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EVENTS: FLOWER CITY CHALLENGE, ROC THE RUNWAY

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FILM: “OBLIVION,” ROCHESTER INT’L FILM FEST

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CHOW HOUND: SHEMA SUSHI, ERIE GRILL

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URBAN JOURNAL: VIOLENCE ON THE MIND

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CROSSWORD

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CHINA CRISIS • INSANE CLOWN POSSE • BUZZO • RPO POPS • THERE IS NO MOUNTAIN • LAZLO HOLLYFIELD • AND MORE MUSIC, PAGE 12

APRIL 24-30, 2013 Free

Greater Rochester’s Alternative Newsweekly

Vol 42 No 33

News. Music. Life.

Do I want to stage a big opera? Hell, yes!” CLASSICAL PREVIEW, PAGE 20

Turned off to teaching. EDUCATION, PAGE 6

Child care subsidy stays. NEWS, PAGE 5

Eastman’s new plan. NEWS, PAGE 5

Unearthing the MAG’s buried treasures. ART REVIEW, PAGE 24

City’s 4th Annual Best Busker Contest is almost here! DETAILS, PAGE 17

MUSIC FEATURE | BY WILLIE CLARK | PAGE 14 | PHOTO BY CAESAR SEBASTIAN

Bassnectar: a spasm of madness Bassnectar may not be a household name, but for electronic-music fans, he’s a musical maelstrom. He’s a painter whose canvas is musical waves and ambient beats. He’s half metal, half underground-style aficionado, collector, and librarian, and all-around electronic-music guru. And when that bass drops, watch out. The fans lap it up. While electronic dance music (often referred to simply as EDM) and dubstep have exploded across

America in recent years, Bassnectar is quick to point out that he’s been performing on his own merits — and playing to large crowds — for longer than that. He has worked with the likes of Perry Farrell, Gogol Bordello, RJD2, and Ellie Goulding. Bassnectar packed 4000 fans into the Main Street Armory when he played here last year. He returns to the venue on April 27 as part of his spring tour. Will you be in the audience this time?


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APRIL 24-30, 2013

Feedback Send comments to themail@rochestercitynews.com, or post them on our website, rochestercitynewspaper.com, our Facebook page, or our Twitter feed, @roccitynews.

City should encourage food trucks

Other cities throughout the world have figured out ways to be sure that food trucks have become an integral part of their cities. Food trucks offer excellent cuisine in unusual places, and can respond to events throughout the city. I know several food truck owners, and literally end up getting in my car and driving to eat food from wherever they are that day. And wherever they are seems to be vanishing, as the city and towns keep limiting where they can serve from. I challenge our normally obstructive city, county, and town governments to step outside the box and consider that fabulous cities like LA, Philadelphia, Boston, New York, Toronto, and others celebrate their food trucks and are known for gourmet cuisine on wheels. Rochester has the potential to be one of these cities – if it weren’t for its continual interference by its own government. As a business owner, I insist that Rochester re-examine its zoning and permitting laws, and its limits on food trucks participating in local events like the Busker competition. We harp constantly that we “need to attract a younger crowd” to Rochester and give college students a reason to stay here. Food trucks should be part of that solution, because their demographic crosses all borders. Look carefully at the city’s attitude, and check out the downtown area. Is it a bustling hive of commerce? Or row after row of empty buildings? By allowing food trucks you attract people, and you make the area more attractive to developers. I encourage you to visit fine venues such as Le Petit Poutine, Brick-N-Motor, Hello Arepa, and Wafel. I think you will find their food better than many restaurants in town, and each of these trucks is run by an entrepreneur. Shame on the city for discouraging these businesses, and shame on it for making it hard for them to succeed. We should be encouraging businesses like these. LEE DRAKE, ROCHESTER

Charters and public schools

I think Mr. Klein is “supportive” of public schools in the same way Jean Claude Brizard was (“A Surge of Charters to Rochester?” News). Brizard introduced a strategic plan in which the Parthenon Group (a capital investment firm specializing in opening up opportunities to generate investor profits in the public K-12 “market”) was the primary basis for his discredited branding-style, charter-expanding portfolio approach to school choice. The solutions to the crisis in education involve more democracy and less privatization, not the reverse. Democratization and powerful movements for local control of public education would minimize the perversions of profiteering “investors,” but more importantly we would finally see learning focused on meeting our children’s needs according to high community standards. MARY ADAMS, ROCHESTER

Posted on rochestercitynewspaper.com I don’t know if charters are good or bad per se, but you’re assuming that this is a zero sum game due to our slow population growth (“Could Charters Chew Up the Rochester School District?” News Blog). Every year plenty of middle-class parents exit the city for the suburbs because they rightly or wrongly believe that their children won’t have an opportunity for a quality education if they stay. If charters provide that opportunity, then the overall pool of students within the city is larger, not smaller. ROCHESTER PARENT

Posted on rochestercitynewspaper.com Indeed Joe Klein helped bring former Rochester School District Superintendent Jean-Claude Brizard to Rochester. Joe had a plan then. He has one now, although in my humble but informed view, it’s a very, very bad plan, and even dangerous in some ways; but at least he has one, which raises the critically important question: What is the Rochester Board of Education’s and the current superintendent’s plan? They don’t appear to have one, which is a big part of the reason why people like Joe Klein can so easily implement theirs. Bold, courageous, unbought, unbossed, committed leadership is clearly a big part of

what’s missing in the Rochester City School District. HOWARD EAGLE

News. Music. Life. Greater Rochester’s Alternative Newsweekly

Posted on rochestercitynewspaper.com

April 24-30, 2013 Vol 42 No 33

Warren and the schools

250 North Goodman Street Rochester, New York 14607-1199 themail@rochester-citynews.com phone (585) 244-3329 fax (585) 244-1126 rochestercitynewspaper.com

On Council President Lovely Warren’s announcement that city schools would be her top priority as mayor: So Ms. Warren does not want mayoral control, but besides spending $119 million dollars for education (administered by the superintendent, with oversight by the School Board), she now wants to have the main focus of the mayor’s office also be education. If education is Ms. Warren’s prime focus, she should run for the Board of Education rather than for mayor. If we don’t have mayoral control, then the mayor’s office has other priorities that should take precedence. PAUL KINGSLEY

Posted on rochestercitynewspaper.com Ms. Warren has had three years as City Council president to focus her attention on the city school situation and to convince her colleagues on Council that this area should be their first priority. But for some reason she neglected to do this. Nor, when one reads her biography and personal “mission statement” on City Council’s web site, does she give the condition of Rochester’s schools even a passing mention. Such overnight conversions may be genuine if one is St. Paul on the road to Damascus. But when claimed by politicians running for higher office they tend to appear cynical and disingenuous. MJN

Posted on rochestercitynewspaper.com I applaud the focus of Lovely! Rather than telling us what we cannot afford and what we cannot do, she is rolling out a plan with a solution to the most pressing problem we have. I do not know enough about school issues to say this will work, but you never find answers without trying to find solutions. I, for one, will support someone with vision, not someone who tells us what we cannot do. We have that now! CLINT

Posted on rochestercitynewspaper.com

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URBAN JOURNAL | BY MARY ANNA TOWLER

Violence on the mind The manhunt following the tragedy in Boston ended Friday night better than it might have. Now we want answers. Why did these two young men – one of them little more than a boy, really – want to do this? Was the target of their hatred the marathon? Boston? The United States? Did they get advice, help, inspiration from anyone else, in the US or elsewhere? Is this part of a larger plan to kill Americans, to instill fear, to exact revenge for US actions and policies in other parts of the world? Or were the bombings on Boylston Street individual, isolated acts, more akin to those of Timothy McVeigh than those of the 9/11 hijackers? Equally important to the answers to those questions, though, is our response. What will we do with the knowledge we gain? Days before Dzhokhar Tsarnaev’s capture, there were calls from some quarters for tougher security at events like the Boston Marathon. But what could we do to protect participants and the public in an event like that? Screen all runners and bystanders? Put every backpack and handbag through a metal detector? Hold marathons in remote, secure places, accessible only to the runners, watched only on video? A marathon is a joyful, exceptionally public event – joyful for both runners and observers. And running – even in an intense form like a marathon – is joyful by its very nature: free, innocent, almost childlike at heart. Start trying to protect it from every conceivable threat, and we turn it into something very, very different. And we have let the bombers win. The bombers win if we erode basic rights in the name of national security. (It is a relief that the Obama administration will prosecute Dzhokhar Tsarnaev in the civilian justice system, not treat him as an enemy combatant.) The bombers also win if, in our anger and fear, we start profiling classes of immigrant Americans. They win if we turn our backs on immigrants who need assistance and who want to live and work here. And yet already some politicians, debating immigration reform in Washington, are bringing the Boston Marathon bombings into the discussion. And shouldn’t we talk, at last, about the relationship between our culture of violence and the violence that takes place in this country? I was struck by an article on New York magazine’s website last week, “The Roar of Young Male Rage.” Youth and gender and anger don’t predict whether someone will act violently, says writer Lisa Miller, but testosterone is an “aggression drug,” and “young men have more of it than older ones.”

When we get answers to our questions about the Boston bombings, what will we do with that knowledge? And, writes Miller, citing therapist and author Michael Gurian: “The willingness of men to imagine themselves as warriors is rooted in a protective impulse that can get distorted through culture and especially trauma….” This is certainly not to say that movies, television programs, or video games led to the Boston Marathon tragedy. But doesn’t it matter what kind of culture our young people are raised in? Culture, the broad, societal culture and its values, can nurture for both good and ill. Doesn’t it matter whether our culture nurtures, celebrates, and encourages violence? Can we deny that it does?

State of corruption

You have to laugh: A Sienna College poll has found that New Yorkers don’t trust state government. Shocking, yes? That finding came on the heels of a Quinnipiac poll that found that A) New Yorkers are fed up with the corruption in Albany, and B) we want Andrew Cuomo to clean it up. And just what do we want the governor to do about it? OK; that’s a bit flip. He can do some things, and once again, he’s promising action. He wants tougher penalties for politicians found guilty of corruption (“make it even more against the law to be a crook than it already is,” as the Times’ Jim Dwyer wryly continues on page 8 rochestercitynewspaper.com

CITY 3


POLITICS | BY TIM LOUIS MACALUSO

Warren lays out education plan Rochester mayoral candidate Lovely Warren has staked out education as the centerpiece of her campaign. At a press conference last week, Warren said Rochester is facing many challenges, but “none of them is more important than the failure of our schools.” The city will not survive Lovely Warren. if the crisis in education is not addressed, she said. PHOTO BY MARK CHAMBERLIN Warren, who is president of Rochester City Council, introduced a sevenpoint plan that includes expanding pre K, recruiting teachers trained to work with urban children, creating a scholarship bank to help students with college costs, and realigning city programs around education needs. But the thrust of Warren’s approach is to offer parents more choice, largely by recruiting successful charter school management organizations to open and manage charters in Rochester. Parents in Rochester should not have to wait another 20 years for the city’s schools to improve, Warren said. Warren went so far as to say that she supported a close friend’s decision to sell her house and move to the suburbs rather than put her children’s education at risk in city schools. Warren said she doesn’t dismiss city schools, but she defended without apology the right of city parents to choose the best education option for their children. The city could support charter schools, she said, by assisting charters with one of their biggest expenses: making city-owned building space available. Warren also said that she will not pursue mayoral control of the city school district, a contentious issue that divided the city under Lieutenant Governor Bob Duffy’s tenure as mayor. And she said she would not lobby to change the city’s annual contribution of $119.1 million to the district.

4 CITY

APRIL 24-30, 2013

News

The Department of Environmental Conservation is developing a management plan for the Hemlock-Canadice State Forest. FILE PHOTO

ENVIRONMENT | BY JEREMY MOULE

Forest plan not clear enough The State Department of Environmental Conservation received more than 400 comments on its draft plan to manage the Hemlock-Canadice State Forest. The next step is for officials to respond to those comments. The part of the response that will undoubtedly get the bulk of the public’s attention is what officials say about natural gas and oil drilling on the forest land. The predominant criticism of the draft plan is that it doesn’t clearly prohibit gas and oil drilling within the forest; it suggests that it won’t. Most of the comments received by the DEC address the plan’s language

on oil and gas drilling, says Linda Vera, the department’s regional spokesperson. “The final [plan] will clarify that the state has no intention of allowing any sort of drilling in the HemlockCanadice State Forest,” Vera says. DEC representatives made similar statements during the comment period. But skeptical environmentalists, lake users, and water consumers haven’t found the remarks reassuring. “I don’t think everyone’s concerns will be allayed, at least not mine, until we see it in writing,” says Nedra

Harvey, a co-founder of the antifracking group R-CAUSE. Hemlock and Canadice are the only two Finger Lakes with undeveloped shorelines; the City of Rochester uses them for its drinking water supply. The city bought up land along the shores beginning in 1896, and sold it to the state in 2010 for permanent preservation. Rochester officials have also submitted comments to the DEC. They urge officials to change the management plan so it contains strong, direct language prohibiting drilling on the properties.


Day care subsidies are important because they allow parents to work. Without the assistance, child care costs can eat up more than one-third of a low-income family’s budget. The subsidies also help families afford higher-quality child care.

CHILD CARE | BY JEREMY MOULE

DEVELOPMENT | BY MARY ANNA TOWLER

Child subsidies stay Children’s advocates in Monroe County say they were pleasantly surprised to find that the state’s 2013 to 2014 budget contains funding for a local child care subsidy program. The recently passed budget sets aside $1.1 million for the “facilitated enrollment” program, which provides subsidies to working parents earning between 165 percent and 275 percent of the federal poverty level. That means a family of four, for example, would have to earn between $38,857 and $64,762 annually to qualify for the subsidy. The program was first funded in the 2004 to 2005 state budget with money secured by former Assembly member Susan John. But the program was a trial, and local advocates thought the funding would end when John retired several years ago. But the funding has received single-year extensions since, says Carolyn Lee-Davis, policy analyst at the Children’s Agenda. Without the assistance, child care costs can eat up more than one-third of a low-income family’s budget, she says. The subsidies also help families afford higher-quality child care. But the money will be accompanied by a change. Initially, the Children’s Institute administered the local subsidy program, which it called Child Care Dollar$. But this year, the nonprofit Workforce Development

Institute, which is affiliated with the AFL-CIO, takes over. The Children’s Institute and WDI approached some Rochester-area state legislators about the change, says Harry Bronson. Assembly member FILE PHOTO Harry Bronson. WDI administers facilitated enrollment programs in the Albany region and in Oneida County, and that experience is a benefit, Bronson says. “There’s a sense that it’s going to work better for all concerned,” says Ed Murphy, WDI’s executive director. WDI will conduct outreach about the program and collect applications, but it won’t make the final decision about eligibility. The county’s Department of Human Services reviews the applications and determines whether a family is eligible. WDI staff estimate that the state’s funding will cover 250 to 300 slots, which is similar to the number of slots funded through the Child Care Dollar$ program.

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[ NEWS FROM THE WEEK PAST ]

Kodak sell-off

Eastman Kodak is selling its document imaging equipment to Japanese office equipment giant Brother Industries for $210 million. The deal allows Kodak scanners and imaging technology to be added to Brother printers and fax machines, according to a Bloomberg News report.

Still wrong

GEH has plan The George Eastman House, which is fighting a Morgan Management development plan for 933 University Avenue, adjacent to the museum campus, has released an alternative proposal for the site. | Morgan wants to build a 102-unit apartment building on property now owned by the Monroe Voiture veterans group. Morgan would construct a new building for the veterans, maintaining it and leasing it to them rent-free. That plan will be considered by the Rochester Preservation Board on May 8. | Eastman House director Bruce Barnes says the Morgan development plan is too large, is inappropriate for the East Avenue Preservation District, and would have a negative impact on the Eastman House campus. The Eastman House wants to preserve the existing Monroe Voiture building, renovating it and leasing it rent-free to the veterans. GEH would create a garden, sculpture area, and new Eastman House parking lot and driveway on the remainder of the property. | Eastman House officials initially said they might need the property for additional museum space. But Barnes says the museum now wants the site kept relatively undeveloped. New museum facilities would be built elsewhere in Rochester when needed. | The Morgan and Eastman House plans are available with this article on our website, rochestercitynewspaper.com.

The Boy Scouts of America arrived at what it calls a potential policy compromise concerning its stance on gays. No youth would be denied membership in the Scouts because of sexual orientation or preference. But the Scouts would continue to ban openly gay adults, “avowed homosexuals,” or those who engage in behavior that becomes a distraction from the Scouts’ mission, according to a statement from BSA. The 1,400 national council members are expected to vote on the proposed policy in May.

Lakeside closing

Lakeside Memorial Hospital in Brockport will close at the end of the week. Officials had planned to try to convert the hospital to an outpatient clinic and to keep the emergency room open. But those plans dissolved when state funding was not available.

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CITY 5


EDUCATION | BY TIM LOUIS MACALUSO

Turned off to teaching Emily Kirsch says teaching is in her blood. Her father taught for 36 years, her grandfather was a school superintendent, and her sister is a teacher. But Kirsch, a graduate student at the University of Rochester’s Warner School of Education, says she has serious concerns about whether her passion for working with children will lead to the career satisfaction she saw in her father and grandfather. “No one really knows what the role of teachers is anymore,” she says. “It’s kind of discouraging to a new teacher. It keeps new teachers in this constant worry about their job, and they become unwilling to take risks in the classroom. I guess it’s very overwhelming to me.” The public seems to have forgotten the amount of training it takes before a teacher can step into a classroom, Kirsch says. A minimum of a master’s degree is needed within five years of completing the undergraduate degree in order to receive permanent certification. And starting salaries for new teachers are about $35,000 to $42,000 a year, depending on the type of certification. Kirsch isn’t alone in her apprehension about where her chosen field is headed. To say the US public education system is undergoing a major transformation would probably make some educators laugh. Teachers, particularly in urban and rural districts, are coping with an onslaught of criticism and intense scrutiny. And the attacks are coming from almost every direction: superintendents and principals are under pressure to raise graduation rates and close the achievement gap between black and white students, for example, and government think tanks predict the US economy will continue to falter unless students do better in math and science. The once all-powerful teachers unions have for the first time conceded to a job performance evaluation system tying teachers’ paychecks to students’ test scores in New York State. And after education reformers convinced both Democratic and Republican lawmakers to lift the limit on the number of charter schools, many more charters are opening in urban districts. It’s not surprising that many veteran teachers are anxious, frustrated, and confused by the changes they’re seeing in education. But the turmoil that has hovered over the field for the last 10 years may be having an unintended consequence: fewer college students are entering the field, and some say that uproar is to blame. Enrollment in education and teacher preparation programs in many Rochester-area colleges and universities has dipped, mirroring 6 CITY

APRIL 24-30, 2013

a trend being reported in higher ed institutions across the country. The number of teaching credentials issued annually fell 29 percent in California over the last five years, according to the Los Angeles Times. And enrollments in post-bachelor’s degree programs for teachers are also declining. Applications to teacher colleges in Indiana have hit their lowest levels in years, according to the Associated Press. Purdue has seen its enrollment fall 23 percent since 2008, and Indiana University’s has dropped by 20 percent since 2009, the AP reported. Some local professors say the reluctance to choose teaching as Joanne Larson (left), a professor at UR’s Warner School, and Emily Kirsch (right), a graduate student a career is going to have serious at Warner. PHOTOS BY MARK CHAMBERLIN consequences that may not be felt for five to 10 years. But worse, they say, is curriculum at the UR’s Warner School. She children’s preparedness and focus on that many of the reform initiatives required recommends that students have multiple learning, Larson says. of teachers — like increased time devoted certifications so they enter the job market While the UR declined to provide to standardized testing — are doing more with two or three areas they can teach. enrollment data for the Warner School, harm than good, and will do little to improve associate professor David Hursh says the Graduate student Kirsch is a perfect student performance. decline is more serious than a temporary example. She was initially certified to teach scarcity of jobs. He’s queried education music, “but being a new teacher, I was always There were roughly 3.7 million full-time departments in six Rochester-area colleges, and being faced with cuts,” she says. elementary and secondary teachers in the though he would not name schools, he says the She is now getting certified to teach first nation’s public schools in 2011, according drop in enrollment during the last three years through sixth grade. to the National Center for Educational is as high as 40 percent in some schools. Larson says she tells her graduate students Statistics. The majority, 76 percent, were “I think it’s a crisis for some of these that they’ll have to apply to hundreds of female, and the average annual salary was schools,” he says. positions and that they could have a long about $56,000. Hursh has interviewed many local commute or even relocate. While that figure increased by 7 percent education faculty members who have been let While many Warner students aspire to since 2001, there is another side to those go and are looking for jobs. teach in the Rochester school district, the numbers. Historically, nearly 50 percent “I don’t know what to tell them,” Hursh chances of getting hired there are pretty of new teachers abandon the profession says. “Should I tell them to go on and get slim, Larson says, because the district is within five years. And the nation has been their Ph.D. in education?” downsizing. And even though many teachers shedding about 300,000 teacher jobs That may be a risk, he says, because many retire every year, teachers with seniority can annually since 2009, according to a 2012 colleges are hiring adjunct instructors instead transfer into those positions. White House report. of full-time professors on a tenure track. The But Larson says that while there have While many of the area’s local teaching colleges, many of which have invested millions always been ups and downs in enrollment in colleges have experienced a dip in new of dollars in new buildings and infrastructure, education programs, she is concerned that enrollments, how serious the situation is want flexibility, Hursh says, because they’re not something is different this time. depends on who you ask. Some education sure about the future, either. “Because the profession has been department heads are reluctant to attribute Craig Hill, interim dean of Nazareth devalued, they [students] are looking out the dip to anything more than the recession College’s School of Education, says there there at a dismal space,” she says. “It’s a blame and a bad economy. has been a significant drop in enrollment at game in urban districts in particular.” “The job search process is more difficult his school. Teachers are taking the brunt of than ever before,” says Joanne Larson, continues on page 8 responsibility for societal issues impacting professor and chair of teaching and


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CITY 7


Turned off to teaching continues from page 6

“It’s not just here,” he says. “It’s occurring throughout the state.” Like Larson and Hursh, Hill attributes the drop to multiple concerns, but the main

suspect is apprehension about the Annual Professional Performance Review. The new teacher evaluation system links 40 percent of a teacher’s evaluation in New York State to students’ test scores. Many teachers say the evaluation’s reliance on test scores is flawed, Hill says, and they doubt it will filter out ineffective teachers. “I absolutely think there should be accountability,” Hursh says. “But there are better models being used successfully in other countries than the one we’re using.” The evaluation anxiety has led teachers who once welcomed student teachers into their classrooms to turn them away, Hursh says. The teachers are concerned that the student teachers will bring down their evaluations, he says. And school counselors and teachers are not promoting the field as much as they used to, he says. “There’s so much competition that [teachers] don’t help each other collaboratively as much as they should,” says graduate student Kirsch. “Teachers spend a lot of time filling out paperwork now and watching their backs.” The frustration with testing is not just about the APPR, some educators say. There is a heated debate about what the testing measures and whether students are receiving instruction that will lead to the critical thinking skills they’ll need for college and a career in the global market. Kirsch says she’s talked to many students in her current after-school job who have just been through the testing grind. “They come here and they’re just exhausted,” she says. “It’s not only fearful for teachers, but the kids, too.” Kirsch, who has taught in multiple schools, says testing anxiety is not just with teachers, parents, and students in urban schools. The concern is spreading to the suburban schools, too, she says. “It’s time to come back to a balance,” says Nazareth’s Hill. “I believe in assessments, but we’re down to teaching to the test.” Some education researchers say that the colleges themselves gave rise to the reforms and may be partly to blame for some of the turmoil in the industry. The recent enrollment downturn in education programs could be seen as a market correction, they say. In a 2011 editorial in the Chronicle of Higher Education, “The New Normal of Teacher Education,” Arthur Levine, former president of Teachers College at Columbia University, writes that after shifting teacher 8 CITY

APRIL 24-30, 2013

Violence on the mind continues from page 3

training to higher education institutions, the country may be seeing a shift toward alternative training programs with more support from the business community, like the Teach for America program. “Critics say the modern programs have lost touch with the practice,” Levine writes. “Teacher education is a low-status field in universities, even within education schools. Too often, admissions and graduation standards are weak.” The colleges produced substandard teachers over the last three decades, he says, and those teachers filled the nation’s schools. But the UR’s Hursh strongly disagrees with that view. He says it’s an extension of the view that teachers sit around thinking about tenure and all the time they have off. He says he’s never heard one of his teachers talk about tenure, and that most teachers he knows spend their summers in required professional development classes. “Our master students are by and large very, very strong candidates, and no, we do not accept everybody,” Hursh says. “And just because you’re admitted doesn’t mean you’ll finish.” The UR’s Larson says attitudes about teaching that may be impacting enrollment have more to do with how society views what teachers do, and that it’s a field still dominated by women. The caretaking, nurturer role is both positive and negative, she says. If the enrollment decline continues, Larson says there could be a more serious shortage of special education, math, and science teachers than there already is. And she says she’s especially concerned that rural communities will have difficulty filling teaching positions because, like many professionals, the teaching candidates tend to prefer urban and suburban environments. “This is very hard work,” Larson says. “All of us could have done a better job of communicating the value of teachers. I would hate to see people discouraged from teaching because of all that’s going on.” Shaun Russell just finished his master’s degree at Nazareth and fellow student Sarah Bevan is in her last year of the program. Both are hoping to teach elementary school, and they say they are cautiously optimistic. They’ve seen some of their friends get hired, and they say they understand the field is changing, and that their eyes are wide open. They say they know what to expect from the new APPR evaluations, and that they’ve been working with the new, more rigorous curriculum called Common Core, which is being introduced in all New York public schools. “I really feel we’re prepared for this new world we’re entering,” Russell says.

put it). He has created an “independent enforcement unit at the state Board of Elections to investigate and prosecute election law violations.” He wants to let New Yorkers change their political-party registration and vote in their new party’s primary in the same year. The impetus for all this, of course, is the latest Albany scandal: the arrest of State Senator Malcolm Smith, a Democrat, who is accused of trying to bribe his way onto the Republican ballot for New York City mayor. Also ensnared in the case: a member of the state Assembly, two New York City councilmembers, and a suburban mayor. Good government groups have been outraged about state government for years. They’ve pushed for campaign finance reform. They’ve pushed for an end to the redistricting collusion that lets the major parties divide up the state’s election districts like Halloween candy. That little example of bipartisan love has let Democrats keep control of the Assembly and Republicans keep control of the Senate. (That control is slipping away, though, and the state’s demographics guarantee that at some point, the Dems will control everything. Then, Katy bar the door, as my father used to say). Enact term limits; pay legislators more so we attract “better” people to politics; stiffen the penalties for corruption; lower the threshold for what counts as a bribe; make it easier for candidates to get on the ballot; end the practice of party cross endorsements: there’s no end to suggestions for cleaning up Albany. Unquestionably, the problem is serious. Earlier this month, the New York Times, citing studies by the New York Public Interest Research Group, passed along this tidbit: “Over the past seven years, 31 state officeholders have been convicted of a crime, censured, or otherwise accused of wrongdoing.” Other media have been quoting a NYPIRG finding that since 2007, it’s been likelier that members of the New York State Senate would be arrested than lose a general election. When I talked with Assembly Majority Leader Joe Morelle recently, he didn’t deny that there’s a problem. But he defended most of his colleagues. Given the comments of US Attorney Preet Bharara, who called Albany corruption “rampant” as he announced charges in the Smith case, “you’d think that outside the lobby of the Capitol are these seedy-looking characters with paper sacks,” Morelle said, “and it’s simply not true.” Most legislators, “99 percent, or maybe 98 percent, are really honorable people,” Morelle said. “It’s not a glamorous job. You spend a lot of time on the road, staying in crappy hotels.” And, he said, many of the suggestions that pop up after scandals in Albany wouldn’t

prevent a thing. In fact, campaign-finance reform that would provide $7 in public dollars for every dollar of private donations not only would not have stopped Malcolm Smith, Morelle said, but Smith would have taken advantage of it.

We can’t abandon the push for reform. And bribery isn’t the only atrocity taking place in Albany. “Some things, there is just no deterrent for,” said Morelle. “The Speaker [Assembly Speaker Sheldon Silver] said to me the other day, ‘What do people want us to do, give a psychological test to people?’ After all, they were elected.” Government offices and politics supply plenty of temptation. And, said Morelle: “If your design is to take money, or to leverage people into giving you money to put in your pocket… like Willie Sutton said about the banks, that’s where the money is.” So do we just have to tamp down our ire – and our expectations? “It’s like saying we want to get rid of drunk drivers,” Morelle said, “and we do….” That can’t mean that we abandon the push for reform, though. Bribery isn’t the only atrocity taking place in Albany. The blatant rigging of election districts, the influence of money in politics, campaign regulations and party practices that make it hard for newcomers to run for office, the virtual impossibility of third-party candidates to get elected, decisions made behind closed doors: all of these have undermined the public’s trust in government – at all levels. And one of the worst effects of the Albany scandals is that they further undermine that trust. Every scandal is followed by state officials’ pronouncements that they’ll push for reform. But the scandals recede, and very little changes. Andrew Cuomo went into office promising that he would see to it that an independent commission, not politicians, would draw election districts. He has kicked that off into the future. If we could see some major reforms in other areas of politics, the news that yet another Albany pol was under investigation for yet another act of stupidity might not do so much damage. Meanwhile, I don’t know what to do but laugh.


rochestercitynewspaper.com

CITY 9


For more Tom Tomorrow, including a political blog and cartoon archive, visit www.thismodernworld.com

URBAN ACTION This week’s calls to action include the following events and activities. (All are free and open to the public, unless otherwise noted.)

Nonviolent solutions to Israel-Palestine conflict

The Rochester Mennonite Fellowship will present “Refusing to Be Enemies: Palestinian and Israeli Nonviolent Resistance to the Israeli Occupation,” at 7 p.m. on Monday, April 29. Author Maxine Kaufman-Lacusta will lead the presentation. The event is at 111 Hillside Avenue.

Talk on housing and gender

Metro Justice will host “On the Rise: Housing and Inequality and the Fight for Gender Justice,” a community dialogue on the ways women and families are impacted by housing insecurities at 6 p.m. on Thursday, April 25. The meeting is at 167 Flanders Street. 10 CITY APRIL 24-30, 2013

Mayor, police chief at neighborhood meeting

The North Winton Village Association will hold a meeting with Mayor Thomas Richards and Chief of Police James Sheppard at 6:30 p.m. on Wednesday, April 24. The two will answer questions and address safety concerns. The meeting is at 6:30 p.m. at Browncroft Baptist Church, 420 North Winton Road.

Events against racism

As part of the YWCA National Stand Against Racism Day, ACT Rochester will present “Racial and Ethnic Inequalities, Progress and Work to Be Done,” a discussion with Ann Johnson, ACT Rochester’s director, at noon on Friday, April 26. The meeting is at the Central Library, 115 South Avenue. And from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Saturday, April 27, Metro Justice will hold a racial justice workshop to help

build understanding about the ways racism permeates society. The meeting will be held at Downtown United Presbyterian Church, 120 North Fitzhugh Street. Pre-registration is required: 469-8249. Cost: $10 for lunch.

Eisenhower book discussion

Friends of the Rochester Public Library will host a book discussion regarding “Ike’s Bluff: President Eisenhower’s Secret Battle to Save the World,” by Evan Thomas at 12:12 p.m. on Tuesday, April 30. Glenn Kist, RIT dean emeritus, will lead the review, at 115 South Avenue.

Film on Jewish uprising

The University of Rochester will sponsor the showing of “Chronicle of the Warsaw Ghetto Uprising According to Marek Edelman,” at 3 p.m. on Sunday, April 28, at the Little Theatre, 240 East Avenue. Tickets: $8.


Dining 2 a.m.; just don’t forget that last time you went to work with a tequila hangover.

Use your bean

Joe Bean Coffee Roasters (1344

University Ave., 319-5279, joebeanroasters.com) continues its mission to educate Rochester about the mysteries of coffee with a couple of spring classes. Wednesdays through May 29, from 7 to 8:30 p.m., is “Espresso Techniques,” in which participants learn how to pull shots and properly steam milk for lattes. (The fee is $25.) And on Thursday, May 2, at 7 p.m., Joe Bean’s free cupping series focuses on the nuances attendant to the different coffee plants and varietals.

Cheese, please

The Little Bleu Cheese Shop (684 South

Gyoza (left), the Shema roll (middle), and the Volcano roll (right) at Shema Sushi, which recently relocated to Alexander Street. PHOTOS BY MARK CHAMBERLIN

French connection

Urban renewal [ CHOW HOUND ] BY DAYNA PAPALEO

“I’d been looking for a spot in the South Wedge or Park Avenue,” says Shema Sushi chef Su Holmes of her decision to move her popular eatery from the location on West Main Street in Webster that it had occupied since 2007. Shema recently opened the doors to its new home on Alexander Street’s Restaurant Row, in the space formerly occupied by Gusto, and Holmes was pointing out to me a couple tables full of Webster-ites who trekked into the city to enjoy her food. “They’ve been waiting for four months!” Holmes said with a laugh. “They appreciate the freshness.” Decked out in vivid, welcoming hues of orange and brick, the open kitchen at Shema serves up what Holmes describes as “multicultural fusion,” no doubt a byproduct of Holmes’ Korea-to-Hawaii-to-Rochester path. Of course there’s beautifully cut sushi and sashimi, along with nicely priced maki that opts for uncluttered flavors rather than embracing the current trend to cram too many ingredients into a roll and then charge big bucks for it. There are other well-prepared Japanese restaurant favorites as well, like gyoza, tempura, and udon noodle soups, with soba and ramen options. But at Shema, co-owned by Holmes and her niece Dalim Kim, you’ll also notice “the

Ave., 730-8296, littlebleucheese.com) celebrates National Grilled Cheese Month by pitting folks against each other in a heated battle to see who can create the best grilled-cheese sandwich. (The prize? Cheese!) The deadline for entries is April 30; get the details at the shop’s Facebook page.

essence of Korean food,” as Holmes calls it, apparent in dishes like fiery kimchi salad, the Meat Lover roll starring Korean BBQ beef, a satisfying mandoo soup with chicken-filled dumplings, and occasional daily specials like homestyle spicy pork. Shema’s menu helpfully notes vegetarian-friendly selections, and that attention to little details is evidenced even in the wasabi, which gets piped onto the plate, resulting in a creamier texture that makes it easier to spread around. Oh, and save room for dessert. Shema Sushi is located at 277 Alexander St. It is open Tuesday-Friday 11 a.m.-2:30 p.m. and 5-10 p.m., and Saturday noon-10 p.m. Food prices range from $2 to $17. For more information, call 325-6555 or visit shemasushi.com.

This year’s (re)model

Its lovely view of a particularly peaceful stretch of the canal remains unchanged, but the Erie Grill at the Del Monte Lodge is newly revamped, debuting its sleek, updated look earlier this month along with a reinvented menu. The descriptor “Contemporary American cuisine” gives executive chef John Freezee lots of delicious leeway as he draws upon this country’s proverbial melting pot to incorporate a global palette of flavors for three

meals a day, plus room service for guests of the Del Monte Lodge, which operates under Marriott’s Renaissance brand. Standouts on the dinner menu (read: some of the vittles I dug) include perfectly cooked bison sliders with smoky chipotle and cooling avocado, as well as an excellent dish of rabbit sausage, braised leeks, escarole, and wild mushrooms tossed with orecchiette, the pasta’s little dents cradling a luscious dijon crème. Not to mention the addictive salty chips with housemade onion dip, a fitting nibble to accompany one of the Erie Grill’s imaginative craft cocktails. (I adored my Volcano Moreno, in essence a bad-ass margarita.) And the beer and wine selections hail from both far away and very close to home. You can find the Erie Grill at 41 N. Main St. in Pittsford; call 419-3032, or visit eriegrill.com.

Extra Mayo

Hey! Got Cinco de Mayo plans yet? Keep in mind that Mex (295 Alexander St., 262-3060, mexrestaurant.com) will open at noon on May 5 for a rare Sunday, serving brunch — think steak and huevos rancheros; poblano, tofu, and potato frittata; and chipotle and chocolate-chip french toast — then snacks and dinner till 8 p.m. The bar is open until

Rochester has not exactly been accommodating to devotees of classic French food lately, so listen up: from April 25 to May 11, Rooney’s (90 Henrietta St.) will continue its tradition of hosting a guest chef from Lyon, France. Make your reservations by calling 442-0444 or visiting rooneysrestaurant.com.

Ch-ch-changes

Small World food collective recently moved into its larger new facility at 90 Canal St., one that will allow for retail space and class instruction. Visit smallworldfood.com to learn more. Gitsis, a Rochester institution at 600 Monroe Ave., has closed its doors and, after renovations, will reopen in May with a new menu and new hours as the Avenue Diner. Track the progress at Gitsis’s Facebook page. The Flour City Diner is no more; meet the Flower City Grill (2500 East Ave., 5867730, flowercitygrill.com), now serving comfort-food favorites from morning till evening. But Jerry Manley fans should keep an eye out for the former FCD chef as he heads up the kitchen at Spencerport’s Wylie Chayote’s Fine Mexican Food & Cantina, opening in the coming weeks.

Chow Hound is a food and restaurant news column. Do you have a tip? Send it to food@ rochester-citynews.com. rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 11


Upcoming [ RAP/ROCK ] Hollywood Undead Friday, May 24. Main Street Armory. 900 East Main St. $25. 7 p.m. 232-3221. rochestermainstreetarmory.com

Music

[ POP/ROCK ] Steely Dan Saturday, July 20. CMAC, 3355 Marvin Sands Drive, Canandaigua. $30.50-$96. 7 p.m. 758-5330. cmacevents.com [ COUNTRY ] Toby Keith w/Kip Moore Sunday, July 21. Darien Lake PAC, 9993 Allegheny Rd., Darien Center. $28.75-$73.75. 7 p.m. 599-4641. darienlake.com

All Time Low

TUESDAY, APRIL 30 MAIN STREET ARMORY, 900 E. MAIN ST. 5:30 P.M. | $25-$30 ROCHESTERMAINSTREETARMORY.COM [ POP/PUNK ] Whereas Baltimore’s All Time Low has been

known to unabashedly wear its collective influences on its collective sleeve, its latest record, “Don’t Panic,” has smoothed out the seams of all the band’s Frankensteined influences. Instead it arrives at its own jagged take on pop-infused punk. The result is a lot less ironic, and perhaps even a bit more mature while harkening back to the wide -eyed excitement of the band’s early days. Don’t sweat it, though; “Don’t Panic” still packs in the fun. — BY FRANK DE BLASE

RPO Pops: Sondheim and Bernstein FRIDAY-SATURDAY, APRIL 26-27 KODAK HALL AT THE EASTMAN THEATRE, 60 GIBBS ST. 8 P.M. | $15-$79 | RPO.ORG [ BROADWAY ] Early on in his career, lyricist Stephen

Sondheim collaborated with then-established composer Leonard Bernstein on one of the most beloved musicals in theater history, “West Side Story.” This weekend the Rochester Philharmonic Orchestra, led by conductor Jeff Tyzik, will present songs from the aforementioned musical, as well as selections from Bernstein’s “Candide” and choice pieces from several of Sondheim’s own musicals (including “Company,” “Sweeney Todd,” and “Follies”). The RPO will be joined by vocalists Lisa Vroman (who has played Johanna in “Sweeney”) and J. Mark McVey (Jean Valjean in “Les Miserables”) in a night that musical-theater lovers will surely not want to miss. — BY LEAH CREARY

CELEBRATE EARTH DAY THIS SATURDAY! April 27th, 10am-noon,

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www.mflumber.com 12 CITY APRIL 24-30. 2013

Find us on

Rochester’s 24 Hour Jazz Station Streaming Live 24/7/365 at Jazz901.org


WEDNESDAY, APRIL 24 [ ACOUSTIC/FOLK]

Acoustic Open Jam hosted by The Druids. The Rabbit Room,

61 N. Main St. 582-1830. 7:30 p.m. Call for info. [ CLASSICAL ]

Live from Hochstein: Nocturnes for Solo Piano and Voice and Piano. Hochstein

Performance Hall, 50 N Plymouth Ave. 454-4596. 12:10 p.m. Free.

Laura Pfleuger SATURDAY, APRIL 27 LOVIN’ CUP, 300 PARK POINT DRIVE 6 P.M. | FREE | LOVINCUP.COM [ COUNTRY/FOLK ] By the time Laura Pfleuger got her

first guitar at the age of 15, she had already spent eight years singing in musicals, talent shows, and other low-key venues. But by the end of her senior year in high school she was a seasoned performer with weekly appearances at a local country club and a slew of coffee shops. Pfleuger, currently a music business major at Nazareth College, may be placed in the acoustic-country category by most, but her sweetly sullen vocal approach and beyond-her-age lyrics could easily cast her into the infinitely deeper sea of indie-pop. — BY DAVID YOCKEL, JR.

Big Upstate Reggae Festival FRIDAY, APRIL 26 WATER STREET MUSIC HALL, 204 N. WATER ST. 8 P.M. | $14-$20 | WATERSTREETMUSIC.COM [ REGGAE ] Of all the ingredients the fertile, all-

encompassing jam-band scene tosses into the cauldron, reggae seems to be the most dominant. Sure, John Brown’s Body surfs the world-beat side of things with its polyrhythmic display, but it’s that wily one-drop that digs the deepest groove. “Future roots,” as the band calls it. Based in Boston and the Northeast’s hippy hotbed, Ithaca, JBB has been rockin’ steady since 1995. Bad-ass Brooklyn threesome Dub Trio plays with savage dynamics and deadly precision. Think Return To Forever with no looking back, or Fishbone after a copious bong hit. — BY FRANK DE BLASE

Rochester Lyric Opera 2013 Chamber Opera Festival: Jonathan B. Angelone High School Voice Competition Winner’s Recital. Baptist Temple,

Buzzo performed Saturday, April 20, as part of Record Store Day at the Bop Shop.

1101 Clover St. 473-3200. 7:30 p.m. $10.

PHOTO BY FRANK DE BLASE

Sing, sing, sing

[ COUNTRY ]

Amy LaVere w/Savannah King.

[ REVIEW ] BY FRANK DE BLASE

Digging deep into its catalogue, and adding generous doses from its new “Divinity of Purpose” album, Connecticut hardcore harbinger Hatebreed pummeled the heavy crowd at Water Street Music Hall Thursday night. The twin guitars were l-l-l-loud yet discernible as they lead the rhythm-driven onslaught. There was plenty of push and pull between instruments that antagonized the audience ebb and flow, but it was when the group collectively pounded the down beat that shit got nuts. It was loud, mesmerizing, and infectious. The dance floor — or the area typically reserved for dancing — was a sea of pumping fists and flying elbows as Hatebreed summoned a tumultuous tantrum with its thunder. There was a little confusion Friday night on the club side at Water Street Music Hall. Who were the Slide Brothers? Well, this Robert Randolph-sponsored ensemble features Aubrey Ghent, the nephew of godfather of sacred steel Willie Eason, along with Calvin Cooke (sometimes called “the B.B. King of gospel steel guitar”), and Chuck and Darick Campbell of our beloved Campbell Brothers. Alas, the Campbell half

of the outfit was absent Friday night, but Ghent and Cooke percolated a blistering set in a more bluesy, secular vein. It was utterly righteous. The steel was definitely the focal point, but I could swear I heard the ghost of Johnnie Johnson, the original Johnny B. Goode slithering out of the piano. Saturday was Record Store Day, to the delight of the boys and girls all over the land. My first stop was the Bop Shop to dig Austin, Texan Wammo flexin’ some spokenword exasperation above a hip, hip groove. The Big B, Buzzo, followed with his band and with his trumpet, and swung mad/cool like Herb Alpert taking a stuffed moose head though a revolving door. It was a lot of fun, with DJ Tanner punctuating the madness and gladness with lacquer cracker spins from The Cramps and The Sonics, to name a few. Rounded out my afternoon with the fun-lovin’ dopes in The Isotopes at the Record Archive. The band opened its irreverent show with a beautiful Venturesmeets-Louis Prima-and-gives-him-anatomic-wedgie take on “Sing, Sing, Sing.” And of course, as always, there were dancing girls.

Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. 8:30 p.m. $15-$20. [ DJ/ELECTRONIC ]

DJ Adam. Nashvilles, 4853

W Henrietta Rd. 334-3030. Call for info. Ladies at the Lake Party. Pelican’s Nest, 566 River St. 663-5910. 10 p.m. Call for info.

Ladies Nite: High Heels and Mini Skirts New Wave Wednesdays. Club Clarissas,

293 Clarissa St. 232-3430. 10 p.m. 21+. Call for info. Teen Set 45 Party. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. Free. Y Not Wednesday w/DJ ET. Plush, 151 St. Paul St. 232-5650. Call for info. [ JAZZ ]

Ben Waara. Lemoncello, 137

West Commercial St. 385-8565. 6:30 p.m. Free. Margaret Explosion. The Little Theater, 240 East Avenue. 7:30 p.m. Free. Night Trane. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. 585-662-5555. 6 p.m. Free. continues on page 15

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 13


AS SP SPA PAZ PA P AZ A ZO OF FM MA AD ADN A DN D NE N ES E SS SS Bassnectar may not be a household name, but for underground electronic fans, he’s a musical maelstrom. He’s a painter whose canvas is musical waves and ambient beats. He’s half metal, half underground-style aficionado, collector, and librarian, and all electronic-music guru. And when that bass drops, watch out. The fans lap it up. While electronic dance music (often referred to simply as EDM) and dubstep have exploded across America in recent years, Bassnectar is quick to point out that he’s been performing on his own merits — and playing to large crowds — for longer than that. He has worked with the likes of Perry Farrell, Gogol Bordello, RJD2, and Ellie Goulding. “I feel pretty much like I’m on the fringe when it comes to the EDM scene,” says Bassnectar (real name Lorin Ashton). “And so when the EDM scene really blew up…it’s cool for what it is, but I’m not really that into house or techno, and I don’t really get that turned on by DJs using CD players or whatever. So I’m not really that much of an expert on the EDM scene. It happens that I DJ as well and I make electronic music, but I’m way into underground styles and way into the creative process, and the hyper-marketed EDM thing is about as boring to me as Britney Spears and pop music.”

Ashton says. “As that progressed and got more and more nerdy and more geeky, I found new equipment and new tools, and it happened to be electronic tools.” Although death metal and EDM may not seem like the closest of musical bedfellows, that progression was a natural one for Ashton,

songs] as kind of like magic spells in my set,” Ashton says. “I’m all about the live set, and I’m writing music for the live set.” Along with the explosion of live DJ music, there has been increased criticism of the artform from more pop- and rock-centric music culture. But the static image of a DJ letting a show run on autopilot could not be further from Bassnectar’s

liner progression of any given song. It’s not quite the rock generation’s simple chord progressions and verse-chorus-verse structure patterns. “It’s kind of like this infinite grid of possibilities,” Ashton says. “So a lot of what I’m doing up there is navigating the course of what I’m broadcasting over the system and what I’m about to play, and figuring out the best way to loop and layer the sounds.” When Bassnectar was first getting started,

America didn’t have a lot of venues that could support the large systems his music requires. He was playing mostly rock clubs, jazz rooms, or theaters, which aren’t always the most acoustically pleasing for EDM. “I think in a large part we paved the way in North America for sound-system culture to be able to tour,” Ashton says. “Because when I was touring in 2004-05, it was like pulling teeth to get venues to even add subs, even if I’d bring them myself.” These days, it’s a lot more complicated than that. Three semis full of gear follow Bassnectar on tour, along with two full tour busses and a crew of 20 to 25 people. Ashton is quick to credit them: “Most of the guys on the road are Jedis and shaman when it comes to lights, video, and sound.”

Bassnectar started creating music in high

school with as part of the death-metal band Pale Existence. He worked to create a scene around himself in San Francisco, and even then his intense work ethic shone through: rehearsals every day and working on drum beats in between classes were not uncommon. “Making up songs in my mind became something I would do kind of relentlessly,” Ashton says. Ashton took an interest in the production side of music. Using a four-track recorder he was able to make demos for his band, and the more he knew on the production side, the better. “As I began to learn electronic music production and how to kind of realize the sounds in my head, it was kind of like an exponential growth period. You learn one new technique, it’s kind of like kung-fu — you are on to the next level and constantly progressing,” 14 CITY APRIL 24-30. 2013

following the path of the various underground styles that he was into. “DJing just kind of happened,” Ashton says. “DJing is just playing music you love for other people, so it’s the easiest part of it. I just wanted to make music, and I wanted to make events happen.” And make events happen he did. His devoted

fans — appropriately referred to as Bass Heads — flock to his giant shows, including back-to-back sold-out New Year’s Eve shows at Nashville’s Bridgestone Arena. Bassnectar is certainly no stranger to festivals and large-scale festival-like shows. It’s the crafting of live shows that is constantly on Ashton’s mind. “I use [the

live performances. Frequently turning himself into a whipping web of tangled hair, Ashton isn’t sitting back and resting on stage. “You know, when I was at Ultra [Music Festival, in Miami], every DJ I saw pretty much stood there behind the deck with both hands up in the sky,” Ashton says. “And I was like, What is this guy doing, what is the point of this? And you look out and the crowd was going off. So on some level I don’t think people necessarily care what the DJ is doing, which is weird for me, because I’m working pretty much nonstop and I go into kind of a trance and can barely think straight. It’s just kind of like this spaz of madness.” That madness includes controlling and sequencing a song live, weaving in and out of layers of different songs, and actual reordering the

“Customizing a room to very high standards, it’s mandatory,” Ashton says. Rochester’s own Main Street Armory must have met those standards, as Ashton returns there this weekend. “I’ve only been [to Rochester] once, and that was last year, and it blew us away,” Ashton says. “And not only because the venue was this weird abandoned castle, but because I didn’t expect to have more than a couple hundred people, having never played there. And we had well over 4000 people show up — it was a mob scene. One of the most epic shapes of a room, just a pure old-school box.” “We’re extremely stoked to make sure that we came back on the spring tour,” he says.


WEDNESDAY, APRIL 24 Old Wine, New Bottles: Arranging 101 ft. The Rod Blumenau Quartet, Doug Stone.

Rochester Institute of Technology, 1 Lomb Memorial Dr. 8 p.m. Ingle Auditorium. $5-$20.

Vince Ercolamento& Joe Chiappone Jazz Quartet. Murph’s Irondequoit Pub, 705 Titus Ave. 342-6780. 8 p.m. Free. [ POP/ROCK ]

Beyond Dishonor. Water Street

Music Hall, 204 N. Water St. 585325-5600. 6:30 p.m. $10-$12.

Crazy Spirit w/Glam, Una Bestia Incontrolable, and Bad Taste. Bug

Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. $6-$8. The Mid Card. Dinosaur BarB-Que, 99 Court St. 585-3257090. 9 p.m. Free.

New Archery, Buckets, and Peter House. Tala Vera, 155 State St.

546-3845. 8 p.m. $5-$7. Sound Body. Temple Bar and Grille, 109 East Ave. 232-6000. Call for info. Free.

THURSDAY, APRIL 25 [ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ]

Bill Engelhardt, Tom Hernandez. McGraw’s Irish

Pub, 146 W Commercial St. 348-9091. 7 p.m. Free. Frankie & Jewels. The Avenue Pub, 522 Monroe Ave. 244-4960. 7 p.m. Call for info. Jim Lane. Murph’s Irondequoit Pub, 705 Titus Ave. 342-6780. 8 p.m. Free. Jumbo Shrimp w/Mojo Monkeyz. Johnny’s Irish Pub, 1382 Culver Rd. 224-0990. 5 p.m. Free.

Proceeds for Preemies Match of Dimes Fundraiser w/Amanda Lee Peers, Teressa Wilcox, and The Lonely Ones. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. 6 p.m. $5.

Singer-Songwriter Spotlight Series ft. Chris Moore, Cammy Enaharo, Sean Jacoby, Eli Flynn, Matthew Corey. Tala Vera, 155

State St. 546-3845. 8 p.m. $5-$7. Tim Avrom w/Dark Road Duo. The Rabbit Room, 61 N. Main St. 582-1830. 8 p.m. Free. [ BLUES ]

John Payton Project. Dinosaur

Bar-B-Que, 99 Court St. 585-325-7090. 9 p.m. Free.

[ DJ/ELECTRONIC ]

Party Monster Thursdays. ONE

Nightclub and Lounge, 1 Ryan Alley. 546-1010. 10 p.m. 18+. Call for info. DJ Matt. Nashvilles, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. 334-3030. Call for info. DJ Sal DeSantis. Center Cafe, 150 Frank Dimino Way. 594-8882. 7 p.m. Call for info. Karaoke at Panorama. Panorama Night Club & Sports Bar, 730 Elmgrove Rd. 247-2190. 9 p.m. Free. Revolution Thursdays. Grotto, 7 Lawrence St. 739-5377. Call for info. Thirsty Thursday’s. TC Riley’s, 200 Park Point Dr. 272-9777. 10 p.m. Call for info.

Thursday Night Dance Craze Contest W/Floorwax. Lux

Lounge, 666 South Ave. 2329030. Last Thursday of every month, 10 p.m. Free. Thursday Night Shakedown.. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 11 p.m. Free.

Tiki Thursdays: Shotgun Music DJ. McGhan’s Pub, 11 W. Main St. 924-3660. 7:30 p.m. Free.

Tilt-a-Whirl Drag Show.. Tilt

Nightclub & Ultralounge, 444 Central Ave. 232-8440. 11:15 p.m. & 12:30 a.m. $3. [ JAZZ ]

D’Jangoners. The Little Theater, 240

East Avenue. 7:30 p.m. Free. John Palocy Trio. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. 585-6625555. 6 p.m. Free. Mike Kaupa. Monroe’s Restaurant, 3001 Monroe Avenue. (585) 348-9104. 6 p.m. Call for info. Mike Kaupa Duet Project. Monroe’s Restaurant, 3001 Monroe Avenue. 348-9103. 6 p.m. Free. Nazareth College Jazz Ensemble. Nazareth College Wilmot Recital Hall, 4245 East Avenue. 3892700. 7:30 p.m. Free. Nightfall. The Beale New Orleans Grille and Bar-South Ave., 693 South Ave. 271-4650. 7:30 p.m. Call for info. Ryan from El Rojo Jazz. Lemoncello, 137 West Commercial St. 385-8565. 6 p.m. Free.

Spotlight on Faculty: More Jazz It Up!. Hochstein Performance Hall, 50 N Plymouth Ave. 454-4596. 7 p.m. $5.

Ted Nicolosi and Shared Genes. Roncones Italian Restaurant, 232 Lyell Ave. 458 3090. 6 p.m. Free.

[ CLASSICAL ]

Eastman at Washington Square Lunchtime Concerts.

1st Universalist Church, 150 S. Clinton Ave. 274-1400. 12:15 p.m. Free. [ COUNTRY ]

Alysia Groth Band w/Natalie B. Band. Sticky Lips BBQ Juke

Joint, 830 Jefferson Rd. 2925544. 9 p.m. $5. Peewee Moore and Band. Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. 8:30 p.m. $5-$8.

[ HIP-HOP/RAP ] Chris Webby. Montage Music Hall, 50 Chestnut St. 232-1520. 7 p.m. $20-$22. [ REGGAE/JAM ]

Mitty and The Followers. Pane Vino Ristorante, 175 N. Water St. 232-6090. 8 p.m. Free. Old Timey Jam. Bernuzio Uptown Music, 122 East Ave. 473-6140. 6:30 p.m. Call for info. Reggae Thursday. Pure Night Club, 117 Liberty Pole Way. 454-7230. 10 p.m. $5 before 11 pm.

POP/ROCK | CHINA CRISIS

UK’s canonical new-wave band China Crisis makes an ultra-rare appearance in the United States. China Crisis is best known stateside for “Arizona Sky” and the melancholy “Wishful Thinking.” The band shares attributes with fellow post-punk Liverpudlians Teardrop Explodes and OMD — namely smart lyrics and a moody, dancey, multi-dimensional synth aesthetic. The band’s genre-busting evolution through the 1980’s brought in one of the members’ own idols to produce subsequent projects, giving Steely Dan fans reason to scour record bins for “Flaunt the Imperfection,” finding signature touches of major dude Walter Becker best exemplified in tracks such as “You Did Cut Me” and “Wall of God.” The China Crisis discography is full of sparkling gems. China Crisis performs Tuesday, April 30, 6:30 p.m. at the Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. This show kicks off the anticipated alternative-music film series curated by Lakeshore Record Exchange. While tickets are free, they are required. Call 276-8950 or visit mag.rochester.edu for details. — BY KATHERINE STATHIS [ POP/ROCK ]

Five Alarm Open Jam. Firehouse

Saloon, 814 South Clinton. 3193832. 9 p.m. Call for info. Luther w/Glocca Morra, Keeler. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 7:30 p.m. Call for info. Phillip Phillips. St. John Fisher College, 3690 East Ave. 7:30 p.m. $20.

FRIDAY, APRIL 26 [ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ] Dan Marcus. Boulder Coffee Co., 739 Park Ave. 585-697-0235. 8 p.m. Call for info. Friday Night Event!. ,. Last Friday of every month, 8 p.m. FridayAcoustic/ Open Mic Night 8pm. Open Mic night is the last Friday of every month - $5 Tankers of Bud and Bud Light - $4 for 3 Olives Drinks (Drink Specials begin January 1st). Jim Lane. Bathtub Billy’s, 630 Ridge Road West. 865-6510. 4 p.m. Free The Reunion Inn, 4565 Culver Rd. 323-9899. 9:30 p.m. Free Bathtub Billy’s, 630 Ridge Road West. 865-6510. 4 p.m. Free. Johnny Bauer. Nashvilles, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. 334-3030. 6 p.m. Call for info Lucky’s Irish Bar Chili, 3240 Chili Ave. 889-1005. 9:30 p.m. Call for info. Landmark. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. 9 p.m. $3-$5. Ralph Louis. Rochester Plaza Hotel, 70 State St. 546-3450. 6 p.m. Free.

Put some pomp into this circumstance

The perfect sighs for her graduation

RICHARD’S fine jewelers

richardsf inejewelers.com 1855 Monroe Ave • Brighton Commons • 585-242-8777

Tim Avram. Acanthus Café, 337 East Ave. 585-319-5999. 9:30 p.m. Free. Trace Wilkins & Ken Snyder w/ Ciaran’s Pride - Open Session. McGraw’s Irish Pub, 146 W Commercial St. 348-9091. 6 p.m. Free.

[ BLUES ] Blue Birds. The Beale-Webster, 1930 Empire Blvd. 216-1070. 7:30 p.m. Call for info. Ezra & The Storm. The Beale New Orleans Grille and Bar-South Ave., 693 South Ave. 271-4650. 7:30 p.m. Call for info. Mama Hart Band. The Landing Bar and Grille, 30 Fairport Village Landing. 425-7490. 10 p.m. Free. [ CLASSICAL ]

Gibbs & Main: EuphoNY 2013 Lines and Dimensions. The

Harley School, 1981 Clover St. 442-1770. 7 p.m. $8-$15.

RPO: Sondheim and Bernstein on Broadway. Kodak Hall at

Eastman Theater, 60 Gibbs St. 8 p.m. $15-$82. continues on page 16

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 15


FRIDAY, APRIL 26

[ R&B ]

Natalie B Band. Sticky Lips

BBQ Juke Joint, 830 Jefferson Rd. 292-5544. 10 p.m. Free.

Sitar Concert. India

Community Center, 2171 Monroe County Line Rd. 244-1760. 8 p.m. $5-$15.

[ HIP-HOP/RAP ]

Kyro Da Grate, Coco Latt’e, Tim Avram. California Brew

[ COUNTRY ]

Haus, 402 Ridge Rd. West. 621-1480. $5-$7.

Closing Time. Sticky Lips BBQ

Juke Joint, 830 Jefferson Rd. 292-5544. 9 p.m. $5.

[ POP/ROCK ]

affliXXtion, Burn Unit.

[ DJ/ELECTRONIC ]

On the House Fridays. ONE Nightclub and Lounge, 1 Ryan Alley. 546-1010. 21+. Call for info. Chill Out Fridays Happy Hour.

Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. 5:30 p.m. Free. DJ/Karaoke w/Coyote Cody. McKenzie’s, 3686 West Henrietta Rd. 334-8970. 9:30 p.m. Call for info. DJ Bac Spin. Plush, 151 St. Paul St. 232-5650. 8 p.m. Call for info. DJ Blake. 140 Alex Bar & Grill, 140 Alexander St. 585-256-1000. 10 p.m. Call for info. DJ Cedric. ,. 10 p.m. $3-$8. DJ Energon. ,. 10 p.m. $3-$8. DJ Mi-T-Mo. Richmond’s Tavern, 21 Richmond Street. (585) 270-8570. 9 p.m. Free.

Fresh Meat Fridays w/Samantha Vega, DJ Mighty Mic. Tilt

Nightclub & Ultralounge, 444 Central Ave. 232-8440. 11:15 p.m. & 12:30 a.m. $4-$12. Lube After Dark.. Quaker Steak & Lube, 2205 Buffalo Rd. 585-6979464. 9:30 p.m. Free. Reggaeton w/DJ Carlos. La Copa Ultra Lounge, 235 W. Ridge Rd. 254-1050. 10 p.m. Free. Sexy Fridays w/DJ Wizz. Pure Night Club, 117 Liberty Pole Way. 454-7230. 10 p.m. Call for info.

T.G.I. Bucket Friday ft. DJ Jestyr, Dr. Jamo. Grotto, 7 Lawrence St. 739-5377. Call for info. [ JAZZ ]

Fred Costello & Roger Eckers Jazz Duo. Charley Brown’s, 1675 Penfield Rd. 385-9202. 7:30 p.m. Free.

Joel Harrison w/Steve Green & Dave Arenius. The Bop Shop,

1460 Monroe Ave. 271-3354. 9 p.m. $10. Madeline Forster. The Little Theater, 240 East Avenue. 7:30 p.m. Free.

The Midnight City w/Bobby DiBaudo Duo. Bistro 135, 135

W. Commercial St. 585-6625555. 5:30 p.m. Call for info.

Prime Time Funk: 17 Years & Counting. Taylor’s Nightclub,

3300 Monroe Ave. 381-3000. 9:30 p.m. $5.

Ted Nicolosi and Shared Genes. Pultneyville Grill, 4135 Mill St, Williamson, NY. (315) 589-4512. 7 p.m. Free. [ R&B ]

Mitty & The Followers. Dinosaur

Bar-B-Que, 99 Court St. 585325-7090. 10 p.m. Free. Upstate Grooves. Vibe Lounge, 302 North Goodman St. 5034506. 7 p.m. $15.

16 CITY APRIL 24-30. 2013

HIP-HOP | INSANE CLOWN POSSE

POST-ROCK | LAZLO HOLLYFELD

Before you dismiss Insane Clown Posse as merely juvenile humor for booger-eating morons drenched in soda pop, check out one of the duo’s more recent videos, “Where’s God?” with the thought-provoking chorus, “Where’s god when shit goes down?” Believe it or not, Violent J and Shaggy 2 Dope have been at it for more than 30 years, releasing over 23 albums where above and beyond the celebrated lo-jinx, they’ve created a kind of lyrical and mystical fantasy world called the Dark Carnival. This is gonna get sticky.

The term “art rock” originated in the late 60’s when artists like David Bowie and Brian Eno began to expand the conceived limits of rock music. By its very nature, the genre’s scope is immense, so to simply call Lazlo HoLLyfeld an art-rock band would be nearsighted. This Buffalo-based outfit is in the business of making instrumental, emotional journeys, blending the minimalism of post-rock with moments of vibrant, electro-infused beats, and atmospheric, jazzy experimentation. The sound is sweeping, tactile, and magnetic. It’s Explosions in the Sky meets a sleep-deprived Duke Ellington. Really. Check it out.

Insane Clown Posse plays Wednesday, May 1, 7:30 p.m. at the Main Street Armory, 900 E. Main St. $22.50-$28. rochestermainstreetarmory.com. — BY FRANK DE BLASE [ REGGAE/JAM ]

John Brown’s Body Big Upstate Reggae Festival w/Dub Trio, Nevergreen, Among Criminals, and Axis Armada. Water Street

Music Hall, 204 N. Water St. 585325-5600. 8 p.m. $14-$20. Noble Vibes. Firehouse Saloon, 814 South Clinton. 319-3832. 8 p.m. $5. [ POP/ROCK ]

Burndweller w/Chillum, Malformed, Special Buddy Discount. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe

Ave. 9 p.m. Limited entry for unders. $5-$7. Cherry Bomb. T.C. Hooligans, 134 Greece Ridge Center Dr. 225-7180. 9:30 p.m. $5.

Cypher’s Stand Against Racism . Rochester Youth

for Christ, 1 Favor St. 2565050. 6:30 p.m. $3-$5, students w/ID free. Happy Hour: Lindsay Mazza. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 6 p.m. 21+. Free. Into The Now. Temple Bar and Grille, 109 East Ave. 232-6000. 10 p.m. Free. Intrinsic. California Brew Haus, 402 Ridge Rd. West. 6211480. Call for info. Mr. Mustard w/Todd Bradley. Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. 6 p.m. $5-$8. Push. Pineapple Jack’s, 485 Spencerport Rd. 247-5225. 10 p.m. Call for info. Swamp Moose. Hamlin Station Bar & Grill, 52 Railroad Ave. 9642010. 8:30 p.m. Call for info. Taran. Pelican’s Nest, 566 River St. 663-5910. 10 p.m. Call for info.

Violet Mary CD Release Party. Richmond’s Tavern, 21

Richmond Street. (585) 2708570. 7 p.m. $5 after 8:30 p.m.

Your Own Reflection, The Home Crowd, and We’ve All Drowned Once. Tala Vera, 155 State St.

546-3845. 8 p.m. $5-$7.

SATURDAY, APRIL 27 [ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ] Amy Montrois. Hamlin Station Bar & Grill, 52 Railroad Ave. 9642010. 8:30 p.m. Call for info. Jim Lane. Mama Lor’s Cafe, 1891 Ridge Rd. 545-4895. 5:30 p.m. Free.

Left of Center Stage Variety Show: Hieronymus Bogs, Maurice Fibbs. Flying Squirrel

Community Space, 285 Clarissa St. 8 p.m. $3-$5.

Lovin Cup Unplugged Dinner Music Series: Laura Pfleuger.

Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. 6 p.m. Free. Peg and “The Fiddler”. Barry’s Old School Irish, 2 W. Main St. 545-4258. 7 p.m. Free. Tony Padilla. Tapas 177 Lounge, 177 St. Paul St. 585-262-2090. 11 p.m. Free. Travis Fitch. Flaherty’s Webster, 1200 Bay Rd. 671-0816. Call for info.

Victoria Vox w/Rochester Ukulele Orchestra. Rochester

Christian Reformed Church, 2750 Atlantic Ave. 7:30 p.m. $10-$18. Virgil Cain. Flaherty’s Honeoye Falls, 60 W. Main St. 497-7010. 9 p.m. Call for info.

Lazlo HoLLyfeld performs with B.C. Likes You! and Wisdom Kids Tuesday, April 30, 9 p.m. at Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. $6-$8. bugjar.com. — BY DAVID YOCKEL, JR. [ BLUES ]

The Imaginary Band. The BealeWebster, 1930 Empire Blvd. 216-1070. 7:30 p.m. Call for info. Joe Beard. Dinosaur Bar-B-Que, 99 Court St. 585-325-7090. 10 p.m. Free. John Weyl. The Beale New Orleans Grille and Bar-South Ave., 693 South Ave. 271-4650. 7:30 p.m. Call for info. Steve Grills & the Roadmasters. The Little Theater, 240 East Avenue. 8:30 p.m. Free. [ CLASSICAL ] Ad Hoc. Christ Church, 141 East Ave. 454-3878. 7 p.m. Free.

Taiwanese Choral Society of Rochester: Canons of Asia . St. Mary’s Church, 15

St. Mary’s Place. 802-2488. 7:30 p.m. $5-$7. Guitar Faculty in Concert. Hochstein Performance Hall, 50 N Plymouth Ave. 454-4596. 7 p.m. Donations accepted.

RPO: Sondheim and Bernstein on Broadway. Kodak Hall at

Eastman Theater, 60 Gibbs St. 8 p.m. $15-$82.

La Selva. Tilt Nightclub &

Ultralounge, 444 Central Ave. 232-8440. 10 p.m. Call for info.

Latino Saturdays w/DJ Bobby Base. Pure Night Club, 117

Liberty Pole Way. 454-7230. 10 p.m. Call for info.

Saturday Night Ladies Night.

BLU Bar & Grill, 250 Pixley Rd. 247-0079. 9 p.m. Call for info. [ JAZZ ]

AudioInFlux. Richmond’s

Tavern, 21 Richmond Street. (585) 270-8570. 9:30 p.m. $5. El Rojo Jazz. Lemoncello, 137 West Commercial St. 385-8565. 7 p.m. Free.

Fred Costello & Roger Eckers Jazz Duo. Charley Brown’s, 1675 Penfield Rd. 385-9202. 7:30 p.m. Free.

Honor Flight Rochester Benefit Concert. Nazareth College Arts

Center Callahan Theater, 4245 East Avenue. (585) 389-2170. 7 p.m. $12-$15.

Ted Nicolosi and Shared Genes. Jasmine’s Asian Fusion, 657 Ridge Rd. 216-1290. 6:30 p.m. Free.

Vanessa Mangione Quartet.

[ COUNTRY ] Double Cross. Nashvilles, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. 334-3030. 9 p.m. Call for info.

Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. 585-662-5555. 6 p.m. Free. The White Hots. The Pultneyville Grill, 4135 Mill St. (315) 589-4512. 6:30 p.m. Call for info.

[ DJ/ELECTRONIC ] DJ Big Reg. Plush, 151 St. Paul St. 232-5650. 10 p.m. Call for info. DJ Darkwave. ,. 10 p.m. $3-$8. DJ Trancesend. Decibel Lounge., 45 Euclid St. 7544645. 10 p.m. $5.

L.R. Pheonix Book Launch w/ Open Mic. Lovin’ Cup, 300

[ OPEN MIC ] Park Point Dr. 292-9940. 2:30 p.m. Call for info.

Firehouse Saloon, 814 South Clinton. 319-3832. 9:30 p.m. 21+. Call for info. Brass Taxi. Pelican’s Nest, 566 River St. 663-5910. 10 p.m. Call for info. Define Normal. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N. Water St. 585325-5600. 6:30 p.m. $10-$15. Download. Nola’s Restaurant & Nightclub, 4775 Lake Ave. 663-3375. 9 p.m. Call for info. Light Years w/Safe. Dubland Underground, 315 Alexander St. 232-7550. 5:30 p.m. $10-$12. Mesh. McKenzie’s, 3686 West Henrietta Rd. 334-8970. 9 p.m. Free.

Raining Blood, Nasty Trast, Blanco Diablo, and Butter Locks.

Montage Music Hall, 50 Chestnut St. 232-1520. 8 p.m. Call for info.

Rockabilly Rumble w/ Krypton 88, Andy Riot and the Sockhoppers. Lovin’ Cup,

300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. 9 p.m. $3-$5. Sleep Walk Parade. Boulder Coffee Co., 100 Alexander St. 585-454-7140. 8 p.m. Call for info. Smooth Talkers. Johnny’s Irish Pub, 1382 Culver Rd. 224-0990. 8 p.m. Free. The Surge. Captain Jack’s Goodtime Tavern, 8505 Greig St. 315-483-9570. 9 p.m. Call for info. Tempest. Pineapple Jack’s, 485 Spencerport Rd. 247-5225. 10 p.m. Call for info.

Ten Foot Polecats CD Release Show. Abilene Bar & Lounge,

153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. 9:30 p.m. $6-$9.

Trash Wave Review Volume III: Pink Elephant, Handsome Jack, Abandoned Buildings Club, Clockmen, and Heatseeker. Bug Jar, 219

Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. $6-$8.

White Woods, Cloud Gavin, Fowls, and Of Fortune and Fame. Tala Vera, 155 State St. 546-3845. 9 p.m. $5-$7.

SUNDAY, APRIL 28 [ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ]

Celtic Music Sundays: Brian Clancy. Temple Bar and Grille, 109 East Ave. 232-6000. 7 p.m. Free. continues on page 18


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Come out for CITY’s fourth annual night of FREE music on the streets! Listen to great local musicians, PLUS get ridiculous deals from neighborhood merchants on food, drink, goods, and services!

GREAT OFFERS 5-9pm FREE MUSIC 6-8pm

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$3 well drinks at The Old Toad! $2 Coronas at Bamba Bistro! $1 cups of gourmet coffee at Java's! $2 tacos (meat or vegetarian), $2 Tecate bottled beer at Mex! $5 chicken-on-a-stick, $3 cans of Genny Bock at Acanthus Cafe! $2 "grab bag" beers and $2 Tullamore Dew shots at Dub Land Underground! 2 risotto balls for $3; 2 prosciutto wraps for $3; $3 Sam Adams; $3 chardonnays at Veneto! $2.50 meatball sliders & chips at Camarella's! Half-price appetizers at Temple Bar & Grill! $2 off all flavored cigars at Santiago Cigar Factory! $3 Art-o-Mat works, plus free admission to "Eat It: Artists Explore Food & Consumption" at Rochester Contemporary Art Center! $2 pepperoni or cheese pizza slices at Pontillo's Pizza! $3 for any standard 6" pita at Pita Pit! $1 for 2 cookies at Orange Glory Café! 50 percent off every book in the store at Greenwood Books! $3 sliders and fries, $2 gourmet beef or chicken tacos, $3 house wines & domestic drafts from Wall Street! $3 Jameson shots from Havana Moe's!

PITKIN ST

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of a baked good; $1 off small pizza, $2 off large pizza at Spot Coffee! 2 $3 bottles of Pyramid Curve Ball Blonde Ale at Matthew's East End Grill! 3 $5 flights of beer at Roc Brewing Co! 4 $2 cheese and pepperoni slices at Cam's Pizzeria! 5 Half-price appetizers 4-6 p.m. and 2 for 1 on select beers at Victoire! 6 $3 sliders with a can of Schmidt at Skylark Lounge! 7 $2 Bud Light pints, $3 shots of Cabin Fever Maple Whiskey or Smirnoff Sorbet at MacGregor's! 8 15% discount on any room in May (Sundays-Thursdays only) at East Ave Inn! 9 50% off any one menu item at Moe's Southwest Grill! 10 $3 blue velvet cake push pops from Fraiche! 11 $7.50 music stand lights. $8.50 F-Zone digital music tuners, $30 colored ukuleles, and 25 percent off in-stock new ukuleles at Bernunzio Uptown Music! 12 $1 mac & cheese cups and $3 chicken portabella sliders at Ludwig's Center Stage Café! 13 $2 large fountain sodas, $2 small popcorns, $1 bottled waters at Little Theatre! 14 2 spring rolls for $2 at Golden Port! 15 $2 pints and 16 oz. cans (21 and over only) at Salinger's! 16 $2 slices of pepperoni and cheese pizza at Stromboli Express!

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CITY Busker Zone Find buskers here! City Newspaper Staff

Pick up your guitar picks to vote for your favorite busker! PRIZES SPONSORED BY

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Merchant Offer

PRODUCED BY

Full list of musicians, Facebook Event link, details & updates at:

ROCHESTERCITYNEWSPAPER.COM

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 17


NEW!

SUNDAY, APRIL 28

CITY CITY NEWSPAPER

Fandango at the Tango. Tango Cafe, 389 Gregory St. 271-4930. 7:30 p.m. Free, donations accepted.

on

pinterest.com/roccitynews

Traditional Irish Music Session. Johnny’s Irish Pub, 1382 Culver Rd. 224-0990. 5 p.m. Free. [ CLASSICAL ]

Gibbs & Main: EuphoNY 2013 Bebop to Bach: Add It Up for Kids and Families. The Harley

School, 1981 Clover St. 4421770. 2 p.m. Reservations recommended: 509-2745, tsmith@harleyschool.org. $5-$10.

Only 25 Minutes From Rochester!

Check us out online at:

PultneyvilleGrill.com FINE DINING IN A CASUAL WATERFRONT SETTING 4135 Mill St. (Lake Rd.) Pultneyville, NY 14538

(315) 589-4512

IF YOU HAVE ASTHMA AND ARE A NON-SMOKER

You may be eligible to join our ASTHMA RESEARCH STUDY with an Investigational Dry Powder Inhaler Device for ALBUTERAL. Albuterol has been in use for nearly 30 years. Qualified participants must:

• Be at least 12 years of age • Have a medical diagnosis of asthma • Be taking asthma controller medication daily

While in the study you will receive at no cost:

• Medical care for your asthma by an asthma specialist • Study medication • Compensation for time and travel YOU DO NOT NEED HEALTH INSURANCE TO PARTICIPATE

Contact AAIR Research Center at: (585) 442-1980 or Email: research@aair.info AAIR Research Center

300 Meridian Centre Suite 305, Rochester NY 14618

www.aairresearch.com Dedicated to Improving Your Present and Future Health 18 CITY APRIL 24-30. 2013

Mu Phi Epsilon - Richard Killmer, musician of the year.

Kilbourn Hall, 26 Gibbs St. 7 p.m. Free.

Carly’s Angels Woodwind Quartet. Scottsville Free Library, 28 Main Street. 889-2023. 4 p.m. Pre-register at 889-2023 for all programs. Free. Pops on Pipes: Chris Elliott. Rochester Auditorium Theatre, 885 E. Main St. 585222-5000. 2:30 p.m. $15, students w/ID free.

Rochester Gay Men’s Chorus: Spring Fling. ARTISANworks,

565 Blossom Rd. 585-288-7170. 4 p.m. $40.

Society for Chamber Music in Rochester: An Evening with the Yings. Hochstein

Performance Hall, 50 N Plymouth Ave. 454-4596. 7:30 p.m. $10-$30.

SUNY Geneseo Festival Chorus Concert. Geneseo Central

Presbyterian Church, 31 Center Street, Geneseo, NY 14454. 245-5516. 3 p.m. Free. [ POP/ROCK ] Catch 22. Pelican’s Nest, 566 River St. 663-5910. 5 p.m. Call for info. Cut Off CD Release Show. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. 4 p.m. $5. Fear Factory, Hate Eternal. Montage Music Hall, 50 Chestnut St. 232-1520. 6:30 p.m. $25. Generationals w/Brass Bed. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. $12-$14. MGMT w/The White Panda. SUNY Geneseo, 1 College Rd. 8 p.m. $40.

MONDAY, APRIL 29 [ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ]

Watkins & the Rapiers. The

Little Theater, 240 East Avenue. 7:30 p.m. Free.

AMERICANA | THERE IS NO MOUNTAIN

Portland-based band There Is No Mountain describes itself as “specializing in music that’s fun to play.” The duo is reminiscent of artists like Andrew Bird and Dirty Projectors, both of whom combine a love for folk/Americana music with psychedelic, chamber-pop qualities that set them apart from other, more traditional folk artists. The band was previously known as Ascetic Junkies, but has recently changed both its name and its “sonic direction” after its members had been writing music together for nearly a decade. The band just released its self-titled debut album under the new name. If this genre-defying, energetic album is any indication, the live show at Boulder this Tuesday is sure to be fun for everyone, audience and musicians alike. There Is No Mountain performs Tuesday, April 30, 8 p.m. at Bolder Coffee, 100 Alexander St. $5. bouldercoffeeco.com. — BY LEAH CREARY [ DJ/ELECTRONIC ]

Manic Monday Retro Dance Night. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. 21+. Free. [ JAZZ ]

[ CLASSICAL ] Hilda D. Taylor Recital Hall at the Hochstein School of Music and Dance, 50 N. Plymouth Avenue. 957-0284. April 30, 7:30 p.m. $15-$25.

World Music Series: Gamelan Lila Muni. Kilbourn Hall, 26

Gibbs St. 8 p.m. $10-$20.

Hilda D. Taylor Recital Hall at the Hochstein School of Music and Dance, 50 N. Plymouth Avenue. 957-0284. 7:30 p.m. $15-$25.

Kathryn Cufari. Lemoncello,

137 West Commercial St. 3858565. 6 p.m. Call for info. Kyle Vock Duo. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. 585-662-5555. 5:30 p.m. Free.

TUESDAY, APRIL 30 [ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ]

Don Christiano-The Beatles Unplugged. Abilene Bar &

Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. 8 p.m. Free. Teagan Ward. The Beale New Orleans Grille and Bar-South Ave., 693 South Ave. 2714650. 7 p.m. Call for info. There Is No Mountain. Boulder Coffee Co., 100 Alexander St. 585-454-7140. 8 p.m. $5. [ BLUES ]

ensemble.twenty.21 New 2012-13 Concert Series.

ensemble.twenty.21 New 2012-13 Concert Series.

Bluesday Tuesday Blues Jam. P.I.’s Lounge, 495 West Ave. 8 p.m. Call for info. [ CLASSICAL ]

Duane Prill, organ. Geneseo

Central Presbyterian Church, 31 Center Street, Geneseo, NY 14454. (585) 245-5516. noon. Free, donations accepted.

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2 Reason Tuesdays w/DJ Zio.

Nathaniel’s Pub, 251 Exchange Boulevard. 232-8470. Call for info. Free. DJ Ghetto Blaster. Club Clarissas, 293 Clarissa St. 2323430. Call for info. Old School Tuesdays. Grotto, 7 Lawrence St. 739-5377. Call for info. Free.

Tuesday Americano w/Bobby Base. Flat Iron Cafe, 561 State

St. 454-4830. Call for info. [ JAZZ ]

Ben Waara. Lemoncello, 137 West Commercial St. 3858565. 6 p.m. Free.

Ted Nicolosi and Shared Genes. Bistro 135, 135 W.

Commercial St. 662 5555. 6 p.m. Free. [ POP/ROCK ]

All Time Low, Pierce The Veil w/Mayday Parade, You Me At Six. Main Street Armory, 900 E.

Main St. 232-3221. 5:30 p.m. $25-$30. China Crisis. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. 2768900. 8 p.m. Tickets required via Memorial Art Gallery or Lakeshore Records. Free.


Ghostwriter w/Ahura Mazda. Skylark Lounge, 40 South Union St. 270-8106. 9 p.m. 21+. Call for info. Lazlo Hollyfeld w/B.C Likes You!, Wisdom Kids. Bug Jar,

219 Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. $6-$8.

WEDNESDAY, MAY 1

[ CLASSICAL ]

Live from Hochstein: Antara Winds w/Joseph Werner.

Hochstein Performance Hall, 50 N Plymouth Ave. 454-4596. 12:10 p.m. Free. RPO: Around the Town. East High School, 1801 Main Street East. 288-3130. 7:30 p.m. Free.

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DJ Adam. Nashvilles, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. 334-3030. Call for info.

Ladies Nite: High Heels and Mini Skirts New Wave Wednesdays. Club Clarissas,

293 Clarissa St. 232-3430. 10 p.m. 21+. Call for info. Teen Set 45 Party. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. Free. Y Not Wednesday w/DJ ET. Plush, 151 St. Paul St. 232-5650. Call for info. [ JAZZ ]

Mike Pappert. Lemoncello, 137

West Commercial St. 385-8565. 6:30 p.m. Free. Roses & Revolutions. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. 585-662-5555. 6 p.m. Free.

Vince Ercolamento& Joe Chiappone Jazz Quartet. Murph’s

Irondequoit Pub, 705 Titus Ave. 342-6780. 8 p.m. Free. [ HIP-HOP/RAP ]

Insane Clown Posse. Main Street Armory, 900 E. Main St. 232-3221. 7:30 p.m. $22.50-$28. [ POP/ROCK ]

Amanda Ashley. Cottage Hotel

of Mendon, 1390 Pittsford Mendon Road. 5856241390. first Wednesday of every month, 9:30 p.m. Call for info. Bobby Henrie & The Gonerrs. Dinosaur Bar-B-Que, 99 Court St. 585-325-7090. 9 p.m. Free.

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Original Music Open Showcase: Doug Bert and the Monkey Scream Project. Tala Vera, 155

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If you inevitably associate the word “opera” with the word “grand,” prepare for an eye- and earopening couple of weeks from Rochester Lyric Opera. Its Chamber Opera Festival, opening this week and running until May 5, is a kind of operatic tapas bar — bite-sized but tasty offerings that offer something for all tastes. The menu includes a rare bel canto work by a beloved 19th-century composer, two one-act comedies by 20th-century master Gian Carlo Menotti, a Gilbert and Sullivan favorite in an appropriate setting, and a recent work by a favorite local composer — not to mention two recitals showcasing high-school students and other talented regional singers. It’s an unusual approach for opera in Rochester, but then Rochester Lyric Opera is an unusual group. It was the idea of Susan Delly Cotroneo. A Rochester native trained at Ithaca College as a singer and teacher, Cotroneo started a career as a singer in New York City, then returned to Rochester to marry and raise a family. Her passions for performing and teaching remained, however; she wanted to create an outlet for them, and to include as many people as possible. Her brainchild, Empire State Lyric Theatre, began in 2006 with a performance of Mozart’s “Impresario,” followed by concert versions of Donizetti’s “L’Elisir d’Amore” and Leoncavallo’s “Pagliacci.” The company has also sponsored numerous voice recitals — open to anyone who is interested — and two voice competitions. Last year, Empire State Lyric Theatre presented its first Chamber Opera Festival, which included Menotti’s “The Medium” and a program of scenes of arias from favorite operas. Renamed Rochester Lyric Opera in 2012, the group will do the same this year — and much more. Throughout, the intention has been to use talented regional singers of all levels and ages. Cotroneo also wants to provide stage and recital opportunities younger singers, “who work so hard on a classical training and then have no outlet to display it other than their school musical,” she says. In chronological order, the 2013 festival includes: “Trial By Jury” (April 24-25): Before

“The Pirates of Penzance” or “The Mikado,”

Gilbert and Sullivan teamed up for this oneact extravaganza, first produced in 1875. This through-sung piece lampoons a Victorianera breach-of-promise trial, and combines zany wit and elaborate music in an alchemy that came to be known simply as “G&S.” The festival’s presentation of “Trial By Jury” will actually take place “on location” in Courtroom 303 at the Hall of Justice, and is sponsored by a number of local law firms, whose members should get all the jokes. “Rita” (April 26), a one-act comedy by Gaetano Donizetti, should be a genuine discovery even for fans of this composer’s popular works, like Don Pasquale and Lucia di Lammermoor. In fact, “Rita,” written in 1841 in French, wasn’t A recital featuring winners from a recent highschool voice competition will kick off the 2013 produced until 1860 (12 years after Donizetti’s Chamber Opera Festival. PHOTO PROVIDED death), and in Italian — and then put to rest for almost a century. It has been occasionally revived food (rice and beans, and much more) for since the 1950’s, but this will definitely be Rita’s Catalina’s seventh birthday party, but then first visit to Kilbourn Hall. turn out to be unexpectedly helpful. “Rita” is a comedy about a woman who The composer and librettist is Rochester’s finds out she has two husbands — but who Cary Ratcliff, known for his challenging but ends up with only one by the final curtain. Music Director Eric Townell says “Rita” should very singable vocal and choral works. “Mice and Beans” was originally produced in Los appeal to anyone who enjoys vocal fireworks Angeles; this is its East Coast premiere. Mezzoand outstanding voices. (The original dialogue will be replaced by a narration in English.) “It’s soprano Allyn Van Dusen, who plays Rosa a good showpiece and definitely a lesser-known Maria, previously created roles in Ratcliff’s operas “Eleni” and “By the Golden Door.” gem for the soprano, which perhaps explains why Sue suggested it,” he says. Those roles were heavily dramatic, she says, but The cast of “Rita” will be casually dressed, and playing the harried grandmother in “Rice and the atmosphere will suggest a recording studio Beans” gives her a chance to show a comic side. rather than an opera house. This simple approach She adds that Ratcliff’s music is challenging “was an ideal choice for Kilbourn Hall, and for but very melodic, with tunes and rhythms that our production schedule,” says Townell. The often suggest the story’s Mexican setting. “He’s evening also includes a reception, and Cotroneo even invented some very imaginative ‘mouse says she hopes to recreate the atmosphere at music’ set to nonsense syllables,” she says. the beginning of the history of opera, when Besides these staged operas, the festival performances were social as well as musical events. includes two recitals. “Local Vocal” (April “Amelia Goes to the Ball” and “The Old 28) brings together talented local singers Maid and the Thief” (April 30-May 1): Gian for a program of scenes from favorites like Carlo Menotti’s first two hits were these one“Carmen,” “The Magic Flute,” and many acters from the 1930’s (“The Old Maid and more, directed by Van Dusen and her the Thief” was the first opera commissioned fellow voice teacher Susanna Adams. And for radio, in 1939). RAPA will present both the first event of the festival is the Jonathan comic operas with casts of talented high-school B. Angelone Recital (April 24), featuring students directed by Judith Ranaletta. The winners of a high-school voice competition cast will include a guest from the professional named after a voice student of Cotroneo’s. world: singer-actor Keith Greene, a Greece This year’s first-prize winner is bass-baritone native who appeared on the 2007 NBC reality Aaron Bigeleisen, a McQuaid senior. show “Grease: You’re the One that I Want.” It’s an impressive list of events, even if “Mice and Beans” (May 4-5): The title there is not a “grand opera” among them. is not a typo, although rice and beans play “Do I want to stage big opera? Hell, yes!” important roles in this one-act opera based says Sue Cotroneo. “Hell, yes! But we need on a popular children’s book by Pam Munoz to grow into that. We want to be around a Ryan. The characters include a Catalina, her long time, so we need to make some very grandmother Rosa Maria, and a horde of mice, calculated decisions. And we want to include played by a children’s chorus, who steal the the community, always.”


Art Exhibits [ OPENING ] Bridge Art Gallery University of Rochester Medical Center, 300 Crittenden Blvd. Tue Apr 30, 5-6 p.m. Artist Reception for Beyond Barriers. 275-3571. Davison Gallery, Cultural Life Center, Roberts Wesleyan College, 2301 Westside Dr. Senior Showcase. Through May 11. Mon-Fri 11 a.m.-5 p.m., Sat 1-4 p.m. Reception Apr 26 5-7 p.m. 594-6442. roberts.edu. Good Luck, 50 Anderson Ave. Plate It: Functional Ceramics by Suzanne Kumar. First 100 donations will receive a plate made by the artist. 340-6161. restaurantgoodluck.com. Hartnett Gallery, Wilson Commons, University of Rochester, River Campus. Annual Undergraduate Juried Exhibition. Tue-Fri 11 a.m.-7 p.m., Sat-Sun 12-5 p.m. 275-4188. blogs. rochester.edu/hartnett. International Art Acquisitions, 3300 Monroe Ave. “Living Fabric” by Kathleen Kinkopf. Through May 31. Mon-Fri 10 a.m.-9 p.m., Sat 10 a.m.-6 p.m., Sun 12-5 p.m. 264-1440. internationalartacquisitions.com. Irondequoit Public Library, Evans Branch, 45 Cooper Rd. Irondequoit Art Club’s 55th Annual Spring Show and Sale. Through May 4. Reception Apr 25, 7-8:30 p.m. 336-6062. aholland@libraryweb.org. irondequoitartclub.org. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. Alan Singer: Fact of Fiction. Through May 24. thelittle.org. Oxford Gallery, 267 Oxford St. “The Four Humors.” Through Jun 1. Tue-Fri 12-5 p.m., Sat 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Reception May 4, 5-8 p.m. 271-5885. oxfordgallery.com. [ CONTINUING ] 1975 Gallery, 89 Charlotte St. Folding Space: Karen Mahardy Glass MFA Thesis Show. Through Apr 27. Reception Apr 13, 7-10 p.m. 1975ish.com. Arts & Cultural Council, 277 N. Goodman St. Architectural Design Showcase 2013: “Genesis: The Art in Architecture.” 473-4000. artsrochester.org. A.R.T.S. Gallery, 321 East Ave. “Painting The Gospel”” by local artists. Through April 30. 7299916. Axom Gallery, 176 Anderson Ave., 2nd floor. “The New Town Collection: A Gift of Hope” Photographic Prints by Henry Avignon. Through May 4. Wed-Sat noon-5 p.m. and by appt. Closing reception May 3, 6-9 p.m. Also on display: a welded metal heart by Christine Knoblauch, engraved with the 26 names of the victims. 232-6030 x23. axomgallery.com. Black Radish Studio, 274 N. Goodman. “Spirit of the River” by Richard Margolis. Through May 18. Mon-Fri 10 a.m.-6 p.m., Sat 12-6 p.m. 413-1278. blackradishstudio.com. Books Etc., 78 W. Main St. “Backdoor Artists.” Through June 10. With Sue Higgins, Martin Heit, Nicki Millor, Emily Osgood, and Susan Sweet. Reception Apr 5, 6-8 p.m. 474-4116. books_ etc@yahoo.com. Bridge Art Gallery University of Rochester Medical Center, 300

Allen Main Stage Theatre

SCHOOL EDITION

Music and Lyrics by Robert Lopez & Jeff Marx | Book by Jeff Whitty

Original Concept by Robert Lopez & Jeff Marx | Directed by Lorie Dengler Dewey

Online Box Office ART | SLOW ART DAY

www.sotarochester.org

Raise your hand if you spend more than half of your visit to any art opening chatting up friends you bump into, one after another. Now how many of us allow ourselves the luxury of visiting an exhibition after the reception night, and truly spend time with the works? Slow Art Day is a worldwide initiative to celebrate art, which encourages people to be truly present in the experience of viewing it. This year, the event is set to take place on Saturday, April 27, and some local institutions plan on leading the way by hosting Slow Art Day gatherings which will focus on their current exhibitions.

$9 - Adult $7 - Children and Seniors

Saturday April 27 2 pm • 7 pm Sunday April 28 5 pm 585-324-3535 45 Prince St. Rated PG-13

Rochester Contemporary Art Center (137 East Ave.) will host a Slow Art Day event 1-2 p.m., followed by lunch at 2 p.m. right around the corner at Java’s Cafe (16 Gibbs St.). The event is free to attend, but bring some dough for lunch. For more information or to RSVP, call 461-222 or visit rochestercontemporary.org. Slow Art Day at the Memorial Art Gallery (500 University Ave.) takes place 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Participants will engage in discussions facilitated by area artists Jeanne Beck, Elizabeth Durand, Sid Roepke, and Amy Vena, and MAG staffer Marlene Hamann-Whitmore. This event is included in gallery admission ($5-$12). For more information, call 276-8900 or visit mag.rochester.edu. Learn more about the mission behind it at slowartday.com, and check our online calendar at rochestercitynewspaper.com for more events. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY Crittenden Blvd. Beyond Barriers Exhibit. Through June 30. 2753571. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. “Man vs Machine” Through May 30. Hours 8 p.m.-2 a.m. Featuring Bile, Cruk, Yewzer, John Magnus, Thievin’ Stephen, Spaceman, Derek Crowe, Mike Turzanski, Sidhe, Matt Ely, Doe Gawn, Adam Maida, and Clayton Cowles. $5. lobbydigital.com. Community Darkroom Gallery, 713 Monroe Ave. “Draft 10” Through May 18. Mon 9 a.m.-9:30 p.m., Tue-Thu 9 a.m.-6:30 p.m., Fri 12-5 p.m., Sat 10 a.m.-5:30 p.m. 271-5920. A Different Path Gallery, 27 Market St. “A Little Twisted: An Exploration of the Self.” BFA Painting Exhibit by Karen Nelson. Wed-Fri 11 a.m.-noon, Sat-Sun noon-4 p.m. adifferentpathgallery.com. Friendly Home’s Memorial Gallery, 3165 East Ave. “Searching for Spring” by Elizabeth Liano.. Through Jun 30. Daily 10 a.m.-5 p.m. aflinn@friendlyhome.org. Geneva Historical Society, 543 South Main St. Geneva City School District Art Show. Through May 18. Mon-Fri, 9:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m., Sat, 1:30-4:30 p.m. 315-789-5151. genevahistoricalsociety.com. George Eastman House, 900 East Ave. “Silver and Water” Through May 26. 271-3361. eastmanhouse.org.

Hartnett Gallery, Wilson Commons, University of Rochester, River Campus. Sweet Tea and Pecan Pie, Student Show. Through May 12. Tue-Fri 11 a.m.-7 p.m. SatSun noon-5 p.m. blogs.rochester. edu/hartnett. High Falls Fine Art Gallery, 60 Browns Race. A Photographer’s Path 16. 1st Floor Museum: Neil and Jamie Montanus: A Glimpse of the World and Tom Kirn: The Walk Through Photo Album. 3252030. centerathighfalls.org. Image City Photography Gallery, 722 University Ave. Worlds Apart: Ethiopia and Elsewhere. Featuring Jim Patton and David Perlman. Through May 12. Wed-Sat 11 a.m.-7 p.m., Sun 12-4 p.m. Reception Friday, May 3, 5-9 p.m. 482-1976. imagecityphotographygallery.com. International Art Acquisitions, 3300 Monroe Ave. “H2O.” Through Apr 30. Mon-Fri 10 a.m.-9 p.m., Sat 10 a.m.-6 p.m., Sun noon-5 p.m. 264-1440. internationalartacquisitions.com. Keshequa High School, 13 Mill St. Livingston Arts Student Art Exhibit. Through April 27. 2436785. livingstonarts.org. Link Gallery at City Hall, 30 Church St. “Silver Print” Awards Ceremony, Book Release, and Exhibition Receoption. Studio 678, the Wilson Foundation Academy Photo Club. Exhibition continues on page 22 rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 21


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KIDS | BEST OF THE BRICK WEEKEND

As if the National Museum of Play didn’t already offer enough outlets for kids of all ages, the museum debuted its new permanent exhibit, “Game Time!,” in mid-April. This interactive exhibit has more than three centuries worth of American game and puzzle history to see and play. Look for everything from jumbo chess to oversized Connect Four and Battleship to Perplexus, a maze game designed exclusively for the museum. In addition to its newest exhibit, the museum (located at 1 Manhattan Square) will present its Best of the Brick Weekend on Saturday, April 27, and Sunday, April 28. Kids can put their architectural acumen to use with a special weekend of Lego build-a-thons, paper Lego-block making, and two meet-and-greets with Greg Hyland, a Lego artist who has worked on several Lego mini-movies and art pieces. The events coincide with the “Lego Travel Adventure” exhibit, which continues through May 12.

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The Best of the Brick Weekend runs Saturday 11 a.m.-4 p.m. and Sunday 1-4 p.m. All activities are included with regular museum admission: $13 for general admission, and free for members and all visitors under 2. For more information on these and other exhibits at the museum, visit museumofplay.org. — BY JASON SILVERSTEIN

Art Exhibits on display through Apr 29. 2715920. cityofrochester.gov. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. “Becoming Modern:Armory Show Artists at MAG” Through May 12. In Lockhart Gallery. “It Came From the Vault: Rarely Seen Works from MAG’s Collection. Wed-Sun 11 a.m.-5 p.m., Thu until 9 p.m. 276-8900. mag.rochester.edu. My Sister’s Gallery, 505 Mt. Hope Ave. “Under the Influence,” Artwork by Students from School Without Walls. Through May 12. Hours 10 a.m.-8 p.m. daily. 546-8400 x3716. abmiller@ episcopalseniorlife.org. NTID Dyer Arts Center, 52 Lomb Memorial Dr. Time & Again, Photography by Tom Policano. Mon-Thu 9:30 a.m.-4 p.m., Fri 9:30 a.m.-7 p.m., Sat 1-3 p.m. ntid.rit.edu/dyerarts. Ock Hee’s Gallery, 2 Lehigh St. Eastern Sensibility: Fine Art in Women’s Clothing. Through May 11. With Etsuko and Jae Hee. Mon-Sat 11 a.m.-5 p.m. 624-4730. Orange Glory Café, 240 East Ave. “Canis lupus familiaris,” Photographs by Gerry Szymanski. Through Apr 30. Hours Mon-Fri 11 a.m.-3 p.m. 232-7340. Outside the Box Art Gallery, Bldg 9, The Canal Works, 1000 Turk Hill Rd. Spirit & Mind. Through May 1. 645-2485. outsidetheboxag.com.

Record Archive, 33 1/3 Rockwood St. “Nocturnal Devotions: The Artwork of Allie Hartley.” recordarchive.com. Rochester Contemporary Arts Center, 137 East Ave. EAT IT. Including Stefani Bardin, Christine Chin, The Counter Kitchen (Stefani Bardin & Brooke Singer), Brady Dillsworth, Tatiana Kronberg, Andrzej Maciejewski, Spurse. 461-2222. rochestercontemporary.org. Rush Rhees Library, University of Rochester, River Campus. Senior Art Exhibitions. Gallery at the Art & Music Library. Mon-Thu 9 a.m.-10 p.m., Fri 9 a.m.-6 p.m., Sat noon-5 p.m., Sun noon-10 p.m. Apri 26-30: Laura Hobbs. 275-4476. The Shoe Factory Art Co-op, 250 N. Goodman St. Handcrafted Jewelry by Lisa Johnson. Wed 12-5 p.m. shoefactoryarts.com. Spectrum Gallery at Lumiere Photo, 100 College Ave. Rare and Vintage Prints from the Collections of Nathan Lyons, Carl Chiarenza, and Spectrum Gallery. 461-4447. lumierephoto.com. SPoT Coffee, 200 East Ave. “The Elements” Photographs by Carissa Hurdstrom. Through Apr 30. 613-4600. spotcoffee.com. St. John Fisher College, 3690 East Ave. Rochester Art Club Spring Show. Through May 9. Patricia O’Keefe Ross Gallery in Joseph S Skalney Welcome Center. rochesterartclub.org. Starry Nites Café, 696 University Ave. “Let Them Eat Cake!

Portraits of Pastries.” 732-0036. studio212@shoefactoryarts.com. shoefactoryarts.com. Tap & Mallet, 381 Gregory St. “It’s a Funny Story” Illustrations by Aarom Humby. 473-0503. tapandmallet.com. Tower Fine Arts Center, SUNY Brockport, 180 Holley St. Breaking Currents: The 2013 Annual Student Art Exhibition. Through May 5. Mon-Fri 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Sun 1-4 p.m. 3952805. brockport.edu/finearts. University Gallery, James R. Booth Hall, RIT, Lomb Memorial Dr. “Connections” Arena Art Group. Mon-Thu 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Fri & Sat 10 a.m.-3 p.m. 4752866. jleugs@rit.edu. rit.edu/ fa/gallery. UR Medical Center, 300 Crittenden Blvd. Olympus BioScapes Digital Imaging Competition Winners. 275-3361. urmc.edu/libraries/miner/. The Yards, 50-52 Public Market. “Based on a True Story: An Investigation of Family & Self Through Narrative Objects.” Through May 12. MFA Thesis Exhibition by Wil Eldgridge Sideman. Tue, Thu, Sat 10 a.m.2 p.m. attheyards@gmail.com. attheyards.com.

Art Events [ THU., APRIL 25 ] Gallery r Benefit. April 25, 5-9 p.m. University Gallery, James R. Booth Hall, RIT, Lomb Memorial Dr $100 admits two people and gets you one artwork 475-2733. jleugs@rit. edu. galleryr.cias.rit.edu/benefit. [ SAT., APRIL 27 ] Erotic Nights Spring Fever 2013 series. Last Saturday of every month, 8 p.m Equal=Grounds, 750 South Ave. 18+ Free, register. 256-2362. Mayday Underground. April 27, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Village Gate Atrium, 274 N. Goodman St maydayunderground. wordpress.com. [ SUN., APRIL 28 ] “We’re Still Here.” April 28, 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Black Radish Studio, 274 N. Goodman Fundraising & awareness event to support Wilmot Cancer Center education and support group. Local jewelry artist, Sharon Jeter, tea & live chamber music 413-1278. blackradishstudio.com.

Comedy [ THU., APRIL 25 ] Marianne Sierk. April 25-27. Comedy Club, 2235 Empire Blvd. Thu 7:30 p.m., Fri-Sat 7:30 & 10 p.m $9-$12. 671-9080. thecomedyclub.us.

Dance Events [ WED., APRIL 24 ] Elizabeth Clark Dance Ensemble: World Beat. April 24, 7 p.m. St. Thomas’ Episcopal Church, 2000 Highland Ave. $13, register. 442-5988. [ FRI., APRIL 26 ] Latin Dance Fest: Rochester Salsa Weekend. April 26-27. Inikori Dance Studio, 1060 University Ave. Attend parties, workshops, or the entire weekend $10-$85. 271-6840. inikoridance.com.


Moving Connections. April 26, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Kinections, 718 University Ave. Lunch on your own $160, register. kinections. com. [ SAT., APRIL 27 ] Mariah Maloney Dance Spring Soiree. April 27, 8 p.m. Visual Studies Workshop, 31 Prince St. $8-$12. 646-584-2329 April 27, 8 p.m. Visual Studies Workshop, 31 Prince Street $8-$12. 4428676. vsw.org. [ SUN., APRIL 28 ] Culture and Commuity Sundays: Bhangra Dance. April 28, 2-3 p.m. Rochester Museum and Science Center, 657 East Ave. Included in admission: $11-$13. 697-1942. rmsc.org.

Festivals [ FRI., APRIL 26 ] Springtime in Canandaigua. April 26-28. Canandaigua Civic Center, 250 North Bloomfield Rd. Fri 3-7 p.m., Sat-Sun 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Art and food vendors, gardening seminars springtimeincanandaigua.com.

It Up. April 28, 2 p.m. The Harley School, 1981 Clover St For children grades K-6 and their families $5, $10/family, register 509-2745. tsmith@ harleyschool.org. harleyschool. org.

Lectures

[ WED., MAY 1 ] Low Bridge, High Water. May 1-5. Village of Brockport. Join Brockport’s week long celebration of the seasonal opening of the Erie Canal. brockportny.org.

[ WED., APRIL 24 ] Science on the Edge: “Crocodiles at the Poles: Viewing the Past and Future Ice-free Arctic.” April 24, 7:30 p.m. Rochester Museum and Science Center, 657 East Ave. $8-$14. 697-1942. rmsc.org.

Kids Events

[ THU., APRIL 25 ] “Agatha Christie, Archaeology, and Alzheimer’s.” April 25, 7:30 p.m. Memorial Art Gallery, 500

[ SUN., APRIL 28 ] Bebop to Bach Kidsemble: Add

University Ave. Free to AIA and MAG members Included in gallery admission: $5-$12. 2768900. mag.rochester.edu. Film: Koran by Heart: One Chance to Remember. April 25, 7 p.m. Penfield Public Library, 1985 Baird Rd. Free, register. 3408720. penfieldlibrary.org. Profiled: Race in Civic Circles: Race & Spirituality. April 25, 7 p.m. Baobab Cultural Center, 728 University Ave. RSVP. thebaobab.org. Sierra Club Forum: “Great Lakes Need Great Friends: Protecting the Great Lakes Forever.” April 2526. Monroe Community College, 1000 E. Henrietta Rd Register. 234-1056. sierraclubforum@ gmail.com. newyork.sierraclub. org/rochester.

[ SAT., APRIL 27 ] What Would You Have Us Do? Implement Justice in Your Everyday Life. April 27, 9 a.m.3:30 p.m. Project URGE, Inc. 31 W. Church St., Fairport $25$35, register projecturge.org. Women For Women: Up Close & Personal conference. April 27, 8:30 a.m.-4 p.m. Rochester Museum and Science Center, 657 East Ave. This year’s theme is “Work-Life Balance.” $35, RSVP. wdkx.com. [ MON., APRIL 29 ] Reshaping Rochester: “Transit Talks.” April 29, 7-9 p.m. Gleason Works Auditorium, 1000 University Ave. With Rep. Earl Blumenauer and Rep. Louise Slaughter $15,

free to students. 271-0520. rrcdc.org. [ TUE., APRIL 30 ] Genesee-Finger Lakes Active Transportation Summit. April 30, 8 a.m. Radisson Riverside Hotel, 120 East Main St. $50, includes breakfast, lunch, and snacks (Limited number of scholarships are available 2243121. elizabethmurphy@flhsa. org. gflats.eventbrite.com.

Literary Events [ WED., APRIL 24 ] 11th Annual FLCC Faculty Reading. April 24, 7 p.m. FLCC Honors House, 4340 Lakeshore Dr. Free. 785-1367. continues on page 25

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 23


Art Harper uploaded a JPEG of the work to Google images, it matched it as “Opus 18: Last Notes from Endenich” by Tom Phillips. The origins of other fascinating objects remain in shadowy territory even as the works themselves are pulled into the light. These include a set of wooden ears from larger sculptures of ancient Egypt, and the Chinese “Lotus Shoes,” a pair of embroidered slippers so impossibly tiny that the practice of foot-binding gains a more tangible pinch in viewers’ minds. “There’s really no way of knowing exactly when they were made, or what part of China they came from, because [footbinding] was such a widespread custom,” says Via. In another room, a gorgeously lush Right to left: Winslow Homer’s “Paddling at Dusk” and an Austrian glass panel work by an unknown artist are part of the current exhibit at Memorial Art Gallery that showcases rarely-shown works from the gallery’s collection. PHOTOS PROVIDED

One hundred years of solitude “It Came From the Vault” THROUGH JUNE 9 MEMORIAL ART GALLERY, 500 UNIVERSITY AVE. 276-8900, MAG.ROCHESTER.EDU WEDNESDAY-SUNDAY 11 A.M.-5 P.M., THURSDAY 11 A.M.-9 P.M. | $5-$12 [ REVIEW ] BY REBECCA RAFFERTY

I was still noticing previously overlooked works and nuances within works on my third visit to the Memorial Art Gallery’s current exhibit, “It Came from the Vault: Rarely Seen Works from MAG’s Collection.” I recently spoke with MAG Director of Exhibitions Marie Via about how more than 200 objects included in the show were selected from the more than 12,000 objects in the museum’s permanent collection, and about the ways in which both the museum and the community may benefit from an exhibition such as this, which contains a story of obscurity and opportunity for expanded understanding. “It Came From the Vault” is part of the MAG’s centennial celebration, and showcases objects that are for various reasons seldom or never placed in public view. The collection of a museum can be likened to an iceberg, in that only a small percent of the whole is visible 24 CITY APRIL 24-30, 2013

at any one time. And like an iceberg, a cross-section through its core will reveal much about the time that has passed since its origination. MAG’s holdings were collected under six directors since 1913, each with different tastes, and each of whom lived through vastly different cultural climates. This exhibition has also “given us a chance to reconnect with donors or with artists who we have lost track of throughout the years,” says Via. While she was selecting works for this exhibit, Via invited anyone who works at the gallery to select a seldom-shown work from the collection to be included, providing that they were willing to record themselves speaking about the piece for the exhibit’s cell phone tour. One especially enigmatic, impossibly tiny

acrylic painting captivated then-intern Sarah Gerin, whose efforts to research the artist and the painting set in motion a very emotional reunion. “Sunny Ducks” is a surreal photo-real work of impossible intricacy in which a horse-headed man offers a miniature duck that seems to emanate white light, to an another equally glowing duck across a stream. The piece was created in 1973 by Rochester artist Daniel Arthur Allen, shortly before the artist committed suicide. The chain of inquiry passed from local artist and professor Kathy

Calderwood until it reached Allen’s former partner, artist Bill Whiting, now a Pennsylvania resident. The quest resulted in reconnections between Allen’s family and old friends, Whiting writing a book on his firework years with Allen, and more of Allen’s fascinating work emerging from the shadows. This story reflects the fact that at times, extensive external research is necessary in order to gain information about a work. Curators at MAG also reach out to colleagues at different institutions who specialize in a specific genre, artist, or type of object about which more information is sought. Works by yesteryear’s up-and-coming

artists were collected before their makers faded into the background of our cultural memoryscape. Other fascinating works haven’t yet found their logical niche in the museum’s storylines, says Via. Then there are donated or acquired objects, from antiquity to modern times, about which little or nothing is known. A number of these works were gathered by Exhibitions Assistant Chiyo Ueyama for one of the four themed mini exhibitions within the show. During the planning stages of the show, Ueyama received help identifying a nameless, illegibly signed abstract work on paper featuring dancing musical language. When MAG librarian Lu

horse cover is spread over a low platform. While researching the work, Curator of European Art Nancy Norwood contacted a colleague who specializes in Russian art, who was able to identify it as a gift from the Emir of Bukhara to the Russian royal family sometime before 1917, when the Czar was overthrown. The pattern of the textile helped her identify the region of its origin, says Via. During the course of putting the show together, Via sought more information about Paul S. Berry, the artist who painted “Fishwife,” which was a purchase made during the Rochester-Finger Lakes exhibition in the 1950’s. One of the gallery’s volunteers was the mother-in-law of the artist’s daughter, who then brought her mother into the conversation to provide more information on what turned out to be an atypical painting for Berry. During the run of the show visitors have the opportunity to provide any information they might have about stubbornly mysterious works and artists. An exhibition such as this one also affords the opportunity to learn more about our ever-changing culture. For example, when researching Janina Konarska’s “Tennis,” a 1931 woodcut print that shows doubles in action with long shadows upon the court, curators learned that the Polish artist won a silver medal back in 1932, back when the Olympic Games included an art competition.


Literary Events Pure Kona Open Mic. 7:30 p.m. Acanthus Café, 337 East Ave. Free. 585-319-5999. acanthuscafe.com. [ THU., APRIL 25 ] Book Celebration: “The Last Generation of Women Who Cook” by Kathy Johncox. April 25, 7 p.m. Writers and Books, 740 University Ave $3-$4. 4732590. wab.org. [ SAT., APRIL 27 ] “Among Murderers: Life After Prison.” April 27, 7 p.m. Rochester Friends Meeting, 84 Scio St. Free. 325-7260. rochesterquakers.org. Earth Water: Poetry Reading w/ John Roche. April 27, 4 p.m. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 18+. Free. bugjar.com. L.R. Phoenix book launch: “Music of the Heart” w/ Open Mic. April 27, 2:30-5 p.m. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. lovincup.com.

RECREATION | FLOWER CITY CHALLENGE

Rochester runners, bikers, paddlers, and kayakers: this is what you’ve been training for all year. Unity Health System presents its fourth Flower City Challenge on Saturday, April 27, and Sunday, April 28. This year’s traditional challenges include the SPM River Challenge — a duathlon or paddle triathlon, depending on your stamina and/or preference — starting Saturday at 7:30 a.m. at Genesee Waterways on Elmwood Avenue.

[ SUN., APRIL 28 ] 10th Annual Poetry Month Celebration at Lift Bridge Book Shop. April 28, 12:30 p.m. Lift Bridge Book Shop, 45 Main St Free. 637 2260. liftbridgebooks.com.

On Sunday, you can come back to tackle the Flower City Half Marathon and Wegmans Family 5K, starting at the War Memorial (1 War Memorial Square) at 7:30 and 7:45 a.m., respectively. In summary: Get ready for one of the most exhausting weekends of the year.

[ MON., APRIL 29 ] Refusing to be Enemies: Palestinian and Israeli Nonviolent Resistance to the Israeli Occupation. April 29, 7 p.m. Rochester Mennonite Fellowship, 111 Hillside Ave. Presentation by Maxine Kaufman-Lacusta, followed by a discussion. Books will be available for sale cptausten@yahoo.com.

Pre-registration for Flower City Challenge events costs $18$140, depending on the event and the number of people registering together. Day-of registration will only be available for the Flower City Half Marathon ($70) and the Wegmans 5K ($25). To register or for more information about prices and events, race over to flowercitychallenge.com. —BY JASON SILVERSTEIN

[ TUE., APRIL 30 ] Fundraiser for Tiger Bark Press. April 30, 7 p.m. Writers and Books, 740 University Ave. $5. 754-7279. tigerbarkpress.com.

Recreation [ WED., APRIL 24 ] Rochester Birding: Highland Park. April 24, 8 a.m. Highland Park, 171 Reservoir Ave Meet at Conservatory 787-0507. rochesterbirding.com. [ SAT., APRIL 27 ] Beginner Birder Trip: Island Cottage Woods Area and Durand Eastman Park. April 27, 7:3010:30 a.m. Meet at Island Cottage Woods, Schaller’s Woods section. 503-2534. rochesterbirding.com. GVHC Hike. April 27, 10 a.m. Mendon Ponds Nature Center, Douglas Rd. Easy/moderate 5.5 mile hike, Quaker Ponds Trails 750-8937. gvhchikes.org. Migratory Birds. April 27, 8 a.m. The Thousand Acre Swamp Sanctuary, 1581 Jackson Road Free. 773-8911. Rochester Birding: Cobbs Hill Park. April 27, 7:30 a.m. Cobbs Hill Park, 100 Norris Drive Meet on grassy area on top of hill between road and woods 6719639. rochesterbirding.com. [ SUN., APRIL 28 ] Birding Site: Braddock Bay Hawk Watch. April 28, 9:30 a.m.-noon. Meet in Braddock Bay Parking Lot off East Manitou Road. 6715690. rochesterbirding.com. GVHC Hike. April 28, 1 p.m. Whiting Road Park. Moderate/

hilly 5.5 mile hike, Quaker Pond Trails 721-1175. gvhchikes.org. [ WED., MAY 1 ] Birding Site: Washington Grove. May 1, 8-11 a.m. Cobbs Hill Park, 100 Norris Drive Meet in the main Reservoir loop off Highland Avenue. 473-1277. rochesterbirding.com.

Special Events [ WED., APRIL 24 ] Rochester Winos Wine and Food Pairing. April 24, 6:30 p.m. Banzai Sushi and Cocktail, 682 South Ave. $30-$35. rochesterwinos.com. [ THU., APRIL 25 ] Casino Night at the Radisson. April 25, 5:30-7:30 p.m. Radisson Hotel Riverside, 120 E. Main St $12-$15, RSVP. 546-6920. rddc@rddc.org. rochesterdowntown.com. “Hello, My Name Is...and I’m a ROC-aholic” a “PechaKucha” event hosted by Rochester Improvement Society. April 25, 6-8 p.m. The Space Theater and Gallery, 1199 East Main St. Free. 585-209-0734. rocimprovement.org/2013/04/ hello-my-name-is/. On the Rise: Housing Inequality and the Fight for Gender Justice. April 25, 6-8 p.m. Rochester Friends Meeting, 84 Scio Street Free. 585.325.7260. metrojustice.org. Proceeds for Preemies! w/ Amanda Lee Peers, Teressa Wilcox & The Lonely Ones fundraiser for March of Dimes. April 25, 6 p.m.-midnight.

Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. $5 suggested donation. 2929940. lovincup.com. Rochester International Film Festival. April 25-27. George Eastman House, 900 East Ave. Dryden Theatre rochesterfilmfest.org. [ FRI., APRIL 26 ] Cypher’s Stand Against Racism. April 26, 6:30 p.m. Rochester Youth for Christ, 1 Favor St. Singers, rappers, dancers, poets present $3-$5, free to ages 10 and under. 943-4325. sh@yarochester.org. PAWS Happy Hour. April 26, 6-8 p.m. Richmond’s Tavern, 21 Richmond Street PAWS: Providing Animal Welfare Services (585) 270-8570. richmondstavern.com. Race and Our Lives: Whistle Blowers in the Workplace. April 26, 2 p.m. 1872 Cafe, 431 W. Main Street Myra Brown will give keynote address on her recently published D&C article. A community panel with discussion will follow Free. 325-1180. 1872cafe@gmail. com. spirituschristi.org. Rochester Bar Crawl. April 26. $10, register. rochesterbarcrawl.com. Spring Wine & Cheese Weekend. April 26-28. flxcheesetrail@gmail.com. Wine & Herb Festival. April 26-28. Cayuga Lake Wine Trail. $40-$65, DD discount. 1-800-684-5217. cayugawinetrail.com. YWCA National Stand Against Racism Day. April 26, 12-1 p.m. continues on page 26 rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 25


Left of Center Stage Variety Show. April 27, 8 p.m. Flying Squirrel Community Space, 285 Clarissa St. Featuring Hieronymous Bogs and your host Maurice Fibb $3$5 suggested donation. facebook. com/leftofcenterstage?fref=ts. Luau for Lustgarten Benefit Dinner for Pancreatic Cancer Research. April 27, 5 p.m. RIT Inn & Conference Center, 5257 W Henrietta Rd. $40, register. No tickets sold at door 2253088. lustgarten.org/luau2013. Peppermind Sewn Seeds Debut Runway Show. April 27, 4 p.m. Rochester Institute of Technology, 1 Lomb Memorial Dr. Vignelli Center for Design Studies, 73 Lomb Memorial Dr $10-$40. sewnseeds.com. Speak Out Rochester 2013. April 27, 1 p.m. Hochstein Music Hall, 50 N. Plymouth Ave. Free. 315-6480. “Squash It.” April 27, 6:15 & 7:30 p.m. Little Theatre, 240 East Ave. $3. kinkbmx.com/team/pro. Tulip Champagne Tasting and the Painted Glass Lady. April 27-28, 12-6 p.m. Casa Larga Vineyards, 2287 Turk Hill Rd. Tastings are $5 and include a complimentary champagne flute 233-4210. casalarga.com. World T’ai Chi & Qigong Day 2013. April 27, 10 a.m. Brighton High School, 1150 Winton Rd S. Free. 461-0130.

THEATER | “MEASURE FOR MEASURE”

Some are born great. Some achieve greatness. And some achieve so much greatness that we’re still celebrating the day they were born after four centuries. Friends, Romans, countrymen: William Shakespeare’s 449th birthday is coming up, and to celebrate the occasion as you like it, the Shakespeare Players are presenting his play “Measure for Measure” at the MuCCC (142 Atlantic Ave.) through April 27. This adaptation, directed by Judy Molner, transports the tale to the Roaring 20’s, mixing the classic story with Prohibition-era issues of sexual morality. The production also features both period and original songs, performed live by a four-piece jazz band. Tickets are $19 for general admission, $14 for seniors over 65, and $9 for anyone under 25. For tickets, more information, and the full performance schedule of “Measure for Measure,” go to muccc.org. — BY JASON SILVERSTEIN

Special Events Central Library, Kate Gleason Auditorium, 115 South Ave. [ SAT., APRIL 27 ] All Member Ikebana Exhibit. April 27-28. RIT Barnes & Noble, 100 Park Point Sat 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Sun 11 a.m.-5 p.m Free admission. 585-4246777. padimadi@rochester. rr.com. The Annual Crime Victim’s Rights “Walk”. April 27, 9:30 a.m. 244 South Plymouth Ave. 753-4455. 4victims.org.

“Flower” City Brewery Collectible Show and Sale. April 27, 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Local #13 Union Hall, 1850 Mt. Read Blvd. Free addmission. 671-7992. 12horsechapter.webs.com. Civil War Day. April 27, 10 a.m. Penfield Public Library, 1985 Baird Rd. Free. 340-8720. penfieldlibrary.org. A Civil War Tribute Day in Penfield. April 27, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Penfield Community Center, 1985 Baird Rd. 340-8655. penfieldrec.org. Global Youth Service Day Fair/Roc Stars Talent Show. April 27, 2-8 p.m. Fair 2-5 p.m., talent show 5-8 p.m 428-7371.

[ SUN., APRIL 28 ] Camp DayDreams 10th Annual Auction Fundraiser, “Dream BIG!” for City Kids. April 28, 4-7 p.m. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. $40, $70 per couple, $15 kids, ages 10 and under free, register. 461-2324. dreambigauction.org. “The Chronicle of the Warsaw Ghetto Uprising According to Marek Edelman.” April 28, 3 p.m. Little Theatre, 240 East Ave. $8. 275-9898. Roc the Runway 2013. April 28, 7 p.m. Hyatt Regency Rochester, 125 E. Main St $40$100. 362-2101. roctherunway. eventbrite.com.

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[ TUE., APRIL 30 ] Alternative Music Film Series. April 30. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. $10. 2768950. events@mag.rochester. edu. mag.rochester.edu. Genesee Transportation Council Releases Draft 2014-2017 Transportation Improvement Program. Apr 30, Ogden Town Hall, 269 Ogden Center Road, Ogden. 6 p.m. 262-3106. tipcomment@gtcmpo.org. Genesee-Finger Lakes Active Transportation Summit (G-FLATS) 2013. April 30, 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Radisson Hotel Riverside, 120 E. Main St $50, including breakfast, lunch, and snacks. 224-3146. elizabethmurphy@flhsa.org. gflats.eventbrite.com/#.

Theater “33 Variations.” Blackfriars Theatre, 795 E. Main St Thu 7:30 p.m., Fri-Sat 8 p.m 4541260. bftix.org. “Avenue Q: School Edition.” School of the Arts, 45 Prince St Fri 7 p.m., Sat 2 & 7 p.m., Sun 5 p.m $5-$9. 324-3535. sotarochester.org. Chamber Opera Festival. Through May 5. Kilbourn Hall, 26 Gibbs St April 24 Jonathan B. Angelone High School Voice Competition Winners, April 25 & April 26 Trial by Jury, April 26 Donizetti’s Rita: A Live Recording, April 28 Local Vocal, April 30 & May 1 Teens Take the Stage, Saturday, May 4 & Sunday, May 5 Mice and Beans Some free, some paid events. rochesterlyricopera.org. Charlie and the Chocolate Factory. Rochester Institute of Technology, 1 Lomb Memorial Dr. Robert F. Panara Theatre. Thu Apr 25-27, 7:30 p.m., Sun 2 p.m. Fri May 3-4,7:30 p.m $5-$7. 475-6254. ntidtix@rit.edu. “Duck Hunter Shoots Angel.” BUM Players. Through Apr 27. Fri-Sat 7:30 p.m $7-$15. 261-7381. “Fox on the Fairway.” Tower Fine Arts Center, SUNY

THEATER | RAINBOW THEATER FESTIVAL

The Rainbow Theater Festival, presented by Bread & Water Theatre, started in early April with a production of “8,” the new play from Dustin Lance Black, Oscar-winning screenwriter of “Milk.” But if you missed you that show — or if it left you wanting more GLBT-themed productions — you can still catch the last two shows of the Rainbow Theater Festival in the next few weeks. Wendy Graf’s “No Word in Guyanese for Me” (pictured), a one-woman show about a gay Muslim immigrant struggling to reconcile her religious, cultural, and sexuality identity, premieres on Friday, April 26, at 8 p.m. The play will also run on Saturday and Sunday, April 27-28, and May 3-5. All performances are at 8 p.m., except the May 5 show, which starts at 2 p.m. After the curtain closes on “No Word,” the Rainbow Theater Festival will wrap up with Tony Ayres’ “The Fat Boy,” which runs May 10-19. All performances will be held at Bread & Water Theatre (243 Rosedale St.). Tickets are $6-$12 and can be purchased by calling 271-5523, or through breadandwatertheatre.org. — BY JASON SILVERSTEIN Brockport, 180 Holley St. Fri-Sat Apr 26-27 7:30 p.m., Sun 2 p.m., Thu-Sat May 2-4 7:30 p.m $8-$15. 395-2787. brockport.edu/finearts. “The Glass Menagerie.” Through May 4. Todd Theatre, University of Rochester, River Campus Apr 25-27 8 p.m.,

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“Measure For Measure.” MuCCC, 142 Atlantic Ave RCP’s Shakespeare Players. Thu Apr 25-Sat 8 p.m. $9-$19. 234-7840. muccc.org. The Merchant of Venice. Hale Auditorium, Roberts Cultural Life Center, Roberts Wesleyan College, 2301 Westside Dr. FriSat 7:30 p.m. $5-$8. 594-6008. “A Night of Cabaret.” Italian American Community Center, 150 Frank Dimino Way $16. 594-8882. gatescommunitytheater.com. No Word in Guyanese for Me. Through May 5. Bread & Water Theatre, 243 Rosedale St. April 26, 27, May 3 and 4 at 8pm; April 28 and May 5 at 2pm. $6-$12. 271-5523. BreadandWaterTheatre.org. Regional Writers Showcase. Geva Theatre Center, 75 Woodbury Blvd “Memories of a Revolution” by Jessie Atkin Free, RSVP. 2324382. gevatheatre.org. Respect: A Musical Journey of Women. Downstairs Cabaret at Winton Place, 3450 Winton Place Thu 7 p.m., Fri-Sat 8 p.m., Sun 3 p.m $26-$39. 325-4370. downstairscabaret.com. “Trial by Jury” an operetta in one act by Gilbert & Sullivan. At the Hall of Justice, Courtroom 303, 99 Exchange Blvd Free. 7385995. rochesterlyricopera.org. “Vincent” By Leonard Nimoy. Black Sheep Theatre, 274 N Goodman St., third floor, Studio D313 Through Apr 27. Fri-Sat 7:30 p.m., Sun Apr 21 2 p.m. followed by a reception and discussion with the Artistic Company $16-$20, RSVP recommended. 861-4816. blacksheeptheatre.org. “The Whipping Man.” Geva Theatre Center, 75 Woodbury Blvd Through Apr 28. \Wed Apr 24 7:30 p.m., Thu 7:30 p.m. (sign-interpreted performance), Fri 8 p.m., Sat 4 & 8:30 p.m., Sun 2 p.m. (Sunday Salon) & 7 p.m Tickets start at $25. 2324382. gevatheatre.org.

Workshops [ WED., APRIL 24 ] Basic Espresso Techniques. 7-8:30 p.m Joe Bean Coffee Roasters, 1344 University Ave. $25 per class. 319-5279. kturiano@joebeanroasters.com. joebeanroasters.com. Grant Writing For For-Profits. April 24, 7 p.m. Rochester Brainery, Village Gate, 274 N Goodman St. $15. 730-7034. rochesterbrainery.com. Worm Composting and Lasagna Gardening. April 24, 6-8 p.m. Cornell Cooperative Extension of Genesee County, 420 East Main St $10, register. 343-3040 x101. genesee.shutterfly.com/gardening. [ THU., APRIL 25 ] Master Classes in Russian Birch Bark Basketry. April 25-27, 6 p.m. Linkages of Rochester, 392 Barry Rd. $15. 544-5168. president@linkagesrochester.org. linkagesrochester.org. [ FRI., APRIL 26 ] Spring Dinner Party with Debbie Maruke. April 26, 6-8:30 p.m. The Culinary Center at Vella, 237 Pittsford-Palmyra Rd $75, register. 421-9362. vellaculinarycenter.com. [ SAT., APRIL 27 ] Hadar Jacobson. April 2729. Studio 34 Creative Arts

SPECIAL EVENTS | ROC THE RUNWAY/PEPPERMINT SEWN SEEDS RUNWAY SHOW

Rochester’s got a growing passion for fashion, and you can sample local haute couture at two aesthetically minded showcase events to be held this weekend. On Saturday, April 27, head over to Rochester Institute for Technology’s Vignelli Center for Design Studies (73 Lomb Memorial Drive, Henrietta) for the Peppermint Sewn Seeds debut runway show. Held in partnership with locally owned shop, Peppermint, RIT’s Industrial Design program, and the Vignelli Center for Design studies, the event will feature the collections of three emerging designers (Tanvi Asher, Josean Vargas, and Andrea Geer), and showcase their journey as makers. The event will be held 4-7 p.m. and tickets are $40 for VIP, $20 general seating, and $10 for students with ID. Proceeds will benefit Girls Rock! Rochester. Get tickets at RIT’s Shop One inside the Global Village or Shop Peppermint (121 Park Ave.), or online at sewnseeds.com. The annual Roc the Runway event will take place Sunday, April 28, at the Hyatt Regency Rochester (125 E. Main St.). Get started with a VIP cocktail hour at 5 p.m., and watch the fashion show at 7 p.m. VIP tickets ($100) include the cocktail hour, admission to the after party, and gift bags packed with chic goodies; second-row tickets are $50, and general admission tickets go for $40. The collaboration of designers, models, stylists, and photographers showcases this year’s latest looks and trends, and the event will benefit Women Helping Girls. For more information or to reserve your tickets, call 309-3239 or visit roctherunway.eventbrite.com. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY Center and Gallery, 34 Elton St. Color Process in Hollow Form April 27-28, $350. Totally Techniques April 29, $200 All three days, $450 total Register. 737-5858. Racial Justice Workshop. April 27, 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Downtown United Presbyterian Church, 121 N. Fitzhugh Street $10 for lunch, register. 469-8249. girafepm@aol.com. [ SUN., APRIL 28 ] Comics for Beginners: Getting Past the Pitfalls of Pacing. April 28, 5 p.m. Rochester Brainery, Village Gate, 274 N Goodman St. $20. 730-7034. rochesterbrainery.com. Make Your Own Fairy Garden. April 28, 2-4 p.m. Wayside Garden Center, 124 PittsfordPalmyra Rd Free, RSVP. 223-1222 x100. trish@ waysidegardencenter.com. waysidegardencenter.com. [ MON., APRIL 29 ] Family Development Class: “Last One Picked, First One Picked On.” April 29, 6-8 p.m. Mental Health Association, 320 N Goodman St. For parents of children of all ages Free, RSVP. 325-3145 x131. mharochester.org.

[ TUE., APRIL 30 ] Creating An Income Distribution Plan. April 30, 7 p.m. Rochester Brainery, Village Gate, 274 N Goodman St. $15. 730-7034. rochesterbrainery.com. Family Development Class: “You Make a Difference.” April 30, 12:30-2:30 p.m. Mental Health Association, 320 N Goodman St. For parents of children up to 5 years old Free, RSVP. 3253145 x131. mharochester.org. Flowering Container Garden Workshop. April 30, 6:30 p.m. Gallea’s Tropical Greenhouse & Florist, 2832 Clover St., Pittsford $40, register. 586-3017. galleas.com. Radical Mycology Meet-up. April 30, 7 p.m. Smugtown Mushrooms, 127 Railroad St. Donations accepted. facebook. com/smugtownmushrooms.

GETLISTED get your event listed for free e-mail it to calendar@rochestercitynews.com. Or go online to rochestercitynewspaper.com and submit it yourself!

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 27


Movies Theaters Searchable, up-to-the-minute movie times for all area theaters can be found at rochestercitynewspaper.com, and on City’s mobile website.

Film

Brockport Strand 93 Main St, Brockport, 637-3310, rochestertheatermanagement.com

Canandaigua Theatres 3181 Townline Road, Canandaigua, 396-0110, rochestertheatermanagement.com

Cinema Theater 957 S. Clinton St., 271-1785, cinemarochester.com

Culver Ridge 16 2255 Ridge Rd E, Irondequoit  544-1140, regmovies.com

Dryden Theatre 900 East Ave., 271-3361, dryden.eastmanhouse.org

Eastview 13 Eastview Mall, Victor 425-0420, regmovies.com

Geneseo Theatres Geneseo Square Mall, 243-2691, rochestertheatermanagement.com

Greece Ridge 12 176 Greece Ridge Center Drive 225-5810, regmovies.com

Henrietta 18 525 Marketplace Drive 424-3090, regmovies.com

The Little 240 East Ave., 258-0444 thelittle.org

Apocalypse somehow [ REVIEW ] BY GEORGE GRELLA

“Oblivion” (PG-13), DIRECTED BY JOSEPH KOSINSKI NOW PLAYING

Whatever their merits, the devotion of their many fans, and the panegyrics of a whole gaggle of critics, those phenomenally successful semi-literary works known as graphic novels (in my day they were pretty much just comic books) often generate a certain pretension. The writers and illustrators introduce learned allusions, copy established literary patterns, interweave complicated plots and narratives, make unsubtle hints about ancient myths, provide some psychological depth and

Movies 10 2609 W. Henrietta Road 292-0303, cinemark.com

Pittsford Cinema 3349 Monroe Ave., 383-1310 pittsford.zurichcinemas.com

Tinseltown USA/IMAX 2291 Buffalo Road 247-2180, cinemark.com

Webster 12 2190 Empire Blvd., 888-262-4386, amctheatres.com

Vintage Drive In 1520 W Henrietta Rd., Avon 226-9290, vintagedrivein.com

Film Previews on page 30

ROCHESTER’S

emotional complexity to their characters, and often underline their themes with a good deal of heavy melodrama. See, for example, “The Dark Knight” series, “From Hell,” “Watchmen” (one of the best), and of course, that version of “The Sorrows of Young Werther” for the bubblegum crowd, “The Amazing Spider-Man.” The latest cinematic adaptation of a graphic novel, “Oblivion,” conforms quite closely to the conventions of its form. It accommodates the expectations of its presumed audience with a brilliant panoply of speed, violence, and special effects; it stars one of the most famous (and still surprisingly youthful) leading men; and it fits solidly into a currently highly popular film genre: science fiction, in this case of the post-apocalyptic variety. It begins with black-and-white footage of a young couple on what looks like the observation deck of the Empire State Building, accompanied by a voice-over narration from Tom Cruise, who introduces himself as Jack Harper. The footage — apparently a dream —ends abruptly, switching to

Tom Cruise and Morgan Freeman in “Oblivion.” PHOTO COURTESY UNIVERSAL PICTURES

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pastel tones as Jack awakes, mentioning something called memory wipe, in a different setting, a bare, bright space whose stark, antiseptic geometry immediately suggests the future as we all recognize it from a hundred science-fiction flicks. In a movie full of long explanations, Jack outlines the situation — an alien invasion of beings called Scavengers has devastated the Earth. In a brilliant new approach to such conquests, the Scavengers blew up the moon, creating tsunamis, volcanoes, immense craters, destroying cities, turning the world into an uninhabitable wasteland. As he puts it, though humanity finally defeated the enemy, they won the war but lost the world. In 2077, Jack and his female companion/coworker/lover, Victoria (Andrea Riseborough), man a station as an “effective team,” as they constantly phrase it in their reports to Sally (Melissa Leo), their controller located somewhere in space. Among the few people left on Earth — everyone else has departed for Titan, one of Saturn’s moons — they service and maintain devices that police the planet, fighting the remaining Scavengers. Those devices, cleverly called drones, are large flying spheres, heavily armed with automatic weapons, and sporting a sort of malevolent mechanical visage. Jack takes off every day in a nifty aircraft, part helicopter, part jet plane, repairing the drones that suffer attacks and sometimes fighting off the Scavengers themselves; under Sally’s supervision, Victoria guides him by means of an elaborate


Short and sweet [ PREVIEW ] BY ADAM LUBITOW

2013 Rochester International Film Festival SCREENS THURSDAY-SATURDAY AT THE DRYDEN THEATRE FREE (DONATIONS ACCEPTED); ROCHESTERFILMFEST.ORG

communications system, a kind of living map. Within that relatively simple situation, the picture rapidly dissolves into generally incomprehensible dialogue and action. Jack discovers a crashed space ship and rescues one of its crew, a young woman named Julia (Olga Kurylenko), who informs him that she’s his wife — in fact the person in his black-and-white dream — and then Jack encounters a tribe of survivors, led by Beech (Morgan Freeman), who tell an entirely different story of the invasion and the war. Very little of the several expositions — Julia’s, Beech’s, or even Jack’s — makes a great deal of sense. Jack’s own history and identity come into question, leading him (and the audience) to wonder just who the hell he is and what exactly he is doing. He and Beech join together in some battles against the enemies he previously believed were allies, then embark on a kind of apocalyptic journey of their own, inspired by the story of the hero Horatio, defending Rome singlehanded against a whole army. All the talking in the movie, which interrupts some perfectly acceptable action, muddles rather than clarifies its meaning, whatever that might be. Apparently intended to inspire the Deep Thoughts that so many comic-book artists insert to embellish their entertainments with a semblance of intellectual and emotional content, all the metaphysical and ontological blather simply dissolves into confusion. Instead of “Oblivion,” which by the way means exactly nothing in the picture, it should have been called “Obscurity.”

I’ve always loved the short-film format. I’m impressed and awed by a filmmaker’s ability to tell a complete, self-contained, and satisfying story in a condensed period of time. Feature-length films have the benefit of taking their time, enveloping you in the story they’re setting out to tell. Short films, by necessity, must hook you instantly. The shortened length often frees filmmakers to experiment with storytelling forms, and the best ones feel almost dangerous — unpredictable and seemingly unconstrained by the rules more traditional films need to play by. Happily for film lovers of all types, Rochester happens to be home to the Rochester International Film Festival, the world’s longest-running festival of short films. Now in its 55th year, the final crop of movies this year is incredibly strong, with 32 films from all around the world presented in four different programs over

A scene from “Desconexión,” screening Friday as part of the Rochester International Film Festival. PHOTO PROVIDED

three days. Below find brief takes on a smattering of this year’s films. For the complete schedule of movies and more information visit rochesterfilmfest.org.

Thursday, April 25

The festival kicks off with “The Future,” Venetia Taylor’s darkly comic tale about a newly engaged couple’s unexpected glimpse into their future together. In “I Spy With My Little Eye,” what’s supposed to be a quiet, romantic weekend getaway to the country for Laura and Hans, turns into something a bit more dangerous after an argument raises suspicions about the real purpose behind their excursion. The delightfully odd stop-motion film “Idle Worship” allows animator Theo P. Stefanski to channel legendary visual-effects creator Ray Harryhausen, to wonderful effect. “Do Cybernauts Dream of Digital Love?” is an adorable romantic comedy from France, about a man and a woman who connect via an online role-playing game that’s a cross between Second Life and World of Warcraft. Sparks fly in the virtual realm, but the would-be couple finds that things are a bit more complicated IRL.

Friday, April 26

Cut down from their feature-length travelogue, local filmmakers Woodlief and Merrillan Thomas’ “French Bread and Cheese” has the feel of one of those educational documentary segments from an old episode of “Sesame Street.” And I absolutely mean that as a compliment. The beautifully shot music video for Portland, Oregon band Alialujah Choir’s song, “A House, a Home,” tells its own story about how love can bloom in the most unexpected of places. The unusual technique of digitally applying the eyes of real actors to stop-motion puppets adds a haunting quality to an already darkly striking story in Johan Oettinger’s

“Seven Minutes in the Warsaw Ghetto.”

Slickly directed by Yecid Benavides, “Desconexión” offers up a kinetic tale of cause and effect detailing the consequences of one man’s lost cell phone.

Saturday, April 27 (4 p.m.)

You can practically breathe the salty ocean air in “The Bard,” a somber, moving tale of an aged fisherman who lost everything to the sea. “The Last Marble” might err slightly toward the sappy side, but it is a sweet exploration of the true meaning of happiness, seen through the eyes of a homeless child of the streets. “Something Different: A Working Gristmill” is a fascinating documentary about one of the last water-powered mills still in operation. “Georgena Terry” celebrates the work of the woman who designed the first bike frame made specifically for female cyclists. A marvel of economical storytelling, Iranian film “Thank God” fits a novel’s worth of story into three wordless minutes.

Saturday, April 27 (8 p.m.)

The polished supernatural drama “To the Other Side” depicts a student’s obsession

with solving the mysterious disappearance of a writer and her lover. Penfield natives Jason and Jonathan Drago present a tale of suspicion and infidelity in the Tarantino-esque thriller, “H.E.D.” An elderly woman rediscovers her passion for life when she’s randomly selected for the chance to win 300,000 Euros in the Spanish comedy, “Free Kick.” “The Op Shop” is a hilarious Australian comedy about a mysterious object that’s been dropped off at a thrift shop, and the elderly workers’ valiant attempts to identify it. In the atmospheric thriller “The Unpardonable Night,” a young boy is left home alone while his parents go out for the night, and accidentally stumbles upon a shocking family secret.

THE HOUSEHOLDER

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Film Previews

Full film reviews available at rochestercitynewspaper.com. [ OPENING ] THE BIG WEDDING (R): A family tries to get along during a weekend wedding celebration in this comedy starring Robert De Niro, Diane Keaton, Amanda Seyfried, Topher Grace, Katherine Heigl, Susan Sarandon, and Robin Williams. Canandaigua, Culver Ridge, Geneseo, Greece Ridge, Eastview, Pittsford, Webster CHRONICLE OF THE WARSAW GHETTO UPRISING (1993): This documentary chronicles the 1943 uprising of Jewish prisoners in the largest ghetto in Nazi-occupied Germany. Little (Sun, Apr 28, 3 p.m.) THE COMPANY YOU KEEP (R): A journalist discovers the identity of a wanted former member of militant group the Weather Underground in this political thriller directed by and starring Robert Redford. With Shia LaBeouf, Susan Sarandon, Julie Christie, Nick Nolte, Stanley Tucci, and Anna Kendrick. Little, Pittsford DISCONNECT (R): This drama presents a group of intertwined stories centered around social media, the internet, and the ways people use them to connect with one another. Starring Jason Bateman, Alexander Skarsgård, and Hope Davis. Little THE HOUSEHOLDER (1963): A young Indian newlywed finds his marriage threatened by the arrival of his domineering mother, and seeks advice from a variety of sources. Directed by James Ivory, based on the novel by Jhabvala. Dryden (Wed, Apr 24, 8 p.m.) THE INVISIBLE WAR (NR): Oscar-nominated documentary investigating the sad and horrifying epidemic of rape of female soldiers in the U.S. military. Little (Tue, Apr 30, 6:30 p.m.) THE ISLAND PRESIDENT (2011): This documentary follows the efforts of President of the Maldives, Mohamed Nasheed’s efforts to confront climate change and prevent his country from eventually disappearing under the sea. Little (Mon, Apr 29, 7 p.m.) KING’S FAITH (PG-13): A young gang member attempts to leave his criminal life behind him, but his past continues to threaten his family and faith. Henrietta LAND OF MILK AND HONEY (1971): Director Pierre Étaix veered from comedies to make this investigative documentary about French society post-May 1968. Dryden (Tue, Apr 30, 8 p.m.)

MOVIES ON A SHOESTRING: See film column in this week’s issue for films and times. Dryden MUD (PG-13): Two young boys befriend a fugitive and agree to help him reunite with the love of his life and evade the authorities. Starring Matthew McConaughey, Reese Witherspoon, and Michael Shannon. Pittsford OVERBOARD (1987): A carpenter gets revenge on the wealthy, spoiled heiress who hired him by convincing her that she’s his wife after she gets amnesia. Starring Kurt Russell and Goldie Hawn. Little (Sat, Apr 27, 10 a.m.) PAIN & GAIN (R): Mark Wahlberg and Dwayne Johnson star as bodybuilders who get caught up in a kidnapping plot that goes bad in Michael Bay’s latest action extravaganza, inspired by true events. Also starring Tony Shalhoub, Ed Harris, Rob Corddry, Anthony Mackie, and Rebel Wilson. Brockport, Canandaigua, Culver Ridge, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece Ridge, Vintage, Webster ROCHESTER INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL: See feature on page 33. Dryden STARBUCK (R): A slacker discovers that as a result of his frequent sperm donation, he’s the biological father of 533 children, 144 of whom have filed a suit to discover his identity. Little SUNSET (1988): Bruce Willis stars as a silent film actor who hires Wyatt Earp (James Garner) to be technical advisor on his latest film, and the two men end up teaming up to solve a murder. Directed by Blake Edwards.  Dryden (Sun, Apr 28, 2 p.m) [ CONTINUING ] 42 (PG-13): Brian Helgeland writes and directs this biopic about Jackie Robinson as he’s signed to the Brooklyn Dodgers under team GM Branch Rickey (Harrison Ford). Also starring Chadwick Boseman, Christopher Meloni, and Alan Tudyk. Brockport, Canandaigua, Culver Ridge, Geneseo, Greece Ridge, Eastview, Pittsford, Webster THE CALL (R): Halle Berry plays a 911 operator who must use her wits to help an abducted girl escape the clutches of a violent serial killer from her past. Also starring Abigail Breslin. Culver Ridge THE CROODS (PG): A prehistoric family sets off on an epic journey to find a new home after their cave is destroyed in this animated family adventure film from Chris Sanders (“How to Train your Dragon”). Featuring the voice talents of Nicolas

Cage, Emma Stone, Ryan Reynolds, Catherine Keener, and Cloris Leachman. Canandaigua, Culver Ridge, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece Ridge, Pittsford, Vintage, Webster DARK SKIES (PG-13): An escalating series of disturbing events seems to hint that a malevolent force has targeted a suburban family. Starring Keri Russell and J.K. Simmons. Movies 10 EVIL DEAD (R): Sam Raimi produced this remake of his 1981 classic horror film, about five friends who stumble across a Book of the Dead while vacationing in a cabin in the woods. Hijinks ensue. Canandaigua, Culver Ridge, Geneseo, Greece Ridge, Eastview G.I. JOE: RETALIATION (PG13): In this sequel based on the film inspired by a line toys, the G.I. Joes once again battle the evil forces of the Cobra empire. Starring Dwayne Johnson, Channing Tatum, Adrianne Palicki, and Bruce Willis. Canandaigua, Culver Ridge, Eastview,Geneseo, Greece Ridge, Vintage THE HOST (PG-13): Based on the Stephanie Meyer novel, where instead of vampires and werewolves, this time the love story involves alien invaders bent on enslaving the human race. Directed by Andrew Niccol and starring Saoirse Ronan, William Hurt, and Diane Kruger. Culver Ridge IDENTITY THIEF (R): Hijinks ensue as Jason Bateman and Melissa McCarthy explore the lighter side of identity fraud in this comedy about a mild-mannered businessman who tracks down the con artist who’s been stealing from him. Also starring Jon Favreau, John Cho, and Amanda Peet. Vintage JURASSIC PARK 3D (PG-13): Steven Spielberg’s beloved adventure tale, about a dinosaur theme park that goes terribly wrong, returns to the big screen and gets the snazzy 3D treatment. Clever girl. Canandaigua, Culver Ridge, Geneseo, Greece Ridge, Eastview NO (R): Part historical drama, part satire, this Oscarnominated film follows the unusual political campaign to defeat Chilean dictator Augusto Pinochet. Starring Gael García Bernal. Little OBLIVION (PG-13): In a future where humanity has abandoned Earth, one man sent to harvest its resources begins to question the true purpose of his mission. Starring Tom Cruise and Morgan Freeman. Brockport, Canandaigua, Culver Ridge, Geneseo, Eastview, Greece Ridge, Pittsford, Vintage, Webster


OLYMPUS HAS FALLEN (R): Terrorists overtake the a White House in this action thriller starring Gerard Butler, Aaron Eckhart, Morgan Freeman, Angela Bassett, Ashley Judd, and Melissa Leo. Canandaigua, Culver Ridge, Eastview, Greece Ridge, Vintage OZ THE GREAT & POWERFUL (PG):Director Sam Raimi presents the previously untold story of the origins of the Wizard of Oz. Starring James Franco, Mila Kunis, Michelle Williams, and Rachel Weisz. Canandaigua, Culver Ridge, Eastview,Greece Ridge, Vintage, Webster THE PLACE BEYOND THE PINES (R): Director Derek Cianfrance’s follow up to “Blue Valentine” stars Ryan Gosling as a small-time bank robber and Bradley Cooper as the rookie cop who’s pursuing him. With Eva Mendes. Eastview, Little, Pittsford, Webster THE SAPPHIRES (PG-13): In 1968, a singing group made up of four young Australian Aboriginal girls gets their first gig, entertaining the American troops in Vietnam. Starring Chris O’Dowd. Pittsford SCARY MOVIE 5 (R): The latest in the long-running series of film spoofs parodies everything from “Paranormal Activity” to “Black Swan,” with a cast that includes Charlie Sheen, Lindsay Lohan, Heather Locklear, Snoop Dogg, and Mike Tyson. Canandaigua, Culver Ridge, Greece Ridge, Eastview, Webster SILVER LININGS PLAYBOOK (R): Lovably unstable mental patients Bradley Cooper and Jennifer Lawrence fall for one another and learn to ballroom dance in this likely Oscar contender from David O. Russell. With Robert De Niro and Jacki Weaver. Cinema STOKER (R): Chan-wook Park, the director of “Oldboy” makes the jump to American cinema with this gothic mystery-thriller about one very unusual family. Starring Nicole Kidman, Mia Wasikowska, Matthew Goode, and Jacki Weaver. Cinema TYLER PERRY’S TEMPTATION (PG-13): A marriage counselor, unhappy in her own marital situation, faces unforeseen consequences when she begins an affair with one of her clients. Starring Jurnee SmollettBell (“Friday Night Lights”), Vanessa L. Williams, Brandy Norwood, and ahem, Kim Kardashian. Culver Ridge

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Classifieds For information: Call us (585) 244-3329 Fax us (585) 244-1126 Mail Us City Classifieds 250 N. Goodman Street Rochester, NY 14607 Email Us classifieds@ rochester-citynews.com EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY

All real estate advertised in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act, which makes it unlawful, “to make, print, or publish, any notice, statement, or advertisement, with respect to the sale or rental of a dwelling that indicates any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin.” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under the age of 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertisement for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. Call the local Fair Housing Enforcement Project, FHEP at 325-2500 or 1-866-671-FAIR. Si usted sospecha una practica de vivienda injusta, por favor llame al servicio legal gratis. 585-325-2500 - TTY 585-325-2547.

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Adoption A BABY IS OUR DREAM: Neil and Naomi are longing to ADOPT. Happily married, creative, active, loving couple. Please call: 1-800-982-3678 or www.coupleseeksadoption.com EXPENSES PAID. ADOPT: A loving married couple wishes to adopt newborn to support wholeheartedly, educate fully, discipline fairly, engage completely and love unconditionally! Natalie/David: 1-855-759-2229. www.davidandnatalie.info. ADOPT: Our hearts reach out to you. Couple seek newborn bundle of joy to complete our family. Please call Maria and John (888)988-5028. johnandmariaadopt.com ADOPT: A childless couple seeks to adopt. Loving home with tenderness, warmth, hapiness. Financial security. Expenses paid. Regis & David (888)986-1520 or text (347)406-1924; www. davidandregisadopt.com ADOPTION: A childless, married couple (ages 34/35)desire to adopt and be stay-at-home mom & devoted dad. Financial security. Expenses paid. Ellen & Chris. 1-888-701-2170 UNPLANNED PREGNANCY? THINKING OF ADOPTION? Open or closed adoption. YOU choose the family. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Abby’s One

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For Sale DINING ROOM TABLE Antique 1929 Dark Wood. Need work! Asking $200 or best offer Call 585-773-1255 DOG & CAT HOUSES Kennels, porch steps, do it yourself kits. Quick assembly 585-752-1000 $49 Jim FOR SALE Lady’s Used Haband Pants Collection, $49 cash. 12 pairs: 8 rainbow colors size 16A stretch polyester, 2 dungarees, 2 size 18A corduroy. Phone (585) 413-0827. PAINT never opened. 2 Gallon Behr Premium Moonlit Yellow $15 each 585-225-5526 PERSIAN RUG Hand-made Qashqai Tribal Rug. (Southern Iran) 6 1/2’x9’1” condition excellent Ivory, Salmon, Navy

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Garage and Yard Sales BRIGHTON TEMPLE B’RITH KODESH Handbags, jewelry, household items, games /toys, childrens clothing, Ladies white mink jacket (L). Sun. April 28th, 9am-5pm, Mon. April 29th 10am-7pm, Tues. April 30th 10am-1pm 2131 Elmwood Ave. BROWNCROFT:200+ garage sales in a square mile! May 4-5 (some May 3) 9-5. I-590: west on Browncroft. Maps & lists: www.browncroftna.org HUGE Second-Hand Sale! Fri. 4/26 4-7pm & Sat. 4/27 9am3pm Something for everyone! Including café & boutique. Twelve Corners Presbyterian Church, 1200 Winton Rd. S. Rochester, NY 14618.

Jam Section BLUES/ROCK BAND Needs bass player. Experienced musicians, we have all the pieces but you! Call Mike 424-4122 or 7381151. BRIAN MARVIN lead vocalist, is looking for a job and is looking to form band (Classic Rock) with lead guitarist, bassist, drummer & rhythm guitars Covers & originals 585-4735089 CALLING ALL MUSICIANS OF ALL GENRES the Rochester Music Coalition wants you! Please register on our website. For further info: www. rochestermusiccoalition.org info@rochestermusiccoalition. org 585-235-8412 EXP. DRUMMER Strong vocals to join (keyboard)/ (keyboard bass) who also sings lead. To form duo (Retro Pop/Dance/ Jazz). Must be willing to shop the musical product around to get gigs 585-426-7241

We placed an ad in City Newspaper advertising the availability of two office suites in my office building at 55 Canterbury Road in the City. The response was excellent. One of the two available spaces was leased within days, and we have active interest in the other space.” - DOUGLAS C. BURKHARDT, FIRST REALTY COMPANY

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DOWNTOWN united presbyterian church Rental Space Now Available Downtown Office Space Available Immediately for Rent to Not-For-Profit Organizations Call 585-325-4000 ext. 15 For additional information or to schedule an appointment to tour the building. We are proud to be located in the heart of Downtown Rochester.


Place your real estate ad by calling 244-3329 ext. 23 or rochestercitynewspaper.com Ad Deadlines: Friday 4pm for Display Ads Monday at noon for Line ads Miscellaneous GET A FREE VACATION as well as IRS tax deduction BY DONATING your vehicle, boat, property, collectibles to DVAR. Help teens in crisis. Call: 1-800-338-6724 HAS YOU BUILDING SHIFTED OR SETTLED? Contact Woodford Brothers Inc, for straightening, leveling, foundation and wood frame repairs at 1-800-OLDBARN. www.woodfordbros. com. “Not applicable in Queens county”

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Mind Body Spirit DRUG & ALCOHOL Problems? TLC Outpatient Clinic. Individual & Group Therapy, Substance Abuse, Yoga, Art & more. 480-577-1172 for information. Private Insurance or Reasonable Self-Pay/ Personalized Treatment Plans. (AAN CAN)

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Find your way home with TO ADVERTISE CONTACT CHRISTINE TODAY!

CALL 244-3329 X23 OR EMAIL CHRISTINE@ROCHESTER-CITYNEWS.COM

238 English Rd, Greece, $74,900. 4 Bedroom 2 FULL BATH ranch bigger than it seems - A MUST SEE @ this PRICE! Kitchen with appliances Opens to a large family room with a wood burning stove. Call Ryan @ 201-0724 for Info.

Ryan Smith 585-201-0724

Ryan Smith

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Pristine on Park

988 Park Avenue

Located toward the north end of one of the city’s most popular streets, 988 Park Avenue offers a metro-chic, row house-style home that is not common in Rochester. Built in 1920, this spacious and carefully maintained home is across from Darwin Street – giving the would-be owner easy access to the many shops, restaurants and amenities that make Park Avenue so popular, while still providing a quiet and family-friendly location. Situated between two similar homes, 988 Park is a low-maintenance investment perfect for the first-time homebuyer, young family or empty nesters interested in spending more time relaxing than mowing the lawn and fixing things up. The ultimate turnkey listing – everything has been updated and polished – while still retaining the historic charm that one would expect from a 1920s home. From the gleaming white modern cupboards in the kitchen, to the deluxe double-headed shower that graces the original claw foot tub, the previous owners’ attention to detail is evident in every room. The first floor features a small porch that leads into the foyer. Highlights of the living room include built-in shelving, a brilliant bay window, gleaming hardwoods and original molding. The dining room is bright and airy with more large windows that look out at a charmingly landscaped back patio. The kitchen is bright and completely updated with new appliances. There is an unexpected number of closets and storage space on the first floor – and a fully updated powder room.

Don’t let the outside fool you. This home is much bigger than it looks from the sidewalk. The second floor houses three spacious bedrooms with large closets, ceiling fans and a lovely bay window in the master bedroom. Each room is freshly pained in muted tones that complement the antique moldings. Small details such as the original doorknobs remind visitors that despite its pristine appearance, this home has a history and a timeless charm that is often absent from modern abodes. But there’s even more if you continue up a small flight of stairs. Where one might expect to find an unfinished attic, 988 Park Avenue offers one final surprise: a beautifully finished third floor. The two huge rooms that make up the top floor could serve as guest rooms, a home office or even a home theater. With walk-in closets and an inviting open floor plan, the possibilities are almost endless. Listed at $149,900, 988 Park Avenue is a great deal. To view the house, contact Mike Ruff at (585) 737-3688. Editor’s note: At the time of print, this listing was no longer active. by Lisa M. Feinstein Lisa is the Executive Director of College Advancement at SUNY Geneseo, a city resident and an avid fan of historic architecture and neighborhoods.

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> page 33

Notices GOOD NUTRITION is the best medicine! Nearly 1,000,000 older (60+) New Yorkers are income eligible for SNAP – the new name for the Food Stamp Program. Let’s help older adults in Monroe County get the nutrition support they need to stay healthy. Contact the Nutrition Outreach & Education Program at MCLAC – the Rochester office of LAWNY, Inc. Call us at (585) 295-5624 or (585) 295-5626 to find out if you may be eligible for SNAP. Prepared by a project of Hunger Solutions New York and NYSOTDA. This institution is an equal opportunity provider.

Wanted to Buy A DIABETIC NEEDS YOUR TEST STRIPS: Any Brand. Unexpired & Unopened. Will Beat Any Fair Price. FAST Payment! CASH Paid. Call Doug (877)710-5620 or (716)7084512 diabeticteststrips4cash@ gmail.com

Next-to-New Sale:

BLESSED SACRAMENT AUDITORIUM MONROE AVENUE AT OXFORD STREET

Thursday & Friday, May 2 & 3, 9am-8pm Saturday, May 4, 9am-12noon ROCHESTER’S ORIGINAL NEXT-TO-NEW SALE: Clothing, furniture, appliances, kitchen items, jewelry, books, games, toys, numerous other items. Home-made chili, sauerkraut and baked goods for sale. Come for lunch or supper! www.blessedsacramentrochester.org

EMPLOYMENT / CAREER TRAINING

Employment AIRLINE CAREERS - begin here.Become an Aviation Maintenance Tech. FAA approved training. Financial aid if qualified – Housing available. Job placement assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 877-492-3059 AIRLINES ARE HIRING Train for hands on Aviation Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified- Job Placement Assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance (866)296-7093 DEDICATED COMPANY DRIVERS Local & Regional Opportunities. $2,000 Sign On Bonus. Avg. weekly pay of $850-$1,000. Must have necessary authorization to travel into Canada 866-723-6470 www.NFITruckingJobs.com DISCOVER THE “Sucess and Moneymaking Secrets” THEY don’t want you to know about. To get your FREE “Success and Money Making Secrets” CD, please call 1-800-790-5752 (AAN CAN) HELP WANTED! make extra money in our free ever popular homemailer program,includes valuable guidebook! Start immediately! Genuine! 1-888292-1120 www.easyworkfromhome.com (AAN CAN) $$$HELP WANTED$$$ Extra Income! Assembling CD cases from Home! No Experience Necessary! Call our Live Operators Now! 1-800-4057619 EXT 2450 http://www. easywork-greatpay.com (AAN CAN) PAID IN ADVANCE! MAKE up to $1000 A WEEK mailing brochures from home! Helping Home Workers since 2001! Genuine Opportunity! No Experience required. Start Immediately! www. themailingstation.com (AAN CAN) RGIS PROVIEDS Regular parttime work (30 hours). Starting pay 9.00 + incentive pay. Promotion opportunities. Paid Training. Paid Travel & Per Diem. Transportation provided. Overnights (3 consecutive nights) Required. Generally leave on Monday return on Thursday. Group health plan after 90 days. Pre-employment Screening Required. Equal Opportunity Employer. No Experience Needed. Apply at www.rgis.com Keyword Rochester

Volunteers A SECOND THOUGHT Resale Shop in East Rochester is accepting applications for volunteer sale associates and online researchers. Shop benefits people with disabilities in Guatemala. Call (585) 3402000.

ARE YOU 55+ & interested in learning about local volunteer opportunities? Call RSVP! Many opportunities available. Help meet critical needs. Regular information sessions - call 287-6377 or email jpowers@ lifespan-roch.org. BRIGHTEN A LIFE. Lifespan’s Senior Connection matches volunteers 55+ with older adults who could benefit from a weekly phone call or visit by a friend. Call Katie 287-6352 for info. CATHOLIC FAMILY CENTER seeks volunteers to: teach American Sign Language, do clerical work, and organize a teen soccer league. Contact Claudia at 262-7044 or cgill@ cfcrochester.org DYNAMIC VOLUNTEER opportunities at the Zoo await you. If you love the Zoo, donate your time today. To learn more, visit the volunteer page of the Seneca Park Zoo’s Web site at www.senecaparkzoo.org FOSTER PARENTS WANTED! Monroe County is looking for

adults age 21 and over to consider opening their homes to foster children. Call 334-9096 or visit www.MonroeFosterCare. org. GIRLS ROCK ROCHESTER seeking musical and nonmusical volunteers for rock ‘n’ roll summer camp staff. Applications now available at girlsrockrochester.com. Email girlsrockrochester@gmail.com for more info.

HERITAGE CHRISTIAN STABLES, a therapeutic horsemanship program for children and adults with developmental disabilities, is looking for volunteers to serve as horse leaders and side walkers. Call Kim Kennedy at (585) 3402016 or email kkennedy@ heritagechristianservices.org

continues on page 36

WELDING/FABRICATION TEACHER Cattaraugus Allegany BOCES SEE WEBSITE FOR DETAILS APPLY ON-LINE AT

WWW.CABOCES.ORG EOE/AA

Uncommon Schools

ROCHESTER PREP

Are you an educator looking to make a difference and prepare students for college? JOIN THE ROCHESTER PREP TEAM AT OUR UPCOMING

Speed Interviewing Event! Elementary School Speed Interviewing Saturday, May 11th from 9AM – 12PM Rochester Prep Elementary School – 899 Jay St. Rochester, NY 14611.

Middle School Speed Interviewing Saturday, May 18th from 9AM – 12PM Rochester Prep West Campus – 1020 Maple St. Rochester, NY 14611.

To register for the event,

Elementary School applicants email a resume to esinterview@rochesterprep.org BY WEDNESDAY, MAY 8TH AT 5PM. Middle School applicants email a resume to msinterview@rochesterprep.org BY WEDNESDAY, MAY 15TH AT 5PM. If you are unable to aŒend, but are sŽll interested in working at Rochester Prep, apply online at www.uncommonschools.org/careers. rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 35


I’m very pleased with the calls I got from our apartment rental ads, and will continue running them. Your readers respond — positively!” - M. Smith, Residential Management EMPLOYMENT / CAREER TRAINING > page 35 LIFESPAN’S OMBUDSMAN PROGRAMS looking for volunteers to advocate for individuals living

in long-term care settings. Please contact call 585.287.6378 or e-mail dfrink@lifespan-roch.org for more information

LITERACY VOLUNTEERS OF ROCHESTER needs adult tutors to help adults who are waiting to improve their reading,

writing, English speaking, or math skills. Call 473-3030, or check our website at www. literacyrochester.org

card. For further information, contact Trevor Gates, College at Brockport, (585)204-7144, or email tgates@brockport.edu.

Business Opportunities

ROCHESTER CARES is looking for volunteers interested in joining us to make a difference in Rochester!! One time and recurring volunteer opportunities with a wide range of organizations. www. rochestercares.org/calendar.php

VOLUNTEERS NEEDED for the Men’s Emergency Winter Shelter at Dimitri House. Please call us at 325-1796 for more information or to volunteer your time.

START A HOME BASED BUSINESS. Part-time or FullTime. Serious inquires only. 585-271-3243

SCHOOL #12 999 South Ave. is looking for reading & math volunteers, English & Spanish. Training provided. Call Vicki 585-461-4282 VOLUNTEERS ARE NEEDED tinyurl.com/rochester2013 for research study on organizational tolerance for heterosexism and workplace well-being in the metropolitan Buffalo, Rochester, and Syracuse, New York areas. You do not need to identify as lesbian, gay, or bisexual to participate. Survey takes approximately 15 minutes. You are eligible to be entered into a drawing to win a $10 gift

36 CITY APRIL 24-30, 2013

VOLUNTEERS NEEDED To assist with praise and worship. Living Waters Fellowship is a Christ centered nondenominational church in the early stages of development. Individuals, groups, and musicians are welcomed. Call 585-957-6155. WOMEN: ROCHESTER HABITAT is looking for women 18 years+ to help build a house with a single mother. Visit rochabitat. org or call 546-1470

Career Training ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home. *Medical, *Business, *Criminal Justice, *Hospitality. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV authorized. Call 800-481-9472 www.CenturaOnline.com EARN $500 A DAY Airbrush & Media Makeup Artists For: Ads - TV - Film - Fashion Train & Build Portfolio in 1 week Lower Tuition for 2012. AwardMakeupSchool.com


Legal Ads [ CITATION BY PUBLICATION ] THE STATE OF TEXAS TO: JAMES EDWARD VIGIL NOTICE TO THE DEFENDANT: “YOU HAVE BEEN SUED. YOU MAY EMPLOY AN ATTORNEY. IF YOU OR YOUR ATTORNEY DO NOT FILE A WRITTEN ANSWER WITH THE CLERK WHO ISSUED THIS CITATION BY 10:00 A.M. ON THE MONDAY NEXT FOLLOWING THE EXPIRATION OF TWENTY DAYS AFTER YOU WERE SERVED THIS CITATION AND PETITION, A DEFAULT JUDGMENT MAY BE TAKEN AGAINST YOU.” GREETINGS: YOU ARE HEREBY COMMANDED to appear and answer before the Honorable 340th District Court, San Angelo, Texas, at the Courthouse in Tom Green County, Texas, at or before 10:00 o’clock a.m. of the Monday next after the expiration of 20 days from the date of service of this citation, then and there to answer the ORIGINAL PETITION FOR CHANGE OF NAME OF CHILD filed in said Court September 10, 2012 against JAMES EDWARD VIGIL, Respondent and said suit being Cause Number C120618F on the docket of said court and entitled: In the Interest of XAVIER JAMES VIGIL The nature of which suit is a request to dissolve marriage by divorce and matter of conservatorship of minor child/children. The court has authority in this suit to enter any judgment or decree dissolving the marriage and providing for division of property for any matter in the interest of the child/children including, but not limited to, the appointment of a conservator and order for child-support, all of which will be binding upon you.” Issued and given under my hand and seal of said Court at San Angelo, Texas on this the 20th day of March, 2013 Sheri Woodfin, District Clerk 340th District Court Tom Green County, Texas By:Natoschia Fry Deputy DISTRICT COURT OF TOM GREEN COUNTY, TEXAS [ LEGAL NOTICE ] Articles of organization of DUTCHMAN PROPERTIES, LLC filed with the Sec. of State of NY (SSNY) on October 1, 2012. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY may mail a copy of any process to Friedman &

Ranzenhofer, PC, 74 Main Street, POB 31, Akron, NY 14001-0031. The purpose of the LLC is to engage in any business permitted under the Law. [ LEGAL NOTICE ] Articles of organization of VAN LATHAM, LLC filed with the Sec. of State of NY (SSNY) on September 7, 2012. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY may mail a copy of any process to Friedman & Ranzenhofer, PC, 74 Main Street, POB 31, Akron, NY 140010031. The purpose of the LLC is to engage in any business permitted under the Law. [ LEGAL NOTICE ] Articles of Organization of ZUCCHINI PEOPLE GAMES, LLC, filed with the Sec. of State of NY (SSNY) on February 19, 2013. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY may mail a copy of any process to Friedman & Ranzenhofer, PC, 74 Main Street, POB 31, Akron, NY 140010031. The purpose of the LLC is to engage in any business permitted by law. [ LEGAL NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of A&M Liquor Store, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (“SSNY”) on March 17, 2013. Office location: Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to LLC at 3118 E Henrietta, Henrietta, NY 14467. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ LEGAL NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of GVH - 3 LLC. GVH -3 filed Articles of Organization with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 2/28/2013. Office location: Monroe County. The Secretary of State was designated as agent upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process served to: 267 Pearl Street, Rochester, NY 14607. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ LEGAL NOTICE ] Notice of formation of Marciano Brothers LLC, Articles of Formation filed with the NYS Secretary of State (SSNYS) on 0827-2012. Office location

Monroe County, SSNYS designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against the company may be served. SSNYS shall mail a copy of any process to 435 Parma Center Road, Hilton, NY 14468. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ LEGAL NOTICE ] Notice of formation of Rochester Home Inspections & Engineering, PLLC a Professional Limited Liability Company. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of N.Y. (SSNY) on 03/04/2013. Office location Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of PLLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The PLLC, 1065 Wickerton Lane, Webster, NY 14580 Purpose: practice the profession of Engineering. [ LEGAL NOTICE ] R and S Group Consulting, LLC (“LLC”) filed Arts. of Org. with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on March 26, 2013. Office Location: Monroe County. SSNY designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 18 Bosworth Field, Mendon, New York 14506. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] A1-AC, LLC filed Articles of Organization with the New York Department of State on March 15, 2013. Its office is located in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent of the Company upon whom process against it may be served and a copy of any process shall be mailed to 574 Melwood Drive, Rochester, New York 14626. The purpose of the Company is any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Articles of Organization with respect to Flat Decor, LLC, a New York Limited Liability Company, were filed with the Secretary of State of New York on March 6, 2013. The County in New York State where its office is located is Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent of Flat Decor, LLC upon whom process against it may be served, and the post office address to which the Secretary of State shall mail a copy of any process against Flat Decor, LLC served upon him or her is 2 Old Brick Circle, Pittsford, New

York 14534. There are no exceptions adopted by the Company, or set forth in its Operating Agreement, to the limited liability of members pursuant to Section 609(a) of the Limited Liability Company Law of the State of New York. Flat Decor, LLC is formed for the purpose of operation of an importing and exporting business, domestic retail and wholesale sales and any other activities that are lawful for a limited liability company in the State of New York. [ NOTICE ] ATMOSTFIT LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 3/4/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Howard Charles Cragg, 515 Bay Rd., Webster, NY 14580. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] C6 MOBILITY LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 3/20/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, Attn: David M. Sprout, Manager, 1222 Waterbrook Xing, Webster, NY 14580. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] Fiona’s Hard Goods LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 4/2/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 536 Glenview Court, Webster, NY 14580. General Purposes [ NOTICE ] FIXINGFOX, LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 3/19/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, Attn: Arthur Alves, Mgr., 5 Monroe Ave., Pittsford, NY 14534. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] LEGAL NOTICE is hereby given (number to be assigned) for beer, and wine license that has been applied for by the undersigned; Xingwang Sushi Inc, dba Sushi Palace to sell beer, and wine at retail

(ON-PREMISE) under the Alcoholic Beverage Control Law of the State of New York at 1000 Hylan Dr, Rochester, New York 14623, County of Monroe for on premise consumption. [ NOTICE ] MADOH MUSIC GROUP LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 12/28/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Jeremiah Abiah, 126 W. 129 St., Ste. 3, NY, NY 10027. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] NAMCO DEVELOPMENT, LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 11/17/10. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, PO Box 20135, Rochester, NY 146020135. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] Not. of Form. of Homewise MGMT.LLC, Art.of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 04/13/10. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY may mail a copy of any process to LLC. 3177 Latta Rd,Ste. 160, Rochester, NY 14612. Purpose: any lawful Purpose [ NOTICE ] Not. of Form. Of M&M Gardens LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 3/20/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY may mail copy of any process to LLC at 445 Peck Rd, Spencerport, NY 14559. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Not. of Form. of, Tricia Marsh Holistic Health Coach, LLC was filed with SSNY on 3/1/2013, county, Monroe. SSNY is designated Agent of LLC to whom process may be served. SSNY may mail a copy of any process to LLC, 166 Monteroy Rd Rochester, NY 14618. Purpose any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice is hereby given that a license (Serial Number pending) for

beer, liquor, and wine been applied for by the undersigned* to sell beer, liquor, and wine at retail in a restaurant under the under the Alcoholic Beverage Control Law at 1290 University Ave. Suite A, Rochester, NY 14607 in Monroe County for on premises consumption.*Secession Company, LLC DBA The Revelry

State of NY (SSNY) on 12/24/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o U.S. Corp. Agents, Inc., 7014 13th Ave., Ste. 202, Brooklyn, NY 11228, regd. agent upon whom and at which process may be served. Purpose: Any lawful activity.

[ NOTICE ]

[ NOTICE ]

Notice is hereby given that a license, number not yet assigned, for a full on premise beer & wine license has been applied for by ISOTYPE CONSULTING LLC dba The Crossroads Coffeehouse,752 Goodman St S., Rochester NY 14620, County of Monroe, City of Rochester for a restaurant.

Notice of Formation of Cambridge Park, LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 2/20/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 88 Sugar Tree Circle, Brockport, NY 14420. Purpose: any lawful activities.

[ NOTICE ]

[ NOTICE ]

Notice of Formation of Acrospire Management LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 3/25/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: National Registered Agents, Inc., 111 Eighth Ave., 13th Fl., NY, NY 10011, also the registered agent. Purpose: any lawful activities.

Notice of Formation of CC Interactive Marketing Services, LLC, Art.of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 02/26/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 118 Kirklees Rd; Pittsford, NY 14534. Purpose: any lawful activity.

[ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Aristo Management, LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 2/15/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 1142 Mount Hope Ave., Rochester, NY 14620. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of ASSURED EDGE SOLUTIONS LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 04/09/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o U.S. Corp. Agents, Inc., 7014 13th Ave., Ste. 202, Brooklyn, NY 11228, regd. agent upon whom and at which process may be served. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of BCW CHEMICALS LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of

[ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of CRANBERRY CAPITAL WATER LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 02/27/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o U.S. Corp. Agents, Inc., 7014 13th Ave., Ste. 202, Brooklyn, NY 11228, regd. agent upon whom and at which process may be served. Purpose: Any lawful activity.

with Secy. of State of NY (“SSNY”) on February 15, 2013. Office location: Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to LLC at P.O Box 64607, Rochester, NY 14624. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Greater Rochester Premier Hockey, LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 3/20/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 93 Roselawn Ave., Fairport, NY 14450. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of JUNIOR IV ENTERPRISES, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 03/11/13. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 1881 East Ave., Rochester, NY 14610. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Operation of restaurant. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of KAYJOR PROPERTIES, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 03/11/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Corporation Service Co., 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207-2543, regd. agent upon whom and at which process may be served. Purpose: Any lawful activity.

[ NOTICE ]

[ NOTICE ]

Notice of Formation of CRESCENT BEACH RESTAURANT AND HOTEL LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 03/20/13. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 1372 Edgemere Dr., Rochester, NY 14612. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity.

Notice of Formation of KREAG-WOOD EAST, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 3/21/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, c/o Todd Clicquennoi, 44 Exchange Blvd., Rochester, NY 14614. Purpose: any lawful activity.

[ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Faith Performances, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed

[ NOTICE ] NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY

cont. on page 38

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Legal Ads > page 37 COMPANY. NAME: 5435 WEST RIDGE ROAD, LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 04/16/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to the LLC, 122 Sherwood Drive, Hilton, New York 14468. Purpose: For any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY. NAME: BITACHON PROPERTIES AT ROCHESTER, LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 11/08/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to the LLC, 1911 Avenue L, Brooklyn, New York 11230. Purpose: For any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] NOTICE OF FORMATION of NFE/GREENWOOD TERRACE, LLC (“LLC”) Art. of Org. filed with NY Secretary of State (“NYSOS”) on 9/12/2002, pursuant to LLC Law Section 203. Office location: Monroe County. NYSOS is designated as service of process agent for LLC. NYSOS shall mail copy of process served to:

Chamberlain, D’Amanda, etal., Attn: Jerry R. Greenfield, Esq., 1600 Crossroads Bldg., Two State St., Rochester, NY 14614. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] NOTICE OF FORMATION of NFE/ LEISURE VILLAGE, LLC (“LLC”) Art. of Org. filed with NY Secretary of State (“NYSOS”) on 9/12/2002, pursuant to LLC Law Section 203. Office location: Monroe County. NYSOS is designated as service of process agent for LLC. NYSOS shall mail copy of process served to: Chamberlain, D’Amanda, etal., Attn: Jerry R. Greenfield, Esq., 1600 Crossroads Bldg., Two State St., Rochester, NY 14614. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] NOTICE OF FORMATION of NFE/ MARINE MEMORIAL, LLC (“LLC”) Art. of Org. filed with NY Secretary of State (“NYSOS”) on 9/12/2002, pursuant to LLC Law Section 203. Office location: Monroe County. NYSOS is designated as service of process agent for LLC. NYSOS shall mail copy of process served to: Chamberlain, D’Amanda, etal., Attn: Jerry R. Greenfield, Esq., 1600 Crossroads Bldg., Two State St., Rochester, NY 14614. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] NOTICE OF FORMATION of NFE/ PINEVIEW, LLC (“LLC”) Art. of Org. filed with NY Secretary

of State (“NYSOS”) on 9/12/2002, pursuant to LLC Law Section 203. Office location: Monroe County. NYSOS is designated as service of process agent for LLC. NYSOS shall mail copy of process served to: Chamberlain, D’Amanda, etal., Attn: Jerry R. Greenfield, Esq., 1600 Crossroads Bldg., Two State St., Rochester, NY 14614. Purpose: any lawful activities.

of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 03/15/13. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 29 Leland Rd., Rochester, NY 14617. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity.

[ NOTICE ]

Notice of Formation of THE RED FERN CAFE, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State on 3/4/13. Office location: Monroe County. Principal business address: 223 Dartmouth Street, #3, Rochester, New York 14607. Secy. of State designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. Secy. of State shall mail process to: 223 Dartmouth Street, #3, Rochester, New York 14607. Purpose: any lawful activity.

NOTICE OF FORMATION of NFE/ WILLIAMS COURT, LLC (“LLC”) Art. of Org. filed with NY Secretary of State (“NYSOS”) on 9/12/2002, pursuant to LLC Law Section 203. Office location: Monroe County. NYSOS is designated as service of process agent for LLC. NYSOS shall mail copy of process served to: Chamberlain, D’Amanda, etal., Attn: Jerry R. Greenfield, Esq., 1600 Crossroads Bldg., Two State St., Rochester, NY 14614. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Northern Attachments LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 2/20/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 741 Maple Dr., Webster, NY 14580. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of PEARTREE HEALTH STRATEGIES LLC. Arts.

Adult Services

[ NOTICE ]

[ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of VALLEYCREST CONSULTING LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 1/17/2013. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o The LLC, 156 Valley Crest Road, Rochester NY 14616. Purpose: any lawful act. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Zitka Island, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 2/28/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Timothy Farrell, 854 Esjay Drive, Victor, NY 14564. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] RENT FROM US, LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 6/8/2012. Office in Monroe Co. SSNY desig. agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to Marchioni & Associates, 2024 W. Henrietta Rd., Ste. 3G, Rochester, NY 14623. Purpose: Any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] RIVER CITY AIRSOFT CLUB LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 2/11/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against

38 CITY APRIL 24-30, 2013

the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 351 Huffer Rd., Hilton, NY 14468. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] SHIRE SENIOR LIVING LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 3/7/13. Office in Monroe Co. SSNY design. Agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to The LLC 2515 Culver Road Rochester, NY 14609. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] SYANDA GROUP LLC (LLC) filed Arts. of Org. with NY Secy. of State (SS) on 4/11/13. LLC’s office is in Monroe Co. SS is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS shall mail a copy of any process to 620 Park Avenue, Suite 157, Rochester, NY 14607. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] YARIV PAZ, LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 4/5/13. Office in Monroe Co. SSNY desig. agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 2255 Lyell Ave., Rochester, NY 14606, which is also the principal business location. Purpose: Any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] YP ROCHESTER 1, LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 4/5/13. Office in Monroe Co. SSNY desig. agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 2255 Lyell Ave., Rochester, NY 14606, which is also the principal business location. Purpose: Any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] Direct4U Marketing & Telecom Solutions LLC filed Articles of Organization with the New York Department of State on 2/20/13. Its office is located in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent of the Company upon whom process against it may be served and a copy of any process shall be mailed to 42 Matthews Drive, Fairport, NY 14450. The purpose of the Company is marketing services. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] Name: CHRISTOPHER J. CALABRESE, P.L.L.C.

Arts. Of Org. filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 04/04/2013. Office Location: Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to: C/O CHRISTOPHER J. CALABRESE, P.L.L.C., 45 Exchange Street, Rochester, New York 14614. Purpose: Any Lawful Purpose. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] Name: CONSUMER SERVICES OF WESTERN NY LLC. Arts. Of Org. filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 03/13/2013. Office Location: Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to: C/O CONSUMER SERVICES OF WESTERN NY LLC, One East Main Street, 10th Floor, Rochester, New York 14614. Purpose: Any Lawful Purpose. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] Notice of Formation of Wood Team Limo, LLC. Articles of Organization filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on March 8, 2013. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to principal business location: The LLC, 2171 Monroe Avenue, Rochester, NY 14618. Purpose: any lawful activity [ NOTICE OF FORMATION ACCURET LLC ] Articles of Organization filed with Secretary of State of NY (“SSNY”) on 03/21/2013. Office in Monroe County. SSNY designated agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to ACCURET LLC, C/O JOHN S. HERBRAND, ESQ., ONE CHASE SQUARE, SUITE 1900, ROCHESTER, NY 14604. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION HOUND HAVEN HOTEL LLC ] Articles of Organization filed with Secretary of State of NY (“SSNY”) on 01/05/2005. Office in Monroe County. SSNY designated agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to

HOUND HAVEN HOTEL LLC, 1259 LAWRENCE RD., HILTON, NY 14468. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF 1744 MANITOU ROAD, LLC ] The name of the Limited Liability Company is 1744 Manitou Road, LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the New York Secretary of State on 3/20/13. The office of the LLC is in Monroe County. The New York Secretary of State is designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. The Secretary of State shall mail a copy of such process to 152 Snowy Owl Ridge, Rochester, NY 14612, The LLC is organized to engage in any lawful activity for which an LLC may be formed under NY LLC Law. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY ] GAMACA HOLDINGS, LLC has filed Articles of Organization with the Secretary of State on March 7, 2013. Its office is located in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent upon whom process against it may be served and a copy of any process will be mailed to 508 Pipeline Way, Webster, NY 14580. Its business is to engage in any lawful activity for which limited liability companies may be organized under Section 203 of the New York Limited Liability Company Act. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY ] The name of the Limited Liability Company is 1349 South Avenue Properties, LLC. (the Company). The Articles of Organization of the Company were filed with the Secretary of State on March 14, 2013. The office of the Company within the State of New York is in the County of Monroe. The Secretary of State of the State of New York is hereby designated as Agent of the Company for the purpose of service of Process. The address to which the Secretary of State shall mail a copy of any process against the Company served upon him/her is PO Box 93031, Rochester, NY 14692. The character and purpose of the business of the Company shall be purchase,

remodeling , sale or rental of residential units. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF VISTA PROPERTY MANAGEMENT, LLC ] The name of the Limited Liability Company is Vista Property Management, LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the New York Secretary of State on 3/13/13. The office of the LLC is in Monroe County. The New York Secretary of State is designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. The Secretary of State shall mail a copy of such process to PO Box 77339, Rochester, NY 14617, The LLC is organized to engage in any lawful activity for which an LLC may be formed under NY LLC Law. [ NOTICES ] Index No. 13/1704 Summons SUPREME COURT OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF MONROE LINDA J. STEWART Plaintiff v. JAMES F. STEWART, JR 95 Sandcastle Drive Rochester, New York 14622 And EAGLE ONE INVESTMENTS, LLC Defendants TO DEFENDANT JAMES F. STEWART, JR.: You are hereby summoned and required to submit to plaintiff’s attorneys your answering papers on this motion within the time provided in the Notice of Motion annexed hereto. In case of your failure to submit answering papers, summary judgment will be taken against you by default for the relief demanded in the Notice of Motion. The basis of the venue designated is the residence of defendant James F. Stewart, Jr., 95 Sandcastle Drive, Rochester, New York 14622. Dated: February 13, 2013 CHAMBERLAIN D’AMANDA OPPENHEIMER & GREENFIELD LLP Henry R. Ippolito, Esq. Attorneys for Plaintiff 1600 Crossroads Building Two State Street Rochester, New York 146141397 Telephone: (585) 232-3730 TO: JAMES F. STEWART, JR. Defendant 95 Sandcastle Drive Rochester, New York 14622 Index No. 13/1704 NOTICE OF MOTION FOR SUMMARY JUDGMENT IN LIEU OF COMPLAINT SUPREME COURT OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF MONROE LINDA J. STEWART Plaintiff v.


Legal Ads JAMES F. STEWART, JR. EAGLE ONE INVESTMENTS, LLC Defendants PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that upon the Summons, Dated February 13, 2013, and the affidavit of Henry R. Ippolito, Esq., sworn to on February 13, 2013, the plaintiff will move this Court at a Special Term thereof, the Hon. John J. Ark presiding at the Hall of Justice, 99 Exchange Boulevard, Rochester, New York on May 22, 2013 at 9:30 a.m. or as soon thereafter as counsel can be heard, for an Order pursuant to CPLR 3213 directing the entry of judgment for the plaintiff against James F. Stewart, Jr., making a judgment of the Circuit Court of the Eighth Judicial Circuit of Illinois, Adams County, Quincy, Illinois, entered on October 2, 2012, against defendant James F. Stewart, Jr., a judgment of the State of New York, and ordering judgment against defendant James F. Stewart, Jr. in the amount of Six Hundred Fifty-two Thousand One Hundred Thirty-three and 45/100 Dollars ($652,133.45) in favor of the plaintiff, Linda J. Stewart, with expenses and court costs in the Circuit Court of the Eighth Judicial Circuit of Illinois, Adams County, in the amount of Five Hundred Seventy-four and 40/100 Dollars ($574.40), together with interest from October 2, 2012, and the costs and disbursement of this action. TAKE FURTHER NOTICE that all answering papers shall be served on the undersigned on or before the twentieth (20th) day after personal delivery of the Summons to you. Dated: February 13, 2013 CHAMBERLAIN D’AMANDA OPPENHEIMER & GREENFIELD LLP Henry R. Ippolito, Esq. Attorneys for Plaintiff 1600 Crossroads Building Two State Street Rochester, New York 146141397 Telephone: (585) 232-3730 TO: JAMES F. STEWART, JR. Defendant 95 Sandcastle Drive Rochester, New York 14622 EAGLE ONE INVESTMENTS, LLC Index No. 13/1704 AFFIDAVIT SUPREME COURT OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF MONROE LINDA J. STEWART Plaintiff v JAMES F. STEWART, JR. and EAGLE ONE INVESTMENTS, LLC Defendants STATE OF NEW YORK ss.: COUNTY OF MONROE HENRY R. IPPOLITO, being duly sword,

deposes and says: 1. I am an attorney licensed by the State of New York, and I am a member of Chamberlain D’Amanda Oppenheimer & Greenfield LLP, attorneys for the plaintiff. 2. I make this affidavit in support of a motion for summary judgment in lieu of complaint based upon my personal knowledge, the plaintiff’s records, and the records of the original forum. 3. This is an action to convert a judgment entered in favor of the plaintiff, Linda J. Stewart, against defendant James F. Stewart, Jr., on October 2, 2012 in the Circuit Court of the Eighth Judicial Circuit of Illinois, Adams County, the Honorable Scott E. Walden presiding, into a New York State judgment. 4, Attached as Exhibit A is a court authenticated and exemplified copy of the Illinois default judgment. It bears the stamp “Filed October 2, 2012.” The inside of the cover bears a certification from Lori R. Geschwandner, the Clerk of the Circuit Court, that she has compared the default judgment attached as Exhibit A with the original judgment on file and that it is a true copy. 5. The cover backing also contains the certification by the Honorable Scott H. Walden, a Judge of the Court, who granted the default judgment against defendant James F. Stewart, Jr., on October 2, 2012, that Lori R. Geschwandner’s signature in her certificate is true and genuine, and that on the date of her certificate, February 4, 2013, she was the duly elected Clerk of the Court, and that full faith and credit are due to all her official acts. 6. Finally, the cover backing contains a certificate by Lori R. Geschwandner that Scott H. Walden’s signature is true and genuine, and that at the time of his signing, February 4, 2013, he was a duly qualified and acting Judge of the Circuit Court of the Eighth Judicial Circuit of Illinois in and for Adams County, and that full faith and credit are due his acts. 7. As a judgment of a sister state, it is entitled by the United States Constitution to full faith and credit by New York State. Since it was obtained by default in appearance by defendant James F. Stewart, Jr., however, the summary enforcement filing procedure of CPLR

Article 54 cannot be used. Accordingly, the procedures of CPLR Section 3213, motion for Summary Judgment in Lieu of Complaint, are being used. The default judgment is unsatisfied in whole, the amount of $652,133.45 plus interest from October 2, 2012 remains unpaid, and enforcement of the judgment has not been stayed. 8. The judgment debtor is James F. Stewart, Jr., and his last known address is 95 Sandcastle Drive, Rochester, New York14622. WHEREFORE, deponent requests that summary judgment be granted: 1. Making the State of Illinois judgment into a New York State judgment entitled to all enforcement procedures as a judgment of the Supreme Court of the State of New York. 2. Allowing the entry of judgment against defendant James F. Stewart, Jr., in the amount of $652,133.45, plus Illinois expenses and court costs in the amount of $574.40, plus interest from October 2, 2012, together with the New York costs and disbursements of this action. Henry R. Ippolito Sworn to before me this 13th day of February, 2013. Notary Public K. WADE EATON Notary Public, State of New York Monroe County Commission Expires July 22, 2015 Exhibit A DEFAULT JUDGMENT No. 12CH-31 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE EIGHTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF ILLINOIS, ADAMS COUNTY IN PROBATE Filed Oct 02 2012 Randy E. Frese Clerk Circuit Court 8th Judicial Circuit ILLINOIS, ADAMS CO.LINDA J. STEWART, Plaintiff,vs. JAMES F. STEWART Jr. and EAGLE ONE INVESTMENTS, LLC, Defendants, Now, on this 2nd day of October, this cause comes on for prove up hearing. Plaintiff appears by her attorney, RaNae A. Dunham Inghram, and Defendant, James F. Stewart Jr. having been duly served with notice and failing to appear after having been three times called in open court to plead, answer or otherwise appear. NOW, THEREFORE, upon motion of Plaintiff, it is ORDERED, as follows:1. Judgment is entered for Plaintiff, Linda J. Stewart and against James F. Stewart Jr. in the amount of six hundred and fifty two thousand, one hundred thirty three dollars and forty five cents ($652,133.45), and expenses and court

costs in the amount of five hundred seventy four dollars and forty cents ($574.40). 2. Defendant, James F. Stewart, Jr. is hereby ordered to render a full and complete accounting of all his actions as trustee of the Linda J. Stewart irrevocable Trust (“Trust”), including an accounting as to all moneys and properties received and disbursed by him, all income collected by him in the administration of the Trust, and all charges for compensation made by him against the trust property. Defendant is to deliver said accounting to RaNae A. Dunham Inghram, attorney for Plaintiff. 3. James F. Stewart Jr. is hereby ordered to deliver any remaining Trust funds, passbooks, checking accounts, certificates of deposit, and any other Trust property in his possession to Roxanne J. McCarron, successor trustee. 4. A permanent injunction is hereby entered against Defendant James F. Stewart Jr. Defendant James F. Stewart Jr., his agents and assigns are hereby permanently enjoined and ordered not to withdraw, encumber, transfer, or in any manner to deal with the assets of the Trust. 5.The Trust is hereby reformed to remove James F. Stewart, Jr. and any issue of Defendant James F. Stewart, Jr. as beneficiaries. 6. The injunction against Eagle One Investments, LLC is hereby lifted as to successor trustee Roxanne Jewel McCarron for all purposes delineated in the Trust. 7. Assessment of attorney’s fees reserved. ENTER: October 2, 2012 Thomas J. Ortbal Judge Pc: RaNae A. Dunham Inghram Roxanne McCarron James F. Stewart, Jr.

Fun

[ PUBLICATION NOTICE OF ORGANIZATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY ] The name of the Limited Liability Company is 997 Beahan Road LLC; its Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State on March 1, 2013; the County within New York in which its office is to be located is Monroe; the Secretary of State has been designated as agent upon whom process may be served; the post office address to which the Secretary of State shall mail process is 369 Bostwick Road, Phelps, NY 14532; the purpose of its business is to conduct any lawful business under law.

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April 24-30 - City Newspaper