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EVENTS: EARTH DAY EVENTS, ROC THE RUNWAY 23 COMMENT: JUST TAXES

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RESTAURANT REVIEW: PEACHES CAFE 13 CLASSICAL: TRIPLE-PIANO MOZART CONCERT 22 THEATER REVIEW: “LEAVING IOWA” AT DOWNSTAIRS CAB 26 FILM: “THE CABIN IN THE WOODS” 32 CROSSWORD, NEWS OF THE WEIRD 43

A Thousand Shades of Cold • Sports • Lou Gramm • Eastman Repertory Singers • Bassnectar • and more music, page 14 •

Greater Rochester’s Alternative Newsweekly

Vol 41 No 32

News. Music. Life.

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Surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy: we’ve had the same options for years now.”

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NEWS, PAGE 4

Affordable housing dogs College Town. NEWS, PAGE 5

Interviews with superintendent finalists. NEWS, PAGE 6

Preview: 2012 Rochester Film Festival. FILM, PAGE 33

City Newspaper’s Cultural Crawl. GUIDE INSIDE

COVER STORY | BY JEREMY MOULE | PAGE 8 | ILLUSTRATION BY MATT DETURCK

Climate change: upsetting the balance Nature is an intricate and finely-tuned balancing act. Mess with one aspect of it, and big — and unanticipated — changes can occur. Climate change is altering the balance of nature. It’s driving up temperatures and forcing shifts in precipitation patterns. These changes, in turn, are causing changes in ecosystems. Many of the changes are subtle, for now. But animals and plants could shift their ranges, disappearing from places they’ve historically called home. And new invasive plants, insects, and pathogens could move in to territories they’ve previously found inhospitable.

Earth has experienced climate shifts before, but they’ve historically occurred over thousands of years. Temperatures are now increasing at an unprecedented rate. And human activities are at least partly responsible, especially the consumption of fossil fuels, which emit greenhouse gases. The animals and plants that have evolved over many generations for current conditions are facing substantial changes in less than a century. And each potential change hinges on other factors which, themselves, are variable. This is the first in an occasional series on the regional effects of climate change.


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Feedback We welcome your comments. Send them to themail@rochester-citynews.com, or post them on our website, rochestercitynewspaper.com, our Facebook page, or our Twitter feed, @roccitynews. We edit selections for publication in print.

Housing in College Town

“If City Council insists we must have affordable housing, let it be for medical students or young professionals trying to pay off student loans” (a southeast resident’s comment in “Affordable Housing Dogs College Town”). While this may sound reasonable, I think it verges on illegal discrimination. You can’t pick and choose who can move into a particular neighborhood. If you can decide which poor people you want to live in your community, then why not just decide which race? Or which religion? Illegal is illegal, regardless of what rationale you use to justify it. Kudos to Lovely Warren for fighting for the people of Rochester.

197 PARK AVENUE 442-4293 WWW.HOGANSHIDEAWAY.COM

JOHN MCGILL

Posted on rochestercitynewspaper.com Like it or not, low-income housing is a surefire way to drag down any area that may hold promise (“Affordable Housing Dogs College Town”). That said, if the city is paying for it, Ms. Warren’s point is valid. UR needs to ante up. J

Posted on rochestercitynewspaper.com WE’RE BLOGGING EVERY WEEKDAY ABOUT LOCAL, STATE & NATIONAL ISSUES

Brooks and Slaughter College Town Fracking New York casinos The Supreme Court Romney and Obama ANYTHING THAT HAS US THINKING THE CITY NEWSPAPER

NEWS BLOG

J O I N I N T H E C O V E R S AT I O N AT

w w w. r o c h e s t e r c i t y n e w s p a p e r . c o m / N E W S / B L O G

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APRIL 18-24, 2012

There’s a saying that “you are liberal because you can afford to be.” College Town is a highprofile project; let’s charge full market rate and pay back any loans or invested dollars as quickly as possible. This is not the place for “affordable” housing, which is “subsidized” housing. We have provided that in our city for all our citizens of need. Not everyone who reads City Newspaper is hung up in the 1 percent bull. Life is not always on a level playing field, and we have gone way too far with subsidies that don’t return the investment. RICHARD ROWE

Posted on rochestercitynewspaper.com

Grading schools

(On “State Report Shows Little Progress in City Schools,” News Blog) One major problem with reports like this one (and the subsequent reporting on the reports) is the emphasis on math and English. While math and English

are important subjects, the schools are emphasizing them to the detriment of other subjects that can compliment math and English – but only if they’re respected. At many middle schools, it is common knowledge that students do not need to pass science or social studies to pass the grade. As long as their English and math grades are good enough, the administration will move them on to the next grade. The result is the extraordinarily high failure rates in ninthgrade science and social studies. Students arrive in high school only caring about math and English scores and not realizing how important other subjects are in high school. We can tell them until they’re blue in the face, but until they experience failure, too many don’t realize, and at that point the damage is done. Whatever the positives or negatives this report has to say about the district, the (over)emphasis on math and English is damaging in the long term to the students we seek to help. YUGOBOY

Posted on rochestercitynewspaper.com

The search for a superintendent

This was a “search” like the first search for MCC’s presidency in ‘08. And surprise, surprise, the interim is doing one heck of a job! Why bother going through this whole thing? We’ll just drop the “interim” part. It angers me that the board allowed Vargas to apply; the interim was NOT supposed to be able to. But I doubt enough people care, and even if they did, it’s irrelevant, because they don’t get a vote. But never let it be said that only Republicans think of Rochester as Smugtown. SEAN

Posted on rochestercitynewspaper.com This was not an open process. The board LIED to this community. You said that the interim would not be allowed to apply, and you told candidate after candidate that inquired about this that if they applied they would not be eligible for permanent job. Had you been forthright in the beginning, when hiring the interim, saying that the interim would be allowed to apply, other candidates probably would have applied for that position. The person sitting in the chair always gets the advantage. LISA JOHNSON

Posted on rochestercitynewspaper.com

One of the reasons to hire a search firm is to identify potential candidates and approach them about applying for the position. This is how the search can be opened up – by finding people who might not actively be looking for a position but who would be a good fit for the RCSD. Two candidates, with one the interim, is not a choice. It’s more important to get it right than to meet a deadline. The search committee must reconvene and the search firm must do its job, or they should find another firm. LAUREN VICKER

Posted on rochestercitynewspaper.com

Tom Richards’ first year

Well, Tom Richards managed to make a big controversial mess out of the Paetec-Midtown project, wasting millions in taxpayers’ hardearned money (“Year One: How’s He Doing?”). There is some good news about something being built by a company on the site, but no one is clear as to what is going to go in the remainder of the Midtown site. Crime is another big issue; the mayor has not explained in full detail what he is going to do, especially in the area of gang-related murders. Overall, he is doing ok and not an outstanding job. DAVID BERGMANN

Posted on rochestercitynewspaper.com Midtown was a dying white elephant. Someone was going to have to pay to get rid of the asbestos and take it down. The city was in no position to do that; the state was. The “deal” with Paetec brought the state money in, not a bad result for the city. We now have land that can be developed rather than an abandoned white elephant loaded with asbestos. XCTRAVELER

Posted on rochestercitynewspaper.com The only structural problem the city has is how we give away our tax base with all these Pilots and other agreements. The loan College Town wants would be paid for by the reduced property taxes the project would pay. We’re broke but giving away $20 million in tax revenue? The rewatering of Broad Street isn’t dead; they are still planning it, along with the marina in Charlotte. Our financially strapped city would be flush with money if they’d stop the give-aways and get out of property development. DOWNTOWNDUDE

Posted on rochestercitynewspaper.com

News. Music. Life. Greater Rochester’s Alternative Newsweekly April 18-24, 2012 Vol 41 No 32 250 North Goodman Street Rochester, New York 14607-1199 themail@rochester-citynews.com phone (585) 244-3329 fax (585) 244-1126 rochestercitynewspaper.com Publishers: William and Mary Anna Towler Editor: Mary Anna Towler Asst. to the publishers: Matt Walsh Editorial department themail@rochester-citynews.com Features editor: Eric Rezsnyak News editor: Christine Carrie Fien Staff writers: Tim Louis Macaluso, Jeremy Moule Music editor: Willie Clark Music writer: Frank De Blase Calendar editor: Rebecca Rafferty Contributing writers: Kate Antoniades, Paloma Capanna, Casey Carlsen, Roman Divezur, George Grella, Susie Hume, Andy Klingenberger, Dave LaBarge, Kathy Laluk, Michael Lasser, James Leach, Ron Netsky, Dayna Papaleo, Rebecca Rafferty, David Yockel Jr. Editorial intern: Deb Schleede, Alex Steingraber Art department artdept@rochester-citynews.com Production manager: Max Seifert Designers: Aubrey Berardini, Matt DeTurck Photographers: Frank De Blase, Matt DeTurck, Michael Hanlon Advertising department ads@rochester-citynews.com Advertising sales manager: Betsy Matthews Account executives: Tom Decker, Annalisa Iannone, William Towler Classified sales representatives: Christine Kubarycz, Tracey Mykins Operations/Circulation info@rochester-citynews.com Circulation Manager: Katherine Stathis Distribution: Andy DiCiaccio, David Riccioni, Northstar Delivery City Newspaper is available free of charge. Additional copies of the current issue may be purchased for $1, payable in advance at the City Newspaper office. City Newspaper may be distributed only by authorized distributors. No person may, without prior written permission of City Newspaper, take more than one copy of each weekly issue. City (ISSN 1551-3262) is published weekly by WMT Publications, Inc. Periodical postage paid at Rochester, NY (USPS 022-138). Send address changes to City, 250 North Goodman Street, Rochester, NY 14607. City is a member of the Association of Alternative Newsweeklies and the New York Press Association. Subscriptions: $35.00 ($30.00 for senior citizens) for one year. Add $10 yearly for out-of-state subscriptions: add $30 yearly for foreign subscriptions. Due to the initial high cost of establishing new subscriptions, refunds for fewer than ten months cannot be issued. Copyright by WMT Publications Inc., 2011 - all rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, photocopying, recording or by any information storage retrieval system without permission of the copyright owner.


GUEST COMMENTARY | BY RICHARD S. GILBERT

Tax facts and just taxes One of the missing dimensions in the debate over the federal budget is justice – simple fairness. I believe that good fortune obligates. Those who have fared well in our economy have a moral obligation to contribute more to the common good, not as a punishment for success, but as a responsibility to our community: our fair share. Congressman Paul’s Ryan’s reverse Robin Hood budget, granting more tax cuts to the rich by cutting programs for the poor, takes a different approach. Ryan has confessed admiration for the philosophy of the late Ayn Rand, whose Atlas Shrugged protagonist John Galt said, “I swear – by my life and my love of it – that I will never live for the sake of another man, nor ask another man to live for mine.” Rand once said: “Capitalism and altruism are incompatible. They are philosophical opposites; they cannot co-exist in the same man, or in the same society.” Adam Smith’s “invisible hand” is sometimes shaped like the fist of capitalism’s “creative destruction.” Our vaunted free-market ethic is the “devil take the hindmost.” Our no-holdsbarred society becomes increasingly fractured in the yawning gap between rich and middle class, and middle class and poor. Yet some call Ryan “courageous” for this proposal. What astonishes me is the whining I hear about our tax burden as Americans. We are one of the least taxed of the industrial democracies; only Chile and Mexico have lower federal tax burdens as a percentage of GDP. As a share of the nation’s economy, we pay the lowest federal taxes since the 1950’s. Marginal tax rates for the wealthiest have plummeted from 90 percent under a Republican president to 35 percent on earned income, but only 15 percent for capital gains. The tax rate paid by all Americans since the beginning of the recession in 2007 has fallen 26 percent; one-third of the often-vilified stimulus package went for tax cuts. Many wealthy individuals and profitable corporations exploit loopholes and pay nothing. Yet we have developed a victimhood mentality, fed by politicians who have never seen a tax cut they didn’t like or a tax hike they didn’t hate. Tax cutting has become an article of religious faith. Tax cuts are virtuous; tax increases are sinful. I think of the tombstone inscription, “Born a man; died a taxpayer.”

We have a stark choice: a winnertake-all policy, which further splinters our already fractured society, or a policy based on community responsibility.” When you count only the federal income tax, the wealthy pay a lion’s share; they have most of the money. But when you take state and local, property, sales, FICA, and other mostly regressive taxes into account, people pay approximately proportionate to their incomes. The share of total taxes paid by the richest 1 percent (21.6 percent) is almost identical to that group’s share of total income (21 percent). The share of total taxes paid by the poorest fifth of Americans (2.1 percent) is only slightly less than this group’s share of total income (3.4 percent). The total effective tax rate for the richest 1 percent (29 percent) is only slightly more than the total effective tax rate for the middle fifth of taxpayers (25.2 percent). Overall we are very close to a de facto flat tax. These are tax facts to contemplate as we pay our taxes this election season. And there are just taxes we ought to support: a fair tax policy based on ability to pay. We have a stark choice before us: a winnertake-all policy, which further splinters our already fractured society, or a policy based on community responsibility, in which we understand our obligation to the common good. Poet T. S. Eliot puts it well: “When the Stranger says: ‘What is the meaning of this city?’ … What will you answer? ‘We all dwell together to make money from each other’? or ‘This is a community’?” Richard S. Gilbert is a retired Unitarian Universalist minister and is president of Interfaith Impact of New York State. Mary Anna Towler’s Urban Journal is on break and will return next week.

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City 


[ news from the week past ]

Brooks out-raises Slaughter

Reports filed with the Federal Elections Commission show that Republican Maggie Brooks has so far received more in campaign contributions than Democrat Louise Slaughter. Brooks is challenging Slaughter for the 25th congressional seat. Brooks reported that she took in more than $250,000 to Slaughter’s $205,000. But Slaughter has more cash on hand, $529,800, compared to Brooks’ $252,000.

Dems want to end intercept

County Legislature Democrats have introduced legislation to end Monroe’s participation in a Medicaid-sales tax swap. This year’s state budget has a provision that would let the county opt out. The reason: the state is phasing-in a takeover of counties’ Medicaid cost growth, which should be fully implemented in 2015.

Majority Leader Morelle?

Rumors are swirling in Albany and Rochester that Democrat Joe Morelle could be the next majority leader in the State Assembly. The appointment would come via Assembly

 City

APRIL 18-24, 2012

Speaker Sheldon Silver. The position will be vacant in January.

News

VisitRochester’s CEO retiring

Ed Hall, CEO of Monroe County’s tourism agency, VisitRochester, will retire later this year. Hall has been with the organization for 15 years. He is credited with helping to build a regional approach to marketing Rochester and the Finger Lakes to attract tourists from around the country. Hall was inducted into the National Tourism Foundation’s Hall of Fame in 2000.

HEALTH CARE | BY TIM LOUIS MACALUSO

Group pledges to end cancer by 2020

Landmark surgery

The cardiac team at the University of Rochester Medical Center implanted an artificial heart in 49year-old Gaetano Orlando. Orlando played hockey with the Rochester Americans and Buffalo Sabres. The device is a bridge for transplant patients who suffer from some forms of end-stage heart failure, but a transplanted organ isn’t an immediate option. There are more than 3,100 people waiting for heart transplants in the US. The URMC is one of 30 sites in the country offering the technology.

The American public needs to demand more results and accountability for our cancer research dollars, says Gary Mervis, founder of Cancer Mission 2020. PHOTO BY MIKE HANLON

It’s been decades since former President Richard Nixon declared war on cancer. Enormous strides have been made in preventing and treating the disease, but 11,000 Americans still die from cancer weekly. And cancer is now the leading cause of death in Monroe County, surpassing heart disease. Cancer Mission 2020 got its start in 2010 when Gary Mervis met with a group of community leaders and together they vowed to wipe-out cancer by the end of the decade. It may sound like a daunting challenge, but Mervis, a long-time children’s health advocate and founder of Camp Good Days and Special Times, disagrees. He took on the challenge after picking up three major daily newspapers in the Tampa airport. “Between these three dailies, there were nine pages on the swine flu epidemic, and not even a word about cancer,” Mervis says. “We have the ability to do this, but we have got to get the American people to put cancer on the front burner.”

By increasing public awareness, Mervis says he hopes CM2020 can create a sense of urgency and accountability. The organization has convened several meetings involving city, county, and congressional leaders as well as oncology specialists to draft federal legislation to help fund and expedite cancer research. For instance, more clinical trials are needed and adult cancer patients need greater access to the trials, Mervis says. “Surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy: we’ve had the same options for years now,” Mervis says. “We need to go to the next level.” Mervis says he hopes the bill will be introduced in Congress in January 2013. More information on Cancer Mission 2020: www.cancermission2020.com.


“There’s a market for moderate-income people over there. If you’re a beginning nurse at Strong hospital, you are, in some cases, a low-income individual. Everybody over there is not a neurosurgeon.” [ Mayor Tom Richards speaking about College Town ]

DEVELOPMENT | BY CHRISTINE CARRIE FIEN

4,485 US servicemen and servicewomen, 318 Coalition servicemen and servicewomen, and approximately 106,247 to 116,068 Iraqi civilians have been killed in Iraq from the beginning of the war and occupation to April 13. No American casualties were reported after November 14. IRAQ TOTALS —

AFGHANISTAN TOTALS

Affordable housing dogs College Town Rochester City Council President Lovely Warren says she will not sign-off on a $20 million loan for College Town on Mt. Hope unless the Lovely Warren. project includes affordable housing. FILE PHOTO “I know that they have to find some sort of balance as far as the numbers are concerned,” Warren says. “But I don’t think that it should be all market-rate apartments when the entire city is going to be footing the bill for this. If you’re putting in city money, then the city should be able to say to the developer, ‘some of these apartments should be affordable.’” College Town is a 500,000-squarefoot project planned for 16 acres on Mt. Hope. Part of the purpose is to bring the University of Rochester, the UR Medical Center, and the surrounding neighborhoods together. Plans for College Town include a Barnes and Noble bookstore, grocery, hotel and conference

Cost of War

center, fitness center, transit station, and shops and restaurants. Plans also include 150 market-rate apartments. Rochester Mayor Tom Richards wants City Council to approve a $20million loan to get College Town moving. It would be a federal loan repaid by the city with money it receives from a tax agreement with College Town’s developers. Richards says the loan is a good investment because College Town would create around 600 permanent jobs. And he says he understands Warren’s point. “There’s a market for moderateincome people over there,” Richards says. “If you’re a beginning nurse at Strong hospital, you are, in some cases, a lowincome individual. Everybody over there is not a neurosurgeon.” Although it’s ultimately the developers’ decision whether or not to include it in the project, Richards says College Town should have affordable housing. Where Warren may run into trouble is with the neighborhood. Dan Hurley, president of the Upper Mount Hope Neighborhood Association, is urging neighbors to contact Council members

about the affordable housing issue, whether they’re in favor or opposed. “If City Council insists we must have affordable housing, then let it be for medical students or young professionals trying to pay off student loans,” Hurley wrote in a letter to neighbors. “[Or] patients with high medical costs in need of some form of financial assistance.” Hurley says the neighborhood is trying to come up with progressive ways to meet affordable housing needs, “instead of just the traditional, ‘Well, let’s just let anybody who’s HUD or Section 8 or whatever move in.” Warren says that Hurley doesn’t get to choose who lives in College Town and who doesn’t. “He wants to be able to choose what poor people live where, and you don’t get that choice,” she says. “I don’t think that’s logical. And I don’t think that’s fair.” Richards says he expects Council to vote on the $20-million loan at its April 24 meeting. Groundbreaking for College Town is expected in November of this year.

1,933 US servicemen and servicewomen and 1,023 Coalition servicemen and servicewomen have been killed in Afghanistan from the beginning of the war and occupation to April 6. Statistics for Afghan civilian casualties are not available. American casualties from April 4 to 11: -- Cpl. Alex Martinez, 21, Elgin, Ill. -- Spc. Antonio C. Burnside, 31, Great Falls, Mont. -- Staff Sgt. Tyler J. Smith, 24, Licking, Mo. -- Constructionman Trevor J. Stanley, 22, Virginia Beach, Va. -- Lance Cpl. Ramon T. Kaipat, 22, Tacoma, Wash. -- Spc. Philip C. S. Schiller, 21, The Colony, Texas —

iraqbodycount.org, icasualties.org, Department of Defense SOURCES:

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EDUCATION | BY TIM LOUIS MACALUSO

The superintendent finalists speak After a long and somewhat controversial search, two finalists are vying to become the Rochester school district’s new superintendent. City recently interviewed the candidates: Andre Spencer, an administrator with the Houston Independent School District, and Bolgen Vargas, a former counselor at Greece Arcadia High School and the RCSD’s interim superintendent. Edited versions of interviews with Spencer and Vargas follow. The complete interviews are at rochestercitynewspaper.com.

Bolgen Vargas. FILE PHOTO

CITY: What are the biggest problems facing students, parents, and the community in the Rochester school district?

Vargas: The district needs to be proactive with children at a very early age. By early age I mean being school ready and continuing to provide them with the social and emotional support they need to have a developmental trajectory that leads to high achievement. We do know from research that when you do not have an early intervention program and you try to intervene in middle or high school, it becomes more difficult to get students to achieve. So, the district needs to make sure that every child is reading at least at the third-grade level by the time they reach that grade. That is a fundamental goal for me, reading. Why? Because we know that if that child is not reading proficiently at the third-grade level, that child has a 74 percent chance of falling behind. If you consider our dropout problems, research and our experience tell us that  City

APRIL 18-24, 2012

unless you provide strong intervention in literacy and math early on, many students get stuck by the time they reach ninth grade. We have a high level of retention in ninth grade because kids come to high school without the skill set they need. If you want student achievement to be measured by graduation rates, college readiness, and career readiness then you’re going to have to strengthen intervention services and support at the elementary level. And that cannot be done, in my view, unless you extend the school day. The fact is that too many of our students need extra support. Imagine if we said to that child and that parent that we are going to step up and provide the support you need, and the week or day you fall behind, we have support available for you. A highly trained individual will help you catch up. At the same time you have to provide social and emotional support with music, arts, and sports. The second challenge is proper allocation of resources. We have to make this organization more effective and efficient in order for us to provide the kind of service and support our children need. Every dollar we spend has to be well-spent.

support to our students, teachers, and principals who try to do the hard work that we’re asking them to do. Evaluations have to be fair. Their aim has to be continuous improvement and a continued learning approach. And unless you’re fair, teachers and parents won’t trust you or follow your lead. We were one of the first five districts in the state to meet the standards for teacher evaluations. How do you increase parent involvement?

We’re trying to improve communication. That is critical. We’re doing better, but we have so much more to do. I want students to know what classes they are going to have by the time they go home for summer break, and I want teachers to know where they are going to be teaching by June. We’re going to have a strong orientation program in each school for parents, to help them set expectations for children. High expectations can’t be a slogan; it has to be demonstrated with support.

We have many schools that the state says are either failing or are in need of improvement. What are the reasons schools fail, and what can you do about it?

We need to be more proactive: you don’t wait for the State Education Department to notify you that your children are failing. We should know way in advance and we should be coming to the situation with a response. Is it possible to support tougher teacher evaluations and still be supportive of teachers?

Great companies provide support, nurturing, and benefits for the people who work for them. And I believe this district will only be great if we provide tremendous

Andre Spencer. PHOTO PROVIDED

CITY: What are the two biggest problems facing students, parents, and the community in the Rochester school district?

Spencer: One would be the graduation rate. I think that is a significant challenge. Another challenge I think Rochester has is really giving students and parents a quality experience in all of its schools.

We can only do that if we make sure students are in attendance every day. The attendance piece is extremely important because we can set goals for graduation, but attendance is going to determine if kids are actually going to graduate. And I would add making sure that the kids are reading, and that they can read at the appropriate level. We have a high number of schools that the state says are either failing or in need of improvement. What are the reasons schools fail, and what can you do about it?

It’s important to look at a variety of factors regarding why a school isn’t doing well. A big piece is the allocation of resources. To give you an example: in Baltimore and Houston, the groups that are struggling the most with reading are our African American and Hispanic boys. When we began to allocate resources, we made sure that we targeted our resources at those two groups. African American and Hispanic boys have the highest dropout rate, the lowest graduation rate, and the highest retention rate. Those are the kids that typically are moved into special education for a variety reasons. Improperly allocating resources is what keeps schools from making the improvements they need to make. The second thing is having quality and effective teachers. Looking at the most important factor critical to a child’s education, it’s the teacher. We need to make sure the teachers we have in front of kids are trained, supported, heard, and that we’re providing them with the resources they need to do the job. We also have to make sure the exact same thing is happening with the principal. There has to be an effective leader at every campus, and that leader has to be visionary, and they have to understand how to use data to support where the resources need to be allocated. What is your view on teacher tenure? Is it something that should happen somewhat automatically? Or should it be reserved for the best teachers?

I’ve worked with unions and negotiated with bargaining units. And I think it’s important that we have fair evaluation systems for teachers, and that teachers are supported in the work that they do. We also need to hear from students, parents, and teachers, and get some


perspective. It’s really important to zero in on the performance level, and how to identify pathways. If we have a teacher who is doing extremely well, that teacher can be on one pathway. If we have a teacher who is struggling, we need to provide support for that teacher. A big problem that happens, especially in urban education, is we have a significant amount of turnover. With that turnover comes a lack of consistency, and we then have a breakdown. We have to make sure that we’re supporting teacher quality and teacher professional development. That doesn’t mean that every teacher will be effective. We’ll have some ineffective teachers and we’ll have to transition them out. When we’ve done all that we can do and provided all the support possible, but a teacher is still an ineffective teacher, we have to transition that teacher out. What would you do to increase parent participation?

To mobilize and engage parents starts with learning about what parents want to see: what’s important to parents? You can do that in a variety of ways. One way is through a parent advisory group. I work with my principals and schools on what is pretty much a survey sheet that spells out as a parent coming into this school, what would you like to engage in? How would you like to help? Parent involvement doesn’t always mean that they have to be in the building. Many working-class parents can’t come to the school mid-day to help out. But they can work to get resources directed into their school.

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t e Clima h a U P S E Tc TING nge THE ENVIRON

MENT

| BY J ERE

MY M OULE

BALANCE

This is the first of an occasional series on climate change. It focuses on the effects that changing temperature and precipitation trends will have on ecosystems. Nature is about balance and climate change is already knocking finely tuned systems out of whack. Future installments will look at the effects on agriculture, the economy, and energy. Pity the painted turtle in our warming world. Anyone who’s spent time around a pond or marsh is familiar with the species, which is common in New York. They’re the turtles you’re likely to see basking on rocks near water. But like many reptiles, painted turtles are temperature sensitive, which means that warmer weather can have profound effects on them. In some cases, that’s not necessarily bad. For example: the turtles grow faster and reach sexual maturity sooner when temperatures are higher, says a landmark report on climate change published earlier this year by the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority. But research cited in the report also says that warmer temperatures correlate with a higher ratio of female turtle hatchlings. And decreasing snow cover can reduce hatchlings’ winter survival rates. So even if the turtles are growing faster and reproducing earlier, hatchling sex ratios and winter survival rates would still affect the viability of turtle populations. Turtles are predators and prey, so their decline would, in turn, affect food webs. This is what climate change does: it knocks natural balances out of whack. Rising average temperatures and changing precipitation patterns are causing shifts in ecosystems and putting native species at risk. The painted turtle is only one example. But the climate is not the only issue that will affect painted turtle populations in the future: development is eliminating or fragmenting some of the turtles’ habitat. “Climate change, in many ways, makes a lot of the stresses on systems potentially an even bigger deal,” says Kristin France, a senior conservation scientist with the Nature Conservancy of Central and Western New York.  City

APRIL 18-24, 2012

Consider invasive species and pests, which are already causing problems for native plants and animals. Changes in climate are enabling them to grow faster or to expand their range. Some insects are also emerging earlier, which has implications for the migratory birds that rely on the region as a stopping point on their journey. Historically, the influx of insects has been timed with the influx of birds that eat them, says June Summers, president of the Genesee Valley Audubon Society. “If we don’t supply them that food because we’re not in sync with their migration, they’re not going to make it,” she says. Earth has seen climate shifts before, but they’ve historically occurred over thousands of years. Now, however, temperatures are increasing at an unprecedented rate. Starting in the 1970’s, average temperatures across New York have been increasing by 0.6 degrees Fahrenheit each decade, says the NYSERDA report. Winter average temperatures are increasing by more than 1.1 degrees Fahrenheit each decade, it says. The same report says that by the 2050’s, annual average temperatures in the Rochester area could be 3 to 5 degrees higher than they were in the 1970’s. The projected increase rises to 4.5 to 8 degrees in the 2080’s. Human activities are driving these rather rapid changes, and the main culprit is carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gas emissions associated with fossil fuel consumption. Carbon dioxide levels are higher now than they’ve been at any time in the past 650,000 years, says a fact sheet from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. And now, the animals and plants that have evolved for current conditions over many generations are facing substantial environmental changes in less than a century.

The hitch is that nobody’s absolutely certain what those changes will be; each potential change hinges on other factors which, themselves, are variable. But scientists have developed many credible predictions of what’s likely to happen, given certain changes. Many of those predictions are based on trends that are already unfolding. The Rochester area is already seeing shifts in precipitation:

how intensely rain and snow falls and when. For example, researchers predict that the Rochester region will have more late-summer dry periods and droughts. And the area is already experiencing more downpours, which tend to be more intense than they were in the past. Eastern hemlocks, like the ones at the Gosnell Big Woods pre Downpours generate surges serve in Webster, could face a growing threat from the hemlock wooly adelgid due to the effects of climate change. of storm water runoff, which wash contaminants into streams, PHOTO by jeremy moule vital protection from predators: the previously ponds, and lakes. In the case of mentioned painted turtle hatchlings, for impermeable surfaces like paved roads or example, or some small mammals. But parking lots, those contaminants could be automotive fluids or salt. Smaller water bodies snow also insulates the soil, which aids in decomposition of dead leaves and plants along can experience water temperature increases with other organic matter. when storm water runs off of nearby sun But snow cover and the associated spring heated pavement. thaw also play an important role in spring Nutrients from fertilizer, which help streamflow and on water supplies later in the accelerate algae growth, are carried by runoff year. Lack of snow cover may actually worsen from lawns and fields. The nutrient pollution summer dry periods and droughts. The dry is a problem for many water bodies in the periods would further stress some animals, Rochester-Finger Lakes region. habitats, and plants. The storm water surges also contribute to stream erosion, which degrades water quality, and they lead to flooding, which can affect habitat and people, especially those who live along water. It’s tough to talk about precipitation in Rochester without bringing up snow: over time, researchers expect less of it in the area. Snow cover provides some species with

Lake Ontario already has problems with near-

shore algae and some effects of climate change could make the situation worse. Take the county’s two public beaches, Ontario Park and Durand-Eastman. The county health department frequently closes continues on page 10


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City 


Climate change continues from page 8

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one or both beaches to swimming, and algae are occasionally at the root of the decision. Algae clumps can be breeding grounds for bacteria, and high pathogen counts can lead to beach closings. Algae can also cloud up the water. Water clarity is another major factor in whether or not you can swim. There are a few factors driving algae growth in the lake: nutrient runoff is one, although local and state environmental and health officials have worked hard to address it. In late March, county health department analyst Charles Knauf told the audience at a Color Brighton Green forum that algae also tends to be worse in years without big winter storms to disrupt growth. The just-passed mild winter could mean that algae blooms will be a bigger problem than normal when the weather warms up, he said. The mild winter and warm early spring aren’t the result of global warming — at least not entirely. Weather patterns fluctuate from year to year, sometimes significantly. Longterm trends are what’s significant. But some experts say the warm winter and spring could be a preview of the region’s future. The Great Lakes’ winter ice cover has declined by more than 70 percent since the 1970’s, says a study published in the February edition of the Journal of Climate. The study says that Lake Ontario has lost 88 percent of its ice cover since 1973 — a rate higher than any of the other lakes. Because of the ice-cover trends, the Rochester area can expect heavier and wetter lake-effect snowstorms, says Mark Lowery, a climate policy analyst with the State Department of Environmental Conservation. “That’ll likely be the trend through about mid century,” he says. “But by mid century it will be generally too warm to have snow, and so those late-winter lake-effect snows will become later winter-early spring heavy rains,” Lowery says. And those rains will, in turn, lead to floods, which will pose threats to aquatic species’ habitat, he says. Other local water bodies are also impacted by climate changes, including Allens Creek, a

tributary of Irondequoit Creek. In 2010, the Town of Penfield commissioned a report on the conditions of Allens Creek, specifically streambank and erosion problems. Land-use changes in the creek’s watershed and development in its floodplains have contributed to those issues, the report says. But the report also says that changes in climate patterns, specifically higher intensity storms, have led to more flooding along the stream corridor. The flooding exacerbates erosion which, like runoff from higher intensity storms, will affect water quality.

Allens Creek is a cool water stream that provides habitat for some trout species as well as spawning salmon. The stream is an important and sensitive ecosystem. Trout are one of the first species to leave a water body when water quality suffers. In general, trout statewide are expected to suffer from the effects of climate change. Warmer air temperatures will translate to warmer water temperatures, forcing the fish out of their historical habitat. In turn, the trout will try to move to cooler water, perhaps in deeper areas of lakes, says the NYSERDA report. The brook trout is of special concern to state officials and angler groups. It’s the state fish and it is especially intolerant of warmer water. Brown and rainbow trout, which aren’t native to New York, will tolerate slightly warmer water than brook trout, though they too prefer cooler temperatures. At the least, climate change may knock some popular sport fish out of their previous habitat. But trout are an important predator fish, and it’s tough to know exactly how their absence will affect the natural balance. Their former habitats could become more attractive to warm-water fish like bass — which, like trout, are predators — and that could also change the ecological balance. Trout could also fall victim to cascading effects, where one problem facing one species snowballs into a group of problems affecting several other species. For example, trout are vulnerable to the loss of eastern hemlock trees, which often grow beside streams and shade the water, keeping it cool. The trees could help offset warmer average temperatures, but they are facing troubles of their own. The eastern hemlock is a common tree

in New York that in the Rochester area is often found mixed in with some common hardwoods. However, warmer summer temperatures — researchers expect more summer heat waves in the future — could stress the trees: weakening, damaging, or even killing them. Drier soils and more frequent droughts could also be harmful to the trees. But the trees are also vulnerable to the hemlock wooly adelgid, an invasive insect that attacks the trees and can eventually kill them. Stress from heat, drought, or other pests can hasten that process. The adelgid is native to Asia and, like other invasives that are wreaking havoc on this continent’s trees, has no North American predators. Infestations have been found in Monroe County, but they’ve been eradicated, says Linda Vera, a spokesperson for the Department of Environmental Conservation Region 8. The last reported infestation was four or five years ago, she says. Warmer temperatures, however, may make it easier for the hemlock wooly adelgid to


expand its range, making it a bigger threat. Other invasives, pests, and pathogens may find warmer temperatures favorable too, and could expand their ranges or populations. “One of the things that’s very helpful for areas that have fairly cold winters is that the freezing controls a number of invasive species,” says Peter Debes, a naturalist and vice chair of the Rochester group of the Sierra Club. Historically, Rochester’s winters have been cold enough to hold back or kill off invasive plants and insects. But warmer weather — especially winters without prolonged deep freezes — puts New York at risk for invaders. For example, diseasecarrying ticks may become more prevalent. Or new invasive plants that aren’t here yet, like kudzu vine, could move in and choke out native plants. Kudzu vine is already in Pennsylvania. One way that animals and plants might adapt to changing

More frequent, intense downpours are associated with climate change, and storm-water runoff exacerbates erosion in streams like Allens Creek. The portion of the creek pictured here is in Penfield. PHOTO by matt deturck

climate and environment is to move. Literally. For example, species like brook trout that are at the southern part of their natural range may try to head north. But habitat fragmentation could make that difficult. It can be tough enough for a speedy deer to cross a road, let alone a turtle to cross an interstate. Environmental officials and organizations recognize this fact. The Nature Conservancy, for example, is trying to establish or improve connections between its larger preserves, says the Conservancy’s France. The Conservancy is especially focused on its Tug Hill Plateau and Adirondacks properties, since many species in those areas — plants and animals — are at the southern edge of their range. The state, too, is trying to improve habitat connections. State fish and wildlife staff are making sure that lower stream sections are connected to cooler upper-stream sections so that trout and other cold-water fish can move if they want to, says the NYSERDA report. Those efforts include designing culverts, bridges, and abutments that allow the fish to swim through. The state and environmental groups are also continuing efforts to address storm water runoff. And they’re scrutinizing land-use policies: development can contribute to runoff problems as well as habitat fragmentation. The Nature Conservancy is working with the state and other partners to diversify its forests and other important forest areas, so if one

tree species disappears, another native tree can replace it. That’s an approach that land stewards will have to take with other species, too. The NYSERDA report says that ecosystems will have to be managed to encourage biodiversity, not necessarily to “maintain indefinitely the exact mix of species present today.” Ultimately what’s necessary is a long-term approach centered on drastically reducing human-caused greenhouse gas emissions. The state is trying to do that through several efforts, whether it’s home energy efficiency programs or participation in a regional capand-trade program for power plant emissions. The current political climate makes it unlikely that any sort of serious, sustained national effort to cut greenhouse gas emissions will occur, however. If the government won’t act, there are changes people can make in their own lives: most being centered on reducing energy consumption. They aren’t new ideas: walking or biking instead of driving, hanging the laundry out to dry instead of using the dryer, and turning down the thermostat and minimizing the use of air conditioning. “We know there are a lot of things that people can do that involve a little bit more human effort that could seriously reduce the amount of carbon emissions we’re producing and reliance on the energy that’s contributing to that,” says the Sierra Club’s Debes.

rochestercitynewspaper.com City 11


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Urban Action This week’s calls to action include the following events and activities. (All are free and open to the public, unless otherwise noted.)

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Sierra Club forum

The Sierra Club will hold its 14th Environmental Forum, “Our Water’s Fragile Future: Hydrofracking, Climate Change, and Privatization,” from 5:30 p.m. to 9 p.m. on Thursday, April 19. Michigan environmental attorney Jim Olson will discuss ways to protect the Great Lakes and other freshwater sites. The event is at First Unitarian Church, 220 South Winton Road. Suggested donation: $3 to $15.

Building a pedestrianfriendly downtown

The Rochester Regional Community Design Center will host “Downtown: It’s About People, Not Projects,” a talk with architect Michael Watkins, at 7 p.m. on Tuesday, April 24. Watkins will appear at Gleason Works Auditorium, 12 City APRIL 18-24, 2012

1000 University Avenue. Tickets are $10 and can be purchased at the door.

Remembering survivors

The Jewish Federation of Greater Rochester will host “Forging New Lives After the Holocaust: Rochester’s Survivor Community” at 7 p.m. on Wednesday, April 18. Phyllis Kasdin, author of “The Future Begins With the Past: An Archives Exhibit of Jewish Rochester,” will discuss the survivor community. The event is at 1200 Edgewood Avenue.

City meeting on Mt. Hope roadwork

The City of Rochester’s Department of Environmental Services will hold a pre-construction meeting for Mt. Hope Avenue reconstruction at 6:30 p.m. on Wednesday, April 25. Sam Priem, the city’s project manager for the work, will lead the meeting. It will be held at St. Anne’s Church in the Social Hall, 1600 Mt. Hope Avenue.

Film on politics and the black community

The Rochester Association of Black Journalists and the Minority Reporter will present “Taken for Granted or Ignored: African Americans and Two Party Politics,” a panel discussion on politics and the African-American community, from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. on Saturday, April 21. The film “Fear of Black Republicans” will be shown. The event is at the Baobab Cultural Center, 728 University Avenue. Suggested donation: $5.

Bike trail talk

NeighborWorks Rochester and the Green Neighborhoods Initiative will present a discussion about a proposed UR-RIT-MCC Bike Corridor at 6 p.m. on Tuesday, April 24. The discussion will be led by Jon Schull, director of the Center for Student Innovation at RIT. The event is at the Staybridge Suites Hotel, 1000 Genesee Street.


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Dining

FOOTWEAR

Fruits of labor Peaches Café 925 Holt Road, Webster 872-1200, peachescafe.biz Tuesday-Friday 9 a.m.-9 p.m., Saturday 8 a.m.-9 p.m., Sunday 8 a.m.-3 p.m. [ REVIEW ] BY JAMES LEACH

If Rochester’s restaurant community has an old guard, Charlie Scanio, more popularly known as “Charlie Brown,” is one of its charter members. Having worked in what he describes as the “hospitality industry” since he was in high school, and as the original owner of that restaurant landmark Charlie Brown’s on Goodman Street, Scanio has been a fixture in the restaurant world for going on 50 years. Even catching up with him to get a quick summary of his life as a restaurateur is a challenge. He recently described himself as a “nonstop perpetualmotion person,” a “long-distance runner” who can — at an age when most folks are considering retiring — be found at his newest restaurant venture, Peaches Café in Webster, from early in the morning until “at least 9 or 10 each night.” To say that Scanio is a busy man is an understatement. To say that he’s good at what he does damns him with faint praise.

Peaches Café is something of a departure for Scanio. Charlie Brown’s humble digs on Goodman Street were always clean and pleasant, but not flashy. Peaches, on the other hand, has the look and feel of a restaurant in which every detail has been carefully considered and coordinated, where a vast space has been thoughtfully divided into a series of manageable dining rooms without making the whole seem cluttered. Its aesthetic may owe a bit to Scanio’s brief foray into the restaurant business in Las Vegas, where he went in 2007 after selling Charlie Brown’s. That business was, unfortunately, a victim of the Great Recession, but Vegas’ loss was Webster’s gain. Scanio returned to the area and opened Peaches in January 2009 after spending months micromanaging every aspect of the transformation of the space from what he described as “a vanilla box” into something warm, friendly, and appealing. At its heart, though, Peaches Café is still a family restaurant in the best sense of that term. With a voluminous menu embracing everything from breakfast through dinner, waitresses clad in identical black-and-white uniforms, a rotating display case full of carefully wrapped slices of pie (the wrap kept off the topping by a judiciously placed frilly toothpick), a glass counter up front full of candy and mints, and Scanio himself — always wearing a carefully pressed shirt and tie — at the front of the house playing the gracious and sometimes garrulous host, Peaches is an updated set piece and a model of its kind. On any weekend day, but

The club sandwich at Peaches Cafe. PHOTO BY MATT DETURCK

particularly on Sunday, Peaches Café is packed. The after-church crowd on a Sunday creates lines that snake out the door, and even on weekdays it’s not at all unusual to encounter a bit of a wait at lunchtime. It’s the sort of place that you’d expect to see members of the Rotary Club or perhaps members of the PTA or the local hospital auxiliary getting together for a working lunch (there’s a set of tables up on a riser at the rear of the dining room that often seem to get called into service for this sort of thing). What are they eating? Everything you can imagine. The first time I was presented with Peaches Café’s menu I nearly broke out laughing. The thing weighed about two pounds and it came with a couple of appendices — a list of specials, and a kids menu. It reminded me of the

screens that my friends and I used when we played Dungeons & Dragons in high school. In fact, when stood up on the table, the menu was so high that I couldn’t even see my companions over it. I found myself itching for a handful of colorful dice. I could have used them, too: the number of choices available to diners at Peaches is so bewildering that I could have used a good d-20 roll to narrow things down a bit. Peaches is known for breakfast food, and does an excellent job of serving up the kind of stick-to-your-arteries food that is so appealing on a weekend morning. With so many offerings featuring either gravy or hollandaise, it’s almost mandatory to throw caution (and your diet) aside and dig in. A plate of sausage gravy and biscuits ($6.99) is a good, if somewhat basic, introduction to the good things Peaches has to offer. Creamy, and studded with bits of zesty, meaty sausage, the gravy is ladled over a plate of flaky biscuits so full of butter that it seems a miracle that they hold together at all. More imaginative is something like the Cordon Bleu Skillet: three eggs over easy atop a mix of home-fries, diced chicken breast, and ham smothered in Swiss cheese and hollandaise ($7.99). You may find yourself groaning and vowing never to eat again after you finish it (and finish it you will, even though the portion is easily enough for two or even three to share), but the combination is frankly addicting and entirely wonderful. If you want something a bit on the lighter side, one of Peaches’ scrambles might be the way to go, if only because they tend to be topped only with cheese rather than cheese and hollandaise. When I was a boy, I used to think that the club sandwich was the height of sophistication. But over the years I’ve been bitterly disappointed by soggy, floppy, ill-cut versions of this king of sandwiches. At Peaches, consummate restaurant veteran Scanio gets it just right. Starting with excellent bread toasted just so (he’ll happily tell you that it costs him 23 cents a slice), and layering on both ham and turkey cut right from the bone, crispy bacon, and surprisingly good tomatoes along with the usual lettuce and a generous quantity of mayonnaise, this is hands down the Platonic ideal of the club sandwich ($8.29). Served with house-made, thick-cut potato chips and a tart pickle, this club is the standard against which all others should be measured.

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Correcting ourselves

The April 11 Chow Hound incorrectly reported that Seabreeze institution Vic and Irv’s had closed. In fact, the business has new owners. Look for the full story in the April 25 edition of Chow Hound.

rochestercitynewspaper.com City 13


Upcoming [ Hip-hop/Rap ] B.o.B. Saturday, April 28. Gordon Field House, RIT. 8 p.m. $17-$36. 475-2509. rittickets.com.

Music

[ Pop/Rock ] Journey w/Pat Benatar Wednesday, August 15. CMAC, 3355 Marvin Sands Drive, Canandaigua. 7 p.m. $30$89.50. 393-4880. cmacevents.com. [ Pop/Rock ] The Fray/Kelly Clarkson Wednesday, August 29. CMAC, 3355 Marvin Sands Drive, Canandaigua. 8 p.m. $35$75. 393-4880. cmacevents.com.

Bassnectar, Vibe SquaD

Saturday, April 21 Main Street Armory, 900 E. Main St. 6.30 p.m. | $36 | rochestermainstreetarmory.com [ DJ/Electronic ] If you need an out-of-this-world

experience, this might just be the show for you. Bassnectar is a sound cake layered over the top of heavy dub bass lines, and Vibe SquaD sounds like he’s been hanging out in a UFO. Good thing Vibe SquaD describes himself as an interstellar traveler, because both bands sound like they’re on an tour of outer space instead of the VAVA VOOM tour, which goes in hand with the album of the same name. I was sold at “concurrent laser show.” This show ought to blow your mind, if you let it. — BY SUZAN PERO

Leland Sundries Tuesday, April 24 Abilene Bar and Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way 7:30 p.m. | No Cover | abilenebarandlounge.com [ INDIE-FOLK ] Brooklyn indie-folk troubadours Leland

Sundries and special guest Joan Hutcheson share the floor at Abilene on Tuesday. The former, an imaginative musical project led by Nick Loss-Eaton, has been described by The Boston Phoenix as what happens when The Band meets Lou Reed. Loss-Eaton’s baritone, plain-spoken vocals are the perfect accoutrement to his idiosyncratic lyrics, and posit a contemporary take on Americana. The latter, also a Brooklyn native, has a voice just as beautiful and vibrant as her countenance. Hutcheson’s debut album “All Is Not Lost,” which blends influences as disparate as The Muppets and Leonard Cohen, is a delight. — BY DAVID YOCKEL, JR.

14 City APRIL 18-24, 2012

photo courtesy Ceaesar Sebastian


Wednesday, April 18

Reverend Horton Heat Wednesday, April 25 German House Theatre, 315 Gregory St. 8 p.m. | $22.50-$25 | upallnightpresents.com [ ROCKABILLY ] When I first heard The Reverend

Horton Heat, it changed my life. Rock ’n’ roll is best when it’s done wrong. This guitar wizard and his band out of Texas played full-bore slap ’n’ twang rockabilly too fast, too loud, and too cool. It was wrong, it was perfect. The Reverend (nee Jim Heath) plays blindingly fast, mixing innovative jazz phrasing, blues, and punk into his accelerated rockabilly. This is one of the wildest, no-frills, no-gimmicks shows you will ever see. The Reverend is relentless, the Reverend is righteous. It would be wrong to miss it. Krypton 88 and Tommy Brunett open the whole sordid affair. — BY FRANK DE BLASE

Unicycle Loves You Thursday, April 19 The Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 8:30 p.m. | $6-$8 | 454-2966, bugjar.com [ Indie ] Like a skilled performer that can

simultaneously balance on one wheel and blow you kisses, Chicago’s Unicycle Loves You juggles the fullbodied sweet pop of bands like Belle & Sebastian with the noisy guitar-driven garage rock of groups including The Raveonettes and The Strokes. These modern-day minstrels of romance make the fine art of songwriting look easy. The group’s latest album, “Failure,” earned a thumbs-up from USA Today. Unicycle, I’m lovin’ you, too. With Valentiger and Limeworks. Shakedown DJ’s to follow at 11 pm. — BY ROMAN DIVEZUR

[ Acoustic/Folk ] Lil’ Brian and the Zydeco Travelers. Abilene, 153 Liberty Pole Way. abilenebarandlounge.com, 232-3230. 7 p.m. $8 21+, $10 unders.  Rob & Gary Acoustic.  Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr., woodcliffhotelspa.com, 3814000. 5:30 p.m. Free.  Scottish Session w/ Jeremy Button. McGraw’s Irish Pub, 146 W Commercial St., East Rochester. mcgrawsirishpub. com, 348-9091. 7 p.m. Free.  The Dady Brothers. Johnny’s Irish Pub, 1382 Culver Rd., johnnysirishpub.com, 2240990. 7:30 p.m. Free.  Tommy Gravino. Rio Tomatlan, 5 Beeman St., Canandaigua. 394-9380. 6:30 p.m. Free. Salsa w/Shelia dancing during the performance. 

James Hunter played the Club at Water Street on Tuesday, April 10. PHOTO BY FRANK DE BLASE

Swallowing Cookie Monster [ review ] by frank de blase

James Hunter and Jesse Dee made for a

dream co-bill Tuesday, April 10, at The Club at Water Street. Dee got things rolling with just his guitar and his broken heart. I can’t quite figure out his haircut, but the man can sing as sorrowful as a toddler with melted ice cream. After that James Hunter commandeered the bandstand like he owned the joint. Hunter is a master vocalist in the way he works around a phrase, and as a guitarist the man is aces. He worked his Les Paul Jr. into emitting a mumble-sting full of percussive energy and urgency. He dug in deep into his album “The Hard Way” and teased the crowd with a handful of newbies in the same mambo/shuffle vein. As I was watching Cannibal Corpse pummel the crowd Friday night at Water Street Music Hall, a question came to mind: if the singer forgot any of the words, would anyone notice? The vocals sounded as if the frontman swallowed Cookie Monster. But trust me, it fit the overall sound. This band is pure rhythmic mayhem. Its riffs are so in sync that

the twin guitar, bass, drums, and vocal onslaught takes on the feel of a singular, unified percussive output. It may be a bit much to take, but the band is relentless as it plays incredibly heavy and fast. It was so fast, it was slow. It was so loud, it was silent. The head-bangers reveled and collided like cars at an intersection with green lights all around. And they sang along to words that were anyone’s guess. St. Phillip’s Escalator made it back up to the Rochester floor with a packed and sweaty show at The Bug Jar Saturday night. The band remains rough and raw despite the new — and tres cool — material creeping into the set. This band has always played with a bluesy bigness, not quite as out of control as the MC-5 or as loud as Blue Cheer, but definitely from the same church. It was loud but appropriate and discernible. The show peaked for me when the trio pulled off thundering versions of “Tobacco Road” and “Ramblin’ Rose.”

[ Blues ] Open Blues Jam w/The King Bees. Beale Street Cafe, 693 South Ave., bealestreetcafe. com, 271-4650. 7:30 p.m. Call for info.  [ Classical ] Clarinets for Conservation. SUNY Brockport-Drake Memorial Library, 350 New Campus Dr., Brockport. 395-2787. Noon. Free.  Eastman Wind Orchestra, Eastman Wind Ensemble.  Eastman Theatre-Kodak Hall, 60 Gibbs St., esm.rochester. edu. 8 p.m. Free.  Gateswingers. Ontario Beach Park, 4800 Lake Ave., 8653320. 6 p.m. Call for info.  [ DJ/Electronic ] DJ Keyyo. TC Riley’s, 200 Park Point Dr., tcrileysparkpoint. com, 272-9777. Call for info. Guest DJs. Vertex, 169 N Chestnut St., 232-5498. 10 p.m. $3-$8.  Teen Set 45 Party. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave., 542-8336. Midnight. Free. Y Not Wednesday w/DJ ET. Venu Resto-Lounge, 151 St. Paul St., 232-5650. 10 p.m. Call for info.  continues on page 16

rochestercitynewspaper.com City 15


Music

Wednesday, April 18

From stripper poles to the octagon A Thousand Shades of Cold reverbnation.com/atsoc [ INTERVIEW ] By Frank De Blase

Since 2005, A Thousand Shades of Cold has dominated the local music scene with a sound straight out of the progressive dark. And where others in the genre lean into a post-numetal sound, ATSOC teeters on the precipice — yet it does not succumb to the stock thunder and scream. ATSOC endures as a unique, fivepiece powerhouse. Members Jake Gissin (vocals), Juan Calixto (drums), McCue Greene (bass), Dan Vanderostyn (guitar), and Randy McLeod (guitar) embrace the dynamic darkness with a progressive edge. They’ve committed the sound to disc twice; on the first self-titled album and ATSOC’s

latest, “Darken The Daylight,” which is slated for national re-release on Spectra Records this July. On top of that, the band is hobnobbing with ultimate fighters and video-game geeks. Gissin and Calixto recently came down to CITY to brag and explain. An edited transcript of the interview follows. CITY: Did A Thousand Shades of Cold arise from the ashes of other bands? Jake Gissin: The band formed in the summer

of 2005. Me and Juan had worked together before in bands that never came to fruition. Juan Calixto: They just sort of led up to A Thousand Shades of Cold. What about this line-up clicked? Gissin: It’s just that everybody brought

something to the table, the guitarists were bringing riffs we wanted to use, and Juan was playing the drums we wanted to hear, and I was coming up with some vocal ideas everyone was happy with. So we just ran with it. Calixto: There was a lot of room to grow. We all saw the potential. ATSOC is a heavy outfit, sometimes considered metal. You don’t agree? Gissin: We’re not really

a metal band. People say we’re a metal band, but we’re really not. I just think nowadays metal is a term that’s thrown around loosely. So is rock ’n’ roll. Gissin: Exactly. I

consider us really heavy alternative rock with progressive influences. So it’s easier to say metal… Gissin: It kind of sucks,

Local band A Thousand Shades of Cold has recently had several of its songs licensed by the Ultimate Fighting Championship, and will have its music used in video games. PHOTO PROVIDED 16 City APRIL 18-24, 2012

because you want to say something quick, but then you get lumped in these categories.

The heaviness has paid off commercially though, right? Calixto: Yeah. We just started working with

the Ultimate Fighting Championship. They wanted bands to contribute to all their live events and they picked up eight of our songs. It’s cool that the UFC is picking nonmainstream bands. What was the reasoning behind this? Calixto: It’s just a mixture of good music

in general. I guess they see the potential and gave us a shot. Our manager, Tommy [Casserino], knows their licensing guy and pitched us on a whim.

Did you guys specifically write material for the UFC Gissin: The only time we’ve written a song

with something else in mind — other than just writing a song — was for this TV pilot about a DJ at a strip club. What happened to that song? Calixto: That’s one of the eight UFC

picked up.

So what’s good for the stripper pole is good for the octagon…and the gaming console. Gissin: Yeah. We just licensed music to

“Supremacy MMA,” it’s a mixed-martial-arts fighting game; it’s on Xbox 360, PS3… What makes this band so dark in the light of its budding success? Gissin: Our music is our release. We may not

seem that aggressive, but everybody’s going to have a side like that to them. And this is our outlet. We just let it breathe, we let it go. That’s where all our frustrations come out. That’s why sometimes our music is angry or down-driven or depressing at times…just lots of energy. We bounce around between slow grooves and intense, high-speed stuff. Calixto: I definitely think it’s a good fit with aggressive stuff like UFC. So as the band continues to grow, how will that change the sound? Or will it at all? Gissin: Just more progressive. It’s kind of

like expanding what we already do. We’re not really throwing any curveballs; we’re just refining what we do.

[ Jazz ] Iced Chill. Lemoncello, 137 W Commercial St., E Rochester. lemoncello137.com, 385-8565. 6 p.m. Free.  Margaret Explosion. Little Theatre Cafe, 240 East Ave., thelittle.org. 7:30 p.m. Free.  Michael Vidala Trio. Bistro 135, 135 W Commercial St., East Rochester. bistro135.net, 6625555. 6 p.m. Free.  Open Jam w/The King Bees. Beale Street Cafe, 693 South Ave., bealestreetcafe. com. 7:30 p.m. Free.  Rick Holland Evan Dobbins Little Big Band. Tala Vera, 155 State St., tala-vera.com, 546-3945. 8 p.m. $5, or free w/dinner.  The Glenn Miller Orchestra. Smith Opera House, 82 Seneca St., Geneva. thesmith.org. 7 p.m. $20 GA, $15 seniors, children free.  [ Pop/Rock ] Clutch, Hellyeah. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N Water St., waterstreetmusic.com, 3255600. 6:30 p.m. $26-$30.  Samantha Fish. Dinosaur Bar-B-Que, 99 Court St., dinosaurbarbque.com, 3257090. 9:30 p.m. Free.  TeenSet Rock ‘n Roll Party ft. The Isotopes w/The Concrete Rivals, Attic Abasement. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave., bugjar. com, 454-2966. 9 p.m. $6-$8.  Tempest. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr., lovincup.com, 2929940. 8 p.m. $15. 

Thursday, April 19 [ Acoustic/Folk ] John Akers, Deborah Magone, and Suzanne Monroe. Easy on EaSt., 170 East Ave., 3256484. 6 p.m. Free, suggested $5 donation.  Open Session w/Mark Weeg. McGraw’s Irish Pub, 146 W Commercial St., East Rochester. mcgrawsirishpub. com, 348-9091. 7 p.m. Free.  [ Blues ] Fat City. Dinosaur Bar-B-Que, 99 Court St., dinosaurbarbque. com, 325-7090. 9 p.m. Free.  Son House Blues Night w/Gordon Munding. Beale Street Cafe, 693 South Ave., bealestreetcafe.com, 2714650. 7:30 p.m. Call for info.  The Backsliders. Rabbit Room Restaurant, 61 N Main St., Honeoye Falls, NY. thelowermill.com. 7 p.m. Free.  [ Classical ] Eastman at Washington Square Noontime Concerts. First Universalist Church, Court St., & S.Clinton Ave., 275-1400, esm.rochester.edu/community/ calendars/lunchtime. 12:15 p.m.-12:45 p.m. Free.  RPO: Russian Masters. Eastman Theatre-Kodak Hall, 60 Gibbs St., rpo.org. 7:30 p.m. $15-$77.  The Brockport Symphony Orchestra Presents A Night at the Movies. Blue Room in Edwards Hall at The College at Brockport. brockportco@yahoo.


HIGHEST PRICES PAID

com, brockportsymphony.org. 7:30 p.m. Free. [ DJ/Electronic ] DJ Dorian. TC Riley’s, 200 Park Point Dr., tcrileysparkpoint. com, 272-9777. Call for info. DJ Noname. Vertex, 169 N Chestnut St., 232-5498. 10 p.m. $3-$8.  DJ Sal DeSantis. Center Cafe, 150 Frank DiMino Way. iaccrochester.org, 594-8882. 7 p.m. Call for info.  Thursday Night Shakedown. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave., 4542966, bugjar.com. 11 p.m. Free.  Tiki Thursdays: Shotgun Music DJ. McGhan’s, 11 W Main St., Victor, NY. 924-3660. 7:30 p.m. Free.  Tilt-a-Whirl Drag Show. Tilt Night Club, 444 Central Ave., 232-8440, tiltroc.com. 11:15 p.m. & 12:30 a.m. $3.  [ Hip-Hop/Rap ] Sophistifunk w/ Ocupanther. Montage Music Hall, 50 Chestnut Plaza. themontagemusichall.com, 232-1520. 9 p.m. Call for info.  [ Jazz ] Anthony Gianovola on Spanish Guitar. Lemoncello, 137 W Commercial St., E Rochester. lemoncello137.com, 385-8565. 6 p.m. Free.  Jazz/Wine Happy Hour w/The Swooners. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr., woodcliffhotelspa.com. 5:30 p.m. Free.  Joe Santora Trio w/Emily Kirchoff. Michael’s Valley Grill, 1694 Penfield R, Penfield. 383-8260. 7 p.m. Free.  Mark Cassara. Pane Vino, 175 N Water St., panevinoristorante. com, 232-6090. Call for info. Sonny Brown Band. Prosecco Italian Restaurant & Bar, 1550 Route 332, Farmington. proseccoitalianrestaurant.com, 924-8000. 6 p.m. Call for info.  The Bowties. Little Theatre Cafe, 240 East Ave., thelittle. org. 7:30 p.m. Free.  The John Palocy Trio. Bistro 135, 135 W Commercial St., East Rochester. bistro135.net, 662-5555. 6 p.m. Free.  The Mike Kaupa Trio Project. Roncone’s, 232 Lyell Ave., 458-3090. 7 p.m. Free.  Uptown Groove. The Brighton Restaurant, 1881 East Ave., thebrightonrestaurant.com, 271-6650. 8 p.m. Call for info.   [ Pop/Rock ] Extended Family w/The Filthy McNastys. Sticky Lips BBQ Juke Joint, 830 Jefferson Rd. stickylipsbbq.com. 9 p.m. $5.  Haewa. Blueroom, 293 Alexander St., haewamusic@ gmail.com. 8 p.m. $5.  Jeff Elliott. Irondequoit Ale House, 2250 Hudson Ave., 544-5120. 5 p.m. Free.  Jim Lane. Six Pockets, Ridge Hudson Plaza. 266-1440. 7 p.m. Free.  Unicycle Loves You w/ Valentiger, Limeworks. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave., bugjar.com, 454-2966. 8:30 p.m. $6-$8. 

old, broken, or unwanted gold, SELL ORTRADE Your diamonds, platinum, sterling silver or coins.

Watch Batteries installed $1.99 (with coupon)

100 N. Main St., Fairport • 377-4641

CLASSICAL | Eastman Repertory Singers/ UR Women’s Chorus/Concentus Women’s Chorus

Three choral groups will be performing at St. Mary’s Catholic Church in a program including Mendelssohn’s “Hear My Prayer,” Britten’s “Jubilate Deo” and “Festival Te Deum,” and Holst’s “Ave Maria.” The Eastman Women’s Chorus is a select ensemble of students, and the University of Rochester Repertory Singers is a 60-voice mixed chorus from the broader campus. Concentus Women’s Chorus is a community-based vocal ensemble. Conductors for the program are Philip Silvey, assistant professor of music education and director of the UR Women’s Chorus, as well as graduate choral conducting students Felix Shuen, Camila Ospina Fadul, and Nils Klykken. The concert takes place Friday, April 20, 8 p.m. at St. Mary’s Catholic Church, 15 St. Mary’s Place. Free. 274-1100, esm.rochester.edu. — BY PALOMA CAPANNA

Friday, April 20 [ Acoustic/Folk ] Dungarees w/The Lurgadan Lads & Lasses Pub Session. McGraw’s Irish Pub, 146 W Commercial St., East Rochester. mcgrawsirishpub. com, 348-9091. 5 p.m. Free.  Grand Canyon Rescue Episode w/Flatbed. Abilene, 153 Liberty Pole Way. abilenebarandlounge. com, 232-3230. 6 p.m. $4 21+, $6 unders.  Groovefest 4.20. Montage Music Hall, 50 Chestnut Plaza. 755-3152. 4 p.m. $10 adv, $15 doors. Happy Hour: Erik Plymale. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave., bugjar.com, 454-2966. 5 p.m. Free. 21+.  Hard Road. Argyle Grill, 4344 Nine Mile Point Rd, Fairport, NY. dragons66@live.com. 7 p.m. Free. Jeff Riales & the Silvertone Express. Lakeshore Community Church, 3651 Latta Rd. 3925253. 7 p.m. Call for info.  Julia Nunes. Cellar Pub, Hobart and William Smith Colleges. 781-5483. 8 p.m. $15.  Kevin McCarthy. TC Riley’s, 200 Park Point Dr., tcrileysparkpoint.com, 2729777. 6 p.m. Call for info.  Mahara and Lisa Toth. The Red Coyote Cafe, 7 Honeoye Cmns., Honeoye. 229-7266. 7 p.m. Call for info.  Ralph Louis. Rochester Plaza Hotel, 70 State St., rochesterplaza.com. 6 p.m. Free.  Rochester Groove FeSt., Montage Music Hall, 50 Chestnut Plaza. frontgatetickets.com, themontagemusichall.com. 6 p.m. $10.  The Lawnmowers. Sticky Lips BBQ Juke Joint, 830 Jefferson Rd., stickylipsbbq.com. 9:30 p.m. $3. 

[ Blues ] Billy Joe & the Blues Gypsies w/Dave Riccioni. Six Pockets, Ridge Hudson Plaza. 2661440. 6-9 p.m. Free.  Carolyn Kelly Blues Band. Dinosaur Bar-B-Que, 99 Court St., dinosaurbarbque. com, 325-7090. 10 p.m. Free.  Doubletake. Sevens, Rt 96, Farmington. 924-3232. 8 p.m. Call for info.  Six Pac. Beale Street Cafe, 693 South Ave., bealestreetcafe. com, 271-4650. 7:30 p.m. Call for info. 

Everyone’s Theatre Company

PROUDLY ANNOUNCES

Music & Lyrics by Maury Yeston | Book by Peter Stone

Port of Call

W. Irondequoit High School 260 Cooper Rd.

Sail Dates April 19 & 21 @ 7:30pm

It’s been 100 years... be a part of history Tickets available at www.everyonestheatre.com $15 Adults | $10 Students/Seniors/TANYS group sales call 585.415.4747 Produced by Special Arrangement with Tams-Witmark (www.tams-witmark.com) 560 Lexington Avenue New York, NY 10226

[ Classical ] Cordancia Chamber Ensemble.  Asbury First United Methodist Church, 1050 East Ave., 2711050 x103. 7:30 p.m. $10 GA, $5 students and seniors. RPO: Subversive Subtexts. Hochstein Performance Hall, 50 N Plymouth Ave., rpo.org. Friday7:30 p.m. Sunday- 2 p.m. $24.  Repertory Singers and Women’s Chorus. St Mary’s Church, 15 St Mary’s Pl., esm.rochester. edu. 8 p.m. Free.  Two Saints Spring Music Festival: Eastman Cello Choir. St., Luke and St., Simon Cyrene Church, 17 South Fitzhugh St., 5467730. 12:15 p.m. Free.  One Woman, A World of Music, ft. Flutist Rhonda Larson in Concert. First Unitarian Church, 220 S Winton Rd., rfaonline.org, 234-4RFA. 7:30 p.m. Adults $15, Students/Seniors $10. [ DJ/Electronic ] DJ Bac Spin. Venu RestoLounge, 151 St. Paul St., 2325650. 8 p.m. Call for info.  DJ Cakeslayer. TC HooligansGreece, Greece Ridge Ctr. tchooligans.com, 225-7180. 4 p.m. Call for info.  continues on page 18 rochestercitynewspaper.com City 17


Friday, April 20

White Swans Asia Caffé

FINE ASIAN CUISINE Fresh Baked Sweet & Savory Pastries Serving Dim Sum everyday • Bubble Tea

798 S. Clinton Ave. • 585-270-4431

Sun–Thurs: 10am - 9:30pm • Fri & Sat: 9am – 10:30pm

Earth DAY!

HAPPY

LANDSCAPE & DESIGN WORKSHOP Saturday, April 21 & 28 10am-4pm

Bring in a PHOTO of the area and Logan will help you expertly design and install stonework, plantwork and woodwork.

Our Spring Sale:

HARDY AZALEAS (2 gal pots 20-24˝ spread)

TURF LINE 4-STEP

BUY ONE FOR $29.99,

GET 2 FREE!

5,000 sq ft $49.99 10,000 sq ft $94.99

FREE

Set-up • Delivery • Propane Fill-up with the purchase of any WEBER Grill! SEE STORE FOR DETAILS

M U L C H D E L I V E R E D by the yard Propane Fill-ups all Year 18 City APRIL 18-24, 2012

Greenhouse & Florist 2832 Clover St. Pittsford (corner of Clover & Jefferson) 586-3017 • www.galleas.com

DJ Cedric. Vertex, 169 N Chestnut St., 232-5498. 10 p.m. $3-$8.  DJ Mosart212. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr., 292-9940. 6 p.m. Free.  DJs Jon Herbert, DJ Ease. One, 1 Ryan Alley.546-1010. 10:30 p.m. $5 after 11 p.m.  Fresh Meat Fridays w/Samantha Vega, DJ Mighty Mic. Tilt Night Club, 444 Central Ave., 2328440, tiltroc.com. 11:15 p.m. & 12:30 a.m. $4-$12.  Lube After Dark. Quaker Steak and Lube, 2205 Buffalo Rd. 697.9464. 9:30 p.m. Free. Reggaeton w/DJ Carlos. La Copa Ultra Lounge, 235 W Ridge Rd. 254-1050. 10 p.m. Free.  [ Jazz ] Acoustic Alchemy Review. Jasmine’s Asian Fusion, 657 Ridge Rd, Webster. JasminesAsianFusion. com, 216-1290. 6:30 p.m. Free. Bobby DiBaudo Trio. Bistro 135, 135 W Commercial St., East Rochester. bistro135.net, 6625555. 6 p.m. Free.  Chris Wilson. Lemoncello, 137 W Commercial St., E Rochester. lemoncello137.com, 385-8565. 8 p.m. Free.  Eastman Jazz Ensemble and New Jazz Ensemble. Eastman School of Music-Kilbourn Hall, 26 Gibbs St., esm.rochester. edu. 8 p.m. Free.  Jive Street Five. Prosecco Italian Restaurant & Bar, 1550 Route 332, Farmington. proseccoitalianrestaurant.com, 924-8000. 6 p.m. Call for info.  Joe Santora Trio w/Emily Kirchoff. Michael’s Valley Grill, 1694 Penfield R, Penfield. 383-8260. 7 p.m. Free.  Johnny Matt Band w/Jon Seiger. Wegmans-Eastway, 1955 Empire Blvd, Webster. 671-8290. 5:30 p.m. Free.  Madeline Forster. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr., 381-4000. 8:00 p.m. Free. Ryan T Carey. Thali of India, 3259 S Winton Rd. 427-8030. 7-9 p.m. Free.  SUNY Geneseo Monday Night Jazz Ensemble ft. Kiku Collins. SUNY GeneseoWadsworth Auditorium. 2545824. 8 p.m. Call for info.  The Westview Project. Little Theatre Cafe, 240 East Ave., thelittle.org. 8:30 p.m. Free.  [ Open Mic ] Songwriters Open Mic. Equal Grounds Coffee House, 750 South Ave., 242-7840. 9-11 p.m. Free.  [ Pop/Rock ] 4/20 Party w/The Lawn Boys. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr., lovincup.com, 2929940. 9 p.m. $10.  7th Annual 4/20 Music Fest w/ Absolution Project, The Silence Broken, Shadows of the PaSt., Intrinsic, and Beneath Hells Sky. California Brew Haus, 402 Ridge Rd W., 621-1480. 7 p.m. $5 adv, $7 doors. 

ROCK | Lou Gramm

Lou Gramm started out as a drummer, and when he moved to the front of the stage, that’s when it became obvious that the Rochester native had the gift. As Foreigner’s lead singer and as a solo performer, Gramm became one of rock’s greatest vocalists. He’s still a cut above the rest. This “storyteller” performance emceed by Brother Wease and featuring the Lou Gramm Band will give concertgoers an intimate experience to hear unplugged versions of classic songs that have rocked stadiums and continents. Mixed in will be stories and anecdotes from behind the music that have defined Gramm’s illustrious career. Lou Gramm performs Friday, April 20, 8 p.m. at the German House Theater, 315 Gregory St. $30.50-$35. upallnightpresents.com. — BY ROMAN DIVEZUR Abdicate w/Scaphism, Othin, and Beard Without A Mustache. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave., bugjar. com, 454-2966. 9 p.m. $5. Limited entry for unders.  Amanda Ashley. The Brighton Restaurant, 1881 East Ave., thebrightonrestaurant.com, 2716650. 9:30 p.m. Call for info.  Fun. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N Water St., waterstreetmusic.com, 3255600. 8 p.m. $17.50-$20.  Hair Nation. Nola’s BBQ, 4775 Lake Ave., nolasweb.com, 6633375. 10 p.m. Call for info.  Lou Gramm, Storytellers: A special evening of music and stories. German House Theatre, 315 Gregory St., upallnightpresents.com. 8 p.m. $30.50-$35.  Loud and Proud w/Tres Cool. Jukebox, 5435 Ridge Rd W., Spencerport. 352-4505. 9 p.m. Call for info.  Mansfield Avenue. Mulconry’s Irish Pub & Restaurant, 17 Liftbridge Lane E., Fairport. mhalterm2@mac.com. 9 p.m. Free.  Order 66 @ Pub 511. Pub 511, 511 E Ridge Rd., twilightzoner2009@gmail.com. 9:00 p.m. $5.  Pillow Fight Accident. Monty’s Krown Lounge, 875 Monroe Ave., 271-7050. 9 p.m. $3-$5.  Sam Deleo. Perlo’s Italian Grill, 202 N Washington St., East Rochester. 248-5060. 6:30. Free.  Sending Station. Captain Jack’s Goodtime Tavern, 8505 Greig St., Sodus Point. captainjacksgoodtimetavern. com, 315-483-9570. 9 p.m. Call for info.  Small Town. TC HooligansGreece, Greece Ridge Ctr., tchooligans.com, 225-7180. Call for info. Smooth Talkers w/ Earthtones. Johnny’s Irish Pub, 1382 Culver Rd.,

johnnysirishpub.com, 2240990. 5 p.m. Free.  Springer. Shooters Sports Bar & Grill, 1226 Fairport Rd., shootersny.com, 924-9914. Call for info. The 80’s Hair Band. Anchor Bar Marketplace. anchorsportsbar. com, 272-9333. Call for info. Ugly Junk. McGhan’s, 11 W Main St., Victor, NY. 924-3660. Call for info. Free.  Wayward Son. Glengarry Inn at Eagle Vale, 4400 Nine Mile Point Road, Rt 250, Fairport. 377-5200. 7 p.m. Free.  [ R&B ] Carlton Wilcox Live. Tala Vera, 155 State St., tala-vera.com, 546-3945. 9 p.m. $5. 

Saturday, April 21 [ Acoustic/Folk ] Amy Speace. First Unitarian Church-Cafe Veritas, 220 Winton Rd S. robertgrolling@ yahoo.com. 8:00 p.m. $15 GA, $7 students w/ID. Deborah Magone. The Brighton Restaurant, 1881 East Ave., thebrightonrestaurant.com, 271-6650. 9 p.m. Call for info.  Earth Day Concert for the Finger Lakes. Smith Opera House, 82 Seneca St., Geneva. edlavin@ gmail.com. 7:30 p.m. $15-$18. Edd Tide. Flaherty’s Macedon, 113 Pittsford Palmyra Rd., Macedon. flahertys.com, 2231221. Call for info. Jeff Slutsky. Boulder Coffee Co. - Park Ave, 739 Park Ave., bouldercoffeeco.com. 8 p.m. Free.  John Akers. Johnny’s Irish Pub, 1382 Culver Rd., johnnysirishpub.com, 2240990. 8 p.m. Free.  Marty Roberts. Flaherty’s Webster, 1200 Bay Rd., flahertys.com, 671-0816. Call for info. Songwriters In the Round w/Scott Regan, Maria Gillard,


Brian Coughlin. Tango Cafe, 389 Gregory St., tangocafedance.com, 2714930. 8 p.m. $8.  Steve Bartolotta. Pittsford Pub, 60 S. Main St., PittsfoRd., 5864650, pittsfordpub.net. 9 p.m.midnight. Free.  The Canal Street String Band. Rochester Christian Reformed Church, 2750 Atlantic Ave., Penfield. goldenlink.org. 7:30 p.m. $18, $15 Golden Link members, $10 students.  Thunder Body w/Kevin Kinsella, Spiritual Rez. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N Water St., waterstreetmusic.com. 9 p.m. $8-$10. 

Tom Gravino. Thali of India, 3259 S Winton Rd., 355-8206. 7 p.m. Free.  Tumbao. Tapas 177 Lounge, 177 St. Paul St., tapas177. com, 262-2090. 11 p.m. Free.  Unplugged Dinner Music Series. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr., 292-9940, lovincup. com. 6 p.m. Free.  Wingin’ It. McGraw’s Irish Pub, 146 W Commercial St., East Rochester. mcgrawsirishpub. com, 348-9091. 8 p.m. Free.  [ Blues ] Coupe de Villes. Sticky Lips BBQ Juke Joint, 830 Jefferson Rd., stickylipsbbq.com. 10 p.m. $3. 

Gap Mangione New Blues Band. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr., woodcliffhotelspa.com, 3814000. 7:30 p.m. Free.  The Fakers. Beale Street Cafe, 693 South Ave., bealestreetcafe.com, 2714650. 7:30 p.m. Call for info.  The Public Market Band w/Sarah Rush & Silvernail. Abilene, 153 Liberty Pole Way. abilenebarandlounge.com, 232-3230. 8 p.m. $4.  Three for the Road. Beale Street Cafe-Webster, 1930 Empire Blvd, Webster. bealestreetcafe.com, 2161070. 7:30 p.m. Call for info. 

[ Classical ] 2012 Family Concert series. Arnett Branch Library, 310 Arnett Blvd.deb.leary@ libraryweb.org. 1 p.m. Free. The final concert in our 2012 series will feature a Classical Saxophone Duet from the Eastman School of Music. Lotte Lenya Competition.  Eastman School of MusicKilbourn Hall, 26 Gibbs St., esm. rochester.edu. 11 a.m. Free.  Lotte Lenya Competition Evening Concert. Eastman School of Music-Kilbourn Hall, 26 Gibbs St., esm.rochester.edu. 8 p.m. Free. RPO: Russian Masters. Eastman Theatre-Kodak Hall, 60 Gibbs

St., rpo.org. Thursday- 7:30 p.m. Saturday- 8 p.m. $15-$77.  Rhythmic Rubrics with Rhonda with flutist Rhonda Larson. Bethel Christian Fellowship, 321 East Ave., rfaonline.org, 234-4RFA. 9:30 a.m. Adults $15, Students/ Seniors $10. Women of Note Concert. Trinity Reformed Church, 909 Landing Rd., North, Rochester 14625. cwarn18@rochester.rr.com. 7:00 p.m. Free, donations accepted. [ Country ] Border Town w/Johnny Bauer. Jukebox, 5435 Ridge Rd W, Spencerport. 352-4505. 9 p.m. Call for info. 

[ DJ/Electronic ] Bassnectar w/VibeSquaD, Mr. Projectile. Main Street Armory, 900 E Main St., rochestermainstreetarmory. com. 6:30 p.m. $36.  Big Dance Party w/DJ Jon Herbert. Tilt Night Club, 444 Central Ave., 232-8440, tiltroc. com. 10 p.m. $3.  DJ Big Reg. Venu Resto-Lounge, 151 St. Paul St., 232-5650. 10 p.m. Call for info.  DJ Darkwave. Vertex, 169 N Chestnut St., 232-5498. 10 p.m. $3-$8.  DJs Richie Salvaggio, Kalifornia.  One, 1 Ryan Alley. 546-1010. 10:30 p.m. $5 after 11 p.m.  continues on page 20

rochestercitynewspaper.com City 19


Saturday, April 21 DeeDee’s Wild College Party w/DJ Jon Herbert. Tilt Night Club, 444 Central Ave., tiltroc. com, 232-8440. 10 p.m. Call for info.  Flashback Saturdays w/DJ Lino, Dino from Fickle 93.3. Nola’s BBQ, 4775 Lake Ave., nolasweb.com, 663-3375. 9 p.m. Call for info.  True to Life MC Party. California Brew Haus, 402 Ridge Rd W.621-1480. 8 p.m. Call for info.  [ Jazz ] 7 Sense. Lemoncello, 137 W Commercial St., E Rochester. lemoncello137.com, 385-8565. 8:30 p.m. Free.  Amanda Ashley. Little Theatre Cafe, 240 East Ave., thelittle. org. 8:30 p.m. Free.  Bob Sneider. Bistro 135, 135 W Commercial St., East Rochester. bistro135.net, 6625555. 6:30 p.m. Free.  East End Jazz Boys. Havana Moe’s, 125 East Ave., 3251030. 9 p.m. Free.  Fred Costello & Roger Eckers Duo. Charley Brown’s Restaurant, 1675 Penfield Rd., 385-9202. Call for info. Free. Jazz at Jazzy’s. Jasmine’s Asian Fusion, 657 Ridge Rd, Webster. 216-1290. 8:30-11 p.m. Free.  Joe Santora Trio w/Emily Kirchoff. Michael’s Valley Grill, 1694 Penfield R, Penfield. 383-8260. 7 p.m. Free.  Ted Nicolosi and Shared Genes. Jasmine’s Asian Fusion, 657 Ridge Rd, Webster. JasminesAsianFusion.com, 216-1290. 6:30 p.m. Free. The Jimmie Highsmith Experience. Tala Vera, 155 State St., tala-vera.com, 5463945. 9 p.m. $10, dinner required before 9 p.m.  [ Pop/Rock ] BML w/Philo Beddoe. Montage Music Hall, 50 Chestnut Plaza. themontagemusichall.com, 232-1520. 8 p.m. Call for info.  Jam Level 3. Boulder Coffee Co. - Alexander St., 100 Alexander St., bouldercoffeeco.com. 8 p.m. Free.  Jumbo Shrimp. Anchor Bar Marketplace. anchorsportsbar. com, 272-9333. Call for info. Lower Town Trio. Monty’s Krown Lounge, 875 Monroe Ave., 271-7050. 9 p.m. $3-$5.  Me & The Boyz. Captain Jack’s Goodtime Tavern, 8505 Greig St., Sodus Point. captainjacksgoodtimetavern. com, 315-483-9570. 9 p.m. Call for info.  Mud Creek. Flaherty’s Honeoye Falls, 60 W Main St., Honeoye Falls, NY 14472. flahertys.com, 497-7010. Call for info. Mulletude w/Power Down. Pineapple Jacks, 485 Spencerport Rd., 247-5225. 9 p.m. Call for info.  Mushroomhead w/Hed Pe. Montage Music Hall, 50 Chestnut Plaza.frontgatetickets. com, themontagemusichall. com. 7 p.m. $18.  20 City APRIL 18-24, 2012

POP/ROCK | Sports

Sure, I’m biased; I love the Rochester rock ’n’ roll. But I challenge anyone to find me a more perfect pop band than Sports. This band embraces pop from the no-wave era — that period between punk and new wave that had the former’s anger and intensity and the latter’s hooks and fun. The comparisons to Elvis Costello are unavoidable, what with the band’s Attractions-style instrumentation and singer Ian Proper’s halting phrasing and drama. Son of the Sun, The Admirers, and Josh Netsky add to the fun. Sports performs Saturday, April 21, 8 p.m. at the Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. $7-$9. 454-2966, bugjar.com. — BY FRANK DE BLASE Naked Grey. McKenzie’s Irish Pub - W. Henrietta Rd., mckenziesirishpub.com. 9 p.m. Free.  Nod CD release show w/Muler. Skylark Lounge. skylarklounge@yahoo.com. 9 p.m. Free, tips welcomed. Northside Johnny. Shooters Sports Bar & Grill, 1226 Fairport Rd., shootersny.com, 924-9914. Call for info. Open G. Six Pockets, Ridge Hudson Plaza. sixpockets.net, 266-1440. 9 p.m. Call for info.  Peachy Neachy w/Sirsy, Seahshell Radio. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr., lovincup.com, 292-9940. 9 p.m. $5 GA, $3 student.  Record Store Day w/Inner Loop, The Po’ Boys Brass Band, Anonymous Willpower, The Driftwood Sailors, Revengineers, The Tombstone Hands. Record Archive, 33 1/3 Rockwood St., 244-1210. 9 a.m. Free.  Record Store Day w/Peter Stampfel, Djangoners, guest DJs. Bop Shop, 1460 Monroe Ave., bopshop.com. 9 a.m. Free.  Record Store Day: Foot and Mouth Disease, Godzilla, Time Code, Endangered Youth, Third Party Gentlemen, Shawnee Boyeee, Red Inc. House of Guitars, 645 Titus Ave., houseofguitars.com. 10 a.m., music starts at noon. Free.  Steve Bartolotta. Pittsford Pub, 60 S. Main Street, PittsfoRd., pittsfordpub.net, 586.4650. 9 p.m. Call for info.  Teagan & the Tweeds. Dinosaur Bar-B-Que, 99 Court St., dinosaurbarbque.com, 3257090. 10 p.m. Free.  The Skakin’ Bones. Sevens, Rt. 96, Farmington. 924-3232. 8 p.m. Call for info.  The Tombstone Hands & Out Of The Blue. Pub 511, 511 E Ridge Rd., 266-9559. 9 p.m. $5. Tryst. Brickwood Grill, 250 Monroe Ave., Rochester, NY 14607. brickwoodgrill.com, 730-8230. 10 p.m. Call for info. 

WITR Local Night Presenting: Sports w/Son of the Sun, Josh Netsky, and Admirers. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave., bugjar. com, 454-2966. 9 p.m. $7-$9. Limited entry for unders.  Wayward Son. Sully’s Pub, 242 South Ave., 232-3960. 8 p.m. Call for info. 

Sunday, April 22 [ Acoustic/Folk ] Celtic Music. Temple Bar & Grille, 109 East Ave., 2326000. 10 p.m. Free.  [ Blues ] The Meta Accord. Beale Street Cafe, 693 South Ave., bealestreetcafe.com, 2714650. Call for info. [ Classical ] Eastman at St., Michael’s Concert Series. St Michael’s Church, 869 N Clinton Ave., esm.rochester.edu. 2:30 p.m. Free.  Eastman-Ranlet Series - Ying Quartet. Eastman School of Music-Kilbourn Hall, 26 Gibbs St., esm.rochester.edu. 3 p.m. $10-$20, discounts to UR/ student ID holders.  Gibbs & Main. First Baptist Church of Rochester, 175 Allen’s Creek Rd., gibbsandmain.com. 6 p.m. $15 GA, $10 seniors and students, $8 children unde.  Going for Baroque Organ Recital. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave., 276-8900. 1 & 3 p.m. Free w/admission.  Rochester Chamber Orchestra: Mozart’s Triple. Hochstein Performance Hall, 50 N Plymouth Ave., rochesterchamberorchestra. org. 7 p.m. $25 GA, $15 seniors, $10 students.  [ Country ] Sarah and the Tall Boys. Abilene, 153 Liberty Pole Way. abilenebarandlounge. com, 232-3230. 7 p.m. $5. 


[ DJ/Electronic ] Self Made Sundays w/DJ Big Reg. Maxwell’s Resto Lounge, 169 St. Paul St., 503-4163. Call for info. [ Hip-Hop/Rap ] The Industry Part II: Featuring Black Sinatra, Monsta Black, Rocs Reason, King Worthy, Lil Eto. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave., bugjar.com, 454-2966. 9 p.m. $7-$10.  [ Jazz ] An Evening of Jazz w/Dave Mancini and Friends. Downstairs Cabaret Theatre, 20 Windsor St., 325-4370. 7:00 p.m. $21 adults, $18 seniors, $10.50 students. Bill Slater Solo Piano (Brunch). Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr., woodcliffhotelspa.com, 3814000. Call for info. Free.  Fred Costello & Roger Eckers Duo. Charley Brown’s Restaurant, 1675 Penfield Rd., 385-9202. Call for info. Free. Iced Chill. Prosecco Italian Restaurant & Bar, 1550 Route 332, Farmington. proseccoitalianrestaurant.com, 924-8000. 6 p.m. Call for info.  The Smugtown Stompers. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr., lovincup.com, 292-9940. 3 p.m. Free, tips welcomed.   [ Pop/Rock ] Dragon’s 1st Annual Spring Fling w/The Kronic’s, Ransom. California Brew Haus, 402 Ridge Rd W., 621-1480. 1 p.m. $15 per person, $20 couple.  Sepultura w/Death Angel, Krisiun, Havok. Mercia. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N Water St., waterstreetmusic.com, 325-5600. 7:30 p.m. $22-$25.  This A.M. Static. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N Water St., waterstreetmusic.com, 3255600. 5:30 p.m. $10-$12. 

Monday, April 23 [ Classical ] An Afternoon of German Organ Music. Christ Church, 141 East Ave., jenningswj@comcast.net. 3:30 p.m. Free. Penfield Symphony Orchestra: Springtime Celebration. Penfield High School Auditorium. penfieldsymphony.org. 7:30 p.m. $14 GA, $12 seniors, high school and younger free.  [ DJ/Electronic ] Bullet Hell w/Calligraphy, The Yummies. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave., bugjar.com, 454-2966. 9 p.m. $6-$8.  Manic Mondays DJs. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave., 454-2966. 11 p.m. Free.  [ Jazz ] Fred Costello & Roger Eckers Duo. Charley Brown’s Restaurant, 1675 Penfield Rd., 385-9202. Call for info. Free. Mark Bader. Bistro 135, 135 W Commercial St., East Rochester. bistro135.net, 662-5555. 5:30 p.m. Free.  The Westview Project. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr., woodcliffhotelspa.com. 5:30 p.m. Free. 

Tony Gianavola. Beale Street Cafe, 693 South Ave., 2714650, bealestreetcafe.com. 7 p.m. Free.  Watkin and the Rapiers. Little Theatre Cafe, 240 East Ave., thelittle.org. 7:30 p.m. Free.  

Tuesday, April 24 [ Acoustic/Folk ] Fritz’s Polka Band. Sevens, Rt 96, Farmington. 924-3232. 1:30 p.m. Call for info.  Leland Sundries w/Joan Hutcheson. Abilene, 153 Liberty Pole Way. abilenebarandlounge.com, 232-3230. 7:30 p.m. Free.  Reggae Night. Elite Bar & Grill, 398 W Main St., 527-8720. Call for info. Teagan WaRd., Beale Street Cafe, 693 South Ave., bealestreetcafe.com, 2714650. 7 p.m. Call for info.  [ Classical ] Barbershop Harmony. Harmony House, 58 E Main St., Webster. chorusofthegenesee.org. 7 p.m. Free. Open practices/try outs.  [ Jazz ] Ballroom Dance Series w/live music. Edgerton Community Center, 41 Backus St., cityofrochester. gov/ballroomdanceseries. 7:30 p.m. $3. See website for full line up.  Beau. Lemoncello, 137 W Commercial St., E Rochester. lemoncello137.com, 385-8565. 8 p.m. Free.  Fred Costello & Roger Eckers Duo. Charley Brown’s Restaurant, 1675 Penfield Rd., 385-9202. Call for info. Free. Jim Nugent. Bistro 135, 135 W Commercial St., East Rochester. bistro135.net, 6625555. 6 p.m. Free.  Scott Krier. Prosecco Italian Restaurant & Bar, 1550 Route 332, Farmington. proseccoitalianrestaurant.com, 924-8000. 6 p.m. Call for info.  The Chris Hollywood Pro-Am Jam. Abilene, 153 Liberty Pole Way. abilenebarandlounge. com, 232-3230. 9:30 p.m. Free 21+, $5 unders.  Tinted Image. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr., woodcliffhotelspa.com, 3814000. 5:30 p.m. Free.  [ Pop/Rock ] City Lights w/We Still Dream. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N Water St., waterstreetmusic.com, 3255600. 6:30 p.m. $10-$12.  Wizard Rifle w/Torus, The Love Tunnels, Abhor. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave., bugjar.com, 4542966. 9 p.m. $7-$9. 

Wednesday, April 25 [ Acoustic/Folk ] Acoustic Open Jam hosted by The Druids. Rabbit Room Restaurant, 61 N Main St., Honeoye Falls, NY. thelowermill. com. 7:30 p.m. Free.  Reggae Lounge w/DJ Ras Courtney, DJ FreakA-Nature. Abilene,

153 Liberty Pole Way. abilenebarandlounge.com, 232-3230. 8 p.m. Free.  Rob & Gary Acoustic. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr., woodcliffhotelspa.com, 3814000. 5:30 p.m. Free.  Tommy Gravino. Rio Tomatlan, 5 Beeman St., Canandaigua. 394-9380. 6:30 p.m. Free. Salsa w/Shelia dancing during the performance.  [ Blues ] Ezra & The Storm. Dinosaur Bar-B-Que, 99 Court St., dinosaurbarbque.com, 3257090. 9 p.m. Free.  Open Blues Jam w/The King Bees. Beale Street Cafe, 693 South Ave., bealestreetcafe.com, 271-4650. 7:30 p.m. Call for info. 

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[ Classical ] Johnny Matt Band. Ontario Beach Park, 4800 Lake Ave., 865-3320. 6 p.m. Call for info.  [ DJ/Electronic ] DJ Keyyo. TC Riley’s, 200 Park Point Dr., tcrileysparkpoint. com, 272-9777. Call for info. Guest DJs. Vertex, 169 N Chestnut St., 232-5498. 10 p.m. $3-$8.  Teen Set 45 Party. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave., 542-8336. Midnight. Free. Y Not Wednesday w/DJ ET. Venu Resto-Lounge, 151 St. Paul St., 232-5650. 10 p.m. Call for info.  [ Hip-Hop/Rap ] Fever. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N Water St., waterstreetmusic.com, 3255600. 8:30 p.m. $5-$7.  [ Jazz ] El Rojo Jazz. Bistro 135, 135 W Commercial St., East Rochester. bistro135.net, 662-5555. 6 p.m. Free.  Fred Costello & Roger Eckers Duo. Charley Brown’s Restaurant, 1675 Penfield Rd., 385-9202. Call for info. Free. Iced Chill. Lemoncello, 137 W Commercial St., E Rochester. lemoncello137.com, 385-8565. 6 p.m. Free.  Joe Galusha Trio. Prosecco Italian Restaurant & Bar, 1550 Route 332, Farmington. proseccoitalianrestaurant.com, 924-8000. 6 p.m. Call for info.  Margaret Explosion. Little Theatre Cafe, 240 East Ave., thelittle.org. 7:30 p.m. Free.  Open Jam w/The King Bees. Beale Street Cafe, 693 South Ave., bealestreetcafe. com. 7:30 p.m. Free.  [ Pop/Rock ] Abandon Kansas w/Backstage Royalty, So Far So Good. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave., bugjar. com, 454-2966. 9 p.m. $7-$9.  Reverend Horton Heat w/Tommy Brunett, Krypton 88. German House Theatre, 315 Gregory St., upallnightpresents.com. 8 p.m. $22.50-$25. 

rochestercitynewspaper.com City 21


Classical

Barry Snyder, Rose Grace, and Elinor Freer (left to right) practice Mozart’s Concerto for Three Pianos, which will be performed Sunday. PHOTO BY PALOMA CAPANNA

Three is a magic number Rochester Chamber Orchestra David Fetler, conductor w/Barry Snyder, Elinor Freer, Rose Grace, pianos Sunday, April 22 Hochstein School of Music & Dance, 50 N. Plymouth Ave. 7 p.m. | $10-$25 | 442-9778, rochesterchamberorchestra.org [ PREVIEW ] BY PALOMA CAPANNA

How often do even hear of pianists performing on three concert-grand pianos during the same work? The odds are few, considering that the musical choices may be limited to Mozart, Bach, George Antheil, Morton Feldman, Steve Reich, and some Stravinsky transcriptions. On April 22, the audience at the Hochstein School of Music & Dance will be treated to the rare sight and sound of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart’s Concerto for Three Pianos and Orchestra in F Major, K. 242 (also known as “The Lodron Concerto”). Performing the first piano part will be Barry Snyder; the second, Elinor Freer; and the third, Rose Grace. The Rochester Chamber Orchestra will be under the baton of conductor David Fetler. 22 City april 18-24, 2012

“It’s an early piece and shows some of the great genius of Mozart,” says Snyder, a pianist, and a professor of piano at the Eastman School of Music since 1970. Snyder won three prizes at the 1966 Van Cliburn International Piano Competition: the silver medal, the Pan American Union Award, and the Chamber Music Prize. Snyder understands the modern reputation of Mozart’s music, particularly among young piano students. “It is relatively simple music. It can be pretty easy. It’s not as dramatic as, maybe, Shostakovich,” says Snyder. “But with Mozart, it’s the little things that come into play, the musical jokes, and those are maybe not so apparent when you’re young.” For second pianist Elinor Freer, interest in the concerto is not a problem. She’s an unabashed fan of Mozart. “I’m biased because I happen to think Mozart is one of the greatest composers ever,” says Freer. “Anything he wrote — he’s just such a genius. Even his most simplistic pieces, or his so-called lesser works, you’re already starting at an incredibly high level.” Also an accomplished pianist, Freer holds degrees with honors from the Cleveland Institute of Music and the University of Southern California. Freer was awarded a performer’s diploma from the Hogeschool voor de Kunsten Utrecht (Netherlands), and

among her European performances is the Concertgebouw (Amsterdam). Rose Grace, the third pianist for the concerto, is drawn to the second movement of the concerto, which she describes as “charming” and “revealing of [Mozart’s] inner soul.” Grace and Freer will consider minor rearranging of their parts to make the third piano a more active role, perhaps, for example, sharing the credenzas. As Grace pointed out, in Mozart’s day, scores were not viewed with the exactitude they are today; musicians routinely rearranged scores to suit themselves and their instruments. Grace is fond of Mozart concerti, and has written about them during her academic career. She received her doctorate in piano performance from the Eastman School of Music, her masters of arts in musicology from the University of Chicago, and a bachelors of music in piano performance and musicology from the Oberlin Conservatory. Now a teacher at Bethune-Cookman University in Daytona Beach, Florida, Grace has launched a publicschool music-outreach program. Freer is anticipating that the three pianists

will have to take the inherent volume of the modern concert-grand piano into consideration when balancing the sound of the pianos with the orchestra. But, she points

out that Mozart was “very smart” when he prepared the score, because in many sections the three pianos play without orchestra. Freer says, “The score takes care of the balancing.” While the naming of this work as the “Lodron Concerto” could not be singlesourced, various resources brought together tell the story. In the 1770’s, Mozart traveled from one location in Europe to the next to perform concerts, teach students, and win commissions for new works. At the time, classical music for hire to the nobility was the bread and butter of many a classical musician, including Mozart. In 1776, when Mozart was just 20 years old, the Countess Maria Antonia Lodron commissioned Mozart to write a piece for herself and two of her daughters, Aloisia and Josepha. The Countess lived with her husband and eight children at the grand Palazzo Lodron of Nogaredo, where a weekly salon with an amateur orchestra performed on Sundays. The three instruments for the original concert would have been much different than the modern 9’ concert grand pianos, each weighing more than 1000 pounds, made with metal harps of cast iron. Instead, the “piano” instrument of Mozart’s day would have been the “fortepiano,” a predecessor to the modern “pianoforte,” or, “piano.” The fortepiano might only have weighed 100-150 pounds, being made primarily of wood. As Grace points out, “The orchestra will be playing on modern instruments, too; not Baroque or early period instruments with less volume.” Just as Countess Lodron and her daughters would have been knowledgeable of each other’s skills and sensitivities, Snyder, Freer, and Grace know each other as pianists. Snyder taught both Freer and Grace earlier in their careers. “We’re three individuals with slightly different personalities,” says Snyder. “How much each of our approaches to the piece will be the same is a question we’ll have to work out.” Snyder, Freer, and Grace will begin rehearsals at the Eastman School of Music, where special accommodations are being made to bring together three pianos, before the trio shifts over to the pianos at Hochstein. Freer explained that there was a certain amount of logistical challenge in planning the performance as venues were sought with three concert grands, plus a stage that could also accommodate an orchestra. In separate interviews with City, the one word used by all three pianists to describe the Mozart triple piano concerto was “spectacle.” “These three and four monster piano concertos are so unusual that there’s an element of spectacle, acrobatics; the pianists interacting, tossing phrases between the pianos,” says Freer. “It’s incredibly exciting. Whether you are young or old, this piece is attractive.”


[ OPENING ] “Mail Art” Wed Apr 18. MCC Mercer Gallery, 1000 E. Henrietta Rd. 4-6 p.m. 292-2021, monroecc.edu/go/mercer/ “The Ghosts of Auschwitz-Birkenau” &”Histories de France” Fri Apr 20. Image City Photography Gallery, 722 University Ave. 5-8:30 p.m. 482-1976, imagecityphotographygallery.com. 2012 Juried Senior Art Show Sat Apr 21. Davison Gallery at Roberts Wesleyan College, 2301 Westside Drive. 4-6 p.m. 594-6442, roberts. edu/davisongallery. “Transformations,” Women’s Fahsion Exhibit Sat Apr 21. Ock Hee’s Gallery, 2 Lehigh St. 11 a.m.-5 p.m. 624-4730, ockhee@ frontiernet.net. Art Show curated by Artkestry Sun Apr 22. Gallery at the Gables, 2001 Clinton Ave. 2-4 p.m. 461-1880 “Happiness, Fun, and Art,” a display of artwork by the residents of Episcopal SeniorLife Communities Mon Apr 23. My Sister’s Gallery, The Episcopal Church Home, 505 Mt. Hope Ave. 2:30 p.m. 546-8439. [ CONTINUING ] 2 Chic Boutique 151 Park Ave. Through Apr 30: “Little Gardens,” fabric collages by Susie Cohen. Wed-Thu 11 a.m.-7 p.m., Fri 11 a.m.-6 p.m., Sat 11 a.m.-5 p.m. 271-6111, 2chicboutique.com. A.R.T.S. Gallery at Aviv Café 321 East Ave. Through May 30: “Draw Me” by Richmond Futch Jr. Fri 6-11 p.m., Sun 8 a.m.-1 p.m. 729-9916. Arts & Cultural Council Gallery 277 N Goodman St. Through Apr 26: “Brian O’Neill: The Bridge Between Two Worlds.” Mon-Fri 10 a.m.-4 p.m. 473-4000, artsrochester.org. Axom Gallery 176 Anderson Ave. 2nd floor. Through May 26: “Convergence” by Paul Garland. Mon-Fri 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Sat 12-5 p.m. 232.6030 x23, axomgallery. com. Baobab Cultural Center 728 University Ave. Continuing: Magnificent Africa. Thu-Fri 5:309 p.m., Sat 2-4 p.m. 563-2145, thebaobab.org. Black Radish Gallery Village Gate, D Entrance, 274 N. Goodman St. Through Apr 30: “4 Views / 8 Eyes,” work by Zanne Brunner, Jeffrey Young, Courtney Gruttadauria, and Peter Macon. Mon-Fri 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Sat 12-5 p.m. arenaartgroup.com Bridge Gallery Brodie Fine Arts, SUNY Geneseo. Through May 1: Irish Contemporary Art on Paper. | Through Apr 7: Calligraphy Show. Mon-Fri 8 a.m.-11 p.m., SatSun 10 a.m.-11 p.m. 245-5814, Geneseo.edu. B.T. Roberts Memorial Hall Gallery at Roberts Wesleyan College 2301 Westside Drive. Through June 30: “Vapors: The Brevity of Life” by Athesia Benjamin. Mon-Fri 10 a.m.-5 p.m. 594-6800, nes.edu. Bug Jar 219 Monroe Ave. Through May 31: THE LOBBY Presents: Lea Rizzo. Mon-Sun 8 p.m.- 2 a.m. 454-2966, bugjar.com, lobbydigital.com Coach Street Clay 39 Coach Street, Canandaigua. Through May 12: “First then Next,” an exhibition of work by Andrew

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continues on page 24 rochestercitynewspaper.com City 23


THE BIG SPRING SHOW 1•2•3

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Featuring large single pieces, up to 30”x40” and unique diptych & triptych works

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Free & open to the public. Exhibition runs through May 27th.

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The annual carnival-themed event raises money for arts education and facilities in Rochester. Silent-auction items include works of art and items donated by local businesses and organizations, including a pair of Wegmans Rochester LPGA tickets, tickets to local cultural institutions, Rock Ventures rock-climbing classes, and 18 holes of golf at Shadow Pines. In addition to the auction, the evening will feature raffles, silent auction items, hors d’oeuvres, a cash bar with beer from Genesee Brewing Company, and live musical entertainment from Margaret Explosion and Krypton 88. Tickets to the event are $25, and available online at geneseearts.org, by calling 244-1730, at Wegmans “That’s The Ticket!” locations, in advance at GCAE, or at the door. Proceeds support the Genesee Center’s community-outreach programs, keep classes and workshops affordable, and maintain their studio spaces. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY

Art Exhibits Cho. Call for hours. 474-3103, coachstreetclay.com. Community Darkroom Gallery 713 Monroe Ave. Through May 12: “Age of Consequences,” photography by Matthew Christopher. Mon 9 a.m.-9:30 p.m.; Tue-Thu 9 a.m.-6:30 p.m.; Fri 12-5 p.m.; Sat 10 a.m.-5:30 p.m. 271-5920, geneseearts.org. Crocus Clay Works Gallery Hungerford Building Door #2, Suite 225, 1115 E. Main St. Through Apr 28: “Kuma gama: teaware & sculpture by Cody Kroll.” Tue-Wed 5-8 p.m., Sat 10 a.m.-3 p.m., or by appointment. 469-8217, crocusclayworks.com. Davison Gallery at Roberts Wesleyan College 2301 Westside Drive. Through May 5: 2012 Juried Senior Art Show. MonFri 11 a.m.-5 p.m.; Sat 1-4 p.m. 594-6442, roberts.edu/ davisongallery. Finger Lakes Gallery & Frame 36 S. Main St., Canandaigua. Through Apr 28: “Some of My

Best” juried photography show. Mon-Wed 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; Thu 10 a.m.-8 p.m.; Fri 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; Sat 10 a.m.-4 p.m. 396-7210. Friendly Home’s Memorial Gallery 3165 East Ave. Through May 31: “Warm Weather Visions” by Elizabeth Liano. Daily 10 a.m.-5 p.m. 381-1600, friendlyhome.org. Fusion Salon 333 Park Ave. Continuing: “Tongue-in-Cheek!” New Works by Jennifer Cichello. Mon & Tue 9 a.m.-8 p.m., Thu Noon-8 p.m., Fri 9a.m.-6 p.m., Sat 9 a.m.-4 p.m. 271-8120, fusionsalon.us. Gallery at the Art & Music Library University of Rochester River Campus, Rush Rhees Library, Wilson Blvd. Continuing: “Vissection” by Nan Zhu. MonThu 9 a.m.-midnight, Fri 9 a.m.10 p.m., Sat noon-5 p.m., Sun noon-midnight. 275-4476. Gallery @ Equal=Grounds 750 South Ave. Through Apr 28: “Seasons of Change: Multi-media works of art by Allison J. Nichols.” Tue-Fri 7 a.m.-Midnight, Sat-

Sun 10 a.m.-Midnight. gallery@ equalgrounds.com. Gallery at the Gables 2001 Clinton Ave. Opens Apr 22: Art Show curated by Artkestry. Daily 9 a.m.-5 p.m. 461-1880 Gallery at One Bausch & Lomb Place 1 Bausch & Lomb Pl. Through May 15: “Dioversification of Landscapes.” Mon-Fri 7 a.m.-7 p.m., Sat 9 a.m.-2 p.m. 338-6000 Gallery Salon & Spa 780 University Ave. Through Apr 30: “Fractured Fairy Tales” and “American Road Trip” featuring Beth Bailey. TueThu 11 a.m.-8 p.m., Fri 11 a.m.-7 p.m., Sat 9:30 a.m.-3 p.m. 2718340, galleryhair.com. Gallery r 100 College Ave. Through Apr 27: “School of Art Senior Illustration Exhibition.” Wed-Sun 1-5 p.m. galleryr.org. George Eastman House 900 East Ave. Through Sep 16: “See: Untold Stories.” Tue-Sat 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Thu 10 a.m.-8 p.m., Sun 1-5 p.m. $4-$12. 2713361, eastmanhouse.org Gilded Square Picture Framing & Gallery 714 University Ave. Continuing: “Framed” artwork by Keith Uhrich & Michelle Michael. Tue-Fri 11 a.m.-5 p.m., Sat 11 a.m.-3 p.m. 461-2808, gildedsquare.com. Greece Historical Museum 595 Long Pond Rd. Apr 22 & 29: Art Show by the Art Club of the Greece Community & Senior Center. Sundays 1:30-4 p.m. 225-3771, greecehistoricalsociety.net. High Falls Fine Art Gallery 60 Browns Race. Through Apr 27: “A Photographer’s Path 15” and Thaw: “ROC Art,” paintings by Jim Mott. Wed-Fri 11 a.m.5:30 p.m.; Sat Noon-5:30 p.m.; Sun 1-5 p.m. 325-2030, centerathighfalls.org. I-Square Visions 693 Titus Ave., Irondequoit. Through Apr 26: East Meets West Art Show: Eastridge and Irondequoit High Schools’ art students and art teachers. MonFri 10 a.m.-2 p.m., Sat 11 a.m.-2 p.m. 943-1941. Image City Photography Gallery 722 University Ave. Apr 18-May 13: “The Ghosts of AuschwitzBirkenau” & Histoires de France.” Wed-Sat 11 a.m.-7 p.m.; Sun noon-4 p.m. 482-1976, imagecityphotographygallery.com. International Art Acquisitions 3300 Monroe Ave. Through Apr 30: Graphic Work by Henry Moore. Mon-Fri 10 a.m.-9 p.m.; Sat 10 a.m.-6 p.m.; Sun Noon-5 p.m. 264-1440, internationalartacquisitions.com. Joe Bean Coffee Roasters 1344 University Ave., Suite 110. Through Apr 30: “Urban Cultura: Green Culture & Cultivation.” Mon-Wed 7:30 a.m.-7:30 p.m., Thu 7:30 a.m.-9 p.m., Fri 7:30 a.m.-10 p.m., Sat 9 a.m.-10 p.m., Sun 9 a.m.-4 p.m. 3195279, joebeanroasters.com. Legacy at the Fairways 681 High Street, Victor. Through Apr 28: Rochester Area Colored Pencil Club. Call for viewing hours. 924-7043 Link Gallery at City Hall 30 Church St. Through Apr 30: “Forever Focused,” works by Studio 678, the Wilson Foundation Academy Photo Club. Mon-Fri 9 a.m.-5 p.m. 271-5920, cityofrochester.gov.


Little Theatre Café 240 East Ave. Through Apr 27: Thomas Galambos. Sun 5-8 p.m. MonThu 5-10 p.m.; Fri-Sat 5-11 p.m. 258-0403, thelittle.org. Memorial Art Gallery 500 University Ave. Through May 20: “Crafting Modernism: Midcentruy American Art and Design.” | Lucy Burne Gallery: In the Lockhart Gallery, Through May 6: Modern Icon: The Machine as Subject in American Art.” Wed-Sun 11 a.m.-5 p.m., Thu until 9 p.m., $5-$12. Thu night reduced price: $6 from 5-9 p.m. 276-8900, mag.rochester.edu. Mill Art Center & Gallery, 61 N Main St, Honeoye Falls. Through May 19: “Connie Ehindero: 20 Views Within 20 Yards.” Mon-Fri & Sat 11 a.m.-3 p.m., Fri 11 a.m.-8 p.m. Free. 624-7740, millartcenter.com. MCC Mercer Gallery 1000 E. Henrietta Rd. Through Apr 27: “Mail Art.” Mon-Thu 11 a.m.-6 p.m.; Fri 11 a.m.-4 p.m. 2922021, monroecc.edu/go/mercer/ Muddy Waters Geneseo 53 Main St., Geneseo. Through Apr 30: Paintings by Robert Frank Abplanalp. Mon-Fri 6:30 a.m.-7 p.m.; Wed 6:30 a.m.-10 p.m.; Sat 8 a.m.-7 p.m.; Sun 8 a.m.-5 p.m. 243-9111, mwcoffeehouse.com. My Sister’s Gallery The Episcopal Church Home, 505 Mt. Hope Ave. Apr 18-May 28: “Happiness, Fun, and Art,” a display of artwork by the residents of Episcopal SeniorLife Communities. Daily 10 a.m.-8 p.m. 546-8439. Nazareth College Arts Center Gallery 4245 East Ave. Through Apr 22: Undergraduate Student Art Show. Wed-Thu 12-5 p.m., Fri 12-8 p.m., Sun 12-5 p.m. 3895073, naz.edu. Nazareth College Colacino Gallery 4245 East Ave. Through May 11: “Brooklyn Bound: A Survey of Brooklyn Art.” Wed-Sat 12-5 p.m. 389-5073, naz.edu. Ock Hee’s Gallery 2 Lehigh St. Apr 21-May 25: “Transformations,” Women’s Fashion Exhibit. ThuSun 11 a.m.-5 p.m. 624-4730, ockhee@frontiernet.net. Orange Glory Café 240 East Ave. Continuing: “Cloudage” by Gerry Szymanski. Mon-Fri 11 a.m.-3 p.m. 232-7340. Oxford Gallery 267 Oxford St. Apr 21-Jun 2: “Palimpsest.” Tue-Fri Noon-5 p.m; Sat 10 a.m.-5 p.m. 271-5885, oxfordgallery.com. Record Archive 33 1/3 Rockwood St. Through Apr 30: “Peter Plastic Presents: Vacuum-formed wall reliefs.” Mon-Sat 10 a.m.-9 p.m., Sun noon-5 p.m. alayna@ recordarchive.com. Rochester Contemporary Arts Center 137 East Ave. Through May 13: “Work It: Artists Address Labor & Unemployment” and “Visual Rhythms” by Kristine Bouyoucos. Wed-Sun 1-5 p.m., Fri 1-10 p.m. 461-2222, rochestercontemporary.org. $1. RIT Univeristy Gallery 90 Lomb Memorial Drive. Booth Hall. Through May 26: “Frances & Albert Paley.” Mon-Fri 9 a.m.-5 p.m.; Sat 10 a.m.-2 p.m. 4752404. Roz Steiner Art Gallery 1 College Rd., Batavia. Through Apr 26: Student Art Show. Call for hours. 343-0055 x6448, genesee.edu.

DANCE | BHARATA UTSAV 2012 Prepare to be mesmerized and delighted by vibrant color and grace, because on Sunday, April 22, at 3:30 p.m., Bharata School of Indian Dance & Music will present its annual recital, Bharata Utsav 2012, in collaboration with UnTap’d Rhythm Tap Ensemble. The recital will take place at The Harley School (1981 Clover St.) and will feature “sangamam,” or union, which is a blend of the most popular and beautiful South Indian classical dance, Bharatanatyam, and Carnatic music, along with other popular contemporary dances, including folk dances of India, some set to live orchestra. Proceeds from the event goes in supporting STEM_SMART, a non-profit located in Rochester dedicated to increasing the number of minorities and female students pursuing careers in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics. Premium tickets are $25, regular tickets are $20, students with ID get in for $15, and children under 5 are admitted free. Get advance tickets at India Market (3259 Winton Rd. #2), India house (999 Clinton Ave.), Namaste (3047 W.Henrietta Rd.), Thali of India (3259 Winton Rd.), or at the door the day of the event. For more information, contact Dr. Uma G. Gupta at 489-4606 or guptaguma@gmail. com, or Parvatha Chidambaram at 264-9499 or parvatha@ bharataschoolofarts.com. For more information on the school visit bharataschoolofarts.com. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY Rush Rhees Library Rare Books and Special Collections University of Rochester River Campus, Rush Rhees Library, Wilson Blvd. Through Aug 17: “Picturing AIDS and Its Publics,” educational AIDS posters from the Atwater Collection, and “Springing to Life: Moveable Books and Mechanical Devices.” Mon-Fri 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Sat 11 a.m.-3 p.m. 475-6766. Sage Art Center UR River Campus. Through August 2012: Photo exhibit by Thomas Evans, curated by Jessica Holmes. Mon-Thu 9 a.m.-11p.m., Fri 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Sat-Sun 2-6 p.m. 273-5995, rochester.edu/college/ AAH/facilities/sage School of Photographic Arts & Sciences Gallery Rochester Institute of Technology, 1 Lomb Memorial Dr. Through Apr 5: “Photo Art Collective: I Know You through Pictures.” MonFri 9 a.m.-6 p.m. 475-2616, iknowyouthroughpictures. blogspot.com. Spectrum Gallery at Lumiere Photo, 100 College Ave. Continuing: “Photo Spectrum: Daguerreotype to Digital.” Mon-Fri 9 a.m.-6 p.m., Sat 10 a.m.-2 p.m. 461-4447, lumierephoto.com. Starry Nites Café 696 University Ave. Continuing: “Autism Does Not Define Me” photographs by Sam Maloney. Mon-Thu 7:30 a.m.-10 p.m., Fri 7:30 a.m.midnight, Sat 8 a.m.-midnight, Sun 9 a.m.-9 p.m. 271-2630, starrynitescafe.com

Stella Art Gallery & Studio 350 West Commercial St., East Rochester. Continuing: “Diversarty,” watercolors & photography by Mario Kozinczak. Thu 9 a.m.-4 p.m., Fri 9 a.m.-9 p.m., Sat noon-9 p.m. stellaartgalleryandstudio.com. Steve Carpenter Gallery and Studio 176 Anderson Ave. Through May 16: Kevin Feary: “Where Do We Go From Here?” Daily 1-4 p.m. 758-1410, stevecarpenterstudio.com. Strong Behavioral Health University of Rochester Medical Center, 601 Elmwood Ave. Through Jun 25: “Balance.” Visit site for hours. urmc.rochester.edu. Tower Fine Arts Center @ SUNY Brockport 180 Holley St. Through May 16: “Rendered from the Right Brain,” 2012 Annual Student Art Exhibition. Mon-Fri 10 a.m.-4 p.m. 395ARTS, brockport.edu. Visual Studies Workshop 31 Prince St. Through Apr 22: “Hank Willis Thomas.” Thu 5-8 p.m., Sat-Sun noon-5 p.m. | Apr 19-29: ARTBOOK@VSW. Special hours: Apr 19-20 5-8 p.m., Apr 21-22 12-5 p.m., Apr 25-27 5-8 p.m., Apr 28-19 12-5 p.m. 4428676, vsw.org. Wallace Library Rochester Institute of Technology, 1 Lomb Memorial Dr. Through Aug 6: “The Light of the Sublime: The Works of Rumi as Interpreted continues on page 26 rochestercitynewspaper.com City 25


Theater

Art Exhibits

communicate primarily by shouting, including mine) it proved overwhelming in several of the scenes. Also, bear in mind that much of the comedy in the show is low-key, observational humor. It’s pleasant but does not inspire much in the way of laugh-out-loud moments. Thomas Schario gets the bulk of the lines

Davida Bloom, Kara Minute, Thomas Schario, and Richard St. George (clockwise, from bottom left) in “Leaving Iowa.” photo courtesy campbell photos

Life in the back seat “Leaving Iowa” Through May 13 Downstairs Cabaret Theatre, 3450 Winton Place $25-$36 | 325-4370, downstairscabaret.com [ REVIEW ] BY ERIC REZSNYAK

While considering “Leaving Iowa,” the new comedy at the Downstairs Cabaret Theatre’s Winton Place location, the words that kept coming back to me were “quaint,” “American,” “identifiable,” and “universal.” The DCT website references a review that places the play in “Mitch Albom territory.” That’s a good summation of the show. It’s a wholesome, relatable piece that will seem familiar to anyone who ever burned his lower thighs on the Naugahyde-covered back seat of a station wagon on a long car trip, bored out of his mind, besieged by irritating siblings, and trying to parse the logic of squabbling parents. Although sometimes lacking in laughs, the comedy about family road trips has its charms. Perhaps fittingly, it finds its way as it gets closer to the end. “Leaving Iowa” starts with a quintessential American middle-class family in the car on its annual summer vacation, dealing with those quintessential American road-trip issues. Dad has no 26 City april 18-24, 2012

idea where he is. Brother and Sister whine and yell and get one everyone’s nerves. Mom tries desperately to hold on to order and sanity. Quickly, however, the show slips ahead in time, and the focus shifts to the now-adult son, who undertakes an entirely different road trip. Through flashes of adventures in both the family’s past and present we get a story of a young man struggling to balance familial obligations and personal goals. And that is where the play succeeds most, with the emotional undercurrents we can all understand. The circular ending to the show is a lovely final touch. Throughout the first act of the play, I assumed that the piece was autobiographical; all of the situations, humor, and characters felt very real to me. But a look at the bios of the co-writers Tim Clue and Spike Manton — neither of whom are from Iowa — suggest that this is in fact a work of fiction, informed by their own personal experiences. That the story is so natural and believable is a credit to them, and to the cast. Unfortunately that compliment is a bit of a double-edged sword. The family presented in the play is very much a typical American family, which is to say that it is also at times dull, irritating, and loud — very, very loud. There is a lot of yelling in this play, and while that fits the characters and situations (lots of families

as Don, the son. Schario is a likable lead, brings good energy to both the adult and child parts of his character, and delivers flawless, natural line reads. Richard St. George plays the unnamed father with a mix of excitement, pride, and that kind of gooberish energy that makes kids bury their palms in their hands and moan, “Oh, DAD.” As Mom, Davida Bloom veers between stern and chipper in the past portions of the show and slightly befuddled in the present. Kara Minute is given fairly little to do as Sis. Having only brothers, I had to ask my companion if sisters really are that whiny and annoying, and he replied in the affirmative. So good job, I guess. (I should clarify: Minute is not annoying; she simply does a good job bringing those aspects of the character to life.) Perhaps because much of the humor in the show is understated, the two supporting actors —Jackie Schram and Bradley J. Sumner — play their multiple incidental characters extremely large. Like, dialed-to-13 large. Schram and Sumner are both talented, and when they’re more reserved, such as when playing a couple of Kansas hog farmers, they are naturally charming. But in other scenes the overacting is just too much. During the portion where Sumner played a Civil War re-enactor, he was yelling so loudly that I actually felt assaulted. The co-direction by Eddie Urish and Tim Clue is slick; scenes that change from place to place and time to time flow smoothly from one to another. (They do frequently shatter the illusion that the cast is in a car when characters get up and move around, but given how much of the play occurs in a station wagon, that’s preferable to four people sitting transfixed on crates.) There are countless lighting and sound cues in this show, all of which went off without a hitch. And the projections used consistently throughout the play were well designed and implemented, and made the show stronger rather than distracting from the proceedings. I also enjoyed the Iowa facts that flashed on the screen prior to curtain time. Did you know Iowa has the highest literacy rate in the country? Perhaps it’s because all those kids have to pass the time doing something on those long summer car trips.

by Zahra Partovi and Vincent FitzGerald & Co.” Mon-Fri 9 a.m.noon and 1-5 p.m. 475-4213. West Side Gallery SUNY Brockport, 180 Holley St., Brockport. Through Apr 19: “Eat Your Heart Out,” a mixed media exhibition by Alyssa C. Hutchins. Mon-Thu 10 a.m.-5 p.m. 395ARTS, brockport.edu. Williams-Insalaco Gallery 34 at FLCC, 3325 Marvin Sands Dr., Canandaigua. Through Apr 20: The Arena Art Group Exhibition. Mon-Thu 8:30 a.m.-9 p.m., Fri 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m., Sat-Sun noon-5 p.m. 394-3500 x7369, gallery34@flcc.edu.

Art Events [ Thursday, April 19 ] SageFest. University of RochesterSage Art Center, 835 Wilson Blvd. 273-2267. 4-7 p.m. Free. [ Friday, April 20 ] Healing Through Art: Adult Day Health Anniversary and participant Art Show. AIDS Care, 259 Monrow Ave. Heather 2104131, hgallant@acRochester.org. 8-10 a.m. RSVP. Presenting Rochester Artists John Hendry and Rachel Harnish and wine tasting. Wine Sense, 749 Park Ave. 271-0590. 5-7 p.m. Free. [ Saturday, April 21 ] 10th Annual “Evening With the Arts” Spring Auction. High Falls Fine Art Gallery, 60 Browns Race. 271-5920, geneseearts.org. 6:309:30 p.m. $25. ArtAwake. Rorbach Brewing Co., 97 Railroad St. info@artawake. org, artawake.org. 2 p.m.midnight. $7-$11. Make Your MARC Mural Debut & RocPK 1-Year Anniversary Celebration. 121 Lincoln Ave. marcmurals@gmail.com. Ninja Warrior Competition 2-5 p.m., Celebration Mural Debut and 1-Yr Anniversary 5-8 p.m. Free, $10 ninja warrior competitors fee. Speak Out Rochester. Hochstein Performance Hall, 50 N Plymouth Ave. Melanie Blow 315-6480, speakoutny@yahoo.com. 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Free. Weaving & Fiber Arts Center Open House. Weaving and Fiber Arts Center, Studio 1940, Piano Works Mall, 349 West Commercial St., East Rochester. 377-2955, weaversguildofrochester.org/ center. 1-5 p.m. Free. [ Saturday, April 21Sunday, April 22 ] All Member Ikebana Exhibit and Teacher Demonstrations. Barnes & Noble @ RIT, 100 Park Point Dr. ikebanarochester.org. Sat 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Sun 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Free admission. [ Tuesday, April 24 ] Dick Kane Watercolor Demonstration at Irondequoit Art Club Meeting. Chapel Oaks Community Center, 1500 Portland Ave. 787-4086, 704-5020, irondequoitartclub.org. 7:30 p.m. Free.

Comedy [ Wednesday, April 18 ] Search Engine Improv Presents Harold Night. The


free

Space, 1115 E. Main St., The Hungerford Building, Door 2: Floor 2. Contact@ searchengineimprov.com. 7:30-9 p.m. $5, 2 for $5 with College ID. searchengineimprov.com/haroldteams/what-is-a-harold-team.

[ Friday, April 20Saturday, April 21 ] Geva Comedy Improv: “Test Pilots.” Geva Theatre Center, 75 Woodbury Blvd. 232-4382, gevacomedyimprov.org. 7:30 p.m. $10. Village Idiots: Director’s Cut/Last Idiot Standing. Village Idiots Pillar Theater, Village Gate 1st floor, 274 North Goodman St., #D106. 797-9086, vip@improvVIP.com, improvVIP.com. Director’s Cut 7:30 p.m., Last Idiot Standing 9:30 p.m. $5 per show. [ Saturday, April 21 ] Nuts and Bolts Comedy Improv. Downstairs Cabaret Theatre Center, 540 E Main St. 3254370, downstairscabaret.com, nacbcomedy.com. 8 p.m. $10. SEI Presents: Jimmy Carrane Special Event Showcase. The Space Theater, Hungerford Building, 1115 East Main St., Door 2, Floor 2. 269-4673, thespacerochester.com. 8:309:30 p.m. $10-$15. [ Sunday, April 22 ] Provumentary Improv and Smugtown Stompers Band. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 607760-0422. 3-6 p.m. Free.

Dance Events [ Thursday, April 19 ] Jamey Leverett’s brand new unnamed piece. Rochester City Ballet, 1326 University Ave. 4615850, kfassler@rochestercityballet. com. 6:30-8 p.m. Call for details. [ Sunday, April 22 ] Bharata Utsav 2012. The Harley School, 1981 Clover St. 4894606, 264-9499, guptaguma@ gmail.com, parvatha@ bharataschoolofarts.com. 3:30 p.m. $15-$25, under age 5 free.

Festivals [ Friday, April 20Sunday, April 22 ] Bird of Prey Days. Braddock Bay Park. 267-5483, information@ bbrr.org. Fri 7-9 p.m., Sat-Sun 7:30 a.m.-4 p.m. Free for kids; suggested $3 donation for adults. [ Saturday, April 21 ] Hamlin Earth Day at the Park. Area 3, Hamlin Beach State Park. 964-2462. 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Free admission. continues on page 28

Tasting Event!

� Tuesday April 24th � from 5-9pm

[ Thursday, April 19 ] Laugh Riot Presents: The 420 Tokes and Jokes Show! The Space Theater, Hungerford Building, 1115 East Main St., Door 2, Floor 2. info@laughriotcomedy. com, laughriotcomedy.com. 8-10 p.m. $5. [ Thursday, April 19Saturday, April 21 ] Pauly Shore/Brian Herberger. Comedy Club, 2235 Empire Blvd, Webster. 671-9080, thecomedyclub.us. Thu 7:30 p.m., Fri-Sat 7:30 & 10 p.m. $9-$12.

Chocolate

Cocoa Bean Shoppe and village boutiques on Main Street will be open!

Fine Chocolate and Wine Tasting!

Hamlin Earth Day at the Park will be taking place Saturday, April 21, 9 a.m.-3 p.m. at Hamlin Beach State Park (1 Camp Road, Hamlin). The event will feature a number of environmental information booths, participatory crafts, eco-friendly vendors, and a display of fuel-efficient vehicles. Other activities include a beach clean-up 10:30 a.m.-noon and music by The Dady Brothers at 1 p.m. For more information visit hamlinny.org. If you have hazardous waste and no clue what to do with it, head out Saturday, April 21, 7:45 a.m.-1 p.m., to the Town of Penfield Highway Garage (1607 Jackson Road), where you will be able to bring in your household hazardous waste and dispose of it properly. Items accepted for disposal include toxic, lead-based, flammable, and other chemicals that should not be let into the environment. To schedule an appointment and for further information, visit monroecounty.gov/hhw.

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Across from Federal Building

PITTSFORD MAIN STREET SHOPPING

SPECIAL EVENT | EARTH DAY EVENTS As Uncle Ben once told Peter Parker, “With great power, comes great responsibility.” This holds true with Earth Day. While humanity has accomplished extraordinary things, it is our responsibility to help preserve the natural beauty of our planet. Even if we don’t contribute every day, little by little, there is one day a year that we all can do something to better our environment. Earth Day takes place on Sunday, April 22. Here are just a few eco-friendly Rochester-area events to inspire you to think about the environment.

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Rochester Chamber Orchestra PRESENTS

MOZART’S TRIPLE Concerto for Three Pianos and more April 22, 7 p.m. at Hochstein Performance Hall

www.RochesterChamberOrchestra.org

Earth Day at Tinker Nature Park (1525 Calkins Road) will take place Saturday, April 21, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Activities include wetland explorations with RIT environmental-science students, crafts for the kids, and the live animal program “Vanishing Species” presented by World of Wildlife Education at 11 a.m. This is a free event, for more information, visit: https://sites.google.com/site/hansennaturecenter. On Saturday, April 21, WXXI will be celebrating Earth Day at the Seneca Park Zoo (2222 St. Paul St.) 10 a.m.-4 p.m. In addition to the animals that the zoo has to offer, there will be a scavenger hunt, hands-on nature tracker activities, and a free screening of an episode of “Dinosaur Train.” This event is included with regular zoo admission. For more information and tickets, visit senecaparkzoo.org. Helmer Nature Center (154 Pinegrove Ave.) will be holding its Earth Day event on Saturday, April 21, noon-3 p.m. This free event will include a nature hike, reading of “The Lorax,” recycled-materials crafts, environmental songs, and other educational opportunities. For more info call 336-3035. Discover more ways to protect the environment during Earth Day at the RMSC (657 East Ave.) Saturday, April 21-Sunday, April 22, noon-4 p.m. Learn about recycling and how easy it is to be “green,” discover how chemists promote a better world through new and innovative means, and investigate humankind’s effect on waterways. This event is included with regular museum admission. For more information visit rmsc.org. — BY ALEX STEINGRABER rochestercitynewspaper.com City 27


Festivals [ Sunday, April 22 ] Family Wellness Fest. Penfield Community Recreation Center, 1985 Baird Rd, Penfield. 3408655, wellness@penfield.org. 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Free.

Kids Events [ Thursday, April 19 ] 5, 2, 1, 0: Be a Healthy Hero: School-Age Activity Series. Brighton Memorial Library, 2300 Elmwood Ave. 784-5300, brightonlibrary.org. 6 p.m. Free, register. Part Two: Eat Well.

[ Sunday, April 22 ] Seed Starting Workshop. Wayside Garden Center, 124 Pittsford-Palmyra Rd, Macedon. 223-1222 x100, trish@ waysidegardencenter.com. 2-4 p.m. Pay by container, register. [ Tuesday, April 24 ] Lion vs Gazelle. Helmer Nature Center, 154 Pinegrove Ave. 359-7044, naturecenter@ henrietta.org. 4-5:30 p.m. $5$7, register by 4/20.

Lectures

[ Saturday, April 21 ] Earth Day Celebration. Seneca Park Zoo, 2222 St Paul Blvd. 336-7212, senecaparkzoo.org. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. $7-$10, under age 2 and members free. Earth Day at Tinker Nature Park. Tinker Nature Park/Hansen Nature Center, 1525 Calkins Rd, Henrietta. 359-7044, naturecenter@henrietta.org. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Free. Sunflower Presentation. Wayside Garden Center, 124 PittsfordPalmyra Rd, Macedon. 223-1222 x100, trish@waysidegardencenter. com. 2-3 p.m.

[ Wednesday, April 18 ] “War of 1812: Fury, Frenzy, and Honor” by Raya Lee. Wood Library, 134 N Main St, Canandaigua. 394-1381, woodlibrary.org. 6:30 p.m. Free. 10 Magnum Photographers. Rochester Institute of Technology-Webb Auditorium, 1 Lomb Memorial Dr. 475-2717. 8 p.m. Free. You Mean I Agreed to What? Making sure your contract is worth the paper it is written on. Arts & Cultural Council Gallery, 277 N Goodman St. 473-4000 x215, ashaughnessy@artsrochester.org. 10 a.m.-noon. $50, free to ACC members, RSVP.

[ Saturday, April 21Sunday, April 22 ] “Go, Dog. Go!” TYKEs. Jewish Community Center, 1200 Edgewood Ave. 461-2000 x235, jcccenterstage.org, tykestheatre. org. Sat 2 p.m., Sun 11 a.m. & 2 p.m. $14.

[ Thursday, April 19 ] 14th Annual Environmental Forum: Our Water’s Fragile Future: Hydrofracking, Climate Change, and Privatization. First Unitarian Church, 220 S Winton Rd. 234-1056, sierraclubforum@ gmail.com, NewYork.SierraClub.

Org/Rochester. 5:30 p.m. doors open, 7-9 p.m. progra.m. Free, $5 donations appreciated. 1942 Doolittle Raid Over Tokyo. Henrietta Public Library, 455 Calkins Rd. 359-7092, hpl.org. 6:30-8:30 p.m. Free, register. Arts & Lectures: Wallace Shawn. Downtown Presbyterian Church, 121 N Fitzhugh St. 546-8658, artsandlectures.org. 7:30 p.m. $15 standing room. Endgame: The End of the World Debt Supercycle. Penfield Community Recreation Center, 1985 Baird Rd, Penfield. 3408655, penfield.org. 12:30-1:30 p.m. Free. Liberal Arts Lecture Series: “The Undesirable Wife: Sex Scandals and the Wifely Script.” Campus Center Reading Room, Rochester Institute of Technology. 4752076, mmjsrs@rit.edu. 4-6 p.m. Free. With Hinda Mandell, assistant professor in the Department of Communications. Local Midcentury Modern Landmarks. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. 276-8900, mag.rochester.edu. 7 p.m. Included with museum admission: $2.50-$6. New Insights & Treatments for Lymphoma Conference. Inn on the Lake, 770 S Main St, Canandaigua. 1-800-784-2368 x4667, coleen.jones@lls.org. Dinner 5-6 p.m., progra.m. 67:30 p.m. Free, register by 4/11. UNAR Annual Meeting & Awards Dinner. Diplomat Banquet Center, Diplomat Way 14606, off Lyell Ave. 473-7286, unar@

unar.org. 5:30-9 p.m. $25-35. Keynote Speaker Jane Roberts, Founder of 34 Million Friends of United Nations Population. “Stage Whispers” Conversation Features Skip Greer, Star of Geva’s “Superior Donuts.” Tower Fine Arts Center Mainstage, 180 Holley St., College at Brockport. 395-2787, brockport.edu/ finearts. 10 a.m. Free. “Steuben Glass: Quality, Craftsmanship and Design,” with Robert Cassetti. Geneva Historical Society Museum, 543 S Main St, Geneva. 315-7895151, genevahistoricalsociety. com. 7:30 p.m. Free.

Regenerative Energy Symposium. SUNY Geneseo-Wadsworth Auditorium, Holcomb 203, Geneseo. geo@geneseo.edu. 8:30-11:30 a.m. Wadsworth Auditorium, 11:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m. Welles Hall. Free. Simple Secrets to Great B & W Photography with Cole Thompson. 1600 East Ave. 2712540. 1-4 p.m. $35, RSVP.

[ Friday, April 20 ] Judicial Process Commission 40th Anniversary Luncheon. Temple B’rith Kodesh, 2131 Elmwood Ave. 325-7727, janecoons@rocjpc.org. 11:30 a.m. $15 speaker only, $30 includes lunch, register. Featuring Peter Neufeld Cofounder and co-director of The Innocence Project. New York State Wrongful Convictions Conference: “Justice Miscarried: Convicting the Innocent.” Rochester Institute of Technology, Liberal Arts Hall, room A205. rit.edu/cla/ wrongfulconvictions. 8 a.m.-5 p.m. $60-$75, register.

[ Sunday, April 22Tuesday, April 24 ] “Knowledge, Expertise, Leadership: Influence Change in Your Organization,” Technical Communication Conference. Rochester Institute of Technology, Golisano Hall Auditorium, 20 Lomb Memorial Drive, Building 70, Room 1400. stc-rochester.org, spectrum@ stc-rochester.org. “Suburban Outlaw” Pa.m. Sherman address Sun 6:30 p.m. Free, register.

[ Saturday, April 21 ] Landmark Society 2012 Preservation Conference. Colgate Rochester Crozer Divinity School, 1100 South Goodman St. 5467029 x11, landmarksociety.org. 8 a.m.-5 p.m. $45-$95, register.

[ Sunday, April 22 ] Dr. Walter Brueggemann: The Food Fight in Faith. Asbury First United Methodist Church, 1050 East Ave. 271-1050 x103. 7 p.m. $10/$5 seniors and students.

[ Tuesday, April 24 ] 7th Annual Reshaping Rochester Series “Downtown: It’s About People Not Projects!” Gleason Works Auditorium, 1000 University Avenue. 271-0520, rrcdc.org. 7-9 p.m. $10. Michael Watkins AIA, AICP, CNU, ICA & CA LEED. NeighborWorks Rochester & Green Neighborhoods: “Rocehster Multiversity.” Staybridge Suites

Hotel, 1000 Genesee St. Emily Klotz 325-4170 x317. 6 p.m. Free, RSVP. A discussion of the positive affects a universityconnected bike corridor would have on Rochester.

Literary Events [ Thursday, April 19 ] Book Launch Party: “The Storehouses of the Snow: Psalms, Parables and Dreams” by Phil Memmer. Writers & Books, 740 University Ave. 4732590, wab.org. 7 p.m. $3-$4. Book Discussion: “Horoscopes for the Dead” by Billy Collins. Penfield Public Library, 1098 Baird Rd, Penfield. 3408720. 7-9 p.m. Free. Leader: Kathleen Wakefield. Book Group: The Culinary Reading and Discussion Group. Writers & Books, 740 University Ave. 473-2590, wab.org. 6- 8 p.m. Donations appreciated, register. [ Saturday, April 21 ] Poets Respond. Geva Theatre Center, 75 Woodbury Blvd. 4732590, wab.org, gevatheatre.org. 6 p.m. Call for details. Geva Theatre Center’s season contains several plays that were inspired by poetry. To celebrate this, Geva and Writers & Books have asked ten local writers to read the works of ten poets mentioned in Superior Donuts, a play by Tracy Letts. The writers will then read a work of their own in response. Book Signing: Jan Surasky. Books Etc, 78 W Main St, Rt 31, Macedon. 474-4116,

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books_etc@yahoo.com. 2-3:30 p.m. Free. [ Sunday, April 22 ] Book Group: History Book Club: “The Patriot War Along the New York-Canada Border: Raiders and Rebels” by Shaun J. McLaughlin. Lift Bridge Book Shop, 45 Main St, Brockport. 637-2260, liftbridgebooks.com. 2 p.m. Free. [ Monday, April 23 ] World Book Night. Flat Iron Cafe, 561 State St. 247-6446. 7-8:30 p.m. Free. World Book Night started in the U.K. in 2011, and has expanded to the U.S. Our party will include displays of the 30 books highlighted this year, readings by local personalities, giveaways, and more. Poetry Reading: Free Speech Zone Series. Tango Cafe, 389 Gregory St. 260-9005, bit.ly/rochpoets. 8 p.m. Free. Featured poet or musician followed by open mic. [ Tuesday, April 24 ] Book Discussion: Books Sandwiched-In: “A History of the World in 100 Objects” by Neil MacGregor. Central Library, 115 South Ave. 428-8350, libraryweb. org. 12:12-12:52 p.m. Free.

Recreation [ Friday, April 20 ] Family Stroll in the Swamp. Thousand Acre Swamp Sanctuary, 1581 Jackson Rd, Penfield. 7738911. 6:30 p.m. Free. Mars over the Swamp. Thousand Acre Swamp Sanctuary, 1581 Jackson Rd, Penfield. 773-8911.

8 p.m. Free. Leaders will provide telescopes; your own binoculars or telescope is welcome. Bring flashlight. [ Saturday, April 21 ] Birding Trip: Trails at High Acres. Meet at parking lot on Perinton Parkway. Norma 671-9639, Sandy 264-1704, rochesterbirding.com. 8 a.m. Free. GVHC Hike. Seneca Park Zoo lot, by playground. Jim K. 865-7835, gvhchikes.org. 10 a.m. Free. Moderate 9-10 mile hike, Seneca park, turning point park loop. GVHC Leisurely Hike. Durand Park, Zoo Rd. lot. Ann B. 3195794, gvhchikes.org. 1 p.m. Free. 3.5 mile hike. Joint Birding Trip: High Acres Wildlife Refuge. Meet at Perinton Town Hall, 1350 Turk Hill Rd. Janet Miles, 787-0507. 8 a.m. Free. Wear waterproof boots. Serendipity Walk. RMSC Cummings Nature Center, 6472 Gulick Rd, Naples. 374-6160, rmsc.org. 11 a.m.-2 p.m. $3, free to members. Stollin’ for the Colon 5K fundraiser. Cotton Auction House, 120 Court St., Geneseo. 2615648, gastro.urmc.edu. 7:30 a.m. $20-$25, register. The Rochester Orienteering Club Meet. Rochester Institute of Technology, Interfaith Center. 3775650, roc.us.orienteering.org. 11 a.m.-1 p.m. $6 per entry/group. [ Sunday, April 22 ] Birding Trip: Braddock Bay Hawk Lookout. Braddock Bay park, E. Manitou Rd. Bob 671-5690,

rochesterbirding.com. 9:30 a.m. Free. Dr. Tobias Ekeze Memorial Soccer Marathon. Doug Miller Sports Dome, 4618 Ridge Road West. Thomas Langelotti bufflange@ yahoo.com, brockportsoccer.org. 3-10 p.m. $5, or $20 per family. GVHC Hike. Black Creek Park, Green Rd entrance. Pam N. 2245140, gvhchikes.org. 10 a.m. Free. Moderate 5 mile hike. GVHC Hike. Pittsford Plaza by Barnes & Nobel. Iris 334-9072, gvhchikes.org. 1 p.m. Free. Easy 5 mile Pittsford triangle hike. Pizza & Petals. Sterling Nature Center, Off 104 East, Sterling. 315-947-6143, snc@co.cayuga. ny.us. Pizza at noon, Wildflower Walk at 1 p.m. Donations appreciated, register. [ Tuesday, April 24 ] Birding Trip:Beechwood State Park and Olga Fleisher Wildlife Preserve. Meet at Webster Park, corner of Lake and Holt Rds. Kimberly 5032534, rochesterbirding.com. 7 a.m. Free.

Special Events [ Wednesday, April 18 ] Annual Holocaust Commemoration: “Forging New Lives after the Holocaust: Rochester’s Survivor Community.” Jewish Community Center, 1200 Edgewood Ave. 461-2000, jccrochester.org. 7 p.m. Free. [ Thursday, April 19 ] Burrough’s Audubon Nature Club Annual Banquet. Glendoveers,

2328 Old Browncroft Rd. Mary Gordon, 586-3524. 6 p.m. Call for reservations. OnFilm Series: “12 Angry Lebanese: The Documentary” and “Together.” University of Rochester-Hoyt Auditorium, Eastman Quadrangle. rochester. edu/college/onfilm. 7 p.m. Free. RCTV-15 Output Fest. RCTV, 21 Gorham St. 325-1238, rctv15.org. 7-8:30 p.m. Free. Free film screening of locallyproduced films, shorts, PSAs and documentaries by award-winning as well as emerging filmmakers. Rainbow SAGE on the road. Rush Public Library, 5977 East Henrietta Rd. kellyc@gayalliance. org. 1-2 p.m. Free. Single Fun Raisers Happy Hour. Valicia’s Restorante, 2155 Long Pond Road. sandraconvertino@ yahoo.com, singlefunraisers. org. 5-7 p.m. Free. Singles: Rochester’s Single Fun Raisers for people 40 and better. United Nations Association of Rochester Annual Dinner with Jane Roberts. Diplomat Banquet Center, 1 Diplomat Way off Lyell Ave. 4737286, unar@unar.org. 5:30 p.m. $25-$35, register. XRX Pioneer Club Lunch. Golden Ponds, 500 Long Pond Rd. xeroxpioneerclub.org. Noon. $19.50 members, $21.50 guests. Bring donations for Dimitri House & Sister Regis Food Ministry. [ Thursday, April 19Sunday, April 22 ] 39th Rochester Mineralogical Symposium. Radisson Hotel, 175

Jefferson Rd. rasny.org. Visit site for details. Register. 54th Rochester International Film Festival. George Eastman House, 900 East Ave. rochesterfilmfest.org. Thu-Fri 8 p.m., Sat 4 & 8 p.m. Free. [ Friday, April 20 ] Dr. Sketchy’s Anti-Art School. The Space Theater, Hungerford Building, 1115 East Main St., Door 2, Floor 2. 269-4673, thespacerochester.com. 7-10 p.m. BYOB, $10. XRX Pioneer Singles Group. Immanuel Lutheran Church, 131 W. Main St., Webster. xeroxpioneerclub.org. 12:30 p.m. Rubino’s box lunch, semi-annual business meeting follows. $9, register. [ Friday, April 20Saturday, April 21 ] Pittsford Nursery School Garage Sale. Pittsford Nursery School. 381-1390. Fri 10 a.m.-2 p.m., Sat 8:30 a.m.-3 p.m. Free. Held inside the First Presbyterian Church of Pittsford, 25 Church St. [ Friday, April 20-Sunday, April 22 ] New York State AAUW Convention. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. 473-7286, unar@ unar.org. Call for details. [ Saturday, April 21 ] 14th Annual Antique Show & Sale. Genesee Country Village & Museum, 1410 Flint Hill Rd, Mumford. 538-6822, gcv.org. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. $6 admission, members free.

Bush Mango Drum & Dance’s 2nd Annual “Beat the Drum” FriendRaiser. Bush Mango Community Center, 34 Elton St. 235-3960, bushmango.org. 7 p.m. $100, RSVP. Proceeds benefit Bush Mango’s Youth Project. City Newspaper’s Cultural Crawl. Various participating venues throughout rochester. rochestercitynewspaper.com. 10 a.m.-7 p.m. Free, low cost offers. Community Earth Day. Helmer Nature Center, 154 Pinegrove Ave. 359-7044, naturecenter@ henrietta.org. 12-3 p.m. Free. Film: “The Celestine Prophecy.” Healthy Alternatives, 458 Stone Rd. 787-6954. 7 p.m. Free, held only if there are enough RSVPs. Panel Discussion and Film: Taken For Granted or Ignored: African Americans and Two Party Politics. Baobab Cultural Center, 728 University Ave. 563-2145, Baobab.center@ yahoo.com. 4-7 p.m. Free, RSVP. Psychic Fair. Plymouth Spiritualist Church, 29 Vick Park A. 271-1470, plymouthspiritualistchurch.org. 11 a.m.-7 p.m. Free admission. Speak Out Rochester. Hochstein Performance Hall, 50 N Plymouth Ave. Melanie 3156480, speakoutny@yahoo.com. 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Free. Three Heads Beer at Casa Larga. Casa Larga Vineyards, 2287 Turk Hill Rd, Fairport. 2234210, casalarga.com. 12-5 p.m. $5. continues on page 30

rochestercitynewspaper.com City 29


SOS DAY

bike corridor would have on Rochester. Friends of Educational Excellence (FREE) Partnerships Annual Meeting. Central Library, 115 South Ave. freepartnerships.org. 4 p.m. Free. Keynote Speaker RCSD Interim Superintendent Dr. Bolgen Vargas.

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LECTURE | WALLACE SHAWN The name Wallace Shawn might not be immediately recognizable, but as soon as you see or hear the actor, author, intellectual, and humorist, you’ll realize you’ve known his work for years. Shawn not only wrote the well-regarded “My Dinner with Andre,” but he played unforgettable roles in such cult films as “The Princess Bride” and “Clueless,” is a recurring character on the CW teen soap “Gossip Girl,” and is a go-to voice actor for Pixar, having put his unmistakable pipes to use in animated films like “Toy Story,” “The Incredibles,” and “Monsters, Inc.” Shawn speaks Thursday, April 19, as part of the Rochester Arts & Lectures series. The lecture will take place at 7:30 p.m. at the Downtown United Presbyterian Church (121 N. Fitzhugh St.). A limited number of standing-room-only tickets will be available at the door for $15. For more information about the event, and for tickets, visit artsandlectures.org. — BY ALEX STEINGRABER

Special Events [ Saturday, April 21Sunday, April 22 ] Earth Day Celebration. Rochester Museum and Science Center, 657 East Ave. 271-1880, rmsc. org. 12-4 p.m. Included with museum admission: $10-12. West Bloomfield Congregational Church Rummage Sale. West Bloomfield Congregational Church, 9035 Rt 5&20, W. Bloomfield. Teresa Keyes 6247208, wbccoffice@rochester. rr.com. Sat 9 a.m.-2 p.m., Sun 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m. Free. [ Sunday, April 22 ] “Red Carpet Sundays.” Club R.O.A.R., 233 Mill St. redcarpetsundays.eventbrite.com. 6-11 p.m. $5-$10. Ages 25+. Durand Eastman Park Arboretum Tours. Durand Eastman Park. 261-1665, bob.bea@gmail.com. 2-4 p.m. Free. Electronics Recycling. Finger Lakes Community College, 4355 Lakeshore Dr, Canandaigua. sunnking.com/acceptablematerials. 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Free, preview list of accepted items. Fashion on the Green Fashion Show. Penfield Country Club, 1784 Jackson Road, Penfield. 586-7870, truconceptsalon. com. 2-5 p.m. $30, register. ROC the Runway. Harro East Ballroom, 155 Chestnut St. 465-1702, 7-9:30 p.m. $30$60, register. STEM-SMART Fundraiser. The Harley School, 1981 Clover St. 489-4606. 3:30 p.m. $20$25, register. Skin & Steel Motorcycle Show & Swap Meet. Main Street Armory, 900 E Main St. rochestermainstreetarmory. 30 City april 18-24, 2012

com. Noon-6 p.m. $10, kids 12 and under free. Sound Healing and Meditation. Sonnenberg Gardens & Mansion State Historic Park, 151 Charlotte St, Canandaigua. 612-6629 or 208-2501. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. $30-$35, register. Year of the Dragon Fashion Show. School of the Arts (SOTA), 45 Prince St. 768-8631, fccrochester.org. 2-4 p.m. $15. [ Monday, April 23 ] “The Boys Are Back in Town” Fundraiser. Auditorium Theatre, 875 E Main St. 800-745-3000, ticketmaster. com, info@rbtl.org. Doors Open/Silent Auction 6:30 p.m., preshow 7 p.m., curtain 8 p.m. $50-$75, register. Rochester Beekeepers Group. Cornell Cooperative Extension-Rochester, 249 Highland Ave. 820-6619, RochesterBeekeepers@gmail. com. 7 p.m. Free. “Meditate for Wellness” program and “Networking for Wellness.” First Unitarian Church, 220 S Winton Rd. marjorie@centeringforwellness. com, centeringforwellness. org. 7-8:30 p.m. Free, $5 suggested donation. [ Tuesday, April 24 ] “Facing Changes” Open Forum. The Gables at Brighton, 2001 South Clinton Ave. 4611880. 1:30 p.m. Free, RSVP. Facilitator Arlene Levit, M. ED., will focus on bereavement and stress reduction. “Rochester Multiversity” Discussion. Staybridge Suites Hotel, 1000 Genesee St. nwrochester.org. 6 p.m. Free. A discussion on the affects a proposed university-connected

[ Friday, April 20Sunday, April 22 ] Rochester Red Wings vs. Lehigh Valley IronPigs. Frontier Field, 1 Morrie Silver Way. 423-9464, redwingsbaseball.com. Fri 7:05 p.m., Sat-Sun 1:05 p.m. $7-$12. [ Saturday, April 21 ] Dirtcar Racing. Canandaigua Motorsports Park, 2820 Couney Rte. 10, Canandaigua. 394-0961, dirtcar.com. 7 p.m. Call for details. Opening Weekend at The Glen. Watkins Glen International. theglen.com/Tickets-Events/ Events/2011/Opening-Weekend. aspx. Gates at 9 a.m., laps begin at 10 a.m., gates close at 4:30 p.m. Visit web for details. [ Tuesday, April 24Thursday, April 26 ] Rochester Red Wings vs. Syracuse Chiefs. Frontier Field, 1 Morrie Silver Way. 423-9464, redwingsbaseball.com. TueWed 7:05 p.m., Thu 11:35 a.m. $7-$12.

Theater

“Adding Machine: A Musical.” Wed Apr 18-Apr 25. Continues through April 29. Todd Theater, University of Rochester River Campus. Wed Apr 18-Fri 8 p.m., Sat 3 & 8 p.m., Sun 3 p.m., Wed Apr 25 8 p.m. $10-$15. 2754088, rochester.edu/theatre. “Dear Delinquent.” Fri Apr 20-Apr 21. The BUM Players. Brockport United Methodist Church, Fellowship Hall, 92 Main St., Brockport. 7:30-10 p.m. $5-$7; $15 one-household family. 6374240 or 261-7381. “The Glass Menagerie.” Thy Apr 19-Apr 22. Rochester Institute of Technology, Lab Theatre 1510. Thu-Sat 7:30 p.m., Sun 2 p.m. $5-$7. ntidtix@gmail.com. “Go, Dog. Go!” Sat Apr 21-Apr 22. TYKEs. Jewish Community Center, 1200 Edgewood Ave. Sat 2 p.m., Sun 11 a.m. & 2 p.m. $14. 461-2000 x235, jcccenterstage.org, tykestheatre.org. Impact Theatre. Fri Apr 20. 1180 Canandaigua Rd., Palmyra. 6:30-9:15 p.m. Free, register. 315-597-3553 (wait for prompt), impactdrama.com. Dinner theatre with Tommy Wales & The “In Your Face” Players. “Jersey Boys.” Wed Apr 18-Apr 25. Continues through Apr 29. Auditorium Theatre, 875 E Main St. 7:30 p.m. Monday special fundraiser performance at 8 p.m. $29.50-$74.50. 800-745-3000, ticketmaster.com, info@rbtl.org. “Leaving Iowa.” Apr 19-Apr 21. Continues through May 13. Downstairs Cabaret at Winton Place, 3450 Winton Place. Thu 7 p.m., Fri 8 p.m., Sat 4


& 8 p.m. $26-$36. 325-4370, downstairscabaret.com. “A Moon for the Misbegotten.” Fri Apr 20-Apr 22. Rochester Community Players. Fri-Sat 8 p.m., Sun 2 p.m. $5$15. 244-0960, muccc.org, rochestercommunityplayers.org. “Playwrights/Playreadings” Fri Apr 20-Apr 22. Geneva Theatre Guild. Fri 7 p.m. Geneva Free Library (22 Main St., Geneva), Sat-Sun 2 p.m. Torrey Park Grill (98 Avenue East, Geneva). $8.315-946-6686, gtglive.org. “The Princess and the Goblin.” Fri Apr 20. Stuart Steiner Theatre, Genesee Center for the Arts, Genesee Community College, 1 College Rd., Batavia. 7:30 p.m. $5-$8, ages 12 and under free. 345-6814, boxoffice@genesee.edu. Rainbow Theatre: “She Said/ She Said.” Fri Apr 20-Apr 22. Bread & Water Theatre, 243 Rosedale St. Fri-Sat 8 p.m., Sun 2 p.m. $6-$12. 271-5523, breadandwatertheatre.org. “Spring Awakening.” Fri Apr 20-Apr 22. Nazareth College Arts Center, 4245 East Ave. Fri-Sat 8 p.m., Sun 2 p.m. $10$12. 389-2170, artscenter. naz.edu. “Superior Donuts.” Wed Apr 18Apr 25. Continues through Apr 29. Geva Theatre Center, 75 Woodbury Blvd. Wed Apr 18 2 & 7:30 p.m., Thu 7:30 p.m., Fri Fri 8 p.m., Sat 4 & 8:30 p.m., Sun 2 p.m. (Audio-described) & 7 p.m., Tue- Wed Apr 25 7:30 p.m. Tickets start at $25.2324382, gevatheatre.org. “Titanic.” Apr 19-Apr 22. Continues through April 22. Everyone’s Theatre Company. West Irondequoit High School, 260 Cooper Rd. Thu & Sat 7:30 p.m., Sun 2 p.m. $10-$15. 4154747, everyonestheatre.com. “You Say Tomato, I Say Shutup.” Apr 19-Apr 21. Downstairs Cabaret Theatre, 20 Windsor St. Thu 7 p.m., Fri 8 p.m., Sat 5 & 8:30 p.m. $29-$36. 325-4370, downstairscabaret.com.

Theater Auditions [ Tuesday, April 24 ] Auditions for Dancers. Best Foot Forward, Eastview Mall. 6-7 p.m. Free. 398-0220, bestfootforwardkids.com. Paid positions for male and female dancers ages 17+. Dancers must be trained in classical, modern and Jazz.

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SPECIAL EVENT | ROC THE RUNWAY Rochester Fashion Week takes place each fall. But in the meantime, this weekend an event will scratch your fashion itch: ROC the Runway. This couture event, taking place Sunday, April 22, 7 p.m. at the Harro East Ballroom (155 N. Chestnut St.), will showcase collections by designers from Rochester and the surrounding area.

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At 6 p.m. there will be a preview cocktail hour where VIP guests and designers get to mingle, discuss the collections, and enjoy the sounds of local musicians. Following that, the models will take to the runway to show off the chic styles. Among the guests at the event will be Rochester’s own Gari “G-Funk” Fields, along with reality-TV star and wardrobe stylist Emily Bustamante from VH1’s, “Love & Hip Hop.” Tickets for the event cost $50-$65 for VIP and $20-$40 for general admission. All proceeds from ticket sales will go to the Women Helping Girls organization. For more information about the event and for tickets, visit: roctherunway.eventbrite.com. — BY ALEX STEINGRABER Center, 2655 Ridgeway Ave., Suite 220. 368-4560, unityhealth.org. 6-8 p.m. $120 for 4 weeks, register. Starting Your Own Business Workshop. Perinton Community Center, 1350 Turk Hill Rd., Perinton. 263-6473, scorerochester@frontiernet.net. 7-9 p.m. $45 for 4 sessions, register. [ Friday, April 20 ] Knit Nite: Knitting Workshop & Clinic. The Crafting Social, Hungerford Building, 1115 East Main St., Door 2, Floor 3, Studio D-330. thecraftingsocial. myshopify.com. 6:30-8:30 p.m. $20, register.

Workshops

[ Saturday, April 21 ] Celebrate Earth Day at Stella Art Gallery & Studio. Stella Art Gallery & Studio 350 West Commercial St., East Rochester. stellaartgalleryandstudio.com. 12-6 p.m. $10, register. Earth Week Observance. Country Way Garden Center, 2755 Penfield Rd. 377-9810. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Call for details. Make Your Own Cigar Box Guitar. Wayne County Council for the Arts, Inc., 108 West Miller St., Newark. 315-5532273, wayne-arts.com. 1-2 p.m. $5-$15, register.

[ Wednesday, April 18 ] Judaism 10: Moses, Mitzvahs, Matzah & More. Temple B’rith Kodesh, 2131 Elmwood Ave. 721-7568, daorange@earthlink. net. 7-9 p.m. $120 for 12 weeks, register. Seeds of Change Vegan Classes. Unity Diabetes

[ Sunday, April 22 ] What you need to know about Buddhism and meditation. Amitabha Foundation, 11 South Goodman St. NY@ amitabhafoundation.us. 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m. Donations welcome. 4-week Introduction to Buddhism and meditation.

[ Tuesday, April 24 & Thursday April 26 ] “The Musical of Musicals, The Musical.” YOHP. Penfield Community Recreation Center, 1985 Baird Rd, Penfield. Call to reserve audition time for Tue or Thu (no Wed). Free, RSVP. 340-8664, penfield.org.

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Write, Publish & Promote Your own Book Seminar. Lift Bridge Book Shop, 45 Main St, Brockport. 637-2260, liftbridgebooks.com. 1-4 p.m. $30, two for $45, register. [ Tuesday, April 24 ] A Royal Flush: Workshop Series to Detoxify, Clean Up & Clean Out Your Body this Spring. The LightHeart Institute, 21 Prince St. 288-6160, info@lightheart. com. 4:15-5:30 p.m. $47 per session, register. Home Vegetable Gardening Basics. Cornell Cooperative Extension-Rochester, 249 Highland Ave. 461-1000 x225, mycce.org/monroe. 9 a.m.noon. $10, register. [ Wednesday, April 25 ] Judaism 10: Moses, Mitzvahs, Matzah & More. Temple B’rith Kodesh, 2131 Elmwood Ave. 721-7568, daorange@ earthlink.net. 7-9 p.m. $120 for 12 weeks, register. Preparing a Portfolio: A Great Way to Improve Your Photography. Image City Photography Gallery, 722 University Ave. bchalifour@ rochester.rr.com. 7-9:30 p.m. $40, register. Instructor: Bruno Chalifour.

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All participants will receive a behavioral treatment for sleep problems, at no charge, either as part of the study or after. Half of the participants will receive a drug called armodafinil that may be helpful in reducing daytime tiredness and fatigue.

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• Be between the ages 21 and 75 • Have finished radiation treatments and/or chemotherapy • Insomnia began or got worse with the onset of cancer or treatment

Please call Jenine Hoefler (585) 276-3559 or Joseph Roscoe, Ph.D. (585) 275-9962 at the University of Rochester James P. Wilmot Cancer Center for more information about this research study rochestercitynewspaper.com City 31


Film Times Fri Apr 20-Thu Apr 26 Schedules change often. Call theaters or visit rochestercitynewspaper.com for updates.

Film

Brockport Strand 637-3310 89 Main St, Brockport CABIN IN THE WOODS: 7:15, 9:15; also Sat-Sun 1:15, 3:15, 5:15; THE LUCKY ONE: 7, 9; also Sat-Sun 1, 3, 5, 7; THE THREE STOOGES: 7:10, 9:10; also SatSun 1:10, 3:10, 5:10.

Canandaigua Theatres 396-0110 Wal-Mart Plaza, Canandaigua 21 JUMP STREET: 7:15, 9:20; also Fri- Sun 5:10, Sat-Sun 1, 3:05; AMERICAN REUNION: 7:10, 9:25; also Fri-Sun 4, Sat-Sun 1:30; CABIN IN THE WOODS: 7:15, 9:15; also FriSun 5:15, Sat-Sun 1:15, 3:15; THE HUNGER GAMES: 7:15, 9; also Fri-Sun 4, Sat-Sun 1; LOCKOUT: 7:10, 9:10; also Fri-Sun 5:10, Sat-Sun 1:10, 3:10; THE LORAX: Fri-Sun 5; also Sat-Sun 1, 3, Mon-Thu 7; THE LUCKY ONE: 7,9; also FriSun 5, Sat-Sun 1,3; MIRROR MIRROR: 7; also Fri-Sun 5, SatSun 1,3; THE THREE STOOGES: 7:10, 9:10; also Fri-Sun 5:10; Sat-Sun 1:10, 3:10; TITANIC 3D: 7:15; also Sat-Sun 1:30; WRATH OF THE TITANS: 9:10, also Fri-Sun 7:10.

Cinema Theater 271-1785 957 S. Clinton St. THE ARTIST: Fri-Wed 7; also Sat-Sun 4:45; W.E.: Fri-Wed 8:45.

Culver Ridge 16 544-1140 2255 Ridge Rd E, Irondequoit  21 JUMP STREET: 12:30, 4:05, 7:15, 10:10; AMERICAN REUNION: 1:10, 4:10, 7, 10; THE CABIN IN THE WOODS: 12:10, 2:35, 4:55, 7:50, 10:20; THE HUNGER GAMES: 12:25, 12:55, 1:25, 3:30, 4, 4:50, 6:40, 7:10, 8:10, continues on page 34

A new classic in horror [ REVIEW ] by George Grella

“Psycho,” “Night of the Living Dead,” and “The Texas Chainsaw Massacre.” The director constantly cuts between a “The Cabin in the Woods” most predictable pattern of events with a (R), directed by Drew Goddard familiar cast of characters, and a puzzling Now playing parallel plot involving entirely different people, establishing a mystery that gradually reveals Cleverly ingenious and utterly preposterous, itself, finally exploding into comprehension “The Cabin in the Woods” reinterprets in an apocalyptic conclusion. The central plot its genre in some highly unusual ways, involves a handful of college students who take building a horror movie on the foundation off for a weekend of fun in the dwelling of the of hundreds of others, many of which appear title, an isolated place deep in a dark pine forest. in the film, either as allusion or as a real The group consists of a provocative blonde, presence. The picture actually advances the her jock boyfriend, her innocent roommate, an boundaries of its form, achieving something intellectual, and a stoner, who come to assume new within its rich and venerable tradition, identities straight out of the Tarot deck. making it as much a landmark work as, say, As any student of the form knows, any assortment of youths out for a good time who journey to the countryside risks a terrible fate — the film industry spawns scores of motion pictures in which outsiders in rural areas encounter ghastly monsters, vampires, troglodytes, inbred families of cannibals; in other Kristen Connolly stars as one of the doomed vacationers in “The Cabin in the

words, Hollywood’s version of the salt of the earth, good country people. Honoring that tradition, in fact, the group meets a classic rural degenerate on the way to the cabin, a hostile, tobacco-chewing yokel who insults them and promises some cryptic punishment for their youth and high spirits. The other narrative intercut with the central story involves a group of scientists and technicians who operate in some huge, sterile factory, chatting amiably about mundane matters and some mysterious competitors around the globe, whom they watch on a battery of television screens. They also monitor and, as the picture slowly develops, manipulate the behavior of the young people in the cabin, more or less forcing them into various hideous scenarios, all constructed to end in the usual terror, mutilation, and dismemberment. The scenario they create for this particular group involves resurrecting a collection of dead rustics they call the Zombie Redneck Torture Family, who demonstrate that they richly deserve the appellation. As the family attacks the students, the army of employees viewing the mayhem on the television screens celebrates its success with a boozy party; they also watch a series of parallel scenarios from all over the world, which duplicate the familiar plots and characters of other horror flicks from Spain, Germany, South America, and most characteristically, Japan. The techies clearly enjoy the hell out of the spectacle and chat enthusiastically about their

Woods.” PHOTO COURTESY AFX STUDIOS

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Short stories [ prEVIEW ] BY DAYNA PAPALEO

The 54th Rochester International Film Festival Thursday, April 19-Saturday, April 21 George Eastman House Dryden Theatre (900 East Ave.) Rochesterfilmfest.org

accomplishment, particularly savoring the way they outdid their competitors around the globe. Not unexpectedly, their grand project begins to disintegrate as some of the students, despite a whole series of frightening episodes, manage to escape the attacks of the rednecks and fight back. Ultimately the two parallel plots intersect in a bizarre apocalypse that erupts into a really wonderful orgy of destruction featuring an amazing assortment of menaces and monsters of every kind from virtually every known horror film. Within this rich and fantastic series of events the endlessly inventive script provides a genuine sense of character in both groups, with the offhand ordinariness of the technicians contrasting with the melodramatic exaggeration of the horror plot. The cast at the cabin consists of a group of mostly unfamiliar performers who overact appropriately and scream with great professionalism. The most well-known cast members play the techies — Richard Jenkins and Bradley Whitford handle their parts with absolute conviction, and Sigourney Weaver, in her stern schoolmistress mode, turns up at the end to explain the whole incredible mess. “The Cabin in the Woods” includes references to a grand anthology of horror, which should delight any student of the genre. Unlike most of its kind, without parodying its tradition, it sparkles with witty allusions and funny dialogue, infusing a good deal of ironic self-awareness into its situations. A most unusual movie, it will probably (and deservedly) become a classic.

It’s the oldest continually held short-film festival in the world, and it calls our humble little city home. The Rochester International Film Festival — sometimes known as Movies on a Shoestring — marks its 54th year this weekend at the Dryden Theatre with another stellar lineup of pocket-sized narratives, documentaries, and animated pieces from around the world, all separated into four unique programs for your viewing pleasure. Admission, as always, is free, but donations are gratefully accepted. For more details, including the complete roster of films, pop on over to rochesterfilmfest.org. But first, a quick preview...

Thursday 8 p.m.

An unsupervised new hire in the Department of Human Fate needs to learn the ropes quickly in “Lunch Breaks,” a nicely rendered cartoon about a construction worker, his elusive sandwich, and the risks of the job. Iranian filmmaker Jafar Pashaee’s twisty and challenging “Depth of Field” tries to keep up with two lookalike footballers as they switch identities

A still from “Trashland,” screening Saturday evening at the Dryden. PHOTO COURTESY ROCHESTER INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL

in order to keep an eye on their respective women. In the intriguing French entry “Catharsis,” Alexandre, an aspiring director, destroys the fourth wall — and quite possibly his relationship with his frustrated girlfriend — in an effort to process what’s real and what isn’t when it looks as though he’s become part of a film himself.

Friday 8 p.m.

“Our only hope is to find the beat that moves us,” the narrator tells us in the heavyhanded but huge-hearted “My Angel, My Hero,” which stars director Faizan Sheikh as a former banker who becomes a street dancer and unwittingly changes the life of a young man with Parkinson’s Disease. In the dreamy drama “Luz,” a car-crash victim’s subconscious memories allow him to come to grips with his mother’s untimely death. The concise (and concisely titled) “There’s A Dead Crow Outside” wittily illustrates the life cycle through squishy sounds and animation that is black, white, and red all over. Benoit Blanc writes, directs, and stars in the dark comedy “Oops!” as a man, despondent over an apparently lost love, whose myriad suicide attempts go hilariously wrong.

Saturday 4 p.m.

The award-winning documentary “Carbon For Water,” by Evan Abramson and Carmen Elsa Lopez, chronicles the efforts of one company to bring potable drinking water to a village in Kenya’s Western Province, a powerful initiative that has implications that reach even beyond the basic human right to good health. “What’s my mother gonna say?” one woman wonders in “The Miracle of Life,” a sly French satire about four neighbors who all wake up very pregnant and understandably puzzled about it. A young Latino man who desperately wants to assimilate learns to embrace his traditional culture in Gloriana Fonseca-Malavasi’s touching “Historias,” which draws its inspiration

from Central American legend. Irish filmmaker Steve Woods employs the art and science of pixelation in the striking “Dutch Darkness,” which brings painterly images to life in the story of a woman, her maid, and the mysterious contents of a closet. Excellent performances highlight “Face,” a drama set in WWI-era France as a young boy waits for the return of his soldier father.

Saturday 8 p.m.

The American dream threatens to become a nightmare for a young immigrant in Brian Aramayo’s overacted but effective “Intercambios” once Cristina crosses paths with a bank teller who may be taking advantage of her. “Crescendo” boasts splendid period design as the story of an unhappy mother-to-be veers in an unexpected direction following the birth of her gifted son. What makes Jim Ed Wills’ “Trashland” worthwhile is the wildly inventive found-object surroundings of a grumpy old trash sculptor and the clichéd moppet who steals his heart. Belgian filmmaker Joachim Weissmann, who opened RIFF 2011 with “Le Négociant,” closes this year’s installment with “Kerosene,” an ambitious suspense flick about a young woman whose efforts to get over her fear of flying take an interesting turn... then another. But of the films I got to preview, two stood out. The festival opener, Agnès Caffin’s delightfully wry “Shéhérazade and the Kosher Delight” (Thursday), stars gorgeous Gallic treasure Fanny Ardant as a sharp-tongued Jewish restaurant owner bucking against hiring an illegal Palestinian immigrant to work in her kitchen. And the lovely feel-good drama “Prunelle and Mélodie” (Friday), by writer-director Mathieu Simonet, tags along with two best friends, one blind and one deaf, as they overcome limitations and apprehensions to embark on the road trip of their literal dreams.

THE NAKED ISLAND

Wednesday, April 18, 8 p.m. Kaneto Shindo called this almost wordless, documentary-style film a “visual poem” about the hard lives of a family scratching out a living on a barren and remote island in Japan’s Inland Sea. Directed, written, and produced by Shindo, this moving tribute to the human will to survive is considered his definitive work. (Hadaka no shima, Kaneto Shindo, Japan 1960, 96 min.)

MR. & MRS. SMITH Movies for movie lovers, 6 nights a week. Kaneto Shindo

Sunday, April 22, 2 p.m. Alfred Hitchcock and screwball comedy? Indeed! The match of director to genre might seem odd at first, but the master did possess a wicked sense of humor. Carole Lombard and Robert Montgomery wonder what life would’ve been like had they not married, only to find out that, thanks to a bureaucrat’s error, they were never wed! While the free-spirited Lombard faces the prospect of singleness with a smile, Montgomery just can’t stay away. (Alfred Hitchcock, US 1941, 95 min.)

Carole Lombard

Film Info: 271-4090 l 900 East Avenue l Eastman House Café—stop in for a light dinner or dessert before the film. l Wi-Fi Hotspot l Sponsored by rochestercitynewspaper.com City 33


9:45, 10:15; LOCKOUT: 3:05, 5:25 8, 10:30; open captioned 12:45; THE LORAX: 3:00, 5:10, 7:25, 9:40; also in 3D 12:50; THE LUCKY ONE: 12:20, 2:45, 5:15, 7:40, 10:25; MIRROR MIRROR: 1:20, 4:20, 6:55, 9:25; THINK LIKE A MAN: 12:35, 1:05, 3:20, 4:30, 6:50, 7:20, 9:35, 10:05;THE THREE STOOGES: 12:40, 2:55, 5:20, 7:35, 9:50; TITANIC (3D): 2:40, 7:30; also in 3D: 12:15, 5:05, 9;55; WRATH OF THE TITANS: 4:40, 9:50; also in 3D 1:30, 7:05.

Dryden Theatre 271-3361 900 East Ave *NOTE: Film times for Wed 4/18-4/25* NAKED ISLAND: Wed 4/18 8; MR. & MRS. SMITH: Sun 2; L’ARGENT: Tue 8; ONIBABA: Wed 4/25 8.

Geneseo Theatres 243-2691 Geneseo Square Mall 21 JUMP STREET: 7:15, 9:20; AMERICAN REUINON: 7:10, 9:25; also Sat-Sun

Film Previews Full film reviews available at rochestercitynewspaper. com. [ OPENING ] BULLY (PG-13): This acclaimed documentary personalizes an important and heartbreaking social issue by spending time with five families whose lives have been deeply impacted by what is essentially the cruel abuse of a child by another child. Little, Pittsford CHIMPANZEE (G): Tim Allen narrates this documentary about a 3-year-old chimp who finds himself alone in the African forests until he is adopted by a fully grown male chimpanzee. Greece, Pittsford, Tinseltown, Webster. FOOTNOTE (PG): From writerdirector Joseph Cedar (2007’s “Beaufort”) comes this Israeli drama, one of 2012’s Foreign Language Oscar nominees, that tells the story of the thorny rivalry between two Talmudic scholars who just happen to be father and son. Little, Pittsford L’ARGENT (1983): French filmmaker Robert Bresson’s final work, inspired by a Tolstoy short story, follows a counterfeit bill until it winds up in the hands of an innocent deliveryman whose life spirals out of control. Dryden (Tue, Apr 24, 8 p.m.) Dryden THE LUCKY ONE (PG-13): Zac Efron stars in the latest from director Scott Hicks (1996’s “Shine”), an adaptation of a Nicholas Sparks novel about a Marine who returns from duty in Iraq looking for the mystery 34 City april 18-24, 2012

1:30, 4; THE HUNGER GAMES: 7. 9:20; also SatSun 1, 4; THE LUCKY ONE: 7, 9; also Sat-Sun 1, 3, 5; MIRROR MIRROR: SatSun 1, 3, 5; THE THREE STOOGES: 7:10, 9:10; also Sat-Sun 1:10, 3:10, 5:10; TITANIC 3D: 7:15; also SatSun 1:30.

Greece Ridge 12 225-5810 176 Greece Ridge Center Dr. 21 JUMP STREET: 1:25, 4:40, 7:40, 10:30; AMERICAN REUNION: 1:00, 4:20, 7:05 9:45; THE CABIN IN THE WOODS: 12:50, 3:10, 5:30, 7:50, 10:20; CHIMPANZEE: 12:40, 2:45, 4:55, 7:20, 9:25; THE HUNGER GAMES: 12:20, 3:30, 4, 7, 9:35, 10:05; LOCKOUT: 12:25, 2:50, 5:10, 7;30, 9:50; THE LUCKY ONE: 12:35, 1:30, 3, 5:25, 7:10, 8, 10:25; MIRROR MIRROR: 1:10, 4:05, 6:50, 9:30; THINK LIKE A MAN: 1:20, 4:30, 7:25, 10:15;THE THREE STOOGES: 12:30, 2:55, 5:15, 7;35, 9;55; TITANIC (3D): 12:15, 4:15, 8:15.

woman he believed to be his good-luck charm. With Taylor Schilling and Blythe Danner. Culver, Geneseo, Greece, Tinseltown, Webster MR. AND MRS. SMITH (1941): Alfred Hitchcock’s only screwball comedy stars Carole Lombard and Robert Montgomery as a couple who have very different reactions to the news that their marriage is technically invalid. Dryden (Sun, Apr 22, 2 p.m.) Dryden THE NAKED ISLAND (1960): Celebrate the 100th birthday of Japanese auteur Kaneto Shindo with this nearly wordless verité drama about the hardscrabble existence of a family living alone on a barren island in the Inland Sea. Dryden (Wed, Apr 18, 8 p.m.) Dryden THINK LIKE A MAN (PG-13): This ensemble comedy from director Tim Story (“Fantastic Four”) follows four buddies who turn the tables on their women when they learn that the ladies are devotees of a popular self-help book. With Taraji P. Henson, Romany Malco, and Gabrielle Union. Culver, Tinseltown, Greece Tinseltown, Webster [ CONTINUING ] 21 JUMP STREET (R): Jonah Hill co-wrote the script for this tacky-looking 80’s redo, in which he and Channing Tatum go undercover at a high school to bust a drug ring. Johnny Depp cameos, and Ice Cube yells. Canandaigua, Culver, Geneseo, Greece, Pittsford, Tinseltown, Vintage, Webster. AMERICAN REUNION (R): Jason Biggs, Alyson Hannigan, and Seann

The Little 258-0400 240 East Ave.  BULLY: 6:30, 9:40; also SatSun 12:40, 3; THE DEEP BLUE SEA: 6:50, 9; also SatSun 12, 3:30; FOOTNOTE: 7, 9:20; also Sat-Sun 12:20, 3:20; JEFF WHO LIVES AT HOME: 7:10 (except Thur April 26) 9:50; also Sat-Sun 12:30, 3:10; NYFQ: Wed 7;THE RAID: 9:30; SALMON FISHING IN THE YEMEN: FriTue 6:40; Sat-Sun 3:40, Sun 12:10.

Movies 10 292-5840 2613 W. Henrietta Rd. ALVIN & THE CHIPMUNKS: CHIPWRECKED: 2:20, 4:30, 6:55, 9:20; CHRONICLE: 2:00, 4:25, 7, 9:15; GHOST RIDER: SPRIT OF VENGEANCE: 2:15, 7:15; HUGO (3D): 2:30, 5:20, 8:10; JOURNEY 2: THE MYSTERIOUS ISLAND: 2:25, 4:50, 7;10, 9:45; also in 3D 5:10; PROJECT X: 2:45, 5:05, 7:35, 10:05; SAFE HOUSE: 2:10, 4:45, 7:20, 9:55;THE SECRET WORLD OF ARRIETTY: 4:55, 9:40; STAR WARS: EPISODE 1 (3D): 2:05, 8:00; THIS MEANS WAR: 2:35, 5,

William Scott lead the cast in this raunchy gathering of “American Pie” alumni, in which we learn that the Class of 1999’s dreams and plans may not have worked out. Pittsford, Canandaigua, Geneseo, Culver, Webster, Vintage, Greece Ridge, Eastview, Henrietta, Tinseltown THE ARTIST (PG-13): From French writer-director Michel Hazanavicius comes the critically lauded Oscar frontrunner, a silent romance set in 1927 Hollywood about a movie star wondering if his career will end with the birth of talkies. With Golden Globe winner Jean Dujardin, John Goodman, and James Cromwell. Little THE CABIN IN THE WOODS (R): Joss Whedon co-wrote the script for the directing debut of “Cloverfield” writer Drew Goddard, a genre-tweaking horror flick in which a group of 20somethings on vacation learn that there is much more to their remote spot than mere evil. With Chris Hemsworth, Richard Jenkins, and Bradley Whitford. Canandaigua, Culver, Greece, Tinseltown, Vintage, Webster. THE DEEP BLUE SEA (R): Filmmaker Terence Davies’ adaptation of a Terence Ratigan play stars Rachel Weisz as the wife of a British judge who is caught up in a self-destructive affair with a Royal Air Force pilot (Tom Hiddleston, “Thor”). Little DR. SEUSS’ THE LORAX (PG): Zac Efron, Taylor Swift, and Danny DeVito provide a few of the voices for this 3D take on the classic environmental parable about the residents

7:25, 9:50; THE VOW: 2:15, 4:40, 7:30, 10;

Pittsford Cinema 383-1310 3349 Monroe Ave. 21 JUMP STREET: 7:40, 10; AMERICAN REUNION: 2:45, 5:15, 7:45, 10:05; also FriSun 12:20; BULLY: 2:40, 4:55, 7:20, 9:40; Fri-Sun 12:25; CHIMPANZEE: 2:20, 4:25, 6:30, 8:35; also FriSun 12:15; FOOTNOTE: 2:10, 4:35, 7, 9:25; THE HUNGER GAMES: 2, 5, 8; THE LUCKY ONE: 2:50, 5:10, 7:30, 9:50; also Fri-Sun 12:30; MIRROR MIRROR: 3, 5:20; also FriSun 12:40; SALMON FISHING IN THE YEMEN: 2:25, 4:45, 7:10, 9:30; also Fri-Sun 12:05; TITANIC (3D): 4:00, 7:50; also Fri-Sun 12:10.

Tinseltown USA / IMAX 247-2180 2291 Buffalo Rd.  21 JUMP STREET: 11:50 a.m., 2:25, 5, 7:35, 10:10; AMERICAN REUNION: 1:30, 4:15, 7, 9:40; THE CABIN IN THE WOODS: 11:50 a.m., 2:10, 4:40, 7:05, 9:45; CHIMPANZEE: 12:30,

of Thneed-ville and their dealings with the grumpy but charming guardian of the land. Canandaigua, Culver, Tinseltown, Webster THE HUNGER GAMES (PG13): Jennifer Lawrence plays Katniss Everdeen in this adaptation of Suzanne Collins’ wildly popular YA novel set in a dystopian future where teens must fight to the death on live TV. Co-starring Josh Hutcherson and Liam Hemsworth. Canandaigua, Culver, Geneseo, Pittsford, Tinseltown, Vintage, Webster JEFF, WHO LIVES AT HOME (R): Jason Segel plays the title character in the latest from Jay and Mark Duplass (“Cyrus”) about a 30-year-old slacker who encounters his destiny when he finally leaves mom Susan Sarandon’s basement to go buy wood glue. With Ed Helms. Little JOURNEY 2: THE MYSTERIOUS ISLAND (PG): Dwayne Johnson, Michael Caine, and Josh Hutcherson (“The Kids Are Alright”) star in this family adventure about a teen who goes looking for his explorer grandpa. Also starring Luis Guzmán and Vanessa Hudgens. Movies Ten LOCKOUT (PG-13): From the mind of Luc Besson comes this action flick starring Guy Pearce as a wrongly convicted man (obviously) who is offered his freedom if he can rescue the president’s daughter (of course) from an outer-space prison taken over by violent inmates (naturally). With Maggie Grace and Peter Stormare. Canandaigua, Culver, Greece, Tinseltown,Webster.

2:45, 5:05, 7:15, 9:25; THE HUNGER GAMES: 12, 3:20, 5:10, 6:40, 8:25, 9:50; THE LOCKOUT: 11:55 a.m., 2:25, 4:45, 7:20, 9:50; THE LORAX: 12:15, 4:50, also in 3D 2:40, 7:10, 9:30; THE LUCKY ONE: 11:45 a.m., 12:55, 2:15, 3:35, 4:55, 6:15, 7:35, 8;55, 10:15; MIRROR MIRROR: 11:45 a.m., 2:20, 4:55, 7:25, 10; THINK LIKE A MAN: 12:45, 4, 7:15, 10:10; THE THREE STOOGES: 11:55 a.m., 1:15, 2:30, 3:45, 5, 6:20, 7:30, 8:45, 9;55; TITANIC (3D): 1:00, 5:05, 9:05; also in IMAX 3D 12, 4:05, 8:15; also in 2D 12:30; WRATH OF THE TITANS: 12:05, 5:15, 10:05; also in 3D 2:35, 7:40.

Vintage Drive In 226-9290 1520 W Henrietta Rd. *NOTE: Film times for FriSun 4/20-4/22* 21 JUMP STREET: 10:10; AMERICAN REUNION: 8:15; CABIN IN THE WOODS: 8:15; THE HUNGER GAMES: 8:15; SAFE HOUSE: 10:05; SILENT HOUSE: 9:50; THIS MEANS WAR: 9:45; THE THREE STOOGES: 8:15; WOMAN IN BLACK: 10:35.

MIRROR MIRROR (PG): Tarsem Singh follows up “Immortals” with his retelling of the Brothers Grimm fairy tale about an Evil Queen (Julia Roberts) whose ranking as the fairest of them all is threatened by a feisty orphan called Snow White (Lily Collins). Canandaigua, Culver, Geneseo, Greece, Tinseltown, Webster PROJECT X (R): This comedy, shot documentary style, tracks one night in the lives a trio of high-school seniors who decide to throw an epic party. Starring a bunch of kids you’ve probably never heard of. Culver, Movies 10 THE RAID: REDEMPTION (R): This inventive, wildly violent action film by writer-director Gareth Huw Evans takes place in a Jakarta high-rise, in which SWAT team is trapped by a ruthless drug lord and his henchpeople. Little SAFE HOUSE (R): Denzel Washington appears to be in sexy, swaggering bad-guy mode as Tobin Frost, a rogue CIA operative who becomes Ryan Reynolds’ problem when even badder guys come gunning for them. With Sam Shepard, Vera Farmiga, and Brendan Gleeson. Vintage, Movies Ten SALMON FISHING IN THE YEMEN (PG-13): Lasse Hallström’s follows up 2010’s “Dear John” with another feelgood literary adaptation, this one starring Ewan McGregor and Emily Blunt as hirelings of a sheik hoping to bring fly-fishing to the desert. Little, Pittsford A THOUSAND WORDS (PG-13): This comedy (let’s hope!) stars Eddie Murphy as a fast-talking literary agent forced to budget

Webster 12 888-262-4386 2190 Empire Blvd. 21 JUMP STREET: 2:10, 5:10, 7:40, also Sat-Sun 11:20 a.m.; Fri-Sat 10:10.; AMERICAN REUNION:12, 2:30, 5:30, 8; also Fri-Sat 10:35; CABIN IN THE WOODS: 12:45, 3:15, 5:45, 8:15; also Sat-Sun 10:20 a.m.; Fri-Sat 10:30; CHIMPANZEE: 12:30, 2:45, 4:50, 7, 9:15; also Sat-Sun 10; THE HUNGER GAMES: 1, 4:05, 7:20; also Sat-Sun 10:05 a.m., Fri-Sat 10:15; LOCKOUT: 1:15, 3:45, 5:55, 8:30; also Sat-Sun 10:45 a.m., Fri-Sat 10:45; THE LORAX: 3; also SatSun 10:10 a.m., also in 3D 12:15, 5:20; THE LUCKY ONES: 2, 4:30, 7:15, 9:50; also Sat-Sun 11:30; MIRROR MIRROR: 1:30, 4:15, 7:05, 9:40; also Sat-Sun 10:30 a.m.; THINK LIKE A MAN: 1:45, 4:40, 7:30; also SatSun 11 a.m., Fri-Sat 10:20; THE THREE STOOGES: 2:20, 5, 7:10, 9:30; also Sat-Sun 11:45 a.m.; TITANIC (3D): 3:30, 7:25; also Sat-Sun 11:10 a.m.; WRATH OF THE TITANS (3D): 7:50, also FriSat 10.

his words when a magical Bodhi tree makes him think before he speaks. Co-starring Kerry Washington and Cliff Curtis. Culver THE THREE STOOGES (PG): The latest from the Farrelly brothers resurrects the sadistically dunderheaded trio for a story that finds Larry, Curly, and Moe stumbling into a murder plot... and a reality TV show. Starring Sean Hayes, Jane Lynch, and Larry David. Canandaigua, Culver, Geneseo, Greece, Tinseltown, Vintage, Webster TITANIC 3D (R): The box-office tally, much like the heart, goes on. Canandaigua, Culver, Greece, Geneseo, Pittsford, Tinseltown, Webster THE VOW (PG-13): Take the lovable hunk from “Dear John” (Channing Tatum), add the tempestuous rich girl from “The Notebook” (Rachel McAdams), marry ‘em off, throw in a pinch of amnesia, and make him woo her all over again. Next, start crying. Movies 10 W.E. (R): Madonna’s latest directorial effort juxtaposes the affair between a married woman and a Russian security guard against the inconvenient romance of King Edward VIII and American divorcée Wallis Simpson. Cinema WRATH OF THE TITANS (PG-13): Sam Worthington reprises his role as Perseus in the sequel, in which he must brave the underworld and lots of special effects to rescue Zeus. With Liam Neeson, Rosamund Pike, and Ralph Fiennes as Hades. Canandaigua, Culver, Tinseltown, Webster


Classifieds For information: Call us (585) 244-3329 Fax us (585) 244-1126 Mail Us City Classifieds 250 N. Goodman Street Rochester, NY 14607 Email Us classifieds@ rochester-citynews.com EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY

All real estate advertised in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act, which makes it unlawful, “to make, print, or publish, any notice, statement, or advertisement, with respect to the sale or rental of a dwelling that indicates any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin.” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under the age of 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertisement for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. Call the local Fair Housing Enforcement Project, FHEP at 325-2500 or 1-866-671-FAIR. Si usted sospecha una practica de vivienda injusta, por favor llame al servicio legal gratis. 585-325-2500 - TTY 585-325-2547.

Apartments for Houses for Rent Sale MONROE /ALEXANDER AREA Small Studio, 2nd floor, quiet building. Includes appliances, coin laundry, $400 includes all. 330-0011 or 671-3806 ROWLEY/PARK Two Bedroom Plus, Extra room. Second floor, hardwoods, appliances, quiet, sunny, private entrance, laundry, parking, heat. No pets, $825 + deposit. June 1st. 585-544-1962 WELCOME TO OUR Neighborhood! A spacious 2-bedroom flat in a recently restored 1900’s double in the historic Park Avenue area. Living room, dining room, study, 2 bedrooms, kitchen, pantry, large sleeping porch. Off-street garage parking, hardwood floors, laundry; basement and attic storage. Restaurants, YMCA, library, park, museums, right in your neighborhood. The Eastman Theatre, Geva, and the Little are a 5-minute drive. Available NOW! Call Dave Walsh at 585269-4068.

Shared Housing ALL AREAS - ROOMMATES. COM. Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http://www.Roommates.com. GAY MALE Furnished bedroom in an 8 room house. With male, direct tv, Security deposit. $575 all. Dog on premiss, smoker ok. 585-267-0356

HOMES FOR SALE Pittsford/ Bushnells Basin 3 Homes on fabulous 3 acre park-like yard. Beautifully updated, 1800’s large main house plus 2 smaller homes which are leased for $24,000 per year (Great In-Law Home). Owner must sell due to age & health 585-383-8888

Land for Sale NEW YORK STATE Land Sale Discounted to 1990’s prices! 3 Acre Starter camp -$17,995. 5 Acres w/Farmhouse - $49,995. 52 Acres, Stream, 2 ponds, Beautiful woods & views. Access to road front, utilities and state land Limited offer. Call Christmas & Associates 800-2297843 Or visit landandcamps.com VIRGINIA SEASIDE LOTS Absolute buy of a lifetime! Fully improved 3 acre lots, exclusive development on the seaside (the mainland) overlooking Chincoteague Bay and islands. Gated entrance, paved roads, caretaker, community dock, pool and club house including owners guest suites. Build the house of your dreams! Unique bank foreclosure situation makes these lots available at 1/3 of original cost. Great climate, low taxes and National Seashore beaches nearby. Only $49,000 each or pond lots $65,000. Tel. (757) 824-5284 website: http:// ViewWebPage.com/5EUO or email: oceanlandtrust@yahoo.com

Commercial/ Office Space

OCEAN CITY MARYLAND Best selection of affordable rentals. Full/ partial weeks. Call for FREE brochure. Open daily. Holiday Real Estate. 1-800-638-2102. Online reservations: www. holidayoc.com

Home Services MASTER CHIMNEY & MASONRY See our ad under Home and Garden Professionals. Chimney Cleaning, Masonry Repairs, Foundation Repairs, Roof Leaks, Brick Steps Repaired. 585-734-8444

family. Make our adopted daughter a big sister! Call Laurel and Adam (516)884-6507 to talk. PREGNANT? CONSIDERING ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions 866-413-6293 (Void in Illinois) (AAN CAN)

Automotive ALWAYS BETTER Higher cash for your Junk Cars, Trucks and Vans.

From $260-$800 or more for newer. Running or not. With free towing. Also free removal of any unwanted model in any condition. Call 585-305-5865 AUTOS WANTED Free Vacation for donating vehicles, boats, property, collectables and merchandise. Maximize IRS deductions while n helping teens in crisis. Quick Prompt Service 1-800-338-6724 www.dvarinst.com CASH FOR CARS Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid.

continues on page 37

Ceilings & Drywall 100% ABSOLUTE DUST-FREE: Ceilings & walls. $25.00 Seniors; discount. Repaired, installed. Textured, swirled, sunburst. Water damage specialist. Insurance work. Free estimates. 45 years experience. 225-6590

Adoption ADOPT: A LOVING couple in NYC suburbs hopes to complete our

STORE HOUSE 105 Grand Opening

Sat. April 21st 8am-5pm • 105 Craig Street (off Maple) vintage, retro, furniture, architectural salvage, industrial fixtures, ligh�ng, bikes.

UofR/ AIRPORT AREA Brick, Mixed use building. 6,000 sq.ft. of stores/office plus 3 apartments. Owner must sell due to illness. Owner financing, no banks needed. 383-8888

Vacation Property DELAWARE: Multiple 1 Family NEW Ranch Homes! Peaceful Setting, 55+ Community. Close to shopping, beach, bay & I-95. Low 100’s, low taxes. CALL: 302-6595800 www.bonayrehomes.com

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THESE BRAND NEW UNITS WON’T LAST LONG!

Find your way home with

Eastman Commons is under construction and taking rental applications. Applicants must income qualify. Please call 585-427-7570 for information and an application package.

TO ADVERTISE CONTACT CHRISTINE TODAY!

CALL 244-3329 X23 OR EMAIL CHRISTINE@ROCHESTER-CITYNEWS.COM

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Place your real estate ad by calling 244-3329 ext. 23 or rochestercitynewspaper.com Ad Deadlines: Friday 4pm for Display Ads Monday at noon for Line ads > page 35 We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888-420-3808 www. cash4car.com (AAN CAN) DONATE VEHICLE RECEIVE $1000 GROCERY COUPONS. National Animal Welfare Foundation. Support NO KILL Shelters. Help Homeless Pets. Free Towing, TAX DEDUCTIBLE, NON-RUNNERS Accepted 1888-333-3848

Education ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from home. *Medical, *Business, *Criminal Justice, *Hospitality, Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEC certified. Call 888-201-8657www. CenturaOnline.com

For Sale BABY WALKER on wheels, tray. Sides pull out with toys $10 5685-880-2903 BRONZE HORSE STATUE 12” long x 10: high with saddle, rope, pretty gift. $35 585-880-2903 BRYERS HORSE Late 1970’s $45. 585-880-2903 DOG & CAT HOUSES Kennels, porch steps, do it yourself kits. Quick assembly 585-752-1000 $49 Jim GRACO CAR SEAT, stroller system $49.99 585-225-5526 GRACO CONVERTIBLE CRIB Light wood, excellent condition. $49.99 225-5526 HIGH SPEED INTERNET AVAILABLE ANYWHERE!!! $0 down for equipment, FREE INSTALLATION. No phone line required. Call now for free next day installation! Call 888-313-8504 OFF GRID ELECTRIC POWER for your home or remote cabin Can run off of solar, wind or microhydro Complete with batteries and inverters 855-744-2665 www. solarhomeimprovements.com SERTA MANUFACTURED FACTORY-DIRECT. Queen mattress sets. 50-70% off Retail. Simply the best deal in town. By appointment only. 585-752-1434 SOLAR BACKUP IndoorGenerator™ Safe indoor backup power.  Get FREE Drain Water Heat Recovery System with purchase & save 50% on water heating costs 716-245-4744 www.solarhomeimprovements.com STEEL PROGRAMABLE LOCKBOX for Computer $30, Assorted computer accessories and public domain software program floppy disk “Secret Treasures” Collection $10 Mary 585-413-0827

waterproofed brown suede calf high. 1 Rockport-style brown suede work boots. Mary 585/413-0827

Garage and Yard Sales 21 CAYUGA ST Sat & Sun 04/21 & 04/22 9am - 5pm. Clothes, shoes, handbags, household, motorcycle seat, handle bars, lots more COMMUNITY GARAGE SALE @ South Presbyterian Church

HomeWork A cooperative effort of City Newspaper and RochesterCityLiving, a program of the Landmark Society.

4 East Henrietta Rd to benefit Ellwanger Barry Nursery School. 4/27-4/28 9am-1pm. Huge sale, lots of kid stuff!

Jam Section BASS PLAYER I don’t want to hang around in bars. I just want to play some twangy old rock’n’roll, ska, or New Wave. Who’s up for it? Craig at mooskamovers@aol.com

continues on page 38

Room with a View

499 Beach Avenue

Enjoy a home with beach access and views of Lake Ontario without the price of a waterfront property. The home at 499 Beach Avenue right in the heart of Charlotte is walking distance to what will feel like a vacation. The “Secret Sidewalk” across the street allows quick access to the beach on a hot summer day. Walk along the beach to Ontario Beach Park and enjoy an Abbott’s ice cream cone while strolling along the pier. After a day at the beach, relax with a book on the front porch while glancing up to see boats on the lake. The enclosed front porch is a large bright Florida room complete with a ceiling fan and many windows, perfect for warm summer nights. The rest of the home is filled with oak and pine floors, wooden bead board and wide door and window moldings. Each room has a ceiling fan to keep cool in the summer and radiators to warm the house in the winter. Each of these features come together to give the house a warm, summer cottage feel. The first floor consists of a wide open living room with large windows, bead board ceiling, oak floors and an electric fireplace. A small nook with a glass door tucked beneath the stairway provides a special space to showcase cherished items. Beyond the living room is a combination full bathroom/laundry room to the right and a large dining room to the left. Just off the

dining room is a small, peaceful room that’s perfect for an office. Located at the back of the house, the kitchen features modern cupboards, counters, a deep sink and recessed lighting. The cozy backyard features a garden that can be admired from the kitchen or the back porch. The garden leads to a private alley for parking that is plowed and maintained by the City. In the second floor hallway, a chandelier hanging from the hardwood ceiling welcomes one to a full bathroom and four bedrooms that add a unique charm to the home. One bedroom is completely surrounded in wood and boasts a sleeping porch that gives an amazing view of the lake. The master bedroom has extra storage areas that are hidden in the bead board walls. Another bedroom is long and bright with cathedral ceilings and a loft that allows for storage. A full attic and basement complete this charming, cottage style home built in 1900. The 1,913 square foot property is listed at $154, 900 and includes deeded beach access. For more information visit rochestercityliving.com/property/R179098 or contact Pam Bebee with Nothnagle Realtors at 585.400.4000. by Rebekah Bottazzo Rebekah is a Landmark Society volunteer.

SWINGING SHUTTER WOOD DOOR(1) ONLY ONE. Like in Cowboy movies, 5’ 5” tall, 2’ 2” wide (pantry, closet) Hangs middle of door frame. $15 585880-2903 WOMEN’S BOOTS For Sale, Size 9-1/2 Wide - $25 both used 1

rochestercitynewspaper.com City 37


I’m very pleased with the calls I got from our apartment rental ads, and will continue running them. Your readers respond — positively!” - M. Smith, Residential Management > page 37 CALLING ALL MUSICIANS OF ALL GENRES - the Rochester Music Coalition wants you! Please register on our website. For further info: www. rochestermusiccoalition.org. info@rochestermusiccoalition. org. 585-235-8412

FOR SALE: Upright bass, old German had extensive repair but now very solid. New strings and bow. Asking $1200, cash only please 889-1202 LOOKING FOR VOCALISTS to be part of vocal group. Doing originals and covers. 25 years and older. Please do not inquire if not serious and stable. Contact Bobby 585-328-4121

ROCK STAR, MR. ROCHESTER, lead vocalist, is looking to form band (Classic Rock) with lead guitarist, bassist, drummer & rhythm guitars Covers & originals 585-473-5089 THE CHORUS OF THE GENESEE Needs all male voices for Spring Concerts; reading music NOT necessary; Tuesday evenings;

CITY Newspaper presents

Mind Body Spirit TO ADVERTISE IN THE MIND BODY SPIRIT SECTION CALL CHRISTINE AT 244.3329 x23 OR EMAIL CHRISTINE@ROCHESTER-CITYNEWS.COM

we sing; we laugh; we train; we buy a visitors’ first beer. Call Ed Rummler 585-385-2698

Music Services PIANO LESSONS In your home or mine. Patient, experienced instructor teaching all ages, levels and musical styles. Call Scott: 585- 465-0219. Visit www. scottwrightmusic.com

Miscellaneous HAS YOUR BUILING SHIFTED OR SETTLED? Contact Woodford Brothers Inc, for straightening, leveling, foundation and wood frame repairs at 1-800-OLD-BARN www.woodfordbros.com. “Not applicable in Queens county”

SAWMILLS from only $3997MAKE MONEY & SAVE MONEY with your own bandmil Cut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship. FREE Info & DVD www.NorwoodSawmills. com/300N 1-800-578-1363 Ext.300N

Notices CHER, MOM- seeking call from DAVID and JAIME W. Kids, please get in touch with your worried Mother. 585-413-0827 MCC DENTAL HYGIENE student looking for volunteer patients interested in complimentary dental cleaning, just pay $1 for parking. Preferred 2+ years since last professional cleaning. Call 292-2045 and leave message for Leslie S.

Wanted to Buy CASH FOR CARS! We Buy ANY Car or Truck ,Running or NOT! Damaged, Wrecked, Salvaged OK! Get a top dollar INSTANT offer today! 1-800-267-1591 WANTED UNEXPIRED DIABETIC DIABETIC TEST STRIPS UP TO $26/BOX. PRE PAID SHIPPING LABELS. HABLAMOS ESPANOL! 1-800-266-0702 www. SellDiabeticStrips.com WANTED: Will Pay Up to $15.00 For High School Yearbooks 1900-1988. Any School / Any State. Yearbookusa@yahoo.com or 972-768-1338

CHECK OUT THE

BRAND NEW CITY ONLINE CLASSIFIEDS Faster, easier-to-use! • Find what you’re looking for with new categories! Clickable links to business websites • and many more improvements!

go to ROCHESTERCITYNEWSPAPER.COM and click on “CLASSIFIEDS”

CITY Newspaper presents

Workshops

38 City april 18-24, 2012


Rent your apartment special third week is

Place your ad by calling 244-3329 ext. 23 or rochestercitynewspaper.com Ad Deadlines: Friday 4pm for Display Ads Monday at noon for Line ads

FREE

EMPLOYMENT / CAREER TRAINING

Employment P LY M O U T H S P I R I T UA L I S T C H U R C H Together We Are One

2 9 V I C K PA R K A RO C H E S T E R , N Y

Sunday Services 10:30 AM All Message Service & Free Spiritual Healing Third Weds ~ 7 PM ~ Séances ~ Classes ~ Gallery Reading ~ For more information and schedules www.plymouthspiritualistchurch.org Robin Higgins, Pastor ~ Phone: 585.271.1470

AIRLINES ARE HIRING Train for hands on Aviation Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified- Job Placement Assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance (866)296-7093 DRIVERS Drivers- New Freight lanes in your area. Annual Salary $45K to $60K. Flexible hometime. Modern Fleet of Trucks. CDL-A, 3 months current OTR experience. 800-4149569 www.driveknight.com HELP WANTED!!! Make money Mailing brochures from home! FREE Supplies! Helping Home-Workers since 2001! Genuine Opportunity! No experience required. Start Immediately! www.theworkhub.net (AAN CAN) $$$HELP WANTED$$$ Extra Income! Assembling CD cases from Home! No Experience Necessary! Call our Live Operators Now! 1-800405-7619 EXT 2450 http://www. easywork-greatpay.com (AAN CAN) MALE & FEMALE Dance Instructors Needed! Dance experience preferable, but will train the right candidate. Fred Astaire Dance Studio 292-1240 to schedule your interview! www.fadsrochester.com OWN A CAR? Earn $7k per year renting out your car. RelayRides provides insurance and support. You set the price and who rents your car. www.RelayRides.com/list-your-car Questions? (415)729-4227 (AAN CAN)

HERITAGE CHRISTIAN STABLES, a therapeutic horsemanship program for children and adults with developmental disabilities, is looking for volunteers to serve as horse leaders and side walkers. Call Kim Kennedy at (585) 340-2016 or email kkennedy@ heritagechristianservices.org LAKE PLAINS 4-H seeks volunteers to work with youth on various projects. Share your interests with young people! Contact Aimee Widger aw254@ cornell.edu for more information. LIFESPAN’S OMBUDSMAN Program is looking for volunteers to advocate for individuals living in long-term care settings. Please contact call 585.287.6378 or email dfrink@lifespan-roch.org for more information.

A SECOND THOUGHT Resale Shop in East Rochester is accepting applications for volunteer sale associates and online researchers. Shop benefits people with disabilities in Guatemala. Call (585) 340-2000. CAMP GOOD DAYS! Help create some good days and special times for children and families dealing with cancer. Volunteer at Camp Good Days! Volunteer Applications and program information available at www.campgooddays.org or call 585-624-5555. COMMUNITY LUTHERAN MINISTRY seeking volunteers for Saturday program with reading, crafts and board games from noon to 2 p.m. on the third and fourth Saturdays at 942 Joseph Ave. Info. 585-338-2420. FOSTER PARENTS WANTED! Monroe County is looking for adults age 21 and over to consider opening their homes to foster children. Call 334-9096 or visit www.MonroeFosterCare.org.

training), financial-aid, housing if qualified.  National Tractor Trailer School Liverpool/Buffalo, NY Branch 1-888-243-9320 www. ntts.edu

Career Training

EARN $500 A DAY Airbrush & Media Makeup Artists For: Ads TV Film Fashion Train & Build Portfolio in 1 week Lower Tuition for 2012 AwardMakeupSchool.com

CDLA TRAINING (Tractor/Trailer) Experience new challenges. Conditional pre-hires (prior to

America’s Navy:

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Transform your future and have a challenging career by joining the Navy Reserve Medical Officer Team. We have positions available in many rewarding healthcare fields including: • Nursing • Dentistry • Podiatry • Physician • Industrial and Environmental Health • Clinical Psychology • Healthcare Administration

SDS AUTHOR/REGULATORY SPECIALIST Full Time position with growing regulatory services firm in LATHAM, NY is looking for an SDS Author with 3-5 years experience, as well as BS in Science Concetration. Relocation to LATHAM area is REQUIRED. Please email resume and cover letter to robind@thewercs. com. EOE

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CITY

Active and Reserve Opportunities Are Available. Now, the need for health-care specialists is critical in the Navy.

Join an elite group who serve their country by providing healthcare while maintaining their civilian employment.

Call 1-800-242-3736 or email jobs_pittsburgh@navy.mil

ADVERTISING SALES OPPORTUNITY SEEKING ONE OUTSTANDING SALES PROFESSIONAL. MUST BE ASSERTIVE, OUTGOING, SMART, IMAGINATIVE AND CONFIDENT. SALES EXPERIENCE AND PROVEN RECORD OF SALES ACHIEVEMENT A MUST. NEWSPAPER/MEDIA SALES A DEFINITE PLUS. SALARY PLUS COMMISSION PLUS BENEFITS.

SEND RESUME TO: Betsy Matthews, City Newspaper, 250 N. Goodman St., Rochester, NY 14607 OR EMAIL TO: bmatthews@rochester-citynews.com rochestercitynewspaper.com City 39


Legal Ads [ CITATION ] File No.2011-319 SURROGATE’S COURTONTARIO COUNTY THE PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK, By the Grace of God Free and Independent TO: ‘’To the Unknowns (whose names and whereabouts are unknown), and Katherine Gladstone Esq..as Guardian Ad Litem on behalf of the Unknowns, hereby intending to designate the aunts and uncles of or their distributees, legal representatives, assigns, and all persons who by purchase, inheritance, or otherwise have or claim to have in the estate of Frances L. Knobel, deceased, if living, and if any of them to be dead, to their heirs at law, next of kin, distributees, legatees, executors, administrators, assignees and successors in interest whose names are Unknown and cannot be ascertained after due diligence. A petition having been duly filed by John W. Williams, who is domiciled at 8844 Sandy Bottom Road, Honeoye, New York 14471, USA. YOU ARE HEREBY CITED TO SHOW CAUSE, before the Surrogate’s Court, Ontario at the Ontario County Courthouse, 27 North Main Street, Canandaigua, New York, on May 8, 2012 at 1:30 o’clock in the afternoon of that day, why a decree should not be made in the estate of Frances L. Knobel lately domiciled at 5420 Middle Road, Honeoye, New York 14471, admitting to probate a Will dated August 4, 2010, a copy of which is attached, as the Will of Frances L. Knobel, deceased, relating to real and personal property, and directing that Letters Testamentary issue to John W. Wlliams. Dated: March 23, 2012 HON. FREDERICK G. REED, Surrogate, Elizabeth T. Simpson, Chief Clerk, Wayne I. Ohl, Esq. P.O. Box 788, Honeoye, New York 14471 (585) 229-2501 Fax: (585) 229-4723 NOTE: This citation is served upon you as required by law. You are not required to appear. If you fail to appear, it will be assumed you do not object to the relief requested. You have a right to have an attorney appear for you. [ LEGAL NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of a Limited Liability Company (LLC): Name:

JLapp Construction LLC, Articles of Organization filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 02/07/2012 Office location: Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to: JLapp Construction 1658 Vroom Rd Spencerport NY 14559. Purpose: Any lawful purpose. Latest date upon which LLC is to dissolve: No specific date. [ LEGAL NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Humbert & Swiech LLC filed with Secretary of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/29/11. Office located in Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent upon whom process against the Company may be served. SSNY shall mail process to 180 Merrick Street, Rochester, NY, 14615. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ LEGAL NOTICE GENESEE CHANNEL MAINTENANCE COMPANY LLC ] Notice of Organization: Genesee Channel Maintenance Company LLC was filed with SSNY on March 29, 2012. Office: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. PO address which SSNY shall mail any process against the LLC served upon it: 361 Boxart Street, Rochester, NY 14612. Purpose is to engage in any lawful activity. [ LEGAL NOTICE VG ENTERPRISES MANAGEMENT GROUP LLC ] Notice of Organization: VG Enterprises Management Group LLC was filed with SSNY on March 14, 2012. Office: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. PO address which SSNY shall mail any process against the LLC served upon it: c/o Nixon Peabody, LLP, 1300 Clinton Square, Rochester, NY 14604. Purpose is to engage in any lawful activity. [ LEGAL NOTICE VG HAMPTONS LLC ] Notice of Organization: VG Hamptons LLCVG Hamptons LLC was filed with SSNY on March 14, 2012. Office: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. PO address which SSNY shall mail any process against the

40 City april 18-24, 2012

LLC served upon it: c/o Nixon Peabody, LLP, 1300 Clinton Square, Rochester, NY 14604. Purpose is to engage in any lawful activity. [ LEGAL NOTICE VG ORLANDO LLC ] Notice of Organization: VG Orlando LLC was filed with SSNY on March 14, 2012. Office: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. PO address which SSNY shall mail any process against the LLC served upon it: c/o Nixon Peabody, LLP, 1300 Clinton Square, Rochester, NY 14604. Purpose is to engage in any lawful activity. [ LEGAL NOTICE VG TILLER LLC ] Notice of Organization: VG Tiller LLC was filed with SSNY on March 14, 2012. Office: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. PO address which SSNY shall mail any process against the LLC served upon it: c/o Nixon Peabody, LLP, 1300 Clinton Square, Rochester, NY 14604. Purpose is to engage in any lawful activity. [ LEGAL NOTICE WATCH POINT TRUST COMPANY, LLC ] Notice of Qualification: Watch Point Trust Company, LLC filed an Application for Authority with SSNY on February 24, 2012. Office: Monroe County. Formed in ME on 8/31/10. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. PO address which SSNY shall mail any process against the LLC served upon him: 1300 Clinton Square, Rochester, NY 14604. ME address of LLC: c/o James I. Cohen, P.O. Box 586, Portland, ME 04112-0586. Articles of Organization filed with ME Sec. Of State, 101 State House Station, Augusta, ME 043330101. Purpose is to engage in any lawful activity. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF CADRE CURBING, LLC LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY ] CADRE CURBING, LLC, a NYS LLC. Formation filed with SSNY March 7, 2012. Its principal office is in Monroe County, NY. The Secretary of State has been designated as its agent and the address to which the SSNY shall mail a copy of any process against it is: The LLC, 838 Shoemaker Drive

Webster NY 14580. Purpose: Any lawful purposes. [ NOTICE ] BURY MY HEART WITH TONAWANDA, LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 2/24/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, Attn: Kristina Nomeika, Mgr., 100 Woodsmeadow Ln., Rochester, NY 14623. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] BASISTY PROPERTIES, LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 2/24/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 58 Valley View Dr., Brockport, NY 14420. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] Bass Grey LLC filed Arts.of Org.with the Sec.of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/16/11. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of any process to Christian M. Nadler, Esq., 585 Packetts Landing, Fairport NY 14450. Purpose of LLC is to engage in any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Compass Lode LLC filed Arts. of Org. with the Sec .of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/16/11. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of any process to Christian M. Nadler, Esq., 585 Packetts Landing, Fairport NY 14450. Purpose of LLC is to engage in any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] ECDS PROPERTIES, LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 3/30/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, Attn: Hochan Son, 1305 Chili Ave., Rochester, NY 14624. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] First Lichen LLC filed Arts.of Org.with the Sec.of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/16/11.

Office location: Monroe County.SSNY has been designated as agent upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of any process to Christian M. Nadler, Esq., 585 Packetts Landing, Fairport NY 14450. Purpose of LLC is to engage in any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Georgena Terry & Ass., LLC, filed Articles of Organization with the NY Department of State on 3/12/2012. Its office is located in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent of the Company upon whom process against it may be served and a copy of any process shall be mailed to 3 Center Ct Ln, Penfield NY 14526. The purpose of the Company is bicycle design. [ NOTICE ] High Site LLC filed Arts .of Org. with the Sec. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/16/11. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of any process to Christian M. Nadler, Esq., 585 Packetts Landing, Fairport NY 14450. Purpose of LLC is to engage in any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] International Facilitators, LLC (LLC) filed Arts. of Org. with NY Secy. of State (SS) on 3/21/2012. LLC’s office is in Monroe Co. SS is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS shall mail a copy of any process to LLC’s principal business location at 145 Culver Rd., Ste. 100. Rochester, NY 14620. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] LADUE PRECISION LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 3/12/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 859 Ladue Rd., Brockport, NY 14420. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] LAST ONE STANDING LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 12/21/2011. Office in Monroe Co. SSNY design. Agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy

of process to Kenneth Chung PO Box 295 Alpine, NJ 07620. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] LEGAL NOTICE OF FORMATION KELINA’S CAFE, LLC, filed Arts. of Org. with SSNY on 3/02/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as its agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o United States Corporation Agents, Inc., 7014 13th Ave, Suite 202, Brooklyn, NY 11228. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Mary Wade LLC (LLC) filed Arts. of Org. with NY Secy. of State (SS) on March 29, 2012. LLC’s office is in Monroe County. SS is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS shall mail a copy of any process to LLC’s principal business location at 23A Cullen’s Run, Pittsford, NY 14534. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] MITRA WEST ACQUISITIONS AND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT, LLC. Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of (SSNY) 3/16/12. Office in Monroe Co. SSNY desig. agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process tp 2976 Chili Ave., Rochester, NY 14624, which is also the principal business location. Purpose: Any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Name of LLC: Lighting IQ, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State on 3/30/12. Office loc.: Monroe County. Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: 271 Marsh Rd., Ste. 2, Pittsford, NY 14534. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Name of LLC: Sail Services LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State: 1/31/12. Office loc.: Monroe Co. Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o Business Filings Inc., 187 Wolf Rd., Ste. 101, Albany, NY 12205, regd. agt. upon whom process may be served. Purpose: any lawful act. [ NOTICE ] Not. of Form. of DOLIN ASSOCIATES

LLC, Art. Of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 1/30/12. Location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to LLC at 11 Partridge Hl, Honeoye Falls, NY, 14472. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Not. of Form. of NOVO ENTERPRISES, LLC. Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 3/9/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY may mail a copy of any process to LLC. 125 Florendin Drive, Henrietta, NY 14467. Purpose: any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Not. of Form. of SEVARED RECORDS, LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 2/12/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY may mail a copy of any process to LLC. 350 Windsor Rd, Rochester, NY 14612. Purpose: any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Notice is hereby given that a license (number pending) for beer, wine, and liquor has been applied for by the undersigned*to sell beer, wine, and liquor at retail in a restaurant under the Alcoholic Beverage Control Law at 2160 Penfield Road, Suite 2, Penfield, NY 14526 in the County of Monroe. *Monte Alban of Penfield Inc. DBA Monte Alban Mexican Grill [ NOTICE ] Notice is hereby given that a license, number not yet assigned, for a full on premise beer, wine & liquor license has been applied for by Jim Cady Enterprises LLC. dba Brewski’s Food & Drink, 5019 West Ridge Rd, Spencerport , NY 14559, County of Monroe, Town of Parma, for a restaurant. [ NOTICE ] Notice is hereby given that a license, number not yet assigned, for beer & wine license has been applied for by D’MANGU, LTD. Dba D’MANGU, 1475 East Henrietta Rd. Ste. A Rochester, NY 14623, County of Monroe, Town of Henrietta, for a restaurant.

[ NOTICE ] Notice of Form. of BALAJI OF ROCHESTER, LLC (the “LLC”). Art. of Org. filed with Secretary of the State of NY (SSNY) on 2/9/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, 2041 Penfield Rd, Penfield, NY 14526. Purpose: any lawful purpose [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of ANDCON, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 1/19/2012. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 1495 Fieldcrest Drive, Webster, NY 14580. Purpose: any lawful act [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of Big Time Fishing Adventures, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/20/2011. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 914 Old Way Dr, Webster, NY 14580. Purpose: any lawful act [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of BLAINE RESEARCH LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Secy of State (SSNY) 2/22/2012. Office in Monroe County. SSNY designated agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Blaine Research, LLC, 48 Laconia Pkwy, Rochester, NY 14618. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of BUCKTON HOLDINGS LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 3/12/2012. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 1820 Taboret Trail, Ontario, NY 14519. Purpose: any lawful act [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Cascade Printing, LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 2/27/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process


Legal Ads against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 41 Chestnut St., Rochester, NY 14604. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] NOTICE OF FORMATION of CONTINENTAL EQUITY INCOME LLC (“LLC”) Art. of Org. filed with NY Secretary of State (“NYSOS”) on 12/14/2011, pursuant to Limited Liability Company Law Section 203. Office location: Monroe County. NYSOS designated as agent for LLC upon whom process against it may be served. NYSOS shall mail copy of process served to: 2604 Elmwood Avenue, Suite 352, Rochester, NY 14618. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of EXILEONMAINSTPROPERTIES LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 1/20/2012. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o Ciminelli & Ciminelli, 421 Penbrooke Drive, Suite 2, Penfield, NY 14526-2045. Purpose: any lawful act [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of GALLO AND GLEASON ORTHODONTICS, PLLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/5/11. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of PLLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The PLLC, 246 South Avenue, Webster, NY 14580. Purpose: practice the profession of dentistry. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of HatZ, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 3/12/2012. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 144 Exchange Blvd., Suite 102, Rochester, NY 14614. Purpose: any lawful act [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of HOLY ROSARY APARTMENTS, L.P. Cert. of LP filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 03/14/12. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LP: 1136 Buffalo Rd.,

Rochester, NY 14624. Latest date on which the LP may dissolve is 12/31/2072. SSNY designated as agent of LP upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LP at the addr. of its princ. office. Name and addr. of each general partner are available from SSNY. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of HOPEWELL HOSPITALITY, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 03/27/12. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 1170 Pittsford Victor Rd., Pittsford, NY 14534. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Kingsley Maintenance & Management LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 2/3/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 684 Hinchey Rd., Rochester, NY 14624. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Lynch Plumbing, LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 1/26/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to CSC, 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207, the Reg. Agt. upon whom proc. may be served. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of MOEAIR, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 03/09/12. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 2020 S. Clinton Ave., Rochester, NY 14618. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of MSE SOLUTIONS, LLC. Art. Of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY)

on 02/10/12. Office in Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, 1730 Penfield Road #79, Penfield, NY 14526. Purpose: Any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of POWER TRAIN SPORTS ROCHESTER LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/22/2011. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 1026 Sunset Trail, Webster, NY 14580. Purpose: any lawful act [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Real Good Pizza, LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 3/13/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 545 Titus Ave., Rochester, NY 14617. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of Rising Places LLC, a limited liability company. Arts. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) on 2/16/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated for service of process. SSNY shall mail copy of process to The LLC, 150 Benton Street Rochester NY 14620. Purpose: any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of ROCKWOOD SENIOR HOUSING, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 03/09/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, 505 Mount Hope Ave., Rochester, NY 14620. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Sansone Development, LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 2/17/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 212 Willowen Dr., Rochester, NY 14609. Purpose: any lawful

activities. Latest date 2/16/2042. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Sibley Redevelopment GP LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State on 2/28/2012. Office location: Monroe County. Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: Samuel Ross, WinnCompanies, 6 Faneuil Hall Marketplace, Boston, MA 02109, principal business address. Purpose: all lawful purposes. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Sibley Redevelopment Limited Partnership. Cert. filed with NY Dept. of State on 3/5/2012. Office location: Monroe County. Sec. of State designated agent of LP upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: Samuel Ross, WinnCompanies, 6 Faneuil Hall Marketplace, Boston, MA 02109, principal business address. Name/address of general partner available from Sec. of State. Term: until 12/31/2060. Purpose: all lawful purposes. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of SIRRAH PROPERTIES, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 02/23/12. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 3 Gateway Rd., Fairport, NY 14450. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Spruce Risk Purchasing Group LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State on 10/14/11. Office location: Monroe County. Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: University of Rochester, Office of the General Counsel, Attn: Spencer L. Studwell, Esq., 263 Wallis Hall, Rochester, NY 14627, principal business address. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Stetzer Consulting LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with Secy of State (SSNY) on 1/4/12. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. Office of LLC: 458 Whiting Rd Webster,

NY 14580. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to LLC’s princ. office. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of STONE DESIGN MASONRY LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 03/09/12. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 1458 Shoecraft Rd., Penfield, NY 14526. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Stone design, masonry. [ NOTICE ] NOTICE OF FORMATION of STRONG ISLAND ASSOCIATES LLC (“LLC”) Art. of Org. filed with NY Secretary of State (“NYSOS”) on 10/9/2003, pursuant to Limited Liability Company Law Section 203. Office location: Monroe County. NYSOS designated as agent for LLC upon whom process against it may be served. NYSOS shall mail copy of process served to: 3280 Elmwood Avenue, Rochester, NY 14618. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of VJV HOLDINGS LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 03/20/12. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 570 Shipbuilder’s Creek Rd., Webster, NY 14580. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of Flats, LLC. Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 3/2/12. NYS fict. name: Flats NY, LLC. Office location: Monroe County. LLC formed in MN on 2/27/12. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o Sam Feldman, Esq., 3445 Winton Pl., Ste. 228, Rochester, NY 14623, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. MN and principal business addr.: 12 S. 6th St.,

Ste. 715, Minneapolis, MN 55402. Cert. of Org. filed with MN Sec. of State, 60 Empire Dr., Ste. 100, Saint Paul, MN 55103. Purpose: all lawful purposes. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of The Outdoor Group, LLC. Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 3/7/12. Office location: Monroe County. Principal business addr.: 235 Middle Rd., Henrietta, NY 14467. LLC formed in DE on 1/9/12. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., 13th Fl., NY, NY 10011. DE addr. of LLC: The Corporation Trust Co., 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. [ NOTICE ] OF FORMATION of CARRIAGEHOUSE ENTERPRISES, LLC (“LLC”) Art. of Org. filed with NY Secretary of State (“NYSOS”) on 12/19/2011, pursuant to Limited Liability Company Law Section 203. Office location: Monroe County. NYSOS designated as agent for LLC upon whom process against it may be served. NYSOS shall mail copy of process served to: 203 Meigs Street, Rochester, NY 14607. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Only This Moment, LLC (LLC) filed Arts. of Org. with NY Secy. of State (SS) on March 8, 2012. LLC’s office is in Monroe County. SS is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS shall mail a copy of any process to LLC’s principal business location at 8 Royal Birkdale Court, Penfield, NY 14526. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] OPTICOOL TECHNOLOGIES, LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 3/14/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 45 Hendrix Rd., W. Henrietta, NY 14586. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] Twelfth Spire LLC filed Arts .of Org. with

the Sec.of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/16/11 .Office location: Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of any process to Christian M. Nadler, Esq., 585 Packetts Landing, Fairport NY 14450. Purpose of LLC is to engage in any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Two Wrights LLC filed Arts .of Org .with the Sec.of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/16/11. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of any process to Christian M. Nadler, Esq., 585 Packetts Landing, Fairport NY 14450. Purpose of LLC is to engage in any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] West Bellwether LLC filed Arts.of Org.with the Sec.of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/17/11. Office location: Monroe County.SSNY has been designated as agent upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of any process to Christian M. Nadler, Esq., 585 Packetts Landing, Fairport NY 14450. Purpose of LLC is to engage in any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Fair Sail LLC filed Arts.of Org.with the Sec.of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/16/11. Office location: Monroe County.SSNY has been designated as agent upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of any process to Christian M. Nadler, Esq., 585 Packetts Landing, Fairport NY 14450. Purpose of LLC is to engage in any lawful activity. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF BTEVM, LLC ] BTEVM, LLC (the “LLC”) filed Articles of Organization with NY Secretary of State (SSNY) 3/1/12. Office location: Monroe County, NY. Principal business location: 1265 Scottsville Rd, Rochester, NY 14624. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to CT Corporation System, 111 Eighth Avenue, NY, NY 10011 which is also the registered agent upon whom process may be served.

Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF BTGRC, LLC ] BTGRC, LLC (the “LLC”) filed Articles of Organization with NY Secretary of State (SSNY) 3/16/12. Office location: Monroe County, NY. Principal business location: 1265 Scottsville Rd, Rochester, NY 14624. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to CT Corporation System, 111 Eighth Avenue, NY, NY 10011 which is also the registered agent upon whom process may be served. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF COLEADD PROPERTIES, LLC ] The name of the Limited Liability Company is ColeAdd PROPERTIES, LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the New York Secretary of State on 3/6/12. The office of the LLC is in Monroe County. The New York Secretary of State is designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. The Secretary of State shall mail a copy of such process to 30 Crestwood Circle, Pittsford, NY 14534. The LLC is organized to engage in any lawful activity for which an LLC may be formed under NY LLC Law. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF JLMW WALWORTH, LLC ] The name of the Limited Liability Company is JLMW WALWORTH, LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the New York Secretary of State on 2/24/2012. The office of the LLC is in Monroe County. The New York Secretary of State is designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. The Secretary of State shall mail a copy of such process to 275 Commerce Dr., Rochester, NY 14231. The LLC is organized to engage in any lawful activity for which an LLC may be formed under NY LLC Law. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY ] LAYER 3 CONSULTING, LLC (“LLC”), has filed Articles of Organization

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Legal Ads > page 41 with the NY Secretary of State (“NYSS”) on November 23, 2011 pursuant to Section 203 of the NY Limited Liability Law. The office of the LLC shall be located in Monroe County, NY. The NYSS is designated as the agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served, and the address to which the NYSS shall mail a copy of any process served on him against the LLC is 1645 LYELL AVENUE, STE. 200, ROCHESTER, NY 14606. The purpose of the LLC is to engage in any lawful act or activity for which limited liability companies may be formed under the law. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LLC ] Enalas LLC has filed articles of organization with the New York Secretary of State on March 1, 2012. Its principal place of business is located at 14 Vantage Drive, Pittsford, New York in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent upon whom

process may be served. A copy of any process shall be mailed to 14 Vantage Drive, Pittsford, New York 14534. The purpose of the LLC is to engage in any lawful activity for which Limited Liability Companies may be organized under Section 203 of the New York Limited Liability Company Law. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LLC ] Kate Hare Events, LLC has filed articles of organization with the New York Secretary of State on March 5, 2012. Its principal place of business is located at 77 West Church Street, Fairport, New York in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent upon whom process may be served. A copy of any process shall be mailed to 77 West Church Street, Fairport, New York 14450. The purpose of the LLC is to engage in any lawful activity for which Limited Liability Companies may be organized under Section 203 of the New York Limited Liability Company Law.

[ NOTICE OF LEGAL POSTPONEMENT OF SALE ] Index No. 201014927 SUPREME COURT STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF MONROE ESL Federal Credit Union, Plaintiff, James S. Hinman; Joan K. Hinman, a/k/a Joan B. Karas-Hinman, f/k/a Joan B. Karas; Jeffrey Latinville, Defendants. Pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale dated February 27, 2011 and entered herein, I, the undersigned, the Referee in said Judgment named, will sell at public auction in the front vestibule of the Monroe County Office Building, 39 West Main Street, Rochester, New York, County of Monroe, on April 27, 2012 at 10:00 A.M.,(original sale date was April 4, 2012) on that day, the premises directed by said Judgment to be sold and therein described as follows: ALL THAT TRACT OR PARCEL OF LAND, situate in the Town of Irondequoit, County of Monroe and State of

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42 City april 18-24, 2012

New York, known and described as Lot No. 27 as shown on a map of Irondequoit Gardens, Section 3, which map is filed in the Office of the Clerk of the County of Monroe in Liber 138 of Maps, Page 76, and situate on the south side of Minocqua Drive. Tax Acct. No. 076.192-30; Property Address: 103 Minocqua Drive, Town of Irondequoit, New York Said premises are sold subject to any state of facts an accurate survey may show, zoning restrictions and any amendments thereto, covenants, restrictions, agreements, reservations, and easements of record and prior liens, if any, municipal departmental violations, and such other provisions as may be set forth in the Complaint and Judgment filed in this action. Judgment amount: $138,321.11 plus, but not limited to, costs, disbursements, attorney fees and additional allowance, if any, all with legal interest. DATED: March 30, 2012 Charles Noce, Esq., Referee LACY KATZEN LLP Attorneys for Plaintiff 130 East Main Street Rochester, New York 14604 Telephone: (585) 3245767 [ NOTICE OF SALE ] Index No. 201013233 SUPREME COURT STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF MONROE ESL Federal Credit Union, Plaintiff, Timothy S. Noonan; Prime Acceptance Corp.; New York State Commissioner of Taxation and Finance; ESL Federal Credit Union; Kathleen RyanDickey; United States of America, Internal Revenue Service; Ford Motor Credit Company LLC; Kathy Jurkowski, Defendants. Pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale dated June 24, 2011 and entered herein, I, the undersigned, the Referee in said Judgment named, will sell at public auction in the front vestibule of the Monroe County Office Building, 39 West Main Street, Rochester, New York, County of Monroe, on May 16, 2012 at 9:30 a.m., on that day, the premises directed by said Judgment to be sold and therein described as follows: ALL THAT TRACT OR PARCEL OF LAND, situate in the Town of Henrietta, County of Monroe and State of New York, known and described as Lot No. 434 of the

Mapledale Subdivision, Section IX , according to a map made by Sear, Brown and Associates, Engineers, recorded in Monroe County Clerk’s Office in Liber 177 of Maps, at pages 23 and 24. Tax Account No. 175.10-1-39 Property Address: 40 Maple Valley Crescent, Town of Henrietta, New York Said premises are sold subject to any state of facts an accurate survey may show, zoning restrictions and any amendments thereto, covenants, restrictions, agreements, reservations, and easements of record and prior liens, if any, municipal departmental violations, and such other provisions as may be set forth in the Complaint and Judgment filed in this action. Judgment amount: $116,445.76 plus, but not limited to, costs, disbursements, attorney fees and additional allowance, if any, all with legal interest. DATED: April 2012 Seema Ali Rizzo, Esq., Referee LACY KATZEN LLP Attorneys for Plaintiff 130 East Main Street Rochester, New York 14604 Telephone: (585) 3245767 [ NOTICE OF SALE ] Index No. 201110023 SUPREME COURT STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF MONROE ESL Federal Credit Union, Plaintiff, vs. Christian R. Mascadri; Eva Kozlowski-Mascadri; Unifund CCR Partners; Midland Funding LLC d/b/a Midland Funding of Delaware LLC; Eric Mascadri; Mark Mascadri, Defendants. Pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale dated March 16, 2012 and entered herein, I, the undersigned, the Referee in said Judgment named, will sell at public auction in the front vestibule of the Monroe County Office Building, 39 West Main Street, Rochester, New York, County of Monroe, on May 2, 2012 at 10:30 A.M., on that day, the premises directed by said Judgment to be sold known as 1891 Baird Road, Town of Penfield, Monroe County, New York 14526; Tax Acct. No. 124.01-2.41; Deed (L6746 P141) property size: 100.88 x 224.75. Said premises are sold subject to any state of facts an accurate survey may show, zoning restrictions and any amendments thereto, covenants, restrictions,

agreements, reservations, and easements of record and prior liens, if any, municipal departmental violations, and such other provisions as may be set forth in the Complaint and Judgment filed in this action. Judgment amount: $102,803.74 plus, but not limited to, costs, disbursements, attorney fees and additional allowance, if any, all with legal interest. DATED: March 2012 Richard T. Bell, Jr., Esq., Referee LACY KATZEN LLP Attorneys for Plaintiff 130 East Main Street Rochester, New York 14604 Telephone: (585) 3245767 [ NOTICE OF SALE ] Index No. 20116443 SUPREME COURT STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF MONROE ESL Federal Credit Union, Plaintiff, vs. Michael W. Johnston; Lori A. Johnston, a/k/a Lori A. Gould, f/k/a Lori A. Pagano; Monroe County Department of Human Services, Defendants. Pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale dated March 2, 2012 and entered herein, I, the undersigned, the Referee in said Judgment named, will sell at public auction in the front vestibule of the Monroe County Office Building, 39 West Main Street, Rochester, New York, County of Monroe, on May 2, 2012 at 10:00 A.M., on that day, the premises directed by said Judgment to be sold and therein described as follows: ALL THAT TRACT OR PARCEL OF LAND, situate in the Town of Parma, County of Monroe and State of New York, being part of Lot 34 in the Gore of said Town and bounded and described as follows: Beginning at a point in the center line of Webster Road, 440 feet northerly, measured along said center line of the southwest corner of premises conveyed to Donald N. Gotts and wife by deed recorded in the Monroe County Clerk’s Office in Liber 2244 of Deeds at page 359, and hereinafter referred to as “Gotts premises”, which point of beginning is also the northwest corner of premises conveyed by Donald N. Gotts and wife to R. Donald Hilfiker and wife by deed recorded in said Clerk’s Office

in Liber 2265 of Deeds at page 110; thence (1) easterly and at right angles to said center line, 393.90 feet to a point in the east line of said “Gotts premises”, which point is also the northeast corner of said premises so conveyed to R. Donald Hilfiker and wife; thence (2) northerly along the said east line of said “Gotts premises”, and making an included angle of 88º 32’ 40” with course (1) a distance of 440.17; thence (3) westerly and parallel to course (1), a distance of 382.71 feet to a point in the said center line of Webster Road; thence (4) southerly and along the center line of Webster Road and at right angles to course (3) a distance of 440 feet to the place of beginning. Excepting from said parcel above described a parcel of land on the northerly side thereof fronting 100 feet on Webster Road and being 100.03 feet on the rear as conveyed to Agnes F. Gell by deed dated October 24, 1967 and recorded in the Monroe County Clerk’s Office on said date in Liber 3856 of Deeds at page 160. The parcel conveyed is referred to as Parcel RA-1 on a map dated October 9, 1967 prepared by Schultz and Ackerman, resubdividing “Parcel A” as shown on a map filed in Liber 2687 of Deeds at page 421 in the Monroe County Clerk’s Office; being the southerly 340 feet part of premises described in a deed recorded in the Monroe County Clerk’s Office on June 30, 1966 in Liber 3745 of Deeds at page 299. Tax Acct. No. 072.02-3-20; Property Address: 64 Webster Road, Town of Parma, New York Said premises are sold subject to any state of facts an accurate survey may show, zoning restrictions and any amendments thereto, covenants, restrictions, agreements, reservations, and easements of record and prior liens, if any, municipal departmental violations, and such other provisions as may be set forth in the Complaint and Judgment filed in this action.

Judgment amount: $159,216.65 plus, but not limited to, costs, disbursements, attorney fees and additional allowance, if any, all with legal interest. DATED: March 2012 Martin P. McCarthy, II, Esq., Referee LACY KATZEN LLP Attorneys for Plaintiff 130 East Main Street Rochester, New York 14604 Telephone: (585) 324-5767 [ NOTICE OF SALE ] Index No. 2011-7561 SUPREME COURT STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF MONROE ESL Federal Credit Union, Plaintiff vs. Doreen M. Burnside, Defendants. Pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale dated March 26, 2012 and entered herein, I, the undersigned, the Referee in said Judgment named, will sell at public auction in the lobby of the Monroe County Clerk’s Office, 39 West Main Street, Rochester, New York, County of Monroe, on May 10, 2012 at 10:00 A.M., on that day, the premises directed by said Judgment to be sold and therein described as follows: ALL THAT TRACT OR PARCEL OF LAND, situate in the Town of Ogden, County of Monroe and State of New York, known as 3648 Brockport-Spencerport Road, Spencerport, New York 14559, Tax Account No. 085.041-7.1, described in Deed recorded in Liber 10645, page 378; 387.54 ft. x 174.80 ft. Said premises are sold subject to any state of facts an accurate survey may show, zoning restrictions and any amendments thereto, covenants, restrictions, agreements, reservations, and easements of record and prior liens, if any, municipal departmental violations, and such other provisions as may be set forth in the Complaint and Judgment filed in this action. Judgment amount: $106,705.05 plus, but not limited to, costs, disbursements, attorney fees and additional allowance, if any, all with legal interest. DATED: April 2012 Anthony John LaDuca, Esq., Referee LACY KATZEN LLP Attorneys for Plaintiff 130 East Main Street Rochester, New York 14604 Telephone: (585) 324-5767


Fun

[ rehabilitating mr. wiggles ] BY neil swaab

[ news of the weird ] BY CHUCK SHEPHERD As the U.S. government’s role in health care is debated, the French government’s role was highlighted in February with a report on Slate.com about France’s guarantee to new mothers of “10 to 20” free sessions of “la reeducation perineale” (vaginal re-toning to restore the pre-pregnancy condition, a “cornerstone of French post- natal care,” according to Slate). The sessions involve yoga-like calisthenics to rebuild muscles and improve genital flexibility. Similar procedures in the U.S. not only are not government entitlements, but are almost never covered by private insurance, and besides, say surgeons, the patients who request them do so almost entirely for aesthetic reasons. The French program, by contrast, is said to be designed not only for general health but to strengthen women for bearing more children, to raise the birth rate.

Compelling Explanations — Drill, Baby, Drill: U.S. Rep. Louie

Gohmert of Texas may have been joking, but according to a February Washington Post story, he seemed serious at a Natural Resources Committee hearing when searching for yet more reasons why the U.S. should support oil drilling in Alaska. Caribou, he said, are fond of the warmth of the Alaskan pipeline. “So when they want to go on a date, they invite each other to head over to the pipeline.” That mating ritual, Rep. Gohmert concluded, is surely responsible for a recent tenfold increase in the local caribou population. — In assigning a bail of only $20,000, the judge in Ellisville, Miss., seemed torn about whether to believe that Harold Hadley is a terrorist -- that is, did Hadley plant a bomb at Jones County Junior College? In February, investigators told WDAM-TV that the evidence against

Hadley included a note on toilet paper on which he had written in effect, “I passed a bomb in the library.” However, no bomb was found, and a relative of Hadley’s told the judge that Hadley often speaks of breaking wind as “passing a bomb.” The case is continuing. — John Hughes, 55, was fined $1,000 in February in Butte, Mont., after pleading guilty to reckless driving for leading police on a 100-mph-plus chase starting at 3:25 a.m. After police deflated his tires and arrested him, an officer asked why he had taken off. Said Hughes, “I just always wanted to do that.” — Melvyn Webb, 54, was acquitted in March of alleged indecent behavior on a train. An eight-woman, four-man jury in Reading (England) Crown Court found Webb’s explanation entirely plausible -- that he was a banjo player and was “playing” some riffs underneath the newspaper in his lap. “(S)ometimes I do, with my hands, pick out a pattern on my knees,” he said. (On the other hand, the female witness against him had testified that Webb “was facing me, breathing heavily and snarling.”)

Fine Points of the Law

Internal Revenue Service is battling the estate of art dealer Ileana Sonnabend over the value of a Robert Rauschenberg stuffed bald eagle that is part of his work “Canyon.” IRS has levied taxes as if the work were worth $65 million, but the Sonnabend estate, citing multiple auction-house appraisals, says the correct value is “zero,” since it is impossible to sell the piece because two federal laws prohibit the trafficking of bald eagles, whether dead or alive. (Despite the law, IRS says, there is a black market for the work, for example, by a “recluse billionaire in China (who) might want to buy it and hide it.”)

[ LAST WEEK’S SOLUTION ON PAGE 39 ]

[ LOVESCOPE ] BY EUGENIA LAST ARIES (March 21-April 19): A sudden attraction will not come with all the bells and whistles you hoped for. Time is on your side, and someone less outgoing but more endearing is closer than you think. Let love grow slowly. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Get involved in new pastimes or groups of interest, and mingle with people who share your concerns. Finding common ground with someone will lead to an interesting partnership that encompasses both business and pleasure. A short trip will help determine a new lifestyle.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): You’ll attract plenty of partners, but the ones who interest you most will not be your best choice. Stay away from unpredictable, overbearing, forceful individuals trying to possess you and control your every move. CANCER (June 21-July 22): You may be enamored of someone, but before you get involved, find out his or her status. A secret affair will not satisfy your needs for very long. Take an all-or-nothing approach to love, and spare getting involved with someone who is unavailable.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Love and romance are highlighted. Someone unusual but with plenty to offer will fit into your world perfectly. A change of location, a pleasure trip or getting involved in a new project will bring you in contact with a variety of potential partners. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Don’t mistake aggressive action for love. Ulterior motives are likely to be behind someone’s chummy attitude. Keep your guard up until you determine what’s expected of you in return. Be ready to back away if any financial implications

surface. Protect your assets and possessions. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Put everything you’ve got into love, happiness and working toward a relationship that is based on equality, common interests and plenty of chemistry. A commitment can be made and you can move toward greater domestic security. Now is not the time to procrastinate. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Someone from your past will come back into your life. You can reestablish a relationship, but do so slowly. This time, build a strong friendship and see where it goes. Maturity should

help you make a decision that protects you from disillusionment and disappointment. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Don’t believe everything you hear, and don’t make promises you cannot keep. When it comes to love, if someone can offer you what you want in a long-term relationship, don’t mince words -- take action. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): You’ll be attracted to someone who is fickle in nature. Try to see past the games before you sign up for heartache. Stick to less flirtatious, more established partners interested in achieving a long lasting relationship

instead of a one-night stand. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): You’ve got what it takes to attract someone looking for the same quality of life you desire. Be willing to experiment with love and to take an unusual approach to relationships. Make a mind connection first and foremost, and the physical will fall into place. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Question anyone who comes on to you aggressively. Being captivated by someone’s dominance will lead to an unequal relationship. Falling in love with money will end in dissatisfaction. Don’t make a foolish mistake for all the wrong reasons.

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44 City april 18-24, 2012


April 18-24, 2012 - CITY Newspaper