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EVENTS: NATIVE AMERICAN DANCE & MUSIC, GROWING UP GANDHI 21 FILM: “THE WAY, WAY BACK” 27 RESTAURANT REVIEW: ESPADA BRAZILIAN STEAK 11 URBAN JOURNAL: EMBRACING CHARTER SCHOOLS

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Greater Rochester’s Alternative Newsweekly

Vol 42 No 46

News. Music. Life.

I just want to sound like me. A damned good me.” MUSIC INTERVIEW, PAGE 14

Cable calamity in the making? MEDIA, PAGE 7

East Main Street revival. DEVELOPMENT, PAGE 5

Sing, sing, sing: Finger Lakes Choral Festival. CLASSICAL, PAGE 20

Recently remodeled: Blackfriars’ “Rent.” THEATER REVIEW, PAGE 22

INTERVIEW | BY TIM LOUIS MACALUSO | PAGE 8 | PHOTO BY MIKE HANLON

Tim Mains: ‘I was the gay teacher’ Tim Mains was still new to teaching when he came out of the closet at a time, the 1970’s, when doing so posed risks to employment in many careers. The experience was gut-wrenching, he says, due to the relentless name-calling — gay slurs hurled at him almost daily for the better part of a school year. But he says he learned that being out and visible can be a catalyst for changing attitudes. In 1985, Mains became the first openly gay man in New York State to win election to public office.

He served on City Council for 20 years. Educator, politician, and role model for Rochester’s LGBT community, Mains leaves Rochester shortly to start his new job as superintendent of the Jamestown school system. In a recent interview, Mains talked about the challenges for city schools, his support of Superintendent Bolgen Vargas’s expanded learning efforts, and his experiences as a gay rights activist.


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Feedback We welcome your comments. Send them to themail@rochester-citynews. com, or post them on our website, rochestercitynewspaper.com, our Facebook page, or our Twitter feed, @roccitynews. Comments of fewer than 350 words have a greater chance of being published, and we do edit selections for publication in print. We don’t publish comments sent to other media.

Facing the art

I take umbrage at Dr. Wilson’s diagnoses of our response as “acute inflammation followed by quiescence” (“Worlds Collide on Walls: Wall/Therapy”). Although I am no physician, I would be inclined to call the current status as “chronic indignation.” We understand that continued public comment is useless since the works are generally on private walls over which the city claims to have no authority, and some in the art community seem to think this is a very fine addition to our city. I am hardly alone in my complaints about “Resting Bears.” I hear the subject raised by many others whenever the subject of art in Rochester comes up among our friends and acquaintances. The usual comment I get is “I drove by to see the ‘Rats,’ and I really think they are awful.” This usually results in a further outbreak of “inflammation” which eventually subsides once again into chronic indignation. Once again I suggest that having a painting thrust into your home with no opportunity to chose is far different from choosing the art for yourself regardless of the subject matter. My wife and I have spent over 49 years choosing the artwork that adorns our walls. “Resting Bears” is hardly something we would have chosen, yet it is what we rise to every morning and it is in our face whenever we look to the north from our apartment window. The residents in the neighborhood who gather in the World Wide News parking lot to escape their un-air-conditioned apartments across the street also have no great love of the painting. Welcome to life in downtown Rochester! PAUL GOLDBERG

Race talk

Mary Anna Towler writes: “It’s also too big a stretch to think that 2 CITY

JULY 24-30, 2013

Zimmerman would have thought Trayvon was suspicious if Trayvon were white” (“The Zimmerman Verdict,” Urban Journal). Excuse me? There are no white burglars in Ms. Towler’s universe? WILLIAM RICKEY

We should move away from landfills

While I applaud Monroe County’s efforts at recycling, I do not believe that a landfill, any landfill, is an “environmentally sound” way to dispose of waste (“Trash Talk”). The Zero Waste committee of the Rochester Sierra Club has hosted a park cleanup in the county’s yearly “PickUpTheParks” program for four years. Our group and many other groups and residents cheered the long-awaited decision by Monroe County to recycle Number 3 and Number 7 plastics. Monroe County’s eco-park, a residential drop-off point for recyclables and hazardous waste, is an incredible service that all residents should use. Everyone can dispose of paints and old gasoline and other environmentally hazardous stuff. However, according to an eco-park representative, only 1 percent of the public is availing themselves of this critical service. That is unacceptable, and one has to wonder where the other 99 percent are dumping their hazardous waste. Landfills as a waste option are becoming suspect. Yes, they’ve come a long way from the toxic garbage dumps of the past. And of course Monroe County does need to provide the public with a waste removal system. They do not have the luxury of eliminating landfilling as a waste option at present, so landfills may well be a necessary evil at this point. But landfills are never “environmentally sound,” and we should be moving away from them as quickly as possible. When we try to solve our energy and waste problems by capturing and then burning the methane gases that naturally accompany landfills, the public gets the false impression that this solves either problem. What it does is perpetuate landfills as a basic component of waste management, thus sweeping our waste, energy, and resource problems under the rug. It is a better idea to get rid of the idea of landfills and instead find ways to recycle those things

we toss into them. Recycling our waste – organic, furniture, plastics, aluminum, etc.– would provide a wealth of resources for businesses instead of having to further deplete our natural resources. I am in total agreement with Mr. Garland’s statement about updating plans on landfills, which includes: “develop public education programs about proper disposal, recycling, or reuse of different wastes.” Not only should there be widespread education about proper waste disposal, I believe our local media should step up to the plate and provide this educational component free of charge, as it is in the public interest. FRANK J. REGAN

“Mill Seat currently captures about 70 percent of the landfill gas and burns it in generators to produce electricity, which cuts down on the landfill’s methane emissions.” Burning the methane emits CO2, thereby contributing to climate change. It is better to burn it for energy than not, but far better to not be creating the methane in the first place. There are far better destinations for our organic waste than a landfill. Sadly, the county sees it as a “win” since the big picture as usual eludes them. SANITY MONGER

Spelling lesson

I can’t decide which would be worse – that someone representing the Landmark Society would misspell the last name of the designer of Seneca Park, or that Rochester City Paper would make the error (HomeWork, July 10). For future reference, please remember that the noted landscape architect and designer was Frederick Law Olmsted, not Olmstead. Even my e-mail program’s spell-checker knows the difference! RUTH E. THALER-CARTER

The Landmark Society, which produces the HomeWork content, responds: Our HomeWork column

reader is correct regarding the spelling of noted landscape architect Frederick Law Olmsted, designer of Rochester’s park system. This is a common mistake that Landmark Society staff frequently correct in others’ work. This time we made the mistake ourselves! Thanks for staying on top of us!

News. Music. Life. Greater Rochester’s Alternative Newsweekly July 24-30, 2013 Vol 42 No 46 250 North Goodman Street Rochester, New York 14607-1199 themail@rochester-citynews.com phone (585) 244-3329 fax (585) 244-1126 rochestercitynewspaper.com Publishers: William and Mary Anna Towler Editor: Mary Anna Towler Asst. to the publishers: Matt Walsh Editorial department themail@rochester-citynews.com Features editor: Eric Rezsnyak News editor: Christine Carrie Fien Staff writers: Tim Louis Macaluso, Jeremy Moule Music editor: Willie Clark Music writer: Frank De Blase Calendar editor: Rebecca Rafferty Contributing writers: Paloma Capanna, Casey Carlsen, Roman Divezur, George Grella, Susie Hume, Andy Klingenberger, Dave LaBarge, Kathy Laluk, Michael Lasser, Adam Lubitow, Ron Netsky, Dayna Papaleo, Suzan Pero, Rebecca Rafferty, Deb Schleede, David Yockel Jr. Art department artdept@rochester-citynews.com Art director/production manager: Matt DeTurck Designers: Aubrey Berardini, Mark Chamberlin Photographers: Mark Chamberlin, Frank De Blase, Michael Hanlon Photo intern: Matt Burkhartt Advertising department ads@rochester-citynews.com Advertising sales manager: Betsy Matthews Account executives: Nancy Burkhardt, Tom Decker, William Towler Classified sales representatives: Christine Kubarycz, Tracey Mykins Operations/Circulation kstathis@rochester-citynews.com Circulation manager: Katherine Stathis Distribution: Andy DiCiaccio, David Riccioni, Northstar Delivery, Wolfe News City Newspaper is available free of charge. Additional copies of the current issue may be purchased for $1, payable in advance at the City Newspaper office. City Newspaper may be distributed only by authorized distributors. No person may, without prior written permission of City Newspaper, take more than one copy of each weekly issue. City (ISSN 1551-3262) is published weekly by WMT Publications, Inc. Periodical postage paid at Rochester, NY (USPS 022-138). Send address changes to City, 250 North Goodman Street, Rochester, NY 14607. City is a member of the Association of Alternative Newsweeklies and the New York Press Association. Subscriptions: $35.00 ($30.00 for senior citizens) for one year. Add $10 yearly for out-of-state subscriptions: add $30 yearly for foreign subscriptions. Due to the initial high cost of establishing new subscriptions, refunds for fewer than ten months cannot be issued. Copyright by WMT Publications Inc., 2013 - all rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, photocopying, recording or by any information storage retrieval system without permission of the copyright owner.


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URBAN JOURNAL | BY MARY ANNA TOWLER

Changing my mind about charter schools Right now, 10 charter schools are operating in the City of Rochester. Soon, you can expect to see more. The Farash Foundation plans to award up to $1 million in grants to spur charter growth in the region. While the grants will be available to selected charter schools in Monroe and Ontario Counties, nearly all of the new ones will probably be in the city. That’s the case with charter growth throughout the country, because urban districts are where most of the most poorly preforming students are. For years, I resisted the charter-school bandwagon, based on evidence that students didn’t do any better in them than in traditional schools. But I can’t oppose them any longer. For one thing, they offer a tuition-free alternative to the schools operated by the school district. The city’s health is tenuous, and one of the biggest risks to its future is the school district. Concern about the district is a big reason families choose to live in the suburbs rather than the city. Alternatives to traditional city schools – including several select district-operated schools like School of the Arts – have kept some parents from leaving. Charters can do that as well, and I think some are. Still, if their students didn’t perform better than those in traditional public schools, I’d find it hard to support charter schools. But there is growing evidence that students in well-run charters do perform better. One of the reasons, unquestionably, is parent motivation. While charter students are usually chosen by lottery, they don’t necessarily represent the average population of their district. Parents of students applying to a charter are likely to be more engaged in their children’s education than parents of the other children. In addition, charter schools tend to have fewer students with disabilities and students for whom English is not the primary language. In many of them, however, most of the students are black and Hispanic and poor. And in well-run charters, some studies indicate that those students are getting a better education than they would if they stayed in regular public schools. In a report prepared for the Farash Foundation, the Center for Governmental Research cites a study of New York City’s charter schools by Harvard University professor Caroline Hoxby. The study looked at the performance of students who were chosen by lottery for the charters; students who took part in the lottery but weren’t chosen and so were going to

If their students didn’t perform better, I’d find it hard to support charter schools. But there is growing evidence that they do.”

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traditional public schools; and students who didn’t take part in the lottery. Hoxby had two key conclusions, the CGR study says: 1) The students enrolled in the charter schools “did much better” than the students who didn’t win the lottery. 2) The students who entered the lottery but didn’t win a place in a charter school did better than the regular-school students who didn’t enter the lottery. “That tells us,” says the CGR report, “that parental motivation really matters, just as we’d expect.” It also indicates that the charters themselves had an effect. CGR also cites studies by Stanford researcher Margaret Raymond. In a widely quoted 2009 nationwide assessment, Raymond found that children in the average charter school didn’t do better than those in the average regular public school. But in that study and in more recent ones, Raymond and her Center for Research on Education Outcomes have found that in states where charter schools have strong oversight and are held accountable for their performance, charters outperform the non-charter public schools. New York is one of the states where charters are held accountable and nonperforming charters are closed. Raymond and the center have also found that two charter companies with

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CITY 3


[ NEWS FROM THE WEEK PAST ]

United cutting jobs

United Airlines will cut 40 positions and eliminate its customer service and ramp operations at the Greater Rochester International Airport. United, the second largest airline to serve Rochester, will continue its flight service out of the Rochester airport. The company has made similar plans to cut workers at the Albany airport.

EPA objects to Kodak fund

In a court filing, the Environmental Protection Agency objected to Kodak’s proposed $49 million environmental trust fund for Eastman Business Park and the Genesee River. The agency is concerned that the sum won’t be enough to clean up Kodak’s legacy pollution. A Kodak spokesperson told WXXI that company and state officials have confidence in the figure.

Solar tech facility for Greece

The SUNY College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering will establish a solar power manufacturing and technology development hub in the Town of Greece. The new Photovoltaic Manufacturing and Technology Development Facility will be in a former Kodak building at 115

4 CITY

JULY 24-30, 2013

News

Canal Landing Boulevard. State and college officials said that the $105 million investment should create 100 new high-tech jobs.

Fringe Fest returns

The First Niagara Fringe Festival announced its complete 2013 lineup. There will 360 performances from September 19 to September 28, with 120 of them free. The festival will have performances in dance, comedy, music, performance art, and theater. Highlights include Cirque du Fringe and Silent Disco.

Council approves projects

Two Rochester projects received approvals from City Council. CityGate, a mixed-used project slated for the former Iola campus at the intersection of Westfall and East Henrietta roads, received the approval it needed to reflect the addition of a Costco store. And Council also approved the sale of Midtown Tower to a partnership between Morgan Management and Buckingham Properties for rental units and commercial space.

A University of Rochester Medical Center study shows that socioeconomic status influences who gets prescribed powerful opioid painkillers. PHOTO BY MARK CHAMBERLIN

HEALTH CARE | BY TIM LOUIS MACALUSO

Pain threshold Few medical conditions have as complicated and far-reaching of an impact on the economy and health care coverage as pain. The Mayo Clinic reports that the cost of pain on employee productivity is more than $47 billion annually. But the treatment of pain is extremely controversial. Opioids — medications like Vicodin, OxyContin, and Percocet — can play an important role in reducing pain and promoting recuperation. But concerns about narcotic abuse in the US, also a serious health problem, cause many physicians to be reluctant to prescribe these

drugs. And some people are more likely than others to be denied. A new study by the University of Rochester Medical Center shows that socioeconomic status influences who gets powerful painkillers. Affluent whites are much more likely to be prescribed opioids than poor African Americans and Hispanics, the study shows. While it’s been known for some time that racial and ethnic disparities play a role in who receives opioids, the URMC team found that income and education also influence the prescription of the medications. URMC researchers examined data collected from 2006 to

2009 of 50,000 visits to about 1,400 emergency departments. Patients from the most affluent neighborhoods were more likely to receive prescriptions for opioids, while patients from the poorest were least likely to receive the drugs. The researchers don’t say why the disparity occurs, but other research suggests that there are multiple factors, including language barriers, poor general health care and coverage, and political influence. A Michigan study showed that pharmacies located in minority neighborhoods are less likely to adequately stock the drugs.


The musicians-artists theme would mesh well on East Main, which also has the armory, Auditorium Theatre, Blackfriars, and is not far from Art Walk. “That’s what we’re attempting to do in everything — to build on the assets that we have, as opposed to trying to create something that’s kind of an island.” [ CAROL WHEELER, CITY HOUSING MANAGER ]

DEVELOPMENT | BY CHRISTINE CARRIE FIEN

East Main revival Two developers are interested in reinventing a couple of important Rochester landmarks — although one project is further along than the other. The former Corpus Christi School and the former Eastman Dental Dispensary are both on East Main Street in southwest Rochester. Both are vacant, and the dental dispensary was recently named to the Landmark Society’s “Five to Revive” list of priority sites for revitalization. Current plans are to turn the school into a 42-unit housing project for musicians and artists. But Carol Wheeler, the City of Rochester’s housing manager, cautions that the proposal is still in the early stages and plans could change. The musicians-artists theme would mesh well with that area of East Main, Wheeler says, which also has the armory, Auditorium Theatre, Blackfriars, and is not far from the Art Walk project. “It just goes so well,” Wheeler says. “And that’s what we’re attempting to do in everything — to build on the assets that we have, as opposed to trying to create something that’s kind of an island.” The $9 million project has already received state funding. And Wheeler says that ideally, work on the site should begin before the end of the year.

Wheeler says that the dental dispensary could possibly be turned into a mixed-income, live-work space. “We are negotiating — seeing exactly what would be the best use for that building,” The Corpus Christi she says. “It’s a great School. PHOTO BY MARK building, but it has a lot CHAMBERLIN of challenges, as well.” The projects are part of a system where the City of Rochester seeks out proposals for rental projects that will eventually go to the state for possible funding. City officials evaluate and score the proposals, and determine what level of assistance they can give each project. Officials say the process helps find the best projects, and increases those projects’ chances of getting state money. “Development is not simple,” Wheeler says. “There’s a lot of competition when it comes to applying for city and state funds, so you want those projects that are as close to being ready as possible.”

DEVELOPMENT | BY CHRISTINE CARRIE FIEN

Design redo Morgan Management has submitted a revised plan for a proposed apartment development at 933 University Avenue. | The proposal has faced opposition from some neighborhood groups over its size and density. Eastman House officials oppose the project, too, as they had hoped to acquire the land. | Morgan Management has revised its plans several times in response to neighborhood concerns. The last iteration lowered the number of apartments to 102 and increased the number of parking spaces to 164. It also dramatically changed the exterior. | The new plan would retain but restore the Monroe Voiture clubhouse currently located on the site. It also drops the proposed number of apartment units from 102 to 99. The design and placement of the building remain unchanged. | The city’s Preservation Board will take up the proposal on August 7, and based on that meeting, will make a recommendation to the Planning Commission about the impact of the project on the character of the neighborhood. The earliest the Planning Commission will review and vote on the proposal is in September. The application then goes back to the Preservation Board for a vote.

Cost of War — 2,251 US servicemen and servicewomen and 1,099 Coalition servicemen and servicewomen have been killed in Afghanistan from the beginning of the war and occupation to July 22. Statistics for Afghan civilian casualties are not available. American casualties from July 4 to July 16: -- Lance Cpl. Benjamin W. Tuttle, 19, Gentry, Ark. -- Staff Sgt. Sonny C. Zimmerman, 25, Waynesfield, Ohio AFGHANISTAN TOTALS

iraqbodycount.org, icasualties.org, Department of Defense SOURCES:

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Charter schools continues from page 3

schools in several areas of the country are doing exceptionally well: KIPP and Uncommon Schools. Three of Rochester’s charter schools are operated by Uncommon Schools, and a fourth is planned. The CGR report is careful to say that charter schools “are not a panacea.” And Hunter College public policy professor Joe Viteritti echoes that. “But,” he said in an interview last week, “there are signs that when run well, they do better.” The reason, Viteritti said, is the accountability – closing what isn’t working. For the problems in urban education itself

there is no panacea, because there is no one cause. There are many: the poverty of the children and their families, which too often results in mental, physical, and behavioral problems; the education level and parenting skills of many parents, which results in too many children entering school with poor language and social skills; the quality of some of the teachers and administrators; the quality of teacher education; the bureaucracy of large school districts; the dispersion of power, and the sometimes conflicting interests, of the adults responsible for children’s education. But we have tried for years to improve urban education, and we have made little – maybe no – progress. And now we have a growing number of charter schools, many having to choose their students through a lottery because so many want in. If charters were a false hope, if students are no better off there than in a traditional public school, it would be different. But the evidence seems to indicate otherwise. And if that’s because their parents are better motivated? “So what?” said Viteritti. “There’s something wrong with letting motivated parents make that choice?” I do worry about the financial impact on the school district. For public school districts,

including Rochester’s, charters carry a real cost. Most charter students come from district-operated schools, taking per-pupil government funding with them. And while the district has fewer students to educate, it can’t reduce its costs proportionally. The charter students don’t all come from one classroom or one school. Reducing the size of several dozen classes by two or three students doesn’t let the district reduce the size of its staff or close schools. At some point there’ll be real savings, but that won’t be overnight. Meantime, the district may have to raise class sizes and reduce services – services that help the remaining children. It may have to limit pay and benefits for teachers and administrators, making it a less attractive place to teach. 6 CITY

JULY 24-30, 2013

Rochester has tried everything imaginable to turn things around. And too many of its students leave school woefully unprepared.”

Shouldn’t we be concerned about that? “To me, it’s the wrong question,” Viteritti said. “To me, the question is ‘what’s going to help the kids?’” Rochester has tried everything imaginable to turn things around. And the majority of the children in the school district either fail to graduate or graduate woefully unprepared for a productive life. I’m still convinced that we won’t solve the problems facing urban education until we focus enormous efforts on children in the city’s poorest neighborhoods from birth on. Too many of them enter school unprepared, in language skills and in social skills. And we can’t expect teachers to make up for that. I’m not giving up on the district. I know that teachers in Rochester’s traditional public schools will keep trying to do the best they can for their students. And significantly, the Farash Foundation isn’t focusing solely on charter schools. It plans to finance some Rochester school district initiatives. “We are working very closely with Superintendent Vargas and his staff,” said the foundation’s director of grants and programs, Isobel Goldman, “to identify projects” for the foundation to support. And the foundation will likely be announcing some of those soon, she said. “There isn’t anything we should not do for the students in the traditional public schools,” says Kent Gardner, who co-wrote the CGR report for the Farash Foundation. But, he adds, we can’t say that we’re not going to allow new initiatives that work. As the CGR study says, charter schools are not a panacea. But the best of them seem to offer opportunity to many children. If wealthier parents aren’t satisfied with the education their children are getting in a school, they send their children somewhere else. They move to a different school district or pay for private school tuition. Charter schools offer a tuition-free alternative to poor families. I don’t know how we justify denying that choice to those families.


MEDIA | BY JEREMY MOULE

Changing channels Time Warner Cable is not taking away PBS. Earlier this month, the cable company informed its Western New York subscribers via a letter that it’s changing how it carries public, educational, and government access television stations. These aren’t public stations in the PBS sense, even though some subscribers clearly believe they are. They’re better known as the local cable access channels 4, 12, and 15. The company is not eliminating the channels. Rather, on July 23, Tim Warner will stop transmitting the channels as an analog signal and will begin transmitting them digitally — a change it’s implementing across the state and New England. As a result, some subscribers will have to take extra steps to continue receiving their cable access stations. But directors of local cable access channels are concerned. They say the quick changeover could create confusion or give people the impression the channels have been switched off. “How’s it impact us? It’s kind of a nightmare,” says David Renner, television coordinator for Penfield. In Monroe County, the active stations are concentrated in the eastside communities and the City of Rochester. While state law says cable providers have to make the access channels available, communities don’t have to use them. How the transition impacts different households will depend on the cable package the households subscribe to and whether they have a set-top box. It also depends on whether a subscriber’s television is a digital or analog set. Here are the three scenarios: • Subscribers with Time Warnerissued set-top boxes and DVR’s will see no change and the stations will remain at channels 4, 12, and 15. They don’t have to do anything to keep the channels. • Subscribers who have a digital television and plug their cables directly into the TV will have to rescan the stations. On these televisions, the community access channels will move to 98.3, 98.4, and 98.5. • Subscribers with analog televisions who plug the cable directly into their sets will need a converter box from Time Warner. The company is distributing the boxes free on a firstcome-first-served basis, and subscribers can get them online, at the company’s

service centers, or by calling (855) 2861736. Beginning in 2015, the company will charge 99 cents per month to use the converters. Time Warner spokesperson Joli Plucknette-Farmen plays down the

potential for complications from the switch. The company gave its subscribers 30 days’ notice, she says, and has developed a website — twc. com/digitaladapter — to explain what’s happening and what customers need to do to keep the access channels. “It should be relatively seamless,” she says. And about 75 percent of the company’s cable TV customers in the area won’t be affected because they subscribe to digital packages, Plucknette-Farmen says. She says the company doesn’t know how many subscribers have analog televisions without a set-top tuner. The community access channel transition is part of Time Warner’s broader switch to digital, PlucknetteFarmen says. In an online FAQ, the company touts digital channels’ better picture and sound quality. PlucknetteFarmen says subscribers should see some improvement in cable access channels’ picture quality after the switch, particularly a reduction in “snow.” Digital channels are more efficient than analog in terms of capacity, she says. Cable is a lot like a pipe, which means a limited amount can be forced through at any given time. One analog channel takes up as much cable capacity as three high-definition digital channels, Plucknette-Farmen says, or 14 standarddefinition digital channels. The company says that capacity freed up through the conversion can be used to provide higher-speed Internet or more on-demand programming. Penfield Community Television’s Renner says that, in the long term, the changes could provide opportunities for the station to improve the video

David Renner, the Town of Penfield’s television coordinator, says Time Warner’s approach to switching the way it transmits cable access channels could cost Penfield Community Television some viewers. PHOTO BY MARK CHAMBERLIN

and audio quality of its broadcasts. He says that after the transition, he wants to find out whether the station could eventually broadcast in a widescreen format and whether it could use stereo sound, among other issues. Renner says he’s also interested in knowing whether Time Warner will make the cable access channels or their programming available through the company’s mobile apps. For now, however, the stations operators say they’re worried about the impact of

the transition. The channels fill an important niche. They provide residents with information, events coverage, and locally-oriented programming not available anywhere else. In Penfield, channel 12 broadcasts all town meetings. Supervisor Tony LaFountain says that residents often catch the meetings, or parts of them, on the channel and ask him about them later. He says that town officials have tried to operate Penfield’s government as openly as possible. And Time Warner’s plan to move the channels, without allowing time for significant public awareness campaigns, may undermine some of those efforts, he says. LaFountain says he’s disappointed by Time Warner’s approach to the switch. The company should help town officials inform residents about the change, he says.

Schroth. The lineup includes cooking shows, local history programs, and government meetings. Each year, the station also records the Sing-Out musical revue, which is performed at East Rochester High School, but features students from across the county. Time Warner had cautioned local community access channels about the pending shift, Schroth says, but the company never said when it would happen. He says he would have preferred a few months’ notice instead of the few weeks the East Rochester Community Television received. Schroth says he’s especially worried about East Rochester’s older, fixedincome residents who are the subscribers most likely to have analog television sets. He says he suspects that those residents are most likely subscribing to basic cable and not using a set-top box. They could unwittingly lose access to valuable information, he says. Carvin Eison, station manager for Rochester’s RCTV-15, echoes Schroth’s concerns. And he says that older residents may not be comfortable with hooking up the converter. “Community access is just that,” Schroth says. “It is programming that the community should easily have access to, and this has made it tougher for the community to have access.”

The 28 volunteers at East Rochester Community Television produce about

250 programs a year, all unique to the village, says station director John rochestercitynewspaper.com

CITY 7


INTERVIEW | BY TIM LOUIS MACALUSO

Tim Mains was still new to teaching in the early 1970’s when he walked into his class in the Greece school district one day to find the word “faggot” written on the blackboard. That and a series of other events led him to come out of the closet to his students and peers at a time when, as he put it, “gay and teacher didn’t belong in the same sentence.” The experience was gut-wrenching, Mains said in a recent interview, due to the relentless name-calling — including gay slurs — flung at him almost daily for the better part of a school year. But it was also a turning point. Mains said he learned that although it isn’t easy and doesn’t happen quickly, being out and visible can be a catalyst for changing attitudes. Within days, Mains leaves Rochester to start his new job as superintendent of the Jamestown school system. But he leaves behind a long history of public service in education and local politics. In 1985, Mains was the first openly gay man in New York State to be elected to public office. He served on City Council for 20 years. Mains has been both a teacher and an administrator, working in the Greece school system and the Rochester City School District. He is the former principal of School 50, and eventually became director of internal school operations at the RCSD. He made an unsuccessful run for Rochester mayor, and he was considered as a possible successor to former superintendent Jean-Claude Brizard. Between his work for City Council and his knowledge of city schools, Mains gained an unusual vantage point of both entities. In a recent interview, he said that many of the challenges facing city schools involve a breakdown and misalignment of organizational systems — everything from attendance recordkeeping to instruction and assessment. Those problems are exacerbated by the mandatory implementation of the new, more rigorous 8 CITY

JULY 24-30, 2013

TIM MAINS Common Core curriculum, Mains said, and by the state’s new teacher and principal evaluations. But Mains said he firmly believes that the district is on the right track. And he said that the shift toward extended learning under the supervision of Superintendent Bolgen Vargas is critically important for city students. In our interview, Mains also discussed being a role model for the LGBT community, how local zoning laws are at the root of both the city’s and the school district’s problems with poverty, the teachers union, and how charter schools are impacting the city school district. The following is an edited version of that discussion. CITY: How do you explain the city school district’s low graduation rate and student underachievement? What is blocking improvement?

Mains: One of the huge problems is that systems are horribly aligned, if they’re aligned at all. Instructional, delivery, assessment, and attendance systems — they’re not in sync. What happens in schools today needs to occur within a system. Gone is the day when teachers walk into their classroom, shut the door, and do whatever they want to do. For example, if we both teach fourth grade, but we don’t teach the same thing, then when the fifth-grade teacher gets our kids, the students are not going to be at the same place in math. In the time that I’ve been with the city school district, we have aligned and realigned the instructional curriculum several times. We’re doing it again now, trying to align with the Common Core curriculum. So what you have are people always running to catch up, but they never get ahead of the game. My second year as a principal [at School 50], I got 90 percent of my fourth graders passing the

I WAS THE GAY TEACHER

math test. We were busting our butts. Back then, the only students who had to take the tests were in fourth grade and eighth grade. The very next year, the state instituted grades 3 to 8 testing, and when they did that, test scores across the state crumbled. And when the test scores crumbled, so did teacher morale. It took me five years of steady gains to move the scores back up to the point of getting 68 percent to 69 percent passing the English language arts tests and 72 percent passing math. And just at the point where we were getting to something acceptable, the state changed the scoring process again. Trying to motivate the instructional staff and help them believe that they really do make a difference was difficult. I would say, “You’re really doing what you need to be doing.” And teachers would tell me, “But the test says I’m not.” Morale is a tremendously important thing. The research is clear about this: the single most important thing that makes an effective student is an effective teacher. But teachers, because of the current way that we rate them, sometimes don’t feel effective even when they’re having an impact. The second problem: because we have all of these failed systems that are not in alignment with one another, what people have learned is to do what they want to do, and fight for what they think they deserve, regardless of what anyone else is doing. One of the crazy things about the culture in the city school district is an attitude of “I’m going to do this anyway.” The third thing is not inherent to Rochester; it’s a problem in districts across the country. In a standards based system, we can’t be satisfied to say, “I taught them, but they just didn’t learn it.” That’s equivalent to a doctor saying, “I operated, but the patient died anyway.”

The standards for kids and what they are supposed to know is much higher, and so is the standard for teachers. I can’t evaluate a teacher on what he or she presented. I have to evaluate on how effective they were in getting their students to learn. This problem is made more complicated by the first two things I talked about. The fourth thing is the population of children who come into our schools. We have one of the highest child poverty rates, and we certainly have the highest in the state’s Big Five school districts. We know that kids who come from deep poverty, their brains don’t develop the same way as the brains of children who live in suburban environments. Kids come to us with the equivalent of posttraumatic stress disorder. They’ve been subjected to so many stressors in their lives that it literally slows development. When I was running for mayor I used to talk to people about when I worked in the Greece school system. A child entering kindergarten class there had a working vocabulary of about 3,000 words. The average child coming into my classroom at School 50 had a vocabulary of about 300 words. An amazing number of kids who come into our system have one parent incarcerated. They’ve witnessed violence in their home. They’ve had an immediate family member murdered or killed, and they’re aware of this loss even before they enter pre K. That’s the bad news. The good news is we can compensate for that, but we have to start early and we have to spend more time with them. What Superintendent Vargas is talking about right now in terms of extended time for learning is critical. Are RCSD teachers well-supported by their principals, central office, and through professional development? Many say no one


Tim Mains (left) and spouse David Gardner. PHOTO BY MIKE HANLON

is listening to them even though they’re the professionals working with children.

I certainly think they’re supported through professional development. I tried to make sure that my staff had what they needed. I don’t know that I was always able to meet all of their needs. I can tell you that teachers right now feel beleaguered, attacked, and defensive. The morale is very low. Teaching is part art and part science. Other professionals requiring higher degrees — doctors, lawyers, architects, dentists, accountants — see their clients one at a time. You don’t go to your dentist’s office and have him come out and say, “The next 37 people who need crowns come into my office.” Teachers work in a very complex environment with multiple clients simultaneously, and they’re making a thousand split-second decisions about what they need to do to move kids forward. Some critics of the RCSD say that the Rochester Teachers Association shares the blame for the district’s poor performance because ineffective teachers are protected and misconduct is tolerated. Is that fair?

I don’t blame the unions. The unions guarantee that due process is being followed. I feel the responsibility for patrolling the system to make sure that only excellent people get in falls on administrators. And if a bad apple does get hired, it’s their responsibility to correct their mistake and get them out. It’s not fun. It’s not pleasant. And it’s the hardest part of my job. There are people who I thought were not effective and I talked to them about that. I’ve said, “You know, if it’s just not clicking for you, maybe it’s time to think about retiring.” You’ve got to throw the red flag when you see something that’s out of whack. That’s how the systems stay aligned. Someone has to pay attention to the boundaries of what’s acceptable and what’s not. On the rare occasion when I have someone who is not doing their job or I think is doing

harm to kids, it’s my job to make sure that they’re not available to do harm to kids. When teachers weren’t performing, how long did it normally take you to move them out?

Sometimes a year. Sometimes two. I had someone several years ago who I had huge concerns about. I sat down and I gave him feedback, and every time I talked with him about formal observations that didn’t meet standards, he would write an eight- to 10-page rebuttal. In year two, I changed his assignment to a place where I could watch him even more carefully. And I documented every single month the things he was not doing, and it got tense. But at the end of that year, I fired him. Do principals have the ability to move their most skilled teachers around? Are the most seasoned and experienced teachers aligned with the students who have the highest needs?

The RTA contract makes a distinction that says I can’t move a teacher between primary and intermediate, between K-2 and 3-5. That’s something that the district allowed to get into the contract that they shouldn’t have, so it does create limitations. But, no. In most school districts, the principal doesn’t have too much leeway in moving people around, hiring, and recruiting. You have to work within the system that exists. No, you don’t have carte blanche, but you can certainly try to make sure you get the best people into your classrooms. The new performance evaluations are supposed to increase accountability and make it easier to terminate ineffective teachers and principals. Do you think they will?

Theoretically, I do believe measuring a teacher’s effectiveness based on what students are learning is a valid concept. My personal bias is that the tests shouldn’t be used at this particular time to evaluate teachers and schools because the testing keeps changing. The concept is defensible, but I don’t think the metric is fair or reliable.

I would say, ‘You’re really doing what you need to be doing.’ And teachers would tell me, ‘But the test says I’m not.’ -Tim Mains Would we have different student outcomes in a smaller RCSD?

That sounds logical, but in the South there are some enormous countywide school systems that are successful. Size is not necessarily an impediment, but I will say that the point I made about people doing whatever the hell they want to do is made a little bit easier in a larger system. It’s easier to do and easier to get away with it. If the estimates are accurate, city schools could lose as much as 20 percent of their students over the next decade to charter schools. When parents came to you and said, “I’m sending my child to a charter school,” what were their reasons?

I believe that the reason charter schools will continue to draw students away from us is because we’re not successful enough. Rather than just accepting that and saying that’s the reality, I think we need to fix and align the systems that will help improve student performance. And it can be done. Despite the challenges we’ve talked about, I sincerely believe that Superintendent Vargas and Deputy Superintendent Anita Murphy understand the problems and are on the right path. But what about the people, many of whom are in the business community, who say the district has been failing students for years — that it’s time to recognize that the district is broken and to offer parents an alternative?

Isn’t it interesting that they want to create charter schools which allow them to skim off and cherry pick kids whose parents are paying attention to education? They may not have the monetary resources, but they’re concerned. They are most likely the most involved parents, so now you’re taking kids out of the city schools whose parents value education — basically making the remaining system even worse. If the district is that bad, and you know all of these schools around it are so much better, why not just disband the city school district? Just

Tim Mains was selected as superintendent of the Jamestown public school system. PHOTO BY MIKE HANLON

close the city school district. Then all the kids who live in the city would have to be absorbed by the surrounding suburbs. I don’t hear anyone in the business community proposing that. You were on City Council and working in the district. The economic transitions were already under way in the city — Kodak’s decline, retail’s exit from downtown. Did you see a correlation between what was happening to the city economically and the problems developing in city schools?

The things that drive decline in the school district have little to do with the economics of the city. The problem is not the economics of the city. It’s the zoning laws in the communities around the city that led to this enormous concentration of poverty. The majority of lowincome housing was confined to the city. Your activism on behalf of Rochester’s LGBT community is well-documented. You’re a role model. Did you plan this, and did you have any role models?

No, it was nothing I planned. I grew up in an era and in a place [Indiana] where I thought I was the only person like this. There were no role models. When I finally came out in college, my dad said, “Those people usually get shot or they get arrested in bus stations.” Is that what I wanted for my life? When I left Indiana to come to Rochester to take a teaching job in 1971, I assumed that gay and teacher didn’t belong in the same sentence. I came here with the mindset that my private life was going to remain private. But in the second school year, we launched a program called “selective-elective.” And I taught a class on the future: ecology, technology, and one on the sexual revolution. In that one, the students wanted to have speakers come and talk about women’s lib and gay lib. I called the Gay Liberation Front at the University of Rochester, and they had a speakers’ continues on page 10 rochestercitynewspaper.com

CITY 9


TIM MAINS continues from page 9

bureau. And I told them that I wanted their speakers to come and talk to my class. They said they wouldn’t come unless they received a letter from an administrator. I went to my vice principal, and she was fine with it. The speakers came and within minutes wherever they went there was a string of kids following behind them gawking and staring. All the cafeteria ladies stopped serving and watched them. Word was out that queers were in the school, and everyone was curious. There must have been 300 kids jammed into the stairwell trying to get into my class to hear my speakers. It took several of us to ferret out the kids in my class, since they were the only ones allowed to come in. The next morning I was summarily called over the loud speaker. I walked into the office and the superintendent was there. He never questioned what I did. He questioned my [lesson] plans. At the end of the day, I was called back to the principal’s office and handed an envelope with a letter of reprimand from the superintendent. All of these accusations had been made. I found out every member of the board had received so many phone calls that they took their phones off the hook, but not before telling the superintendent, “You’ll deal with this tomorrow.” The Greece Police Department also received calls, and dutifully recorded all the incoming calls. But [on examination] none of the parents of my students who were actually in the class and conversed with the speakers called to complain. And I realized then what incredible power that visibility has. Weighing on me at the time were my own sharp memories of high school. At the end of that year, I made a decision that I would never be invisible to my kids the way my [LGBT] teachers had been invisible to me. I also decided that I would become involved with this group that sent the speakers to me. And I’ll tell you I was terrified. But gradually I got connected with the Gay Liberation Front, and then I helped found the Gay Alliance [of the Genesee Valley]. The Gay Alliance was protesting something that was shown on a television show, and I got a call from the Democrat and Chronicle. And I thought about it for a second, and I was interviewed and quoted as a board member of the GAGV. That was it. That was the crossover. What was the response from students at the time? This is in the early ‘70’s and you were new to teaching.

It was very difficult. Name-calling daily. Nasty stuff. I was just a teacher with a label. I was the gay teacher. “Hey faggot.” “Hey queer bait.” Trying to get through a day, I would wonder to myself, “How long is this going to go on?” 10 CITY JULY 24-30, 2013

Students came to me all the time to discuss their problems. Here I had gone to get my counseling degree and now nobody came to me. I had my tires slashed, nasty notes left under my windshield wiper, crank calls all the time. But slowly the kids in my class got over it. By the time we got through their first marking period, I was their teacher. One day, though, I came in and someone had written “faggot” on the board. I erased it, and on that day, I turned around and I said, “I suppose you think that is going to offend me. I’m your teacher and I believe I deserve the same respect I give to you.” That was the beginning of my slowly deciding I was going to respond. Also, other teachers started helping me by confronting it, too. Then my kids started defending me: “Leave him alone. He’s my teacher and he’s a good teacher.” By the time you entered politics and ran for City Council, you really had no alternative except to run as an openly gay man, right?

I didn’t run for office because I was gay. I ran for office because of actual issues. Gay rights issues are not so much city issues as they are state and federal issues. I was concerned about the paucity of lowincome housing, the crappy job we were doing of training police on sensitivity so they could relate to our different communities, and I thought we had a crappy economic development program. That’s what I ran on in 1985. I wasn’t doing it to break any ground. But it was the only issue on the table over and over. There were protests, and I would have reporters put a microphone in front of me and say, “Is it true you’re gay and you have a gay agenda?”

Is it true that you received death threats?

I never thought the death threats were real; they were just people spouting off. The counselor in me seemed to take over. I never personalized it. I knew it wasn’t about me. Although when I showed up on the doorstep [while campaigning] and a guy opened the door and pointed a gun at me and said, “Get off my fucking porch now, faggot,” that was a little unnerving. I didn’t feel afraid. I felt frustrated. I kept thinking, “When are we ever going to get past this?” I raised more money than anyone had ever raised for a City Council race at that time. I had all the endorsements. I had the D&C, the Times Union, and City’s endorsement. I had labor behind me. With those kinds of backings, I should have won handily. But I remember getting the call that my margin of victory had shrunk. I was ahead, but only by 15 votes. The net result was I was ahead by 11 votes, and I won. I became the poster child for “every vote counts.”

For more Tom Tomorrow, including a political blog and cartoon archive, visit www.thismodernworld.com

URBAN ACTION This week’s calls to citizenship include the following events and activities. (All are free and open to the public, unless otherwise noted.)

is $79 per student, which includes dinners and visits to local places of worship. Seating is limited. Registration: interfaith@naz.edu or (585) 389-2963.

Youth workshop explores religions Hiroshima Nazareth College will and Nagasaki host the “Next Genremembered eration 2013 Youth Interfaith Encounter,” a weeklong workshop for area youth to explore and discuss the world’s religions. The event will be held from Monday, August 12, to Friday, August 16. Registration

Genesee Valley Citizens for Peace will hold a candlelight vigil in recognition of the 68th anniversary of the US atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Japan. The vigil is at 7:30 p.m. on Tuesday, August 6,

CITY NEWS BLOG

at the Avon traffic circle (Routes 5 and 20).

Voter registration drive

The League of Women Voters is seeking volunteers to help with a major registration project from Saturday, August 3, through Sunday, August 11. The purpose is to prepare and encourage more residents to vote, especially in those areas of the city where voter turnout is particularly low. Information: www.lwv-rma.org or call Barbara Grosh at (585) 415-8251.

POLITICS, PEOPLE, EVENTS, & ISSUES

rochestercitynewspaper.com/BLOGS/NEWSBLOG COMMENTING ON THE STATE OF ROCHESTER & BEYOND


Dining

Left to right: Fraldinha (Bottom Sirloin); The Gourmet salad bar at Espada, and the Chefs; Salmon cucumber canapés with capers.

PHOTOS BY MARK CHAMBERLIN

add another layer of flavor and a bit of crunch. Scatter more farofa on your plate to soak up the meat juices that are soon to come. The tri-tip steak is packed with richness, strong in umami, and a bit chewy (not unusual for this cut). Out of all the proffered beef, this one was the most “meaty” and the most satisfying. Two cuts popular in Brazil and, therefore, Brazilian steakhouses, are the picanha and alcatra, cuts of top sirloin. Both slices I received had an off-flavor, yet the hearty pieces a friend received were fine. The pork ribs are tantalizing salty, as is the parmesan-encrusted pork loin. The lamb chops are juicy, tender, and savory. The chicken wrapped in bacon is tasty when the bacon is not flaccid, as it was on one visit; this same visit had limp bacon encircling the beef filet. (Espada’s general manager Mike Caito points out that the kitchen is searching for locally sourced bacon and experimenting with different suppliers, which may account for the difference in texture.) The meal is finished off with grilled pineapple, slathered in cinnamon sugar. Tropical, light and satisfyingly sweet, it’s a refreshing contrast to a salty, proteinpacked dinner. Those not in the mood for a heavy meal

The grill from Ipanema Espada Brazilian Steak 274 N. GOODMAN ST. (IN VILLAGE GATE) 473-0050, ESPADASTEAK.COM WEDNESDAY-THURSDAY 4:30-10 P.M.; FRIDAY-SATURDAY 11:30 A.M.-3 P.M. (LUNCH) & 4:30-11 P.M. (DINNER); SUNDAY 10 A.M.3 P.M. (BRUNCH) & 4:30-9 P.M. [ REVIEW ] BY LAURA REBECCA KENYON

If you do a Google image search for “rodízio,” a Brazilian-style restaurant in which servers continually bring diners food until the patron signals they’ve had enough to eat, one of the first images you’ll see is a man sitting in a restaurant. Before him is a table cluttered with dishes, food scraps and used utensils. His shirt is lifted to reveal his naked torso, hands resting on his clearly engorged, pregnant-with-a-food-baby belly. The man smiles dazedly at the camera, eyes slightly glazed: the symptoms of what I like to think of as a meat hangover. I recognize his expression. It’s the same one I had on my face after dining at Espada, Rochester’s only churrascaria, a.k.a., Brazilian steakhouse. (I refrained from hiking up my shirt.) It’s hard to leave Espada without feeling

very full. I’m talking an after-Thanksgivingdinner kind of full. Espada fills Rochester’s churrascaria niche and will appeal to serious carnivores. I’m not one of them. On my initial visit, I made the mistake of not flipping my chip to red the moment I received a portion of food -- more on that in a second -- and ended up like Lucy Ricardo in the chocolate factory, gobbling up morsels as quickly as I could to keep things from piling up. There is so much food, copious amounts of meat and sides and salads, that it’s easy to become overwhelmed, even numb. It’s a shame if that happens, as there are some things that Espada does well.   At dinner, you’re offered three all-you-can-eat

rodízio “levels” from which to choose: green, silver, and gold. The green rodízio ($20) gives you access to the salad bar -- a misnomer, because in addition to green salads, you can easily make a meal of rice and beans, soup, canapes, grilled vegetables, and other assorted sides. The silver rodízio ($35) gets you the salad bar, plus eight types of meat, including chicken drumsticks, parmesan-encrusted pork, and two types of sirloin. The gold rodízio ($45) -- a churrascaria for Henry VIII -- affords you

the salad bar, all the silver-level meats, plus five additional meats (filet mignon, filet wrapped in bacon, lamb chops, beef ribs and rib eye). There is also a children’s rodízio option ($15). All levels come with Brazilian cheese bread (akin to a chewy French gougère), mashed potatoes, and fried plantains. Silver and gold rodízio diners are handed a cardboard chip. One side is ringed with your selected color to signal for food, and the other side is red to ask for a respite. When your chip is flipped to silver or gold, large hunks of beef, pork, lamb, and chicken are presented to you on a steel skewer and sliced onto your plate with machete-like knives; in some cases, you catch the slice with a pair of delicate tongs. Only moments earlier, those skewers had been in the kitchen, spit roasting over hot, charcoal-fueled flames, the chef keeping a watchful eye on the meat, and occasionally, the curious diners looking in at him through the large plate glass window overlooking the salad bar. At the salad bar, heap onto your plate some

feijoada, the zesty and flavorful Brazilian take on rice and beans made with pork. Top this off with farofa, a well-seasoned bread-crumb topping, to

don’t need to avoid Espada. Sunday brunch offers a lighter take on the silver rodízio, plus several traditional breakfast options. One Sunday, I enjoyed an unexpected chilled strawberry soup from the salad bar, a sweet and fresh taste of summer in a bowl. Vegetarians, too, will have plenty of choices at the salad bar, though they may be put off by its close proximity to the grilling meats. Or, you might spend a languorous evening at the bar, enjoying a wickedly delicious strawberry mango caipirinha ($8). Traditionally made with sugar, lime, and cachaça, a liquor derived from sugar-cane juice with a flavor somewhere between light rum and silver tequila, a strawberry mango caipirinha is not the standard -- but is too good to pass up. Order an à la carte item or two from the bar menu to offset the effects of the potent cachaça. The bar itself is a 30-foot structure of well-polished, reclaimed wood, and is a great vantage point from which to admire the dining room. It’s a beautiful mix of natural and industrial touches: high ceilings with exposed wood and ductwork, Edison bulbs shining down on chairs built from an old ship, restored glass tiles shimmering behind verdant plants. The overall effect is hip yet relaxed and inviting, and well-suited to an after-work drink, light brunch, or a dinner consisting of a mountain of meat. rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 11


Upcoming [ POP/ROCK ]

Keller Williams Thursday, September 12. German House Theater. 315 Gregory St. 8 p.m. $25.50-$30. 857-8358. upallnightpresents.com [ POP/ROCK ]

Rochester Indie Fest Thursday October 24, and Friday,

October 25. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. Various prices and times. 454-2966. bugjar.com. [ CELTIC ]

Enter The Haggis Saturday, November 30. Water Street

Music Hall, 204 N. Water St. $12-$15. 8 p.m. 352-5600. waterstreetmusic.com

Indians

FRIDAY, JULY 26 THE BUG JAR, 219 MONROE AVE., 7:30 P.M. | $8-$10 | BUGJAR.COM [ SINGER/SONGWRITER ] Copenhagen’s Soren Lokke Juul

spent a decade performing in less-than-chart-topping bands until the Dane made a music video for his song “Magic Kids” on his iPhone. The clip gained momentum, the sound was fresh, and the melodies contagious. Indians is, at the end of the day, Juul and Juul alone, although he has procured backing musicians to help him translate the synthladen, folk-inspired indie pop from the studio to the stage. Like most of the truly unique and legitimate alternative acts of the day, Indians’ sound defies categorization. Whatever genre Indians may be, the songs are emotionally charged and inspired. — BY DAVID YOCKEL, JR.

Officer Friendly FRIDAY, JULY 26 WATER STREET MUSIC HALL, 204 NORTH WATER ST., 8:30 P.M. | $10-$12 | WATERSTREETMUSIC.COM [ ROCK ] In the early 1990s Officer Friendly was

Rochester’s window into the post-grunge, return-to-rock world of bands like Alice In Chains and Pearl Jam. The band developed a huge following of the hard rock faithful and released two independent albums before hanging it up in search of other adventures. Now begins phase two. Let’s hope it lasts. — BY FRANK DE BLASE

PRESENTS:

FIRST EVER JAZZ CRUISE August 12th. 7-9pm • $23/ticket

Join us aboard the Colonial Belle in Fairport for a 2-hour cruise on the Erie Canal! Live music from the Bill Tiberio Trio, Great Snacks & Cash Bar ON SALE NOW! Limited seating. Call 966-5299 or 966-2660 today!

12 CITY JULY 24-30, 2013

Music


WEDNESDAY, JULY 24

Revolution Fest THURSDAY THROUGH SUNDAY, JULY 25-JULY 28 MONTAGE MUSIC HALL, 50 CHESTNUT ST.,  7 P.M. (THUR/FRI), 4 P.M. (SAT/SUN) | $6-$15 | THEMONTAGEMUSICHALL.COM [ ROCK ] I don’t get the revolution reference entirely

here. I mean, the festival includes 35 of Rochester’s best hard and heavy bands. Sounds like a majority to me. You can have your head and your eardrums handed back to you in a bag if you witness this incredibly relentless line-up. This ain’t no battle. It’s a healthy and positive coming together of like-minded banging heads. Maybe that’s the revolution. Setiva, One Fate Remains, Mulu Lizzi, Lowkey, Burndwiller, and Caustic Method are just a fraction of the musical tonnage on display. Duck. — BY FRANK DE BLASE

SUNDAY, JULY 28 BLUE CROSS ARENA, ONE WAR MEMORIAL SQUARE 7:30 P.M. | $78-$128 | BLUECROSSARENA.COM [ R&B ] Oh, R. Kelly, what don’t you do? In town on

the most recent leg of his tour to promote “Write Me Back” before he heads off to South Africa, Kelly is also working on his memoir, and to show us he’s still got it as an auteur… more chapters of “Trapped in the Closet,” just in case the first 33 chapters didn’t wrap up the story tidily enough. Going a bit more in the soul direction on his most recent effort, he certainly has not lost any skills as a crooner of the finest sort. Providing support for the night of world-class entertainment is Fantasia and Syleena Johnson. — BY SUZAN PERO

We’re seeking one outstanding sales professional to help us grow more! Media / newspaper / advertising sales experience a must. Telemarketing, classified and online sales experience a definite plus. Salary plus commission plus benefits.

Jeff Riales and the Silvertone Express played at Woody Woodward’s joint on Saturday. PHOTO FRANK DE BLASE

That Twang thang

[ BLUES ]

[ REVIEW ] BY FRANK DE BLASÉ

Man, it was like a weekend of strikeouts. I was extremely bummed when surfguitar king Dick Dale bailed on his Friday night gig at Water Street, so I climbed into the two-wheel station wagon and hung ten (twenty if you count the fingers) to the Public Market for some sweltering outdoor boogie with Los Lonely Boys, Melia, and The Tommy Brunett Band as part of the Bands on the Bricks series. Miss finger-

R.Kelly

[ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ] Dave McGrath. Sticky Lips BBQ Juke Joint, 830 Jefferson Rd. Henrietta. 2925544. stickylipsbbq.com. 6:30 p.m. Free. Jeff Elliott. Marge’s Lakeside Inn, 4909 Culver Rd. 3231020. margeslakesideinn.com. 6 p.m. Call for info. The Maria Gillard Band. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 7:30 p.m. Free. Marty Roberts. Schooner’s Riverside Pub, 70 Pattonwood Dr. 342-3030. shumwaymarine.com/ schooners.shtml. 7 p.m. Call for info. Rob & Gary Acoustic. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. 248-4825. woodcliffhotelspa.com. 5:30 p.m. Free.

tapping, harmonic pentatonic badass, Melia herself was getting off the stage as I arrived under angry skies. Brunett and his ragamuffin honky tonk crew took to the stage and delivered as they always do, but had to scurry in a hurry when the storm came barreling in. It looked like a recipe for a tornado so Los Lonely Boys, who I’m sure didn’t want to become Los Soggy Boys, bailed. Texans know better than to fuck with a potential tornado.  Local impresario, music man on the — as well as behind the — scene, and Big Easy zydeco bon vivant, Woody Woodward’s events are parties where

parties go to party hard and learn how to throw a hardy party. It’s simple; start with music and end with music. And if you wanna be smart, you throw some music in the middle. I had the pleasure of crashing the Woodward estates Saturday afternoon to hear the country and western twang and talent of Jeff Riales and the Silvertone Express. Riales cool baritone was an ideal way to beat the heat as he and the boys worked through a set of mostly original tunes of heartbreak and heart fix. It was twangtastic, twangtacular, twangzemplory, and twangcellent. I think I drank too much iced tea. Thanks anyway, Wood. ‘Twas a blast. Caught Buffalo’s Kickstart Rumble at Lovin’ Cup later that night after a tight set from the homeboys in Krypton 88 — dig that purdy new guitar. Kickstart Rumble plays rockabilly right down the middle in the vein of cats like Eddie Cochran and Chuck Berry, just a hint-ocountry with beat appeal and balls. Truly “Somethin’ Else.” 

Sauce Boss. Dinosaur Bar-BQue, 99 Court St. 325-7090. dinosaurbarbque.com. 9:30 p.m. Free. [ DJ/ELECTRONIC ]

DJ Reign and Ladies Night.

Captain’s Attic, 37 Charlotte St. 546-8885. Call for info. DJ Adam. Nashvilles, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. Henrietta. 3343030. nashvillesny.com. Call for info.

Ladies Nite: High Heels and Mini Skirts New Wave Wednesdays. Club Clarissas,

293 Clarissa St. 232-3430. 10 p.m. 21+. Call for info. Teen Set 45 Party. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. Free. Why Not Wednesday. Eclipse Bar & Grill, 374 Thurston Rd. 502-922-6567. 10 p.m. Call for info. Y Not Wednesday w/DJ ET. Plush, 151 St. Paul St. 2325650. venurochester.com. Call for info. [ JAZZ ]

Andy Stobie & The Greater Finger Lakes Jazz Band. 6:30 p.m. Lakefront Park, Geneva. Free. continues on page 15

SEND RESUME TO: Betsy Matthews, CITY Newspaper, 250 N. Goodman St., Rochester, NY 14607 FRIE

NDLY

COMMUN

ICATIVE ORGANI

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OR EMAIL: bmatthews @rochester-citynews.com OR CALL: 585-244-3329 ext. 27

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 13


Music Stiletto sharp and bouffant cool Nikki Hill SUNDAY, JULY 28 ABILENE BAR & LOUNGE,  153 LIBERTY POLE WAY 6 P.M. | $15-$20 | ABILENEBARANDLOUNGE.COM NIKKIHILLMUSIC.COM [ INTERVIEW ] BY FRANK DE BLASE

All hyperbole aside, St. Louis-based soul shouter Nikki Hill is one of the best rootsrock singers I have ever seen. And I’ve seen quite a few. And I’m not just talking about the stars of now, but of all time. I rate her up there with Wanda Jackson, Barbara Pittman, Etta James, and Ruth Brown. Seriously folks, Hill blows my doors off. With little fanfare, Hill and her band blew through the Dinosaur Bar-B-Que last month to rock the lid off the joint. The buzz hasn’t stopped since. Everyone’s still carrying on about the girl with the voice; a voice that is part sweet seduction, part sweeter threat. At 28, Hill is stiletto sharp and bouffant cool, flamier than Little Richard (or perhaps more appropriately, Esquerita), raunchier than Sharon Jones, more straight-ahead than Rachel Nagy of The Detroit Cobras. More than a couple of us fell in love with Hill that night. Hill recently rang up from a tour stop in Oregon to discuss how she stumbled into singing, who she digs, and how a skyscraper hairdo is divine. An edited transcript of the conversation follows.    CITY: You started singing in church. What of that remains of that in your music and what got cut? NIKKI HILL: I would say aside from the

religious references, nothing got cut. The best part about gospel music is it’s as rock and roll as anything else out there. The energy, intensity, the realness -- I always want that in my music if I can help it.  When did you first want to sing? When did you first realize you could sing?

This is hand-in-hand for me. I never really wanted to sing. My dad made me join the gospel choir when I was a kid. People said, “Wow, that little girl can wail!” Well, I didn’t really care. I just did it because I had to, and then it was something to do to pass the time when I was at my dad’s. I guess it’s kind of cheesy, but music found me, not really the 14 CITY JULY 24-30, 2013

other way around. I’m just a big music nerd at heart, and I guess I wanted to throw my 2 cents out there and be immersed in it full time. Who were some of your early influences?

There are plenty. Little Richard, Nappy Brown, Chuck Berry, Etta James, Nick Curran, Amy Winehouse, Bon Scott, The Faces (with Rod Stewart), Eddie Hinton, Allen Stone, The Staple Singers, Otis Redding, Lou Ann Barton, Sister Rosetta Tharpe...it goes on and on. I love them all for how real they are. Vocally, they are unique, strong, intense, and just plain real. And it doesn’t hurt that they had bad-ass bands. What was your first experience on stage? How did you feel?

Well, singing in the choir really prepared me more than anything for the stage. We had to sing in front of the people in church, and then we also traveled to other churches to sing and to gospel revivals and all kinds of stuff. We had these little dancing entrances coming in through the doors sometimes. I tell you, some of it really teaches you the elements of show business. So, to be honest, the other times on stage haven’t really been anything different. It’s hard for me to explain. I just don’t get nervous. Excited, yes. Every single time I’m excited, because I’m about to go onstage with my gang of pirates and we’re going to do what we can to blow people’s minds. So really, every time is just as awesome as the first. I don’t go out there with a notion of how my voice is going to sound. I just want to sound like me. A damned good me. It seems like you’ve exploded onto the scene. Give a little back ground as to why and how we got here.

My musical history is very quick. My husband heard me singing and it just sparked something in him to keep encouraging me to do it. I kind of thought he was bullshitting me because, you know, we were dating at the time, and I thought he was just being nice. I started singing a couple of songs at some of his shows when we moved to St. Louis and got a great response. Still, it wasn’t much more than that. Our friend, Vinnie Valenza, who owns Blues City Deli and brings in great bands, offered me a gig. I said yes, put together a set list and went for it. That was in November of 2011. Not that long ago. After that, I did a couple shows here and

Roots singer Nikki Hill has only been on the scene for a few years, but she’s getting a big buzz for her huge voice and fiery stage presence. PHOTO BY FRANK DE BLASE

there, but it was more a thing: Matt Hill featuring Nikki Hill. April 2012 and I’m at Viva Las Vegas with girlfriends. We were at Ronnie Weiser’s house party, where they have bands come up and jam. My sneaky girlfriend signed me up and I got stuck in it. Before I knew it guys had been rounded up going, “Well, what are you gonna do?” I did three tunes. They showed up on YouTube. The rumor spread that I performed at the actual festival. And by the time I got home, I had e-mails, Facebook messages, phone calls about gigs. Holy crap. My husband was basically like, “Told you.” So I wrote the EP to see what the response would be like. That was last July. And, well, here we are. There seem to be so few female vocalists in this genre, yet obviously a huge demand. Are there other girls we need to listen for?

I honestly am not sure why there are so few female vocalists in the roots music scene. I actually think they are out there, but maybe just not discovered yet. I think unfortunately a lot of females get caught up in doing either what people suggest they do, or what they think they should be doing to impress the people in the music world. And that just doesn’t last long, so they never get past playing locally or a few tours here or there. I mean, it applies to everyone, not just females. This is a tough business. It’s hard, it’s expensive if you’re doing it yourself like we are, and it takes balls. If you have a good day job and don’t want to give it up, then it’s only going to go so far. The amazing female artists that we all admire have set the bar waaaaayyyy up there. So, it’s a lot to overcome and make your niche in it. Hell, I’m still surprised people listen to me. I wish all the ladies luck. Be yourselves, and rock!

Discuss what American roots audiences can learn from European audiences.

So far this year we have played in seven countries aside from America. We had a great time and the crowds were great, but it wasn’t anything starkly different. The only thing I would say is that they make a little more effort to go check out live music. They still have the same problems, though. Weekday gigs can still be iffy. Thankfully we had great full houses, but talking with the bands over there, they have the same issues with the crowds as we do. If anything, I say they research what they listen to a little more and have sometimes a better musical knowledge. But, again, you meet people here like that, too. To be honest, after playing there so much throughout this year, it was all the same minus the language barrier. Oh, and more people cry over there when they are moved by your songs. So sweet. What is your discography and future recording plans?

Right now I have my self-titled EP that I released late last summer. And a brand new full-length that I have been taking on the road the last couple of months. I just recorded an EP with Deke Dickerson and The Bo-Keys in Memphis that should be out later this year. We will start recording again when we’re not touring. Right now, the goal is to get out there and rock and roll in front of as many people as we can. Is it true, the higher the hair the closer to god?

Amen! Can I get a witness? 


WEDNESDAY, JULY 24 Anthony Gianovola. Lemoncello,

137 West Commercial St. East Rochester. 385-8565. lemoncello137.com. 6 p.m. Free. Westview Project. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. East Rochester. 662-5555. bistro135. net. 6 p.m. Free. [ KARAOKE ]

Italian American Karaoke.

Italian American Community Center, 150 Frank Dimino Way. 594-8882. iaccrochester.org. 7:30 p.m. Free. Karaoke at Mayfield’s Pub. Mayfield’s Pub, 669 N. Winton Rd. 288-7199. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke at Sanibel Cottage. Sanibel Cottage, 1517 Empire Blvd. Webster. 671-9340. sanibelcottage.net. 6 p.m. Free. Karaoke w/Cyd Scarlett. Jose & Willy’s, 20 Lakeshore Drive. Canandaigua. 905-0222. Joseandwillys.com. 8:30 p.m. Karaoke Wednesdays. Flat Iron Café, 561 State St. 454-4830. flatironcafe.net. Call for info. Karaoke w/Mark. Flipside Bar & Grill, 2001 E. Main St. 288-3930. 9 p.m. Free. [ OPEN MIC ]

Open Acoustic Mic Night w/ Mandy. Shorts Bar & Grill, 35

N. Main St. Fairport. 388-0136. shortsfairport.com. 9 p.m. Free. Open Mic at Jeffrey’s. Jeffrey’s, 3115 E. Henrietta Rd. Henrietta. 486-4937. 7 p.m. Call for info.

Open Mic Jam Boulder Alexander St.. Boulder Coffee

Co., 100 Alexander St. 454-7140. bouldercoffeeco.com. 8 p.m. Open Mic w/Steve West. Muddy Waters Coffee House, 53 Main St. Geneseo. 2439111. mwcoffeehouse.com. 7 p.m. Free. [ HIP-HOP/RAP ]

Word of Mouth Wednesday’s w/DJ Private Eye. Dubland

Underground, 315 Alexander St. 232-7550. dublandunderground. wordpress.com. 10 p.m. 21+. $5. [ REGGAE/JAM ]

Medicine Wednesdays w/ Thunder Body. Abilene Bar &

Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. abilenebarandlounge. com. 9:30 p.m. $5-$10. [ POP/ROCK ]

2013 Hilton Fire Department Carnival. hiltonfd.org. See

website for full festival details. 40 Rod Lightning. noon. Aqueduct Park. Free. Jeff Elliott. Marge’s Lakeside Inn, 4909 Culver Rd. 323-1020. margeslakesideinn.com. 6 p.m. Call for info Jeff Elliott. Marge’s Lakeside Inn, 4909 Culver Rd. 323-1020. margeslakesideinn. com. 6 p.m. Call for info. Don Mancuso & Friends. Nola’s Restaurant & Nightclub, 4775 Lake Ave. 663-3375. nolasweb. com. 4 p.m. Call for info.

CHIPTUNE | ANAMANAGUCHI

Imagine sitting down to tackle an old video game. You are treated to an assortment of 8-bit tunes. Imagine the surprise then, when the various melodies resemble actual songs with a keen sense for pop sensibilities and are so catchy they slightly distract you from the game initially. As the game proceeds you feel the music feeding your performance more than usual, partly since it’s just so darn good at matching what’s happening on screen, but also because you can imagine yourself enjoying the music outside of this imaginary video game world. That’s Anamanaguchi. Anamanaguchi play Sunday, July 28, 8 p.m. at Water Street Music Hall, 204 N. Water St., $10-$12. waterstreetmusic.com. — BY DAVE LABARGE Mr. Mustard. 7 p.m. East

Rochester Village Municipal Lot, 120 W. Commercial St. Free. Mr. Mustard, Pat Kane. McGraw’s Irish Pub, 146 W Commercial St. East Rochester. 348-9091. mcgrawsirishpub. com. 7 p.m. Free.

TeenSet Outsider 2-Year Anniversary Bash ft. Harmonica Lewinski, Black Bandit & The Stickups, Ian Downey is Famous, and Ian Decay. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. $5-$7. The Skycoasters. Ontario Beach Park, 4799 Lake Ave. geneseelighthouse.org. 7 p.m. Free.

THURSDAY, JULY 25 [ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ] Crossmolina. McGraw’s Irish Pub, 146 W Commercial St. East Rochester. 348-9091. mcgrawsirishpub.com. 7 p.m. Free.

Hochstein at High Falls: The Pickpockets. Granite Mills Park, 82 Browns Race. 12:10 p.m. Free. Jim Lane. Hooligan’s Eastside Grill, 809 Ridge Rd. Webster. 671-7180. facebook.com/ HOOLIGANS.EASTSIDE. 5 p.m. Free Murph’s Irondequoit Pub, 705 Titus Ave. Irondequoit. 3426780. 8 p.m. Free. Loves It!. Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. abilenebarandlounge.com. 8:30 p.m. $5-$8. Old Timey Jam. Bernunzio’s Uptown Music, 112 East Ave. 6:30 p.m. Call for info. Oxford Train. Sticky Lips BBQ Juke Joint, 830 Jefferson Rd. Henrietta. 292-5544. stickylipsbbq.com. 9 p.m. Free.

Salsa Night presented by Essence of Rhythm. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. lovincup.com. 9 p.m. $5. The Strings ft. Jen Heron. The Rabbit Room, 61 N. Main St. Honeoye Falls. 582-1830. thelowermill.com. 8 p.m. Call for info.

Trindad & Tabogo Steel Drum Band. Pelican’s Nest,

566 River St. 663-5910. pelicansnestrestaurant.com. 7 p.m. Free.

Interested?

Please contact this office

[ BLUES ]

Ezra & The Storm. Captain’s

Attic, 37 Charlotte St. 546-8885. Call for info. Nightfall. The Beale, 693 South Ave. 271-4650. thebealegrille. com. 7:30 p.m. Call for info.

Steve Grills & The Roadmasters. Dinosaur Bar-B-Que, 99 Court St. 325-7090. dinosaurbarbque. com. 9 p.m. Free.

585-288-0890

www.rcrclinical.com 500 Helendale Rd., suite L20 Rochester, NY 14609 COME BE A PART OF THE SOLUTION!

[ CLASSICAL ]

Arshak Andriasov. Little

Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 7:30 p.m. \. Free.

Summer@Eastman - Summer Sing: Brahms - A German Requiem. Eastman East Wing Hatch Recital Hall, 26 Gibbs St. 7:30 p.m. Suggested $5 donation. continues on page 16

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 15


THURSDAY, JULY 25

The Swooners. Woodcliff Hotel

[ COUNTRY ]

Party in the Park: Leon Russell, Driftwood, The Deep Blue Dream. Riverside

666 South Ave. 232-9030. lux666.com. 10 p.m. Free.

Floorwax Thursday Night Dance Craze. Lux Lounge,

666 South Ave. 232-9030. lux666.com. 10 p.m. Karaoke at Panorama. Panorama Night Club & Sports Bar, 730 Elmgrove Rd. 247-2190. 9 p.m. Free. Thirsty Thursday’s. TC Riley’s, 200 Park Point Dr. 272-9777. tcrileysparkpoint. com. 10 p.m. Call for info.

Thursday Night Dance Craze Contest W/Floorwax. Lux Lounge, 666 South Ave. 232-9030. lux666.com. Last Thursday of every month, 10 p.m. Free. Thursday Night Shakedown. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 11 p.m. Free.

Tiki Thursdays: Shotgun Music DJ. McGhan’s Pub, 11

W. Main St. Victor. 924-3660. 7:30 p.m. Free. Tilt-a-Whirl Drag Show.. Tilt Nightclub & Ultralounge, 444

p.m. Free.

Karaoke at Center Cafe. 7 p.m. Free.

Party Monster Thursdays.

Floorwax : Thursday Night Dance Craze!. Lux Lounge,

Ted Nicolosi and Shared Genes.

[ KARAOKE ]

[ DJ/ELECTRONIC ] ONE Nightclub and Lounge, 1 Ryan Alley. 546-1010. oneclublife.com. 10 p.m. 18+. Call for info. DJ Matt. Nashvilles, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. Henrietta. 3343030. nashvillesny.com. Call for info.

5 Alarm Open Jam. 9 p.m. Call

Roncone’s, 232 Lyell Ave. 4583090. ItalianRestaurantRochester. com. 6 p.m. Free.

Festival Site, 148 Exchange Blvd. rochesterevents.com. 5 p.m. $2-$5.

Karaoke at Willow Inn. Willow

JAZZ | MARK KELLOGG AND TONY CARAMIA

“Together Again” is the title of the upcoming concert featuring trombonist Mark Kellogg and pianist Tony Caramia. It not only alludes to the length of time since the two musicians have performed together in Kilbourn Hall, it also recalls the title of the second duet record by pianist Bill Evans and singer Tony Bennett. Kellogg and Caramia both love the Evans/Bennett mid-1970s collaborations, so they chose 10 songs from the albums to play at the concert. While Caramia’s piano will explore the tunes Evans first played, Bennett’s vocals will be replaced by the gorgeous tone of Kellogg’s trombone. Mark Kellogg and Tony Caramia perform Tuesday, July 30, 7:30 p.m. at Kilbourn Hall, 26 Gibbs St., $10, esm. rochester.edu. — BY RON NETSKY Central Ave. 232-8440. facebook. com/Tiltnightclub. 11:15 p.m. & 12:30 a.m. $3. [ JAZZ ]

Deborah Branch. Lemoncello,

137 West Commercial St. East Rochester. 385-8565. lemoncello137.com. 6 p.m. Free. John Bolger. Pane Vino Ristorante, 175 N. Water St. 2326090. panevinoristorante.com. 8 p.m. Free.

John Palocy Trio. Bistro

135, 135 W. Commercial St. East Rochester. 662-5555. bistro135.net. 6 p.m. Free. Mike Kaupa . Monroe’s Restaurant, 3001 Monroe Avenue. 348-9104. 6 p.m. Call for info. Suzanne Monroe. Starry Nites Café, 696 University Ave. 271-2630. starrynitescafe.com. 8 p.m. Call for info.

est.

[ OPEN MIC ]

& Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. 2484825. woodcliffhotelspa.com. 5:30 p.m. Free.

Inn, 428 Manitou Rd. Hilton. 392-3489. 8 p.m. Free. Karaoke at Brickwood Grill. Brickwood Grill, 250 Monroe Ave. 730-8230. brickwoodgrill.com. 9 p.m. Call for info.

Karaoke at Pineapple Jack’s. Pineapple Jack’s,

485 Spencerport Rd. Gates. 247-5225. facebook.com/ PineappleJacks. 9 p.m. Free.

Karaoke Night w/Debbie Randyn. Pittsford Pub, 60 N.

Main St. Pittsford. 586-4650. thepittsfordpub.com. 9:30 p.m. Free. Karaoke w/DJ Smooth. Club Clarissas, 293 Clarissa St. 2323430. Call for info. Karaoke w/George. Temple Bar and Grille, 109 East Ave. 2326000. templebarandgrille.com. 8 p.m. Free. Karaoke w/Shotgun Music. McGhan’s Pub, 11 W. Main St. Victor. 924-3660. Free. Karaoke w/Summer Bob. Shorts Bar & Grill, 35 N. Main St. Fairport. 388-0136. shortsfairport. com. 10 p.m. Free. Karaoke w/Tina P. Richmond’s Tavern, 21 Richmond Street. 270-8570. richmondstavern.com. 9:30 p.m. Call for info. Karoake w/Cyd Scarlett. Victor Village Inn, 34 East Main Street. Victor. 925-5025. 8:30 p.m. Call for info.

for info.

Open Mic at Towpath Cafe. 6:30 Open Mic Jam Boulder Park Ave.. Boulder Coffee Co., 739 Park Ave. 697-0235. bouldercoffeeco.com. 7:30 p.m. Free. Open Mic w/Steve Piper. Flipside Bar & Grill, 2001 E. Main St. 2883930. 9 p.m. Free. Spot Coffee Open Mic. SPoT Coffee, 200 East Ave. 6134600. spotcoffee.com. 7 p.m. Call for info. [ POP/ROCK ]

2013 Hilton Fire Department Carnival. hiltonfd.org. See

website for full festival details. Dave McGrath Trio. Schooner’s Riverside Pub, 70 Pattonwood Dr. 3423030. shumwaymarine.com/ schooners.shtml. 7 p.m. Call for info. Dinner Dogs. Penfield Amphitheater, 3100 Atlantic Ave. Penfield. 340-8663. penfield.org. 7 p.m. Free. Five Alarm Open Jam. Firehouse Saloon, 814 S. Clinton Ave. 319-3832. thefirehousesaloon.com. 9 p.m. Call for info.

Lord Dying w Howl, Order of The Dead. Bug Jar, 219

Monroe Ave. 7:30 p.m. $8-$10. Mike & Sergei. Silk O’Loughlin’s, 5980 St. Paul Blvd. 266-7047. silkoloughlins. com. 7 p.m. Call for info. Revolution Fest 2013. Montage Music Hall, 50 Chestnut St. 232-1520. themontagemusichall.com. Thursday, Friday: 7 p.m. Saturday, Sunday: 4 p.m. See Montage Facebook for full band lineup. $6-$15.

FRIDAY, JULY 26 [ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ] The Avett Brothers. CMAC, 3355 Marvin Sands Drive. Canandaigua. 758-5300. cmacevents.com. 7:30 p.m. $25-$45.

Bands on the Bricks: The Felice Brothers, Grand Canyon Rescue Episode, Park Ave. Band.

Rochester Public Market, 280 N. Union St. 5 p.m. Free. Beau Ryan. Lemoncello, 137 West Commercial St. East Rochester. 385-8565. lemoncello137.com. 7 p.m. Free. Jim Lane. Hooligan’s Eastside Grill, 809 Ridge Rd. Webster. 671-7180. facebook.com/ HOOLIGANS.EASTSIDE. 5 p.m. Free. John Akers. Johnny’s Irish Pub, 1382 Culver Rd. 2240990. johnnysirishpub.com. 8 p.m. Free. Johnny Bauer. Back Nine Grill, 3500 East Ave. 267-7031. thebackninegrill.com. 10 p.m. Call for info. Ralph Louis. Rochester Plaza Hotel, 70 State St. 546-3450. rochesterplaza.com. 6 p.m. Free.

Summer@Eastman - South Indian Percussion and Mbira Institutes: Participants Concert.

Ciminelli Formal Lounge – Eastman School of Music, Gibbs Street. 7:30 p.m. Free.

Trace Wilkens & Ken Snyder w/Ciarin’s Pride. McGraw’s

Irish Pub, 146 W Commercial St. East Rochester. 348-9091. mcgrawsirishpub.com. 6 p.m. Free.

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[ BLUES ]

Dan Schmitt. The Beale,

693 South Ave. 271-4650. thebealegrille.com. 7:30 p.m. Call for info. Steve Grills & The Roadmasters. Acanthus Café, 337 East Ave. 319-5999. acanthuscafe.com. Call for info. [ DJ/ELECTRONIC ]

On the House Fridays. ONE

Nightclub and Lounge, 1 Ryan Alley. 546-1010. oneclublife.com. 21+. Call for info. Chill Out Fridays Happy Hour. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. lovincup.com. 5:30 p.m. Free. C.J. Gainey. Boulder Coffee Co., 739 Park Ave. 697-0235. bouldercoffeeco.com. 7:30 p.m. Call for info. DJ/Karaoke w/Coyote Cody. 9:30 p.m. Call for info. DJ Bac Spin. Plush, 151 St. Paul St. 232-5650. venurochester. com. 8 p.m. Call for info. DJ Blake. 140 Alex Bar & Grill, 140 Alexander St. 2561000. 140alex.com. 10 p.m. Call for info. DJ Cedric. Vertex Night Club, 169 N. Chestnut St. 232-5498. 10 p.m. $3-$8. DJ Energon. Vertex Night Club, 169 N. Chestnut St. 232-5498. 10 p.m. $3-$8. DJ Mi-T-Mo. Richmond’s Tavern, 21 Richmond Street. 270-8570. richmondstavern.com. 9 p.m. Free. Final Friday Party. Skylark Lounge, 40 South Union St. 2708106. theskylarklounge.com. 10 p.m. 21+. Call for info.

Fresh Meat Fridays w/Samantha Vega, DJ Mighty Mic. Tilt

Nightclub & Ultralounge, 444 Central Ave. 232-8440. facebook. com/Tiltnightclub. 11:15 p.m. & 12:30 a.m. $4-$12.

Jose Padron’s Birthday Havana Night ft. DJ Bobby Base. Flat Iron Café, 561 State

St. 454-4830. flatironcafe.net. Call for info. Lube After Dark. Quaker Steak & Lube, 2205 Buffalo Rd. 6979464. quakersteakandlube.com/ Rochester_NY. 9:30 p.m. Free. Reggaeton w/DJ Carlos. La Copa Ultra Lounge, 235 W. Ridge Rd. 254-1050. lacopaultralounge. com. 10 p.m. Free.

The Salad Bar Revue hosted by Ambrosia Salad, DJ Solid Bear. 140 Alex Bar & Grill,

140 Alexander St. 256-1000. 140alex.com. 11:30 p.m. & 1 a.m. Call for info. [ JAZZ ]

Bobby DiBaudo Trio. Bistro 135,

135 W. Commercial St. East Rochester. 662-5555. bistro135. net. 6 p.m. Free. Marco Amadio. Pane Vino Ristorante, 175 N. Water St. 2326090. panevinoristorante.com. 6:30 p.m. Free. The MusicMakes Big Band. Sonnenberg Gardens and Mansion State Historic Park, 151 Charlotte St. Canandaigua. 3944922. sonnenberg.org. 8 p.m. $4-$9. The Russell Fielder Trio. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 8:30 p.m. Free. Soul Express. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. 2484825. woodcliffhotelspa.com. 7:30 p.m. Free.

Summer@Eastman - Jazz Primer for Classical Musicians Concert. 3:30 p.m. Eastman School Ray Wright Room. Free.

Ted Nicolosi and Shared Genes.

Glengarry Inn at Eagle Vale, 4400 Nine Mile Point Road, Rt 250. Fairport. 598-3820. EagleVale. com. 7 p.m. Free.

[ POP/ROCK ]

2013 Hilton Fire Department Carnival. hiltonfd.org. See

website for full festival details. Catch 22. Captain Jack’s Good Time Tavern, 8505 Greig St. Sodus. 483-9570. captainjacksgoodtimetavern.com. 9 p.m. Call for info. Dark Hollow. Dinosaur BarB-Que, 99 Court St. 3257090. dinosaurbarbque.com. 10 p.m. Free. The Fools. Captain’s Attic, 37 Charlotte St. 546-8885. Call for info.

Mosaic Foundation w/Greg Townson Record Release Party. Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. abilenebarandlounge.com. 5:30 p.m. $6-$8.

Indians w/Mikaela Davis, Stoney Lonesome & The House of Lights, and Precious Kindred.

Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. Limited entry for unders. $8-$10. Low Flying Planes. Sticky Lips BBQ Juke Joint, 830 Jefferson Rd. Henrietta. 2925544. stickylipsbbq.com. 9:30 p.m. Free. Mike & Sergei. Schooner’s Riverside Pub, 70 Pattonwood Dr. 342-3030. shumwaymarine. com/schooners.shtml. 7 p.m. Call for info.

Officer Friendly Reunion Show w/Nasty Habit, Eyesalve. Water

Street Music Hall, 204 N. Water St. 325-5600. waterstreetmusic. com. 8:30 p.m. $10-$12. Polluted Moon. Pelican’s Nest, 566 River St. 663-5910. pelicansnestrestaurant.com. 10 p.m. Call for info. Revolution Fest 2013. Montage Music Hall, 50 Chestnut St. 2321520. themontagemusichall. com. Thursday, Friday: 7 p.m. Saturday, Sunday: 4 p.m. See Montage Facebook for full band lineup. $6-$15.

Shaded Passion. Finger Lakes

Casino & Racetrack, 5857 Rt. 96. Farmington. 924-3232. fingerlakesracetrack.com. Call for info. Skycoasters. 6:30 p.m. Henrietta Town Park Amphitheater. Free. Spencerport Canal Days. Village of Spencerport. See website for full schedule. spencerportcanaldays.com. That Party Band. Richmond’s Tavern, 21 Richmond Street. 270-8570. richmondstavern.com. 9:30 p.m. $5. This Life w/Fowls. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. lovincup.com. 9 p.m. $3-$5.

The Tommy Brunett Band w/ Galileo. Nola’s Restaurant &

Nightclub, 4775 Lake Ave. 6633375. nolasweb.com. 6 p.m. Call for info.

The Virginmarys w/American Fangs. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N. Water St. 325-5600. waterstreetmusic.com. 7 p.m. $9.41-$13.

SATURDAY, JULY 27 [ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ]

22nd Annual Native American Dance & Music Festival.

ganondagan.org/NADMF.html. Ganondagan State Historic Site, Victor. $5-$12. Candela. Tapas 177 Lounge, 177 St. Paul St. 262-2090. tapas177. com. 11 p.m. Free. Frankie & Jewels. 1872 Café, 431 W. Main St. 730-7687. 1872cafe.com. 6:30 p.m. Free. Jim Lane. Brewery Pub & Grill, 8 W. Main St. Honeoye Falls. 624-7870. breweryatthefalls.com. 9:30 p.m. Free. Jon Lewis. Starry Nites Café, 696 University Ave. 271-2630. starrynitescafe.com. 8 p.m. Call for info.

Lovin Cup Unplugged Dinner Music Series: Big Blue House. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. lovincup.com. 6 p.m. Free. Rayce & Ryan. McGraw’s Irish Pub, 146 W Commercial St. East Rochester. 348-9091. mcgrawsirishpub.com. 7 p.m. Free.

Woody Dodge w/Ana Egge and Band. Abilene Bar & Lounge,

153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. abilenebarandlounge.com. 9 p.m. $8-$12. [ BLUES ]

Dirty Bourbon Blues Band.

Richmond’s Tavern, 21 Richmond Street. 270-8570. richmondstavern.com. Call for info $5. The Fakers. The Beale, 693 South Ave. 271-4650. thebealegrille.com. 7:30 p.m. | Call for info. The Imaginary Band. The Beale, 1930 Empire Blvd. Webster. 2161070. thebealegrille.com. 7:30 p.m. Call for info. Joe Beard. Dinosaur Bar-BQue, 99 Court St. 325-7090. dinosaurbarbque.com. 10 p.m. Free. John Bolger Band. Finger Lakes Casino & Racetrack, 5857 Rt. 96. Farmington. 924-3232. fingerlakesracetrack.com. Call for info. Shaded Passion. Johnny’s Irish Pub, 1382 Culver Rd. 2240990. johnnysirishpub.com. 8 p.m. Free. Steve Grills & The Roadmasters. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 8:30 p.m. Free.

Honeoye Falls Community Concert Band Summer Band Festival with “1812 Overture.”

hfccb.org. 4 p.m. Harry Allen Park, Honeoye Falls. Call for info.

Summer@Eastman - Saxophone Institute Faculty Recital: ChienKwan Lin & Friends. Eastman East Wing Hatch Recital Hall, 26 Gibbs St. 2 p.m. $10. [ COUNTRY ]

Shotgunn Wedding. Nashvilles,

4853 W Henrietta Rd. Henrietta. 334-3030. nashvillesny.com. 9 p.m. Call for info. [ DJ/ELECTRONIC ]

Blue Label Saturdays ft. DJ Andy Fade and DJ Bobby Base. Flat Iron Café, 561 State St. 454-4830. flatironcafe.net. Call for info. DJ Big Reg. Plush, 151 St. Paul St. 232-5650. venurochester. com. 10 p.m. Call for info. DJ Blake. 140 Alex Bar & Grill, 140 Alexander St. 2561000. 140alex.com. 10 p.m. Call for info. DJ Darkwave. Vertex Night Club, 169 N. Chestnut St. 232-5498. 10 p.m. $3-$8. DJ Trancesend. Decibel Lounge, 45 Euclid St. 754-4645. decibellounge.com. 10 p.m. $5.

Elyse Inzinga Kizomba Birthday Bash ft. DJ Andy Fade, DJ Bobby Base. Flat Iron Café, 561 State St. 454-4830. flatironcafe.net. Call for info. continues on page 18

[ CLASSICAL ]

Audrey Q. Snyder. Eastman

School of Music, 26 Gibbs St. 274-1000. esm.rochester.edu. 6 p.m. Miller Center Atrium. Free.

hey kids, rock the wedge! august 9,10, 11 and

= 11am-3pm = 2 Bounce Houses, Roc City Rollergirls, Hands-on Clay creations, Children’s Music Stage, Face Painters, Jugglers, magicians, and Live Art

BENEFIT FOR HARMONY CASEY | hELPHARMONY.COM BOULDER COFFEE | 100 Alexander Street, Rochester NY www.bouldercoffeeco.com postersource.biz

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 17


DOES SEX HURT? Are you between 18 and 50 years of age and have pain with intercourse and tampon insertion? The University of Rochester is conducting a double-blind placebo-controlled research study sponsored by the National Institute of Health to determine the effectiveness of Gabapentin compared to placebo in reducing intercourse pain. Participants will receive Gabapentin one half of the time and placebo (inactive treatment) one half of the time, study-related care at no cost, and $50 per visit, or a total of $300 if all six visits are completed.

Call Linda Leoni at 585-275-3160 or email linda_leoni@urmc.rochester.edu.

When did you first learn the value of a good mechanic? Our Certified ASE technicians do precision car repair... Which means we get it right the first time. Because quality is our top priority, customer trust and satisfaction are very important to us.

How Cold Is Your A/C? If all that comes out is warm, dusty air, don’t get in a ‘pickle’ - CALL US! We’ll fix it so you’ll be as cool as a cucumber!

SATURDAY, JULY 27 La Selva. Tilt Nightclub &

Ultralounge, 444 Central Ave. 232-8440. facebook.com/ Tiltnightclub. 10 p.m. Call for info. Saturday Night Ladies Night. BLU Bar & Grill, 250 Pixley Rd. 247-0079. blurochester.com. 9 p.m. Call for info. Wasabi Funk. Banzai Sushi & Cocktail Bar, 682 South Ave. 473-0345. banzairochester.com. 10 p.m. Free. [ JAZZ ]

Bob Sneider Trio. Bistro 135,

135 W. Commercial St. East Rochester. 662-5555. bistro135. net. 6 p.m. Free. Gap Mangione Big Band. Penfield Amphitheater, 3100 Atlantic Ave. Penfield. 340-8663. penfield.org. 7 p.m. Free. Just Jazz Trio. Lemoncello, 137 West Commercial St. East Rochester. 385-8565. lemoncello137.com. 7 p.m. Free. Northeast Funk (N.E.F.). Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 2929940. lovincup.com. 9 p.m. $3-$5. Ted Nicolosi and Shared Genes. Jasmine’s Asian Fusion, 657 Ridge Rd. Webster. 216-1290. JasmineAsianFusion.com. 6:30 p.m. Free. Two for the Road. Pane Vino Ristorante, 175 N. Water St. 2326090. panevinoristorante.com. 6:30 p.m. Free. The White Hots. Pultneyville Grill, 4135 Lake Rd. Pultneyville. 315589-4512. pultneyvillegrill.com. 7 p.m. Call for info. [ KARAOKE ]

Karaoke at 140 Alex. 140 Alex

ANNUAL GARAGE SALE! ALL FRAMES $69

SPECIAL OFFER 30% OFF Lenses with Garage Sale Purchase (Can be used at any time)

Bar & Grill, 140 Alexander St. 256-1000. 140alex.com. 10:30 p.m. Free. Karaoke w/Cyd Scarlett!. Norton’s Pub, 1730 N. Goodman St. 266-3570. 10 p.m. Kick-Ass Karaoke. Temple Bar and Grille, 109 East Ave. 2326000. templebarandgrille.com. 10 p.m. Free.

18 CITY JULY 24-30, 2013

& Grill, 52 Railroad Ave. Hamlin. 964-2010. hamlinstation.net. 8:30 p.m. Call for info. Five-0. Pelican’s Nest, 566 River St. 663-5910. pelicansnestrestaurant.com. 10 p.m. Call for info. The Fools w/Dave Meyers. Schooner’s Riverside Pub, 70 Pattonwood Dr. 342-3030. shumwaymarine.com/schooners. shtml. 2 p.m. Call for info. Krypton 88. Bayside Pub, 279 Lake Rd. Webster. 323-1224. baysidepubwebster.com. Call for info. Last Note CD Release Party. Sticky Lips BBQ Juke Joint, 830 Jefferson Rd. Henrietta. 292-5544. stickylipsbbq.com. 10 p.m. Free. Mike & Sergei. The Argyle Grill at Eagle Vale Golf Club, 4344 Nine Mile Point Rd. Fairport. 3772452. eaglevale.com/argyle-grill. 8 p.m. Call for info. Mike Pullano. 7:30 p.m. Gazebo in Fairport (near Lift Bridge). Call for info.

New Archery w/Sleepwalk Parade, Sparx & Yarms, and The Tarants. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. $6-$8.

Revolution Fest 2013. Montage

Music Hall, 50 Chestnut St. 2321520. themontagemusichall. com. Thursday, Friday: 7 p.m. Saturday, Sunday: 4 p.m. See Montage Facebook for full band lineup. $6-$15. Spencerport Canal Days. Village of Spencerport. See website for full schedule. spencerportcanaldays.com. Ten Ugly Men Festival. Genesee Valley Park, Elmwood Ave. 6835734. 9 a.m. $10-$50.

Under The Sun w/Smash Mouth, Sugar Ray, Gin Blossoms. CMAC, 3355 Marvin Sands Drive. Canandaigua. 758-5300. cmacevents.com. 8 p.m. $17$36.50.

Zach Brown Tribute Band w/ Woodstone. Captain Jack’s

[ CLASSICAL ]

Finger Lakes Choral Festival.

Hochstein Performance Hall, Hochstein Performance Hall, 50 N Plymouth Ave. 454-4596. hochstein.org. 4 p.m. Free. [ COUNTRY ]

Paul Cummings & Anthony Gallucci. Nola’s Restaurant &

Nightclub, 4775 Lake Ave. 6633375. nolasweb.com. 4 p.m. Call for info. [ DJ/ELECTRONIC ] Boasy Sundaze. Club Clarissas, 293 Clarissa St. 232-3430. Call for info. Drink and Drag Sundays. ONE Nightclub and Lounge, 1 Ryan Alley. 546-1010. oneclublife.com. 8 p.m. 18+. Call for info.

Ship Wrecked Sunday’s ft. DJ Trancesend. Captain’s Attic, 37

Charlotte St. 546-8885. 21+. Call for info.

Tequila Sundays ft. DJ Andy Fade. Flat Iron Café, 561 State

St. 454-4830. flatironcafe.net. 10 p.m. Call for info. [ JAZZ ]

Bill Slater Solo Piano (Brunch).

Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. 248-4825. woodcliffhotelspa.com. Call for info. Free. Joe Santora Trio. Pultneyville Grill, 4135 Lake Rd. Pultneyville. 315-589-4512. pultneyvillegrill. com. 4 p.m. Call for info. Nancy Kelly. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. lovincup.com. 7 p.m. $10-$12 Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. lovincup.com. 7 p.m. $10-$12. [ R&B ]

R. Kelly w/Fantasia, Syleena Johnson. Blue Cross Arena, One

War Memorial Square. 758-5300. bluecrossarena.com. 7:30 p.m. $78-$128. [ POP/ROCK ]

Anamanaguchi w/Kitty Pryde, Danimal Cannon. Water Street

[ HIP-HOP/RAP ]

Good Time Tavern, 8505 Greig St. Sodus. 483-9570. captainjacksgoodtimetavern.com. 1 p.m. Call for info.

Sonny Stevens CD Release Party. House of Guitars, 645 Titus

SUNDAY, JULY 28

Big Time Rush, Victoria Justice. Darien Lake PAC, 9993

Ave. 544-3500. houseofguitars. com. 6 p.m. Free. [ POP/ROCK ]

2013 Hilton Fire Department Carnival. hiltonfd.org. See website for full festival details.

80s Hair Band w/Carrie G & The Runaways. Nola’s Restaurant &

2929 MONROE AVE • 442-0123 • Appointments Suggested

Ernie Capone. Hamlin Station Bar

Nightclub, 4775 Lake Ave. 6633375. nolasweb.com. 6 p.m. Call for info. Adam Clark. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N. Water St. 325-5600. waterstreetmusic.com. 6:30 p.m. $10-$12. BeatleMagic. Genesee Country Vllage & Museum, 1410 Flint Hill Rd. Mumford. 538-6822. gcv.org. 5 p.m. $8-$20. Blue Falcon w/The Capitols. Skylark Lounge, 40 South Union St. 270-8106. theskylarklounge. com. 10 p.m. 21+. $5.

[ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ]

22nd Annual Native American Dance & Music Festival.

ganondagan.org/NADMF.html. Ganondagan State Historic Site, Victor. $5-$12. Fandango at the Tango. Tango Cafe, 389 Gregory St. 271-4930. tangocafedance.com. 7:30 p.m. Free, donations accepted. Jim Lane. The Titus Tavern, 692 Titus Ave. 270-5365. titustavern. com. 4 p.m. Free. Traditional Irish Music Session. Johnny’s Irish Pub, 1382 Culver Rd. 224-0990. johnnysirishpub. com. 5 p.m. Free. [ BLUES ]

Teagan & The Tweeds. Marge’s Lakeside Inn, 4909 Culver Rd. 323-1020. margeslakesideinn. com. 4 p.m. Call for info.

Music Hall, 204 N. Water St. 3255600. waterstreetmusic.com. 8 p.m. $10-$12. Allegheny Rd. Darien. 5994641. godarienlake.com. 7 p.m. $22.50-$79. Corey R-J. Boulder Coffee Co., 739 Park Ave. 697-0235. bouldercoffeeco.com. 8 p.m. Call for info. Dave McGrath Trio. Captain Jack’s Good Time Tavern, 8505 Greig St. Sodus. 483-9570. captainjacksgoodtimetavern.com. 3 p.m. Call for info. Nikki Hill. Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. abilenebarandlounge.com. 6 p.m. $15-$20.


OneRepublic. CMAC,

3355 Marvin Sands Drive. Canandaigua. 758-5300. cmacevents.com. 7 p.m. $20$39.50. Revolution Fest 2013. Montage Music Hall, 50 Chestnut St. 2321520. themontagemusichall. com. Thursday, Friday: 7 p.m. Saturday, Sunday: 4 p.m. See Montage Facebook for full band lineup. $6-$15.

Shu Lace w/Archimedes, Epilogue, and Frankly Blargh.

Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. $5-$7. Spencerport Canal Days. Village of Spencerport. See website for full schedule. spencerportcanaldays.com. Taran, Catch 22. Pelican’s Nest, 566 River St. 663-5910. pelicansnestrestaurant.com. 2 p.m. Call for info. Vintage. Bayside Pub, 279 Lake Rd. Webster. 323-1224. baysidepubwebster.com. Call for info.

MONDAY, JULY 29 [ DJ/ELECTRONIC ]

Magic City Monday’s. Louie’s

Cordial’s Lounge, 392 Lyell Ave. 254-2844. 7 p.m. $5 before 10 p.m.

Manic Monday Retro Dance: Lady Z. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 11 p.m. 21+. Free. [ JAZZ ]

Alphonso Williams. Bistro 135,

135 W. Commercial St. East Rochester. 662-5555. bistro135. net. 5:30 p.m. Free. The Seth Uptown Duo. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 7:30 p.m. Free. [ POP/ROCK ]

Anagnorisis, Desekrator. Bug

Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 8:30 p.m. Call for info.

TUESDAY, JULY 30 [ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ] Jim Lane. Schooner’s Riverside Pub, 70 Pattonwood Dr. 3423030. shumwaymarine.com/ schooners.shtml. 6 p.m. Free. Nightfall. The Titus Tavern, 692 Titus Ave. 270-5365. titustavern. com. 7 p.m. Call for info.

River Whyless w/ Gin & Bonnets, Conor Perodeau McCann, and Steve Geraci. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. $7-$9. [ BLUES ]

Bluesday Tuesday Blues Jam.

P.I.’s Lounge, 495 West Ave. 8 p.m. Call for info. Teagan Ward. The Beale, 693 South Ave. 271-4650. thebealegrille.com. 7 p.m. Call for info. [ CLASSICAL ]

Irondequoit Concert Band.

Lutheran Church of the Resurrection, 3736 St. Paul Blvd. 7:15 p.m. Call for info.

AMERICANA | TINA AND HER PONY

Based out of New Mexico, folk duo Tina and Her Pony combine a love for traditional Appalachian folk with “radical, queer lyrics, uncommon instrumentation and vocals tighter than your mama’s brazier.” All joking aside, the duo’s harmonies are truly something to be noted, featuring two voices that meld together to create a smooth, pleasant, rarely witnessed sound. Tina lists their influences as being female folk greats such as Joni Mitchell, Ani DiFranco, and Jenny Lewis, and the duo joins these women in creating confessional tunes with a strong, proud edge to them. With two women who are multi-instrumentalists as well as brilliant singers, Tina and Her Pony is an act that should not be missed. Tina and Her Pony performs on Wednesday, July 31st, 8 p.m. at Abilene Bar and Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way, $5-$8. abilenebarandlounge.com. — BY LEAH CREARY Summer@Eastman - Mark Kellogg, trombone and Tony Caramia, piano. Kilbourn

Hall, 26 Gibbs St. esm. rochester.edu. 7:30 p.m. $10. [ DJ/ELECTRONIC ]

2 Reason Tuesdays w/DJ Zio. Nathaniel’s Pub, 251

Exchange Boulevard. 2328470. Call for info. Free. DJ Ghetto Blaster. Club Clarissas, 293 Clarissa St. 232-3430. Call for info. DJ Kathy. Nashvilles, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. Henrietta. 3343030. nashvillesny.com. Call for info.

Tuesday Americano w/ Bobby Base. Flat Iron Café,

Help us to test an investigational immunotherapy tablet for dust mite allergy. Participants may be eligible for this study if they are 12 years of age or older and have been taking allergy medications for dust mite allergy symptoms during the past year. Medical history and other criteria will be reviewed at the first study visit, including a skin prick allergy test and blood test. The study lasts up to 2 years and requires 9 clinic visits. All study-related office visits, medical examinations, and investigational immunotherapy treatment will be provided at no cost to qualified participants. Call today for more information: Contact AAIR Research Center at: (585) 442-1980 or Email: research@aair.info AAIR Research Center 300 Meridian Centre Suite 305, Rochester NY 14618 www.aairresearch.com

Dedicated to Improving Your Present and Future Health

The White Hots. Penfield

Amphitheater, 3100 Atlantic Ave. Penfield. 340-8663. penfield.org. 7 p.m. Free. [ HIP-HOP/RAP ] Lil’ Wayne. Darien Lake PAC, 9993 Allegheny Rd. Darien. 5994641. godarienlake.com. 7 p.m. $29.75-$119.75. [ POP/ROCK ] The Lost Dogs. Boulder Coffee Co., 100 Alexander St. 454-7140. bouldercoffeeco.com. 7:30 p.m. $10. Paulsen, Baker, and Friends. 7:30 p.m. Tom Whal’s Picnic Pavilion. Rt. 5 & 20, Avon. Free.

561 State St. 454-4830. flatironcafe.net. Call for info. [ JAZZ ]

Charlie Mitchell Group.

Flipside Bar & Grill, 2001 E. Main St. 288-3930. 8 p.m. Free. Kyle Vock Duo. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. East Rochester. 662-5555. bistro135.net. 6 p.m. Free. Ryan from El Rojo Jazz. Lemoncello, 137 West Commercial St. East Rochester. 385-8565. lemoncello137.com. 6 p.m. Free. Tinted Image. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. 2484825. woodcliffhotelspa.com. 5:30 p.m. Free. rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 19


Classical solo vocal movements (soloists will be heard with the chorus in several movements) and one choral movement, so the piece clocks in at about 45 minutes. This allows time for another major work on the program – and an even more unusual one. Unlike Dvorak’s “Stabat Mater,” Edvard

The Finger Lakes Choral Festival performed at Davies Symphony Hall in San Francisco in the summer of 2012. PHOTO PROVIDED

Songs sung huge Finger Lakes Choral Festival SUNDAY, JULY 28 HOCHSTEIN PERFORMANCE HALL, 50 N. PLYMOUTH AVE. 4 P.M. | FREE | 742-8092, FINGERLAKESCHORAL.ORG [ PREVIEW ] BY DAVID RAYMOND

Rochester boasts an unusual number of choral groups, and when summer rolls around, most of those large choruses, small ensembles, school groups, and church choirs take a break. But choral singers still want to sing choral music. Luckily there are a few summertime outlets for them. Rochester’s Really Big Choral Show each summer is the Finger Lakes Choral Festival. Since 2003, this group has presented a largescale concert each July under its founder and director, Adrian “Andy” Horn. Horn started the Finger Lakes Choral Festival in the summer of 2003; he had moved to the region a few years prior, after a long period of work with several choral groups in the San Francisco area and a stint in Washington. The Choral Festival made its debut with Verdi’s Requiem, singing with the Rochester Philharmonic Orchestra, and has performed in 20 CITY JULY 24-30, 2013

Rochester every summer since, usually at the Hochstein Performance Hall. The group meets weekly starting in May of each year, aiming for a concert in late July. “I didn’t think of the festival in competition with local choral groups,” says Horn. “I did want to have a place where the area’s choral singers could sing in the summer, or where we could wean former singers back into choral music.” They’ve been very successful on both counts. In the last decade, Finger Lakes Choral

Festival has concentrated on the big choral works, including another performance of the Verdi and one of the Brahms Requiem at Chautauqua Institution; Beethoven’s Ninth with the RPO; and independent performances of Orff’s “Carmina Burana,” Beethoven’s “Missa Solemnis,” Bach’s “St. Matthew Passion,” and perhaps the biggest choral spectacular of them all, the Berlioz Requiem – twice, in Rochester in 2010 and in San Francisco last summer to excellent reviews. “I do try to offer mainstream choral pieces – the big works that everybody loves,” says Horn. “But I try to mix it up, too. There are works by composers that people love that are not performed very often.” That describes this summer’s Finger Lakes Choral Festival concert, taking place July 28, to

a T: the program includes unfamiliar but highly satisfying music by two well-loved 19th-century composers. Antonin Dvorák is best known for his symphonies, concertos, and chamber music, but he also wrote several religious choral works, of which his “Stabat Mater” is generally considered the best. A classic in Dvorak’s native Czechoslovakia, it is seldom performed in this country. Horn reckons that of the 150 or so people in his chorus, only a half-dozen have ever sung this work before. “Dvorak is one of the leading classical composers in name recognition, but he was very prolific, and much of his music is not well known,” says Horn. “However, everything I have heard has a really fresh feeling about it, including the choral music.” Horn has never conducted Dvorak’s “Stabat Mater” before, though he loves the work, a moving, lyrical setting of a medieval poem describing the suffering of Christ on the cross and of Mary at his feet. “At the beginning I told the chorus members that this music was so powerful, there were tear stains on my score. I meant it tongue-in-cheek, but on the other hand, it’s true. This music has made a definite emotional connection with me and with the singers.” Horn adds that they’ll be singing an abridged version of the work; he has cut the

Grieg’s “Peer Gynt” Suites contain some of the most familiar tunes in classical music. An animated-cartoon sunrise seldom occurs without Grieg’s “Morning Mood” on the soundtrack, and rock bands and rap performers have appropriated “In the Hall of the Mountain King,” which has also turned up in Woody Allen’s “Scoop” and on “Mad Men.” They’re two of the most familiar movements from the voluminous incidental music Grieg composed for Henrik Ibsen’s play “Peer Gynt,” a satirical epic about the life of a Norwegian ne’er-do-well that spans decades and continents. The combination of Ibsen and Grieg was acclaimed at first, but for modern tastes Ibsen’s sour satire and Grieg’s sweet, tuneful score don’t mesh, so play and music have gone their separate ways. As did their creators: the two great Norwegians were friends, but Grieg disliked Ibsen’s play, and Ibsen sneered at Grieg’s music years later. But Grieg did deliver the goods, composing a huge score for a huge play. The two popular “Peer Gynt” suites contain only a fraction of the material, which include several choral movements. Horn heard a few of these, and they gave him the idea of turning Ibsen’s five-act play into a dramatic sequence that includes many of the best-known numbers in the order in which they appear in the play. They are tied together with narration, which will be delivered by Thomas Paul, the wellknown local bass, whose speaking voice is as sonorous as his singing voice. This creation took some time: Ibsen’s play has been translated from Norwegian into English several times, but the words for Grieg’s settings of the choruses hadn’t, so the conductor took on that job with the help of Google Translate. The men’s chorus joins in the “Hall of the Mountain King” (singing some notably bloodthirsty words), the women’s chorus in an “Arabian Dance.” They join for an a capella hymn and a grand finale combining previous themes from the music, a climax that Horn promises “will blow your mind.” Rare choral music by Dvorak and Grieg doesn’t guarantee a packed house, but Horn’s enthusiasm for the music on this concert is obvious. “My philosophy has always been: if it’s not music that excites me and that I feel passionate about, then why do it?” says the conductor. “After all, you wouldn’t walk into the finest restaurant in the world and order a hamburger.”


ART | IRONDEQUOIT ART TRAIL

A rare opportunity to see Irondequoit artists at work is offered to the public this weekend. On Friday and Saturday, July 26-27, multiple Irondequoit artists exhibit their work during “Irondequoit Art Trail.” Visitors will have the chance to watch artists create, purchase artwork, and witness various demonstrations, with some hands-on opportunities. Participating artists include Howard Beatty (painting pictured), Zanne Brunner, Meg celso, Kate Deane, Jeanette FerrettiWojtas, Kat Kennel, John Lenhard, Paula Peters Marra, Elizabeth Papaleo, Jackie Salsbury, Robin Salsbury, Sheila (“S.A.M.”) Shrestha, Sally Steinwachs, Craig Wilson, and Lisa Zaccour. The group represents various media, including acrylics, oils, watercolors, pastels, colored pencil, collage, fiber art, jewelry, furniture, goldsmith art, bird carvings, dyes on silk, and welded steel. Preview samples of their work will be exhibited at various locations in and around Irondequoit. The Art Trail will be held on Friday, 5:30-8:30 p.m., and Saturday, 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Participation is free, and more information and a list of locations is available at irondequoitartclub.org. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY

Art Exhibits [ OPENING ] Axom Gallery, 176 Anderson Ave., 2nd floor. “Pour Quality” by Gareth Fitzgerald Barry. Through Aug 24. Wed-Sat 12-5 p.m. and by appt. Reception Jul 26, 5:309 p.m. 232-6030. axomgallery. com. I-Square Visions, 693 Titus Ave. Irondequoit. “Blind Eros.” Jul 26, 6-10 p.m. Closing Reception for exhibit of paintings and such by Gary Wurzer, Mike Wurzer, and Joe kewin. 313-9865. joekewin@gmail.com. Spencer Hill Gallery, 10503 North Rd., Corning. Footloose: A Showcase of 12 X 12s by 21 Artists. Through Sep 14. Participating Rochester artists: Scot Bennett, Douglas Giebel, Nancy Jurs, Lanna Pejovic, Peter Pincus, Masha Ryskin, and Sabra Wood. Opening Reception and Celebration of 1st anniversary Sun Aug 4, 2-5 p.m. spencerhillgallery.com. [ CONTINUING ] Acanthus Café, 337 East Ave. “Bestest of Friends.” New artwork by Kristine A. Greenizen. Reception May 3, 6 p.m. 3195999. acanthuscafe.com. Arts Council for Wyoming County, 31 S. Main St. “Reflections” by The Silver Lake Art Group. Through July 26. artswyco.org. Aviv Café, 321 East Ave. “Images of Faith” Mix Media Paintings by Richmond Futch Jr. Through Jul 31. 729-9916. bethelcf.com/aviv. Baobab Cultural Center, 728 University Ave. Francesca Lalanne Jeune: “Morphogenesis.”

Through July 31. 563-2145. thebaobab.org. Books Etc., 78 W. Main St. Macedon. “Whales, Windmills and Wonders.” Through Sep 30. Highlights the work of John Domm, Terry Patti, and Marie Starr. 474-4116. books_etc@ yahoo.com. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. The Lobby’s Summer Showcase Art Opening. Through Jul 31. Featuring Rachel Dow, Peter Lazarski, Adam Maida, Topher Martin, Thievin’ Stephen, Mike Turzanski, Yews, Jason Vector, etc. Reception Jun 7 8 p.m. lobbydigital.com. Community Darkroom Gallery, 713 Monroe Ave. “Gramma’s Cameras II,” Photography by Lori Horton Ball. Through Aug 31. Mon 9 a.m.-9:30 p.m., Tue-Thu 9 a.m.-6:30 p.m., Fri 12-5 p.m., Sat 10 a.m.-5:30 p.m. 271-5920. geneseearts.org. Crossroads Coffeehouse, 752 S. Goodman St. First Annual Highland Park Neighborhood Art Show. Through end of July. 2446787. highlandparkrochester.org. A Different Path Gallery, 27 Market St. Brockport. “A Little Twisted: An Exploration of the Self.” BFA Painting Exhibit by Karen Nelson. Wed-Fri 11 a.m.-noon, Sat-Sun noon-4 p.m. 637-5494. adifferentpathgallery.com. The Episcopal Church Home, 505 Mt. Hope Ave. “Colored Pencil Perspectives.” Through Aug 4. 10 a.m.-8 p.m. Members of the Rochester Area Pencil Club. 5468400. episcopalseniorlife.org. Equal=Grounds, 750 South Ave. Canis lupus familiaris II by Gerry Szymanski. Through Jul 27. 242-

7840. gallery@equalgrounds.com. equalgrounds.com. Friendly Home’s Memorial Gallery, 3165 East Ave. “Watercolor World” by Sybie Culbertson. Through Sep 2. Daily 10 a.m.-5 p.m. friendlyhome.org. George Eastman House, 900 East Ave. The Gender Show. Through Oct 13. Tue-Sat 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Sun 11 a.m.-5 p.m. 271-3361. eastmanhouse.org. Image City Photography Gallery, 722 University Ave. “4 Cities, 4 Wallaces.” Through Aug 4. WedSat from 11 a.m.-7 p.m., Sun 12-4 p.m. Reception Aug 2 5-9 p.m. 482-1976. dano@rochester. rr.com. International Art Acquisitions, 3300 Monroe Ave. “Petals Upon Petals,” Featuring Flawless Contemporary Realism by David Kerstetter. Through Jul 31. Also featured are Roberto Salas and Ning Lee. Mon-Fri 10 a.m.-9 p.m., Sat 10 a.m.-6 p.m., Sun 12-5 p.m. 264-1440. internationalartacquisitions.com. Livingston Arts Center, 4 Murray Hill Dr. Mt. Morris. Apartment One Gallery: “Simple Gifts: The Artwork of Sharon Leary and Anne Clements.” Through Aug 10. New Deal Gallery: “Under the Influence: New Deal Painters And Their Artistic Influences.” Through October 5. 243-6785. Lux Lounge, 666 South Ave. The Art of J. Nevadomski and Allie Hartley. 232-9030. lux666.com. Main Street Arts, 20 W. Main St., Clifton Springs. Main Street Art Grand Opening: “Locality.” Through Aug 30. Two floors of artwork from over 30 local artists, live music, and catering by Warfield’s Restaurant and Bakery. 315-462-0210. mstreetarts@ gmail.com. facebook.com/ MainStreetArtsCliftonSprings. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. Mortal: A Portfolio of Woodcuts by Kiki Smith. Through Aug 25. Lockhart Gallery. Wed-Sun 11 a.m.-5 p.m., until 9 p.m. on Thu. 64th RochesterFinger Lakes Exhibition. Through Sep 8. Wed-Sun 11 a.m.–5 p.m. Thu 11 a.m.-9 p.m. 276-8900. mag.rochester.edu. Mental Health Association, 320 N Goodman St. “Luminaria” Art lighting the path to wellness. Creative Wellness Coalition. 3253145 x144. Mill Art Center & Gallery, 61 N Main St. Honeoye Falls. “Celebrate Our Surroundings.” Benefit for The Finger Lakes Museum. 624-7740. millartcenter.com. New Deal Gallery, 4 Livingston County Campus. Mount Morris. Expressions of the Civil War. In recognition of the 150th Anniversary. Wed, Fri 1-4 p.m., Thu 1-7:30 p.m., Sat 11 a.m.-3 p.m.; Expressions of the Civil War: In Recognition of the 150th Anniversary; The Faces of Michael Teres and Leslie Heen. Photographer Michael Teres and painter Leslie Heen team up for an exhibit in Apartment One. 2436785. livingstonarts.org. Ock Hee’s Gallery, 2 Lehigh St. “Buddhist & Asian Art.” Through Aug 24. Mon-Sat 11 a.m.-5 p.m. 624-4730. ockheesgallery.com. The Owl House, 75 Marshall St. Jen Vaccarella Art Show.. Through Aug 12. 360-2920. owlhouserochester.com. Oxford Gallery, 267 Oxford St. “Summer Session.” Through

Sept 7. Tue-Fri, noon-5 p.m., Sat 10 a.m.-5 p.m. 271-5885. oxfordgallery.com. Rush Rhees Library, University of Rochester, River Campus. Alice in the Looking Glass: Illustrations and Artists’ Books 1865-2012. Through Aug 16. Rare Books & Special Collections, Rush Rhees Library. Mon-Fri 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Sat 11 a.m.-3 p.m. 275-4477.; Memorial Art Gallery: 100 Years of Art for the Community. mag. rochester.edu. Schweinfurth Art Center, 205 Genesee St. Innovators and Legends: Generations in Textiles and Fiber. Through Aug 11. Tue-Sat 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Sun 1-5 p.m. 315-255-1553. mtraudt@ schweinfurthartcenter.org. myartcenter.org. The Shoe Factory Art Co-op, 250 N. Goodman St. Mona Oates and Wen-Hua Chen. Wed 12-5 p.m. shoefactoryarts.com. Spectrum Gallery, 100 College Ave. “At the Pump” and “American Playgrounds” by David Freund. Through Jul 27. 4614447. spectrumgalleryroc.com. St. John Fisher College, 3690 East Ave. “The Finger Lakes: Above & Below” by Gloria Betlem. Through Aug 16. Patricia O’Keefe Ross Gallery in the Welcome Center. Mon-Thu 9 a.m.-4 p.m., Fri 9 a.m.-noon. 385-7322. gloriabetlem.com. Starry Nites Café, 696 University Ave. “Hex Signs & Barn Stars” by Beth Brown. Through Aug 3. 2712630. shoefactoryarts.com. Tap & Mallet, 381 Gregory St. “It’s a Funny Story” Illustrations by Aarom Humby. 473-0503. tapandmallet.com. Visual Studies Workshop, 31 Prince Street. “ChemoToxic, I Am That, and other stories” by Willie Osterman. 442-8676. vsw.org. Wayne County Council for the Arts, 108 W. Miller St. Newark. 2013 Annual Members’ Art Show. Through Aug 9. Thu-Sat noon-3 p.m. and by appt. 315-331-4593. waynearts.wordpress.com.

Art Events [ FRI., JULY 26 ] Annual Irondequoit Art Trail. July 26-27. Various locations in Irondequoit. Fri 5:30-8 p.m., Sat 11 a.m.-4 p.m Pick up maps at I-Square Gallery or Irondequoit Town Hall. 544-7846. irondequoitartclub.org.

Comedy [ THU., JULY 25 ] Jeremy Essig. July 25-27. Comedy Club, 2235 Empire Blvd Webster Thu 7:30 p.m., Fri-Sat 7:30 & 10 p.m $9-$12. 671-9080. thecomedyclub.us. [ FRI., JULY 26 ] Improv Comedy Battles. Fri 9:30 p.m., Sat 7:30 p.m. Village Idiots Improv Comedy, 274 Goodman St. N. $5. 797-9086. VIP@ improvVIP.com. [ TUE., JULY 30 ] Comedy Open Mic. 7:30-10:30 p.m. Acanthus Café, 337 East Ave. 7 p.m. sign up. Host: Woody Battaglia 902-2010. woodybattaglia@gmail.com. acanthuscafe.com. Laugh Riot Underground: Stand-Up Comedy Showcase. 9-11 p.m. Free. laughriotcomedy.com.

WORKSHOP | BEEKEEPING EVENT

We’ve known for a while now that the honeybees are in trouble, and some people understand that this means we are in trouble too, because our ability to feed ourselves depends on the wee beasts. Recent studies have finally confirmed what many feared was true -- that the big hit their populations have taken has a lot to do with the anti-pest chemicals we spray on our crops, which they pollinate. Little wonder. There’s been an increase in people interested in personal beekeeping, which in some cases originates from the desire to help safeguard and and monitor the health of the bees. If you’re currently a beekeeper (or interested in becoming one), but unsure what to do with for the fragile creatures during the harsher months, sign up for “Christmas in July, or Preparing your Hives for Winter,” a workshop with entomologist Mike Griggs offered on Monday, July 29, 7-9 p.m., at Monroe County Cooperative Extension (249 Highland Ave.). The workshop offers a look at wintering history and talk about proactive winter preparation. Participation is free, but donations are accepted. Sign up or learn more: rochesterbeekeepers.com, rochesterbeekeepers@gmail.com. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY

Dance Events [ WED., JULY 24 ] Bill Evans’ Approach to Laban Movement Analysis and Operationalizing Theory. Through July 26. Kinections, 718 University Ave. kinections. com. Group Processes in Dance/ Movement Therapy: The Marian Chace Approach. Through July 26. Kinections, 718 University Ave. kinections.com. [ THU., JULY 25 ] Wall Therapy: Floor Therapy Dance Party. July 25. Skylark Lounge, 40 South Union St Hassaan Mackey (Low Budget Crew/Daily Bread) Moses Rockwell, MdotCoop (AudioInFlux), DJ Tim Tones, Thievin’ Stephen (vinyl record DJ sets & new music), One Dance Co. (new dance performance), Dr. Hamburger (visual projections). Hosted by Lord Krow (DKT$) $5. 2708106. lobbydigital.com. [ SAT., JULY 27 ] The Sleeping Beauty. July 27, 4:30 p.m. Simco Event Center, 61 S. Main Street, Canandaigua Free. 704-1903. jill@balletprestigerochester.com. balletprestigerochester.com/ events.

Festivals [ FRI., JULY 26-SUN., JULY 28 ] Spencerport Canal Days. July 26-28. Along Erie Canal, Spencerport. Fri 7-10 p.m. Ruby Shooz street concert, Sat 11 a.m.-11 p.m., Sun 11 a.m.-5 p.m spencerportcanaldays.com.

[ SAT., JULY 27 ] Ten Ugly Men Festival. July 27, 10 a.m.-8 p.m. Genesee Valley Park, Elmwood Ave. A day-long festival filled with live music, kickball and volleyball tournaments, and a 5K and 10K race (register for each at active.com), as well as food and drink for everyone $40-$50, kids $10, 12 and under free 6835734. tenuglymen.com. [ SAT., JULY 27-SUN., JUL 28 ] Lake Ontario Wine Trail Fruit Fest. July 27-28. Collect stamps at each stop and enter to win 1 of 3 gift baskets. Purchase passports online $10 or 2/$15. 315-986-4202. contactus@ lakeontariowinetrail.com. lakeontariowinetrail.com. Native American Dance and Music Festival. July 27-28, 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Ganondagan State Historic Site, 1488 New York 444 $5-$12, members and children 2 and under free. 7421690. ganondagan.org. Sterling Renaissance Festival. Sundays Sterling, NY 800-8794446. sterlingfestival.com. Waterfront Art Festival. July 27-28, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Kershaw Park, Canandaigua $3 admission, children 12 and under free. 6719102. waterfrontartfestival.com.

Kids Events [ WED., JULY 24 ] Magic Mysteries Revealed. July 24, 6:30-7:30 p.m. Seymour Library, 161 East Ave., Brockport Ages 8-12 Free, register. 637-1050. seymourlibraryweb.org. continues on page 23

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 21


Theater Scenes from boho life: Blackfriars revisits ‘Rent’ “Rent” THROUGH AUGUST 3 BLACKFRIARS THEATRE, 795 E. MAIN ST. $33.50-$39.50 | 454-1260, BLACKFRIARS.ORG

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RUMISGRILLCAFE.COM 22 CITY JULY 24-30, 2013

[ REVIEW ] BY DAVID RAYMOND

As I imagine everybody knows by now, in the early 1990’s the composer-lyricist Jonathan Larson had the inspiration of reimagining Puccini’s “La Bohème” among the boho set in New York’s Alphabet City. The show, titled “Rent,” was a smash hit on Broadway, won every award imaginable (including the Pulitzer Prize for Drama), made a ton of money, and produced a core of rabid fans called Rent-heads. (Larson got to enjoy none of this, because he died the night of its first preview performance.) It remains a beloved show, and younger audiences see it as a classic, but the excitement around it seems to have died down. What better time for Blackfriars to take another look at it? The company’s production of “Rent” opened last Friday night and plays through August 3, and it’s a rousing one. Puccini also had his source material, the popular 19th-century book “Scenes from Bohemian Life” by Henri Mürger. Puccini’s version is tragic, but his suave, romantic music gives the story an overlay of charm. Larson’s characters are grimier, grittier, and raunchier; their lives are blighted by poverty, as in Puccini, but here the plague is not tuberculosis but AIDS. The music is Broadway-style rock and roll (with a not-quite-respectful nod to Puccini’s “Musetta’s Waltz”). Larson was definitely a talented writer, and had a knack for fusing the elements of rock music to write real musical scenes. He could write a catchy tune; to hear “Seasons of Love” once is to have it in your head forever. There’s also some elaborate choral writing and many beautiful and powerful moments. His lyrics are practically nonstop; there must be as many words in “Rent” as there are in “War and Peace,” and unlike many pop-music lyrics, Larson’s rhyme consistently. “La Bohème’s” Rodolfo is here a songwriter named Roger (played by Nick Faruch) and his Mimi is uh, Mimi (Courtney Weather), although here she’s not a charming seamstress with tuberculosis but a pole dancer who’s HIV-positive. (Larsen’s recasting of their initial meeting, in a musical scene called

“Light My Candle,” is one of the wittiest things in the show, set to an infectious rhythm and managing to be dirty and charming at the same time.) Marcello is now Mark, Roger’s roommate and a video artist documenting life among his friends (Jimmy Boorum); Musetta is Maureen (Kaitlin Baldwin), a “performance artist” (do they still call them that?) of dubious talent who looks smashing in black leather – Mark’s ex and now an item with a lawyer named Joanne (Janine Mercandetti). There are also Roger and Mark’s friend and landlord Benny (Michael D. Hall), Janine Mercandetti and Kaitlyn Baldwin in Blackfriars Theatre’s a boho-turned-bougie, and, production of “Rent.” PHOTO BY DAN HOWELL in one of Larson’s most imaginative changes to pointing out that while the show it still the original, a black male couple – a rogue packs an emotional punch in places, it computer genius named Tom Collins (Tamar is, to say the least, uneven. The first act Greene) and a drag queen named Angel goes like gangbusters, introducing the Dumott Schunard (Josh Johnson), who characters, their relationships, and their spends Act One in a Santa Claus suit. The life milieu efficiently and ending with a force of the group, he is also the first to die bang (the happily defiant song “La Vie of AIDS. These characters are practically bit Bohème”). During the second act, when the players in “La Bohème,” but in “Rent” they relationships begin to sour and death casts a become the show’s emotional center. (Now long shadow, the show loses its momentum, that’s re-imagining a classic.) turning into more of a song cycle than a One ground rule of a good production libretto: a succession of short scenes and of anything is that the performers care about songs punctuated with blackouts. it a lot, and everybody, but everybody, in There’s so much energy emanating Blackfriars’ production of “Rent” seems from the cast that the show’s start-andtotally invested in it. The principals stop-and-start structure, particularly in mentioned above are a dynamic combination the second act, becomes frustrating – and of familiar local performers with new talents; it is emphasized in Simmons’ staging, they all have powerhouse voices (several are which ends most every number with operatically trained) and energy to burn, and a blackout while cast members move they mesh well as friends and lovers. While some furniture. This is a minor quibble; they all get standout moments and sing the the full-cast numbers are excitingly and hell out of them, they are a real ensemble. fluidly staged, and Simmons’s directing of The principals and the very busy the principals is spot-on. This is a show supporting cast all blossom under Andy full of magnetic performances. Pratt’s music direction. The band is Any remaining Rent-heads will occasionally overpowering, and with the be pleased with this production of actors delivering their lines in the round, their favorite, and if you’ve never sometimes with their backs to the audience, seen this show and want to judge it some words get lost. The full-cast numbers for yourself, I can’t imagine a much are almost overwhelming. better performance of it than the one “Rent” is old enough now that you don’t Blackfriars is presenting this month. risk being called an old fuddy-duddy for


Kids Events

Saturday Author Salon: “Autumn Leaves” by Sue Savard. July 27, 2-4 p.m. Lift Bridge Book Shop, 45 Main St Free. liftbridgebooks.com. Talk and Book Signing: George “The Animal” Steele. July 27, 7 p.m. Barnes & Noble, 3349 Monroe Ave. Free. 586-6020. crm2790@bn.com. bn.com.

Make & Take Crafts. Through July 25, 3 p.m. Brighton Memorial Library, 2300 Elmwood Ave. Free. 784-5300. brightonlibrary.org. Preschool Drive in Movie. July 24, 1:30-3:30 p.m. Henrietta Public Library, 455 Calkins Rd Ages 2.55 years. Each child will make a car out of a cardboard box, in which they will sit while we watch a movie Free, register. 359-7092. [ THU., JULY 25 ] Mini-Monster Making Workshop. July 25, 7-8:30 p.m. Seymour Library, 161 East Ave., Brockport Grades 6-12 Free, register. 6371050. seymourlibraryweb.org. [ FRI., JULY 26 ] Cool Kids! Green Kids! presents: World Drum Jam. July 26, 7 p.m. Cool Kids, Sagawa Park, 100 Main St. Free. 637-3984. coolkids@ rochester.rr.com. Create Your Own Ancient Scroll. July 26, 2 p.m. Irondequoit Public Library, Evans Branch, 45 Cooper Rd Grades K-6 Free, register. 3366062. aholland@libraryweb.org. Family Fridays. 12-4 p.m Rochester Museum and Science Center, 657 East Ave. 7/26: Music Madness. Included in museum admission $11-$13. 271-1880. rmsc.org. Friday Make and Take Craft. 1-5 p.m Central Library, Children’s Center, 115 South Ave. Ages 3+ Free. 428-8150. libraryweb.org. Teen CPR/First Aid Program. July 26, 9:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Henrietta Public Library, 455 Calkins Rd $30, register. 359-7092. [ MON., JULY 29 ] Introduction to Screen Printing: Youths. 2-5 p.m Rochester Makerspace, 850 St. Paul St. #23 $100, register. 210-0075. rocmaker.eventbrite.com. OmniPresent Puppet Theater. July 29, 10:30 a.m. Brighton Memorial Library, 2300 Elmwood Ave. Free. 784-5300. brightonlibrary.org. Teen Comic Book Workshop. July 29-Aug. 2, 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Wood Library, 134 North Main St Canandaigua Register. 394-1381. woodlibrary.org. [ TUE., JULY 30 ] Dig into Summer Movies. 2 p.m Brighton Memorial Library, 2300 Elmwood Ave. Jul 2: “A Bug’s Life,” Jul 9: “The Borrowers,” Jul 16: “James and the Giant Peach,” Jul 23 “Holes,” Jul 30: “Treasure Buddies”. Free. 784-5300. brightonlibrary.org. Mad Scientists’ Lab. July 30, 1-2 p.m. Seymour Library, 161 East Ave., Brockport. Grades 3-5 Free, register. 637-1050. seymourlibraryweb.org. Reptile Guys: Captive Lifeforms. July 30, 2-3 p.m. Henrietta Public Library, 455 Calkins Rd All ages Free, register. 359-7092. “Tales of the Brothers Grimm.” July 30-Aug. 2. Bristol Valley Theater, 151 South Main St Jul 30-Aug 2 and Jul 13-16 at 11 a.m $5. 3746318. bvtnaples.org. Teen Art Studio. July 30, 7-8:30 p.m. Seymour Library, 161 East Ave., Brockport Grades 6-12 Free, register. 637-1050. seymourlibraryweb.org. Teen Movie Makers. July 30, 2:30-4:30 p.m. Seymour Library, 161 East Ave., Brockport Grades 6-12 Free, register. 637-1050. seymourlibraryweb.org.

MOONLIGHT STROLL MUSIC SERIES FRIDAY NIGHTS 8-10PM The Gardens are aglow again! Cash Wine Bar available

[ TUE., JULY 30 ] Lift Bridge Writers’ Group. 6:30 p.m. Lift Bridge Book Shop, 45 Main St Free. 637-2260. liftbridgebooks.com.

FESTIVAL | NATIVE AMERICAN DANCE & MUSIC FESTIVAL

This weekend, Friends of Ganondagan will celebrate Native America’s rich culture with the 22nd Annual Native American Dance & Music Festival, which features Native performers, artists, and family activities at Ganondagan State Historic Site (1488 State Rte. 444, Victor). The festival takes place Saturday and Sunday, July 27-28, 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Celtic Fusion musician, “the Lord of the Strings,” Arvel Bird (Paiute/Me’tis) and singer-songwriter Jennifer Kreisberg (Tuscarora) will headline both days of the festival. The festival will also feature a new, multi-style violin Family String Jam with Arvel Bird (pictured; bring your violins if you want to participate), demonstrations in traditional lacrosse stick-making, basketry, and cornhusk dolls, a family drum jam, traditionation Iroquois Social Dancing, storytelling, a Native American Arts Market, educational displays, bark longhouse tours, guided trail walks, and more. Festival tickets, which are available at the event, are $12 for adults, $10 for seniors (62+), $7 for students with ID (18+), $5 for children (ages 3-18), and free for Friends of Ganondagan members and children ages 2 and under. Free festival parking is available at the Fireman’s Field off Maple Avenue in Victor with a free shuttle service from 9:45 a.m. to 6 p.m. each day. For more information and a full schedule of events, visit ganondagan.org/ NADMF.html or call 742-1690. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY

Lectures [ WED., JULY 24 ] Dragonflies, Masters of the Sky. July 24, 1 p.m. Sterling Nature Center, 15380 Jenzvold Rd Free. 315-947-6143. snc@co.cayuga. ny.us. snc@co.cayuga.ny.us. Exploring Our Relationships with Money. July 24, 6:30 p.m. Rochester Brainery, Village Gate, 274 N Goodman St. $15. 7307034. info@RochesterBrainery. com. rochesterbrainery.com. Wall Therapy: Artist Talk with the Community. July 24, 6 p.m. School of the Arts, 45 Prince St Free. 242-7682. wall-therapy.com. [ THU., JULY 25 ] Solar Power for Your Home. July 25, 7 p.m. Rochester Brainery, Village Gate, 274 N Goodman St. $15. 730-7034. info@rochesterbrainery.com. rochesterbrainery.com. [ MON., JULY 29 ] An Introduction to Seed Saving Class. July 29, 7 p.m. Rochester Brainery, Village Gate, 274 N Goodman St. $15. 730-7034. rochesterbrainery.com. [ TUE., JULY 30 ] Growing Up Gandhi. July 30, 5:30-7 p.m. Carlson MetroCenter YMCA, 444 E Main St. With Arun Gandhi Free. 325-2880. rochesterymca. org/growingupgandhi. Learn About Letchworth Series. July 30, 7 p.m. Letchworth State

Museum Exhibit [ WED., JULY 24 ] Boardwalk Arcade. Through Sep. 8. The Strong National Museum of Play, 1 Manhattan Square MonThu 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Fri-Sat 10 a.m.-8 p.m., Sun noon-5 p.m. Opening Weekend Celebration July 6, 11 a.m.-4 p.m. and July 7, 1-4 p.m $13, free to members and kids under 2 263-2700. museumofplay.org. “Bringing Down the Attic”.. Through Aug. 3. Museum of Wayne County History, 21 Butternut St Opening March 28, 7 p.m. Explore the hidden collection at the museum Free. 315-9464943. waynehistory.org. PGA Championship History Exhibit. Through Sep. 2. Rochester Museum and Science Center, 657 East Ave. Through September 2. Mon-Sat 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Sun 11 a.m.-5 p.m Included in admission: $11-$13. 271-1880. rmsc.org.

Recreation [ WED., JULY 24 ] Historic Landscape Garden Tours. Tuesdays-Sundays George Eastman House, 900 East Ave. Tue-Sat noon & 3:30 p.m., Sun 3:30 p.m Included in admission: $5-$12. 271-3361. eastmanhouse.org.

Park, 1 Letchworth State Park . Castile Meet at Lower Falls Restaurant. Letchworth Park and the New Americanist Art by Cynthia Hawkins $8 parking fee. 493-3625.

[ THU., JULY 25 ] Twilight Tours. 7 p.m Mount Hope Cemetery, North Gate, 791 Mt. Hope Ave. $5, members and under 16 free 461-3494. fomh. org.

[ WED., JULY 31 ] Digitize Your Old Cassettes Class. July 31, 7 p.m. Rochester Brainery, Village Gate, 274 N Goodman St. $15. 730-7034. rochesterbrainery.com.

[ SAT., JULY 27 ] Focus on Trees. July 27, 9:30 a.m.-noon. Cumming Nature Center, 6472 Gulick Rd. Join Dave Gotham, director of the CNC, this summer and fall for an informative series of woodland walks highlighting trees. 9:30 a.m.-noon. 7/27: Plantations. $3, $10 per family. 374-6160. rmsc.org. GVHC Event. July 27, 9 a.m. Durand Park (Lakeshore Blvd opposite Log Cabin Rd.). Moderate 5 mile hike, east side of park 7508937. gvhchikes.org. Public Tour of South Section of Mount Hope Cemetery. Mount Hope Cemetery, 1133 Mt. Hope Avenue. Meet: Cemetery Office, South entrance opposite the Distillery restaurant. $5, members and kids under 16 free 461-3494. fomh.org. Rochester Orienteering Club Meet. July 27, 10 a.m. Mendon Ponds Park, Douglas Road . Mendon Registration at 9 a.m $8 per team. roc.us.orienteering.org. Rochester’s Abolitionists, Patriots, and Philanthropists. July 27, 10 a.m. Mount Hope Cemetery, North Gate, 791 Mt. Hope Ave. $7, free to members. 461-3494. fomh.org. continues on page 24

Literary Events [ WED., JULY 24 ] Pure Kona Poetry Readings. 7 p.m. Acanthus Café, 337 East Ave. 7/3: Chris Shelton 7/10: Karen Beck 7/17: Colleen Powderly 7/24: Sheila Evans 7/31: Michael Ketchek. Free. 319-5999. acanthuscafe.com. Read with Seymour: “Sarah’s Key” by Tatiana de Rosnay. July 24, 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Seymour Library, 161 East Ave., Brockport Free. 6371050. seymourlibraryweb.org. [ FRI., JULY 26 ] Last Friday Story Slam. July 26, 7-8 p.m. Writers and Books, 740 University Ave Hosted by Carol Roberts Free. 473-2590. wab.org. [ SAT., JULY 27 ] “Folklore and Legends of Rochester” by Michael Keene.. July 27, 2 p.m. Books Etc., 78 W. Main St Macedon Free. 474-4116. books_etc@yahoo.com.

PERFORMANCES BY: JULY 26 - The Music Makers Big Band

AUG. 2 - Neville Francis and the Riddim Posse (reggae)

$9 Adults •$7 Members •$4 Youth 6-17 Kids under 5 are FREE

151 Charlotte St. Canandaigua 394-4922 •www.sonnenberg.org This organization is supported in part with public funds from the New York State Council on the Arts administered locally by the Finger Lakes Community Arts Grant.

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 23


FESTIVAL | TEN UGLY MEN FESTIVAL

The 24th Annual Ten Ugly Men Festival will take place on Saturday, July 27, enabling participants a day full of partying while they help support local charities. The event takes place 10 a.m.-8 p.m. in Genesee Valley Park (1000 E River Rd.), and benefits The Bright Eyes Fund for pediatric brain tumor treatment at Golisano Children’s Hospital, Equicenter, St. Mary’s Oncology Center, and Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation. Enjoy a day-long festival filled with live music, kickball and volleyball tournaments, and a 5K and 10K race (register for each at active.com), as well as food and drink for everyone. Admission is $40 in advance through Wegmans, $50 the day of the festival, and kids ages 13-20 are admitted for $10 only the day of the event. Ages 12 and under get in free. Free parking is available at the University of Rochester (look for the signs detailing parking locations), with a shuttle bus running every half hour, 11 a.m.-8 p.m. Pick-up locations are at Hotshots Volleyball on University Avenue and at the corner of Park Avenue and Berkley Street. For more information, visit tenuglymen.com or email tenuglymen@rochester.rr.com. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY

Recreation [ SUN., JULY 28 ] GVHC Hike. July 28, 8:30 a.m. Creekside Inn, Rte 15a, Rush. Moderate/flat 8 mile hike, Lehigh Valley Trail 860-460-0156. gvhchikes.org. Public Tour of North Section of Mount Hope Cemetery. 2 p.m Mount Hope Cemetery, 1133 Mt. Hope Avenue. Meet: North Gatehouse opposite Robinson Dr. $5, members and kids under 16 free 461-3494. fomh.org. Women Run The Roc 5K Run/ Walk and Coed Kids Races. July 28. Frontier Field, 1 Morrie Silver Way 8:30 a.m. start, kids races starts at 9:45 a.m. One lucky man will get to run with the ladies. Register. 270-4334. fleetfeetrochester.com. [ TUE., JULY 30 ] Pacesetters Walk. July 30, 6:30 p.m. Seneca Park Zoo, 2222 St. Paul St Meet in parking lot before zoo entrance Free. 249-9507. huggersskiclub.org. Radical Mycology Meet-up. July 30, 7 p.m. Genesee Valley Park, Elmwood Ave. Free, donations accepted. 683-5734. smugtownmushrooms.com. Roc City Challenge Adult Bicycle Safety Course. 6-8:30 p.m Genesee Valley Park, Elmwood Ave. Helmets are strongly encouraged $10, register. 4286755. cityofrochester.gov.

Special Events [ WED., JULY 24 ] 13th Annual Rochester Jewish Film Festival. Through July 29. 24 CITY JULY 24-30, 2013

Held at Dryden, Little, and JCC Hart Theatres Prices vary. 4612000. rjff.org. Anthonly L. Jordan Center Annual Community Health Fair. July 24, 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Anthony L. Jordan Center, 82 Holland St Free. 423-5890. aesce@ jordanhealth.org. Geeks Who Drink Pub Quiz. 8 p.m. Scotland Yard Pub, 187 Saint Paul St Free. 730-5030. scotlandyardpub.com. Rochester Winos Wine and Food Pairing. July 24, 6:30 p.m. Fraîche Bistro & Dessert Bar, 130 East Ave. $30-$35, register. 3194313. rochesterwinos.com. Scottsville Midweek Farmers’ Market. 4-7 p.m Smith Warren Post 367 American Legion, 61 Main Street in Scottsville 8893981. kmemccall@aol.com. Walking Tours of Downtown Geneva. July 24, 7 p.m. Begin at Finger Lakes Gifts & Lounge, 60 Seneca St., Geneva $5, register. 315-789-5151. [ THU., JULY 25 ] 2013 Neighborhood Fair. July 25, 12-3 p.m. Don Samuel Torres Park (School 20), 70 Oakman St. Free food, information, testing, raffle, youth services, music Free. 467-6410 x24. ihall@ iberodevelopment.org. Airplay Juggling. July 25, 10:30 a.m. Brighton Memorial Library, 2300 Elmwood Ave. Free. 7845300. brightonlibrary.org. Famly Funday Sunday. July 25, 3-9 p.m. Nola’s Restaurant & Nightclub, 4775 Lake Ave. A very special event to help “Elmer The Bull”, the petting zoo mascot at Lollypop Farms get a much needed complete make-over. Live music. mynolas.com.

Film: End of the Line: Rochester’s Subway. July 25, 6:30 p.m. Brighton Memorial Library, 2300 Elmwood Ave. Free. 7845300. brightonlibrary.org. Lincoln Tours. Saturdays, 1 & 3 p.m. Seward House Historic Museum, 33 South St., Auburn. 315-252-1283. sewardhouse.org. “Movies in the Parks” series. Ontario Beach Park Tue Jul 30: “The Hunger Games.” Highland Park Bowl Jul 25: “Madagascar 3: Europe’s Most Wanted,” Aug 1: “Les Misérables” Pre-show fun starts at 8:30 p.m., and movies begin at dark. Bring blankets or lawn chairs Free. 753-7275. monroecounty.gov. PhotoFinish 5K Info Sessions. July 25. George Eastman House, 900 East Ave. Each session will run from 12:15 to 1 p.m. in Eastman House’s Curtis Theatre. Event on Sat. Oct 5 271-3361 x445. crowdrise.com/ photofinish5k2013. ROC Summer of Riesling Patio Parties. July 25. Casa Larga Vineyards, 2287 Turk Hill Rd Fairport Music on the front patio, local breweries, a Riesling food pairing, and Casa Larga Riesling tastings, fireworks. 5:30-8:30 p.m Call for Pricing. 233-4210. casalarga.com. South Wedge Farmers’ Market. 4 p.m Boulder Coffee Co., 100 Alexander St. 4 p.m Free. 2698918. swfm.org. Stammtisch. Every other Thursday, 5:30 p.m. Roc Brewing Co., 56 S. Union St 794-9798. rocbrewingco@ gmail.com. rocbrewingco.com. Swimmin’ for Women. July 25, 6 a.m.-8 p.m. Webster Aquatic Center, 875 Ridge Rd., Webster. Proceeds benefit Alternatives for Battered Women and to fight sex trafficking swimminforwomenusa.org. Tablelands ‘at sea’ wine tasting experience aboard the Sam Patch. July 25, 6 p.m. Tickets must be purchased in advance at Lovin’ Cup. Special Guest: New Zealand wine expert and owner of Tablelands Wine Company, Magnus Riddiford. Departure: Schoen Place, Pittsford. Afterparty at Label 7 $55, register 292-9940. lovincup.com. [ FRI., JULY 26 ] Friday Happy Hour! 5-7 p.m. Veritas Wine Bar, 217 Alexander St. 2-for-1 on wines by-the-glass and beers by-the-bottle!. 2622336. veritaswinebar.com. Moonlight Stroll Concert Series. 8-10 p.m Sonnenberg Gardens and Mansion State Historic Park, 151 Charlotte St . Canandaigua Jul 26: The MusicaMakers Big Band. Aug 2: Neville Francis & The Riddim Posse. Aug 9: Italian Night with Gap Mangione. $4-$9 ($12-$15 on Aug 9.). 394-4922. sonnenberg.org. Play Date Rochester. July 26, 9 p.m.-2 a.m. Diplomat Party House, 1956 Lyell Ave 21+. $10-$15. 647-1566. playdaterochester.com. Rochester Community Animal Clinic Grand Opening: Free Rabies Vaccinations. July 26, 3-8:30 p.m. Rochester Community Animal Clinic, 985 Bay St. Free rabies vaccinations will be given 4:30-7 p.m 2880600. rochestercommunityanimalclinic@yahoo.com.

Wine Cruise onboard Sam Patch. July 26, 6:30-8 p.m. Wednesdays 6-7:30 p.m., Fridays 6:30-8 p.m. Meet at Schoen Place in Village of Pittsford $26, register. 6625748. samandmary.org. [ SAT., JULY 27 ] Canandaigua Farmer’s Market. 8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m Pavilion on Mill Street, one block east of Main St., Canandaigua canandaiguafarmersmarket.com. Caring for the City Family Health Fair. July 27, 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Southwest Community Center, 275 Samuel McCree Way Free. 1-888-343-3547. fideliscare.org. CarniBRAWL. July 27, 9 p.m. Lux Lounge, 666 South Ave 232-9030. rochesterbrawl. tumblr.com. Screening: “More Than Honey.” Cinema Theatre, 957 S. Clinton Ave. Film begins at 1 p.m Suggested donation. 2711785. info@sweetbeez.org. sweetbeez.org. The International Society of Glass Beadmakers Bead Bazaar. July 27, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Rochester Riverside Convention Center, 123 E Main St $5 admission. 614222-2243. isgb.org. “July 64-July 2013: Envisioning and Building a Better Community.” July 27, 8:30 a.m.-4 p.m. 250 Dr. Samuel McCree Way. Film screening, panel discussion Free, register. 328-4660. zion-hill.org. Party Madagascar. July 27, 6:3011 p.m. Seneca Park Zoo, 2222 St. Paul St Patron event (preevent reception): 5:30 p.m, $30 $10-$12. senecaparkzoo.org. Rochester Singletons Movie & Dessert. July 27. For Information, call: 381-9184. Veritas Wine Bar 1st Anniversary. July 27, 5-11 p.m. Veritas Wine Bar, 217 Alexander St. Complementary wine tastings and drink specials 262-2336. veritaswinebar.com. [ SUN., JULY 28 ] Affinity Orchard Farmers’ Market. 11 a.m.-2 p.m Affinity Orchard Place, at English & Fetzner Roads, Greece Free. affinityorchardplace.com. Brighton Farmers’ Market. 9 a.m.1 p.m Brighton High School, 1150 Winton Rd S. 242-5046. brightonfarmersmarket.org. Gardening Sale Extravaganza! July 28, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Cornell Cooperative Extension of Monroe County, 249 Highland Ave Multiple plant societies plant sale, along with gently used garden objects for sale. Master Gardener question booth, demos, more Free. 889-4864. rochesterperennial.com. Greatest Community Garage Sales and Super Fleas. July 28. Rochester Public Market, 280 N. Union St. 8 a.m.-2 p.m cityofrochester.gov/publicmarket. [ MON., JULY 29 ] Essential Oils 101. July 29, 7 p.m. Rochester Brainery, Village Gate, 274 N Goodman St. $15, register. 730-7034. info@rochesterbrainery.com. rochesterbrainery.com. [ TUE., JULY 30 ] Fundraiser: The Red Cross Experience. July 30, 6 p.m. Rochester Brainery, Village Gate, 274 N Goodman St. Raffle tickets will be available at $5 each to win an Adult CPR/AED Certification

LECTURE | GROWING UP GANDHI

As progressive human rights movements take hold and work against imperialism, colonialism, and their ugly, many-headed children, it’s surprisingly easy for the newer generations to forget the fight and overlook that there will always be more work to be done. One good way to avoid taking advancements of the underdogs for granted is to remain in contact with those who experienced the world in its former state, who remember what it was like to live under different policies, and who understand the world as it is today a bit more keenly than others. The YMCA of Greater Rochester will host Arun Gandhi, grandson of Indian nationalist leader Mahatma Gandhi, for an evening of conversation and reflection as he shares his experiences growing up in a time of apartheid. The community is invited to attend “Growing up Gandhi” on Tuesday, July 30, as the speaker shares the valuable lessons he learned from his late grandfather. The event will take place 5:30-7 p.m. at Carlson MetroCenter YMCA (444 E. Main St.), and is free and open to the public, but advance registration is required. Free parking is available in the East End Garage. For more information or to register, call 325-2880 or visit rochesterymca.org/growingupgandhi. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY Course worth $110 $20. 7307034. info@rochesterbrainery. com. rochesterbrainery.com. Tilling the Soil: Tuesday Summer Movie. July 30, 6:15 p.m. Brighton Memorial Library, 2300 Elmwood Ave. “The Secret Garden.” Free. 784-5300. brightonlibrary.org. Tuesday Taco Trivia. 9-11 p.m. Temple Bar and Grille, 109 East Ave. 232-6000. templebarrochester@gmail.com. templebarandgrille.com. Westside Farmers Market. 4-7:30 p.m Westside Farmers Market, 831 Genesee St. 436-8999. westsidemarketrochester@ gmail.com. westsidemarketrochester.com. [ WED., JULY 31 ] Food Truck Rodeo. July 31, 5-9 p.m. Rochester Public Market, 280 N. Union St. Free admission. cityofrochester.gov. Info Session for Proposed Mary L. Wright Charter School. July 31, 7 p.m. 7/31: 384 Chili Avenue. 8/21: 48 Clifton Street marylwrightprep.weebly.com. New York Filmmakers Quarterly Series. July 31, 7 p.m. Little Theatre, 240 East Ave. Screenings held last Wednesday at 7 p.m. and Saturday (matinee) of January, April, July, and October emergingfilmmakers@ yahoo.com. thelittle.org.

Theater Beauty and the Beast. Hale Auditorium, Roberts Cultural

Life Center, Roberts Wesleyan College, 2301 Westside Dr Westside Theater Productions. Thu-Sat 7:30 p.m., Sun 2 p.m $10-$12 802-0576. westsidetheaterproductions. com. “Gentlemen Prefer Blondes.” Through Aug. 14. Merry-GoRound Playhouse, 6877 East Lake Rd. Through Aug 14. Wed Jul 24-Thu 7:30 p.m., Fri-Sat 2 & 8 p.m., Sun 2 p.m., Tue-Wed Jul 31, 2 & 7:30 p.m. $22-$50 1‑800‑457‑8897. fingerlakesmtf.com. Impact Dinner Theatre. 1180 Canandaigua St. (Rte. 21 Palmyra town hall), Palmyra. Fri Jul 26, 7:30-9:15 p.m. Christian theater (with dinner). Yahweh Dance Troupe and David Bullard Free, register. 315-5973553. impactdrama.com. “Legally Blonde, The Musical.” JCC Rochester, 1200 Edgewood Ave. Wed-Thu Jul 24-25 at 7 p.m, Sat July 27 at 8 p.m., Sun Jul 28 at 2 p.m. $18-$26. 4612000. jcccenterstage.org. “MoM: A Rock Concert Musical.” Through Aug. 3. Geva Theatre Center, 75 Woodbury Blvd Through Aug 3. Fri Jul 24, 7:30 p.m. Opening Thu Jul 25, 7:30 p.m., performances Fri 7:30 p.m., Sat 3 & 8 p.m., Mon-Wed July 31, 7:30 p.m. Tickets start at $38 232-4382. gevatheatre.org. “More Than This,” A World Musical Premiere. MuCCC, 142 Atlantic Ave Presented by DVC. Thu-Fri 7:30 p.m., Sat 2 & 7:30 p.m $5. 866-811-4111. muccc.org.


“My Gal Patsy.” Downstairs Cabaret Theatre Center, 540 E. Main St. Sat 7 p.m., Sun 3 p.m $29-$33. 325-4370. downstairscabaret.com. Neurosis: A New Musical. Through Aug. 10. Auburn Public Theater, 8 Exchange St. Through Aug 10. Wed Jul 24, 2 & 7:30 p.m., Thu 7:30 p.m., Fri 8 p.m., Sat 2 & 8 p.m., Sun 2 p.m., Tue 7:30 p.m., Wed Jul 31 2 & 7:30 p.m. 1‑800‑457‑8897. fingerlakesmtf.com. The PiTCH. Jun 13-Aug 17. Thu 7:30 p.m., Fri-Sat 8 p.m. July 25-27: Ten: The Story of Grace and Joe. $20. 315‑255‑1785. fingerlakesmtf.com. “Rent.” Blackfriars Theatre, 795 E. Main St Fri-Sat 8 p.m., Sun 2 p.m., Tue-Thu Jul 23-25, 7:30 p.m.; Fri-Sat 8 p.m., Sun 2 p.m $33.50-$39.50. 4541260. blackfriars.org. Song Man, Dance Man. Through July 31. Downstairs Cabaret at Winton Place, 3450 Winton Place Thu 7 p.m., Fri-Sat 8 p.m., Sun 3 p.m., Wed Jul 31 7 p.m $25. 325-4370. downstairscabaret.com. “State Fair.” Geneseo Community Players. Alice Austin Theatre, Brodie Fine Arts building, 1 College Circle, Geneseo. Thu-Sat 8 p.m $12-$14. 245-5833. geneseocommunityplayers.org.

Workshops [ WED., JULY 24 ] Family Development Class: “One from the Heart, One from the Mind.” July 24, 12:30-2:30 p.m. Mental Health Association, 320 N Goodman St. For parents of preteens and teens Free, RSVP. 3253145 x131. mharochester.org. Job Strategies for The Experienced Communicator. July 24, noon. Mario’s, 2740 Monroe Ave. $20-$30, register. 697-2602. James.Mignano@Text100.com. prsarochester.org. Money Tales: Exploring Our Relationships with Money Class.

RECREATION | FOCUS ON TREES PROGRAM

Rochester Museum & Science Center’s 900 acre Cumming Nature Center (6472 Gulick Road, Naples) will offer a new exploratory program on trees, beginning this weekend. Focus on Trees is a series of guided walks for all ages with Dave Gotham, director of CNC. Each informative woodland walk will highlight a specific tree species with facts about the many important things we derive from trees, including lumber, medicine, oxygen, heat, paper, wildlife cover, and food. Walks will take place from 9:30 a.m. to noon, beginning Saturday, July 27, and continuing into the fall. This weekend’s program focuses on Plantations, with a hike to six plantations and discussion centered on their potential economic benefits and the drawbacks. Participation in the hikes is free for RMSC members, with a donation of $3 per person or $10 per family requested from the general public. CNC trails are open 9 a.m.-3:30 p.m., Wednesday-Friday, and 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m. on Saturday and Sunday. Visit rmsc.org or call 374-6160 for more information. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY July 24, 6:30 p.m. Rochester Brainery, Village Gate, 274 N Goodman St. $15. 730-7034. rochesterbrainery.com. Smartphones: Productive Tools or Expensive Toys?. July 24, 3-4:30 p.m. Wood Library, 134 North Main St Canandaigua Free, register. 394-1381. woodlibrary.org.

[ THU., JULY 25 ] Free Energy Efficiency Seminar. July 25, 5:30 p.m. PathStone Corporation, 400 East Ave. Free. 442-2030 x214. rgonzalez@pathstone.org. PathStoneEnergyInfo.org. Free Home Energy Efficiency Seminar.. July 25, 5:30 p.m. PathStone Corporation, 400 East

Ave. Free, register. 442-2030 x214. rgonzalez@pathstone.org. PathStoneEnergyInfo.org. Italian Language Class: Children’s Program. 6-7 p.m Italian American Community Center, 150 Frank Dimino Way $50 per session, register. 749-5346. mafocarazzo@gmail.com. iaccrochester.org. Italian Language Class: Conversation Italian. 7:45-9:30 p.m Italian American Community Center, 150 Frank Dimino Way $50 per session, register. 7495346. mafocarazzo@gmail.com. iaccrochester.org. Italian Language Class: Grammar Review and Verb Conjugation. 6-7:30 p.m Italian American Community Center, 150 Frank Dimino Way $50 per session, register. 749-5346. mafocarazzo@gmail.com. iaccrochester.org. JSY at the Market. Saturdays, 1 p.m Rochester Public Market, 280 N. Union St. Foodlink’s nutritionist offers free cooking demonstrations on ways to prepare fresh fruits and vegetables purchased at the Rochester Public Market using SNAP benefits. Free. 328-3380. Miniature Gardens Workshop for Adults. July 25, 7-8:30 p.m. Wayside Garden Center, 124 Pittsford-Palmyra Rd Free, register. 223-1222 x100. waysidegardencenter.com. Rochester Makerspace Open Nights. 6-10 p.m. Rochester Makerspace, 850 St. Paul St. #23 Bring a project to work on or something to show others, help work on the space, or just get to know the venue Free. 210--0075. rochestermakerspace.org. Solar For Your Home Class. July 25, 7 p.m. Rochester Brainery, Village Gate, 274 N Goodman St. $15. 730-7034. rochesterbrainery.com. [ FRI., JULY 26 ] “Fun with Natural Dyes” and Pot Luck Dinner. July 26, 6-8 p.m. BANC Sanctuary, 301 Railroad

Mills Road, Victor. Bring a dish to pass and table service, then enjoy the company and food of others. After supper, Valerie DeVrie, an expert on the art of dyeing, will share various methods and materials for making the world a little more colorful 377-6072. bancny.org. [ SAT., JULY 27 ] Edible Forest Garden Charette. July 27, 10 a.m. South Wedge Mission (Lutheran Church of Peace), 125 Caroline St. Free. 506-6505. info@lotsoffood.org. lotsoffood.org. Standup Comedy Classes. Comedy Club, 2235 Empire Blvd Webster Saturday July 27, 2013 22-5 p.m. Business of Comedy Clinic. $50, register. 671-9080. thecomedyclub.us. [ SUN., JULY 28 ] Introduction to Screen Printing: Adults. 2-5 p.m Rochester Makerspace, 850 St. Paul St. #23 $100, register. 210-0075. rocmaker.eventbrite.com. Tim Boebel’s Hydrangea Update. July 28, 2 p.m. Wayside Garden Center, 124 Pittsford-Palmyra Rd Free, register. 223-1222 x100. trish@ waysidegardencenter.com. waysidegardencenter.com. [ MON., JULY 29 ] “Christmas in July or Preparing your Hives for Winter” with Mike Griggs. July 29, 7-9 p.m. Cornell Cooperative Extension of Monroe County, 249 Highland Ave Free, donations accepted. RochesterBeekeepers.com. Essential Oils 101 Class. July 29, 7 p.m. Rochester Brainery, Village Gate, 274 N Goodman St. $15. 730-7034. rochesterbrainery.com. Family Development Class: “Drugs, Sexuality, and Violence (Part 1).” July 29, 12:30-2:30 p.m. Mental Health Association, 320 N Goodman St. For parents of preteens and teens Free, RSVP. 3253145 x131. mharochester.org. An Introduction to Seed Saving. July 29, 7 p.m. Rochester

Brainery, Village Gate, 274 N Goodman St. $15. 730-7034. info@rochesterbrainery.com. rochesterbrainery.com. [ TUE., JULY 30 ] Accidental Social Skill: Comedy Improv. July 30, 7-8:30 p.m. Writers and Books, 740 University Ave Workshop recommended for young people with Asperger’s, high functioning autism, ADD, ADHD, depression, or shyness $25-$30 single session, $45-$55 both, register. 473-2590. wab.org. African World History Class. 7:30-9 p.m. Baobab Cultural Center, 728 University Ave. $5 donation requested per session. baobab.center@yahoo.com. thebaobab.org. Buddhist Book Discussion Group. 7 p.m. Amitabha Foundation, 11 South Goodman St. “The Essence of the Heart Sutra.”. By donation. 451-7039. NY@ amitabhafoundation.us. amitabhafoundation.us. Chorus of the Genesee: Free Singing Lessons. 6-7 p.m. Harmony House, 58 East Main St. Webster 698-7784. Family Development Class: “Nothing Works.” July 30, 12:30-2:30 p.m. Mental Health Association, 320 N Goodman St. For parents of children 5 to 12 years old Free, RSVP. 3253145 x131. mharochester.org. Mini-Vet School. 7-8 p.m Wood Library, 134 North Main St Canandaigua Four week course on general wellness care and preventative medicine for your pets Register. 394-1381. woodlibrary.org.

GETLISTED get your event listed for free e-mail it to calendar@rochestercitynews.com. Or go online to rochestercitynewspaper.com and submit it yourself!

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 25


Movies Theaters Searchable, up-to-the-minute movie times for all area theaters can be found at rochestercitynewspaper.com, and on City’s mobile website.

Film

Brockport Strand 93 Main St, Brockport, 637-3310, rochestertheatermanagement.com

Canandaigua Theatres 3181 Townline Road, Canandaigua, 396-0110, rochestertheatermanagement.com

Cinema Theater 957 S. Clinton St., 271-1785, cinemarochester.com

Culver Ridge 16 2255 Ridge Rd E, Irondequoit  544-1140, regmovies.com

Dryden Theatre 900 East Ave., 271-3361, dryden.eastmanhouse.org

Eastview 13 Eastview Mall, Victor 425-0420, regmovies.com

Geneseo Theatres Geneseo Square Mall, 243-2691, rochestertheatermanagement.com

Greece Ridge 12 176 Greece Ridge Center Drive 225-5810, regmovies.com

Henrietta 18 525 Marketplace Drive 424-3090, regmovies.com

The Little 240 East Ave., 258-0444 thelittle.org

Movies 10 2609 W. Henrietta Road 292-0303, cinemark.com

Pittsford Cinema 3349 Monroe Ave., 383-1310 pittsford.zurichcinemas.com

Tinseltown USA/IMAX 2291 Buffalo Road 247-2180, cinemark.com

Webster 12 2190 Empire Blvd., 888-262-4386, amctheatres.com

Vintage Drive In 1520 W Henrietta Rd., Avon 226-9290, vintagedrivein.com

Film Previews on page 28

26 CITY JULY 24-30, 2013

New York versus New Jersey [ REVIEW ] BY GEORGE GRELLA

“Girl Most Likely” (PG-13), DIRECTED BY SHARI SPRINGER BERMAN AND ROBERT PULCINI NOW PLAYING

Amid the reverberating thunder of the seasonal spectaculars, a movie without any special effects should reassure audiences that Hollywood has not yet destroyed the world with planetary collision, climate catastrophe, thermonuclear war, or all those tiresome zombies. A modest little romantic comedy and a quintessential chick flick, “Girl Most Likely,” provides a modicum of relief from the coming apocalypse.

The movie proceeds in a most predictable manner, following a familiar trajectory of loss, suffering, learning, and resolution. Kristen Wiig plays Imogene, a once promising young playwright now reduced to working at a New York magazine, writing capsule reviews of Broadway plays, hanging around with some phony, artsy society types, and living in a posh apartment with her wealthy boyfriend Peter (Brian Petsos). Her whole world collapses when Peter dumps her and she loses her job, which leads to a half-hearted suicide attempt, the gesture that in effect reopens her life. Against her wishes, she must return to her home in Ocean City, New Jersey to stay with her mother Zelda (Annette Benning) in a most dysfunctional household, the sort of domicile full of eccentrics that appears in some 1940s comedies. Zelda, a compulsive gambler, now has a live-in boyfriend, George Boosh (Matt Dillon), who consumes only turkey sandwiches, claims to be a CIA agent, and spins fantastic tales of his incredible experiences.

Kristen Wiig and Darren Criss in “Girl Most Likely.” PHOTO COURTESY MAVEN PICTURES

She has also rented Imogene’s bedroom to Lee (Darren Criss) a young singer in a casino band that impersonates the Backstreet Boys (really). Imogene’s younger brother Ralph (Christopher Fitzgerald), pudgy and dim, collects mollusks and runs a kiosk called Crabville on the boardwalk. Disheartened by the company she must keep, fully aware of her failure as a writer, broke and alone, Imogene pines for her old life in New York, but when Lee drives her back to her apartment, she discovers that on top of everything else, she’s been evicted, her supposed friends won’t help her, and actually don’t even like her. Another force propels her, the discovery that the father she had believed died when she was a child — Zelda’s invention — is alive and well, a scholar who lives in a palatial home in Manhattan. The script includes a number of familiar comic gimmicks and touches, the usual gags and some physical bits mixed in with the obvious patterns demanded of its form; it also provides some funny surprises. Ralph, whose obsession with mollusks inspires him to create a hermit crab shell for humans, turns out to be smarter and more resourceful than anyone would expect. And a potentially violent climactic moment reveals the real truth about George, the fantasizing secret operative. In addition to the reasonably pleasant, reasonably successful comic plot, “Girl Most Likely” employs a number of repeated shots that in effect visually summarize the major conflict


Growing up is hard to do [ REVIEW ] BY ADAM LUBITOW

“The Way, Way Back” (PG-13), WRITTEN AND DIRECTED BY NAT FAXON AND JIM RASH NOW PLAYING

of the movie. The directors juxtapose some nighttime panoramas of Ocean City with New York City, with Manhattan’s glittering necklace of bridges beautifully contrasting with the lighted amusement park along the boardwalk, especially the Ferris wheel turning in its brilliant circles against the dark background of the sea. The contrast also illuminates Imogene’s own internal conflict, stuck in Ginsberg’s nowhere Zen New Jersey and longing for the glamour of New York. Everybody in the cast performs well, so well in fact that the supporting players actually prove more interesting than Kristen Wiig, who mostly seems bland and passive. Matt Dillon plays the secret agent with absolute seriousness, never even hinting at the absurdity of his character and his ridiculous utterances; his consistent deadpan and absolute belief in himself make him perhaps the funniest person in the whole messy group. As usual, Annette Benning demonstrates that she can play comedy as well as anything else, imbuing the ostensibly nutty and self-centered Zelda with a touching and sincere element of pathos. Like “Sex and the City,” the picture shows a cinema version of Manhattan, with a certain stratum of the city populated by affluent, sophisticated, well dressed people, most of them attractive women who attend art shows, book launches, and glossy parties. Most impressive and least believable, it also shows that Lee, who drives Imogene into the city on a couple of occasions, always finds a parking space.

It’s been a big year for films of the “and nothing was ever the same after that summer” genre. Between “Mud,” “The Kings of Summer,” and now “The Way, Way Back,” teenage boys have been coming of age all over your multiplex. (I swear I didn’t mean to make that sound quite so filthy...) If nothing else, it proves the versatility of movies of this type when they’re done right. From thriller to whimsical fantasy to the more traditional dramedy that “The Way, Way Back” traffics in, each abovementioned film has brought something different to their tales of an adolescent’s journey toward maturity. But despite probably being the most formulaic, “Back” is far and away the most crowdpleasing of the bunch. The audience at the preview screening I attended actually applauded at the end, and I can’t even remember the last time I was in a movie theater where that happened. Duncan (Liam James, “The Killing”) has been dragged along on summer vacation with his mother, Pam (a

Liam James and Sam Rockwell in “The Way, Way Back.” PHOTO COURTESY FOX

wonderful Toni Collette), and her condescending, dickish new boyfriend Trent (Steve Carell, in his villain mode) along with Trent’s bitchy teenage daughter, and he couldn’t be less happy about it. Duncan is an introverted, socially awkward 14-year-old, and the idyllic beachside setting of the lake house where they’re vacationing only adds to his feeling of isolation. As his mother acts less like herself, getting drunk with Trent and his friends (Rob Corddry and Amanda Peet) and gossiping with their gregarious next-door neighbor, Betty (Allison Janney, all but stealing the movie), Duncan feels left in the dust. Things look up slightly when he meets Betty’s sensitive daughter, Susanna (AnnaSophia Robb, “Soul Surfer”), who seems to be just about the same amount of miserable as he is. “It’s like spring break for adults,” Susanna notes, observing their mothers’ juvenile behavior. Also the product of divorced parents, Susanna and Duncan bond over their shared angst. Naturally Duncan develops a crush, but of course he’s too painfully shy to do anything about it. Then Duncan meets Owen (Sam Rockwell), the friendly, freespirited manager of the Water Wizz water park down the road. Owen takes Duncan under his wing, giving him a part-time job at the park and generally showing him the ropes. Under Owen’s unorthodox tutelage, the teen slowly comes out of his shell and learns a few life lessons along the way. James makes for an immensely appealing lead. Just the right amount of dorky, he makes Duncan’s innate decency shine through the character’s reticent nature. James has a nice chemistry with Robb, but it pales in comparison to the interactions between him and Sam Rockwell, and

that’s intentional; it’s the relationship between Owen and Duncan that’s truly the heart of the film. Rockwell and James have a nice, playful dynamic and they bounce off one another incredibly well, managing to tap into a poignant emotional undercurrent when the chips are down. Carell’s character is never anything other than a complete lout, but the actor gives him just enough dimension that he doesn’t becomes an outright caricature. When he tells Duncan early on that as a person he sees the kid as a 3 out of 10, it’s clear that in his mind he’s imparting important life lessons and helping to snap a disaffected youth out of his malaise. The supporting cast is rounded out with ringers, and the staff of Water Wizz is filled with a fantastic collection of comedic actors, including the alwayswelcome Maya Rudolph as the put-upon assistant manager who also functions as a potential love interest for Owen. The Oscar-winning screenwriting duo of Jim Rash and Nat Faxon (who previously collaborated with Alexander Payne on “The Descendants”) acquit themselves well in their directorial debut; the film zips along entertainingly. Their script too often relies on contrived and formulaic developments, and there’s never any real question of where the story is headed. But when the formula is melded to strong writing, charismatic performers, and a fun setting, the predictable way in which the events unfold doesn’t seem to matter so much. I had a smile on my face nearly the entire way through. “The Way, Way Back” is like a great beach novel; not the most complex or challenging entertainment out there, but definitely one of the most satisfying.

SEARCHLIGHT PICTURES

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 27


Film Previews

Full film reviews available at rochestercitynewspaper.com.

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[ OPENING ] BEYOND THE HILLS (2012): Two women in a Romanian convent find that, after a lifetime together, the divide between them may have become insurmountable. Also, there may or may not be demonic possession. Dryden (Tue, Jul 30, 8 p.m.) E.T. (1982): The classic film returns for a special showing at the Little. Little (Sat, Jul 28, 11 a.m.) FRUITVALE STATION (R): This timely winner of the Audience Award and the Grand Jury Prize at this year’s Sundance Film Festival is based on the true story of Oscar Grant, whose death at the hands of Bay Area police shocked the nation. Starring Michael B. Jordan, Octavia Spencer, and Chad Michael Murray. Culver Ridge, Greece Ridge, Henrietta, Little, Tinseltown THE HUNGER GAMES (2012): Based on the best-selling novel about a dystopian future where two children from each of the twelve districts of the nation are selected to fight to the death. Starring Jennifer Lawrence, Josh Hutcherson, and Liam Hemsworth.  Ontario Beach Park (Tue, Jul 30, 8:30 p.m.) MADAGASCAR 3: EUROPE’S MOST WANTED (2012): Alex, Marty, Melman, and Gloria travel through Europe and join a circus as cover on their continued quest to get home to New York. With the voices of Ben Stiller, Chris Rock, Jada Pinkett Smith, and David Schwimmer. Highland Park Bowl (Thu, Jul 25, 8:30 p.m.) MIDNIGHT MARY (1933): Loretta Young is a good girl who makes very bad decisions in this Depression-era drama about trying to make it in difficult economic times. Dryden (Thu, Jul 25, 8 p.m.) THE ROCKY HORROR PICTURE SHOW (1975): Do the Timewarp again with this cult classic musical about a straight-laced couple who run afoul of the eccentric Dr. Frank-N-Furter. Vintage (Tue, Jul 30, 11 p.m.) ROMEO AND JULIET (Ballet): Sergei Prokofiev’s world-famous ballet, based on William Shakespeare’s play, performed by the Bolshoi Ballet. Little (Sun, Jul 28, 12 p.m.; Tue, Jul 30, 6:30) SMOKEY AND THE BANDIT (1977): Burt Reynolds is racecar driver, The Bandit, who makes a bet that he can transport a shipment of beer from Texas to Atlanta in 28 hours in this action comedy classic. Also starring Sally Field and Jackie Gleason. Dryden (Fri, Jul 26, 8 p.m.) THE TO DO LIST (R): High school valedictorian Brandy Klark (Aubrey Plaza) wants to shed her Goody TwoShoes image before college. How? With a list of the things (including sex) she passed on in high school that she must complete before her summer is over. Henrietta, Tinseltown THERE WILL BE BLOOD (2007): Daniel Day Lewis won an Oscar for his portrayal of a ruthlessly ambitious oil tycoon. He also drinks a lot milkshakes. Dryden (Wed, Jul 24, 7 p.m.) THE WOLVERINE (PG-13): Hugh Jackman returns as Wolverine, and this time he’s fighting ninjas in Japan. Brockport, Canandaigua, Culver Ridge, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece Ridge, Henrietta, Tinseltown, Vintage, Webster


YOUNG FRANKENSTEIN (1974): It’s pronounced Fronk-un-schteen! Vintage (Tue, Jul 30, 9 p.m.) [ CONTINUING ] 20 FEET FROM STARDOM (PG13): This documentary follows the experiences of the backup singers for some of the biggest music acts around. Little THE CONJURING (R): Based on the true story of paranormal investigators Lorraine and Ed Warren (Vera Farmiga and Patrick Wilson), who assist a family threatened by a demonic presence in their home. With Lili Taylor and Ron Livingston. Canandaigua, Culver Ridge, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece Ridge, Henrietta, Tinseltown, Vintage, Webster DESPICABLE ME 2 (PG): A former supervillain is recruited by the Anti-Villain League to spy on a dangerous new super criminal in this animated sequel. With the voice talents of Steve Carell, Kristen Wiig, Russell Brand, and Ken Jeong. Brockport, Canandaigua, Culver Ridge, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece Ridge, Henrietta, Tinseltown, Vintage, Webster GIRL MOST LIKELY (PG-13): Kristen Wiig stars in this as a New York playwright who has to move back in with her mother (Annette Bening) after her personal and professional life takes a nosedive. Also starring Matt Dillon, Darren Criss, and Natasha Lyonne. Little GROWN UPS 2 (PG-13): Adam Sandler, Chris Rock, Kevin

James, and David Spade all return in this sequel about a group of overgrown man-children. Also starring Salma Hayek and Maya Rudolph. Canandaigua, Culver Ridge, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece Ridge, Henrietta, Tinseltown, Vintage, Webster THE LONE RANGER (PG-13): The fictional cowboy hero gets the summer blockbuster treatment, from director Gore Verbinski (“Pirates of the Caribbean”). Starring Armie Hammer, Johnny Depp, and Helena Bonham Carter. Hi-yo Silver! Away! Canandaigua, Culver Ridge, Eastview, Tinseltown RED 2 (PG-13): Ex Black Ops CIA agent Frank Moses (Bruce Willis) gets his elite team back together in this sequel to the popular action film, Red. Co-starring John Malkovich, Mary-Louise Parker, Helen Mirren, Anthony Hopkins, and Catherine Zeta-Jones. Canandaigua, Culver Ridge, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece Ridge, Henrietta, Tinseltown, Webster R.I.P.D. (PG-13): Jeff Bridges and Ryan Reynolds are undead police officers with the “Rest In Peace Department,” protecting the world from supernatural baddies. Based on the comic book series. With Kevin Bacon and MaryLouise Parker. Canandaigua, Culver Ridge, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece Ridge, Henrietta, Tinseltown, Vintage, Webster ROCHESTER JEWISH FILM FESTIVAL: This annual festival features a selection of films from around the world with a focus

on the Jewish culture. (Sun, Jul 21-Mon, Jul 29) STAR TREK INTO DARKNESS (PG-13): Kirk, Spock and crew return in J.J. Abrams’ sequel to his massively successful reboot of the Star Trek franchise. Cinema THIS IS THE END (R): Seth Rogen, James Franco, Jonah Hill, and a host of other mainstays of the Judd Apatow repertory company play themselves in this comedyhorror-adventure about the end of the world. With Jay Baruchel, Craig Robinson, and Danny McBride. Henrietta TURBO (PG): A garden snail gets a shot at achieving his dream of winning the Indy 500 when he’s accidentally exposed to nitrous oxide. Starring the voice talents of Ryan Reynolds, Paul Giamatti, Samuel L. Jackson, Maya Rudolph, Michelle Rodriguez, and Snoop Dogg. Brockport, Canandaigua, Culver Ridge, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece Ridge, Henrietta, Tinseltown, Vintage, Webster UNFINISHED SONG (PG-13): A curmudgeonly widower finds a new lease on life after joining a choir group. Starring Terence Stamp, Vanessa Redgrave, and Gemma Arterton. Little THE WAY, WAY BACK (PG-13): A coming-of-age story about an unhappy young boy on summer vacation with his family, who’s taken under the wing of the freespirited manager of the nearby water park. Henrietta, Little, Tinseltown

For information: Call us (585) 244-3329 Fax us (585) 244-1126 Mail Us City Classifieds 250 N. Goodman Street Rochester, NY 14607 Email Us classifieds@ rochester-citynews.com EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY

All real estate advertised in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act, which makes it unlawful, “to make, print, or publish, any notice, statement, or advertisement, with respect to the sale or rental of a dwelling that indicates any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin.” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under the age of 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertisement for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. Call the local Fair Housing Enforcement Project, FHEP at 325-2500 or 1-866-671-FAIR. Si usted sospecha una practica de vivienda injusta, por favor llame al servicio legal gratis. 585-325-2500 - TTY 585-325-2547.

P LY M O U T H S P I R I T UA L I S T C H U R C H Together We Are One

2 9 V I C K PA R K A RO C H E S T E R , N Y

Sunday Services 10:30 AM All Message Service & Free Spiritual Healing Third Weds ~ 7 PM ~ Séances ~ Classes ~ Gallery Reading ~ For more information and schedules www.plymouthspiritualistchurch.org Robin Higgins, Pastor ~ Phone: 585.271.1470

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 29


> page 29 Repairs, Roof Leaks, Brick Steps Repaired. 585-734-8444

Adoption ADOPT. The stork didn’t call. We hope you will. Loving family of 3 looking to adopt another little miracle. Contact Robin and Neil: 866-303-0668, www.rnladopt.info ADOPTION - Happily married, nature-loving couple wishes to adopt a child. We promise love, laughter, education, security, and extended family. Expenses paid. www.DonaldAndEsther.com. 1-800965-5617.

ADOPTION: Affectionate, educated, financially secure, married couple want to adopt baby into nuturing, warm, and loving environment. Expenses paid. Cindy and Adam. 800.860.7074 or cindyadamadopt@aol.com APOPT- Hoping to share our hearts and home with a newborn baby. Loving, nurturing home for your baby. Expenses paid. Married couple, Walt/ Gina 1-800-3156957

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records, new tires, 131k miles, just inspected. Last chance $2,500/BO, 585-442-3993 ALWAYS BETTER Higher cash for your Junk Cars, Trucks and Vans. From $200-$800 or more for newer. Running or not. With free towing. Also free removal of any unwanted model in any condition. Call 585-305-5865 CASH FOR CARS Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888-420-3808 www.cash4car.com (AAN CAN)

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DOG & CAT HOUSES Kennels, porch steps, do it yourself kits. Quick assembly 585-752-1000 $49 Jim DRIVEWAY GATES 8’ sections. All welded parts complete $49 per each 585-752-1000 EVEN FLO Aura strooler & combo car seat $40 B/O 585-225-5526 FIRE SAFE Only you can prevent your Bros, garden

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Place your real estate ad by calling 244-3329 ext. 23 or rochestercitynewspaper.com Ad Deadlines: Friday 4pm for Display Ads Monday at noon for Line ads weeding implements or assorted conflagratards from smokin your stash Gardall Fire Safe 10x10x13 $45 585-749-6968 FOR SALE Roof brackets $3, Hammers-eastwing $12,tape measures 25’ $6, step ladders 5’ aluminum $15,wood 6’ $10 Jim 752-1000 GERMAN SHEPHERD Plaque on chain. Carved head on real wood. (says, beware!) Nice gift $15.00 585-880-2903

GLASS TABLES Oval glass top coffee table $50, 2 round, glass end tables $25 each or $100 for all plus 2 table lamps. Please call 585-325-7979 GRACO DOUBLE STROLLER $40 B/O 585-225-5526 HORSE HALTER / Black & white New $15. Quick clip 585-8802903 KITCHEN TABLE 3/8 Thick round glass top table. 40” diameter. 41” high. $49 585-490-5870

HomeWork A cooperative effort of City Newspaper and RochesterCityLiving, a program of the Landmark Society.

KODAK ICE MAKER Brand new in box. Will hold 1 bag of ice or ice and food or drinks. 585-383-0405 NORDIC TRACK SPORT EXCERSIZER Simulator, X-country skiing, adjustable resistance & elevation. Excellent condition. Charlotte 585-663-6983 $50 OLD FASHIONED GUM BALL Machine works. $20 585-3830405 PALM TREE 5’ tall $15 585-4905870

continues on page 32

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This 1,789 square foot home, built in 1930, has three bedrooms and one full bathroom. An unfinished attic and basement provide extra storage or can be converted into large guest bedrooms. The home’s convenient location in the historic Browncroft neighborhood contributes to its appeal, with easy access to I-490 and I-590, Ellison Park, and the amenities of the North Winton Village within walking distance. The Brown brothers’ planning and green thumbs shows in the rich number and variety of plantings throughout the neighborhood. The area is a great place to take an evening stroll with your family or a morning jog. With the nearest school only a few blocks away, this home is a great place for a family.

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Greece; 158 Merrick St, $94,900. This home boasts refinished hardwoods, woodburing fireplace, an archway to the dining room, and a closed in porch with a brick floor. Many Upgrades! Call Ryan @ 585-201-0724

Ryan Smith 585-201-0724

A roomy front porch, perfect for warm and breezy summer evenings, welcomes you. Entering the house, light pours in through a large window across the front of the formal living room. A large working gas fireplace, moldings, leaded glass, and hardwood floors set this house apart. Built-ins scattered throughout the house are great for extra storage. You will find expansive counter space and updated appliances in this Tuscan-style kitchen. Cooking becomes easier with the use of the pot filler over the stove. You will enjoy the luxury of a dedicated coffee bar with its own water source. With a simple turn of a knob, the pot automatically begins to refill. The kitchen also opens into the dining area, which is great for entertaining friends and family.

The laundry is located centrally in the second floor hallway for easy access. No need to lug heavy laundry hampers up and down the stairs. All of the bedrooms are situated around a central hall, which would be great for parents of young children. Enjoy wide and deep closets in each bedroom, an unusual characteristic for a house built in 1930. Window seats in the smaller bedrooms are great for children or guests who like to read a book and relax in the natural sunlight. The master bedroom is large enough to accommodate a king size bed along with other furniture. A private porch, accessed exclusively through the master bedroom, looks onto a lush secluded garden with tall, full trees and a privacy fence. A gushing fountain pours into the pond, which is home to many goldfish and lily pads. Look out into the majestic garden and drink your morning coffee while sitting in the open sunroom. In the evenings, relax in the hot tub with a glass of wine. This wonderful home in a wonderful neighborhood is listed at $199,900. Contact Mark Siwiec with Nothnagle Realtors at 585461-6375 for more information. by Jessica Lankston Jessica is a summer intern with Bero Architecture, PLLC

Ryan Smith

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201-0724 RochesterSells.com

Search. Buy. Sell. rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 31


> page 31 PALM TREE 6’ tall $17 585-4905870 PRO TEC BAN SAW 9” model 3202 $40 58/5-225-5526 VARIOUS Shovel, rakes, brooms, heavy duty $3 ea, duffle bags $3 ea, Hand tools $2, Ramps (car) heavy duty $35, work shoe & boots $1, wire cage for rabbit $25 585752-1000 VCR - Emerson, records, no remote. Nice. 585-880-2903 $25 WEDDING: Card box, ring pillow basket, toast glasses, 2 candle holders. Excellent, must see $50 585-392-5127 WHIRLPOOL GAS DRYER. Very Good Condition. 3 years old. $50 Call 585-527-8024

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MULTI-FAMILY GARAGE SALE!** Furniture too! Everything is in good condition, no junk. SAT, 7/27, 9-4, 2137 BAIRD RD, Penfield.

Jam Section BRIAN MARVIN lead vocalist, is looking for a job and is looking to form band (Classic Rock) with lead guitarist, bassist, drummer & rhythm guitars Covers & originals 585-473-5089 CALLING ALL MUSICIANS OF ALL GENRES the Rochester Music Coalition wants you! Please register on our website. For further info: www.rochestermusiccoalition. org info@rochestermusiccoalition. org 585-235-8412 DRUMMER Experienced Young Drummer available. Influences are Led Zep, Rush, Pink Floyd, Foo Fighters. Looking for Guitar, Bass and Vocals. Contact through: http:// www.youtube.com/user/Chaztize7 EXPERIENCED DRUMMER Looking to join Blues band. Call Bob, leave

message 585-473-1654 LOOKING FOR MULTI INSTRUMENT MUSICIANS. please no freelancers apply. Available evenings, equipment & transportation Contact Bobby 585328-4121 SEEKING VOCALIST that can learn many songs quickly. Many styles of music, lead & background. Please no one who requires too much attantion. Bobby 585-328-4121 THE GREGORY KUNDE CHORALE is looking for male voices. Call for an audition now to join our fourteenth season! Info Line 377 7568 or visit our website www. gregorykundechorale.org

Music Services BASS LESSONS Acoustic, electric, all styles. Music therory and composition for all instruments. Former Berklee and Eastman Teacher. For more information, call 585-260-9958 & 585-512-6044 PIANO LESSIONS In your home or mine. Patient, experienced instructor teaching all ages, levels and musical styles. Call Scott: 585- 465-0219. Visit www. pianolessonsrochester.com

Miscellaneous ADVERTISE YOUR BUSINESS or product in alternative papers across the U.S. for just $995/ week. New advertiser discount “Buy 3 Weeks, Get 1 Free” christine@rochester-citynews.com HAS YOU BUILDING SHIFTED OR SETTLED? Contact Woodford Brothers Inc, for straightening, leveling, foundation and wood frame repairs at 1-800-OLDBARN. www.woodfordbros. com. “Not applicable in Queens county” SAWMILLS from only $4897.00MAKE & SAVE MONEY with your own bandmill- Cut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship. FREE Info/DVD:  www. NorwoodSawmills.com 1-800-5781363 Ext.300N

Looking For... WOMAN COMPANION Healthy Independent white male of good character and humor seeking woman companion 65 plus with similar qualifications. Write to Post Office 425 East Ridge Rd., NY 14621 box #17669. Leave name and number. I will respond.

Mind Body Spirit EMILY WATTS: God-Gifted Love Psychologist. Reunites Lovers. Stops unwanted Divorce. Helps all problems. 2 Free Questions by Phone. 1-630-835-7256 (AAN CAN)

Wanted to Buy CASH FOR COINS! Buying ALL Gold & Silver. Also Stamps & Paper Money, Entire Collections, Estates. Travel to your home. Call Marc in NYC 1-800-959-3419

32 CITY JULY 24-30, 2013

EMPLOYMENT / CAREER TRAINING

Employment A.DUIE PYLE Needs: Owner Operators for Regional Truckload Operations. HOME EVERY WEEKEND!!! O/O AVE. $1.85/ Mile. NO-TOUCH FREIGHT. REQUIRES 2-YRS EXP. CALL DAN or Jon @ 888-477-0020 xt7 OR APPLY @ www.driveforpyle.com

immediately! Genuine! 1-888-2921120 www.easywork-fromhome. com (AAN CAN)

opening their homes to foster children. Call 334-9096 or visit www.MonroeFosterCare.org.

$$$HELP WANTED$$$ Extra Income! Assembling CD cases from Home! No Experience Necessary! Call our Live Operators Now! 1-800-405-7619 EXT 2450 http:// www.easywork-greatpay.com (AAN CAN)

HABITAT FOR CATS — Help Trap-Neuter-Return cats on Tuesdays, in East Rochester, for an important grant project. Impact the number of owner-less cats living outside. All training provided. 585-787-4209 or habitat4cats@yahoo.com!

AIRLINE CAREERS begin here– Get FAA approved Aviation Maintenance Technician training. Financial aid for qualified students– Housing available.Job placement assistance. Call AIM 866-296-7093

PAID IN ADVANCE! MAKE up to $1000 A WEEK mailing brochures from home! Helping Home Workers since 2001! Genuine Opportunity! No Experience required. Start Immediately! www. themailingstation.com (AAN CAN)

ART INSTRUCTORS Main Street Arts, Clifton Springs NY. We are seeking qualified art instructors to teach classes. Interested candidates can email their resume to mstreetarts@gmail.com. Call 315-462-0210 or email with questions. Visit our website at www.mainstreetartsgallery.com.

Volunteers

HERITAGE CHRISTIAN STABLES, a therapeutic horsemanship program for children and adults with developmental disabilities, is looking for volunteers to serve as horse leaders and side walkers. Call Kim Kennedy at (585) 340-2016 or email kkennedy@ heritagechristianservices.org

CATHOLIC FAMILY CENTER needs volunteers to help people apply for citizenship. The commitment is 2.5 hrs per mth one evening a month. Training is provided. For more information call Nate at (585) 546-7220 ex 4854.

LIFESPAN’S OMBUDSMAN PROGRAMS looking for volunteers to advocate for individuals living in long-term care settings. Please contact call 585.287.6378 or e-mail dfrink@lifespan-roch.org for more information

FOSTER PARENTS WANTED! Monroe County is looking for adults age 21 and over to consider

LITERACY VOLUNTEERS OF ROCHESTER needs adult tutors to help adults who are waiting

HELP WANTED! make extra money in our free ever popular homemailer program,includes valuable guidebook! Start


Legal Ads [ Ciminelli & Ciminelli, Attorneys and Counselors at Law, PLLC ]

to improve their reading, writing, English speaking, or math skills. Call 473-3030, or check our website at www.literacyrochester.org WOMEN: ROCHESTER HABITAT is looking for women 18 years+ to help build a house with a single mother. Visit rochabitat.org or call 546-1470

EARN $500 A DAY Airbrush & Media Makeup Artists For: Ads TV - Film - Fashion Train & Build Portfolio in 1 week Lower Tuition for 2012. AwardMakeupSchool.com

Business Opportunities

Notice of the formation of the above named Professional Limited Liability Company (“PLLC”). Articles of Organization filed with the Department of State of NY on 5/23/2013. Office Location: County of Monroe. The Secretary of State of NY (“SSNY”) has been designated as agent of the PLLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of any such process served to: 421 Penbrooke Dr., Suite 2, Penfield NY 14526-2045. Purpose: to practice law. [ LEGAL NOTICE ]

START A HOME BASED BUSINESS. Part-time or Full-Time. Serious inquires only. 585-2713243

Career Training AIRLINE CAREERS - begin here. Become an Aviation Maintenance Tech. FAA approved training. Financial aid if qualified – Housing available. Job placement assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 877-492-3059

ACTIVISM

SUMMER JOBS FOR THE ENVIRONMENT NYPIRG is now hiring students, grads & others for an urgent campaign to protect our drinking water. Get paid to make a difference!

F/T positions available. EOE Call Chris: 585-851-8012

CAREER FOUNDATIONS TEACHER 50% position located at the Belmont BOCES Center Cattaraugus Allegany BOCES SEE WEBSITE FOR DETAILS APPLY ON-LINE AT

WWW.CABOCES.ORG EOE/AA

Start Your Career With ConServe!

Debt Counselor Openings

• Uncapped Bonus • Competitive Wages • Unbeatable Benefits • Flexible Scheduling • Growth Potential

200 Cross Keys Office Park, Fairport 14450 For more information and to apply:

www.conserve-arm.com Click the “ConServe Careers” tab

ConServe is an EOE & Drug-Free Workplace ce

Ruffles Boutique LLC (“LLC”) filed Arts. of Org. with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on June 17, 2013. Office Location: Monroe County. SSNY designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 35 Brunswick Street, Apt. 2, Rochester, New York 14607. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of Limited Liability Company, (LLC) LabSystems, LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of NY (“SSNY”) on June 28, 2013. Office location is Monroe County, New York. The SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. The SSNY shall mail a copy of any process to the LLC at 424 Brookwood Drive, Webster, New York 14580. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] 1976 Sea Ray 4947M0676195105306, Anthony Barbarita, date of auction 08/1/13 9am, Voyager Boat Sales [ NOTICE ] 26 SAGINAW DRIVE LLC (LLC) filed Arts. of Org. with NY Secy. of State (SS) on 6/20/2013. LLC’s office is in Monroe Co. SS is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS shall mail a copy of any process to 26 Saginaw Drive, Rochester, NY 14623. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] 4699 LAKE AVENUE LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 6/13/2013. Office in Monroe Co. SSNY desig. agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 4699 Lake Ave., Rochester, NY 14612, which is also the principal business locaton. Purpose: Any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] 583 WEST AVE LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 5/7/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Michael Veltri,

583 West Ave., Rochester, NY 14611. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] A & D REAL ESTATE DEVELOPMENT, LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 5/28/13. Office in Monroe Co. SSNY design. Agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to The LLC 22 Whitestone Lane Rochester Lane Rochester, NY 14618. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] ALKEMY MACHINE, LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 7/10/13. Office in Monroe Co. SSNY desig. agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 8305 Royal Ascot Circle, E. Amherst, NY 14051. Purpose: Any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ]

1. Name of the LLC is RealGem Properties, LLC. 2. Articles of Org. were filed with Department of State of NY on June 7, 2013. 3.County of office: Monroe. 4. The Secretary of State is designated as agent upon whom process against the Company may be served. The address to which process shall be mailed: c/o Teaposy, Inc., 1900 Clinton Avenue, S., Unit 18111, Rochester, New York 14618.

[ NOTICE ]

[ NOTICE ]

Notice is hereby given that a license, number not yet assigned, for an on premise liquor, beer & wine license has been applied for by 1373 Edgemere LLC dba Italian Grill at Crescent Beach,1372 Edgemere Drive, Rochester, NY 14612, County of Monroe, for a restaurant.

LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE OF FORMATION MEDIRESP LLC, filed with the Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 07/10/2013. County office location: Monroe. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 100 Hogan Point Road, Hilton, NY 14468. Purposes: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ]

Notice is hereby given that a license, number not yet assigned, for a full on premise beer, wine & liquor license has been applied for by Tar-Nick Inc. dba Bluewater Seafood and Steak, 716. East Ridge Road, Rochester, NY 14621, County of Monroe, for a restaurant. [ NOTICE ]

[ NOTICE ] Notice is hereby given that a license, number not yet assigned, for beer & wine license has been applied for by KIM LOI RESTAURANT LLC dba SAIGON RESTAURANT, 2171 West Henrietta Rd., Rochester, NY 14623, County of Monroe, for a restaurant.

Billmizer LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 5/6/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 1175 Pittsford Victor Rd., Pittsford, NY 14534. General Purposes

MAANNUS USA, LLC, a domestic LLC , Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 2/5/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, Attn: John Defilippo, 415 Fiesta Dr., Rochester, NY 14626. General Purposes.

[ NOTICE ]

[ NOTICE ]

DGMAS, LLC has filed articles of organization with the New York Secretary of State on June 18, 2013 with an effective date of formation of June 18, 2013. Its principal place of business is located at 3817 W. Henrietta Road, Rochester, New York in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent upon whom process may be served. A copy of any process shall be mailed to 3817 W. Henrietta Road, Rochester, New York 14623. The purpose of the LLC is to engage in any lawful activity for which Limited Liability Companies may be organized under Section 203 of the New York Limited Liability Company Law.

Name of LLC: LaRue Positioning Solutions LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State: 6/25/13. Office loc.: Monroe Co. Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o Business Filings Inc., 187 Wolf Rd., Ste. 101, Albany, NY 12205, regd. agt. upon whom process may be served. Purpose: any lawful act.

Notice is hereby given that an Order entered by the Supreme Court, Monroe County on the 17th day of July, 2013, bearing Index Number 136475, a copy of which may be examined at the office of the Monroe County Clerk, located at 39 West Main Street, Room 115, Rochester, New York 14614, grant me the right to assume the name of Annette Marie. My present address is 238 River Heights Circle, Rochester NY, 14612; my date of birth is 08/11/54; my place of birth is New London Ct.; my present name is Annette Nield.

[ NOTICE ]

[ NOTICE ]

Not. of form of KCP Solutions of Upstate New York, LLC. Art. of Org. filed with SSNY 5/24/13 County: Monroe SSNY is designated agent of LLC to whom process may be served. SSNY may mail a copy of any process to LLC, 2 Clebourne Dr. Rochester, NY 14625. Purpose any lawful activity.

Notice of filing of Application for Authority of limited liability company Carestream Health World Holdings LLC. Name of foreign LLC is Carestream Health World Holdings LLC. The Application for Authority was filed with the Sec. of State of New York (SSNY) on 5/30/13. Jurisdiction: Delaware. Formed: 5/29/13. County: Monroe. SSNY is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to LLC’s principal business: 150 Verona Street, Rochester, NY 14608. The address of the office required to be maintained in Delaware is its registered agent: Registered Agent Solutions, Inc., 1679 S. Dupont Hwy, Suite 100, Dover DE, 19901. The name and address of the authorized officer in Delaware where the Articles of Organization are filed is: Secretary of State, State of Delaware, Division of Corporations, John G. Townsend Bldg., 401 Federal St., Suite 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: any and all lawful activities.

[ NOTICE ] Doan EZ Auto Rental LLC (LLC) filed Arts. of Org. with NY Secy. of State (SS) on June 17, 2013. LLC’s office is in Monroe County. SS is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS shall mail a copy of any process to LLC’s principal business location at 4477 Ridge Road West, Rochester, NY 14626. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] KimSanity, LLC (“LLC”) filed Arts. of Org. with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on June 12, 2013. The name was changed to KimSulting, LLC. Office Location: Monroe County. SSNY designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 18 Sanfilippo Circle, Rochester, New York 14625. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] LEGAL NOTICE FORMATION of Limited Liability Company.

[ NOTICE ] Not. of Form. of A&M Reporting, LLC, Art. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 5/30/13. Office Location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to LLC, 376 Westside Drive, Rochester, NY 14624. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Not. of Form. of Engineered Components HF, LLC, Art. of Org. filed with Sec’y of State New York (SSNY) on 6/7/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served and a copy of any process shall be mailed to: 303 Taylor Rd. Honeoye Falls NY 14472. Purpose: engage in any lawful activity.

[ NOTICE ]

[ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of BIRCHGROVE REAL ESTATE LLC. Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of

State (SSNY) 00-00-00. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to P.O. Box 10068, Rochester, NY 14610. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of 151 Park, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 5/29/2013. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 151 Park Ave., Rear Bldg, Rochester, NY 14607. Purpose: Any lawful act. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of 455 POST AVENUE LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 2/14/2013. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 124 Stockton Ln, Rochester, NY 14625. Purpose: Any lawful act. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of 593 West Ave LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 6/26/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 4962 Eastbrooke Place, Williamsville, NY 14221. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of a Limited Liability Company (LLC): Name: OpenTee, LLC, Articles of Organization filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 5/20/2013. Office location: Monroe county. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to: 117 Heather Dr, Rochester, 14625. Purpose: Any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of ADAM SOLUTIONS, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 06/18/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Corporation Service Co., 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207, regd. agent upon whom and at which process may be served. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of ANDERSON GRANITE & MARBLE RESTORATION LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 06/26/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail

cont. on page 34

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 33


Legal Ads against it may be served and a copy of any process shall be mailed to The LLC, 2171 Monroe Ave., Suite 206, Rochester, NY 14618. The purpose of the Company is any lawful activity.

mail process to Ingram Yuzek Gainen Carroll & Bertolotti, LLP, Attn: Michael Grandis, 250 Park Ave., NY, NY 10177. Purpose: Any lawful activity.

Notice of Formation of AVANT GARDE AMENITIES LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 06/17/13. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 902 Broadway, 6th Fl., NY, NY 10010. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Don Trooien, 212 Brewing Company, LLC at the princ. office of the LLC. Purpose: Any lawful activity.

[ NOTICE ]

[ NOTICE ]

[ NOTICE ]

Notice of Formation of Bernard Enterprises, LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 6/10/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 3 Box Car Dr., North Chili, NY 14514. Purpose: any lawful activities.

Notice of Formation of HearShield, LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 6/6/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 90 Sycamore Ridge, Honeoye Falls, NY 14472. Purpose: any lawful activities.

NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY. NAME: 2009 CPG HOLDINGS, LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 06/03/09. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNYshall mail a copy of process to the LLC, 2590 Brighton Henrietta TL Road, Rochester, NewYork 14623. The address of the registered agent is c/o Robert F. Leone, Esq., 2590 Brighton Henritta TL Road, Rochester, New York 14623. Purpose: For any lawful purpose.

[ NOTICE ]

[ NOTICE ]

Notice of Formation of CASTLE PARK, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 06/11/13. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 58 Whitestone Ln., Rochester, NY 14618. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Howard R. Crane, c/o Relin Goldstein & Crane LLP, 28 E. Main St., Ste. 1800, Rochester, NY 14614. Purpose: Any lawful activity.

Notice of Formation of HICKEY FREEMAN PROPERTIES LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 07/11/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Ingram Yuzek Gainen Carroll & Bertolotti, LLP, Attn: Michael Grandis, 250 Park Ave., NY, NY 10177. Purpose: Any lawful activity.

> page 33 process to the LLC, PO Box 1066, Henrietta, NY 14467. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ]

[ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of Cleartower Partners LLC filed Articles of Organization with the New York Department of State on 05/02/13. Its office is located in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent of the Company upon whom process

Notice of Formation of Direct EDU, LLC. Articles of Organization filed with the New York Department of State on 5/13/13. Its office is located in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent upon whom process against the Company may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to: 772 Shorecliff Drive Rochester, NY 14612. Purpose: any lawful activity.

[ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of HICKEY FREEMAN TAILORED CLOTHING LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 07/11/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall

[ NOTICE ]

[ NOTICE ] NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY. NAME: CLINTON ERIE ASSOCIATES II, LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 04/05/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to the LLC, 20 Dahlia Drive, Fairport, New York 14450. Purpose: For any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of MERCHANTS PORT LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 07/02/13. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 36 Stutson St., Rochester, NY 14612. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity.

Adult Services

[ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of MRECC Enterprises, LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 5/9/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 45 Bauers Cove, Spencerport, NY 14559. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of NB4 PROPERTIES, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 5/22/2013. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 590 Salt Rd., Ste 5, Webster, NY 14580. Purpose: any lawful act. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of PINK SALON, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 06/14/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, 14 Galwood Dr., Rochester, NY 14622. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Sean Moran Architect, PLLC. Articles of Organization filed with the New York Department of State on July 2, 2013. Its office is located in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent upon whom process against the Company may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to: 215 East Spruce St., East Rochester, NY 14445. The purpose of the Company is any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of SNOWBIRD PROPERTIES LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 6/11/2013. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o Chad R. Hayden, Esq., 1634 Lehigh Station Rd., Henrietta, NY 14467. Purpose: Any lawful act. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of SOUTH HICKORY PROPERTIES LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 6/24/2013. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 31 Scottsville Rd., Rochester, NY 14611. Purpose: Any lawful act. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of STRATEGIC ALLIANCE NETWORK LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 06/11/13. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 2479 Browncroft Blvd, Rochester, NY 14625.

34 CITY JULY 24-30, 2013

SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of TAMARAC ORGANIZATIONAL SOLUTIONS LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 06/11/13. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 4 Kingsbury Ct., Rochester, NY 14618. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, Attn: Julie LaFave at the princ. office of the LLC. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of THIS GOOD WORLD NETWORK LLC. Art. Of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 3/22/2013. Office in Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, 710 S. Lincoln Rd. East Rochester, NY 14445. Purpose: Any lawful purpose [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Tiptop Properties LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 04/01/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 645 Thurston Road, Rochester, NY 14619. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of Ubiquity Enterprise, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 3/23/2007. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 59 Raines Park, Rochester NY 14613. Purpose: any lawful act. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Universal LEC LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 5/24/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to CT Corp. System, 111 Eighth Ave., NY, NY 10011. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of USA Choice Realty, LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 6/7/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 33 University Ave., Rochester, NY 14605. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of USAIRPORTS HANGAR SOUTH LLC. Arts. of Org. filed

with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 07/05/13. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: One Airport Way, Ste. 300, Rochester, NY 14624. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Of Formation of SageDog Ventures L.P. A Certificate of Limited Partnership was filed with the New York Department of State (NYDOS) on June 13, 2013. Office location: Monroe County. NYDOS has been designated as agent upon whom process against it may be served. The Post Office address to which the NYDOS shall mail a copy of any process against the LP served upon it is 2255 Lyell Ave, Ste 201, Rochester, NY 14606. The principal business address of the LP is 2255 Lyell Ave, Ste 201, Rochester, NY 14606. Dissolution date: December 31, 2063. Purpose: any lawful activity. The name and business address of the general partner is available from the NYDOS. [ NOTICE ] VISION BUICK GMC LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 5/22/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Daniel E. Edwards, 800 Panorama Trail S, Rochester, NY 14625. General Purposes. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] Developub LLC filed Articles of Organization with the New York Department of State on 07/30/12. Its office is located in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent of the Company upon whom process against it may be served and a copy of any process shall be mailed to United States Corporation Agents Inc, 7014 13th Ave Suite 202, Brooklyn, NY 11228. The purpose of the Company is to engage in any lawful activity. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] Notice of Formation of 2851 Monroe Office Suites LLC. Articles of Organization filed with Sec. of State of NY (SSNY) on 7/3/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to principal business location: The LLC, 2740 Monroe Avenue, Rochester, NY 14618. Purpose: any lawful activity [ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] Notice of Formation of 619 Jefferson Road, LLC. Articles of Organization filed with Sec. of State of NY (SSNY) on 6/3/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to principal business location: The LLC, 2740 Monroe Avenue, Rochester, NY 14618. Purpose: any lawful activity

[ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] Notice of Formation of Kim Loi Restaurant, LLC. Articles of Organization filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on June 28, 2013. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to principal business location:The LLC, 53 Maple Valley Crescent, Rochester, NY14623. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] Notice of Formation of Royal Wash Brighton, LLC. Articles of Organization filed with Sec. of State of NY (SSNY) on 6/3/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to principal business location: The LLC, 2740 Monroe Avenue, Rochester, NY 14618. Purpose: any lawful activity [ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] Notice of Formation of Royal Wash Henrietta, LLC. Articles of Organization filed with Sec. of State of NY (SSNY) on 6/3/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to principal business location: The LLC, 2740 Monroe Avenue, Rochester, NY 14618. Purpose: any lawful activity [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF COLEADD LAKE PROPERTIES, LLC ] The name of the Limited Liability Company is ColeAdd Lake Properties. LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the New York Secretary of State on 6/25/13. The office of the LLC is in Monroe County. The New York Secretary of State is designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. The Secretary of State shall mail a copy of such process to 30 Crestwood Circle, Pittsford, NY 14534, The LLC is organized to engage in any lawful activity for which an LLC may be formed under NY LLC Law. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF HANNA -HADDON HALL, LLC ] The name of the Limited Liability Company is HannaHaddon Hall, LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the New York Secretary of State on 7/11/2013. The office of the LLC is in Monroe County. The New York Secretary of State is designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. The Secretary of State shall mail a copy of such process to36 South Goodman Street, Rochester, NY 14607, The LLC is organized to purchase and to operate real property known as 493-505 University Avenue, Rochester, NY and to engage in any lawful activity for which an LLC may be formed under NY LLC Law. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LLC ] Byblos Wholesale Distribution, LLC has filed articles of

organization with the New York Secretary of State on June 28, 2013 with an effective date of formation of June 28, 2013. Its principal place of business is located at 156 Handy Street, Rochester, New York in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent upon whom process may be served. A copy of any process shall be mailed to 156 Handy Street, Rochester, New York 14611. The purpose of the LLC is to engage in any lawful activity for which Limited Liability Companies may be organized under Section 203 of the New York Limited Liability Company Law. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF South Averill LLC ] Articles of Organization filed with Secretary of State of NY on 9/14/2012. Office in Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC at 1048 South Ave, Rochester, NY 14620. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF WRGRC, LLC.] WRGRC, LLC (the “LLC”) filed Articles of Organization with NY Secretary of State (SSNY) 7/8/13. Office location: Monroe County, NY. Principal business location: 1265 Scottsville Rd, Rochester, NY 14624. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to CT Corporation System, 111 Eighth Avenue, NY, NY 10011 which is also the registered agent upon whom process may be served. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE OF SALE ] Index No. 2011-15155 SUPREME COURT STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF MONROE ESL Federal Credit Union Plaintiff, vs. Jean C. McDermott, Defendant. Pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale dated May 9, 2012 and entered herein, I, the undersigned, the Referee in said Judgment named, will sell at public auction in the lobby of the Monroe County Clerk’s Office located at 39 West Main Street, Rochester, New York, County of Monroe, on September 9, 2013 at 9:30 a.m., on that day, the premises directed by said Judgment to be sold and therein described as follows: ALL THAT TRACT OR PARCEL OF LAND, situate in the City of Rochester, County of Monroe and State of New York, known as 64 Arbordale Avenue, Rochester, NY 14610, Tax Account No. 122.42-1-42, described in Deed recorded in Liber 7310 of Deeds, page 239; lot size 40 x 140.53. Said premises are sold subject to any state of facts an accurate survey may show, zoning restrictions and any amendments thereto, covenants, restrictions, agreements, reservations, and easements of record and prior liens, if any, municipal departmental violations, and such other provisions as may be set forth in the Complaint and Judgment


Legal Ads filed in this action. Judgment amount: $33,571.85 plus, but not limited to, costs, disbursements, attorney fees and additional allowance, if any, all with legal interest. DATED: July , 2013Lisa Siragusa, Esq., Referee LACY KATZEN LLP Attorneys for Plaintiff 130 East Main Street Rochester, New York 14604 Telephone: (585) 324-5767 [ NOTICE OF SALE ] Index No. 2012-13618 SUPREME COURT STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF MONROE ESL Federal Credit Union, Plaintiff, vs. Timothy P. Nihill; ESL Federal Credit Union, Defendants. Pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale dated July 1, 2013 and entered herein, I, the undersigned, the Referee in said Judgment named, will sell at public auction in the front vestibule of the Monroe County Office Building, 39 West Main Street, Rochester, New York, County of Monroe, on August 21, 2013 at 11:30 a.m., on that day, the premises directed by said Judgment to be sold and therein described as follows: ALL THAT TRACT OR PARCEL OF LAND, situate in the Town of Gates, County of Monroe and State of New York, known as 44 Emeralda Road, Rochester, NY 14624; Tax Account No. 133.12-3-82 described in Deed recorded in Liber 10990 of Deeds, page 449. Said premises are sold subject to any state of facts an accurate survey may show, zoning restrictions and any amendments thereto, covenants, restrictions, agreements, reservations, and easements of record and prior liens, if any, municipal departmental violations, and such other provisions as may be set forth in the Complaint and Judgment filed in this action. Judgment amount: $97,169.83 plus, but not limited to, costs, disbursements, attorney fees and additional allowance, if any, all with legal interest. DATED: July 2013 Stephanie Barnes, Esq., Referee LACY KATZEN LLP Attorneys for Plaintiff 130 East Main Street Rochester, New York 14604 Telephone: (585) 324-5767 [ NOTICE OF SALE ] Index No. 2012-9142 SUPREME COURT STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF MONROE ESL Federal Credit Union Plaintiff, vs. Ronney F. Morris, Deceased, and any persons who are heirs or distributees of Ronney F. Morris, Deceased, and all persons who are widows, grantees, mortgagees, lienors, heirs, devisees, distributees, successors in interest of such of them as may be deceased, and their husbands, wives, heirs, devisees, distributees and successors of interest all of whom and whose names and places of residence are unknown to Plaintiff; ESL Federal Credit Union; United States of America; People of the State of New York. Defendants. Pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale dated June 17,

2013 and entered herein, I, the undersigned, the Referee in said Judgment named, will sell at public auction in the front vestibule of the Monroe County Office Building, 39 West Main Street, Rochester, New York, County of Monroe, on July 31, 2013 at 11:00 a.m., on that day, the premises directed by said Judgment to be sold and therein described as follows: ALL THAT TRACT OR PARCEL OF LAND, situate in the Town of Clarkson, County of Monroe and State of New York, known as 626 Lawrence Road, Brockport, NY 14420; Tax Account No. 030.04-1-4 described in Deed recorded in Liber 10644 of Deeds, page 558. Said premises are sold subject to any state of facts an accurate survey may show, zoning restrictions and any amendments thereto, covenants, restrictions, agreements, reservations, and easements of record and prior liens, if any, municipal departmental violations, and such other provisions as may be set forth in the Complaint and Judgment filed in this action. Judgment amount: $58,142.93 plus, but not limited to, costs, disbursements, attorney fees and additional allowance, if any, all with legal interest. DATED: June 2013 Christopher Calabrese, Esq., Referee LACY KATZEN LLP Attorneys for Plaintiff 130 East Main Street Rochester, New York 14604 Telephone: (585) 324-5767 [ NOTICE OF SALE ] Index No. 2012-9970 SUPREME COURT STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF MONROE ESL Federal Credit Union Plaintiff vs Christopher M. Vanhall, a/k/a Christopher Vanhall; Karon Lewis; NY Financial Services, LLC; Arrow Financial Services, LLC; Portfolio Recovery Associates, LLC; “John Doe” and/or “Mary Roe”, Defendants Pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale dated June 17, 2013 and entered herein, I, the undersigned, the Referee in said Judgment named, will sell at public auction in the front vestibule of the Monroe County Office Building, 39 West Main Street, Rochester, New York, County of Monroe, on July 31, 2013 at 11:30 a.m., on that day, the premises directed by said Judgment to be sold and therein described as follows: ALL THAT TRACT OR PARCEL OF LAND, situate in the Town of Parma, County of Monroe and State of New York, known as 94 Clearview Avenue, Hilton, NY 14468; Tax Account No. 009.67-3-8.1 described in Deed recorded in Liber 9345 of Deeds, page 287. Said premises are sold subject to any state of facts an accurate survey may show, zoning restrictions and any amendments thereto, covenants, restrictions, agreements, reservations, and easements of record and prior liens, if any, municipal departmental violations, and such other provisions as may be set forth in the

Complaint and Judgment filed in this action. Judgment amount: $54,256.45 plus, but not limited to, costs, disbursements, attorney fees and additional allowance, if any, all with legal interest. DATED: June 2013 Vincent E. Merante, Esq., Referee LACY KATZEN LLP Attorneys for Plaintiff 130 East Main Street Rochester, New York 14604 Telephone: (585) 324-5767 [ SUPPLEMENTAL SUMMONS ] Index No.: 2013-1397 Date of Filing: July 10, 2013 SUPREME COURT OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF MONROE CITIBANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION AS TRUSTEE FOR GSAA HOME EQUITY TRUST 2007-9, ASSETBACKED CERTIFICATES SERIES 2007-9, Plaintiff, -against- KIMBERLY C LO RE A/K/A KIMBERLY C LORE, if living, or if either or all be dead, their wives, husbands, heirs-at-law, next of kin, distributees, executors, administrators, assignees, lienors and generally all persons having or claiming under, by or through said KIMBERLY C LO RE A/K/A KIMBERLY C LORE, by purchase, inheritance, lien or otherwise, of any right, title or interest in and to the premises described in the complaint herein, and the respective husbands, wives, widow or widowers of them, if any, all of whose names are unknown to plaintiff; WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A.; STATE OF NEW YORK; UNITED STATES OF AMERICA; “JOHN DOES” and “JANE DOES”, said names being fictitious, parties intended being possible tenants or occupants of premises, and corporations, other entities or persons who claim, or may claim, a lien against the premises, Defendants. TO THE ABOVE-NAMED DEFENDANTS: YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED to answer the complaint in this action and to serve a copy of your answer, or, if the complaint is not served with this summons, to serve a Notice of Appearance on the Plaintiff’s attorney(s) within twenty (20) days after the service of this summons, exclusive of the day of service, where service is made by delivery upon you personally within the State, or within thirty (30) days after completion of service where service is made in any other manner, and in case of your failure to appear or answer, judgment will be taken against you by default for the relief demanded in the complaint. NOTICE YOU ARE IN DANGER OF LOSING YOUR HOME If you do not respond to this summons and complaint by serving a copy of the answer on the attorney for the mortgage company who filed this foreclosure proceeding against you and filing the answer with the court, a default judgment may be entered and you can lose your home. Speak to an attorney or go to the court where your case is pending for further information on how to answer the summons and

protect your property. Sending a payment to your mortgage company will not stop this foreclosure action. YOU MUST RESPOND BY SERVING A COPY OF THE ANSWER ON THE ATTORNEY FOR THE PLAINTIFF (MORTGAGE COMPANY) AND FILING THE ANSWER WITH THE COURT. YOU ARE HEREBY PUT ON NOTICE THAT WE ARE ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT, AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. TO THE ABOVENAMED DEFENDANTS: The foregoing summons is served upon you by publication pursuant to an Order of the Honorable Richard Dollinger of the Supreme Court of the State of New York, signed on June 14, 2013, and filed with supporting papers in the Office of the Clerk of the County of Monroe, State of New York. The object of this action is to foreclose a mortgage upon the premises described below, executed by KIMBERLY C LO RE A/K/A KIMBERLY C LORE to WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A. in the principal amount of $68,800.00, which mortgage was recorded in Monroe County, State of New York, dated May 23, 2007 and recorded on May 24, 2007 in Liber 21202 of Mortgages, at page 0512, MTG# M# CY005591. The mortgage tax was duly paid. Thereafter said mortgage was assigned to CITIBANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION AS TRUSTEE FOR GSAA HOME EQUITY TRUST 2007-9, ASSET-BACKED CERTIFICATES SERIES 20079 by assignment of mortgage dated on February 4, 2012 and recorded on February 13, 2012 in Book 1685, Page 614, MTG# MCY005591. Said premises being known as and by 423 MAGNOLIA AVE, EAST ROCHESTER, NY 14445-1337. Date: June 5, 2013 Batavia, New York Virginia C. Grapensteter, Esq. ROSICKI, ROSICKI & ASSOCIATES, P.C. Attorneys for Plaintiff Batavia Office 26 Harvester Avenue Batavia, NY 14020 585.815.0288 Help For Homeowners In Foreclosure New York State Law requires that we send you this notice about the foreclosure process. Please read it carefully. Mortgage foreclosure is a complex process. Some people may approach you about “saving” your home. You should be extremely careful about any such promises. The State encourages you to become informed about your options in foreclosure. There are government agencies, legal aid entities and other nonprofit organizations that you may contact for information about foreclosure while you are working with your lender during this process. To locate an entity near you, you may call the toll-free helpline maintained by the New York State Banking Department at 1-877-BANKNYS (1-877-2265697) or visit the Department’s website at www.banking.state. ny.us. The State does not guarantee the advice of these agencies.

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July 24-30, 2013 - City Newspaper