, members and kids under 16 free 461-3494. fomh.org. [ TUE., AUGUST 27 ] Pacesetters Walk. 6:30 p.m. Meet in parking lot of Fairport

Village Landing Dollar Tree Store 249-9507.

Special Events [ WED., AUGUST 21 ] 100 Days of Entertainment in the Park. Through Sep. 2. Commons Park, Lakeshore Dr. To celebrate the Canandaigua Centennial, the Canandaigua BID presents ‘100 Days of Entertainment in the Park.’ Most entertainment will be at Commons Park, larger groups will perform at the Kershaw Gazebo. Bring your chair and enjoy entertainment every day, for 100 days, in Canandaigua Free. 396-0300. 3rd Wednesdays with Lento. 6:30 p.m. Rochester Brainery, Village Gate, 274 N Goodman St. $50. 730-7034. info@ rochesterbrainery.com. rochesterbrainery.com. 3rd Wednesdays with Lento: Craft Cocktails 101. 6:30 p.m. Rochester Brainery, Village Gate, 274 N Goodman St. $50. 730-7034. rochesterbrainery.com. The Affordable Care Act and Your Small Business. 7:30 p.m. Pittsford Financial Center, 3330 Monroe Ave RSVP. 613-0143. deckers@ xfcu.org. Break the Record Bike Night. Aug. 21. Quaker Steak & Lube, 2205 Buffalo Rd. Giving away 4 $500 Gas Cards & win a Limo Ride and VIP passes to Allman Brothers Band. Special performance by Afflixxion from 5:30-9:30 p.m 697-9464. quakersteakandlube.com/ Rochester_NY.

Dave Matthews/Beatles Laser Show. Through Aug. 31. Rochester Museum and Science Center, 657 East Ave. Dave Matthews at 8 p.m., Beatles at 9:30 p.m One show $6-$7, both $9-$11. 2711880. rmsc.org. Dentzel Carousel. Through Oct. 14. Ontario Beach Park, 4799 Lake Ave The Carousel’s 2013 Operating Schedule is, as follows: Through Labor Day – Open Daily (7-Days per Week) Post-Labor Day through Columbus Day – Open Weekends (Saturday and Sunday) Columbus Day – Open Monday, October 14 (Last Day of 2013 Season) The Carousel’s 2013 Hours of Operation are: Noon to 9:00 p.m. The Carousel’s 2013 Price Schedule is, as follows: Single Ride -- $1.00 Punch Card (12 rides for the cost of 10) -- $10.00 **Valid Any Time** Wrist Band (Ride All Day) -- $5.00. cityofrochester. gov. Film: Rooftop Docs. 6:30-9:30 p.m. Capron Street Lofts, 1 Capron St. Short films, food, drinks, busker entertainment $25, register. r-y-p.org. Food Pairing Event featuring Bear Republic. 7 p.m. The Old Toad, 277 Alexander St. $35, register. 232-2626. theoldtoad.com. Geeks Who Drink Pub Quiz. 8 p.m. Scotland Yard Pub, 187 Saint Paul St Free. 730-5030. scotlandyardpub.com. Info Session for Proposed Mary L. Wright Charter School. 7 p.m. 7/31: 384 Chili Avenue. 8/21: 48 Clifton Street marylwrightprep.weebly.com. Scottsville Midweek Farmers’ Market. 4-7 p.m Smith Warren Post 367 American Legion, 61 Main Street in Scottsville 8893981. kmemccall@aol.com. Screening and talk back: “The March.” 6:30 p.m. Little Theatre, 240 East Ave. Free. 258-0400. thelittle.org. A Summer Movie Series: Children’s Series. Aug. 22, 10 a.m. Cinema Theatre, 957 S. Clinton Ave. Finding Nemo $3, $12 family max suggested donation. 354-3214. Theology On Tap. 7 p.m. Firehouse Saloon, 814 S. Clinton Ave. “Stirring up the World: An Evening on Pope Francis” with Fr. Bob Kennedy, Pastor of Blessed Sacrament/St. Boniface Free. 328-3228 x1218. sloughlin@dor.org. thefirehousesaloon.com. [ THU., AUGUST 22 ] African American Landmarks. 5:15-6:45 p.m. Arnett Branch Library, 310 Arnett Boulevard Southwest Neighborhood 5467029 x14. landmarksociety. org. Info session: Proposed new charter school for boys in Rochester. Aug. 22. Meet at The Freedom School, 630 Goodman Street N 396-2028. pwhite@vertusschool.org. Lincoln Tours. 1 & 3 p.m. Seward House Historic Museum, 33 South St., Auburn. 315-252-1283. sewardhouse.org. Max at the Gallery Tapas Night. 5-8 p.m. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. Live music, wine, beer,

tapas for purchase Included in admission: $2.50-$6. 2768900. mag.rochester.edu. Outdoor Movie Night: “Driving Miss Daisy.” 8 p.m. Quail Summit, 5102 Parrish Street Extension, Canandaigua. Bring lawn chairs Free, RSVP. 3961010. quailsummit.com. PhotoFinish 5K Info Sessions. Aug. 22. George Eastman House, 900 East Ave. Each session will run from 12:151 p.m. in Eastman House’s Curtis Theatre. The Photo Finish 5K allows non-profit organizations of any size to raise money while Eastman House staff and volunteers handle the event organization. While Eastman House raises money from registration fees, participants can raise money to run or walk in the Photo Finish 5K for any charity of their choice. Individuals or teams can sign up on behalf of a favorite non-profit organization. Event on Sat. Oct 5 271-3361 x445. crowdrise. com/photofinish5k2013. Screening: “Peaceable Kingdom: The Journey Home.” 5:30 p.m. Pittsford Community Library, 24 State St Pittsford 7 p.m. remarks by Harold Brown, with Q&A and discussion to follow Free. 2486275. libraryweb.org. South Wedge Farmers’ Market. 4 p.m Boulder Coffee Co., 100 Alexander St. 4 p.m Free. 269-8918. swfm.org. Stammtisch. Every other Thursday, 5:30 p.m. Roc Brewing Co., 56 S. Union St 794-9798. rocbrewingco@ gmail.com. rocbrewingco.com. Stone Tool Craftsman Show. Aug. 22-25, 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Letchworth State Park, 1 Letchworth State Park . Castile $8 parking fee. 493-3625. Thursday Teas. 12:30 & 3 p.m Sonnenberg Gardens and Mansion State Historic Park, 151 Charlotte St . Canandaigua $10$22, register. 394-4922. sonnenberg.org. [ FRI., AUGUST 23 ] A Big Hit for Young Audiences: 50 Years and Beyond. 6 p.m. Frontier Field, 1 Morrie Silver Way $6 game only, $15-$25 includes game and meal 5302060. yarochester.org. Big Screen Adventure: Coral Reef Adventure. Rochester Museum and Science Center, 657 East Ave. Fri 4 p.m., sat 2:30 & 4:30 p.m., Sun 1, 2, & 4 p.m., also Mon Oct 8 2:30 & 4:30 p.m $3-$7. 271-1880. rmsc.org. Career Fair. 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Staybridge Suites Hotel, 1000 Genesee St Free. 428-5990. cityofrochester.gov/careerfair. Caregiver Support Group Ice Cream Social. 3:30-5:30 p.m. Quail Summit, 5102 Parrish Street Extension, Canandaigua. Free, RSVP. 396-1010. quailsummit.com. Cobblestone Arts Center’s Summer Fun Fundraiser “Carnival.” 12-2 p.m. Cobblestone Arts Center, 1622 New York 332 Artwork display, goodies sale 3890220. cobblestonesrtscenter. com. Doodle Bugs! Children’s Center Grand Opening Celebration Event. 2-6 p.m. The new

center is located at 1700 English Road in Greece doodlebugs.com. Friday Happy Hour! 5-7 p.m. Veritas Wine Bar, 217 Alexander St. 2-for-1 on wines by-the-glass and beers by-the-bottle!. 262-2336. veritaswinebar.com. The Paris Flea: An Occasional Market in the City. Aug. 23-31, 2-7 p.m. Blackfriars Theatre, 795 E. Main St A Benefit for Blackfriars Theatre. Open daily except Monday. The sale features some of Rochester’s top designers and dealers $5. bftix.org. Word Play: A Chocolate Tasting. 5 p.m. Hedonist Artisan Chocolates, 674 South Ave Join us for a chocolate tasting featuring a collection of truffles designed and created by Mary Rice, a Hedonist intern and wordsmithing English major Free, RSVP. 461-2815. info@hedonistchocolates. com. facebook.com/ events/674197562609689/. [ SAT., AUGUST 24 ] “A Call To Women of Color Social Gathering.” 9 a.m.3:30 p.m. Genesee Valley Park, Elmwood Ave. Event highlights will include continental breakfast and lunch, entertainment, Zumba, giveaways, massages, socializing, health information, and screenings. Confidential HIV counseling and testing will be offered by Trillium Health Free, register. 210-4126. jdozier@TrilliumHealthNY.org. Canandaigua Farmer’s Market. 8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m Pavilion on Mill Street, one block east of Main St., Canandaigua canandaiguafarmersmarket. com. New Buffalo Brewing Company Tasting. 7-10 p.m. Tap & Mallet, 381 Gregory St. 4730503. newbuffalobrewing. com. The Password is Hope. 6 p.m. Rochester Pillars, 35 S. Washington St. 3rd Annual Breast Cancer Charity Fundraiser event. Proceeds benefit SIS and The Avon Walk for Breast Cancer. This vaudeville era-themed event will feature live performances from Danielle Ponder, Jimmy C Magic, and Deadly Dames Burlesque $25-$40. 4208699. Rochester Singletons Monthly Dinner. 5 p.m. Winfield Grill & Restaurant, 647 N. Winton Rd RSVP. 338-1080. Rockin’ for Rescue: A Pitty Love Event. 2-8 p.m. Ontario Beach Park, 4799 Lake Ave Roger Robach Center at Ontario Beach Park. Special Guests: D DRIVE, All Acoustic, Anonymous Willpower, Fat City and Goodbye Dawn. All proceeds from this event go to benefit Pitty Love Rescue, Inc $20-$30. pittyloverescue.org. Singles Mingle: Go-Kart and Mini-Golf. 2 p.m. Clubhouse Fun Center, 70 Jay Scutti Blvd. Price includes one go-kart ride, one game of mini-golf, 10 tokens, 2 slices of pizza and a drink, plus fun and games with singles $20, RSVP by 8/23. 939-5895. rochester.date@facebook.com. continues on page 30

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 29


Special Events Snakes and Friends Day. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Seneca Park Zoo, 2222 St. Paul St Touch table stations will focus on the importance of snakes, alligators, turtles and tortoises, frogs and lizards Included in zoo admission: $8-$11 senecaparkzoo.org. Veteran Benefit and Employment Fair. 9 a.m.-2 p.m. VFW Post 6778 Palmyra Memorial Post in Palmyra 315-665-0131. invest.vista@ waynecap.org. Victorian Day. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Genesee Country Village & Museum, 1410 Flint Hill Rd Mumford This new event will focus on the lives of western New Yorkers during those years and feature a fashion show, games of croquet, free carriage rides, cake tastings, and a Mad Hatter tea party $9.50-$15.50. 538-6822. gcv.org. WWE Legend Jimmy “Superfly” Snuka. Aug. 2425. Autographs at Frontier Field on Sat, 6-7:30 p.m. Autographs at the Webster Columbus Center, #70 Barrett Dr., Webster on Sun. 1-2:30 p.m $15 for autographs. collectorfestmonthly.com. [ SUN., AUGUST 25 ] 50s and 60s Family Fun in the Sun. 1:45-5 p.m. Veterans Memorial Park, Henrietta. Games, family bingo, car show, food vendors, featuring Shama Lama henrietta.org. Affinity Orchard Farmers’ Market. 11 a.m.-2 p.m Affinity Orchard Place, at English & Fetzner Roads, Greece Free. affinityorchardplace.com. Brighton Farmers’ Market. 9 a.m.-1 p.m Brighton High School, 1150 Winton Rd S This year on June 30 the market will temporarily move to the parking lot at Temple B’rith Kodesh, 2131 Elmwood Avenue (across the street and slightly west of Brighton

1622 New York 332 Come and enjoy singing dancing and musical theater. January 28: Grease $5. 398-0220. cobblestonesrtscenter.com. Voice of the Citizen Budgeting for Public Safety meetings. 6-8 p.m. 8/26: Edgerton Community Center, Stardust Ballroom, 41 Backus St. 9/4: Thomas P. Ryan Community Center, 530 Webster Ave. 9/5: Danforth Community Center, 200 West Ave. 9/16: Carter St. Community Center, 500 Carter St 429-5990. cityofrochester. gov/youdecide. SPECIAL EVENT | WORD PLAY AT HEDONIST

In addition to offering Rochester an ever-evolving spectrum of truffles, caramels, drinking chocolate, ice cream, and other hand-made, French-chocolate-and-naturalingredients-treats, local artisanal chocolatier Hedonist offers its interns the opportunity to showcase their diverse creative talents through a very delicious medium. Head to the South Wedge and join Hedonist Chocolates (674 South Ave.) on Friday, August 23, for a free chocolate tasting featuring truffles from an exclusive new collection. Mary Rice, a Hedonist intern and wordsmithing English major, has designed Word Play, a collection of truffles that celebrates the marriage of the culinary and literary worlds. The event takes place 5-7 p.m., while supplies last. Rice’s five pun-derful flavors will be featured at Hedonist for a limited time only. For more information, call 461-2815 or visit hedonistchocolates.com. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY Town Hall) 242-5046. brightonfarmersmarket.org. Equality Day. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Genesee Country Village & Museum, 1410 Flint Hill Rd Mumford Meet some activists from the 19th century, participate in a “Votes for Women” parade and experience casting your vote $9.50-$15.50. 538-6822. gcv.org. Greatest Community Garage Sales and Super Fleas. Aug. 25. Rochester Public Market, 280 N. Union St. 8 a.m.-

30 CITY AUGUST 21-27, 2013

2 p.m cityofrochester.gov/ publicmarket. Russian Conversation Hour. 1 p.m. Colie’s Cafe, 657 Park Ave. Meet for an informal Russian conversation for all levels from beginners to native speakers Free. 330389-4983. facebook.com/ coliescafe. [ MON., AUGUST 26 ] 2013 Community Performance series. Fourth Monday of every month, 10:30-11:15 a.m. Cobblestone Arts Center,

[ TUE., AUGUST 27 ] Tilling the Soil: Tuesday Summer Movie. 6:15 p.m. Brighton Memorial Library, 2300 Elmwood Ave. JAug 27: “Of Mice and Men.” Free. 784-5300. brightonlibrary.org. Tuesday Taco Trivia. 9-11 p.m. Temple Bar and Grille, 109 East Ave. Lots of giveaways, including hats, t-shirts, drinks, tacos - come alone or come with a team! $1.50 Beef Tacos, $2.50 Chicken Tacos, $2.50 Drafts except Guinness, $3 Bacardi Flavors 232-6000. templebarrochester@gmail. com. templebarandgrille.com. Westside Farmers Market. 4-7:30 p.m Westside Farmers Market, 831 Genesee St. 436-8999. westsidemarketrochester@ gmail.com. westsidemarketrochester.com. [ WED., AUGUST 28 ] Food Truck Rodeo. 5-9 p.m. Rochester Public Market, 280 N. Union St. Free admission. cityofrochester.gov. Retro Game Night. 7 p.m. Vertex Night Club, 169 N. Chestnut St. 80s nite with DJ Energon at 10 p.m., retro games available for playing beggining at 7 p.m 232-5498. facebook.com/ vertexnightclub. Rochester Winos Wine and Food Pairing. 6:30-9 p.m.

Lemoncello, 137 West Commercial St East Rochester $30, register. 385-8565. Lemoncello@Frontier.com. rochesterwinos.com. Walking Tours of Downtown Geneva. 7 p.m. Begin at Finger Lakes Gifts & Lounge, 60 Seneca St., Geneva $5, register. 315-789-5151. Wildlife Defenders Program. 11 a.m. Quail Summit, 5102 Parrish Street Extension, Canandaigua. The Wildlife Defenders Program is a wildlife education outreach group run by the day program members of Bridges for Brain Injury Inc., all who are adult survivors of brain injuries. Come out and enjoy visiting with the animals and learning about wildlife conservation. All ages RSVP. 396-1010. quailsummit.com.

Theater “Cats.” Through Sep. 11. Merry-Go-Round Playhouse, 6877 East Lake Rd Wed Aug 21-Thu 7:30 p.m., Fri-Sat 2 & 8 p.m., Mon 7:30 p.m., Tue-Wed Aug 28 2 & 7:30 p.m., Thu 7:30 p.m., Fri 2 & 8 p.m., Sat 8 p.m., Mon 7:30 p.m., Tue-Wed Sep 4 2 & 7:30 p.m., Thu 7:30 p.m., Fri-Sat 8 p.m., Mon 7:30 p.m., Tue-Wed Sep 11 2 & 7:30 p.m $22-$50 315-2551305. fingerlakesmtf.com. “Family Secrets.” Downstairs Cabaret at Winton Place, 3450 Winton Place Thu 7 p.m., Fri 8 p.m., opening Sat 8 p.m., Sun 3 p.m $26-$33. 325-4370. downstairscabaret.com. “My Gal Patsy.” Downstairs Cabaret Theatre Center, 540 E. Main St Sat 7 p.m., Sun 3 p.m $29-$33. 325-4370. downstairscabaret.com. “Pass the Remote: The Boob Tube Revue.” Through Sep. 1. Bristol Valley Theater, 151 South Main St. Through Sep 1. First Week: Thu-Sat 8 p.m., Sun 2 p.m. Second Week:

Wed Aug 28, 2 p.m., Thu 2 & 8 p.m., Fri-Sat 8 p.m., Sun 2 p.m $12-$33. 374-6318. bvtnaples.org. Sankofa Evening of Theatre & Jazz Festival. MuCCC, 142 Atlantic Ave $12-$18, $30 three-night package 2717010. moodckr@frontiernet. net. muccc.org.

Theater Audition [ WED., AUGUST 21 ] Greentopia Fest open call for all bands! Through Aug. 30. Play on one of three stages at September’s ECOFEST. Local bands and performers greentopiafestival.com. [ THU., AUGUST 22 ] Dr. Doolittle. 6-8 p.m. A Magical Journey Through Stages, Auditorium Center, 875 E. Main St Call for performers in grades 4-9. Performances Oct 25-Nov 3 935-7173. mjtstages.com. [ SAT., AUGUST 24 ] “Cinderella Kids.” Aug. 24-25, 1 p.m. Best Foot Forward, 100 Cobblestone Court Dr. Ages 4-9 & 1017. Kids should bring a photo and come prepared to sing a song and recite a poem or monologue Free. 398-0220. Vanessa@ BestFootForwardKids.com. bestfootforwardkids.com. “The Nutcracker.” Aug. 24. Rochester City Ballet Studios, 1326 University Ave, Ages 5-6 9:45 a.m., ages 7-8 11 a.m., ages 9-12 12:30 p.m 461-5850. [ MON., AUGUST 26 ] “Born Yesterday.” Aug. 26-27, 7 p.m. Penfield Community Center, 1985 Baird Rd Penfield Roles are available for 8 men and 6 women of all ages 3408655. bigongit@yahoo.com. penfieldplayers.org. Rochester Children’s Theatre Oz Auditions. 7 p.m. Nazareth


College Arts Center, 4245 East Ave Adult auditions (ages 15 and older) for RCT’s Wizard of Oz. Please prepare 2 contrasting, 32 bar musical theatre selections. No appointment necessary. Callbacks are on Aug 28 at 7 p.m 3850510. rctdanny@gmail.com. rochesterchildrenstheatre.org. Sing with the Rochester Oratorio Society. Call/email for info 473-2234. info@ rocsings.org. [ WED., AUGUST 28 ] “A Midsummer Night’s Dream.” Aug. 28-29, 7-9:30 p.m. Bartlett Theatre in Coxe Hall, Hobart and William Smith Colleges, Pultney St., Geneva. All auditioners should have a working knowledge of the script (available online). If you are unable to attend either of the audition dates, please contact the director, Chris Hatch (hatch@hws.edu, 315-781-3042) to arrange an alternate time prior to August 28. In addition to actors, we’d love to see singers, dancers, gymnasts, movers, drummers, DJs, other musicians, and people who simple love Shakespeare! hatch@hws.edu.

Workshops [ WED., AUGUST 21 ] Family Development Class: “Wise Choices.” 6-8 p.m. Mental Health Association, 320 N Goodman St. For parents of school-age children RSVP. 325-3145 x131. mharochester.org. Gandhi Institute Summer Intensive. Through Aug. 23. 929 S. Plymouth Ave 4633265. gpayne2@ur.rochester. edu. [ THU., AUGUST 22 ] How to Make Greek Yogurt. 7 p.m. Rochester Brainery, Village Gate, 274 N Goodman St. $20. 730-7034. rochesterbrainery.com.

choices with their SNAP dollars Free. 328-3380. Kindergarten to College: Essential Oils for Health. 7 p.m. Rochester Brainery, Village Gate, 274 N Goodman St. $15. 730-7034. rochesterbrainery.com. Rochester Makerspace Open Nights. 6-10 p.m. Rochester Makerspace, 850 St. Paul St. #23 Bring a project to work on or something to show others, help work on the space, or just get to know the venue Free. 210--0075. rochestermakerspace.org. RECREATION | SINGLES MINGLE GO-KART & MINI GOLF

Tired of trying to spy a fun-loving mate through beer goggles? Too sketched out to try online dating? Gather up your playful, competitive edge, and flirt the day away at the Singles Mingle Go-Kart and Mini-Golf event, which will take place Saturday, August 24, at Clubhouse Fun Center (70 Jay Scutti Blvd., Henrietta). Shy? Bring your single friends! In addition to go-karts and mini-golf, The Clubhouse Fun Center features an arcade and a café. The event begins at 2 p.m., and the $20 price includes one gokart ride, one game of mini-golf, 10 tokens, two slices of pizza and a drink, and fun and games with other singles. An RSVP is required by Friday, August 23. For more information, call 939-5895 or email rochester. date@facebook.com. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY Italian Language Class: Children’s Program. 6-7 p.m Italian American Community Center, 150 Frank Dimino Way $50 per session, register. 7495346. mafocarazzo@gmail. com. iaccrochester.org. Italian Language Class: Conversation Italian. 7:459:30 p.m Italian American Community Center, 150 Frank Dimino Way $50 per session, register. 749-5346. mafocarazzo@gmail.com. iaccrochester.org. Italian Language Class: Grammar Review and Verb

Conjugation. 6-7:30 p.m Italian American Community Center, 150 Frank Dimino Way $50 per session, register. 7495346. mafocarazzo@gmail. com. iaccrochester.org. JSY at the Market. 1 p.m Rochester Public Market, 280 N. Union St. Foodlink’s nutritionist offers free cooking demonstrations on ways to prepare fresh fruits and vegetables purchased at the Rochester Public Market using SNAP benefits. “Just Say Yes” to Fruits and Vegetables is a state-funded initiative to help individuals make healthier

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[ FRI., AUGUST 23 ] Family Development Class: “Four Keys to Successful Parenting (Part 4 of 4).” 10 a.m.-noon. Mental Health Association, 320 N Goodman St. For parents of children up to 5 years old Free, RSVP. 325-3145 x131. mharochester.org. Navigating the 2013-14 Common College Application. 4-5:30 p.m. Brighton Memorial Library, 2300 Elmwood Ave. Register. 7845300. brightonlibrary.org. [ SAT., AUGUST 24 ] Paddlesports Safety. 9 a.m. Flotilla 42, 520 River St., Charlotte. The course is for novice and experienced paddle enthusiasts. Topics: your paddlecraft, float plans, pre-departure check, visual distress signals, navigation lights, capsizing, life jackets, sound producing devices, homeland security restrictions, and handling weather emergencies. Includes four hours of classroom instruction and all course materials and handouts (no on-water activity) $15 donation 2787501. larryoheron@gmail.com. [ SUN., AUGUST 25 ] Scottish Fiddle Workshop with Jenna Moynihan. 11 a.m. Dunleavy School of Irish Dance, 101 Lincoln

Parkway, East Rochester $20-$25, register. 705-2337. jeremyjbutton@gmail.com. Soap Making. 1 p.m. Rochester Brainery, Village Gate, 274 N Goodman St. $30. 730-7034. rochesterbrainery.com. Soap Making Class. 1 p.m. Rochester Brainery, Village Gate, 274 N Goodman St. $30. 730-7034. rochesterbrainery.com. Using Herbs for Beauty and Health. 2-4 p.m. Wayside Garden Center, 124 PittsfordPalmyra Rd Free, RSVP. 223-1222 x100. trish@ waysidegardencenter.com. waysidegardencenter.com. [ MON., AUGUST 26 ] Family Development Class: “The First Years Last Forever.” 12:30-2:30 p.m. Mental Health Association, 320 N Goodman St. For parents of children up to 5 years old Free, RSVP. 325-3145 x131. mharochester.org. Roof Top Beehive Inspections in Rochester Workshop. 6:459 p.m. Cornell Cooperative Extension of Monroe County, 249 Highland Ave We will be doing basic hive inspections with emphasis on checking varroa mite levels and winter readiness. Good for new or beginning beekeepers. Please bring a veil and smoker; gloves and tools are provided rochesterbeekeepers.com. [ TUE., AUGUST 27 ] Buddhist Book Discussion Group. 7 p.m. Amitabha Foundation, 11 South Goodman St. “The Essence of the Heart Sutra.”. By donation. 451-7039. NY@ amitabhafoundation.us. amitabhafoundation.us. Chorus of the Genesee: Free Singing Lessons. 6-7 p.m. Harmony House, 58 East Main St . Webster 698-7784. Family Development Class: “One from the Heart, One from

the Mind.” 12:30-2:30 p.m. Mental Health Association, 320 N Goodman St. For parents of pre-teens and teens Free, RSVP. 325-3145 x131. mharochester.org. Radical Mycology Meet-up. 7 p.m. Durand Eastman Park, Zoo Rd. Donations accepted. 261-1665. smugtownmushrooms.com. [ WED., AUGUST 28 ] Family Development Class: “How to Say NO to Your Child.” 6-8 p.m. Mental Health Association, 320 N Goodman St. For parents of school-age children Free, RSVP. 325-3145 x131. mharochester.org. Lace Making Demo with Kenn Van Dieren. 7 p.m. Irondequoit Library, Helen McGraw Branch, 2180 E. Ridge Rd Before the invention of machinery, lace was entirely made by hand. Kenn Van Dieren will demonstrate how lace was created in the 16th and 17th centuries and describe the unique styles that developed in England and Europe Free, register. 336-6060. mcgrawbr@libraryweb.org. Tips For Packing Healthy School Lunches Class. 6:30 p.m. Rochester Brainery, Village Gate, 274 N Goodman St. $15. 730-7034. rochesterbrainery.com.

GETLISTED get your event listed for free e-mail it to calendar@rochestercitynews.com. Or go online to rochestercitynewspaper.com and submit it yourself!

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rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 31


Movies Theaters Searchable, up-to-the-minute movie times for all area theaters can be found at rochestercitynewspaper.com, and on City’s mobile website.

Film

Brockport Strand 93 Main St, Brockport, 637-3310, rochestertheatermanagement.com

Canandaigua Theatres 3181 Townline Road, Canandaigua, 396-0110, rochestertheatermanagement.com

Cinema Theater 957 S. Clinton St., 271-1785, cinemarochester.com

Culver Ridge 16 2255 Ridge Rd E, Irondequoit  544-1140, regmovies.com

Dryden Theatre 900 East Ave., 271-3361, dryden.eastmanhouse.org

Eastview 13 Eastview Mall, Victor 425-0420, regmovies.com

Woody Allen’s annual picture “Blue Jasmine”

(PG-13), WRITTEN AND DIRECTED BY WOODY ALLEN NOW PLAYING

Geneseo Theatres Geneseo Square Mall, 243-2691, rochestertheatermanagement.com

[ REVIEW ] BY GEORGE GRELLA

Greece Ridge 12

Although he dutifully releases something like a film a year, and despite the reflexive gushing of the reviewers, Woody Allen has actually not produced a genuinely good movie in years, perhaps even decades. A good deal of his work ranges from abysmal — “Alice,” “Mighty Aphrodite,” “The Curse of the Jade Scorpion” — to the merely silly, pretentious, or trivial — “Match Point,” “To

176 Greece Ridge Center Drive 225-5810, regmovies.com

Henrietta 18 525 Marketplace Drive 424-3090, regmovies.com

The Little 240 East Ave., 258-0444 thelittle.org

Movies 10 2609 W. Henrietta Road 292-0303, cinemark.com

Pittsford Cinema 3349 Monroe Ave., 383-1310 pittsford.zurichcinemas.com

Tinseltown USA/IMAX 2291 Buffalo Road 247-2180, cinemark.com

Webster 12 2190 Empire Blvd., 888-262-4386, amctheatres.com

Vintage Drive In 1520 W Henrietta Rd., Avon 226-9290, vintagedrivein.com

Film Previews on page 34

Rome With Love,” “Vicky Cristina Barcelona.” Now and then, amid the adolescent fantasy and sophomoric philosophizing, he makes a sort of half-good film, like “Deconstructing Harry,” or “Midnight in Paris,” that at least provides some entertainment value even for those viewers who are not devout Woodyites. His newest movie, “Blue Jasmine,” therefore comes as a refreshing surprise — it’s actually rather different from much of his previous stuff and it’s actually a solid piece of work. A director who often imitates others, including Ingmar Bergman, Fritz Lang, and Federico Fellini, in “Blue Jasmine” Allen employs a situation that initially resembles Tennessee Williams’ “A Streetcar Named Desire,” and filters it through his own imagination, creating a sad, only occasionally comic story out of some familiar material. The picture opens with a manically gabby, broke, and despondent Jasmine (Cate Blanchett), in flight from a completely dreadful situation in New York, seeking refuge in San Francisco with her sister Ginger (Sally Hawkins). As a great

Cate Blanchett in “Blue Jasmine.” PHOTO COURTESY SONY PICTURES CLASSICS

many flashbacks reveal, Jasmine’s husband, Hal (Alec Baldwin), has committed a massive financial swindle in the Bernie Madoff class, resulting in a prison sentence for him and impoverishment for Jasmine, who loses, along with her jewels, furs, cars, and houses, a measure of her sanity. In San Francisco Jasmine washes down handfuls of Xanax with quantities of vodka, alternately patronizing Ginger and attempting to break up her relationship with her boyfriend Chili (Bobby Cannavale). Desperately unhappy, she finds herself remembering and of course regretting all the material goods, the fun, the prestige she’s lost. She also wants to meet a suitable man, someone who can provide the luxury she enjoyed with the swindling Hal, who not only cheated his clients and partners but also cheated on her with a bevy of women, many of them her wealthy friends. Although the movie displays some of the familiar Woody Allen humor — when in doubt, he always goes for the gag — it generally maintains a level of seriousness, while avoiding all that Allenesque preoccupation with what he regards as Big Ideas and Deep Thoughts. Instead of his usual concentration on a small, select, sophisticated group of New Yorkers dwelling in the general region of Central Park, for the first time in memory he actually confronts the fluid and complex question of social and economic class in America, with a sympathy he’s never shown before. Jasmine’s sister and her friends all work at jobs she could never imagine — bagging groceries

Classic Tracks Current Grooves Future Legends FOR REAL JAZZ IN ROCHESTER, TUNE TO 90.1 FM OR JAZZ901.ORG. 32 CITY AUGUST 21-27, 2013


Guess who’s coming to dinner? “You’re Next” (R), DIRECTED BY ADAM WINGARD OPENS FRIDAY [ REVIEW ] BY ADAM LUBITOW

in the supermarket, laying pipe, moving furniture — and all her interactions with them underline a multitude of differences between her previous and her present life. As all the flashbacks suggest, the movie constantly emphasizes the presence of the past and the consequent problem of discarding it and moving forward; as it turns out, the successful characters are the ones who come to understand just how to deal with their own histories of mistakes, poor choices, and bad luck. While her sister accepts her situation, Jasmine struggles with a past that haunts her and positively wallows in regret. The whole cast, even the supporting players, performs with exceptional competence. The greatest surprise may be the work of Andrew Dice Clay, the colossally foul-mouthed, profoundly unfunny stand-up comic, as Ginger’s ex-husband Augie, who eventually teaches Jasmine a bitter lesson and strips her of her illusions. The picture, however, really belongs to Cate Blanchett, who appears in almost every scene and demonstrates an astonishing variety of emotions in word, gesture, and appearance. At times she looks stunning and sophisticated, at others, almost ugly in her confusion and vulnerability; she can be wickedly funny and obnoxiously superior, but she can also be completely distraught and unbalanced: “Blue Jasmine” constitutes a kind of tour de force for her, a polished and authentic vehicle she sustains with what may be the best performance of her career.

There are certain movies that simply demand to be seen with an audience. Comedy and horror films typically benefit the most from a group setting; being able to sit in the dark, screaming, shrieking, and/or laughing your head off alongside a group of perfect strangers undeniably increases one’s enjoyment of a film (it’s for this reason that I believe movie theaters are never truly going to go extinct, the way some cultural commentators keep predicting). The communal experience makes these movies better, and the supremely entertaining horror flick “You’re Next” is a definitive example of this. Horror fans have been waiting for this film’s arrival in theaters for a while now. Completed in 2011, “You’re Next” premiered at the Toronto International Film Festival that same year to nearly ecstatic reviews, instigating a studio bidding war before the film was ultimately purchased by Lionsgate. The film followed that with a similarly rapturous reception at the horror film festival Fantastic Fest, and then: nothing. Lionsgate inexplicably

Sharni Vinson in “You’re Next.” PHOTO COURTESY LIONSGATE PICTURES

decided to shelve the film until now. Hopefully the studio’s boneheaded move does nothing to sabotage the film’s chances of finding an audience. While it’s not the game-changing savior of the horror genre that early reviews hinted at (“Cabin in the Woods,” oddly also released by Lionsgate, was closer in that regard), it is an absolute blast. As the film begins, Crispian Davidson (AJ Bowen) is bringing his new girlfriend, Erin (Aussie actress Sharni Vinson), to meet his WASPy family for the first time, as they come together at the Davidsons’ ostentatiously enormous home to celebrate AJ’s parents wedding anniversary. The gathering also functions as a reunion of sorts, since the family hasn’t seen each other in quite some time. It’s soon apparent why, as Crispian and his brothers and sisters waste no time with pleasantries, and immediately begin bickering and sniping at one another. Simon Barrett, the writer of “You’re Next,” nails the dysfunctional family dynamic in these early scenes, perfectly capturing the passive-aggressive tendencies that can emerge when blood relations get together. But we’re not here for an insightful portrayal of family drama, and it’s not long before the reunion is broken up in harrowing fashion, when an arrow comes crashing through the window, impaling sis’ new boyfriend and absolutely ruining the family’s dinner. It’s soon apparent that the Davidsons are under attack from a sadistic and determined group of homicidal maniacs clad in combat gear and animal masks. A wrench is thrown into their plans, however, when it turns out that Erin is not as helpless as she first appears. It’s here that the film detours from its conventional setup to veer off in a direction that feels new. But to say any more about the plot would be doing a huge disservice to this tight, tension-filled exercise in genre terror. Director Adam Wingard forgoes the traditionally grim tone that comes with

most entries in the home-invasion subgenre of horror, delivering visceral thrills, complete with a strong, ass-kicking female lead. Unlike most characters of the Final Girl archetype, who don’t really rise to the occasion until somewhere around the last reel, Erin makes with the heroics straight out the gate. Her resourcefulness is explained in a throwaway bit of dialogue where she mentions the fact that she grew up on a survivalist compound in the outback, but it doesn’t really matter: watching her start to fight back against her tormentors, in increasingly creative ways, is all the explanation we really need. Wingard fills out the supporting cast well, utilizing his filmmaker buddies, including mumblecore director Joe Swanberg (“Hannah Takes the Stairs”) as Crispian’s smarmy older brother and Ti West (“The Innkeepers,” “The House of the Devil”) as the ill-fated boyfriend. The Davidson family matriarch is played, in a fantastic bit of casting, by horror movie favorite Barbara Crampton (“ReAnimator”). The cast delivers everything you could want from a horror movie performance; the actors infuse their characters with enough personality to give us a sense of their identities in as little screentime as possible (all the better to get on with the mayhem). There are plenty of big laughs in the film, especially as the sibling bickering doesn’t stop once the carnage begins. I wouldn’t go quite so far as to call “You’re Next” a horror-comedy, but the filmmakers know that humor doesn’t necessarily have to come at the expense of tension, and in fact can often enhance it. Even more impressively, that tension doesn’t dissipate once we eventually learn the attacker’s motives. Wingard proves an expert craftsman, skillfully keeping control of the film’s tone all the way through. It’s not terribly original or complex, but in his hands, “You’re Next” is a bloody good time

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 33


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[ OPENING ] 8 1/2 (1963): A famous Italian director struggles to complete his latest film while receiving pressure from his producers, his wife, and his mistress, in Federico Fellini’s masterpiece. Dryden (Sat, Aug 24, 8 p.m.; Sun, Aug 25, 2 p.m.) ANCHORMAN: THE LEGEND OF RON BURGUNDY (2004): Great Odin’s raven! Prepare yourself for the upcoming sequel, with the first film starring Will Ferrell as San Diego’s top-rated newsman. With Christina Applegate, Paul Rudd, Steve Carell, and David Koechner. Vintage Drive In (Tue, Aug 27, 11 p.m.) THE BIG LEBOWSKI (1998): Jeff Bridges stars as “The Dude,” an unemployed bowler tasked with securing the release of the kidnapped wife of the millionaire who shares his name, in the Coen brothers surreal cult classic. Vintage Drive In (Tue, Aug 27, 9 p.m.) BORIS GODUNOV (Opera): Modest Mussorgsky’s opera about the titular Russian czar, performed by the Teatro Regio di Torino. Little (Sun, Aug 25, 12 p.m.; Tue, Aug 27, 6:30 p.m.) GLEN OR GLENDA (1953): This semi-autobiographical exploitation film/docudrama about cross-dressing and transexuality is (arguably) infamous director Ed Wood’s second-most-famous film. Dryden (Tue, Aug 27, 8 p.m.) HAIRSPRAY (1988): Director John Waters’ shot at familyfriendly entertainment follows “pleasantly plump” teenager Tracy Turnblad as she fights for integration after winning a spot on a local TV dance show in 1960’s Baltimore. Dryden (Wed, Aug 21, 8 p.m.) THE MORTAL INSTRUMENTS: CITY OF BONES (PG-13): A young girl learns that she’s descended from a long line of demon hunters in this adaptation of the popular young adult book series. Starring Lily Collins, Lena Headey, and Jonathan Rhys Meyers. Brockport, Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece, Henrietta, Tinseltown, Vintage, Webster NINOTCHKA (1940): Greta Garbo stars as a Russian agent sent to France, who ends up falling for a Count against her better judgment in Ernst Lubitsch’s classic romantic-comedy. Dryden (Thu, Aug 22, 8 p.m.) REALITY (2012): An Italian fishmonger becomes obsessed with becoming a contestant on Italy’s version of the reality TV show “Big Brother” in this satirical comedy. Dryden (Fri, Aug 23, 8 p.m.) THE WORLD’S END (R): Simon Pegg and Nick Frost reunite with director Edgar Wright in this comedic tale of a group of old friends who reunite for a

nostalgic pub crawl, but end up fighting to save the world. Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Greece, Henrietta, Pittsford, Tinseltown, Webster YOU’RE NEXT (R): See review on page 33. Canandaigua, Eastview, Geneseo, Henrietta, Tinseltown, Vintage, Webster [ CONTINUING ] 2 GUNS (R): Based on the graphic novel by Steven Grant the film centers around partners in crime, Bobby (Denzel Washington) and Stig (Mark Wahlberg). Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Greece, Henrietta, Tinseltown, Webster BLACKFISH (PG-13): In this provocative new documentary, director Gabriela Cowperthwaite examines the treatment of orca whales in SeaWorld theme parks. Little BLUE JASMINE (PG-13): See review on page 32. Henrietta, Little, Pittsford, Tinseltown, Webster CHENNAI EXPRESS (NR): An Indian man sets out on a journey to fulfill his grandfather’s dying wish, and along the way he meets and falls in love with a girl who’s fleeing an arranged marriage. Henrietta THE CONJURING (R): Based on the true story of paranormal investigators Lorraine and Ed Warren (Vera Farmiga and Patrick Wilson), who assist a family threatened by a demonic presence in their home. With Lili Taylor and Ron Livingston. Canandaigua, Culver, Greece, Henrietta, Tinseltown, Vintage DESPICABLE ME 2 (PG): A former supervillain is recruited by the Anti-Villain League to spy on a dangerous new super criminal in this animated sequel. With the voice talents of Steve Carell, Kristen Wiig, Russell Brand, and Ken Jeong. Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Henrietta, Tinseltown ELYSIUM (R): Matt Damon stars in this sci-fi action film from director Neill Blomkamp (“District 9”), about a future where Earth is in ruins while the rich and powerful reside on a manmade space station called Elysium. Also starring Jodie Foster and William Fichtner. Brockport, Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece, Henrietta, Pittsford, Tinseltown, Vintage, Webster FRUITVALE STATION (R): This timely winner of the Audience Award and the Grand Jury Prize at this year’s Sundance Film Festival is based on the true story of Oscar Grant, whose death at the hands of Bay Area police shocked the nation. Starring Michael B. Jordan, Octavia Spencer, and Chad Michael Murray. Culver GROWN UPS 2 (PG-13): Adam Sandler, Chris Rock, Kevin James, and David Spade all return in this sequel about a group of overgrown man-

children. Also starring Salma Hayek and Maya Rudolph. Culver THE HEAT (R): A by-the-book FBI agent teams up with a coarse Boston cop to bring down a drug lord in this buddy comedy from director Paul Feig (“Bridesmaids”). Starring Sandra Bullock and Melissa McCarthy. Cinema, Movies 10 IRON MAN 3 (PG-13): Shane Black (“Kiss Kiss Bang Bang”) takes over directing duties while Robert Downey Jr. reprises his role as Tony Stark in the third installment of the superhero franchise. Also starring Gwyneth Paltrow, Don Cheadle, Ben Kingsley, and Guy Pearce. Movies 10 JOBS (PG-13): Ashton Kutcher portrays Steve Jobs in this biopic of the Apple Computers cofounder. Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Greece, Henrietta, Pittsford, Tinseltown, Webster KICK-ASS 2 (R): The continued adventures of masked vigilante, Kick-Ass and his cohorts. Starring Aaron Taylor-Johnson, Chloe Moretz, and Christopher Mintz-Plasse. Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece, Henrietta, Tinseltown, Vintage, Webster LEE DANIELS’ THE BUTLER (PG-13): Forest Whitaker stars in this true story, about a butler who served eight American presidents over the course of three decades. Also starring Oprah Winfrey, Terrence Howard, Alan Rickman, Jane Fonda, Robin Williams, and John Cusack. Brockport, Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece, Henrietta, Little, Pittsford, Tinseltown, Webster MAN OF STEEL (PG-13): Look! Up in the sky! It’s a bird! It’s a plane! It’s Zack Snyder and Christopher Nolan’s angsty new reboot of the Superman franchise! Starring Henry Cavill, Kevin Costner, Amy Adams, Michael Shannon, Diane Lane, and Russell Crowe. Movies 10 MONSTERS UNIVERSITY (G): This prequel to Pixar’s “Monsters, Inc.” shows us the origins of Mike and Sulley’s friendship, which dates all the way back in their college days. Cinema NOW YOU SEE ME (PG-13): A team of illusionists use their talents to perpetrate a series of heists targeting corrupt business leaders. Starring Jesse Eisenberg, Michael Caine, Morgan Freeman, Mark Ruffalo, Woody Harrelson, and Isla Fisher. Movies 10 PACIFIC RIM (PG-13): When enormous monsters rise from the sea, humankind fights back by building giant robot warriors to defend the world in this sci-fi action film from director Guillermo del Toro (“Pan’s Labyrinth”). Starring Charlie Hunnam, Idris Elba, Ron Perlman, and Charlie Day. Cinema


PARANOIA (PG-13): An entry-level employee at a powerful corporation is forced to spy on the leader of a rival company. Starring Liam Hemsworth, Harrison Ford, and Gary Oldman. Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Greece, Henrietta, Pittsford, Tinseltown, Webster PERCY JACKSON: SEA OF MONSTERS (PG): The continued epic adventures of Percy, the son of Poseidon, who now must journey across the sea of monsters to find the mythical Golden Fleece. Starring Logan Lerman, Stanley Tucci, Anthony Head, and Nathan Fillion. Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece, Henrietta, Pittsford, Tinseltown, Webster PLANES (PG): An animated spin-off of “Cars,” this time about a little plane who dreams of being a racer. With the voices of Dane Cook, Teri Hatcher, Julia Louis-Dreyfus, John Cleese, Anthony Edwards, and Val Kilmer. Canandaigua, Culver, Greece, Eastview, Henrietta, Tinseltown, Vintage, Webster R.I.P.D. (PG-13): Jeff Bridges and Ryan Reynolds are undead police officers with the “Rest In Peace Department,” protecting the world from supernatural baddies. Based on the comic book series. With Kevin Bacon and Mary-Louise Parker. Movies 10

THE SMURFS 2 (PG): The little blue guys are back, this time facing off against a pair of imposter Smurfs, known as the Naughties, created by Gargamel to help him steal the Smurfs’ essence. Starring Neil Patrick Harris, Jayma Mays, Hank Azaria, and the voices of Christina Ricci, Katy Perry, and Alan Cumming. Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece, Henrietta, Tinseltown, Vintage THE SPECTACULAR NOW (R): A popular high-school senior gets his life turned upside down when he unexpectedly falls in love with the “nice girl” in school. With Shailene Woodley, Brie Larson, Kyle Chandler, Jennifer Jason Leigh, and Mary Elizabeth Winstead. Little STAR TREK INTO DARKNESS (PG-13): Kirk, Spock and crew return in J.J. Abrams’ sequel to his massively successful reboot of the Star Trek franchise. Movies 10 TURBO (PG): A garden snail gets a shot at achieving his dream of winning the Indy 500 when he’s accidentally exposed to nitrous oxide. Starring the voice talents of Ryan Reynolds, Paul Giamatti, Samuel L. Jackson, Maya Rudolph, Michelle Rodriguez, and Snoop Dogg. Movies 10 THE WAY, WAY BACK (PG-13): A coming-of-age story about an unhappy young boy on

summer vacation with his family, who’s taken under the wing of the free-spirited manager of the nearby water park. Starring Sam Rockwell, Steve Carell, Toni Collette, Maya Rudolph, Allison Janney, and Jim Rash. Little, Pittsford WE’RE THE MILLERS (R): A small-time pot dealer hires strangers to pose as his family in order to not arouse suspicion while making his way across the Mexican border with a shipment. Starring Jason Sudeikis, Jennifer Aniston, Emma Roberts, and Ed Helms. Brockport, Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece, Henrietta, Pittsford, Tinseltown, Vintage, Webster WHITE HOUSE DOWN (PG13): The White House is under terrorist attack, and it’s up to the president (Jamie Foxx) and a wannabe Secret Service agent (Channing Tatum) to save the day. Also with Maggie Gyllenhaal. Movies 10 THE WOLVERINE (PG-13): Hugh Jackman returns as Wolverine, and this time he’s fighting ninjas in Japan. Culver, Eastview, Henrietta, Tinseltown, Webster

For information: Call us (585) 244-3329 Fax us (585) 244-1126 Mail Us City Classifieds 250 N. Goodman Street Rochester, NY 14607 Email Us classifieds@ rochester-citynews.com EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY

All real estate advertised in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act, which makes it unlawful, “to make, print, or publish, any notice, statement, or advertisement, with respect to the sale or rental of a dwelling that indicates any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin.” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under the age of 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertisement for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. Call the local Fair Housing Enforcement Project, FHEP at 325-2500 or 1-866-671-FAIR. Si usted sospecha una practica de vivienda injusta, por favor llame al servicio legal gratis. 585-325-2500 - TTY 585-325-2547.

We placed an ad in City Newspaper advertising the availability of two office suites in my office building at 55 Canterbury Road in the City. The response was excellent. One of the two available spaces was leased within days, and we have active interest in the other space.” - DOUGLAS C. BURKHARDT, FIRST REALTY COMPANY

www.firstrealtyrochester.com rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 35


> page 35

Vans. From $200-$800 or more for newer. Running or not. With free towing. Also free removal of any unwanted model in any condition. Call 585-305-5865

Adoption PREGNANT? THINKING OF ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families Nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions. 866-413-6293. Void in Illinois/New Mexico/ Indiana (AAN CAN)

CASH FOR CARS Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888-420-3808 www.cash4car.com (AAN CAN)

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DOG & CAT HOUSES Kennels, porch steps, do it yourself kits. Quick assembly 585-752-1000 $49 Jim

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13” TV, CONVERTER BOX antennna $47 585-752-1000 (2) HEAVY DUTY STEEL SHELVES 36x74 Ideal for storage Both for $45 585-5444296 BOOK ENDS of race horses with jockey’s carved in wood, gift. $15. 585-880-2903

EVEN FLO Aura strooler & combo car seat $40 B/O 585225-5526 GERMAN SHEPHERD Plaque on chain. Carved head on real wood. (says, beware!) Nice gift $15.00 585-880-2903 GLASS TABLES Oval glass top coffee table $50, 2 round, glass

end tables $25 each or $100 for all plus 2 table lamps. Please call 585-325-7979

condition. Charlotte 585-6636983 $50

GRACO DOUBLE STROLLER $40 B/O 585-225-5526

OLD FASHIONED GUM BALL Machine works. $20 585-3830405

HORSE HALTER / Black & White. New $15 clips 585-8802903

OLD FASHIONED GUM BALL MACHINE. Works $20 585-3830405

KITCHEN TABLE 3/8 Thick round glass top table. 40” diameter. 41” high. $49 585490-5870

PALM TREE 5’ tall $15 585490-5870

NORDIC TRACK SPORT EXCERSIZER Simulator, X-country skiing, adjustable resistance & elevation. Excellent

PORCELAIN FIGURINE (German Shepherd) for 50’s or 60’s $25 585-880-2903 VARIOUS Shovel, rakes, brooms, heavy duty $3 ea, duffle bags $3 ea, Hand tools

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36 CITY AUGUST 21-27, 2013


Place your real estate ad by calling 244-3329 ext. 23 or rochestercitynewspaper.com Ad Deadlines: Friday 4pm for Display Ads Monday at noon for Line ads $2, Ramps (car) heavy duty $35, work shoe & boots $1, wire cage for rabbit $25 585-752-1000 WHIRLPOOL GAS DRYER. Very Good Condition. 3 years old. $50 Call 585-527-8024

Garage and Yard Sales BRIGHTON: 151 Grosvenor Rd. Saturday Aug 24th 9am3pm and Sunday August 25th 9-2. Toys, doll clothing, beanie

babies, housewares, women’s designer shoes, size 7 1/2, bedding, dog carriers, beds, cage, tons more CITY PARK AVE. Berkeley Vassar - Milburn - Harvard Saturday 9 am - 3 pm MultiFamily sale, street area noted above, convenient to Park Ave and Culver Rd, several houses participating, antiques, housewares, collectibles, etc. SATURDAY ONLY 9 to 3 St ANNE CHURCH Next to New Sale 1600 Mt Hope Ave. Thurs.

HomeWork A cooperative effort of City Newspaper and RochesterCityLiving, a program of the Landmark Society.

& Fri. August 22nd & 23rd 9am - 6pm .Sat August 24th 9am 3pm Social Hall & Garage. Wide variety of items, refreshments. Handicap accessible. YARD SALE 16 French Meadow Lane, Brighton. Fri./Sat. 23rd,24th-9-5; Sun. 25th 125; . HUGE; treadmill, Mt.bike, rocking chair, TV., games, paintings, dolls, serving dishes, hiker’s backpack, fiish tank; MUCH MORE - SOMETHING FOR EVERYONE. PRICED TO SELL.

continues on page 38

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Grand Greek Revival Near the Genesee 1600 Crittenden Road Upon a shallow knoll near the southern border of Genesee Valley Park in Brighton, lies the homestead of Chauncey Crittenden, a prominent and early denizen of the town. The expanse of the original farmland once encompassed 600 acres, extending as far north as Mount Hope Cemetery. Today, this unique property includes the 1,984 square foot main house and three outbuildings on 1.6 acres.

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Located in relative proximity to one another are the original 1817 cottage, grand barn, privy, water well, and the stately 1830 Greek Revival style house. Many of these structures remain in astonishingly good and nearly unaltered condition, a testament to the long and caring stewardship of the property’s three owners.

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The prominent proportions of the Greek Revival main house make quite the statement with its deep overhanging architraves. Walking up the stone steps the classical front door’s peculiar wrought iron latch pull hints at the unique interior. When the home was last sold in 1920 to the Strong’s they hired an architect to sympathetically update the home to 20th century standards. The result is an elegant blend of Colonial and Greek Revival styles with a splash of Arts and Crafts. On the first floor, original casework and doors harmonize with 1920s pegged oak floors and wrought iron hardware. The living room, which comprises half of the perfectly square house, provides access to the outdoor terrace and flowing staircase, along with a large stone fireplace and hearth. Through a large architrave opening is the dining room,

filled with light and an exposed section of the elaborate 19th century wall mural. Passing into the kitchen you find more large windows and an unadulterated 1920s kitchen complete with wood floors, glass front cabinets and multi-functional efficiency hutch. Proceed up the staircase to the second floor with its original wide-plank pine floors, three bedrooms and the spectacular bathroom. The influence of the Arts and Crafts movement can be seen in the bedroom archways, builtin alcove and linen closet, and the arched bathroom door with its immense strap hinges. The bathroom almost defies description with its completely original 1920s built-in shower, tub, toilet alcove, bronze vanity and pedestal sink, all conceived in an alluring palate of lavender, cobalt blue, sea foam green, and pink ceramic. Exiting from the house, the barn, which rivals the main house in size, immediately captures your attention. Passing through immense doors, the interior’s hand-hewn heavy timbers and original 1830s horse stalls—complete with turned hitching posts and feeding troughs—are breathtaking. Above is a full hay loft with soaring ceilings. For sale for the first time in 93 years this historic property is listed at $175,000. For more information contact Irene Bennett with Nothnagle Realtors at 259-2124. by Christopher Brandt Christopher is a longtime Landmark Society volunteer and proud Brighton resident.

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> page 37

Jam Section ARMATI PROFESSIONAL TRUMPET ATR604H Silverplalte w/hardcase, 7c mouthpiece. $775. or 585-336-9927 CALLING ALL MUSICIANS OF ALL GENRES the Rochester Music Coalition wants you! Please register on our website. For further info: www. rochestermusiccoalition.org info@rochestermusiccoalition.org 585-235-8412 DRUMMER Experienced Young Drummer available. Influences are Led Zep, Rush, Pink Floyd, Foo Fighters. Looking for Guitar, Bass and Vocals. Contact through: http://www.youtube. com/user/Chaztize7 LOOKING FOR EXPERIENCED guitar player that knows his/her job as a lead rhythm guitarist, has equip. & transportation. 1 band only. Avail evenings contact Bobby 585-328-4121 NEEDED MULTI INSTRUMENT MUSICIANS Bass, guitars, keys, horns. Must have equipt.

& transportation & be avail. evenings. Bobby 585-328-4121

Scott: 585- 465-0219. Visit www.pianolessonsrochester.com

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THE GREGORY KUNDE CHORALE is looking for male voices. Call for an audition now to join our fourteenth season! Info Line 377 7568 or visit our website www. gregorykundechorale.org

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VOCALIST that can lead & background with other vocalists that do the same. Avail evenings, transportation, R & B, Funk, Jazz, Pop, Blues......Bobby 585-328-4121 Experienced please.

Music Services BASS LESSONS Acoustic, electric, all styles. Music therory and composition for all instruments. Former Berklee and Eastman Teacher. For more information, call 585-260-9958 & 585-512-6044 PIANO LESSIONS In your home or mine. Patient, experienced instructor teaching all ages, levels and musical styles. Call

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Miscellaneous HAS YOU BUILDING SHIFTED OR SETTLED? Contact Woodford Brothers Inc, for straightening, leveling, foundation and wood frame repairs at 1-800-OLDBARN. www.woodfordbros. com. “Not applicable in Queens county” KILL BED BUGS & THEIR EGGS! Buy a Harris Bed Bug Kit. Complete Treatment Program. Odorless, Non-Staining. Available online at homedepot. com (NOT IN STORES) KILL ROACHES! Buy Harris Roach Spray/ Roach Trap Value Pack or Concentrate. Eliminate Roaches-Guaranteed. Effective results begin after spray dries. BUY ONLINE homedepot.com (NOT IN STORES)

Notices WORKING HARD? SNAP can work for you! SNAP can help you purchase nutritious foods at farmers markets & grocery stores. Find out if you may be eligible for SNAP by calling (585) 295-5624 or (585) 2955626. LAWNY, Inc. ® Monroe County Nutrition Outreach & Education Program. Prepared by a project of Hunger Solutions New York and NYSOTDA. This institution is an equal opportunity provider.

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Notice of the formation of the above named Professional Limited Liability Company (“PLLC”). Articles of Organization filed with the Department of State of NY on 5/23/2013. Office Location: County of Monroe. The Secretary of State of NY (“SSNY”) has been designated as agent of the PLLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of any such process served to: 421 Penbrooke Dr., Suite 2, Penfield NY 14526-2045. Purpose: to practice law. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of Limited Liability Company, (LLC) LabSystems, LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of NY (“SSNY”) on June 28, 2013. Office location is Monroe County, New York. The SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. The SSNY shall mail a copy of any process to the LLC at 424 Brookwood Drive, Webster, New York 14580. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ]

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583 WEST AVE LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 5/7/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Michael Veltri, 583 West Ave., Rochester, NY 14611. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] A notice is herewith given of two general meetings of the Corn Hill Neighbors Association at which action will be taken Monday Sept. 9th, 2013, Election of five members of the Board of Directors. Location 133 South Fitzhugh St., Rochester, NY 14608. Voting 5-7:30pm, meeting starts at 7:30pm.. Tues. October 15th, 2013. Review and approval of the 2014 CHNA budget. Location 133 S. Fitzhugh St. Time; 7:30 pm [ NOTICE ] ALKEMY MACHINE, LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 7/10/13. Office in Monroe Co. SSNY desig. agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 8305 Royal Ascot Circle, E. Amherst, NY 14051. Purpose: Any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Billmizer LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 5/6/13. Office location: Monroe County.

38 CITY AUGUST 21-27, 2013

SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 1175 Pittsford Victor Rd., Pittsford, NY 14534. General Purposes [ NOTICE ] EMPIRE DISTILLERY FARM, LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 7/9/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Floyd J. Hanes, 19 Jackson St., Holley, NY 14470. General Purposes [ NOTICE ] HOWARD ROAD PROPERTIES, LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 7/25/2013. Office in Monroe Co. SSNY desig. agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 51 Howard Rd., Rochester, NY 14624, which is also the principal business location. Purpose: Any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Index # 13/414 STATE OF NEW YORK SUPREME COURT COUNTY OF MONROE ATLANTIC CASUALTY INSURANCE COMPANY Plaintiff, v. FELIX LUIS GARCIA GONZALES, individually, and d/b/a FG REMODELING,233 Durnan St.Rochester, NY 14621, FIVE STAR IMPROVEMENTS, INC., and 298 Turk Hill Park Fairport, NY 14450, MARCOS QUIROS 415 Bernard Street Rochester, NY 14621, Defendants. TO THE ABOVE-NAMED DEFENDANTS: YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED AND REQUIRED to answer the complaint in this action, and to serve a copy of your answer, or if the complaint is not served with a summons, to serve a notice of appearance on the plaintiff’s attorneys, within twenty (20) days after the service of this summons, exclusive of the day of service, or within thirty (30) days after completion of service where service is made in any other manner than by personal delivery within the State. In case of your failure to appear or answer, judgment will be taken against you by default for the relief demanded in the complaint. The County of Monroe is designated as the place of trial on the basis that defendants are residents thereof. DATED:Albany, New York January 11, 2013 GOLDBERG SEGALLA LLP BY Mark P. Donohue, Esq. Attorneys for Plaintiff 8 Southwoods Boulevard, Suite 300 Albany, New York 12211 Tel. (518) 463-5400 Fax (518) 4635420. The complaint in this action seeks a declaratory judgment from the Court that plaintiff American Casualty

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EMPLOYMENT / CAREER TRAINING

Employment AIRLINE CAREERS begin here– Get FAA approved Aviation Maintenance Technician training. Financial aid for qualified students– Housing available.Job placement assistance. Call AIM 866-296-7093 EDUCATORS Needed for upcoming educational test scoring project; $14-$18/hr. Must be currently certified to teach in NYS. Send resume and copy of teaching certificate to nytest@ smeasurement.com GEVA THEATRE CTR Hiring phone-sales agents to sell our 2013-14 Season Tickets. Help us grow! Base + Bonus, Free Tix, P/T EVES, 16-24 hrs/wk. Call Howard NOW! 585-420-2039 HELP WANTED! make extra money in our free ever popular homemailer program,includes valuable guidebook! Start immediately! Genuine! 1-888292-1120 www.easyworkfromhome.com (AAN CAN) $$$HELP WANTED$$$ Extra Income! Assembling CD cases from Home! No Experience Necessary! Call our Live Operators Now! 1-800-405-7619 EXT 2450 http://www.easywork-greatpay.com (AAN CAN) TIME WARNER CABLE WILL BE HOSTING AN OPEN HOUSE ON THURSDAY, AUGUST 22, 2013 FROM 10AM-4PM AT COURTYARD BY MARRIOTT BRIGTON LOCATED AT 33 CORPORATE WOODS,

ROCHESTER NY 14623. ON THE SPOT INTERVIEW FOR CUSTOMER SERVICE REP!!! Training starts September 13 2013 for approximately 8-9 weeks. Schedule is 8am – 5pm from Monday to Friday. After training schedule: 2pm – 11pm (4 weekdays) plus Saturday or Sunday (must be flexible to work either day) Pay rate is $11.06/hr + night differential + performance compensation and sales commission. For more information, please email Zoila at Zoila.nunez@twcable.com. You can apply directly online at http://bit.ly/15FoWvT

Volunteers A SECOND THOUGHT Resale Shop in East Rochester is accepting applications for volunteer sale associates and online researchers. Shop benefits people with disabilities in Guatemala. Call (585) 340-2000. ARE YOU A ‘SUPER VOLUNTEER’? Join us at GREENTOPIA and help promote Greentopia Fest at local events and the festival (Sept.1015th). Contact Jackie Mangione #585.967.7749! BOOK LOVERS needed to sort and price donated books for resale at Downtown Library bookstore. Proceeds benefit library programs. Training provided. 585-428-8322 or Kate.Antoniades@libraryweb.org. BRIGHTEN A LIFE. Lifespan’s The Senior Connection program needs people 55+ to volunteer to make

2 friendly phone calls / 2 visits each month to an older adult Call Katie 585-244-8400 x 152 CATHOLIC FAMILY CENTER needs volunteers to help people apply for citizenship. The commitment is 2.5 hrs per mth

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Share your experience

The University of Rochester is currently looking for experienced individuals to fill temporary positions in: NOW HIRING MBE/DBE/WBE Subcontractors/Suppliers

One of the leading General Contractors in Western NY is soliciting bids for an upcoming construction project in Rochester. New York State Certified MBE, DBE, and WBE subcontractors are requested for all scopes of work for the construction of this project already underway, with an estimated completion in Fall of 2014.

Please send information, or a Vendor Qualification Form to: TAYLOR – The Builders 2580 Baird Road, Penfield, NY 14526, fax to 585-248-5630, or email to RochesterGC@Yahoo.com. No phone calls will be accepted!

• Clerical support • Secretarial support (Medical & Administrative) • Environmental Services • Food Service • Skilled Trades (Carpenters, Painters, Electricians, & Groundskeepers) To be considered for an interview, candidates must have: High School diploma or GED Prior experience Env. Services & Food Service candidates must be available rotating shifts, and alternating weekends & holidays

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EMPLOYMENT / CAREER TRAINING > page 39 one evening a month. Training is provided. For more information call Nate at (585) 546-7220 ex 4854. FOSTER PARENTS WANTED! Monroe County is looking for adults age 21 and over to consider opening their homes to foster children. Call 334-9096 or visit www.MonroeFosterCare. org. HABITAT FOR CATS — Help Trap-Neuter-Return cats on Tuesdays, in East Rochester, for an important grant project. Impact the number of owner-less cats living outside. All training provided. 585-787-4209 or habitat4cats@yahoo.com! HERITAGE CHRISTIAN STABLES, a therapeutic horsemanship program for

children and adults with developmental disabilities, is looking for volunteers to serve as horse leaders and side walkers. Call Kim Kennedy at (585) 340-2016 or email kkennedy@ heritagechristianservices.org LIFESPAN’S OMBUDSMAN PROGRAM is looking for volunteers to advocate for individuals living in long-term care settings. Please contact call 585.287.6378 or e-mail dfrink@lifespan-roch.org for more information LITERACY VOLUNTEERS OF ROCHESTER needs adult tutors to help adults who are waiting to improve their reading, writing, English speaking, or math skills. Call 473-3030, or check our website at www.literacyrochester. org

Business Opportunities START A HOME BASED BUSINESS. Part-time or FullTime. Serious inquires only. 585271-3243

Actors Wanted MOVIE EXTRAS NEEDED! Men/ Women ages 18-85. All Looks Needed. Movies & TV. No experience Preferred! Flexible Hours, Earn $200-$300/Day! Call 877-625-1842. (AAN CAN)

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is seeking one bright, outgoing, creative

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Media / newspaper / advertising sales experience a must. Telemarketing, classified and online sales experience a definite plus. Salary plus commission plus benefits.

INTERESTED? EMAIL BETSY MATTHEWS:

bmatthews@rochester-citynews.com

Legal Ads > page 38 Insurance Company is not obligated to defend or indemnify defendants Five Star Improvements, Inc. or Felix Luis Garcia-Gonzalez Individually and d/b/a FG Remodeling in a personal injury lawsuit commenced by defendant Marcos Quiros. This service by publication is made upon defendant Felix Luis Garcia-Gonzalez, Individually and d/b/a FG Remodeling. [ NOTICE ] LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE OF FORMATION MEDIRESP LLC, filed with the Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 07/10/2013. County office location: Monroe. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 100 Hogan Point Road, Hilton, NY 14468. Purposes: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] MAANNUS USA, LLC, a domestic LLC , Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 2/5/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, Attn: John Defilippo, 415 Fiesta Dr., Rochester, NY 14626. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ]

Live-In Care Giver Lifeme Assistance Inc, a leader in the provision of services to persons with developmental disabilies is looking for a female or a couple (of which one must be female), who are interested in being cerfied as Family Care providers to share their lives and a home with two young ladies in the Chili area. The person would be cerfied as a Family Care Provider and would move into the individual’s home. In exchange for providing support and assistance as needed, the Family Care Provider(s) would receive a spend and would live in the ladies’ home. The applicant MUST have an income source, and be able to support themselves. Job hours cannot be a second shi or overnight. Some of the responsibilies would include administering medicaons, assisng with making and transporng to medical appointments, monitoring nutrion needs, ulizing a variety of communicaon techniques, and geng the ladies out into the community, and acvely parcipate in community acvies. The Family Care Provider(s) would be required to aend free training, as well as on-going and annual training in order to become cerfied as a Family Care Provider. This is an excing and unique opportunity for the right person. If you think you might be that person, contact Maria Rugg at Lifeme Assistance 784-3059 for more informaon.

40 CITY AUGUST 21-27, 2013

MotionSavvy LLC filed Arts. of Org. with Sec’y of State (SSNY) on July 29, 2013. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of any process to 1335 Jefferson Rd., Box 92057, Rochester, NY 14623. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Name of LLC: LaRue Positioning Solutions LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State: 6/25/13. Office loc.: Monroe Co. Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o Business Filings Inc., 187 Wolf Rd., Ste. 101, Albany, NY 12205, regd. agt. upon whom process may be served. Purpose: any lawful act. [ NOTICE ]

assigned, for a beer & wine license has been applied for by Plum House Sushi Inc. dba, Plum House Sushi, 686 – 688 Monroe Ave, Rochester, NY 14607, County of Monroe, for a restaurant. [ NOTICE ] Notice is hereby given that a license, number not yet assigned, for a beer & wine license has been applied for by New Cantonese Restaurant Inc. dba, New Cantonese Restaurant, 85 Commerce Drive, Rochester, NY 14623, County of Monroe, for a restaurant. [ NOTICE ] Notice is hereby given that a license, number not yet assigned, for a full on premise beer, wine & liquor license has been applied for by Tangiers Resto Lounge & Nite Club Inc dba, Magic City, 6 Lawrence St. Rochester, NY 14607, County of Monroe, for a restaurant. [ NOTICE ] Notice is hereby given that a license, number not yet assigned, for a full on premise beer, wine & liquor license has been applied for by Tar-Nick Inc. dba Bluewater Seafood & Steakhouse, 716. East Ridge Road, Rochester, NY 14621, County of Monroe, for a restaurant. [ NOTICE ] Notice is hereby given that a license, number not yet assigned, for an on premise liquor, beer & wine license has been applied for by 1372 Edgemere LLC dba Italian Grill at Crescent Beach,1372 Edgemere Drive, Rochester, NY 14612, County of Monroe, Town of Greece, for a restaurant. [ NOTICE ] NOTICE is hereby given that a license, number not yet assigned, for beer and wine has been applied for by the undersigned to sell beer and wine at retail in a restaurant under the Alcoholic Beverage Control Law at 283 Oxford Street, Rochester, NY 14607 in the City of Rochester and County of Monroe for on premises consumption. The Red Fern CafÊ, LLC. d/b/a The Red Fern [ NOTICE ]

Not. of Form. of Engineered Components HF, LLC, Art. of Org. filed with Sec’y of State New York (SSNY) on 6/7/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served and a copy of any process shall be mailed to: 303 Taylor Rd. Honeoye Falls NY 14472. Purpose: engage in any lawful activity.

Notice of Formation of 2005 BRIGHT HEN ROAD LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 4/10/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 90 Goodway Drive, Rochester, NY 14623. Purpose: any lawful activity.

[ NOTICE ]

[ NOTICE ]

Notice is hereby given that a license, number not yet

Notice of formation of 2667 West Ridge Rd Apartments,

LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 7/26/2013. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 136 Thunder Ridge Drive, Rush NY 14543. Purpose: any lawful act. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of 593 West Ave LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 6/26/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 4962 Eastbrooke Place, Williamsville, NY 14221. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Airsoft Tactical Field LLC. Arts. of Org. Filed with NYS Secretary of State (SSNY) on 04/01/13. Location: Monroe County. NS is designated as agent upon whom process may be served, SSNY shall mail a copy of process to: 1555 E. Henrietta Rd. Rochester, NY 14623. The purpose is any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of AMINOV NY1, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 07/17/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Corporation Service Co., 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207, regd. agent upon whom and at which process may be served. Purpose: Any lawful activity.

State on 05/02/13. Its office is located in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent of the Company upon whom process against it may be served and a copy of any process shall be mailed to The LLC, 2171 Monroe Ave., Suite 206, Rochester, NY 14618. The purpose of the Company is any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of CREATIVE CREPES LLC. Art. Of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 3/12/2013. Office in Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, 661 South Ave. Apt 406 Rochester, NY 14620. Purpose: Creperie [ NOTICE ] NOTICE OF FORMATION of CRLYN ACQUISITIONS, LLC (“LLC�) Art. of Org. filed with NY Secretary of State (“NYSOS�) on 4/2/2013, pursuant to LLC Law Section 203. Office location: Monroe County. NYSOS is designated as service of process agent for LLC. NYSOS shall mail copy of process served to: 2070 Lyell Ave., Rochester, NY 14606. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of DSDJ, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 7/9/2013. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 91 Baneberry Way, Hilton NY 14468. Purpose: any lawful act.

[ NOTICE ]

[ NOTICE ]

Notice of Formation of ANDERSON GRANITE & MARBLE RESTORATION LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 06/26/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, PO Box 1066, Henrietta, NY 14467. Purpose: Any lawful activity.

Notice of Formation of Eagle Family Realty, L.L.C. Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State on 7/10/13. Office location: Monroe County. Secy. of State designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. Secy. of State shall mail process to: 20 Tobey Court, Pittsford, NY 14534. Purpose: any lawful activity.

[ NOTICE ]

Notice of Formation of F & H Development, LLC, Art. Of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 7/17/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 4 Old Ivy Circle Rochester, NY 14624. Purpose: any lawful Activities.

Notice of Formation of BHTL, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 7/16/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, c/o Sammy Feldman, 3445 Winton Place, Ste. 228, Rochester, NY 14623. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of Cleartower Partners LLC filed Articles of Organization with the New York Department of

[ NOTICE ]

[ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of FSI 2005 BRIGHT HEN ROAD LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 4/18/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY

cont. on page 42


rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 41


Legal Ads > page 40

[ NOTICE ]

designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 90 Goodway Drive, Rochester, NY 14623. Purpose: any lawful activity.

Notice of Formation of HICKEY FREEMAN TAILORED CLOTHING LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 07/11/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Ingram Yuzek Gainen Carroll & Bertolotti, LLP, Attn: Michael Grandis, 250 Park Ave., NY, NY 10177. Purpose: Any lawful activity.

[ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of FSI ADAMS CENTER LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 4/10/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 90 Goodway Drive, Rochester, NY 14623. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of HICKEY FREEMAN PROPERTIES LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 07/11/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Ingram Yuzek Gainen Carroll & Bertolotti, LLP, Attn: Michael Grandis, 250 Park Ave., NY, NY 10177. Purpose: Any lawful activity.

[ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of INTELLOPS NEW YORK, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 08/13/13. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 120 Moxon Dr., Rochester, NY 14612. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Registered Agents Inc., 90 State St., Ste. 700, Office 40, Albany, NY 12207, regd. agent upon whom and at which process may be served. Purpose: Hold/own real estate. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of KELSEY PROPERTIES OF WESTERN NY, LLC Arts. of

Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 07/18/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, 559 MacIntosh Dr., Rochester, NY 14626. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of KOZY KOVE LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 7/25/2013. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 31 Scottsville Rd., Rochester, NY 14611. Purpose: any lawful act. [ NOTICE ] NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY. NAME: 2009 CPG HOLDINGS, LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 06/03/09. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNYshall mail a copy of process to the LLC, 2590 Brighton Henrietta TL Road,

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Rochester, NewYork 14623. The address of the registered agent is c/o Robert F. Leone, Esq., 2590 Brighton Henritta TL Road, Rochester, New York 14623. Purpose: For any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY. NAME: CLINTON ERIE ASSOCIATES II, LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 04/05/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to the LLC, 20 Dahlia Drive, Fairport, New York 14450. Purpose: For any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of MERCHANTS PORT LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 07/02/13. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 36 Stutson St., Rochester, NY 14612. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Paychex Brazil LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State on 7/24/13. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. bus. addr.: 911 Panorama Trail South, Rochester, NY 14625. Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. Purpose: all lawful purposes. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Seabreeze Wine & Spirits, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 6/25/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o Adams Bell Adams, P.C., 28 E. Main St., Ste. 600, Rochester, NY 14614. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Sean Moran Architect, PLLC. Articles of Organization filed with the New York Department of State on July 2, 2013. Its office is located in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent upon whom process against the Company may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to: 215 East Spruce St., East Rochester,

42 CITY AUGUST 21-27, 2013

NY 14445. The purpose of the Company is any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of SINGH MART LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY. Art of Org. filed with Secretary of State (SSNY) on July 31st of 2013, Office location: Monroe County, InCorp Services, Inc. is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 1 Commerce Plaza, 99 Washington Ave, Suite 805-A, Albany, NY 12210. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of THIS GOOD WORLD NETWORK LLC. Art. Of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 3/22/2013. Office in Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, 710 S. Lincoln Rd. East Rochester, NY 14445. Purpose: Any lawful purpose [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Tiptop Properties LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 04/01/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 645 Thurston Road, Rochester, NY 14619. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of TOMAS FLINT PHOTOGRAPHY LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 08/01/13. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 351 Bay Village Dr., Rochester, NY 14609. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Thomas A. Flint at the princ. office of the LLC. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of Ubiquity Enterprise, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 3/23/2007. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 59 Raines Park, Rochester NY 14613. Purpose: any lawful act. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of USAIRPORTS HANGAR SOUTH LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 07/05/13. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: One Airport Way, Ste. 300, Rochester, NY 14624. SSNY

designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity.

of LLC: 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes.

[ NOTICE ]

[ NOTICE ]

Notice of Qualification of 3E Mobile, LLC. Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 7/2/13. Office location: Monroe County. LLC formed in PA on 1/30/13. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: 39 Cascade Dr., Rochester, NY 14607. PA and principal business address: 461 Melwood Ave., Pittsburgh, PA 15213. Cert. of Org. filed with PA Sec. of the Commonwealth, 401 North St., Rm. 206, Harrisburg, PA 17120. Purpose: any lawful purpose.

Notice of Qualification of Charming Charlie Manhattan LLC. Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 7/19/13. Office location: Monroe County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 7/19/13. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: National Registered Agents, Inc., 111 Eighth Ave., NY, NY 10011, also the registered agent. Principal office address: 6001 Savoy Dr., 4th Fl., Hourston, TX 77036. Arts of Org. filed with the DE Secretary of State, John G. Townsend Bldg., 401 Federal St., Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: any lawful activities.

[ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of Allcom Northeast LLC. Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 5/29/13. Office location: Monroe County. LLC formed in FL on 2/21/13. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: 65 Industrial Park Circle, Rochester, NY 14624, principal business address. FL address of LLC: 3060 Alt 19N, Ste. B-8, Palm Harbor, FL 34683. Cert. of Org. filed with FL Sec. of State, 500 S. Bronough St., Tallahassee, FL 32399. Purpose: all lawful purposes. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of BD-ROC, LLC. Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 7/26/13. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. bus. addr.: 12201 Merit Dr., Ste. 900, Dallas, TX 75251. LLC formed in DE on 7/19/13. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. DE addr. of LLC: 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of BD, LLC. Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 7/26/13. NYS fictitious name: BDNY Licensing LLC. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. bus. addr.: 12201 Merit Dr., Ste. 900, Dallas, TX 75251. LLC formed in DE on 4/16/03. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. DE addr.

[ NOTICE ] Of Formation of SageDog Ventures L.P. A Certificate of Limited Partnership was filed with the New York Department of State (NYDOS) on June 13, 2013. Office location: Monroe County. NYDOS has been designated as agent upon whom process against it may be served. The Post Office address to which the NYDOS shall mail a copy of any process against the LP served upon it is 2255 Lyell Ave, Ste 201, Rochester, NY 14606. The principal business address of the LP is 2255 Lyell Ave, Ste 201, Rochester, NY 14606. Dissolution date: December 31, 2063. Purpose: any lawful activity. The name and business address of the general partner is available from the NYDOS. [ NOTICE ] ROE DOGS CURBSIDE GRILL & CATERING LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 7/23/2013. Office in Monroe Co. SSNY desig. agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 186 Lake Bluff Rd., Rochester, NY 14622, which is also the principal business location. Purpose: Any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] RUSH FAIRWAYS LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 7/9/13. Office location: Monroe county. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Johnson Mullan & Brundage, 1399 Monroe Ave., Rochester, NY 14618-1005. General Purposes [ NOTICE ] Tax Serf Enterprises LLC , Arts of Org filed with the NY Sec. of State (SSNY) on 7/24/13. Office in Monroe County. SSNY designated

as an agent of the LLC upon whom process may be served, SSNY shall mail copy to: USCA, Inc., 7014 13th Ave Suite 202, Brooklyn, NY 11228. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Who is Playing Tonight.com LLC filed Articles of Organization with the New York Department of State on 7/1/13. Its office is located in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent of the Company upon whom process against it may be served and a copy of any process shall be mailed to 188 Culver Road, Rochester, NY, 14607. The purpose of the Company is all lawful purposes. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] Notice of Formation of 2851 Monroe Office Suites LLC. Articles of Organization filed with Sec. of State of NY (SSNY) on 7/3/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to principal business location: The LLC, 2740 Monroe Avenue, Rochester, NY 14618. Purpose: any lawful activity [ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] Notice of Formation of 619 Jefferson Road, LLC. Articles of Organization filed with Sec. of State of NY (SSNY) on 6/3/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to principal business location: The LLC, 2740 Monroe Avenue, Rochester, NY 14618. Purpose: any lawful activity [ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] Notice of Formation of Kim Loi Restaurant, LLC. Articles of Organization filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on June 28, 2013. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to principal business location:The LLC, 53 Maple Valley Crescent, Rochester, NY14623. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] Notice of Formation of RLP Design/Consulting, LLC. Articles of Organization filed with Secy. Of State of NY (SSNY) on 5/8/13. Office location: Monroe County SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to principal business location: The LLC, 665 Five Points Road, Rush, NY 14543. Purpose: any lawful activity [ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] Notice of Formation of Royal Wash Brighton, LLC. Articles


Legal Ads of Organization filed with Sec. of State of NY (SSNY) on 6/3/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to principal business location: The LLC, 2740 Monroe Avenue, Rochester, NY 14618. Purpose: any lawful activity [ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] Notice of Formation of Royal Wash Henrietta, LLC. Articles of Organization filed with Sec. of State of NY (SSNY) on 6/3/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to principal business location: The LLC, 2740 Monroe Avenue, Rochester, NY 14618. Purpose: any lawful activity [ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] THE DALLE GROUP LLC filed Articles of Organization with NY Dept of State (SSNY) on August 8, 2013. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served and a copy of any process shall be mailed to 133 Cabot Road, Rochester, NY 14626. Purpose: Any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF Edgemont-Elmerston LLC ] Articles of Organization filed with Secretary of State of NY on 7/19/2013. Office in Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC at 1048 South Ave, Rochester, NY 14620. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF HANNA -HADDON HALL, LLC ] The name of the Limited Liability Company is HannaHaddon Hall, LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the New York Secretary of State on 7/11/2013. The office of the LLC is in Monroe County. The New York Secretary of State is designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. The Secretary of State shall mail a copy of such process to36 South Goodman Street, Rochester, NY 14607, The LLC is organized to purchase and to operate real property known as 493-505 University Avenue, Rochester, NY and to engage in any lawful activity for which an LLC may be formed under NY LLC Law. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF KRENHAFEN, LLC ] Krenhafen, LLC filed Articles of Organization with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) July 3, 2013. Its principal office is in Monroe County, NY at 620 Malloch

Road, Churchville, NY 14428. SSNY is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of any process against the LLC to 620 Malloch Road, Churchville, NY 14428. The purpose of the company is to engage in any and all lawful activities. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY ] Notice of formation of Cornell & Vetter Executive Search LLC. Articles of Organization filed with the New York Secretary of State on July 5, 2013. The office of the LLC is in Monroe County . The New York Secretary of State is designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. The Secretary of State shall mail a copy of such process to P. O. Box 215, Penfield, New York 14526. The LLC is organized to engage in any lawful activity for which an LLC may be formed under the NY LLC law. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY ] The name of the Limited Liability Company (“LLC”) is Community Composting LLC. The articles of organization were filed with the New York Secretary of State (“NYSS”) on July 16, 2013. The office of the LLC is located at 972 Plymouth Avenue South, Rochester, NY 14608 in Monroe County. NYSS has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. The NYSS shall mail a copy of any process to 972 Plymouth Avenue, Rochester, NY 14608. The LLC is organized for any purpose authorized by law. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY ] The name of the limited liability company is Heidi Wolf LLC. The Articles of Organization were filed with the NY Secretary of State on August 12, 2013. The office of the LLC is located in Monroe County, New York State. The NY Secretary of State is designated as the agent of the LLC upon whom process against may be served. The address to which a copy of the process served shall be mailed is 4 Commercial Street 2nd Floor, Rochester, NY 14614. The LLC is managed by a manager. The purpose of the LLC is any lawful business.

The Secretary of State has been designated as agent upon whom process may be served. A copy of any process shall be mailed to 156 Handy Street, Rochester, New York 14611. The purpose of the LLC is to engage in any lawful activity for which Limited Liability Companies may be organized under Section 203 of the New York Limited Liability Company Law. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LLC ] Rakestraw Cabinetry, LLC has filed articles of organization with the New York Secretary of State on May 1, 2013. Its principal place of business is located at 215 Whittier Road, Rochester, New York in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent upon whom process may be served. A copy of any process shall be mailed to 215 Whittier Road, Rochester, New York 14624. The purpose of the LLC is to engage in any lawful activity for which Limited Liability Companies may be organized under Section 203 of the New York Limited Liability Company Law. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LLC ] The Village Mobile Home Park, LLC has filed articles of organization with the New York Secretary of State on July 17, 2013 with an effective date of formation of July 17, 2013. Its principal place of business is located at 421 Penbrooke Drive, Suite 500, Penfield, New York in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent upon whom process may be served. A copy of any process shall be mailed to 421 Penbrooke Drive, Suite 500, Penfield, New York 14526. The purpose of the LLC is to engage in any lawful activity for which Limited Liability Companies may be organized under Section 203 of the New York Limited Liability Company Law. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF South Averill LLC ] Articles of Organization filed with Secretary of State of NY on 9/14/2012. Office in Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC at 1048 South Ave, Rochester, NY 14620. Purpose: any lawful activity.

[ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LLC ]

[ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF SWETMAN PROPERTIES, LLC ]

Byblos Wholesale Distribution, LLC has filed articles of organization with the New York Secretary of State on June 28, 2013 with an effective date of formation of June 28, 2013. Its principal place of business is located at 156 Handy Street, Rochester, New York in Monroe County.

The name of the Limited Liability Company is Swetman Properties, LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the New York Secretary of State on10/31/2007. The office of the LLC is in Monroe County. The New York Secretary of State is designated as agent of

Fun

the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. The Secretary of State shall mail a copy of such process760-B Canning Parkway, Victor, NY 14564, The LLC is organized to engage in any lawful activity for which an LLC may be formed under NY LLC Law. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF WRGRC, LLC.] WRGRC, LLC (the “LLC”) filed Articles of Organization with NY Secretary of State (SSNY) 7/8/13. Office location: Monroe County, NY. Principal business location: 1265 Scottsville Rd, Rochester, NY 14624. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to CT Corporation System, 111 Eighth Avenue, NY, NY 10011 which is also the registered agent upon whom process may be served. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE OF SALE ] Index No. 2013-202 SUPREME COURT STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF MONROE ESL Federal Credit Union Plaintiff, vs. Edward Punch; Anna May Fedele; Beneficial Homeowner Service Corporation, Defendants. Pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale dated August 1, 2013 and entered herein, I, the undersigned, the Referee in said Judgment named, will sell at public auction in the front vestibule of the Monroe County Office Building, 39 West Main Street, Rochester, New York, County of Monroe, on September 18, 2013 at 10:00 a.m., on that day, the premises directed by said Judgment to be sold and therein described as follows: ALL THAT TRACT OR PARCEL OF LAND, situate in the Town of Irondequoit, County of Monroe and State of New York, known as 4115 Culver Road, Rochester, NY 14622; Tax Account No. 062.19-3-27 described in Deed recorded in Liber 9013 of Deeds, page 582. Said premises are sold subject to any state of facts an accurate survey may show, zoning restrictions and any amendments thereto, covenants, restrictions, agreements, reservations, and easements of record and prior liens, if any, municipal departmental violations, and such other provisions as may be set forth in the Complaint and Judgment filed in this action. Judgment amount: $67,719.38 plus, but not limited to, costs, disbursements, attorney fees and additional allowance, if any, all with legal interest. DATED: August 2013 Paul F. Shanahan, Esq., Referee LACY KATZEN LLP Attorneys for Plaintiff 130 East Main Street Rochester, New York 14604 Telephone: (585) 324-5767

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August 21-27, 2013 - City Newspaper