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FILM: “THE HANGOVER PART III”

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RESTAURANT REVIEW: POMODORO GRILL AND WINE BAR

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URBAN JOURNAL: WAR, POLICY, AND OBAMA

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CROSSWORD

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SEAN PHILLIPS • MACK GOLDSBURY QUARTET • MADRIGALIA • THE ROTARIES • TICA DOUGLAS • AND MORE MUSIC, PAGE 12 MAY 29 - JUNE 4, 2013 Free

Greater Rochester’s Alternative Newsweekly

Vol 42 No 38

News. Music. Life.

That’s right, Vin Diesel. It’s me.” MOVIE REVIEW, PAGE 27

Pride Games come to Rochester. LGBT, PAGE 4

Monroe Community Hospital: coulda, woulda, shoulda. GOVERNMENT, PAGE 6

Bible studies: PUSH Physical Theatre’s “Arc of Ages.” DANCE, PAGE 18

PREVIEW: 2013 Shaw Festival. THEATER, PAGE 22

EDUCATION | BY TIM LOUIS MACALUSO | PAGE 8 | ILLUSTRATION BY AUBREY BERARDINI

The RCSD’s grant dependency The Rochester City School District now receives about $100 million in grant money annually from federal, state, and private funding sources. Grants make up 13 percent of the district’s new budget, and could soon eclipse the funding the district receives from the City of Rochester every year. Is there reason for concern when public schools become so dependent on grants? What happens to students, teachers, and programs after the grant funds are gone? Since virtually all of the grants come with

strings attached, how does the money impact policy decisions? And how do taxpayers know that the funding is being used judiciously? The current system has created huge disparities in school funding between wealthy and poor communities. Rochester is not alone in this predicament; many urban school districts face similar financial dilemmas. With resources so tight, grants have become the piñata the RCSD must tap for added funds.


Feedback Send comments to themail@ rochester-citynews.com, or post them on our website, rochestercitynewspaper.com, our Facebook page, or our Twitter feed, @roccitynews. For our print edition, we select comments from all three sources, and we edit those selections.

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On April 24, the Rana Plaza building – which housed six garment factories – crumbled to pieces in Bangladesh. The day before the collapse, managers told the workers that they would lose a month’s pay if they did not report to work, even though the building had giant cracks. As a result, thousands of workers entered the building and were trapped inside when it crumbled. Rescue teams rescued 2,438 people and discovered 1,127 dead bodies. A major garment purchaser, New York State spends $43 million a year on apparel, including public uniforms. The New York State law requires the government to buy its apparel from the lowest responsible bidder, but current standards are too low. “Subsidizing Sweatshops II,” a report put out by International Labor Rights Forum’s Sweatfree Communities, reported that factories supplying New York State apparel had instances of child labor use, limited bathroom breaks, dangerous working conditions, and mandated unpaid overtime. I urge Governor Cuomo to implement a Sweatfree Code of Conduct that would require these factories to respect workers’ rights and ensure safe working conditions. This policy would make exemplary factories competitive in the bidding process while elevating conditions in sweatshoplike factories. The current global economy favors countries with the lowest wages, weakest workplaces safety laws, and toughest repression of unions. This race to the bottom has caused an exodus of the garment industry from the US. Between 1990 and 2011, the Bureau of Labor Statistics reports that over 750,000 American apparel workers were laid off. I worked for over 30 years in the garment industry at Don Alleson Athletic in Geneva, New York. I worked in the cutting room as a spreader-cutter, preparing the material to be sewn into garments. I

was paid a decent wage and received good benefits. It saddened me to see the factory at which I had worked so long downsized because it could not compete with the low wages in other countries. The Code of Conduct would support higher standards that level the playing field for garment workers and support worker organizing around the world. New York State must implement a Code of Conduct to ensure that public dollars support the improvement of factory conditions rather than subsidizing lethal working conditions. With the deaths at Rana Plaza and Tazreen Fashions fresh in our minds, the time has come for New Yorkers to declare that these deadly conditions are not moral. Workers should not have to die for government-made apparel or for any apparel. SHIRLEY FRANNIE SOBCZAK

Sobczak is secretary-treasurer of Workers United-Rochester Regional Joint Board.

Bees’ demise

Europe has banned neonicotinoid pesticides, which have been linked to the loss of bees. Why not in the US – now? If we wait, we could be too late. BYRNA WEIR, BRIGHTON

On children and protests

Fifty years ago, on May 2, 1963, more than 1,000 African-American students marched into downtown Birmingham, and scores were arrested. When hundreds more gathered the following day, the local police and fire departments were directed to use force to halt the demonstrations. Images of children being blasted by high-pressure fire hoses, clubbed by police officers, and attacked by police dogs were viewed on television and in newspapers, triggering international outrage. Martin Luther King offered encouragement to parents of the young protesters: ‘‘Don’t worry about your children, they’re going to be alright. Don’t hold them back if they want to go to jail. For they are doing a job for not only themselves, but for all of America and for all mankind.’’ Children were marching in what was known as “The Children’s Crusade” to protest Birmingham’s

system of segregation by putting pressure on its merchants for their role. Meanwhile, business was faltering in the city due to the adverse publicity and pressure of the boycott. On May 10, the Birmingham Truce Agreement was signed. The power of children and parents for justice! Today, students supported by their parents have made conscious decisions to opt out of the unjust, unproven Common Core tests foisted upon them by the likes of the business community through the bankroll of Bill Gates and Achieve. The tests have no basis in research and have no evidence that they have any value whatsoever. Our children are being used as guinea pigs and as tools to shut down urban neighborhood schools, fire experienced teachers, and break unions, enabling the hiring of low-cost, unqualified (cheap) teacher surrogates. Once again, urban children of poverty shoulder the burden of these machinations by being herded into the remaining failing, overcrowded schools and being given an austere, barren curriculum of incessant test drilling that saps the life and joy out of learning. Yet parents are being attacked in editorials for using their children for adult purposes. Quite ironic to say the least, as it’s the corporate adults who are abusing our children to achieve their ends. Talk to child psychologists to understand the depth of the abuse, as I have. Children vomiting, not sleeping, fear of failure to the point of illness: the list goes on. This testing cycle, a Bethlehem, New York, fourth grader was presented a math test in his hospital bed as he was being prepared for brain surgery. It’s time to stop vilifying parents. It’s time for schools to stop punishing children for not taking tests that will not ameliorate public education but rather erode it further. It is time to celebrate the courage of their convictions and remember the wisdom of Gandhi: “First they ignore you, then they ridicule you, then they fight you, and then you win.” WILLIAM CALA

Cala is former superintendent of the Fairport school district and served as interim superintendent of the Rochester school district.

News. Music. Life. Greater Rochester’s Alternative Newsweekly May 29 - June 4, 2013 Vol 42 No 38 250 North Goodman Street Rochester, New York 14607-1199 themail@rochester-citynews.com phone (585) 244-3329 fax (585) 244-1126 rochestercitynewspaper.com Publishers: William and Mary Anna Towler Editor: Mary Anna Towler Asst. to the publishers: Matt Walsh Editorial department themail@rochester-citynews.com Features editor: Eric Rezsnyak News editor: Christine Carrie Fien Staff writers: Tim Louis Macaluso, Jeremy Moule Music editor: Willie Clark Music writer: Frank De Blase Calendar editor: Rebecca Rafferty Contributing writers: Paloma Capanna, Casey Carlsen, Roman Divezur, George Grella, Susie Hume, Andy Klingenberger, Dave LaBarge, Kathy Laluk, Michael Lasser, James Leach, Adam Lubitow, Ron Netsky, Dayna Papaleo, Suzan Pero, Rebecca Rafferty, Deb Schleede, David Yockel Jr. Art department artdept@rochester-citynews.com Art director/production manager: Matt DeTurck Designers: Aubrey Berardini, Mark Chamberlin Photographers: Mark Chamberlin, Frank De Blase, Michael Hanlon Advertising department ads@rochester-citynews.com Advertising sales manager: Betsy Matthews Account executives: Nancy Burkhardt, Tom Decker, William Towler Classified sales representatives: Christine Kubarycz, Tracey Mykins Operations/Circulation kstathis@rochester-citynews.com Circulation manager: Katherine Stathis Distribution: Andy DiCiaccio, David Riccioni, Northstar Delivery, Wolfe News City Newspaper is available free of charge. Additional copies of the current issue may be purchased for $1, payable in advance at the City Newspaper office. City Newspaper may be distributed only by authorized distributors. No person may, without prior written permission of City Newspaper, take more than one copy of each weekly issue. City (ISSN 1551-3262) is published weekly by WMT Publications, Inc. Periodical postage paid at Rochester, NY (USPS 022-138). Send address changes to City, 250 North Goodman Street, Rochester, NY 14607. City is a member of the Association of Alternative Newsweeklies and the New York Press Association. Subscriptions: $35.00 ($30.00 for senior citizens) for one year. Add $10 yearly for out-of-state subscriptions: add $30 yearly for foreign subscriptions. Due to the initial high cost of establishing new subscriptions, refunds for fewer than ten months cannot be issued. Copyright by WMT Publications Inc., 2013 - all rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, photocopying, recording or by any information storage retrieval system without permission of the copyright owner.


URBAN JOURNAL | BY MARY ANNA TOWLER

War, policy, and Obama The days leading up to Memorial Day seem a particularly appropriate time to start a broad discussion about war and national security. And President Obama tried to do that in his speech at the National Defense University last week. If his actions back up his words (and if he can persuade Congress to support him), it may prove to be the most important speech of his presidency. He got headlines for saying that we can’t live in a perpetual state of war. But he went much, much further, laying out the nature of the terrorist threats we face and prescribing a cautious, multi-faceted course to deal with them. Increasingly, national security is a complex task, and Obama’s topics covered a wide range: the war in Afghanistan, our relationship with Pakistan, drones, Muslims in America, Guantanamo Bay, sectarian violence, al Qaeda, Syria, the Boston bombings…. Overall, it was a highly significant speech, one that could define US policy in a period of troubling challenges. It offers a policy based on full recognition of the complexity of those challenges, a clear departure from the approach of the Bush administration, and a clear divergence from the wishes of some members of Congress. Obama emphasized the necessity of adhering to our laws and our principles. He warned that our actions – the use of torture, misguided wars, even the most thought-out and essential military actions – can have unintended consequences. He warned against both exaggerating and simplifying the threat of terrorism. “Neither I, nor any president, can promise the total defeat of terror,” he said. “We will never erase the evil that lies in the hearts of some human beings, nor stamp out every danger to our open society.” Our task, he said, is to protect against the terrorism that is a direct threat “while maintaining the freedoms and ideals that we defend.” Our decisions must be based “not on fear but on hard-earned wisdom,” he said. “That begins with understanding the threat that we face.” Some terrorists are “al Qaeda affiliates,” he said, intent on attacking Americans in the US. Others are groups of extremists hoping to gain political control and territory in countries like Algeria and Libya, posing a threat not to us in the US but to our diplomats and businesses in other countries. And others are “radicalized individuals here in the United States”: Timothy

“Force alone cannot make us safe,” the president said.We must also address “the underlying grievances and conflicts that feed extremism.” McVeigh in Oklahoma City in 1995, the Boston Marathon terrorists this year.... We faced terrorists like them before 9/11, Obama noted, and we’ll continue to face them. Not every “collection of thugs that labels themselves al Qaeda,” he said, “will pose a credible threat to the United States.” Use of military force, Obama said, is only one aspect of a strong national security policy: “Force alone cannot make us safe.” We also need to address “the underlying grievances and conflicts that feed extremism – from North Africa to South Asia,” he said. He called foreign aid “fundamental to our national security,” “fundamental to any sensible long-term strategy to battle extremism.” After the speech, Republicans and conservatives were furious. South Carolina Senator Lindsay Graham called the president “tone deaf ” about terrorism’s threat. But Obama’s speech was an eloquent, principled, and rational one – the result, maybe, of the president wrestling with his conscience and listening to his liberal critics. He has disappointed before, though. In a Brookings Institution post, Benjamin Wittes said that the speech was “less than meets the eye,” full of “nice words” but giving the president plenty of wiggle room. Obama cannot run for president again, so maybe he is finding some freedom that he did not see before. But for much of his national-security agenda, he will need a willing Congress and an informed public. And we are a year away from a crucial Congressional campaign. Proof of the value of his words last week – of his intent, his will, and his leadership skills – will be in what he does to flesh out his national security vision over the next three years.

rochestercitynewspaper.com

CITY 3


[ NEWS FROM THE WEEK PAST ]

Brooks delivers annual speech

Monroe County Executive Maggie Brooks touched on economic development, county partnerships, the crushing burden of state-mandated spending, and public safety in her State of the County address. She also announced that Dr. Byron Kennedy will take over as director of the county’s health department. Dr. Andrew Doniger is retiring after 23 years on the job.

Monroe GOP big in soft money

A new report by Common Cause/NY and NYPIRG says that between 2006 and 2012, the Monroe County Republican Party took in more so-called soft money contributions than any other county-level political committee in New York State: $4.4 million. By comparison, the Queens County Democratic Party’s housekeeping committee took in $3.5 million. But the Monroe GOP appears to be using the money for what state law says it should: rent, payroll, satellite TV, volunteer appreciation events, and party events, to list a few items.

Scouts still don’t get it right

News

The Boy Scouts of America will accept gay boys as scouts, but openly gay adults will not be permitted to become leaders or volunteers. After a long and contested debate, the National Council’s vote to at least partially lift the ban on gays was praised by many LGBT groups and harshly criticized by many conservative religious groups. And some LGBT groups say the new policy is still discriminatory, and sends a confusing message.

LGBT | BY TIM LOUIS MACALUSO

Pride Games for Rochester

Could Rochester become a hub for LGBT sporting events? That’s what officials at the Gay Alliance of the Genesee Valley and Bill Gray’s Iceplex, a multi-sport arena on the MCC campus, envision. In conjunction with Rochester’s Pride Week this year, ROC Pride Games will launch with a hockey tournament. The teams will play from Friday, July 19, to Sunday, July 21, which coincides with Rochester’s Pride Parade, festival, and picnic.

B+L sale

Montreal-based Valeant Pharmaceuticals is purchasing Bausch + Lomb for $8.7 billion. Many analysts familiar with both companies view the Rochester eye-health company as a good fit for the Canadian drug company. Though there has been no word from Valeant on the subject, the big question is whether job cuts at B+L will come with the deal.

Hockey is the first sport in the ROC Pride Games. ILLUSTRATION BY MATT DETURCK

“Rochester has a huge hockey community, and we’re right in the center of all of the hockey enthusiast cities,” says Chris Woodworth, director of marketing and programming at Bill Gray’s Iceplex. “We’re the epicenter of gay-specific hockey with all of these teams within six hours from here.” Officials plan to grow the games in subsequent years, Woodworth says. “Once we talked about this thing, we realized [it] could really grow and become huge,” Woodworth says. “Year one will focus on hockey and be small scale so we can learn what works from it.” They’re aiming to have six to eight hockey teams compete this year, and next year expand the games to

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include volleyball and softball, for example. Roc City Roller Derby will also participate this year with bouts on Friday, July 19, and Saturday, July 20. “We are doing something that no one else in the country has done: showcase amateur athletic competition as a way to enhance pride in our community,” says Scott Fearing, acting director of the GAGV. More information: www. rocpridegames.com.

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“Not everybody’s a gangbanger or hanging on the corner. They just need to know someone cares. Those little conversations you have with people make a difference. It’s not just about cuffing those boys up.” RPD CHIEF JAMES SHEPPARD

NEIGHBORHOODS | BY CHRISTINE CARRIE FIEN

Broken bonds People living in the City of Rochester’s troubled neighborhoods can’t wait for committees and studies and prayers to pay off. Yes, they are interested in longer-term discussions like neighborhood schools versus school choice, but they also want to know how to help themselves, their neighbors, and their children right now. Police Chief James Sheppard and City Council President Lovely Warren, who is running for mayor, held events within one day and less than two miles of each other last week in southwest Rochester. Sheppard had one of his recurring “Shop Talk” events at Junior’s Barber Shop & Unisex Salon on West Main Street, while Warren discussed education, crime, drugs, parenting, and other issues at a campaign stop at the Iglesia Educational Center on Thurston Road. Warren talked about her education plan, which includes expanding city children’s access to high-quality early education and recruiting high-performing charter operators to open schools in Rochester. Warren said she doesn’t want to get rid of the city school district, but given its poor record of success, she said city parents deserve choices. Sheppard, naturally, took questions on public safety issues, including youth fights, dog fighting, drug sales, and use of force by police.

But the common thread at both events was regret for what attendees said was a loss of community cohesion. Young people, especially young males, lack positive adult role James Sheppard. models in their lives, FILE PHOTO they said. “Not everybody’s a gangbanger or hanging on the corner,” Sheppard said. “They just need to know someone cares. Those little conversations you have with people make a difference. It’s not just about cuffing those boys up.” Karen Iglesia, founder of the Iglesia Educational Centers, said the young men she sees sometimes refer to the “3 c’s” as the only ways out of the ‘hood: the classroom, the cell block, or the cemetery. “I need you. You’re my history,” a woman said to a young man at the Sheppard event. “Why are we killing each other? Our families are so destroyed. We see each other killing each other in droves. We don’t have to know you to hurt.”

TRANSPORTATION | BY TIM LOUIS MACALUSO

More busing?

Cost of War AFGHANISTAN TOTALS —

2,227 US servicemen and servicewomen and 1,088 Coalition servicemen and servicewomen have been killed in Afghanistan from the beginning of the war and occupation to May 24. Statistics for Afghan civilian casualties are not available. American casualties from May 14 to May 16: -- Sgt. Eugene M. Aguon, 23, Mangilao, Guam -- Spc. Dwayne W. Flores, 22, Sinajana, Guam iraqbodycount. org, icasualties.org, Department of Defense

SOURCES:

Officials at the Rochester school district have asked the State Education Department for permission to change the district’s transportation policy guidelines. Superintendent Bolgen Vargas says he wants to provide elementary students who live a half-mile or more from their school with bus transportation. The current policy limits transportation to students who live a mile-anda-half or more from their school, because that’s what the state will reimburse. The district would cover the cost of the additional busing. | Vargas says providing more busing is critical. Attendance, which is already a huge problem in city schools, becomes even worse during the winter months, he says. And most parents in working-poor households are not able to easily fill in when their children miss the bus, he says. | Providing more elementary students with transportation would also encourage many families to choose their neighborhood school, Vargas says. Some parents don’t pick their neighborhood school because they don’t want their children walking through sketchy neighborhoods. | More busing will also be needed to accommodate longer school days, Vargas says. | District officials say they are confident the state will allow them to adjust the policy, and they expect to hear a response to their request by mid June.

rochestercitynewspaper.com

CITY 5


GOVERNMENT | BY JEREMY MOULE

New life for MCH advisory board At one time, the Monroe Community Hospital board was an active group that played a vital role for the facility. Its members advised staff on operations, advocated for the hospital, and helped raise money. “The advisory board was a wonderful board that acted as a cheerleader for MCH,” says Fran Weisberg, executive director of the Finger Lakes Health Systems Agency. Weisberg served on the board in the late 1970’s and early 1980’s, where she headed a federal program that placed volunteer patient advocates in nursing homes. But at some point in the early 2000’s, the board went dormant. It remained inactive until recently, following a state Department of Health report that accused then-hospital director Todd Spring of mistreating a patient (Spring has since been fired by County Executive Maggie Brooks). In response to the report, the Monroe County Legislature reactivated the board by approving a full list of appointments. The board’s status has been an issue for years, however. Legislature Democrats have pushed to reinstate the board since at least 2007, questioning why and when it stopped meeting. They’ve also asked who, if anyone, has been fulfilling the board’s notinsubstantial advisory duties. Democratic Legislator Justin Wilcox says if the board had been active in recent years, the incident involving Spring might have been avoided. Why and when the board lapsed is unclear. County officials haven’t publicly addressed those questions and may not be willing or able to — several messages left for the county’s spokesperson were not returned. And Legislature Republicans rebuffed calls from Democrats to look into the lapse. During the May 14 Legislature meeting, which is when legislators appointed the new board, Wilcox asked the body’s Republican president, Jeff Adair, why he didn’t reactivate the board sooner.

“I believe now is a timely time to do it, and I’m not going to dwell,” Adair said. Brooks briefly addressed the hospital situation in her State of the County address last week. She said that the state report showed that the hospital “failed to live up to its tradition of excellence and our mission of putting residents first as the result of one incident.” She said the hospital is committed to serving people who may not have anywhere else to go, and she mentioned that two of her grandparents received care at Monroe Community Hospital. “We have re-trained our staff on new resident care policies,” she said. “We’ve empowered a new board of community advocates. And I personally will be overseeing the implementation of the state-approved corrective plan in the months ahead.” The state-approved plan included reestablishing the hospital board. The board is supposed to advise the hospital and county administration on

staffing, patient care, hospital renovations, hospital policies and regulations, and contracts. And under county law, board members are supposed to have access to all hospital facilities and records. The board is also supposed to make an annual report to the Legislature. “Those charges are quite substantial,” Wilcox says. Whether an active advisory board would have prevented the incident described in the state report is tough, if not impossible, to say. Weisberg, who’s serving as the FLHSA’s representative on the reconstituted board, says the new board will, at minimum, provide additional oversight of the hospital. Lynda Garner Goldstein, a former county legislator who served on the board, agrees. Garner Goldstein says she left the board in 2001 and doesn’t know when the body stopped

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The County Legislature has reactivated the advisory board at Monroe Community Hospital (the hospital is pictured), but questions remain about when and why the board stopped meeting in the first place. PHOTO BY MARK CHAMBERLIN

meeting. But her experience offers insight into the role the board has historically played. The board met monthly — county law currently requires it to meet bimonthly — at the dinner hour, and members were served hospital food, she says. Members were briefed on hospital programs, who the hospital was serving, hospital renovations and plans, and contracts between the hospital and the University of Rochester Medical Center. (The URMC provides most of the medical services at the hospital, says medical center spokesperson Teri D’Agostino. Monroe Community Hospital is also a teaching site for the university’s medical and nursing students, she says.) Carol Pennington, a former board member who has also been appointed to the new board, says she believes the body’s been dormant for about 13 years. She says she’s excited to serve again. “I know it’s a good hospital,” she says. “It’s a good, caring hospital. My husband was there and received excellent care.” When the new board first meets, members

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should play, Weisberg says. And she has some thoughts on what she’d like the board to do. Like other former board members, Weisberg remembers receiving reports from the hospital administration and updates from the residents council. She says she’d like to see those practices adopted by the new board. She says she’d also like to receive updates on how the hospital is meeting the needs of patients and residents. After receiving the state’s report, County Executive Brooks hired attorney Anna Lynch to conduct an independent review of the hospital. Weisberg says the board should be briefed on Lynch’s findings. She also says the board could conduct staff and patient surveys as a means to identify unaddressed issues. The board’s new members are knowledgeable in long-term care, aging, and health care, Weisberg says, and that will be good for the hospital. “You want to use this board as a resource and a guide and as a cheerleader for an amazing institution,” she says.


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CONVENTION SCHEDULE OF EVENTS THURSDAY JUNE 6, 2013 ♦ Board of Directors Meeting 1:00 PM – Private Dining Room • 2:00 PM Candidate Interviews ♦ Evening Service – 7:30 PM – River Room • Candidate Demonstration • Thought Exchange FRIDAY JUNE 7, 2013 ♦ Board Meeting – 11:00 AM-1:00 PM – Private Dining Room ♦ Candidate Interviews – Board Room – 1:00 PM ♦ Workshop – Rev. Florence Edwards – “Journey Through the Gifts of Spirit” Demonstrations

• River Room – 3:00 PM (Donation $20.00) ♦ Healing Service – River Room – 7:30 PM (Healer Please register at registration table.) SATURDAY JUNE 8, 2013 ♦ Business Meeting – 10:00 AM – River Room ♦ 2:00-4:00 PM Workshop – NEAL RZEPOKOWSKI

Native American Healing Ceremonies – 2:00 PM – 4:00 PM ($30.00 donations) ♦ Evening Services – All Message Service – 7:00 PM

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CITY 7


The RCSD’s grant dependency EDUCATION | BY TIM LOUIS MACALUSO

Grants have become a crucial part of the Rochester City School District’s yearly budget. How important are they? Consider that the RCSD now receives about $100 million in grant money annually from federal, state, and private funding sources. And grants make up 13 percent of the budget just approved by the school board for the 2013 to 2014 school year. Grant money could soon eclipse even the funding the district receives from the City of Rochester — about $119 million a year. Jennifer Leonard, president of Rochester Area Community Foundation, says district officials should be commended for landing so many grants. She says she knows how difficult it can be, in the current economic development. But when such a substantial portion of the district’s $728 million budget is contingent upon grants, is there cause for concern? What happens to students, teachers, and programs after the grant funds are gone? Are district officials building a financial model that’s unsustainable? Since virtually all of the grants come with strings attached, how does the money impact policy decisions? And how do taxpayers know the funding is being used judiciously? Grants have become an addendum to what some critics say is a broken funding system for elementary and secondary public education in the United States. Generally speaking, funding for public schools largely comes from federal, state, and local government sources. In many suburban and rural districts, a major portion of the money comes from local property taxes. Superintendents propose a budget, the school board approves it, and then it’s put to voters. According to numerous studies, wellfunded schools have better student outcomes because they attract more qualified teachers, feature better working conditions, and have a greater ability to make major operational decisions, such as reducing class size. But the current system has created huge disparities in school funding between wealthy and poor communities. The problem is especially evident in the Rochester school district, with its largely poor, high-needs student population. Even though the district relies heavily on city revenue, Rochester’s tax base is stressed. The city has a significant number of nontaxable municipal and nonprofit properties. When that’s combined with stagnate population growth and a huge swath of housing in poor neighborhoods with depressed tax rates, it’s no wonder that city administrators are reluctant to raise taxes. And Rochester is not alone in this paradox; many urban school districts face similar financial dilemmas. The result has been a decades-long debate on how to mitigate inequalities in school funding. And there have been spirited arguments among lawmakers and educators 8 CITY

MAY 29 - JUNE 4, 2013

2012-2013 GRANT FUND SOURCES

includes federal, state, and private

*Information provided by the Rochester City School District

OTHER

28% Recurring • Services such as • universal pre-K and school health services

$31,666,196

COMPETITIVE

33%

Non-recurring • Federal & private aid • Examples include • School Improvement Grants, Gates Foundation, Race to the Top, Teacher Training

TITLE I FUNDS

30%

• Recurring • Used for expenses such as bilingual education and teacher training

$33,477,335

I.D.E.A. FUNDS

9%

• Recurring • Special education services as part of the “Individuals with Disabilities Education Act”

$10,668,551

$37,353,483

around the country about what to do when the needs of some students exceed the available resources. And there’s no indication that will change any time soon, making grants a lifeline for districts like the RCSD. Grants fall into some basic categories.

Title I grants are basically to supplement the district’s general fund, says Anita Murphy, deputy superintendent of the RCSD. Annually, billions of dollars in Title I funding are managed by the federal government through the US Department of Education. In 2010, for example, it was roughly $15 billion. The money is meant to help create equity in education for children from poor households. The funds are divided into three tiers, and provided to schools across the country with such regularity that many educators no longer view them as grants. The RCSD is using the money to support ongoing programs like reading proficiency, Murphy says. “You don’t fund hiring all reading teachers,” she says. “You fund to complement what we’re trying to do in reading.” “I think it’s really important for people to understand the difference between the grants,” Murphy says. “People often think the money can be used for a lot of different things, but the guidelines can be pretty specific.” The Individuals with Disabilities Education Act created a pot of grant funding to help students with special education needs, Murphy says. Another major funding source is School Improvement Grants, which originated in

2002 under former President George W. Bush for the sole purpose of fixing failing schools. In 2009, the Obama administration increased funding for the program, but made it much more competitive and focused on only those schools falling into the lowest performing 5 percent in each state. The states distribute the funds, which can only be used for a brief menu of school turnaround strategies. The RCSD more than qualifies for the funds. Barely a handful of city schools are not identified by the New York State Education Department as either priority or focus schools — those that already need a turnaround strategy and those that will soon become priority schools if remedial action isn’t taken. Another form of highly competitive grants emanates from private sources, such as foundations, nonprofit agencies, and businesses. The Ford and the Bill and Melinda Gates foundations are among the best known, awarding thousands of dollars to urban districts like the RCSD. But there are hundreds of others willing to fund programs in everything from music to math, teacher training, technology, and systems management. Karen Jacobs is essentially the RCSD’s doyenne of grants. As director of finance, she

oversees a staff of eight people who spend most of their time rooting out education grant sources, analyzing budgets, and writing grants. There is no pretense about how important grant money is to the district’s budget, Jacobs says. “Money and resources were already scarce and they’re becoming scarcer every year,” she

says. “We have to do our very best to go out and find new sources.” Knowing where to look for the money takes years of experience, Jacobs says. Her department has one foot in the fiscal world and the other in the program and curriculum world. “We have to fully understand the superintendent’s initiatives in every detail,” Jacobs says. “We’ll continue to look for grants that support reading proficiency, and to help implement the new [Common Core] curriculum, expanded learning through foundations and state and federal money, and universal pre-k. That’s our focus.” The grants are not just to supplement the budget, Jacobs says. They’re also needed to replace money cut from the budget. More than $1 million was cut from the city school district 2013 to 2014 budget due to sequestration — the across-the-board cuts Congress made to federal spending. “Everybody said it would never happen because it was the worst-case scenario,” Jacobs says. “But it happened and now we have to deal with it.” The RCSD occasionally receives offers of grant money, Jacobs says, but that’s extremely rare. Obtaining grants usually requires advance planning, sometimes years before the money is needed, Jacobs says, and it’s never easy. “Nobody just hands you money,” she says. “They want lots and lots of reports, and sometimes detailed plans for how it will be used. They’re all different. And there’s a strong push for collaboration between agencies and different organizations because we all have scarce resources, and they [grantors] often want to see us working together.” Monitoring the money is another of Jacobs’ main responsibilities. Federal and state authorities conduct their own audits of the money they provide through grants. “At any time they can show up in my doorway and I can be audited going back seven years,” Jacobs says. “Every dollar has to be accounted for at all times, no excuses.” Despite the district’s success obtaining grants, the added funds have frequently been a point of contention. The concerns have more to do with sustainability than monitoring how the money is used. For example, City Council has to vote on the district’s budget and historically, some Council members have questioned whether the district is overly reliant on grants. Some complained that school officials often failed to budget for programs once the grant funds were depleted. The council members viewed the loss of grant money as a weak rationale for steadily increasing the district’s budget. Even some school board members have expressed concerns about certain grant funds. During the most recent school budget


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review process, some board members said they didn’t have enough data to know whether a grant-funded program worked, and whether the program should be continued using the district’s funds. But Murphy and Jacobs say the RCSD’s approach to grants has changed, and is much more tightly focused than it has been in the past. The district doesn’t pursue grants just for the sake of obtaining more money, they say; the grants must align with the superintendent’s priorities. Many grants are not intended to be ongoing, Murphy says. Some grants are specifically designed to build internal capability, she says, and don’t involve hiring more staff. “The problem was in the past, we never built that capacity,” Murphy says. “At School 34, we have an arts grant [for next year] for artists in residence. Because we know that an artist can’t be maintained, that person will work with children. But also they will work with teachers so they can learn how to do this work with the students themselves when the artist leaves.” Murphy, who joined Vargas’s cabinet last year, says she doesn’t know all of the district’s history with grants. “But the district is doing some things differently,” she says. “We’re tracking data at every school. We are going to measure effectiveness of all these different programs. We’ll know whether math scores went up, for example, and we’ll be able to better analyze why.” On a broader note, however, there is ongoing

debate about how effective some grants are at improving student achievement. Private sector grants, according to some critics, are often an opportunity to advance the goals and ideologies of some business leaders. And government grants are often inadequate to address the increasing needs of poor urban students. For example, a recent report by the Center for American Progress says that even though SIG funds have been an important source of financial support for the states, the amount of SIG dollars provided is insufficient. With 13,000 schools identified as needing improvement, the money is spread too thin to support turnaround strategies in every failing school, the report says. And how states distribute these highly competitive dollars is inconsistent, it says. Rochester school board member Mary Adams says she’s concerned about the district’s growing reliance on grants — which she says is driven by the decrease of state money relative to need. When it comes to grants, Adams says, schools are forced to an absurd degree into rigid financial compliance requirements.

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The district looks for grants that align with the superintendent’s priorities, says Karen Jacobs, RCSD’s director of financial management.

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“In addition to siphoning an inordinate number of staff resources, grant and restricted funding compliance also significantly shapes what happens and does not happen in schools,” she says. Adams cites the ending of grant funding for Student and Family Support Center coordinators, which were cut from next year’s budget despite what she calls “their central function in assisting and supporting students with complex issues.” Jodi Siegle, executive director of the Monroe County School Boards Association, says the problem is that the funding is not constant and stable, and funding priorities change with each new administration at every level of government. Rochester Superintendent Vargas’s priorities can be boiled down to improving reading proficiency, extending school days, implementing the new Common Core curriculum, and expanding universal pre-k. Those priorities are remarkably similar to those of state Education Commissioner John King. And King’s priorities, probably not by coincidence, are similar to US Secretary of Education Arne Duncan’s. Siegle’s point is that the priorities can be traced to the source of the funding. “Each new person has differing agendas for education,” she says. “A key person changes, and you have a new agenda.” Grants can be used to exercise control, Siegle says. Political leaders and lawmakers sometimes use grants to get schools to sign on to their agenda, she says. “The big fear is always that they’re going to come up with a new agenda that undermines what’s really needed,” Siegle says.

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CITY 9


For more Tom Tomorrow, including a political blog and cartoon archive, visit www.thismodernworld.com

URBAN ACTION This week’s calls to action include the following events and activities. (All are free and open to the public, unless otherwise noted.)

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The Moving Beyond Racism Book Group will meet at 7 p.m. on Monday, June 3, to talk about “Parable of Sower” by Octavia Butler. The novel is set in a future vision of Los Angeles in a violent and broken society divided into three groups: the super wealthy, middle class who have walled themselves into armed neighborhoods, and a wilderness of poverty. The group will meet at Barnes and Noble, Pittsford Plaza. Reading the book before coming to the meeting is not required.

Public engagement through art

The Rochester Regional Community Design Center will present “Transforming Spaces” at 7 p.m.

on Wednesday, June 5. Justin Langlois, fellow at Broken City Lab in Windsor, Ontario, and Ian Wilson, co-founder of Wall/Therapy, are the speakers. The two artists will talk about the role of art in sparking inspiration and engaging the public. The event is at the Little Theatre, 240 East Avenue. Tickets: $15, free to students with valid identification. Information: 271-0520.

Interfaith symposium

Nazareth College’s Hickey Center for Interfaith Studies and Dialogue in cooperation with the Center for Interfaith Affairs at Peace Islands Institute will present “Sacred Texts and Human Contexts: A Symposium on the Role of the Sacred Texts of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam in Uniting and Dividing Humanity.” The symposium will be held from Sunday, June 23, to Tuesday, June 25, at the college, 4245

East Avenue. For complete information on the panelists, topics, presentations, housing, food, registration, and costs: www.naz.edu or call 389-2525.

White privilege discussion

A Quieter Place will host “A Talking Circle: White Privilege for White Women” at 7 p.m. on Wednesday, June 5. It’s a discussion about race, white privilege, and women that parallels Tim Wise’s book “Letters to White America.” The event is at 472 Harrogate Drive. Reservations requested by Saturday, June 1: 381-2093.


Dining

The zuppa di pesce at Pomodoro Grill and Wine Bar in Pittsford. PHOTO BY MIKE HANLON

Away from the tracks Pomodoro Grill and Wine Bar 3400 MONROE AVE. DINNER: MONDAY-THURSDAY 4:30-10 P.M., FRIDAY-SATURDAY 4:30-11 P.M., SUNDAY 4:30-9 P.M. LUNCH: MONDAY-FRIDAY 11:30 A.M.-3 P.M. 586-7000, THEPOMODOROGRILL.COM [ REVIEW ] BY DAVE CHAPUS

On the surface, Pomodoro Grill and Wine Bar in Pittsford appears to have little in common with its older sister establishment in Rochester. The original Pomodoro, which opened in 1994, occupies the rear of a former sawmill factory on an otherwise restaurant-free stretch of University Avenue. Freight and passenger trains rumble by occasionally on the nearby CSX tracks, but as something of a railroad buff, I consider that a plus. Contrast that with its younger sibling in Pittsford Colony Plaza, at the southeastern end of the bustling Monroe Avenue retail corridor, with its specialty shops, movie theaters, and restaurants. Lots of restaurants, from burger joints to steakhouses, most of which have that attractive, if somewhat boring look that’s endemic to much of suburbia. And the nearest railroad track is a good mile away. In terms of its overall appearance, the Pittsford Pomodoro has more in common with its neighbors than with its city namesake. Eschewing the rustic-industrial look of the University Avenue location, the Monroe Avenue Pomodoro affects a vaguely Mediterranean ambience, with a muted, earthtone color scheme, dark wood trim, and soft, warm lighting.

To an extent, of course, these differences are due to the two establishments’ very different physical settings. But there’s another explanation as well. Pomodoro owner Sami Mina opened the Pittsford restaurant in 2002 under the name Brio, which billed itself as a Mediterranean bistro. A trademark issue with an Ohio-based restaurant chain led to a name change in 2011, and Brio was rechristened as the area’s second Pomodoro. In addition to the name change, the menus at the two establishments went from merely similar to identical. But the Pittsford location retains the overall look and feel of Brio. As before, a large rectangular bar takes up much of the center of the space, though it’s well enough separated from the dining areas to allow patrons to enjoy a meal in relative peace, if not always quiet. The open kitchen at the far end of the room is dominated by Pomodoro’s wood-fired oven, a feature you’ll also find at the University Avenue location. Foodwise, Pomodoro aims higher than basic Italian-American fare of the spaghetti-andmeatballs variety, but it’s not out to dazzle or to break new culinary ground. Think higher-end, Italian chain restaurant food, and you’ll get the general idea. Not that that’s necessarily a bad thing. On lunch and dinner visits, all the food was well prepared and served, with only a few minor shortcomings. For lunch, I chose Pomodoro’s zuppa di pesce. A bowlful of jumbo shrimp, mussels, clams, calamari, and chunks of salmon swam in a saffron-colored broth marked by a hint of lemon and a peppery bite. It arrived hot, but not overcooked, allowing the varied textures of the components to come through. My only

complaint is that this soup clearly called for a thick slice or two of crusty Italian bread, which was neither served nor offered at lunch (though it was served at dinner, and was rather good, which only made me wish all the more that I’d asked for some at lunch). One of my two lunchtime companions reported being well pleased with his chicken sandwich. The grilled chicken breast was cooked through but still juicy, topped with barbeque sauce and cheddar cheese, and served between slices of crusty French bread, cut lengthwise. My other companion had one of that day’s specials, a white pizza with sausage, roasted red peppers, asiago cheese, and fresh basil. The cracker-thin crust was crisp and well charred, with a slightly nutty flavor owing to her selection of a whole-wheat crust. The only disappointment here was the crumbled sausage, which was remarkably bland; it tasted more like unseasoned ground beef than Italian sausage. Pizza was also on the table during dinner, when I was accompanied by my wife and daughter. My wife selected the frutti di mare pizza, which was topped with an olive oilgarlic spread, mozzarella and feta cheeses, shrimp, and scallops. Though I would’ve liked to try Pomodoro’s white crust, she too opted for whole wheat, which this time seemed to have a smoky aroma that I hadn’t noticed at lunch. I could’ve done without the feta, which tended to compete with, rather than enhance, the flavors of the seafood. But the toppings otherwise complemented each other well. Not wanting to neglect Pomodoro’s redmeat offerings, I ordered another one of that day’s specials, lamb T-bones, which I asked for medium rare. The two chops, well-trimmed and each roughly the size of a baseball, were blackened and crusty outside, but tender and appropriately pink inside. A spoonful of pan sauce, dotted with pine nuts and golden raisins, added extra flavor and textural contrast. Sides of sauteed vegetables and saffron rice with peas rounded out the dish. Prices at Pomodoro run toward the high end, by local standards. At $21 a bowl, my zuppa di pesce may have been the most expensive soup I’ve eaten, but it was well stocked with seafood, and — with bread — would make a satisfying dinner entree. Pasta dishes are generally priced in the teens, and most meat-based entrees are in the $20-$30 range. With so many choices in the area, Pomodoro might not be the first place that comes to mind for those looking to grab a post-shopping or pre-movie meal. But it fills a certain niche, reasonably well. It may lack the funky charm of the original, but the Monroe Avenue Pomodoro provides a dependably pleasant dining experience. If only it were a little closer to the tracks.

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Upcoming [ DJ/ELECTRONIC ] DJ Logic Saturday, June 22. Lovin’ Cup. 300 Park Point Dr. $10. 5:30 p.m. 292-9940. [ POP/ROCK ] Vans Warped Tour Saturday, July 6. Darien Lake PAC, 9993 Allegheny Rd., Darien Center. $32.50. 11 a.m. 599-4641. darienlake.com [ R&B ] The Whispers Friday, July 12. Rochester Auditorium Theatre. 885 East Main St. $27.50-32.50. 7:30 p.m. 222-5000. rbtl.org

Music

Rochester Philharmonic Orchestra THURSDAY, MAY 30 & SATURDAY, JUNE 1 KODAK HALL AT EASTMAN THEATRE, 60 GIBBS ST. $15-$82, $10 STUDENTS | 454-2100, RPO.ORG

[ CLASSICAL ] In these final days of this reluctant spring,

head over to Gibbs Street for the final RPO concert of the season featuring Stravinsky’s “Rite of Spring.” The other triedand-true classic on the program will be the Rachmaninoff Concerto No. 3 in D Minor for Piano and Orchestra, Op. 30, featuring up-and-coming pianist Leonardo Colafelice (pictured). City covered Colafelice when he snagged the gold medal at the 2012 Eastman Young Artists International Piano Competition, and since then he’s gone on to win the Gina Bachauer Young Artists International Piano Competition, and others. (Thursday’s concert is at 7:30 p.m., Saturday’s at 8 p.m.) — BY PALOMA CAPANNA

Divinex SATURDAY, JUNE 1 THE CLUB AT WATER STREET, 204 N. WATER ST. 6:30 P.M. | $10-$15 | WATERSTREETMUSIC.COM [ METAL ] This four-piece outfit from Waterloo, NY,

is taking thinking-man’s metal to another level. Thick, muted guitars, a tinge of electronica, and uncanny technical prowess make for a sound that is nothing less than atmospheric. Divinex has been repeatedly praised for its live performances filled with massive swells of ethereal distortion and a distinctive display of sonic textures.

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WEDNESDAY, MAY 29 [ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ]

Acoustic Open Jam hosted by The Druids. The Rabbit Room,

Tica Douglas SUNDAY, JUNE 2 BUG JAR, 219 MONROE AVE. 8 P.M. | $6-$8 | BUGJAR.COM [ SINGER-SONGWRITER ] Brooklyn-based singer-

songwriter Tica Douglas explores the boundaries of folk music, shifting its gentle, melodic roots through a sparse, atmospheric pop lens. Douglas cites among her influences Sharon Van Etten and Neutral Milk Hotel, two artists who have successfully combined a dark, morose quality with characteristically bright, traditional folk instrumentation. Similar to the aforementioned musicians, Douglas’ music is mellow and mysterious, and often addresses somber, life-altering events and issues. Douglas recently released her newest album, “Summer Valentine.” — BY LEAH CREARY

Nikki Hill played Wednesday, May 22, at the Dinosaur Bar-B-Que. PHOTO BY FRANK DE BLASE

61 N. Main St. 582-1830. 7:30 p.m. Call for info. Johnny Bauer. Schooner’s Riverside Pub, 70 Pattonwood Dr. 342-3030. 6 p.m. Call for info. Rob & Gary Acoustic. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. 248-4825. 5:30 p.m. Free. Sarah Horner Duo. Dinosaur Bar-B-Que, 99 Court St. 585325-7090. 9 p.m. Free. Steve Lyons. Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 585-232-3230. 8 p.m. Free.

Getting the music heard

ECMS Spring Festival: Drum Joy and Rhythm Adventure. Kilbourn Hall,

On Wednesday, May 22, the night sky looked like one big black eye as I moseyed the grey ghost downtown. I had heard word that North Carolina knockout Nikki Hill simply had to be seen. I dove into the fracas she was creating at Dinosaur Bar-B-Que and was promptly blown away. So was the crowd, which clapped thunderously between thunderclaps. The crowded dance floor was in a rapid boil. This was some of the best r&binjected, soul-ified kick in the blues I have ever heard. Hill commanded the stage perched on sparkly mules and beneath a sky-high turban, and channeled the sweet ‘n’ sour bouquet of switchblades that was once held by Etta James. Hill’s voice was sweet with just a hint of ragged rust that shone through whenever she leaned on a note. This was like a less punk-careening, more authentic-leaning Detroit Cobras. Her band was top notch as it wove through a set of awesome originals, punctuated by some Little Richard, Otis Redding, Irma Thomas, and so on. Between sets, I stood out in the parking lot with the band discussing its

TUESDAY, JUNE 4 ABILENE, 153 LIBERTY POLE WAY 7:30 P.M. | $4-$5 | ABILENEBARANDLOUNGE.COM [ AMERICANA ] Dan Weber is relatively new to

songwriting, but you wouldn’t know it from his music. Weber has lived a very full life — and, therefore, has many stories to tell. That storytelling aspect is the basis for his music, brought to life through his lively country roots. Weber cites legendary country and folk musicians such as Johnny Cash, Harry Chapin, and Jim Croce as his childhood influences. That level of insight accounts for both Weber’s down-home, traditional approach toward making music and his love for narrative-driven lyrics. — BY LEAH CREARY

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expert take on Tarheel Slim’s “Number 9 Train.” How do you like that? I thought me and Steve Grills were the only ones around who cared about Tarheel Slim. Nikki Hill returns to Rochester to play Abilene in July. Be there, I’m warning you. Hell, I’m gonna go twice. Thursday night Lindsay Lou and the Flatbellys slowly filled the room at Abilene with bodies as the Ann Arbor band rapidly filled the air with its acoustic-based stomp and swirl. It was all bluegrasssy in its tunes, tone, and theme, what with the mandolin’s terse twang and pluck woven throughout. But the band left a little room up top for Lindsay Lou to belt that upper register in the chops with a throaty haymaker. In a completely modern-embracing gesture (in spite of the act’s sonic antiquity), the band passed out gift cards to download its music for free. This is why, as the power and priorities and technology shift in the record industry, the musicians will prevail. It ain’t about riches, bitches. It’s about getting your music heard.

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Ian McColm & Ross Chait perform music for silent films.

The Bop Shop, 1460 Monroe Ave. 271-3354. 9 p.m. $10. Margaret Explosion. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 7:30 p.m. Free. Mike Pappert. Lemoncello, 137 West Commercial St. 3858565. 6:30 p.m. Free. The Swooners. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. 585662-5555. 6 p.m. Free. continues on page 15

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Music Swing low International Society of Bassists Convention

There will also be nightly concerts featuring some of the greatest bassists of our time, including Ron Carter, Victor Wooten, Dave Holland, and Chuck Israels.

SUNDAY, JUNE 2-SATURDAY, JUNE 8 EASTMAN SCHOOL OF MUSIC, GIBBS STREET ESM.ROCHESTER.EDU

Israels was studying to be an engineer at Massachusetts Institute of Technology in the mid-1950’s when his life took a different path. On the side he played guitar and cello and there were two Boston musicians with whom he was interested in working. They needed a bass player. “If you have two instruments that you need to know before you play the bass, guitar and the cello are probably the best,” says Israels. “It took me about three weeks to be ready to be part of that trio.” A few years later he was asked to join one of the greatest groups in jazz history: the Bill Evans Trio. “I didn’t know a lot of the things that I needed to know when I joined Bill,” says Israels, “but there was a profound agreement about how music works and that hasn’t changed in my thinking since leaving Bill.” Israels also played with John Coltrane, Stan Getz, and other jazz greats. “There were chances to play with so many different musicians because jazz was a part of the everyday fabric of our lives,” says Israels. “What you now look back upon as being remarkable was at the time fairly normal for someone who was pretty good and lucky enough to be noticed.”

[ PREVIEW ] BY RON NETSKY

Don’t be alarmed if you hear a deep vibration emanating from downtown Rochester next week. It’s not an aftershock from the recent Ottawa earthquake; it’s hundreds of bassists meeting at the Eastman School of Music. “When I play certain low notes on my bass in the orchestra, you can feel it in your skeleton,” says Jeff Campbell, Eastman professor and co-host of the International Society of Bassists Convention, which starts June 2. “In pieces like Beethoven’s Third Symphony, the low notes feel so strong. I have a great bass that’s very vibrant and, when I play certain notes, I can feel it move my rib cage and the bones in my legs.” The convention is expected to draw about 1000 participants from 30 countries. Aside from master classes, recitals, and lectures, there will be solo, jazz, and orchestral bass competitions, a composition contest and a bass builders competition in which newly made instruments will be judged for workmanship and tone.

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Back in the day one of Israels’ main influences on bass was Oscar Pettiford. He’ll be paying tribute to Pettiford in his concert at Kodak Hall at on June 6. A nonet will play his own compositions and arrangements of works by Pettiford, but, says Israels, “it’s really orchestrated Bill Evans Trio.” Jeff Campbell is one of a rare breed of bassists who

crosses genres with ease. A member of the Rochester Philharmonic Orchestra, he is also one of Rochester’s top jazz players, having worked with Marian McPartland, Phil Woods, and the Vanguard Jazz Orchestra. Jazz legend Chuck Israels is one of the nearly 1000 bass players He started playing who will come to Rochester next week as part of the International Society of Bassists Convention. PHOTO BY JOHN MELOY while growing up in Salt Lake City. His dad was a to joke that bass is the only instrument in drummer and Campbell wanted to play the whole world that has its name on the with him. That meant taking up the bass, stereo,” Campbell says. and Campbell didn’t mind. Israels goes further. “The bass supplies “I like the low notes. I like the way they the harmonic and rhythmic underpinning sound. They define the parameters of the for everything that happens on top of it,” harmonic framework of the music. I like continues on page 17


WEDNESDAY, MAY 29 Vince Ercolamento& Joe Chiappone Jazz Quartet.

Murph’s Irondequoit Pub, 705 Titus Ave. 342-6780. 8 p.m. Free. [ POP/ROCK ]

Clockmen w/Muler. Bug Jar,

219 Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. $5-$7.

THURSDAY, MAY 30 [ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ] Art of Xpresion 3. Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 585-232-3230. 5 p.m. Free. Jim Lane. Murph’s Irondequoit Pub, 705 Titus Ave. 342-6780. 8 p.m. Free.

Salsa Night presented by Essence of Rhythm. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. 9 p.m. $5. [ BLUES ]

Double Take Blues Band.

Dinosaur Bar-B-Que, 99 Court St. 585-325-7090. 9 p.m. Free. [ CLASSICAL ]

Eastman at Washington Square Lunchtime Concerts.

1st Universalist Church, 150 S. Clinton Ave. 274-1400. 12:15 p.m. Free.

RPO: Rite of Spring and Rachmaninoff. Kodak Hall at

CLASSICAL | MADRIGALIA W/CORDANCIA CHAMBER ORCHESTRA

“Of Heaven and Earth.” The concert title offers such promise that one has only to read the program listings and know a bit about Madrigalia and Cordancia to know it will be a special evening. The program will include works for small orchestra and chorus by Vaughan Williams (“Flos Campi”), Mendelssohn (“Kyrie in D Minor”), and Brahms (“Nänie”). The real treat will be the performance of Arvo Pärt’s “Cantique des Degrès.” Beethoven may have said God was shouting in his ears, but I’d be willing to present the case that it’s Part (b. 1935) who can actually hear the voices of the heavens. Madrigalia, directed by Lee Wright, and Cordancia, with co-artistic directors Pia Liptak and Kathleen Suher, both seek to present high quality, innovative concerts with artistic excellence. If it looks this good on paper, it should be a heavenly concert to attend.

Eastman Theater, 60 Gibbs St. Thursday: 7:30 p.m.; Saturday: 8 p.m. $15-$82.

The concert takes place Saturday, June 1, at 8 p.m. at Kilbourn Hall, 26 Gibbs St. $15, $5 students. 454-2100, madrigalia.org. — BY PALOMA CAPANNA

[ COUNTRY ] Mulberry Soul. Roots Cafe, 197 North Main Street. 7276149. 7 p.m. Tickets include Roots food. $15.

The Buddhahood. Sticky Lips

[ JAZZ ]

[ REGGAE/JAM ] BBQ Juke Joint, 830 Jefferson Rd. 292-5544. 9 p.m. $5 Sticky Lips BBQ Juke Joint, 830 Jefferson Rd. 292-5544. 8 p.m. $5.

D’Jangoners. Little Theatre Café,

240 East Ave. Free.

ECMS Spring Festival: Nights of Jazz. Kilbourn Hall, 26 Gibbs St.

4:30 p.m. Free. Gary Chudyk. Lemoncello, 137 West Commercial St. 385-8565. 6 p.m. Free. John Palocy Trio. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. 585-6625555. 6 p.m. Free. Kneptune w/Upward Groove. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 8:30 p.m. $5-$7. Mike Kaupa. Monroe’s Restaurant, 3001 Monroe Avenue. (585) 348-9104. 6 p.m. Call for info. Steve Geraci. The Rabbit Room, 61 N. Main St. 582-1830. 7 p.m. Free. The Swooners. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. 248-4825. 5:30 p.m. Free. [ R&B ]

The Coupe De’ Villes. Pane

Vino Ristorante, 175 N. Water St. 232-6090. 8 p.m. Free.

[ POP/ROCK ]

Automatic James, James Draudt. Tala Vera, 155 State St.

546-3845. 9 p.m. $5-$7. Dave McGrath Band. Pelican’s Nest, 566 River St. 663-5910. 7 p.m. Call for info. Five Alarm Open Jam. Firehouse Saloon, 814 South Clinton. 319-3832. 9 p.m. Call for info.

FRIDAY, MAY 31 [ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ]

Barefoot Brothers CD Release Party. Montage Music Hall, 50

Chestnut St. 232-1520. 8 p.m. $5-$7.

The Dady Brothers, Luke Winslow-King. Tala Vera, 155

State St. 546-3845. 8 p.m. $10. Dave McGrath Duo. Schooner’s Riverside Pub, 70 Pattonwood Dr. 342-3030. 7 p.m. Call for info. Jim Lane. 58 Main, 58 N. Main St. 585-637-2383. 8 p.m. Free. Nancy Perry. Sanibel Cottage, 1517 Empire Blvd. 671-9340. 6 p.m. Free.

Ralph Louis. Rochester Plaza

Hotel, 70 State St. 546-3450. 6 p.m. Free. Rayce Malone and John Ryan. McGraw’s Irish Pub, 146 W Commercial St. 348-9091. 7 p.m. Free McGraw’s Irish Pub, 146 W Commercial St. 348-9091. 7 p.m. Free. [ BLUES ]

Gap Mangione & The New Blues Band. Woodcliff Hotel

& Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. 2484825. Call for info.

Gap Mangione New Blues Band. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa,

199 Woodcliff Dr. 248-4825. 7:30 p.m. Free. Joe Beard. Dinosaur Bar-BQue, 99 Court St. 585-3257090. 10 p.m. Free. Third Degree. The Beale, 1930 Empire Blvd. 585-216-1070. 7:30 p.m. Call for info. [ CLASSICAL ] Stringplicity. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 8:30 p.m. Free. continues on page 16

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 15


INDIE ROCK | THE ROTARIES

SINGER/SONGWRITER | SHAWN PHILLIPS

JAZZ | MACK GOLDSBURY QUARTET

New York-based band The Rotaries transcends indie rock’s casual indifference — indifference masked as cool — and instead embraces dreamy tones and textures that border on a kind of pop-symphonic aesthetic. Consequently, the tunes liberate, the beat drives, and the cool is genuine. The equally cool Sports, Cottage Jefferson, and the Rochambros also share the bill.

Legendary rock impresario Bill Graham once dubbed Shawn Phillips, “the best-kept secret in the music business.” That’s exactly what a working musician doesn’t want to hear. The Texas-born Phillips sprang forth amidst contemporaries like Donovan, Steve Winwood, and Bernie Taupin. Phillips appeared on several Donovan projects, including “Sunshine Superman,” and sang on The Beatles’ “Lovely Rita.” Kinloch Nelson also appears.

If you haven’t heard of powerhouse saxophonist Mack Goldsbury it may be because he’s spent a significant portion of his career in Europe. But over the decades he has contributed his muscular tenor sound to more than 60 albums. Goldsbury, who also plays flute, toured Europe with Joe Lovano and Paul Motian and has also played with Stevie Wonder, Elvin Jones, and Tony Bennett. When he takes the stage at Lovin’ Cup he’ll be joined by Herb Robertson on trumpet, Lou Grassy on drums, and Erik Unsworth on bass.

The Rotaries perform Wednesday, June 5, 8 p.m. at the Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. $7-$9. bugjar.com. — BY FRANK DE BLASE

FRIDAY, MAY 31 [ COUNTRY ]

Grand Canyon Rescue Episode w/Significant Other. Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 585-2323230. 6 p.m. $5-$8. [ JAZZ ]

Chris Wilson. Lemoncello, 137

West Commercial St. 385-8565. 8:30 p.m. Free.

ECMS Spring Festival: Nights of Jazz. Kilbourn Hall, 26 Gibbs St. 6 p.m. Free.

Fairport CanalDays/CanalNights.

,. See website for full line up. Call for info. Jazz and Food Rodeo. Penfield Amphitheater, 3100 Atlantic Ave. 340-8663. 4:30 p.m. Free. Jim E Leggs. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. 585-662-5555. 6 p.m. Free.

Cry to the Blind. Water Street

Music Hall, 204 N. Water St. 585325-5600. 7 p.m. $10-$12. Divided by Zero. Captain Jack’s Goodtime Tavern, 8505 Greig St. 315-483-9570. 9 p.m. Call for info. John Akers w/Rob Boiya. Johnny’s Irish Pub, 1382 Culver Rd. 2240990. 5 p.m. Free. The LPs. Smokin’ Joe’s Bar & Grill, 425 Lyell Ave. Call for info.

Sports, Dumb Angel, and Pleistocene. Skylark Lounge,

40 South Union St. 270-8106. 10 p.m. $3. Springer. Pelican’s Nest, 566 River St. 663-5910. 10 p.m. Call for info. Tryst. Nola’s Restaurant & Nightclub, 4775 Lake Ave. 6633375. 10 p.m. Call for info. Virgil Cain. Shamrock Jack’s, 4554 Culver Rd. 323-9310. 9:30 p.m. Call for info.

Lovin’ Art Release: Mary Moore ft. The Moho Collective, DJ Holloway. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park

SATURDAY, JUNE 1

Point Dr. 292-9940. 9 p.m. $3-$5.

[ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ]

Marco Amadio. Pane Vino

Bogs Visionary Orchestra CD Release w/Michelle Younger, James Hearne. Abilene Bar &

Ristorante, 175 N. Water St. 2326090. 6:30 p.m. Free. Three’s A Crowd. The Pultneyville Grill, 4135 Mill St. (315) 5894512. Call for info. [ R&B ]

Coupe De Villes. Sticky Lips

BBQ Juke Joint, 830 Jefferson Rd. 292-5544. 9:30 p.m. $5. [ POP/ROCK ]

Abandonded Buildings Club w/Buckets, DRIPPERS!, and Thoroughbred. Bug Jar, 219

Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. $7-$9. Bad Habit. Nashvilles, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. 334-3030. 9 p.m. Call for info.

Shawn Phillips performs Saturday, June 1, 7:30 p.m. at Café Veritas, First Unitarian Church, 220 S. Winton Road. $10-$18. cafeveritas.org. — BY FRANK DEBLASE

Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 585-232-3230. 9 p.m. $5-$8. Jim Lane. The Pint And Goblet Tavern, 300 Village Square. 624-4386. 6 p.m. Free. Jon Akers. Flaherty’s Webster, 1200 Bay Rd. 671-0816. Call for info.

Lovin Cup Unplugged Dinner Music Series: Micah. Lovin’

Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 2929940. 6 p.m. Free.

Shawn Phillips w/Kinloch Nelson . Cafe Veritas at

First Unitarian Church, 220 Winton Road South. 7:30 p.m. $10-$18.

16 CITY MAY 29 - JUNE 4. 2013

[ BLUES ]

[ POP/ROCK ]

Big Blue House. Lemoncello,

Brass Taxi. Pelican’s Nest, 566

137 West Commercial St. 3858565. 7 p.m. Free.

Genesee Johnny & The River Rats. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park

Point Dr. 292-9940. 9 p.m. $3-$5. John Cole Blues Band. Dinosaur Bar-B-Que, 99 Court St. 585325-7090. 10 p.m. Free. [ CLASSICAL ]

LaDue Memorial Performance Series Winners Recital. Baptist Temple, 1101 Clover St. 4733200. 3 p.m. Zalina FedotovD, soprano. Jeffrey Thompson, tenor. Call for info.

Madrigalia: Of Heaven & Earth. Kilbourn Hall, 26 Gibbs St. 8 p.m. Free.

RPO: Rite of Spring and Rachmaninoff. Kodak Hall at

Eastman Theater, 60 Gibbs St. Thursday: 7:30 p.m.; Saturday: 8 p.m. $15-$82.

River St. 663-5910. 10 p.m. Call for info. The Chairs. Sticky Lips BBQ Juke Joint, 830 Jefferson Rd. 292-5544. 10 p.m. Call for info Sticky Lips BBQ Juke Joint, 830 Jefferson Rd. 292-5544. 10 p.m. Free. Divinex. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N. Water St. 585-325-5600. 6:30 p.m. Free. Mud Creek. Flaherty’s Honeoye Falls, 60 W. Main St. 497-7010. Call for info. Push. Captain Jack’s Goodtime Tavern, 8505 Greig St. 315-4839570. 9 p.m. Call for info. Renegade. Hamlin Station Bar & Grill, 52 Railroad Ave. 964-2010. 8:30 p.m. Call for info. Run for the Roses. Montage Music Hall, 50 Chestnut St. 2321520. 9 p.m. Call for info. Teagan & Lou. Johnny’s Irish Pub, 1382 Culver Rd. 2240990. 8 p.m. Free.

The Mack Goldsbury Quartet performs Sunday, June 2, 8 p.m. at Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Drive. $10. lovincup.com, 292-9940. — BY RON NETSKY [ POP/ROCK ]

[ CLASSICAL ]

Mikaela Davis w/Tica Douglas, Josh Netsky, and MD Woods.

International Society of Bassists: Brett Shurtliffe/YungChiao Wei; Ron Carter with Russell Malone, guitar, and Donald Vega, piano. Kodak Hall

Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. $6-$8. Misfit Karma. Captain Jack’s Goodtime Tavern, 8505 Greig St. 315-483-9570. 3 p.m. Call for info. MoChester. Pelican’s Nest, 566 River St. 663-5910. 5 p.m. Call for info.

The Reinhartds w/Ron Lo Curdo. Smokin’ Joe’s Bar &

Grill, 425 Lyell Ave. Call for info.

full line up. Call for info.

The Joe Santora Trio w/Cabo Frio’s Curtis Kendrick ft. Emily Kirchoff. Boulder Coffee Co.,

960 Genesee St. 697-0236. 8 & 10 p.m. CD Recording for “Just The 3 Of Us”. $15. Roses & Revolutions. Pane Vino Ristorante, 175 N. Water St. 232-6090. 6:30 p.m. Free.

[ POP/ROCK ]

[ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ] Mario Gillard. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 8 p.m. Free.

Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 8:30 p.m. $6-$8.

SUNDAY, JUNE 2

TUESDAY, JUNE 4

[ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ] Fandango at the Tango. Tango Cafe, 389 Gregory St. 271-4930. 7:30 p.m. Free, donations accepted. Jim Lane. Hooligan’s Eastside Grill, 809 Ridge Rd. 671-7180. 2 p.m. Free. The Joe Williams Project. The Titus Tavern, 692 Titus Ave. 2705365. 6 p.m. Call for info.

[ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ] Acoustic Brew. The Titus Tavern, 692 Titus Ave. 2705365. 7 p.m. Call for info. Dan Weber. Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 585-232-3230. 7:30 p.m. $4-$5.

Rockwood Ferry Trio w/ Jordan Morton. Bernunzio’s

Uptown Music, 112 East Ave. 6 p.m. $10.

[ JAZZ ] [ R&B ]

Jimmie Highsmith, Jr. CD Release Show w/Teressa Wilcox. Tala Vera, 155 State St. 546-3845. 8 p.m. $10-$20.

Fairport CanalDays/ CanalNights. See website for full line up. Call for info.

The Mack Goldsbury Quartet.

Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. 8 p.m. $10.

[ REGGAE/JAM ] Roc City Pro Jam. Richmond’s Tavern, 21 Richmond Street. (585) 270-8570. 10 p.m. Free.

MONDAY, JUNE 3

[ JAZZ ]

Fairport CanalDays/ CanalNights. ,. See website for

at Eastman Theater, 60 Gibbs St. 8 p.m. Free.

[ BLUES ]

Bluesday Tuesday Blues Jam. P.I.’s Lounge, 495 West Ave. 8 p.m. Call for info.

The Van Allen Belt w/Paxtor, Fowls, Eyeway, and The Nash.


Swing low continues from page 14

he says. “You feel like a hero, like the catcher on a baseball team.” Israels and Campbell are both anxious to meet with kindred spirits. “Bassists get along very well,” says Campbell. “We’re generally calm, laidback people.” Because it’s tough to travel with the large instruments, there’s a fellowship of bassists who loan each other instruments all over the world. There’s another reason Campbell is looking forward to the convention. “I’m such a nerd about the double bass and there are so many great instruments that will be brought here by the venders from around the country. You get to see the crème de la crème of double basses.” While the instrument’s proper name is bass violin, neither Israels nor Campbell thinks of their instrument as a giant violin. “I think of it as a big acoustic guitar, because I play it that way,” says Israels, who prefers to pluck lines in a guitar-like fashion. Campbell explains that the bass is actually a distant relative of the viol, the competitor to the violin 300 or 400 years ago. “The violin won out as the dominant family of instruments, so you get the viola and the cello,” says Campbell. “But our instrument, the double bass, is kind of a leftover of that old viol. So I don’t think of it so much connected to the violin, I think of it as our own separate instrument.” And Campbell would play it even if he never got to step into the spotlight. “I’m more happy being an accompanist,” he says. “I don’t mind playing solos, but I find great joy in making the foundation for the other musicians. I’m glad to play all night long and not play any solos because I enjoy so much the role of the bass.”

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Concert schedule Tuesday, June 4: Eastman alumni Brett Shurtliffe, Yung-Chiao Wei, and Grammy winner Ron Carter with Russell Malone, guitar, and Donald Vega, piano Wednesday, June 5: Jazz Bass Supergroup “Talking Hands” (John Clayton, Rufus Reid, Lynn Seaton and Martin Wind) Thursday, June 6: Diana Gannett performs new works; Chuck Israels pays tribute to a master of bebop with the “Oscar Pettiford and Beyond” Octet Friday, June 7: Orchestral and chamber music bassist Szymon Marciniak and Grammy-winning Dave Holland Saturday, June 8: Joel Quarrington principal bassist of the London Symphony Orchestra, and Victor Wooten, bassist for Bela Fleck and the Flecktones All concerts take place at 8 p.m. at Kodak Hall at Eastman Theatre, 60 Gibbs St. Tickets cost $20; call 454-2100 or visit esm.rochester.edu/concerts/tickets. rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 17


Dance moving — swaying, leaning, and so on. It’s a basic physiological response.” PUSH uses a hybrid movement form that incorporates modern dance, non-traditional partnering (heavily influenced by the contemporary dance group Pilobolus), acrobatics, mime, and other disciplines, depending in part on the particular talents of its current company members. Right now, its five core members include veteran Jonathan Lowery, former Cirque du Soleil performer Avi Pryntz-Nadworny, Rochester Parkour member Andrew Salmon, and both Stevensons. Eighteen additional members round out the cast for “Arc of Ages.” At a recent rehearsal, Pryntz-Nadworny,

Jonathan Lowery and Darren Stevenson (left to right) in “Arc of Ages.”

PHOTO COURTESY PUSH

PHYSICAL THEATRE

PUSH’s new testament “Arc of Ages” BY PUSH PHYSICAL THEATRE THURSDAY, MAY 30-SUNDAY, JUNE 9 JCC HART THEATRE, 1200 EDGEWOOD AVE. $18-$26 | 461-2000, JCCROCHESTER.ORG [ PREVIEW ] BY CASEY CARLSEN

PUSH Physical Theatre’s new masterwork, “Arc of Ages,” embraces epic stories of Western civilization and explores basic human archetypes by depicting the legendary struggles of biblical characters. Dramatic, actionpacked interpretations of Samson, Delilah, David, Bathsheba, and Job connect audiences to these characters’ flawed humanness, and to the continued relevance of their plights today. “What do these stories have to tell that keeps returning them to the forefront of art and popular culture?” cofounder and director Darren Stevenson asked in a recent interview with City. “Certainly these characters embody some of the most dysfunctional relationships you can imagine. There is an awful lot of sex and violence perpetrated on these 18 CITY MAY 29 - JUNE 4, 2013

people. Our generation tends to sanitize the classics, ignore issues we prefer not to deal with.” Stevenson promises, however, that the production would warrant no rating higher than PG if paralleled to film. There is no nudity, and the rawness and violence are neither random nor meaningless. Indeed, for children ages 8 and over seeing the production with parents, the content can provide fodder for important conversations, Stevenson says. Stevenson and his wife, Heather Stevenson, formed the company in 2000 as a means to “push” the boundaries of conventional theater. Its first major work, premiered in 2009, was the highly praised “Dracula.” “For us, physical theater is about communicating with the body as the primary tool, which is really pretty cool,” Darren Stevenson says. “One pertinent saying is that ‘the body never lies.’ We are so attuned to body language, and the stories of our lives are recorded in our muscles. When we move, memories and emotions come up in us — and in the audience. If you watch the audience at one of our performances, you will see them

25, was practicing his role as the suffering title character in “The Trials of Job.” For a good part of this piece, Pryntz-Nadworny propels himself around stage within a 60-pound steel ring called the cyr wheel, a potentially dangerous piece of equipment named after Daniel Cyr, a circus artist from Montreal who popularized the apparatus. More popular in Canada and Europe, the wheel, is, however, slowly gaining in popularity in the States. This is the first time that PUSH has incorporated it into a piece. Pryntz-Nadworny, who grew up in Brighton, studied circus art in Quebec and Italy, and has been performing professionally since he was 21. This is his second year with PUSH. Watching him simultaneously keep the cyr wheel in motion and express the wrenching pain of Job’s plight through his tormented facial expressions, bodily movements, and anguished breathing and cries, belies the difficulty of performing on this piece of equipment. “It’s almost like an extension of Ari’s body at this point,” Stevenson says. “And having Ari inside that wheel is a great metaphor for Job being stuck in pain.” Pryntz-Nadworny worked closely with Stevenson to create the piece. Stevenson is not an expert on the cyr wheel, so a good deal of improvisation from PryntzNadworny was needed to put together the choreography. “Avi was basically like, ‘Yes, I can do that.’ Or ‘No, I can’t do that.’ Or ‘Yes, I can do that, but it would be cooler to do this,’” Stevenson says. “There are really three sequences that correspond to Job’s emotions,” PryntzNadworny says. “First, Job experiences anger, questions why this is happening

to him. Next, despair. And finally, tormented possession. I basically looked for movements that expressed those qualities.” During this rehearsal, the group runs

through the work’s wrenching ending again and again, struggling to find the truest and most emotionally affective depiction of the final plot element: Job’s wife, portrayed by Rachel Kodweis, rejoining her husband, choosing to share in his pain. By this point, Pryntz-Nadworny has expressed frenzied agony at his situation — tearing and scratching at his skin (boils were one of Job’s curses), lunging from side to side, lashing out at stage-mates and letting loose with primal yelps of pain. Finally, he sinks to the ground within the circle of the cyr wheel, knees to chest, forehead to floor, hands covering head. Eventually, he rises back up to his knees, gaze casting suspiciously around, before leaning backward onto his arms, his palms open in a gesture of submission. Kodweis enters from offstage, darting in alarm toward the ring, only to bring herself up short, afraid and unsure, teetering there like someone unwilling to enter a body of cold water. But, a dawning of awareness slowly suffuses her features, as if just now she is realizing what a balm her presence could be and, gingerly but with determination, she steps over and into the ring, literally joining her husband in his eternal circle of pain. And Job’s face brightens slightly, not even a smile, but enough to register his appreciation of her act of love. This is strong stuff, and my eyes actually moisten watching this scene again and again in such close proximity. I find myself thinking about people in my own life and feeling unsettling inflections of guilt that will linger with me throughout the evening. That is the kinesthetic power of PUSH, its ability to elicit emotions within us through physical witness. It forces me to ponder earlier comments Stevenson made about art. “Art asks questions. There are so few answers anywhere in life, and art creates more uncertainty,” Stevenson says. “That can be a very powerful thing. It can also make people angry or uncomfortable. They don’t want to be asked those questions.” But I don’t doubt that PUSH will keep posing them.


Art Exhibits [ OPENING ] 1975 Gallery, 89 Charlotte St. “Black and Blue: New Works by Ryan Bubnis and Lucas Irwin.” Through Jun 29. Reception Jun 1 7-10 p.m. 1975ish.com. Axom Gallery, 176 Anderson Ave., 2nd floor. Paul Garland: “In Retrospect.” Through June 22. Wed-Sat noon-5 p.m. and by appointment. Reception May 31, 5:30-8:30 p.m. 2326030. axomgallery.com. High Falls Fine Art Gallery, 60 Browns Race. Color, An Exuberant Group Show. Through Jun 22. Tue-Fri 11 a.m.-5:30 p.m., Sat noon-5:30 p.m., Sun 1-5 p.m. Reception Jun 2, 3-6 p.m. Also “Snaps,” Retrospective Images from the Xerox Rochester International Jazz Festival.. Through Jun 30. 325-2030. centerathighfalls.org. International Art Acquisitions, 3300 Monroe Ave. “All Dressed Up,” by Marcella Gillenwater and Malcolm Liepke. Through Jun 30. Mon-Fri 10 a.m.-9 p.m., Sat 10 a.m.-6 p.m., Sun 12-5 p.m. 264-1440. internationalartacquisitions.com. Nazareth College Arts Center, 4245 East Ave. Shared Spaces 2013. Through Jun 14. This year’s exhibit features 53 teacher/student pairs. Tue-Fri, Sat-Sun 12-5 p.m. Reception May 31, 4 p.m. 389-5073. naz. edu/art/arts-center-gallery. Rochester Contemporary Arts Center, 137 East Ave. 6x6x2013. Through Jul 14. In gallery previews May 2931, 1-10 p.m. Reception & artwork sale Jun 1, 6-10 p.m. ($5 admission, $20 per artwork). 461-2000. rochestercontemporary.org. [ CONTINUING ] Acanthus Café, 337 East Ave. “Bestest of Friends.” New artwork by Kristine A. Greenizen. 319-5999. acanthuscafe.com. Aviv Café, 321 East Ave. “For Those Who Served” by John Retallack. Through May 31. 7299916. bethelcf.com/aviv. Axom Gallery, 176 Anderson Ave., 2nd floor. Paul Garland: “In Retrospect.” Through June 22. Wed-Sat noon-5 p.m. and by appointment. Reception May 31, 5:30-8:30 p.m. 232-6030. axomgallery.com. Books Etc., 78 W. Main St. “Backdoor Artists.” Through June 10. With Sue Higgins, Martin Heit, Nicki Millor, Emily Osgood, and Susan Sweet. 474-4116. books_etc@yahoo.com. Bridge Art Gallery University of Rochester Medical Center, 300 Crittenden Blvd. Beyond Barriers Exhibit. Through June 30. 275-3571. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. “Man vs Machine” Through May 30. Hours 8 p.m.-2 a.m. Featuring Bile, Cruk, Yewzer, John Magnus, Thievin’ Stephen, Spaceman, Derek Crowe, Mike Turzanski, Sidhe, Matt Ely, Doe Gawn, Adam Maida, and Clayton Cowles. lobbydigital.com. A Different Path Gallery, 27 Market St. “A Little Twisted: An Exploration of the Self.” BFA Painting Exhibit by Karen Nelson. Wed-Fri 11 a.m.noon, Sat-Sun noon-4 p.m. adifferentpathgallery.com.

ART | “6X6X2013”

Rochester Contemporary Art Center’s annual “6x6” fundraiser, during which you can purchase small-format, unlabeled artworks donated by artists from Rochester and around the world, takes on a special significance this year, as the art center is in the midst of a capital campaign to purchase the building it currently rents. RoCo (137 East Ave.) will present the event June 1-July 14 this year, with a global online preview beginning May 24 at 10 a.m., and in-gallery previews (no purchasing) May 29-31, 1-10 p.m. The opening party and artwork sale will take place Saturday, June 1, 6-10 p.m. The space’s typical $1 admission will move up to $5 for the night, and eager art lovers can purchase the numbered sticker dots ($20 each) that you use to claim your art works at the appointed moment, as well as raffle tickets that can put you in the running for buyer positions 1-20 ($5 each). Emcee duo Nancy Jurs & Wendell Castle will announce the raffle winners at 7:30 p.m., at which point winners may select artworks. At 8 p.m. all other sticker holders can vie for the artworks they desire. Global online purchasing begins Tuesday, June 4, at 10 a.m., and the names of artists who made sold artworks will be revealed online on July 5. Artwork pickup dates are July 14-16, 1-7 p.m. Precisely 6,021 works of art have arrived from 51 countries, made by more than 2,600 artists, with more than 900 new contributors. Contributors of note include internationally renowned composer Philip Glass, visual artists Carolee Schneemann and Robert Marx, Congresswoman Louise Slaughter, City Councilwoman Elaine Spaull, film critic Jack Garner, Robert Marx, TV chef Dan Eaton, and Grant Holcomb, director of the Memorial Art Gallery. For more information, call 461-2222 or visit roco6x6.org. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY Equal=Grounds, 750 South Ave. “My journey of life through my art: a collection of work from my soul:” Mixed media work by Jessica Bell. Through end of May. gallery@equalgrounds.com. Frederick Douglass Community Resource Center, 36 King St. The Price of Freedom is Death: Black Arts Aesthetic Art Show.. Through June 29. 4976139. facebook.com/pages/ Frederick-Douglass-ResourceCenter/341993564799. Friendly Home’s Memorial Gallery, 3165 East Ave. “Searching for Spring” by Elizabeth Liano.. Through Jun 30. Daily 10 a.m.-5 p.m. aflinn@friendlyhome.org. Geisel Gallery, Bausch & Lomb Place, One Bausch & Lomb Place. Paul Garland: “Confluence.” Through June 22. Mon-Fri 7 a.m.-7 p.m., Sat 8 a.m.-2 p.m. thegeiselgallery.com. High Falls Fine Art Gallery, 60 Browns Race. Color, An Exuberant Group Show. Through Jun 22. Tue-Fri 11 a.m.-5:30 p.m., Sat noon-5:30 p.m., Sun 1-5 p.m. Reception Jun 2, 3-6 p.m. Also “Snaps,” Retrospective Images from the Xerox Rochester

International Jazz Festival. Through Jun 30. 325-2030. centerathighfalls.org. Image City Photography Gallery, 722 University Ave. “Shapes, Light, and Color..An Ode to Architecture” by Dan Neuberger.. Through Jun 9. Wed-Sat 11 a.m.-7 p.m., Sun 12-4 p.m. Reception First Friday, June 7, 5-9 p.m. 271-2540. imagecityphotographygallery.com. International Art Acquisitions, 3300 Monroe Ave. “Living Fabric” by Kathleen Kinkopf. Through May 31. Mon-Fri 10 a.m.-9 p.m., Sat 10 a.m.-6 p.m., Sun 12-5 p.m. 264-1440. internationalartacquisitions.com. Link Gallery at City Hall, 30 Church St. Artists Breakfast Group Art Show. Through Jun 17. 271-5920. facebook.com/ABG. Rochester. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. Substantiality: New and Recent Paintings by Bradley Butler. Through Jun 21. Sun 5-8 p.m., Mon 5-10 p.m., Tue 5-9 p.m., Wed 5-10 p.m., Fri-Sat 5-11 p.m. bradleybutler.net. continues on page 20

THE LANDMARK SOCIET Y ’S

HOUSE AND GARDEN TOUR 2013 June 8th & 9th Tickets $22 in Advance Available at:

www.landmarksociety.org Parkleigh (Park & Goodman) or 546-7029 x11

Ten charming homes in the Westminster Road area , South of Park Avenue rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 19


ART EVENT | YARN BOMBING

“Yarn bombers” knit panels to stitch around trees, lamp posts, and benches, adding pretty patchwork and some surprise color-pop to a gray urban environment. Artists (and activists) have upped the game, adding humorous knitted bits here and there, or completely wrapping stairways, fences, tanks, and even the bronze bull on NYC’s Wall Street.

In the Strath allan in the heart of the Neighborhood of the Arts

OUR PATIO IS OPEN Enjoy dinner, dessert, or your favorite cocktail on our outdoor patio!

On Saturday, June 1, knitters and other fiber folk will convene downtown to yarn bomb the South Avenue and Broad Street area. You can participate or watch them work beginning at 2 p.m. So grab your needles (or camera), choose your palette, and head down to the river to meet local fiber artists and watch the surface of the city become more colorful and downy. The decorative endeavor will also be extended to the interior of the Central Library (115 South Ave.). If you are interested in participating, send a message to the event’s Facebook page; search for “ROC the Yarn Bomb.” For more information, call 428-8150. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY

Breakfast | Lunch | Dinner Private Parties | Sunday Brunch 11-3 550 EAST AVE | ROCHESTER

charsteakandlounge.com FOR RESERVATIONS

241.7100

SPECIAL EVENT | FOOD TRUCK RODEO

Rochester’s food-truck businesses are steadily gaining ground for the right to operate legally in the city and suburbs. But we the people already knew we wanted them around. Help the trucks celebrate by attending the summer Food Truck Rodeo events held at the Public Market (280 N. Union St.), which will kick off Wednesday, May 29, 5-9 p.m. Enjoy streetside cuisine from vendors including Le Petit Poutine, The Sammich Guy, Cheesed and Confused, Potatoes to Go, and others. Perfect for a quick dinner or a long evening of hanging out at the market with friends (bring lawn chairs), each of the monthly rodeos will also feature different musical entertainment. This month, Miles Watts & The Brothers from Other Mothers will perform. Admission is free, but bring some greenbacks for grub. The remaining rodeos are set for June 26, July 31, August 28, and September 25. For more information, call 428-6907 or visit cityofrochester.gov. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY

Art Exhibits Lux Lounge, 666 South Ave. The Art of J. Nevadomski and Allie Hartley. Reception Feb 8 6-9 p.m. 232-9030. lux666.com. 20 CITY MAY 29 - JUNE 4, 2013

Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. Creative Workshop Spring Children’s Show. Creative Workshop. “It Came From the Vault: Rarely Seen Works from MAG’s Collection. Mortal: A Portfolio of

Woodcuts by Kiki Smith. Through Aug 25. Lockhart Gallery. WedSun 11 a.m.-5 p.m., until 9 p.m. on Thu. 276-8900. mag. rochester.edu. Mental Health Association, 320 N Goodman St. “Luminaria” Art lighting the path to wellness. Creative Wellness Coalition. 325-3145 x144. My Sister’s Gallery, 505 Mt. Hope Ave. “Through My Lens” by Dan Hausenauer. Through June 23. 10 a.m.-8 p.m. daily. 546-8439 x3716. abmiller@ episcopalseniorlife.org. New Deal Gallery, 4 Livingston County Campus. The Faces of Michael Teres and Leslie Heen. Photographer Michael Teres and painter Leslie Heen team up for an exhibit in Apartment One. Expressions of the Civil War: In Recognition of the 150th Anniversary. Reception Dec 6. Continues TFN Wed, Fri 1-4 p.m., Thu 1-7:30 p.m., Sat 11 a.m.-3 p.m. 243-6785. livingstonarts.org. Ock Hee’s Gallery, 2 Lehigh St. “Birds and Mammals” by Kurt Feuerherm. Through Jun 22. Mon-Sat 11 a.m.-5 p.m. 6244730. ockheesgallery.com. Oxford Gallery, 267 Oxford St. “The Four Humors.” Through Jun 1. Tue-Fri 12-5 p.m., Sat 10 a.m.-5 p.m. 271-5885. oxfordgallery.com. Pat Rini Rohrer Gallery, 71 S Main St. “Floral & Figures of Spring.” Through June 16. 394-0030. prrgallery.com. Rush Rhees Library, University of Rochester, River Campus. Alice in the Looking Glass: Illustrations and Artists’ Books 1865-2012. Through Aug 16. Rare Books & Special Collections, Rush Rhees Library. Mon-Fri 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Sat 11 a.m.-3 p.m. 275-4477.; Memorial Art Gallery: 100 Years of Art for the Community. Through Sep 30, 2013. mag. rochester.edu. The Shoe Factory Art Co-op, 250 N. Goodman St. Mona Oates and Wen-Hua Chen. Wednesdays from 12-5 p.m. shoefactoryarts.com. Spectrum Gallery at Lumiere Photo, 100 College Ave. Rare and Vintage Prints from the Collections of Nathan Lyons, Carl Chiarenza, and Spectrum Gallery. 461-4447. lumierephoto.com. St. John Fisher College, 3690 East Ave. “Parallel Universe and Figurations” Through June 28. Patricia O’Keefe Ross Art Gallery in the Joseph S. Skalny Welcome Center. An exhibit featuring the work of the husband and wife team, Frederic and Mary Ann Richard Skalny. Mon-Thu 9 a.m.4 p.m., Fri 9 a.m.-noon. 3857322. camering@sjfc.edu. Starry Nites Café, 696 University Ave. “Hex Signs & Barn Stars” by Beth Brown. Through Aug 3. 271-2630. shoefactoryarts.com. Tap & Mallet, 381 Gregory St. “It’s a Funny Story” Illustrations by Aarom Humby. Reception Mar 13 7 p.m. 585-473-0503. tapandmallet.com. Valley Manor, 1570 East Ave. “Shared Visions” by Jim and Gail Thomas. Through Jun 28. Hours: 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Mon-Fri or by appointment. 770-1923. Visual Studies Workshop, 31 Prince Street. “ChemoToxic, I Am That, and other stories” by Willie Osterman. 442-8676. vsw.org.


Art Events [ FRI., MAY 31 ] heART beat. May 31, 6 p.m. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. Featuring local artist Mary Moore, DJ Holloway 6-9 Moho Collective 9-midnight Live painting at 9:30 proceeds to human touch initiativehumantouchinitiative. org/. $5 after 9pm. 292-9940. lovincup.com. Women Artists of the Finger Lakes: A Contemporary Art Show and Sale. May 31-June 2. First Congregational Church of Canandaigua UCC, 58 N Main St. Sat 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Sun 10 a.m.-2 p.m. $5. 3942184. canandaiguachurch.org/ ArtShow.html.

Comedy [ THU., MAY 30 ] Donnell Rawlings. May 30-June 1. Comedy Club, 2235 Empire Blvd. Thu 7:30 p.m., Fri-Sat 7:30 & 10 p.m $9-$12. 6719080. thecomedyclub.us. [ FRI., MAY 31 ] 3 Guys Walk Into A Bar Present: Mikey Heller. May 31, 8 p.m. Boulder Coffee Co., 100 Alexander St. MC - Uncle Trent Featuring - Austin Lafond & Jon Schuta! Headlined by MIKEY HELLER. Doors at 7:30 p.m $5. 585-4547140. bouldercoffeeco.com. Canary In A Coal Mine. May 31, 9 p.m. The Space Theater and Gallery, 1199 East Main Street Featuring Jeff Andrews, Angela Prodrick, and BJ Scanlon, with guests $10. 585-209-0734. thespacerochester.com. Improv Comedy Battles. Fri 9:30 p.m., Sat 7:30 p.m. Village Idiots Improv Comedy, 274 Goodman St. N. $5. 797-9086. VIP@ improvVIP.com.

Dance Events [ THU., MAY 30 ] PUSH Physical Theatre: Arc of Ages. May 30-June 9. JCC Rochester, 1200 Edgewood Ave. Through Jun 9. Thu May 30, 7 p.m., Sat Jun, 1 8 p.m., Sun Jun 2, 2 p.m. Wed Jun 5, 7:30 p.m., Thu Jun 6, 7:30 p.m., Sat Jun 8, 8 p.m., Sun Jun 9, 2 p.m $18$26. 461-2000. jccrochester.org. [ SAT., JUNE 1 ] Taipei Physical Education College Cultural Arts Performing Team. June 1, 7:30 p.m. Rochester Institute of Technology, 1 Lomb Memorial Dr. Ingle Auditorium. Taiwanese dancers and musicians open TaiwaneseAmerican Heritage Week $5-$10, register. 461-3765. tcsroc.net.

Festivals [ THU., MAY 30 ] Greek Festival. May 30-June 2, 11 a.m.-11 p.m. Greek Orthodox Church of the Annunciation, 962 East Ave Free admission. rochestergreekfestival.org. [ FRI., MAY 31 ] 59th Annual Fiesta. May 31-June 1, 5-10 p.m. St. Rita’s Church, 1008 Maple Drive 671-1100. saintritawebster.org. Fairport Canal Days. May 31June 2. Fairport village. Fri 6-9 p.m., Sat-Sun 10 a.m fairportcanaldays.com. Second Annual Naples Rally in the Valley. May 31-June 2. This

Classic Tracks Current Grooves Future Legends FESTIVALS | SHOW ON MONROE, GREEK FEST, 19TH WARD SQUARE FAIR, FAIRPORT CANAL DAYS

Roc gals and gentle ’Chesters: festival season is officially open. Here are just four of the upcoming festivals to be held this week in various pockets of our lovely city. For more reasons to go outside and enjoy the community, visit the calendar at rochestercitynewspaper.com.

FOR REAL JAZZ IN ROCHESTER, TUNE TO 90.1 FM OR JAZZ901.ORG.

The Greek Festival (pictured) will take place Thursday, May 30-Sunday, June 2, 11 a.m.-11 p.m. daily at Greek Orthodox Church of the Annunciation (962 East Ave., near George Eastman House). The festival promises live music and dancing, Greek foods and desserts for sale, a boutique and shops, and a kids village with activities. Admission is free. For more information, visit rochestergreekfestival.org. The Show on Monroe is brand new this year, and will take place on Saturday, June 1, noon-6 p.m., based on Monroe Avenue between 490 and the Inner Loop. The event will feature busker performances and live music, a street-wide scavenger hunt (register for $10) with prizes, and great deals from Avenue businesses. Admission is free. For more information, visit showonmonroe.com. Fairport Canal Days take place Friday, May 31-Sunday, June 2 on Main Street in Fairport, and feature a Friday-night barbecue and concert kick-off, and a canal-celebrating weekend full of music, arts & crafts, and more. Admission is free, and hours are Friday 4:30-9:30 p.m., Saturday 10 a.m.-6 p.m., and Sunday 10 a.m.-5 p.m. For more information, visit facebook. com/FairportCanalDays. The 19th Ward Square Fair is the 19th Ward’s annual festival and fundraiser, which features music, a parade, food, a book sale, kids activities, and local vendors. This year’s fest takes place Saturday, June 1, 8 a.m.-4 p.m., at Aberdeen Square Park (where Sherwood Avenue terminates south of Arnett Boulevard). Admission is free. For more info, call 328-6571, or visit 19wca.org. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY town wide community event will feature lawn sales, live music, wine tastings, sidewalk sales, retail and restaurant specials, and more naplesvalleyny.com. [ SAT., JUNE 1 ] 19th Ward Square Fair. June 1. Aberdeen Square Park 328-6571. 19wca.org. The Show on Monroe. June 1. Along Monroe Avenue. Music, activities uppermonroeavenue.org. [ SUN., JUNE 2 ] Inspiration: a Festival of Arts and Nature. June 2, 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Sterling Nature Center, 15380 Jenzvold Rd Free. 315-947-6143. snc@cayugacounty.us. facebook. com/sterlingnaturecenter.

Kids Events [ WED., MAY 29 ] Film: “Beautiful Creatures.” May 29, 6:30 p.m. Brighton Memorial

Library, 2300 Elmwood Ave. PG 13 784-5300. brightonlibrary.org. Submit Work for Rochester Teen Film Festival. Through June 7. Open call for film and videos in all genres from regional high school students. Deadline June 7. Festival takes place August 7 at Little Theatre go.naz.edu/rtff. Tales from Beatrix Potter. Ongoing, 11 a.m. & 7 p.m. Bristol Valley Theater, 151 South Main St 374-9032. bvtnaples.org.

Lectures [ WED., MAY 29 ] The Art of Edouard Manet with Gisela Balents. May 29, 7 p.m. Irondequoit Library, Helen McGraw Branch, 2180 E. Ridge Rd Free, register. 336-6060. Guild Opera Lecture: History and Geography of Opera from its continues on page 23 rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 21


Theater and a better-known movie of the same name) packs up a batch of Englishwomen, sodden from the unceasing rain and disheartened from the gloom of postWWI London, and unloads them in an enchanted garden on the Mediterranean coast. It’s only a matter of time until Italy, once again, has its way with everyone. If the play can do what the movie did — be absolutely phony and utterly winning at the same time — it will deserve its name.

Diana Donnelly and Claire Jullien in “Peace in Our Time: A Comedy,” part of the 2013 Shaw Festival. PHOTO BY EMILY COOPER

Shaw says ‘Pshaw!’ to Shaw 2013 Shaw Festival THROUGH NOVEMBER 3 NIAGARA-ON-THE-LAKE, ONTARIO, CANADA 800-511-SHAW, SHAWFEST.COM [ PREVIEW ] BY MICHAEL LASSER

How long can you call yourself The Shaw Festival if you do hardly any Shaw? For most of the last 30 of its more than 50 seasons, the Festival in nearby Niagara-on-the-Lake, Ontario, has mounted a dozen plays, more or less, between April and late October, including three or four by George Bernard Shaw, and has devoted itself to keeping alive what he and his contemporaries wrote. Since GBS lived to be 94, the well-traveled highway stretches from High Victorianism all the way to post-WW2 Modernism. This year, though, Shaw’s work has been squeezed out until only two plays remain. Actually, one and a half: the essential “Major Barbara” (Royal George Theatre, through October 19) plus “Peace in Our Time: A Comedy” (Court House Theatre, through October 12), a transformation of Shaw’s little-known “Geneva” by Canadian playwright John Murrell. The Festival says the result of Murrell’s substantial rewrite is a “political comedy where affairs of state meet the Three Stooges,” and we’re left to ponder what Shaw would have thought of that. 22 CITY MAY 29 - JUNE 4, 2013

The plays this summer range from the predictable to the exciting. Those with good memories will remember the thrilling 1998 production of Oscar Wilde’s “Lady Windermere’s Fan” (Festival Theatre, through October 19). Who cares if comparisons are odious; they’re also inevitable, especially when the play is this good and the memories of that production so vivid. Wilde’s satiric take on upper-class Victorian marriage and morality from 1892 takes its pepper from his playful irreverence and his topsy-turvy morality. With melodrama as its guiding spirit, the plot is a comedy that feels poised to tumble into disaster, thanks to jealousy, betrayal, and deception, all leading to up-to-date lessons learned for the new modern century only eight years off. “Lady Windermere” is both an obvious choice and a wonderful play. Tom Stoppard’s “Arcadia” (Studio Theatre, through September 7) is less obvious but just as wonderful. It’s a tour de force that carries you back and forth between past (1809) and present, combining mystery, romance, and scandal. As you stumble between clarity and confusion, be prepared to question just what reality consists of. Mathematics, poetry, and — oh, yes — sex are there to help you sort things out, or make them even more confusing. If there’s such a thing as an intellectual romp, Stoppard is its

master. Even if I don’t always understand his language, trying not to fall overboard on his hell-bent-for-somewhere theatrical speedboat is always exhilarating. Two strikingly different musicals are on the boards this summer. “Guys and Dolls” (Festival Theatre, through November 3), with a glorious score by Frank Loesser, is the one that will get all the attention and draw the bigger crowds. It is almost certainly the greatest of the New York-centered musicals and holds an honored spot on the short list of Greatest American Musicals. But, like so many musicals, it takes star power to pull it off. This is one of those shows where the comic lovers — what amounts to the secondary plot — are really the more important. Without a Miss Adelaide and a Nathan Detroit who soar, “Guys and Dolls” will never cast off its earthbound coil. In other words, the other musical — “The Light in the Piazza” (Court House Theatre, through October 13), with a score by Adam Guettel — might just be the sleeper this summer. It’s another airing of the familiar tale about women who worry about convention and propriety until the romance of Italy transforms them. “Enchanted April” (Festival Theatre, through October 26) tells much the same story as “Light in the Piazza,” but instead of following a mother and daughter from the States, Matthew Barber’s play (from a novel

Now for the plays I’m unfamiliar with. Brian Friel is a fine Irish playwright in a tradition of glorious storytellers that traces back to Shaw himself, and to Wilde, Yeats, Synge, and O’Casey as well. His name alongside the title is enough to persuade me to take a chance. Like the movie “Roshomon,” “Faith Healer” (Royal George Theatre, through October 6) recounts the same story from three different angles. The reputation of a small-time faith healer in the Welsh countryside rests on his once having cured 10 people in a single village. But is he the real deal, and what has been his effect on his wife and his manager? Each has a singular version of what’s real and even what’s true. I know W. Somerset Maugham for such novels as “Of Human Bondage” and “Of Moon and Sixpence,” but he was also a successful playwright, as The Shaw’s productions of “The Constant Wife” (2005) and “The Circle” (2007) amply testified. “Our Betters” (Royal George Theatre, through October 27) is less well known, but it’s always gratifying to see the festival trying uncharted waters — or at least forgotten plays. This is yet another social satire that derives from the arrival of a wealthy American woman who will, without mercy, find herself pursued by aristocratic British gents who happen to be flat broke. Consider it a “Downton Abbey” prequel. Sexual liaisons and titled marriages are an essential part of the story; only the frivolous think that all the history that matters takes place around the table. Maugham appears to have a distinctively ironic tongue stuck in his suavely Modernist cheek. The lunchtime series in the Court House Theatre (through October 12) packages two one-act mysteries this summer. One is “Trifles” by the largely forgotten female playwright Susan Glaspell, who was very popular between the 1910’s and the 1940’s. The other is “A Wife for a Life” by Eugene O’Neill. It is, in fact, O’Neill’s first play. Glaspell’s one-act shows how men and women look at the same incident differently, while O’Neill’s becomes a brief study of a very unhappy marriage.


Lectures Origin through the Golden Age. May 29, 7-8:30 p.m. Pittsford Community Library, 24 State St. With Art Axelrod Free. 248-6275. operaguildofrochester.org. Rochester’s Two-Wheeled Revolution: Promoting a Sustainable Bicycle Culture. May 29, 7 p.m. Eisenhart Auditorium, Rochester Museum and Science Center, 657 East Avenue Free. 271-4552 x460. [ THU., MAY 30 ] Community Summit on Race: Where we have been; Where we are now; Where we are going! May 30, 5:30-8:30 p.m. East High School, 1801 Main Street East 288-3130. faceraceroc.org/ events/summit/. [ SAT., JUNE 1 ] The Role of Diet in Preventing, Arresting, & Reversing the 15 Leading Causes of Death. June 1, 7:15 p.m. Presented by Michael Greger, M.D. The Summit at Brighton, Multi-Purpose Room, 1st floor, 2000 Summit Circle Dr Free. 234-8750. rochesterveg.org. [ SUN., JUNE 2 ] Animating the Dragon: Education in China. June 2, 9:50 a.m. Downtown United Presbyterian Church, 121 N. Fitzhugh Street With Tom Folan Free. 325-4000. [ MON., JUNE 3 ] Downton Abbey Discussion Series. 7 p.m Writers and Books, 740 University Ave $3-$5, register. 473-2590 x112. wab.org. [ TUE., JUNE 4 ] Autism Understanding and Awareness with Aaron Likens. June 4, 6-8 p.m. CP Rochester, 3399 Winton Rd. South $2-$5. 490-7100. lifeskills-mo.org. [ WED., JUNE 5 ] Honduras After the Coup by Grahame Russell. June 5, 7 p.m. Downtown United Presbyterian Church, 121 N. Fitzhugh Street A Presentation of the Rochester Committee on Latin America (ROCLA). Wheelchair accessible. Looped for the hearing impaired Free. 7682345. ahmatlingvcp@igc.org. Reshaping Rochester: “Transforming Spaces.” June 5, 7-9 p.m. Gleason Works Auditorium, 1000 University Ave. With Justin Langlois and Dr. Ian Wilson $15, free to students. 2710520. rrcdc.org.

Literary Events [ WED., MAY 29 ] Pure Kona Poetry Readings. 7 p.m. Acanthus Café, 337 East Ave. May 29: James Rowe June 5: Deborah Cornaire June 12: Rigel Klingman June 19: Joe St. Martin. Free. 319-5999. acanthuscafe.com. [ FRI., MAY 31 ] Last Friday Story Slam: Detours. May 31, 7-8:30 p.m. Writers and Books, 740 University Ave Hosted by Carol Roberts. Free. wab.org. [ SAT., JUNE 1 ] Big Book Sale. June 1-2. Monroe Branch Library, 809 Monroe Ave Sat 3-6 p.m.m, Sun 11 a.m.-4 p.m 428-8202. libraryweb.org. Latino poets & musicians from Toronto. June 1, 7-9 p.m. Writers and Books, 740 University Ave Donation requested. wab.org.

JUNE 1 & 2 JAZZ at CANAL DAYS! SPECIAL EVENT | “THE PRICE IS RIGHT LIVE!”

Whenever I stayed home sick from school, I would loaf on the couch and watch “The Price is Right,” weakly amused by the audience members’ flashy outfits and antics, and trying to keep count of how many kisses Bob Barker received from enthusiastic grandmas. It’s likely that most people who have watched the show have their strategy down, just in case they ever found themselves about to roll the Big Wheel. Now’s your chance, fellow Rochesterians. Come on down to the Auditorium Theatre (885 E. Main St.) on Saturday, June 1, and be a part of the audience for “The Price Is Right Live!” Contestants (ages 18+) will be pulled from the audience and offered a chance to win appliances, vacations, new cars, and local glory as they take on Plinko, Cliffhangers, and the fabulous Showcase Showdown. The show will be hosted by Todd Newton. “The Price is Right Live!” takes place at 7:30 p.m., and tickets cost $30.50-$90.50. Get tickets by calling 222-5000 and register for your chance to be a contestant (no purchase necessary) by visiting rbtl.org. Registration will also be available at the Auditorium Theatre Box Office three hours prior to show time (4:30 p.m.). Ticket purchase will not increase your chances of being selected to play. To watch the show, a ticket purchase is required. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY Saturday Author Salon featuring local author Philomina EmekaIheukwu. June 1, 2-4 p.m. Lift Bridge Book Shop, 45 Main St Free. liftbridgebooks.com. [ SUN., JUNE 2 ] Until Tuesday: A Wounded Warrior and the Golden Retriever. June 2, 2:30 p.m. Penfield Public Library, 1985 Baird Rd. With author Capt. Luis Carlos Montalvan Free, register. 340-8720. penfieldlibrary.org. [ MON., JUNE 3 ] Moving Beyond Racism Book Group. June 3, 7-8:30 p.m. Barnes & Noble, 3349 Monroe Ave. “Parable of the Sower” by Octavia Butler. All welcome, even if you haven’t read the book. Safe discussion Free. 288-8644. mbrbookinfo@aol.com. “Oppose and Propose! Lessons from Movement for a New Society,” Book Talk with Andrew Conrnell. June 3, 7-9 p.m. Flying Squirrel Community Space, 285 Clarissa St. Free. flyingsquirrel.rocus.org. [ TUE., JUNE 4 ] R-SPEC meeting. first Tuesday of every month, 7 p.m. Writers of speculative fiction meet once a month to discuss craft Free. r-spec.org.

Museum Exhibit [ WED., MAY 29 ] “Bringing Down the Attic.” Through Aug. 3. Museum

“The jazz festival before The Jazz Festival” Over 30 BANDS including: Paradigm Shift • John Nyerges Quartet • Mike Melito Quartet • Jeff McLeod Organ Trio • Westview Project • Sofrito Latin Jazz Quartet • Jimmie Highsmith Experience • Dave Mancini Quartet • John Seiger & The All Stars • Greater Rochester Jazz Orchestra • Mighty High & Dry • The Bill Tiberio Band • Perinton Concert Band

Friday, May 31st (6pm-9pm) Fairport Junction Band: It’s My Party • Free Admission! Saturday, June 1st (7pm-11pm) Fairport Junction

FEATURING: Chet

Catallo & The Cats, Mr. Mustard

Admission $10 at gate Beer and Wine Garden • Fine Food

fairportcanaldays.com

of Wayne County History, 21 Butternut St Opening March 28, 7 p.m. Free. 315-946-4943. waynehistory.org. The Pride & Passion: The AfricanAmerican Baseball Experience. Through June 14. Central Library, 115 South Ave. Through June 14. Reception May 5 2-4 p.m. 428-8150. www3.libraryweb.org/ pridepassion/home.aspx.

Recreation [ WED., MAY 29 ] Historic Landscape Garden Tours. Tuesdays-Sundays George Eastman House, 900 East Ave. Tue-Fri noon, Sat noon & 3:30 p.m., Sun 3:30 p.m Included in admission: $5-$12. 271-3361. eastmanhouse.org. [ THU., MAY 30 ] Twilight Tours. 7 p.m Mount Hope Cemetery, North Gate, 791 Mt. Hope Ave. $5, members and under 16 free 461-3494. fomh.org. [ SAT., JUNE 1 ] Historic Landscape Garden Tours. Tuesdays-Sundays George Eastman House, 900 East Ave. Tue-Sat noon & 3:30 p.m., Sun 3:30 p.m Included in admission: $5-$12. 271-3361. eastmanhouse.org. Morning Bird Hike. June 1, 8 a.m. Hansen Nature Center, 1525 Calkins Rd. Meet at continues on page 24 rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 23


THEATER | “BARRYMORE”

Just because you started an acting or filmmaking dynasty doesn’t mean your apples will fall close to the tree. Take Francis Ford Coppola and his ridiculous nephew, Nicolas Cage, for instance. The legacy of the Drews and the Barrymores has been altered for the new generations by the silly film choices of the grandchild who shares both family names (you could easily blame Hollywood for the dearth of good roles, however). But if you like older films, you’re probably familiar with her grandfather John Barrymore, the handsome talent who starred in silent and “talkie” films, as “Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde” and many Shakespearean roles. John is the subject of Limelight Productions’ new show, “Barrymore,” written by William Luce and starring David C. Woodworth as the man himself. The one-character biography features the 60-year-old legend (at the age that he died), who has rented a stage to prepare for a comeback performance of “Richard III,” as he reminisces about better times and offers comedic imitations of his siblings. The production kicks off at 8 p.m. on Thursday, May 30, at MuCCC (142 Atlantic Ave.). The show continues through June 8, with performances at 8 p.m. on Friday, May 31, through Saturday, June 1, and Thursday, June 6, through Saturday, June 8, and a matinee performance at 2 p.m. on Sunday, June 2. Tickets cost $10-$12 in advance, and $18-$20 at the door. Call 527-0884 or visit muccc.org for additional information. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY

Recreation Hansen. Bring your binoculars and join Naturalist Liz Magnanti for a morning walk in search of songbirds at Tinker Nature Park. Ages 13+ Free, register. 359-7044. sites.google.com/site/ hansennaturecenter. Public Tour of South Section of Mount Hope Cemetery. Mount Hope Cemetery, 1133 Mt. Hope Avenue Meet: Cemetery Office, South entrance opposite the Distillery restaurant.$5, members and kids under 16 free 4613494. fomh.org. River Ramble 5K Run-Walk for Rochester School for the Deaf. June 1, 8 a.m. Rochester School for the Deaf, 1545 St. Paul Street Annual 5k Run-Walk supports RSD children and their families $20-$25. 336-5884. Rochester Birding: Norway Road. June 1, 7 a.m. Meet in Ridgemont Plaza on Rte 104 in Greece Free 503-4226. rochesterbirding.com. Stepping Out to Cure Scleroderma. June 1, 9 a.m. Seneca Park Longhouse Shelter, 2222 St. Paul St walks.sclerodermatristate.org. [ SUN., JUNE 2 ] Public Tour of North Section of Mount Hope Cemetery. 2 p.m Mount Hope Cemetery, 1133 Mt. Hope Avenue. $5, 24 CITY MAY 29 - JUNE 4, 2013

members and kids under 16 free 461-3494. fomh.org. Rochester Orienteering Club Meet. June 2, 1 p.m. Braddock Bay starting from Tackles on the Bay, 372 Manitou Road, Hilton. Participants will be given maps with key locations noted on the water and shore. Bring own canoes and kayaks. $8 per entry/team, register roc. us.orienteering.org. Rochester Tour de Cure. June 2, 6:30 a.m. Monroe Community College, 1000 E. Henrietta Rd Raise critical funds for diabetes research, education and advocacy in support of the American Diabetes Association Register. 458-3040. monroecc.edu. Warrior Walk. June 2, 8 a.m. University of Rochester, River Campus Wilson Commons. Walking half-marathon urmc. rochester.edu.

Special Events [ WED., MAY 29 ] 100 Days of Entertainment in the Park. Through Sep. 2. Commons Park, Lakeshore Dr. Free. 396-0300. Food Truck Rodeo. May 29, 5-9 p.m. Rochester Public Market, 280 N. Union St. Free admission. cityofrochester.gov.

Maybasket Luncheon. May 29, 12:30 p.m. Hurd Orchards, 17260 Ridge Rd. Paid reservations required 6388838. hurdorchards.com. Memorial Day weekend at Seneca Park Zoo. Through Sep. 2. Seneca Park Zoo, 2222 St. Paul St Observe an alligator feeding. Watch an otter and keeper interact. Talk with staff after a Stage Show. There will be seven live shows daily, from 10:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m Included in zoo admission: $8$11 senecaparkzoo.org. One Day Only Seat Sale. May 29, 12-7 p.m. Little Theatre, 240 East Ave. the Little will be selling seats from Little Theatre Two for $10 each thelittle.org. Rochester Winos Wine and Food Pairing. May 29, 6:309 p.m. Signatures at the Humphrey House, 1783 Penfield Rd., Penfield $30$35, register. rochesterwinos. com. [ THU., MAY 30 ] Art of Xpression 3. May 30, 5-8 p.m. Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way Presented by the Mocha Center. Poetry, spoken word, singers, drag show, free food, free HIV testing, drink specials Free. 585-232-3230. abilenebarandlounge.com. Lincoln Tours. Saturdays, 1 & 3 p.m. Seward House Historic Museum, 33 South St., Auburn. 315-252-1283. sewardhouse.org. Young Political Professionals in Monroe County: A Panel Discussion. May 30, 5:307:30 p.m. Boulder Coffee Co., 100 Alexander St. Free. 585-454-7140. facebook.com/ monroeyoungdems. [ SAT., JUNE 1 ] The Big Hair Event. June 1, 7 p.m. Rochester Museum and Science Center, 657 East Ave. $15-$20. 347-546-2416. bighair.eventbrite.com. Director Ben Shapiro in Person. June 1, 8 p.m. George Eastman House, 900 East Ave. Shapiro will introduce two of his films $6-$8. 271-3361. eastmanhouse.org. Lou Gramm Meet & Greek, Book Signing, Acoustic Performance. June 1, 5-7 p.m. House of Guitars, 645 Titus Ave. Free. 544-3500. houseofguitars.com. Peony Weekend. June 1-2, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Ellwanger Garden, 625 Mt. Hope Ave. Free, donations accepted. landmarksociety.org. Walking the Path of Peace. June 1, 9 a.m. The Assisi Institute, 1400 North Winton Rd. Free. 473-8731 x5. [ SUN., JUNE 2 ] Brighton Farmers’ Market. 9 a.m Brighton High School, 1150 Winton Rd S 9 a.m Free. 269-8918. brightonfarmersmarket.org. Flower City Days. June 2. Rochester Public Market, 280 N. Union St. 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Free admission. 428-6907. cityofrochester.gov/publicmarket. [ MON., JUNE 3 ] Downton Abbey Discussion Series: The Ladies of Downton. June 3, 7-8:30 p.m. Writers and Books, 740 University Ave $3-$5. wab.org.


AUDIO

[ TUE., JUNE 4 ] Downtown Rising. June 4, 11:15 a.m.-1:30 p.m. Radisson Hotel Riverside, 120 E. Main St $45-$50, RSVP. rddc.org.

Flower City Grill

[ MON., JUNE 3 ] Wegmans LPGA Championship. June 3-9. Locust Hill Country Club, 2000 Jefferson Road 427-7100. wegmanslpga.org.

2500 East Ave Rochester, NY 586-7730 Open Tuesday - Sunday

Theater “Barrymore.” MuCCC, 142 Atlantic Ave Through Jun 8. Limelight Productions. Thu May 30-Sat Jun 1 8 p.m., Sun 2 p.m. Thu Jun 6-Sat Jun 8 8 p.m $10$12 advance, $18-$20 door. 866-811-4111. muccc.org. A Midsummer Night’s Dream. Geva Theatre Center, 75 Woodbury Blvd. Wed May 29-Thu 7:30 p.m. (Thu sign interpreted), Fri 8 p.m., Sat 4 & 8:30 p.m., Sun 2 p.m. (Sunday Salon) & 7 p.m Tickets start at $25. 232-4382. gevatheatre.org. The Price is Right! Live. Jun 1, 7:30 p.m. Auditorium Theatre, 885 E. Main St. $30.50-$90.50. 222-5000. rbtl.org. Respect: A Musical Journey of Women. Downstairs Cabaret at Winton Place, 3450 Winton Place Thu 7 p.m., Fri 8 p.m., Sat 5 & 8:30 p.m $26-$39. 325-4370. downstairscabaret.com. “Singin’ In the Rain.” Through June 5. Merry-Go-Round Playhouse, 6877 East Lake Rd Through Jun 19. Wed May 29-Thu 7:30 p.m., Fri-Sat 2 & 8 p.m., Mon 7:30 p.m., Tue-Wed, Jun 5 2 & 7:30 p.m 315-2551305. fingerlakesmtf.com. “Steel Magnolias.” Blackfriars Theatre, 795 E. Main St Thu 7:30 p.m., Fri-Sat 8 p.m., Sun 2 p.m $28.50-$36.50. 454-1260. bftix.org. “Venus in Fur.” Geva Theatre Center, 75 Woodbury Blvd. Wed May 29-Fri 7 p.m., Sat 3 & 8 p.m., Sun 3 p.m Tickets start at $27. 232-4382. gevatheatre.org.

Theater Audition [ WED., MAY 29 ] Auditions for “Pippin” and “BROADWAY! Through the Ages.” Through May 29, 6-8:30 p.m. Lutheran Church of the Reformation, 111 North Chestnut St. Stageworks. Please prepare 16 bars of a ballad and 16-32 bars of an upbeat piece. All excerpts should be from musicals. No music from “Pippin” at auditions. Please bring sheet music, in the correct key. An accompanist will be provided 454-3367. StageworksROC.org. Improv Comedy Open Auditions. May 29, 7 p.m. Village Idiots Improv Comedy, 274 Goodman St. N. Free. 797-9086. VIP@ improvVIP.com. improvvip.com.

Workshops [ WED., MAY 29 ] Basic Espresso Techniques. 7-8:30 p.m Joe Bean Coffee Roasters, 1344 University Ave. $25 per class. 319-5279. kturiano@joebeanroasters.com. joebeanroasters.com. Easy Appetizers. May 29, 7 p.m. Rochester Brainery, Village Gate, 274 N Goodman

SOLUTIONS

Now open breakfast, lunch, and dinner!

Sports

SPORTS | WEGMANS LPGA CHAMPIONSHIP

The Wegmans LPGA Championship is back this week, featuring dozens of golfers from around the world, kicking off at Locust Hill Country Club (2000 Jefferson Road, Pittsford) on Monday, June 3, and continuing through Sunday, June 9.

SOUND

$4 OFF $20 exp. 06/12/13.

STEREO

FOR LESS AREA’S FASTEST REPAIR

Receivers • CD Players • Speakers Turntables • Tuners • Phono Cartridges Repair & Service • Vintage Records Equipment and lots more!

442-0890

402 W. Commercial St. East Rochester

AUDIOSOUNDSOLUTIONS.NET

Tee time on Monday is 7 a.m., and in addition to the opportunity to watch the players, a wine tasting, a sunrise walk, and beer and food tastings, other (ticketed) special events will be held throughout the week. The three rounds of the LPGA Championship will be held Thursday through Saturday. Ticket prices are $10 for practice rounds, $35 for a one-day LPGA Championship Grounds Voucher, and $60 for a one-day LPGA Championship Clubhouse Voucher, which gains you access to the grounds and the clubhouse. Power players Morgan Pressel, lexi Thompson, Lydia Ko, and Nicole Castrale will take part in “A Conversation With Champions” panel, held at the Locust Hill Country Club Summit FCU Pavilion at noon on Wednesday, June 5. The ladies will discuss how they are pursuing their dream on and off the golf course. Tickets to this luncheon event are $50. For more information, call 427-5742, and for a complete schedule of events, visit wegmanslpga.org. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY St. We will make stuffed mushrooms, spanikopita and baked brie $30. 730-7034. rochesterbrainery.com. Family Development Class: “Drugs, Sexuality, and Violence.” May 29. Mental Health Association, 320 N Goodman St. For parents of pre-teens and teens. Part 1: 5/29 6-8 p.m., part 2: 6/5 6-8 p.m Free, RSVP. 325-3145 x131. mharochester.org. [ SAT., JUNE 1 ] Culinary Basics III: Soups with Bridgette Pendleton. June 1, 12-2:30 p.m. The Culinary Center at Vella, 237 PittsfordPalmyra Rd $65, register. 421-9362. vellaculinarycenter. com. Cultivars and Care of Lilacs. June 1, 10 a.m.-noon. Hansen Nature Center, 1525 Calkins Rd. Free, register. 359-7044. sites.google. com/site/hansennaturecenter. Ukulele Workshop by Kala Ukulele Artist Stuart Fuchs. June 1. Bernunzio’s Uptown Music, 112 East Ave Beatles: The Fab Four Strings pt. 1, 11 a.m.-12:15 p.m. Ukeabilly Workshop 12:30-1:15 p.m $20 for one/$35 for both. 473-6140. julie@bernunzio.com. [ SUN., JUNE 2 ] Clawhammer Banjo Workshops with Chris Coole. June 2. Bernunzio’s Uptown Music, 112 East Ave 12:30-2 p.m.: The Elements of Clawhammer Banjo, Beginner/Intermediate. 2:30-4 p.m.: Learning Tunes by Ear, All Levels. RSVP $20 for one workshop, $35 for both. 473-6140.

[ MON., JUNE 3 ] Family Development Class: “Will My Child Still Love Me?” June 3, 12:30-2:30 p.m. Mental Health Association, 320 N Goodman St. For parents of children birth to 5 Free, RSVP. 325-3145 x131. mharochester.org. Restaurant Six50 with Ryan Vanburen. June 3, 6-8:30 p.m. The Culinary Center at Vella, 237 Pittsford-Palmyra Rd $85, register. 421-9362. vellaculinarycenter.com. [ TUE., JUNE 4 ] African World History Class. 7:30-9 p.m. Baobab Cultural Center, 728 University Ave. $5 donation requested. baobab.center@yahoo.com. thebaobab.org. Building and Maintaining Your Coral Reef. June 4, 7 p.m. Rochester Brainery, Village Gate, 274 N Goodman St. $15. 730-7034. rochesterbrainery. com. Family Development Class: “Courage and Self-Esteem.” June 4, 12:30-2:30 p.m. Mental Health Association, 320 N Goodman St. For parents of children 5 to 12. Free, RSVP. 325-3145 x131. mharochester.org.

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rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 25


Movies Theaters Searchable, up-to-the-minute movie times for all area theaters can be found at rochestercitynewspaper.com, and on City’s mobile website.

Film

Brockport Strand 93 Main St, Brockport, 637-3310, rochestertheatermanagement.com

Canandaigua Theatres 3181 Townline Road, Canandaigua, 396-0110, rochestertheatermanagement.com

Cinema Theater 957 S. Clinton St., 271-1785, cinemarochester.com

Culver Ridge 16

The third time’s a harm

2255 Ridge Rd E, Irondequoit  544-1140, regmovies.com

Dryden Theatre 900 East Ave., 271-3361, dryden.eastmanhouse.org

[ REVIEW ] BY GEORGE GRELLA

Eastview 13

“The Hangover Part III”

Eastview Mall, Victor 425-0420, regmovies.com

(R), DIRECTED BY TODD PHILLIPS NOW PLAYING

Geneseo Theatres Geneseo Square Mall, 243-2691, rochestertheatermanagement.com

The magical number of three helps account for the success of some of the important literary and cinematic trilogies — in literature, for example, the Oedipus cycle, Shakespeare’s history plays about Henry IV and V, Dumas’s volumes about the Three Musketeers, Dos Passos’s “U.S.A.,” Farrell’s Studs Lonigan novels. In the cinema, the most obvious are the first three works in the “Star Wars” group, the adventures of Indiana Jones, and perhaps

Greece Ridge 12 176 Greece Ridge Center Drive 225-5810, regmovies.com

Henrietta 18 525 Marketplace Drive 424-3090, regmovies.com

The Little 240 East Ave., 258-0444 thelittle.org

Movies 10 2609 W. Henrietta Road 292-0303, cinemark.com

Pittsford Cinema 3349 Monroe Ave., 383-1310 pittsford.zurichcinemas.com

Tinseltown USA/IMAX 2291 Buffalo Road 247-2180, cinemark.com

Webster 12 2190 Empire Blvd., 888-262-4386, amctheatres.com

Vintage Drive In 1520 W Henrietta Rd., Avon 226-9290, vintagedrivein.com

Film Previews on page 28

most memorable, the “Godfather” films. Too often, of course, trilogies explode into bloated franchises, like all the “Rocky” films, the rest of the “Star Wars” movies, and the innumerable remakes of dumb action and horror flicks. On a perhaps lower level of significance, the wildly successful “The Hangover” of 2009 has now grown into a trilogy all its own, and as it turns out, not an especially good idea. The first movie, outrageously funny, shocking, raunchy, and quite cleverly plotted, belongs with some of the great anarchic guy flicks, like “Animal House” and “The Big Lebowski.” The second, a lavish sequel set in Bangkok, exhibits a sad degeneration into sentimentality and decadence, while the newest, brilliantly titled “The Hangover Part III” —the Roman numerals certainly add a touch of class — simply demonstrates a failure of intelligence and imagination, with the added problem of an almost total lack of humor. After an odd prologue showing a prison riot, with the weird Leslie Chow

Zach Galifianakis in “The Hangover Part III.” PHOTO COURTESY WARNER BROS. PICTURES

26 CITY MAY 29 - JUNE 4, 2013

(Ken Jeong) breaking out, the movie proper opens with Alan (Zach Galifianakis), tooling down the freeway in his Mercedes convertible, laughing and screaming maniacally, while towing a giraffe in a trailer. He drives under a low bridge, which beheads the animal, triggering a multiplevehicle crash and, soon after, his father’s fatal heart attack. That beginning pretty much sums up the level of humor in the film — low, broad, crude, and violent. After the funeral, at which Alan sings “Ave Maria” in an angelic soprano voice, then takes off his shirt and helps bury his father, once again the Wolfpack, especially Phil (Bradley Cooper) and Stu (Ed Helms), swings into action. The Wolfpack decides to take the manic simpleton Alan to some clinic in Arizona to change his childish ways and convince him to take his medications. On their way, however, a major thug named Marshall (John Goodman) ambushes them and announces a change of plans for the group, which establishes the rest of the silly plot. Under the threat of death — Marshall kidnaps Alan’s brother-in-law — the guys must locate Chow and find $21 million in gold bars that he stole from Marshall. They track Chow to Tijuana, then to Las Vegas, where the whole series began; their various encounters with Chow, who deceives and betrays them every time, constitute the source for the alleged comedy. The script plods along from incident


American muscle [ REVIEW ] BY DAYNA PAPALEO

“Fast & Furious 6” (PG-13), DIRECTED BY JUSTIN LIN NOW PLAYING

to incident as if the several screenwriters were making it up as they went along, and somehow managing to do it without creating any laughs. We know “Hangover Part III” is a comedy because it grows out of two previous comic pictures that employ the same cast; further, other people from those earlier flicks pop up, and the characters now and then refer to incidents in those movies, like Stu’s face tattoo and his unfortunate amorous encounter with a lovely transsexual in Bangkok. It also ends in a wedding, the classic conclusion to comedies since the form began. At the same time, the attempts at humor depend heavily on the decidedly non-comic device of brutal violence. In addition to the giraffe decapitation, the car wrecks, and the heart attack, the movie features three coldblooded murders, with one of the killers escaping all punishment and even achieving a kind of benevolence. The cast behaves very much in the manner of the earlier flicks, i. e., with the bland stupidity of gulls and fools. Once again, Zach Galifianakis dominates, extracting every drop of sentiment out of the character of the lovable goof, growing ever more tiresome as the film proceeds. Like its predecessors, the picture scooped up pots of dough over its opening weekend, which may prove that nothing succeeds like excess, or perhaps the value of that magic number after all — a sad commentary on contemporary film and the state of comedy.

That’s right, Vin Diesel. It’s me. Did you really think I’d miss our biennial date, the one where I hang out in the dark with a lapful of candy while you drive and punch and growl and drive? Honestly, the fact that we even have this time together is downright shocking, given that the “Fast & Furious” conceit was basically flatlining after 2006’s “Tokyo Drift.” Over the course of the last several years, however, you and your crew not only reanimated the franchise, but reinvented it by locking into a blueprint designed for global appeal. “F&F” chapters are now bona fide event movies, two frenetic hours where audiences have an unironic blast immersing themselves in noisy, preposterous situations involving musclebound dudes, barely dressed chicks, and tricked-out rides. Somehow gleefully surpassing its predecessors in terms of energy, melodrama, and utter implausibility, the crazy-fun “Fast & Furious 6” is your latest go-round as Dominic Toretto, street-racerturned-thief-turned-prison-escapee-turnedthief-again-turned-wealthy-expat-in-acountry-with-no-extradition. It’s in the

Vin Diesel in “Fast & Furious 6.”

gorgeous Canary Islands that the nearly neckless federal agent Hobbs (Dwayne Johnson) intrigues Toretto with a recent surveillance photo of an apparently alive Letty along with a deal: help the law take down Letty’s boss, Eurotrash baddie Owen Shaw (Luke Evans), in exchange for... well, you guys eventually hammer that out. We know it’s just an excuse to get the band back together. So Toretto’s de facto family reunites in London, their teasing chemistry intact and one of this series’ true pleasures. But Han’s constant snacking and Rome’s miserly ways are not what people came to see, Vin Diesel, so it’s not long before Toretto, et al., are going tire to tire with Shaw and his henchpeople, including an amnesiac Letty (Michelle Rodriguez returns!). Shaw’s evil plan involves — oh, who cares. You already know, and I’ve already forgotten. What matters is that Shaw’s people have Formula One-ish skeleton cars with front ends that act as ramps, sending opposing traffic into midair, because it’s just not an “F&F” flick without massive property damage and a high civilian body count. Plus at least one flashy street race to give local strippers a chance to moonlight as extras. Another hallmark of this franchise is the operatic action interludes, typically designed for maximum thrills and in “Furious 6” — as it’s known on the title card — resetting an already-high bar. All I will say is that the tank set piece is bonkers, while the final showdown, involving a cargo jet and what might be the world’s longest runway, completely abandons any pretense of realism. But don’t be insulted, Vin Diesel! No one is looking to “F&F” movies for lessons in cinema verité; we want twisted metal, loud explosions, and gravity-mocking stunts. We also like a little hand-tohand combat, which we get in various

pairs, including a couple of skillfully choreographed brawls between Rodriguez and ex-MMA fighter Gina Carano (“Haywire”) as Hobbs’ sidekick. Obviously, Vin Diesel, it’s not your fault that most of Toretto’s dialogue sounds like it was cribbed from the inside of a fortune cookie — and, at one laughable moment, Brillat-Savarin’s “The Physiology of Taste” — but it’s not out of character, and few can either brood or sparkle like you. Even Paul Walker as former cop O’Conner seems to be improving with age, and the rest of the team gets some quality screen time, especially Chris Bridges’ Tej and Sung Kang’s Han. Now, if I were to do my job correctly, I’d thank my lucky stars that the plot saw fit to mostly sideline the awful Jordana Brewster’s Mia, and I’d wonder why The Rock, usually quite magnetic, is so dull as Hobbs. And I am beyond impressed that director Justin Lin and screenwriter Chris Morgan were able to wrangle this behemoth mythology into something both linear and coherent after seemingly bringing Han back from the dead for 2009’s jumpstarter “Fast & Furious.” Yeah, you know what I’m talking about: that end-credit scene which almost seamlessly weaves “Tokyo Drift” into the story, answering questions about Han’s death and setting everything up for “Fast 7.” Oh, and introducing one of the planet’s biggest action stars as the ultimate super-villain. “You don’t know me yet,” he snarls to Toretto over the phone as a decimated car erupts into a giant fireball. “But you will.” I almost cheered. Kidding! I totally f--king cheered. Let’s do it again next year, Vin Diesel. How does July 11 work for you? Ride or die, Dayna

PHOTO COURTESY UNIVERSAL PICTURES

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 27


Film Previews ***Due to the holiday weekend, film schedules were not available for many theaters. Check rochestercitynewspaper. com for updated movie times and theater listings*** Full film reviews available at rochestercitynewspaper.com. [ OPENING ] AFTER EARTH (PG-13): Will and Jaden Smith play a father and son who struggle for survival after crash landing on Earth, 1000 years after humanity has abandoned the planet. Brockport, Canandaigua, Culver Ridge, Geneseo, Pittsford, Webster DEAD MEN DON’T WEAR PLAID (1982): Steve Martin stars as a private eye investigating the death of a famous cheesemaker in Carl Reiner’s spoof of 1940’s film noir. Dryden (Fri 8 p.m.; Sun 2 p.m.) GREGORY CREWDSON: BRIEF ENCOUNTERS (2012): Director Ben Shapiro will be in attendance to discuss his film — 10 years in the making — documenting the creative process of celebrated photographer Gregory Crewdson. Dryden (Sat 8 p.m.) KON-TIKI (PG-13): This Oscar-nominated adventure film dramatizes explorer Thor

Heyerdal’s legendary 1947 journey across the Pacific Ocean in a balsa-wood raft. Little MAGNIFICENT OBSESSION (1954): Robert Hudson stars in this Douglas Sirk melodrama, about a spoiled playboy and his relationship with the widow of the man whose death he inadvertently caused. Dryden (Tue 8 p.m.) NOW YOU SEE ME (PG-13): A team of illusionists use their talents to perpetrate a series of heists targeting corrupt business leaders. Starring Jesse Eisenberg, Michael Caine, Morgan Freeman, Mark Ruffalo, Woody Harrelson, and Isla Fisher.  Canandaigua, Culver Ridge, Geneseo, Pittsford, Webster THE RULES OF THE GAME (1939): Frequently cited as one of the greatest films of all time, director Jean Renoir presents a darkly comedic examination of upper-class French society just prior to the start of WWII. Dryden (Wed, May 29, 8 p.m.) THE TREE OF LIFE (2011): Terrence Malick’s experimental drama about the meaning of life, as told through a man’s memories of growing up in 1950’s Texas and the origins of the universe. A light-hearted romp. Dryden (Thu 8 p.m.)

[ CONTINUING ] EPIC (PG): A young girl gets caught in the middle of a battle between the forces good and evil over the fate of the natural world in the animated adventure film. With the voices of Beyoncé Knowles, Colin Farrell, Josh Hutcherson, Amanda Seyfried, and Aziz Ansari. Canandaigua, Geneseo, Pittsford, Webster FAST & FURIOUS 6 (PG13): The sixth installment of the street-racing action film series. Expect fast (and potentially furious) cars, which may or may not explode in epic fashion. Starring Vin Diesel, Paul Walker, Dwayne Johnson, Michelle Rodriguez, Luke Evans, and Tyrese Gibson. Brockport, Canandaigua, Geneseo, Pittsford, Webster THE GREAT GATSBY (PG-13): F. Scott Fitzgerald’s classic Jazz Age novel gets the Baz Luhrmann treatment in this glitzy adaptation. Starring Leonardo DiCaprio, Carey Mulligan, Tobey Maguire, Joel Edgerton, and Isla Fisher. Canandaigua, Geneseo, Little, Pittsford, Webster THE HANGOVER PART III (R): The Wolfpack returns in the final film of the blockbuster comedy franchise. Starring Bradley Cooper, Ed Helms, and Zach Galifianakis.

Mark Ruffalo in “Now You See Me.” PHOTO COURTESY SUMMIT ENTERTAINMENT Brockport, Canandaigua, Geneseo, Pittsfor, Webster IRON MAN 3 (PG-13): Shane Black (“Kiss Kiss Bang Bang”) takes over directing duties while Robert Downey Jr. reprises his role as Tony Stark in the third installment of the superhero franchise. Also starring Gwyneth Paltrow, Don Cheadle, Ben Kingsley, and Guy Pearce. Canandaigua, Pittsford, Webster KING’S FAITH (PG-13): A young gang member attempts to leave his criminal life behind him, but his past continues to threaten his family and faith. Tinseltown

For information: Call us (585) 244-3329 Fax us (585) 244-1126 Mail Us City Classifieds 250 N. Goodman Street Rochester, NY 14607 Email Us classifieds@ rochester-citynews.com EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY

All real estate advertised in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act, which makes it unlawful, “to make, print, or publish, any notice, statement, or advertisement, with respect to the sale or rental of a dwelling that indicates any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin.” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under the age of 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertisement for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. Call the local Fair Housing Enforcement Project, FHEP at 325-2500 or 1-866-671-FAIR. Si usted sospecha una practica de vivienda injusta, por favor llame al servicio legal gratis. 585-325-2500 - TTY 585-325-2547.

28 CITY MAY 29 - JUNE 4, 2013

We placed an ad in City Newspaper advertising the availability of two office suites in my office building at 55 Canterbury Road in the City. The response was excellent. One of the two available spaces was leased within days, and we have active interest in the other space.” - DOUGLAS C. BURKHARDT, FIRST REALTY COMPANY

www.firstrealtyrochester.com

THE PLACE BEYOND THE PINES (R): Director Derek Cianfrance’s follow up to “Blue Valentine” stars Ryan Gosling as a small-time bank robber and Bradley Cooper as the rookie cop who’s pursuing him. With Eva Mendes. Little THE RELUCTANT FUNDAMENTALIST (R): A young Pakistani man living in NYC finds success on Wall Street until the events of 9/11 turn his American Dream into a nightmare. Starring Liev Schreiber, Kate Hudson, and Kiefer Sutherland. Little

RENOIR (R): This French drama tells the story of Andrée Heuschling, who became the muse of impressionist painter PierreAuguste Renoir as well as his son, filmmaker Jean Renoir. Little STAR TREK INTO DARKNESS (PG-13): Kirk, Spock and crew return in J.J. Abrams’ sequel to his massively successful reboot of the Star Trek franchise. Brockport, Canandaigua, Geneseo, Pittsford, Webster


Place your real estate ad by calling 244-3329 ext. 23 or rochestercitynewspaper.com Ad Deadlines: Friday 4pm for Display Ads Monday at noon for Line ads LandFirstNY.com Ends May 31st Call Now! 1-888-683-2626. UPSTATE NY COUNTRYSIDE SPRING LAND SALE $5,000 Off Each Lot 6 AC w/ Trout Stream: $29,995 3 AC / So. Tier: $15,995 5.7 AC On the River: $39,995 Beautiful & All Guaranteed Buildable. Financing Available. Offer Ends 5/31/13. Call Now: 1-800-2297843 www.landandcamps.com WATERFRONT LOTS - Virginia’s Eastern Shore WAS 300K Now From $55k Large Lots, Community Pool, Pier and Recreational Center. Great for boating, fishing & kayaking. www. oldemillpointe.com 757-824-0808

Full/ partial weeks. Call for FREE brochure. Open daily. Holiday Real Estate. 1-800-638-2102. Online reservations: www.holidayoc.com

Home Services MASTER CHIMNEY & MASONRY See our ad under Home and Garden Professionals. Chimney Cleaning, Masonry Repairs, Foundation Repairs, Roof Leaks, Brick Steps Repaired. 585-734-8444

Adoption

Vacation Property

ADOPT: A happily married couple promises cozy home, secure future, extended family, unconditional love for baby of any race. Expenses paid. Leslie/ Daniel TOLLFREE 1-855767-2444. danielandleslieadopt@ gmail.com

OCEAN CITY MARYLAND Best selection of affordable rentals.

ADOPTION - Happily married, nature-loving couple wishes to adopt

A cooperative effort of City Newspaper and RochesterCityLiving, a program of the Landmark Society.

a baby. We promise love, laughter, education, and security. Expenses paid. www.DonaldAndEsther.com. (Se habla español.) 1-800-9655617. ADOPTION: A childless, married couple (ages 34/35)desire to adopt and be stay-at-home mom & devoted dad. Financial security. Expenses paid. Ellen & Chris. 1-888-701-2170

Automotive 1999 SAAB 9.5 good condition, green. Automatic. Runs good, needs transmission filter. Hepa filter brand new. $900 OBO, 5857647587. AAAA AUTO RECYCLING And Fast Cash for your cars, vans and trucks. Up to $800. Free towing. Any condition. Up to $5,000 for newer

continues on page 30

Find your way home with TO ADVERTISE CONTACT CHRISTINE TODAY!

CALL 244-3329 X23 OR EMAIL CHRISTINE@ROCHESTER-CITYNEWS.COM Greece; 158 Merrick St, $99,900. This home boasts refinished hardwoods, woodburing fireplace, an archway to the dining room, and a closed in porch with a brick floor. Many Upgrades! Call Ryan @ 585-201-0724

Ryan Smith 585-201-0724

Ryan Smith

NYS Licensed Real Estate Salesperson

201-0724 RochesterSells.com

HomeWork

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Patrick DeMay patrickdemay@hotmail.com 585.734.6422

Prestigious Seneca Parkway 355 Seneca Parkway Welcome to the one-of-a-kind Seneca Parkway in the heart of the Maplewood neighborhood. This beautiful, quiet tree lined street has a wide park-like median, which hosts annual block parties such as the Picnic on the Parkway and the Kentucky Derby Party. In this lovely American Foursquare at 355 Seneca Parkway, you’ll feel right at home among friendly neighbors. As you walk in through the three season enclosed porch you enter an inviting home that is filled with beautiful hardwood floors, wide molding and a warm color scheme that is reminiscent of an autumn day, all of which has been maintained by the current owners of 14 years. One of the first rooms you come upon is the anteroom, or sitting room, with a cozy built-in bench in the front corner where you can sit and admire the outside surrounded by windows with internal wooden shutters. Looking across the hall, your eyes will be drawn to a decorative artificial fireplace with a wooden mantle in the living room. The kitchen includes an island and a sunny breakfast nook. There is a pantry across from a half bath with a pocket door; both nestled between the kitchen and dining room. The formal dining room features a charming builtin bench with a hidden compartment for your tablecloths or linens. After a meal in this room

step out onto the outdoor deck that overlooks a yard secluded by hedges and trees. The backyard is fenced and includes a powered and detached two car garage. Gorgeous wide plank wood stairs lead you to the second floor with four bedrooms, a built-in wooden linen closet and a full bath that includes original floor tiles and a working bidet! One bedroom has double doors that lead to an outdoor porch overlooking the backyard. The finished attic could be a fifth bedroom with ample creative storage from built-in drawers, shelves and cabinets along with a closet that can be accessed from two smaller doors on either side. Built in 1908, the root cellar remains for storing canned goods or wine. The original coal gravity furnace has been replaced; the current central air/forced air furnace is 10 years old. The exterior of the home was painted last month and the roof was replaced in the last 10 years. This 1,586 square foot home (not including the attic) is listed at $114,900. For more information visit rochestercityliving.com/property/ R218000 or contact realtor Heather Affronti with RE/MAX Realty at 585-756-7401. by Rebakah Bottazzo Rebekah is a Landmark Society volunteer.

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 29


> page 29 cars. www.cash4carsrochester.com 585-482-2140 ALWAYS BETTER Higher cash for your Junk Cars, Trucks and Vans. From $200-$800 or more for newer. Running or not. With free towing. Also free removal of any unwanted model in any condition. Call 585305-5865 CASH 4 CARS TRUCKS AND VANS. Up to $800 running or not, more for newer models. We’ll be there in 30 minutes. 585-482-9988 www. cash4carsrochester.com

CASH FOR CARS Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888-420-3808 www. cash4car.com (AAN CAN)

Antiques & Collectibles BUYING/SELLING: Gold, gold coins, sterling silver, silver coins, silver plate, diamonds, fine watches (Rolex, Cartier, Patek), paintings, furs, estates. Call for appointment 917-696-2024 JAY

Education

in perfect working order. All for $39 585-654-9480

MAGNAZOX digital to analog converter $28 585-490-5870

ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from home. *Medical, *Business, *Criminal Justice, *Hospitality, Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call 888-2018657www.CenturaOnline.com

3 1/2 T Hydraulic car jack $49 585490-5870

PALM TREE 5’ tall $15 585-4905870

ALUMINUM FOLDING CHAIRS (2) $15. 585-490-5870

PRO TEC BAN SAW 9” model 3202 $40 58/5-225-5526

DOG & CAT HOUSES Kennels, porch steps, do it yourself kits. Quick assembly 585-752-1000 $49 Jim

VARIOUS Shovel, rakes, brooms, heavy duty $3 ea, duffle bags $3 ea, Hand tools $2, Ramps (car) heavy duty $35, work shoe & boots $1, wire cage for rabbit $25 585752-1000

For Sale

FABRIC REMNANTS SELLING OUT fabric remnants. Originally $25-30 per yard cuts of 6-10yrds per yard at $5.00 per yard. THE WORKSHOP 351 Empire Blvd. 585-654-9480 2p.m. to 5p.m.

13” TV, CONVERTER BOX antennna $47 585-752-1000 2 DIGITAL T.V. CONVERTER BOXES. 26” Magnovox T.V. set. All

WHIRLPOOL GAS DRYER. Very Good Condition. 3 years old. $50 Call 585-527-8024

WOOD GARDEN FIGURES, 2 girls, 1 dog, stands in ground. All three $10 585-880-2903

Garage and Yard Sales ART SUPPLIES Fiber Art Supplies & Tools For Sale: Basketry reeds, Weaving, Bobbin Lace Making, Rug Hooking & More 5/30,31, 6/1, noon-4, Studio #202, 250 N. Goodman St NEIGHBOR HOOD SALE Greece, 5/23-5/25 Also 5/30-6/1. Thursday/ Friday/Saturday 9am-5pm. @ 2724

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ROOF LEAKS? Shop with a Roofer Certified in Metal Roofing - AND with Owens Corning, GAF and IKO Roofing • General Contracting • Roofs • Siding • Windows/Doors • Kitchens • Baths • Handicap Renovations • Repairs Big or Small • Metal Roofing • Electrical • Masonry

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30 CITY MAY 29 - JUNE 4, 2013

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Latta Rd. to 1375 English Rd. About 40 homes each week! PITTSFORD: Sherwood Neighborhood Garage sale. Fri. & Sat. May 31 & June 1st, 9am - 4 pm. Tools, Garden items, Snowboard, Baby clothes, various Household Items. Off 31F or Washington Rd. SAVE THE DATE The Highland Park Neighborhood Association is pleased to sponsor our 3rd Neighborhood Wide Yard Sale! The sale will take place on Saturday, June 8, from 9AM to 4PM – rain or shine! TAG SALE Fri–Sat, June 7th - 8th, 2013, 9am – 5pm. Greek Orthodox Church of the Holy Spirit 835 South Ave. Rochester, NY 14620. Great Selection of Clothes,Furniture, Housewares,Toys VISUAL STUDIES WORKSHOP Summer Sale! May 31 – June 9. Mon-Fri, 9 to 5PM, Sat-Sun, 10 to 4PM. photo/video equipment, prints, lantern slides, books, etc! @31 Prince St., 585-442-8676

Jam Section BRIAN MARVIN lead vocalist, is looking for a job and is looking to form band (Classic Rock) with lead guitarist, bassist, drummer & rhythm guitars Covers & originals 585-4735089 CLASSIC ROCK COVER BAND? Experienced Young Drummer available to play - Led Zeppelin, Rush, etc. Looking for Guitar, Bass and Vocals. Contact through: http://www.youtube.com/user/ Chaztize7 HAMMOND AURORA ORGAN - Nice sounding Hammond Spinet organ w/ Leslie speaker built-in. Solid state. Includes bench $500 Hurry! 585455-5739 SEEKING GUITARIST Who likes early Beatles and Who, Jefferson Airplane, Springsteen, Ramones, B-52s and X. I play bass, write, and sing backup. Want to jam without pressure, see where things go. mooskamovers@aol.com THE GREGORY KUNDE CHORALE is looking for male voices. Call for an audition now to join our

K-D Moving & Storage Inc.

Experience in office & household moving and deliveries

Big or small, we do them all

473-6610 or 473-4357 23 Arlington St. NY D.O.T.#9657

KdMovingandStorage.com

fourteenth season! Info Line 377 7568 or visit our website www. gregorykundechorale.org

Music Services PIANO LESSIONS In your home or mine. Patient, experienced instructor teaching all ages, levels and musical styles. Call Scott: 585- 465-0219. Visit www. pianolessonsrochester.com

Miscellaneous IF YOU USED THE MIRENA IUD between 2001-present and suffered perforation or embedment in the uterus requiring surgical removal, or had a child born with birth defects you may be entitled to compensation. Call Johnson Law and speak with female staff members 1-800-535-5727 NEED VIAGRA? Stop paying outrageous prices! Best prices ... VIAGRA 100MG, 40 pills+/4 free, only $99.00. Discreet shipping, Call Power Pill. 1-800-374-2619 (AAN CAN) SAWMILLS from only $3997MAKE MONEY & SAVE MONEY

with your own bandmil Cut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship. FREE Info & DVD www. NorwoodSawmills.com/300N 1-800-578-1363 Ext.300N

Lost and Found CAT MISSING Answers to Kijani (keejanee). Friendly, affectionate and curious. Last seen Tuesday, 5/7/13 on Broadway between Griffith and S. Union Sts., Male, neutered, slim build, gray tiger with striking markings. Approximately 4 years old. Substantial Reward. Call 585 201-8091 or email: rnr@ rn-r.net LEFT @ BROWNCROFT Garage Sale Saturday May 4, glass lilac plate , box of decorative gels, toy purse 585-654-8253

Wanted to Buy CASH BUYER, 1970 and Before, Comic Books, Toys, Sports, entire collections wanted. I travel to you and Buy EVERYTHING YOU have! Call Brian TODAY: 1-800-6173551

P LY M O U T H S P I R I T UA L I S T C H U R C H Together We Are One

2 9 V I C K PA R K A RO C H E S T E R , N Y

Sunday Services 10:30 AM All Message Service & Free Spiritual Healing Third Weds ~ 7 PM ~ Séances ~ Classes ~ Gallery Reading ~ For more information and schedules www.plymouthspiritualistchurch.org Robin Higgins, Pastor ~ Phone: 585.271.1470

Legal Ads [ LEGAL NOTICE ] C4 VENTURES LLC, a domestic Limited Liability Company (LLC) filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on May 1, 2013. NY office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of any process against the LLC served upon him/her to the LLC, 51 Orchard Hill Drive, Spencerport, New York 14559. General purposes. [ LEGAL NOTICE ] Not. of Form. of SENECA WINTERBERGERS LLC. Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 4/9/2013. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY may mail a copy of any process to LLC. 30 Gravel Hill Lane, Honeoye Falls, NY 14472. Purpose: any lawful purpose. [ LEGAL NOTICE ] ROCHESTER BEER RUN LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 4/1/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 66 Alliance Ave., Rochester, NY 14620. General Purposes. [ LEGAL NOTICE ] ROCHESTER GENESEE REGIONAL TRANSPORTATION AUTHORITY NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING TO BE HELD ON MAY 29, 2013 PURSUANT TO SECTION 1299ii OF THE PUBLIC AUTHORITIES LAW AND SECTIONS 201204 OF THE EMINENT DOMAIN PROCEDURE LAW IN CONNECTION WITH THE 2013 CAMPUS IMPROVEMENT PROJECT. PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that a public hearing, open to all persons, will be held on May 29, 2013 at the Rochester Genesee Regional Transportation Authority (“RGRTA”) John G. Doyle Jr. Administration Building, located at 1372 East Main Street, Rochester, New York, 14609, commencing at 6:30 p.m. (doors and registration will open at 6:00) by RGRTA, pursuant to Sections 201-204 of the New York State Eminent Domain Procedure Law (“EDPL”) and Section 1299ii of the New York State Public Authorities Law, to consider the proposed acquisition by condemnation of certain property, as hereafter described, in furtherance of the construction of the proposed 2013 Campus Improvement Project (the “Project”). The purposes

of the public hearing are to review the public use to be served by the Project and the impact of the Project on the environment and residents of the locality where the Project is proposed to be constructed, pursuant to Article 2 of the EDPL, and to give all interested persons an opportunity to present oral or written statements and to submit other documents concerning the Project and the acquisition of property to be acquired. The public purpose of the Project is to improve the overall efficiency of RGRTA’s Regional Transit Service (RTS) operations and regular servicing and maintenance activities at RGRTA’s RTS Campus at 1372 East Main Street. More specifically, the Project is needed to (i) provide an adequate number of on-site designated bus parking areas, with the maximum number of spaces located indoors; (ii) improve the capacity and efficiency of maintenance and servicing operations at the campus; (iii) maintain adequate secured employee parking; (iv) improve vehicular and pedestrian safety on campus; and (v) address on-site deficiencies that are adversely affecting daily operations and limiting RGRTA’s ability to plan for and accommodate future anticipated growth. An additional goal of the Project is to limit disturbances from RGRTA operations on surrounding residents. Project Location and Description RGRTA is proposing to improve operations at its existing RTS transportation campus, located on approximately 16.5 acres at 1372 East Main Street in the City of Rochester, Monroe County, New York. The Project will include renovations to and expansion of the existing Operations Building; construction of a new Maintenance Warehouse Building; developing new indoor and outdoor bus parking spaces and staging areas for buses waiting for maintenance; construction of a new Service Building; providing a new employee parking area to replace the parking displaced by the new Maintenance Warehouse Building and Service Building; and other site improvements. Proposed Property Acquisition The proposed property acquisition involves the exercise by RGRTA of its power of eminent domain, either with or without negotiated agreements, on the following properties: 104-106 Chamberlain Street-Tax Map Parcel No 107.61-3-37; 36-38 Chamberlain Street-Tax Map Parcel No 107.69-1-32; 42 Chamberlain Street-Tax Map Parcel No 107.69-1-33; 46

Chamberlain Street-Tax Map Parcel No 107.69-1-34; 58 Chamberlain Street-Tax Map Parcel No 107.69-1-36.001; 580-582 Hayward AvenueTax Map Parcel No 107.613-36; 586 Hayward AvenueTax Map Parcel No 107.613-35; 587-589 Hayward Avenue-Tax Map Parcel No 107.69-1-19; 591-593 Hayward Avenue-Tax Map Parcel No 107.69-1-20; 592 Hayward Avenue-Tax Map Parcel No 107.61-3-34; 596 Hayward Avenue-Tax Map Parcel No 107.61-3-33; 597 Hayward Avenue-Tax Map Parcel No 107.691-21; 60 Chamberlain Street-Tax Map Parcel No 107.69-1-37; 601 Hayward Avenue-Tax Map Parcel No 107.69-1-22; 602 Hayward Avenue-Tax Map Parcel No 107.61-3-32; 603-605 Hayward Avenue-Tax Map Parcel No 107.69-1-23; 608 Hayward Avenue-Tax Map Parcel No 107.61-3-31; 614 Hayward Avenue-Tax Map Parcel No 107.61-3-30; 618 Hayward Avenue -Tax Map Parcel No 107.613-29; 62 Chamberlain Street- Tax Map Parcel No 107.69-1-38; 66-68 Chamberlain Street- Tax Map Parcel No 107.69-139; Receipt of Comments All persons having an interest in the Project are invited to attend the public hearing to give oral or written statements and to submit other documentation concerning this proposed publicly needed project. ACCORDING TO EDPL §202(C)(2), THOSE PROPERTY OWNERS WHO MAY SUBSEQUENTLY WISH TO CHALLENGE THE CONDEMNATION OF THEIR PROPERTY VIA JUDICIAL REVIEW, MAY DO SO ONLY ON THE BASIS OF ISSUES, FACTS, AND OBJECTIONS RAISED AT THE HEARING OR IN WRITING DURING THE PUBLIC COMMENT PERIOD. Comments on the Project and the proposed acquisition may be made orally or in writing at the public hearing on May 29, 2013, or presented in writing to RGRTA’s address shown below or emailed to RTSCIP2013comments@ rgrta.com on or before June 12, 2013. Please include “EDPL COMMENTS” in the subject line of e-mail correspondence. Comments received after the close of business on June 12, 2013 will not be considered. Rochester Genesee Regional Transportation Authority Attn: Myriam T. Contiguglia 1372 East Main Street Rochester, New York 14609 Lisa G. Berrittella RGRTA In House Counsel Dated: May 13, 2013 [ NOTICE ] Artisan Cabinetworks, LLC has filed articles of organization with the New York Secretary of State on May 10, 2013. Its principal place of business is located at 15 Nevele Creek, Town of

Penfield in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent upon whom process may be served. A copy of any process shall be mailed to 15 Nevele Creek, Penfield, New York 14526. The purpose of the LLC is to engage in any lawful activity for which Limited Liability Companies may be organized under Section 203 of the New York Limited Liability Company Law. [ NOTICE ] BROWN, GRUTTADARO, GAUJEAN & PRATO, PLLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 4/29/13. Office in Monroe Co. SSNY desig. agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 19 Prince St., Rochester, NY 14607, which is also the principal business location. Purpose: To practice Law. [ NOTICE ] C&D REMODELING, LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 2/12/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Edward R. Dundas, 91 Leroy St., Rochester, NY 14612. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] CONDUSTAR NY3, L.P. formed as a Limited Partnership (LP) in NY. The office is located in the County of Monroe. The Cert. of LP was filed with the Department of the State of NY on 3/27/2013. The Secretary of the State of NY (“SSNY”) is designated as agent upon whom process against the LP may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of any process against it served upon him to: 2255 Lyell Ave. #201, Rochester NY 14606. The latest date on which the LP is to dissolve is: 12/31/2050. The name and address of the General Partners are available from the Secretary of State. The purpose of the LP is any lawful act. [ NOTICE ] GASLIGHT PROPERTIES LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 5/9/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 1399 Monroe Ave., Rochester, NY 14618. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] HAVENTEN, LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 5/14/2013. Office in Monroe Co. SSNY desig. agent of LLC upon whom process may be

cont. on page 33

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 31


EMPLOYMENT / CAREER TRAINING

Employment ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT Organization skills, follow through, filing, phone skill, scheduling appointments, data entry, ordering office supplies, Microsoft Work and Excel needed. Hours are MondayFriday 8:30 until 3:00pm. Starting $9 per hour. Call 585-461-3270 ext 222 AIRLINE CAREERS - begin here. Become an Aviation Maintenance Tech. FAA approved training. Financial aid if qualified – Housing available. Job placement assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of

Maintenance 877-492-3059 AIRLINES ARE HIRING Train for hands on Aviation Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified- Job Placement Assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance (866)296-7093 DEDICATED COMPANY DRIVERS Local & Regional Opportunities. $2,000 Sign On Bonus. Avg. weekly pay of $850-$1,000. Must have necessary authorization to travel into Canada 866-723-6470 www. NFITruckingJobs.com HELP WANTED! make extra money in our free ever popular homemailer

program,includes valuable guidebook! Start immediately! Genuine! 1-888-292-1120 www. easywork-fromhome.com (AAN CAN) $$$HELP WANTED$$$ Extra Income! Assembling CD cases from Home! No Experience Necessary! Call our Live Operators Now! 1-800405-7619 EXT 2450 http://www. easywork-greatpay.com (AAN CAN) PAID IN ADVANCE! MAKE up to $1000 A WEEK mailing brochures from home! Helping Home Workers since 2001! Genuine Opportunity! No Experience required. Start Immediately! www. themailingstation.com (AAN CAN)

ACTIVISM

SUMMER JOBS FOR THE ENVIRONMENT

DRIVERS & HELPERS NEEDED

Furniture delivery company seeking CDL Drivers and helpers with A or B license. Must meet all Federal DOT requirements. Clean background, MVR, must be able to travel into Canada. Send resume to Adrian@plyconvanlines.com

NYPIRG is now hiring students, grads & others for an urgent campaign to protect our drinking water. Get paid to make a difference!

F/T positions available. EOE Call Chris: 585-851-8012

Volunteers

Call 334-9096 or visit www. MonroeFosterCare.org.

A SECOND THOUGHT Resale Shop in East Rochester is accepting applications for volunteer sale associates and online researchers. Shop benefits people with disabilities in Guatemala. Call (585) 340-2000.

GIRLS ROCK ROCHESTER seeking musical and non-musical volunteers for rock ‘n’ roll summer camp staff. Applications now available at girlsrockrochester.com. Email girlsrockrochester@gmail.com for more info.

ARE YOU 55+ & interested in learning about local volunteer opportunities? Call RSVP! Many opportunities available. Help meet critical needs. Regular information sessions - call 287-6377 or email jpowers@lifespan-roch.org.

HABITAT FOR CATS — Help TrapNeuter-Return cats on Tuesdays, in East Rochester, for an important grant project. Impact the number of owner-less cats living outside. All training provided. 585-787-4209 or habitat4cats@yahoo.com!

CATHOLIC FAMILY CENTER needs volunteers to help people apply for citizenship. The commitment is 2.5 hrs per mth one evening a month. Training is provided. For more information call Nate at (585) 5467220 ex 4854.

HERITAGE CHRISTIAN STABLES, a therapeutic horsemanship program for children and adults with developmental disabilities, is looking for volunteers to serve as horse leaders and side walkers. Call Kim Kennedy at (585) 340-2016 or email kkennedy@ heritagechristianservices.org

DYNAMIC VOLUNTEER opportunities at the Zoo await you. If you love the Zoo, donate your time today. To learn more, visit the volunteer page of the Seneca Park Zoo’s Web site at www. senecaparkzoo.org FOSTER PARENTS WANTED! Monroe County is looking for adults age 21 and over to consider opening their homes to foster children.

HOPE HALL Recruiting volunteers to call sponsors and assist with events. Please contact: Michele KaiderKorol, Development Associate at Hope Hall, (585) 426-5824 x111. LIFESPAN’S OMBUDSMAN PROGRAM s looking for volunteers to advocate for individuals living in long-term care settings. Please

contact call 585.287.6378 or e-mail dfrink@lifespan-roch.org for more information LITERACY VOLUNTEERS OF ROCHESTER needs adult tutors to help adults who are waiting to improve their reading, writing, English speaking, or math skills. Call 473-3030, or check our website at www.literacyrochester.org WOMEN: ROCHESTER HABITAT is looking for women 18 years+ to help build a house with a single mother. Visit rochabitat.org or call 546-1470

Business Opportunities START A HOME BASED BUSINESS. Part-time or Full-Time. Serious inquires only. 585-271-3243

Career Training ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home. *Medical, *Business, *Criminal Justice, *Hospitality. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV authorized. Call 800-4819472 www.CenturaOnline.com (AAN CAN)

SINGLE ALTERNATIVE WEEKLY NEWSPAPER

is seeking one bright, outgoing, creative

SALES PROFESSIONAL for long-term relationship!

Media / newspaper / advertising sales experience a must. Telemarketing, classified and online sales experience a definite plus. Salary plus commission plus benefits.

INTERESTED? EMAIL BETSY MATTHEWS:

bmatthews@rochester-citynews.com

TECHNICAL SALES US Water Services is the fastest growing industrial water treatment company in the U.S. As a Technical Sales Rep you will receive competitive pay & benefits by working for one of the most respected companies in the industry. As a seasoned sales professional (3-5 years Boiler, Cooling and Waste water industry sales experience) you leverage a high technical aptitude to grow your territory through new business acquisition while maintaining and growing and existing account base. Results matter and you are passionate about not only meeting, but exceeding sales goals. At U.S. Water Services, you can launch an exciting career with an industry leader while helping impact a customer's water footprint on all levels.

Please send your resume to: mhancock@uswaterservices.com 32 CITY MAY 29 - JUNE 4, 2013


Legal Ads > page 31 served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 3000 Marcus Ave., Ste. 1W5, Lake Success, NY 11042. Purpose: Any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] KD BENEFITS LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. Of Org., filed with the SSNY on 5/09/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 311 Brooksboro Drive, Webster, NY 14580. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] MOSES MAN LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 5/7/13. Office in Monroe Co. SSNY design. Agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to The LLC 41 French Rd Rochester, NY 14618. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] New China 1 of Henrietta LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with SSNY on 11/26/2012. Office location: Monroe county. SSNY has been designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to LLC at 3118 E. Henrietta, Road, Henrietta, NY 14467. Purpose: Any lawful activity [ NOTICE ] Not. Of Form. of A Muse Ink, LLC. Art. Of Org. with the Sec’y of State (SSNY) on 4/18/2013. Its office is located in Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against the Company may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to: 620 Park Avenue, Suite 161, Rochester, NY 14607. Purpose of the Company is any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Not. of Form. of Bay View Investors LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 4/16/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may mail a copy of any process to LLC. 8265 Ridge Rd Brockport, NY 14420. Purpose: any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Not. of Form. of Finish Line Investors LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 1/24/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may mail a copy of any process to LLC. 39 Vassar St Rochester, NY

14607. Purpose: any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Not. Of Form. Of GQR Consulting LLC, Art. Of Org. Filed with SSNY 4/17/13. County: Monroe SSNY is designated Agent of LLC to whom process may be served. SSNY may mail a copy of any process to LLC. 194 Saint Regis Drive South, Rochester, NY 14618, Purpose: Any lawful Activities. [ NOTICE ] Not. of Form. of RUNWAY BAZAAR, LLC, Art. Of Org. filed with Sec’y of State (SSNY) 04/12/2013. Office Location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY may mail a copy of any process to LLC. 16 Breezewood Court, Fairport NY 14450. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Not. of Form. of Simply Superior Sales, LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 2/11/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY may mail a copy of any process to LLC. 923 Lothario Circle, Webster, NY 14580. Purpose: any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Notice is hereby given that a license #3010047 , for a, beer & wine license has been applied for by Daniel Tekilu dba Abyssnia Restaurant, 1657 Mt Hope Ave, Rochester NY 14620, County of Monroe, City of Rochester for a restaurant. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of 381-383 GENESEE LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 3/18/2013. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 590 Salt Road, Ste. 5, Webster NY 14580. Purpose: any lawful act. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of 65 ARTHUR ST., LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 4/15/2013. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 95 Seneca Ave., Rochester NY 14621. Purpose: any lawful act.

[ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of All-Star Shenanigans, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 4/10/2013. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, P.O. Box 20664, Rochester, NY 14602. Purpose: any lawful act. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of Big Green Lawns, LLC Art. of Org. filed Secy of State of NY (SSNY) on 04/17/2013. Office location: Monroe County. The SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY may mail copy of any process to the LLC at 24 Raymond St. Rochester, NY 14620. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Buckingham Net Leased Properties Group LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State on 5/8/13. Office location: Monroe County. Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: 259 Alexander St., Rochester, NY 14607, principal business address. Purpose: all lawful purposes. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Callea Family Holdings, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 4/18/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, c/o Sammy Feldman, 3445 Winton Place, Ste. 228, Rochester, NY 14623. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of GCG Renovations, LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 4/5/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 8 Donlin Dr., Rochester, NY 14624. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of GENETT PROPERTIES, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 04/18/13. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 142 Pinnacle Rd., Pittsford, NY 14534. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom

process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, Attn: Frederick J. Genett at the princ. office of the LLC. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of Good Living Properties, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 4/26/2013. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 32 Town Pump Circle, Spencerport NY 14459. Purpose: any lawful act. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of INDIEVISIBLE LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 05/03/13. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 200 Park Ave., Rochester, NY 14607. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to John M. Maggio at the princ. office of the LLC. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of IQM360 LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 3/22/2013. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o Law Office of Anthony A. Dinitto, L.L.C., 8 Silent Meadows Dr., Spencerport, NY 14559. Purpose: any lawful act. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of JTS Buffalo, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 4/30/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: National Registered Agents, Inc., 111 Eighth Ave., 13th Fl., NY, NY 10011, also the registered agent. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of LEONE DEVELOPMENT - HERITAGE COMMONS, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 04/24/13. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 20 Lancer Pl., Webster, NY 14580. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity.

[ NOTICE ] NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY. NAME: 5435 WEST RIDGE ROAD, LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 04/16/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to the LLC, 122 Sherwood Drive, Hilton, New York 14468. Purpose: For any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Morsch 1, LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 5/1/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 43 Pearwood Rd., Rochester, NY 14624. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] NOTICE OF FORMATION of NFE/GREENWOOD TERRACE, LLC (“LLC”) Art. of Org. filed with NY Secretary of State (“NYSOS”) on 9/12/2002, pursuant to LLC Law Section 203. Office location: Monroe County. NYSOS is designated as service of process agent for LLC. NYSOS shall mail copy of process served to: Chamberlain, D’Amanda, etal., Attn: Jerry R. Greenfield, Esq., 1600 Crossroads Bldg., Two State St., Rochester, NY 14614. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] NOTICE OF FORMATION of NFE/LEISURE VILLAGE, LLC (“LLC”) Art. of Org. filed with NY Secretary of State (“NYSOS”) on 9/12/2002, pursuant to LLC Law Section 203. Office location: Monroe County. NYSOS is designated as service of process agent for LLC. NYSOS shall mail copy of process served to: Chamberlain, D’Amanda, etal., Attn: Jerry R. Greenfield, Esq., 1600 Crossroads Bldg., Two State St., Rochester, NY 14614. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] NOTICE OF FORMATION of NFE/MARINE MEMORIAL, LLC (“LLC”) Art. of Org. filed with NY Secretary of State (“NYSOS”) on 9/12/2002, pursuant to LLC Law Section 203. Office location: Monroe County. NYSOS is designated as service of process agent for LLC. NYSOS shall mail copy of process

served to: Chamberlain, D’Amanda, etal., Attn: Jerry R. Greenfield, Esq., 1600 Crossroads Bldg., Two State St., Rochester, NY 14614. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] NOTICE OF FORMATION of NFE/PINEVIEW, LLC (“LLC”) Art. of Org. filed with NY Secretary of State (“NYSOS”) on 9/12/2002, pursuant to LLC Law Section 203. Office location: Monroe County. NYSOS is designated as service of process agent for LLC. NYSOS shall mail copy of process served to: Chamberlain, D’Amanda, etal., Attn: Jerry R. Greenfield, Esq., 1600 Crossroads Bldg., Two State St., Rochester, NY 14614. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] NOTICE OF FORMATION of NFE/WILLIAMS COURT, LLC (“LLC”) Art. of Org. filed with NY Secretary of State (“NYSOS”) on 9/12/2002, pursuant to LLC Law Section 203. Office location: Monroe County. NYSOS is designated as service of process agent for LLC. NYSOS shall mail copy of process served to: Chamberlain, D’Amanda, etal., Attn: Jerry R. Greenfield, Esq., 1600 Crossroads Bldg., Two State St., Rochester, NY 14614. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of PCC Capital Group LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State on 4/23/13. Office location: Monroe County. Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o Nixon Peabody LLP, 1300 Clinton Square, Rochester, NY 14604, principal business address. Purpose: all lawful purposes. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of Power Train Sports East Rochester LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 3/26/2013. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 1026 Sunset Trail, Webster NY 14580. Purpose: any lawful act. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of Primark Interactive, LLC. Art. Of Org. filed Secretary of State of NY (“SSNY”) 4/02/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served.

SSNY shall mail copy of any process to Primark Interactive, LLC, 1 East Main Street, Rochester, New York 14614. Purpose: any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Skyroc Enterprises, LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 4/24/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of any process to c/o United States Corporation Agents, Inc., 7014 13th Avenue, Suite 202, Brooklyn, NY 11228. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of UPSTATE POWER MANAGEMENT, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 04/18/13. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 32 Marway Circle, Rochester, NY 14624. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of UrHome(s), LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 4/9/2013. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 11 Folkestone Lane, Penfield, NY 14526. Purpose: any lawful act. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of YL PROPERTIES, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 05/16/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Corporation Service Co., 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207, regd. agent upon whom and at which process may be served. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of ADR NY Dist. LLC. Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 4/11/13. Office location: Monroe County. LLC formed in OH on 4/2/13. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. OH and principal business

address: 5300 Tod Ave. SW, Lordstown, OH 44481. Cert. of Org. filed with OH Sec. of State, 180 E. Broad St., Columbus, OH 43215. Purpose: all lawful purposes. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of CT Rochester, LLC. Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 5/2/13. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. bus. addr.: 7 Jackson Walkway, Providence, RI 02903. LLC formed in DE on 6/22/11. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. DE addr. of LLC: c/o The Corporation Trust Co., 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: any lawful act or activity. [ NOTICE ] RGRTA 2013 Campus Improvement Project Environmental Assessment Notice of Availability Summary This is to announce the release of an Environmental Assessment (EA) for the proposed construction of the 2013 RGRTA Campus Improvement Project at 1372 East Main Street in Rochester, New York, as required under the Council on Environmental Quality regulations at 40 CFR 1506.6, Federal Transit Administration (FTA) regulations under 23 CFR 771.119(d), the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969 and in accordance with Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966, the State Historic Preservation Act of 1980, and Executive Order 12898 for Environmental Justice. The EA has been prepared with the FTA by the Rochester Genesee Regional Transportation Authority (RGRTA), in conjunction with RGRTA’s request for FTA funding of this project. The FTA is serving as the Lead Agency for the purpose of the NEPA review. Availability Viewing locations for the EA are listed below. The document can also be downloaded from the RGRTA web site at www. rgrta.com. RGRTA 1372 E. Main Street Rochester, New York 14609 Federal Transit Administration, Region 2 Office One Bowling Green, Room 429 New York, NY 10004 City of Rochester Bureau of Architecture and Engineering 30 Church Street, Room 300B Rochester, New York 14614 Monroe

cont. on page 34

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 33


Legal Ads > page 33 County Public Library – Sully Branch Thomas P. Ryan Center 530 Webster Avenue Rochester, NY 14609 Monroe County Public Library – Winton Branch 611 Winton Road North Rochester, NY 14609 Supplementary Information RGRTA is proposing to improve operations at its existing Regional Transit Service (RTS) transportation campus, located on approximately 16.5 acres at 1372 East Main Street in the City of Rochester, Monroe County, New York. The Project will include renovations to and expansion of the existing Operations Building; construction of a new Maintenance Warehouse Building; developing new indoor and outdoor bus parking spaces and staging areas for buses waiting for maintenance; construction of a new Service Building; providing a new employee parking area to replace the parking displaced by the new Maintenance Warehouse Building and Service Building; and other site improvements. To facilitate the project, RGRTA is proposing to acquire 21 parcels adjacent to its existing campus on Chamberlain Street and Hayward Avenue.

RGRTA will also request that the City of Rochester de-map the portion of Hayward Avenue between Chamberlain Street and the existing RGRTA property boundary. Public Hearing FTA and RGRTA will hold a public hearing on: Wednesday, May 29, 2013 RGRTA, John G. Doyle Jr. Administration Building, 1372 East Main Street, Rochester, NY 6:30PM to 8:30PM with a brief presentation at 7:00PM A stenographer will record all public comments made on the EA at the public hearing. The hearing will include a brief presentation on the project and other informational materials. Please visit the RGRTA web site at www.rgrta. com or call RGRTA at 585-654-0601 for further information regarding the public hearing or if you require special assistance. Written Comments Written comments on the Environmental Assessment will be accepted by RGRTA until 5:00 PM on June 12, 2013. Public comments regarding impacts to historic resources under Section 106 of the National Historical Preservation Act and the State Historic Preservation Act will also be accepted. Please send written comments to: 2013 Campus

Improvement Project Environmental Assessment c/o RGRTA 1372 East Main Street Rochester, NY 14609 Comments may also be provided electronically via email to RTSCIP2013comments@ rgrta.com. Please include “Environmental Assessment” in the subject line of e-mail correspondence. [ NOTICE ] Rochester Lice Treatment & Removal, LLC has filed Articles of Organization with the Secretary of State on 3/26/13. Its office is located in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent upon whom process against it may be served and a copy of any process will be mailed to the LLC at 1919 Hickory Lane, Honeoye Falls, NY 14472. The purpose of the LLC is any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] SARA’S GARDEN AND NURSERY, LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 2/21/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Kathleen Kepler, 389 East

Adult Services OVER 100,000 WEEKLY WE EEKLY READERS

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Ave., Brockport, NY 14420. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] SGA TOUR, LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 4/12/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 594 Van Alstyne Rd., Webster, NY 14580. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] SUPREME COURT COUNTY OF MONROE WELLS FARGO BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE FOR THE POOLING AND SERVICING AGREEMENT DATED AS OF MARCH 1, 2004 FIRST FRANKLIN MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST 2004-FFH1 ASSET- BACKED CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2004-FFH1, Plaintiff, Against SHANNON WARDEN; et al, Defendant(s) Pursuant to a judgment of foreclosure and sale duly entered 4/15/2013, I, the undersigned Referee will sell at public auction at the Front Vestibule of Monroe County Office Bldg., 39 W. Main St., Rochester, NY on 6/11/2013 at 1:00 pm premises known as 42 Pearwood Road, Rochester, NY 14624. ALL that certain plot piece or parcel of land, with the buildings and improvements thereon erected, situate, lying and being in the Town of Gates, Monroe County, New York. Section 119.200 Block 0004 Lot 042 Approximate amount of lien $76,497.12 plus interest and costs; premises will be sold subject to provisions of filed judgment Index # 2011-7118 Bryan Oathout, Esq., Referee Leopold & Associates, PLLC, 80 Business Park Drive, Suite 110, Armonk, NY 10504 Dated: 4/22/2013 File Number: 707128468 gs [ NOTICE ] TENPIN ASSOCIATES, LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 5/14/2013. Office in Monroe Co. SSNY desig. agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 3000 Marcus Ave., Ste. 1W5, Lake Success, NY 11042. Purpose: Any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] WHOZ NEXT, LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 4/12/13. Office in Monroe Co. SSNY design. Agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to The LLC 104 Troup ST Rochester, NY 14608. Purpose: Any lawful activity.

34 CITY MAY 29 - JUNE 4, 2013

[ NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR AUTHORITY OF FOREIGN LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY ] The name of the foreign limited liability company is, Quantem Aviation Services, LLC (the “LLC”). The application for Authority was filed with the NY Secretary of State (“NYSS”) on February 08, 2013. The Articles of Organization were filed in the Delaware Secretary of State (“DSS”) on July 21, 2010. The office of the LLC is located in Monroe County. The NYSS has been designated as agent of the Company upon whom process against it may be served, and a copy of any process shall be mailed to Corporation Service Company, 80 State St, Albany, NY 12207. A copy of the Articles of Organization can be obtained from the DSS at John G. Townsend Bldg, 401 Federal St, Ste 4, Dover, DE 19901. The purpose of the Company is any lawful business. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY ] The name of the Limited Liability Company (LLC) is Motherhood Matters, LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of NY (“SSNY”) on March 28, 2013. Office location is Monroe County, New York. The SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. The SSNY shall mail a copy of any process to the LLC at 249 Hollywood Avenue, Rochester, New York 14618. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] ALYESKA LLC, a domestic Liability Company (LLC), filed Articles of Organization with SSNY on 04/09/2013. Office: Monroe County. The SSNY is designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process in any action or proceeding may be served, and the address to which the SSNY shall mail a copy of any such process is: c/o United States Corporation Agents, Inc., 7014 13th Avenue, Suite 202, Brooklyn, NY 11228. Purpose: any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] Name: KENT WOODS LLC. Arts. Of Org. filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 05/08/2013. Office Location: Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to: C/O KENT WOODS LLC, One East Main Street, 10th Floor, Rochester, New York

14614. Purpose: Any Lawful Purpose. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] Young Lioness LLC filed Articles of Organization with the New York Department of State on 01/18/2013. Its office is located in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent of the Company upon whom process against it may be served and a copy of any process shall be mailed to 17 Mulberry Street, Rochester NY 14620. The purpose of the Company is any lawful business. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION HOME CARE OF WESTERN NEW YORK, LLC ] Articles of Organization filed with Secretary of State of NY (“SSNY”) on 04/24/2013. Office in Monroe County. SSNY designated agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to HOME CARE OF WESTERN NEW YORK, LLC, C/O SUSAN BENNETT, 340 OXFORD ST., ROCHESTER, NY 14607. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY ] Notice of formation of 21 Vinal Avenue LLC. Art. of Org. filed by Sec. of State of NY (SSNY) on 4/30/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. NYSS shall mail process to: Susan Kramacyk, 214 Heberle Rd., Rochester, NY 14609. Purpose: Any lawful act or activity. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY ] The name of the limited liability company is OSCAR’S VISION, LLC (the “LLC”). The Articles of Organization of the LLC were filed with the NY Sec. of State on April 25, 2013. The office of the LLC is located in Monroe County, New York. The NY Sec. of State is designated as the agent of the LLC upon whom process in any action or proceeding against it may be served, and the address to which the NY Sec. of State shall mail a copy of process in any action or proceeding against the LLC is: c/o LLC, 1529 Old Penfield Road, Penfield, New York 14526, and also shall mail to: c/o LLC, 20831 Evergreen Mills Road, Leesburg VA 20175. The LLC is to be managed by one or more members. The business purpose of the LLC is to carry out any lawful act or activity for which limited liability companies may

be organized pursuant to the NY Limited Liability Company Law. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY ] The name of the limited liability company is SUNSTAR MANAGEMENT, LLC(the “LLC”). The Articles of Organization of the LLC were filed with the NY Sec. of State on April 29, 2013. The office of the LLC is located in Monroe County, New York. The NY Sec. of State is designated as the agent of the LLC upon whom process in any action or proceeding against it may be served, and the address to which the NY Sec. of State shall mail a copy of process in any action or proceeding against the LLC is: c/o LLC, 5565 Vardon Drive, Canadaigua, NY 14424. The LLC is to be managed by one or more members. The business purpose of the LLC is to carry out any lawful act or activity for which limited liability companies may be organized pursuant to the NY Limited Liability Company Law. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LLC ] Advanced Rakestraw Cabinetry, LLC has filed articles of organization with the New York Secretary of State on May 1, 2013. Its principal place of business is located at 215 Whittier Road, Rochester, New York in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent upon whom process may be served. A copy of any process shall be mailed to 215 Whittier Road, Rochester, New York 14624. The purpose of the LLC is to engage in any lawful activity for which Limited Liability Companies may be organized under Section 203 of the New York Limited Liability Company Law. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LLC ] CDE Partners LLC has filed articles of organization with the New York Secretary of State on May 7, 2013. Its principal place of business is located at 27 Center Crossing, Fairport, New York in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent upon whom process may be served. A copy of any process shall be mailed to 27 Center Crossing, Fairport, New York 14450. The purpose of the LLC is to engage in any lawful activity for which Limited Liability Companies may be organized under Section 203 of the New York Limited Liability Company Law. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LLC ] Development Awareness Associates, LLC has filed

articles of organization with the New York Secretary of State on April 17, 2013. Its principal place of business is located at 7 Caversham Woods, Pittsford, New York in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent upon whom process may be served. A copy of any process shall be mailed to 7 Caversham Woods, Pittsford, New York 14534. The purpose of the LLC is to engage in any lawful activity for which Limited Liability Companies may be organized under Section 203 of the New York Limited Liability Company Law. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LLC ] M & E Properties Five, LLC has filed articles of organization with the New York Secretary of State on April 26, 2013. Its principal place of business is located at 1599 Highland Avenue, Rochester in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent upon whom process may be served. A copy of any process shall be mailed to 1599 Highland Avenue, Rochester, New York 14618. The purpose of the LLC is to engage in any lawful activity for which Limited Liability Companies may be organized under Section 203 of the New York Limited Liability Company Law. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LLC ] Wrightstone, LLC has filed articles of organization with the New York Secretary of State on April 29, 2013. Its principal place of business is located at 1 Park Avenue, Brockport, New York in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent upon whom process may be served. A copy of any process shall be mailed to 1 Park Avenue, Brockport, New York 14420. The purpose of the LLC is to engage in any lawful activity for which Limited Liability Companies may be organized under Section 203 of the New York Limited Liability Company Law. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION SOVEREIGN VORTEX SYSTEMS LLC ] Articles of Organization filed with Secretary of State of NY (“SSNY”) on 05/21/2013. Office in Monroe County. SSNY designated agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to SOVEREIGN VORTEX SYSTEMS LLC, C/O JOHN COTTON, 620 PARK AVE., ROCHESTER, NY 14607. Purpose: any lawful activity.


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May 29 - June 4, 2013 - City Newspaper