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[ PAGE 12 ]

Water warning. [ INTERVIEW, PAGE 8 ]

A community scorecard. [ PROFILE, PAGE 7 ]

City's 2013 Best Busker Contest. [ DETAILS, PAGE 27 ]

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Feedback Send comments to themail@ rochester-citynews.com, or post them on our website, rochestercitynewspaper.com, our Facebook page, or our Twitter feed, @roccitynews. We edit selections for publication in print.

Cuomo’s reforms

On Governor Andrew Cuomo’s proposed IDA reforms: Under Cuomo, New York has experienced the demise of 39,453 businesses. Cuomo is raiding $1.75 billion from the reserves of the off-budget State Insurance Fund. Cuomo cannot even hold on to his Democratic majority, which is in the middle of a corruption scandal and pay-to-play politics. He has disenfranchised the northern and western part of New York with his SAFE Act. He can’t make a decision, either way, with respect to fracking. New York has the highest taxes in the nation and is the most indebted state, with 33 percent of income dedicated to borrowing. It is ranked as the least “business-friendly” state in the country, has the distinction of being the least free state in the union, and is being termed the “Nanny State” with politicians legislating what we can eat and drink. Nine percent of the state’s population left for another state between 2000 and 2011 — the highest in the nation. (See the study by George Mason’s libertarianleaning Mercatus Center.) MICHAEL SILVER

Posted on rochestercitynewspaper.com I like the idea of state guidelines, but I like the idea of more community oversight and veto over these tax-break packages. The list of COMIDA board members has mostly business executives of varying fields, with a union member and a few lawyers. I’m not saying these people 2 CITY

APRIL 17-23, 2013

aren’t qualified or are evil or malicious, but it means that these tax breaks are being given out by a very narrow slice of the Rochester community. I would advocate for more community members, perhaps a rotating member from a neighborhood council, maybe a college professor, community advocates on issues like housing or poverty. We need to stop letting these tax breaks be given out by the business community, and deal with them with the whole Rochester community in mind. PATRICK CHASE

Posted on rochestercitynewspaper.com

In it together

On State Senator Ted O’Brien’s objection to the possibility that Upstate utility users would help pay to close the Indian Point nuclear plant in Westchester County: Since Downstate has been subsidizing Upstate for over 30 years now, O’Brien is way off base here. We’re all New Yorkers. Ted, what did Bill Clinton say at the DNC last year? “We’re all in this together.” This comes off as dumb posturing, something we don’t need. If O’Brien and others want to highlight the prohibitive costs of nuclear energy, fine. There is certainly enough to be said about that. But let’s do so without this kind of divisive politics and posturing. TROLL WHISPERER

Posted on rochestercitynewspaper.com

Correcting ourselves

In our April 10 Feedback, an editing change resulted in an incorrect spelling of the name of a reader praising the current Geva production, “The Whipping Man.” The correct spelling is Cathy Andersen. We regret the error.

News. Music. Life. Greater Rochester’s Alternative Newsweekly April 17-23, 2013 Vol 42 No 32 250 North Goodman Street Rochester, New York 14607-1199 themail@rochester-citynews.com phone (585) 244-3329 fax (585) 244-1126 rochestercitynewspaper.com On the cover: Illustration by Aubrey Berardini Publishers: William and Mary Anna Towler Editor: Mary Anna Towler Asst. to the publishers: Matt Walsh Editorial department themail@rochester-citynews.com Features editor: Eric Rezsnyak News editor: Christine Carrie Fien Staff writers: Tim Louis Macaluso, Jeremy Moule Music editor: Willie Clark Music writer: Frank De Blase Calendar editor: Rebecca Rafferty Contributing writers: Paloma Capanna, Casey Carlsen, Roman Divezur, George Grella, Susie Hume, Andy Klingenberger, Dave LaBarge, Kathy Laluk, Michael Lasser, James Leach, Adam Lubitow, Ron Netsky, Dayna Papaleo, Suzan Pero, Rebecca Rafferty, Deb Schleede, David Yockel Jr. Editorial intern: Jason Silverstein Art department artdept@rochester-citynews.com Art director/production manager: Matt DeTurck Designers: Aubrey Berardini, Mark Chamberlin Photographers: Mark Chamberlin, Frank De Blase, Michael Hanlon Advertising department ads@rochester-citynews.com Advertising sales manager: Betsy Matthews Account executives: Nancy Burkhardt, Tom Decker, Annalisa Iannone, William Towler Classified sales representatives: Christine Kubarycz, Tracey Mykins Operations/Circulation kstathis@rochester-citynews.com Circulation manager: Katherine Stathis Distribution: Andy DiCiaccio, David Riccioni, Northstar Delivery, Wolfe News City Newspaper is available free of charge. Additional copies of the current issue may be purchased for $1, payable in advance at the City Newspaper office. City Newspaper may be distributed only by authorized distributors. No person may, without prior written permission of City Newspaper, take more than one copy of each weekly issue. City (ISSN 1551-3262) is published weekly by WMT Publications, Inc. Periodical postage paid at Rochester, NY (USPS 022-138). Send address changes to City, 250 North Goodman Street, Rochester, NY 14607. City is a member of the Association of Alternative Newsweeklies and the New York Press Association. Subscriptions: $35.00 ($30.00 for senior citizens) for one year. Add $10 yearly for out-of-state subscriptions: add $30 yearly for foreign subscriptions. Due to the initial high cost of establishing new subscriptions, refunds for fewer than ten months cannot be issued. Copyright by WMT Publications Inc., 2013 - all rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, photocopying, recording or by any information storage retrieval system without permission of the copyright owner.


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GUEST COMMENTARY | BY JOHN KLOFAS

From our cold, dead minds Before there was Wayne LaPierre, there was Charlton Heston. At the 2000 NRA convention, he raised a rifle high over his head, conjured up the straw man of gun confiscation, and declared: “I’ll give you my gun when you pry it from my cold, dead hands.” Bluster and intimidation have been important elements in the NRA’s strategy. But these are not the NRA’s only, or even its most potent, tools. The NRA has aggressively and successfully pursued a strategy designed to ensure that the information needed for rational policy discourse is not available. Largely through riders attached to unrelated legislation by gun-friendly lawmakers, the gun lobby has prevented the collection or analysis of critical data and has erected barriers to much-needed research on gun violence. Pushed by the gun lobby, Congress cut firearms safety research funding at the Centers for Disease Control by 96 percent in the mid-1990’s and added additional gun research restrictions to that and other agencies. Using the argument that any database could be used for gun confiscation, the gun lobby has also prevented collection of almost all data on gun owners, buyers, and sellers. There are no centralized records of gun dealers, and dealers are not required to inventory their merchandise. Tracing guns used in crimes has been made nearly impossible by legal restrictions on maintaining transaction records. The NRA’s de-information strategy has allowed it to bolster its position with the claim that there is little evidence supporting specific gun-reform policies. It is more than ironic that those who fight on the false front of gun confiscation do so by trying to confiscate our knowledge, our reason, and our ability to understand. This is, though, just one skirmish in a growing war over the value and power of information. A new front opened just recently. The bill to fund the US government through the summer was amended to include a provision that bars the use of National Science Foundation funding to support research in political science unless that research promotes national security or serves US economic interests. One can only imagine the range of research topics that cannot receive taxpayer support. If not new, we are, at least, in unfamiliar territory – made so by stealth strategies. These assaults on access to information have nothing in common with better-known anti-science arguments, such as those made by advocates of teaching creationism in schools, or those who reject evidence of climate change. The warriors for deinformation are not deniers of science. They are instead its truest believers. They

The NRA’s attempt to limit research is just one skirmish in a growing war over the value and power of information. understand the power of science, and they fear it. Their goal is not to deny science but to deny access to it. It is not coincidence that the effort to limit research and restrict access to information comes at a time when the technology for collecting, analyzing, and disseminating information is expanding at a pace unparalleled in history. While the quantity of available information and the speed at which knowledge accumulates are new, the problems these pose, for some, are not. Those who want to limit research and reduce access to information want to do so for the same reasons Galileo was excommunicated and imprisoned for usurping the priestly power to decide the center of the universe. That challenge to power was what was revolutionary about the “scientific revolution,” and it’s what is truly revolutionary about the “information revolution” today. The stakes are high. Rational policy on guns, and on everything else, requires information. But by itself, the cold clinical sweep of that idea assumes the power of information, but ignores the power that it challenges. Little did we know that the real fight was over access to facts rather than how we interpret and understand them, and what conclusions should be drawn from them. It is the search for truth that must be protected now, because it is a revolution that some seek to confiscate. John Klofas is professor of criminal justice at the Rochester Institute of Technology. Mary Anna Towler’s Urban Journal returns next week. rochestercitynewspaper.com

CITY 5


[ NEWS FROM THE WEEK PAST ]

RPO challengers lose legal battle

State Supreme Court Justice Kenneth Fisher upheld the board election results from the Rochester Philharmonic Orchestra’s annual meeting, which took place in January. Fisher rejected an attempt by attorney Eileen Buholtz to invalidate the meeting and the elections. Buholtz says she will not pursue further legal action.

Charging ahead

A state agency is giving $3.6 million to install 260 electric vehicle charging stations across New York. In Rochester: 10 stations will go in at the Frito-Lay facility for charging fleet vehicles, and three will be installed on the RIT campus for student and staff use. Statewide, stations may go in at hotels and shopping plazas, among other locations.

Lej Dems stand up to the GOP

Democrats in the Monroe County Legislature voted against borrowing for a bridge project in Wheatland and for a road project in Chili. As a result, the measures failed. Democrats, long the minority party in the Legislature, say the votes were a tactical

move to try to get some of their proposals considered and discussed.

News

Art Walk earns award

Art Walk Extension was awarded the Transportation Project of the Year by the state chapter of the American Public Works Association. The $9 million extension of the outdoor museum concept to Union and Goodman streets is supposed to help revitalize the Neighborhood of the Arts.

ENVIRONMENT | BY JEREMY MOULE

Curbside compost Rochester residents receive city-provided trash and recycling pickup, but when it comes to composting, it’s kind of a DIY thing. That’s about to change. Local residents Brent Arnold and Steve Kraft have started a city-based business, Community Composting, which will provide residential pickup of compost fodder. They’ll give subscribers a bucket for food scraps and other organic materials and they’ll make weekly pickups, Arnold says. They’ll charge $5 to $7 per pickup. (Subscribers will be able to direct Community Composting not to make a pickup on any given week by clicking a button in a weekly e-mail reminder they’ll receive.)

Sustainability Hall opens at RIT

The Rochester Institute of Technology officially opened its Sustainability Hall, which houses the Golisano Institute for Sustainability. The 84,000 square foot facility cost more than $30 million to build, and features multiple energy sources such as fuel cell technology, geothermal system, solar panels, and wind turbines. The institute was designed for master’s and doctoral studies, as well as for research in sustainable product development and manufacturing. Brent Arnold (front) and Steve Kraft (back) are starting a composting service. PHOTO BY MARK CHAMBERLIN

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In return, subscribers will receive credits based on the amount of waste they generate. They’ll be able to redeem the credits through a webbased store for loose compost or small kitchen herb plants, Arnold says. Community Composting will take the scraps to Epiphergy, a local company that will turn the waste into compost, animal feed, and ethanol. Arnold says that about 100 people have signed up so far and that he and Kraft should have the service going within a couple of weeks. Initially they plan to serve the Park Avenue, South Wedge, Brighton, and 19th Ward areas.

The service offers a broader benefit by diverting food waste from landfills. In the big picture, keeping food wastes out of landfills helps avoid the need to expand the landfills. And when food wastes break down in a landfill they produce methane: a potent greenhouse gas. “Anything that we can do to complete the food cycle in Rochester is exciting to us,” Arnold says. For more information: www. communitycomposting.org.

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By recruiting well-known and tested charter management organizations, E3 Rochester could potentially change the education landscape in the city by adding more schools much quicker than individual charter school creators.

EDUCATION | BY TIM LOUIS MACALUSO

PROFILE | BY TIM LOUIS MACALUSO

A surge of charters to Rochester? A new company created by Joe Klein, chair of Klein Steel and former board member of True North Rochester Preparatory Charter School, is recruiting specialized organizations to open and manage charter schools in Rochester. By recruiting well-known and tested charter management organizations, E3 Rochester could potentially change the education landscape in the city by adding more schools much quicker than individual charter school creators. But Klein says quality is more important than just adding schools. E3 is working with PUC Schools, an organization that operates 13 charter schools in Los Angeles, to open a middle school in Rochester, Klein says. And E3 is working with the Noble Network of Charter Schools, operators of the Pritzker College Preparatory High School in Chicago, to open a charter high school, he says. Applications to the State Education Department for the two new charters have been sent out, Klein says, and the plan is to open the schools in 2014. Each school would probably launch with a single grade and grow out, Klein says. And 100 percent of the students would be chosen by lottery, he says. Klein says he is an avid supporter of public schools, but that the problems with

Joe Klein. PHOTO BY MARK CHAMBERLIN

the Rochester school district are nearly intractable for reasons that are beyond the control of the superintendent. Opponents of charters argue that the schools siphon money and students away from the host district. And Rochester Superintendent Bolgen Vargas says the district has lost more than 3,000 students to charters. But advocates say Rochester is a ripe market for more charters because so many city schools are failing and parents want other options. Eleven charter schools are operating in Rochester, according to the New York State Education Department’s website, and more are planned in addition to E3 Rochester’s.

Community report The scores on ACT Rochester’s recently released community report card probably won’t shock you. Most people know that the nine-county Rochester region, overall, is doing better than the state in certain areas — the economy, education, health, and housing. | But when the report focuses on the city, it exposes stark disparities involving race and ethnicity. | For example, third grade English Language Arts scores on state tests show that 61 percent of white students in the region are proficient at reading and writing, compared to 34 percent of white students in city schools. | But only 35 percent of African-American third graders in the region are proficient at reading and only 23 percent from city schools. | And an interesting thing happens when you look at a comparison of rent as a percent of income by race and ethnicity. | About 12 percent of a white person’s income goes to rent in the Rochester region, and about 34 percent of their income goes to rent in the city. | But African Americans struggle, with 45 percent of their income going to rent for those living in the region. And 49 percent of their income goes to rent if they live in the city.

Cost of War AFGHANISTAN TOTALS —

2,200 US servicemen and servicewomen and 1,081 Coalition servicemen and servicewomen have been killed in Afghanistan from the beginning of the war and occupation to April 15. Statistics for Afghan civilian casualties are not available. American casualties from April 3 to 9: -- Staff Sgt. Christopher M. Ward, 24, Oak Ridge, Tenn. -- Spc. Wilbel A. Robles-Santa, 25, Juncos, Puerto Rico -- Spc. Delfin M. Santos Jr., 24, San Jose, Calif. -- Chief Warrant Officer Matthew P. Ruffner, 34, Tafford, Pa. -- Chief Warrant Officer Jarett M. Yoder, 26, Mohnton, Pa. iraqbodycount. org, icasualties.org, Department of Defense

SOURCES:

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INTERVIEW | BY JEREMY MOULE

Sounding the alarm on water The Aral Sea in Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan was once one of the world’s largest saltwater lakes. But in the 1950’s and 1960’s, the Soviet Union ramped up agricultural programs in the sea’s basin, which included diverting the freshwater streams that fed the sea and using the water for farming. By 2010, the Aral Sea was a puddle of its former self. Maude Barlow, a Canadian activist wellknown for advancing the concept of water as a human right, uses the Aral Sea as a cautionary tale. It’s an example of what can happen when water resources are abused or used unsustainably, she says. “They just diverted it to death,” Barlow says. A high-profile voice on water issues, Barlow is chair of the Council of Canadians, which is Canada’s largest public interest group, and chairs the board of Food and Water Watch in Washington, D.C. She was deeply involved in efforts to get the United Nations to declare water a human right, which it did in 2010. Barlow will be one of the keynote speakers at the Rochester Sierra Club’s annual environmental forum, which this year will span two days, April 25 and April 26. More information on the forum is available at http://newyork.sierraclub.org/rochester/. Barlow says the Great Lakes, the world’s largest freshwater ecosystem, are not the inexhaustible water source they are often perceived to be; they face threats of their own. One threat comes from over-extraction, whether it’s for drinking or for large-scale uses like agriculture and food production, industry, power plants, or paper mills. While the United States and Canada have a pact to limit withdrawals from within the Great Lakes basin, there are loopholes. For example, water bottling plants still operate in the Great Lakes region, Barlow says. And developing the regulations to implement the pact, as well as enforcing them, has been done on a state-by-state — or province-by-province — basis. And there are threats to water quality: nutrient runoff feeds algae blooms in the lakes; fracking for natural gas — which is under consideration in New York — is water-intensive; and the heavy crude oil from Canadian tar sands is being transported across the lakes via pipelines and ships. (Extracting the oil is also water-intensive, though the sands lie outside of the Great Lakes basin.) “We’ve got a kind of conquest mentality to water,” Barlow says. “We don’t respect it; we don’t protect it in watersheds.” An edited version of a conversation with Barlow follows. 8 CITY

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CITY: What does it mean to recognize water as a human right?

Barlow: There is actually a global water crisis in terms of the actual demand for water and the actual supply. It doesn’t mean that the water isn’t still there on the planet; it means we’ve done bad things with it. Some people have all they want, all they don’t even need, while others are going without. If you just look at straight numbers and nothing else, the lack of access to clean water is the biggest killer in the world. There isn’t anything that comes near. It’s a bigger killer of people than violence of all kinds, including war. And it’s by far the largest killer of children. While most of the people in the world who are doing without water live in the developing world, it is increasingly true that there are people in the global north experiencing this as well. In inner-city Detroit, the authorities have cut off the water officially to 42,000 residents because they can’t pay their water bills. They’re largely African American, older people, single mothers. And we’re literally talking about third-world conditions where people go out with buckets and they go to parks or they go to the local schools, or they do whatever they can to find water and bring it home. And increasingly, the water is being given over to private interests to develop industrial areas, to develop commercial interests, and away from the people and the small farmers who need it and who depend on it for life. It’s a double issue of the amount of water — the quality, quantity, and accessibility — plus poverty and injustice. Those come together to create a really serious story. As far as the Great Lakes are concerned, what are the implications of treating water as a human right? What would that mean on a global and regional basis?

If you really look at the whole concept of water as a human right, you start to look at who has access, why they have access. For the Great Lakes you start to say: “These lakes don’t just belong to the people of North America.” I would argue that as a fifth of the world’s water, they are a global asset. And we have a responsibility to take care of them, and that means we have to bring in a set of principles upon which we build sustainable use for these lakes. We used to worry more about wealthy companies or countries putting pipes in the Great Lakes and just sucking the water out. I don’t think that’s going to happen. Nobody will let that happen, certainly in the near future. The larger issue is the millions and millions of refugees — water refugees, climate refugees — in the world, where they’re going

to live and where they’re going to get food and water. We have this gift. We have this incredible bounty and shame on us if we allow it to be destroyed. What are some of the other issues facing the Great Lakes?

First of all, they’re in decline in every way in terms of pollution, in terms of invasive species, in terms of water quality, in terms of eutrophication. And we have climate change. We’ve got a huge reduction in the amount of ice cover over the last few decades, which means that [the water] evaporates too quickly because the ice cover isn’t thick and it melts earlier in the spring. We also have overextraction. We’re literally Maude Barlow: The Great Lakes are a global asset. PHOTO PROVIDED taking more out of the BY THE COUNCIL OF CANADIANS lakes every day than we’re collectively putting back production for local needs, as opposed to this into them. And this is a really serious part massive export of stuff. of the story. You can bring in the right kind of law We also have a whole bunch of new private that spells out the ways in which you’re interests moving in to the lakes. It seems to going to protect the water, but it really does me the problem we have is there are too many start with a vision. elected officials and business people who just see the lakes as big dollar signs. We use Fracking is a big issue in New York right now, the Great Lakes as an economic resource to and the potential impact on water is a major promote profit and well-being. Now, there’s concern. In your opinion, is there any way the nothing wrong with that to a point; obviously, state could allow fracking in any capacity? people have to make a living. Of course there’s Not under current circumstances. Not with the a commercial dimension to water or a water dimension to commercial interests. But it seems method of fracking [that’s being widely used]. I chair the board of Food and Water Watch to me that’s come first. in the US and we’re calling for a full [national] moratorium on [fracking] Now, at some future What will the future of Great Lakes time they may find the technology that allows preservation or protection look like? What them to frack the gas without destroying water do you think it should look like? and without those chemicals. I’m open to that. I think we should see it as a common But under the current circumstances, under heritage; it’s a public trust that must be the current way that natural gas is produced guarded by law and by local communities. under fracking, no. And if there’s a commercial taking [of ] the We pit air against water here. We say water — if somebody wants to use the waters for some commercial purpose — they have to “Well, natural gas is better than oil, especially tar sands oil; it’s better than coal; it’s better convince the owners of the lake, the people, than nuclear. But it’s destroying water. We that they’re not going to hurt it. always see water as that thing that’s endless, Vermont’s done this. Vermont has that you can use and abuse as much as you passed groundwater legislation that says want because there’ll always be more. their groundwater is a public trust. And The story that I’m spending my life trying they actually spell out what that means: if to tell people is that’s not true. It’s just simply there’s any conflict or shortage that water for not true. It’s the most vulnerable of all the people’s daily use is a top priority, as is water resources, actually. for the ecosystem, and then sustainable food


rochestercitynewspaper.com

CITY 9


For more Tom Tomorrow, including a political blog and cartoon archive, visit www.thismodernworld.com

URBAN ACTION This week’s calls to action include the following events and activities. (All are free and open to the public, unless otherwise noted.)

and pedestrian safety. The event will be held at Gleason Works, 1000 University Avenue. Tickets: $15. Pay online at www.rrcdc.org or at the door (cash only).

Film on IsraeliPalestinian conflict Albright’s memoir reviewed Christians Witnessing for Palestine will show the film “With God on Our Side” at 7 p.m. on Thursday, April 18. The film looks at Christian Zionism and will be followed by a discussion. It’s at Immanuel Baptist Church, 815 Park Avenue.

Rochester transportation talk The Rochester Regional Community Design Center will present “Transit Talks” at 7 p.m. on Monday, April 29. Representatives Earl Blumenauer of Oregon and Louise Slaughter will discuss changing transit needs, including the future of high-speed rail, biking,

Friends of the Rochester Public Library will hold “Prague Winter: A Personal Story of Remembrance and War,” a book discussion about Madeleine Albright’s memoir about the Nazi invasion of Czechoslovakia and World War II. Sandra Frankel, former Brighton town supervisor, will lead the review and discussion at 12:12 p.m. on Tuesday, April 23, at 115 South Avenue.

Spring cleaning party

The Genesee Land Trust will hold the Brookdale Preserve spring work

party from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Saturday, April 20. Dress appropriately for cleaning and preparing for trail season at this preserve in Chili. Register with Emily Johnson at landprotection@geneseelandtrust.org.

Event focuses on Great Lakes

The Sierra Club will present “Protecting the Great Lakes Forever” on Thursday, April 25, and Friday, April 26. The twoday event will be held at Monroe Community College and Rochester Institute of Technology with discussions on topics ranging from the tools needed to protect local water to creating rain gardens. Registration, costs, and locations: www.newyork.sierraclub. org/rochester/ or call (585) 234-1056.

Correcting ourselves The April 10 theater review of Geva Theatre Center’s “The Whipping Man” included an incorrect first name for playwright Matthew Lopez. 10 CITY APRIL 17-23, 2013


Dining More manageable, but no less tasty, was Greenwald’s Cherise sandwich ($8.99). Pastrami, Swiss, cole slaw, and Russian dressing grilled on marble rye, this analog of the classic Reuben sandwich brought a welcome peppery and creamy accent to a sandwich that I honestly thought couldn’t be improved upon. While some might quibble with the pickle — real delis down in New York City only serve half-sours rather than the fully “done” garlic dills they hand out at Harry G’s (real delis also wouldn’t put Swiss cheese on a meat sandwich, which just shows how wrongheaded they are) — no one could reasonably deny that this combination of ingredients is inspired, possibly by a Higher Authority.

French dip with au jus (left), Cherise sandwich (center), and chicken florentine panini (right), all from Harry G's New York Deli. PHOTOS BY MARK CHAMBERLIN

The price is right Harry G’s New York Deli & Cafe 678 SOUTH AVE. 256-1324, HARRYGSDELI.COM MONDAY-FRIDAY 8 A.M.-10 P.M., SATURDAY 10 A.M.-10 P.M., SUNDAY 10 A.M.-5 P.M. [ REVIEW ] BY JAMES LEACH

My tax worksheets this year were a little bit hard to read by the time I actually got around to filing on Monday morning. On one corner of the first page of my 1040 form was a mustard-colored blot obscuring the signature block. My Schedule C was spattered with tiny dots (and not-so-tiny dots) of au jus, the paper warped and a bit smeared. The estimated tax vouchers were a complete loss — destroyed when I put a grilled sandwich (transparent spots on the paper) with cole slaw (whitish yellow stain with a tiny bit of carrot), pastrami (smear of fragrant meat juice and pepper), and Russian dressing (orange stains) down on it to answer my cell phone. Such, I guess, are the hazards of reviewing your taxes at a superlative sandwich shop like Harry G’s New York Deli on South Avenue.

At this time of year, like just about everyone else, I’m painfully conscious of money and how I spent it in 2012. As I sat at home looking over piles of twisted, folded, and torn receipts I noticed something interesting. In terms of value for price there were few — barely a scant handful — expensive restaurants where happiness and satisfaction were in any way proportional to price. On the other hand, at the other end of the price spectrum were a host of restaurants delivering generous portions of delicious food at modest prices. Which, I suppose, is how I came to be dribbling au jus on my Schedule C at Harry G’s one afternoon. Harry G’s New York Deli is a perfect example of a restaurant that delivers excellent value for the price. Owned by chef Brandon Greenwald and his in-laws, Mary Beth and Frank Giglio, and open only since May of last year, Harry G’s serves up almost grossly overstuffed sandwiches at prices that are probably the envy of other sandwich shops in town. Based on excellent cold cuts, good bread (probably Martusciello’s rolls, from the look of them), and backed up by salads, stocks, and sauces that Greenwald makes from scratch, the menu at Harry G’s is well

thought-out and well-executed. If the chef errs at all, he does so on the side of trying to put too much between two piece of bread. Take the portobello mushroom panini ($8),

for instance. A stellar vegetarian sandwich tailored, Greenwald told me, for the large number of vegetarians who haunt the South Wedge, this sandwich is simply too large to eat with anything but a knife and fork (and a large stack of napkins). The sandwich is made with slices of grilled portobellos, red onion, fresh tomato, and a remarkably large amount of basil mayo topped with fresh mozzarella and then passed under a true panini press. The combination of flavors is exceptional and the portion is more than enough for two people to split — even if they don’t get a side of potato salad or some crunchy sweet-potato fries with a side of honey butter. But there’s no way anyone could ever successfully pick it up and eat it without completely destroying whatever clothing they were wearing. That said, the combination of mayo, mushroom marinade, and caramelized tomatoes and red onions that fell out on the waxed paper under the sandwich was so good I considered picking it up and licking it.

I suspect one of those who might take issue with mixing meat and cheese on a deli sandwich would be Greenwald’s grandmother, whose recipe for both chicken soup and matzoh balls are used in Harry G’s kitchen. As with all good chicken soups, this one starts with whole chickens and fresh vegetables, cooked low and slow until the remaining broth could probably revive the dead and would probably restore those who have given up hope to vigorous life. Greenwald’s soup is squarely in the tradition of matzoh-ball soup pretty much everywhere. While I was hoping for the elusive, and perhaps illusory, fluffy, light matzoh ball, the three kneidlach in my soup (which Greenwald says he is still experimenting with) were dense and heavy enough to be a meal in themselves, not at all unpleasant, but not my favorites by any means. Many people speak with reverential awe of Harry G’s Pittsburgh sub, which Greenwald told me is the restaurant’s best seller. But I think the best thing on the whole menu is the French Dip sub ($5.75/ half, $8.99/whole). I first had a French Dip when I was only 7 years old, and I remember thinking then that it was the apex of the sandwich maker’s art. Until I had this deceptively simple combination of sliced roast beef, melted provolone, and garlic-herb mayonnaise on an excellently toothsome roll at Harry G’s, I’d never had a version of the French Dip that lived up to my fond childhood memories. Greenwald’s version, accompanied by an au jus that’s not homemade, but is certainly jacked with some additional ingredients, is nothing short of sensational. The garlicky goodness of the spread, the admirable rareness of the roast beef, and the burliness of the roll all combine to make the perfect sandwich for a chilly afternoon. And the modest price tag for the more-than-generous “half” sandwich is a definite salve for a wallet recently decimated by the Tax Man. rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 11


THE 2013

HIGH FALLS FILM FESTIVAL [ PREVIEW ] BY ADAM LUBITOW

stablished in 2001, the High Falls Film Festival was originally conceived with the intent of highlighting the contributions of women in all aspects of the film industry. But in 2010, the festival shifted gears, renaming itself the 360 | 365 Film Festival. For two years, the festival drifted away from its original mission, instead opting to function as an all-purpose film festival, open to independent filmmakers of all types. After going on hiatus for 2012, the High Falls Film Festival returns this week under its original name, and with a renewed focus on its founding mission. The 2013 edition of the festival, headed by new executive director Mary Howard, will run April 18-21. The lineup, curated by new programming director Kate Dobbertin Bernola, boasts more than 50 independent, foreign, documentary, and short films from 12 countries around the world, all in their own unique ways shining a well-deserved spotlight on women in film. What follows is a quick take on 10 selections from this year’s festival. For the complete schedule, visit the festival’s website at highfallsfilmfestival.com, which also has ticket information, as well as a full list of all the events, panel discussions, and parties.

“The Girls in the Band” It’s no secret that we Rochesterians love some jazz, so kicking off this year’s festival with this fascinating musical documentary, focusing on the early female pioneers of the art form, was probably a no-brainer. The film serves well as a primer on the subject, beginning just prior to World War II, when all-female jazz groups like The Sweethearts of Rhythm were seen as little more than novelty acts, and moving all the way up through the rise of contemporary artists like Esperanza Spalding. Director Judy Chaikin treats all her subjects with reverence, especially the older women. She shows them for the trailblazers they were, fighting for their right to follow their dreams in a field that was seen largely as a man’s domain, and in so doing, paving the way for others to follow in their footsteps. While the film too often relies on the documentary crutch of talking-head interviews, the real highlight here is the 12 CITY APRIL 17-23, 2013

plethora of performance clips showcasing these gifted musicians who prove that gender is no definer of true talent. (Screens Thursday, April 18, Little 1, 6:30 p.m.; Friday, April 19, Cinema, 4 p.m.)

“California State of Mind: The Legacy of Pat Brown” Known as “The Grandfather of Modern California,” Governor Pat Brown’s two terms (from 1958 to 1964) marked a time of incredible change in an era that was particularly crucial to the development of the state as we know it today. Directed by Brown’s granddaughter, Sascha Rice, the film perhaps naturally ends up being somewhat biased. The harshest criticisms the film makes are that he was fairminded to a fault, making him come across as wishy-washy, and that he was possibly too devoted to his family. But it’s hard not to be impressed with what Brown was able to accomplish, setting

up key components of California’s infrastructure, and one can’t help thinking would have been all but impossible in today’s age of political gridlock. Everyone from Tom Brokaw to Nancy Pelosi and Arnold Schwarzenegger provide commentary, explaining how the governor’s career set the standard for all who were to follow, including Pat’s son, Jerry Brown, the current governor of California. Director Rice keeps things interesting (even for a generally politics-averse moviegoer like myself ), an even more impressive accomplishment considering that this is her first foray into documentary filmmaking. (Screens Friday, April 19, Cinema, 1:15 p.m.)

“Diana Vreeland: The Eye Has to Travel” Blessed with a sublimely charismatic subject, Lisa Immordino Vreeland’s glossy documentary captures fashion icon Diana Vreeland’s larger-than-life personality, bringing the legend to life through archival footage, interviews with friends, family, and those who worked alongside her. But the director’s most effective decision was to allow Diana to narrate her own life story, through the use of an actress reading from transcripts from interviews conducted by writer George Plimpton while they worked together on her autobiography. Chronicling Vreeland’s life from birth through her time as an editor for Harper’s Bazaar and Vogue, and finally, as head of the Metropolitan Museum of Art Costume Institute, Vreeland comes across as delightfully droll and eminently quotable. While always entertaining, the doc doesn’t

attempt at any sort of psychological depth, content to stay on the surface of things. But hey, that’s exactly how Diana would have wanted it. (Screens Friday, April 19, Little 1, 6:30 p.m.)

“Unfinished Spaces”

The National School of the Arts was commissioned by Fidel Castro during the early days of the Cuban Revolution. In that time of hopeful beginnings and romantic ideals, three architects — Roberto Gottardi, Ricardo Porro, and Vittorio Garratti — were given the task of designing a campus that Castro hoped would become home to the greatest art school in the world. Given a practically unlimited budget and complete creative freedom, the buildings they created were themselves works of art. Before construction was finished, the school had become home to a community of student artists of all types. But as Cuba became increasingly totalitarian, creativity and art was no longer an integral part of the plan. Construction of the school was halted, and what existed of the campus was allowed to fall into disrepair as the years passed. Directors Alysa Nahmias and Benjamin Murray’s inspiring and often quite moving history of the school, including recent efforts toward preservation by the World Monument Fund, allows audiences to see the campus in all its glory, as well as the ruin it gradually became. It acts simultaneously as a symbol of what


passion and imagination can accomplish, as well as a warning of what can happen when those freedoms are taken away. (Screens Friday, April 19, Little 5, 6:45 p.m.)

“Casting By” Outside of maybe soundeffects editor, there isn’t a behind-the-scenes position on a film set that fascinates me as much as that of the casting director. These men and women call upon a powerful insight that allows them to see an actor’s potential, often before the performers themselves are aware of it. This star-studded and slickly directed documentary shines a spotlight on this aspect of the filmmaking process and pays tribute to Marion Dougherty, a pioneer in the field. Dougherty veered from the traditional Hollywood star-making system, and focused on finding real actors, often from the New York theater community, and often not the standard definition of what Hollywood wanted their stars to look like. In so doing, she ended up securing the first roles of an entire generation’s worth of important actors, from James Dean to Al Pacino, and she ultimately altered the face of her profession for all time. Unexpectedly emotional by its end, “Casting By” pays tribute to an incredibly influential woman and an unsung hero of the industry. (Screens Friday, April 19, Little 1, 9:15 p.m.)

“Turn Me On, Dammit!”

Fifteen-year-old Alma has an active and varied sex life, but it’s one that she’s frustrated to admit exists entirely inside her head. These fantasies incorporate just about everyone she comes into contact with, but most frequently star the main object of her affection, her handsome classmate Artur. The rare story to tackle the subject of teen sexuality from the female perspective, this frequently funny, sometimes quite painful film gets a lot of comedic mileage out of poor Alma’s blurred line between fantasy and reality. Lead actress Helene Bergsholm gives a hilarious, charming, and utterly fearless performance, and director Jannicke Systad Jacobsen demonstrates a keen understanding of the way teenagers can sometimes feel like prisoners in their own bodies, completely at the mercy of the hormones raging inside them. (In Norwegian with English subtitles; screens Friday, April 19, Little 5, 9:30 p.m.) continues on page 34

2013

High Falls Film Festival Schedule

Live Antique Appraisal Show Saturday, April 20th 1-4PM • $10 ADMISSION

Appraisals by Mike Deming

$5 each with maximum of two items/person

Thursday, April 18 9:30-11 a.m.: Informal Coffee Chat with Directors Rochester Plaza, FREE 6:30 p.m.: “Girls in the Band” Little 1 ($15; Q&A to follow) 7 p.m.: “Watchtower” Little 5 9 p.m.-midnight: Opening Night Party Inn on Broadway ($25) 9:15 p.m.: “Facing Mirrors” Little 1 9:30 p.m.: Shorts Program 1: Short Cuts Little 5

St. Paul‘s Episcopal Church (Westminster Rd & East Ave) Hosted by Rochester chapters of P.E.O. Proceeds benefit Cottey College, a women’s college owned by the P.E.O Sisterhood, founded in 1989.

Friday, April 19 9:30-11 a.m.: Informal Coffee Chat with Directors Rochester Plaza (Free) 1:15 p.m.: “California State of Mind: The Legacy of Pat Brown” Cinema 4 p.m.: “Girls in the Band” Cinema (Q&A to follow) 6:30 p.m.: “Diana Vreeland: The Eye Has to Travel” Little 1 (Fashion Show to follow) 6:40 p.m.: “The Most Fun I’ve Ever Had With My Pants On” Cinema (Q&A to follow) 6:45 p.m.: “Unfinished Spaces” Little 5 8 p.m.-midnight: Party at the Strathallan (Free) 9:15 p.m.: “Casting By” Little 1 9:30 p.m.: “Turn Me On, Dammit!” Little 5 9:30 p.m.: “Pretty Brutal” Cinema

Saturday, April 20 9-10:15 a.m.: So You Want To Make A Movie? Panel Discussion Little 5 (Free) 9:30-11 a.m.: Informal Coffee Chat with Directors Rochester Plaza (Free) 10:30 a.m.-Noon: Future of Film-The Impact of Digital Media Panel Discussion Little 1 (Free) 11 a.m.: RIT Women of SoFA Little 5 (Meet & Greet to follow in Little Café) 12:30 p.m.: Go Public Project 4 Shorts & Panel Discussion w/Director Little 1 1 p.m.: “Molly Maxwell” Dryden 1:15 p.m.: “The Way to Nowhere Island” Little 5 3:15 p.m.: “Future Weather” Little 1 (Q&A to follow) 3:30 p.m.: Shorts Program 2: Dead Ends Little 5 3:30 p.m.: “How We Got Away With It” Dryden 6 p.m.: “First Comes Love” Little 5 6:30 p.m.: “Margarita” Little 1 (Q&A to follow) 6:30 p.m.: “The Day I Saw Your Heart” Dryden 9 p.m.-midnight: Closing Night Party Potter Peristyle, George Eastman House ($25) 9 p.m.: “A Teacher” Dryden ($15) 9:15 p.m.: “Harisma” Little 5 9:30 p.m.: “A Lot Like You” Little 1 (Q&A to follow)

Sunday, April 21 3:30 p.m.: Audience Choice: Best of the Fest (Documentary) Little 1 6 p.m.: Audience Choice: Best of the Fest (Narrative) Little 1

WEEKLY SPECIALS

• $1 Oyster Tuesdays after 5pm only • • No Corkage Fee Wednesdays • • $5 Custom Craft

Cocktails on Thursdays • CELEBRATING 5 YEARS!

Local. Seasonal. Lento. 274 N. Goodman St., Rochester www.lentorestaurant.com 271-3470

Before or after a show... Stop by Jines for Breakfast, Lunch, or Dinner! 658 PARK AVENUE

585-461-1280 (f) 585-461-4487 www.jinesrestaurant.com Find us on

!

TICKETS: Unless otherwise noted, all tickets cost $12, and can be purchased at the venues or online at highfallsfilmfestival. com. Students and seniors 65 and older (with IDs) receive $2 discounts on all tickets. A Film Fanatics Pass, which grants admission to all 27 regular festival screenings, costs $120. An All-Access Film Fanatics Pass, which covers screenings and all parties, costs $170. VENUES: Little Theatre 240 East Ave. | Dryden Theatre George Eastman House, 900 East Ave. | Cinema Theater 957 S. Clinton Ave. | Rochester Plaza 70 State St. | Inn on Broadway 26 Broadway | The Strathallan 550 East Ave.

VOTED BEST PLACE FOR BREAKFAST, BRUNCH & WAITSTAFF

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 13


Upcoming [ FOLK ] The Avett Brothers Friday, July 26. CMAC, 3355 Marvin Sands Drive, Canandaigua. $25-$45. 7:30 p.m. 758-5330. cmacevents.com [ HIP-HOP/RAP ] Lil Wayne w/T.I. & Future Tuesday, July 30. Darien Lake PAC, 9993 Allegheny Rd., Darien Center. $29.75-$99.75 7 p.m. 599-4641. darienlake.com

Music

[ POP/ROCK ] Aaron Carter Friday, September 20. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N. Water St. $18.50-$20. 8 p.m. 352-5600. waterstreetmusic.com

PHOTO COURTESY JOSEPH BOGGESS

Joe Locke SATURDAY, APRIL 20 HOCHSTEIN SCHOOL OF MUSIC, 50 N. PLYMOUTH AVE. 8 P.M. | $25-$42 | EXODUSTOJAZZ.COM [ JAZZ ] On the first cut of his superb new album, “Lay Down My Heart,” Joe Locke enters the slow groove of “Ain’t No Sunshine” with the melody and then proceeds to take it for beautiful flight. The Rochester native, who graced the stage of Jenks n’ Jones and other long-gone local clubs in the late 1970’s, is now one of the world’s greatest vibraphonists. On his 33rd album Locke offers excellent originals and a variety of standards, but his most sensitive performance comes on the tune that supplies the album’s title, “I Can’t Make You Love Me.” Locke will explore the album and more when he brings his top-notch group — Ryan Cohan, piano; Jaimeo Brown, drums; and Lorin Cohen, bass — to the Exodus To Jazz series. — BY RON NETSKY

Harvey Mandel and The SnakeCrew MONDAY, APRIL 22 THE CLUB AT WATER STREET, 204 N. WATER ST. 8 P.M. | $15-$20 | WATERSTREETMUSIC.COM [ BLUES ] At a time when the radio was flooded with acts looking to cash in on the psychedelic craze, Harvey “The Snake” Mandel made a name for himself as a technical master of the blues guitar. The music industry’s ubiquitous respect of Mandel’s skills landed him a string of studio gigs with rock legends like The Rolling Stones and John Mayall. His sound, defined by its sustained feedback and slightly distorted, but melodic, tone, has kept this Chicago blues boy relevant for more than 45 years. — BY DAVID YOCKEL, JR.

CITY Newspaper offices will be

CLOSED on WEDNESDAY, APRIL 17 from 1PM-5:30PM for a Staff Retreat We will re-open at 8:30AM on Thursday, April 18

14 CITY APRIL 17-23. 2013


WEDNESDAY, APRIL 17 [ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ] The Dady Brothers. Johnny’s Irish Pub, 1382 Culver Rd. 224-0990. 7:30 p.m. Free. Steve Lyons. Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. 9:15 p.m. Free. [ BLUES ]

Johnny Rawls. Dinosaur

Bar-B-Que, 99 Court St. 585325-7090. 9:30 p.m. Free. [ CLASSICAL ]

Record Store Day SATURDAY, APRIL 20 VARIOUS LOCATIONS RECORDSTOREDAY.COM [ SPECIAL EVENT ] It’s nice to know that some cool

things in this country aren’t being gobbled up, chewed up, spit out, re-packaged, and re-sold. Independent record stores are still going strong. On Saturday, April 20, independent record stores around the country — including Rochester — will celebrate Record Store Day by offering special limited releases and all sorts of promotional shenanigans, including performances by independent bands that make the music in the first place. It’ll be like a party without walls, a parade with tentacles. Check out the festivities, sluggo.

— BY FRANK DE BLASE

Montage Music Hall Groove Fest FRIDAY, APRIL 19-SATURDAY, APRIL 20 MONTAGE MUSIC HALL, 50 N. CHESTNUT ST. 7 P.M. | $7/NIGHT, $10/BOTH NIGHTS | THEMONTAGEMUSICHALL.COM [ GROOVE ROCK ] They’re calling it a groove fest, but I’m telling you it’s a lot more. Groove rock has moved beyond the hippies who birthed it to include angrier, grittier, jazzier, and more rock overtones. But just like its long-haired forefathers, it welcomes all with open ears. Just dig this swirling lineup. On Friday you’ll get PharmHouse, George Wesley Band, Minds Open Wide, Universe Shark, and Meta Accord. On Saturday its Run For The Roses, Upstate Inner Planets, White Woods, and Experimental Sandwich. — BY FRANK DE BLASE

Live from Hochstein: Chroma Piano Trio.

Lowkey performed Saturday, April 13, at Firehouse Saloon. PHOTO BY FRANK DE BLASE

Hochstein Performance Hall, 50 N Plymouth Ave. 4544596. 12:10 p.m. Free.

Stevie wonderland

[ JAZZ ]

Ben Waara. Lemoncello, 137

[ REVIEW ] BY FRANK DE BLASE

Though the answer sounded rather obvious, it had never dawned on me before upstanding, upright bassist Brian Williams spelled it out. “That’s because you can’t clog on grass,” he said. Williams was sitting in on the bottom end with The Ruff Alley Rounders, bringing extra happy to Abilene’s Friday night happy-hour hootenanny. He was explaining the board lying in front of the four-piece band as it fiddled away in the corner. The young lady that mounted this board — there to amplify her redcowboy-booted feet — bobbed and clogged and stomped in an exuberant gallop that resembled step dancing if the Irish ever moved their arms. The band huddled around a single mic King Biscuit style and bopped instrumentally rural and Tin Pan as folks washed it all down along with the dust of the work week. Boston soul-shouter Jesse Dee is getting bigger and better, and a little more polished. I don’t begrudge the man success, but I liked it better when he served up his shaggy blue-eyed soul a little more close to the

bone and medium rare. The kids still ate him up as he warmed the stage for the Ryan Montbleau Band Friday night at Water Street Music Hall. Walking in off of Water Street I had sort of dismissed Montbleau as one of those mixing-in-a-lot-of-everything jamsters. I’ve got to tell you, I was knocked out by the band, the groove, the tone, and the dynamics. It was all wonderful. Mochester from Rochester was sandwiched between the two acts, rocking steady and in earnest with an exemplary drummer that really stood out as the band plugged though its own mid-tempo rockers and took a detour into Stevie Wonderland. On Saturday night I was due for something hard and heavy and stuck my head in the metal blast furnace that was Lowkey a t the Firehouse Saloon. The band was a volatile mix of old-school heavy with new-school arrangements, kind of like Pantera, just not as over the top. The band bounded about maniacally and chugged full steam beneath vocals that roared in melodic urgency and guttural intimidation.

West Commercial St. 3858565. 6:30 p.m. Free. Margaret Explosion. The Little Theater, 240 East Avenue. 7:30 p.m. Free. Spirits Rising. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 2929940. 8 p.m. Free. The Swooners. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. 585-662-5555. 6 p.m. Free Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. 585-6625555. 6 p.m. Free.

Vince Ercolamento& Joe Chiappone Jazz Quartet.

Murph’s Irondequoit Pub, 705 Titus Ave. 342-6780. 8 p.m. Free. [ POP/ROCK ]

Dave Sestito, Sexy Teenagers, and People Can Be More Awesome. Tala

Vera, 155 State St. 5463845. 8 p.m. $5-$7.

The Dead Catholics w/The Years. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. $5-$7.

Moon Zombies. Temple

Bar and Grille, 109 East Ave. 232-6000. Call for info. Free. continues on page 17

Exotic ingredients infuse beef, lamb, and vegetarian dishes for lunch or dinner every day of the week. VEGETARIAN • COMBINATION DISHES BEEF • LAMB • CHICKEN DISHES LUNCH & DINNER • 7 DAYS A WEEK Coming Soon! Ethiopian Beer & Honey Wine 302 University Ave. (at N. Union near Main St) 285-6960 • MEDAETHIOPIANRESTAURANT.COM rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 15


Music

Guitarist Joel Harrison combines influences as varied as American roots, rock and blues, and Asian music into his eclectic style. PHOTO PROVIDED

Guitar chameleon Joel Harrison W/STEVE GREENE, DAVE ARENIUS FRIDAY, APRIL 26 BOP SHOP RECORDS, 1460 MONROE AVE. 9 P.M. | $10 | BOPSHOP.COM [ PROFILE ] BY RON NETSKY

Guitarist Joel Harrison may have made his name in the jazz world, but when you go to hear him don’t expect perfect bebop runs. “I approach the guitar as an orchestral instrument in the group, not as the star soloist,” says Harrison, who plays at the Bop Shop on Friday, April 26, “so when I’m writing music that involves the guitar, the guitar just becomes part of the ensemble.” Of course that doesn’t mean Harrison’s guitar is lackluster. “I try to bring as much color, texture, imagination, and support to the pieces as I can,” says Harrison. “Each project demands different things. My background is very eclectic. I’ve always been interested in all kinds of music, so I’ve visited American roots music, Asian music… I’ve spent a lot of time in jazz and I grew up as a rock and blues player. All of this has coalesced so that I draw from it in different measures when a project comes forth.” 16 CITY APRIL 17-23. 2013

Instead of one recognizable style — think Wes Montgomery in the 1960’s or Pat Metheny today — Harrison is one of a new breed of musician, embracing a pluralistic approach. “I would say the actual concept, or the word ‘style’ has become outmoded,” says Harrison. “People are absorbing so much information now that very few of us grow up in vacuums where there’s a certain tradition that we’re exclusively working in.” Harrison continues: “I’m approaching the instrument from a compositional point of view, so I look at my playing and my jazz writing as a classical composer would — that is, always evolving. I’m always trying to come up with different ideas and concepts and approaches and not getting locked into any one tradition.” Harrison, 55, has been playing guitar since he was 9. Growing up in Washington, D.C., where his father, Gilbert Harrison, was editor of The New Republic, Harrison listened to The Beatles, Jimi Hendrix, The Allman Brothers Band and other acts of the 1960’s. “It was an exciting time musically and artistically because there was such a feeling of invention and turning of the tide in all aspects of society,” says Harrison. “Rock music at that time, at its best, was brand new. Psychedelic and improvisational rock was being invented in front of us, so it had a feeling of being avant-garde.”

A major influence on Harrison was Hendrix, who he regards as a once-in-acentury musician. “He’s like Beethoven,” Harrison says. You can hear Harrison channeling Hendrix on his fantastic rendition of The Allman Brothers’ “Whipping Post” on his recent album, “Search.” But Harrison was also enamored of the lesser-known Washington phenom Danny Gatton. “My desire to approach the guitar — especially electric guitar — as an instrument deeply rooted in American tradition, but also full of unpredictable and explosive behavior, partly comes from watching him go completely insane so many nights.” Harrison’s multi-directional approach wasn’t always in vogue. It used to cause him a bit of an identity crisis. “I felt kind of lonely and directionless sometimes,” says Harrison. “I was attracted to institutions and musicians who expounded my world view even though they were few and far between. At some point everything started to connect and now I don’t have any concern whatsoever about who I am and how to make everything fit together, because it’s just a grab bag.” Harrison’s connection can be summed up in two words: third stream. The term,

coined by musician/composer/historian Gunther Schuller, describes a fusion of jazz and classical music. Harrison furthered his understanding of it when he studied with Schuller’s disciple, Ran Blake, at New England Conservatory in the early 1980’s. “I learned so much from Ran Blake,” says Harrison. “He would have his students make music out of so many diverse tunes from different eras, and even different countries.” One component of third stream is re-composition. Harrison’s best-known project in this vein, “Harrison on Harrison,” involved the songs of George Harrison Harrison’s songs played a role in another facet of Joel Harrison’s career: Indian music. “So many of us first heard Indian music on Beatles records, and it really was kind of an amazing thing back then,” he says. His interest was further piqued when he heard Vilayat Khan at New England Conservatory in the late 1970’s. “It shocked me to the core. It was so mournful and beautiful,” Harrison says. Harrison pursued the music, attending the Ali Akbar Khan College of Music in California. “I don’t make myself out to be a really knowledgeable person regarding Indian music, but it’s always been in the background for me. So, when I had the opportunity to collaborate with the amazing sarod player [Anupam Shobhakar], the time came to dig more deeply into that.” But Harrison has not forgotten his American roots. “Free Country,” a 2003 project exploring old country and Appalachian songs, featured an emerging singer, Norah Jones. “She was playing with friends of mine and I met her and thought she had a wonderful voice,” says Harrison. “When I recorded the record I needed somebody to sing a few tunes and I asked her. It was just when things were taking off for her. She appeared on the record, and before it came out she had already sold more than a million copies of her own record. That was the luck of the timing.” At his Bop Shop gig Harrison will play in a

trio with Rochester guitarist Steve Greene and bassist Dave Arenius. While upstate Harrison will spend three days workshopping a composition with the Buffalo Philharmonic Orchestra through the Jazz Composers Orchestra Institute, culminating with a performance of his piece on April 24. In keeping with his eclecticism, Harrison’s next album takes on another new frontier for him: big-band music. “Writing for this many players challenged me hugely,” he says. “The possibilities seemed limitless and it is opening up all kinds of intriguing pathways. It’s a whole new world.”


THURSDAY, APRIL 18

Meet the Artist Concert Series!

[ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ]

PRESENTED BY

Arbitration Sweets w/Cammy Enaharo. Abilene Bar &

JOHN COLE

Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. 9 p.m. Free. Beginner Bluegrass Jam. Bernuzio Uptown Music, 122 East Ave. 473-6140. 7 p.m. Call for info.

BLUES BAND Thurs, April 18th

The Blues Project ft. Gordon Munding and friends. The

Beale New Orleans Grille and Bar-South Ave., 693 South Ave. 271-4650. third Thursday of every month, 7 p.m. Free. Jim Lane. Murph’s Irondequoit Pub, 705 Titus Ave. 342-6780. 8 p.m. Free. [ BLUES ]

John Cole Blues Band. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. 8 p.m. $10. Jokin’ Steves. Dinosaur Bar-BQue, 99 Court St. 585-325-7090. 9 p.m. Free. Son House Blues Night w/ Gordon Munding. The Beale

New Orleans Grille and BarSouth Ave., 693 South Ave. 271-4650. 7 p.m. Call for info.

FREE!

8-10PM • FREE ADMISSION

Donations accepted to help support this great series!

Lovin’ Cup 300 park point drive at RIT 292-9940

CLASSICAL | PENFIELD SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA

As the perfect accompaniment to this season’s dramatic weather, the Penfield Symphony Orchestra will present a concert titled “Revolutionary Russians” at the Penfield High School Auditorium on April 22. Conductor David Harman will lead the PSO in Prokofiev’s Piano Concerto No. 3 in C-Major, Op. 26 (featuring Joseph Werner, piano) and Tchaikovsky’s Symphony No. 5 in E-minor, Op. 64. The piano part in the Prokofiev is dazzling from its first notes, and simply doesn’t let up as it demands the pianist fly from one end of the keyboard to the other. If you think that classical music does no more than put you to sleep, then this is the program to correct that misimpression.

CITY Newspaper presents

Mind Body Spirit & Workshops TO ADVERTISE IN THE MIND BODY SPIRIT SECTION CALL CHRISTINE AT 244.3329 x23 OR EMAIL CHRISTINE@ROCHESTER-CITYNEWS.COM

[ CLASSICAL ]

Brockport Symphony Orchestra: “A Night at the Movies”. Seymour College

Union Ballroom The College at Brockport, Residence Drive. 402-8126. 7:30 p.m. Free, donations accepted.

The Penfield Symphony Orchestra performs Monday, April 22, 7:30 p.m. at Penfield High School Auditorium, 25 High School Drive, Penfield. $12-$14, students free with ID. PenfieldSymphony.org, 872-0774. — BY PALOMA CAPANNA

RENEW YOUR LIFE Each soul is potentially divine. The goal is to manifest this divinity within by controlling nature: external and internal. Do this either by work, or worship, or mind control, or philosophy – by one, or more, or all of these – and be free.

Eastman at Washington Square Lunchtime Concerts.

1st Universalist Church, 150 S. Clinton Ave. 274-1400. 12:15 p.m. Free. RPO: Beethoven’s “Eroica”. Kodak Hall at Eastman Theater, 60 Gibbs St. Thursday: 7:30 p.m. Saturday: 8 p.m. $15-$82.

-Vivekananda A world renowned Yogi, Philosopher and Religious Leader

A TEN WEEK COURSE IN

PRACTICAL PHILOSOPHY Wednesday nights beginning April 17, 2013

[ DJ/ELECTRONIC ]

From 7-9:30p.m. at the AAUW House, 494 East Ave. Rochester. • Free Parking

G.I. Joe and Army Hoes. Grotto,

7 Lawrence St. 739-5377. Call for info.

INTERACTIVE, EXPERIENTIAL, and INFORMAL Tuition: $100, cash or check Mail to: School of Applied Philosophy, P.O. Box 525, Pittsford, NY 14534; or in person, from 6:15-6:45pm on your first night of attendance.

[ JAZZ ]

Dave Rivello Ensemble.

Village Rock Cafe, 213 Main St. 586-1640. Every other Thursday, 9 p.m. Free. D’Jangoners. The Little Theater, 240 East Avenue. 7:30 p.m. Free.

Greg Gilmore & Steve Santini. The Rabbit Room, 61

N. Main St. 582-1830. 7 p.m. Call for info. John Palocy Trio. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. 585662-5555. 6 p.m. Free. Mike Kaupa. Monroe’s Restaurant, 3001 Monroe Avenue. (585) 348-9104. 6 p.m. Call for info. continues on page 18

GETLISTED get your event listed for free e-mail it to calendar@rochestercitynews.com. Or go online to rochestercitynewspaper.com and submit it yourself!

FOLK | ARCHIMEDES

The essence of folk music is stories and melodies. It’s a gift from the performers to the audience and back again. Acoustic folk group Archimedes is lush with melodies and sings about everyday things, if your world is poetry. The band nails it down with male-female vocal harmonies and sympathetic notes on guitar that resonate in your head. Archimedes sound like disciples of the Sufjan Stevens school of folk-revival. The trio’s songwriting and vocal arrangements remind me of my favorite Michigander. Check out Archimedes on its Bandcamp site and you will hear why this group is a cut above most. With John Valenti, Bogs Visionary Orchestra, The Sleep Soundlies. Archimedes performs Sunday, April 21, 9 p.m. at the Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. $5-$7. bugjar.com. — BY ROMAN DIVEZUR

585-288-6430

SCHOOL OF APPLIED PHILOSOPHY YOU ARE WISER THAN YOU KNOW Not for profit. Non Sectarian, Provisional Charter: NYS ED. Dept. Since 1989

DANCE YOURSELF FIT You’ll have so much fun, you’ll forget you’re exercising! GROUP AND PRIVATE LESSONS FOR ALL SKILL LEVELS Gift Certificates Available 3450 WINTON PLACE ROCHESTER, NY 14623 585-292-1240

WWW.FADSROCHESTER.COM rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 17


THURSDAY, APRIL 18 Mike Kaupa Duet Project.

Monroe’s Restaurant, 3001 Monroe Avenue. 348-9103. 6 p.m. Free. Ryan from El Rojo Jazz. Lemoncello, 137 West Commercial St. 385-8565. 6 p.m. Free.

Ted Nicolosi and Shared Genes. Roncones Italian

Restaurant, 232 Lyell Ave. 458-3090. 6 p.m. Free. [ R&B ]

The Coupe De’ Villes. Pane

Vino Ristorante, 175 N. Water St. 232-6090. 8 p.m. Free. [ REGGAE/JAM ]

Reggae Thursday. Pure Night

Club, 117 Liberty Pole Way. 4547230. 10 p.m. $5 before 11 pm. [ POP/ROCK ]

Declan Ryan & Close Calls Album Release w/Baby Shark, Tim Avery. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe

Ave. 8 p.m. Call for info. Five Alarm Open Jam. Firehouse Saloon, 814 South Clinton. 3193832. 9 p.m. Call for info.

Hatebreed w/Everytime I Die, Terror, Job For A Cowboy, and This Is Hell. Water Street Music

Hall, 204 N. Water St. 585-3255600. 7 p.m. $20-$25.

Nazareth College’s Rock Ensembles. Tala Vera, 155 State

St. 546-3845. 8 p.m. Free.

The Swaggerin’ Growlers w/S.S. Webb. Thirsty Frog,

Influenced by a veritable hall of fame list of rock musicians, this Rochester-based quartet is gaining some acclaim of their own. The Mighty High & Dry’s sound is rooted in soulful blues, but will surprise you with its ability to funk it up with the best of ‘em. The grooves are infectious, the songwriting solid, and the musicianship workmanlike. It all adds up to Heartland Rock with an almost jazzy feel. The group is scheduled to release its self-titled debut album this May, and is already receiving critical praise. The Mighty High & Dry performs Friday, April 19, 6-9 p.m. at Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. $5-$8. abilenebarandlounge.com. — BY DAVID YOCKEL, JR. Hotel, 70 State St. 546-3450. 6 p.m. Free. Sinzibukwud w/Smalltown. Johnny’s Irish Pub, 1382 Culver Rd. 224-0990. 5 p.m. Free.

511 East Ridge Rd. 730-5285. 9 p.m. $5.

[ BLUES ]

FRIDAY, APRIL 19

Funkharp w/Hollands, The Mighty High & Dry. Abilene

[ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ] Bearfoot Brothers. Boulder Coffee Co., 100 Alexander St. 585-454-7140. 8 p.m. Call for info.

Cabinet w/Ruckus Juice Jug Stompers. Sticky Lips BBQ Juke

Joint, 830 Jefferson Rd. 292-5544. 10:30 p.m. $12-$15. Collin Jones Music. Shamrock Jack’s, 4554 Culver Rd. 402-9802. Call for info.

Dave North Trio w/McMahon Irish School of Dance, Carin’s Pride. McGraw’s Irish Pub,

146 W Commercial St. 3489091. 6 p.m. Free. Frankie & Jewels. Hamlin Station Bar & Grill, 52 Railroad Ave. 964-2010. 9 p.m. Call for info.

Happy Hour: Serge Tsvasman & Friends. Bug Jar, 219

Monroe Ave. 5 p.m. 21+. Free.

Jeff Slutsky. Lemoncello,

137 West Commercial St. 385-8565. 7 p.m. Free. Jim Lane. 58 Main, 58 N. Main St. 585-637-2383. 8 p.m. Free Bathtub Billy’s, 630 Ridge Road West. 865-6510. 4 p.m. Free. Peg and “The Fiddler!”. Hatter’s Pub, 5 West Main St. 872-1505. 8 p.m. Free. Ralph Louis. Rochester Plaza 18 CITY APRIL 17-23. 2013

ROCK/SOUL | THE MIGHTY HIGH & DRY

Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. 6 p.m. $5-$8. John Cole Blues Band. The BealeWebster, 1930 Empire Blvd. 216-1070. 7:30 p.m. Call for info.

The Slide Brothers w/Turning Colors. Water Street Music

Hall, 204 N. Water St. 585325-5600. 8 p.m. $13-$17. Third Degree. The Beale New Orleans Grille and Bar-South Ave., 693 South Ave. 2714650. 7:30 p.m. Call for info. [ CLASSICAL ]

Carnatic Instrumental (Veena) Concert. India Community Center, 2171 Monroe County Line Rd. 244-1760. 8 p.m. $5-$15.

SUNY Geneseo Wind Ensemble and Jazz Ensemble Concert.

Wadsworth Auditorium, 1 College Circle. 245-5516. 8 p.m. Free. [ COUNTRY ]

Poison Whiskey. Nashvilles, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. 3343030. 9 p.m. Call for info. [ DJ/ELECTRONIC ]

“3rd Friday Event: Let’s Get Creative”. Energy on East, 320

East Ave. 585-732-6221. 8 p.m. $5. Bang Fridays. ONE Nightclub and Lounge, 1 Ryan Alley.

546-1010. Call for info.

Chill Out Fridays Happy Hour.

Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. 5:30 p.m. Free. DJ/Karaoke w/Coyote Cody. McKenzie’s, 3686 West Henrietta Rd. 334-8970. 9:30 p.m. Call for info. DJ Bac Spin. Plush, 151 St. Paul St. 232-5650. 8 p.m. Call for info. DJ Blake. 140 Alex Bar & Grill, 140 Alexander St. 585-2561000. 10 p.m. Call for info. DJ Cedric. ,. 10 p.m. $3-$8. DJ Energon. ,. 10 p.m. $3-$8. DJ Mi-T-Mo. Richmond’s Tavern, 21 Richmond Street. (585) 270-8570. 9 p.m. Free.

Fresh Meat Fridays w/Samantha Vega, DJ Mighty Mic. Tilt

Nightclub & Ultralounge, 444 Central Ave. 232-8440. 11:15 p.m. & 12:30 a.m. $4-$12. Lube After Dark.. Quaker Steak & Lube, 2205 Buffalo Rd. 585-697-9464. 9:30 p.m. Free. Reggaeton w/DJ Carlos. La Copa Ultra Lounge, 235 W. Ridge Rd. 254-1050. 10 p.m. Free. Sexy Fridays w/DJ Wizz. Pure Night Club, 117 Liberty Pole Way. 454-7230. 10 p.m. Call for info.

T.G.I. Bucket Friday ft. DJ Jestyr, Dr. Jamo. Grotto, 7 Lawrence St. 739-5377. Call for info. [ JAZZ ]

Fred Costello & Roger Eckers Jazz Duo. Charley Brown’s,

1675 Penfield Rd. 385-9202. 7:30 p.m. Free. Gap Mangione. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. 585662-5555. 5:30 p.m. Free. Madeline Forster. The Little Theater, 240 East Avenue. 7:30 p.m. Free.


Marco Amadio. Pane Vino

[ REGGAE/JAM ]

Ted Nicolosi and Shared Genes. Prime Steakhouse, 42

Chestnut St. 232-1520. 7 p.m. $7-$10. Turnip Stampede. Dinosaur Bar-B-Que, 99 Court St. 585325-7090. 10 p.m. Free.

Ristorante, 175 N. Water St. 232-6090. 6:30 p.m. Free.

E Main St. 265-4777. 6:30 p.m. Free.

The Westview Project.

The Mendon House, 1369 Pittsford-Mendon Rd. 624-7370. 6 p.m. Free.

[ R&B ]

Mitty & The Followers.

Smokin’ Joe’s Bar & Grill, 425 Lyell Ave. Call for info.

Rochester Groove Fest Night 1. Montage Music Hall, 50

[ POP/ROCK ] Atlas. Pelican’s Nest, 566 River St. 663-5910. 10 p.m. Call for info. Brass Taxi. Pineapple Jack’s, 485 Spencerport Rd. 247-5225. 10 p.m. Call for info. Dust & Bone. Boulder Coffee Co., 739 Park Ave. 585-697-0235. 8 p.m. Call for info.

KENmode, Sulaco, Burn Everything. Monty’s Krown,

875 Monroe Ave. 271-7050. 9:30 p.m. $3. Lap Giraffe. SPoT Coffee, 200 East Ave. 585-613-4600. 7 p.m. Free.

Right Turn Racer w/ Spaceweather Shakes, The Way Home, and Moon Zombies. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. $7-$9.

The Rob Gioia Experience.

Marge’s Lakeside Inn, 4909 Culver Rd. 323-1020. 7 p.m. 21+. Free. Sexy Teenagers. Firehouse Saloon, 814 South Clinton. 3193832. 8 p.m. 21+. Call for info.

Something Else. Brickwood

Grill, 250 Monroe Ave. 7308230. 10 p.m. Call for info. Teressa Wilcox. Temple Bar and Grille, 109 East Ave. 2326000. Call for info. Free.

Vinyl Orange Ottoman, 34 Feet Deep, and Cole Michaels. Tala Vera, 155 State St. 5463845. 9 p.m. $5-$7.

Wholesalae Kids, The Reactions, Kopps, and Amnl.

Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. 9 p.m. $3 GA, free for students w/ID.

SATURDAY, APRIL 20

[ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ] Ache. Tapas 177 Lounge, 177 St. Paul St. 585-262-2090. 11 p.m. Free. Acoustic Brew. Flaherty’s Webster, 1200 Bay Rd. 6710816. Call for info.

Cedria Watson & Bijou Creole.

Harmony House, 58 East Main St. 8 p.m. $10-$18. Jim Lane. Brewery Pub & Grill, 8 W. Main St. 585-624-7870. 9 p.m. Free. Jon Akers. Flaherty’s Honeoye Falls, 60 W. Main St. 497-7010. Call for info. Rafe and Clelia. Bernuzio Uptown Music, 122 East Ave. 473-6140. 7 p.m. $15.

Rayce Malone & John Ryan w/Ted McGraw .

McGraw’s Irish Pub, 146 W Commercial St. 348-9091. 5:30 p.m. Free.

Songwriters in the Round ft. Maria Gillard, Scott Regan, Brian Coughlin. Tango Cafe,

389 Gregory St. 271-4930. 8 p.m. $8. continues on page 20

GETLISTED get your event listed for free e-mail it to calendar@rochestercitynews.com. Or go online to rochestercitynewspaper.com and submit it yourself!

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 19


AUDIO

SOUND

SOLUTIONS

STEREO

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SATURDAY, APRIL 20 Spiritual and Folkloric Songs of Ukraine. Nazareth College Linehan Chapel, 4245 East Ave., Rochester, NY 14618. (585) 389-2673. 6 p.m. Free. [ BLUES ]

Bill Schmitt and The Bluesmasters. Sticky Lips BBQ

Juke Joint, 830 Jefferson Rd. 292-5544. 10 p.m. Free. Dan Schmitt. The Beale New Orleans Grille and Bar-South Ave., 693 South Ave. 2714650. 7:30 p.m. Call for info. The Fakers. The Beale-Webster, 1930 Empire Blvd. 216-1070. 7:30 p.m. Call for info. The Joe Locke Group. Hochstein Performance Hall, 50 N Plymouth Ave. 454-4596. 8 p.m. $10-$42. Natalie B Band. Johnny’s Irish Pub, 1382 Culver Rd. 2240990. 8 p.m. Free. Steve Grills & the Roadmasters. The Little Theater, 240 East Avenue. 8:30 p.m. Free. [ CLASSICAL ]

6 YEARS IN A ROW 2007-2012

302 N. Goodman St.

Village Gate, Rochester 256 . 5980 • SALENAS . COM

Honeoye Falls Community Concert Band 25th Anniversary Celebration. HF-L District

Auditorium, 619 Quaker Meeting House Rd. 7 p.m. Free.

Rochester Oratorio Society: Classical Idol. Temple B’rith

Kodesh, 2131 Elmwood Ave. 585.244.7060. 6 p.m. $40. RPO: Beethoven’s “Eroica”. Kodak Hall at Eastman Theater, 60 Gibbs St. Thursday: 7:30 p.m. Saturday: 8 p.m. $15-$82. [ COUNTRY ] Flint Creek. Nashvilles, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. 334-3030. 9 p.m. Call for info. [ DJ/ELECTRONIC ] DJ Big Reg. Plush, 151 St. Paul St. 232-5650. 10 p.m. Call for info. DJ Darkwave. ,. 10 p.m. $3-$8. DJ Trancesend. Decibel Lounge., 45 Euclid St. 754-4645. 10 p.m. $5. La Selva. Tilt Nightclub & Ultralounge, 444 Central Ave. 232-8440. 10 p.m. Call for info.

Latino Saturdays w/DJ Bobby Base. Pure Night Club, 117

Liberty Pole Way. 454-7230. 10 p.m. Call for info. The Manhattan Project. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N. Water St. 585-325-5600. 8 p.m. $10-$15. Saturday Night Ladies Night. BLU Bar & Grill, 250 Pixley Rd. 247-0079. 9 p.m. Call for info. [ JAZZ ]

Fred Costello & Roger Eckers Jazz Duo. Charley Brown’s,

1675 Penfield Rd. 385-9202. 7:30 p.m. Free. John Nyerges. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. 585-6625555. 6 p.m. Free. 20 CITY APRIL 17-23. 2013

CLASSICAL | CONCENTUS WOMEN’S CHORUS & SPECTRUM WOMEN’S ENSEMBLE

Concentus Women’s Chorus invites you to “Sing in the Spring!” a concert with the SUNY Geneseo Spectrum Women’s Ensemble, Gwendolyn Gassler of Concentus and Gerard Floriano of Spectrum Women’s Ensemble, conductors. The concert includes two pieces the groups will perform together by Geneseo-based composer Glenn McClure. Concentus Women’s Chorus was founded in 2000, and it is devoted to exploring classical music written for women’s voices, from medieval chant through contemporary compositions. The 16 singers list an array of credentials from music degrees to concerts abroad to church music. Spectrum Women’s Ensemble is part of SUNY Geneseo’s School of the Arts. The concert takes place Sunday, April 21, 3 p.m. at Wadsworth Auditorium, SUNY Geneseo. Free. 586-5677, concentus.org. — BY PALOMA CAPANNA Record Story Day: The Buzzo All-Stars, Natalia Quevedo, Wammo, and Boyd Lee Dunlop.

The Bop Shop, 1460 Monroe Ave. 271-3354. 1 p.m. Free. Shades of Blue. Lemoncello, 137 West Commercial St. 385-8565. 7 p.m. Free. Ted Nicolosi and Shared Genes. The Glengarry Inn @ Eagle Vale, 4400 Fairport 9 Mile Point Rd. 598-3820. 7 p.m. Free. The White Hots. The Pultneyville Grill, 4135 Mill St. (315) 589-4512. Call for info. [ KARAOKE ]

Karaoke at 140 Alex. 140 Alex

Bar & Grill, 140 Alexander St. 585-256-1000. 10:30 p.m. Free. Karaoke w/Cyd Scarlett!. Norton’s Pub, 1730 N. Goodman St. 266-3570. 10 p.m. Kick-Ass Karaoke. Temple Bar and Grille, 109 East Ave. 232-6000. 10 p.m. Free. [ REGGAE/JAM ]

4/20 Bash ft. Buddhahood, The Filthy McNastys, Extended Family, and Hollands (Acoustic). Abilene Bar &

Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. 6 p.m. $10.

Rochester Groove Fest Night 2. Montage Music Hall, 50

Chestnut St. 232-1520. 7 p.m. $7-$10.

Thunder Body’s 3rd Annual April Powers w/Big Mean Sound Machine. The German House Theater, 315 Gregory St. 442-6880. 8 p.m. $10.

[ POP/ROCK ]

80s Hair Band. Nola’s Restaurant

& Nightclub, 4775 Lake Ave. 6633375. 9 p.m. Call for info. The American Moon Dogs. Boulder Coffee Co., 100 Alexander St. 585-454-7140. 8 p.m. Call for info. Dang!. Jeffrey’s, 3115 E. Henrietta Rd. 486-4937. 8 p.m. 21+. Free.

El Ten Eleven w/Slow Magic, Nude Pop. Bug Jar, 219

Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. $10-$12. The Extremists. Captain Jack’s Goodtime Tavern, 8505 Greig St. 315-4839570. 9 p.m. Call for info.

The Gowns, Ever Upward, Andy Smash & The Rust Belt Hotrods. Tala Vera, 155 State

St. 546-3845. 9 p.m. $5-$7. Inside Out. Richmond’s Tavern, 21 Richmond Street. (585) 270-8570. Call for info. Me & The Boyz. Pelican’s Nest, 566 River St. 663-5910. 10 p.m. Call for info. MoChester. Brickwood Grill, 250 Monroe Ave. 730-8230. 10 p.m. Call for info. Record Store Day. Record Archive, 33 1/3 Rockwood St. See website for full lineup. Free.

Record Store Day Celebration: Zombie Walri, Johnny Outlaw and the Johnson Creek Stranglers. Abilene Bar &

Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. 9 p.m. $8-$12. Record Story Day. House of Guitars, 645 Titus Ave. 5443500. 11 a.m. See website for full lineup. Free.


Renegade. Hamlin Station Bar

HIV+ Research Volunteers Needed for HIV Study

& Grill, 52 Railroad Ave. 9642010. 8:30 p.m. Call for info.

Setiva, BML, Keaton, GhostFeeder, and HeatSeeker.

Pineapple Jack’s, 485 Spencerport Rd. 247-5225. 8 p.m. Call for info. Teagan & The Tweeds. Dinosaur Bar-B-Que, 99 Court St. 585325-7090. 10 p.m. Free.

[ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ]

• Must be 18-55 years old and have documented HIV and taking ATRIPLA • Must be substance-free • 35 day study commitment • One 4 overnight and one 2 overnight stay in our unit • 6 clinic visits • Get paid up to $2900 for entire study • Get free health and laboratory evaluations

Archimedes w/John Valenti, Bogs Visionary Orchestra, and The Sleep Soundlies. Bug Jar,

Call the Buffalo Clinical Research Center at 716-885-3580 ext 205 for information on “Study #2206” or go to www.bcrc.us/studies.php

SUNDAY, APRIL 21

219 Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. $5-$7.

Benefit for Al & Pauline Kerstein ft. The Ruckus Juice Jug Stompers, The LPs.

Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. 2 p.m. $15.

Celtic Music Sundays: Dave North. Temple Bar and Grille,

109 East Ave. 232-6000. 7 p.m. Free.

Harley Gamelan Ensemble Performance. Central Library

of Rochester, Kate Gleason Auditorium, 115 South Ave. 428-8145. 2 p.m. Free. Sean Gavin, Jesse Smith. McGraw’s Irish Pub, 146 W Commercial St. 348-9091. 8 p.m. $10.

[ CLASSICAL ] Compline. Christ Church, 141 East Ave. 454-3878. 9 p.m. Free, donations accepted.

Sing in the Spring! ft. Concentus, Geneseo Spectrum Women’s Ensemble. SUNY Geneseo, 1 College Rd. 3 p.m. Free.

Nazareth College Chamber Singers. Nazareth College

Linehan Chapel, 4245 East Ave.,. 389-2700. 3 p.m. Free.

Rochester Chamber Orchestra ft. Barry Snyder, Elinor Freer.

Hochstein Performance Hall, 50 N Plymouth Ave. 454-4596. 7 p.m. $10-$25.

RPO: Beethoven and the Making of Genius. Hochstein

Performance Hall, 50 N Plymouth Ave. 454-4596. 2 p.m. $10-$24.

[ DJ/ELECTRONIC ] Boasy Sundaze. Club Clarissas, 293 Clarissa St. 232-3430. Call for info. Drink and Drag Sundays. ONE Nightclub and Lounge, 1 Ryan Alley. 546-1010. 8 p.m. 18+. Call for info.

CHILL WAVE | EL TEN ELEVEN, SLOW MAGIC

El Ten Eleven is back in town bringing the summer sound with that mix of indie and Casio it does so well. While the music doesn’t have lyrics, the density says all it needs to through the magic of mix pedals. Slow Magic has a nice display of chill wave, so if you like The xx or Memory Tapes, this will make your evening just a wee bit more fantastical through the mix of drum machine, samples, and widdly electro bits. Nude Pop will start the evening with a Violens-tinted electro mix. What this group lacks in releases it makes up for by being earnest about it. You can catch El Ten Eleven and the crew Saturday, April 20, 9 p.m. at Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. $10-12. bugjar.com.— BY SUZAN PERO

MONDAY, APRIL 22 [ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ]

Watkins & the Rapiers. The

Little Theater, 240 East Avenue. 7:30 p.m. Free.

[ BLUES ]

Bluesday Tuesday Blues Jam. P.I.’s Lounge, 495 West Ave. 8 p.m. Call for info. Teagan Ward. The Beale New Orleans Grille and Bar-South Ave., 693 South Ave. 2714650. 7 p.m. Call for info.

[ CLASSICAL ]

Penfield Symphony Orchestra: Revolutionary Russians. Penfield High School, 25 High School Dr. 7:30 p.m. $12-$14, students w/ID free.

[ CLASSICAL ]

Peter Geise, organ. Geneseo Central Presbyterian Church, 31 Center Street, Geneseo, NY 14454. (585) 245-5516. noon. Free, donations accepted.

[ DJ/ELECTRONIC ]

Manic Monday Retro Dance Night. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. 21+. Free. [ JAZZ ]

Alphonso Williams. Bistro 135,

135 W. Commercial St. 585662-5555. 5:30 p.m. Free. Kathryn Cufari. Lemoncello, 137 West Commercial St. 3858565. 6 p.m. Call for info.

[ POP/ROCK ]

Harvey Mandel and The SnakeCrew. Water Street Music

[ JAZZ ]

Ben Waara. Lemoncello, 137

West Commercial St. 3858565. 6 p.m. Free. Jim Nugent. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. 585-662-5555. 6 p.m. Free.

[ POP/ROCK ] Exodus. Montage Music Hall, 50 Chestnut St. 232-1520. 7:30 p.m. $15-$17.

Green Dreams w/Chica & The Wolves, Comedown. Bug Jar,

219 Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. $5-$7.

Hall, 204 N. Water St. 585-3255600. 8 p.m. $15-$20. [ POP/ROCK ]

Hurt w/Smile Empty Soul.

Montage Music Hall, 50 Chestnut St. 232-1520. 7:30 p.m. $15-$17.

Taste Charcoal Grilling & Smoking at its BEST!

SATURDAY, APRIL 27TH • 11AM-4PM PIZZA • TURKEY • WINGS • STEAKS • BEEF JERKY • AND MUCH MORE!

LAZER/WULF w/Manray, Chaos Came to Be. Bug Jar, 219

BIG GREEN EGG SPECIAL!

Monroe Ave. 8 p.m. $7-$9.

TUESDAY, APRIL 23

The Reinhardts w/Ron LoCurto.

Smokin’ Joe’s Bar & Grill, 425 Lyell Ave. Call for info. Springer. Pelican’s Nest, 566 River St. 663-5910. 5 p.m. Call for info.

COOKOUT!

[ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ]

Carrie Nation & The Speakeasy. Abilene Bar &

Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. 8:30 p.m. $5-$8.

Save up to $200 when you purchase a Big Green Egg on April 27th or 28th.

GETLISTED get your event listed for free e-mail it to calendar@rochestercitynews.com. Or go online to rochestercitynewspaper.com and submit it yourself!

2832 Clover St. (corner of Clover & Jefferson) Pittsford • 586-3017 • www.galleas.com Rooted in excellence since 1957

Open 7 Days

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 21


Classical Although you may never have heard of

Conductor Courtney Lewis and violinist Corey Cerovsek will join the Rochester Philharmonic for the “Eroica” this weekend. LEWIS PHOTO BY TRAVIS ANDERSON; CEROVSEK PHOTO PROVIDED

The timelessness of ‘Eroica’ Beethoven’s “Eroica” ROCHESTER PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA THURSDAY, APRIL 18, 7:30 P.M., SATURDAY, APRIL 20, 8 P.M. KODAK HALL AT EASTMAN THEATRE, 60 GIBBS ST. $15-$82 | 454-2100, RPO.ORG [ PREVIEW ] BY PALOMA CAPANNA

It’s fun to imagine the kind of kid who would fall in love with Beethoven’s monumental “Eroica” symphony — that jolt, eyes lighting up, smile growing wide. “It’s one of the first pieces I ever loved as a child,” says Courtney Lewis, who will guest conduct the Rochester Philharmonic in a program headlined by Beethoven’s “Eroica” symphony this weekend. “‘Eroica,’ [Bach’s] Brandenburg first, and [Stravinsky’s] ‘Rite of Spring.’ These are the pieces that made me want to be a musician.” In the 1990’s, Lewis was a teen growing up in Belfast, Northern Ireland. At a similar age, but in the 1980’s and in Indiana, violinist Corey Cerovsek was also falling in love with “Eroica.” Cerovsek will be the featured violinist at the upcoming RPO performance, which will also feature 22 CITY APRIL 17-23, 2013

Margaret Brouwer’s “Remembrances” and Wieniawski’s Violin Concerto No. 2. The pairing of the Wieniawski violin concerto and the Beethoven “Eroica” symphony “is sweet for me,” says Cerovsek. “I remember studying ‘Eroica’ in music analysis classes at the same time I was studying Wieniawski — at age 13, 14, 15, something like that. These are the primary colors of my musical education.” Regarding the “Eroica,” Lewis says, “of all the Beethoven symphonies, including the 5th and the 9th, it’s the most emotionally complex and wide-ranging. ‘Eroica’ begins with great energy, but has this kaleidoscopic range of emotion, energy, and enjoyment of life. But as soon as it gets into the development, there is a sense of human beings struggling with something that is very difficult to grasp. It includes the funeral march for mankind. But it traverses into some of the greatest triumph you can imagine experiencing.” Lewis left home at 18 to go to Cambridge,

England to study music. It was there that Lewis first conducted the “Eroica” while a student. Now 28 years old, Lewis approaches the score feeling like it’s even more his own. “It’s almost terrifying; it’s such a huge piece of music,” says Lewis. “How do

you assimilate it all and give it out to the orchestra in just a few rehearsals?” Adding to the level of challenge in conducting such a monumental symphony is that Lewis has yet to meet the RPO. “It always feels like a blind date the first time you meet an orchestra,” says Lewis. “You know in the first minutes whether it will work or not. I generally don’t say anything for the first half hour — it’s just play, play, play. I’m figuring out what the orchestra will do when I do this. Or, when I do that, what is the sound they will make. What do I need to do more or less. It’s a process.” Lewis, who is also a composer, brings a perspective to his interpretation of “Eroica” that includes a study of the earlier drafts of the symphony. On Sunday, April 21, Lewis will lead a discussion and performance of excerpts from earlier drafts of “Eroica” at the Hochstein School of Music & Dance. “When you look through Beethoven’s sketches, it’s insane. It looks like spiders crushed on the page,” Lewis says. “The score hadn’t yet been typeset. But, you can see that he’s always trying to simplify the music into something that is easier to understand so that the listener can get at what he means.” On Sunday “we’ll take the audience through that process so that they can get more insight,” Lewis says.

the composer Wieniawski, violinist Corey Cerovsek has been performing his works since he was a teenager. “I have a certain affection for this piece that goes way back for me,” says Cerovsek. “It’s part of the romantic, virtuoso repertoire. It has lovely, lyrical passages, a slow movement. It is well constructed. It is well orchestrated.” While the “Eroica” is a symphonic masterpiece where the audience will easily see the hard work exerted by every musician, Cerovsek says that sometimes it is more difficult for the audience to see the challenges faced in a piece that is a virtuoso challenge for a violinist. “Your hand travels a few inches from one end of the fingerboard to another, sometimes it’s only a sub-millimeter of movement on this instrument without frets,” Cerovsek says. “I often close my eyes; small spaces become kind of immense from the inside. A part of me says, ‘I hope the audience can see this.’” Cerovsek will play on his “Milanollo” Stradivarius from 1728, which has been played by the likes of Niccolo Paganini. He says of his instrument, “It is a relationship. I’ve spent nine years with it. Each Stradivarius has its own unique personality. This one is beautiful, but temperamental. Very sensitive to changes in conditions.” Both Lewis and Cerovsek bring a particular sense of history to their approaches to music. Lewis wove historical context in and out of his remarks, as did Cerovsek. Both revere the magnitude of a giant composer like Beethoven, the historical context in which he worked, and even what he was reading in the newspapers of the day. And both have been tied to the music they will perform over the course of their lives. Cerovsek puts it this way: “The older you get, the more you enjoy these strands that tie together the experiences of your life. One of the things I love about the music career is traveling through a magical transporter, where normal rules of time don’t apply. I’m communing with the composer and hundreds of years evaporate. I’m pouring my heart into a performance that evaporates. But over decades, how I change and how that changes my performance of this virtuoso piece makes me part of the change of the universe. It’s not the clock that time measures; it’s another dimension.” Conductor Courtney Lewis will also present the program “Beethoven and the Making of Genius” Sunday, April 21, 2 p.m. at Hochstein School of Music & Dance, 50 N. Plymouth Ave. The afternoon will feature music from Beethoven and Mozart. $10-$24; visit rpo.org for more information.


Art Exhibits [ OPENING ] Community Darkroom Gallery, 713 Monroe Ave. “Draft 10” Through May 18. Mon 9 a.m.9:30 p.m., Tue-Thu 9 a.m.-6:30 p.m., Fri 12-5 p.m., Sat 10 a.m.-5:30 p.m. Reception Apr 19, 7-9 p.m. 271-5920. Image City Photography Gallery, 722 University Ave. Worlds Apart: Ethiopia and Elsewhere. Featuring Jim Patton and David Perlman. Through May 12. Wed-Sat 11 a.m.-7 p.m., Sun 12-4 p.m. Receptions Friday, April 19, 5-8:30 p.m. and Friday, May 3, 5-9 p.m. 482-1976. imagecityphotographygallery.com. Ock Hee’s Gallery, 2 Lehigh St. Eastern Sensibility: Fine Art in Women’s Clothing. Through May 11. With Etsuko and Jae Hee. Mon-Sat 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Reception Apr 20, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. 624-4730. The Yards, 50-52 Public Market. “Based on a True Story: An Investigation of Family & Self Through Narrative Objects.” Through May 12. MFA Thesis Exhibition by Wil Eldgridge Sideman. Tue, Thu, Sat 10 a.m.2 p.m. Reception Apr 20, 6-9 p.m. attheyards@gmail.com. attheyards.com. [ CONTINUING ] 1975 Gallery, 89 Charlotte St. Folding Space: Karen Mahardy Glass MFA Thesis Show. Through Apr 27. Reception Apr 13, 7-10 p.m. 1975ish.com. Arts & Cultural Council, 277 N. Goodman St. Architectural Design Showcase 2013: “Genesis: The Art in Architecture.” Through Apr 26. 473-4000. artsrochester.org. A.R.T.S. Gallery, 321 East Ave. “Painting The Gospel”” by local artists. Through April 30. 7299916. Axom Gallery, 176 Anderson Ave., 2nd floor. “The New Town Collection: A Gift of Hope” Photographic Prints by Henry Avignon. Through Apr 23. WedSat noon-5 p.m. and by appt. 232-6030 x23. axomgallery.com. Black Radish Studio, 274 N. Goodman. “Spirit of the River” by Richard Margolis. Through May 18. Mon-Fri 10 a.m.-6 p.m., Sat 12-6 p.m. 413-1278. blackradishstudio.com. Books Etc., 78 W. Main St. “Backdoor Artists.” Through June 10. With Sue Higgins, Martin Heit, Nicki Millor, Emily Osgood, and Susan Sweet. 474-4116. books_etc@yahoo.com. Bridge Art Gallery University of Rochester Medical Center, 300 Crittenden Blvd. Beyond Barriers Exhibit. Through June 30. 275-3571. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. “Man vs Machine” Through May 30. Hours 8 p.m.-2 a.m. Featuring Bile, Cruk, Yewzer, John Magnus, Thievin’ Stephen, Spaceman, Derek Crowe, Mike Turzanski, Sidhe, Matt Ely, Doe Gawn, Adam Maida, and Clayton Cowles. $5. lobbydigital.com. Cumming Nature Center Hurst Gallery, 6475 Gulick Rd. Nature in Art: Selections from the Finger Lakes Chapter of the Guild of Natural Science Illustrators. Wed-Fri 9 a.m.-3:30 p.m., Sat-Sun 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m. 374-6160. rmsc.org. Davison Gallery, Cultural Life Center, Roberts Wesleyan College, 2301 Westside Dr. Schoenhals

ART EVENT | ARTAWAKE

Fifteen local musicians. More than 150 works of art. A drag show, a dance show, and a crafts table. All in just 10 hours. Plan your day accordingly, because ArtAwake has returned. The festival, organized by University of Rochester students and now in its sixth year, will commandeer the Sibley Tower Building (25 Franklin St.) on Saturday, April 20, for a plethora of Rochester art, music, and culture. From 2 p.m. to midnight, there will be a slew of local musicians to hear, local art to see, and locally made hors d’oeuvres to munch on (courtesy of Aladdin’s Natural Eatery, Java’s Café, Shanghai Chinese Restaurant, and Tasteful Connection). There will also be special performances throughout the day, including a drag show from UR’s Pride Network, and a 15- to 20-minute performance by the dance troupe One Dance Co. (performances times to be announced). Tickets for ArtAwake are $8-$10 for UR and Eastman School of Music students; $9-$11 for members of the UR community and students from other area colleges; and $10-$12 for general admission. Children 12 and under are admitted free. For more information on tickets and the day’s schedule, visit artawake.org. — BY JASON SILVERSTEIN Symposium. Through Apr 19. Mon-Fri 11 a.m.-5 p.m., Sat 1-4 p.m. 594-6442. roberts.edu. A Different Path Gallery, 27 Market St. “A Little Twisted: An Exploration of the Self.” BFA Painting Exhibit by Karen Nelson. Wed-Fri 11 a.m.noon, Sat-Sun noon-4 p.m. adifferentpathgallery.com. Friendly Home’s Memorial Gallery, 3165 East Ave. “Searching for Spring” by Elizabeth Liano.. Through Jun 30. Daily 10 a.m.-5 p.m. aflinn@friendlyhome.org. George Eastman House, 900 East Ave. “Silver and Water” Through May 26. 271-3361. eastmanhouse.org. Greece Museum, 595 Long Pond Rd. The Greece Community & Senior Center art club, featuring Jeffery Kusz, Jeanette Zucco, Sheila McCleod, Laurie Caraballo, Patricia Newman, Lori Pacific, Linda Schneider and Jim Gaffney. 225-7221. greecehistoricalsociety@yahoo. com. greecehistoricalsociety.net. Hartnett Gallery, Wilson Commons, University of Rochester, River Campus. Sweet Tea and Pecan Pie, Student Show. Through May 12. Tue-Fri 11 a.m.-7 p.m. SatSun noon-5 p.m. blogs.rochester. edu/hartnett. High Falls Fine Art Gallery, 60 Browns Race. A Photographer’s Path 16. 1st Floor Museum: Neil and Jamie Montanus: A Glimpse of the World and Tom Kirn: The Walk Through Photo Album. 3252030. centerathighfalls.org. International Art Acquisitions, 3300 Monroe Ave. “H2O.”

Through Apr 30. Mon-Fri 10 a.m.-9 p.m., Sat 10 a.m.-6 p.m., Sun noon-5 p.m. 264-1440. internationalartacquisitions.com. Keshequa High School, 13 Mill St. Livingston Arts Student Art Exhibit. Through April 27. 2436785. livingstonarts.org. Link Gallery at City Hall, 30 Church St. “Silver Print” Awards Ceremony, Book Release, and Exhibition Receoption. Studio 678, the Wilson Foundation Academy Photo Club. Through Apr 29. 271-5920. cityofrochester.gov. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. Nannette Nocon and John Kastner. 258-0400. thelittle.org. Lux Lounge, 666 South Ave. The Art of J. Nevadomski and Allie Hartley. 232-9030. lux666.com. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. “Becoming Modern:Armory Show Artists at MAG” Through May 12. In Lockhart Gallery. “It Came From the Vault: Rarely Seen Works from MAG’s Collection. Wed-Sun 11 a.m.-5 p.m., Thu until 9 p.m. 276-8900. mag.rochester.edu. My Sister’s Gallery, 505 Mt. Hope Ave. “Under the Influence,” Artwork by Students from School Without Walls. Through May 12. Hours 10 a.m.-8 p.m. daily. 546-8400 x3716. abmiller@ episcopalseniorlife.org. Nazareth College Arts Center Gallery, 4245 East Ave. Nazareth College Department of Art Undergraduate Art Show. Through Apr 21. Hours Wed-Sun

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[ WED., APRIL 17 ] The ARTS Experience. Through April 19. Hobart and William Smith Colleges, Geneva. Workshops, performances hws. edu/festival. RIT MFA Photography Thesis Exhibitions. Through April 19. Visual Studies Workshop, 31 Prince Street Siskind Gallery at Visual Studies Workshop. Through April 19. Free. (585) 442-8676. vsw.org.

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ART | “WORLDS APART: ETHIOPIA AND ELSEWHERE”

You’ve probably never been to Ethiopia. We’re guessing that you’ve probably never thought about going there, either. But “Worlds Apart: Ethiopia and Elsewhere,” the new exhibit at Image City Photography Gallery (722 University Ave.) will bring Ethiopia to Rochester. The exhibit will feature images of Ethiopia from artists-in-residence Jim Patton and David Perlman, as well as additional works from several guest photographers, gallery partners, and the winners of the Camera Rochester competition. “Worlds Apart” opens on Wednesday, April 17, and continues at Image City through May 12. An artists’ reception will be held on Friday, April 19, and on May 3 for First Friday. The exhibit is free. To preview images from “Worlds Apart” and see other Image City shows, visit imagecityphotographygallery.com. — BY JASON SILVERSTEIN

Art Exhibits noon-5 p.m. Reception Apr 5, 5-7 p.m. 389-5073. NTID Dyer Arts Center, 52 Lomb Memorial Dr. Time & Again, Photography by Tom Policano. Mon-Thu 9:30 a.m.-4 p.m., Fri 9:30 a.m.-7 p.m., Sat 1-3 p.m. rit.edu/dyerarts. Orange Glory Café, 240 East Ave. “Canis lupus familiaris,” Photographs by Gerry Szymanski. Through Apr 30. Hours Mon-Fri 11 a.m.-3 p.m. 232-7340. Outside the Box Art Gallery, Bldg 9, The Canal Works, 1000 Turk Hill Rd. Spirit & Mind. Through May 1. 645-2485. outsidetheboxag.com. Record Archive, 33 1/3 Rockwood St. “Nocturnal Devotions: The Artwork of Allie Hartley.” recordarchive.com. Rochester Contemporary Arts Center, 137 East Ave. EAT IT. Including Stefani Bardin, Christine Chin, The Counter Kitchen (Stefani Bardin & Brooke Singer), Brady Dillsworth, Tatiana Kronberg, Andrzej Maciejewski, Spurse. 461-2222. rochestercontemporary.org. Rush Rhees Library, University of Rochester, River Campus. Senior Art Exhibitions. Gallery at the Art & Music Library. Mon-Thu 9 a.m.-10 p.m., Fri 9 a.m.-6 p.m., Sat noon-5 p.m., Sun noon-10 p.m. Apr 12-16: Caitlin Farmer. Apr 19-23: Lauren Fischer. Alice in the Looking Glass: Illustrations and Artists’ Books 1865-2012. Through Aug 16. Rare Books & Special Collections, Rush Rhees Library. Mon-Fri 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Sat 11 a.m.-3 p.m. 2754477.; Memorial Art Gallery: 100 Years of Art for the Community. Through Sep 30, 2013. mag. rochester.edu. The Shoe Factory Art Co-op, 250 N. Goodman St. Handcrafted Jewelry by Lisa Johnson. Wed 12-5 p.m. shoefactoryarts.com.

Spectrum Gallery at Lumiere Photo, 100 College Ave. Rare and Vintage Prints from the Collections of Nathan Lyons, Carl Chiarenza, and Spectrum Gallery. 461-4447. lumierephoto.com. SPoT Coffee, 200 East Ave. “The Elements” Photographs by Carissa Hurdstrom. Through Apr 30. 613-4600. spotcoffee.com. St. John Fisher College, 3690 East Ave. Rochester Art Club Spring Show. Through May 9. Patricia O’Keefe Ross Gallery in Joseph S Skalney Welcome Center. rochesterartclub.org. Starry Nites Café, 696 University Ave. “Let Them Eat Cake! Portraits of Pastries..” 732-0036. studio212@shoefactoryarts.com. shoefactoryarts.com. Tap & Mallet, 381 Gregory St. “It’s a Funny Story” Illustrations by Aarom Humby. 473-0503. tapandmallet.com. Tower Fine Arts Center, SUNY Brockport, 180 Holley St. Breaking Currents: The 2013 Annual Student Art Exhibition. Through May 5. Mon-Fri 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Sun 1-4 p.m. 3952805. brockport.edu/finearts. University Gallery, James R. Booth Hall, RIT, Lomb Memorial Dr. “Connections” Arena Art Group. Mon-Thu 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Fri & Sat 10 a.m.-3 p.m. 475-2866. jleugs@rit.edu. rit.edu/fa/gallery. UR Medical Center, 300 Crittenden Blvd. Olympus BioScapes Digital Imaging Competition Winners. 275-3361. urmc.edu/libraries/miner/. West Side Gallery, SUNY Brockport, 180 Holley St. Sticks and Stones: Words Will Always Hurt Me.. A BFA Senior Exhibition by Lindsey Galasse. Through Apr 23. Mon-Fri 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Closing reception Apr 19, 5-7 p.m. brockport.edu. Williams-Insalaco Gallery at FLCC, 3325 Marvin Sands Dr. FLCC Arts Faculty Biennial Exhibition. Through Apr 19. 785-1369.

[ THU., APRIL 18 ] SageFest. April 18, 4-7 p.m. University of Rochester, River Campus. 273-2267. rochester. edu. [ SAT., APRIL 20 ] ArtAwake. April 20, 2 p.m.midnight. Sibley Tower Building, 25 Franklin St $8-$12, kids under 12 free. artawake.org. Caution! Artist @ Work!. April 20, 1 p.m. Central Library of Rochester, Kate Gleason Auditorium, 115 South Ave. Free. 428-8145. libraryweb.org. RecyclArte Gala. April 20, 7 p.m. Rochester Greenovation, 1199 East Main St. $15-$30. 2701683. events@rochestergreen. org. rochestergreenovation. eventbrite.com. [ SUN., APRIL 21 ] Greece Community & Senior Center Art Club Show. 1:30-4 p.m Greece Museum, 595 Long Pond Rd. Free. Donations accepted. 2257221. greecehistoricalsociety@ yahoo.com.

Comedy [ THU., APRIL 18 ] Adam Hunter. April 18-20. Comedy Club, 2235 Empire Blvd. Thu 7:30 p.m., Fri-Sat 7:30 & 10 p.m $9-$12. 671-9080. thecomedyclub.us. [ FRI., APRIL 19 ] Improv Comedy Battles. Fri 9:30 p.m., Sat 7:30 p.m. Village Idiots Improv Comedy, 274 Goodman St. N. $5. 797-9086. VIP@ improvVIP.com. [ SAT., APRIL 20 ] Unleashed! Improv. April 20, 7:30 p.m. The Space Theater and Gallery, 1199 East Main Street 585-209-0734. facebook.com/ unleashedimprov.

Dance Events [ THU., APRIL 18 ] DANCE/Hartwell. April 18-20, 7:30 p.m. Brockport College, 350 New Campus Drive $8-$15. brockport.edu. Geneseo Dance Ensemble: Dancing Past to Present: Celebrating 45 Years. April 1821, 8 p.m. SUNY Geneseo, 1 College Rd. Thu-Sat 8 p.m., Sun 2 p.m. $10. 245-5516. bbo. geneseo.edu. In Studio Series: Bill Evans. April 18, 6:30 p.m. Rochester City Ballet Studios, 1326 University Ave. RSVP. 461-5850. rochestercityballet.com. [ FRI., APRIL 19 ] Fundamentals of LivingDance~LivingMusic. April 19, 6:30-9:30 p.m. Kinections, 718 University Ave. $20-$35, register. 473-5050. kinections. com.


[ SAT., APRIL 20 ] LivingDance: Working In Depth. April 20, 9:30 a.m.-1 p.m. Kinections, 718 University Ave. $25-$40, register. 473-5050. kinections.com. Triple Ki.S.S. Dance. April 20, 8:30 p.m. Dancencounters, 215 Tremont St . Dress to impress $10 for 3 minilessons, open dancing and refreshments. 738-1782. [ WED., APRIL 24 ] Elizabeth Clark Dance Ensemble: World Beat. April 24, 7 p.m. St. Thomas’ Episcopal Church, 2000 Highland Ave. $13, register. 442-5988.

Festivals [ THU., APRIL 18 ] OUTPUT: RCTV Commuity Video Festival. April 18, 7 p.m. RCTV Studios, 21 Gorham St Screening of works produced by members of RCTV community, followed by Q&A session with producers Free. rctv15.org. [ FRI., APRIL 19 ] The 25th annual Bird of Prey Days. April 19-21. Braddock Bay Park, East Manitou Road, Greece. $5 per adult (good all weekend), kids free 267-5483. information@bbrr.org. bbrr.org. [ SAT., APRIL 20 ] Earth Day at Hamlin Beach State Park. April 20, 9 a.m. Hamlin Beach State Park, 1 Hamlin Beach Blvd. West 3 p.m. Free park admission Free. 964-2462. friendsofhamlinbeach.org. Sheep Sheering Festival. April 20, 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Springdale Farm, 700 Colby St. $4-$5. springdalefarm.org.

Kids Events [ WED., APRIL 17 ] Children’s Film Festival. Through April 30. Various times at various libraries and centers cityofrochester.gov/article. aspx?id=8589952183. Submit Work for Rochester Teen Film Festival. Through June 7. Open call for film and videos in all genres from regional high school students. Deadline June 7. Festival takes place August 7 at Little Theatre go.naz.edu/rtff. [ THU., APRIL 18 ] Art & Story Stroll. April 18, 11 a.m.-noon. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. Ages 2-5 Register. 276-8971. mag. rochester.edu. [ SAT., APRIL 20 ] How I Became a Pirate.. Sundays JCC Rochester, 1200 Edgewood Ave. Sat 2 p.m., Sun 11 a.m., 2 p.m $15. 461-2000. tykestheatre.org. Kid’s Fest. April 20, 1-5 p.m. AMF Dewey Garden Lanes, 4470 Dewey Ave. 1 free hour of bowling, discounted refreshments, chance to win prizes when you sign up for a league 865-0470. [ SUN., APRIL 21 ] Our Home Planet. April 21, 12-4 p.m. Rochester Museum and Science Center, 657 East Ave. Included in admission: $13, under age 2 free. 271-1880. rmsc.org.

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twitter.com/roccitynews APPETIZERS • SALADS • SANDWICHES • BAR & GRILL GROWLERS • PACKAGED BEER • TOURS FESTIVAL | WOODSMEN CONCLAVE

If you’re looking to gather a team of handy folks for your apocalypse survivalist group, think lumberjacks. Around 250 woodsmen — and women — from around 18 colleges and universities in the northeastern United States will converge this weekend on the campus of Finger Lakes Community College for the two-day 67th Annual Northeast Collegiate Woodsmen Conclave competition. The conclave will be held Friday and Saturday, April 19 and 20, on the college’s main campus in Canandaigua (3325 Marvin Sands Drive). The lumberjacks will compete in 19 individual and team events, including cross-cutting, logrolling, pole-climbing, axe-throwing, and canoeing. Opening ceremonies will be held at 8 a.m. on Friday, with events beginning immediately afterward until 3 p.m. The conclave continues on Saturday at 8 a.m., with the finale event at 2 p.m. The event is sponsored in part by chainsaw manufacturer STIHL, which will host its own professional and collegiate competitions, the 2013 STIHL Timbersports Series, at FLCC on Friday, 4-9 p.m. The conclave and STIHL events are free and open to the public. Parking is available Friday at the Constellation Brands-Marvin Sands Performing Arts Center and on Saturday in the parking lot behind the main campus building. For more information call 785-1623 or visit flccconnects.com, where you can find a complete schedule of events. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY

Lectures [ WED., APRIL 17 ] A “CFA” Overview: New York State’s Consolidated Funding Application. April 17, 10 a.m. Arts & Cultural Council, 277 N. Goodman St Free, space is limited, register 473-4000 x206. artsrochester.org. Former British Parliament Member Nocholas Bennett. April 17, 4:30-6 p.m. Brighton Memorial Library, 2300 Elmwood Ave. Free. brightonlibrary.org. Light Works! Presents Rev. Jeff and Meddy Jacques: Ministers, Mediums and Authors. April 17, 6:30 p.m. RIT Barnes & Noble, 100 Park Point $5, $4 bring a friend. 585-424-6777. meetup. com/Light-Works. McPearl Bieenial Meeting. April 17, 7:30 p.m. Brighton Town Hall, 2300 Elmwood Ave Jody Siegle will speak about Public Funds for Ethnic Segregation 686-5036. mlaties@rochester.rr.com. Science on the Edge Series: “Lake Sturgeon Repartriation: A Science-Based Success Story for Genesee River Health..” April 17, 7:30 p.m. Rochester Museum and Science Center, 657 East Ave. With Jeff Wyatt $7-$15. 697-1492. rmsc.org. “Secret Gardens” with Genesee Country Master Gardeners. April 17, 6-8 p.m. Cornell Cooperative

Extension of Genesee County, 420 East Main St $10, register. 343-3040 x101. genesee. shutterfly.com/gardening. “So Far From Home: Elmira’s Confederate Prison Camp,” a lecture by Kerry Lippincott. April 17, 7:30 p.m. Geneva History Museum, 543 South Main St., Geneva Free. 315-789-5151. Top 10 Good Tech Habits. April 17, 6:30-8 p.m. Wood Library, 134 North Main St. Free, register. 394-1381. woodlibrary.org.

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[ THU., APRIL 18 ] From Russia With Love: Literature, Music, Art, and Film. April 18, 8:30 a.m.-9 p.m. Rochester Institute of Technology, 1 Lomb Memorial Dr. rit.edu. Protecting Yourself Against Fraud and Identity Theft. April 18, 7-8:30 p.m. Brighton Memorial Library, 2300 Elmwood Ave. Free, register. 784-5300. brightonlibrary.org. Rochester Minearalogical Symposium. April 18-19. Radisson Hotel Rochester Airport, 175 Jefferson Rd. Fri 8 p.m. Kevin Downey: Mineralization in Caves Part I.” Sat 9 a.m Register. 368-2368. contactrms@hotmail. com. rasny.org. Scholar Mary Evelyn Tucker to Speak on Religion and the Environment. April 18-19. Nazareth College, 4245 East continues on page 27 rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 25


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Ross Amstey and Patricia Lewis in “33 Variations,” now on stage at Blackfriars. PHOTO BY DAN HOWELL

The measure of a life “33 Variations” THROUGH APRIL 27 BLACKFRIARS THEATRE, 795 E. MAIN ST. $27 | 454-1260, BFTIX.COM [ REVIEW ] BY ERIC REZSNYAK

Intricate, delicate, and lovely are possibly the three words that best describe “33 Variations,” the drama currently on stage at Blackfriars. The play, written by Moises Kaufman (“The Laramie Project,” “I Am My Own Wife”) and directed by John Haldoupis, is a nuanced look at the way people relate to one another, refuse to relate to themselves, reject human frailty, and ultimately come to grasp simple truths. It’s a show with many moving parts, and while not all of them are executed with equal strength, the results are still evocative and thought provoking, and certainly worth watching. The show concerns two separate but related stories. The main protagonist is Katherine Brandt, a musicologist about to depart on a trip to Bonn, Germany, to research her musical icon, Ludwig van Beethoven. Specifically, Katherine is interested in discovering why such a musical genius spent years obsessed with writing the 33 compositions that became known as the Diabelli Variations, aural meditations on a simple waltz that she routinely describes as “mediocre.” Even as she embarks on the journey of her professional life, Katherine wrestles with the greatest challenge of her actual life:

she has been diagnosed with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), and the disease is ravaging her body at an aggressive rate. As we follow Katherine’s story, the show flashes back in time to show us its version of why Beethoven — nearing the end of his life, drowning in debt, and growing increasingly deaf — kept going back and back to Diabelli’s waltz, to the detriment of more lucrative and ambitious creative endeavors. The show switches between the modern day and the early 19th century, with characters from both time-period ensembles sometimes sharing the stage — and even actual lines — at points where the stories and themes intersect. It’s an interesting structure, and the insightful but never obvious language by Kaufman and thoughtful directing choices by Haldoupis make the most of the material and the Blackfriars stage. The modern-day cast is the core of the show, and it is anchored by Patricia Lewis as Katherine. Lewis is unquestionably one of our great local acting talents, and her performance in “33 Variations” is essentially flawless. Her line readings are thoughtful and honest, and always, always totally in character. But her physical acting here is astonishing. As Katherine becomes increasingly stricken with ALS, Lewis herself seems almost to shrink in response, wasting away before our eyes, but still fighting all the time. There is not a moment of her performance that feels forced, or anything less than honest, including the less-than-flattering exchanges with Katherine’s

estranged daughter. The final monologue that she delivers is powerful yet restrained. Lewis is joined by a great supporting cast in the present-day sections of the play, and there is some terrific partner work throughout their scenes. The evolving relationship between Katherine and her daughter, Clara (Ruth Bellavia), will feel familiar to anyone with mother/daughter issues. The scenes between Clara and Nurse Mike (Adam Petzol) are awkwardly, sweetly romantic. And the exchanges between Katherine and German librarian Gertie (Vicki Casarett in a largely comedic role) are frequently hilarious. Unfortunately, the 19th century cast does not fare as well. Jeff Siuda as Beethoven’s associate, Anton Schindler, is the most successful, his exaggerated mannerisms best realizing the grander acting that defines almost all of these scenes. Ross Amstey is only occasionally believable as Beethoven. He is at his best when accessing the composer’s more impish impulses, but often lacks energy. This is true of almost every exchange between him and Terry Browne as Diabelli. It’s telling that Amstey’s best scene is the one he shares with Lewis toward the end of the play. Director Haldoupis clearly found

inspiration in the classical-music subject matter, weaving in visual and aural details throughout the piece. Several of the Diabelli Variations are performed live throughout the show by pianist Julie Covach. The show closes with the cast dancing a minuet (a work that begins with a dance should end with a dance). And the two giant sliding doors that define the set are covered top to bottom with sheet music. (Speaking of the set, designer Haldoupis smartly combines traditional construction with countless digital projections that add to the story rather than detract from it. Blackfriars has been heavily using projections since at least its production of “The Who’s Tommy,” and no other theater in the area uses them more effectively.) The remarkable thing about “33 Variations” is that even as it deals with some grim subject matter — the inevitable failing of our physical body, and our mind’s inability to come to grips with it — it is also sometimes uproariously funny and life affirming. And I mean that last bit in the best way. The show is never sappy, or even melodramatic. Like the Diabelli Variations themselves, it explores the various facets of human reality and relationships in relatable and sometimes unexpected ways.


6619. rochesterbeekeepers@ gmail.com. ‘Untold Truths: Immigration & You.’ April 22, 7 p.m. Brighton Town Hall, 2300 Elmwood Ave Free. lwv-rma.org. [ TUE., APRIL 23 ] Backyard Birding with Kevin Griffith. April 23, 7-8:30 p.m. Greece Public Library, 2 Vince Tofany Blvd. Free, register. 225-8951. President Jefferson. April 23, 7 p.m. Rochester Brainery, Village Gate, 274 N Goodman St. $15. 730-7034. rochesterbrainery.com.

LIT | JOHN DENSMORE

Legendary rock drummer John Densmore is one hardcore dude. As a founding member of The Doors, Densmore was part of a pivotal time in music when the worlds of entertainment, social consciousness, and spiritual awareness collided. And, as it still does, corporate America wanted a taste of the windfall. For The Doors, and in particular its late front man Jim Morrison, it was no dice. Over the years, the band has been approached to license its music in exchange for a ton of pocket salad. Whereas other members have warmed to the idea, Densmore has remained steadfast and vehemently opposed. A tall order when millions of dollars are concerned. And though still active, Densmore has not participated in the undoing of the band’s original cool by participating in any Doors reunions. He’s written “The Doors Unhinged” to document this court battle with his former band mates and his quest to maintain the band’s majesty and legacy. This week he’ll come to the Record Archive (33 1/3 Rockwood Place) to sign copies of the tome. You can pre-order the book directly from the Archive and receive a wristband to get it signed along with one other item.

[ WED., APRIL 24 ] Science on the Edge: “Crocodiles at the Poles: Viewing the Past and Future Ice-free Arctic..” April 24, 7:30 p.m. Rochester Museum and Science Center, 657 East Ave. $8-$14. 697-1942. rmsc.org.

John Densmore will appear Monday, April 22, 5 p.m. at the Record Archive. Free admission. For more information visit recordarchive.com. — BY FRANK DE BLASE

[ SAT., APRIL 20 ] ‘Growing Up In A Frank Lloyd Wright House’ by Kim Bixler. April 20, 3-4 p.m. Central Library, Kate Gleason Auditorium, 115 South Ave. Free. 428-8350. libraryweb.org. Reading: Sally Valentine Steinmiller and Kathy Johncox. April 20, 2 p.m. Books Etc., 78 W. Main St. Free. 474-4116. books_etc@yahoo.com.

Lectures Ave. “Envisioning a Sustainable Future: Ecological, Spiritual, and Ethical Perspectives on Thursday, April 18 at 7 p.m. and Religions and Ecology: The Emerging Alliance on Friday, April 19 at 1:30 p.m. as part of the 2012-2013 Shannon Lecture Series Free, register. 389-2728. cbochen4@naz.edu. Treaty of Canandaigua or the Pickering Treaty. April 18, 6 p.m. Genesee Community College Dansville Campus Center, 31 Clara Barton Street Dr. Randy John will lead the discussion 585 335 7820. dansville@genesee. edu. genesee.edu. [ FRI., APRIL 19 ] Real-Time Marketing & PR with David Meerman Scott. April 19, 3:30 p.m. St. John Fisher College, 3690 East Ave Kearny Hall. Talk with David Meerman Scott on How to Instantly Engage Your Market, Connect with Customers, and Create Products that Grow Your Business Now 703-4825. Sustainability Seminar. April 19, 2 p.m. University of Rochester, River Campus Dewey Hall 2-110D. Karl Korfmacher: “Assessing Emissions from the Transport of Sand, Water, and Waste in High-Volume Hydraulic Fracturing Activities..” Free. karen.berger@rochester.edu. rochester.edu. [ SAT., APRIL 20 ] An Armchair Tour of Rochester’s South Wedge. April 20, 1 p.m.

Rochester Brainery, Village Gate, 274 N Goodman St. $15. 7307034. rochesterbrainery.com. “History of Rochester’s South Wedge” with Rose O’Keefe. April 20, 1-2:30 p.m. Rochester Brainery, Village Gate, 274 N Goodman St. $15. 730-7034. rochesterbrainery.com. Prof. Paul Finkelman: “Are the Ten Commandments the Moral Foundation of American Law? Why Jews Should be Concerned About Public Displays of the Decalogue.” April 20, 1:30 p.m. East Avenue Synagogue, 1369 East Ave. Dessert reception follows talk Free. bhbirochester.org. [ SUN., APRIL 21 ] Below the Belt, Out in the Open. April 21, 7-9 p.m. JCC Rochester, 1200 Edgewood Ave. Educational and awareness program about gynecological cancers Free. 4612000. jccrochester.org. [ MON., APRIL 22 ] Criminal Justice Day 2013: Human Trafficking; Victims Among Us. April 22, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Genesee Community College, 1 College Road Panel will feature U.S. Attorney William Hochul, Jr. Room T-102 of GCC’s Conable Technology Building $12-$20, register. 344-2611. readme.readmedia.com/GCCHosts-Criminal-Justice-DayEvent/5960531. “There’s More Than One Way to Split a Hive!” with Peter L. Borst. April 22, 7-9 p.m. Cornell Cooperative Extension, 249 Highland Avenue 820-

MUSIC! FOOD! FRESH AIR! ’s Y T CI

Literary Events [ WED., APRIL 17 ] Pure Kona Open Mic. 7:30 p.m. Acanthus Café, 337 East Ave. Free. 585-319-5999. acanthuscafe.com. [ FRI., APRIL 19 ] Public reading of John Steinbeck’s “The Grapes of Wrath..” April 1920, 7 p.m. Genesee Community College Dansville Campus Center, 31 Clara Barton Street Donations accepted to benefit the New Deal Gallery and Livingston Art Center Free, donations accepted. 585 335 7820. dansville@genesee. edu. genesee.edu.

[ SUN., APRIL 21 ] Sterling Nature Center Celebrates National Poetry Month. April 21, 3-5 p.m. Sterling Nature Center, 15380 Jenzvold Rd Readings by Tim McCoy, Susan Peterson Gateley, Stephanie Ackerman, Devon Moore, Bob Early, Steve Smith and Open Mic Free. 947-5522. snc@ co.cayuga.ny.us. facebook.com/ sterlingnaturecenter. [ MON., APRIL 22 ] Book Signing: John Densmore of The Doors. April 22, 5 p.m. Record Archive, 33 1/3 Rockwood St. Free. recordarchive.com. Talk and Reading: Etgar Keret. April 22, 5 p.m. Rush Rhees Library, University of Rochester, River Campus HawkinsCarlson Rm 275-5378. edward. wierenga@rochester.edu. [ TUE., APRIL 23 ] Books Sandwiched-in: “Prague Winter: A Personal Story of Remembrance and War: 19371948” by Madeleine Albright.. April 23, 12:12-12:52 p.m. Central Library, Kate Gleason Auditorium, 115 South Ave. Reviewer: Sandra Frankel 4288350. libraryweb.org. continues on page 28

THURSDAY, MAY 2 5-9pm in

ROCHESTER’S EAST END Come out for CITY’s fourth annual night of FREE music on the streets. Listen to great local musicians, PLUS get ridiculous deals from neighborhood merchants on food, drink, goods, and services!

$3 $1

mac & cheese cups at Ludwig’s Center Stage Café!

$2 $2

for 2 spring rolls at Golden Port!

slices of pepperoni & cheese pizza at Stromboli Express!

PRIZES FOR TOP BUSKERS PROVIDED BY: THIS EVENT IS MADE POSSIBLE WITH SUPPORT FROM:

Get more details at

rochestercitynewspaper.com or find the event on Facebook!

P.S. In case you don’t know: a “busker” is a street musician.

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 27


5-6 mile trail maintnenace hike, Finger Lakes Trail. 377-1812. gvhchikes.org. Rochester Birding: Trails at High Acres. April 21, 8 a.m. Meet at parking lot of Perinton Parkway. Extra spotting scopes helpful 248-8959. rochesterbirding.com.

Special Events

RECREATION | COLOR VIBE 5K

This weekend brings a great, get-active event not only for running enthusiasts, but also for anyone playful enough to become part of a human rainbow. The Color Vibe 5K run, held throughout the nation and resembling the joyful Indian holiday Holi, is a unique race in which the participants are turned into human canvases as runners are painted with colors throughout their journey. The YMCA of Greater Rochester will present the 2nd Annual Rochester Color Vibe 5K event on Saturday, April 20, at Monroe Community College (1000 E. Henrietta Road, entrance B). The first wave of the race begins at 9 a.m., with waves of runners following incrementally. If you’re not into getting covered in colors while running through the city, consider signing up to assist with spraying color on participants throughout the race. Registration is $45 or $50 on the day of the event. Ages 7 and under can participate for free, but all participants under age 18 must have a parent or guardian present. Obviously, participants should wear clothing they don’t mind getting messy. For more information and to sign up or volunteer, visit rochesterymca.org/colorvibe. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY

Literary Events Plutzik Reading Series: Peter Ho Davies. April 23, 5 p.m. Rush Rhees Library, University of Rochester, River Campus Free. 275-9255. rochester.edu/college/ eng/plutzik April 23, 5 p.m. Rush Rhees Library, University of Rochester, River Campus Welles-Brown Rm 275-9255. rochester.edu/college/eng/plutzik.

Museum Exhibit [ WED., APRIL 17 ] “Bringing Down the Attic.” Through Aug. 3. Museum of Wayne County History, 21 Butternut St Opening March 28, 7 p.m. Explore the hidden collection at the museum Free. 315-946-4943. waynehistory.org. “Race: Are We So Different?” Through April 28. Rochester Museum and Science Center, 657 East Ave. Through Apr 28. faceraceroc.org. Included in admission: $11-$13. 2711880. rmsc.org.

Recreation [ THU., APRIL 18 ] UrbanFIT 6 week Session. Mondays,. Location changes weekly training@fleetfeetrochester. com. fleetfeetrochester.com/ training/urban-fit. [ FRI., APRIL 19 ] Chrous of the Swamp. April 19, 7 p.m. The Thousand Acre Swamp Sanctuary, 1581 Jackson Road Free. 773-8911. 28 CITY APRIL 17-23, 2013

First Quarter Moon Over the Swamp. April 19, 8 p.m. The Thousand Acre Swamp Sanctuary, 1581 Jackson Road Free. 773-8911. [ SAT., APRIL 20 ] Color Vibe 5K Race. April 20. Mercer Gallery at Monroe Communtiy College, 1000 E. Henrietta Rd thecolorvibe.com. Early Spring Wildflower Walk. April 20, 10 a.m.-noon. Harris Whalen Park, Penfield 3853531. GVHC Hike. April 20, 9 a.m. I-490 exit 27. Strenuous/hilly 6 mile hike, Hi Tor area $4 carpool. 465-0990. gvhchikes.org April 20, 1 p.m. Oatka Creek Park. Leisurely/easy 3 mile hike Free. 319-5794. gvhchikes.org. Return of the Bluebirds. April 20, 8 a.m. The Thousand Acre Swamp Sanctuary, 1581 Jackson Road Free. 773-8911. Seneca7. April 20-21. Along the shore of Seneca Lake seneca7. com/media/pdf/seneca7_media_ guide_2013.pdf. Slutwalk. April 20, noon. Liberty Pole, Main, East, & Franklin Streets Slutwalk is a anti rape and victim blaming rally/street march Free. 607-661-7320. Strollin’ for the Colon 5K Walk/ Run. April 20. Cottone Auction House, 120 Court St., Geneseo. Registration 8:30 a.m., 10 a.m. runners start $20-$25. urmc. rochester.edu. [ SUN., APRIL 21 ] GVHC Hike. April 21, 8:30 a.m. Meet at I-390 exit 11. Moderate

[ WED., APRIL 17 ] Beer Tasting Seminar. April 17, 7 p.m. The Rabbit Room, 61 N. Main St. $25, register. 582-1830. thelowermill.com. Electri…FYI! 2013 Upstate Electrical Trade Show. April 17, 9 a.m.-6 p.m. Main Street Armory, 900 E. Main St. Free. 232-3221. eawny.com. February Meeting: Love as a Revolutionary Force. ongoing, 7 p.m. Flying Squirrel Community Space, 285 Clarissa St. Green Party of Monroe County gpomc.org. Girls Rock! Rochester seeks volunteers. Through April 17. Seeking musical and nonmusical volunteers for rock ‘n’ roll summer camp staff. Applications now available at girlsrockrochester.com. Email girlsrockrochester@gmail.com for more info. Mud Creek Farm CSA: Free Informational Meeting. April 17, 7 p.m. The Rabbit Room, 61 N. Main St. Free. 582-1830. mudcreekfarm.com April 17, 7 p.m. Victor Free Library, 15 West Main St. Free. 924-2637. mudcreekfarm.com. A Very Special Happy Hour: Poetry and Spoken Word Night. April 17, 6-9 p.m. Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way “Art of Xpression 2” by The Mocha Center. Ages 21+ only Free. 232-3230. info@ abilenebarandlounge.com. mochacenter.org. [ THU., APRIL 18 ] High Falls Film Festival. April 18-21. Little Theatre, Dryden Theatre, Cinema Theatre highfallsfilmfestival.com. Rochester International Film Festival. Thursday, April 18, 7 p.m., Winton Branch Library, 611 Winton Road, 428-8204 Free. rochesterfilmfest.org/bestof-the-fest/. [ FRI., APRIL 19 ] 15th Annual Antique Show. April 19-20. Genesee Country Village & Museum, 1410 Flint Hill Rd. Friday night (6-8 pm) Preview Party, Saturday open to public at 10 a.m $6; $30 preview party 538-6822. gcv.org. 67th Northeast Woodsman Conclave. April 19-20, 8 a.m.-3 p.m. Finger Lakes Community College, 3325 Marvin Sands Dr 785-1574. flccconnects.com. Discovering Deaf Worlds’ Third Annual Benefit. April 19, 6-9 p.m. The German House Theater, 315 Gregory St. Catered by Zeppa Bistro, performance by Bharata School of Indian Dance and Geneseo Bhangra $30, register. 442-6880. discoveringdeafworlds.org. Flames and Frequencies: performance for glass percussion and fire. April 19, 8-10 p.m. Rochester Contemporary Arts Center, 137 East Ave. An interdisciplinary event of fire, live and electronic percussion and glassblowing. Percussionists Peter Ferry and Adam Maalouf of The


donations accepted. 243-6785. LivingstonArts.org. Psychic Fair. April 20, 11 a.m.7 p.m. Plymouth Spiritualist Church, 29 Vick Park A plymouthspiritualistchurch.org. Record Store Day. April 20. Support your local record stores. recordstoreday.com. Screenplay reading: “Citizens Band” by Jason Olshefsky. April 20, 7 p.m. Flying Squirrel Community Space, 285 Clarissa St. Jason Olshefsky in association with The Shakespeare Company of Greater Rochester. ShakeCo. com. SPECIAL EVENT | CIRQUE ZUMA ZUMA

The only circus I want to see features no animals with the wild nearly broken out of them, and instead showcases mind-blowingly talented humans willingly showing off their obsessively honed skills. Because of its quality of performance and production, Cirque Zuma Zuma has been described as an African-style Cirque du Soleil by adoring critics and audiences. Featuring performers from 16 African nations, the show has delighted audiences around the world with its combination of playful choreographed dance, a live musical score, carefully coordinated acrobatics, juggling, and impressive acts of contortion. Head over to the Roberts Wesleyan website to watch a preview video in which, among many other impressive feats, a svelte man fits his entire body through an un-stringed tennis racket. Cirque Zuma Zuma will take place in Hale Auditorium at Roberts Wesleyan College (2301 Westside Drive) on Saturday, April 20, 7:30 p.m. Tickets are $22-$34, and can be purchased by calling 594-6008 or online at roberts.edu/home/clc. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY Eastman School of Music play new glass instruments generated by Carrie Fertig, artist in residence at Rochester Institute of Technology. The live performance includes electronic music from recorded glass instruments by Dr. Alistair MacDonald, Royal Conservatoire of Scotland, and musical audience interaction $4-$6. 461-2222. rochestercontemporary.org. Nat Turner: A Troublesome Property. April 19, 7 p.m. Baobab Cultural Center, 728 University Ave. Discussion follows screening. Facilitator TBA thebaobab.org. Nazareth and Golisano Children’s Hospital Host Spaghetti SMILE Dinner. April 19, 5:30-7:30 p.m. St. John of Rochester Church, 8 Wickford Way $4-$10, free to children under 2 years, and $20 for a family of four or more (takeout available for $6 per meal). 389-2770. csda@naz.edu. [ SAT., APRIL 20 ] “Roll Out The Barrel” on the Lake Ontario Wine Trail. April 20-21, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Guests will be given food and wine pairings at each of the 5 wineries $15, 2 for $25. 315-986-4202. lakeontariowinetrail.com. 11th Annual ¡Soy Unica! ¡Soy Latina! Rally. April 20, 8:15 a.m.-2:15 p.m. University of Rochester, River Campus At the Simon School of Business, Schlegel Hall. Girls ages 7-18 284-8006. latinasunidas.org. Abundance Cooperative Market bEARTHday Party. April 20, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Abundance Cooperative Market, 62 Marshall St. Free. 943-4786. Big Sale. 9 a.m.-2 p.m. 127 Railroad St. Art, books, clothes, handmade soap,

zines, more facebook.com/ smugtownmushrooms. Cirque Zuma Zuma. April 20, 7:30 p.m. Hale Auditorium, Roberts Cultural Life Center, Roberts Wesleyan College, 2301 Westside Dr $22-$34. roberts.edu. Earth Festival. April 20, 11 a.m. Rochester Greenovation, 1199 East Main St. Free, register. 2701683. events@rochestergreen. org. rochestergreen.org/earthweek-2013/. Electric Car Show at Penfield Cleanup Day. April 20, 9 a.m.noon. Penfield Community Center, 1985 Baird Rd. 3408655. penfield.org. Film: Awakening the Dreamer, Changing the Dream.” April 20, 8:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m. Spiritus Christi Church, 121 North Fitzhugh St. Free, register. 3460557. Myrabrown@frontier.com. SpiritusChristi.org. Go Green! Recycle Rally and Party for the Planet. April 20, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Seneca Park Zoo, 2222 St. Paul St Included in zoo admission. 336-7200. senecaparkzoo.org. Live Antique Appraisal Show. April 20, 1-4 p.m. St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, 25 Westminster Rd Appraisals by Mike Deming. Raffle drawings at 3 p.m $10 admission, $5 appraisals 271-2240. stpaulsec.org/. New-to-You Sale & Crafts Bazaar. April 20, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Cornell Cooperative Extension, 249 Highland Avenue Free admission. 271-2733 ext 89. Polish Easter Traditions. April 20, 10 a.m. Interfaith Center, 11 Franklin St., Geneseo Free,

[ SUN., APRIL 21 ] The ACF Chef of the Year. April 21, 5 p.m. New York Wine & Culinary Center, 800 South Main St $65, $75 at door 394-7070. foodlinkny.org. Culture and Commuity Sundays: RIT Storytellers. 1-3 p.m Rochester Museum and Science Center, 657 East Ave. Included in admission: $11$13. 697-1942. rmsc.org. Durand Eastman Park Arboretum Tours. 2 p.m Durand Eastman Park, Zoo Rd. Meet at the kiosk on Zoo Rd. next to the park offices lot Free. 261-1665. Gilda’s Club Annual Surviving in Style Fashion Show. April 21, 2 p.m. Hyatt Regency Rochester, 125 E. Main St $50, RSVP. gildasclubrochester.org. GVBCA’s 44th Annual Bottle, Table Top Antique, Paper & Postcard Show & Sale. April 21, 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Roberts Wesleyan College, 2301 Westside Dr. $4 admission. 594-6008. gvbca@frontiernet.net. gvbca.org. Springtime Trolley Rides. New York Museum of Transportation, 6393 E. River Rd 20 minute rides depart at noon, 12:30 p.m., 1 p.m. and 1:30 p.m $4-$5, under age 12 free. 533-1113. nymtmuseum.org. [ MON., APRIL 22 ] 2013 Community Performance series. fourth Monday of every month, 10:30-11:15 a.m. Cobblestone Arts Center, 1622 New York 332. January 28: Grease $5. 398-0220. cobblestonesrtscenter.com.

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[ TUE., APRIL 23 ] The 449 Birthday of William Shakespeare, a celebration!. April 23, 7:30 p.m. MuCCC, 142 Atlantic Ave The Shakespeare Players of Rochester present a benefit for MuCCC. Pay what you can. muccc.org. Irondequoit Art Club Meeting and Margaret Ross Artist Demonstration. April 23, 7:30 p.m. Chapel Oaks, St. Ann’s Community, 1550 Portland Ave 787-4086. irondequoitartclub.org. Woman’s Club Of Rochester Annual Fashion Show. April 23, 11:30 a.m. Midvale Country Club, 2387 Baird Rd. $25, register. 585-586-7100. womansclubofrochester@gmail. com. womansclubofrochester.org.

Sports [ FRI., APRIL 19 ] Rochester Americans v. Toronto Marlies. April 19, 7:05 p.m. Blue Cross Arena, One War Memorial Square $15-$20. 800-7453000. ticketmaster.com. continues on page 30 rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 29


THEATER | “AVENUE Q” SCHOOL EDITION

The Internet is for…socializing? The Bad Idea Bears have cut back on drinking? And what happened to my girlfriend who lives in Canada? This isn’t the foul-mouthed “Avenue Q” that you know, love, and can’t sing in most public places. Rather, this is “Avenue Q” School Edition, a family-friendly (or at least, friendlier) version of the Tony-winning, dirty-minded puppet musical. This PG-13-style reimagining of “Avenue Q” cuts back on the swearing, the drinking, the drug use, the porn watching, and the puppet screwing, and somehow has enough story left for a production that still packs in lots of laughs and harsh truths about the post-grad life. This amended “Avenue Q” plays in the Ensemble Theatre of the School of the Arts (45 Prince St.) from Friday, April 19, through April 28, with matinee and evening performances. Tickets are $9 for adults, $7 for seniors, and $5 for children ages 2 through 6. Tickets can be ordered through rcsdk12.org/ sota, where you can also see the full performance schedule. — BY JASON SILVERSTEIN

Sports [ SAT., APRIL 20 ] 2013 Niagara Disctrict Junior Olympic Boxing Tournament. April 20-21. U-Prep Charter School, 189 Raines Park. Sat 1:30 p.m., Sun 10 a.m 752-2621. Rochester Americans v. Hamilton Bulldogs. April 20, 7:05 p.m. Blue Cross Arena, One War Memorial Square $15-$20. 800745-3000. ticketmaster.com. [ SUN., APRIL 21 ] Roc CityThunder Home Game. April 21, 3 p.m. Rochester Institute of Technology, 1 Lomb Memorial Dr. Gordon Field House $8-$11. 475-4121. rittickets. com.

Theater “33 Variations.” Blackfriars Theatre, 795 E. Main St Through Apr 27. Thu 7:30 p.m., Fri-Sat 8 p.m. Sun 2 p.m $27. 454-1260. bftix.org. “Avenue Q: School Edition.” School of the Arts, 45 Prince St Through Apr 28. Fri 7 p.m., Sat 2 & 7 p.m., Sun 5 p.m. Rated PG 13 $5-$9. 324-3535. sotarochester.org. “”Duck Hunter Shoots Angel.” BUM Players. Through Apr 27. Fri-Sat 7:30 p.m $7-$15. 261-7381. Hourglass Playreading Serie: “Time Stands Still.” Blackfriars Theatre, 795 E. Main St Free, donations accepted. lists.rocus. org/listinfo/hourglass. Into the Woods. Lutheran Church of the Reformation, 111 North Chestnut St. Tickets are available online at Showtix4u.com, from cast members and at the door $10-$12. 866-967-8167. stageworksroc.org. 30 CITY APRIL 17-23, 2013

“Measure For Measure.” MuCCC, 142 Atlantic Ave RCP’s Shakespeare Players. Through Apr 27. Thu Apr 18Sat 8 p.m., Sun 1 p.m. $9-$19. 234-7840. muccc.org. “No Child.” Geva Theatre Center, 75 Woodbury Blvd. Wed Apr 17 7 p.m., Fri 7 p.m., Sat 8 p.m., Sun 3 p.m Tickets start at $27. 232-4382. gevatheatre. org. “Over the River and Through the Woods.” The Geneva Theatre Guild. Pat Collins Black Box Theater in the Geneva Community Center, 160 Carter Rd., Geneva. Through Apr 21. Fri-Sat 7:30 p.m., Sun 2 p.m gtglive.org. Readers Theater: The Grapes of Wrath. Genesee Community College, 31 Clara Barton St. Staged Reading 585-2436785. livingstonarts.org. Rochester Fringe Play Reading Series: “Time Stands Still.” Blackfriars Theatre, 795 E. Main St 454-1260. bftix.org. Stageworks presents “Into the Woods.” The Evangelical Lutheran Church of the Reformation, 111 N Chestnut St. $10-$12. 454-3367. StageworksRoc.org. “The Threepenny Opera.” Nazareth College Arts Center, 4245 East Ave Through Apr 21. Fri-Sat 8 p.m., Sun 2 p.m $15-$17. 389-2170. artscenter. naz.edu. The Vagina Monologues. April 21, 7:30 p.m. at Ingle Auditorium at RIT $10-$20. vdayrochester@ gmail.com. “Vincent” By Leonard Nimoy. Black Sheep Theatre, 274 N Goodman St., third floor, Studio D313 Through Apr 27. Fri-Sat 7:30 p.m., Sun Apr 21 2 p.m. $16-$20, RSVP

recommended. 861-4816. blacksheeptheatre.org. “The Whipping Man.” Geva Theatre Center, 75 Woodbury Blvd. Through Apr 28. Wed Apr 17 7:30 p.m. Thu 7:30 p.m. Fri 8 p.m., Sat 4 & 8:30 p.m., Sun 2 p.m.(audio-described performance) & 7 p.m., Tue-Wed Apr 24 7:30 p.m. Tickets start at $25. 232-4382. gevatheatre.org. “Wicked.” Rochester Auditorium Theatre, 885 E. Main St. Tue-Thu 7:30 p.m., Fri 8 p.m., Sat 2 & 8 p.m., Sun 1 & 6:30 p.m Tickets start at $37.50. 222-5000. mail@rbtl. org. rbtl.org.

Theater Audition Technical Director, Musical Director, Musicians Wanted. Through April 24. Working Class Theatre Company is looking for a Technical Director, a Musical Director, and Musicians for their upcoming Summer 2013 production of The Fantasticks 643-0836. workingclasstheatre.net. [ THU., APRIL 18 ] Seeking Musicians/Singers for “A New Day Starts Tonight.” Tuesdays,. Second Time Around Players. Local theatre group is in need of men and woman (preferably 40-60) who sing and are accomplished at playing either a guitar, flute, mandolin or fiddle for an original musical title, “A New Day Starts Tonight.” The show is scheduled to be performed in early 2014 at GEVA’s Fielding NextStage. Good stage presence is a must as well. Please e-mail a brief explanation of singing and playing experience and your contact info to Rehearsals start in April, 2013 tgenesee9@ gmail.com.

Workshops [ WED., APRIL 17 ] 3rd Wednesdays with Lento & Rochester Brainery! April 17, 6-9 p.m. Rochester Brainery, Village Gate, 274 N Goodman St. Enjoy an hour long class at Rochester Brainery followed by a 3-course meal at Lento. April’s theme is Pasta. $50. 730-7034. rochesterbrainery.com. Efficient Exercise and Efficient Eating: Ancestral Health in a Modern World. April 17, 7 p.m. Rochester Brainery, Village Gate, 274 N Goodman St. $15. 7307034. rochesterbrainery.com. Family Development Class: “Raising Your Spirited Child.” April 17, 6-8 p.m. Mental Health Association, 320 N Goodman St. Free, RSVP. 325-3145 x131. mharochester.org. [ THU., APRIL 18 ] Advanced Web Development. April 18, 6:30 p.m. Rochester Brainery, Village Gate, 274 N Goodman St. $20. 730-7034. rochesterbrainery.com. Citizen Preparedness Program. April 18, 10 a.m. Regional Center For Independent Living, 497 State St. 442-6470. tgarrison@ rcil.org. [ FRI., APRIL 19 ] Creative Spirits. April 19, 6 p.m. Best Foot Forward, 100 Cobblestone Court Dr. No experience necessary $30 per session. 398-0220. Vanessa@


BestFootForwardKids.com. BestFootForwardKids.com. Introduction to Screen Printing for Fun and Profit. April 19, 7 p.m. Rochester Brainery, Village Gate, 274 N Goodman St. $22. 7307034. rochesterbrainery.com. [ SAT., APRIL 20 ] Artisan Cheese Making 101 with Antonio Toscano. April 20, 12-3 p.m. The Culinary Center at Vella, 237 Pittsford-Palmyra Rd $90, register. 421-9362. vellaculinarycenter.com. A Beginner’s Guide to the Writing Life. April 20, 3 p.m. Rochester Brainery, Village Gate, 274 N Goodman St. $16. 730-7034. rochesterbrainery.com. Borosilicate Glass: Couples Date Night. April 20, 7-11 p.m. Roc Arc & Flame Center, 125 Fedex Way $150, register. 349-7110. rocafc.com. Campaign Craft: An Insiders Guide to Outsider Political Campaigns. April 20, 9 a.m. Rochester Brainery, Village Gate, 274 N Goodman St. $30. 7307034. rochesterbrainery.com. [ SUN., APRIL 21 ] Vocal Techniques & Exercises. April 21, 2 p.m. Rochester Brainery, Village Gate, 274 N Goodman St. $15. 730-7034. rochesterbrainery.com. [ MON., APRIL 22 ] Healthy Cooking Series: Whole Grains and Seeds. April 22, noon. Penfield Community Center, 1985 Baird Rd. $20, register. 340-8655, option 6. penfieldrec.org. The History Of Rochester’s Transportation In First Half Of The 20th Century. April 22, 7 p.m. Rochester Brainery, Village Gate, 274 N Goodman St. A class in two parts: The Interurban Era and The Rochester Subway. The Interurban Era. A $15. 7307034. rochesterbrainery.com. John’s Tex-Mex Eatery with John and Jeana Roth. April 22, 6-8:30 p.m. The Culinary Center at Vella, 237 Pittsford-Palmyra Rd $70, register. 421-9362. vellaculinarycenter.com. [ TUE., APRIL 23 ] African World History Class. 7:309 p.m. Baobab Cultural Center, 728 University Ave. $5 donation requested per session. baobab. center@yahoo.com. thebaobab. org. Mushrooms 101. April 23, 6 p.m. Smugtown Mushrooms, 127 Railroad St. Donations accepted. facebook.com/ smugtownmushrooms.

AJI ZONING & LAND USE ADVISORY 50 Public Market | 208-2336 AWAKEN: Qi gong, yoga, tai chi, fine art 8 Public Market | 261-5659 BOULDER COFFEE CO. 1 Public Market | 232-5282 CARLSON METRO CENTER YMCA 444 East Main Street | 325-2880 CITY NEWSPAPER 250 N. Goodman St | 244-3329 THE CITY OF ROCHESTER Market Office | 428-6907

HARMAN FLOORING CO. 29 Hebard Street | 546-1221

MARKET DISTRICT

B U S I N E S S A S S O C I AT I O N

JUAN & MARIA’S EMPANADA STOP www.juanandmarias.com | 325-6650 “HOME OF THE HIGHLY ADDICTIVE SPANISH FOODS”

FOOD SERVICE DISTRIBUTOR

DEEP DISCOUNT STORAGE 265 Hayward Avenue | 325-5000

WHAT YOU NEED IS JUST A PHONE CALL AWAY

FRIENDS OF THE PUBLIC MARKET marketfriends@rochester.rr.com | 325-5058

THE GOURMET WAFFLER Catering 461-0633

20-22 Public Market | 423-0994

1115 E. Main Street | 469-8217 Open Studios First Friday Every Month CAFE 50 Public Market | 325-5280 Purveyors of Fine Coffee and Tea OBJECTMAKER 153 Railroad Street | 244-4933

97 Railroad Street | 546-8020 Tours • Tastings • Private Parties www.rohrbachs.com TIM WILKES PHOTOGRAPHY 9 Public Market | 423-1966

[ WED., APRIL 24 ] Grant Writing For For-Profits. April 24, 7 p.m. Rochester Brainery, Village Gate, 274 N Goodman St. $15. 730-7034. rochesterbrainery.com. Worm Composting and Lasagna Gardening. April 24, 6-8 p.m. Cornell Cooperative Extension of Genesee County, 420 East Main St $10, register. 3433040 x101. genesee.shutterfly. com/gardening.

GETLISTED get your event listed for free e-mail it to calendar@rochestercitynews.com. Or go online to rochestercitynewspaper.com and submit it yourself!

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 31


Movies Theaters Searchable, up-to-the-minute movie times for all area theaters can be found at rochestercitynewspaper.com, and on City’s mobile website.

Film

Brockport Strand 93 Main St, Brockport, 637-3310, rochestertheatermanagement.com

Canandaigua Theatres 3181 Townline Road, Canandaigua, 396-0110, rochestertheatermanagement.com

Cinema Theater 957 S. Clinton St., 271-1785, cinemarochester.com

Culver Ridge 16 2255 Ridge Rd E, Irondequoit  544-1140, regmovies.com

Dryden Theatre 900 East Ave., 271-3361, dryden.eastmanhouse.org

Eastview 13 Eastview Mall, Victor 425-0420, regmovies.com

Geneseo Theatres Geneseo Square Mall, 243-2691, rochestertheatermanagement.com

Greece Ridge 12 176 Greece Ridge Center Drive 225-5810, regmovies.com

Henrietta 18 525 Marketplace Drive 424-3090, regmovies.com

The Little 240 East Ave., 258-0444 thelittle.org

Movies 10 2609 W. Henrietta Road 292-0303, cinemark.com

Pittsford Cinema 3349 Monroe Ave., 383-1310 pittsford.zurichcinemas.com

Tinseltown USA/IMAX 2291 Buffalo Road 247-2180, cinemark.com

Webster 12 2190 Empire Blvd., 888-262-4386, amctheatres.com

Vintage Drive In 1520 W Henrietta Rd., Avon 226-9290, vintagedrivein.com

Film Previews on page 35

32 CITY APRIL 17-23, 2013

Breaking the color barrier on and off the field [ REVIEW ] BY GEORGE GRELLA

“42” (PG-13), WRITTEN AND DIRECTED BY BRIAN HELGELAND NOW PLAYING

No doubt consciously timed for the opening of the baseball season, the new movie “42” provides a valuable lesson in contemporary American history, showing viewers the culture of baseball and of the nation not all that long ago. As everyone must know, the picture deals with some of Jackie Robinson’s struggles as the first black man to play in the Major Leagues. His remarkable achievement in the face of extraordinary challenges

remains one of the greatest baseball stories of them all, a fine subject for film and one apparently too little known today. A four-sport athlete at UCLA, a lieutenant in the United States Army during World War II who was court-martialed for refusing to take a back seat in a military bus, Robinson was playing for the Kansas City Monarchs in the Negro League when Branch Rickey, the legendary baseball executive, offered him the chance to join the Brooklyn Dodgers. Rickey chose him over other prospects not only for his athletic abilities, but for qualities of character that he knew would be required — patience, tenacity, and above all, courage. Rickey told Robinson that he wanted him to have the guts not to fight back, to endure the inevitable bad calls, cheap shots, insults, brush-back pitches, and spikings without complaining or striking back. The picture concentrates mostly on Robinson’s first year in the National League, showing some glimpses of the verbal and physical abuse he suffered

Chadwick Boseman as Jackie Robinson in “42.” PHOTO COURTESY LEGENDARY PICTURES

and some of the anguish it caused him. Some teammates drew up a petition stating that they wouldn’t play with him, some opposing teams proposed a boycott, and thousands of haters sent obscene letters and death threats. Throughout the season Robinson (Chadwick Boseman), in the face of unimaginable pressure, keeps his promise to Rickey, accepting without retaliating all the hatred heaped on him. As important as Robinson’s heroic struggle, the picture also shows the plight of African Americans, especially in the South, a couple of generations ago, the Jim Crow laws, the separate drinking fountains, the whites-only signs for rest rooms, hotels, restaurants, even ball-park seating — all the daily humiliations inflicted for the simple fact of being black in America. Robinson and his supportive wife, Rachel (Nicole Beharie), raised in California, encountering the situation for the first time, educate the audience in the burdens of race, a disconcerting lesson in American history. Despite all that he suffered, Robinson played outstanding baseball, helping the Dodgers win a pennant in 1947, leading the league in stolen bases, and winning Rookie of the Year. After that season, his competitive fire inspired the whole Dodger team for a decade, leading them to five National League pennants and a World Series victory in 1955. He was elected to the Hall of Fame, breaking another historic barrier and leading the way for all the black stars after him.


Never-ending stories [ REVIEW ] BY ADAM LUBITOW

“The Place Beyond the Pines” (R), DIRECTED BY DEREK CIANFRANCE NOW PLAYING

“Room 237” DIRECTED BY RODNEY ASCHER SCREENS THURSDAY AND SUNDAY AT THE DRYDEN

The director sticks closely to the facts of Robinson’s early career, relying on the historic record of games and events, using a cast of relatively unknown actors, including Boseman, who resemble the people they impersonate and who actually look like athletes. In voice and appearance, for example, John C. McGinley provides an uncanny imitation of the legendary broadcaster Red Barber. Beyond Robinson’s heroism, he also shows the nobility of Pee Wee Reese (Lucas Black), the Kentucky native who became Jackie’s best friend and supporter on the Dodgers, something of a hero in his own right. Amazingly, the picture really belongs to Harrison Ford as the brave, brilliant, innovative Branch Rickey. Sanctimonious, sententious, comically folksy, and absolutely charismatic, Ford looks and sounds exactly like the man the sportswriters dubbed “The Mahatma.” The script provides Ford with all the best lines and he makes the most of them in what may be the best performance of his career. Aside from its depiction of the history of the game and the country, “42” recalls something of the way the teams performed decades ago, the aggressive style of Jackie Robinson and the whole National League. The game boasted no multimillionaires, no preening superstars, no fancy uniforms or batting helmets or Astroturf, just baseball, played in a lost era on the green grass of Ebbets Field in the bright clear sunshine of Brooklyn.

As the showing I attended of “The Place Beyond the Pines” — director Derek Cianfrance’s moody, ambitious, new crime-drama — came to an end, I couldn’t help overhearing the conversation happening amongst the college-age group sitting behind me. One was explaining to his friends that while the film wasn’t what he expecting, he thought it was “really good.” He went on to say that he was still processing the film, trying to piece together what exactly it was trying to say. “Yeah,” one of his friends chimed in, “it probably has a really deep meaning.” I don’t think I could come up with a better explanation for this flawed, but fascinating, film if I tried. Cianfrance takes a novelistic approach to his small-scale epic about fathers and

Ryan Gosling in “The Place Beyond the Pines.” PHOTO COURTESY FOCUS FEATURES

sons, the choices they make, and the legacies they leave behind. Told in triptych, the film is split into three connected storylines. In the first, Ryan Gosling plays Luke Glanton, a talented motorcyclist making a meager living working in a stunt show for a traveling fair. After one of his shows, he’s approached by Romina (a slightly frumped up Eva Mendes, giving a natural, understated performance), a diner waitress with whom he had a fling the last time the fair passed through town. It turns out she had a son as a result, who she never told Luke about. Instead of turning tail and running away, he makes the decision to quit the fair and stick around. He wants to take responsibility and provide for his family the way his own father never did. Unfortunately, he decides that the best way to do that quickly and easily is to start robbing banks. At a crucial moment, he crosses paths with Avery Cross (Bradley Cooper), a young, too-smart-for-his-own-good cop who gets injured in the line of duty. We then follow Avery’s story, as he’s raised up as a hero as a result of his efforts. His father, a district attorney, encourages Avery to capitalize on the notoriety and transition to a career in politics. Avery soon learns that his decisions open a number of windows of opportunity, while slamming shut several others. The final, most interesting, but also most flawed section of the film jumps in time 15 years to find the two men’s sons (played by Dan DeHaan of “Chronicle” and Emory Cohen of TV’s “Smash”), now teenagers, as they’re beginning to make choices of their own, setting down the paths that will come to define them as they grow into adulthood. Cianfrance’s previous film was “Blue Valentine,” an intimate drama observing the slow implosion of the relationship between a married couple, played by Ryan Gosling and Michelle Williams, and the director has a gift for getting rich, textured performances from his actors. Here he’s

telling a much bigger story, admirable in its ambition and scope. Gosling gives another great performance as the stoic, brooding type that he’s so good at playing, and his segment is the strongest of the film. The characterization is so sharply drawn and richly detailed that it’s a little disappointing that the story loses some of its focus as it moves forward. It balances this out, however, by becoming increasingly thrilling as its ambition becomes more apparent. “The Place Beyond the Pines” has a scruffy sort of beauty to it, and while it ultimately offers no thesis to the story it weaves, I was OK with that. Perhaps the highest praise I can give the film is to say that the point at which the movie ends could easily mark the beginning to another that I’d gladly buy a ticket to see. Rodney Ascher’s documentary, “Room 237,” playing at the Dryden this week, presents some very unusual interpretations of Stanley Kubrick’s classic adaptation of “The Shining.” Through voiceover, we hear from a number of people offering their explanations for what the director was really saying with his horror masterpiece. Using “clues” found in the film, they see everything from a commentary on the genocide of the American-Indians to an admission of Kubrick’s role in the faking of the Apollo 11 moon landing. Kubrick’s notoriously meticulous, detail-oriented method of directing lends itself well to this sort of interpretation. The many theories are fascinating, often through their sheer insanity, and Ascher’s carefully selected supplemental film clips keep things moving. But clocking in at 98 minutes, “Room 237” is far too long. There’s a lot interesting material, but at a certain point it seemed like overkill, and my eyes began to glaze over. Up until then, the film offers an intriguing illustration of the way in which some works of art take root in our minds, and take on a life of their own.

ROOM 237

Thursday, Apr. 18, 8 p.m.; Sunday, Apr. 21, 2 p.m. Rodney Ascher takes on the theories surrounding The Shining—Stanley Kubrick’s adaptation of the bestselling thriller by Stephen King—in Room 237, which explores the divergent readings of a group of devout fans and film scholars in the manner of a suspense thriller. A darkly funny deconstruction of Kubrick’s masterpiece and our desire for fixed meanings. (Rodney Ascher, US 2012, 102 min., Blu-ray)

2001: A SPACE ODYSSEY Movies for movie lovers, 6 nights a week.

Friday, Apr. 19, 8 p.m. Deemed “the ultimate science fiction movie” by George Lucas, Kubrick’s blockbuster 2001 contains some of the most enduring images, characters, and dialogue in all of cinema. A near-perfect intersection of stunning cinematography, epic storytelling, and cultural relevance, this landmark film will be presented in its original widescreen format. (Stanley Kubrick, US/UK 1968, 142 min.)

Film Info: 271-4090 l 900 East Avenue l Eastman House Café—Stop in for a light dinner or dessert before the film. l Wi-Fi Hotspot l Sponsored by rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 33


High Falls Film Festival continues from page 13

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The first feature from writer/director Jenny Deller is a sensitively drawn coming-of-age story about 13-yearold tomboy Lauduree (Perla Haney-Jardine, demonstrating a talent beyond her years), a budding scientist with an obsession for climate change and conservation. When her flaky mother abandons her to run off and pursue her dream of becoming a make-up artist in California, Lauduree is left in the care of her pragmatic, no-nonsense grandmother (Amy Madigan). This amiable indie film balances a blatant green message with a sweet-natured story, but it’s the performances — including Lili Taylor as Lauduree’s compassionate science teacher — that stand out the most. (Screens Saturday, April 20, Little 1, 3:15 p.m.)

“How We Got Away With It” A group of 30-something friends gather together for their annual lakeside summer vacation, but when an unexpected tragedy occurs, some of them are forced to cover up a deadly secret. I really wanted to like this locally filmed thriller, and it does feature some fine performances and confident direction from first-time helmer Jon Lindstrom. It’s also undeniably fun to note the Rochester landmarks that pop up throughout. The problem is that the script too often asks the audience to ignore any concept of how rational people would behave. The characters constantly seem to make the least logical decisions possible. I grew frustrated with the script’s reluctance to divulge crucial information, so that by the time it gets around to revealing the (by that point obvious) answers, it was difficult to work up the energy to care. (Screens Saturday, April 20, Dryden, 3:30 p.m.)

“The Day I Saw Your Heart” In the Strath allan in the heart of the Neighborhood of the Arts

Celebrate the High Falls Film Festival with a superb dinner, dessert or your favorite cocktail in the lounge. Breakfast | Lunch | Dinner | Private Parties | Sunday Brunch 11-3

550 East Avenue | Rochester | charsteakandlounge.com FOR RESERVATIONS 241.7100 34 CITY APRIL 17-23, 2013

Justine (Mélanie Laurent, “Inglourious Basterds”) works as a radiology technician at the local hospital, but prefers clandestinely using the x-ray machines for her personal art projects. She’s always been content to drift through life, and has never been able to maintain a romantic relationship. All of her problems, however, seem to stem from her strained relationship

with her overly critical, self-involved father, Eli. If she has any hope of finding happiness, it appears she’ll have to start by mending their broken relationship. Blending elements of romantic comedy with dysfunctional family drama, this lively, colorful film is occasionally too quirky for its own good, but it is always entertaining. Director Jennifer Devoldère deftly handles the transition from broad comedic material to the more dramatic moments that come later, and Laurent continues to prove that she deserves to be a huge star. (In French with English subtitles; screens Saturday, April 20, Dryden 6:30 p.m.)

“A Lot Like You” Filmmaker Eliaichi Kimaro’s intensely personal documentary grew from a desire to explore her roots. Born to a Tanzanian father and Korean mother, but raised in America, Elaichi felt trapped between cultures, truly belonging to none. In an attempt to connect with and understand her heritage, she decided to travel with her parents to visit her father’s tribe in the Mt. Kilimanjaro region of Africa. She hoped to gather enough material to make a film out of her experiences. Her film didn’t turn out exactly that way she’d envisioned. When she arrives in Tanzania, she finds herself kept at a distance by her father’s family, until one day when she approaches her aunts to talk about their lives, and they open up to her in a way that they never had with anyone before. They speak of a culture’s subjugation of women, of female circumcision and forced marriages. Kimaro’s sudden connection to the women is deepened by her own background of abuse. A powerful and thought-provoking film exploration of identity and conflicts of culture, her film emerges as one of the highlights of this year’s festival. (Screens Saturday, April 20, Little 1, 9:30 p.m.)


Film Previews

Full film reviews available at rochestercitynewspaper.com. [ OPENING ] 2001: A SPACE ODYSSEY (1968): I’m sorry, Dave, but describing the plot of Stanley Kubrick’s sciencefiction masterpiece is something I just can’t do. Dryden (Fri, Apr 19, 8 p.m.) DEFIANT REQUIEM (NR): Documentary examining the Nazi concentration camp Terezin, where inmates used the arts to confront the horrors around them. Little (Tue, Apr 23, 7 p.m.) ESMERALDA (Ballet): This ballet based on Victor Hugo’s “The Hunchback of Notre Dame,” focuses on the novel’s gypsy character, Esmeralda. Little (Sun, Apr 21, 12 p.m.; Tue, Apr 23, 6:30 p.m.) HIGH FALLS FILM FESTIVAL: See cover story in this week’s issue for films and times. Little LE GRAND AMOUR (1969): Even after 15 years with his wife, a man finds himself fantasizing about all the other women he could have married, in Pierre Étaix’s comedy of midlife crisis. Dryden (Tue, Apr 23, 8 p.m.) MAURICE (1987): James Ivory’s adaptation of E.M. Foster’s novel, about a student at Cambridge who falls in love with a fellow classmate. Starring Hugh Grant, James Wilby, and Rupert Graves. Dryden (Wed, Apr 17, 8 p.m.) OBLIVION (PG-13): In a future where humanity has abandoned

Earth, one man sent to harvest its resources begins to question the true purpose of his mission. Starring Tom Cruise and Morgan Freeman. Brockport, Canandaigua, Geneseo, Greece Ridge, Eastview, Henrietta, Pittsford, Tinseltown, Vintage, Webster ROOM 237 (NR): This documentary explores various theories about the hidden meanings of Stanley Kubrick’s “The Shining.” Dryden (Thu, Apr 18, 8 p.m.; Sun, Apr 21, 2 p.m.) THE SAPPHIRES (PG-13): In 1968, a singing group made up of four young Australian Aboriginal girls gets their first gig, entertaining the American troops in Vietnam. Starring Chris O’Dowd. Pittsford [ CONTINUING ] 42 (PG-13): See review on page 32. Brockport, Canandaigua, Geneseo, Greece Ridge, Eastview, Pittsford, Tinseltown, Webster ADMISSION (PG-13): Tina Fey and Paul Rudd star in this romantic dramedy, which means that even if the movie’s terrible, it will still be worth watching because hey, Tina Fey and Paul Rudd. Also starring Lily Tomlin, Wallace Shawn, and Michael Sheen. Canandaigua, Pittsford THE CALL (R): Halle Berry plays a 911 operator who must use her wits to help an abducted girl escape the clutches of a violent serial killer from her past. Also starring Abigail Breslin. Canandaigua, Greece Ridge, Tinseltown

THE CROODS (PG): A prehistoric family sets off on an epic journey to find a new home after their cave is destroyed in this animated family adventure film from Chris Sanders (“How to Train your Dragon”). Featuring the voice talents of Nicolas Cage, Emma Stone, Ryan Reynolds, Catherine Keener, and Cloris Leachman. Canandaigua, Geneseo, Greece Ridge, Eastview, Pittsford, Tinseltown, Vintage, Webster DARK SKIES (PG-13): An escalating series of disturbing events seems to hint that a malevolent force has targeted a suburban family. Starring Keri Russell and J.K. Simmons. Movies 10 DJANGO UNCHAINED (R): Quentin Tarantino’s latest exploitation extravaganza, this time starring Jamie Foxx as a former slave out to rescue his wife from the clutches of an evil plantation owner. Also starring Leonardo DiCaprio, Christoph Waltz, and Samuel L. Jackson. Vintage EVIL DEAD (R): Sam Raimi produced this remake of his 1981 classic horror film, about five friends who stumble across a Book of the Dead while vacationing in a cabin in the woods. Hijinks ensue. Brockport, Canandaigua, Geneseo, Greece Ridge, Eastview, Tinseltown, Webster G.I. JOE: RETALIATION (PG-13): In this sequel based on the film inspired by a line toys, the G.I. Joes once again battle the evil

forces of the Cobra empire. Starring Dwayne Johnson, Channing Tatum, Adrianne Palicki, and Bruce Willis. Canandaigua, Geneseo, Greece Ridge, Eastview, Tinseltown, Webster GINGER & ROSA (PG-13): Two teenage girls find their friendship tested as they make their way through the tumultuous era of 1960’s London. Starring Elle Fanning, Alice Englert, Christina Hendricks, Oliver Platt, Timothy Spall, and Annette Bening. Little THE HOST (PG-13): Based on the Stephanie Meyer novel, where instead of vampires and werewolves, this time the love story involves alien invaders bent on enslaving the human race. Directed by Andrew Niccol and starring Saoirse Ronan, William Hurt, and Diane Kruger. Greece Ridge, Eastview, Tinseltown IDENTITY THIEF (R): Hijinks ensue as Jason Bateman and Melissa McCarthy explore the lighter side of identity fraud in this comedy about a mild-mannered businessman who tracks down the con artist who’s been stealing from him. Also starring Jon Favreau, John Cho, and Amanda Peet. Tinseltown, Vintage NO (R): Part historical drama, part satire, this Oscar-nominated film follows the unusual political campaign to defeat Chilean dictator Augusto Pinochet. Starring Gael García Bernal. Little OLYMPUS HAS FALLEN (R): Terrorists overtake the a White

House in this action thriller starring Gerard Butler, Aaron Eckhart, Morgan Freeman, Angela Bassett, Ashley Judd, and Melissa Leo. Canandaigua, Greece Ridge, Eastview, Tinseltown ON THE ROAD (R): Jack Kerouac’s seminal novel of the Beat Generation finally gets a big-screen adaptation. Starring Sam Riley, Garrett Hedlund, Kristen Stewart, Amy Adams, Kirsten Dunst, and Viggo Mortensen. Little OZ THE GREAT & POWERFUL (PG):Director Sam Raimi presents the previously untold story of the origins of the Wizard of Oz. Starring James Franco, Mila Kunis, Michelle Williams, and Rachel Weisz. Canandaigua, Greece Ridge, Eastview, Tinseltown, Vintage, Webster THE PLACE BEYOND THE PINES (R): See review on page 33. Eastview, Little, Pittsford, Tinseltown, Webster QUARTET (PG-13): Dustin Hoffman directs this comedy with a cast stacked with veteran British actors (Maggie Smith, Michael Gambon, Billy Connolly) about a home for retired opera singers thrown into upheaval after the arrival of a diva. Pittsford SCARY MOVIE 5 (R): The latest in the long-running series of film spoofs parodies everything from “Paranormal Activity” to “Black Swan,” with a cast that includes Charlie Sheen, Lindsay Lohan, Heather Locklear, Snoop Dogg, and Mike Tyson. Brockport,

Canandaigua, Geneseo, Greece Ridge, Eastview, Tinseltown, Vintage, Webster SIDE EFFECTS (R): Steven Soderbergh’s latest (and possibly final) film, about a young couple whose lives are torn apart when one of them is put on a new anti-anxiety drug that has some deadly side effects. Starring Rooney Mara, Jude Law, Catherine Zeta-Jones, and Channing Tatum. Tinseltown SILVER LININGS PLAYBOOK (R): Lovably unstable mental patients Bradley Cooper and Jennifer Lawrence fall for one another and learn to ballroom dance in this likely Oscar contender from David O. Russell. With Robert De Niro and Jacki Weaver. Tinseltown TRANCE (R): Danny Boyle’s mind-bending heist film stars James McAvoy as an art auctioneer turned thief and Rosario Dawson as the hypnotherapist hired to determine where he hid the loot after he loses his memory. Also starring Vincent Cassel. Little, Pittsford TYLER PERRY’S TEMPTATION (PG-13): A marriage counselor, unhappy in her own marital situation, faces unforeseen consequences when she begins an affair with one of her clients. Starring Jurnee Smollett-Bell (“Friday Night Lights”), Vanessa L. Williams, Brandy Norwood, and ahem, Kim Kardashian. Greece Ridge, Tinseltown

For information: Call us (585) 244-3329 Fax us (585) 244-1126 Mail Us City Classifieds 250 N. Goodman Street Rochester, NY 14607 Email Us classifieds@ rochester-citynews.com EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY

All real estate advertised in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act, which makes it unlawful, “to make, print, or publish, any notice, statement, or advertisement, with respect to the sale or rental of a dwelling that indicates any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin.” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under the age of 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertisement for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. Call the local Fair Housing Enforcement Project, FHEP at 325-2500 or 1-866-671-FAIR. Si usted sospecha una practica de vivienda injusta, por favor llame al servicio legal gratis. 585-325-2500 - TTY 585-325-2547.

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 35


Adoption

> page 35 Estate or State Income Taxes, minutes to Atlantic Ocean.  772581-0080, www.beach-cove.com. Limited seasonal rentals

ADOPT - Happily married couple wishes to adopt a baby! We promise love, learning, laughter, security, extended family. Expenses paid. www.DonaldAndEsther.com. 1-800-965-5617. (Se habla español.)

Home Services MASTER CHIMNEY & MASONRY See our ad under Home and Garden Professionals. Chimney Cleaning, Masonry Repairs, Foundation Repairs, Roof Leaks, Brick Steps Repaired. 585-734-8444

ADOPT: A happily married couple promises cozy home, secure future, extended family, unconditional love for baby of any race. Expenses paid. Leslie/ Daniel TOLLFREE 1-855-767-2444. danielandleslieadopt@gmail.com

ADOPT: A loving married couple wishes to adopt newborn to support wholeheartedly, educate fully, discipline fairly, engage completely and love unconditionally! Natalie/ David: 1-855-759-2229. www. davidandnatalie.info. ADOPT: A childless couple seeks to adopt. Loving home with tenderness, warmth, hapiness. Financial security. Expenses paid. Regis & David (888)986-1520 or text (347)406-1924; www. davidandregisadopt.com

Automotive AAAA AUTO RECYCLING of your cars, vans and trucks. Up to $500. Free towing. Any condition. Up to $5,000 for newer cars. www.cash4carsrochester.com 585-482-2140 ALWAYS BETTER Higher cash for your Junk Cars, Trucks and Vans. From $200-$800 or more for newer. Running or not. With free towing. Also free removal of any unwanted model in any condition. Call 585-305-5865

CASH 4 CARS TRUCKS AND VANS. Up to $800 running or not, more for newer models. We’ll be there in 30 minutes. 585-482-9988

Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call 888-201-8657www. CenturaOnline.com

CASH FOR CARS Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888-420-3808 www. cash4car.com (AAN CAN)

For Sale

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BOOK ENDS of race horses with jockey’s carved in wood, gift. $20 585-880-2903 DINING ROOM TABLE Antique 1929 Dark Wood. Need work! Asking $200 or best offer Call 585-773-1255

continues on page 38

Home and Garden Professionals

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Basement Renovations Bathrooms Kitchens Additions Windows Siding Decks Fireplaces Painting 585-313-1940 brian54@rochester.rr.com Brian Donovan

36 CITY APRIL 17-23, 2013

Innovative Panelized Systems

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-since 1983-

Where Art and Fine Gardening Meet • Maintenance • Pruning • Design

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HomeWork Find your way home with

A cooperative effort of City Newspaper and RochesterCityLiving, a program of the Landmark Society.

238 English Rd, Greece, $74,900. 4 Bedroom 2 FULL BATH ranch bigger than it seems - A MUST SEE @ this PRICE! Kitchen with appliances Opens to a large family room with a wood burning stove. Call Ryan @ 201-0724 for Info.

Ryan Smith 585-201-0724

Ryan Smith

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Tamara Bald real estate coach • tamaralynnbald@gmail.com 585-857-1616-Cell • 706 East Ave - Rochester, NY 14607

Penthouse Living on the Avenue 901 East Avenue, #D An opportunity so rare: virtual carefree living in a beautifully restored Tudor Revival style estate on East Avenue, directly across from the iconic George Eastman House. This sophisticated condo features all the original craftsmanship of a bygone era, meticulously updated for today’s urban dweller. The estate is steeped in history. The home was built in 1891 for banker and real estate speculator, Henry C. Brewster, and designed by James G. Cutler, a regional architect who became, almost by accident, most famous for his design of the Cutler Mail Chute. At nearly 6,000 grand square feet, the home was sensitively divided a handful of years ago into four condominiums. The penthouse condo comes in at just under 2,000 handsome square feet. The shared grand entrance and stair hall, at once intimate and grand, with beamed ceilings and paneled walls, leads to the private entrance of your very own East Avenue penthouse. The space is ideal for the owner who enjoys entertaining. The main room features an open living and dining area, with ceilings that soar nearly twelve feet in height. On one end is a gracious sitting area with decorative fireplace and overhead transom windows, allowing in the morning sun. Opposite the sitting area is an open and bright dining space, with ample room for a large dining table, side table and chairs. Adjacent to this is a gourmet kitchen, complete with breakfast bar, chef-inspired stainless steel appliances and ample counter space. The kitchen is

roomy enough for an additional breakfast table or prep-island! On both ends of the main room are the sleeping areas. Facing east is the master suite, with in-unit washer and dryer and a closet that will ensure one will never feel the need to curtail online shopping. Tucked off the large bedroom is the opulent bath, featuring a soaking tub, shower and bidet! On the west end of the home is the guest suite, additional storage, office nook, second bathroom and a warm sitting area. Owners of condos often struggle with lack of storage. 901 East Avenue breaks any assumption. With ample storage in-unit, the owner also has access to storage on the basement level of the home. The unit features a private parking garage and additional guest spot. Built for style and elegance, this gracefully updated gem is within walking distance to Park and East Avenue amenities and affords an elegant experience living in the heart of East Avenue’s Cultural District. Christopher Carretta with Hunt Real Estate ERA/Columbus is representing the home, currently priced at $289,900. To see more photos visit rochestercityliving.com/ property/R182326. by Jason Roberts Jason is The Landmark Society House & Garden Tour Chairperson and the majordomo of The Good Home Steward, now found at facebook.com/GoodHomeSteward.

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 37


I’m very pleased with the calls I got from our apartment rental ads, and will continue running them. Your readers respond — positively!” - M. Smith, Residential Management > page 36 DOG & CAT HOUSES Kennels, porch steps, do it yourself kits. Quick assembly 585-752-1000 $49 Jim

FOR SALE Lady’s Used Haband Pants Collection, $49 cash. 12 pairs: 8 rainbow colors size 16A stretch polyester, 2 dungarees, 2 size 18A corduroy. Phone (585) 413-0827.

GARDEN, HORSE PINWHEELS (2) stick in ground. $12 bold, also Daisy Pinwheel $3 585880-2903 585-544-4155

Garage and Yard Sales

HORSE HALTER / Black & white New $15. Quick clip 585-8802903

BROWNCROFT: 200+ garage sales in a square mile! May 4-5 (some May 3) 9-5. I-590: west on Browncroft. Maps & lists: www.browncroftna.org

PAINT never opened. 2 Gallon Behr Premium Moonlit Yellow $15 each 585-225-5526 PERSIAN RUG Hand-made Qashqai Tribal Rug. (Southern Iran) 6 1/2’x9’1” condition excellent Ivory, Salmon, Navy Blue circa 1950 $3500.00 Call for appointment 585-586-0617 PRO TEC BAN SAW 9” model 3202 $40 58/5-225-5526 TV RCA Big 35” w/ remote $35 585-225-5526 VCR - EMERSON , Records no remote (but you can buy one). Nice. 585-880-2903 $25

T O A D V E RT I S E I N O U R

HOME & GARDEN PROFESSIONALS SECTION

C A L L C H R I S T I N E AT

244.3329 x23 OR EMAIL

CHRISTINE@ROCHESTER-CITYNEWS.COM S E E PA G E 3 6 O F T H I S W E E K ’ S I S S U E

WALKER FOR HANDICAPPED use. Next to New condition. Red. $50 585-383-0405

DOWNTOWN united presbyterian church Rental Space Now Available

Jam Section BLUES/ROCK BAND Needs bass player. Experienced musicians, we have all the pieces but you! Call Mike 424-4122 or 7381151. BRIAN MARVIN lead vocalist, is looking for a job and is looking to form band (Classic Rock) with lead guitarist, bassist, drummer & rhythm guitars Covers & originals 585-4735089 CALLING ALL MUSICIANS OF ALL GENRES the Rochester Music Coalition wants you! Please register on our website. For further info: www. rochestermusiccoalition.org info@rochestermusiccoalition. org 585-235-8412 EXP. DRUMMER Strong vocals to join (keyboard)/ (keyboard bass) who also sings lead. To form duo (Retro Pop/Dance/ Jazz). Must be willing to shop the musical product around to get gigs 585-426-7241

EXPERIENCED LEAD VOCALS Seeks employment. Pat experience Inkspots, Platters, Drifters, James Brown among many. Leroy Harris. Contact Bobby 585-328-4121 Specialties, classics, R&B Soul. I SAY New Wave peaked in 1977-81. Who wants to play Blondie, The Cars, The Ramones, Squeeze, Elvis Costello, U2 and much more? I play bass. Craig. mooskamovers@aol.com MEET OTHER MUSICIANS any instrument, male singer- jam together- coffee house, private gigs, I play keys Call Martin 585-266-6337 MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS (1955) Conn Trumpet (Coprion Bell) serial#517429 $800; (1960) Conn Trumpet (Director) $200; (1960) Wurlitzer Electric Piano model #200 serial #72828L $1500. All good condition 585-458-9722 R & B SOUL BANDS seek employment, experienced groups, already performing, seek new jobs. Contact Bobby 585-328-4121 THE GREGORY KUNDE CHORALE is looking for male voices. Call for an audition now to join our fourteenth season! Info Line 377 7568 or visit our website www. gregorykundechorale.org

Downtown Office Space Available Immediately for Rent to Not-For-Profit Organizations Call 585-325-4000 ext. 15 For additional information or to schedule an appointment to tour the building. We are proud to be located in the heart of Downtown Rochester.

K-D Moving & Storage Inc.

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Sunday Services 10:30 AM All Message Service & Free Spiritual Healing Third Weds ~ 7 PM ~ Séances ~ Classes ~ Gallery Reading ~ For more information and schedules www.plymouthspiritualistchurch.org Robin Higgins, Pastor ~ Phone: 585.271.1470

Music Services PIANO LESSIONS In your home or mine. Patient, experienced instructor teaching all ages, levels and musical styles. Call Scott: 585- 465-0219. Visit www.pianolessonsrochester.com

Lost and Found CAT FOUND March 14th Cobbs Hill area. Black with some white. No Collar. Friendly. Distinctive features. Call 4420617 to identify. LOST COMPOSITION BOOK REWARD FREE RENT TO RITE PERSON REWARD ANYWAY ron. east8888@gmail.com

Miscellaneous GET A FREE VACATION as well as IRS tax deduction BY DONATING your vehicle, boat, property, collectibles to DVAR. Help teens in crisis. Call: 1-800-338-6724 HAS YOU BUILDING SHIFTED OR SETTLED? Contact Woodford Brothers Inc, for straightening, leveling, foundation and wood frame repairs at 1-800-OLDBARN. www.woodfordbros. com. “Not applicable in Queens county” SAWMILLS from only $3997MAKE MONEY & SAVE MONEY with your own bandmil Cut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship. FREE Info & DVD www.NorwoodSawmills. com/300N 1-800-578-1363 Ext.300N

Mind Body Spirit DRUG & ALCOHOL Problems? TLC Outpatient Clinic. Individual & Group Therapy, Substance Abuse, Yoga, Art & more. 480-577-1172 for information. Private Insurance or Reasonable Self-Pay/ Personalized Treatment Plans. (AAN CAN)

Wanted to Buy

OFFICE SPACE FOR LEASE 55 CANTERBURY ROAD Two immaculate office suites for lease: 1,575 square feet consisting of 5 offices, large conference room, reception area. Ground floor with parking at the door. Fully handicap accessible. 671 square feet consisting of a reception area and large office. Ground floor with parking at the door. Move-in condition. Immediate availability. Call Doug Burkhardt, owner. Office 271-1720. Cell phone 820-3631. Or e-mail at DBurkhardt@FirstRealtyRochester.com and I will send you floor plans, photos, and descriptive information. 38 CITY APRIL 17-23, 2013

Experience in office & household moving and deliveries

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A DIABETIC NEEDS YOUR TEST STRIPS: Any Brand. Unexpired & Unopened. Will Beat Any Fair Price. FAST Payment! CASH Paid. Call Doug (877)710-5620 or (716)7084512 diabeticteststrips4cash@ gmail.com


Rent your apartment special third week is

FREE

Place your ad by calling 244-3329 ext. 23 or rochestercitynewspaper.com Ad Deadlines: Friday 4pm for Display Ads Monday at noon for Line ads

EMPLOYMENT / CAREER TRAINING

Employment AIRLINE CAREERS - begin here.Become an Aviation Maintenance Tech. FAA approved training. Financial aid if qualified – Housing available. Job placement assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 877-492-3059 AIRLINES ARE HIRING Train for hands on Aviation Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified- Job Placement Assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance (866)296-7093 HELP WANTED! make extra money in our free ever popular homemailer program,includes valuable guidebook! Start immediately! Genuine! 1-888292-1120 www.easyworkfromhome.com (AAN CAN) $$$HELP WANTED$$$ Extra Income! Assembling CD cases from Home! No Experience Necessary! Call our Live Operators Now! 1-800-405-7619 EXT 2450 http://www.easyworkgreatpay.com (AAN CAN) LIVE LIKE A POPSTAR Now hiring 10 spontaneous individuals. Travel full time. Must be 18+. Transportation and hotel provided. Call Loraine 877-777-2091 (AAN CAN) PAID IN ADVANCE! MAKE up to $1000 A WEEK mailing brochures

from home! Helping Home Workers since 2001! Genuine Opportunity! No Experience required. Start Immediately! www.thehomemailer. com (AAN CAN) RGIS PROVIEDS Regular part-time work (30 hours). Starting pay 9.00 + incentive pay. Promotion opportunities. Paid Training. Paid Travel & Per Diem. Transportation provided. Overnights (3 consecutive nights) Required. Generally leave on Monday return on Thursday. Group health plan after 90 days. Pre-employment Screening Required. Equal Opportunity Employer. No Experience Needed. Apply at www.rgis.com Keyword Rochester THE THINK AND GROW RICH of the 21st Century! Revolutionary breakthrough for success being released! For a FREE CD, please call 1-800-385-8470 (AAN CAN)

Volunteers A SECOND THOUGHT Resale Shop in East Rochester is accepting applications for volunteer sale associates and online researchers. Shop benefits people with disabilities in Guatemala. Call (585) 340-2000. ARE YOU 55+ & interested in learning about local volunteer opportunities? Call RSVP! Many opportunities available. Help meet critical needs. Regular information

sessions - call 287-6377 or email jpowers@lifespan-roch.org. BRIGHTEN A LIFE. Lifespan’s Senior Connection matches volunteers 55+ with older adults who could benefit from a weekly phone call or visit by a friend. Call Katie 287-6352 for info. CATHOLIC FAMILY CENTER seeks volunteers to: teach American Sign Language, do clerical work, and organize a teen soccer league. Contact Claudia at 262-7044 or cgill@ cfcrochester.org DYNAMIC VOLUNTEER opportunities at the Zoo await you. If you love the Zoo, donate your time today. To learn more, visit the volunteer page of the Seneca Park Zoo’s Web site at www.senecaparkzoo.org FOSTER PARENTS WANTED! Monroe County is looking for adults age 21 and over to consider opening their homes to foster children. Call 334-9096 or visit www.MonroeFosterCare.org. GIRLS ROCK ROCHESTER seeking musical and non-musical volunteers for rock ‘n’ roll summer camp staff. Applications now available at girlsrockrochester. com. Email girlsrockrochester@ gmail.com for more info.

with developmental disabilities, is looking for volunteers to serve as horse leaders and side walkers. Call Kim Kennedy at (585) 340-2016 or email kkennedy@ heritagechristianservices.org LIFESPAN’S OMBUDSMAN PROGRAMS looking for volunteers to advocate for individuals living in long-term care settings. Please contact call 585.287.6378 or e-mail dfrink@lifespan-roch.org for more information LITERACY VOLUNTEERS OF ROCHESTER needs adult tutors to help adults who are waiting to improve their reading, writing, English speaking, or math skills. Call 473-3030, or check our website at www.literacyrochester.org ROCHESTER CARES is looking for volunteers interested in joining us to make a difference in Rochester!! One time and recurring volunteer opportunities with a wide range of organizations. www. rochestercares.org/calendar.php SCHOOL #12 999 South Ave. is looking for reading & math

volunteers, English & Spanish. Training provided. Call Vicki 585-461-4282

Individuals, groups, and musicians are welcomed. Call 585-957-6155.

VOLUNTEERS ARE NEEDED tinyurl.com/rochester2013 for research study on organizational tolerance for heterosexism and workplace well-being in the metropolitan Buffalo, Rochester, and Syracuse, New York areas. You do not need to identify as lesbian, gay, or bisexual to participate. Survey takes approximately 15 minutes. You are eligible to be entered into a drawing to win a $10 gift card. For further information, contact Trevor Gates, College at Brockport, (585)204-7144, or email tgates@brockport.edu.

WOMEN: ROCHESTER HABITAT is looking for women 18 years+ to help build a house with a single mother. Visit rochabitat. org or call 546-1470

VOLUNTEERS NEEDED for the Men’s Emergency Winter Shelter at Dimitri House. Please call us at 325-1796 for more information or to volunteer your time. VOLUNTEERS NEEDED To assist with praise and worship. Living Waters Fellowship is a Christ centered nondenominational church in the early stages of development.

Business Opportunities START A HOME BASED BUSINESS. Part-time or FullTime. Serious inquires only. 585-271-3243

Career Training ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home. *Medical, *Business, *Criminal Justice, *Hospitality. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV authorized. Call 800-481-9472 www.CenturaOnline.com

HERITAGE CHRISTIAN STABLES, a therapeutic horsemanship program for children and adults

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 39


Legal Ads [ CITATION BY PUBLICATION ] THE STATE OF TEXAS TO: JAMES EDWARD VIGIL NOTICE TO THE DEFENDANT: “YOU HAVE BEEN SUED. YOU MAY EMPLOY AN ATTORNEY. IF YOU OR YOUR ATTORNEY DO NOT FILE A WRITTEN ANSWER WITH THE CLERK WHO ISSUED THIS CITATION BY 10:00 A.M. ON THE MONDAY NEXT FOLLOWING THE EXPIRATION OF TWENTY DAYS AFTER YOU WERE SERVED THIS CITATION AND PETITION, A DEFAULT JUDGMENT MAY BE TAKEN AGAINST YOU.” GREETINGS: YOU ARE HEREBY COMMANDED to appear and answer before the Honorable 340th District Court, San Angelo, Texas, at the Courthouse in Tom Green County, Texas, at or before 10:00 o’clock a.m. of the Monday next after the expiration of 20 days from the date of service of this citation, then and there to answer the ORIGINAL PETITION FOR CHANGE OF NAME OF CHILD filed in said Court September 10, 2012 against JAMES EDWARD VIGIL, Respondent and said suit being Cause Number C120618F on the docket of said court and entitled: In the Interest of XAVIER JAMES VIGIL The nature of which suit is a request to dissolve marriage by divorce and matter of conservatorship of minor child/children. The court has authority in this suit to enter any judgment or decree dissolving the marriage and providing for division of property for any matter in the interest of the child/ children including, but not limited to, the appointment of a conservator and order for child-support, all of which will be binding upon you.” Issued and given under my hand and seal of said Court at San Angelo, Texas on this the 20th day of March, 2013 Sheri Woodfin, District Clerk 340th District Court Tom Green County, Texas By:Natoschia Fry Deputy DISTRICT COURT OF TOM GREEN COUNTY, TEXAS [ LEGAL NOTICE ] Articles of organization of DUTCHMAN PROPERTIES, LLC filed with the Sec. of State of NY (SSNY) on October 1, 2012. Office location: Monroe

County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY may mail a copy of any process to Friedman & Ranzenhofer, PC, 74 Main Street, POB 31, Akron, NY 140010031. The purpose of the LLC is to engage in any business permitted under the Law. [ LEGAL NOTICE ] Articles of organization of VAN LATHAM, LLC filed with the Sec. of State of NY (SSNY) on September 7, 2012. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY may mail a copy of any process to Friedman & Ranzenhofer, PC, 74 Main Street, POB 31, Akron, NY 140010031. The purpose of the LLC is to engage in any business permitted under the Law. [ LEGAL NOTICE ] Articles of Organization of ZUCCHINI PEOPLE GAMES, LLC, filed with the Sec. of State of NY (SSNY) on February 19, 2013. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY may mail a copy of any process to Friedman & Ranzenhofer, PC, 74 Main Street, POB 31, Akron, NY 140010031. The purpose of the LLC is to engage in any business permitted by law. [ LEGAL NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of A&M Liquor Store, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (“SSNY”) on March 17, 2013. Office location: Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to LLC at 3118 E Henrietta, Henrietta, NY 14467. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ LEGAL NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of GVH - 3 LLC. GVH -3 filed Articles of Organization with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 2/28/2013. Office location: Monroe County. The Secretary of State was designated as agent upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process served to: 267 Pearl Street, Rochester, NY 14607. Purpose: Any lawful activity.

40 CITY APRIL 17-23, 2013

[ LEGAL NOTICE ] Notice of formation of Marciano Brothers LLC, Articles of Formation filed with the NYS Secretary of State (SSNYS) on 0827-2012. Office location Monroe County, SSNYS designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against the company may be served. SSNYS shall mail a copy of any process to 435 Parma Center Road, Hilton, NY 14468. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ LEGAL NOTICE ] Notice of formation of Rochester Home Inspections & Engineering, PLLC a Professional Limited Liability Company. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of N.Y. (SSNY) on 03/04/2013. Office location Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of PLLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The PLLC, 1065 Wickerton Lane, Webster, NY 14580 Purpose: practice the profession of Engineering. [ LEGAL NOTICE ] R and S Group Consulting, LLC (“LLC”) filed Arts. of Org. with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on March 26, 2013. Office Location: Monroe County. SSNY designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 18 Bosworth Field, Mendon, New York 14506. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ LEGAL NOTICE ACCOUNTABLE HEALTH PARTNERS, LLC ] Notice of Organization: Accountable Health Partners, LLC was filed with SSNY on January 31, 2013. Office: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. PO address which SSNY shall mail any process against the LLC served upon it: Attn: Robert McCann, M.D., FACP, c/o Highland Hospital, 1000 South Avenue, Rochester, NY 14620. Purpose is to engage in any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] A1-AC, LLC filed Articles of Organization with the New York Department of State on March 15, 2013. Its office is located in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent of the Company upon whom process against it may be served and a copy of any

process shall be mailed to 574 Melwood Drive, Rochester, New York 14626. The purpose of the Company is any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Articles of Organization with respect to Flat Decor, LLC, a New York Limited Liability Company, were filed with the Secretary of State of New York on March 6, 2013. The County in New York State where its office is located is Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent of Flat Decor, LLC upon whom process against it may be served, and the post office address to which the Secretary of State shall mail a copy of any process against Flat Decor, LLC served upon him or her is 2 Old Brick Circle, Pittsford, New York 14534. There are no exceptions adopted by the Company, or set forth in its Operating Agreement, to the limited liability of members pursuant to Section 609(a) of the Limited Liability Company Law of the State of New York. Flat Decor, LLC is formed for the purpose of operation of an importing and exporting business, domestic retail and wholesale sales and any other activities that are lawful for a limited liability company in the State of New York. [ NOTICE ] ATMOSTFIT LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 3/4/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Howard Charles Cragg, 515 Bay Rd., Webster, NY 14580. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] C6 MOBILITY LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 3/20/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, Attn: David M. Sprout, Manager, 1222 Waterbrook Xing, Webster, NY 14580. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] Davidandjill.net LLC Arts. of Org filed NYSS 1/22/2013. Office in Monroe Co. SS is designated agent of LLC upon whom process

may be served. SS shall mail a copy of process to 20 Buckingham St., #5, Rochester, NY 14607 which is also the principal business location. General purpose. [ NOTICE ] Fiona’s Hard Goods LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 4/2/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 536 Glenview Court, Webster, NY 14580. General Purposes [ NOTICE ] FIXINGFOX, LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 3/19/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, Attn: Arthur Alves, Mgr., 5 Monroe Ave., Pittsford, NY 14534. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] MADOH MUSIC GROUP LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 12/28/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Jeremiah Abiah, 126 W. 129 St., Ste. 3, NY, NY 10027. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] NAMCO DEVELOPMENT, LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 11/17/10. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, PO Box 20135, Rochester, NY 146020135. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] Not. of Form. of Homewise MGMT.LLC, Art.of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 04/13/10. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY may mail a copy of any process to LLC. 3177 Latta Rd,Ste. 160, Rochester, NY 14612. Purpose: any lawful Purpose [ NOTICE ] Not. of Form. Of M&M Gardens LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 3/20/13. Office

location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY may mail copy of any process to LLC at 445 Peck Rd, Spencerport, NY 14559. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Not. of Form. of Obsidian Group, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with SSNY 11/14/12. Office: Monroe County. SSNY designated Agent of LLC to whom process may be served. SSNY may mail a copy of any process to LLC, 15 Alger Drive, Rochester, NY 14624. Purpose: Any lawful purpose.

the registered agent. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Aristo Management, LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 2/15/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 1142 Mount Hope Ave., Rochester, NY 14620. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ]

Not. of Form. of, Tricia Marsh Holistic Health Coach, LLC was filed with SSNY on 3/1/2013, county, Monroe. SSNY is designated Agent of LLC to whom process may be served. SSNY may mail a copy of any process to LLC, 166 Monteroy Rd Rochester, NY 14618. Purpose any lawful activity.

Notice of Formation of ASSURED EDGE SOLUTIONS LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 04/09/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o U.S. Corp. Agents, Inc., 7014 13th Ave., Ste. 202, Brooklyn, NY 11228, regd. agent upon whom and at which process may be served. Purpose: Any lawful activity.

[ NOTICE ]

[ NOTICE ]

Notice is hereby given that a license (Serial Number pending) for beer, liquor, and wine been applied for by the undersigned* to sell beer, liquor, and wine at retail in a restaurant under the under the Alcoholic Beverage Control Law at 1290 University Ave. Suite A, Rochester, NY 14607 in Monroe County for on premises consumption.*Secession Company, LLC DBA The Revelry

Notice of Formation of BCW CHEMICALS LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/24/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o U.S. Corp. Agents, Inc., 7014 13th Ave., Ste. 202, Brooklyn, NY 11228, regd. agent upon whom and at which process may be served. Purpose: Any lawful activity.

[ NOTICE ]

[ NOTICE ]

[ NOTICE ]

Notice is hereby given that a license, number not yet assigned, for a full on premise beer, wine & liquor license has been applied for by S & H ENTERPRISES OF ROCHESTER INC dba RAJ MAHAL RESTAURANT,368 Jefferson Rd., Rochester NY 14623, County of Monroe, Town of Henrietta for a restaurant.

Notice of Formation of Cambridge Park, LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 2/20/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 88 Sugar Tree Circle, Brockport, NY 14420. Purpose: any lawful activities.

[ NOTICE ]

[ NOTICE ]

Notice of Formation of Acrospire Management LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 3/25/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: National Registered Agents, Inc., 111 Eighth Ave., 13th Fl., NY, NY 10011, also

Notice of Formation of CC Interactive Marketing Services, LLC, Art.of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 02/26/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 118 Kirklees Rd; Pittsford, NY 14534. Purpose: any lawful activity.

[ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of CRANBERRY CAPITAL WATER LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 02/27/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o U.S. Corp. Agents, Inc., 7014 13th Ave., Ste. 202, Brooklyn, NY 11228, regd. agent upon whom and at which process may be served. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of CRESCENT BEACH RESTAURANT AND HOTEL LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 03/20/13. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 1372 Edgemere Dr., Rochester, NY 14612. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of DAVID PROPERTIES LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/24/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o U.S. Corp. Agents, Inc., 7014 13th Ave., Ste. 202, Brooklyn, NY 11228, regd. agent upon whom and at which process may be served. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Faith Performances, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (“SSNY”) on February 15, 2013. Office location: Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to LLC at P.O Box 64607, Rochester, NY 14624. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Greater Rochester Premier Hockey, LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 3/20/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of


Legal Ads process to 93 Roselawn Ave., Fairport, NY 14450. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of JUNIOR IV ENTERPRISES, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 03/11/13. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 1881 East Ave., Rochester, NY 14610. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Operation of restaurant. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of KAYJOR PROPERTIES, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 03/11/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Corporation Service Co., 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207-2543, regd. agent upon whom and at which process may be served. Purpose: Any lawful activity.

Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 741 Maple Dr., Webster, NY 14580. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of PEARTREE HEALTH STRATEGIES LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 03/15/13. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 29 Leland Rd., Rochester, NY 14617. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Strong Will Development, LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 2/14/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 280 Marne St., Rochester, NY 14609. Purpose: any lawful activities.

[ NOTICE ]

[ NOTICE ]

Notice of Formation of KREAG-WOOD EAST, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 3/21/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, c/o Todd Clicquennoi, 44 Exchange Blvd., Rochester, NY 14614. Purpose: any lawful activity.

Notice of Formation of THE RED FERN CAFE, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State on 3/4/13. Office location: Monroe County. Principal business address: 223 Dartmouth Street, #3, Rochester, New York 14607. Secy. of State designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. Secy. of State shall mail process to: 223 Dartmouth Street, #3, Rochester, New York 14607. Purpose: any lawful activity.

[ NOTICE ] NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY. NAME: BITACHON PROPERTIES AT ROCHESTER, LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 11/08/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to the LLC, 1911 Avenue L, Brooklyn, New York 11230. Purpose: For any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Northern Attachments LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 2/20/13. Office location:

[ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of VALLEYCREST CONSULTING LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 1/17/2013. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o The LLC, 156 Valley Crest Road, Rochester NY 14616. Purpose: any lawful act. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Zitka Island, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 2/28/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served.

SSNY shall mail process to: Timothy Farrell, 854 Esjay Drive, Victor, NY 14564. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of Force-520 Metro LLC. Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 9/24/12. Office location: Monroe County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 9/20/12. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, Attn: Michael B. Kaplan, 9350 Wilshire Blvd., Ste. 302, Beverly Hills, CA 90212, also the principal address. Address to be maintained in DE: National Corporate Research, Ltd., 615 South DuPont Hwy, Dover, DE 19901. Arts of Org. filed with the DE Secretary of State, John G. Townsend Bldg., 401 Federal St., Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of Forward Development, LLC. App. for Auth. filed Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 2/27/13. Off. loc.: Monroe County. LLC formed in North Carolina (NC) on 12/29/12. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the NC address of LLC: 128 S. Tryon St., Ste. 900, Charlotte, NC 28202. Arts. of Org. filed NC Secy. of State, 2 S. Salisbury St., Raleigh, NC 27601. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] PATRIOT LAWN AND LANDSCAPE LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 2/12/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 38 Summertime Trl., Hilton, NY 14468. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] PAULA J. MARTIN CPA, PLLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 1/8/13. Office in Monroe Co. SSNY desig. agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 1344 University Ave., Ste. 235, Rochester , NY 14607. Purpose: To Practice the profession of Public Accountancy. [ NOTICE ] RENT FROM US, LLC Articles of Org. filed NY

Sec. of State (SSNY) 6/8/2012. Office in Monroe Co. SSNY desig. agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to Marchioni & Associates, 2024 W. Henrietta Rd., Ste. 3G, Rochester, NY 14623. Purpose: Any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] RIVER CITY AIRSOFT CLUB LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 2/11/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 351 Huffer Rd., Hilton, NY 14468. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] SHIRE SENIOR LIVING LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 3/7/13. Office in Monroe Co. SSNY design. Agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to The LLC 2515 Culver Road Rochester, NY 14609. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] SYANDA GROUP LLC (LLC) filed Arts. of Org. with NY Secy. of State (SS) on 4/11/13. LLC’s office is in Monroe Co. SS is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS shall mail a copy of any process to 620 Park Avenue, Suite 157, Rochester, NY 14607. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] TROUTSNOBS GUIDE SERVICE AND OUTFITTERS, LLC (LLC) filed Arts. of Org. with NY Secy. of State (SS) on 3/4/2013. LLC’s office is in Monroe Co. SS is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS shall mail a copy of any process to 57 Meadow Cove Rd., Pittsford, NY 14534. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] YARIV PAZ, LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 4/5/13. Office in Monroe Co. SSNY desig. agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 2255 Lyell Ave., Rochester, NY 14606, which is also the principal business location. Purpose: Any lawful purpose.

[ NOTICE ] YP ROCHESTER 1, LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 4/5/13. Office in Monroe Co. SSNY desig. agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 2255 Lyell Ave., Rochester, NY 14606, which is also the principal business location. Purpose: Any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] Direct4U Marketing & Telecom Solutions LLC filed Articles of Organization with the New York Department of State on 2/20/13. Its office is located in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent of the Company upon whom process against it may be served and a copy of any process shall be mailed to 42 Matthews Drive, Fairport, NY 14450. The purpose of the Company is marketing services. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] Name: CHRISTOPHER J. CALABRESE, P.L.L.C. Arts. Of Org. filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 04/04/2013. Office Location: Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to: C/O CHRISTOPHER J. CALABRESE, P.L.L.C., 45 Exchange Street, Rochester, New York 14614. Purpose: Any Lawful Purpose. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] Name: CONSUMER SERVICES OF WESTERN NY LLC. Arts. Of Org. filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 03/13/2013. Office Location: Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to: C/O CONSUMER SERVICES OF WESTERN NY LLC, One East Main Street, 10th Floor, Rochester, New York 14614. Purpose: Any Lawful Purpose. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] Notice of Formation of Wood Team Limo, LLC. Articles of Organization filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on March 8, 2013. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY

designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to principal business location: The LLC, 2171 Monroe Avenue, Rochester, NY 14618. Purpose: any lawful activity

to 508 Pipeline Way, Webster, NY 14580. Its business is to engage in any lawful activity for which limited liability companies may be organized under Section 203 of the New York Limited Liability Company Act.

[ NOTICE OF FORMATION ACCURET LLC ]

[ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY ]

Articles of Organization filed with Secretary of State of NY (“SSNY”) on 03/21/2013. Office in Monroe County. SSNY designated agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to ACCURET LLC, C/O JOHN S. HERBRAND, ESQ., ONE CHASE SQUARE, SUITE 1900, ROCHESTER, NY 14604. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION HOUND HAVEN HOTEL LLC ] Articles of Organization filed with Secretary of State of NY (“SSNY”) on 01/05/2005. Office in Monroe County. SSNY designated agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to HOUND HAVEN HOTEL LLC, 1259 LAWRENCE RD., HILTON, NY 14468. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF 1744 MANITOU ROAD, LLC ] The name of the Limited Liability Company is 1744 Manitou Road, LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the New York Secretary of State on 3/20/13. The office of the LLC is in Monroe County. The New York Secretary of State is designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. The Secretary of State shall mail a copy of such process to 152 Snowy Owl Ridge, Rochester, NY 14612, The LLC is organized to engage in any lawful activity for which an LLC may be formed under NY LLC Law. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY ] GAMACA HOLDINGS, LLC has filed Articles of Organization with the Secretary of State on March 7, 2013. Its office is located in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent upon whom process against it may be served and a copy of any process will be mailed

The name of the Limited Liability Company is 1349 South Avenue Properties, LLC. (the Company). The Articles of Organization of the Company were filed with the Secretary of State on March 14, 2013. The office of the Company within the State of New York is in the County of Monroe. The Secretary of State of the State of New York is hereby designated as Agent of the Company for the purpose of service of Process. The address to which the Secretary of State shall mail a copy of any process against the Company served upon him/ her is PO Box 93031, Rochester, NY 14692. The character and purpose of the business of the Company shall be purchase, remodeling , sale or rental of residential units. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LLC ] Advanced Custodial Equipment and Supply, LLC has filed articles of organization with the New York Secretary of State on March 1, 2013. Its principal place of business is located at 465 Blossom Road, Rochester, New York in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent upon whom process may be served. A copy of any process shall be mailed to 465 Blossom Road, Rochester, New York 14610. The purpose of the LLC is to engage in any lawful activity for which Limited Liability Companies may be organized under Section 203 of the New York Limited Liability Company Law. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF PRIVATE LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY ] The name of the Limited Liability Company is TGS KITCHENS, LLC. The Articles of Organization were filed 2-22-2013 with the New York State Secretary of State, (SSNY) who is designated as Agent for Service of Process against the LLC. The SSNY shall mail a copy

of process to 4391 Lake Avenue, Rochester, N.Y. 14612. Purpose - any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF VISTA PROPERTY MANAGEMENT, LLC ] The name of the Limited Liability Company is Vista Property Management, LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the New York Secretary of State on 3/13/13. The office of the LLC is in Monroe County. The New York Secretary of State is designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. The Secretary of State shall mail a copy of such process to PO Box 77339, Rochester, NY 14617, The LLC is organized to engage in any lawful activity for which an LLC may be formed under NY LLC Law. [ NOTICES ] Index No. 13/1704 Summons SUPREME COURT OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF MONROE LINDA J. STEWART Plaintiff v. JAMES F. STEWART, JR 95 Sandcastle Drive Rochester, New York 14622 And EAGLE ONE INVESTMENTS, LLC Defendants TO DEFENDANT JAMES F. STEWART, JR.: You are hereby summoned and required to submit to plaintiff’s attorneys your answering papers on this motion within the time provided in the Notice of Motion annexed hereto. In case of your failure to submit answering papers, summary judgment will be taken against you by default for the relief demanded in the Notice of Motion. The basis of the venue designated is the residence of defendant James F. Stewart, Jr., 95 Sandcastle Drive, Rochester, New York 14622. Dated: February 13, 2013 CHAMBERLAIN D’AMANDA OPPENHEIMER & GREENFIELD LLP Henry R. Ippolito, Esq. Attorneys for Plaintiff 1600 Crossroads Building Two State Street Rochester, New York 146141397 Telephone: (585) 232-3730 TO: JAMES F. STEWART, JR. Defendant 95 Sandcastle Drive Rochester, New York 14622 Index No. 13/1704 NOTICE OF MOTION

cont. on page 42

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 41


Legal Ads > page 41 FOR SUMMARY JUDGMENT IN LIEU OF COMPLAINT SUPREME COURT OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF MONROE LINDA J. STEWART Plaintiff v. JAMES F. STEWART, JR. EAGLE ONE INVESTMENTS, LLC Defendants PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that upon the Summons, Dated February 13, 2013, and the affidavit of Henry R. Ippolito, Esq., sworn to on February 13, 2013, the plaintiff will move this Court at a Special Term thereof, the Hon. John J. Ark presiding at the Hall of Justice, 99 Exchange Boulevard, Rochester, New York on May 22, 2013 at 9:30 a.m. or as soon thereafter as counsel can be heard, for an Order pursuant to CPLR 3213 directing the entry of judgment for the plaintiff against James F. Stewart, Jr., making a judgment of the Circuit Court of the Eighth Judicial Circuit of Illinois, Adams County, Quincy, Illinois, entered on October

2, 2012, against defendant James F. Stewart, Jr., a judgment of the State of New York, and ordering judgment against defendant James F. Stewart, Jr. in the amount of Six Hundred Fifty-two Thousand One Hundred Thirty-three and 45/100 Dollars ($652,133.45) in favor of the plaintiff, Linda J. Stewart, with expenses and court costs in the Circuit Court of the Eighth Judicial Circuit of Illinois, Adams County, in the amount of Five Hundred Seventy-four and 40/100 Dollars ($574.40), together with interest from October 2, 2012, and the costs and disbursement of this action. TAKE FURTHER NOTICE that all answering papers shall be served on the undersigned on or before the twentieth (20th) day after personal delivery of the Summons to you. Dated: February 13, 2013 CHAMBERLAIN D’AMANDA OPPENHEIMER & GREENFIELD LLP Henry R. Ippolito, Esq.

Attorneys for Plaintiff 1600 Crossroads Building Two State Street Rochester, New York 146141397 Telephone: (585) 232-3730 TO: JAMES F. STEWART, JR. Defendant 95 Sandcastle Drive Rochester, New York 14622 EAGLE ONE INVESTMENTS, LLC Index No. 13/1704 AFFIDAVIT SUPREME COURT OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF MONROE LINDA J. STEWART Plaintiff v JAMES F. STEWART, JR. and EAGLE ONE INVESTMENTS, LLC Defendants STATE OF NEW YORK ss.: COUNTY OF MONROE HENRY R. IPPOLITO, being duly sword, deposes and says: 1. I am an attorney licensed by the State of New York, and I am a member of Chamberlain D’Amanda Oppenheimer & Greenfield LLP, attorneys for the plaintiff. 2. I make this affidavit in support of a motion for summary judgment in lieu of complaint based upon my personal knowledge,

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42 CITY APRIL 17-23, 2013

the plaintiff’s records, and the records of the original forum. 3. This is an action to convert a judgment entered in favor of the plaintiff, Linda J. Stewart, against defendant James F. Stewart, Jr., on October 2, 2012 in the Circuit Court of the Eighth Judicial Circuit of Illinois, Adams County, the Honorable Scott E. Walden presiding, into a New York State judgment. 4, Attached as Exhibit A is a court authenticated and exemplified copy of the Illinois default judgment. It bears the stamp “Filed October 2, 2012.” The inside of the cover bears a certification from Lori R. Geschwandner, the Clerk of the Circuit Court, that she has compared the default judgment attached as Exhibit A with the original judgment on file and that it is a true copy. 5. The cover backing also contains the certification by the Honorable Scott H. Walden, a Judge of the Court, who granted the default judgment against defendant James F. Stewart, Jr., on October 2, 2012, that Lori R. Geschwandner’s signature in her certificate is true and genuine, and that on the date of her certificate, February 4, 2013, she was the duly elected Clerk of the Court, and that full faith and credit are due to all her official acts. 6. Finally, the cover backing contains a certificate by Lori R. Geschwandner that Scott H. Walden’s signature is true and genuine, and that at the time of his signing, February 4, 2013, he was a duly qualified and acting Judge of the Circuit Court of the Eighth Judicial Circuit of Illinois in and for Adams County, and that full faith and credit are due his acts. 7. As a judgment of a sister state, it is entitled by the United States Constitution to full faith and credit by New York State. Since it was obtained by default in appearance by defendant James F. Stewart, Jr., however, the summary enforcement filing procedure of CPLR Article 54 cannot be used. Accordingly, the procedures of CPLR Section 3213, motion for Summary Judgment in Lieu of Complaint, are being used. The default judgment is unsatisfied in whole, the amount

of $652,133.45 plus interest from October 2, 2012 remains unpaid, and enforcement of the judgment has not been stayed. 8. The judgment debtor is James F. Stewart, Jr., and his last known address is 95 Sandcastle Drive, Rochester, New York14622. WHEREFORE, deponent requests that summary judgment be granted: 1. Making the State of Illinois judgment into a New York State judgment entitled to all enforcement procedures as a judgment of the Supreme Court of the State of New York. 2. Allowing the entry of judgment against defendant James F. Stewart, Jr., in the amount of $652,133.45, plus Illinois expenses and court costs in the amount of $574.40, plus interest from October 2, 2012, together with the New York costs and disbursements of this action. Henry R. Ippolito Sworn to before me this 13th day of February, 2013. Notary Public K. WADE EATON Notary Public, State of New York Monroe County Commission Expires July 22, 2015 Exhibit A DEFAULT JUDGMENT No. 12-CH-31 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE EIGHTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT OF ILLINOIS, ADAMS COUNTY IN PROBATE Filed Oct 02 2012 Randy E. Frese Clerk Circuit Court 8th Judicial Circuit ILLINOIS, ADAMS CO.LINDA J. STEWART, Plaintiff,vs. JAMES F. STEWART Jr. and EAGLE ONE INVESTMENTS, LLC, Defendants, Now, on this 2nd day of October, this cause comes on for prove up hearing. Plaintiff appears by her attorney, RaNae A. Dunham Inghram, and Defendant, James F. Stewart Jr. having been duly served with notice and failing to appear after having been three times called in open court to plead, answer or otherwise appear. NOW, THEREFORE, upon motion of Plaintiff, it is ORDERED, as follows:1. Judgment is entered for Plaintiff, Linda J. Stewart and against James F. Stewart Jr. in the amount of six hundred and fifty two thousand, one hundred thirty three dollars and forty five cents ($652,133.45), and

expenses and court costs in the amount of five hundred seventy four dollars and forty cents ($574.40). 2. Defendant, James F. Stewart, Jr. is hereby ordered to render a full and complete accounting of all his actions as trustee of the Linda J. Stewart irrevocable Trust (“Trust”), including an accounting as to all moneys and properties received and disbursed by him, all income collected by him in the administration of the Trust, and all charges for compensation made by him against the trust property. Defendant is to deliver said accounting to RaNae A. Dunham Inghram, attorney for Plaintiff. 3. James F. Stewart Jr. is hereby ordered to deliver any remaining Trust funds, passbooks, checking accounts, certificates of deposit, and any other Trust property in his possession to Roxanne J. McCarron, successor trustee. 4. A permanent injunction is hereby entered against Defendant James F. Stewart Jr. Defendant James F. Stewart Jr., his agents and assigns are hereby permanently enjoined and ordered not to withdraw, encumber, transfer, or in any manner to deal with the assets of the Trust. 5.The Trust is hereby reformed to remove James F. Stewart, Jr. and any issue of Defendant James F. Stewart, Jr. as beneficiaries. 6. The injunction against Eagle One Investments, LLC is hereby lifted as to successor trustee Roxanne Jewel McCarron for all purposes delineated in the Trust. 7. Assessment of attorney’s fees reserved. ENTER: October 2, 2012 Thomas J. Ortbal Judge Pc: RaNae A. Dunham Inghram Roxanne McCarron James F. Stewart, Jr. [ PUBLICATION NOTICE OF ORGANIZATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY ] The name of the Limited Liability Company is 997 Beahan Road LLC; its Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State on March 1, 2013; the County within New York in which its office is to be located is Monroe; the Secretary of State has been designated as agent upon whom process may be served; the

post office address to which the Secretary of State shall mail process is 369 Bostwick Road, Phelps, NY 14532; the purpose of its business is to conduct any lawful business under law. [ SUMMONS ] Index No. 9899/10 STATE OF NEW YORK SUPREME COURT COUNTY OF MONROE U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE FOR CITIGROUP MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST 2006 WFHE4 3476 Stateview Boulevard Ft. Mill, SC 29715 Plaintiff vs. ROBERT BROWN AS HEIR OF THE ESTATE OF VALERIE N. DUNBAR A/K/A VALERIE NICOLE DUNBAR, UNKNOWN HEIRS OF THE ESTATE OF VALERIE N. DUNBAR A/K/A VALERIE NICOLE DUNBAR, CITY COURT OF ROCHESTER, GREEENWOOD TRUST COMPANY, MICHAEL F. ELIO, MONROE SEALERS, INC., MRC RECEIVABLE CORP., NEW YORK STATE DEPARTMENT OF TAXATION AND FINANCE, PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK, PINNACLE CREDIT SERVICES LLC, ROBERT J. SCHILIRO, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA ACTING THROUGH THE IRS JOHN DOE (Said name being fictitious, it being the intention of Plaintiff to designate any and all occupants of premises being foreclosed herein, and any parties, corporations or entities, if any having or claiming an interest or lien upon the mortgaged premises.) Defendants This is an attempt to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. To the above named Defendants: You are hereby summoned to answer the complaint in this action and to serve a copy of your answer, or if the complaint is not served with this summons, to serve a notice of appearance on the plaintiff’s attorneys within thirty days after the service of this summons, exclusive of the day of service, and in case of your failure to appear or answer, judgment will be taken against you by default for the relief demanded in the complaint. NOTICE YOU ARE IN DANGER OF LOSING

YOUR HOME If you do not respond to this summons and complaint by serving a copy of the answer on the attorney for the mortgage company who filed this foreclosure proceeding against you and filing the answer with the court, a default judgment may be entered and you can lose your home. Speak to an attorney or go to the court where your case is pending for further information on how to answer the summons and protect your property. Sending a payment to your mortgage company will not stop this foreclosure action. YOU MUST RESPOND BY SERVING A COPY OF THE ANSWER ON THE ATTORNEY FOR THE PLAINTIFF (MORTGAGE COMPANY) AND FILING THE ANSWER WITH THE COURT. The foregoing summons is served upon you by publication pursuant to an order of Hon Joanne M. Winslow, Justice of the Supreme Court of the State of New York, signed the 7th day of March, 2013 at Rochester, New York. The object of this action is to foreclose a mortgage on the Following property: ALL THAT TRACT OR PARCEL OF LAND, situate in the City of Rochester, County of Monroe and State of New York, being Lot No. 5 of the Webster-Walrath Tract as shown by a map thereof made by W.R. Storey, Surveyor and filed in Monroe County Clerk’s Office April 29, 1914, in Liber 34 of Maps at page 21, excepting however, a strip of land 7.49 feet in width off the south of said lot which was heretofore conveyed to Maude Hembree and Ella M. Skeels by Warranty Deed dated September 16, 1915, and recorded in Monroe County Clerk’s Office in Liber 970 of Deeds, at page 276. Said property hereby conveyed is situate on the south side of Raeburn Avenue, is forty (40) feet wide both front and rear and about one hundred (100) feet deep. These premises are also known as 31 Raeburn Avenue, Rochester, NY 14619 Richard S. Mullen, Esq Woods Oviatt Gilman LLP Attorneys for Plaintiff 700 Crossroads Building 2 State Street Rochester, New York 14614


Fun [ NEWS OF THE WEIRD ] BY CHUCK SHEPHERD Undocumented immigrant Jose Munoz, 25, believed himself an ideal candidate for President Obama’s 2012 safe-harbor initiative for illegal-entry children, in that he had been brought to the U.S. by his undocumented parents before age 16, had no criminal record and had graduated from high school (with honors, even). Since then, however, he had remained at home in Sheboygan, Wis., assisting his family, doing odd jobs and, admittedly, just playing video games and “vegging.” Living “in the shadows,” he found it almost impossible to prove the final legal criterion: that he had lived continuously in the U.S. since graduation (using government records, payroll sheets, utility bills, etc.). After initial failures to convince immigration officials, reported the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel in March, Munoz’s lawyer succeeded -- by submitting Munoz’s Xbox Live records, documenting that his computer’s Wisconsin location had been accessing video games, day after day, for years.

Government in Action!

— Among the lingering costs of U.S. wars are disability payments and compensation to veterans’ families, which can continue decades after hostilities end. An Associated Press analysis of federal payment records, released in March, even found two current recipients of Civil War benefits. Vietnam war payments are still about $22 billion a year, World War II, $5 billion, World War I, $20 million, and the 1898 Spanish-American war, about $1,700. — Each year, Oklahoma is among the states to receive $150,000 federal grants to operate small, isolated airfields (for Oklahoma, one in the southern part

of the state is so seldom used that it is primarily a restroom stop for passing pilots). The payments are from a 13year- old congressional fund for about 80 similar airfields (no traffic, no planes kept on site), described by a February Washington Post investigation as “ATM(s) shaped like (airports).” Congress no longer even requires that the annual grants be spent on the actual airports drawing the grants. — During the massive February Southern California manhunt for former Los Angeles cop Christopher Dorner, nervous-triggered LAPD officers riddled an SUV with bullets after mistakenly believing Dorner was inside. Instead there were two women, on their early-morning job as newspaper carriers, and LAPD Chief Charlie Beck famously promised them a new truck and arranged with a local dealership for a 2013 Ford F-150 ($32,560). However, the deal fell through in March when the women discovered that Beck’s “free” truck was hardly free. Rather, it would be taxable as a “donation,” reported on IRS Form 1099, perhaps costing them thousands of dollars.

Perspective

Some Third-Worlders eat dirt because they are mentally ill or have no meaningful food. However, diners at Tokyo’s upscale Ne Quittez Pas eat it because it is a trendy dish prepared by prominent chef Toshio Tanabe. Among his courses are soil soup served with a flake of dirty truffle, soil sorbet and the “soil surprise” (a dirt-covered potato ball). (Spoiler alert: It has a truffle center.) Tanabe lightly precooks his dirt and runs it through a sieve to eliminate the crunchiness.

[ LAST WEEK’S SOLUTION ON PAGE 38 ]

[ LOVESCOPE ] BY EUGENIA LAST ARIES (March 21-April 19): You’ll have a hard time making up your mind when it comes to commitment. You’ll make someone angry if you flirt and run. Perhaps your uncertainty has more to do with not meeting the right partner. Make a list of relationship must-haves, and don’t settle for less. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Express your thoughts, socialize and don’t be afraid to make the first move. Showing a little aggression will appeal to someone looking for the same type of commitment as you. Share your intentions, dreams and plans. Love is in the stars, and commu-

nication will seal the deal. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Flirt, have fun and enjoy partners who are looking for a good time. Before you know it, you will be heading in the same direction as one of your playmates to a serious relationship that allows you both the freedom to explore and experiment as a couple. CANCER (June 21-July 22): Regroup and rethink your current situation. No relationship is perfect, but being with someone who is unpredictable or untrustworthy will lead to a stressful, unhappy situation. Time is on your side, so slow down and enjoy activities that

make you happy, and the right one will come along. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): You’ll attract a lot of interest with your witty conversation and adventurous appeal, but you must watch out for the chameleons in your audience who are willing to ride on your coattails. Don’t settle for a yesperson when what you really need is an equal. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Say what you mean and mean what you say, and you will attract someone who is on the same page as you regarding commitment and life goals. Don’t be shy — if you see someone you want to get to know better,

initiate the connection. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Uncertainty must not be allowed to surface. Talk to a trusted friend regarding any partner you think may fit into your lifestyle. Getting a second opinion will ease your mind. Being wishy-washy isn’t a trait to display if you are looking for equality in a relationship. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): You will know instantly when you meet the right partner. Take it upon yourself to charm, persuade and masterfully entice the person you want to spend the rest of your life with. Don’t hesitate to move quickly. A commitment is encouraged.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): You just want to have fun. Explore and set sail on a romantic adventure. Choose a partner looking for the same kind of free-spirited connection that you have to offer. The person who fits your lifestyle will be the one to commit to. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Don’t expect smooth sailing when it comes to love. The person you connect with will probably not be welcome by your friends and family. Listen to advice being offered, and if you don’t feel the complaints are legitimate, move forward with the one

who has captured your heart. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Reuniting with someone from your past may appear to be a safe bet, but take it nice and slow and give the relationship a chance to develop as a friendship first. Take it to the next level only if you have both matured enough to make it work. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Affection will pave the way to a stable and secure relationship. Trust and commitment are apparent; however, don’t be afraid to negotiate the ins and outs of what’s important to you. The couple that shares is the one that can go the distance.

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44 CITY APRIL 17-23, 2013


April 17-23, 2013 - City Newspaper