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EVENTS: IMAGINE RIT, ROC CITY TATTOO EXPO

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FILM: “THE COMPANY YOU KEEP,” “MUD”

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FEATURE: “AN EARLY WORK LATE IN LIFE”

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RESTAURANT REVIEW: OPA AUTHENTIC GREEK KOOZINA

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CROSSWORD, NEWS OF THE WEIRD

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CHINESE CHORAL SOCIETY OF ROCHESTER • CODES • TWENTY ONE PILOTS • STILL HAND STRING BAND • MELANIE • AND MORE MUSIC, PAGE 18

MAY 1-7, 2013 Free

Greater Rochester’s Alternative Newsweekly

Vol 42 No 34

News. Music. Life.

I don’t try to play reckless. That’s just the way I play.” MUSIC PROFILE, PAGE 20

The next foodtruck frontier? The ‘burbs. NEWS, PAGE 6

East End garage SOS. NEWS, PAGE 5

Javert talks “Les Miserables.” THEATER, PAGE 26

City’s 4th Annual Best Busker Contest is May 2! DETAILS, PAGE 24

DEVELOPMENT | BY CHRISTINE CARRIE FIEN AND MARY ANNA TOWLER | PAGE 3 & 8 | PHOTO PROVIDED

Rochester’s apartment boom If you’ve been trying to track down Rochester Mayor Tom Richards, odds are good you can catch him at a ribbon cutting. Richards and a revolving cast of supporting characters have been snipping their way around the city, welcoming each new addition to Rochester’s seemingly endless parade of apartment projects. But how many apartments are too many? The population of Monroe County is not and has not

been growing at any significant rate, and one of the entrenched problems facing the City of Rochester is that it’s overbuilt — too much housing, not enough people. So who is going to live in all these new apartments, lofts, townhouses? City has the story behind Rochester’s apartment boom, while Publisher Mary Anna Towler goes behind the scenes of one project in particular, a controversial apartment proposal for University Avenue (pictured), in this week’s Urban Journal.


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Refusing the tests

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MAY 1-7, 2013

Some of us coached our children to refuse six days of state exams last month. Some of us coached our kids to take the exams and understand that they are a meaningless measure. Some of our children who refused sat still for 90 minutes each of six days – nine hours total – not being allowed to read (in school!) and having extracurricular activities taken away. Some of our children who refused were supported by their teachers. Others faced threats of detention and suspension. Others were marked absent despite being present in school. Many were lied to, saying their test performance would affect their grade. More than 200 moms and dads from 16 area school districts have come together to share information about coaching our children to refuse New York State math and ELA tests. Why? First, the test is a snapshot from which the kids’ annual performance is measured – like a beauty contest being measured by the contestants’ driver’s license photograph. It’s just not a good measure. Another reason is concern over how the test scores are used. The New York State Education Department’s plan is to use scores to measure building performance and teacher performance, yet the scores are not reported on the child’s report card. Classroom teachers are not given the scores from the tests, so they cannot actually use them to help a child learn. Nine hours of test taking, plus the pre-test preparation and practice: Think of the worthy classroom learning crowded out by this waste of time. And we are merely halfway through the testing season. Still to come are the science and social studies tests. Also of concern is what is being tested. The new Common Core curriculum was not in the hands of many teachers in September.

Regardless of the quality of this curriculum, teachers did not have the material that the test covers. This is why administrators predict dismal scores this year. Parents have a concern about children being set up for failure. Lastly, the tests are an intrusion on the classroom, not a part of the learning process. I understand that superintendents must require schools to implement these tests, because superintendents are pressured from the state. In turn, the state is pressured from the federal government to implement the Common Core, which requires these standardized tests. This is a cycle of bullying which has nothing to do with the classroom, nothing to do with teachers, nothing to do with children. Children are pawns. The beautiful thing is that children have the power to stop this cycle. This is why my daughter, in eighth grade, refused to take these tests last year. She had no adverse effects on her report card or on placement for the next year. Refusing actually empowered her. If you’re interested in learning more to make an informed decision for your child during May’s fourth and eighth grade science and social studies test and June’s field testing, join the Great Rochester Opt Out on Facebook. (School districts in which children refused to take ELA and Math tests are Brighton, ByronBergen, Fairport, Honeoye FallsLima, Marion, Newark, Penfield, Pittsford, Rochester, Rush Henrietta, Sodus, Spencerport, Victor, Wayland Cohocton, West Irondequoit, and Williamson.)

Missing from this account is that Rochester has more schools of education per capita than any other city in the country, in an area with steady K-12 enrollment decline. And despite what Dr. Hursh thinks, many are diploma mills and have taken no responsibility for the lack of quality of their graduates’ teaching. Another fact missing is that none of the private ed schools in Rochester were willing to submit data on their admissions in a national study on the quality of teacher prep programs. Easy to claim you are selective and fabulous in the dark. These college kids are taking on a lot of debt. They deserve to know about the quality of their teacher prep program. DARLING DYAN

Posted on rochestercitynewspaper.com

Ban drilling near the lakes

OMG... After the public meeting in Springwater and 400 comments, the state thinks they only need to clarify their intention not to drill on the land? (“Hemlock-Canadice Plan not Clear Enough on Drilling,” News) The intention was perfectly clear from the beginning, and that’s why people reacted so strongly. Just put it in writing that oil and gas drilling is forever prohibited/ banned on this land. It’s that simple, and there will never be any need to clarify intentions again. TOM JANOWSKI

Posted on rochestercitynewspaper.com

Boston’s bombings

Becoming a teacher is a very costly and time-consuming process, especially considering the relatively low salary (“Turned Off to Teaching,” News). In addition to completing two degrees, you have to pay to take three state certification exams ($90 each), get fingerprinted ($100), and pay about $50 for the certificate itself. Plus the requirements are constantly changing; I had a hard time getting straight answers about anything when I was studying to be a teacher.

“The bombers also win if, in our anger and fear, we start profiling classes of immigrant Americans” (Violence on the Mind,” Urban Journal). We Americans lose if we fail to learn any lessons from this. “...some politicians, debating immigration reform in Washington, are bringing the Boston Marathon bombings into the discussion.” Like discussing the Newtown tragedy in the discussion about gun control. “And shouldn’t we talk, at last, about the relationship between our culture of violence and the violence that takes place in this country?” How about the culture of violence in Chechnya that the bombers brought with them?

SARAH

HEADINTHESAND

Posted on rochestercitynewspaper.com

Posted on rochestercitynewspaper.com

BETH LAIDLAW, ROCHESTER

Teaching trauma

News. Music. Life. Greater Rochester’s Alternative Newsweekly May 1-7, 2013 Vol 42 No 34 250 North Goodman Street Rochester, New York 14607-1199 themail@rochester-citynews.com phone (585) 244-3329 fax (585) 244-1126 rochestercitynewspaper.com Publishers: William and Mary Anna Towler Editor: Mary Anna Towler Asst. to the publishers: Matt Walsh Editorial department themail@rochester-citynews.com Features editor: Eric Rezsnyak News editor: Christine Carrie Fien Staff writers: Tim Louis Macaluso, Jeremy Moule Music editor: Willie Clark Music writer: Frank De Blase Calendar editor: Rebecca Rafferty Contributing writers: Paloma Capanna, Casey Carlsen, Roman Divezur, George Grella, Susie Hume, Andy Klingenberger, Dave LaBarge, Kathy Laluk, Michael Lasser, James Leach, Adam Lubitow, Ron Netsky, Dayna Papaleo, Suzan Pero, Rebecca Rafferty, Deb Schleede, David Yockel Jr. Editorial intern: Jason Silverstein Art department artdept@rochester-citynews.com Art director/production manager: Matt DeTurck Designers: Aubrey Berardini, Mark Chamberlin Photographers: Mark Chamberlin, Frank De Blase, Michael Hanlon Advertising department ads@rochester-citynews.com Advertising sales manager: Betsy Matthews Account executives: Nancy Burkhardt, Tom Decker, Annalisa Iannone, William Towler Classified sales representatives: Christine Kubarycz, Tracey Mykins Operations/Circulation kstathis@rochester-citynews.com Circulation manager: Katherine Stathis Distribution: Andy DiCiaccio, David Riccioni, Northstar Delivery, Wolfe News City Newspaper is available free of charge. Additional copies of the current issue may be purchased for $1, payable in advance at the City Newspaper office. City Newspaper may be distributed only by authorized distributors. No person may, without prior written permission of City Newspaper, take more than one copy of each weekly issue. City (ISSN 1551-3262) is published weekly by WMT Publications, Inc. Periodical postage paid at Rochester, NY (USPS 022-138). Send address changes to City, 250 North Goodman Street, Rochester, NY 14607. City is a member of the Association of Alternative Newsweeklies and the New York Press Association. Subscriptions: $35.00 ($30.00 for senior citizens) for one year. Add $10 yearly for out-of-state subscriptions: add $30 yearly for foreign subscriptions. Due to the initial high cost of establishing new subscriptions, refunds for fewer than ten months cannot be issued. Copyright by WMT Publications Inc., 2013 - all rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, photocopying, recording or by any information storage retrieval system without permission of the copyright owner.


URBAN JOURNAL | BY MARY ANNA TOWLER

City should turn down University Ave. project It’s not an attractive piece of property right now: a blacktopped parking lot and a mid-1920’s stucco house on University Avenue, to which nondescript, architecturally inappropriate extensions have been affixed. The property is the home of the Monroe Voiture veterans group, which holds its own events there, rents space to 14 other non-profit organizations, including several other veterans groups, and occasionally rents its dining space for outside functions. Morgan Management – a Rochester firm with numerous apartment complexes in the area – hopes to take over the property, demolish the veterans’ building and build a new one for them, and build a large apartment building, three and four stories high, with 102 one- and twobedroom units. For the veterans, the Morgan development is a very good deal. In return for their property, they would get a brand new home, and Morgan would take over the maintenance and utility costs for at least the next 99 years. Morgan must get approval from both the Rochester Preservation Board and the Planning Commission, and that process starts next week. On May 8, Preservation Board members will listen to public comments and then make their own remarks. Board members won’t vote, but, says Peter Siegrist, a preservation planner for the City of Rochester, “we urge our members to make pretty solid comments.” That will provide “a sense of how the Preservation Board feels,” Siegrist says. Those comments will be sent to the Planning Commission, which will meet on May 20, take comments from the public, and vote. If the Planning Commission approves the project, the application will then go back to the Preservation Board for a vote. Morgan Management has revised its plans several times in response to neighborhood concerns. It has lowered the number of apartments to 102 from the initial 110 and increased the number of parking spaces to 164, from 139. And it has dramatically changed the exterior. Once an undistinguished structure resembling something in a suburban office park, it now looks like a building on a college campus, with brick on the University Avenue façade and brick and hardy plank on the sides and rear. There would be 62 one-bedroom and 40 two-bedroom units, 132 underground parking spaces, and 32 above ground spaces, the latter reserved for the Monroe Voiture. Rents for the apartments would be $1100 to $1500, and Morgan vice president Kevin Morgan says the company

The Morgan proposal is inappropriate for the preservation district, is too big for the site, and is bad city planning. anticipates that tenants would be young professionals and empty-nesters. To many public officials, new residential development is attractive, particularly in the City of Rochester, which has been losing population. The project would put tax-exempt property back on the city’s tax rolls. And unless all of the residents moved there from nearby, it would put more people in the neighborhood, adding to life on the street in that area – and, presumably, providing customers for nearby restaurants and other businesses. With those advantages, the proposal might be expected to breeze through the approval process. But the Morgan project is in the East Avenue Preservation District, where demolition, new construction, and even minor exterior changes to a property are strictly regulated. The Preservation Board will consider whether the Morgan proposal is appropriate for the site and for the preservation district. The Planning Commission will consider landuse issues such as density, parking, and traffic. Both groups should deny the proposal. It is inappropriate for the preservation district. It’s too big for the site. It requires the demolition of an existing house. It dramatically changes the streetscape and the continues on page 13 rochestercitynewspaper.com

CITY 3


[ NEWS FROM THE WEEK PAST ]

Possible RGH and Unity merger Rochester General Health System and Unity Health System are pursuing a formal partnership, according to a statement from RGH. It could take months to develop the plans, and as long as two years to get the necessary governmental approvals, the statement says. Rochester General Hospital is home to the fourth largest cardiac care center in New York.

MCH director stays

Monroe County Democrats are seeking more information from County Executive Maggie Brooks about alleged patient abuse at Monroe Community Hospital. State officials issued a report questioning MCH Executive Director Todd Spring’s treatment of an amputee. Spring will remain in the job, according to county officials. Minority leader Willie Lightfoot has been critical of what he says is the lack of accountability at MCH.

Duffy dead last

The political website City & State ranked lieutenant governor and former Rochester mayor Bob Duffy last among New York’s top 100 power bro-

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MAY 1-7, 2013

kers. Duffy lagged behind several publicists and political reporters. Mayor Tom Richards says Duffy’s ranking is not accurate.

News

Dems question picks

Democrats in the Monroe County Legislature criticized two potential appointments to the Monroe County Airport Authority. Charles Stuart and John Perrone serve on or have ties to local development corporation boards that have come under scrutiny by the state Comptroller’s Office. County Executive Maggie Brooks submitted the names, and the Legislature has to vote on them.

Changing how phone books are delivered could mean few piles of unwanted or unused directories. PHOTO BY MARK CHAMBERLIN

Power struggle

State Senator Ted O’Brien and Assembly Majority Leader Joe Morelle touted a Public Service Commission directive on the Indian Point nuclear power plant. The plant provides electricity for downstate customers, but its permits expire within the next couple of years and may not be renewed. A plan proposed by Consolidated Edison and the New York Power Authority to replace the energy called for upstate ratepayers to help foot the bill. But the PSC said upstate ratepayers shouldn’t have to pay for the project.

ENVIRONMENT | BY JEREMY MOULE

Directory dilemma In San Francisco, if you want a copy of the yellow pages, you have to ask for it. City law prohibits delivery of the phone books to anyone who hasn’t specifically requested them. A similar opt-in system could cut down on the number of unwanted or unused phone books that sit in piles at Rochester-area apartment buildings and office complexes, says Frank Regan, chair of the local Sierra Club’s Zero Waste Committee. And Regan says he and other like-minded club members are planning to start a campaign for a local opt-in law. Frontier Communications publishes two directories, one for

residential listings and one for business listings. The residential phone book is already distributed on an opt-in basis, says Desiree Demanincor, the company’s director of directory services and operations. But anyone who doesn’t want the business directory has to say so. Frontier sells ads in its business directory, which contains white and yellow page listings, so the company wants to make sure as many people as possible see and use it, Demanincor says. Frontier published and distributed approximately 500,000 business directories this year, all

printed on recycled paper, she says. The delivery contractor reported receiving notes from 102 customers asking not to get the books, she says. And if Frontier is notified of unused phone books lying around, it will pick them up, she says. “We want to be a good neighbor,” Demanincor says. Frontier is not the only yellow pages publisher in the Rochester area; Yellowbook also produces a directory. To opt out of delivery of any local phone book, go to www. yellowpagesoptout.com.


The East End garage needs approximately $5 million in high-priority maintenance, including repairs to the concrete deck and repair or replacement of the garage’s drainage system. “This is major, not just aesthetics.” LAURA MILLER, CITY PARKING CHIEF

Cost of War The following people have been killed in the City of Rochester in recent weeks: -- Kyle Georgia, 20, Rochester

ROCHESTER TOTALS —

SOURCE: Rochester Police Department AFGHANISTAN TOTALS —

DEVELOPMENT | BY CHRISTINE CARRIE FIEN

ENVIRONMENT | BY JEREMY MOULE

East End S O S

Cleaner air

The East End garage needs millions of dollars in repairs or it will have to be shut down within two to three years, said Laura Miller, the City of Rochester’s new parking director, at a City Council work session last week. The garage needs approximately $5 million in high-priority maintenance, Miller said, including repairs to the concrete deck and repair or replacement of the garage’s drainage system. “This is major, not just aesthetics,” she said. Miller also outlined $2 million in nonemergency repairs to the garage, including repair or replacement of the elevators, and sign and lighting work. The East End is a thriving area of the city and the garage gets a lot of use. The garage, which can hold 1,300 vehicles, opened in 1981. An addition was put on in the early 1990’s. The garage came up in discussions about the future of the Cultural Center Commission. The commission, which is funded jointly by the City of Rochester and Monroe County, was founded in 1979 to help revitalize the area around the Eastman School of Music and Gibbs Street. Mayor Tom Richards noted that Eastman officials were concerned about the deterioration in the immediate area and were talking about moving the school to the University of Rochester’s River Campus.

Each year, the American Lung Association ranks the air quality of the country’s largest metro areas. And this year’s State of the Air Report has good news for Monroe County. | The county received an A grade for ground-level ozone, and a B for short-term particle pollution. The report, which is based on averages from 2009 to 2011, says the county had no days with high ozone levels and less than one day when short-term particle pollution was a problem. | Four years ago, Monroe County received an F on ozone pollution and a C on short-term particle pollution. Both of the pollutants are the result of burning fossil fuels, particularly coal and diesel gasoline. And they can pose risks to people with respiratory or cardiovascular problems. | The Lung Association says that, nationally, particle pollution is down because of cleaner diesel formulas and advances in engine technology. It’s likely that local residents also benefit from RG&E’s decision to shut down the coal-fired Russell Station power plant in 2008. | Michael Seilback, vice president of public policy and communications for the Lung Association’s Northeast office, says the same factors would contribute to a decrease in ozone. He says actions that decrease one air pollutant often decrease others, too.

Y’s T I C

The East End garage. PHOTO BY MARK CHAMBERLIN

The commission created a cultural district plan to help control and encourage development in the area. The East End garage was part of the plan, and since then, the Sagamore on East, Metro YMCA, and other projects have been built. But the commission sold its last property — 1.5 acres across from the Eastman School known as Block F — in 2011, and is probably no longer needed, officials said. The city would take ownership of the East End garage, and the commission’s remaining assets would be split between the city and the county. The city would get $3.3 million, with the county’s share being $248,000. City officials said their share of the money would be used for garage repairs. And a public hearing will be scheduled on the dissolution of the commission.

2,207 US servicemen and servicewomen and 1,081 Coalition servicemen and servicewomen have been killed in Afghanistan from the beginning of the war and occupation to April 29. Statistics for Afghan civilian casualties are not available. American casualties from April 9 to 27: -- Pfc. Barrett L. Austin, 20, Easley, S.C. -- Capt. Aaron R. Blanchard, 32, Selah, Wash. -- 1st Lt. Robert J. Hess, 26, Fairfax, Va. -- Capt. Brandon L. Cyr, 28, Woodbridge, Va. -- Capt. Reid K. Nishizuka, 30, Kailua, Hawaii -- Staff Sgt. Richard A. Dickson, 24, Rancho Cordova, Calif. -- Staff Sgt. Daniel N. Fannin, 30, Morehead, Ky. iraqbodycount. org, icasualties.org, Department of Defense

SOURCES:

THURSDAY, MAY 2

THROUGHOUT ROCHESTER’S EAST END

MORE DETAILS ON PAGE 24 Full list of musicians, Facebook Event link, details & updates at:

ROCHESTERCITYNEWSPAPER.COM rochestercitynewspaper.com

CITY 5


BUSINESS | JEREMY MOULE

Suburbs: the next food truck frontier May 1 could be a watershed moment for local food trucks. That’s when the Henrietta Town Board is scheduled to take up Brick-N-Motor’s request for permission to operate a truck at the Eagle’s Landing Business Park on Jefferson Road. The board postponed the request last month. “We took that as a small victory because it wasn’t a ‘no,’” says Paul Vroman, who co-owns the food truck with Nathan Hurtt. Brick-N-Motor had stopped at the office park two days a week for six months. They had the property owner’s permission and employees welcomed the truck. But on March 15, Henrietta officials told Vroman and Hurtt they couldn’t operate in the town without a permit. Hurtt drove to Town Hall and started the application process that day. But Brick-N-Motor’s situation illustrates a broader issue. Rochester’s food trucks are a burgeoning business, and local laws haven’t necessarily caught up. Before Henrietta, the food truck debate hadn’t played out publicly in any of the suburbs. Each town and village has its own laws and requirements that could apply to the trucks. And as the businesses expand their range, operators and officials will undoubtedly have questions about where the trucks can operate legally and profitably. “It’s a learning process for everyone, and I think that the best thing we can do is work together,” Vroman says. That’s what’s happening in the City of Rochester, which has been the center of the local food truck scene. Over the past year or two especially, there’s been much debate between truck owners, customers, and city officials about where the trucks can and should operate. For example, city codes have kept the trucks out of the downtown area: a market the operators are keen to enter. (Food carts are allowed downtown under certain conditions.) But cooperation between truck operators and city officials is bearing some fruit. The city will start a downtown pilot program for food trucks in June. Several predetermined spots will be set aside for the trucks. Henrietta officials have opposed permit requests from mobile food vendors in the

past. Generally, the requests have been to operate carts, not trucks. Town Board member Bill Mulligan says the argument against the mobile vendors is that they are unfair competition to the town’s 150 or so restaurants, and that they don’t pay property taxes, own buildings, or need to hire employees. And on some occasions, cart operators have asked for permission to set up close to other restaurants, he says. 6 CITY

MAY 1-7, 2013

But Mulligan is ready to support BrickN-Motor’s request. He says the truck is performing a service to the people at Eagle’s Landing, who have no food Brick-N-Motor has applied for a permit in the town of Henrietta. Owners Paul Vroman and Nathan Hurtt want to operate at an office park in the town. FILE PHOTO options within the park — unless vending machines count. And there says, because they’d eat into already limited are few dining options in the immediate parking and they’d compete with restaurants. vicinity, Mulligan says. Food trucks would be harder to “This is a guy trying to get started, and accommodate, Corby says. They’re bigger, hopefully if he does well, at some point down can serve more people, and can generate the road he will build a building or buy a noise. Corby says that about 10 years building and operate a full-scale restaurant,” ago, the village received an application Mulligan says. “I’m very upbeat about it. I for a food truck, but there were too many think it has some merit.” obstacles and the request was denied. The Town Board member Jack Moore says he Gates Town Board is considering a permit also wants to find a way to allow the trucks, request to operate a food cart at Offas long as they’re not directly competing with Track Betting on Marway Circle. A public the town’s restaurants. hearing is set for May 6. “To me, it’s a very new, creative way of Gates has a few requirements for serving the public,” Moore says. applicants seeking a vendor permit, says Supervisor Mark Assini. Applicants have Brick-N-Motor isn’t the only food truck to prove that the property owner has given making suburban stops. Trucks have been permission to operate on the site. They also operating in Perinton, Pittsford, Brighton, must have set operating hours and health and other trucks even make occasional stops department permits. And the town will in Henrietta. determine the safest spot on the property for There are business opportunities in the vendor to locate, Assini says. the ‘burbs, including isolated office parks, The Town of Penfield has similar says Lizzie Clapp, co-owner of the Le Petit requirements, though officials there leave it Poutine food truck and co-founder of the up to the applicant to propose a spot on the Rochester Food Truck Alliance. But Clapp chosen site. The town’s Zoning Board reviews says she and other alliance leaders encourage the application and decides whether to food trucks to operate only where they’re permitted. Le Petit Poutine generally operates license a vendor, says Jim Costello, the town’s director of developmental services. Among in the city. the criteria it considers: whether the proposed In some of the suburbs, the trucks are regulated under the same statutes as food carts. location interferes with traffic or pedestrian For about 10 years, the Village of Pittsford circulation, and whether it interferes with emergency access. has allowed a hot dog cart to operate on a “We just haven’t had anybody knocking town-owned spot along North Main Street. on our door for them at this point in time,” But Mayor Bob Corby says that’s one of Costello says. only a few places a cart would be allowed. The village won’t let carts within the central business district or along Schoen Place, he

Paul Vroman makes tacos inside the Brick-N-Motor truck. FILE PHOTO


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CITY 7


Rochester’s

2

APARTMENT

BOOM

DEVELOPMENT | BY CHRISTINE CARRIE FIEN PHOTOS | BY MARK CHAMBERLIN

If you’ve been trying to track down Rochester Mayor Tom Richards, odds are good you can catch him at a ribbon cutting. Voters Block, Bridge Square, Frederick Douglass, Carriage Factory.... Richards and a revolving cast of supporting characters have been snipping their way around the city, welcoming each new addition to Rochester’s seemingly endless parade of apartment projects. And with the eventual redevelopment of the Sibley building, Midtown Tower, and many other projects in various stages, the mayor is well-advised to keep the scissors, and maybe a good pair of running shoes handy.

But how many apartments are too many? The population of Monroe County as a whole is not and has not been growing at a significant rate, and one of the entrenched problems facing the City of Rochester is that it’s overbuilt — too much housing, not enough people. So who’s going to live in all these new apartments, lofts, townhouses? Experts say it’s you, the empty nester, looking to downsize to a simpler lifestyle. And you, the millennial, who’s rediscovered the allure of urban living. And you, average guy, who isn’t satisfied with the older housing stock available; you want the latest and greatest. The suburban market is much harder to get a handle on because it’s not really a “market” so much as 29 individual towns and villages, each with its own distinct market and submarkets. Henrietta is seeing a real trend of residents looking for apartments and has several projects under construction or in the pipeline, says town Supervisor Mike Yudelson. And a Brighton official says residents there are increasingly asking for different housing options. But what are the consequences of building, building, building when the population is essentially stagnant? Are you just shuffling people around, stealing residents from one town or one part of the city to populate another? What happens to

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MAY 1-7, 2013

the towns and city neighborhoods on the losing end? And with no regional mechanism to plan or track development, how do you know when you hit a saturation point? At least one local developer has pulled out of the suburban market altogether, saying demand was drying up. The demand in the city is strong, he says, for now. “You do have this new, nascent trend of demand that is directly centered around the City of Rochester,” says James Costanza, president of Costanza Enterprises, a local real estate management and investment firm. “And you’ve had dozens of new rehab projects, where you’ve taken old buildings and you’ve created new apartments. That demand is still healthy. But one asks, when does this healthy trend become unhealthy and unbalanced with too much supply? And frankly, I’m not sure I have the answer to that.” A complex web is driving the City of Rochester’s apartment boom. One factor is household formation, which, simply put, is the number of households in existence. Fewer households were formed during the recession, but that number, by many accounts, seems to be bouncing back. Young people afraid to leave the nest because of the shaky economy are crawling out of their parents’ basements to strike out on their own. And more people have been holding off on marriage, getting married much later in life than they did 20 years ago, says Kent Gardner, chief economist and chief research officer for the Center for Governmental Research. Those people are starting to show up in the housing numbers. “So part of it is pure demographics,” he says. “There are more housing units needed because there are more separate households.” The other issue, he says, is market

demand for a more diverse housing stock. Data shows that retiring baby boomers are in large measure looking to dump the singlefamily home for townhouses, condos, or patio homes, Gardner says. “And because we’ve got this great big bulge of baby boomers entering retirement age now, a lot of what’s going to be happening in the residential housing market is going to be a shift toward different housing stocks,” he says. And city officials say there’s also a shift occurring in household demographics in that households are much smaller than they used to be. Over the next two decades, more than 80 percent of new households formed will be one- and two-person households, says Heidi Zimmer-Meyer, president of Rochester Downtown Development Corporation. And that’s the prime demographic for the new urban lifestyle, she says. “These new adults-only households won’t give a hoot about the quality of local schools or the size of their back yards,” writes Jeff Speck in his 2012 book, Walkable City. Millennials, the generation born in the late 1970’s or early 1980’s to the early 2000’s, represent the biggest population bubble in the United States in 50 years, Zimmer-Meyer says, and 77 percent plan to live in America’s urban cores. “Pop culture is driving some of this, and tastes and desires have been changing,” she says. “More people want authenticity in their housing and neighborhoods; density now has currency in the housing market. More people want walkable, culture-rich environments to live in.” But it’s more than millennials and baby boomers. Young professionals, artists, students, wealthy retirees, and childless couples are also exploring housing options in the city.


3

1 The Temple building on Franklin Street is billed as “Manhattan-style living.” 2 Larry Glazer, CEO Buckingham Properties, says Rochester’s apartment market is nowhere near saturation.

3 Inside the Temple building. 4 James Costanza, president of Costanza Enterprises, inside the Temple building, which features lofts and commercial space. 5 A kitchen in the Temple building. 6 Inside Buckingham Commons, a Glazer property.

4

“You can’t ignore the fact that people are looking for different types of amenities, different types of units, loft-style living, living on the river,” says Bret Garwood, the city’s director of business and housing development. The growth, though, with some exceptions is disproportionately tilted in favor of the downtown area. The City of Rochester as a whole lost 4.2 percent of its population from 2000 to 2010, according to Census figures, but downtown’s population grew by 11.5 percent. A healthy rental market has about a 5 percent vacancy rate, Garwood says. The city’s total vacancy rate is around 11 percent, he says, while downtown’s vacancy rate is between 3.2 percent and 4.2 percent. (Overall, though, the city’s vacancy rate dropped slightly from 2000 to 2010). Downtown Rochester now has approximately 5,000 residents with 36 buildings that have been or are being converted from commercial use to housing since 2000. And 89 percent of those rental units lease in three months or less, Zimmer-Meyer says. “We have no trouble, no trouble at all filling up good housing,” says Mayor Richards. There are pockets of demand outside of downtown, he says, such as in the South Wedge, where development is being driven by the neighborhood’s proximity to the University of Rochester. Demand from the UR is also the reason for the new Brooks Court subdivision on Genesee Street in the 19th Ward. Other parts of the city seeing increased property values include the Highland Park neighborhood, Park Avenue, College Town area on Mount Hope, and the Neighborhood of the Arts. While all of this development is planned or taking place, the City of Rochester is stepping up the number of vacant houses it tears down from about 300 to about 500 a year. There are approximately 2,500 vacant structures in the city, Garwood says.

Rochester is built for a population exceeding 300,000 residents, Richards says, but currently about 210,000 people live within the city limits. “There’s a dichotomy here, and it seems like a conflict if you look at it from a distance,” Richards says. “We’re tearing down properties at the same time we’re building others.” But it’s not a one-for-one discussion, Garwood says. The vacant properties are often in bad shape and located in less-thandesirable neighborhoods. The bulk of the city’s housing stock was built in the early 20th century, Richards says, and the properties are often small and lack garages and driveways. Nobody would buy those houses even if there was never another house or apartment complex built in the city, Garwood says. “There’s not a direct connection there,” he says. “If we just decided we’re not going to [build], that’s not going to keep more of our homes from going vacant. It’s not going to solve our problem with vacant single-family homes in the northeast and the southwest and the northwest [quadrants]. If we don’t build for the market that’s emerging, all that’s going to happen is we’re going to miss capturing some of that market. That would be catastrophic.” The factors the city uses to determine the strength of the housing market are the vacancy rate, how quickly new units are leased, and the price of rent. And in downtown as well as in targeted neighborhoods, Garwood says, those indicators are generally strong. “We could overbuild,” he says. “We need to be sensitive to that. We need to monitor it. We don’t want to just develop new housing to eat the lunch of the existing.” Developers, as to be expected, tend to have a different, less-altruistic way of looking at it. They make money by leasing units, and if they can steal your tenants by offering them things you can’t or won’t, well, then, they say, you lose.

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Apartment boom continues from page 9

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Buckingham Commons on Allen Street features one-bedroom loft apartments.

“People move for a variety of reasons, but it’s definitely what I would classify as a zero-sum game in the macro area,” says Larry Glazer, CEO of Buckingham Properties, a local real estate development and property management company. “If I rent one apartment to somebody, somebody else is going to lose them. But maybe they’re losing because they weren’t doing a good job. That’s life, folks. That’s what happens.”

Nobody likes a vacant, derelict house; it junks up the street and attracts troublemakers. But if you keep demolishing without building anew, you end up with nearempty neighborhoods that hardly seem worthy of the name. Buffalo, for example, has pursued an aggressive demolition policy over the last 20 years, says CGR’s Gardner, and the results are visually striking. “As you come east from downtown, you go through neighborhood after neighborhood, you see many blocks where there seems to be only maybe 20 percent of the buildings still standing,” he says. “It’s very difficult, I think, to support a neighborhood when you’ve got that much vacant land. If we become this gap-toothed community with only a few houses left standing on a particular block, how is that neighborhood ever going to come back?” RDDC’s Zimmer-Meyer says the hope is that by securing “funnel points” for middle-class families to move back to the city — downtown, for example — it will lift up the entire city. “[That] we will see greater fiscal stability for the city as a whole, which will create more opportunities to effectively impact the toughest, most challenged city neighborhoods and the families who live in them,” she says. But building anew is not a panacea for a region that’s not growing, Garwood

says. Some of Rochester’s neighborhoods have such extreme problems with poverty, crime, high vacancy rates, low rates of owner occupancy, and low property values — homes may sell for as little as $10,000 or $20,000 — that inserting new units into those situations won’t help. What do you do? Garwood says you start by finding solutions that fit individual neighborhoods; there is not a one-size-fits-all approach. In some neighborhoods, beefing up the commercial corridors might help. In others, maybe the city could assemble enough land to create a community asset like a park, or a pocket of light manufacturing activity. Instead of a neighborhood that’s largely vacant, you demolish the derelict housing, Garwood says, and build betterquality housing, strategically. The city is attempting to implement this vision in the JOSANA neighborhood in Rochester’s northwest quadrant. JOSANA is in Rochester’s infamous “crescent” and has for many years been considered one of the city’s most troubled neighborhoods in terms of crime, drugs, poverty, vacancies, and other indicators. In 2011, the City of Rochester put together a master plan to improve the social network of the neighborhood, and to boost public safety, public health, and job creation. Housing is a major component of the vision. “The goal there is to get some density along Broad Street and inward,” Garwood says. And then around School 17, “try to target Habitat and other infill housing to get owner occupancy really surrounding that school, and re-establish the fabric of the neighborhood around the school and around Broad Street.” At the same time, you accumulate parcels of land in other parts of the neighborhood to create green space for a neighborhood


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amenity, Garwood says, or for a future economic development project. But the point is that when the work in JOSANA is complete, he says, it won’t have any more housing than it does now. The city is also participating in the Project Green program, where plans are to convert more than three dozen city blocks to green space over the next 20 years for use as community gardens, urban farms, parks, and renewable energy generating facilities. And the city recently won approval from New York State to form a land bank: a nonprofit corporation that can help streamline the city’s approach to dealing with vacant, abandoned, and taxdelinquent properties.

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their housing markets as are occurring in the city. The trend toward apartment living reflects people wanting to simplify, says Henrietta Supervisor Yudelson. In other cases, the units are aimed at young professionals or people looking for more modern, up-to-date housing. A former Henrietta meat-packing facility on Brighton-Henrietta Town Line Road is being converted for apartments, there’s a proposal for a complex with more than 200 units near the Rochester Institute of Technology campus, and Graywood Meadows between East River Road and the Genesee River will consist of a couple of hundred units of single-family houses, townhouses, and apartments, to name three projects. “All these different developers are coming, telling me there’s definitely a market for this,” Yudelson says. “We have several projects either under construction continues on page 12 rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 11


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or in the pipeline. Some are fairly large and some more modest.” Apartments used to be a cheaper alternative to houses, he says, but now they’re more a lifestyle choice. Brighton town planner Ramsey Boehner says residents there want more housing options, too: something other than the big single-family house. The retiring baby boom generation, young people attracted to urban living, and others who live active lifestyles want their services in walking distance, Boehner says. Suburban developers are trying to capitalize on the “urban renaissance,” he says, by incorporating into their projects the features that draw people to cities. “You’re seeing more mixed-used projects,” Boehner says. “You’re mixing it, making it more walkable, more sustainable, connecting it to trails, and those types of things.” An example, though it may be an extreme one, is Brighton’s 63-acre Reserve on the Erie Canal: 327 units of townhouses, patio homes, executive lots for custom homes, and brownstones in six buildings on the canal. There will be a clubhouse with a movie theater, dining room, exercise area, and a wine cellar. And the Reserve will have a dock for canal touring boats and another dock for kayaks and canoes. The project will be broken up into six distinct “neighborhoods,” says Anthony Costello, chair and CEO of Anthony J. Costello and Son, a Rochester real estate development and property management firm. The neighborhoods will be connected by a trail running through the property. “It’s a walkable neighborhood,” Costello says. “There’s a big pent-up demand for this type of housing, and there’s a pent-up demand in Brighton. Brighton has not had any new development for, like, 35 years. The average home is over 71 years old.” Another example is the Brickstone senior housing project on Elmwood Avenue. The mixed-use complex has retail, restaurants, bungalows, townhouses, lofts, and apartments. It’s also connected to a trail system and a sidewalk system. “It’s a dense project, which is another feature of urban planning because you’re not using as much open space,” says Brighton’s Boehner. But not everyone is sold on the suburbs. Costanza Enterprises sold its suburban portfolio — about 1,000 apartment units — in 2007. Company president James Costanza says he saw a distinct and difficult-to-counteract trend happening.

“We don’t want to just develop new housing to eat the lunch of the existing.” Bret Garwood, City of Rochester

“Our ability to raise revenues was severely limited and our operating expenses — typically insurance, utilities, and taxes — were going up in double, and in some cases triple digits,” he says. We had a very real ceiling on rent increases, mainly because the demand for the apartments was limited.” It was limited because of the county’s static population, he says, and because of the demographic he was aiming for: young people just starting out on their own. Young people need jobs to pay the rent, Costanza says, and Rochester and New York State haven’t been kind in that area. The people with the cash to make rent payments — “tax generators,” Costanza calls them — have been leaving the state, he says, while the number of “tax consumers” — the older generation — is growing. “So it’s kind of an upside-down pyramid,” Costanza says. “We decided to sell our portfolio in the suburbs because of that trend. And there have been others who have done the same thing over the course of the last decade.” But Costanza says he sees hope in the local start-up and high-tech communities, as well as the growing number of jobs provided by the area’s colleges and universities. And the jobs situation at Rochester’s “celebrity” businesses — Kodak, Xerox, and Bausch & Lomb — seems to be stabilizing, Costanza says. “If you can’t sustain and you can’t grow your younger demographic, you’re going to at some point run into a mathematical economic problem,” Costanza says. “Ultimately it gets back to demographics and can we continue to grow those demographics? And the answer is, if we can continue to create businesses and jobs, we can.”


University Ave. project continues from page 3

view from the neighboring George Eastman House, which is a national historic landmark. And it is bad city planning, adding density to an area of the city that doesn’t need more. Some neighbors are delighted with the plan. But some are not. Among them: the Neighborhood of the Arts Neighborhood Association, in which the Monroe Voiture property lies. Last week, the association issued a statement opposing the development “because the size and the scale of the project is incongruent with property in the East Avenue Preservation District.” The stand was the result of several months of studying the Morgan proposal, neighborhood meetings, and a survey of neighborhood residents, businesses, visitors, and others. Ninety-five people responded to the survey, 59 of them residents, 20 of them neighborhood business owners or employees. Asked whether the Morgan proposal fits in “with the style of the neighborhood,” 60 said either that it was better suited to another location or that it was “jarring to the senses.” Only 19 had a favorable response to that question. (The association said it is “open to working with Morgan Management on building in another more appropriate location in the neighborhood.”) The opponents also include the large institutions that flank the Monroe Voiture property: the Greek Orthodox Church of the Annunciation and the George Eastman House. Both object to the size and density of the apartment building, which would cover the vast majority of the Monroe Voiture property and would be relatively near their property line. Church officials also worry that Morgan tenants would park in the church parking lot, which would be only a few feet away from the apartment building. Although Morgan would provide 30 more parking spaces for residents than there are apartments, it’s likely that many of the twobedroom apartments would have at least two occupants – and two cars. The same may be true of some of the one-bedroom apartments. And certainly there would be times when the tenants would have guests with cars. Motorists already use the church driveway and parking lot as an easy route between East Avenue and University, says Amiel Mokhiber Jr., vice president of the church’s board of directors, and Morgan tenants and guests would find the lot a convenient parking spot. Morgan vice president Kevin Morgan says the company doesn’t anticipate parking problems. Even some of the two-bedroom units would have only one tenant, he predicts. And while he says he does anticipate that some tenants would park on the street, he says he doesn’t think they would use the church parking lot.

The home of the Monroe Voiture veterans group, at 933 University Avenue – a 1920’s English Tudor Revival house built for the daughter of a prominent Rochester family – is the focus of the debate over Morgan Management’s development proposal. PHOTO BY MARK CHAMBERLIN

“We would make sure to let our residents know on signing a lease that we’re not responsible for where they park if they don’t park on our property,” Morgan said in a recent interview. If they park in the church lot, “they might get towed,” he said. “And I think if that happened once, it wouldn’t happen again.” But the church would be responsible for policing its lot, and Mokhiber says the church doesn’t want to have to do that. Nor does it want to have to put up a gate, forcing church members to have to use access cards to get into their own parking lot.

The meetings on Morgan’s plan Morgan Management will go before two boards this month seeking permission to build a 102unit apartment building at 933 University Avenue. The schedule: Rochester Preservation Board: 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, May 8, City Council Chambers (Room 302A), City Hall. The board will take public comments, and board members will make their own comments but will not vote.

But he had just become the museum’s new director, and in an interview in late March, he said his view had “changed dramatically.” The museum hired Bergmann Associates The Eastman House concerns initially to create a new design for its plans for centered on its own future needs: it wanted the Monroe Voiture property. It includes expansion room for its collections, exhibits, a community garden, a sculpture area, a and research. In 2011, GEH, supported by new parking lot for the Eastman House the Monroe Voiture, successfully applied (augmenting the existing one off of East for a Planned Development District that Avenue), and a walkway from the new included both properties, as well as that of parking lot to the museum. The changes the Hutchison House, just to the east of the would “better connect Eastman House with Eastman House on East Avenue. “The explicit purpose,” says GEH director the revitalized Neighborhood of the Arts,” Bruce Barnes, “was to promote the purposes of Barnes says in a statement in the museum’s “Films & Events” publication. the George Eastman House and the Monroe The plan keeps the Monroe Voiture house, Voiture, and it allowed a wide range of nonand Barnes said last week that the Eastman residential uses, including a restaurant.” The district designation also permitted the House would be willing to renovate it and development of new multi-family residences. maintain it for the veterans for at least 20 years. And it would be willing to “explore That would permit the Eastman House, a other alternatives, including adapting the first major, national photographic archives and research institution, to build classrooms and a floor of the Hutchison House to be suitable veteran’s club facilities.” small dormitory if its leaders decided “We do need more room,” he said, they needed to. but new construction would likely take place Earlier this year, Barnes was listing the somewhere else in Rochester. “We already museum’s expansion needs as one of the have a substantial amount of storage” in the reasons it opposed the Morgan development.

City Planning Commission: 6:30 p.m. Monday, May 20, in City Council Chambers, City Hall. The Commission will take public comments and will also vote at that meeting. If the Planning Commission approves the Morgan project, the Preservation Board will meet again on June 5 to vote. All three meetings will be open to the public.

nearby Gleason Works building. The museum could move some of its archives, library, and conservation space to another location, Barnes said, opening up space in the existing museum building for exhibitions. “I don’t think – I’m not saying it’s impossible – but I don’t think we would put it next door,” Barnes said. Barnes said he doesn’t rule out classroom space or another “low-impact” construction next door sometime in the future, “but near term,” he said, the museum wants to preserve its surroundings. The Eastman House is facing a problem that

is a bit of its own creation. When it first asked the city to rezone its property and that of the Hutchison House and the Monroe Voiture as a Planned Development District, the museum and the veterans reached an agreement that provided for the museum’s expansion in return for the museum maintaining the veterans’ building – or building them a new one. (There is disagreement now about the specifics of that early agreement.) continues on page 14 rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 13


University Ave. project continues from page 13

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For some reason, the museum gave the Monroe Voiture a document later that changed the terms of that agreement, infuriating the veterans. Barnes agrees that the museum dropped the ball on the issue. Unquestionably, Barnes said in late March, “we didn’t handle it well,” and he has reached out to the veterans to try to smooth things over. If the Morgan plan doesn’t go through, he said, “George Eastman House would still like to enter into an agreement” with the veterans. But it will have to find a way to smooth things over. Clearly, the veterans find a new building and 99 years of free rent and free maintenance more attractive than a promise of renovations to their existing space and 20 years of free occupancy there. The current building has “about three times the amount of square footage we need,” Monroe Voiture member and club manager Rene Vanmulem says. Some critics of the development proposal worry that because the Monroe Voiture members are aging, their future use of the building is uncertain. But Vanmulem says that after the development issue is settled, “we’re going to go after new members in an aggressive way.” And he says that the other activity in the building – space for other non-profits, the events they hold – “justifies the existence of our building beyond our 100 members.” Given the way the Eastman House changed the terms of its initial agreement, Vanmulem said he wasn’t sure how the two could have an “amicable” relationship in the future. And Vanmulem questions whether the Eastman House will have the resources to carry out its plan for the Monroe Voiture Morgan Management’s site plan for its University Avenue apartments, top, giving the Monroe Voiture a property. “You can come up with all the new building. Bottom: the George Eastman House’s alternative plan, preserving the veterans’ house and highfalutin ideas you want,” he said, “but if creating a garden and sculpture area. PHOTOS PROVIDED you haven’t got the money to back it up….” The Greek Orthodox Church of the and for the preservation district. East Avenue were demolished, replaced Annunciation wants to be able to ease that by apartment buildings whose design The substantial changes that Morgan conflict. “The church would be willing to act was inappropriate to their surroundings, made to the building’s design seem to as peacemakers,” says Amiel Mokhiber. “And dramatically changing the character of part have swayed some area residents and some we’re willing to have a joint venture with of that important street. The preservation preservationists. But the Preservation Board the Eastman House to renovate the Monroe district legislation halted that development. and the Planning Commission should Voiture building.” consider much more than design. The Monroe Voiture’s stucco house is not But the church is as opposed to the Its presence in the East Avenue of landmark quality itself, but it is a good Morgan development as is the Eastman house, a step or two down from the grander Preservation District – the city’s first such House. “We believe Bob Morgan is a good mansions that lined East Avenue at the time. district – should put the property under person and a good developer,” said Mokhiber. extraordinary scrutiny. For Morgan to build It was built as the home of the daughter “The project may be a good project. But it’s of George D.B. Bonbright and his wife, a its apartments, it will have to tear down the just in the wrong place.” building that houses the Monroe Voiture. The prominent Rochester family. And it is typical Preservation Board must approve not only the of some of the houses built just off East We’ll get a sense of the prospects for the proposed new Morgan structure but also the Avenue in that period. Morgan plan on May 8, when Preservation demolition that will make it possible. Demolishing it would set a precedent. Board members make public comments Only three buildings of any size have been The East Avenue Preservation District about the development. There is concern that demolished in the East Avenue Preservation contains many ordinary old houses – much Preservation Board members will look only at District since 1969, when the district more “ordinary” than the Monroe Voiture the Morgan building’s design, and whether it, was formed. Prior to the establishment of house. Permit the destruction of one, and the considered by itself, is appropriate for that site the district, some significant houses on


Preservation Board makes it hard to prevent the destruction of another, and another, and another… eating away at the fabric of the neighborhood. That was the justification for making the area a preservation district in the first place – and the justification for the district’s boundaries being set at University and Park Avenues, not just along East Avenue. The focus of a preservation district is not to preserve “landmarks,” the most historically and architecturally significant buildings in a city. Preservation districts are designed to protect the character of a larger area, all of the buildings, the open space, the streetscape, the ambiance, the feeling of a historically important neighborhood. Any new development – any exterior change to a property – must be appropriate to its surroundings. And that includes not only the design of the building but its size, its mass. In addition to concerns related to the

preservation district, public officials must consider the impact that this large, dense development would have on that area of the city, which itself is predominantly a densely developed neighborhood. One is the loss of green space. Morgan’s apartment building and parking lot would leave very little lawn left on property. Although stretches of East Avenue are lined with large homes and relatively large yards, Park and University Avenues and their adjacent streets are densely built. The neighborhood is also home to three significant, low-density museum campuses: those of the Museum and Science Center, the Memorial Art Gallery, and the George Eastman House. And in an urban neighborhood, with small city yards, the museums’ open space not only has visual and passive-recreation appeal but also contributes positively to the environment. Rather than take away green space, as the Morgan plan does, the Eastman House design for the Monroe Voiture property would add to it. And while Eastman House director Bruce Barnes agrees that the museum may want to build its own facilities on the Monroe Voiture property sometime in the future, that development would be small, he says, set back from University, and no taller than two stories. And if the Eastman House ever wanted to build on the Monroe Voiture property, it would have to go through the same scrutiny that Morgan Management is facing. There’s also the question of the future of the University Avenue-East Avenue-Park Avenue area. What kind of neighborhood should it be? What do the people who live there want? The Morgan development would add density to an already dense area. And its

density has grown because of apartment developments, often in single and two-family homes that were once owner-occupied but are now rental units. This has created both traffic problems and parking problems. And they’re compounded by the age of the neighborhood’s housing stock. Built at a time when people were much less dependent on cars, many of the houses have nowhere near the parking space needed for the multiple tenants, each with their own car, that now live in them.

At what point does the density become too much? Has this part of the city’s southeast reached its apartment saturation point? The neighborhood, with its art galleries, restaurants, and unique retail stores, has become an attractive place for apartment dwellers, particularly young adults. And their presence has attracted more apartment dwellers – and more developers interested in owning apartments in that neighborhood. Apartment development is already under way at the old Genesee Hospital site on Alexander Street, just off Park Avenue; at the Culver Road Armory site a few blocks south of Park Avenue; and in individual large houses in the area. City Councilmember Elaine Spaull, whose district includes the neighborhood, says she hears frequently from people interested in investing in the neighborhood and knows of several lots and buildings being eyed for apartment developments. With the growth in investor-owner apartments, says city preservation planner Peter Siegrist, that section of the city has “fewer and fewer resident owners.” Sometimes the needs and wishes of investor owners and resident owners coincide. But sometimes they do not, and that can change the character of the neighborhood. At what point does the density become too much? Has this part of the city’s southeast area reached its apartment saturation point? Is it time to cap the expansion of apartments in that neighborhood, letting them spread to other areas? City officials should also consider Morgan’s proposal in the context of the goals continues on page 16 rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 15


University Ave. project continues from page 15

for the city as a whole. While this project isn’t appropriate for the East Avenue Preservation District, it could be a real boon to other areas. It could, for instance, add significantly to the critical mass building downtown. One important voice has not yet been heard

on this issue: that of the Landmark Society of Western New York, which historically has been devoted not only to the preservation of significant individual properties but also to fostering the health and preservation of older neighborhoods. Its research and support have been key in the creation and protection of the city’s eight preservation districts. The organization isn’t devoted to preservation at any price; its leaders have been careful to pick their battles, recognizing, for instance, that cost can make a preservation proposal unrealistic. And in some cases, the organization has declined to oppose development, angering some preservationists. So far, the Landmark Society has not taken a stand on the Morgan proposal. In an e-mail last week, executive director Wayne Goodman said that the Landmark Society is “reviewing all materials.” “We want to make sure that any new construction is done in a manner consistent with the guidelines” of the Preservation Board, Goodman said. “We do not, as a general rule, rule out new construction as a legitimate form of investment in our historic districts,” he said. “But that new construction must be compatible with its surroundings….” And, he said, the Landmark Society is also studying the existing building housing the Monroe Voiture. “There are many things to consider when a demolition is proposed in a historic district,” Goodman said. Indeed there are. But there are also many things to consider when a new development is proposed for a city neighborhood, whether demolition is involved or not. Additional tax base and the architectural design of individual projects are only two of them. It is encouraging that Morgan and other developers are willing to invest in the city. But the city has other properties that could be developed. A healthy city needs to house a variety of uses: residential, commercial, open space, institutional. When the city approved the Planned Development District for the Eastman House-Hutchinson HouseMonroe Voiture properties, the purpose was to serve the needs of the museum and the veterans. The Morgan development serves the veterans’ needs, unquestionably. But it doesn’t serve the museum’s. This won’t be an easy decision for the Preservation Board and the Planning Commission. The possibility of more tax 16 CITY MAY 1-7, 2013

revenue for the city is attractive. And I understand the concern of the Monroe Voiture’s Rene Vanmulem, who told me that he worries that some critics of the Morgan plan would oppose anything. For Morgan Management, and for the Monroe Voiture,

It is encouraging that Morgan is willing to invest in the city. But the city has other properties that could be developed. the best outcome is for the Preservation Board and the Planning Commission to vote “yes” on Morgan’s proposal. But for the neighborhood, the Eastman House, the Greek Orthodox Church of the Annunciation – and for the city – the best outcome is a “no” vote. People heavily invested in the neighborhood – residents, the church, the museum – oppose the project. Neighborhood opinion shouldn’t be the sole determinant when the two boards vote on the Morgan proposal. But neighborhood opinion has to be considered in any development proposal. And in this case, that opinion has to count for a lot. I thought about this project recently as I read a Wall Street Journal review of an exhibit focused on the works of the late architect Louis Kahn (whose First Unitarian Church graces Winton Road a little less than two miles from the Monroe Voiture property). “Kahn saw the planning of a city much like the planning of a house, with areas of the city defined like rooms with specific uses,” said writer Colin Amery. “City housing, he thought, should always be the product of the wishes of the neighborhood.” Residents of the neighborhood fought hard for the preservation district that contains the Monroe Voiture property. They fought hard for the restrictions that the preservation legislation provides, because they were convinced that those restrictions would improve not only their neighborhood but the city as a whole. They were right then. And the Preservation Board and Planning Commission need to stand with them now.

For more Tom Tomorrow, including a political blog and cartoon archive, visit www.thismodernworld.com

URBAN ACTION This week’s calls to action include the following events and activities. (All are free and open to the public, unless otherwise noted.)

Park the car

ColorBrightonGreen.org will hold its annual Curb Your Car Week from Sunday, May 12, to Saturday, May 18. Bike, walk, bus, carpool, and telecommute to cut global warming and air pollution. Anyone can participate. Register at ColorBrightonGreen.org and, after May 18, report by e-mail the miles saved.

Lecture on smart growth

The Rochester Regional Community Design Center will present “Regional Choices,” a lecture with Charles Marohn, director of Strong Towns in Baxter, Minnesota; and Peter Fleischer, director of Empire State Future in Albany. The lecture will focus on how local governments have failed to consider the long-term returns on

public investment, and how to advocate for smart growth. The event is at 7 p.m. on Tuesday, May 14, at Gleason Works, 1000 University Avenue. Tickets: $15, free to students with ID. Info: www.rrcdc.org.

Film about 1920’s political left

The Rochester Committee on Latin America will present a showing of “Reds” at 8 p.m. on Wednesday, May 1. The 1981 film depicts the “radical left” in the US in the 1920’s with the Russian Revolution in the backdrop. The film will be shown at the Dryden Theatre, George Eastman House, 900 East Avenue. See Marilyn Anderson of ROCLA in the theater’s lobby for a free pass for ROCLA members and supporters.

Volunteer to clean Rochester

The City of Rochester seeks volunteers for Clean Sweep 2013. Dates and locations: in the southeast section of the city on

Saturday, May 4, at Cobbs Hill Park at the Culver Road and Norris Drive entrance; in the southwest on Saturday, May 11, at Genesee Valley Park, 131 Elmwood Park; and in the northeast on Saturday, May 18, at the Norton Neighborhood Service Center, 500 Norton Street. The sweeps begin at 8:30 a.m. and end around 1 p.m. Registration: www. cityofrochester.gov.

Church, state, and contraception discussion Americans United for Separation of Church and State-Rochester will sponsor “Does the Obamacare Contraceptive Mandate Violate Religious Freedom?” at 7:30 p.m. on Monday, May 6. Jann Armantrout, life issues coordinator for the Roman Catholic Diocese, and the Rev. James Swarts, lecturer in history at SUNY Geneseo will debate the issue. The event will be held at First Unitarian Church, 220 South Winton Road.


Dining

Moussaka (left) and kreatika pikilia (right) from Opa Authentic Greek Koozina on Jefferson Road. PHOTOS BY MIKE HANLON

Home cooking, Greek style Opa Authentic Greek Koozina 1175 JEFFERSON ROAD 272-0001, OPAROCHESTER.COM SUNDAY-MONDAY 11 A.M.-9 P.M., TUESDAY-SATURDAY 11 A.M.-10 P.M. [ REVIEW ] BYJAMES LEACH

“The secrets of the Greek cuisine,” Toula Votsis told me recently, “are simplicity, good olive oil, the freshest ingredients, spices, and love.” Votsis, who is the manager of the sixmonth-old Opa Authentic Greek Koozina on Jefferson Road, knows of whence she speaks: she, and most of the other members of the Votsis family who are involved in Opa, has been in the restaurant business, and in the business of cooking for her own family, since she was a teenager. (Most recently, she and her husband owned the Southview Family Restaurant). Votsis’ brother-in-law Konstantinos Votsis opened Opa to offer Rochester something it doesn’t see too often — Greek food without the pervasive American-diner influence. Greek food the

way that Konstantinos Votsis and his family eat at home. Spring has taken its good, sweet time coming to us this year, and so as yet another dismal, cold April week spun itself out a few weeks ago, I went looking for comfort food. The first dish that jumped out at me on Opa’s menu was a plate of sliced potatoes, fried in olive oil, topped with melted saganaki cheese and sprinkled with herbs and a bit more olive oil ($8). Served hot, the spuds were toothsome outside and fluffy within, kind of like perfect French fries. The salt and pleasantly funky sheep’s milk cheese was a nice touch, and a good bridge to the second course of my carband fat-rich lunch, makaronia me kima ($13). Topped with a generous dusting of more of that saganaki, makaronia me kima looks at first glance like a plate of workaday spaghetti with meat sauce. That is, after all, what it is — kind of. According to Toula Votsis, there is no more authentic Greek home cooking than this. It’s the dish, she told me, that you make when “no one knows what they want to eat.” And, as it was for me, this is always a crowd pleaser. Anyone who has ever eaten in Cincinnati will recognize makaronia me kima as their beloved Cincinnati chili — although

they will be curious why someone left the beans and chopped onions out of the mix, and will miss the mono-dimensional chili powder with just a whisper of cinnamon that characterizes that mid-western specialty. At Opa, there’s a lot more going on than just cinnamon, which takes a front seat rather than the sidecar. The chef adds to his rich, meaty sauce a powerful blast of garlic, some oregano, and a host of other flavors that I quickly gave up on trying to identify, creating something that would be as good served on a bun as it is over spaghetti — think, Zeus’ sloppy joe. I was lucky enough to have some of the vlahikes patates left over from my appetizer to get to test the proposition that this could make a superlative Greek-ish poutine. It really, really could. A few days later, spring finally arrived, and I

started craving all things grilled. A companion and I met up for an epic lunch at Opa. Starting with a bottle of retsina, we ordered fried smelts (heads removed, thankfully; $8), grilled octopus drizzled with olive oil and herbs ($13), butter beans stewed with tomatoes and onions ($7), skewers of grilled beef, pork, and chicken served with lemon-

roasted potatoes, pilaf, tzatziki, and Greek salad ($15-$16). While the smelts were underwhelming, more like glorified fish-sticks than anything else, the octopus was surprisingly good. It was meaty without being rubbery, and nicely grilled, the herb-infused olive oil a nice sop for the meat. The real star of this early round of lunch, though, was the beans. Tender and cooked to the point that they nearly burst out of their skins, the beans luxuriated in a sauce that was a masterful example of how to coax every bit of flavor out of humble ingredients. The tomatoes cooked until they dissolved into a sweet and umami-rich paste, the onions caramelized perfectly, and a judicious amount of chicken stock and garlic were thrown in to round things out. I kept coming back to the remaining sauce throughout the meal, dabbing it on everything that came to hand (it was particularly good on the octopus). You can do a lot with a lemon and some olive oil, and at Opa these two kitchen staples get an incredibly brisk work-out. All of the souvlaki on Opa’s menu are marinated in ladolemono, an olive oil and lemon juice emulsion, before being tossed on the grill. The marinade tenderizes the meat, but the lemon juice also breaks down connective tissues a bit, transforming tough but flavorful cuts of meat into buttery morsels that positively ooze tasty juices despite the plentiful char they exhibit on the outside. Pork and chicken are great choices here, but the beef truly is far superior to its peers. Cooked medium rare yet almost lovingly browned on the surface, the two skewers of steak that I had for lunch were so good I seriously considered ordering a couple more just so I wouldn’t have to stop eating. I was absolutely delighted to realize that the drippings from the beef had mixed with the lemon sauce on the roasted potatoes, making a good thing just that much better. On my final visit to Opa, I returned to comfort food, opting for the Greek equivalent of chicken soup, avgolemono ($5-$6). It seems that every culture that has grandmothers has some form of chicken soup, and here it is served up thickened with rice, the eggs, lemon, and chicken stock whipped into an emulsion that belies the origins of the dish. Avgolemono, which traces its origins back to the 15th century, was originally a sauce served with chicken or fish, the eggs used primarily as a thickener in the age before cooks started thickening their sauces with roux. The version served here at the beginning of the 21st century was spectacular — tangy, substantial, and exactly what you’d want to come home to after a long day at the grind. rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 17


Upcoming PARTY IN THE PARK 2013 LINE UP: All concerts are Thursdays at the Riverside Festival Site (corner of Exchange Blvd and Court St.). All concerts $2, or $15 for all concerts. June 6: Blues Traveler. June 13: Southside Johnny. June 20: Moe w/AudioInFlux. June 27: Puddle of Mudd w/Officer Friendly Reunion, Melia. July 4: Dawes w/Shovels and Rope.  July 11: Reggae Fest ft. John Brown’s Body, The Skatalites. July 18: Great Big Sea. July 25: Leon Russell. August 1: Head and the Heart w/Lucius. August 8: John Hiatt w/Matthew Perryman Jones. 

Music

Chinese Choral Society of Rochester SATURDAY, MAY 4 PENFIELD HIGH SCHOOL AUDITORIUM, 25 HIGH SCHOOL DRIVE, PENFIELD 7:30 P.M. | $4-$6 | 377-0063, CCSRMUSIC.COM [ WORLD MUSIC ] “Flow, River, Flow” is the title of the

upcoming 30th anniversary concert of the Chinese Choral Society of Rochester. Founded in 1983, the group focuses mostly on Chinese repertoire to enrich its members’ cultural heritage. The group will perform in Mandarin with English translation. Performers will also include AiZe Wang, soprano; Caleb Woo, baritone; Cherry Tsang, piano; a festival chamber orchestra, and the Park Road Elementary School Chorus. — BY PALOMA CAPANNA

Codes THURSDAY, MAY 2 DUBLAND UNDERGROUND, 315 ALEXANDER ST. 9 P.M. | $7-$10 | 21+, 232-7550 [ HOUSE ] Codes wants to know if you can get down.

Can you get down, Rochester? He’s been hanging out in Brooklyn, and clearly the atmosphere is electric. He’s got a steady mix of house, and knows when to give you the bass. By most my estimates, it’s pretty bouncy all over so it should be good times. Almost makes me wish I had hydraulics in my car, but I suppose GTA will suffice. As always, upstairs and downstairs will be fully stocked in the finest blend of electronic goodness Dubland has to offer, with a whole lot of DJs, including Papi Chulo and Sita!Tronn. — BY SUZAN PERO

WEBER GRILL DEMO DAY Classic Tracks Current Grooves Future Legends FOR REAL JAZZ IN ROCHESTER, TUNE TO 90.1 FM OR JAZZ901.ORG. 18 CITY MAY 1-7. 2013

On SATURDAY, MAY 4, 11am-2pm You can learn how to get the most out of your Weber grill.

The Weber rep will show various grilling techniques using chicken, fish and vegetables.

MILEAGE MASTER “The Grillmaster’s Mecca” LP Gas • Parts • Service MON-FRI 9AM-5PM, SATURDAY 9AM-4PM • 2488 Browncroft Blvd. • 586-1870


WEDNESDAY, MAY 1 [ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ]

Rob & Gary Acoustic. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. 248-4825. 5:30 p.m. Free. Steve Lyons. Sticky Lips BBQ Juke Joint, 830 Jefferson Rd. 292-5544. 7 p.m. Free. [ CLASSICAL ]

Live from Hochstein: Antara Winds w/Joseph Werner.

Still Hand String Band THURSDAY, MAY 2 ABILENE BAR & LOUNGE, 153 LIBERTY POLE WAY 9 P.M. | $7-$10 | ABILENEBARANDLOUNGE.COM [ JAZZ/BLUEGRASS ] Brooklyn, Pennsylvania is not

that far from the (in)famous New York borough, but the Still Hand String Band sound has put a significant distance between this Pennsylvania four-piece and the skinny-jean wearing, hipsters that have been pouring over the Williamsburg Bridge. Jimmy Dee (guitar), Dee Maple (bass), Dee Kid (banjo), and Sunny Dee (mandolin) make knee-slappin’, boot-stompin’ music for the modern world. The band has created a distinctive species of Appalachian roots rock by mixing elements of jam, jazz, folk, bluegrass, pop, and country into a gloriously frenzied genre it has deemed “spazzgrass.” — BY DAVID YOCKEL, JR.

Lindsay Mazza SATURDAY, MAY 4 BOULDER COFFEE, 100 ALEXANDER ST. 8 P.M. | FREE | BOULDERCOFFEECO.COM [ SINGER-SONGRWITER ] Lindsay Mazza describes

herself as being “a devoted advocate for self-expression.” She cites Fiona Apple, Sarah McLachlan, and Alanis Morissette as some of her many influences. Mazza’s voice is strong and smooth, with a soulful depth and an impressive range. Mazza combines a pop sensibility with a gift for inventive chord structures and catchy melodies, making her music both familiar and completely her own. She conveys a sense of intimacy that is rarely experienced in modern pop. — BY LEAH CREARY

Hochstein Performance Hall, 50 N Plymouth Ave. 454-4596. 12:10 p.m. Free. RPO: Around the Town. East High School, 1801 Main Street East. 2883130. 7:30 p.m. Free.

AFR played at Montage Music Hall on Saturday, April 27. PHOTO BY FRANK DE BLASE

In dreams [ REVIEW ] BY FRANK DE BLASE

Dreams don’t come true. I’m sorry to be the bearer of bad news, but if you want it to happen, make it a goal and just do it. It’s all about hard work and focus, pal. Dreams come to those who sleep. Let me explain what prompted this rant. As a music journalist I am a conduit between the mouths of musicians and the ears of the audience. I’ve interviewed hundreds of bands, asked hundreds of questions, and received hundreds of the same answers back. One point of intrigue is “making it” — achieving stardom, wallowing in the excess. Rochester bands: you know I love you, but a lot of you won’t “make it.” Not because you’re not good enough. But you won’t “make it” because “making it” is a dream. However, I saw one band last weekend that will make it. I was there the moment it happened. AFR was thrown on to a multi-band bill at the last minute Saturday night. By the time the band was set to go on, Montage Music Hall was a ghost town. The soundman gave the band permission to opt out. But AFR held fast and delivered an energetic set as if the place was choked

with bodies. As a musician myself, I know that hollow feeling brought on by an empty room. I know that heavy feeling in the arms, the total lack of sustained energy. I know how it feels when it’s uphill, for nobody and for no money. But I also know that’s when you know you love music. And AFR loves its music. The band plays metal core of sorts, with a dynamic trade-off between heavy riffing and everyone joining in on the thunderous one. The vocals are stock scream/roar. And though it’s a lonely cry when unleashed in an empty room, it’s the best sound in the world when you believe in it and don’t just dream about it. I would be remiss if I didn’t mention Rochester-based Slayer tribute act Raining Blood, which played before AFR on this Montage bill. When you tackle Slayer’s whole body of work with its hellacious hyper speed and relentless drive, you’ve set yourself up for a challenge. Raining Blood met that challenge as it effortlessly whipped out the band’s trademark double-kick gallop and its fleet pentatonic scream.

[ DJ/ELECTRONIC ] DJ Adam. Nashvilles, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. 334-3030. Call for info. Ladies at the Lake Party . Pelican’s Nest, 566 River St. 663-5910. 10 p.m. Call for info.

Ladies Nite: High Heels and Mini Skirts New Wave Wednesdays. Club Clarissas,

293 Clarissa St. 232-3430. 10 p.m. 21+. Call for info. Teen Set 45 Party. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. Free. Y Not Wednesday w/DJ ET. Plush, 151 St. Paul St. 2325650. Call for info. [ JAZZ ]

Mike Pappert. Lemoncello,

137 West Commercial St. 385-8565. 6:30 p.m. Free. Roses & Revolutions. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. 585-662-5555. 6 p.m. Free.

Vince Ercolamento& Joe Chiappone Jazz Quartet.

Murph’s Irondequoit Pub, 705 Titus Ave. 342-6780. 8 p.m. Free. [ HIP-HOP/RAP ]

Insane Clown Posse. Main

Street Armory, 900 E. Main St. 232-3221. 7:30 p.m. $22.50-$28. continues on page 21

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 19


Music Blasting the blues Greg “Stackhouse” Prevost GREGSTACKHOUSEPREVOST.COM [ FEATURE ] BY FRANK DE BLASE

Anticipation ran high amongst the glitterati and the black-clad hoi polloi as Rochester rocker Greg Prevost mounted the Skylark Lounge stage in his highheeled shoes. A few in the joint had laid ears on his new bluesy solo disc, “Mississippi Murderer,” but most were in the dark, not knowing what to expect on this chilly late March evening. That included Prevost, who felt slightly out of his element. “I hadn’t performed in four years,” he says. “It was a full house, I was sitting down, I was kind of scared. But I just started ripping into it.” What followed was an eardrumshattering, soul-shaking battle between Prevost’s Jagger swagger and wail and his guitar’s primal scream. It physically hurt. Audience members could feel it in their molars. But nobody left. That’s because, beneath the cacophony and ensuing nose bleeds lurked some incredibly bodacious gut-bucket blues. It was just the right amount of too much, not enough, and just right. But you’ve got to hear the record. “Mississippi Murderer” is Prevost’s new solo venture. It’s a lowdown, menacing thrill ride that grinds like a lap dance from a big girl. After leading garage-rock heroes The Chesterfield Kings for more than 30 years with a voice that was part banshee wail, part garage-rock snarl, part field holler, paired with the stage personae of a chainfree wrecking ball, Greg Prevost had had enough. He split with the band in 2011 and headed for the fairway. “I just played golf,” Prevost says. “I didn’t want to play music anymore. I had just kind of burned out. I didn’t want to tour, I didn’t want to play, I didn’t want to do nothin’.” One day, however, Prevost forgot his golf-course-instead-of- rock mantra, picked up a guitar and re-ignited the fever. “Once I started playing guitar again,” he says, “I was like, ‘You know, I’m just going to learn 60 to 70 songs I like — Skip James, Bukka White, John Lee Hooker… I kind of wanted it to be like Son House on a National steel, with slide and finger picks. And I just sort 20 CITY MAY 1-7. 2013

of got back into it. I couldn’t stay away from it. And as I started playing songs, I began noodling with other things. Then I started writing stuff.” Prevost recorded these raunchy nuggets on

a 70’s cassette player in his basement. It was crude, to be sure. “It was like 20’s delta blues,” he says. “Primitive recording, trashy…” The hip hombres at Penniman Records in Barcelona, Spain, dug Prevost’s sound big time and immediately convinced him to let the company put out a limited-edition single, “Mr. Charlie”/“Rolling Stone” under

the name Greg “Stackhouse” Prevost. But it didn’t stop there. “They were like, ‘You know, if there were bass and drums and electric guitars on this, it would sound like ‘Exile on Main Street’ demos,” Prevost says. “And that’s what happened. This album was going to be all acoustic songs. But I plugged it in. It was the same music, just louder.” After hearing his superb production with St. Phillip’s Escalator, Prevost went into the studio and laid it down with Alex Patrick (The Absolutes, producer, and bassist on the record) and Zachary Koch (St. Phillip’s Escalator, The Ohm, Chesterfield

Former Chesterfield Kings frontman Greg Prevost recently released an old-school blues disc that has received attention nationally, as well as in Spain. PHOTO BY FRANK DE BLASE

Kings, and drummer on the record). They somehow managed to harness Prevost’s bombastic blast of ballsy blues. With a blend of originals and classics like Son House’s “John The Revelator,” “Mississippi Murderer” was born. “We first tried recording in my house,” Prevost says. “But it was too loud, stuff was falling off the walls and shit.” As a musician Prevost is as reverential

as he is referential; he knows everything by everyone. And he’s keenly aware

of misperceptions that can be drawn watching a white, long-haired rock ’n’ roller sing and play the blues. In 1990 The Kings recorded “Drunk on Muddy Water,” a sloppy, sleazy, raucous blues rave-up with the late, great Paulie Rocco on guitar. The band came close, but big rock production killed the vintage vibe. “Mississippi Murderer” is the record “Drunk On Muddy Water” set out to be, and wishes it was. A good deal of the Chesterfield Kings’ music had black undertones; think Bo


Diddley, Chuck Berry, Little Richard. The band twisted it some, often careening into Dolls and Stones territory, but always with at least one toe in blue waters. And from an early age, Prevost was listening to the blues wherever he could and riding the rails. It was 1964 and the 10-year-old Prevost prowled his Greece-Charlotte neighborhood, including a teen hangout/ coffee shop called the Black Candle next to the House of Guitars, then located on Lake Avenue. One day, Prevost spied a simple sign in the Black Candle’s window announcing that Son House — who at the time lived in Corn Hill — would be playing. To most 10-year-olds this wasn’t a big deal. Son who? But Prevost knew exactly who the blues master was. “I saw ‘Shindig’ when the Stones were on there with Howlin’ Wolf,” Prevost says. “I used to read all the teen magazines, and in Rave Brian Jones was saying [about that performance], ‘We played with Howlin’ Wolf and it was really a gas, and he was there with Son House.’” When the day of House’s show arrived, Prevost says that the one of the owners wouldn’t let him in. “He said, ‘Hey, no kids in here, but you can stand outside,’” Prevost says. Though he wasn’t aware of it at the time, Prevost’s mode of travel was in keeping with the bluesman’s hobo aesthetic. “I used to ride the boxcars,” he says. “They’d go by each day. I’d go to my cousin’s house, throw my bike in, lay around in the straw, then I’d throw my bike out and ride it home. Sometimes when I didn’t want to walk home from school, I’d jump the boxcar.” But today it isn’t Boxcar Prevost, it’s Stackhouse, with a brick shithouse wall of sound. And the sound has been capably played and produced by Patrick and Koch, who are clearly disciples of The Chesterfield Kings’ rock ’n’ roll and Prevost’s take on the blues, with all its reckless fun and danger. Prevost assures that it isn’t just for show. “I don’t try to play reckless,” he says. “That’s just the way I play.” Prevost says that offers are coming in from Spain as well as the States, though this wasn’t his initial plan. “I just wanted to do a cool record,” he says — though he thinks he’ll heed the call electrically and acoustically. “I like playing acoustic so people can actually hear what I’m doing. But I like playing loud, too.”

[ JAZZ ]

Dave Rivello Ensemble. Village

POP/ROCK | TWENTY ONE PILOTS

All you have to say is piano-driven schizoid pop and you’ve got my attention. Twenty One Pilots is actually two Columbus, Ohio, musicians, Tyler Joseph and Josh Dun. The sound is poppy and thoughtful with lyrics delivered with an astute poetry-slam kind of feel over a synthetic backdrop that is surprisingly and thankfully free of any throwback cheese. What you get is an epic sound that doesn’t overshadow the simple joy. For whatever it’s worth, Twenty One Pilots is a MTV Band To Watch in 2013. The band is blowing up so catch it in this intimate setting while you can. Twenty One Pilots plays Sunday, May 5, 7 p.m. at Water Street Music Hall, 204 N. Water St. $10. waterstreetmusic.com. — BY FRANK DE BLASE

WEDNESDAY, MAY 1 [ POP/ROCK ]

Amanda Ashley. Cottage Hotel

of Mendon, 1390 Pittsford Mendon Road. 5856241390. first Wednesday of every month, 9:30 p.m. Call for info. Bobby Henrie & The Gonerrs. Dinosaur Bar-B-Que, 99 Court St. 585-325-7090. 9 p.m. Free.

The Fevertones w/Routine Involvements, The Tabs. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. $5-$7.

Original Music Open Showcase: Doug Bert and the Monkey Scream Project. Tala

Vera, 155 State St. 546-3845. 8 p.m. $3, musicians free.

THURSDAY, MAY 2 [ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ] Ahren Henby. Boulder Coffee Co., 100 Alexander St. 585454-7140. 7 p.m. Call for info.

The Blind Owl Band w/Still Hand String Band. Abilene Bar

& Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. 9 p.m. $7-$10. Dave McGrath Band. Pelican’s Nest, 566 River St. 663-5910. 7 p.m. Call for info. Jim Lane. Murph’s Irondequoit Pub, 705 Titus Ave. 342-6780. 8 p.m. Free.

JJ Lang w/Paul Cummings, Chris Moore. Tala Vera, 155 State St.

546-3845. 9 p.m. $5-$7. Pat Kane. McGraw’s Irish Pub, 146 W Commercial St. 348-9091. 7 p.m. Free.

Rock Cafe, 213 Main St. 5861640. Every other Thursday, 9 p.m. Free. Deborah Branch. Lemoncello, 137 West Commercial St. 385-8565. 6 p.m. Free. John Palocy Trio. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. 585-662-5555. 6 p.m. Free. Marbin. Dinosaur Bar-B-Que, 99 Court St. 585-325-7090. 9 p.m. Free. Michael Vadala. 1872 Cafe, 431 W. Main Street. 585-730-7687. 6:30 p.m. Free. Mike Kaupa. Monroe’s Restaurant, 3001 Monroe Avenue. (585) 348-9104. 6 p.m. Call for info. Mike Kaupa Duet Project. Monroe’s Restaurant, 3001 Monroe Avenue. 348-9103. 6 p.m. Free. Sonny Brown Band. The Rabbit Room, 61 N. Main St. 582-1830. 7 p.m. Free. The Swooners. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. 248-4825. 5:30 p.m. Free.

Ted Nicolosi and Shared Genes. Vino Bistro and Lounge, 27 West Main St. 872-9463. 6:30 p.m. Free.

[ HIP-HOP/RAP ] Shwayze. Montage Music Hall, 50 Chestnut St. 232-1520. 7 p.m. $15-$17.

[ CLASSICAL ]

Eastman at Washington Square Lunchtime Concerts.

1st Universalist Church, 150 S. Clinton Ave. 274-1400. 12:15 p.m. Free. RPO: Around the Town. Church of Love Faith, 700 Exchange St. 454-3270. 7:30 p.m. Free. DJ/ELECTRONIC

Party Monster Thursdays. ONE

Nightclub and Lounge, 1 Ryan Alley. 546-1010. 10 p.m. 18+. Call for info. Codes. Dubland Underground, 315 Alexander St. 232-7550. 9 p.m. 21+. $7-$10. DJ Matt. Nashvilles, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. 334-3030. Call for info. DJ Sal DeSantis. ,. 7 p.m. Call for info. Karaoke at Panorama. Panorama Night Club & Sports Bar, 730 Elmgrove Rd. 247-2190. 9 p.m. Free. Revolution Thursdays. Grotto, 7 Lawrence St. 739-5377. Call for info. Thirsty Thursday’s. TC Riley’s, 200 Park Point Dr. 272-9777. 10 p.m. Call for info. Thursday Night Shakedown.. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 11 p.m. Free.

Tiki Thursdays: Shotgun Music DJ. McGhan’s Pub, 11 W. Main

St. 924-3660. 7:30 p.m. Free. Tilt-a-Whirl Drag Show.. Tilt Nightclub & Ultralounge, 444 Central Ave. 232-8440. 11:15 p.m. & 12:30 a.m. $3.

[ REGGAE/JAM ]

Mosaic Foundation w/The Lawnmowers. Sticky Lips BBQ

Juke Joint, 830 Jefferson Rd. 292-5544. 9 p.m. $8-$10.

Open Jam hosted by Casey Bloom w/Natalie B Band.

V-Pub at the Villager, 245 South Main Street. 394-2890. 9 p.m. Reggae Thursday. Pure Night Club, 117 Liberty Pole Way. 4547230. 10 p.m. $5 before 11 pm. [ POP/ROCK ]

Big D & The Kids table w/Mrs. Skannotto. Water Street Music

Hall, 204 N. Water St. 585-325-5600. 6:30 p.m. $12-$15. Five Alarm Open Jam. Firehouse Saloon, 814 South Clinton. 319-3832. 9 p.m. Call for info.

Goatwhore w/3 Inches of Blood, Revocation, Ramming Speed. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe

Ave. 7:30 p.m. $15-$19.

FRIDAY, MAY 3 [ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ]

Dave North w/Carin’s Pride. McGraw’s Irish Pub, 146 W Commercial St. 348-9091. 6 p.m. Free.

Peg Dolan and “The Fiddler!”.

Barry’s Old School Irish, 2 W. Main St. 545-4248. 7 p.m. Free. Ralph Louis. Rochester Plaza Hotel, 70 State St. 546-3450. 6 p.m. Free.

Salsa Night presented by Essence of Rhythm. Lovin’ Cup,

300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. 9 p.m. $5. [ BLUES ] Deep Blue. Hatter’s Pub, 5 West Main St. 872-1505. 8 p.m. Free.

Gap Mangione New Blues Band. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa,

199 Woodcliff Dr. 248-4825. 7:30 p.m. Free. [ CLASSICAL ]

Benjamin Britten’s “War Requiem”. Kodak Hall at

Eastman Theater, 60 Gibbs St. 8 p.m. Free.

SUNY Geneseo Tremont String Quartet Concert. Wadsworth Auditorium, 1 College Circle. 245-5516. 8 p.m. Free.

Geneseo Festival Chorus Concert: Tremont String Quartet and Jonathan Gonder, Pianist. Wadsworth Auditorium, 1 College Circle. 245-5516. 8 p.m. Free. [ COUNTRY ]

Happy Hour: Emma Lane, Brian McCormick. Lovin’ Cup, 300

Park Point Dr. 292-9940. 6 p.m. 21+. Free.

Johnny Bauer and Great Escape. Nashvilles, 4853 W

Henrietta Rd. 334-3030. 9 p.m. $5.

[ DJ/ELECTRONIC ] On the House Fridays. ONE Nightclub and Lounge, 1 Ryan Alley. 546-1010. 21+. Call for info. Chill Out Fridays Happy Hour. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. 5:30 p.m. Free. DJ/Karaoke w/Coyote Cody. McKenzie’s, 3686 West Henrietta Rd. 334-8970. 9:30 p.m. Call for info. DJ Bac Spin. Plush, 151 St. Paul St. 232-5650. 8 p.m. Call for info. DJ Blake. 140 Alex Bar & Grill, 140 Alexander St. 585-2561000. 10 p.m. Call for info. DJ Cedric. ,. 10 p.m. $3-$8. DJ Energon. ,. 10 p.m. $3-$8. DJ Mi-T-Mo. Richmond’s Tavern, 21 Richmond Street. (585) 270-8570. 9 p.m. Free.

Fresh Meat Fridays w/Samantha Vega, DJ Mighty Mic. Tilt

Nightclub & Ultralounge, 444 Central Ave. 232-8440. 11:15 p.m. & 12:30 a.m. $4-$12. Lube After Dark.. Quaker Steak & Lube, 2205 Buffalo Rd. 585697-9464. 9:30 p.m. Free. Reggaeton w/DJ Carlos. La Copa Ultra Lounge, 235 W. Ridge Rd. 254-1050. 10 p.m. Free. Sexy Fridays w/DJ Wizz. Pure Night Club, 117 Liberty Pole Way. 454-7230. 10 p.m. Call for info. continues on page 22

GETLISTED get your event listed for free e-mail it to calendar@rochestercitynews.com. Or go online to rochestercitynewspaper.com and submit it yourself!

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 21


FRIDAY, MAY 3

Spring Arts Festival. Finger Lakes Community College, 3325 Marvin Sands Dr. 7 p.m. Free.

The Taurus Takeover ft. DJ Grand Imperial, Massive D.

Ted Nicolosi and Shared Genes. Glengarry Inn at Eagle

Maxwell’s Resto Lounge, 169 St. Paul St. 325-5710. Call for info.

Vale, 4400 Nine Mile Point Road, Rt 250. 598-3820. 7 p.m. Free. Tinted Image. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. 2484825. 7:30 p.m. Free. The White Hots. The Pultneyville Grill, 4135 Mill St. (315) 589-4512. 6:30 p.m. Call for info.

T.G.I. Bucket Friday ft. DJ Jestyr, Dr. Jamo. Grotto, 7 Lawrence St. 739-5377. Call for info.

VH0S7. Water Street Music

Hall, 204 N. Water St. 585325-5600. 6:30 p.m. $10-$15. [ JAZZ ]

Amanda Montone Duo.

Lemoncello, 137 West Commercial St. 385-8565. 7 p.m. Free.

[ KARAOKE ]

Annex Society, Northeast Funk (N.E.F.). Tala Vera, 155 State St.

SINGER/SONGWRITER | MELANIE

Champagne & The Swoon Daddies. Bistro 135, 135 W.

Though she’s flown a bit under the big time’s radar for the past few decades, singer-songwriter Melanie has racked up the accolades and an impressive resume. She has taken the stage at Woodstock, Carnegie Hall, and Royal Albert Hall. She’s had her material covered by artists like Cher, Dolly Parton, and Macy Gray. She’s sold more than 80 million records to date and has been awarded a Grammy and an Emmy. And in fall of 2012, Rochester’s own Blackfriars Theatre premiered a musical devoted to her life and music. And if that doesn’t get you, how about her whimsical tune “Brand New Key” — you know, “I’ve got a brand new pair of roller skates, you’ve got a brand new key…”

546-3845. 8 p.m. Call for info.

Commercial St. 585-662-5555. 6 p.m. Free.

Fred Costello & Roger Eckers Jazz Duo. Charley Brown’s, 1675 Penfield Rd. 385-9202. 7:30 p.m. Free.

The Music of Ferrante & Furioso. Yummy Garden Hot

Pot, 2411 W. Henrietta Rd. 3689888. 5:30 p.m. Call for info.

Ted Nicolosi and Shared Genes. Hedges Restaurant, 1290 Lake Rd. 265-3850. 6:30 p.m. Free. [ KARAOKE ]

Karaoke at Pineapple Jack’s. Pineapple Jack’s, 485

Spencerport Rd. 247-5225. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke w/Cody. Nashvilles, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. 3343030. 5 p.m. Free.

Karaoke at Flaherty’s Webster. Flaherty’s Webster, 1200 Bay Rd. 671-0816. 9 p.m. Call for info. Karaoke by Dan & Sherri. Barnard Restaurant & Party House, 360 Maiden Ln. 585663-1250. 8 p.m. Free. Karaoke w/Cyd Scarlett!. Norton’s Pub, 1730 N. Goodman St. 266-3570. 10 p.m. Karaoke w/Krazy George. Scotland Yard Pub, 187 Saint Paul St. 730-5030. 10 p.m. Call for info. Karaoke w/Summer Bob. Shorts Bar & Grill, 35 N. Main St. 388-0136. 10 p.m. Free. [ R&B ]

Coupe De Villes. Dinosaur

Bar-B-Que, 99 Court St. 585325-7090. 10 p.m. Free. [ REGGAE/JAM ]

The Buddhahood, Fire Wheel.

V-Pub at the Villager, 245 South Main Street. 394-2890. 9 p.m. $8-$10. Count Blastula. Sticky Lips BBQ Juke Joint, 830 Jefferson Rd. 292-5544. 9:30 p.m. $5. [ POP/ROCK ]

Colossus w/MR. BONELESS, The Reactions. Bug Jar, 219

Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. $6-$8.

22 CITY MAY 1-7. 2013

Melanie performs Tuesday, May 7, 8 p.m. at Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Place. $22-$25. lovincup.com. — BY FRANK DE BLASE Happy Hour w/Suzi Willpower, 40 Rod Lightning. Abilene Bar

& Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. Call for info.

Hate Machine Farewell Show.

Montage Music Hall, 50 Chestnut St. 232-1520. 7 p.m. $8. Household Pest. Pelican’s Nest, 566 River St. 663-5910. 10 p.m. Call for info. Quarter Mile Club. Boulder Coffee Co., 100 Alexander St. 585-4547140. 8 p.m. Call for info. Something Else. Brickwood Grill, 250 Monroe Ave. 7308230. 10 p.m. Call for info. Steve Lyons & The Believers. Smokin’ Joe’s Bar & Grill, 425 Lyell Ave. Call for info. Warehouse Band. Hamlin Station Bar & Grill, 52 Railroad Ave. 964-2010. 8:30 p.m. Call for info.

SATURDAY, MAY 4 [ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ] Ebb Tide. Flaherty’s Honeoye Falls, 60 W. Main St. 497-7010. Call for info. Frankie & Jewels. Hamlin Station Bar & Grill, 52 Railroad Ave. 964-2010. 8:30 p.m. Call for info. The Grey Hollow Road. Boulder Coffee Co., 100 Alexander St. 585-454-7140. 8 p.m. Call for info. Jeff Slutsky. Lemoncello, 137 West Commercial St. 3858565. 7 p.m. Free.

Jim Lane. The Pint And Goblet

Tavern, 300 Village Square. 624-4386. 6 p.m. Free. John Akers. Flaherty’s Webster, 1200 Bay Rd. 671-0816. Call for info. Michael W. Lasota. Starry Nites Café, 696 University Ave. 8 p.m. Call for info. Nick Young. Sticky Lips BBQ Juke Joint, 830 Jefferson Rd. 292-5544. 10 p.m. Free. Rayce Malone & John Ryan. McGraw’s Irish Pub, 146 W Commercial St. 348-9091. 7 p.m. Free. [ BLUES ]

The Crawdiddies. The Beale

New Orleans Grille and BarSouth Ave., 693 South Ave. 271-4650. 7:30 p.m. Free. John Cole Blues Band. Dinosaur Bar-B-Que, 99 Court St. 585-325-7090. 10 p.m. Free. Natalie B Band. The Landing Bar and Grille, 30 Fairport Village Landing. 425-7490. 10 p.m. [ CLASSICAL ]

Chinese Choral Society of Rochester 30th Anniversary Concert: Flow River Flow.

Penfield High School, 25 High School Dr. 7:30 p.m. $4-$6.

Master Degree Recital: Joseph Yungen (Piano); CheHo Lam (Violin). Kilbourn Hall, 26

Gibbs St. 7 p.m. Free.

CLASSICAL/FOLK | WAR MUSIC

This weekend it’s a double-header for war music, at home and abroad, in a pair of performances ranging from large-scale classical to period recreation. On Friday, May 3, William Weinert will conduct Benjamin Britten’s massive “War Requiem,” written to celebrate the opening of an English church destroyed during a World War II. A 90-minute work in six movements, the composition will require performances by the Eastman Rochester Chorus, Eastman Chorale, Eastman Philharmonia, and the Eastman Children’s Chorus, along with four soloists. Weinert described the piece as “the most important musical work ever written with an anti-war message.” Then, two days later on Sunday, May 5, Dearest Home, a folk ensemble from Gettysburg, will don Civil War-era attire to recreate a vespers liturgy from an 1862 worship book. The Civil War Vespers is presented to commemorate the 150th anniversary of the Battle of Gettysburg. The group features vocals, fiddle, concertina, guitar, bass, piano, reed organ, mountain dulcimer, pennywhistle, flugelhorn, trumpet, trombones, and tambourine. Reception to follow. “War Requiem” will be performed Friday, May 3, 8 p.m. at the Eastman Theatre, 60 Gibbs St. Free. 274-1100, esm.rochester.edu. Dearest Home will perform Sunday, May 5, 4 p.m. at The Lutheran Church of the Incarnate Word, 597 East Ave. Suggested freewill offering $10. 244-6065, MusicAtIncarnateWord.org/wp/. — BY PALOMA CAPANNA Morning Chamber Music: Los Angeles Piano Quartet. Eastman East Wing Hatch Recital Hall, 26 Gibbs St. 11 a.m. Free.

RPO Community Chorus Concert. Kodak Hall at Eastman Theater, 60 Gibbs St. 8 p.m. Free, $5 donation recommended.

Veni Creator Spiritus: French Organ Music of the 20th Century. St. Anne Church, 1600

Mt. Hope Ave. 540-845-7767. 8 p.m. Free.

Dynamic Saturdays. ONE

Nightclub and Lounge, 1 Ryan Alley. 546-1010. first Saturday of every month. 21+. Call for info. La Selva. Tilt Nightclub & Ultralounge, 444 Central Ave. 232-8440. 10 p.m. Call for info.

Latino Saturdays w/DJ Bobby Base. Pure Night Club, 117

Liberty Pole Way. 454-7230. 10 p.m. Call for info.

Saturday Night Ladies Night.

BLU Bar & Grill, 250 Pixley Rd. 247-0079. 9 p.m. Call for info.

[ COUNTRY ]

Chuck Pyle. Greece Baptist

Church, 1230 Long Pond Rd. 225-6160. 8 p.m. $20-$23.

[ DJ/ELECTRONIC ] DJ Big Reg. Plush, 151 St. Paul St. 232-5650. 10 p.m. Call for info. DJ Darkwave. ,. 10 p.m. $3-$8. DJ Trancesend. Decibel Lounge, 45 Euclid St. 585-7544645. 10 p.m. $5.

[ JAZZ ]

Fred Costello & Roger Eckers Jazz Duo. Charley Brown’s, 1675 Penfield Rd. 385-9202. 7:30 p.m. Free.

The Music of Ferrante & Furioso. Yummy Garden Hot

Pot, 2411 W. Henrietta Rd. 3689888. 5:30 p.m. Call for info. Sofrito. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. 585-662-5555. 6 p.m. Free.

Karaoke at Pineapple Jack’s. Pineapple Jack’s, 485

Spencerport Rd. 247-5225. first Saturday of every month, 9 p.m. Call for info. Karaoke at 140 Alex. 140 Alex Bar & Grill, 140 Alexander St. 585-256-1000. 10:30 p.m. Free. Karaoke w/Cyd Scarlett!. Norton’s Pub, 1730 N. Goodman St. 266-3570. 10 p.m. Kick-Ass Karaoke. Temple Bar and Grille, 109 East Ave. 232-6000. 10 p.m. Free. [ POP/ROCK ]

Autoverse, The Gifted Children, Cottage Jefferson, and The Small Print. Tala Vera, 155 State St. 546-3845. 9 p.m. $5-$7.

Big Eyed Phish w/Zac Brown Tribute Band, Moon Zombies.

Water Street Music Hall, 204 N. Water St. 585-325-5600. 8 p.m. $10-$15.

Bitchin’ Kitchen, Bobby Henrie and the Goners. Abilene Bar &

Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. Call for info. Kingsfoil. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N. Water St. 585325-5600. 6:30 p.m. $10-$12. Lindsay Mazza. Boulder Coffee Co., 739 Park Ave. 585-6970235. 8 p.m. Call for info. Run for the Roses. Montage Music Hall, 50 Chestnut St. 232-1520. 8:30 p.m. Call for info.

There’s No Place Like Hope Benefit Concert for Mt. Hope Family Center ft. Midnight City, Extended Family. Lovin’ Cup,

300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. 6 p.m. $20. Two Or Less. Brickwood Grill, 250 Monroe Ave. 730-8230. 10 p.m. Call for info.

VOWS w/The Branch Davidians, Monoculture, and Little Spoon. Bug Jar, 219

Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. Limited entry for unders. $7-$9. Widow Maker. Pelican’s Nest, 566 River St. 663-5910. 10 p.m. Call for info.

SUNDAY, MAY 5 [ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ]

Celtic Music Sundays. Temple Bar and Grille, 109 East Ave. 232-6000. 7 p.m. Free. Aurora House Benefit ft. Dady Brothers. Aquinas Institute, 1127 Dewey Avenue. 7431168. 3 p.m. $15.


SUNDAY, MAY 5 Fandango at the Tango. Tango Cafe, 389 Gregory St. 271-4930. 7:30 p.m. Free, donations accepted. [ CLASSICAL ]

Benefit for the Brockport Ecumenical Food Shelf and BUUF: “Spring is in the Air”.

Brockport Unitarian Universalist Church, 3723 Sweden Walker Rd. 637-6374. 2 p.m. $10.

Canal Opening Celebration Concert: Brockport Symphony Orchestra and Golden Eagle String Band. Seymour College

Union Ballroom The College at Brockport, Residence Drive. 402-8126. 7:30 p.m. Free, donations accepted. Michel Bouvard, organ. Christ Church, 141 East Ave. 454-3878. 7 p.m. Free, donations accepted.

Civil War Vespers ft. Dearest Home. The Lutheran Church

of the Incarnate Word, 597 East Avenue. (585) 2446065. 4 p.m. Freewill offering, suggested $10. Concentus. First Presbyterian Church of Pittsford, 25 Church St. 586-5688. 3 p.m. $5-$10.

First Muse Chamber Music: The Dumka: Then and Now.

First Unitarian Church, 220 S Winton Rd. 271-9070. 7:30 p.m. $5-$20.

Geneseo Symphony Orchestra Concert. Wadsworth

Auditorium, 1 College Circle. 245-5516. 3 p.m. Free.

Greece Performing Arts Society: A Festival of Sacred Music. St. Charles Borromeo Church, 3003 Dewey Ave. 663-3230. 3:30 p.m. Free, donations accepted. Handbell Concert. Third Presbyterian Church, 4 Meigs St. 271-6513. 4 p.m. Free.

Publick Musick: Fabulous Fortepiano!. Christ Episcopal Church, 36 S Main St. 5861226. 3 p.m. $10-$50. World Organ Day. St. Anne Church, 1600 Mt. Hope Ave. 3 p.m. Free.

AJI ZONING & LAND USE ADVISORY 50 Public Market | 208-2336 AWAKEN: Qi gong, yoga, tai chi, fine art 8 Public Market | 261-5659 BOULDER COFFEE CO. 1 Public Market | 232-5282 CARLSON METRO CENTER YMCA 444 East Main Street | 325-2880 CITY NEWSPAPER 250 N. Goodman St | 244-3329 THE CITY OF ROCHESTER Market Office | 428-6907

HARMAN FLOORING CO. 29 Hebard Street | 546-1221

MARKET DISTRICT

B U S I N E S S A S S O C I AT I O N

JUAN & MARIA’S EMPANADA STOP www.juanandmarias.com | 325-6650 “HOME OF THE HIGHLY ADDICTIVE SPANISH FOODS”

FOOD SERVICE DISTRIBUTOR

DEEP DISCOUNT STORAGE 265 Hayward Avenue | 325-5000

WHAT YOU NEED IS JUST A PHONE CALL AWAY

FRIENDS OF THE PUBLIC MARKET marketfriends@rochester.rr.com | 325-5058

THE GOURMET WAFFLER Catering 461-0633

20-22 Public Market | 423-0994

1115 E. Main Street | 469-8217 Open Studios First Friday Every Month CAFE 50 Public Market | 325-5280 Purveyors of Fine Coffee and Tea OBJECTMAKER 153 Railroad Street | 244-4933

97 Railroad Street | 546-8020 Tours • Tastings • Private Parties www.rohrbachs.com TIM WILKES PHOTOGRAPHY 9 Public Market | 423-1966

[ DJ/ELECTRONIC ]

Boasy Sundaze. Club Clarissas,

293 Clarissa St. 232-3430. Call for info. Cinco De Mayo Party . Marge’s Lakeside Inn, 4909 Culver Rd. 585-323-1020. 3 p.m. 21+. Free. Drink and Drag Sundays. ONE Nightclub and Lounge, 1 Ryan Alley. 546-1010. 8 p.m. 18+. Call for info.

Tequila Sundays ft. DJ Andy Fade. Flat Iron Café, 561 State St. 585-454-4830. 10 p.m. Call for info. continues on page 25

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 23


’s Y T I C

SHARE IT!

THURSDAY, MAY 2

THROUGHOUT ROCHESTER’S EAST END

Come out for CITY’s fourth annual night of FREE music on the streets! Listen to great local musicians, PLUS get ridiculous deals from neighborhood merchants on food, drink, goods, and services!

GREAT OFFERS 5-9pm FREE MUSIC 6-8pm 1 Complimentary tall coffee with purchase

of a baked good; $1 off small pizza, $2 off large pizza at Spot Coffee! 2 $3 bottles of Pyramid Curve Ball Blonde Ale at Matthew's East End Grill! 3 $5 flights of beer at Roc Brewing Co! 4 $2 cheese and pepperoni slices at Cam's Pizzeria! 5 Half-price appetizers 4-6 p.m. and 2 for 1 on select beers at Victoire! 6 $3 sliders with a can of Schmidt at Skylark Lounge! 7 $2 Bud Light pints, $3 shots of Cabin Fever Maple Whiskey or Smirnoff Sorbet at MacGregor's! 8 15% discount on any room in May (Sundays-Thursdays only) at East Ave Inn! 9 50% off any one menu item at Moe's Southwest Grill! 10 $3 blue velvet cake push pops from Fraiche! 11 $7.50 music stand lights. $8.50 F-Zone digital music tuners, $30 colored ukuleles, and 25 percent off in-stock new ukuleles at Bernunzio Uptown Music!

Full list of musicians, Facebook Event link, details & updates at: 24 CITY MAY 1-7. 2013

12 $1 mac & cheese cups and $3 chicken

25 Half-price appetizers at Temple Bar & Grill 26 $2 off all flavored cigars at Santiago

13

27 $3 Art-o-Mat works, plus free admissio

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portabella sliders at Ludwig's Center Stage Café! $2 large fountain sodas, $2 small popcorns, $1 bottled waters at Little Theatre! 2 spring rolls for $2 at Golden Port! $2 pints and 16 oz. cans (21 and over only) at Salinger's! $2 slices of pepperoni and cheese pizza at Stromboli Express! $2 gourmet Old Toad sliders and $3 well drinks at The Old Toad! $2 Coronas at Bamba Bistro! $1 cups of gourmet coffee at Java's! $2 tacos (meat or vegetarian), $2 Tecate bottled beer at Mex! $5 chicken-on-a-stick, $3 cans of Genny Bock at Acanthus Cafe! $2 "grab bag" beers and $2 Tullamore Dew shots at Dub Land Underground! 2 risotto balls for $3; 2 prosciutto wraps for $3; $3 Sam Adams; $3 chardonnays at Veneto! $2.50 meatball sliders & chips at Camarella's!

Cigar Factory!

28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37

to "Eat It: Artists Explore Food & Consumption" at Rochester Contemporar Art Center! $2 pepperoni or cheese pizza slices at Pontillo's Pizza! $3 for any standard 6" pita at Pita Pit! $1 for 2 cookies at Orange Glory Café! 50 percent off every book in the store a Greenwood Books! $3 sliders and fries, $2 gourmet beef or chicken tacos, $3 house wines & domestic drafts from Wall Street! $3 Jameson shots from Havana Moe's! $4 Carolina Pulled Pork Sandwich & sig up to win a “Party with Marty” for 30 people from Marty’s Meats! $1 Le Petit S'more Treat from Le Petite Poutine! $3 Mac-Daddy, $3 Back Alley Burger $3 Portabella Sandwich from Mr. V’s! 3 cake shots for $5 from Lettuce B. Fra

ROCHESTERCITYNEWSPAPER.COM


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Dr. 292-9940. 4 p.m. Free.

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CITY

Busker Zone Find buskers here! City Newspaper Staff

Pick up your guitar picks to vote for your favorite busker!

ALEXANDER ST

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Merchant Offer

MADE POSSIBLE WITH SUPPORT FROM

Karaoke w/Walt O’Brien. Flipside Bar & Grill, 2001 E Main St. 288-3930. 9 p.m. Free. [ OPEN MIC ]

PRODUCED BY

P.I.’s Lounge, 495 West Ave. 8 p.m. Call for info. [ CLASSICAL ]

Handel: Te Deum and Jubilate. Lutheran Church of

[ DJ/ELECTRONIC ]

Alphonso Williams. Bistro

Open Jam at Thirsty Frog. PRIZES SPONSORED BY

[ BLUES ]

Bluesday Tuesday Blues Jam.

[ JAZZ ]

[ KARAOKE ]

P Parking

Colossus performs Friday, May 3, 9 p.m. at the Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. $6-$8. bugjar.com. — BY ROMAN DIVEZUR

Auditorium, 1 College Circle. 245-5516. 8 p.m. Free.

135, 135 W. Commercial St. 585-662-5555. 5:30 p.m. Free.

P

When Dave Chisholm came up with the name Colossus he was waiting for the right group. Like its descriptive name suggests, Colossus is a rather large ensemble. It’s a big band that’s heavy on brass and dwarfs others in comparison. The 17-member orchestra is co-led by composer-performers Dave Chisholm (trumpet), Mike Conrad (trombone), and Levi Saelua (woodwinds), and among its missions — like the U.S.S. Enterprise — is to boldly go where no jazz band has gone before. Colossus offers up a cerebral modern jazz twist on the big-band sound. This concert is the group’s third gig at the Bug Jar. To paraphrase the big man on the TV, it’s gonna be huge. With Mr. Boneless, and The Reactions.

the Reformation, 111 North Chestnut St. 454-3367. 7:30 p.m. Free, donations accepted. Timothy Smith, organ. Geneseo Central Presbyterian Church, 31 Center Street, Geneseo, NY 14454. (585) 245-5516. noon. Free, donations accepted.

VFW, 4306 Rt 31. 315-5970011. 7 p.m. $10-$12. [ CLASSICAL ]

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155 State St. 546-3845. 7 p.m. $6-$8.

SUNY Geneseo Percussion Ensemble Concert. Wadsworth

ALEXANDER ST

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Upward Groove, The Dead Love Society, The Results, Cinco De Mayo, Kneptune, and Awake At Last. Tala Vera,

Igor & Red Elvises w/The Kids in the Band Hall. Palmyra

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Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. $6-$8. Hall Pass. Pelican’s Nest, 566 River St. 663-5910. 5 p.m. Call for info. The Reinhardts w/Ron LoCurto. Smokin’ Joe’s Bar & Grill, 425 Lyell Ave. Call for info.

[ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ]

32

21

Cinco de Grunge: Anchorage Nebraska w/ Thoroughbred, Old Soul, White Woods, and Sexy Teenagers. Bug Jar, 219

Music Hall, 204 N. Water St. 585325-5600. 7 p.m. $9.41-$10.

PITKIN ST

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[ POP/ROCK ] Beartooth. Dubland Underground, 315 Alexander St. 232-7550. 5:30 p.m. $10.

Twenty One Pilots w/New Politics, Melia. Water Street

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[ KARAOKE ]

Karaoke w/Cyd Scarlett. Jose & Willy’s, 20 Lakeshore Drive. 905-0222. 8:30 p.m.

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Joe Santora & Curtis Kendrick. The Pultneyville Grill, 4135 Mill St. (315) 589-4512. 4 p.m. Call for info. The Penfield High School Jazz Ensemble: Steppin’ Out At Lovin’ Cup. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point

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[ JAZZ ] Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. 2484825. 7:30 p.m. Free.

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SUNDAY, MAY 5 Bill Slater. Woodcliff Hotel &

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Thirsty Frog, 511 East Ridge Rd. 730-5285. 9 p.m. Call for info.

2 Reason Tuesdays w/DJ Zio.

Nathaniel’s Pub, 251 Exchange Boulevard. 232-8470. Call for info. Free. DJ Ghetto Blaster. Club Clarissas, 293 Clarissa St. 2323430. Call for info. DJ Kathy. Nashvilles, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. 334-3030. Call for info. Old School Tuesdays. Grotto, 7 Lawrence St. 739-5377. Call for info. Free.

Tuesday Americano w/Bobby Base. Flat Iron Café, 561

TUESDAY, MAY 7

State St. 585-454-4830. Call for info.

[ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ] Melanie. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. 8 p.m. $22-$25.

Kyle Vock. Bistro 135, 135 W.

Penfield Rotary Big Band Swing Dance. Penfield

Community Center, 1985 Baird Rd. 340-8655. 7:30 p.m. $1. Ryan from El Rojo Jazz. Lemoncello, 137 West Commercial St. 385-8565. 6 p.m. Free. Tinted Image. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. 248-4825. 5:30 p.m. Free.

[ REGGAE/JAM ] Roc City Pro Jam. Richmond’s Tavern, 21 Richmond Street. (585) 270-8570. 10 p.m. Free. [ POP/ROCK ]

Cemeteries w/The Branch Davidians, Eyeway, and Stevie Nicks Ray Vaughn. Bug Jar,

219 Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. $6-$8.

Rock 4 Recovery w/Saving Abel, Art of Dying. Montage

Music Hall, 50 Chestnut St. 232-1520. 7 p.m. $19.94-$21.94. Tim & Alex. Boulder Coffee Co., 100 Alexander St. 585454-7140. 8 p.m. Call for info.

[ JAZZ ] Commercial St. 585-662-5555. 5:30 p.m. Free. rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 25


Theater FLOWERS FOR MOTHER’S DAY

Viva la revolucion “Les Miserables” TUESDAY, MAY 7-SUNDAY, MAY 12 AUDITORIUM THEATRE, 885 E. MAIN ST. TUESDAY-THURSDAY 7:30 P.M.; FRIDAY 8 P.M.; SATURDAY 2 & 8 P.M.; SUNDAY 1 & 6:30 P.M. TICKETS START AT $37.50 800-745-3000, RBTL.ORG [ PREVIEW ] BY ERIC REZSNYAK

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The old adage says that misery loves company. The musical adaptation of Victor Hugo’s “Les Miserables” has certainly had plenty of visitors over its nearly three-decade life span. The trials and tribulations of Jean Valjean, Fantine, Marius, and the other Revolution-era Frenchmen have pulled in audiences again and again. People are drawn in by Hugo’s characters and plot and the memorable songs by Claude-Michel Schonberg and Alain Boublil (“One Day More,” “On My Own,” “Castle on a Cloud,” to name just a few). The show won a slew of 1987 Tony Awards after it opened on Broadway and has since become the fourthlongest-running show in Broadway history — not bad for a musical that was largely panned when it debuted. While there is not currently a version of “Les Miserables” playing on Broadway (a revival is planned for 2014), the 25th Anniversary Tour comes to Rochester next week courtesy of the Rochester Broadway Theatre League. The tour itself — launched in 2010 and featuring new staging and scenery inspired by the paintings of Victor Hugo — just recently passed a milestone 1000th performance. Andrew Varela, who plays the role of the relentless antagonist Javert in the tour, spoke to City about the enduring popularity of the show, the complex nature of his character, and how the recently released, Oscar-winning film adaptation has impacted live performances of the musical. An edited transcript of the conversation follows. CITY: With such a long-running show, how do you keep your character fresh and interesting? Andrew Varela: It’s important to realize that,

as an actor, you’re privileged to do what you’re doing. People work really hard in the world. It’s an honor to do what I do and be paid for it. Specific to this production, “Les Mis,” is it’s so good. We’re having so much fun. I get to do something that has meaning,

26 CITY MAY 1-7, 2013

Andrew Varela as Javert in the 25th Anniversary Tour of “Les Miserables,” coming to the Auditorium May 7-12. PHOTO BY DEEN VAN MEER

has importance. I never feel like I’m doing a puff piece. Every time I’m out there, I’m actually replicating art. This show is so large. It’s about life, it’s about God — it’s about the meaning of life, how we’re supposed to live it. “To love another person is to see the face of God.” These are the biggest themes of the human experience. That’s what the show is about. Wherever this show is, it lands. China, South America, Europe — it hits every human because it’s so universal. Javert is a complicated character. Some view him as a tragic figure, others as a madman. How do you interpret the character?

I was doing some press in Washington, and a lady brought up the fact that Javert is just doing his job. He’s a cop, doing his job as he sees it. At the end he’s actually wrong, and he realizes that he has been the bad guy. It’s sort of like the end of “The Sixth Sense, “where you realize that Bruce Willis is a ghost. Javert is doing everything that he can to do the right thing. I play him very honestly. Because up until the point where he realizes he is wrong about Valjean, he’s just a good cop, doing his job. It is tragic, what happens, and how he chooses to deal with it. The movie version of the musical was released last year to huge success. Has that had any impact on how stage productions have approach the show?

In the movie they switch two of the numbers. They move “I Dreamed a Dream” to a slightly later part of the

story. I’ve heard rumbling they may do that with the stage. The show has had such a following for so many years, I’m not certain the numbers have bumped up at all. Moving forward after the movie, we’re getting a different audience member. We’ve had a lot of great feedback. What is it about this show that has kept it so consistently popular over multiple decades?

The themes we’re dealing with. It’s about love, it’s about God, it’s about revolution, it’s about sex — we’re talking about things that, regardless where you are on this earth, you’re experiencing the emotions here. So 50 million, 60 million people on, you can see that people are being affected. It’s a pan-humanistic, emotional experience. What have been some of your favorite roles?

On Broadway I played Jean Valjean. It’s a huge role, obviously; anyone you see taking on that role deserves a bow. I’ve played The Phantom. Did “Little Women.” I would like to try all of the big men’s roles going forward in my career. When you do the work and then you nail it on stage, you feel like a champion. You feel like you got the gold medal. It never gets, old because it’s a choice to not let it get old. You find something new in each scene. As an actor you are doing the same thing every day, but you find the subtle differences and you focus on those.


Art Exhibits [ OPENING ] 1975 Gallery, 89 Charlotte St. Our Cryptozoological Expedition into “The Elusive” A Presentation by the Huckle Buckle Boys.. Through May 25. Reception May 4, 7-10 p.m. 1975ish.com. Acanthus Café, 337 East Ave. “Bestest of Friends.” New artwork by Kristine A. Greenizen. Reception May 3, 6 p.m. 585-319-5999. acanthuscafe.com. Anderson Alley Building, 250 N. Goodman St. Nosferatü Studios Annual Soirée. 250 N. Goodman St. in the Anderson Arts Building, suite 3-10. Nosferatü Studios invites you to come celebrate our 3rd year and the Welcoming of Spring with guest artists John Magnus Champlin and Super Science Lady. Enter to win a signed limited edition print of Magnoliaceæ plus other prizes. nosferatustudios.com. Aviv Cafe, 321 East Ave. “For Those Who Served” by John Retallack. Through May 31. Reception May 3, 6-9 p.m. Open Painting (Bring own supplies). 729-9916. Gallery r, 100 College Ave. The School for American Crafts BFA Exhibition. Through May 11. Reception May 3, 6-9:30 p.m. Hours: Wed-Sun 1-5 p.m. 2563312. galleryr99@gmail.com. Hungerford Building, 1115 E. Main St. Senior Art Exhibitions. Through May 20. Rooms 248 and 258. UR students Lauren Blair, Sharon Hector, Olivia Morgan, Kirsten Williamson, Carlos Tejeda, and Jacq Carpentier. Reception May 3, 6-9 p.m. 315-264-3151. lauren. blair5@gmail.com. International Art Acquisitions, 3300 Monroe Ave. “Living Fabric” by Kathleen Kinkopf.. Through May 31. Mon-Fri 10 a.m.-9 p.m., Sat 10 a.m.-6 p.m., Sun 12-5 p.m. 264-1440. internationalartacquisitions. com. Main Street Artists’ Gallery & Studio, 1115 E. Main St. Main Street Artists’ First Friday open studio show and sale. Featured artist for May: Gabriele Lodder of Webster Music: Ralph DeBergalis & Co., jazz. 233-5645. suzizeftingkuhn@gmail.com. mainstreetartistsgallery.com. Mental Health Association, 320 N Goodman St. “Luminaria” Art lighting the path to wellness. Creative Wellness Coalition. Reception May 3, 6-9 p.m. 325-3145 x144. Monroe Branch Library, 809 Monroe Ave. Sand and Stone: Exhibit of Original Photography by Libby Hsiao. Reception May 3, 4-6 p.m. 428-8202. libraryweb.org. Nazareth College Arts Center, 4245 East Ave. Annual Art Education Graduate Art Show. Through May 12. Reception May 3, 5-8 p.m. featuring live music by Alexandra Vasilius. Exhibit Hours: Tuesday-Thursday 12-5 p.m.; Friday-Saturday 12-8 p.m.; Sunday 12-5 p.m. 389-2170. artsceneter.naz.edu. RIT Barnes & Noble, 100 Park Point. (ART BOUND). 4246766.

FESTIVAL | IMAGINE RIT

The college and university settings have long been hotbeds for thriving creative collaboration among students and staff. Imagine RIT, the annual campus-wide innovation and creativity festival, will take place Saturday, May 4, at the Rochester Institute for Technology campus (Lomb Memorial Drive, Henrietta). RIT students and staff will showcase their innovations and creations during a festival of games, demos, performances, and exhibits. Witness creative movement and juggling, bring the kids to the Science Playground, join Dumbledore’s Army or take a potions class in “A Day at Hogwarts,” and visit the boggling Escherian Stairwell. Food vendors will be on site and RIT’s dining facilities will be open and operating. The event takes place 10 a.m.-5 p.m. and admission is free. Visitors can park for free on the RIT campus on a first-come, first-serve basis, and additional parking is available at Monroe Community College (1000 E. Henrietta Road), with a free shuttle bus service to RIT. For a schedule of events and more information, visit rit.edu/imagine, or follow @ritnews on Twitter. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY The Shoe Factory Art Co-op, 250 N. Goodman St. Mona Oates and Wen-Hua Chen. Reception May 3, 6-9 p.m. and Second Saturday, May 11, 12-4 p.m. Additional gallery hours are on Wednesdays from 12-5 p.m. shoefactoryarts.com. The Firehouse Gallery at Genesee Pottery, 713 Monroe Avenue. “One” by Aaron Benson.. Through May 24. Reception May 3, 6-9 p.m. On Saturday, May 25th, the artist will be sharing his techniques in a workshop at Genesee Pottery entitled Large Scale Architectural Handbuilding. The workshop is $60 for non-members and $50 for members, register. 271-5183. geneseearts.org. Valley Manor, 1570 East Ave. “Shared Visions” by Jim and Gail Thomas. Through Jun 28. Reception May 3, 5-8 p.m. Hours: 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Mon-Fri or by appointment. 770-1923. Vineyard Community Space, 836 South Clinton Ave. Art Rains. Fine arts & photography exhibit by Justyn Sweany Wolf. Live music by the Standard Jazz Trio 6:309 p.m. 288-2034. info@ monroeparkvineyard.org. Visual Studies Workshop, 31 Prince Street. “ChemoToxic, I Am That, and other stories” by Willie Osterman. Receptions and fundraiser for Pluta Cancer Treamtment Center May 3, 7-9 p.m. 9:30 p.m. music by Brian Murphy. (585) 442-8676. vsw.org.

[ CONTINUING ] Anderson Alley Building, 250 N. Goodman St. D RK-WH1T3: Kurt Ketchum Experiment. Through May 3. Colleen Buzzard Studio Anderson Alley 4th Floor No.1. facebook.com/ kurt.ketchum.3. Axom Gallery, 176 Anderson Ave., 2nd floor. “The New Town Collection: A Gift of Hope” Photographic Prints by Henry Avignon. Through May 4. Wed-Sat noon-5 p.m. and by appt. Closing reception May 3, 6-9 p.m. Also on display: a welded metal heart by Christine Knoblauch, engraved with the 26 names of the victims. 232-6030 x23. axomgallery.com. Black Radish Studio, 274 N. Goodman. “Spirit of the River” by Richard Margolis. Through May 18. Mon-Fri 10 a.m.-6 p.m., Sat 12-6 p.m. 413-1278. blackradishstudio.com. Books Etc., 78 W. Main St. “Backdoor Artists.” Through June 10. With Sue Higgins, Martin Heit, Nicki Millor, Emily Osgood, and Susan Sweet. 4744116. books_etc@yahoo.com.

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GETLISTED get your event listed for free e-mail it to calendar@rochestercitynews.com. Or go online to rochestercitynewspaper.com and submit it yourself!

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Bridge Art Gallery University of Rochester Medical Center, 300 Crittenden Blvd. Beyond Barriers Exhibit. Through June 30. 275-3571. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. “Man vs Machine” Through May 30. Hours 8 p.m.-2 a.m. Featuring Bile, Cruk, Yewzer, John Magnus, Thievin’ Stephen, Spaceman, Derek Crowe, Mike Turzanski, Sidhe, Matt Ely, Doe Gawn, Adam Maida, and Clayton Cowles. $5. lobbydigital.com. Community Darkroom Gallery, 713 Monroe Ave. “Draft 10” Through May 18. Mon 9 a.m.9:30 p.m., Tue-Thu 9 a.m.6:30 p.m., Fri 12-5 p.m., Sat 10 a.m.-5:30 p.m. 271-5920. Cumming Nature Center Hurst Gallery, 6475 Gulick Rd. Nature in Art: Selections from the Finger Lakes Chapter of the Guild of Natural Science Illustrators. Wed-Fri 9 a.m.3:30 p.m., Sat-Sun 9 a.m.4:30 p.m. 374-6160. rmsc.org. Davison Gallery, Cultural Life Center, Roberts Wesleyan College, 2301 Westside Dr. Senior Showcase. Through May 11. Mon-Fri 11 a.m.-5 p.m., Sat 1-4 p.m. 594-6442. roberts.edu. A Different Path Gallery, 27 Market St. “A Little Twisted: An Exploration of the Self.” BFA Painting Exhibit by Karen Nelson. Wed-Fri 11 a.m.noon, Sat-Sun noon-4 p.m. adifferentpathgallery.com. Friendly Home’s Memorial Gallery, 3165 East Ave. “Searching for Spring” by Elizabeth Liano.. Through Jun 30. Daily 10 a.m.-5 p.m. aflinn@friendlyhome.org. Geneva Historical Society, 543 South Main St. Geneva City School District Art Show. Through May 18. Mon-Fri, 9:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m., Sat, 1:30-4:30 p.m. 315-789-5151. info@genevahistoricalsociety. com. genevahistoricalsociety. com. George Eastman House, 900 East Ave. “Silver and Water” Through May 26. 271-3361. eastmanhouse.org. Hartnett Gallery, Wilson Commons, University of Rochester, River Campus. Sweet Tea and Pecan Pie, Student Show. Through May 12. Tue-Fri 11 a.m.-7 p.m. Sat-Sun noon-5 p.m. blogs. rochester.edu/hartnett.; Annual Undergraduate Juried Exhibition. Tue-Fri 11 a.m.-7 p.m., Sat-Sun 12-5 p.m. 2754188. blogs.rochester.edu/ hartnett. Image City Photography Gallery, 722 University Ave. Worlds Apart: Ethiopia and Elsewhere. Featuring Jim Patton and David Perlman. Through May 12. Wed-Sat 11 a.m.-7 p.m., Sun 12-4 p.m. Reception May 3, 5-9 p.m. 482-1976. imagecityphotographygallery.com. Irondequoit Public Library, Evans Branch, 45 Cooper Rd. Irondequoit Art Club’s 55th Annual Spring Show and Sale. Through May 4. 336-6062. aholland@libraryweb.org. irondequoitartclub.org. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. Alan Singer: Fact of Fiction. Through May 24. thelittle.org.

KIDS | “SIMPLE GIFTS” CASHORE MARIONETTES SHOW

Before previewing videos of the masterful Cashore Marionettes shows, my experience with marionettes began and ended with “Pinocchio,” who sought a string-less life. But the Cashore Marionettes move so realistically and expressively that audience members easily lose themselves in the believability of their presence. For example, Maestro Janos Zelinka is a marionette “who” performs a violin solo so realistically that “he” entirely absorbs the focus of the viewers, though the strings — and shadowy puppeteers — are visible. Puppeteer Joseph Cashore has toured his award-winning shows in Asia, Europe, and North America since 1990. Nazareth College Arts Center (4245 East Ave.) will present “Cashore Marionettes: Simple Gifts” on Sunday, May 5, at 2 p.m. and 4 p.m. in the Callahan Theater. The hour-long performance will run without an intermission, and is recommended for children ages 8 and up with their families, who should appreciate the craftsmanship of the marionettes, the lovely music, and the moving stories. Tickets are $15-$18, and you can reserve your spot by calling 389-2170, online at artscenter.naz.edu, or by visiting the Arts Center box office. A demonstrative lecture with creator Joseph Cashore, who has been designing and performing with his marionettes for more than 30 years, will follow the 4 p.m. performance. Learn more at cashoremarionettes.com. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY Lux Lounge, 666 South Ave. The Art of J. Nevadomski and Allie Hartley. 232-9030. lux666.com. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. “Becoming Modern:Armory Show Artists at MAG” Through May 12. In Lockhart Gallery. Wed-Sun 11 a.m.-5 p.m., until 9 p.m. on Thu. 276-8900. mag.rochester. edu.; “It Came From the Vault: Rarely Seen Works from MAG’s Collection. Wed-Sun 11 a.m.-5 p.m., Thu until 9 p.m. 2768900. mag.rochester.edu. My Sister’s Gallery, 505 Mt. Hope Ave. “Under the Influence,” Artwork by Students from School Without Walls. Through May 12. Hours 10 a.m.-8 p.m. daily. 546-8400 x3716. abmiller@ episcopalseniorlife.org. New Deal Gallery, 4 Livingston County Campus. The Faces of Michael Teres and Leslie Heen. Photographer Michael Teres and painter Leslie Heen team up for an exhibit in Apartment One. Hours: Tue, Wed, Fri 1-4 p.m., Thu 1-7:30 p.m., Sat 11 a.m.-3 p.m. After November 12: Closed Tuesdays. 243-6785. livingstonarts.org.; Expressions

of the Civil War: In Recognition of the 150th Anniversary. Reception Dec 6. Continues TFN Wed, Fri 1-4 p.m., Thu 1-7:30 p.m., Sat 11 a.m.-3 p.m. 243-6785.; Expressions of the Civil War. In recognition of the 150th Anniversary. Hours: Tue, Wed, Fri 1-4 p.m., Thu 1-7:30 p.m., Sat 11 a.m.-3 p.m. After November 12: Closed Tuesdays. 243-6785. livingstonarts.org. Ock Hee’s Gallery, 2 Lehigh St. Eastern Sensibility: Fine Art in Women’s Clothing. Through May 11. With Etsuko and Jae Hee. Mon-Sat 11 a.m.-5 p.m. 624-4730. Outside the Box Art Gallery, Bldg 9, The Canal Works, 1000 Turk Hill Rd. Spirit & Mind. Through May 1. 645-2485. outsidetheboxag.com. Oxford Gallery, 267 Oxford St. “The Four Humors.” Through Jun 1. Tue-Fri 12-5 p.m., Sat 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Reception May 4, 5-8 p.m. 271-5885. oxfordgallery.com. Roc Brewing Co., 56 S. Union St. Carla Bartow. carlasswanktank.blogspot.com. 794-9798. rocbrewingco@ gmail.com. rocbrewingco.com.


Rochester Contemporary Arts Center, 137 East Ave. EAT IT. Including Stefani Bardin, Christine Chin, The Counter Kitchen (Stefani Bardin & Brooke Singer), Brady Dillsworth, Tatiana Kronberg, Andrzej Maciejewski, Spurse. 461-2222. rochestercontemporary.org. Rush Rhees Library, University of Rochester, River Campus. Alice in the Looking Glass: Illustrations and Artists’ Books 1865-2012. Through Aug 16. Rare Books & Special Collections, Rush Rhees Library. Mon-Fri 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Sat 11 a.m.-3 p.m. 2754477.; Memorial Art Gallery: 100 Years of Art for the Community. Through Sep 30, 2013. mag. rochester.edu.

Schweinfurth Art Center, 205 Genesee St. Made in NY 2013. Through Tue-Sat 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Sun 1-5 p.m. 315-255-1553. mtraudt@ schweinfurthartcenter.org. myartcenter.org. Spectrum Gallery at Lumiere Photo, 100 College Ave. Rare and Vintage Prints from the Collections of Nathan Lyons, Carl Chiarenza, and Spectrum Gallery. 461-4447. lumierephoto.com. St. John Fisher College, 3690 East Ave. Rochester Art Club Spring Show. Through May 9. Patricia O’Keefe Ross Gallery in Joseph S Skalney Welcome Center. rochesterartclub.org. Starry Nites Café, 696 University Ave. “Let Them Eat

Cake! Portraits of Pastries.” 732-0036. studio212@ shoefactoryarts.com. shoefactoryarts.com. Studio 215, 1115 E. Main St. BLEEP!. A collaboration by Jose Cruz, Heather Erwin, Maria Friske and André Macedo inspired by the word censorship. 6-9 p.m. 490-1210. humanette66@gmail.com. Tower Fine Arts Center, SUNY Brockport, 180 Holley St. Breaking Currents: The 2013 Annual Student Art Exhibition. Through May 5. Mon-Fri 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Sun 1-4 p.m. 3952805. brockport.edu/finearts. University Gallery, James R. Booth Hall, RIT, Lomb Memorial Dr. “Connections” Arena Art Group. Mon-Thu 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Fri &

Sat 10 a.m.-3 p.m. 475-2866. jleugs@rit.edu. rit.edu/fa/gallery. West Side Gallery, SUNY Brockport, 180 Holley St. “Inside Out.” Solo thesis exhibition of Brockport BFA Student Ali Campbell. It is a collaborative body of work encompassing painting, theatre and photography. 737-5191. brockport.edu. The Yards, 50-52 Public Market. “Based on a True Story: An Investigation of Family & Self Through Narrative Objects.” Through May 12. MFA Thesis Exhibition by Wil Eldgridge Sideman. Tue, Thu, Sat 10 a.m.-2 p.m. attheyards@gmail.com. attheyards.com.

Art Events [ WED., MAY 1 ] HomeSpun. May 1, 7 p.m. Finger Lakes Community College, 3325 Marvin Sands Dr Stage 13. Spotlights musical, literary, and performing arts by students, staff, alumni, and neighbors $2, free with FLCC ID. 785-1367. flcc.edu. The Paper bag Project. May 1, 5:30-7 p.m. Acanthus Café, 337 East Ave. Local silk screen artist Harold Copp’s limited showing of his Paper Bag Project, pre-purposing a 100% recycled paper bag into a useful yet limited life piece of art. This event is followed by Pure Kona Poetry, in which the same night Harold is the

featured poet 585-319-5999. acanthuscafe.com. [ FRI., MAY 3 ] The Civil Appetites. May 3, 7-10 p.m. Rochester Contemporary Arts Center, 137 East Ave. Taste the local with food gleaned from the streets of Rochester. Come celebrate the launch of spurse’s experimental cookbook Eat Your Sidewalk and join in the continues on page 31

GETLISTED get your event listed for free e-mail it to calendar@rochestercitynews.com. Or go online to rochestercitynewspaper.com and submit it yourself!

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 29


Art / Lit

When the late Danny Allen’s painting, “Sunny Ducks” (pictured left), was chosen from the Memorial Art Gallery’s permanent collection for inclusion in the gallery’s current exhibit, it set off a chain of events which resulted in the publishing of a book about the artist and the author, Bill Whiting, and their life in Rochester of yesteryear. Pictured right: Daniel Arthur Allen as captured by noted photographer Eva Weiss, ca. 1973. PHOTOS PROVIDED

Closing chapters “An Early Work Late in Life: The Art and Life of Danny Allen” BY BILL WHITING DENISON CREATIVE/PIXELPRESERVE ANEARLYWORKLATEINLIFE.COM [ REVIEW] BY REBECCA RAFFERTY

It can be difficult, even impossible, for us to see clearly the vital people in our lives while we are living through turbulent, critical moments. We only gain a true sense of things with enough time, distance, and contemplation. Suicide denies us the opportunity of knowing a loved one after we have resolved our issues, of looking back with the other and sharing insight and peace after we have settled down and learned the ropes of life. It leaves the survivors bereft and often burdened with crushing guilt. These are the difficult issues explored in artist and author Bill Whiting’s debut novel about his years living in Rochester in the late 1960’s and early 1970’s with his boyfriend, Danny Allen. It was the last thing he expected to find himself writing. In the whirlwind of events after 28-yearold Danny Allen leaped from the Driving 30 CITY MAY 1-7, 2013

Park Bridge in 1974, Whiting relocated to Philadelphia, where he has lived and worked ever since. In February 2012, Whiting received an e-mail from a friend in Rochester, which requested more information about a tiny wonder of a painting that was selected for inclusion in the Memorial Art Gallery’s current exhibition, “It Came From the Vault.” The exhibit showcases seldom-shown works from the gallery’s permanent collection. An intern at the museum was quite moved by the piece “Sunny Ducks,” about which little was known, except that it was submitted to the annual Finger Lakes Exhibition and subsequently donated to the MAG in the name of the artist, Danny Allen, by one William T. Whiting. Whiting, who is an artist himself, specializing in detailed dollhouses and gorgeous portraits, didn’t immediately know that this innocent e-mail would result in a novel. With long-buried feelings stirred up, he began blogging about his memories and faced emotional wave after wave of revelations as friends and family contributed to and challenged his memories, and eventually someone suggested that he turn the endeavor into a book. So Whiting set about the painful work of resurrecting Allen and his own younger self, telling the story of their challenges and

adventures as poor young artists, their love and troubles, and the long, harrowing process of healing from the loss of a man he still considers to have been the love of his life. By the time the current exhibition opened in March, the book was printed and a reunion was organized to include the old group of hippie artist friends and Allen’s family members, many of whom contributed images of Allen’s artworks as well as precious and troubling memories of the late artist to Whiting’s novel. The volume itself contains multiple stories,

and despite it being the specific experience of a specific teller, much of it will resonate with any adult who picks it up and digs in. On one level, “An Early Work” is a fascinating, semifamiliar reflection on life in Rochester during the tumultuous 1960’s and 70’s: the chaos of Corn Hill and of post-Sexual Revolution life, rife with experimental drug use, and the terror of a time when young people could be forced to kill and die in a war with a supposed purpose that grew less and less tangible as time marched forward. The book also serves to celebrate the life and work of a talented yet troubled young man. It is Whiting’s tribute to Allen; it is a

story of the hard work of seeking closure the hard way — by openly revisiting the good and the bad and holding hands with what will never be known. It has the potential to provide new insight to those who felt the warmth of Allen’s sun, but didn’t spend as much time in close proximity to its scorching volatility as the author did. On still another level, the book tells the story of youthful fumbling and the intensity of first, fragile love; of trying to force a workable life by piecing together the kind of helpless mutual brokenness that has the tendency to shred one another before we have gained the tools needed to smooth over our edges. Some people deal with raw periods in life with self-destructive behavior. Inner gales of great joy and great despair chase one another without end, which is as bewildering to them as it is to behold. And as much love and support as they may have, such people are alone in it. They swing in great loops around their own lives like trapped celestial beings trying to gain the proper momentum to bust free. According to this book, Allen’s young life was wracked by an inner instability that Whiting believes was likely exacerbated by recreational drugs, possibly used to dull a persistent pain that no one around him was equipped to identify properly, much less handle well. Whiting writes that Allen was surrounded by kindness and even adoration, but few detected the intensity of his problems, and as it goes, no one expected the devastating outcome. Amid Whiting’s meandering storytelling, which guides the reader back and forth through time as he recalls significant moments in his and Danny’s shared years, many images of artwork and of Allen, Whiting, and their friends are strung like little gems that serve to illustrate precise points the author seeks to make. The group of artists around the couple comes to life, and Allen’s work moves from burgeoning brilliance to extreme talent, to a strange dissolution of form as mysterious and layered as the collection of his poems found at the end of the book. The story will hold special significance for those whose lives have been jolted by a loved one’s suicide; whose lives are left with this lighting-shaped scar, the branches of which burrow inward anew each time we contemplate what was and what might have been. Fair warning: if you fit this description, the old wound will gain a low ache and persistent pulse even as the author comforts with his hard-won insight. Bill Whiting will visit the Memorial Art Gallery for a reading and book signing on Thursday, May 16, at 5:30 p.m. Watch anearlyworklateinlife.com and mag.rochester.edu for more information.


Art Events discussion! The Civil Appetites is an experimental dinner event with research and design collaborative spurse, aimed at exploring future food ways and commons. More info: thecivilappetites.org. Free. 451-7737. Eating Place: An urban foraging workshop with spurse. May 3, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Rochester Contemporary Arts Center, 137 East Ave. Join us for a gleaning walk to share knowledge and sense a world of pleasures under our feet. We will collect edibles from parks, dumpsters, restaurants, markets and create a “freegan” picnic. Dress code: be ready for a little dirt and adventure Free, rsvp. 451-7737. rodechenko@yahoo. com. thecivilappetites.org. First Friday City Wide Gallery Night. first Friday of every month, 6-9 p.m. firstfridayrochester.org. Hungerford First Friday Open Studios/Galleries. first Friday of every month, 6-9 p.m thehungerford.com. Urban Arts Festival. May 3-5. Tajze, 139 State Street (585) 423-0873. facebook.com/ TajzeLounge. [ WED., MAY 8 ] Lauren Bon and The Optics Division/AgH2O Exhibition. May 8, 6 p.m. George Eastman House, 900 East Ave. Ingallery photograph printing performance. The team will create a print a giant negative included in the Silver and Water exhibition Included in museum admission $5-$12. eastmanhouse.org.

Comedy [ THU., MAY 2 ] Iliza Schlesinger. May 2-4. Comedy Club, 2235 Empire Blvd. Thu 7:30 p.m., Fri-Sat 7:30 & 10 p.m $9-$12. 6719080. thecomedyclub.us. [ FRI., MAY 3 ] Rochester Comedy Festival. May 3, 7 p.m. Blue Cross Arena, One War Memorial Square $55-$70. 800-745-3000. ticketmaster.com. [ SAT., MAY 4 ] Honestly Funny: Long Form Comedy Improvisation. May 4, 3 p.m. Rochester Brainery, Village Gate, 274 N Goodman St. $15. 730-7034. rochesterbrainery.com. Nuts & Bolts Comedy Improv Season Finale. May 4, 8 p.m. Downstairs Cabaret Theatre Center, 540 E. Main St After the show, come grab a drink with us across the street at Richmond’s Tavern $10. 3254370. bit.ly/ZGZ7wB.

Dance Events [ THU., MAY 2 ] Sankofa African Dance and Drum Ensemble. May 2-6. Brockport College, 350 New Campus Drive Thu-Sat 7:30 p.m., Sat-Sun 2 p.m brockport. edu/finearts. [ FRI., MAY 3 ] Upstate NY Spring Salsa Weekend. May 3-5. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. Essence of Rhythm Latin Dance Co 2929940. rhythm-society.org.

[ SAT., MAY 4 ] Peter and the Wolf Concert. May 4, 2 p.m. Edgerton Community Center, 41 Backus St Rochester Medical Orchestra is performing music from Peter and the Wolf by Prokofiev while Flower City Ballet will be dancing to the tunes from this classic children’s tale. The concert also features narration by poet Shaq Payne. Donations benefit Coalition to Prevent Lead Poisoning Free admission. 428-6769. rochestermedicalorchestra.org. [ SUN., MAY 5 ] Decades of Bollywood: A Tribute to the Legends. May 5, 2:30 p.m. India Community Center, 2171 Monroe County Line Rd $15-$25. 248-5982. bollywooddancemania.com.

Festivals [ WED., MAY 1 ] Low Bridge, High Water. May 1-5. Village of Brockport. Join Brockport’s week long celebration of the seasonal opening of the Erie Canal. brockportny.org. [ SUN., MAY 5 ] Imagine RIT. May 5. Rochester Institute of Technology, 1 Lomb Memorial Dr. rit.edu/imagine. Kite Flight. May 5, 11 a.m.3 p.m. Ontario Beach Park, 4799 Lake Ave Acrobats and entertainers 1-3 p.m Free cityofrochster.gov.

Lectures [ WED., MAY 1 ] Food Allergies with Dr. Anitha Shrikhande. May 1, 7 p.m. Irondequoit Library, Helen McGraw Branch, 2180 E. Ridge Rd Free, register. 336-6060. Institute of Popular Music Talk: Steven Page. May 1, 5 p.m. University of Rochester Strong Auditorium, River Campus rochester.edu/popmusic. Light Works! Presents Rev. Dan Chesbro and The Gospel of Thomas. May 1, 6:30 p.m. RIT Barnes & Noble, 100 Park Point. $5, bring a friend $4. 585-424-6777. bn.com. “NY’s Forgotten War: The War of 1812 and the Making of the Empire State” by Garth Swanson.. May 1, 7 p.m. Genesee Community College, 1 College Road 343-0055 x6616. dsutherland@genesee.edu. Ontario County Geneaological Society: “Resources to Use in Tracing Your Grandmother’s Mother” by Barbara Hill. May 1, 7 p.m. Ontario County Historical Society Museum, 55 North Main St., Canandaigua 394-4975. ochs.org. [ THU., MAY 2 ] Derek Maxfield: The Battle of Gettysburg, July, 1863.” May 2, 7:30 p.m. Mendon Community Center, 167 N. Main St. townofmendon.org. Digital Humanities Distinguished Speaker Series: Katherine Behar. May 2, 8 p.m. Carlson Auditorium, RIT Campus, Lomb Memorial Dr. Katherine Behar is an interdisciplinary new media and performance artist and is Assistant Professor of New Media at Baruch College Free. 475-2057.

Frederick Douglass Institute Conference. May 2, 12:30-2 p.m. University of Rochester, River Campus 276-5744. fdi@mail. rochester.edu. rochester.edu. [ SAT., MAY 4 ] “I Don’t: Violence against Young Girls”. May 4, 6:30 p.m. Rochester Baha’i Center, 693 East Avenue. Potluck dinner as we share a meal as a community. Then, join Nat Yogachandra as he highlights several countries where child marriage is robbing girls of their childhood and educational opportunities while feeding the vicious cycle of domestic violence and poverty Free 461-3272. Citizen Emergency Preparedness. May 4, 10:30 a.m. Penfield Public Library, 1985 Baird Rd. Free, register. 340-8720. penfieldlibrary.org. Don’t Freak if You Spring a Leak: Coping with Incontinence. May 4, 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Mario’s, 2740 Monroe Ave. RSVP. 334-0999. homecarerochesterny.com. [ SUN., MAY 5 ] Catherine Bertini, Former Head of United Nations World Food Program. May 5, 4 p.m. Finger Lakes Community College, 3325 Marvin Sands Dr $29$39. gmeforum@flcc.edu. gmeforum.org. Mushrooms and Health. May 5, 2:30 p.m. Penfield Public Library, 1985 Baird Rd. With Dr. Alice W. Chen Free. 3408720. penfieldlibrary.org.

HIV+ Research Volunteers Needed for HIV Study • Must be 18-55 years old and have documented HIV and taking ATRIPLA • Must be substance-free • 35 day study commitment • One 4 overnight and one 2 overnight stay in our unit • 6 clinic visits • Get paid up to $2900 for entire study • Get free health and laboratory evaluations

Call the Buffalo Clinical Research Center at 716-885-3580 ext 205 for information on “Study #2206” or go to www.bcrc.us/studies.php

CITY Newspaper presents

Mind Body Spirit & Workshops TO ADVERTISE IN THE MIND BODY SPIRIT SECTION CALL CHRISTINE AT 244.3329 x23 OR EMAIL CHRISTINE@ROCHESTER-CITYNEWS.COM

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[ MON., MAY 6 ] Does the Obamacare Contraceptive Mandate Violate Religious Freedom?. May 6, 7:30 p.m. First Unitarian Church, 220 S Winton Rd Rochester Chapter of Americans United for the Separation of Church and State 271-9070. info@aurochester. org. rochesterunitarian.org. [ TUE., MAY 7 ] Community Supported Agriculture. May 7, 2:30 p.m. Penfield Public Library, 1985 Baird Rd. Bill and Debbie Wickham from Wickham Farms in Penfield return this spring to discuss community-supported agriculture programs (CSAs) which are popular among people who want to eat healthy and local Free, register. 3408720. penfieldlibrary.org. Forum on Social Security. May 7, 6 p.m. Workers United Building, 750 East Ave action@ metrojustice.org. metrojustice.org. The Pride & Passion: The African-American Baseball Experience Lecture Series. May 7, 12-1 p.m. Central Library, Kate Gleason Auditorium, 115 South Ave. May 7: Satchmo: The Life of Louis Armstrong. May 14: History of the Negro Leagues. June 11: Talking Baseball with Johnny Antonelli & Scott Pitoniak Free. 428-8350. libraryweb.org/ pride&passion. continues on page 32

GETLISTED get your event listed for free e-mail it to calendar@rochestercitynews.com. Or go online to rochestercitynewspaper.com and submit it yourself!

OPEN HOUSE Sat., May 11th • 5:30pm-8:30pm

Cha Cha Fox Trot Salsa Swing Tango Waltz 1060 University Ave | 271-6840 Livehappyrochester.com

The Spiritual Basis of Prosperity Sunday lessons and a class beginning on May 15th on “Prosperous Living.”

Sunday Celebration 11:00 a.m. Music, Meditation and Message May focus on Prosperous Living Children's Program

Christ Church Unity

Unity

Church of the Daily Word.

We welcome you!

55 Prince St., Rochester, NY 14607 • www.unityrochester.org • 585-473-0910

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 31


Lectures

discussion Free. 288-8644. mbrbookinfo@aol.com.

Rochester Museum and Arts Meetup: Michael T. Keene author of “Mad House.” May 7, 6:45 p.m. RIT Barnes & Noble, 100 Park Point $5. 585-4246777. bn.com.

[ TUE., MAY 7 ] R-SPEC meeting. first Tuesday of every month, 7 p.m. Barnes and Noble, Pittsford Plaza Writers of speculative fiction meet once a month to discuss craft Free. 585 278 7501. r-spec.org. Spring Book Sale. May 7-11. Webster Library, 980 Ridge Rd Members only (memberships $8 at door) Tue May 7 5-8:30 p.m. Public sale hours WedThu 10 a.m.-8:30 p.m., Fri 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Sat 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Special sale on Friday, and Saturday shoppers can fill a bag of books for $3 or buy one book get one book free Free admission 872-7075. websterlibrary.org.

Literary Events [ WED., MAY 1 ] The Art of Fact Award: Cheryl Strayed.. May 1, 7:30 p.m. Temple B’rith Kodesh, 2131 Elmwood Ave. Free 395-2451. brockport.edu/wforum. Pure Kona Poetry Readings. 7 p.m. Acanthus Café, 337 East Ave. Local poets gather to read their latest works Free. 3195999. acanthuscafe.com. [ THU., MAY 2 ] Book Thieves: Young Professionals Book Club Meetings. May 2. Writers and Books, 740 University Ave Group meets at 6:30 p.m. to eat and mingle, discussion follows 7-9 p.m. Apr-Jun: “Devil’s Highway” or “Swamplandia” meetings May 2, Jun 6. Jul-Sep: “Great Gatsby” meetinsg Aug 1, Sep 5. Oct-Dec “The Book Thief” meetings Nov 7, Dec 5 473-2590 x105. facebook.com/book.thieves. Books Sandwiched-In: “Ghostbread” by Sonja Livingston. May 2, 12:10 p.m. Brighton Memorial Library, 2300 Elmwood Ave. Sandwiches are welcome; coffee and tea are available brightonlibrary.org. [ FRI., MAY 3 ] First Fridays/Wide Open Mic. first Friday of every month, 7-9 p.m. Writers and Books, 740 University Ave Rochester’s longest running open mic welcomes poets, performers, and writers of all kinds. wab.org. The Friends of the Pittsford Library Spring 2013 Book Sale. May 3-5. Pittsford Community Library, 24 State St. riday May 3rd 5pm 8:30pm (Members Only - You Can Join At The Door!) Saturday

SPECIAL EVENT | CITY NEWSPAPER’S BEST BUSKER CONTEST

The Best Busker Contest on Thursday, May 2, marks its fourth year of fantastic street festival fun. Join City Newspaper and a horde of talented local musicians as they play on the sidewalks of the East End between Chestnut and Alexander streets, competing for votes (guitar picks) from passers-by, and the chance to win prizes from Bernunzio Uptown Music. You, the viewer, will be surrounded by all manner of acoustic tunes, and have access to ridiculous deals from neighborhood merchants on food, drink, goods, and services. Participation is entirely free — just head down to the East End and visit City’s booth for your five guitar picks (that’s how you cast your vote), a map to the buskers, and a list of merchant deals and locations. Merchant offers will run 5-9 p.m. (unless otherwise noted), and musicians will play 6-8 p.m. For previews of merchant deals, participating musicians, more information, and updates, visit rochestercitynewspaper.com and follow us on Twitter @roccitynews. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY May 4th 10am - 5pm (Open to the Public) Sunday May 5th 10am - 4pm (Everything is Half Price) Closed for an hour, 5pm 6pm Fill a Bag for $3. 248-6275.

[ SAT., MAY 4 ] The Quest(ion) of Self-Publishing with Nina Alvarez. May 4, 2 p.m. Central Library of Rochester, Kate Gleason Auditorium, 115

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32 CITY MAY 1-7, 2013

SPECIAL EVENT | BROWNCROFT GARAGE SALE

If you love the hunt for new-to-you treasures as much as acquiring them, check out the Browncroft Garage Sale. This biennial event boasts 200 garage sales in a square mile, at the rate of about one out of every three houses. Bike over to the Browncroft neighborhood or park your car and walk to dozens of sales amid lilacs, forsythia, and springtime air. The event takes place Saturday-Sunday, May 4-5, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. each day, but several sales will open Friday night. The neighborhood is on the city’s east side, just west of the I-590 Browncroft and Blossom exits and east of Winton Road. Signs and balloons will guide visitors to the area and individual houses hosting sales. You can even preview what is for sale before you head out at browncroftna.org, where participants have posted lists of sale items. Shoppers may print out a map of the 17 streets with address numbers for each participating home. More information is also available at the event’s Facebook page: facebook.com/browncroftna and you can get updates on Twitter @browncroftna. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY South Ave Free, register. 4288375. libraryweb.org. [ MON., MAY 6 ] Moving Beyond Racism Reading Group. May 6, 7-8:30 p.m.

Barnes & Noble Pittsford Plaza, 3349 Monroe Ave. “Inheriting the Trade” by Thomas DeWolf. Everyone is welcome whether or not you have read the book. Join us for a safe, stimulating

Museum Exhibit [ WED., MAY 1 ] “Rochester Baseball: From Mumford’s Meadow to Frontier Field.”. Through June 14. Lower Link Gallery, Central Library, 115 South Ave. 4288053. libraryweb.org. [ SUN., MAY 5 ] The Pride & Passion: The African-American Baseball Experience. May 5-June 14. Central Library, 115 South Ave. Through June 14. Reception May 5 2-4 p.m. Exhibit tells the story of how black baseball players from the late 19th century onward persevered through discrimination to excel at the sport they loved. For more events visit site 585-4288150. www3.libraryweb.org/ pridepassion/home.aspx.

Recreation [ WED., MAY 1 ] Birding Site: Washington Grove. May 1, 8-11 a.m. Cobbs Hill Park, 100 Norris Drive Meet in the main Reservoir loop off Highland Avenue. Bring your eyes and ears. Binoculars


are helpful but not necessary. Appropriate footwear is recommended. Contact trip leaders for questions 4731277. rochesterbirding.com. [ THU., MAY 2 ] Rochester Birding Trip: Ellison Park Wetlands Area. May 2, 8:30 a.m. Meet in parking lot behind Wetlands Area Trailhead sign off Empire Blvd. just east of the bridge over Irondequoit Bridge Free 6719639. rochesterbirding.com. [ SAT., MAY 4 ] Clean Sweep: Cobbs Hill Park. May 4, 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Cobbs Hill Park, 100 Norris Drive Free. 428-5990. cityofrochester.gov/cleansweep. Color Run 5K. May 4, 9 a.m. Frontier Field, 1 Morrie Silver Way Raise funds, register thecolorrun.com. Free Guided Hike at Penfield’s Harris Whalen Park. May 4, 9-11 a.m. Harris Whalen Park located at 2126 Penfield Road, next across the road from Wegmans. Look for the “Hike” signs Free, register. 340-8655 x6. GVHC Event. May 4, 1 p.m. Fishers Park, moderate/hilly 5 mile hike Free. 445-1932. gvhchikes.org. NAMI Walks. May 4, 10 a.m. Village Gate, 274 N. Goodman St Raise funds, register 3301968. namiwalks.org/rochester. Public Tour of South Section of Mount Hope Cemetery. Mount Hope Cemetery, 1133 Mt. Hope Avenue Meet: Cemetery Office, South entrance opposite the Distillery restaurant. $5, members and kids under 16 free 461-3494. fomh.org. Rochester Birding Trip: Island Cottage Woods and West Lakeshore. May 4, 8 a.m. Meet at Island Cottage lot at Island Cottage Rd. and Edgemere Dr. Boots recommended Free 5760422. rochesterbirding.com. Rochester Map Adventure. May 4, 11 a.m. South Avenue Community Center, 999 South Ave $5-$15,

register. roc.us.orienteering.org/ RMA_2013.pdf. Walk to Connect 3. May 4, 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Irondequoit Public Library, Evans Branch, 45 Cooper Rd $8-$12. 544-1948. aholland@libraryweb.org. irondequoitlibrary.org. [ SUN., MAY 5 ] GVHC Event. May 5, 1 p.m. Powder Mills Park, 154 Park Rd. Moderate 5 mile hike, Fishers Park Free. 254-4047. gvhchikes.org. Public Tour of North Section of Mount Hope Cemetery. 2 p.m Mount Hope Cemetery, 1133 Mt. Hope Ave. $5, members and kids under 16 free 4613494. fomh.org. Rochester Birding Trip: Amy’s Ponds and Woodsmith: Genesee Land Trust Conservation Easements. May 5, 7 a.m. Meet at 484 Lake Rd., Ontario NY Free 671-9639. rochesterbirding.com. Rochester Southwest CROP Walk 2013. May 5, 1:30 p.m. Walkers will convene at Carlson Commons, 70 Coretta Scott Crossing. There are a 3.7-mile and a 1.5-mile option 3280856. cropwalkonline.org. USATF Niagara Association 20k Race Walk Championships and Clinic. May 5, 6:30 a.m. Penfield High School Track $30-$40, register. pacracewalks.org. Walk MS Rochester. May 5, 9 a.m. Genesee Valley Park, Elmwood Ave. Register online. 271-0801 x70330. walknyr. nationalmssociety.org. Walk the Land: Celebrate Life!. May 5, 2 p.m. JCC Rochester, 1200 Edgewood Ave. 4610490. jewishrochester.org.

Special Events [ WED., MAY 1 ] Film: Living with Bipolar Disorder. May 1, 6:308:30 p.m. Mental Health Association, 320 N Goodman

to Workers United (750 East Avenue). Great speakers on various issues affecting working class people. Labor leaders, various activist groups will be represented Free. facebook.com/ vents/150548708453656/?fref=ts. RBA Staffing Skilled Jobs Fair. May 1, 8 a.m. 150 State St. Bring resumes 256-4666. Sarah Amelia Antiues and High Definition Giclee Opening. May 1-5. Suite B 127, Village Gate. May 1-2 11 a.m.-6 p.m., May 3-5 11 a.m.-8 p.m 880-1184.

FILM | JOEL HODGSON “RIFFING MYSELF”

My sense of snarky sarcasm developed in part from watching the creator of “Mystery Science Theater 3000” and his robot cronies rip B-movies to shreds. I would spend the afternoon watching the hilarious, oddball show at a friends’ house, and then we would try out our new skills, much to the chagrin of other moviegoers, at the latest action movie to hit local theaters. They might have been blockbusters, but serial explosions and bad acting bored us, and we considered them fair game. MST3K’s creator, Joel Hodgson, will visit the Dryden Theatre this Saturday, May 4, at 8 p.m., to present his new one-man show, “Riffing Myself,” a presentation of stories, photos, videos, and notebook pages, concluding with premiere screenings of newly riffed short films. Tickets for this special event are $20 for the performance only, and $50 for the performance and a post-screenings meet & greet. Reserve your tickets by calling 271-4090, or visit the box office at the Dryden Theatre (George Eastman House, 900 East Ave.). For more information, visit dryden. eastmanhouse.org. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY St. Free, RSVP. 202-2783. sclark@afsp.org. May Day Rally and March: Stop the War on Workers. May 1, 5:30

p.m. Washington Square Park, S. Clinton Avenue at Washington Square May Day 2013. March from Washington Square Park

Road, Rt 250 A Fiesta of Fabulous Food, Delicious Drinks & Marvelous Music! New! Live! Sofrito Latin Jazz! New! Live! DJ & Zumba Latin Dancing! • Silent & Live Auctions • Dress: festive attire (sombreros and ponchos optional) $50/person, $90/ couple, $350/table of 8, $400/ table of 10. 377-6010. Roc City Tattoo Expo. May 3-5. Radisson Hotel Riverside, 120 E. Main St $10-$25. roccitytattooexpo.com. Wine & Herb Festival. Through May 5. Cayuga Lake Wine Trail. $40-$65, DD discount. 1-800684-5217. cayugawinetrail.com.

[ THU., MAY 2 ] City Newspaper Best Busker Competition. May 2, 5-9 p.m. East End between Chestnut and Alexander rochestercitynewspaper.com. Genesee Transportation Council Releases Draft 2014-2017 Transportation Improvement Program. May 2. Aor 23: Rochester City Council Chambers, 30 Church St., 6 p.m. May 2: Henrietta Town Hall, 475 Calkins Rd., Henrietta. 9:30 a.m. ALSO Perinton Community Center, 1350 Turkhill Rd., 6 p.m 262-3106. tipcomment@ gtcmpo.org. Original Next to New Sale. May 2-4. Blessed Sacrament, Monroe Ave. at Oxford St. ThuFri 9 a.m.-8 p.m., Sat 9 a.m.noon, half price 271-7240. Thursday Evening Film Series. May 2, 7 p.m. Penfield Public Library, 1985 Baird Rd. The film “Prince Among Slaves” depicts the true story of Abdul Ibrahima Sori, an African prince enslaved in the American South Free. 3408720. penfieldlibrary.org. Wine Therapy Nights for Girlfriends. May 2, 5 p.m. Casa Larga Vineyards, 2287 Turk Hill Rd. May 2: Jill Bates Fashion and music provided by Harpist Lara Haase. Free Admission. 233-4210. casalarga.com.

GETLISTED get your event listed for free

[ FRI., MAY 3 ] Cinco de Mayo. May 3, 6:30 p.m. Glengarry Inn at Eagle Vale, 4400 Nine Mile Point

e-mail it to calendar@rochestercitynews.com. Or go online to rochestercitynewspaper.com and submit it yourself!

[ SAT., MAY 4 ] 13th Annual Wine Auction Dinner. May 4. Rochester Plaza Hotel, 70 State St $150, register. 624-5555. campgooddays.org. American Red Cross Military Brunch. May 4, 10 a.m.-noon. Palmyra VFW at 4306 Route 31 in Palmyra RSVP. betsy. americo@redcross.org. Big Sale. 9 a.m.-2 p.m. 127 Railroad St. Art, books, clothes, handmade soap, zines, more facebook.com/ smugtownmushrooms. Blue Ribbon Days Fundraiser. May 4, 6 p.m. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. psych.rochester.edu/mhfc/. Browncroft Garage Sale. May 4-5, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. browncroftna.org. Cinco de Vino on the Lake Ontario Wine Trail. May 4-5, 10 a.m. Lake Ontario Wine Trail. Each winery will feature a wine in a Sangria recipe and a Salsa pairing $10 or 2/$15. 315-9864202. lakeontariowinetrail.com. continues on page 34

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Special Events ‘Escape to the Tropics’. May 4, 9 a.m.-6 p.m. Grossmans Garden & Home, 1801 Fairport Nine Mile Point Rd Free 377-1982. grossmans. com. Joel Hodgson: Riffing Myself. May 4, 8 p.m. George Eastman House, 900 East Ave. $20-$50. 271-4090. eastmanhouse.org. Keuka in Bloom. May 4-5, 10 a.m. Keuka Lake Wine Trail, 2375 Route 14A Sample wines and enjoy herb-inspired foods at each winery. $35, $50 couple. 800-440-4898. info@keukawinetrail.com. keukawinetrail.com. Opening Weekend. May 4-5. Ganondagan State Historic Site, 1488 New York 444 May 4, 2 p.m.:Wooden Sticks lacrosse demonstration and game; May 5, 10:30 a.m.noon: Corn mush-making demonstration at Longhouse, and 1:30-3:30 p.m.: The Bent Stick, story and demonstrations of woodland style archery 742-1690. ganondagan.org. Opening Weekend at Long Acre Farms. May 4-5, 10 a.m. Long Acre Farms, 1342 Eddy Rd Celebrate 20 years with us. Farm Market and Ice Cream Shop open. Tasting room open. Free jumping pillow 315-986-4202. longacrefarms.com. Rochester Free School Open House. May 4, 11 a.m. 1st Universalist Church, 150 S. Clinton Ave Free lunch and snacks provided by Rochester Food Not Bombs. 5856218794. RochesterFreeSchool@gmail. com. “A Taste of Brockport” and Pizza Wars. May 4-5. Sat 4:30-8 p.m. Downtown locations with music. Tickets $20.00 and limited to 150 total. Purchase from participating locations. Starts at Welcome Center on Water Street. Sun Noon: Pizza Wars: A select panel will judge who has the best pizza in the Greater Brockport Area. Canalfront Welcome Center Water Street, Brockport brockportny.org. Weaving and Fiber Arts Center Open House. May 4, 1-4 p.m. Studio 1940, Piano Works Mall, 349 West Commercial St., East Rochester weaversguildofrochester.org/ courses. Work Hard. Play Hard. Live Right. Good Life Expo 2013. May 4, 1 p.m. PCX Sports Performance, 847 Holt Rd. Health and wellness event with hands-on demonstrations and presentations Free. 5454453. linsay@pcxsports.com. pcxsports.com. [ SUN., MAY 5 ] Annual Metro Justice Dinner. May 5, 6 p.m. Temple B’rith Kodesh, 2131 Elmwood Ave. Speaker: Steve Meacham, Organizer for City Life/Vida Urbana $35-$40. 325-2560. metrojustice.org. Asian Pacific American Heritage Family Day. May 5, 12-5 p.m. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. $5 suggested donation 276-8900. mag.rochester.edu.

34 CITY MAY 1-7, 2013

SPECIAL EVENT | ROC CITY TATTOO EXPO

Body modification is the furthest thing from a new or passing trend, and it certainly isn’t going away anytime soon. Examples of modification and adornments such as piercings, lobe or lip stretching, and tattooing can be found in the histories of nearly every corner of the world, and this form of beautification is only gaining popularity in modern cultures. Many of my non-inked friends joke that they are the edgy ones now, and one of my little nieces is perturbed when she sees someone who doesn’t have “pictures” on their skin. Love Hate Tattoo will present the 5th Annual Roc City Tattoo Expo this weekend at Rochester Riverside Radisson Hotel (120 E. Main St.). The event takes place Friday, May 3, 1-11 p.m.; Saturday, May 4, noon-11 p.m.; and Sunday, May 5, noon-6 p.m. Six local parlors will be represented, and artists from dozens of tattoo shops from around the country and world will be present to ink visitors, so you can get body artwork from a beloved artist sans plane ticket. Love the look but not interested in permanence or needles? Many artists will be selling drawings, paintings, jewelry, and more. Admission is $10 per day, or $25 for a weekend pass. For more information, call 546-6400 or visit roccitytattooexpo.com. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY Garage Sale/Fundraiser. May 5, 8 a.m.-2 p.m. Temple Beth El, 139 S Winton Rd 1:30 p.m. bag sale Free. 473-1770. tberochester.org. Greatest Community Garage Sales and Super Fleas. May 5. Rochester Public Market, 280 N. Union St. 8 a.m.2 p.m cityofrochester.gov/ publicmarket. May Day Wellness Health Event. May 5, 1-7 p.m. Pick any “3” Therapies for $35. Global Risings Inc. 1595 Elmwood Avenue, Side B, Lower Level 612-6629. thereikihealingcenter.com. Vertex Cinco de Mayo Late Riser’s Garage Sale. May 5, 5-10 p.m. Vertex Night Club, 169 N. Chestnut St. 585-2325498. vertexggs@hotmail.com. Walk MS Greece. May 5, 9 a.m. Olympia High School, 1139 Maiden Lane Fundraiser, register. 271-0801 X70330. [ TUE., MAY 7 ] Center for Autism and Related Disorders Meet & Greet. May 7, 4-7 p.m. 6 N. Main St. Suite 110, Fairport RSVP. d.plump@ centerforautism.com. Screening: Raising 100,000 Voices.. May 7, 6:30 p.m. The Little Theater, 240 East Avenue Free. wxxi.org/events.

There’s No Place Like Happy Hour. May 7, 5 p.m. Donnelly’s Public House, One Water Street, Fairport psych. rochester.edu/mhfc/.

Sports [ SAT., MAY 4 ] Roc City Roller Derby. May 4, 7 p.m. The Fair & Expo Center, 2695 East Henrietta Rd. Doors at 6 p.m $5-$20. 334-4000. rocderby.com.

Theater Cashore Marionettes: Simple Gifts. Nazareth College Arts Center, 4245 East Ave $15$18. 389-2170. artsceneter. naz.edu. Chamber Opera Festival. Kilbourn Hall, 26 Gibbs St May 1 Teens Take the Stage, Saturday, May 4 & Sunday, May 5 Mice and Beans Some free, some paid events. rochesterlyricopera.org. Charlie and the Chocolate Factory. Rochester Institute of Technology, 1 Lomb Memorial Dr. Robert F. Panara Theatre. Thu Apr 25-27, 7:30 p.m., Sun 2 p.m. Fri May 3-4,7:30 p.m $5$7. 475-6254. ntidtix@rit.edu. “Ching Chong Chinaman.” SUNY Geneseo, 1 College Rd.


Theater Audition [ SUN., MAY 5 ] “The Fantasticks.” May 5, 6:30 p.m. Working Class Theatre Company is looking for an actor in their 20’s for the role of Matt in their Summer 2013 musical The Fantasticks. Auditions are at the Webster Village Community Meeting Room in Webster 469-4176. workingclasstheatre.net.

[ WED., MAY 1 ] Annuals in the Garden. May 1, 6-8 p.m. Cornell Cooperative Extension of Genesee County, 420 East Main St $10, register. 343-3040 x101. genesee.shutterfly.com/ gardening. Basic Espresso Techniques. 7-8:30 p.m Joe Bean Coffee Roasters, 1344 University Ave. $25 per class. 319-5279. kturiano@joebeanroasters. com. joebeanroasters.com. Extreme Presentation Makeover: Practical Ideas for Making your Presentations Memorable. May 1, 7 p.m. Rochester Brainery, Village Gate, 274 N Goodman St. $15. 730-7034. rochesterbrainery.com. Family Development Class: “Teen Responsibility.”. May 1, 6-8 p.m. Mental Health Association, 320 N Goodman St. For parents of pre-teens and teens Free, RSVP. 3253145 x131. mharochester.org. Family Development Class: “What Teens Need to Succeed.”. May 1, 6-8 p.m. Mental Health Association, 320 N Goodman St. Free, RSVP. 325-3145 x131. mharochester.org. Interior Design Tricks & Tips. May 1, 7 p.m. Rochester Brainery, Village Gate, 274 N Goodman St. $15. 730-7034. rochesterbrainery.com. [ THU., MAY 2 ] Borosilicate Sampler: Tear Drop Pendant. May 2, 6-9 p.m. Roc Arc & Flame Center, 125 Fedex Way $75, register. 349-7110. RocAFC.com. Coffee Cupping Series: Discovering the Coffee Family Tree.. May 2. Joe Bean Coffee Roasters, 1344 University Ave. 7 p.m Free. 319-5279. joebeanroasters.com. Leveraging LinkedIn, Facebook & Twitter for Businesses. May 2, 7 p.m. Rochester Brainery, Village Gate, 274 N Goodman St. $15. 730-7034. rochesterbrainery.com. [ SAT., MAY 4 ] Beginners Guide to Vegetable Gardening. May 4, 9 a.m. Cornell Cooperative Extension of Monroe County, 249 Highland Ave $10. 461-1000 x225. mycce.org/ May 4, 9-11 a.m. Cornell Cooperative Extension, 249 Highland Avenue $10, register. 4611000 x225. mycce.org/ programsevents. Edible Landscaping. May 4, 2-4 p.m. Wayside Garden Center, 124 PittsfordPalmyra Rd Free, RSVP. 223-1222 x100. trish@ waysidegardencenter.com. waysidegardencenter.com. Introduction to Zen Meditation Workshop. May 4, 9:15 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Rochester Zen Center, 7 Arnold Park Vegetarian lunch included $45-$60, register. 473-9180. rzc.org. Monroe May Wellness Day. May 4, noon. Windflower Reiki & Reflexology, 3380 Monroe Ave., Suite 217 Join in for an afternoon of reflexology, angel card readings, wellness coaching, and

workshops Free. 210-2262. windflowerreiki@gmail.com. windflowerreikiandreflexology. com. [ SUN., MAY 5 ] Mother’s Day Container Workshop. May 5, 2-4 p.m. Wayside Garden Center, 124 Pittsford-Palmyra Rd Free, RSVP. 223-1222 x100. trish@ waysidegardencenter.com. waysidegardencenter.com. United by Faith. May 5, 10 a.m. Congregation Beth Hamedresh-Beth Israel, 1369 East Ave 754-2338. [ MON., MAY 6 ] DIY Graphic Design. May 6, 6:30 p.m. Rochester Brainery, Village Gate, 274 N Goodman St. $15. 730-7034. rochesterbrainery.com. Experiencing the Shamanic Journey. May 6, 7 p.m. Energy on East, 320 East Ave. Bring a journal, pillow, and wear comfortable clothes $15, RSVP. 732-6221. kxw516@ yahoo.com. Family Development Class: “20 Minutes to Effective Parenting Communication Skills.”. May 6, 6-8 p.m. Mental Health Association, 320 N Goodman St. Free, RSVP. 325-3145 x131. mharochester.org. How to Save Money on Organic Foods. May 6, 6:30 p.m. Rochester Brainery, Village Gate, 274 N Goodman St. $15. 730-7034. rochesterbrainery.com. Pomodoro Grill & Wine Bar with Isaac Borgstrom. May 6, 6-8:30 p.m. The Culinary Center at Vella, 237 Pittsford-Palmyra Rd $75, register. 421-9362. vellaculinarycenter.com. Smart and Sassy Springtime Cooking. May 6. Cornell Cooperative Extension of Monroe County, 249 Highland Ave Apr 15, 6-8 p.m. Go with the Grains! May 6, 6-8 p.m. Simply Risotto. Jun 10, 6-8 p.m., Picnics, Parties, and Potlucks $30 per class, register. 461-1000. mycce. org/monroe. [ TUE., MAY 7 ] African World History Class. 7:30-9 p.m. Baobab Cultural Center, 728 University Ave. $5 donation requested per session. baobab.center@ yahoo.com. thebaobab.org. Home Brewing Techniques: Coffee. May 7, 7 p.m. Rochester Brainery, Village Gate, 274 N Goodman St. With Joe Bean Coffee Roasters $20. 730-7034. rochesterbrainery.com. Pinhole Cinema and an Aesthetic of Handmade with Robert Schaller of the Optics Division/AgH2O. May 7, 7 p.m. Visual Studies Workshop, 31 Prince Street (585) 4428676. vsw.org/calendar.php.

GETLISTED get your event listed for free e-mail it to calendar@rochestercitynews.com. Or go online to rochestercitynewspaper.com and submit it yourself!

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FIRST

Workshops

FRIDAY

Robert Sinclair Theatre. ThuFri 7 p.m., Sat 2 & 7 p.m $10. 245-5833. geneseo.edu/bbo. “Fox on the Fairway.” Tower Fine Arts Center, SUNY Brockport, 180 Holley St. Fri-Sat Apr 26-27 7:30 p.m., Sun 2 p.m., Thu-Sat May 2-4 7:30 p.m $8-$15. 395-2787. brockport.edu/finearts. “Funny Girl.” JCC Rochester, 1200 Edgewood Ave. Through May 19. Sat 8 p.m., Sun 2 p.m $18-$26. 461-2000. jcccenterstage.org. “The Glass Menagerie.” Todd Theatre, University of Rochester, River Campus May 1-3 8 p.m., May 4 6 p.m $10-$15. 275-4088. rochester.edu/theatre. “Les Miserables.” Rochester Auditorium Theatre, 885 E. Main St. Tue-Thu 7:30 p.m., Fri 8 p.m., Sat 2 & 8 p.m., Sun 1 & 6:30 p.m. Tickets start at $37.50. 222-5000. mail@rbtl.org. rbtl.org. “The Man in Black.” Downstairs Cabaret Theatre, 20 Windsor St Thu 7 p.m., Fri 8 p.m., Sat 5 & 8:30 p.m., Sun 3 p.m $26-$33. 3254370. downstairscabaret.com. No Word in Guyanese for Me. Bread & Water Theatre, 243 Rosedale St. May 3 and 4 at 8pm; May 5 at 2pm. $6-$12. 271-5523. BreadandWaterTheatre.org. Playing the Odds. MuCCC, 142 Atlantic Ave An original musical drama written and performed by a diverse group of teenagers from throughout the Rochester area. Thu-Sat 7 p.m., Sun 2 p.m $12-$20. muccc.org. Regional Writers Showcase. Geva Theatre Center, 75 Woodbury Blvd “Galileo’s” by Bill Capossere. Mon 6 p.m. Free, RSVP. 232-4382. gevatheatre.org. Respect: A Musical Journey of Women. Downstairs Cabaret at Winton Place, 3450 Winton Place Thu 7 p.m., Fri 8 p.m., Sat 5 & 8:30 p.m., Sun 3 p.m $26-$39. 325-4370. downstairscabaret.com. Stars of Tomorrow 15th Annual Recognition Ceremony. Auditorium Theatre, 885 Main St Thu May 2. rbtl.org. The Triumph of Love. Genesee Community College, 1 College Road Thu-Sat 7:30 p.m., Sun 2 p.m $3-$8. 345-6814. genesee.edu. The Villain Took a Chip Shot. Penfield Community Center, 1985 Baird Rd. Penfield Players. Through May 18 May 3-4, 8 p.m. $12-$15. 3408655. penfieldrec.org. Young Writers Showcase. Geva Theatre Center, 75 Woodbury Blvd. Sat 2 p.m. Free, register. 232-4382. gevatheatre.org.

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First Friday

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Citywide Gallery Night

May 3 • 6-9pm FirstFridayRochester.org

A.R.T.S Gallery at Aviv Cafe For Those Who Served

Rochester Contemporary Art Center (RoCo) Eat It / Special Event with Spurse

Art and Vintage on Main (AVoM) Allegories through Material

Spectrum Gallery Rare and Vintage Prints

AXOM Gallery Exhibition Space The New Town Collection: A Gift of Hope

Spot Coffee Homegrown

Bernunzio Uptown Music Miller's Wheel

The Gallery@Equal=Grounds Mixed media work by Jessica Bell

Chartreuse Studios Blue Honey Jewelry and Candles

The Shoe Factory Art Co-op Mona Oates & Wen-Hua Chen

Creative Wellness Coalition Luminaria

Visual Studies Workshop Gallery ChemoToxic, I Am That and Other Stories

Gallery at The Arts and Cultural Council Mythologies and Cultures, Nitin Banwar

M AY H I G H L I G H T S :

Hungerford Urban Artisans (HUA) Open Studios Image City Photography Gallery Worlds Apart: Ethiopia and Elsewhere Richard Margolis Art + Architectural Photography Rustic Furniture & "Growing Up in Wisconsin"

• Eat It: Artists Explore Food & Consumption at RoCo • Worlds Apart: Ethiopia and elsewhere at Image City Photography Gallery • Open Studios at Hungerford Urban Artisans (HUA) • For Those Who Served at A.R.T.S Gallery at Aviv Cafe • Blue Honey Jewelry and Candles at Chartreuse Studios • Mixed media work by Jessica Bell at The Gallery @ Equal=Grounds

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 35


Movies Theaters Searchable, up-to-the-minute movie times for all area theaters can be found at rochestercitynewspaper.com, and on City’s mobile website.

Film

Brockport Strand 93 Main St, Brockport, 637-3310, rochestertheatermanagement.com

Canandaigua Theatres 3181 Townline Road, Canandaigua, 396-0110, rochestertheatermanagement.com

Cinema Theater 957 S. Clinton St., 271-1785, cinemarochester.com

Culver Ridge 16 2255 Ridge Rd E, Irondequoit  544-1140, regmovies.com

Dryden Theatre 900 East Ave., 271-3361, dryden.eastmanhouse.org

Eastview 13 Eastview Mall, Victor 425-0420, regmovies.com

Geneseo Theatres Geneseo Square Mall, 243-2691, rochestertheatermanagement.com

Greece Ridge 12 176 Greece Ridge Center Drive 225-5810, regmovies.com

Henrietta 18 525 Marketplace Drive 424-3090, regmovies.com

The Little 240 East Ave., 258-0444 thelittle.org

Movies 10 2609 W. Henrietta Road 292-0303, cinemark.com

Pittsford Cinema 3349 Monroe Ave., 383-1310 pittsford.zurichcinemas.com

Tinseltown USA/IMAX 2291 Buffalo Road 247-2180, cinemark.com

Webster 12 2190 Empire Blvd., 888-262-4386, amctheatres.com

Vintage Drive In 1520 W Henrietta Rd., Avon 226-9290, vintagedrivein.com

Film Previews on page 38

A journey to the politics of the past [ REVIEW ] BY GEORGE GRELLA

“The Company You Keep” (R), DIRECTED BY ROBERT REDFORD NOW PLAYING

Despite the passage of time and age, the fading of memory, no matter how many horrors blight the last several decades, the Vietnam War still haunts the American soul. It remains one of those exclusively American tragedies, a wound that may never heal, still a source of anger, guilt, and blame. Robert Redford’s new movie, “The Company You Keep,” provides a necessary lesson for another generation in some of the reasons for a continuing engagement with that unhappy past.

The film begins with some historical context, a montage of archival footage, newsreel, and television reports on the antiwar protests that flared up all over the nation in the 1960’s and 70’s, the formation of the radical Students for a Democratic Society and its subgroup, the more violent Weather Underground. Switching to color and the present day, it shows the FBI’s capture of Sharon Solarz (Susan Sarandon), a Weather Underground member involved in a bank robbery 30 years before that resulted in the death of a guard; her arrest in Albany precipitates a complicated series of actions involving a great many people. Ben Shepard (Shia LaBeouf ), a zealous young reporter for an Albany paper, embarks on an investigation of Solarz’s past and finds a connection to a local lawyer, Jim Grant (Robert Redford); he discovers that Grant is actually Nick Sloan, one of Solarz’s former comrades. His news stories, which imply Sloan’s participation

Robert Redford in “The Company You Keep.” PHOTO COURTESY SONY PICTURES CLASSICS

in the fatal robbery, force the lawyer to take off, with both Shepard and the FBI on his trail. Redford’s direction establishes an exciting pace, constantly cutting from his character’s flight from his pursuers, the FBI’s use of all its technology to track him down, and Shepard’s ingenious combination of dogged research, aggressive interviewing, clever persuasion, threats, bribery, and even some leaps of imagination.. At the same time, as Nick seeks out his old pals, he shows the contrasts between their lives as young radicals and their present existence. Nick’s encounters with various members of his Weather Underground cell not only suggest the differences between past and present, youth and age, but also the reactions of his comrades to his reappearance. Donal Fitzgerald (Nick Nolte), who now owns a lumberyard in Wisconsin, helps him out; Jed Lewis (Richard Jenkins), a university professor, reacts with hostility; most important, Mimi Lurie (Julie Christie), his former lover, a drug smuggler, refuses to clear his name. Nick Sloan’s travels to the Midwest and the Upper Peninsula of Michigan turn the plot into a journey into his and the nation’s past. His meetings with his old friends and their discussions and reminiscences also make “The Company You Keep” something like a thriller of ideas. They not only react in different ways to his situation, but also provide a kaleidoscope of reflections on their present lives and their past involvement with a passionate and even noble cause.

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Down by the water [ REVIEW ] BY ADAM LUBITOW

“Mud” (PG-13), DIRECTED BY JEFF NICHOLS NOW PLAYING

In the process of his persistent efforts to find Nick Sloan, the young reporter serves as a detective, uncovering the facts of his quarry’s past; as he learns from his investigation and his several interviews with a number of people, he also becomes a major character himself. He grows and learns through his pursuit, connecting with some of his interviewees, coming to understand Nick, his friends, his cause, and perhaps himself. An actor’s director, Redford employs a large and really quite remarkable cast of accomplished performers, allowing all of them to inhabit their roles fully and occupy important moments of screen time. None of them lets him down, and all of them, even in small supporting roles, act with real conviction — they appear to believe the words they utter and the emotions they express. Some of the movie’s occasionally excessive talkiness probably results from Redford’s background as an actor himself. The expressions of anger, bitterness, and regret that color the dialogues between Nick and his group, however, also suggest something of the state of the nation, the way we lived then, the way we live now, with a powerful sense of sadness that nothing has really changed since those violent days in a turbulent past. If the movie addresses an earlier time, it also addresses our own time, with sorrow and disillusionment.

After spending years slumming it in one dimwitted romantic comedy (more often than not co-starring Kate Hudson) after another, Matthew McConaughey appears to have grown tired of coasting and decided to remind audiences that he’s still capable of, you know, acting. Starting with 2011’s “The Lincoln Lawyer,” he has made a number of good choices, taking interesting roles in several smaller indie films, from “Magic Mike” to “Killer Joe.” In the process he has turned in some of the best performances he’s ever given. His career renaissance continues with his stellar portrayal of the title character in “Mud,” Jeff Nichols’ (“Take Shelter”) Southern crime drama meets sensitive coming-of-age tale. Despite having the film named after him, McConaughey’s character isn’t actually the focus of this story. The film’s true concern is two 14-year-old boys: adventurous Ellis (Tye Sheridan, “The Tree of Life”) and his smart Alec

Matthew McConaughey and the child actors in “Mud.” PHOTO COURTESY LIONSGATE/

friend, Neckbone (Jacob Lofland). While out exploring an island on the Mississippi, the boys stumble across the temporary home of Mud, who is on the run from the law and hiding out in the woods while formulating a plan to reunite with Juniper (Reese Witherspoon), the love of his life. We soon learn that Mud murdered a man in an attempt to defend the honor of his less than faithful girlfriend and is now a fugitive, struggling to keep ahead of the authorities, as well as a band of bounty hunters who have rolled into town, led by the murdered man’s father and brother. Having just been told of his parents’ impending divorce, Ellis sees a lot of appeal in Mud’s brand of outlaw romanticism, and the boys promise to aid Mud in whatever way they can. It isn’t long before the boys are running errands for Mud, collecting the supplies he needs to make his great escape, and acting as his go-between, delivering messages to Juniper. Nichols’ film is leisurely paced, focused more on character and tone than on the admittedly sometimes familiar story. His script owes an obvious debt to the works of Mark Twain; Ellis and Neckbone share a bit of literary DNA with Tom Sawyer and Huck Finn. Mud himself often comes across as what might have become of one of those characters if they had grown up and gone wrong. Filmed on location in Arkansas, the setting adds a lot of texture to the tale, enhancing the feeling of authenticity in its depiction of the river-dwelling community in which the film is set. Adam Stone’s cinematography captures the mood perfectly, straddling the line between the idyllic beauty of childhood and the harsh realism of the workingclass environment. Nichols does such a good job immersing us in this world

that it’s a bit of a letdown when the film ditches the rich character development that has come before for a climax that resorts to a standard shootout showdown. But after such a grippingly slow build, the film has more than earned it. It is refreshing to note that his script doesn’t resort to caricature in its depiction of the deep south. But the film’s underwritten female roles are a problem, inadvertently sending the message that all women are selfish, duplicitous, and absolutely not to be trusted. Still, Witherspoon and Sarah Paulson (as Ellis’ mother) do what they can to add some depth to their characters, and there is a method behind the way in which the women in the film are written that ties in with the story’s resonant themes of redemption and the nature of love in its many complexities. McConaughey gives a traditional anti-hero role some interesting shades. His natural magnetism and charisma adds to the character’s innate likeability, while not taking away from the fact that there is a dangerous side to his personality lying just beneath the surface. There’s also strong supporting work from Ray McKinnon, as Ellis’ gruff but loving father, and Sam Shepard as Mud’s former mentor. But the real standout of the film is young Tye Sheridan, giving a performance that ranks among the best I’ve seen by a child actor (firsttimer Lofland is also extremely good as Neckbone, but he’s given slightly less to do). More than anything else, this is the story about Ellis’s rite-of-passage journey into manhood, and it is through his eyes that we view the events of the film. Without Sheridan’s strong performance as an anchor, “Mud” wouldn’t work nearly as well as it does.

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rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 37


Film Previews Full film reviews available at rochestercitynewspaper.com.

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[ OPENING ] BADLANDS (1973): Acclaimed filmmaker Terrence Malick’s classic crime drama stars Sissy Spacek as a teenage girl who finds herself an accomplice as she follows her much older boyfriend (Martin Sheen) on a cross-country killing spree. Dryden (Thu, May 2, 8 p.m.) THE CONFORMIST (1970): An Italian man becomes a flunky for Mussolini’s secret police and is tasked with arranging the assassination of his former professor. Dryden (Tue, May 7, 8 p.m.) IRON MAN 3 (PG-13): Shane Black (“Kiss Kiss Bang Bang”) takes over directing duties while Robert Downey Jr. reprises his role as Tony Stark in the third installment of the superhero franchise. Also starring Gwyneth Paltrow, Don Cheadle, Ben Kingsley, and Guy Pearce. Brockport, Canandaigua, Culver Ridge, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece Ridge, Henrietta, Pittsford, Tinseltown, Vintage, Webster THE JERK (1979): In his first starring role, Steve Martin plays the imbecilic white son of black sharecroppers, who stumbles his way from rags to riches and back again. With Bernadette Peters and Jackie Mason. Dryden (Fri, May 3, 8 p.m.; Sun, May 5, 2 p.m.) REDS (1981): Warren Beatty’s epic film about John Reed, a radical American journalist who gets involved with the Russian Communist revolution. With Jack Nicholson, Diane Keaton, and Maureen Stapleton. Dryden (Wed, May 1, 8 p.m.) RENOIR (R): This French drama tells the story of Andrée Heuschling, who became the muse of impressionist painter Pierre-Auguste Renoir as well as his son, filmmaker Jean Renoir. Little UNLOYALTY (NR): Two friends have their loyalty put to the test when street life threatens to destroy their bond. Cinema (Sat, May 4, 7 p.m. & 9 p.m.) [ CONTINUING ] 42 (PG-13): Brian Helgeland writes and directs this biopic about Jackie Robinson as he’s signed to the Brooklyn Dodgers under team GM Branch Rickey (Harrison Ford). Also starring Chadwick Boseman, Christopher Meloni, and Alan Tudyk. Brockport, Canandaigua, Culver Ridge, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece Ridge, Henrietta, Pittsford, Tinseltown, Vintage, Webster ADMISSION (PG-13): Tina Fey and Paul Rudd star in this romantic dramedy, which means that even if the movie’s terrible, it will still be worth watching because hey, Tina Fey and Paul Rudd. Also starring Lily Tomlin, Wallace Shawn, and Michael Sheen. Cinema

38 CITY MAY 1-7, 2013

THE BIG WEDDING (R): A family tries to get along during a weekend wedding celebration in this comedy starring Robert De Niro, Diane Keaton, Amanda Seyfried, Topher Grace, Katherine Heigl, Susan Sarandon, and Robin Williams. Canandaigua, Culver Ridge, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece Ridge, Henrietta, Pittsford, Tinseltown, Webster THE CALL (R): Halle Berry plays a 911 operator who must use her wits to help an abducted girl escape the clutches of a violent serial killer from her past. Also starring Abigail Breslin. Cinema THE COMPANY YOU KEEP (R): See review on page 36. Henrietta, Little, Pittsford, Tinseltown THE CROODS (PG): A prehistoric family sets off on an epic journey to find a new home after their cave is destroyed in this animated family adventure film from Chris Sanders (“How to Train your Dragon”). Featuring the voice talents of Nicolas Cage, Emma Stone, Ryan Reynolds, Catherine Keener, and Cloris Leachman. Canandaigua, Culver Ridge, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece Ridge, Henrietta, Pittsford, Tinseltown, Vintage DISCONNECT (R): This drama presents a group of intertwined stories centered around social media, the internet, and the ways people use them to connect with one another. Starring Jason Bateman, Alexander Skarsgård, and Hope Davis. Little EVIL DEAD (R): Sam Raimi produced this remake of his 1981 classic horror film, about five friends who stumble across a Book of the Dead while vacationing in a cabin in the woods. Hijinks ensue. Canandaigua, Culver Ridge, Greece Ridge, Henrietta G.I. JOE: RETALIATION (PG-13): In this sequel based on the film inspired by a line toys, the G.I. Joes once again battle the evil forces of the Cobra empire. Starring Dwayne Johnson, Channing Tatum, Adrianne Palicki, and Bruce Willis. Canandaigua, Culver Ridge, Greece Ridge, Vintage JURASSIC PARK 3D (PG-13): Steven Spielberg’s beloved adventure tale, about a dinosaur theme park that goes terribly wrong, returns to the big screen and gets the snazzy 3D treatment. Clever girl. Culver Ridge, Eastview, Tinseltown KING’S FAITH (PG-13): A young gang member attempts to leave his criminal life behind him, but his past continues to threaten his family and faith. Henrietta, Tinseltown MUD (PG-13): See review on page 37. Pittsford OBLIVION (PG-13): In a future where humanity has abandoned Earth, one man sent to harvest its resources begins to question the true purpose of his mission.

Starring Tom Cruise and Morgan Freeman. Brockport, Canandaigua, Culver Ridge, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece Ridge, Henrietta, Pittsford, Tinseltown, Vintage, Webster OLYMPUS HAS FALLEN (R): Terrorists overtake the a White House in this action thriller starring Gerard Butler, Aaron Eckhart, Morgan Freeman, Angela Bassett, Ashley Judd, and Melissa Leo. Canandaigua, Culver Ridge, Eastview, Henrietta, Tinseltown, Vintage OZ THE GREAT & POWERFUL (PG):Director Sam Raimi presents the previously untold story of the origins of the Wizard of Oz. Starring James Franco, Mila Kunis, Michelle Williams, and Rachel Weisz. Canandaigua, Henrietta, Vintage, Webster PAIN & GAIN (R): Mark Wahlberg and Dwayne Johnson star as bodybuilders who get caught up in a kidnapping plot that goes bad in Michael Bay’s latest action extravaganza, inspired by true events. Also starring Tony Shalhoub, Ed Harris, Rob Corddry, Anthony Mackie, and Rebel Wilson. Brockport, Canandaigua, Culver Ridge, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece Ridge, Henrietta, Tinseltown, Webster THE PLACE BEYOND THE PINES (R): Director Derek Cianfrance’s follow up to “Blue Valentine” stars Ryan Gosling as a small-time bank robber and Bradley Cooper as the rookie cop who’s pursuing him. With Eva Mendes. Canandaigua, Eastview, Henrietta, Little, Pittsford, Tinseltown THE SAPPHIRES (PG-13): In 1968, a singing group made up of four young Australian Aboriginal girls gets their first gig, entertaining the American troops in Vietnam. Starring Chris O’Dowd. Pittsford SCARY MOVIE 5 (R): The latest in the long-running series of film spoofs parodies everything from “Paranormal Activity” to “Black Swan,” with a cast that includes Charlie Sheen, Lindsay Lohan, Heather Locklear, Snoop Dogg, and Mike Tyson. Canandaigua, Culver Ridge, Eastview, Greece Ridge, Henrietta, Tinseltown STARBUCK (R): A slacker discovers that as a result of his frequent sperm donation, he’s the biological father of 533 children, 144 of whom have filed a suit to discover his identity. Little TYLER PERRY’S TEMPTATION (PG-13): A marriage counselor, unhappy in her own marital situation, faces unforeseen consequences when she begins an affair with one of her clients. Starring Jurnee Smollett-Bell (“Friday Night Lights”), Vanessa L. Williams, Brandy Norwood, and ahem, Kim Kardashian. Culver Ridge


Classifieds For information: Call us (585) 244-3329 Fax us (585) 244-1126 Mail Us City Classifieds 250 N. Goodman Street Rochester, NY 14607 Email Us classifieds@ rochester-citynews.com EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY

All real estate advertised in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act, which makes it unlawful, “to make, print, or publish, any notice, statement, or advertisement, with respect to the sale or rental of a dwelling that indicates any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin.” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under the age of 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertisement for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. Call the local Fair Housing Enforcement Project, FHEP at 325-2500 or 1-866-671-FAIR. Si usted sospecha una practica de vivienda injusta, por favor llame al servicio legal gratis. 585-325-2500 - TTY 585-325-2547. Guaranteed Buildable. Financing Available. Offer Ends 5/31/13. Call Now: 1-800-229-7843 www. landandcamps.com

Shared Housing

ALL AREAS - ROOMMATES. COM. Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http://www. Roommates.com.

Land for Sale ORGANIC FARM LIQUIDATION! LENDER MUST SELL! 5 acre -$19,900 On sale 5/4! No closing costs! Gorgeous views, upstate NY Amish country. 3 hrs, NY City, ½ hour Albany. (888) 905-8847 www.newyorklandandlakes.com TROUT STREAM 10 acres $39,900 Available 5/4! No closing costs! Beautiful forest, crystal clear stream, Gorgeous upstate NY. Amish country ½ hour from Albany! (888) 701-7509 www.NewYorkLandandLakes.com UPSTATE NY COUNTRYSIDE SPRING LAND SALE $5,000 Off Each Lot 6 AC w/ Trout Stream: $29,995 3 AC / So. Tier: $15,995 5.7 AC On the River: $39,995 Beautiful & All

DOWNTOWN united presbyterian church Rental Space Now Available for Not-For-Profit Organizations

Downtown Office Space Available Immediately for Rent Call 585-325-4000 ext. 15 For additional information or to schedule an appointment to tour the building. We are proud to be located in the heart of Downtown Rochester.

Vacation Property OCEAN CITY MARYLAND Best selection of affordable rentals. Full/ partial weeks. Call for FREE brochure. Open daily. Holiday Real Estate. 1-800-638-2102. Online reservations: www.holidayoc.com

Home Services MASTER CHIMNEY & MASONRY See our ad under Home and Garden Professionals. Chimney Cleaning, Masonry Repairs, Foundation Repairs, Roof Leaks, Brick Steps Repaired. 585-734-8444

Automotive ALWAYS BETTER Higher cash for your Junk Cars, Trucks and Vans. From $200-$800 or more for newer. Running or not. With free towing. Also free removal of any unwanted model in any condition. Call 585-305-5865

CASH FOR CARS Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888-420-3808 www. cash4car.com (AAN CAN)

Adoption A BABY IS OUR DREAM: Neil and Naomi are longing to ADOPT. Happily married, creative, active, loving couple. Please call: 1-800-982-3678 or www.coupleseeksadoption.com EXPENSES PAID. ADOPT: A happily married couple promises cozy home, secure future, extended family, unconditional love for baby of any race. Expenses paid. Leslie/ Daniel TOLLFREE 1-855-7672444. danielandleslieadopt@ gmail.com ADOPT: A loving married couple wishes to adopt newborn to support wholeheartedly, educate fully, discipline fairly, engage completely and love unconditionally! Natalie/ David: 1-855-759-2229. www. davidandnatalie.info. ADOPT: Our hearts reach out to you. Couple seek newborn bundle of joy to complete our family. Please call Maria and John (888)988-5028. johnandmariaadopt.com

For Sale

GARDEN, HORSE PINWHEELS (2) stick in ground. $12 bold, also Daisy Pinwheel $3 585-880-2903 585544-4155

DINING ROOM TABLE Antique 1929 Dark Wood. Need work! Asking $200 or best offer Call 585-773-1255

HORSE HALTER / Black & white New $15. Quick clip 585-880-2903

DOG & CAT HOUSES Kennels, porch steps, do it yourself kits. Quick assembly 585-752-1000 $49 Jim FOR SALE Lady’s Used Haband Pants Collection, $49 cash. 12 pairs: 8 rainbow colors size 16A stretch polyester, 2 dungarees, 2 size 18A corduroy. Phone (585) 413-0827.

KENTUCKY DERBY T-SHIRT 1998, XL, new, $12 585-880-2903 PAINT never opened. 2 Gallon Behr Premium Moonlit Yellow $15 each 585-225-5526 PERSIAN RUG Hand-made Qashqai Tribal Rug. (Southern Iran) 6 1/2’x9’1” condition excellent Ivory,

P LY M O U T H S P I R I T UA L I S T C H U R C H Together We Are One

2 9 V I C K PA R K A RO C H E S T E R , N Y

Sunday Services 10:30 AM

Salmon, Navy Blue circa 1950 $3500.00 Call for appointment 585-586-0617 PRO TEC BAN SAW 9” model 3202 $40 58/5-225-5526 TV RCA Big 35” w/ remote $35 585-225-5526 VCR EMERSON, records, no remote (bit you can buy one) Nice 585880-2903 $25 WALKER FOR HANDICAPPED use. Next to New condition. Red. $50 585-383-0405

continues on page 43

K-D Moving & Storage Inc.

All Message Service & Free Spiritual Healing Third Weds ~ 7 PM ~ Séances ~ Classes ~ Gallery Reading ~ For more information and schedules www.plymouthspiritualistchurch.org Robin Higgins, Pastor ~ Phone: 585.271.1470

Experience in office & household moving and deliveries

Big or small, we do them all

ADOPT: A childless couple seeks to adopt. Loving home with tenderness, warmth, hapiness. Financial security. Expenses paid. Regis & David (888)986-1520 or text (347)406-1924; www. davidandregisadopt.com

473-6610 or 473-4357

ADOPTION - Happily married, nature-loving couple wishes to adopt a baby. We promise love, laughter, education, and security. Expenses paid. www. DonaldAndEsther.com. (Se habla español.) 1-800-965-5617. ADOPTION: A childless, married couple (ages 34/35)desire to adopt and be stay-at-home mom & devoted dad. Financial security. Expenses paid. Ellen & Chris. 1-888-701-2170

Education ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from home. *Medical, *Business, *Criminal Justice, *Hospitality, Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call 888-201-8657www. CenturaOnline.com

We placed an ad in City Newspaper advertising the availability of two office suites in my office building at 55 Canterbury Road in the City. The response was excellent. One of the two available spaces was leased within days, and we have active interest in the other space.”

23 Arlington St. NY D.O.T.#9657

KdMovingandStorage.com

CHECK OUT

CITY NEWSPAPER’S

ONLINE CLASSIFIEDS Fast and easy-to-use! • Find what you’re looking for with new categories! • Clickable links to business websites • and many more features!

go to

ROCHESTERCITYNEWSPAPER.COM and click on

“CLASSIFIEDS”

- DOUGLAS C. BURKHARDT, FIRST REALTY COMPANY

www.firstrealtyrochester.com

CITY rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 39


Home and Garden Professionals Build Your New Garage or Addition

Fast, with Custom Built Panelized Structures! • Attached/Detached Garages

Basement Renovations Bathrooms Kitchens Additions Windows Siding Decks Fireplaces Painting 585-313-1940 brian54@rochester.rr.com Brian Donovan

Let us tear down and rebuild your new garage! Packages available for any size garage!

Innovative Panelized Systems www.ipsgarages.com • Henrietta, NY • (585) 624-7780

We’re TOPS In Roofing Service Free Estimates! • Re-Roof and Complete Tear-off • Insurance Claims • Storm Damage • Installation & Repairs Since 1968

637-3348

ALL WASHED UP

WINDOW CLEANING • Window Cleaning • Power Washing • Gutter Cleaning

Tear-offs • Flat Roofs • Re-Roofs • Ventilation & Repairs

RESIDENTIAL SPECIALIST

We Will Beat any Legitimate Written Estimate

Do it right the first time

Call: 458-ROOF

(7663)

HOME SERVICE PROVIDERS

Did you know that City Newspaper Readers spent OVER $90 MILLION DOLLARS on home improvements in the LAST 12 MONTHS?

Fully insured

414-3692

Call Christine today to advertise

585-244-3329 ext. 23

BOTTOM LINE PRICING - Owner On Every Job!

ROOF LEAKS? Shop with a Roofer Certified in Metal Roofing - AND with Owens Corning, GAF and IKO Roofing

2 Glass Block Windows Free* *32”x14” solid glass block windows

with any full roofing or siding job. Coupon must be present at time of signing. *special excludes all previous work

Home Repair Specialist! Trusted quality service since 1994!

FULLY INSURED, FREE ESTIMATES

703-7738

820-6431

FREE ESTIMATES FULLY INSURED

ATTENTION

• Bath • Kitchen • Basement • Windows/Doors • Roofing • Siding

-since 1983-

Where Art and Fine Gardening Meet • Maintenance • Pruning • Design

Robert L. Wilcox • 474-6584 gardens9@rochester.rr.com 40 CITY MAY 1-7, 2013

• Save time, reduce stress • No more guessing • Our service pays for itself

WWW.WHICHCOLORROOF.COM • (585) 730-0729

Once Over

All Phases of Home Improvements

• General Contracting • Roofs • Siding • Windows/Doors • Kitchens • Baths • Handicap Renovations • Repairs Big or Small • Metal Roofing • Electrical • Masonry

We’ll send you a picture of your house showing the best color choice.

Commercial & Residential 10 year labor warranty on all workmanship

Affordable Home Improvements Call

82% of existing roof color choices could have been better. Let us help.

& MASONRY

SPRING IS HERE!!!!! • Chimney Cleaning • Chimney Repairs • Brick Steps Repaired • Founda�on Repairs • Concrete Repairs & New Walks Installed • Chimney Pain�ng • Chimneys Rebuilt Fully Insured

585-734-8444


HomeWork Find your way home with

A cooperative effort of City Newspaper and RochesterCityLiving, a program of the Landmark Society.

238 English Rd, Greece, $74,900. 4 Bedroom 2 FULL BATH ranch bigger than it seems - A MUST SEE @ this PRICE! Kitchen with appliances Opens to a large family room with a wood burning stove. Call Ryan @ 201-0724 for Info.

Ryan Smith 585-201-0724

Ryan Smith

Search. Buy. Sell.

NYS Licensed Real Estate Salesperson

201-0724 RochesterSells.com

Conesus Lake! OPEN Sunday, May 5th, 12pm-2pm.

Conesus Lake! OPEN Sunday, May 5th, 2pm-5pm.

5514 East Lake Road. Great year round 3 bdrm colonial on 50' of gentle shale beach with great lake views throughout the house. Amenities include AC, gas fireplace, wrap around deck and more. Offered at $299,000.

5957 Calvin Lane. Unique year round tri level has 2 bedroom, 3 full baths, cantilevered decks, bells and whistles galore, terraces, storage, parking. Don't miss this opportunity on 50' of leased land. Offered at $145,000.

Holly Harvey,

Associate Broker ReMax Realty Group For more information about this or other Conesus Lake listings call me at 585-414-4845

Conesus Lake! OPEN Sunday, May 12th, 1pm-3pm. 5963 Calvin Lane Open May 12 from 1-3. Your lake front retreat is right here! Adorable seasonal 1 bedroom, 1 bath cozy cottage with newer gas fireplace. Breakwall, terraced deck, large storage shed. On 50' of leased land. Offered at $89,000. Come learn all about Calvin Lane

Holly Harvey,

Associate Broker ReMax Realty Group For more information about this or other Conesus Lake listings call me at 585-414-4845

Holly Harvey,

Associate Broker ReMax Realty Group For more information about this or other Conesus Lake listings call me at 585-414-4845

Charming Browncroft Bungalow 55 Mayfield Street Known by their slogan, “a beautiful section of a beautiful city,” the Browncroft neighborhood is one of the most picturesque and walkable areas in Rochester. Now that spring is here, the horticultural origins of this area – part of the extensive Brown Brother’s Continental Nursery – are even more apparent, as forsythia, magnolia, wisteria and lilac plantings along the tree lawns come into bloom. Tucked away on one of these attractive streets is the charming Bungalow style house at 55 Mayfield Street. Popular during the first three decades of the 20th century, the Bungalow style was part of the Arts-and-Crafts movement that originated in England in the 1870s. The prototype for the American Bungalow came from India, where similarly designed vacation houses were built in the foothills of the Himalayas for English expatriates serving in governmental and military posts. In the United States, the style was first seen on the west coast and later promoted extensively through popular magazines such as House Beautiful, Ladies’ Home Journal, and Good Housekeeping. Built in 1920, this lovely home has had only three owners over the past nine decades and is in remarkable original condition, retaining the many details that make it such an appealing residence. The pebble-dash stucco exterior and robin’s egg blue bead-board trim give the house the appearance of an English cottage. Highlighted with brick corner piers and a decorative trellis, the front porch provides ample seating for summer evening relaxation.

The first floor has an open floor plan, with more space than you might expect in a house of this design. The front vestibule opens into the main hall. To the right, the living room and adjacent music room remind you of earlier house designs that featured a double parlor as the principal space for family activities. The dining room and kitchen flow together as one large space, due to a sensitive renovation where a dividing wall was partially removed. The first floor rooms retain their gumwood trim and distinctive “Rochester” oak floors. An updated full bathroom is also located on the first floor. Three bedrooms with gumwood trim and pine floors are located on the second floor. The cozy front bedroom, with distinctive “ribbon windows” has the potential to be a study or home office. The basement offers ample space for laundry, work room, exercise equipment, and storage. The enclosed yard includes a new driveway, wood deck, and plenty of opportunity for the gardening enthusiast, with its generous exposure to sunlight. The house has updated mechanicals, circuit breakers and plumbing. This 1,400 square foot residence is listed at $109,900. For more information on this exceptional house, visit rochestercityliving.com/ property/R209409 or contact Carl J. Hopfinger of Red Barn Properties at 381-2222. by Cynthia Howk Cynthia is the Architectural Research Coordinator at The Landmark Society.

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 41


EMPLOYMENT / CAREER TRAINING ACTIVISM

LIFEGUARDS & SWIM INSTRUCTORS

SUMMER JOBS FOR THE ENVIRONMENT NYPIRG is now hiring students, grads & others for an urgent campaign to protect our drinking water. Get paid to make a difference!

The Bay View Family YMCA is looking for experienced life guards and swim instructors to work a variety of shis. Day, night and weekend shis available.

Apply online at

www.rochesterymca.org/bayview or call Anne Hossenlopp at 341-3218 for details Equal Opportunity Employer

THE BAY VIEW FAMILY YMCA

F/T positions available. EOE Call Chris: 585-851-8012

AIRLINES ARE HIRING Train for hands on Aviation Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified- Job Placement Assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance (866)296-7093

WEEKLY WE EEKLY READERS

Available at over 900 locations all over Monroe County and beyond.

DISCOVER THE “Sucess and Moneymaking Secrets” THEY don’t want you to know about. To get your FREE “Success and Money Making Secrets” CD, please call 1-800-790-5752 (AAN CAN)

OVER 100,000

ROCHESTER PREP

Are you an educator looking to make a difference and prepare students for college? JOIN THE ROCHESTER PREP TEAM AT OUR UPCOMING

Speed Interviewing Event! Elementary School Speed Interviewing Saturday, May 11th from 9AM – 12PM Rochester Prep Elementary School – 899 Jay St. Rochester, NY 14611.

Middle School Speed Interviewing Saturday, May 18th from 9AM – 12PM Rochester Prep West Campus – 1020 Maple St. Rochester, NY 14611.

To register for the event,

Elementary School applicants email a resume to esinterview@rochesterprep.org BY WEDNESDAY, MAY 8TH AT 5PM. Middle School applicants email a resume to msinterview@rochesterprep.org BY WEDNESDAY, MAY 15TH AT 5PM. If you are unable to aŒend, but are sŽll interested in working at Rochester Prep, apply online at www.uncommonschools.org/careers. 42 CITY MAY 1-7, 2013

AIRLINE CAREERS - begin here. Become an Aviation Maintenance Tech. FAA approved training. Financial aid if qualified – Housing available. Job placement assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 877-492-3059

DEDICATED COMPANY DRIVERS Local & Regional Opportunities. $2,000 Sign On Bonus. Avg. weekly pay of $850-$1,000. Must have necessary authorization to travel into Canada 866-723-6470 www.NFITruckingJobs.com

1209 Bay Rd., Webster, NY 14580 www.rochesterymca.org/bayview 585-671-8414

Uncommon Schools

Employment

DRIVER - One Cent Raise after 6 and 12 months.$0.03 Enhanced Quarterly Bonus. Daily or Weekly pay. Hometime Options. CDL-A, 3 months OTR exp. 800-414-9569 www.driveknight.com

HELP WANTED! make extra money in our free ever popular homemailer program,includes valuable guidebook! Start immediately! Genuine! 1-888292-1120 www.easyworkfromhome.com (AAN CAN) $$$HELP WANTED$$$ Extra Income! Assembling CD cases from Home! No Experience Necessary! Call our Live Operators Now! 1-800405-7619 EXT 2450 http://www. easywork-greatpay.com (AAN CAN) PAID IN ADVANCE! MAKE up to $1000 A WEEK mailing brochures from home! Helping Home Workers since 2001! Genuine Opportunity! No Experience required. Start Immediately! www. themailingstation.com (AAN CAN) RGIS PROVIEDS Regular part-time work (30 hours). Starting pay 9.00 + incentive pay. Promotion opportunities. Paid Training. Paid Travel & Per Diem. Transportation provided. Overnights (3 consecutive nights) Required. Generally leave on Monday return on Thursday. Group health plan after 90 days. Preemployment Screening Required. Equal Opportunity Employer. No Experience Needed. Apply at www.rgis.com Keyword Rochester

Volunteers A SECOND THOUGHT Resale Shop in East Rochester is accepting applications for volunteer sale associates and online researchers. Shop benefits people with disabilities in Guatemala. Call (585) 340-2000. ARE YOU 55+ & interested in learning about local volunteer opportunities? Call RSVP! Many opportunities available. Help meet critical needs. Regular information sessions - call 287-6377 or email jpowers@ lifespan-roch.org. BRIGHTEN A LIFE. Lifespan’s Senior Connection matches volunteers 55+ with older adults who could benefit from a weekly phone call or visit by a friend. Call Katie 287-6352 for info. CATHOLIC FAMILY CENTER seeks volunteers to: teach American Sign Language, do clerical work, and organize a teen soccer league. Contact Claudia at 262-7044 or cgill@cfcrochester.org DYNAMIC VOLUNTEER opportunities at the Zoo await you. If you love the Zoo, donate your time today. To learn more, visit the volunteer page of the


Rent your apartment special third week is

FREE

Seneca Park Zoo’s Web site at www.senecaparkzoo.org FOSTER PARENTS WANTED! Monroe County is looking for adults age 21 and over to consider opening their homes to foster children. Call 334-9096 or visit www.MonroeFosterCare.org. Monroe County, 585- - ad #3, Start 03/23/11 4X • Page 1 GIRLS ROCK ROCHESTER seeking musical and non-musical volunteers for rock ‘n’ roll summer camp staff. Applications now available at girlsrockrochester. com. Email girlsrockrochester@ gmail.com for more info. HERITAGE CHRISTIAN STABLES, a therapeutic horsemanship program for children and adults with developmental disabilities, is looking for volunteers to serve as horse leaders and side walkers. Call Kim Kennedy at (585) 340-2016 or email kkennedy@ heritagechristianservices.org LIFESPAN’S OMBUDSMAN PROGRAM s looking for volunteers to advocate for individuals living in long-term care settings. Please contact call 585.287.6378 or e-mail dfrink@lifespan-roch.org for more information

LOOKING

TOHIRE?

LITERACY VOLUNTEERS OF ROCHESTER needs adult tutors to help adults who are waiting to improve their reading, writing, English speaking, or math skills. Call 473-3030, or check our website at www. literacyrochester.org ROCHESTER CARES is looking for volunteers interested in joining us to make a difference in Rochester!! One time and recurring volunteer opportunities with a wide range of organizations. www. rochestercares.org/calendar.php VOLUNTEERS NEEDED for the Men’s Emergency Winter Shelter at Dimitri House. Please call us at 325-1796 for more information or to volunteer your time. VOLUNTEERS NEEDED To assist with praise and worship. Living Waters Fellowship is a Christ centered non-denominational church in the early stages of development. Individuals, groups, and musicians are welcomed. Call 585-957-6155. WOMEN: ROCHESTER HABITAT is looking for women 18 years+ to help build a house with a single mother. Visit rochabitat.org or call 546-1470

WORK EXCHANGE Work exchange, Retreat Center in CA. Seeking good men, 23-45. strong, with spiritual interest. Hands-on work, metal shop, foundry. Includes room, board, living allowance $150 month. www.volunteer.odiyan.org Email volunteer@odiyan.org

Business Opportunities START A HOME BASED BUSINESS. Part-time or Full-Time. Serious inquires only. 585-271-3243

> page 39 WEDDING: Card box, ring pillow basket, toast glasses, 2 candle holders. Excellent, must see $50 585-392-5127

Events **GUN SHOW - HAMBURG FAIRGROUNDS ** 5820 S. Park Avenue US Route 62, Hamburg. 300 TABLE SHOW! Public Hours: Saturday May 4th, 9am - 4pm and Sunday, May 5th, 9am - 3pm. Erie County Pistol Permit Department in attendance. www.nfgshows.com.

Career Training Garage and ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home. *Medical, *Business, Yard Sales *Criminal Justice, *Hospitality. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV authorized. Call 800-481-9472 www. CenturaOnline.com EARN $500 A DAY Airbrush & Media Makeup Artists For: Ads - TV - Film - Fashion Train & Build Portfolio in 1 week Lower Tuition for 2012. AwardMakeupSchool.com

PLACE YOUR EMPLOYMENT AD WITH CITY NEWSPAPER! CALL CHRISTINE AT 244.3329 x23 FOR MORE INFORMATION

BROWNCROFT:200+ garage sales in a square mile! May 4-5 (some May 3) 9-5. I-590: west on Browncroft. Maps & lists: www.browncroftna.org

Jam Section BLUES/ROCK BAND Needs bass player. Experienced musicians, we have all the pieces but you! Call Mike 424-4122 or 738-1151. BRIAN MARVIN lead vocalist, is looking for a job and is looking to form band (Classic Rock) with lead guitarist, bassist, drummer & rhythm guitars Covers & originals 585-473-5089 CALLING ALL MUSICIANS OF ALL GENRES the Rochester Music Coalition wants you! Please register on our website. For further info: www.rochestermusiccoalition.org info@rochestermusiccoalition.org 585-235-8412 CLASSIC ROCK COVER BAND? Experienced Young Drummer available to play - Led Zeppelin, Rush, etc. Looking for Guitar, Bass and Vocals. Contact through: http://www.youtube.com/user/ Chaztize7 EXPERIENCED LEAD VOCALS Seeks employment. Pat experience Inkspots, Platters, Drifters, James Brown among many. Leroy Harris. Contact Bobby 585-328-4121 Specialties, classics, R&B Soul.

Place your ad by calling 244-3329 ext. 23 or rochestercitynewspaper.com Ad Deadlines: Friday 4pm for Display Ads Monday at noon for Line ads Music Services

www.NorwoodSawmills.com/300N 1-800-578-1363 Ext.300N

PIANO LESSIONS In your home or mine. Patient, experienced instructor teaching all ages, levels and musical styles. Call Scott: 585- 465-0219. Visit www. pianolessonsrochester.com

Notices

Lost and Found CAT FOUND March 14th Cobbs Hill area. Black with some white. No Collar. Friendly. Distinctive features. Call 442-0617 to identify. LOST COMPOSITION BOOK REWARD FREE RENT TO RITE PERSON REWARD ANYWAY ron. east8888@gmail.com

Miscellaneous GET A FREE VACATION as well as IRS tax deduction BY DONATING your vehicle, boat, property, collectibles to DVAR. Help teens in crisis. Call: 1-800-338-6724

GOOD NUTRITION is the best medicine! Nearly 1,000,000 older (60+) New Yorkers are income eligible for SNAP – the new name for the Food Stamp Program. Let’s help older adults in Monroe County get the nutrition support they need to stay healthy. Contact the Nutrition Outreach & Education Program at MCLAC – the Rochester office of LAWNY, Inc. Call us at (585) 295-5624 or (585) 295-5626 to find out if you may be eligible for SNAP. Prepared by a project of Hunger Solutions New York and NYSOTDA. This institution is an equal opportunity provider.

Wanted to Buy

HAS YOU BUILDING SHIFTED OR SETTLED? Contact Woodford Brothers Inc, for straightening, leveling, foundation and wood frame repairs at 1-800-OLDBARN. www.woodfordbros.com. “Not applicable in Queens county”

A DIABETIC NEEDS YOUR TEST STRIPS: Any Brand. Unexpired & Unopened. Will Beat Any Fair Price. FAST Payment! CASH Paid. Call Doug (877)710-5620 or (716)7084512 diabeticteststrips4cash@ gmail.com

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Legal Ads [ LEGAL NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of A&M Liquor Store, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (“SSNY”) on March 17, 2013. Office location: Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to LLC at 3118 E Henrietta, Henrietta, NY 14467. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ LEGAL NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of GVH - 3 LLC. GVH -3 filed Articles of Organization with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 2/28/2013. Office location: Monroe County. The Secretary of State was designated as agent upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process served to: 267 Pearl Street, Rochester, NY 14607. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ LEGAL NOTICE ] Notice of formation of Marciano Brothers LLC, Articles of Formation filed with the NYS Secretary of State (SSNYS) on 08-272012. Office location Monroe County, SSNYS designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against the company may be served. SSNYS shall mail a copy of any process to 435 Parma Center Road, Hilton, NY 14468. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ LEGAL NOTICE ] Notice of formation of Rochester Home Inspections & Engineering, PLLC a Professional Limited Liability Company. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of N.Y. (SSNY) on 03/04/2013. Office location Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of PLLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The PLLC, 1065 Wickerton Lane, Webster, NY 14580 Purpose: practice the profession of Engineering. [ LEGAL NOTICE ] R and S Group Consulting, LLC (“LLC”) filed Arts. of Org. with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on March 26, 2013. Office Location: Monroe County. SSNY designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it

44 CITY MAY 1-7, 2013

may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 18 Bosworth Field, Mendon, New York 14506. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ LEGAL NOTICE ] ROCHESTER BEER RUN LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 4/1/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 66 Alliance Ave., Rochester, NY 14620. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] A1-AC, LLC filed Articles of Organization with the New York Department of State on March 15, 2013. Its office is located in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent of the Company upon whom process against it may be served and a copy of any process shall be mailed to 574 Melwood Drive, Rochester, New York 14626. The purpose of the Company is any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Articles of Organization with respect to Flat Decor, LLC, a New York Limited Liability Company, were filed with the Secretary of State of New York on March 6, 2013. The County in New York State where its office is located is Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent of Flat Decor, LLC upon whom process against it may be served, and the post office address to which the Secretary of State shall mail a copy of any process against Flat Decor, LLC served upon him or her is 2 Old Brick Circle, Pittsford, New York 14534. There are no exceptions adopted by the Company, or set forth in its Operating Agreement, to the limited liability of members pursuant to Section 609(a) of the Limited Liability Company Law of the State of New York. Flat Decor, LLC is formed for the purpose of operation of an importing and exporting business, domestic retail and wholesale sales and any other activities that are lawful for a limited liability company in the State of New York.

[ NOTICE ] ATMOSTFIT LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 3/4/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Howard Charles Cragg, 515 Bay Rd., Webster, NY 14580. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] C&D REMODELING, LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 2/12/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Edward R. Dundas, 91 Leroy St., Rochester, NY 14612. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] C6 MOBILITY LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 3/20/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, Attn: David M. Sprout, Manager, 1222 Waterbrook Xing, Webster, NY 14580. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] Fiona’s Hard Goods LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 4/2/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 536 Glenview Court, Webster, NY 14580. General Purposes [ NOTICE ] FIXINGFOX, LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 3/19/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, Attn: Arthur Alves, Mgr., 5 Monroe Ave., Pittsford, NY 14534. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] LEGAL NOTICE is hereby given (number to be assigned) for beer, and wine license that has been applied for by the undersigned; Xingwang Sushi Inc, dba Sushi Palace to

sell beer, and wine at retail (ON-PREMISE) under the Alcoholic Beverage Control Law of the State of New York at 1000 Hylan Dr, Rochester, New York 14623, County of Monroe for on premise consumption. [ NOTICE ] MADOH MUSIC GROUP LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 12/28/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Jeremiah Abiah, 126 W. 129 St., Ste. 3, NY, NY 10027. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] NAMCO DEVELOPMENT, LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 11/17/10. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, PO Box 20135, Rochester, NY 14602-0135. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] Not. of Form. of Homewise MGMT.LLC, Art.of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 04/13/10. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY may mail a copy of any process to LLC. 3177 Latta Rd,Ste. 160, Rochester, NY 14612. Purpose: any lawful Purpose [ NOTICE ] Not. of Form. Of M&M Gardens LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 3/20/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY may mail copy of any process to LLC at 445 Peck Rd, Spencerport, NY 14559. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice is hereby given that a license, number 3129064, for beer, liquor and wine has been applied for by the undersigned to sell beer, liquor and wine at retail in a catering establishment under the Alcoholic Beverage Control Law at 1361

Marsh Road, Pittsford, Monroe County for on premises consumption. Arena Clarcq Hospitality, Inc. d/b/a Burgundy Basin [ NOTICE ] Notice is hereby given that a license, number not yet assigned, for a full on premise beer & wine license has been applied for by ISOTOPE CONSULTING LLC dba The Crossroads Coffeehouse, 752 Goodman St S., Rochester NY 14620, County of Monroe, City of Rochester for a restaurant. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Acrospire Management LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 3/25/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: National Registered Agents, Inc., 111 Eighth Ave., 13th Fl., NY, NY 10011, also the registered agent. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Aristo Management, LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 2/15/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 1142 Mount Hope Ave., Rochester, NY 14620. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of ASSURED EDGE SOLUTIONS LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 04/09/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o U.S. Corp. Agents, Inc., 7014 13th Ave., Ste. 202, Brooklyn, NY 11228, regd. agent upon whom and at which process may be served. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of BCW CHEMICALS LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/24/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent

of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o U.S. Corp. Agents, Inc., 7014 13th Ave., Ste. 202, Brooklyn, NY 11228, regd. agent upon whom and at which process may be served. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of Big Green Lawns, LLC Art. of Org. filed Secy of State of NY (SSNY) on 04/17/2013. Office location: Monroe County. The SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY may mail copy of any process to the LLC at 24 Raymond St. Rochester, NY 14620. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Callea Family Holdings, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 4/18/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, c/o Sammy Feldman, 3445 Winton Place, Ste. 228, Rochester, NY 14623. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Cambridge Park, LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 2/20/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 88 Sugar Tree Circle, Brockport, NY 14420. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of CC Interactive Marketing Services, LLC, Art.of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 02/26/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 118 Kirklees Rd; Pittsford, NY 14534. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of CRANBERRY CAPITAL WATER LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY

(SSNY) on 02/27/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o U.S. Corp. Agents, Inc., 7014 13th Ave., Ste. 202, Brooklyn, NY 11228, regd. agent upon whom and at which process may be served. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of CRESCENT BEACH RESTAURANT AND HOTEL LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 03/20/13. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 1372 Edgemere Dr., Rochester, NY 14612. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Faith Performances, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (“SSNY”) on February 15, 2013. Office location: Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to LLC at P.O Box 64607, Rochester, NY 14624. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of GCG Renovations, LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 4/5/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 8 Donlin Dr., Rochester, NY 14624. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of GENETT PROPERTIES, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 04/18/13. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 142 Pinnacle Rd., Pittsford, NY 14534. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, Attn: Frederick J. Genett at the princ. office of the LLC. Purpose: Any lawful activity.

[ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Greater Rochester Premier Hockey, LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 3/20/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 93 Roselawn Ave., Fairport, NY 14450. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of IQM360 LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 3/22/2013. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o Law Office of Anthony A. Dinitto, L.L.C., 8 Silent Meadows Dr., Spencerport, NY 14559. Purpose: any lawful act. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of KREAG-WOOD EAST, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 3/21/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, c/o Todd Clicquennoi, 44 Exchange Blvd., Rochester, NY 14614. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY. NAME: 5435 WEST RIDGE ROAD, LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 04/16/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to the LLC, 122 Sherwood Drive, Hilton, New York 14468. Purpose: For any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] NOTICE OF FORMATION of NFE/GREENWOOD TERRACE, LLC (“LLC”) Art. of Org. filed with NY Secretary of State (“NYSOS”) on 9/12/2002, pursuant to LLC Law Section 203.


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[ NOTICE ] NOTICE OF FORMATION of NFE/ LEISURE VILLAGE, LLC (“LLC”) Art. of Org. filed with NY Secretary of State (“NYSOS”) on 9/12/2002, pursuant to LLC Law Section 203. Office location: Monroe County. NYSOS is designated as service of process agent for LLC. NYSOS shall mail copy of process served to: Chamberlain, D’Amanda, etal., Attn: Jerry R. Greenfield, Esq., 1600 Crossroads Bldg., Two State St., Rochester, NY 14614. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] NOTICE OF FORMATION of NFE/ MARINE MEMORIAL, LLC (“LLC”) Art. of Org. filed with NY Secretary of State (“NYSOS”) on 9/12/2002, pursuant to LLC Law Section 203. Office location: Monroe County. NYSOS is designated as service of process agent for LLC. NYSOS shall mail copy of process served to: Chamberlain, D’Amanda, etal., Attn: Jerry R. Greenfield, Esq., 1600 Crossroads Bldg., Two State St., Rochester, NY 14614. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] NOTICE OF FORMATION of NFE/ PINEVIEW, LLC (“LLC”) Art. of Org. filed with NY Secretary of State (“NYSOS”) on 9/12/2002, pursuant to LLC Law Section 203. Office location: Monroe County. NYSOS is designated as service of process agent for LLC. NYSOS shall mail copy of process served to: Chamberlain, D’Amanda, etal., Attn: Jerry R. Greenfield, Esq., 1600 Crossroads Bldg., Two State St., Rochester, NY 14614. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] NOTICE OF FORMATION of NFE/ WILLIAMS COURT, LLC (“LLC”) Art. of Org. filed with NY Secretary of State (“NYSOS”) on

9/12/2002, pursuant to LLC Law Section 203. Office location: Monroe County. NYSOS is designated as service of process agent for LLC. NYSOS shall mail copy of process served to: Chamberlain, D’Amanda, etal., Attn: Jerry R. Greenfield, Esq., 1600 Crossroads Bldg., Two State St., Rochester, NY 14614. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Northern Attachments LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 2/20/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 741 Maple Dr., Webster, NY 14580. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of PCC Capital Group LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State on 4/23/13. Office location: Monroe County. Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o Nixon Peabody LLP, 1300 Clinton Square, Rochester, NY 14604, principal business address. Purpose: all lawful purposes. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of PEARTREE HEALTH STRATEGIES LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 03/15/13. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 29 Leland Rd., Rochester, NY 14617. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of THE RED FERN CAFE, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State on 3/4/13. Office location: Monroe County. Principal business address: 223 Dartmouth Street, #3, Rochester, New York 14607. Secy. of State designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. Secy. of State shall mail process to: 223 Dartmouth Street, #3, Rochester,

New York 14607. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of UPSTATE POWER MANAGEMENT, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 04/18/13. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 32 Marway Circle, Rochester, NY 14624. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of VALLEYCREST CONSULTING LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 1/17/2013. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o The LLC, 156 Valley Crest Road, Rochester NY 14616. Purpose: any lawful act. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Zitka Island, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 2/28/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Timothy Farrell, 854 Esjay Drive, Victor, NY 14564. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of ADR NY Dist. LLC. Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 4/11/13. Office location: Monroe County. LLC formed in OH on 4/2/13. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. OH and principal business address: 5300 Tod Ave. SW, Lordstown, OH 44481. Cert. of Org. filed with OH Sec. of State, 180 E. Broad St., Columbus, OH 43215. Purpose: all lawful purposes. [ NOTICE ] RENT FROM US, LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY)

6/8/2012. Office in Monroe Co. SSNY desig. agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to Marchioni & Associates, 2024 W. Henrietta Rd., Ste. 3G, Rochester, NY 14623. Purpose: Any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] RIVER CITY AIRSOFT CLUB LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 2/11/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 351 Huffer Rd., Hilton, NY 14468. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] SHIRE SENIOR LIVING LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 3/7/13. Office in Monroe Co. SSNY design. Agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to The LLC 2515 Culver Road Rochester, NY 14609. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] SYANDA GROUP LLC (LLC) filed Arts. of Org. with NY Secy. of State (SS) on 4/11/13. LLC’s office is in Monroe Co. SS is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS shall mail a copy of any process to 620 Park Avenue, Suite 157, Rochester, NY 14607. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] YARIV PAZ, LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 4/5/13. Office in Monroe Co. SSNY desig. agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 2255 Lyell Ave., Rochester, NY 14606, which is also the principal business location. Purpose: Any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] YP ROCHESTER 1, LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 4/5/13. Office in Monroe Co. SSNY desig. agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 2255 Lyell Ave., Rochester, NY 14606, which is also the principal business location. Purpose: Any lawful purpose.

[ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] Direct4U Marketing & Telecom Solutions LLC filed Articles of Organization with the New York Department of State on 2/20/13. Its office is located in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent of the Company upon whom process against it may be served and a copy of any process shall be mailed to 42 Matthews Drive, Fairport, NY 14450. The purpose of the Company is marketing services. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] Name: CHRISTOPHER J. CALABRESE, P.L.L.C. Arts. Of Org. filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 04/04/2013. Office Location: Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to: C/O CHRISTOPHER J. CALABRESE, P.L.L.C., 45 Exchange Street, Rochester, New York 14614. Purpose: Any Lawful Purpose. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] Notice of Formation of Wood Team Limo, LLC. Articles of Organization filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on March 8, 2013. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to principal business location: The LLC, 2171 Monroe Avenue, Rochester, NY 14618. Purpose: any lawful activity [ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] Young Lioness LLC filed Articles of Organization with the New York Department of State on 01/18/2013. Its office is located in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent of the Company upon whom process against it may be served and a copy of any process shall be mailed to 17 Mulberry Street, Rochester NY 14620. The purpose of the Company is any lawful business. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION ACCURET LLC ]

Articles of Organization filed with Secretary of State of NY (“SSNY”) on 03/21/2013. Office in Monroe County. SSNY designated agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to ACCURET LLC, C/O JOHN S. HERBRAND, ESQ., ONE CHASE SQUARE, SUITE 1900, ROCHESTER, NY 14604. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION HOME CARE OF WESTERN NEW YORK, LLC ] Articles of Organization filed with Secretary of State of NY (“SSNY”) on 04/24/2013. Office in Monroe County. SSNY designated agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to HOME CARE OF WESTERN NEW YORK, LLC, C/O SUSAN BENNETT, 340 OXFORD ST., ROCHESTER, NY 14607. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION HOUND HAVEN HOTEL LLC ] Articles of Organization filed with Secretary of State of NY (“SSNY”) on 01/05/2005. Office in Monroe County. SSNY designated agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to HOUND HAVEN HOTEL LLC, 1259 LAWRENCE RD., HILTON, NY 14468. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF 1744 MANITOU ROAD, LLC ] The name of the Limited Liability Company is 1744 Manitou Road, LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the New York Secretary of State on 3/20/13. The office of the LLC is in Monroe County. The New York Secretary of State is designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. The Secretary of State shall mail a copy of such process to 152 Snowy Owl Ridge, Rochester, NY 14612, The LLC is organized to engage in any lawful activity for which an LLC may be formed under NY LLC Law.

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Office location: Monroe County. NYSOS is designated as service of process agent for LLC. NYSOS shall mail copy of process served to: Chamberlain, D’Amanda, etal., Attn: Jerry R. Greenfield, Esq., 1600 Crossroads Bldg., Two State St., Rochester, NY 14614. Purpose: any lawful activities.

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cont. on page 46 rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 45


Legal Ads > page 45 [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY ] GAMACA HOLDINGS, LLC has filed Articles of Organization with the Secretary of State on March 7, 2013. Its office is located in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent upon whom process against it may be served and a copy of any process will be mailed to 508 Pipeline Way, Webster, NY 14580. Its business is to engage in any lawful activity for which limited liability companies may be organized under Section 203 of the New York Limited Liability Company Act. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY ] The name of the Limited Liability Company is 1349 South Avenue Properties, LLC. (the Company). The Articles

of Organization of the Company were filed with the Secretary of State on March 14, 2013. The office of the Company within the State of New York is in the County of Monroe. The Secretary of State of the State of New York is hereby designated as Agent of the Company for the purpose of service of Process. The address to which the Secretary of State shall mail a copy of any process against the Company served upon him/her is PO Box 93031, Rochester, NY 14692. The character and purpose of the business of the Company shall be purchase, remodeling , sale or rental of residential units. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF VISTA PROPERTY MANAGEMENT, LLC ] The name of the Limited Liability Company is Vista Property Management, LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the New York Secretary of State on

3/13/13. The office of the LLC is in Monroe County. The New York Secretary of State is designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. The Secretary of State shall mail a copy of such process to PO Box 77339, Rochester, NY 14617, The LLC is organized to engage in any lawful activity for which an LLC may be formed under NY LLC Law. [ NOTICES ] Index No. 13/1704 Summons SUPREME COURT OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF MONROE LINDA J. STEWART Plaintiff v. JAMES F. STEWART, JR 95 Sandcastle Drive Rochester, New York 14622 And EAGLE ONE INVESTMENTS, LLC Defendants TO DEFENDANT JAMES F. STEWART, JR.: You are hereby summoned and required to submit to plaintiff’s attorneys your answering papers on this motion within the time provided in the Notice of Motion

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46 CITY MAY 1-7, 2013

annexed hereto. In case of your failure to submit answering papers, summary judgment will be taken against you by default for the relief demanded in the Notice of Motion. The basis of the venue designated is the residence of defendant James F. Stewart, Jr., 95 Sandcastle Drive, Rochester, New York 14622. Dated: February 13, 2013 CHAMBERLAIN D’AMANDA OPPENHEIMER & GREENFIELD LLP Henry R. Ippolito, Esq. Attorneys for Plaintiff 1600 Crossroads Building Two State Street Rochester, New York 146141397 Telephone: (585) 232-3730 TO: JAMES F. STEWART, JR. Defendant 95 Sandcastle Drive Rochester, New York 14622 Index No. 13/1704 NOTICE OF MOTION FOR SUMMARY JUDGMENT IN LIEU OF COMPLAINT SUPREME COURT OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF MONROE LINDA J. STEWART Plaintiff v. JAMES F. STEWART, JR. EAGLE ONE INVESTMENTS, LLC Defendants PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that upon the Summons, Dated February 13, 2013, and the affidavit of Henry R. Ippolito, Esq., sworn to on February 13, 2013, the plaintiff will move this Court at a Special Term thereof, the Hon. John J. Ark presiding at the Hall of Justice, 99 Exchange Boulevard, Rochester, New York on May 22, 2013 at 9:30 a.m. or as soon thereafter as counsel can be heard, for an Order pursuant to CPLR 3213 directing the entry of judgment for the plaintiff against James F. Stewart, Jr., making a judgment of the Circuit Court of the Eighth Judicial Circuit of Illinois, Adams County, Quincy, Illinois, entered on October 2, 2012, against defendant James F. Stewart, Jr., a judgment of the State of New York, and ordering judgment against defendant James F. Stewart, Jr. in the amount of Six Hundred Fifty-two Thousand One Hundred Thirty-three and 45/100 Dollars ($652,133.45) in favor of the plaintiff, Linda J. Stewart, with expenses and court costs in the Circuit Court of the Eighth

Judicial Circuit of Illinois, Adams County, in the amount of Five Hundred Seventy-four and 40/100 Dollars ($574.40), together with interest from October 2, 2012, and the costs and disbursement of this action. TAKE FURTHER NOTICE that all answering papers shall be served on the undersigned on or before the twentieth (20th) day after personal delivery of the Summons to you. Dated: February 13, 2013 CHAMBERLAIN D’AMANDA OPPENHEIMER & GREENFIELD LLP Henry R. Ippolito, Esq. Attorneys for Plaintiff 1600 Crossroads Building Two State Street Rochester, New York 146141397 Telephone: (585) 232-3730 TO: JAMES F. STEWART, JR. Defendant 95 Sandcastle Drive Rochester, New York 14622 EAGLE ONE INVESTMENTS, LLC Index No. 13/1704 AFFIDAVIT SUPREME COURT OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF MONROE LINDA J. STEWART Plaintiff v JAMES F. STEWART, JR. and EAGLE ONE INVESTMENTS, LLC Defendants STATE OF NEW YORK ss.: COUNTY OF MONROE HENRY R. IPPOLITO, being duly sword, deposes and says: 1. I am an attorney licensed by the State of New York, and I am a member of Chamberlain D’Amanda Oppenheimer & Greenfield LLP, attorneys for the plaintiff. 2. I make this affidavit in support of a motion for summary judgment in lieu of complaint based upon my personal knowledge, the plaintiff’s records, and the records of the original forum. 3. This is an action to convert a judgment entered in favor of the plaintiff, Linda J. Stewart, against defendant James F. Stewart, Jr., on October 2, 2012 in the Circuit Court of the Eighth Judicial Circuit of Illinois, Adams County, the Honorable Scott E. Walden presiding, into a New York State judgment. 4, Attached as Exhibit A is a court authenticated and exemplified copy of the Illinois default judgment. It bears the stamp “Filed October 2, 2012.” The inside

of the cover bears a certification from Lori R. Geschwandner, the Clerk of the Circuit Court, that she has compared the default judgment attached as Exhibit A with the original judgment on file and that it is a true copy. 5. The cover backing also contains the certification by the Honorable Scott H. Walden, a Judge of the Court, who granted the default judgment against defendant James F. Stewart, Jr., on October 2, 2012, that Lori R. Geschwandner’s signature in her certificate is true and genuine, and that on the date of her certificate, February 4, 2013, she was the duly elected Clerk of the Court, and that full faith and credit are due to all her official acts. 6. Finally, the cover backing contains a certificate by Lori R. Geschwandner that Scott H. Walden’s signature is true and genuine, and that at the time of his signing, February 4, 2013, he was a duly qualified and acting Judge of the Circuit Court of the Eighth Judicial Circuit of Illinois in and for Adams County, and that full faith and credit are due his acts. 7. As a judgment of a sister state, it is entitled by the United States Constitution to full faith and credit by New York State. Since it was obtained by default in appearance by defendant James F. Stewart, Jr., however, the summary enforcement filing procedure of CPLR Article 54 cannot be used. Accordingly, the procedures of CPLR Section 3213, motion for Summary Judgment in Lieu of Complaint, are being used. The default judgment is unsatisfied in whole, the amount of $652,133.45 plus interest from October 2, 2012 remains unpaid, and enforcement of the judgment has not been stayed. 8. The judgment debtor is James F. Stewart, Jr., and his last known address is 95 Sandcastle Drive, Rochester, New York14622. WHEREFORE, deponent requests that summary judgment be granted: 1. Making the State of Illinois judgment into a New York State judgment entitled to all enforcement

procedures as a judgment of the Supreme Court of the State of New York. 2. Allowing the entry of judgment against defendant James F. Stewart, Jr., in the amount of $652,133.45, plus Illinois expenses and court costs in the amount of $574.40, plus interest from October 2, 2012, together with the New York costs and disbursements of this action. Henry R. Ippolito Sworn to before me this 13th day of February, 2013. Notary Public K. WADE EATON Notary Public, State of New York Monroe County Commission Expires July 22, 2015 Exhibit A DEFAULT JUDGMENT No. 12-CH-31 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE EIGHTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF ILLINOIS, ADAMS COUNTY IN PROBATE Filed Oct 02 2012 Randy E. Frese Clerk Circuit Court 8th Judicial Circuit ILLINOIS, ADAMS CO.LINDA J. STEWART, Plaintiff,vs. JAMES F. STEWART Jr. and EAGLE ONE INVESTMENTS, LLC, Defendants, Now, on this 2nd day of October, this cause comes on for prove up hearing. Plaintiff appears by her attorney, RaNae A. Dunham Inghram, and Defendant, James F. Stewart Jr. having been duly served with notice and failing to appear after having been three times called in open court to plead, answer or otherwise appear. NOW, THEREFORE, upon motion of Plaintiff, it is ORDERED, as follows:1.Judgment is entered for Plaintiff, Linda J. Stewart and against James F. Stewart Jr. in the amount of six hundred and fifty two thousand, one hundred thirty three dollars and forty five cents ($652,133.45), and expenses and court costs in the amount of five hundred seventy four dollars and forty cents ($574.40). 2. Defendant, James F. Stewart, Jr. is hereby ordered to render a full and complete accounting of all his actions as trustee of the Linda J. Stewart irrevocable Trust (“Trust”), including an accounting as to all moneys and properties received and disbursed

by him, all income collected by him in the administration of the Trust, and all charges for compensation made by him against the trust property. Defendant is to deliver said accounting to RaNae A. Dunham Inghram, attorney for Plaintiff. 3. James F. Stewart Jr. is hereby ordered to deliver any remaining Trust funds, passbooks, checking accounts, certificates of deposit, and any other Trust property in his possession to Roxanne J. McCarron, successor trustee. 4. A permanent injunction is hereby entered against Defendant James F. Stewart Jr. Defendant James F. Stewart Jr., his agents and assigns are hereby permanently enjoined and ordered not to withdraw, encumber, transfer, or in any manner to deal with the assets of the Trust. 5.The Trust is hereby reformed to remove James F. Stewart, Jr. and any issue of Defendant James F. Stewart, Jr. as beneficiaries. 6. The injunction against Eagle One Investments, LLC is hereby lifted as to successor trustee Roxanne Jewel McCarron for all purposes delineated in the Trust. 7. Assessment of attorney’s fees reserved. ENTER: October 2, 2012 Thomas J. Ortbal Judge Pc: RaNae A. Dunham Inghram Roxanne McCarron James F. Stewart, Jr. [ PUBLICATION NOTICE OF ORGANIZATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY ] The name of the Limited Liability Company is 997 Beahan Road LLC; its Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State on March 1, 2013; the County within New York in which its office is to be located is Monroe; the Secretary of State has been designated as agent upon whom process may be served; the post office address to which the Secretary of State shall mail process is 369 Bostwick Road, Phelps, NY 14532; the purpose of its business is to conduct any lawful business under law.


Fun [ NEWS OF THE WEIRD ] BY CHUCK SHEPHERD

The Precocious Tots of Finland

A University of Kansas professor and two co-authors, in research in a forthcoming issue of the Journal of Finance, found that children age 10 and under substantially outperformed their parents in earnings from stock trading in the few days before and after rumors swirled on possible corporate mergers. A likely explanation, they said, is that the parents or guardians were buying and selling for their children’s accounts using illegal insider information that they were cautious about using in their personal accounts, which would more easily arouse suspicion. While the parents’ accounts had nice returns, the kids’ accounts (including those held by the very recently born) were almost 50 percent more profitable. (The study, reported by NPR in April, covered 15 years of trades in Finland, chosen because that country collects age data that the U.S. and other countries do not.)

The Entrepreneurial Spirit!

-- Delicate Marketing Required: (1) A fluoride-free chocolate toothpaste “proven” to strengthen teeth and regenerate enamel is now on sale in limited markets in the U.S. Theodent (active ingredient: “rennou”) is also available in mint flavor, said its New Orleans-based inventor, Dr. Tetsuo Nakamoto. (2) One of the 12 Canadian foods chosen to accompany the country’s International Space Station astronaut in December is the limited-issue dry cereal especially noted for its fiber, organic buckwheat and various nontraditional ingredients. “Holy Crap” cereal is available throughout Canada and in 19 other countries. -- “Even to Icelanders accustomed to harsh weather and isolation,” report-

ed The New York Times in March, the city of Grimsstadir “is a particularly desolate spot.” Nonetheless, Chinese billionaire land developer Huang Nubo has announced he intends to build a luxury hotel and golf course in the area for his countrymen seeking “clean air and solitude.” Since snowfalls often run from September until May, locals are skeptical of Huang’s motives, but he continues to press for a long-term lease covering about 100 square miles for a project estimated to eventually cost about $100 million.

Frontiers of Science

-- Since gastrointestinal noroviruses are so infectious and can be fatal in countries with marginal hygiene, scientists at the U.K. government’s Health and Safety Lab in Derbyshire needed to study the “reach and dispersion” of human “vomitus,” especially its aerosolizing. Working with nauseous patients would be impractical, and thus, researcher Catherine Makison created “Vomiting Larry,” a puke-hurling robot with a range of almost 10 feet. (According to a University of Cambridge researcher, one can be infected by fewer than 20 norovirus particles, each droplet of puke can contain 2 million particles, and the virus remains active on hard surfaces for 12 hours.) -- Research published in February by Britain’s Royal Society science association found that male guppies in mating mode prefer to congregate with plainer, less colorful males, probably for an obvious reason: to look better by comparison. Said Italian researcher Clelia Gasparini, “You want to impress (a female potential mate).” Would you “look more attractive in comparison with (the dowdy, awkward comic star) Mr. Bean or George Clooney?”

[ LAST WEEK’S SOLUTION ON PAGE 43 ]

[ LOVESCOPE ] BY EUGENIA LAST ARIES (March 21-April 19): Don’t feel pressured to be in a one-onone relationship. You cannot force love or sign up for a commitment that you feel uncertain about honoring. Bide your time, and enjoy what life has to offer. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Put your heart on the line. Proceed passionately and you will enhance your love life. Creating a special bond with someone who shares your goals and offers as much in return is possible. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Flirting is fun, but sending the wrong signal will hurt

someone, or it will be difficult to discourage the person you are toying with emotionally. Either you want a serious relationship or you don’t. Pick one or the other and proceed. CANCER (June 21-July 22): Your vibe will say it all when it comes to love. Participating in events, activities or causes that concern you will lead to an encounter with someone unique. Share your plans and they will include an eager partner. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): You’ll have difficulty choosing just one partner. Temptation will be

great, and the need to satisfy your adventuresome mood will lead to plenty of opportunities with a variety of people. Don’t move too fast -- watch for signs of an overly possessive partner. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Put your heart on the line and pursue the person you feel fits your lifestyle. You’ll have no trouble convincing the right person to make a commitment that will help you both reach long-term goals that will satisfy both your needs. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Giveand-take will be the prerequisite

to finding love. Size up what’s being offered, and consider if the relationship you are interested in will lead to an imbalance and future trouble. Ulterior motives are apparent, and loneliness must not be the reason to settle. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): You won’t have much to complain about when it comes to love, marriage and an interesting future unless you let your possessiveness get in the way. Trust issues cannot be part of a lasting relationship. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Socialize, have fun and look

for adventure, but don’t make promises you don’t intend to keep. Having fun and exploring what life has to offer should be your goal. You’ll have no trouble attracting interest, but you mustn’t rush into an intimate relationship. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Set the stage for romance. Your confidence and charm will attract the perfect type of partner. Don’t shy away from discussing your plans or making a commitment to someone offering exactly what you want from a life partner. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Back away from anyone trying

to make decisions for you or keep you from seeing your old friends. You need freedom to come and go as you please for a relationship to work. Restrictions and jealousy should be your signal to keep looking. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Your unique way of presenting who you are and what your life goals are will attract other creative and passionate people. A past lover or someone offering the same qualities that you miss will want to take a chance on joining with you emotionally, financially and physically.

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48 CITY MAY 1-7, 2013


May 1-7, 2013 - City Newspaper