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EVENTS: “WEST SIDE STORY,” DUDE THEORY SYMPOSIUM 20 RESTAURANT REVIEW: JOEY’S PASTA HOUSE

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CLASSICAL: MADRIGALIA 19 FILM: “THE HANGOVER, PART II,” “NORA’S WILL” 28 CROSSWORD 39

great white plains • Ball in the house • Rochester philharmonic • big sandy • wycliffe gordon • ray lamontagne • AND MORE MUSIC, PAGE 10

JUNE 1-7, 2011 Free

Greater Rochester’s Alternative Newsweekly

Vol 40 No 38

News. Music. Life.

We thought naively that our work was done.” COMMENTARY, PAGE 3

Unusual election year in Brighton. NEWS, PAGE 4

McFadden gets a challenger. NEWS, PAGE 5

Bolgen Vargas: a dramatic beginning. NEWS, PAGE 6

Shaw Festival 2011 preview. THEATER, PAGE 22

GUIDE | BY CITY MUSIC STAFF | INSIDE | ILLUSTRATION BY AUBREY BERARDINI

2011 Rochester International Jazz Fest Natalie Cole. Elvis Costello. K.d. lang. Chris Botti. These are just a few of the big names that will be coming to town as part of the 2011 Xerox Rochester International Jazz Festival, which will take over a good chunk of downtown June 10-18. This year marks the 10th installment of the Rochester International Jazz Festival, which has blossomed into a local cultural juggernaut. Last year’s installment attracted more than 160,000 music fans, and this year’s festival promises 285 concerts with more than 1000 musicians at 18 different

venues. And it’s not just jazz: genres include blues, Americana, pop/rock, funk, and more. There is truly something for everyone, and many of the festival’s concerts are free. Inside you’ll find City Newspaper’s 2011 Jazz Fest Guide, which includes day-by-day schedules, brief bios on the festival musicians, and exclusive interviews with some of the festival’s biggest names. For more jazz, make sure to check the City Newspaper Music Blog at rochestercitynewspaper.com throughout the run of the festival.


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Send letters to themail@rochestercitynews.com or The Mail, City Newspaper, 250 North Goodman Street, Rochester 14607, with your name, address, and daytime telephone number. Letters must be original, and we don’t publish letters sent to other media. Those of fewer than 350 words have a greater chance of being published, and we do edit for clarity and brevity.

Responsible hydrofracking

The gas industry objects to the recent Duke University study in Pennsylvania and New York about methane in water wells, because there have been no “base line” surveys of wells in the hydrofracking vicinity done before drilling the wells. The baseline survey is the responsibility of the gas industry. Not having done it, we must then rely on the testimony of the water-well users who have been damaged by the hydrofracking. If the drillers were confident of the outcome, I would think that their counsel would have advised them to do a pre-drilling water-well survey to defend against false claims, or as a basis for compensating damaged neighbors. It is high cheek to assert that the neighbors would be obligated to do a survey before drilling, at their own cost. RON JOHNSON, PITTSFORD

Working for rights

Thank you for your insightful editorial on justice in the Presbyterian Church (USA) (“Justice Being Done,” May 18). I too am a grateful Presbyterian. Various organizations and dedicated individuals helped bring this about: Covenant Network, More Light Presbyterians, That All May Freely Serve, and others. In particular, TAMFS was founded locally by the Downtown United Presbyterian Church and its first Minister Director, the Rev. Janie Spahr. Its current Minister Director, Lisa Larges, is hoping to finally be ordained after being rejected by the various Presbyterian courts for 25 years. Janie Spahr will visit Rochester and preach at Downtown Presbyterian on June 12. JIM REES, PITTSFORD

Where is church’s justice towards Israel? Mary Anna Towler has praised her own Presbyterian Church’s  City

JUNE 1-7, 2011

recent decision to ordain gay and lesbian ministers and lay leaders (Urban Journal, “Justice Being Done,” May 18). But Towler has not mentioned some lingering prejudices still harbored within her own church. In 2000, the Presbyterians launched a campaign to divest themselves from five US companies (Caterpillar, Motorola, ITT, United Technologies, and CitiGroup). They claim that these companies, which operate in Israel, are complicit in that country’s mistreatment and suppression of the Arabs. The United Church of Christ has taken similar action, and the Episcopalians are considering the same course. Israel, the only democracy in the Middle East, is thankful that John Paul II was the first Pope in two millennia to set foot in a synagogue and to visit Israel. The Israelis are also very grateful that American Evangelical Christians continue to provide unwavering support for their country and to visit Biblical sites in the Holy Land. It seems that Towler may still have another item to address on her church’s “Justice being done” list. GERALD W. GRUMET, BRIGHTON

More choices at the Food Bar

In his lengthy review of Wegmans’ Food Bar, James Leach neglected to mention two outstanding menu choices. 1) Veggie Burgers, an original recipe formulated by one of Wegmans’ very own chefs. 2) Hot Fudge Sundaes that rate a 10. MORLEY GWIRTZMAN, BRIGHTON

From our website

On the Monroe County and state Bar Associations’ backing of marriage equality: Maybe this is

why less than 1/2 of the licensed attorneys in Monroe County are members of the county Bar Association, and why far less than 1/2 of the licensed attorneys in NYS are members of the NYS Bar Association. The Bar Associations took a serious turn to the Left in the 1990s and have essentially become liberal advocacy organizations. They no longer represent the views of the lawyers in the county or the state. B SARBANE

On our blog on teacher evaluations: Sounds good on paper

and gets everyone wagging tongues, but take a good look at WHO is directing this. No, it’s not the ignorant tea baggers, it’s the Dems. Think of Chi town’s new mayor Rahm Emanuel, who snatched up our very own former super. Yet another generation of kids is being cheated out of a fair and appropriate education because of sorry, slothlike politicians in our beloved Albany and in other states across the union. NANCY

On our article on Mayor Tom Richards’ proposed city budget:

“It also eliminates 140 positions, a figure that could include as many as 80 layoffs. Of the position cuts, 51 will come from the police department, 28 will come from the fire department, 23 will come from the Department of Environmental Services. Other positions are being cut from business development, libraries, and housing and code enforcement.” So how many positions are being cut from the mayor’s office? How many department heads or similar senior administrators are being eliminated or their salaries cut? What about the support staff for the City Council? In addition, given the millions of scarce city tax dollars that have been used to sweeten the Paetec deal, can Mayor Richards provide the citizenry with revenue projections for the Midtown project? In other words, when will that investment start showing a profit and how much will that profit be? CITIZEN CANDY KANE

On our blog on Massey Energy and the April 2010 coal-mine disaster: Massey Energy is

the perfect example of everything that is wrong with “free enterprise.” It seems Massey’s business philosophy is “safety costs too much.” That message was strong; government safety watchdogs bought into it and either didn’t look or looked the other way. And then there are the workers. Obviously what was going on was a matter of life or death. Why didn’t they shut down the mine by walking off the job? TOM JANOWSKI

News. Music. Life. Greater Rochester’s Alternative Newsweekly JUNE 1-7, 2011 Vol 40 No 38 250 North Goodman Street Rochester, New York 14607-1199 themail@rochester-citynews.com phone (585) 244-3329 fax (585) 244-1126 rochestercitynewspaper.com Publishers: William and Mary Anna Towler Editor: Mary Anna Towler Asst. to the publishers: Matt Walsh Editorial department themail@rochester-citynews.com Features editor: Eric Rezsnyak News editor: Christine Carrie Fien Staff writers: Tim Louis Macaluso, Jeremy Moule Music writer: Frank De Blase Calendar editor: Rebecca Rafferty Contributing writers: Kate Antoniades, Paloma Capanna, Casey Carlsen, Emily Faith, George Grella, Susie Hume, Kathy Laluk, Michael Lasser, James Leach, Ron Netsky, Dayna Papaleo, Rebecca Rafferty, Todd Rezsnyak, Ryan Whirty Editorial intern: Alexandra Carmichael Art department artdept@rochester-citynews.com Production manager: Max Seifert Designers: Aubrey Berardini, Matt DeTurck Photographers: Frank De Blase, Matt DeTurck, Michael Hanlon Advertising department ads@rochester-citynews.com Advertising sales manager: Betsy Matthews Account executives: Tom Decker, Annalisa Iannone, William Towler Classified sales representatives: Christine Kubarycz, Tracey Mykins Operations/Circulation info@rochester-citynews.com Circulation Assistant: Katherine Stathis Distribution: Andy DiCiaccio, David Riccioni, Northstar Delivery City Newspaper is available free of charge. Additional copies of the current issue may be purchased for $1, payable in advance at the City Newspaper office. City Newspaper may be distributed only by authorized distributors. No person may, without prior written permission of City Newspaper, take more than one copy of each weekly issue. City (ISSN 1551-3262) is published weekly by WMT Publications, Inc. Periodical postage paid at Rochester, NY (USPS 022-138). Send address changes to City, 250 North Goodman Street, Rochester, NY 14607. City is a member of the Association of Alternative Newsweeklies and the New York Press Association. Subscriptions: $35.00 ($30.00 for senior citizens) for one year. Add $10 yearly for out-of-state subscriptions: add $30 yearly for foreign subscriptions. Due to the initial high cost of establishing new subscriptions, refunds for fewer than ten months cannot be issued. Copyright by WMT Publications Inc., 2011 - all rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, photocopying, recording or by any information storage retrieval system without permission of the copyright owner.


SPECIALIZING IN RARE & UNUSUAL GUEST COMMENTARY | by Richard S. Gilbert

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Reproductive justice: back to the bad old days?

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The year was 1969 — before New York State legalized abortion, before Roe v. Wade, before the war on Planned Parenthood. I was minister at the First Unitarian Church of Ithaca when I joined the Clergy Consultation Service, a counseling service for women with unwanted pregnancies. We developed a discipline to provide effective consultation while protecting ourselves legally should that become necessary. We engaged in “all options counseling.” If the woman wanted an abortion, we sought to determine if she qualified for a legal therapeutic abortion in New York; that was possible only if two doctors determined that the life of the woman was threatened. We maintained a list of safe and legal abortion services outside New York. Our caseload grew quickly. I counseled with 50 women in our 15 months of operation, 17 in one unusually hectic week. Women from all over the state and beyond called us. They were a microcosm of the nation’s social problems: from a young college coed fearful of her sexually repressive parents, to a couple both near 40 who already had five children and could not afford more, to a Native American woman who had failed to obtain a legal abortion and left my office threatening suicide when I could not help. I learned that an unwanted pregnancy was only a symptom of much larger problems. From the outset we combined counseling with advocacy of legal abortion. Republican Assemblywoman Constance Cook introduced legislation to repeal the restrictive abortion law. The debate on the Assembly floor was bitter, and the vote was close. The legislation passed when Auburn’s George Michaels changed his mind, risked his career, and cast the deciding vote, legalizing abortions in New York as of July 1, 1970. In the next election he was swept from office. With a sense of relief, we disbanded in June 1970. We assumed that the new law would make our consultation service unnecessary. Our relief turned to hope when the Supreme Court handed down its 1973 decision in Roe v. Wade. We thought naively that our work was done. The 2010 election has done collateral damage to the reproductive justice movement: 49 more anti-choice votes in

Thanks to the 2010 election, there are 49 more anti-choice votes in the House and a slim pro-choice margin in the Senate. the House, a slim margin of pro-choice votes in the Senate. Twelve states switched from pro-choice to anti-choice governors. New York still has in its criminal code that 1970 law. The Women’s Reproductive Rights Act has been proposed to update that law and place it in the health code where it properly belongs. It would essentially embed in law the 1973 Roe v. Wade Supreme Court decision. The threat to reproductive freedom brought on by the 2010 election makes its passage imperative. I wish those who oppose reproductive freedom could have been with me in 1969 and 1970. I wish they could have looked those troubled women in the eye and told them that they have no right to control their own body; I wish they had been there to tell them that because some people have religious views opposing abortion, they may not have one; I wish they could have been there to help these women cope with the overwhelming problems they faced with a pregnancy carried to term. But they weren’t, and they aren’t. They are out there picketing Planned Parenthood, which helps prevent unwanted pregnancies; from pulpits, they are proclaiming that their moral values should become a law controlling the behavior of others. They are protesting embryonic stem cell research with its lifegiving promise. They seek a return to a time when troubled women had to seek out sympathetic clergy in the desparate hope that they might maintain their reproductive rights. Having been at the vortex of the battle over abortion in 1970, I pray we won’t return to those bad old days. Richard Gilbert is a retired Unitarian Universalist minister and is chair of Interfaith Impact of New York State. rochestercitynewspaper.com

City 


[ news from the week past ]

Hochul wins special election

Democrat Kathy Hochul won the special election for New York’s 26th Congressional District, beating three other candidates. The victory gave Democrats control of an otherwise reliably Republican seat. Medicare played a significant role in the campaign, and Republican Jane Corwin’s position — she backed a House GOP plan that would eventually turn Medicare into a voucher program — likely played a role in her defeat.

Brooks’ re-election bid is official County Republicans held their annual convention, endorsing County Executive Maggie Brooks for a third term and cross-en-

News

Unemployment drops

The unemployment rate for the Rochester region has dropped again, says the state’s department of labor. New claims for the month of April fell to 7.2 percent from 7.7 percent in March, and 8 percent a year ago. More than 12,000 privatesector jobs have been added to the Rochester economy from a year ago, most of them in the areas of health care, education, and construction.

POLITICS | BY JEREMY MOULE

Five seats in play in Brighton

DEC to study well blowout

A Cuomo administration official directed the State Department of Environmental Conservation to study a recent blowout of a natural gas well in Pennsylvania. The well gushed hydraulic fracturing wastewater for two days. The state’s review will be part of its Marcellus Shale environmental statement preparation. Cuomo wants the statement, which could green-light a combination of horizontal wells and hydraulic fracturing in New York, completed by July 1.

Brighton Democrat Ray Tierney, who’s served on the Town Board since 1992, isn’t seeking reelection. Photo by MATT DETURCK

CITY NEWSPAPER’S

This is no typical election year for Brighton Democrats. The reason: there will be five open seats for town and county offices. Long-time Supervisor Sandra Frankel isn’t seeking re-election and is instead running for Monroe County executive. Town Board member Ray Tierney — who’s advocated regionalism and has been a critic of the county industrial development agency — is stepping down, as is fellow board member Sheila Gaddis. Travis Heider, who represents part of Brighton in the County Legislature, isn’t seeking re-election, either. Town Clerk Susan Kramarsky didn’t seek nomination for the job, says Brighton Democratic Leader Jim Vogel. That leaves five elected positions wide open. And races without an incumbent are riskier for the party that previously controlled the seats. Brighton is heavily Democratic, however, so Democrats has a low risk of losing the seats. To replace those stepping down, the Brighton Democratic committee has nominated:

• Town attorney William Moehle for supervisor • Parks and recreation advisory board member Christopher Werner for Town Board • Town Zoning Board of Appeals member Jason DiPonzio for Town Board • Deputy clerk and deputy receiver of taxes Dan Aman for town clerk • Legislative staffer Justin Wilcox for the County Legislature’s 14th District seat. Brighton Republicans have nominated Brian Callahan for supervisor and David Rizzo for Town Board. Taxes and town operations are stock issues in local races, but Brighton candidates are likely to talk development and land use, too. Two recent development proposals — an already approved residential development and a pending commercial project — have faced considerable public criticism. The projects would eliminate open space and important animal habitat, and could change neighborhood character, some residents say.

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The Senate Judiciary Committee questioned Monroe County district attorney and potential federal judge Mike Green, poking at his experience and activities. Green has been nominated for a district court judgeship by President Barack Obama, and could be confirmed as soon as this week. Local Democrats haven’t yet decided who they’ll run for DA in Green’s place this year. Republicans have endorsed former Monroe County Attorney Bill Taylor for DA.

dorsing two Democratic members of the Irondequoit Town Board. The party also endorsed all of its incumbent county legislators who aren’t term-limited, in addition to several new candidates.

02

Green goes before Senate committee


Critics who see the district’s central office as a bloated behemoth employing a lot of high-salaried paper-pushers view the cuts to administration as a necessity. Others think the cuts are part of a strategy to help get negotiations restarted with the Rochester Teachers Association.

EDUCATION | BY TIM LOUIS MACALUSO

POLITICS | BY CHRISTINE CARRIE FIEN

Reaction mixed to city school district cuts

Watkins weighs in

Barely two weeks in office as the city school district’s interim superintendent, Bolgen Vargas made heads turn with his decision to fire three top administrators last week. John Scanlan, deputy superintendent of administration; James Fenton, chief of strategy and planning; and Tom Petronio, chief of communications were dismissed without explanation. “My objective as interim superintendent is to create an administration that is both more effective and more efficient,” said a written statement provided by Vargas. The statement did not mention the employees by name, and Vargas would not comment further. Reactions to the firings have been mixed. To critics who see the district’s central office as a bloated behemoth employing a lot of high-salaried paper-pushers, the cuts to administration are viewed as a necessity. Others think the cuts are part of a strategy to help get negotiations restarted with the Rochester Teachers Association. As concerns grew over how to close the district’s $76-million budget gap, some teachers and parents demanded to see more cuts from the administration and, in particular, the Superintendent’s Employee Group — a group of employees generally making six-figure salaries. The cuts were one of several prerequisites issued by the teachers union before concessions could even be discussed.

Diane Watkins, a social studies teacher in the city school district, plans to primary south district City Council member Adam McFadden in September. | “This is not about Adam McFadden as an individual,” Watkins says. “It’s my time to run because I’m seeing things in the district that should have been addressed for some time.” | Watkins, 43, announced her candidacy at a press conference last week. | Watkins says overly burdensome regulations from City Hall are making it difficult for the city to prosper. She cites as examples the delay in the new East Avenue Wegmans store, and the decades it took to bring the Brooks Landing project to fruition. | Bureaucracy and red tape also make it difficult, she says, for people to start businesses. And while the city grants incentives to big businesses like Paetec, she says, there never seems to be enough money for things like getting small businesses off the ground or to fixup homes “that are falling apart around us.” | Watkins opposes mayoral control of the city school district, but said that given the amount the city gives the school district every year — about $119 million — City Council needs a “tried and true educator” among its ranks.

School board President Malik Evans has said that one of Vargas’s directives is to improve communications between the district Malik Evans. and its many Photo BY MIKE HANLON stakeholders, which may at least partially account for Petronio’s dismissal. But the district’s communications problems were not exactly about how the message was delivered. Many of former Superintendent Jean-Claude Brizard’s critics simply disagreed with the message, and there is no indication that they have changed their opinions. Some board members are baffled by the cuts. “A strategic planner can be couched as an unnecessary expense at this time, I suppose,” says board member Willa Powell, referring to James Fenton’s position. But Fenton’s role involved quality assurance and control, which saves the district money in the long term, she says.

Cost of War 4,454 US servicemen and servicewomen, 318 Coalition servicemen and servicewomen, and approximately 101,060 to 110,384 Iraqi civilians have been killed in Iraq from the beginning of the war and occupation to May 27. American servicemen and servicewomen killed from April 29 to May 22: -- Sgt. 1st Class Clifford E. Beattie, 37, Medical Lake, Wash. -- Pfc. Ramon Mora Jr., 19, Ontario, Calif. IRAQ TOTALS —

AFGHANISTAN TOTALS

1,594 US servicemen and servicewomen and 886 Coalition servicemen and servicewomen have been killed in Afghanistan from the beginning of the war and occupation to May 27. Statistics for Afghan civilian casualties are not available. American servicemen and servicewomen killed from May 18 to 23: -- Staff Sgt. Kristofferson B. Lorenzo, 33, Chula Vista, Calif. -- Pfc. William S. Blevins, 21, Sardinia, Ohio -- Pvt. Andrew M. Krippner, 20, Garland, Texas -- Pvt. Thomas C. Allers, 23, Plainwell, Mich. —

iraqbodycount. org, icasualties.org, Department of Defense SOURCES:

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City 


INTERVIEW | By TIM LOUIS MACALUSO AND CHRISTINE CARRIE FIEN

Bolgen Vargas: a dramatic beginning Bolgen Vargas repeatedly used the word “trust” in an interview last week. The interim superintendent of city schools is convinced that one of the district’s biggest problems is a severe lack of it. There is a lack of trust between the district and teachers, parents, employees, community leaders, and even the media, he said. You could almost hear a collective sigh of relief when the city school board picked Vargas to lead the district on an interim basis after former Superintendent Jean-Claude Brizard left for Chicago. Vargas was on the Rochester school board from 1996 to 2003, serving as president for part of that time. And he is known outside of Rochester’s education community. Vargas describes his leadership style as someone who listens and collaborates, and he said he’s approaching all four of the district’s bargaining units in an all-out effort to mend fences. The district’s communications failures are at least partly to blame for the scarcity of trust, he said, and his success depends on how well he can rebuild that trust. And he has taken strong action. Just two weeks into his new job, Vargas fired three of the district’s top administrators: Chief of Communications Tom Petronio, Deputy Superintendent John Scanlan, and Chief of Strategy and Planning Jim Fenton. Some people are questioning the timing and rationale behind those cuts, and they raise a more important question: Does a counselor from the Greece school district have the administrative chops to manage a district with 32,000 students and a budget of nearly $700 million? It’s a question that Vargas dislikes being asked, and he almost flicks it away. His doctorate was in education leadership and organization, he said, and his oneon-one experience with students is an asset, not a weakness. Still, there is concern about his close relationship to RTA President Adam Urbanski. Will Vargas pull back from some of the reforms important to his predecessor, such as greater teacher accountability, merit pay, and enforcing higher standards for receiving tenure? Or will he cave to pressure from the teachers union? Vargas said he has no plans to dramatically change the district’s current course, intimating that he is more of a place-holder than a person who is charged with returning the district to its pre-Brizard days. And he seems to agree with many of Brizard’s ideas. Though he never criticized Brizard directly, Vargas said implementing great ideas is much more difficult than envisioning them.  City

JUNE 1-7, 2011

And the district has long had problems with implementation, he said, even when it comes to fundamentals like recording attendance. Vargas is likeable, but his popularity will be tested when he has to make decisions that are less populist than cuts to top brass; cutting teachers will be a different situation. And he may soon discover that some of the district’s communications problems have more to do with the unpopularity of the message, and not how the message is delivered. And some board members, he may also learn, have their own approach to communications with the public — one that has not always been supportive of the superintendent. In a recent interview, Bolgen Vargas talked about his respect for teachers, poverty’s influence on education, and the importance of arts, music, and physical education programs. The following is an edited version of that discussion. CITY: What is your charge as the interim superintendent? Vargas: As an interim you do a lot of assessment

and you make sure you don’t lose any ground when it comes to the education of our kids. You make the most out of each day with instruction in our schools. One thing you don’t do is bring large new initiatives. I’m putting my energy into making sure that whatever we do we are guided by three principles: one is the needs of our students, and then there are the needs of families in our community, and definitely you have to pay attention to the needs of the organization: the needs of our staff, our teachers, and so on. Those are the fundamental things that you keep in mind. And then — in my view at this time — we need to concentrate very specifically on no more than three to five to seven objectives. In other words, you need to stay focused?

Yes. You have to make sure that the kids who are on track to graduate, that they do graduate from high school, for example. Make sure that the summer school program goes into effect to serve the needs of our kids. Make sure the opening of the school year is effective; that you examine everything that you need to make sure that the schools are in the position to serve the needs of our students.

The popularity of Interim Superintendent Bolgen Vargas will be tested when teaching jobs are on the line. Photo by MIKE HANLON

And those are challenges because we do have a budget challenge in place. Those are easier said than done. But you’ve got to at least know what you’re focused on. My top priority and I think my biggest contribution at this point is to make sure that you provide some stability, because this is a very unstable time. My biggest challenge is to build trust, because I’m running an organization where there’s a lack of trust everywhere. The reality is that our families and the staff sometimes don’t trust what’s going on in central office. So how do I begin to build trust? For example, one of the first things that I did was try to bring all the bargaining units together. The conversations were not going as well as we would like them to be prior to my arrival, and I think we’ve got to shift that. How do you do that?

I began meeting with each one of the bargaining units — not just the RTA. Basically my approach is, “What do you need?” And I asked my teachers, “What do you need to educate kids?” I tend not to lead by telling people what to do. I like to lead by telling people, “What do you need to do the best job you can?” So teachers will tell you a lot of reasonable things, like for example, “We want our

kids to have music and art.” That seems reasonable to me. What has been the saddest day for me was a Thursday night when I went to East High School and I was told that they were performing the first play in about 20 years. I saw teachers there, administrators, and parents. Let me ask you about your predecessor, JeanClaude Brizard, and his approach. He was a supporter of charter schools, for example. What is your opinion of charter schools?

We have done a lousy job as educators explaining to this community this whole reform movement. Education, in particular urban education, is driven by the federal government, both through cash and policies. All the reform initiatives that were put in place, so-called Brizard reform initiatives, are required and in many cases we enter into an agreement with both the federal government and the state education department, because there’s a large intrusion on the part of both. For example, many of our schools have been listed [by the state] as schools in need of improvement. When you miss the target for a couple of years you’re given four choices. One of them is to close low-performing schools and open charter schools. As a superintendent, I have to do the best I can under the current system. Now [RTA


President] Adam Urbanski and a whole group of us believe that charter schools are a way to innovate and could be very helpful. However, Rochester’s experience teaches us that we have to be very cautious, and I’ve got to make sure that we have quality schools at all levels. On the plus side, we have some charter schools that do pretty well, like True North. Who would be against those good schools, which keep parents in the city? But we had two charter schools that were closed because of low performance. So what happened to those students? That would be an interesting piece of research. There is strong resistance to charter schools in some pockets.

When it comes to charter schools my position is that all the tools to educate, including if it is a way to innovate through charter schools, you do it measurably, thoughtfully, and utilize that. The challenge that you have to be careful of is, when it comes to the charter-school movement, people either call you procharter or anti-charter. You can’t put me in one camp or the other. I believe that charter schools could make a contribution to the public-education menu. But you have to work with people. If you bring people together, you have hope and people feel empowered. Take all the division that goes on in this community. It’s not going to help us if I just continue to say, “Let’s get together.” You have to show by example what working together means. Let’s talk about teacher evaluations.

As an educator I believe that a teacher’s work matters. And I believe you can measure the contribution that a teacher’s work makes to the teaching and learning process. Teacher evaluations are extremely important to me. That’s a priority. Teaching has so many components. You have curriculum, instruction, and assessment. I call it the “C.I.A.” Most people talk about teacher evaluations just in terms of the individual. What if I give my teachers a lousy curriculum? In terms of input, my education experience tells me that teachers want, for example, to have input into the curriculum. And let’s talk about what part teachers play in delivering this curriculum. And I think there are ways that both teachers and administrators could agree on assessments. Whether you like tests or not, that’s the world we live in. So I would tell even those that argue with tests: philosophically, you may be talking about education as you would like it to be. But as a superintendent, I have to look at both: the world as it is for education and the world as I would like it to be. There are many factors that go into the educational outcome of our children. One of them is the quality of teachers; I don’t think anyone would discount that. The other thing is, how much support do teachers have? What is the quality of the school?

So what does a good school look like?

They engage kids in all kinds of things. In Greece for example, we have as much music, art as School of the Arts. That should be the norm. So we’ve been talking in Rochester, how do you engage all of these groups? If you provide a good menu of activities, that helps engage not just the students, but the whole school community. This community’s very blessed that we have a lot of talented people and a lot of people who want to do well for our kids. But we haven’t found ways to come together and work with each other. You see the mistrust, even in the school district. It appears that central office, for example, is removed from the schools. Now the question you need to ask me as a leader is, “How the heck are you going to reform the schools if there’s an appearance you’re removed from the schools?” That’s a legitimate question. Sometimes it’s as simple as going to a school and helping the principal get the kids off the bus. What is your view on the relationship between concentrated poverty and student performance?

Children in poverty face multiple challenges. Poverty is a range of things. If you’re poor and you come from a working parent, it’s very different, let’s say, than if you’re poor and you’re in foster care. I would love to look at the challenges that kids face and then match them with mitigating factors. Let’s say you have a situation where a family’s economics don’t allow a kid to be wellclothed in the winter time. I do believe that if this community comes together, we can make sure that all our kids are well-clothed. We know that children in poverty have fewer books in their homes. Can we match those kids with library cards for them and their families? What I’ve found in Rochester is that our kids’ challenges are poverty plus multiple adverse factors, and in order to mitigate them, common sense would tell us that you have to have multiple protective factors.

My biggest challenge is to build trust, because I’m running an organization where there’s a lack of trust everywhere.” B O L G E N VA R G A S

How the heck can you bring people together when they don’t trust each other? We have to break our own barriers. We have great barriers between administrators and unions, central office and the schools, the schools and the communities. You hear, “The school doesn’t respond to our needs.” You hear that constantly. We have signs of hope. There are a lot of good things going on. But we need to be more collaborative, more precise, and more targeted as to what we want our kids to know by the end of 12th grade. We have the capacity, but we have to find a way to use it more effectively and efficiently than we have. I do believe this community can improve education if all of us would concentrate and make sure that kids come to school, make sure they put in some effort, and make sure that they behave. Is the in-school suspension program effective?

I believe it’s much better than the alternative: release the kid with no program or anything. Do I believe that it could be improved? Anything could be improved. How do you build or maintain an organization when there’s the possibility of hundreds of teachers being let go? How do you keep teachers from fleeing?

employees. If all these cuts go on, Adam will have about 3,000, about half. So that would be a terrible mistake to make him a co-manager. I don’t think that it would be the best way to run a district. But we’re asking teachers what contribution they can make to student learning. Well, don’t you think it would be a fair question to ask, what contribution does central office make to student learning? Now that’s an uncomfortable question for both sides. But as a leader I want to ask that question. It is unfair to say that only teachers matter. And it’s equally unfair to say that only the superintendent’s work matters. And sometimes people who occupy this position have this superhero thing, “I will change things.” I can tell you I won’t change one thing unless I can bring people together and break down the mistrust. What’s your view on mayoral control of the city school district?

I’ve got no time in terms of paying attention to that right now. As a superintendent, I work for the school board. I will do the best job I can for my school board. I’m interested and I believe that Mayor Richards and his administration are and continue to be supportive of this school district. I know that they are open, willing, and ready to help if we ask. Is yours a political position as well as an administrative position?

It’s a leadership position. I think the reason I got the job is because I can bring people together. I’m very collaborative and also have strong convictions. I have the ability and a willingness to be open-minded, to work with people on behalf of students. I don’t look at political persuasion. If [County Executive] Maggie Brooks were to call me and say “Hey Bolgen, what can I help you with…?

You can work collaboratively with the union in order to help us. For example, Adam [Urbanski] and I met and discussed this very issue. We came up with ways in which methodically, measurably we make sure to create some stability. That’s part of my charge. That’s what I want to do. You do that even by example. The fact that Adam and I can sit at the same table and talk about collaborating on some of these issues, it may have a ripple effect and give confidence to the teachers that in September, things might be much better.

What would you ask her for?

But we’ve had so many different efforts aimed at getting those people together. How do you make that connection?

A lot of people believe [RTA President] Adam Urbanski helped chase Brizard out of Rochester. And many see Urbanski as a comanager of the district. Are you concerned about his influence?

You need to break the barriers to trust in this community. You saw it in the budget process.

I don’t believe that Adam is a co-manager. I don’t see him as such. I have 6,000-plus

If I do a couple of things right and I can make a contribution to Rochester – I am committed to this community – I wouldn’t mind ending my career here. Do I have other opportunities? Yes, I do.

It sounds like you believe the ideas are there, the understanding is there, but the implementation has been problematic.

We educators need to take responsibility for the educational outcome of our students, but we also have a responsibility to say, “Here are the factors that are getting in the way.” So when we pick up the phone, we’re more targeted, more deliberate about what we need from our social service agencies, from our families, from the business community, from our neighborhoods, from City Hall.

Can we expand summer school? Can we persuade the business community that we need more summer jobs for kids? Maybe she can help. A leader can collaborate. I never met a Republican or a Democratic kid. Most of them just like to play on the playground. All this fighting is about adults. Children look at their teacher like, “Does she care about me? What is she teaching me? Am I enjoying it?” Do you want to be the permanent superintendent?

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City 


For more Tom Tomorrow, including a political blog and cartoon archive, visit http://thismodernworld.com

Urban Action This week’s calls to action include the following events and activities. (All are free and open to the public, unless otherwise noted.)

Obama campaign begins

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JUNE 1-7, 2011

Organizers for President Obama’s re-election, “Rochester for Obama 2012,” will meet to begin volunteer recruitment at 1 p.m. on Saturday, June 4, at the Bagel Bin Café in Brighton. Bumper stickers and T-shirts will be available for purchase.

The restaurant is located at 2600 Elmwood Avenue (Twelve Corners).

Public hearing on superintendent

The Rochester Board of Education will hold a public hearing to gather community input on the search process for a permanent superintendent. The meeting will be held at 6 p.m. on Monday, June 6, at the district’s central office, 131 West Broad Street.

Bee buzz

The Center for Sustainable Living will hold a “Bee Workshop” at 6 p.m. on Saturday, June 11. The workshop will show how bees live and work in a hive. It will be held at 1856 Amann Road in West Bloomfield. Registration: mangia0529@aol.com.

Peace vigil

Peace advocates and antiwar activists will hold a “Bring Them Home” vigil at 7:30 a.m. on Thursday, June 2, at Park Avenue and Culver Road.

Correcting ourselves

The article “Getting to ‘yes’ on marriage equality” in last week’s issue included an incorrect statistic. Married couples are entitled to 1,324 rights and responsibilities. The classical-music feature on Concentus Women’s Chorus that ran in the May 26 issue included an error. The group’s spring concert will take place Sunday, June 5.


Dining sauce in which his scallops of veal luxuriated had the right balance of sweet and savory, and just enough of the wine’s bouquet to keep it interesting. We could quibble over whether you can honestly call portabella and crimini mushrooms “wild,” as he does (they are only wild in the sense that you can’t make them grow in nice, straight rows), but the dish was technically perfect. (Marsala available as either chicken for $16, or veal for $19.) McCall is even a dab hand with a deep fryer, turning out light, tender calamari ($10) served with a brightly flavored cup of marinara that’s quite good. Paired with one of his well-composed salads, it’s big enough to make a meal. Even though it reminded us forcefully of its heyday back in the late 1990’s, we particularly enjoyed McCall’s grilled Caesar salad: two hearts of romaine, brushed with olive oil and walked across a hot grill before being dressed with a smoky and creamy dressing and served with two crunchy slices of crostini ($8). Oddly for a chef of such obvious The house-made gnocchi in a plum-tomato sauce at Joey’s Pasta House in Penfield.

Photo by MIKE HANLON

Italian dressing Joey’s Pasta House 1789 Penfield Road 586-2426, joeyspastahouse.com Mon-Thu 11:30 a.m.-10 p.m., Fri 11:30 a.m.-11 p.m., Sat 4:30-11 p.m., Sun 4-9 p.m. [ REVIEW ] BY JAMES LEACH

Pick up the phone to make a reservation at pretty much any restaurant on a Monday night and you are likely to get a lot of answering machines. Monday is the traditional restaurant “weekend” — the chef ’s day off — when all but a handful of places tend to be closed. Joey’s Pasta House in Penfield is the exception to that rule: on a recent Monday evening at 5:30 p.m., its parking lot was packed to capacity with SUVs and minivans. Apparently every family in Penfield had decided to go out for an early dinner. Crowding the downstairs dining room to capacity and spilling over into the upstairs dining area, a noisy and basically happy crowd of moms, dads, and kids enjoyed mammoth plates of pasta, substantial and fragrant entrees, and endless baskets of bread. My family fit right in, even though the hostess

— who was effusively helpful and friendly on a second visit — seemed less than thrilled to see us, and even less happy when we declined the four top crowded between the hostess stand and server’s station. Joey’s Pasta House has been open for about nine months now. Its popularity stems from a winning combination of reasonable prices and large portions of familiar Italian food served in an atmosphere that can support everything from a casual family meal to a semi-formal soiree. That wide appeal makes Joey’s a convivial neighborhood place, often full of regulars who make it their restaurant of choice again and again. The atmosphere at Joey’s and the reasonably

efficient servers keep diners happy, but it’s the food that’s clearly the draw here. Executive Chef Joe McCall has been a feature in the Rochester restaurant scene for more than 13 years, and for a significant part of that time he’s been honing his take on Italian-American classics with a Rochester twist. His food is reliable, sometimes even great. But it is food without risk. Eating at Joey’s is like watching a tightrope walker doing his act three feet off the ground rather

than 30: it’s clear that there’s a lot of skill going into the act, but there’s no sense that he’s pushing his limits. That’s actually a great part of this restaurant’s appeal. You always know what you are getting when you sit down, and you can be certain that pretty much everyone at the table will like it. Chef McCall displays substantial technical skill in his cooking. His stocks are rich and flavorful, forming an excellent base for a thick, hearty lentil soup packed with nicely cut vegetables, a tomato Florentine soup that will ruin you for any other, and even a cream of broccoli soup whose velvety texture was a real pleasure to experience. (Soups $5 a bowl.) For my 6-year-old dining companion, the soup might have been the highlight of our meal — we ended up vying for the right to finish the Florentine after he’d already harvested every morsel of carrot, celery and spinach in the broth. His mother and I grudgingly shared the lentil soup, enjoying the complex flavor of a soup built on a welldeveloped vegetable base thickened with parmesan cheese rinds — an old-school cooking trick that I strongly endorse. Likewise, McCall’s marsala sauce is a model of its kind. The glossy and fragrant

technical skill, Joey’s falls short on its namesake pasta. I was looking forward to the homemade pappardelle and tagliatelle, about which I’d heard so much. But on two visits both were sadly overcooked and more than a bit gummy. The pappardelle (pappardelle Bolognese, $13) particularly reminded me of the thick dumplings my grandmother used to make with chicken. Dishes made with dried pasta fared much better: both the mountain of spaghetti under our meatballs and the penne enrobed in vodka sauce ($12) were pleasingly al dente. The penne was particularly gratifying: it actually stood up on the plate rather than slump into a slippery mass, as too often happens. Italian restaurants often live or die on their red sauce, and it’s fortunate that chef McCall is such a good chef that his cream and brown sauces could carry the restaurant by themselves. Compared to countless other excellent examples in our area, McCall’s sauce is too tomatoey, more acidic than it needs to be, and lacks the complexity of sauce that’s been left to simmer for hours on end. Usually, it’s possible to taste a bit of meatiness, as well as some herbs and garlic in a good red sauce, but that was not the case here. It was fine sauce that wouldn’t offend even the most timid of palates, and it played nicely with both meatballs and pasta, but it sadly wasn’t up to par with the rest of the chef ’s solid repertoire.

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City 


Upcoming [ HIP-HOP/RAP ] Dirty South Summer feat. Yo Gotti, OJ Da Juiceman Friday, July 1. Main Street Armory, 900 E. Main St. 8:30 p.m. $35-$50. Rochestermainstreetarmory.com.

Music

[ HIP-HOP/RAP ] Kid Cudi w/Chip Tha Ripper Wednesday, July 27. CMAC, 3355 Marvin Sands Drive, Canandaigua. 8 p.m. $46$55.25. cmacevents.com. [ POP/ROCK ] American Idol Live! Tour 2011 Saturday, September 10. Blue Cross Arena, 1 War Memorial Square. 7 p.m. $45$65. bluecrossarena.com.

RPO: A Grand Finale for Christopher Seaman Kodak Hall at Eastman Theatre, 60 Gibbs St. Thursday, June 2, 7:30 p.m. & Saturday, June 4, 5:30 p.m. $28-$100 | 454-2100, rpo.org

[ CLASSICAL ] Does it really seem possible that this is

the 13th and final season with Christopher Seaman as the music director of the Rochester Philharmonic Orchestra? Aren’t we used to his long legs, striding across the stage, tails flying out behind him? Haven’t we laughed during his pre-concert chats when his sense of humor came burbling through, piqued with his Canterbury-intoned British accent? And haven’t we been spoiled by his outstanding command of repertoire and of the baton? Although we are promised that Seaman will return as conductor emeritus on an annual basis, what we know is that this final concert of this season will be special. On the program are the Maestro’s favorite composers, Vaughan Williams, Elgar, and Brahms. Singers from Mercury Opera will highlight the “Serenade to Music” by Williams. When I interviewed Seaman last September for City, he was already looking forward to these musical selections. I may be giving away the ending when I say, just try to stay in your seats during the fourth and final movement of the Brahms Symphony No. 2 in D. It’s marked “Allegro con spirito” and is the perfect marking with which to mark this most special occasion. — BY PALOMA A CAPANNA PHOTO COURTESY Gelfand-Piper

RECREATION, NIGHTLIFE & WHAT TO DO

EVERY

DAY OF THE SUMMER!

CITY NEWSPAPER’S

SUMMER GUIDE 2011 IN PRINT AND ONLINE 10 City JUNE 1-7, 2011

JUNE 15!


Wednesday, June 1 [ Acoustic/Folk ] Ralph Louis. Lento, 274 N Goodman. 271-3470. 7:30 p.m. Free. Tom Gravino. Cafe 54, 54 W Main St, Victor. 742-3649. 6 p.m. Free. [ Blues ] Gina Sicilia. Dinosaur Bar-BQue, 99 Court St. 325-7090. 9:30 p.m. Free. [ Classical ] Trudy Moon. Geneva on the Lake, 1001 Lochland Rd, Geneva. 800-3-GENEVA. 6:30-9 p.m. Free.

Friday in America

Big Sandy and his Fly-Rite Boys performed at Abilene Thursday, May 26. photo by FRANK DE BLASE

Friday, June 3 Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. | $5 | 454-2966 [ ROCK ] You’ve just got to hear Friday In America’s

“Hitman” to fall in love with this band. There’s a lot going on here — jazz, rock, blues, hip-hop, and funk — but the band doles it out in pinches and dashes that sparkle within its acoustic-electric rock ’n’ roll framework. Dig the band’s 2011 release “Cut The Brakes,” or better yet catch it live, where an added scoop of unpredictability gets tossed in. DJ Knapps will be there, too. — BY FRANK DE BLASE

The Wailers Saturday, June 4 Water Street Music Hall, 204 N. Water St. 9 p.m. | $20-$25 | 325-5600 [ REGGAE ] Led by original bassist Aston “Family

Man” Barrett, The Wailers is one of the few remaining reggae bands of legend. Up until its frontman’s death in 1981, it was Bob Marley and the Wailers. It doesn’t get much heavier than that. The band formed in Jamaica in 1963, ushering in a new era of reggae, ska, and rocksteady. Members have come and gone, but Family Man remains. At this concert the band will be performing its 1980 album “Uprising” — which includes the hits “Redemption Song” and “Could You Be Loved” — in its entirety. Duane Stephenson also performs. — BY FRANK DE BLASE

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Abilene’s air conditioner was put to the test Thursday, May 26, as Big Sandy and his Fly-Rite Boys put on a hot show in the packed room. It was weeknight but everyone was dancing and drinking as if it were Saturday night with no end in sight. Whittled down to its quartet fighting weight and scooping generously into virtually all of its albums, the band played slick and tight with those frayed edges I dig so much. It jumped, it jived, it swung. Rusbo Sloan and The Brothers of Rock had people pouring into Pineapple Jack’s Friday night as it poured hammers and nails outside. Pineapple Jack’s is a way-cool rock room with a big stage and a sound system that can be heard from space. Sloan and his crew used all the notches on the volume knob (yup, even the 11) with their heavy, heavy — but not quite metal — rock. It was solid, vicious, and fun. These cats are seasoned and it shows. Splished and splashed my way out of there to catch the tail end of The Spacelords’ set at the Bug Jar

(incidentally, happy 20th anniversary to the folks at the Jar). The show could’ve used a few more bodies to soak up the high end, but the band still delivered the goods. Spacelords are another example of hard and heavy that, despite myriad influences and lots of talent, really just comes down to good ol’ rock ’n’ roll when all is said and done. Hung out all day Saturday at Ontario Beach Park for the Roc City Rib Fest. Blues and barbeque is all you really ever need. People were lined up for miles at the various booths to dine on some swine while bands like The Dirty Bourbon Blues Band wailed from the gazebo. The Dirty Bourbon boys rock and are a lot of fun, but there’s a sinister streak in there, too. Deep Blue Dream rocked the fest as well. I can’t say enough about singerkeyboardist Lauren Faggiano’s voice. She positively burns up the blues- and soultinged rock her band serves up with pipes that go from blast furnace to purr. Great music for getting’ it on with your honey, or some honey-smoked meat. And really, what’s the difference?

[ DJ/Electronic ] $2 Bill: R.E.A.L. Record Release Party. White Rabbit Lounge, 655 Monroe Ave. actlivemusic.com. 9 p.m. $2. Bad Wolf: 50s & 60s Vinyl Bop. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 454-2966, bugjar.com. 10 p.m. Free. DJ. Woody’s, 250 Monroe Ave. 730-8230. 9 p.m. Call for tix. DJ. Westside Sports Bar & Grill, 1600 Lyell Ave. 4587888. 9 p.m. Call for tix. DJ. One, 1 Ryan Alley. 5461010. 10 p.m. Free. DJ Babi Katt/Dancehall Reggae. Blueroom, 293 Alexander St. 730-5985. 10 p.m. $5 after 11 p.m. DJ Cosmo. Bay Bar & Grill, 372 Manitou Rd, Hilton. 392-7700. 10 p.m. Free. DJ Fat Daddy Buck. Roost, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. 3211170. 8:30 p.m. Free. DJs Jared & Mario B. Venu Resto-Lounge, 151 St Paul St. 232-5650. 9 p.m. $5. DJs NaNa & PJ. Vertex, 169 N Chestnut St. 232-5498. 10 p.m. $3-$8. [ Jazz ] Artisan Jazz Trio. McGraw Public Library, 2180 E Ridge Rd. 336-6060, artisanjazz. com. 7 p.m. Free. ECMS Nights of Jazz. Eastman School of Music-Kilbourn Hall, 26 Gibbs St. 454-2100, esm. rochester.edu. 5 p.m. Free. Paradigm Shift. Pomodoro Grill & Wine Bar, 1290 University Ave. 271-5000. 7:30 p.m. Free. continues on page 12

SALINGER’S 107 EAST AVENUE ROCHESTER NEW YORK

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Sat. 6/4: Jony James Band Sat. 6/11: Bobby Henrie & the Goners Sat. 6/18: Luca Foresta & the Electro Kings Jazz Fest Hours 6/10-6/18: M-F Open at 11:30 AM, Sat. 3 PM, Sun. 5 PM

www.salingersrochester.com rochestercitynewspaper.com City 11


Music

Wednesday, June 1 Robert Chevrier. Brio Wine Bar & Grill, 3400 Monroe Ave. 5867000. 6:30 p.m. Free. The Bowties A Cappella Group. Little Theatre Cafe, 240 East Ave. 258-0403, thelittle.org. 7:30 p.m. Free. To Giannavola. Beale Street Cafe, 693 South Ave. 2714650. 6 p.m. 271-4650, bealestreetcafe.com.

Alex Fieg and Corey Berger (left to right) make up Medina-based blues-rock duo Great White Plains. Photo by FRANK DE BLASE

Great white hope Great White Plains w/The Greener Grass Band Saturday, June 4 58 Main, 58 Main St., Brockport 9 p.m. | Free | 637-2383 Reverbnation.com/greatwhiteplains [ PROFILE ] By Frank De Blase

With a stomp and a howl, Great White Plains rocks with a savage bravado. Stripped down to the bare necessities — guitar and drums — GWP brings the heat, the beat, the sweat, and the threat. It’s blues that will leave you black and blue. Though just barely out of the gate, this Medina duo is strong with the comeon, light on the polish. It plays the brand of blues championed by lo-fi artists that hold the blues in high regard. Artists like The Black Keys, The Jon Spencer Blues Explosion, The Revelators, ’68 Comeback, Black Top, the late, great White Stripes, and Great White Plains all take base elements of the blues and keep the music raw, creating a sidecar for white blues musicians, who otherwise would just be borrowing from or visiting this black phenomenon. It isn’t the Delta, but you can get the blues in Medina. “For me,” says Great White Plains’ singer-guitarist Alex Fieg, “it’s universal. Blues…you can find it in everything. Every song on the radio you can break down to four chords. And I’m doing songs you can break down to three chords, maybe even two. And 12 City JUNE 1-7, 2011

that’s what drew me to it; it’s so simple, yet so powerful at the same time.” Necessity also kept the ranks at a deuce. Fieg and drummer Corey Berger were tired of pieces of the puzzle that didn’t fit. “We couldn’t find anyone congruent to our idea,” Berger says. “We were like, ‘We just want you to go along with what we’re doing because we’ve already figured it out,’” Fieg says. “I wanted to play blues guitar and slide guitar and fill up the sound with that — there wasn’t need for bass, there wasn’t need for a rhythm guitar. I’m satisfied just playing with a drummer.” Though rock duos are in the minority, groups like Great White Plains make you wonder why. There’s nothing missing. The beat is big and bad and driving, all the sonic bases are covered. The only thing missing is clutter. “There’s beauty in the silence and the space,” says Fieg. “It’s so raw, you can hear the emotion of the song. And my voice isn’t covered up with bullshit. People miss out on that — especially in music now. There’s so much going on.” Great White Plains’ sound is a simple-yet-

clever volley between its two members. Berger applies the loping thunder as Fieg switches off, playing simple runs and slide fills so ferocious it sounds as if he’s playing with a rusty hunting knife. The vocals are plaintive, matter of fact, and honest — the blues sans the hyperbole and histrionics, despite the lyrical weight. “It’s about struggle and it’s about heartache,” Fieg says. “I’m not going to try and write a song to make people escape reality, like a Lady Gaga

thing. I’d rather write something where you start with a problem, get it out, and it doesn’t even have to be resolved necessarily. It’s getting your problem out, it’s venting. A lot of our songs have love as a topic. Love is the universal answer, but there are different ways people use the word love. In today’s music they’ve given it a bad name.” Fieg and Berger make their own music; there’s not a lot of outside influence or distraction in their battle cry. The radio in their van doesn’t work; they don’t have Pandora. “I don’t listen to new music that much,” Fieg says. “I just want to be who I am.” Who he is still manages to take songs by contemporary artists like Cee-Lo Green, Gnarls Barkley, and Moby and paint them with a great white blues brush. The sugar pop may reel them in, but GWP’s blues keeps them there. The band has one album, “Heavy Dose,” produced by the extraordinary Calvin May. Another is in the works, again with May at the helm, and due sometime this summer. Meanwhile the band digs deeper and deeper into its own groove. Of course there is the odd pop cover that pops up every now and then. The band has noticed some dudes in the audience scratching their heads over this while their girlfriends dig it. This is why bars have ladies’ night, after all. Fieg agrees. “It’s always ladies night,” he says. But Berger stresses the No. 1 thrill is their own. “A lot of people can play most of the songs we’re playing,” he says. “But it’s the places you pick out and where you put yourself into the song. That makes it so special at that moment. There’s no other place I’d rather be.”

[ Karaoke ] Karaoke. Roost, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. 321-1170. 9:30 p.m. Free. Karaoke. Southpaw Brew Pub, 315 Gregory St. 303-2234. 8:30 p.m. Free. Karaoke. Elite Bar & Grill, 398 W Main St. 527-8720. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke. Pineapple Jacks, 485 Spencerport Rd. 247-5225. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke. Jose & Willy’s, 20 Lake Shore Dr, Canandaigua. 394-7960. 8:30 p.m. Free. Karaoke. Monty’s Korner, 363 East Ave. 263-7650. 9.30 p.m. Free. Karaoke. Lemoncello, 137 W Commercial St, E Rochester. 385-8565, lemoncello137.com. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke. Applebee’s-Fairport, 585 Moseley Rd, Fairport. 4254700. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke. Mayfields Pub, 669 Winton Rd N. 288-7199. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke. Sanibel Cottage, 1517 Empire Blvd, Webster. 6719340. 6 p.m. Free. Karaoke w/DJ Flyin’ Brian. Tap Room, 364 Rt 104. 265-0055. 8:30 p.m. Free. Karaoke w/Mark. Flipside Bar & Grill, 2001 E Main St. 2883930. 8:30 p.m. Free. [ Open Mic ] Acoustic Open Mic. Pub 511, 511 E Ridge Rd. 266-9559. 8 p.m. Free. Drum Circle. Rich’s Cafe, 839 West Ave. 235-7665. 6 p.m. Free. Entertainment Showcase. Clarissa’s, 293 Clarissa St. 4542680. 8 p.m. Free-$5. Open Jam w/Big Daddy Blues Band. Deweys, 1380 Lyell Ave. 254-4707. 9:30 p.m. Free. Open Jam w/Justin Gurnsey. Jukebox, 5435 Ridge Rd W, Spencerport. 352-4505. 10 p.m. Free. Open Mic. Boulder Coffee CoSouth Wedge, 100 Alexander St. 454-7140, bouldercoffeeco. com. 8 p.m. Free. Open Mic. Dr’s Inn Grill & Tap Room, 1743 East Ave. 2710820. 5 p.m. Free. Open Mic w/Jam Shack Music. Stoneyard Bar & Grill, 1 Main St, Brockport. 637-3390. 9 p.m. Free. Open Mic w/Steve West. Muddy Waters Coffee House-Geneseo, 53 Main St, Geneseo. 243-9111. 7-10 p.m. Free. continues on page 14


KNOCK ‘EM DEAD

BIKE & SPORT

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Learn. Dance. Have Fun. rochestercitynewspaper.com City 13


Wednesday, June 1

Madrigalia presents: Draw On, Sweet Night. St Mary’s Church, 15 St Mary’s Pl. 230-2894, madrigalia.org. 7:30 p.m. $5-$20. Two Saints Spring Music Festival: Striking Strings Hammer Dulcimer Ensemble. St. Luke & St. Simon Cyrene Church, 17 South Fitzhugh St. twosaints.org. 12:15-12:45 p.m. $7 suggested donation.

[ Pop/Rock] Dinosaur Bones w/ The Absolutes, Allergic to Retro. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 454-2966, bugjar. com. 8 p.m. $7-$9. Ten Ugly Bands Competition: Evan Prewitt Band vs. Starlight Cities. Lovin’ Cup, Park Point @ RIT. 292-9940, lovincup.com. 8 p.m. Call for tix.

[ Country ] David Pronko. Sandra’s Saloon, 276 Smith St. 546-5474. 9:30 p.m. Free.

Thursday, June 2 [ Acoustic/Folk ] Chris Moore. California Brew Haus, 402 Ridge Rd W. 6211480. 8 p.m. Free. Jim Lane. Six Pockets, Ridge Hudson Plaza. 266-1440. 7:30 p.m. Free. John Akers & Elvio Fernandes. Easy on East, 170 East Ave. 325-6490. 8 p.m. Free. Live Band Thursdays. Blueroom, 293 Alexander St. 730-5985. 8 p.m. Free. Mark Fantasia. Village Pub, Chili Center Plaza. 889-4547. 9 p.m. Free. Nancy Perry. Mythos Cafe, 77 Main St, Brockport. 637-2770. 6 p.m. Free. Paul Strowe. Cottage Hotel, 1390 Pittsford-Mendon Rd, Mendon. 624-1390. 7-10 p.m. Free. Reggae Night. Elite Bar & Grill, 398 W Main St. 527-8720. 9 p.m. Call for tix. Todd Snider. German House Theatre, 315 Gregory St. 8578385, upallnightpresents.com. 8 p.m. $20-$25. Ukelele Support Group. Bernunzio Uptown Music, 122 East Ave. 473-6140, bernunzio. com. 7 p.m. Free. [ Blues ] Nicole Christian and Alfie Smith. Johnny’s Irish Pub, 1382 Culver Rd. 224-0990, johnnysirishpub. com. 8 p.m. Free. Pro-Blues Jam w/ Rochester Blues Review. PI’s Lounge, 495 West Ave. 235-1630. 8 p.m.-midnight. Free. Scandal w/Monica & Funknut. Dinosaur Bar-B-Que, 99 Court St. 325-7090. 9:30 p.m. Free. The Crawdiddies. Beale Street Cafe, 693 South Ave. 271-4650, bealestreetcafe.com. 7 p.m. Free. [ Classical ] Christopher Seaman’s Grand Finale. Eastman Theatre-Kodak Hall, 60 Gibbs St. 454-2100, rpo.org. 7:30 p.m. $28-$100. Tom McClure. Geneva on the Lake, 1001 Lochland Rd, Geneva. 800-3-GENEVA. 6:309 p.m. Free. [ DJ/Electronic ] DJ. Pelican’s Nest, 566 River Street. 663-5910. 5 p.m. Free. DJ Big Reg. Liquid, 169 St Paul St. 325-5710. 9:30 p.m. Free. DJ Biggie. McKenzie’s Irish Pub, 3685 W Henrietta Rd. 334-8970. 9 p.m. Call for tix. DJ ET & DJ Proof. Tribeca, 233 Mill St. 232-1090. 9 p.m. $5-$10. DJ Jestyr. Soho East, 336 East Ave. 262-2060. 9 p.m. Free. DJ Matt. Roost, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. 321-1170. 7:30 p.m. Free. DJ Mike Dailor. Vertex, 169 N Chestnut St. 232-5498. 10 p.m. $3-$8. 14 City JUNE 1-7, 2011

FOLK | Todd Snider

A CAPPELLA | Ball in the House

Singer-songwriter Todd Snider’s style crosses through and between Americana, alt-country, and folk. The 44-year-old Portlander owns his own record company (Aimless Records) that has recently released a double-disc live album, “The Storyteller,” featuring tracks that span Snider’s 17year career. The collection is vintage Snider, and captures many of the narratives that the folk-rocker has been known to share at his intimate shows. Thursday’s show is sure to be another penetrating experience filled with quirky anecdotes and wholesome, beautifully written music.

Taking its name from an episode of “The Brady Bunch,” Boston’s Ball in the House may be the only a cappella group in history whose work is referenced in the online Urban Dictionary. The band is behind the Cool Whip jingle, and the related game where points are scored if you can get people to sing along. The members of the group take inspiration from genres like old-school R & B and contemporary pop. The five voices singing in harmony create some catchy originals and unique versions of familiar songs. Despite no instruments, look for founder Jon J. Ryan to lay down a solid foundation of vocal percussion. It all works like a charm.

Todd Snider performs Thursday, June 2, 8 p.m. at the German House Theatre, 315 Gregory St. $20-$25. 857-8385, upallnightpresents.com. — BY DAVID YOCKEL JR. DJs Designer Junkies, Etiquette, Ginnis. One, 1 Ryan Alley. 5461010. 10 p.m. $3. Mostly 80’s Night. Hatter’s Pub, 5 W Main St, Webster. 8721505. 6 p.m. Call for tix. RIPROC Sockhop w/AreHouse, Brother Bear, Biacco. Dub Land Underground, 315 Alexander St. 232-7550. 10 p.m. $5, $15 under 21. Soul Sides Record Listening Party. Good Luck, 50 Anderson Ave. 340-6161. 9 p.m. Free. Thursday Night Shakedown. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 454-2966, bugjar.com. 11 p.m. Free. Tilt-a-Whirl Drag Show. Tilt Night Club, 444 Central Ave. 232-8440, tiltroc.com. 11:15 p.m. & 12:30 a.m. $3. [ Jazz ] Dave Rivello Ensemble. Village Rock Cafe, 213 Main St, E Rochester. 586-1640. 9 p.m. Free. ECMS Nights of Jazz. Eastman School of Music-Kilbourn Hall, 26 Gibbs St. 454-2100, esm. rochester.edu. 5 p.m. Free. Jazz Dawgs. Bistro 135, 135 W Commercial St,, E Rochester. 662-5555, bistro135.net. 6:30 p.m. Free. Jim Nugent Trio. Little Theatre Cafe, 240 East Ave. 258-0403, thelittle.org. 7:30 p.m. Free. Joe Santora Trio w/Emily Kirchoff. Michael’s Valley Grill, 1694 Penfield R, Penfield. 383-8260. 7 p.m. Free. Live Jam w/Eastman School Students. Triple Deuces Bar & Grill, 151 St Paul St. 232-3888. 6 p.m. Free. Soul Express. Pane Vino, 175 N Water St. 232-6090, panevinoristorante.com. 8:30 p.m. Free.

[ Karaoke ] Karaoke. Panorama Night Club, 730 Elmgrove Rd. 247-2190. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke. Goody Goodies, 6108 Loomis Rd, Farmington. 7422531. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke. Pineapple Jacks, 485 Spencerport Rd. 247-5225. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke. Carey Lake Bar & Grill, 959 Penfield Rd, Walworth. 315-986-1936. 4 p.m. Free. Karaoke. Jukebox, 5435 Ridge Rd W, Spencerport. 352-4505. 7:30 p.m. Free. Karaoke. Applebee’s-Penfield, 1955 Empire Blvd, Webster. 787-0570. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke. GridIron Bar & Grill, 3154 State St, Caledonia. 5384008. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke w/DJ Smooth. Clarissa’s, 293 Clarissa St. 454-2680. 8:30 p.m. Free. Karaoke w/George, King of Karaoke. Temple Bar & Grille, 109 East Ave. 232-6000. 8 p.m. Free. Karaoke w/Summer Bob. Shorts Bar & Grill, 35 N Main St, Fairport. 585-388-0136. 10 p.m. Free. Karaoke w/Tim Burnette. Sevens, Rt 96, Farmington. 924-3232. 8 p.m. Free. Rochester Idol Karaoke. Landing Bar & Grille, 30 Main St, Fairport. 425-7490. 9:30 p.m. Free. [ Open Mic ] Open Blues Jam w/Alex D & Jimmie Mac. PJ’s Lounge, 499 West Ave. 436-9066. 9 p.m. Free. Open Jam. Pub 511, 511 E Ridge Rd. 266-9559. 8 p.m. Free.

Ball in the House performs Friday, June 3, 8 p.m. at Nazareth College Arts Center, 4245 East Ave. $10-$40. 389-2170, artscenter.naz.edu. — BY ROMAN DIVEZUR Open Jam w/Beau Ryan & Amanda Ashley. Firehouse Saloon, 814 Clinton Ave S. 244-6307. 9 p.m. Free. Open Mic. Towpath Cafe, 6 N Main St, Fairport. 377-0410. 6:30 p.m. Free. Open Mic Night. Boulder Coffee Co-Brooks Landing, 955 Genesee St. 287-5282, bouldercoffeeco. com. 7 p.m. Free. Open Mic w/Jed Curran & Steve Piper. Flipside Bar & Grill, 2001 E Main St. 288-3930. 8 p.m. Free. Rochester Ukulele Support Group. Bernunzio Uptown Music, 122 East Ave. 473-6140. 7 p.m. Free. [ Pop/Rock] Be Glad & Dunn. Westside Sports Bar & Grill, 1600 Lyell Ave. 4587888. 9 p.m. Call for tix. Flying Eyes w/ Cheebahawk, A Viking Funeral. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 454-2966, bugjar. com. 7:30 p.m. $6-$8. Jeff Elliott. Irondequoit Ale House, 2250 Hudson Ave. 544-5120. 5 p.m. Free. Jimmy Lane. Six Pockets, Ridge Hudson Plaza. 266-1440. 7 p.m. Free. Seth Faergolzia. Havana Moe’s, 125 East Ave. 325-1030. 9 p.m. Free.

Friday, June 3 [ Acoustic/Folk ] Jim Lane. 58 Main, 58 Main St, Brockport. 637-2383. 6 p.m. Free. Mike & Sergei. Hatter’s Pub, 5 W Main St, Webster. myspace.com/ mikeandsergei. 8 p.m. Free. Petar Kodzas, Bob Sneider, Kinloch Nelson. Harmo House,

58 E Main St., Webster. 2659540, rochesterguitarclub.com. 8 p.m. $12-$15. Ralph Louis. Rochester Plaza Hotel, 70 State St. 546-3450. 7:30 p.m. Free. The WIndy Barley Shakers. McGraw’s Irish Pub, 146 W Commercial St, E Rochester. 348-9091, mcgrawsirishpub. com. 5-7:30 p.m. Free. Tom Gravino. Tandoor of India, 376 Jefferson Rd. 427-7080. 7 p.m. Free. Tommy Emmanuel Review. Glengarry Inn at Eagle Vale, 4400 Nine Mile Point Road, Fairport . 598-3820, eaglevale. com. 9 p.m. Free. Wayward Son. Village Rock Cafe, 213 Main St, E Rochester. 10 p.m. Free. [ Blues ] Aldis Blues Band. Rab’s Woodshed, 4440 Lake Ave. 663-4610. 10 p.m. Call for tix. Billy Joe & the Blues Gypsies w/Dave Riccioni. Six Pockets, Ridge Hudson Plaza. 2661440. 6-9 p.m. Free. John Cole Blues Band. Dinosaur Bar-B-Que, 99 Court St. 3257090. 10 p.m. Free. [ Classical ] Gregory Kunde Chorale: “O’er the Land of the Free”. St. Joseph’s Church, 43 Gebhardt Rd, Penfield. 3777568, gregorykunde.com. 7:30 p.m. $12-$15. Jewel Hara. Geneva on the Lake, 1001 Lochland Rd, Geneva. 800-3-GENEVA. 6:309 p.m. Free. John Ballings. Hedges, 1290 Lake Rd, Webster. 265-3850. 6:30 p.m. Free.

[ DJ/Electronic ] DJ. Coach Sports Forum, 19 W Main St, Webster. 872-2910. 9 p.m. Call for tix. DJ Cedric. Vertex, 169 N Chestnut St. 232-5498. 10 p.m. $3-$8. DJ Dream. Nola’s BBQ, 4775 Lake Ave. 663-3375. 10 p.m. Call for tix. DJ Fat Daddy Buck. Roost, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. 321-1170. 8:30 p.m. Free. DJ GI. Liquid, 169 St Paul St. 325-5710. 10 p.m. Free-$5. DJ Mosart212. Lovin’ Cup, Park Point @ RIT. 292-9940. 6 p.m. Free. Jon Herbert, RipRoc. One, 1 Ryan Alley. 546-1010. 10 p.m. $3. Reggaeton w/DJ Carlos. La Copa Ultra Lounge, 235 W Ridge Rd. 254-1050. 10 p.m. Call for tix. Salsa Night w/DJ Javier Rivera. Tango Cafe, 389 Gregory St. 475-0249. 9 p.m. $5. What A Drag w/Samantha Vega, Kyla Minx & Pauly. Tilt Night Club, 444 Central Ave. 2328440, tiltroc.com. 11:15 p.m. & 12:30 a.m. $4-$12. [ Hip-Hop/Rap ] Good Fridays. Westside Sports Bar & Grill, 1600 Lyell Ave. 458-7888. 10 p.m. $10. [ Jazz ] 3rd Annual Jamm’n June Jazz Concert w/Cabo Frio, Cindy Miller, and more. St. Mark’s and St. John’s Episcopal Church, 1245 Culver Road. 654-9229, stmarksandstjohns.org. 5:30 p.m. $5-$10. Amanda Ashley. Little Theatre Cafe, 240 East Ave. 258-0403, thelittle.org. 8:30 p.m. Free. Gap Mangione New Blues Band. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. 381-4000, woodcliffhotelspa.com. 8:30 p.m. Free. Joe Santora Trio w/Emily Kirchoff. Michael’s Valley Grill, 1694 Penfield R, Penfield. 383-8260. 7 p.m. Free. John Matt Band w/Jon Seiger. Wegmans-Eastway, 1955 Empire Blvd, Webster. 6718290. 5:30 p.m. Free. PM Band. Tala Vera, 155 State St. 546-3844, tala-vera.com. 7 p.m. Free. Ryan T Carey. Thali of India, 3259 S Winton Rd. 427-8030. 7-9 p.m. Free. Ted Nicolosi and Shared Genes. Glengarry Inn at Eagle Vale, 4400 Nine Mile Point Road, Fairport . 598-3820, eaglevale. com. 7 p.m. Free. [ Karaoke ] Karaoke. Flaherty’s, 1200 Bay Rd. 671-0816. 9 p.m. Free.


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[ Pop/Rock] Audioinflux w/The Goods. Lovin’ Cup, Park Point @ RIT. 292-9940, lovincup.com. 8 p.m. $5-$7. Ball In The House. Nazareth College Arts Center, 4245 East Ave. 389-2170, boxoffice.naz. edu. 8 p.m. $10-$40. Bitchin’ Kitchen. Bop Shop, 274 N Goodman St. 271-3354, bopshop.com. 6 p.m. Free. East End Fest w/Thousands of One, Joe Beard Band and more. East Ave between Gibbs and

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Mathews. eastendmusicfestival. com. 5 p.m. $4. Fire Wheel. McGhan’s, 11 W Main St, Victor. 924-3660. 9 p.m. Free. Friday In America. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 454-2966, bugjar. com. 8 p.m. $5. Irondequoit Chorale Pops Concert. Durand Eastman Intermediate School Auditorium, 95 Pt. Pleasant Rd. 266-5018, theirondequoitchorale.org. 7:30 p.m. $10-$12. Kid Kurry. California Brew Haus, 402 Ridge Rd W. 6211480. 10 p.m. Call for tix. Mercia. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N Water St. 546-

3887, waterstreetmusic.com. 6 p.m. $10-$12. Mojo Monkeys. Johnny’s Irish Pub, 1382 Culver Rd. 2240990, johnnysirishpub.com. 8 p.m. Free. Sam Deleo. Perlo’s Italian Grill, 202 N Washington St, E Rochester. 248-5060. 6:3010:30 p.m. Free. White Woods w/Sonar Mail. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N Water St. 546-3887, waterstreetmusic.com. 10 p.m. $8 adv. [ R&B ] Old School R&B. Elite Bar & Grill, 398 W Main St. 5278720. 9 p.m. Call for tix.

Saturday, June 4 [ Acoustic/Folk ] Africa University Choir Concert. Covenant UMC, 1124 Culver Rd. 654-8115. 7 p.m. Donations accepted. Latin Band. Tapas 177 Lounge, 177 St Paul St. 262-2090. 11 p.m. Free. Mike & Sergei. Corner Sports Bar, 122 Main St, E Rochester. myspace.com/mikeandsergei. 8-11 p.m. Free. Ray LaMontagne and the Pariah Dogs w/ Brandi Carlile and The Secret Sisters. CMAC, 3355 Marvin Sands Dr, Canandaigua. 393-4880, cmacevents.com. 7 p.m. $25-$50.

Re-Hatched Female Artist Showcase. Tango Cafe, 389 Gregory St. 271-4930, tangocafedance.com. 7 p.m. $10-$12. Ted McGraw. McGraw’s Irish Pub, 146 W Commercial St, E Rochester. 348-9091, mcgrawsirishpub.com. 5-7 p.m. Free. continues on page 16

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[ Open Mic ] Open Mic. RIT-Java Wally’s, 90 Lomb Memorial Dr. 475-2562. 9 p.m. Free.

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Karaoke. Village Pub, Chili Center Plaza. 889-4547. 9 p.m. Call for tix. Karaoke. Goody Goodies, 6108 Loomis Rd, Farmington. 7422531. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke. Pineapple Jacks, 485 Spencerport Rd. 247-5225. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke. Deweys, 1380 Lyell Ave. 254-4707. 9:30 p.m. Free. Karaoke w/Bobby C. Ciao Baby’s BBQ Steak & Seafood, 421 River St. 621-5480. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke w/Summer Bob. Shorts Bar & Grill, 35 N Main St, Fairport. 585-388-0136. 10 p.m. Free. Karaoke w/Tina P. Norton’s Pub, 1730 N Goodman St. 2663570. 9 p.m. Free.

E!

Wed, June 1

Beale Street Blues Band Thur, June 2

TUESDAY, JUNE 7 • 7PM

SLY FOX BEER AND DESSERT TASTING Come and enjoy some delicious sweet treats expertly paired with some of Sly Fox's finest brews -

Totally quaffable!

$20 PER PERSON including tax, not tip

Reservations Only Tickets on sale now at www.THEOLDTOAD.com 277 Alexander Street | 232-2626 WWW.THEOLDTOAD.COM

From Michigan - Minimalist Folk with

Small Houses Fri, June 3

Happy Hour with

“This Other Life” 9:30 pm

“Grand Canyon Rescue Episode” Sat, June 4

“The Lobster Quadrille” with the movie

Special Sunday Show Sun, June 5

Doors Open at 3PM for “Fett Svin BBQ” then at 7:30PM it’s live rockabilly with

“The Lustre Kings!” 153 LIBERTY POLE WAY•232-3230

for complete entertainment schedule go to

www.abilenebarandlounge.com

rochestercitynewspaper.com City 15


Saturday, June 4 The Wailers w/Duane Stephenson. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N Water St. 546-3887, waterstreetmusic. com. 8 p.m. $20-$25. Tom Gravino. Thali of India, 3259 S Winton Rd. 355-8206. 7 p.m. Free. Unplugged Dinner Music Series. Lovin’ Cup, Park Point @ RIT. 292-9940, lovincup.com. 6 p.m. Free. [ Blues ] Bill Brown. Brown Hound Bistro, 6459 Rt 64, Naples. 374-9771. 7 p.m. Free. Deep Blue. Don’s Original Pub, 2055 Fairport Nine Mile Point Rd. jaweyl@rochester.rr.com. 8 p.m. TBA. Fabulous Ripcords. Dinosaur Bar-B-Que, 99 Court St. 3257090. 10 p.m. Free. [ Classical ] Christopher Seaman’s Grand Finale. Eastman Theatre-Kodak Hall, 60 Gibbs St. 454-2100, rpo.org. 5:30 p.m. $28-$100. John Ballings. Hedges, 1290 Lake Rd, Webster. 265-3850. 6:30 p.m. Free. Penfield Symphony Orchestra: Picnic Pops. Veteran’s Memorial Park, Penfield. 872-0774, penfieldsymphony.org. 4 p.m. Free. Spring Concert of Youth Voices. Hochstein Performance Hall, 50 N Plymouth Ave. 454-4596, hochstein.org. 3 p.m. Free. [ DJ/Electronic ] Big Dance Party w/DJ Jon Herbert. Tilt Night Club, 444 Central Ave. 232-8440, tiltroc. com. 10 p.m. $3. DJ. Goody Goodies, 6108 Loomis Rd, Farmington. 7422531. 9 p.m. Free. DJ. Straight Home Inn Bar & Grill, 688 Lexington Ave. 4580020. 9 p.m. Free.

Rock/Pop | East End Festival

FOLK-ROCK | Ray LaMontagne

The East End Festival celebrates its 21st anniversary this year and continues to push for a more family-friendly atmosphere by focusing on music, food, fitness, and fun. I definitely agree with three of those. For anyone new to town, this is the first of three East End Festivals to be held this summer; the others take place July 8 and August 12. Highlights for the June outing include 13 bands on five stages with headliners Uncle Plum, 50/50, Something Else, Thousands of One (pictured), and Joe Beard Band. New this year is an optional VIP ticket, which grants holders a special entrance to the festival, food by some of the neighborhood’s best restaurants, a bathroom trailer, free parking, and beer and wine tickets.

Ray LaMontagne decided on a career in music after hearing “Treetop Flyer” by Stephen Stills; the former shoefactory worker has since seen his debut 2004 release, “Trouble,” go gold, and sold more than 1.5 million copies of his albums. Known for his sensitive songwriting and distinctive raspy vocals, LaMontagne is touring on the back of his Grammy-nominated 2010 release, “God Willin’ and The Creek Don’t Rise,” along with the band The Pariah Dogs. Brandi Carlisle and Secret Sister open the show.

The first East End Festival of the season takes place Friday, June 3, 5-11 p.m. on East Avenue, from Mathews to Gibbs streets. Regular admission is $4; $40 for VIP tickets. For more information visit eastendmusicfestival.com. — BY ROMAN DIVEZUR DJ Big Reg. Venu RestoLounge, 151 St Paul St. 2325650. 7 p.m. Free. DJ Darkwave. Vertex, 169 N Chestnut St. 232-5498. 10 p.m. $3-$8. DJ Fat Daddy Buck. Roost, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. 3211170. 8:30 p.m. Free.

DJ Howard & Mega Mix. Island Fresh Cuisine, 382 Jefferson Rd. 424-2150. 9 p.m. Free. DJ Jestyr. Soho East, 336 East Ave. 262-2060. 9 p.m. Free. DJ Mirage. Blueroom, 293 Alexander St. 730-5985. 10 p.m. Call for tix. DJ Wiz. Liquid, 169 St Paul St. 325-5710. 9:30 p.m. Free-$5.

Ray LaMontagne performs Saturday, June 4, 7 p.m. at CMAC, 3355 Marvin Sands Drive, Canandaigua. $25-$50. cmacevents.com. — BY ANDY KLINGENBERGER DJs Richie Salvaggio, Kalifornia. One, 1 Ryan Alley. 546-1010. 10 p.m. Free-$10. R&B DJs. Tribeca, 233 Mill St. 232-1090. 9 p.m. $5-$10. [ Jazz ] Calligraphy. Tala Vera, 155 State St. 546-3844, tala-vera. com. 6 p.m. Free. Connie Deming. Little Theatre Cafe, 240 East Ave. 2580403, thelittle.org. 8:30 p.m. Free.

East End Jazz Boys. Havana Moe’s, 125 East Ave. 3251030. 9 p.m. Free. Gap Mangione New Blues Band. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. 381-4000, woodcliffhotelspa.com. 8:30 p.m. Free. Jazz Cafe. Monty’s Korner, 363 East Ave. 263-7650. 7:30 p.m. Free. Jazz at Jazzy’s. Jasmine’s Asian Fusion, 657 Ridge Rd, Webster. 216-1290. 8:30-11 p.m. Free.

Joe Santora Trio w/Emily Kirchoff. Michael’s Valley Grill, 1694 Penfield R, Penfield. 383-8260. 7 p.m. Free. Mark Cassara Band. Bistro 135, 135 W Commercial St,, E Rochester. 662-5555, bistro135.net. 8 p.m. Free. Pamela Reese Smith ft. Lonnie Crittenden. The R.O.A.R. Club, 233 Mill St. 413-1167. 7 p.m. $10-$15. Ted Nicolosi and Shared Genes. Bistro 135, 135 W Commercial St,, E Rochester. 662-5555, bistro135.net. 5-7 p.m. Free. Ukrainian Cabaret Night w/ Stephania Romaniuk. Ukrainian Cultural Center, 1040 Jackson Rd, Webster. 872-0240. 7:30 p.m. $10. Wycliffe Gordon and Jimmie Highsmith. George Eastman House, 900 East Ave. 5461700, advocacycenter.com. 7 p.m. $30-$50. [ Karaoke ] Karaoke. The Galley Restaurant, 94 S Union St, Spencerport. 352-0200. 8 p.m. Free. Karaoke. 140 Alex, 140 Alexander St. 256-1000. 10:30 p.m. Free. Karaoke. Pineapple Jacks, 485 Spencerport Rd. 247-5225. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke. Straight Home Inn Bar & Grill, 688 Lexington Ave. 458-0020. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke. Temple Bar & Grille, 109 East Ave. 232-6000. 10 p.m. Free. Karaoke w/Andy & Kim. Norton’s Pub, 1730 N Goodman St. 266-3570. 10 p.m. Free. Karaoke w/The Tin Man. Shorts Bar & Grill, 35 N Main St, Fairport. 585-388-0136. 10 p.m. Free. [ Open Mic ] Italianfest Idol Contest. Mt. Morris Central School Auditorium, 30 Bonadonna Ave. lindalou@ rochester.rr.com. 7 p.m. $5.

Are you A Cancer Survivor

est.

1927

With Trouble Sleeping? We are seeking cancer survivors who are having difficulty falling or staying asleep for a study testing two methods for reducing sleep problems and fatigue.

LARGE SELECTION OF

HARDY TREES & SHRUBS

Over 3 acres of fresh hardy nursery stock, from the common to the hard to find

ANNUALS • PERENNIALS • FERTILIZER • SEED BAGGED MULCH STONE • BULK MULCH • LARGE SELECTION OF FINE POTTERY

Delivery & Planting Services Available LOCATED NEAR ELLISON PARK • OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK

485 LANDING ROAD NORTH • 482-5372 WWW.CLOVERNURSERY.COM

16 City JUNE 1-7, 2011

How may you benefit

All participants will receive a behavioral treatment for sleep problems, at no charge, either as part of the study or after. Half of the participants will receive a drug called armodafinil that may be helpful in reducing daytime tiredness and fatigue.

Eligibility (partial list)

• Be between the ages 21 and 75 • Have finished radiation treatments and/or chemotherapy • Insomnia began or got worse with the onset of cancer or treatment

Please call Jenine Hoefler (585) 276-3559 or Joseph Roscoe, Ph.D. (585) 275-9962 at the University of Rochester James P. Wilmot Cancer Center for more information about this research study


[ Pop/Rock] Absolution Project, Ten Dead Heroes, God Size Hate, and more. California Brew Haus, 402 Ridge Rd W. 621-1480. 7 p.m. Call for tix. Boneyard w/ Methanol. Pineapple Jacks, 485 Spencerport Rd. 247-5225. 9 p.m. $5. Boneyard. House of Guitars, 645 Titus Ave. 544-3500. 5 p.m. Free. Fairport Canal Days w/Isotopes, Hard Logic, Clockmen and more. Main Street, Fairport. 234-4323, fairportcanaldays. com. 11 a.m.-6 p.m. Free. Fallen Angel. Montage Music Hall, 50 Chestnut Plaza. 4131642, themontagemusichall. com. 8 p.m. Call for tix. Smooth Talkers. Johnny’s Irish Pub, 1382 Culver Rd. 2240990, johnnysirishpub.com. 8 p.m. Free. Velvet Elvis, White Bison, Chillum, Anchorage Nebraska. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 454-2966, bugjar.com. 8 p.m. $5-$7. [ R&B ] RCTV’s Third Annual Black Music Month Celebration. RCTV-15, 21 Gorham St. 3251238, rctv15.org. 2-8 p.m. Free.

Sunday, June 5 [ Acoustic/Folk ] Celtic Music. Temple Bar & Grille, 109 East Ave. 232-6000. 7 p.m. Free. Henrietta Community Chorale: Americana Medley. Covenant Life Church, 70 Bailey Rd, W Henrietta. henriettacommunitychorale@ gmail.com. 2 p.m. Free. Jewish Family Service Gala featuring The Klezmatics. Temple B’rith Kodesh, 2131

Elmwood Ave. 461-0110, jfsrochester.org. 7:30 p.m. $45. John Dady. McGraw’s Irish Pub, 146 W Commercial St, E Rochester. 348-9091, mcgrawsirishpub.com. 7 p.m. Free. PJ Elliott. Bay Street Hotel, Bay St, Sodus Point. 315-4832233. 9 p.m. Free. Rob & Gary Acoustic. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. 381-4000, woodcliffhotelandspa.com. 6-9 p.m. Free. [ Blues ] Beale St. Blues Band. Pane Vino, 175 N Water St. 2326090, panevinoristorante.com. 4 p.m. Free. [ Classical ] Amadeus Chorale 15th Anniversary Reunion Concert. Blessed Sacrament Church, Monroe and Oxford Sts. 4941795, theamadeuschorale.org. 7 p.m. $10. Candlelight Concert. Christ Church, 141 East Ave. 4543878. 8:30 p.m. Free. Concentus Women’s Chorus: Joy! First Presbyterian Church, 21 Church St, Pittsford. 5865688, concentus.org. 3 p.m. $10 donation. Ella Cripps. Geneva on the Lake, 1001 Lochland Rd, Geneva. 800-3-GENEVA. 6:309 p.m. Free. Going for Baroque Organ Recital. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. 276-8900. 1 & 3 p.m. Free w/admission. Jennifer Pascual, organ. Holy Cross, 4492 Lake Avenue. 6632244, holycrossrochester.org. 2:00 p.m. Free. Madrigalia presents: Draw On, Sweet Night. Downtown Presbyterian Church, 121 N Fitzhugh St. 230-2894, madrigalia.org. 4 p.m. $5-$20. Restoration Fund benefit w/ Joseph and John Irrera. St.

480 W Main St. 235-3550. 8 p.m. $5-$10. [ Jazz ] Quintopus. Lovin’ Cup, Park Point @ RIT. 292-9940, lovincup.com. 7 p.m. Free. [ Pop/Rock] 1st Sunday Hardcore Showcase: Rational Animals, Love Pork, Root Hogs. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 454-2966, bugjar. com. 7:30 p.m. $5-$7. Fairport Canal Days w/Paradigm Shift, St. Phillips Escalator, Tommy Brunett and more. Main Street, Fairport. 234-4323, fairportcanaldays.com. 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Free. JAZZ | Wycliffe Gordon & Jimmie Highsmith

Wycliffe Gordon rose to fame as trombonist extraordinaire with Wynton Marsalis and the Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra. Saxophonist Jimmie Highsmith is Rochester’s own gift to the smooth-jazz world. Add four more stars: Bob Sneider, Annie Wells, Will Holton, and Bobby Floyd — not to mention a silent auction and raffles for Xerox International Jazz Festival club passes and gadgets ranging from an iPad to a flat-screen TV — and you’ve got an Evening of Art and Jazz, the annual fundraiser for the Advocacy Center, a local nonprofit dedicated to supporting individuals with disabilities and their families. Wycliffe Gordon and Jimmie Highsmith perform Saturday, June 4, 7 p.m. at George Eastman House, 900 East Ave. $30$50. 546-1700, advocacycenter.com. — BY RON NETSKY James Episcopal Church, 405 E Main, Batavia. 343-6802, stjamesbatavia.org. 3 p.m. $10-$20. Stefania Neonato, pianoforte. Granger Homestead, 295 N Main St, Canandaigua. 3941472, grangerhomestead.org. 4 p.m. $15-$25.

DJ. Pelican’s Nest, 566 River Street. 663-5910. 10 p.m. Free. DJ Rasta Spoc/Old-School Reggae. Blueroom, 293 Alexander St. 730-5985. 10 p.m. $5 after 11 p.m. Old School DJ. Clarissa’s, 293 Clarissa St. 454-2680. 8 p.m. Free.

[ DJ/Electronic ] DJ. Westside Sports Bar & Grill, 1600 Lyell Ave. 458-7888. 9 p.m. Call for tix.

[ Hip-Hop/Rap ] R&B Hip-Hop Spring Edition. Cafe Underground Railroad,

Monday, June 6 [ Acoustic/Folk ] Baby Gramps. Record Archive, 33 1/3 Rockwood St. 2441210, recordarchive.com. 7 p.m. Call for tix. Dave McGrath & Guests. Rehab Lounge , 510 Monroe Ave. 442-9165. 6 p.m. Free. Gamelan Ensemble Experience. Harley School, 1981 Clover St. 442-1770. 6:30 p.m. Free. Irish Waltzes. McGraw’s Irish Pub, 146 W Commercial St, E Rochester. 348-9091, mcgrawsirishpub.com. 6-7 p.m. Free. John Akers. Dinosaur Bar-BQue, 99 Court St. 325-7090. 9 p.m. Free. Mandy. Shorts Bar & Grill, 35 N Main St, Fairport. 585-3880136. 9 p.m. Free. Slow Learners’ Session. McGraw’s Irish Pub, 146 W Commercial St, E Rochester. 348-9091, mcgrawsirishpub. com. 7-9 p.m. Free.

[ Pop/Rock] Chris Bathgate w/ On Horses, Archimedes, Nick Moore & The Helping Hands. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 454-2966, bugjar. com. 7:30 p.m. $7-$9.

Tuesday, June 7 [ Acoustic/Folk ] Jeff Elliott. Norton’s Pub, 1730 N Goodman St. 266-3570. 5-8 p.m. Free. John Bauer. Cottage Hotel, 1390 Pittsford-Mendon Rd, Mendon. 624-1390. 7-10 p.m. Free. Singer’s Session with Joe Moore. McGraw’s Irish Pub, 146 W Commercial St, E Rochester. 348-9091. 8:30-10 p.m. Free. [ Jazz ] Barry Tee Jazz Trio. WegmansPittsford, 3195 Monroe Ave. btoenshoff@rochester.rr.com. 5:30-7:30 p.m. Free. [ Open Mic ] Open Jam. Mo’s Mulberry St, 191 Lee Rd. 647-3522. 8 p.m. Free. Open Jam w/ Too Tall. Dinosaur Bar-B-Que, 99 Court St. 3257090. 9 p.m. Free. Open Mic Night. Lovin’ Cup, Park Point @ RIT. 292-9940, lovincup.com. 8:30 p.m. Free. Open Mic w/Rapier Slices. Clarissa’s, 293 Clarissa St. 4542680. 7-11 p.m. $3-$5. Open Mic w/String Theory. Johnny’s Irish Pub, 1382 Culver Rd. 224-0990, johnnysirishpub. com. 8 p.m. Free. continues on page 18

[ Jazz ] Uptown Groove. Little Theatre Cafe, 240 East Ave. 258-0403, thelittle.org. 7:30 p.m. Free.

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Tuesday, June 7

Wednesday, June 8

[ Pop/Rock] Don Christiano - With A Little Help from My Friends: The Beatles Unplugged. Abilene, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230, abilenebarandlounge.com. 8 p.m. Egg Man’s Traveling Carnival. Hatter’s Pub, 5 W Main St, Webster. 872-1505. 6 p.m. Call for tix. Jennings, Mikaela Davis, Ryan Webster, Notso Good. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 454-2966, bugjar.com. 8 p.m. $6-$8.

[ Acoustic/Folk ] Jim Lane. Norton’s Pub, 1730 N Goodman St. 266-3570. 8 p.m. Free. Mike & Sergei. Perlo’s Italian Grill, 202 N Washington St, E Rochester. myspace.com/ mikeandsergei. 6-9 p.m. Free. Ralph Louis. Lento, 274 N Goodman. 271-3470. 7:30 p.m. Free. Tom Gravino. Cafe 54, 54 W Main St, Victor. 742-3649. 6 p.m. Free.

[ R&B ] Carlton Wilcox. Tala Vera, 155 State St. 546-3844, tala-vera. com. 8 p.m. $5.

[ DJ/Electronic ] Bad Wolf: 50s & 60s Vinyl Bop. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 4542966, bugjar.com. 10 p.m. Free.

DJ Babi Katt/Dancehall Reggae. Blueroom, 293 Alexander St. 7305985. 10 p.m. $5 after 11 p.m. DJ Fat Daddy Buck. Roost, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. 321-1170. 8:30 p.m. Free. DJs Jared & Mario B. Venu Resto-Lounge, 151 St Paul St. 232-5650. 9 p.m. $5. [ Jazz ] Paradigm Shift. Pomodoro Grill & Wine Bar, 1290 University Ave. 271-5000. 7:30 p.m. Free. Robert Chevrier. Brio Wine Bar & Grill, 3400 Monroe Ave. 5867000. 6:30 p.m. Free. [ Open Mic ] Acoustic Open Mic. Pub 511, 511 E Ridge Rd. 266-9559. 8 p.m. Free.

Drum Circle. Rich’s Cafe, 839 West Ave. 235-7665. 6 p.m. Free. Entertainment Showcase. Clarissa’s, 293 Clarissa St. 454-2680. 8 p.m. Free-$5. Open Jam w/Big Daddy Blues Band. Deweys, 1380 Lyell Ave. 254-4707. 9:30 p.m. Free. Open Jam w/Justin Gurnsey. Jukebox, 5435 Ridge Rd W, Spencerport. 352-4505. 10 p.m. Free. Open Mic. Boulder Coffee CoSouth Wedge, 100 Alexander St. 454-7140, bouldercoffeeco. com. 8 p.m. Free. Open Mic. Dr’s Inn Grill & Tap Room, 1743 East Ave. 2710820. 5 p.m. Free.

Open Mic w/Jam Shack Music. Stoneyard Bar & Grill, 1 Main St, Brockport. 637-3390. 9 p.m. Free. [ Pop/Rock] Bill Orcutt, Pengo, Andy Gilmore, City Harvest Black. Rochester Contemporary, 137 East Ave. rochestercontemporary.org. 8 p.m. $6. Count Blastula. Dinosaur BarB-Que, 99 Court St. 325-7090. 9:30 p.m. Free. Lovers w/ KOPPS, Professional Victims. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 454-2966, bugjar.com. 8 p.m. $6-$8. Phish. Darien Lake PAC, 9993 Alleghe Rd, Darien Lake. livenation.com. 7 p.m. $55-$75.

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Classical

Art Exhibits

Madrigalia’s upcoming concert will feature music by Schumann, Elgar, and Camille Saint-Saens. PHOTO PROVIDED

Singing of night, sleep, and Madrigalia Madrigalia Friday, June 3, 7:30 p.m. St. Mary’s Church, 15 St. Mary’s Place Sunday, June 5, 4 p.m. Downtown Presbyterian Church, 121 N. Fitzhugh St. $20 ($5 students) | 230-2894, Madrigalia.org [ PREVIEW ] BY PALOMA CAPANNA

“Draw On, Sweet Night,” the title of Madrigalia’s upcoming concerts, is drawn from a poem by John Wilbye (1574-1638) set to music by John Rutter (b. 1945). The 17 voices of Madrigalia will present their chamber-choir concert featuring songs about night, sleep, and dreams twice this weekend, Friday at St. Mary’s Church and Sunday at Downtown Presbyterian Church. “It’s interesting how you can think about ‘night’ so differently — you’re dreading it, you count your blessings — so many composers have found this inspiration from night and have found different ways to express it across time,” says Dan McInerney, the administrative and concert manager for Madrigalia. In these days leading up to the concerts, McInerney is reflecting on the lyrics of the songs for the program, which gets him into the poetry of the works. The program list uses such words as “sweet night,” “threshold of night,” “sun goes down,” “shining night,” and

“golden slumbers.” Madrigalia uses themebased concerts to tie together a range of genres and composers. Madrigalia was conceived as a music group

in 1975 after a performance of “Camelot” in the Opera Under the Stars series in Highland Bowl, and it has sustained as a Rochester-based chamber choral group for more than 30 years. The timing of these concerts in June, at the end of the traditional performance season, was an intentional effort to fit the mood of the music to the lightening mood of the days. The pieces were selected by Lee Wright, Madrigalia’s music director. “Lee did a great job of selecting the work. When I get to June, I think about the fact that the daylight is long, the solstice is coming, and we can stay outside to 9 o’clock,” says McInerney. McInerney is particularly taken by the work “Zigeunerleben” (“a Gypsy’s Life”) by Robert Schumann, which he says is “all about gypsies — in the woods, bonfires lit, dancing, cymbals clashing, wild abandon.” McInerney says, “Schumann did a whole series of these gypsy songs using mid-19th century poems. You might look at them and ask, are they really true? It’s not something that we would think about in Rochester.” The selections about sleep and dreams, says McInerney, involve a work titled “Sleep” from American composer Eric Whitacre (b. 1970). The work is a poem, for which Whitacre wrote a score that was recorded

by singers around the globe. The singers recorded the parts and electronically sent them to Whitacre, who put them together into a “virtual chorus” of 200 voices from 58 countries. “We were talking about that at rehearsal, and we’re pretty interested to sing this work,” says McInerney. The selections about the “not-so-calm” part of the night include a piece titled “Serenade” by English composer Edward Elgar (1857-1934). “He talks about dreams as being all too brief — that if you wake up, they’re gone,” says McInerney. He describes the mood of the piece as coming from a contrast between the three lower parts (alto, tenor, bass) while the sopranos glide above them in a completely fluid melody. Finally, what McInerney characterizes as songs for the “calm” part of the night come from pieces titled “Sure on This Shining Night” by American composer Morten Lauridsen (b. 1943) and “Calme des Nuits” (“Calm of the Nights”) by French composer Camille Saint-Saëns (1835-1921). Madrigalia belongs to the Greater Rochester

Choral Consortium, which includes more than 25 groups as members, from the Bach Children’s Chorus to the Genesee Valley Orchestra & Chorus, to the Rochester Oratorio Society. McInerney says that several members of Madrigalia also sing with other choral groups in the area, and that Madrigalia also collaborates in showcase concerts, such as the annual Early Music Festival hosted by Musica Spei. McInerney credits the unique sound that Madrigalia brings to the Rochester choral scene as “performances with the forces that the composers had in mind when they wrote.” What he means by this is that many of these and other choral works were originally composed for small groups, sometimes even just a quartet. “When you start to double up on different parts, you get a different sound,” says McInerney. “By the time you get up to the size of the Rochester Oratorio Society, you have 30 to 40 voices on a part and it becomes a voice orchestra.” McInerney, who also sings as a soloist in churches as well as in Rochester Oratorio Society and Voices, says that there are some familiar faces at concerts for Madrigalia and other groups. “But I do also see people at some concerts that I don’t see anywhere else,” he says. “Sometimes we forget how profoundly we can touch somebody in that audience or that congregation, and maybe only two to three times a year that person walks up to you who says that you touched them,” says McInerney. “In every audience you look until you find that one person who is clearly looking at you and you sing to them and that makes it worth it.”

[ OPENINGS ] “6x6x2011: Global” Wed-Sat Jun 1-4. Rochester Contemporary Arts Center, 137 East Ave. Preview hours Wed-Fri 1-10 p.m., $1; Reception and event Sat 6-10 p.m., $5. 461-2222, rochestercontemporary.org. “Becoming an Art Educator” Fri Jun 3. FourWalls Gallery, 179 Atlantic Ave. 6-9 p.m. 442-7824, fourwallsartgallery@gmail.com, cmwfaa@rit.edu. “Beyond the Racks: The Art of Nancy Howard Lyon” Fri Jun 3. 2 Chic Boutique, 151 Park Ave. 5-8 p.m. 271-6111, 2chicboutique. com. “Cove at Rest,” featuring artist Ron Smith Fri Jun 3. A.R.T.S. Gallery at Aviv Café, 321 East Ave. 6-11 p.m. 729-9916. “Declan Ryan: An American Icon,” Rochester artists’ perspective on a modern myth Fri Jun 3. Record Archive, 33 1/3 Rockwood St. 6-9 p.m. alayna@recordarchive.com. “Elements,” work by Amy Vena and Henrik Søderstrøm Fri Jun 3. Joe Bean Coffee Roasters, 1344 University Ave., Suite 110. 6-9 p.m. 319-5279. Genesee Valley Quilt Club’s 75th Annual Quilt Festival, featuring “The Fiber Face Project,” self portraits by Rochester City School students Fri-Sun, Jun 3-5. Gordon Field House, Rochester Institute of Technology, Lomb Memorial Drive. $10 per day, $15 weekend pass. Fri-Sat 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Sun 9 a.m.-4 p.m. gvqc.org. “Graffita: Not Your Average Brazilian Post Card,” Sabbatical artwork by Kaaren Anderson Fri Jun 3. Crocus Clay Works Gallery, Hungerford Building Door #2, Suite 225, 1115 E. Main St. 5-9 p.m. 469-8217, crocusclayworks.com. “In a Graphic Sense,” works by Carl Gielow Fri Jun 3. Chait Fine Art Gallery, 234 Mill St. 6-9 p.m. 454-6730, schait@chaitstudios. com. “Intake,” works by Mitch Messina Fri Jun 3. The Firehouse Gallery @ Genesee Pottery, 713 Monroe Ave. 6-9 p.m. 244-1730, geneseearts.org. “Layers of Imagining: Paintings by Mollie Wolf” Fri Jun 3. Living Room Café, 1118 Monroe Ave. 5: 30-9 p.m. thelivingroomcafe. com. “The Museum of Future Past” Fri Jun 3. Hungerford Building, 1115 E Main St., Door 2, Suite 129. 6-9 p.m. 267-6735. “Off the Page: Reinventing Alphabets,” works by Jeanne Raffer Beck Fri Jun 3. Arts & Cultural Council Gallery, 277 N Goodman St. 5-9 p.m. 4734000, artsrochester.org. “Our Wonderland,” work by Andrea Dionese, Anne McCune, Mary Stid, and Lisa Zaccour Fri Jun 3. Gallery at Rubino’s Café, 1659 Mt. Hope Ave. 6-9 p.m. 271-0110. “Parallax: Views of Contemporary Quilts” & “Scapes” group photo show Fri Jun 3. Booksmart Studio, 250 N. Goodman St. 6-9 p.m. 1-800-761-6623, booksmartstudio.com. continues on page 20 rochestercitynewspaper.com City 19


Art Exhibits

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Rochester Art Club featuring Kathleen Hanny and Phil Bliss Fri Jun 3. Rochester Art Club Studio, Hungerford Building, 1115 E. Main St., Door 2, Suites 437 & 439. 5-9 p.m. 288-2183, mdwyer@rochester.rr.com. “Shared Spaces 2011,” high school art teacher & student show Fri Jun 3. Nazareth College Arts Center Gallery, 4245 East Ave. 3-5 p.m. 389-5073, naz.edu. Steve Carpenter Gallery and Art Center Annual Exhibition and Opening Reception Fri Jun 3. Steve Carpenter Gallery and Studio, 176 Anderson Ave. 6: 30-10 p.m. 758-1410, stevecarpenterstudio.com. “School’s Out For Summer!” Heather Erwin and student collaboration Fri Jun 3. Studio 215, Anderson Alley, 250 N. Goodman St. Donations appreciated. 6-9 p.m. 966-5953. “Through the Artist’s Eye,” new oils and watercolors by Judy Soprano Fri Jun 3. Renaissance Art Gallery, 74 St. Paul St. 6-8 p.m. 423-8235, rochesterrenaissanceartgallery. com. “The World Through Different Eyes” by Jim Patton and David Perlman Fri Jun 3. Image City Photography Gallery, 722 University Ave. 5-9 p.m. 482-1976, imagecityphotographygallery. com. “Sixty Years of Contemporary Vision,” The Arena Art Group Sat Jun 4. Wayne County Council for the Arts, 108 W Miller St, Newark. 6-9 p.m. 315-3314593, wayne-arts.com. “Whimsical Abstract Nudes” by Nancy Coons, closing party Wed Jun 8. Edibles, 704 University Ave. 5-8 p.m. 2714910 (Edibles), 317-1898, nancycoons.com (click on Facebook icon). [ CONTINUING ] 1570 Gallery at Valley Manor 1570 East Ave. Through Jun 17: “The Art of Friendship,” watercolors by M. Wendy Gwirtzman, pastels by Pat Ross Marx. Mon-Fri 9 a.m.-5 p.m. and weekends by appt. 770-1923. 2 Chic Boutique 151 Park Ave. Jun 3-30. “Beyond the Racks: The Art of Nancy Howard Lyon.” Wed-Thu 11 a.m.-7 p.m., Fri 11 a.m.-6 p.m., Sat 11 a.m.-5 p.m. 271-6111, 2chicboutique.com. American Association of University Women (AAUW) Art Forum and Gallery 494 East Ave. Through Jul 8: “Life in Remote Places: A Fragile Balance,” photography by Kris Dreessen. Mon-Fri 10 a.m.-4 p.m. by appt. only. 255-0065, aauwrochester. org. A.R.T.S. Gallery at Aviv Café 321 East Ave. Jun 3-30: “Cove at Rest,” featuring artist Ron Smith. Fri 6-11 p.m., Sun 8 a.m.-1 p.m. 729-9916. Arts & Cultural Council Gallery 277 N Goodman St. Through Jun 16: “Off the Page: Reinventing Alphabets,” works by Jeanne Raffer Beck. MonFri 10 a.m.-4 p.m. 473-4000, artsrochester.org.

20 City June 1-7, 2011

ART EVENT | FIRST FRIDAY

It’s June, which means a few things for the arts community. Many — but not all — of the local college galleries have gone on vacation. It’s the sixth month, which means Rochester Contemporary’s super successful, annual “6x6” show and sale is back. And finally, the weather allows you to fully enjoy your First Friday art trek. The monthly, city-wide gallery night is held by non-profit, university, and commercial and indie art venues in Rochester, where we all trot about from station to station, filling our eyes and ears with what’s new and exciting in our community. On Friday, June 3, 6-9 p.m. (and sometimes later) you can check out art openings, poetry readings, and musical performances in various locations. Visit firstfridayrochester.org for a list of this month’s participating venues, and check our online events calendar at rochestercitynewspaper.com for more receptions and exhibits. You can preview Rochester Contemporary’s “6x6x2011: Global” exhibition Wednesday-Friday, June 1-3, 1-10 p.m. (as well as online at roco6x6x.org). The actual opening party and artwork sale takes place Saturday, June 4, 6-10 p.m., and admission is $5. By now you know the drill: buy numbered stickers for $20 each, stalk your favorite pieces, and at the signal, claim them. Online purchasing follows on June 6 at 10 a.m. At the Record Archive (33 1/3 Rockwood St., 244-1210), a group of Rochester artists will pay tribute to another in “Declan Ryan: An American Icon,” with a variety of works by Trudy Feikert, The Professor of Rap, the Family Storms, and more. Over at the Hungerford Building (1115 E. Main St., thehungerford.com), The Rochester Art Club Studio (Door 2, Suite 437, 439) will feature work by Kathleen Hanney and Phil Bliss at a 5-9 p.m. reception. Stop by Crocus Clay Works (Suite 225, 414-5643, crocusclayworks.com) to check out “Graffita: Not Your Average Brazilian Post Card, Sabbatical Artwork by Kaaren Anderson,” also 5-9 p.m. For one night only, 6-9 p.m., you can visit post-apocalyptic “Museum of Future Past” (Door 2, Suite 129), which through artifacts and Marvel comic story arcs will bring viewers into the mythos of superhero and super-villain characters no longer with us. “The age of heroes has come to an end,” says artist Chris Wells, “but hope still remains.” Studio 215 in the Anderson Alley Building (250 N. Goodman St., 966-5953) will host “School’s Out for Summer,” a collaboration with students who want to express themselves outside of the art room. Artist and educator Heather Erwin will be on hand to aid with exploring the creative process, and supplies will be provided while they last. Over at the Firehouse Gallery at Genesee Pottery (713 Monroe Ave., 271-5183), take in “Intake,” an exhibition of new work by artist and Nazareth College professor Mitch Messina. The Renaissance Art Gallery (74 St. Paul St., 423-8235) will hold a reception 6-8 p.m. for “Through the Artist’s Eye,” (pictured) a show of new oils and watercolors by Judy Soprano. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY


Books Etc. 78 W. Main St., Macedon. Through Jun 30: “Seeing and Beyond: A New Exhibit: The Work of Sue Higgens, Joe Thompson, and Tim Casselman. Wed-Sun Noon5 p.m. 474-4116, books_etc@ yahoo.com. Booksmart Studio 250 N. Goodman St. Through Jun 30: “Scapes,” with Chris Kogut, Rick Mearns, Gil Maker, Don Menges, John Solberg, George Wallace, and Paul Yarnall. | Through Jun 25: “Parallax: Views of Contemporary Quilts.” Mon-Fri 9 a.m.-6 p.m.; Sat 10 a.m.-4 p.m. 1-800-761-6623, booksmartstudio.com. Chait Fine Art Gallery 234 Mill St. Jun 3-25: “In a Graphic Sense,” works by Carl Gielow. By appointment. 454-6730, schait@ chaitstudios.com. Community Darkroom Gallery 713 Monroe Ave. Through Jun 11: “Landscape: Mind and Matter,” and “The Okinawa Series.” Mon 9 a.m.-9: 30 p.m.; Tue-Thu 9 a.m.-6: 30 p.m.; Fri 12-5 p.m.; Sat 10 a.m.-5: 30 p.m. 2715920, geneseearts.org. Creative Wellness Center 320 N Goodman St, Suite 201. Through Jun 30: “Searching Beyond.” Mon-Fri 9 a.m.-4 p.m. 325-3145 x142, mhcrochester.org. Crocus Clay Works Gallery Hungerford Building Door #2, Suite 225, 1115 E. Main St. Jun 3-26: “Graffita: Not Your Average Brazilian Post Card,” Sabbatical artwork by Kaaren Anderson. Tue-Wed 5-8 p.m., Sat 10 a.m.-3 p.m., or by appointment. 4698217, crocusclayworks.com. A Different Path Gallery 27 Market St., Brockport. Jun 3-26: “Generational Influence,” fatherson-daughter art show. Wed-Fri 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Sat 10 a.m.-6 p.m., Sun 10 a.m.-4 p.m. 6375494, differentpathgallery.com. Edibles 704 University Ave. Through Jun 8: “Whimsical Abstract Nudes” by Nancy Coons. Mon-Thu 11 a.m.-2: 30 p.m. & 5-9 p.m., Fri 11 a.m.-2: 30 p.m. & 5-10 p.m., Sat 5-10 p.m. 271-4910 (Edibles), 3171898, nancycoons.com (click on Facebook icon). The Firehouse Gallery @ Genesee Pottery, 713 Monroe Ave. Jun 3Jul 22: “Intake,” works by Mitch Messina. Mon-Fri 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; Sat noon-4 p.m. 244-1730, geneseearts.org. FourWalls Gallery 179 Atlantic Ave. Opening Jun 3: “Becoming an Art Educator,” featuring art by Rochester area teachers, RIT art education graduate students, and the young students they teach. Thu-Fri 3-6 p.m., Sat 1-3 p.m. 442-7824, fourwallsartgallery@ gmail.com, cmwfaa@rit.edu. Gallery @ Equal=Grounds 750 South Ave. Through Jun 30: “Bracketed Exposures at Equal=Grounds” Photography by George Wallace, Gilbert Maker and Don Menges (The Three Tenors). Tue-Fri 7 a.m.-Midnight, Sat-Sun 10 a.m.-Midnight. gallery@equalgrounds.com. Gallery Salon & Spa 780 University Ave. Though Jun 30: “Some from Three,” New works

by Courtney Konecny, John Perry, and Paul Schramm. Tue-Thu 11 a.m.-8 p.m., Fri 11 a.m.-7 p.m., Sat 9: 30 a.m.-3 p.m. Contact 271-8340, galleryhair.com. George Eastman House 900 East Ave. Through Jun 12: “Larry Merrill: Looking at Trees,” “Between the States: Photographs of the American Civil War from the George Eastman House Collection,” and “Still Here: Contemporary Artists and the Civil War.” Tue-Sat 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Thu 10 a.m.-8 p.m., Sun 1-5 p.m. $4-$10. 2713361, eastmanhouse.org Gilded Square Picture Framing & Gallery 714 University Ave. Through June 30: “From the Art Closet” works by Keith Uhrich & Michelle Michael. Tue-Fri 11 a.m.-5 p.m., Sat 11 a.m.-3 p.m. 461-2808, gildedsquare.com. Gordon Field House, Rochester Institute of Technology, Lomb Memorial Drive. Jun 3-5: Genesee Valley Quilt Club’s 75th Annual Quilt Festival, featuring “The Fiber Face Project,” self portraits by Rochester City School students. $10 per day, $15 weekend pass. Fri-Sat 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Sun 9 a.m.-4 p.m. gvqc. org. High Falls Fine Art Gallery 60 Browns Race. Through Jul 8: “Strings and Threads” and “Burning Man,” Photographs by Laura Jackett. Wed-Fri 11 a.m.-5: 30 p.m.; Sat Noon-5: 30 p.m.; Sun 1-5 p.m. 325-2030, centerathighfalls.org. Image City Photography Gallery 722 University Ave. Through Jun 12: “The World Through Different Eyes” by Jim Patton and David Perlman. Wed-Sat 11 a.m.-7 p.m.; Sun noon-4 p.m. 482-1976, imagecityphotographygallery.com. International Art Acquisitions 3300 Monroe Ave. Jun 330: “Essence of the Female Form.” Mon-Fri 10 a.m.-9 p.m.; Sat 10 a.m.-6 p.m.; Sun Noon-5 p.m. 264-1440, internationalartacquisitions.com. Link Gallery at City Hall 30 Church St. Through Jun 13: The Artists’ Breakfast Group. MonFri 9 a.m.-5 p.m. 271-5920, cityofrochester.gov. Little Theatre Café 240 East Ave. Through Jun 24: Jim Downer. Sun 5-8 p.m. Mon-Thu 5-10 p.m.; Fri-Sat 5-11 p.m. 2580403, thelittle.org. Living Room Café 1118 Monroe Ave. Jun 3-27: “Layers of Imagining: Paintings by Mollie Wolf.” Sun-Thu 7 a.m.-10 p.m., Fri-Sat 7 a.m.-11 p.m. thelivingroomcafe.com. MCC Mercer Gallery 1000 E. Henrietta Rd. Through Sep 4: 35th Student Art Exhibition. | Through June: “(Miss Havisham’s) Charming Gloom” by Genevieve Waller. Sibley Window (Satellite space at Damon City Campus.). Mon-Thu 10 a.m.-7 p.m.; Fri 10 a.m.-5 p.m. 292-2021. Memorial Art Gallery 500 University Ave. Through Jul 3: “Fiberart International.” | Through Jun 11: “Children’s Show” in Lucy Burne Gallery. | Through

Jun 12: “John Ashbery and Friends: Self-Portrait in a Convex Mirror.” In the Lockhart Gallery. Wed-Sun 11 a.m.-5 p.m., Thu until 9 p.m., $4-$10. Thu night reduced price: $6 from 5-9 p.m. 276-8900, mag.rochester.edu. Mill Art Center & Gallery, 61 N Main St, Honeoye Falls. Though Jun 11: “HF-L Senior Exhibition.” | Through June: “Bloom: An Homage,” Photographs by Beth Bloom, in the Rabbit Room Restaurant. Mon-Fri & Sat 11 a.m.-3 p.m., Fri 11 a.m.-8 p.m. Free. 624-7740, millartcenter. com. Nan Miller Gallery 3450 Winton Place. Through Jun 26: “Kaleidoscope of Color: Landscapes, Florals, and Abstracts featuring artists Gurevich, Akiyama, Romanovsky,West, and Bigness. Mon-Sat 10 a.m.-5 p.m. 2921430, nanmillergallery.com. Nazareth College Arts Center Gallery 4245 East Ave. Jun 3-18: “Shared Spaces 2011,” high school art teacher & student show. Wed-Sun 1-8 p.m. 3895073, naz.edu. Ock Hee’s Gallery 2 Lehigh St. Through Jun 18: “Continuation: Painting & Sculpture” by William Keyser. Mon-Sat 11 a.m.-5 p.m. 624-4730, ockhee@frontiernet. net. Oxford Gallery 267 Oxford St. Through Jun18: “Tradition” group exhibition. Tue-Fri Noon-5 p.m; Sat 10 a.m.-5 p.m. 271-5885, oxfordgallery.com. Record Archive 33 1/3 Rockwood St. Jun 3: “Declan Ryan: An American Icon,” Rochester artists’ perspective on a modern myth. Mon-Sat 10 a.m.-9 p.m., Sun noon-5 p.m. alayna@ recordarchive.com. Renaissance Art Gallery 74 St. Paul St. Jun 3-Jul 31: “Through the Artist’s Eye,” new oils and watercolors by Judy Soprano. Tue-Sat 11 a.m.-5 p.m. 423-8235, rochesterrenaissanceartgallery. com. Roberts Wesleyan B.T. Roberts Memorial Hall Art Gallery 2265 Westside Dr. Through Jun 30: “Faculty Invitational 2011.” MonFri 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Roberts.edu. Rochester Contemporary Arts Center 137 East Ave. Jun 1-Jul 10: “6x6x2011: Global.” WedSun 1-5 p.m., Fri 1-10 p.m. 4612222, rochestercontemporary. org. $1. Rochester Medical Museum & Archives Through Jun 24: “1960s Genesee Hospital Newsletter Cover Art.” Mon-Fri 9 a.m.-4 p.m. 922-1847, viahealth.org/archives. Rochester Regional Community Design Center Hungerford Complex/E. Main Business Park. Door 3B. Through Jun 3: “Build it Right and They Will Come.” Mon-Fri 8: 30 a.m.-5: 30 p.m. 271-0520, rrcdc.com. Gallery at Rubino’s Café 1659 Mt. Hope Ave. Jun 3: “Our Wonderland,” work by Andrea Dionese, Anne McCune, Mary Stid, and Lisa Zaccour. Mon-Fri 8: 30 a.m.-6: 30 p.m., Sat 8: 30 a.m.-6: 30 p.m., Sun 9: 30 a.m.-2: 00 p.m. 271-0110.

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Theater

Art Exhibits

of what had by the mid-50’s come to be known as the Rodgers and Hammerstein musical. Most of these shows were adaptations of other works, so it’s fitting for Shaw to choose a musical based on Shaw’s “Pygmalion,” the story of Eliza Doolittle and Henry Higgins set to music by Frederick Loewe and Alan Jay Lerner. Benedict Campbell plays Higgins, and the often-underused Neil Barclay as Alfred P. Doolittle finally has a role worthy of his talents. Nonetheless, isn’t it also time to give the show a rest? There are so many good musicals that deserve to be revived, but every “My Fair Lady” and “Camelot” (see the 2011 schedule for the Stratford Festival) keep them from the stage for at least one more year. Other productions worth considering: “Maria Severa” is the season’s second musical, a new

Moya O’Connell and Gray Powell in “Cat on a Hot Tin Roof,” part of the 2011 Shaw Festival. PHOTO BY EMILY COOPER

With a little bit of luck 2011 Shaw Festival Through October 30 Niagara-on-the-Lake, Ontario, Canada 800-511-SHAW, shawfest.com [ PREVIEW ] BY MICHAEL LASSER

The Shaw Festival’s roster of plays for 2011 looks like any other recent season, but for some reason it feels hard to get excited about most of Artistic Director Jackie Maxwell’s decisions even though this is the Shaw’s 50th anniversary season. There’s the usual mix of plays by George Bernard Shaw and his contemporaries, a couple of musicals, and two current plays that have become part of Maxwell’s approach to programming even if they have little to do with the festival’s mandate. Yet most of the choices feel more-or-less perfunctory, although some of them do raise a question or two. The three plays by Shaw this summer include “Candida,” Shaw’s entertaining take on love and marriage, and the monumental “Heartbreak House,” a difficult play for actors, directors, and audiences alike. Written in 1919, it’s a long, brilliant, not-always-easyto-follow examination of the upper class’s failure to understand the lessons of World War I as Britain slouches toward disaster in its own self-satisfied way. The third Shaw play this summer, “On the Rocks,” is a political comedy about a prime minister who goes from having no ideas (George W. Bush?) to having too many (Newt Gingrich?). I’ve never seen this rarely produced work, but will I actually be seeing it? Maxwell has had the moxie — or more likely 22 City June 1-7, 2011

the effrontery — to hire Canadian playwright Michael Healey to write a new version of the play. It’s the perfect conceit for a postmodern world where only shifting perceptions matter because there is no objective reality. So anything you write is fair game for somebody else to rewrite. It’s the start of a new project for the Festival — as if Shaw is no longer good enough to stand on his own, assuming he has an “own” of his own to stand on. So what’s to look forward to? For me, it’s not the plays by Shaw but rather J.M. Barrie’s “The Admirable Crichton” and Lennox Robinson’s “Drama at Inish — A Comedy.” Barrie is one

of those appealing English playwrights whose work keeps showing up at the Shaw. This season, it’s “Crichton,” a 1902 social comedy that tests the convictions of a British aristocrat who argues that class distinctions are artificial. When he and his family find themselves stranded on an island, their butler Crichton takes over. But what happens when they’re rescued? This is the kind of revival that the Shaw was put on this earth to do; the festival should be able to pull it off…admirably. The other play I’m eager to see is “Drama at Inish,” by a playwright who is often overlooked even though he was part of the Irish theatrical renaissance with Lady Gregory, O’Casey, Synge, and Yeats. In fact, Shaw has never done any of Robinson’s plays before. It looks at what happens to a happy town when a repertory company shows up one summer to perform plays by the likes of Ibsen, Strindberg, and Chekhov, and then takes their melancholy truths to heart — a comedy about theater itself. True, “My Fair Lady” is one of the towering American musicals, perhaps the finest example

work by Jay Turvey and the Shaw Festival’s musical director, Paul Sportelli, based on the story of the eponymous mother of fado, Portugal’s street music, as she moves from the slums of Lisbon to become a world-famous singer. For moviegoers, Tennessee Williams’ “Cat on a Hot Tin Roof” conjures up memories of Elizabeth Taylor or Paul Newman. Both were gorgeous in the 1958 movie version, but Hollywood’s production code was still in effect. The result is significantly different from what Williams originally wrote. It remains to be seen if Moya O’Connell and Gray Powell as Maggie and Brick can make an audience forget Taylor and Newman for a couple of hours, even though the always-powerful Jim Mezon will be there to fill the stage as Big Daddy. After its great success as the noontime play in 2008, Ferenc Molnar’s “The President” returns. In less than 45 minutes, be prepared to encounter a bank president, a young heiress, her secret marriage to a Commie taxi driver, and the very funny way the president solves the problem the marriage raises. The cast is close to a Shaw dream come true, including the wonderful William Vickers and Michael Ball. Americans old enough to remember it will recognize the story from its 1961 movie adaptation, “One, Two, Three,” directed by Billy Wilder and starring James Cagney. Finally, if there are exceptions to my carping about the season back in the first paragraph, they may lie in the two new plays in the new Studio Theater, located in the Production Centre behind the Festival Theatre building. The plays this year are “When the Rain Stops Falling” by Andrew Bovell, the Shaw’s first try at a work from Australia, and “Topdog/Underdog” by Suzan-Lori Parks, about two con-artist brothers whose father named them Lincoln and Booth as a joke. Bovell’s sprawling work begins in 1959 and ends 80 years later, having told the story, mainly, of a single family. Parks’ profane take on the Cain and Abel story won the Pulitzer Prize for drama in 2002.

Steve Carpenter Gallery and Studio 176 Anderson Ave. Jun 3: Steve Carpenter Gallery and Art Center Annual Exhibition and Opening Reception. Daily 1-4 p.m. 7581410, stevecarpenterstudio.com. Visual Studies Workshop 31 Prince St. Through Jul 31: “In Retrospect: Artists’ Books and Works on Paper by Maureen Cummins, Ann Lovett, and Nava Atlas.” Thu 5-8 p.m., Fri-Sun noon-5 p.m. 442-8676, vsw.org. Wayne County Council for the Arts 108 W Miller St, Newark. Jun 427: “Sixty Years of Contemporary Vision,” The Arena Art Group. Thu-Sat 12-3 p.m., and by appt. 315-331-4593, wayne-arts.com. Williams Gallery 220 S Winton Rd. Through Jun 16: “Another Person’s Point of View: Oil Paintings by Elisa Root.” MonFri 9 a.m.-2 p.m. 271-9070, rochesterunitarian.org. [ CALL FOR ARTWORK ] “Dresscue Me” 1st Annual Salvage Selvedge Contest. Showcase your re-purposed designs from clothing you get from the bargain backroom at Second Bloom. All entries due June 6 for display until June 11. For more information, visit seconbloomconsignment.com.

Art Events [ Wednesday, June 1Sunday, June 5 ] Third Annual Women’s Fine Art Show & Sale. First Congregational Church, 58 N. Main St., Canandaigua. 3942184, fcccan@frontiernet.net. Thu-Sat 10 a.m.-7 p.m., Sun 10 a.m.-5 p.m. $5 admission. [ Thursday, June 2 ] MAG Highlights Tour. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. 276-8900, mag.rochester.edu. 6: 30 p.m. Included with gallery admission: $5-10. [ Friday, June 3 ] Fiberart International Exhibtion Tour. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. 276-8900, mag. rochester.edu. 2 p.m. Included with gallery admission: $5-10. First Friday Citywide Gallery Night. Various. firstfridayrochester.org. 6-9 p.m. Free. [ Saturday, June 4 ] Re-Hatched Female Artist Showcase. Tango Cafe, 389 Gregory St. 271-4930, tangocafedance.com, localvisionaries.weebly.com. 7 p.m. $10-12. [ Sunday, June 5 ] Art Inspiration 2011. Sterling Nature Center, Off 104 East, Sterling. 315-947-6143, snc@ co.cayuga.ny.us, cayuganet.org/ sterlingpark. 12-4: 30 p.m. Free admission. Fiberart International Exhibtion Tour. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. 276-8900, mag. rochester.edu. 1 p.m. Included with gallery admission: $5-10. What’s Up: Native American Pottery and Glass: Contemporary Forms. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. 276-8900, mag. rochester.edu. 2 p.m. Included with gallery admission: $5-10.


Comedy [ Wednesday, June 1 ] First Wednesdays Standup Comedy Open Mike. Writers & Books, 740 University Ave. 473-2590, wab.org. 7-9 p.m. Free, $2 donation suggested for audience. Ages 12+.

[ Friday, June 3 ] Search Engine Improv Presents Monsssstrocity. The Space, 1115 E. Main, Suite 248. Contact@ searchengineimprov.com. 9-11 p.m. $8 online, $10 door. Village Idiots Improv Comedy “Director’s Cut.” Village Idiots Comedy Improv, 274 N Goodman St, VIP Studio D312. vip@improvVIP.com, improvVIP. com. 8 p.m. $5. [ Saturday, June 4 ] Village Idiots Improv: “Catch23.” Village Idiots Comedy Improv, 274 N Goodman St, VIP Studio D312. vip@ improvVIP.com, improvVIP. com. 8 p.m. $8. [ Sunday, June 5 ] Comedy Open Mic. Boulder Coffee Co-South Wedge, 100 Alexander St. 454-7140, bouldercoffeeco. com. 8 p.m. Free. [ Monday, June 6 ] Open Mic for Alternative Comedy. Boulder Coffee CoBrooks Landing, 955 Genesee St. 287-5282, bouldercoffeeco. com. 6: 30 p.m. Free.

[ Saturday, June 4 ] Frances Dances Presents: “Dance It Out.” Tango Cafe, 389 Gregory St. 249-0354, franceshare@yahoo.com. 2 p.m. $5.

Dance Participation [ Friday, June 3 ] Neutral Ground Singles Dance. Green Lantern Inn, Fairport. nytutu@hotmail.com or 3888908. 8p.m.-12 a.m. $7 donation requested. Music by DJ Joetta. [ Saturday, June 4 ] Inikori Dance Studio’s Ballroom Party. Inikori Dance Studio, 1100 University Ave. 2716840, frontdesk@inikoridance. com. 7-11 p.m. $13, $20 with lesson.

“Whether you like it or not, Dudes are emerging as the new, self-determined Class in 21st C. America,” explain the authors of “Contemporary Dude Theory” on their blog. Now in its second edition, this compendium of 21st century Dude science helps readers navigate the tricky strata of Dudes, Folks, Dicks, and Monsters, and is penned by Lou Joseph, Mary Lewandowski, and Ian Downey. You might recognize the latter two from The Bloody Noes, the hyper-intelligent and highly entertaining performance art duo who, along with friends, brought the Saturnalia Pageant to Rochester audiences this past December. CDT “concerns itself with the cataloging and observation of the social class of 21st-Century Dudes,” and the authors would like to point out “21st-Century Dude is not the same as (but incorporates) the 20th-Century Dude model, a blend of Jeff Lebowski and the common ‘Bro.’” The long-awaited First Dude Theory Symposium will commence at the Flying Squirrel Community Space (285 Clarissa St.) on Sunday, June 5, 10 a.m.-4 p.m., followed by a group discussion, final thoughts, and closing address. The event will feature a multimedia presentation of material by serious and amateur Dude theorists, and perhaps even you, if you answered the authors’ call for submissions last month. “Our knowledge will not be complete without additional data and perspectives provided by a range of persons,” say the authors in a recent press release. Further investigation into dude-related topics will be conducted through community discussion and debate, and pizza will be provided. The symposium is free to attend. For more information, contact dudetheory@gmail.com or visit flyingsquirrel. rocus.org or dudetheory.blogspot.com, where you can also access the Contemporary Dude Theory booklet. Copies of the second edition are also available for $8; send requests via email. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY [ Friday, June 4Saturday, June 5 ] Sulpher Springs Festival. Village of Clifton Springs. sulphurspringsfestival.com. Fri 5-10 p.m., Sat 10 a.m.-10 p.m. Free admission.

[ Thursday, June 2Sunday, June 5 ] Rochester’s Greek Festival 2011. Greek Orthodox Church, 962 East Ave. 244-3377, rochestergreekfestival.org. 11a. m.-11 p.m. Free.

[ Friday, June 3-Sunady, June 5 ] 75th Diamond Jubilee Quilt Festival. Rochester Institute of Technology-Gordon Field House, 149 Lomb Memorial Dr. 2011festival@gvqc.org, gvqc. org. Fri-Sat 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Sun 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Day pass: $10, weekend pass: $15.

[ Friday, June 3 ] East End Festival. Rochester’s East End. eastendmusicfestival. com. 5 p.m. $4 admission fee, $40 VIP tickets.

[ Saturday, June 4 ] 19th Ward Community Square Fair. Aberdeen Square (Aberdeen and Post). 328-6571, 19thward@19wca.org. Breakfast

Festivals

8-10 a.m., parade begins at 216 Thurston Rd. 12: 30 p.m., Square Fair @ Aberdeen Square 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Free. Hamlin Wheel Festival. Hamlin Town Hall, 1658 Lake Rd., Hamlin. 964-2421, hamlinny. org. 10 a.m.-6 p.m., fireworks 10 p.m. Call for information. Rally for Roc City Skatepark. High Falls District. Amy Riposo 7462576. 12-6 p.m. rally, 6-8 p.m. Free; VIP Event at Max at High Falls. $50 VIP tickets include beer, wine, hors d’eouvres. Taste of Penfield. Veterans Memorial Park, 3100 Atlantic Ave., Penfield. 340-8655, penfield.org. 5-8 p.m. Call for tickets. Music, tastings. Winestock NY 2011. Three Brothers Wineries and Estates, 623 Lerch Rd., Geneva. 315continues on page 24

FRIDAY

Dance Events

LECTURE | CONTEMPORARY DUDE THEORY SYMPOSIUM

FIRST

[ Thursday, June 2Saturday, June 4 ] Valarie Storm. Comedy Club, 2235 Empire Blvd. 671-9080, thecomedyclub.us. Thu 7: 30 p.m., Fri-Sat 7: 30 & 10 p.m. $9.

First Friday

Sponsored by

Citywide Gallery Night

June 3 • 6-9pm FirstFridayRochester.org

2 Chic Boutique Beyond the Racks Art Series A.R.T.S Gallery at Aviv Cafe Cove at Rest American Association of University Women Member Artists and Guests Anderson Arts Building Open studios, artists and summer fun are waiting for you! Arts Center Gallery at Nazareth College Shared Spaces 2011 Bernunzio Uptown Music Musical Sidewalk Sale Booksmart Studio Parallax: Views of Contemporary Quilt Artists Chait Fine Art In A Graphic Sense Creative Wellness Coalition Spoken Art, Written Word Crocus Clay Works Graffita: Not Your Average Brazilian Postcard Four Walls Gallery Becoming an Educator Gallery at The Arts and Cultural Council Off the Page: Reinventing Alphabets Galvin/Davis Studio/Gallery Open Studio with Chas and Tom Genesee Center for the Arts Intake Image City Photography Gallery The World Through Different Eyes International Art Acquisitions Essence of the Female Form

Joe Bean Coffee Roasters Elements Military History Society D-Day Exhibit Plastic DIY friday at PLASTIC Renaissance Art Gallery Through the Artist's Eye Rochester Art Club Kathleen Hanney and Phil Bliss Rochester Contemporary Art Center (RoCo) 6x6x2011: Global Rubino's Mt. Hope Café Our Wonderland with Live Music Soulstice Artisan Market Did You See That? The Gallery@Equal=Grounds Bracketed Exposures The Living Room Cafe Layers of Imagining: Paintings by Mollie Wolf Writers & Books Wide Open Mic T H I S M O N T H O N LY:

The Museum of Future Past The Museum of Future Past Sponsored by:

rochestercitynewspaper.com City 23


Festivals 585-4432, 3brotherswinery.com. 12-7 p.m. $17, register by 6/3. [ Saturday, June 4Sunday, June 5 ] Fairport Canal Days. Village of Fairport. 234-4323, fairportcanaldays.com. Sat 10 a.m.-6 p.m., Sun 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Call for information. Tree Peony Festival of Flowers. Linwood Gardens, 1912 York Rd., Pavilion. 584-3913, leegratwick@frontier.com, linwoodgardens.org. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Suggested contribution $8, guided tour $10.

Kids Events [ Saturday, June 4 ] Global History and Geography Regents Review Class. Henrietta Public Library, 455 Calkins Rd. 359-7092. 11: 30 a.m.-1: 30 p.m. Free, register by 6/1. Meet the Fang Gang. Genesee Country Village & Museum, 1410 Flint Hill Rd, Mumford. 5386822, gcv.org. 2 p.m. $10-12, register. Tea Party. Tops Cooking School, 3507 Mt Read Blvd. 663-5449, topsmarkets.com. 10 a.m.-noon. $12, register. Ages 4-7. [ Saturday, June 4Sunday, June 5 ] Auditions for “A Curvin’s Summer Tale: The Charming Princes.” Smith Opera House, 82 Seneca St, Geneva. 315-789-2221, thesmith.org. 5: 30-7: 30 p.m. Free. Ages 13-19, no preparation is necessary. Literature Live: Madeline. Strong National Museum of Play, 1 Manhattan Sq. 263-2700, museumofplay.org. Sat 11 a.m.-5 p.m., Sun 1-5 p.m., with related story readings Sat 11: 30 a.m. & 2: 30 p.m., and Sun 1: 30 & 3: 30 p.m. Included with museum admission: $9-11.

[ Monday, June 6 ] Toddler Book Club: Pop-Ups. Strong National Museum of Play, 1 Manhattan Sq. 2632700, museumofplay.org. 10: 30 a.m., 11: 30 a.m. & 12: 30 p.m. Included with museum admission: $9-11. [ Wednesday, June 8 ] K is for Kangaroo Kabobs, Kite Kupcakes, and Kiwi. Tops Cooking School, 3507 Mt Read Blvd. 663-5449, topsmarkets. com. 1-2: 30 p.m. $12, register.

Lectures [ Wednesday, June 1 ] Alzheimer’s Association Educational Seminar: “Safety Concerns.” First Presbyterian Church, 1054 West Clinton St., Elmira. 760-5400, 800-2723900, alz.org/rochesterny. 1-2: 30 p.m. Free, register. [ Thursday, June 2 ] “How to be a Good Audience: A Delicate Balance” with Michael H. Arve. Oasis at Lifetime Care, 259 Monroe Ave. 730-8800, oasisnet.org. 9: 30-11 a.m. $38, register. Anarchist Discussion and Debate Series: Why Anarchist Organization? Flying Squirrel, 285 Clarissa St. 469-269, rochesteranarchistforum@ gmail.com. 6: 30 p.m. Free. Thursdays. Browncroft Neighborhood History Talk. The Lutheran Church of the Incarnate Word, 597 East Ave. 546-7029 x11, landmarksociety.org. 7 p.m. $5, free to tour ticket holders. [ Saturday, June 4 ] “Body Intelligence” with Priscilla Auschincloss. Physikos, Village Gate Square, 302 N. Goodman Street, 2nd fl. 7214220, physikosmovement.com. 11 a.m. Free, register.

37th Annual Title I Parent/ Family Conference. Monroe Community College R. Thomas Flynn Campus Center, 1000 East Henrietta Rd. 262-8359, parents@rcsdk12.org. 8 a.m.-3 p.m. Free, register. From the Brink of Extinction: The Bald Eagles of Hemlock and Canadice. Rochester Museum and Science Center, 657 East Ave. 315-595-2200, fingerlaskesmuseum.org. 2 p.m. Free, register. Walk with Eagles. Hansen Nature Center, 1525 Calkins Rd., Henrietta. 359-7044, naturecenter@henrietta.org. 11 a.m. & 1 p.m. Free. [ Sunday, June 5 ] First Dude Theory Symposium. Flying Squirrel, 285 Clarissa St. dudetheory.blogspot.com. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Free. [ Tuesday, June 7 ] Geocaching with Jim Hooper. Wood Library, 134 N Main St, Canandaigua. 394-1381, woodlibrary.org. 6-9 p.m. Free, register. [ Wednesday, June 8 ] Legal Considerations for Starting a Small Business. Kate Gleason Auditorium, Central Library, 115 South Ave. 4288130, libraryweb.org. 10 a.m.12: 30 p.m. Free, register.

Literary Events [ Wednesday, June 1 ] Book Discussion: “Visions of the Multiverse” with author Dr. Steven Manly. Wood Library, 134 N Main St, Canandaigua. 394-0087, woodlibrary.org. 7 p.m. Free. [ Wednesday, June 1Sun, June 5 ] Book Sale: Fairport Public Library Book Sale. 223-9091, fairportlibrary.org. Wed preview sale 5-9 p.m., Thu-Fri 9 a.m.-8 p.m., Sat 9 a.m.-6 p.m. (half

THANKS, CHRISTOPHER!

price 4-6 p.m.), Sun ($2 bag sale) 11 a.m.-3 p.m. $1-5 admission preview sale, free admission other. [ Thursday, June 2 ] A Conversation with John Ashbery. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. 2768900, mag.rochester.edu. 7 p.m. Included with gallery admission: $5-10. Open Mic: Summer Kona: Pure Kona in the Summer. Flying Squirrel, 285 Clarissa St. flyingsquirrel.rocus.org. 8-11 p.m. Free.

RECREATION | BURROUGHS AUDUBON OPEN HOUSE

[ Friday, June 3 ] CWC Authors Night: Creative Writing Group Showcase. Creative Wellness Center, 320 N. Goodman Street Suite 201. 325-3145, mharochester.org. 6-9 p.m. Free. First Friday Readings & Performances. Writers & Books, 740 University Ave. 473-2590. 6-9 p.m. Free.

Rochester is rife with clubs, centers, and organizations dedicated to exploring, appreciating, and conserving the natural world. On Monday, June 6, 10 a.m.-2 p.m., the Burrough’s Audubon Nature Club and Sanctuary (301 Railroad Mills Road, Victor) will host a free open house. Visitors are invited to spend time in the library, watch the birds from the indoor viewing area, and walk the wildflower-lined trails, on which you’ll likely encounter deer, birds, and butterflies. For more information, call hosts Janet Miles 787-0507, Steve Weber 720-9382, or visit bancny.org.

[ Monday, June 6 ] Moving Beyond Racism Book Group: “Race, Rights and the Asian American Experience” by Angelo Ancheta. Barnes & Noble Pittsford, 3349 Monroe Ave. 288-8644, mbrbookinfo@ aol.com. 7-8: 30 p.m. Free.

Also upcoming is the sanctuary’s free guided walk on Sunday, June 12, at 1 p.m., which will take participants through the trails as well as various habitats along Irondequoit Creek and its surrounding woods, and wetlands. For more information, call Nancy Rosenberg at 271-6931 or email rue4@rochester.rr.com. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY

[ Wednesday, June 8 ] Book Group: Women Who Love to Read “Hotel on the Corner of Bitter and Sweet” by Jamie Ford. Lift Bridge Book Shop, 45 Main St, Brockport. 637-2260, liftbridge.com. 7 p.m. Free.

wesleygardens.com. Call for information. Spring Garden Walk & Wildflower Workshop. Hurd Orchards, Rt 104 W & Monroe-Orleans County Line Rd, Holley. 6388838, hurdorchards.com. 10: 30 a.m. $15, register. Summer 5K Training Program. 340-8655, penfield.org. 6 p.m. $60, register.

Recreation [ Wednesday, June 1 ] Brooks & Brambles: Along Dishmill Creek. Letchworth State Park, off Rt. 390, Castile. 493-3625. 10 a.m. Free. Friends of Wesley’s 5th Annual Golf Tournament. Shadow Lake Golf Course, 1850 Five Mile Rd., Penfiled. 241-2102,

[ Thursday, June 2 ] Mount Hope Cemetery Twilight Tour. Mount Hope Cemetery,

791 Mount Hope Ave. 4613494, fomh.org. 6: 30 p.m. $5. Warbler Walk: Common Species. Letchworth State Park, off Rt. 390, Castile. 493-3625. 7 a.m. Free. [ Friday, June 3 ] Women’s Health Golf Classic. Victor Hills Golf Club, 1450 Brace Rd., Victor. 275-5201, james_woods@urmc.rochester. edu. 10 a.m. $100 individuals, $350 foursome, register.

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[ Friday, June 3Sunday, June 5 ] Full Moon Vista Cycling Grand Prix. Various. fullmoonvista.com. Fri Genesee Valley Park, Sat Powder Mills Park, Sun Durand Eastman Park. $40-100, register. [ Saturday, June 4 ] Dragonfly Quest! Sterling Nature Center, Off 104 East, Sterling. 315-947-6143, snc@ co.cayuga.ny.us. 1 p.m. Free. GVHC Hike: Crescent Trail. Kreag Rd. Park, Bushnell’s Basin. Jon K. 323-1911, gvhchikes.org. 11 a.m. Free. Strenuous, hilly 5 miles. Girls on the Run 5K. Roundhouse Pavilion,

Genesee Valley Park, 131 Elmwood Ave. 732-1090, fleetfeetrochester.com, active. com. 6 p.m. $10-15 advance, $18-20 after. High Falls Guided Walking Tour. Center at High Falls, 60 Browns Race. 325-2030, swinslow@frontiernet.net. 2 p.m. $2 donation requested. Mount Hope Cemetery Tour. Mount Hope Cemetery, 791 Mount Hope Ave. 461-3494, fomh.org. 1 p.m. Free. National Learn to Row Day. Pittsford Indoor Rowing Center, 2800 Clover St., Pittsford. mjules@rochester.rr.com, pittsfordindoorrowingcenter.org. 9: 30 a.m.-noon. Free.

National Trails Day Celebration: Canal Walk. Letchworth State Park, off Rt. 390, Castile. 4933625. 10 a.m. Free. Oakland Rd. jct. rte. 436 in Oakland. 2 hours, 2 miles. Weather or Not with Kevin Williams. Thousand Acre Swamp Sanctuary, 1581 Jackson Rd, Penfield. Marie Heerkens 425-9561, Sue Pixley 586-6677. 9 a.m. Free. [ Sunday, June 5 ] 8th Annual Beth El 5K. Temple Beth El, 139 S Winton Rd. BethEl5K.com. Registration 7 a.m., run/walk starts 8: 15 a.m., post race pancake breakfast is free to participants, $3 for all others. $20-25.

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GVHC Hike: Turning Point Park. End of Boxart St., off Lake Ave. Pam N. 224-5140, gvhchikes. org. 1 p.m. Free. Moderate 5 mile hike. Longball. Ganondagan State Historical Site, 1488 State Rte 444, Victor. 742-1690, ganondagan.org. 1-3 p.m. Included with site admission $2-3. Pittsford Triathlon 2011. Thornell Farm Park, 480 Mendon Rd. 248-6280, townofpittsford.org, active.com. 7 a.m. $50, register. Rochester Orienteering Club Meet: Abraham Lincoln Adventure Race & Sprint. Abraham Lincoln Park, 355 North Park Dr. 3775650, roc.us.orienteering.org. 1 p.m. $6 per entry/group.

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Springtime Walk: Lower Falls Trail. Letchworth State Park, off Rt. 390, Castile. 493-3625. 10 a.m. Free. Parking lot past Cabin Area B. Bring lunch. 3 hours, 1 mile. [ Monday, June 6 ] Arthritis Foundation Walking Program. Veterans Memorial Park, Penfield. penfield.org. 1: 30-2: 30 p.m. $5, register. Mon, Wed, Fri 6 week program. Burrough’s Audubon Sanctuary Open House. BANC Sanctuary, 301 Railroad Mills Rd., Victor. Janet Miles 787-0507. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Free. [ Tuesday, June 7 ] Nature Nights: Discovering Rochester’s Wilderness Walk,

Turning Point Park. Meet at Boxart St. parking lot. 4285990, cityofrochester.gov. 6 p.m. Free. [ Wednesday, June 8 ] Brooks & Brambles: Griffith Road to Pennycook. Letchworth State Park, off Rt. 390, Castile. 493-3625. 10 a.m. Free. Summer 5K Training Program. 340-8655, penfield.org. 6 p.m. $60, register.

Special Events [ Wednesday, June 1 ] August Group Career Fair. Monroe Community College R. Thomas Flynn Campus Center, 1000 East continues on page 26

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rochestercitynewspaper.com City 25


Special Events Henrietta Rd. augustgroup.org/ careerfair. 2-5 p.m. Free. Information Session: Train for a Marathon or Half Marathon. Fleet Feet Sports, 2210 Monroe Ave. 697-3338, fleetfeetrochester. com. 6 p.m. Free. June Career Fair. Monroe Community College-Forum/ Flynn/Fine Arts Building, 1000 E Henrietta Rd. taiello@ augustgroup.org. 2-5 p.m. Free admission. Rochester Winos Wine & Food Pairing. Scotland Yard, 187 St. Paul St. 288-2277, rochesterwinos.com. 6: 30 p.m. registration, event 7 p.m. $30-35, register. Screening: “Return to El Salvador.” Downtown Presbyterian Church, 121 N Fitzhugh St. rkaiser3@rochester. rr.com, rocla.com. 7 p.m. Free. [ thurSday, JuNE 2 ] New York State Coalition of Property Owners and Businesses Inc. Meeting. Wishing Well Party House, 1190 Chili Ave., Gates. 703-7444, nyscoalition.com. 6: 30 p.m. $15, free to members, register. [ thurSday, JuNE 2Saturday, JuNE 4 ] George Eastman House Garden and Estate Sale. Hutchinson House, 930 East Ave. 271-3361, eastmanhouse.org. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Free admission. South Wedge Farmers Market. Boulder Coffee Co-South Wedge, 100 Alexander St. info@swfarmersmarket.org, swfarmersmarket.org. 4-7 p.m. Free. Sticky Lips BBQ Fundraiser. School 46, 250 Newcastle Rd. kristen.french@rcsdk12.org. 4-7 p.m. while meals last. $10. [ FrIday, JuNE 3 ] Church Women United of Rochester’s June Program and Picnic. Carmen Clark Lodge, Brighton Town Park, 777 Westfall Rd. 342-2790. 9: 30 a.m.-12: 30 p.m. $3 registration. Rochester Activists for Animal Rights (RAAR) Vegan Ice-Cream/ Movie Fundraiser. Flying Squirrel, 285 Clarissa St. Kathryn Caldwell 509-7307. 8-10 p.m. $5-10 suggested donation. We Are Change Rochester. Java’s Cafe, 16 Gibbs St. 469-2323, WeAreChangeRochesterNY.org. 7 p.m. Free. [ Saturday, JuNE 4 ] “Chef’s Day” Series: Chuck Wilson, The Hungry Pirate. Public Market, 280 N Union St. 428-6907, cityofrochester.gov/ publicmarket. 10-11 a.m. Free. ABC Basset Rescue Summer Fest. Monroe County Fairgrounds, 2695 E Henrietta Rd, Henrietta, NY 14467. SommerSlavin@ hotmail.com, nybasset.org. 12-6 p.m. $25/couple or $10/ Individual, Kids 16 & under free. Annual Rochester Hamfest and Tech Expo. Barnard Carnival Grounds, 360 Maiden Lane, Greece. HFProducer@ RochesterHam.org, rochesterhamfest.org. 8 a.m.-4 p.m. $5 admission, ages 16 and under free. 26 City JuNE 1-7, 2011

The Advocacy Center’s Evening of Art & Jazz. George Eastman House, 900 East Ave. Seneca Brashear 546-1700 x265. 7-11 p.m. $30 students, $50 general. The Ontario Coast IPA Release Party. Lovin’ Cup, Park Point @ RIT. 292-9940, lovincup.com. 5 p.m.- 2 a.m. $5. Zoobilation. Seneca Park Zoo, 2222 St Paul Blvd. 336-7217, senecaparkzoo.org. 5: 45-11 p.m. $80, RSVP. Fundraiser for adults only. SPECIal EVENt | SkatE Park rally

There’s a lot to be said about skate culture, including the incredible sense of self and independence (not to mention coordination) it lends many developing kids. For the past few years, efforts have been in place to create a space for skaters and BMX riders to play, in a projected park beneath the east side of the Frederick Douglass/ Susan B. Anthony Memorial Bridge. Some doubted, and many nay-sayed, claiming that Rochester is full of half-pipe dreams. But with the recent announcement of $2 million dollars reserved in the city budget for the Roc City Skatepark, those dreams are closer than ever to becoming reality. On Saturday, June 4, efforts to actualize the dream continue, and you can help out while you get a taste of the fun to come. From noon to 6 p.m., join other supporters for the Rally for the Roc City Skatepark, which will feature an outdoor skateboarding and BMX biking experience, exhibitions by pro skateboarders and BMX riders, contests, all-ages physical activities, family activities, music, an art exhibit, silent auction, video-game lounge, a parent-oasis area, and delicious food. Announced pro athletes include Marcus McBride, Jackson Curtin, Lenny Rivas, Zered Basset, and Tony Hamlin. The rally is free to attend (pre-register and collect sponsorships to ride), but activities and refreshments are available for purchase. The rally will be followed by a VIP event hosted by Max at High Falls (260 Browns Race) 6-8 p.m. The $50 tickets include beer and wine, hors d’oeuvres, and a cash bar with music, an art exhibit, and silent auction. Purchase tickets at Marshall Street Bar & Grill, Record Archive, Park Ave. Bikes, RASP, and KRUDCO. Visit roccitypark.org for more info. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY Antique Appraisal Fair and Book Sale. Canandaigua Civic Center, 250 N. Bloomfield Rd., Canandaigua. Carol Shama cshama@pls-net.org, woodlibrary.org. 12-3 p.m. $5 per item appraised. A fundraiser for Wood Library. Classic Car Cruise In. The Carriage Place Crafts & Antique Co-op, 6000 Sweden-Walker Rd., Brockport. Betty Glidden 6376224, carriageplaceantiques@ yahoo.com. 12-4 p.m. Free. Food, prizes, and a 50/50 raffle. Greyhound Summer Picnic. Sunnyside Lodge at Black Creek Park, 3835 Union St., North Chili. 877-211-1451, events@ greyhoundadopt.org. 11 a.m.3 p.m. Free admission, food available to purchase. [ Saturday, JuNE 4SuNday, JuNE 5 ] Landmark Society’s 41st Annual House & Garden Tour. Eight homes in Browncroft neighborhood. 546-7029 x11, landmarksociety.org. Tour 10 a.m.-4 p.m., luncheon 11: 30 a.m.-3: 00 p.m. at Pomodoro

Grill & Wine Bar. $20-25, RSVP, luncheon $15. RCTV’s Third Annual Black Music Month Celebration. RCTV-15, 21 Gorham St. 325-1238, rctv15. org. 2-8 p.m. Free. Rabies Vaccination Clinic. Penfield Sewer Garage, 1607Jackson Rd. 340-8616. 10 a.m.-noon. Free. Dogs must be leashed and cats must be in carriers. All pets must be at least three months old. Rally for Roc City Skatepark. High Falls District. Amy Riposo 7462576. 12-6 p.m. rally, 6-8 p.m. Free; VIP Event at Max at High Falls. $50 VIP tickets include beer, wine, hors d’eouvres. Rochester School for the Deaf River Ramble 5K Run/Walk/Fun Walk Event. 1545 St. Paul St. 544-1240, RSD5K@RSDeaf.org, RSDeaf.org. 8 a.m. registration, 9 a.m. race/walk. $10-50, register. The 2011 Golden Nose Competition. New York Wine & Culinary Center, 800 S Main St., Canandaigua. 394-7070, nywcc. com. Call for information. $40 dinner, $250 judges, register.

[ SuNday, JuNE 5 ] ABC Basset Rescue Rally. Monroe County Fairgrounds, 2695 E Henrietta Rd, Henrietta, NY 14467. SommerSlavin@hotmail. com, nybasset.org. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Free, donations accepted. Brighton Farmers’ Market. Brighton High School parking lot, 1150 Winton Road S., Rochester 14618. info@ brightonfarmersmarket.org. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Free. Fine Tastings & Live and Silent Auctions. Rochester Academy of Medicine, 1411 East Ave. 4738731, info@assisi-institute.org. 2-5 p.m. $25, rsvp. Flower City Days at the Market. Public Market, 280 N Union St. 428-6755, cityofrochester.gov. 8 a.m.-2 p.m. Free admission. Fly-In Pancake Breakfast. Geneseo Airport/Museum, 3489 Big Tree Lane, Geneseo. 243-2100, 1941hag.org. 7 a.m.-noon. $3-6. Grand Reopening Celebration at Sonnenberg. Sonnenberg Gardens & Mansion State Historic Park, 151 Charlotte St, Canandaigua. 394-4922, sonnenberg.org. 9 a.m.-4: 30 p.m. Free. Hochstein at Canandaigua Musical Feast & Open House. Canandaigua Academy, 435 East St., Canandaigua. 4544596, hochstein.org. 2-4 p.m. Free. Instrument Petting Zoo, dance, and more. Jewish Family Service Annual Gala. Temple B’rith Kodesh, 2131 Elmwood Ave. 461-0110, jfsrochester.org. 5 p.m. reception, dinner; 7: 30 p.m. Klezmatics perform. $45 show only, $136 for dinner, reception, show. Rides for Life Car Show. Damascus Shrine Center, 979 Bay Rd., Webster. 2753676, urmc.rochester.edu, bit. ly/ifckrochester. 11 a.m.-4 p.m. $10 requested donation. Rochester Civil Rights Front Meeting. Equal Grounds Coffee House, 750 South Ave. civilrightsfront.wordpress.com, rochestercrf@gmail.com. 5 p.m. Free. Grassroots organization for LGBT equality. [ mONday, JuNE 6 ] Curls Night Out. Fusion Salon, 333 Park Ave. 271-8120, fusionsalonnewyork.com. 6-8 p.m. Free. Race Car Team Meet and Greet at Toshiba. 150 Metro Park. jordynn.eddinger@tbs.toshiba. com. 1-2 p.m. Free. [ tuESday, JuNE 7 ] Faith in Action 20th Annual Celebration Dinner. Diplomat Party House, 1956 Lyell Ave. grcc1@frontiernet.net. 5: 30-8: 30 p.m. $40, register .

FEStIValS | SummEr FEStIVal rOuNd uP

Rochester seems to be made up of 100 unique communities and cultures. Many of these communities celebrate their identity throughout the summer with small festivals. Rochester’s Greek Festival will kicks off the 2011 celebrations, running Thursday, June 2-Sunday, June 5. Greek Fest has become a Rochester favorite for its delicious Greek food and desserts, live music, and dancing. Admission to the festival is free. Slides and a rock wall will be provided for kids’ entertainment, while parents can shop at Greek boutiques. The festival is located at 962 East Ave. and will take place from Thursday-Saturday 11 a.m.-11 p.m. and Sunday noon11 p.m. Visit rochestergreekfestival.org for more information. The 19th Ward will also hold its annual Square Fair Saturday, June 4, to celebrate the diversity shared by the 19th Ward community. The festival will feature a garage sale, flea market, used book sale, and children’s games. Located at Aberdeen Square Park, the festival begins with a pancake breakfast at 8 a.m., a parade at 12:30 p.m., and food vendors and live entertainment will continue throughout the day. Visit 19wca.org for more information. Fairport features its own local art and music during its annual Fairport Canal Days taking place Friday, June 3-Sunday, June 5. Hundreds of artisans and vendors will gather along the Erie Canal to sell everything from food to jewelry and pottery. There is also a battle of the bands and the famous Fairport duck race, where 5000 rubber ducks are dumped into the canal and race to the other side. Visit fairportcanaldays.com for more event information. These festivals are few of the many small local festivals that take place throughout Rochester’s summer. For future festival listings, check the events calendar at rochestercitynewspaper.com. — BY ALEXANDRA CARMICHAEL Information Session: Train for a Marathon or Half Marathon. Fleet Feet Sports, 2210 Monroe Ave. 697-3338, fleetfeetrochester. com. 7 p.m. Free. [ wEdNESday, JuNE 8 ] 2011 Foodlink Farmers’ Market. Washington Square Park, 80 Woodbury Blvd. nsmalarz@ foodlinkny.org. 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Free. Local farmers, bakers, and specialty food vendors. Friendships Children’s Center 85th Anniversary & Open House. Friendship Children’s Center, 310 Fernwood Ave. 342-7250, frienshipcenter85@gmail.com. 4-7 p.m. Free, RSVP. Last Laff Bar & Grill Opening. Last Laff Bar & Grill, 4768 Lake Ave. 633-5233, lastlaff.net. Lunch 11: 30 a.m.-all day, dinner 4: 30 p.m.-til. Cost of food. Poppies and Popovers Luncheon. Hurd Orchards, Rt 104 W & Monroe-Orleans County

Line Rd, Holley. 638-8838, hurdorchards.com. 12: 30 p.m. $25-35, register.

Sports [ wEdNESday, JuNE 1thurSday, JuNE 2 ] Rochester Red Wings vs. Toledo Mud Hens. Frontier Field, 1 Morrie Silver Way. 454-1001, redwingsbaseball.com. Mon 5: 05 p.m., Tue-Wed 7: 05 p.m., Thu 11: 05 p.m. $6.50-11.50. [ FrIday, JuNE 3mONday, JuNE 6 ] Rochester Red Wings vs. Norfolk Tides. Frontier Field, 1 Morrie Silver Way. 454-1001, redwingsbaseball.com. Fri-Sat & Mon 7: 05 p.m., Sun 1: 05 p.m. $6.50-11.50. Fireworks Friday and Saturday nights. [ Saturday, JuNE 4 ] Greater Rochester Soap Box


Derby. Durand Eastman Park. 428-5990, cityofrochester.gov, grsbd.com. Call for information.

Theater

“Defending the Caveman.” Ongoing. Downstairs Cabaret Theatre, 3450 Winton Road. Thu 7 p.m., Fri 8 p.m., Sat 8:30 p.m., Sun 7 p.m. $29-$39. 325-4370, downstairscabaret.com. “The Dining Room.” Fri Jun 3-Sat Jun 4. Young Open and Honest Players. Penfield Community Recreation Center, 1985 Baird Rd, Penfield. 7 p.m. $7-$10. 340-8655, penfieldplayers.org. “Jay Johnson: The Two and Only.” Through Jun 5. Downstairs Cabaret Theatre, 3450 Winton Place. Wed June 1 3 &7 p.m., Thu 7 p.m., Fri 8 p.m., Sat 5 & 8:30 p.m., Sun 3 p.m. $29-39. 325-4370, downstairscabaret. com. “The Music Man.” Through Jun 5. Geva Theatre Center, 75 Woodbury Blvd. Wed Jun 1 2 & 7:30 p.m., Sat 3:30 & 8:30 p.m., Sun 2 & 7 p.m. $28-65. 2324382, gevatheatre.org. Shakespeare’s “Apocrypha.” Thu Jun 2-Sat Jun 4. Cold readings by The Shakespeare Company. MuCCC, 142 Atlantic Ave. ThuSat 7 p.m. Pay what you will. 244-0960, muccc.org. Summer Curtain Call 2011. Fri Jun 3. Geva Theatre Center, 75 Woodbury Blvd.. 6:30 p.m. reception and auction, 8:15 p.m. performance. $150, RSVP. Auctions, performances, food, fundraiser for education programs featuring a special performance of “Trouble in River City.” 232-1366 x3011, specialevents@gevatheatre.org. “West Side Story.” Through Jun 5. Rochester Broadway Theatre League. Auditorium Theatre, 875 E Main St. Wed Jun 1-Thu 7:30 p.m., Fri 8 p.m., Sat 2 & 8 p.m., Sun 2 & 7 p.m. $39.50-$69.50. 800-745-3000, rbtl.org.

Theater Auditions [ Wednesday, June 1 ] “The Rocky Horror Show.” JCC SummerStage. Jewish Community Center, 1200 Edgewood Ave. 7 p.m. Free. 461-2000 x235, jcccenterstage.org. High school and college students age 23 and under. Audition candidates should come with two prepared songs (accompanist provided) and dressed appropriately for a dance audition. [ Through Thursday, June 30 ] Everyone’s Theatre Company Open Call for Directors for Evening of One Acts. Send applications to: info@everyonestheatre.com. Include name of the play and letter of intent. Performance dates are October 15-16, audition date August 29.

THEATER | “WEST SIDE STORY”

“West Side Story” is regarded as one of the greatest Broadway shows and songs like “Maria,” “I Feel Pretty,” and “Somewhere” give it one of the most memorable scores of all time. The Rochester Broadway Theater League brings the Broadway tour of the classic show to the Auditorium Theater now through Sunday, June 5. Based on the plot of “Romeo & Juliet,” “West Side Story” revolves around the rivalry between two teenage street gangs in 1950’s New York City. Protagonists Tony and Maria fall in love despite being connected to opposing gangs. The play was Steven Sondheim’s big Broadway break, and has continued to gain attention since its opening in 1957. The new Broadway cast album won the Grammy Award for Best Musical Show Album in 2010. Note that the recommended viewing age for this performance is 13 years or older. The show runs Wednesday-Thursday 7:30 p.m., Friday 8 p.m., Saturday 2 & 8 p.m., and Sunday 2 & 7 p.m. Ticket prices range from $32.50 to $67.50. The Auditorium is located at 875 E. Main St. For more information visit rbtl.org. — BY ALEXANDRA CARMICHAEL Join the Meatless Monday Craze. Tops Cooking School, 3507 Mt Read Blvd. 663-5449, topsmarkets.com. 7-9 p.m. $20, register. Urban Fiction Writing Workshop. Phillis Wheatley Library, 33 Dr Samuel McCree Way. 428-8212. 5: 30-6: 30 p.m. Free, register. Wednesdays. [ Thursday, June 2 ] American Dinner Cuisine. New York Wine & Culinary Center, 800 S Main St., Canandaigua. 394-7070, nywcc.com. 6-8: 30 p.m. $60, register. French Night. Books Etc, 78 W Main St, Rt 31, Macedon. 4744116, books_etc@yahoo.com. 7-9 p.m. Free. Hands On-Cooking Healthier Meals. Tops Cooking School, 3507 Mt Read Blvd. 663-5449, topsmarkets.com. 7-9 p.m. $25, register. Urban Fiction Writing Workshop. Arnett Branch Library, 310 Arnett Blvd. 428-8214. 5: 306: 30 p.m. Free, register.

Workshops

[ Friday, June 3 ] Woman2Woman: Leadership in Action. Career Development Services, 150 State St. Sharon Melville 244-0765. 8: 30 a.m.5 p.m. Limited scholarships available.

[ Wednesday, June 1 ] Chop, Dice, & Cook. Cornell Cooperative Extension-Rochester, 249 Highland Ave. 461-1000 x228, mycce.org/monroe. 6-8 p.m. $35, register.

[ Sunday, June 5 ] Celebrate American BBQ: The Carolinas. Williams-Sonoma, Eastview Mall, 7979 Pittsford Victor Rd., Victor. 223-1660. 10 a.m.-noon. Free, register.

Ornamental Grasses: Planting and Design. Wayside Garden Center, 124 PittsfordPalmyra Rd, Macedon. 223-1222, x100, trish@ waysidegardencenter.com. 2 p.m. Free, register. [ Tuesday, June 7 ] German Night. Books Etc, 78 W Main St, Rt 31, Macedon. 4744116, books_etc@yahoo.com. 7-9 p.m. Free. [ Wednesday, June 8 ] Cooking Class: The Spanish Table. Williams-Sonoma, Eastview Mall, 7979 Pittsford Victor Rd., Victor. 223-1660. 6: 30-8: 30 p.m. $50 includes dinner, class, recipes. Register. French Dinner. Tops Cooking School, 3507 Mt Read Blvd. 663-5449, topsmarkets.com. 7-9 p.m. $20 class only, $30 with wine, register. Hooked on Bivalves. New York Wine & Culinary Center, 800 S Main St., Canandaigua. 3947070, nywcc.com. 6-8: 30 p.m. $60, register.

rochestercitynewspaper.com City 27


Film Times Fri June 3 – Thu June 9 Schedules change often. Call theaters or visit rochestercitynewspaper.com for updates. *DUE TO THE HOLIDAY, MANY THEATERS DID NOT REPORT FILM TIMES BY PRESS TIME. THE FOLLOWING IS AN INCOMPLETE REPRESENTATION OF CURRENT FILMS. PLEASE CHECK ROCHESTERCITYNEWSPAPER. COM FOR MORE FILM TIMES AND LOCATIONS*

Film

Brockport Strand 637-3310 89 Main St, Brockport HANGOVER 2: 7:15, 9:15; also Sat-Sun 1:15, 3:15, 5:15; KUNG FU PANDA 2: 7, 8:45; also SatSun 1, 3, 5; PIRATES OF THE CARIBBEAN: ON STRANGER TIDES: 7, 9:35; also Sat-Sun 1, 4.

Canandaigua Theatres 396-0110 Wal-Mart Plaza, Canandaigua BRIDESMAIDS: 7, 9:20; also Fri-Sun 4; also Sat-Sun 1; FAST FIVE: 9:25; also Fri-Sun 4; HANGOVER 2: 7:15, 8:15, 9:15; also Fri-Sun 4:15, 5:15, 6:15; also Sat-Sun 1:15, 2:15, 3;15; KUNG FU PANDA 2 (3D): 7, 8:45; also Fri-Sun 5; also Sat-Sun 1, 3; PIRATES OF THE CARIBBEAN: ON STRANGER TIDES: 7, 8, 9:35; also Fri-Sun 4, 5; also Sat-Sun 1, 2; THOR (3D): 7:10; 9:25; also Fri-Sun 4; also Sat-Sun 1:15; WATER FOR ELEPHANTS: 7:10; also Sat-Sun 1:15; WIN WIN: 7:15, 9:20; also Fri-Sun 5:10; also Sat-Sun 1, 3:05; XMEN: FIRST CLASS: 7:10, 9:35; also Fri-Sun 4; also Sat-Sun 1:15.

A strange Passover in Mexico [ review ] by george grella

“Nora’s Will” (NR), directed by Mariana Chenillo Now playing

Once produced in significant numbers by a thriving industry and exported around the world, Mexican movies nowadays pretty much amount to a rarity in this country. Whatever happens in motion pictures down there, very little of it crosses the border, which makes the importation of the new picture, “Nora’s Will,” originally released more than a year ago, a special occasion. Adding to that special quality, the movie, a seriocomic exploration of a most unusual subject,

Cinema Theater 271-1785 957 S. Clinton St. POTICHE: 7; RIO: Fri-Sun 4:30; WIN WIN: 8:45.

Culver Ridge 16 544-1140 2255 Ridge Rd E, Irondequoit *NO FILM TIMES BY PRESS TIME* continues on page 30

deals with a world and a culture that I am sure few North Americans knew existed. The movie begins with a sequence in a posh apartment, where a woman, the Nora of the title, whose face we never see, methodically packs up what seems a good deal of her life. She writes out a series of envelopes addressed to various people, locks up some photographs and diaries, posts notes on numerous containers of food, and even spells out a series of recipes for a Passover dinner. As her ex-husband, José Kurtz (Fernando Luján), who lives across the street, soon learns, all those arrangements constitute a careful preparation for suicide. Once he discovers her body, he calls her doctor, who is also his friend, and his son Ruben (Ari Brickman), who in turn calls Rabbi Jacowitz (Max Kerlow), and then the fun begins. Although Jewish law demands that Nora be buried within 24 hours of her death, he explains, the observance of Passover precludes a funeral until after the ceremonies are over. The rabbi calls

in a crew of assistants, who pack Nora in dry ice to preserve her for five days, and a devout young officer of the temple, Moisés (Enrique Arreola), to recite the appropriate prayers. A nonbeliever, José seethes over the situation, which he regards as another example of his ex-wife’s ability to manipulate people, even posthumously. Impatient with Moisés’s piety, the rabbi’s Talmudic hairsplitting, and his son’s obsequious regard for his father-in-law, a rich member of the congregation, he embarks on a series of insults. He shocks them all by ordering a pizza with bacon, ham, and sausage, and making some separate funeral arrangements, including flowers, religious items, and a cruciform casket, with a Catholic organization. The movie constantly oscillates between the serious matters of loss, faith, and grief and the frequent comedy of José’s determination to thwart his ex-wife’s plans and the rabbi’s theology. A dropped photograph leads him to the discovery of her infidelity and an angry search through her secret papers, where at the same time, his two young granddaughters find their grandmother’s sizable vibrator, which they mistake for a flashlight. The rabbi revenges José’s insult by invoking Jewish law against burying suicides with other family members in the main area of the cemetery, which naturally enrages him more. His own solution to the dilemma awakens a spirit of forgiveness and leads to a final and

Fernando Luján in “Nora’s Will.” PHOTO PROVIDED

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International incidents [REVIEW] BY DAYNA PAPALEO

“The Hangover Part II” (R), directed by Todd Phillips Now playing

“Incendies” (R), written and directed be Dennis Villeneuve Opens Friday

essentially comic reconciliation with all the disparate forces he opposes throughout the film. “Nora’s Will” should surprise most audiences north of the border, who I am sure would never expect a Mexican film to deal with Jewish culture and customs. It shows the presence of an obviously large, affluent, and devout Jewish population in a nation many of us probably regard as violent, impoverished, and very Catholic. With a few changes, the whole movie in fact could very easily be mistaken for the work of Woody Allen. The director, Mariana Chenillo, exhibits a good deal of skill in her management of the small cast, mostly within the limits of Nora Kurtz’s apartment, without ever allowing the action to sink into staginess or claustrophobic dullness. She handles the rhythms of the narrative with ease, balancing the comical and the emotional without a hint of exaggeration in either direction, allowing the situation to generate the appropriate responses. Aside from the deft confidence of the director, the real triumph of the movie belongs to Fernando Luján, who provides an almost impeccable performance. He underacts so thoroughly and naturally, mostly through a series of small gestures and expressive facial reactions that the film hardly needs its subtitles. The camera focuses constantly on him, but he never allows it to magnify his emotions or his personality — he virtually carries “Nora’s Will.”

So “The Hangover Part II” closed out that long holiday weekend with a staggering box-office haul quite north of $130 million, which means that a) a third “Hangover” installment will be in motion before the ink on the deposit slip dries; and b) many, many people spent 102 minutes not laughing through an alleged comedy that isn’t so much a sequel as it is a remake of “The Hangover,” except darker and uglier. And please know that I totally dug the original, a cleverly constructed blend of bawdy raunch and often surreal humor, with a soupçon of genuine surprise. But “The Hangover Part II” is merely a stale Mad Lib of the first film, lazily replacing a few of the nouns and verbs but pushing any so-called shock value into squirmy territory.

Zach Galifianakis and Ken Jeong in “The Hangover Part II.” PHOTO COURTESY WARNER BROS. PICTURES

“It happened again,” Bradley Cooper’s Phil actually says as “Hangover II” opens, setting up the exact same outline as the Wolf Pack tries to piece together the hazy pre-wedding events that caused them to misplace yet another person. This time we’re invited as Ed Helms’ Stu prepares to marry an irrelevant woman (in this particular universe, they all are) whose convenient Thai heritage gets everyone in closer proximity to the hedonism of Bangkok. It’s not spoiling anything to say that Phil, Stu, and Zach Galifianakis’ whacked-out Alan convene one evening for a low-key beer to toast the impending nuptials, only to regain consciousness in a scummy hotel the next morning with no memory of what happened to the bride’s teenage brother Teddy (Ang Lee’s son Mason) or why he would have left his class ring behind with his finger still in it. Now, here’s how this sequel works: instead of a missing tooth, Stu wakes up with a tribal tattoo on the side of his face. And instead of an adorable baby, Alan totes around a cute monkey. And instead of Ken Jeong’s manic Mr. Chow, the answers lie with — oh, wait; it’s the crowd-pleasing stereotype Chow again, attending to his criminal activity in the Far East as Alan’s plus-one for the wedding. And instead of marrying a stripper, Stu... well, let’s just say that you’re in Bangkok now. Chow jumps out of confined spaces, Stu screeches, and Phil works the phones, trying to buy time as they hunt for Teddy. Alan’s job is to be the passive-aggressive man-child, and for this he’s rewarded with the funniest lines, like being “a stay-at-home son.” But “funniest lines” is a relative term at best, since the phoned-in script isn’t really funny at all, despite following the blueprint of the first. If anything, the banter in “Hangover II” is angry, even threatening, so much so that I honestly thought that we might be headed into a “Midnight Express” sort of situation

here. Cooper plays Phil self-serving and resentful (his vulgar tirade at the IHOP bachelor brunch is more unsettling than comical), while Alan has obvious and serious psychological problems. Stu even cops to a hooker-loving dark side, though all this disturbing confession does is finally earn him the respect of his father-in-law, who had previously compared him to weak rice pudding. Then, of course, Mike Tyson shows up, and what was simply lame becomes completely embarrassing. Their late mother’s specific wishes are

to be buried face-down, naked, and with neither marker nor stone. “No epitaphs for those who don’t keep their promises,” reads Nawal’s will. Her executor then slides two envelopes across the table to her adult children, Jeanne (Mélissa Désormeaux-Poulin) and Simon (Maxim Gaudette), with delivery instructions to the father they never knew and the brother they never knew they had. Thus begins Québécois filmmaker Denis Villeneuve’s “Incendies,” a moving, Oscar-nominated drama that unfolds as a daughter combs the still-bruised present day for clues about her mother’s mysterious past. Basing his film on the play by Wajdi Mouawad, Villeneuve weaves the narrative from Nawal’s early life in an unnamed Middle Eastern country (presumably Lebanon) through Jeanne’s efforts to both carry out her mother’s final request and learn more about her in the process. It’s no surprise that the most resonance lies with Nawal’s twisty story; as played by Lubna Azabal (2005’s “Paradise Now”) in a subtle but powerful performance, Nawal is confronted with the extremism and patriarchy of her time and place. Unfortunately, as the resilient victim, Nawal never really comes into focus. Though, do we ever truly know our parents?

ALL ABOUT EVE

Thursday, June 2, 8 p.m. Bette Davis stars as legendary stage actress Margo Channing in this tour de force drama of jealousy, manipulation, and betrayal in the world of the theater. Anne Baxter plays Margo’s rival, ambitious wannabe Eve; the supporting cast includes George Sanders, Celeste Holm, and Marilyn Monroe. (Joseph L. Mankiewicz, US 1950, 138 min.)

WHATEVER HAPPENED TO BABY JANE? Movies for movie lovers, 6 nights a week. Joan/Bette

Friday, June 3, 8 p.m. Baby Jane Hudson was once a hugely popular child star of the vaudeville stage. Now she’s a drunken madwoman (Bette Davis) “caring” for her sister (Joan Crawford), a movie star whose own career abruptly ended when she was crippled in a car crash that was no accident. Robert Aldrich’s scathing, shamelessly entertaining indictment of the exploitative star system makes brilliant use of these two real-life grand dames. (Robert Aldrich, US 1962, 132 min.)

Joan/Bette

Film Info: 271-4090 l 900 East Avenue l Eastman House Café—stop in for a light dinner or dessert before the film. l Wi-Fi Hotspot l Sponsored by rochestercitynewspaper.com City 29


Dryden Theatre

Geneseo Theatres

Henrietta 18

Movies 10

Webster 12

271-3361 900 East Ave *NOTE: Film times for Wed 6/1-Wed 6/8* RED BADGE OF COURAGE: Wed 6/1 8; ALL ABOUT EVE: Thu 8; WHATEVER HAPPENED TO BABY JANE?: Fri 8; AUTUMN LEAVES: Sun 7; SUNNYSIDE/PAYDAY/ SHOULDER ARMS: Tue 8; THE WHITE BALLOON: Wed 6/8 8.

243-2691 Geneseo Square Mall BRIDESMAIDS: 7, 9:20; also SatSun 1, 4; HANGOVER 2: 7:15, 9:15; Sat-Sun 1:15, 3:15, 5:15; KUNG FU PANDA 2 (3D): 7, 8:45; also Sat-Sun 1, 3, 5; PIRATES OF THE CARIBBEAN: ON STRANGER TIDES: 7, 9:25; also Sat-Sun 1, 4; THOR: 7:10, 9:25; also Sat-Sun 1:15, 4; X-MEN: FIRST CLASS: 7:10, 9:35; also Sat-Sun 1:15, 4.

424-3090 525 Marketplace Dr. *NO FILM TIMES BY PRESS TIME*

292-5840 2613 W. Henrietta Rd. *NO FILM TIMES BY PRESS TIME*

The Little

Pittsford Cinema

258-0400 240 East Ave. DOUBLE HOUR: 6:40, 8:45; also Sat-Sun 1, 3:10; EVERYTHING MUST GO: 7, 9:40; also SatSun 12:15, 2:20; I AM: 7:20, 9:20; also Sat-Sun 12:45, 2:30; INCENDIES: 6:30, 9:10; also Sat-Sun 12, 2:40; NORA’S WILL: 7:10, 9:30; also Sat-Sun 12:30, 2:50.

383-1310 3349 Monroe Ave. *NO FILM TIMES BY PRESS TIME*

888-262-4386 2190 Empire Blvd. BRIDESMAIDS: 1:15, 4:15, 7:10, 10:10; FAST FIVE: 1:50, 5, 7:40, 10:30; also Sat-Sun 11 a.m.; HANGOVER 2: 12:45, 2:15, 3:15, 4:50, 5:55, 7:20, 8:30, 9:40, 10:50; also Sat-Sun 10:20 a.m., 11:45 a.m.; KUNG FU PANDA 2: 12:10, 2:30, 4:40, 6:45, 9; also Sat-Sun 10 a.m.; also in 3D 1:30, 3:45, 5:45, 7:50, 9:50; also Sat-Sun in 3D 11:30 a.m.; L.A. PHILHAROMIC LIVE: BRAHMS: Sun 5; PIRATES OF THE CARIBBEAN: ON STRANGER TIDES: 1:40, 4:30 (no Sun), 7:30 (no Sun), 10:20;

Eastview 13 425-0420 Eastview Mall, Victor *NO FILM TIMES BY PRESS TIME*

Greece Ridge 12 225-5810 176 Greece Ridge Center Dr. *NO FILM TIMES BY PRESS TIME*

Tinseltown USA / IMAX 247-2180 2291 Buffalo Rd. *NO FILM TIMES BY PRESS TIME*

also Sat-Sun 10:45 a.m.; also in 3D 10:30 a.m., 12:30, 3:30, 6:30, 9:30; RIO: 12:20, 2:45, 5:30; THOR: 8:15, 10:40; also in 3D 12, 3, 6:15, 9:15; XMEN: FIRST CLASS: 1, 2, 4:05, 5:15, 7, 8, 10, 11; also Sat-Sun 10:10 a.m., 11:15 a.m.

Film Previews Full film reviews available at rochestercitynewspaper.com. *DUE TO THE HOLIDAY, MANY THEATERS DID NOT REPORT FILM TIMES BY PRESS TIME. THE FOLLOWING IS AN INCOMPLETE REPRESENTATION OF CURRENT FILMS. PLEASE CHECK ROCHESTERCITYNEWSPAPER. COM FOR MORE FILM TIMES AND LOCATIONS* [ OPENING ] ALL ABOUT EVE (1950): Bette Davis stars as aging Broadway star Margo Channing in this drama (with 14 Oscar nominations) that watches as an ambitious ingenue (Anne Baxter) insinuates herself into Margo’s life. Dryden (Thu, June 2, 8 p.m.) AUTUMN LEAVES (1956): Joan Crawford plays a lonely middle-aged woman who weds a charismatic younger man (Cliff Robertson), only to learn that he may not be as perfect as he seems. Dryden (Sun, June 5, 7 p.m.) INCENDIES (R): Directed by Denis Villeneuve, the Canadian Oscar nominee for Best Foreign Language Film is a drama that hops around time as it tells the story of a Middle Eastern refugee through her Québécois children, hoping to learn the truth about their late mother. Little THE RED BADGE OF COURAGE (1951): John Huston’s adaptation of Stephen Crane’s 19th-century classic about a Union soldier who wilts in the heat of battle will be preceded by “The Civil War,” Ford’s contribution to “How the West Was Won,” starring John Wayne as General Sherman. Dryden (Wed, June 1, 8 p.m.) SUNNYSIDE/PAY DAY/ SHOULDER ARMS (19181922): This program is made up of silent Charlie Chaplin short comedies from his own studio. Dryden (Tue, May 31, 8 p.m.) WHATEVER HAPPENED TO BABY JANE? (1962): Bette 30 City June 1-7, 2011

Michael Fassbender in “X-Men: First Class.” PHOTO COURTESY 20th Century Fox

Kristen Wiig in “Bridesmaids.” PHOTO COURTESY Universal Pictures Davis and Joan Crawford go sharp-clawed mano a mano in this psychological thriller about an alcoholic former child star and her nowdependent sister, holed up in a decrepit mansion and still wrestling with ancient jealousies. Dryden (Fri, June 3, 8 p.m., and Sun, May 29, 7 p.m.) X-MEN: FIRST CLASS (PG-13): James McAvoy and Michael Fassbender star as Charles Xavier and Eric Lehnsherr in the Matthew Vaughn-directed origin story detailing their friendship as well as the rift that resulted in Professor X and Magneto. With Kevin Bacon and January Jones. Canandaigua, Geneseo, Webster [ CONTINUING ] BRIDESMAIDS (R): Kristen Wiig co-wrote the script for this “Hangover”-esque comedy in which she stars as a woman tapped to be her best friend’s maid of honor,

despite the fact her own life is in shambles. With Maya Rudolph, Melissa McCarthy, and the late Jill Clayburgh. Canandaigua, Geneseo, Webster THE DOUBLE HOUR (NR): This twisty Italian thriller tells the story of a hotel maid and a security guard who meet at a speed-dating event, only to have their new romance derailed by her past. Little EVERYTHING MUST GO (R): Will Ferrell and Rebecca Hall star in the first film from writer-director Dan Rush, a comedy-drama adapted from a short story by Raymond Carver about a newly unemployed alcoholic who begins living on his front lawn after his wife throws him out. Little FAST FIVE (PG-13): Vin Diesel and Paul Walker lead a cast assembled from the other “Fast & Furious” flicks to pull off the classic “one last job” (sure it is) in Rio de Janeiro, except this time Dwayne Johnson is hot on

their tailpipes. Canandaigua, Webster THE HANGOVER PART II (R): Bradley Cooper, Zach Galifianakis, and Ed Helms reassemble the Wolf Pack for this sequel, one which finds them waking up in Bangkok and having to piece together the previous evening in order to find Stu’s missing brother-in-law. Brockport, Canandaigua, Geneseo, Webster I AM (NR): This personal project from director Tom Shadyac (“Ace Ventura: Pet Detective”) finds him speaking to religious and intellectual luminaries like Desmond Tutu, Noam Chomsky, and the late Howard Zinn about what’s wrong with the world and what we can do about it. Little KUNG FU PANDA 2 (PG): This sequel to the 2008 animated hit features the voice talents of Jack Black, Angelina Jolie, and Jackie Chan recounting the further adventures of Po and the Furious Five, this time going up against an old enemy. With Jean-Claude Van Damme, David Cross, and Dustin Hoffman. Brockport, Canandaigua, Geneseo, Webster

NORA’S WILL (NR): This bittersweet Mexican drama explores the aftermath of a woman’s suicide, as the living try to make sense of a death that seems to have left nothing to chance. Little PIRATES OF THE CARIBBEAN: ON STRANGER TIDES (PG-13): Johnny Depp is back as the heroic and hedonistic Captain Jack Sparrow, this time on a hunt to find the Fountain of Youth. With Penélope Cruz, Ian McShane, Keith Richards, and, of course, Geoffrey Rush. Brockport, Canandaigua, Geneseo, Webster RIO (PG): Jesse Eisenberg and Anne Hathaway provide the lead voices for this animated feature about a domesticated macaw from small-town Minnesota who embarks on a South American adventure with the pretty bird of his dreams. Featuring Jamie Foxx, Jane Lynch, and Wanda Sykes. Cinema, Webster THOR (PG-13): Kenneth Branagh directs the bigscreen debut of the God of Thunder, whose banishment to Earth turns him into a Marvel Comics superhero. With Chris Hemsworth, Natalie Portman, Anthony Hopkins, and Rene Russo. Canandaigua, Geneseo, Webster

WATER FOR ELEPHANTS (PG-13): Robert Pattinson gets top billing over Oscar winners Reese Witherspoon and Christoph Waltz in this adaptation of Sara Gruen’s novel about a veterinary student who abandons his studies and joins up with a traveling circus after his parents are killed. Canandaigua WIN WIN (R): Paul Giamatti stars in the third film from writer-director Tom McCarthy (2007’s “The Visitor”) as a lawyer and high-school wrestling coach whose questionable ethics threaten to derail the promising future of one young wrestler. Costarring Amy Ryan, Bobby Cannavale, and Jeffrey Tambor. Canandaigua, Cinema


Classifieds For information: Call us (585) 244-3329 Fax us (585) 244-1126 Mail Us City Classifieds 250 N. Goodman Street Rochester, NY 14607 Email Us classifieds@ rochester-citynews.com EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY

All real estate advertised in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act, which makes it unlawful, “to make, print, or publish, any notice, statement, or advertisement, with respect to the sale or rental of a dwelling that indicates any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin.” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under the age of 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertisement for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. Call the local Fair Housing Enforcement Project, FHEP at 325-2500 or 1-866-671-FAIR. Si usted sospecha una practica de vivienda injusta, por favor llame al servicio legal gratis. 585-325-2500 - TTY 585-325-2547.

Apartments for Rent CULVER/PARK AREA: One bed¬room, 2nd floor, hardwoods, fire¬place, kitchen, one car parking, basement storage, no pets, no smoking. $625 plus + security. Includes all util. 2444123 DOWNTOWN GIBBS/EASTMAN Theatre area. 1&2 bedrooms. Bright, cheerful, nice neighbors, laundry, convenient to everything. Available immediately. Priced from $595. Call 585-383-8888. MONROE /ALEXANDER AREA Large Studio, 2nd floor, quiet building. Includes appliances, coin laundry, $440 includes all. 330-0011 or 671-3806 ON PARK AVE With quiet offstreet parking, close-to boutiques & res¬taurants, large 1 bedroom. First month free to qualified applicants. $815 includes heat, & 24 hour maintenance 585-2717597

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Cabin w/ 8 Acres -$32,995. Call 800-229-7843. Or Visit www. LandandCamps.com For Camp Pictures.

FOR SALE/CABIN WITH LAND: This cabin/retreat sits nestled on 11+ acres with access to two ponds and 340 acres for hunting, fishing and recreational purposes. The cabin comes fully furnished including appliances and too many extras to list. This is truly a fabulous buy for the outdoorsman and ready to be enjoyed today. Call for a personal tour today to check out all the extras this property has to offer. This secluded cabin/retreat is priced to sell @ $69,000. Call 607937-0678 for more details.

SULLIVAN COUNTY REAL PROPERTY TAX FORECLOSURE AUCTION. 400+/- Properties June 22-23, @ 10AM. The Lodge at Rock Hill, NY. 800-2430061 AAR, Inc. HAR, Inc. www. NYSAuctions.com

Commercial/ Office Space

HOMES FOR SALE Pittsford/ Bushnells Basin 3 Homes on fabu¬lous 3 acre park-like yard. Beautifully updated, 1800’s large main house plus 2 smaller homes which are leased for $24,000 per year (Great In-Law Home). Owner must sell due to age & health 585-383-8888

Land for Sale ABSOLUTE NY FARMLAND SALE 6/4! 5-14 acre parcels - opening price $24,900! Less than 3 hours NY City; No closing costs! Prime buildable acreage! (888) 7017509 NY FARM LIQUIDATION SALE 6/4! LENDER OWNED LAND/ FARM BUILDINGS $69,900! Less than 3 hrs\ NYC. Gorgeous views, views,\ stonewalls! FREE CLOSING COSTS! (888) 905-8847 www. NewYorkLandandLakes.com NY’S LARGEST SELECTION Land & Camp Packages New 2 story cabin on River w/ 5 Acres -$79,995. Farmhouse and Barns w/ 5 Acres $69,995. New

UofR/ AIRPORT AREA Brick, Mixed use building. 6,000 sq.ft. of stores/office plus 3 apartments. Owner must sell due to illness. Owner financing, no banks needed. 383-8888

Vacation Property DENNISPORT, MA- Come experience the Pelham House’s private beach, pool, tennis, recently renovated waterfront rooms. Suites available, free breakfast daily, located on Nantucket sound. 508-398-6076 OCEAN CITY, MARYLAND Best selection of affordable rentals. Full/ partial weeks. Call for FREE brochure. Open daily. Holiday Real Estate. 1-800-638-2102. Online reservations: www. holidayoc.com

Adoption ADOPT: A devoted married couple wishes to become parents to baby. We promise unconditional love, security, and strong values. Confidential. Expenses paid. Barb/ Pete 888-516-3402. ADOPT: A wonderful life filled with love, devotion and happiness awaits your newborn. Financially secure with extended family. Expenses paid. Please call Rosanne: 1-800-755-5002 ADOPT: Happy couple loves traveling, animals, gardening, cooking; close to beach, parks. We promise love, happiness, security, strong family values for baby. CHRIS/JENN 1-800-970-7055 www.chrisandjenn.net. PREGNANT? CONSIDERING ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions 866-413-6293 (Void in Illinois) (AAN CAN)

continues on page 33

utilities. 1 year lease w/security deposit. No DSS/8. 585-6545987 FOR RENT OR SALE ON LAND CONTRACT/ROCHESTER: Nice 3 bedroom, 1 bath home with may updates. $650/mo. Call Cornerstone 607-936-1945. See our complete listings at www.homesbycornerstone.com

OPENING AUGUST 2011 LIVE ROCHESTER HISTORY THE MOST EXCITING NEW/OLD DOWNTOWN APARTMENTS BUILT 1840-RENOVATED 2011 HEAT INCLUDED • TOWNHOUSES AND FLATS INCOME RESTRICTIONS APPLY 80% AMI AND BELOW STOP BY FOR AN APPLICATION 312 STATE STREET M-F 9-6, SAT 1-4 LOTTERY DEADLINES JUNE 20, 2011, 5:00PM

Houses for Rent ATLANTIC/WINTON 3 bedroom, Full basement w/workshop area, washer. Small yard, garden possibility, parking. $780/+

rochestercitynewspaper.com City 31


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Everything from foundations to roofs, including additions, remodeling, garages, decks, windows, doors, ceramic tile, siding & swimming pool repairs. Finished basements, pavers and retaining walls, concrete & stonework, outdoor kitchens & custom brick ovens, storm damage repairs. Insurance work & emergency repairs. FULLY INSURED www.pridelandhomes.com

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ROCHESTER’S REMODELING CONTRACTOR • Painting • Plaster & Drywall • Masonry • Tile Work • Carpentry • Cabinetry • Electrical • Plumbing • Roofing • Foundation Work • Gutters & Drainage Systems • Waterproofing • HVAC Installation • Design-Build Projects

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32 City JUNE 1-7, 2011

Office 624-9684 • Cell 303-5386 • Dave Ogden


Place your real estate ad by calling 244-3329 ext. 23 or rochestercitynewspaper.com Ad Deadlines: Friday 4pm for Display Ads Monday at noon for Line ads > page 31

Antiques & Collectibles BUYING COINS Gold, Silver & ALL Coins, US & World Stamp albums, Entire Collections. Travel to your home. Best prices paid. Call Marc at 1-800-488-4175 CASH BUYER Pre-1980 Comic Books, Toys, Sports, ANYTHING. I travel to you and Buy EVERYTHING YOU have. Call Brian at 1-800-617-3551

Automotive ALWAYS BETTER Higher cash for your Junk Cars, Trucks and Vans. From $260-$800 or more for newer. Running or not. With free towing. Also free removale of any unwanted model in any condition. Call 585-305-5865 CA$H 4 CARS Free Towing of your junk cars and vans. $50-$5,000 or donate to our children’s charities. 482-2140 DONATE VEHICLE: RECEIVE $1000 GROCERY COUPON. NOAH’S ARC SUPPORT NO KILL SHELTERS, RESEARCH TO ADVANCE VETERINARY TREATMENTS FREE TOWING, TAX DEDUCTIBLE, NONRUNNERS ACCEPTED 1-866912-GIVE

Education HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA! Graduate in just 4 weeks!!! FREE Brochure. Call NOW! 1800-532-6546 Ext. 97 www. continentalacademy.com (AAN CAN)

Financial Services CASH NOW! Cash for your structured settlement or annuity payments.Call J.G.Wentworth.866-494-9115. Rated A+ by the Better Business Bureau.

For Sale EXERCISE BIKE $45 Irondequoit 585-746-8756 SAWMILLS Band/Chainsaw - SPRING SALE - Cut lumber any dimension, anytime. MAKE

$50 - $5,000

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CAR$

MONEY and SAVE MONEY!. In stock ready to ship. Starting at $995 www.NorwoodSawmills. com/300N 1-800-661-7746 Ext 300N

Garage and Yard Sales PENFIELD / WEBSTER Moving Sale 152 Havenshire Road, off Creek St. 40 yrs accumulation June 2,3,&4 9:00am to 4:00 pm.

Groups Forming FIBROMYALGIA/ CHRONIC PAIN? Need emotional support, connections with others or additional information? Free support, initial consult before group start date by licensed professional. Call 208-6968

Jam Section 2 TROMBONE PLAYERS NEEDED to play with one of Rochester’s Finest Big Bands. Must read. (Great Charts). Able to rehearse every oth¬er Wednesday 585-442-7480 BRIAN MARVIN Lead Vocalist, looking to join a band. Rock Star, Mr. Rochester, 255 Pearl St. 585-473-5089

HomeWork A cooperative effort of City Newspaper and RochesterCityLiving, a program of the Landmark Society.

CALLING ALL MUSICIANS OF ALL GENRES - the Rochester Music Coalition wants you! Please register on our website. For further info: www. rochestermusiccoalition.org. info@rochestermusiccoalition. org. 585-235-8412 CALLING ALL MUSICIANS OF ALL GENRES - the Rochester Music Coalition wants you! Please register on our website. For further info: www.rochestermusiccoalition. org. info@rochestermusiccoalition. org. 585-235-8412 DRUMMER NEEDED For rock band. Fast, basic style preferred. Regular rehearsals and play occasional shows 585-482-5942 DRUMMER NEEDED NOW For es¬tablished industrial metal cover band., Heated secure practice space. No rental or utility fees. Call 58/5-621-5488 FOR SALE AMP PEAVY KB60 on wheels with 2 shore mics and 2 mic stands and all cords. Excellent condition . Asking $150 Cash Only 585-889-1202 FOR SALE UPRIGHT KAY BASS Model C-1 with German bow, excellent instrument. Asking $1,100 OBO Cash Only 585889-1202 LEAD GUITAR PLAYER Needed now for established industrial metal cover band. Heated, secure practice space. No rental or utility fees. Call 585-621-5488

continues on page 34

Classic and Convenient in Park Avenue

324 Canterbury Road As the city of Rochester expanded outward from downtown at the turn of the last century, new neighborhoods were created wherever the street trolley lines were built. Neighborhoods such as the 19th Ward, Beechwood, Maplewood, and Browncroft experienced their major growth, with many handsome houses built in their respective tracts between the 1890s and 1920s. For house lovers who love to explore interiors of historic homes, the Landmark Society’s 41st Annual House and Garden Tour in the city’s Browncroft neighborhood this Saturday and Sunday will fulfill your desire to visit beautiful homes in a beautiful part of the city (for ticket information, call 546-7029 ext. 11). As you explore the Browncroft neighborhood, be sure to drive over to a beautiful historic gem at 324 Canterbury Road in the Park Avenue neighborhood. This handsome, c. 1910 Colonial Revival house awaits the owner who loves the challenge of restoring a pristine house whose original details, hardware, light fixtures, parquetedged hardwood floors, woodwork and layout await the “magic touch” that a sympathetic owner would bring to this lovely residence. The first floor features an enclosed vestibule that opens onto a spacious center hallway that extends the full width of the house. The large living room is entered via a colonnade and bi-fold wood doors with leaded glass. The room features original varnished woodwork, fireplace, and extensive bookcases with leaded glass doors. French doors open onto the large, front porch where many summer

evenings will be passed enjoying the view of the neighboring houses and gardens. To the north of the hall, one enters the dining room through another set of bi-fold wood and leaded glass doors. An unpainted coffered ceiling and built-in, floor-to-ceiling china cabinets lend the room character and elegance. The kitchen retains its original butler’s pantry with glassfront doors and pull-out drawers, as well as a 1940s stove and ceramic sink with washboard. Designed with Arts and Crafts detailing, the split staircase features varnished wood work, square newel posts, and spindles. Four spacious bedrooms are located on the second floor. The north bedroom includes a large, enclosed sleeping porch with original windows, perfect for enjoying morning coffee or an evening cocktail. The bathroom retains its original claw-footed bathtub. Lit by several dormers, the large attic includes two bedrooms and a full bathroom, in addition to ample storage space. The cozy backyard offers great potential for the gardener who appreciates mature trees and a shaded area where hosta, fern, and other shade-loving plants will thrive. This 1,848 square foot , 0.12 acre property is listed at $134,900 through Michael Dixon with Nothnagle Realtors, 585-300-9871. For more information and photos visit: http:// rochestercityliving.com/property/R151694. by Cynthia Howk Cynthia Howk is a lifelong resident of the city and is Architectural Research Coordinator at The Landmark Society of Western New York.

Trucks & Vans Free Towing 482-9988

www.cash4carsrochester.com rochestercitynewspaper.com City 33


I’m very pleased with the calls I got from our apartment rental ads, and will continue running them. Your readers respond — positively!” - M. Smith, Residential Management > page 33 LOOKING FOR LEAD GUITARIST Rhythm guitarist, & bass player, cover tunes, originals must be reli¬able, dependable. Looking for seri¬ous musicians 585-4735089 smoke-freeBrian, Mr. Rochester, Rock Star

EMPLOYMENT / CAREER TRAINING

Employment AIRLINES ARE HIRING Train for high paying Aviation Career.

FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified- Job Placement Assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance (866)296-7093

OUTGROWN SKA-PUNK? Looking for musicians for ska and rock band, especially drummer, singer, horn players. See details at www.myspace. com/mooskamovers or email mooskamovers@aol.com. Craig THE CHORUS OF THE GENESEE (CoG) has openings in all voice parts. The CoG performs a wide variety of musical styles from barbershop to Broadway, to patriotic and religious. Men of all ages. Contact Ed Rummler at 585385-2698. WANTED: Guitar, bass, drummer, singer, jam, & play out. Beginner to intermediate level OK, Call Martin 585-266-6337

Music Services PIANO LESSONS In your home or mine. Patient, experienced in¬structor teaching all ages, levels and musical styles. Call Scott: 585- 465-0219. Visit www.scottwrightmusic.com

DANCERS PT/FT, Earn BIG $$$$, 18+, no exp. necessary, Tally Ho, 1555 E. Henrietta Rd. Roch. Call 585-424-6190

Call our Live Operators Now! 1-800405-7619 EXT 2450 http://www. easywork-greatpay.com (AAN CAN)

EXPERIENCED HANDYMAN Part-Time. Experience in Electrical, Plumbing, Heating. $20 per hour. Must be insured, and have own tools, transportation, and be available for emergencies. 750-0826

PAID IN ADVANCE Make $1,000 a Week mailing brochures from home! Guaranteed Income! FREE Supplies! No experience required. Start Immediately! www. homemailerprogram.net (AAN CAN)

$$$HELP WANTED$$$ Extra Income! Assembling CD cases from Home! No Experience Necessary!

RV DELIVERY DRIVERS needed. Deliver RVs, boats and other trailers to the 48 states and

DRIVERS ROUTE SALES Immediate openings for motivated persons selling Scoops Ice Cream! Top $$$. Established Routes. Call 585-288-7590

A HORSE’S FRIEND Work with children & Horses, in a local urban program where kids “Saddle Up For Success” 585-503-4087 ahorsesfriend@yahoo.com

STANLEY STEEMER CARPET CLEANER

ADOPTED ADULTS WANTED! Adoption Resource Network at Hillside is looking for a few adults who were adopted to volunteer for the AdoptMent program. AdoptMent matches adult adoptees with children who are somewhere in the adoption process. AdoptMent youth and adults meet as a group and individually for one hour a week from September until June. Training and support are provided. If you are interested, please call or email Shari Bartlett at 585-350- 2529, sbartlet@hillside.com.

Stanley Steemer, the nation’s largest carpet cleaner, has full-time positions available with paid training.

HAS YOUR BUILING SHIFTED OR SETTLED? Contact Woodford Brothers Inc,for straightening, leveling, foundation and wood frame repairs at 1-800-OLDBARN. www.woodfordbros. com. “Not applicable in Queens county” YOUR WISH IS Your Command! Revolutionary discovery goes beyond “Law of Attraction.” Create wealth, love, happiness! Limited time offer, $300 value, 14-CD set, yours FREE! Call 1800-591-0346 NOW.

Must have valid license. Benefits available. Drug-free workplace. Visit us at

StanleySteemer.com

Fax resume to 244-4555 or Call 244-4445 ext.202

GREAT CAREERS START HERE NOW HIRING

• Resident Counselor • Habilitaon Specialist • Community Respite Provider Support adults and children with developmental disabilies lead a full life. Hours include evenings, weekends and overnights. Outstanding benefits for full-me and part-me employees. Apply online today: www.futureyoucareers.org For more informaon call: (585) 340-2079 EOE

34 City JUNE 1-7, 2011

VACCINE VOLUNTEERS NEEDED Consider taking part in HIV vaccine research studies at the University of Rochester Medical Center. A preventive HIV vaccine can help STOP the global AIDS crisis. If you are HIV negative, healthy and age 1850, YOU may qualify. Vaccines are syn¬thetic and it is IMPOSSIBLE to get HIV from the vaccine. Being in a study is more like donating blood. Participants will be paid an average of $750. For more information, visit www.rochestervictoryalliance.org. To learn if you qualify, or to sched¬ule an appointment, call (585) 7562329 (756-2DAY).

Volunteers

Miscellaneous ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE From home. *Medical, *Business, *Paralegal, *Accounting, *Criminal Justice. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. Call 888-2018657 www.CenturaOnline.com

Canada. For details log on to www. horizontransport.com

CENTER FOR YOUTH is looking for households to serve as Host Homes to house 12-18 year old for 1 -14 nights of care. Adults must be caring, respectful and an interest in helping teens. Must pass a thorough background check. Call 473-2464 X 112 for information. COMPEER’S “50 PROMISED” CAMPAIGN is underway! Volunteers needed to mentor youth experiencing parental incarcera¬tion. Spend rewarding time each month doing fun activities. Vehicle needed, training/support provided. Laura Ebert/Compeer lebert@compeer.org 585-546-8280 Ext-117 FOSTER PARENTS WANTED! Monroe County is looking for adults age 21 and over to consider opening their homes to foster children. Call 334-9096 or visit www.MonroeFosterCare.org. Monroe County, 585- - ad #3, Start 03/23/11 4X • Page 1

ACTIVISM

SUMMER JOBS FOR THE ENVIRONMENT

NYPIRG is now hiring students, grads and others for an urgent campaign to protect our air and water. Make a difference while getting paid! F/T positions available. EOE Call Chris: 585-232-7990


Rent your apartment special third week is

FREE

Place your ad by calling 244-3329 ext. 23 or rochestercitynewspaper.com Ad Deadlines: Friday 4pm for Display Ads Monday at noon for Line ads

EMPLOYMENT / CAREER TRAINING LITERACY VOLUNTEERS OF ROCHESTER Has several 1 hour preview sessions scheduled for anyone interested in becoming a tutor. No prior teaching experience is required. For info call Shelley Alfieri at 585-473-3030 MEALS ON WHEELS Needs Volunteers! Do you have an hour and a smile? Deliver meals during lunchtime to homebound neigh¬bors. Interested? Call 7878326 to help.

cen¬tered non-denominational church in the early stages of development. Individuals, groups, and musicians are welcomed. Call 585-957-6155. VOLUNTEERS NEEDED To assist with praise and worship. Living Waters Fellowship is a Christ cen¬tered non-denominational church in the early stages of development. Individuals, groups, and musicians are welcomed. Call 585-957-6155.

VOLUNTEERS OF AMERICA Have time after getting your children off to school? Help out with general of¬fice work or retail processing. Help us continue serving those in need. 585-647-1150 visit www. voawny.org. VOLUNTEERS OF AMERICA Have time after getting your children off to school? Help out with general of¬fice work or retail processing. Help us continue serving those in

NEW FIBRO SUPPORT Group is seeking volunteers for all positions, long-term & short-term Call Brenda 585-341-3290 YMCA

THE LUPUS FOUNDATION OF GENESEE VALLEY welcomes volunteers to help weekly, monthly or once a year. We match your interests with our projects. Each volunteer makes a difference. Call 585-2882910. VOLUNTEERS NEEDED To assist with praise and worship. Living Waters Fellowship is a Christ

VOLUNTEERS OF AMERICA Have time after getting your children off to school? Help out with general of¬fice work or retail processing. Help us continue serving those in need. 585-647-1150 visit www. voawny.org. VOLUNTEERS OF AMERICA Is re¬cruiting committed individuals to help with monthly birthday

parties for homeless children, afterschool clubs at the Children’s Center and to sort books for the EBay sales division. 585-647-1150 for or vis¬it www.voawny.org. WEBSITE DEVELOPER Must be knowledgeable and experienced to create for new non-profit. Serious inquiries email resume to: jacolyn_ fibrosupport@hotmail;

Career Training TRACTOR TRAILER TRAINING: National Tractor Trailer School, Liverpool/Buffalo branch NY. Approved for Veterans, Financial Aid, Housing, Pre- Training Employment Offers if qualified. 1-888-2439320. www.ntts.edu

We Are Upsizing!

3 Sales & 2 Management

NEW FIBRO SUPPORT Group is seeking volunteers for all positions, long-term & short-term Call Brenda 585-341-3290 YMCA OMBUDSMAN VOLUNTEERS NEEDED! LIFESPAN If you are a good listener, like resolving prob¬lems and want to protect the rights of older individuals in long term care, Call 585-244-8400 Ext. 178

need. 585-647-1150 visit www. voawny.org.

Serving Northwest Monroe County Non-medical agency seeking Caring & Mature Individuals Part-time Only. Must have own Transportation. Enjoy a special kind of job that pays you to help the elderly stay independent. Run errands, light housework, prepare meals and provide companionship. Some assignments, strictly housecleaning. Applications accepted Monday-Friday, 10AM-3PM

positions available. Leads provided, full comprehensive benefits package, first year $40,000-50,000

Contact Pat Lomando (585) 615-8686

Home Instead Senior Care

105 Canal Landing Blvd., Suite 5 Rochester, NY 14626 • 585-663-4620 Ext. 3

Lifetime Care Career Info Night JOIN US FOR HORS D’OEUVRES & REFRESHMENTS

Thursday, June 16th 5:30pm-7:30pm Mario’s Italian Restaurant 2740 Monroe Ave. Rochester

32” FLAT SCREEN TV RAFFLE

NOW RECRUITING FOR: RSVP YOUR ATTENDANCE • RNs & LPNs by June 15, 2011 • Pharmacists to (585) 214-1133 • Pharmacy Technicians • Physical Therapists • Occupational Therapists CAN’T ATTEND? • Speech Therapists To learn more and apply, visit: • Home Health Aides www.lifetimecare.org

Direct Care On-the-Spot Interviews at CDS We are in need of compassionate, reliable, and honest direct care employees with a service first attitude, join our team of highly skilled dedicated employees. Full time, Part-time, evenings and overnight shifts available. Must have HS Diploma or GED, a valid drivers license for 2 yrs and acceptable driving record. FT/PT openings $9.00-$10.45 based on exp working with people with developmental disablilities.

Wolf Life Transition Center

Continuing Developmental Services

860 Hard Rd. Webster, NY 14580 Mon.-Thurs. 8:30am-4:00pm Fri. 9am-2pm

It’s all about disabilities.

rochestercitynewspaper.com City 35


Legal Ads [ LEGAL NOTICE ] of formation of limited liability company (LLC) JACK SMITH ARCHIVE, LLC. Articles of Organization filed with the Secretary of State of the State of New York (SSNY) on April 19, 2011. Office location: 2000 HSBC Plaza, 100 Chestnut Street, Rochester, Monroe County, New York 14604. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 2000 HSBC Plaza, 100 Chestnut Street, Rochester, New York 14604. Purpose: to engage in any lawful act or activity. [ LEGAL NOTICE ] Notice of formation of limited liability company (LLC) MAD COOL FITNESS, LLC. Articles of Organization filed with the Secretary of State of the State of New York (SSNY) on April 8, 2011. Office location: 2000 HSBC Plaza, 100 Chestnut Street, Rochester, Monroe County, New York 14604. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 2000 HSBC Plaza, 100 Chestnut Street, Rochester, New York 14604. Purpose: to engage in any lawful act or activity [ NOTICE ] 1989 Seabold Runabout HIN #BXJ02228J889, Tom Heindl Date of Sale 06/17/11 10:00am Voyager Boats. [ NOTICE ] B>NEW PARADIGM PRINTING SOLUTIONS, LLC, a domestic Limited Liability Company (LLC), filed with the Sec of State of NY on 4/15/11. NY Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of any process against the LLC served upon him/her to Brenton T. Bassi, 6580 Redman Rd., Brockport, NY 14420. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] Broccolo Property Management, LLC (LLC) filed Arts. of Org. with NY Secy. of State (SS) on 5/4/11. LLC’s office is in Monroe Co. SS is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS shall mail a copy of any process to LLC’s principal business location at 370 Canfield

Rd. Pittsford, NY 14534. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ]

Rochester, NY 14609. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ]

Chambers & Oe NY LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 4/19/2011. Office in Monroe Co. SSNY desig. agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 2255 Lyell Ave., Rochester, NY 14606, which is also the principal business location. Purpose: Any lawful purpose.

Formation of The Abbatoy Law Firm, PLLC, Art of Org filed with Sec’y of State (SSNY) 3/11/11. SSNY designated as agent of PLLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY may mail process to principal business address: 250 Mill Street, Rochester, 14614. County: Monroe. Purpose: any lawful activity.

[ NOTICE ]

[ NOTICE ]

CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGISTS OF ROCHESTER PLLC (PLLC) filed Arts. of Org. with NY Secy. of State (SS) on 4/21/2011. PLLC’s office is in Monroe Co. SS is designated as agent of PLLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS shall mail a copy of any process to PLLC, 1577 South Avenue, Rochester, NY 14620. PLLC’s purpose: any lawful activity.

GLOWCITY, LLC a domestic Limited Liability Company (LLC), filed with the Sec of State of NY on 4/7/11. NY Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of any process against the LLC served upon him/her to The LLC, 650 Klem Rd., Webster, NY 14580. General Purposes.

[ NOTICE ] Crash Data Specialists, LLC filed Arts. of Org. with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 03/04/2011. Office Location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC : C/O United States Corporation Agents Inc., 7014 13th Ave., Suite 202 Brooklyn, NY 11228. Purpose: Any Lawful Purpose [ NOTICE ] Elody & Co, LLC filed Articles of Organization with the NYS on May 11, 2011. Its principal office is in Monroe County, New York. The principal business location is 383 Park Avenue, Rochester, NY 14607. The Secretary of State has designated as its agent and post office address to which the Secretary of State shall mail a copy of any process against is c/o Elody & Co, LLC, 383 Park Avenue, Rochester, NY 14607. Purpose: Any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] ENCEL HOMES REALTY LLC, a domestic Limited Liability Company (LLC), filed with the Sec of State of NY on 4/7/11. NY Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of any process against the LLC served upon him/her to The LLC, 96 Empire Blvd.,

36 City JUNE 1-7, 2011

[ NOTICE ] GRT MANAGEMENT LLC, Articles of Org. filed N.Y. Sec. of State (SSNY) 22nd day of February 2011. Office in Monroe Co. at 53 Country Corner Lane, Fairport, New York 14450. SSNY desig. agt. upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 53 Country Corner Lane, Fairport, New York 14450. Reg. Agt. upon whom process may be served: Spiege l& Utera, P.A., P.C. 1 Maiden Lane, NYC 10038 1 800 576-1100 Purpose: Any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Homes by Helen, LLC filed Articles of Organization with the NYS on January 20, 2011. Its principal office is in Monroe County, New York. The principal business location is 145 Quesada Drive, Rochester, NY 14616. The Secretary of State has designated as its agent and post office address to which the Secretary of State shall mail a copy of any process against is c/o Homes by Helen, 145 Quesada Drive, Rochester, NY 14616. Purpose: Any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] J. DANIELS PROPERTIES, LLC (LLC) filed Arts. of Org. with NY Secy. of State (SS) on March 30, 2011. LLC’s office is in Monroe County. SS is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS shall mail a copy of any

process to LLC’s principal business location at 1600 Lyell Avenue, Suite C, Rochester, NY 14606. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Name of LLC: Smails Property Group, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State on 5/10/11. Office location: Monroe County. Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: 983 John Leo Dr., Webster, NY 14580. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Name: JTLT Enterprises, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 04/12/2011. Office Location: Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to: C/O JTLT Enterprises, LLC, 90 Fairlawn Dr. Rochester, NY 14617. Purpose: Any Lawful Purpose. [ NOTICE ]

State (SSNY) 4/5/2011. County: Monroe. SSNY is designated Agent of LLC to whom process may be served. SSNY may mail a copy of any process to LLC, 16 Fallwood Ter. Hilton, NY 14468. Purpose any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice is hereby given that a license number not yet assigned for a beer license has been applied for by Timber Ridge Golf Club LLC dba Timber Ridge Golf Club, 7061 West Ridge Road Brockport, NY 14420, County of Monroe, Town of Clarkson, for a golf cart. [ NOTICE ] Notice is hereby given that a license number not yet assigned for a full on premise beer, wine & liquor wine license has been applied for by Timber Ridge Golf Club LLC dba Timber Ridge Golf Club, 7061 West Ridge Road Brockport, NY 14420, County of Monroe, Town of Clarkson, for a restaurant.

NEBOVISTA, LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 5/6/2011. Office in Monroe Co. SSNY desig. agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 2255 Lyell Ave., Rochester, NY 14606, which is also the principal business location. Purpose: Any lawful purpose.

[ NOTICE ]

[ NOTICE ]

[ NOTICE ]

Not. of Form. of Cianciana Property Management, LLC, filed Art. Of Org. with NY Sec’y of State (SSNY) on 4/4/11. LLC’s office is in Monroe Co. SSNY is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of any process to 147 Woodsong La. Rochester, NY 14612. Purpose: any lawful purpose.

Notice is hereby given that license, number not yet assigned, for beer & wine has been applied for by CIMINO ENTERPRISES INC dba PAPA C’s EASTSIDE CAFE PIZZA, PASTA & GRILL, 303 Macedon Ctr. TL Rd, Ste #1 Fairport NY 14450, County of Monroe, for a restaurant.

[ NOTICE ]

Notice of Formation M. P. Grant LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 01/21/2011. Office location: Monroe County, Princ. Office of LLC: 227 Genesee Pk. Blvd. Rochester, NY 14619. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the address of its prin. Office. Purpose: Any lawful activity.

Not. of Form. of Dragon Phoenix Properties, LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 3/11/11. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 270 Hayward Ave. Rochester, NY 14609. Purpose: any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Not. Of Form. Of FarmFresh Longboard Co., LLC. Art. Of Org. filed with NY Secretary of

Notice is hereby given that a license number not yet assigned for a restaurant beer & wine license has been applied for by SDADJ LLC dba EL COQUI, 1182 Dewey Ave., Rochester, NY 14613, County of Monroe, City of Rochester, for a restaurant.

[ NOTICE ]

[ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of BLACK CREEK EQUITIES LLC. Arts. of

Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 05/20/11. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, P.O. Box 418, N. Chili, NY 14514. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of BW Fayette, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with NY Secy. of State (SSNY) on 04/25/2011. Office in Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to PO Box 18005, Rochester, NY 14618. Purpose: any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of COBB’S LANE LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 5/9/11. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, Attn: Dan Morgenstern, 114 St. Paul St., Rochester, NY 14604. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of EAST BROWN, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 05/06/11. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 336 Averill Ave., Rochester, NY 14620. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Ellicott Shores Apartments LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State on 4/22/11. Office location: Monroe County. Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: 349 W. Commercial St., Suite 3100, East Rochester, NY 14445. Purpose: all lawful purposes. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of High Falls IT Company LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of New York (SSNY) on 5/16/11. Office Location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served.

SSNY shall mail copy of process to: The LLC, 2604 Elmwood AV #306, Rochester, NY 14618. Purpose of LLC is any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Ivy Bridge Townhomes, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Sec’y of State of NY (“SSNY”) on April 22, 2011. Office location Monroe County. the SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. The SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at 21 Crossbow Dr. Penfield, NY 14526. Purpose any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of JVJP MANAGEMENT LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 05/20/11. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, P.O. Box 418, N. Chili, NY 14514. Purpose: Any lawful activity [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of MCGRATH ENTERPRISES LLC. Art. of Org. filed with the Sec’y of State (SSNY) on 05/17/11. Office Location: Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to 357 Lanning Road, Honeoye Falls, NY 14472. Purpose: Any Lawful Purpose. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of SAC OF ROCHESTER, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 05/17/11. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, 26 Alden Glenn Dr., Webster, NY 14580. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Timber Ridge Golf Club, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 4/21/11. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, c/o Tom J. Thomas, 55 Allied Way, Hilton, NY 14468. Purpose: any lawful activity.

[ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of JML Acquisition, LLC. Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 5/4/11. Office location: Monroe County. LLC formed in NC on 4/26/11. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. NC and principal business addr.: 201 N. Tryon St., 30th Fl., Charlotte, NC 28202. Cert. of Form. filed with NC Sec. of State, 2 S. Salisbury St., Raleigh, NC 27601. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of Kayex Holdings LLC. Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 4/25/11. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. bus. addr.: 13515 Ballantyne Corporate Place, Charlotte, NC 28277. LLC formed in DE on 3/28/11. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. DE addr. of LLC: 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of KOEHLER-BRIGHT STAR LLC. Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 05/05/11. Office location: Monroe County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 01/31/96. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Corporation Service Co., 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207-2543. DE addr. of LLC: 2711 Centerville Rd., Ste. 400, Wilmington, DE 19808. Cert. of Form. filed with Secy. of State of DE, 401 Federal St., Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of L.A. DARLING COMPANY LLC. Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 04/19/11. Office location: Monroe County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 04/28/58. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served.


Legal Ads SSNY shall mail process to c/o Corporation Service Co. (CSC), 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207-2543. DE addr. of LLC: CSC, 2711 Centerville Rd., Ste. 400, Wilmington, DE 19808. Cert. of Form. filed with Secy. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of WALTHAM SERVICES, LLC. Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 04/19/11. Office location: Monroe County. LLC formed in Georgia (GA) on 06/30/10. Princ. office of LLC: 2170 Piedmont Rd., NE, Atlanta, GA 30324. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Corporation Service Co., 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207-2543. Cert. of Form. filed with GA Secy. of State, 315 W. Tower, #2 Martin Luther King Jr. Dr., Atlanta, GA 303341530. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of WG Greece SH, LLC. Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 3/29/11. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. bus. addr.: 10350 Ormsby Park Pl., Ste. 300, Louisville, KY 40223. LLC formed in DE on 11/12/10. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. DE addr. of LLC: 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of WG Penfield SH, LLC. Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 3/29/11. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. bus. addr.: 10350 Ormsby Park Pl., Ste. 300, Louisville, KY 40223. LLC formed in DE on 11/12/10. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. DE addr. of LLC: 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec.

of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] SMOKE ON THE WATER LLC, a domestic Limited Liability Company (LLC), filed with the Sec of State of NY on 3/17/11. NY Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of any process against the LLC served upon him/her to The LLC, 16 Vermont St., Rochester, NY 14609. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] STORNELLI ENTERPRISES, LLC, a domestic Limited Liability Company (LLC), filed with the Sec of State of NY on 3/11/11. NY Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of any process against the LLC served upon him/her to The LLC, 317 Alpine Knoll, Fairport, NY 14450. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] TIPS AND TOES SALON, LLC, a domestic Limited Liability Company (LLC), filed with the Sec of State of NY on 3/24/11. NY Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of any process against the LLC served upon him/her to The LLC, 3217 Spragbrook Circle, Macedon, NY 14502. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] Uncle Eddie’s Pizzeria, LLC was filed with SSNY on February 25, 2011. Office: Monroe County, SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. P.O. address which SSNY shall mail any process against the LLC served upon SSNY: Uncle Eddie’s Pizzeria, LLC, 1350 Mendon Pittsford Road, Mendon, New York 14506. Purpose is to engage in any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Verizon Wireless is proposing to install new wireless telecommunications antennas on an existing water tower at 130 West Maple Avenue, Rochester, Monroe County, NY. Nine panel antennas will be

installed in two sectors at a centerline height of 100 feet above ground level (agl) and 5 antennas will be installed at a centerline height of 123 feet agl. Support equipment will be located within an 11.5-foot by 20foot equipment shelter to be placed on the ground southwest of the water tower. Any interested party wishing to submit comments regarding the potential effects the proposed facility may have on any historic property may do so by sending such comments within 30 days of the publication of this notice to: Project 61111800-AMG c/o EBI Consulting, 21 B Street, Burlington, MA 01803 or via telephone at 585815-3290. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of 7061 WEST RIDGE RD. ASSOCIATES, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 4/13/11. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC c/o Tom J. Thomas, 55 Allied Way, Hilton, NY 14468. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] Articles of Organization with respect to RDF PROPERTY SOLUTIONS, LLC, a New York Limited Liability Company, were filed with the Secretary of State of New York on May 2, 2011. The County in New York State where its office is located is Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent of RDF PROPERTY SOLUTIONS, LLC upon whom process against it may be served, and the post office address to which the Secretary of State shall mail a copy of any process against RDF PROPERTY SOLUTIONS, LLC served upon him of her is 81 Williston Road, Rochester, New York 14616. There are no exceptions adopted by the Company, or set forth in its Operating Agreement, to the limited liability of members pursuant to Section 609(a) of the Limited Liability Company Law of the State of New York. RDF PROPERTY SOLUTIONS, LLC is formed for the purpose of managing, leasing, and operating apartment projects, office buildings, retail and wholesale commercial spaces and other real estate.

[ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] Baby Fresh Farms, LLC (LLC). Art. of Org. filed with Sec’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 3/10/2011, Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent for LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process served to: P.O. Box 10223, Rochester, NY, 14610. Purpose: any lawful activities [ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] Notice of Formation of 103 RUTGERS STREET, LLC. Articles of Organization filed with Secy. Of State of NY (SSNY) on 4/28/11. Office location: Monroe County SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to principal business location: The LLC, 789 East Avenue, Rochester, NY 14607.Purpose: any lawful activity [ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] Notice of Formation of 105 MERRIMAN STREET, LLC. Articles of Organization filed with Secy. Of State of NY (SSNY) on 4/29/11. Office location: Monroe County SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to principal business location: The LLC, 789 East Avenue, Rochester, NY 14607. Purpose: any lawful activity [ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] Notice of Formation of 11 THAYER STREET, LLC. Articles of Organization filed with Secy. Of State of NY (SSNY) on 4/28/11. Office location: Monroe County SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to principal business location: The LLC, 789 East Avenue, Rochester, NY 14607. Purpose: any lawful activity [ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] Notice of Formation of 14 OXFORD STREET, LLC. Articles of Organization filed with Secy. Of State of NY (SSNY) on 4/28/11. Office location: Monroe County SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to principal business location: The LLC, 789

East Avenue, Rochester, NY 14607.Purpose: any lawful activity [ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] Notice of Formation of 220 RUTGERS STREET, LLC. Articles of Organization filed with Secy. Of State of NY (SSNY) on 4/28/11. Office location: Monroe County SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to principal business location: The LLC, 789 East Avenue, Rochester, NY 14607. Purpose: any lawful activity [ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] Notice of Formation of 29 STRATHALLAN PARK, LLC. Articles of Organization filed with Secy. Of State of NY (SSNY) on 4/29/11. Office location: Monroe County SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to principal business location: The LLC, 789 East Avenue, Rochester, NY 14607. Purpose: any lawful activity [ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] Notice of Formation of 376 PEARL STREET, LLC. Articles of Organization filed with Secy. Of State of NY (SSNY) on 4/28/11. Office location: Monroe County SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to principal business location: The LLC, 789 East Avenue, Rochester, NY 14607. Purpose: any lawful activity [ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] Notice of Formation of 39 RUTGERS STREET, LLC. Articles of Organization filed with Secy. Of State of NY (SSNY) on 4/28/11. Office location: Monroe County SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to principal business location: The LLC, 789 East Avenue, Rochester, NY 14607. Purpose: any lawful activity [ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] Notice of Formation of 76 MEIGS STREET, LLC. Articles of Organization filed with Secy. Of State of NY (SSNY) on 4/29/11. Office location: Monroe County SSNY designated

as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to principal business location: The LLC, 789 East Avenue, Rochester, NY 14607. Purpose: any lawful activity [ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] Notice of Formation of 789 EAST AVENUE, LLC. Articles of Organization filed with Secy. Of State of NY (SSNY) on 4/28/11. Office location: Monroe County SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to principal business location: The LLC, 789 East Avenue, Rochester, NY 14607. Purpose: any lawful activity [ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] Notice of Formation of 83 MERRIMAN STREET, LLC. Articles of Organization filed with Secy. Of State of NY (SSNY) on 4/28/11. Office location: Monroe County SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served .SSNY shall mail process to principal business location: The LLC, 789 East Avenue, Rochester, NY 14607. Purpose: any lawful activity [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF BOULDER ARMS, LLC ] Boulder Arms, LLC filed Articles of Organization with the NY secretary of State on May 6, 2011. (1) Its principal office is in Monroe County, New York. (2) The secretary of State has been designated as its agent upon whom process against it may be served and its post office address to which the Secretary of State shall mail a copy of any process against it served upon him or her is c/o Boulder Arms, LLC, 1580 Westfall Road, Rochester, New York 14618 (3) The character or purpose of its business is to engage in any lawful activity for which limited liability companies may be organized under Section 203 of the Limited Liability Company Act. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF isquare, llc ] Notice of formation of Limited Liability Company (“LLC”). Articles of Organization filed with Sec. of State of NY (“SSNY”) on April 15, 2011. Office location: 85 Excel Drive, Rochester, NY 14621, Monroe County. SSNY

has been designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of any process to the LLC, 85 Excel Drive, Rochester, NY 14621. Purpose: to engage in any lawful activity.

process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to CT Corporation System, 111 Eighth Avenue, NY, NY 10011 which is also the registered agent upon whom process may be served. Purpose: Any lawful activity.

[ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY ]

[ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF ONE WHIPPLE LANE LLC ] First: ONE WHIPPLE LANE LLC, a Limited Liability Company, filed Articles of Organization with the Secretary of State of New York on March 28, 2011. Second: The county within this state in which the office of the limited liability company is to be located is Monroe. Third: The Secretary of State is designated as agent of the limited liability company upon whom process against it may be served. The post office address within or without this state to which the Secretary of State shall mail a copy of any process against the limited liability company served upon him or her is: 1835 St. Paul Street, Rochester, New York 14621. Fourth: The purpose of the business of ONE WHIPPLE LANE LLC is any lawful purpose.

PITTSFORD PAINTING, LLC (“LLC”), has filed Articles of Organization with the NY Secretary of State (“NYSS”) on 3/9/2011 pursuant to Section 203 of the NY Limited Liability Law. The office of the LLC shall be located in Monroe County, NY. The NYSS is designated as the agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served, and the address to which the NYSS shall mail a copy of any process served on him against the LLC is C/O United States Corporation Agents, Inc., 7014 13th Avenue, Brooklyn, New York 11228. The purpose of the LLC is to engage in any lawful act or activity for which limited liability companies may be formed under the law. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY ] NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY The name of the Limited Liability Company is HOT DELICIOUS DELIVERED, LLC. (the Company). The Articles of Organization of the Company were filed with the Secretary of State on April 21, 2011. The office of the Company within the State of New York is in the County of Monroe. The Secretary of State of the State of New York is hereby designated as Agent of the Company for the purpose of service of Process. The address to which the Secretary of State shall mail a copy of any process against the Company served upon him/her is PO Box 30783 Rochester, NY 14603. The character and purpose of the business of the Company shall be purchase and remodeling of residential units. NOTICE OF FORMATION OF NEWTERRA Newterra, LLC (the “LLC”) filed Articles of Organization with NY Secretary of State (SSNY) 5/19/11. Office location: Monroe County, NY. Principal business location: 1265 Scottsville Rd, Rochester, NY 14624. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom

[ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF RED & WHITE HOLDINGS, LLC ] The name of the Limited Liability Company is Red & White Holdings, LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the New York Secretary of State on 4/21/2011. The office of the LLC is in Monroe County. The New York Secretary of State is designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. The Secretary of State shall mail a copy of such process to 10 Algonquin terrace, Rochester, NY 14611. The LLC is organized to engage in any lawful activity for which an LLC may be formed under NY LLC Law. [NOTICE OF SALE ] Index No. 2010-14329 SUPREME COURT STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF MONROE ESL Federal Credit Union Plaintiff vs. Mark S. Polizzi, a/k/a Mark L. Polizzi; NY Financial Services LLC; Frontier Telephone of Rochester, Inc.; Rochester General Hospital; Steven Chatwin, as Trustee of the I.L. Bunis Family Trust; ESL Federal Credit Union; Portland Pediatric Group LLC; “John Doe” and/or “Mary Roe”, Defendants. Pursuant to a Judgment

cont. on page 38 rochestercitynewspaper.com City 37


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Legal Ads > page 37 of Foreclosure and Sale dated May 9, 2011 and entered herein, I, the undersigned, the Referee in said Judgment named, will sell at public auction in the front vestibule of the Monroe County Office Building, 39 West Main Street, Rochester, New York, County of Monroe, on June 15, 2011 at 9:00 a.m., on that day, the premises directed by said Judgment to be sold and therein described as follows: ALL THAT TRACT OR PARCEL OF LAND, situate in the Town of Irondequoit, County of Monroe and State of New York, being part of Subdivision 4 and 5 of Town Lot No. 43, Township 14, Range 67, and more particularly described as being Lot No. 36 of the Densmore Heights Subdivision, Addition No. 1, Sec. 1, as shown on a map of said subdivision entitled “Addition No. 1, Densmore Heights, Sec. 1,” made by LaDieu and Eshbaugh, Surveyor and Engineer, dated July 24, 1964, and filed in Monroe County Clerk’s Office in Liber 165 of Maps at page 5, on January 11, 1965. Said lot #36 fronts 85 feet on the east side of Densmore Road in said subdivision, is the same width in rear and 121.34 feet in depth throughout, all as shown on said above referred to map. Tax Acct. No. 092.112.76; Property Address: 218 Densmore Road, Town of Irondequoit, New York Said premises are sold subject to any state of facts an accurate survey may show, zoning restrictions and any amendments thereto, covenants, restrictions, agreements, reservations, and easements of record and prior liens, if any, municipal departmental violations, and such other provisions as may be set forth in the Complaint and Judgment filed in this action. Judgment amount: $68,108.39 plus, but not limited to, costs, disbursements, attorney fees and additional allowance, if any, all with legal interest DATED: May 2011 Matthew J. Fero, Esq., Referee LACY KATZEN LLP Attorneys for Plaintiff130 East Main Street Rochester, New York 14604 Telephone: (585) 324-5767 [ NOTICE OF SALE ] Index No. 2010-9211 SUPREME COURT STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF MONROE ESL Federal Credit Union, Plaintiff, vs. Paul M. Meyer; Kathleen R. Moran; ESL Federal

38 City JUNE 1-7, 2011

Credit Union; “John Doe” and/or “Mary Roe” Defendants. Pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale dated February 17, 2011 and entered herein, I, the undersigned, the Referee in said Judgment named, will sell at public auction in the front vestibule of the Monroe County Office Building, 39 West Main Street, Rochester, New York, County of Monroe, on June 23, 2011 at 9:00 a.m., on that day, the premises directed by said Judgment to be sold and therein described as follows: ALL THAT TRACT OR PARCEL OF LAND, situate in the Town of Irondequoit, County of Monroe and State of New York, known and described as follows: The southerly part of Lot 39, Huntington Hills Tract, as shown on a map of said Huntington Hills Tract, filed in the Monroe County Clerk’s Office in Liber 49 of Maps, page 16 and 17. Said southerly part of Lot 39 is more particularly described as follows: Commencing at a point distant 122.53 feet southerly of the north line of Lot 39 as measured along a road or lane lying to the east of said Lot 39. Said point of commencing being further described as distant 122.53 feet southerly of the northeast corner of Lot 39; thence westerly along a line 120 feet southerly of the north line of Lot 39 and parallel to said north line of Lot 39 a distance of 267.19 feet to the east line of Hoffman road thence southerly along the east line of Hoffman Road a distance of 115.94 feet to a point of curvature; thence continuing southerly along the east line of Hoffman Road a distance of 141.60 feet to a point; thence continuing southerly along the east line of Hoffman Road 98.65 feet to the point of intersection of the east line of Hoffman Road with the northerly line of a lane or right of way shown on said tract map; thence along the northerly line of said lane or right of way and forming an interior angle of 50º 9’, a distance of 109.74 feet to a point of curvature; thence continuing along the northwesterly and westerly side of said lane or right of way, a distance of 62.46 feet to a point; thence continuing northerly along the westerly line of said lane or right of way a distance of 184.06 feet to the place of beginning. Excepting, however and reserving right of way

and easement reserved in Liber 2623 of Deeds at page 351. ALSO ALL THAT TRACT OR PARCEL OF LAND, situate, lying and being in the Town of Irondequoit, County of Monroe, State of New York, being the extreme southerly portion of Lot 39, Huntington Hills Tract, as shown on a map of said tract filed in the Monroe County Clerk’s Office in Liber 49 of Maps, page 16 and 17, bounded and described as follows: Commencing at the point of intersection of the south line of Lot 39 with the east line of Hoffman Road; thence northeasterly along a lane or roadway and forming an interior angle of 55º 53’ 45” a distance of 124.78 feet along the easterly line of said roadway to a point; thence continuing on a curve having a radios of 79.52 feet along the southerly line of a road or lane to a point distant 201.22 feet northwesterly from the southeast corner of Lot 39, measured along the southerly line of a road or lane to the southeast corner of Lot 39; thence westerly along the south line of Lot 39 a distance of 331.86 feet to the place of beginning, excepting and reserving however, from said last above described parcel so much of the southerly portion of Lot 39, as was conveyed for the purpose of laying a road or lane lying northerly of said parcel above described by instrument recorded in the Monroe County Clerk’s Office in Liber 2418 of Deeds page 365. Also conveying that parcel in the Town of Irondequoit, County of Monroe, State of New York, which is the fractional share in and to the Common Areas and former Garden Plots as provided in Conveyance of Common Areas of Hunting Hills Subdivision to Owners of Residential Lots therein dated April 28, 1976 and recorded in Monroe County Clerk’s Office in Liber 5015 of Deeds, page 67. Tax Acct. No.: 077.06-1-10 Property Address: 478 Hoffman Road, Town of Irondequoit, New York Said premises are sold subject to any state of facts an accurate survey may show, zoning restrictions and any amendments thereto, covenants, restrictions, agreements, reservations, and easements of record and prior liens, if any, municipal departmental violations, and such other provisions as may be set forth in the Complaint and Judgment filed in this action. Judgment amount: $148,737.23 plus, but not limited to, costs, disbursements, attorney fees and additional allowance, if

any, all with legal interest. DATED: May 2011 Adrian J. Burke, Esq., Referee LACY KATZEN LLP Attorneys for Plaintiff 130 East Main Street Rochester, New York 14604 Telephone: (585) 324-5767 [ NOTICE] Notice of Formation of 27 COUNTY CLARE, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 4/27/11. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, Attn: James Verdi, 30 North Union St., Rochester, NY 14607. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ SUMMONS AND NOTICE ] Index No.: 11144/2010. Mortgaged Premises: 45 Birch Crescent, Rochester, (City of Rochester) N.Y. 14607. STATE OF NEW YORK - SUPREME COURT - COUNTY OF MONROE CITIMORTGAGE, INC., Plaintiff, vs. PAUL G. SWAN; Defendants. TO THE ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANTS: YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED to answer the Complaint in the above entitled action and to serve a copy of your Answer on the plaintiff’s attorney within twenty (20) days after the service of this Summons, exclusive of the day of service, or within thirty (30) days after completion of service where service is made in any other manner than by personal delivery within the State. The United States of America, if designated as a defendant in this action, may answer or appear within sixty (60) days of service hereof. In case of your failure to appear or answer, judgment will be taken against you by default for the relief demanded in the Complaint. NOTICE OF NATURE OF ACTION AND RELIEF SOUGHT THE OBJECT of the above captioned action is for the foreclosure of: Mortgage bearing the date of November 26, 2001, executed by Paul G. Swan, an unmarried man to ABN AMRO Mortgage Group, Inc., a Delaware Corporation to secure the sum of $ 66,970.00, and interest, and recorded in the Office of the Clerk of Monroe County on November 27, 2001 in Book: 15815 Page: 592. CitiMortgage Inc. is successor by merger to ABN AMRO Mortgage Group, Inc., a Delaware Corporation. Loan

Modification bearing the date of April 8, 2008, executed by Paul G. Swan to CitiMortgage, Inc. to secure the sum of $ 72,697.43, with interest. The relief sought in the within action is a final judgment directing the sale of the premises described above to satisfy the debt secured by the Mortgage described above. Plaintiff designates Monroe County as the place of trial. The basis of venue is the County in which the mortgaged premises is situated. (Section: 106.83, Block: 1, Lot: 23) NOTICE YOU ARE IN DANGER OF LOSING YOUR HOME If you do not respond to this summons and complaint by serving a copy of the answer on the attorney for the mortgage company who filed this foreclosure proceeding against you and filing the answer with the court, a default judgment may be entered and you can lose your home. Speak to an attorney or go to the court where your case is pending for further information on how to answer the summons and protect your property. Sending a payment to your mortgage company will not stop this foreclosure action. YOU MUST RESPOND BY SERVING A COPY OF THE ANSWER ON THE ATTORNEY FOR THE PLAINTIFF (MORTGAGE COMPANY) AND FILING THE ANSWER WITH THE COURT. DAVIDSON FINK LLP Attorneys for Plaintiff Foreclosure Department 28 East Main Street, Suite 1700 Rochester, New York 14614 Tel: (585) 7608218 WE ARE ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. To the above named defendants: The foregoing summons is served upon you by publication pursuant to an order of the Hon. Francis A. Affronti, a Justice of the Supreme Court of the State of N.Y., dated May 19, 2011 and filed along with the supporting papers in the Monroe County Clerk’s Office. This is an action to foreclose a mortgage. The premises is described as follows: All that tract or parcel of land, situate in the City of Rochester, County of Monroe and State of New York. Premises known as 45 Birch Crescent, Rochester, N.Y. 14607.


Fun

[ rehabilitating mr. wiggles ] BY neil swaab

[ news of the weird ] BY CHUCK SHEPHERD Rights of women are severely restricted in Pakistan’s tribal areas and among Muslim fundamentalists, but the rights of the country’s estimated 50,000 “transgenders” blossomed in April when the country’s Supreme Court ordered the government to accept a “third sex” designation on official documents (instead of forcing a choice of “male” or “female”). The court further recommended that transgenders be awarded government job quotas and suggested “tax collector” as one task for which they are particularly suited, since their presence at homes and businesses still tends to embarrass debtors into paying up quickly (especially since many transgenders outfit themselves, and behave, flamboyantly).

Police Report

(1) Homeless Charles Mader, a convicted sex offender in Albuquerque, was arrested in May for failure to report his change of address, as required by law. Mader had moved out of his registered address, which was a Dumpster, into a community shelter. (2) Robert Norton Kennedy, 51, was arrested in Horry County, S.C., in May and charged with assault and battery, despite the humble tattoo on his forehead referencing a Bible verse and reading, “Please forgive me if I say or do anything stupid.”

Great Art!

Occasionally (as News of the Weird has reported), patrons of art galleries mistake ordinary objects as the actual art (for example, solemnly “contemplating” a broom inadvertently left behind by a janitor), and sometimes the opposite mistake occurs. At the Boijmans van Beuningen museum in Rotterdam in May, a wandering patron absent-mindedly traipsed through a re-creation of Wim T. Schippers’ floor-level Peanut Butter Platform (a 40-square-foot installation of

creamy spread). (The museum manager had declined to fence in the exhibit, which he said would spoil its beauty.)

Chutzpah!

-- A college senior in Colorado complained long-distance in March to the Better Business Bureau in Minnesota’s Twin Cities because EssayWritingCompany.com, headquartered in Farmington, Minn., failed to deliver the class paper she ordered (at $23 per page). (The meaning of “academic dishonesty” is evolving, but it is still a sometimes-expellable offense to submit someone else’s work as one’s own.) -- Filipino Henson Chua, working in the U.S., was indicted in March for illegally bringing back into the country an American-made military spy plane and openly offering it for sale for $13,000 on eBay. Sophisticated equipment such as the RQ-11B “Raven” Unmanned Aerial Vehicle requires highlevel government approval to prevent acquisition by U.S. enemies.

Cavalcade of Rednecks

(1) Sharon Newling, 58, was arrested in Salisbury, N.C., in April and charged with shooting at her stepson with a .22-caliber rifle. She denied shooting “at” him, but said she was just shooting toward him “to make him stop working on his truck.” (2) In April in Greensboro, N.C., Stephanie Preston and Bobby Duncan were married in front of family and friends at the local Jiffy Lube. (3) A 25-year-old man in Okaloosa County, Fla., was arrested and charged with misdemeanor trespassing after he entered the Club 51 Gentlemen’s Club, from which he had been banned after a February incident. The man told police that he knew he had been banned from a strip club but couldn’t remember which one.

[ LAST WEEK’S SOLUTION ON PAGE 33 ]

[ LOVESCOPE ] BY EUGENIA LAST ARIES (March 21-April 19): Review past relationships and why they didn’t work. Once you realize what qualities you want your partner to have, you will find it much easier to recognize who is a candidate for a long-term relationship and who isn’t. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Participating in community activity or attending an event or seminar of interest will draw people who share your principles and are likely to complement you emotionally, mentally and physically.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): You’ll be attracted to the wrong partners. Before you step into intimacy with someone, find out how available the person is. Avoid anyone carrying emotional baggage from a never-ending relationship. CANCER (June 21-July 22): True love comes only when it is unconditional and with no stipulations or promises. It is what it is and what makes it so great is that you both enjoy being together more than anything else in the world. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Don’t

let someone’s charm fool you into thinking that if you give as much as you can, you will get the same in return. Not everyone is as generous as you and, if you don’t protect what you have worked to acquire, it could be in jeopardy. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Mix and mingle and find out what’s available. Love is in the stars -- all you need to do is be a participant. Look for the qualities you find most desirable, like honesty, integrity and, of course, a wellbalanced bank account.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): You may be flying high when it comes to emotional encounters but, before you jump on a magic carpet ride, make sure it is going to land on solid ground. Ask the right questions before taking off. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): You’ll be drawn to someone who fills your dreams, hopes and wishes for the future. Enjoy the ride but make sure you do your part or, when things start to slow down, you will wake up to uncertainty and a desire for something better.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22Dec. 21): Your emotions may lead you in the wrong direction romantically. Don’t fall for someone you work with or for. It may lead to a compromising position, let alone unemployment. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Put your heart on the line. Don’t be afraid to spell out what you want and what you expect in return. Once you have determined what works for both you and the person you want to be with, the rest will be easy.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Before you give your heart to someone who doesn’t deserve you, think about past relationships that didn’t turn out so well. Spare yourself the anguish of dealing with someone who doesn’t measure up or have much to offer you. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Believe in who you are and what you have to offer and you will attract someone as gifted and giving as you are. Use your head, not your heart, to deduce whether someone is being legitimate with you or not.

rochestercitynewspaper.com City 39


40 City JUNE 1-7, 2011

June 1-7, 2011 - CITY Newspaper  

Cover: 2011 Rochester International Jazz Fest | News: Bolgen Vargas: a dramatic beginning | Dining Review: Joey's Pasta House | Music: Great...