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JULY 10-16, 2013 Free

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Greater Rochester’s Alternative Newsweekly

EVENTS: CRITICAL MASQUERADE, RENAISSANCE FEST

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FILM: “THE LONE RANGER,” “KINGS OF SUMMER”

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DINING: WOOD-FIRED PIZZA ROUND-UP

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GUEST COMMENT: CUOMO’S LATEST GIVE-AWAY

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CROSSWORD, NEWS OF THE WEIRD

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SUMMER PEOPLE

Vol 42 No 44

AND MORE MUSIC, PAGE 14

News. Music. Life.

We don’t need more office space downtown. We need less.” DEVELOPMENT, PAGE 6

Jobs program disappoints. EDUCATION, PAGE 5

Round 2 for controversial Pittsford project. DEVELOPMENT, PAGE 4

Shakespeare in the park: Boogie “Night.” THEATER, PAGE 22

2013 Corn Hill Arts Fest Guide. INSIDE

FEATURE | BY REBECCA RAFFERTY | PAGE 10 | FILE PHOTOS

Worlds collide on walls: Wall/Therapy Symbolically, walls stand to divide space, to enclose people and property. But for Dr. Ian Wilson and the network of medical professionals, artists, and volunteers he has organized around Rochester’s annual Wall\ Therapy street-art festival, walls stand for something more. Through that initiative, walls have the capability to unite communities on local and global scales. Wall\Therapy efforts officially started in 2011. Since then more than a dozen local murals have been created by more than 20 international and local

artists. These works grace the largely empty walls of Rochester; you can currently see murals from the project in the areas surrounding the Rochester Public Market and the St. Paul Quarter. Leading up to this year’s Wall\Therapy event, which will see artists painting July 19-28, City caught up with Wilson, who reflected on the endeavor so far, previewed the festival line-up of artists, and discussed how they are preparing to shift the medicalphilanthropy side of the endeavor to the forefront.

Feedback We welcome your comments. Send them to themail@rochester-citynews. com, or post them on our website, rochestercitynewspaper.com, our Facebook page, or our Twitter feed, @ roccitynews. Comments of fewer than 350 words have a greater chance of being published, and we do edit selections for publication in print. We don’t publish comments sent to other media.

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I take issue with one of the more outrageous claims made in Ken Maher’s letter blaming Democrats in the state legislature for the defeat of the Women’s Equality Act (Feedback, July 3). Maher claims the bill died because New York voters did not support the provision in the WEA dealing with abortion, and Republican senators understood that and voted accordingly. That’s a supersized whopper. In fact, a Quinnipiac University poll conducted in June showed that close to 70 percent of New York State voters supported that provision. As Bruce Gyory pointed out recently in City & State, “Over the past three decades, when you distill the polling data, the prolife share of the New York State electorate has dwindled from roughly 40 percent to about a 25 percent share.” As they head into next year’s election, all this should be disquieting news for the Republicans in the State Senate, a k a the ones who were actually responsible for killing the WEA. A prescient observer recently summed up the Republican senators’ predicament this way: “If a candidate threatens women’s choices, the female body has ways to shut that down.” It’s called voting. LINDA STEPHENS, GREECE

Stephens is a member of the Finger Lakes WEA Regional Committee.

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2 CITY

JULY 10-16, 2013

A recent letter brought up the issue of pedestrian right-of-way in a crosswalk (“Crosswalk Dangers,” Feedback). Here’s the law when crossing a street or highway, according to www.safeny.ny.gov: “(a) When traffic-control signals are not in place or not in operation the driver of a vehicle shall yield the right of way,

slowing down or stopping if need be to so yield, to a pedestrian crossing the roadway within a crosswalk on the roadway upon which the vehicle is traveling, except that any pedestrian crossing a roadway at a point where a pedestrian tunnel or overpass has been provided shall yield the right of way to all vehicles. “(b) No pedestrian shall suddenly leave a curb or other place of safety and walk or run into the path of a vehicle which is so close that it is impractical for the driver to yield. “(c) Whenever any vehicle is stopped at a marked crosswalk or at any unmarked crosswalk at an intersection to permit a pedestrian to cross the roadway, the driver of any other vehicle approaching from the rear shall not overtake and pass such stopped vehicle.” Part (b) poses a question as to what constitutes “suddenly” stepping out into traffic. I’ve never assumed that this law means one can simply stroll out into busy traffic and expect all the cars to come screeching to a stop (and I’m not accusing the letter writer of doing that). The law seems to suggest some judgment is expected on the part of the pedestrian regarding how close oncoming cars are and how “impractical” it may be for them to stop. No one in a car wants to hit a pedestrian. Both parties need to exercise caution and courtesy. JAMES DIERKS

I work with people who are blind or visually impaired, instructing them on safe travel skills (using the long cane, taking buses, crossing streets), and I have seen my share of bad drivers, distracted drivers, and drivers who just don’t seem to care that there are pedestrians around them. When I am teaching my clients about safe street crossings, I say the same thing: “As a pedestrian, you generally have the right of way. As a blind pedestrian, you almost have more right of way, but that doesn’t mean that you shouldn’t be smart about it. Crossing at a controlled intersection is the safest way to go, because drivers are, more likely than not, going to stop for a stop sign or a red light. Crossing in the middle of the intersection,

even with a crosswalk where the state law dictates that the drivers stop is putting yourself in danger because really, the only thing that is making them stop is YOU.” I had a totally blind client in the village of Brockport who wanted to cross over Main Street at a midblock crosswalk, and I strongly recommended against it, for the reasons listed above. But I don’t think she quite got it until we were in my car, after our lesson, when I stopped at one of those crosswalks to let a pedestrian cross, and almost got struck by a driver in a car coming up fast behind me, who wasn’t paying attention. These mid-block crosswalks are all over the area – I can think of ones in Fairport, Pittsford, Brockport, Canandaigua – and all of the ones I am thinking of are no more than 50 yards away from a controlled intersection. Yes, it’s the law for drivers to stop for pedestrians in the crosswalk, but we all know that doesn’t mean that it will happen. My suggestion is that rather than standing your ground, to be smart about it, walk a little further, and get to where you need to go, rather than take a ride in an ambulance. MEGHAN O’BRIEN

Losing DOMA

What about achieving marriage equality, not simply removing blocks to it? (“After Marriage: the Future of Gay Rights,” News) What about housing, jobs, health services, culture, etc.? We have a LONG way to go, people. Don’t go sit on the couch yet. SEAN

Snowden and the media

On “The Misadventures of Edward Snowden,” News Blog: I would counter by saying that the mainstream media, undeniably in bed with the federal government, has deliberately crafted and downplayed the Snowden story to focus on him in an effort to deflect attention from the real issues of “government overreach.” This is not a failure of Snowden’s, but a victory of the media-government complex. I expected better from you, City Newspaper. HENRY FITTS

News. Music. Life. Greater Rochester’s Alternative Newsweekly July 10-16, 2013 Vol 42 No 44 250 North Goodman Street Rochester, New York 14607-1199 themail@rochester-citynews.com phone (585) 244-3329 fax (585) 244-1126 rochestercitynewspaper.com On the cover: "See the Forest for the Trees" by HowNosm on Pitkin Street. Photos by Lauren Petracca. Publishers: William and Mary Anna Towler Editor: Mary Anna Towler Asst. to the publishers: Matt Walsh Editorial department themail@rochester-citynews.com Features editor: Eric Rezsnyak News editor: Christine Carrie Fien Staff writers: Tim Louis Macaluso, Jeremy Moule Music editor: Willie Clark Music writer: Frank De Blase Calendar editor: Rebecca Rafferty Contributing writers: Paloma Capanna, Casey Carlsen, Roman Divezur, George Grella, Susie Hume, Andy Klingenberger, Dave LaBarge, Kathy Laluk, Michael Lasser, Adam Lubitow, Ron Netsky, Dayna Papaleo, Suzan Pero, Rebecca Rafferty, Deb Schleede, David Yockel Jr. Art department artdept@rochester-citynews.com Art director/production manager: Matt DeTurck Designers: Aubrey Berardini, Mark Chamberlin Photographers: Mark Chamberlin, Frank De Blase, Michael Hanlon Photo intern: Matt Burkhartt Advertising department ads@rochester-citynews.com Advertising sales manager: Betsy Matthews Account executives: Nancy Burkhardt, Tom Decker, William Towler Classified sales representatives: Christine Kubarycz, Tracey Mykins Operations/Circulation kstathis@rochester-citynews.com Circulation manager: Katherine Stathis Distribution: Andy DiCiaccio, David Riccioni, Northstar Delivery, Wolfe News City Newspaper is available free of charge. Additional copies of the current issue may be purchased for $1, payable in advance at the City Newspaper office. City Newspaper may be distributed only by authorized distributors. No person may, without prior written permission of City Newspaper, take more than one copy of each weekly issue. City (ISSN 1551-3262) is published weekly by WMT Publications, Inc. Periodical postage paid at Rochester, NY (USPS 022-138). Send address changes to City, 250 North Goodman Street, Rochester, NY 14607. City is a member of the Association of Alternative Newsweeklies and the New York Press Association. Subscriptions: $35.00 ($30.00 for senior citizens) for one year. Add $10 yearly for out-of-state subscriptions: add $30 yearly for foreign subscriptions. Due to the initial high cost of establishing new subscriptions, refunds for fewer than ten months cannot be issued. Copyright by WMT Publications Inc., 2013 - all rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, photocopying, recording or by any information storage retrieval system without permission of the copyright owner.

GUEST COMMENT | BY DAVID CAY JOHNSTON

Passing the bucks: Cuomo’s latest give-away Governor Andrew Cuomo’s tax-free zones at state universities are just the latest move to create politically favored businesses and insulate their owners from the rigors of market competition. Cuomo and others in both parties who back such laws say they spur entrepreneurs. What they are really doing is creating an enlarged body of business owners who depend on the largesse of the voters and, thus, become political dependents. His new law undermines market economics and promotes corporate socialism, in which profits are privatized and costs are socialized. Had Cuomo proposed this law in, say, 1979, the year his father Mario became governor, it would have been regarded as a major political scandal. By 2008, the enemies of market economics were so triumphant that the George W. Bush administration bailed out Wall Street after willfully blinding itself to massive fraud by mortgage marketers, as did the Obama administration. Cuomo’s plan redistributes wealth upwards, showing that he is no Democrat in the traditional sense that Democrats care about working people. Rather, Cuomo is part of the growing cadre of politicians whose success depends on being vetted by Wall Street and who win acceptance because they work to tax the many to benefit the already rich few. These political dependents differ from children, the disabled, the sick, and the elderly who collect benefits from the state. The rich dependents make campaign donations and find jobs when needed for politicians’ friends and family – legalized kickbacks that are a bargain compared to the welfare they collect. Nationwide, state and local gifts and subsidies to business cost $70 billion or more annually. That is $900 each year for a family of four. New York taxpayers are being forced to give $1.4 billion to microchip maker GlobalFoundries, owned by the hereditary ruler of Abu Dhabi, Sheikh Khalifa bin Zayed Al Nahyan. Your cost: $71. Alcoa will collect $5.6 billion in state subsidies over 50 years, costing you $284. Contrast these giveaways with Cuomo’s refusal to investigate cheating by real-estate partnerships that cost the state up to $700 million per year in taxes. The Cuomo administration claims that it chases these cheats, yet not a single document in the public record supports this. Instead, the record reveals audits focusing on cheating by out-of-state investors, meaning people less likely to be Cuomo donors.

Had Cuomo proposed this law in, say, 1979, the year his father Mario became governor, it would have been regarded as a major political scandal.” The Wall Street Journal opinion pages, Forbes Magazine, and the Heritage Foundation all encourage corporate welfare and policies that insulate the biggest businesses from the rigors of market competition. Corporate welfare is a failure. Three decades of data show zero factual support for the proposition that taking from the many to give to the rich benefits all. If corporate welfare worked, we would be drowning in jobs. Instead we have chronic long-term unemployment. The average income of the 90 percent of American taxpayers in 2011 was 13 percent smaller than in 1973. Since 1999, the median wage – half make more, half less – has been stuck at a little north of $500 per week, while the number of jobs has grown at a small fraction of population increases. Under the Cuomo giveaway law, businesses located on favored parcels of land owned by the state universities (land already exempt from property taxes) will earn taxfree profits. “By tax-free, I mean really, really tax-free,” Cuomo said recently. Workers at these businesses would be exempt from state income taxes. That will put downward pressure on wages as owners try to capture part of the tax savings. They can do this by delaying raises and letting inflation work in the owners’ favor. Business owners who cannot operate from these parcels are disadvantaged because they and their workers will be taxed. continues on page 7 rochestercitynewspaper.com

CITY 3

[ NEWS FROM THE WEEK PAST ]

Cop’s bullet struck bystander

Ballistics testing showed that the bullet that struck and seriously injured Henrietta resident Gene McDougal was fired by a Rochester police officer. McDougal was an innocent bystander during a June 27 shootout between Sgt. Flamur Zenelovic and homicide suspect Ralph Strong on the city’s northeast side. Zenelovic and Strong were also struck by gunfire. All three are recovering. Strong was wanted in connection with a double shooting on Central Avenue earlier in June. He has pleaded not guilty to two charges of first-degree murder in the Central Avenue shootings.

Home purchasing assistance from district The Rochester school district will offer a new benefit to employees in the 2013 to 2014 school year. The RCSD will provide a $3,000 grant for a down payment or closing costs for the purchase of a city home. District employees can also apply for an additional $3,000 grant with the City of Rochester, which is available to first-time buyers of city homes.

Both programs are intended to encourage employees of the district and the city to stay and invest in the city.

News

New name for AIDS Care

AIDS Care, a Rochester-area nonprofit that has been providing medical and social care to people living with HIV, has changed its name to Trillium Health. While HIV care will still be provided, the agency has reorganized around improving LGBT health. Trillium serves patients in Rochester, the Finger Lakes, and the Southern Tier. More information: www.trilliumhealth.

Schumer pushes for lake funding

Senator Chuck Schumer stopped in Rochester to push legislation to increase funding for Great Lakes beaches. He’s sponsoring legislation that would restore $9.9 million for water quality testing and monitoring programs, and legislation to provide $475 million for the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative. Schumer also pushed for Congress to pass funding for other Great Lakes cleanup projects, such as removing contaminated sediment.

The restaurant that would be part of the Westport Crossing project at 75 Monroe Avenue in the Village of Pittsford. PROVIDED IMAGE

DEVELOPMENT | BY JEREMY MOULE

Round two for Pittsford project The Westport Crossing project in the Village of Pittsford is set for another flare up. The developer, a subsidiary of Mark IV Enterprises, has proposed a maximum 167-unit apartment complex with a restaurant at 75 Monroe Avenue. But the developer now wants to make changes significant enough to require another sign off from the village board, says Pittsford Mayor Bob Corby. The prior plan already had the board’s approval. Chris DiMarzo, chief operating officer for Mark IV, says the new plan is better because it contains

fewer buildings, has better internal circulation, and cuts down on the amount of paved surface in the project. The new conceptual plan reflects input from residents and village officials, he says. The company has eliminated one building from the plan, moved the larger buildings to the back of the site, and moved the restaurant to the front of the site, DiMarzo says. The restaurant’s seating capacity and the number of apartments would not change under the new proposal, he says. But there’s a chance the village board won’t go along with the new plan. Corby says he prefers the plan

the board approved last year (which he voted against). He says the new plan has bulkier buildings and moves the pool from the interior of the site to the waterfront, which detracts from the public feel the development is supposed to have. Corby says he’s also concerned about changes to the landscaping. The plantings in the previous proposal were meant to offset the buildings’ bulk. If the village board rejects the new proposal, the company would move ahead with the previous plan, DiMarzo says. The board could vote as early as this week.

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Call the Buffalo Clinical Research Center at 716-885-3580 ext 205 for information on “Study #2206” or go to www.bcrc.us/studies.php 4 CITY

JULY 10-16, 2013

City Council member Loretta Scott says it’s unclear why so few of ROAR’s initial applicants graduated, and then why so few of the graduates are employed. And she says she’s frustrated by the lack of follow-through on a program that began with so much promise.

Cost of War The following people have been killed in the City of Rochester in recent weeks: -- Eugene Wade, 24, Rochester. ROCHESTER TOTALS —

Rochester Police Department, media reports SOURCE:

AFGHANISTAN TOTALS —

EDUCATION | BY TIM LOUIS MACALUSO

POLITICS | BY CHRISTINE CARRIE FIEN

Jobs training program falls short Residents, parents, and educators consistently urge the city and the Rochester school district to do more to prepare young people who aren’t college-bound for careers in the trades. Many Rochester residents who are chronically unemployed — often women, African Americans, and Latinos — could benefit from the training, too. Reaching Occupational Achievement for Residents in Rochester, a program launched more than a year ago, was supposed to help address the problem. More than 1,000 residents signed up for the six-month job preparation program, says City Council member Loretta Scott, but only 156 trainees made it to the end. “I’ve found that if you can get people employed, it alleviates a lot of other problems,” Scott says. “So I’ve been tracking it. And I was told that only about 43 of them are employed today. That’s less than one-third.” Scott says it’s unclear why so few of ROAR’s initial applicants graduated, and then why so few of the graduates are employed. And she says she’s frustrated by the lack of follow-through on a program that began with so much promise. ROAR was created by the Rochester Joint Construction Board to recruit city residents for

Election economics

construction jobs on the $325 million first phase of the schools modernization project. ROAR’s proponents say that electricians, carpenters, painters, masons, and plumbers Loretta Scott. are paid well, and that FILE PHOTO the jobs typically can’t be outsourced. And while the massive rehabilitation of city school district buildings did create some jobs, Scott says, there were also unanticipated challenges. “Our system was not prepared to absorb that many people at one time,” she says. “The project was not far enough along. And they all have different trades — electricians, painters, carpenters — and they’re not all needed at the same time. It was a workflow issue.” Scott says she has no evidence that contractors and local labor unions were not hiring minorities. “I think the problem was that this was not well thought out,” Scott says.

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City Council President and mayoral candidate Lovely Warren rolled out her economic plan last week during a press conference at her west-side headquarters. | Warren’s plan includes creating a Rochester Industrial Development Agency to guarantee jobs for city residents, pursuing social impact bonds to help deal with Rochester’s serious social problems, creating a small business center, and adopting measures to increase transparency and promote sustainability. | Warren said her biggest criticism of her opponent, incumbent Mayor Tom Richards, is that he hasn’t done enough to create jobs for city residents. Unemployment in the City of Rochester is higher than unemployment in the county as a whole. Unemployment in the Rochester metro area was 7 percent in May, compared to 9.3 percent in the City of Rochester, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. | Warren’s plan also addresses housing and aging in place — measures to help aging residents stay in their homes as long as possible. | The Richards campaign called Warren’s plan a “collection of random ideas from a politician who has never created a private sector job in her life.” | Warren and Richards will square off in a Democratic primary on Tuesday, September 10.

2,249 US servicemen and servicewomen and 1,098 Coalition servicemen and servicewomen have been killed in Afghanistan from the beginning of the war and occupation to July 1. Statistics for Afghan civilian casualties are not available. American casualties from June 28 to July 4: -- Spc. Hilda I. Clayton, 22, Augusta, Ga. -- 1st Sgt. Tracy L. Stapley, 44, Clearfield, Utah -- Pvt. Errol D.A. Milliard, 18, Birmingham, Ala. iraqbodycount. org, icasualties.org, Department of Defense SOURCES:

Rochester’s premier bicycle shop in the South Wedge rochestercitynewspaper.com

CITY 5

DEVELOPMENT | BY TIM LOUIS MACALUSO

Historic Gannett building for sale Standing next to the Gannett building at 55 Exchange Boulevard, it’s immediately clear that the building is a monument to another time. Built in the late 1920’s by Gannett founder Frank Gannett, the building’s neoClassical style exudes the authority and power of newspapers during their golden age. The building, which Frank Gannett constructed to house the newsroom and operations of the long-gone Times Union and now serves as the Democrat and Chronicle’s office, was recently put on the market. The asking price for the 154,000-square-foot building is reportedly just shy of $5 million. The Gannett building is the latest in a long string of Rochester’s iconic downtown buildings to end up on the sales block. The big questions now are who will buy it? And how will it be used? Savvy developers have purchased many of these downtown buildings for re-use, but other buildings have lingered on the market for years, often sitting vacant. The Gannett building is in an area of downtown that has traditionally been home to large institutional structures like government offices, churches, and financial companies. But the building is probably not best suited for office space, says Heidi Zimmer-Meyer, president of the Rochester Downtown Development Corporation. Her company tracks downtown construction projects and redevelopment. “The office market in this region is soft,” she says. This is a reflection of the recent economic recession, she says. But it’s also because companies have fewer employees due to advances in technology and they require less space. “Commercial space has taken a real hit, not just downtown, but all over,” she says. “We don’t need more office space downtown. We need less.” Housing has been the main driver of downtown investment, she says. There are more than a dozen projects in what she calls the pipeline to completion. “Since 2000, we now have 38 buildings converted to housing that were either downtown offices or some kind of light manufacturing,” Zimmer-Meyer says. “What we call downtown is now a collection of probably 14 neighborhoods that are very distinct. And this particular neighborhood, the Four Corners area, is defined by buildings with a lot of architectural character.” 6 CITY

JULY 10-16, 2013

The Gannett building: another historic downtown Rochester building is looking for a buyer. PHOTOS BY MARK CHAMBERLIN

Converting the Gannett building to housing

The Gannett building was added to the

wouldn’t have been conceivable even five years ago, Zimmer-Meyer says, because the buildings in the area and the area itself have been somewhat institutional. Developers were wary of trying to create housing in a section of downtown that many thought was too close to the Blue Cross Arena and the Public Safety Building to attract apartment hunters. But two projects helped to change their minds, Zimmer-Meyer says. First, the former Central Trust Company building, with its 1950’s glass and metal design at 44 Exchange Boulevard was given a $6 million update. Comprised mostly of apartments, the owners embellished the building’s retro style. And a multimillion-dollar restoration converted the formerly vacant Academy building to a combination of market-rate housing and retail. Built in the late 1800’s, the Academy building is the former home of the high-end eatery, Edwards Restaurant. The Gannett building, though it appears to be in good basic condition, will require what some developers describe as a “gut to rehab,” says Zimmer-Meyer, which essentially takes much of the building down to its bare bones. “Developers have been most successful when they are respectful of the uniqueness of these buildings,” Zimmer-Meyer says. “They’ve created spaces that really take advantage of that, celebrate that, and don’t cover it with drywall or something. Exposed brick, polished floors, tall ceilings, high windows, and quirky things like gargoyles and carvings — things like this you can preserve in the redesign are what this market wants.”

National Register of Historic Places in the mid 1980’s. The original building was constructed under the supervision of Howell and Thomas, a Cleveland-based architecture firm, says Cynthia Howk, architectural research coordinator for the Landmark Society of Western New York. And well-known industrial architect Albert Kahn oversaw one of the larger additions to the building in the 1940’s. The addition housed the printing operations, Zimmer-Meyer says. “That was one of the great treats of walking through that area of downtown,” Howk says. “You could look in those great big windows and see the printing press running.” It was not unusual for cities across the country, Rochester included, to support morning and evening newspapers through much of the 20th century. And the Democrat and Chronicle’s news organization moved into the Gannett building, joining the Time Union. But the collapse of evening editions was a sign of industry changes to come. The building at 55 Exchange Boulevard served as Gannett’s corporate headquarters until the mid 1980’s, when the headquarters moved to its current Virginia location. The Democrat and Chronicle news group is looking for a new location in downtown Rochester. Though Zimmer-Meyer says she’s unaware of any developers interested in the Gannett building, she says she’s optimistic. Her organization is tracking downtown development projects totaling more than $700 million, she says, with more than half coming from private sources. The influx of private money may be the best indicator that the commercial real estate

market is on the mend, since only three years ago it was extremely difficult to find lenders for big projects. Zimmer-Meyer says that three significant projects under way are going to significantly

change downtown: Midtown Tower, the Sibley building, and Alexander Park. Plans call for converting the Sibley office tower into market-rate rental apartments and possibly senior housing. Though Buckingham Properties and Morgan Management have not yet completed the purchase of Midtown Tower, Zimmer-Meyer says that between 170 and 185 residential units are planned for that site. And Buckingham Properties plans to add new housing to Alexander Park, site of the now demolished Genesee Hospital. “We have over 5,000 people living downtown now, adding 1,900 since 2000,” Zimmer-Meyer says. “We have another 1,600 to 1,700 [projected]. I think we’re getting up to 6,700, and it’s still climbing.” All of this development has finally helped downtown reach that much anticipated tipping point when major retail would return, she says. The most significant development would be a downtown grocery store, and Zimmer-Meyer says there are three entities talking about possible locations. “Certain kinds of retail are turning their heads and taking a second look, including the grocery stores,” she says. “We’ll have to wait and see what really happens. But at least the talk is there, and for a long time it wasn’t.”

Passing the bucks continues from page 3

Here is a simple principle to keep in mind: If an investment is sound, the market will finance it. If it is not sound, why should taxpayers be forced to subsidize it? If we are going to subsidize businesses, then shouldn’t the taxpayers get a return on their investment? How about shares of stock paying dividends until taxpayers are repaid? A better idea than Cuomo’s corporate welfare is a level playing field that makes investment in New York more attractive. The legislature could repeal the state corporate income tax, which applies mostly to small business. All business taxes raise about 11 percent of state revenue, the basic corporate income tax 4 percent. The legislature could make up for that 4 percent with less corporate welfare and higher taxes on very rich New Yorkers, who in turn own most of the capital. How about closing loopholes through which very rich New Yorkers put their assets in trusts? How about taxing money borrowed against untaxed gains? Why let managers of hedge and private equity funds defer their fees, paying their taxes by-and-by? And then there are those real estate cheats. The problem is that there is no lobby for this, no organization of principled business owners who will shower politicians with donations in return for promoting competitive markets. In 1846 we enacted an absolute ban

on gifts of money, or even credit, to corporations. Article VII, Section 8 of the New York state constitution states that “the money of the state shall not be given or loaned to or in aid of any private corporation or association, or private undertaking; nor shall the credit of the state be given or loaned to or in aid of any individual, or public or private corporation or association, or private undertaking.” In adopting the state constitutions of 1874 and 1938 and rejecting a new one in 1967, we reaffirmed that ban, all by 2-to-1 votes. The gift to the sheikh – $1 million plus per promised job – was challenged in court by 50 taxpayers, an amalgam that included liberals and libertarians, Republicans and Democrats. Barbara Underwood, the state solicitor general, argued in court that these were not gifts but monetary tools “to promote the New York economy.” New York’s highest court ruled in November 2011 that these gifts were perfectly legal. So how did Judge Theodore Jones, who wrote the decision, along with Chief Judge Jonathan Lippman and Judges Carmen Beauchamp Ciparick, Victoria A. Graffeo,

and Susan Phillips get around the voters saying no, no, no and no? They ruled that while the state “may not lend its credit to a public corporation,” nothing “prohibits the State from adopting appropriations directed to” intermediaries, who can then give the money, or credit, to private corporations. In other words, what the state cannot do directly it can do by passing the money through an entity it creates. That is not just absurd, it makes a mockery of our state constitution. In dissent, Judge Eugene Pigott meticulously deconstructed the errors of logic and willful blindness of the majority. He quoted the great jurist Benjamin Cardozo in a case declaring that gifts to World War I veterans violated the no-gifts clause. Judge Cardozo, who supported gifts to soldiers, wrote that the ban was intended only “to put an end to the use of credit of the state in fostering the growth of private enterprise and business.” Judge Pigott said he was unimpressed by the majority argument that corporate gifts have a long history. “Unconstitutional acts do not become constitutional by virtue of repetition, custom or passage of time,” he wrote. Judge Robert S. Smith heartily endorsed Pigott’s dissent. The legislature, he wrote, “is free to disregard both received economic teachings and common sense…. But when our Legislature commits the precise folly that a provision of our Constitution was written to prevent, and this Court responds by judicially repealing the constitutional provision, I think I am entitled to be annoyed.” The GlobalFoundries ruling makes future challenges to corporate gifts virtually impossible. Now before having any opportunity to compel testimony or obtain documents, plaintiffs must prove that a gift is unconstitutional to the standard in criminal cases: beyond reasonable doubt. Eventually Cuomo, or a successor, will issue a report on the new tax-free plan. Expect ginned-up numbers claiming success. After all, Thomas DiNapoli, the state comptroller, told us in May that $2.8 billion in state and local tax breaks for businesses from 2007 though 2011 “gained” more than a million jobs at an average cost of about $2,700. The state lost 88,400 jobs during those years, Bureau of Labor Statistics data show. Corporate welfare does not work. David Cay Johnston, winner of the Pulitzer Prize in 2011, is an investigative journalist specializing in economics and tax issues. Mary Anna Towler’s Urban Journal returns next week. rochestercitynewspaper.com

CITY 7

Classic Tracks Current Grooves Future Legends FOR REAL JAZZ IN ROCHESTER, TUNE TO 90.1 FM OR JAZZ901.ORG. JOIN US AT

“Paws for Pets” EVENT HELD AT

SATURDAY,

July 13th 1-4PM

Camp Eastman, Durand Eastman Park

Activities at Rotary Cabin • Free admission Details online at: emanuelrochester.org/news/retreat or call: 585-520-7241

Events include:

• Talk by Dr. Eugene Sherlin, DVM: “The Emotional Expression of Animals” • Demonstrations on Animal Safety & Children, Therapy Animals, and Obedience Training • Activities for children • Vendors and a prize raffle • A memorial service for our lost pets • Refreshments available Proceeds benefit the Animal Service League and the Pet Adoption Network of Irondequoit.

SPONSORED BY

For more Tom Tomorrow, including a political blog and cartoon archive, visit www.thismodernworld.com

URBAN ACTION This week’s calls to action include the following events and activities. (All are free and open to the public, unless otherwise noted.)

Pride Weekend events

The Rochester region’s LGBT community and friends will celebrate Pride Weekend beginning on Friday, July 19, with a Pride Rainbow Ride. Cyclists will take the Pride colors through the Neighborhood of the Arts, Park Avenue, South

Wedge, and Corn Hill neighborhoods starting at 5:15 p.m. On Saturday, July 20, the Pride Festival will be held in Manhattan Square Park, and organizers have set aside noon to 3:30 p.m. as family festival hours. Admission is free during this time and the activities are family and senior friendly. At 3:30 p.m., the event is gated and the activities will include live music, drag shows, dancing, and a beer garden. Tickets for the second half of the fes-

tival are $10 in advance or $15 at the gate. The Pride Parade is from 3 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. on Saturday, July 20. And attendees should note that the parade has a new route this year. It begins at Park Avenue and Buckingham Street, travels through the city’s East End, and then finishes at the festival site at Manhattan Square Park. For a complete list of events and activities: www.gayalliance.org.

Correcting ourselves The students in last week’s “chess kids” story attend Wilson Foundation Academy, not Wilson Commencement.

CITY NEWS BLOG

POLITICS, PEOPLE, EVENTS, & ISSUES

rochestercitynewspaper.com/BLOGS/NEWSBLOG COMMENTING ON THE STATE OF ROCHESTER & BEYOND

8 CITY

JULY 10-16, 2013

Dining

Left to right: the margherita pizza at Fiamma; the rustica pizza at Veneto; and a veggie-topped, coal-fired pizza from Tony D's. FILE PHOTOS

Fired up [ ROUND UP ] BY DAVE CHAPUS

Pollsters tell us that more than 90 percent of Americans eat pizza at least once a month, and statistically we consume some 350 slices of pizza per second. Pizza is probably as universally popular a food as there is in this great land of ours. The vast majority of that pizza is baked in gas or electric ovens, which differ from your home oven mostly in sheer size. But in line with the broader culinary trend toward more traditional, artisanal styles of cooking, recent years have seen an upsurge in the number of pizzerias using wood-fired ovens. Go back far enough in history and all pizzas, like all bread, were baked in wood-fired ovens, for the simple reason that there were no other options. But the current wood-fired renaissance isn’t just about tradition for tradition’s sake; the radiant heat and high temperatures generated by a wood fire, if utilized properly, can result in a fast-baking pizza with a slightly charred, aromatic crust, and toppings that have been cooked just enough to yield optimal flavor and texture without drying out or burning. In the Rochester area, wood-fired pizza has been around for more than a decade,

but it’s only been in the past few years that it’s really taken off. Every month or two seems to bring news of a new place opening, and for now at least, most of them seem to have taken root. Depending on how wide a geographic net you throw, the Rochester region is currently home to 20 or so woodfired pizzerias. Here’s a look at some of the best purveyors of the style. Did we leave out your favorite wood-fired pizzeria in the Greater Rochester area? Add it to the comments section of this story at rochestercitynewspaper.com. Veneto is among Rochester’s most senior

wood-fired pizzerias, having opened in Rochester’s East End in 2001. Veneto’s well charred, thin-crust pizzas range from a simple sauce-and-cheese margherita to more complex, yet well-thought-out permutations, such as a mushroom pie topped with oregano-infused oil, ovenroasted mushrooms, mozzarella, and Provolone and goat cheeses, drizzled with truffle oil. Or come up with your own combination by choosing from among Veneto’s 21 toppings. Sit at the bar of Veneto’s open kitchen if you’d like to

watch your pizza’s journey from raw dough to finished pie. (Veneto is located at 318 East Ave. For more information call 454-5444 or visit venetorestaurant.com.) Napa Wood Fired Pizzeria has two area

locations, on South Clinton Avenue and in the Perinton Hills Mall in Fairport. If you’re a believer that less is more, go with Napa’s Simply Red (housemade red sauce and cheese) or Simply White (garlic oil, fresh basil, and cheese). Feeling more adventurous? Try the Cuban, with BBQ sauce, pulled pork, ham, dill pickles, fried onions and cheese, or the Parma, with house-made garlic oil, prosciutto, artichokes, figs, goat cheese and Napa’s own five-cheese blend. (Napa Wood Fired Pizzeria is located at 573 S. Clinton Ave. and at 687 Moseley Road in Fairport. For more information call 232-8558 (Rochester) or 223-5250 (Fairport), or visit napawoodfired.com.)

On Rochester’s west side, head straight for Fiamma, where Italian-born pizzaiolo Giuseppe Paciullo puts to good use the skills he learned as a pizzamaker in his hometown of Salerno.

After spending about a minute in Fiamma’s 1000-degree oven, Fiamma’s pizzas emerge crisp, supple, aromatic, and flavorful. From the imported ingredients to the preparation, this may be as close to authentic Italian pizza as you can get without an airline ticket. (Fiamma Pizza e Vino is located at 1308 Buffalo Road in Gates. For more information call 270-4683 or visit fiammarochester.com.)

Though it technically falls outside the category of wood-fired pizza, Tony D’s Coal Fired Pizza also deserves mention. This Corn Hill restaurant is the only one in the Rochester region using a coal-fired oven, the roots of which go back not to Italy but to New York City, where early20th-century Italian immigrants developed their own style of pizza, using the more easily obtained coal rather than hardwood as their fuel. Tony D’s pizzas mostly stick to traditional Italian styles — margherita, bianca (white), and vongole (clams), among others — marked by a blackened but pliable crust. (Tony D’s Coal Fired Pizza is located at 288 Exchange Boulevard. For more information call 340-6200 or visit tonydsroc.com).

rochestercitynewspaper.com

CITY 9

FEATURE

\

PHOTOS

BY REBECCA RAFFERTY

\

BY MATT BURKHARTT, MARK CHAMBERLIN, MATT DETURCK & LAUREN PETRACCA

ymbolically, walls stand to divide space, to enclose people and property. But for Dr. Ian Wilson and the network of medical professionals, artists, and volunteers he has organized around Rochester’s annual Wall\Therapy street-art festival, and the medical-philanthropy organization Impact, walls stand for something other than themselves. Through those initiatives, walls have the capability to unite communities on local and global scales. Wall\Therapy efforts officially started in 2011. Since then more than a dozen local murals have been created by more than 20 international and local artists. These works grace the largely empty walls of Rochester; you can currently see murals from the project in the areas surrounding the Rochester Public Market and the St. Paul Quarter. Leading up to this year’s Wall\Therapy event, which will see artists painting July 19-28, City caught up with Wilson and Erich Lehman of 1975 Gallery, who has taken a stronger organizing role in the effort this year. They reflected on the endeavor so far, previewed the festival line-up of artists, and discussed how they are preparing to shift the medical-philanthropy side of the endeavor to the forefront. For information on and photos of the existing murals, search “Wall Therapy” at rochestercitynewspaper. com. To learn more about what’s coming up, read on. In addition to adding imagery to our Image City, the impact of Wall\Therapy artwork

has been massive and varied. School and other group tours still take place, locals and out-of-towners pose in front of the murals for amateur and professional photos shoots. The images are becoming as iconic to Rochester as other visible aspects of the city, including the buildings upon which they are painted. For example, Faith47’s Railroad Street painting of a girl with sparrows swirling around her face is the background for a promotional photo of the Rochester musical group, Gibbs & Main. But the images weren’t immediately welcomed by all. Last year, two murals in particular — Belgian artist ROA’s slumbering bears, and South African artist Faith47’s mural of a bare-breasted religious icon, both in the St. Paul corridor — created a bit of controversial buzz. Wilson describes the few negative responses in medical terms: “acute inflammation followed by quiescence. In other words, there was a vigorous reaction at first, which eventually healed. Some members of the community hadn’t seen art on this scale, so accessible and visible. And all art is a mirror. What people see in it says a lot about themselves, and I’ll continue to say that forever.” But by and large, the artwork has been well received. Lehman says: “There were people within the municipality who just enjoyed the energy that was brought to the city. Not just the art, but the fact that people were in the community having a dialogue about art, for about a month.” Lehman argues that the art has brought

people into neighborhoods that they might not otherwise visit, creating connections that might not have otherwise happened. This year, the Wall\Therapy initiative

will take place in two locations: along the El Camino Trail in the north part of the city, and through the South Wedge neighborhood in the south. Just as Wall\ Therapy broke ground in the 2012 festival focal point, the Public Market area, with the Faith47, DALeast, and Freddy Sam paintings created in the summer of 2011 on Railroad Street, the organization introduced its presence to the El Camino Trail in 2012 with murals painted on the side of the Avenue D Recreation Center by San Francisco artist Siloette and New York City artist Cern. “The El Camino Trail is an area of town we wanted to work in last year,” says Wilson. “But it turns out that there was kind of a natural gravitation toward the Market area, since there were so many walls concentrated in that area. It just seemed fitting to kind of focus our efforts mostly on the Market, and then offer an idea of things to come with the Avenue D Rec Center.” This year, Wilson and Lehman partnered with The Genesee Land Trust, in addition to Commissioner Luis Burgos and the Department of Recreation and Youth Services, in locating walls to paint and organizing the event’s presence in that area.

The inclusion of the South Wedge in this year’s festival grew out of casual conversations between property owners the Wall\Therapy organization, says Wilson. The Business Association of the South Wedge Area and the South Wedge Planning Committee, specifically Chris Jones of Historic House Parts and Duane Girdner of St. John’s Living, reached out to Lehman and Wilson independently of each other, and almost simultaneously. In addition to the main two sites, property owners Dan and Randy Morgenstern will offer walls again in the St. Paul corridor, and Foodlink has offered walls on its building on Mt. Read Boulevard. There will also likely be some work created on West Main, in the Susan B. Anthony neighborhood, and on the side of Ethiopian eatery, Natural Oasis, on Monroe Avenue. Additional sites could be added, contingent upon a variety of factors. But the team is still interested in more walls for this year and to amass an inventory for the future, says Wilson. “We can never have too many walls.” (For an updated list of this year’s Wall/ Therapy site locations visit wall-therapy.com.) “The idea is to have some of the artists swap locations mid-week, depending on how long they’ll be here in the city and depending on how fast they paint,” says Wilson. “They may be able to paint in two different sections of our city, which have two completely

different personalities.” That not only gives artists the opportunity to vary the location in which they are painting, but also for the city to have a significant amount of public art created in about a week. In addition to the added imagery, it’s an “invitation for [residents] to explore the rest of the city they live in, and to see how the two neighborhoods, north and south, are linked by this art project,” says Wilson. Even though Rochester is a relatively small city, people tend to keep to their own quadrants for the most part. The festival provides a way of bridging communities within our greater community that need connections, he says. The scope of the endeavor doubles not only

in location this year, but also in the number of artists who will paint the town. The 2013 lineup will include more than 25 artists, one-third of whom are locally based. Returning out-oftowners include South African-based artists Faith47 and DALeast, who have participated each year, and Freddy Sam, who came to Rochester in 2011 but not last summer. Also returning are Cern (NYC), and Siloette (San Francisco). German artist Case is also scheduled to return, but a conflict will keep him away until later in the year; organizers anticipate he’ll visit in August. New to this year are Binho (Brazil), DAZE (NYC), Ever (Argentina), Gaia (NYC/ Baltimore), Conor Harrington (London),

Public events for Wall\Therapy will be updated at facebook.com/ walltherapyny/events. All events are free unless otherwise specified. Friday, July 19: Kickoff at 1975 Gallery (89 Charlotte St.) 7-10 p.m. Welcome the participating artists to town and learn more about the project from organizers. Saturday, July 20: Block Party at El Camino Trail area. Details TBA. Sunday, July 21: Block Party in the South Wedge neighborhood. Details TBA. Wednesday, July 24: Artists’ Talk at School of the Arts (45 Prince St.) 6-7:30 p.m.

Thursday, July 25: “Floor Therapy”

Dance Party presented by Thievin’ Stephen at Skylark Lounge (40 S. Union St.). 10 p.m. $5 cover.

Lady Pink (NYC), Jessie and Katey (Jessie Unterhalter and Katey Truhn of Baltimore), Mike Ming (NYC), Chris Stain (NYC), and Wise Two (Kenya). Freedom (NYC) came to town earlier in July and painted murals in a secret location. “One of the biggest changes this year is, whereas the 2012 year was really focused on what can be termed ‘street art,’ on an incredibly large scale, this year is back to the initial intended mix of what could be continues on page 12

Opposite page, clockwise from top right: Detail from a mural of a whale by DALeast; one of the artists from "HowNosm"; a detail from a mural by Case; Thieven' Stephen works on his mural; a detail from the mural on Union Street by St. Monci; a detail of the Freddy Sam mural located in Troup Street Park; detail of a work by Cern on the Avenue D Recreation Center This page, clockwise from top left: Detail from the Troup Street Park mural; spray paint cans; Richmond Street mural; Wall\Therapy artist Liqen

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 11

WALL\THERAPY continues from page 11

considered traditional graffiti, the roots of America graffiti, and modern street art,” says Lehman. Lady Pink, Freedom, and DAZE “are some of the original progenitors of New York City graffiti, coming to our city to paint with our local artists, to learn about our culture and our city and our crews,” he says. Baltimore-based artist Gaia will arrive a few days prior to the official festival to do a bit of Rochester research. “He’s going to do a very city-specific mural. His work tends to be very much rooted in the neighborhoods and communities he’s painting in, with a lot of historical context,” says Lehman. Some of the non-local artists being brought in have been huge inspirations for some of our artists here in town, such as Chris Stain, who is a pioneer in stencil work. Lehman is particularly excited to about the inclusion of London-based painter Conor Harrington, whose grandscale murals blend historic and contemporary elements in a kinetic, cinematic staging, and Mike Ming of Barnstormers crew, who attended school at RIT and was a huge eye-opener for Lehman regarding “what creativity is. He was a huge, huge personal influence,” he says. Legendary street-art and graffiti photographer Martha Cooper, who helped Wall\Therapy gain international attention last year, will return this year, Lehman says. “In the last year just seeing the world’s response to what we are doing here, and how wellreceived it is, is humbling and mind-blowing,” he says. “The rest of the world is seeing what

we’re seeing, and why we love this place.” Cooper’s images of Rochester’s 2012 Wall\ Therapy works were posted on her blog, which is hosted at 12ozprophet.com, and were subsequently picked up by blogs and street art culture sites around the world. “We have some established artists locally whose work was so well received that it just made sense to have them participate again,” says Wilson of stencil artists Thievin’ Stephen and Mr. Prvrt (FUA Krew), as well as shifting-shapes painter St. Monci. Other local artists to be included this year are Bile (FFL crew), Change (FUA Krew), Range (FUA Krew), Adam Francey, Lea Rizzo, and Sarah Rutherford. The latter two artists together run collaborative art space The Yards, which again functions as the “mission control” center for Wall\Therapy. Because both Yards organizers are painting in the festival this year, they plan to begin painting a bit in advance of the other artists, and extra volunteer support will be needed at The Yards. “We need as many volunteers as possible to commit for the duration of the project,” say Wilson. Organizers are still in search of people to support the artists and to provide logistic support in both the Wedge and the El Camino Trail. That includes tasks like driving artists to their mural sites, bringing them food and water, and bringing them to various eateries and areas of local interest in their free time. “To be taken under the wing of a local person just makes the experience all the more genuine and less structured,” says Wilson.

an Indiegogo community crowd-sourced funding endeavor for $30,000, and reached their goal. “Two things pushed me toward crowd-funding this year,” says Wilson. “A lot of resources have been spent personally, and I always say I couldn’t have spent that money in a better way. But it is still a significant amount that I can’t sustain year-to-year. The other bit is that last year we saw how many people supported our efforts...I think we were nominated for five categories [for City Newspaper’s Best of Rochester survey]. It really makes sense to share ownership of something this significant with a larger group of people. I think that’s the way to sustain something like this going forward — to continuously offer people who identify with the mission of this project the opportunity to support” as much as they comfortably can, he says. “With so many worthy causes vying for support, it says a lot that people are choosing to support us,” says Wilson, adding that it speaks to the Rochester community’s progressive thinking regarding patronage of the arts, and specifically the non-traditional arts. In addition to watching the artists’ progress, the community is invited to special events during the festival that will include two block parties (one in each of the main neighborhoods where the festival will take place) with music, dancing, and food on Saturday, July 20, and Thievin’ Stephen’s dance party, “Floor Therapy,” held at Skylark Lounge on Thursday, July 25. An artists’ talk at School of the Arts will be held again this year on Wednesday, July 24.

Because of the more ambitious scope of the

The medical philanthropy endeavor, Impact,

festival this year, Wilson and his team launched

for which Wall\Therapy is a promotional

tool and fundraiser, will soon take center stage, as Wilson seeks to achieve the organization’s goal of implementing medical diagnostic technology in specific third-world communities by the end of this year. Wilson traveled to Borgne, Haiti, in December 2012 as part of a delegation led by Dr. Rose-Marie Chierici, who is the founder of H.O.P.E. Haiti, a Rochester-based charity. “What I saw by putting my feet on the ground in Haiti was an amazing level of dedication by a very young staff of people to care for the community using whatever resources they have,” says Wilson. “I asked the physicians how the addition of x-ray technology would enhance their ability to care for the community,” he says, “and they said it would be like night and day, what they would be able to do diagnostically, and therapeutically.” During his trip, the difficulty of travel in Haiti became apparent to Wilson. “Outside of Port-au-Prince, infrastructure is significantly lacking in many areas,” he says. Roads to connect larger cities often times aren’t paved, and depending on the weather, can be impassible because of rock slides and other hazards. Wilson says that he traveled for hours at about 3 miles per hour over rocks and boulders to get to a cholera clinic. They crossed about three rivers in a vehicle equipped with a snorkel, as well as precarious mountain passes. “And then you realize that people actually walk that distance to get to the clinic,” he says. Wilson says he has seen sick and injured people carried by others on the doors to their houses to get to a clinic. The staff members “are already doing as much as they can, and their needs are much greater. They can’t do

This page, clockwise from top left: Case's mural on State Street; one of Freedom's 2013 murals in an undisclosed location; Wall\Therapy organizer Dr. Ian Wilson; Mr. Prvrt's owls in the Public Market district Opposite page: Murals on Pennsylvania Ave. Cern's animals (top) and Case's mermaid and swimmer (bottom)

See more photos of the wall\therapy murals online at rochestercitynewspaper.com 12 CITY JULY 10-16, 2013

any more without the support of an initiative like ours,” he says. The journey emboldened Wilson to try to get the needed medical facilities funded in this calendar year. Impact will assume a larger presence in the group’s promotional efforts after this summer’s Wall\Therapy festival is done. “We want to weave a stronger link between the medical philanthropy and the mural art this year,” he says. “The goal is to give Impact more of a presence nationally, internationally, and to get support for it. Development is the major hurdle — it’s a lot of money to raise, especially when you’re talking about two sites in conjunction.” (The other Impact site is Cox’s Bazar, in Bangladesh.) In all, the goal is to raise nearly $500,000. “Projects like Wall\Therapy continually allow us to sit down face-to-face with people who actually want to support medical philanthropy in a significant way. And those meetings are happening now,” says Wilson. “There are folks in the community who have expressed interest in helping with the, frankly, more important work of all of this,” he says. “Helping to preserve human life is infinitely more important.” Wall\Therapy seeks not only to create connections through the celebration of art, but also to expose the community to Impact, and its mission of improving the healthcare of communities in the developing world. “Every opportunity that we had to tell that story has come about because of Wall\Therapy. So Wall\Therapy is a tremendous vehicle, a catapult for telling that story,” he says. “We are going to continue to do so in a more robust way for the balance of the year and into 2014.” To that end, Wilson is planning some endeavors and events for the fall, which will include a globalgiving.org campaign. “I realized that my development strategies for

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Impact were a little too provincial, too small, too shortsighted,” Wilson says. “It makes sense that support for Wall\Therapy comes from this community because it’s something that benefits this community, is visible by this community, and is something based here in Rochester.” Wilson believes it makes more sense to have a similar but more widespread approach with regard to Impact, “which from its inception, by definition, is an international project.” “The idea with the Global Giving campaign is to have the Haitian diaspora and the Bengali diaspora be able to support projects that are a benefit to their own communities from wherever they are, be they in the United States, in the United Kingdom, Asia, wherever,” says Wilson. The goal is to get one of the projects funded, if not both of them, by the end of this year. In preparation, Impact will establish a digital presence, “so that people can learn more about what we’re doing and spread the word about what we are trying to accomplish,” he says. “All the pieces of the puzzle are in place, it’s just a matter of funding.”

at wall-therapy.com. If you’re interested in volunteering during the festival, email walltherapyny@gmail.com. City Newspaper will post blogs and Tweet updates during the course of the festival. Watch rochestercitynewspaper.com for updates and follow us on Twitter: @roccitynews. rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 13

Upcoming [ COUNTRY ]

Music

Kenny Chesney Wednesday, August 21. CMAC, 3355 Marvin Sands Drive, Canandaigua. $32.50-$85. 7 p.m. 758-5330. cmacevents.com [ POP/ROCK ]

Maroon 5, Kelly Clarkson Wednesday, September 4. Darien Lake PAC, 9993 Allegheny Rd., Darien Center. $25.50$99.50. 7:30 p.m. 599-4641. darienlake.com [ CLASSICAL ]

RPO: Opening Weekend- Mahler’s First Symphony Thursday,

September 26 and Saturday, September 28. Kodak Hall at Eastman Theatre, 26 Gibbs St. $TBA. 8 p.m. 454-2100. rpo.org

Big Rib BBQ & Blues Fest

THURSDAY, JULY 11-SUNDAY, JULY 14 HIGHLAND PARK FESTIVAL SITE 11:30 A.M. | FREE UNTIL 3 P.M., $5 AFTER ROCHESTEREVENTS.COM [ BLUES ] It’s the perfect festival, really. It centers on two

of my three favorite pastimes: blues and barbeque. And it’s a perfect blend of national and Rochester artists, with locals like the Deborah Magone Band, Steve Grills and the Roadmasters, the Coupe de Villes, Mitty and the Followers, Fred Vine, John Cole, and Joe Beard join the killed-diller line up of Cedric Burnside (pictured; that’s right, RL’s kid), blue-eyed soulster Jesse Dee, just to name a few. Both the line-up and the chow have me salivating like a lawn sprinkler. — BY FRANK DE BLASE

Babayaga SATURDAY, JULY 13 MONTY’S KROWN, 875 MONROE AVE. 9 P.M. | $3 | 271-7050 [ HARD ROCK ] Some heavy or “stoner” bands have

trouble getting out of second gear, getting caught up in their own sludge and drop-tuned quicksand. One glowing exception is Rochester’s Babayaga. With its new disc, “Been A long Time Comin’,” Babayaga pounces as much as it pounds and pummels. It’s monstrous and heavy but still has rock ’n’ roll wings. Achtung! — BY FRANK DE BLASE

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402 W. Commercial St. East Rochester 14 CITY JULY 10-16, 2013

It’s never too late to live happily ever after

WEDNESDAY, JULY 10 [ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ] Jim Lane. Schooner’s Riverside Pub, 70 Pattonwood Dr. 3423030. 7 p.m. Free. The Maria Gillard Band. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 7:30 p.m. Free. Rob & Gary Acoustic. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. 248-4825. 5:30 p.m. Free. Soulfish. Sticky Lips BBQ Juke Joint, 830 Jefferson Rd. 2925544. 7:15 p.m. Free. [ BLUES ]

Rich Thompson THURSDAY, JULY 11 KILBOURN HALL, 26 GIBBS ST. 7:30 P.M. | $10 | ESM.ROCHESTER.EDU [ JAZZ ] Drummer Rich Thompson may be known

locally for teaching jazz drumming and directing the Jazz Lab Band at the Eastman School of Music, but he’s also toured with the Count Basie Orchestra and Byron Stripling, and played with artists like Marian McPartland, Tito Puente, and Bobby McFerrin. When he celebrates the release of his excellent new CD, “Less Is More,” he’ll be joined by a variety of musicians, including Jeff Campbell on bass; Mike Kaupa, flugelhorn; Harold Danko, piano; Doug Stone, tenor sax; and Clay Jenkins, trumpet. — BY RON NETSKY

The Sound Awake SATURDAY, JULY 13 LOVIN’ CUP BISTRO, 300 PARK POINT DRIVE 9 P.M. | $3-$5 | LOVINCUP.COM [ ROCK ] Ithaca-based band The Sound Awake presents

a pleasant, laid-back vibe that feels as classic as it does innovative. Singer-songwriter Nick Bullock has created a collection of songs that recalls the folk-rock of the 60’s, complete with overlapping, background harmonies and clean, tight production. Bullock’s songwriting also calls to mind the late Elliott Smith, due to his clever blend of catchy melodies and lo-fi, relaxed instrumentation. — BY LEAH CREARY

The Ghost Peppers, The Greener Grass Band . Water

Pop sugar and broken arrows

Street Music Hall, 204 N. Water St. 585-325-5600. 9:30 p.m. $5-$10. Natalie B Band. Dinosaur BarB-Que, 99 Court St. 585-3257090. 9 p.m. Free.

[ REVIEW ] BY FRANK DE BLASE

[ CLASSICAL ]

The Bygone Few play the Bug Jar. PHOTO BY FRANK DE BLASE

I know it’s lazy to describe a band’s sound with another band — bands as adjectives, I call it — but sometimes it’s a good kick start in the right direction. So when I tell you the new Rochester band The Bygone Few sounds like a Misfit Concrete Blonde, you’ll understand why…and hopefully accept my apology. The quartet caught me a little off guard when I saw it Tuesday, July 2, at the Bug Jar. Maybe I was used to guitarist Ryan Hurley’s upright-bassdriven psychobilly leanings (most recently in the late, heavy, fast, and sorely underrated Quartershots). What I got instead was a loud and heavy slug of dark rock ’n’ roll. Too swift to be called a dirge, but too noir to ever flirt with pop sugar. All around it was a pretty cool debut for this band, which hopefully won’t be bygone too soon. Coming at you straight outta Broken Arrow, Oklahoma, JD McPherson played an amazing set of gen-u-ine barroom rock ’n’ roll Saturday night at Abilene. The place was boiling to the brim and spilled

out on to the sidewalk, where the music ricocheted as well. Hipsters, greasers, unawares, ne’er-do-wells, Betties, boppers, freaks, and geeks all lined up to see what is one of the next great saviors of vintage and classic American music. McPherson’s guitar work was tight, tart, terse, and twangy as his band flawlessly pumped along like a casual locomotive. When not dishing out delicious originals, the band dug into the Chess catalogue to shake tails in the sardined crowd even further. Its spirited take Chuck Berry and Bo Diddley didn’t hammer on the cliché licks and rhythms, but rather the subtle flow of this unmistakable Windy City wail. Because most of the audience couldn’t see the band due to the large crowd and McPherson’s diminutive size, everything around us — the pretty girls, the duck-tailed boys, bluesers and boozers — became part of a 3-D sensory onslaught of pure rock ’n’ roll glee. Fun, fun, fun. Shazam!

SENSEational MusicArt Night w/SoulSword. ,. 7:15 p.m.

Pieters Family Life Center. 1025 Commons Way. $5. RPO. Ontario Beach Park, 4799 Lake Ave. 7:30 p.m. Free. [ DJ/ELECTRONIC ] Baauer and RL Grime. Pearl Nightclub, 349 East Ave. 757752-8370. 8 p.m. $18. DJ Adam. Nashvilles, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. 334-3030. Call for info.

Ladies Nite: High Heels and Mini Skirts New Wave Wednesdays. Club Clarissas,

293 Clarissa St. 232-3430. 10 p.m. 21+. Call for info. Teen Set 45 Party. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. Free. Why Not Wednesday. Eclipse Bar & Grill, 374 Thurston Rd. 502-922-6567. 10 p.m. Call for info. Y Not Wednesday w/DJ ET. Plush, 151 St. Paul St. 2325650. Call for info. [ JAZZ ]

Mike Pappert. Lemoncello,

137 West Commercial St. 3858565. 6:30 p.m. Free. continues on page 17

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 15

Music

In 2012 the Jon Spencer Blues Explosion released its first album in nearly a decade. But don’t call it a comeback — the band has been around the whole time. PHOTO COURTESY STEFANO GIOVANNINI

The blues don’t jam C O M E H E L P U S C E L E B R AT E O U R

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A reminder of a time when rock ’n’ roll was nothing more than a raw, primal wail, the Jon Spencer Blues Explosion came back in 2012 with “Meat and Bone,” the band’s first album in eight years. Formed in 1991 in New York City out of the ashes of Pussy Galore, The Blues Explosion — frontman Jon Spencer, guitarist Judah Bauer, and drummer Russell Simins — took (and still take) all forms of classic American music, long abandoned by many musicians, and forged a new yet familiar sound. Blues, soul, rockabilly, rhythm and blues, punk are blended together, with all genres linked by a common, urgent thread. Without The Blues Explosion there would be no White Stripes or Black Keys.

Without The Blues Explosion there would be nowhere to go. Spencer got on the horn recently and gave us a blast to discuss the new album, taking chances, the Blues Explosion legacy, and how he doesn’t like the word “jamming.” An edited transcript of the conversation follows.

done in the summer of 2011. Then in October of that year we took a trip out to Benton Harbor, Michigan, to work in this fantastic studio called The Key Club. We holed up there for about nine or 10 days and tracked the record and came back home. And by January 2012 we were done with it.

CITY: What’s happening? Jon Spencer: Man, the Blues Explosion. We

What is the thrust of this new album?

took a few years off last decade. We didn’t do any work, we didn’t play any shows for a few years. Why was that?

For me I was focusing on Heavy Trash. We made three albums and did a lot of touring. What got you to fire the Blues Explosion up again?

We took a few shows here and there, we had a good time, found out we could still do it, that we could play together, and still have a good show. It felt good. So we began to take more concerts and play more frequently. This went on for a couple of years and in 2011 we began thinking about doing another studio album. Most of the writing on “Meat and Bone” was

As far as the sound of the “Meat and Bone” record, like I said before, we just felt awfully good about playing together again. So when we went in to make this record the focus was very much just us playing — the band playing these songs live in the studio. I think every record we’ve made always has that element. We start with a live recording. Granted, it’s in the studio — we play differently in the studio than we do on the stage. But it’s still a real performance. Some are calling “Meat and Bone” a classic Blues Explosion record, as if you strayed from the formula before.

Yeah, I think we’ve always stuck to our guns. At the same time I’d like to think we’ve taken some chances. We’ve done different things to experiment while making records. We’ve made

records where we got real crazy and experimental with the production or whatnot, the mixing. This one I think is lot more straightforward. It’s a savage record in a way; it’s raw, and quite raucous at times. But really it’s just, “OK, here’s the three of us and we’re making a racket.”

WEDNESDAY, JULY 10

What are some of the chances you took with this one?

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Just in making it, which could have been an opportunity for us to fall flat on our faces. We’re not kids anymore. We’ve been playing in this band for more than 22 years.

[ HIP-HOP/RAP ]

But it’s not like the band broke up and now is coming back together to reclaim former glory.

[ REGGAE/JAM ]

With some of our contemporaries, some of our peers, there’s a lot of talk about reunions, or bands going around and playing their classic albums. With The Blues Explosion, we never really broke up, there was no stop, so we’re not really in the same camp. There are bands that are my favorites, real hero bands. The Stooges is a good example. And as much as I love The Stooges, and as important as the band is and was to me, what I’ve heard of the new studio albums…it’s not really my bag. But I can’t begrudge them for wanting to do it, you know? So I guess speaking from a fan’s point of view, I can understand why someone might be a little suspicious to hear that The Blues Explosion was putting out a record in 2012. But I think we made a really great record, and a record that’s very much alive with energy, passion, and a lot of ideas. Yeah, I think in a way it’s a classic thing… but it’s also new in the sense that we ‘ve been doing this so long, and with all that experience comes a kind of wisdom or energy or power, and we applied that to making this record. The Blues Explosion has always struck me as a reminder for those who lose sight of what’s important in rock ’n’ roll. Why do people keep forgetting?

I think anyone going to a concert, going out to see a band and getting sweaty, that person doesn’t need to be reminded. There’s always this stuff in the media about the death of the guitar and the demise of live music and bands. I don’t think that’s ever going to go away. It’s part of who we are as animals. It fulfills a very strong need. It’s this very weird, spiritual, communal happening, going to a show. What’s your songwriting formula?

When we write together, it’s very much a collaboration as far as the music goes. I write the lyrics. We just get together and play. You could call it jamming, but I don’t like that term so much. We just get together and play and the songs just sort of come; they happen. One hundred years from now what will they say about the Jon Spencer Blues Explosion?

I hope someone will still dig it. I’ve always been knocked out by records that seem out of time, out of place. And hopefully some Blues Explosion records will be like that for some kid to puzzle over or marvel at and enjoy as well.

Word of Mouth Wednesday’s w/DJ Private Eye. Dubland

N o t t h e s a m e o l d Ro c h e s t e r S e l e c t i o n

Underground, 315 Alexander St. 585-232-7550. 10 p.m. 21+. $5.

Medicine Wednesdays w/ Thunder Body. Abilene Bar &

Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 585-232-3230. 9:30 p.m. $5-$10. [ POP/ROCK ] Amanda Ashley. Cottage Hotel of Mendon, 1390 Pittsford-Mendon Rd. 585-624-1390. second Wednesday of every month, 9 p.m. Call for info. The Grandmothers of Invention. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. 9 p.m. $22-$25. Don Mancuso & Friends. Nola’s Restaurant & Nightclub, 4775 Lake Ave. 663-3375. 4 p.m. Call for info. Lane & Ott. Schooner’s Riverside Pub, 70 Pattonwood Dr. 3423030. 7 p.m. Call for info. Me and the Boyz. ,. noon. Aqueduct Park, 23 E. Main St. Free.

NAAM w/DRIPPERS!, Thoroughbred, and Stevie Nix Ray Vaughn. Bug Jar, 219

Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. $10-$14. Warehouse. Flaherty’s Webster, 1200 Bay Rd. 671-0816. Call for info.

THURSDAY, JULY 11 [ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ] Bluegrass Jam. Bernunzio’s Uptown Music, 112 East Ave. 7 p.m. Call for info.

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Hochstein at High Falls: Mikaela Davis. Granite Mills Park, 82 Browns Race. 12:10 p.m. Free. Jim Lane. Murph’s Irondequoit Pub, 705 Titus Ave. 342-6780. 8 p.m. Free. Jumbo Shrimp. Marge’s Lakeside Inn, 4909 Culver Rd. 585-3231020. 6 p.m. Call for info.

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Ruckus Juice Jug Stompers w/ Steve Melcher & Drew Moore.

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The Rabbit Room, 61 N. Main St. 582-1830. 6 p.m. Call for info.

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THURSDAY. JULY 11 Big Rib BBQ & Blues Fest. ,.

11:30 a.m. Highland Park Festival Site (Corner of Highland and South Ave.). $5 after 3 p.m. Nightfall. The Beale, 693 South Ave. 585-271-4650. 7:30 p.m. Call for info. The Record Company. House of Guitars, 645 Titus Ave. 585-5443500. 6 p.m. Free.

Rockin’ Robin and The Bucket of Blues. Sticky Lips BBQ Juke Joint, 830 Jefferson Rd. 292-5544. 9 p.m. Free. [ CLASSICAL ]

Arshak Andriasov. Little

Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 7:30 p.m. \. Free.

RPO: Temple B’rith Kodesh Concert. Temple B’rith Kodesh, 2131 Elmwood Ave. 585-2447060. 7:30 p.m. $25-$30.

Summer@Eastman - Historical Harp Society concert. Eastman

East Wing Hatch Recital Hall, 26 Gibbs St. 7:30 p.m. $10.

Valley Manor Annual Arts and Musicfest. ,. noon. Valley Manor

Apartments, 1570 East Ave. Free. [ DJ/ELECTRONIC ]

Party Monster Thursdays. ONE

Nightclub and Lounge, 1 Ryan Alley. 546-1010. 10 p.m. 18+. Call for info. DJ Matt. Nashvilles, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. 334-3030. Call for info. DJ Sal DeSantis. ,. 7 p.m. Call for info. Karaoke at Panorama. Panorama Night Club & Sports Bar, 730 Elmgrove Rd. 2472190. 9 p.m. Free.

Midnite Snack Buffet ft. DJ Blaze. Hatter’s Pub, 5 West

Main St. 872-1505. 11:30 p.m. Call for info. Revolution Thursdays. Call for info. Thirsty Thursday’s. TC Riley’s, 200 Park Point Dr. 272-9777. 10 p.m. Call for info. Thursday Night Shakedown. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 11 p.m. Free.

Tiki Thursdays: Shotgun Music DJ. McGhan’s Pub, 11 W. Main

St. 924-3660. 7:30 p.m. Free. Tilt-a-Whirl Drag Show.. Tilt Nightclub & Ultralounge, 444 Central Ave. 232-8440. 11:15 p.m. & 12:30 a.m. $3. [ JAZZ ]

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Kilbourn Hall, 26 Gibbs St. 3 p.m. Call for info. The Swooners. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. 248-4825. 5:30 p.m. Free. [ KARAOKE ]

Karaoke at Center Cafe. ,. 7 p.m. Free.

Karaoke at Willow Inn. Willow

Inn, 428 Manitou Rd. 392-3489. 8 p.m. Free. Karaoke at Brickwood Grill. Brickwood Grill, 250 Monroe Ave. 585-730-8230. 9 p.m. Call for info.

Karaoke at Pineapple Jack’s. Pineapple Jack’s, 485 Spencerport Rd. 247-5225. 9 p.m. Free.

Karaoke Night w/Debbie Randyn.

Pittsford Pub, 60 N. Main St. 585586-4650. 9:30 p.m. Free. Karaoke w/DJ Smooth. Club Clarissas, 293 Clarissa St. 2323430. Call for info. Karaoke w/George. Temple Bar and Grille, 109 East Ave. 2326000. 8 p.m. Free. Karaoke w/Shotgun Music. McGhan’s Pub, 11 W. Main St. 924-3660. Free. Karaoke w/Summer Bob. Shorts Bar & Grill, 35 N. Main St. 3880136. 10 p.m. Free. Karoake w/Cyd Scarlett. Victor Village Inn, 34 East Main Street. 925-5025. 8:30 p.m. Call for info. [ OPEN MIC ]

5 Alarm Open Jam. ,. 9 p.m. Call for info.

Open Mic at Towpath Cafe. ,. 6:30 p.m. Free.

Open Mic Jam Boulder Park Ave.. Boulder Coffee Co., 739 Park Ave. 585-697-0235. 7:30 p.m. Free. Open Mic w/Steve Piper. Flipside Bar & Grill, 2001 E. Main St. 585288-3930. 9 p.m. Free. Spot Coffee Open Mic. SPoT Coffee, 200 East Ave. 585-6134600. 7 p.m. Call for info. [ R&B ]

Jesse Dee. House of Guitars,

645 Titus Ave. 585-544-3500. 4:30 p.m. Free.

Rochester Summerfest Day Party ft. J-Holiday, Ms. Angel White. ONE Nightclub and Lounge, 1 Ryan Alley. 5461010. 6 p.m. $20.

Deborah Branch. Lemoncello,

137 West Commercial St. 3858565. 6 p.m. Free. John Palocy Trio. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. 585-6625555. 6 p.m. Free. Mike Kaupa. Monroe’s Restaurant, 3001 Monroe Avenue. (585) 348-9104. 6 p.m. Call for info. Rhythm Dogs. Dinosaur Bar-BQue, 99 Court St. 585-325-7090. 9 p.m. Free.

Summer@Eastman - Summer Jazz Studies Faculty Concert: Rich Thompson CD release concert. Kilbourn Hall, 26 Gibbs St. 7:30 p.m. $10.

18 CITY JULY 10-16, 2013

[ REGGAE/JAM ]

Party in the Park: Island Reggae Party ft. John Brown’s Body, The Skatalites, Mosaic Foundation. Riverside Festival Site, 148 Exchange Blvd. 5 p.m. $2-$5.

[ POP/ROCK ] Bart and Kevin. Penfield Amphitheater, 3100 Atlantic Ave. 340-8663. 7 p.m. Free. Dave McGrath Trio. Schooner’s Riverside Pub, 70 Pattonwood Dr. 342-3030. 7 p.m. Call for info. Five Alarm Open Jam. Firehouse Saloon, 814 S. Clinton Ave. 585319-3832. 9 p.m. Call for info.

The Fleshtones. Lovin’ Cup, 300

[ REGGAE/JAM ] Turnip Stampede. Dinosaur Bar-B-Que, 99 Court St. 585325-7090. 10 p.m. Free.

Park Point Dr. 292-9940. 9 p.m. $12-$15.

MATH the Band w/Revengineers, Matthew Joseph Payne. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 8 p.m. $7-$9. Mr. Mustard. Silk O’Loughlin’s, 5980 St. Paul Blvd. 585-2667047. 7 p.m. Call for info.

[ POP/ROCK ]

Adam Falcon Memorial Scholarship Fundraiser w/Peter Pitts, Toothless Flamingo. Mickey Finn’s, 14 Railroad St. 924-4660. 9 p.m. Free. Aqueous. Dubland Underground, 315 Alexander St. 232-7550. 10 p.m. $7.

FRIDAY, JULY 12 [ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ] Frankie & Jewels. 140 Alex Bar & Grill, 140 Alexander St. 585-2561000. 6:30 p.m. Call for info. Jim Lane. Hooligan’s Eastside Grill, 809 Ridge Rd. 671-7180. 5 p.m. Free. Owen Winter. Crossroads Coffeehouse, 752 S. Goodman St. 230-6086. 7:30 p.m. Free, Donations Accepted. Ralph Louis. Rochester Plaza Hotel, 70 State St. 546-3450. 6 p.m. Free.

Rayce Maolne & John Ryan w/ Ciarin’s Pride. McGraw’s Irish

Pub, 146 W Commercial St. 3489091. 6 p.m. Free.

Tullamore Celtic Band w/ Young School of Irish Dance.

Sonnenberg Gardens and Mansion State Historic Park, 151 Charlotte St. 394-4922. 7 p.m. $4-$9. [ BLUES ]

Big Rib BBQ & Blues Fest. ,.

11:30 a.m. Highland Park Festival Site (Corner of Highland and South Ave.). $5 after 3 p.m. Dan Schmitt & The Shadows. Johnny’s Irish Pub, 1382 Culver Rd. 224-0990. 8 p.m. Free. Ezra & The Storm. The Beale, 693 South Ave. 585-271-4650. 7:30 p.m. Call for info. Gian Carlo Cervone Trio. The Pultneyville Grill, 4135 Mill St. (315) 589-4512. 7 p.m. Call for info. Johnny B and The MVPs. The Beale, 1930 Empire Blvd. 585216-1070. 7:30 p.m. Call for info. [ CLASSICAL ] RPO: Summer Spectacular with Fireworks. SUNY Geneseo, 1 College Rd. 8:30 p.m. $5-$12. [ COUNTRY ] Brad Paisley. Darien Lake PAC, 9993 Allegheny Rd. 599-4641. 7 p.m. $30.50-$79.50. [ DJ/ELECTRONIC ] On the House Fridays. ONE Nightclub and Lounge, 1 Ryan Alley. 546-1010. 21+. Call for info. Chill Out Fridays Happy Hour. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. 5:30 p.m. Free. DJ/Karaoke w/Coyote Cody. ,. 9:30 p.m. Call for info. DJ Bac Spin. Plush, 151 St. Paul St. 232-5650. 8 p.m. Call for info. DJ Blake. 140 Alex Bar & Grill, 140 Alexander St. 585-256-1000. 10 p.m. Call for info. DJ Cedric. Vertex Night Club, 169 N. Chestnut St. 585-232-5498. 10 p.m. $3-$8.

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CLASSICAL | ROCHESTER PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA

Baritone Aaron Bigeleisen (pictured) has won several local and national competitions for young singers, appeared on NPR’s “From the Top,” sang the national anthem at the White House as a presidential scholar in the arts — and he just graduated from high school. Bigeleisen also won the Rochester Philharmonic League’s Young Artist Auditions Special Award and a chance to perform with the RPO. He will do just that on July 11 in a concert at Temple B’rith Kodesh, singing Mozart’s “Non più andrai” (“The Marriage of Figaro”) and the American song “Shenandoah.” Matthew Kraemer leads the orchestra in operatic, ballet, and Broadway selections by Offenbach, Tchaikovsky, Irving Berlin, and other composers. Also this weekend, the RPO offers its 90th Anniversary Gala, a Roaring 20’s-themed evening with music from the orchestra led by Jeff Tyzik, dinner, dancing, live and silent auctions, and lots more (Saturday, July 13, 6 p.m. at the Rochester Riverside Convention Center; $200/ticket). The Rochester Philharmonic Orchestra performs Thursday, July 11, 7:30 p.m. at Temple B’rith Kodesh, 2131 Elmwood Ave. $25-$30. 244-7060, rpo.org. — BY DAVID RAYMOND DJ Energon. Vertex Night Club,

169 N. Chestnut St. 585-2325498. 10 p.m. $3-$8. DJ Mi-T-Mo. Richmond’s Tavern, 21 Richmond Street. (585) 2708570. 9 p.m. Free.

Fresh Meat Fridays w/Samantha Vega, DJ Mighty Mic. Tilt

Nightclub & Ultralounge, 444 Central Ave. 232-8440. 11:15 p.m. & 12:30 a.m. $4-$12. Happy Hour: DJ NaNa. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 5:30 p.m. 21+. Free. Lube After Dark. Quaker Steak & Lube, 2205 Buffalo Rd. 585-6979464. 9:30 p.m. Free. Reggaeton w/DJ Carlos. La Copa Ultra Lounge, 235 W. Ridge Rd. 254-1050. 10 p.m. Free.

The Salad Bar Revue hosted by Ambrosia Salad, DJ Solid Bear. 140 Alex Bar & Grill, 140

Alexander St. 585-256-1000. 11:30 p.m. & 1 a.m. Call for info.

T.G.I. Bucket Friday ft. DJ Jestyr, Dr. Jamo. ,. Call for info. [ JAZZ ]

The Russell Fielder Trio. Little

Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 8:30 p.m. Free. Vanessa Mangione. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. 585-6625555. 6 p.m. Free. The White Hots. Lemoncello, 137 West Commercial St. 385-8565. 7 p.m. Free.

[ KARAOKE ]

Karaoke w/Cody. Nashvilles,

4853 W Henrietta Rd. 334-3030. 5 p.m. Free. Karaoke at Flaherty’s Webster. Flaherty’s Webster, 1200 Bay Rd. 671-0816. 9 p.m. Call for info.

Karaoke at Pineapple Jack’s. Pineapple Jack’s, 485

Spencerport Rd. 247-5225. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke by Dan & Sherri. Barnard Restaurant & Party House, 360 Maiden Ln. 585-6631250. 8 p.m. Free. Karaoke w/Cyd Scarlett!. Norton’s Pub, 1730 N. Goodman St. 2663570. 10 p.m. Karaoke w/Krazy George. Scotland Yard Pub, 187 Saint Paul St. 730-5030. 10 p.m. Call for info. Karaoke w/Summer Bob. Shorts Bar & Grill, 35 N. Main St. 3880136. 10 p.m. Free. [ OPEN MIC ]

Open Mic Night. Mooseberry

Café, 2555 Baird Rd. 585-3489022. 6 p.m. Call for info. [ R&B ]

Rochester Summerfest: The Whispers, Lenny Williams.

Auditorium Theatre, 885 E. Main St. 585-222-5000. 7:30 p.m. $27.50-$32.50.

Public Market, 280 N. Union St. 6 p.m. Free. Crabapples. Acanthus Café, 337 East Ave. 585-319-5999. Call for info. Fat City. Schooner’s Riverside Pub, 70 Pattonwood Dr. 3423030. 7 p.m. Call for info. Gang of Thieves. Sticky Lips BBQ Juke Joint, 830 Jefferson Rd. 292-5544. 9:30 p.m. Free. Johnny Bauer And Great Escape. ,. 7 p.m. Gazebo Concerts On The Canal: Union St. At Canal, Spencerport. Call for info. Mercia. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N. Water St. 585-325-5600. 6:30 p.m. $10-$12. Octane. Pelican’s Nest, 566 River St. 663-5910. 10 p.m. Call for info.

Park Point Concert Series: Springer, Bonfire, and Tryst. ,. 6 p.m. Park Point. Free.

Roc City w/The Morgan Twins.

Nola’s Restaurant & Nightclub, 4775 Lake Ave. 663-3375. 6 p.m. Call for info.

Labatt/Park Point Fest After Party: Sirsy. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. 10:30 p.m. Free.

Sleepwalk Parade w/49 Days, The Lost Patrol. Firehouse

Saloon, 814 S. Clinton Ave. 585319-3832. 9 p.m. $7.

Summer People w/ Televisionaries, Blue Falcon, and Pleistocene. Bug Jar, 219

Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. $7-$9. The Surge. Captain Jack’s Good Time Tavern, 8505 Greig St. 4839570. 9 p.m. Call for info.

SATURDAY, JULY 13 [ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ] Jim Lane. Hamlin Station Bar & Grill, 52 Railroad Ave. 964-2010. 8:30 p.m. Free. Katherine Aelias Band. Boulder Coffee Co., 739 Park Ave. 607280-9898. 7 p.m. Free.

Lovin Cup Unplugged Dinner Music Series: Amanda Lee Peers. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. 6 p.m. Free. Noel Leon. Tapas 177 Lounge, 177 St. Paul St. 585-262-2090. 11 p.m. Free. [ BLUES ]

Big Rib BBQ & Blues Fest. ,.

11:30 a.m. Highland Park Festival Site (Corner of Highland and South Ave.). $5 after 3 p.m. The Imaginary Band. The Beale, 1930 Empire Blvd. 585-2161070. 7:30 p.m. Call for info.

DOES SEX HURT?

Luca Foresta & Electro Kings.

The Beale, 693 South Ave. 585271-4650. 7:30 p.m. Call for info. Steve Grills & The Roadmasters. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 8:30 p.m. Free. Teagan & The Tweeds. Dinosaur Bar-B-Que, 99 Court St. 585325-7090. 10 p.m. Free.

Are you between 18 and 50 years of age and have pain with intercourse and tampon insertion? The University of Rochester is conducting a double-blind placebo-controlled research study sponsored by the National Institute of Health to determine the effectiveness of Gabapentin compared to placebo in reducing intercourse pain. Participants will receive Gabapentin one half of the time and placebo (inactive treatment) one half of the time, study-related care at no cost, and $50 per visit, or a total of $300 if all six visits are completed.

[ CLASSICAL ]

Gibbs & Main Kidsemble III: Rap It Up. The Harley School, 1981 Clover St. 442-1770. 2 p.m. $5.

RPO: 90th Anniversary Gala. Rochester Riverside

Convention Center, 123 E Main St. 6 p.m. $200. [ COUNTRY ] Wolf Mountain. Nashvilles, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. 334-3030. 9 p.m. Call for info Nashvilles, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. 334-3030. 9 p.m. $5.00. [ DJ/ELECTRONIC ]

Blue Label Saturdays ft. DJ Andy Fade and DJ Bobby Base. Flat Iron Café, 561 State St. 585-454-4830. Call for info. DJ Big Reg. Plush, 151 St. Paul St. 232-5650. 10 p.m. Call for info. DJ Blake. 140 Alex Bar & Grill, 140 Alexander St. 585-2561000. 10 p.m. Call for info. DJ Darkwave. Vertex Night Club, 169 N. Chestnut St. 585-2325498. 10 p.m. $3-$8. DJ Trancesend. Decibel Lounge, 45 Euclid St. 585-754-4645. 10 p.m. $5. La Selva. Tilt Nightclub & Ultralounge, 444 Central Ave. 232-8440. 10 p.m. Call for info. Saturday Night Ladies Night. BLU Bar & Grill, 250 Pixley Rd. 247-0079. 9 p.m. Call for info. [ JAZZ ]

Jim E Leggs. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. 585-662-5555. 6 p.m. Free.

Ted Nicolosi and Shared Genes. Jasmine’s Asian

Fusion, 657 Ridge Rd. 216-1290. 6:30 p.m. Free. Uptown Groove. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. 2484825. 7:30 p.m. Free. The White Hots. The Pultneyville Grill, 4135 Mill St. (315) 5894512. 7 p.m. Call for info. [ R&B ]

Coupe De Villes. Nola’s

Restaurant & Nightclub, 4775 Lake Ave. 663-3375. 6 p.m. Call for info.

Rochester Summerfest: TGT (Tyrese, Ginuwine and Tank), Kelly Rowland, Chrisette. Blue

Cross Arena, One War Memorial Square. 758-5300. 7:30 p.m. $26.25-$70.25. [ POP/ROCK ]

Babayaga CD Release Party w/ Sulaco. Monty’s Krown, 875

Monroe Ave. 271-7050. 9 p.m. $3.

Earth Crisis “Firestorm” 20th Aniversary Concert. The Lost

Horizon, 5863 Thompson Rd. 313-9655. 6 p.m. $10-$12.

R&B/HIP-HOP | ROCHESTER SUMMERFEST

Call Linda Leoni at 585-275-3160 or email linda_leoni@urmc.rochester.edu.

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It seemed for a while that the Rochester Music Fest (now called Rochester Summerfest) had died off with the Johnson administration. Weak line-ups and a lack of focus all but killed the once-huge summer event. But it looks like it’s back. There’s some heavy hitters on this bill in the hip-hop/R&B scene. Something for everyone — even the big kids. The event kicks off Thursday, July 11, 6 p.m. with a Day Party featuring J-Holiday at One (1 Ryan Alley), then continues with soul legends The Whispers Friday, July 12, 7:30 p.m. at the Auditorium Theatre (885 E. Main St.). The music moves to Blue Cross Arena (1 War Memorial Square) on Saturday, July 13, 7:30 p.m. for a modern r’n’b line-up featuring TGT (Tyrese, Ginuwine, Tank), Kelly Rowland, Fabolous, and Chrisette Michele. And then it wraps up Sunday, July 14, for the All-White Affair at Max at High Falls (60 Browns Race). Tickets vary for each event; check rochestersummerfest.com for more information. — BY FRANK DE BLASE The Chairs. Johnny’s Irish Pub,

1382 Culver Rd. 224-0990. 8 p.m. Free. Cosco & The Banditos. Pelican’s Nest, 566 River St. 663-5910. 10 p.m. Call for info. Corn Hill Arts Festival. Corn Hill Neighborhood, 133 South Fitzhugh Street. 585.262.3142. 10 a.m. Free. fun. w/Tegan and Sara. CMAC, 3355 Marvin Sands Drive. 7585300. 8 p.m. $25-$40.

Geneseo Rotary Summer Festival ft. The Skycoasters. ,. 8 p.m. Geneseo Village Park. Free. InsideOut Party of the Deck. Richmond’s Tavern, 21 Richmond Street. (585) 2708570. 8:30 p.m. Call for info. The Katherine Aelias Band. Boulder Coffee Co., 739 Park Ave. 585-697-0235. 7 p.m. Call for info.

Kindness for Kendall Benefit Concert and Festival.. The Apple Farm, 1640 State Rte. 444. noon. Call for info. Midnight City. Sticky Lips BBQ Juke Joint, 830 Jefferson Rd. 292-5544. 10 p.m. Free. Mike & Sergi. Bayside Pub, 279 Lake Rd. 585-323-1224. Call for info. Mojo Monkeyz w/Eric Carlin. Schooner’s Riverside Pub, 70 Pattonwood Dr. 342-3030. 2 p.m. Call for info.

Psychic Temple. Visual Studies Workshop, 31 Prince Street. (585) 442-8676. Call for info.

Rockstar Energy Drink Mayhem Festival. Darien Lake PAC, 9993 Allegheny Rd. 599-4641. 1 p.m. $35-$105.

Severed Fest: Criminal Element, Scalpel, Abdicate, and Goemagot. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 8 p.m. Limited entry for unders. Call for info. The Sound Awake. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. 9 p.m. $3-$5.

Train w/Michael Franti & Spearhead, Gavin DeGraw.

Darien Lake PAC, 9993 Allegheny Rd. 599-4641. 7 p.m. $25-$75.

SUNDAY, JULY 14 [ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ] Celtic Music Sundays. Temple Bar and Grille, 109 East Ave. 232-6000. 7 p.m. Free. Corey & Brian. The Titus Tavern, 692 Titus Ave. 270-5365. 6 p.m. Call for info. Fandango at the Tango. Tango Cafe, 389 Gregory St. 271-4930. 7:30 p.m. Free, donations accepted. continues on page 20

Up 2 Something w/Night Stalkers. Captain Jack’s Good

Time Tavern, 8505 Greig St. 4839570. 9 p.m. Call for info. rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 19

SUNDAY, JULY 14

[ DJ/ELECTRONIC ]

Friends Unplugged. Captain

Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. 21+. Free.

Manic Monday Retro Dance: DJ Cub, C, Darren. Bug Jar, 219

Jack’s Good Time Tavern, 8505 Greig St. 483-9570. 3 p.m. Call for info.

[ JAZZ ]

Alphonso Williams. Bistro 135,

135 W. Commercial St. 585-6625555. 5:30 p.m. Free. Ed Clute’s Dixie Five Plus. Green Lantern Inn, One East Church St. 381-7603. 6:30 p.m. $12. The Seth Uptown Duo. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 7:30 p.m. Free.

[ BLUES ]

Big Rib BBQ & Blues Fest. 11:30 a.m. Highland Park Festival Site (Corner of Highland and South Ave.). $5 after 3 p.m.

The Jon Spencer Blues Explosion w/catl, The Ginger Faye Bakers. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. 21+. $13-$17. Teagan Ward. Marge’s Lakeside Inn, 4909 Culver Rd. 585-3231020. 4 p.m. Call for info.

[ DJ/ELECTRONIC ] Boasy Sundaze. Club Clarissas, 293 Clarissa St. 232-3430. Call for info. Drink and Drag Sundays. ONE Nightclub and Lounge, 1 Ryan Alley. 546-1010. 8 p.m. 18+. Call for info.

Tequila Sundays ft. DJ Andy Fade. Flat Iron Café, 561 State

St. 585-454-4830. 10 p.m. Call for info. [ JAZZ ]

Bill Slater Solo Piano (Brunch).

Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. 248-4825. Call for info. Free. Joe Santora Trio. The Pultneyville Grill, 4135 Mill St. (315) 5894512. 4 p.m. Call for info. Rhythm Dogs. Schooner’s Riverside Pub, 70 Pattonwood Dr. 342-3030. 3 p.m. Call for info. [ KARAOKE ]

Karaoke w/Cyd Scarlett. Jose &

Willy’s, 20 Lakeshore Drive. 9050222. 8:30 p.m.

[ KARAOKE ] EXPERIMENTAL ROCK | SUMMER PEOPLE

Upstate New York’s Donna the Buffalo has been active in the music scene for more than two decades. The group is well-known for its distinctive brand of Americana music, mixing its familiar roots with a plethora of genres, ranging from reggae to zydeco to the blues. Donna recently released “Tonight, Tomorrow, and Yesterday,” an album that is devoid of heavy production, as it was recorded live, directly onto analog tape. In fact, on this new release, the band presents an entirely different sound than on most previous releases — particularly 2008’s “Silverlined,” which embraced a radio-friendly, clean-cut sound.

Despite the incessant rain and lackluster sunshine that we have been forced to live with lately, summer will finally come to Rochester this week in the form of five dudes from Binghamton. The Summer People sound is as unpredictable as the weather in Western New York, so calling it “experimental” is about as close as it gets. The collective is known for its energetic and unpredictable live shows that throw elements of post-punk, progressive rock, heavy blues, and freaky folk against the proverbial wall to see what sticks. The band’s most recent album, “Burn the Germs,” was released in April and has been lighting a fire under critics and fans alike. With Televisionaries, Blue Falcon, and Pleistocene.

Donna the Buffalo performs Friday, July 12, 6-10 p.m. as part of Band on the Bricks at the Rochester Public Market, 280 N. Union St. Free admission. Cityofrochester.gov/ bandsonbricks. — BY LEAH CREARY [ POP/ROCK ]

Brass Taxi, Anger Management. Pelican’s Nest, 566 River St. 663-5910. 2 p.m. Call for info. Corn Hill Arts Festival. Corn Hill Neighborhood, 133 South Fitzhugh Street. 585.262.3142. 10 a.m. Free.

Listener. Dubland

Underground, 315 Alexander St. 585-232-7550. 7:50 p.m. $8-$10. Warehouse. Bayside Pub, 279 Lake Rd. 585-323-1224. Call for info.

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TUESDAY, JULY 16 [ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ] Mike Z. The Titus Tavern, 692 Titus Ave. 270-5365. 7 p.m. Call for info. [ BLUES ] P.I.’s Lounge, 495 West Ave. 8 p.m. Call for info. Teagan Ward. The Beale, 693 South Ave. 585-271-4650. 7 p.m. Call for info.

Asbury First United Methodist Church, 1050 East Ave. 2711050. 8 p.m. Free, donations accepted.

[ CLASSICAL ]

Pipe Organ Encounter Advanced: Faculty Recital featuring organists: Peter DuBois, Nathan Laube, Nicole Marane, and Carole Terry.

Summer@Eastman - Faculty Recital - Janet Milnes, violin & George Taylor, viola. Kilbourn

Hall, 26 Gibbs St. 7:30 p.m. $10.

[ CLASSICAL ]

Irondequoit Concert Band.

Charlotte Genesee Lighthouse, 70 Lighthouse St. 7:15 p.m. Free.

Pipe Organ Encounter Advanced: Faculty Recital featuring organists: Eduardo Bellotti, Annie Laver, Elizabeth Lenti,

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Summer People performs Friday, July 12, 9 p.m. at Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. $7-$9. bugjar.com. — BY DAVID YOCKEL, JR.

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and Charles Tompkins. Sacred

The Directionals w/Citris, The Hounds Below, Wixley & Crump.

Heart Cathedral, 296 Flower City Park. 7:30 p.m. Free, donations accepted.

Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. $6-$8. Dog House. Pelican’s Nest, 566 River St. 663-5910. 7 p.m. Free.

Summer@Eastman - Summer Sing: Haydn - The Creation.

Kilbourn Hall, 26 Gibbs St. 7:30 p.m. $5.

WEDNESDAY, JULY 17

[ DJ/ELECTRONIC ]

[ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ]

2 Reason Tuesdays w/DJ Zio.

Nathaniel’s Pub, 251 Exchange Boulevard. 232-8470. Call for info. Free. DJ Ghetto Blaster. Club Clarissas, 293 Clarissa St. 232-3430. Call for info. DJ Kathy. Nashvilles, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. 334-3030. Call for info. Old School Tuesdays. ,. Call for info. Free.

Tuesday Americano w/Bobby Base. Flat Iron Café, 561 State St. 585-454-4830. Call for info. [ JAZZ ]

Charlie Mitchell Group. Flipside

Bar & Grill, 2001 E. Main St. 2883930. 8 p.m. Free. Jim Nugent. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. 585-662-5555. 6 p.m. Free.

The River Dogs Dixieland Jazz Band -. Penfield Amphitheater,

3100 Atlantic Ave. 340-8663. 7 p.m. Free. Roses & Revolutions. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. 248-4825. 5:30 p.m. Free. [ KARAOKE ]

Karaoke at 140 Alex. 140 Alex

Bar & Grill, 140 Alexander St. 585-256-1000. 10:30 p.m. Free. Karaoke with Nik Entertainment. Richmond’s Tavern, 21 Richmond Street. (585) 2708570. 10 p.m. Call for info. Karaoke w/Tina P. MicGinny’s, 2246 E River Rd. 247-7770 . 9 p.m. Call for info.

The Blind Owl Band Album Release Party. Sticky Lips BBQ

ROCK | SIRSY

Albany-based Sirsy’s sound is impressively full, considering the fact that it is merely a duo. The band consists of singer/drummer Mel and guitarist Mike, joining together in a White Stripes-esque effort toward making a very big noise with a very small band. Sirsy’s songs are reminiscent of the heavy, grunge-influenced pop of the 90’s, calling to mind such bands as No Doubt and Soundgarden. Mel’s voice is the star of the show — equal parts strong and vulnerable — with an impressive range and a captivating style. The duo writes energetic rock songs with introspective lyrics and unforgettable melodies. Sirsy performs on Friday, July 12, 10:30 p.m. at Lovin’ Cup Bistro, 300 Park Point Drive. Free. Lovincup.com. — BY LEAH CREARY Open Mic w/String Theory.

[ OPEN MIC ]

Golden Link Singaround.

Twelve Corners Presbyterian Church, 1200 S. Winton Rd. 244-8585. 7:30 p.m. Free. Open Mic Night. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. 8:30 p.m. Free Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. 8:30 p.m. Free.

Johnny’s Irish Pub, 1382 Culver Rd. 224-0990. 8 p.m. Free. [ POP/ROCK ]

Daughtry, 3 Doors Down w/ Halestorm, Bad Seed Rising. CMAC, 3355 Marvin Sands Drive. 758-5300. 7 p.m. $20-$55.

Juke Joint, 830 Jefferson Rd. 292-5544. 8 p.m. $8-$10. The Dady Brothers. Ontario Beach Park, 4799 Lake Ave. 7 p.m. Free. Dave McGrath. Marge’s Lakeside Inn, 4909 Culver Rd. 585-3231020. 6 p.m. Call for info. Irish Ben. Johnny’s Irish Pub, 1382 Culver Rd. 224-0990. 8 p.m. Free. Johnny Bauer. Schooner’s Riverside Pub, 70 Pattonwood Dr. 342-3030. 7 p.m. Call for info. The Maria Gillard Band. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 7:30 p.m. Free. Rob & Gary Acoustic. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. 248-4825. 5:30 p.m. Free.

DJ Cedric. Vertex Night Club, 169 N. Chestnut St. 585-232-5498. third Wednesday of every month. Call for info.

Ladies Nite: High Heels and Mini Skirts New Wave Wednesdays. Club Clarissas,

293 Clarissa St. 232-3430. 10 p.m. 21+. Call for info. Teen Set 45 Party. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. Free. Why Not Wednesday. Eclipse Bar & Grill, 374 Thurston Rd. 502922-6567. 10 p.m. Call for info. Y Not Wednesday w/DJ ET. Plush, 151 St. Paul St. 232-5650. Call for info. [ JAZZ ]

Bobby DiBaudo Duo. Bistro

135, 135 W. Commercial St. 585-662-5555. 6 p.m. Free. Mike Pappert. Lemoncello, 137 West Commercial St. 3858565. 6:30 p.m. Free. [ KARAOKE ]

Italian American Karaoke. Italian American Community Center, 150 Frank Dimino Way. 5948882. 7:30 p.m. Free.

Karaoke at Mayfield’s Pub. ,.

9 p.m. Free.

[ CLASSICAL ]

Eighth Annual Chamber Music Concert. Temple B’rith Kodesh, 2131 Elmwood Ave. 585-2447060. 7 p.m. Free.

Pipe Organ Encounter Advanced: Faculty Recital featuring organists: David Higgs, Stephen Kennedy, Christian Lane, and Catherine Rodland. Christ Church, 141 East Ave. 4543878. 7:30 p.m. Free, donations accepted Kilbourn Hall, 26 Gibbs St. 7:30 p.m. $10. [ DJ/ELECTRONIC ] DJ Adam. Nashvilles, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. 334-3030. Call for info.

Karaoke at Sanibel Cottage.

Sanibel Cottage, 1517 Empire Blvd. 671-9340. 6 p.m. Free. Karaoke w/Cyd Scarlett. Jose & Willy’s, 20 Lakeshore Drive. 905-0222. 8:30 p.m. Karaoke Wednesdays. Flat Iron Café, 561 State St. 585-4544830. Call for info. Karaoke w/Mark. Flipside Bar & Grill, 2001 E. Main St. 585288-3930. 9 p.m. Free.

[ HIP-HOP/RAP ]

Word of Mouth Wednesday’s w/DJ Private Eye. Dubland Underground, 315 Alexander St. 585-232-7550. 10 p.m. 21+. $5. [ REGGAE/JAM ]

Medicine Wednesdays w/ Thunder Body. Abilene Bar &

Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 585-232-3230. 9:30 p.m. $5-$10. [ POP/ROCK ]

Def Leppard w/Slash, Myles Kennedy, and The Conspirators. CMAC, 3355 Marvin Sands Drive. 7585300. 8 p.m. $30-$125.

Garden Vibes Series: NRBQ.

George Eastman House, 900 East Ave. 6 p.m. $5-$12. Don Mancuso & Friends. Nola’s Restaurant & Nightclub, 4775 Lake Ave. 663-3375. 4 p.m. Call for info.

Mac DeMarco w/Light Feelings, The Branch Davidians. Bug Jar, 219

Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. $8-$12. Nostalgic Reunion . ,. 6:30 p.m. Lakefront Park, Geneva. Free. Our Friends Band. Dinosaur Bar-B-Que, 99 Court St. 585325-7090. 9 p.m. Free. Virgil Cain. BLU Bar & Grill, 250 Pixley Rd. 585-7502980. 6 p.m. Call for info.

[ R&B ]

Melodic Collage. ,. noon.

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rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 21

Theater

Cast members of Shakespeare Players’ “Twelfth Night.” The production is running through July 20 at the Highland Bowl. PHOTO PROVIDED

Summer of love “Twelfth Night” BY THE SHAKESPEARE PLAYERS THROUGH JULY 20 HIGHLAND BOWL, SOUTH AVENUE FREE | ROCHESTERCOMMUNITYPLAYERS.ORG [ REVIEW ] BY DAVID RAYMOND

The combination of Shakespeare, a warm summer night, a lovely green space, fireflies, and a bottle of wine (well, not if you’re reviewing, of course) has been a popular one in Rochester for 17 years, thanks to the Rochester Community Players. The group’s Shakespeare Players shingle presents the Bard’s works throughout the year, but it’s always pleasant to revisit these annual summer performances, held outdoors in the Highland Bowl. This year the Shakespeare Players are presenting “Twelfth Night,” which continues nightly (except Mondays and Thursdays) through July 20. And it is as pleasing an evening as ever. The play is generally thought of as one of those “rollicking” Shakespeare comedies — it was originally performed at the end of the Christmas season, which apparently was the 17th-century equivalent of Spring Break, a time for 22 CITY JULY 10-16, 2013

rule-bending and bad behavior (hence the play’s subtitle, “What You Will”). But while “Twelfth Night” is definitely a comedy, it strikes me a rather sad, or at least philosophical, one. It begins with a shipwreck and a supposed death, and ends with a clown singing a song with the refrain, “The rain it raineth every day.” In between we have a woman excessively mourning her brother’s death, and a pompous servant given his comeuppance by being locked up as a madman, among other events. But there are also roistering drunks, mistaken identities, bawdy puns, some gentle gender-bending, and musings on the nature of love, and a happy ending in which order is restored, at least temporarily. The Shakespeare Players’ production, directed by Brad Craddock, keeps things light and direct, which is appropriate enough for such an informal (and huge) venue as Highland Bowl. Craddock, the designers (or at least the costume designer), and the composer try to give the play a vaguely 60’s or 70’s, love-the-one-you’re-with vibe. There’s nothing wrong with that. The play is set in Illyria, a kind of Never-Never Land, and the action has no historical parallels. This is fine as far as it goes, but the approach is a bit gingerly to evoke such a crazy and colorful period,

and the show might have been even more fun had the troupe gone even further with it. The set is handsome and stage-filling, but doesn’t reinforce the retro idea of the rest of the production. (More about the music later.) This “Twelfth Night” starts at a placid pace — there are a lot of characters to introduce — but picks up steam once the plot kicks in. At the performance I attended, there were a few stage waits and some capricious mics, but the performance proceeded smoothly and got things wrapped up in a little over two hours. “Twelfth Night” is a real ensemble piece

among Shakespeare’s comedies — some parts are showier than others, but all the major ones seem roughly equal. This production is very evenly cast, with strong participation from all the actors. Their enunciation is almost always clear and direct, and you’ll have no trouble following the plot, such as it is. Olivia Choma is a charming and lively Viola and convincing enough in her disguise as “Cesario,” and a good match with her brother Sebastian (Edward Coomber). As a hippie-dippy Count Orsino, Ken Dauer sounds like George Carlin and looks like a Peter Max drawing. (His “If music be the food of love” speech is accompanied by a guitar rendition of “Stairway to Heaven.”)

Stephanie Roosa is an engaging Olivia, and as her besotted servant Malvolio, Jeffrey W. Jones (who was a notably nasty Richard III last summer), makes his first entrance done up in a Victorian three-piece suit, spats, and muttonchops, looking like he stepped from a page of an 1890’s Punch magazine. In the second half, he tries wooing his employer in the famous “yellow stockings and cross garters,” which here make him look like the most clueless hip-hop wannabe. Jones makes the transition from pomposity to silliness (and a bit later in the play, to near-despair) with panache. The members of the “below-stairs” crowd in this play deserve a paragraph to themselves. Katharine Sanford (Maria), Elliot F. Fox (Sir Toby Belch), T. Bohrer (Sir Andrew Aguecheek), and Jay O’Leary (Fabian) have an awful lot of heavy-handed fooling around to do here; Shakespeare did go on with his lowlife characters. But these actors fool around with physical agility and even some pleasingly subtle line readings. Fox’s entrance with Sanford in Act I wakes up the play, and the energy doesn’t let up. O’Leary comes into her own late in the show with a very funny imitation of the pompous Malvolio. Jeff Siuda is the Lord of Misrule character as the household’s resident clown, Feste. Shakespeare gives him plenty to say and sing, and Craddock has him all over the stage. Siuda throws himself into the role. He makes his entrance in a silver lamé jacket and gold platform shoes. Some of what he is asked to do is not all that amusing (he does a song and dance with the strait-jacketed Malvolio and some disco-lighting that is downright embarrassing), but when he is channeling Rod Stewart or Bob Dylan in a mock-60’s pop song, he’s very funny. The cast is rounded out nicely with James Heath (who also designed the set) as a dashing Antonio, who in this interpretation is, as the Elizabethans said, crushing on Sebastian; and Daile Mitchum in two smaller roles, to which she brings an attractive presence and voice. That brings us to the music for this “Twelfth Night,” by Mark Frey. “Twelfth Night” needs a lot of music — in fact, with all those songs it’s practically a musical itself. The incidental music has been a very variable element in different summer Shakespeare productions I have seen, but this is the best I have heard. Frey’s mock60’s treatments of the famous song lyrics reinforce the production concept very well and he comes up with some good tunes (and of course, the lyrics are excellent). His music generally works so well in this context that I wish there was more of it.

Art Exhibits [ OPENING ] Image City Photography Gallery, 722 University Ave. “4 Cities, 4 Wallaces.” Through Aug 4. Wed-Sat from 11 a.m.-7 p.m., Sun 12-4 p.m. Receptions Jul 12 5-8:30 p.m. and Aug 2 5-9 p.m. 482-1976. dano@ rochester.rr.com. Main Street Arts, 20 W. Main St., Clifton Springs. Main Street Art Grand Opening: “Locality.” Through Aug 30. Two floors of artwork from over 30 local artists, live music, and catering by Warfield’s Restaurant and Bakery. Reception Jul 13, 3-8 p.m. 315-462-0210. mstreetarts@ gmail.com. facebook.com/ MainStreetArtsCliftonSprings. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. 64th RochesterFinger Lakes Exhibition. Through Sep 8. Wed-Sun 11 a.m.–5 p.m. Thu 11 a.m.-9 p.m. Opening party Jul 13, 8-11 p.m. Open and free to members. 276-8900. mag.rochester.edu. St. John Fisher College, 3690 East Ave. “The Finger Lakes: Above & Below” by Gloria Betlem.. Through Aug 16. Patricia O’Keefe Ross Gallery in the Welcome Center. Mon-Thu 9 a.m.-4 p.m., Fri 9 a.m.-noon. Reception Jul 10, 7 p.m. 385-7322. gloriabetlem.com. Veritas Wine Bar, 217 Alexander St. The Art of Beatrix Rose: “Open.” Through end of Aug. Tue-Sat 5-11 p.m. Reception July 11 7-10 p.m. 262-2336. beatrixrose1974.com. [ CONTINUING ] “At the Pump” and “American Playgrounds” by David Freund. Through Jul 27. Reception Jun 7, 6-9 p.m. 461-4447. spectrumgalleryroc.com. Acanthus Café, 337 East Ave. “Bestest of Friends.” New artwork by Kristine A. Greenizen. Reception May 3, 6 p.m. 585-319-5999. acanthuscafe.com. Arts Council for Wyoming County, 31 S. Main St. “Reflections” by The Silver Lake Art Group. Through July 26. artswyco.org. Aviv Café, 321 East Ave. “Images of Faith” Mix Media Paintings by Richmond Futch Jr.. Through Jul 31. Reception Jun 7, 6-9 p.m. Live Music and Open Painting (Bring own supplies). 729-9916. bethelcf. com/aviv. Baobab Cultural Center, 728 University Ave. Francesca Lalanne Jeune: “Morphogenesis.” Through July 31. 563-2145. thebaobab.org. Books Etc., 78 W. Main St. “Whales, Windmills and Wonders.”. Through Sep 30. Highlights the work of John Domm, Terry Patti, and Marie Starr. Reception Jul 12, 6 p.m. 474-4116. books_etc@yahoo. com. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. The Lobby’s Summer Showcase Art Opening. Through Jul 31. Featuring Rachel Dow, Peter Lazarski, Adam Maida, Topher Martin, Thievin’ Stephen, Mike Turzanski, Yews, Jason Vector, etc. Reception Jun 7 8 p.m. Benefit for Thievin’ Stephen hospital bill, live music plus live painting by Thievin’ Stephen at 8 p.m. $3 or suggested donation. lobbydigital.com.

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Other festival features include refreshment vendors, the Emerging Artists Expo section of booths, as well as The Emerging Artists for Entertainers program, which will include 18-year-old singer/songwriter Young Fleck, pop-rock band Mochester, and alternative rockers Bendix. Children. The young-at-heart will delight in the Fairy House Tour, an exhibit of whimsical habitats crafted from natural materials for the fairies, comprised of submissions from artists of all ages. The exhibit is inspired by the popular Fairy Houses Series of books by Tracy Kane, who will be present at the festival to read from her stories, chat with visitors, and autograph books. Festival-goers can build their own fairy house at the festival in a grassy area beside the exhibit. Admission is free and the festival will take place rain or shine. No pets are permitted on the grounds. For a full schedule of performances and events or for more information, call 262-3142 or visit cornhillartsfestival.com. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY Community Darkroom Gallery, 713 Monroe Ave. “Gramma’s Cameras II,” Photography by Lori Horton Ball. Through Aug 31. Mon 9 a.m.-9:30 p.m., Tue-Thu 9 a.m.-6:30 p.m., Fri 12-5 p.m., Sat 10 a.m.-5:30 p.m. Reception Jun 21, 7-9 p.m. 271-5920. geneseearts.org. Crossroads Coffeehouse, 752 S. Goodman St. First Annual Highland Park Neighborhood Art Show. Through end of July. Opening Night Event: Friday June 14, 7-9 p.m. Portrait Nights: Wednesday June 19, 6-8 p.m. (July Portrait Night Date TBA). 585-244-6787. highlandparkrochester.org. A Different Path Gallery, 27 Market St. “A Little Twisted: An Exploration of the Self.” BFA Painting Exhibit by Karen Nelson. Wed-Fri 11 a.m.-noon, Sat-Sun noon-4 p.m. Reception Apr 12 4:30-7:30 p.m. 585-637-5494. adifferentpathgallery.com. The Episcopal Church Home, 505 Mt. Hope Ave. “Colored Pencil Perspectives.” Through Aug 4. 10 a.m.-8 p.m. Members of the Rochester Area Pencil Club. Reception Wed Jun 26, 4-6 p.m. 546-8400. episcopalseniorlife. org. Equal=Grounds, 750 South Ave. Canis lupus familiaris II by Gerry Szymanski. Through

Jul 27. Reception Jun 7, 7-9 p.m. 585-242-7840. gallery@equalgrounds.com. equalgrounds.com. Friendly Home’s Memorial Gallery, 3165 East Ave. “Watercolor World” by Sybie Culbertson. Through Sep 2. Daily 10 a.m.-5 p.m. friendlyhome.org. Gallery r, 100 College Ave. “Alumni Invitational / New Work.” Through July 20. Featuring the work of RIT alumni Belinda Bryce, Bradley Butler, Elizabeth Coyne, Vincent Massaro, Jose-Enrique Portas. Reception July 5, 6-9 p.m. 585256-3312. galleryr99@gmail. com. George Eastman House, 900 East Ave. The Gender Show. Through Oct 13. Tue-Sat 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Sun 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Exhibition party Jun 14, 7:15-9:30 p.m., $18. 2713361. eastmanhouse.org. International Art Acquisitions, 3300 Monroe Ave. “Petals Upon Petals,” Featuring Flawless Contemporary Realism by David Kerstetter.. Through Jul 31. Also featured are Roberto Salas and Ning Lee. Mon-Fri 10 a.m.-9 p.m., Sat 10 a.m.-6 p.m., Sun 12-5 p.m. 264-1440. internationalartacquisitions.com. continues on page 24

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FESTIVALS | RENAISSANCE FESTIVAL, SPORTS AND MUSIC FEST

This weekend brings us festivals in celebration of ye olde times, babe-a-licious beach sports, and more. The following fests are just a sampling; for more events, check out our calendar at rochestercitynewspaper.com. Sterling Renaissance Festival (pictured): Sterling, NY. Feast on food fit for the Queen, and enjoy artisan demonstrations and interactive performances each Saturday and Sunday through August 18. Each weekend has a different theme, July 13-14 being “Wine, Chocolate & Romance Rendezvous,” with special element specifically for couples. Festival hours are 10 a.m.-7 p.m. Admission is $25.95 for adults, $15.95 for children ages 5-12, and free to kids age 4 and younger. For more information, call 800-879-4446 or visit sterlingfestival.com. Ontario Beach Sports & Music Festival: Ontario Beach Park, 4800 Lake Ave. The festival takes place Friday, July 12, through Sunday, July 14, and features beach wrestling and sand soccer, music, and festival food. On Saturday, check out Roc Boxing & Fitness Center’s Bells On the Beach, the IKFF Western NY Invitational, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. The annual Beach Wrestling Championships takes place Saturday beginning at 11:30 a.m., and Sunday beginning at 10 a.m. For registration and more information, visit monroecountysports.org/events. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY

Art Exhibits Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. Sharon Stiller. Through Jul 19. thelittle.org. Livingston Arts Center, 4 Murray Hill Dr. Apartment One Gallery: “Simple Gifts: The Artwork of Sharon Leary and Anne Clements”. Through Aug 10. 585 243-6785. livingstonarts. org.; New Deal Gallery: “Under the Influence: New Deal Painters And Their Artistic Influences.”. Through October 5. 585 243-6785. Lux Lounge, 666 South Ave. The Art of J. Nevadomski and Allie Hartley. Reception Feb 8 6-9 p.m. 232-9030. lux666.com. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. Mortal: A Portfolio of Woodcuts by Kiki Smith. Through Aug 25. Lockhart Gallery. Wed-Sun 11 a.m.-5 p.m., until 9 p.m. on Thu. 2768900. mag.rochester.edu. Mental Health Association, 320 N Goodman St. “Luminaria” Art lighting the path to wellness. Creative Wellness Coalition. Reception May 3, 6-9 p.m. 325-3145 x144. Mill Art Center & Gallery, 61 N Main St. “Celebrate Our Surroundings.” Benefit for The Finger Lakes Museum. Reception Thu June 13, 7-9 p.m. 624-7740. millartcenter.com. 24 CITY JULY 10-16, 2013

New Deal Gallery, 4 Livingston County Campus. Expressions of the Civil War. In recognition of the 150th Anniversary. Hours: Tue, Wed, Fri 1-4 p.m., Thu 1-7:30 p.m., Sat 11 a.m.-3 p.m. After November 12: Closed Tuesdays. 243-6785. livingstonarts.org.; Expressions of the Civil War: In Recognition of the 150th Anniversary. Reception Dec 6. Continues TFN Wed, Fri 1-4 p.m., Thu 1-7:30 p.m., Sat 11 a.m.-3 p.m. 243-6785.; The Faces of Michael Teres and Leslie Heen. Photographer Michael Teres and painter Leslie Heen team up for an exhibit in Apartment One. Hours: Tue, Wed, Fri 1-4 p.m., Thu 1-7:30 p.m., Sat 11 a.m.-3 p.m. After November 12: Closed Tuesdays. 243-6785. livingstonarts.org. Ock Hee’s Gallery, 2 Lehigh St. “Buddhist & Asian Art.” Through Aug 24. Mon-Sat 11 a.m.-5 p.m. 624-4730. ockheesgallery.com. The Owl House, 75 Marshall St. Jen Vaccarella Art Show.. Through Aug 12. Reception July 8, 6-9 p.m. 360-2920. owlhouserochester.com. Rochester Contemporary Arts Center, 137 East Ave. 6x6x2013. Through Jul 14. In gallery previews May 29-31, 1-10 p.m. Reception & artwork sale Jun 1, 6-10 p.m. ($5 admission, $20 per artwork). 461-2222. rochestercontemporary.org.

Rush Rhees Library, University of Rochester, River Campus. Alice in the Looking Glass: Illustrations and Artists’ Books 1865-2012. Through Aug 16. Rare Books & Special Collections, Rush Rhees Library. Mon-Fri 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Sat 11 a.m.-3 p.m. 275-4477.; Memorial Art Gallery: 100 Years of Art for the Community. Through Sep 30, 2013. mag. rochester.edu. Schweinfurth Art Center, 205 Genesee St. Innovators and Legends: Generations in Textiles and Fiber. Through Aug 11. Tue-Sat 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Sun 1-5 p.m. 315-255-1553. mtraudt@schweinfurthartcenter. org. myartcenter.org. The Shoe Factory Art Co-op, 250 N. Goodman St. Mona Oates and Wen-Hua Chen. Reception May 3, 6-9 p.m. and Second Saturday, May 11, 12-4 p.m. Additional gallery hours are on Wednesdays from 12-5 p.m. shoefactoryarts.com. Starry Nites Café, 696 University Ave. “Hex Signs & Barn Stars” by Beth Brown. Through Aug 3. 271-2630. shoefactoryarts.com. Tap & Mallet, 381 Gregory St. “It’s a Funny Story” Illustrations by Aarom Humby. Reception Mar 13 7 p.m. 585-473-0503. tapandmallet.com. The Firehouse Gallery at Genesee Pottery, 713 Monroe Ave. College Clay Collective. Through July 20. National juried exhibition featuring the best in college ceramics. 2715183. geneseearts.org. Visual Studies Workshop, 31 Prince Street. “ChemoToxic, I Am That, and other stories” by Willie Osterman. Receptions and fundraiser for Pluta Cancer Treamtment Center May 3, 7-9 p.m. 9:30 p.m. music by Brian Murphy. (585) 442-8676. vsw.org. Wayne County Council for the Arts, 108 W. Miller St. Art of the Railroad & Large Scale Model Trains. Through July 12. Model trains by Robert Thon and drawings by Sam Ferrara. Reception June 14, 5:30-7:30 p.m. 315-331-4593. waynearts. wordpress.com. The Yards, 50-52 Public Market. Flower Child from the Flower City: Artworks by Kristina Kaiser. Through Jul 11. Reception Jul 5, 7-10 p.m. attheyards@gmail. com. attheyards.com.

Call for Artwork [ WED., JULY 10 ] Call for Art! ongoing. Main Street Arts, 20 W. Main St., Clifton Springs The gallery is currently seeking artists working in all media. Please include the following in your email: - 3 to 5 jpeg images of current work Artist statement - CV/Resume Kindly indicate whether you are submitting available work or work that is representative (315) 5210832. mstreetarts@gmail.com. mstreetarts@gmail.com. Call for Artists. ongoing. 4614447. spectrumgalleryroc.com. ImageArt: “I do?!” Through July 10. Deadline August 10. Submit works that respond to or address the issues surrounding marriage equality. All artists working in any media are welcome to submit imageout.org.imageart. New York Filmmakers Quarterly. ongoing. Films must have been produced within NYS in

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the past 2 years. No fee. No honorarium. Max length 30 minutes. To be screened at Little Theatre last Wednesdays and Saturdays in January, April, July, and October. Send DVD screener + cover letter with 1 sentence bio and one sentence film description to Karen vanMeenan, Programmer, New York Filmmakers Quarterly, Little Theatre, 240 East Ave., Rochester NY 14604. Notification by email within 8 weeks of receipt emergingfilmmakers@yahoo.com.

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Art Events [ SAT., JULY 13 ] Anderson Alley Artists Second Saturday Open House. second Saturday of every month, 12-4 p.m. Anderson Alley Building, 250 N. Goodman St eve@evebotelho.com. andersonalleyartists.com. Saturday Demos. 12-7 p.m Hyatt’s All Things Creative, 937 Jefferson Rd. July 13Golden Acrylics and Mediums July 20- Sculpey Clay & Art Alternatives Clay Tools July 27- Art Alternatives Pastels & Blending Stumps. Free. 2926500. kzwink@hyatts.com. hyatts.com/art.

Comedy [ THU., JULY 11 ] Goo House Presents: A Night of One Acts. July 11, 7:30 p.m. The Space Theater and Gallery, 1199 East Main Street $5. 585-2090734. goohouse.tumblr.com. Kevin Meaney. July 11-13. Comedy Club, 2235 Empire Blvd. Thu 7:30 p.m., Fri-Sat 7:30 & 10 p.m $9-$12. 671-9080. thecomedyclub.us. [ FRI., JULY 12 ] Improv Comedy Battles. 9:30 p.m. Village Idiots Improv Comedy, 274 Goodman St. N. $5. 7979086. VIP@improvVIP.com. [ SAT., JULY 13 ] “Buddies In Space: Please Remain Seated!”. July 13, 8 p.m. Black Sheep Theatre, 274 N Goodman St., third floor, Studio D313 $5. improvius@yahoo.com. buddiesinspace.com. Improv Comedy Battle. 7:30 p.m. Village Idiots Improv Comedy, 274 Goodman St. N. $5. 7979086. VIP@improvVIP.com. [ SUN., JULY 14 ] The 2013 Funniest Person in Rochester Contest Round 1, Shows 9 & 10. July 14, 6 & 8:30 p.m. Comedy Club, 2235 Empire Blvd. $7. 671-9080. thecomedyclub.us. [ TUE., JULY 16 ] Laugh Riot Underground: Stand-Up Comedy Showcase. 9-11 p.m. Free. laughriotcomedy.com.

Dance Events [ WED., JULY 10 ] Dance/Movement Therapy for Children & Adolescents. Through July 13. Kinections, 718 University Ave. kinections.com. Lindy Jam: Weekly Swing Dance. 8:45 p.m. Tango Cafe Dance Studio (3rd Floor Ballroom), 389 Gregory St., Rochester, NY Lindy Jam is a weekly swing dance on Wednesday nights, 8:45-11pm, hosted by Groove Juice Swing.

RECREATION | SWIMMING SPOTS

It’s July. Go swimming. ‘Nuff said. Oh, you don’t have a pool? Me neither. Lucky for us, there are dozens of public places to cool off, many of which are listed at cityofrochester.gov. Just search “aquatics” and you’ll get the list of recreation centers and schools with pools, beaches that offer open swimming hours under the careful supervision of lifeguards, as well as the “Cool Sweep” locations and times, which are operations that include opened fire hydrants, spray parks, and cooling locations with A/C, triggered when the temperatures reach 85 degrees or higher. Admission is free to all locations. Monroe County public beaches include Durand Eastman Beach (Lakeshore Drive and Kings Highway North), and Ontario Beach Park (4800 Lake Ave.). Lifeguards are on duty daily 11a.m.-7 p.m. during the summer at both locations. For daily beach conditions, call the Monroe County Beach Hotline at 753-5887, which is updated each morning. If you’re looking to relax with a good read, Durand tends to be more peaceful, and for those with kiddos, Ontario Beach Park has a carousel and an Abbott’s. Just sayin’. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY Friendly atmosphere. Beautiful ballroom. Free beginner dance lesson at 9pm. No partner or experience necessary. Admission is free if it’s your first time!. $4 (or free if it’s your first time!). 585271-4930. lindyjam.com. [ THU., JULY 11 ] Dance Lab East. 10 p.m. Skylark Lounge, 40 South Union St 80s new wave music for the future (on vinyl) and visual effects 99 cents. 270-8106. theskylarklounge.com. [ SAT., JULY 13 ] Fandango at the Tango. 7 p.m. Tango Cafe, 389 Gregory St. 2714930. tangocafedance.com. [ SUN., JULY 14 ] English Country Dancing. 6:30 p.m. First Baptist Church of Rochester, 175 Allens Creek Rd English Country Dancing, live music, called dances. $7-$8, under 17 free with adult. 2442468. fbcrochester.net. [ WED., JULY 17 ] Social Dance Sampler with Esther Brill. 7 p.m Irondequoit Library, Helen McGraw Branch, 2180 E. Ridge Rd Register. 336-6060. mcgrawbr@libraryweb.org.

Festivals [ THU., JULY 11 ] Big Rib BBQ and Blues Fest. July 11-14. Highland Park, 171 Reservoir Ave $5 admission after 3 p.m rochesterevents.com. [ FRI., JULY 12 ] Finger Lakes Wine Festival. July 12-14. Watkins Glen International Speedway, Watkins Glen flwinefest.com.

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Ontario Beach Sports & Music Festival. July 12-14. Ontario Beach Park, 4799 Lake Ave monroecountysports.org. [ SAT., JULY 13 ] 45th Annual Corn Hill Arts Festival. July 13 and July 1314. Corn Hill Neighborhood, 133 South Fitzhugh Street Enjoy the Historic Corn Hill Neighborhood, Free Admission. Experience 400+ Original Artists, 4 Stages of Live Music, Food & Family Fun Free. 4611570 x227. chna@cornhill.org. Canadaigua Arts and Music Festival. July 13-14. Commons Park, Canandaigua 394-0787. canandaiguaartfestival.com. Corn Hill Arts Festival. July 1314. Corn Hill Neighborhood, 133 South Fitzhugh Street Sat 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Sun 10 a.m.6 p.m Free. 585.262.3142. chna@cornhill.org. cornhillartsfestival.com. Sterling Renaissance Festival. Sundays Sterling, NY 800-8794446. sterlingfestival.com. [ TUE., JULY 16 ] Genesee County 4-H Fair. July 16-20. East Main Street, Batavia genesee4h@cornell. edu. gcfair.com.

Kids Events [ WED., JULY 10 ] Acting Basics Class for Kids (Ages 10-13). July 10, 6 p.m. Rochester Brainery, Village Gate, 274 N Goodman St. $15. 7307034. rochesterbrainery.com. Bubble Party. July 10, 1-2 p.m. Seymour Library, 161 East Ave., continues on page 26 rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 25

Kids Events Brockport Free. 637-1050. seymourlibraryweb.org. Catfish Charlie’s Hot Diggety Dog Show with Barrel of Fun Productions. July 10, 10:3011:30 a.m. Central Library, Kate Gleason Auditorium, 115 South Ave. Get “hooked” on Charlie and his puppet partners Free. 428-8150. libraryweb.org. Storytime with Mike. Barnes & Noble, 330 Greece Ridge Center Dr. 9:30 & 10:30 a.m Free. 227-4020. bn.com. Tales from Beatrix Potter. ongoing, 11 a.m. & 7 p.m. Bristol Valley Theater, 151 South Main St 374-9032. bvtnaples.org. Wednesday Afternoon at the Movies: The Odd Life of Timothy Green.. July 10, 2:30-4:30 p.m. Central Library, Children’s Center, 115 South Ave. Free. 428-8150. libraryweb.org. [ THU., JULY 11 ] It’s Magic of Course with Ted Burzynski. July 11, 6-7 p.m. Henrietta Public Library, 455 Calkins Rd Free, register. 3597092. libraryweb.org. Make & Take Crafts. July 11-25, 3 p.m. Brighton Memorial Library, 2300 Elmwood Ave. Free. 7845300. brightonlibrary.org. Mini-Monster Maker Workshop. July 11, 7-8:30 p.m. Seymour Library, 161 East Ave., Brockport Grades 6-12 Free, register. 6371050. seymourlibraryweb.org. Tops Cooking School: Pizza. July 11, 11 a.m.-noon. Henrietta Public Library, 455 Calkins Rd Free, register. 359-7092. libraryweb.org. [ FRI., JULY 12 ] Cool Kids! Green Kids! presents: The Magic Guy. July 12, 7 p.m. Cool Kids, Sagawa Park, 100 Main St. Free. 637-3984. coolkids@rochester.rr.com. generationcool.biz. Fairy Houses. July 12, 11 a.m.noon. Seymour Library, 161 East Ave., Brockport Ages 5-10 Free, register. 637-1050. seymourlibraryweb.org. Family Fridays. 12-4 p.m Rochester Museum and Science Center, 657 East Ave. 7/12: Super Villains, 7/19: Make It! 7/26: Music Madness, 8/2: Game Show Fun, 8/9: Magic and Illusion, 8/16: Myths and Mysteries, 8/23: Tech at Your Fingertips, 8/30: Sports Science Included in museum admission $11-$13. 271-1880. rmsc.org. Friday Make and Take Craft. July 12, 1-5 p.m. Central Library, Children’s Center, 115 South Ave. Ages 3+. Free. 428-8150. libraryweb.org 1-5 p.m Central Library, Children’s Center, 115 South Ave. Ages 3+ Free. 4288150. libraryweb.org. Games on the Lawn and Bingo. July 12, 1-4 p.m. Seymour Library, 161 East Ave., Brockport Free, register. 637-1050. seymourlibraryweb.org. Storytelling with Mike. 10:30 a.m. Barnes & Noble, 330 Greece Ridge Center Dr. Free. 227-4020. bn.com. [ SAT., JULY 13 ] Kidsemble: “Rap It Up” with Glory, Local Rochester Hip Hop Artist & Terry Fonda Smith, Music Explorer. July 13, 2 p.m. The Harley School, 1981 Clover 26 CITY JULY 10-16, 2013

Teen Art Studio. July 16, 7-8:30 p.m. Seymour Library, 161 East Ave., Brockport Grades 6-12 Free, register. 637-1050. seymourlibraryweb.org. Teen MovieMakers. July 16, 2:30-4:30 p.m. Seymour Library, 161 East Ave., Brockport Grades 6-12 Free, register. 6371050. seymourlibraryweb.org. Tuesday Matinee. July 16, 2-4:30 p.m. Seymour Library, 161 East Ave., Brockport PG film Free, register. 637-1050. seymourlibraryweb.org.

THEATER | JAWBONE PUPPET THEATRE & PONCILI COMPANY

When I hear the words “puppet theater,” I think of crafty embodiments of archetypes relating moralizing tales, geared toward tots. Unless, of course, we’re talking about “Avenue Q,” which is a set of crafty embodiments of archetypes relating moralizing tales for the sexually mature set. On Thursday, July 11, MuCCC (142 Atlantic Ave.) will host something that is infinitely more bizarre: Jawbone Puppet Theater & Poncili Company will present “Sacred Candy: An Experimental Adult Puppet Show,” featuring physical theatre, puppets, and big strange masks. Jawbone Puppet Theater is described as a quirky, pottymouthed, father-son act from Brooklyn, by way of Taiwan, and Poncili Company is a mysterious experimental art collective from Puerto Rico. The show will include the short masterpiece “Fire Hydrant Woman gets Tooken Away,” written, designed, and directed by a 5-year-old named Corn Snake (no, really: facebook.com/cornsnakemonsterprint), which culminates in a disemboweled T-rex spewing guts and candies. The show goes on: a clueless girl meets the world through the eyes of Candywoot, a schizophrenic clown obsessed with the reality of a near, but bizarre, dystopian future, while a man with a bad leg tries to make his way home, and everybody prays to the holy mutant cow in hopes of ending their addiction to candy. Sounds about right. In addition, a potty-mouthed biblical scholar will regale you with the tale of “Genesis, Chapter 38,” a funny, dirty retelling of one of the weirder bible stories, which includes scenes of graphic puppet-on-puppet sex. The event starts at 8 p.m. Tickets are sold for a donation of $8 in advance or $10 at the door (no one will be turned away for lack of funds), and the event will also host inexpensive prints, small sculptures, comics, and more for sale. For more information, visit muccc.org. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY St $5/$10 per family, register. 442-1770. gibbsandmain.com. [ MON., JULY 15 ] Computer Programming for Teens. July 15, 7-8 p.m. Seymour Library, 161 East Ave., Brockport Grades 6-12 Free, register. 6371050. seymourlibraryweb.org. Mysterious Caves. July 15, 6:307:30 p.m. Seymour Library, 161 East Ave., Brockport Grades 1-5 Free, register. 637-1050. woodlibrary.org. ntroduction to Screen Printing: Youths. 2-5 p.m Rochester Makerspace, 850 St. Paul St. #23 $100, register. 210-0075. rocmaker.eventbrite.com. Rick Merritt’s Traveling Campfire. July 15, 10:30 a.m. Brighton Memorial Library, 2300 Elmwood Ave. Ages 8-12 784-5300. brightonlibrary.org. Widget the Reading Dog and Her Pal Joey. July 15, 3-4 p.m.

Seymour Library, 161 East Ave., Brockport Free. 637-1050. seymourlibraryweb.org. [ TUE., JULY 16 ] Dig into Summer Movies. 2 p.m Brighton Memorial Library, 2300 Elmwood Ave. Jul 2: “A Bug’s Life,” Jul 9: “The Borrowers,” Jul 16: “James and the Giant Peach,” Jul 23 “Holes,” Jul 30: “Treasure Buddies.”. Free. 7845300. brightonlibrary.org. Ice Cream Social. July 16, 5-7 p.m. All Doodle Bugs locations doodlebugs.com. Lunch Bunch Book Group. July 16, 12-1 p.m. Seymour Library, 161 East Ave., Brockport Grades 4-5 Free, register. 637-1050. seymourlibraryweb.org. Mad Scientists’ Lab. July 16, 1-2 p.m. Seymour Library, 161 East Ave., Brockport Grades 3-5 Free, register. 637-1050. seymourlibraryweb.org.

[ WED., JULY 17 ] Morning with RW Magic. July 17, 10-11 a.m. Central Library, Kate Gleason Auditorium, 115 South Ave. Magical Entertainer Richard McClendon II mixes amazement, wonder, and magical illusions Free. 4288150. libraryweb.org.

Lectures [ WED., JULY 10 ] Reverse Mortgages: Is It Right For You? July 10, 2-5 p.m. Seymour Library, 161 East Ave., Brockport Free. 637-1050. seymourlibraryweb.org. [ THU., JULY 11 ] “Focus 45” Lunchtime Lecture. July 11, 12:15 p.m. George Eastman House, 900 East Ave. Photographer Nick Brandreth $3-$6. 271-3361. eastmanhouse.org. [ SAT., JULY 13 ] Nature of Montezuma Lecture Series: Managine Eastern Bluebird Boxes. July 13, 2 p.m. Montezuma National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Center, 3395 US Route 20 East with John Rogers $3-$5. 315-568-5987 x229. Tasha_Daniels@fws.gov. Ock Hee talk on “Compassion” for the Living and Dead. July 13, 11:30 a.m. Ock Hee’s Gallery, 2 Lehigh St. 624-4730. ockheesgallery.com. [ SUN., JULY 14 ] Car Talk with Dick and Jim. July 14, 4 p.m. Books Etc., 78 W. Main St. Free. 474-4116. books_ etc@yahoo.com. What’s Up: Alan Singer on the Print Club of Rochester and MAG. July 14, 2 p.m. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. Included in gallery admission: $5-$12. 276-8900. mag. rochester.edu. [ MON., JULY 15 ] American Football 101 Class. July 15, 7 p.m. Rochester Brainery, Village Gate, 274 N Goodman St. $15. 730-7034. rochesterbrainery.com. Getting More Out of Google. July 15, 6:30-8 p.m. Wood Library, 134 North Main St. Free, register. 394-1381. woodlibrary.org. [ TUE., JULY 16 ] An Armchair Tour of Rochester’s South Wedge. July 16, 7 p.m. Rochester Brainery, Village Gate, 274 N Goodman St. $15. 7307034. rochesterbrainery.com. [ WED., JULY 17 ] The Icarus Sessions. third Wednesday of every month, 7 p.m. Hanlon-Fiske Studios, 34 Elton St. Ten or fifty or a hundred people come together and follow the simple rules of the Icarus Session. You have 140 seconds to talk about the art you

are working on, what inspires you, what’s holding you back, whatever! You meet, connect, support each other, and then go back into the world, ready to make a ruckus Free. 705-6581.

Literary Events [ WED., JULY 10 ] Contemporary Book Discussion Group: “Defending Jacob” by William Landay—Wednesday. July 10-11. Irondequoit Library, Helen McGraw Branch, 2180 E. Ridge Rd Wed 10 a.m., Thu 3 p.m 336-6060. libraryweb.org. Pure Kona Poetry Readings. 7 p.m. Acanthus Café, 337 East Ave. 7/3: Chris Shelton 7/10: Karen Beck 7/17: Colleen Powderly 7/24: Sheila Evans 7/31: Michael Ketchek. Free. 319-5999. acanthuscafe.com. Women Who Love to Read: “ Song Yet Sung” by James McBride. July 10, 7 p.m. Lift Bridge Book Shop, 45 Main St liftbridgebooks.com. [ THU., JULY 11 ] Just Poets Open Mic: Steve Tills. July 11, 7 p.m. Barnes & Noble, 3349 Monroe Ave. This month the reading will be hosted by Donna Marbach and Claudia Stanek. An open mic will follow the reading 585-586-6020. thejustpoets.wordpress.com. [ FRI., JULY 12 ] Deep Fried Poetry Reading Series. July 12, 6:30 p.m. The Yards, 5052 Public Market Willa Carroll, Noah Falck, and Matt Hart Free, donations accepted. attheyards@ gmail.com. attheyards.com. [ SAT., JULY 13 ] Reading: Thom Erb. July 13, 2 p.m. Books Etc., 78 W. Main St. Free. 474-4116. books_etc@ yahoo.com. [ MON., JULY 15 ] The Sun Magazine Discussion Group. third Monday of every month, 6:30 p.m. Lift Bridge Book Shop, 45 Main St 6372260. liftbridgebooks.com. [ TUE., JULY 16 ] Book Discussion: The Vanishing Act of Esme Lennox. July 16-17. Brighton Memorial Library, 2300 Elmwood Ave. Tue 1:30-3 p.m., Wed 7-8:30 p.m Free. 784-5300. brightonlibrary.org. Lift Bridge Writers’ Group. 6:30 p.m. Lift Bridge Book Shop, 45 Main St Free. 637-2260. liftbridgebooks.com.

Museum Exhibit [ WED., JULY 10 ] Boardwalk Arcade. Through Sep. 8. The Strong National Museum of Play, 1 Manhattan Square Mon-Thu 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Fri-Sat 10 a.m.-8 p.m., Sun noon-5 p.m. Opening Weekend Celebration July 6, 11 a.m.-4 p.m. and July 7, 1-4 p.m $13, free to members and kids under 2 263-2700. museumofplay.org. “Bringing Down the Attic”. Through Aug. 3. Museum of Wayne County History, 21 Butternut St Opening March 28, 7 p.m. Explore the hidden collection at the museum Free. 315-946-4943. waynehistory.org. PGA Championship History Exhibit. Through Sep. 2. Rochester Museum and Science Center, 657 East Ave. Through September 2. Mon-Sat 9 a.m.5 p.m., Sun 11 a.m.-5 p.m

Included in admission: $11$13. 271-1880. rmsc.org.

Recreation [ WED., JULY 10 ] Historic Landscape Garden Tours. Tuesdays-Sundays George Eastman House, 900 East Ave. Tue-Sat noon & 3:30 p.m., Sun 3:30 p.m Included in admission: $5-$12. 271-3361. eastmanhouse.org. [ THU., JULY 11 ] 4-8km Trail Challenge. July 11, 6:30 p.m. Genesee Valley Park, Elmwood Ave. $8-$10. (585) 683-5734. roc.us.orienteering. org. GVHC Hike. July 11, 8 a.m. YMCA Bay View, 1209 Bay Rd Very/ strenuous 5-6 mile hike, Abe Lincoln Park Free. 721-1175. gvhchikes.org. Twilight Tours. 7 p.m Mount Hope Cemetery, North Gate, 791 Mt. Hope Ave. $5, members and under 16 free 461-3494. fomh. org. [ FRI., JULY 12 ] Bats! Beneficial and beleaguered creatures of the night. July 12, 7 p.m. Sterling Nature Center, 15380 Jenzvold Rd Free. 315-947-6143. snc@ co.cayuga.ny.us. facebook.com/ sterlingnaturecenter. Saturn over the Swamp. July 12, 9 p.m. The Thousand Acre Swamp Sanctuary, 1581 Jackson Road Some telescopes provided, personal telescopes and binoculars welcome Free. 773-8911. [ SAT., JULY 13 ] Critical Masquerade. July 13, 3 p.m.-2 a.m. Meeting place to be disclosed upon ticket purchase. Bike and body decoration and refreshments, followed by bike ride, ending with dance party at The Yards $20, register. brownpapertickets.com/ event/397869. Guided Hike at Abraham Lincoln Park. July 13, 9-11 a.m. Abraham Lincoln Park, along the southeastern shoreline of Irondequoit Bay within the Town of Penfield. Enter the park from Smith Road off of Empire Boulevard. Look for the “Hike” signs Free, register. 340-8655 x6. GVHC Event. July 13, 8 a.m. Perinton Recreation Center, 1350 Turk Hill Rd. Moderate 8.5 mile hike Free. 944-8768. gvhchikes. org. Public Tour of South Section of Mount Hope Cemetery. Mount Hope Cemetery, 1133 Mt. Hope Avenue Meet: Cemetery Office, South entrance opposite the Distillery restaurant.The tour consists of a two hour leisurely walk through the south section covering approximately 1–1 ½ miles on paved roads and even terrain. Learn about 19th and 20th century Rochesterians including Rufus Sibley co-founder of Sibley, Lindsay, and Curr department store, Frank Gannett, founder of the Democrat and Chronicle, James Vick founder of Vicks Nursery, and others $5, members and kids under 16 free 461-3494. fomh.org. Rochester’s Prosperous and Penniless. July 13, 10 a.m. Mount Hope Cemetery, 1133 Mt. Hope Avenue $7, free to members. 461-3494. fomh.org. Summer Wildflowers. July 13, 10 a.m. The Thousand Acre Swamp

Sanctuary, 1581 Jackson Road Free. 773-8911. Webster Garden Tour. July 13, 1-4 p.m. A self-guided tour of ten Webster gardens Free, donations accepted. 265-9819. villageofwebster.com. Where the Eagles Fly. July 13, 10 a.m. Rob’s Trail Preserve, Old Bald Hill Rd. S., Springwater Family-friendly gentle 1.5-mile hike at The Nature Conservancy’s Rob’s Trail preserve Free, RSVP. 546-3030 x32. cwnyevents@ tnc.org. [ SUN., JULY 14 ] GVHC Event. July 14, 9 a.m. Meet at I490 exit 27. Moderate 7 mile hike, Keuka outlet trail $4 carpool. 671-6359. gvhchikes.org. Mushroom and Herb Walk. July 14. South Bristol smugtownmushrooms.com. Public Tour of North Section of Mount Hope Cemetery. 2 p.m Mount Hope Cemetery, 1133 Mt. Hope Avenue Except May 12 see Special Events. Meet: North Gatehouse opposite Robinson Dr. This tour consists of a two hour leisurely walk of approximately one mile on paved roads and uneven terrain. Subjects covered include local history, famous people (including Susan B. Anthony and Frederick Douglass), horticulture, geology, architecture, symbolism, and more $5, members and kids under 16 free 461-3494. fomh.org. [ TUE., JULY 16 ] Roc City Challenge Adult Bicycle Safety Course. 6-8:30 p.m Genesee Valley Park, Elmwood Ave. Helmets are strongly encouraged $10, register. 428-6755. cityofrochester.gov. [ WED., JULY 17 ] Let’s Explore the Pond. July 17, 1 p.m. Sterling Nature Center, 15380 Jenzvold Rd Free. 315-947-6143. snc@co.cayuga.ny.us. snc@ co.cayuga.ny.us.

Special Events [ WED., JULY 10 ] 100 Days of Entertainment in the Park. Through Sep. 2. Commons Park, Lakeshore Dr. To celebrate the Canandaigua Centennial, the Canandaigua BID presents ‘100 Days of Entertainment in the Park.’ Most entertainment will be at Commons Park, larger groups will perform at the Kershaw Gazebo. Bring your chair and enjoy entertainment every day, for 100 days, in Canandaigua Free. 396-0300. Dentzel Carousel. Through Oct. 14. Ontario Beach Park, 4799 Lake Ave The Carousel’s 2013 Operating Schedule is, as follows: June 21 through Labor Day – Open Daily (7Days per Week) Post-Labor Day through Columbus Day – Open Weekends (Saturday and Sunday) Columbus Day – Open Monday, October 14 (Last Day of 2013 Season) The Carousel’s 2013 Hours of Operation are: Noon to 9:00 p.m. The Carousel’s 2013 Price Schedule is, as follows: Single Ride -- $1.00 Punch Card (12 rides for the cost of 10) -- $10.00 **Valid Any Time**

RECREATION | CRITICAL MASQUERADE

On Saturday, July 13, you can join an event that combines the exhilarating activity of a Critical Mass bike ride and the playful, fancy affair of a masquerade. At approximately 3 p.m., gussied-up cyclists will meet at a secret location — to be disclosed to ticket holders — to build and decorate bicycles and other rolling vehicles. Bring your bike and you’ll receive assistance altering it into a work of art. Skateboarders, scooter-riders, and the wheel-less are welcome. All materials for decorating bikes and bodies and mask-making, as well as food and beverages, will be provided. Local artists will create art bikes and provide demonstrations. At sunset, the group will gather for an evening bike ride (with glow sticks and blinking items to increase visibility), which will culminate at the Public Market for a Masquerade Ball at The Yards (50-52 Public Market Way), with about an hour of live music and three hours of DJ sets, visual projection by VJ Screen Sabre, and stage sets by Puppatron. Masks are mandatory, and the event is BYOB, though complementary beverages will also be provided. Only 200 tickets are available at $20 each, and are available at brownpapertickets.com/event/397869. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY Wrist Band (Ride All Day) -$5.00. cityofrochester.gov. Farm to Table Dinner. July 10, 5-8:30 p.m. Mud Creek Farm, Victor. A benefit to support the farm and electric tractor. Cocktail hour, farm tour, silent auction, dinner $100, register. 315-212-2916. mudcreekfundraiser@gmail. com. Geeks Who Drink Pub Quiz. 8 p.m. Scotland Yard Pub, 187 Saint Paul St Free. 730-5030. scotlandyardpub.com. Memorial Day weekend at Seneca Park Zoo. Through Sep. 2. Seneca Park Zoo, 2222 St. Paul St Observe an alligator feeding. Watch an otter and keeper interact. Talk with staff after a Stage Show. There will be seven live shows daily, from 10:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m Included in zoo admission: $8$11 senecaparkzoo.org. Scottsville Midweek Farmers’ Market. 4-7 p.m Smith Warren Post 367 American Legion, 61 Main Street in Scottsville 8893981. kmemccall@aol.com. Turning Points. 3:30-5 p.m. An information Center for families whose lives have been touched by Incarceration. Join us to share information, resources, and support Free. 328-0856. turningpoints4families@frontier. com. Walking Tours of Downtown Geneva. July 10, 7 p.m. Begin at Finger Lakes Gifts & Lounge, 60 Seneca St., Geneva $5, register. 315-789-5151.

Wine Cruise onboard Sam Patch. July 10, 6-7:30 p.m. Wednesdays 6-7:30 p.m., Fridays 6:30-8 p.m. Meet at Schoen Place in Village of Pittsford $26, register. 6625748. samandmary.org. [ THU., JULY 11 ] Lincoln Tours. Saturdays, 1 & 3 p.m. Seward House Historic Museum, 33 South St., Auburn. 315-252-1283. sewardhouse.org. “Movies in the Parks” series. Ontario Beach Park Tue Jul 16: “The Amazing Spider-Man,” Jul 23 “Skyfall,” Jul 30: “The Hunger Games.” Highland Park Bowl Thu Jul 11: “The Lorax,” Jul 18: “Ghostbusters,” Jul 25: “Madagascar 3: Europe’s Most Wanted,” Aug 1: “Les Misérables.” Pre-show fun starts at 8:30 p.m., and movies begin at dark. Bring blankets or lawn chairs Free. 753-7275. monroecounty.gov. Muslim Journeys Movie: “Islamic Art: Mirror of the Invisible World,”. July 11, 7 p.m. Brighton Memorial Library, 2300 Elmwood Ave. Free. 7845300. brightonlibrary.org. NASCAR Driver Showcase with Kyle Busch. July 11, 11 a.m. Downtown Rochester in front of Radisson Hotel on Main St theglen.com. ROC Summer of Riesling Patio Parties. July 11. Casa Larga Vineyards, 2287 Turk Hill Rd. Music on the front patio, continues on page 28 rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 27

Special Events local breweries, a Riesling food pairing, and Casa Larga Riesling tastings, fireworks. 5:30-8:30 p.m Call for Pricing. 233-4210. casalarga.com. South Wedge Farmers’ Market. 4 p.m Boulder Coffee Co., 100 Alexander St. 4 p.m Free. 2698918. swfm.org. Stammtisch. Every other Thursday, 5:30 p.m. Roc Brewing Co., 56 S. Union St 794-9798. rocbrewingco@ gmail.com. rocbrewingco.com. [ FRI., JULY 12 ] Bachelor/ette Auction. July 12-13. Bread & Water Theatre fundraiser to purchase a home for a theatre. Fri Bachelor Auction at Bachelor Forum (670 University Ave.)., 9 p.m. Sat Bachelorette Auction at 140 Alex (140 Alexander St.), 9 p.m crowdrise.com/bwt01. Big Screen Adventure: Coral Reef Adventure. Sundays. Rochester Museum and Science Center, 657 East Ave. Fri 4 p.m., sat 2:30 & 4:30 p.m., Sun 1, 2, & 4 p.m., also Mon Oct 8 2:30 & 4:30 p.m $3$7. 271-1880. rmsc.org. Friday Happy Hour! 5-7 p.m. Veritas Wine Bar, 217 Alexander St. 2-for-1 on wines by-the-glass and beers bythe-bottle!. 585-262-2336. veritaswinebar.com. Garage Sale. July 12-13. Christ the Good Shepherd Church, 1000 N Winton Rd Fri 9 a.m.-4 p.m., Sat 9 a.m.-3 p.m 4822018. Moonlight Stroll Concert Series. 8-10 p.m Sonnenberg Gardens and Mansion State Historic Park, 151 Charlotte St. Jul 12: Tullamore Celtic Band with Young School of Irish Dance. Jul 19: Rochester Metropolitan Jazz Orchestra. Jul 26: The MusicaMakers Big Band. Aug 2: Neville Francis & The Riddim Posse. Aug 9: Italian Night with Gap Mangione ($12-$15) $4-$9 (only $1 on July 5, $12$15 on Aug 9.). 394-4922. sonnenberg.org. Move and Groove and Eat to the Beat at Long Acre Farms. July 12, 4-9 p.m. Long Acre Farms, 1342 Eddy Rd Harvey Possemato and Vinnie Ruggiero’s Jazz Duo, access to the Full Back 40, Doug’s Famous Pulled Pork dinners, chardonnay release party. Bring a blanket and family Prices vary 315-986-4202. getlost@longacrefarms.com. longacrefarms.com. [ SAT., JULY 13 ] Annual Ice Cream Social. July 13, 12-3 p.m. Tinker Homestead , 1525 Calkins Rd., Henrietta Free, donations accepted. 359-7044. Bill Maher: Making Back My Millions. July 13, 8 p.m. Auditorium Theatre, 885 E. Main St. $38-$78. 800-7453000. rbtl.org. Brainery Bazaar Craft Show. July 13, 10 a.m. Rochester Brainery, Village Gate, 274 N Goodman St. 20 great, local vendors selling jewelry, home goods, clothing, crafts and more Free. 730-7034. info@rochesterbrainery.com. rochesterbrainery.com. Canandaigua Farmer’s Market. 8:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m Pavilion on Mill Street, one block east 28 CITY JULY 10-16, 2013

of Main St., Canandaigua canandaiguafarmersmarket. com. Geneseo Airshow. July 13-14. Geneseo Airport, 3489 Big Tree Lane Bring coolers and lawn chairs, watch World War Two reenactments, Vintage Warbirds, and the classic car display. Airshow performances 10 a.m.-4:30 p.m $17-$20, ages 12 and under free 2432100. Office@1941HAG. org. 1941hag.org/GeneseoAirshow/index.html. Miss Puerto Rico of Rochester Pageant. July 13, 3 p.m. Rochester Museum and Science Center, 657 East Ave. $10. prfestival.com. Paranormal Program. July 13, 12-2 p.m. Seymour Library, 161 East Ave., Brockport Free, register. 637-1050. woodlibrary.org. “Paws for Pets.” July 13, 1-4 p.m. Camp Eastman, 1558 Lakeshore Blvd. The activity is meant to raise awareness and funds for two animal rescue agencies in Irondequoit, the Animal Service League and the Pet Adoption Network Free. 520-7241. susannjune@frontiernet.net. emanuelrochester.org/news/ retreat. Pirates Night At The Harbor. July 13, 10-11:55 p.m. Nola’s Restaurant & Nightclub, 4775 Lake Ave. With Catch 22 Free admission with a pirate costume 663-3375. mynolas. com. RPO 90th Anniversary Gala. July 13, 6 p.m. Rochester Riverside Convention Center, 123 E Main St $200, register. 454-7311 x268. [ SUN., JULY 14 ] “Advanced Pipe Organ Encounter.” July 14-19. Organ lessons, building demonstrations, and public concerts in a variety of locations Free, donations accepted. esm. rochester.edu. Affinity Orchard Farmers’ Market. 11 a.m.-2 p.m Affinity Orchard Place, at English & Fetzner Roads, Greece Free. affinityorchardplace.com. All White Affair. July 14, 10 p.m.-2 a.m. Max at High Falls. 21+. $20. thisisteame. eventbrite.com. Brighton Farmers’ Market. 9 a.m.-1 p.m Brighton High School, 1150 Winton Rd S This year on June 30 the market will temporarily move to the parking lot at Temple B’rith Kodesh, 2131 Elmwood Avenue (across the street and slightly west of Brighton Town Hall) 242-5046. brightonfarmersmarket.org. Greatest Community Garage Sales and Super Fleas. July 14. Rochester Public Market, 280 N. Union St. 8 a.m.2 p.m cityofrochester.gov/ publicmarket. [ MON., JULY 15 ] YMCA “Dream Big” Golf Tournament.. July 15, noon. Brook-Lea Country Club, 891 Pixley Rd. Registration includes lunch, golf, dinner, contests, prizes and more See website. 247-3242. rochesterymca.org. [ TUE., JULY 16 ] The Adult and Continuing Education Connection. July 16, 5-7 p.m. Rochester Institute of

Technology, 1 Lomb Memorial Dr. Bausch & Lomb Center on the RIT campus Free, register. 866-260-3950. rit.edu/emcs/ ptgrad/landing/PTconnection. html. Tilling the Soil: Tuesday Summer Movie. July 16, 6:15 p.m. Brighton Memorial Library, 2300 Elmwood Ave. Jul 9: “Field of Dreams,” Jul 16: Bridges of Madison County,” Jul 30: “The Secret Garden.”. Free. 784-5300. brightonlibrary.org. Tuesday Taco Trivia. 9-11 p.m. Temple Bar and Grille, 109 East Ave. Lots of giveaways, including hats, t-shirts, drinks, tacos - come alone or come with a team! $1.50 Beef Tacos, $2.50 Chicken Tacos, $2.50 Drafts except Guinness, $3 Bacardi Flavors 232-6000. templebarrochester@gmail. com. templebarandgrille.com. Westside Farmers Market. 4-7:30 p.m Westside Farmers Market, 831 Genesee St. 436-8999. westsidemarketrochester@ gmail.com. westsidemarketrochester.com. [ WED., JULY 17 ] Film: “Go West” with live piano by Philip C. Carli. July 17, 8:30 p.m. Dryden Theatre, 900 East Ave $6-$8. 2714090. dryden.eastmanhouse. org.

Sports [ FRI., JULY 12 ] 25K National Basketball Tournament: Project R.O.C.. July 12-14. Thomas P. Ryan Community Center, 530 Webster Ave. Ages 0-5 free, ages 6+ $5 info@25kbball. com. thisisteame.com.

Theater “Accomplice.” Through July 21. Bristol Valley Theater, 151 South Main St Through Jul 21. First week Thu-Sat 8 p.m., Sun 2 p.m. Second week: Wed 2 p.m., Thu 2 & 8 p.m., Fri-Sat 8 p.m., Sun 2 p.m $12-$33 3746318. bvtnaples.org. Dance/Movement Therapy Theory and Practice II: Bridging and Operationalizing Theory. Through July 20. Kinections, 718 University Ave. kinections.com. The Great American Trailer Park Musical. Auburn Public Theater, 8 Exchange St Wed Jul 10 2 & 7:30 p.m. Thu 7:30 p.m. Fri 8 p.m., Sat 2 & 8 p.m., Sun 2 p.m $22-$50 315-255-1785. fingerlakesmtf.com. Hill Cumorah Pageant. Through July 20. Hill Cumorah, near Palmyra Free. 315-597-5851. hillcumorah.org/pageant. Jawbone Puppet Theater & Poncili Company. Thu 8 p.m. MuCCC, 142 Atlantic Ave $8$10. 866-811-4111. muccc. org. Judah Leblang: “Finding My Place: One Man’s Journey through the Middle Ages.” Sat 8 p.m. MuCCC, 142 Atlantic Ave $10-$12. 866-811-4111. muccc.org. “Legally Blonde: The Musical.” Through July 17. Merry-GoRound Playhouse, 6877 East Lake Rd Through July 17. Wed Jul 10 2 & 7:30 p.m., Thu 7:30 p.m., Fri-Sat 8 p.m., Mon 2

p.m., Tue-Wed Jul 17 2 & 7:30 p.m $22-$50 315-255-1785. fingerlakesmtf.com. Pippin. The Evangelical Lutheran Church of the Reformation, 111 N Chestnut St. Fri 7:30 p.m., Sat 2 & 7:30 p.m $10-$12. 866-967-8167. stageworksroc.org. The PiTCH. Jun 13-Aug 17. Thu 7:30 p.m., Fri-Sat 8 p.m. July 11-13: Legends and Lore July 18-20: The Take July 25-27: Ten: The Story of Grace and Joe Aug 1-3: The Coincidentals Aug 8-10: Beautiful Dreamer: The Stephen Foster Musical Aug 15-17: Love on Ice. $20. 315‑255‑1785. fingerlakesmtf. com. Readers Theater: “Hamlet.” Books Etc., 78 W. Main St. Free. 474-4116. books_etc@ yahoo.com. Respect: A Musical Journey of Women. Downstairs Cabaret at Winton Place, 3450 Winton Place Thu 7 p.m., Fri 8 p.m., Sat 5 & 8:30 p.m., Sun 3 p.m $29-$39. 325-4370. downstairscabaret.com. Rocky Horror Picture Show. Fri 8:30 p.m. Rochester Institute of Technology, 1 Lomb Memorial Dr. The movie will be played with live actors shadow casting. The insanity begins with some pre-show fun and always ends with a bang $5 includes prop bag jms7005@rit.edu. “Twelfth Night.” Through July 20, 8 p.m. Highland Park Bowl, 1200 South Ave. July 5-7, 9-10, 12-14, 1617, 19-20 at 8 p.m Free, donations accepted. 234-7840. rochestercommunityplayers.org.

Theater Audition [ WED., JULY 10 ] The Gregory Kunde Chorale is looking for male voices. Call for an audition now to join our fourteenth season! Info line: 377-7568. gregorykundechorale.org. “Metal Quest: Planet Metal.” Through Sep. 20. MuCCC, 142 Atlantic Ave “Planet Metal” is a fun, thought-provoking play about three metal-loving aliens who visit Earth and become rock stars. We still need a few actors, no experience required. No audition required, just contact me somehow and you’re probably in! No spoken lines, about five practices. Nothing difficult. Free 2980983. metalquest1@gmail.com.

Workshops [ WED., JULY 10 ] Computer Basics with Jack Kellogg. 1:30-3:30 p.m Wood Library, 134 North Main St. Free, register. 394-1381. woodlibrary.org. Cooking Class: Chinese Classics with Chloe Kung. July 10, 6-8 p.m. Rosario Pino’s Artisan Foods, 349 W Commercial St $60, register. 267-7405. rosariopinos.com. Small Business Council Coot Camp #5: Lessons Learned: Recovering From A Real Disaster. July 10, 7:45 a.m. Mario’s, 2740 Monroe Ave. Presented By: Peter Bruu and Michael Montagliano, IV4 $25, SBC members free. 271-1111. rochestersbc.com/.

Weight Loss: What You Really Need to Know Class. July 10, 7 p.m. Rochester Brainery, Village Gate, 274 N Goodman St. $15. 730-7034. rochesterbrainery.com. [ THU., JULY 11 ] Cooking Class: Iron Chef with Joel Kraft. July 11, 6-8 p.m. Rosario Pino’s Artisan Foods, 349 W Commercial St $75, register. 267-7405. rosariopinos.com. Italian Language Class: Children’s Program. 6-7 p.m Italian American Community Center, 150 Frank Dimino Way $50 per session, register. 7495346. mafocarazzo@gmail.com. iaccrochester.org. Italian Language Class: Conversation Italian. 7:459:30 p.m Italian American Community Center, 150 Frank Dimino Way $50 per session, register. 749-5346. mafocarazzo@gmail.com. iaccrochester.org. Italian Language Class: Grammar Review and Verb Conjugation. 6-7:30 p.m Italian American Community Center, 150 Frank Dimino Way $50 per session, register. 749-5346. mafocarazzo@gmail.com. iaccrochester.org. JSY at the Market. Saturdays, 1 p.m Rochester Public Market, 280 N. Union St. Foodlink’s nutritionist offers free cooking demonstrations on ways to prepare fresh fruits and vegetables purchased at the Rochester Public Market using SNAP benefits. “Just Say Yes” to Fruits and Vegetables is a state-funded initiative to help individuals make healthier choices with their SNAP dollars Free. 3283380. Rochester Makerspace Open Nights. 6-10 p.m. Rochester Makerspace, 850 St. Paul St. #23 Bring a project to work on or something to show others, help work on the space, or just get to know the venue Free. 210--0075. rochestermakerspace.org. Table Saw Basics: Intro/Demo. July 11. Rochester Makerspace, 850 St. Paul St. #23 Choose 7-8 p.m. or 8-9 p.m Free, register. 210-0075. rocmaker. eventbrite.com. [ SAT., JULY 13 ] Container Gardening Class. July 13, 9 a.m. Cornell Cooperative Extension of Monroe County, 249 Highland Ave $10, register. 461-1000 x225. ksk8@cornell. edu. Standup Comedy Classes. Comedy Club, 2235 Empire Blvd. Saturday July 13, 2013 2:00-5:00 P.M. Writing Clinic Saturday July 20, 2013 2:00-5:00 P.M. Performance/ Improv Clinic Saturday July 27, 2013 2:00-5:00 P.M. Business of Comedy Clinic. $50, register. 671-9080. thecomedyclub.us. Writing to Heal Workshop. July 13, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. 640 Kreag Rd., Suite 202, Pittsford $95, register. 586-1590. innerjourneyarts.com. [ SUN., JULY 14 ] Introduction to Screen Printing: Adults. 2-5 p.m Rochester Makerspace, 850 St. Paul St. #23 $100, register. 210-0075. rocmaker.eventbrite.com.

[ TUE., JULY 16 ] Accidental Social Skill: Comedy Improv. July 16, 7-8:30 p.m. Writers and Books, 740 University Ave Workshop recommended for young people with Asperger’s, high functioning autism, ADD, ADHD, depression, or shyness $25-$30 single session, $45$55 both, register. 473-2590. wab.org. African World History Class. 7:30-9 p.m. Baobab Cultural Center, 728 University Ave. The African World History class provides an ongoing experience of the contributions and achievements Africans and African-Americans have made throughout history. The class uses the historical experiences of African peoples to highlight the cultural values we share. Stay tuned and check the Baobab website for further details $5 donation requested per session. baobab.center@ yahoo.com. thebaobab.org. Buddhist Book Discussion Group. 7 p.m. Amitabha Foundation, 11 South Goodman St. “The Essence of the Heart Sutra.”. By donation. 451-7039. NY@ amitabhafoundation.us. amitabhafoundation.us. Chorus of the Genesee: Free Singing Lessons. 6-7 p.m. Harmony House, 58 East Main St 698-7784. Community Labyrinth Walk with free energy work, chair massage, and music. July 16, 7-9 p.m. First Unitarian Church, 220 S Winton Rd Fifteen minute orientation from 7-7:15 p.m. Handicapped Accessible Free, donations accepted. 392-3601. kwhipple@rochester.rr.com. rochesterunitarian.org. Mini-Vet School. 7-8 p.m Wood Library, 134 North Main St. Four week course on general wellness care and preventative medicine for your pets Register. 394-1381. woodlibrary.org. [ WED., JULY 17 ] 3rd Wednesday with Lento: Sausage Making at Rochester Brainery. July 17, 6:30 p.m. Rochester Brainery, Village Gate, 274 N Goodman St. Hour-long class on “The basics of Sausage Making,” taught by Art Rogers, chef and owner of Lento. Then head to Lento for a 3-course meal based on our theme: sausage. Cost of ticket includes one glass of wine as well as tip $50, register. 730-7034. info@rochesterbrainery.com. rochesterbrainery.com. Cooking Class: Summer Harvest Vegetables with Gary Piazza of Grey Ghost Gormet. July 17, 6-8 p.m. Rosario Pino’s Artisan Foods, 349 W Commercial St $40, register. 267-7405. rosariopinos.com. Going Social: Understanding Social Networks. July 17, 4-5:30 p.m. Wood Library, 134 North Main St. Free, register. 394-1381. woodlibrary.org.

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Canandaigua Theatres 3181 Townline Road, Canandaigua, 396-0110, rochestertheatermanagement.com

Cinema Theater 957 S. Clinton St., 271-1785, cinemarochester.com

Culver Ridge 16 2255 Ridge Rd E, Irondequoit  544-1140, regmovies.com

Dryden Theatre 900 East Ave., 271-3361, dryden.eastmanhouse.org

Eastview 13 Eastview Mall, Victor 425-0420, regmovies.com

Geneseo Theatres Geneseo Square Mall, 243-2691, rochestertheatermanagement.com

Greece Ridge 12 176 Greece Ridge Center Drive 225-5810, regmovies.com

Henrietta 18 525 Marketplace Drive 424-3090, regmovies.com

The Little 240 East Ave., 258-0444 thelittle.org

The Ranger rides again [ REVIEW ] BY GEORGE GRELLA

“The Lone Ranger” (PG-13), DIRECTED BY GORE VERBINSKI NOW PLAYING

As history demonstrates, the law of the conservation of matter applies magnificently to Hollywood, where nothing, it seems, is ever wasted, lost, or forgotten. The Lone Ranger galloped through decades of radio shows, comic books, television series, and movies, yet returns once again, with his faithful Indian companion Tonto and his white horse Silver, only now in a grand spectacle that belongs with all the other overblown remakes, sequels,

Movies 10 2609 W. Henrietta Road 292-0303, cinemark.com

Pittsford Cinema 3349 Monroe Ave., 383-1310 pittsford.zurichcinemas.com

Tinseltown USA/IMAX 2291 Buffalo Road 247-2180, cinemark.com

Webster 12 2190 Empire Blvd., 888-262-4386, amctheatres.com

Vintage Drive In 1520 W Henrietta Rd., Avon 226-9290, vintagedrivein.com

Film Previews on page 32

30 CITY JULY 10-16, 2013

prequels, and plagiarisms that populate the cineplexes this summer. In a film season featuring blockbuster versions of “The Wizard of Oz” and “The Great Gatsby,” it should come as no surprise that the modest little radio serial becomes one of the showiest and, frankly, silliest movies of the year. Apparently in the interests of political correctness or appeasing the sensibilities of Native Americans understandably resentful of their treatment in both history and cinema, and weary of decades of Caucasians and even African Americans playing Indians, the script turns good old Tonto (Johnny Depp) into an equal partner of John Reid (Armie Hammer), the Lone Ranger. In addition, Depp, who enjoys top billing in the credits, has frequently and unconvincingly advertised some faint connection to some Indian tribe or other, though without specifying if he is a descendant of Geronimo, Sitting Bull, Crazy Horse, or some perhaps lessfamous chieftain. The picture unfolds in a retrospective

Armie Hammer and Johnny Depp in “The Lone Ranger.” PHOTO COURTESY WALT DISNEY PICTURES

narrative, with the aged Tonto, on display in a Wild West show in 1933, recounting the story to a young boy. Throughout his account the plot moves back and forth in time, with several stories within the primary story providing context and history. That history bears only a vague resemblance to the familiar tale of the masked man who became the hero of a thousand adventures in every popular medium. Filmed all over the West, the film magically moves fabled Monument Valley to Texas in 1869 as the transcontinental railroad, also moved magically to Texas, nears completion. A gang of outlaws attacks the train itself, which carries John Reid, a young prosecutor, and two prisoners, Tonto and the gang’s leader, a vicious murderer named Butch Cavendish (William Fichtner). The trio of Reid, Tonto, and Cavendish carry on a series of pursuits, ambushes, and gunfights throughout this very long movie. Just about every element of the picture from that point onward grows increasingly violent and extreme, sometimes leading to horror, sometimes to humor. Cavendish, for example, even disgusts his gang of thugs when he cuts out the heart of one of his living victims and devours it. On the other hand the script portrays Reid as a dumb, incompetent, straitlaced, naïve buffoon, guided and frequently rescued by the sly, clever, sardonic Tonto, who gets all the laughs. Repeating itself over and over, the film shows the Ranger and his sidekick constantly

Into the woods [ REVIEW ] BY ADAM LUBITOW

“The Kings of Summer” (R), DIRECTED BY JORDAN VOGT-ROBERTS NOW PLAYING

landing in trouble and escaping through luck or subterfuge or the assistance of the “spirit horse,” a wonderful white beast who of course becomes the famous Silver. In the process, John Reid actually grows into the role of the Lone Ranger, which as a man of peace he had resisted despite the villainy he and Tonto confront. The stirring climax of the picture, which goes on interminably, features dozens of remarkable stunts involving two separate trains, the Ranger riding Silver across the roofs of a whole string of railroad cars, an exploding trestle, a tremendous wreck, and of course, numerous slugfests and gun fights. The credits list over a thousand people, hundreds of them digital artists who create all those amazing effects, which indicates just how far the concept has traveled from the great days of the “William Tell” overture and the ringing voice of Clayton Moore, television’s original Ranger. Although it contains some traditional Western themes and devices — Native Americans, outlaws, railroads, train and bank robberies, the memory of the Civil War — the movie plays many of them for laughs and exaggerates the others beyond plausibility. The actors, including the trio of Depp, Hammer, and Fichtner, play their characters on one dull, repetitive note. The dumb comedy conflicts with the attempts at serious action and a running gag about the Ranger’s mask undercuts any of the romance of the original hero. Hiyo Silver, go away!

We’ve all been there: you’re 15, filled with angst, hormones raging, your parents are driving you insane, and you just can’t wait to get the f— out of the house. You’re still a kid, but longing for the sweet freedom of adulthood, fantasizing about finally striking out on your own, away from the rules and expectations of your parents. Perhaps those patron saints of adolescence, DJ Jazzy Jeff and the Fresh Prince, summed it up best when they explained: parents just don’t understand. It’s a feeling that director Jordan Vogt-Roberts and writer Chris Galletta clearly remember all too well and utilize to great effect in their hilarious and charmingly offbeat comingof-age tale, “The Kings of Summer.” Joe (Nick Robinson) lives alone with his widower father, Frank (Nick Offerman, “Parks and Recreation”). The gulf between them, which existed even before the death of Joe’s mother, has only gotten bigger as Frank has allowed his unhappiness to get the better of him, turning him bitter and antagonistic. Joe’s older sister, Heather (Alison Brie, “Community”), offers a

Gabriel Basso, Moises Arias, and Nick Robinson in “The Kings of Summer.”

sympathetic ear during her occasional visits, but long ago saw her chance to escape, and hasn’t really looked back since. Meanwhile, Joe’s best friend, Patrick (Gabriel Basso), is having trouble with his own parents (Megan Mullally and Marc Evan Jackson, both hilarious in roles that unfortunately amount to little more than caricatures). They are the very definition of helicopter parents, incessantly hovering over him and nitpicking every move he makes, to the extent that they’ve given the poor kid hives. After stumbling across a secluded area deep within the woods, Joe, always the more industrious of the duo, thinks he’s found the solution to their problems: they’ll run away and build a home for themselves in the forest. Finally they’ll be masters of their own destinies, and if their newfound independence impresses Kelly (Erin Moriarty), Joe’s longtime crush, all the better. Somewhere along the way, they pick up Biaggio (Moises Arias), their oddball classmate, who just sort of shows up one day and gets absorbed into their ranks. Together the three boys make their own rules, living off the land (aside from occasional takeout from Boston Market when hunting proves a bit more difficult than anticipated), and taking advantage of their lack of supervision. The concept behind “The Kings of Summer” is more than a little ridiculous, but the underlying emotions are real and Vogt-Roberts wisely plays them straight, even if the wild shifts in tone — alternating between wild flights of fancy, absurd humor, and earnest melodrama — sometimes threaten to give the audience whiplash. The film manages to break outside the box of traditional coming-ofage stories with a delightfully off-kilter sensibility. Not everything works all the time, but as a whole, the film maintains a goofy charm and by its end has gained a

somewhat unexpected poignancy. There’s even a scene late in the film of almost unbearable suspense and a dream sequence that plays like a scene out of “Scott Pilgrim vs. the World,” proving Vogt-Roberts is capable of just about anything. This is the director’s first feature film, and it’s a debut that hints at greatness to come. The film is anchored by strong performances from all three of the young leads. Robinson’s performance deepens as the film goes on, making great use a boyish smile and eyes that suggest an endless capacity for mischief. Basso is soulful and sympathetic, even as his character takes some actions that might have proved unlikeable in a less capable actor’s hands. But possibly best of all is Arias, who proves himself a master of the non sequitur and all but steals the movie with his kooky charm. I’m fighting the urge to segue into a list of some of his best lines, but I wouldn’t want to ruin them. The roles for the adults are a bit slim, but Nick Offerman gets the most to do and he nails the role; he’s playing a bastard, but his performance never obscures the wounded man underneath. The film was shot in the woods of Ohio, and the locations are shown off to great effect in director of photography Ross Riege’s lovely cinematography. The gorgeous shots of nature and the wildlife verge on Malick territory. Also noteworthy is the score by Ryan Miller, lead singer of the band Guster. His original music blends indie-rock with an 8-bit video-game sound, and it’s remarkably effective at getting the audience into the mindset of a 15-yearold boy. With their help, “The Kings of Summer” captures the feeling of summer when you’re a kid; the way that school and the “real” world are a distant memory, and those few months stretch out before you, seemingly filled with endless possibility.

PHOTO COURTESY CBS FILMS

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 31

Film Previews

Full film reviews available at rochestercitynewspaper.com. [ OPENING ] 20 FEET FROM STARDOM (PG-13): This documentary follows the experiences of the backup singers for some of the biggest music acts around. Little AIRPLANE! (1980): Disaster movies of the 70s get spoofed in this comedy classic. Starring Leslie Nielsen, Lloyd Bridges, Peter Graves, and Kareem Abdul-Jabbar. Vintage (Tue, Jul 16, 9 p.m.) THE AMAZING SPIDER-MAN (2012): The Spider-Man franchise gets rebooted with this origin story, in which Spidey faces off against the Lizard. Starring Andrew Garfield, Emma Stone, Rhys Ifans, Sally Field, and Martin Sheen. Ontario Beach Park (Tue, Jul 16, 9 p.m.) BHAAG MILKHA BHAAG (NR): The epic true life story of the Indian world champion runner and Olympian Milkha Singh. Henrietta FILL THE VOID (PG): An Israeli girl is pressured by her Orthodox family to marry the husband of her late sister in this acclaimed drama. Little EMPLOYEES’ ENTRANCE (1933): This risqué Pre-Code drama follows the goings on at a department store run by a shockingly ruthless manager. Dryden (Thu, Jul 11, 8 p.m.) GROWN UPS 2 (PG-13): Adam Sandler, Chris Rock, Kevin James, and David Spade all return in this sequel about a group of overgrown man-children. Also starring Salma Hayek and Maya Rudolph. Brockport, Canandaigua, Culver Ridge, Eastview, Geneseo,

Greece Ridge, Henrietta, Pittsford, Tinseltown, Vintage, Webster THE LORAX (2012): The Lorax speaks for the trees in this computeranimated adaptation of the beloved Dr. Suess story. With the voices of Danny DeVito, Zac Efron, Taylor Swift, Betty White, and Ed Helms. Highland Park Bowl (Thu, Jul 11, 9 p.m.) MONTY PYTHON AND THE HOLY GRAIL (1975): Monty Python takes on the legend of King Arthur and his knights in this silly comedy epic. Vintage (Tue, Jul 16, 10:30 p.m.) NIGHT OF THE LIVING DEAD (1968): They’re coming to get you, Barbara! George Romero’s film is a horror classic, and kicked off the zombie film genre as we know it. Dryden (Fri, Jul 12, 8 p.m.) PACIFIC RIM (PG-13): When enormous monsters rise from the sea, humankind fights back by building giant robot warriors to defend the world in this sci-fi action film from director Guillermo del Toro (“Pan’s Labyrinth”). Starring Charlie Hunnam, Idris Elba, Ron Perlman, and Charlie Day. Brockport, Canandaigua, Culver Ridge, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece Ridge, Henrietta, Pittsford, Tinseltown, Vintage, Webster RAIDERS OF THE LOST ARK (1981): Archeologist Indiana Jones’ squares off against the Nazis to find the Ark of the Covenant in Steven Spielberg’s action-adventure masterpiece. Starring Harrison Ford, John RhysDavies, Alfred Molina, and national treasure, Karen Allen. Dryden (Sat, Jul 13, 8 p.m.; Sun, Jul 14, 2 p.m.) UNFINISHED SONG (PG-13): A curmudgeonly widower finds a new lease on life after joining a choir

group. Starring Terence Stamp, Vanessa Redgrave, and Gemma Arterton. Little Y TU MAMÁ TAMBIÉN (2001): Two teenage boys embark on a road trip across Mexico with an older women in this sexy drama from director Alfonso Cuarón.  Dryden (Tue, Jul 16, 8 p.m.) YOUNG MR. LINCOLN (1939): Henry Fonda stars as the titular Mr. Lincoln in this fictionalized account of the president’s early life as a lawyer. Dryden (Wed, Jul 10, 8 p.m.) [ CONTINUING ] THE ATTACK (R): An IsraeliPalestinian goes on a dangerous mission to find out the truth when the police inform him that his wife is the perpetrator behind a deadly suicide bombing. Little, Pittsford THE EAST (PG-13): A former FBI agent infiltrates an anarchist group that seeks revenge against corporations who engage in criminal activity. With Ellen Page, Alexander Skarsgård, and Patricia Clarkson. Cinema THE HEAT (R): A by-the-book FBI agent teams up with a coarse Boston cop to bring down a drug lord in this buddy comedy from director Paul Feig (“Bridesmaids”). Starring Sandra Bullock and Melissa McCarthy. Canandaigua, Culver Ridge, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece Ridge, Henrietta, Pittsford, Tinseltown, Vintage, Webster THE KINGS OF SUMMER (PG-13: See review on page 31. Little THE LONE RANGER (PG-13): See review on page 30. Away! Canandaigua, Culver Ridge, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece Ridge,

Henrietta, Pittsford, Tinseltown, Vintage, Webster MUCH ADO ABOUT NOTHING (PG13): Joss Whedon takes a break from superheroes with a low-budget adaptation of Shakespeare’s play, starring all your Whedonverse favorites. Pittsford NOW YOU SEE ME (PG-13): A team of illusionists use their talents to perpetrate a series of heists targeting corrupt business leaders. Starring Jesse Eisenberg, Michael Caine, Morgan Freeman, Mark Ruffalo, Woody Harrelson, and Isla Fisher. Cinema, Eastview, Tinseltown THIS IS THE END (R): Seth Rogen, James Franco, Jonah Hill, and a host of other mainstays of the Judd Apatow repertory company play themselves in this comedy-horroradventure about the end of the world. With Jay Baruchel, Craig Robinson, and Danny McBride. Canandaigua, Culver Ridge, Greece Ridge, Henrietta, Pittsford, Tinseltown, Webster WHITE HOUSE DOWN (PG-13): The White House is under terrorist attack, and it’s up to the president (Jamie Foxx) and a wannabe Secret Service agent (Channing Tatum) to save the day. Also with Maggie Gyllenhaal. Canandaigua, Culver Ridge, Eastview, Greece Ridge, Henrietta, Pittsford, Tinseltown, Vintage, Webster WORLD WAR Z (PG-13): Brad Pitt tries to stop the zombie outbreak that threatens to destroy the world in this apocalyptic action thriller. Canandaigua, Culver Ridge, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece Ridge, Henrietta, Tinseltown, Vintage, Webster

For information: Call us (585) 244-3329 Fax us (585) 244-1126 Mail Us City Classifieds 250 N. Goodman Street Rochester, NY 14607 Email Us classifieds@ rochester-citynews.com EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY

All real estate advertised in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act, which makes it unlawful, “to make, print, or publish, any notice, statement, or advertisement, with respect to the sale or rental of a dwelling that indicates any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin.” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under the age of 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertisement for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. Call the local Fair Housing Enforcement Project, FHEP at 325-2500 or 1-866-671-FAIR. Si usted sospecha una practica de vivienda injusta, por favor llame al servicio legal gratis. 585-325-2500 - TTY 585-325-2547.

32 CITY JULY 10-16, 2013

We placed an ad in City Newspaper advertising the availability of two office suites in my office building at 55 Canterbury Road in the City. The response was excellent. One of the two available spaces was leased within days, and we have active interest in the other space.” - DOUGLAS C. BURKHARDT, FIRST REALTY COMPANY

www.firstrealtyrochester.com

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HomeWork Find your way home with

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Greece; 158 Merrick St, $94,900. This home boasts refinished hardwoods, woodburing fireplace, an archway to the dining room, and a closed in porch with a brick floor. Many Upgrades! Call Ryan @ 585-201-0724

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sculpture! Another bank of leaded-glass windows adds sparkle to this room.

in under 10 minutes.  In New York City, you might pay millions for the privilege, but in Rochester look no further than this elegant Arts and Crafts home at 77 East Ridge Road, less than a half mile walk from the Seneca Park entrance on Saint Paul Boulevard. Sure, it might not come with a Central Park West doorman, but who can complain at $99,900 for 1,820 square feet?   Seneca Park was just 25 years old when this inviting home was built in 1918, and it retains much of its early 20th century allure. The asymmetric exterior is a welcoming introduction, full of visual interest and charm—with contrasting roof lines with deep eaves, a 5-window bay on the left, and inviting front porch to the right flanking a center, arched entrance with leaded sidelights. Wooden clapboard and windows— including wooden storm windows—have been kept in wonderful condition and good working order.   Through a small entryway with hexagonal tile and a leaded glass interior door, one enters into a foyer. A convenient powder room has been tucked under the stairwell. To the right is a spacious living room with a working fireplace surrounded by twin built-in bookshelves, topped by leaded-glass windows. On the left, the dining room’s bay window looks out over the front yard above a 35-rib curved radiator— what an impressive piece of utilitarian

Toward the back of the house is the home’s updated kitchen featuring an island perfect for food prep and entertaining, but there are two real surprises here: an adjoining breakfast room with huge windows overlooking the two-car garage and lovely backyard, as well as the original butler’s pantry with all the drawers, counter-space, and cupboards for which one could ask.   Upstairs are four spacious bedrooms, a laundry chute, and a linen closet. The master bedroom has an adjoining sleeping porch lined with original casement windows. It’s a beautiful bonus space with a ton of potential just awaiting your vision. The full bath on this floor adds vintage flair with plenty of space and period tile. Not included in the square footage is a full-size attic, partially finished and with high ceilings and good light—the possibilities up here are limitless.   This is a special home with a special location, providing excellent access to all points in the city and Seneca Park, as well as the El Camino rail-trail and Genesee Riverway trail. For an appointment, call Michael Ciavarri at Nothnagle/Holly Creek (585.944.4756) or for more information see the listing at http:// rochestercityliving.com/property/R225575. By Sarah Nguyen Hooper Sarah is a Landmark Society volunteer and proud city resident.

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 33

> page 32

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34 CITY JULY 10-16, 2013

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Jam Section BRIAN MARVIN lead vocalist, is looking for a job and is looking to form band (Classic Rock) with lead guitarist, bassist, drummer & rhythm guitars Covers & originals 585-4735089 CALLING ALL MUSICIANS OF ALL GENRES the Rochester Music Coalition wants you! Please register on our website. For further info: www. rochestermusiccoalition.org info@rochestermusiccoalition. org 585-235-8412 DRUMMER Experienced Young Drummer available. Influences are Led Zep, Rush, Pink Floyd, Foo Fighters. Looking for Guitar, Bass and Vocals. Contact through: http://www.youtube. com/user/Chaztize7 HAMMOND AURORA ORGAN Nice sounding Hammond Spinet organ w/ Leslie speaker built-in. Solid state. Includes bench $500 Hurry! 585-455-5739 LOOKING FOR MULTI INSTRUMENT MUSICIANS. please no freelancers apply. Available evenings, equipment & transportation Contact Bobby 585-328-4121 SEEKING GUITARIST Who likes early Beatles and Who, Jefferson Airplane, Springsteen, Ramones, B-52s and X. I play bass, write, and sing backup. Want to jam without pressure, see where things go. mooskamovers@aol.com SEEKING VOCALIST that can learn many songs quickly.

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EMILY WATTS: God-Gifted Love Psychologist. Reunites Lovers. Stops unwanted Divorce. Helps all problems. 2 Free Questions by Phone. 1-630-835-7256 (AAN CAN)

Music Services BASS LESSONS Acoustic, electric, all styles. Music therory and composition for all instruments. Former Berklee and Eastman Teacher. For more information, call 585-260-9958 & 585-512-6044 PIANO LESSIONS In your home or mine. Patient, experienced instructor teaching all ages, levels and musical styles. Call Scott: 585- 465-0219. Visit www.pianolessonsrochester.com

Miscellaneous ADVERTISE YOUR BUSINESS or product in alternative papers across the U.S. for just $995/ week. New advertiser discount “Buy 3 Weeks, Get 1 Free” christine@rochester-citynews. com

P LY M O U T H S P I R I T UA L I S T C H U R C H Together We Are One

2 9 V I C K PA R K A RO C H E S T E R , N Y

Sunday Services 10:30 AM All Message Service & Free Spiritual Healing Third Weds ~ 7 PM ~ Séances ~ Classes ~ Gallery Reading ~ For more information and schedules www.plymouthspiritualistchurch.org Robin Higgins, Pastor ~ Phone: 585.271.1470

HAS YOU BUILDING SHIFTED OR SETTLED? Contact Woodford Brothers Inc, for straightening, leveling, foundation and wood frame repairs at 1-800-OLDBARN. www.woodfordbros. com. “Not applicable in Queens county” SAWMILLS from only $3997MAKE MONEY & SAVE MONEY with your own bandmil Cut

CHECK OUT

CITY NEWSPAPER’S

ONLINE CLASSIFIEDS Experience in office & household moving and deliveries

Big or small, we do them all

473-6610 or 473-4357 23 Arlington St.

Fast and easy-to-use! • Find what you’re looking for with new categories! • Clickable links to business websites • and many more features!

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CITY rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 35

I’m very pleased with the calls I got from our apartment rental ads, and will continue running them. Your readers respond — positively!” - M. Smith, Residential Management EMPLOYMENT / CAREER TRAINING

Employment AIRLINE CAREERS begin here– Get FAA approved Aviation Maintenance Technician training. Financial aid for qualified students– Housing available.Job placement assistance. Call AIM 866-296-7093 DRIVERS: Dedicated Company Drivers (Local & Regional). Ask about various pay, hometimes

and bonus options. Must be 23 YOA w/CDL-A & 1 year experience. 855-263-1163 NFltruckingjobs.com GROUP LEADERS Needed to work at EMH Charter School (Clifford Ave. or Joseph Ave.) supervising and teaching students grades 4-8 from 3 p.m.-5:30 p.m., M-F, September through June. Applications available at 938 Clifford Avenue or contact Ms. Williams at 585.544.6170.

HELP WANTED! make extra money in our free ever popular homemailer program,includes valuable guidebook! Start immediately! Genuine! 1-888292-1120 www.easyworkfromhome.com (AAN CAN) $$$HELP WANTED$$$ Extra Income! Assembling CD cases from Home! No Experience Necessary! Call our Live Operators Now! 1-800-4057619 EXT 2450 http://www.

SINGLE ALTERNATIVE WEEKLY NEWSPAPER

is seeking one bright, outgoing, creative

SALES PROFESSIONAL for long-term relationship!

Media / newspaper / advertising sales experience a must. Telemarketing, classified and online sales experience a definite plus. Salary plus commission plus benefits.

INTERESTED? EMAIL BETSY MATTHEWS:

bmatthews@rochester-citynews.com

easywork-greatpay.com (AAN CAN) PAID IN ADVANCE! MAKE up to $1000 A WEEK mailing brochures from home! Helping Home Workers since 2001! Genuine Opportunity! No Experience required. Start Immediately! www. themailingstation.com (AAN CAN) PROJECT ENGINEERS in Rochester, NY. Participate in building systems integration including computer-aided modeling, simulations, development of equip. databases and rel. building information model (BIM). Perform engineering calculations related to HVAC industry. Limited travel req. Send res to Erdman, Anthony and Associates, Inc. at 145 Culver Road, Ste. 200, Rochester, NY 14620

Volunteers A SECOND THOUGHT Resale Shop in East Rochester is

ACTIVISM

SUMMER JOBS FOR THE ENVIRONMENT NYPIRG is now hiring students, grads & others for an urgent campaign to protect our drinking water. Get paid to make a difference!

F/T positions available. EOE Call Chris: 585-851-8012

NOW HIRING MBE/DBE/WBE Subcontractors/Suppliers

One of the leading General Contractors in Western NY is soliciting bids for an upcoming construction project in Rochester. New York State Certified MBE, DBE, and WBE subcontractors are requested for all scopes of work for the construction of this project set to break ground in July of 2013, with an estimated completion in Fall of 2014.

Please send information, or a Vendor Qualification Form to: TAYLOR – The Builders 2580 Baird Road, Penfield, NY 14526, fax to 585-248-5630, or email to RochesterGC@Yahoo.com. No phone calls will be accepted! “An Equal Opportunity Employer”

36 CITY JULY 10-16, 2013

accepting applications for volunteer sale associates and online researchers. Shop benefits people with disabilities in Guatemala. Call (585) 3402000.

HOPE HALL Recruiting volunteers to call sponsors and assist with events. Please contact: Michele Kaider-Korol, Development Associate at Hope Hall, (585) 426-5824 x111.

ARE YOU 55+ & interested in learning about local volunteer opportunities? Call RSVP! Many opportunities available. Help meet critical needs. Regular information sessions - call 2876377 or email jpowers@lifespanroch.org.

LIFESPAN’S OMBUDSMAN PROGRAMS looking for volunteers to advocate for individuals living in long-term care settings. Please contact call 585.287.6378 or e-mail dfrink@lifespan-roch.org for more information

CATHOLIC FAMILY CENTER needs volunteers to help people apply for citizenship. The commitment is 2.5 hrs per mth one evening a month. Training is provided. For more information call Nate at (585) 546-7220 ex 4854.

LITERACY VOLUNTEERS OF ROCHESTER needs adult tutors to help adults who are waiting to improve their reading, writing, English speaking, or math skills. Call 473-3030, or check our website at www.literacyrochester. org

DYNAMIC VOLUNTEER opportunities at the Zoo await you. If you love the Zoo, donate your time today. To learn more, visit the volunteer page of the Seneca Park Zoo’s Web site at www.senecaparkzoo.org

WOMEN: ROCHESTER HABITAT is looking for women 18 years+ to help build a house with a single mother. Visit rochabitat. org or call 546-1470

Business Opportunities

FOSTER PARENTS WANTED! Monroe County is looking for adults age 21 and over to consider opening their homes to foster children. Call 334-9096 or visit www. MonroeFosterCare.org.

START A HOME BASED BUSINESS. Part-time or FullTime. Serious inquires only. 585-271-3243

HABITAT FOR CATS — Help Trap-Neuter-Return cats on Tuesdays, in East Rochester, for an important grant project. Impact the number of ownerless cats living outside. All training provided. 585-7874209 or habitat4cats@yahoo. com!

Career Training

HERITAGE CHRISTIAN STABLES, a therapeutic horsemanship program for children and adults with developmental disabilities, is looking for volunteers to serve as horse leaders and side walkers. Call Kim Kennedy at (585) 340-2016 or email kkennedy@ heritagechristianservices.org

AIRLINE CAREERS - begin here.Become an Aviation Maintenance Tech. FAA approved training. Financial aid if qualified – Housing available. Job placement assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 877-492-3059

Hiring? GET THE RESULTS YOU NEED AT ABOUT HALF THE PRICE OF OTHER PAPERS! To advertise in our

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CITY

Legal Ads [ LEGAL NOTICE ] Ruffles Boutique LLC (“LLC”) filed Arts. of Org. with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on June 17, 2013. Office Location: Monroe County. SSNY designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 35 Brunswick Street, Apt. 2, Rochester, New York 14607. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] 26 SAGINAW DRIVE LLC (LLC) filed Arts. of Org. with NY Secy. of State (SS) on 6/20/2013. LLC’s office is in Monroe Co. SS is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS shall mail a copy of any process to 26 Saginaw Drive, Rochester, NY 14623. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] 4699 LAKE AVENUE LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 6/13/2013. Office in Monroe Co. SSNY desig. agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 4699 Lake Ave., Rochester, NY 14612, which is also the principal business locaton. Purpose: Any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] A & D REAL ESTATE DEVELOPMENT, LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 5/28/13. Office in Monroe Co. SSNY design. Agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to The LLC 22 Whitestone Lane Rochester Lane Rochester, NY 14618. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] CRC RESOURCES, LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 5/9/13. Office in Monroe Co. SSNY desig. agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 140 Metro Park, Rochester, NY 14623. Purpose: Any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] DGMAS, LLC has filed articles of organization with the New York Secretary of State on June 18, 2013 with an effective date of formation of June 18, 2013. Its principal place of business is located at 3817 W. Henrietta Road, Rochester, New York in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has

been designated as agent upon whom process may be served. A copy of any process shall be mailed to 3817 W. Henrietta Road, Rochester, New York 14623. The purpose of the LLC is to engage in any lawful activity for which Limited Liability Companies may be organized under Section 203 of the New York Limited Liability Company Law. [ NOTICE ] Doan EZ Auto Rental LLC (LLC) filed Arts. of Org. with NY Secy. of State (SS) on June 17, 2013. LLC’s office is in Monroe County. SS is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS shall mail a copy of any process to LLC’s principal business location at 4477 Ridge Road West, Rochester, NY 14626. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] E.C.O. ENTERPRISE, LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 4/29/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 235 Root Rd., Brockport, NY 14420. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] KimSanity, LLC (“LLC”) filed Arts. of Org. with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on June 12, 2013. The name was changed to KimSulting, LLC. Office Location: Monroe County. SSNY designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 18 Sanfilippo Circle, Rochester, New York 14625. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] LEGAL NOTICE FORMATION of Limited Liability Company. 1. Name of the LLC is RealGem Properties, LLC. 2. Articles of Org. were filed with Department of State of NY on June 7, 2013. 3.County of office: Monroe. 4. The Secretary of State is designated as agent upon whom process against the Company may be served. The address to which process shall be mailed: c/o Teaposy, Inc., 1900 Clinton Avenue, S., Unit 18111, Rochester, New York 14618. [ NOTICE ] NEW MARKET VENTURES, LLC Articles

of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 1/12/09. Office in Monroe Co. SSNY design. Agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to The LLC 38 Kimbark RD Rochester, NY 14610. Purpose: Any lawful activity. Registered Agent: Chris Rimlinger 38 Kimbark RD Rochester, NY 14610. [ NOTICE ] Not. of form of KCP Solutions of Upstate New York, LLC. Art. of Org. filed with SSNY 5/24/13 County: Monroe SSNY is designated agent of LLC to whom process may be served. SSNY may mail a copy of any process to LLC, 2 Clebourne Dr. Rochester, NY 14625. Purpose any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Not. of Form. of A&M Reporting, LLC, Art. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 5/30/13. Office Location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to LLC, 376 Westside Drive, Rochester, NY 14624. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Not. of Form. of DL CHURCH WEBSITES, LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 5/03/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY may mail a copy of any process to LLC. PO Box 71, W Henrietta, NY 14586. Purpose: any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Notice is hereby given that a license, number not yet assigned, for a full on premise beer, wine & liquor license has been applied for by RENYI, INC dba SHANGHAI RESTAURANT, 2920 W. Henrietta RD., Rochester, NY 14623, County of Monroe, for a restaurant. [ NOTICE ] Notice of filing of Application for Authority of limited liability company Carestream Health World Holdings LLC. Name of foreign LLC is Carestream Health World Holdings LLC. The Application for Authority was filed with the Sec. of State of New York (SSNY) on 5/30/13. Jurisdiction: Delaware. Formed: 5/29/13. County: Monroe. SSNY is designated as agent of

LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to LLC’s principal business: 150 Verona Street, Rochester, NY 14608. The address of the office required to be maintained in Delaware is its registered agent: Registered Agent Solutions, Inc., 1679 S. Dupont Hwy, Suite 100, Dover DE, 19901. The name and address of the authorized officer in Delaware where the Articles of Organization are filed is: Secretary of State, State of Delaware, Division of Corporations, John G. Townsend Bldg., 401 Federal St., Suite 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: any and all lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of BIRCHGROVE REAL ESTATE LLC. Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 00-00-00. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to P.O. Box 10068, Rochester, NY 14610. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of 1372 EDGEMERE DRIVE LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 05/22/13. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 1372 Edgemere Dr., Rochester, NY 14612. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of 151 Park, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 5/29/2013. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 151 Park Ave., Rear Bldg, Rochester, NY 14607. Purpose: Any lawful act. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of 212 BREWING COMPANY LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 06/03/13. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 902 Broadway, 6th Fl., NY, NY 10010. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process

to the LLC, Don Trooien at the princ. office of the LLC. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of 455 POST AVENUE LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 2/14/2013. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 124 Stockton Ln, Rochester, NY 14625. Purpose: Any lawful act. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of 4700 East Lake Road, LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 5/16/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 128 Lynx Ct., Fairport, NY 14450. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of 880 LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 1/16/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to Bansbach Zoghlin P.C., 31 Erie Canal Dr., Rochester, NY 14626. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of a Limited Liability Company (LLC): Name: OpenTee, LLC, Articles of Organization filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 5/20/2013. Office location: Monroe county. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to: 117 Heather Dr, Rochester, 14625. Purpose: Any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of ADAM SOLUTIONS, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 06/18/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Corporation Service Co., 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207, regd. agent upon whom and at which process may be served. Purpose: Any lawful activity.

[ NOTICE ]

[ NOTICE ]

Notice of Formation of Aidan Samuel, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 5/31/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, c/o Sammy Feldman, 3445 Winton Place, Ste. 228, Rochester, NY 14623. Purpose: any lawful activity

Notice of Formation of HearShield, LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 6/6/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 90 Sycamore Ridge, Honeoye Falls, NY 14472. Purpose: any lawful activities.

[ NOTICE ]

Notice of Formation of Manning Marine, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State on 6/5/13. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. bus. addr.: 290 Woodcliff Dr., Fairport, NY 14450. Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. Purpose: any lawful purpose.

Notice of Formation of AVANT GARDE AMENITIES LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 06/17/13. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 902 Broadway, 6th Fl., NY, NY 10010. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Don Trooien, 212 Brewing Company, LLC at the princ. office of the LLC. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Bernard Enterprises, LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 6/10/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 3 Box Car Dr., North Chili, NY 14514. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of CASTLE PARK, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 06/11/13. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 58 Whitestone Ln., Rochester, NY 14618. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Howard R. Crane, c/o Relin Goldstein & Crane LLP, 28 E. Main St., Ste. 1800, Rochester, NY 14614. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Direct EDU, LLC. Articles of Organization filed with the New York Department of State on 5/13/13. Its office is located in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent upon whom process against the Company may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to: 772 Shorecliff Drive Rochester, NY 14612. Purpose: any lawful activity.

[ NOTICE ]

[ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Marino Law Group, PLLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 5/2/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of PLLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 1 S. Washington St., Ste. 220, Rochester, NY 14614. Purpose: to practice the profession of Law. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of MRECC Enterprises, LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 5/9/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 45 Bauers Cove, Spencerport, NY 14559. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of NB4 PROPERTIES, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 5/22/2013. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 590 Salt Rd., Ste 5, Webster, NY 14580. Purpose: any lawful act. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Personalized Visual Learning LLC. Articles of Organization filed with the New York Department of

State on 05/08/2013. Its office is located in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent upon whom process against the Company may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to: 36 Cobb Terrace, Rochester, NY 14620. The purpose of the Company is any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of PINK SALON, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 06/14/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, 14 Galwood Dr., Rochester, NY 14622. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Primetime Ventures, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State on 6/4/13. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. bus. addr.: 290 Woodcliff Dr., Fairport, NY 14450. Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. Purpose: any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of REN LIQUORS, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 6/3/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, Sammy Feldman, 3445 Winton Place, Ste. 228, Rochester, NY 14623. Purpose: any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of SNOWBIRD PROPERTIES LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 6/11/2013. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o Chad R. Hayden, Esq., 1634 Lehigh Station Rd., Henrietta, NY 14467. Purpose: Any lawful act. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of Solid State Concrete Design LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on

cont. on page 38

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 37

Legal Ads > page 37 5/9/2013. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 31 Scottsville Rd., Rochester, NY 14611. Purpose: Any lawful act. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of SOUTH HICKORY PROPERTIES LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 6/24/2013. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 31 Scottsville Rd., Rochester, NY 14611. Purpose: Any lawful act. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of STRATEGIC ALLIANCE NETWORK LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 06/11/13. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 2479 Browncroft Blvd, Rochester, NY 14625.

SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of TAMARAC ORGANIZATIONAL SOLUTIONS LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 06/11/13. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 4 Kingsbury Ct., Rochester, NY 14618. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, Attn: Julie LaFave at the princ. office of the LLC. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Universal LEC LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 5/24/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to CT Corp. System, 111 Eighth Ave., NY, NY 10011.

Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of USA Choice Realty, LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 6/7/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 33 University Ave., Rochester, NY 14605. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] NOTICE OF SALE SUPREME COURT COUNTY OF MONROE Midfirst Bank, Plaintiff, against Traycie L. Calhoun, et al., Defendant(s). Pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale duly dated 9/7/2012 I, the undersigned Referee will sell at public auction at Monroe County Office Bldg., at W. Main Street, State of New York on 07/17/2013 at 10:00AM, premises known as 127 Perinton Street, Rochester, NY 14615- 3141. All that certain plot piece or parcel of land, with the buildings and improvements erected, situate, lying

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and being in the City of Rochester, County of Monroe and State of New York, SECTION: 090.30, BLOCK: 1, LOT: 41. Approximate amount of judgment $90,975.12 plus interest and costs. Premises will be sold subject to provisions of filed Judgment Index# 13297/2010. Kristine Demo Vazquez, Esq., Referee FRENKEL LAMBERT WEISS WEISMAN & GORDON, LLP Attorney for Plaintiff, 53 Gibson Street, Bayshore, NY 11706 Dated: May 9, 2013 1037221 6/19, 6/26, 7/3, 07/10/2013 [ NOTICE ] Portable Basement, LLC has filled Arts. of Org. with the Secretary of State on 4/12/2013. Office location: Monroe County. United States Corporation Agents, INC. is designated as the agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. USCA, INC. shall mail process to: 7014 13th Ave., Brooklyn, NY 11228. Purpose: Manufacturing. [ NOTICE ] T-Mobile USA proposes to remove and replace 3 existing antennas at a centerline height of 133 feet on a 150-foot smokestack at 4245 East Avenue, Rochester, NY 14618. Any interested party wishing to submit comments regarding the potential effects the proposed facility may have on any historic property may do so by sending such comments to: Project 61133307SLG c/o EBI Consulting, 21 B St., Burlington, MA 01803 or via telephone at 207-210-2535. [ NOTICE ] VISION BUICK GMC LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 5/22/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Daniel E. Edwards, 800 Panorama Trail S, Rochester, NY 14625. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] VISION TWO, LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 5/15/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 421 Sundance Trail, Webster, NY 14580. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] Not. Of Form. Of Front Runner Media LLC. Art.

38 CITY JULY 10-16, 2013

Of Org. filed with SSNY 1/ 25/07. County: Monroe. SSNY is designated Agent of LLC to whom process may be served. SSNY may mail a copy of any process to LLC, 7014 13th Ave. Suite 202 Brooklyn, NY 11228. Purpose any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of SUPERIOR CARE AGENCY LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) , 05/16/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to the LLC at 207 Tremont Street, Suite 112, Rochester, New York, 14608. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] Developub LLC filed Articles of Organization with the New York Department of State on 07/30/12. Its office is located in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent of the Company upon whom process against it may be served and a copy of any process shall be mailed to United States Corporation Agents Inc, 7014 13th Ave Suite 202, Brooklyn, NY 11228. The purpose of the Company is to engage in any lawful activity. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF COLEADD LAKE PROPERTIES, LLC ] The name of the Limited Liability Company is ColeAdd Lake Properties. LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the New York Secretary of State on 6/25/13. The office of the LLC is in Monroe County. The New York Secretary of State is designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. The Secretary of State shall mail a copy of such process to 30 Crestwood Circle, Pittsford, NY 14534, The LLC is organized to engage in any lawful activity for which an LLC may be formed under NY LLC Law. [ NOTICE OF SALE ] Index No. 2012-9142 SUPREME COURT STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF MONROE ESL Federal Credit Union Plaintiff, vs. Ronney F. Morris, Deceased, and any persons who are heirs or distributees of Ronney F. Morris, Deceased, and all

persons who are widows, grantees, mortgagees, lienors, heirs, devisees, distributees, successors in interest of such of them as may be deceased, and their husbands, wives, heirs, devisees, distributees and successors of interest all of whom and whose names and places of residence are unknown to Plaintiff; ESL Federal Credit Union; United States of America; People of the State of New York. Defendants. Pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale dated June 17, 2013 and entered herein, I, the undersigned, the Referee in said Judgment named, will sell at public auction in the front vestibule of the Monroe County Office Building, 39 West Main Street, Rochester, New York, County of Monroe, on July 31, 2013 at 11:00 a.m., on that day, the premises directed by said Judgment to be sold and therein described as follows: ALL THAT TRACT OR PARCEL OF LAND, situate in the Town of Clarkson, County of Monroe and State of New York, known as 626 Lawrence Road, Brockport, NY 14420; Tax Account No. 030.04-1-4 described in Deed recorded in Liber 10644 of Deeds, page 558. Said premises are sold subject to any state of facts an accurate survey may show, zoning restrictions and any amendments thereto, covenants, restrictions, agreements, reservations, and easements of record and prior liens, if any, municipal departmental violations, and such other provisions as may be set forth in the Complaint and Judgment filed in this action. Judgment amount: $58,142.93 plus, but not limited to, costs, disbursements, attorney fees and additional allowance, if any, all with legal interest. DATED: June 2013 Christopher Calabrese, Esq., Referee LACY KATZEN LLP Attorneys for Plaintiff 130 East Main Street Rochester, New York 14604 Telephone: (585) 324-5767 [ NOTICE OF SALE ] Index No. 2012-9970 SUPREME COURT STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF MONROE ESL Federal Credit Union Plaintiff vs Christopher M. Vanhall, a/k/a Christopher Vanhall; Karon Lewis; NY Financial Services, LLC; Arrow Financial Services, LLC; Portfolio Recovery Associates, LLC; “John Doe” and/or “Mary Roe”, Defendants Pursuant to a Judgment

of Foreclosure and Sale dated June 17, 2013 and entered herein, I, the undersigned, the Referee in said Judgment named, will sell at public auction in the front vestibule of the Monroe County Office Building, 39 West Main Street, Rochester, New York, County of Monroe, on July 31, 2013 at 11:30 a.m., on that day, the premises directed by said Judgment to be sold and therein described as follows: ALL THAT TRACT OR PARCEL OF LAND, situate in the Town of Parma, County of Monroe and State of New York, known as 94 Clearview Avenue, Hilton, NY 14468; Tax Account No. 009.67-38.1 described in Deed recorded in Liber 9345 of Deeds, page 287. Said premises are sold subject to any state of facts an accurate survey may show, zoning restrictions and any amendments thereto, covenants, restrictions, agreements, reservations, and easements of record and prior liens, if any, municipal departmental violations, and such other provisions as may be set forth in the Complaint and Judgment filed in this action. Judgment amount: $54,256.45 plus, but not limited to, costs, disbursements, attorney fees and additional allowance, if any, all with legal interest. DATED: June 2013 Vincent E. Merante, Esq., Referee LACY KATZEN LLP Attorneys for Plaintiff 130 East Main Street Rochester, New York 14604 Telephone: (585) 324-5767 [ SUPPLEMENTAL SUMMONS AND NOTICE ] Index No. 20129837 STATE OF NEW YORK SUPREME COURT MONROE COUNTY AMERICAN TAX FUNDING, LLC, Plaintiff, vs. JUAN R. IZQUIERDO; LYDIA RAMOS, if living, or if she be dead, her husband, heirsat-law, next of kin, distributees, executors, administrators, assignees, lienors, creditors, successors-ininterest and generally all persons having or claiming under, by or through LYDIA RAMOS, by purchase, inheritance, lien or otherwise of any right, title or interest in and to the premises described in the complaint herein, and all creditors thereof, and the respective husbands, or widowers of hers, if any, all of whose names and addresses are unknown to plaintiff; U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS

TRUSTEE FOR THE REGISTERED HOLDERS OF AEGIS ASSET BACKED SECURITIES TRUST, MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2005-5; CAPITAL ONE BANK (USA), NATIONAL ASSOCIATION; COUNTY OF MONROE and “JOHN DOE #1” THROUGH “JOHN DOE #100”, Defendants. TO THE ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANTS: YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED to answer the amended complaint in the aboveentitled foreclosure action, and to serve a copy of your answer on plaintiff’s attorney within thirty (30) days after the service of this supplemental summons, exclusive of the day of service or within thirty (30) days after completion of service where service is made in any other manner than by personal service within the State. The United States of America, if designated as a defendant in this action, may answer or appear within sixty (60) days of service hereof. In case of your failure to appear or answer, judgment will be taken against you by default for the relief demanded in the amended complaint. Monroe County is designated as the place of trial. The basis of venue is the location of the subject premises. Dated: June 10, 2013 TO THE ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANTS: The foregoing supplemental summons is served upon you by publication, pursuant to an Order of Honorable Richard Dollinger, a Justice of the Supreme Court, dated June 14, 2013, and filed with supporting papers in the Monroe County Clerk’s Office. This is an action to foreclose certain tax liens (the “Tax Lien”) covering the property known as 27 Chapin Street, City of Rochester, New York and identified as Tax Account No. 091.76-1-51 (the “Premises”). The relief sought is the sale of the Premises at public auction in satisfaction of the Tax Lien. In case of your failure to appear, judgment may be taken against you in the sum of $4,463.47, together with interest, costs, disbursements and attorney’s fees of this action, and directing the public sale of the Premises. Anthony J. Iacchetta Phillips Lytle LLP Office and Post Office Address 1400 First Federal Plaza Rochester, New York 14614 Tel. No. (585) 238-2000

Fun [ NEWS OF THE WEIRD ] BY CHUCK SHEPHERD

Things People Believe

— Sheriffs and government deed-recorders in several states have reported annoying attempts recently by “Moorish American nationals” to confiscate temporarily vacant houses (often mansions), moving in without inhibition, changing the locks, and partying joyously -- based on made-up documents full of gobbledygook and stilted legalese granting them sovereignty beyond the reach of law-enforcement. There is a venerable Moorish Temple Science of America, but these trespassers in Florida, Maryland, Tennessee, and other states are from fanciful offshoots that demand reparations (usually in gold) for ChristopherColumbus-era Europeans having stolen “their” land. A North Carolina police investigator told the Washington Post in March that “every state” is experiencing the “Moorish American” invasion. — Britain’s Anomalous Mind Management Abductee Contactee Helpline is the nation’s “weirdest” support group, wrote the Daily Mirror in June, providing a range of services to victims of kidnapping by extraterrestrials and other haunting incidents to about 1,500 people a year, according to co-founder Miles Johnston. AMMACH uses an ordinary wall-stud detector to locate bodily implants and employs magnetic field meters and mineral lamps to identify “signatures” left on a skin’s atoms by visits to another dimensional reality, Johnston explained. “We are under the threat of termination as a species if we do not get this sorted out.”

Cliches Comes to Life

— Sheriff’s deputies arrested Shane Kersey, 35, in March as the one who

made phone calls to four schools in New Orleans’s Westbank neighborhood, threatening to burn them down. When taken into custody, Kersey had aluminum foil wrapped around his skull and secured by a baseball cap but explained to an officer that he needed it “to prevent microwave signals from entering his head.” — Among the character witnesses in May at the New York City sex-trafficking trial of alleged pimp Vincent George, Jr., 33, and his father were three of the younger man’s ladies, who praised him unconditionally to the jury as a good father to the children they bore for him and as the person responsible for helping them kick their drug habits. Heather Keith, 28, and Danielle Geissler, 31, referred to each other as Vincent, Jr.’s “wife-in-law.” Geissler admitted that George (“Daddy”) slapped her around a bit, explaining that they both “slapped each other around sometimes but never over work or staying in the (prostitution) life.” (Three weeks later, the Georges were acquitted of sex trafficking, although convicted of money- laundering.)

Oops!

— Tim Blackburn, 50, fell off a ladder in Stockton-on-Tees, England, in 2007, and shattered his arm so badly that doctors had to remove four inches of bone and attach a metal scaffold around his arm that took six years to heal completely (and then only because of help from a cutting-edge ultrasound procedure). In May 2013 -- one day after he got a clean bill of health -- Blackburn tripped over his dog and tumbled down the stairs in his home, and his arm “snapped like a twig,” he said.

[ LAST WEEK’S SOLUTION ON PAGE 35 ]

[ LOVESCOPE ] BY EUGENIA LAST ARIES (March 21-April 19): Socialize, participate and, most of all, show your playful personality, and you will send a signal to individuals willing to take on the challenge of keeping up to you. Updating your look or making a couple of changes will attract compliments and romance. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Meeting new people is your first step toward finding someone special, but before you jump into to a one-on-one relationship, explore a friendship first. Once you are sure you share the same interests with a newfound friend, you can become intimate.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Boredom is your enemy when it comes to love. Chemistry is a wonderful thing and will capture your interest and your heart, leading to an impulsive move that may not end up being in your best interest. Have fun, but don’t make promises that may stifle your freedom. CANCER (June 21-July 22): Latching on to someone from your past may seem like a good idea when you first make contact, but the same problems that lead to separation are likely to surface. Learn from the experiences you’ve encountered in the past and you’ll find someone who fits your lifestyle better.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): You won’t have to do much to attract attention. Love is in the stars, but so is jealousy and possessiveness. Make sure you are ready to settle down before you engage in an intimate relationship. A tendency to entice someone who is overbearing can lead to stalking. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Do your research. Someone is likely to play games with you when it comes to an emotional relationship. Don’t take part in a relationship with someone who is still involved with someone else. A secret affair may start sweet and harmlessly, but it’s likely to turn sour.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Participating in the arts, entertainment or volunteering for something of an intellectual nature will bring you in contact with someone who sparks your interest and shares your thoughts. A sudden change in your status is likely to take place. Enjoy the encounter. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): A short-lived romance is likely to occur. Don’t settle for less than what you want in a partner. Slow down and make sure that whomever you end up with has similar morals, values and integrity. Mentally dance with whatever partner you choose before becoming intimate.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Travel and physical activities will lead to love, romance, intrigue and a change in the way you live your life. Have fun enjoying the pursuit of love. The games are just beginning, and the thrill, adventure and rush of love looks positive. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Pushiness is likely to lead to a dead end when it comes to love. You have to let partners come to you if you want to build a strong and lasting relationship. Too much of anything will come across as needy. An aloof and confident approach will bring better results.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Your experimental nature will entice someone spectacular. Swing into action and lead the way. It’s your uniqueness and desire to try something new that will keep someone special coming back for more. You’ll have a change of heart if your partner isn’t as adventuresome as you. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Let your intuition lead the way when it comes to love. Look closer to home and you will find that someone special has an interest in you. Choosing to engage in events or activities of an unusual nature will open up conversations that will eventually lead to intimacy.

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 39

AJI ZONING & LAND USE ADVISORY 50 Public Market | 208-2336 AWAKEN: Qi gong, yoga, tai chi, fine art 8 Public Market | 261-5659 BOULDER COFFEE CO. 1 Public Market | 232-5282 CARLSON METRO CENTER YMCA 444 East Main Street | 325-2880 CITY NEWSPAPER 250 N. Goodman St | 244-3329 THE CITY OF ROCHESTER Market Office | 428-6907

HARMAN FLOORING CO. 29 Hebard Street | 546-1221

MARKET DISTRICT

B U S I N E S S A S S O C I AT I O N

JUAN & MARIA’S EMPANADA STOP www.juanandmarias.com | 325-6650 “HOME OF THE HIGHLY ADDICTIVE SPANISH FOODS”

FOOD SERVICE DISTRIBUTOR

DEEP DISCOUNT STORAGE 265 Hayward Avenue | 325-5000

WHAT YOU NEED IS JUST A PHONE CALL AWAY

FRIENDS OF THE PUBLIC MARKET marketfriends@rochester.rr.com | 325-5058

THE GOURMET WAFFLER Catering 461-0633

20-22 Public Market | 423-0994

1115 E. Main Street | 469-8217 Open Studios First Friday Every Month CAFE 50 Public Market | 325-5280 Purveyors of Fine Coffee and Tea OBJECTMAKER 153 Railroad Street | 244-4933

97 Railroad Street | 546-8020 Tours • Tastings • Private Parties www.rohrbachs.com TIM WILKES PHOTOGRAPHY 9 Public Market | 423-1966

CITY CITY CITY CITY CITY CITY SALES HELP WANTED We’re seeking one outstanding sales professional to help us grow more! Media / newspaper / advertising sales experience a must. Telemarketing, classified and online sales experience a definite plus. Salary plus commission plus benefits.

SEND RESUME TO: Betsy Matthews, CITY Newspaper, 250 N. Goodman St., Rochester, NY 14607 OR EMAIL: bmatthews @rochester-citynews.com OR CALL: 585-244-3329 ext. 27 40 CITY JULY 10-16, 2013


July 10-16, 2013 - City Newspaper