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EVENTS: CHARLIE MURPHY’S ACID TRIP, ART & TREASURES SALE 20 RESTAURANT REVIEW: WHITE SWANS ASIA CAFFE 11 THEATER REVIEW: ALBEE ONE-ACTS @ MUCCC 19 FILM: “MOONRISE KINGDOM” 28 URBAN JOURNAL: WHAT I SAW IN DETROIT

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get the led out

JUNE 27 - JULY 3, 2012 Free

mark farina

anthony green • mikaela davis • and MORE MUSIC, PAGE 12

Greater Rochester’s Alternative Newsweekly

Vol 41 No 42

News. Music. Life.

We’re after the violence. We’re not after the hip-hop.” NEWS, PAGE 4

An unfair advantage for Greece Ridge?

EVENTS, PAGE 22

City’s Jazz Blog: daily dispatches from the Fest. DETAILS, PAGE 12

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Where to watch things explode: July 4 guide.

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EDUCATION | BY TIM LOUIS MACALUSO | PAGE 6 | PHOTO BY MATT DETURCK

The march of the charters Josephine Horton says she would have moved her family to the suburbs if her son, Daunte, hadn’t been accepted at Urban Choice Charter School (pictured above). But Horton’s biting her nails anticipating the time her son grows out of Urban Choice. If the school doesn’t expand beyond 8th grade, she says she’ll reconsider moving to the suburbs. Horton, like so many parents around the country, didn’t trust her child’s education to a traditional public school, so she turned to one of Rochester’s charter schools. There are seven charters in Rochester — if Rochester Preparatory’s two middle schools are

counted separately — and more are scheduled to open in the fall. But charter schools are at the heart of a heated debate about how to fix the country’s faltering urban school districts. Many parents view charters as the answer to their prayers. But critics raise important questions. Are charters really public schools? Have they discovered the secret to higher achievement, or do they “cream” the best students from the district? And are charters destroying the traditional public education system? City looks at these and other issues this week in the first of an occasional series on charter schools.


Feedback We welcome your comments. Send them to themail@ rochester-citynews.com, or post them on our website, rochestercitynewspaper.com, our Facebook page, or our Twitter feed, @roccitynews. Comments of fewer than 350 words have a greater chance of being published, and we do edit selections for publication in print. We don’t publish comments sent to other media.

The Bug Jar’s importance

I understand that the recent events at the Bug Jar were tragic and jarring to our beautiful city. I hope that the cause of this incident is sorted out and dealt with in a timely fashion. I also want to express deep sympathy to the families and friends of those victimized by such a needless act. Rochester’s music, art, culinary, and cultural diversity make it a magnet for those of us who live in and around the area and appreciate these things. A vast majority of performance groups, art collectives, etc., owe many of their accomplishments to the few venues in town that take chances on original and unique musical acts, art installations, etc. These venues are an integral part of the Rochester experience and provide an unparalleled outlet for creativity and entertainment here. The importance of this outlet cannot by denied. It beckons many people to put down roots and remain in the area when there could be other options for career and family. We have been embraced by a very open and nondiscriminating environment and are proud to call Rochester our home for this reason. I urge city officials to consider the history and importance of the Bug Jar as it relates to a very large demographic in Rochester over the course of their investigation into the violent act that occurred recently. The venue is an integral part of our community and has been for a long time. The Bug Jar offers the opportunity to experience music, art, and beauty every  City

day that it opens its doors to the people of Rochester. We’re a much better city having them stay open. MICHAEL MUNN, ROCHESTER

Munn is a member of the local band Cavalcade.

The bus monitor and human nature

We all need someone to blame. Kids have been shockingly cruel since I can remember; they say deeply hurtful things to each other, they kill small animals for fun – we just haven’t always had iPhones readily available to capture it. I don’t blame “today’s kids.” We say “shame on their parents.” Yes, parenting is a strong factor in a child’s behavior. But then again, many serial killers come from perfectly “normal,” responsible, disciplined homes. And most great people I know came from messed up childhoods. Is it a new thing for humans to act out as youngsters, go against what is taught and expected of them, rebel against their parents’ plans for them? Until I’ve met these parents and observed how they raise their children, I’m not going to pass harsh judgment on them as so many have. “Blame society”? Good luck with that one. We all make up the same population – so, does that technically mean you blame yourself, too? So who do we blame? Maybe the human species for being cruel by nature and doomed to repeat our mistakes for the duration of our existence. So then I guess you can blame Who or whatever it was that created us. But just as parents can’t control their children’s future, Who/whatever created us probably didn’t intend on us being so selfdestructive, either. As proactive as we try to be, unexplainable acts of cruelty will continue to happen, and it’s how we react to them that defines us as humans. After 9/11, American humans beat the shit out of innocent Muslim-Americans. An innocent bus monitor gets verbally assaulted by children.

june 27 - JULY 3, 2012

Meantime, their parents are showered by hundreds of comments about what terrible people they are and how their kids deserve to be murdered and raped. The Greece kids are the owners of their actions and need to be punished appropriately. And the punishment needs to come from their parents; no use blaming the Greece school district or the police for not “doing something.” Preferably the punishment should actually serve the bus monitor: a summer’s worth of chores for her, a sincere apology (not an immediate reaction to all the media hype, but a hand-written reflection after they’ve had several weeks to think about the chaos they’ve caused), and maybe a nice gift, like a day at the spa while she’s on her vacation of a lifetime. And to those of us who respond emotionally and irrationally to cruelty, therefore perpetuating the very thing that we protest: I don’t blame you, either. You’re just a human. WILLY O’RILEY, ROCHESTER

Women, abortion, and the church

The Catholic bishops have declared June 21-July 4 as the “Fortnight for Freedom,” supposedly to highlight the importance of religious freedom. In Brazil, a 9-yearold girl was raped by her stepfather, and both she and the doctors who performed her abortion were excommunicated. The church has not taken steps against the stepfather; the archbishop for the region was quoted as saying that although the stepfather had committed a heinous crime, the abortion was more serious. Hundreds of millions of dollars have been spent by the church to settle pedophilia lawsuits. Every week, hard-working Catholics put money in the collection basket that the church then uses to protect pedophile priests and launch campaigns to create false controversies that are political in nature. Until women are given full equality in the

Catholic Church, the male hierarchy will continue to cling to their power thru any means necessary. Shame on them. Pursuit of power in the name of Jesus is obscene. PATRICIA MEGERLE, ROCHESTER

Papaleo’s take

I was at the Pittsford Library trying to complete coursework from my graduate-school program when for the third time this month, the library alarm went off. While exiting the building, I grabbed the recent City News to read, in case I was going to be stuck outside for a long time. I flipped to the movie reviews and started reading Dayna Papaleo’s hilarious review of “That’s My Boy” (June 20). I was literally laughing out loud. Of course, the picture next to it, with Adam Sandler and, more important, Andy Samberg’s classical doofus face, made me envision all the things she was describing. Dayna, thank you for the entertainment. It was what I needed after a truly horrible week and a half of reading and writing papers. You may wish to reconsider being a reviewer and consider moving to Hollywood and pitching your own screenplay. With your skill, we could have another “Bridesmaids.” LIZ SERLING, ROCHESTER

Helping students in city schools

Thank you for continuing to be a thorn in the side of our community by correctly insisting that it is our lack of meaningful commitment to the children of Rochester that perpetuates the cycle of under-educated urban youth and the continuation of a permanent and growing underclass (Urban Journal, June 13). I especially appreciate your response to those who fail to recognize that concentrated poverty means something different today than it did when their fore-

bearers arrived in America. And let’s not forget that most of these folks did not arrive in shackles. Denial of the roots of the problem or worse, blaming the parents and then just walking away, are what keeps me grinding my teeth at night. I want to believe that the people of the Greater Rochester area are better than this. There are pockets of hope and initiatives that help a small percentage of those in need, but until suburban leadership has the courage to integrate, I fear nothing will change. LINDA LOPATO, ROCHESTER

Campaign trivia

Mr. Moule apparently hasn’t taken a good look at the American Electorate lately. (“Obama and Romney Shouldn’t Trivialize the Presidential Campaign,” News Blog.) If he had, he might have noticed that they aren’t out in the streets demanding that the two candidates engage in serious debate. Nor are they complaining that they’re being short-changed. What they ARE doing, when they do anything at all, is responding favorably to the “small” style of campaigning epitomized by the use of useless (for this purpose) technologies such as Twitter, Farcebook, etc. A candidate would be a fool to waste his/her time and money trying to hammer a lengthy or detailed message into the heads of those who live in a world bounded by such short-attention-span activities as texting and nattering on cell phones. You want to blame somebody, Mr. Moule, then blame the “consumers,” not the “suppliers.” The fault, dear Brutus, is not in our candidates, but in ourselves! CHAIM DELOYE

Posted on rochestercitynewspaper.com.

News. Music. Life. Greater Rochester’s Alternative Newsweekly June 27 - July 3, 2012 Vol 41 No 42 250 North Goodman Street Rochester, New York 14607-1199 themail@rochester-citynews.com phone (585) 244-3329 fax (585) 244-1126 rochestercitynewspaper.com Publishers: William and Mary Anna Towler Editor: Mary Anna Towler Asst. to the publishers: Matt Walsh Editorial department themail@rochester-citynews.com Features editor: Eric Rezsnyak News editor: Christine Carrie Fien Staff writers: Tim Louis Macaluso, Jeremy Moule Music editor: Willie Clark Music writer: Frank De Blase Calendar editor: Rebecca Rafferty Contributing writers: Kate Antoniades, Paloma Capanna, Casey Carlsen, Roman Divezur, George Grella, Susie Hume, Andy Klingenberger, Dave LaBarge, Kathy Laluk, Michael Lasser, James Leach, Ron Netsky, Dayna Papaleo, Rebecca Rafferty, David Yockel Jr. Editorial intern: Alexandra Carmichael, Antoinette Ena Johnson, Anne Ritz Art department artdept@rochester-citynews.com Production manager: Max Seifert Designers: Aubrey Berardini, Matt DeTurck Photographers: Frank De Blase, Matt DeTurck, Michael Hanlon Photography Intern: Lauren Petracca Advertising department ads@rochester-citynews.com Advertising sales manager: Betsy Matthews Account executives: Tom Decker, Annalisa Iannone, William Towler Classified sales representatives: Christine Kubarycz, Tracey Mykins Operations/Circulation info@rochester-citynews.com Circulation Manager: Katherine Stathis Distribution: Andy DiCiaccio, David Riccioni, Northstar Delivery, Wolfe News City Newspaper is available free of charge. Additional copies of the current issue may be purchased for $1, payable in advance at the City Newspaper office. City Newspaper may be distributed only by authorized distributors. No person may, without prior written permission of City Newspaper, take more than one copy of each weekly issue. City (ISSN 1551-3262) is published weekly by WMT Publications, Inc. Periodical postage paid at Rochester, NY (USPS 022-138). Send address changes to City, 250 North Goodman Street, Rochester, NY 14607. City is a member of the Association of Alternative Newsweeklies and the New York Press Association. Subscriptions: $35.00 ($30.00 for senior citizens) for one year. Add $10 yearly for out-of-state subscriptions: add $30 yearly for foreign subscriptions. Due to the initial high cost of establishing new subscriptions, refunds for fewer than ten months cannot be issued. Copyright by WMT Publications Inc., 2012 - all rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, photocopying, recording or by any information storage retrieval system without permission of the copyright owner.


NEW LOCATION IN VILLAGE GATE

urban journal | by mary anna towler

Same Chefs and Staff New Full Service Bar

What I saw in Detroit It’s risky to visit a city for a few days, see only part of it, and then draw conclusions. But you can’t visit Detroit – as we did earlier this month for our alternative news media convention – and not be stunned by the devastation: the result, physical and human, of years of abandonment by residents, by manufacturing, by investment. City block after city block of empty, weedy lots, boarded-up houses, fire-scarred apartment buildings. Spectacular, thriving downtown buildings nearly cheek to jowl with tall, hauntingly empty ones. Signs in a middle-class neighborhood announcing that it is patrolled by a private security force. Concern about crime so serious that convention-goers were warned, by the convention hosts, to take a cab, not walk, from our hotel to the MGM Casino five blocks away. (Online, I’ll include links to some Detroit photo websites.) Detroit has a lot going for it. The Detroit Institute of Arts’ Diego Rivera murals alone make the museum worth visiting. The city’s rich collection of important architecture includes Mies van der Rohe’s beautiful Lafayette Park and Frank Lloyd Wright’s Dorothy Turkel House (recently privately restored). And despite challenges that would snuff out the hope of many Americans, Detroit is fighting its way back, in big ways and small. Campus Martius Park becomes a lively, people-filled, downtown community center over lunch hour. Quicken Loans founder Dan Gilbert not only had his company build a new headquarters downtown but has been convincing other companies to follow his example. Renaissance Center, the sports stadium, restaurants, hotels: there’s a lot going on downtown. There’s plenty going on in Detroit neighborhoods, too, led by residents themselves: community gardens, neighborhood preservation, outdoor art…. The afternoon we went to see the Turkel House, it was hosting a fund-raiser for the Woodward Avenue Action Association, a neighborhood group whose work focuses on everything from public safety, street beautification, and code enforcement to community organizing. What Detroit residents and community leaders are doing is impressive. And yet Detroit has lost so much. Its population is now less than 750,000 – down from a peak of about 2 million. The result includes residential blocks where well over half of the houses have been demolished, commercial strips dominated by deteriorating buildings, a high poverty rate, and a city government that strains to provide basic services.

Detroit is simply a particularly stark example of what happens when a nation decides that cities are no longer important.”

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What has happened to Detroit is unconscionable. And Detroit is not alone, of course. It is simply a particularly stark example of what happens when a nation decides that cities are no longer important and that their decline has no consequences. (“Syracuse Will Be Broke Within Three Years,” read a recent Syracuse Post-Standard headline.) Detroit’s effort to survive and thrive, against soul-killing odds, is inspirational. But I have to admit that it was really, really good to get back to Rochester, where the decline has not been as severe (relatively, at any rate) and the odds against recovery aren’t quite as large (relatively). A few days after we got home, we went to the kick-off party for the Jazz Festival, which this week is again packing downtown streets and concert venues with ecstatic people of every age and ethnicity. (Look what we’re doing in Rochester! Success!) At the kick-off party in the Eastman Place atrium, the Jazz Fest’s founders talked about this year’s event while across Main Street, men were rhythmically leaning and straining, pulling on ropes and raising the festival’s Big Tent by hand. That is how America’s cities are being saved, by individual people leaning and straining and pulling by hand. This nation has abandoned its cities, emotionally, financially, morally. Cities are having to survive on their own, because we have no urban policy, not at the federal level, not at the state level, not at the county level. And the work for Detroit, Rochester, Syracuse, and far too many others – the work for their residents, their business owners, their public officials – gets harder, not easier. Because we have decided that cities are no longer important. rochestercitynewspaper.com

City 


[ news from the week past ]

Cataract demolition

the moratorium is needed because there hasn’t been sufficient research into the impact of fracking in urban areas, and that the process “may pose a significant threat to the health, safety, and welfare” of residents and visitors.

Demolition began on the old Cataract Street brew house. The building was the subject of a fierce preservation battle earlier this year, but in the end, the city agreed to let North American Breweries tear down the historic building to construct a museum, microbrewery, restaurant, and other amenities on Cataract Street in the city’s St. Paul corridor.

News

Deal reached on teacher evals

State lawmakers agreed to provide the public with limited access to teacher and principal evaluations. The decision has been controversial, since some lawmakers supported full disclosure of all information pertaining to the evaluations. But Democrats and Republicans agreed on a version introduced by Governor Andrew Cuomo that makes scores available on the State Education Department’s website.

Intermodal mojo

The City of Rochester received $15 million from the feds to construct the first phase of the intermodal station on Central Avenue. It would replace the existing Amtrak station and house trains and intercity buses. There are questions, though, about the need for the new station. The main justification is to prime the city for high-speed rail, but the concept seems to have lost momentum in some circles, including Congress.

SOTA students sentenced

Students who were involved in vandalizing the School of the Arts were allowed to graduate, but they had to complete 10 hours of community service first. The punishment followed an investigation by school officials into damages that included spray painting SOTA’s entrance.

No fracking, no how

Rochester City Council approved a one-year moratorium on natural gas exploration and extraction in the city. Council members said

A rally was held at the Liberty Pole on Sunday to remember Deavoughn Hernandez-Ruffin, who was killed outside the Bug Jar last week. Photo by LAUREN PETRACCA ENTERTAINMENT | BY CHRISTINE CARRIE FIEN

Bug Jar breakdown The Bug Jar may have to change the way it operates as a result of a shooting death outside the club last week. City Hall asked the owners of the iconic bar to temporarily close after Deavoughn Hernandez-Ruffin of Rochester was shot and killed following a fight inside the club. Some people have focused on the fact that a “rap battle” concert was taking place at the time of the fight. But Mayor Tom Richards says don’t blame the music. “There are all kinds of music where people get riled up and do things they shouldn’t do,” he says. “We’re after the violence. We’re not after the hip hop.”

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Richards says that before the Bug Jar can reopen, he wants a plan in place to prevent similar incidents. And the city might end up putting conditions on the Bug Jar’s entertainment license, he says. Those conditions can range from increasing security to reducing maximum occupancy, Richards says. “It might entail not doing the kind of concert they did before because they can’t control it, or because they’re unwilling to put in the kind of investment to control it,” he says. “That’s a relatively small venue, and maybe this just isn’t the kind of thing for them to do there.”

“It’s a funky place and it attracts a funky crowd, but not a violent crowd,” Richards says. “There’s nothing wrong with being funky. There’s nothing wrong with being hip hop. It’s just, you can’t shoot each other.” The Bug Jar will likely be assigned nuisance points as a result of this latest issue, says city spokesperson Gary Walker. But nuisance points rarely lead to a place being permanently shut down, he says. The city was also required by law to report the incident to the State Liquor Authority, Richards says.


Do property tax breaks for retail make sense? The answer isn’t simple, though critics and some researchers generally say they don’t. Tax breaks for retail often amount to government subsidizing one store or restaurant at the expense of another, they say.

DEVELOPMENT | BY JEREMY MOULE

HEALTH | by jeremy moule

Tax shopping The County Industrial Development Agency has some thinking to do. After the Greece Central School District protested a property tax break for Greece Ridge Mall, COMIDA delayed a decision on the deal. The school district says it stands to lose at least $6 million in tax money over 25 years, based on a study it commissioned. COMIDA has a different analysis that says the district won’t lose money. The tax breaks would come through a payment in lieu of taxes agreement. But there’s a broader question: Do property tax breaks for retail make sense? The answer isn’t simple, though critics and some researchers generally say they don’t. Tax breaks for retail often amount to government subsidizing one store or restaurant at the expense of another, they say. Retail businesses are dependent on the market. They locate where they think they’ll draw enough customers to be profitable, and they generally draw from a fixed spending pool, says Kent Gardner, president of the Center for Governmental Research. In other words, if a store locates in a mall, it’s pulling from the same group of customers as other local stores. For that reason, new retail isn’t likely to increase total retail spending in the Rochester region. The exception: if it taps into markets that aren’t served at all.

Kent Gardner. FILE PhotO

Dennis Wilmot, an executive with the mall’s owner, Wilmorite, told the COMIDA board that renovation plans for the mall’s former Bon-Ton store won’t proceed without the PILOT agreement. Wilmorite plans to redevelop the former store into smaller spaces. The company is trying to keep the mall viable and attractive to tenants, Wilmot said. To that end, a PILOT may actually help, not necessarily because of the lower taxes but because of “tax certainty,” Gardner says. Wilmorite would know exactly what it’ll pay in taxes for, in this case, the next 30 years. That allows the company to tell potential tenants what their lease payments will be years in advance. But even then, there’s still a question of whether the tax breaks will give the mall an unfair competitive advantage over other plazas and retail spaces.

Bookends Summer Bookout!

Lead picture improves Last year, Monroe County had fewer reports of children younger than age 6 with elevated levels of lead in their blood. | Specifically, the number of children with blood-lead levels of 10 micrograms per deciliter dropped from 290 in 2010 to 222 in 2011, according to statistics released recently by the Coalition to Prevent Lead Poisoning. In Monroe County, 10 micrograms is the blood-lead threshold that triggers intervention by public health officials. | The 2011 figure is significantly lower than it was in 1999, when 1,698 children had bloodlead levels above 10 micrograms per deciliter. | “We have been making tremendous progress over the years in reducing the amount of lead poisoned children,” says Dr. Andrew Doniger, director of the county Health Department. | Earlier this year, the Centers for Disease Control recommended a lower intervention threshold of 5 micrograms per deciliter. There were 993 Monroe County children under age 6 who exceeded that threshold in 2011.| Mel Callan, a nurse practitioner with Highland Family Medicine and co-chair of the Coalition to Prevent Lead Poisoning, says more frequent inspection of older one- and two-unit buildings would help bring child lead poisoning numbers down further.

Cost of War AFGHANISTAN TOTALS

2016 US servicemen and servicewomen and 1,038 Coalition servicemen and servicewomen have been killed in Afghanistan from the beginning of the war and occupation to June 22. Statistics for Afghan civilian casualties are not available. American casualties from June 13 to 20: -- Sgt. Nicholas C. Fredsti, 30, San Diego, Calif. -- Sgt. Joseph M. Lilly, 25, Flint, Mich. -- Spc. Trevor A. Pinnick, 20, Lawrenceville, Ill. -- Pfc. Jarrod A. Lallier, 20, Spokane, Wash. -- 1st Lt. Ryan D. Rawl, 30, Lexington, S.C. -- Sgt. 1st Class Matthew B. Thomas, 30, Travelers Rest, S.C. -- Spc. John D. Meador II, 36, Columbia, S.C. —

iraqbodycount. org, icasualties.org, Department of Defense SOURCES:

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EDUCATION | BY TIM LOUIS MACALUSO

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This is the first in an occasional series on charter schools in Rochester. Preparations for this series included visits to every Rochester charter, classroom observations, and interviews with administrators, parents, and others.

The future of Josephine Horton’s family depended on whether or not her son, Daunte, got into a charter school. Josephine applied to two on her son’s behalf, and Daunte was accepted at Urban Choice Charter School. Horton says she was not only overjoyed, but relieved. Now her family could stay in the City of Rochester, instead of packing up for the suburbs. “I felt like I won the lottery,” she says. And she did. Most charter schools, including Urban Choice, use lotteries to admit students. Daunte finished fourth grade this year, and Horton says she couldn’t be happier with his performance or the school. And why wouldn’t she be? Josephine Horton says she felt like she won the lottery when The school’s small parking lot her son, Daunte, was accepted at Urban Choice. off of Floverton Street hums Photo by MATT DETURCK with cars and buses by 8:30 in the morning. Children, many with their But safety is not her only concern about parents in tow, pass through a welcoming Rochester’s schools. gauntlet of smiling adults and shaking hands. “They’re cutting programs and I just don’t The school’s main building, a 1960’s style feel that the education quality is there,” she says. red brick structure wrapped in long, wide But Horton’s biting her nails anticipating the windows, sits neatly on a quiet tree-lined time her son grows out of Urban Choice. If the street. The hallways and walls inside are school doesn’t expand beyond 8th grade, she says covered with children’s art and photos. she’ll reconsider moving to the suburbs. Urban Choice evokes images of the little Horton is one of millions of parents neighborhood school that many adults nationwide, mostly in urban communities, remember from their childhood. And parents who say they don’t want their children trapped like Josephine Horton yearn for that kind of in failing public schools. They turn to the experience for their own children. high-stakes lotteries of charter schools, often Horton has family members with children because they cannot afford a private education in Rochester’s schools, and she dismisses any for their children. thought of her son attending a city school. But charter schools are at the center of a “I have to think of the safety of my son,” hotly contested debate about the future of she says. “I feel the city school district has a the country’s public education system. And problem with safety, and it’s trickling down to there is considerable confusion about charters, the elementary schools.” including the charter schools in Rochester:  City

june 27 - JULY 3, 2012

Are they really public schools? Have they discovered the secret to higher student achievement, or do charters “cream” the best students from the district? And are charters draining resources from traditional public schools, or are they causing teachers and administrators to think more competitively? There’s also what critics describe as the “charter school mystique.” The allure of charters is almost overpowering for some parents, critics say, causing those parents and their children unwarranted emotional duress. Even though the verdict is still out on whether charter schools can deliver better results than traditional public schools, one thing is certain: parents in Rochester and in school districts across the country want more of them. The history of the charter school movement

can be traced to the 1970’s when innovation became a theme for improving public school outcomes in some of the country’s largest and most troubled school districts like New York City, Philadelphia, Los Angeles, and Chicago. As urban public schools produced fewer and fewer college-ready graduates, educators, parents, and community leaders began questioning whether a one size fits all approach to education still worked. But it wasn’t until 1991 that Minnesota approved the first charter school legislation in the US, with the first school opening a year later. New York passed its charter school legislation in 1998. Though charter schools are the subject of considerable debate, they’re definitely not a fad, as some critics say, that will burn out in a few years. Despite the country’s bitterly partisan political environment, charter schools seem to draw support from both Democrats and Republicans. The cap on the number of charter schools is being raised in many states. And in some states, the cap is being eliminated all together.

The number of students attending charter schools has risen by 76 percent over the last five years, according to the National Alliance for Public Charter Schools. Student enrollment in charter schools jumped from 1,165,200 in the 2006 to 2007 school year, to 2,035,261 in 2011 to 2012, says the NACPS. Over the same period, the number of charter schools in the US grew from 3,999 to 5,627, with more than 520 new schools opening this year. Locally, more than 2,200 Rochester students were enrolled in seven charter schools at the beginning of the 2011 to 2012 school year, say Rochester school district officials. And at least two more charters are expected to open in the city in September. The demand is high. Most of the Rochester schools have waiting lists for students who didn’t win a lottery, but are called when vacancies occur. Charter schools are public schools financed with public funding. The framework for approving and operating charter schools is usually determined at the state level. In New York, for example, applications for new charter schools can be approved by either the Board of Trustees for the State University of New York, or New York State Board of Regents. And nearly embossed on the schools’ charter documents is the right to autonomy from local school district authorities, oversight, and regulations. “There is a Perestroika happening in education, where you’re not having only the top-down model,” says Steve Mancini, a spokesperson for the Knowledge is Power Program. KIPP has 109 charter schools in 20 states and Washington, D.C., serving 33,000 students. But does this emphasis on autonomy explain why so many parents are attracted to charters? No, but autonomy lays the ground work, since the schools’ founders are free to


adopt an existing education model, or to innovate and create something new. And that provides parents with choices: the real engine driving the charter school movement. “Parents are often the first to recognize the needs of their children, and usually know best when it comes to identifying a learning environment that would allow their children to thrive,” says Michelle Rhee. The fiery former chancellor of Washington, D.C.’s schools is founder and CEO of StudentsFirst, an education advocacy group. “Public charter schools help to empower parents with public school choice, so they can select the school environment that is best for their children,” Rhee says. People are just beginning to understand charter schools, says Marci Weber, a parent at Urban Choice. Weber says parents need more high-quality education options for their children and charter schools help fill that need. They’re not the regimented, standardized testing hives that critics have portrayed, she says. Weber’s son, George, is in third grade at Urban Choice, where he’s taking fourth-grade math and doing fine, she says. “It should be your choice where you send your child to school based on what you think they need,” she says. “Every kid doesn’t fit neatly into every school. Every kid is different, and I think you as a parent need to find out what’s out there.” But charter schools offer more than just an

alternative to traditional public schools. One of their key advantages is their self-styled approach to education. Parents have a range of choices, even among charters in Rochester: from relaxed schools with fewer restrictions, to schools with highly structured environments. For example, the Genesee Community Charter School, a K to 6 school, uses the Expeditionary Learning model, which is based on the work of German educator Kurt Hahn. Students engage in interdisciplinary research, often on issues relevant to the community. And they frequently venture into the community to conduct field work, which becomes the basis of their publications and presentations. Tours of Genesee Community are often lead by the students, and the school’s leader, Lisa Wing, probably wouldn’t be able to hire a better promotional team. Their carefully thought out and earnestly delivered descriptions of the school’s activities could close the deal with even the most skeptical parents. Genesee Community has two teachers to a classroom with as many as 30 students, which allows teachers to break students into smaller learning groups. “One teacher may have a small group of five who need some intervention, while the other teacher takes the other 25,” Wing says. “That co-teaching model allows for flexibility in meeting kids’ needs. And it allows us to really be where the child is.”

Charters

at a glance

Charters are public schools that operate autonomously of the district in which they’re located. There are seven that are part of the Rochester school district.

(Left) Genesee Community Charter School has an idyllic location behind the Rochester Museum and Science Center on East Avenue. (Right) Eugenio Maria de Hostos Charter School, located in the heart of Rochester’s Latino community, provides dual language instruction. PhotoS by LAUREN PETRACCA

It also allows teachers to deal with discipline issues without interrupting the entire class, Wing says. But is Genesee Community a good fit for every child? “I think kids who need a lot of structure, a lot of predictability from day to day, and less stimulation around them, it’s probably not right for them,” Wing says. “But that’s not that many children.” University Preparatory Charter for Young Men, an all-boys middle school, offers something entirely different. Long gone is the rustle of nuns’ robes, and the alcoves that once dressed the hallways with statues of saints are bare. But University Prep’s dress code is a reminder of the building’s beginnings as a Catholic school. “Boys wear uniforms,” says Joseph Munno, the school’s principal. “Shirt and ties, dress pants, and shoes are required every day. No sneakers, no head gear, and no jewelry are allowed.” Munno says he doesn’t take anything for granted, including that the young boys know how to dress professionally. “I want them to understand as early as 7th grade that your appearance is everything,” Munno says. “Your cleanliness counts. When you enter the world of work, when you’re applying for college, you need to impress the other person you’re meeting before you even open your mouth to speak.” Munno, a former principal at Rochester’s John Marshall High School, says he’s often asked why University Prep is for boys only. “When we decided to open a charter school, we said, ‘What’s the neediest population?’” Munno says. “It’s the boys. Every strike is against urban boys. Their truancy is higher, their dropout rate is higher, and their getting into trouble is higher. And with all respect to the females, eliminating the girls from the school brings out the best in the boys. They participate. They speak and read out loud. And they don’t make fun of each other.” The school focuses on three things: reading, writing, and math.

“The rigor here is not just to be able to get into college,” Munno says. “This is the thing that hurts urban kids. We can find a college for them. We can even get them in. But so many of them don’t have the skills needed to survive as a college student. That’s our focus here.” Even more highly structured is Rochester Preparatory, which has two middle schools and an elementary school in Rochester. The schools are managed by Uncommon Schools, which has 28 charter schools in New York, New Jersey, and Massachusetts. Long strips of tape mark the hallway floors to show students where they should line up and stand after leaving their classrooms. Students quickly form a tight and straight line and wait for the next direction, their feet barely making a sound on the floor. Their teachers walk past them, almost like an inspector. A gentle reminder will draw students’ heads up straight and eyes to the front. “We believe that learning should be fun, but that doesn’t mean it’s a laugh riot,” says Anna Hall, Rochester Prep’s chief operating officer. Eugenio Maria de Hostos is another example of the diversity of Rochester’s charter schools. The K to 7 school has taken what is sometimes a controversial approach to education by offering a dual language curriculum with instruction in Spanish and English. But its founders say the approach is critically important because a lack of communication skills can lead to isolation and low student achievement. Having a school like Eugenio Maria de Hostos empowers parents in Rochester’s Latino community, says Julio Vazquez Sr., president of the school’s board of directors. It’s hard enough to engage parents, but it further intimidates them when they come to a school and don’t understand what’s happening, he says. “Bilingualism is not a disadvantage,” Vazquez says. “It’s an asset for our students.”

The information below was provided by the Rochester school district and the New York State Department of Education‘s 2010-2011 “School Report Card.”

Eugenio Maria de Hostos Charter 938 Clifford Ave • Opened: Sept. 2000 Enrolls K-8: about 400 students

Eligible for free and reduced price lunch:

92%

Genesee Community Charter School 657 East Ave • Opened: Aug. 2001

about 230 students

Eligible for free and reduced price lunch:

17%

Rochester Academy Charter School 841 Genesee St • Opened: Sept. 2008 Enrolls 7-12: about 350 students

Eligible for free and reduced price lunch:

75% Roch. Preparatory Charter School-West Campus 1020 Maple St • Opened: Aug. 2011 Enrolls grade 5: about 87 students

Eligible for free and reduced price lunch:

NA Roch. Preparatory Charter School-Brooks Campus 630 Brooks Ave • Opened: Aug. 2006

about 550 students

83% University Prep. Charter School for Young Men 180 Raines Park • Opened: Sept. 2010 Enrolls 7-9: about 200 students

Eligible for free and reduced price lunch:

86%

Urban Choice Charter School 545 Humboldt St • Opened: Sept. 2007

about 400 students

Though there is a range of charter

schools for Rochester parents to pursue, charters do tend to have some important characteristics in common. continues on page 8

Eligible for free and reduced price lunch:

81% More information: www.p12.nysed.gov/irs/reportcard/

rochestercitynewspaper.com

City 


CHARTERS continues from page 7

For example, they tend to be small schools, having fewer than 1,000 students. Some of Rochester’s charters are still growing into their full capacity, and currently have enrollments of several hundred students. Some will stay at fewer than 500 students by design. But it’s mostly a myth that charter schools have smaller classes. Genesee Community, for example, has as many as 30 students to a classroom. But charter schools frequently have more teachers and adults working with those students. Charters tend to open in poor neighborhoods in large urban school districts. Though they typically give preference to city students from lowincome households, suburban families can apply, too. And most charters have longer school days and longer school years, with less vacation and seasonal breaks. Some charters have Saturday classes or tutoring. “The average low-income student entering kindergarten has a significant word deficit,” says Rochester Prep’s Hall. “So what I would argue is that you cannot address that with the typical repertoire. Our elementary students go to school from 7:30 [a.m.] to 4:30[ p.m.]. And elementary students don’t have naps and recess. We believe school is for learning.” University Preparatory has longer school days, too. And it doesn’t stop there. “I have after-school tutoring and Saturday morning tutoring,” Munno says. He also arranged for his students to go to St. John Fisher College for 20 days of intensive preparation for their Regents exams “I think we’re putting in the support needed to succeed, and the boys know that,” Munno says. The longer hours of instruction and intense academic workouts pay off in better student outcomes in some charter schools, but not all. Some charters are showing higher student achievement than others, and some are struggling to improve student performance, just like their colleagues in city schools. Rochester has also seen two of its charters close due to poor student performance. “We have outperformed the district in every test, in every grade, in every year we’ve been open,” says Rochester Prep’s Hall. Though Hall is correct, there’s a caveat. The district’s low graduation rate — less than 50 percent again this year — and its low student test scores are well known. But comparing the performance of a small charter school to the performance of a district of many schools is unfair, say advocates of traditional public schools. There are excellent schools within the district, too. And a better comparison might be a charter school to a similar city school.  City

june 27 - JULY 3, 2012

(Left) Urban Choice Charter School has a large staff to provide a surround care experience for its students, says John Bliss, (lower center) the school’s CEO and founder. (Right) Students come to Urban Choice from all areas of the city, though it feels like a neighborhood school. PhotoS by MATT DETURCK

For example, School 58 offers an Expeditionary Learning model similar to some charter schools, and 58 is extremely popular with parents. Perhaps the most controversial characteristic shared by charter schools is that, in most cases, teachers and administrators are not represented by a labor union. Charter school leaders tend to view this as a big advantage. “Teachers in this school work extremely hard,” says University Prep’s Munno. “They work at the pleasure of the principal. It’s more difficult to work with an at-will contract than a collective bargaining contract. It just is. You’re held more accountable.” If a teacher isn’t a good fit, he or she is out, Munno says. Not only can charter school leaders identify an ineffective teacher quicker, it’s also easier to identify a teacher who isn’t right for the school’s culture, or doesn’t excel at the style of teaching the school promotes. That teacher can be terminated and replaced relatively quickly. Months and in some cases years of haggling over the nuances of an employee’s performance — a major criticism of most traditional public schools — is not an issue for the typical charter school. The lack of a union dynamic is also in keeping with the autonomy factor that is so important to charter schools. Charter school leaders say they have a nimbleness and flexibility that allows for quick decisions. Bargaining units add another huge layer of bureaucracy to central offices in large urban districts that are already anchored with too many rules and regulations, they say. Simple decisions like purchasing a copier or taking students to a movie or on a field trip become mountainous in traditional public schools, says John Bliss, CEO and founder of Urban Choice. And that discourages teachers and principals, he says. Charter schools also tend to have some

criticisms in common. The most frequent is that they “skim” or “cream” students from their districts, which gives them an unfair advantage

when it comes to student performance. And they do it in a variety of ways, critics say. The fact that parents fill out an application to a charter indicates to some critics that the parents are more involved in their child’s education. That child is therefore likely to come from a more stable surrounding, and the parent is more likely to cover the basics, like making sure the child is rested and that homework is done, critics say. But advocates of charter schools say this is nonsense. Parents have to complete an application to enroll their child in any school, they say. And some of the leaders of Rochester’s charters say that they struggle with parent involvement in their schools, too. And much of it is for the same reason teachers and principals cite in city schools: many city parents are poor, and they don’t have jobs with flexible work schedules. But teachers and principals in charters seem to place a huge emphasis on forging partnerships with parents. University Preparatory’s Munno says he is constantly networking with parents. And parents don’t need appointments to meet their child’s teachers. Between the hours of 7:30 a.m. and 4:30 p.m., University Prep’s door is always open to them, Munno says. “I say, ‘You can come any day in those hours and I will bring all of your kid’s teachers to the table,’” he says. And Munno says he asks parents to visit often, and not just when there are problems. “I absolutely believe in celebrations for achievement,” he says. “And I tell them, ‘When I celebrate your child’s success, you need to be here and do it with me.’ And they come out.” Hall at Rochester Prep says that her teachers spend a lot of time changing parents’ perceptions about education. “A lot of families have had a pretty negative school experience,” she says. Critics who say that charter schools have an advantage because of more involved parents are only looking at one aspect of what that means, Hall says.

“The flipside to that argument is that people can leave,” she says. The more involved and borderline middle class parent can be more discerning and demanding, Hall says. “They know they have options,” she says. “Their only tool is advocacy and they will use it. If you’re a hammer, everything is a nail.” But critics say charter schools also cream by not accepting every student. Children with severe behavioral problems, learning challenges, or physical handicaps can be turned away, more or less “cleansing” the pool of students. The criticism stings some of Rochester’s charter school leaders, and they all insist it isn’t true, with a bit of qualification. Their lotteries typically don’t reveal much about the child’s capabilities. And each of the charters enrolls students with issues ranging from socialemotional to autism, they say. But students with severe physical handicaps can receive more services at the city school district, say the charter leaders. “I do disagree that we cream,” says Rochester Prep’s Anna Hall. “We do take every child. If a child has some behavior problems, then he’s a child. All children make bad decisions. But we do not have the capacity to work with the most physically handicapped children, nor do I think we’re the best place for them. Just the same way, if you want a bilingual program, we’re not a bilingual program. And if you want an arts focused program, we’re not an arts focused program.” But at least two of the charter schools’ leaders say that parents are not always dissuaded. Sometimes the charter school environment is more important to them than the district’s services, they say. The most inflammatory criticism of charter schools is that they’re sabotaging traditional

public schools. The legislation that created charter schools was often sold as a way to provide school districts with “incubators” for experimentation; their autonomous nature


would provide lessons to help improve traditional public schools. But instead of helping public schools, charters are draining them of their resources, critics say. And charter schools are permitted to operate like private schools, while being underwritten by taxpayers. “I think the charters’ position is sufficiently well thought out,” says Adam Urbanski, president of the Rochester Teachers Association. “It helps the few.” Charter critics say the schools have opened the door to privatization, and their backers’ real interests are in making money on everything from textbook publishing to real estate. And they warn that the country is witnessing the slow death of the traditional public school system. Millions of dollars are being diverted away from ailing urban schools, which have become portals for money to pass through to other organizations, they say. And it’s more than just the money that public schools receive from the state. Funding for educational grants is being diluted, and there are rising hard costs to bear, too, such as energy. Another example: in Rochester, the city school district assists charters with transportation, which is one of the district’s biggest budgetary expenses. And the loss of city students to charter schools could make it difficult to plan for future infrastructure, manpower, and programs, some school officials say. But education reformers say the “draining resources” claim is an over the top response to healthy and much needed competition. Traditional public schools have learned plenty from charter schools during the last 20 years, they say, such as the need for extended hours of instruction and having more educational choices. But it’s up to school boards, administrators, and unions to apply these lessons, they say. When Fed Ex began offering nextday delivery, nobody thought the postal service could compete, says KIPP’s Steve Mancini. “Not only did other groups come in and offer next-day mail, but you saw the US Postal Service offer next-day mail,” he says. “And I think that’s what we’re seeing.” Thirty years from now, education historians will say that charter schools did for poor urban families what Ralph Nader did for US consumers: gave them better options, Mancini says. “Demographics should not dictate destiny,” he says. When charter school critics say that public schools are losing money and students, the big question is why, Mancini says. “You can figure it out or wage war with these schools,” he says.

Charter school

YOU’RE A REAL EYE OPENER

SUNGLASS SALE

performance

40% OFF

This information was taken from the New York State Education’s website for the 2010-2011 school year. “Level 3 proficiency” refers to students who performed at grade level on state tests.

ON ALL SUNGLASS FRAMES

Eugenio Maria de Hostos Charter Level 3 proficiency:

Grade 3 English: Grade 3 math: Grade 7 English: Grade 7 math:

66% 82% 26% 74%

2929 Monroe Ave. 442-0123

Appointments Suggested

Genesee Community Charter School Grade 3 English: Grade 3 math: Grade 6 English: Grade 6 math:

90% 84% 81% 88%

*school does not have grade 7

Rochester Academy Charter School Grade 7 English: Grade 7 math:

15% 33%

*school does not have grade 3

Rochester Preparatory Charter School-Brooks Campus Grade 7 English: Grade 7 math:

49% 90%

*NYS data only available on Brooks Campus for 2010-2011.

University Preparatory Charter School for Young Men Grade 7 English: Grade 7 math:

25% 31%

*school does not have grade 3

Urban Choice Charter School Grade 3 English: Grade 3 math: Grade 6 English: Grade 6 math:

56% 69% 24% 33%

More information: www.p12.nysed.gov/irs/reportcard/

rochestercitynewspaper.com

City 


MOONLIGHT STROLL MUSIC SERIES

ICHMOND STREET 21 R 270-8570

FRIDAY NIGHTS 8-10PM The Gardens are aglow again!

Cash Wine Bar • Mansion Tours

ROCHESTER’S

FAVORITE TAVERN! OUTDOOR DECK ALL SUMMER! ENJOY THE #1 CHICKEN WINGS IN ROCHESTER!

PERFORMANCES BY: JULY 6 - 198th Army Concert Band JULY 13 - Tullamore Celtic Band & the Young School of Irish Dance

JULY 20 - Rochester Metropolitan

WATCH THE GAMES LISTEN TO YOUR FAVORITE MUSIC MAKE A FEW MEMORIES

Jazz Orchestra

JULY 27 - The Music Makers Big Band $9 Adults •$7 Members •$4 Youth 6-17 Kids under 5 are FREE

AUG. 10 - Bat McGrath Special Performance

UNCLE RALPH’S BACK FOR LIFE

“Bat, Brats and Brews”

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EVERY SUNDAY 4-9PM

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EVERY THURSDAY - SATURDAY! Thursdays: Todd East 7-10pm For more Tom Tomorrow, including a political blog and cartoon archive, visit http://thismodernworld.com

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COME HAVE A GOOD TIME!

151 Charlotte St. Canandaigua 394-4922 •www.sonnenberg.org This organization is supported in part with public funds from the New York State Council on the Arts Decentralization Program which is administrated locally by Phelps Art Center.

Potential Subjects NEEDED FOR A 52 week research study examining the safety and efficacy of a topical investigational solution of study medication or vehicle solution for infected toenails. Subjects who qualify will be compensated for time and travel, study related assessments included.

Urban Action This week’s calls to action include the following events and activities. (All are free and open to the public, unless otherwise noted.)

Book discussion

The Moving Beyond Racism Book Group meets at 7 p.m. on Monday, July 2, to discuss James Ford’s “Hotel on the Corner of Bitter and Sweet.” The meeting is at Barnes & Noble in Pittsford Plaza. Reading the book in advance of the meeting is not required.

Bicycle and pedestrian planning meeting

The Brighton Bicycle and Pedestrian Task Force will hold “Exploring Alternatives,” an information meeting at 7 p.m. on Thursday, June 28. The Town of Brighton has been awarded $68,500 from the Genesee Transportation Council’s Unified Planning Work Program to develop a pedestrian and bicycle master plan, and citizen input is needed. The meeting is at Brighton Town Hall, 2300 Elmwood Avenue.

Drone warfare discussion

Rochester Against War hosts a talk by activist Medea Benjamin on Friday, July 6. Benjamin will discuss her new book, “Drone Warfare: Killing by Remote Control,” and the growing momentum to stop robotic killing. A pot luck will be held at 6:30 p.m. and the talk begins at 7:30 p.m. at St. Mary’s Church, 15 St. Mary’s Place.

Correcting ourselves

In the Stratford Shakespeare Festival preview that ran in the June 13 issue, we incorrectly listed Des McAnuff as the director of the current production of “Much Ado About Nothing.” Christopher Newton is directing the show.

IF INTERESTED IN PARTICIPATING, PLEASE CONTACT:

In the June 20 classical preview we incorrectly identified the conductor/arranger for Sarah McLachlan’s June 26 concert at CMAC. His name is Sean O’Laughlin.

Denise or Jennifer

(585) 697-1818 WWW.DERMROCHESTER.COM

Follow us on Like us on 10 City june 27 - JULY 3, 2012


Dining

Szechuan dan dan mein, from White Swans Asia Caffe. Photo by MATT DETURCK

only one of these that has any English on it at all advertises “House Special Dumplings,” suggesting that the other notices are for similarly exciting and tasty dishes. While the menu looks like any other pan-Asian place in town, offering an array of Chinese, Thai, and Vietnamese dishes along with terrifically good bubble tea and dim sum, there are several hints that this is not at all a typical restaurant. Start with bubble tea ($3.25). By now, the

Shrimp dumplings, siu mai, and fried “house special dumplings” (clockwise, from top) at White Swans Asia Caffe. Photo by MATT DETURCK

A taste of Chinatown White Swans Asia Caffe 798 S. Clinton Ave. 270-4431 Sunday-Thursday 9 a.m.-9:30 p.m., Friday-Saturday 9 a.m.-10:30 p.m. [ review ] by JAMES LEACH

In the restaurant industry, you often hear about “turn-key operations.” These are businesses in which the owner (or his creditors) sell the entire restaurant — everything from the tables, chairs, kitchen appliances, and pots and pans on down to the dishes, silverware, and linens — for one price. All the new owner, theoretically, has to do with his new restaurant is sweep up a bit, change the sign, turn on the lights, and open the doors. The property at 798 South Clinton Avenue is such a restaurant. Over the past several years it has been a Mediterranean restaurant and then a short-lived pan-Asian place opened up by the former chef at the South Wedge Diner who struck out on his own, and

then struck out in early April 2011. Rui Hunag Mai, the new owner of the property, opened White Swans Asia Caffe only about a month after South City Garden closed last year, and there’s every indication that he’s going to be there for a long time, offering very good panAsian cuisine at what he accurately describes as among the first of a “new generation of Asian restaurants” in the Rochester area. Those who dined at South City Garden won’t notice any significant changes in the interior of White Swans. The dining room still has a vaguely Miami nightclub-café sort of feel to it, with a smattering of Chinese figurines — dragons, a laughing Buddha, a frog with coins in its mouth — and bamboo plants scattered here and there. Right inside the front door are two things worth noting, though: a monumental red-lacquer shrine carefully tended to by the staff each morning, and a display case full of Chinese breads, cakes, and pastries. Observant diners will also notice an array of hand-written signs — in Chinese characters, alas — tacked up behind the cash register. The

bubble-tea craze has pretty much peaked in our area, but most places that sell it use powders and concentrates rather than fresh juices in making the drinks (that’s what gives them their vivid hues and one-dimensional flavors). White Swans uses fresh fruit, pureed to order for each drink (I once glimpsed a waitress wrestling a huge watermelon out the kitchen door and over to the blender). The results speak for themselves. The colors aren’t as bright, but the flavors are the essence of fresh fruit punctuated by the pleasant pop of black-tea-soaked tapioca pearls. While enjoying your bubble tea, look closely at the menu. You’ll immediately notice that English is really the second language here. Chinese — Mandarin, for the most part — is the lingua franca, and that’s how most of your fellow diners communicate their orders to the wait staff. Ignore the traffic on Clinton Avenue outside, and you could just as easily be in Chinatown in New York City or Toronto. For many diners, the big draw at White Swans is the dim sum. There are only a handful of places in the city that offer this a la carte dining experience, and an even smaller number that offer it every day (it’s mostly a weekend thing). At White Swans, dim sum is available daily and the menu is a good one, offering the usual steamed and fried dumplings along with flat noodles wrapped around shrimp or beef, congee, and “chicken paws” (stewed chicken feet — a dish that, presumably, you have to grow up with to have a taste for).

Mai is both the owner and the chef at White

Swans, and he makes everything that he can from scratch. Trained in kitchens in China and in New York City (he worked in Chinatown for several years before coming up to Rochester because the air was better up here), Mai makes his own dim sum skins. That means that the “shells” of fried dumplings come out lighter and almost translucent, and the skins on steamed dumplings have an almost fluffy texture to them. Of particular note are the “House Special Dumplings” ($4.50). Available both steamed and fried, these pork, shrimp, leek, scallion, and water-chestnut dumplings are enclosed in wheat-and-egg-based skins and served with a dish of soy sauce mixed with red vinegar and a whisper of chili oil. Although you would do well to let them cool just a bit before biting into them (this is true of the fried ones in particular), the flavors pop in your mouth, the pork and shrimp distinct, tasty, and well complemented by the oniony goodness of leek and scallion. Mai also makes his own noodles. In my mind, I pictured him stretching and twisting balls of dough as I’ve seen it done on the very cool extra features included in the DVD version of “Kung-Fu Panda.” But Mai disabused me of the notion: if your wheatflour noodles are square, they’ve been rolled out and cut, not bounced and stretched. The results, showcased best in his version of dan dan mien (literally, “peddler’s noodles”, $7.50), are sublime — the noodles substantial and pleasantly stretchy, making them fun to slurp and bite. Mai’s version of the dish is topped with a spicy mixture of ground pork with a subtle black-bean sauce funkiness and a “salad” of shredded snow peas, carrots, celery, and cabbage. It is both filling and refreshing, the veg a cool counterpoint to the spicy meat sauce. Regardless whether, as Mai asserts, his recipe is traditional, it makes a delicious and inexpensive lunch for one that could easily serve two in a pinch. rochestercitynewspaper.com City 11


Upcoming [ DJ/Electronic ] Tony Matterhorn Friday, July 20. Main Street Armory, 900 E. Main St. 8 p.m. $30-$50. 232-3221. rochestermainstreetarmory.com. [ Pop/Rock ] Summerland Tour 2012 w/Everclear, Sugar Ray, Lit, Gin Blossoms, Marcy Playground Thursday, July 26. Sahlen’s Stadium, 460 Oak St. 5 p.m. $34. 454-5425. summerlandtour.net.

Music

[ Pop/Rock ] Metric Thursday, September 6. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N. Water St. 8 p.m. $28-$30. 325-5600. waterstreetmusic.com.

Demi Lovato, Hot Chelle Rae

Sunday, July 1 CMAC, 3355 Marvin Sands Drive, Canandaigua 6 p.m. | $25-$75 | cmacevents.com [ Pop/Alt-Country ] Have a teenager in the house?

Tonight’s your night to drop them off in Canandaigua. Demi Lovato is best known for her work on the Disney Channel, and like most of its alums, has moved into an auto-tuned wonder career as a singer/actress/songwriter (she will also be making her judging debut on Fox’s “The X Factor” this fall). It will be interesting to see if she uses the auto-tune live as well. Hot Chelle Rae definitely has an alt-country (but still heavily pop) streak, so the two should make for a fun night. — SUZAN PERO

Agnostic Front Friday, June 29 Dub Land Underground, 315 Alexander St. 8 p.m. | $15-$23 | myspace.com/thedublandunderground [ HARDCORE ] Though originally consisting of all

skinheads, Agnostic Front really began when the hand opened up the ranks to include, among other people, its third singer, the charismatic Roger Miret. One of the New York City hardcore scene’s most important and seminal outfits since 1980, the band shifted to a less thrash, more punk sound before hanging it up in 1992. It reformed again in 1996 to continue its mastery and dominance of the genre and the scene. — BY FRANK DE BLASE

C I T Y N E W S PA P E R ’ S

NEW POSTS EVERY MORNING OF THE JAZZ FESTIVAL! Check out concert reviews & photos from CITY’s music writers, and post your reviews on

ROCHESTERCITYNEWSPAPER.COM 12 City june 27 - JULY 3, 2012


Wednesday, June 27 For Jazz Fest listings see separate calendar on page 18.

Diana Krall performed Friday, June 22, at Kodak Hall at Eastman Theatre as part of the 2012 Xerox Rochester International Jazz Festival. PHOTO BY FRANK DE BLASE

Tim McGraw Friday, June 29 CMAC, 3555 Marvin Sands Drive, Canandaigua 7:30 p.m. | $35.50-$80 | cmacevents.com [ COUNTRY ] With that country-wide smile under those

black cowboy hats, what girl hasn’t fallen in love once or twice with the sound on the radio of country-music star Tim McGraw? McGraw’s current tour launches at LP Field in Nashville, TN, rolls through Charlotte, NC, and arrives at its third stop at CMAC in Canandaigua. McGraw has graced the airwaves with 32 No. 1 singles, and his charttopping hits include “Live Like You Were Dying,” “Angry All the Time,” and that rock-it-out “Indian Outlaw.” Also performing is Dierks Bentley, whose “Free and Easy (Down the Road I Go)” is lyric-perfect for summer in Upstate New York. — BY PALOMA A. CAPANNA

Teagan Taylor Trio Saturday, June 30 Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Drive 5-7 p.m. | Free | lovincup.com [ Jazz ] With a voice reminiscent of Norah Jones, Teagan

Taylor has a lot going for her. Then she picks up the trumpet and you start to grasp the depth of her talent. But she’s not the only formidable player on the stage, or in the family for that matter. The guy playing those tasteful bass runs is Dylan Taylor, her twin brother. And that superb guitarist supplying the rhythm and an occasional riff (not to mention more trumpet) is their father, Tim. He’s also the arranger of the standard and original tunes Teagan sings. The band will also play at Boulder Coffee in the South Wedge at 8 p.m. Friday. — BY RON NETSKY

Dispatches from the Jazz Blog [ REVIEW ] BY WILLE CLARK, FRANK DE BLASE, AND RON NETSKY

I’ve often wondered if Diana Krall was as cool as she comes off, or just bored. I’m here to say she’s cool, daddy-o. As Krall strolled out of the backstage darkness at Kodak Hall and over to the piano on Friday night, every Raymond Chandler description of a woman poured out of me like sweat. Not only is Krall breathtakingly beautiful, but that voice — it’s pure seduction and invitation. Krall tackled songs by artists like Nat “King” Cole and Tom Waits. I was told that the show was sold out, but there was nobody there except for Krall and myself as she sang and completely unglued me front and center. I bounded out of there in love like Pepe le Pew. Le sigh! (FD) Earlier Saturday evening I caught Tom Harrell’s Debussy & Ravel Project at Kilbourn Hall. Both Impressionist composers are favorites among jazz musicians due to their experimentation with unconventional harmonies, melodies, rhythms, and voicings. So when Harrell and his superb band played an hour and 20 minute set of (and in the spirit of ) the composers’ music, it just seemed like cerebral jazz.

Harrell, who suffers from schizophrenia, never made eye contact with the audience. He walked slowly with his head down, every movement deliberate. But when he picked up his trumpet or flugelhorn he came to life. And he got better as the set progressed, with the last three tunes (two of them by Harrell, one by Ravel) the best. His ensemble, enhanced by violin and cello, boasted some top players. Especially strong on solos were Wayne Escoffery on tenor sax and Charles Pillow on various woodwinds. (RN) Things got hot hot hot with Monophonics under the Big Tent Sunday night. The group blends psychedelic rock with funky, funky funk, and just enough soul to keep things hopping. The group was loud — very loud — but that was the way the musicians wanted it: the trumpet and saxophone player kept telling the sound guy to bring the instruments up. With soaring electric guitar solos, a tight horn section, and that lovely spin of the organ, Monophonics had the crowd up and dancing in no time. I can’t remember the last time I saw a dance pit at a Jazz Fest show, but Monophonics lit fire under people’s seats. (WC)

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[ Acoustic/Folk ] Abilene Late-Night Sessions: Grand Canyon Rescue Episode. Abilene, 153 Liberty Pole Way. abilenebarandlounge.com, 232-3230. 11:15 p.m. Free. Acoustic Jam hosted by The Druids. Rabbit Room Restaurant, 61 N Main St, Honeoye Falls. thelowermill. com. 7 p.m. Free. Dave McGrath. Marge’s Lakeside Inn. 4909 Culver Rd. 323-1020. 6 p.m. Free. 21+. Jim Lane. Lemoncello, 137 W Commercial St, E Rochester. lemoncello137.com. 7:30 p.m. Free.  HuDost. MuCCC. 142 Atlantic Ave., muccc.com. 7:30 p.m. $12. Rob & Gary Acoustic. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. woodcliffhotelspa.com. 5:30 p.m. Free.  [ Blues ] Open Blues Jam w/The King Bees. Beale Street Cafe, 693 South Ave. bealestreetcafe. com, 271-4650. 7:30 p.m. Call for info.  Paul Strowe. Beale Street Cafe-Webster, 1930 Empire Blvd, Webster. bealestreetcafe.com, 2161070. 6:30 p.m. Call for info.  [ Classical ] RPO: Ontario Beach Park. Ontario Beach Park. 4799 Lake Ave. rpo.org. 7:30 p.m. Free. [ Jazz ] El Rojo Jazz. Bistro 135, 135 W Commercial St,, East Rochester. bistro135.net, 662-5555. 6 p.m. Free. Gabe Condon. Tala Vera, 155 State St. tala-vera.com, 5463945. 8 p.m. $5. Jim Nugent Jazz Trio. Pier 45. Port Terminal Building, 1000 North River St., 865.4500. Call for info. Marco Amidio. Prosecco Italian Restaurant & Bar, 1550 Route 332, Farmington. proseccoitalianrestaurant. com, 924-8000. 6 p.m. Call for info.  continues on page 14

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Music

Wednesday, June 27 Uptown Groove. Little Theatre Cafe, 240 East Ave. thelittle.org. 7:30 p.m. Free.

have to say my biggest influences are Sufjan Stevens and Elliott Smith. How has the Crane School helped you grow as a songwriter?

I took a little musical theory in high school, but it was only when I started at Crane that I began to understand how to utilize it as a way to approach the construction of songs. It geared me toward starting with the chord progression, and then laying the melody over that. But I am really self-conscious about my lyrics. Whose lyrics do you like?

Joanna Newsom’s lyrics are amazing. Or someone like Josh Netsky, who I’m actually going on a short tour with in July; his lyrics are like beautiful poems. I’ve seen you play solo a couple of times, but your upcoming show is with your band. How is the chemistry?

Local musician/harpist Mikaela Davis has received an enormous response from her YouTube video featuring her performing a song from “The Legend of Zelda.” PHOTO COURTESY JILL MCCRACKEN

Harp condition Mikaela Davis Saturday, June 30 Skylark Lounge, 40 S. Union St. 9 P.M. | $8-$10 | 270-8106 purevolume.com/MikaelaDavis [ INTERVIEW ] BY DAVID YOCKEL JR.

If heaven has an orchestra of harp-strumming angels, someone should probably take a head count. Twenty-year-old Mikaela Davis began playing the harp in third grade. Since then she has studied with Grace Wong, the principal harpist of the Rochester Philharmonic Orchestra, and she now attends the Crane School of Music at SUNY Potsdam. She has used that musical pedigree to conjure a sound that picks the indie-folk genre up from its roots and lets it loose into an ethereal jet stream. In addition to her studies and regular live performances, Davis has just put the finishing touches on her debut self-titled album with the help of Brian Moore at Redbooth Studios in Rochester. Moore says of Davis, “It is artists such as [Mikaela] that inspired me to open Redbooth. Not only does she have a beautiful voice, but she plays harp without skipping a beat. She makes the intricate balance of fluttering vocal folds and fingers on strings appear effortless…Simply magical.” 14 City june 27 - JULY 3, 2012

City recently had a chat with Davis to discuss her burgeoning musical career, as well as video games and vegetables. An edited transcript of the conversation follows. CITY: What inspired you to take up the harp? Mikaela Davis: They actually offered harp

lessons at my grammar school in Penfield, and from the first time I heard a note, I knew that it was the instrument for me. Also, I was extremely close with my grandmother, who had recently passed, and I could picture myself playing under the skylight in my living room, and her watching me practice. What are some of your musical influences?

My taste in music has definitely evolved as I’ve grown up. When I was in grammar school I listened to the Dixie Chicks and Britney Spears. In middle school I really got into Vanessa Carlton — you know, like, cheesy piano pop music. But it was also around that time that I started to write my own material. When I was in sixth grade, my dad moved to California and I wrote a song about how it made me feel. I think that’s when I learned that songwriting could be such a rewarding and therapeutic experience. I had an art teacher tell me once that some of my songs sounded like Fiona Apple, so I started listening to a lot of her stuff, as well as bands like The Beatles and The Kinks. I love Dinosaur Jr. and Beach House. But I would

It’s great. Alex Coté, who plays drums and adds some back-up vocals, has been my friend since childhood. Our new member, Cian McCarthy, who plays keyboard and guitar, has fit right in. Both are in the jazz performance program at SUNY Purchase, Alex for drums and Cian for saxophone. Having the guys behind me gives me a sense of security and I love the extra sounds. It is truly a collaborative enterprise. You have your album coming out soon. What was the recording experience like?

Absolutely fantastic. Brian Moore, the recording engineer at Redbooth Studios, made us feel right at home. I was really nervous about it at first, but the whole experience was so comfortable, very relaxed. We didn’t feel any pressure and we just trusted his judgment. I am so happy with the way it turned out. The release party will be at Lovin’ Cup on July 31. Stoney Lonesome and Josh Netsky will help us celebrate. What would you say is the weirdest thing about you?

When I was a younger, kids used to make fun of me because I absolutely love artichokes or Brussels sprouts; you know, anything that kids usually hate to eat. Also, I posted a video of me playing “Great Fairy Fountain” — theme music from “The Legend of Zelda” — on YouTube and have received a ridiculous amount of positive feedback. What are your future plans?

I would like to eventually get my masters degree, but ideally I would like to be able to support myself by touring. I’d like to see where the music takes me.

[ Pop/Rock ] 100.5 The Drive’s’ 10 Ugly Bands Competition. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. lovincup. com, 292-9940. 9 p.m. Free. Count Blastula. Dinosaur Bar-B-Que, 99 Court St. dinosaurbarbque.com. 9 p.m. Free.  Eddie Money. Finger Lakes Casino & Racetrack. Rt 96, Farmington. 924-3232. 7p.m. Free.  Roger Clyne and the Peacemakers. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N Water St. waterstreetmusic.com. 8 p.m. $15-$20. Theo Bleckmann & Ben Monder. Bernuzio Uptown Music. 122 East Ave. bernunzio.com, 4736140. 9:30 p.m. Call for info. White Trash. Sully’s Brickyard Pub.240 South Ave. 2323960.7 p.m. Free.

Thursday, June 28 For Jazz Fest listings see separate calendar on page 18. [ Acoustic/Folk ] Ben Torres. Johnny’s Irish Pub, 1382 Culver Rd. 224-0990, johnnysirishpub.com. 7 p.m. Free. Hochstein at High Falls: The Dady Brothers. Granite Mills Park, 82 Browns Race. hochstein.org. 12:15 p.m. Free. Mark Herman. California Brew Haus, 402 Ridge Rd W. 6211480. 8 p.m. Free  Rochester Ukulele Orchestra. Bernuzio Uptown Music. 122 East Ave. bernunzio.com, 4736140. 7 p.m. Call for info. The Rukus Juice Jug Band. Abilene, 153 Liberty Pole Way. abilenebarandlounge.com, 232-3230.11:15 p.m. Free.  Scott Bradley. Rabbit Room Restaurant, 61 N Main St, Honeoye Falls. thelowermill. com. 7 p.m. Free. The Towpath Café Songwriter Series hosted by Maynard, ft. Connie Deming. The Towpath Café. 6 North Main St., Fairport. 7:30 p.m. Free. [ Blues ] Ezra & The Storm. Beale Street Cafe, 693 South Ave. bealestreetcafe.com, 2714650. 7:30 p.m. Call for info.  Teagan Ward. Beale Street CafeWebster, 1930 Empire Blvd, Webster. bealestreetcafe.com, 216-1070. 6:30 p.m. Call for info.  [ Classical ] Community Concert to Celebrate Life and Loved Ones. Ascension Garden Mausoleum and Cemetery. 1900 Pinnacle Rd., Henrietta. RSVP 697-1122. Free. [ Country ] Eric Church. Darien Lake PAC. 9993 Allegheny Road, Darien Center. 599-4641. Call for info. [ Jazz ] Darrly Parker. Tala Vera, 155 State St. tala-vera.com, 5463945.8 p.m. $5.


JB and Jim. Prosecco Italian Restaurant & Bar, 1550 Route 332, Farmington. proseccoitalianrestaurant.com, 924-8000. 8 p.m. Call for info. Jon Greeno Jazz Trio. Lemoncello, 137 W Commercial St, E Rochester.lemoncello137. com. 7 p.m. Free.  Mark Cassara. Pane Vino, 175 N Water St. panevinoristorante. com, 232-6090. 8:30 p.m. Free.  Acoustic Alchemy Review. Bistro 135, 135 W Commercial St,, East Rochester. bistro135. net, 662-5555. 6 p.m. Free.  The Swooners. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. woodcliffhotelspa.com. 5:30 p.m. Free.  WAKOS. Little Theatre Cafe, 240 East Ave. thelittle.org. 7:30 p.m. Free.  [ Pop/Rock ] A Life Once Lost. Dubland Underground. 315 Alexander St. dublandunderground.wordpress. com, 232-7550. Call for info. Anthony Green w/The Dear Hunter. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N Water St. waterstreetmusic.com. 7 p.m. $16 Adv-$18 Door.  The Dads w/Atlas Arrows, Calvacade. Monty’s Krown. 875 Monroe Ave, 271-7050. $6. 9 p.m. 21+ Jon Payton Project. Dinosaur Bar-B-Que, 99 Court St. dinosaurbarbque.com.9:30 p.m. Free. Last Minute, Rt Turn Racer. Sully’s Brickyard Pub.240 South Ave. 232-3960.7 p.m. Free. Party in the Park: Get The Led Out. Riverside Festival Site, 148 Exchange Boulevard. rochesterevents.com 5 p.m. $2. Third Degree. Pelican’s Nest, 566 River St., pelicansnestrestaurant.com, 663-5910.7pm. Free.

Friday, June 29 For Jazz Fest listings see separate calendar on page 18. [ Acoustic/Folk ] The Gentlemen Callers w/ Meghan Koch. McGraw’s Irish Pub, 146 W Commercial St, East Rochester. mcgrawsirishpub.com, 3489091. 5 p.m. Free. Herb Heins and His Pro-Am Jam Band. Abilene, 153 Liberty Pole Way. abilenebarandlounge.com, 232-3230.11:15 p.m. Free.  Jim Lane. Village Rock Café. 213 Main St., E. Rochester. jimlanemusic.com. 9 p.m. Free. Ryan Montbleau Band, Turkuaz w/ LastNote. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N Water St. waterstreetmusic. com. 10 p.m. Free.  Smooth Talkers. Johnny’s Irish Pub, 1382 Culver Rd. 2240990, johnnysirishpub.com. 9 p.m. Free.  Wayward Son. Argyle Grill. 4344 Nine Mile Point Rd. 3772452. 7 p.m. Call for info. [ Blues ] Luca Foresta. Beale Street CafeWebster, 1930 Empire Blvd, Webster. bealestreetcafe.com, 216-1070. 7:30 p.m. Call for info. 

ALTERNATIVE | Anthony Green

While Anthony Green’s voice is immediately recognizable as the lead singer of Saosin and currently Circa Survive, his work as a solo artist only hints at the angst and vocal-cord wringing of those groups. To be fair, “Beautiful Things” takes its influences from seemingly everywhere. The record, released in January of this year, cascades through Green’s varied genres and emotions from start to finish. While the troubadour touch of longtime collaborators Good Old War permeates tracks like “Moon Song” or the a cappella gem “Do It Right,” guitarand vocal-driven tracks such as “Get Yours While You Can” remind fans of Green’s heavier, sweatier origins. Anthony Green performs Thursday, June 28, 7 p.m. at Water Street Music Hall, 204 N. Water St. $16-$18. waterstreetmusic.com. — BY JARED BENNETT

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POP/ROCK | Get the Led Out

Bands may come and go, but reverence for Led Zeppelin hangs in there like white on rice. The Rock and Roll Hall of Famers formed in the late 60’s and went on to influence everyone from the typical (Aerosmith, AC/DC, Van Halen) to the sublime (Dread Zeppelin, Lez Zeppelin, P. Diddy). Remember Diddy’s “Come With Me”? If you close your eyes, Philly septet Get The Led Out plays it legit and will transport you to Knebworth or Madison Square Garden or the 1971 concert at the Rochester War Memorial Auditorium. My Plastic Sun opens the show. Get The Led Out performs Thursday, June 28, as part of Party in the Park, Riverside Festival Site, Exchange Blvd. 510 p.m. $2. rochesterevents.com. — BY ROMAN DIVEZUR Third Degree. Beale Street Cafe, 693 South Ave. bealestreetcafe. com, 271-4650. 7:30 p.m. Call for info. [ Country ] Tim McGraw w/Dierks Bentley and Kip Moore. CMAC. 3355 Marvin Sands Drive, Canandaigua. cmacevents.com. 393-4880. 7:30 p.m. $35-$80. [ Jazz ] Annie Wells. Little Theatre Cafe, 240 East Ave. thelittle. org. 8:30 p.m. Free.  Arian DiMatteo. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. woodcliffhotelspa.com. 7:30 p.m. Free.  Art St Halarie, solo piano. Pier 45. Port Terminal Building, 1000 North River St., 865.4500. Call for info.

The Beach Boys. Darien Lake PAC. 9993 Allegheny Road, Darien Center. 599-4641. 8 p.m. $25.75-128.50. Bobby DiBaudo. Bistro 135, 135 W Commercial St,, East Rochester. bistro135.net, 6625555. 6 p.m. Free. Marco Amidio. Prosecco Italian Restaurant & Bar, 1550 Route 332, Farmington. proseccoitalianrestaurant.com, 924-8000. 6 p.m. Call for info.  The Sign. Tala Vera, 155 State St. tala-vera.com, 546-3945.8 p.m. $5. Teagan Taylor Trio. Boulder Coffee Co. - Alexander St., 100 Alexander St. bouldercoffeeco. com. 8 p.m. Free.  Ted Nicolosi and Shared Genes. Pultneyville Grill, 4135 continues on page 16 rochestercitynewspaper.com City 15


Friday, June 29 Mill St., Pultneyville 5894512. 7 p.m. Free. The White Hots. Bernuzio Uptown Music. 122 East Ave. bernunzio.com, 473-6140. 6:30 p.m. Call for info. [ Pop/Rock ] Anger Management, Affliction. Jukebox, 5435 Ridge Rd W, Spencerport. 352-4505. Call for info. Brass Taxi. Captain Jack’s Goodtime Tavern, 8505 Greig St, Sodus Point. captainjacksgoodtimetavern. com, 315-483-9570. 9 p.m. Call for info.  Download w/Hair Nation. Nola’s BBQ, 4775 Lake Ave. nolasweb.com, 663-3375. 6 p.m. Call for info.  MoCheseter w/Friday in America. A-Pub Live, 6 Lawrence St. 9:30 p.m. $5. Mr. Mustard. Sticky Lips BBQ Juke Joint, 830 Jefferson Rd. stickylipsbbq.com. 9 p.m. $5.  Red INC. w/Insky. California Brew Haus, 402 Ridge Rd W. 621-1480. 9 p.m. $5-$7. Routine Involvements, w/ Harmonica Lewinski, Tropical Punk, and Dick Snare. Skylark Lounge. 40 South Union St. 9 p.m. $7. 21+ Something Else. Nashvilles, 4853 West Henrietta Rd. 3343030. 9 p.m. Call for info.  Surge. Pelican’s Nest, 566 River St., pelicansnestrestaurant.com, 663-5910.10 p.m. Call for info. The Student Union. Sully’s Brickyard Pub.240 South Ave. 232-3960.7 p.m. Free. Violet Mary. Dinosaur Bar-B-Que, 99 Court St. dinosaurbarbque. com.10 p.m. Free. [ R&B ] Anonymous Willpower. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. lovincup.com, 292-9940. 9 p.m. $5 public/$3 student.

Saturday, June 30 For Jazz Fest listings see separate calendar on page 18. [ Acoustic/Folk ] Enter The Haggis. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. lovincup. com, 292-9940. 8 p.m. $15. Jim Lane. Schooner’s Riverside Pub, 40 Marina Dr. jimlanemusic.com. 1 p.m. Free. Jim Lane. Pultneyville Grill, 4135 Mill St., Pultneyville. jimlanemusic.com. 7 p.m. Free. Jumbo Shrimp. Hamlin Station Bar & Grill, 52 Railroad Ave., Hamlin.hamlinstation.net, 9642010. 8:30 p.m. Call for info.  [ Blues ] Gap Mangione New Blues Band. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. woodcliffhotelspa. com. 7:30 p.m. Free.  Joe Beard. Dinosaur Bar-B-Que, 99 Court St. dinosaurbarbque. com.10 p.m. Free. Natalie B Band. Beale Street Cafe-Webster, 1930 Empire Blvd, Webster. bealestreetcafe. com, 216-1070. 7:30 p.m. Call for info.  Shades of Blue. Lemoncello, 137 W Commercial St, E Rochester. lemoncello137.com. 7 p.m. Free.  True Blue. Johnny’s Irish Pub, 1382 Culver Rd. 224-0990, johnnysirishpub.com. 8 p.m. Free.  [ Classical ] RPO: Patriotic Pops. CMAC. 3355 Marvin Sands Drive, Canandaigua. cmacevents. com. 393-4880. 7:30 p.m. $15-$60. [ Country ] Closing Time. Sticky Lips BBQ Juke Joint, 830 Jefferson Rd. stickylipsbbq.com. 10 p.m. $3.  Rascal Flatts. Darien Lake PAC. 9993 Allegheny Road, Darien Center. 599-4641.7 p.m. $36-157.

Sarah Rush &Silvernail. Abilene, 153 Liberty Pole Way. abilenebarandlounge.com, 232-3230.11:15 p.m. Free. [ DJ/Electronic ] DJ Big Reg. Venu Resto-Lounge, 151 St Paul St. 232-5650. 10 p.m. Call for info.  DJ Darkwave. Vertex, 169 N Chestnut St. 232-5498. 10 p.m. $3-$8.  DJ Matt. Nashvilles, 4853 West Henrietta Rd. 334-3030. Call for info.  DJs Richie Salvaggio, Kalifornia. One, 1 Ryan Alley. 546-1010. 10:30 p.m. $5 after 11 p.m.  La Selva. Tilt Night Club, 444 Central Ave. 232-8440. 10 p.m. Call for info.  [ Jazz ] Art St Halarie, solo piano. Pier 45. Port Terminal Building, 1000 North River St., 8654500. Call for info. The Jane Mutiny. Little Theatre Cafe, 240 East Ave. thelittle. org. 8:30 p.m. Free.  Kate Ernest. Bistro 135, 135 W Commercial St,, East Rochester. bistro135.net, 6625555. 6 p.m. Free.  Lisa Lee Trio. Captain Jack’s Goodtime Tavern, 8505 Greig St, Sodus Point. captainjacksgoodtimetavern. com, 315-483-9570. 1 p.m. Call for info.  Mike DiMartino. Tala Vera, 155 State St. tala-vera.com, 5463945.8 p.m. $5. Norman Tibbils. Prosecco Italian Restaurant & Bar, 1550 Route 332, Farmington. proseccoitalianrestaurant.com, 924-8000. 8 p.m. Call for info.  Teagan Taylor Trio. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. lovincup. com, 292-9940. 5 p.m. Free.  Ted Nicolosi and Shared Genes. Eagle Vale, 4400 Nine Mile Point Rd. Fairport. 598-3820. 6:30 p.m. Free.

[ Pop/Rock ] 2012 Dyke Picnic & Womyn’s Festival. Hazelwood Lodge Ellison Park. dykepicnic.org. See website for full line up. 11 a.m. Free. 50/50. Pelican’s Nest, 566 River St., pelicansnestrestaurant.com, 663-5910.Call for info.10 p.m. Beneath Hell’s Sky, LinchPin, Sleep Circadia. California Brew Haus, 402 Ridge Rd W. 6211480. 9 p.m. $5-$7. The Filthy Mcnastys. Montage Music Hall, 50 Chestnut Plaza. themontagemusichall.com, 2321520. Midnight. Call for info. Goodness. Captain Jack’s Goodtime Tavern, 8505 Greig St, Sodus Point. captainjacksgoodtimetavern. com, 315-483-9570. 9 p.m. Call for info.  Joywave w/Mikaela Davis, Kitty Snowpants. Skylark Lounge. 40 South Union St. 270-8106. 9 p.m. $8. 21+ Michael Jackson Tribute. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N Water St. waterstreetmusic.com. 7 p.m. Free.  Wooden Nickel. Nashvilles, 4853 West Henrietta Rd. 3343030. 9 p.m. Call for info.  You Can’t Do That in Church Organ Concert. Salem United Church of Christ. 60 Bittner St. 2 p.m. $10.

Sunday, July 1 [ Acoustic/Folk ] Seamus Kennedy. McGraw’s Irish Pub, 146 W Commercial St, East Rochester. mcgrawsirishpub.com, 3489091. 7 p.m. $10. [ Classical ] Noncerts: RochesterOne. Good Luck Restaurant. 50 Anderson Ave., noncertsrochester.org. 8 p.m. $60-$100.

[ Jazz ] Bill Slater Solo Piano. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. woodcliffhotelspa.com, 3814000. Call for info. Free. Fairport Band. Lemoncello, 137 W Commercial St, E Rochester. lemoncello137.com. 5 p.m. Free.  [ Pop/Rock ] Demi Lovato w/Hot Chelle Rae. CMAC. 3355 Marvin Sands Drive, Canandaigua, cmacevents.com. 393-4880. 7 p.m. $30-75. Jeff Cosco and the Bandito Bullets. Nola’s BBQ, 4775 Lake Ave. nolasweb.com, 6633375.6 p.m. Call for info.  Me & The Boyz. Captain Jack’s Goodtime Tavern, 8505 Greig St, Sodus Point. captainjacksgoodtimetavern. com, 315-483-9570. 7 p.m. Call for info.  Melvins Lite. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N Water St. waterstreetmusic.com. 8 p.m. $17-$20. The Skycoasters. Pelican’s Nest, 566 River St., pelicansnestrestaurant.com, 663-5910.5 p.m. Call for info. Stand My Ground, Fowls, California Cousins, Dirty Needle, Ever Upward. Dubland Underground. 315 Alexander St. dublandunderground. wordpress.com, 232-7550. 9 p.m. $6-$10. [ R&B ] Mitty & The Followers. Captain Jack’s Goodtime Tavern, 8505 Greig St, Sodus Point. captainjacksgoodtimetavern. com, 315-483-9570. 1 p.m. Call for info. 

Monday, July 2 [ Acoustic/Folk ] WoodStone. Captain Jack’s Goodtime Tavern, 8505 Greig St, Sodus Point.

captainjacksgoodtimetavern. com, 315-483-9570. 7 p.m. Call for info. [ DJ/Electronic ] Manic Mondays DJs. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 454-2966. 11 p.m. Free.  [ Country ] Sean Patrick McGraw. Captain Jack’s Goodtime Tavern, 8505 Greig St, Sodus Point. captainjacksgoodtimetavern. com, 315-483-9570. 1 p.m. Call for info.  [ Jazz ] Mark Bader. Bistro 135, 135 W Commercial St,, East Rochester. bistro135.net, 6625555. 5:30 p.m. Free.  Nick Laduc Duo. Lemoncello, 137 W Commercial St, E Rochester.lemoncello137.com. 8 p.m. Free.  Summer Jazz Studies Faculty Recital - John Nyerges, jazz pianist and combo. Eastman School of Music-Kilbourn Hall, 26 Gibbs St. esm.rochester. edu. 7:30 p.m. Free.  [ Pop/Rock ] Chloroformcoulier w/Pollock, Murder City Outlaws, The Cheetah Whores. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 542-8336. 9 p.m. $5-$7.

Tuesday, July 3 [ Acoustic/Folk ] Jim Lane. Schooner’s Riverside Pub, 40 Marina Dr. jimlanemusic.com. 6 p.m. Free. [ DJ/Electronic ] DJ Kathy. Nashvilles, 4853 West Henrietta Rd. 334-3030. Call for info.  [ Jazz ] Acoustic Alchemy Review. Bistro 135, 135 W Commercial St,, East Rochester. bistro135. net, 662-5555. 6 p.m. Free. 

HOUSE/DJ | Mark Farina

HEAVY ROCK | Melvins Lite

JAM ROCK | Dave Matthews Band

If you feel lost gazing in that sea of jazz that continues to crest over Rochester, fear not. While at first glance Mark Farina seems to be a House DJ, it readily becomes apparent that his output has a very definite jazzy streak to it, which should go well with the other musicians that will be all over the East End this weekend. But Farina’s tunes are also different enough to give you a break. Just listening to the tracks on the internet brought back memories of racing around San Andreas. If you like House Rhythm Radio, this is an easy yes. Paul Kuenzi and NickL will be starting the night with some ambient tracks, so it’ll be pretty chill by any standard.

To keep fans guessing — or on edge — The Melvins have just released “Freak Puke” under the moniker Melvins Lite, a three-piece version of the band. But don’t worry; it’s still the Pacific Northwest band’s gloriously heavy, sometimes sludgy dirge we’ve all come to expect and use liberally as an adjective. The current line-up includes Buzz Osborne, Dale Crover, and Trevor Dunn (Mr. Bungle, Tomahawk). The band is trying to set the record for the world’s fastest tour in the Guinness Book Of World records by playing virtually every night from September 5 to October 25 Staring in Anchorage, Alaska, and ending in Honolulu, Hawaii.

A Dave Matthews Band concert is a summertime ritual. Each year, Matthews and band hit the road, winding their way across the United States, performing their radio-friendly jam rock to masses of fans, ranging from fraternity bros in cargo shorts to families bonding over a shared musical experience. Matthews hasn’t released any new material since 2009’s “Big Whiskey and the GrooGrux King,” but he’s been playing new songs live in anticipation for an album to be released in the fall. Expect a set of crowd-pleasing, sing-along songs from his extensive back catalog mixed with some soon-to-be favorites. Brandi Carlisle opens the show.

Mark Farina performs Friday, June 29, 10 p.m. at Pearl Nightclub, 349 East Ave. $12, 21+. Check Facebook for details. — SUZAN PERO

Melvins Lite performs Sunday, July 1, 8 p.m. at Water Street Music Hall, 204 N. Water St. $17-$20. waterstreetmusic.com. — BY FRANK DE BLASE

Dave Matthews Band performs Tuesday, July 3, 7 p.m. at Darien Lake Performing Arts Center, 9993 Allegheny Road. $40.50-$75. livenation.com. — BY ANDY KLINGENBERGER

16 City june 27 - JULY 3, 2012


Jim Nugent. Bistro 135, 135 W Commercial St,, East Rochester. bistro135.net, 6625555. 6 p.m. Free. Tinted Image. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. woodcliffhotelspa.com. 5:30 p.m. Free.  [ Pop/Rock ] 50/50. Captain Jack’s Goodtime Tavern, 8505 Greig St, Sodus Point. captainjacksgoodtimetavern. com, 315-483-9570. 9 p.m. Call for info.  The Billionaire. Captain Jack’s Goodtime Tavern, 8505 Greig St, Sodus Point. captainjacksgoodtimetavern. com, 315-483-9570. 1 p.m. Call for info.  Dave Matthews Band. Darien Lake PAC. 9993 Allegheny Road, Darien Center. 5994641.7 p.m. $40.50-$89.50. Household Pests. Pelican’s Nest, 566 River St., pelicansnestrestaurant.com, 663-5910. Call for info.

Wednesday, July 4 Due to the holiday, repeating events may not be taking place. Please call ahead to confirm. [ Acoustic/Folk ] Thunder Body w/Paleface. Abilene, 153 Liberty Pole Way. abilenebarandlounge.com, 232-3230. Call for info. Rob & Gary Acoustic. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. woodcliffhotelspa.com. 5:30 p.m. Free. [ Blues ] Nick Moss. Bar-B-Que, 99 Court St. dinosaurbarbque. com.9 p.m. Free. [ Classical ] RPO: July 4 Celebration and Fireworks. Main St. Bridge. 9 p.m. Free. [ Jazz ] El Rojo Jazz and The Swooners. Bistro 135, 135 W Commercial St,, East Rochester. bistro135. net, 662-5555. 6 p.m. Free.  Uptown Groove. Little Theatre Cafe, 240 East Ave. thelittle.org. 7:30 p.m. Free. 

AJI ZONING & LAND USE ADVISORY 50 Public Market | 208-2336

HARMAN FLOORING CO. 29 Hebard Street | 546-1221

AWAKEN: Qi gong, yoga, tai chi, fine art 8 Public Market | 261-5659 BOULDER COFFEE CO. 1 Public Market | 232-5282 CARLSON METRO CENTER YMCA 444 East Main Street | 325-2880 CITY NEWSPAPER 250 N. Goodman St | 244-3329 THE CITY OF ROCHESTER Market Office | 428-6907 DEEP DISCOUNT STORAGE 265 Hayward Avenue | 325-5000 FLOWER CITY PRODUCE 20-22 Public Market | 423-0994

1115 E. Main Street | 469-8217 Open Studios First Friday Every Month

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JAVA’S CAFE 50 Public Market OBJECTMAKER 153 Railroad Street | 244-4933

97 Railroad Street | 546-8020 Tours • Tastings • Private Parties www.rohrbachs.com TIM WILKES PHOTOGRAPHY 9 Public Market | 423-1966

[ Pop/Rock ] Back in Time. Captain Jack’s Goodtime Tavern, 8505 Greig St, Sodus Point. captainjacksgoodtimetavern. com, 315-483-9570. 9 p.m. Call for info. Something Else. Captain Jack’s Goodtime Tavern, 8505 Greig St, Sodus Point. captainjacksgoodtimetavern. com, 315-483-9570. 1 p.m. Call for info.  That Party Band. Pelican’s Nest, 566 River St., pelicansnestrestaurant.com, 663-5910.5 p.m. Call for info. White Trash. Sully’s Brickyard Pub.240 South Ave. 2323960.7 p.m. Free.

rochestercitynewspaper.com City 17


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18 City june 27 - JULY 3, 2012

J A Z Z F E S T I VA L S C H E D U L E Wednesday, June 27 Thursday, June 28 4 p.m.: Steve Martin & The Steep Canyon Rangers Kodak Hall ($35$60, SOLD OUT) 4:30 p.m.: Webster Schroeder HS Jazz Band Jazz Street Stage (FREE) 5:15 p.m.: School of the Arts HS Jazz Band Jazz Street Stage (FREE) 5:30 p.m.: Bill Evans Soulgrass Harro East Ballroom ($20 or Club Pass) 5:45 p.m.: Benny Green Hatch Recital Hall ($20 or Club Pass) 6 p.m.: The Westview Project Big Tent ($20 or Club Pass) 6 p.m.: ESM-XRIJF Jazz Scholarships Alumni Combo Jazz Street Stage (FREE) 6 p.m.: Rino Cirinna & Friends Rochester Club ($20 or Club Pass) 6 p.m.: Kneebody Montage ($20 or Club Pass) 6 p.m.: Eliane Elias Brasileira Quartet Kilbourn Hall ($25 or Club Pass) 6:15 p.m.: Shirantha Beddage Quartet Max of Eastman Place ($20 or Club Pass) 6:30 p.m.: Rich Thompson Trio Generations Xerox Auditorium ($20 or Club Pass) 6:45 p.m.: Osian Roberts/Steve Fishwick Quintet Christ Church ($20 or Club Pass) 7 p.m.: Russell Scarbrough Soul Jazz Big Band RG&E Fusion Stage (FREE) 7:15 p.m.: Bill Evans Soulgrass Harro East Ballroom ($20 or Club Pass) 7:15 p.m.: Fred Costello Jazz Street Stage (FREE) 7:30 p.m.: FFEAR Lutheran Church ($20 or Club Pass) 7:45 p.m.: Benny Green Hatch Recital Hall ($20 or Club Pass) 7:45 p.m.: Yvette Landry Abilene ($20 or Club Pass) 8 p.m.: Steve Martin & The Steep Canyon Rangers Kodak Hall at Eastman Theatre ($35-$60, SOLD OUT) 8:30 p.m.: Big Sam’s Funky Nation Big Tent ($20 or Club Pass) 8:45 p.m.: Osian Roberts/Steve Fishwick Quintet Christ Church ($20 or Club Pass) 9 p.m.: Russell Scarbrough Soul Jazz Big Band RG&E Fusion Stage (FREE) 9 p.m.: Rich Thompson Trio Generations Xerox Auditorium ($20 or Club Pass) 9:15 p.m.: Fred Costello Jazz Street Stage (FREE) 9:30 p.m.: FFEAR Lutheran Church ($20 or Club Pass) 9:45 p.m.: Yvette Landry Abilene ($20 or Club Pass) 10 p.m.: Rino Cirinna & Friends Rochester Club ($20 or Club Pass) 10 p.m.: Eliane Elias Brasileira Quartet Kilbourn Hall ($25 or Club Pass) 10 p.m.: Shirantha Beddage Quartet Max of Eastman Place ($20 or Club Pass) 10 p.m.: Kneebody Montage ($20 or Club Pass) 10 p.m.: Big Sam’s Funky Nation Big Tent ($20 or Club Pass) 10:30 p.m.: Jazz Jam Session w/ Bob Sneider Trio State St. Bar and Grill (FREE)

4 p.m.: The Gutbusters Jazz Street Stage (FREE) 5:15 p.m.: Eastridge HS Jazz Band Jazz Street Stage (FREE) 5:30 p.m.: Ruthie Foster & The Family Band Harro East Ballroom ($20 or Club Pass) 5:45 p.m.: Harold Danko Hatch Recital Hall ($20 or Club Pass) 6 p.m.: Greater Rochester Jazz Orchestra Big Tent ($20 or Club Pass) 6 p.m.: The Abney Effect Montage ($20 or Club Pass) 6 p.m.: Bat McGrath Jazz Street Stage (FREE) 6 p.m.: Colin Stetson Kilbourn Hall ($25 or Club Pass) 6 p.m.: Dominick Farinacci Quintet Rochester Club ($20 or Club Pass) 6:15 p.m.: Taurey Butler Trio Max of Eastman Place ($20 or Club Pass) 6:30 p.m.: Terje Rypdal & Bergen Big Band Xerox Auditorium ($20 or Club Pass) 6:45 p.m.: Mark McKnight Christ Church ($20 or Club Pass) 7 p.m.: The Barrel House Blues Band RG&E Fusion Stage (FREE) 7:15 p.m.: Ruthie Foster & The Family Band Harro East Ballroom ($20 or Club Pass) 7:15 p.m.: Soul Stew Jazz Street Stage (FREE) 7:30 p.m.: Bjorn Thoroddsen Trio Lutheran Church $20 or Club Pass) 7:45 p.m.: Pokey LaFarge and the South City Three Abilene ($20 or Club Pass) 7:45 p.m.: Harold Danko Hatch Recital Hall ($20 or Club Pass) 8 p.m.: Daryl Hall “Live from Daryl’s House” w/Special Guest Keb’ Mo’ Kodak Hall At Eastman Theatre ($75-$115) 8:30 p.m.: Dwayne Dopsie & The Zydeco Hellraisers Big Tent ($20 or Club Pass) 8:45 p.m.: Mark McKnight Christ Church ($20 or Club Pass) 9 p.m.: The Barrel House Blues Band RG&E Fusion Stage (FREE) 9 p.m.: Terje Rypdal & Bergen Big Band Xerox Auditorium ($20 or Club Pass) 9:15 p.m.: Soul Stew Jazz Street Stage (FREE) 9:30 p.m.: Bjorn Thoroddsen Trio Lutheran Church ($20 or Club Pass) 9:45 p.m.: Pokey LaFarge and the South City Three Abilene ($20 or Club Pass) 10 p.m.: The Abney Effect Montage ($20 or Club Pass) 10 p.m.: Dominick Farinacci Quintet Rochester Club ($20 or Club Pass) 10 p.m.: Dwayne Dopsie & The Zydeco Hellraisers Big Tent ($20 or Club Pass) 10 p.m.: Taurey Butler Trio Max of Eastman Place ($20 or Club Pass) 10 p.m.: Colin Stetson Kilbourn Hall ($25 or Club Pass) 10:30 p.m.: Jazz Jam Session w/ Bob Sneider Trio State St. Bar and Grill (FREE)

Friday, June 29

4:30 p.m.: Greece-Olympia HS Jazz Band Jazz Street Stage (FREE) 5:15 p.m.: Newark HS Jazz Band Jazz Street Stage (FREE) 5:45 p.m.: Jean-Michel Pilc Hatch Recital Hall ($20 or Club Pass) 6 p.m.: Marco Pignataro Quartet Rochester Club ($20 or Club Pass) 6 p.m.: The Music of Gil Evans w/Ryan Truesdell Montage ($20 or Club Pass) 6 p.m.: ECMS Saxology Jazz Street Stage (FREE) 6 p.m.: Roy Haynes Fountain of Youth Band Kilbourn Hall ($25 or Club Pass) 6 p.m.: Rochester Metro Jazz Orchestra Big Tent ($20 or Club Pass) 6:15 p.m.: The Bridge Trio Max of Eastman Place ($20 or Club Pass) 6:30 p.m.: Robi Botos Trio Xerox Auditorium ($20 or Club Pass) 6:45 p.m.: Orlando LeFleming Trio Christ Church ($20 or Club Pass) 7 p.m.: Po’ Boys Brass Band East Ave. & Chestnut Stage (FREE) 7:15 p.m.: Dwayne Dopsie & The Zydeco Hellraisers Jazz Street Stage (FREE) 7:30 p.m.: Terje Rypdal & Bergen Big Band Lutheran Church ($20 or Club Pass) 7:45 p.m.: Peter Karp & Sue Foley Abilene ($20 or Club Pass) 7:45 p.m.: Jean-Michel Pilc Hatch Recital Hall ($20 or Club Pass) 8 p.m.: Norah Jones Kodak Hall Eastman Theatre ($36-$60; SOLD OUT) 8:30 p.m.: Big James & The Chicago Playboys Big Tent ($20 or Club Pass) 8:45 p.m.: Orlando LeFleming Trio Christ Church ($20 or Club Pass) 9 p.m.: Jimmie Vaughan & the TiltA-Whirl Band East Ave. & Chestnut Stage (FREE) 9 p.m.: Robi Botos Trio Xerox Auditorium ($20 or Club Pass) 9:15 p.m.: Dwayne Dopsie & The Zydeco Hellraisers Jazz Street Stage (FREE) 9:30 p.m.: Terje Rypdal & Bergen Big Band Lutheran Church ($20 or Club Pass) 9:45 p.m.: Peter Karp & Sue Foley Abilene ($20 or Club Pass) 10 p.m.: Music of Gil Evans with Ryan Truesdell Montage ($20 or Club Pass) 10 p.m.: Big James & The Chicago Playboys Big Tent ($20 or Club Pass) 10 p.m.: The Bridge Trio Max of Eastman Place ($20 or Club Pass) 10 p.m.: Marco Pignataro Quartet Rochester Club ($20 or Club Pass) 10 p.m.: Roy Haynes Fountain of Youth Band Kilbourn Hall ($25 or Club Pass) 10:30 p.m.: Jazz Jam Session w/Bob Sneider Trio State St. Bar & Grill (FREE)

Saturday, June 30

4:30 p.m.: West Irondequoit HS Jazz Band Jazz Street Stage (FREE) 5:15 p.m.: Jazz Bones Directed by Evan Dobbins Jazz Street Stage (FREE) 5:45 p.m.: Joanne Brackeen Hatch Recital Hall ($20 or Club Pass) 6 p.m.: Raul Midon Kilbourn Hall ($25 or Club Pass) 6 p.m.: Mario Romano Quartet feat. Pat LaBarbera Rochester Club ($20 or Club Pass) 6 p.m.: ESM Honors Performance Units Jazz Street Stage (FREE) 6 p.m.: Greece Jazz Band Big Tent ($20 or Club Pass) 6 p.m.: Mederic Collignon Montage ($20 or Club Pass) 6:15 p.m.: Chic Gamine Max of Eastman Place ($20 or Club Pass) 6:30 p.m.: Victor Goines Quartet Xerox Auditorium ($20 or Club Pass) 6:45 p.m.: Arun Ghosh Quintet Christ Church ($20 or Club Pass) 7 p.m.: Sierra Leone’s Refugee All Stars East Ave. & Chestnut Stage (FREE) 7 p.m.: Thunder Body East Ave. & Alexander Stage (FREE) 7:15 p.m.: Big James & The Chicago Playboys Jazz Street Stage (FREE) 7:30 p.m.: Hakon Kornstad Lutheran Church ($20 or Club Pass) 7:45 p.m.: The Sadies Abilene ($20 or Club Pass) 7:45 p.m.: Joanne Brackeen Hatch Recital Hall ($20 or Club Pass) 8:30 p.m.: Locarno Big Tent ($20 or Club Pass) 8:45 p.m.: Arun Ghosh Quintet Christ Church ($20 or Club Pass) 9 p.m.: Victor Goines Quartet Xerox Auditorium ($20 or Club Pass) 9 p.m.: Gov’t Mule East Ave. & Chestnut Stage (FREE) 9 p.m.: Trombone Shorty & Oleans Avenue East Ave. & Alexander Stage (FREE) 9:15 p.m.: Big James & The Chicago Playboys Jazz Street Stage (FREE) 9:30 p.m.: Hakon Kornstad Lutheran Church ($20 or Club Pass) 9:45 p.m.: The Sadies Abilene ($20 or Club Pass) 10 p.m.: Locarno Big Tent ($20 or Club Pass) 10 p.m.: Raul Midon Kilbourn Hall ($25 or Club Pass) 10 p.m.: Mario Romano Quartet feat. Pat LaBarbera Rochester Club ($20 or Club Pass) 10 p.m.: Chic Gamine Max of Eastman Place ($20 or Club Pass) 10 p.m.: Mederic Collignon Montage ($20 or Club Pass) 10:30 p.m.: Jazz Jam Session w/ Bob Sneider Trio State St. Bar and Grill (FREE)

To get all of the details on the 2012 XRIJF, check out City Newspaper’s Jazz Guide at rochestercitynewspaper.com. Our music writers are also posting reviews of each night’s Jazz Fest shows on our Jazz Blog, new every morning of the festival.


Theater

YOU GOT SOMETHING TO SAY?

TWEET AT ME, BRO!

@ROCCITYNEWS Midge Marshall is the only actor in the cast

Alex Black and Midge Marshall in “The Sand Box,” one of the Edward Albee one-acts currently on the stage at MuCCC. PHOTO BY ANNETTE DRAGON

The loneliest number An Evening of Albee By John W. Borek Presents Through June 30 MuCCC, 142 Atlantic Ave. Thu-Sat 7:30 p.m. | $10-$20 | 234-1254, muccc.org [ REVIEW ] BY ERIC REZSNYAK

Edward Albee might not be the most accessible playwright, but he’s found a kindred spirit in local director Michael Arve. In the past few years Arve has staged three of Albee’s most well-known works — “The Zoo Story,” “A Delicate Balance,” and “Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?” — and he and producing partner John Borek are committed to ongoing explorations of the American writer’s work at community performance space MuCCC. Currently on stage are three of Albee’s one-acts. Although very different, they show off some of Albee’s signature traits and give some insight into his life and struggles. Of the two one-acts, the first two — “The American Dream” and “The Sand Box” — are performed consecutively, using the same actors. The two pieces have similar themes and, according to Arve’s program notes, are informed heavily by Albee’s own upbringing as an adopted child in a severely dysfunctional upper-class family, his main source of emotional support

coming from his maternal grandmother. In “The American Dream,” a married couple waits impatiently for the arrival of a mystery guest — one whose identity and purpose they can’t remember. Meanwhile, the woman’s mother makes plans for a surprise of her own while intermittently squabbling with her daughter and bemoaning society’s treatment of the elderly. In “The Sand Box,” the same three characters (or very similar variations of them) are transported to the beach. Or maybe not. Both plays contain strong elements of absurdity and massive metaphors, as well as some breaking of the fourth wall. But don’t let that distract you from what Albee’s really saying. There are some powerful messages in both plays, and the pain, the loneliness, and the desperation he must have felt growing up in such an environment (from his perspective, at least) is practically palpable in the first. The third work, which follows intermission, is titled “Listening.” In it, three characters — The Man, The Woman, and The Girl — meet in a dilapidated garden and ask questions of, and make judgments about, one another. It’s an interesting, artistic play in which almost nothing is spelled out for the viewer, and careful attention must be paid if you hope to have any clue about what is going on. It is riveting in moments, but also undeniably self-indulgent on Albee’s part, relying heavily on some of his more grating habits as a writer (see: the constant repetition of the same lines).

to appear in all three plays, and she does an excellent job throughout. In the first two pieces she plays Grandma, wise, wily, and sweet but tough. She finds a perfect balance of sugar and vinegar, never overplaying the sass or the pathos so that either devolves into shtick. If her portrayal of the character is anything like Albee’s grandmother, it explains an awful lot about him as a writer. In the last play, her Woman is a totally different creature. She’s cunning, manipulative, resentful, and extremely sharp. Not quite opposite ends of the spectrum, but the fact that Marshall is so deeply rooted in both roles on the same night is truly impressive. Joining her in the first two plays is Kevin Sean Sweeney as Daddy. For a role that’s fairly limited — Daddy is an emotionally neutered, browbeaten shell of a man — Sweeney brings surprising range. He doesn’t waste a single line, although a lot of his acting in this role is in what he doesn’t say. He plays opposite Nancy Fancher as Mommy, a frigid, vapid, cruel woman with apparently zero redeeming qualities. Fancher has the entitled ice-queen act down, but her line delivery was consistently flat. I debated whether the bored-sounding affectation was an intentional part of the performance, but if so, it made it seem like Fancher was acting while everyone else on the stage was fully in character. Musician Cristina Dinella also performs as part of “The Sound Box,” while “The American Dream” also features the funny, natural Denise Bartalo as Mrs. Barker and Alex Black as The American Dream. Black also appears as Young Man in “The Sand Box,” in which he spends the entirety of the play doing calisthenics in nothing but his underpants. Let’s get this out of the way: Black is a stunning physical specimen. Tall, muscular, blonde hair, chiseled features — he’s practically Olympian. But the important thing is, he can act. His program bio states that he’s a relative newcomer to the stage, but he does a good job handling an emotionally charged monologue in “Dream” and he hints at some solid comedic instincts in both plays. In addition to Marshall, “Listening” features Jim Valone as The Man and Meredith Powell as The Girl. As alluded to earlier, “Listening” is an extremely challenging piece, both for the audience and the performers. Timing is crucial, and the play’s circuitous dialogue and labyrinthine logic (if it can even be called that) must have put all three talented local actors through their paces. The fact that the play works as well as it does can be attributed almost solely to the presence of the actors and the work Arve did with them.

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Art Exhibits [ OPENING ] “The Rhythm of Art” Fri Jun 29. Pat Rini Rohrer Gallery, 71 S Main St, Canandaigua. 6-8 p.m. 394-0030, prrgallery.com. “Robert Marshall Haven: Drawing the Beatles” Fri Jun 29. Lorette Wilmot Library @ Nazareth College, 4245 East Ave. Closing reception 5-7 p.m. 389-2129, naz.edu. “Summer Fine Art Show & Sale” Nazareth College Arts Center Gallery, 4245 East Ave. 5 p.m. 389-5073, naz.edu. [ CONTINUING ] 1570 Gallery at Valley Manor 1570 East Ave. Jun 29-Aug 24: “Making Gift of the Rose” by Peggy Martinez. Mon-Fri 9 a.m.-5 p.m. and weekends by appt. 770-1923. Artisans’ Loft 4135 Mill St, Pultneyville. Ongoing: “Dream Sails...and More” by David Chamberlain; “Waterscapes” by Lee Hanford; “Trees and More” by Rocky Greco. Fri 1-3 & 6-8, Sat 1-4 p.m. & 6-8 p.m., Sun 1-4 p.m. 315-589-5000 Arts & Cultural Council Gallery 277 N Goodman St. Through Jun 27: “Manuel Rivera-Ortiz: India, A Celebration of Life.” Mon-Fri 10 a.m.-4 p.m. 4734000, artsrochester.org. Axom Gallery 176 Anderson Ave. 2nd floor. Through Jun 30: “Convergence” by Paul Garland. Mon-Fri 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Sat 12-5 p.m. 232.6030 x23, axomgallery.com. Baobab Cultural Center 728 University Ave. Continuing: Magnificent Africa. Thu-Fri 5:30-9 p.m., Sat 2-4 p.m. 5632145, thebaobab.org. Books Etc. 78 W. Main St., Macedon. Through Aug 15: “Relative Image,” work by Dolores Seagren, Richard Lacey, and Anne Lacey

COMEDY | Charlie Murphy’s Acid Trip Tour

It can’t be easy to come from a family where one sibling has made it big in the profession you too have chosen. But even though Eddie is the better known name of the Murphy clan, big brother Charlie holds his own as an actor, comedian, and writer and performer, perhaps best known for his work on Comedy Central’s beloved “Chappelle’s Show.” That’s where I first saw Charlie Murphy, and I still fondly remember his hilarious skit about the time that he and his friends played basketball with Prince and The Revolution at Paisley Park. Catch Charlie Murphy’s Acid Trip Tour stop in Rochester on Thursday, June 28, at the Auditorium Theatre (885 E. Main St.). Murphy will be accompanied with special guests Faizon Love and Freez Luv. The show starts at 7:30 p.m. (doors at 6:30) and tickets cost $49-$69, available by calling 800-745-3000 or by visiting ticketmaster.com. For more information on Murphy visit charliemurphycomedy.com. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY Ellington. Wed-Sun Noon-5 p.m. 474-4116, books_etc@ yahoo.com. Black Radish Gallery Village Gate, D Entrance, 274 N. Goodman St. Jun 30-Jul 29: “Artists Breakfast Group: Four Artists’ Receptions.” Mon-Fri 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Sat 12-5 p.m. arenaartgroup.com B.T. Roberts Memorial Hall Gallery at Roberts Wesleyan College 2301 Westside Drive. Through June 30: “Vapors:

The Brevity of Life” by Athesia Benjamin. Mon-Fri 10 a.m.-5 p.m. 594-6800, nes.edu. Bug Jar 219 Monroe Ave. Through Jul 31: THE LOBBY Presents: “The Artist: Formally Shown as Prints” group exhibit. Mon-Sun 8 p.m.- 2 a.m. 454-2966, bugjar.com, lobbydigital.com Community Darkroom Gallery 713 Monroe Ave. Through Aug 31: “We Are Ten,” A Black and White Photo Exhibition

by Wilson Commencement Academy Photo Club. Mon 9 a.m.-9:30 p.m.; Tue-Thu 9 a.m.-6:30 p.m.; Fri 12-5 p.m.; Sat 10 a.m.-5:30 p.m. 2715920, geneseearts.org. Cumming Nature Center Hurst Gallery 6475 Gulick Rd., Naples. Through Sep 2: “Dragonflies & Damselflies” photo exhibit. Wed-Fri 9 a.m.3:30 p.m., Sat-Sun 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m. $3 requested donation, $10 for families. 374-6160, rmsc.org. A Different Path Gallery 27 Market St., Brockport. Continuing: “I and Love and You” group show and “Women” a solo show of new works by chickenbone. Wed-Fri 10 a.m.5 p.m., Sat 10 a.m.-6 p.m., Sun 10 a.m.-4 p.m. 637-5494, differentpathgallery.com. Finger Lakes Gallery & Frame 36 S. Main St., Canandaigua. Through Jul 2: Silent Art Auction to benefit Sands Cancer Center. Mon-Wed 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; Thu 10 a.m.-8 p.m.; Fri 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; Sat 10 a.m.-4 p.m. 396-7210, galleryandframe.com. Friendly Home’s Memorial Gallery 3165 East Ave. Through Aug 31: “Something For All Seasons” by Pamela LoCicero. Daily 10 a.m.-5 p.m. 3811600, friendlyhome.org. The Gallery Annex Dallywater’s, 83 Geneva St., Geneva. Continuing: “Bloom” by Kevin Harwood. Call for details. 315719-0140. Gallery @ Equal=Grounds 750 South Ave. Through Jun 30: “Secrets of the Solstice,” Artwork by Tim Mack. TueFri 7 a.m.-Midnight, Sat-Sun 10 a.m.-Midnight. gallery@ equalgrounds.com. Gallery r 100 College Ave. Through Jul 3: “I Know You through Your Pictures,” RIT’s

Photo Arts Collective club. Wed-Sun 1-5 p.m. galleryr.org. Gallery Salon & Spa 780 University Ave. Through Jul 31: “ReMix” by Belinda Bryce. Tue-Thu 11 a.m.-8 p.m., Fri 11 a.m.-7 p.m., Sat 9:30 a.m.-3 p.m. 271-8340, galleryhair. com. Genesee Co-op Federal Credit Union 395 Gregory St. Through Jun 29: The Work of Cheryl and Don Olney. Mon-Wed 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; Thu-Fri 10 a.m.-6 p.m. 461-2230, genesee.coop. George Eastman House 900 East Ave. Jul 3-Sep 30: “Lost Birds: Sculptures by Todd McGrain.” | Jun 30-Oct 21: “Ideas in Things.” | Through Sep 16: “See: Untold Stories.” | Ongoing: “Cameras from the Technology Collection,” and “The Remarkable George Eastman.” | Tue-Sat 10 a.m.5 p.m., Thu 10 a.m.-8 p.m., Sun 1-5 p.m. $4-$12. 2713361, eastmanhouse.org Gilded Square Picture Framing & Gallery 714 University Ave. Continuing: “Framed” artwork by Keith Uhrich & Michelle Michael. Tue-Fri 11 a.m.-5 p.m., Sat 11 a.m.-3 p.m. 4612808, gildedsquare.com. High Falls Fine Art Gallery 60 Browns Race. Through Jul 5: “Stephen Spinder, Solo Photography,” “Pen, Pencil, Tool, & Brush,” and “A Photographer’s Path 15.” Wed-Fri 11 a.m.-5:30 p.m.; Sat Noon-5:30 p.m.; Sun 1-5 p.m. 325-2030, centerathighfalls.org. Hungerford Building 1115 E. Main St., door 1, floor 2. Through Jun 29: “My Apocalypse.” Visit for details: myapocalypse2012.tumblr. com. Image City Photography Gallery 722 University Ave. Through Jul 8: “Israel: A Country in

Transition” by Bruce Bennett. Wed-Sat 11 a.m.-7 p.m.; Sun noon-4 p.m. 482-1976, imagecityphotographygallery. com. International Art Acquisitions 3300 Monroe Ave. Jul 1-31: Recent works by Canadian artist Sam Paonessa.| Through Jun 30: “Ode to Matisse” original gouache and ink paintings by Marsha Hammel. Mon-Fri 10 a.m.-9 p.m.; Sat 10 a.m.-6 p.m.; Sun Noon-5 p.m. 264-1440, internationalartacquisitions. com. I-Square Visions 693 Titus Ave., Irondequoit. Through Jul 12: “Hot in Irondequoit” Show & Sale. Mon-Thu 10 a.m.-2 p.m. 943-1941. Jewish Community Center 1200 Edgewood Ave. Through Jul 22: “Traveling Exhibition: Nazi Persecution of Homosexuals.” Wed 9 a.m.-4 p.m., Thu 11 a.m.-8 p.m., Fri 11 a.m.-5 p.m., Sat-Sun Noon-6 p.m., and Mon-Tue by request. 4612000, www.jccrochester.org Joseph S. Skalny Welcome Center Gallery St. John Fisher College, 3690 East Ave. Through Jun 25: Rochester Art Club Spring Show. Mon-Fri 10 a.m.-3 p.m. 899-3720. Little Theatre Café 240 East Ave. Through Jul 20: Valerie Berner: “Megachromatic.” Sun 5-8 p.m. Mon-Thu 5-10 p.m.; Fri-Sat 5-11 p.m. 258-0403, thelittle.org. Lorette Wilmot Library @ Nazareth College 4245 East Ave. Through Jun 29: “Robert Marshall Haven: Drawing the Beatles.” Call 389-2129 for hours. naz.edu. Memorial Art Gallery 500 University Ave. Through Aug 5: Fifth Rochester Biennial. Wed-Sun 11 a.m.-5 p.m., Thu until 9 p.m., $5-$12.

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Thu night reduced price: $6 from 5-9 p.m. 276-8900, mag. rochester.edu. Mill Art Center & Gallery, 61 N Main St, Honeoye Falls. Continuing: “Felted Fashions” by Jae Hee Lee and “Fresh Produce.” Mon-Fri & Sat 11 a.m.-3 p.m., Fri 11 a.m.8 p.m. Free. 624-7740, millartcenter.com. My Sister’s Gallery The Episcopal Church Home, 505 Mt. Hope Ave. Through Jul 10: “Between the Lines, Patriotism in Print.” Daily 10 a.m.-8 p.m. 546-8439. Nan Miller Gallery 3450 Winton Place. Through Jul 7: “Albert Paley’s The Mastery of Metal.” Mon-Sat 10 a.m.-5 p.m. 2921430, nanmillergallery.com. Nazareth College Arts Center Gallery 4245 East Ave. Jun 29Jul 29: “Summer Fine Art Show & Sale.” Wed-Thu 12-5 p.m., Fri 12-8 p.m., Sun 12-5 p.m. 389-5073, naz.edu. Nazareth College Colacino Gallery 4245 East Ave. Through Jul 22: “Jazz: The Spirit of the Movement,” The Photographs of Jim Allen. Wed-Sat 12-5 p.m. 389-5073, naz.edu. Ock Hee’s Gallery 2 Lehigh St. Through Aug 25: “The Inner World of Dario Tazziolo.” MonSat 11 a.m.-5 p.m. 624-4730, ockhee@frontiernet.net. Orange Glory Café 240 East Ave. Continuing: “Poster and Fine Art Show” by Carla Bartow. Mon-Fri 11 a.m.-3 p.m. 232-7340. Our House Art Gallery Veterans Outreach Center, 783 South Ave. Through Jun 30: “No Rules” by David Duncan. Tue 1-7 p.m., Fri 1-3 p.m., or by appt. 295-7804, veteransoutreachcenter.org. Oxford Gallery 267 Oxford St. Through Aug 25: “Summer Exhibit: James Strohmeier.”

DANCE | Bill Evans Dancing the Summer Solstice

Summer solstice: the day where the tilt of the planet’s axis makes for the longest day of the year. This year the solstice occurred on June 20, but the Bill Evans Dance Company invites you to celebrate it a few days late. On Saturday, June 30, SUNY Brockport will be hosting “Dancing in the Summer Solstice: An Evening of Choreography by Bill Evans” at 8 p.m. in the Hartwell Dance Theater. The BEDCO formed 38 years ago in Seattle, and now makes its home in Rochester. The company performs a blend of modern dance and rhythm tap, and it has performed in all 50 states, including in prestigious venues like the Kennedy Center. General admission tickets are $15 ($10 for students and children). For more information visit billevansdance.org. For directions to SUNY Brockport, visit brockport.edu/about/visit. — BY ANNE RITZ Tue-Fri Noon-5 p.m; Sat 10 a.m.-5 p.m. 271-5885, oxfordgallery.com. Pat Rini Rohrer Gallery 71 S Main St, Canandaigua. Jun 29-Aug 11: “The Rhythm of Art.” Mon-Tue 10 a.m.-6 p.m.; Wed-Fri 10 a.m.-8 pm.; Sat 10 a.m.-6 p.m.; Sun 12:30-4 p.m. 394-0030, prrgallery. com. Record Archive 33 1/3 Rockwood St. Through Jun 30: “Posters and Recent Works by Chris Charles of Fly Rabbit Press.” Mon-Sat 10 a.m.-9

p.m., Sun noon-5 p.m. alayna@ recordarchive.com. Rochester Contemporary Arts Center 137 East Ave. Through Jul 15: “6x6x2012: Bigger and Better.” Wed-Sun 1-5 p.m., Fri 1-10 p.m. 461-2222, rochestercontemporary.org. $1. Rochester Plaza Hotel & Conference Center 70 State St. Through Jun 30: “Art at the Jazz Fest!” Featuring Paul and Christine Knoblauch, Cordell Cordaro, Frank Argento, and Greg Polisseni. Call for details. 546-3450.

Rochester Regional Community Design Center Hungerford Complex/E. Main Business Park. Door 3B. Continuing: “Corn Hill: What’s Next?” MonFri 8:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m. 2710520, rrcdc.com. Roz Steiner Art Gallery Genesee Community College, 1 College Rd., Batavia. Through Jun 28: Student Digital Art Show. Call for hours. 343-0055 x6448, genesee.edu. Rush Rhees Library Rare Books and Special Collections University of Rochester River Campus, Rush Rhees Library, Wilson Blvd. Through Aug 17: “Picturing AIDS and Its Publics,” educational AIDS posters from the Atwater Collection, and “Springing to Life: Moveable Books and Mechanical Devices.” Mon-Fri 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Sat 11 a.m.-3 p.m. 475-6766. Sage Art Center UR River Campus. Through August 2012: Photo exhibit by Thomas Evans, curated by Jessica Holmes. Mon-Thu 9 a.m.-11p.m., Fri 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Sat-Sun 2-6 p.m. 273-5995, rochester.edu/ college/AAH/facilities/sage Sips Coffee Shop 149 Pattonwood Dr., Irondequoit. Through Jun 30: Artist of the Month: Oil and Acrylic Paintings by Sunita Dixit. Call for hours: 323-9360. Starry Nites Café 696 University Ave. Through Aug 25: “Fly Me to the Moon: Celestial Bodies at Starry Nites Café.” Mon-Thu 7:30 a.m.-10 p.m., Fri 7:30 a.m.-midnight, Sat 8 a.m.midnight, Sun 9 a.m.-9 p.m. 271-2630, starrynitescafe.com, shoefactoryarts.com. Stella Art Gallery & Studio 350 West Commercial St., East Rochester. Continuing: “East Rochester High School Student Exhibit.” Thu 9 a.m.-4 p.m., Fri

9 a.m.-9 p.m., Sat noon-9 p.m. stellaartgalleryandstudio.com. Studio 215 Hungerford Building Door #1 or 2, Floor 4, Suite 433E, 1115 E. Main St. Continuing: “School’s Out for Summer 2,” with students from Buckman Heights Elementary School. Tue-Wed 5-8 p.m., Sat 10 a.m.-3 p.m., or by appointment. 490-1210, humanette66@gmail.com. Tap & Mallet 381 Gregory St. Continuing: “Paintings by Bradley Butler.” MonSat 11:30 a.m.-2 a.m.; Sun 4 p.m.-12 a.m. 473-0503, tapandmallet.com. Visual Studies Workshop 31 Prince St. Through Jul 9: “Reversing the Catastrophe of Fixed Meaning” by Scott McCarney. Thu 5-8 p.m., FriSat 12-5 p.m., and by appt. 442-8676, vsw.org. Wallace Library Rochester Institute of Technology, 1 Lomb Memorial Dr. Through Aug 6: “The Light of the Sublime: The Works of Rumi as Interpreted by Zahra Partovi and Vincent FitzGerald & Co.” Mon-Fri 9 a.m.-noon and 1-5 p.m. 475-4213. Wayne County Council for the Arts 108 W. Miller St., Newark. Through Jul 28: “Illustrations” by Elaine Verstraete. Thu-Sat 12-3 p.m., and by appt. 315331-4593, info@wayne-arts. com, waynearts.wordpress.com. Wood Library 134 North Main St., Canandaigua. Through Jul 12: “The Finger Lakes: Above and Below,” paintings by Gloria Betlam. Mon-Thu 10 a.m.-9 p.m., Fri 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Sat 10 a.m.-2 p.m. 394-1381. [ CALL FOR ARTWORK ] 56th Clothesline Festival. Limited exhibitor spaces remain for Sep 8-9 juried

outdoor show & sale at Memorial Art Gallery. Apply at clothesline.rochester.edu. Arts at the Gardens: Call for Vendors. Takes place August 20-21. Information: artsatthegardens.org. Call for Art: Crow Show. Deadline July 21. Call for artwork relating to crows or ravens for August exhibit. More information and more calls for art at shoefactoryarts.com. Call for Art: Skin Deep – The Art of Tattooing and Body Art. Deadline June 30. Submit framed drawings, illustrations, and/or photos of body art for July 6 exhibit. More info: stellaartgalleryandstudio.com. Call for Art: “Landmarks of Wayne County.” Must be delivered to Wayne County Council for the Arts October 5 or 6. Adult & Youth categories; photos must be taken within Wayne Country between October 1, 2011 and September 30, 2012. Information: 315-331-4593, waynearts.wordpress.com. Call for Art Proposals for New Roz Steiner Art Gallery at Genesee Community College. Individuals and groups working in all media are welcome to submit proposals. Submit bio, resume, digital JPEG samples to GCC Art Department Office, Art Gallery Committee, Genesee Community College, One College Road, Batavia, NY 14020. The new gallery will be ready for exhibitions beginning in early 2011. For more info, email hsjones@genesee.edu. Call for Emerging Film- and Videomakers. Ongoing. Submit films and videos to the monthly Emerging Filmmakers Series at the Little Theatre. Films of maximum 30 minutes must have been produced in New continues on page 24

rochestercitynewspaper.com City 21


SPECIAL EVENT | Independence Day Celebrations

Rochester and its surrounding communities tend to go all out when celebrating Independence Day. Just about every nearby town has special events and fireworks to recognize the anniversary of our nation’s birth. This year July 4 falls on a Wednesday, which makes for all kinds of interesting schedules (and a very weird workweek). Below is a list of major area July 4 events. If you think of something we missed post it to this article at rochestercitynewspaper.com. — BY ANNE RITZ

Saturday, June 30

Penfield: A parade begins at 10 a.m. at Penfield High School (25 High School Drive), and continues on Five Mile Line Road, Route 441, and Baird Road to the Penfield Community Center. After the parade, head to Harris Whalen Park (126 Penfield Road) at 6 p.m. for the remaining events, including activities for kids, food vendors, local musicians Bobby Henrie & The Goners (6 p.m.) and Dog House (8 p.m.), and fireworks at 10 p.m. For more information, visit penfield.org or call 340-8651.

Tuesday, July 3Wednesday, July 4

Irondequoit: On Tuesday, an arts and crafts show and community fair will run 11 a.m.-11 p.m. From noon until 6 p.m. stop by for the Pioneer House Blacksmith Shop Open House. For ages 21 and up, there will be a beverage garden 2-10:30 p.m. that will feature performances from Jeff Elliot & Danny Blues at 3 p.m. and the Lakeside Hooligans at 6:30 p.m. A street dance will be held 7-11 p.m. with music by Ruby Shooz and youth performer showcases 8-8:30 p.m. 9:30-10 p.m. On Wednesday, start your day with the 2-mile fun run at 8 a.m. or the 10K race at 8:15 a.m. A parade starts at 11 a.m. on Titus Avenue and continues from Irondequoit Town Plaza to Town Hall. The beverage garden will be open 2-10:30 p.m. There will be several activities and food vendors throughout the day, closing the evening with fireworks at 9:30 p.m. Activities take place at Irondequoit Town Hall (1280 Titus Avenue). For more information, visit Irondequoit.org.

Wednesday, July 4

Brighton: The town will begin its festivities with a 5K race beginning at Twelve Corners Brighton High School (2643 Elmwood Ave) at 8 a.m. The rest of the day’s festivities will begin at 2 p.m. at Meridian Centre Park (located at 2025 Winton Road), and will include rides, food, entertainment by the Skycoasters, and a 22 City june 27 - july 3, 2012

fireworks display. Admission is free. For more information, visit townofbrighton.org. Brockport: Gather on the lawn of the Morgan-Manning House (151 Main St., Brockport) for a day of patriotic activities. At 10 a.m. a children’s parade will go from Remembrance Park to the Morgan Manning House along South Street; the parade will be accompanied by the music of the Excelsior Brigade Drum & Fife Corp. Followed by the parade, the new Brockport Community Concert Band will provide music on the Morgan Manning House lawn beginning at 11 a.m. and the Community Jazz band will follow. Other activities include old-fashioned games, face painting and chalk painting, and a traditional cakewalk. For more information, call 637-3645 or visit frontiernet.net/~morganmanninghouse/ fourthofjuly.html. Chili: This will be Chili’s 23rd annual ChiliE Festival. Come down to the Chili Senior Center (3235 Chili Ave.) starting at noon for food vendors and craft exhibits, a car show, live entertainment by Coup De Villes and Wooden Nickel, children’s activities, a 2 p.m. screening of James Cagney’s “Yankee Doodle,” and more. A parade will begin at 5 p.m. and continue from Bucky Drive to Chili Avenue. Fireworks cap off the event at 10 p.m. For more information and a full list of events visit townofchili.org or call 784-5250. City of Rochester: Head to Main Street from the South Avenue exchange to see Steve Grills & the Roadmasters performing at 7:30 p.m. and patriotic pops by Rochester Philharmonic Orchestra at 9 p.m. After the performances, a massive fireworks display will begin at 10 p.m. You can park for free South Avenue Garage (39 Stone Street), Court Street Garage (194 Court Street), or Sister Cities Garage (28 N. Fitzhugh St.). Bring blankets or lawn chairs, unless you plan on standing. For more information, visit cityofrochester.gov/july4. Fairport:/Perinton: The Firecracker 5-mile Race begins at 8 a.m. at Perinton Park (off of Fairport Road). A parade begins at

10 a.m., featuring floats of historic events, places, people, and eras. After the parade, take a tour of the historic Bethlehem Lutheran Church (48 Perrin St.); free hot dogs and lemonade will be available to tour goers. Relax the rest of the day at a picnic at Perinton Park, which will include activities and music starting at noon. For more information, visit perinton.org. Greece: The First Bible Baptist Church will put on “Spirit of America” at the Grace & Truth Sports Center (373 North Greece Road). The festival is a tribute to all branches of the Armed Forces with a special presentation to honor fallen soldiers. Country-Western artist Josie Waverly will perform and fireworks will commence at 10 p.m. The festivities begin at 5 p.m. For more information, call 392-0777. Henrietta: Henrietta holds its 4th of July Garage and Craft Sale at 595 Calkins Road 9 a.m.-2 p.m. After that, festivities begin at 4 p.m. at the Henrietta Senior Center (515 Calkins Road) with entertainment, children’s activities, and concessions. Kids won’t be bored with pony rides, inflatable amusements, and arts and crafts. The night concludes with a fireworks display beginning at 9:40 p.m. For more information, call 359-2540 or visit henrietta.org. Mumford: Genesee Country Village & Museum (1410 Flint Hill Road, Mumford) will celebrate Independence Day on July 4, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., with traditional activities such as parade, concerts, a pie-eating contest, egg toss, sack races, pea-shooter contest, and town ball match. At 11 a.m. a naturalization ceremony will occur on the steps of the village Town Hall, where new citizens take the oath of allegiance. A Civil War-era replica balloon will be on display surrounded by a Civil War encampment (balloon rides are available for an extra fee starting at 10 a.m.). Two ceremonies will honor the nation’s birth, one set in 1826 and the other in 1876, along with the recreation of a duel using flintlock pistols handmade by the museum’s gunsmith. Admission costs $10.50-$16.50; children under 3 admitted free. For more information call 538-6822 or visit gcv.org.


rochestercitynewspaper.com City 23


Comedy

Art Exhibits York State in the last two years. For more information, email emergingfilmmakers@ yahoo.com. Call for Entries: Films. Greentopia | Film Festival takes place September 1214. Submit or get more info: greentopiafestival.com/film/. Central Library Offers Exhibit Opportunities for Artists at Lower Link Gallery. Space currently available free of charge. Applications available at libraryweb. org; call 428-8051 for more information. Donate Artwork to Evening at Auction to benefit Boys and Girls Club in Geneva. To be held September 21. Contact margaret.bernay@hws.edu or kvaughn@hws.edu for more information. Seneca Park Zoo Photo Contest. Deadline July 15 at 5 p.m. For 2013 calendar. Send images to photos@senecazoo.org. For complete contest rules, visit senecaparkzoo.org.

Art Events [ Thursday, June 28 ] 5th Annual Rochester Biennial Lectures: Roberto Bertoia. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. 276-8900, mag.rochester.edu. 11 a.m. Included in gallery admission: $5-$12. Artist Talk: Scott McCarney. Visual Studies Workshop, 31 Prince St. 442-8676, vsw.org. 7 p.m. Free. McCarney’s show, “Reversing the Catastrophe of Fixed Meaning,” is currently at VSW.

[ Thursday, June 28Saturday, June 30 ] Jamie Lissow. Comedy Club, 2235 Empire Blvd., Webster. 671-9080, thecomedyclub.us. Thu 7:30 p.m., Fri-Sat 7:30 & 10 p.m. $9-$12.

KIDS | Space Travel at RMSC

It was only a matter of time before even space travel became democratized. Well, OK, it’s still not upon us, and it definitely won’t be accessible to everyone, but soon humans won’t need to be ordained astronauts to breach the atmosphere. Commercial spaceflight is in the works in a serious way due to entrepreneurs such as Richard Branson of The Virgin Group. A new family-friendly star show at Rochester Museum & Science Center’s Strasenburgh Planetarium (657 East Ave.) will explore the next generation of space travel. “Astronaut Mission: The Future” explores the topic through high-definition visualizations of the new generation of space vehicles from NASA, as well as private companies such as SpaceX and Virgin Galactic. The show will “help visitors imagine themselves flying in one of the new spaceships now under development or on the drawing board,” says Steve Fentress, director of Strasenburgh Planetarium, per a press release. “Astronaut Mission” considers asteroids, other planets, and their moons as possible targets of exploration, and touches on such popular topics as warp drive and faster-than-light travel. The show opens Monday, July 2, and will be shown throughout the summer. Admission is $7 for adults, $6 for seniors, college students, and kids ages 5-18, and free to RMSC members. For more information, call 271-4320 or visit rmsc.org. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY [ Satruday, June 30 ] Fresco Painting Demonstration with Dario Tazzioli. Ock Hee’s

Gallery, 2 Lehigh St. 6244730, ockhee@frontiernet. net. 11 a.m. Free.

[ Friday, June 29Saturday, June 30 ] Village Idiots Improv Comedy. Village Idiots Pillar Theater, Village Gate, 1st floor, 274 North Goodman St., #D106. 797-9086, improvVIP.com. 7:30 & 9:30 p.m. $5. [ Sunday, July 1 ] The Funniest Person in Rochester Contest: Round 1. Comedy Club, 2235 Empire Blvd., Webster. 671-9080, thecomedyclub.us. 6 & 8:30 p.m. $7.

Dance Events [ Saturday, June 30 ] Dancing in the Summer Solstice: An Evening of Choreography by Bill Evans. Hartwell Dance Theatre, Kenyon, The College at Brockport, SUNY. billevansdance.org. 8 p.m. $10-$15.

Festivals [ Saturday, June 30 ] Dyke Picnic & Womyn’s Festival 2012. Ellison Park. dykepicnic. org. 11 a.m.-9 p.m. Free. Penfield Independence Day Celebration. 10 a.m. parade from Penfield High School, 25 High School Dr., to Five Mile Line Road, Route 441, and Baird Road to the Penfield Community Center. 6 p.m. Harris Whalen Park, 126 Penfield Rd. for activities for kids, food vendors, music. Fireworks at 10 p.m.

For more information, visit penfield.org or call 3408651. [ Sunday, July 1-Sunday, July 15 ] Perinton Bicentennial. Perinton. Various activities and events. For info, visit perinton.org. [ Tuesday, July 3Wednesday, July 4 ] Irondequoit Independence Day Celebration. Irondequoit Town Hall, 1280 Titus Ave. Various events and times. For more information, visit Irondequoit.org. [ Wednesday, July 4 ] Brighton Independence Day Celebration. 5K race beginning at Twelve Corners Brighton High School,2643 Elmwood Ave. at 8 a.m. More festivities at 2 p.m. at Meridian Centre Park, 2025 Winton Rd. Free admission. For more information, visit townofbrighton.org. Brockport Independence Day Celebration. MorganManning House, 151 Main St., Brockport. Beginning at 10 a.m. 637-3645, frontiernet. net/~morganmanninghouse/ fourthofjuly.html. Chili’s 23rd Annual Chili-E Festival. Chili Senior Center, 3235 Chili Ave. 784-5250, townofchili.org. Noon. Food vendors and craft exhibits, a car show, live entertainment by Coup De Villes and Wooden Nickel, children’s activities, a 2 p.m. screening of James Cagney’s “Yankee Doodle,” and more. A parade will begin at 5 p.m. and continue from Bucky Drive to Chili Avenue. Fireworks cap off the event at 10 p.m. City of Rochester Independence Day Celebration. Main Street from the South Ave. exchange. Steve Grills & the Roadmasters perform at 7:30 p.m.,

patriotic pops by Rochester Philharmonic Orchestra at 9 p.m. After the performances, a massive fireworks display will begin at 10 p.m. You can park for free South Avenue Garage (39 Stone Street), Court Street Garage (194 Court Street), or Sister Cities Garage (28 N. Fitzhugh St.). Bring blankets or lawn chairs, unless you plan on standing. For more information, visit cityofrochester.gov/july4. Fairport/Perinton Independence Day Celebration. Firecracker 5-mile Race begins at 8 a.m. at Perinton Park, off of Fairport Rd.. Parade begins at 10 a.m. Tour the historic Bethlehem Lutheran Church, 48 Perrin St., picnic at Perinton Park, which will include activities and music starting at noon. For more information, visit perinton.org. Greece Independence Day Celebration. “Spirit of America” at the Grace & Truth Sports Center, 373 North Greece Rd. Country-Western artist Josie Waverly will perform and fireworks will commence at 10 p.m. The festivities begin at 5 p.m. For more information, call 392-0777. Henrietta Independence Day Celebration. 4th of July Garage and Craft Sale at 595 Calkins Road 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Festivities begin at 4 p.m. at the Henrietta Senior Center, 515 Calkins Rd. with entertainment, children’s activities, and concessions. Pony rides, inflatable amusements, and arts and crafts. The night concludes with a fireworks display beginning at 9:40 p.m. For more information, call 3592540 or visit henrietta.org. Mumford Independence Day Celebration. Genesee Country Village & Museum, 1410 Flint Hill Rd., Mumford. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Parade, concerts, a pieeating contest, egg toss, sack

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Please call Jenine Hoefler (585) 276-3559 or Joseph Roscoe, Ph.D. (585) 275-9962 at the University of Rochester James P. Wilmot Cancer Center for more information about this research study


races, pea-shooter contest, and town ball match. At 11 a.m. a naturalization ceremony will occur on the steps of the village Town Hall, where new citizens take the oath of allegiance. A Civil War-era replica balloon will be on display surrounded by a Civil War encampment (balloon rides are available for an extra fee starting at 10 a.m.). Two ceremonies will honor the nation’s birth, one set in 1826 and the other in 1876, along with the recreation of a duel using flintlock pistols handmade by the museum’s gunsmith. Admission costs $10.50-$16.50; children under 3 admitted free. For more information call 538-6822 or visit gcv.org.

Kids Events [ Wednesday, June 27 ] Teen Game Night. Henrietta Public Library, 455 Calkins Rd., 359-7092, hpl.org. 6:30-8 p.m. Free. Ages 12+. [ Thursday, June 28 ] Anime Movie Night. Henrietta Public Library, 455 Calkins Rd., 359-7092, hpl.org. 6:308 p.m. Free. Lego Club. Gates Public Library, 902 Elmgrove Rd. 247-6446. 6:30-7:30 p.m. Ages 5-12. Free, register. Night at the Zoo: Fun for the whole family. Seneca Park Zoo, 2222 St Paul Blvd. 3367212, senecaparkzoo.org. 6-8:30 p.m. $7-$10. Practice SAT. Brighton Memorial Library, 2300 Elmwood Ave. 784-5300, brightonlibrary.org. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Register. Grades 9-12. [ Friday, June 29 ] Cool Kids: “Dance Connection.” Sagawa Park, corners of Main (Rte. 19) and

Little Buddies film screening: “Oliver!” Little Theatre, 240 East Ave. 258-0444, thelittle. org. 10 a.m. $5 [ Saturday, June 30Sunday, July 1 ] Literature Live: The Cat in the Hat. The Strong National Museum of Play, 1 Manhattan Square. 2632700, museumofplay.org. Sat 11 a.m.-4 p.m., Sun 1-4 p.m. Included in museum admission: $11-$13. SPECIAL EVENT | Great Space Duck Race

On Sunday, July 1, take part in a fun-in-the-sun fundraiser for The Space, a downtown Rochester venue for performing arts located in the Hungerford Building (1115 E. Main St., floor 2). Groups that hold events at The Space include the Search Engine Improv Harold Teams and other improvisers and comedians. Progressive Implantology & Periodontics will sponsor The Great Space Duck Race, a 20-minute race at Irondequoit Creek in Ellison Park beginning at 1 p.m. Participants may purchase rubber ducks for $5 each (no more than 500 ducks will be sold), and compete prizes including a kayak and paddles valued at more than $550, gift certificates to local restaurants, and fine arts and crafts from Hungerford Urban Artisans. Unless they sell out sooner, ducks will be offered for sale on the day of the race at the park. Duck owners don’t need to be present to win, but if you’re not in attendance, you’ll miss the festive concert by Chris Wilson, mini-craft show, and potluck picnic. The party takes place 11 a.m.-4 p.m. at Ellison’s Orchard Grove Pavilion. For more information on the race or to purchase your ducks in advance, visit thespacerochester.com. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY Erie Streets, Brockport. 6373984, generationcool.biz. 7-8 p.m. Free. Meet Liberty, the Bald Eagle. Irondequoit High School Auditorium, 260 Cooper Rd. 467-8840. 7 p.m. Free.

[ Saturday, June 30 ] Help Kids: The Family Spot at the Jazz Fest. Little Theatre, 240 East Ave. 258-0444, thelittle.org. 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Free. Toddlers to age 8 with families.

[ Monday, July 2 ] BabyTime Storytime. Irondequoit Public Library Evans Branch, 45 Cooper Rd. 336-6062, aholland@libraryweb.org. Mondays through August 6 11:30 a.m. Free. Ages 0-23 months with caregiver. Buffalo and Brandy. Brighton Memorial Library, 2300 Elmwood Ave. 784-5300, brightonlibrary.org. 10:30 a.m. Free. Ages 2+. Magic, drumming, singing, and storytelling. Movie Mondays. Gates Public Library, 902 Elmgrove Rd. 2476446. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. [ Monday, July 2-Tuesday, July 3 ] Toddler/Talkers Storytime. Irondequoit Public Library Evans Branch, 45 Cooper Rd. 336-6062, aholland@ libraryweb.org. Mondays orTuesdays through August 7 10:30 a.m. Free. Ages 2-3 months with caregiver. [ Tuesday, July 3 ] Movie: “Happy Feet.” Brighton Memorial Library, 2300 Elmwood Ave. 784-5300, brightonlibrary.org. 2 p.m. Free. Pre-school/Pre-readers Storytime. Irondequoit Public Library Evans Branch, 45 Cooper Rd. 336-6062,

aholland@libraryweb.org. Tuesdays through August 7 11:30 a.m. Free. Ages 4-5 months with caregiver.

Lectures [ Through Saturday, June 30 ] Jazz-Related Classes. Introduction to Jazz History 1-2:30 p.m. Hatch Recital Hall at the Eastman School of Music; Jazz Improvisation Steps for Adults 3-4:30 p.m. Eastman School of Music, Room 209; Six Advanced Jazz Improvisation Workshops 3-4:30 p.m. Eastman School of Music, Room 120. Prices vary, register. Legacy of the Masters of Jazz. Eastman School of Music, 25 Gibbs Street, Room 120. esm.rochester.edu/summer. 5-6 p.m. $10 per session. Daily pre-concert discussions/ demonstrations on the lineage of instruments that will be featured at the Xerox Rochester International Jazz Festival. [ Wednesday, June 27 ] Advancing the Arts through Social Media. Arts & Cultural Council Gallery, 277 N Goodman St. 473-4000, artsrochester.org. 10 a.m.-noon. $50, free to members, RSVP. Brighton Farmers’ Market. Brighton Memorial Library, 2300 Elmwood Ave. 784-5300, brightonlibrary.org. 7 p.m. Free. Sue Gardner Smith will talk about the markets, local food, and the Brighton Community Garden. Monroe County Fair Flower & Vegetable Show Talk. Brighton Memorial Library, 2300 Elmwood Ave. 784-5300, brightonlibrary.org. 7 p.m. Free. [ Wednesday, June 17Thursday, June 28 ] College Admissions: An In-Depth Look. Brighton Recreation

Center, 220 Idlewood Rd. 7845260. 7-8:30 p.m. $15, $30/ family. Register. [ Thursday, June 28 ] Online Dating with Harry Reis. Brighton Memorial Library, 2300 Elmwood Ave. 784-5300, brightonlibrary.org. 7 p.m. Free. [ Thursday, June 28Saturday, June 30 ] Photo-Bookworks Symposium. Visual Studies Workshop, 31 Prince St. 442-8676, vsw. org. Various hours. $75-$100, register. [ Friday, June 29 ] Architecture for Lunch: Grove Place/East End. Eastman Place, 25 Gibbs St. 546-7029 x10, landmarksociety.org. 12:1012:45 p.m. Free.

Literary Events [ Wednesday, June 27 ] Brown Bag Book Discussion: “The Cat’s Table” by Michael Ondaatje. Rundel Auditorium, Central Library, 115 South Ave. 428-8350, libraryweb. org. Noon-1 p.m. Free, lunches welcome. Graphic Novel Book Club: “The Push Man and Other Stories” by Yoshihiro Tatsumi. Lift Bridge Book Shop, 45 Main St., Brockport. 637-2260, liftbridgebooks.com. 6:30 p.m. Free. Titles over tea: “This Beautiful Life” by Helen Schulman. Barnes & Noble Greece, 330 Greece Ridge Center Dr. 2274020, bn.com. 7 p.m. Free. [ Thursday, June 28 ] Annie & Joe’s Eclectic Book Group: “The Sense of an Ending” by Julian Barnes.” Lift Bridge Book Shop, 45 Main St., Brockport. 6372260, liftbridgebooks.com. 6:30 p.m. Free. continues on page 26

rochestercitynewspaper.com City 25


Literary Events Classics Book Group: “A Room with a View” by E. M. Forster. Barnes & Noble Greece, 330 Greece Ridge Center Dr. 2274020, bn.com. 7 p.m. Free.

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[ Monday, July 2 ] Moving Beyond Racism Book Group: “Hotel on the Corner of Bitter and Sweet” by James Ford. Barnes & Noble at Pittsford Plaza, 3349 Monroe Ave. 288-8644, bn.com. 78:30 p.m. Free. [ Tuesday, July 3 ] Poetry Reading: Authors Aloud in the Café. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. thelittle.org, wab.org. 8-9 p.m. Free.

Museum Exhibits [ Through Thursday, September 13 ] Quilts & Samplers. The Rochester Historical Society, Rundel Memorial Building, 2nd floor, 115 South Ave. 4288470, rochesterhistory.org. Tue-Wed 10 a.m.-3 p.m., Thu 11 a.m.-3 p.m. $3-$5, free to members.

Recreation [ Thursday, June 28 ] Nature Hike: El Camino Trail. Meet at corner of Clifford and Conkey Aves. cityofrochester. gov/fclg. 6 p.m. Free. Twilight Tours. Mount Hope Cemetery, 791 Mount Hope Ave. 461-3494, fomh.org. 7 p.m. $5, free to FOMH members. Every Thursday through Aug 9. [ Saturday, June 30 ] Mount Hope Cemetery Tour. South cemetery entrance, 1133 Mt. Hope Ave. 461-3494, fomh. org. 1 p.m. $5, members & children under 16 free. Every Saturday through Oct 27. Old Goat Run. Ganondagan State Historic Site, 1488 State Rte. 444, Victor. 742-1690, ganondagan.org. 9 a.m. $18-$25. Seven-mile crosscountry run. [ Sunday, July 1 ] GVHC Hike. Meet at Durand Golf Course Lot. Chris C 2479237, gvhchikes.org. 1 p.m. Free. Mount Hope Cemetery Tour. North Gatehouse opposite Robinson Dr. 1133 Mt. Hope Ave. 461-3494, fomh.org. 2 p.m. $5, members & children under 16 free. Every Sunday through Oct 28. [ Tuesday, July 3 ] Guided Bike Ride, University Ave, Neighborhood of the Arts, and East Ave. Begin at Rochester Public Market. cityofrochester.gov/fclg. 6 p.m. Free.

Special Events [ Daily through November 21 ] Vineyard Public Tours. Casa Larga, 2287 Turk Hill 26 City june 27 - july 3, 2012

SPECIAL EVENT | Art & Treasures Sale

There’s nothing like that feeling of finding the perfect treasure at a garage sale. And at this dignified version, you won’t be seeing any broken bobble heads. On Friday, June 29, and Saturday, June 30, the Memorial Art Gallery (500 University Ave.), will be hosting “Rochester’s Most Prestigious Garage Sale” with the annual Art & Treasures Sale. Check out high-quality antiques like artwork, jewelry, small furniture items, crystal, fine linen, and china. Entry is free and all sales go to benefit the MAG. The event runs Friday 10 a.m.-6 p.m. and Saturday 9 a.m.-2 p.m. You can get a jump on the crowd Thursday, June 28, 6-8 p.m. at the “Bargains and Beer” preview party. Enjoy a cold one and snatch up your treasures early. Tickets are $15 in advance (but you must reserve a spot by June 27) and $18 at the door. Purchase tickets by calling 276-8910. If you feel that you have some treasures of your own that you’re willing to part with, there will be drop-off days Wednesday, June 27, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. and Thursday, June 28, 9 a.m.-1 p.m. All donations are tax-deductible. For more information, visit mag. rochester.edu/events/art-treasures-2012. — BY ANNE RITZ Rd., Fairport. 585-223-4210 x2. 11 a.m., 1 & 3 p.m. $5-$7. [ Wednesday, June 27 ] “Life, Cancer, and the NFL… An Evening With NY Giants’ Mark Herzlich.” Rochester Plaza Hotel, 70 State St. 624-5555, campgooddays. org. 6 p.m. $60, register. Benefit for Camp Good Days. Rochester Winos Wine & Food Pairing. Lemoncello Café & Lounge, 137 West Commercial St., Fairport. rochesterwinos.com. 6:30 p.m. arrival, 7-9:30 p.m. tasting. $25-$30, register. [ Thursday, June 28 ] Film Screening: “A Love to Hide.” Jewish Community Center, 1200 Edgewood Ave., Brighton. 461-2000, jccrochester.org. 7 p.m. Free. Part of programming for “Nazi Persecution of Homosexuals 1933-1945” Exhibition. Perinatal Network of Monroe County Summer Networking Session. Perinatal Network of Monroe County, 339 East Ave., Suite 203. 546-4930, perinatalnetwork.net. Noon-2 p.m. Free. Salon on Kefir. Call for address: 490-4710. 6:30-8:30 p.m. $25 requested donation, RSVP. South Wedge Farmers Market. 100 Alexander St. at S. Clinton. swfarmersmarket. org. 4-7 p.m. Free admission. Through Oct 18.

[ Thursday, June 28Satruday, June 30 ] Art & Treasures Sale. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. 276-8900, mag.rochester.edu. Bargains & Beer Party Thu 6-8 p.m. $15-$18. Regular sale Fri 10 a.m.-6 p.m., Sat 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Free admission. [ Friday, June 29 ] Caribbean Film Series: “Rise Up.” Baobab Cultural Center 728 University Ave. 5632145, thebaobab.org. 7 p.m. Free, register. [ Friday, June 29Sunday, July 1 ] Summer Officially Begins: Summer of Riesling Kick Off. Casa Larga, 2287 Turk Hill Rd., Fairport. 585-223-4210 x2. Noon-5 p.m. $5-$15. [ Saturday, June 30 ] British Brunch. Christ Church, 141 East Ave. 454-3878. 11 a.m. or 1 p.m. $5-$10. DeeDee’s Drag101: A Throw Back Party. Tilt Nightclub, 444 Central Ave. 232-8440, tiltroc.com. 10 p.m. $5-$15 admission. Rochester Hamfest and Technology Expo. R.I.T. Field House. rochesterhamfest.org. 9 a.m.-4 p.m. $8, youth under 16 free with adult. Miss Puerto Rico of Rochester Pageant. Rochester Museum & Science Center, 657 East Ave. prfestival.com. 3 p.m. $10.


Saturday Night Laser Show: Pink Floyd. Rochester Museum and Science Center, 657 East Ave. 271-1880, rmsc.org. 9:30 p.m. $6-$7, no children under age 5. Weaving & Fiber Arts Center Open House. Weaving and Fiber Arts Center Studio, 1940 Piano Works Mall, 349 West Commercial St., East Rochester. 377-2955, weaversguildofrochester.org. 1:30-4:30 p.m. Free. [ Saturday, June 30Sunday, July 1 ] Yard(s) Sale. The Yards, 50-52 Public Market Way. attheyards. com. 9 a.m.-2 p.m. and 7-9 p.m., Sun 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Art show and sale, music and goodies. [ Sunday, July 1 ] Brighton Farmers Market. Brighton High School, 1150 Winton Rd. S. brightonfarmersmarket.com. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Each Sunday through October 28. Free admission. Community Garage Sales & Super Fleas. Rochester Public Market, 280 N. Union St. cityofrochester.gov/ publicmarket. 8 a.m.-2 p.m. Through Oct 14. East Avon Flea Market. 1520 West Henrietta Road, Avon. eastavonfleamarket.com. 7 a.m.-2 p.m. Free admission. Sundays through October. The Great Space Duck Race. Ellison Park. thespacerochester.com. 11 a.m.-4 p.m., race at 1 p.m. Ducks $5 each. Music, picnic, prizes. fundraiser for The Space. [ Tuesday, July 3 ] Maafa: Day of Remembrance. Durand Eastman Park shoreline. 748-7727, 3133685, maafacc.webs.com. 6-8 p.m. Free. Movie: “The Artist.” Brighton Memorial Library, 2300 Elmwood Ave. 784-5300, brightonlibrary.org. 7 p.m. Free. Westside Farmers Market. St. Monica Church parking lot, 831 Genesee St. westsidemarketrochester.com. 4-7:30 p.m. Free admission. Tuesdays through October 16. [ Wednesday, July 4Thursday, July 5 ] Two Nights with 3D Film Archive Founder Bob Furmanek. George Eastman House, 900 East Ave. 271-3361, eastmanhouse.org. 8 p.m. $6-$8.

Sports [ Saturday, June 30Sunday, July 1 ] Rochester Redwings vs. Scranton W/B Yankees. Frontier Field, 1 Morrie Silver Way. redwingsbaseball.com. Sat 7:05 p.m., Sun 6:05 p.m. $7-$12. [ Wednesday, July 4 ] Rochester Redwings vs. Pawtucket Red Sox. Frontier

Field, 1 Morrie Silver Way. redwingsbaseball.com. 7:05 p.m. $7-$12. [ Saturday, June 30 ] Dirtcar Racing. Canandaigua Motorsports Park, 2820 County Rd. 10, Canandaigua. 394-0961, canandaiguamotorsportspark. com. 7 p.m. $12, ages 16 and under free. Tue World of Outlaws Late Model Series.

Theater “The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee.” Fri Jun 29-Jul 1. Westside Theater. STAGES at Auditorium Theatre, 885 East Main St. Fri-Sat 7:30 p.m., Sun 2 p.m. $10-$12. showtix4u.com. “9 to 5: The Musical.” Wed Jun 27-Jul 4. Continues through July 18. Merry-GoRound Playhouse, 6877 East Lake Rd., Auburn. Wed Jun 27-Thu 7:30 p.m., Fri-Sat 2 & 8 p.m., Mon 7:30 p.m., Tue 2 p.m., Wed Jul 4 2 & 7:30 p.m. $40-$42. 315255-1785, merry-go-round. com. “Altar Boyz.” Continues through Jun 30. Auburn Public Theatre, 108 Genesee St. at Exchange St., Auburn. Wed Jun 27Thu 2 & 7:30 p.m., Fri-Sat 8 p.m. 315‑255‑1785, fingerlakesmtf.com. “Avenue Q.” Thu Jun 28-Jul 4. Continues through Jul 21. Geva Theatre Center, 75 Woodbury Blvd. Thu 7:30 p.m., Fri 8 p.m., Sat 4 & 8:30 p.m., Sun 2 p.m. Tue 7:30 p.m., Wed Jul 4 2 p.m. Tickets start at $25. 2324382, gevatheatre.org. “An Evening of Albee: Three short Plays by Edward Albee.” Thu Jun 28-Jun 30. John W. Borek Presents. MuCCC, 142 Atlantic Ave. 7:30 p.m. $10-$20. 234-1254, muccc. org. Featuring “The American Dream,” “Sandbox,” and “Listening.” “An Evening of Song, Dance & Comedy with Traveling Cabaret.” Thu Jun 28. Irondequoit Town Hall Campus, 1280 Titus Ave. 6 p.m. Free. Bring lawn chairs. 336-6070. “The Calamari Sisters’ Big Fat Italian Wedding.” Continues through September 2. RAPA East End Theatre, 727 E Main St. Sat 8 p.m., Sun 2 p.m. $39-$45, buy-one/ get-one-half-off discount for June only. 420-8338, thecalamarisisters.com. Finger Lakes Musical Theatre Festival: The Pitch: “Blood and Fire” and “The Life of a Mob Wife: A Mafia Comedy.” Thu Jun 28-Jun 30. Theatre Mack, Cayuga Museum, 203 Genesee St., Auburn. Thu 7:30 p.m., Fri 8 p.m., Sat 5 & 8 p.m. $20. 315-2551785, fingerlakesmtf.com. “Generational Curses.” Fri Jun 29-Jun 30. East High School, 1807 E. Main St. 7 p.m. $10-$30. 288-3130.

“Mary’s Wedding.” Jun 28-Jul 4. Continues through Jul 8. Bristol Valley Theater, 151 South Main St., Naples. ThuSat 8 p.m., Sun & Wed Jul 4 2 p.m. $12-$33. 374-6318, bvtnaples.org. Reader Theatre Series: “The Zero Hour.” Sun Jul 1. Jewish Community Center, 1200 Edgewood Ave., Brighton. 461-2000, jccrochester. org. 7 p.m. Free. 461-2000, jccrochester.org. Part of programming for “Nazi Persecution of Homosexuals 1933-1945” Exhibition. A Red, White & Blue Holiday of Song, Dance & Comedy Featuring the award-winning Traveling Cabaret. Wed Jul 4. Irondequoit Town Hall Campus, 1280 Titus Ave. 5:30 p.m. Free. Bring lawn chairs. 336-6070. “You Say Tomato, I Say Shutup.” Fri Jun29-Jun 30. Downstairs Cabaret Theatre, 3450 Winton Place. Fri 8 p.m. Sat 5 & 8 p.m. $31-$36. 325-4370, downstairscabaret.com.

Workshops [ Wednesday, June 27Tueday, July 3 ] Workshops. Mental Health Association, 320 N Goodman St. 325-3145 x 131. Wed Jun 27: Family Development Class: “Winning at Parenting.” Chores, discipline, and other topics for parents of all ages. Thu: Family Development Class: “Nothing Works.” Strategies for developing responsibility and accountability in your children. For parents of children 5 to 12 years old. Mon: Family Development Class: “Don’t Make Me Say It Again.” Focus on giving attention for positive rather than negative behavior. For parents of toddlers to teens. Tue: Family Development Class: “How to Say No to Your Child.” Techniques for staying firm when children try to negotiate, as well as methods for setting appropriate consequences when the rules are broken. For parents of toddlers to teens. All classes 12:30-2:30 p.m. Free, RSVP. [ Thursday, June 28 ] Comics’ Night Out. Books Etc., 78 W. Main St., Macedon. 474-4116, books_ etc@yahoo.com. 6:30 p.m. Free. Bring your own laugh/ applause meters. [ Saturday, June 30 ] Family Rain Barrel Workshops. Rochester Museum and Science Center, 657 East Ave. 271-1880, rmsc.org. 10 a.m.-noon or 1-3 p.m. $25 per family, register 697-1942. [ Sunday, July 1 ] Journaling for Success. Books Etc., 78 W. Main St., Macedon. 474-4116, books_etc@yahoo. com. 1:30 p.m. Free.

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Film Times Times for Friday 6/29-Tuesday 7/3

Film

Cinema Theater 271-1785 957 S. Clinton St. HUNGER GAMES: 7, also Sat-Sun 4.

Culver Ridge 16 544-1140 2255 Ridge Rd E, Irondequoit ABRAHAM LINCOLN: 11:45 a.m., 2:15, 4:45, 7:45, 10:15, also in 3D 12:35, 4:05, 7:10, 9:40; AVENGERS: 1, 4:35, 8:05; BRAVE: 2:30, 5, 10, also in 3D 12:30, 4, 7, 9:30; MADAGASCAR 3: 12:05, 2:40, 7:35, also in 3D 5:10, 9:55; MAGIC MIKE: 11:50 a.m., 2:25, 5:05, 7:55, 10:35; MEN IN BLACK 3: 12:50; PEOPLE LIKE US: 11:55 a.m., 2:35, 5:15, 8, 10:40; PROMETHEUS: 12:25, 4:15, 7:05, 10:10; ROCK OF AGES: 12:55, 3:55, 6:55, 9:45; SEEKING A FRIEND: 4:30, 10:05; SNOW WHITE: 12:15, 4:25, 7:20, 10:25; TED: 12:20, 2:50, 4:20, 5:20, 7:15, 7:50, 9:50, 10:30; THAT’S MY BOY: 12:45, 7:25; TYLER PERRY’S MEDEA: 12:10, 12:40, 4:10, 4:40, 6:50, 7:40, 9:35, 10:20.

Eastview 13 425-0420 Eastview Mall, Victor ABRAHAM LINCOLN: noon, 2:40, 7:45, also in 3D 5:15, 10:15; AVENGERS: 12:30, 3:50, 6:55, 10; BRAVE: 11:45, 2:15, 4:50, 7:20, 9:50, also in 3D 12:15, 2:45, 5:20, 7:55, 10:20; MADAGASCAR 3: 11:50 a.m., 2:25, 7:30; MAGIC MIKE: 12:10, 2:50, 5:25, 8, 10:35; PEOPLE LIKE US: 11:40 a.m., 2:20, 5:05, 7:50, 10:30; PROMETHEUS: 12:50, 4:30, 7:25, 10:25; ROCK OF AGES: 4:20, 10:05; SEEKING A FRIEND: 12:45; SNOW WHITE: 12:20, 7:15; TED: 11:35 a.m., 12:05, 2:05, 2:35, 4:10, 4:40, 5:10, 6:40, 7:10, 7:40, 9:10, 9:40, 10:10; TYLER PERRY’S MEDEA: 12:40, 4, 6:50, 9:30.

Greece Ridge 12 225-5810 176 Greece Ridge Center Dr. ABRAHAM LINCOLN: 2:55, 8, continues on page 30

The rail splitter and his axe [ REVIEW ] By George Grella

adversary in this instance, if not up to the level of the great Transylvanian, qualifies as an evil, sneering aristocrat. Besides, if zombies “Abraham Lincoln: can inhabit the placid rural landscape of Jane Vampire Hunter” Austen’s novels, surely a horde of vampires can (R), directed by Timur Bekmambetov ravage 19th-century America and mount a Now playing threat to the Union. Despite those admittedly tenuous Two of the most frequently filmed characters justifications, the concept of Honest Abe roaming in the history of cinema, Abraham Lincoln around decapitating vampires — his frequent and Count Dracula, probably deserve some practice throughout the movie — seems so common treatment, which might explain absolutely silly that it should make the immortal both the original novel and the blockbuster count revolve dizzily in his coffin (only in daylight, adaptation of “Abraham Lincoln: Vampire of course). As the expensive set pieces, the Hunter.” The Rail Splitter, after all, knew spectacular special effects, and the innumerable something about wooden stakes, those stunts demonstrate, however, the filmmakers sovereign remedies for vampirism, and his proceed entirely seriously through the viscous nonsense of their version of history. Perhaps they don’t realize the complete idiocy of their project. The film posits that the young Abraham vowed to avenge the death of his mother at the hands (or rather, teeth) of a vampire, a quest that drives him Benjamin Walker in “Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter.” PHOTO COURTESY 20TH CENTURY FOX

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throughout his life. The grown Abe (Benjamin Walker) meets Henry Sturges (Dominic Cooper), an experienced vampire hunter who understands the young man’s obsession and tutors him in the history and practices of the breed and the art of hunting and killing them. Given a choice of weapons, Abe naturally decides on an axe, which Sturges coats with silver, the only metal that in this movie, at least, proves fatal to the undead. Once he masters his lessons, the young man sets out for Springfield, Illinois, to encounter his destiny. There, as every schoolchild knows, he meets and marries Mary Todd (Mary Elizabeth Winstead) and debates Stephen Douglas. Before launching his political career, however, Lincoln stalks the monsters who pose as respectable citizens, slaughtering half a dozen with that lethal axe and burying their headless bodies in the surrounding prairie. The movie shows that Honest Abe was actually a serial killer: who knew? Pursuing its bizarre version of history, the picture skips rapidly through Lincoln’s ascent up the ladder of American politics all the way to the White House, where with the help of Sturges and childhood friend Will Johnson (Anthony Mackie), he continues his campaign against the hated monsters. The movie shows that the most important event of Lincoln’s presidency, the Civil War, actually coincided with his lifelong pursuit of the undead. The vampires, led by their chief, Adam (Rufus Sewell), control the South, enslaving black


The kids are alright [ REVIEW ] BY DAYNA PAPALEO

“Moonrise Kingdom” (PG-13), directed by Wes Anderson Now playing

“I Wish” (PG), written and directed by Hirokazu Kore-eda Screens Saturday and Sunday at the Dryden

people for nutritional purposes, as a supply of fresh blood; Adam even cuts a deal with Jefferson Davis to fight for the Confederacy against the Union, a perfect emblem of the conflict. At Gettysburg, the climactic battle of the Civil War, where the Confederate troops and the vampires prevail at first, the cause seems lost until Lincoln’s ingenuity and the efforts of his brave staff carry the day; even Mary Todd Lincoln, bless her heart, shows up at the battle, instructing the Union troops in the tried and true method of dispatching the hated creatures. Since a vampire killed her beloved son William, she bears a special sorrow and a resolve that matches her husband’s, and like him, she exacts her own revenge. Although it seems passing strange that a picture about the most revered president of the United States should rise to such flights of fancy and fraudulence, the notion that vampires took a hand in the bloodiest conflict in American history suggests at least a touch of ingenuity and perhaps even an explanation for slavery itself. It seems even stranger that, thanks to the magic of the cinema, Abraham Lincoln should fight with the graceful, acrobatic agility of a gymnast and twirl a large axe like a drum majorette at halftime. In our childhood we all learned that our 16th president was a good man, a brilliant thinker, a great president, but I’m sure no one suspected the true nature of his passions or his possession of such remarkable abilities. Again, who knew?

The filmography of Wes Anderson is not like a box of chocolates, because at this stage of the game you pretty much know what you’re gonna get: a tale of how parents don’t understand their children told through meticulously whimsical production design and a soundtrack teeming with often obscure 60’s pop. Anderson’s second film, 1998’s “Rushmore,” was his first big success, and it’s easily one of my five favorite movies ever. As the years have passed, though, Anderson has simply done variations on a theme. That it’s his own weirdly wondrous theme is definitely a saving grace, but what once seemed fresh and inspired has come to feel trite, derivative, and — please know that this hurts me more than it hurts Wes Anderson — dull. “Moonrise Kingdom” is Anderson’s latest, and though I’ve already essentially

Kara Hayward and Jared Gilman in “Moonrise Kingdom.” PHOTO COURTESY FOCUS FEATURES

outlined it, a few specifics probably won’t kill me. The year is 1965, and a bespectacled 12-year-old Khaki Scout named Sam (newcomer Jared Gilman) has bolted from a vaguely New England-y summer camp to rendezvous with the young lady who bewitched him in her raven costume during the local church’s reenactment of the Great Flood. Her heavy eye makeup evoking a younger Margot Tenenbaum, Suzy (Kara Hayward in her film debut) is fleeing an unsatisfying home life headed up by two miserable parents (consummate pros Frances McDormand and Bill Murray). We flash back to Sam and Suzy’s adorable courtship through exchanged correspondence, and we tag along as they run off together, batteryoperated record player and stolen library books in tow. The adults are, of course, concerned; besides Suzy’s mom and dad, the search party includes the perpetually underrated Bruce Willis as New Penzance’s lone, lonely cop and a delightful Edward Norton as Sam’s well-meaning but mildly incompetent scoutmaster. (The opening scene, an intricate, unbroken dioramarama in which the scoutmaster inspects the camp, is typically bravura Anderson.) Telling details about their emotional lives emerge as the smitten runaways set up housekeeping at a peaceful little inlet, while unexpected entanglements among the adults come to light, too. As usual, nobody’s happy, and the deadpan script, written by Anderson and Roman Coppola (they also collaborated on “The Darjeeling Limited”) and veering between twee and wise, allows its characters to work through their issues a bit too efficiently. With his thick glasses and calmly officious attitude, Gilman can’t help but bring to mind “Rushmore” hero Max Fischer. (Sam on the dangers of turtles: “They’ll bite you if you put your fingers in their mouths.”) Gilman and Heyward are the thumping heart of “Moonrise

Kingdom,” and both thankfully refrain from coming across as precocious despite trying to navigate grown-up situations. Otherwise, it’s the Anderson status quo: expressive music, carefully crafted sets, and Robert Yeoman’s vivid, matchless cinematography. So maybe it’s greedy, in the face of all those artistic riches, to wonder whether there’s anything else. Anderson has made seven films — some OK, some amazing — and they’ve all been more or less the same. My hope is that one day soon, he will surprise me again. Sometimes, when watching youngsters act,

it’s painfully obvious that they’re reciting lines written by some middle-aged guy. The other option might be to let the kids improvise, but that sounds as though it could test the patience of even the saintliest saint. So I’m not sure how Japanese filmmaker Hirokazu Kore-eda was able to coax such natural, lived-in performances from the largely pint-sized cast of the lovely and heartwarming “I Wish.” It no doubt helps that the two main characters are siblings in real life; Koki and Ohshiro Maeda play Koichi and Ryu, brothers evenly divided between estranged parents, at least one of them hoping for a reconciliation. The introspective Koichi’s plan is to wish for a volcanic eruption that will force him and his mother back to the home where the noisy and madcap Ryu still lives with their father. This hinges on the wish being made at a very specific time and place, and “I Wish” follows Koichi and Ryu separately in the days leading up to it. The film drags a bit when it’s just adults on screen, probably because Kore-eda — he also worked with a bunch of talented children in 2004’s wrenching “Nobody Knows” — traffics so effectively in the seemingly throwaway but beautifully crucial elements of being a kid, like cleaning your room, getting sidetracked by some dazzling flowers, and the quiet contemplation of life’s unfolding mysteries.

IT’S ALWAYS FAIR WEATHER

Thursday, June 28, 8 p.m. A bittersweet satirical postwar commentary, Donen and Kelly’s musical goodbye to MGM was conceived as a loose sequel to On the Town. Estranged Army buddies Gene Kelly, Dan Dailey, and Michael Kidd are reunited by TV coordinator Cyd Charisse. Kelly’s performance — and his celebrated roller skating sequence — shine. (Gene Kelly & Stanley Donen, US 1955, 102 min.)

I WISH Movies for movie lovers, 6 nights a week. Gene Kelly

Saturday, June 30, 8 p.m. & Sunday, July 1, 2 p.m. Separated by divorce, 12-year-old Koichi lives with his mother in southern Japan while his brother lives with their father in the north. When Koichi learns of a new bullet train line linking the two towns, he starts to believe his family will be miraculously reunited when the trains pass each other at top speed. (Kiseki, Hirokazu Koreeda, Japan 2011, 127 min., Japanese w/subtitles.)

Rochester Premiere

Film Info: 271-4090 l 900 East Avenue l Eastman House Café—stop in for a light dinner or dessert before the film. l Wi-Fi Hotspot l Sponsored by rochestercitynewspaper.com City 29


also in 3D 12:25, 5:25, 10:30; AVENGERS: 3:50, 6:55, 10:10; BRAVE: 12:15, 2:45, 5:15, 7:45, 10:15, also in 3D 11:45 a.m., 2:15, 4:45, 7:15, 9:45; MADAGASCAR 3: 11:55 a.m., 2:20, 7:30, also in 3D 4:55, 9:50; MAGIC MIKE: 11:50 a.m., 2:25, 5, 7:50, 10:25; MEN IN BLACK 3: noon, 5:10, 10:20; PEOPLE LIKE US: 1:05, 4:20, 7:10, 9:55; SEEKING A FRIEND: 12:35; SNOW WHITE: 12:55, 4:10, 7:05, 10; TED: 12:05, 1:15, 2:35, 4, 5:05, 7, 7:55, 9:35, 10:25; THAT’S MY BOY: 2:30, 7:40; TYLER PERRY’S MEDEA: 12:45, 4:30, 7:25, 10:05.

Henrietta 18 424-3090 525 Marketplace Dr. ABRAHAM LINCOLN: 1:25, 4, 6:35, 9:15, 11:35, also in 3D 11:55 a.m., 2:25, 5, 7:35, 10:15; AVENGERS: 3, 9:40, 11:25, also in 3D 11:45 a.m., 6:20; BRAVE: 11:40 a.m., 2:20, 3:40, 5:05, 9:10, 11:20, also in open caption 1, 6:25, also in 3D 1:40, 4:20, 7:05, 9:50; MADAGASCAR 3: noon, 2:35, 5:20, 7:45, 10:05; MAGIC MIKE: 11:25 a.m., 2, 4:35, 7:15, 10, 11:50; MEN IN BLACK 3: 7:50, 10:35; MOONRISE KINGDOM: 11:35 a.m., 1:50, 4:10, 6:45, 9:05; PEOPLE LIKE US: 1:15, 4:15, 7:10, 9:55; PROMETHEUS: 12:50, 6:55, also in 3D 3:50, 9:45; ROCK OF AGES: 1:30; SEEKING A FRIEND: 1:20; SNOW WHITE: 4:25, 7:20, 10:20; TED: 11:50 a.m., 12:45, 1:55, 2:30, 3:30, 4:05, 5:15, 6:15, 6:50, 7:25, 8, 9, 9:35, 10:45, 11:55; THAT’S MY BOY: 4:40, 10:10; TYLER PERRY’S MEDEA: 11:30 a.m., 1:10, 2:10, 3:55, 4:55, 6:40, 7:40, 9:25, 10:25, 11:15.

The Little 258-0400 240 East Ave. BEST EXOTIC MARIGOLD: 6:30,

9; Fri-Sat 6:30 only; also Sun 12:10, 3:30; HYSTERIA: 7, 9:20; Fri 9:20 only; also Sat 3:50; also Sun 12:40; THE INTOUCHABLES: 6:40, 9:10; also Sat-Sun 12:20, 3:40; LOLA VERSUS: 6:50, 8:50; also Sat-Sun 12:30, 4; MOONRISE KINGDOM: 7:10, 9:30; also SatSun 12:50, 4:10; OLIVER: Sat 10 a.m. only.

Movies 10 292-5840 2613 W. Henrietta Rd. 21 JUMP STREET: 11:20 a.m., 1:55, 4:30, 7:05, 9:35; BATTLESHIP: 11:15 a.m., 2:15, 5:10, 8:05; CABIN IN THE WOODS: 11:55 a.m., 2:40, 4:55, 7:20, 9:45; CHERNOBYL DIARIES: 2:10, 7; DARK SHADOWS: noon, 2:45, 5:20, 8:15; THE LORAX: 11:50 a.m., 2:35, 4:45, 7:15, 9:40; MIRROR MIRROR: 11:30 a.m., 4:35, 9:40; THE PIRATES: 3D only 11:50 a.m., 2:05, 4:15, 6:55, 9:20; THE RAVEN: 2, 7:10; THINK LIKE A MAN: 11:35 a.m., 2:20, 5:05, 8:10; THREE STOOGES: 11:45 a.m., 4:20, 9:15.

Pittsford Cinema 383-1310 3349 Monroe Ave. BRAVE: 11:50 a.m., 2:10, 6:50, also in 3D 4:30, 9:10; BEST EXOTIC MARIGOLD: 1, 3:45, 6:30, 9:15; MADAGASCAR 3: Fri-Mon only 12, 2:20, 4:40; MAGIC MIKE: 2, 4:50, 7:35, 10:20; MOONRISE KINGDOM: 12:45, 3, 5:15, 7:30, 9:45; PEOPLE LIKE US: 1:50, 4:35, 7:10, 9:45; PROMETHEUS: 1:30, 4:10, 7:20, 10; ROCK OF AGES; Fri-Mon only 7, 9:40; SEEKING A FRIEND: 1:40, 4:20, 6:40, 9; TED: 12:25, 2:50, 5:15, 7:40, 10:05; SPIDERMAN: Mon midnight, Tue-Thu 1, 4, 7, also in 3D Tue-Thu 10.

30 City june 27 - july 3, 2012

Tinseltown USA / IMAX

Film Previews

247-2180 2291 Buffalo Rd. ABRAHAM LINCOLN: 11:35 a.m., 5, 10:05, also in 3D 1, 3:40, 6:20, 9; AVENGERS: 2:30, also in 3D 9:40; BRAVE: 11 a.m., 11:55 a.m., 2:40, 4:30, 5:25, 8:10, 9:55, also in 3D 12:50, 1:45, 3:35, 6:15, 7:15, 9:05; MADAGASCAR 3: 11:15 a.m., 4:30, 6:50, also in 3D 1:50, 9:15; MAGIC MIKE: 11:30 a.m., 2:15, 4:55, 7:30, 10:10; MEN IN BLACK 3: 1:45, also in 3D 10:05; MOONRISE KINGDOM: 11:50 a.m., 2:10, 4:40, 7:20, 9:45; PROMETHEUS: 3D 12:45, 4, 7, 10; ROCK OF AGES: 12:30, 3:50, 6:55, 9:50; SEEKING A FRIEND: 2:05, 7:35; SNOW WHITE: 11:20 a.m., 6:40; TED: 11:40 a.m., 1, 2:20, 3:40, 5, 6:20, 7:40, 9, 10:15; THAT’S MY BOY: 11:05 a.m., 4:25, 7;10; TYLER PERRY’S MEDEA: noon, 1:35, 2:50, 4:15, 5:40, 7:05, 8:30, 9:55

Full film reviews available at rochestercitynewspaper.com.

Webster 12 888-262-4386 2190 Empire Blvd. ABRAHAM LINCOLN: 3, 8:30, also in 3D 12:15, 5:30, 11; AVENGERS: 1, 7:05; BRAVE: 10 a.m., 11 a.m., 2:20, 4:50, 7:20, 9:40, also in 3D 10:30 a.m., 12:45, 3:30, 6:30, 9; MADAGASCAR 3: 1:45, 7, also in 3D 11:40 a.m., 4:05, 9:15; MAGIC MIKE: 11:50 a.m., 2:30, 5:20, 8, 10:40; MEN IN BLACK 3: noon, 5:10, 10:20; PEOPLE LIKE US: 10:45 a.m., 1:15, 4:30, 7:15, 10; ROCK OF AGES: 11:20 a.m., 5, 10:30; SEEKING A FRIEND: 2:45, 7:40; SNOW WHITE: 10:15 a.m., 3:45, 9:50; TED: 10 a.m., 12:30, 3:15, 5:45, 8:15, 10:50; THAT’S MY BOY: 2:10, 7:50; TYLER PERRY’S MEDEA: 11:10 a.m., 2, 4:40, 7:30, 10:10

[ OPENING ] THE AMAZING SPIDER-MAN (PG13): Andrew Garfield shoulders the Peter Parker mantle for this reboot from “(500) Days of Summer” director Marc Webb, in which our hero sets out to learn the truth about his missing parents and takes on The Lizard. With Emma Stone, Rhys Ifans, and Sally Field as Aunt May. Starts Tuesday, July 3. Brockport, Canandaigua, Geneseo, Pittsford THE DEEP BLUE SEA (2011): Filmmaker Terence Davies’ adaptation of a Terence Ratigan play stars Rachel Weisz as the wife of a British judge who is caught up in a self-destructive affair with a Royal Air Force pilot (Tom Hiddleston, “Thor”). Dryden (Fri, Jun 29, 8 p.m., and Sun, Jul 1, 5 p.m.) I WISH (2011): From acclaimed Japanese writer-director Hirokazu Kore-eda comes this sweet drama about a thoughtful 12year-old who hopes to reunite his family by wishing on two bullet trains passing each other at top speed. Dryden (Sat, Jun 30, 8 p.m., and Sun, Jul 1, 2 p.m.) IT’S ALWAYS FAIR WEATHER (1951): Stanley Donen and star Gene Kelly co-direct this bittersweet musical about ex-GIs who reunite after the war and find that they no longer have much in common. Dryden (Thu, Jun 28, 8 p.m.) LOLA VERSUS (R): Current cinema darling (and potential heir to the Meg Ryan throne) Greta Gerwig stars in this romantic comedy about a jilted bride-to-be who tries to come to grips with her singledom as she closes in on 30. With Bill Pullman and Debra Winger as Lola’s hippie parents. Little

MADEA’S WITNESS PROTECTION (PG-13): Welcome to the debut of my boilerplate blurb for Madea movies! Tyler Perry’s insanely profitable creation shames C-list stars — this time it’s Eugene Levy, Denise Richards, and Tom Arnold — into being better humans. Canandaigua, Culver Ridge, Henrietta, Tinseltown, Webster MAGIC MIKE (R): The prolific Steven Soderbergh returns with a rather un-Soderberghy comedy that features Channing Tatum as the title character, an experienced stripper who shows a new guy the ropes while he contemplates his own non-gyrating future. Co-starring Alex Pettyfer and Matthew McConaughey. Canandaigua, Culver Ridge, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece Ridge, Henrietta, Pittsford, Tinseltown, Webster MAN IN THE DARK (1953): The first major studio release in 3D, this noir thriller stars Edmond O’Brien as a lobotomized ex-con who can’t remember where he stashed the $130,000 that his former gang is looking for. Dryden (Tue, Jul 3, 8 p.m.) THE MAN IN THE WHITE SUIT (1951): Director Alexander Mackendrick’s satire on big business stars Alec Guinness as a humble chemist who develops a stain- and wear-resistant fabric that greatly displeases the garment industry. Dryden (Wed, June 27, 8 p.m.) PEOPLE LIKE US (PG-13): Chris Pine (a/k/a the new Jack Ryan) stars in this sudsy drama as a fast-talking salesman who must deliver $150,000 of his dead father’s fortune to the 30-year-old half-sister (Elizabeth Banks) he has never met. Co-starring Olivia Wilde, Jon Favreau, and Michelle Pfeiffer. Canandaigua, Culver Ridge, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece Ridge, Henrietta,

Pittsford, Tinseltown, Webster TED (R): This profane comedy from “Family Guy” creator Seth McFarlane envisions what happens when one of those moviemaking clichés — the talking stuffed animal — grows up along with the boy who wished him into existence. Starring Mark Wahlberg, Mila Kunis, and McFarlane himself as the voice of Ted. Canandaigua, Culver Ridge, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece Ridge, Henrietta, Pittsford, Tinseltown, Vintage, Webster [ CONTINUING ] THE BEST EXOTIC MARIGOLD HOTEL (PG-13): Dame Judi Dench leads a stacked cast in this ensemble piece about a gaggle of British seniors who travel to India in search of exotic sights, discount medical care, and inexpensive retirements. Co-starring Bill Nighy, Tom Wilkinson, and Dame Maggie Smith. Canandaigua, Little, Pittsford HYSTERIA (R): Hugh Dancy, Maggie Gyllenhaal, and Rupert Everett lead the cast of this truthbased period comedy about Mortimer Granville, a physician in Victorian-era London who made it easier for doctors to treat female hysteria via pelvic massage with — OK; enough euphemism. This dude invented the vibrator. Little THE INTOUCHABLES (R): Toothy Dustin Hoffman lookalike François Cluzet (2008’s “Tell No One”) stars in this feelgood French import as a wealthy paraplegic who hires a charismatic Senegalese hustler from the projects as his caretaker. Little **For complete Film Previews visit rochestercitynewspaper.com.**


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All real estate advertised in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act, which makes it unlawful, “to make, print, or publish, any notice, statement, or advertisement, with respect to the sale or rental of a dwelling that indicates any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin.” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under the age of 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertisement for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. Call the local Fair Housing Enforcement Project, FHEP at 325-2500 or 1-866-671-FAIR. Si usted sospecha una practica de vivienda injusta, por favor llame al servicio legal gratis. 585-325-2500 - TTY 585-325-2547.

Apartments for Rent ROWLEY/PARK Two Bedroom Plus, Extra room. Second floor, hardwoods, appliances, quiet, sunny, private entrance, laundry, parking, heat. No pets, $825 + deposit. June 1st. 585544-1962 WELCOME TO OUR Neighborhood! A spacious 2-bedroom flat in a recently

restored 1900’s double in the historic Park Avenue area. Living room, dining room, study, 2 bedrooms, kitchen, pantry, large sleeping porch. Off-street garage parking, hardwood floors, laundry; basement and attic storage. Restaurants, YMCA, library, park, museums, right in your neighborhood. The Eastman Theatre, Geva, and the Little are a 5-minute drive. Available NOW! Call Dave Walsh at 585-269-4068.

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agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions 866-413-6293 (Void in Illinois) (AAN CAN)

Automotive ALWAYS BETTER Higher cash for your Junk Cars, Trucks and Vans. From $200-$800 or more for newer. Running or not. With free towing. Also free removal of any unwanted model in any condition. Call 585-305-5865 CASH FOR CARS Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888-4203808 www.cash4car.com (AAN CAN) DONATE VEHICLE RECEIVE $1000 GROCERY COUPONS. National Animal Welfare Foundation. Support NO KILL Shelters. Help Homeless Pets. Free Towing, TAX DEDUCTIBLE, NON-RUNNERS Accepted 1888-333-3848 FOR SALE 02 CHRYSLER SEBRING XL Vin#103EL55R12N123012, sale will be 7/6/12 at 9am. The Bidding will start at 4K at 941 Ridge Rd Webster, If interested pls call 671-5260

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continues on page 32

Find your way home with TO ADVERTISE CONTACT CHRISTINE TODAY!

CALL 244-3329 X23 OR EMAIL CHRISTINE@ROCHESTER-CITYNEWS.COM South Wedge Colonial.132 Rockingham: JUST REDUCED to $169,900. PORCHES!! 4 Bed 2 Baths, Hardwoods, built-ins, a must see.

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> page 31

FIREPLACE RACK or use for outdoor fire rack $10 585-8802903

For Sale

FOR SALE USED: 4.6 Ghz LinkSys Router $20, Surge protector powercord $5, Optical mouse $8, Glass chess $10, 2 SD Card readers $5. Mary 585/413-0827.

ATTENTION BACK PAIN SUFFERERS! Special, custom made firming mattress-pads. Fit’s existing beds. Double hinged to also relief stomach gas reflux. $149-$179. The Workshop 654-9480 DOG & CAT HOUSES Kennels, porch steps, do it yourself kits. Quick assembly 585-752-1000 $49 Jim

FOR SALE USED: Paper Cutter $10, Blue Hoover Upright Vacuum Cleaner $20, never used Linksys 4.6 Gbs Router

$20, Orange Optical mouse $8. Mary 585/413-0827. GRACO CONVERTIBLE CRIB Light wood, excellent condition. $49.99 225-5526 HOMELITE WEED WACKER VT20002A. Not started in 2 years $20 585-225-5526 HORSE HALTER / Black & white New 415. Quick clip 585-8002903 HORSE TACK BITS Cury comb, bridle, bridle parts, stirrups,

western, all $30 585-880-2903 NEW MATTRESS SETS 5070% off Retail, SERTA MANUFACTURED FACTORYDIRECT. Queen and other sizes available. Simply the best deal in town. Call 585-752-1434 QUART SIZE Plastic thermos; handle & pump dispenser $5 OBO 261-1798 STIRRUPS (WESTERN FOR SADDLE) $7 585-880-2903

Garage and Yard Sales ESTATE SALE: SOUTH WEDGE Fri & Sat June 29th & 30th 9am-5pm, furniture, books, kitchen items, and oddles size 10,12 & 14 women’s clothes, wheel-chair, commode... .26 Diem St, off Caroline near SClinton & S-Goodman.

GREEK ORTHODOX CHURCH OF THE HOLY SPIRIT 16th Annual TAG SALE Fri–Sat June 29th - 30th, 2012 9am – 5pm Greek Orthodox Church of the Holy Spirit 835 South Ave. Rochester, NY 14620

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AT TENTION

HOME SERVICE PROVIDERS

Did you know that City Newspaper Readers spent OVER $90 MILLION DOLLARS on home improvements in the LAST 12 MONTHS? Call Christine today to advertise

585-244-3329 ext. 23

32 City june 27 - july 3, 2012


Place your real estate ad by calling 244-3329 ext. 23 or rochestercitynewspaper.com Ad Deadlines: Friday 4pm for Display Ads Monday at noon for Line ads Who’s up for it? Craig at mooskamovers@aol.com CALLING ALL MUSICIANS OF ALL GENRES the Rochester Music Coalition wants you! Please register on our website. For further info: www. rochestermusiccoalition.org info@rochestermusiccoalition. org 585-235-8412 DRUMMER WITH JAZZ skills applied to R&B and funk, originals & covers. Evenings open, transportation. Working Western New York Contact Bobby 585-328-4121 sitting heavyonsd@yahoo.com GUITAR & KEYBOARDS, performing R&B, funk, covers & originals, vocals a plus. Be ready to learn & work. Preparing for studio Gigs. Contact Bobby 585-328-4121 GUITAR PLAYER/SINGER+ Needed for Funky/Jazz/Blues band. Transportation a must. Rehearsal at Creative Wellness Coalition, 320 N. Goodman St, Rochester, 6pm-8pm Thursday. MEN ENJOY SINGINING Fun with the Chorus of the Genesee, Sing, learn, perform, share

BOOK SALE! Sat, June 30th Sun, July 1st 10 am - 4 pm Livonia, NY Next to Ember Grill

60,000 ON SALE!

K-D Moving & Storage Inc.

Experience in office & household moving and deliveries

Big or small, we do them all

473-6610 or 473-4357

laughs and libation! Guest night Tuesday at 7 PM. Stop in at 58 E Main St, Webster. Call 585698-7784 R&B VOCALIST SINGERS No wannabe’s. Lead & background, originals & covers. Must adapt quickly, temperment a must, preparation studio & gigs, evenings open, stage presence. Contact Bobby 585-328-4121 sittingheavyonsd@yahoo.com ROCK STAR, MR. ROCHESTER, lead vocalist, is looking to form band (Classic Rock) with lead guitarist, bassist, drummer & rhythm guitars Covers & originals 585-473-5089 UPRIGHT BASS, German, new strings and bow. Beautiful tone. Asking $950. Call 585-8891202

HomeWork A cooperative effort of City Newspaper and RochesterCityLiving, a program of the Landmark Society.

Miscellaneous CANADA DRUG CENTER Safe and affordable medications. Save up to 90% on your medication needs. Call 1888-432-1479 ($25.00 off your first prescription and free shipping) HAS YOUR BUILING SHIFTED OR SETTLED? Contact Woodford Brothers Inc, for straightening, leveling, foundation and wood frame repairs at 1-800-OLDBARN www.woodfordbros. com. “Not applicable in Queens county” SAWMILLS from only $3997MAKE MONEY & SAVE MONEY with your own bandmil Cut lumber any dimension. In stock

continues on page 34

Craftsman Curb Appeal

394 Cedarwood Terrace Residents of the Culver-Winton-Main neighborhood are blessed with an urban community convenient to restaurants, shops, and open space. They enjoy a short downtown commute and an easy walk to Tryon Park, 80 undeveloped acres belonging to the Monroe County Parks system. While farmhouses once dotted this southeast quadrant of the city, most of the current houses in the neighborhood were constructed in the early 20th Century. The 1920 Craftsman style house at 394 Cedarwood Terrace was built during this period of growth. Located on a 40 by 135-foot lot on one of the neighborhood’s tree-lined streets, this city gem exudes curb appeal. Wide eaves that shade the second floor, decorative brackets, character-rich original windows, wood shingle siding, and an inviting porch give the house its unique appeal. Two sets of columns support the gabled roof of the red-trimmed expansive front porch, the exterior’s most charming feature. Hanging baskets of ferns and a trellised rose make this a serene spot to spend a summer afternoon. A red brick walk and steps lead you in. Inside, you notice the house’s impeccable details: gleaming hardwood floors, natural gumwood crown and floor moldings and archways. In the living room cabinets with leaded glass doors flank the brick fireplace, and a large bay window overlooks the front yard. Another bay window in the spacious dining room overlooks the partially fenced backyard. Beyond the swinging door, the updated eat-in kitchen has a convenient center

island, abundant cabinet storage space, and a pantry. A side entranceway and a foyer closet complete the first floor. Upstairs all three tastefully decorated bedrooms are spacious with hardwood floors and generous closet space. The bath is updated with subway tile and marble flooring but retains its original medicine cabinet. Another stairway off the upstairs hall leads to the finished third floor that provides additional space for a fourth bedroom, den, or home office. The full basement is home to the laundry and the house’s mechanics as well as a convenient half bath. In back, a detached garage has room for two cars. Modern shops and restaurants on Winton and Culver Roads surround this period house. Elementary schools of the Rochester City School District are within walking distance as is East High School. The Winton Branch Library and several houses of worship are nearby. Two community associations serve the neighborhood. Northeast Area Development provides services such as a neighborhood watch, and the North Winton Village Association works to improve the area’s quality of life. The 2,000 square foot house is listed at $109,900 with taxes of $3,194. For a tour, call Lanie Bittner of Nothnagle Realty at 329-0479. by Bonnie DeHollander Bonnie is a Landmark Society volunteer.

23 Arlington St. NY D.O.T.#9657

KdMovingandStorage.com rochestercitynewspaper.com City 33


CITY Newspaper presents

Mind Body Spirit TO ADVERTISE IN THE MIND BODY SPIRIT SECTION CALL CHRISTINE AT 244.3329 x23 OR EMAIL CHRISTINE@ROCHESTER-CITYNEWS.COM

> page 33 ready to ship. FREE Info & DVD www.NorwoodSawmills. com/300N 1-800-578-1363 Ext.300N

Notices SUMMER SUN food & fun! Free summer meals for all children and teens. For a site near you, call 1-800-522-5006 or

MCLAC’s Nutrition Outreach & Education Program at (585) 295-5624. Prepared by a project of Hunger Solutions New York, USDA/FNS and NYSOTDA.

continues on page 36

Paul Rooney, NYS licensed,

board certified acupuncturist Practicing in Rochester since 1997

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CITY Newspaper presents

Fearful Flyers Course • Skills to reduce anxiety, fears, phobias. • Learn about air traffic safety controls, airplane technology and weather effects. • Complete tour of airport facilities.

Starting on July 11th

For information, please call Judy Willis at (585) 461-0810

10 hours of instruction by Stress Management Consultant Judith J. Willis. Hosted by Greater Rochester Int. Airport.

Don’t put this off any longer, make flying “just something you do.”

Workshops Drop-in Dance Lessons $8 No Partner Needed Argentine Tango Social Ballroom Every Sunday 7-10pm Beginners Classes 7-8pm Dance 8-10pm

Dance 8-10pm

www.dancencounters.com

SUMMER SPECIAL

We ended March on a high note with a record breaking week of 175 treatments!! Our ad in CITY Newspaper continues to draw in new patients and has played a vital role in the growth of our business over the last 3 years. We are looking forward to another successful year!”

For new students!

$10 per person for a drop in class on Thursday Night’s Beginner Class at 6:50pm. Singles or Couples welcome!

GROUP AND PRIVATE LESSONS FOR ALL SKILL LEVELS

- Janeane

34 City june 27 - july 3, 2012

Beginners Classes 7-8pm

215 Tremont St. (Kee Lox Business Park) Door #8 • 585.473.8550

“2012 has been our best year yet.

ROCHESTER COMMUNITY ACUPUNCTURE

Every Monday 7-10pm

3450 WINTON PLACE ROCHESTER, NY 14623 585-292-1240

Gift Certificates Available

WWW.FADSROCHESTER.COM


EMPLOYMENT / CAREER TRAINING

Employment AIRLINES ARE HIRING Train for hands on Aviation Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified- Job Placement Assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance (866)296-7093 CLASS A DRIVERS Regional Up to 42 CPM. Weekly Pay, Benefits, Home Time, Sign ON BONUS, Paid Orientation. 2 Years T/T EXP. 800524-5051 www.gomcilvaine.com DRIVERS- New Freight lanes in your area. Annual Salary $45K to $60K. Flexible hometime. Modern Fleet of Trucks. CDL-A, 3 months current OTR experience. 800-414-9569 www.driveknight.com HELP WANTED!!! Make money Mailing brochures from home! FREE Supplies! Helping Home-Workers since 2001! Genuine Opportunity! No experience required. Start Immediately! www.theworkhub.net (AAN CAN) $$$HELP WANTED$$$ Extra Income! Assembling CD cases from Home! No Experience Necessary! Call our Live Operators Now! 1-800405-7619 EXT 2450 http://www. easywork-greatpay.com (AAN CAN) MALE & FEMALE Dance Instructors Needed! Dance experience preferable, but will train the right candidate. Fred Astaire Dance Studio 292-1240 to schedule your interview! www.fadsrochester.com VACCINE VOLUNTEERS NEEDED Consider taking part in HIV vaccine research studies at the University of Rochester Medical Center. A pre-ventive HIV vaccine can help STOP the global AIDS crisis. If you are HIV negative, healthy and age 18-50, YOU may qualify. Vaccines are synthetic and it is IMPOSSIBLE to get HIV from the vaccine. Being in a study is more like donating blood. Participants

will be paid an average of $750. For more information, visit www. rochestervictoryalliance.org. To learn if you qualify, or to schedule an appointment, call (585) 7562329 (756-2DAY).

Volunteers A SECOND THOUGHT Resale Shop in East Rochester is accepting applications for volunteer sale associates and online researchers. Shop benefits people with disabilities in Guatemala. Call (585) 340-2000. CATHOLIC FAMILY CENTER is seeking volunteers to answer calls from seniors from mid-August to mid-November. Flexible hours and training provided. Please join us in this important work. For more info, contact Claudia at 262-7044 or cgill@cfcrochester.org COMMUNITY LUTHERAN MINISTRY seeking volunteers for Saturday program with reading, crafts and board games from noon to 2 p.m. on the third and fourth Saturdays at 942 Joseph Ave. Info. 585-338-2420. FOSTER PARENTS WANTED! Monroe County is looking for adults

age 21 and over to consider opening their homes to foster children. Call 334-9096 or visit www. MonroeFosterCare.org. HERITAGE CHRISTIAN STABLES, a therapeutic horsemanship program for children and adults with developmental disabilities, is looking for volunteers to serve as horse leaders and side walkers. Call Kim Kennedy at (585) 340-2016 or email kkennedy@ heritagechristianservices.org

VOLUNTEER GROUP works with Local Non-Profits, Charity Works for Rochester, meets 3rd Thursday each Month 7:30PM Al Sigl Center, 1000 Elmwood Ave. Door 5 Lower level conference room 585-2340187

LAKE PLAINS 4-H seeks volunteers to work with youth on various projects. Share your interests with young people! Contact Aimee Widger aw254@cornell.edu for more information.

VOLUNTEER GROUP works with Local Non-Profits, Charity Works for Rochester, meets 3rd Thursday each Month 7:30PM Al Sigl Center, 1000 Elmwood Ave. Door 5 Lower level conference room 585-2340187

ROCHESTER CARES is looking for enthusiastic volunteers who are interested in joining us to make a difference in the Rochester community Also looking for

WOMEN: ROCHESTER HABITAT is looking for women 18 years+ to help build a house with a single mother. Visit rochabitat.org or call 546-1470

NOW HIRING SCHOOL BUS DRIVERS! Summer drivers needed turn in your application before June 30th

ACTIVISM

SUMMER JOBS FOR THE ENVIRONMENT NYPIRG is now hiring HS & college students, grads & others for an urgent campaign to protect our drinking water. Get paid to make a difference!

those interested in helping us in a leadership capacity. Check out our calendar online for more information: www.rochestercares. org/calendar.php

CDL - C/B with P&S Endorsements 178 Newbury Rochester, NY 14613

Apply online at: www.Durhamschoolservices.com

or call (585) 647-6020

F/T positions available. EOE Call Chris: 585-851-8012

Career Training CDLA TRAINING [Tractor/ Trailer] - Experience it, travel, opportunity & excitement can be yours! National Tractor Trailer School [NTTS] Liverpool NY, Branch in

Buffalo 1-800-243-9300 www. ntts.edu  Consumer Information: www.ntts.edu/programs/ disclosures

Start Your Career With ConServe! Immediate Debt Counselor Openings Work on highly collectible defaulted student loans. • Uncapped Bonus • Unbeatable Benefits • Competitive Wages • Paid Training

200 Cross Keys Office Park, Fairport 14450 For more information and to apply:

www.conserve-arm.com Click the “ConServe Careers” tab

ConServe is an EOE & Drug-Free Workplace

ATTENTION VETERANS! THE NAVY IS LOOKING FOR VETERANS. Those individuals who have served honorably in any branch of the Armed Forces, (i.e., the Navy, Army, Marines, Air Force or Coast Guard) and who want to continue their military career.

BENEFITS OF SERVICE INCLUDE: Is seeking an ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT to provide support to Executive Vice President Must be energetic, amicable and highly organized with ability to work independently and with a team. This position requires excellent writing skills including, and includes writing newsletters, articles and general correspondence, as well as experience planning and coordinating special events. Candidate must possess: Minimum of 5 years clerical/administrative responsibility, two of which must have been in an administrative role. College-level course work may be substituted for up to two years of administrative office experience.

For more information or to apply, please visit

www.lifetimeassistance.org EOE

NO BOOT CAMP! A competitive salary Work only one weekend a month and two weeks per year College Stipend (MGIBSR for students) Advancement Exchange and Commissary privileges Life insurance TRICARE Reserve Select Retirement Opportunities for travel

QUALIFICATIONS FOR SERVICE INCLUDE: Must pass a MEPS physical May have to retake the ASVAB test Must be able to complete 20 years of service before age 60 If you, or someone you know, is a Veteran and would like the opportunity to serve in the United States Navy,

Call 1-800-242-3736 or email Jobs_pittsburgh@navy.mil America’s Navy: A Global Force For Good rochestercitynewspaper.com City 35


Legal Ads > page 34 This institution is an equal opportunity provider.

Professional Services GOTOGIRL ROCHESTER provides services for every day people who need help with everyday errands...cleaning, shopping, organizing, planning,

animal care etc. Call 585-5094817 for scheduling.

Music Services PIANO LESSONS In your home or mine. Patient, experienced instructor teaching all ages, levels and musical styles. Call Scott: 585- 465-0219. Visit www.scottwrightmusic.com

Wanted to HOME & GARDEN Buy CHECK OUT OUR

PROFESSIONALS SECTION

see page 32 of this week’s issue

TO ADVERTISE CALL CHRISTINE AT

CASH FOR CARS! We Buy ANY Car or Truck ,Running or NOT! Damaged, Wrecked, Salvaged OK! Get a top dollar INSTANT offer today! 1-800-267-1591

244.3329 x23

P LY M O U T H S P I R I T UA L I S T C H U R C H Together We Are One

2 9 V I C K PA R K A RO C H E S T E R , N Y

Sunday Services 10:30 AM All Message Service & Free Spiritual Healing Third Weds ~ 7 PM ~ Séances ~ Classes ~ Gallery Reading ~ For more information and schedules www.plymouthspiritualistchurch.org Robin Higgins, Pastor ~ Phone: 585.271.1470

[ LEGAL NOTICE ] Investor News Source Consulting LLC, filed Articles of Organization with NYS on February 16, 2012. Its Principle Office is 34 South Goodman Street #402, Rochester NY 14607. SSNY is designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 34 South Goodman St. #402, Rochester NY, 14607. Any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY (LLC) ] Name: MARVACK, LLC. Articles of Organization filed by the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on: 4/20/2012. Office location: Monroe County Purpose: for any and all lawful activities. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to the LLC at 19 Tawney Point, Rochester, New York 14626. [ NOTICE ] KRUGER COMPANY, LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 5/11/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Peter M. Kruger, 21 Hideaway Ln., Brockport, NY 14420. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] ABID HENRIETTA REALTY, LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 5/11/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Mahmoud Abid, 98 Timrod Dr., Rochester, NY 14617. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] ANAPHORA, LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 4/17/12. Office in Monroe Co. SSNY design. Agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to YVAN SCHER 3 GRAYWOOD LN PITTSFORD, NY 14534. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Articles of Organization with respect to ClinROC, LLC, a New

36 City june 27 - july 3, 2012

York Limited Liability Company, were filed with the Secretary of State of New York on May 9, 2012. The County in New York State where its office is located is Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent of ClinROC, LLC upon whom process against it may be served, and the post office address to which the Secretary of State shall mail a copy of any process against ClinROC, LLC served upon him or her is 56 Hunters Lane, Rochester, NY 14618. There are no exceptions adopted by the Company, or set forth in its Operating Agreement, to the limited liability of members pursuant to Section 609(a) of the Limited Liability Company Law of the State of New York. ClinROC, LLC is formed for the purpose of Providing services to designers, manufacturers and dispensers of medical devices and products and equipment used in connection with the same in the field of Ophthalmology. [ NOTICE ] CORNERSTONE INFO SOLUTIONS LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 5/10/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 3896 Dewey Ave., #151, Rochester, NY 14616. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] Eagle Crest Contracting, LLC was filed with SSNY on May 31, 2012. Office: Monroe County, SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. P.O. address which SSNY shall mail any process against the LLC served upon SSNY: Eagle Crest Contracting, LLC, PO Box 183, North Chili, New York 14514. Purpose is to engage in any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Index No. 201115102SUPREME COURT STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF MONROE Kathleen M. DiFiore and Mary Valenti, Plaintiffs, Courtney Lazarevski, Individually and as Administrator of The Estate of Michael Lazarevski; List Assist Real Estate, Inc.; John Lascala,

CPA; Erdal Erol d/ b/a Erol Consulting; Lucille Izzo; Allstate Insurance, Inc.;Defendants. Pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale dated May 11, 2012 and entered herein, I, the undersigned, the Referee in said Judgment named, will sell at public auction in the front vestibule of the Monroe County Office Building, 39 West Main Street, Rochester, New York, County of Monroe, on July 10, 2012 at 10:00 a.m., on that day, the premises directed by said Judgment to be sold and therein described as follows: ALL THAT TRACT OR PARCEL OF LAND, situate in the Town of Irondequoit, County of Monroe and State of New York, known as 230 Empire Boulevard, Rochester, New York 14609; Tax Account No. 107.07-2-42, described in Deed recorded in Liber 10498 of Deeds, page 379; lot size 89 x 125. Said premises are sold subject to any state of facts an accurate survey may show, zoning restrictions and any amendments thereto, covenants, restrictions, agreements, reservations, and easements of record and prior liens, if any, municipal departmental violations, and such other provisions as may be set forth in the Complaint and Judgment filed in this action. Judgment amount: $147,108.96 plus, but not limited to, costs, disbursements, attorney fees and additional allowance, if any, all with legal interest. DATED: June 2012 Jennifer T. Lockemeyer, Esq., Referee LACY KATZEN LLP Attorneys for Plaintiff 130 East Main Street Rochester, New York 14604 Telephone: (585) 324-5767 [ NOTICE ] Index No. 201013233 SUPREME COURT STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF MONROE ESL Federal Credit Union, Plaintiff, Timothy S. Noonan; Prime Acceptance Corp.; New York State Commissioner of Taxation and Finance; ESL Federal Credit Union; Kathleen RyanDickey; United States of America, Internal Revenue Service; Ford Motor Credit Company LLC; Kathy Jurkowski, Defendants. Pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale dated June 24, 2011 and entered herein, I, the undersigned,

the Referee in said Judgment named, will sell at public auction in the front vestibule of the Monroe County Office Building, 39 West Main Street, Rochester, New York, County of Monroe, on July 25, 2012 at 9:30 a.m., on that day, the premises directed by said Judgment to be sold and therein described as follows: ALL THAT TRACT OR PARCEL OF LAND, situate in the Town of Henrietta, County of Monroe and State of New York, known and described as Lot No. 434 of the Mapledale Subdivision, Section IX , according to a map made by Sear, Brown and Associates, Engineers, recorded in Monroe County Clerk’s Office in Liber 177 of Maps, at pages 23 and 24. Tax Account No. 175.10-1-39 Property Address: 40 Maple Valley Crescent, Town of Henrietta, New York Said premises are sold subject to any state of facts an accurate survey may show, zoning restrictions and any amendments thereto, covenants, restrictions, agreements, reservations, and easements of record and prior liens, if any, municipal departmental violations, and such other provisions as may be set forth in the Complaint and Judgment filed in this action. Judgment amount: $116,445.76 plus, but not limited to, costs, disbursements, attorney fees and additional allowance, if any, all with legal interest. DATED: June 2012 Seema Ali Rizzo, Esq., Referee LACY KATZEN LLP Attorneys for Plaintiff 130 East Main Street Rochester, New York 14604 Telephone: (585) 3245767 [ NOTICE ] LearnSmartz, LLC (LLC) filed Arts. of Org. with NY Secy. of State (SS) on 6/11/2012. LLC’s office is in Monroe Co. SS is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS shall mail a copy of any process to LLC’s principal business location at 332 Jefferson Rd., Rochester, NY 14623. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice is hereby given that a license, number not yet assigned, for a full on premise beer, wine & liquor license has been applied for by . Nidia Santiago

dba 809 Sports Bar, 150 East Ridge Road, Rochester, NY 14621, County of Monroe, for a restaurant. [ NOTICE ] Notice is hereby given that a license, number not yet assigned, for a restaurant wine license has been applied for by Han Chen dba Lotus Oriental , 79 State St., Rochester, NY 14614, County of Monroe, for a restaurant. [ NOTICE ] Notice of form. of Front Door Staging, LLC. Art. of Org. filed with Sec’y of State of NY on 05/23/2012. Office location: Monroe County, SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY mail a copy of process to: Front Door Staging LLC, 75 Chadwick Manor, Fairport NY 14450. Purpose: Any Lawful Purpose. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Form. of PENFIELD PROFESSIONAL, LLC (the “LLC”). Art. of Org. filed with Secretary of the State of NY (SSNY) on 5/22/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, 2041 Penfield Rd, Penfield, NY 14526. Purpose: any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Form. of SMOKESHOP WHOLESALE, LLC (the “LLC”). Art. of Org. filed with Secretary of the State of NY (SSNY) on 4/26/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, 62 Glendale Park, Rochester, NY 14613. Purpose: any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Form. of VINA PIZZA, LLC (the “LLC”). Art. of Org. filed with Secretary of the State of NY (SSNY) on 6/11/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, 45 Maywood Circle, Rochester, NY 14618. Purpose: any lawful purpose.


Legal Ads [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of Alice Information Support, LLC. Art. of Org. filed with the Sec of State of NY (SSNY) on 04/18/2012. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process served to: Alice Information Support, LLC, 2 Hunters Pointe, Pittsford, NY 14534. Purpose: any lawful act. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of 229 East Ave., Hilton, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 5/15/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 590 Salt Road, Ste. 5, Webster, NY 14580. Purpose: any lawful business purpose. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of 45 South Main St., Churchville, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 5/15/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 590 Salt Road, Ste. 5, Webster, NY 14580. Purpose: any lawful business purpose. [ NOTICE ] NOTICE OF FORMATION of A TIME TO GROW, LLC (“LLC”) Art. of Org. filed with NY Secretary of State (“NYSOS”) on 5/3/2012, pursuant to Limited Liability Company Law Section 203. Office location: Monroe County. NYSOS designated as agent for LLC upon whom process against it may be served. NYSOS shall mail copy of process served to: 61 Elmford Road, Rochester, NY 14606. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of ADVENT TOOL & MOLD ACQUISITION, L.P. Cert. of LP filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 05/16/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LP upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Rochling Materials Corp., 903 Gastonia Technology Pkwy., Dallas, NC

28034. Name and addr. of each general partner are available from SSNY. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of ALTPETER, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 05/14/12. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 2220 Highland Ave., Rochester, NY 14610. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to John Altpeter at the princ. office of the LLC. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] NOTICE OF FORMATION of BARBARA KOZEL, LLC (“LLC”) Art. of Org. filed with NY Secretary of State (“NYSOS”) on 4/11/2012, pursuant to Limited Liability Company Law Section 203. Office location: Monroe County. NYSOS designated as agent for LLC upon whom process against it may be served. NYSOS shall mail copy of process served to: 245 Vernon Place, Rochester, NY 14618. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] NOTICE OF FORMATION of CB CLIFFORD’S OF STATE STREET, LLC (“LLC”) Art. of Org. filed with NY Secretary of State (“NYSOS”) on 3/22/2012, pursuant to Limited Liability Company Law Section 203. Office location: Monroe County. NYSOS designated as agent for LLC upon whom process against it may be served. NYSOS shall mail copy of process served to: 80 N. Country Club Drive, Rochester, NY 14618. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of CG HARDSCAPES & LANDSCAPE DESIGN LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 02/13/2012. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 838 Shoemaker Rd, Webster, NY 14580. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of EMPIRE CHEER LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY

(SSNY) on 4/19/2012. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 2199 E. Henrietta Road, Rochester, NY 14623. Purpose: any lawful act [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of FLEETWOOD ACCESSIBILITY SERVICES, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 2/22/2012. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 48 Mt. Hope Avenue, Rochester, NY 14620. Purpose: any lawful act [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of Fringe Cool, LLC. Art. of Org. filed Secretary of State of NY (“SSNY”) 3/20/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of any process to Daniel Hetrick, 22 Shaker Mill, Rochester, NY 14612. Purpose: any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of GREEN WIRE CHOPPERS LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 4/17/2012. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 106 Syke Street, Rochester, NY 14611. Purpose: any lawful act [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of HIVE @ 155 LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 5/10/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, Attn: c/o Dan Morgenstern, 114 St. Paul St., Rochester, NY 14606. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of HIVE ANDREWS LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 6/12/12. Office location:

Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, Attn: c/o Dan Morgenstern, 114 St. Paul St., Rochester, NY 14604. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of HIVE PARKING LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 5/10/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, Attn: c/o Dan Morgenstern, 114 St. Paul St., Rochester, NY 14606. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of HIVE PROPERTIES LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 5/10/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, Attn: c/o Dan Morgenstern, 114 St. Paul St., Rochester, NY 14606. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of HOWARD D. MERZEL MD PLLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/12/09. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of PLLC: 125 Trevor Court Rd., Rochester, NY 14610. SSNY designated as agent of PLLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, 10 Hagen Dr., Ste. 350, Rochester, NY 14625. Purpose: Medicine. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of INLAND PORT ASSOCIATES LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 05/10/12. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 11 State St., Pittsford, NY 14534. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Kiss2010 LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with

Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 04/01/10. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 46 Blind Creek Circle, Henrietta, NY 14467-9528. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of MENDON CENTER, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 05/23/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Timothy P. Sheehan, 230 Crosskeys Office Park, Fairport, NY 14450. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of NATHAN HALLANCIA CUSTOM REMODELING, LLC. Art. of Org. filed Secretary of State of NY (“SSNY”) 6/4/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of any process to Nathan Hallancia, 2396 Whitney Rd., E., Fairport, NY 14450. Purpose: any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of NEW FOUNTAIN, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 4/17/2012. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o Dollinger Associates, P.C., Attn: Kevin Brzezinski, Esq., 2170 Monroe Avenue, Rochester, NY 14618. Purpose: any lawful act [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of PASSERO REALTY SERVICES, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 03/31/12. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 100 Liberty Pole Way, Rochester, NY 14604. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity.

[ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Pinnacle Apartments LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 5/17/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 400 East Ave., Rochester, NY 14607. Purpose: any lawful purpose [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Pinnacle Managing Member, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 5/17/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 400 East Ave., Rochester, NY 14607. Purpose: any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of PROTEA ENTERPRISES LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 5/10/2012. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 2000 Mallory Lane, Ste, 1300-385, Franklin, TN 37067. Purpose: any lawful act [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of Randolph Consulting Services, LLC. Art. Org. Filed Sec’y of state (SSNY) 4/6/12. Office Location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 210 Buck Hill Rd, Rochester, NY 14626. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of Unlimited Innovation, LLC. Art. of Org. filed Secretary of State of NY (“SSNY”) 3/19/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of any process to Daniel Hetrick, 22 Shaker Mill, Rochester, NY 14612. Purpose: any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of West Creek Properties, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on

6/5/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, c/o Andrea Leone, 1 Rockridge Circle, Spencerport, NY 14559. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of WHEELERHOUSE MANAGEMENT LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 05/03/12. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 1 Lentine Dr., Churchville, NY 114289447. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of New Ground Capital Fund, L.P. Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 4/20/12. Office location: Monroe County. LP formed in DE on 10/23/06. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LP upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to the principal business address: 150 Allens Creek Rd., Rochester, NY 14618. DE address of LP: 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Name/ address of general partner available from NY Sec. of State. Cert. of LP filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of New Ground Capital GP, LLC. Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 4/20/12. Office location: Monroe County. LLC formed in DE on 1/24/12. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to the principal business address: 150 Allens Creek Rd., Rochester, NY 14618. DE address of LLC: 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of New Ground Capital LLC. Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 4/20/12. Office location: Monroe

County. LLC formed in DE on 10/16/06. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to the principal business address: 150 Allens Creek Rd., Rochester, NY 14618. DE address of LLC: 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of TDG Acquisition Company, LLC. Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 6/1/12. Office location: Monroe County. Principal business address: 517 Locust Place, Sewickley, PA 15143. LLC formed in DE on 5/3/12. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, registered agent upon whom process may be served. DE address of LLC: 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. [ NOTICE ] POLITE COMPANY IMPROV & SKETCH COMEDY, LLC filed Art. of Org. with Sec’y of State (SSNY) on 3/ 21/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy process to P O Box 1434, Webster, New York 14580. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] WEBSTER PROPERTIES, LUXURY LIVING, LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 4/16/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Stephen Webster, 1595 Elmwood Ave., Rochester, NY 14620. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] ZEEGAN REAL ESTATE ENTERPRISES, LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 5/11/12. Office in Monroe Co. SSNY desig.

cont. on page 38

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Legal Ads > page 37 agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 99 Pearson Ln., Rochester, NY 14612, which is also the principal business location. Purpose: Any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] Michael Leone LLC, filed Articles of Organization with the New York Department of State on 5/4/2012. Its office is located in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent of the Company upon whom process against it may be served and a copy of any process shall be mailed to 923 Meadow Ridge Lane, Webster, NY 14580. The purpose : any lawful activities. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] 30 Black Creek LLC filed Articles of Organization with the New York Department of State on May 11,2012. Its office is located in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has

been designated as agent of the Company upon whom process against it may be served and a copy of any process shall be mailed to 266 Melrose St. Rochester, NY 14619. The purpose of the Company is renting & leasing. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] Nutradiet Labs, LLC filed Articles of Organization with the New York Department of State on 5/21/2012. Its office located in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent of the Company upon whom process against it may be served and a copy of any process shall be mailed to the LLC, Attn: General Counsel, PO Box 201, North Chili, NY 14514. Purpose: Any lawful activity [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF Crittenden-Rossiter LLC] Articles of Organization filed with Secretary of State of NY on 5/10/2012. Office in Monroe County. SSNY

designated as agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC at 1048 South Ave, Rochester, NY 14620. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY ] BURGER STOP, LLC has filed Articles of Organization with the Secretary of State on April 20, 2012. Its office is located in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent upon whom process against it may be served and a copy of any process will be mailed to 128 Autumn Chapel Way, Rochester, NY 14624. Its business is to engage in any lawful activity for which limited liability companies may be organized under Section 203 of the New York Limited Liability Company Act. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION THE LAKE GROUP, LLC ] Articles of Organization filed with Secretary of

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38 City june 27 - july 3, 2012

State of NY (“SSNY”) on 11/05/2009. Office in Monroe County. SSNY designated agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to THE LAKE GROUP, LLC, C/O PATRICIA A. DWYER, 11 RAILROAD MILLS RD., PITTSFORD, NY 14534. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE OF SALE ] Index No. 201113611 SUPREME COURT STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF MONROE ESL Federal Credit Union f/k/a Eastman Savings nd Loan Association Plaintiff vs. Gloria J. Frisone; Midland Funding LLC Defendants. Pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale dated June 4, 2012 and entered herein, I, the undersigned, the Referee in said Judgment named, will sell at public auction in the front vestibule of the Monroe County Office Building, 39 West Main Street, Rochester, New York, County of Monroe, on July 12, 2012 at 10:00 a.m., on that day, the premises directed by said Judgment to be sold and therein described as follows: ALL THAT TRACT OR PARCEL OF LAND, situate in the Town of Greece, County of Monroe and State of New York, known as 173 Mount Ridge Circle, Rochester, New York 14616, Tax Account No. 075.142-6, described in Deed recorded in Liber 6446 of Deeds, page 345; lot size 70 x 150. Said premises are sold subject to any state of facts an accurate survey may show, zoning restrictions and any amendments thereto, covenants, restrictions, agreements, reservations, and easements of record and prior liens, if any, municipal departmental violations, and such other provisions as may be set forth in the Complaint and Judgment filed in this action. Judgment amount: $49,695.62 plus, but not limited to, costs, disbursements, attorney fees and additional allowance, if any, all with legal interest. DATED: June 2012 Kevin K. McKain, Esq., Referee LACY KATZEN LLP Attorneys for Plaintiff 130 East Main Street Rochester, New York 14604 Telephone: (585) 3245767

[ SUMMONS ] Index No. 20123725 SUPREME COURT STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF MONROE ESL Federal Credit Union, Plaintiff, Rosalie D. Barnes, Deceased and any persons who are heirs or distributees of Rosalie D. Barnes, Deceased, and all persons who are widows, grantees, mortgagees, lienors, heirs, devisees, distributees, successors in interest of such of them as may be deceased, and their husbands, wives, heirs, devisees, distributees and successors of interest all of whom and whose names and places of residence are unknown to Plaintiff; United States of America; People of the State of New York; “John Doe” and/or “Mary Roe”, Defendants. Location of property to be foreclosed: 208 Milburn Street, City of Rochester, Monroe County, NY TO THE ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANTS: YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED to answer the Complaint in the above action and to serve a copy of your Answer on the Plaintiff’s attorney within twenty (20) days after the service of this Summons, exclusive of the day of service, or within (30) days after completion of service where service is made in any other manner than by personal delivery within the State. The United States of America, if designated as a Defendant in this action, may answer or appear within sixty (60) days of service hereof. In case of your failure to appear or answer, judgment will be taken against you by default for the relief demanded in the Complaint. Monroe County is designated as the place of trial. The basis of venue is the location of the mortgaged premises. NOTICE: YOU MAY BE IN DANGER OF LOSING YOUR HOME If you do not respond to this Summons and Complaint by serving a copy of the Answer on the attorney for the mortgage company who filed this foreclosure proceeding against you and filing the Answer with the Court, a default judgment may be entered and you can lose your property. Speak to an attorney or go to the Court where your case is pending

for further information on how to answer the Summons and protect your property. Sending a payment to your mortgage company will not stop this foreclosure action. YOU MUST RESPOND BY SERVING A COPY OF THE ANSWER ON THE ATTORNEY FOR THE PLAINTIFF (MORTGAGE COMPANY) AND FILING THE ANSWER WITH THE COURT. DATED: April 5, 2012 MATTHEW RYEN, ESQ. Lacy Katzen LLP Attorneys for Plaintiff Office and Post Office Address 130 East Main Street Rochester, New York 14604 Telephone: (585)-324-5767 NATURE AND OBJECT OF ACTION: The object of the above action is to foreclose a mortgage held by the Plaintiff recorded in the Monroe County Clerk’s Office on July 20, 2007 in Liber 21325 of Mortgages, page 618 in the amount of $83,000.00. TO THE ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANTS, EXCEPT ROSALIE D. BARNES, DECEASED, The plaintiff makes no personal claim against you in this action. To the above named Defendants: The foregoing Summons is served upon you by publication pursuant to an Order of the Hon. Joseph D. Valentino, a Justice of the Supreme Court of the State of New York, dated May 1, 2012 and filed along with the supporting papers in the Monroe County Clerk’s Office. This is an action to foreclose a mortgage. The premises is described as follows: ALL THAT TRACT OR PARCEL OF LAND with the buildings and improvements thereon erected, situate, lying and being in the City of Rochester, County of Monroe and State of new York, known and distinguished as Lot Number Ten (10) in Charles M. Thom’s subdivision of Lot Number Fifty-eight (58 ) of the Bates Farm on the north side of Milburn Street and being about thirty-nine (39) feet front and rear, by ninety-five and one-half (95-1/2) feet deep, be the same more or less, as more particularly set forth upon a map of said premises made by William C. Gray, Surveyor, recorded in the Monroe County Clerk’s Office in Liber 10 of Maps at Page 94. Tax Acct. No.: 122.532-87 Property Address:

208 Milburn Street, City of Rochester, New York. [ SUMMONS ] Index No. 2012-3736 SUPREME COURT STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF MONROE ESL Federal Credit Union, f/k/a Eastman Savings and Loan Association, Plaintiff, Sollie E. Barr, Deceased, and any persons who are heirs or distributees of Sollie E. Barr, Deceased, and all persons who are widows, grantees, mortgagees, lienors, heirs, devisees, distributees, successors in interest of such of them as may be deceased, and their husbands, wives, heirs, devisees, distributees and successors of interest all of whom and whose names and places of residence are unknown to Plaintiff; United States of America; People of the State of New York; “John Doe” and/or “Mary Roe” Defendants. Location of property to be foreclosed: 4 Riverbank Place, City of Rochester, Monroe County, NY TO THE ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANTS: YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED to answer the Complaint in the above action and to serve a copy of your Answer on the Plaintiff’s attorney within twenty (20) days after the service of this Summons, exclusive of the day of service, or within (30) days after completion of service where service is made in any other manner than by personal delivery within the State. The United States of America, if designated as a Defendant in this action, may answer or appear within sixty (60) days of service hereof. In case of your failure to appear or answer, judgment will be taken against you by default for the relief demanded in the Complaint. Monroe County is designated as the place of trial. The basis of venue is the location of the mortgaged premises. NOTICE: YOU MAY BE IN DANGER OF LOSING YOUR HOME If you do not respond to this Summons and Complaint by serving a copy of the Answer on the attorney for the mortgage company who filed this foreclosure proceeding against you and filing the Answer with the Court, a default judgment may

be entered and you can lose your property. Speak to an attorney or go to the Court where your case is pending for further information on how to answer the Summons and protect your property. Sending a payment to your mortgage company will not stop this foreclosure action. YOU MUST RESPOND BY SERVING A COPY OF THE ANSWER ON THE ATTORNEY FOR THE PLAINTIFF (MORTGAGE COMPANY) AND FILING THE ANSWER WITH THE COURT. DATED: April 5, 2012 MATTHEW RYEN, ESQ. Lacy Katzen LLP Attorneys for Plaintiff Office and Post Office Address 130 East Main Street Rochester, New York 14604 Telephone: (585) 324-5767 NATURE AND OBJECT OF ACTION: The object of the above action is to foreclose a mortgage held by the Plaintiff recorded in the Monroe County Clerk’s Office on April 10, 1990 in Liber 10062 of Mortgages, page 16 in the amount of $30,000.00. TO THE ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANTS, EXCEPT SOLLIE E. BARR, DECEASED, The plaintiff makes no personal claim against you in this action. To the above named Defendants: The foregoing Summons is served upon you by publication pursuant to an Order of the Hon. Thomas M. VanStrydonck, a Justice of the Supreme Court of the State of New York, dated April 25, 2012 and filed along with the supporting papers in the Monroe County Clerk’s Office. This is an action to foreclose a mortgage. The premises is described as follows: ALL THAT TRACT OR PARCEL OF LAND SITUATE IN THE City of Rochester, County of Monroe and State of new York, known and described as Lot #8 in John Wasp’s Subdivision, as shown and laid down on an amended map of said subdivision, made for John Wasp and filed in the Monroe County Clerk’s Office in Liber 13 of Maps, page 16. Said Lot #8 fronts 40 feet on the north side of Riverbank Place and runs back of equal width 62.5 feet, as shown on said map, to which reference is hereby made. Tax Acct. No.: 105.36-1-4 Property Address: 4 Riverbank Place, City of Rochester, New York.


Fun

Due to space constraints, we are unable to run the super-sized final strip of Neil Swaab’s “Rehabilitating Mr. Wiggles.” You can see the full comic, in color, at mrwiggleslovesyou.com. It contains a penis cloud.

[ news of the weird ] BY CHUCK SHEPHERD Chinese media reported that on May 4th, at the Xiaogan Middle School in Hubei province, high school students studying for the all-important national college entrance exam worked through the evening while hooked up to intravenous drips of amino acids to fight fatigue. A director of the school’s Office of Academic Affairs reasoned that before the IVs were hung, weary students complained of losing too much time running back and forth to the school’s infirmary for energy injections. After the media reports, there was a public backlash, but less against the notion that China was placing too much importance on the exams than against reports that the government was subsidizing the cost of the injections.

Can’t Possibly Be True

— Desmond Hatchett, 33, was summoned to court in Knoxville, Tenn., in May so that a judge could chastise him for again failing to make childsupport payments. Official records show that Hatchett has at least 30 children (ages 14 down to “toddler”) by at least 11 women. He said at a 2009 court appearance that he was “through” siring children and apparently has taken proper precautions since then. (In Milwaukee, Wis., in April, Sean Patrick was sentenced to 30 years in prison for owing more than $146,000 for 12 children by 10 mothers, and the city’s Journal Sentinel newspaper reported that, before being locked up, two convicted pimps, Derrick Avery and Todd Carter, had fathered, respectively, 15 kids by seven women and 16 children with “several” mothers.) — The Associated Press reported in May that Kentucky prison officials were working behind the scenes to

resolve the thorny question of whether inmate Robert Foley deserves a hip replacement. Normally, a prisoner in such extreme pain would qualify. However, Foley, 55, is on death row for killing six people in 1989 and 1991, and since he has exhausted his appeals, he is still alive only because a court has halted all executions while the state reconsiders its lethal-injection procedure. Furthermore, all local hospitals queried by the prison to perform the procedure have declined to take Foley because the prison considers him dangerous. — Chilean artist Sebastian Errazuriz recently created “Christian popsicles” made from wine that Errazuriz obtained by trickery after a priest consecrated it into “the blood of Christ.” The popsicle’s stick is actually a figure of Jesus on the cross, as sort of a reward for finishing the treat. (Also, The Icecreamists shop in London, England, recently began offering a popsicle made with absinthe -- and holy water from a spring in Lourdes, France, which many Catholics revere for its healing powers. The “Vice Lolly” sells for the equivalent of about $29.) — The official class photo of Eileen Diaz’s second-grade kids at Sawgrass Elementary School in Sunrise, Fla., was distributed this spring with the face of the front-and-center child replaced by a dark-on-white smiley face. Apparently there was miscommunication between the school and the photographer about redoing the photo without the child, whose parents had not given permission for the shot. (Another child without parental authorization was easily edited out of the photo, but the front-and-center student could not be.)

[ LAST WEEK’S SOLUTION ON PAGE 33 ]

[ LOVESCOPE ] BY EUGENIA LAST ARIES (March 21-April 19): Past lovers will come to mind. Comparisons will be made, and emotions will be close to the surface. Taking a walk down memory lane will help you put your personal life in perspective. Make decisions that will enhance your current or next relationship. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Volunteer to lend a helping hand, and you will encounter someone with whom you’ll enjoy spending time. You’ll know exactly where you stand if you listen to the personal information being revealed to you. Don’t lead anyone on.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Your heart is in the right place, and socializing will help you enhance your love life. Sharing your feelings and talking about your dreams will encourage someone to elaborate about similar expectations. Having common interests is a healthy start to a long union. CANCER (June 21-July 22): Making demands or limiting someone’s freedom will backfire. You cannot buy love or own your partner. Back off and enjoy a little breathing room. Finding your own interests will help you build confidence and give you more leverage in a one-on-one relationship.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): You’ll attract romance. Get involved in events or activities that allow you to show off, and you will be flooded with all sorts of offers to get together with interesting people. You can date more than one person as long as you don’t mislead anyone. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Don’t take anything or anyone for granted. Someone may be leading you to an embarrassing situation. Hold back when it comes to revealing your feelings. Concentrate more on self-improvement and hobbies or skills you want to develop. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Love is

highlighted. Opportunities to be with someone special will lead to changes in your personal life or the way you do things. Good fortune, travel and residential changes will all contribute to a healthy long-term relationship. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): An unpredictable situation will work against you regarding your personal relationships. You are better off sticking close to home and making plans to engage in travel or a visit with a potential partner when you feel sure you want to make a commitment. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): You’ll be drawn to someone who

shares your morals and ethics. A chance to talk about long-term plans will bring you even closer together. A last-minute change in your plans will make you realize how adaptable, carefree and comfortable a potential partner makes you feel. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Socialize, but don’t become too serious about life, love and your future plans or you will meet with resistance. Lighten up and have some fun. There will be plenty of time to share your intentions, but first you need to capture someone’s heart. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18):

You’ll impress someone with your knowledge, curiosity and fun-loving approach to life and love. A fast-paced relationship will lead to an interesting turn of events that will help you change your lifestyle quickly. A joint effort will bring good results. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Don’t believe everything you hear, especially when it pertains to how much someone cares for you. Take your time and don’t offer too much, or you may be taken for granted. Ask questions if you feel someone is avoiding the truth or withholding important information.

rochestercitynewspaper.com City 39


40 City june 27 - july 3, 2012

June 27 - July 3, 2012 - CITY Newspaper  

Cover: The march of the charters | News: Bug Jar breakdown | Dining Review: White Swans Asia Caffe | Music: Mikaela Davis | Theater: An Even...