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EVENTS: “50 SHADES! THE MUSICAL,” UNCORK YOUR IMAGINATION

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FILM: “THE GREAT GATSBY,” “TO THE WONDER”

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RESTAURANT REVIEW: ORANGE GLORY CAFÉ

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URBAN JOURNAL: THE PROBLEM WITH SYRIA

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CROSSWORD, NEWS OF THE WEIRD

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JIM AVETT • THE UV RACE • THE SLACKERS • LYRIC CHORALE • NEW FOUND GLORY • AND MORE MUSIC, PAGE 12 MAY 15-21, 2013 Free

Greater Rochester’s Alternative Newsweekly

Vol 42 No 36

News. Music. Life.

Remember, you love to dance. Love it.” DANCE PREVIEW, PAGE 28

Hands reveal trauma of sexual assault. NEWS, PAGE 4

New role for Rochester’s Red Shirts? PUBLIC SAFETY, PAGE 6

REVIEW: Geva’s “Midsummer Night’s Dream.” THEATER, PAGE 22

Lilac Fest Week 2 schedule. EVENTS, PAGE 18

COVER STORY | BY JEREMY MOULE | PAGE 8 | PHOTO BY MARK CHAMBERLIN

Rochester’s poisoned past A graffiti-covered building hulks over the end of Flint Street — a dilapidated monument on a blighted landscape in southwest Rochester’s Plymouth-Exchange neighborhood. The building is part of the Vacuum Oil site (pictured), a 24-acre property along the Genesee River waterfront that once held an oil refinery. City officials and the neighborhood want the site redeveloped, but it’s a brownfield. Past industrial uses have left the property contaminated.

Rochester has many brownfields. These vacant or underused properties could be redeveloped, but the contamination often deters investors. Several levels of government offer grants and incentives to spur development of these sites, but resources for those programs are limited. And that has led to a debate about who should benefit.

Feedback We welcome your comments. Send them to themail@ rochester-citynews.com, or post them on our website, rochestercitynewspaper.com, our Facebook page, or our Twitter feed, @roccitynews. For our print edition, we select comments from all three sources; those of fewer than 350 words have a greater chance of being published, and we do edit those selections. We don’t publish comments sent to other media.

Government and freedom

Reading “Violence on the Mind” and “State of Corruption” (Urban Journal, April 24), I was starting to believe that a die-hard liberal has finally seen the light. It kinda looks like you realize that the government can’t protect us as individuals – and that the liberal administrations, both national and state, are headed down the wrong path with even greater restrictions on our freedoms. It is interesting that you commented on corruption and violence in the same article, maybe not realizing that they are one and the same thing. That is right: the corruption at the state and federal level is no less hideous than the bombers in Boston. The difference is that the bomber in Boston stole the freedoms of many instantly while the idiots in Albany and Washington DC are stealing our freedoms piece by piece. In both cases, you have people with a complete disregard for the freedom of others creating havoc for their own undefined ends. This isn’t a matter of gun control, as some associate the fight for freedom; it is about the insanity of trying to make everything illegal in the pursuit of “safety.” When you have a state like New York that has an almost inbred need to make anything it can illegal and uses senseless violence like what has happened in Boston to justify 2 CITY

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even more restrictions on freedom, we as a nation and a state have problems. It is bad enough that ill-conceived gun-control legislation was passed without the freedom to interact with our so-called representative government, but that wasn’t good enough for some of our elected officials, who now want to reconsider the entire Bill of Rights. (The Mayor of New York City is pushing hard for this, and his government regularly ignores the Bill of Rights.) It is no wonder that even non-gun-owners see us on a slippery slope to self destruction. I have to wonder when City will change its view: before or after the government comes to shut you down? One of the great horrors of liberalism is the idea that the government always knows what is good for you. If that were the case, why is New York in such a state of decay? The best course of action is for the people to stand up and demand that that which was taken away be returned by the state. DAVE FRANTZ

The state of black Rochester

On “Blacks, Poverty, and the Future of Rochester,” Urban Journal’s commentary on “The State of Black Rochester”: How come nobody EVER brings up the biggest issue: having kids before you’re ready? Stopping that would fix many of the other problems that come up. And it’s not like getting pregnant is some disease you catch; there are easy and well-documented ways to prevent it. Of course, if your parent(s) didn’t choose to use these methods, it might not be immediately obvious to you. It all starts with the parents! BORED…MAN ST

The economic realities will remain bleak until the concepts of birth control

and family planning are understood. It is pretty hard to “raise” six children, with six different ex-con/ BabyDaddies with no money and no education. And that is the problem: They are not “raised”; they are released to the streets and the “village” or aunts, cousins, or grandparents. If you look at successful black and Hispanic people, what they have in common is they waited to have children until they could support them (emotionally and financially).

key motivating factor is to provide better opportunities for your kids than you had. The failure to thrive discussed here is not due to people being black or being in the city, but it’s primarily a lifestyle choice: a conscious decision to indulge in unproductive behaviors while gaming the social safety net instead of undertaking the hard work of self improvement, or perhaps just not realizing that there’s another way to live due to lack of role models. LINCOLN DECOURSEY

KATY

ACTRochester.org says that 79 percent of black “families” in the city of Rochester are single parent for the 2007-10 period, up from 74 percent in 2000. Nationally, the percentage of black “families” that are single parent is 63 percent. The black “family” has disintegrated, and this is a direct contributor to poverty. A guy that fathers eight kids from seven different mommies is not all that unusual. The only way to change this is to demonize single parenthood in the same way we demonize other things in society that we want less of – cigarette smoking, obesity, texting while driving, and more. The “lifestyle choice” of having kids out of wedlock is wrong, and should be discouraged. I and sick and tired of paying for somebody else’s irresponsible lifestyle “choices.” ANIMULE

The transition from poverty to working class is the easiest of the upward transitions to be made, and people born into disadvantaged circumstances are in prime position to enjoy some upward mobility, regardless of race or neighborhood. Being self-made has some unique benefits that being born with a silver spoon does not. Hard work builds character, and a

Putting all the blame on blacks and Hispanics for immorality and the continuing cycle of poverty rather than on our society for ignoring the problem while wasting our money on corporate welfare, senseless wars of choice, and tax breaks for the wealthy is both racist and classist. JUSTICE

The problem is a cyclical, self-perpetuating one that isn’t “caused” by race but has a strong racial component due to historical factors. Poor, impoverished, barely literate high-school dropouts are more likely to raise the same, no matter what color their skin. When people of this type are concentrated due to housing costs and/or inability to take advantage of opportunities due to ignorance or ignorancebased fear, they become a visible class, and if there’s some way to distinguish them physically, that “reason” will be blamed as the cause. It is absolutely true that people throughout history have raised themselves up by their bootstraps. It is equally true that those people are exceptional, and not the rule. Education is the most democratic method of helping the lower class rise from poverty, but education also requires certain skills and

habits that may not be well supported at home. But at the root of the issue is that even when people get an education, they need a job to be able to take advantage of it. There is a decided lack of jobs in the Rochester area for people who have graduated high school but have not been able to go to college. There is no reason for many young people to put forth the effort to get a diploma when there’s nothing to do with that diploma. Many of the service-industry jobs they can get, they can get with a GED or less. Rochester needs more lower-tech industrial-level jobs where people with only a high school diploma can make a living wage. As much as I, as an educator, want everyone to get the best and most education possible, I recognize that not everyone is college material. Those people deserve to be able to make a living as well. It should not require stitching together three jobs’ worth of income to be able to make ends meet. How do we get those lower-tech, higher-paying jobs here (higher than Wegmans or Walmart, anyway)? That’s an answer I don’t have. YUGOBOY

Correlation of variables does not prove causation. Just because a number of factors are associated with a certain outcome – poverty or poor academic performance – does not imply that the outcome is caused by all of those factors. So those who look at the implications that this is a racial or ethnicity-driven problem may be wrong. All of the factors indicated – “race, ethnicity, social-economic background, and family and neighborhood stability” – are (I suspect) correlated with each other. They don’t all help explain the cause. VINCE

News. Music. Life. Greater Rochester’s Alternative Newsweekly May 15-21, 2013 Vol 42 No 36 250 North Goodman Street Rochester, New York 14607-1199 themail@rochester-citynews.com phone (585) 244-3329 fax (585) 244-1126 rochestercitynewspaper.com Publishers: William and Mary Anna Towler Editor: Mary Anna Towler Asst. to the publishers: Matt Walsh Editorial department themail@rochester-citynews.com Features editor: Eric Rezsnyak News editor: Christine Carrie Fien Staff writers: Tim Louis Macaluso, Jeremy Moule Music editor: Willie Clark Music writer: Frank De Blase Calendar editor: Rebecca Rafferty Contributing writers: Paloma Capanna, Casey Carlsen, Roman Divezur, George Grella, Susie Hume, Andy Klingenberger, Dave LaBarge, Kathy Laluk, Michael Lasser, James Leach, Adam Lubitow, Ron Netsky, Dayna Papaleo, Suzan Pero, Rebecca Rafferty, Deb Schleede, David Yockel Jr. Art department artdept@rochester-citynews.com Art director/production manager: Matt DeTurck Designers: Aubrey Berardini, Mark Chamberlin Photographers: Mark Chamberlin, Frank De Blase, Michael Hanlon Advertising department ads@rochester-citynews.com Advertising sales manager: Betsy Matthews Account executives: Nancy Burkhardt, Tom Decker, Annalisa Iannone, William Towler Classified sales representatives: Christine Kubarycz, Tracey Mykins Operations/Circulation kstathis@rochester-citynews.com Circulation manager: Katherine Stathis Distribution: Andy DiCiaccio, David Riccioni, Northstar Delivery, Wolfe News City Newspaper is available free of charge. Additional copies of the current issue may be purchased for $1, payable in advance at the City Newspaper office. City Newspaper may be distributed only by authorized distributors. No person may, without prior written permission of City Newspaper, take more than one copy of each weekly issue. City (ISSN 1551-3262) is published weekly by WMT Publications, Inc. Periodical postage paid at Rochester, NY (USPS 022-138). Send address changes to City, 250 North Goodman Street, Rochester, NY 14607. City is a member of the Association of Alternative Newsweeklies and the New York Press Association. Subscriptions: $35.00 ($30.00 for senior citizens) for one year. Add $10 yearly for out-of-state subscriptions: add $30 yearly for foreign subscriptions. Due to the initial high cost of establishing new subscriptions, refunds for fewer than ten months cannot be issued. Copyright by WMT Publications Inc., 2013 - all rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, photocopying, recording or by any information storage retrieval system without permission of the copyright owner.

URBAN JOURNAL | BY MARY ANNA TOWLER

National security and the problem with Syria As we leave Afghanistan, will we jump into Syria? Should we? An estimated 80,000 people have been killed in the Syrian conflict, and the United Nations estimates that more than 5 million have been uprooted. Officials in Jordan say that 10 percent of that country’s population now consists of Syrian refugees, according to a BBC report, and they expect that to reach 25 percent by 2014. The fighting and the bloodshed need to stop. But Bashar al-Assad has resisted international attempts to negotiate a settlement. He won’t leave. And he shows no signs of ending the brutality. As tragic as the situation is, though, the negatives of military involvement seem to far outweigh the positives. Senator John McCain and others want military intervention, warning that Assad may use chemical weapons – if he hasn’t already. They warn that the chaos in Syria threatens the stability of the entire region. And they warn that the longer we resist helping the rebels, the worse the consequences will be. Humanitarian aid isn’t enough, the interventionists say; we need to provide weapons to the rebels, attack Assad’s air bases, create a no-fly zone. But on Al Hunt’s Political Capital show on Bloomberg Television, former National Security Adviser Zbigniew Brzezinski had warnings of his own. The rebels are not a cohesive group, and some of them are hostile to the United States. Which rebels would we give lethal weapons to, asked Brzezinski. Those who are seeking a democratic government? The dangerous religious fanatics? The members of Al Qaeda? All of them are part of the uprising. How do we control where those weapons end up? And if we destroy Assad’s air force and the result is “that the more radical elements gain from it and they are stronger militarily,” Brzezinski said, “what do we accomplish by it?” Former Senator Richard Lugar, appearing on the same program, had similar concerns. And, he added, using US air power to attack Syrian bases or enforce a no-fly zone “really does get into warfare,” and it “puts Americans at risk.” There would be no point in US military involvement, numerous officials and commentators have said, unless we commit enough to get rid of Assad. And, Gerald Seib noted in a Wall Street Journal column last week, “When you go big as a superpower, you own the problem forever.” “The lesson of America’s incursions in Iraq and Afghanistan,” Seib wrote, “is that once the U.S. steps in, other nations tend

With Syria, one journalist writes, we are facing ‘the Frankenstein of foreign-policy crises, made up of the parts of dead blunders.’ to step back and leave it to Washington to clean up the mess after the fighting ends.” And that, we have learned, takes a very long time and a lot of money. Syria is a frighteningly complex problem. And in The American Prospect, Steve Erickson makes that complexity starkly clear. We are facing, Erickson writes, “the Frankenstein of foreign-policy crises, made up of the parts of dead blunders.” And he ticks off those blunders: “Vietnam, where we learned that firepower won’t overcome the unquantifiables that make for a quagmire; Iraq, where we learned that intelligence may be faulty or manipulated; Libya, where we learned both the combat possibilities and limitations of no-fly zones; Afghanistan, where a quartercentury ago we armed freedom-fighters who became accomplices in the murder of 3,000 citizens on American soil; Kosovo and Rwanda, where we ignored mass slaughter at the cost of our collective conscience; and Somalia, where we answered the call of conscience to disastrous end.” “Syria,” Erickson warns, “surpasses them all.” It’s no surprise to see senators like John McCain urging military action. But we are facing new kinds of conflicts, with new kinds of enemies. We cannot solve them by ourselves, and as awful as the humanitarian crises are, we cannot be the police agent for the world. This is a time for caution and reason. And unfortunately, the intense heat in Washington may overwhelm them both.

rochestercitynewspaper.com

CITY 3

[ NEWS FROM THE WEEK PAST ]

Moore named (insert job here)

David Moore furthers his quest to hold the most law enforcement titles in Monroe County by being named the county’s new public safety director. Moore has been Rochester police chief, director of the city’s Office of Public Integrity, and director of public safety for Monroe Community College in relatively short order. Moore starts his new job in June.

Beebe to challenge Reilich

Former Monroe County Legislator Dick Beebe, a Democrat, announced his candidacy for Greece town supervisor. He’s backed by the Greece Democratic Committee. Beebe is running against State Assembly member and Monroe County GOP chair Bill Reilich, who was endorsed by the Greece Republican Committee in March. The sitting supervisor, Republican John Auberger, can’t seek re-election due to term limits.

Brooks fires hospital head

County Executive Maggie Brooks fired Todd Spring from his job as executive health director at Monroe Community Hospital. A state report said that

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Spring mistreated a patient, and Brooks said she was taking action based on a county-commissioned external review. Rosemary Provo, the hospital’s assistant administrator, is serving as acting executive health director.

News

RCSD budget passes

The Rochester school board approved a $734 million budget for the 2013 to 2014 school year. It will allow for up to 10 schools to open in the fall with longer school days, and it increases music, arts, and sports opportunities for students, according to district officials.

ADVOCACY | BY TIM LOUIS MACALUSO

Hands of help for rape survivors

Survivors of rape and sexual assault often have trouble healing emotionally because talking about the experience is difficult. They often experience guilt, shame, and depression when family, friends, health care professionals, and even law enforcement ask questions like: “Why didn’t you run?” “Why didn’t you scream?” or “Didn’t you fight back?” Local artist Sharon Locke says she wants to give survivors a way to boost awareness about sexual assault, while helping them heal through self-expression.

URMC AIDS research recognized

The University of Rochester Medical Center was named a National Institutes of Health Center for AIDS Research. The designation places URMC in a limited group of organizations in the US conducting high-level research considered vital to the field and that warrants extra funding. The URMC is currently studying HIV-related dementia, and what that means for elderly patients.

Local artist Sharon Locke’s exhibit has survivors of sexual assault using their hands to express their trauma. Pictured above: a detail from "Joshua 1:9". PHOTO BY SHARON LOCKE

Locke, in conjunction with the Rape Crisis Service of Planned Parenthood of the Rochester/ Syracuse Region, is creating “Survivors of Sexual Assault.” The exhibit will be a 25-foot freestanding structure featuring black-andwhite photos of survivors’ hands. Participants were asked to use their hands to express their trauma. “Hands are so expressive,” Locke says. “One woman held a class ring, another held seven black roses.” Locke, who is a rape survivor, says the project and a similar earlier work came out of her own experience.

“The public doesn’t understand how much this happens and how devastating it is,” she says. “I did start carrying a gun and I was eventually talked out of doing that. I got a German shepherd and I went to therapy, but you never forget it. The trauma never goes away.” Rape is about power and control — the sense of owning someone, says Jeff Pier, program manager for the Rape Crisis Service. Encouraging survivors to report the crime to police would help reduce its occurrence, but many people don’t want to talk to law continues on page 10

The project’s supporters say University Avenue is quite different from East Avenue. Like Monroe Avenue, they say, University was intentionally planned for increased density with residential properties interspersed between clusters of commercial properties.

DEVELOPMENT | BY TIM LOUIS MACALUSO

EDUCATION | BY TIM LOUIS MACALUSO

Apartment plan delayed

Dark days

Members of the City of Rochester’s Preservation Board say they need more time to weigh a controversial proposal for an apartment complex on University Avenue. It was thought that board members would make comments on the Morgan Management application at the board’s May 8 meeting. But the board received a slew of last-minute letters and documents on the proposal, and decided to delay, says Peter Siegrist, the city’s preservation planner. Preservation Board members will take up the application again on June 5. The project will then go before the Planning Commission on June 17. The 102-unit apartment complex proposed for 933 University Avenue has pitted the developers and the property’s current owners — the Monroe Voiture veterans group — against the Eastman House and many residents and neighborhood associations who oppose the plan. The property is located in the East Avenue Preservation District and critics say the project’s design is inappropriate and too big for the site. Morgan Management wants to demolish the existing 1920’s Tudor-style stucco home where the vets currently meet, and construct the apartments as well as a new building for Monroe Voiture.

The four-year graduation rate for the Rochester school district has dropped by one point, according to the New York State Education Department. The SED released its report cards for districts throughout the state, and out of Rochester’s 2007 cohort of 2,868 students, 50 percent graduated in 2012, down from 51 percent in the prior school year. | African American students had a 49 percent graduation rate, while the rate was 48 percent for Latino students, and 62 percent for white students. Buffalo’s graduation rate, in comparison, was 56 percent. The state’s goal is 80 percent. | RCSD officials point out that the grade rate has remained fairly steady as students adjusted to higher standards. Local diplomas are being phased out, and students will have to pass five Regents exams to earn a Regents diploma and graduate next year. | School officials also say that the five-year graduation rate of 56 percent is an indicator that progress is possible when students have more time. | The more rigorous standards will continue as districts around the state implement the tougher Common Core curriculum. Superintendent Bolgen Vargas says he expects the district’s test scores and grad rates to get worse before they get better.

Morgan’s plan. PHOTO PROVIDED

While the Preservation Board is charged with determining whether the developer’s plans significantly impact the historic resources of the East Avenue Preservation District, arriving at that decision will be difficult. The project’s supporters say University Avenue is quite different from East Avenue. Like Monroe Avenue, they say, University was intentionally planned for increased density with residential properties interspersed between clusters of commercial properties. And apartment complexes already exist on University Avenue. Morgan’s plan is complicated by Monroe Voiture’s proximity to the landmark George Eastman House. The internationally-known photography museum’s management has expressed interest in the University Avenue property, but they’ve never made an acceptable offer to purchase it.

Cost of War AFGHANISTAN TOTALS —

2,220 US servicemen and servicewomen and 1,085 Coalition servicemen and servicewomen have been killed in Afghanistan from the beginning of the war and occupation to May 13. Statistics for Afghan civilian casualties are not available. American casualties from May 3 to 4: -- Staff Sgt. Eric D. Christian, 39, Warwick, N.Y. -- Cpl. David M. Sonka, 23, Parker, Colo. -- 1st Lt. Brandon J. Landrum, 26, Lawton, Okla. -- Staff Sgt. Francis G. Phillips IV, 28, Meridian, N.Y. -- Spc. Kevin Cardoza, 19, Mercedes, Texas -- Spc. Thomas P. Murach, 22, Meridian, Idaho -- Spc. Brandon J. Prescott, 24, Bend, Ore. iraqbodycount. org, icasualties.org, Department of Defense

SOURCES:

rochestercitynewspaper.com

CITY 5

PUBLIC SAFETY | BY CHRISTINE CARRIE FIEN

New role for Rochester’s Red Shirts?

(left) Chris Vigliotti, the head of the Red Shirt detail. (right) Karen Coriddi and Fred Van Orden ride their bikes down Main Street during their shift. PHOTOS BY LAUREN PETRACCA

The guy hit the gas instead of the brake, sending his car smashing through the garage wall of his home in Rochester’s Grove Place neighborhood, and rupturing a gas line. He tried to call Rochester Gas and Electric — you know how much fun that can be — but then the Red Shirts showed up. The Red Shirts saw the severity of the situation and were able to get the fire department down there in moments. The Red Shirts are a safety services team, part of the Downtown Special Services Program. The team is made up of 23 salaried members who complete rounds throughout downtown Rochester — High Falls and everything inside the Inner Loop — on foot and by bicycle. All members are retired law enforcement officers — most from the Rochester Police Department — and all except one are part time. They’re unarmed, and easily spotted by their red polo shirts and the fact that they usually work in pairs. The Red Shirts are essentially a highoctane neighborhood watch program, acting as eyes and ears for the police department and other first responders. They also have a “walk you to your car” service available on request, which is frequently used by guests staying at downtown hotels. “There is a pretty intense constituency for this,” says Rochester Mayor Tom Richards. “The people who like it, like it a lot.” The Red Shirts fielded 661 walking requests in 2012, according to a contact and incident log. They also have fixed posts: places where Red Shirts keep a regular presence. For example, female employees of a downtown 6 CITY

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law firm were being routinely harassed by a gauntlet of young people as they tried to exit their building and get to their cars, says Chris Vigliotti, supervisor of the Red Shirts. The Red Shirts are now at the building every day from 4:30 p.m. to 6 p.m. “It has solved the problem,” Vigliotti says. “They’re so grateful to see us there. I get a bigger thrill out of hearing the ‘thank you’s,’ just knowing that you’ve done something and put these women at ease as they’re leaving work.” But downtown is changing: the climate, culture, and maybe even the geography, officials say. And, they say, it’s probably time for the Red Shirts to change, too. What that evolution might look like is being decided now. “I think it’s inevitable,” Richards says. “It’s going to evolve.” They weren’t always red. When City

Council established the Downtown Special Services Program in 1994, part of the package was the “Downtown Guides,” who were essentially friendly people out on the street giving directions and performing hospitality-type duties. The guides were college students, but the turnover was high and there were other

complications. So the Rochester Downtown Development Corporation, which managed the guides and now manages the Red Shirts, began using retirees. The retirees wore green uniforms and headgear resembling Australian slouch hats. But gradually, city officials began to recognize that the issues downtown were changing and that people wanted a harderedged program focusing more on safety than ambassador activities, says Heidi ZimmerMeyer, president of the RDDC. And that’s when the Red Shirts program was initiated. The annual budget for the Downtown Special Services Program is about $530,200, funded by a service fee tacked on to the tax bill of most property owners within the special district set up by City Council in 1994. Homestead properties — those with four or fewer housing units — are exempt. As former law-enforcement officers, the Red Shirts know the culture and rhythm of the streets, Zimmer-Meyer says, and they project an aura of authority that diffuses potentially volatile situations. She cites an incident where the rival East High and Franklin football teams were exchanging words downtown by the Liberty Pole. The posturing began and it looked like things might become physical, Zimmer-Meyer says, until the group spotted a pair of Red Shirts across the street. The altercation ceased, she says, and the group split up. “You don’t want to put yourself in harm’s way if you don’t have to,” Vigliotti says. “But I think we have really prevented — and it’s

very difficult to measure prevention — a lot of situations.” And having the Red Shirts perform duties like keeping an eye on vacant buildings or contacting property owners when something seems amiss at their homes or businesses frees up the RPD for more serious matters, Zimmer-Meyer says. “Our guys are not a police force,” she says. “They are eyes and ears. They create a perception of safety that’s very valuable.” The Red Shirts did 7,728 “special attention checks” — places they keep an extra eye on — from July 1, 2012 to February 28, 2013.

The new police section opening downtown this summer and long-percolating trends like the renewed appeal of urban living mean that the Red Shirts program is ripe for reinvention, officials say. More people and more development downtown mean less opportunity for some public safety issues, she says. She says it would be incredible if in a decade, Rochester no longer needs the Red Shirts. But for now, Zimmer-Meyer says, there are still areas of open territory downtown — including a sea of parking lots — “where you don’t feel like anyone’s watching.” The changes in Rochester’s downtown mean the services that support downtown need to change, she says. For example, the Downtown Enhancement District, which provides supplemental services like graffiti removal and general clean-up and repair to continues on page 10

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CITY 7

8 CITY

BY MARK CHAMBERLIN PHOTOS

ENVIRONMENT

BY JEREMY MOULE

R OCH E S T E R ' S A graffiti-covered building hulks over the end of Flint Street — a dilapidated monument on a blighted landscape in southwest Rochester’s PlymouthExchange neighborhood. The building is part of the Vacuum Oil site, a 24acre property along the Genesee River waterfront that once held an oil refinery (it shut down in the 1930’s). In the decades that followed, parts of the site were used for various other purposes, including a junkyard. But neighbors and city officials see potential in the site. Instead of decay and debris, they see the possibility of an inviting and publicly accessible waterfront with new mixed-use development nearby. “In an urban neighborhood that is perceived as unattractive, we’ve got one of the most attractive assets: the waterfront itself,” says John Curran, chair of a PLEX Neighborhood Association waterfront revitalization subgroup. Making that vision a reality will be a challenge, however. The Vacuum Oil site is contaminated from its past life as an industrial campus and requires expensive cleanup work. It’s what’s known as a brownfield, a vacant or underused property with actual or potential pollution that complicates redevelopment. The whole site fits the commonly accepted definition, but two parcels are officially enrolled in the state’s Department of Environmental Conservation Brownfield Cleanup Program. There are brownfields in practically every community in the state, says Linda Shaw, an attorney with the Knauf Shaw law firm, which specializes in environmental law, including brownfield matters. By some estimates there are more than 10,000 potential brownfields in New York.

MAY 15-21, 2013

PA ST And developers aren’t exactly drawn to them; many are discouraged by the costs and complexity associated with the cleanup work. That’s left communities, including Rochester, wrestling with the question of what to do with their brownfields. “You don’t quite know what you’re getting into before you’ve spent sometimes a pretty good amount of money,” says Mark Gregor, the City of Rochester’s manager of environmental quality. The state and federal governments have stepped in with programs to relieve the cost and technical burdens posed by the sites. They provide local governments with cleanup funding or give developers incentives to tackle the sites. A recent report from the state Comptroller’s Office says that between 2008 and 2012, New York granted brownfield tax credits worth $188 million a year, on average. But government resources are limited, so the programs can only accomplish so much. And that has led to a debate about who should benefit. It’s complicated, in part because the programs, like the sites they address, are complicated. But there’s a simple, dirty fact about brownfields: while suburbs like Perinton or Scottsville may have a few brownfield sites between them, brownfields tend to be concentrated in urban areas, particularly in poorer neighborhoods.

For example, the Vacuum Oil site is in a census tract where 75 percent of families with children under age 18 have incomes below the poverty line. And in the 14621 zip code, where more than 80 potential brownfields have been identified, approximately 49 percent of families with children under age 18 have below-poverty incomes. New York lawmakers are beginning to discuss renewing or replacing the state’s brownfield cleanup and redevelopment tax credits for developers, which expire at the end of 2015. Some legislators and advocacy groups are pushing for the credits to be better targeted to distressed communities and lowand moderate-income neighborhoods.

The chief criticism of the tax credit program

is that the incentives have mostly gone to higher-value projects in desirable real estate markets. Critics point to projects in downtown Manhattan and housing projects in well-to-do suburbs — projects built on cleaned-up brownfields — as examples. “We’ve spent about $1.23 billion in tax credits — these are tax credits that have been claimed so far — and we’ve only cleaned up about 129 sites,” says Andrew Postiglione, a fiscal policy program associate at Environmental Advocates of New York. His organization is one of several advocating for the credits to go to lower-income areas.

(opposite) A dilapidated building on Flint Street that’s part of the Vacuum Oil site. (above) Crews have been tearing down part of a plaza in the Bull’s Head neighborhood. (right) The city is cleaning up the former Delco property between Whitney and Orchard streets. PHOTO BY JEREMY MOULE (below) Dorothy Hall, president of the Plymouth-Exchange Neighborhood Association, and John Curran, chair of a neighborhood association subgroup.

Shaw, the environmental attorney, says that just because a site is in a more affluent neighborhood doesn’t mean cleaning it up is any less costly, and without some sort of incentive, a developer still may not make an adequate return on investment. And the existing state program does award larger credits for sites in distressed neighborhoods and state-designated Brownfield Opportunity Areas, she says. The BOA program provides grants for local governments and community organizations to do planning work around large or concentrated brownfields. The process relies heavily on resident and business input, and the end result is a detailed revitalization plan. Shaw also says that in recent years, upstate projects have been taking better advantage of the credits. She looks at the tax credits as an investment program. For the cost of the credits, developers clean up and reuse the sites, which not only gives local governments more tax revenue, but generally improves the surrounding communities, she says. The benefits just aren’t always easy to measure, she says. “Without a tax credit program, I don’t see how any of these brownfield neighborhoods, where you’ve got multiple brownfields next to each other, can get redeveloped,” she says. The city and the PLEX neighborhood are using the state’s Brownfield Opportunity

Areas program to plan for the Vacuum Oil site’s future. By using a community-driven process, redevelopment efforts can be targeted to a neighborhood’s needs, whether it’s housing, jobs, or even a grocery store. In the case of the Vacuum Oil plan, residents stressed keeping the Genesee River waterfront publicly accessible. They also said they didn’t want the neighborhood to become

gentrified, says Joan Roby-Davison, executive director of the Sector 4 Community Development Corporation. The city’s Gregor says that the plans can help communities attract development by providing clarity about property conditions, particularly environmental conditions. They also lay out how the communities would ultimately like brownfield sites used, he says. The BOA program is less than a decade old,

but several areas in the City of Rochester are already going through the process; the Vacuum Oil site was one of the first applications made by Rochester officials. Planning efforts are ongoing in the 14621 area, where much of the focus is on improving recreation and housing opportunities, as well as rehabilitating commercial corridors. The Lyell-LakeState area plan is still in its early stages, but some cleanup work is happening, including work at the former Delco plant between Whitney and Orchard streets. The proposed Bull’s Head Brownfield Opportunity Area spans 188 acres and includes more than 100 potential brownfield sites. The city and Sector 4 Community Development Corporation are awaiting approval of the BOA application.

The proposed plan area includes the plaza at West Main and Genesee streets. It also includes the former Taylor Instruments site, a concrete-covered lot across the street from the Danforth Community Center. A couple of years ago, neighbors beat back a proposal to turn the site into a salvage yard. Residents asked that the property be included in the BOA plan with the hope they could avoid similar proposals in the future. The owners want to sell the property, Roby-Davison says. But many potential buyers are put off by the mercury contamination on the site, she says. The Newcroft Park housing tract in the

North Winton Village neighborhood successfully used a different brownfield redevelopment approach: the city cleaned up the site before selling lots to private builders. Newcroft Park was once a contractor’s lot surrounded by residential properties. But the properties’ owner was substantially behind on the property taxes and, after years of citizen complaints about operations on the site, the city foreclosed. After an environmental assessment and cleanup that included removal of contaminated soil, construction debris,

and asbestos, the city carved up the property into 22 smaller lots. The project started in 1996 and all of the lots were sold over the course of one weekend in 2004. The 22 houses now located on the site contribute about $200,000 to $250,000 in tax revenue annually, Gregor says. And property values in the surrounding neighborhood have gone up, too, he says. Gregor calls the project a “homeruntype success story.” But the state program that funded the cleanup, the dryly-named Environmental Restoration Program, hasn’t accepted new applications since 2008. In fact, until New York lawmakers passed the 2013 to 2014 state budget, the program was flat broke. This year’s state budget includes $12 million to replenish the program, which provides cleanup funding to local governments and community-based organizations. But with $40 million worth of projects waiting for funding, it’ll only make a small dent. Legislation introduced in the US Senate could add more funding for municipal and nonprofit cleanups. The bipartisan BUILD Act would expand an existing EPA grant program. But some sites are so polluted that private developers won’t touch them, even with tax incentives, Gregor says. “That’s a role for government,” he says. “When the marketplace is failing and you’ve got issues of crime, public safety, health… That’s where government does need to step in and at least start the process.”

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Hands of help continues from page 4

enforcement for a variety of reasons. Only about 30 percent of people who have been raped or assaulted come forward, Pier says. “The worst part is that means about 70 percent never receive the help they need,” he says. Public records for New York State show 156 reported rapes in Monroe County in 2012. But the Rape Crisis Service’s hotline — (585) 546-2777 — received more than 2,500 calls last year, Pier says. More than 1,500 of those callers received treatment either at the service, which is free, or at a local hospital, he says. Locke and Planned Parenthood received a $4,500 grant from the Arts and Cultural Council for Greater Rochester to create the Survivors of Sexual Assault exhibit. And Locke is still photographing survivors. For more information, email Locke at slockebeyondbooundaries@gmail.com. Survivors of Sexual Assault will be displayed in the Rochester Public Library, 115 South Avenue, in September. “My hope is that the more survivors hear about this, the more it will encourage them to come forward,” Locke says. “We’ve got to talk about this.”

Red Shirts continues from page 6

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contributing property owners, doesn’t cover all of Rochester’s East End — the epicenter of city nightlife. That’s because the East End wasn’t the “East End” when the district was formed decades ago, Zimmer-Meyer says. It could also mean new duties and new hours for the Red Shirts. Mayor Richards says he’s not sure how the program will evolve, but it could turn out, for example, that the Red Shirts focus more on quality of life issues, he says, instead of public safety “This coming year is the year we have to answer this question,” he says. “What could happen, for instance, is their hours could change in recognition of the fact that the police presence is larger. The area they cover could change in the sense that they don’t come down to the major part of downtown at all because they don’t need to. That answer to that is, we’ll see. What I don’t want to do is throw the whole thing out before we had a chance to think our way through it.”

For more Tom Tomorrow, including a political blog and cartoon archive, visit www.thismodernworld.com

URBAN ACTION This week’s calls to action include the following events and activities. (All are free and open to the public, unless otherwise noted.)

Project TIPS event

Project TIPS will hold its first event on Thursday, May 16, in Pulaski Park, 1200 North Street in Rochester’s 14621 neighborhood. Police will go door to door from 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. accompanied by volunteers, firefighters, and human service workers to seek residents’ help solving neighborhood crimes. But they will also provide residents with information about diet, nutrition, and general health care. There will be a community cookout from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. in Pulaski Park, and all are welcome.

Regional transportation meeting

The Genesee Transportation Council will hold

a planning committee meeting at 10 a.m. on Thursday, May 23. The agenda will be available on May 16 at www.gtcmpo.org. The meeting is at the Rochester Bureau of Water, 10 Felix Street.

Rally against big banks

Band of Rebels will hold a rally in front of Bank of America on Park Avenue at Berkeley on Monday, May 20. The event will be held from noon to 1 p.m.

Ruth Holland Scott’s memoir reading

Friends of the Rochester Public Library will present a talk by the Honorable Ruth Holland Scott from 12:12 p.m. to 12:52 p.m. on Tuesday, May 28. Scott will discuss her memoir, “The Circles God Draws.” Scott was the first African American woman to lead the 19th Ward Neighborhood

Association, and the first elected to Rochester City Council. The event is at the Rochester Public Library, 115 South Avenue.

Dining I’ve had at countless Chinese restaurants over the years, the noodles well-cooked and nicely seasoned. The cole slaw, a coarsely sliced red-cabbage version, was not my favorite take of the café staple, but wellexecuted for all that.

The sumptuous cookies at East Avenue's Orange Glory come in many varieties, including snickerdoodle, chocolate chip, and peanut butter and jelly (left). The nontraditional sandwich menu includes offerings like a vegetarian chickpea and eggplant burger served with coleslaw (right). PHOTOS BY MARK CHAMBERLIN

The way the cookie crumbles Orange Glory Café 240 EAST AVE. 232-7340, ORANGEGLORYCAFE.COM MONDAY-FRIDAY, 11 A.M.-3 P.M. [ REVIEW ] BY JAMES LEACH

Jackie Powers, the owner of Orange Glory Café on East Avenue, would like you to have a cookie. She says so on her website. Every review and evaluation of her restaurant swoons over them. Without exception, over the course of four visits, every diner I saw leaving the restaurant was carrying one out of the shop, often not making it more than a few steps from the counter before taking that first irresistible bite of a chocolate chip, a macadamia chip, an oatmeal raisin, or lemon crème cookie (these are only a few of the options that Powers makes on a regular basis), and smiling with pleasure. At 8 years old, Orange Glory Café is, you could fairly say, built on cookies. Powers specialized in them when she was a baker at the now-defunct Little Bakery, and they are

absolutely perfect. Her chocolate-chip cookie has a judicious excess of chocolate chips married to just enough flour and sugar to keep it from falling to pieces. Her oatmeal raisin is moist and entrancingly spicy, fragrant with what might be just a little bit of cardamom. Her lemon crème cookie is nothing short of perfection — the apex of the cookie maker’s art. Almost but not quite toothache sweet and infused with what could be real lemons (and likely lemon zest, the flavor is so vivid), and studded with white chocolate chunks that remain gooey and creamy hours after the cookies come out of the oven, these are worth stopping at Orange Glory for, and perhaps even waiting in line for a while. So, Orange Glory is built on cookies. That’s probably a good thing, because even though Powers and her staff start with good ingredients and do some interesting things with them, in most cases the lunch menu at Orange Glory is less than the sum of its parts. On any given weekday, the lunchtime lines at Orange Glory can be long, particularly when the weather is good and the competition for

tables on the sidewalk becomes a Hobbesian war of all versus all. The staff of two who hold down the kitchen and the counter work hard to keep everyone happy, and they make a point of greeting regulars by name, occasionally asking them if they want “the usual.” The usual is more often than not a Lunch Box, a sandwich, a side (or soup), a drink, and, of course, a cookie for $9. The cookie, it goes without saying, is the best thing on the plate (although you have to ask for it on the way out the door rather than having it served with your lunch, presumably to force you to eat your veggies rather than skipping straight to the good stuff). The sides (each $2) are also decent and mostly well executed. Powers’ take on potato salad reminded me a bit of patatas bravas, a tapas-bar standard. Deeply roasted cubes of potato tossed with thinly sliced celery and dressed with a chili-garlic mayonnaise, the piquant dressing and the crunch of the celery made a nice foil for the well-roasted spuds. Sesame noodles, with just a tiny bit of cayenne-pepper heat to make them interesting, were as good or better than any

Soup was a bit more problematic. I tried the lentil soup ($4) twice on two separate visits to Orange Glory, assuming the first time I had it that someone had simply forgotten to add any seasoning to the mix. Sadly that was not the case. Under-seasoned to the point of pasty blandness with undercooked vegetables stirred into what seemed to be not much more than lentils and vegetarian broth, it might have made a good base for a dal if you developed a spice base on the side and then added this along with a fistful of salt. But as a soup it was an abundant (the bowl was, to the restaurant’s credit, huge) failure. The soup is indicative of a larger problem with Orange Glory’s menu: lack of proper seasoning and attention to detail. It’s not that hard to sweat vegetables and create a good base for a soup. All it takes is a little patience, some experience at the stove, and a willingness to taste as you go to make sure that things are coming along. Orange Glory, with its display case of premade burgers and its long lines, feels more like an assembly line, and not a terribly efficient one at that. The wait for your veggie burger can be pretty long, and if you make it to the front of the line and don’t know the drill — if, for instance, you can’t tell at a glance the difference between a mushroom-artichoke burger, a lentil burger, and a black-bean burger, or identify whether the orange-yellow patty on a slice of bread is a poultry burger or a curried-cauliflower burger — then be prepared for barely restrained impatience and eye-rolling. As I was tucking into my nicely seasoned starch bomb of a curried cauliflower burger on my first visit, and watching a fair amount of it fall off of the bread onto the plate, I kept thinking that the filling would have been so much better in a samosa. Similarly, the black-bean burger cried out for a tortilla, some guacamole, some salsa, and maybe a bit of steak or chicken. The spinach burger, which everyone raves about, really, really wants to be a spanakopita. On bread, each of these seemed to be lost — good, not great, fillings in search of better wrappers. (Sandwiches all cost $7.) But, as Powers reminds us on her website, there’s always a cookie to cheer us on our way.

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 11

Upcoming [ HIP-HOP/RAP ] Ke$ha Sunday, August 25. CMAC, 3355 Marvin Sands Drive, Canandaigua. $20-$49.50. 7:30 p.m. 758-5330. cmacevents.com

Music

[ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ] Joanne Shenandoah Saturday, October 5. Asbury First United Methodist Church, 1050 East Ave. 7 p.m. $20. 369-4687. [ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ] Arlo Guthrie Thursday, October 17. German House Theater. 315 Gregory St. 8 p.m. $45.50-$50. 857-8358. upallnightpresents.com

The Slackers

THURSDAY, MAY 16 BUG JAR, 219 MONROE AVE. 7:30 P.M. | $14-$17 | BUGJAR.COM [ SKA ] Of all the genres I like, I have multiple favorite bands for multiple various reasons. But when it comes to ska, I’ve got one: The Slackers. Since the early 90’s, this Brooklyn-based band has played around rock-steady grooves with subtlety and control, mixing elements of jazz, calypso, and garage rock. When the band comes to town you know it’s going to be a fantastic live show. — BY FRANK DE BLASE

The Lyric Chorale SATURDAY, MAY 18 ST. LOUIS CHURCH, 60 S. MAIN ST., PITTSFORD. 7:30 P.M. | $12-$18 | LYRICCHORALE.ORG [ BLUEGRASS ] The last time I heard them, it was sacred

classical. But the 40-voice community chorus of The Lyric Chorale is contemporary bluegrass for its spring concert, “Black Ties and Blue Grass.” The concert will feature American music, including “The World Beloved: A Bluegrass Mass” by Carol Barnett. Librettist Marisha Chamberlain described the mass as coming from both traditions of classical and bluegrass, a sacred classical choral tradition with sounds of banjo, mandolin, and fiddle. The Bowties, a Rochester a cappella group, will be special guests. The Lyric Chorale was founded in 2003 and is directed by Chrisanne Yule. — BY PALOMA CAPANNA

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Sky People

[ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ] The Dady Brothers. Johnny’s Irish Pub, 1382 Culver Rd. 224-0990. 7:30 p.m. Free. Heather Maloney. Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 585-232-3230. 8:30 p.m. $8-$12. Hinkley, NOD, The Years. Tala Vera, 155 State St. 546-3845. 8 p.m. $5-$7. Jed Curran. Sticky Lips BBQ Juke Joint, 830 Jefferson Rd. 292-5544. 7 p.m. Free. Jim Lane. Schooner’s Riverside Pub, 70 Pattonwood Dr. 3423030. 6 p.m. Free. Rob & Gary Acoustic. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. 248-4825. 5:30 p.m. Free.

Teressa Wilcox Band played Saturday, May 11, at the Dinosaur Bar-B-Que.

FRIDAY, MAY 17 TALA VERA, 155 STATE ST. 9 P.M. | $5-$7 | TALA-VERA.COM

PHOTO BY FRANK DE BLASE

Tristan Omand w/Barry, Emma Lane, and Peter House. Bug

Train wrecks and parades

[ ROCK ] Local band Sky People describes itself as being

“a crowd of cloud-dwellers [who] coalesce to create cacophonous compositions.” Alliteration aside, Sky People is a band that has a clear reverence for the psychedelic rock that came out of the 60’s, made obvious thanks to the band’s frequent use of rich harmonies and its relaxed, laid-back vibe. The band’s music is reminiscent of current bands like Fleet Foxes, Dr. Dog, and The Dirty Projectors. Sky People’s music feels natural and grounded, devoid of the bells, whistles, and filters that often come with contemporary rock. With The Reactions and The Grey Light. — BY LEAH CREARY

Kneptune SATURDAY, MAY 18 LOVIN’ CUP, 300 PARK POINT 9 P.M. | $3-$5 | LOVINCUP.COM [ FOLK/JAZZ ] This will be this Rochester band’s Lovin’ Cup debut. Self-described as alternative/folk/jazz, this seven-piece adds an element of darkness to its rather dense textures and lighthearted irony. It’s kind of a cross between Primus and 10,000 Maniacs. Polyrhythmic and loads of fun.— BY FRANK DE BLASE

Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. $6-$8.

[ REVIEW ] BY FRANK DE BLASE [ BLUES ]

Friday night marked the first part of The David Mayfield Parade’s two-night stand at

Abilene. By the time I made the scene the place was packed and sufficiently lubricated on Genny, Jim, and Jack, and show openers The Tarbox Ramblers’ opening set was full of lowdown, drop-tune, and swampy Beantown voodoo. The headliners from Columbus, Ohio, kicked off in high gear, playing hella loose and reckless, and succeeded in winding things up high and tight like a first-time inmate’s haircut. Mayfield’s guitar work is utterly brilliant and mad in a sort of demolition-derby way. It sounds as if the guitar can’t make up its mind, or has ideas of its own as the frets shout at Mayfield’s fingers, “Go here; no, go here. That’s right, now here. That’s it, that’s it. Now doesn’t that sound cool?” Cool collided with beautiful when, toward the end of the set, Mayfield and his stage-right bottle-blonde vocalist ventured into the crowd to harmonize a gorgeous lament over each other’s honky-tonk heart. Saturday night was a big surprise as I discovered a fantastic Rochester singer/

songwriter named Jeremy Laurson as he played at Tala Vera. Backed by a throwntogether-yet-capable back-up band made up of members of Meta Accord and Moon Zombies, Laurson went from hook-laden heavy pop to gentle-as-the-dust-in-theair salvos. His guitar work was efficient and interesting but hard to classify (in a good way). It was understated and casual, leaving room for the material to swell sweet bordering on epic in its impact. From the jungles of Vermont, Bow Thayer & Perfect Trainwreck rolled into town and followed Laurson’s killer set with a banjo- and guitar-driven set that riffed heavy with the ghost of Dylan floating between the lines. Drove the Chevy to the levy but the levy was dry, so I drove the Caddy to The Dinosaur and stumbled in as The Teressa Wilcox Band was sinking its teeth into Lucinda Williams’ “Joy,” with blood running from its grin down its chin. Sure, it’s Wilcox who all the eyeballs gravitate toward. But every single player up on that stage is a major-league heavy hitter.

Harper. Dinosaur Bar-B-Que,

99 Court St. 585-325-7090. 9:30 p.m. Free. [ CLASSICAL ]

Live from Hochstein: Hochstein Merit Scholarship Winners. Hochstein

Performance Hall, 50 N Plymouth Ave. 454-4596. 12:10 p.m. Free.

[ DJ/ELECTRONIC ] DJ Adam. Nashvilles, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. 334-3030. Call for info. DJ Cedric. ,. third Wednesday of every month. Call for info. Ladies at the Lake Party. Pelican’s Nest, 566 River St. 663-5910. 10 p.m. Call for info.

Ladies Nite: High Heels and Mini Skirts New Wave Wednesdays. Club Clarissas,

293 Clarissa St. 232-3430. 10 p.m. 21+. Call for info. Teen Set 45 Party. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. Free. Why Not Wednesday. Eclipse Bar & Grill, 374 Thurston Rd. 502-922-6567. 10 p.m. Call for info. continues on page 15

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337 East Avenue • 319-5999 Tues–Wed: 11am-10pm, Thurs: 11am-Midnight, Fri-Sat: 11am-2am, Closed Sunday & Monday 14 CITY MAY 15-21. 2013

Mighty morphing The Mighty High and Dry SUNDAY, MAY 26, 7:30 P.M. TANGO CAFÉ, 389 GREGORY ST. REVERBNATION.COM/THEMIGHTYHIGHDRY

[ PROFILE ] BY FRANK DE BLASE

In addition to having arguably one of the cooler band names in all of Smugtown, The Mighty High and Dry is the sum of some impressive parts. Members of this elite ensemble have flexed in the wall-o-brash brass that was The Po’ Boys Brass Band and the funky-as-it-gets boogie of Street Level. Compared to those two powerhouses, The Mighty High & Dry — Alan Murphy, vocals, guitar, keyboards; Chris Teal, drums; Kyle Vock, bass; and Mike Frederick, guitar — is a much more controlled outfit full of soulful nuance and hooks. Founder and frontman Murphy was looking forward by looking back — and beyond the spine-bending groove of Street Level. According to Murphy, Street Level was primarily a studio project that he built a band around. “Running a band with horns is hard,” he says. Street Level lasted a couple of years before Murphy found another itch to scratch. At the same time, he was teaching music in the Rochester city school district and getting his master’s degree. Still, what would soon be known as The Mighty High and Dry was calling. “I wanted to do something a little more rootsy,” Murphy says. “I liked the idea of the upright bass, the sound of it, and I started to think of ways to build tunes around it to some degree.” “It was sort of an accidental band in some ways,” Murphy says. “I met Kyle [Vock] on a jazz gig we were doing together. I was playing keyboards and piano at the time.” Big Apple trombonist extraordinaire Nick Finzer, another Po’ Boys alum, introduced Murphy to Chris Teal, and to Mike Frederick. The troops were assembled but a mission was yet to be chosen. The sound was still going to be funky to a certain extent, but Murphy was down for whatever. “It was open,” he says. “Yeah, but it’s since developed,” Chris Teal adds. “We had the conversation how we were going to present ourselves because we came

Local band The Mighty High and Dry features former members of funk bands Street Level and Po’ Boys Brass Band. PHOTO BY MICHAEL OVERMAN

from a lot of different musical backgrounds. So we sat down and said, ‘What is The Mighty High and Dry?’” Murphy knew the approach he wanted… and what he didn’t want. “I didn’t want to be recording stuff at home,” he says. “I wanted to record in a studio.” Murphy and the High and Dry crew plugged GFI Music’s Tony Gross into the pre-production and production equation. What emerged is the band’s eponymous CD, and a beautiful blast of fresh, soulful, rootsy air. In a genre that tends to get heavy and overwrought (Wilco comes to mind, so does Ryan Adams), The Mighty High and Dry’s material still has wings. And though it doesn’t employ the bombast and sonic geometry of its members’ previous outings, it still packs a quite a wallop. Perhaps it’s the seasoned work ethic brought by each musician. They’ve been conveying and expressing the unconveyable and the unexpressable for years. It’s an unwritten language of shrugs and glances and sleight of hand. Teal thinks they’ve figured it out. “Alan has a large amount of material he brings in along with the concept,” he says. “And because he plays bass and drums, he’s able to describe or refer to what he wants.” “I’m really excited for the future of this,” says Murphy. “It was a process learning each

other at first, getting tempos right, describing feels. I was purposely being more hands-off than I’d been in previous projects.” As for whether that was difficult for him, “Yes and no,” Murphy says. “It was a process for me to say, ‘OK this isn’t what I want, but it sounds good. Let’s keep moving.’ I did try to not play busy, especially on keyboards. I was influenced by The Heartbreakers, the way they put together their stuff so well. So I was really conscious of letting spaces be open whenever possible.” “Things definitely move more quickly now,” Teal says. “Initially we were doing stuff that was really groove-oriented music and fairly simple, and we were also working on material to accompany poetry that Alan had written that was more like a free-jazz thing. So that was automatically pretty interesting.” With the CD put to bed and dreaming of its summertime release, the band is already onto the next one — one that Murphy hopes goes a little quicker in the studio. The band wants to spend its time on stage twisting for the masses. “I want to see people sweating and dancing,” Murphy says.

WEDNESDAY, MAY 15 Y Not Wednesday w/DJ ET.

Plush, 151 St. Paul St. 2325650. Call for info. [ JAZZ ]

ECMS Spring Festival: New Horizons Vintage Jazz Ensemble. New Horizons Big Band. Kilbourn Hall, 26 Gibbs St. 7 p.m. Free.

Margaret Explosion. Little

Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 7:30 p.m. Free. Mike Pappert. Lemoncello, 137 West Commercial St. 385-8565. 6:30 p.m. Free. Roses & Revolutions. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. 585-6625555. 6 p.m. Free.

Vince Ercolamento& Joe Chiappone Jazz Quartet. Murph’s

Irondequoit Pub, 705 Titus Ave. 342-6780. 8 p.m. Free. [ KARAOKE ]

Italian American Karaoke. Italian American Community Center, 150 Frank Dimino Way. 5948882. 7:30 p.m. Free. Karaoke at Mayfield’s Pub. Mayfield’s Pub, 669 N Winton Rd. 288-7199. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke at Sanibel Cottage. Sanibel Cottage, 1517 Empire Blvd. 671-9340. 6 p.m. Free. Karaoke w/Cyd Scarlett. Jose & Willy’s, 20 Lakeshore Drive. 905-0222. 8:30 p.m. Karaoke Wednesdays. Flat Iron Café, 561 State St. 585-4544830. Call for info. Karaoke w/Mark. Flipside Bar & Grill, 2001 E Main St. 288-3930. 9 p.m. Free. [ OPEN MIC ]

Open Acoustic Mic Night w/ Mandy. Shorts Bar & Grill, 35

N. Main St. 388-0136. 9 p.m. Free. Open Mic at Jeffrey’s. Jeffrey’s, 3115 E. Henrietta Rd. 4864937. 7 p.m. Call for info.

Open Mic Jam Boulder Alexander St.. Boulder Coffee

Co., 100 Alexander St. 585454-7140. 8 p.m. Open Mic w/Steve West. Muddy Waters Coffee House, 53 Main St. 585-243-9111. 7 p.m. Free. [ POP/ROCK ]

Drum Wars: Vinny and Carmine Appice. Pineapple

Jack’s, 485 Spencerport Rd. 247-5225. 7:30 p.m. $12-$15. Lilac Festival. Highland Park, 171 Reservoir Ave. May 19, 10:30 a.m. See website for full festival schedule. Free.

THURSDAY, MAY 16 [ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ] Arbitration Sweets. Acanthus Café, 337 East Ave. 585-3195999. 9 p.m. Free.

The Blues Project ft. Gordon Munding and friends. The Beale, 693 South Ave. 585-271-4650. third Thursday of every month, 7 p.m. Free.

PUNK | THE UV RACE

The UV Race comes all the way from Australia, where the band makes a lo-fi brand of punk that is akin to the likes of Lou Reed, The Sex Pistols, and The Ramones. The band doesn’t stray far from the classic punk feel, generally employing a limited melody, defiant lyricism, and conventional punk instrumentation. However, when the musicians do stray, they move toward a psychedelic, fuzzy, garage-rock feel, expanding their instrumentation and bringing the tempo down to a comfortable, Velvet Undeground-esque jam. Occasionally the band ventures into noise territory as well, working with an ambient, wallof-sound quality and slightly off-kilter tunings that both please and repel at the same time. The UV Race performs with Bad Taste, Big Brain & The Drug Cartel, and Glass on Sunday, May 19, 9 p.m. at the Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. $8-$10. bugjar.com. — BY LEAH CREARY CCE Session. McGraw’s Irish Pub, 146 W Commercial St. 3489091. 7 p.m. Free. Jim Avett. Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 585-2323230. 7 p.m. $7-$10. Jim Lane. Murph’s Irondequoit Pub, 705 Titus Ave. 342-6780. 8 p.m. Free. Preston Frank & Big Daddy Zydeco w/Demijohn. Abilene

Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 585-232-3230. 8:30 p.m. $10-$18. [ BLUES ]

Natalie B Band. Dinosaur BarB-Que, 99 Court St. 585-3257090. 9 p.m. Free.

Son House Blues Night w/ Gordon Munding. The Beale,

693 South Ave. 585-271-4650. 7 p.m. Free. Steve West. The Rabbit Room, 61 N. Main St. 582-1830. 7 p.m. Free. [ CLASSICAL ]

Eastman at Washington Square Lunchtime Concerts.

1st Universalist Church, 150 S. Clinton Ave. 274-1400. 12:15 p.m. Free. [ DJ/ELECTRONIC ]

DJ Sal DeSantis. ,. 7 p.m. Call for info.

Karaoke at Panorama.

Panorama Night Club & Sports Bar, 730 Elmgrove Rd. 2472190. 9 p.m. Free. Revolution Thursdays. Grotto, 7 Lawrence St. 739-5377. Call for info. Thirsty Thursday’s. TC Riley’s, 200 Park Point Dr. 272-9777. 10 p.m. Call for info. Thursday Night Shakedown. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 11 p.m. Free.

Tiki Thursdays: Shotgun Music DJ. McGhan’s Pub, 11 W. Main

St. 924-3660. 7:30 p.m. Free. Tilt-a-Whirl Drag Show.. Tilt Nightclub & Ultralounge, 444 Central Ave. 232-8440. 11:15 p.m. & 12:30 a.m. $3. [ JAZZ ]

D’Jangoners. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. Free.

Deborah Branch. Lemoncello,

137 West Commercial St. 3858565. 6 p.m. Free. D’jangoners. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 7:30 p.m. Free. John Akers, Erik Welsh. Pane Vino Ristorante, 175 N. Water St. 232-6090. 8 p.m. Free. continues on page 16

Party Monster Thursdays. ONE Nightclub and Lounge, 1 Ryan Alley. 546-1010. 10 p.m. 18+. Call for info. DJ Matt. Nashvilles, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. 334-3030. Call for info.

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 15

THURSDAY, MAY 16

INTERNET EASE MEETS THE ENJOYMENT OF FLIPPING PAGES. READ CITY ONLINE EVERY WEEK AT www.issuu.com/roccitynews

John Palocy Trio. Bistro 135,

135 W. Commercial St. 585-6625555. 6 p.m. Free Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. 585-6625555. 6 p.m. Free. Mike Kaupa. Monroe’s Restaurant, 3001 Monroe Avenue. (585) 348-9104. 6 p.m. Call for info. The Swooners. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. 248-4825. 5:30 p.m. Free. Ted Nicolosi and Shared Genes. Roncone’s, 232 Lyell Ave. 4583090. 6 p.m. Free.

The complete print edition • Link to specific pages • Clickable weblinks

[ KARAOKE ]

AMERICANA | JIM AVETT

Karaoke at Brickwood Grill.

Brickwood Grill, 250 Monroe Ave. 730-8230. 9 p.m. Call for info. Karaoke at Center Cafe. ,. 7 p.m. Free. Karaoke at Willow Inn. Willow Inn, 428 Manitou Rd. 392-3489. 8 p.m. Free.

Karaoke at Pineapple Jack’s. Pineapple Jack’s, 485

Spencerport Rd. 247-5225. 9 p.m. Free.

Karaoke Night w/Debbie Randyn. Pittsford Pub, 60 N. Main St. 585-586-4650. 9:30 p.m. Free. Karaoke w/DJ Smooth. Club Clarissas, 293 Clarissa St. 2323430. Call for info. Karaoke w/George. Temple Bar and Grille, 109 East Ave. 2326000. 8 p.m. Free. Karaoke w/Shotgun Music. McGhan’s Pub, 11 W. Main St. 924-3660. Free. Karaoke w/Summer Bob. Shorts Bar & Grill, 35 N. Main St. 388-0136. 10 p.m. Free. Karoake w/Cyd Scarlett. Victor Village Inn, 34 East Main Street. 925-5025. 8:30 p.m. Call for info. [ OPEN MIC ]

When did you first learn the value of a good mechanic? Our Certified ASE technicians do precision car repair... Which means we get it right the first time. Because quality is our top priority, customer trust and satisfaction are very important to us.

How Cold Is Your A/C? If all that comes out is warm, dusty air, don’t get in a ‘pickle’ - CALL US! We’ll fix it so you’ll be as cool as a cucumber!

5 Alarm Open Jam. The Firehouse Saloon, 814 S. Clinton Ave. 5853193832. 9 p.m. Call for info. Open Mic at Towpath Cafe. ,. 6:30 p.m. Free.

Open Mic Jam Boulder Park Ave.. Boulder Coffee Co., 739

Park Ave. 585-697-0235. 7:30 p.m. Free. Open Mic w/Steve Piper. Flipside Bar & Grill, 2001 E Main St. 288-3930. 9 p.m. Free. Spot Coffee Open Mic. SPoT Coffee, 200 East Ave. 585-6134600. 7 p.m. Call for info. [ REGGAE/JAM ]

UpState w/Solstice Dream, Red On Left. Tala Vera, 155

State St. 546-3845. 8:30 p.m. $5-$7. [ POP/ROCK ]

Five Alarm Open Jam.

Firehouse Saloon, 814 South Clinton. 319-3832. 9 p.m. Call for info.

Johnny Bauer And Great Escape. Jake’s Bar and Grill,

4390 Buffalo Rd. 8 p.m. 21+. Call for info. 16 CITY MAY 15-21. 2013

I guess you could say the tree doesn’t stand too far from where the apple falls. The Avett Brothers’ father, Jim, has retired from his career as a welder to hit the road, just like his very popular boys. Perhaps the welding dream didn’t pan out for him. His music is rooted in the same folk Americana that his boys have helped to resurrect, defined by simple acoustic beauty and delicate harmonies. Perhaps we should thank him as well. Jim Avett plays Thursday, May 16, 7 p.m. at Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. $7-$10. abilenebarandlounge.com. — BY FRANK DE BLASÉ Lilac Festival. Highland Park,

171 Reservoir Ave. May 19, 10:30 a.m. See website for full festival schedule. Free.

The Slackers w/Mrs. Skanotto. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 7:30 p.m. $14-$17. Third Degree. Pelican’s Nest, 566 River St. 663-5910. 7 p.m. Call for info. Turkuaz. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N. Water St. 585325-5600. 10 p.m. $10.

FRIDAY, MAY 17 [ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ] Johnny Bauer. Back Nine Grill, 3500 East Ave. 585-267-7031. 9 p.m. 21+. Call for info. Jumbo Shrimp. Flaherty’s Honeoye Falls, 60 W. Main St. 497-7010. Call for info. Kinloch Nelson. Sanibel Cottage, 1517 Empire Blvd. 671-9340. 6 p.m. Call for info. Ralph Louis. Rochester Plaza Hotel, 70 State St. 546-3450. 6 p.m. Free.

Rayce Malone & John Ryan w/ Ciaran’s Pride Open Session.

McGraw’s Irish Pub, 146 W Commercial St. 348-9091. 6 p.m. Free. Table Top Three. Sticky Lips BBQ Juke Joint, 830 Jefferson Rd. 292-5544. 9:30 p.m. Call for info. [ BLUES ]

Gap Mangione New Blues Band. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa,

199 Woodcliff Dr. 248-4825. 7:30 p.m. Free. John Cole Blues Band. Smokin’ Joe’s Bar & Grill, 425 Lyell Ave. Call for info.

Open G. The Beale New Orleans Grille and Bar-Webster, 1930 Empire Blvd. 216-1070. 7:30 p.m. Call for info. South Wedge Blues All-Stars. The Beale, 693 South Ave. 585-271-4650. 7:30 p.m. Call for info. [ CLASSICAL ]

Eastman Community Music School Guitar Program 20th Anniversary Concert. Eastman

East Wing Hatch Recital Hall, 26 Gibbs St. 7:30 p.m. Free. Stringplicity. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 8:30 p.m. Free. [ COUNTRY ]

North of Nashville w/The Good Trip Band ft. Angelo Rose. Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 585-2323230. 6:30 p.m. Free. [ DJ/ELECTRONIC ]

On the House Fridays. ONE

Nightclub and Lounge, 1 Ryan Alley. 546-1010. 21+. Call for info. Chill Out Fridays Happy Hour. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. 5:30 p.m. Free. DJ/Karaoke w/Coyote Cody. McKenzie’s, 3686 West Henrietta Rd. 334-8970. 9:30 p.m. Call for info. DJ Bac Spin. Plush, 151 St. Paul St. 232-5650. 8 p.m. Call for info. DJ Blake. 140 Alex Bar & Grill, 140 Alexander St. 585-256-1000. 10 p.m. Call for info. DJ Cedric. ,. 10 p.m. $3-$8. DJ Energon. ,. 10 p.m. $3-$8. DJ Mi-T-Mo. Richmond’s Tavern, 21 Richmond Street. (585) 2708570. 9 p.m. Free.

Fresh Meat Fridays w/Samantha

Vega, DJ Mighty Mic. Tilt

Nightclub & Ultralounge, 444 Central Ave. 232-8440. 11:15 p.m. & 12:30 a.m. $4-$12. Lube After Dark.. Quaker Steak & Lube, 2205 Buffalo Rd. 585-6979464. 9:30 p.m. Free. Reggaeton w/DJ Carlos. La Copa Ultra Lounge, 235 W. Ridge Rd. 254-1050. 10 p.m. Free.

Bobby DiBaudo Trio. Bistro 135,

135 W. Commercial St. 585-6625555. 6 p.m. Free. Marco Amadio. Pane Vino Ristorante, 175 N. Water St. 232-6090. 6:30 p.m. Free.

The Music of Ferrante & Furioso. Yummy Garden Hot

T.G.I. Bucket Friday ft. DJ Jestyr, Dr. Jamo. Grotto, 7 Lawrence St.

Pot, 2411 W. Henrietta Rd. 368-9888. 5:30 p.m. Call for info. NiteFall. Lemoncello, 137 West Commercial St. 385-8565. 7 p.m. Free.

[ JAZZ ]

Ted Nicolosi and Shared Genes. Hedges Restaurant,

739-5377. Call for info.

Aleks & Ted. The Pultneyville Grill, 4135 Mill St. (315) 5894512. Call for info.

1290 Lake Rd. 265-3850. 6:30 p.m. Free.

[ KARAOKE ]

Karaoke at Pineapple Jack’s. Pineapple Jack’s, 485

Spencerport Rd. 247-5225. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke w/Cody. Nashvilles, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. 334-3030. 5 p.m. Free.

Karaoke at Flaherty’s Webster. Flaherty’s Webster,

1200 Bay Rd. 671-0816. 9 p.m. Call for info. Karaoke by Dan & Sherri. Barnard Restaurant & Party House, 360 Maiden Ln. 585663-1250. 8 p.m. Free. Karaoke w/Cyd Scarlett!. Norton’s Pub, 1730 N. Goodman St. 266-3570. 10 p.m.

Karaoke w/Krazy George.

[ REGGAE/JAM ]

Scotland Yard Pub, 187 Saint Paul St. 730-5030. 10 p.m. Call for info. Karaoke w/Summer Bob. Shorts Bar & Grill, 35 N. Main St. 3880136. 10 p.m. Free.

Turnip Stampede. Dinosaur Bar-

[ OPEN MIC ]

California Brew Haus, 402 Ridge Rd. West. 621-1480. 9 p.m. $5-$7. Catch 22 w/Phill Vassar. Pelican’s Nest, 566 River St. 663-5910. 6 p.m. Call for info Pelican’s Nest, 566 River St. 6635910. 6 p.m. Call for info. Divided by Zero. Nashvilles, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. 334-3030. 9 p.m. Call for info.

Open Mic Night. Mooseberry

Café, 2555 Baird Rd. 585-3489022. 6 p.m. Call for info. [ HIP-HOP/RAP ]

Subsoil w/Universe Shark. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 2929940. 9 p.m. $3-$5.

B-Que, 99 Court St. 585-3257090. 10 p.m. Free. [ POP/ROCK ]

Catastrophe Me, Minds Open Wide, and Define Normal.

LORI’S

Dust & Bone. Boulder Coffee

Co., 100 Alexander St. 585-4547140. 8 p.m. Call for info. Gavin and Pyntch. Boulder Coffee Co., 739 Park Ave. 585-697-0235. 8 p.m. Call for info. Haewa. Montage Music Hall, 50 Chestnut St. 232-1520. 8 p.m. Call for info. continues on page 18

NATURAL FOODS

900 JEFFERSON RD, ROCHESTER • 585-424-2323 MON-SAT 8am-9pm, SUN 10am-6pm

www.lorisnatural.com

ALL THINGS

GLUTEN FREE!

SUNDAY, MAY 19th • 6:30-8:30PM

Tastings, GF Sampling, Free Samples, Giveaways, Raffles 100% of proceeds raised goes to AllForPetsWNY.org, A Charitable Not-for-Profit Organization

ALL PRODUCTS ON SALE NOW! Learn more about what Nordic Naturals can do for you! Come meet our knowledgeable rep, Thomasina, this Sunday from 6 to 8pm and sample our line of pure and great tasting Omega Oils. These award-winning formulas are pharmaceutical grade, doctor-recommended, and third-party tested, showing they are unsurpassed in purity, freshness and taste.

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 17

AUDIO

SOUND

SATURDAY, MAY 18

SOLUTIONS

[ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ] Acoustic Brew. Hamlin Station Bar & Grill, 52 Railroad Ave. 9642010. 8:30 p.m. Call for info. Ebb Tide. Flaherty’s Macedon, 113 Pittsford Palmyra Rd. 2231221. Call for info. Jim Lane. Mama Lor’s Cafe, 1891 Ridge Rd. 545-4895. 5:30 p.m. Free Brewery Pub & Grill, 8 W. Main St. 585-624-7870. 9:30 p.m. Free.

STEREO

FOR LESS AREA’S FASTEST REPAIR

Receivers • CD Players • Speakers Turntables • Tuners • Phono Cartridges Repair & Service • Vintage Records Equipment and lots more!

442-0890

402 W. Commercial St. East Rochester

Songwriters in the Round ft. Meg Gehman, Miche Fambro, Brian Coughlin. Tango Cafe, 389

FESTIVAL | 2013 ROCHESTER LILAC FESTIVAL

Gregory St. 271-4930. 8 p.m. $8.

AUDIOSOUNDSOLUTIONS.NET

True Blue. Flaherty’s Webster, The weather wasn’t exactly cooperative for the first weekend of the 2013 Rochester Lilac Festival, so let’s hope the second half of the spring salvo is embraced a little more closely by Mother Nature. Among the free music headliners taking the Main Stage this week are world-music mainstays Rusted Root, “Blood & Roses” rockers The Smithereens, and local favorites like The Prickers, Prime Time Funk, and The Campbell Brothers. The Rochester Lilac Festival continues through Sunday, May 19, running 10:30 a.m.-9:30 p.m. daily in Highland Park. Admission is free. For more information visit rochesterevents.com.

WEEKLY SPECIALS

• $1 Oyster Tuesdays after 5pm only • • No Corkage Fee Wednesdays • • $5 Custom Craft Cocktails on Thursdays • WEEKDAY HAPPY HOUR 4-6PM! CELEBRATING 5 YEARS!

Local. Seasonal. Lento. 274 N. Goodman St., Rochester www.lentorestaurant.com 271-3470

THE ONLY THING BETTER THAN THE FOOD & DRINK

IS THE LOCATION

Wednesday, May 15 10:30 a.m.-4 p.m.: Seniors Day 10:30 a.m.: St. Joseph’s School Band (Center Stage) 11:30 a.m.: St. John’s Jam Band (Center Stage) 12:30 p.m.: Twelve Corners Middle School Jazz Band & Select Choir (Center Stage) 12:30 p.m.: “Farmer Tom” Walsh (Children’s Stage) 1:30 p.m.: Smugtown Stompers (Center Stage) 4 p.m.: Meghan Koch and the Gentleman Callers (Center Stage) 4-8 p.m.: Wine & Chocolate Tasting (fees apply) 5:30 p.m. Tommy Brunett Band (Center Stage) 6 p.m.: “Farmer Tom” Walsh (Children’s Stage) 7 p.m.: The Marshall Tucker Band (Center Stage)

Thursday, May 16 10:30 a.m.: Holly Elementary Chorus (Center Stage) 11 a.m.: Gates Chili Middle School Jazz Ensemble & Spartan Original Singers (Center Stage) Noon: School #12 Concert Band and Hand Bell Choir (Center Stage) 12:30 p.m.: Mike Kornrich (Children’s Stage) 1 p.m.: North Christian Academy Concert Band and High School Choir

FRIDAY, MAY 17

CLASSIC BELGIAN CUISINE

WITH A MODERN AMERICAN TWIST 120 EAST AVENUE 325-3663 Mon-Sat 11:30am–2am Sun 4pm-2am

18 CITY MAY 15-21. 2013

Infrared Radiation Orchestra, Anonymous Willpower w/Marty Roberts. Johnny’s Irish Pub, 1382 Culver Rd. 224-0990. 5 p.m. Free. Into The Now. Temple Bar and Grille, 109 East Ave. 232-6000. 10 p.m. Free.

(Center Stage) 4 p.m.: The Moho Collective (Center Stage) 4-8 p.m.: Wine & Chocolate Tasting (fees apply) 5:30 p.m.: The Lawnmowers (Center Stage) 6 p.m.: Mike Kornrich (Children’s Stage) 7 p.m.: Rusted Root (Center Stage)

Friday, May 17

10:30 a.m.: Cosgrove Middle School 7th Grade Chorus (Center Stage) 11 a.m.: Rochester City School District “Bloomin Arts” (Center Stage) 12:30 p.m.: “Farmer Tom” Walsh (Children’s Entertainment) 4 p.m.: Mikaela Davis (Center Stage) 5:30 p.m.: Brian Lindsay Band (Center Stage) 6 p.m.: “Farmer Tom” Walsh (Children’s Entertainment) 7 p.m.: The Smithereens (Center Stage)

Saturday, May 18

10:30 a.m.-6 p.m.: Art In The Park -Juried Art & Craft Show 11:30 a.m.: Teressa Wilcox Band (Center Stage) 12:30 p.m.: The Fools (Center Stage) 1 p.m.: Matt Episcopo (Children’s Stage) 2 p.m.: Gary the Happy Pirate

Lilac Festival. Highland Park, 171 Reservoir Ave. May 19, 10:30 a.m. See website for full festival schedule. Free. Mike & Sergei, Mick. Schooner’s Riverside Pub, 70 Pattonwood Dr. 342-3030. 7 p.m. Call for info. New Found Glory w/Cartel, Living With Lions. Water Street

Music Hall, 204 N. Water St. 585325-5600. 8 p.m. $19.99-$23.

(Children’s Stage) 2 p.m.: The Crawdiddies (Center Stage) 3 p.m.: Matt Episcopo (Children’s Stage) 3:30 p.m.: Driftwood (Center Stage) 4 p.m.: Gary the Happy Pirate (Children’s Stage) 5 p.m.: Matt Episcopo (Children’s Stage) 5:30 p.m.: The Lone Bellow (Center Stage) 7 p.m.: The Prickers (Center Stage)

Sunday, May 19 8 a.m./9 a.m.: Medved Lilac 10K and 5K Family Fun Run 10:30 a.m.-5 p.m.: Art In The Park - Juried Art & Craft Show 11:30 a.m.: Flint Creek (Center Stage) 1 p.m.: Dang! (Center Stage) 1 p.m.: Matt Episcopo (Children’s Stage) 2 p.m.: Mike Kornrich (Children’s Stage) 2:30 p.m.: Big Sandy and his Fly-Rite Boys (Center Stage) 3 p.m.: Matt Episcopo (Children’s Stage) 4 p.m.: Mike Kornrich (Children’s Stage) 4 p.m.: The John Cole Blues Band (Center Stage) 5 p.m.: The Magical John Show (Children’s Stage) 5:30 p.m.: Prime Time Funk (Center Stage) 7 p.m.: The Campbell Brothers (Center Stage)

sky people, The Reactions, The Grey Light. Tala Vera, 155 State St. 546-3845. 9 p.m. $5-$7.

Up2Something. Captain Jack’s

1200 Bay Rd. 671-0816. Call for info. [ BLUES ]

Deep Blue. The Beale, 693

South Ave. 585-271-4650. 7:30 p.m. Free. Dirty Bourbon Blues Band. Richmond’s Tavern, 21 Richmond Street. (585) 2708570. 9:30 p.m. $5. Ezra & The Storm. Village Rock Cafe, 213 Main St. 586-1640. 9 p.m. Free. The Imaginary Band. The Beale New Orleans Grille and BarWebster, 1930 Empire Blvd. 2161070. 7:30 p.m. Call for info. John Weyl. The Beale, 693 South Ave. 585-271-4650. 7:30 p.m. Call for info. [ CLASSICAL ]

Jessie Kneisel Lieder Competition Winner’s Concert.

Kilbourn Hall, 26 Gibbs St. 8 p.m. Free.

The Lyric Chorale, The Bowties: Black Ties and Bluegrass. St. Louis Church, 60 South Main St. 7:30 p.m. $12-$18.

Rochester Oratorio Society: Voice of Liberation. Hochstein

Performance Hall, 50 N Plymouth Ave. 454-4596. 7:30 p.m. $10-$25. [ COUNTRY ]

Shot Gunn Wedding.

Nashvilles, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. 334-3030. 9 p.m. Call for info. [ DJ/ELECTRONIC ]

DJ Big Reg. Plush, 151 St.

Paul St. 232-5650. 10 p.m. Call for info. DJ Darkwave. ,. 10 p.m. $3-$8. DJ Trancesend. Decibel Lounge, 45 Euclid St. 585-754-4645. 10 p.m. $5. La Selva. Tilt Nightclub & Ultralounge, 444 Central Ave. 232-8440. 10 p.m. Call for info. Saturday Night Ladies Night. BLU Bar & Grill, 250 Pixley Rd. 247-0079. 9 p.m. Call for info.

Goodtime Tavern, 8505 Greig St. 315-483-9570. 9 p.m. Call for info.

[ JAZZ ]

West Webster Fireman’s Benefit Show ft. Sulaco, Reign in Blood, and Order of the Dead. Bug Jar,

Bob Sneider. Bistro 135, 135 W.

219 Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. 21+. $8.

Annie Wells. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 8:30 p.m. Free.

Commercial St. 585-662-5555. 6 p.m. Free.

Brent Bond. Pane Vino Ristorante, 175 N. Water St. 2326090. 6:30 p.m. Free. Day Break. Lemoncello, 137 West Commercial St. 385-8565. 7 p.m. Free. Family Funktion and the Sitar Jams. Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153

Liberty Pole Way. 585-232-3230. 9:30 p.m. $5-$7. The Music of Ferrante & Furioso. Yummy Garden Hot Pot, 2411 W. Henrietta Rd. 368-9888. 5:30 p.m. Call for info. Special Blend. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. 248-4825. 7:30 p.m. Free.

Ted Nicolosi and Shared Genes. Jasmine’s Asian Fusion, 657 Ridge Rd. 216-1290. 6:30 p.m. Free.

Upward Groove w/Kneptune. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. 9 p.m. $3-$5. The White Hots. The Pultneyville Grill, 4135 Mill St. (315) 5894512. 7 p.m. Call for info. [ KARAOKE ]

Karaoke at 140 Alex.

140 Alex Bar & Grill, 140 Alexander St. 585-256-1000. 10:30 p.m. Free. Karaoke w/Cyd Scarlett!. Norton’s Pub, 1730 N. Goodman St. 266-3570. 10 p.m. Kick-Ass Karaoke. Temple Bar and Grille, 109 East Ave. 2326000. 10 p.m. Free. [ REGGAE/JAM ] Dark Hollow. Dinosaur BarB-Que, 99 Court St. 585-3257090. 10 p.m. Free. [ POP/ROCK ] 8 Days A Week. 58 Main, 58 N. Main St. 585-637-2383. 9:30 p.m. & 12:30 a.m. Call for info. 80s Hair Band. Nola’s Restaurant & Nightclub, 4775 Lake Ave. 663-3375. 9 p.m. Call for info. Amanda Ashley. Johnny’s Irish Pub, 1382 Culver Rd. 224-0990. 8 p.m. Free. Amy & Jon. Schooner’s Riverside Pub, 70 Pattonwood Dr. 3423030. 6 p.m. Call for info. Dave Sestito. Boulder Coffee Co., 739 Park Ave. 585-697-0235. 8 p.m. Call for info.

CITY Newspaper presents

WHAT ARE YOU DOING TODAY?

CITY NEWSPAPER’s

DAILY

Mind Body Spirit TO ADVERTISE IN THE MIND BODY SPIRIT SECTION CALL CHRISTINE AT 244.3329 x23 OR EMAIL CHRISTINE@ROCHESTER-CITYNEWS.COM

CHOICES

The Dead Catholics, Pat Buchanan’s Hearse, Linchpin.

Tala Vera, 155 State St. 5463845. 8 p.m. $5-$7.

Geoff Harder and the Moonlighters. Flaherty’s Honeoye

Falls, 60 W. Main St. 497-7010. Call for info. Isotopes. Montage Music Hall, 50 Chestnut St. 232-1520. 8 p.m. Call for info. Joywave w/KOPPS, Admirers. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. $10-$12. continues on page 20

NEW EVENTS EVERY DAY, ONLINE AT ROCHESTERCITYNEWSPAPER.COM

DANCE YOURSELF FIT

Every morning City Newspaper’s calendar editors give their picks for the most interesting events of the day, everything from concerts to exhibits, theater shows to festivals!

You’ll have so much fun, you’ll forget you’re exercising! GROUP AND PRIVATE LESSONS FOR ALL SKILL LEVELS Gift Certificates Available

3450 WINTON PLACE ROCHESTER, NY 14623 585-292-1240

WWW.FADSROCHESTER.COM rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 19

HIV+ Research Volunteers Needed for HIV Study • Must be 18-55 years old and have documented HIV and taking ATRIPLA • Must be substance-free • 35 day study commitment • One 4 overnight and one 2 overnight stay in our unit • 6 clinic visits • Get paid up to $2900 for entire study • Get free health and laboratory evaluations

Call the Buffalo Clinical Research Center at 716-885-3580 ext 205 for information on “Study #2206” or go to www.bcrc.us/studies.php

SATURDAY, MAY 18 Lilac Festival. Highland Park,

171 Reservoir Ave. May 19, 10:30 a.m. See website for full festival schedule. Free. Me & Matt. Boulder Coffee Co., 100 Alexander St. 585-454-7140. 8 p.m. Call for info. My Plastic Sun. Sticky Lips BBQ Juke Joint, 830 Jefferson Rd. 292-5544. 10 p.m. Free. Shameless. Captain Jack’s Goodtime Tavern, 8505 Greig St. 315-483-9570. 9 p.m. Call for info. Spika. House of Guitars, 645 Titus Ave. 585-544-3500. 7 p.m. Free.

The Surge w/Crossroads, Rebel’s Posse, Aliysia Groth, Julie Dunlap, and Sean Patrick McGraw. Pelican’s Nest, 566 River St. 663-5910. noon. Call for info.

SUNDAY, MAY 19 [ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ] Brendan Nolan. McGraw’s Irish Pub, 146 W Commercial St. 348-9091. 7 p.m. Free.

Celtic Music Sundays: Dave North. Temple Bar and Grille,

109 East Ave. 232-6000. 7 p.m. Free. Fandango at the Tango. Tango Cafe, 389 Gregory St. 271-4930. 7:30 p.m. Free, donations accepted. Friends Unplugged. Captain Jack’s Goodtime Tavern, 8505 Greig St. 315-483-9570. 3 p.m. Call for info. Jim Lane. Schooner’s Riverside Pub, 70 Pattonwood Dr. 3423030. 3 p.m. Free. [ CLASSICAL ]

American Recorder Society Rochester Chapter: Spring Thing: A Concert of Musical Delights. First Baptist Church of

Rochester, 175 Allens Creek Rd. 244-2468. 4:30 p.m. Free.

Fisk Pipe Organ 30th Anniversary Recital. Downtown

United Presbyterian Church, 121 N. Fitzhugh Street. 325-4000. 3 p.m. Free, donations accepted.

Irondequoit Concert Band, Irondequoit Community Orchestra. Eastridge High School,

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Sister Grace Miller, that provides food, clothing, shelter, advocacy assistance for the poor, drop-in services for emergencies, and more (houseofmercyrochester. org). The church is handicapped accessible. A free will offering will be accepted. Free, free will offering accepted. [ DJ/ELECTRONIC ] Boasy Sundaze. Club Clarissas, 293 Clarissa St. 232-3430. Call for info. Drink and Drag Sundays. ONE Nightclub and Lounge, 1 Ryan Alley. 546-1010. 8 p.m. 18+. Call for info.

Tequila Sundays ft. DJ Andy Fade. Flat Iron Café, 561 State

St. 585-454-4830. 10 p.m. Call for info. [ JAZZ ]

Bill Slater. Woodcliff Hotel &

Flipside Bar & Grill, 2001 E Main St. 288-3930. 9 p.m. Free. [ OPEN MIC ]

Open Jam at Thirsty Frog.

Thirsty Frog, 511 East Ridge Rd. 730-5285. 9 p.m. Call for info. Open Mic w/Dave McGrath. Johnny’s Irish Pub, 1382 Culver Rd. 224-0990. 7 p.m. Free. [ POP/ROCK ]

Nokturnal Hellstorm, Malformed. Bug Jar, 219

[ KARAOKE ]

Karaoke w/Cyd Scarlett. Jose

& Willy’s, 20 Lakeshore Drive. 905-0222. 8:30 p.m.

153 Liberty Pole Way. 585-2323230. 8:30 p.m. $10-$15.

Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. $5-$7.

TUESDAY, MAY 21 [ BLUES ]

Dark Star Orchestra. Water

Street Music Hall, 204 N. Water St. 585-325-5600. 8:15 p.m. $24-$28.

Bluesday Tuesday Blues Jam. P.I.’s Lounge, 495 West Ave. 8 p.m. Call for info. Teagan Ward. The Beale, 693 South Ave. 585-271-4650. 7 p.m. Call for info.

[ POP/ROCK ]

[ DJ/ELECTRONIC ]

[ REGGAE/JAM ]

Lilac Festival. Highland Park,

171 Reservoir Ave. 10:30 a.m. See website for full festival schedule. Free. Minstrels In The Gallery. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. 7 p.m. $5-$10. Something Else. Pelican’s Nest, 566 River St. 663-5910. 5 p.m. Call for info. Sons of Synergy. The Titus Tavern, 692 Titus Ave. 2705365. 6 p.m. Call for info.

The U.V. Race w/Bad Taste, Big Brain & The Drug Cartel, and Glass. Bug Jar, 219

Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. $8-$10.

[ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ]

RPO: Eudora’s Fable: The Shoe Bird. Hochstein Performance

Bernunzio’s Uptown Music, 112 East Ave. 7:30 p.m. Call for info.

Church, 4322 Buffalo Rd. 594-9488. 7 p.m. 13th Annual Benefit Concert at Pearce Memorial Church at 7:00 p.m. Choirs from churches in the Gates and Chili areas will each present a song and the combined men’s, women’s and combined choirs wll perform. Beneficiary is House of Mercy, an outreach center begun by

Karaoke w/Walt O’Brien.

Joe Santora & Curtis Kendrick. The Pultneyville Grill, 4135 Mill St. (315) 589-4512. 4 p.m. Call for info.

The Opera Guild of Rochester Donors Recital. Rochester

Westside Ecumenical Benefit Concert. Pearce Memorial

[ KARAOKE ]

Bob Wayne and the Outlaw Carnies. Abilene Bar & Lounge,

MONDAY, MAY 20

Hall, 50 N Plymouth Ave. 4544596. 2 p.m. $10-$15.

135 W. Commercial St. 585662-5555. 5:30 p.m. Free. JazzHappens Band. Green Lantern Inn, One East Church St. 381-7603. 6:30 p.m. $12.

Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. 2484825. Call for info.

2350 E Ridge Rd. 339-1450. 3 p.m. Free.

Academy of Medicine, 1441 East Ave. 2 p.m. Call for info.

[ JAZZ ]

Alphonso Williams. Bistro 135,

The Bicycats w/Garden Fresh.

[ CLASSICAL ] The Bowties. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 7:30 p.m. Free. [ DJ/ELECTRONIC ]

Manic Monday Retro Dance: DJ Cub, Lulu. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 11 p.m. 21+. Free.

2 Reason Tuesdays w/DJ Zio.

Nathaniel’s Pub, 251 Exchange Boulevard. 232-8470. Call for info. Free. DJ Ghetto Blaster. Club Clarissas, 293 Clarissa St. 2323430. Call for info. DJ Kathy. Nashvilles, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. 334-3030. Call for info. Old School Tuesdays. Grotto, 7 Lawrence St. 739-5377. Call for info. Free.

Tuesday Americano w/Bobby Base. Flat Iron Café, 561 State

St. 585-454-4830. Call for info. [ JAZZ ]

Charlie Mitchell Group. Flipside

Bar & Grill, 2001 E Main St. 288-3930. 8 p.m. Free. Jim Nugent. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. 585-662-5555. 6 p.m. Free. Ryan from El Rojo Jazz. Lemoncello, 137 West Commercial St. 385-8565. 6 p.m. Free. Tinted Image. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. 2484825. 5:30 p.m. Free. [ KARAOKE ]

Karaoke at 140 Alex. 140 Alex

Bar & Grill, 140 Alexander St. 585-256-1000. 10:30 p.m. Free. Karaoke w/Tina P. MicGinny’s, 2246 E River Rd. 247-7770. 9 p.m. Call for info.

[ OPEN MIC ]

Golden Link Singaround. Twelve Corners Presbyterian Church, 1200 S. Winton Rd. 244-8585. 7:30 p.m. Free. Open Mic Night. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. 8:30 p.m. Free Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. 8:30 p.m. Free. Open Mic w/String Theory. Johnny’s Irish Pub, 1382 Culver Rd. 224-0990. 8 p.m. Free.

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[ POP/ROCK ]

Mixtapes w/Masked Intruder, The Emersons, California Cousins, and Envious Disguise. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe

Ave. 8:30 p.m. $8-$12.

WEDNESDAY, MAY 22 [ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ] Laura Thurston. Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 585-232-3230. 8:30 p.m. $3-$5; or free w/canned goods donation. Rob & Gary Acoustic. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. 248-4825. 5:30 p.m. Free. [ CLASSICAL ]

Brighton Symphony Spring Concert. Temple B’rith

Kodesh, 2131 Elmwood Ave. 490-9351. 7:30 p.m. Free; donations welcomed.

Ladies Nite: High Heels and Mini Skirts New Wave Wednesdays. Club Clarissas,

293 Clarissa St. 232-3430. 10 p.m. 21+. Call for info. Teen Set 45 Party. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. Free. Why Not Wednesday. Eclipse Bar & Grill, 374 Thurston Rd. 502-922-6567. 10 p.m. Call for info. Y Not Wednesday w/DJ ET. Plush, 151 St. Paul St. 232-5650. Call for info. [ JAZZ ]

Jim E Leggs. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. 585-6625555. 6 p.m. Free. Margaret Explosion. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 7:30 p.m. Free. Mike Pappert. Lemoncello, 137 West Commercial St. 385-8565. 6:30 p.m. Free.

Vince Ercolamento& Joe Chiappone Jazz Quartet .

Murph’s Irondequoit Pub, 705 Titus Ave. 342-6780. 8 p.m. Free. [ KARAOKE ]

Italian American Karaoke .

Italian American Community Center, 150 Frank Dimino Way. 594-8882. 7:30 p.m. Free.

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POP/ROCK | NEW FOUND GLORY

While New Found Glory’s heyday may have been in the late 90’s and early 00’s, that certainly doesn’t mean it has lost any punch in the interim. In town for the 10-year anniversary tour of “Sticks and Stones,” the band has come to not only play the album in its entirety, but maybe show you something new. This may possibly be that the music and members have aged better than some of their fellow Warped Tour alums. Cartel, which has a slower, mellower sound than New Found Glory, mixes quite well. Living With Lions has also toured with Blink-182, and clearly already know what it is doing as it has a sound that is seriously reminiscent of both bands. New Found Glory is appearing Friday, May 17, 8 p.m. at Water Street Music Hall, 204 N. Water St. $19.99-$23. 325-5600, waterstreetmusic.com. — BY SUZAN PERO Karaoke at Mayfield’s Pub.

[ DJ/ELECTRONIC ] DJ Adam. Nashvilles, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. 334-3030. Call for info.

Exotic ingredients infuse beef, lamb, and vegetarian dishes for lunch or dinner every day of the week.

Mayfield’s Pub, 669 N Winton Rd. 288-7199. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke at Sanibel Cottage. Sanibel Cottage, 1517 Empire Blvd. 671-9340. 6 p.m. Free. Karaoke w/Cyd Scarlett. Jose & Willy’s, 20 Lakeshore Drive. 9050222. 8:30 p.m. Karaoke Wednesdays. Flat Iron Café, 561 State St. 585-4544830. Call for info. Karaoke w/Mark. Flipside Bar & Grill, 2001 E Main St. 288-3930. 9 p.m. Free. [ OPEN MIC ]

Open Acoustic Mic Night w/ Mandy. Shorts Bar & Grill, 35

[ POP/ROCK ]

Code Orange Kids w/Hostage Calm. Dubland Underground,

315 Alexander St. 232-7550. 6 p.m. $10.

The Dads Reunion Show w/ why+the+wires, The Gifted Children,. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe

Ave. 9 p.m. $5-$7. Marty Roberts. Schooner’s Riverside Pub, 70 Pattonwood Dr. 342-3030. 6 p.m. Call for info. Nikki Hill. Dinosaur Bar-BQue, 99 Court St. 585-3257090. 9:30 p.m. Free.

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The Tabs, The Everleigh Club, Michael Yaple, Dusty West & The Tumbleweeds. Tala Vera,

155 State St. 546-3845. 8 p.m. $5-$7.

N. Main St. 388-0136. 9 p.m. Free. Open Mic at Jeffrey’s. Jeffrey’s, 3115 E. Henrietta Rd. 4864937. 7 p.m. Call for info.

Open Mic Jam Boulder Alexander St.. Boulder Coffee

Co., 100 Alexander St. 585454-7140. 8 p.m. Open Mic w/Steve West. Muddy Waters Coffee House, 53 Main St. 585-243-9111. 7 p.m. Free. [ REGGAE/JAM ]

Cravin’s Bliss, Fire Wheel. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N. Water St. 585-325-5600. 9:30 p.m. $5-$7. Personal Blend. Temple Bar and Grille, 109 East Ave. 232-6000. 10 p.m. Free. rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 21

Theater lost in the shtick. The play’s poignancy rarely surfaced. “Dream” needs to tickle us and move us, but Cuddy and Greer settled for the giggles. Theseus’ (Keith Hamilton Cobb) imposition of marriage on Hippolyta (Carly Street) appears as mere fact, without emotion. Does she resent his authority? Does he impose his will because he has the power? Or does affection grow between them despite their recent war? We never know. Cobb and Street also portray Oberon and Titania. It’s a solid decision that would have made a lot more sense if Theseus and Hippolyta had served some purpose. The directors downgrade them by replacing their opening scene with the introduction of The Mechanicals. They seem to be saying that this is a production in which everything is for fun. In the process, they deprive the rulers of their implicit roles in the dreams and nightmares to follow.

The cast of “A Midsummer Night’s Dream,” currently on stage at Geva Theatre Center. PHOTO BY KEN HUTH

A frenzied, flamboyant ‘Dream’ “A Midsummer Night’s Dream” THROUGH JUNE 2 GEVA THEATRE CENTER, 75 WOODBURY BLVD. TICKETS START AT $25 | 232-4382, GEVATHEATRE.ORG [ REVIEW ] BY MICHAEL LASSER

For a director, William Shakespeare’s “A Midsummer Night’s Dream” is always threatening to become “A Midsummer Night’s Nightmare.” The wide-ranging play, currently at Geva Theatre Center, dives headlong into comedy at the same time that it sidles more subtly toward tragedy. The challenge is to give full expression to its contradictory nature yet come away with its ambiguity intact. Too dark and you betray its flamboyant spirit; too celebratory and you trivialize its shadowy dangers. “Dream” consists of four interwoven stories, starting with the wedding of Duke Theseus and his defeated foe, Hippolyta, Queen of the Amazons. Beyond that, two young couples find themselves the victims of the Duke’s firm justice and the fairy Puck’s mischief. At the same time the king and 22 CITY MAY 15-21, 2013

queen of the fairies, Oberon and Titania, quarrel bitterly until Oberon seeks revenge. Finally, a motley crew of workingmen — called The Mechanicals — are preparing a version of “Pyramus and Thisbe” to entertain the royal couple. The potential tragedies reside in the love stories: a royal couple who may wed despite their animosity; four young people caught in the forest at night, who may never find the love they seek; and fairy rulers who may never learn to forgive. Typical of Shakespeare’s comedies, “Dream” exposes a vulnerable world of waking, sunlight, and reason to the disorder we can’t resist — an enveloping world of nightmare, magic, and comic madness. Shakespeare understood the id nearly 400 years before Freud gave us a word for it. Each plot line intrudes on the others because

characters in one story parallel characters in another, and because Oberon’s servant, Puck, uses his magic potion indiscriminately. Usually an otherworldly mix of sympathy, skepticism, and mischief, Puck (George Abud) is the one who moves most easily between the worlds. But the directors have made him downright Dionysian, with little concern for the humans he observes.

Co-directors Mark Cuddy and Skip Greer, and the cast of two dozen, have chosen to unleash the play’s wilder elements. What the text refers to at one point as a “frolic” soon becomes a frenzy of burlesque-like slapstick that eventually infuses nearly everything with manic momentum. The production, ravishingly costumed by Pamela Scofield and dreamily lit by Ann G. Wrightson, is a nonstop version that comes the closest I’ve seen to unapologetic farce. After the intermission — especially after the production’s slow, unfunny start — the cast finds its footing to turn Shakespeare’s wise poetic eye and sharp prosaic elbows into a wildly funny confabulation. Is there anything wrong with that? How about the fact that it’s a confabulation? Despite the directors’ skillful use of the play’s sexuality, from the flirtatious to the ridiculous to the lovingly erotic, an hour after the nosh they served up, I was hungry for some substance. Cuddy and Greer’s gaudy cotton candy wasn’t filling enough, not when the play is one of the supreme comedies in the English language. The production was so fast, so entertainingly loony, and so filled with comic bits (too many of which were tired anachronisms) that the language and sometimes the characters got

As for what might have been — Jo Winiarski’s exquisite woodland set, populated by weightless fairies in gossamer and lace, brings Oberon and Titania’s realm to life before we ever see them. Yet when the two fairy regents restore their love — after her dalliance with Bottom, who has been turned into an ass — Movement Coordinator Darren Stevenson gives them some choreography to suggest something ethereal, although it feels mainly artsy-fartsy. The Mechanicals’ supremely silly version of “Pyramus” ends with the eponymous hero (Brian O’Connor as Nick Bottom the weaver) lying dead from a hilarious excess of stabbings. But when his beloved Thisbe (Ron Menzel as Francis Flute the bellows-mender) discovers him, the tone becomes instantly tender and loving. It’s the play’s most moving moment, ironically the closest this romp of a production comes to recognizing tragedy. Near the end, Puck, the sardonic outsider and observer (“What fools these mortals be”), dances with the fairies and actually kisses one of them. After an evening of revelry he’s largely responsible for, why would the directors want their Puck — in his satyr-like garb — to turn suddenly sentimental? It may have been a feel-good moment for an audience, but it doesn’t fit the directors’ view of the character. Puck’s epilogue ends the play with the traditional call for applause: “Give me your hands, if we be friends.” Not because we’re friends, but if. Shakespeare’s “Dream” sustains its shadowy fragility and uncommon wit to the end even though we don’t get to see all of it. Cuddy and Greer staged the play with great skill and vigor, but they kept finding answers even where Shakespeare gave us mainly questions and conjectures.

Art Exhibits [ OPENING ] Frederick Douglass Community Resource Center, 36 King St. The Price of Freedom is Death: Black Arts Aesthetic Art Show.. Through June 29. Reception May 18, 5:30-8 p.m. 4976139. facebook.com/pages/ Frederick-Douglass-ResourceCenter/341993564799. I-Square Visions, 693 Titus Ave. “Reflections of Our Town.” Through May 26. An Exceptional and Unique Exhibition of Photographs of Historic Irondequoit, New York. Mon-Thu 10 a.m.-2 p.m., Sat 11 a.m.-2 p.m., Sun May 26, 2-4 p.m. Reception Sat May 18, 7-9 p.m. Irondequoit Tales Wed May 22, 7-9 p.m., talks by Irondequoit Historian, Pat Wayne and SeaBreeze Historian, Matt Kaufman. ZanneBrunner@gmail.com. Image City Photography Gallery, 722 University Ave. “Shapes, Light, and Color.. An Ode to Architecture” by Dan Neuberger.. Through Jun 9. Wed-Sat 11 a.m.7 p.m., Sun 12-4 p.m. Receptions Fri May 17, 5-8:30 p.m. and First Friday, June 7, 5-9 p.m. 271-2540. imagecityphotographygallery. com. Ock Hee’s Gallery, 2 Lehigh St. “Birds and Mammals” by Kurt Feuerherm. Through Jun 22. Mon-Sat 11 a.m.5 p.m. Reception May 18, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. 624-4730. ockheesgallery.com. [ CONTINUING ] ART EXHIBITS 1975 Gallery, 89 Charlotte St. Our Cryptozoological Expedition into “The Elusive” A Presentation by the Huckle Buckle Boys. Through May 25. 1975ish.com. Acanthus Café, 337 East Ave. “Bestest of Friends.” New artwork by Kristine A. Greenizen. 319-5999. acanthuscafe.com. Arts & Cultural Council for Greater Rochester, 277 N. Goodman St. “Mythologies and Cultures” by Nitin Banwar. Through May 30. Mon-Fri 10 a.m.-4 p.m. 4734000. artsrochester.org. Aviv Café, 321 East Ave. “For Those Who Served” by John Retallack. Through May 31. 729-9916. bethelcf.com/aviv. Axom Gallery, 176 Anderson Ave., 2nd floor. Paul Garland: “In Retrospect.” Through June 22. Wed-Sat noon-5 p.m. and by appointment. Reception May 31, 5:30-8:30 p.m. 232-6030. axomgallery. com. Black Radish Studio, 274 N. Goodman. “Spirit of the River” by Richard Margolis. Through May 18. Mon-Fri 10 a.m.-6 p.m., Sat 12-6 p.m. 4131278. blackradishstudio.com. Books Etc., 78 W. Main St. “Backdoor Artists.” Through June 10. With Sue Higgins, Martin Heit, Nicki Millor, Emily Osgood, and Susan Sweet. 474-4116. books_ etc@yahoo.com. Bridge Art Gallery University of Rochester Medical Center, 300 Crittenden Blvd. Beyond Barriers Exhibit. Through June 30. 275-3571.

ART | “THE PRICE OF FREEDOM IS DEATH: BLACK ARTS AESTHETIC ART SHOW”

The Black Arts Movement was the artistic branch of the Black Power Movement, initiated by unflinching poet and playwright Amiri Baraka in Harlem in 1965. The movement sought to inspire African Americans to re-evaluate western aesthetics and to define an identity and aesthetic that was distinct from and refused to assimilate with the identity, aesthetics, and value systems imposed upon blacks by Euro-centric oppressors. It led to the founding of African-American publishing houses, magazines, journals, art institutions, and African-American Studies programs within universities. The Frederick Douglass Resource Center (36 King St.) will host a reception for “The Price of Freedom is Death: Black Arts Aesthetic Art Show” on Saturday, May 18, 5:30-8 p.m. The exhibit will feature works by local black artists that explore and seek to reignite the Black Power/ Arts Movement. A short documentary will be screening in Pitts Hall during the reception, and cultural crafts will be available for purchase in the gift shop. The show remains on view through June 29, and admission is $15. For more information, call 497-6139 or visit facebook.com/pages/Frederick-Douglass-Resource-Center/341993564799. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. “Man vs Machine” Through May 30. Hours 8 p.m.-2 a.m. Featuring Bile, Cruk, Yewzer, John Magnus, Thievin’ Stephen, Spaceman, Derek Crowe, Mike Turzanski, Sidhe, Matt Ely, Doe Gawn, Adam Maida, and Clayton Cowles. lobbydigital.com. Community Darkroom Gallery, 713 Monroe Ave. “Draft 10” Through May 18. Mon 9 a.m.9:30 p.m., Tue-Thu 9 a.m.6:30 p.m., Fri 12-5 p.m., Sat 10 a.m.-5:30 p.m. 271-5920. A Different Path Gallery, 27 Market St. “A Little Twisted: An Exploration of the Self.” BFA Painting Exhibit by Karen Nelson. Wed-Fri 11 a.m.noon, Sat-Sun noon-4 p.m. adifferentpathgallery.com. Equal=Grounds, 750 South Ave. “My journey of life through my art: a collection of work from my soul:” Mixed media work by Jessica Bell. Through end of May. gallery@ equalgrounds.com. Friendly Home’s Memorial Gallery, 3165 East Ave. “Searching for Spring” by Elizabeth Liano. Through Jun 30. Daily 10 a.m.-5 p.m. aflinn@friendlyhome.org.

Geisel Gallery, Bausch & Lomb Place, One Bausch & Lomb Place. Paul Garland: “Confluence.” Through June 22. Mon-Fri 7 a.m.-7 p.m., Sat 8 a.m.-2 p.m. thegeiselgallery. com. George Eastman House, 900 East Ave. “Silver and Water” Through May 26. 271-3361. eastmanhouse.org. Hungerford Building, 1115 E. Main St. Senior Art Exhibitions. Through May 20. Rooms 248 and 258. UR students Lauren Blair, Sharon Hector, Olivia Morgan, Kirsten Williamson, Carlos Tejeda, and Jacq Carpentier. 315-264-3151. lauren.blair5@gmail.com. International Art Acquisitions, 3300 Monroe Ave. “Living Fabric” by Kathleen Kinkopf. Through May 31. Mon-Fri 10 a.m.-9 p.m., Sat 10 a.m.-6 p.m., Sun 12-5 p.m. 264-1440. internationalartacquisitions.com. continues on page 24

GETLISTED get your event listed for free e-mail it to calendar@rochestercitynews.com. Or go online to rochestercitynewspaper.com and submit it yourself!

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 23

Art Exhibits Link Gallery at City Hall, 30 Church St. Artists Breakfast Group Art Show. Through Jun 17. 271-5920. facebook.com/ ABG.Rochester‎. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. Alan Singer: Fact or Fiction. Through May 24. thelittle.org. Lux Lounge, 666 South Ave. The Art of J. Nevadomski and Allie Hartley. 232-9030. lux666.com. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. Creative Workshop Spring Children’s Show. Creative Workshop. “It Came From the Vault: Rarely Seen Works from MAG’s Collection. Wed-Sun 11 a.m.-5 p.m., Thu until 9 p.m. 2768900. mag.rochester.edu. Mental Health Association, 320 N Goodman St. “Luminaria” Art lighting the path to wellness. Creative Wellness Coalition. 325-3145 x144. Orange Glory Café, 240 East Ave. “Your Body” Anatomy Drawings by Carla Bartow. Through May 28. carlasswanktank.blogspot.com. Oxford Gallery, 267 Oxford St. “The Four Humors.” Through Jun 1. Tue-Fri 12-5 p.m., Sat 10 a.m.-5 p.m. 271-5885. oxfordgallery.com. Pat Rini Rohrer Gallery, 71 S Main St. “Floral & Figures of Spring.”. Through June 16. 394-0030. prrgallery.com. Rush Rhees Library, University of Rochester, River Campus. Alice in the Looking Glass: Illustrations and Artists’ Books 1865-2012. Through Aug 16. Rare Books & Special Collections, Rush Rhees Library. Mon-Fri 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Sat 11 a.m.-3 p.m. 275-4477.; Memorial Art Gallery: 100 Years of Art for the Community. Through Sep 30, 2013. mag. rochester.edu. The Shoe Factory Art Coop, 250 N. Goodman St. Mona Oates and Wen-Hua Chen. Wed 12-5 p.m. shoefactoryarts.com. Spectrum Gallery at Lumiere Photo, 100 College Ave. Rare and Vintage Prints from the Collections of Nathan Lyons, Carl Chiarenza, and Spectrum Gallery. 461-4447. lumierephoto.com. Starry Nites Café, 696 University Ave. “Hex Signs & Barn Stars” by Beth Brown. Through Aug 3. 271-2630. shoefactoryarts.com. The Firehouse Gallery at Genesee Pottery, 713 Monroe Avenue. “One” by Aaron Benson.. Through May 24. 271-5183. geneseearts.org. University Gallery, James R. Booth Hall, RIT, Lomb Memorial Dr. “Connections” Arena Art Group. Mon-Thu 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Fri & Sat 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Reception Mar 21 5-7 p.m. 475-2866. jleugs@rit.edu. rit. edu/fa/gallery. Valley Manor, 1570 East Ave. “Shared Visions” by Jim and Gail Thomas. Through Jun 28. Mon-Fri 9 a.m.-5 p.m. or by appointment. 770-1923. Visual Studies Workshop, 31 Prince Street. “ChemoToxic, I Am That, and other stories” 24 CITY MAY 15-21, 2013

KIDS | “SEEDFOLKS”/TEEN BOOK FESTIVAL

Two events taking place this week focus on literature geared toward children, and can help families wrap up the school year while emphasizing summer reading, community, and healthy choices. The Southwest Area Neighborhood Association’s youth after-school program will present its production of “Seedfolks,” a play celebrating gardening, youth, and community (pictured). The play has been adapted from Paul Fleischman’s book by Lisa Barker, director of SWAN’s Grow Green Program, and Tom Lake, children’s arts specialist. The piece was performed by the kids last May, and will return to the stage on Thursday, May 16, at 6:30 p.m. in the auditorium of Wilson Foundation Academy (200 Genesee St.). The production will feature music by the SWAN band and will be followed by a potluck reception. Admission is free, but donations are appreciated and will benefit the Grow Green program, which seeks to engage the community in urban agriculture and healthy eating. For more information, visit growgreenrochester.com. On Saturday, May 18, Nazareth College (4245 East Ave.) will host the 8th Annual Greater Rochester Teen Book Festival, during which thousands of teens will come together to meet their favorite authors. Among the 34 award-winning authors from across the nation and beyond, featured writers include Tom Angleberger, Kate Brian, Andrea Cremer, Ellen Hopkins, Mark Shulman, Margaret Stohl, and Terry Trueman. The festival includes a panel, breakout sessions, teen films selected from the Rochester Teen Film Festival, a performance by the Wilson Pearls Steam Team, and a special presentation by Michael Morpurgo, author of “War Horse.” Books by authors in attendance, lunch, snacks, and beverages will be available for purchase. The event takes place 8:45 a.m.-5 p.m. and is free and open to the public. For more information visit tbflive.org. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY by Willie Osterman. 442-8676. vsw.org.

Art Events [ THU., MAY 16 ] Collector’s Show and Tell. May 16, 7 p.m. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. Free. 276-8970. mag. rochester.edu. [ SAT., MAY 18 ] Art & Access. May 18, 5-9 p.m. The Yards, 50-52 Public Market Art auction to raise money and awareness for the long acting reversible contraceptive fund. Ages 21+.

$10. attheyards@gmail.com. attheyards.com. [ SUN., MAY 19 ] Heart’s Desire Event. May 19, 2-5 p.m. Outside the Box Art Gallery, Bldg 9, The Canal Works, 1000 Turk Hill Rd. Meet other seasoned and fledgling creatives for encouragement, support and discussion $5. 6452485. outsidetheboxag.com.

Comedy [ THU., MAY 16 ] Craig Shoemaker. May 16-18. Comedy Club, 2235 Empire Blvd. Thu 7:30 p.m., Fri-Sat

NEW!

7:30 & 10 p.m $9-$12. 6719080. thecomedyclub.us. [ FRI., MAY 17 ] Improv Comedy Battles. Fri 9:30 p.m., Sat 7:30 p.m. Village Idiots Improv Comedy, 274 Goodman St. N. $5. 797-9086. VIP@improvVIP.com.

CITY

[ SAT., MAY 18 ] Unleahed! Improv. May 18, 7:30 p.m. JCC Rochester, 1200 Edgewood Ave. facebook.com/ unleashedimprov.

CITY NEWSPAPER

Dance Events [ FRI., MAY 17 ] “Past, Present, Future.” May 17, 7:30 p.m. Nazareth College Arts Center, 4245 East Ave $45-$60. 461-5850. rochestercityballet.com. Graduation Dances. May 17, 6:30-8 p.m. Brockport College, 350 New Campus Drive Hartwell Dance Theater, Kenyon Street, Brockport Free. brockport.edu/finearts. Rochester City Ballet: “Past, Present & Future.” May 17-19. Nazareth College Arts Center, 4245 East Ave Fri-Sat 7:30 p.m., Sun 2 p.m $40-$60. 389-2170. artsceneter.naz.edu. [ SAT., MAY 18 ] Musical Feet: Celebrating National Tap Dance Day. May 18, 10 a.m.-2:15 p.m. Hochstein Music Hall, 50 N. Plymouth Ave $10$15, register 454-4596. activenet.active.com/ hochsteinschoolofmusic.

Festivals [ WED., MAY 15 ] Lilac Festival. Through May 19, 10:30 a.m.-8:03 p.m. Highland Park, 171 Reservoir Ave Music, vendors, food, entertainment Free admission. lilacfestival.com. [ FRI., MAY 17 ] Faith Family Fair. May 17, 5-8:30 p.m. Faith Lutheran Church, 2576 Browncrot Blvd. Come for fun, food, fitness events, carnival games, and live music by The Fiddlers of the Genesee. 381-3970. [ SAT., MAY 18 ] Tree Peony Festival of Flowers. Sundays, 10 a.m Linwood Gardens, 1912 York Rd. Suggested contribution $8, guided tour $12. 584-3913. leegratwick@frontier.com. linwoodgardens.org.

Kids Events [ WED., MAY 15 ] Tiny Tots Concerts: Alien Encounter. Through May 17. May 14 at 9:45 and 11:15 a.m. at Roberts Wesleyan College, May 15 at 9:45 and 11:15 a.m. at Browncroft Community Church, May 16 at 9:45 a.m. at Canandaigua Academy, and May 17 at 9:45 a.m. at Temple B’rith Kodesh 454-2100. rpo.org. [ FRI., MAY 17 ] Day Out with Thomas: The Go Go Thomas Tour 2013. Through May 19, 8:45 a.m. Medina Railroad Museum, 530 West Ave. Activities and storytelling aboard Thomas the Tank Engine $18. 798-6106. thomasandfriends.com/dowt.

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pinterest.com/roccitynews DINING · NEWS · ART · CULTURE

RECREATION | PLANETARY CONJUNCTION OVER THE SWAMP

The seasonal warmth of the days is finally stretching into the evenings, so take advantage of the more comfortable weather and check out the beautiful nighttime skies. Thousand Acre Swamp Sanctuary (1581 Jackson Road, Penfield) will host a Planetary Conjunction over the Swamp gathering on Friday, May 17, at 8:30 p.m. Weather providing and with cooperation from the clouds, Venus, Jupiter, and Mercury will be visible and in close proximity to one another on this evening. The former two celestial bodies will appear to move closer and closer to one another through May 28, when they will appear to sit within one degree of each other. The event is free to attend. Leaders Jackson Thomas, Steve Gooding, and Diane Taggart will provide some telescopes, but personal telescopes, binoculars, and flashlights are welcome. Dress in layers in case the evening turns chilly, because we all know that regional weather is fickle. For more information, call 773-8911. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY [ SAT., MAY 18 ] 17th Annual Kids’ Trout Fishing Derby. May 18, 8 a.m. Location is Powder Mills Park, Powderhorn Lodge. Ages 15 and under. Donuts, hot chocolate and coffee. Trophies awarded at 11:15 a.m. Hatchery tours available after 11:30 a.m Free. 641-0668. PittsfordRotaryClub.org. Tales from Beatrix Potter. ongoing, 11 a.m. & 7 p.m. Bristol Valley Theater, 151 South Main St 374-9032. bvtnaples.org. [ SUN., MAY 19 ] OrKIDStra: Eudora’s Fable: The Shoe Bird.. May 19, 2 p.m. Hochstein Performance Hall, 50 N Plymouth Ave. $10-$15. 454-2100. rpo.org.

Lectures [ WED., MAY 15 ] Guild Opera Lecture: Heroic and Powerful Women in Opera. May 15, 7-8:30 p.m. Pittsford Community Library, 24 State St. With Agneta D. Borgstedt Free. 248-6275. operaguildofrochester.org. The Icarus Sessions. Third Wednesday of every month, 7 p.m. Hanlon-Fiske Studios, 34 Elton St. Free. 705-6581. [ THU., MAY 16 ] 2013 May Hill Arbuthnot Honor Lecture. May 16, 7 p.m. Nazareth College Linehan Chapel, 4245 East Ave., Michael Morpurgo, author

of the novel “War Horse.” Free, register. 315-986-3949. lisawemett@frontiernet.net. Profiled: Race in Civic Circles: Race & Spirituality. May 16, 7 p.m. Baobab Cultural Center, 728 University Ave. Free, register. 563-2145. thebaobab.org. [ MON., MAY 20 ] Monday Lecture Series: “Susan B. Anthony: Debates about Birth Control and Abortion in the late 19th Century” with Dr. Alison Parker. May 20. Susan B. Anthony Museum & House, 17 Madison St Noon lunch lecture $25, 2 p.m. tea lecture $15 susanbanthonyhouse.org. [ TUE., MAY 21 ] Rochester Academy of Science, Mineral Section. May 21, 7-9 p.m. Brighton Town Hall, 2300 Elmwood Ave Harry deLahunta: “Geology of the Grand Canyon.” Free. 2885683. rasny.org/mineral.

Literary Events [ WED., MAY 15 ] Pure Kona Poetry Readings. 7 p.m. Acanthus Café, 337 East continues on page 26

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Literary Events Ave. Local poets gather to read their latest works Free. 3195999. acanthuscafe.com. [ THU., MAY 16 ] Reading and Book Signing: “An Early Work Late in Life” by Bill Whiting. May 16, 5:30 p.m. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. Adult content Included in admission: $$2.50-$6. 2768900. mag.rochester.edu. [ SAT., MAY 18 ] 8th Annual Greater Rochester Teen Book Festival. May 18, 9 a.m. Nazareth College Shults Center, 4245 East Ave. 2239091. Human Book Library. May 18, 10:30 a.m. Penfield Public Library, 1985 Baird Rd. Free, register. 340-8720. penfieldlibrary.org. [ SUN., MAY 19 ] Tom Angleberger, author of the “Origami Yoda” series. May 19, 1 p.m. Lift Bridge Book Shop, 45 Main St Free. liftbridgebooks.com. [ TUE., MAY 21 ] Geva Theatre Center: A Midsummer Night’s Dream. May 21, 12:12-12:52 p.m. Central Library, Kate Gleason Auditorium, 115 South Ave. Director and members of the cast will speak about the play 428-8350. libraryweb.org.

Recreation [ WED., MAY 15 ] Dirt Cheap Trail Series Race #2. May 15, 6:30 p.m. Webster Park, Holt Rd. at Lake Rd. Parkview Lodge Register. 621 8794. yellowjacketracing. com/fleet-feet-dirt-cheap-trailrace-series. Historic Landscape Garden Tours. Tuesdays-Sundays George Eastman House, 900 East Ave. Tue-Fri noon, Sat noon & 3:30 p.m., Sun 3:30 p.m Included in admission: $5-$12. 271-3361. eastmanhouse.org. Senior Sojourn. May 15, 9:3010:30 a.m. Cumming Nature Center, 6472 Gulick Rd. Easy pace $3, $10 per family. 3746160. rmsc.org. [ THU., MAY 16 ] Twilight Tours. 7 p.m Mount Hope Cemetery, North Gate, 791 Mt. Hope Ave. $5, members and under 16 free 461-3494. fomh.org. [ FRI., MAY 17 ] Planetary Conjunction over the Swamp. May 17, 8:30 p.m. The Thousand Acre Swamp Sanctuary, 1581 Jackson Road Personal binoculars and telescopes welcome, some telescopes provided Free. 773-8911. The Thirteenth Annual “Ride for Missing Children.” May 17, 7:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m. A 100-mile bicycle trek around Monroe County beginning and ending at the Total Sports Experience in Gates Fundraiser. 242-0900 x3328. rideformissingchildren.org. [ SAT., MAY 18 ] All About Dahlias. May 18, 10 a.m.-noon. Hansen Nature

26 CITY MAY 15-21, 2013

THEATER | “50 SHADES! THE MUSICAL”

Our culture is inundated with what is known as “potato-chip entertainment.” We know that certain books, programs, and films offer little intellectual sustenance, if they don’t rot our minds outright. But it’s difficult to put it down, especially when everyone we know is indulging. A little while ago, it seemed like everyone was reading the racy trilogy “Fifty Shades of Grey,” by E. L. James, which tells the story of a young literature student who is introduced to the world of BDSM by a more seasoned, successful entrepreneur. The elements of naivete, seduction, and obsession with power gathered a tidy crossover audience of “Twilight” fans, and rumor has it that James’ novel actually got its start as a piece of “Twilight” fanfiction (Google it!). We love to indulge in such nonsense (to the tune of 32 million copies sold in America), and even lecture one another about why such phenomena are supposedly important looks at our culture, but we also love to hate on it, hard. A parody couldn’t have been far behind, and we find that in “50 Shades! The Musical,” which will come to the Auditorium Theatre (885 E. Main St.) on Thursday, May 16. The show opens with a ladies book club deciding to read “Fifty Shades of Grey,” and follows their interpretation of the novel through dance numbers and original songs such as “I Don’t Make Love” and “There’s a Hole Inside of Me.” Because Thursday’s 7:30 p.m. show sold out, a 5 p.m. show has been added. Tickets cost $39.50-$47.50, and the musical is recommended for ages 18 and over. For more information, call 222-5000 or visit rbtl.org. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY Center, 1525 Calkins Rd. Free, register. 359-7044. naturecenter@henrietta. org. sites.google.com/site/ hansennaturecenter. Bird Songs. May 18, 8 a.m. The Thousand Acre Swamp Sanctuary, 1581 Jackson Road Bring binoculars. Free. 773-8911. Easter Seals Walk With Me. May 18, 11 a.m. Genesee Valley Park, Elmwood Ave. Raise funds with pledge form 957-9247. walkwithme.org/ Rochester. GVHC Event. May 18, 10 a.m. Crescent Trail, 1280 Moseley Rd. (Rte. 250) Strenuous/ hilly 5.5 mile hike, Crescent Trail Free. 201-0065. gvhchikes.org. Identification Series Walk. May 18, 10 a.m.-noon. Cumming Nature Center, 6472 Gulick Rd. Apr 27: Early Spring Wildflowers. May 18: Woodland Wildflowers. June 8: Trees $3, $10/family requested donation, free to members. 374-6160. rmsc.org.

Merilee’s Morning March for Mental Wellness. May 18, 9 a.m. Perinton Park, 99 O’Connor Rd. Free, fundraiser 678-1427. Public Tour of South Section of Mount Hope Cemetery. Mount Hope Cemetery, 1133 Mt. Hope Avenue Meet: Cemetery Office, South entrance opposite the Distillery restaurant. $5, members and kids under 16 free 461-3494. fomh.org. Searching Among the Stones. May 18, 11 a.m. Mount Hope Cemetery, North Gate, 791 Mt. Hope Ave. $5, $6 family, members free 461-3494. fomh.org. [ SUN., MAY 19 ] The Bird Watcher Tour. May 19, 8 a.m. Mount Hope Cemetery, 1133 Mt. Hope Avenue $7, free to members. 461-3494. fomh.org. GVHC Event. May 19, 8:30 a.m. Meet at I-390 exit 11. Moderate 5-6 mile trail maintenanace hike, Finger Lakes Trail Free. 621-8794. gvhchikes.org.

Public Tour of North Section of Mount Hope Cemetery. 2 p.m Mount Hope Cemetery, 1133 Mt. Hope Avenue Except May 12 see Special Events. Meet: North Gatehouse opposite Robinson Dr. $5, members and kids under 16 free 461-3494. fomh.org. [ TUE., MAY 21 ] J.P. Morgan Corporate Challenge. May 21, 7 p.m. Rochester Institute of Technology, 1 Lomb Memorial Dr. $32, register. 367-9307. jpmorganchasecc.com/ registration.php?city_id=3.

Special Events [ WED., MAY 15 ] Gilda’s Club Charity Event. May 15, 5:30-8 p.m. Nan Miller Gallery, 3450 Winton Place. 292-1430. nanmillergallery. com. Master Gardener Plant Sale. Through May 19. Cornell Cooperative Extension of Monroe County, 249 Highland Ave During Lilac Festival, 10 a.m.-8 p.m. daily 461-1000. mycce.org/monroe. A Week of Human Trafficking Awareness at The Little Theatre. Through May 16. The Little Theater, 240 East Avenue Wednesday May 15, 7 p.m.: Renan Salgado & Gonzalo Martinez, Workers Justice Center of NY Focus: Migrant Labor Thursday May 16, 7 p.m.: Sean Wrench, Executive Director, Forsaken Generation Focus: Impacting a community; awareness, policy advocacy, education, rescue, and restoration. $5-$8. notmylife. org/press-releases. [ THU., MAY 16 ] FDRC Underground: “Mindbuilders.” May 16, 5:308 p.m. Frederick Douglass Community Resource Center, 36 King St. A community discussion centered on the fundamental elements of Hip Hop $7. 497-6139. facebook.com/pages/ Frederick-Douglass-ResourceCenter/341993564799. Fibromyalgia 20th Anniversary Awareness Day Celebration of the Fibromyalgia Association Of Rochester. May 16, 5 p.m. Greece Town Hall, one Vince Tofany Blvd 7 p.m. Free. 2257515. farny.org. Pinnacle Awards. May 16, 5 p.m. Colgate Rochester Crozer Divinity School, 1100 South Goodman St $40-$45. 7034825. ama-rochester.org. Uncork Your Imagination, a Wine & Culinary Event. May 16, 6-8 p.m. Visual Studies Workshop, 31 Prince Street Proceeds benefit Mercier Literacy for Children $40, register. (585) 442-8676. mercierliteracyprogram.org/ social-event.html. Veteran Salute to commemorate our veterans at Edna Tina Wilson Living Center. May 16, 2 p.m. Edna Tina Wilson Living continues on page 30

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Dancers from “4Play,” one of the works being performed this weekend as part of Rochester City Ballet’s 25th anniversary show. PHOTO BY TIM LEVERETT

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BY ROCHESTER CITY BALLET FRIDAY, MAY 17-SUNDAY, MAY 19 NAZARETH COLLEGE ARTS CENTER, 2425 EAST AVE. FRI-SAT 7:30 P.M., SUN 2 P.M. | $45-$60 | 389-2170, ARTSCENTER.NAZ.EDU [ PREVIEW ] BY CASEY CARLSEN

At an April rehearsal at the Rochester City Ballet studios on University Avenue, the company was running through the George Balanchine work “Serenade” under the direction of Leslie Peck, one of an elite group of dancers authorized by the George Balanchine Trust to stage his ballets, in an effort to keep the artistic integrity of his works intact. It is a much-sought-after privilege in the dance world, to have one of these “repetiteurs” set a Balanchine work on your company. This is the second time that Peck has worked with the Rochester City Ballet; she first set “Serenade” on the company in 2010. “They give ‘Serenade’ all the love I have for it,” Pecks says of RCB. The dancers “keep growing with it. They don’t just say, ‘I know it and that’s it.’ They’re also super-fast studies and disciplined, working long hours.” The Balanchine piece will be performed this weekend along with other works choreographed by RCB Artistic Director Jamey Leverett,

and the world premiere of “For Tim: Remembering Beloved Mentors,” a work created for RCB by noted dancer and choreographer Bill Evans. The concert, “Past, Present, and Future,” celebrates the 25th anniversary of the company and highlights the company’s collaborations with renowned artists and choreographers. Among the selections featured this weekend will be “LumaVoce,” first presented by the company in 2008. It’s an abstract work with an eerie gothic sensibility lit almost entirely with hand-held lighting. Computer-manipulated human voices in the music by Stephen Kennedy contribute to the piece’s unearthly feel. Live voices will accompany the original sound scape during this weekend’s performances. A witty battle of the sexes is the basis of Leverett’s 2012 work, “4Play.” Tim Leverett and his drum kit will share the stage with the dancers for this number. Piano and strings will be performed live for the new Bill Evans piece, a tribute to the memory of Tim Draper, founder of RCB, and other mentors who inspire in the dance world. During Peck’s April “Serenade” rehearsal

it was apparent that the RCB dancers held her in some thrall. She trained at The School of American Ballet when “Mr. B” — as George Balanchine was known — still taught class, and she danced in the core of the New York City Ballet under the legendary choreographer.

“Company class at SAB wasn’t there to warm you up,” Peck says. “I went 45 minutes early. And Mr. B never missed a class. Never.” The RCB dancers listened intently to Peck’s every word of advice and worked to put her corrections into action. The excitement of her attention and the strain of concentration were more transparent in the 15- to 18-year-old dancers who were pulled from the Professional Training Program at The Timothy M. Draper Center for Dance Education to raise the ranks to the 28 dancers required for this ballet. Faces glistened and nervous laughter occasionally rang out as the joy of learning the movements, and the intensity of the work required to absorb the ballet into muscle memory, bubbled over the hushed attentiveness permeating the warm studio. “Remember, you love to dance. Love it,” Peck called out as the dancers went back over a difficult bit of phrasing for the umpteenth time. “Five and six, and seven and eight, and reach and reach!” The dancers outstretched their limbs like deer as they soared down the diagonal of the studio, their eyes flicking instinctively to the mirrored wall to check the alignment of their extensions. While holding a position, they adjusted the crook of a finger or pulled up their torsos another fraction of an inch, as if lines of energy stretched from their mirror images to their flesh-and-blood selves.

Patio Doors and Windows to fit your Lifestyle But, more often than not, they looked to Peck for affirmation or correction. After all, she was there as an emissary of sorts for the works of Balanchine, the undisputed genius of 20th Century ballet. “Serenade,” which premiered in 1934, was the first original ballet that the Russian-born-and-trained Balanchine created in America, and one of the signature works of New York City Ballet’s repertory. Set to Serenade for Strings in C, Op. 48 by Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky — the composer with whom Balanchine is most closely identified — the emotion inherent in the music ranges from jovial to deeply sad. Balanchine is known for the extreme musicality of his choreography. In “Serenade” he seems to have almost made the music visible in the rise and fall and collective shapes of the pale-blueclad dancers. It is a ballet of patterns, the core of dancers gliding in and out of geometrical formations as simple yet complex as the shifting figments inside of a kaleidoscope. Balanchine created the ballet as a lesson in stage technique; during rehearsals he wove unexpected events — a student arriving late, another falling — into the final ballet. Moments like these have become iconic to the work; audiences love to recognize them. In “Elegy,” the work’s final section, a memorable moment occurs when the Dark Angel, hauntingly danced by RCB’s Megan Kamler, covers the eyes of talented newcomer Ian Buchanan to lead him first toward and then away from the Waltz Girl, poignantly danced by Jessica Tretter. Casting also includes principal Courtney Catalana as a wondrously vibrant Russian Girl, and accomplished veteran Adam Kittelberger as the Waltz Boy. The ballet concludes with another iconic moment, as Tretter is lifted high into the air in a standing position by three male dancers — Kittelberger, Jesse Campbell, and Anthony Dionisio, Jr. — who hold her by the legs as they slowly transport her upstage and into the wings. Watch how smoothly Tretter’s arms flow through first and third positions while she is borne aloft. Finally, she reaches behind herself, her arms like spread wings, as she arches her torso, head and neck backward in a seeming lament. Beneath her, the surrounding corps de ballet matches her movements, wistfully ethereal. “Give it your all!” Peck called out before the final run-through. And the dancers have, ending wreathed in sweat and smiles. For Rochester City Ballet, the staging

of “Serenade” is one accomplishment among many during this silver anniversary

year. It also marks the 15th year that the company has teamed with the Rochester Philharmonic Orchestra to put on the holiday classic “The Nutcracker,” arguably Balanchine’s most well-known work. Also this year, RCB collaborated with Jeff Tyzik and the RPO on “New York Cityscapes,” newly choreographed by Leverett. “We’re making our dream a reality with this company,” Artistic Director Jamey Leverett says. “Times are difficult for dance, companies are folding, but we’re still going strong. We have a unique voice and a lot to offer the whole upstate region with our eclectic performances.” The company has grown tremendously since its inception by founder Tim Draper 25 years ago. Leverett has journeyed with the company as it rose from preprofessional status to, currently, being able to boast 18 paid dancers. She herself trained under Draper as a young dancer, performed as a principal in his newly established company, and worked closely under him as he groomed her to eventually take his place. In 2003, with Draper’s death, Leverett became acting artistic director. The company has come far under her leadership, just as her choreography has gelled into a strong voice with a distinctive style, winning her personal acclaim and affording new opportunities for the company. This July, RCB’s voice will be heard all the way up to the Berkshires in western Massachusetts, where the prestigious Jacob’s Pillow Dance Festival is held for weeks every summer, typically involving more than 50 dance companies from countries around the world as well as music, art, nature and culture. Principal dancers will perform “4Play” and “Bravo!Colorado,” both signature repertoire pieces and original works by Leverett, at the free Inside/Out outdoor stage on July 19. Rochesterians will have a chance to preview the pieces in the company’s studios on July 17 as part of the free Studio Series. Leverett created the series last year as a way to offer potential audience members the opportunity to glimpse behind the scenes of a ballet company. The series has thrived, embraced by an audience eager to learn the secrets of the trade. Latecomers, finding the seating at capacity, often end up flanking the back mirrored wall or clustered around the doorway. The next Studio Series takes place in June. The dancers will be showcasing their own forays into choreography, presenting their creations to the public in the studio.

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S. Main St. RSVP. 586-0938. hicksandmccarthy.com.

Center, 700 Island Cottage Rd unityhealth.org. Wine Tasting and Art Show. May 16, 5-7 p.m. Wine Sense, 749 Park Ave. Benefit Rochester branch of English Speaking Union. Proceeds will go to High School Shakespeare Contest $5 donation 271-0590. wedefinewine.com.

[ SAT., MAY 18 ] 2013 “Roc Stylez” International Hair Competition. May 18, 6 p.m. Monroe Community College, 1000 E. Henrietta Rd $20-$35 805-751-5915. rocstylez.eventbrite.com. 35& Up Speed Dating. May 18, 4 p.m. Vibe Lounge, 302 North Goodman St. $20, register. 503-4506. verticalentertainmentny.com. 40th Anniversary Bonsai Exhibit & Sale. May 18-19, 10 a.m.5 p.m. Monroe Community Hospital, 435 E Henrietta Rd. $3-$5 admission, children under 12 free. 334-2595. bonsaisocietyofupstateny.org. Film & Dialogue: Malcolm After Mecca. May 18, 3-5 p.m. Baobab Cultural Center, 728 University Ave. RSVP. thebaobab.org. Finger Lakes Regional Invention Convention. May 18. Rochester Museum and Science Center, 657 East Ave. Included in museum admission $11-$13. rmsc.org Garden Gala. May 18, 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Cornell Cooperative Extension of Genesee County, 420 East Main St Plant sale, auction Free admission. 343-3040 x132. genesee.shutterfly.com. Gell Retreat Center Open House. May 18, 12-4 p.m. Gell Center, 6581 West Hollow Rd., Naples. Free. 473-2590 x103. wab.org. Genesee Land Trust Native Plant Sale. May 18, 8:30 a.m.-2 p.m. Brighton Town Hall, 2300 Elmwood Ave geneseelandtrust.org. Historic Spring Plant Sale. May 18, 10 a.m.-3 p.m. George Eastman House, 900 East Ave. Free admission. 271-3361. eastmanhouse.org. Mill Creek Gardeners Annual Plant Sale. May 18, 8 a.m.noon. 300 Webster Rd., Webster Free. 265-9819.

[ FRI., MAY 17 ] Film & Dialogue: Ida B. Wells: a Passion for Justice. May 17, 7 p.m. Baobab Cultural Center, 728 University Ave. RSVP. thebaobab.org. Fire on the Genesee: Civil War Encampment Day. May 1719. Letchworth State Park, 1 Letchworth State Park $8 parking fee. 493-3625. Pot Luck Dinner and program by Cathy McGrath, local Irish musician. May 17, 6-8 p.m. Burroughs Audubon Nature Club, 301 Railroad Mills Road, Victor. Bring a dish to share, as well as table service Free. 4252380. bancny.org/. RBG Real Talk: (The Ballot/ The Bullet). May 17, 5-7 p.m. Frederick Douglass Community Resource Center, 36 King St. $5. 4976139. facebook.com/pages/ Frederick-Douglass-ResourceCenter/341993564799. ROPEX/NTSS 2013 National Stamp Show. May 17, 11 a.m. Main Street Armory, 900 E. Main St. Fri 11 a.m.-6 p.m., Sat 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Sun 10 a.m.-3 p.m $2 daily admission, under 18 free. 752-6178. rochestermainstreetarmory. com. St. Ann’s Angels Wine Event. May 17. St. Ann’s Community, 1500 Portland Ave. Patron reception 6-7:30 p.m., $100; grand tasting tour 7-9:30 p.m., $45 $45-$100, register. 6976321. stannscommunity.com. Wine Dinner. May 17, 6:30 p.m. Hicks & McCarthy, 23

facebook.com/pages/MillCreek-Garden-Club-WebsterNY/286335428114229. The Victory Summit Symposium for People with Parkinson’s Rochester. May 18, 10 a.m. Radisson Riverside Hotel, 120 East Main St. Free, register. 1-888-364-6415. ow.ly/cPMe4. WNY Military Heritage Day. May 18, 10 a.m. Genesee Country Village & Museum, 1410 Flint Hill Rd. $9.50-$16.50. 5386822. gcv.org. [ SUN., MAY 19 ] All Things Gluten Free. May 19, 6:30-8:30 p.m. Lori’s Natural Foods, 900 Jefferson Rd Tastings and giveaways Free. 424-2323. lorisnatural.com. Flower City Days. May 19. Rochester Public Market, 280 N. Union St. 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Free admission. 4286907. cityofrochester.gov/ publicmarket. GCVM Red Day. May 19, 10 a.m. Genesee Country Village & Museum, 1410 Flint Hill Rd. $950-$15.50 538-6822. gcv.org. Jewish Family Service of Rochester’s 90th Anniversary Gala. May 19. Temple B’rith Kodesh, 2131 Elmwood Ave. With columnist and humorist Dave Barry $45 for show, $150 for full evening. 461-0110. jfsrochester.org. Lehigh Valley Railroad Historical Society Station Museum Open for the Season. May 19, 1-3 p.m. Lehigh Valley Railroad Historical Society Station Museum, 8 E. High St Free admission, donations welcome 289-8022. lvrrhs.org. Master Gardeners of Monroe County Plant Sale. May 19, 10 a.m. Call Nancy Goodermote for location Various prices. 461-1000. Powerful Beauty. May 19, 1-4 p.m. Powerful Beauty, 180 St Paul St. Pampering spa tasting and empowering event. A portion of the proceeds will be donated to Bivona

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of Transportation, 6393 E. River Rd $8-$10. 533-1113. nymtmuseum.org. [ MON., MAY 20 ] Worldly Approach to Wine Seminar: The Wines of Central Italy. May 20, 6 p.m. Casa Larga Vineyards, 2287 Turk Hill Rd. $45-$55, RSVP. 223-4210 x2. casalarga.com May 20, 6 p.m. Casa Larga Vineyards, 2287 Turk Hill Rd. $45-$55, register. 2234210 x2. casalarga.com.

SPECIAL EVENTS | BONSAI AND HISTORIC PLANT SALES

We’re in the midst of that odd, yet completely welcome, mixture of spring and summer weather, and everything’s blooming and thriving and making Rochester more cheerful than it was mere weeks ago. If your home or office needs the pick-me-up that the exterior world has gained, check out one of this week’s plant-oriented events and take home some new flora. George Eastman House (900 East Ave.) will host its annual Historic Spring Plant Sale on Saturday, May 18, 10 a.m.-3 p.m., offering perennials and woody plants that have been grown from seeds, divisions, cuttings, and offshoots from the George Eastman House gardens. Admission is free, and the sale will be held on the lawn near the University Avenue entrance. Eastman House members have early access to the sale at 9 a.m. For more information, call 271-3361 or visit eastmanhouse.org. The 40th Anniversary Bonsai Exhibit & Sale will take place Saturday-Sunday, May 18-19, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. at Monroe Community Hospital (435 E. Henrietta Road). Admission is $3-$5, and free to children under age 12. A bonsai demo will take place on Saturday at 2 p.m., and an Ikebana demo will be held on Sunday at 2 p.m. For more information, call 334-2595 or visit bonsaisocietyofupstateny.org. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY Child Advocacy Center $130. 415-6600. Rosemarie@ XRAAevents.com.

Trolleys, Trains, and Buses Open the Season. May 19, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. New York Museum

[ TUE., MAY 21 ] East Avenue Inn & Suites Urban Nights. May 21, 5:30-7:30 p.m. 384 East Ave $12-$15. 5466920. rddc@rddc.org. Screening: “Big Star: Nothing Can Hurt Me.” May 21, 7 p.m. The Little Theater, 240 East Ave. “One Take: Stories Through the Lens” series. Followed by a discussion with the director, Drew DeNicola, via Skype. thelittle.org.

Theater 50 Shades! The Musical. Auditorium Theater, 885 E. Main St. May 16. 5 p.m. The 7:30 p.m. performance is sold out $39.50$47.50. 222-5000. rbtl.org. “Funny Girl.” JCC Rochester, 1200 Edgewood Ave. Thu 7 p.m., Sat 8 p.m., Sun 2 & 7 p.m $18-$26. 461-2000. jccrochester.org. “If Boys Wore the Skirts.”. MuCCC, 142 Atlantic Ave Pay what you will. 866-811-4111. muccc.org. “Legally Blonde, The Musical.”. A Magical Journey Through Stages, Auditorium Center, 875 E. Main St Through May 19. Thu-Sat 7:30 p.m., Sun 2 p.m. Fri May 17 & Sun May 19 3 p.m $12-$15. 935-7173. mjtstages.com. “The Life of Leo Wool.” RAPA, 727 E. Main St Greater Rochester Repertory Companies. Through May 19. Fri-Sat May 10-11, 17-18, 7:30 p.m.; Sat-Sun May 18-19, 2 p.m $15-$20. 325-3366.

A Midsummer Night’s Dream. Through May 22. Geva Theatre Center, 75 Woodbury Blvd Through Jun 2. Wed May 15Thu 7:30 p.m., Fri 8 p.m., Sat 4 & 8 p.m., Sun 2 p.m. (Sunday Salon) & 7 p.m., Tue 6 p.m., Wed May 22 7:30 p.m Tickets start at $25. 232-4382. gevatheatre.org “My Gal Patsy.” Downstairs Cabaret Theatre Center, 540 E. Main St Sat 3 & 7 p.m., Sun 3 p.m $29-$33. 325-4370. downstairscabaret.com. “Next to Normal.” Batavia Players. Harvester 56 Theater, 56 Harvester Ave., Batavia. Thu-Sat 7:30 p.m., Sun 2 p.m $8-$10. 343-9721. Utopia, Ltd. or The Flowers of Progress. Salem United Church of Christ, 60 Bittner St OffMonroe Players. Through May 19. Fri-Sat 7:30 p.m., Sun 2 p.m Free. 232-5570. offmonroeplayers.org. “Palmer Park.” The Space Theater and Gallery, 1199 East Main Street Through May 18. $5-$15. 269-4673. outofpocketproductions.org. Rainbow Theatre Festival: “The Fat Boy.” Bread & Water Theatre, 243 Rosedale St. Through May 19. Fri-Sat 8 p.m., Sun 2 p.m. (May 19 only) $6-$12. 271-5523. BreadandWaterTheatre.org. Respect: A Musical Journey of Women. Downstairs Cabaret at Winton Place, 3450 Winton Place Thu 7 p.m., Fri 8 p.m., Sat 5 & 8:30 p.m., Sun 3 p.m $26-$39. 325-4370. downstairscabaret.com. “Seedfolks.” Wilson Foundation Academy, 200 Genesee St. May 16, 6:30 p.m. Free, donations accepted. growgreenrochester.com. ShakeCo Radio Theater: The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes. MuCCC, 142 Atlantic Ave. May 19, 7:30 p.m. Pay what you will. muccc.org. Sombras de Nuestros Rostros/ Shadows of Our Faces. MuCCC, 142 Atlantic Ave Presented by the Rochester Latino Theatre

18. Fri-Sat 8 p.m $12-$15. 340-8655. penfieldplayers.org.

Theater Audition

SPECIAL EVENT | UNCORK YOUR IMAGINATION

This week, you can attend an event that is playful in its theme while geared toward adult guests who will be enabled to help a child literacy organization. Whether or not you have children, you’ll enjoy this throwback evening of story, song, culinary delights, and community. On Thursday, May 16, 5-8 p.m., Visual Studies Workshop (31 Prince St.) will host “Uncork Your Imagination,” a children’s book-themed wine & culinary event. The evening will feature food from some of Rochester’s top restaurants paired with diverse wine selections; each booth will represent a different story. The event will also feature auction items and music featuring jazzed-up classic storybook songs, rhymes, and melodies. Tickets are $40 per person, and all proceeds will benefit Mercier Literacy for Children. Learn more about the event and the organization at mercierliteracyprogram.org/social-event.html. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY Company. Fri-Sat 7 p.m., Sun 2 & 7 p.m $10-$12. 917-224 2347. muccc.org. “Venus in Fur.”. Through May 22. Geva Theatre Center, 75 Woodbury Blvd Through Jun 2. Previews Thu-Fri 7 p.m.,

Sat 3 p.m. Opening Sat 8 p.m. Performances Sun 3 p.m., Wed May 22 7 p.m Tickets start at $27. 232-4382. gevatheatre.org. “The Villain Took a Chip Shot.”. Penfield Community Center, 1985 Baird Rd. Through May

[ FRI., MAY 17 ] 35mm: A Musical Exhibition Auditions. May 17, 6 p.m. Raymond C. Adams Cobblestone Hall, 22 West Buffalo St. Casting calls for 3 men and 2 women approximately early 20s-mid 30s. 293-3880. ccpchurchville@gmail.com. newmusicaltheatre.com. Geva Theatre Center’s 2013/14 Season. May 17. Geva Theatre Center, 75 Woodbury Blvd By appointment. 232-4382. gevatheatre.org. [ SUN., MAY 19 ] “State Fair.” May 19-20. Genesee Community College, 1 College Road Geneseo Community Players. Sun 4 p.m., Mon 6:30 p.m. Brodie Fine Arts building, room 210 5853430055. geneseocommunityplayers.org. [ TUE., MAY 21 ] “Forever Plaid.” May 21, 7 p.m. GPAS Summer Theatre. Greece Athena High School, 800 Long Pond Rd. Auditionees are asked to bring 32 bars of a “typical 1930’s/1940’s” song and are encouraged to sing from the show. An accompanist will be provided 234-5636. GreecePerformingArts.org. “Legally Blonde.” May 21-22, 6 p.m. JCC Rochester, 1200 Edgewood Ave. Roles for high school and college age performers of all races. Please come with two contrasting songs of 32 bars that are not from the show 461-2000 x1235. jccrochester.org.

Workshops [ WED., MAY 15 ] 3rd Wednesdays with Rochester Brainery and Lento: Spring Vegetables!. May 15, 6-7

p.m. Rochester Brainery, Village Gate, 274 N Goodman St. If you have any allergies, please let us know as we can accommodate them $50. 7307034. rochesterbrainery.com. Family Development Class: “Teen Responsibility.” May 15, 6-8 p.m. Mental Health Association, 320 N Goodman St. For parents of pre-teens and teens 325-3145 x131. mharochester.org

Succulents Container Workshop. May 19, 2-4 p.m. Wayside Garden Center, 124 Pittsford-Palmyra Rd Free, RSVP. 223-1222 x100. trish@ waysidegardencenter.com. Understanding your Teen: Enhancing Cooperation, Communication, and Relational Bonds. May 19, 3 p.m. Rochester Brainery, Village Gate, 274 N Goodman St. $20. 7307034. rochesterbrainery.com.

[ THU., MAY 16 ] Community Labyrinth Walk with free energy work, chair massage, and music. May 16, 7-9 p.m. First Unitarian Church, 220 S Winton Rd. Free, donations accepted. 3923601. kwhipple@rochester. rr.com. rochesterunitarian.org. Rochester Makerspace Open Nights. 6-10 p.m. Rochester Makerspace, 850 St. Paul St. #23. Bring a project to work on or something to show others, help work on the space, or just get to know the venue Free. 210--0075. rochestermakerspace.org.

[ MON., MAY 20 ] Family Development Class: “How to Say NO to Your Child.” May 20, 12:30-2:30 p.m. Mental Health Association, 320 N Goodman St. For parents of school-age children Free, RSVP. 325-3145 x131. mharochester.org. Healthy Cooking Series: Healthy Vegan Cooking. May 20, noon. Penfield Community Center, 1985 Baird Rd. $20, register. 340-8655, option 6. penfieldrec.org.

[ FRI., MAY 17 ] Enrich Your Life Through Volunteering. May 17, 1-3 p.m. Mental Health Association, 320 N Goodman St. 325-3145 x100. mharochester.org. [ SAT., MAY 18 ] Healthy Eating Series: Cooking with Kids. May 18, 12:30 p.m. Arnett Branch Library, 310 Arnett Blvd. Presenter: Lisa Barker and “Grow Green” kids Free. 428-8214. Introduction to Animation with Adobe After Effects. May 18, 1 p.m. Rochester Brainery, Village Gate, 274 N Goodman St. $20. 730-7034. rochesterbrainery.com. [ SUN., MAY 19 ] Container and Urban Organic Gardening. May 19, 1 p.m. Rochester Brainery, Village Gate, 274 N Goodman St. $30. 7307034. rochesterbrainery.com.

[ TUE., MAY 21 ] Advanced Web Development. May 21, 6:30 p.m. Rochester Brainery, Village Gate, 274 N Goodman St. $20. 730-7034. rochesterbrainery.com. African World History Class. 7:30-9 p.m. Baobab Cultural Center, 728 University Ave. $5 donation requested per session. baobab.center@yahoo. com. thebaobab.org. Family Development Class: “Responsibility: What Is It?”. May 21, 12:30-2:30 p.m. Mental Health Association, 320 N Goodman St. For parents of Children ages 5-12 325-3145 x131. mharochester.org.

GETLISTED get your event listed for free e-mail it to calendar@rochestercitynews.com. Or go online to rochestercitynewspaper.com and submit it yourself!

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 31

Movies Theaters Searchable, up-to-the-minute movie times for all area theaters can be found at rochestercitynewspaper.com, and on City’s mobile website.

Film

Brockport Strand 93 Main St, Brockport, 637-3310, rochestertheatermanagement.com

Canandaigua Theatres 3181 Townline Road, Canandaigua, 396-0110, rochestertheatermanagement.com

Cinema Theater 957 S. Clinton St., 271-1785, cinemarochester.com

Culver Ridge 16 2255 Ridge Rd E, Irondequoit  544-1140, regmovies.com

Dryden Theatre 900 East Ave., 271-3361, dryden.eastmanhouse.org

Eastview 13 Eastview Mall, Victor 425-0420, regmovies.com

Geneseo Theatres Geneseo Square Mall, 243-2691, rochestertheatermanagement.com

Greece Ridge 12 176 Greece Ridge Center Drive 225-5810, regmovies.com

Henrietta 18 525 Marketplace Drive 424-3090, regmovies.com

The Little 240 East Ave., 258-0444 thelittle.org

Movies 10 2609 W. Henrietta Road 292-0303, cinemark.com

Pittsford Cinema 3349 Monroe Ave., 383-1310 pittsford.zurichcinemas.com

Tinseltown USA/IMAX 2291 Buffalo Road 247-2180, cinemark.com

Webster 12 2190 Empire Blvd., 888-262-4386, amctheatres.com

Vintage Drive In 1520 W Henrietta Rd., Avon 226-9290, vintagedrivein.com

Film Previews on page 34

Baz Luhrmann meets F. Scott Fitzgerald “The Great Gatsby”

trepidation. The movie actually inspires one of those bad news/good news responses: the (PG-13), DIRECTED BY BAZ LUHRMANN bad news is that it is a terrifically excessive NOW PLAYING adaptation of a great book; the good news is that it is not quite as awful as I had feared. [ REVIEW ] BY GEORGE GRELLA The familiar story of Jay Gatsby (Leonardo The hype preceding the long-awaited release DiCaprio), a self-made millionaire and even of “The Great Gatsby” rivals the hoopla self-invented person, who dedicates his entire life surrounding summer blockbusters — Cartier to winning the love of Daisy Buchanan (Carey features Gatsby jewelry and Brooks Brothers Mulligan), whom he courted in the past, unfolds (naturally) offers a Gatsby line of clothing; pretty much in the manner of the novel. But there’s a video game, and who knows, maybe given a work full of visual imagery, with cinematic the toy stores will sell Gatsby action figures. As structures and scenes, the director chooses an someone who has taught F. Scott Fitzgerald’s odd approach, on the one hand literalizing the novel for many years, therefore, I approached narrative, on the other, exaggerating almost every Baz Luhrmann’s production with considerable element. While retaining much of Fitzgerald’s fine prose, for some reason he also floats many of the sentences out of the screen at the viewer in 3D. Apparently incapable of understanding the role of Nick Carraway (Tobey Maguire), the narrator, he turns him into a recovering alcoholic who writes the Leonardo DiCaprio, Carey Malligan, and Joel Edgerton in “The Great Gatsby.” novel as therapy, PHOTO COURTESY WARNER BROS. PICTURES

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which immediately robs the film of the parallels between Nick and the title character. By translating Fitzgerald into three dimensions, Luhrmann also necessarily magnifies even small moments in a tightly controlled fiction, so that when Gatsby shows his beloved Daisy his wonderful shirts, he throws them at the camera to take advantage of the special effects. All the grand parties at Gatsby’s mansion look like production numbers in an old Hollywood musical, with hundreds of people dancing, jumping up and down, diving into the swimming pool, accompanied by a full orchestra playing a weird blend of 1920’s jazz and contemporary rap. Even the final party that precedes the film’s catastrophe turns almost embarrassingly violent through its display of excessive and entirely fake rage. Although not always so exaggerated, even the interpretation of characters departs from their meaning in the novel. With his thin, reedy voice, diminutive Tobey Maguire hardly fits the Nick Carraway who generally behaves with gentlemanly restraint; instead of the narrator we must trust, and himself a Gatsby manqué, his tight suits and little bow tie often make him look distressingly like Pee-wee Herman. Although Joel Edgerton occasionally reflects the boorish arrogance of Tom Buchanan, he demonstrates such laborious effort in the part that he seems pathetically unconvincing. No matter how well his career has developed, Leonardo DiCaprio lacks the necessary

Care package “To the Wonder” (R), WRITTEN AND DIRECTED BY TERRENCE MALICK SCREENS SATURDAY AND SUNDAY AT THE DRYDEN [ REVIEW ] BY ADAM LUBITOW

innocence, charm, and sheer presence of the central character — he may be Gatsby, but he never seems great. To make the movie work, he must suggest some of Gatsby’s mystery, his mythic qualities, his difference from the people who surround him, perhaps even the reason that Nick tells him he is “worth the whole damn bunch put together,” but none of that ever emerges. Despite its many faults, the movie should entertain a great many people, perhaps even those who know and care for the novel, one of the masterpieces of 20th-century American literature. It captures in wildly exaggerated form the revolution in public morality of postwar America, the Jazz Age, the Roaring 20’s. It suggests the sense of a corruption so deep and wide that one man — Arnold Rothstein, called Meyer Wolfsheim (Amitabh Bachchan) in the book — could fix the World Series, when the automobile liberated the sex life of the young by becoming a destination as well as a vehicle, and Prohibition turned the whole populace into a nation of criminals. It seems passing strange that a brief, tightly controlled masterpiece — in most editions the novel runs less than 200 pages — should inspire such a large, loud, lavish production, but Baz Luhrmann’s work often displays what used to be called wretched excess. “The Great Gatsby” joins the ridiculously overpraised “Moulin Rouge” and the spectacular flop “Australia” as another in a list of overcooked turkeys.

Terrence Malick is a polarizing filmmaker. Some people respond to his works, in all their enigmatic glory — dreamy, abstract narratives told though hushed, halfconversations, weighty ideas contrasted against a fascination with the natural world and, always, endlessly expansive shots of sunsets. Others find his work pretentious and dull. Generally speaking, I would label myself a fan, but even I found his latest, “To the Wonder,” to be a bit of a ponderous slog at times. It’s not that there isn’t much to admire in the film; there is. But this time around, the ideas that Malick appears to be wrestling with feel wispier and more ineffable than ever before. They dissolve in the mind, leaving viewers with nothing to latch onto, or to make us care. The major characters in the film are an American named Neil (Ben Affleck) and a Frenchwoman named Marina (Olga Kurylenko) who meet while Neil

Rachel McAdams and Ben Affleck in “To the Wonder.” PHOTO COURTESY MAGNOLIA PICTURES

is abroad in Paris and fall in love. He convinces her, along with her young daughter, to move back with him to Oklahoma, where they attempt to make a life together. We watch as they fall in and out of love, then back in and out again once more, and on and on. There’s an interlude during one of the couple’s lengthier separations when Marina returns to Paris because her visa expires, and Neil begins seeing another woman, Jane (a criminally underused Rachel McAdams), his childhood sweetheart. There’s also a priest, Father Quintana (Javier Bardem), who is going through a crisis of faith, and he ties in, but only sort of, and in a way acts as the conscience of the film. He has a connection with Marina only in the sense that they share the loneliness of being foreigners living in a strange land. Neil and Marina’s story feels as though it is being told exclusively through the moments between the moments that define their relationship. Dialogue is extremely sparse; Malick might as well have made a silent film. We see the couple argue, sometimes violently, but we never hear what they’re quarreling about. They constantly shift between tender caresses and shouting matches, with an awful lot of frolicking and twirling in between. I assume it’s all meant to show the lows and the glorious highs of being in love, but mostly it makes them (Kurylenko’s character in particular) come across as bipolar. Affleck’s Neil is such a blank that it’s impossible to know how we’re supposed to feel about him. We learn so little about these two people that it wasn’t until the credits rolled that I realized the characters had even been given names. Both actors do as well as can be expected playing abstractions instead of fully developed characters. The film is, at its essence, a visual tone poem about love, in all its myriad forms and complexities, and the ways in which a person’s spiritual and emotional

wellbeing is reflected in the ways we interact with the world around us. Or something. Malick alludes to these ideas through image and sound, and it truly can’t be overstated how lovely those images are (cinematographer Emmanuel Lubezki, who also photographed Malick’s “The Tree of Life,” once again delivers Oscar-worthy work). But instead of that beauty serving as a portal for the audience to enter into the world of its characters, the film feels cold and distant with a sometimes oppressively melancholy tone. Supposedly performances from Jessica Chastain, Rachel Weisz, Amanda Peet, Barry Pepper, and Michael Sheen were all left on the cutting-room floor, but the film still feels lengthy and could have done with even more streamlining. Possibly some of that frolicking and twirling. I’m perfectly fine with a filmmaker leaving things open-ended and refusing to provide any answers, but there has to be something concrete to grasp onto aside from the pretty pictures. It’s possible to tell the story of a relationship through an abstract, disjointed narrative if you care enough about the characters themselves to feel invested in their relationship. Michel Gondry proved this with “Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind.” Gondry made us care what happened to the couple at the heart of his film, and we truly mourned when things didn’t work out between them. Malick’s love story, on the other hand, doesn’t exactly make for an emotionally satisfying viewing experience. I realize all of this has made it sound as though I think “To the Wonder” is a bad film. The movie works precisely as it was meant to, so it remains a sometimes fascinating experiment, worth seeing for its moments of brilliance and stunning imagery (it will look fantastic on the big screen). But ultimately it’s one that’s likely only to appeal to Malick’s most diehard fans.

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 33

Film Previews Full film reviews available at rochestercitynewspaper.com. [ OPENING ] BIG STAR: NOTHING CAN HURT ME (NR): This documentary turns the spotlight on influential Memphis rock band, Big Star. Little (Tue, May 21, 7 p.m.) CONFIDENTIALLY YOURS (1983): In legendary director François Truffaut’s final film, a secretary conducts her own investigation after her boss is accused of murder. Dryden (Tue, May 21, 8 p.m.) DIRTY ROTTEN SCOUNDRELS (1988): Steve Martin and Michael Caine play a pair of con men competing to be the first to swindle $50,000 out of a young heiress. Dryden (Fri, May 17, 8 p.m.) PROJECT HEALING WATERS: FLY FISHING (NR): The International Fly Fishing Film Festival makes a stop in Rochester, showing a collection of feature length and short films about the sport. Little (Fri, May 17, 6:30 p.m.) THE RELUCTANT FUNDAMENTALIST (R): A young Pakistani man living in NYC finds success on Wall Street until the events of 9/11 turn his American Dream into a nightmare. Starring Liev Schreiber, Kate Hudson, and Kiefer Sutherland. Little RUGGLES OF RED GAP (1935): When wealthy Englishmen loses his butler to a cowboy

and his wife in a game of poker, the couple brings the servant back with them to America, and the Wild West. Dryden (Wed, May 15, 8 p.m.) STAR TREK INTO DARKNESS (PG-13): Kirk, Spock and crew return in J.J. Abrams’ sequel to his massively successful reboot of the Star Trek franchise. Brockport, Canandaigua, Culver Ridge, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece Ridge, Henrietta, Pittsford, Tinseltown, Vintage, Webster THE THIN RED LINE (1998): Terrence Malick adapts James Joyce’s novel in this World War II epic starring Sean Penn, Adrien Brody, George Clooney, John Cusack, Woody Harrelson, Nick Nolte, and John C. Reilly. Dryden (Thu, May 16, 8 p.m.) TO THE WONDER (2012): See review on page 33. Dryden (Sat, May 18, 7 & 9:30 p.m.; Sun, May 19, 2 & 5 p.m.) [ CONTINUING ] 42 (PG-13): Brian Helgeland writes and directs this biopic about Jackie Robinson as he’s signed to the Brooklyn Dodgers under team GM Branch Rickey (Harrison Ford). Also starring Chadwick Boseman, Christopher Meloni, and Alan Tudyk. Canandaigua, Culver Ridge, Eastview, Geneseo, Henrietta, Pittsford, Tinseltown, Vintage, Webster THE ANGELS’ SHARE (NR): After narrowly avoiding jail, a new

Geneseo, Henrietta, Little, Pittsford, Tinseltown, Vintage, Webster IRON MAN 3 (PG-13): Shane Black (“Kiss Kiss Bang Bang”) takes over directing duties while Robert Downey Jr. reprises his role as Tony Stark in the third installment of the superhero franchise. Also starring Gwyneth Paltrow, Don Cheadle, Ben Kingsley, and Guy Pearce. Brockport, Canandaigua, Culver Ridge, Eastview, Geneseo, Henrietta, Pittsford, Tinseltown, Vintage, Webster KING’S FAITH (PG-13): A young gang member attempts to leave his criminal life behind him, but his past continues to threaten his family and faith. Henrietta, Tinseltown MUD (PG-13): Two young boys befriend a fugitive and agree to help him reunite with the love of his life and evade the authorities. Starring Matthew McConaughey, Reese Witherspoon, and Michael Shannon. Pittsford OBLIVION (PG-13): In a future where humanity has abandoned Earth, one man sent to harvest its resources begins to question the true purpose of his mission. Starring Tom Cruise and Morgan Freeman. Canandaigua, Culver Ridge, Eastview, Henrietta, Tinseltown OZ THE GREAT & POWERFUL (PG):Director Sam Raimi

father vows to improve his life for the sake of his infant son. Little THE BIG WEDDING (R): A family tries to get along during a weekend wedding celebration in this comedy starring Robert De Niro, Diane Keaton, Amanda Seyfried, Topher Grace, Katherine Heigl, Susan Sarandon, and Robin Williams. Canandaigua, Eastview, Geneseo, Henrietta, Pittsford, Tinseltown THE COMPANY YOU KEEP (R): A journalist discovers the identity of a wanted former member of militant group the Weather Underground in this political thriller directed by and starring Robert Redford. With Shia LaBeouf, Susan Sarandon, Julie Christie, Nick Nolte, Stanley Tucci, and Anna Kendrick. Pittsford THE CROODS (PG): A prehistoric family sets off on an epic journey to find a new home after their cave is destroyed in this animated family adventure film from Chris Sanders (“How to Train your Dragon”). Featuring the voice talents of Nicolas Cage, Emma Stone, Ryan Reynolds, Catherine Keener, and Cloris Leachman. Canandaigua, Culver Ridge, Eastview, Henrietta, Tinseltown THE GREAT GATSBY (PG13): See review on page 32. Brockport, Canandaigua, Culver Ridge, Eastview,

presents the previously untold story of the origins of the Wizard of Oz. Starring James Franco, Mila Kunis, Michelle Williams, and Rachel Weisz. Canandaigua, Cinema, Vintage PAIN & GAIN (R): Mark Wahlberg and Dwayne Johnson star as bodybuilders who get caught up in a kidnapping plot that goes bad in Michael Bay’s latest action extravaganza, inspired by true events. Also starring Tony Shalhoub, Ed Harris, Rob Corddry, Anthony Mackie, and Rebel Wilson. Canandaigua, Culver Ridge, Eastview, Geneseo, Henrietta, Tinseltown, Vintage PEEPLES (PG-13): Average Joe Craig Robinson crashes his rich girlfriend’s family reunion in order to ask for her hand in marriage in this comedy from producer Tyler Perry. Also starring Kerry Washington and David Alan Grier. Culver Ridge, Eastview, Henrietta, Tinseltown, Webster THE PLACE BEYOND THE PINES (R): Director Derek Cianfrance’s follow up to “Blue Valentine” stars Ryan Gosling as a small-time bank robber and Bradley Cooper as the rookie cop who’s pursuing him. With Eva Mendes. Little RENOIR (R): This French drama tells the story of Andrée Heuschling, who became the muse of impressionist painter

Pierre-Auguste Renoir as well as his son, filmmaker Jean Renoir. Little SCARY MOVIE 5 (R): The latest in the long-running series of film spoofs parodies everything from “Paranormal Activity” to “Black Swan,” with a cast that includes Charlie Sheen, Lindsay Lohan, Heather Locklear, Snoop Dogg, and Mike Tyson. Culver Ridge SIDE EFFECTS (R): Steven Soderbergh’s latest (and possibly final) film, about a young couple whose lives are torn apart when one of them is put on a new anti-anxiety drug that has some deadly side effects. Starring Rooney Mara, Jude Law, Catherine ZetaJones, and Channing Tatum. Movies 10 SNITCH (PG-13): Dwayne Johnson infiltrates a drug ring as an undercover informant in order to clear the name of his wrongly convicted son. Also starring Susan Sarandon and Barry Pepper. Movies 10 TYLER PERRY’S TEMPTATION (PG-13): A marriage counselor, unhappy in her own marital situation, faces unforeseen consequences when she begins an affair with one of her clients. Starring Jurnee Smollett-Bell (“Friday Night Lights”), Vanessa L. Williams, Brandy Norwood, and, ahem, Kim Kardashian. Culver Ridge

Classifieds For information: Call us (585) 244-3329 Fax us (585) 244-1126 Mail Us City Classifieds 250 N. Goodman Street Rochester, NY 14607 Email Us classifieds@ rochester-citynews.com EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY

All real estate advertised in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act, which makes it unlawful, “to make, print, or publish, any notice, statement, or advertisement, with respect to the sale or rental of a dwelling that indicates any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin.” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under the age of 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertisement for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. Call the local Fair Housing Enforcement Project, FHEP at 325-2500 or 1-866-671-FAIR. Si usted sospecha una practica de vivienda injusta, por favor llame al servicio legal gratis. 585-325-2500 - TTY 585-325-2547.

34 CITY MAY 15-21, 2013

Apartments for Rent STRONG / U of R / 19th WARD 1-bedroom, kitchen w/ appliances, refinished bath, small living-room. On bus-line. off-street parking. $575 includes everything! Free Cable 585-482-6009 WELCOME TO OUR neighborhood! A spacious 2-bedroom flat in a recently restored 1900’s double in the historic Park Avenue area. Living room, dining room, study, 2 bedrooms,kitchen, pantry, large sleepingporch. Off-street garage

parking, hardwood floors, laundry; basement and attic storage. Restaurants, YMCA, library, park, museums, right in your neighborhood. The Eastman Theatre, Geva, and the Little are a 5-minute drive. Available NOW! Call Dave Walsh at 585-269-4068.

Shared Housing ALL AREAS - ROOMMATES. COM. Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http://www. Roommates.com.

Real Estate Auctions SULLIVAN COUNTY REAL PROPERTY TAX FORECLOSURE AUCTION: 300+/- Properties June 13+14 @ 9:30AM. At “The Sullivan” Route 17 Exit 109. 800-243-0061 AAR. & HAR, Inc. FREE brochure: www. NYSAuctions.com

Land for Sale LAKE SALE: 6 acres Bass Lake $29,900. 7 acres 400’ waterfront

$29,900. 6 lake properties. Were $39,900 now $29,900. www.LandFirstNY.com Ends May 31st Call Now! 1-888-6832626. LENDER ORDERED SALE 5 acres - $19,900. Certified organic farm land! Views, fields, woods! Just off NY State Thruway! Terms! Call NOW! (888) 905-8847! upstateNYland.com UPSTATE NY COUNTRYSIDE SPRING LAND SALE $5,000 Off Each Lot 6 AC w/ Trout Stream: $29,995 3 AC / So. Tier: $15,995 5.7 AC On the

We placed an ad in City Newspaper advertising the availability of two office suites in my office building at 55 Canterbury Road in the City. The response was excellent. One of the two available spaces was leased within days, and we have active interest in the other space.” - DOUGLAS C. BURKHARDT, FIRST REALTY COMPANY

www.firstrealtyrochester.com

Rent your apartment special third week is

FREE

River: $39,995 Beautiful & All Guaranteed Buildable. Financing Available. Offer Ends 5/31/13. Call Now: 1-800-229-7843 www. landandcamps.com

Vacation Property OCEAN CITY MARYLAND Best selection of affordable rentals. Full/ partial weeks. Call for FREE brochure. Open daily. Holiday Real Estate. 1-800-638-2102. Online reservations: www. holidayoc.com

Retirement Property CAPE CHARLES, VA Homesite in gated golf course community, on 4th fairway w/pond & short walk to sandy beach on Chesapeake Bay & Marina Weichert Realtors 757-787-1010 or andy@masondavis.com

Home Services MASTER CHIMNEY & MASONRY See our ad under Home and Garden Professionals. Chimney Cleaning, Masonry Repairs, Foundation Repairs, Roof Leaks, Brick Steps Repaired. 585-7348444

Automotive ALWAYS BETTER Higher cash for your Junk Cars, Trucks and Vans. From $200-$800 or more for newer. Running or not. With free towing. Also free removal of any unwanted model in any condition. Call 585-305-5865 CASH FOR CARS Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid.

K-D Moving & Storage Inc.

We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888-420-3808 www. cash4car.com (AAN CAN)

Education ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from home. *Medical, *Business, *Criminal Justice, *Hospitality, Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call 888-201-8657www. CenturaOnline.com

Antiques & Collectibles BUYING/SELLING: Gold, gold coins, sterling silver, silver coins, silver plate, diamonds, fine watches (Rolex, Cartier, Patek), paintings, furs, estates. Call for appointment 917-696-2024 JAY

For Sale BOOK ENDS of race horses with jockey’s carved in wood, gift. $20 585-880-2903 DOG & CAT HOUSES Kennels, porch steps, do it yourself kits. Quick assembly 585-752-1000 $49 Jim FREE VHS MOVIES 20+ Various, including musical & comedies. Free to a good home. 585-663-6983 GARDEN, HORSE PINWHEELS (2) stick in ground. $12 bold, also Daisy Pinwheel $3 585-8802903 585-544-4155 HORSE HALTER / Black & white New $15. Quick clip 585-8802903 PRO TEC BAN SAW 9” model 3202 $40 58/5-225-5526 WEDDING: Card box, ring pillow basket, toast glasses, 2 candle

holders. Excellent, must see $50 585-392-5127 WOOD GARDEN FIGURES, 2 girls, 1 dog, stands in ground. All three $10 585-880-2903

Jam Section BRIAN MARVIN lead vocalist, is looking for a job and is looking to form band (Classic Rock) with lead guitarist, bassist, drummer & rhythm guitars Covers & originals 585-4735089

CHORALE is looking for male voices. Call for an audition now to join our fourteenth season! Info Line 377 7568 or visit our website www. gregorykundechorale.org

Music Services PIANO LESSIONS In your home or mine. Patient, experienced in¬structor teaching all ages, levels and musical styles. Call Scott: 585- 465-0219. Visit www.pianolessonsrochester.com

Place your ad by calling 244-3329 ext. 23 or rochestercitynewspaper.com Ad Deadlines: Friday 4pm for Display Ads Monday at noon for Line ads Brothers Inc, for straightening, leveling, foundation and wood frame repairs at 1-800-OLDBARN. www.woodfordbros.com. “Not applicable in Queens county”

continues on page 37

DOWNTOWN united presbyterian church Rental Space Now Available

Miscellaneous GET A FREE VACATION as well as IRS tax deduction BY DONATING your vehicle, boat, property, collectibles to DVAR. Help teens in crisis. Call: 1-800-338-6724

Call 585-325-4000 ext. 15 For additional information or to schedule an appointment to tour the building.

CLASSIC ROCK COVER BAND? Experienced Young Drummer available to play - Led Zeppelin, Rush, etc. Looking for Guitar, Bass and Vocals. Contact through: http://www.youtube.com/user/ Chaztize7

HAS YOU BUILDING SHIFTED OR SETTLED? Contact Woodford

We are proud to be located in the heart of Downtown Rochester.

HAMMOND AURORA ORGAN Nice sounding Hammond Spinet organ w/ Leslie speaker built-in. Solid state. Includes bench $500 Hurry! 585-455-5739

for Not-For-Profit Organizations

Downtown Office Space Available Immediately for Rent

THIS IS YOUR CITY

SO LIVE IN IT

UPPER MONROE- 4 BDRM House For Rent $1,400+ contact Theresa Bertolone, Email Only:

tbertolone@rochester.rr.com

CALLING ALL MUSICIANS OF ALL GENRES the Rochester Music Coalition wants you! Please register on our website. For further info: www.rochester musiccoalition.org info@rochester musiccoalition. org 585-235-8412

EXPERIENCED LEAD VOCALS Seeks employment. Pat experience Inkspots, Platters, Drifters, James Brown among many. Leroy Harris. Contact Bobby 585-328-4121 Specialties, classics, R&B Soul.

HOUSE FOR RENT

One Month Security Deposit Required Off-Street parking, Washer/Dryer, Cable Hook-up, Dishwasher, Microwave, Storage, Bus Line. Beautiful tree-lined neighborhood convenient to downtown, Monroe/ Park Avenue, Arts District, RIT & UofR. Perfect for residency student & family, or four students or professionals to share. No DSS/Section 8. No Pets, No Exceptions. ORANGE LINE TO UofR. RIT: #7 Clinton/Main then #24 RIT/Marketplace.

www.200eastavenue.com Call 585-325-7940 Today! Office Hours: Monday – Friday: 8:30 AM to 4:00 PM Saturday: By Appointment Only 11:00 AM – 2:00 PM

Two Bedroom Two Bath Penthouse Apartment Available $2475 Per Month Includes Heat, Water, Cable TV, WIFI & Parking 1205 Sq. Ft. -Vaulted Ceilings, Fireplace, Large Rooftop Balcony, Updated Kitchen with Stainless, In-Unit Washer & Dryer. Mention this ad in City for special savings offer!

R & B SOUL BANDS seek employment, experienced groups, already performing, seek new jobs. Contact Bobby 585-328-4121 THE GREGORY KUNDE

Visit Historic Churches Sacred Sites Open House Saturday, May 18th & Sunday, May 19th

Experience in office & household moving and deliveries

Big or small, we do them all

473-6610 or 473-4357 23 Arlington St. NY D.O.T.#9657

Parsells Ave. Community Church 345 Parsells Ave., Rochester, NY 14609

Saturday and Sunday 2pm-4pm St. Stanislaus Catholic Church

1124 Hudson Ave., Rochester, NY 14621

Sunday 3pm-5pm See great architecture, see stained glass, hear pipe organs and more! For further informaon about Sacred Sites grants to restore your historic church, Call 585-546-7029 ext. 24

Sponsored by:

www.nylandmarks.org/events

KdMovingandStorage.com rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 35

Home and Garden Professionals We’re TOPS In Roofing Service

82% of existing roof color choices could have been better. Let us help. We’ll send you a picture of your house showing the best color choice.

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Basement Renovations Bathrooms Kitchens Additions Windows Siding Decks Fireplaces Painting

-since 1983-

Where Art and Fine Gardening Meet • Maintenance • Pruning • Design

Robert L. Wilcox • 474-6584 gardens9@rochester.rr.com 36 CITY MAY 15-21, 2013

585-313-1940 brian54@rochester.rr.com Brian Donovan

ALL WASHED UP

WINDOW CLEANING • Window Cleaning • Power Washing • Gutter Cleaning

FREE ESTIMATES FULLY INSURED

820-6431

Place your real estate ad by calling 244-3329 ext. 23 or rochestercitynewspaper.com Ad Deadlines: Friday 4pm for Display Ads Monday at noon for Line ads > page 35

DonaldAndEsther.com. (Se habla español.) 1-800-9655617.

Adoption ADOPT: A happily married couple promises cozy home, secure future, extended family, unconditional love for baby of any race. Expenses paid. Leslie/ Daniel TOLLFREE 1-855-767-2444. danielandleslieadopt@gmail. com ADOPT: Our hearts reach out to you. Couple seek newborn bundle of joy to complete our family. Please call Maria and John (888)988-5028. johnandmariaadopt.com ADOPTION - Happily married, nature-loving couple wishes to adopt a baby. We promise love, laughter, education, and security. Expenses paid. www.

ADOPTION: A childless, married couple (ages 34/35)desire to adopt and be stay-at-home mom & devoted dad. Financial security. Expenses paid. Ellen & Chris. 1-888-701-2170

Events ***GUN SHOW-NEWSTEAD FIRE HALL*** 5691 Cummings Rd. Akron, 85 TABLES! Saturday 05/18, 9am-4pm & Sunday, 05/19, 9am-3pm. Next Show: Alexander Fireman’s Rec Hall, 06/16 www.nfgshows.com

Notices GOOD NUTRITION is the best medicine! Nearly 1,000,000 older

A cooperative effort of City Newspaper and RochesterCityLiving, a program of the Landmark Society.

(60+) New Yorkers are income eligible for SNAP – the new name for the Food Stamp Program. Let’s help older adults in Monroe County get the nutrition support they need to stay healthy. Contact the Nutrition Outreach & Education Program at MCLAC – the Rochester office of LAWNY, Inc. Call us at (585) 295-5624 or (585) 2955626 to find out if you may be eligible for SNAP. Prepared by a project of Hunger Solutions New York and NYSOTDA. This institution is an equal opportunity provider.

Lost and Found CAT MISSING Answers to Kijani (keejanee). Friendly, affectionate and curious.

continues on page 39

Find your way home with TO ADVERTISE CONTACT CHRISTINE TODAY!

CALL 244-3329 X23 OR EMAIL CHRISTINE@ROCHESTER-CITYNEWS.COM 238 English Rd, Greece, $74,900. 4 Bedroom 2 FULL BATH ranch bigger than it seems - A MUST SEE @ this PRICE! Kitchen with appliances Opens to a large family room with a wood burning stove. Call Ryan @ 201-0724 for Info.

Ryan Smith 585-201-0724

Ryan Smith

NYS Licensed Real Estate Salesperson

201-0724 RochesterSells.com

HomeWork

Search. Buy. Sell.

Here to work for you! Nino Vitale Real Estate Agent

Proudly serving the Rochester area.

CALL: 585-381-0540

Bragdon’s Cro Nest in the Park

3 Castle Park

The listing at 3 Castle Park presents a rare opportunity to own an architect’s own home in a secluded, peaceful location in the heart of the city. Famed Rochester architect, Claude Bragdon, designed the Arts and Crafts style house for himself and his wife in 1902. Located in an area favored by Rochester’s infamous crows and situated atop a hill, Bragdon dubbed the property “Cro Nest.” The current owners have lovingly cared for the property for thirty-seven years, even receiving a Historic Home Award from The Landmark Society in 2006. Cro Nest is nestled amongst a stand of trees in a serene lot at the edge of Highland Park. Approaching the house through a break in the trees on a stone path, you feel as though you are stepping down a secret pathway into a childhood fairytale. On your way to the front door, you can peak into the private front yard, which features a garden shed and a small vegetable garden. A cozy, shaded porch with a built-in bench leads to the main entrance, where the understated architectural journey begins. Fittingly, a stained glass window with a crow adorns the front door. Through the door is the entrance foyer with a coat closet and a classic Arts and Crafts style staircase. Wood floors, unpainted woodwork, simple paneled doors with original egg-shaped knobs, and leaded glass windows and doors remain in pristine and original condition throughout the home. A pocket door opens to the expansive living room. On one side is a wall of built-in

bookshelves and a built-in bench. A large bay window overlooks the scenic backyard. Opposite that is the large wood-burning fireplace with a simple wood mantel and Grueby tile. Leaded glass pocket doors lead to the dining room, which also boasts a large bay window. Off the dining room is a perfect three season porch. The kitchen can be accessed from the dining room or the front hall. It is relatively large for a house of this vintage, with the original butler’s pantry, acres of white solid surface countertops, enough room for a small dining table, and plenty of cabinets. Upstairs are four bedrooms and a full bath. The finished attic (formerly the servant’s quarters) offers extra space—two good-sized bedrooms (one with loads of built-in cabinets) and a small bath. Should you feel the need to venture from this serene location, Mt. Hope Cemetery and Highland Park are easily accessed on foot and downtown, the South Wedge, and the University of Rochester are all minutes away. With 2,798 square feet, a four-year-old tear off roof, and a new furnace, this unique property is listed at $279,000. To learn more contact realtor Mayda Mihevc at 820-4176. by Caitlin Meives Caitlin is the Preservation Planner at The Landmark Society and a self-proclaimed ROC-aholic.

email: ninovitale33@gmail.com web: vincent-associates.com rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 37

I’m very pleased with the calls I got from our apartment rental ads, and will continue running them. Your readers respond — positively!” - M. Smith, Residential Management EMPLOYMENT / CAREER TRAINING

Employment ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT Organization skills, follow through,

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New Fleet Volvo Tractors! 1 Year OTR Exp. Req.-Tanker Training Available. Call Today: 877-8826537 www.OakleyTransport.com

DEDICATED COMPANY DRIVERS Local & Regional Opportunities. $2,000 Sign On Bonus. Avg. weekly pay of $850-$1,000. Must have necessary authorization to travel into Canada. 866-7236470 www.NFITruckingJobs.com

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INTERESTED? EMAIL BETSY MATTHEWS:

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Uncommon Schools

ROCHESTER PREP

Are you an educator looking to make a difference and prepare students for college? JOIN THE ROCHESTER PREP TEAM AT OUR UPCOMING

Speed Interviewing Event! Elementary School Speed Interviewing Saturday, May 11th from 9AM – 12PM Rochester Prep Elementary School – 899 Jay St. Rochester, NY 14611.

Middle School Speed Interviewing Saturday, May 18th from 9AM – 12PM Rochester Prep West Campus – 1020 Maple St. Rochester, NY 14611.

To register for the event,

Elementary School applicants email a resume to esinterview@rochesterprep.org BY WEDNESDAY, MAY 8TH AT 5PM. Middle School applicants email a resume to msinterview@rochesterprep.org BY WEDNESDAY, MAY 15TH AT 5PM. If you are unable to aend, but are sll interested in working at Rochester Prep, apply online at www.uncommonschools.org/careers. 38 CITY MAY 15-21, 2013

Rent your apartment special third week is

FREE

Place your ad by calling 244-3329 ext. 23 or rochestercitynewspaper.com Ad Deadlines: Friday 4pm for Display Ads Monday at noon for Line ads

EMPLOYMENT / CAREER TRAINING immediately! Genuine! 1-888292-1120 www.easyworkfromhome.com (AAN CAN) $$$HELP WANTED$$$ Extra Income! Assembling CD cases from Home! No Experience Necessary! Call our Live Operators Now! 1-800-405-7619 EXT 2450 http://www.easywork-greatpay.com (AAN CAN) HIGHEST PAY In The Industry, Up To $.052 Per Mile. No Truck Older Than 2010. Call Or Apply Online Today. 800-441- 4953* DRIVEHEARTLAND.COM PAID IN ADVANCE! MAKE up to $1000 A WEEK mailing brochures from home! Helping Home Workers since 2001! Genuine Opportunity! No Experience required. Start Immediately! www. themailingstation.com (AAN CAN)

Volunteers A SECOND THOUGHT Resale Shop in East Rochester is accepting applications for

volunteer sale associates and online researchers. Shop benefits people with disabilities in Guatemala. Call (585) 340-2000. ARE YOU 55+ & interested in learning about local volunteer opportunities? Call RSVP! Many opportunities available. Help meet critical needs. Regular information sessions - call 2876377 or email jpowers@lifespanroch.org. CATHOLIC FAMILY CENTER needs volunteers to help people apply for citizenship. The commitment is 2.5 hrs per mth one evening a month. Training is provided. For more information call Nate at (585) 546-7220 ex 4854. DYNAMIC VOLUNTEER opportunities at the Zoo await you. If you love the Zoo, donate your time today. To learn more, visit the volunteer page of the Seneca Park Zoo’s Web site at www. senecaparkzoo.org FOSTER PARENTS WANTED! Monroe County is looking for

adults age 21 and over to consider opening their homes to foster children. Call 334-9096 or visit www.MonroeFosterCare.org. Monroe County, 585- - ad #3, Start 03/23/11 4X • Page 1 GIRLS ROCK ROCHESTER seeking musical and nonmusical volunteers for rock ‘n’ roll summer camp staff. Applications now available at girlsrockrochester.com. Email girlsrockrochester@gmail.com for more info. HABITAT FOR CATS — Help Trap-Neuter-Return cats on Tuesdays, in East Rochester, for an important grant project. Impact the number of owner-less cats living outside. All training provided. 585-787-4209 or habitat4cats@yahoo.com! HERITAGE CHRISTIAN STABLES, a therapeutic horsemanship program for children and adults with developmental disabilities, is looking for volunteers to serve as horse leaders and side walkers. Call Kim

> page 37 Kennedy at (585) 3402016 or email kkennedy@ heritagechristianservices.org HOPE HALL Recruiting volunteers to call sponsors and assist with events. Please contact: Michele Kaider-Korol, Development Associate at Hope Hall, (585) 426-5824 x111. LIFESPAN’S OMBUDSMAN PROGRAM s looking for volunteers to advocate for individuals living in long-term care settings. Please contact call 585.287.6378 or e-mail dfrink@lifespan-roch.org for more information LITERACY VOLUNTEERS OF ROCHESTER needs adult tutors to help adults who are waiting to improve their reading, writing, English speaking, or math skills. Call 473-3030, or check our website at www.literacyrochester.org

Business Opportunities START A HOME BASED BUSINESS. Part-time or FullTime. Serious inquires only. 585271-3243

Career Training ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home. *Medical, *Business, *Criminal Justice, *Hospitality. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV authorized. Call 800-481-9472 www. CenturaOnline.com (AAN CAN)

Last seen Tuesday, 5/7/13 on Broadway between Griffith and S. Union Sts., Male, neutered, slim build, gray tiger with striking markings. Approximately 4 years old. Substantial Reward. Call 585 201-8091 or email: rnr@rn-r. net LEFT @ BROWNCROFT Garage Sale Saturday May 4, glass lilac plate , box of decorative gels, toy purse 585-654-8253

WOMEN: ROCHESTER HABITAT is looking for women 18 years+ to help build a house with a single mother. Visit rochabitat.org or call 546-1470

P LY M O U T H S P I R I T UA L I S T C H U R C H Together We Are One

2 9 V I C K PA R K A RO C H E S T E R , N Y

Sunday Services 10:30 AM All Message Service & Free Spiritual Healing Third Weds ~ 7 PM ~ Séances ~ Classes ~ Gallery Reading ~ For more information and schedules www.plymouthspiritualistchurch.org Robin Higgins, Pastor ~ Phone: 585.271.1470

LIFEGUARDS & SWIM INSTRUCTORS

TECHNICAL SALES US Water Services is the fastest growing industrial water treatment company in the U.S. As a Technical Sales Rep you will receive competitive pay & benefits by working for one of the most respected companies in the industry. As a seasoned sales professional (3-5 years Boiler, Cooling and Waste water industry sales experience) you leverage a high technical aptitude to grow your territory through new business acquisition while maintaining and growing and existing account base. Results matter and you are passionate about not only meeting, but exceeding sales goals. At U.S. Water Services, you can launch an exciting career with an industry leader while helping impact a customer's water footprint on all levels.

Please send your resume to: mhancock@uswaterservices.com

The Bay View Family YMCA is looking for experienced life guards and swim instructors to work a variety of shis. Day, night and weekend shis available.

Apply online at

www.rochesterymca.org/bayview or call Anne Hossenlopp at 341-3218 for details Equal Opportunity Employer

CITY TO ADVERTISE HERE CALL CHRISTINE AT 244-3329 x23 and book your ad today!

THE BAY VIEW FAMILY YMCA

1209 Bay Rd., Webster, NY 14580 www.rochesterymca.org/bayview 585-671-8414 rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 39

Legal Ads [ LEGAL NOTICE ] C4 VENTURES LLC, a domestic Limited Liability Company (LLC) filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on May 1, 2013. NY office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of any process against the LLC served upon him/her to the LLC, 51 Orchard Hill Drive, Spencerport, New York 14559. General purposes. [ LEGAL NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of A&M Liquor Store, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (“SSNY”) on March 17, 2013. Office location: Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to LLC at 3118 E Henrietta, Henrietta, NY 14467. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ LEGAL NOTICE ] Notice of formation of Rochester Home Inspections & Engineering, PLLC a Professional Limited Liability Company. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of N.Y. (SSNY) on 03/04/2013. Office location Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of PLLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The PLLC, 1065 Wickerton Lane, Webster, NY 14580 Purpose: practice the profession of Engineering. [ LEGAL NOTICE ] ROCHESTER BEER RUN LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 4/1/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 66 Alliance Ave., Rochester, NY 14620. General Purposes. [ LEGAL NOTICE ] ROCHESTER GENESEE REGIONAL TRANSPORTATION AUTHORITY NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING TO BE HELD ON MAY 29, 2013 PURSUANT TO SECTION 1299ii OF THE PUBLIC AUTHORITIES LAW AND SECTIONS 201-204 OF THE EMINENT DOMAIN PROCEDURE LAW IN CONNECTION WITH THE 2013 CAMPUS IMPROVEMENT

PROJECT. PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that a public hearing, open to all persons, will be held on May 29, 2013 at the Rochester Genesee Regional Transportation Authority (“RGRTA”) John G. Doyle Jr. Administration Building, located at 1372 East Main Street, Rochester, New York, 14609, commencing at 6:30 p.m. (doors and registration will open at 6:00) by RGRTA, pursuant to Sections 201-204 of the New York State Eminent Domain Procedure Law (“EDPL”) and Section 1299ii of the New York State Public Authorities Law, to consider the proposed acquisition by condemnation of certain property, as hereafter described, in furtherance of the construction of the proposed 2013 Campus Improvement Project (the “Project”). The purposes of the public hearing are to review the public use to be served by the Project and the impact of the Project on the environment and residents of the locality where the Project is proposed to be constructed, pursuant to Article 2 of the EDPL, and to give all interested persons an opportunity to present oral or written statements and to submit other documents concerning the Project and the acquisition of property to be acquired. The public purpose of the Project is to improve the overall efficiency of RGRTA’s Regional Transit Service (RTS) operations and regular servicing and maintenance activities at RGRTA’s RTS Campus at 1372 East Main Street. More specifically, the Project is needed to (i) provide an adequate number of on-site designated bus parking areas, with the maximum number of spaces located indoors; (ii) improve the capacity and efficiency of maintenance and servicing operations at the campus; (iii) maintain adequate secured employee parking; (iv) improve vehicular and pedestrian safety on campus; and (v) address on-site deficiencies that are adversely affecting daily operations and limiting RGRTA’s ability to plan for and accommodate future anticipated growth. An additional goal of the Project is to limit disturbances from RGRTA operations on surrounding residents. Project Location and Description RGRTA is proposing to improve operations at its existing RTS transportation campus, located on

40 CITY MAY 15-21, 2013

approximately 16.5 acres at 1372 East Main Street in the City of Rochester, Monroe County, New York. The Project will include renovations to and expansion of the existing Operations Building; construction of a new Maintenance Warehouse Building; developing new indoor and outdoor bus parking spaces and staging areas for buses waiting for maintenance; construction of a new Service Building; providing a new employee parking area to replace the parking displaced by the new Maintenance Warehouse Building and Service Building; and other site improvements. Proposed Property Acquisition The proposed property acquisition involves the exercise by RGRTA of its power of eminent domain, either with or without negotiated agreements, on the following properties: 104-106 Chamberlain Street-Tax Map Parcel No 107.61-3-37; 36-38 Chamberlain Street-Tax Map Parcel No 107.691-32; 42 Chamberlain Street-Tax Map Parcel No 107.69-1-33; 46 Chamberlain Street-Tax Map Parcel No 107.691-34; 58 Chamberlain Street-Tax Map Parcel No 107.69-1-36.001; 580-582 Hayward Avenue-Tax Map Parcel No 107.61-3-36; 586 Hayward Avenue-Tax Map Parcel No 107.613-35; 587-589 Hayward Avenue-Tax Map Parcel No 107.69-1-19; 591593 Hayward Avenue-Tax Map Parcel No 107.691-20; 592 Hayward Avenue-Tax Map Parcel No 107.61-3-34; 596 Hayward Avenue-Tax Map Parcel No 107.61-3-33; 597 Hayward Avenue-Tax Map Parcel No 107.691-21; 60 Chamberlain Street-Tax Map Parcel No 107.69-1-37; 601 Hayward Avenue-Tax Map Parcel No 107.69-1-22; 602 Hayward Avenue-Tax Map Parcel No 107.613-32; 603-605 Hayward Avenue-Tax Map Parcel No 107.69-1-23; 608 Hayward Avenue-Tax Map Parcel No 107.61-3-31; 614 Hayward Avenue-Tax Map Parcel No 107.613-30; 618 Hayward Avenue -Tax Map Parcel No 107.61-3-29; 62 Chamberlain Street- Tax Map Parcel No 107.691-38; 66-68 Chamberlain Street- Tax Map Parcel No 107.69-1-39; Receipt of Comments All persons having an interest in the Project are invited to attend the public hearing to give oral or written statements and to submit other documentation concerning this proposed publicly needed

project. ACCORDING TO EDPL §202(C)(2), THOSE PROPERTY OWNERS WHO MAY SUBSEQUENTLY WISH TO CHALLENGE THE CONDEMNATION OF THEIR PROPERTY VIA JUDICIAL REVIEW, MAY DO SO ONLY ON THE BASIS OF ISSUES, FACTS, AND OBJECTIONS RAISED AT THE HEARING OR IN WRITING DURING THE PUBLIC COMMENT PERIOD. Comments on the Project and the proposed acquisition may be made orally or in writing at the public hearing on May 29, 2013, or presented in writing to RGRTA’s address shown below or emailed to RTSCIP2013comments@ rgrta.com on or before June 12, 2013. Please include “EDPL COMMENTS” in the subject line of e-mail correspondence. Comments received after the close of business on June 12, 2013 will not be considered. Rochester Genesee Regional Transportation Authority Attn: Myriam T. Contiguglia 1372 East Main Street Rochester, New York 14609 Lisa G. Berrittella RGRTA In House Counsel Dated: May 13, 2013

[ NOTICE ]

[ NOTICE ]

[ NOTICE ]

Articles of Organization with respect to Flat Decor, LLC, a New York Limited Liability Company, were filed with the Secretary of State of New York on March 6, 2013. The County in New York State where its office is located is Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent of Flat Decor, LLC upon whom process against it may be served, and the post office address to which the Secretary of State shall mail a copy of any process against Flat Decor, LLC served upon him or her is 2 Old Brick Circle, Pittsford, New York 14534. There are no exceptions adopted by the Company, or set forth in its Operating Agreement, to the limited liability of members pursuant to Section 609(a) of the Limited Liability Company Law of the State of New York. Flat Decor, LLC is formed for the purpose of operation of an importing and exporting business, domestic retail and wholesale sales and any other activities that are lawful for a limited liability company in the State of New York.

C6 MOBILITY LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 3/20/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, Attn: David M. Sprout, Manager, 1222 Waterbrook Xing, Webster, NY 14580. General Purposes.

Not. of Form. of Bay View Investors LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 4/16/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may mail a copy of any process to LLC. 8265 Ridge Rd Brockport, NY 14420. Purpose: any lawful purpose.

[ NOTICE ]

Not. of Form. of RUNWAY BAZAAR, LLC, Art. Of Org. filed with Sec’y of State (SSNY) 04/12/2013. Office Location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY may mail a copy of any process to LLC. 16 Breezewood Court, Fairport NY 14450. Purpose: any lawful activities.

[ NOTICE ]

[ NOTICE ]

1913 Cruiser Hardtop, Gordon Santos, date of auction, May 31, 2013 9am, Voyager Boat Sales

ATMOSTFIT LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 3/4/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Howard Charles Cragg, 515 Bay Rd., Webster, NY 14580. General Purposes.

[ NOTICE ] 1950 Thunderbird Sailboat, Homemade Jeffrey Amering, date of Auction May 31, 2013 9am. Voyager Boat Sales [ NOTICE ] 1970 Cal Model 29. John Ogden, date of auction May 31, 2013 9am Voyager Boat Sales [ NOTICE ] 1990 Sea Ray HIN#ERM6533 H990270DA0066, John E Lacy, date of auction 05/31/13 9am, Voyager Boat Sales [ NOTICE ] A1-AC, LLC filed Articles of Organization with the New York Department of State on March 15, 2013. Its office is located in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent of the Company upon whom process against it may be served and a copy of any process shall be mailed to 574 Melwood Drive, Rochester, New York 14626. The purpose of the Company is any lawful purpose.

[ NOTICE ] BROWN, GRUTTADARO, GAUJEAN & PRATO, PLLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 4/29/13. Office in Monroe Co. SSNY desig. agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 19 Prince St., Rochester, NY 14607, which is also the principal business location. Purpose: To practice Law. [ NOTICE ] C&D REMODELING, LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 2/12/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Edward R. Dundas, 91 Leroy St., Rochester, NY 14612. General Purposes.

CONDUSTAR NY3, L.P. formed as a Limited Partnership (LP) in NY. The office is located in the County of Monroe. The Cert. of LP was filed with the Department of the State of NY on 3/27/2013. The Secretary of the State of NY (“SSNY”) is designated as agent upon whom process against the LP may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of any process against it served upon him to: 2255 Lyell Ave. #201, Rochester NY 14606. The latest date on which the LP is to dissolve is: 12/31/2050. The name and address of the General Partners are available from the Secretary of State. The purpose of the LP is any lawful act. [ NOTICE ] Fiona’s Hard Goods LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 4/2/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 536 Glenview Court, Webster, NY 14580. General Purposes [ NOTICE ] FIXINGFOX, LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 3/19/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, Attn: Arthur Alves, Mgr., 5 Monroe Ave., Pittsford, NY 14534. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] New China 1 of Henrietta LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with SSNY on 11/26/2012. Office location: Monroe county. SSNY has been designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to LLC at 3118 E. Henrietta, Road, Henrietta, NY 14467. Purpose: Any lawful activity

[ NOTICE ]

[ NOTICE ] Not. of Form. of Simply Superior Sales, LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 2/11/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY may mail a copy of any process to LLC. 923 Lothario Circle, Webster, NY 14580. Purpose: any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of 381-383 GENESEE LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 3/18/2013. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 590 Salt Road, Ste. 5, Webster NY 14580. Purpose: any lawful act. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Acrospire Management LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 3/25/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: National Registered Agents, Inc., 111 Eighth Ave., 13th Fl., NY, NY 10011, also the registered agent. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of All-Star Shenanigans, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 4/10/2013. Office location, County of

Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, P.O. Box 20664, Rochester, NY 14602. Purpose: any lawful act. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of Big Green Lawns, LLC Art. of Org. filed Secy of State of NY (SSNY) on 04/17/2013. Office location: Monroe County. The SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY may mail copy of any process to the LLC at 24 Raymond St. Rochester, NY 14620. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Callea Family Holdings, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 4/18/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, c/o Sammy Feldman, 3445 Winton Place, Ste. 228, Rochester, NY 14623. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Cambridge Park, LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 2/20/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 88 Sugar Tree Circle, Brockport, NY 14420. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of CC Interactive Marketing Services, LLC, Art.of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 02/26/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 118 Kirklees Rd; Pittsford, NY 14534. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of GCG Renovations, LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 4/5/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 8 Donlin Dr., Rochester, NY 14624. Purpose: any lawful activities.

Legal Ads [ NOTICE ]

[ NOTICE ]

Notice of Formation of GENETT PROPERTIES, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 04/18/13. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 142 Pinnacle Rd., Pittsford, NY 14534. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, Attn: Frederick J. Genett at the princ. office of the LLC. Purpose: Any lawful activity.

Notice of Formation of KREAG-WOOD EAST, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 3/21/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, c/o Todd Clicquennoi, 44 Exchange Blvd., Rochester, NY 14614. Purpose: any lawful activity.

[ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of Good Living Properties, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 4/26/2013. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 32 Town Pump Circle, Spencerport NY 14459. Purpose: any lawful act. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Greater Rochester Premier Hockey, LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 3/20/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 93 Roselawn Ave., Fairport, NY 14450. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of INDIEVISIBLE LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 05/03/13. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 200 Park Ave., Rochester, NY 14607. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to John M. Maggio at the princ. office of the LLC. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of IQM360 LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 3/22/2013. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o Law Office of Anthony A. Dinitto, L.L.C., 8 Silent Meadows Dr., Spencerport, NY 14559. Purpose: any lawful act.

[ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of LEONE DEVELOPMENT - HERITAGE COMMONS, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 04/24/13. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 20 Lancer Pl., Webster, NY 14580. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY. NAME: 5435 WEST RIDGE ROAD, LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 04/16/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to the LLC, 122 Sherwood Drive, Hilton, New York 14468. Purpose: For any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] NOTICE OF FORMATION of NFE/GREENWOOD TERRACE, LLC (“LLC”) Art. of Org. filed with NY Secretary of State (“NYSOS”) on 9/12/2002, pursuant to LLC Law Section 203. Office location: Monroe County. NYSOS is designated as service of process agent for LLC. NYSOS shall mail copy of process served to: Chamberlain, D’Amanda, etal., Attn: Jerry R. Greenfield, Esq., 1600 Crossroads Bldg., Two State St., Rochester, NY 14614. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] NOTICE OF FORMATION of NFE/LEISURE VILLAGE, LLC (“LLC”) Art. of Org. filed with NY Secretary of State (“NYSOS”) on 9/12/2002, pursuant to

LLC Law Section 203. Office location: Monroe County. NYSOS is designated as service of process agent for LLC. NYSOS shall mail copy of process served to: Chamberlain, D’Amanda, etal., Attn: Jerry R. Greenfield, Esq., 1600 Crossroads Bldg., Two State St., Rochester, NY 14614. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] NOTICE OF FORMATION of NFE/MARINE MEMORIAL, LLC (“LLC”) Art. of Org. filed with NY Secretary of State (“NYSOS”) on 9/12/2002, pursuant to LLC Law Section 203. Office location: Monroe County. NYSOS is designated as service of process agent for LLC. NYSOS shall mail copy of process served to: Chamberlain, D’Amanda, etal., Attn: Jerry R. Greenfield, Esq., 1600 Crossroads Bldg., Two State St., Rochester, NY 14614. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] NOTICE OF FORMATION of NFE/PINEVIEW, LLC (“LLC”) Art. of Org. filed with NY Secretary of State (“NYSOS”) on 9/12/2002, pursuant to LLC Law Section 203. Office location: Monroe County. NYSOS is designated as service of process agent for LLC. NYSOS shall mail copy of process served to: Chamberlain, D’Amanda, etal., Attn: Jerry R. Greenfield, Esq., 1600 Crossroads Bldg., Two State St., Rochester, NY 14614. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] NOTICE OF FORMATION of NFE/WILLIAMS COURT, LLC (“LLC”) Art. of Org. filed with NY Secretary of State (“NYSOS”) on 9/12/2002, pursuant to LLC Law Section 203. Office location: Monroe County. NYSOS is designated as service of process agent for LLC. NYSOS shall mail copy of process served to: Chamberlain, D’Amanda, etal., Attn: Jerry R. Greenfield, Esq., 1600 Crossroads Bldg., Two State St., Rochester, NY 14614. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of PCC Capital Group LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State on 4/23/13. Office location: Monroe County. Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to:

c/o Nixon Peabody LLP, 1300 Clinton Square, Rochester, NY 14604, principal business address. Purpose: all lawful purposes. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of Power Train Sports East Rochester LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 3/26/2013. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 1026 Sunset Trail, Webster NY 14580. Purpose: any lawful act. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of THE RED FERN CAFE, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State on 3/4/13. Office location: Monroe County. Principal business address: 223 Dartmouth Street, #3, Rochester, New York 14607. Secy. of State designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. Secy. of State shall mail process to: 223 Dartmouth Street, #3, Rochester, New York 14607. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of UPSTATE POWER MANAGEMENT, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 04/18/13. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 32 Marway Circle, Rochester, NY 14624. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of UrHome(s), LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 4/9/2013. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 11 Folkestone Lane, Penfield, NY 14526. Purpose: any lawful act. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of VALLEYCREST CONSULTING LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 1/17/2013. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be

served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o The LLC, 156 Valley Crest Road, Rochester NY 14616. Purpose: any lawful act. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of ADR NY Dist. LLC. Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 4/11/13. Office location: Monroe County. LLC formed in OH on 4/2/13. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. OH and principal business address: 5300 Tod Ave. SW, Lordstown, OH 44481. Cert. of Org. filed with OH Sec. of State, 180 E. Broad St., Columbus, OH 43215. Purpose: all lawful purposes. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of CT Rochester, LLC. Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 5/2/13. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. bus. addr.: 7 Jackson Walkway, Providence, RI 02903. LLC formed in DE on 6/22/11. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. DE addr. of LLC: c/o The Corporation Trust Co., 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: any lawful act or activity. [ NOTICE ] RGRTA 2013 Campus Improvement Project Environmental Assessment Notice of Availability Summary This is to announce the release of an Environmental Assessment (EA) for the proposed construction of the 2013 RGRTA Campus Improvement Project at 1372 East Main Street in Rochester, New York, as required under the Council on Environmental Quality regulations at 40 CFR 1506.6, Federal Transit Administration (FTA) regulations under 23 CFR 771.119(d), the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969 and in accordance with Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966, the State Historic Preservation Act of 1980, and Executive Order

12898 for Environmental Justice. The EA has been prepared with the FTA by the Rochester Genesee Regional Transportation Authority (RGRTA), in conjunction with RGRTA’s request for FTA funding of this project. The FTA is serving as the Lead Agency for the purpose of the NEPA review. Availability Viewing locations for the EA are listed below. The document can also be downloaded from the RGRTA web site at www. rgrta.com. RGRTA 1372 E. Main Street Rochester, New York 14609 Federal Transit Administration, Region 2 Office One Bowling Green, Room 429 New York, NY 10004 City of Rochester Bureau of Architecture and Engineering 30 Church Street, Room 300B Rochester, New York 14614 Monroe County Public Library – Sully Branch Thomas P. Ryan Center 530 Webster Avenue Rochester, NY 14609 Monroe County Public Library – Winton Branch 611 Winton Road North Rochester, NY 14609 Supplementary Information RGRTA is proposing to improve operations at its existing Regional Transit Service (RTS) transportation campus, located on approximately 16.5 acres at 1372 East Main Street in the City of Rochester, Monroe County, New York. The Project will include renovations to and expansion of the existing Operations Building; construction of a new Maintenance Warehouse Building; developing new indoor and outdoor bus parking spaces and staging areas for buses waiting for maintenance; construction of a new Service Building; providing a new employee parking area to replace the parking displaced by the new Maintenance Warehouse Building and Service Building; and other site improvements. To facilitate the project, RGRTA is proposing to acquire 21 parcels adjacent to its existing campus on Chamberlain Street and Hayward Avenue. RGRTA will also request that the City of Rochester de-map the portion of Hayward Avenue between Chamberlain Street and the existing RGRTA property boundary. Public Hearing FTA and RGRTA will hold a public hearing on: Wednesday, May 29, 2013 RGRTA, John G. Doyle Jr. Administration Building, 1372 East Main Street, Rochester, NY 6:30PM to 8:30PM with a brief presentation at

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Legal Ads > page 41 7:00PM A stenographer will record all public comments made on the EA at the public hearing. The hearing will include a brief presentation on the project and other informational materials. Please visit the RGRTA web site at www.rgrta. com or call RGRTA at 585-654-0601 for further information regarding the public hearing or if you require special assistance. Written Comments Written comments on the Environmental Assessment will be accepted by RGRTA until 5:00 PM on June 12, 2013. Public comments regarding impacts to historic resources under Section 106 of the National Historical Preservation Act and the State Historic Preservation Act will also be accepted. Please send written comments to: 2013 Campus Improvement Project Environmental Assessment c/o RGRTA 1372 East Main Street Rochester, NY 14609 Comments may also be provided electronically via email to

RTSCIP2013comments@ rgrta.com. Please include “Environmental Assessment” in the subject line of e-mail correspondence. [ NOTICE ] RIVER CITY AIRSOFT CLUB LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 2/11/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 351 Huffer Rd., Hilton, NY 14468. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] Rochester Lice Treatment & Removal, LLC has filed Articles of Organization with the Secretary of State on 3/26/13. Its office is located in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent upon whom process against it may be served and a copy of any process will be mailed to the LLC at 1919 Hickory Lane, Honeoye Falls, NY 14472. The purpose

of the LLC is any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] SARA’S GARDEN AND NURSERY, LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 2/21/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Kathleen Kepler, 389 East Ave., Brockport, NY 14420. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] SGA TOUR, LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 4/12/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 594 Van Alstyne Rd., Webster, NY 14580. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] SUPREME COURT COUNTY OF MONROE WELLS FARGO BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS

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TRUSTEE FOR THE POOLING AND SERVICING AGREEMENT DATED AS OF MARCH 1, 2004 FIRST FRANKLIN MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST 2004-FFH1 ASSET- BACKED CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2004-FFH1, Plaintiff, Against SHANNON WARDEN; et al, Defendant(s) Pursuant to a judgment of foreclosure and sale duly entered 4/15/2013, I, the undersigned Referee will sell at public auction at the Front Vestibule of Monroe County Office Bldg., 39 W. Main St., Rochester, NY on 6/11/2013 at 1:00 pm premises known as 42 Pearwood Road, Rochester, NY 14624. ALL that certain plot piece or parcel of land, with the buildings and improvements thereon erected, situate, lying and being in the Town of Gates, Monroe County, New York. Section 119.200 Block 0004 Lot 042 Approximate amount of lien $76,497.12 plus interest and costs; premises will be sold subject to provisions of filed judgment Index # 2011-7118 Bryan Oathout, Esq., Referee Leopold & Associates, PLLC, 80 Business Park Drive, Suite 110, Armonk, NY 10504 Dated: 4/22/2013 File Number: 707128468 gs [ NOTICE ] SYANDA GROUP LLC (LLC) filed Arts. of Org. with NY Secy. of State (SS) on 4/11/13. LLC’s office is in Monroe Co. SS is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS shall mail a copy of any process to 620 Park Avenue, Suite 157, Rochester, NY 14607. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] YARIV PAZ, LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 4/5/13. Office in Monroe Co. SSNY desig. agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 2255 Lyell Ave., Rochester, NY 14606, which is also the principal business location. Purpose: Any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] YP ROCHESTER 1, LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 4/5/13. Office in Monroe Co. SSNY desig. agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 2255 Lyell Ave., Rochester, NY 14606, which is also the principal business

42 CITY MAY 15-21, 2013

location. Purpose: Any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR AUTHORITY OF FOREIGN LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY ] The name of the foreign limited liability company is, Quantem Aviation Services, LLC (the “LLC”). The application for Authority was filed with the NY Secretary of State (“NYSS”) on February 08, 2013. The Articles of Organization were filed in the Delaware Secretary of State (“DSS”) on July 21, 2010. The office of the LLC is located in Monroe County. The NYSS has been designated as agent of the Company upon whom process against it may be served, and a copy of any process shall be mailed to Corporation Service Company, 80 State St, Albany, NY 12207. A copy of the Articles of Organization can be obtained from the DSS at John G. Townsend Bldg, 401 Federal St, Ste 4, Dover, DE 19901. The purpose of the Company is any lawful business. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY ] The name of the Limited Liability Company (LLC) is Motherhood Matters, LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of NY (“SSNY”) on March 28, 2013. Office location is Monroe County, New York. The SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. The SSNY shall mail a copy of any process to the LLC at 249 Hollywood Avenue, Rochester, New York 14618. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] Name: CHRISTOPHER J. CALABRESE, P.L.L.C. Arts. Of Org. filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 04/04/2013. Office Location: Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to: C/O CHRISTOPHER J. CALABRESE, P.L.L.C., 45 Exchange Street, Rochester, New York 14614. Purpose: Any Lawful Purpose. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] Name: KENT WOODS LLC. Arts. Of Org. filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 05/08/2013.

Office Location: Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to: C/O KENT WOODS LLC, One East Main Street, 10th Floor, Rochester, New York 14614. Purpose: Any Lawful Purpose. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] Notice of Formation of Wood Team Limo, LLC. Articles of Organization filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on March 8, 2013. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to principal business location: The LLC, 2171 Monroe Avenue, Rochester, NY 14618. Purpose: any lawful activity [ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] Young Lioness LLC filed Articles of Organization with the New York Department of State on 01/18/2013. Its office is located in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent of the Company upon whom process against it may be served and a copy of any process shall be mailed to 17 Mulberry Street, Rochester NY 14620. The purpose of the Company is any lawful business. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION ACCURET LLC ] Articles of Organization filed with Secretary of State of NY (“SSNY”) on 03/21/2013. Office in Monroe County. SSNY designated agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to ACCURET LLC, C/O JOHN S. HERBRAND, ESQ., ONE CHASE SQUARE, SUITE 1900, ROCHESTER, NY 14604. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION HOME CARE OF WESTERN NEW YORK, LLC ] Articles of Organization filed with Secretary of State of NY (“SSNY”) on 04/24/2013. Office in Monroe County. SSNY designated agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to HOME CARE OF WESTERN NEW YORK, LLC, C/O SUSAN BENNETT, 340 OXFORD ST., ROCHESTER, NY 14607. Purpose: any lawful activity.

[ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY ] GAMACA HOLDINGS, LLC has filed Articles of Organization with the Secretary of State on March 7, 2013. Its office is located in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent upon whom process against it may be served and a copy of any process will be mailed to 508 Pipeline Way, Webster, NY 14580. Its business is to engage in any lawful activity for which limited liability companies may be organized under Section 203 of the New York Limited Liability Company Act. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY ] Notice of formation of 21 Vinal Avenue LLC. Art. of Org. filed by Sec. of State of NY (SSNY) on 4/30/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. NYSS shall mail process to: Susan Kramacyk, 214 Heberle Rd., Rochester, NY 14609. Purpose: Any lawful act or activity. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY ] The name of the limited liability company is OSCAR’S VISION, LLC (the “LLC”). The Articles of Organization of the LLC were filed with the NY Sec. of State on April 25, 2013. The office of the LLC is located in Monroe County, New York. The NY Sec. of State is designated as the agent of the LLC upon whom process in any action or proceeding against it may be served, and the address to which the NY Sec. of State shall mail a copy of process in any action or proceeding against the LLC is: c/o LLC, 1529 Old Penfield Road, Penfield, New York 14526, and also shall mail to: c/o LLC, 20831 Evergreen Mills Road, Leesburg VA 20175. The LLC is to be managed by one or more members. The business purpose of the LLC is to carry out any lawful act or activity for which limitedl liability companies may be organized pursuant to the NY Limited Liability Company Law. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY

COMPANY ] The name of the limited liability company is SUNSTAR MANAGEMENT, LLC(the “LLC”). The Articles of Organization of the LLC were filed with the NY Sec. of State on April 29, 2013. The office of the LLC is located in Monroe County, New York. The NY Sec. of State is designated as the agent of the LLC upon whom process in any action or proceeding against it may be served, and the address to which the NY Sec. of State shall mail a copy of process in any action or proceeding against the LLC is: c/o LLC, 5565 Vardon Drive, Canadaigua, NY 14424. The LLC is to be managed by one or more members. The business purpose of the LLC is to carry out any lawful act or activity for which limited liability companies may be organized pursuant to the NY Limited Liability Company Law. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LLC ] Development Awareness Associates, LLC has filed articles of organization with the New York Secretary of State on April 17, 2013. Its principal place of business is located at 7 Caversham Woods, Pittsford, New York in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent upon whom process may be served. A copy of any process shall be mailed to 7 Caversham Woods, Pittsford, New York 14534. The purpose of the LLC is to engage in any lawful activity for which Limited Liability Companies may be organized under Section 203 of the New York Limited Liability Company Law. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LLC ] M & E Properties Five, LLC has filed articles of organization with the New York Secretary of State on April 26, 2013. Its principal place of business is located at 1599 Highland Avenue, Rochester in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent upon whom process may be served. A copy of any process shall be mailed to 1599 Highland Avenue, Rochester, New York 14618. The purpose of the LLC is to engage in any lawful activity for which Limited Liability Companies may be organized under Section 203 of the New York Limited Liability Company Law.

Fun [ NEWS OF THE WEIRD ] BY CHUCK SHEPHERD Caribou Baby, a Brooklyn, N.Y., “eco-friendly maternity, baby and lifestyle store,” has recently been hosting gatherings at which parents exchange tips on “elimination communication” — the weaning of infants without benefit of diapers (as reported in April by the New York Times). Parents watch for cues, such as a certain “cry or grimace” that supposedly signals that the tot urgently needs to be hoisted onto a potty. (Eventually, they say, the potty serves to cue the baby.) Dealing with diapers is so unpleasant, they say, that cleaning an occasional mess becomes tolerable. The little darlings’ public appearances sometimes call for diapers, but can also be dealt with by taking the baby behind the nearest tree. One parent even admitted, “I have absolutely been at parties and witnessed people putting their baby over the sink.”

Can’t Possibly Be True

-- Washington, D.C.’s WRC-TV reported in March that a woman from the Maryland suburbs showed a reporter a traffic citation she had just received, ticketing her for driving in the left lane on Interstate 95 in Laurel while going only 63 mph -- compared to the posted (“maximum”) speed of 65. The citation read, “Failure of driver ... to keep right.” The station’s meteorologist noted that winds that day were gusting to 40 mph and that the woman might simply have been trying to control her car. -- The principal and head teacher at a Godalming, England, special-needs school were reported by employees in March for allowing a student with selfharm issues to cut herself, under staff supervision. (Unsted Park School enrolls

kids aged 7 to 19 who have high-functioning autism.) Teachers were to hand the girl a sterilized blade, wait outside a bathroom while she acted out, checking up on her at two-minute intervals, and then dress the girl’s wounds once she had finished. The school reportedly abandoned the policy six days after implementing it. -- Last year, according to Chicago’s WBBM-TV, Palmen Motors in Kenosha, Wis., sold a brand-new GMC Terrain SUV to an elderly couple, 90 and 89, in which the husband was legally blind and in hospice care, on morphine, and the wife had dementia and could barely walk. According to the couple’s daughter, it was her brother, David McMurray, who wanted the SUV but could not qualify financially and so drove his mother from Illinois to Kenosha to sign the documents while a Palmen employee traveled to Illinois to get the father’s signature (three weeks before he passed away, it turns out). An attorney for Palmen Motors told the TV station that the company regretted its role and would buy the vehicle back.

Democracy Blues

-- The city council of Oita, Japan, refused to seat a recently elected member because he refused to remove the mask he always wears in public. Professional wrestler “Skull Reaper A-ji” said his fans would not accept him as authentic if he strayed from his character. Some masked U.S. wrestlers, and especially the popular Mexican “lucha libre” wrestlers, share the sentiment. (At press time, the issue was apparently still unresolved in Oita.)

[ LAST WEEK’S SOLUTION ON PAGE 39 ]

[ LOVESCOPE ] BY EUGENIA LAST ARIES (March 21-April 19): You’ll meet someone, but you must ask specific questions to find out their current status. You’ll be subject to changing your mind, so take any relationship you consider getting into slowly. Honesty will lead to a good friendship and the possibility of a long-term commitment. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Put a little pressure on someone if you want to get to know him or her better. Making plans that are hard to resist will intrigue and entice that special person. That followed by a chance to see how you live firsthand should seal the deal. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): False impressions along with ulterior motives are present. Keep your distance from anyone you feel is not telling you the

truth or is offering you something that is too good to be true. Make sure you are upfront about your situation and living arrangements as well. CANCER (June 21-July 22): Participation will be your entry into interesting conversations, opportunities and emotional relationships. Share your dreams, hopes and wishes, and someone will want to work toward the same goals. Personal stability and security can be yours to share with someone just as loving and caring as you. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Your generosity will attract someone eager to move into an intimate relationship. Before you make a commitment, consider your motives. Slow down, test the waters and keep your eyes open for

someone less needy or demanding. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Work on friendships and get to know the ins and outs of anyone who interests you before you give an inkling that you may want more. Deception and disillusionment are apparent, and you are likely to be disappointed if you jump into an intimate relationship too quickly. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Love at first sight will tempt you. Before jumping into a situation that appears perfect, question your motives. If you are tired of being alone or unhappy with someone you are currently with, you may be willing to overlook whether this new relationship is feasible. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Don’t let love cost you. Back away from anyone offering you everything

without actually giving you anything. Deception and disillusionment are present and will leave you in a vulnerable position -- should you believe what you are being told. Don’t get angry; do a background check. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): You’ll have an opportunity to become intimate with someone from a different background than you. Before you travel down that path, go over what you have in common and what you don’t. Tradition and family issues are likely to arise. Be sure it’s worth it before you engage. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Your bravado and confidence will attract attention and entice someone who wants to be taken care of emotionally, physically and financially. Make sure

this is what you want and that you get something worthwhile in return. A lack of equality will wear thin pretty fast. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Love and romance are highlighted, and socializing will lead to a change in the way you live. You can reconnect with someone from your past, or you will discover you have feelings for someone you least expect. An unusual relationship will capture your interest and your heart. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Easy does it. What you think you are getting and what you end up with will not be the same. Trying to be something you are not or expecting someone else to be more like you will cause problems down the road. Avoid overindulgent partners. rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 43

44 CITY MAY 15-21, 2013


May 15-21, 2013 - City Newspaper