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EVENTS: JULY 4 CELEBRATIONS, FIRST FRIDAY 23 DINING REVIEW: SINBAD’S MEDITERRANEAN CUISINE 13 THEATER: STRATFORD FESTIVAL PREVIEW 26 FILM: “TREE OF LIFE,” “BAD TEACHER” 32 URBAN JOURNAL: POLITICS AND MARRIAGE EQUALITY

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CROSSWORD, NEWS OF THE WEIRD 43

Skrillex • Bootsy Collins • CAROLINE COUNTY • Accordion Babes • RPO: “Red, White, and Boom!” • grace potter • and more music, page 14

JUNE 29 - July 5, 2011 Free

Greater Rochester’s Alternative Newsweekly

Vol 40 No 42

News. Music. Life.

It’s horrendous and sickening. I hate that part.” MUSIC INTERVIEW, PAGE 16

FINALLY! Marriage equality in NYS. NEWS, PAGE 6

City Council races shaping up. NEWS, PAGE 7

Building a better defense. NEWS, PAGE 8

Examining a temporary, hidden city. ART REVIEW, PAGE 22

Get to know Glimmerglass Festival 2011. CLASSICAL PREVIEW, PAGE 20

COVER STORY | BY CHRISTINE CARRIE FIEN | PAGE 10 | PHOTO BY MATT DETURCK

Baby blues: Rochester’s young police force Rochester Police Chief Jim Sheppard calls rookies “young bloods” — and there are a lot of them. Fortyfour percent of Rochester’s police officers have less than five years on the job. Sheppard says it’s a natural cycle, given that officers can retire after 20 years. But police union President Mike Mazzeo says officers might stick around longer if there were more career-development opportunities. The consequences of a force full of less-experienced cops are significant. Generally, newer officers are wellsuited to the physical demands of the job, Sheppard says, but they lack maturity.

Neighborhood leader Eugenio Cotto says younger officers tend to have a more rigid, aggressive style that puts them in conflict with some residents. (This observation may be relevant to the case of activist Emily Good. Good was arrested in May while videotaping a young officer performing a traffic stop. The charge has been dismissed. The case has drawn national attention, with many people accusing the officer of acting overzealously. Police are investigating the incident.) Pictured: RPD rookie Jon Laureano.


 City

JUNE 29 - JULY 5, 2011


urban journal | by mary anna towler

Promise kept

BOULDER JULY

When a bill legalizing same-sex marriage went before the State Senate in 2009, word was that Rochester-area Senator Jim Alesi would provide a vote that could help assure its passage. Instead, as the roll call began in the Senate, Alesi, his head in his hands, voted “no.” On Friday night, the Republican-dominated Senate finally did the right thing and, with the governor’s quick signature, gave important civil rights to the state’s LGBT citizens. It was a historic vote, to put it mildly. It was a victory for the statewide LGBT coalition, for Democrats in the Assembly and Senate, and for Governor Andrew Cuomo, whose first-year leadership grows increasingly impressive. And it was an important victory — and an important step — for the Republican senators without whose vote the marriageequality bill would have failed: Stephen Saland of Poughkeepsie, Mark Grisanti of Buffalo, and Jim Alesi. In a time when politics has become fractious, partisan, and narrow minded, their courage (and I believe it was courage) offers a lesson in what the political process can — and should — be like. I was fascinated by an interview with Alesi earlier this month on YNN’s Capital Tonight. Alesi said that he had supported the right of same-sex couples to marry in 2009, but that the vote had come up “at the worst possible time,” right before an election. His vote then “was really a political vote,” he said. In 2011, he said, “I am now voting from my heart.” As grateful as I am for Alesi’s vote, I can’t help wondering: Did Alesi feel that this year, a “yes” vote wouldn’t jeopardize his seat, either with his constituents or his own party? Some of his fellow Republicans apparently still didn’t think they could put conscience ahead of politics. Near the end of the Capital Tonight interview, Alesi was asked if he thought there were enough Senate Republican votes to pass the equality bill. Alesi’s answer: “I think that if we did not have to worry about the politics of this, if we did not have to worry about getting re-elected — and this is the world we live in — if we were out in everyday normal life, you would probably see 12 or 14 more votes than you will see when the final vote is cast.” If 12 or 14 more senators supported equal rights for LGBT people but felt that they couldn’t vote for the bill politically, on what issues would they risk their seats? For Alesi, and for many of us, the right to marry is an issue of equality. For many Americans, of course, it’s not an

The vote was important, not just for New Yorkers in the LBGT community who want to get married, but for everyone.” issue of equality at all. It’s a religious issue — specifically, of the very word of God on the subject of homosexuality. And some (much?) of the anti-LGBT sentiment is also rooted in homophobia — and in discomfort not only with homosexual sex but with sex, period. But it’s clear that Americans’ opinions have been changing, slowly. Research has bolstered common sense, showing that attraction to people of the same sex is innate, not learned (or indoctrinated). And the passage of time itself is helping. Younger Americans are far less likely than older ones to be concerned about someone’s sexual orientation. This, too, will pass, in other words. Eventually. But the pain of discrimination and the deprivation of rights, the attacks, the suicides continue. We cannot wait until discrimination and homophobia age out. And so the New York vote on Friday night was important, not just for New Yorkers in the LBGT community who want to get married, but for everyone. “I think we are coming to a point where if we are going to live in a country that is based on freedom and equality, that freedom and equality have to exist for everyone,” Alesi said in the YNN interview. “It’s just a matter of equality,” Alesi said. “It’s America. You can’t see it as anything other than that.” I hope he takes that message to the leaders of his party in Washington.

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We welcome readers’ letters for publication. Send them to: themail@ rochester-citynews.com or The Mail, City Newspaper, 250 North Goodman Street, Rochester 14607. Please include your name, address, and daytime telephone number. Letters must be original, and we don’t publish letters sent to other media. Those of fewer than 350 words have a greater chance of being published, and we do edit for clarity and brevity. You can also post comments on specific articles on our website: rochestercitynewspaper.com.

Wait for inquiry before protesting videotape issue

I sincerely thank all the people who have corresponded with me on the Emily Good - police recording controversy over the last few days. However, to those of you calling me to the front line: I will not be attending any rallies, protests, or action committees in the foreseeable future. Within 12 hours of the video being posted on IndyMedia, Police Chief Jim Sheppard released a statement and launched an internal investigation. Given our government’s reputation for lethargy, this is a massive victory for efficiency, if not for civil rights. I believe that at this early stage any organized protesting or “taking to the streets” would be an unwarranted act of aggression. If you are unconvinced, please consider: We are winning. An internal investigation is exactly how this should proceed. I’d be a great deal more concerned if we had a chief of police who was ready to fire someone moments after watching some video on the Internet. And yes, it is just that. It’s some video on the Internet. It is out of context, and it is a single device’s account of an event. Its users had a clear bias. It warrants an investigation, not immediate action. I advise concerned citizens (and don’t get me wrong; you should be concerned) to join me in what I postulate to be the most appropriate response: Write a letter to Jim Sheppard or Mayor Tom Richards. Let them know you’re upset. Convey your views and reactions clearly and rationally. Ask questions, request results. Right now, communication is our strongest tool. Aggression will get you nowhere. Wait to rally until a decision is made. Don’t throw any bricks unless there’s an absolute injustice.

I empathize with those of you who are furious, those of you who are searching for a place to direct your energy. I have done a great deal of useless protesting in my life. But I am done with it. I challenge you to forsake the mob that is Rage and join me on the side of Efficiency, for that is how we will accomplish change. It is okay to be angry. Do something about it. Here are phone numbers and addresses for the two people you should be voicing your concerns to, as listed on cityofrochester.gov: Police Chief James Sheppard, shepparj@cityofrochester.gov, 428-7033; Mayor Thomas Richards, info@ cityofrochester.gov, 428-7045. SPENCER CHRISTIANO, ROCHESTER

Want vision? Frankel has it

In her June 15 article, Mary Anna Towler doubted the creativity and vision in today’s candidates. She has not looked carefully at Sandra Frankel, who is running for County Executive. Sandy brings integrity, leadership, and vision to a county that has been mismanaged and as a result suffers from economic stagnation resulting in public cynicism. As Brighton Town Supervisor, Sandy was able to translate ideas into action. She rolled back her salary, closed the deficit, created a town-wide park system, enlarged the library, instituted an aggressive infrastructure maintenance program, supported environmental policies, and was instrumental with help for new housing and commercial projects. She will do the same for Monroe County. Sandy is a candidate of action. She speaks about the culture of corruption that is rampant in Monroe County, but her words lead to policy. She is the only chance we have of restoring a sense of trust and hope to county government. Sandy intends to institute an Office of Integrity to investigate and oversee problems of honesty in government, which will establish a long-lost sense of trust. In addition, she will hire the best qualified people regardless of their political affiliation. Sandy believes in participatory government and will establish a business roundtable to help plot a strategy for future economic success. She will be honest. Maggie Brooks has raised taxes seven times in seven years but claims she has not. Individuals have paid more taxes every year of the current Republican administration.

In Monroe County, we have the talent and the drive to bring our region back if we have a visionary leader like Sandy Frankel who has a plan as well as a commitment to work openly with others rather than in secret with a cadre of friends. If you get to know Sandy and the policies she advocates, it is clear that change is possible in Monroe County. BARBARA LOVENHEIM, ROCHESTER

Mary Anna Towler’s response: Your letter seems to help me make my case. Instituting competent, trustworthy, ethical government isn’t visionary; it’s the least we can expect from public servants. And as I noted in my column, the challenges facing local governments right now are so enormous that even the most ethical, professional government is hard-pressed to do much more than keep its head above water.

From our website

On Rochester teachers’ new contract: Seven percent pay hike over

two years? It must be nice. The private sector will never see that kind of pay increase.... but hey, they don’t have unions and the liberal agenda backing them. DANIEL

That liberal agenda....riiiiight. That liberal agenda got you the five-day work week, eight-hour days, ending the exploitation of children, social security, unemployment insurance, etc. Private sector corporations wouldn’t survive without exploiting their workers, so instead of having to account for their behavior, they pit their workers against public workers. Because there’s no way people who have to have six years of higher education for their job shouldn’t be paid a decent wage. A decent wage, which by the way, the liberal agenda wants for everyone. Oh, and there’s no money to pay them, but there’s money to give tax breaks to every developer who comes along waving campaign contributions to build houses our new mayor says we don’t even need. And there’s money to send me countless 79cent postcards to tell me about the ribbon cutting at new restaurants. DAVE ATIAS

News. Music. Life. Greater Rochester’s Alternative Newsweekly June 29 - July 5, 2011 Vol 40 No 42 250 North Goodman Street Rochester, New York 14607-1199 themail@rochester-citynews.com phone (585) 244-3329 fax (585) 244-1126 rochestercitynewspaper.com Publishers: William and Mary Anna Towler Editor: Mary Anna Towler Asst. to the publishers: Matt Walsh Editorial department themail@rochester-citynews.com Features editor: Eric Rezsnyak News editor: Christine Carrie Fien Staff writers: Tim Louis Macaluso, Jeremy Moule Music editor: Willie Clark Music writer: Frank De Blase Calendar editor: Rebecca Rafferty Contributing writers: Kate Antoniades, Paloma Capanna, Casey Carlsen, Emily Faith, George Grella, Susie Hume, Kathy Laluk, Michael Lasser, James Leach, Ron Netsky, Dayna Papaleo, Rebecca Rafferty, Todd Rezsnyak, Ryan Whirty Editorial intern: Alexandra Carmichael, Melissa Goldin, Deb Schleede Art department artdept@rochester-citynews.com Production manager: Max Seifert Designers: Aubrey Berardini, Matt DeTurck Photographers: Frank De Blase, Matt DeTurck, Michael Hanlon Advertising department ads@rochester-citynews.com Advertising sales manager: Betsy Matthews Account executives: Tom Decker, Annalisa Iannone, William Towler Classified sales representatives: Christine Kubarycz, Tracey Mykins Operations/Circulation info@rochester-citynews.com Circulation Assistant: Katherine Stathis Distribution: Andy DiCiaccio, David Riccioni, Northstar Delivery City Newspaper is available free of charge. Additional copies of the current issue may be purchased for $1, payable in advance at the City Newspaper office. City Newspaper may be distributed only by authorized distributors. No person may, without prior written permission of City Newspaper, take more than one copy of each weekly issue. City (ISSN 1551-3262) is published weekly by WMT Publications, Inc. Periodical postage paid at Rochester, NY (USPS 022-138). Send address changes to City, 250 North Goodman Street, Rochester, NY 14607. City is a member of the Association of Alternative Newsweeklies and the New York Press Association. Subscriptions: $35.00 ($30.00 for senior citizens) for one year. Add $10 yearly for out-of-state subscriptions: add $30 yearly for foreign subscriptions. Due to the initial high cost of establishing new subscriptions, refunds for fewer than ten months cannot be issued. Copyright by WMT Publications Inc., 2011 - all rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, photocopying, recording or by any information storage retrieval system without permission of the copyright owner.


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[ news from the week past ]

Insider out

The Democrat and Chronicle announced it was folding its youth-oriented tabloid, the Insider. The final issue came out last week. Company-wide, Gannett laid off 700 employees — 10 from the Rochester operations.

Sabres and Amerks, together again

Buffalo Sabres owner Terry Pegula bought the Rochester Americans. The move restored the Amerks status as the Sabres farm team, an arrangement that was prized by Buffalo and Rochester hockey fans. Prior to 2008, when the two teams parted, the Amerks had a 29-year relationship with the Sabres.

Schools project dodges a bullet

The showdown over the $1 billion schools modernization project was resolved at the 11th hour, and work on the first phase of the project should continue as planned. A dispute over competing bills in the State Legislature was reportedly resolved by the State Education Department.

Vote on teachers contract postponed

Members of the Rochester Teachers Association approved a new contract with the city school district that would increase teachers’ salaries by 3.53 percent in 20112012. Out of the district’s 3,500 teachers, about 91 percent voted in favor of the agreement, said RTA President Adam Urbanski. Concessions in the agreement could help to restore about 100 of the 400 teachers who have received layoff notices. The contract needs to be approved by the city school board, but a scheduled vote on it Monday evening was postponed. RTA members have been without a contract for more than a year.

Rochester is hiring

The Rochester metro is number one in state job growth. According to the State Labor Department, Rochester added 11,600 private-sector jobs for the 12-month period ending in May 2011. The last time the area saw this level of job growth was in the mid 1990’s. Despite the growth in the private sector, however, government jobs are still being cut.

News

Anita Cassano and Ivy Shelby enjoy the celebration at Washington Square Park on Saturday, the day after New York legalized samesex marriage. PHOTO BY CHRISTINE CARRIE FIEN CIVIL RIGHTS | BY CHRISTINE CARRIE FIEN

Finally: Marriage equality in NYS It is destined to be one of those “Where were you when…?” moments. With a one-vote cushion, the New York State Senate approved same-sex marriage last week, 33 to 29. Thirty-two votes were needed to pass the measure. (The Assembly had already approved a bill by the time the Senate voted.) The vote came late Friday night following more than a week of agonizing starts and stops, rising hopes followed by crushing disappointment. It wasn’t clear until the last minute whether the GOP, which has the majority in the Senate, would even bring the bill to the floor for a vote.

Governor Andrew Cuomo signed the bill shortly after the vote, officially making New York the sixth, and largest, state in the nation to allow gay couples to wed. Cuomo said that by approving the bill, New York had lived up to its reputation as a bellwether for progressive issues. The Rochester community celebrated the historic moment with a gathering in Washington Square Park on Saturday afternoon. Local activists Bess Watts and Anne Tischer were married in the park several years ago “in an act of civil disobedience,” Watts said Saturday. The couple legally wed in Canada and now plan to renew their vows in New York State, she said.

“We’re going to have the reception we never had,” Tischer said. Rochester City Clerk Dan Karin said he’s waiting for guidance from the State Department of Health on how to implement the new law, which goes into effect on Sunday, July 24. Once a couple fills out required paperwork, he says, they have to wait 24 hours to get married. The license expires in 60 says. Karin said that as of Monday afternoon, he had received two phone calls and one e-mail inquiring about the process.

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Lovely Warren’s re-election bid is worth noting because she’s been talked about as a possible choice for deputy mayor. Warren could always run for re-election and then step down if given the appointment, but it’s difficult to believe that Mayor Tom Richards would wait that long to appoint a deputy.

POLITICS | BY CHRISTINE CARRIE FIEN

CIVIL LIBERTIES | BY JEREMY MOULE

City Council races shaping up

‘Good’ news

For a minute there it looked like the City Council races were going to be tedious compared to the races for school board this year. But things are picking up. Seeking re-election are district Council people Carla Palumbo (northwest), Adam McFadden (south), Elaine Spaull (east), and Lovely Warren (northeast). Warren’s bid is worth noting because she’s been talked about as a possible choice for deputy mayor. Warren could always run for re-election and then step down if given the appointment, but it’s difficult to believe that Mayor Tom Richards would wait until November to appoint someone to the number-two slot. Here’s what is known so far: Diane Watkins, a teacher in the city school district, is petitioning to primary McFadden. McFadden has traditionally played the “agitator” role on Council, but some wonder if he’s losing his edge. Critics still fume over McFadden’s decision to support Richards and the special election for mayor. Also known: James Muscarella, long-time president of the Dutchtown Neighborhood Association, intends to primary Palumbo for the northwest district seat. Less certain is a possible primary challenge to Palumbo from Tom Brennan.

Emily Good is a free woman. The Rochester resident was arrested in May while videotaping police conducting a traffic stop. The video recently went viral, bringing national attention to Good’s case and significant outcry against the Rochester Police Department. Good’s supporters said the police officer who arrested Good acted overzealously. | The District’s Attorney’s Office dropped the single misdemeanor charge against Good earlier this week, citing a lack of evidence. | Good’s arrest touched on an ongoing national debate over citizens’ rights to record police. | “We want to make clear that it is not the policy or practice of the Rochester Police Department to prevent citizens from observing its activities — including photographing or videotaping — as long as it does not interfere with the safe conduct of those activities,” said a statement issued by Mayor Tom Richards, City Council President Lovely Warren, and Police Chief James Sheppard. | The police department is continuing two internal reviews, one related to the original incident and another relating to officers ticketing cars outside of a meeting of Good’s supporters. | The traffic stop in question began when officers pulled over a car with a group of people known to the police department, Sheppard said, and police had information that weapons could have been in the car.

Adam McFadden, Diane Watkins. FILE PHOTOS

(Brennan could not be reached for comment.) Brennan is a former Rochester school board member and ran an unsuccessful bid for City Council in 2009. And frequent candidate Harry Davis says he’s petitioning to force an east district primary against Spaull. Looking ahead to the general election: former mayoral candidate Alex White says he will seek the Green Party’s designation for McFadden’s Council seat (south district), and Republicans Andreas Rau and Rich Tyson are running in the northwest and east districts. They’ll take on whoever wins the primaries for those seats, currently held by Palumbo and Spaull, respectively.

Cost of War IRAQ TOTALS — 4,463 US service-

men and servicewomen, 318 Coalition servicemen and servicewomen, and approximately 101,395 to 110,752 Iraqi civilians have been killed in Iraq from the beginning of the war and occupation to June 24. American servicemen and servicewomen killed from June 13 to 16: -- Spc. Marcos A. Cintron, 32, Orlando, Fla. AFGHANISTAN TOTALS — 1,623 US servicemen and servicewomen and 910 Coalition servicemen and servicewomen have been killed in Afghanistan from the beginning of the war and occupation to June 24. American servicemen and servicewomen killed from June 16 to 22: -- Spc. Scott D. Smith, 36, Indianapolis, Ind. -- Pfc. Brian J. Backus, 21, Saginaw Township, Mich. -- Pfc. Josue Ibarra, 21, Midland, Texas -- Pfc. Gustavo A. Rios-Ordonez, 25, Englewood, Ohio -- Sgt. James W. Harvey II, 23, Toms River, N.J. -- Sgt. 1st Class Alvin A. Boatwright, 33, Lodge, S.C. -- Sgt. Edward F. Dixon III, 37, Whiteman Air Force Base, Mo. -- Staff Sgt. Alan L. Snyder, 28, Blackstone, Mass. -- Spc. Tyler R. Kreinz, 21, Beloit, Wis. -- Lance Cpl. Jared C. Verbeek, 22, Visalia, Calif. -- Pfc. Joshua L. Jetton, 21, Sebring, Fla. -- Spc. Levi E. Nuncio, 24, Harrisonburg, Va. -- Cpl. Gurpreet Singh, 21, Antelope, Calif. SOURCES: iraqbodycount.org, icasualties.org, Department of Defense

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JUSTICE | BY JEREMY MOULE

Building a good defense Two young attorneys will serve three-year fellowships in the Monroe County Public Defender’s Office: part of a new national program focused on training newer attorneys in public interest law. Katherine Higgins, a Cornell Law School graduate, and Felipe Alexandre, a graduate of the Indiana University School of Law, will start in the defender’s office in August. They’re part of the Public Defender Corps, a new program developed by Equal Justice Works and the Southern Public Defender Training Center. That Higgins and Alexandre were chosen for the program speaks to their talents and dedication to providing legal services for the poor. That the county Public Defender’s Office was selected as a host speaks to the office’s reputation. “We’re really just hoping that the next wave and next army of public interest lawyers and public defenders can really get their feet wet, really make a difference in the communities they’re helping, and serve as assets in the public defender offices that they’re in,” says Becky Brand, an Equal Justice Works spokesperson. The program and the fellowships also touch on deeper issues. Public defender offices across the country are underfunded and their attorneys carry excessive caseloads. And few public defender training opportunities exist — a problem partly attributed to funding. Funding and caseloads are wellknown issues, while public defender training has received less attention. In 2006, however, a state indigent defense commission report explicitly identified lack of training as a problem. The report relied on testimony, research, and previous reports. “We learned that very few institutional providers have in place viable training programs, and that access to training is inconsistent across the state,” the report says. The state Defenders Association offers training programs, but overworked public defenders are often not able to participate, it says. Monroe Public Defender Tim Donaher

offered his office as a fellowship host the first time he heard about the program. The mentoring, in particular, got his attention. “I can name 15 to 20 attorneys off the top of my head in this office who would be perfect mentors to teach these young men and women,” Donaher says. Higgins and Alexandre will handle and try cases in the town court bureau.  City

JUNE 29 - JULY 5, 2011

Donaher says that will enable him to move an experienced attorney out of that bureau and into city courts, which will help reduce caseloads there, too. Newer attorneys start in the town court bureau and work their way up through other bureaus, which handle cases in higher courts. The office’s more experienced attorneys mentor lessexperienced defenders, and attorneys in the town or city bureaus occasionally help other attorneys with felony cases. The 60 attorneys in the Monroe County Public Defender’s Office handled more than 29,000 cases in 2010. Higgins and Alexandre have a deep

interest in helping low-income people who need legal services. Alexandre says he wasn’t initially going to pursue criminal defense or public interest law in school. As an undergraduate he earned a degree in Asian studies and wanted to be a business lawyer. He speaks Chinese and wanted to use that skill in his work. He landed an internship in China, but says he soon realized that the work lacked something. He’d previously worked as a court interpreter and, during that time, realized that he liked the idea of going up against the system for people. He had also come to the conclusion that some, though not all, criminal defendants are “good people who made bad choices,” he says. Alexandre has completed internships working in employment law for a legal aid group in Boston, immigration law in New York City, and in a public defender’s office when he was in law school. “I wanted to do work that was more meaningful to me,” he says. Higgins says that a criminal conviction or incarceration can change a person’s life and that’s what drives her interest in working as a public defender. The consequences of a conviction can last a lifetime, she says, and may lead to


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Program organizers and participants expect

broader benefits beyond caseload relief. They say they hope the fellows spread out through public defender offices across the country and share what they’ve learned to improve the quality of public defense and public interest law. Nationwide, there are 18 fellowships happening in roughly one-dozen offices, and that number could grow in future years of the program. When the fellowship ends, the attorneys can stay in the office in which they’ve served if jobs are available, or they could spread out. They could go to offices in large cities, or they could go to work in underserved rural areas. Donaher offers one possibility: post-Hurricane Katrina

New Orleans is in desperate need of qualified public defenders, he says. By putting highly qualified public defenders out into the world, Monroe County will have done a small part, Donaher says, to improve the representation of the indigent in other areas of the country. Another benefit of the program is to combat the stereotype that public defenders are lawyers who couldn’t get a better job. The classic scenario is the defendant who says, “I want a real lawyer.” These fellowships show that public defenders do the work because they are passionate about it: that it’s what they want to do, Donaher says. That the program aims to pull in the best and brightest young attorneys interested in public interest law will help. “My dream is to just walk into the courtroom and the prosecutor just knows that my presence there means something,” Alexandre says. “He knows that I’m not there to play around. I’m not there to negotiate so I can close a file. He knows I’m going to fight it to the end.”

FRIDAY

difficulty getting housing or a job. She’s worked with people experiencing those problems via her fellowship at a legal aid group in Ithaca. “Without having passionate, competent, trained attorneys to help them, they’re just going to be run over by the justice system and the government,” she says. Higgins went to law school planning to do public interest work, and has interned at the criminal division of the Legal Aid Society in Manhattan. She’s currently completing a fellowship with a legal aid organization in Ithaca, and she’s taught constitutional law to inmates at the Auburn Correctional Facility.

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Public Defender Tim Donaher says he hopes that by taking in two fellows through a national program, his office can help improve the quality of other public-defender offices. FILE PHOTO

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BABY blues Nail clipper, toothbrush, aspirin: this guy’s a walking medicine cabinet. Rochester Police rookie Jon Laureano, who’s searching the man, lets the stuff spill out onto the ground. But the guy seems to have an inexhaustible supply of pockets and hidden compartments, so the search takes awhile. “I ain’t gonna steal no car,” the man says. “I ain’t got time.” But that’s not why the cops are there. Laureano and his field training officer, Matt Klein, were called to this corner on South Avenue for reports of a man trying to sell drugs. “You can’t be down here serving people up,” Klein says. “People are going to call. There are a lot of good people down here.” They don’t find drugs, but they do find something that Klein says he suspects is “burn” — essentially imitation crack — in an aspirin bottle. “Whatever you’re doing with your aspirin — look at me. Look at me in the eyes — you’re not going to do it down here no more,” Klein says to the man. Laureano cuts a lean, energetic figure in his blues, but he lacks the command presence that flows naturally from Klein. That will come with experience, Klein says. “When you’re new, you’re going from point A to point B, and you’re just happy to get to point B,” Klein says. Rochester Police Chief Jim Sheppard calls rookies “young bloods” — and there are a lot of them. Forty-four percent of Rochester’s police officers have less than five years on the job. Sheppard says it’s a natural cycle, given that officers can retire after 20 years. But police union President Mike Mazzeo says officers might stick around longer if there were more career-development opportunities or places for officers to go once they’ve “burned out” on the streets. He points to the elimination of support positions, the reorganization of the RPD to a two-section 10 City JUNE 29 - JULY 5, 2011

by the fact that he’s yelling and screaming, maybe cursing. You learn that how you talk to people makes a difference in how the situation ends.” (This observation may be

relevant to the case of activist Emily Good. Good was the cer, Matt Klein, on offi arrested in May ng ini tra ld fie reano and his May. RPD rookie Jon Lau d Harvard streets in an n gto while videotaping rrin Ba at t ciden scene of a traffic ac a young officer performing a traffic stop. The charge has model, and the conversion of former police been dismissed. The case has drawn national jobs to civilian positions. attention, with many people accusing the “Officers are burning out with less and officer of acting overzealously. Police are less time on, and there’s not a place to investigating the incident.) transfer to,” Mazzeo says. There are cultural consequences, too, to The consequences of a force full of lesshaving a less-experienced force. A young, experienced cops are significant. Generally, probably unmarried rookie might not newer officers are well-suited to the physical have the same credibility on the scene of demands of the job, Sheppard says, but they a domestic disturbance as an older, more lack maturity and are more vulnerable to the experienced counterpart. And neighborhood adrenaline that comes with police work. leader Eugenio Cotto says that younger “As a young officer, the badge and the officers tend to have a more rigid, aggressive gun are your authority, and you may act style that puts them in conflict with some that way in terms of how you interact with residents. It’s not a bad thing, he says, because people,” he says. “As you mature you realize that, ‘you know, maybe that person just the cops are just following the rules. But it had a bad day.’ You don’t feel challenged does take some adjustment from residents

who are used to parking their cars on their lawns or playing basketball on the street and not being called to task on it. “The newer officers will follow their procedures to a ‘T,’ when more seasoned officers may look at it from a different point of view,” says Cotto, who is executive director of the Group 14621 Community Association. “It’s a different culture. It’s a totally different culture.” Expect the RPD to keep getting younger, too, at least for awhile. To help close its budget gap, City Hall is offering a one-time, $15,000 retirement incentive to certain senior employees this year. Sheppard says he won’t know until September how many officers will take the incentive, but approximately 64 are eligible. City Hall is also eliminating funding for police overhire, where the RPD hires more officers than necessary in order to prepare for future openings. “You can have more cops than you need so as people retire, you’re actually staying at the staffing level that you’re supposed to,” Sheppard says. About 20 to 25 people leave the RPD every year, he says, so without overhire, there will be more vacancies. “You’ll always be catching up,” Sheppard says. “It means younger officers and fewer officers.” RPD recruits spend six months at the police

academy, do their field training, and then go back to the academy for two weeks. New York State requires that recruits receive 15 weeks of training, but the RPD has historically exceeded that, training recruits for 24 weeks. In field training, a recruit is matched with different veteran officers for varying


lengths of time. The variety is important, Chief Sheppard says, so new officers observe different policing styles. Recruits return to their primary field training officer for the last two weeks of training. “Each phase you’re doing a little bit more,” Sheppard says. “When you come back, your primary FTO is in plain clothes, and it’s on you to do the work. He’s almost invisible.” Field training is an extremely important duty, says John Klofas, criminal justice professor at the Rochester Institute of Technology. “Historically, they really augment the academy training,” he says. “People learn one set of experiences and skills in the academy, and then to go out and practice those is a very different experience for them.” Rookie Laureano agrees. The main difference between the academy and field training is that everything happens much faster on the streets, he says. “There’s no room for error,” he says. “At the academy, if I make a mistake, it gets written on a form somewhere. In reality, if I make a mistake, it could cost a fellow officer dearly.” Field training came under scrutiny in a 2004 report compiled for then-Mayor Bill Johnson by a commission headed by the Rev. Lawrence Hargrave and former Family Court judge Michael J. Miller, with help from the Center for Governmental Research. The report criticized the relatively short amount of time required for an officer to become a field training officer – three years – saying it creates a “young training the young” situation. Field training officers have to be highly recommended by supervisors familiar with their work, and they have to undergo 40 hours of state-mandated training. They also have to be in good standing with the department. “It means that there’s no discernible pattern of disciplinary problems or moral ineptitude,” says Officer Stephen Scott, the RPD’s spokesperson. The RPD has 118 field training officers, he says, and they range in experience from three years to more than 20 years on the force. FTO Klein and Klofas say that time matters less than character. Some officers will be ready to train after three years, they say, and others will never be ready. “Time is significant, but there are other characteristics that are significant, also,” Klofas says. “How does the person carry himself? How does he handle himself? You don’t want the wrong people doing this, clearly.” Just as important as field training, Klofas says, is having shifts and assignments that encourage frequent interaction between rookies and more experienced officers. The new officers benefit from the guidance, he says, and from observing the vets at work. “The thing that people have to be concerned with is making sure that there are senior people around to help guide new people,” Klofas says. “Generational differences are significant in policing, probably more important than most other occupations:

how do you relate to people on the street? Police have powers that average citizens don’t have around the use of force, so how do you judiciously use those powers? How do you interact with people in the neighborhoods to strengthen those neighborhoods instead of causing additional strain?” “The nature (above) Third-platoon of policeroll call at Patrol Divisio n West of the RPD on Jay Street. community (right) Rochester Police Officer Matt Klein say relations is very, s he enjoys his interaction with new officers. His very important,” role as a field training officer is to make sure the RPD has the he says. “And I highest-quality officer s out on the streets, he says. think it’s a very difficult thing for new people coming out to get a grasp on.” When you get to 40, 45 and you’re chasing somebody Police union President Mike Mazzeo says the through a back young force is not the result only of the 20year retirement cycle. Contributing factors are yard, jumping over management decisions that took rookies fresh fences — it doesn’t work anymore.” from field training and placed them in the “I think it’s tactical unit or other specialized assignments, having a lot of different he says, and a trend of turning police jobs effects,” he says. “I think we’re seeing our sick over to civilians. times increasing. I think we’re seeing maybe When you put rookies in specialized more conflicts in their work.” units, you diminish the experience of that Mazzeo makes a similar argument against unit, Mazzeo says, while depriving rookies privatizing police jobs. Doing so takes of the foundation they need to become wellopportunities away from aging officers, he rounded officers. says, and that gives them little reason to stay “The essence of patrol is calls for service, past their 20 years. and that’s a huge variety of things,” he says. Chief Sheppard says rookies went to “When you take young officers who haven’t tactical and other specialized assignments developed completely and you don’t allow because management, under former Chief them to develop by all that experience, they David Moore, wanted to beef up tactical, and lose a step. Now you’ve got officers who never worked in neighborhoods, but they just strictly so the RPD could reduce overtime. The jobs were posted, Sheppard says, but the veterans worked traffic. That’s what they know.” by and large chose not to take them. (This The new officers need that neighborhood base, Mazzeo says, to effectively move up into should be less of an issue going forward, he says, due to budget cuts. The RPD has to shed supervisory and investigation positions. approximately 50 positions, and Sheppard says “I’m convinced that if we look at this the jobs will be cut from specialized units.) group over a long period of time, we The same issue with veterans is the reason might see that they’re not making these rookies have been posted downtown to development steps,” he says. deal with problems involving unruly young And the specialized units have people, Sheppard says. traditionally been plum assignments prized “The veterans didn’t want those slots, by department vets. Officers progressed because they didn’t want to be downtown naturally into them, Mazzeo says, giving vets a place to go when they burn out on the dealing with these kids,” he says. “So if the vets don’t want these positions, they streets – physically or mentally — or just automatically go to the people who have no want to advance. Senior officers are leaving, Mazzeo says, because those opportunities are time and no choice, really.” But ideally, Sheppard says, it’s true that “you increasingly difficult to find. don’t want all your babies working together.” “We really need a place for officers As for privatization, Sheppard says that to be able to go as they progress in in certain positions, civilians are cheaper age,” he says. “Realistically, you come than cops, and the jobs don’t require a police on at a young age, and you’re dealing officer’s knowledge or experience. He uses the with a young criminal. As you age, the technician’s unit, which collects evidence at individuals you’re dealing with stay crime scenes, as an example. the same age, but you’re getting older.

“Does that person need to have a gun? No. The crime’s done. So we’ve civilianized those jobs,” Sheppard says. “It makes sense from a moneymanagement point of view to have cops where you need cops, which is out there fighting crime. And then in those support positions where you don’t necessarily need a cop, to have a civilian.” Sheppard says he understands Mazzeo’s point about burnout, but that it clearly doesn’t affect everyone since there are long-time officers still out on the streets. “If you really love your job, you love your job,” Sheppard says. “I don’t think you make positions to satisfy that need, or [for] people not wanting to work where they’re working.” The fact that the RPD is a young force isn’t

going unnoticed in the neighborhoods. Cotto, from Group 14621, says he’s heard concerns from residents, leaders of block clubs, and others about how the young officers conduct themselves. “It’s how you perceive it,” Cotto says. “They’re aggressive, yeah, and they want to do a good job. It’s just a question of the folks getting accustomed to having young officers out there: to get the message to the people, ‘This is how the police department is doing business.’ And we all have to try to work with residents so that when we do have the newer officers, people understand that they’re going to come in with this hunger to help and do their job.” The RPD is aware of the cultural divide, Cotto says, and has stepped up community outreach under Sheppard. Officers have been showing up at business association and block club meetings, and elsewhere. “I think that’s a very good move, to get their faces out there, and it’s been one of the things the chief has talked to us about,” Cotto says. “That definitely is something that works.” Sheppard says you can train younger officers to keep their cool in stressful situations, but once they’re out on the streets, the adrenaline tends to take over. Self-control usually improves with age and experience, he says. “I get complaints from constituents: ‘These young guys, they’re different.’ They are different,” Sheppard says. continues on page 12 rochestercitynewspaper.com City 11


continues from page 11

More experienced officers tend to have a command presence that rookies generally lack, says RIT’s Klofas. And it takes new people a while, he says, to really hone their observation and human-relations skills. One person who has nothing but praise for the current RPD is Kyle Crandall, president of the Beechwood Neighborhood Coalition. Response times have improved greatly over the last five years, he says. Response times in the past were “completely unacceptable,” he says, “but that trend has completely turned.” “I have not seen a lack of performance from the RPD due to the fact they have a young force. I’ve seen just the opposite,” Crandall says. “To me, I would rather have a young police force who has been trained, who know their job, who are out there doing the best they can even if they have less experience, as long as they are getting to the scene quicker. I have a much better feeling about the RPD.” If response times are slow, people don’t feel safe, Crandall says. And if people don’t feel safe, he says, they’ll move. Crandall’s observation about response times probably has more to do with increased staffing, however, than the age of the force. The RPD grew under former Mayor Bob Duffy and former Chief Moore. Back in early May, RPD rookie Jon Laureano

was in his third phase of field training, the last before he returned to his primary FTO for the final stage. Law enforcement is encoded in Laureano’s genes: his father was a police officer and his mother is a corrections officer. His father was a little put off by his son’s career choice, Laureano says, but he’s come around. “He didn’t want me to see some of the things he’s seen,” he says. “But now, he’s proud. It kind of worked out.” Klein and Laureano have a busy Friday evening. In just a few hours, they respond to two car accidents, reports of a knife fight, a brewing girl-brawl on East Main Street, and several other calls. Laureano makes a couple of mistakes: missing an unlocked door on a home with the burglar alarm going off, and not ordering the passenger at a traffic stop to roll down his tinted window. Still, nothing seems to dent his enthusiasm. “Every day I work, I get a little more comfortable,” he says. “It gets just a little easier.” When they have no calls for service to answer, they can choose to play back-up on other calls. Reports come over the radio or on the computer, and Klein looks over at Laureano to see what he wants to do. “Well?” he says. “I want to go,” Laureano says, every time. “Let’s go.”

12 City JUNE 29 - JULY 5, 2011

For more Tom Tomorrow, including a political blog and cartoon archive, visit http://thismodernworld.com

Urban Action This week’s calls to action include the following events and activities. (All are free and open to the public, unless otherwise noted.)

Supporting South Sudan

The First Unitarian Church will host “Celebrate South Sudan” at 2:30 p.m. on Saturday, July 9. Come and listen to local Sudanese humanitarian groups share their joy, activities, and plans of support for the new republic of South Sudan on the lawn at 220 South Winton Road.

Be heard on pedestrian study

The City of Rochester will hold a public meeting on the “Center City Tourist-Visitor Circulation & Pedestrian Wayfinding” study from 4 to 7 p.m. on Wednesday, June 29. The meeting is to solicit input and feedback from residents, businesses, and property owners regarding improving pedestrian movement in the Center City. The meeting will be held at City Hall, 30 Church Street.

A skinhead’s story Moving Beyond Racism will hold a book discus-

sion on at 7 p.m. on Monday, July 11, regarding “Autobiography of a Skinhead” by Jody M. Roy. The meeting will be held at Barnes & Noble’s community room, Pittsford Plaza. Everyone is welcome, and reading the book is not a requirement to attend the meeting.

Peace vigil

Peace advocates will hold a “Bring the Soldiers Home” vigil from 4:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. on Tuesday, July 12, in front of the First Unitarian Church, 220 South Winton Road.

FROM OUR BLOGS The State Legislature has approved a new law governing where power plants can be located. It will also streamline the permitting process. The old law helped expedite plant siting and permitting which, in turn, saved the power companies and the state money and resources. Title X takes the same approach, but with some differences. The old law predated New York’s

wind-farm boom and consequently didn’t cover those facilities. Title X does, as long as they have a generation capacity exceeding 25 megawatts. That would exclude some small power plants or small wind towers at homes and businesses. But the threshold is low enough that it would cover some smaller wind farms and possibly solar power projects. — JEREMY MOULE


Dining pastry, allowing the meaty mixture within to steam in a fragrant bath of cinnamon, garlic, and perhaps a bit of cumin, along with tomato and onion ($5.95). For me, however, there is really only one appetizer at Sinbad’s, a cross between a salad and vegetable stew called balila ($5.75). A simple combination of chickpeas, fava beans, scallions, garlic, cumin, and tomato in a lemon-and-olive-oil dressing, balila is served warm rather than cold (I’ve noticed in the winter that it is actually served hot) — a strange move for something that appears to be a salad, but an inspired one. Heating the dressing softens the beans a bit, and releases all sorts of delicious aromas making the dish simultaneously comforting and invigorating, comfort food at its very best. Almost everything that can be served in

At Sinbad’s: the farrouj plate featuring marinated cornish hen (pictured left); bailila, a mix of fava beans nd chickpeas (pictured right). PHOTOS BY MATT DETURCK

Think outside the pita Sinbad’s Mediterranean Cuisine 719 Park Ave. 473-5655, mysinbads.com Daily 11 a.m.-10 p.m. [ REVIEW ] BY JAMES LEACH

Ziad and Imad Naoum, co-owners of Sinbad’s Mediterranean Cuisine on Park Avenue, want you to make a mess. They don’t say it in so many words, but their menu tempts you to abandon knife, fork, and a bit of decorum and dig in with your hands and a chunk of pita. Diners at this 18-year-old Park Avenue institution can get the usual Greek restaurant fare — gyros, falafel, hummus, and tabouleh. But they can also find dishes, particularly appetizers and salads, that are less familiar staples of the Lebanese cuisine that the Naoums grew up with: kebbe, balila, maza, and farrouj (the last item is a golden-brown, herbflecked roasted hen that puts the carnal back in carnivore). Summer was made for food like this, for dishes that hover on the edge between healthy

and louche. And the patio at Sinbad’s is one of the best places to satisfy your Greek jones and enjoy some of the best people-watching in town at the same time. Sinbad’s makes a great gyro, the juicy

and fragrant meat — a mixture of finely ground lamb and beef with garlic and herbs — sliced thick and wrapped in a fresh, hot pita with tahini, tomato, and onions ($5.95). Served wrapped in a twist of waxed paper, it’s a perfect sandwich for a quick lunch or a picnic in the park, especially if you add a salad or appetizer to the mix. My only complaint is that Naoum’s gyros tend to be less abundant than the ones served at Greek diners and restaurants closer to New York City. They are still messy and delicious, but I always find myself wanting more. This is easily remedied if you know to ask for a double portion of meat. Of course, even if you don’t order double meat, you can order a gyro plate and get not only all the meat you will ever want, but also salad greens, garlicky sauteed mushrooms, feta cheese, and a side of a creamy garlic and herb dressing that would be good spread on anything and everything ($10.25).

But if you really want to get a sense of the breadth and depth of Lebanese cuisine, you should (reluctantly) skip the familiar and explore the other offerings on Sinbad’s menu. Start with a bowl of rich, brown lentil soup, redolent of garlic and lemon and full of escarole and chunks of potato ($3.50). Or, if your taste runs toward cold soups, a bowl of cacik, a mixture of yogurt, cucumber, and mint reminiscent of tzatziki might fit the bill ($3.50). Nice as a soup, it’s even better as a dip for chunks of pita or a falafel ball. You could default to the familiar hummus. The Naoums make a particularly velvety version with lots of garlic and lemon, and a nice finishing splash of fruity olive oil ($5.50). Or you could opt for baked pita stuffed with feta and scallions (maza, $5.50), or kebbe, ground beef and bulgar (cracked wheat or buckwheat) mixed with pine nuts, tomatoes, and onions served with pita wedges in lieu of a spoon ($6.75). If you’d rather use a knife and fork, and you don’t mind potentially getting tasty grease all over your shirt, consider ordering sfiha. Sfiha (also known as lamajun) are usually open-faced combinations of pita, ground beef or lamb, and feta akin to pizza. Zaid Naoum folds his into a triangular

a pita — gyros, falafel, shish kebob, and grilled chicken — can also be served as an entrée, and most of these come with a side salad of your choice. You could opt for the familiar Greek salad topped with feta cheese and olives, or the house salad, but that lacks imagination. Instead, consider Sinbad’s excellent tabouleh, long on parsley and short on bulgar (as Zaid Naoum assures me it should be) with a bright lemony dressing to pull it all together ($6.50). There’s also malfouf, a sort of Lebanese coleslaw of shredded cabbage and tomato dressed with a Greek dressing in which oregano plays a starring role alongside a healthy dose of garlic ($5.95). Malfouf, I’ve found, makes a stellar companion for grilled and roasted dishes, providing crunch and an herbal blast to seared meat. The one dish you should not miss, though, is Zaid Naoum’s roasted cornish hen, farrouj ($12.50). There’s something eminently satisfying about attacking a roasted chicken with your bare hands, and here there’s no other way to do it. Marinated in olive oil, herbs, and a whole lot of tasty garlic, and roasted until the skin is a gorgeous golden brown, Sinbad’s farrouj is a poultry masterpiece — a pleasure to dismember and an invitation to wrestle with your dinner. Sprinkled inside and out with a mixture of fresh herbs, and so juicy that the flesh weeps at the slightest touch, this is not a neat dish to eat, and you’ll be very grateful that it is served atop a pita slathered with that wonderful garlic dressing. Meat juices, herbs, and garlic make an intoxicating combination that makes the last bite just as good, if not better, than the first. Although it might seem like excess, one hen a person is probably the right quantity to order, and even then you may find yourself casting greedy glances at your companions’ untended drumsticks. rochestercitynewspaper.com City 13


Upcoming [ POP/ROCK ] Kings of Leon Tuesday, August 16. Darien Lake PAC, 9993 Allegheny Road, Darien Lake. 7 p.m. $30.50$75.75. 599-4641, godarien.com

Music

[ R&B ] The O’Jays, Keith Sweat, The Whispers Saturday, August 20. Blue Cross Arena, 1 War Memorial Square. 7:30 p.m. $46.50-$72. Bluecrossarena.com. [ POP/ROCK ] Judas Priest Wednesday, November 16. Main Street Armory, 900 E. Main St. 6 p.m. $47.50-$55. 232-3221, rochestermainstreetarmory.com.

Skrillex

Tuesday, July 5 Waterstreet Music Hall, 204 N. Water St. 8 p.m. | $23-$125 | 325-5600 [ Pop/Rock ] Skrillex is the moniker of Los Angeles

producer Sonny Moore. Formerly the frontman for screamo act From First To Last, Moore left the band to pursue a solo career. Taking shape as a slightly less vitriolic effort, Moore’s move toward electronic music began as he added DJ-producer to his title of vocalist. In 2010, capitalizing on the increasing popularity of the divisive and somewhat indefinable genre of dubstep, Skrillex took off. His live act consists of his computer and his beats, which are sure to elicit some response on the dance floor. — BY DAVE LABARGE

Reggae Explosion Saturday, July 2 Main Street Armory, 900 E. Main St. 8:30 p.m. | $40-$50 | rochestermainstreetarmory.com [ Reggae ] What better way to enjoy a weekend devoted

to the celebration of freedom than to listen to some truly liberating music? The “explosion” features Capleton, an act with surprising staying power in today’s fickle dancehall reggae scene. Clifford Smith, better known as Mr. Vegas, is the other big name on Saturday’s bill. Vegas hit it big in 1997 with his infectious single “Nike Air.” The song brought him mainstream acclaim and even some play on MTV. Born Jamericans and Adventerous will also perform. — BY DAVID YOCKEL JR.

NEED SOME IDEAS FOR WHAT TO DO THIS WEEKEND? OUR THURSDAY NEWSLETTER HAS SUGGESTIONS FOR COOL MUSIC, THEATER, ART, AND OTHER SPECIAL EVENTS HAPPENING THROUGHOUT THE AREA SO YOU’LL ALWAYS HAVE SOMETHING FUN TO DO.

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Wednesday, June 29

Chris Webby Wednesday, July 7 Water Street Music Hall, 204 N. Water St. 7 p.m. | $20-$24 | waterstreetmusic.com [ Hip-Hop/Rap ] Chris Webby finds himself part

of recent upswing of young, Caucasian males trying their hands at the rap game that’s ensnared even the likes of one of Tom Hanks’ sons. Granted, that trend is not new in and of itself, but lately these artists rely on much more obvious sampling on their mix-tapes, taking the most recognizable parts of the more famous songs they use, and distorting them to create their beats. Lyrically, like any smart emcee, Webby talks about the parts of his life that he understands. In his case, that seems to encompass college, parties, Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, and video games. — BY ANDY KLINGENBERGER

Anti-Pendance Day Massacre Monday, July 4 Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 7:30 p.m. | $5-$7 | bugjar.com [ SPECIAL EVENT ] Anti-pendance Day, commonly

known as the day pen-toting poindexters danced themselves into oblivion, is a DIY holiday in the city of Rochester that fuses garage rock and 80’s dance party. Expect tambourine fireworks, men parading around in dresses, distortion-driven brain barbecues, carnivals of carnage, ceremonious beards, and pig tails. All can rejoice as the Sinbusters of Lowell, Massachusetts, offer a dynamic screamscape of fuzz and freak fair, with a fly-bythe-seat-of-your-sparkler sensibility. — BY EMILY FAITH

Grace Potter and The Nocturnals performed Friday, June 24, at Water Street Music Hall. PHOTO PROVIDED

Grace jones [ REVIEW ] BY DAVID YOCKEL JR.

Grace Potter was barely old enough

to order a drink when she first began blowing away crowded bars with her bluesy vocals. Since her debut album in 2004, the Vermont native continued to grow as both a singer and songwriter. She brought her wide range of talents and her band, The Nocturnals, to Water Street Music Hall on Friday night as they tour in support of their acclaimed, self-titled album. Fellow Vermonters Chamberlin opened the show. This five-piece outfit played a smooth set, including some polished versions of tracks off the band’s debut disc, “Bitter Blood.” And in just about a year, Chamberlin has put together some well-thought-out, well-executed, genre-defying anthems. It is a unique blend of true rock-androll energy with a funky folk sensibility. The resulting sound is extremely modern, placing the band in the same category as Fleet Foxes and Bon Iver. But the teeming room was definitely there to see Potter, and she and The

Nocturnals did not disappoint. From her first moment on stage, an energetic Potter commanded the audience with her seductive sonic style. I immediately thought of a young Stevie Nicks or the Heart sisters as Potter and her super-tight band ran through a catalog sprinkled with everything from R&B, folk, soul, country, jazz, and blues, to funk, reggae, and even hard rock with moments of ethereal, improvisational jams. The band opened the show with “Medicine,” a rollicking tune from its most recent release. As Potter sang, “She got the medicine that everybody wants…,” the crowd wholeheartedly agreed. She was completely entrancing. Her unbelievable vocal range, her harmonious work on her Hammond B-3, and her respectable chops on an axe perfectly mixed with a truly spotless group of backing musicians. Potter was playful with the audience and extremely interactive. At continues on page 19

[ Acoustic/Folk ] Acoustic Open Jam. Rabbit Room Restaurant, 61 N Main St, Honeoye Falls. thelowermill.com. 7:30 p.m. Free. Auld Lang Syne w/ Roadside Graves, & Bogs Visionary Orchestra. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave.. 454-2966, bugjar.com. 9 p.m. $5-$7. 21+ get in free after 11. Kevin MacConkey & the Family. Dinosaur Bar-B-Que, 99 Court St. 325-7090, dinosaurbarbque.com. 9:30 p.m. Free. Mike & Sergei. Perlo’s Italian Grill, 202 N Washington St, East Rochester. myspace. com/mikeandsergei. 6-9 p.m. Free. Rob & Gary Acoustic. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. 381-4000, woodcliffhotelandspa.com. 6-9 p.m. Free. Tom Gravino. Cafe 54, 54 W Main St, Victor. 742-3649. 6 p.m. Free. [ Blues ] Tony Giannavola. Beale Street Cafe, 693 South Ave.. 2714650, bealestreetcafe.com. 6 p.m. Free. [ Classical ] Rochester Philharmonic Orchestra. Ontario Beach Park, 4800 Lake Ave. wegmans.com. 7 p.m. Free. [ DJ/Electronic ] Bad Wolf: 50s & 60s Vinyl Bop. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave.. 454-2966, bugjar.com. 10 p.m. Free. DJ. Westside Sports Bar & Grill, 1600 Lyell Ave. 4587888. 9 p.m. Call for tix. DJ. One, 1 Ryan Alley. 5461010. 10 p.m. Free. DJ Babi Katt/Dancehall Reggae. Blueroom, 293 Alexander St. 730-5985. 10 p.m. $5 after 11 p.m. DJ Cosmo. Bay Bar & Grill, 372 Manitou Rd, Hilton. 3927700. 10 p.m. Free. DJ Fat Daddy Buck. Roost, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. 3211170. 8:30 p.m. Free. continues on page 17

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rochestercitynewspaper.com City 15


Music that day on, it was me and my brother. And from there we went with James Brown a couple years later. How cool was that?

First he sent us out on the road with Hank Ballard and Marva Whitney as a test. And by the time I got to be 18 he put out the call to have us come in and be The JBs. What do you think your influence has been on those who came up listening to your stuff?

Wow, I’ve never looked at what my influence has been. But a lot of cats look up to you.

Bass legend Bootsy Collins has played with Parliament-Funkadelic, James Brown, and several of his own groups. He’s currently on his first tour in decades. PHOTO COURTESY Michael Weintrob

On the one Bootsy Collins and the Funk Unity Band

and if groove is really in the heart. An edited transcript of the conversation is below. Dig…

Thursday, June 30 Party in the Park, Riverside Festival Site, Court and Exchange streets 5-10 p.m. | $2 | rochesterevents.com Bootsycollins.com

CITY: This is your first tour in 16 years. What’s been keeping you? Bootsy Collins: Oh man, I just had to wrap my

[ INTERVIEW ] By Frank De Blase

Bootsy Collins is the master of the one — that all-important downbeat that makes booties shake and funk funky. Funk’s swagger and style can also be attributed to this man, who grins behind star-shaped shades while swinging his space bass in platform boots and enough spectacle and glitter to make a Mardi Gras parade look like a funeral procession. Coming up on the heels of his brother — the incredible, late Catfish Collins — Bootsy Collins has thumped and thundered for the past 40 years, developing a trademark style that has spawned and influenced countless fourstring wizards in his wake. As a teenager, he was invited to play in James Brown’s band after Brown caught wind of the Collins brothers’ session work for King Records. As a member of Parliament-Funkadelic, he has been inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. He has also fronted projects like Bootsy’s Rubber Band, The Sweat Band, and Praxis. Collins has a new album out, “Tha Funk Capital of the World,” and is embarking on his first tour in almost two decades. The man gave us a ring (on the one) and talked about taking care of business, his influence, 16 City JUNE 29 - JULY 5, 2011

head around it. A lot has changed, a lot is going on and touring is not as easy as it used to be. It’s a different thing now. It takes a lot more money. There’s a lot more of taking care of business. Everything is so exposed now. So I really had to prepare myself to go out and try and take care of business. It’s a big operation and I’m not a business person; I love music and you get cursed with having to take care of business. It’s horrendous and sickening… I hate that part. And you’ve got a big operation just on stage. It’s a big band.

I’ve always had to do that. I have to bring the people — the whole “P” and nothing but the “P.” And why should I skimp now just because the economy’s screwed up? The people don’t want to hear that, they want to hear some funk and they want to get down. I made sure I got exactly what they want, what they need: the core members of Parliament-Funkadelic, Bernie Worrell, Frankie Cash, Razor Sharp Johnson, who started with me back in the day in Bootsy’s Rubber Band, Blackbyrd McKnight, T.M. Stevens, has got my back… So I’ve got a core group within about 13 members. How do you blend the old-school funk with the new?

It’s like making a stew, a gumbo; just putting

it all together and making it taste good. We took two weeks of rehearsal, defining and re-defining, getting together, making sure we were all on the one. That’s why I call it the Funk Unity Band, because I wanted to be sure we were all on the one. Who first influenced you?

My brother Catfish, who was 8 years older. Since we had no father in the house, he was the one I looked up to. He was the one I wanted to be like. He played guitar, so I wanted to play guitar. He had all the chicks. He would rehearse around the house. I was like 9 years old and it was all very appealing to me, you know? He started getting a reputation around Cincinnati, and I’m like, “I want to be like him.” So I started playing guitar. Then I started listening to people like Lonnie Mack and those instrumentals that he did. And the next one on the scene was Jimi Hendrix and my little cosmic mind just opened up and soaked it all in. That pretty much sealed it for me. How’d you wind up on the bass?

My brother had a gig where his bass player couldn’t show up and I was like, “I can do it.” He was like, “You don’t even have a bass.” And I said, “If you get me four bass strings I can do it.” He gave me four bass strings. And just to show you how the funk works — the funk makes something out of nothing — I put those bass strings on my guitar, my $29 guitar, and I said, “Bam! I got a bass. I’m ready to play with you tonight.” And from

I suppose it’s like that. And that’s a good thing. They can talk to me. They can do things in front of me they couldn’t have done in front of James Brown. Because with James Brown, he was more of a father figure than an uncle. George Clinton was more my uncle figure — I could get in the back seat and throw down with a chick in front of him. I couldn’t do that in front of James Brown. And these kids can get away saying things they couldn’t say to their fathers, and that’s a good thing. I get a lot of people coming to me telling me how I influenced them. Take for instance Victor Wooten — I mean the baddest bass player on the planet — telling me I influenced him, and all I could do was laugh because this cat is so incredible with the technique he’s developed. And it’s like, yeah, OK, I can hear a little bit of this, that, and the other, but these performers today are just taking it way over the top. We were just starting out, creating something out of nothing. Things are more common today than they were back in the day. Bass was not a cool instrument back in the day. Guitar players had all the chicks. You’d go up to a chick and say, “I play the bass,” and she’d be like, “Where’s the guitar player?” You made it cool.

Yeah, I kind of helped make it cool. What’s next?

I’m looking forward to expanding on the Funk University — the online school that we have. We just finalized the second semester and signed on Larry Graham, Stanley Clarke, Verdine White, Jack Bruce, Ron Carter… C’mon man, it don’t get better than that. One last question: is groove really in the heart?

Oh, yeah. Groove definitely starts right there in the heart. If you get your groove on, it’s in the heart.


Wednesday, June 29 DJs Jared & Mario B. Venu Resto-Lounge, 151 St Paul St. 232-5650. 9 p.m. $5. DJs NaNa & PJ. Vertex, 169 N Chestnut St. 232-5498. 10 p.m. $3-$8. [ Hip-Hop/Rap ] The 2 Dollar Bill. White Rabbit Lounge. actlivemusic.com. 9 p.m. $2. [ Jazz ] Julie Ketchum Duo. Bistro 135, 135 W Commercial St,, East Rochester. 662-5555, bistro135.net. 6 p.m. Free. Paradigm Shift. Pomodoro Grill & Wine Bar, 1290 University Ave. 271-5000. 7:30 p.m. Free. Robert Chevrier. Brio Wine Bar & Grill, 3400 Monroe Ave. 5867000. 6:30 p.m. Free. The Bowties A Cappella Group. Little Theatre Cafe, 240 East Ave.. 258-0403, thelittle.org. 7:30 p.m. Free. [ Karaoke ] Karaoke. Roost, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. 321-1170. 9:30 p.m. Free. Karaoke. Southpaw Brew Pub, 315 Gregory St. 303-2234. 8:30 p.m. Free. Karaoke. Elite Bar & Grill, 398 W Main St. 527-8720. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke. Pineapple Jacks, 485 Spencerport Rd. 247-5225. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke. Jose & Willy’s, 20 Lake Shore Dr, Canandaigua. 3947960. 8:30 p.m. Free. Karaoke. Monty’s Korner, 363 East Ave.. 263-7650. 9.30 p.m. Free. Karaoke. Applebee’s-Fairport, 585 Moseley Rd, Fairport. 4254700. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke. Mayfields Pub, 669 Winton Rd N. 288-7199. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke. Sanibel Cottage, 1517 Empire Blvd, Webster. 6719340. 6 p.m. Free. Karaoke Night. Lemoncello, 137 W Commercial St, E Rochester. 385-8565, lemoncello137.com. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke w/Jimmy C’s Music Machine ft. Johnny Rocker. Sully’s Pub, 242 South Ave. sullyspubonline.com. 8:30 p.m. Free. Karaoke w/Mark. Flipside Bar & Grill, 2001 E Main St. 2883930. 8:30 p.m. Free. [ Open Mic ] Acoustic Open Mic. Pub 511, 511 E Ridge Rd. 266-9559. 8 p.m. Free. Entertainment Showcase. Clarissa’s, 293 Clarissa St. 4542680. 8 p.m. Free-$5. Open Jam w/Big Daddy Blues Band. Deweys, 1380 Lyell Ave. 254-4707. 9:30 p.m. Free. Open Jam w/Justin Gurnsey. Jukebox, 5435 Ridge Rd W, Spencerport. 352-4505. 10 p.m. Free. Open Mic. Boulder Coffee CoSouth Wedge, 100 Alexander St. 454-7140, bouldercoffeeco. com. 8 p.m. Free.

Open Mic. Dr’s Inn Grill & Tap Room, 1743 East Ave. 2710820. 5 p.m. Free. Open Mic w/Jam Shack Music. Stoneyard Bar & Grill, 1 Main St, Brockport. 637-3390. 9 p.m. Free. Open Mic w/Steve West. Muddy Waters Coffee House-Geneseo, 53 Main St, Geneseo. 2439111. 7-10 p.m. Free. [ Pop/Rock ] Ten Ugly Bands Competition. Lovin’ Cup, Park Point @ RIT. 292-9940, lovincup.com. 8 p.m. Call for tix. 6/1: Evan Prewitt Band vs. Starlight Cities 6/8: Oxford Train vs. Father Goat 6/15: In Context vs. Bob’s Brothers Band vs. Sans Ego 6/22: Runaway Radio vs. Last Note 6/29: Nevergreen vs. Rainline vs. Sonia. The Town Pants. Johnny’s Irish Pub, 1382 Culver Rd. 2240990, johnnysirishpub.com. 8 p.m. Free. Thunder Body. Dub Land Underground, 315 Alexander St. 232-7550, dublandunderground. wordpress.com. 10 p.m. $5.

Thursday, June 30 [ Acoustic/Folk ] Hochstein at High Falls: Windsor Folk Family. Granite Mills Park, Platt/Browns Race. 454-4596, hochstein.org. 12:15 p.m. Free. John Akers & Elvio Fernandes. Easy on East, 170 East Ave. 325-6490. 8 p.m. Free. Live Band Thursdays. Blueroom, 293 Alexander St. 730-5985. 8 p.m. Free. Mark Fantasia. Village Pub, Chili Center Plaza. 889-4547. 9 p.m. Free. Nancy Perry. Mythos Cafe, 77 Main St, Brockport. 637-2770. 6 p.m. Free. Paul Strowe. Cottage Hotel, 1390 Pittsford-Mendon Rd, Mendon. 624-1390. 7-10 p.m. Free. Reggae Night. Elite Bar & Grill, 398 W Main St. 527-8720. 9 p.m. Call for tix. Trinidad & Tobago Steel Drum Band. Pelican’s Nest, 566 River Street. 663-5910, pelicansnestrestaurant.com. 7-11 p.m. Free. [ Blues ] Dark Road Due. Rabbit Room Restaurant, 61 N Main St, Honeoye Falls. thelowermill. com. 7 p.m. Free. Nicole Christian and Alfie Smith. Beale Street Cafe, 693 South Ave.. 271-4650, bealestreetcafe.com. 7 p.m. Free. Pro-Blues Jam w/ Rochester Blues Review. PI’s Lounge, 495 West Ave. 235-1630. 8 p.m.midnight. Free. [ Classical ] Tom McClure. Geneva on the Lake, 1001 Lochland Rd, Geneva. 800-3-GENEVA. 6:30-9 p.m. Free.

[ DJ/Electronic ] DJ Big Reg. Liquid, 169 St Paul St. 325-5710. 9:30 p.m. Free. DJ Biggie. McKenzie’s Irish Pub, 3685 W Henrietta Rd. 3348970. 9 p.m. Call for tix. DJ ET & DJ Proof. Tribeca, 233 Mill St. 232-1090. 9 p.m. $5$10. DJ Jestyr. Soho East, 336 East Ave. 262-2060. 9 p.m. Free. DJ Matt. Roost, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. 321-1170. 7:30 p.m. Free. DJ Mike Dailor. Vertex, 169 N Chestnut St. 232-5498. 10 p.m. $3-$8. DJs Designer Junkies, Etiquette, Ginnis. One, 1 Ryan Alley. 5461010. 10 p.m. $3. Forward Movement w/Skanntron. Dub Land Underground, 315 Alexander St. 2327550, dublandunderground. wordpress.com. 10 p.m. $5, $15 under 21. 18 +, limited entry for unders. Mostly 80’s Night. Hatter’s Pub, 5 W Main St, Webster. 8721505. 6 p.m. Call for tix. Soul Sides Record Listening Party. Good Luck, 50 Anderson Ave. 340-6161. 9 p.m. Free. Thursday Night Shakedown. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave.. 454-2966, bugjar.com. 11 p.m. Free. Tilt-a-Whirl Drag Show. Tilt Night Club, 444 Central Ave. 2328440, tiltroc.com. 11:15 p.m. & 12:30 a.m. $3. [ Jazz ] Chris Potter Trio. Bistro 135, 135 W Commercial St,, East Rochester. 662-5555, bistro135.net. 6 p.m. Free. Jim Nugent Trio. Little Theatre Cafe, 240 East Ave.. 258-0403, thelittle.org. 7:30 p.m. Free. Joe Santora Trio w/Emily Kirchoff. Michael’s Valley Grill, 1694 Penfield R, Penfield. 3838260. 7:30 p.m. Free. Live Jam w/Eastman School Students. Triple Deuces Bar & Grill, 151 St Paul St. 2323888. Thu 6 p.m., Fri 5 p.m. Free. Nite Fall w/Amy Montrois. Lemoncello, 137 W Commercial St, E Rochester. 385-8565, lemoncello137.com. 7 p.m. Free. [ Karaoke ] Karaoke. Panorama Night Club, 730 Elmgrove Rd. 247-2190. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke. Goody Goodies, 6108 Loomis Rd, Farmington. 7422531. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke. Pineapple Jacks, 485 Spencerport Rd. 247-5225. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke. Jukebox, 5435 Ridge Rd W, Spencerport. 352-4505. 7:30 p.m. Free. Karaoke. Applebee’s-Penfield, 1955 Empire Blvd, Webster. 787-0570. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke. GridIron Bar & Grill, 3154 State St, Caledonia. 5384008. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke w/DJ Smooth. Clarissa’s, 293 Clarissa St. 454-2680. 8:30 p.m. Free. continues on page 18

BRE

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The Downtown Fitness Club

F R I DAY

JULY 8

th

LIVE MUSIC FROM Rubblebucket Uncle Plum RootsCollider 50/50 Prime Time Funk The Coupe De Ville Big Eyed Phish Skycoasters

GO VIP!

Hang out in the VIP tent for quick beer, wine and food, along with private restrooms. Tickets are still available at Temple Bar & Grille, Aaron’s Alley, The Bop Shop, and EastEndMusicFestival.com.

ENTERTAINMENT

rochestercitynewspaper.com City 17


Thursday, June 30

1694 Penfield R, Penfield. 3838260. 7:30 p.m. Free. Johnny Matt Band w/Jon Seiger. Wegmans-Eastway, 1955 Empire Blvd, Webster. 6718290. 5:30 p.m. Free. Ryan T Carey. Thali of India, 3259 S Winton Rd. 427-8030. 7-9 p.m. Free.

Karaoke w/George, King of Karaoke. Temple Bar & Grille, 109 East Ave. 232-6000. 8 p.m. Free. Karaoke w/Summer Bob. Shorts Bar & Grill, 35 N Main St, Fairport. 585-388-0136. 10 p.m. Free. Karaoke w/Tim Burnette. Sevens, Rt 96, Farmington. 924-3232. 8-11 p.m. Free. [ Open Mic ] Open Blues Jam w/Alex D & Jimmie Mac. PJ’s Lounge, 499 West Ave. 436-9066. 9 p.m. Free. Open Jam. Pub 511, 511 E Ridge Rd. 266-9559. 8 p.m. Free. Open Jam w/Beau Ryan & Amanda Ashley. Firehouse Saloon, 814 Clinton Ave S. 2446307. 9 p.m. Free. Open Mic. Towpath Cafe, 6 N Main St, Fairport. 377-0410. 6:30 p.m. Free. Open Mic Night. Boulder Coffee Co-Brooks Landing, 955 Genesee St. 287-5282, bouldercoffeeco.com. 7 p.m. Free. Open Mic w/Jed Curran & Steve Piper. Flipside Bar & Grill, 2001 E Main St. 288-3930. 8 p.m. Free. Songwriter’s Open Mic. Towpath Cafe, 6 N Main St, Fairport. 377-0410. 7 p.m. Free. [ Pop/Rock ] Be Glad & Dunn. Westside Sports Bar & Grill, 1600 Lyell Ave. 4587888. 9 p.m. Call for tix. Jeff Elliott. Irondequoit Ale House, 2250 Hudson Ave. 5445120. 5 p.m. Free. Party in the Park: Bootsy Collins. Riverside Festival Site, Court St/Exchange Blvd. For more information: Contact the promoter, The Springut Group, 585-473-4482 or www. rochesterevents.com. 5 p.m. $2, 12 & under free. Teegan and the Tweeds. Sully’s Pub, 242 South Ave. sullyspubonline.com. 8 p.m. Free. Tim Herron Corp. Dinosaur BarB-Que, 99 Court St. 325-7090, dinosaurbarbque.com. 9:30 p.m. Free.

Friday, July 1 [ Acoustic/Folk ] Jim Lane. 58 Main, 58 Main St, Brockport. 637-2383. 6 p.m. Free. Nick Young. Monty’s Krown Lounge, 875 Monroe Ave.. 2717050. 10 p.m. Call for tix. 21+. The Accordion Babes. Village Gate, 274 N Goodman St. bopshop.com. 6 p.m. Free. Tom Gravino. Tandoor of India, 376 Jefferson Rd. 427-7080. 7 p.m. Free. [ Blues ] Billy Joe & the Blues Gypsies w/Dave Riccioni. Six Pockets, Ridge Hudson Plaza. 266-1440. 6-9 p.m. Free.

FOLK-ROCK | Accordion Babes

Most bands sell t-shirts and CDs at concerts, but Renee de la Prade and Amber Lee Baker, a.k.a. the Accordion Babes, also sell a calendar. The 2011 Accordion Babes Album & Pin-Up Calendar features the Babes and some of their cohorts, all West Coast female accordionistas, posing in burlesque style with strategically placed squeezeboxes. It’s all part of the Accordion Babes mission: to sex up your grandma’s favorite musical instrument. This may sound like an uphill climb but the Accordion Babes, both veterans of the San Francisco scene, are undaunted and have embarked on a five-week tour. In addition to their local show, part of the 14 Fridays summer concert series at the Village Gate, the Babes are gigging in such accordionfriendly places as San Antonio and New Orleans. Accordion Babes perform Friday, July 1, 6 p.m. at Village Gate Courtyard, 274 N. Goodman St. Free. 271-3354, bopshop.com. — BY ROMAN DIVEZUR [ Classical ] Brian Thomas w/Jared Sims, Paradigm Shift. Lovin’ Cup, Park Point @ RIT. lovincup. com. 9 p.m. $7. Jewel Hara. Geneva on the Lake, 1001 Lochland Rd, Geneva. 800-3-GENEVA. 6:30-9 p.m. Free. John Ballings. Hedges, 1290 Lake Rd, Webster. 265-3850. 6:30 p.m. Free. Moonlight Stroll Music Series: 198th Army Division Band. Sonnenberg Gardens & Mansion State Historic Park, 151 Charlotte St, Canandaigua. sonnenberg.org. 8 p.m. $9 GA, $7/members, $4 youth 6-17, Kids 5 and under. All ticketing is at the gate, day of show. Gates open 7:30 p.m. David Pronko. Sandra’s Saloon, 276 Smith St. 546-5474. 9:30 p.m. Free. [ DJ/Electronic ] DJ. Coach Sports Forum, 19 W Main St, Webster. 872-2910. 9 p.m. Call for tix. DJ Cedric. Vertex, 169 N Chestnut St. 232-5498. 10 p.m. $3-$8. DJ Dream. Nola’s BBQ, 4775 Lake Ave. 663-3375. 10 p.m. Call for tix. DJ Fat Daddy Buck. Roost, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. 321-1170. 8:30 p.m. Free. DJ GI. Liquid, 169 St Paul St. 325-5710. 10 p.m. Free-$5.

18 City JUNE 29 - JULY 5, 2011

DJ Mosart212. Lovin’ Cup, Park Point @ RIT. 292-9940. 6 p.m. Free. DJ Sebastien Leger. Pearl Nightclub, 349 East Ave. sebastienleger.net. 9 p.m. $10. Note: 21+. Ticket price MAY go up the night of show. Capacity is very limited so please get tickets to insure entry. Jon Herbert, RipRoc. One, 1 Ryan Alley. 546-1010. 10 p.m. $3. Reggaeton w/DJ Carlos. La Copa Ultra Lounge, 235 W Ridge Rd. 254-1050. 10 p.m. Call for tix. Rupert Greenall w/Eric “the” Taylor. House of Guitars, 645 Titus Ave. 544-3500, houseofguitars.com. 6 p.m. Free. Salsa Night w/DJ Javier Rivera. Tango Cafe, 389 Gregory St. 475-0249. 9 p.m. $5. What A Drag w/Samantha Vega, Kyla Minx & Pauly. Tilt Night Club, 444 Central Ave. 2328440, tiltroc.com. 11:15 p.m. & 12:30 a.m. $4-$12. [ Hip-Hop/Rap ] Good Fridays. Westside Sports Bar & Grill, 1600 Lyell Ave. 4587888. 10 p.m. $10. Dirty South Summer featuring: Yo Gotti and OJ Da Juiceman. Main Street Armory. 900 E Main St. 232-3221. 8:30 p.m. $35 GA, $50 VIP. [ Jazz ] Joe Santora Trio w/Emily Kirchoff. Michael’s Valley Grill,

[ Karaoke ] Karaoke. Village Pub, Chili Center Plaza. 889-4547. 9 p.m. Call for tix. Karaoke. Goody Goodies, 6108 Loomis Rd, Farmington. 7422531. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke. Pineapple Jacks, 485 Spencerport Rd. 247-5225. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke w/Bobby C. Ciao Baby’s BBQ Steak & Seafood, 421 River St. 621-5480. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke w/Summer Bob. Shorts Bar & Grill, 35 N Main St, Fairport. 585-388-0136. 10 p.m. Free. Karaoke w/Tina P. Norton’s Pub, 1730 N Goodman St. 2663570. 9 p.m. Free. [ Open Mic ] Open Mic. Rochester Institute of Technology-Java Wally’s, 90 Lomb Memorial Dr. 475-2562. 9 p.m. Free. [ Pop/Rock ] 8 Days a Week w/Ben Torres. Johnny’s Irish Pub, 1382 Culver Rd. 224-0990, johnnysirishpub. com. 5 p.m. Free. Nate Coffey Band. Tala Vera.155 State St. 546-3844. 7 p.m. Call for tix. Phish. Watkins Glen International Race Track, 2790 County Route 16. 866-461RACE, theglen.com. All day. $200-$230. Start Date: Friday July 1, 2011 End Date: Sunday July 3, 2011. Sam Deleo. Perlo’s Italian Grill, 202 N Washington St, East Rochester. 248-5060. 6:3010:30 p.m. Free. [ Hip-Hop/Rap ] Old School R&B. Elite Bar & Grill, 398 W Main St. 527-8720. 9 p.m. Call for tix.

Saturday, July 2 [ Acoustic/Folk ] John Akers. Johnny’s Irish Pub, 1382 Culver Rd. johnnysirishpub.com, 2240990. 8 p.m. Free. Latin Band. Tapas 177 Lounge, 177 St Paul St. 262-2090. 11 p.m. Free. Reggae Explosion featuring Capleton, Mr. Vegas. Main Street Armory. 900 E Main St. 2323221. 8:30 p.m. $40-$50. Ted McGraw. McGraw’s Irish Pub, 146 W Commercial St, East Rochester. 348-9091, mcgrawsirishpub.com. 5-7 p.m. Free. Tom Gravino. Thali of India, 3259 S Winton Rd. 355-8206. 7 p.m. Free. Unplugged Dinner Music Series. Lovin’ Cup, Park Point @ RIT. 292-9940, lovincup.com. 6 p.m. Free.

CLASSICAL | RPO: “Red, White, and Boom!”

It’s a red, white, and blue spectacular as the Rochester Philharmonic Orchestra brings us its grandest-scaled concert of the year. Michael Butterman conducts a program that includes “Rhapsody in Blue” by George Gershwin, the “1812 Overture” by Tchaikovsky, the “Stars and Stripes,” and other patriotic tunes to salute the armed services. Leading the charge will be percussionists Jim Tiller from the RPO, Mark Hodges from the Buffalo Philharmonic, and Bradley Fuster from Buffalo College (pictured). The Russian influence will extend to the keyboard with pianist Ilya Yakushev, who is not shy about making a big sound. If you’ve never heard the RPO, this is the best concert of the year to pack your kids in the car (children 12 and under are free on the lawn), spread your blanket out on the slope of the lawn, and listen to some great music. RPO: “Red, White, and Boom!” performs Saturday, July 2, 7:30 p.m. at CMAC, 3355 Marvin Sands Drive, Canandaigua. $13-$50. 454-2100, rpo.org. — BY PALOMA A. CAPANNA [ Blues ] Bill Brown. Brown Hound Bistro, 6459 Rt 64, Naples. 374-9771. 7 p.m. Free. [ Classical ] John Ballings. Hedges, 1290 Lake Rd, Webster. 265-3850. 6:30 p.m. Free. RPO: Red, White and Boom! CMAC, 3355 Marvin Sands Dr, Canandaigua. rpo.org. 7:30 p.m. $13-$50, Kids 12 and under are free on lawn. [ DJ/Electronic ] Big Dance Party w/DJ Jon Herbert. Tilt Night Club, 444 Central Ave. 232-8440, tiltroc. com. 10 p.m. $3. DJ. Goody Goodies, 6108 Loomis Rd, Farmington. 7422531. 9 p.m. Free. DJ. Straight Home Inn Bar & Grill, 688 Lexington Ave. 4580020. 9 p.m. Free. DJ Big Reg. Venu Resto-Lounge, 151 St Paul St. 232-5650. 7 p.m. Free. DJ Darkwave. Vertex, 169 N Chestnut St. 232-5498. 10 p.m. $3-$8. DJ Fat Daddy Buck. Roost, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. 321-1170. 8:30 p.m. Free. DJ Howard & Mega Mix. Island Fresh Cuisine, 382 Jefferson Rd. 424-2150. 9 p.m. Free. DJ Jestyr. Soho East, 336 East Ave. 262-2060. 9 p.m. Free.

DJ Mirage. Blueroom, 293 Alexander St. 730-5985. 10 p.m. Call for tix. DJ Wiz. Liquid, 169 St Paul St. 325-5710. 9:30 p.m. Free-$5. DJs Richie Salvaggio, Kalifornia. One, 1 Ryan Alley. 546-1010. 10 p.m. Free-$10. R&B DJs. Tribeca, 233 Mill St. 232-1090. 9 p.m. $5-$10. [ Jazz ] East End Jazz Boys. Havana Moe’s, 125 East Ave. 325-1030. 9 p.m. Free. Jazz Cafe. Monty’s Korner, 363 East Ave.. 263-7650. 7:30 p.m. Free. Jazz at Jazzy’s. Jasmine’s Asian Fusion, 657 Ridge Rd, Webster. 216-1290. 8:30-11 p.m. Free. Joe Santora Trio w/Emily Kirchoff. Michael’s Valley Grill, 1694 Penfield R, Penfield. 3838260. 7:30 p.m. Free. [ Karaoke ] Karaoke. The Galley Restaurant, 94 S Union St, Spencerport. 352-0200. 8 p.m. Free. Karaoke. 140 Alex, 140 Alexander St. 256-1000. 10:30 p.m. Free. Karaoke. Pineapple Jacks, 485 Spencerport Rd. 247-5225. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke. Straight Home Inn Bar & Grill, 688 Lexington Ave. 4580020. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke. Temple Bar & Grille, 109 East Ave. 232-6000. 10 p.m. Free.


SALINGER’S

Grace Jones

107 EAST AVENUE ROCHESTER NEW YORK

continues from page 15

www.salingersrochester.com

one point in the show, Potter played a song that was requested via Twitter. She also sang the chorus to Nelly’s mega-hit “Hot in Herre” while, unfortunately, keeping most of her clothes on. The set was laced with songs from the new album such as “Goodbye Kiss,” “Only Love,” “Low Road,” and the single “Paris (Ooh La La).” But “Hot Summer Night” was absolutely smoking, and could have been the highlight of the show. The encore began with a cappella standout “Nothing But The Water I,” a gorgeous gospel narrative from The Nocturnals’ first record. “Nothing But

Karaoke. Straight Home Inn Bar & Grill, 688 Lexington Ave. 4580020. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke w/Andy & Kim. Norton’s Pub, 1730 N Goodman St. 2663570. 10 p.m. Free. [ Pop/Rock ] Krypton 88. Abilene, 153 Liberty Pole Way. abilenebarandlounge. com. 9 p.m. Call for tix. Phish. Watkins Glen International Race Track, 2790 County Route 16. 866-461RACE, theglen.com. All day. $200-$230. Start Date: Friday July 1, 2011 End Date: Sunday July 3, 2011. The Isotopes and Trapper Keeper. Lovin’ Cup, Park Point @ RIT. lovincup.com. 8 p.m. $5, $3 students. Polar Bear Club (Acoustic) Montage Music Hall 50 Chestnut Plaza. 232-1520. themontagemusichall.com. 8 p.m. Call for tix. The Steakouts. House of Guitars, 645 Titus Ave. 5443500, houseofguitars.com. 6 p.m. Free.

Sunday, July 3 DUE TO THE HOLIDAY, MANY RECURRING EVENTS MAY BE SUBJECT TO CHANGE. CALL AHEAD TO MAKE SURE. [ Acoustic/Folk ] Celtic Music. Temple Bar & Grille, 109 East Ave. 232-6000. 7 p.m. Free. YouTube Stars: Caroline County w/Kait Weston. Lovin’ Cup, Park Point @ RIT. 292-9940, lovincup.com. 6 p.m. $7 public , $5 student. [ Classical ] Ella Cripps. Geneva on the Lake, 1001 Lochland Rd, Geneva. 800-3-GENEVA. 6:30-9 p.m. Free. Going for Baroque Organ Recital. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. 276-8900. 1 & 3 p.m. Free w/admission. [ DJ/Electronic ] DJ. Westside Sports Bar & Grill, 1600 Lyell Ave. 458-7888. 9 p.m. Call for tix.

The Water II” gave Grace a chance to introduce the Nocturnals one at a time. The subsequent instrumental breakdown offered a fantastic display of each member’s talents. It was an amazing 10 minutes, with the crowd asked to sing along as the band exited stage left. The two-part, soulful ballad was nothing short of a spiritual experience and there were definitely some joyous tears shed as a result.

DJ Rasta Spoc/Old-School Reggae. Blueroom, 293 Alexander St. 730-5985. 10 p.m. $5 after 11 p.m. Old School DJ. Clarissa’s, 293 Clarissa St. 454-2680. 8 p.m. Free. [ Hip-Hop/Rap ] R&B HipHop Spring Edition. Cafe Underground Railroad, 480 W Main St. 235-3550. 8 p.m. $5-$10. [ Karaoke ] Karaoke. Jose & Willy’s, 20 Lake Shore Dr, Canandaigua. 3947960. 8:30 p.m. Free. Karaoke w/Brad London. Willow Inn, 428 Manitou Rd. 3923489. 9 p.m. Free. [ Open Mic ] Acoustic Sunday w/Fred Goodnow. Brown Hound Bistro, 6459 Rt 64, Naples. 374-9771. 11 a.m. Free. Open Country Jam. Sandra’s Saloon, 276 Smith St. 5465474. 4-8 p.m. Free. Open Jam w/Bodega Radio. Jukebox, 5435 Ridge Rd W, Spencerport. 352-4505. 5 p.m. Free. Troup Street Jazz Jam Session. Beale Street Cafe, 693 South Ave.. 271-4650, bealestreetcafe. com. 6 p.m. Free. [ Pop/Rock ] Phish. Watkins Glen International Race Track, 2790 County Route 16. 866-461-RACE, theglen. com. All day. $200-$230.

Monday, July 4 DUE TO THE HOLIDAY, MANY RECURRING EVENTS MAY BE SUBJECT TO CHANGE. CALL AHEAD TO MAKE SURE. [ Acoustic/Folk ] Dave McGrath & Guests. Rehab Lounge , 510 Monroe Ave. 4429165. 6 p.m. Free. Gamelan Ensemble Experience. Harley School, 1981 Clover St. 442-1770. 6:30 p.m. Free. Irish Waltzes. McGraw’s Irish Pub, 146 W Commercial St, East Rochester. 348-9091, mcgrawsirishpub.com. 6-7 p.m. Free.

Live Music Saturday Nights 7/9: Jony James 7/16: Steve Grills 7/23: Luca Foresta & the Electro Kings 7/30: Last Note : Salinger's Specials & Events TWITTER : SalingersRoc Follow us to find out who's playing & what's cooking.

Inside Salinger's:

Baked & Carved

Fresh baked breads, hot roasted meats

Slow Learner’s Session. McGraw’s Irish Pub, 146 W Commercial St, East Rochester. 348-9091, mcgrawsirishpub. com. 7-9 p.m. Free. [ DJ/Electronic ] DJ TW. Roost, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. 321-1170. 7:30 p.m. Free. Manic Mondays DJs. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave.. 454-2966. 11 p.m. Free. [ Karaoke ] Karaoke. Roost, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. 321-1170. 9:30 p.m. Free. Karaoke w/Walt O’Brien. Flipside Bar & Grill, 2001 E Main St. 288-3930. 9 p.m. Free. [ Open Mic ] Open Jam w/Refreshunz. Clarissa’s, 293 Clarissa St. 2323430. 8 p.m. Free.

Tuesday, July 5 [ Acoustic/Folk ] Jeff Elliott. Norton’s Pub, 1730 N Goodman St. 266-3570. 5-8 p.m. Free. Johnny Bauer. Cottage Hotel, 1390 Pittsford-Mendon Rd, Mendon. 624-1390. 7-10 p.m. Free. Singer’s Session with Joe Moore. McGraw’s Irish Pub, 146 W Commercial St, East Rochester. 348-9091. 8:30-10 p.m. Free. [ Classical ] Tom McClure. Geneva on the Lake, 1001 Lochland Rd, Geneva. 800-3-GENEVA. 6:30-9 p.m. Free. [ DJ/Electronic ] DJ Fat Daddy Buck. Roost, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. 321-1170. 8:30 p.m. Free. Skrillex w/Porter Robinson, Zedd. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N Water St. 546-3887, waterstreetmusic.com. 9 p.m. $23-$25. [ Karaoke ] Karaoke. 140 Alex, 140 Alexander St. 256-1000. 10:30 p.m. Free. continues on page 21

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Classical in the country, according to Michael Heaston, director of the Young Artists Program and head of the music staff. “Everybody knows Glimmerglass,” says Heaston. “It doesn’t matter where I go, people know Glimmerglass.” For the Young Artists Program, Heaston receives approximately 750 applications from singers per year. He sorts through them to select roughly 250 applicants who give live auditions during his two-week tour across the country each fall. Only 30 to 35 singers are selected — less than 5 percent of those who applied. “These are the cream of young artists,” says Heaston, who was himself part of the program in 2006. “These are students and recent graduates from Juilliard, the Met, the Chicago Lyric Opera, and they come in residency to us for three months. They are the heart and soul of the company.” The young artists sing minor roles in each production and are the understudies for every major role. They perform two 75-minute concerts, on July 17 and August 19, and they present “Meet Me at the Pavilion” concerts. A set model for “A Blizzard On Marblehead Neck,” which will have its world premiere this summer at Glimmerglass. (Set design by Erhard Rom). PHOTO PROVIDED

The shimmer of Glimmerglass Glimmerglass Festival July 2-August 23 7300 State Highway 80, Cooperstown $26-$126 (single tickets) | 607-5472255, glimmerglass.org [ PREVIEW ] BY PALOMA CAPANNA

Located at the base of Otsego Lake, about three hours’ drive from Rochester, is Cooperstown. And, when the evening weather is just so, the walls of what could be mistaken for a gigantic barn roll back and the sounds of singers and musicians float along with the fireflies and the crickets. Take a step closer, and you’ll see a stage facing 914 seats. Welcome to the magic of the Glimmerglass Festival. This season Glimmerglass will present four major productions: one well-known opera, one lesser-known opera, one American musical, and one or two new works. This year’s billings include “Carmen” by Georges Bizet, “Medea” by Luigi Cherubini, “Annie Get Your Gun” by Irving Berlin, and a double bill of “A Blizzard on Marblehead Neck” by Jeanine Tesori and Tony Tushner, and “Later the Same Evening” by John Musto and Mark Campbell. 20 City JUNE 29 - JULY 5, 2011

During the festival more than 60 performances will be staged. Throughout August, you can spend a weekend at Glimmerglass and see all four productions in two days. Founded in 1975 and first known as

the Glimmerglass Opera Festival, the organization’s name changed to simply the Glimmerglass Festival at the request of its artistic and general director, Francesca Zambello. Zambello, who assumed the position in September 2010, arrived with ideas that expanded the festival offerings to include American musical theater. “I wanted to present classic American musicals heard the way that we first heard them,” says Zambello, “and that meant no amplification. We present everything with a full orchestra, 40 pieces, and with big voices.” This year’s production of “Annie Get Your Gun” features Deborah Voigt, an internationally renowned opera star. Voigt will also be the artist-in-residence for the 2011 festival, working with young artists throughout the season and serving as a mentor for them. Glimmerglass first offered an American musical in 2008, Cole Porter’s “Kiss Me Kate.” “We had so many new people who

came for the first time because of the musical production,” says Brittany Lesavoy, director of public relations. “And they came back, saying that they had so much fun.” For Zambello, becoming the artistic and general director allows her to oversee “very unique, individual productions that you wouldn’t see anywhere else,” she says. She adds, “We are very much about high-levelquality theater music, offering interesting productions for our audiences, who welcome diversity and want a chance to see an unusual opera like ‘Medea,’ as well as a classic opera like ‘Carmen.’” Zambello’s credentials could pave the road from Rochester to Cooperstown. She’s been awarded the Chevalier des Arts et des Lettres by the French government for her contribution to French culture, as well as two French Grand Prix des Critiques. She was given the Russian Federation’s medal for Service to Culture and has won a Russian Golden Mask. She’s won three Olivier Awards and two Evening Standard awards in England. And she’s won a Palme d’Or in Germany and a Green Room in Australia. To achieve its musical offerings,

Glimmerglass includes a Young Artists Program that is one of the most prestigious

In addition to the singers in the Young Artists Program, Glimmerglass takes in approximately 70 interns in production, administration, and management. Zambello says, “There’s a huge learning curve for kids here. They get to see leadership by example.” According to Heaston, Cooperstown is part of the magic of Glimmerglass. “I’ve been in this community six years,” says Heaston, “I know everybody’s name; the community is warm and welcoming.” Cooperstown is also home to the Fenimore Art Museum, where a special exhibition of works by American painter Edward Hopper (1882-1967) will be on display to coincide with the Glimmerglass production “Later the Same Evening,” which has a storyline that brings to life several figures from Hopper’s paintings. Lesavoy says, “People have so much fun with the entire experience, picnicking, walking the grounds, enjoying the gardens.” Glimmerglass is situated near the Glimmerglass State Park and the Robert Woodruff Nature Center, and the Glimmerglass Queen offers boat tours of the nine-mile Otsego Lake. The theater itself was designed by New York City architect Hugh Hardy and opened in 1987. Lesavoy says, “One of the things that he kept in mind in designing the theater is our location, among the hills and the rural farmland. We just had a couple stop in last night and say, ‘What is this place?’”


MOONLIGHT STROLL MUSIC SERIES

Tuesday, July 5 Karaoke. Pineapple Jacks, 485 Spencerport Rd. 247-5225. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke. McKenzie’s Irish Pub, 3685 W Henrietta Rd. 3348970. 8 p.m. Free. Karaoke. Westside Sports Bar & Grill, 1600 Lyell Ave. 458-7888. 9 p.m. Call for tix. [ Open Mic ] Golden Link Singaround. Twelve Corners Presbyterian Church, 1200 S Winton Rd. goldenlink. org. 7:30 p.m. Free. Open Mic Night. Lovin’ Cup, Park Point @ RIT. 292-9940, lovincup.com. 8:30 p.m. Free. Open Mic w/Rapier Slices. Clarissa’s, 293 Clarissa St. 4542680. 7-11 p.m. $3-$5. Open Mic w/String Theory. Johnny’s Irish Pub, 1382 Culver Rd. 224-0990, johnnysirishpub. com. 8 p.m. Free.

Wednesday, July 6 [ Acoustic/Folk ] Tom Gravino. Cafe 54, 54 W Main St, Victor. 742-3649. 6 p.m. Free. [ Country ] Phil Vassar. Finger Lakes Land Trust, 202 E Court St, Ithaca. fingerlakesgaming.com, 9243232. 7 p.m. Free. [ DJ/Electronic ] Bad Wolf: 50s & 60s Vinyl Bop. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave.. 454-2966, bugjar.com. 10 p.m. Free. DJ. Westside Sports Bar & Grill, 1600 Lyell Ave. 458-7888. 9 p.m. Call for tix. DJ/Electronic - DJ. One, 1 Ryan Alley. 546-1010. 10 p.m. Free. DJ Babi Katt/Dancehall Reggae. Blueroom, 293 Alexander St. 730-5985. 10 p.m. $5 after 11 p.m. DJ Cosmo. Bay Bar & Grill, 372 Manitou Rd, Hilton. 392-7700. 10 p.m. Free. DJ Fat Daddy Buck. Roost, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. 321-1170. 8:30 p.m. Free. DJs Jared & Mario B. Venu Resto-Lounge, 151 St Paul St. 232-5650. 9 p.m. $5. DJs NaNa & PJ. Vertex, 169 N Chestnut St. 232-5498. 10 p.m. $3-$8. [ Hip-Hop/Rap ] Chris Webby. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N Water St. waterstreetmusic.com. 7 p.m. $20-$25. [ Jazz ] Paradigm Shift. Pomodoro Grill & Wine Bar, 1290 University Ave. 271-5000. 7:30 p.m. Free.

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With all that glitters in the digital age of music, I sometimes wonder what little girls in this day and age have to marvel at anymore. Sure, the Madonnas and Boy Georges of my youth were a tad controversial, but they never insisted on going all the way or getting drunk the way Katy Perry does today. Thankfully there is a repackaging movement happening via cover versions of these megahits on viral video. Julia Sheer of Caroline County and Tyler Ward fame, along with former Rochesterian Kait Weston, are at the forefront. They offer up kinder, gentler renditions of the mass-market hits that you and your little pumpkin would hate to miss. Check Sheer’s website for details on VIP packs that include a meet-and-greet. Caroline County performs Sunday, July 3, 6 p.m. at Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Drive. $5-$7. lovincup.com. — BY EMILY FAITH Robert Chevrier. Brio Wine Bar & Grill, 3400 Monroe Ave. 5867000. 6:30 p.m. Free. [ Karaoke ] Karaoke. Roost, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. 321-1170. 9:30 p.m. Free. Karaoke. Southpaw Brew Pub, 315 Gregory St. 303-2234. 8:30 p.m. Free. Karaoke. Elite Bar & Grill, 398 W Main St. 527-8720. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke. Pineapple Jacks, 485 Spencerport Rd. 247-5225. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke. Jose & Willy’s, 20 Lake Shore Dr, Canandaigua. 3947960. 8:30 p.m. Free. Karaoke. Monty’s Korner, 363 East Ave.. 263-7650. 9.30 p.m. Free. Karaoke. Applebee’s-Fairport, 585 Moseley Rd, Fairport. 4254700. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke. Mayfields Pub, 669 Winton Rd N. 288-7199. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke. Sanibel Cottage, 1517 Empire Blvd, Webster. 671-9340. 6 p.m. Free. Karaoke Night. Lemoncello, 137 W Commercial St, E Rochester. 385-8565, lemoncello137.com. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke w/Jimmy C’s Music Machine ft. Johnny Rocker. Sully’s Pub, 242 South Ave. sullyspubonline.com. 8:30 p.m. Free. Karaoke w/Mark. Flipside Bar & Grill, 2001 E Main St. 2883930. 8:30 p.m. Free.

PERFORMANCES BY: JULY 1 - 198th Army Division Band (Patriotic/Big Band)

JULY 8 - Flower City Society Orchestra

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[ Pop/Rock ] Don Christiano - With A Little Help from My Friends: The Beatles Unplugged. Abilene, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230, abilenebarandlounge.com. 8 p.m. Egg Man’s Traveling Carnival. Hatter’s Pub, 5 W Main St, Webster. 872-1505. 6 p.m. Call for tix.

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511 E Ridge Rd. 266-9559. 8 p.m. Free. Entertainment Showcase. Clarissa’s, 293 Clarissa St. 4542680. 8 p.m. Free-$5. Open Jam w/Big Daddy Blues Band. Deweys, 1380 Lyell Ave. 254-4707. 9:30 p.m. Free. Open Mic - Open Jam w/Justin Gurnsey. Jukebox, 5435 Ridge Rd W, Spencerport. 352-4505. 10 p.m. Free. Open Mic. Boulder Coffee CoSouth Wedge, 100 Alexander St. 454-7140, bouldercoffeeco. com. 8 p.m. Free. Open Mic. Dr’s Inn Grill & Tap Room, 1743 East Ave. 2710820. 5 p.m. Free. Open Mic w/Jam Shack Music. Stoneyard Bar & Grill, 1 Main St, Brockport. 637-3390. 9 p.m. Free. Open Mic w/Steve West. Muddy Waters Coffee House-Geneseo, 53 Main St, Geneseo. 2439111. 7-10 p.m. Free. [ Pop/Rock ] The Coupe de Villes. Ontario Beach Park, 4800 Lake Ave. wegmans.com. 7 p.m. Free. The Town Pants. Johnny’s Irish Pub, 1382 Culver Rd. 2240990, johnnysirishpub.com. 8 p.m. Free.

[ Open Mic ] Acoustic Open Mic. Pub 511, rochestercitynewspaper.com City 21


Art each time. Part of the concept of creating an installation of a city, says Mr. Prvrt, was to encourage viewers to engage with it the way new residents would, exploring and getting to know the buildings and avenues. Bits of interest balance all levels, from a sort of secret underground at foot-level to the ropes of starry white lights below the rafter sky. Rizzo’s feral, child-faced rats and raccoons (bearing the likeness of her muse-son and his friend) stand or crouch on the floor, provoking the viewer to get down and peek into their hiding spaces. Mr. Prvrt and St. Monci’s work dominates the street level, and higher up, Lehman’s old-timey advertisement signs recall an age that perceived itself as innocent. Rutherford’s lamp-lit, ghostly hot-air balloons float above, bearing baskets of feathers and keys. The group’s goal with this installation

Images from “Welcome to Sweetsville,” the temporary collaborative installation by Sweet Meat Co. on display at the Public Market. PHOTOS BY MATT DETURCK

Blink and you’ll miss it “Welcome to Sweetsville” By The Sweet Meat Co. Through July 2 280 N. Union St. North, 3rd Floor (Above Flour City Bakery at the Public Market) Tue & Thu 9 a.m.-2 p.m., Sat 9 a.m.-3 p.m., or by appt. SweetMeatCo.com [ REVIEW ] BY REBECCA RAFFERTY

Local art collective Sweet Meat Co. combines an obsession with old, built-tolast items and a penchant for using them to create impermanent art. The short-run installations by its members are viewable for a limited time only, before being dissolved again into chaos (and some for-sale sections). The newest endeavor, “Welcome to Sweetsville,” is on display on the third floor of Flour City Bakery at the Public Market. But you can only check it out this week: Sweetsville, like Atlantis, is doomed. Though it’s been more than a year since all five members of the group exhibited artwork together in their “Extravaganza!” 22 City June 29 - july 5, 2011

installation at the Hungerford Building, each artist has kept their fans sated with individual shows or collaborative exhibitions by different pairs from the group. But recently, teasers for a new installation appeared on the group’s blog, including photos that captured the soul of the progress with fittingly dreamy, nostalgic-looking images. Entering the space, viewers will find that

the installation is not on the walls, but in a central towering island of stacked and painted wooden boxes and other found and created detritus. These form the buildings of an imaginary city quadrant for the lost and the stray. The installation bears many familiar themes beloved by the group “exploded out into 3D,” says member artist Sarah Rutherford of the sculptural work. “We’re all traditionally 2D artists, taking installation to a new level. It was 2.5D last time, this time, it’s 2.75D.” The bones of the makeshift city are salvaged materials (the group trekked all over abandoned spots to procure material); paintings by Mr. Prvrt, St. Monci, and Erich Lehman create the setting, and the place is populated by Rutherford and Lea Rizzo’s painted people and creatures.

Reminiscent of Charles de Lint’s stories of Newford, the installation forms a sort of every-city place marked by industrial decline and offering glimpses of mythic creatures that perhaps only a few of the residents can detect. The ramshackle urban setting contains child-animal hybrids, old cars, compartmentalized dwellings, brokendown hovels, and plenty of magic. Monci’s abstract monochrome works read as splinters of wood, shards of glass, or light and shadows, but also perhaps the edges of pointier graffiti tags on the sides of buildings. His work lends a gritty feeling of place to Mr. Prvrt’s array of stenciled automobiles, windows, and barrels. Rutherford constructed a bum’s sanctuary half hidden under the stack, with blankets and feathers, and a largerthan-life gypsy woman guarding over the space. Box reliquaries with windows reveal wee residents, or are shuttered against the circling, giant voyeurs. Having the show at the Public Market

brought in a diverse crowd from all over the city during its opening on Friday, June 24. The piece is so packed with nuance that I took several laps around the tiny city at the reception, discovering overlooked elements

was to do something entirely different than its last project, and to dash the expectations viewers might have based on past Sweet Meat endeavors. For Rutherford, the experience of collecting forgotten treasures, of bringing attention to spaces and things most people don’t know exist, and of working with the others in such an intense way are just as crucial as the end result. It can be a challenge to mesh five different styles in such as collaboration, not to mention five different schedules. This requires not getting attached to everything you contribute, and being flexible with what will and won’t work, especially when working with a limited palette of salvaged material. As work progressed, the tiny city came to life, in that it would shift and grow as each member added to it, left, and returned to find it changed by the other artists. Creation and installation of the work took place over the past three weeks, and toward the end there was a sort of “feverishness to it,” says Rutherford. The group is grateful to the photo documentation of the process by Hannah Betts Moncibiaz that appears on the Sweet Meat blog, because the flurry of working created a sort of “forest for the trees” scenario, says Mr. Prvrt, and the photos provide an opportunity to reflect on the process. Note that the show is only open on Market days this week, Tuesday and Thursday 9 a.m.-2 p.m. and Saturday 9 a.m.-3 p.m., or by appointment. For more information, or to set up a time to view the work, visit sweetmeatco.blogspot.com or email sweetmeatco@gmail.com.


Art Exhibits [ OPENINGS ] Art by Jim Pappas, Jack White, and Eddie Davis Fri Jul 1. Baobab Cultural Center, 728 University Ave. 6-9 p.m. 563-2145, thebaobab.org. “Collection of Curiosities,” creations from the mind of Tim Mack Fri Jul 1. Gallery @ Equal=Grounds, 750 South Ave. 7-9 p.m. gallery@ equalgrounds.com. “Light & Form, Time & Space” by D. G. Adams Fri Jul 1. Image City Photography Gallery, 722 University Ave. 5-9 p.m. 482-1976, imagecityphotographygallery.com.

“One Woman Show” featuring Allison Nichols Fri Jul 1. Gallery Salon & Spa, 780 University Ave. 7-10 p.m. 271-8340, galleryhair.com. Sandy Grana-Kesel and other artists Fri Jul 1. The Main Street Artists’ Gallery & Studio, The Hungerford, Studio 458,1115 E. Main St. 5-9 p.m. 233-5645. “Scapes,” with Chris Kogut, Rick Mearns, Gil Maker, Don Menges, John Solberg, George Wallace, and Paul Yarnall Fri Jul 1. Booksmart Studio, 250 N. Goodman St. 6-9 p.m. 1-800-761-6623, booksmartstudio.com. “Serendipitous Moments,” photographs by Anne Marie Maier

Fri Jul 1. Anthony Road Wine Company, 1020 Anthony Road, Penn Yan. 4-7 p.m. 800-5592182, lumariaphoto.com. “Sum of the Parts: Art Quilts by Pat Pauly” Fri Jul 1. Nazareth College Arts Center Gallery, 4245 East Ave. 6-8 p.m. 389-5073, naz.edu. The photographic art of Lucy Lott and Brett Seamans of LCB Studios Fri Jul 1. 2 Chic Boutique, 151 Park Ave. 5-8 p.m. 271-6111, 2chicboutique.com. “The Zen of Madness: Insane Surrealistic Art by Sean Madden” Fri Jul 1. Art to Zen Tattoo, 4363 Lake Ave. 8 p.m. 621-3515. Photo Exhibit of Puerto Rico Sat Jul 2. Abbotts Downtown, 72 St. Paul St. 7 p.m. 727-0601. Live music.

Thievin’ Stephen: New Paintings & Drawings Closing Reception Wed Jul 6. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 8 p.m. 454-2966, bugjar.com, thievinstephen.com. [ CONTINUING ] DUE TO THE HOLIDAY, EVENTS MAY BE SUBJECT TO CHANGE. CHECK WITH VENUES PRIOR TO YOUR VISIT. 2 Chic Boutique 151 Park Ave. Jul 1-31: The photographic art of Lucy Lott and Brett Seamans of LCB Studios. | Through Jun 30. “Beyond the Racks: The Art of Nancy Howard Lyon.” Wed-Thu 11 a.m.-7 p.m., Fri 11 a.m.-6 p.m., Sat 11 a.m.-5 p.m. 2716111, 2chicboutique.com.

American Association of University Women (AAUW) Art Forum and Gallery 494 East Ave. Through Jul 8: “Life in Remote Places: A Fragile Balance,” photography by Kris Dreessen. Mon-Fri 10 a.m.-4 p.m. by appt. only. 255-0065, aauwrochester.org. Anthony Road Wine Company 1020 Anthony Road, Penn Yan. Opens Jul 1: “Serendipitous Moments,” photographs by Anne Marie Maier. Mon-Sat 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Sun 12-5 p.m. 800-5592182, lumariaphoto.com. Art to Zen Tattoo 4363 Lake Ave. Jul 1-14: “The Zen of Madness: Insane Surrealistic Art by Sean Madden.” Call for hours. 621-3515.

A.R.T.S. Gallery at Aviv Café 321 East Ave. Through Jun 30: “Cove at Rest,” featuring artist Ron Smith. Fri 6-11 p.m., Sun 8 a.m.-1 p.m. 729-9916. Artisan Works 565 Blossom Rd. Through Aug 28: “Masters/ Subjects,” New Paintings by Joseph Accorso. | “Ramon Santiago,” video presentation. | Third Sundays: Park Avenue Dance Company, 3 p.m. Fri-Sat 11 a.m.-6 p.m., Sun Noon-5 p.m. $8$12. 288-7170, artisanworks.net. Arts Council for Wyoming County 31 S Main St, Perry. Through July 29: “Traditional Meets Organic Exhibition” with Gil Jordan & Deborah Benedetto. continues on page 24

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Art Exhibits

SPECIAL EVENTS | INDEPENDENCE DAY CELEBRATIONS

Rochester has almost as many Independence Day events as there are stars on the American flag. Whether you want to celebrate in your suburb, go downtown, see fireworks, or do something completely different this holiday weekend, Greater Rochester has you covered. Here is a list of some notable local celebrations: Brighton: The celebration begins Monday, July 4, with pancakes for breakfast and a 5K race at Twelve Corners and Brighton High School. Afterward the activities move to Meridian Centre Park (2025 S Winton Road), where there will be rides, food, and a performance by The Skycoasters. The night concludes with fireworks. Visit townofbrighton.org for more info. Brockport: Brockport’s Independence Day will take place Monday, July 4, on the lawn of the Morgan Manning House (151 Main St., Brockport). The event starts at 11 a.m. with a performance by the Brockport Community Big Band and continues with a reading of the Gettysburg address and a children’s parade at 1 p.m. There will also be tours of the Morgan Manning House at 12:30 and 1:30 p.m. as well as a cake walk at 2 p.m. Food and refreshments will be available. Visit brockportny. org for more information. Canandaigua: The annual July 4 parade will begin Monday at 10 a.m. on Main Street. At 6 p.m. there will be live music at Kershaw Park (Lake Shore Drive) followed by fireworks at 9:30 p.m. Visit canandaiguachamber.com for more information. Chili: The town’s annual Chil-E Festival will take place Monday, July 4, at 3235 Chili Ave. Food vendors and booths open at noon, a car show will run noon-4 p.m., and there will be music performances, kids activities, comedy shows, and jugglers throughout the day. Fireworks start at 10 p.m. Visit townofchili.org for more info. The Colonial Belle: Take an Independence Day boat tour-fireworks cruise on the Colonial Belle Monday at 7:30 p.m. as the Colonial Belle goes along the Erie Canal. Call 223-9470 to make reservations or visit colonialbelle.com. Downtown Rochester: On Monday, July 4, there will be music by Jimmie Highsmith Jr. at 7:30 p.m. on the Main Street bridge, followed by a performance by the Rochester Philharmonic Orchestra at 9 p.m. Fireworks start at 10 p.m. Bring chairs and blankets to watch the show and enjoy food from various vendors. Free parking is available at the Washington Square, Court Street, and Sister Cities garages. Visit cityofrochester.gov for more info. Fairport: Fairport’s celebration begins at 8:30 a.m. on Monday, July 4, with a 5-mile run at 24 City June 29 - july 5, 2011

Perinton Park followed by a 10 a.m. parade at North Main Street and Whitney Road. There will be a party in the park noon-4:30 p.m. with music by The Skycoasters. Visit village.fairport.ny.us for more info. Genesee Country Village & Museum: The museum will recreate the atmosphere of the 1826 Jubilee July 4 and the 1876 Centennial. The event takes place Monday, July 4, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. and includes a grand parade, costumes, a pie-eating contest, and 19th century games. There will also be a naturalization ceremony where people take the oath to become American citizens. The museum is located at 1410 Flint Hill Road in Mumford. Visit gcv.org for more information. Henrietta: Henrietta starts its celebration Monday with a garage and crafts sale 9 a.m.-2 p.m. at the Senior Center on Calkins Road. The evening celebration starts at 4 p.m. at Veterans Memorial Park (495 Calkins Road). There will be kids entertainment, arts and crafts, rides, and live music. Fireworks start at 9:40 p.m. Visit henrietta.org for more information. Irondequoit: Irondequoit celebrates Independence Day on Sunday, July 3, and Monday, July 4, at Irondequoit Town Hall (1280 Titus Ave.) with activities 11 a.m.-11 p.m. On Sunday check out live entertainment 2-10:30 p.m., including a street dance with Guiseppi Scungelli & the Screamin’ Seagulls Revue 7-11 p.m. On Monday there will be a 2-mile fun run at 8 a.m., a 10k race at 8:15 a.m., a decorated bike contest at 10 am., and a parade at 11 a.m. running from Irondequoit Plaza to the Town Hall. More live entertainment and kids activities starts at 2 p.m., and culminate with fireworks starting at 9:30 p.m. Visit irondequoit.org for more information. Penfield: Penfield’s celebration will take place Saturday, July 2, and starts at 10 a.m. with a parade running from Penfield High School to the Penfield Community Center. The evening celebration at Harris Whalen Park (off Route 441) starts at 6 p.m. and will include a bounce house, food vendors, and a performance by Dog House at 8 p.m. Fireworks are at 10:15 p.m. Visit penfield.org for more information. — BY ALEXANDRA CARMICHAEL

Wed 9 a.m.-6 p.m., Thu-Fri 11 a.m.-7 p.m., Sat 10 a.m.-3 p.m. 237-3517, artswyco.org Baobab Cultural Center 728 University Ave. Jul 1-Aug 27: Art by Jim Pappas, Jack White, and Eddie Davis. Thu-Fri 5:30-9 p.m., Sat 2-4 p.m. 5632145, thebaobab.org. Bead Breakout 2314 Monroe Ave. Through Jul 9: 5th Bead Challenge. Tue-Sat 10 a.m.-6 p.m., Mon & Wed 10 a.m.-9 p.m. 271-2340, beadbreakout.com Books Etc. 78 W. Main St., Macedon. Through Jun 30: “Seeing and Beyond: A New Exhibit: The Work of Sue Higgens, Joe Thompson, and Tim Casselman. WedSun Noon-5 p.m. 474-4116, books_etc@yahoo.com. Booksmart Studio 250 N. Goodman St. Through Jun 30: “Scapes,” with Chris Kogut, Rick Mearns, Gil Maker, Don Menges, John Solberg, George Wallace, and Paul Yarnall. Mon-Fri 9 a.m.-6 p.m.; Sat 10 a.m.-4 p.m. 1-800-761-6623, booksmartstudio.com. Bug Jar 219 Monroe Ave. Through Jul 6: Thievin’ Stephen: New Paintings & Drawings. Mon-Sun 8 p.m.- 2 a.m. 454-2966, bugjar.com, thievinstephen.com. Community Darkroom Gallery 713 Monroe Ave. Through Jul 1: “Landscape: Mind and Matter,” with panoramic landscapes by Christopher Schwer and “The Okinawa Series” of 4x5 pinhole images by Joe Ziolkowski. Mon 9 a.m.-9:30 p.m.; Tue-Thu 9 a.m.-6:30 p.m.; Fri 12-5 p.m.; Sat 10 a.m.-5:30 p.m. 271-5920, geneseearts.org. Creative Wellness Center 320 N Goodman St, Suite 201. Through Jun 30: “Searching Beyond.” Mon-Fri 9 a.m.4 p.m. 325-3145 x142, mhcrochester.org. A Different Path Gallery 27 Market St., Brockport. Jul 130: “Another Man’s Treasure,” group show of recycled material art. Wed-Fri 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Sat 10 a.m.-6 p.m., Sun 10 a.m.-4 p.m. 637-5494, differentpathgallery.com. The Firehouse Gallery @ Genesee Pottery, 713 Monroe Ave. Through Jul 22: “Intake,” works by Mitch Messina. Mon-Fri 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; Sat noon-4 p.m. 2441730, geneseearts.org. FourWalls Gallery 179 Atlantic Ave. Through Jul 8: “Drawing Sake,” with Harold T. Coogan, Jim Downer, Kathleen Farrell, Joe Hendrick, Peter Monacelli, and Jason Smith. Thu-Fri 3-6 p.m., Sat 1-3 p.m. 4427824, fourwallsartgallery@ gmail.com, cmwfaa@rit.edu. Fusion Salon 333 Park Ave. Ongoing: “Shaping a Decade,” with artwork by Cordell Cordaro, St. Monci, Mr. PRVRT, more. Mon & Tue

9 a.m.-8 p.m., Thu Noon-8 p.m., Fri 9a.m.-6 p.m., Sat 9 a.m.-4 p.m. 271-8120, fusionsalonnewyork.com. Gallery @ Equal=Grounds 750 South Ave. Jul 1-31: “Collection of Curiosities,” creations from the mind of Tim Mack. | Through Jun 30: “Bracketed Exposures at Equal=Grounds” Photography by George Wallace, Gilbert Maker and Don Menges (The Three Tenors). Tue-Fri 7 a.m.-Midnight, Sat-Sun 10 a.m.-Midnight. gallery@ equalgrounds.com. Gallery Salon & Spa 780 University Ave. Jul 1-Aug 31: “One Woman Show” featuring Allison Nichols. | Though Jun 30: “Some from Three,” New works by Courtney Konecny, John Perry, and Paul Schramm. Tue-Thu 11 a.m.-8 p.m., Fri 11 a.m.-7 p.m., Sat 9:30 a.m.-3 p.m. 271-8340, galleryhair.com. George Eastman House 900 East Ave. Through Sep 18: “Norman Rockwell Behind the Camera” and “Americana: Hollywood and the American Way of Life.” | Ongoing: “Cameras from the Technology Collection,” and “The Remarkable George Eastman.” | Tue-Sat 10 a.m.5 p.m., Thu 10 a.m.-8 p.m., Sun 1-5 p.m. $4-$10. 2713361, eastmanhouse.org Gilded Square Picture Framing & Gallery 714 University Ave. Through June 30: “From the Art Closet” works by Keith Uhrich & Michelle Michael. Tue-Fri 11 a.m.-5 p.m., Sat 11 a.m.-3 p.m. 461-2808, gildedsquare.com. High Falls Fine Art Gallery 60 Browns Race. Through Jul 8: “Strings and Threads” and “Burning Man,” Photographs by Laura Jackett. Wed-Fri 11 a.m.-5:30 p.m.; Sat Noon-5:30 p.m.; Sun 1-5 p.m. 325-2030, centerathighfalls.org. Image City Photography Gallery 722 University Ave. Through Jul 10: “Light & Form, Time & Space” by D. G. Adams. Wed-Sat 11 a.m.-7 p.m.; Sun noon-4 p.m. 482-1976, imagecityphotographygallery. com. International Art Acquisitions 3300 Monroe Ave. Jul 131: “Dance Study,” original pastel sketches by Marcella Gillenwater. | Through Jun 30: “Mars” by Linda Kall. Mon-Fri 10 a.m.-9 p.m.; Sat 10 a.m.-6 p.m.; Sun Noon-5 p.m. 264-1440, internationalartacquisitions. com. Link Gallery at City Hall 30 Church St. Through Jul 25: The Artists’ Breakfast Group. Mon-Fri 9 a.m.-5 p.m. 2715920, cityofrochester.gov. Little Theatre Café 240 East Ave. Through Jul 22: The Cowles Family (David, Clayton, Alison). Sun 5-8 p.m. Mon-Thu 5-10 p.m.; Fri-Sat 5-11 p.m. 258-0403, thelittle.org. The Main Street Artists’ Gallery & Studio The Hungerford, Studio 458,1115 E. Main St. Jul 1-31: Sandy Grana-

Kesel and other artists. By appointment. 233-5645. MCC Mercer Gallery 1000 E. Henrietta Rd. Through Sep 4: 35th Student Art Exhibition. Mon-Thu 10 a.m.-7 p.m.; Fri 10 a.m.-5 p.m. 292-2021. Memorial Art Gallery 500 University Ave. Through Jul 3: “Fiberart International.” | In the Lockhart Gallery, Through Sep 18: “Alfonsas Dargis: Two Decades of Paintings and Prints (1950-1970).” | In Lucy Burne Gallery: Through Aug 4: “Collaboration 2.” | “What’s Up” lecture, First Sundays, 2 p.m. | Ongoing exhibits: “At the Crossroads,” “Seeing America,” “Italian Baroque Organ,” “Brunswick Armor,” “Judaica.” | Wed-Sun 11 a.m.-5 p.m., Thu until 9 p.m., $4-$10. Thu night reduced price: $6 from 5-9 p.m. 276-8900, mag.rochester.edu. Mill Art Center & Gallery, 61 N Main St, Honeoye Falls. Through June 30: “Bloom: An Homage,” Photographs by Beth Bloom, in the Rabbit Room Restaurant. Mon-Fri & Sat 11 a.m.-3 p.m., Fri 11 a.m.-8 p.m. Free. 624-7740, millartcenter.com. Nazareth College Arts Center Gallery 4245 East Ave. Jun 30Aug 14: “Sum of the Parts: Art Quilts by Pat Pauly.” Wed-Sun 1-8 p.m. 389-5073, naz.edu. Orange Glory Café 240 East Ave. Through July 15: “Human, Nature” photographs by Boris Sapozhnikov. Mon-Fri 11 a.m.-3 p.m. 232-7340, contact@boristakespictures. com, boristakespictures.com. Oxford Gallery 267 Oxford St. Through Aug 20: “Object Lesson” group exhibition. TueFri Noon-5 p.m; Sat 10 a.m.-5 p.m. 271-5885, oxfordgallery. com. Phillips Fine Art 248 East Ave. Through Jun 29: Recent Work by Dave Calver. Tue-Fri Noon-6 p.m.; Sat Noon-5 p.m. or by appt. 232-8120. Public Market 3rd Floor above Flour City Bakery, 280 N Union St. Through Jul 2: “Welcome To Sweetsville” by the Sweet Meat Co. Tue & Thu 9 a.m.-2 p.m., Sat 9 a.m.-3 p.m., and by appt. sweetmeatco.com. Record Archive 33 1/3 Rockwood St. Through Jun 30: “Declan Ryan: An American Icon,” Rochester artists’ perspective on a modern myth. Mon-Sat 10 a.m.-9 p.m., Sun noon-5 p.m. alayna@ recordarchive.com. Renaissance Art Gallery 74 St. Paul St. Through Jul 31: “Through the Artist’s Eye,” new oils and watercolors by Judy Soprano. Tue-Sat 11 a.m.-5 p.m. 423-8235, rochesterrenaissanceartgallery.com. Roberts Wesleyan B.T. Roberts Memorial Hall Art Gallery 2265 Westside Dr. Through Jun 30: “Faculty Invitational 2011.” Mon-Fri 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Roberts.edu. Rochester Contemporary Arts Center 137 East Ave. Through Jul 10: “6x6x2011:


Global.” Wed-Sun 1-5 p.m., Fri 1-10 p.m. 461-2222, rochestercontemporary.org. $1. The Shoe Factory Co-op 250 N. Goodman St., Studio 212. Through Jun 30: “Earthly Delights: Art of the Garden.” Wed-Sat 12-5 p.m. studio212@ shoefactoryarts.com, shoefactoryarts.com The Strong’s National Museum of Play One Manhattan Square. Through Nov 20: “The Fine Art of Airigami: Once Upon a Time” by Larry Moss and Kelly Cheatle. Mon-Thu 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Fri-Sat 10 a.m.-8 p.m., Sun 12-5 p.m. 263-2700, thestrong.org. $10-12. strumGallery at Black Dog Studios 120 East Ave. Ongoing: “Legends: British Invasion Guitars.” Appointments only. 729-7625, strumgallery.com Stomping Grounds 492 Exchange St., Geneva. Through Sep 17: “Abandonment Issues,” photography by Kevin Schoonover. Mon-Sat 10 a.m.-6 p.m. 315-220-0922, flyingwhalestudios.com. SUNY Geneseo Lockhart Gallery McClellan House, 26 Main St., Geneseo. Through July 8: “Livingston Potpourri.” MonThu 12:30-3:30 p.m.; Fri-Sat 12:30-5:30 p.m. geneseo.edu. Visual Studies Workshop 31 Prince St. Through Jul 31: “In Retrospect: Artists’ Books and Works on Paper by Maureen Cummins, Ann Lovett, and Nava Atlas.” Thu 5-8 p.m., Fri-Sun noon-5 p.m. 4428676, vsw.org. Williams Gallery 220 S Winton Rd. Through Aug 22: “Time and Place,” by members of The Artists’ Breakfast Group. Mon-Fri 9 a.m.-2 p.m. 2719070, rochesterunitarian.org, artistsbreakfastgroup.com. Windsor Cottage Home 3495 Winton Place Dr., bldg D. Through Jun 30: Elizabeth King Durand. Tue-Fri 10 a.m.-5:30 p.m., Sat 10 a.m.-4 p.m. or by appt. 442-6530, windsorcottagehome.com. [ CALL FOR ARTWORK ] Art at the Armory: The Show and Sale of Nature-themed Fine Art. Deadline June 30. Call for artists of all fine art media: apply now by visiting artatthearmory.com or call 2238369 to request an application packet. Exhibit and sale to take place November 12-13. Art of the Book. Deadline July 25. Rochester Public Library is looking for book artists and illustrators to participate in a juried exhibition, “The Art of the Book,” which will be on display at the Central Library October 23-December 4. For more information, visit rpl100.org, or call Sally Snow at 428-8051. Audubon Photo Contest. Deadline June 30 for July 1617 Art in the Woods art show and sale. For more information, visit jasphotocontest.com. Call for Art Proposals for New Roz Steiner Art Gallery at Genesee Community College.

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“Rheumatoid Arthritis prevents me from carrying out my daily routine.”

ART EVENT | FIRST FRIDAY

Many of the major galleries and museums are between shows for this edition of First Friday, giving you the opportunity to focus your attention on the smaller spaces and alternative venues you might not normally check out. The monthly, city-wide gallery night is held by non-profit, university, and commercial and indie art venues in Rochester, where we all trot about from station to station, filling our eyes and ears with what’s new and exciting in our community. On Friday, July 1, 6-9 p.m. (and sometimes later) you can check out art openings, poetry readings, and musical performances in various locations. Visit firstfridayrochester.org for a list of this month’s participating venues, and check our online events calendar at rochestercitynewspaper.com for more receptions and exhibits. July’s featured artist at The Gallery @ Equal Grounds (750 South Ave., 242-7840) will be Tim Mack, who presents his wildly patterned and whimsical “Collection of Curiosities” 7-9 p.m. More creative strangeness can be found in the surreal works of Sean Madden, presented by Art to Zen Tattoo (4363 Lake Ave., 621-3515), which kicks off at 8 p.m. and will also feature live music by The Freakness.

The Next Step in

Rheumatoid Arthritis If living with rheumatoid arthritis makes normal activities more difficult, consider joining a clinical research program. We are looking at whether an investigational medication is safe and effective in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis when given in combination with regular rheumatoid arthritis medications.

To participate in the study, you must: • be 18 years of age or older • have been diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis after the age of 16 • have painful, stiff, or swollen joints despite taking a rheumatoid arthritis medication

For more information: Call: (585) 442-1980 or Email: research@aair.info AAIR Research Center, 300 Meridian Centre Suite 305 Rochester, NY 14618

Across town at the Baobab Cultural Center (728 University Ave., 563-2145), check out the work of Jim Pappas, Jack White, and Eddie Davis. Next door, Image City Photography Gallery (722 University Ave., 271-2540) will host “Light & Form, Time & Place” (pictured), the architectural, abstract, black-and-white photos of D. G. Adams. Just a bit down the road is collectible arttoy haven Plastic (34 Elton St., 563, 6348), where local artists Melissa Cantwell, Marta Filipek, Bryce Grantham, Bill Hand, Chuck Harrison, John Perry, and Bill Pifer will present a custom toy show entitled “The Lowbrow Art Project: Rochester Edition.” At the Hungerford Building (1115. E Main St.), many artists and groups will have their studios open for the public to view the work and speak with them. The Main Street Artists (Door 2, Suite 458, 233-5645) will feature work by Sandy Grana Kesel, among other member artists, at a 5-9 p.m. reception. In keeping with the tangle of fiber shows happening locally, Nazareth College Arts Center Gallery (4245 East Ave., naz.edu) will host “Sum of the Parts: Art Quilts by Pat Pauly,” with a 6-8 p.m. reception. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY Individuals and groups working in all media are welcome to submit proposals. Submit bio, resume, digital JPEG samples to GCC Art Department Office, Art Gallery Committee, Genesee Community College, One College Road, Batavia, NY 14020. The new gallery will be ready for exhibitions beginning in early 2011. For more info, email hsjones@genesee.edu. Call for Artists: 5th Annual Arts & Crafts Show/Sale. Charlotte-

Genesee Lighthouse Historical Society show/sale July 1617. For more information, call 621-6179 or visit geneseelighthouse.org. Call for Artists & Crafters for Go Art! Picnic in the Park. Deadline June 30 for July 4 event in Centennial Park, Batavia. For more information, call 3439313 or visit goart.org. Call for Artists: “Exposed! The Nude Self.” Deadline August continues on page 27 rochestercitynewspaper.com City 25


Theater For those seeking a musical that’s more modern in style than “Camelot,” the 1971 rock musical “Jesus Christ Superstar” already possesses a good-sized dose of the bombast for which Andrew Lloyd Webber either became a) famous or b) notorious. I’ll go with b. McKenna also brings back “Shakespeare’s Will,” which she first played in 2007. On

Seana McKenna in “Richard III,” now playing at the 2011 Stratford Shakespeare Festival. PHOTO BY ANDREW ECCLES

The principle of something-for-everyone 2011 Stratford Shakespeare Festival Through October 30 Stratford, Ontario, Canada Stratfordfestival.ca [ PREVIEW ] By MICHAEL LASSER

Maybe operating on the principle of something for everyone, the Stratford Shakespeare Festival provides enough variety in 2011 so that anyone who sees all 12 plays will come away excited by some and irritated by others. Not only by the smashes and flops that are part of any theatrical season, but by the choice of plays as well: four by Shakespeare, two musicals, another of the many Moliere productions over the years, a modern classic, a couple of new plays, and some star power thrown in for good measure. The four by Shakespeare range from one of his very best comedies, to two tragedies (including his goriest), to a comic romp that returns Sir John Falstaff to the stage for a memorable final appearance. The most innovative casting this summer is for Shakespeare’s historical tragedy, “Richard 26 City June 29 - july 5, 2011

III.” This one is especially worth seeing for

the gifted actor who plays Richard: it’s Seana McKenna, transforming the murderous hunchback into a “trouser role.” Even more violent than Richard is “Titus Andronicus,” a horrific tale of revenge unleashed. One of Shakespeare’s earliest plays and long considered a minor work, it has begun to intrigue audiences over the last decade and a half — based partly on Julie Taymor’s 1999 bloodsoaked movie adaptation, “Titus.” Stratford has mounted so many productions of the popular comedy “Twelfth Night” over the last two decades that it’s hard to justify another production — unless you run the box office. It sells tickets. Even though it’s one of Shakespeare’s most winning plays, I wonder how badly I need to see it every five years. Here we go again with the story of Viola, who, washed ashore in a foreign land after a shipwreck, dons male attire to serve — and fall in love with — lovesick Duke Orsino. What makes this new production worth seeing is the star power of Brian Dennehy as rambunctious, unruly Sir Toby Belch, matched in folly by Sir Andrew Aguecheek, played by the brilliant Stephen Ouimette. Ben Carlson takes on the always-intriguing task

of defining the character of Feste, sometimes played as a working-class clown. Although “Twelfth Night” with this cast could be memorable, Stratford is doing too much of this sort of thing: mounting a popular play, waiting a few years, and mounting it again with a new cast. I expect more productions of “Twelfth Night” than, say, the three parts of “Henry VI,” but with the whole range of theater to choose from, they fill too many slots with plays they have recently revived. So, aside from money, why in the world would Stratford do Frederick Loewe and Alan Jay Lerner’s “Camelot” even though the last production was in 1997? In the aftermath of “My Fair Lady,” when Loewe and Lerner tried to create a second great musical, they went as far afield as they could, to the court of King Arthur. But the wonder was missing. The result was a romance weighed down by a long, clunky book. The score has some marvelous songs, though, and director Gary Griffin has loaded the cast with such stalwarts as Brent Carver as Merlin and Geraint Wyn Davies as Arthur to try to keep things moving. Ticket sales aside, it remains to be seen if the production can overcome the show’s turgidity.

the eve of Shakespeare’s funeral, his widow, Anne Hathaway, thinks about their lives together and apart in this one-woman show by Vern Thiessen. After seeing the original production, I wrote that its dwelling on domestic matters would have little interest had the woman involved not been Shakespeare’s wife. For those interested in a play they haven’t seen recently, the ones to consider include “The Homecoming,” by 2005 Nobel Prize laureate Harold Pinter; Shakespeare’s comic romp “The Merry Wives of Windsor,” starring Wyn Davies again, along with Lucy Peacock and Tom McCamus; and John Mighton’s “The Little Years,” about a young woman in the 1950’s with an interest in physics and a brother who earns a reputation as a writer. I don’t know “The Little Years,” but it sounds interesting. I’m also eager to see the other two plays. The problems in Pinter’s play begin with Teddy’s return to London after living in America for six years. His arrival leads to a power struggle within the all-male household of father, uncle, and brothers. Meanwhile, the delectable chaos of “Merry Wives” derives in good measure from a Falstaff who is courting two wealthy women at the same time. When he sends the identical love letter to both of them, complications, as they say, ensue. In many of these plays, familiar worlds turn upside down; at the very least, common assumptions come apart — in “The Homecoming” as well as in Moliere’s “The Misanthrope” and Frank Galati’s dramatic adaptation of John Steinbeck’s novel, “The Grapes of Wrath.” In “The Misanthrope,” things go awry in a comic way when Alceste can’t keep his mouth shut, while in “The Grapes of Wrath,” the lives of ordinary people border on the tragic when the Great Depression shatters lives and one family, the Joads, fights to survive. As I read through the casts of these dozen plays, the same names recurred in important roles — McKenna, Carlson, Wyn-Davies, Ouimette, McCamus, but also Brian Bedford, Peter Donaldson, Martha Henry, Sara Topham, Mike Shara, and many more. Who knows how the productions will turn out, but an ensemble company that can pull off so many different kinds of plays in a single season is what defines a place like Stratford at its best.


Art Exhibits 27 for September 9-30 show. Visit shoefactoryarts.com for more information. Call for Musicians & Artists. Bread & Water Theatre’s Annual Music & Art Fair takes place August 13-14. Visit breadandwatertheatre.org. Call for Emerging Film- and Videomakers. Ongoing. Submit films and videos to the monthly Emerging Filmmakers Series at the Little Theatre. Films of maximum 30 minutes must have been produced in New York State in the last two years. For more information, email emergingfilmmakers@ yahoo.com. Central Library Offers Exhibit Opportunities for Artists at Lower Link Gallery. Space currently available free of charge. Applications available at libraryweb.org; call 4288051 for more information. Finger Lakes Riesling Festival Call for Vendors. Takes place August 13-14. For information and application, visit rieslingfestival.com Flying Squirrel Arts Festival Call Out. Takes place July 9, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. $25 table fee. Contact Dawn Zuppelli at 4157808 or artemiswill@gmail. com, or Shermeeka Mason at twilightsfriend1981@yahoo.com. Ganondagan State Historic Site First Ever Photo Contest for 2012 Calendar. For more information, visit ganondagan. org.contest.2012calendar.html Gibson Custom “Art of the SG” Design Contest. Deadline July 30. Pick up form and design template at House of Guitars (645 Titus Ave.). If chosen, your design will be built by Gibson and handed to you. Info 544-3500. Hilton Apple Fest Photo Contest. Deadline September 9. Submit apple themed photos for October festival. For more information, call 392-7773 or visit hiltonapplefest.org. The Shoe Factory Co-op is accepting submissions for 2011 August Art Exhibit: “6 x 6 FEET: Extra Large Art.” Submission deadline July 30. For information, visit shoefactoryarts.com.

Art Events DUE TO THE HOLIDAY, EVENTS MAY BE SUBJECT TO CHANGE. CHECK WITH VENUES PRIOR TO YOUR VISIT. [ Thursday, June 30 ] MAG Highlights Tour. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. 276-8900, mag.rochester.edu. 6:30 p.m. Included with gallery admission: $5-10. [ Friday, July 1 ] First Friday Citywide Gallery Night. Various. firstfridayrochester.org. 6-9 p.m. Free. [ Saturday, July 2 ] Re-Hatched Female Artist Showcase. Tango Cafe, 389 Gregory St. 271-4930,

RECREATION | ROCHESTER PARKOUR

Ever had one of those dreams where you’re running through an abandoned city, bounding over pavement, up concrete steps in three leaps, and from landing to landing in staircases? Maybe you’ve been watching too many spy flicks with intense chase scenes, or maybe your intuition is telling you to check out parkour. Also called freerunning, parkour is “the physical discipline of training to overcome any obstacle within one’s path by adapting one’s movements to the environment,” per the Rochester Parkour website. The practice is mighty useful for everyone from the balance-challenged to those who want to push the limits of what their bodies can do. Rochester Parkour has existed since 2006, and in April of this year opened the only gym in New York state dedicated to teaching parkour. You can take classes at the gym, or attend one of the group’s special events that involve a set course at the gym (121 Lincoln Ave.), such as this weekend’s “ninja warrior” event. On Saturday, July 2, at 5 p.m., participants will get two shots at running the course. Your goal is to complete the course as fast as possible with as few scratches (falls) as possible. Participants must RSVP to charles@rochesterparkour.com and pay $10, but the event is free to watch. For more information on this weekend’s event, the organization, or parkour in general, visit rochesterparkour.com. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY tangocafedance.com, localvisionaries.weebly.com. 7-10:30 p.m. $10-12. Music, poetry, visual art. [ Sunday, July 3 ] Fiberart International Exhibtion Tour. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. 276-8900, mag. rochester.edu. 1 p.m. Included with gallery admission: $5-10. [ Monday, July 4 ] GO ART! Picnic in the Park. Centennial Park, Batavia. 3439313, info@goart.org. 12-5 p.m. Free.

Comedy DUE TO THE HOLIDAY, EVENTS MAY BE SUBJECT TO CHANGE. CHECK WITH VENUES PRIOR TO YOUR VISIT.

[ Friday, July 1 ] Search Engine Improv Presents Monsssstrocity. The Space, 1115 E. Main, Suite 248. Contact@ searchengineimprov.com. 9-11 p.m. $8 online, $10 door. The Monsssstrocity is an all star collection of improvisers from across the city and beyond. [ Saturday, July 2 ] Village Idiots Improv Comedy “Director’s Cut.” Village Idiots Comedy Improv, 274 N Goodman St, VIP Studio D312. vip@improvVIP.com, improvVIP. com. 8 p.m. $8. [ Sunday, July 3 ] Comedy Open Mic. Boulder Coffee Co-South Wedge, 100 Alexander St. 454-7140, bouldercoffeeco.com. 8 p.m. Free.

[ Wednesday, June 29 ] Village Idiots Auditions. Village Idiots Comedy Improv, 274 N Goodman St, VIP Studio D312. vip@improvVIP.com, improvVIP. com. 7-8 p.m. Free.

[ Monday, July 4 ] Open Mic for Alternative Comedy. Boulder Coffee CoBrooks Landing, 955 Genesee St. 287-5282, bouldercoffeeco. com. 6:30 p.m. Free.

[ Thursday, June 30 ] Chet Wild’s Comedy Showcase. Comedy Club, 2235 Empire Blvd, Webster. 671-9080, thecomedyclub. us. 7:30 p.m. $9.

[ Wednesday, July 6 ] First Wednesdays Standup Comedy Open Mike. Writers & Books, 740 University Ave. 473-2590, wab.org. 7-9 p.m. continues on page 28 rochestercitynewspaper.com City 27


Comedy Free, $2 donation suggested for audience. [ Wednesday, July 6 ] The Second City Summer Spectacular. Geva Theatre Center, 75 Woodbury Blvd.. 232-4382, gevatheatre.org. 7:30 p.m. Tickets begin at $35. Continues through July 31.

Dance Events [ Thursday, June 30 ] Bill Evans Dance Company and Friends. Hartwell Dance Theater, Kenyon St., Brockport. 964-9196, billevansdance@hotmail.com. 7:30 p.m. $5-20.

Dance Participation [ Friday, July 1 ] Neutral Ground First Friday Dance. Green Lantern Inn, 1 East Church St, Fairport. Kathy Grenier 473-2588, neutralground@gmail.com. 8 p.m.-midnight. $7. [ Tuesday, July 5Saturday, July 9 ] Kestenberg Movement Profile Construction &Analysis (KMP-II). Kinections, 718 University Ave. 473-5050, kinectionsinfo@kinections. com. Call for hours. $650, register.

Festivals [ Saturday, July 2 ] Gates Summer Celebration. Gates Chili High School, 910 Wegman Rd., Gates. 4261670, gatesrecparks.org. 4:3010:30 p.m. Free admission.

Kids Events

Main St, Canandaigua. 3941381, jgoodemote@pls-net.org. 6-8 p.m. Free.

DUE TO THE HOLIDAY, EVENTS MAY BE SUBJECT TO CHANGE. CHECK WITH VENUES PRIOR TO YOUR VISIT. [ Wednesday, June 29 ] Red, White & Blue Tie-Dye for Teens. Penfield Public Library, 1098 Baird Rd, Penfield. 340-8720, penfieldlibrary.org. 7-8:30 p.m. Free, register. Grades 6-12. Bring a 100% cotton white T-shirt which has been pre-washed without using fabric softener or dryer sheets. Summer Reading Kickoff Ice Cream Social. Gates Public Library, 1605 Buffalo Rd, Gates. 247-6446. 7-8:30 p.m. Free. Teen Game Night. Henrietta Public Library, 455 Calkins Rd.. 359-7092. 6:30-8 p.m. Free. [ Thursday, June 30 ] Books N’ Brownies Book Discussion. Chili Library, 3333 Chili Ave. 889-2200. 4-5 p.m. Free. Grades 7-8. Boomerang Club in Concert. Penfield Public Library, 1098 Baird Rd, Penfield. 340-8720, penfieldlibrary.org. 11-11:45 a.m. Free, register. Cookie Decorating. Irondequoit Public Library-Pauline Evans Branch, 45 Cooper. 336-6062. 2 p.m. Free, register. Ages 6+. Movie: “How to Train Your Dragon.” Mead Square Park, Victor. victorny.org. 9 p.m. Free. Pajama Time Storytime. Brighton Memorial Library, 2300 Elmwood Ave. 784-5300, brightonlibrary.org. 7 p.m. Free. All ages with a caregiver. Storytime. Hamlin Public Library, 422 Clarkson Hamlin Town Line Rd, Hamlin. 9642320. 6:45 p.m. Free. 4-5 yr olds. Storytime for 4 & 5 Yr Olds. Parma Public Library, 7 West Ave, Hilton. 392-8350.

COMEDY | SECOND CITY SUMMER SPECTACULAR

Next week Geva kicks off its Sizzling Summer Series with a new comedy revue by Chicago’s popular sketch comedy troupe, The Second City. The show begins on Wednesday, July 6, at Geva Theater Center (75 Woodbury Blvd.), and continues through July 31. Founded in 1959, The Second City boasts an impressive alumni list, including Dan Aykroyd, John Candy, Bill Murray, Martin Short, George Wendt, Mike Myers, Bonnie Hunt, Tina Fey, Steve Carell, Gilda Radner, John Belushi, and more. Geva presented The Second City’s Roc-centric revue, “I’ll be Geneseeing You,” earlier this year. This month’s show, with “The Second City Summer Spectacular,” will feature more general subject matter, from the Oval Office to the bedroom, but with the added performances of local improvcomedy groups who will take the stage following The Second City’s show. The shows take place Wednesday through Friday at 7:30 p.m., Saturdays at 4 & 8:30 p.m., and Sundays at 4 p.m. (no show July 17). Tickets prices begin at $35 for the first week of the show. For more information, or to purchase tickets, call 232-4382, or visit gevatheatre.org. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY 10:30-11 a.m. Free. Siblings welcome. Summer Craft Series for Tweens. Gates Public Library, 1605 Buffalo Rd, Gates. 247-6446. 23 p.m. Free, register. Ages 8-13.

Tales for Tots. Barnes & Noble Webster, 1070 Ridge Rd, Webster. 872-9710. 10 a.m. Free. Ages 0-2. Teen Nite Summer Reading Kick-Off. Wood Library, 134 N

[ Friday, July 1 ] Cool Kids: America’s Birthday. Sagawa Park, Corners of Main & Erie St.s, Brockport. 6373984, generationcool.biz. 7-8 p.m. Free. Design Your Own Backpack. Parma Public Library, 7 West Ave, Hilton. 392-8350. 1 p.m. Free, register. Storytelling with Mike Miller. Barnes & Noble Greece, 330 Greece Ridge Center Dr. 2274020, barnesandnoble.com. 10:30 a.m. Free. Toddler Storytime with Miss Barbara. Lift Bridge Book Shop, 45 Main St, Brockport. 6372260, liftbridge.booksense. com. 10:30 a.m. Free. Includes songs, games, and stories. Wizard Rock Concert w/ The Whomping Willows. Henrietta Public Library, 455 Calkins Rd.. 359-7092. 6-8:30 p.m. Free. [ Saturday, July 2 ] Storytime. Borders, 1000 Hylan Dr. 292-5900. 11 a.m. Free. Tie-Dye Saturday. Wood Library, 134 N Main St, Canandaigua. 394-1381, jgoodemote@plsnet.org. 12-1:30 p.m. Free. Bring own t-shirt. [ Monday, July 4 ] Baby and Parent Yoga Class. CNY Healing Arts 2244 East Ave. 244-1280 x2, cnyhealingarts.com. Through Nov. 8 11 a.m.-noon, after Nov 8 11:45 a.m.-12:45 p.m. $9 with package or $14 for one class. Great Starts Storytime w/ Ann-Marie. Barnes & Noble Pittsford, 3349 Monroe Ave. 586-6020. 9:30 & 10:15 a.m. Free. All Ages. Storyhour. Gates Public Library, 1605 Buffalo Rd,

Gates. 247-6446. 10 a.m. Free. 3-5. 2-5 year olds. Wii Funday Monday. Phillis Wheatley Library, 33 Dr Samuel McCree Way. 428-8212. 2:30 p.m. Free. All ages. [ Tuesday, July 5 ] Family Movie: “Shrek.” Brighton Memorial Library, 2300 Elmwood Ave. 784-5300, brightonlibrary.org. 2 p.m. Free. July Craft Tuesdays. Irondequoit Public Library-Helen McGraw Branch, 2180 E Ridge Rd. 336-6060. Library hours. Free. Native American Tales with the Doll House Lady. Fairport Public Library, 1 Village Landing, Fairport. 223-9091, fairportlibrary.org. 10:30 a.m. Free, register. Ages 5+. Speak Japanese. Strong National Museum of Play, 1 Manhattan Sq.. 263-2700, museumofplay.org. 1-2 p.m. Included with museum admission $10-12. Teen Book Discussion. Parma Public Library, 7 West Ave, Hilton. 392-8350. 3:30-4:30 p.m. Free. Teen Cache Bash. 394-1381, jgoodemote@pls-net.org. 6-8 p.m. Free, register. Did you like The Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins? Answer trivia questions a whole new way by joining other teens in the high-tech outdoor activity of geocaching. Webster Storytime in the Park. Ridge Park, Webster. 8727075. 10:30-11 a.m. Free. [ Tuesday, July 5-Friday, July 8 ] Summer Drama Club. 3941381, jgoodemote@pls-net. org. 1-3 p.m. Free, register. Get ready for the Teen Theater auditions and just have fun by learning acting tips from Katie Michalko. Participants

EARLY DEADLINES

For the issue of July 6th, 2011

Display and classified-display ads and all editorial: 4pm Thursday, June 30th Classified line ads: Noon Friday, July 1st Offices will be closed on Monday, July 4th in observation of Independence Day FOR MORE INFORMATION OR TO PLACE AN AD CALL: 244-3329

28 City June 29 - july 5, 2011


will have a blast with acting exercises and games. Start Date: Tuesday July 5, 2011 End Date: Friday July 8, 2011. [ Wednesday, July 6 ] Book and Beast Zoo Storytime. Seneca Park Zoo, 2222 St Paul Blvd. senecaparkzoo. org. 11 a.m. Included in zoo admission: $4-7, free to kids under 2. Captive Lifeforms: Reptile Show. Brighton Memorial Library, 2300 Elmwood Ave. 784-5300, brightonlibrary.org. 10:3011:15 a.m. Free. Ages 3+. Early Bird Storytime with Mike Miller. Barnes & Noble Greece, 330 Greece Ridge Center Dr. 227-4020, barnesandnoble. com. 9:30 a.m. Free. All ages. Going Global: North American Craft. Henrietta Public Library, 455 Calkins Rd.. 359-7092. 2-3 p.m. Free. International Game Day. Irondequoit Public LibraryHelen McGraw Branch, 2180 E Ridge Rd. 336-6060. 3-4:30 p.m. Free, register. Jay Stetser, Storyteller/Musician. Pittsford Community Library, 24 State St, Pittsford. 248-6275. 2 p.m. Free. Magician Sky Sands. Ogden Library, 269 Ogden Center Rd., Spencerport. 617-6181. 11 a.m. Free, register. Pre-School Storytime w/Martha. Barnes & Noble Pittsford, 3349 Monroe Ave. 586-6020. 9:30 and 11 a.m. Free. All Ages.

Storyhour. Gates Public Library, 1605 Buffalo Rd, Gates. 247-6446. 10:15 a.m. Free. Ages 1-5. Storytime and Craft w/Mike. Barnes & Noble Greece, 330 Greece Ridge Center Dr. 2274020. 10:30 a.m. Free. All Ages. Stuck in the Middle Book Discussion Group. Wood Library, 134 N Main St, Canandaigua. 394-1381, jgoodemote@pls-net.org. 6:30 p.m. Free. For grades 7-8 only. Summer Reading Kickoff: The Magic of Mr. J. Rush Public Library, 5977 E. Henrietta Rd., Rush. 533-1370. 7 p.m. Free. Watch the World: Wednesday Afternoon at the Movies: “The Lion King.” Central Library, 115 South Ave. 428-8150, libraryweb.org. 2:30 p.m. Free. Ratatouille. You Are Here..India! Mendhi and “Bride & Prejudice.” Penfield Public Library, 1098 Baird Rd, Penfield. 340-8720, penfieldlibrary.org. 7-9 p.m. Free, register. Grades 6-12.

Lectures [ Wednesday, July 6 ] John A. Tiffany Talk and Fashion Show. Arts Council for Wyoming County, 31 Main St, Perry. 237-3517, artswyco. org. 7 p.m., fashion show follows. $8-10.

Literary Events DUE TO THE HOLIDAY, EVENTS MAY BE SUBJECT TO CHANGE. CHECK WITH VENUES PRIOR TO YOUR VISIT. [ Wednesday, June 29 ] Book Group: Graphic Novel Group: “Anya’s Ghost” by Vera Brosgol. Lift Bridge Book Shop, 45 Main St, Brockport. 637-2260, liftbridge.com. 7 p.m. Free. Book Group: Titles Over Tea: “The Unnamed” by Joshua Ferris. Barnes & Noble Greece, 330 Greece Ridge Center Dr. 227-4020, barnesandnoble. com. 7 p.m. Free. [ Thursday, June 30 ] Classics Book Group. Barnes & Noble Greece, 330 Greece Ridge Center Dr. 227-4020. 7 p.m. Free. Science Fiction Book Club. Lift Bridge Book Shop, 45 Main St, Brockport. 637-2260. 7 p.m. Free. Book Group: Classics: Shakespeare’s “Othello.” Barnes & Noble Greece, 330 Greece Ridge Center Dr. 2274020, barnesandnoble.com. 7 p.m. Free. Open Mic: Summer Kona: Pure Kona in the Summer. Flying Squirrel, 285 Clarissa St. flyingsquirrel.rocus.org. 8-11 p.m. Free. [ Friday, July 1 ] First Friday Readings & Performances. Writers & Books, 740 University Ave. 473-2590. 6-9 p.m. Free.

[ Tuesday, July 5 ] Poetry Reading: Rochester Poets: Reenah Golden’s 2011 Slam High Team featuring at the Free Speech Zone. Tango Cafe, 389 Gregory St. 260-9005, rochesterpoets@ gmail.com. 8 p.m. Free. [ Wednesday, July 6 ] Book Group: American Wars. Barnes & Noble Greece, 330 Greece Ridge Center Dr. 2274020. 7 p.m. Free.

Recreation DUE TO THE HOLIDAY, EVENTS MAY BE SUBJECT TO CHANGE. CHECK WITH VENUES PRIOR TO YOUR VISIT. [ Wednesday, June 29 ] Brooks & Brambles: Gibsonville Road to Perry Gate. Letchworth State Park, off Rt. 390, Castile. 493-3625. 10 a.m. Free. Perry entrance. Mud, prickers, poison ivy, stream crossings. Bring lunch, will car pool. 4 hours, 2 miles. Rochester Orienteering Club Adventure Race and Sprint. Basil Marella Park, 975 English Rd., Greece. 377-5650, roc. us.orienteering.org. 6 p.m. $6 per entry/group, register. [ Thursday, June 30 ] Mount Hope Cemetery Twilight Tour. Mount Hope Cemetery, 791 Mount Hope Ave. 4613494, fomh.org. 6:30 p.m. $5. Nearby Excursion to Rattlesnake Hill State Wildlife

Management Area. Letchworth State Park, off Rt. 390, Castile. 493-3625. 9:30 a.m. Free. Car pool from Visitor Center, bring lunch. 3 hours, 1 mile. [ Friday, July 1 ] Ghost Hunt with the Spirit Diggers. 459 Exchange St., Geneva. 329-1723. 9-11 p.m. $30, RSVP. [ Saturday, July 2 ] GVHC Hike: Tryon Park. Parking lot on Loudisa Dr. Alex 6633489, gvhchikes.org. 10 a.m. Free. Strenuous 4-5 mile hike. Ghost Hunt with the Spirit Diggers. 459 Exchange St., Geneva. 329-1723. 9-11 p.m. $30, RSVP. Mount Hope Cemetery Tour. Mount Hope Cemetery, 791 Mount Hope Ave. 461-3494, fomh.org. 1 p.m. Free. [ Sunday, July 3 ] GVHC Hike: Durand Park. Irondequoit Town Hall Lot, Titus Ave. Judi O. 303-2389, gvhchikes.org. 10 a.m. free. Moderate/hilly 6 mile hike. Isaiah House 9th Annual Golf Tournament. Shadow Lake Golf Course, 1850 Five Mile Rd., Penfiled. 232-5221. Registration 8:45 a.m., event 10 a.m. $95 includes breakfast, lunch and dinner, register. [ Tuesday, July 5 ] Nature Nights: Guided Bike Ride Marketview Heights and

Neighborhood of the Arts. Public Market, 280 N Union St. 428-5990, cityofrochester. gov. 6 p.m. Free. [ Wednesday, July 6 ] Bats! Sterling Nature Center, Off 104 East, Sterling. 315-9476143, snc@co.cayuga.ny.us. 8 p.m. Free.

Special Events DUE TO THE HOLIDAY, EVENTS MAY BE SUBJECT TO CHANGE. CHECK WITH VENUES PRIOR TO YOUR VISIT. [ Wednesday, June 29 ] 2011 Foodlink Farmers’ Market. Washington Square Park, 80 Woodbury Blvd. nsmalarz@foodlinkny.org. 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Free. Local farmers, bakers, and specialty food vendors. Adult Professional Studies: Information Meeting. Meridian Center, 400 Meridian Center Blvd., Suite 220. 594-6210. 6-7 p.m. Free. Cobblestone Gone Country. Cobblestone Arts Center, 1622 Route 332, Farmington and Eastview Mall. 398-0220, cobblestoneartscenter.org. 1 p.m. Free. Cobblestone School’s Walk Up Outdoor Theater. Cobblestone School, 10 Prince St. sterzart@hotmail. continues on page 30

rochestercitynewspaper.com City 29


Special Events com. Dusk (about 8 p.m.). Free. Kid Friendly Movie. Free Popcorn. Soda, water Available. Free Parking. RAPIER SLICES Open Mic. Venu Resto-Lounge, 151 St Paul St. 802-4660. 7:30-11 p.m. $3-5. 18+ with proper ID. Rochester Education FoundationBook Bash. Pomodoro Grill & Wine Bar, 1290 University Ave. 271-5790, info@ rochestereducation.org. 5:307:30 p.m. $20 or discouted price with new children’s book. Rochester Winos Tasting. Lento, 274 N Goodman St. 288-2277, rochesterwinos. com. 6:30 p.m. registration, 7 p.m. tasting. $30-35, registration required. Sales Boot Camp Part II: Write Winning Proposals & Presentations. St John Fisher College, 3690 East Ave.. 3309797, digitalrochester.com. 7:30-9:30 a.m. $15-$20, register. [ Thursday, June 30 ] “From Britain With Love” Indie Film Showcase: “Africa United.” Little Theatre, 240 East Ave. 285-0400, thelittle. org. 7 p.m. $8. Adult Professional Studies: Information Meeting. Roberts Wesleyan College [Chesbro Building] 7 College Greene

Dr. 594-6210, DAPS@ roberts.edu. 6-7 p.m. Free. Backyard BBQ. New York Wine & Culinary Center, 800 S Main St., Canandaigua. 394-7070, info@nywcc.com. 5:30-9 p.m. Ticket prices vary, call for info. Colonial Belle Dinner Boat Island Oasis Cruise. 400 Packett’s Landing, Fairport. 223-9470, colonialbelle.com. 7:30-9:30 p.m. $30, register. Geneseo Farmers’ Market. Lower Center St., Geneseo. geneseofarmersmarket@ gmail.com. 4-7 p.m. Free. Vendors selling fruit, vegetables, wine, meat, jams & jellies, syrups, granola, baked goods, flowers and more! Children’s activities and music as well. Information Sessions for New St. John Fisher Graduate Library Media Program. Barnes & Noble Pittsford, 3349 Monroe Ave. 385-8161, grad@sjfc.edu. 7-8:30 p.m. Free. Juneberry Jam and Watercress Soup. Hurd Orchards, Rt 104 W & Monroe-Orleans County Line Rd, Holley. 638-8838, hurdorchards.com. 12:30 p.m. $25-35, RSVP. Mangu Restaurant Grand Opening. Mangu, 1475 E Henrietta Rd. 424-2200. 12-6 p.m. Free. Dominican cuisine, live entertainment. South Wedge Farmers Market. Boulder Coffee Co-South Wedge, 100 Alexander St. info@swfarmersmarket.

30 City June 29 - july 5, 2011

org, swfarmersmarket.org. 4-7 p.m. Free. Fresh, local, and sustainably grown food, music, free shuttle. New EBT bonus program this year. Tapas at the MAG. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. 276-8900, mag. rochester.edu. 5-8 p.m. $4. Live music, wine & beer for purchase, tapas. [ Friday, July 1 ] Moonlight Stroll Concert Series. Sonnenberg Gardens & Mansion State Historic Park, 151 Charlotte St, Canandaigua. 394-4922, sonnenberg.org. 810 p.m. $4-9 admission, $3-5 carriage rides. Movie Night. The Living Room Cafe, 1118 Monroe Ave. 4130833. 8 p.m. Free. Movie Night. Rich’s Cafe, 839 West Ave. 235-7665, richscaferochester@gmail.com. 6 p.m. $5 donation suggested. We Are Change Rochester. Java’s Cafe, 16 Gibbs St. 469-2323, WeAreChangeRochesterNY.org. 7 p.m. Free. Wine Tastings. Wine Sense, 749 Park Ave. 271-0590. 5-7 p.m. Free. [ Saturday, July 2 ] “The Beatles in Laser Light.” Rochester Museum and Science Center, 657 East Ave. 271-1880, rmsc.org. 9:30 p.m. $9-10. Dollop Gourmet Cupcake Creation’s One Year

Anniversary! 1865 Penfield Rd., Penfield. info@ dollopgourmet.com. 11 a.m.6 p.m. Free. Garage Sale to Support Penfield Community Victory Garden. Penfield Community Victory Garden, 1747 Five Mile Line Rd. 340-8655, penfield.org. 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Cost of items. Penfield Independence Day. Harris-Whalen Park, Penfield. 340-8655, penfield.org. Parade 10 a.m., celebration, fireworks 6-10 p.m. Free admission. Saturday Evening Telescope Viewing. Rochester Museum and Science Center, 657 East Ave. 271-1880, rmsc.org. Dark until 10 p.m. Free. Weather permitting; call ahead. [ Sunday, July 3 ] 13th Annual Maafa: Day of Remembrance. Duran Eastman Park-Shoreline. Libra18722008@aol.com. 3-6 p.m. Free. Brighton Farmers’ Market. Brighton High School parking lot, 1150 Winton Road S., Rochester 14618. info@ brightonfarmersmarket.org. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Free. Rochester Civil Rights Front Meeting. Equal Grounds Coffee House, 750 South Ave. civilrightsfront.wordpress. com, rochestercrf@gmail. com. 5 p.m. Free. Grassroots organization for LGBT equality.

[ Sunday, July 3-Monday, July 4 ] Irondequoit 4th of July Celebration. Irondequoit Town Hall, 1280 Titus Ave. 3366070, irondequoit.org. 11 a.m.-11 p.m., Parade Mon 11 a.m. Free admission. [ Monday, July 4 ] 4th of July Fireworks Cruise. The Erie Canal at Schoen Place, Pittsford. 223-9470, colonialbelle.com. 7:30 p.m. lasts approx. 5 hours. $87 including meal, cruise, show. Brighton 4th of July Celebration. 700 Merridan Center Road. brightonjuly4.com. Parade 10 a.m., TBD. Great duck race raffle, more. Canandaigua 4th of July Celebration. Lakeshore Dr., Canandaigua. 396-0300, downtowncanandaigua.com. Parade 1:30 p.m. on Main Street, music and fireworks at Kershaw Park. Free admission. Fairport 4th of July Celebration. Perinton Park, Route 31F & O’Connor Rd., Fairport. 5869840, fairport.ny.us. Parade on Main Street 10 a.m., party in the park 12-4:30 p.m. Free admission. Fourth of July Celebration. Morgan-Manning House, 151 Main St, Brockport. 637-5300 x12, brockportny.org. 11 a.m.4 p.m. Free. Henrietta 4th of July Celebration. Henrietta Town

Park, 595 Calkins Rd. 3592540, henrietta.org. Craft & garage sale 9 a.m.-2 p.m. at Henrietta Senior Center, afternoon celebration at Veterans Memorial Park 4-10 p.m. Free admission. Independence Day. Genesee Country Village & Museum, 1410 Flint Hill Rd, Mumford. 5386822, gcv.org. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. $9-15, children under 4 free. July 4th Celebration & Fireworks. 123 East Main Street. 428-5990, cityofrochester.gov. 7:30-10:30 p.m. Free. Lovin Glee Club. Lovin’ Cup, Park Point @ RIT. 292-9940, lovincup.com. 8 p.m. Free. This is a competition focused on the art of a cappella. Trivia Night. The Old Toad, 277 Alexander St. theoldtoad.com. 9:30 p.m. Free. Trivia Night. 140 Alex, 140 Alexander St. 140alex.com. 9 p.m. Free. [ Tuesday, July 5 ] Film: “Rabbit Proof Fence.” Brighton Memorial Library, 2300 Elmwood Ave. 7845300, brightonlibrary.org. 7 p.m. Free. SuperCruise Car Night. Fair and Expo Center, 2695 East Henrietta Rd. 334-4000, fairandexpocenter. org. 5 p.m. Free. Westside Farmer’s Market. St. Monica Church 831 Genesee St. westsidemarketrochester@ gmail.com. 4-7:30 p.m. Free.


[ Wednesday, July 6 ] 2011 Foodlink Farmers’ Market. Washington Square Park, 80 Woodbury Blvd. nsmalarz@ foodlinkny.org. 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Free. Local farmers, bakers, and specialty food vendors. 22 Years with Liberty, the Bald Eagle with Paul Schnell. Braddock Bay Raptor Research, E. Manitou Rd., Greece. 267-5483, bbrr.org. 7 p.m. $3-5 suggested donation. Cobblestone School’s Walk Up Outdoor Theater. Cobblestone School, 10 Prince St. sterzart@ hotmail.com. Dusk (about 8 p.m.). Free. Kid Friendly Movie. Free Popcorn. Soda, water Available. Free Parking. Luncheon at the IACC. Italian American Community Center, 150 Frank Dimino Way. 5948882, iaccrochester.org. 121:30 p.m. $12-13 suggested donation, RSVP. RAPIER SLICES Open Mic. Venu Resto-Lounge, 151 St Paul St. 802-4660. 7:30-11 p.m. $3-5. 18+ with proper ID.

Sports DUE TO THE HOLIDAY, EVENTS MAY BE SUBJECT TO CHANGE. CHECK WITH VENUES PRIOR TO YOUR VISIT. [ Friday, July 1 ] Rochester Rhinos vs. Richmond Kickers. Sahlen’s Stadium, 460 Oak St. rhinossoccer.com. 7:30 p.m. $10-25. [ Saturday, July 2 ] Big Block Modified/Sportsman/ Stock Car/Pure Stock plus Midstate Vintage Stock Car Club. Canandaigua Motorsports Park, 2820 County Rte 10, Canandaigua. canandaiguamotorsportspark. com. 7 p.m. $12. Fireworks. [ Sunday, July 3 ] Rochester Rhinos vs. Orlando City. Sahlen’s Stadium, 460 Oak St. rhinossoccer.com. 7 p.m. $10-25. [ Monday, July 4-Tuesday, July 5 ] Rochester Red Wings vs. Pawtucket Red Sox. Frontier Field, 1 Morrie Silver Way. 454-1001, redwingsbaseball.com. 7:05 p.m. $6.50-11.50. [ Wednesday, July 6Friday, July 8 ] Rochester Red Wings vs. Lehigh Valley IronPigs. Frontier Field, 1 Morrie Silver Way. 454-1001, redwingsbaseball.com. 7:05 p.m. $6.50-11.50.

Theater 6 Guitars. Sat Jul 2 Continues Jul 9-10. Downstairs Cabaret Theatre, 20 Windsor St, Rochester, NY. 8 p.m. $21-$24. 325-4370, downstairscabaret. com. The Accidental Hero. Fri Jul 1-Jul 3. Downstairs Cabaret Theatre, 3450 Winton Place. Fri 8 p.m., Sat 3 & 8 p.m., Sun 3 p.m. $21-$24. 325-4370, downstairscabaret.com.

THEATER | SHAKESPEARE IN THE BOWL

Long before we had high-budget dramas played out on the silver (and smaller) screens, humanity had theatrical performances to help them reflect upon the crazy and creative ways that people manipulate and mistreat each other. William Shakespeare’s perception and wit about human folly is captured in his works, which will likely forever be respected and performed. The Bard’s popular tragedy “Othello” deals with ambition, jealousy, revenge, doomed love built on the shaky foundations of hero-worship and vanity, and cunning manipulation. The interracial relationship between the title character and a senator’s daughter was shockingly modern for a play written in 1603. The Shakespeare Players, a program of the Rochester Community Players, will present “Othello” as its 15th annual free Shakespeare program at the Highland Bowl (1200 South Ave.). The production is directed by Stephanie Roosa and produced by Patrick White, with co-sponsorship by the Monroe County Parks Department. The all-local cast consists of Jonathan Ntheketha as Othello, Jeffrey Jones as Iago, and Samantha Mehnert in the role of Desdemona. Twelve performances will take place July 1-July 16, each Friday through Sunday, Tuesday and Wednesday, at 8 p.m. All performances are free, though donations are requested. Bring a lawn chair or blanket, and insect repellent is strongly recommended. Light refreshments and beverages will be sold on site. For more information about the group and performances, call 261-6461 or visit rochestercommunityplayers.org. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY “A Coupla White Chicks Sitting Around Talking.” Thu Jun 29-Jul 3. Bristol Valley Theater, 151 S Main St, Naples. Wed 2 p.m., Thu 2 & 8 p.m., Fri-Sat 8 p.m., Sun 2 p.m. $12-$32. 374-9032, bvtnaples.org. “Defending the Caveman.” Ongoing. Downstairs Cabaret Theatre, 20 Windsor St, Rochester. Thu 7 p.m., Fri 8 p.m., Sat 5 & 8:30 p.m. $29-$36. 325-4370, downstairscabaret.com. An Evening of Song, Dance & Comedy Featuring the Traveling Cabaret. Thu Jun 30. Irondequoit Farmers’ Market, Gazebo, 1280 Titus Ave. 6:30 p.m. Free. 3366070. Bring lawn chairs. “Othello.” Fri Jul 1-3 & Jul 5-6, continues through Jul 16. Rochester Community Players, Inc. Highland Bowl, 1200 South Ave. Fri-Sun and Tue-Wed 8 p.m. Free, donations requested. 261-6461, rochestercommunityplayers.org. “Superman Drinks.” Thu Jun 30-Jul 2. Downstairs Cabaret Theatre 2, 172 W Main St.

Thu 7 p.m., Fri 8 a.m., Sun 5 p.m. $21-$24. 325-4370, downstairscabaret.com.

Theater Auditions [ Through Thursday, June 30 ] Everyone’s Theatre Company Open Call for Directors for Evening of One Acts. Send applications to: info@everyonestheatre.com. Include name of the play and letter of intent. Performance dates are October 15-16, audition date August 29. [ Through Friday, August 19 ] Geneva Theatre Guild Seeks Proposals for 2012 Season. Send proposals to GTG, PO Box 424, Geneva, NY 14456 or ebsterns@ rochester.rr.com. Find specifics online: gtglive.org. [ Ongoing ] The Second City Summer Spectacular. Geva is looking

for individuals in improv and improv groups to be part of The Second City Summer Spectacular (July 6-31). To be considered, visit Geva’s Facebook page (facebook. com/gevatheatrecenter) and post that you want to play with The Second City. An album will be created on Geva’s Facebook page with photos of those interested in being considered (post a funny photo on Geva’s Facebook newsfeed to be used; otherwise, your current Facebook profile pic will be used). In order to win this opportunity, groups and individuals must generate “likes” of their photo. Five groups and five individuals will be chosen to perform on select dates. Winners will watch the show and be brought backstage following the curtain call. For more info, visit gevatheatre.org.

Workshops DUE TO THE HOLIDAY, EVENTS MAY BE SUBJECT TO CHANGE. CHECK WITH VENUES PRIOR TO YOUR VISIT. [ Wednesday, June 29 ] Cookbook Club: “WilliamsSonoma Grill Master Cookbook.” Williams-Sonoma, Eastview Mall, 7979 Pittsford Victor Rd., Victor. 223-1660. 6:30-8:30 p.m. $75 includes dinner, class, cookbook. Register. Opposites Attract Wine Pairing Dinner. New York Wine & Culinary Center, 800 S Main St., Canandaigua. 394-7070, nywcc. com. 7-9 p.m. $65, register. Producers’ Workshop: The Basics of Putting Your Videos Online and Creating a Free Website Using Wordpress. RCTV-15, 21 Gorham St. 3251238. 6-8 p.m. Free, potluck. [ Thursday, June 30 ] AAA 6 hour Driving Improvement Course. Finger Lakes Community College, Room D214, 3325 Marvin Sand Dr., Canandaigua. 394-4400. 6:309:30 p.m. $40, registration required. Memoirs from the Stage: “Making a Play from Your Life.” Genesee Center for the Arts, SUNY Geneseo, 1 College Circle Dr., Geneseo. 345-6868. bestcenter@genesee.edu. 10 a.m.-noon. $150, register by 6/17.

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[ Tuesday, July 5 ] Spanish Night. Books Etc, 78 W Main St, Rt 31, Macedon. 4744116, books_etc@yahoo.com. 7-9 p.m. Free. Writing: A Way Through Grief. Lifetime Care, 3111 S. Winton Rd. 475-8800, lifetimecare.org. 7-8:30 p.m. $5 donation, register. Bereavement support journaling.

197 PARK AVENUE 442-4293 WWW.HOGANSHIDEAWAY.COM rochestercitynewspaper.com City 31


Film Times Fri July 1 – Thu July 7 Schedules change often. Call theaters or visit rochestercitynewspaper.com for updates. DUE TO THE HOLIDAY, SOME THEATERS MAY BE CLOSED. PLEASE CALL AHEAD TO BE CERTAIN THAT FILMS ARE SCREENING.

Film

Brockport Strand 637-3310 89 Main St, Brockport CARS 2: 1, 4, 7, 9:10; GREEN LANTERN: 8:45; MR. POPPERS PENGUINS: 1, 3, 5, 7; TRANSFORMERS: DARK OF THE MOON: 1, 4, 7, 9:45.

Canandaigua Theatres 396-0110 Wal-Mart Plaza, Canandaigua CARS 2: 2, 5, 8; GREEN LANTERN: 1:15, 4, 7:10; HANGOVER 2: 9:15; JUDY MOODY & THE NOT BUMMER SUMMER: 1, 2:45; LARRY CROWNE: 1, 3, 5, 7, 9; MONTE CARLO: 1, 3:05, 5:10, 7:15, 9:20; MR. POPPERS PENGUINS: 1, 3, 5, 7; PIRATES OF THE CARIBBEAN: ON STRANGER TIDES: 9; SUPER 8: 1:15, 4, 7:10; 9:30; TRANSFORMERS: DARK OF THE MOON (3D): 1, 4, 7, 9:45.

Cinema Theater 271-1785 957 S. Clinton St. CAVE OF FORGOTTON DREAMS: 7 (no Mon); EVERYTHING MUST GO: Sat-Sun 4:45; THERE BE DRAGONS: 8:30 (no Mon).

Culver Ridge 16 544-1140 2255 Ridge Rd E, Irondequoit  BAD TEACHER: 11:45 a.m., 2:05, 4:20, 7:35, 10:20; BRIDESMAIDS: 1:15, 4:05, 6:55, 10:15; CARS 2: 11:30 a.m., 2:15, 3:35, 5, 7:55, 9:20, 10:30; also in 3D 11 a.m., 1:45, 4:30, 7:10, 10; GREEN LANTERN: 11:05 a.m., 2, 4:35, 7:20, 9:55; also in 3D 11:40 a.m., 2:30, 5:05, 7:50, 10:25; HANGOVER 2: 7:25, 9:50; KUNG FU PANDA 2: 11:20 a.m., 2:10, 4:55; LARRY CROWNE: 11:25 a.m., 1:55, 4:25, 7:05, 9:40; MR. POPPERS PENGUINS: 11:50 continues on page 34

Terrence Malick and the universe [ REVIEW ] by George Grella

the other a kind of Western. He followed those successes with a couple of overpraised failures, the romanticized adaptation of James Jones’s gritty “The Tree of Life” war novel “The Thin Red Line” in 1998, and the (PG-13), written and directed by story of John Smith and Pocahontas, “The New Terrence Malick World,” in 2005. Now playing And that’s it: four movies over four decades, each seemingly longer and more lavish than its Terrence Malick occupies a special place in predecessor, and each generally pleasing the more contemporary cinema, attracting the sort of intellectually inclined critics with its grandeur high-minded praise customarily accorded to and pretension. Now his fifth film, the eagerly masters of his or any other art. He initially anticipated “Tree of Life,” quite accurately established his reputation as a brilliant filmmaker constitutes an epitome of his whole career, possessing a highly individual narrative sense and reflecting and repeating most of his now-familiar a stunning visual style, with two outstanding themes and techniques. The content and style pictures, “Badlands” (1973) and “Days of of “The Tree of Life” underline the director’s Heaven” (1978), one an unusual crime movie, self-absorption, his interest in what I am sure he regards as Deep Thoughts, and a confusion of narrative methods that, alas, recalls the bogus artiness of David Lynch. The picture employs a strange combination of visual and verbal narrative, with a sporadic voiceover, usually mumbled Brad Pitt and Zach Irsik in “The Tree of Life.” PHOTO COURTESY fox searchlight pictures

PLAYING THIS WEEK

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almost unintelligibly, commenting on the action. It uses its ostensible subject, the O’Brien family, in 1950’s Texas, for excursions into other areas — oh, simple, humdrum matters like time, space, and the cosmos, punctuating it all with whispered utterances about loss, grief, and life. Brad Pitt plays the father, a bitter man who once dreamed of a musical career and out of his frustration treats his sons, especially the oldest, Jack (Hunter McCracken), with a peculiar alternation of brutality and kindness. His wife, played by Jessica Chastain, attempts to protect the boys from their father’s capricious tyranny, which pretty much sums up the central conflict of the plot. To show her relationship with the boys, the camera constantly focuses on her suffering face in long, tight close-ups, often filming her play with her sons from some odd placement at shoulder height, one of many examples of a repetitive artiness. Apparently unable to fill up the movie with that small story, Malick keeps adding confusing and irrelevant content, moving impressionistically back and forth in time to show many repeated moments of Pitt’s behavior and the reactions of the mother and sons. He also jumps forward to show the grown Jack (Sean Penn), an architect, moping around his spacious office in a grand glass tower of a building. Apparently still mourning the death of one of his brothers — the source of the grief in the film — he


Class struggle [ REVIEW ] BY DAYNA PAPALEO

“Bad Teacher” (R), directed by Jake Kasdan Now playing

“Cave of Forgotten Dreams 3D” (G), directed by Werner Herzog Now playing

wanders through a dream landscape that now and then turns into a surrealist painting. Beyond all that Malick frequently interrupts the tedious narrative to deal with some much more bizarre subjects. In a long silent sequence he shows something apparently intended to depict the origin of the universe, then proceeds through some of the early stages of evolution, complete with dinosaurs. The whole thing looks like a lyrical version of a National Geographic documentary combined with the portentousness of “2001: A Space Odyssey,” and a brief visit to “Jurassic Park.” In much of his previous work Malick often focuses intently on some small object or action — a leaf dripping water, blades of grass blowing in the wind, a curtain billowing through a window — creating a symbolism without signification. He continues the practice in “The Tree of Life,” repeatedly dwelling on bits and pieces of nature in the many interruptions of the drab realism of the O’Brien family’s life. To maintain some interest in the story he shoots the people from all sorts of odd and meaningless angles, with a particular fondness for filming the actors from behind, as if we were peeking over their shoulders into their lives. The movie begins with a quotation from the Book of Job, providing a useful warning that the director hopes to examine the mystery and meaning of life’s tragedies. Unfortunately, “The Tree of Life” bores its audiences long before it reaches its pat, sentimental, and utterly false solution.

Bold are the writers willing to make their central character, the person with whom their audience is ostensibly meant to empathize, a selfish, amoral crotch like Elizabeth Halsey from “Bad Teacher.” Stuffing that nasty soul into the arguably flawless body of Cameron Diaz is another brash move, one that could potentially alienate the fairer, ticket-buying sex, who typically prefer that their hot women at least be nice human beings. But this is Hollywood, so we know that no matter how awful a protagonist is, they’re approximately an hour and 40 minutes away from redemption. Also, this is Diaz, who, genetic jackpot notwithstanding, really does seem like a cool chick, and definitely someone who deserves better than the crude, lazy, and — perhaps worst of all — unfunny misogyny of “Bad Teacher.”

Cameron Diaz, Jason Segel, and Justin Timberlake in “Bad Teacher.” PHOTO

COURTESY COLUMBIA PICTURES

When we first meet Diaz’s Elizabeth, she’s bidding an insincere farewell to her fellow teachers at John Adams Middle School on the eve of her wedding, only to arrive home to a wealthy fiancé who dumps the aspiring trophy wife without warning. So she skulks back to JAMS, where her lesson plan consists of parking the students in front of inspirational-educator movies like “Stand and Deliver” and “Dangerous Minds” while she nips from a tiny bottle or naps off a hangover after a night spent gold-digging. Elizabeth’s ultimate goal of breast implants is galvanized upon meeting nerdy-cute sub Scott Delacorte (Justin Timberlake), heir to a wristwatch fortune. But she needs 10 large for new boobs, because, as her mousy co-worker Lynn (scene-stealer Phyllis Smith, “The Office”) observes, “You gotta get two of ‘em.” So cue various get-rich-quick schemes, from a car wash worthy of a Whitesnake video to standardized-test cheating, as Elizabeth’s frenemy Amy Squirrel (British actress Lucy Punch, “You Will Meet A Tall Dark Stranger”) looks on with a mix of professional indignation and personal jealousy. “Bad Teacher” then consists of escalating one-upmanship between Elizabeth and Amy, with a couple of lame subplots designed to show Elizabeth the error of her profane, self-serving ways. Now, what this means, of course, is that we’re somehow supposed to root for the carelessly mean Elizabeth to prevail over Amy, a cheerful kook whose only crime seems to be that she honestly respects both kids and justice. But screenwriters Gene Stupnitsky and Lee Eisenberg (the atrocious “Year One”) take way too long to endear Elizabeth to us, and by then it’s way too late. R-rated studio comedies headlined by women are very rare; coming this soon on the heels of the refreshingly raunchy “Bridemaids,” the (inadvertent pun alert!) broad-based caricatures of “Bad Teacher” feel like a small step backwards off a big

cliff. Yeah, it’s obvious that director Jake Kasdan (“Walk Hard”) was going for an unapologetic “Bad Santa” vibe, but it takes a little truth, not simply cuss words and a rampant id, to earn that third-act absolution. Shame, too, because the cast is aces: Diaz, a reliably go-for-broke comedian, does what she can with her thanklessly written part, as do the hilarious Punch and the slightly skeevy Timberlake. The best part is the deadpan Jason Segel as Russell, the gym teacher; he actually represents us, appreciating the obvious brains that enable Elizabeth to be so crafty and wishing she’d grow up already. There aren’t many directors who move

with such ease between the documentary and narrative genres, which is why most film fans are on board with whatever Werner Herzog does. The latest from the prolific German filmmaker takes us deep into the Chauvet cave of Southern France to allow us a glimpse of Paleolithic drawings, astonishingly well-preserved for being 30,000 years old. And Herzog makes excellent use of 3D, the technology getting the stalagmites to pop and conveying how these ancient artists used the undulating walls to bring their depictions of horses, rhinos, lions, and woolly mammoths to life. Balanced with scientific facts about the Chauvet cave drawings and their creators are sweetly weird ruminations from Herzog, who narrates in his typical pensive but crabby way, blindsiding the scientist interviewees with abstract questions like “Did they cry at night?” So expect a cryptic denouement involving albino crocodiles, as well as a funereal cello score, which, in concert with the hypnotic images, could lull you to sleep. But just power through, because the interior of the Chauvet cave is something you will likely never see in person. Few things can connect us to an unknowable ancestor more than art for art’s sake.

Photo courtesy Photofest

Photo courtesy Photofest

CADDYSHACK

Friday, July 1, 8 p.m.; Sunday, July 3 at 4 p.m. Snobs vs. Slobs! Bill Murray chases gophers, Chevy Chase drinks and cracks wise, and Rodney Dangerfield gets Ted Knight's goat in Harold Ramis's classic golf course comedy. How many lines can you quote? (Harold Ramis, US 1980, 98 min.)

BREAKIN’ Movies for movie lovers, 6 nights a week. Back to Back to the ’80s

Saturday, July 2, 8 p.m; Sunday, July, 3 at 7 p.m. Poppin’, lockin’, cross-cultural love a la West Side Story, and Ice-T! Classically trained dancer Kelly (Lucinda Dickey) befriends Ozone and Turbo (legendary breakdancers Adolfo Quinones and Michael Chambers), and these misfits take the establishment by storm when they join forces to enter a dance contest. (Joel Silberg, US 1984, 90 min.)

Back to Back to the ’80s

Film Info: 271-4090 l 900 East Avenue l Eastman House Café—stop in for a light dinner or dessert before the film. l Wi-Fi Hotspot l Sponsored by rochestercitynewspaper.com City 33


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a.m., 2:25, 4:40, 7, 9:15; MONTE CARLO: 11:10 a.m., 1:40, 4:15, 6:50, 9:45; SUPER 8: 11:15 a.m., 1:50, 4:45, 7:30, 10:10; TRANSFORMERS: DARK OF THE MOON: 12:05, 12:35, 3:25, 6:45, 7:15, 10:05; also in 3D 11:35 a.m., 1:05, 2:55, 3:55, 4:25, 6:15, 8, 9:35, 10:35.

RENT ON

RAINY AFTERNOON MOVIE REVIEWS

rochestercitynewspaper.com /entertainment/movies/

425-0420 Eastview Mall, Victor BAD TEACHER: 11 a.m., 1:20, 4:10, 7:20, 9:40; CARS 2: 10:45 a.m., 11:45 a.m., 1:30, 2:30, 4:15, 5:15, 7, 8, 9:45, 10:45; also in 3D 11:15 a.m., 2, 4:45, 7:30; GREEN LANTERN: 11:10 a.m., 1:50, 7:40; also in 3D 4:40, 10:20; LARRY CROWNE: 10:50 a.m., 1:35, 4:35, 7:05, 9:55; MR. POPPERS PENGUINS: 10:55 a.m., 1:15, 4:05, 7:25, 10:10; MONTE CARLO: 11:05 a.m., 1:40, 4:20, 7:10, 9:50; PIRATES OF THE CARIBBEAN: ON STRANGER TIDES (3D): 10:15; SUPER 8: 12:45, 3:45, 6:55, 9:30; TRANSFORMERS: DARK OF THE MOON: 12:05, 12:35, 3:25, 6:45, 7:15, 10:05; also in 3D 11:35 a.m., 1:05, 2:55, 3:55, 4:25, 6:15, 7:45, 9:35, 10:35.

Geneseo Theatres 243-2691 Geneseo Square Mall BAD TEACHER: 1:10, 3:10, 5:10, 7:10, 9:10; CARS 2: 1, 4, 7, 9:10; GREEN LANTERN:

Film Previews Full film reviews available at rochestercitynewspaper.com. [ OPENING ] BREAKIN’ (1984): One of the first hip-hop flicks — as well as the movie debut of Ice-T! — tells the tale of a young jazz dancer who teams up with a pair of breakdancers for a contest. Dryden (Sat, July 2, 8 p.m., and Sun, July 3, 7 p.m.) BUCK (PG): This documentary tells the true story of Buck Brannaman, who overcame an abusive childhood to find his calling in horsemanship; he’s one of the inspirations for Nicholas Evans’ fiction bestseller “The Horse Whisperer.” Little CADDYSHACK (1980): Directed by Harold Ramis, this comedy classic chronicles the age-old conflict between the snobs and the slobs through the goings-on at a ritzy country club. With Chevy Chase, Bill Murray, and the late, great Rodney Dangerfield. Dryden 34 City June 29 - july 5, 2011

1:15, 4, 7:10; 9:25; LARRY CROWNE: 1, 3, 5, 7, 9; MR. POPPERS PENGUINS: 1, 3, 5, 7, 9; TRANSFORMERS: DARK OF THE MOON: 1, 4, 7, 9:45.

Greece Ridge 12 225-5810 176 Greece Ridge Center Dr. BAD TEACHER: 12:15, 2:40, 5:20, 7:40, 10:05; CARS 2: 11:45 a.m., 2:30, 5:15, 8, 10:40; also in 3D 11:15 a.m., 2, 4:45, 7:30, 10:10; GREEN LANTERN: 2:20, 7:45; also in 3D 11:25 a.m., 11:35 a.m., 4:55, 10:25; LARRY CROWNE: 12:05, 2:35, 5, 7:35, 10; MR POPPERS PENGUINS: 11:50 a.m., 2:15, 4:35, 7:10, 9:35; MONTE CARLO: 11:30 a.m., 2:05, 4:40, 7:15, 9:50; SUPER 8: 11:40 a.m., 2:25, 5:05, 7:55, 10:30; TRANSFORMERS: DARK OF THE MOON: 11:25 a.m., 12:25, 3:55, 6:20, 7:20, 10:45; also in 3D 11:55 a.m., 12:55, 2:50, 3:20, 4:25, 6:50, 7:50, 9:45, 10:15.

The Little 258-0400 240 East Ave.  360/365 SHORTS: Wed 6:30; BUCK: 6:40, 8:50; also Sat-Sun 12:40, 2:50; THE DRY LAND: Tue 9:10; FIRST GRADER: 6:50, 9; also Sat-Sun 12:10, 2:20; HONOR IN THE VALLEY OF TEARS: Tue 7; MIDNIGHT IN PARIS: 7:10, 9:20; also Sat-Sun 12:30, 2:40; THIRD STAR: Thu 7; TREE OF LIFE: 6:30, 9:30; also Sat-Sun 12, 3; WINTER IN WARTIME: 7, 9:10; also Sat-Sun 12:20, 2:30.

Movies 10 292-5840 2613 W. Henrietta Rd. FAST FIVE: 11:55 a.m., 2:45, 5:35, 8:25; HOODWINKED, TOO! (3D): 11:20 a.m., 1:25, 3:30, 5:40, 7:50, 9:55; LIMITLESS: 11:35 a.m., 2:35, 5:05, 7:40, 10:10; LINCOLN LAWYER: 2:40, (Fri, July 1, 8 p.m., and Sun, July 3, 4 p.m.) LARRY CROWNE (PG-13): In director Tom Hanks’ second feature, 15 years after “That Thing You Do!”, he stars as a middle-aged man who returns to school and develops a crush on Julia Roberts’ similarly unfocused teacher. Canandaigua, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece, Pittsford MONTE CARLO (PG): “The Family Stone” director Thomas Bezucha returns with this baby chick flick about three young women whose Paris vacation is derailed to Monte Carlo when one of them is mistaken for royalty. With Selena Gomez, Leighton Meester, and Katie Cassidy. Canandaigua, Eastview, Greece, Webster LIMELIGHT (1952): Charles Chaplin wrote, directed, and stars in this nostalgic period drama about an aging comedian trying to find meaning and purpose in his fading dance-hall milieu. Look for a cameo by fellow legend Buster Keaton. Dryden (Thu, June 30, 8 p.m.)

8; PRIEST: 11:45 a.m., 1:55, 4:05, 7:10, 9:25; RIO: 12:10, 2:30, 4:55, 7:15, 9:35; also in 3D 12:05, 2:50, 5:15, 7:35, 10; SOMETHING BORRORED: 11:40 a.m., 4:50, 10:05; SOUL SURFER: 11:30 a.m., 2:05, 4:35, 7:05, 9:35; SOURCE CODE: 2:15, 7:25; TYLER PERRY’S MADEA’S BIG HAPPY FAMILY: 12, 2:30, 5, 7:30, 10:15; WATER FOR ELEPHANTS: 11:25 a.m., 5:20.

Pittsford Cinema 383-1310 3349 Monroe Ave. BAD TEACHER: 1, 3:10, 5:30, 7:40, 9:50; CARS 2 (3D): 11:40 a.m., 2:10, 4:40, 7:10, 9:40; GREEN LANTERN (3D): 12:50; LARRY CROWNE: 12:10, 2:40, 5:10, 7:30, 9:55; MIDNIGHT IN PARIS: 12:20, 2:30, 4:40, 7, 9:15; SUPER 8: 11:50 a.m., 2:20, 4:45, 7:20; 9:45; TRANSFORMERS 3D: DARK OF THE MOON: 12, 1:40, 3:20, 5, 6:40, 8:20, 10; TREE OF LIFE: 1:50, 3:30, 4:50, 6:30, 8, 9:30.

Webster 12 888-262-4386 2190 Empire Blvd. BAD TEACHER: 10:45 a.m., 1, 3:15, 5:55, 8:30, 11; BRIDESMAIDS: 2:40, 7:50; CARS 2: 9 a.m., 11:30am, 2, 4:30, 7:15, 10; also in 3D 9:45 a.m., 12:15, 3, 5:45, 8:15, 10:50; GREEN LANTERN: 10:15 a.m., 12:50, 3:30, 7:05, 9:30; HANGOVER 2: 12, 5:30, 10:40; MIDNIGHT IN PARIS: 10:30 a.m., 12:40, 2:50, 5, 7:10, 9:15; MR. POPPERS PENGUINS: 9:30 a.m., 11:50 a.m., 2:30, 4:50, 7:25, 9:50; MONTE CARLO: 11 a.m., 1:30, 4:05, 7:30, 10:10; SUPER 8: 11:40 a.m., 2:15, 5:15, 7:40, 10:30; TRANSFORMERS: DARK OF THE MOON: 9:15 a.m., 12:30, 3:45, 7, 10:20; also in 3D 10:10 a.m., 1:30, 4:40, 8, 11:15, 12:01 a.m.. OFFSIDE (2006): Imprisoned filmmaker Jafar Panahi takes a deceptively lighthearted approach to the serious subject of Iran’s patriarchal society through the story of a group of feisty girls trying to sneak into a typically men-only soccer game. Dryden (Wed, June 29, 8 p.m.) TRANSFORMERS: DARK OF THE MOON (PG-13): Hopefully there’s more than meets the eye in Michael Bay’s third chapter of the battle for whatever among some robots and some other robots and a bunch of people. Starring Shia LaBoeuf, Josh Duhamel, and John Turturro. Brockport, Canandaigua, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece, Pittsford, Webster [ CONTINUING ] BRIDESMAIDS (R): Kristen Wiig co-wrote the script for this “Hangover”-esque comedy in which she stars as a woman tapped to be her best friend’s maid of honor, despite the fact her own life is in shambles. With Maya Rudolph, Melissa


McCarthy, and the late Jill Clayburgh. Webster CARS 2 (G): Your annual gift from Pixar Animation puts Lightning McQueen and his faithful pit boss Mater in Europe to compete in the World Grand Prix and, of course, get mixed up in a spy adventure. Featuring the voices of Owen Wilson, Michael Caine, and John Turturro. Brockport, Canandaigua, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece, Pittsford CAVE OF FORGOTTEN DREAMS (NR): The latest from legendary auteur Werner Herzog is a documentary shot in the Chauvet caves of Southern France, where he captures the oldest known artwork by humans in its natural setting. Cinema

EVERYTHING MUST GO (R): Will Ferrell and Rebecca Hall star in the first film from writer-director Dan Rush, a comedy-drama adapted from a short story by Raymond Carver about a newly unemployed alcoholic who begins living on his front lawn after his wife throws him out. Cinema THE FIRST GRADER (G): The audience favorite from the most recent 360 | 365 Film Festival is based on the true story of octogenarian Kimani Maruge, a former Masai warrior who fights for his right to go to school for the first time and get the education he could never afford. Little GREEN LANTERN (PG-13): Ryan Reynolds stars as test pilot Hal Jordan, who becomes a DC

Comics superhero when he is granted a mystical green ring that gives him otherworldly powers. With Blake Lively, Peter Sarsgaard, and Mark Strong. Brockport, Canandaigua, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece, Pittsford, Webster THE HANGOVER PART II (R): Bradley Cooper, Zach Galifianakis, and Ed Helms reassemble the Wolf Pack for this sequel, one which finds them waking up in Bangkok and having to piece together the previous evening in order to find Stu’s missing brotherin-law. Canandaigua, Webster MEEK’S CUTOFF (PG): Filmmaker Kelly Reichardt’s follow-up to the acclaimed “Wendy and Lucy” is a neo-Western that reunites her with Michelle Williams for a meditative

drama about a group of pioneers stranded in the Oregon desert. With Bruce Greenwood and Paul Dano. Little MIDNIGHT IN PARIS (PG-13): Time for your yearly Woody Allen film; this one, set in the City of Light, is a time-hopping ensemble comedy about the dueling illusions of love and art starring Owen Wilson, Rachel McAdams, Marion Cotillard, and Kathy Bates as Gertrude Stein. Little, Pittsford, Webster MR. POPPERS’ PENGUINS (PG): This family film stars Jim Carrey as a businessman who inherits six penguins and learns about the important things as his professional life suffers. Also starring Carla Gugino,

Jeffrey Tambor, and Angela freaking Lansbury. Brockport, Canandaigua, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece, Webster PIRATES OF THE CARIBBEAN: ON STRANGER TIDES (PG-13): Johnny Depp is back as the heroic and hedonistic Captain Jack Sparrow, this time on a hunt to find the Fountain of Youth. With Penélope Cruz, Ian McShane, Keith Richards, and, of course, Geoffrey Rush. Canandaigua, Eastview SUPER 8 (PG-13): Writer-director J.J. Abrams has kept a pretty secretive wrap on his latest, a 70’s-set sci-fi thriller about a group of kids who witness a train crash while making a film, then soon suspect it may not have been an accident following

some creepy goings-on in their small Ohio town. Canandaigua, Eastview, Greece, Pittsford, Webster WATER FOR ELEPHANTS (PG13): Robert Pattinson gets top billing over Oscar winners Reese Witherspoon and Christoph Waltz in this adaptation of Sara Gruen’s novel about a veterinary student who abandons his studies and joins up with a traveling circus after his parents are killed. Cinema, Canandaigua, Movies 10 WINTER IN WARTIME (R): This Dutch WWII drama tells the tale of a teenage boy who gets a crash course in the realities of war as he tries to help a British pilot stay out of Nazi hands. Little

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Classifieds For information: Call us (585) 244-3329 Fax us (585) 244-1126 Mail Us City Classifieds 250 N. Goodman Street Rochester, NY 14607 Email Us classifieds@ rochester-citynews.com EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY

All real estate advertised in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act, which makes it unlawful, “to make, print, or publish, any notice, statement, or advertisement, with respect to the sale or rental of a dwelling that indicates any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin.” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under the age of 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertisement for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. Call the local Fair Housing Enforcement Project, FHEP at 325-2500 or 1-866-671-FAIR. Si usted sospecha una practica de vivienda injusta, por favor llame al servicio legal gratis. 585-325-2500 - TTY 585-325-2547. to everything. Available immediately. Priced from $595. Call 585-383-8888.

Apartments for Rent CULVER/PARK AREA: One bedroom, 2nd floor, hardwoods, fireplace, kitchen, one car parking, basement storage, no pets, no smoking. $625 plus + security. Includes all util. 2444123 DOWNTOWN GIBBS/EASTMAN Theatre area. 1&2 bedrooms. Bright, cheerful, nice neighbors, laundry, convenient

158 Crosman Terrace For Sale:

MONROE /ALEXANDER AREA Small Studio, 2nd floor, quiet building. Includes appliances, coin laundry, $400 includes all. 330-0011 or 671-3806 PARKLAWN APTS Large one bedroom. $830 includes heat & hw. Off street parking. Convenient to Park Avenue shops, restaurants and salons. Special - first month free to qualified applicants. 585-271-7597

Don't miss this well cared for side entrance American Foursquare home from 1900 on one of Rochester's most desirable streets. It is a 2800 sq. ft. house with 4 bedrooms and 3.5 bathrooms, a new roof and a new boiler. $209,900, Call for more information. Dave Walsh • ReMax Realty Group 693 Park Ave • Rochester, NY 14607

585-269-4068

Shared Housing

year (Great In-Law Home). Owner must sell due to age & health 585-383-8888

baby. We promise unconditional love, security, and strong values. Confidential. Expenses paid. Barb/ Pete 1-888-516-3402.

800-532-6546 Ext. 97 www. continentalacademy.com (AAN CAN)

ALL AREAS - ROOMMATES. COM. Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http://www. Roommates.com.

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ADOPT: A wonderful life filled with love, devotion and happiness awaits your newborn. Financially secure with extended family. Expenses paid. Please call Rosanne: 1-800-755-5002

For Sale

Houses for Rent FOR RENT OR SALE ON LAND CONTRACT/ROCHESTER: Nice 3 bedroom, 1 bath home with may updates. $650/mo. Call Cornerstone 607-936-1945. See our complete listings at www. homesbycornerstone.com

Houses for Sale FOR SALE/CABIN WITH LAND: This cabin/retreat sits nestled on 11+ acres with access to two ponds and 340 acres for hunting, fishing and recreational purposes. The cabin comes fully furnished including appliances and too many extras to list. This is truly a fabulous buy for the outdoorsman and ready to be enjoyed today. Call for a personal tour today to check out all the extras this property has to offer. This secluded cabin/retreat is priced to sell @ $69,000. Call 607-9370678 for more details. HOMES FOR SALE Pittsford/ Bushnells Basin 3 Homes on fabulous 3 acre park-like yard. Beautifully updated, 1800’s large main house plus 2 smaller homes which are leased for $24,000 per

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NYS BEST EVER LAND BARGAINS 4 acres rustic camp$19,995. 7 acres trout stream WAS: $29,995 NOW: $22,995. 26 acres River Gorge WAS: $49,995 NOW: $39,995. 12 acres w/ barn WAS: $39,995 NOW: $25,995. 7 acres near Oneida Lake WAS: $27,995 NOW: $17,995. 5 acres forest bordering stateland $15,995. FREE CLOSING COSTS Call 800-229-7843 Or visit www. LandandCamps.com

Commercial/ Office Space UofR/ AIRPORT AREA Brick, Mixed use building. 6,000 sq.ft. of stores/office plus 3 apartments. Owner must sell due to illness. Owner financing, no banks needed. 383-8888

Vacation Property COTTAGE VERONA BEACH Sleeps 6, screen porch. Washer, Dryer, near lake w/beach. Five minute walk to Sylvan Beach. $800 per week, Still available 7/4. 239410-8326 OCEAN CITY, MARYLAND Best selection of affordable rentals. Full/ partial weeks. Call for FREE brochure. Open daily. Holiday Real Estate. 1-800-638-2102. Online reservations: www. holidayoc.com VACATION RENTALS NORTH WILDWOOD, NJ- FLORENTINE FAMILY MOTEL Beach/Boardwalk Block, Heated Pools, Efficiency/ Motel units refrigerator, elevator. Color Brochure/Specials 609522-4075 Department 104 www. florentinemotel.com

Adoption ADOPT: 1st time Mom and Dad promise your baby a lifetime of LOVE. Expenses paid. Ann & Scott, 1-888-449-0803 ADOPT: A devoted married couple wishes to become parents to

ADOPT: Kindergarten teacher longs to give your precious baby endless love, secure home, large extended family, bright future. Expenses paid. Private. Legal. jenny 1-866-751-3377 ADOPTING YOUR NEWBORN is a gift we’ll treasure. A stay home Mom & home full of love and security awaits your baby. Exp. pd. Debbie/Bryan 1 877.819.0080. ADORTION Our adopted daughter dreams of being a big sister! Loving family seeking baby; promises lifetime of happiness, security. Expenses paid. Elena/ Nick 877-224-7833 www. Angel4UsAdopt.com PREGNANT? CONSIDERING ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions 866-413-6293 (Void in Illinois) (AAN CAN)

Antiques & Collectibles ANTIQUES - MOVING Will sacrifsce.antique -oak dressers, tables, chairs, mirror, picture, oriental rug,desk(maghoney). Also tools,duffle bags, suitcases, dog-kennel & house) new & used),lamps Jim 585 752 1000 or email jkress47@ yahoo.com CASH BUYER 1970 and Before Comic Books, Toys, Sports, entire collections wanted. I travel to you and Buy EVERYTHING YOU have. Call Brian at 1-800-617-3551

Automotive ALWAYS BETTER Higher cash for your Junk Cars, Trucks and Vans. From $260-$800 or more for newer. Running or not. With free towing. Also free removale of any unwanted model in any condition. Call 585-305-5865 CA$H 4 CARS Free Towing of your junk cars and vans. $50$5,000 or donate to our children’s charities. 482-2140 DONATE VEHICLE: RECEIVE $1000 GROCERY COUPONS. NATIONAL ANIMAL WELFARE FOUNDATION SUPPORT NO KILL SHELTERS, HELP HOMELESS PETS .FREE TOWING, TAX DEDUCTIBLE, NON-RUNNERS ACCEPTED 1-866- 912-GIVE

Education HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA! Graduate in just 4 weeks!!! FREE Brochure. Call NOW! 1-

36 City JUNE 29 - july 5, 2011

11 SHELF WALL UNIT 93L x 52h x 15w Fully disassembled 5854691-9618 7’ EXTENSION LADDER $30 585-461-9618 CALPHALON Toaster oven, 6 slice $45 585-461-9618 COFFEE TABLE MAPLE 16” high, 20” wide, 58” long. Good condition. $49. 392-5127 DOG & CAT HOUSES Kennels, porch steps, do it yourself kits. Quick assembly 585-752-1000 $49 Jim EXERCISE SKI MACHINE $45, Irondequoit, 585-746-8756 FREE: HONDA 1988GL1500 MOTORBIKE FOR FREE.. IF INTERESTED CONTACT bobbycone102@hotmail.com HEWLETT PACKARD OFFICE COPIER, letters, pictures, color and black ink, Staples, Walmart VGC 585-880-2903 $49 HORSE TACK Western, stirrups $8 western spurs $10 585-8802903 LAMPSHADE 7’ ivory lampshade $3 OBO 261-1798 LEMON TREE $35 585-4619618 SAWMILLS Band/Chainsaw - SPRING SALE - Cut lumber any dimension, anytime. MAKE MONEY and SAVE MONEY!. In stock ready to ship. Starting at $995 www.NorwoodSawmills. com/300N 1-800-661-7746 Ext 300N SWINGING SHUTTER DOOR Only one. Like in cowboy movies. 5’ tall 5 inches, 2 ft 2” wide, fits in door frame $25 585-880-2903 WILL SACRIFICE Antique furniture and glassware, Tools, Duffel Bags, Corellware, Dog House, Kennel, Steps, Sockets Call Jim Kress, 585-752-1000 or email at jkress47@yahoo.com

Jam Section 2 TROMBONE PLAYERS NEEDED to play with one of Rochester’s Finest Big Bands. Must read. (Great Charts). Able to rehearse every other Wednesday 585-4427480 BRIAN MARVIN Lead Vocalist, looking to join a band. Rock Star, Mr. Rochester, 255 Pearl St. 585473-5089 CALLING ALL MUSICIANS OF ALL GENRES - the Rochester Music Coalition wants you! Please register on our website. For further info: www.rochestermusiccoalition. org. info@rochestermusiccoalition. org. 585-235-8412 CALLING ALL MUSICIANS OF ALL GENRES - the Rochester Music Coalition wants you! Please register on our website. For further info: www.


Place your real estate ad by calling 244-3329 ext. 23 or rochestercitynewspaper.com Ad Deadlines: Friday 4pm for Display Ads Monday at noon for Line ads rochestermusiccoalition.org. info@rochestermusiccoalition. org. 585-235-8412 DRUMMER NEEDED For rock band. Fast, basic style preferred. Regular rehearsals and play occasional shows 585482-5942 FOR SALE UPRIGHT KAY BASS Model C-1 with German bow, excellent instrument. Asking $1,100 OBO Cash Only 585889-1202 LEAD GUITAR PLAYER Needed now for established industrial metal cover band. Heated, secure practice space. No rental or utility fees. Call 585-6215488 MEN check out Barbershop Harmony. July 26 Guest Night, 7 PM. Sing and stay for snacks and beer. The Chorus of the Genesee, Harmony House, 58 E. Main Street, Webster Village, (585) 385-2698 It’s a good time. OUTGROWN SKA-PUNK? Looking for musicians for ska and rock band, especially drummer, singer, horn players. See details at www.myspace. com/mooskamovers or email mooskamovers@aol.com. Craig THE CHORUS OF THE GENESEE (CoG) has openings in all voice parts. The CoG performs a wide variety of musical styles from barbershop to Broadway, to patriotic and religious. Men of all ages. Contact Ed Rummler at 585385-2698. WANTED: Guitar, bass, drummer, singer, jam, & play out. Beginner to intermediate level OK, Call Martin 585-2666337

BOOK SALE! July 2, 3 & 4

Sat, Sun & Mon. 10 am - 4 pm Livonia, NY Next to old R.R. Depot

60,000 ON SALE!

Music Services PIANO LESSONS In your home or mine. Patient, experienced instructor teaching all ages, levels and musical styles. Call Scott: 585- 465-0219. Visit www.scottwrightmusic.com

Miscellaneous ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE From home. *Medical, *Business, *Paralegal, *Accounting, *Criminal Justice. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. Call 888-2018657 www.CenturaOnline.com HAS YOUR BUILING SHIFTED OR SETTLED? Contact Woodford Brothers Inc, for straightening, leveling, foundation and wood frame repairs at 1-800-OLD-

HomeWork A cooperative effort of City Newspaper and RochesterCityLiving, a program of the Landmark Society.

BARN www.woodfordbros. com. “Not applicable in Queens county”

Notices FOOD STAMPS – you’d be surprised who qualifies! Find out if you may be eligible by calling MCLAC NOEP at (585) 295-5624. This institution is an equal opportunity provider. Prepared by a project of the Nutrition Consortium of NYS, USDA/FNS & NYSOTDA.

Tudor by the Park

99 Gregory Hill Road A curved stone pathway leads to the stucco, brick and wood Tudor Revival-style house, located on a quiet corner lot just a stone’s throw away from the woods of Highland Park. On one side sits a massive copper beech tree; on the other, a secluded screened porch and driveway. Built in 1934 for a doctor, the current owners have lovingly maintained this property for 54 years. From the main hall, archways open to the dining and living rooms. Randomwidth pegged oak floors run throughout the first floor, some carpeted. The living room has creamy yellow textured walls with multi-paned windows, a wood burning fireplace, and a desk nook between built-in bookshelves. The bright, generous dining room connects to the screened porch. The kitchen has original painted wood cabinets and vintage mid-century Formica, all in good condition. Kitchen doors lead to a generous pantry closet, the attached garage, and stairs to the basement and second floor. In the basement you will find a workroom, half bath, and laundry. The main stairs, with elegant wrought iron balustrade, pass a stained glass window on the landing. A powder room is nestled beneath the stairs. Upstairs are four bedrooms and two full bathrooms. The master bedroom has double closets flanking an arched built-in vanity. The bedrooms have generous closets and attractive builtin storage cupboards. The fourth bedroom

is reached via the back staircase. It has a walk-in closet and its own bathroom with claw-footed tub, making it an optional master suite or private guest room. The bathrooms all have original tile floors and some original pastel-colored fixtures. This house is located in the Highland Park Neighborhood, named for the spectacular park designed by Frederick Law Olmsted, now home to the annual Lilac Festival. The park and neighborhood are built on the land of the Ellwanger Barry Nursery, a leader in the seed and plant industry in the 1800s, contributing to Rochester’s nickname “The Flower City.” It is a short walk to the playground at Meigs and Linden Streets, the historic Cinema Theater, the Highland Park Diner, and myriad ethnic restaurants. For more, see highlandparkrochester.org. The house at 99 Gregory Hill Road remains as elegant and well-built as it was 80 years ago. The period features in the kitchen and bath would delight the lover of vintage details, or offer new owners the chance to add their own touch. At 2,174 square feet, on .16 acres, it is listed at $159,500. For more information, visit http:// rochestercityliving.com/property/R158763 or contact Don Perry at RealtyUSA, 585-7323112, donperry@realtyusa.com. by Rebecca Webb Rebecca Webb is a Landmark Society member who loves Rochester’s old homes.

rochestercitynewspaper.com City 37


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• Painng • Landscaping • Commercial Cleaning Call for your free esmate. Ask about addional Services.

• Painting • Plaster & Drywall • Masonry • Tile Work • Carpentry • Cabinetry • Electrical • Plumbing • Roofing • Foundation Work • Gutters & Drainage Systems • Waterproofing • HVAC Installation • Design-Build Projects

Building & Remodeling Also Specializing in: Historic Restoration • Fire Damage Restoration • High End Custom Interiors • “Senior-friendly” Home Modifications • Basic Maintenance and Home Repair Services

Call

414-3692

All major credit cards accepted • Fully insured

BOTTOM LINE PRICING - ONE CALL DOES IT ALL!

Prideland Home Improvement, LLC.

585-872-7574

Local General Contractor

Everything from foundations to roofs, including additions, remodeling, garages, decks, windows, doors, ceramic tile, siding & swimming pool repairs. Finished basements, pavers and retaining walls, concrete & stonework, outdoor kitchens & custom brick ovens, storm damage repairs. Insurance work & emergency repairs. FULLY INSURED www.pridelandhomes.com

We Offer Yearly Home Maintenance Plans!

Coppeta Heating Contractor, LLC jcoppeta@rochester.rr.com

Office 624-9684 • Cell 303-5386 • Dave Ogden 38 City JUNE 29 - july 5, 2011

Joe Coppeta 585-820-8758

872.0027 Licensed-Insured • Free Estimates

We accept all major credit cards

Phil Cissell / 50 Years Experience

After

585-503-5712 Residential & Commercial

Call TODAY so Your Bugs are Gone for GOOD!

10% OFF YARD CLEAN-UP

ROCHESTER’S REMODELING CONTRACTOR

Before

UNWANTED GUESTS?

SHIP-SHAPE ENTERPRISES

851-2831

After

www.almasglassblockwindows.com

www.allanelectricinc.com

Stand-by Generators Service Changes Exhaust Fans Trouble Shooting Hot Tubs Swimming Pools Cable TV & CAT 5 Wiring Custom Lighting & Wiring Security Cameras Telephone & Intercoms Trenching

Ceilings and Drywall Textured Ceilings • Sunbursts Water Damage • Insurance Work Plaster Repairs • Stress Crack Repair FULL PAINTING AND REMODELING New Installations • Finishing Quality Workmanship • Insured Free Estimates Ceiling Repair Specialist Matthew M.

202-2909

mulcahyceilingsanddrywall.com

Beautiful Bathrooms By Anthony Craftsmanship is the key to a quality work. One company does it all. Average Bathroom 5, days complete. Design and Problem Solving . References, Call for a free estimate, 334-1759 Emergency no. 330-8389


Rent your apartment special third week is

FREE

Place your ad by calling 244-3329 ext. 23 or rochestercitynewspaper.com Ad Deadlines: Friday 4pm for Display Ads Monday at noon for Line ads

EMPLOYMENT / CAREER TRAINING

Employment

Volunteers

ACTORS/MOVIE EXTRAS Needed immediately for upcoming roles $150-$300/day depending on job requirements. No experience, all looks. 1800-560-8672 A-109. For casting times/locations. (AAN CAN)

A HORSE’S FRIEND Work with children & Horses, in a local urban program where kids “Saddle Up For Success” 585-503-4087 ahorsesfriend@yahoo.com

AIRLINES ARE HIRING Train for high paying Aviation Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified- Job Placement Assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance (866)296-7093 CRANE OPERATOR: Driving/ Customer Service skills a plus, $10.50 per hour. ASAP. Interviews Monday-Friday 10:00am-5:00pm, bring resume. Stone Mart 1044 University Ave. Rochester, 14607, 585-442-8701 $$$HELP WANTED$$$ Extra Income! Assembling CD cases from Home! No Experience Necessary! Call our Live Operators Now! 1-800-4057619 EXT 2450 http://www. easywork-greatpay.com (AAN CAN)

ADOPTED ADULTS WANTED! Adoption Resource Network at Hillside is looking for a few adults who were adopted to volunteer for the AdoptMent program. AdoptMent matches adult adoptees with children who are somewhere in the adoption process. AdoptMent youth and adults meet as a group and individually for one hour a week from September until June. Training and support are provided. If you are interested, please call or email Shari Bartlett at 585-350- 2529, sbartlet@hillside.com. ARE YOU PREGNANT? Participate in a study to help you become healthier during and after pregnancy. Don’t Wait! Please visit: www.emomsroc.org

CENTER FOR YOUTH is looking for households to serve as Host Homes to house 12-18 year old for 1 -14 nights of care. Adults must be caring, respectful and an interest in helping teens. Must pass a thorough background check. Call 473-2464 X 112 for information. COMPEER’S “50 PROMISED” CAMPAIGN is underway! Volunteers needed to mentor youth experiencing parental incarceration. Spend rewarding time each month doing fun activities. Vehicle needed, training/support provided. Laura Ebert/Compeer lebert@compeer. org 585-546-8280 Ext-117 FOSTER PARENTS WANTED! Monroe County is looking for adults age 21 and over to consider opening their homes to foster children. Call 334-9096 or visit www.MonroeFosterCare.org. Monroe County, 585- - ad #3, Start 03/23/11 4X • Page 1 LITERACY VOLUNTEERS OF ROCHESTER Has several 1 hour

RECEPTONIST/CUSTOMER SERVICE Admin work. Good communication/computer skills a must, $10.50 per hour. Interviews MondayFriday 10:00am-5:00pm, bring resume. Stone Mart 1044 University Ave. Rochester, 14607, Call 585-442-8701 VACCINE VOLUNTEERS NEEDED Consider taking part in HIV vaccine research studies at the University of Rochester Medical Center. A pre-ventive HIV vaccine can help STOP the global AIDS crisis. If you are HIV negative, healthy and age 18-50, YOU may qualify. Vaccines are synthetic and it is IMPOSSIBLE to get HIV from the vaccine. Being in a study is more like donating blood. Participants will be paid an average of $750. For more information, visit www. rochestervictoryalliance.org. To learn if you qualify, or to schedule an appointment, call (585) 756- 2329 (756-2DAY).

MEALS ON WHEELS Needs Volunteers! Do you have an hour and a smile? Deliver meals during lunchtime to homebound neighbors. Interested? Call 7878326 to help. NEW FIBRO SUPPORT Group is seeking volunteers for all positions, long-term & short-term Call Brenda 585-341-3290 YMCA OMBUDSMAN VOLUNTEERS NEEDED! LIFESPAN If you are a good listener, like resolving problems and want to protect the rights of older individuals in long term care, Call 585-244-8400 Ext. 178

SUMMER JOBS FOR THE ENVIRONMENT

NYPIRG is now hiring high school & college students, grads and others for an urgent campaign to protect our air and water. DRIVERS ROUTE SALES Immediate openings for motivated persons selling Scoops Ice Cream! Top $$$. Established Routes. Call 585-288-7590

projects. Each volunteer makes a difference. Call 585-288-2910. VOLUNTEERS NEEDED To assist with praise and worship. Living Waters Fellowship is a Christ centered non-denominational church in the early stages of development. Individuals, groups, and musicians are welcomed. Call 585-957-6155. VOLUNTEERS OF AMERICA Have time after getting your children off to school? Help out with general office work or retail processing. Help us continue serving those in need. 585-647-1150 visit www. voawny.org. VOLUNTEERS OF AMERICA Is recruiting committed individuals to help with monthly

birthday parties for homeless children, afterschool clubs at the Children’s Center and to sort books for the E-Bay sales division. 585-647-1150 for or visiit www.voawny.org. VOLUNTEERS OF AMERICA Is recruiting committed individuals to help with monthly birthday parties for homeless children, afterschool clubs at the Children’s Center and to sort books for the E-Bay sales division. 585-647-1150 for or visiit www.voawny.org. WEBSITE DEVELOPER Must be knowledgeable and experienced to create for new non-profit. Serious inquiries email resume to: jacolyn_fibrosupport@hotmail

THE LUPUS FOUNDATION OF GENESEE VALLEY welcomes volunteers to help weekly, monthly or once a year. We match your interests with our

ACTIVISM

LOCAL DATA ENTRY/ Local data entry/typists needed immediately. $400 PT - $800 FT weekly. Flexible schedule, work from own PC. 1-800-5019408 PAID IN ADVANCE Make $1,000 a Week mailing brochures from home! Guaranteed Income! FREE Supplies! No experience required. Start Immediately! www.homemailerprogram.net (AAN CAN)

preview sessions scheduled for anyone interested in becoming a tutor. No prior teaching experience is required. For info call Shelley Alfieri at 585-4733030

Make a difference while getting paid! F/T positions available. EOE Call Chris: 585-232-7990

Serving Northwest Monroe County Non-medical agency seeking Caring & Mature Individuals Part-time Only. Must have own Transportation. Enjoy a special kind of job that pays you to help the elderly stay independent. Run errands, light housework, prepare meals and provide companionship. Some assignments, strictly housecleaning. Applications accepted Monday-Friday, 10AM-3PM

Home Instead Senior Care

105 Canal Landing Blvd., Suite 5 Rochester, NY 14626 • 585-663-4620 Ext. 3

We Are Upsizing!

3 Sales & 2 Management positions available. Leads provided, full comprehensive benefits package, first year $40,000-50,000

Contact Pat Lomando (585) 615-8686

ADVERTISING SALES OPPORTUNITY SEEKING ONE OUTSTANDING SALES PROFESSIONAL. MUST BE ASSERTIVE, OUTGOING, SMART, IMAGINATIVE AND CONFIDENT. SALES EXPERIENCE AND PROVEN RECORD OF SALES ACHIEVEMENT A MUST. NEWSPAPER/MEDIA SALES A DEFINITE PLUS. SALARY PLUS COMMISSION PLUS BENEFITS.

SEND RESUME TO: Betsy Matthews, City Newspaper, 250 N. Goodman St., Rochester, NY 14607 OR EMAIL TO: bmatthews@rochester-citynews.com rochestercitynewspaper.com City 39


Legal Ads [ LEGAL NOTICE ] Notice of formation of a limited liability company (LLC). Name: CYCLEDELIC LLC. Article of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on June 09, 2011. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to the LLC, 638 Wilder Rd., Hilton NY 14468. Purpose: For any lawful purpose. [ LEGAL NOTICE DOUBLE CHASE MANAGEMENT, LLC ] Notice of Qualification: Double Chase Management, LLC filed an Application for Authority with SSNY on May 12, 2011. Office: Monroe County. Formed in DE on 2/18/10. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. PO address which SSNY shall mail any process against the LLC served upon him: 1424 Hamilton Ave, Palo Alto, CA 94301-3124. DE address of LLC: c/o National Corporate Research, Ltd., 615 S. Dupont Hwy., Dover DE 19901. Cert. of Form filed with DE Sec. Of State, P.O. Box 898. Purpose is to engage in any lawful activity.

upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of any process against the LLC served upon him/her to Markus Bauer, 27 Washington Ave., Pittsford, NY 14534. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] BookDecay.com, LLC a domestic Limited Liability Company (LLC), filed with the Sec of State of NY on 3/31/11. NY Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of any process against the LLC served upon him/her to The LLC, 211 Gilman Road, Churchville, NY 14428. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGISTS OF ROCHESTER PLLC (PLLC) filed Arts. of Org. with NY Secy. of State (SS) on 4/21/2011. PLLC’s office is in Monroe Co. SS is designated as agent of PLLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS shall mail a copy of any process to PLLC, 1577 South Avenue, Rochester, NY 14620. PLLC’s purpose: any lawful activity.

[ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of 473 and 489 Western Drive Holdings, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 6/8/11. Office location: Monroe Co. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 294 Avalon Court, Rochester, NY 14618. Purpose: any lawful activities.

[ NOTICE ] Elody & Co, LLC filed Articles of Organization with the NYS on May 11, 2011. Its principal office is in Monroe County, New York. The principal business location is 383 Park Avenue, Rochester, NY 14607. The Secretary of State has designated as its agent and post office address to which the Secretary of State shall mail a copy of any process against is c/o Elody & Co, LLC, 383 Park Avenue, Rochester, NY 14607. Purpose: Any lawful purpose.

[ NOTICE ] 22 N. MAIN LLC, a domestic Limited Liability Company (LLC), filed with the Sec of State of NY on 5/10/11. NY Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of any process against the LLC served upon him/her to Jose A. Mendez, P.O. Box 576 Brockport, NY 14420. General Purposes.

[ NOTICE ] GLOWCITY, LLC a domestic Limited Liability Company (LLC), filed with the Sec of State of NY on 4/7/11. NY Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of any process against the LLC served upon him/her to The LLC, 650 Klem Rd., Webster, NY 14580. General Purposes.

[ NOTICE ] BAUER ADVANCED TECHNOLOGIES LLC, a domestic Limited Liability Company (LLC), filed with the Sec of State of NY on 4/7/11. NY Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent

[ NOTICE ] GRT MANAGEMENT LLC, Articles of Org. filed N.Y. Sec. of State (SSNY) 22nd day of February 2011. Office in Monroe Co. at 53 Country Corner Lane, Fairport, New York 14450. SSNY desig. agt. upon whom process may

40 City JUNE 29 - july 5, 2011

be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 53 Country Corner Lane, Fairport, New York 14450. Reg. Agt. upon whom process may be served: Spiege l& Utera, P.A., P.C. 1 Maiden Lane, NYC 10038 1 800 576-1100 Purpose: Any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Homes by Helen, LLC filed Articles of Organization with the NYS on January 20, 2011. Its principal office is in Monroe County, New York. The principal business location is 145 Quesada Drive, Rochester, NY 14616. The Secretary of State has designated as its agent and post office address to which the Secretary of State shall mail a copy of any process against is c/o Homes by Helen, 145 Quesada Drive, Rochester, NY 14616. Purpose: Any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Index No. 201015089 SUPREME COURT STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF MONROE ESL Federal Credit Union Plaintiff, vs Edward Hargrave, Jr.; Tracy Hargrave, Defendants. Pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale dated June 6, 2011 and entered herein, I, the undersigned, the Referee in said Judgment named, will sell at public auction in the front vestibule of the Monroe County Office Building, 39 West Main Street, Rochester, New York, County of Monroe, on July 13, 2011 at 9:00 a.m., on that day, the premises directed by said Judgment to be sold and therein described as follows: ALL THAT CERTAIN PLOT, PIECE OR PARCEL OF LAND with the buildings and improvements thereon erected, situate, lying and being in the Town of Greece, County of Monroe and State of New York, known and described as Lot 20 Arlen Homes Tract, as shown on a map recorded in the Monroe County Clerk’s Office in Liber 101 of Maps, Page 64. Said Lot 20 fronts 60 feet on the north side of Sparling Drive, is the same width in rear and 118 feet deep throughout, all as shown on said map. Tax Acct. No. 060.55-2-37 Property Address: 246 Sparling Drive, Town of Greece, New York Said premises are sold subject to any state of facts an accurate survey may show, zoning restrictions and any amendments

thereto, covenants, restrictions, agreements, reservations, and easements of record and prior liens, if any, municipal departmental violations, and such other provisions as may be set forth in the Complaint and Judgment filed in this action. Judgment amount: $66,155.44 plus, but not limited to, costs, disbursements, attorney fees and additional allowance, if any, all with legal interest. DATED: June2011 Richard Kaul, Esq., Referee LACY KATZEN LLP Attorneys for Plaintiff 130 East Main Street Rochester, New York 14604 Telephone: (585 3245767 [ NOTICE ] MARY ANN KREBBEKS, NP IN PSYCHIATRY, PLLC Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 5/04/2011. Office Location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to: MARY ANN KREBBEKS, NP IN PSYCHIATRY, PLLC, c/o Business Filings Incorporated, 187 Wolf Road, Suite 101, Albany, NY 12205. Purpose: The Practice of the Profession of: Nurse Practitioner in Psychiatry [ NOTICE ] Name of LLC: Allison James of Western New York, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State: 6/14/11. Office loc.: Monroe Co. Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o Business Filings Inc., 187 Wolf Rd., Ste. 101, Albany, NY 12205, regd. agt. upon whom process may be served. Purpose: any lawful act. [ NOTICE ] Name of LLC: Raland Translation, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State: 6/3/11. Office loc.: Monroe Co. Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o Business Filings Inc., 187 Wolf Rd., Ste. 101, Albany, NY 12205, regd. agt. upon whom process may be served. Purpose: any lawful act. [ NOTICE ] Not. Of Form. of DJRJR Enterprises LLC. Art. Of Org. filed with SSNY 4/29/11. County: Monroe. SSNY is designated Agent of LLC to whom process may be served. SSNY may mail a copy of any process to

LLC, 537 Elmgrove Rd., Rochester, NY 14606. Purpose any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] NOT. of Form. of ROCCITYSKATES, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Sec’y. of State of NY (SSNY) 4/28/11. Location: Monroe County SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 181 Monroe Ave., Roch., NY, 14607. Purpose: any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Not. of Form. of SURE LUCK HOMES 002 LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 05/27/11. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY may mail a copy of any process to LLC. 2117 Buffalo Road, Suite 290, Rochester, NY 14624. Purpose: any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Not. of Form. of SURE LUCK HOMES 001 LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 05/27/11. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY may mail a copy of any process to LLC. 2117 Buffalo Road, Suite 290, Rochester, NY 14624. Purpose: any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Not. of Form. of SURE LUCK HOMES 003 LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 05/27/11. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY may mail a copy of any process to LLC. 2117 Buffalo Road, Suite 290, Rochester, NY 14624. Purpose: any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Not. of Form. of SURE LUCK HOMES 004 LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 05/31/11. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY may mail a copy of any process to LLC. 2117 Buffalo Road, Suite 290, Rochester, NY 14624. Purpose: any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Notice is hereby given that a license, number not yet assigned for a full on premise beer, wine & liquor license

has been applied for by Wilton Enterprises Inc. dba Boulder At Brooks Landing , 910 Genesee St. Rochester NY 14611 County of Monroe, City of Rochester for a restaurant. [ NOTICE ] Notice is hereby given that a license, number not yet assigned, for a full on premise beer, wine & liquor license has been applied for by HIGHLAND COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION. dba HIGHLANDS AT PITTSFORD , 301 Stoutenburgh Lane, Pittsford, NY 14534, County of Monroe, Town of Pittsford, for a private club. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of S & S MAIN STREET, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 4/14/2011. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 36 South Street, Brockport NY 14420. Purpose: any lawful act. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of 24 Henion Street LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 3/9/2011. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o Dollinger Associates, P.C., 2170 Monroe Avenue, Rochester NY 14618. Purpose: any lawful act. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of 39-39.5 Locust Street LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 3/9/2011. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o Dollinger Associates, P.C., 2170 Monroe Ave., Rochester NY 14618. Purpose: any lawful act [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of 44 Parkway LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 3/9/2011. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o Dollinger Associates, P.C. 2170 Monroe

Avenue Rochester, NY 14618. Purpose: any lawful act [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of 888 Maple Street LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 6/15/11. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o The LLC, 3445 Winton Place, Ste. 228, Rochester, NY 14623. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of AURELIE, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 5/20/2011. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 70 Rosemount Street, Rochester, NY 14620. Purpose: any lawful act. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of Bactorem, LLC Art. Of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 04/19/11. Office in Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to:1729 Empire Blvd, Apt. 1, Webster, NY 14580. Purpose: Environmental consulting. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of BLACK CREEK EQUITIES LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 05/20/11. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, P.O. Box 418, N. Chili, NY 14514. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of BONMAR HOLDINGS, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 05/24/11. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 65 Arcadia Pkwy., Rochester, NY 14612. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of Bushveld LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 4/29/2011.

Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 49 Wincanton Drive, Fairport, NY 14450. Purpose: any lawful act [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of CANALSIDE DENTISTRY, PLLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 01/07/11. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of PLLC: 69A Monroe Ave., Pittsford Village Green, Pittsford, NY 14534. SSNY designated as agent of PLLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the PLLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Dentistry. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of CSF PROPERTIES LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 06/13/11. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 543 Lake Rd. W. Fork, Hamlin, NY 14464. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Doja Properties NY2 LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 6/6/2011. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to P.O. Box 185, Clarkston, UT 84305. Purpose: any lawful purpose [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of ETDS Enterprises, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 5/5/11. Office location: Monroe Co. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 42 Trotters Field Run, Pittsford, NY 14534. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of FITZHUGH ASSOCIATES DEVELOPER LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 5/26/11. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 460 Buffalo Road, Ste. 110, Rochester, NY


Legal Ads 14611. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of FITZHUGH ASSOCIATES MANAGING MEMBER LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 5/26/11. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 460 Buffalo Road, Ste. 110, Rochester, NY 14611. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of High Falls IT Company LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of New York (SSNY) on 5/16/11. Office Location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to: The LLC, 2604 Elmwood AV #306, Rochester, NY 14618. Purpose of LLC is any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Jackie’s Jams and Jellies, LLC. Arts. Of Org. filed with Secy.of State of N.Y. (SSNY) on 4/28/11. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 140 Biondo Court, Rush, NY 14543. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of JVJP MANAGEMENT LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 05/20/11. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, P.O. Box 418, N. Chili, NY 14514. Purpose: Any lawful activity [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of Limited Liability Company (LLC) Name: J. ANTHONY FOODS, LLC: Articles of Organization filed with Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on March 25, 2011. County location: Monroe. Principal business location is c/o Ronald A. Mittleman, Esq., Scolaro, Shulman, Cohen, Fetter & Burstein, P.C., 507 Plum St., Suite 300, Syracuse, NY 13204. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to c/o Ronald A. Mittleman, Esq., Scolaro, Shulman, Cohen, Fetter

& Bunstein, P.C., 507 Plum St., Suite 300, Syracuse, NY 13204. Purpose: to engage in any and all business for which LLCs may be formed under the New York LLC Law. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Maple Steel LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 6/15/11. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o The LLC, 3445 Winton Place, Ste. 228, Rochester, NY 14623. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of MCGRATH ENTERPRISES LLC. Art. of Org. filed with the Sec’y of State (SSNY) on 05/17/11. Office Location: Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to 357 Lanning Road, Honeoye Falls, NY 14472. Purpose: Any Lawful Purpose. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of MOTT FAMILY LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 5/25/2011. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 2170 Monroe Avenue, Rochester, NY 14618. Purpose: any lawful act [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of Oz Property LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 4/26/2011. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 2269 Lyle Avenue, Unit 3, Rochester, NY 14606. Purpose: any lawful act [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of PERPETUAL CALENDAR COMPANY, LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) on 5/24/2011. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 2670 Highland Ave. #2., Rochester, NY 14610. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Progressive Oral

Surgery, PLLC Articles of Org. filed Secretary of State (SSNY) 6/21/2011. Office location: Monroe County, SSNY designated as agent of PLLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 712 Elmgrove Rd., Rochester, NY 14606. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of SAC OF ROCHESTER, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 05/17/11. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, 26 Alden Glenn Dr., Webster, NY 14580. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of Three Days Smoke Shop LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) on 5/17/11. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to 2042 Chili Ave 1D Rochester NY 14624. Purpose; any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of NGL Supply Wholesale, LLC. Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 5/25/11. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. bus. addr.: 6120 S. Yale Ave., Ste. 805, Tulsa, OK 74136. LLC formed in DE on 10/12/10. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. DE addr. of LLC: 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. [ NOTICE ] PULLMAN ASSOCIATES, LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 5/31/2011. Office in Monroe Co. SSNY desig. agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 699 Pullman Ave., Rochester, NY 14615, which is also the principal business location. Purpose: Any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] SENSORED LIFE, LLC (LLC) filed Arts. of Org. with NY Secy. of State

(SS) on 6/13/2011. LLC’s office is in Monroe Co. SS is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS shall mail a copy of any process to LLC’s principal business location at 350 Mile Crossing Blvd., Rochester, NY 14624. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] TIM HULL CUSTOM CARPENTRY LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 5/4/2011. Office in Monroe Co. SSNY design. Agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to Timothy Hull 1524 Hilton Parma Rd Spencerport, NY 14559. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Uncle Eddie’s Pizzeria, LLC was filed with SSNY on February 25, 2011. Office: Monroe County, SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. P.O. address which SSNY shall mail any process against the LLC served upon SSNY: Uncle Eddie’s Pizzeria, LLC, 1350 Mendon Pittsford Road, Mendon, New York 14506. Purpose is to engage in any lawful activity. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] Name: J&B PRODUCTIONS LLC. Arts. Of Org. filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 06/10/2011. Office Location: Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to: C/O J&B PRODUCTIONS LLC, One East Main Street, 10th Floor, Rochester, New York 14614. Purpose: Any Lawful Purpose. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] Notice of Formation of 103 RUTGERS STREET, LLC. Articles of Organization filed with Secy. Of State of NY (SSNY) on 4/28/11. Office location: Monroe County SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to principal business location: The LLC, 789 East Avenue, Rochester, NY 14607.Purpose: any lawful activity [ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] Notice of Formation of 105 MERRIMAN STREET, LLC. Articles of Organization filed with Secy. Of State of

NY (SSNY) on 4/29/11. Office location: Monroe County SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to principal business location: The LLC, 789 East Avenue, Rochester, NY 14607. Purpose: any lawful activity [ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] Notice of Formation of 11 THAYER STREET, LLC. Articles of Organization filed with Secy. Of State of NY (SSNY) on 4/28/11. Office location: Monroe County SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to principal business location: The LLC, 789 East Avenue, Rochester, NY 14607. Purpose: any lawful activity [ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] Notice of Formation of 14 OXFORD STREET, LLC. Articles of Organization filed with Secy. Of State of NY (SSNY) on 4/28/11. Office location: Monroe County SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to principal business location: The LLC, 789 East Avenue, Rochester, NY 14607.Purpose: any lawful activity [ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] Notice of Formation of 220 RUTGERS STREET, LLC. Articles of Organization filed with Secy. Of State of NY (SSNY) on 4/28/11. Office location: Monroe County SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to principal business location: The LLC, 789 East Avenue, Rochester, NY 14607. Purpose: any lawful activity [ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] Notice of Formation of 29 STRATHALLAN PARK, LLC. Articles of Organization filed with Secy. Of State of NY (SSNY) on 4/29/11. Office location: Monroe County SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to principal business location: The LLC, 789 East Avenue, Rochester, NY 14607. Purpose: any lawful activity [ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] Notice of Formation of 376 PEARL STREET, LLC. Articles of Organization filed with

Secy. Of State of NY (SSNY) on 4/28/11. Office location: Monroe County SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to principal business location: The LLC, 789 East Avenue, Rochester, NY 14607. Purpose: any lawful activity [ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] Notice of Formation of 39 RUTGERS STREET, LLC. Articles of Organization filed with Secy. Of State of NY (SSNY) on 4/28/11. Office location: Monroe County SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to principal business location: The LLC, 789 East Avenue, Rochester, NY 14607. Purpose: any lawful activity [ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] Notice of Formation of 485 UNIVERSITY AVENUE, LLC. Articles of Organization filed with Secy. Of State of NY (SSNY) on 5/24/11. Office location: Monroe County SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to principal business location: The LLC, 789 East Avenue, Rochester, NY 14607. Purpose: any lawful activity [ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] Notice of Formation of 76 MEIGS STREET, LLC. Articles of Organization filed with Secy. Of State of NY (SSNY) on 4/29/11. Office location: Monroe County SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to principal business location: The LLC, 789 East Avenue, Rochester, NY 14607. Purpose: any lawful activity [ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] Notice of Formation of 789 EAST AVENUE, LLC. Articles of Organization filed with Secy. Of State of NY (SSNY) on 4/28/11. Office location: Monroe County SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to principal business location: The LLC, 789 East Avenue, Rochester, NY 14607. Purpose: any lawful activity [ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] Notice of Formation of 83 MERRIMAN STREET, LLC. Articles

of Organization filed with Secy. Of State of NY (SSNY) on 4/28/11. Office location: Monroe County SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served .SSNY shall mail process to principal business location: The LLC, 789 East Avenue, Rochester, NY 14607. Purpose: any lawful activity [ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] Scott and Sheila Schalm, LLC (LLC) filed Arts. of Org. with NY Secy. of State (SS) on 4/12/11. LLC’s office is in Monroe Co. Its principal business location will be 650 Park Ave., Rochester, NY 14607. SS is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS will mail a copy of any process to 47 Park Circle, Rochester, NY 14623. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF BOULDER ARMS, LLC ] Boulder Arms, LLC filed Articles of Organization with the NY secretary of State on May 6, 2011. (1) Its principal office is in Monroe County, New York. (2) The secretary of State has been designated as its agent upon whom process against it may be served and its post office address to which the Secretary of State shall mail a copy of any process against it served upon him or her is c/o Boulder Arms, LLC, 1580 Westfall Road, Rochester, New York 14618 (3) The character or purpose of its business is to engage in any lawful activity for which limited liability companies may be organized under Section 203 of the Limited Liability Company Act. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY ] PITTSFORD PAINTING, LLC (“LLC”), has filed Articles of Organization with the NY Secretary of State (“NYSS”) on 3/9/2011 pursuant to Section 203 of the NY Limited Liability Law. The office of the LLC shall be located in Monroe County, NY. The NYSS is designated as the agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served, and the address to which the NYSS shall mail a copy of any process served on him against the LLC is C/O United States Corporation Agents, Inc., 7014 13th Avenue, Brooklyn, New York 11228. The purpose of

the LLC is to engage in any lawful act or activity for which limited liability companies may be formed under the law. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LLC ] Advanced AV Solutions LLC has filed articles of organization with the New York Secretary of State on May 27, 2011. Its principal place of business is located at 1 Woodbury Boulevard, Rochester, New York in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent upon whom process may be served. A copy of any process shall be mailed to 1 Woodbury Boulevard, Rochester, New York 14604. The purpose of the LLC is to engage in any lawful activity for which Limited Liability Companies may be organized under Section 203 of the New York Limited Liability Company Law. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LLC ] AutoLinc Sports and Classics, LLC has filed articles of organization with the New York Secretary of State on June 6, 2011. Its principal place of business is located at 840 East Avenue, Rochester, New York in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent upon whom process may be served. A copy of any process shall be mailed to 840 East Avenue, Rochester, New York 14607. The purpose of the LLC is to engage in any lawful activity for which Limited Liability Companies may be organized under Section 203 of the New York Limited Liability Company Law. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF NEWTERRA ] Newterra, LLC (the “LLC”) filed Articles of Organization with NY Secretary of State (SSNY) 5/19/11. Office location: Monroe County, NY. Principal business location: 1265 Scottsville Rd, Rochester, NY 14624. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to CT Corporation System, 111 Eighth Avenue, NY, NY 10011 which is also the registered agent upon whom process may be served. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF PLLC ] Ontario Radiology, PLLC has filed articles of organization with the

cont. on page 42

rochestercitynewspaper.com City 41


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42 City JUNE 29 - july 5, 2011

Legal Ads > page 41 New York Secretary of State on June 1, 2011. Its principal place of business is located at 4 Sylvan Knolls, Fairport, New York in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent upon whom process may be served. A copy of any process shall be mailed to 4 Sylvan Knolls, Fairport, New York 14450. The purpose of the PLLC is to practice the profession of medicine and the providing of medical services. [ NOTICE OF SALE ] Index No. 201014709 SUPREME COURT STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF MONROE ESL Federal Credit Union, Plaintiff Daniel L. Bell; Tabatha A. Bell; City of Rochester; New York State Commissioner of Taxation and Finance; New York State Affordable Housing Corporation; Monroe County Department of Human Services; Capital One Bank USA, N.A.; ESL Federal Credit Union; Joseph Laboy Defendants. Pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale dated June 6, 2011 and entered herein, I, the undersigned, the Referee in said Judgment named, will sell at public auction in the front vestibule of the Monroe County Office Building, 39 West Main Street, Rochester, New York, County of Monroe, on July 13, 2011 at 10:30 a.m., on that day, the premises directed by said Judgment to be sold and therein described as follows: ALL THAT TRACT OR PARCEL OF LAND, situate in the City of Rochester, County of Monroe and State of New York, designated on a map of John Gould’s Subdivision of lots 255, 257, 259, 261, 263, 265, 267 of McKee Place, as Lot Number Five (5), which map is filed in Monroe County Clerk’s Office in Liber 29 of Maps, at Page 12. Said Lot Number Five (5) fronts thirty-nine (39) feet on the north side of Electric Avenue is the same width front and rear and one hundred nineteen and five tenths (119.5) feet deep throughout. Tax Account No.:090.50-3-48 Property Address:110 Electric Avenue, City of Rochester, New York Said premises are sold subject to any state of facts an accurate survey may show, zoning restrictions and any amendments thereto, covenants,

restrictions, agreements, reservations, and easements of record and prior liens, if any, municipal departmental violations, and such other provisions as may be set forth in the Complaint and Judgment filed in this action. Judgment amount: $48,754.47 plus, but not limited to, costs, disbursements, attorney fees and additional allowance, if any, all with legal interest. DATEDJune, 2011 Clark J. Zimmermann, Jr., Esq., Referee LACY KATZEN LLP Attorneys for Plaintiff 130 East Main Street Rochester, New York 14604 Telephone:(585) 3245767 [ NOTICE OF SALE ] Index No. 2010-15362 SUPREME COURT STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF MONROE ESL Federal Credit Union Plaintiff vs. Any persons who are heirs or distributees of Jeffrey E. Taylor, Deceased, and all persons who are wives, widows, grantees, mortgagees, lienors, heirs, devisees distributees, successors in interest of such of them as may be deceased, and their husbands, wives, heirs, devisees, distributees and successors of interest all of whom and whose names and places of residence are unknown to Plaintiff; Michael Taylor; Megan Hintz; People of the State of New York; United States of America; New York State Commissioner of Taxation and Finance; RM Lemcke Landscape Associates, Inc., d/b/a RM Landscape Industries; Commissioners of the State Insurance Fund; Credit Acceptance Corporation; Rochester City Court; Centurion Capital Corporation; Daimler Chrysler Financial Services Americas LLC; “John Doe” and/or “Mary Roe”, Defendants Pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale dated June 3, 2011 and entered herein, I, the undersigned, the Referee in said Judgment named, will sell at public auction in the front vestibule of the Monroe County Office Building, 39 West Main Street, Rochester, New York, County of Monroe, on July 13, 2011 at 10:00 a.m., on that day, the premises directed by said Judgment to be sold and therein described as follows: ALL THAT TRACT OR PARCEL OF LAND,

situate in the Town of Henrietta, County of Monroe, and State of New York, known and described as Lot No. 97 of St. Josephs Farm, Section No. 2, as laid down on a map of said farm on file in the Monroe County Clerk’s Office in Liber 114 of Maps, at page 53. Said Lot No. 97 is situate on the southerly side of Glen Iris Drive (formerly William Road) and is 100 feet wide, front and rear, and 184.52 feet deep on its easterly side and 185.55 feet deep on its westerly side, all as shown on said map. Tax Acct. No.: 161.192-33 Property Address: 128 Glen Iris Drive, Henrietta, New York. Said premises are sold subject to any state of facts an accurate survey may show, zoning restrictions and any amendments thereto, covenants, restrictions, agreements, reservations, and easements of record and prior liens, if any, municipal departmental violations, and such other provisions as may be set forth in the Complaint and Judgment filed in this action. Judgment amount $105,976.41 plus, but not limited to, costs, disbursements, attorney fees and additional allowance, if any, all with legal interest. DATED: June 2011 Paul T. Missal, Esq., Referee LACY KATZEN LLP Attorneys for Plaintiff 130 East Main Street Rochester, New York 14604 Telephone: (585) 3245767 [ NOTICE OF SALE ] Index No. 2010-16233 SUPREME COURT STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF MONROE ESL Federal Credit Union, Plaintiff, vs. Steven V. Delorenzo; Lori J. Delorenzo, Defendants. Pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale dated June 9, 2011 and entered herein, I, the undersigned, the Referee in said Judgment named, will sell at public auction in the front vestibule of the Monroe County Office Building, 39 West Main Street, Rochester, New York, County of Monroe, on July 20, 2011 at 11:00 a.m., on that day, the premises directed by said Judgment to be sold and therein described as follows: ALL THAT TRACT OR PARCEL OF LAND, situate in the Town of Hamlin, County of Monroe and State of New York, and being more particularly described as Lot 1

of the Country Creek Estates Subdivision, Phase 1 as shown on a map filed in the Monroe County Clerk’s Office in Liber 323 of Maps, at page 45. Tax Acct. No. 023.10-1-1 Property Address: 1103 Hamlin Parma Townline Road, Town of Hamlin, New York Said premises are sold subject to any state of facts an accurate survey may show, zoning restrictions and any amendments thereto, covenants, restrictions, agreements, reservations, and easements of record and prior liens, if any, municipal departmental violations, and such other provisions as may be set forth in the Complaint and Judgment filed in this action. Judgment amount: $208,100.28 plus, but not limited to, costs, disbursements, attorney fees and additional allowance, if any, all with legal interest. DATED: June 2011 Daniel J. Mastrella, Esq., Referee LACY KATZEN LLP Attorneys for Plaintiff 130 East Main Street Rochester, New York 14604 Telephone: (585) 324-5767 [ NOTICE OF SALE ] Index No. 2011189. SUPREME COURT STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF MONROE ESL Federal Credit Union, Plaintiff, vs. John Vandenbos; Capital One Bank, USA, NA; Cory Vandenbos, Defendants. Pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale dated June 6, 2011 and entered herein, I, the undersigned, the Referee in said Judgment named, will sell at public auction in the front vestibule of the Monroe County Office Building, 39 West Main Street, Rochester, New York, County of Monroe, on July 15, 2011 at 11:00 a.m., on that day, the premises directed by said Judgment to be sold and therein described as follows: ALL THAT TRACT OR PARCEL OF LAND, situate in the Town of Chili, County of Monroe and State of New York, being part of Lot 120 of the Ballantyne Acres Subdivision according to a map filed May 10, 1928 in the Monroe County Clerk’s Office in Case A of Maps at page 27. Said part of Lot 120 is bounded and described as follows: Beginning at the southwest corner of said Lot 120 on the north line of Black Creek Road, running thence northerly along the west

line of said Lot 120 a distance of 237 feet to the northwest corner of Lot 120, running thence easterly along the north line of said Lot 120 a distance of 37.79 feet to a point, thence southerly a distance of 235.72 feet to the north line of said Black Creek Road at a point 37.77 feet east of the point of beginning as measured along the northerly line of said Black Creek Road, thence westerly along the northerly line of said Black Creek Road a distance of 37.77 feet to the point of beginning. Also, all that tract or parcel of land, situate in the Town of Chili, County of Monroe and State of New York, known and described as Lot 120 of the Ballantyne Acres Subdivision as laid down on a subdivision map of Ballantyne Acres filed May 10, 1928 in the Monroe County Clerk’s Office in Case “A” of Maps, at page 27. Said Lot 120 is of the dimensions laid down on said map. Tax Acct. No. 147.19-120 Property Address: 42 Black Creek Road, Town of Chili, Monroe County, New York Said premises are sold subject to any state of facts an accurate survey may show, zoning restrictions and any amendments thereto, covenants, restrictions, agreements, reservations, and easements of record and prior liens, if any, municipal departmental violations, and such other provisions as may be set forth in the Complaint and Judgment filed in this action. Judgment amount: $53,062.48 plus, but not limited to, costs, disbursements, attorney fees and additional allowance, if any, all with legal interest. DATED: June 2011. Leticia D. Astacio, Esq., Referee LACY KATZEN LLP Attorneys for Plaintiff 130 East Main Street Rochester, New York 14604 Telephone: (585) 3245767 [ NOTICE] Notice of Formation of FITZHUGH ASSOCIATES TENANT LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 5/26/11. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 460 Buffalo Road, Ste. 110, Rochester, NY 14611. Purpose: any lawful activity.


Fun

[ rehabilitating mr. wiggles ] BY neil swaab

[ news of the weird ] BY CHUCK SHEPHERD

Latest Religious Messages — Unclear on the Concept: India’s Ganges River has become famously polluted, in part by reverent Hindu pilgrims who toss “offerings” (such as clothing, statues and the cremated ashes of loved ones) into it in hope of prosperous lives and holy afterlives. Hindu immigrants in New York City, without access to the Ganges, have called upon Jamaica Bay as a stand-in. The formerly quiet waters adjacent to JFK International Airport now ebb and flow with similar offerings that ultimately litter the bay’s federal recreation area shoreline. Hindu community leaders in New York, with only mixed success, constantly urge greater environmental sensitivity. — From time to time, clever rabbis suggest ways of bypassing ancient Talmudic laws that restrict observant Jews’ behavior on the Sabbath (a day of “rest”). In April, Rabbi Dror Fixler, an electrooptics expert from Bar-Ilan University in Israel, said he could foresee a day when even driving a car might be permitted on the Sabbath. The driver would wear an encephalography helmet that could catch brain signals and transmit them to a car’s operating and steering system, removing the need for “action” on the driver’s part (thus theoretically leaving him “at rest”).

The Continuing Crisis — Mattel revealed that its best-selling fashion doll in the last year, for the age-6-and-up market, has been the teen werewolf “Monster High” model, Clawdeen Wolf, who comes with heavy makeup, a short skirt and high boots, and who supposedly spends her time “waxing, plucking and shaving.” (Says Clawdeen, in promotional materials, “My

hair is worthy of a shampoo commercial, and that’s just what grows on my legs.”) Though Mattel claims the doll celebrates girls’ imperfections, a counselor told Fox News she was appalled that the company tells young girls they “need to sculpt, tweeze, wax and ... change their bodies” to attract men. — Cyber Making-Out: Tokyo’s Kajimoto Laboratory has created a tongue-kissing machine to enable lovers to suck face over the Internet, according to a May CNN report. At separate locations, the pair place special straws in their mouths and mimic a deep kiss, which is recorded and transmitted to each other’s straws. Researcher Nobuhiro Takahashi sees profit in “celebrity” tongue-kissing applications, but said more work is needed to establish individual taste, breathing and tongue moistness. (Another team of Japanese researchers, using a harness-type device, reported making similar advances -- in Internet “hugging,” with sensors that mimic lovers’ heartbeats and even their spine’s “tingling” and stomach’s “butterflies.”) — Tacky: (1) The Columbus, Ohio, school board accepted principal Kimberly Jones’ resignation in May following revelations by The Columbus Dispatch that she, though earning $90,000 a year, swore on federal forms that she made just $25,000 -- so that her own two children would qualify for reduced-price school lunches. (2) Prime Healthcare Services, with a reputation for rescuing financially failing hospitals, reported that two new acquisitions, in Victorville, Calif., and Redding, Calif., somehow curiously experienced rates about 40 and 70 times the state average in patients with a rare Third World Ghanian sickness that, conveniently, qualified the hospitals for enhanced Medicare reimbursements.

[ LAST WEEK’S SOLUTION ON PAGE 37 ]

[ LOVESCOPE ] BY EUGENIA LAST ARIES (March 21-April 19): Make a move if someone you meet intrigues you. Interest will grow quickly if you are proactive in finding ways to engage your love interest in activities you enjoy regularly. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Someone from your past will be intent on getting back together with you. Proceed with caution; it is likely that the same problems that cropped up before will eventually surface again. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): You will attract plenty of potential partners if you participate, volunteer or get involved in a cause

you believe in. Your determination to make a difference and to help the underdog or the planet will invite someone who admires your propensity to bring about change for a cause you share. CANCER (June 21-July 22): You will be inclined to fall for someone who is already attached to someone else. Avoid being sweet-talked into a love triangle that isn’t in your best interests. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Your vast interests, coupled with your generosity and kindness, will lead to some rather interesting proposals from potential lovers. Being receptive but noncommittal will

put you in the driver’s seat when it comes to picking and choosing the partner who is right for you. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Someone will outsmart or outmaneuver you when it comes to cash and affairs of the heart. Don’t be too willing to spend your hard-earned cash on someone you want to impress. Money cannot buy love. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Back away from anyone trying to strong-arm you into an intimate relationship. You can do so much better if you focus on friendship and someone who enjoys the same pastimes as

you. A long distance romance may seem taxing but it also can lead to positive change. Consider making a move. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): You need to get along with someone mentally, emotionally, spiritually and physically in order for a relationship to turn into something promising and long-term. Anything short of sharing common interests, goals, ethics and morals will not withstand the test of time. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): You can change your whole world by hooking up with someone who offers you challenge, intrigue, excitement and

adventure. Look for the person who best fits these qualifications and don’t let go. Without that sort of stimulation, you are likely to become bored and move on. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Set down some ground rules when it comes to love before you begin your courtship. It’s important that you don’t overlook characteristics in a partner that you don’t like just because you are mesmerized by a potent physical attraction. Your partner’s mind must also be in sync with yours. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): You need to network and enjoy

the company of people who share your interests. Someone who is as innovative and inventive will tweak your imagination and be willing to engage in activities that only a partner who is right for you would consider. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): What you think you are getting and what you attract will not be one in the same. If someone is too accommodating, be careful not to fall into a relationship too quickly. Chances are good that as time passes you will be disappointed with the way this relationship unfolds.

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44 City JUNE 29 - july 5, 2011


June 29 - July 5, 2011 - CITY Newspaper