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Send your comments to themail@ rochester-citynews.com or The Mail, City Newspaper, 250 North Goodman Street, Rochester 14607, with your name, address, and daytime telephone number. Letters must be original, and we don’t publish letters sent to other media. Those of fewer than 350 words have a greater chance of being published, and we do edit for clarity and brevity.

A vision for a new mayor

To the next mayor of Rochester: I am the highly mobile, widely coveted 25- to 29-year-old, college-graduate, young professional your city is in desperate competition for. I don’t do things the way my parents did. Remember the house with the picket fence and two cars? F-- that. I’m social to the extreme, and I want to live in a city. I want to LIVE… in a CITY! I want to wake up and hear the buzz of the street. I feed off of it. I want to walk down the block for some coffee and wi-fi. I want to ride my bike to work ­—­­­ every day— because it makes me feel good. If I’m helping the environment too… awesome. I want the freedom to live carfree. That’s not a social statement. It’s a preference. I want choices. I want a choice for dinner and I want a choice in how I get there. Dollar menus don’t impress me. I sure as hell am not impressed with dollar bus fares if that bus is taking me 40 minutes out of my way to get across town. Real cities have transit systems, not bus-only systems. Real cities attract new businesses with smart investments in infrastructure, not cheap parking. I’m full of wild dreams and new ideas that will change the world faster than Facebook. I’m not following the jobs; ­I create them. Where I go, others follow, and I won’t wait around for your city to catch on. Austin, Dallas, Denver, Minneapolis, Portland, Pittsburgh, Providence, Seattle… they get me. So when you take office and they tell you how perfect Rochester’s transit system is, remember me. When they tell you what this city needs is more parking, remember me. When they tell you it’s not the city’s responsibility to have a vision plan for its own future, remember me. I’ll be gone. MIKE GOVERNALE, IRONDEQUOIT

 City

MARCH 16-22, 2011

Governale is the founder of ReconnectRochester, a group of young adults advocating the creation of a multi-modal transportation network for the Greater Rochester area.

Rich, poor, and the ideal country

In “Isn’t It Rich?” (Urban Journal, March 2), you refer to the aptly-named Charles Blow of the Times, who notes that the US “has the third highest rate of income inequality among advanced economies, behind only Hong Kong and Singapore.” Well, since those two “little tigers” are in East Asia, perhaps your glance may catch sight of what might be your ideal country: North Korea. In that real-life Orwellian nightmare, outside the Kim Jong Il clique everyone is equally starving. No one, on the other hand, starves in Hong Kong or Singapore or, for that matter, in the US, except by choice, like anorexic people. And, as the situation at our porous southern border attests, or the contents of ship containers in West Coast ports at times confirm — we’ll disregard the sight of people in the shark-infested waters of the Florida Straights trying to escape the twin hells of Cuba or Haiti — people go to extraordinary lengths to enter our disgraceful land of inequality. Go figure! Perhaps we need more inequality, not less. Do you not understand, Ms Towler, that this myth of l’égalité, propounded by intellectuals from Rousseau to Pol Pot, has led to the highest piles of corpses since the Mongol armies raided Baghdad and established the Golden Horde empire in Eastern Europe? Inequality is part of the human condition, while the deadly, remorseless logic of equality, pace your supposed good intentions or those of Barack Obama, leads to a gun pointed at your head, the Gulag, and the killing fields of Cambodia. Inevitably! Either in sudden convulsions imposed by the toothless grins of armed, uniformed thugs or step by step by the placid smiles of government bureaucrats. ITALO SAVELLA, GREECE

Go on; leave!

The letter “Socialism and Extinction” (The Mail, March 2) suggests that taxing the wealthy

of New York will only prompt them to leave. I say, “Let them leave” and take Tom Golisano with you! It isn’t taxes that are driving the wealthy out of New York. Many wealthy people and corporations in New York pay no taxes at all (nor, by the way, have they done much to create jobs). It isn’t about taxes. The wealthy will go anywhere and do anything to anyone to grab all the wealth they can from everyone else. If there is profit in bombs and bullets, they will be there. After all the stockbrokers, money changers, and land speculators have left this country, maybe the “too poor to leave” can finally afford a home, a plot of land, and a water buffalo, and then, finally, be able to make a living. I would like to burst the author’s Grand Old Party fantasy and point out that our nation’s government grew the most and went into the deepest debt, with GDP and per-capita income steadily sliding, under Republican administrations, beginning with Ronald Regan. Remember the billions of dollars spent on “Star Wars”? If our 7-figure a year political leaders, corporation owners, bankers, brokers, real-estate agents, etc. don’t want to be patriots, please leave! The rest of us “little people” will be fine. We may even profit by it. CW KASTNER, HENRIETTA

Peter the Terrible

We read about the hearing in Congress, listen to the radio, watch TV, as America is destroyed. The great misnomer, War on Terror, was finally laid to rest after President Barack Obama took office. Now a King named Peter has brought it home from the outside world where it wreaked havoc and could have destroyed us, only to unleash it in Washington. Someone in Washington must explain to Representative King what could result from his procedures. Then he will surely stop what he is doing. BYRNA WEIR, BRIGHTON

News. Music. Life. Greater Rochester’s Alternative Newsweekly March 16-22, 2011 Vol 40 No 27 250 North Goodman Street Rochester, New York 14607-1199 themail@rochester-citynews.com phone (585) 244-3329 fax (585) 244-1126 rochestercitynewspaper.com Cover illustration: Matt DeTurck Publishers: William and Mary Anna Towler Editor: Mary Anna Towler Asst. to the publishers: Matt Walsh Editorial department themail@rochester-citynews.com Features editor: Eric Rezsnyak News editor: Chris Carrie Fien Staff writers: Tim Louis Macaluso, Jeremy Moule Music writer: Frank De Blase Calendar editor: Rebecca Rafferty Contributing writers: Kate Antoniades, Paloma Capanna, Casey Carlsen, Emily Faith, George Grella, Susie Hume, Kathy Laluk, Michael Lasser, James Leach, Ron Netsky, Dayna Papaleo, Rebecca Rafferty, Todd Rezsnyak, Ryan Whirty Art department artdept@rochester-citynews.com Production manager: Max Seifert Designers: Aubrey Berardini, Matt DeTurck Photographers: Frank De Blase, Matt DeTurck, Michael Hanlon, Jeffrey Marini Advertising department ads@rochester-citynews.com Advertising sales manager: Betsy Matthews Account executives: Tom Decker, Annalisa Iannone, William Towler Classified sales representatives: Christine Kubarycz, Tracey Mykins Operations/Circulation info@rochester-citynews.com Circulation Assistant: Katherine Stathis Distribution: Andy DiCiaccio, David Riccioni, Northstar Delivery City Newspaper is available free of charge. Additional copies of the current issue may be purchased for $1, payable in advance at the City Newspaper office. City Newspaper may be distributed only by authorized distributors. No person may, without prior written permission of City Newspaper, take more than one copy of each weekly issue. City (ISSN 1551-3262) is published weekly by WMT Publications, Inc. Periodical postage paid at Rochester, NY (USPS 022-138). Send address changes to City, 250 North Goodman Street, Rochester, NY 14607. City is a member of the Association of Alternative Newsweeklies and the New York Press Association. Subscriptions: $35.00 ($30.00 for senior citizens) for one year. Add $10 yearly for out-of-state subscriptions: add $30 yearly for foreign subscriptions. Due to the initial high cost of establishing new subscriptions, refunds for fewer than ten months cannot be issued. Copyright by WMT Publications Inc., 2010 - all rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, photocopying, recording or by any information storage retrieval system without permission of the copyright owner.


ENDORSEMENT | BY MARY ANNA TOWLER

For mayor: Tom Richards In the March 29 special election for mayor, Rochester has two experienced, highly qualified candidates — former Mayor Bill Johnson and key Duffyadministration official Tom Richards — and a thought-provoking challenger, the Green Party’s Alex White. Our choice is Tom Richards. This has not been an easy decision. We have enormous respect for Bill Johnson. We endorsed him, repeatedly, for mayor. We urged him to run for county executive and endorsed him when he did. And he served Rochester well as mayor. But we have believed for months — long before Johnson decided to run — that the Duffy administration had embarked on important initiatives that needed to continue. Duffy had a strong team in place when he resigned only a year into his second term. And a key member of that team, corporation counsel Tom Richards, seemed the ideal person to serve for the remainder of the term. Our endorsement is based on more than our concern about continuity, however. Richards is exceptionally qualified to be mayor at this moment in Rochester’s history. The city faces enormous problems, in finances, in economic development, in education. Richards is smart, tough, thoughtful, passionate about the City of Rochester, and an excellent administrator. His experience in business — derided in some quarters — gives him knowledge and a pragmatic approach that is crucial right now. He is experienced in the details of city government — and, significantly, of important initiatives already under way. He is — to a remarkable degree — the right person to head and to lead Rochester at this crucial time. Johnson said initially that he was running because he thought voters needed a choice in the special election. More recently, he has expanded that message, saying he is running to “make amends” for endorsing Bob Duffy in 2005, as his own term as mayor wound down. He mistakenly believed that Duffy would continue the programs of his administration, he says. But the Duffy administration did continue some Johnson initiatives. It kept others but made revisions. (Johnson is particularly concerned — as are some neighborhood leaders — that Duffy abandoned his strong grassroots approach to neighborhood development.) The Duffy administration also ended some Johnson initiatives — most significantly, of course, the ferry. Nobody

He is — to a remarkable degree — the right person to head and to lead Rochester at this crucial time.” could have been sorrier about that than we were. We still believe that a ferry could bring substantial benefits to the Rochester region. And it’s possible that if Johnson had recognized and explained the need for ongoing public financial support, the big ferry could have become a viable operation. Johnson has been blamed unfairly for many of the ferry’s problems. His administration did not create the ferry. When the private owners got in trouble, local business leaders had enough faith in its potential that they urged the administration to try to rescue the project. Johnson’s administration made some serious mistakes, however, including a reliance on shaky business and marketing plans and the $1-ayear, long-term lease on the ferry terminal. While both men recognize that a certain amount of risk-taking is important for cities, particularly in economic development, Richards’ hard-nosed pragmatism would likely have kept us out of those problems. The Johnson administration made great contributions to this city. So has the Duffy administration, particularly in downtown development. In some respects, it’s a shame that the next mayor can’t have the best qualities of both candidates: Richards’ pragmatism and Johnson’s vision and strong neighborhood concern (although we believe Richards is more committed to neighborhoods than Johnson implies). Rochester is also fortunate in that the two are among the most ethical, honorable public servants we have known. This is no small qualification when increasingly, politics in New York is known for its scandals. Regarding Green Party candidate Alex White: White knows much more about city policies and the city’s challenges than “outsider” candidates usually do. And some of his ideas are worth pursuing in some form. We hope he and the Greens continue to press them. But he has nowhere near the knowledge and the experience to run the City of Rochester.

rochestercitynewspaper.com

City 


[ news from the week past ]

County gets new lobbyist

Republican legislators gave the green light to County Executive Maggie Brooks’ proposal to hire a new lobbyist, Capitol Public Strategies. Democrats voted against the proposal, saying that it’s not a wise use of taxpayer money, given the economic climate. The county will pay Capital Public Strategies $60,000 each year for five years.

Special election set for House seat Governor Andrew Cuomo set a May 24 special election to fill the 26th District House seat. Republican Chris Lee held the seat until his abrupt resignation amid a scandal. Republicans have endorsed Assembly member Jane Corwin as their candidate, though conservative Iraq war veteran David Bellavia may challenge her on an independent line. Democrats are searching for a candidate.

A force for change in education

Several groups including the Parent and Community Coalition for Educational Change organized a two-day community-

wide public meeting to improve student performance and to change the state of city schools. Hundreds of people attended the event, which featured educator and speaker Adelaide Sanford, vice chancellor emeritus of the New York State Board of Regents.

News

No more MOE?

COURTS | BY JEREMY MOULE

Democratic State Assembly member David Gantt says he is drafting legislation to repeal the Maintenance of Effort law. The controversial law prevents the City of Rochester from reducing its yearly monetary contribution to the Rochester school district.

Legal lessons for Rochester from Brockport

Bad review for city schools

A consultant’s review gave the Rochester school district an extremely low grade. The standards of teaching are not rigorous, management skills of principals vary, and the human resources department is essentially broken, the report says. Superintendent Jean-Claude Brizard authorized the review, which was conducted by Rachel Curtis, consultant and former assistant superintendent for Boston Public Schools.

City of Rochester Corporation Counsel Jeff Eichner says Brockport’s legal victory in a lawsuit challenging the village’s administrative search warrant law could help the city in similar lawsuits. Photo by mike hanlon

The Village of Brockport and the City of Rochester have each faced legal challenges to inspection-related search warrants. Judges recently ruled in Brockport’s favor in its case, and that could have implications beyond the village’s borders. Rochester and Brockport have laws that allow code-enforcement officials to obtain administrative search warrants when landlords won’t consent to rental property inspections. Inspections are required to obtain certificates of occupancy, which are legally required to rent out a residence. The certificates must also be renewed on a regular basis. Both municipalities have faced lawsuits arguing that the laws regarding the search warrants violate constitutional search-andseizure protections. But State Appellate Division justices upheld Brockport’s law. In their decision they said that letting officers apply for the warrants doesn’t violate constitutional probable cause requirements.

City of Rochester Corporation Counsel Jeff Eichner says the court’s decision is good legal precedent for the city’s case. David Ahl, a city landlord who chairs the legal issues committee of a state property owners’ association, says Rochester is being sued for issuing administrative warrants against two properties. A challenge to a warrant for a third property is also possible, he says. Each warrant raised questions, he says, about probable cause. Ahl says the Rochester plaintiffs might have a better shot at winning their cases than the plaintiffs in Brockport. Unlike the Rochester cases, Brockport’s lawsuit occurred before any enforcement actions were taken, Ahl says. A court is more likely to rule that a specific act is unconstitutional, he says, as opposed to a broad law that hasn’t yet been enforced.

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MARCH 16-22, 2011


Officials at City Hall have already warned the school district not to come to them for financial help with the facilities modernization project. And the district may want to think twice before going to Democratic State Assembly member David Gantt. “It’s not my problem,”Gantt said in a telephone interview from Albany. “I did my job. I did what I was supposed to do.”

EDUCATION | BY TIM LOUIS MACALUSO

4,439 US servicemen and servicewomen, 318 Coalition servicemen and servicewomen, and approximately 99,980 to 109,230 Iraqi civilians have been killed in Iraq from the beginning of the war and occupation to March 14. No American servicemen and servicewomen were reported killed after February 17. IRAQ TOTALS —

AFGHANISTAN TOTALS

There is some debate about what the reimbursable amount would be. Jerome Underwood, the district’s senior director of operations, says the amount would be about 85 cents Willa Powell. FILE PHOTO on the dollar, or 15 percent of the project’s costs. A substantial amount of that money, Underwood says, could be paid through a combination of state funds totaling $16 million, and about $10 million realized in energy savings from the renovations. But Powell says the amount is probably closer to 80 cents on the dollar, or 20 percent of the project’s cost. Though the local share would not be due for several years, Powell says, some of the money would undoubtedly come out of the district’s operating budget. The district could be faced with the choice between keeping teachers in the classroom, Powell says, and the cost of making desperately needed renovations to schools — some that are nearly 100 years old. But the real question, Underwood says, is should the district commit to the project or not? “This is one of those things that we can’t stop in the middle of,” he says.

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1,500 US servicemen and servicewomen and 865 Coalition servicemen and servicewomen have been killed in Afghanistan from the beginning of the war and occupation to March 14. Statistics for Afghan civilian casualties are not available. American servicemen and servicewomen killed from March 2 to 11: -- Spc. Jason M. Weaver, 22, Anaheim, Calif. -- Cpl. Jordan R. Stanton, 20, Rancho Santa Margarita, Calif. -- Staff Sgt. Mark C. Wells, 31, San Jose, Calif. -- Pfc. Kalin C. Johnson, 19, Lexington, S.C. -- Spc. Andrew P. Wade, 22, Antioch, Ill. -- Cpl. Loren M. Buffalo, 20, Mountain Pine, Ark. -- Staff Sgt. Eric S. Trueblood, 27, Alameda, Calif. -- Pfc. Andrew M. Harper, 19, Maidsville, W. Va. —

FMP: Where will the money come from? Concern is growing that the $325-million first phase of the city school district’s facilities modernization program could face financial trouble. A morass of fiscal problems at the state and local levels, say officials say, may threaten the much-celebrated renovation project. The FMP legislation authorizes the Rochester Joint Schools Construction Board to borrow money on behalf of the school district for the construction work. The state would later reimburse the money so the district can re-pay the debt. But the law was written to promote renovations directly linked to classroom instruction. This work receives the highest reimbursement, with other work eligible for less reimbursement or none at all. The nonreimbursable costs are usually referred to as the “local share,” and the city school district is on the hook for that money. The problem is, looking long term, the money for the local share isn’t there, says Rochester school board member Willa Powell. And she says she’s frustrated that no one is addressing the concern even though it’s obvious, since the district is facing an $80-million budget shortfall just for the 2011-2012 school year. “We’re essentially buying a house and buying into a mortgage trusting we can grow into it,” Powell says. “Belief that your income tomorrow is going to be greater than it is today isn’t a good thing.”

Cost of War

The funding shortage, Powell says, is due to the state’s history of making commitments to provide extra funding for “high-need” urban districts, and then reneging on those promises. Superintendent Jean-Claude Brizard acknowledges Powell’s concerns. But he says the project is critically important to the school district and the city. The district has to find the money, he says. “How many times will we get this kind of opportunity?” he says. But officials at City Hall have already warned the district not to come to them for financial help. And the district may want to think twice before going to Democratic State Assembly member David Gantt for help, too. “It’s not my problem,” Gantt said in a telephone interview from Albany. “I did my job. I did what I was supposed to do.” Gantt wrote the FMP legislation. The $325-million first phase is part of a $1-billion, 15-year project. Brizard has more immediate concerns about the project, too. The district and the school board have not been able to reach an agreement on swing space. The space is needed to relocate students until work on their school is completed. “I’m worried someone is going to put the brakes on this because each time we kick the can down the road some more, we risk losing the funding,” Brizard says.

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ELECTIONS | BY CHRISTINE CARRIE FIEN

RUMBLE IN THE ROC:

RICHARDS VS. JOHNSON

 

Tom Richards finished up his explanation of why former Mayor Bob Duffy — Richards was corporation counsel under Duffy — shut down the Fast Ferry. It’s a case he’s probably made a hundred times: continuing money losses, a $40-million debt, a “functionally bankrupt” ferry company. It was then that former Mayor Bill Johnson turned to face his opponent, crossed his arms, and looked Richards right in the eye. “I think that this is probably one of the most disingenuous arguments I’ve ever heard,” Johnson said. And that was just the beginning. Instead of standard interviews, City invited mayoral hopefuls Richards, the

THE FAST FERRY It was clear that Johnson arrived fully armed and eager to defend the project that to some people, rightly or wrongly, has come to define his legacy as mayor. He deflected any attempt to change the subject until he was ready. “I’ve been sitting on this for five years,” he said. The ferry, he said, wasn’t given enough time to succeed. And, he said, the city couldn’t have foreseen the spike in the cost of fuel, engine problems, and lower-thanprojected passenger levels. He conceded, however, that marketing was deficient. And, Johnson said, while Richards and other members of the city’s business community publicly praised the ferry, he was somehow the only person blamed after its failure. It’s true he hoped the ferry would work, Richards said, but the project was losing approximately $1 million a month. And the city had planned to borrow $15 million — on top of the $40 million the ferry company owed, which was guaranteed by the city — to keep the project going. “I’m not sure that some of the people   City

MARCH 16-22, 2011

who were involved understood what it meant to default on a $40-million guarantee,” Richards said. But Johnson said there was no threat that that the lenders were going to call the loan. They were partners in the ferry project, he said, and “had a clear, compelling business reason to establish the validity of ferry traffic on the Great Lakes.” (Johnson’s former finance director, Vince Carfagna, agrees with Johnson. There’s no indication that the $40-million loan was going to be called, he says. The city was, in fact, negotiating to borrow the additional $15 million from the same company, Carfagna says.) Johnson also said that Richards publicly supported the ferry and urged people to have patience if it didn’t succeed in the first year. But Richards said there’s also the matter of the 40-year, $1-a-year lease on the terminal building given to the original ferry operators. And there is the long-term lease in Toronto, which required a $250,000 annual payment from the City of Rochester even if the ferry stopped running. 

Democratic candidate, and Johnson, who is endorsed by the Working Families and Independence Parties, to have a one-on-one conversation on a broad range of issues. The men challenged each other on the state of Rochester’s neighborhoods, City Hall’s plans for downtown, the failed Renaissance Square project, and, of course, the Fast Ferry. It was a tense, informative, sometimes funny, sometimes openly hostile two hours. (The responses below have been edited for brevity and clarity. And you can find their responses to additional questions, submitted to them by e-mail, on our website, rochestercitynewspaper.com.)

JOHNSON: I’ve

been blamed for running this into the ground. I didn’t run the Fast Ferry. City Council hired an independent operator. When the City of Rochester took over the ferry, it was done open and above board. It was done with the public knowledge and public approval. And before we made our plans public, we spent a month doing due diligence. We went to Toronto. We met with the Port Authority, we met with the mayor of Toronto, we went to Ottawa and met with the provincial leaders. All of the apparent obstacles that CATS (the original operators) had run into, we wanted to resolve those before we decided to go into that venture. We eliminated all of those obstacles. This was a long-term venture. There was a business plan developed for 10 years. The financing was for 20. It was not set up to run and succeed in the first year. What you did, sir, was go against your own advice: Do not jump to hasty conclusions if it loses money in the first year. 

RICHARDS: The

issue here was recognizing the fact that the ferry was not going to succeed and had gotten the city into a case of financial extremis that it couldn’t afford

to continue. It’s true that we all hoped it would work. In fact, it would be nice if a ferry came up in the future. But it would have to be much smaller, and it would have to be run by private enterprise so we wouldn’t have the city’s money involved. We were stuck in a situation where we couldn’t go forward, where we had extreme risk. And it didn’t fail once; it failed twice. If we could’ve lost $500,000 a year, it might’ve been a good venture. But we were talking millions and millions of dollars. That’s the difference. I don’t think to this day that everybody understands how bad that situation was. I’m not here to accuse you of doing anything. I’m sorry it failed. I really am. 


WANTED

MIDTOWN

Johnson took the conversation from the ferry to Midtown, asking Richards the difference between those two projects. The financial risk with the Midtown redevelopment is limited, Richards said, but the ferry could’ve just kept losing money until the project was halted and the ship sold. And if the Paetec project at Midtown failed, Richards said, the city would still have the property. But the original ferry operators were given a 40-year lease on the terminal regardless if that project succeeded or not. The redevelopment of Midtown will have collateral benefits, Richards said. It helps convince people, including other potential developers, he said, that something is happening downtown. But Johnson questioned why the city was willing to take a risk on the Paetec project but not on the ferry and not on Ren Square. And, he said, the city bought Midtown from a private operator — the same way it bought the ferry. And Richards, he said, is not in a position to bring up the $1-a-year terminal lease considering the $1 land-transfer deal City Council did for Christa-Morgan to redevelop Midtown Tower.

JOHNSON: They

got nothing there but a hole in the ground, Tom.

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I disagree with your formulation. If that were true, what you were saying about the Midtown block, you wouldn’t have been so quick to kill the Renaissance Square deal. The same declining values, the same factors that are forcing the decline in downtown and affecting the Chase Tower, Bausch & Lomb, Frontier, all of those buildings — that same poison spills over from that block. You want patience and understanding. You stood before a forum at the Rochester Downtown Development Corporation and said we need at least 10 years to see the fruition of Midtown. And you were only willing to give 10 days on your watch to the Fast Ferry. In your world, everything’s got to be certain. In our community, the only way we’re going to get out of this free-fall is by willingness to take some risk. The only way we’re going to attract young families is to offer them the amenities that will make them want to live here, even to the extent that taxpayers may have to subsidize some of that for awhile. But in your world, that’s bad. You’re a bottomline guy: it’s all got to end in black ink. Any red ink? No good, no go. You want us to take a risk with the Midtown site. But we didn’t take a risk with Renaissance Square: $23 million of government money up in smoke.

what they will have at the end of that is better than what they had when they started.

JOHNSON:

RICHARDS: But

We’ll have a completely cleared site ready for development. And we’ll have the garage rebuilt so it can be used. And that is better than what we had before, which was a complex that was 80-percent vacant. The tower had been closed for years. The Bausch & Lomb building is assessed for less than it was built for. And one of the reasons that’s true is because Midtown was derelict and dragging down the property values. It had to be cleared up. And it’s better over time as a clear site than it was before. One of the things I was most concerned about with that ferry arrangement is that it would scare us out of taking risks. The idea, though, is to confine the risk so you know you can pay for it. And then design the transaction so if the people you enter into it with fail, you can get it back.

my point: All economic development is a risk. You want to call my risk-taking a mess, but you got money from the state to demolish and abate Midtown. I heard nothing in there about money to build. I don’t care where the money comes from. You say, “Oh, it comes from the state,” like we don’t pay state taxes. People in this city are going to be on the hook for a project whether it’s paid for by local, county, state, or federal funds.

RICHARDS:

JOHNSON: Here’s

HIGHEST PRICES PAID

THE RUMBLE CONTINUES! on page 8

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City 


RUMBLE IN THE ROC

continues from page 7

REN SQUARE

The aftershocks of the failure of the Renaissance Square project continue. MCC is still without a site for its downtown campus, there was great division in the community over the location and design of the bus station, and the theater component of the project struggles to find money and support. Ren Square also, some say, renewed a rift between county and city government. And the long-troubled block at Main and Clinton will remain troubled, at least for the foreseeable future. Though Duffy said that developers and projects were in the wings, just waiting for Ren Square to be resolved, none have materialized, at least publicly. Who’s to blame for the death of Ren Square? Richards said it’s hard to determine who bares the responsibility. But the city is busy, he said, picking up the pieces: the transit center is in its final design phase — a design that was substantially modified, he said, based on community input. And MCC, Richards said, is committed to remaining downtown. The theater, he said, is another story. No money has been raised to build it, he 

NEIGHBORHOODS

said, and it will run an operating deficit no matter what RBTL says. Main and Clinton is a priority, Richards said, but nothing will happen there until the transit center is built and the buses come off Main, which will “open up” the street. Johnson said he would’ve urged City Council to vote in favor of Ren Square. “As long as I’ve been in the city, we’ve been trying to make something happen on that block,” he said. “I can tell you that during my 12 years in office, we exhausted every possibility, to no avail.” There’s no evidence, Johnson said, that either the city or the county was willing to compromise to make the project happen. At least the money spent on Midtown will clear the site, he said. But $23 million was spent on Ren Square, he said, with nothing to show for it.

 

One of the chief criticisms Johnson has lodged at his successor is that the Duffy administration focused too much on downtown and let the city neighborhoods languish. Johnson said the administration was too heavy-handed when it came to neighborhood planning, shutting residents out of the process. But Richards said what the Duffy administration did was to focus on implementation, so people could see improvements actually happening in the neighborhoods. Johnson bristled at what he took to be an accusation that all his administration did was plan. Anthony Square, Newcroft Park, the Carter Street recreation center, and the Upper Falls shopping center are only a few of his administration’s many accomplishments in the neighborhoods, he said. Richards defended the Duffy administration’s record, as well. Downtown gets a lot of media coverage, he said, which feeds the perception that the neighborhoods are secondary. Eighty percent of the city’s economic development and housing money goes to the neighborhoods, he said. And the

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We have not lost all the money. The only money that was available was the

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end up with a new, reconfigured MCC. But we’re also going to end up with that block of East Main Street still standing there looking like a part of Saigon. I joined (County Executive) Maggie Brooks in Albany and Washington to lobby for funds for Renaissance Square, so I know how hard it was to raise that money. I don’t think we could just cavalierly let it go away. If it were physically and politically impossible for Brooks and Duffy to come together, they should have called on the people in this community — we used to be able to do this — and got people together. Let’s find a compromise. I saw no evidence that any of that ever happened. And in this current environment, how are we ever going to get that much money? I think we have to go out of our way to make these deals work.

RICHARDS:

There’s a disagreement here about the level of neighborhood involvement and the way we do it. I don’t accept that we’ve abandoned it. I do accept that we’ve done it differently. Neighbors Building Neighborhoods [a Johnson-era program that encouraged citizen-based planning] worked great in some areas, and other areas it didn’t. That’s true for any program. But some people were very frustrated because they had gone through this long process and nothing had happened. So we felt it was necessary to move from this broader planning process, a lot of which was good, to implementation. We do have a program now, Focused Investment, where we go into individual neighborhoods and go through a process that includes visioning — which is soliciting people’s random ideas for the 

So at the end of the day what will happen is yes, we may end up with a transit center. We may

RICHARDS:

JOHNSON:

majority of housing units the city has added in recent years, he said, have been in the neighborhoods.

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neighborhood — then going into a design phase, and eventually into implementation. We need to combine the visioning — what we would love to have — with the practical elements of the market: what’s going to be sustainable here? What can be built, practically speaking? If Bob Duffy was anything, he was out and about. He had Mayor’s Nights Out where he’d go to various neighborhoods. The budget process itself was designed to take citizen input. We had meetings all over the city. When they did the surveys with respect to how Duffy was performing, one of the highest ratings he got was his commitment to the neighborhoods.

JOHNSON: They

didn’t invent Focused Investment. We started that concept. They may have improved on it. I think, to some degree, they narrowed it by saying upfront, “We’re only going to do these four neighborhoods. The rest of the city is going to have to wait.” I think people 

money for the transit center and MCC. The money for MCC is still in place, and the transit center has $72 million. Those two projects will be different, and they won’t have as dramatic an impact on that block, I agree with that. Some of it was wasted, no question about it. One of the reasons it was wasted was because they designed the thing three times. So some of that money was gone no matter what we would’ve built over there. But that block, as bad as it looks, is manageable. Midtown was unmanageable. No private entity would ever take Midtown and try to do something with it. We can’t do everything at once. I think if we do Midtown and if MCC goes into the Sibley Building, then we will have made significant improvements in downtown. And at some point in time we would be in a position to have that block redeveloped. One of the reasons it’s derelict is because everything around it is derelict.  

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 City

MARCH 16-22, 2011

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are frustrated by that, and I think they feel that they’ve been shut out of the process. What we did through NBN was a process of negotiation and consensus building. Those residents felt empowered, and it took a long time to build up that feeling among them: that they were not wasting their time. ArtWalk is a classic example. That started as nothing more than a street construction plan. And residents got involved, started talking about the assets of the neighborhoods, how they could slow down traffic. Those residents said, “Not only will we bring you ideas, but we will try to develop support for these ideas.” And they went out and they lobbied their state officials to bring in earmarked money for that project. When I listen to this discussion here today and in the past, downtown is pretty much elevated as something that’s apart, above and beyond the rest of the city. Downtown is just one more neighborhood in the City of Rochester. Its interests should not supersede the interests of any other neighborhood. Nor should its interests be subordinated. 

Comment on this and our additional coverage online at

www.rochestercitynewspaper.com


FINANCES 

The City of Rochester is struggling to close a significant budget deficit in the upcoming fiscal year. The projected figure is upward of $50 million. While police and fire have been exempt from cuts in previous years, Acting Mayor Carlos Carballada has made it clear they cannot be spared this time; the problem is too severe. Richards said he’d use a three-step process to address the problem: assess the situation and the city’s available resources, than find ways to conserve without affecting critical services, and, he said, a tax increase has to be on the table. Johnson agreed that a tax increase may be necessary, and people understand that, he said, if they’re told why and what the money is paying for. He also argued for a countywide fire department.

JOHNSON: A countywide fire department would give the city $50-million plus in relief. I think we need to look at ideas like this. And I think this is something that is not as threatening to suburbanites as talking about consolidating their towns and villages. The outlying suburban areas are having a hard time finding enough volunteers. And we should take the opportunity to restructure our costs. There are things that we 

MAINTENANCE OF EFFORT

probably shouldn’t be doing, and I think we need to have a community conversation about that.

RICHARDS: The fire

issue: we agree on that. Everything has got to be on the table. The budgeting, in the past, has started with a whole bunch of things getting exempted from cuts. By the time you finish, there’s very little to touch, and you wind up closing a rec center because the rec center hasn’t got a union, which is not what we want to do here. We’re not going to be able to tax our way out of this problem. Whatever we do there would be relatively small and an attempt to keep the situation from getting worse. With pensions, that’s a problem the State of New York is going to have to help solve. They control it. I think this whole thing has gotten out of control in terms of demonizing people. Of course there are some abuses. There is in any large system. But if you got every single abuse you could think of out of there, you’d still have a problem. The average worker for the City of Rochester is not abusing the system. They’re fairly but modestly paid, and their pensions are not huge. And by the way, we promised it to them. 

Former Mayor Duffy took every opportunity he could to criticize the 2007 Maintenance of Effort law, which prevents City Hall from lowering its monetary contribution to the city school district. That number is currently set at $119 million a year. And there has been some news recently in this area: State Assembly member David Gantt says he’s writing legislation to repeal or change the law.

RICHARDS: The MOE is a problem. And this is the year it’ll come home to roost. Think about the city’s budget circumstances. And even though I’m sure we can get that deficit down, this is the year we will do something in the city because we have a MOE. In other words, we may lay off a policeman because we have to give them the MOE. We may close a rec center. The point is, we’re not making a judgment there. That’s being dictated to us. And it doesn’t allow the city to take into consideration the circumstances and what is best. That’s just bad public policy.

The MOE was horrendous. And I think that’s something that ought to be re-examined and remediated, because I think that there’s a way that the school district’s interests could be taken care of without putting a noose around the neck of the city. In 2004, which was another horrendous budget year for us, we put everything on the table. We did not exempt police and fire from budget cuts. And we also took $7 million back from the school district because I said to the superintendent: “You’re getting all kinds 

of money out of Albany. You’ve got to help us out here. You’re part of this problem, as well.” Now with the MOE, we could never have that discussion.

JOHNSON:

THE FINAL ROUNDS! on page 10

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MAYORAL CONTROL Mayoral control of the Rochester school district was the big story of 2010, but fell almost completely off the radar when its chief advocate, Bob Duffy, left for Albany. A bill did pass in the State Assembly, but without the support of local Senators Jim Alesi and Joe Robach, both Republicans, the issue hasn’t gone anywhere in the State Senate. And it doesn’t seem likely to. Johnson is against mayoral control, and Richards appears lukewarm at best. Without active lobbying from the next mayor, mayoral control is unlikely to happen, at least in the short term. The good thing about the discussion the community had about mayoral control, Richards said, is that it focused attention on the problems at the school district. The bad thing, he said, is that it poisoned the relationship between City Hall and the district. The two bodies need to get along, Richards said, because their futures are inextricably linked. Johnson said running the schools would be an extraordinary undertaking — too much for City Hall to handle in addition to its traditional duties. He agreed that City Hall and the school district need to establish better collaboration and partnership.

JOHNSON: I don’t

think mayoral control, the way it was designed and the way it happened in other communities, really gets to the core of the problem. I think that we’ve got a more immediate issue now, given the war that both the president of the union and the

interesting thing about mayoral control is that a lot of people in the city

think we already have it. They blame the mayor, because “he’s the mayor.” I supported mayoral control when it came up. And I support it because I felt that it’s dramatically important for us to change the situation at the school district. I saw mayoral control as a way to shake up the system. What I am committed to do is push to improve the relationship with the school district. And I support [city schools Superintendent] Jean-Claude Brizard. I don’t think we should be chasing him out of town. I think that’s a mistake. If we chase people out of town every two years just because we decide we don’t like them, we’re never going to make any progress. I’m sure I don’t agree with everything he does, but that’s not the point. The point is we’ve got to stick with something for awhile, give it a chance to be successful, and the city needs to support it. And if you have to have mayoral control to do it, fine. But I don’t think you necessarily do.

RICHARDS: The

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superintendent have declared on each other. And it’s going to be the last man standing. That’s not healthy for this community, and my intention is — even before I’m elected mayor — to try to bring those two people together. They’ve got to cease and desist in the inflammatory rhetoric they’re using against each other. It’s not healthy. It’s not productive. I said to Bob Duffy: “Let me tell you something: I had a person in my office — when I was mayor — whose job was to field complaints. Sixty percent of the calls he got every week were, ‘My child didn’t get on the bus.’ ‘My child had this problem with a teacher.’ Sixty percent of his time was spent referring these calls over to Broad Street (the district’s central office).” I don’t think anybody at City Hall appreciates how running the schools can just disrupt their day-to-day business because of the intensity people have about what goes on with their children. So we need to really keep those two bureaucracies separate. And I think that given the fact we invest $119 million into that enterprise, we need to have more say about how that money is spent than we currently have.

THE DUFFY RECORD

Duffy may be at the state capital, but his ghost is everywhere in Rochester: Midtown was his project, he’s the one who got the mayoral-control ball rolling, some people blame indecisiveness on his part for the collapse of Ren Square, and he was behind Zero Tolerance — a controversial and expensive police crackdown that took effect after two particularly brutal killings in the city. Richards said Zero Tolerance is no longer in effect, but Johnson said the repercussions of the program continue, including heightened tensions with the minority community. The special election, too, is a referendum of sorts on Duffy. Richards was Duffy’s corporation counsel and will undoubtedly be evaluated on the former mayor’s record. Johnson, on the other hand, says he regrets endorsing Duffy — who was police chief under Johnson — and that he wants to roll back many of the changes Duffy made after Johnson left office.

focused and much more disciplined than he is. The other side of it is, in terms of developing enthusiasm, he’s probably better than I am at it. I stand by the Duffy record. I’m proud of it. I think that the priorities that are there, the projects that we’ve started, those are the things I’m going to try to finish. But I think even if Bob Duffy were here today, he would be a different mayor. The circumstances facing the city are significantly different from when he originally took office. One of the things he was most successful at was increasing our aid from the state. And he was able to get the money for Midtown because of his effectiveness in that regard. That’s not where we are today. I don’t care how effective he was, he wouldn’t get those things. He would be faced with a significant set of financial problems that would require us to manage differently. And it would require us to focus and finish much more than we did before. With all due respect to Duffy, I personally think I’m better suited to do that, just because our personalities are different.

RICHARDS: I want to confess upfront that I’m a different personality than Bob Duffy. I am much more  10 City MARCH 16-22, 2011

JOHNSON: He’s acting like Bob Duffy was mayor years ago. He was mayor 60 days ago. Let me make clear there are things on the Duffy record I will not continue. I will not continue mayoral control, I will not continue this ambivalence toward the neighborhoods, I will not continue Zero Tolerance. The residuals of Zero Tolerance are still there; the residuals of hiring and pushing people out on the street before they were property trained. It’s about new ideas. It’s about taking new approaches. The voters have a clear choice. If they want the status quo, they choose Tom Richards. They want change, they choose Bill Johnson.

RICHARDS: Well, I

guess another way of saying that is if you want to go backward, choose Bill. If you want to go forward, choose me. 


ELECTIONS | BY CHRISTINE CARRIE FIEN

Alex White, the Green Party candidate for Rochester mayor, says a local-labor requirement and more apprenticeship programs would help lift people out of poverty. Photo by matt deturck

Green Party’s Alex White wants ‘a better Rochester’ Alex White (alexwhiteformayor.com) has the distinction of being the only person on the ballot for mayor who hasn’t already been mayor. So if you’re looking for a fresh face, White says, he’s your only choice. White is a small-business owner and the Green Party candidate for Rochester mayor. He looks like a hybrid of Michael Moore and Bill Gates and claims to be incapable of having a flattering photograph taken. His green scarf — green for the Green Party, with “White for Mayor” stitched in white, of course — is a gift from a supporter who couldn’t afford to give cash. The scarf is a good symbol for White’s campaign. Rochester, he says, needs to build from the ground up. He repeatedly talks about requiring the use of local labor and creating more apprenticeship programs on public construction projects in the city. It would help lift people out of poverty, he says, generate more spending, raise sales-tax revenue, and improve the city’s bottom line. “As a small-business owner, you really want to help me? Have my customers have more money,” he says. “It’s a cyclone that lifts everyone.” And as a small-business owner (he owns Boldo’s Armory on Monroe Avenue), White says that the city’s regulations are a bureaucratic nightmare. He says that among other changes, he wants to streamline the process for obtaining permits and licenses. White also says he would “recognize the primacy of business activity

and not be held hostage by the complaints of nearby homeowners.” White says he wants to create more mixed-use neighborhoods by zoning through “function,” which means situating businesses not by residential and commercial classifications, for example, but by characteristics like hours and car usage. Under function zoning, for example, residential areas might allow businesses with minimal car use and no additional parking requirements from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. That would be a good match for a child day-care center, White says, but not a bar. The zoning change, he says, would create more vibrant, walkable neighborhoods. The biggest issue facing the city is its

$50-million budget deficit. Raising taxes, White says, is not an option. He has a long list of ideas and attaches a budget figure to each one: for example, consolidations with the city school district in the law, human resources, and other departments would save the city about $10 million, he says. White opposes consolidation of the city and county water systems, unless the county comes through with a price approximately 10 times of what the city department grosses every year. “I believe that 50 years from now, water is going to be the Number 1 asset of any community,” he says. “And to jeopardize or trade away an asset that I feel is going continues on page 12

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to continue to increase in value I think is ridiculous.” To raise revenue, White says he would — reluctantly — look at things like increasing parking fees or a “small increase” in water fees to improve the city’s aging water system. White says the city will have to reduce its police budget, and he says he’d try to do that without cutting jobs, if possible. The money saved would be invested in recreation services, he says, to extend hours and to station social workers and others at rec centers to help children and families. White is right in line with Rochester Police Chief Jim Sheppard when he talks about a return to community policing. Cops should be out in the neighborhoods, he says, fostering relationships with residents and business owners. “Crime needs to be approached from a holistic level,” he says. “We need to look at the causes, and we need to look at the way we treat crime at the end. We need to look at things like drug treatment and prison rehabilitation as part of the way we reduce crime. And we need to look at youth and find ways in which we can use employment and recreation as ways to give alternatives to crime, because the kids are either bored or poor.” White does not support the city’s Focused

Investment strategy, in which resources are brought together in an intense effort to improve targeted neighborhoods. The program has not improved the city as a whole, he says, and is inherently unfair. He says it’s difficult to justify to residents of the struggling 14621 neighborhood, for example, the use of their tax dollars to improve some other area. White says a better strategy is to concentrate development money on transportation systems. That would link neighborhoods, he says, and create “corridors of development” throughout the city. Rochester could create an intermodal station, he says, and work to get away from the “hub-and-spoke” bus system and build multiple, smaller hubs throughout the city. That would encourage broader development, he says. White proposes a number of ideas related to energy. He wants to create a

public utility in the city to help reduce energy costs for residents and businesses. (Democratic candidate Tom Richards has raised questions about the idea’s feasibility and said at a recent forum that since RG&E is one of the city’s biggest taxpayers.) Although he says it’s not a long-term solution to energy problems, White says that as much as possible, city government should convert its fleet to electric vehicles, 12 City MARCH 16-22, 2011

and there should be a charging station in at least one city parking garage. Although there’s not an overwhelming demand for electric vehicles at the moment, White says, there’s no chance they will ever catch on without the availability of charging stations. White also wants to implement a symbolic ban on hydrofracking in the City of Rochester and to lobby for “the strongest possible protections” for Hemlock and Canadice Lakes and the surrounding land. The city sold the property around the lakes to the state, but still owns the water. “This is our water supply,” he says. “Hydrofracking around that can pollute our city’s water supply.” White suggests using city residents to

rehab vacant houses for resale. The city has approximately 2,800 vacant structures — residential and commercial — and about 200 of those are on the demolition list. Demolition is a complicated, expensive process, and some properties sit vacant for years before they are torn down. Population across the region isn’t growing, however, and Rochester’s population has been declining for years, which is why there is a surplus of housing stock. “We do have a surplus of housing,” White says. “We also have a surplus of homelessness. Perhaps we could put these two together through the Rochester Housing Authority. I believe it’s worth looking into.” White opposes mayoral control of the city

school district, but says as mayor he might encourage voters to oust some current school board members. “I have attended school board meetings,” he says. “They are some of the most dysfunctional groupings that I have ever been privileged to witness.” Many members are dedicated and knowledgeable, White says, but as a whole the board seems unable to work together or compromise. White says he also wants Superintendent Jean-Claude Brizard out. Brizard, he says, has lost the confidence of teachers and staff. His reforms are doomed to failure, White says, because of that lack of support. And White objects to Brizard’s support for charter schools and accuses Brizard of fostering the privatization of public schools. White’s mayoral run seems like a long shot; he faces powerhouse candidates Tom

Richards, the Democratic Party’s candidate, and former mayor Bill Johnson, who is endorsed by the Working Families and Independence Parties.


In addition, some of White’s ideas seem simplistic or unrealistic. For example, while the Rochester school board is polarized, as he says, its members are still able to work together on many issues. The polarization has not brought district business to a complete halt. And there’s no guarantee that new school board members wouldn’t behave in the same way, or worse, than current members. White insists that his proposal to rehab rather than demolish city homes would be cost-neutral, but it would take a significant investment to bring these homes back. Many of them are in deplorable shape: damaged, vandalized, and stripped of everything down to the wires. Many are on small lots and lack driveways, which makes them undesirable to potential buyers. And while White says the city’s Focused Investment program is unfair, the financial noose is tightening at every level of government. The argument could be made that it’s better to target money to the neighborhoods where city officials believe it will do the most good, rather than spreading it out so thinly that it makes no appreciable difference anywhere. In other neighborhoods, the compatibility of business and residential uses is a sore point, and some residents may question White’s insistence that business activity “not be held hostage by the complaints of nearby homeowners.” White’s not alone in arguing for an end to the hub-and-spoke bus system. But since the Rochester Genesee Regional Transportation Authority is in the final design phase for the new Mortimer Street transit center, it doesn’t appear that huband-spoke is going anywhere soon. And

although Rochester’s mayor appoints two members to the transit authority board — and can argue publicly for change — the transit authority controls the system, not the mayor, and the authority continues to support the hub-and-spoke system. All that said, White says his campaign is about more than winning: it’s about creating change. If his advocacy for local labor helps get a local-labor requirement for the transit-center project or the massive city schools renovation project, to cite two examples, he says, that’s a victory. “I believe in democracy so strongly that I believe that multiple people having more discussions can only help us come up with solutions,” White says. And maybe some of the things he’s pushing for, like using LED lighting in the city, will happen sooner rather than later because he’s talking about them. A major difference between White and his two opponents is his lack of experience running a major business or institution. Despite that, White says he’s ready, qualified, and wants to be mayor. And, he says, you can hire experience. “I believe if you want things to be better, I’m the person,” he says. “Previous governmental experience has in many ways gotten us to the place where we’re sitting now. Is Rochester better? I’m talking about new things. I’m talking about the future. I’m talking about a better Rochester for all of us. That’s not what my opponents are talking about.”

The write-in candidate Ann Lewis is the sole write-in candidate for the March 29 special election. Dean Wojtcazak dropped out on Monday. Lewis has a master’s degree in public administration. She’s concerned about the financial waste she says she sees in the city budget, and she is disturbed by the racial and economic inequalities that exist in city neighborhoods. She is also quick to challenge the records of candidates Tom Richards and former Mayor Bill Johnson. “It’s interesting to me that Bill Johnson is complaining about Tom Richards and the Duffy administration, but he helped to create that administration when he endorsed Bob Duffy over Wade Norwood,” Lewis says. The city, Lewis says, needs new blood. The biggest problem facing the city, she says, is lack of revenue. She is not in favor of raising property taxes, but she would explore a commuter tax and a regional tax on fastfood companies. And she says she supports raising personal income tax on New York’s high-income earners. — Tim Louis Macaluso

GET OUT AND

TAKE IN ROCHESTER’S ART SCENE IN

ONE DAY!

Saturday, April 16 1-7 p.m. Various venues in downtown and the Neighborhood of the Arts Some of Rochester’s biggest and brightest music, art, dance, theater, film, and literary groups will put on FREE or low-cost performances, lectures, tours, and more.

CITY

Participating organizations include: Geva Theatre Center, George Eastman House, Eastman School of Music, Writers & Books, Golden Link Folk Society, and many more to come! Keep checking City Newspaper and rochestercitynewspaper.com for more details and a list of the special offers. Or find the event page on Facebook.

rochestercitynewspaper.com City 13


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All participants will receive a behavioral treatment for sleep problems, at no charge, either as part of the study or after. Half of the participants will receive a drug called armodafinil that may be helpful in reducing daytime tiredness and fatigue.

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• Be between the ages 21 and 75 • Have finished radiation treatments and/or chemotherapy • Insomnia began or got worse with the onset of cancer or treatment

Please call Jenine Hoefler (585) 276-3559 or Joseph Roscoe, Ph.D. (585) 275-9962 at the University of Rochester James P. Wilmot Cancer Center for more information about this research study

For more Tom Tomorrow, including a political blog and cartoon archive, visit http://thismodernworld.com

Urban Action This week’s calls to action include the following events and activities. (All are free and open to the public, unless otherwise noted.)

Groups to rally against education cuts Metro Justice, the Rochester Teachers Association, and other groups have organized the “Rally Against the Cuts” at 5 p.m. on Thursday, March 17, at the Liberty Pole. The rally is a response to Governor Andrew Cuomo’s budget proposal.

Brighton public safety meeting

The Town of Brighton will hold a public meeting to present results of a study of the town’s operation of Fire and Emergency Medical Services at 7 p.m. on Wednesday, March 16, at the West Brighton Fire Department, 2695 West Henrietta Road. A second meeting will be held at 7 p.m. on Thursday, March 17, at Brighton Town Hall, 2300 Elmwood Avenue. 14 City MARCH 16-22, 2011

Celebrate the Susan B. in you

The Greater Rochester Chapter of NOW and the First Unitarian Church will present Nora Bredes, director of the Susan B. Anthony Center for Women’s Leadership, at the UR on at 7 p.m. Monday, March 21. “You Are Susan B. Anthony,” Bredes’ talk, will be held at the First Unitarian Church, 220 Winton Road South.

Rochester’s unfinished urban symphony

The Rochester Regional Community Design Center will present “The Three Planners” on at 11:45 a.m. on Wednesday, March 23. The luncheon’s featured speakers are George Dark, partner of Urban Strategies in Toronto; Jonathan Lane, senior principal of ICON Architecture; and Benjamin Wauford, principal of Cooper Carry and director of the company’s New

York office. All three have experience with Rochester projects. The event will be held at the Inn on Broadway, 26 Broadway. Tickets: $35, includes the luncheon. Seating is limited. Reservations suggested. Information: 271-0520 or www.rrcdc.org.

Two black Americas

Metro Justice will show the film “Two Nations of Black America,” at 7 p.m. on Thursday, March 17. The film features Harvard scholar Henry Louis Gates Jr., who will explore the gap between the upper and lower classes of black America. A discussion will be held after the film by J. B. Afoh-Manin, attorney and president of the Rochester Black Bar Association. The event is at 167 Flanders Street.


Dining pizza; linguine with baby clams, served with a red or white sauce; and walnut-crusted chicken with a brown-sugar glaze. The restaurant also features an extensive bar menu, including red, white, and sparkling wines; a collection of mixed drinks, including several unique martinis (including one featuring absinthe); and bottled and draft beers, including the restaurant’s signature craft beer, Monroe’s Canal Water Ale. Monroe’s is located at 3001 Monroe Ave. Prices range from $9 to $28. It opens at 11:30 a.m. Monday-Saturday and is closed on Sundays. For more information, call 348-9103 or visit monroes3001.com.

Bobbin’ for beer

The artichokes French at Rosey’s; the Italian restaurant recently relocated to Penfield. PHOTO BY MIKE HANLON

Stop and smell the Rosey’s [ CHOW HOUND ] BY SUSIE HUME

After 14 years of serving affordable, authentic Italian food, Rosey’s Italian Café became something of an institution for downtown diners, many of whom were saddened earlier this month when they found their lunchtime spot of choice vacant. Fortunately for those regulars (and for the as-of-yet unacquainted), Rosey’s Italian Café has not vanished — it has just relocated. After being unable to come to a new lease agreement with their downtown landlord, Rick and Rosey Vitale immediately began searching for a new space in the city to house their beloved restaurant. Feeling as if they could not find an equivalent place (in terms of space, parking availability and cost) in Rochester itself, the Vitales eventually chose to move the restaurant to their own neighborhood of Penfield, in the space formerly occupied by Rigatoni’s Italian Café. The tried-and-true menu has been kept essentially the same, featuring both Rick and Rosey’s family recipes (Rosey’s parents own another well-known downtown Italian food haven, Mama Rosa, on Norton Street). Some of the restaurant’s most popular choices include lasagna, chicken and eggplant parmesan, manicotti, and gnocchi, as well as appetizers like greens and beans and fried calamari. The new location has also allowed the casual

Italian café to offer dinner hours, something it previously only offered on Fridays and occasional Saturdays in the city (dinner menu selections and prices are the same). “We really miss downtown,” says Rick Vitale. “This was a big move for us after so many years, but we’re really hoping for the best.” Rosey’s Italian Café is located at 2133 Five Mile Line Road in Penfield. Prices range from $6 to $12. It is open Tuesday-Saturday 11 a.m.-9 p.m., Sunday 4 p.m.-8 p.m. and closed on Monday. For more information, call 3855600 or visit roseysitaliancafe.com.

Puerto Rico comes to Maplewood

In the last Chow Hound column, we announced the relocation of Dark Horse Coffee to Village Gate from its former Maplewood location. That spot is now home to El Coqui, a Puerto Rican restaurant helmed by Samantha Merced-Nieves, which is set to hold its grand opening on Friday, March 18. The menu features a wide variety of Puerto Rican foods (recipes that MercedNieves credits to her grandmother), including some familiar options like rice and beans, plantains, and meat empanadillas, as well as some harder-to-find selections like octopus or codfish salad, sancocho (a hearty, traditional Puerto Rican soup), and potato bowls

(mashed potatoes formed into bowls with a choice of meat cooked into the middle). In addition, Merced-Nieves is serving up kidfriendly options like pizza empanadillas. El Coqui is located at 1182 Dewey Ave. Prices range from $3 to $9. It is open Tuesday-Saturday 11 a.m.-8 p.m. For more information, call 458-9828 or visit its Facebook page.

Monroe’s on Monroe

Pittsford’s historic Spring House — built as a hostel and spa for Erie Canal travelers in the late 1820’s — is now home to the aptly named restaurant Monroe’s, which held its grand opening earlier this month. The ItalianAmerican restaurant is situated in the space formerly occupied by Northfield Food and Drink, which closed in late 2009. The owners, Katherine Mott and Kenneth Nozik, also own the bakery-cafe Katherine’s Gourmet Creations, which was formerly located in Bushnell’s Basin, but has now been moved to the basement of the Spring House, below the new restaurant. Monroe’s offers a wide selection of antipasti, salads, paninis, flatbread pizzas, pastas, and entrees. Some notable offerings include chicken panini with arugula, red onions, grana padano (an Italian hard cheese somewhat akin to a mild parmesan), and lemon-parsley aioli; anchovy, Spanish onion, and olive flatbread

What do bobcats and beer have in common? They’ll both be the center of attention on Wednesday, March 23, for the second annual Bobcat Challenge 2.0 between Tap and Mallet (381 Gregory St.) and Lovin’ Cup (300 Park Point Drive). It started last year, when both establishments approached Sly Fox Brewery to create a house brew; Sly Fox obliged and a small team from each venue went down to the brewery’s headquarters in Pennsylvania to help craft their specialty brews. With their respective beers launching within just one day of each other, Tap and Mallet co-owner Joe McBane and Leslie Zinck, Lovin’ Cup coowner and director of marketing and special events, decided to host a “barrel race” at Tap and Mallet, wherein each restaurant tried to rally their troops to drain their keg the quickest. The aforementioned bobcat was the “booby” prize for the losing bar — last year it was Lovin’ Cup — which had to prominently display the taxidermy horror. This year, Lovin’ Cup has the home-field advantage and will be serving up its new brew, TW Fearless Pale Ale, while Tap and Mallet will serve SlyPA No. 2 (a revamped version of last year’s brew). If Lovin’ Cup succeeds this year, “Bob” the bobcat will be moving to Tap and Mallet until next year’s keg race. The race begins promptly at 8 p.m., but those interested in supporting their favorite brew are encouraged to arrive at 7 p.m. so that they can buy drink tickets for the race. Drink tickets cost $3 per 12 oz. pour and are limited to two per person. For more information visit lovincup.com or tapandmallet.com. Do you have a food or restaurant tip for our Chow Hound? Send it to food@rochester-citynews.com.

Correcting ourselves

The March 9 Dining review incorrectly referred to Acme Bar & Pizza as Acme Bar and Grill. rochestercitynewspaper.com City 15


Upcoming [ JAM ] Phish Wednesday, June 8. Darien Lake Performing Arts Center, Darien Center. 7 p.m. $45+. Livenation.com.

Music

[ ROCK ] Motley Crue and Poison w/New York Dolls Friday, July 22. Darien Lake Performing Arts Center, Darien Center. 7 p.m. $29.50+. Livenation.com. [ ROCK ] Def Leppard w/Heart Sunday, August 21 Darien Lake Performing Arts Center, Darien Center. 7:30 p.m. $26+. Livenation.com.

Terravita, GTA, Roots Collider Wednesday, March 16 Montage Music Hall, 50 N. Chestnut St. 8 p.m. | $5-$10 | 18+ [ DUBSTEP/DRUM & BASS ] Due to overwhelming

demand, local event-promotion outfit Riproc has decided to move its Sockhop party to Montage Music Hall. You can expect a solid night of music with local support from Skanntronn, DJ on WBER’s Elektrobank program, as well as tunes from the talented DJ Bittle. Also taking the stage are the likes of local band Roots Collider and DJ duo GTA. Guests are also in for infectious beats from Terravita (pictured), the Boston-based crew that is perhaps best known otherwise as the chart-topping electro group, Hot Pink Delorean. — BY MATT HERRINGTON

Trashcan Sinatras Thursday, March 17 Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Drive 8:30 p.m. | $15-$20 | 292-9940 [ ACOUSTIC ROCK ] Celebrating 25 years as a band,

Scotland’s Trashcan Sinatras have embarked on an acousticonly tour. The band layers intricate guitar work with easygoing, breezy harmonies to form delightful indie pop that sounds as fresh today as it did when the band first started out. The foursome is taking requests for each show on the tour, with up to five of the songs most requested in any city will be incorporated into that concert’s set list. If you have a favorite beloved-but-obscure b-side, now is the time to ask the band to play it (e-mail requests@trashcansinatras.com, with the subject line “song requests”). Rochester’s Dave & Marissa open the show. — BY ANDY KLINGENBERGER

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Wednesday, March 16 [ Acoustic/Folk ] IDK. Dinosaur Bar-B-Que, 99 Court St. dinosaurbarbque. com. 9 p.m. Free. Oisin MacDiarmada & Seamus Begley. McGraw’s Irish Pub, 146 W Commercial St, East Rochester. 348-9091, mcgrawsirishpub.com. 7 p.m. $10. Ralph Louis. Lento, 274 N Goodman. 271-3470. 7:30 p.m. Free. Tom Gravino. Cafe 54, 54 W Main St, Victor. 742-3649. 6 p.m. Free.

Rainline at the California Brew Haus. PHOTO BY FRANK DE BLASE

Joshua Bell Sunday, March 20 Kodak Hall at Eastman Theater, 60 Gibbs St. 3 p.m. | $24-$85 | 454-2100 [ CLASSICAL ] For this concert, the Rochester

Philharmonic Orchestra, with Music Director Christopher Seaman, will be joined by guest violinist Joshua Bell, in his hands a 1713 Gibson ex Huberman Stradivarius violin with a late 18th Century bow by Francois Tourte. The sounds these masters will create will be Max Bruch’s Concerto No. 1 in g minor for violin and orchestra, Op. 26 (1866-1867). Bell is a Grammy Award-winning artist, having recorded more than 35 CDs. He has not only played with the New York Philharmonic, he was elected to the group’s Board of Directors in 2010. Bell’s concerts this season have taken him throughout the United States, Canada, and Europe. — BY PALOMA A. CAPANNA

Civil Twilight Tuesday, March 22 Water Street Music Hall, 204 N. Water St. 8 p.m. | $10-$12 | 325-5600 [ ROCK ] A Civil Twilight is a rock trio out of South

Africa that likes the big rock — you know, that whole U2, Oasis, Verve splendor that takes pop simplicity and gives it a mammoth makeover. The band’s melodies are close-to-the-bone rock ’n’ roll, perfect for four walls, a pool table, and a bar, with sonic potential to fill a cathedral. Water Street is about halfway between the two, so this ought to be cool. A Silent Film opens. — BY FRANK DE BLASE

[ Blues ] Songs of Freedom feat. AKOMA. Strong National Museum of Play, 1 Manhattan Sq. 263-2700. 7:30 p.m. Free w/admission.

Dick Tracy on Easter Sunday [ review ] by frank de blase

Remember when going to a concert was an event? You got your hair done, made a play for a chick completely out of your league, made the dinner plans, the after-party plans, and laid out your outfit in your head a week before? Well, if you’ve checked out any of the recent 70’s Soul Jam concerts that have blown through town, you’ve found yourself smack in the middle of a stylin’ and profilin’ scene. We’re talking gentlemen in suits looking like characters from a Dick Tracy strip on Easter Sunday, sporting arm charms that had been poured into their dresses without anybody saying when. But these are far from simply being look-see affairs; the music is incredible. Saturday night at the Auditorium Theatre, a near-sell-out crowd piled in to hear The Manhattans, The Stylistics, The Delphonics, and Cuba Gooding, Sr. do their thing. As with a lot of these groups, members have come and gone over the years. In the case of The Manhattans, Sonny Bivins is the only original cat from the group’s inception in 1962. Who cares? The group sounded incredible. The harmonies were on the mark, and the moves were as smooth as the members’ electric-blue suits. They killed on hits like “Kiss and Say Goodbye” and “Shining

Star,” frequently bringing the crowd to its feet before bringing it to its knees, street corner a cappella style. Cuba Gooding, Sr. — the one remaining Main Ingredient — wailed through a tight set featuring the group’s 1972 hit “Everybody Plays The Fool,” his voice sounding exactly like it did on the record. The whole bill was outstanding, and even the sound, which can sometimes be a little bottom heavy in the Aud, was aces. Do yourself a solid and check out the Soul Jam the next time it comes through. I’m already laying out my clothes. It was a triple bill at The California Brew Haus later that night with Methanol, The Fallen, and Rainline. I caught the majority of Rainline’s set. The band was tight and punchy and eager to dish out several new numbers. The music is brash and modern melodic rock with the occasional progressive detour and stomp on the accelerator. Instead of digging into the bag to pull out what you’d think were appropriate covers, the boys opted to give the hot ’n’ heavy treatment to Cyndi Lauper and a Flock Of Seagulls. Perhaps they were showing their true colors? (Screw you, I’m not apologizing; that’s some funny stuff right there).

[ Classical ] Eastman Trombone Choir. Eastman School of MusicKilbourn Hall, 26 Gibbs St. 274-1000, esm.rochester. edu. 8 p.m. Free. Trudy Moon. Geneva on the Lake, 1001 Lochland Rd, Geneva. . 6:30-9 p.m. Free. [ DJ/Electronic ] Bad Wolf: 50s & 60s Vinyl Bop. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 454-2966. 10 p.m. Free. DJ. Woody’s, 250 Monroe Ave. 730-8230. 9 p.m. Call for tix. DJ. Westside Sports Bar & Grill, 1600 Lyell Ave. 4587888. 9 p.m. Call for tix. DJ. One, 1 Ryan Alley. 5461010. 10 p.m. Free. DJ Andy Fade. Flat Iron Cafe, 561 State St. 454-4830. 9 p.m. Free. DJ Babi Katt/Dancehall Reggae. Blueroom, 293 Alexander St. 730-5985. 10 p.m. $5 after 11 p.m. DJ Cosmo. Bay Bar & Grill, 372 Manitou Rd, Hilton. 392-7700. 10 p.m. Free. DJ Fat Daddy Buck. Roost, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. 3211170. 8:30 p.m. Free. DJs Jared & Mario B. Venu Resto-Lounge, 151 St Paul St. 232-5650. 9 p.m. $5. continues on page 18

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Music

Wednesday, March 16

Do you write from the drums up? West: Yeah, there’s always a drum thought

process right off the bat. It’s about the drums first. We write songs specific to drummers. When we get a new drummer we write to their skills and then the band grows; what they’re good at, we become good at. You all come from metal backgrounds. Why not more metal in the band? West: We’re not good enough to be metal,

that’s why.

Did you set out to be as grunge band per se? West: We definitely decided early on that we

wanted to be a grunge band. We wanted to have indie influences. When we talk about indie influences, we’re talking about early 80’s ones like Dinosaur Jr., Black Flag, stuff from those grunge-founding labels like Sub Pop. Although the three primary members of local band Anchorage Nebraska all have drumming backgrounds, the band cannot keep a steady drummer in its line-up. PHOTO PROVIDED

Rock on, pissed off Anchorage Nebraska w/Bad Kids, Dead Catholics Saturday, March 19 Monty’s Krown, 875 Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. | $3 | 271-7050 [ INTERVIEW ] By Frank De Blase

You can flap your yap about punk’s chaos, emo’s ethos, and grunge’s dirge all you want. But without the right attitude, or any attitude at all for that matter, it all falls short. Anchorage Nebraska — a grungecentric band from our dirty little city along the mighty Genesee — has an attitude. But what is really striking about this band is the nihilism and self-deprecation brewing within its raucous rock ’n’ roll. There’s a genuine recklessness and hopelessness about it. The band rocks on pissed off, and it sounds great. Vocalist-guitarist Dusty West, bassist Matt Tharp, and guitarist Phil Tharp all have drummer and metal backgrounds. But for the last three years metal has just been one of several components tossed in the Anchorage Nebraska mix. Straight-ahead rock ’n’ roll collides with pop hooks, grunge tones, alternative structure, and the myriad influences each member brings along — including that attitude. The band has a new album out, “So What So What?” and is burning up the I-90 blacktop from Albany to Buffalo. Its members sat down with City to shed some light on the music and the attitude. Here’s an edited transcript of what was said. 18 City MARCH 16-22, 2011

CITY: What’s with the name? Dusty West: We made a list of 100 of the

best possible band names ever in existence, or made up. We wanted to pick the best one. Led Zeppelin was taken, so we took No. 2: Anchorage Nebraska. How did the band get started? West: It started with Dusty West demos. I’d

played drums for 15 years and was sick of playing drums, so I started a new band with only drummers. Everybody is a drummer. Do you all switch up? West: We get to trade spots here and there. Tharp: I stay on the bass pretty much, but

when we get a new drummer, since we’re all drummers, it’s easier to show them. It’s ironic; the band is all drummers yet you can’t seem to hold on to a steady drummer. Tharp: That’s the Anchorage curse. West: We don’t want to stop gigging, so we

keep hiring drummers. As long as we have drummers we’ll be able to play. How about hiring another multiinstrumentalist, another utility player? West: No. Tharp: Too much ego to control. I think

there’s a shortage of good drummers for the type of indie, underground, grunge sound we’re trying to go for. To be honest, there are great drummers out there, and they’re usually metal drummers.

Grunge didn’t even exist at that point. West: That’s true. Bands like Dinosaur

Jr. and Sonic Youth were using multiple influences. They were going for that heavy sonic-distortion, crappy-guitar sound and that ended up under the moniker of grunge. We have all these influences but we’re using the tonal range of grunge. What are some other influences Anchorage Nebraska brings in? West: Country and metal. You guys come off more rock ’n’ roll than anything else. West: Grunge or emo or anything like that, it’s

all rock ’n’ roll when you take out all the fluff. What’s unique about this band? West: We’re more pissed than most bands.

Most bands get up there and they’re ready to have a good time. We’re not. We’re ready to be pissed. About what? West: About anything. If it’s not pissed, I can’t

listen to it. Tharp: He broke his guitar last show. West: I smashed it. I hated everyone there. I got pulled over by the cops. There were mostly 40-year-olds there — no offense to 40-year-olds. Tharp: It was the wrong type of 40-year-olds.

How old are you? West: 32 Tharp: And when he turns 40 he’s going to be

even more pissed.

DJs NaNa & PJ. Vertex, 169 N Chestnut St. 232-5498. 10 p.m. $3-$8. RIPROC presents: Terravita, GTA, & Roots Collider. Montage Music Hall, 50 Chestnut Plaza. 698-0662, c.grizzlehoff@gmail. com. Doors 8 p.m. $5 cover, $5 additional for underage. [ Hip-Hop/Rap ] Sophistafunk. Dub Land Underground, 315 Alexander St. dublandunderground.wordpress. com. 10 p.m. Call for tix. [ Jazz ] Craig Snyder Fusion Quartet. Lovin’ Cup, Park Point @ RIT. 292-9940. 8 p.m. $2. Marco Amadio. Bistro 135, 135 W Commercial St, East Rochester. 662-5555, bistro135.net. 6 p.m. Free. Margaret Explosion. Little Theatre Cafe, 240 East Ave. 285-0400, thelittle.org/cafe. 7:30-9:30 p.m. Free. Paradigm Shift. Pomodoro Grill & Wine Bar, 1290 University Ave. 271-5000. 7:30 p.m. Free. Robert Chevrier. Brio Wine Bar & Grill, 3400 Monroe Ave. 5867000. 6:30 p.m. Free. [ Karaoke ] Karaoke. Roost, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. 321-1170. 9:30 p.m. Free. Karaoke. Southpaw Brew Pub, 315 Gregory St. 303-2234. 8:30 p.m. Free. Karaoke. Elite Bar & Grill, 398 W Main St. 527-8720. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke. Pineapple Jacks, 485 Spencerport Rd. 247-5225. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke. Jose & Willy’s, 20 Lake Shore Dr, Canandaigua. 3947960. 8:30 p.m. Free. Karaoke. Monty’s Korner, 363 East Ave. 263-7650. 9.30 p.m. Free. Karaoke. Lemoncello, 137 W Commercial St, E Rochester. 3858565. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke. Applebee’s-Fairport, 585 Moseley Rd, Fairport. 425-4700. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke. Mayfields Pub, 669 Winton Rd N. 288-7199. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke. Sanibel Cottage, 1517 Empire Blvd, Webster. 671-9340. 6 p.m. Free. Karaoke w/DJ Flyin’ Brian. Tap Room, 364 Rt 104. 265-0055. 8:30 p.m. Free. Karaoke w/Debbie Randyn. Merchants Grill, 881 Merchants Rd. 482-2010. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke w/Mark. Flipside Bar & Grill, 2001 E Main St. 288-3930. 8:30 p.m. Free. [ Open Mic ] Acoustic Open Mic. Pub 511, 511 E Ridge Rd. 266-9559. 8 p.m. Free. Drum Circle. Rich’s Cafe, 839 West Ave. 235-7665. 6 p.m. Free. Entertainment Showcase. Clarissa’s, 293 Clarissa St. 4542680. 8 p.m. Free-$5. Open Country Jam. Sandra’s Saloon, 276 Smith St. 5465474. 7-10 p.m. Free.


Open Jam w/Big Daddy Blues Band. Deweys, 1380 Lyell Ave. 254-4707. 9:30 p.m. Free. Open Jam w/Grand Canyon Rescue Episode. Abilene, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230, abilenebarandlounge.com. 8 p.m. Free. Open Jam w/Justin Gurnsey. Jukebox, 5435 Ridge Rd W, Spencerport. 352-4505. 10 p.m. Free. Open Mic. Boulder Coffee CoSouth Wedge, 100 Alexander St. 454-7140. 8 p.m. Free. Open Mic. Dr’s Inn Grill & Tap Room, 1743 East Ave. 2710820. 5 p.m. Free. Open Mic w/Jam Shack Music. Stoneyard Bar & Grill, 1 Main St, Brockport. 637-3390. 9 p.m. Free. Open Mic w/Steve West. Muddy Waters Coffee House-Geneseo, 53 Main St, Geneseo. 243-9111. 7-10 p.m. Free. Sandor Vegh and Queen’s Water Invitation Jam. Standard Lounge, 655 Monroe Ave. 473-2447. 9 p.m. Free. [ Pop/Rock ] Evan Prewitt Band, Black Umbrella, and Friend Museum. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 4542966, bugjar.com. 8 p.m. $6-$8. Up To Something. Tala Vera, 155 State St. 546-3844, talavera.com. 8 p.m. $5.

Thursday, March 17 [ Acoustic/Folk ] Dave McGrath. Cottage Hotel, 1390 Pittsford-Mendon Rd, Mendon. 624-1390. 6:30 p.m. Free. Irish Music. Shamrock Jack’s, 4554 Culver Rd. 323-9310. 9 p.m. Free. Jim Lane. Six Pockets, Ridge Hudson Plaza. 266-1440. 7:30 p.m. Free. John Akers & Elvio Fernandes. Easy on East, 170 East Ave. 325-6490. 8 p.m. Free.

The JV’s. McGraw’s Irish Pub, 146 W Commercial St, East Rochester. 348-9091, mcgrawsirishpub. com. 4 p.m. Free. Thousands of One, Nevergreen, and E3. Dub Land Underground, 315 Alexander St. dublandunderground.wordpress. com. 10 p.m. Call for tix. [ Blues ] Son House Blues Night w/Gordon Munding. Beale Street Cafe, 693 South Ave. 271-4650. 7 p.m. Free.

DISCO BE-BOP | The MacPodz

Melding the concepts of the disco-driven “four on the floor” bass beats with fast-tempo improvisational harmonics that classify “be-bop,” the MacPodz are sure to please most any eardrum. Made up of poets, social activists, and beat fanatics, this Ann Arbor quintet features keys, bass, percussion, trumpet, and spoken word. The music sounds a bit like if Charlie Parker had scored “Saturday Night Fever,” and the film was enacted with every character in roller skates instead of platforms. Bring your good vibes and ride the electric slide for a memorable mix of music and performance. The MacPodz play Thursday, March 17, 8 p.m. at Water Street Music Hall, 204 N Water St. $10-$12. 325-5600, waterstreetmusic.com. — BY EMILY FAITH Kevin DeHond. California Brew Haus, 402 Ridge Rd W. 6211480. 8:30 p.m. Free. Live Band Thursdays. Blueroom, 293 Alexander St. 730-5985. 8 p.m. Free. Mark Fantasia. Village Pub, Chili Center Plaza. 889-4547. 9 p.m. Free. Nancy Perry. Mythos Cafe, 77 Main St, Brockport. 637-2770. 6 p.m. Free.

Paul Killion Irish Music Concert. Legacy-Clover Blossom, 100 McAuley Dr. 218-9000. 7 p.m. Free. Paul Strowe. Cottage Hotel, 1390 Pittsford-Mendon Rd, Mendon. 624-2929. 7-10 p.m. Free. Reggae Night. Elite Bar & Grill, 398 W Main St. 527-8720. 9 p.m. Call for tix. The Dady Brothers. McGraw’s Irish Pub, 146 W Commercial St, East Rochester. 764-0991. 7 p.m. Free.

[ Classical ] Eastman @ Washington Square. S Clinton Ave & Court St. 2741000. 12:15 p.m. Free. Tom McClure. Geneva on the Lake, 1001 Lochland Rd, Geneva. . 6:30-9 p.m. Free. Tuba Mirum. Eastman School of Music-Kilbourn Hall, 26 Gibbs St. 274-1000, esm.rochester. edu. 8 p.m. Free. [ Country ] 40 Rod Lightning. Dinosaur Bar-B-Que, 99 Court St. dinosaurbarbque.com. 9 p.m. Free. [ DJ/Electronic ] DJ. Pelican’s Nest, 566 River Street. 663-5910. 5 p.m. Free. DJ Andy Fade. Flat Iron Cafe, 561 State St. 454-4830. 9 p.m. Free. DJ Big Reg. Liquid, 169 St Paul St. 325-5710. 9:30 p.m. Free. DJ Biggie. McKenzie’s Irish Pub, 3685 W Henrietta Rd. 3348970. 9 p.m. Call for tix. DJ Jestyr. Soho East, 336 East Ave. 262-2060. 9 p.m. Free. DJ Jestyr. Hush Nightclub, 359 East Ave. 506-2851. 10 p.m. Call for tix. DJ Matt. Roost, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. 321-1170. 7:30 p.m. Free. DJ Mike Dailor. Vertex, 169 N Chestnut St. 232-5498. 10 p.m. $3-$8. DJs Designer Junkies, Etiquette, Ginnis. One, 1 Ryan Alley. 5461010. 10 p.m. $3.

House of Love DJs. Decibel Lounge, 45 Euclid St. 754-4645. 9 p.m. Free. Mostly 80’s Night. Hatter’s Pub, 5 W Main St, Webster. 8721505. 6 p.m. Call for tix. Soul Sides Record Listening Party. Good Luck, 50 Anderson Ave. 340-6161. 9 p.m. Free. Thursday Night Shakedown DJs. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 4542966. 11 p.m. Free. Tilt-a-Whirl Drag Show. Tilt Night Club, 444 Central Ave. 2328440. 11 p.m. & 12:30 a.m. $3. [ Jazz ] A Giannavola. Lemoncello, 137 W Commercial St, E Rochester. 385-8565. 6 p.m. Free. Dave Rivello Ensemble. Village Rock Cafe, 213 Main St, E Rochester. 586-1640. 8 p.m. Free. Djangoners. Little Theatre Cafe, 240 East Ave. 285-0400, thelittle.org/cafe. 7:30-9:30 p.m. Free. Jazz Dawgs. Bistro 135, 135 W Commercial St, East Rochester. 662-5555, bistro135.net. 6:308:30 p.m. Free. Joe Santora Trio w/Emily Kirchoff. Michael’s Valley Grill, 1694 Penfield R, Penfield. 383-8260. 7 p.m. Free. Live Jam w/Eastman School Students. Triple Deuces Bar & Grill, 151 St Paul St. 232-3888. Thu 6 p.m., Fri 5 p.m. Free. [ Karaoke ] Karaoke. Panorama Night Club, 730 Elmgrove Rd. 247-2190. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke. Goody Goodies, 6108 Loomis Rd, Farmington. 7422531. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke. Pineapple Jacks, 485 Spencerport Rd. 247-5225. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke. Carey Lake Bar & Grill, 959 Penfield Rd, Walworth. 315-986-1936. 4 p.m. Free.

Karaoke. Jukebox, 5435 Ridge Rd W, Spencerport. 352-4505. 7:30 p.m. Free. Karaoke. Applebee’s-Penfield, 1955 Empire Blvd, Webster. 7870570. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke. GridIron Bar & Grill, 3154 State St, Caledonia. 5384008. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke w/DJ Smooth. Clarissa’s, 293 Clarissa St. 454-2680. 8:30 p.m. Free. Karaoke w/George, King of Karaoke. Temple Bar & Grille, 109 East Ave. 232-6000. 8 p.m. Free. Karaoke w/Summer Bob. Shorts Bar & Grill, 35 N Main St, Fairport. 388-0136. 10 p.m. Free. Karaoke w/Tim Burnette. Sevens, Rt 96, Farmington. 924-3232. 8-11 p.m. Free. Rochester Idol Karaoke. Landing Bar & Grille, 30 Main St, Fairport. 425-7490. 9:30 p.m. Free. [ Open Mic ] Open Blues Jam w/Alex D & Jimmie Mac. PJ’s Lounge, 499 West Ave. 436-9066. 9 p.m. Free. Open Jam. Pub 511, 511 E Ridge Rd. 266-9559. 8 p.m. Free. Open Jam w/Beau Ryan & Amanda Ashley. Firehouse Saloon, 814 Clinton Ave S. 244-6307. 9 p.m. Free. Open Mic. Towpath Cafe, 6 N Main St, Fairport. 377-0410. 6:30 p.m. Free. Open Mic Night. Boulder Coffee Co-Brooks Landing, 955 Genesee St. 454-7140. 7:30 p.m. Free. continues on page 20

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Retaining Walls

Tree Removal

Walkways/Patios

Excavation & Grading

Stump Grinding

Flagstone Unilock Brick Paverstones Keystone Foundation Planting

WaterGardens Gardening Mulching Topsoil Rototilling Tree Planting

FOR AN ESTIMATE, PLEASE CALL!

244-1626

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Shrub Pruning

Oliver Haynes, trumpet Dexter Redic, bass Tony Hiler, drums

Theme Gardens Lawn Care Lawn Maintenance

Friday, March 18th, 7:00 – 9:00 pm

Immanuel Baptist Church 815 Park Ave.

Immanual Baptist Church is an historic landmark listed in the National Register of Historic Places. Net proceeds support the church restoration fund.

Tickets Available

Sponsored by

Immanuel Church - 473.7664, and at the door. Adults $10, Students $5, Maximum per Family $25 This concert is funded in part by a grant from the Arts & Cultural Council for Greater Rochester, the New York State Council on the Arts, and the New York State Legislature. rochestercitynewspaper.com City 19


Thursday, March 17 Open Mic w/Jed Curran & Steve Piper. Flipside Bar & Grill, 2001 E Main St. 288-3930. 8 p.m. Free. Open Mic w/John Mossey. Standard Lounge, 655 Monroe Ave. 473-2447. 9 p.m. Free. [ Pop/Rock ] Be Glad & Dunn. Westside Sports Bar & Grill, 1600 Lyell Ave. 4587888. 9 p.m. Call for tix. Jeff Elliott. Irondequoit Ale House, 2250 Hudson Ave. 544-5120. 5 p.m. Free. Jimmy Lane. Six Pockets, Ridge Hudson Plaza. 266-1440. 7 p.m. Free. Live Lounge. Lovin’ Cup, Park Point @ RIT. 292-9940. 8 p.m. Free. Seth Faergolzia. Havana Moe’s, 125 East Ave. 325-1030. 9 p.m. Free. Teagan & Lou. Sully’s Pub, 242 South Ave. 232-3960, sullyspubonline.com. 7-10 p.m. Free. The MacPodz. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N Water St. 325-5600, waterstreetmusic. com. 7 p.m. $10-$12. Trashcan Sinatras with Dave & Marissa. Lovin’ Cup, Park Point @ RIT. 292-9940, lovincup. com. 8:30 p.m. $15-$20.

Friday, March 18Saturday March 19 [ Classical ] Rochester Philharmonic Orchestra 2010-11 Pops Series: When Irish Eyes are Smiling. Eastman Theatre-Kodak Hall, 60 Gibbs St. 454-2100, rpo.org. 8 p.m. $22-75. Features tenor Benjamin Brecher & dancers from the Boland School of Irish Dance.

Friday, March 18 [ Acoustic/Folk ] Kickin’ Back. Sully’s Pub, 242 South Ave. 877-805-3570. 8-11 p.m. Free. Ralph Louis. Rochester Plaza Hotel, 70 State St. 546-3450. 7:30 p.m. Free. Red Hot Chilli Pipers. Main Street Armory, 900 E Main St. rochestermainstreetarmory.com. 7 p.m. $15. Roger Eckers/Fred Costello Duo. Luna Piena Bistro, 546 Merchants Rd. 288-0067. 9 p.m. Free. Susie Vinnick. First Unitarian Church-Cafe Veritas, 220 Winton Rd S. cafeveritas.org. 8 p.m. $6-$12, under 12 free. The Emerald Party. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N Water St. 325-5600, waterstreetmusic. com. 10 p.m. $7-$12. Featuring the Cheetah Whores, Designer Junkies and Svet. The JV’s. McGraw’s Irish Pub, 146 W Commercial St, East Rochester. mcgrawsirishpub. com. 5 p.m. Free. Tom Gravino. Tandoor of India, 376 Jefferson Rd. 427-7080. 7 p.m. Free. [ Blues ] Billy Joe & the Blues Gypsies w/Dave Riccioni. Six Pockets, Ridge Hudson Plaza. 2661440. 6-9 p.m. Free.

ROCK | Red Hot Chili Pipers

Straight out of Scotland, The Red Hot Chili Pipers have been playing rock music with bagpipes since 2002. They call it bagrock. I know, I know — I laughed my head off when I first heard the term, too. But this shit is good, jack. Often maligned along with the ukulele, banjo, and jaw harp, bagpipes are an acquired taste. These Scots may very well be the instrument’s salvation. Queen, Deep Purple, AC/DC, and everyone in the audience will never be the same. Lochside Celtic shares the bill. Red Hot Chili Pipers play Friday, March 18, 7 p.m. at Main Street Armory, 900 E. Main St. $15-$20. rochestermainstreetrmory.com. — BY FRANK DE BLASE [ Classical ] Composers Sinfonietta. Eastman School of Music-Kilbourn Hall, 26 Gibbs St. 274-1000, esm. rochester.edu. 8 p.m. Free. Eastman School Performance. Strong National Museum of Play, 1 Manhattan Sq. 2632700, museumofplay.org. 6 p.m. Included with museum admission $9-11. Greg DeTurck, piano. Eastman Theatre-Hatch Recital Hall, 60 Gibbs St. 274-1000, esm. rochester.edu. 7 p.m. Free. Hope College Chapel Choir. Asbury First United Methodist Church, 1050 East Ave. 2711050 x116. 7:30-9 p.m. $5-10. Jessica Wooldridge, bassoon. Eastman School of Music, 26 Gibbs St. 274-1000, esm. rochester.edu. 7-8:30 p.m. Free. Howard Hanson Hall. Jewel Hara. Geneva on the Lake, 1001 Lochland Rd, Geneva. . 6:30-9 p.m. Free. John Ballings. Hedges, 1290 Lake Rd, Webster. 265-3850. 6:30 p.m. Free. Margaret Womack, cello. Eastman School of Music, 26 Gibbs St. 274-1000, esm. rochester.edu. 6:30-8 p.m. Free. Ciminelli Formal Lounge. Robert Wells, piano. Eastman School of Music, 26 Gibbs St. 274-1000, esm.rochester.edu. 8:30 p.m. Free. Ciminelli Formal Lounge. [ Country ] Mike Snow. Sandra’s Saloon, 276 Smith St. 546-5474. 9:30 p.m. Free. [ DJ/Electronic ] DJ. Coach Sports Forum, 19 W Main St, Webster. 872-2910. 9 p.m. Call for tix. DJ Andy Fade. Flat Iron Cafe, 561 State St. 454-4830. 9 p.m. Free.

20 City MARCH 16-22, 2011

DJ Annalyze. Hush Nightclub, 359 East Ave. 506-2851. 10 p.m. Call for tix. DJ Cedric. Vertex, 169 N Chestnut St. 232-5498. 10 p.m. $3-$8. DJ Dream. Nola’s BBQ, 4775 Lake Ave. 663-3375. 10 p.m. Call for tix. DJ Fat Daddy Buck. Roost, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. 321-1170. 8:30 p.m. Free. DJ GI. Liquid, 169 St Paul St. 3255710. 10 p.m. Free-$5. DJ Mosart212. Lovin’ Cup, Park Point @ RIT. 292-9940. 6 p.m. Free. Jon Herbert, RipRoc. One, 1 Ryan Alley. 546-1010. 10 p.m. $3. Reggaeton w/DJ Carlos. La Copa Ultra Lounge, 235 W Ridge Rd. 254-1050. 10 p.m. Call for tix. Salsa Night w/DJ Javier Rivera. Tango Cafe, 389 Gregory St. 4750249. 9 p.m. $5. What A Drag w/Samantha Vega, Kyla Minx & Pauly. Tilt Night Club, 444 Central Ave. 232-8440. 11:15 p.m. & 12:30 a.m. Free$12. [ Hip-Hop/Rap ] Good Fridays. Westside Sports Bar & Grill, 1600 Lyell Ave. 458-7888. 10 p.m. $10. [ Jazz ] Bobby Dibaudo Trio. Bistro 135, 135 W Commercial St, East Rochester. 662-5555, bistro135.net. 6-10 p.m. Free. Gap Mangione. Pier 45, 1000 N River St. 865-4500. 6:30 p.m. Free. Joe Santora Trio w/Emily Kirchoff. Michael’s Valley Grill, 1694 Penfield R, Penfield. 383-8260. 7 p.m. Free. Johnny Matt Band w/Jon Seiger. Wegmans-Eastway, 1955 Empire Blvd, Webster. 6718290. 5:30 p.m. Free.

Ryan T Carey. Thali of India, 3259 S Winton Rd. 427-8030. 7-9 p.m. Free. Soul Express. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. 3814000. 8:30 p.m. Free. Special Blend. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. 3814000. 8:30 p.m. Free. Westview Project. Little Theatre Cafe, 240 East Ave. 232-3906, thelittle.org. 8:30 p.m. Free.

Old School R&B. Elite Bar & Grill, 398 W Main St. 5278720. 9 p.m. Call for tix. Soul On Tap. Dinosaur Bar-B-Que, 99 Court St. dinosaurbarbque. com. 10 p.m.-1 a.m. Free. Subsoil and Free Booty Institute. Dub Land Underground, 315 Alexander St. 232-7550. 9 p.m. Call for tix.

[ Karaoke ] Karaoke. Flaherty’s, 1200 Bay Rd. 671-0816. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke. Village Pub, Chili Center Plaza. 889-4547. 9 p.m. Call for tix. Karaoke. Goody Goodies, 6108 Loomis Rd, Farmington. 7422531. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke. Pineapple Jacks, 485 Spencerport Rd. 247-5225. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke. Deweys, 1380 Lyell Ave. 254-4707. 9:30 p.m. Free. Karaoke w/Bobby C. Ciao Baby’s BBQ Steak & Seafood, 421 River St. 621-5480. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke w/Summer Bob. Shorts Bar & Grill, 35 N Main St, Fairport. 388-0136. 10 p.m. Free. Karaoke w/Tina P. Norton’s Pub, 1730 N Goodman St. 266-3570. 9 p.m. Free.

[ Acoustic/Folk ] Bogs Visionary Orchestra. Coffee Connection, 681 South Ave 14620. 442-2180. 5-8 p.m. Free. Celtic Music Concert to Benefit Zion House. Zion Episcopal Church, 10 Park Pl., Avon. 9913545. 7:30 p.m. $10 in advance, $15 at the door. All Proceeds go to support Zion House, the first transitional living home for Female Veterans. Everheart. McGraw’s Irish Pub, 146 W Commercial St, East Rochester. 764-0991. 8 p.m. Free. Latin Band. Tapas 177 Lounge, 177 St Paul St. 262-2090. 11 p.m. Free. Richard Smith and Julie Adams w/Kinloch Nelson. Tango Cafe, 389 Gregory St. 271-4930. 8 p.m. $15. Tom Gravino. Thali of India, 3259 S Winton Rd. 355-8206. 7 p.m. Free.

[ Open Mic ] Open Mic. Rochester Institute of Technology-Java Wally’s, 90 Lomb Memorial Dr. 475-2562. 9 p.m. Free. Songwriters Open Mic. Equal Grounds Coffee House, 750 South Ave. 242-7840. 9-11 p.m. Free. [ Pop/Rock ] Capricious Rex. Boulder Coffee Co-Brooks Landing, 955 Genesee St. 454-7140. 8 p.m. Free. Category 5. California Brew Haus, 402 Ridge Rd W. 621-1480. 10 p.m. $5-$7. Danny & the Rebel Rockers. Rab’s Woodshed, 4440 Lake Ave. 6634610. 10 p.m.-2 a.m. Free. Dick Leschorn in Concert. LegacyClover Blossom, 100 McAuley Dr. 218-9000 x106, nuffindell@ legacycloverblossom.com. 2-3 p.m. Free. Flame. German House Theatre, 315 Gregory St. ticketmaster.com. 6 p.m. $10. HomiSide. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 454-2966, bugjar.com. 8 p.m. $6-$8. Mike Brown and special guests. Standard Lounge, 655 Monroe Ave. 473-2447. 9 p.m. $4. Red Hot Chilli Pipers. Main Street Armory, 900 E Main St. 232-3221mainstreetarmory. com. 7-11p.m. $15. With guests Lochside Celtic Band. redhotchillipipers.co.uk. Sam Deleo. Perlo’s Italian Grill, 202 N Washington St, East Rochester. 248-5060. 6:30-10:30 p.m. Free. The Moho Collective. Boulder Coffee Co-South Wedge, 100 Alexander St. 454-7140. 8 p.m. Free. [ R&B ] LastNote. Victor Village Inn, 34 E Main St, Victor. lastnoteband. com. 9:30 p.m.-1 a.m. Free.

Saturday, March 19

[ Blues ] Bill Brown. Brown Hound Bistro, 6459 Rt 64, Naples. 374-9771. 7 p.m. Free. Carolyn Kelly Blues Band. Dinosaur Bar-B-Que, 99 Court St. dinosaurbarbque.com. 10 p.m. Free. Deep Blue Dream. German House Theatre, 315 Gregory St. 442-6880, thegermanhouse. com. 9 p.m.-12:30 a.m. $3. The Keg (downstairs at the German House). Gap Mangione & the New Blues Band. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. 381-4000. 8:30 p.m. Free. [ Classical ] Antonio Valentin, Jr, piano. Eastman School of Music, 26 Gibbs St. 274-1000, esm. rochester.edu. 3:30 p.m. Free. Ciminelli Formal Lounge. Barbershop Woodwind Quintet. Eastman School of Music, 26 Gibbs St. 274-1000, esm. rochester.edu. 1:30-3 p.m. Free. Ciminelli Formal Lounge. John Ballings. Hedges, 1290 Lake Rd, Webster. 265-3850. 6:30 p.m. Free. Karen Chia-Ling Ho, soprano/LiTing Tseng, piano. Eastman School of Music-Kilbourn Hall, 26 Gibbs St. 274-1000, esm. rochester.edu. 9:00 p.m. Free. Lillian Matchett, viola. Eastman Theatre-Hatch Recital Hall, 60 Gibbs St. 274-1000, esm. rochester.edu. 9:00 p.m. Free. Morning Chamber Music. Eastman School of Music-Kilbourn Hall, 26 Gibbs St. 274-1000, esm. rochester.edu. 11 a.m. Free. Quimby/American Guild of Organists Regional Competition for Young Organists. Webster Presbyterian Church, 550 Webster Rd., Webster. agorochester.org. 1:30 p.m. Free.

Taehee Kim, Piano. Eastman School of Music-Kilbourn Hall, 26 Gibbs St. 274-1000, esm. rochester.edu. 7:00 p.m. Free. [ DJ/Electronic ] Big Dance Party w/DJ Jon Herbert. Tilt Night Club, 444 Central Ave. 232-8440. 10 p.m. $3. DJ. Goody Goodies, 6108 Loomis Rd, Farmington. 742-2531. 9 p.m. Free. DJ. Straight Home Inn Bar & Grill, 688 Lexington Ave. 458-0020. 9 p.m. Free. DJ Big Reg. Venu Resto-Lounge, 151 St Paul St. 232-5650. 7 p.m. Free. DJ Darkwave. Vertex, 169 N Chestnut St. 232-5498. 10 p.m. $3-$8. DJ Ease. Hush Nightclub, 359 East Ave. 506-2851. 10 p.m. Call for tix. DJ Fat Daddy Buck. Roost, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. 321-1170. 8:30 p.m. Free. DJ Howard & Mega Mix. Island Fresh Cuisine, 382 Jefferson Rd. 424-2150. 9 p.m. Free. DJ Jestyr. Soho East, 336 East Ave. 262-2060. 9 p.m. Free. DJ Mirage. Blueroom, 293 Alexander St. 730-5985. 10 p.m. Call for tix. DJ Wiz. Liquid, 169 St Paul St. 325-5710. 9:30 p.m. Free-$5. DJs Andy Fade, Bonitillo. Flat Iron Cafe, 561 State St. 454-4830. 9 p.m. Free-$5. DJs Richie Salvaggio, Kalifornia. One, 1 Ryan Alley. 546-1010. 10 p.m. Free-$10. Sky Baby Productions presents: Frankie Bones. Decibel Lounge, 45 Euclid St. 754-4645. 9 p.m. $10. [ Jazz ] Bourbon Street Jazz. LegacyClover Blossom, 100 McAuley Dr. 218-9000 x106, nuffindell@ legacycloverblossom.com. 3-4 p.m. Free. East End Jazz Boys. Havana Moe’s, 125 East Ave. 325-1030. 9 p.m. Free. Hard Logic. Bistro 135, 135 W Commercial St, East Rochester. 662-5555, bistro135.net. 7-11 p.m. Free. Jazz Cafe. Monty’s Korner, 363 East Ave. 263-7650. 7:30 p.m. Free. Jazz at Jazzy’s. Jasmine’s Asian Fusion, 657 Ridge Rd, Webster. 216-1290. 8:30-11 p.m. Free. Joe Santora Trio w/Emily Kirchoff. Michael’s Valley Grill, 1694 Penfield R, Penfield. 383-8260. 7 p.m. Free. Stringplicity. Little Theatre Cafe, 240 East Ave. 232-3906, thelittle.org. 8:30 p.m. Free. The Westview Project w/Doug Stone, sax. Grill at Strathallan, 550 East Ave. 454-1880. 8:30 p.m. Free. [ Karaoke ] Broadway Karaoke w/Laura Marron. Park Avenue Pub, 650 Park Ave. 461-4140. 10:15 p.m. Free. Karaoke. The Galley Restaurant, 94 S Union St, Spencerport. 352-0200. 8 p.m. Free. Karaoke. Sully’s Pub, 242 South Ave. 232-3960. 9 p.m. Free.


SPECIAL EVENT | The Emerald Party

In nearly every large to mid-sized city you’ll find a place to experience the burlesque phenomenon. Beautiful, sexy, strong women doing tasteful, creative dance routines whilst showing a little skin. The Roc City Diamonds (pictured) dance company brings flavor and flair and that special something that borders on the line of burlesque. They are hosting a green party that is a bit more rock ‘n’ roll than your traditional Irish holiday celebration. These sassy dames will share the stage with such local acts as The Cheetah Whores, Designer Junkies, and hip-hop violinist Svet. Whether emeralds or diamonds, this is sure to be a stunner in more ways than one. The Emerald Party takes place Friday, March 18, 10 p.m. at Water Street Music Hall, 204 N Water St. $7-$12. 3255600, waterstreetmusic.com. — BY EMILY FAITH Karaoke. 140 Alex, 140 Alexander St. 256-1000. 10:30 p.m. Free. Karaoke. Pineapple Jacks, 485 Spencerport Rd. 247-5225. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke. Mickey Flynn’s, 196 Winton Rd. 288-7070. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke. Straight Home Inn Bar & Grill, 688 Lexington Ave. 4580020. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke. Temple Bar & Grille, 109 East Ave. 232-6000. 10 p.m. Free. Karaoke. Straight Home Inn Bar & Grill, 688 Lexington Ave. 4580020. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke w/Andy & Kim. Norton’s Pub, 1730 N Goodman St. 2663570. 10 p.m. Free. Karaoke w/Debbie Randyn. Merchants Grill, 881 Merchants Rd. 482-2010. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke w/The Tin Man. Shorts Bar & Grill, 35 N Main St, Fairport. 388-0136. 10 p.m. Free.

Sunday, March 20 [ Acoustic/Folk ] Celtic Music. Temple Bar & Grille, 109 East Ave. 232-6000. 7 p.m. Free. Fort Hill String Band. All Things Art, 65 S Main St., Canandaigua. 396-0087. 5-7 p.m. $2. Latin Night. Hush Nightclub, 359 East Ave. 506-2851. 10 p.m. Call for tix. PJ Elliott. Bay Street Hotel, Bay St, Sodus Point. 315-483-2233. 9 p.m. Free. Seth Faergolzia and 23 Psaegz w/ Colonel Parmesan & The Torchers. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 4542966, bugjar.com. 8 p.m. $5-$7. [ Classical ] An Afternoon with Joshua Bell. Eastman Theatre-Kodak Hall,

[ DJ/Electronic ] DJ. Westside Sports Bar & Grill, 1600 Lyell Ave. 458-7888. 9 p.m. Call for tix. DJ. Pelican’s Nest, 566 River Street. 663-5910. 10 p.m. Free. DJ Rasta Spoc/Old-School Reggae. Blueroom, 293 Alexander St. 730-5985. 10 p.m. $5 after 11 p.m. continues on page 22

SPRING 2011 ROAD TRIP

The Victor Wooten Band & The Stanley Clarke Band www.victorwooten.com | www.stanleyclarke.com

2011 GRAMMY WINNER

Two Incredible Bands, One Incredible Evening!

MONDAY, MARCH 21, 2011 TICKETS $30 advance | $35 day of show Limited number GA seated $40 advance | $45 day of show 13+ W/Guardian | 16+ W/ ID Tickets at all Ticketmaster locations, Ticketmaster.com, charge by phone at 1-800-745-3000, Abilene, and Record Archive. Water Street Music Hall 204 N. Water Street Info Line: 585.325.5600 waterstreetmusic.com

WATER STREET MUSIC HALL ...where the music comes alive

“Rochester’s Premier Concert Room”

EAT

SHEA’S

[ Pop/Rock ] ‘The Cabin Fever Catastrophe’. Monty’s Krown Lounge, 875 Monroe Ave. 271-7050. 9 p.m. $3. Anchorage Nebraska, The Bad Kids, and The Dead Catholics. 21+. Bad Kids, Dead Catholics, Anchorage Nebraska. Monty’s Krown Lounge, 875 Monroe Ave. harlowcrandall@gmail. com. 9 p.m.-2 a.m. $3. Boogie Men. Rab’s Woodshed, 4440 Lake Ave. 663-4610. 10 p.m.-2 a.m. Free. D.I.L.F., Orient Expresss. McGhan’s, 11 W Main St, Victor. 924-3660. 7 p.m.-12 a.m. Call for tix.

Gibbs & Main FUNdraiser Interactive Concert. Lake Riley Lodge, 100 Norris Dr. gibbsandmain.com. 3 p.m. $20, $40 for families. Kids crafts & music, silent auction, an instrument petting zoo, light refreshments. Pietzsche Neachy w/ Nevergreen, and Anonymous Willpower. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 454-2966, bugjar.com. 8 p.m. $5-7. Rochester Gay Men’s Chorus: Moments in Time. Hochstein Performance Hall, 50 N Plymouth Ave. 454-4596, thergmc.org. 8 p.m. $12-15. Street-Wise. Knuckles Knockout Grill, 2 Old Scottsville-Chili Rd. 889-4920. 9 p.m. $2. Wize Azz. California Brew Haus, 402 Ridge Rd W. 621-1480. 9 p.m. $5-$7.

60 Gibbs St. 454-2100, rpo.org. 3 p.m. $15, $75 ticket includes post-concert reception. Andrew Dunlop, piano. Eastman School of Music-Kilbourn Hall, 26 Gibbs St. 274-1000, esm. rochester.edu. 7 p.m. Free. Breath of Heaven III: Organ Concert. West Bloomfield Congregational Church, 9035 State Routes 5 & 20, Bloomfield. Sarah Williams wbccoffice@ rochester.rr.com. 3 p.m. Free, donations accepted. Ella Cripps. Geneva on the Lake, 1001 Lochland Rd, Geneva. . 6:30-9 p.m. Free. Going for Baroque Organ Recital. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. 276-8900. 1 & 3 p.m. Free w/admission. Guest Recital: Caleb Harris and Tiffany Blake. Eastman School of Music, 26 Gibbs St. 274-1000, esm.rochester.edu. 8:30 p.m. Free. Ciminelli Formal Lounge. Jessica Wilkins, oboe/ Amy Skjerseth, oboe. Eastman School of Music, 26 Gibbs St. 274-1000, esm.rochester.edu. 3:30 p.m. Free. Ciminelli Formal Lounge. John Andrew Slominski, piano. Eastman School of MusicKilbourn Hall, 26 Gibbs St. 2741000, esm.rochester.edu. 1:30 p.m. Free. Julianne Schenk, bassoon. Eastman School of MusicKilbourn Hall, 26 Gibbs St. 2741000, esm.rochester.edu. 3:30 p.m. Free. Musicale: Organ Concert. George Eastman House, 900 East Ave. 271-3361, eastmanhouse.org. 3-4 p.m. Included with museum admission $5-12. Violinists Gabrielle and Charles Monachino and pianist Sherry McCarthy. Quinn and Tets, woodwinds. Eastman School of Music, 26 Gibbs St. 274-1000, esm. rochester.edu. 1:30 p.m. Free. Ciminelli Formal Lounge. Sing With Us: Eastman Children’s Chorus. Lutheran Church of the Incarnate Word, 597 East Ave. 274-1000, esm.rochester.edu. 6 p.m. Free, donations accepted. Nick Page, guest conductor; Karie Templeton, choral director. Sun Min Kim, piano. Eastman School of Music-Kilbourn Hall, 26 Gibbs St. 274-1000, esm. rochester.edu. 9 p.m. Free. Yueun Kim, piano. Eastman School of Music, 26 Gibbs St. 274-1000, esm.rochester.edu. 6:30 p.m. Free. Ciminelli Formal Lounge.

CITY

E

RESTAURANT GUID

ROCHESTERCITYNEWSPAPER.COM/RESTAURANTS rochestercitynewspaper.com City 21


Sunday, March 20

[ Pop/Rock ] Pro-Am Open Jam. Southpaw Brew Pub, 315 Gregory St. 442-6880. 9:30 p.m. Free.

Old School DJ. Clarissa’s, 293 Clarissa St. 454-2680. 8 p.m. Free.

Tuesday, March 22

[ Hip-Hop/Rap ] R&B Hip-Hop Spring Edition. Cafe Underground Railroad, 480 W Main St. 235-3550. 8 p.m. $5-$10.

[ Acoustic/Folk ] Buford Duo. Dinosaur Bar-B-Que, 99 Court St. dinosaurbarbque. com. 9 p.m. Free. Fritz’s Polka Band. Sevens, Rt 96, Farmington. 924-3232. 12:30-2:30 p.m. Free. Jeff Elliott. Norton’s Pub, 1730 N Goodman St. 266-3570. 5-8 p.m. Free. Johnny Bauer. Cottage Hotel, 1390 Pittsford-Mendon Rd, Mendon. 624-2929. 7-10 p.m. Free.

[ Karaoke ] Karaoke. Jose & Willy’s, 20 Lake Shore Dr, Canandaigua. 394-7960. 8:30 p.m. Free. Karaoke w/Brad London. Willow Inn, 428 Manitou Rd. 3923489. 9 p.m. Free. [ Open Mic ] Acoustic Sunday w/Fred Goodnow. Brown Hound Bistro, 6459 Rt 64, Naples. 374-9771. 11 a.m. Free. Open Country Jam w/Randy. Sandra’s Saloon, 276 Smith St. 546-5474. 2-6 p.m. Free. Open Jam w/Bodega Radio. Jukebox, 5435 Ridge Rd W, Spencerport. 352-4505. 5 p.m. Free. Troup Street Jazz Jam Session. Beale Street Cafe, 693 South Ave. 216-1070. 6 p.m. Free. no show 2/27. [ Pop/Rock ] Haiti: A Labor of Love Concert feat. Two Ton, Evan Prewitt Ban. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N Water St. 325-5600, waterstreetmusic.com. 3 p.m. Call for tix. Ned Richardson, Avenue You, Forget Me in Vegas, The Maddigans, A Summer Scene. California Brew Haus, 402 Ridge Rd W. 621-1480. 4 p.m. $8-10. Sonia. Boulder Coffee CoBrooks Landing, 955 Genesee St. 287-java, bouldercoffeeco. com. 8:30 p.m. Free.

Monday, March 21 [ Acoustic/Folk ] Dave McGrath & Guests. Rehab Lounge 510 Monroe Ave. 4429165. 6 p.m. Free. Gamelan Ensemble Experience. Harley School, 1981 Clover St. 442-1770. 6:30 p.m. Free. John Akers. Dinosaur Bar-B-Que, 99 Court St. dinosaurbarbque. com. 9 p.m. Free. Mandy. Shorts Bar & Grill, 35 N Main St, Fairport. 388-0136. 9 p.m. Free. Sore Thumb Radio Live Broadcast w/Jeff Cosco. House of Guitars, 645 Titus Ave. 224-0990. 8 p.m. Free. Stories of The Irish Saints. St Louis Church, 60 Main St, Pittsford. 586-5675. 7:30 p.m. Free. Tullamore Celtic Band. St. Louis Church, 60 Main St., Pittsford. 234-5044, tullamorecelticband. com. 7:30-8:30 p.m. Free. [ Classical ] “When Monarchs Were Absolute and the Guitar Was King: The Guitar in the 17th Century”. Eastman School of Music, 26 Gibbs St. 274-1000, esm. rochester.edu. 7-9 p.m. $5. Presentation featuring Baroque Guitarist Ray Andrews.

CLASSICAL | Sa Chen

The 2010-2011 Rochester classical season has been a bounty of gold-medal pianists: Ilya Itin, Leeds International Piano Competition (1996); Olga Kern, VanCliburn International Piano Competition (2001); Jon Nakamatsu, also VanCliburn (1997). Next week, Sa Chen will perform in Rochester, having been a finalist in the Leeds (1996), the Chopin International Piano Competition (2000), and the Van Cliburn (2005). It’s not to define the piano as a sport instrument, where only the Tchaikovsky or the Rachmaninoff 2nd is worthy of City’s preview space. It is to say that you should take advantage of the exceptional talent that is gracing our halls. Born in Chongqing, China, Chen was educated at the Sichaun Conservatory of Music, the Shenzhen School of the Arts, the Guildhall School of Music and Drama, and the Hochschule fur Musik und Theater. Chen’s program will include three Scarlatti sonatas, Ravel’s “Gaspard de la nuit,” and three Liszt pieces, including a Ballade and a Hungarian Rhapsody. Sa Chen plays Tuesday, March 22, 8 p.m. at Kilbourn Hall, 26 Gibbs St. $10-$20. 274-1100, esm.rochester.edu. — BY PALOMA A. CAPANNA Elise Hughey, cello. Eastman School of Music-Kilbourn Hall, 26 Gibbs St. 274-1000, esm. rochester.edu. 3:30 p.m. Free. Faculty Artist Series: Bill Dobbins, piano. Eastman School of Music-Kilbourn Hall, 26 Gibbs St. 274-1000, esm. rochester.edu. 8 p.m. $10. Hope College Symphonette Concert. Trinity Reformed Church, 909 Landing Rd North. trinityreformedchurch@frontier. com. 7 p.m. Free. Director: Professor Richard Piippo. Trudy Moon. Geneva on the Lake, 1001 Lochland Rd, Geneva. 6:30-9 p.m. Free. Women in Music Festival. Eastman School of Music, 26 Gibbs St. 274-1000, esm. rochester.edu. Noon-1 p.m. Free. Opening Concert: Main Hall | “Live from Hochstein”: Sproull Atrium, Miller Center [ DJ/Electronic ] DJ. Pelican’s Nest, 566 River Street. 663-5910. 5 p.m. Free. DJ TW. Roost, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. 321-1170. 7:30 p.m. Free. Manic Mondays DJs. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 454-2966. 11 p.m. Free. [ Jazz ] Brad Batz Group. Little Theatre Cafe, 240 East Ave. 232-3906, thelittle.org. 7:30 p.m. Free. Dixieland: Barroom Buzzards Plus Two. Green Lantern Inn, 1 E

22 City MARCH 16-22, 2011

Church St, Fairport. flowercityjazz. org. 6:30-9:30 p.m. $12. Simon Fletcher. Bistro 135, 135 W Commercial St, East Rochester. 662-5555, bistro135.net. 6-9 p.m. Free. Victor Wooten Band w/Stanley Clarke Trio. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N Water St. 325-5600, waterstreetmusic.com. 8 p.m. $30-$35. [ Karaoke ] Karaoke. Roost, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. 321-1170. 9:30 p.m. Free. Karaoke w/Walt O’Brien. Flipside Bar & Grill, 2001 E Main St. 288-3930. 9 p.m. Free. [ Open Mic ] Local Visionaries: Artists Unplugged. Lemoncello, 137 W Commercial St, E Rochester. localvisionaries.weebly.com. Sign up at 6:30 p.m. Free. Networking social, artist show and tell, singer/ songwriter and poetry showcase, featured artist, drink specials. Open Jam w/Refreshunz. Clarissa’s, 293 Clarissa St. 2323430. 8 p.m. Free. Singer/Songwriter Open Jam. Lemoncello, 137 W Commercial St, E Rochester. 385-8565. 7 p.m. Free. Traditional Irish Session. McGraw’s Irish Pub, 146 W Commercial St, East Rochester. 764-0991. 7 p.m. Free.

[ Blues ] Billy Wallace w/ Greenland is Melting, Honest John, and Matt & Chris. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 454-2966, bugjar.com. 8 p.m. $6-$8. [ Classical ] Eastman School of Music, 26 Gibbs St. 274-1000, esm. rochester.edu. 3:30-5 p.m. Free. Ciminelli Formal Lounge. Hee Sagong, violin. Eastman School of Music-Kilbourn Hall, 26 Gibbs St. 274-1000, esm. rochester.edu. 11:30 a.m. Free. Roberts Wesleyan Vocalists: The Great American Songbook. Roberts Wesleyan College, Cultural Life Center, Andrews B. Hale Hall, 2301 Westside Dr. roberts.edu. 7:30 p.m. Free. Sa Chen. Eastman School of Music-Kilbourn Hall, 26 Gibbs St. esm.rochester.edu. 8 p.m. $10-20. Tom McClure. Geneva on the Lake, 1001 Lochland Rd, Geneva. . 6:30-9 p.m. Free.

JAZZ | Stanley Clarke Band, Victor Wooten Band

Bass fans rejoice: a double bill with two of the world’s greatest low riders! Stanley Clarke (pictured) helped revolutionize the electronic bass over three decades ago as a member of Return to Forever. He’s still on top of his game, enough to have won the 2011 Grammy Award for Best Contemporary Jazz Album. His record, “The Stanley Clarke Band,” is full of beautiful textural explorations that go well beyond the standard use of the instrument. Wooten, who is well-known for his work with Béla Fleck & The Flecktones, is a brilliant musician with dazzling technique. When he leads his own band, he’s got more room to slap out his distinctive, awe-inspiring solos. The concert takes place Monday, March 21, 8 p.m. at Water Street Music Hall, 204 N. Water St. $30-$45. 800745-3000, waterstreetmusic.com. — BY RON NETSKY

[ DJ/Electronic ] DJ. Pelican’s Nest, 566 River Street. 663-5910. 5 p.m. Free. DJ Andy Fade. Flat Iron Cafe, 561 State St. 454-4830. 9 p.m. Free. DJ Fat Daddy Buck. Roost, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. 321-1170. 8:30 p.m. Free.

Open Jam. Mo’s Mulberry St, 191 Lee Rd. 647-3522. 8 p.m. Free. Open Mic. Sully’s Pub, 242 South Ave. 232-3960. 10 p.m. Free. Open Mic Night. Lovin’ Cup, Park Point @ RIT. 292-9940. 9 p.m. Free. Open Mic w/Joe Moore. McGraw’s Irish Pub, 146 W Commercial St, East Rochester. 348-9091, mcgrawsirishpub.com. 7 p.m. Free. Open Mic w/Rapier Slices. Clarissa’s, 293 Clarissa St. 4542680. 7-11 p.m. $3-$5. Open Mic w/String Theory. Johnny’s Irish Pub, 1382 Culver Rd. 224-0990. 8 p.m. Free.

[ Jazz ] Karl Stabnau. Bistro 135, 135 W Commercial St, East Rochester. 662-5555, bistro135.net. 6-9 p.m. Free. Thomas Gravino. Lemoncello, 137 W Commercial St, E Rochester. 385-8565. 6 p.m. Free.

[ Pop/Rock ] Civil Twilight, A Silent Film. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N Water St. 325-5600. 8 p.m. $10-$12. Egg Man’s Traveling Carnival. Hatter’s Pub, 5 W Main St, Webster. 872-1505. 6 p.m. Call for tix.

[ Karaoke ] Karaoke. 140 Alex, 140 Alexander St. 256-1000. 10:30 p.m. Free. Karaoke. Pineapple Jacks, 485 Spencerport Rd. 247-5225. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke. McKenzie’s Irish Pub, 3685 W Henrietta Rd. 3348970. 8 p.m. Free. Karaoke. Westside Sports Bar & Grill, 1600 Lyell Ave. 458-7888. 9 p.m. Call for tix. Karaoke. Applebee’s-Gates, 2120 Chili Ave. 426-7630. 9 p.m. Free. [ Open Mic ] Golden Link Singaround. Twelve Corners Presbyterian Church, 1200 S Winton Rd. goldenlink. org. 7:30 p.m. Free.

Hochstein Percussion Ensemble. Hochstein Performance Hall, 50 N Plymouth Ave. hochstein. org. 7:30 p.m. Free. Live from Hochstein: Giggs & Main. Hochstein Performance Hall, 50 N Plymouth Ave. hochstein.org. 12:50 p.m. Free. Trudy Moon. Geneva on the Lake, 1001 Lochland Rd, Geneva. 6:30-9 p.m. Free.

[ Acoustic/Folk ] Bobbie Henrie & the Goners. Dinosaur Bar-B-Que, 99 Court St. dinosaurbarbque.com. 9 p.m. Free. Ralph Louis. Lento, 274 N Goodman. 271-3470. 7:30 p.m. Free. Tom Gravino. Cafe 54, 54 W Main St, Victor. 742-3649. 6 p.m. Free.

[ DJ/Electronic ] Bad Wolf: 50s & 60s Vinyl Bop. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 4542966. 10 p.m. Free. DJ. Woody’s, 250 Monroe Ave. 730-8230. 9 p.m. Call for tix. DJ. Westside Sports Bar & Grill, 1600 Lyell Ave. 458-7888. 9 p.m. Call for tix. DJ. One, 1 Ryan Alley. 546-1010. 10 p.m. Free. DJ Andy Fade. Flat Iron Cafe, 561 State St. 454-4830. 9 p.m. Free. DJ Babi Katt/Dancehall Reggae. Blueroom, 293 Alexander St. 730-5985. 10 p.m. $5 after 11 p.m. DJ Cosmo. Bay Bar & Grill, 372 Manitou Rd, Hilton. 392-7700. 10 p.m. Free. DJ Fat Daddy Buck. Roost, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. 321-1170. 8:30 p.m. Free. DJs Jared & Mario B. Venu RestoLounge, 151 St Paul St. 2325650. 9 p.m. $5. DJs NaNa & PJ. Vertex, 169 N Chestnut St. 232-5498. 10 p.m. $3-$8.

[ Classical ] Eastman Wind Orchestra. Eastman School of MusicKilbourn Hall, 26 Gibbs St. 274-1000, esm.rochester.edu. 8 p.m. Free.

[ Hip-Hop/Rap ] Sophistafunk. Dub Land Underground, 315 Alexander St. dublandunderground. wordpress.com. 10 p.m. Call for tix.

Wednesday, March 23


[ Jazz ] Deborah Branch on Piano. Legacy-Clover Blossom, 100 McAuley Dr. 218-9000. 7 p.m. Free. Jim Nugent. Bistro 135, 135 W Commercial St, East Rochester. 662-5555, bistro135.net. 6-9 p.m. Free. Margaret Explosion. Little Theatre Cafe, 240 East Ave. 285-0400, thelittle.org/cafe. 7:30-9:30 p.m. Free. Paradigm Shift. Pomodoro Grill & Wine Bar, 1290 University Ave. 271-5000. 7:30 p.m. Free. Robert Chevrier. Brio Wine Bar & Grill, 3400 Monroe Ave. 5867000. 6:30 p.m. Free.

[ Karaoke ] Karaoke. Roost, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. 321-1170. 9:30 p.m. Free. Karaoke. Southpaw Brew Pub, 315 Gregory St. 303-2234. 8:30 p.m. Free. Karaoke. Elite Bar & Grill, 398 W Main St. 527-8720. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke. Pineapple Jacks, 485 Spencerport Rd. 247-5225. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke. Jose & Willy’s, 20 Lake Shore Dr, Canandaigua. 3947960. 8:30 p.m. Free. Karaoke. Monty’s Korner, 363 East Ave. 263-7650. 9.30 p.m. Free.

Karaoke. Lemoncello, 137 W Commercial St, E Rochester. 385-8565. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke. Applebee’s-Fairport, 585 Moseley Rd, Fairport. 4254700. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke. Mayfields Pub, 669 Winton Rd N. 288-7199. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke. Sanibel Cottage, 1517 Empire Blvd, Webster. 6719340. 6 p.m. Free. Karaoke w/DJ Flyin’ Brian. Tap Room, 364 Rt 104. 265-0055. 8:30 p.m. Free. Karaoke w/Debbie Randyn. Merchants Grill, 881 Merchants Rd. 482-2010. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke w/Mark. Flipside Bar & Grill, 2001 E Main St. 288-3930. 8:30 p.m. Free.

[ Open Mic ] Acoustic Open Mic. Pub 511, 511 E Ridge Rd. 266-9559. 8 p.m. Free. Drum Circle. Rich’s Cafe, 839 West Ave. 235-7665. 6 p.m. Free. Entertainment Showcase. Clarissa’s, 293 Clarissa St. 4542680. 8 p.m. Free-$5. Open Country Jam. Sandra’s Saloon, 276 Smith St. 5465474. 7-10 p.m. Free. Open Jam w/Big Daddy Blues Band. Deweys, 1380 Lyell Ave. 254-4707. 9:30 p.m. Free. Open Jam w/Justin Gurnsey. Jukebox, 5435 Ridge Rd W, Spencerport. 352-4505. 10 p.m. Free.

Open Mic. Boulder Coffee CoSouth Wedge, 100 Alexander St. 454-7140. 8 p.m. Free. Open Mic. Dr’s Inn Grill & Tap Room, 1743 East Ave. 2710820. 5 p.m. Free. Open Mic w/Jam Shack Music. Stoneyard Bar & Grill, 1 Main St, Brockport. 637-3390. 9 p.m. Free. Open Mic w/Steve West. Muddy Waters Coffee House-Geneseo, 53 Main St, Geneseo. 243-9111. 7-10 p.m. Free. Sandor Vegh and Queen’s Water Invitation Jam. Standard Lounge, 655 Monroe Ave. 473-2447. 9 p.m. Free.

[ Pop/Rock ] Bobby Henrie & The Goners. Dinosaur Bar-B-Que, 99 Court St. 888-476-1662, dinosaurbarbq. com. 9:30 p.m. Free. Kingston Trio. German House Theatre, 315 Gregory St. 4426880. 7 p.m. $36.50. The Radium Girls, Stereophone. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 4542966, bugjar.com. 8 p.m. $5-$7.

CHRONIC HIVES STUDY

Local doctors are currently conducting the Glacial Study evaluating an investigational medication for chronic hives. To qualify for this study, you must:

• Be 12-75 years of age, AND • Have experienced itching and have hives: on an almost daily basis for more than 6 weeks continuously even though you are using antihistamine treatment, AND • Have been diagnosed with CIU for at least six months, AND • MUST be willing and able to complete an electronic study diary twice daily at home for the duration of the study. The diary asks questions about your hives and itch. Qualified participants will receive study medication as well as study-related medical evaluations and tests at no cost. Reimbursement for time and travel may also be provided.

AAIR

Research Center

FOR MORE INFORMATION

CALL: (585) 442-1980 OR EMAIL: research@aair.info

300 Meridian Centre Suite 305

Dedicated to Improving Your Present and Future Health

WIN TICKETS! Register to win a pair of tickets to see Radio Golf at Geva Deadline for entries is Friday, March 25, 2011

Send entry to: Radio Golf C/O City Newspaper, 250 N. Goodman St., Rochester, NY 14607 or fax entry to: 244-1126

Name: Address: City/Town: Daytime Phone:

Zip

OR ENTER ONLINE AT: www.rochestercitynewspaper.com No reproductions. One entry per household. Sponsored by the Geva Theatre and City Newspaper.

Email:

rochestercitynewspaper.com City 23


Classical

Pictured, left to right: Amanda Jacobs, Kathleen Suher, Sarah Ioannides, and Elizabeth Roe. The musicians, composers, and conductors agree that there are still many challenges for women in classical music.

Where are the women? 2011 Women in Music Festival Monday, March 21-Friday, March 25 Many different venues FREE | esm.rochester.edu/wmf [ PREVIEW ] BY PALOMA CAPANNA

Next week, the Eastman School of Music will host the 7th Annual Women in Music Festival. Described as “a celebration of women involved in all aspects of music,” the event is free and open to the public, and includes concerts and lectures by women composers like Amanda Jacobs and women-directed groups like Cordancia. (See sidebar for schedule.) Inspired by the event, I interviewed several women and selected four narratives as vignettes of women’s journeys in the field of classical music. While each journey is unique, there are interwoven threads of shared experiences, a desire to get beyond gender labels, and a spirit of collaboration and networking. We are not always a unified force for progress. Many times this season I felt I was the only person asking, “Where are the women among composers and conductors?” But it was actually a man, Arild Remmereit, the incoming music director for the Rochester Philharmonic Orchestra, who would steal the thunder with last week’s announcement that the RPO’s 2011-2012 season would feature women composers, many of whom he aptly characterizes as “lesser known.” And so women, at least here in Rochester, now face the more challenging questions: will we put in the time to go to these and other concerts to support our fellow women? Will we put in the energy to juggle yet one more activity into our day to do it? And will we spend the money to buy the tickets to fund the organizations that offer us this opportunity to advance? 24 City march 16-22, 2011

Amanda Jacobs, Composer: Jacobs earned her

Bachelor of Music degree in piano performance from Wesleyan College (Macon, Georgia, 1984) and her Master of Music in piano performance and pedagogy from Georgia State University (1988). Jacobs lives in Rochester, and is working on her doctorate in educational psychology through Capella University with an emphasis in music and the arts. “What it basically comes down to is my philosophy that you’re going to compose or you’re not,” says Jacobs, who collaborated with Lindsay Warren Baker to create the music and libretto for “Lily, a Musical Portrait,” based upon Edith Wharton’s 1905 novel, “The House of Mirth.” The first public reading of Lily will be presented on Wednesday, March 23, with the Empire State Lyric Theatre at the Memorial Art Gallery as part of the Women in Music Festival. Jacobs and Baker previously created “Pride & Prejudice, a Musical.” Jacobs credits her education at a women’s college with giving her the confidence to be anything that she wanted to be. “I don’t concentrate on gender because I know that my work goes beyond the obstacle,” she says. Even so, Jacobs describes a gender-awareness moment she encountered during an all-male board meeting in 2008. “On Broadway, there are almost no women orchestrators,” Jacob says. “I had always orchestrated my own work because of my classical training and background. The questioning of whether I was good enough to orchestrate my own work [“Pride & Prejudice”] was preposterous to me.” Jacobs’ advice to other women is, “Surround yourself with people that believe in you and keep making art.” She points to collaborating with women, networking with women, and taking advantage of opportunities created for women. “Eventually, we will meld,” says Jacobs. “We have the opportunities to study. We have the right to vote. I am optimistic about it.”

Kathleen Suher, Oboist: Suher, together with

Pia Liptak, is a co-director of Sinfonietta Cordancia, which gave its first performance in 2010. Suher is principal oboist for the University of Rochester Symphony Orchestra. She earned her Bachelor of Arts from the University of Rochester (1990) and her Juris Doctor from Syracuse University (1993). Suher is also an attorney. She resides in Penfield. When she recently saw RPO guest conductor Sarah Ioannides, Suher was struck by the realization that she had “rarely if ever played under, or even seen, an orchestra conducted by a woman.” She says, “It’s not something I had thought about before, which might seem surprising for a female musician.” Suher thinks of herself as a musician or, more specifically, an oboe player. Suher says, “To me, it feels like it takes something away from the person as a composer or musician to specify that they are a woman. If they are good, they are good.” Cordancia’s participation in this year’s festival came about through networking with women, Suher says, and the festival will provide Suher with the opportunity to rehearse and perform works by guest composer Hilary Tann, including her “Shakkei” and “Walls of Morlais Castle.” “It’s exciting for me to have an actual conversation with a composer,” says Suher. Sarah Ioannides, Conductor: Sarah

Ioannides is music director of the El Paso Symphony Orchestra and Spartanburg Philharmonic Orchestra. She was the only female guest conductor of the Rochester Philharmonic Orchestra during its 2010-11 season. Ioannides earned her Bachelor of Arts and her Master of Arts in music from Oxford University (1993) and her Masters of Music in orchestral conducting from the Juilliard School (2000). She was awarded a Fulbright Scholarship in 1996. “I have two really, really huge jobs,” says Ioannides. “Both are extremely complicated

for different reasons. One enhances the other to be able to be doing both.” Ioannides was speaking about the jobs of being a conductor with an international, yearround schedule and being a mother of three children under the age of 5. She notes the simple truth that it is only relatively recent for women to be working full-time out of the house, in a way that has been customary for men. She credits having great role models, both female and male, but acknowledges there are few women conductors, particularly at the top. “We haven’t made enough progress to be off the subject of women,” she says. For Ioannides, women conductors and women composers are issues that people need to be consciously aware of, and “a gap that needs to be rectified.” Ioannides tries to program two or three works by women composers per season. “Everybody knows women have as much potential,” says Ioannides. “We have to see this not as a competition, but as a partnership. When one excels, the other excels. There is room for everybody.” Elizabeth Roe, Pianist: Roe earned her

Bachelor’s and Master’s degrees from The Juilliard School on full scholarships in 2004 and 2006, respectively. Roe teaches at Smith College in Northampton, Massachusetts, in addition to performing across the country. Roe performed at the 2010 Canandaigua Lake Music Festival as part of a piano duo with Greg Anderson. Roe starts by saying that being at Smith College means she is “constantly thinking about ways for women to have a voice in any field, including music.” “I feel thankful to be in a field like the arts, where in terms of expectations and what defines an artist, is a little bit more fluid than another field, like business or science or politics,” says Roe. “I haven’t encountered a lot of blatant opposition or resistance, but when


you do see the roster of great conductors or composers, I feel that it is a little bit uneven.” Roe, who last month performed Clara Schumann’s Piano Trio on a program that included work by Clara’s husband, Robert Schumann, noticed gender in the wording of compliments like, “Clara Schuman was such an interesting woman composer” — not just, “such an interesting composer.” And Roe hears it in the compliments paid to her own performances. “They say, ‘You play like a man,’ or ‘Your sound is so big’ — I’ve heard those phrases several times in a way that’s supposed to be complimentary. This is interesting. It almost seems to state that women should just be delicate or poetic,” says Roe. “I am powerful. I go for it.” Roe’s advice is that “any artist or any creative person really needs to tap into the feminine archetype and the more male archetype. It’s part of who we are as humans, to have this duality, and to find ways to bridge it and marry it and transcend who we are.”

2011 Women in Music Festival Schedule Monday, March 21 Noon: Noontime Concert Main Hall, Eastman School of Music, 26 Gibbs St. 8 p.m.: Works by Hilary Tann Performances by Madrigalia and Musica Spei; Lee Wright, conductor. Downtown United Presbyterian Church, 121 N Fitzhugh St.

Tuesday, March 22 Noon: Noontime Concert Wilmot Hall, Nazareth College, 4245 East Ave. 3:30 p.m.: Lecture and Composition Master Class by Hilary Tann Ciminelli Formal Lounge, Eastman School of Music, 100 Gibbs St. 7 p.m.: Lecture by Hilary Tann Rush Rhees Library, University of Rochester River campus.

Wednesday, March 23 Noon: Noontime Concert Miller Center, Eastman School of Music, 26 Gibbs St. 8:15 p.m.: “Lily, A Musical Portrait” Preview by Empire State Lyric Theatre. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. 6:15 p.m. pre-concert reception (ticket required, $25). 7:15 p.m. pre-concert dialogue.

Thursday, March 24 Noon: Noontime Concert First Universalist Church, 150 S. Clinton Ave. 8 p.m.: Women in Music Festival Tour Wilmot Hall, Nazareth College, 4245 East Ave.

Friday, March 25 Noon: Short films from the 1920’s and 1930’s By Laszlo Moholy-Nagy with music by Michaela Eremiasova and Jairo Duarte-Lopez. Curtis Theatre, George Eastman House, 900 East Ave. 8 p.m.: “Life, Death & Renewal: An Evening of Reflection through Poetry and Music” With the University of Rochester Symphony Orchestra (David Harman, conductor; Timothy Tikker, organ), Sinfonia Cordanica, and ESM student performers. Sacred Heart Cathedral, 296 Flower City Park. *All events free unless otherwise noted

SPECIAL EVENT | GardenScape 2011

Though our beloved city is busy oscillating between spewing the remnants of winter at us and dousing the winter-dirty streets with rain, you can escape to an indoor Eden this week. GardenScape, the annual flower and garden show, will transform the Dome Center (2695 E. Henrietta Road) into instaspringtime Thursday, March 17, through Sunday, March 20. “Rock the Garden” is this the theme of this year’s show, produced by the GardenScape Professionals Association, at which you can enjoy beautifully landscaped gardens on display in the main area of the Dome Center, the live landscaping design challenge at 11 a.m. each day, musical performances, seminars, and more than 100 vendors of gardening wares in the adjoining Minett Hall. And for the kids there’s an interactive garden featuring the boulder-filled yard of a prehistoric home, dinosaurs, and a make-and-take project. A special preview party titled “A Taste of Spring” will be held on Wednesday, March 16, 5:30-8 p.m., and will allow guests to stroll the gardens while enjoying live music and refreshments. Tickets are $50 (advance only) and may be purchased online at epilepsy-uny.org; proceeds will benefit the Epilepsy Foundation. Early-bird breakfast tours, which include breakfast and a leisurely viewing the of the gardens with master gardeners as guides, will be offered at 7 a.m. Friday, March 18, and Saturday, March 19, for $25 per ticket. Regular show hours for “Rock the Garden” at GardenScape are Thursday to Saturday 9 a.m.-9 p.m., and Sunday 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Tickets cost $10-$12; children ages 12 and under are admitted free with parents. Purchase tickets at Wegmans locations and online at rochesterflowershow.com. For more information on the show, call 265-9018. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY

Art Exhibits [ OPENINGS ] “Automobiles: Photographs by Michael Furman” Thu Mar 17. SPAS Gallery, Rochester Institute of Technology, Gannett Bldg, 1 Lomb Memorial Dr. 5-8 p.m. 475-2616, rit.edu. Lecture at 5 p.m. in the Chester F. Carlson Center (bldg. 76, room 1125). “Gary Mayers, Sculpture” and “Bernard Bragg, A Personal Collection of Memorabilia” Thu Mar 17. NTID Dyer Arts Center, 52 Lomb Memorial Dr. 4-6 p.m. 475-6884, ntid.rit.edu/dyerarts. “The Modern Day Diana,” Photographs by Margaret LeJeune Thu Mar 17. Hartnett Gallery, University of Rochester, Wilson Commons. 4-7 p.m. 275-4188, blogs.rochester.edu/ Hartnett. Talk 4 p.m. in Gowen Room. “Something Old, Something New” by Arena Art Group Fri Mar 18. Williams Gallery, 220 S Winton Rd. 5:30-8:30 p.m. 271-9070, rochesterunitarian.org. “A Photographer’s Path 14” Sun Mar 20. High Falls Fine Art Gallery, 60 Browns Race. 3-6 p.m. 325-2030, centerathighfalls.org.

New York State Art Teachers Association Region 2 Student Art Exhibit. Sun Mar 20. Artisan Works, 565 Blossom Rd. 1-4 p.m. $8-$12. 288-7170, artisanworks.net. “Divination of Bones,” Ceramic Installation by Natalie Thompson Tue Mar 22. West Side Gallery, SUNY Brockport, 180 Holley St., Brockport. 5-7 p.m. 395-ARTS, brockport.edu. [ CONTINUING ] American Association of University Women (AAUW) Art Forum and Gallery 494 East Ave. Through Apr 1: Group exhibit. Mon-Fri 10 a.m.4 p.m. by appt. only. 255-0065, aauwrochester.org. Artisan Works 565 Blossom Rd. Through Apr 10: New York State Art Teachers Association Region 2 Student Art Exhibit. | Ongoing: “Ramon Santiago,” video presentation. Third Sundays: Park Avenue Dance Company, 3 p.m. FriSat 11 a.m.-6 p.m., Sun Noon-5 p.m. $8-$12. 288-7170, artisanworks.net. Arts & Cultural Council Gallery 277 N Goodman St. Through Mar 24: “On the Edge: Rochester Area Fiber Artists.” Mon-Fri 10 a.m.-4 p.m. 4734000, artsrochester.org.

A.R.T.S. Gallery at Aviv Café 321 East Ave. Through Mar 31: “Presents Honor Israel,” photography by Lori Sousa. Fri 6-11 p.m., Sun 8 a.m.-1 p.m. 729-9916. Booksmart Studio 250 N. Goodman St. Through Mar 26: “Nothing New: The Ruminations and Imaginings of Sarah C. Rutherford and St. Monci,” Presented by 1975 Gallery. Mon-Fri 9 a.m.-6 p.m.; Sat 10 a.m.-4 p.m. 1800-761-6623, booksmartstudio.com. Books Etc. 78 W. Main St., Macedon. Through Apr 30: “Landscapes and Other Beautiful Things,” work by Terry Patti, Chris Fayad, and Roger Wahl. Wed-Sun Noon-5 p.m. 4744116, books_etc@yahoo.com. Bridge Gallery Brodie Fine Arts, SUNY Geneseo. Through Apr 2: 26th Annual Calligraphy Exhibition. MonThu noon-4 p.m., Fri-Sat noon-6 p.m. 245-5814, Geneseo.edu. Chait Fine Art Gallery 234 Mill St. Through Mar 26: “Catalyst:” A Group Exhibit by Community Arts Connection Artists: The Arc of Monroe. By appointment. 454-6730, schait@chaitstudios.com. Crocus Clay Works Gallery Hungerford Building Door #2, Suite 225, 1115 E. Main St. Through Mar 26: “What the Flux: Thaw at Hungerford” including Paper Tigers and work by Jennifer Buckley and Marie Verlinde Nye. Tue-Wed 5-8 p.m., Sat 10 a.m.-3 p.m., or by appointment. 469-8217, crocusclayworks.com. A Different Path Gallery 27 Market St., Brockport. Through Mar 27: “Metal & Mud,” work by Dennis Scherer and Melita Gill. Wed-Fri 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Sat 10 a.m.-6 p.m., Sun 10 a.m.-4 p.m. 637-5494, differentpathgallery.com. The Firehouse Gallery @ Genesee Pottery, 713 Monroe Ave. Through Mar 26: “Winter Blooms,” work by Giselle Hicks and Kala Stein. MonFri 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; Sat noon-4 p.m. 244-1730, geneseearts.org. Flour City Bread @ 52 Rochester Public Market 280 Union St. Through Apr 5: “Quiet,” photographs by Lisa Barker. Thu 9 a.m.-noon, Sat 7 a.m.2 p.m. 957-3096. FourWalls Gallery 179 Atlantic Ave. Through Mar 25: “Lost & Found: Recent Work of Lee Hoag.” Call for hours. 442-7824, fourwallsartgallery@ gmail.com. Friendly Home’s Memorial Gallery 3165 East Ave. Through Apr 30: Work by Kathy Houston. Daily 10 a.m.-5 p.m. 381-1600, friendlyhome.org. Fusion Salon 333 Park Ave. Through Mar 31: “Famous Faces,” by Jay Lincoln, Jennifer Cichello, Mr. PRVRT, and Rebecca Rafferty. Presented by Method Machine. Mon & Tue 9 a.m.-8 p.m., Thu Noon-8 p.m., Fri 9a.m.-6 p.m., Sat 9 a.m.-4 p.m. 271-8120, fusionsalonnewyork.com. Gallery @ Equal=Grounds 750 South Ave. Through Mar 25: “CORPORA,” drawings by Patrizia Laufer. Tue-Fri 7 a.m.-Midnight, Sat-Sun 10 a.m.Midnight. gallery@equalgrounds.com. Gallery at Rubino’s Café 1659 Mt. Hope Ave. Through Mar 26: “Whimsical Art” by Margot Fass, Mollie Wolf, & Martha Schermerhorn. Mon-Fri 8:30 a.m.-6:30 p.m., Sat 8:30 a.m.-6:30 p.m., Sun 9:30 a.m.2:00 p.m. 271-0110. Genesee Co-op Federal Credit Union 395 Gregory St. Through Apr 2: “Variations on the Endangered Theme” by Margot Fass. Mon-Wed 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; Thu-Fri 10 a.m.-6 p.m. 461-2230, genesee.coop.

George Eastman House 900 East Ave. Through Jun12: “Between the States: Photographs of the American Civil War from the George Eastman House Collection,” and “Still Here: Contemporary Artists and the Civil War.” | Through April 17: “You Ain’t Heard Nothin’ Yet: Early Film and the Coming of Sound.” | Through Apr 10: “Larry Merrill: Looking at Trees.” | Ongoing: “Cameras from the Technology Collection,” and “The Remarkable George Eastman.” | TueSat 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Thu 10 a.m.-8 p.m., Sun 1-5 p.m. $4-$10. 2713361, eastmanhouse.org Gilded Square Picture Framing & Gallery 714 University Ave. Through Apr 29: “Beyond the Reef” by JoEll Mileo-Cunningham. Tue-Fri 11 a.m.-5 p.m., Sat 11 a.m.-3 p.m. 4612808, gildedsquare.com. Hartnett Gallery University of Rochester, Wilson Commons. Mar 17-Apr 10: “The Modern Day Diana,” Photographs by Margaret LeJeune. Tue-Fri 11 a.m.-7 p.m.; Sat-Sun Noon-5 p.m. 275-4188, blogs. rochester.edu/Hartnett. High Falls Fine Art Gallery 60 Browns Race. Mar 18-Apr 29: “A Photographer’s Path 14.” WedFri 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; Sat Noon-6 p.m.; Sun 1-5 p.m. 325-2030, centerathighfalls.org. H&R Block Premium Office 1100 Long Pond Rd. Suite 103. Through Apr 18: Suburban Rochester Art Group: Work by Members. During office hours, call 424-4327. The Hungerford Studio 258,1115 E. Main St. Through Mar 26: “FLUX: THAW at the Hungerford” group show. Saturdays in March, 10 a.m.-3 p.m. thehungerford.com. Image City Photography Gallery 722 University Ave. Mar 23-Apr 17: “Through the Student Lens.” | Through Mar 20: “Thaw.” & “Peter’s Picks 2008-2009.” Wed-Sat 11 a.m.7 p.m.; Sun noon-4 p.m. 482-1976, imagecityphotographygallery.com. International Art Acquisitions 3300 Monroe Ave. Through Mar 31: “Aubusson” by Janet Richardson-Baughman. Mon-Fri 10 a.m.-9 p.m.; Sat 10 a.m.-6 p.m.; Sun Noon-5 p.m. 264-1440, internationalartacquisitions.com. Joy Gallery 551 Genesee St. Through Mar 19: “Salute to Black History Month” with art by James Daniels and the Joy Gallery art group. Noon-4 p.m. 436-5230, joygallery.org. Little Theatre Café 240 East Ave. Through Apr 1: The Art of Peter Monacelli. Sun 5-8 p.m.; Mon-Thu 5-10 p.m.; Fri-Sat 5-11 p.m. 2580403, thelittle.org. Living Room Café 1118 Monroe Ave. Through Mar 31: “Book of Nights,” work by Aydin Ture. Sun-Thu 7 a.m.-10 p.m., Fri-Sat 7 a.m.-11 p.m. thelivingroomcafe.com. Lux Lounge 666 South Ave. Through Mar 31: “Lux Be a Lady” work by Rheytchul Chickenbone, Sarah Rutherford, Stacey Mrva, Juni Moon, Lea Rizzo, and Sara Purr. Mon-Thu 5 p.m.-2 a.m.; Fri 4:30-2 a.m.; Sat-Sun 9 p.m.-2 a.m. 232-9030, lux666.com. MCC Mercer Gallery 1000 E. Henrietta Rd. Through Apr 1: “Follow,” works by Peter Monacelli based on the 1960s Jerry Merrick/ Richy Havens song. Mon, Wed, Fri 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; Tue, Thu 10 a.m.-7 p.m. 292-2021. Memorial Art Gallery 500 University Ave. Through Apr 10: “Wine & Spirit: Rituals, Remedies, and Revelry.” | continues on page 26

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Art Exhibits Through Mar 21: “Great Impressions: The Print Club of Rochester Turns 80” in Lockhart Gallery. | “What’s Up” lecture, First Sundays, 2 p.m. | Ongoing exhibits: “At the Crossroads,” “Seeing America,” “Italian Baroque Organ,” “Brunswick Armor,” “Judaica.” | Wed-Sun 11 a.m.-5 p.m., Thu until 9 p.m., $4-$10. Thu night reduced price: $6 from 5-9 p.m. 276-8900, mag. rochester.edu. Mill Art Center & Gallery, 61 N Main St, Honeoye Falls. Through Apr 23: “Relevant: An HF-L Alumni Art Exhibition.” 6247740, millartcenter.com. Mon-Fri & Sat 11 a.m.-3 p.m., Fri 11 a.m.-8 p.m. Free My Sister’s Gallery The Episcopal Church Home, 505 Mt. Hope Ave. Through Apr 7: “Things in a Row, and More,” paintings by Jeanette Musliner. Daily 10 a.m.-8 p.m. 546-8439. Nazareth College Arts Center Gallery 4245 East Ave. Mar 18-Apr 23: “Nazareth College Department of Art Undergraduate Student Exhibition.” Tue-Thu 1-4 p.m., FriSat 1-8 p.m. 389-5073, naz.edu. Nazareth College Casa Italiana LeChase Lounge 4245 East Ave. Through Apr 22: “Toscana Toscana”, photography by George Wallace. Mon-Fri 8:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m. 389-2469, casa@naz.edu. NTID Dyer Arts Center 52 Lomb Memorial Dr. Mar 17-Apr 23: “Pamela Witcher, 2001-2011, A Retrospective,” “Gary Mayers, Sculpture,” and “Bernard Bragg, A Personal Collection of Memorabilia.” Mon-Thu 9:30 a.m.-4 p.m.; Fri 9:30 a.m.-7 p.m.; Sat 1-3:30 p.m. 475-6884, ntid.rit.edu/dyerarts. Oxford Gallery 267 Oxford St. Through Apr 9: “Anticipating Spring,” group exhibition. Tue-Fri Noon-5 p.m; Sat 10 a.m.-5 p.m. 271-5885, oxfordgallery.com. Pat Rini Rohrer Gallery 71 S Main St, Canandaigua. Mar 18-Apr 30: 6th Annual Studio II Faculty/ Student Exhibit. Mon-Tue 10 a.m.6 p.m.; Wed-Fri 10 a.m.-8 pm.; Sat 10 a.m.-6 p.m.; Sun 12:30-4 p.m. 394-0030, prrgallery.com. Penfield Arts Center repARTee Gallery 2131 Five Mile Line Rd. Through Mar 25: “Thaw: Before the Flow.” Wed-Sat 1-5 p.m. 5865192, penfieldartscenter.com. Pieters Family Life Center Café 1900 E. Henrietta Rd. Through Mar 29: Steven and Robert Tyron. Mon-Fri 6:30 a.m.-9 p.m.; Sat 6:30 a.m.- 5 p.m. 487-3500, heritagechristianservices.org. Record Archive 33 1/3 Rockwood St. Through Mar 31: “A Mess of New Paintings” by Richard F. Storms. Mon-Sat 10 a.m.-9 p.m., Sun noon-5 p.m. alayna@ recordarchive.com. Renaissance Art Gallery 74 St. Paul St. Through Mar 26: Taylor Woolwine. Tue-Sat 11 a.m.-5 p.m. 423-8235, rochesterrenaissanceartgallery.com. Roberts Wesleyan B.T. Roberts Memorial Hall Art Gallery 2265 Westside Dr. Through May 16: “Kathleen Nicastro: Painting Spiritual Geometry.” Mon-Fri 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Roberts.edu. Roberts Wesleyan Davison Gallery 2265 Westside Drive.

March 31. For more information, visit film360365.com or call 2798307. 63rd Annual Rochester-Finger Lakes Exhibition. Deadline March 31. Seeking entries from regional artists for major juried exhibition opening July 24 at Memorial Art Gallery. Apply at mag.rochester. edu/rochester-finger-lakes/. Call for Applications for 55th Clothesline Festival. Deadline March 25. Festival to be held September 10-11 at Memorial Art Gallery. Apply online at clothesline.rochester.edu. DANCE | Viver Brasil

Forget the northern hemisphere this weekend and get transported to Brazil for one night as Viver Brasil brings its stunning and award-winning “Feet on the Ground” to Nazareth College Arts Center (4245 East Ave.) Sunday, March 20. Meet an array of African orixás (deities), witness ceremonial celebrations as well as the graceful Brazilian martial arts/dance form of Capoeira, and be dazzled by the flash and intrigue of Carnaval. The show takes place at 7 p.m. Tickets cost $25-$55 and may be purchased by calling 389-2190 or visiting artscenter. naz.edu. A pre-performance lecture by Dr. Hilda Chacon, Nazareth College professor of Spanish and the Rosemarie Beston Chair for International Studies in Foreign Languages and Literature, will take place at 6 p.m. in room A-14 of the Arts Center. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY Through Mar 28: “THAW: Painting Confluence & Influence,” featuring Dave Berry, Immanuele Cacciatore, Aaron Gosser, Janet McKenzie, Kathleen Nicastro, and Rachael Van Dyke. Mon-Fri 11 a.m.-5 p.m.; Sat 1-4 p.m. Roberts.edu Rochester Contemporary Arts Center 137 East Ave. Through Mar 13: “Mentors & Makers” new sculpture by Wendell Castle and Nancy Jurs and their former students Tom Lacagnina and Bethany Krull. | In the LAB Space: “Charlie Arnold: Pioneer of Electrostatic Art.” Wed-Sun 1-5 p.m., Fri 1-10 p.m. 461-2222, rochestercontemporary.org. $1. Rochester Medical Museum & Archives Through Mar 18: “Military Dress” by Philip G. Maples. Mon-Fri 9 a.m.-4 p.m. 922-1847, viahealth.org/archives. Rochester Regional Community Design Center Hungerford Complex/E. Main Business Park. Door 3B. Through Jun 3: “Build it Right and They Will Come.” Mon-Fri 8:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m. 271-0520, rrcdc.com. Roz Steiner Art Gallery 1 College Rd., Batavia. Through Apr 5: GCC Fine Arts Student Show. Call for hours. 343-0055 x6448, genesee.edu. Rush Rhees Library Rare Books and Special Collections University of Rochester River Campus, Rush Rhees Library, Wilson Blvd. Through Apr 6: “The Theatres of Memory: New Perspective on Edward Curtis’ The North American Indian.” Mon-Fri 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Fat 11 a.m.-3 p.m. 475-6766. The Shoe Factory Co-op 250 N. Goodman St., Studio 212. Through Mar 26: “A Lynn Tate Retrospective.” Wed-Sat 12-5 p.m. studio212@shoefactoryarts. com, shoefactoryarts.com SPAS Gallery Rochester Institute of Technology, Gannett Bldg, 1

26 City march 16-22, 2011

Lomb Memorial Dr. Mar 17-Apr 7: “Automobiles: Photographs by Michael Furman.” Mon-Fri 9 a.m.-6 p.m. 475-2616, rit.edu The Strong National Museum of Play One Manhattan Square. Through May 22: “Whimsical Art Trail” with Gary Carlson, Meredith Schreiber, and Raphaela McCormack. MonThu 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Fri-Sat 10 a.m.-8 p.m., Sun 12-5 p.m. 2632700, thestrong.org. $10-12. SUNY Geneseo Lockhart Gallery McClellan House, 26 Main St., Geneseo. Mar 21-May 5: “Paolo Fidanza and the Reproductive Print.” Mon-Thu 12:30-3:30 p.m.; Fri-Sat 12:30-5:30 p.m. geneseo.edu. Tower Fine Arts Center @ SUNY Brockport 180 Holley St. Through Apr 1: “E. E. Cummings: Painter and Poet.” Mon-Fri 10 a.m.-4 p.m. 395-ARTS, brockport.edu. Visual Studies Workshop 31 Prince St. Through Mar 27: “Shedding Light” by Pamela Vander Zwan. Thu 5-8 p.m., Fri-Sun noon-5 p.m. 442-8676, vsw.org. West Side Gallery SUNY Brockport, 180 Holley St., Brockport. Mar 23-Apr 8: “Divination of Bones,” Ceramic Installation by Natalie Thompson. Mon-Fri 5-7 p.m. 395-ARTS, brockport.edu. Williams Gallery 220 S Winton Rd. Through Apr 4: “Something Old, Something New” by Arena Art Group. Mon-Fri 9 a.m.-2 p.m. 271-9070, rochesterunitarian.org. Williams-Insalaco Gallery 34 at FLCC, 3325 Marvin Sands Dr., Canandaigua. Through Mar 18: “All about Trains and Graphite” by Sam Ferrara. Mon-Thu 8:30 a.m.-9 p.m., Fri 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m., Sat-Sun noon-5 p.m. 3943500 x7369, gallery34@flcc.edu. [ CALL FOR ARTWORK ] 360|365 Shorts Contest Announces Theme: “Mini Musical.” Deadline

Art Events [ Wednesday, March 16 ] “Nothing New” Artists Talk. Booksmart Studio, 250 N Goodman St. erich@1975ish. com. 7-8 p.m. Free. [ Thursday, March 17 ] MAG Highlights Tour. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. 276-8900, mag.rochester.edu. 6:30 p.m. Included with gallery admission: $5-10. Docent-led tour of the collections. Workshop: Understanding and Using Camera RAW. Genesee Center for the Arts & Education, 713 Monroe Ave. 271-5920, geneseearts.org. 7-9:30 p.m. $35-45, register. [ Friday, March 18 ] “Wine and Spirit” Exhibition Tours. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. 276-8900, mag. rochester.edu. Fri 2 p.m. Included with gallery admission: $5-10. Watercolor Class with Peggy Martinez. A Different Path Gallery, 27 Market St., Brockport. kwestonarts@gmail.com. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. $120, 5 week class. [ Saturday, March 19 ] Creative Workshop Open House. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. 276-8900, mag.rochester.edu. 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Free. Palladium Printing. Genesee Center for the Arts & Education, 713 Monroe Ave. 271-5920, geneseearts.org. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. $140-150, register. Persepolis: Culture Carved in Stone. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. 276-8900, mag. rochester.edu. 1:30-5 p.m. Free. Lectures, Nowruz celebration, tea and treats, music. Surface: Slip, Stamps, and Sprigs. Genesee Center for the Arts & Education, 713 Monroe Ave. 2715183, geneseearts.org. 1-5 p.m. $65-75, register. [ Sunday, March 20 ] Craft and Zine Fair. Flying Squirrel, 285 Clarissa St. 4425432, flyingsquirrel.rocus.org. 11 a.m.-5 p.m. $2 donation. Vendors and workshops. [ Monday, March 21 ] Local Visionaries: Artists Unplugged. Lemoncello, 137 W Commercial St, E Rochester. localvisionaries.weebly.com. Sign up at 6:30 p.m. Free.

Comedy [ Thursday, March 17Saturday, March 19 ] Walter Gause. Comedy Club, 2235 Empire Blvd, Webster,

NY 14580. 671-9080, thecomedyclub.us. Thu 7:30 p.m., Fri-Sat 7:30 & 10 p.m. $9. [ Saturday, March 19 ] Village Idiots Improv Comedy “Director’s Cut.” Village Idiots Comedy Improv, 274 N Goodman St, VIP Studio D312. vip@improvVIP.com, improvVIP. com. 8 p.m. $8.

Dance Events [ Thursday, March 17 ] Irish Dancing by the McLaughlinGoodwin-O’Shancey Academy of Irish Dance. Brighton Memorial Library, 2300 Elmwood Ave. 7845300, brightonlibrary.org. 10 a.m. Free, register. [ Sunday, March 20 ] Park Avenue Dance Company���s Dance, Wine, and Good Company. Artisan Works, 565 Blossom Rd. 461-2766, parkavenuedancecompany. org, padco@rochester.rr.com. 1-4 p.m. $25 advance, $30 at the door. Performances by The Park Avenue Dance Company, Faculty, and students, tour of ArtisanWORKS, swing dance lesson; silent auction. Viver Brasil in Feet on the Ground. Nazareth College Arts Center, 4245 East Ave. 389-2170, boxoffice.naz.edu, artscenter.naz. edu. 7 p.m. $25-55. [ Wednesday, March 23 ] Rochester City Ballet “Downtown Dance-off.” Nazareth College Arts Center, 4245 East Ave. 4615850, rochestercityballet.com, downtowndancoff.blogspot.com. 7 p.m. $10, kids 12 and under free.

Dance Participation [ Thursday, March 17 ] Argentine Tango Dance with Jan Bares. Upstairs Hall, 4657 Culver Rd. 323-1040, midnighttango.com. 7-8 p.m. new to tango lesson, 8-9 p.m. guided practice/advanced class, 9 p.m.-midnight dance. $4. Dance ‘60’s Style. Henrietta Public Library, 455 Calkins Rd. 359-7092. 7-8:15 p.m. Free, register. Sky Baby Productions presents: House of Love. Decibel Lounge, 45 Euclid St. 754-4645. 9 p.m. TBA. Always 21+, $1 Off-Street parking available. With Hector, Flex, Our Baby, and Mark. [ Friday, March 18 ] Every Friday is a Good Friday with DJ Reign. Spenders, 1600 Lyell Ave. 458-1040. 10 p.m.-2:30 a.m. $10 cover, 2 for 1 admission before 11 p.m. [ Saturday, March 19 ] Dance Lovers St. Patty’s Dance. Inikori Dance Studio, 1100 University Ave. 746-3290 or 325-3873. 7-11 p.m. $10-13. An evening of ballroom dancing featuring a mix of foxtrot, waltz, Latin, and swing. Dance Hosts available. Handicapped accessible. Attire is After 5 Fashion. Optional attire is green and white. Fundraiser Extraordinaire Music & Square Dancing. Summerville Presbyterian Church, 4845 St. Paul Blvd. 734-6005. 7 p.m. $10, ages 16 and under free. Helps

fund volunteers from Summerville Presbyterian Church and Irondequoit Presbyterian Church to travel to Nashville and assist those affected by the flooding. [ Sunday, March 20 ] Inikori Dance Studio’s Latin Dance Social. Inikori Dance Studio, 1100 University Ave. 271-6840, frontdesk@inikoridance.com. Lesson 615-7 p.m., dance 7-9 p.m. $5, $20 with lesson. Salsa, Tango, Cha Cha, Merengue, Bachata, and Mambo. [ Saturday, March 19Sunday, March 20 ] Special Weekend LivingDance intensive. Kinections, 718 University Ave. 573-5050, kinectionsinfo@kinections.com. Sat 9 a.m.-6 p.m., Sun 9 a.m.-2 p.m. $285; register. [ Tuesday, March 22 ] Stardust Ballroom Dance Series: Dick Stacy. Edgerton Community Center, 41 Backus St. cityofrochester.gov/edgerton. 7:30 p.m. $1.50-3.

Kids Events [ Wednesday, March 16 ] Stuck in the Middle Book Discussion Group: “The Boy in the Striped Pajamas” by John Boyne. 5263 Parkside Dr., Canandaigua. 394-1381, jgoodemote@pls-net.org. 6:30 p.m. Free. Grades 6-8. Discuss a book over a homemade dessert and hot drinks. [ Thursday, March 17 ] American Girl Club: “A Smart Girl’s Guide to Money!” Barnes & Noble Greece, 330 Greece Ridge Center Dr. 227-4020, barnesandnoble. com. 7 p.m. Free. Ages 7+. Anime Club Film: “Kenichi: The Mightiest Disciple.” Canandaigua YMCA, 32 N. Main St. 394-1381, jgoodemote@pls-net.org. 6-8 p.m. Free. Ages 13+. [ Saturday, March 19 ] Latinas Unidas 2011 Rally: Living Healthy and Healthy Choices. University of Rochester, Wilson Blvd. 256-8900, latinasunidas.org. 8:30 a.m.-2 p.m. Free, registration required. For Latinas ages 718. Children under 13 must be accompanied by an adult. [ Saturday, March 19 ] Autism Council of Rochester Soccer Camp. Al Sigl Center Gym, 1000 Elmwood Ave. 413-1681, info@theautismcouncil.com. 10-11:00 a.m. $35 per family, scholarships available, register. Challenger Learning Center: Mission to Mars. Rochester Museum and Science Center, 657 East Ave. 697-1942, rmsc. org. 10:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. $13-16, reservations required. Ages 7+, Ages 7-10 must be paired with adult. Dinner Theater. Twelve Corners Presbyterian Church, 1200 S. Winton Rd. education@ twelvecorners.org. 5-8 p.m. $10 per adult, $6 per child, max: $30 per family. Game Day. Lift Bridge Book Shop, 45 Main St, Brockport. 637-2260, liftbridge.com. 11 a.m. Free. ages 8-12. Practice ACT Test. Brighton Memorial Library, 2300 Elmwood


Ave. 784-5300, brightonlibrary.org. 10 a.m. Free, register. Science Saturday: Much Ado About Nothing. Rochester Museum and Science Center, 657 East Ave. 2711880, rmsc.org. 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Included with museum admission $10-12. Vacuum science. Teen Art Workshop. Henrietta Public Library, 455 Calkins Rd. 359-7092. 1-2 p.m. Free. Ages 12-18. The Very Hungy Caterpillar Visits Storytime. Barnes & Noble Greece, 330 Greece Ridge Center Dr. 2274020, barnesandnoble.com. 11 a.m. Free. [ Saturday, March 19Sunday, March 20 ] Literature Live Series. Strong National Museum of Play, 1 Manhattan Sq. 263-2700, museumofplay.org. Sat 11 a.m.-5 p.m., Sun 1-5 p.m. Included with museum admission: $9-11. [ Monday, March 21 ] Toddler Book Club: Out of this World. Strong National Museum of Play, 1 Manhattan Sq. 263-2700, museumofplay.org. 10:30 a.m., 11:30 a.m., or 12:30 p.m. Included with museum admission $9-11. Wii Funday Monday. Phillis Wheatley Library, 33 Dr Samuel McCree Way. 428-8212. 2:30 p.m. Free. All ages. [ Tuesday, March 22 ] Kids’ Book Club. Henrietta Public Library, 455 Calkins Rd. 359-7092. 4:30-5:30 p.m. Free, registration required. Grades 3-5. No Apr 19. [ Wednesday, March 23 ] Young Modern Ballet Performance. St. Thomas Episcopal Church, 2000 Highland Ave. 442-5988, elizabethclarkdance.com. 5:30-6:55 p.m. Single class $13.

Lectures [ Wednesday, March 16 ] “Israel 2011” Series: Bret Louis Stephens. Temple B’rith Kodesh, 2131 Elmwood Ave. 461-0490, jewishrochester.org. 7 p.m. Free. Alzheimer’s Association Lecture Series. St John’s Meadows, 1 W. Johnsarbor Dr. 760-5400, alz.org/rochesterny. 6:30-7:30 p.m. Free, RSVP. Causes of memory loss and what can be done to lead a brain healthy lifestyle. Alzheimer’s Association Lecture Series: Healthy Body, Healthy Brain. St. John’s Meadows, Briarwood Building, 1 Johnsarbor Drive West. 760-5400, 800-272-3900, alz. org/rochesterny. 6:30-7:30 p.m. Free, register. This class provides information about various causes of memory loss and what can be done to lead a brain healthy lifestyle. Pain Treatment Options with Dr. Len Vilensky. Jewish Community Center, 1200 Edgewood Ave. 461-2000 x214. 7 p.m. Free. [ Thursday, March 17 ] “Celebrating A Season for Nonviolence” Nonviolence Expert Arthur Romano. Asbury First United Methodist Church, 1050 East Ave. 276-4962, gandhiinstitute.org. 7-9 p.m. Free. Lost Architects of Rochester: a Selection of 19th & 20th-Century Names. United Church of Pittsford, 25 S. Main St., Village of Pittsford. historicpittsford.com. 7:30 p.m. Free. Presented by Cynthia Howk. Seeing the Face of God in Each Other Series: The Rt. Rev. Prince Singh, Bishop of Rochester. St. Thomas

Episcopal Church, 2000 Highland Ave. 442-3544, stthomasrochester. org. Supper 6 p.m., talk 6:30 p.m. Free, register. [ Friday, March 18 ] A Community Discussion on Domestic Violence. Friends Meeting House, 84 Scio St. hannahmdmurphy@ hotmail.com. 6-8 p.m. Free, donations accepted. “A Season for Nonviolence: A Community Discussion on Domestic Violence” with Director of Bethany House, Donna Ecker. [ Saturday, March 19 ] Say YES! to Healing with Simon Hay. Colgate Rochester Crozer Divinity School, 1100 South Goodman St. megan@newmoonforyou.com. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. or 3:30 p.m.-6:30 p.m. $39 pre-registration (via web); $45 at the door. [ Sunday, March 20 ] Chincoteague Island Travelogue. Penfield Public Library, 1098 Baird Rd, Penfield. jmathis14526@yahoo. com, penfieldlibrary.org. 2:30-3:30 p.m. Free. Heidi Jung and Kate Squires will discuss flora and fauna on Chincoteague Island. Henrietta Historical Society: “The History of the Moore Family and Farm.” 359-7092. 2 p.m. Free. Presented by Jack and Kathy Moore. Hidden Treasures: A Selection of Greater Rochester’s Historic Houses and Gardens. Pittsford Community Library, 24 State St, Pittsford. 249-5481. 2 p.m. Free, register. Presented by Cynthia Howk. Rochester Area Vegetarian Society Movie & Vegan Potluck Dinner. Brighton Town Park Lodge, 777 Westfall Rd. 234-8750, rochesterveg.org. 5:30 p.m. potluck, 7 p.m. progra.m. $3, free to members. Nick Bovenzi, chef at Natural Oasis Rensaturant, talks about gourmet began cooking. Tom Rivers, author of “Farm Hands.” Big Springs Museum, 3095 Main St., Caledonia. 538-9880. 2 p.m. Free. Rivers, a Batavia newspaper reporter who worked at 13 farms in 2008, will discuss his experiences with farmworkers from Mexico, Jamaica and Haiti during a talk March 20th at the Big Springs Museum and Historical Society. [ Monday, March 21 ] Alzheimer’s Association Care Partner Education: “Medicaid/Medicare.” Mount Olivet Baptist Church, 141 Adams St. 760-5400, alz.org/ rochesterny. 6:30-8:30 p.m. Free, register. Enjoying Life Through Good Hearing. Jewish Community Center, 1200 Edgewood Ave. 461-2000 x214, jccrochester.org. 7 p.m. Free, register. Gates Historical Society Meeting. Gates Town Hall Annex, 1605 Buffalo Rd. 247-7259. 7-8:30 p.m. Free. The CCC and POW Camp in Hamlin, NY will be the topic of a presentation by Ed Evans. You Are Susan B. Anthony: The Value of Her Legacy. First Unitarian Church, 220 S Winton Rd. 723-1062. 7-8:30 p.m. Free. Nora Bredes, director of the Susan B. Anthony Center for Women’s Leadership at the University of Rochester and the president of the Eleanor Roosevelt Legacy, which supports pro-choice Democratic women candidates for local and state offices, will be the guest speaker at Rochester NOW’s Women’s History Month program. “Dealing With Osteoarthritis” with Michael Carpin, P.T., M.P.T. Henrietta Volunteer Ambulance Facility, 280

Calkins Rd. mendedheartsrochester. org. 7:15 p.m. Free. [ Tuesday, March 22 ] Carline Werner Gannett Project Visionaries in Motion: David Liptak “Composing New Music.” Rochester Institute of Technology-Ingle Auditorium, 1 Lomb Memorial Dr. cwgp.org. 8 p.m. Free. Rochester History Lecture Series. German House Theatre, 315 Gregory St. baswa.org. 7 p.m. $10. Tickets include food and beverages from local businesses. “Nineteenth Century Suburbs (Mt. Hope & East Avenues)” by Stan Marshall. Start with a Healthy Heart with Dr. Gladys Velarde. Jewish Community Center, 1200 Edgewood Ave. 4612000 x214, jccrochester.org. 7 p.m. Free, register. The Mystery of Sleep and How to Make it Better. Jewish Community Center, 1200 Edgewood Ave. 461-2000 x214, jccrochester.org. 7 p.m. Free, registration required. [ Wednesday, March 23 ] “Lily, A Musical Portrait.” Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. 7385995, empirestatelyrictheatre.org. 7:15 p.m. Free/performance; $25/Gilded Age reception. A pre-concert talk with Rochester composers Lindsay Warren Baker and Amanda Jacobs as well as literary expert, Jill Karn. A Women’s History Month Keynote: Modhumita Roy: The Lady Vanishes: Motherhood & Reproductive Labor in the Age of Globalization. Nazareth College Arts Center, 4245 East Ave. selliot2@ mail.naz.edu. 5-7 p.m. Free. Alzheimer’s Association Care Partner Education: “Caregiving 103: Honor My Decisions: Making Plans.” The Summit at Brighton, Multi-Purpose room, 2000 Summit Circle Dr. 7605400, alz.org/rochesterny. 6:308:30 p.m. Free, register. Reshaping Rochester: Special Luncheon Presentation The Three Planners: Rochester “An Unfinished Symphony. Inn on Broadway, 26 Broadway, Rochester. 271-0520, rrcdc.org. 11:45 a.m.-1:30 p.m. $35 by reservation only. Mr. George Dark, Partner at Urban Strategies, Inc., Mr. Jonathan Lane, Principal at ICON architecture, inc., and Mr. Benjamin Wauford, Principal at Cooper Carry.

Literary Events [ Wednesday, March 16 ] Book Group: American Wars. Barnes & Noble Greece, 330 Greece Ridge Center Dr. 227-4020. 7 p.m. Free. Book Group: American Wars: “The Drillmaster of Valley Forge: The Baron De Stuben and the Making of the American Army” by Paul Lockhart. Barnes & Noble Greece, 330 Greece Ridge Center Dr. 2274020, bn.com. 7 p.m. Free. Book Group: Book Discussion Group: The Gate at the Stairs. Brighton Memorial Library, 2300 Elmwood Ave. 784-5300, brightonlibrary.org. 7 p.m. Free. [ Thursday, March 17 ] Photographic Historical Society Discussion Group. Barnes & Noble Greece, 330 Greece Ridge Center Dr. 227-4020. 7 p.m. Free. Book Discussion: “A Tree Grows in Brooklyn” by Betty Smith. Penfield Public Library, 1098 Baird Rd, Penfield. 340-8720, penfieldlibrary. org. 7-9 p.m. Free. Book Discussion: “The Good Thief” by Hannah Tinti. Lift Bridge Book Shop,

45 Main St, Brockport. 637-2260, liftbridge.com. 7-8 p.m. Free. Book Group: Annie & Joe’s Eclectic Book Group: “The Good Thief” by Hannah Tinti. Lift Bridge Book Shop, 45 Main St, Brockport. 637-2260, liftbridge. com. 7 p.m. Free. Open Mic: Pure Kona: Matt Shackelford. Flying Squirrel, 285 Clarissa St. flyingsquirrel.rocus.org. 8-11 p.m. Free. [ Friday, March 18 ] Free Speech Fridays. LJ’s Family Restaurant, 360 Thurston Rd. 4648947. 8:30-10:30 p.m. Free. Writing Class: Word Crafters Writer’s Group. Arnett Branch Library, 310 Arnett Blvd. 428-8304. 10 a.m. Free. [ Saturday, March 19 ] Jane Austen Society of North America. Barnes & Noble Pittsford, 3349 Monroe Ave. 586-6020. 1 p.m. Free. Mother-Son Book Discussion of “The Good Thief” by Hannah Tinti. Writers & Books, 740 University Ave. karen@ wab.org. 10-11:30 a.m. Free, register. Book Discussion: “The Things They Carried” by Tim O’Brien. Village Bookmarket, 207 E Main St., Palmyra. 315-597-0210, villagebookmarket. com. 1-3 p.m. Free. With Peter Evans, Wayne County Historian. Book Signing: Saturday Author Salon: “Echoes After the Canyon: A Soul’s Journey Along The Pathway Through Grief” by Luann Helwig. Lift Bridge Book Shop, 45 Main St, Brockport. 637-2260, liftbridge. com. 2-3 p.m. Free. [ Monday, March 21 ] Book Discussion: “The Good Thief” by Hannah Tinti. Pittsford Community Library, 24 State St, Pittsford. 2495481. 7-8:30 p.m. Free, register. Book Discussion: Books Sandwiched In: “The Good Thief” by Hannah Tinti. First Congregational Church, 58 N. Main St., Canandaigua. 394-1381 x307. 12-1 p.m. Free. Book Reading: “Charlie No Face” by David B. Seaburn. Lift Bridge Book Shop, 45 Main St, Brockport. 6372260, liftbridge.com. 7 p.m. Free. Book Reading: Reading & Conversation with Janis F. Gleason. Susan B Anthony House, 17 Madison St. 279-7490 x10, susanbanthonyhouse.org. 2 p.m. tea & presentation. $15, register. Author of “The Life and Letters of Kate Gleason. Writing Class: Writers Workshop. Barnes & Noble Webster, 1070 Ridge Rd, Webster. karina. churchill@yahoo.com, meetup. com/websterwriters/. 6-8 p.m. [ Tuesday, March 22 ] Tantalizing Titles. Webster Public Library, 980 Ridge Rd, Webster. 8727075. 12:15 p.m. Free. Book Discussion: “The Good Thief” by Hannah Tinti. Ontario Public Library, 1850 Ridge Rd., Ontario. 315-5248381. 6:30 p.m. Free, register. Book Discussion: Books SandwichedIn. Kate Gleason Auditorium, Central Library, 114 Sounth Ave. 428-8350, libraryweb.com. 12:12-12:52 p.m. Free. “The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks” by Rebecca Skloot, reviewed by Jane Greenlaw and Gary L. Chadwick. Book Group: Words on Women: “A Short History of Women” by Kate Walbert. Barnes & Noble Greece, 330 Greece Ridge Center Dr. 227-4020, barnesandnoble.com. 7 p.m. Free. Book Reading: Controlling Institutions: International Organizations and the continues on page 29

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Art valuable experience to work collaboratively…in an environment where writing and research is typically a solitary endeavor.” Split into two sections and rife with academic discourse, the exhibit reveals and dissects a selection of images from Curtis’s “The North American Indian,” first acknowledging the misleading nature of the images, and then discussing what understanding an audience might gain from Curtis’s work, regardless of their historic accuracy. Convinced that Native North American

“Bear Belly” by Edward Curtis, part of the “Theatres of Memory” exhibit currently at University of Rochester’s Rare Books & Special Collections Library. PHOTO COURTESY UNIVERSITY OF ROCHESTER

Illusion and perception “Theatres of Memory” “New Perspectives on Edward Curtis’s ‘The North American Indian’” Through April 15 Department of Rare Books & Special Collections, Rush Rhees Library, University of Rochester River Campus 275-4477, rochester.edu Mon-Fri 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Sat 11 am.-3 p.m. [ FEATURE ] BY REBECCA RAFFERTY

By now, many of us understand that when it comes to recorded histories, we cannot take anything for granted. History is nearly always penned and presented by the victors (or victorious cultures), who wish to be remembered in the best, most heroic of lights. Even individuals who are sympathetic to a situational underdog 28 City march 16-22, 2011

cannot truly portray, or even clearly see, the culture as it is, without including elements of their own particular motivation. But it is also a difficult matter to entirely disregard the intention of the subject, especially when confronted directly with the depth of expression. So is the case with the opus of photographer Edward Curtis, whose controversial documentation of the vanishing indigenous North American cultures is the focus of a fascinating new exhibit at the University of Rochester’s Rush Rhees Library. “Theatres of Memory” is the project of co-curators Carlie A. Fishgold and Alex B. Marr, students of the UR’s visual culture studies program, with commentary by UR faculty and Rare Books Library staff. “I’m especially interested in how we can see changing temporalities of indigenous communities in their visual production,” says Ph.D student Marr, adding that this project “was a rare and

cultures were on the brink of extinction, in 1904 Edward Curtis traveled from Seattle to New Mexico to begin work for what became his 20-volume opus “The North American Indian,” which sought to document, in photographic images and ethnographic writing, more than 80 ethnic groups residing west of the Mississippi River. Endorsed by President Theodore Roosevelt and financed by J. P. Morgan, the three-decade undertaking resulted in 4,000 text pages, 1,500 bound images, and 720 folio sheets of loose photogravures. Curtis sold subscriptions to libraries and the wealthy, including Hiram Watson Sibley, who donated his copy to the University of Rochester. “Curtis’s photographic practice,” states the curators’ essay, sought “vestiges of ‘traditional’ Indian life to present a picture of pre-contact culture.” But arriving on the scene far too late for this, the photographer orchestrated scenes and spun false realities for his subjects, dressing them up in traditional garb from his trunk (photo pairing reveals the repeated use of certain articles, clothing that was at the time discouraged to hasten assimilation), posing them, and spinning nonexistent realities by omitting evidence of integration. One particular photo is retouched to burn out an alarm clock. In 1982, author Christopher Lyman accused Curtis’s oeuvre of flagrant “imperialist nostalgia,” states the curators’ essay. The first portion of the exhibit, “Deconstructing Stereotypes,” considers Lyman’s critique, with groupings of sepia tone photogravure prints that reveal the artist’s hand in posing the subjects wistfully reflecting or riding away, indicating the departure of their presence in this land. Some “contaminating traces of settler populations,” as the curators call them, remain in the images: beaded leather and exotic piercings preside above calico dresses, and headdresses incorporate Chinese coins, providing evidence of globalized commerce. In other images, warrior-men pose proudly with medallions bearing the images of American presidents, elements that “puncture the purity of Curtis’s vision,” according to the curators’ text. “‘Theatres of Memory’ is significant in that it

contributes to a more current discussion on

the legacy of Edward Curtis,” says Fishgold, “not drawing on the ‘invalidity’ of the work’s staged and altered nature, but instead drawing from the self-representation exercised by Curtis’s Native subjects.” In the second part of the show, the curators ask the viewer to consider, historic authenticity aside, treating the images “as historically embedded performances” consciously enacted by the subjects. Though the individuals presented in the photographs did not truly exist in the way that Curtis meant us to see, viewers may detect an authenticity nevertheless. “What is enacted in these photographs — these ‘theatres of memory’ — is not some imperialist fantasy,” argue the curators, “but rather the desires of indigenous peoples to maintain a diverse set of relationships with the past” by drawing on cultural memories, and defining “the contours of future memories.” “This is a capricious topic, as some of the ancestors of the peoples featured in his work view these images as an integral and collaborative aspect to knowing their cultural past, such as our guest lecturer Joe Horse Capture,” Fishgold says of the individual who led the roundtable discussion at the exhibition’s March 2 opening reception. Joe Horse Capture is the great-great grandson of Horse Capture, one of Curtis’s subjects who is featured in the show, whom Fishgold describes as someone who exhibited “an astoundingly distinct amount of agency in the way he posed for Curtis.” Similarly, in “Upshaw – Apsaroke,” Alexander Upshaw willingly withholds his own personality as he dons Curtis’s costume and poses stoically for the camera, playing a role which the curators call “a willing collaboration with a form of salvage.” Included in the exhibit are display cases of books and more images and anecdotes from the subjects’ descendants about the importance of the photographs as objects of memory, as well as objects bearing Curtis’s images, such as postcards, t-shirts, mugs, and calendars. Both the images of ancestors, held dear by the descendants, and the presence and popularity of the latter group of commercial items, marketed for consumption by white descendants of this land’s invaders, indicate an awkward cultural hunger, a strong urge to possess what was destroyed. The exhibit is presented in conjunction with a six-week-long Humanities Project and series of visiting scholars entitled “The Parallax Effects: Representations of Native North Americans Then and Now,” which explores the ways in which documentaries, photographs, and literature have helped shape the public’s perceptions of Native Americans throughout history. Film screenings and lectures will continue through April 10; for more information, visit rochester.edu/college/humanities.


Literary Events Global Economy. University of Rochester-Rush Rhees Library, Library Rd. Bozenna Sobolewska 276-1952, bozenna.sobolewska@ rochester.edu. 7:30 p.m. Free, RSVP. Dr. Randall Stone, Director of the Skalny Center for Polish and Central European Studies and Professor of Political Science, University of Rochester. Poetry Reading: Spoken Word Poetry Slam & Open Mic. Tango Cafe, 389 Gregory St. 2714930. Signups begin at 6:45 p.m..Event starts at 8 p.m. Free. 389 Gregory St. [ Wednesday, March 23 ] 2000 Word Club. Barnes & Noble Pittsford, 3349 Monroe Ave. 5866020. 7 p.m. Free. Book Discussion: Hannah Tinti at Penfield Public Library. Penfield Public Library, 1098 Baird Rd, Penfield. 340-8720, penfieldlibrary.org. 7 p.m. Free. Book Group: Titles Over Tea. Barnes & Noble Greece, 330 Greece Ridge Center Dr. 2274020, barnesandnoble.com. 7 p.m. Free. Please call store to confirm events. Book Reading: An Afternoon with Hannah Tinti: Reading and Q&A. Nazareth College, 4245 East Ave. 389-2614. 4-5:30 p.m. Free. Book Reading: An Evening with Hannah Tinti: Reading and Q&A. Penfield Public Library, 1098 Baird Rd, Penfield. 340-8720, penfieldlibrary.org. 7-9:30 p.m. Free, registration required.

Recreation [ Wednesday, March 16 ] St. Helena Valley: East Trek. Letchworth State Park, off Rt. 390, Castile. 493-3625. 10 a.m. Free. Meet at junction of Oak and River Roads. Bring lunch. 3.5 hours, 2.5 miles. [ Wednesday, March 16Thursday, March 17 ] Indoor Fitness Rowing. Pittsford Indoor Rowing Center, 2800 Clover St., Pittsford. info@ geneseerowingclub.com. Tue & Thu: 5:45-7:15 p.m., Wed: 9:3011 a.m. $20 drop in. A mandatory, one-time introductory class for new rowers is required and will be held on 3/1, 3/5, 3/29-31 & 4/2. [ Friday, March 18 ] Kayak Intro 4. Thomas Pool, 800 Five Mile Line Rd, Webster. 3283960, geneseewaterways.org. 6-8 p.m. $85, register. Ages 10+. [ Saturday, March 19 ] 17th Annual Mental Health Association Skyway Open. Eastview Mall, 7979 PittsfordVictor Rd, Victor. 325-3145 x111, cstenzel@mharochester.org. 9:30 a.m.-4 p.m. $40 per 4 person group ($10/person), register. Play for prizes, enjoy family activities. Full Moon Waterfalls Walk. Letchworth State Park, off Rt. 390, Castile. 493-3625. 6 p.m. Free. Meet at Inspiration Point, bring flashlight. 3 hours, 2 miles. GVHC Horizons Hill Hike. Crescent Trail Garnsey Rd. Lot. Jon K. 323-1911. 11 a.m. Free. Hillystrenuous 6 mile hike. Indoor Fitness Rowing. Pittsford Indoor Rowing Center, 2800

[ Tuesday, March 22Thursday, March 24 ] Indoor Fitness Rowing. Pittsford Indoor Rowing Center, 2800 Clover St., Pittsford. info@ geneseerowingclub.com. Tue & Thu: 5:45-7:15 p.m., Wed: 9:3011 a.m. $20 drop in. A mandatory, one-time introductory class for new rowers is required and will be held on 3/1, 3/5, 3/29-31 & 4/2.

Special Events ART/LECTURE | “Persepolis: Culture Carved on Stone”

It makes far more sense to celebrate the New Year in the springtime than in the dead of winter, as we do. Nothing about the cold and the dark of January makes me feel fresh; I’d rather greet the New Year, blossoms, buds, and running streams all at once. Pretend that we’re as logical as Persian cultures — they celebrate the New Year with Nowruz, held on the spring equinox — by attending a special event this Saturday, March 19, at the Memorial Art Gallery (500 University Ave.). In addition to an educational slide and video presentation about Nowruz given by Shahin Monshipour, cultural anthropologist and director of the International Culture & Arts Network, you can hear docent Kitty Jospé speak about an ancient “Tribute Bearer” sculpture from the ruins at Persepolis, listen to a presentation on the vernal equinox by astronomer Steve Fentress, and enjoy live traditional music of Iran, Turkey, and Central Asia. At 4 p.m., join a reception featuring Persian tea and sweets, and a “Haftseen” table of artifacts related to the New Year. The event runs 1:30-5 p.m., is free, and includes museum admission. The Creative Workshop will also hold its spring open house 11 a.m.-4 pm that day, which is free and open to the public. For more information and a complete schedule of events, call 276-8900 or visit mag.rochester.edu. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY Clover St., Pittsford. info@ geneseerowingclub.com. 7-8:30 a.m. $20 drop in. A mandatory, one-time introductory class for new rowers is required and will be held on 3/1, 3/5, 3/29-31 & 4/2. Introduction to Whitewater Kayaking. Monroe Community College Pool, 1000 E. Henrietta Rd. 704-2372, kayak-adventures. org. 1-4 p.m. $75 adults, $55 students. All essentials covered, including the Eskimo Roll. Kayak Pool Practice. Thomas Pool, 800 Five Mile Line Rd, Webster. 328-3960, geneseewaterways.org. 1-3 p.m. Call for details. Rochester Birding Association: Lakeshore Marshes East Wildlife Management Area. Meet in Webster Plaza at Rte 404 and Hard Rd. near Starbucks. Kinsley 872-7334, Wes 315331-0316. 7:30 a.m. Free. Extra spotting scopes and FRS radios are helpful. Search for Hidden Creatures. Letchworth State Park, off Rt. 390, Castile. 493-3625. 10 a.m. Free. Meet at Perry Entrance Gate, may car pool. Bring lunch. 3 hours, 2 miles. Signs of Spring. Sterling Nature Center, Off 104 East, Sterling. 315-947-6143, snc@co.cayuga. ny.us. 1 p.m. Free, register. Winter Tour of Mount Hope Cemetery. Mount Hope Cemetery, 791 Mount Hope Ave. 461-3494,

fomh.org. 1 p.m. $5, free to Friends of Mount Hope. [ Sunday, March 20 ] 8th Annual Gabe Dalmath Memorial Walk For Camp Northpoint. Greece Ridge Mall, 271 Greece Ridge Center Dr. rochesterymca.org/northwest. 8:30 a.m. registration, 9 a.m. walk. Pledge or raise funds. Equinox Signs of Spring Walk. Letchworth State Park, off Rt. 390, Castile. 493-3625. 10 a.m. Free. Meet at Mount Morris Entrance Gate, may car pool. 3 hours, 2 miles. GVHC Victor Rail Trails Hike. Behind Fishers Fire Hall, 7853 Main St. Larry N. 265-9221. 1 p.m. Free. Easy 4-5 mile hike. Indoor Ed-venture: Overwintering Mushrooms. Letchworth State Park, off Rt. 390, Castile. 4933625. 2:30 p.m. Free. Meet in the Conference Room at the Visitor Center. 2 hours. [ Tuesday, March 22 ] Hill/Speed Workouts. Fleet Feet Sports, 2210 Monroe Ave. 6973338, fleetfeetrochester.com. 6 p.m. Free. Kayak Intro 2. Thomas Pool, 800 Five Mile Line Rd, Webster. 3283960, geneseewaterways.org. 5:30-7 p.m. $85, register. Kayak Intro 3. Thomas Pool, 800 Five Mile Line Rd, Webster. 3283960, geneseewaterways.org. 7-8:30 p.m. $85, register.

[ Wednesday, March 16 ] “Quilts and Travel Memories” presentation by Peggy Roll. Morgan-Manning House, 151 Main St, Brockport. 637-3645, brockportny.org. 7:30 p.m. Free. Cobblestone School Information Session. Cobblestone School, 10 Prince St. 271-4548, cobblestone. org. 6-7 p.m. Free. Supervised enrichment activities/free play is available during this time for visiting children, ages 3-1/2 to 12. GardenScape 2011: A Taste of Spring. Fair and Expo Center, 2695 East Henrietta Rd. 4424430, epilepsyuny.org. 5:30-8 p.m. $50. Special preview party for flower and garden show; includes hors d’oeuvres, beverage tastings, and dessert buffet. All proceeds benefit the Epilepsy Foundation. Highland Park Winter Farmers Market. 249 Highland Ave. highlandparkfarmers@gmail. com. 4-7 p.m. Free. Fresh, local, sustainable and organic produce, meats, honey, jams, jellies and more! Movie Night. The Living Room Cafe, 1118 Monroe Ave. 4130833. 8 p.m. Free. RAPIER SLICES Open Mic. Venu Resto-Lounge, 151 St Paul St. 802-4660. 7:30-11 p.m. $3-5. 18+ with proper ID. Rochester Board of Education: Health Forum. Central Office Building, Floor 3 Conference Room, 131 West Broad St. 2628525. 6-8:30 p.m. Free, register. The committee would like to discuss options with parents and community members for addressing this critical issue of the increase in the incidence of HIV infection and sexually transmitted diseases among young people in our community. Screening: “Silence.” Dryden Theatre, George Eastman House, 900 East Ave. 271-3361, dryden. eastmanhouse.org. 8 p.m. $6-8. Women’s History Month Screening: “Lioness.” Little Theatre, 240 East Ave. 2850400, thelittle.org. 7 p.m. $5. [ Thursday, March 17 ] Candidate Forum on Disability Issues. Edgerton Community Center, 41 Backus St. childerbrant@cdrnys.org. 6:30-8 p.m. Free. Invited candidates: Bill Johnson, Ann Lewis, Tom Richards, Alex White. Facility is wheelchair accessible. FM Loop and sign language interpreters will be provided. Community Labyrinth Walk w/ Reiki, Chair Massage & Music. First Unitarian Church, 220 S Winton Rd. 469-4818, droller@ rochester.rr.com. 7-9 p.m. Free, donations accepted. Film: “In Love We Trust.” Baobab Cultural Center, 728 University

Ave. 563-2145, thebaobab.org. 7 p.m. Free, register. Herstory: Inspiration and Film: “Iron Jawed Angels.” University of Rochester-Wilson Commons, Wilson Blvd. 275-8799, rochester. edu/SBA. 7:30 p.m. Free. Screenings in Gowen Room. Informational Session: Foster Parenting. Quest Elementary School, 225 West Ave., Hilton. 334-9096, monroefostercare.org. 7 p.m. Free. 21+. Screening: “I’m Not Rappaport.” Dryden Theater, George Eastman House, 900 East Ave. 271-3361, dryden. eastmanhouse.com. 8 p.m. $6-8. St. Patrick’s Day Event. Jack’s Ryan, 825 Atlantic Ave. 2889037. Open 8 a.m.-close. Call for pricing. Specials all day plus dinner and bagpipers. TC Riley’s 3rd Annual St. Patrick’s Day. TC Riley’s, 200 Park Point Dr. 272-9777, facebook.com/tcrileys. 8 a.m.-2 a.m. Free admission. Irish food specials, Guinness specials, Bud Light specials, and more all night long!! Tapas at the MAG. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. 2768900, mag.rochester.edu. 5-8 p.m. $4. Live music, wine & beer for purchase, tapas. Tilt-A-Whirl Drag Shows with Pandora Boxx & Megan Carter. Tilt Night Club, 444 Central Ave. tiltrochester.com. Two nightly shows: 11:15 p.m. $ 12:30 a.m. $3-12. DJ & dancing. [ Thursday, March 17Sunday, March 20 ] Gardenscape. Fair and Expo Center, 2695 East Henrietta Rd. 265-9018, rochesterflowershow. com. Thu-Sat 9 a.m.-9 p.m., Sun 9 a.m.-5 p.m. $10-12. [ Friday, March 18 ] Catholic Family Center’s 2011 St. Patricks Charity Gala. Rochester Riverside Convention Center, 123 E Main St. 262-7172, cfcrochester.org. 6:30 p.m.midnight. $175, register. Movie Night. The Living Room Cafe, 1118 Monroe Ave. 4130833. 8 p.m. Free. Roberts Wesleyan College Preview Day. Roberts Wesleyan College, 2301 Westside Dr. 5946400, roberts.edu/visits. 8 a.m. registration. Free. Rochester Professional Consultants Network Business Forum. Pittsford Community Library, 24 State St, Pittsford. rochesterconsultants.org. 8-9:30 p.m. Free. Screening: “Four Lions.” Dryden Theater, George Eastman House, 900 East Ave. 271-3361, dryden. eastmanhouse.com. Fri 8 p.m. Sun 4 p.m. $6-8. What a Drag with Samantha Vega, Kyla Minx & Pauly. Tilt Night Club, 444 Central Ave. tiltrochester.com. Two shows nightly: 11:15 p.m. & 12:30 a.m. $4-12. Wine Tastings. Wine Sense, 749 Park Ave. 271-0590. 5-7 p.m. Free. [ Saturday, March 19 ] 2011 EWGA Kick-Off Brunch. Midvale Country Club, 2387 Baird Rd. 1-800-8719012 ext .227373, events@ ewgarochesterny.com. 10 a.m.noon. $25, registration required.

90’s Laser Show. RMSC Strasenburgh Planetarium, 657 East Ave. 271-1880, rmsc.org. 9:30 p.m. $9-10. Be Free Wellness Event. Bamba Bistro, 282 Alexander St. realsustenance.com. 6-8 p.m. Free. Samples and giveaways from Eco Bella Bakery, Donna Marie’s bakery, Hedonist Chocolates, and Simply Crepes. Community Garage Sale. 1400 N. WInton Rd. (former American Cancer). Ursula Arnold, 377-5263. 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Free admission. Huge selection of office furniture and household furniture and items including bedrooms sets, appliances, desks, file cabinets and much more! Deedee Dubois’ Wild College Party. Tilt Night Club, 444 Central Ave. tiltrochester.com. 10 p.m.-2 a.m. 21+ Free til 11 p.m., 2 for 1 admission with college ID. 18+ welcome. Call for info. Twister hot body contest, cash prizes, DJ Jon Herbert, drag performances. Erotic Nights 2011 Series. Equal Grounds Coffee House, 750 South Ave. 242-7840. 8 p.m. $5 donation, reserve your table. Adult only multi-art show. Fawn Ray Designs Presents “Thaw & Flourish,” Thread’s 4 Year Anniversary Party. Thread, 654 South Ave. 232-7110, shopatthread.com. 7-9 p.m. Free. Fawn Ray Designs jewelry launch & fashion show. Gibbs & Main FUNdraiser Interactive Concert, Silent Auction, Instrument Petting Zoo. Cobb’s Hill Park, Lake Riley Lodge, 100 Norris Dr. gibbsandmain.com. 3 p.m. $20 ($40 max. per family). Benefiting Kidsemble. Literacy Volunteers of Rochester Preview Sessions for Potential Tutors. 473-3030, literacyrochester. org. 10 a.m. Free. March Madness: Mad about Olive Oil. Casa Larga Vineyards, 2287 Turk Hill Rd, Fairport. 223-4210, casalarga.com. 12-4 p.m. F. Oliver’s Oils and Vinegars offers samples of their hand crafted and imported products from around the world. Palmyra Pirate Ball. Palmyra Veterans of Foreign Wars, 4306 State Rte. 31, Palmyra. palmyrany.com. Hours TBA. $25 advance, $30 at the door. Dinner, dance, fundraiser, raffle. Rochester Amateur Radio Association: FCC Exams for Ham Radio Licences. RIT campus, Building 9 Room 3139 (Park in lot J). 289-3801, ken@w2krh. com. Registration 10 a.m., testing 10:15 a.m. Free. Rowing for a Reason Fundraiser Gala. AAUW at the Perkins Mansion, 494 East Ave. 215850-8101, greenbaume@gmail. com, urow.org. 6:30-9:30 p.m. $60/single, $100/pair. To support Upstate Recovery on Water and Cross Currents Minority Rowing for scholarships for minority and cancer survivor rowers. Heavy hors d’hoeuvres, wine tastings, live music, art gallery, wellness room; silent auction and 50/50 Raffle. Saturday Evening Telescope Viewing. Rochester Museum and Science Center, 657 East Ave. 271-1880, rmsc.org. Dark until 10 p.m. Free. Weather permitting; call ahead. continues on page 30

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dryden.eastmanhouse.com. 1:30 p.m. Free to those age 60+. Trivia Night. The Old Toad, 277 Alexander St. theoldtoad.com. 9:30 p.m. Free. Trivia Night. 140 Alex, 140 Alexander St. 140alex.com. 9 p.m. Free.

LECTURE | Rochester History Lecture Series

We know you heart the Flower City, but what was it like when it was the Flour City? Celebrate your love for Rochester by learning a bit more about its origins while you nosh on food and down beverages from local businesses. Kicking off Tuesday, March 22, and continuing once a month through June, you can enjoy a different lecture presented by a host of local learned folk through the Rochester History Lecture Series. The first event takes place at the Highland Room at the German House (315 Gregory St.), and features a talk by Stan Marshall on “Nineteenth Century Suburbs (Mt. Hope & East avenues).” On April 26, learn about the German House at the venue itself, with a talk by Donovan Shilling. May 24 will feature “South Wedge History and Architecture” by Cynthia Howk, taking place at Ellwanger Estate Bed & Breakfast (625 Mount Hope Ave.). And on June 21, Lea Kemp will discuss the Albert Stone Photo Collection at the same location. Each program begins at 7 p.m., costs $10-$12, and food and drinks are included in the ticket price. Reserve your spot; get your ticket today at Mise En Place Market, on the corner of South and Gregory in the Wedge. For more information, visit baswa.org. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY

Special Events Screening: “Clunky Brown.” Dryden Theater, George Eastman House, 900 East Ave. 271-3361, dryden.eastmanhouse.com. Sat 8 p.m., Sun 7 p.m. $6-8. The Rochester Committee on Latin America’s Annual Rice & Beans Dinner and White Dove Awards. Downtown Presbyterian Church, 121 N Fitzhugh St. 293-3194, rkaiser3@rochester.rr.com. 5:30 p.m. $15-40 suggested donation, RSVP. All proceeds to benefit ROCLA’s work for peace and justice in Latin America. [ Saturday, March 19Sunday, March 20 ] Antiques on Campus. Nazareth College-Shults Center, 4245 East Ave. Fran Fadden stdtime@ rochester.rr.com, 315- 946-4641. Sat 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Sun 10 a.m.4 p.m. $5 admission, students free. The Genesee Country Antique Dealers Association’s 36th Annual Antique Show “Antiques on Campus” with 50+ dealers selling quality antiques of all kinds. Theme: Reuse, Recycle, Repurpose. Free supervised child care (ages 2-10) will be available from 1-3 each day. Maple Sugaring Weekends. Cumming Nature Center, 6472 Gulick Road, Naples. 374-6160, rmsc.org. Demos 10 a.m.-3 p.m., pancake meals 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Admission: $3, meal $7-10. Rochester Yoga Weekend. Rochester Plaza Hotel, 70 State St. matiyoga.com/rochester-

yoga-weekend. Sat 10 a.m.-9:30 p.m., Sun 10 a.m.-5:30 p.m. $99, register. Two days, 10 teachers, 20 workshops. Sap, Syrup, and Sugar. Genesee Country Village & Museum, 1410 Flint Hill Rd, Mumford. 538-6822, gcv.org. 9:30 a.m.-4 p.m. $4-8. [ Sunday, March 20 ] Bridal Fair. Holiday Inn and Suites, 860n Hold Rd. natureswayfloral@yahoo. com. 11 a.m.-3:30 p.m. Free admission. Door prizes, raffles, vendors, VIP prize for first 50 brides to register via email. Harley School Open House. The Harley School, 1981 Clover St. 442-1770, harleyschool.org. 2:30-4 p.m. Free. For families interested in grades 5-12. Rochester Civil Rights Front Meeting. Equal Grounds Coffee House, 750 South Ave. civilrightsfront.wordpress. com, rochestercrf@gmail. com. 5 p.m. Free. Grassroots organization for LGBT equality. [ Monday, March 21 ] Great Decisions 2011. Penfield Public Library, 1098 Baird Rd, Penfield. 340-8720, penfieldlibrary.org. 7-8:30 p.m. $20 for briefing book, register. A discussion program that focuses on U.S. foreign policy. No session on 2/21. Pub Trivia. Johnny’s Irish Pub, 1382 Culver Rd. 224-0990, johnnysirishpub.com. 7 p.m. Free. Senior Matinee: “Old Maid.” Dryden Theater, George Eastman House, 900 East Ave. 271-3361,

30 City march 16-22, 2011

[ Tuesday, March 22 ] Rochester Winos Tasting. Gusto, 277 Alexander St. 288-2277, rochesterwinos.com. 6:30 p.m. registration, 7 p.m. event. $3035, registration required. Screening: “Angels with Dirty Faces.” Dryden Theater, George Eastman House, 900 East Ave. 271-3361, dryden. eastmanhouse.com. 8 p.m. $6-8. Screening: “Oliver Twist.” Writers & Books, 740 University Ave. karen@wab.org. 7-9 p.m. Free. Part of the “If All of Rochester Read the Same Book” series of events. [ Wednesday, March 23 ] “Wine in Ancient Times: A Historical Tasting.” New York Wine & Culinary Center, 800 S Main St., Canandaigua. 3947070, nywcc.com. 6-8 p.m. $40, RSVP. Overview of the Memorial Art Gallery’s “Wine & Spirit” exhibition and wine tasting. 50th Annual Interfaith Event. Temple B’rith Kodesh, 2131 Elmwood Ave. wrj@tbk.org. 11 a.m. Donation of non-perishable food items, RSVP. Speakers will be Daan Braveman, President, Nazareth College and Dr. Muhammad Shafiq, Nazareth College professor, Islamic & Religious Studies. Community Garden MiniConvention. Fair and Expo Center, 2695 East Henrietta Rd. 334-4000, fairandexpocenter. org. 7-9 p.m. Free. Dragon Users Group. Biaggi’s Ristorante Italiano, Eastview Mall. 586-4550 x222, Linda@ ARtraining.com. 5:30-7:30 p.m. Free. Join fellow Dragon software users and Dragon Product Experts. There is no cost to attend, and a light dinner and wine will be served. Highland Park Winter Farmers Market. 249 Highland Ave. highlandparkfarmers@gmail. com. 4-7 p.m. Free. Fresh, local, sustainable and organic produce, meats, honey, jams, jellies and more! Informational Session: Foster Parenting. Spiegel Community Center, 35 Lincoln Ave., Pittsford. 334-9096, monroefostercare.org. 7 p.m. Free. 21+. Literacy Volunteers of Rochester Preview Sessions for Potential Tutors. Literacy Volunteers of Rochester, 1600 South Ave. 473-3030, literacyrochester.org. 5:30 p.m. Free. Movie Night. The Living Room Cafe, 1118 Monroe Ave. 4130833. 8 p.m. Free. RAPIER SLICES Open Mic. Venu Resto-Lounge, 151 St Paul St. 802-4660. 7:30-11 p.m. $3-5. 18+ with proper ID. Screening: “Nights of Cabiria.” Dryden Theater, George Eastman House, 900 East Ave. 271-3361, dryden.eastmanhouse.com. 8 p.m. $6-8.

Women’s History Month Screening: “Ahead of Time.” Little Theatre, 240 East Ave. 2850400, thelittle.org. 7 p.m. $5.

Sports [ Wednesday, March 16 ] Rochester Amerks vs. Hamilton Bulldogs. Blue Cross Arena, 100 Exchange Blvd. 454-5335, amerks.com. 7:05 p.m. $14-22.

Theater

13th Annual One-Act Play Festival. Wed Mar 16-Sat Mar 19. Todd Theatre, University of Rochester River Campus. Wed-Fri 8 p.m., Sat 3 & 8 p.m. $3. rochester. edu/theatre. “Bermuda Avenue Triangle.” Thu Ma 17-Sun Mar 20. Senior sex farce by the Greater Rochester Repertory Companies. MuCCC, 142 Atlantic Ave. Thu-Sat 7:30 p.m., Sun 2 p.m. $10-$20. 2341254, muccc.org. “Cooking with the Calamari Sisters.” Ongoing. Downstairs Cabaret Theatre, 3450 Winton Road. Thu 7 p.m., Fri 8 p.m., Sat 3 & 8:30 p.m., Sun 3 p.m. $29-$39. 325-4370, downstairscabaret.com. “Defending the Caveman.” Through Apr 9. Downstairs Cabaret Theatre, 20 Windsor St. Thu 7 p.m., Fri 8 p.m., Sat 5 & 8:30 p.m., Sun 3 p.m. $29-$36. 325-4370, downstairscabaret.com. “Disney’s The Lion King.” Tue Mar 22-April 17. Rochester Broadway Theatre League. Auditorium Theatre, 875 E Main St. Tue-Wed Mar 23 7:30 p.m. $44.50-$139.50. 800-7453000, rbtl.org. “Dr. Horrible’s Sing-Along Blog.” Fri Mar 18-Sun Mar 20. RIT Players. Rochester Institute of Technology-Webb Auditorium, 1 Lomb Memorial Drive. Fri 8 p.m., Sat 3 & 8 p.m., Sun 3 p.m. Free. 600-6700, rit.edu/sg/players. Erotic Nights. Sat Mar 19. Equal Grounds Coffee House, 750 South Ave. Sat 8 p.m. Donation. 242-7840. “The Glass Menagerie.” Through Mar 19. Blackfriars Theatre, 795 E Main St. Thu 7:30 p.m., Fri-Sat 8 p.m. $15$27. 454-1260, bftix.com. “Imagining Madoff.” Wed Mar 16. Staged reading of the play by Deb Margolin. Jewish Community Center, 1200 Edgewood Ave. Wed Mar 16 7 p.m. Free. 4612000 x235, jccrochester.org. Impact Theatre. Sat Mar 19. 1180 Canandaigua Road, Palmyra. 7:30-9:15 p.m. Free. 315-5973553, impactdrama.com. “The Lambda Project: The End.” Fri Mar 18-Sun Mar 20. Bread and Water Theatre; part of the Rainbow Theater Festival. 243 Rosedale St. Fri-Sat 8 p.m., Sun 2 p.m. $6-$12. 271-5523, breadandwatertheatre.org. “Lily, A Musical Portrait.” Wed Mar 23. Empire State Lyric Theatre; first look of musical based on “The House of Mirth.” Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. Wed Mar 23 8:15 p.m. (pre-concert chat at 7:15 p.m..). Free/performance; $25/Gilded Age reception. empirestatelyrictheatre.org.

THEATER | “The Lion King”

One of our local bragging rights in this artsy town is Garth Fagan’s Tony Award-winning choreography for Disney Theatrical Productions’ “The Lion Ling.” The captivating show, which blends African aesthetic, storytelling, and music with Western Broadway elements, is the winner of six 1998 Tony Awards for having the best just-about-everything, has 17 global productions under its belt, is in its14th year on the stage, and as popular as ever. The production will return to Rochester’s Auditorium Theatre (885 E. Main St.) next week, with performances taking place Tuesday, March 22, through April 17. On Wednesday, March 23, 5:30-7 p.m., a special performance will take place in support of Rochester Broadway Theatre League and Garth Fagan Dance arts-education programs. Garth Fagan and RBTL will offer “Can You Feel the Love Tonight?” a VIP pre-show cocktail reception with a silent auction and prime seats to the evening’s performance for $225 per person ($250 per person reserved seating). Current “Lion King” ticketholders may exchange their tickets for this evening special, and the ticket price will be applied to the benefit total. RSVP by calling 325-7760 x3104 or emailing cbutera@rbtl.org. Kids’ Night on Broadway is Tuesday, March 22, with select mid-price seats available through ticketmaster.com for a special rate: buy one adult ticket, get one kid’s ticket for halfprice. Use the code: KNOB! at checkout. Performance times vary, and tickets range in price, $47.50$130. For specific times, more info, and to purchase tickets, visit rbtl.org or ticketmaster.com. For more information about the production, visit lionking.com. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY “Magic Time: Early Off-Off Broadway; Three Plays from Caffe Cino.” Through Mar 26. Black Sheep Theatre. Village Gate, 274 N Goodman St. FriSat 8 p.m. $15. 861-4816, blacksheeptheatre.org. “Once Upon a Mattress.” Thu Mar 17-Sat Mar 19. Penfield High School. Thu-Fri 7:30 p.m., Sat 1 & 7:30 p.m. $10-$12. pbirkby@ penfield.monroe.edu. Plays in Progress: “Lavender Scare.” Mon Mar 21. Informal reading of the new play by Peter Duchan. Geva Theatre Center, 75 Woodbury Blvd. Mon 7 p.m. Free, but reservations required. 232-4382, gevatheatre.org. Pretty Things Peepshow. Thu Mar 17. Sword swallowing, human blockhead, classic burlesque, whip cracking, singing, dancing. Nola’s BBQ, 4775 Lake Ave. Thu 10 p.m. $10. prettythingsproductions.com. “Radio Golf.” Tue Mar 22-April 17. Geva Theatre Center, 75 Woodbury Blvd. Previews TueWed Mar 23 7:30 p.m. $22-$59. 232-4382, gevatheatre.org. “Stop Kiss.” Through Mar 19. Out of Pocket Productions; fundraiser for Rochester PRIDE. Geva

Theatre Center, 75 Woodbury Blvd. Thu-Fri 7 p.m., Sat 1:30 & 7 p.m. $15-$20. 232-4382, gevatheatre.org. “The Triangle Factory Fire Project.” Through Mar 20. Jewish Community Center, 1200 Edgewood Ave. Thu 7 p.m., Sat 8 p.m., Sun 2 p.m. $16-$24. 461-2000 x235, jcccenterstage.org.

Auditions Best Foot Forward. Fri Mar 18-Sun Mar 20. Auditioning kids age 4-9 for roles in “The Princess and the Frog.” Best Foot Forward at Eastview Mall. Free to audition, tuition-based theater program. Fri 5-6 p.m., Sat 1-2 p.m., Sun 1-2:30 p.m. vanessa@bestfootforwardkids. com, 398-0220. Bristol Valley Theater. Sat Mar 19. Auditions for 2011 summer season, including roles in “A Dash of Rosemary: The Music of Rosemary Clooney,” “Cabaret,” “Charley’s Aunt,” “The 39 Steps,” and more. Maxfield Hose Company Fire Hall, 2 Race St, Naples. Noon3 p.m. bvtnaples.org.


Comedy Revue. Tue Mar 22. Seeks comedy improvisors. Contact for location: lvolk@rochester.rr.com. 5-6 p.m. Geva Theatre Summer Academy. Fri Mar 18-Sun Mar 20. Open to students aged 12-18 of all levels of experience. Auditions by appointment only. Geva Theatre Center, 75 Woodbury Blvd. Fri 36 p.m., Sat 10 a.m.-4 p.m., Sun noon-4 p.m. If accepted, tuition is $900 (scholarships available). 2321366 x3035, gevatheatre.org. Vegas-Style Performance Troupe. Tue Mar 22. 1000 Turk Hill Road, Fairport. 290-9092. 8 p.m.

Workshops [ Wednesday, March 16 ] Alzheimer’s Association Care Partner Education: “Healthy Body, Healthy Brain.” St. John’s Meadows, Briarwood Building, 1 Johnsarbor Dr. W. 760-5400, alz.org/ rochesterny. 6:30-7:30 p.m. Free. Alzheimer’s Association Care Partner Education: “Managing Challenging Behaviors.” St. Ann’s at Cherry Ridge, 900 Cherry Ridge Blvd., Webster. 760-5400, alz.org/ rochesterny. 1-2 p.m. Free. Beginning Quilting and Beyond. Henrietta Public Library, 455 Calkins Rd. 359-7092. 6:30-8:30 p.m. Free, register. Hands-On Cooking with Beer with the Old Toad British Pub. Tops Cooking School, 3507 Mt Read Blvd. 663-5449, topsmarkets.com. 7-9 p.m. $25 class only, $35 with beer sampling, register. Knit Clique: Knitting/Crocheting Drop-In. Brighton Memorial Library, 2300 Elmwood Ave. 784-5300, brightonlibrary.org. 12-2 p.m. Free. Marketing Know-How for Small Businesses. Kate Gleason Auditorium, Central Library, 115 South Ave. 428-8304. 10 a.m.12:30 p.m. Free. Pantry Cooking. New York Wine & Culinary Center, 800 S Main St., Canandaigua. 394-7070, nywcc. com. 6-8:30 p.m. $50, registration required. Penmanship and Calligraphy Club. Barnes & Noble Pittsford, 3349 Monroe Ave. 586-6020. 7 p.m. Free. Wine 101. JD Wine Cellars 1342 Eddy Rd., Macedon. jdwinecellars. com. 5 p.m. $30, register. Includes samples of at least 10 wines, a small cheese & cracker plate, and a signature JD glass. [ Thursday, March 17 ] Adult Demonstration Class: Breakfast for Dinner. Tops Cooking School, 3507 Mt Read Blvd. 663-5449, topsmarkets.com. 7-9 p.m. $20, register. Individualized Basic Computer Skills Classes. Henrietta Public Library, 455 Calkins Rd. 359-7092. 10-11 a.m. Free, appointment required. Using the internet, setting up an email account, using Microsoft Word to create a resume, and searching for and applying for jobs online. Learn to Read the Tarot I. Tru Center, 6 S. Main St., Pittsford, NY 14534. 381-0190, tru@trubynicole.com. 5:30-7 p.m. $75 for 3-class series, register. With Thomas Johnston. Tarot II is March 24, Tarot III is March 31. Luck of the Irish: St Patrick’s Day Gourmet Celebration. New York

SPECIAL EVENT | Pretty Things Peep Show

Where can you see a mustachioed man willingly snap his tongue in a mouse trap, a buxom little person strut her stuff as well as the big girls, and a lady not only survive the sawed-inhalf act, but emerge from the box nearly nude? In Rochester, of course — but only for one night at Nola’s BBQ (4775 Lake Ave.). On Thursday, March 17, the Pretty Things Peep Show will thrill you twice over with its signature simultaneous sideshow and vintage burlesque act. Ten bucks gets you in the door at 8 p.m., providing that you’re 18 or over, and the show starts at 10. The Pretty Things press release promises you sword swallowing, song and dance, whip-cracking, glass-eating, and “splendiferous specimens of the female form.” The troupe has performed with Motley Crue, Ozzy Osborne, AND Foreigner. Ya heard? And that’s just a few highlights of its 300 shows. Discounts are available for roller-derby members (visit prettythingsproductions.com/RDdiscount.html to sign up). For more information, visit prettythingspeepshow.com, or ring Nola’s at 663-3375. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY Wine & Culinary Center, 800 S Main St., Canandaigua. 394-7070, nywcc.com. 6-8:30 p.m. $60, registration required. Meditation Thursdays. Books Etc, 78 W Main St, Rt 31, Macedon. 315-573-7450, books_etc@yahoo. com. 7:30-9:00 p.m. $5. Guided visualization, discussion, questions and answers. Quick, Easy & Healthy Home Cooking. Cornell Cooperative Extension-Canandaigua, 480 N Main St, Canandaigua. 394-3977 x409 or x410, cceontario.org. 11 a.m.-1:30 p.m. Free to Ontario County residents, register. Shaman Drumming. Books Etc, 78 W Main St, Rt 31, Macedon. 474-4116, books_etc@yahoo.com. 6:30-8 p.m. Free. Bev Jones will lead participants in drumming, meditation, and finding their animal guide. [ Friday, March 18 ] Kingian Nonviolence with Arthur Romano. Church of the Ascension, 1360 Lake Ave. 276-4962, gandhiinstitute.org. 6-9 p.m. Free. Part of the “A Season for Nonviolence” programming. Technology Class: Yahoo Email 101. Brighton Memorial Library, 2300 Elmwood Ave. 784-5300, brightonlibrary.org. 2:30 p.m. Free, register. [ Saturday, March 19 ] AAA 6 hour Driving Improvement Course. Finger Lakes Community College, Room A102, 3325 Marvin Sand Dr., Room B355, third floor, Canandaigua. 394-4400. 9 a.m.-3:30 p.m. $40, registration required. American Red Cross Pet CPR and First Aid. Lollypop Farm, 99 Victor Rd, Fairport. 223-1330, lollypop.org. 9 a.m.-12:30 p.m.

$40 per student, $25 for one additional person. Distilled in NY: An Introduction to Handcrafted NY Spirits. New York Wine & Culinary Center, 800 S Main St., Canandaigua. 394-7070, nywcc.com. 6-8:30 p.m. $30, register. Musical Theatre Master Class with NYC Director Marc Astafan. The Theatre at 31 Prince Street/Visual Studies Workshop. 802-8683, carademanueleproductions@gmail. com. Master Class I (grades 5-10): 10-11:30 a.m.; Master Class I (grades 11-12/college): 2-3:30 p.m. $40. NYC Director Marc Astafan offers Master Classes focusing on dramatic interpretation and presentation of musical theatre songs. Screenwriting Workshop with Zoje Stage. Central Library, 115 South Ave. 428-8202. 2-4 p.m. Free. 3/19: Query letter workshop; 3/26: 1st page workshop. The Meaning and Significance of Animal Totems. Tru Center, 6 S. Main St., Pittsford, NY 14534. 381-0190, tru@trubynicole.com. 2:30-4:30 p.m. $25, registration required. Catherine McMahon will help you meet and work with your animal guides during this workshop. Meditation and creation of sacred art to honor them. [ Monday, March 21 ] Adult Demonstration Class: Crazy About Caramel. Tops Cooking School, 3507 Mt Read Blvd. 6635449, topsmarkets.com. 7-9 p.m. $20, register. Cooking Class: Swing into Spring with Soups & Quiches. Cornell Cooperative Extension-Rochester, 249 Highland Ave. 461-1000 x0, mycce.org/monroe. 6-8 p.m. $30, register. Exploring a Berry Crop Enterprise. Cornell Cooperative ExtensionRochester, 249 Highland Ave. wnn1@

cornell.edu, mycce.org/monroe. 6:308:30 p.m. $25, registration required. Overview of establishing a berry crop business: land, cultural practices and marketing. Monday Night Seasonal Tastings: Dan Martello of Good Luck. Breathe Yoga, 19 S. Main St, Pittsford. 2489070, breatheyoga.com. 6-8 p.m. $50, registration required. Hands-on demonstration, three-course meal, dessert, wine and recipe cards. Six Week Posture Bootcamp. Finger Lakes Community College, 4355 Lakeshore Dr, Canandaigua. 7851906, aiezzaca@flcc.edu. 5-5:55 p.m. $36, register. Wondrous Winter Cooking: Swing into Spring with Soups & Quiches. Cornell Cooperative ExtensionRochester, 249 Highland Ave. 4611000, mycce.org/monroe. 6-8 p.m. $25-30, registration required. [ Tuesday, March 22 ] Autism Council of Rochester Basketball Clinic w/Jim Johnson. Al Sigl Center Gym, 1000 Elmwood Ave., Door #1, 14620. 413-1681, info@ theautismcouncil.com. 6-7:30 p.m. clinic, book signing 7-7:30 p.m. $45, register. For students aged 6-18. Hands-On Fabulous Fiesta. Tops Cooking School, 3507 Mt Read Blvd. 663-5449, topsmarkets.com. 7-9 p.m. $25 class only, $35 with beer sampling, register. Hors D’oeurves To Impress your Guests. The Culinary Center at Vella, 237 Pittsford-Palmyra Rd. 421-9362 x805, vellaculinarycenter.com. 6:30-9 p.m. $65, regisgration required. Living with Diabetes Class. Clinton Crossings, 2400 South Clinton Ave., Building H, Suite 135. 341-7066. 2:30-5 p.m. Covered by most insurers with a co-pay. Each participant can bring a support person. Quick, Easy & Healthy Home Cooking. Cornell Cooperative ExtensionCanandaigua, 480 N Main St, Canandaigua. 394-3977 x409 or x410, cceontario.org. 11 a.m.-1:30 p.m. Free to Ontario County residents, register. Residential Builder Energy Code Training. Holiday Inn & Suites, 800 Jefferson Rd. 518-4652492 x110, jturner@nysba.com, nyserdacodetraining.com. 7:45 a.m. check-in and 8 a.m.-noon training, or 1:45 p.m. check-in and 2-6 p.m. training. $95, register by 3/18. New York State is committed to ensuring that at least 90% of residential and commercial buildings comply with the 2010 Energy Conservation Code of New York State (ECCNYS) by 2017. Workshops to Give Dairy Producers an Edge in Buying and Selling. Cornell Cooperative Extension-Batavia, 420 E Main St, Batavia. 343-3040 x138. 10 a.m.-3 p.m. $15-20, register. Includes lunch.

St. John Neumann School Preschool - Grade 6 Before school and after school care available.

Open House All are Welcome! Thursday, March 24th 6:30pm 31 Empire Blvd. at Culver Rd. www.stjohnneumannschool.com (585) 288-0580

Going Green with Antiques

REUSE, RECYCLE & REPURPOSE

36TH ANNUAL ON CAMPUS Sat., March 19th, 2011 10am-5pm

Sun., March 20th, 2011 10am-4pm

Students with College ID FREE Shuttle service available

[ Wednesday, March 23 ] Adult Demonstration Class: Big-Time Loser Series 3 of 3. Tops Cooking School, 3507 Mt Read Blvd. 6635449, topsmarkets.com. 7-9 p.m. $20, register. Knit Clique: Knitting/Crocheting Drop-In. Brighton Memorial Library, 2300 Elmwood Ave. 784-5300, brightonlibrary.org. 12-2 p.m. Free.

ADMISSION: $5.00

Complimentary Child Care Available Sat. & Sun. 1-3pm

Nazareth College Shults Center 4245 East Ave., Pittsford, NY www.AntiquesRochesterNY.com rochestercitynewspaper.com City 31


Film Times Fri Mar 18 – Thu Mar 24 Schedules change often. Call theaters or visit rochestercitynewspaper.com for updates.

Film

Brockport Strand 637-3310 89 Main St, Brockport BATTLE: LOS ANGELES: 7, 9:20; also Sat-Sun 1:15, 4; BEASTLY: 9; MARS NEEDS MOMS: 7, 8:45, also Sat-Sun 1, 3, 5; RANGO: 7; also Sat-Sun 1, 3, 5.

Canandaigua Theatres 396-0110 Wal-Mart Plaza, Canandaigua ADJUSTMENT BUREAU: 7:10, 9:10; also Fri-Sun 5:10; also Sat-Sun 1:10, 3:10; BATTLE: LOS ANGELES: 7, 9:20; also Fri-Sun 4; also Sat-Sun 1:15; BEASTLY: 9:15; GNOMEO & JULIET: Fri-Sun 5; also Sat-Sun 1, 3; HALL PASS: 9; JUST GO WITH IT: 7; KING’S SPEECH: 7, 9:15; also Fri-Sun 4; also Sat-Sun 1:15; LIMITLESS: 7:10, 9:20; also Fri-Sun 5:10; also Sat-Sun 1, 3:05; LINCOLN LAWYER: 7, 9:15; also Fri-Sun 4; also Sat-Sun 1:30; MARS NEEDS MOMS (3D): 7, 8:45; also Fri-Sun 5; also Sat-Sun 1, 3; PAUL: 7:10, 9:20; also Fri-Sun 4; also Sat-Sun 1:15; RANGO: 7; also Fri-Sun 5; also Sat-Sun 1, 3; RED RIDING HOOD: 7:10, 9:10; also Fri-Sun 5:10; also Sat-Sun 1:10, 3:10.

Cinema Theater

The sands of Santa Monica [ REVIEW ] by George Grella

“Battle: Los Angeles” (PG-13), directed by Jonathan Liebesman Now playing

Another casualty of the end of the Cold War and the collapse of the Soviet Union, the alien-invasion film, once a staple of science fiction, appears only sporadically these days. Lacking the Red Menace, the form longs for solid subtexts. Way back in 1996 “Independence Day” substituted spectacular special effects and horribly embarrassing acting for anything like intelligent meaning, while the 2006 remake of “The War of the Worlds” added little to the illustrious history of film adaptations of the

271-1785 957 S. Clinton St. FIGHTER: 8:50 (no Thu); also Fri-Sun 4:20; TRUE GRIT: 7 (no Thu); also Fri-Sun 2:30.

Culver Ridge 16 544-1140 2255 Ridge Rd E, Irondequoit  ADJUSTMENT BUREAU: 1:30, 4:10, 6:45, 9:35; BATTLE: LOS ANGELES: 1:20, 2:25, 4, 5:05, 6:40, 7:45, 9:25, 10:25; BEASTLY: 7:35, 9:50; BIG MOMMAS: LIKE FATHER LIKE SON: 7:15, 9:45; GNOMEO & JULIET: 2:20, 4:50; HALL PASS: 1:45, 4:15, 7:55, 10:35; I continues on page 34

works of H. G. Wells. Only “District 9” (2009) extracted some surprising and significant intellectual and emotional content from its weird story of the segregation of beings from another world. Following contemporary fashion, the new invasion flick “Battle: Los Angeles” employs a documentary approach to establish some plausibility, showing numerous news reports of clusters of meteors landing in the waters near the great coastal cities of the world. Soon those reports show a series of devastating attacks emanating from the meteors, actually space ships, blowing up those cities, killing thousands of citizens. In Southern California, under the threat of annihilation, the authorities evacuate the coast, and assuming they can defeat the aliens from the air, resolve to level Santa Monica with a bombing raid and thus destroy the invading forces. A squad of Marines at Camp Pendleton receives orders to rescue a group of civilians hiding in a police station in Santa Monica before the bombs fall, a mission that occupies most

An image from “Battle: Los Angeles.” PHOTO COURTESY COLUMBIA PICTURES

of the length of the film. As soon as that endeavor begins, the picture pretty much abandons the notion of science fiction and settles into the patterns and formulas of another familiar genre, the war movie. The group of Marines displays a contemporary version of Hollywood military diversity, a sort of microcosm, with Hispanics and African Americans (and even an actual African), for example, replacing the usual Italians and Jews, a member from New Jersey instead of the required Brooklynite, but nobody, surprisingly, from Texas. From the beginning one Marine is identified as the youngest and most innocent of the squad, which any veteran of the form knows will seal his doom. To provide some complexity within its simple story, the script establishes a few emotional issues among the group. The most important involves the main character, a staff sergeant on the verge of retiring from the Corps, played by Aaron Eckhart, who bears a heavy burden of guilt and a measure of hostility from the other Marines, because he lost several of his men in an ambush in Iraq. Following the standard pattern, through competent leadership and acts of extreme courage he will of course redeem himself in the eyes of the men and change his mind about retiring. Moving in through an endless series of encounters with the aliens, all of it filmed with a jumpy, hand-held camera, the squad suffers

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Bad moon rising [ REVIEW ] BY DAYNA PAPALEO

“Red Riding Hood” (PG-13), directed by Catherine Hardwicke Now playing

considerable attrition in their attempt to rescue the civilians and fight their way back to the base. Although they capture a wounded enemy and perform some impromptu vivisection to locate a vulnerable spot, the script otherwise barely confronts any important questions about the origins of the creatures or the technology that enabled them to attack the planet. The beings themselves, featureless bipeds with globular heads and a mechanical kind of articulation, apparently fire weapons very like the guns the Marines employ, nothing at all fancy like, for instance, our old friend the death ray. A scientist on TV new show concludes that the aliens journeyed to Earth for its water, which they use as fuel for their vessels, a statement that constitutes the film’s only gesture toward actual science fiction. Although the tale of brave men fighting their way to safety against great odds through enemy territory enlivens a great many narratives — the best remains Xenophon’s “Anabasis” — the utterly predictable narrative of “Battle: LA” adds nothing to that tradition. As a science-fiction film it hardly bothers with that form’s usual preoccupations; as a war flick it falls far short of such classics as “Battleground” or “The Sands of Iwo Jima.” The movie finally seems like a vehicle for Aaron Eckhart, who speaks throughout in a hoarse whisper and displays a steadfastly tightlipped grimace on his craggy, cleft-chinned, chiseled face, a poor man’s John Wayne.

Whenever a film captures the imaginations (read: wallets) of the American public, the movie studios shift into overdrive as they try to cram a second bolt of lightning into that mercurial little bottle. On occasion, they are successful; “Die Hard” begat “Passenger 57” and “Speed,” for example, and we’ve spent the last 15 years or so up to our eyeballs in rather decent Jane Austen adaptations. But a well can easily run dry, especially when it’s kind of shallow to begin with. Take the teen juggernaut “Twilight,” which told of a lonely young woman who falls in love with a sparkly emo vampire. It’s a modernday fairy tale, so why not plunder an old-school fairy tale for some new inspiration? And quality be damned, by the way; you chumps are paying to see the movie, not to enjoy it. So meet “Red Riding Hood,” whom you only thought you knew.

Amanda Seyfried in “Red Riding Hood.” PHOTO COURTESY WARNER BROS.

Apparently her given name is Valerie (Amanda Seyfried, “Letters to Juliet”), and she lives with her family in a vaguely wintry medieval village that looks like a sugar-dusted Renaissance Faire. (Seriously, I half-expected a camera pan to reveal the turkey-leg booth.) Valerie hints in voiceover at her rebellious streak, made manifest by her secret romantic connection to local bad boy Peter (the surly and boring Shiloh Fernandez). Their plans to run off together are thwarted by her sister, who dies following a vicious attack by the region’s werewolf. Don’t be sad, though; her death is more plot facilitator than family tragedy, allowing Valerie and her parents (Virginia Madsen and Billy Burke, b/k/a Bella’s dad) to bounce back quickly. Besides, Valerie has bigger issues, most notably her involuntary engagement to local rich boy Henry (the kindly and boring Max Irons), whose escalating game of just-whipit-out-already with Peter takes a back seat to the arrival of Father Solomon, werewolf hunter and, as played by the great Gary Oldman, scenery chomper. Solomon brings with him an elephantshaped torture chamber as well as a Rainbow Coalition of guards, many of whom are forced to fight the werewolf when it returns... for Valerie. But not to eat her; the werewolf seems more smitten than hungry, and Valerie’s ability to communicate with the beast causes her fellow villagers to denounce her as a witch before they use her as bait. This, unfortunately, just makes the werewolf ’s offer to whisk Valerie away seem like a pretty good offer. Now remember, unlike the storytime wolf most of us are familiar with, “Red Riding Hood” features a werewolf, meaning that the

beast typically takes human form by day. So who is he? Or she? Director Catherine Hardwicke (she directed the first “Twilight” before being unceremoniously dumped) posits her version as a whodunit, smacking us in the face with brown-eyed herrings at every turn. Maybe it’s Peter; he’s naughty already. Or perhaps it’s the toadying cleric channeled by Lukas Haas, who deserves much better. Or what if Valerie’s grandmother is the werewolf? She’s played by the eternally foxy Julie Christie, putting the “sex” in “sexagenarian” and hopefully cashing a big check. Too bad that Hardwicke is unable to sustain any real interest in the answer, and once screenwriter David Leslie Johnson finally gets to make those famous observations about the size of Granny’s eyes, ears, and teeth, even that seems forced. This is probably the part where I should touch upon the yarn’s welldocumented symbolism, with the bite of a predatory wolf a thinly veiled substitute for sexual penetration and that flowing scarlet cape representing both the onset of female fertility as well as virginity’s end. OK? So that’s done; I’m reluctant to look too deeply into something so flimsy. But kudos to the stunning Seyfried, incidentally; she does the very best she can with the laughably simplistic script (it features many, many dumbed-down speeches explaining why who did what), and her willingness to take the material in earnest might be the only thing that redeems the film. It likely sounded great on paper, with “Red Riding Hood” positioning itself to supplant “Twilight” in the capricious hearts and minds of teenage girls. The problem? No bark, and no bite either.

FOUR LIONS

Friday, March 18, 8 p.m., and Sunday, March 20, 4 p.m.

In line with the best British comedy of recent years, Four Lions takes on an unlikely subject: terrorism. Focusing on the bumbling attempts of four Muslim fundamentalists to wage violent jihad, satirist Chris Morris mocks their absurd incompetence — buying 12 bottles of peroxide disguised as a bearded woman, for example — while also acknowledging the sad, misguided tragedy that underlies their actions. (Chris Morris, UK 2010, 97 min., Digital Projection)

ANGELS WITH DIRTY FACES

Tuesday, March 22, 8 p.m.

Movies for movie lovers, 6 nights a week. Rochester Premiere!

Street punks Rocky (James Cagney) and Jerry (Pat O’Brien) grew up on the same side of the tracks, but as adults, they couldn’t be more different. As Rocky’s criminal charisma exerts its pull on the neighborhood kids, Father Jerry struggles to make sure his flock doesn’t meet the fate of his old friend. (Michael Curtiz, US 1938, 97 min.)

Film Info: 271-4090 l 900 East Avenue l Eastman House Café—stop in for a light dinner or dessert before the film. l Wi-Fi Hotspot l Sponsored by rochestercitynewspaper.com City 33


AM NUMBER FOUR: 7, 9:40; JUSTIN BIEBER: 2:35, 5; KING’S SPEECH: 1:35, 4:25, 7:10, 9:55; LIMITLESS: 2:05, 5:15, 6:55, 7:50, 9:30, 10:30; LINCOLN LAWYER: 1:50, 4:35, 7:20, 10:05; MARS NEEDS MOMS: 2:30, 5:10; also in 3D 2, 4:20, 7:05, 10:10; PAUL: 2:15, 4:55, 7:30, 10:15; RANGO: 1:25, 1:55, 3:55, 4:45, 7:25, 10; RED RIDING HOOD: 1:40, 2:10, 4:05, 4:40, 6:50, 7:40, 9:20, 10:20.

Dryden Theatre 271-3361 900 East Ave *NOTE: Film times for 3/163/23* SILENCE: Wed 3/16 8; I’M NOT RAPPAPORT: Thu 8; FOUR LIONS: Fri 8; CLUNY BROWN: Sat 8; FOUR LIONS/CLUNY BROWN: Sun 4:30; ANGELS WITH DIRTY FACES: Tue 8; NIGHTS OF CABIRIA: Wed 3/23 8.

Eastview 13 425-0420 Eastview Mall, Victor ADJUSTMENT BUREAU: 1:40, 4:35, 7:25, 10:05; BATTLE: LOS ANGELES: 1:25, 2, 4:15, 5, 6:55, 7:40, 9:55, 10:25; BEASTLY: 4:55, 7:55, 10:10; JUST GO WITH IT: 2:10; KING’S SPEECH: 1:35, 4:25, 7:10, 9:50; LIMITLESS: 1:15, 4, 7, 7:30, 9:30, 10; LINCOLN LAWYER: 1:30, 4:30, 7:15, 10:15; LORD OF THE DANCE (3D): 1:50, 4:20, 7:50, 10:20; MARS NEEDS MOMS: 1:10, 4:10, 7:05, 9:40; also in 3D 1:55, 4:40; MET OPER: LUCIA DI LAMMERMOOR: Sat 1; PAUL: 1:45, 4:45, 7:45, 10:30; RANGO: 1:20, 4:05, 6:50, 9:35; RED RIDING HOOD: 2:05, 4:50, 7:20, 9:45.

Geneseo Theatres 243-2691 Geneseo Square Mall ADJUSTMENT BUREAU: 9; BATTLE: LOS ANGELES: 7, 9:20; also Sat-Sun 1:15, 4; LINCOLN LAWYER: 7, 9:15; also Sat-Sun 1:30, 4; MARS NEEDS MOMS (3D): 7, 8:45; Sat-Sun 1, 3, 5; PAUL: 7, 9:20; also Sat-Sun 1:15, 4; RANGO: 7; also SatSun 1, 3, 5; RED RIDING HOOD: 7:10, 9:10; also Sat-Sun 1:10, 3:10, 5:10.

Film Previews Full film reviews available at rochestercitynewspaper.com. [ OPENING ] ANGELS WITH DIRTY FACES (1938): This classic gangster flick stars James Cagney as an ex-con and Pat O’Brien as a priest, former childhood pals now operating under conflicting moral codes. Also starring Humphrey Bogart and Ann Sheridan. Dryden (Tue, Mar 22, 8 p.m.) CLUNY BROWN (1946): The final film from legendary German moviemaker Ernst 34 City march 16-22, 2011

Greece Ridge 12 225-5810 176 Greece Ridge Center Dr. ADJUSTMENT BUREAU: 2:35, 5:10, 7:50, 10:20; BATTLE: LOS ANGELES: 1:30, 2:05, 4:15, 4:50, 7:15, 7:45, 10, 10:30; HALL PASS: 2:10, 4:45, 7:20, 9:50; JUST GO WITH IT: 4:05, 9:25; LIMITLESS: 1:20, 2:25, 5, 6:55, 7:35, 10:05; LINCOLN LAWYER: 1:50, 4:40, 7:25, 10:15; MARS NEEDS MOMS: 2:15, 4:35; also in 3D 1:15, 4, 7, 9:15; PAUL: 2:40, 5:15, 7:55, 10:25; RANGO: 1:40, 4:25, 7:05, 9:35; RED RIDING HOOD: 2, 4:30, 7:30, 9:55; UNKNOWN: 7:40, 10:10.

Henrietta 18 424-3090 525 Marketplace Dr. ADJUSTMENT BUREAU: 1:10, 4:40, 7:15, 9:45, midnight; BATTLE: LOS ANGELES: 1, 2:10, 3:50, 4:50, 6:40, 7:30, 9:25, 10:25, 11:45; BLACK SWAN: 6:55, 10:35; CEDAR RAPIDS: 12:25, 2:50, 5, 7:20, 9:50, 11:55; GNOMEO & JULIET: 12:10, 2:20, 4:25; GRACE CARD: 1:50, 4:30, 7, 9:30; HALL PASS: 12:35, 7:45,11:50; JUST GO WITH IT: 12:20; KING’S SPEECH: 12:15, 3:15, 6:35, 9:20; LIMITLESS: 12:05, 1:05, 2:30, 4, 5:10, 6:30, 7:10, 7:50, 9:05, 9:40, 10:20, 11:30; LINCOLN LAWYER: 12, 2:40, 5:20, 8, 10:40; LORD OF THE DANCE (3D): 12:45, 3:20, 5:35, 8:10, 10:30; MARS NEEDS MOMS: 12:50, 3:05, 5:15, 7:35, 9:55; also in 3D 1:55, 4:10; MET OPERA: LUCIA DI LAMMERMOOR: Sat 1; PAUL: 2:15, 4:45, 7:40, 10:05, 12:05; RANGO: 12:30, 3, 5:40, 8:15, 10:45; RED RIDING HOOD: 2, 3:10, 4:20, 5:30, 6:50, 7:55, 9:15, 10:15, 11:35; UNKNOWN: 4:05, 10:10.

also Sat-Sun 1:10, 3:20; PAKISTAN ONE ON ONE: Thu 6:30; UNDERTOW: 7 (no Wed); also Sat-Sun 1:20.

Pittsford Cinema 383-1310 3349 Monroe Ave. ADJUSTMENT BUREAU: 2:20, 4:45, 7:10; also Fri-Sat 9:35; also Fri-Sun 12:05; BATTLE: LOS ANGELES: 2:25, 4:55, 7:30; also Fri-Sat 10:10; also Fri-Sat 12; KING’S SPEECH: 1:10, 3:50, 6:30; also FriSat 9:05; LIMITLESS: 1:50, 4:20, 6:50; also Fri-Sat 9:15; LINCOLN LAWYER: 2, 4:40, 7:20; also Fri-Sat 9:55; MARS NEEDS MOMS: 2:30, 4:30, 6:40; also Fri-Sat 8:45; also Fri-Sun 12:25; PAUL: 2:35, 5:05, 7:40; also Fri-Sat 10:15; also Fri-Sun 12:10; RANGO: 2:10, 4:35, 7; also Fri-Sat 9:25; also Fri-Sun 11:55 a.m.; RED RIDING HOOD: 3, 5:20, 7:50; also Fri-Sat 10; also FriSun 12:40.

Webster 12

258-0400 240 East Ave.  AHEAD OF TIME: Wed 7; BIUTIFUL: 9; also Sat-Sun 1; CEDAR RAPIDS: 7:10, 9:10; also Sat-Sun 1:40, 3:40; COMPANY MEN: 9:20; also SatSun 3:30; FIGHTER: 6:40; also Sat-Sun 4; KING’S SPEECH: 6:50, 9:30; also Sat-Sun 1:30, 3:50; LAST LIONS: 6:30, 8:40;

888-262-4386 2190 Empire Blvd. ADJUSTMENT BUREAU: 1:40, 4:05, 7:10; also Fri-Sat 9:50; also Sat-Sun 11:20 a.m.; BATTLE: LOS ANGELES: 1:50, 4:30, 7:30; also Fri-Sat 10:10; also Sat-Sun 10:50 a.m.; BEASTLY: 12:45, 3:30, 5:55, 8:30; also Fri-Sat 10:30; GNOMEO & JULIET: 1:15, 3:15, 5:45; HALL PASS: 8:15; also Fri-Sat 10:35; JUST GO WITH IT: 1:30, 4:15, 7:25; also Fri-Sat 10:05; also Sat-Sun 10:40 a.m.; KING’S SPEECH: 1, 3:45, 7:05; also Fri-Sat 9:30; also Sat-Sun 10:30 a.m.; LIMITLESS: 2, 4:45, 7:20; also Fri-Sat 10; also Sat-Sun 11:10 a.m.; LINCOLN LAWYER: 2:20, 5:15, 7:50; also Fri-Sat 10:25; also Sat-Sun 11:30 a.m.; MARS NEEDS MOMS: 12:15, 4:50; also Fri-Sat 9:15; also in 3D 2:45, 7; also Sat-Sun in 3D 10 a.m.; PAUL: 12:30, 3, 5:30, 8; also Fri-Sat 10:20; also Sat-Sun 10:10 a.m.; RANGO: 2:10, 4:40, 7:15; also Fri-Sat 9:40; also SatSun 11:45 a.m.; RED RIDING HOOD: 12, 2:30, 5, 7:40; also Fri-Sat 10:15.

Lubitsch features Jennifer Jones as an amateur plumber juggling matters of work and love. With Charles Boyer and Peter Lawford. Dryden (Sat, Mar 19, 8 p.m., and Sun, Mar 20, 7 p.m.) FOUR LIONS (2010): This year’s BAFTA for Outstanding Debut Feature went to writerdirector Chris Morris for his comedy about a group of bumbling British jihadists who are neither sure what they’re fighting for nor how exactly to go about it. Dryden (Fri, Mar 18, 8 p.m., and Sun, Mar 20, 4 p.m.) I’M NOT RAPPAPORT (1996): Walter Matthau and Ossie Davis star in Herb Gardner’s

adaptation of his Tonywinning stage comedy that observes the joys and ills of modern society through the eyes of two old men who spend their days on a park bench. Dryden (Thu, Mar 17, 8 p.m.) THE LAST LIONS (PG): Jeremy Irons narrates this documentary exploring the causes of Africa’s dwindling lion population along with the efforts being made to save the majestic cats. Little LIMITLESS (PG-13): This thriller stars Bradley Cooper (“The Hangover”) as a writer who stumbles upon a drug that allows him to tap into his abilities at the

The Little


highest level. Of course, as with most drugs, there’s a dangerous catch. With Abbie Cornish and Robert De Niro. Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Greece, Henrietta, Pittsford, Webster THE LINCOLN LAWYER (R): Matthew McConaughey plays the title role in this adaptation of a Michael Connelly novel about a defense attorney operating out of the back of his Town Car when he’s hired by a high-profile client accused of rape and murder. Costarring Marisa Tomei, Ryan Phillippe, and John Leguizamo. Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece, Henrietta, Pittsford, Webster PAUL (R): The “Hot Fuzz” team of Simon Pegg and Nick Frost return with this Greg Mottola-directed comedy about two British sci-fi geeks who encounter an alien (voiced by Seth Rogen) on a road trip across the American Southwest. Featuring Jeffrey Tambor, Jason Bateman, and Sigourney Weaver. Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece, Henrietta, Pittsford, Webster SILENCE (1971): Japanese auteur Masahiro Shinoda directs this drama about a pair of Portuguese missionaries attempting to spread the word of God through a 17th-century Japan that has outlawed Christianity. Dryden (Wed, Mar 16, 8 p.m.) [ CONTINUING ] THE ADJUSTMENT BUREAU (PG-13): Matt Damon and Emily Blunt star in this trippy adaptation of a Philip K. Dick thriller about a politician who falls for a ballerina, only to realize that the title organization is working to keep them apart. Co-starring Anthony Mackie and Terrence Stamp. Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece, Henrietta, Pittsford, Webster BATTLE: LOS ANGELES (PG-13): Aaron Eckhart, Michelle Rodriguez, and Bridget Moynahan star in this effects-heavy action flick about a Marine platoon fighting an alien invasion in the City of Angels. Brockport, Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece, Henrietta, Pittsford, Webster BEASTLY (PG-13): The second film from Daniel Barnz (“Phoebe In Wonderland”) is a modernday take on “Beauty and the Beast,” with Alex Pettyfer as a cruel Manhattan teenager whose transformation into a hideous monster leads to true love. Featuring Vanessa Hudgens and Neil Patrick Harris. Brockport, Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Webster BIG MOMMAS: LIKE FATHER, LIKE SON (PG-13): Martin

Lawrence and Brandon T. Jackson remind Tyler Perry that he hasn’t cornered the market on plus-sized drag with this “Big Momma’s House” sequel that finds the two men going undercover at an all-girls’ school to investigate a murder. Culver CEDAR RAPIDS (R): Miguel Arteta’s follow-up to “Youth In Revolt” is a comedy with Ed Helms (“The Hangover”) as a small-town insurance salesman who shakes things up at the annual convention in Iowa with the help of John C. Reilly, Anne Heche, and Isiah Whitlock, Jr. Henrietta, Little THE COMPANY MEN (R): Writer-director John Wells jumps to the big screen with this timely drama starring Ben Affleck, Chris Cooper, and Tommy Lee Jones as white collars rocked by corporate downsizing. With Kevin Costner, Rosemarie DeWitt, and Eamonn Walker. Little THE FIGHTER (R): Mark Wahlberg teams with David O. Russell (“I Heart Huckabees”) for a third time to play “Irish” Micky Ward, a boxer who came out of retirement in the mid 90’s to make an inspiring comeback. Christian Bale co-stars as Ward’s drug-addicted brother. Cinema, Little GNOMEO AND JULIET (G): James McAvoy, Emily Blunt, Maggie Smith, and Ozzy Osbourne provide some of the voices for this animated feature about two garden statues from bickering garden-statue families who fall in love. Canandaigua, Culver, Henrietta, Webster HALL PASS (R): The Farrelly brothers are back with this raunchy comedy starring Owen Wilson and Jason Sudeikis as husbands granted a break from their wives, who are out having their own fun. Featuring Jenna Fischer, Christina Applegate, and Richard Jenkins. Canandaigua, Culver, Greece, Henrietta, Webster I AM NUMBER FOUR (PG-13): D.J. Caruso (“Eagle Eye”) directs Brit newcomer Alex Pettyfer in this sci-fi thriller about an extraterrestrial teen trying to stay one step ahead of the enemy aliens that are hunting him down. With Dianna Agron and Timothy Olyphant. Culver JUST GO WITH IT (PG-13): Adam Sandler and Jennifer Aniston star in this romantic “comedy” about a plastic surgeon who convinces his assistant to pose as his estranged wife in order to cover up an itty-bitty lie he told to his trophy girlfriend (Brooklyn Decker). Canandaigua, Eastview, Henrietta, Webster JUSTIN BIEBER: NEVER SAY NEVER (G): Um, is anyone else sick of this kid? Culver

THE KING’S SPEECH (R): Colin Firth stars in this period drama from director Tom Hooper as the future George VI of England, who sought help from a speech therapist (Geoffrey Rush) before his surprise ascension to the throne in 1936 as his country hurtled toward WWII. Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Henrietta, Little, Pittsford, Webster MARS NEEDS MOMS (PG): Seth Green, Joan Cusack, and Dan Fogler provide a few of the voices for this animated adaptation of the book by “Bloom County” author Berkeley Breathed, in which a young boy sets out to save his mother from aliens in need of that maternal touch. Brockport, Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece, Henrietta, Pittsford, Webster RANGO (PG): Johnny Depp reteams with “Pirates of the Caribbean” director Gore Verbinski for this animated Western about a chameleon who gets a chance to become the hero he aspires to be. Also featuring the voice talent of Isla Fisher, Timothy Olyphant, and Abigail Breslin. Brockport, Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece, Henrietta, Pittsford, Webster RED RIDING HOOD (PG-13): Amanda Seyfried stars for director Catherine Hardwicke (“Twilight”) as Valerie, a young woman whose plans to run off with her true love are interrupted by the werewolf terrorizing her medieval village. With Gary Oldman, Lukas Haas, and Julie Christie as Grandmother. Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece, Henrietta, Pittsford, Webster TRUE GRIT (PG-13): Joel and Ethan Coen reunite with their Dude to put a new stamp on Charles Portis’ 1968 novel about Rooster Cogburn (Jeff Bridges), an alcoholic U.S. Marshal who gets a shot at redemption when a teenage girl hires him to bring her father’s murderer to justice. Also starring Matt Damon, Josh Brolin, and Barry Pepper. Cinema UNDERTOW (NR): Originally showcased in ImageOut 2010, this drama watches as a Peruvian fisherman must decide between his devoted wife and new baby or honoring his recently deceased lover by revealing the truth about himself. Little UNKNOWN (PG-13): Liam Neeson continues his action-movie juggernaut with another European-set thriller, this one about a man who wakes from a coma only to learn that another man has stolen his identity. Also, some killers are after him. Featuring Diane Kruger, January Jones, and Aidan Quinn. Greece, Henrietta rochestercitynewspaper.com City 35


Classifieds For information: Call us (585) 244-3329 Fax us (585) 244-1126 Mail Us City Classifieds 250 N. Goodman Street Rochester, NY 14607 Email Us classifieds@ rochester-citynews.com EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY

All real estate advertised in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act, which makes it unlawful, “to make, print, or publish, any notice, statement, or advertisement, with respect to the sale or rental of a dwelling that indicates any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin.” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under the age of 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertisement for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. Call the local Fair Housing Enforcement Project, FHEP at 325-2500 or 1-866-671-FAIR. Si usted sospecha una practica de vivienda injusta, por favor llame al servicio legal gratis. 585-325-2500 - TTY 585-325-2547. to everything. Available immediately. Priced from $595. Call 585-383-8888.

Apartments for Rent

CULVER/PARK AREA: One bed­ room, 2nd floor, hardwoods, fire­ place, kitchen, one car parking, basement storage, no pets, no smoking. $625 plus + security. Includes all util. 244-4123 DOWNTOWN GIBBS/EASTMAN Theatre area. 1&2 bedrooms. Bright, cheerful, nice neighbors, laundry, convenient

DOWNTOWN LOFT 2nd floor, on St. Paul Street, Above Club Liquid 2500 sq. feet. $1500+ utilities. Call 703-2550 ON PARK AVE with quiet offstreet parking, close-to boutiques & res­taurants, large 1 bedroom. First month free to qualified applicants. $815 includes heat, & 24 hour maintenance 585271-7597

Commercial/ Office Space for Rent

Surrounded by State Land, prime Southern Tier location! Woods, fields,100% guaranteed! Call (888) 918-6264 NOW! www. NewYorkLandandLakes.com

OFFICE SPACE FOR RENT. Goodman East. Bright turn-key of­ fice space. 900 square feet. $895/ month heated. Ample parking. Donna 271-3902

Real Estate Auctions

UofR/ AIRPORT AREA Brick, Mixed use building. 6,000 sq.ft. of stores/office plus 3 apartments. Owner must sell due to illness. Owner financing, no banks needed. 383-8888

AUCTION CHEMUNG COUNTY REAL PROPERTY TAX FORECLOSURES.130+ Properties March 30 @11am. Holiday Inn, Elmira, NY 800-243-0061 HAR, Inc. & AAR, Inc. Free brochure: www.NYSAUCTIONS.com FLORIDA AUCTIONS, Boca Raton MANSION & Lake Worth ESTATE HOME, All Bids Due March 30, www.defalco.com (561)922-9727

Houses for Sale

Shared Housing

HOMES FOR SALE Pittsford/ Bushnells Basin 3 Homes on fabu­lous 3 acre park-like yard. Beautifully updated, 1800’s large main house plus 2 smaller homes which are leased for $24,000 per year (Great In-Law Home). Owner must sell due to age & health 585-383-8888 S.E. HIGHLAND SECTION 4bdrm, 2 full bath, Living-room, diningroom, kitchen, full-basement, fullattic, fenced backyard, street park­ ing. Convenient location. Ready to move-in. $69,900, Low Taxes. Must see! Call 442-6351

Land for Sale INVEST NOW IN NY LAND! Our best New York land Bargains EVER! Camp on 5 Acres -$19,995. Big acreage w/timber. Farms & hunting tracts. Waterfront @ 50% discount! Over 150 properties on sale Call now 800-229-7843 Or visit www. LandandCamps.com NY FARM LIQUIDATION ABSOLUTE SALE- 3/19TH ONLY! 12 acres- POND- $24,900 20 acres- STREAM- $39,900

ALL AREAS- ROOMMATES. COM. Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http:// www. Roommates.com. (AAN CAN)

Vacation Property OCEAN CITY, MARYLAND. Best selection of affordable rentals. Full/ partial weeks. Call for FREE bro­chure. Open daily. Holiday Real Estate. 1-800-638-2102. Online reservations: www.holidayoc.com

Adoption ADOPTING YOUR NEWBORN Is a gift we’ll treasure. Lifetime of love, security and understanding. No att­ny. consults or agency. Expenses paid. Debbie/Bryan 877-819-0080

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ADOPTION: Happily married, pro­fessional couple wishes to start family. Can offer child lots of love and stability. Expenses paid. Please call Maria and Michael. 1-800-513- 4914

Automotive CA$H 4 CAR$ Free Towing of your junk cars and vans. $50-$5000 or donate to our Children’s Charities. 482-2140 DONATE VEHICLE: Receive $1000 grocery coupon, Noah’s Arc, Support no kill shelters, research to advance veterinary treatments. Free towing, tax deductible, nonrunners accepted 1-866-912-GIVE

Financial Services BUSINESS LINES OF CREDIT. Contract Finance. Franchise Finance. SBA Loans. Accounts Receivable, Purchase Orders, Bridge loans. Call today for more in­formation and options 888-9064545. www.turnkeylenders.com

For Sale BOOK OF CLASSIC actor & ac­ tresses 1940, Hard Cover 512 pag­es. Color pictures 12”x9” $20 585- 880-2903 DOG & CAT HOUSES kennels, porch steps, do it yourself kits. Quick assembly 585-752-1000 $49 Jim HEWLETT PACKARD OFFICE COPIER, letters, pictures, color and black ink, Staples, Walmart VGC 585-880-2903 $49 SAWMILLS - Band/Chainsaw -Cut lumber any dimension, anytime. Build anything from furniture to homes. IN STOCK ready to ship. From $4090.00._ www. NorwoodSawmills.com/300N 1800-661-7747 SONY WEB TVPlus internet receiv­ er with hard drive, remote, wireless keyboard. Excellent condition $45 or BO 585-244-4447 SWINGING SHUTTER WOOD DOOR. Like in Cowboy movies, 5’ 5” tall, 2’ 2” wide (pantry, closet) Hangs middle of door frame. $25 585-880-2903

Groups Forming DIFFERENT DRUMS GAY GIRLS OUT. Defend America’s Liberty! Stop Obama’s extreme socialist agenda, his one world government takeover. He’s destroying America! Wake Up! 585-747-2699 www. michaelsavage.com FIBROMYALGIA/CHRONIC PAIN? Need emotional support, connec­ tions with others or additional infor­ mation? Free support, initial consult before group start date by licensed professional. Call 208-6968

Home Services TROUBLE GETTING UP YOUR STAIRS? Acorn Stairlifts can help if you Call Now! Discounts available on your new Acorn Stairlift, Please mention this ad. 877-896-8396

Jam Section AUDITIONS The Hochstein Sinfonia, a string orchestra for stu­dents in grades 4-9 who play inter­mediate level. The application deadline for Sinfonia is April 30, 2011; excerpts will be mailed after April 1. Auditions for Sinfonia are Mon, May 17 from 3-9pm. AUDITIONS Chamber Music Connection is for strings, wood­ winds, brass, and piano students who play at NYSSMA Level 3-6 or the equivalent. Trios, quartets, and quintets are formed of players with compatible abilities and ages as possible from the pool of appli­cants. Auditions will also be held in March, call the Hochstein office for more information at 5858-454- 4596 or by visiting www.hochstein.org. AUDITIONS The Hochstein Youth Symphony Orchestra (HYSO), stu­ dents grades 7-12 advanced level. The application deadline April 15, 2011; excerpts mailed after March 25. Auditions strings Mon & Tues, May 2 & 3 3-9 pm. Auditions wood­ winds, brass, percussion will be Weds May 4 from 5-9pm. AUDITIONS Hochstein Philharmonia, full symphonic or­ chestra for students grades 6-11


Place your real estate ad by calling 244-3329 ext. 23 or rochestercitynewspaper.com Ad Deadlines: Friday 4pm for Display Ads Monday at noon for Line ads intermediate to advanced level. Application deadline April 30, 2011; excerpts mailed after April 1. Auditions for strings are Mon, May 16 3-9pm. Auditions for wood­ winds, brass, percussion Weds May 18 from 5-9pm.

OUTGROWN SKA-PUNK? Looking for musicians for ska and rock band, especially drummer, singer, horn players. See details at www.myspace. com/mooskamovers or email mooskamovers@aol.com. Craig

BASSOONIST NEEDED. Woodwind quintet is in danger of becoming a quartet. We’ve lost our bassoonist. Enthusiastic amateur group meets during the day. Join us for a rehearsal. 585-244-7895

SITTING HEAVY PRODUCTIONS needs 3 multi-instr-musicians, key­boards, guitar, horns - vocals funk, R & B, Jazz, Blues Originals. Must have equipt. transportation, avail­able evenings Bobby 585-3284121 585-234-1324

CALLING ALL MUSICIANS OF ALL GENRES - the Rochester Music Coalition wants you! Please register on our website. For further info: www.rochestermusiccoalition. org. info@rochestermusiccoalition. org. 585-235-8412

THE CHORUS OF THE GENESEE (CoG) has openings in all voice parts. The CoG performs a wide va­ riety of musical styles from barber­ shop to Broadway, to patriotic and religious. Men of all ages. Contact Ed Rummler at 585-385-2698.

DREAM ENGINE seeks musicians for musical/poetry artist collabora­ tion. Blues/jazz/funk/rock influenc­es. All instruments. Talent, creativ­ity, improv skills required for non- commercial, performance art en­semble. Practice Tuesday nights. Chris 585-472-9971

VOCALIST WANTED retro dance/ pop/ ballads, experi­ enced,professional, good range,

DRUMMER NEEDED NOW for es­tablished industrial metal cover band., Heated secure practice space. No rental or utility fees. Call 58/5-621-5488 DRUMMER NEEDED for rock band. Fast, basic style prefered. Regular rehearsals and play occa­ sional shows 585-482-5942 LEAD GUITAR PLAYER needed for established hard rock band. Please call 585-621-5488 LOOKING FOR LEAD GUITARIST, rhythm guitarist, & bass player, cover tunes, originals must be reli­able, dependable. Looking for seri­ous musicians 585-473-5089 smoke-freeBrian, Mr. Rochester, Rock Star MEET OTHER MUSICIANS guitar, drummer, horns, male singer - jam & play out. Call Martino 585-266- 6337. MUSICA SPEI Rochester’s sacred Renaissance group. is seeking ex­ perienced singers for the upcoming season. Call Alexandra at 585-4159027 or visit www.musicaspei.org for more details. NEED MULTI INTR playing musi­cians doing strictly originals. Material already established. Must be available evenings, have trans­portation and equipt. Call for au­dition (keyboards, guitars, horns, vocals Contact Bobby 585-328- 4121

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Mind Body Spirit REMOTE ENERGY HEALING Repair tears in energy field, charge chakras, remove negative energy, toxins, static electrics, heavy met­als. Restore Physical body fre­quencies. Psychic clearing. ACamurlu@gmail.com 973.931.7137 (AAN CAN)

continues on page 39

You Too Can Go To Harvard 1059 Harvard Street Built in 1930, this Colonial Revival house is modestly sized, beautifully restored, and invitingly ready to move into. Its carved front door opens to a tiny, tiled vestibule. The main hall and living room have warm, original wood trim, and golden wood floors run throughout. To one side of the main hall, the narrow living room has a wood-burning fireplace framed by leaded windows. Along one wall, French doors open to a porch that spans the front of the house. The wooden porch swing hints at pleasant summer evenings to come. Across the hall, sliding pocket doors with ornate leaded glass lead to the blue dining room with its white-coffered ceiling, built-in corner cabinet and bay window. The kitchen, crisply painted in grey and white, has sharp stainless steel appliances and an eating nook with corner windows. A powder room with vintage sink and corner medicine cabinet is off the hall. The basement has laundry and workshop areas, and new glass block windows. Upstairs are four bright bedrooms. The master bedroom is graced with a sunny bay window; a smaller bedroom has its own tiny sleeping porch. All have closets. The tastefully remodeled main bath is cheery yellow with a black and white tile floor and new white fixtures. The third floor features a small, wonderful main room with exposed wooden beams and slanting ceilings, ideal for guests

or an office. Also here is a private bathroom with claw-footed tub, and some unfinished attic storage space. The back yard is fully fenced and has a paver patio with a stone retaining wall. Steps lead up to a garden with trees against the high back wall. The houses along Harvard St. back onto what is now Highway 490, but was once the bed of the Erie Canal until 1920. When this house was built, the Rochester Subway was operating in the same location, and had a stop at nearby Colby Street (for a view of this station, go to www.vintageviews.org/vv-tl/ Photos/pages/colby_station.html). 1059 Harvard Street is located among the “ABC streets” of the quiet eastern end of the Park Avenue neighborhood. For more information on this tree-lined residential neighborhood, with its lively shops and cafes, see www. rochestercityliving.com/neighborhoods/parkave. Wegmans and other amenities are a short walk away, including the pedestrian bridge to Cobbs Hill Park. This 1,761 square feet home (not including the third floor) is listed at $144,900 by Mark Siwiec, (585) 218-6825. For more information and photos, go to http:// rochestercityliving.com/property/R150745. by Rebecca Webb Becca Webb lives in the Park Avenue area and is member of the Landmark Society.

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Save $25-$300 per unit on select Hunter Douglas window fashions. Hunter Douglas offers an array of attractive colors, fabrics and styles for creating inviting living spaces. With their enduring craftsmanship and energy-efficient designs, they present exceptional value - smart style that’s energy smart, too. And, now you can enjoy smart savings from January 14 through April 29, 2011 with mail-in rebates on select styles. Ask us for details. Decorating • Fabrics • Area Rugs • Blinds • Window Treatments Todd L Perkins • 585.473.1127 Tperkins2000@aol.com www.toddperkinsdesigns.com

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Music Services BASS LESSONS Acoustic, electric, all styles. Music therory and com­ position for all instruments. Former Berklee and Eastman Teacher. For more information, call 413-1896

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IF YOU’RE A GAY, bi, curious, or versatile kind-of-guy, age 18-50, and HIV-negative, you may qualify to take part in an important medical research study at the University of Rochester Medical Center. Participants will be paid an average

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PIANO LESSONS in your home or mine. Patient, experienced in­structor teaching all ages, levels and musical styles. Call Scott: 585- 465-0219. Visit www. scottwrightmusic.com

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CALL FOR INFORMATION AND/OR DEMONSTRATION

1-800-678-2956 R.P.S. Inc. • Taylor Freezer Of Central & Western New York Marcellus, NY 800-678-2956 mnaton@taylor-rps.com

For more information and schedules www.plymouthspiritualistchurch.org Robin Higgins, Pastor ~ Phone: 585.271.1470

Legal Ads [ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of ARC WGGRCNY002, LLC. Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 01/28/11. Office location: Monroe County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 01/24/ 11. Princ. office of LLC: 106 York Rd., Jenkintown, PA 19046. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Corporation Service Co., (CSC), 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207. DE addr. of LLC: c/o CSC, 2711 Centerville Rd., Ste. 400, Wilmington, DE 19808. Arts. of Org. filed with DE Secy. of State, Div. of Corps., 401 Federal St., Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: Any lawful ac­tivity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of ARC WGIRDNY001, LLC. Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 01/28/11. Office location: Monroe County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 01/24/ 11. Princ. office of LLC: 106 York Rd., Jenkintown, PA 19046. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Corporation Service Co., (CSC), 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207. DE addr. of LLC: c/o CSC, 2711 Centerville Rd., Ste. 400, Wilmington, DE 19808. Arts. of Org. filed with DE Secy. of State, Div. of Corps., 401 Federal St., Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: Any lawful ac­tivity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of INDUS REAL ESTATE II LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 02/10/11. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 1170 Pittsford Victor Rd., Pittsford, NY 14534. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful ac­tivity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of IH HOLDING I, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 02/10/11. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 180 Charlotte St., Rochester, NY 14607. SSNY desig­nated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LEILAND OUTLOOK, LLC ] Leiland Outlook, LLC filed Articles of Organization with the NY Secretary of State on March 9, 2011. (1) Its principal office is in Monroe County, New

York. (2) The Secretary of State has been desig­nated as its agent upon whom process against it may be served and its post office address to which the Secretary of State shall mail a copy of any process against it served upon him or her is 471 Reed Road, Churchville, New York 14420 (3) The character or purpose of its business is to engage in any lawful activity for which limited liability companies may be organized under Section 203 of the Limited Liability Company Act. [ NOTICE ] Notice is hereby given that license #3144270 for beer, wine & liquor has been applied for by Torrenelias Inc. dba The McGuiness Pub, 1635 Penfield Rd, Rochester, NY 14625, County of Monroe, Town of Penfield for adding a second bar for public use. [ NOTICE ] Notice is hereby given that license, number not yet assigned, for beer, & wine has been applied for by Rosey H. Pham dba FLAVORS OF ASIA, 831 S. Clinton Avenue, Rochester, NY 14620 County of Monroe, City of Rochester for a Restaurant. [ NOTICE ] Notice is hereby given that license #3010716 for beer & wine has been applied for by Roseys Italian Cafe Inc. dba Rosey’s Italian Cafe, 2133 Five Mile Line Road, Penfield, NY 14526, County of Monroe, Town of Penfield for a restaurant. [ NOTICE ] Notice is hereby given that a license number 3147350 for a full onpremises, liquor, beer and wine license has been applied for by Panorama Restaurant, Inc., dba Panorama Restaurant and Lounge, 730 Elmgrove Road, Rochester NY 14624, County of Monroe, Town of Gates, for a restaurant. [ LEGAL NOTICE TRILLIUM INTERNATIONAL-I CIP, LLC ] Notice of Organization: Trillium International-I CIP, LLC was filed with SSNY on 2/4/11. Office: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. PO ad­dress which SSNY shall mail any process against the LLC served upon him: 1221 Pittsford- Victor Rd., Pittsford, NY 14534. Purpose is to en­gage in any lawful activ­ity. [ LEGAL NOTICE TRILLIUM INTERNATIONAL-I GP, LLC ] Notice of Organization: Trillium International-I GP, LLC was filed with SSNY on 2/4/11. Office: Monroe

cont. on page 41 rochestercitynewspaper.com City 39


I’m very pleased with the calls I got from our apartment rental ads, and will continue running them. Your readers respond — positively!” - M. Smith, Residential Management EMPLOYMENT / CAREER TRAINING

Employment

DELIVER RV TRAILERS FOR PAY! Successful RV transport company seeking pickup owners to deliver RV’s from US to Canada. Paying top rates! www.horizontransport.com/ Canada

DANCERS: PT/FT, Earn BIG $$$$, 18+, no exp. necessary, Tally Ho, 1555 E. Henrietta Rd. Roch. Call 585-424-6190

PAID IN ADVANCE! Make $1000 a Week mailing brochures from home! Guaranteed Income! FREE Supplies! No experience required. Start Immediately! www. homemailerprogram.net (AAN CAN)

MYSTERY SHOPPERS Earn up to $100 per day. Undercover shop­ pers to judge retail & dining estab­ lishments. Experience not required Call 800-488-0524

Volunteers

TRUCK DRIVERS WANTED! 2011 Pay raise! Up to $.52 per mile! Home Weekends! Excellent Benefits! New equipment! Heartland Express 1-800-441-4953 www. heartlandexpress.com

A HORSE’S FRIEND Work with children & Horses, in a local urban program where kids “Saddle Up For Success” 585-503-4087 ahorsesfriend@yahoo.com

$$$HELP WANTED$$$ Extra Income! Assembling CD cases from Home! No Experience Necessary! Call our Live Operators Now! 1-800405-7619 EXT 2450 http:// www. easywork-greatpay.com (AAN CAN)

ADOPTED ADULTS WANTED! Adoption Resource Network at Hillside is looking for a few adults who were adopted to volunteer for the AdoptMent program. AdoptMent matches adult adoptees with children who are somewhere in the adoption process. AdoptMent youth and adults meet as a group and individually for one hour a week from September until June. Training and support are

AIRLINES ARE HIRING- Train for high paying Aviation Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified- Job Placement Assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance (866)296-7093

provided. If you are interested, please call or email Shari Bartlett at 585-3502529, sbartlet@hillside.com. COMPEER’S “50 PROMISED” CAMPAIGN is underway! Volunteers needed to mentor youth experiencing parental incarcera­tion. Spend rewarding time each month doing fun activities. Vehicle needed, training/support provided. Laura Ebert/ Compeer lebert@compeer.org 585546-8280 Ext-117 FOSTER PARENTS WANTED! Monroe County is looking for adults age 21 and over to consider open­ ing their homes to foster children. Call 334-9096 or visit www. MonroeFosterCare.org. FREE DENTAL CLEANING MCC Sophomore Student, needs adult volunteers who have not had a cleaning in 5 plus years. For a free appointment call Sue 585-709- 3593 LITERACY VOLUNTEERS OF ROCHESTER has several 1 hour preview sessions scheduled for anyone interested in becoming a tutor. No prior teaching experience is required. For info call Shelley Alfieri at 585-473-3030

We Are Upsizing!

3 Sales & 2 Management positions available. Leads provided, full comprehensive benefits package, first year $40,000-50,000

MEALS ON WHEELS Needs Volunteers! Do you have an hour and a smile? Deliver meals during lunchtime to homebound neigh­bors. Interested? Call 787-8326 to help. NEED A GOOD TEETH CLEANING? No dental insurance? No Problem! FREE teeth cleanings!! Call MCC Today and ask for Nick. Office: 292.2045 Cell: 831.0365 NEW FIBRO SUPPORT Group is seeking volunteers for all positions, long-term & short-term Call Brenda 585-341-3290 YMCA OMBUDSMAN VOLUNTEERS NEEDED! LIFESPAN If you are a good listener, like resolving prob­lems and want to protect the rights of older individuals in long term care, Call 585244-8400 Ext. 178 THE LUPUS FOUNDATION OF GENESEE VALLEY welcomes vol­ unteers to help weekly, monthly or once a year. We match your inter­ ests with our projects. Each volun­ teer makes a difference. Call Eileen 585-288-2910. VACCINE VOLUNTEERS NEEDED. Consider taking part

in HIV vaccine research studies at the University of Rochester Medical Center. A pre­ventive HIV vaccine can help STOP the global AIDS crisis. If you are HIV negative, healthy and age 18-50, YOU may qualify. Vaccines are syn­thetic and it is IMPOSSIBLE to get HIV from the vaccine. Being in a study is more like donating blood. Participants will be paid an average of $750. For more information, visit www. rochestervictoryalliance.org. To learn if you qualify, or to sched­ule an appointment, call (585) 7562329 (756-2DAY). VOLUNTEERS NEEDED to assist with praise and worship. Living Waters Fellowship is a Christ cen­tered nondenominational church in the early stages of development. Individuals, groups, and musicians are welcomed. Call 585-957-6155. VOLUNTEERS OF AMERICA is re­cruiting committed individuals to help with monthly birthday parties for homeless children, afterschool clubs at the Children’s Center and to sort books for the E-Bay sales division. 585-6471150 for or vis­it www.voawny.org.

Senior Vice President & Chief Human Resources Officer

Requires a human resources professional with a minimum of 10 years of experience, with at least 5 years in a management role, who will be able to strategically and tactically evaluate and implement sophisticated HR related programs and initiatives; be able to work with a variety of organizational leadership to build consensus around HR strategy and tactics; have a demonstrated background in talent management and leadership management; along with a proven ability to attract and retain outstanding talent and assemble and motivate high performance teams. The selected candidate must have the ability to bring immediate credibility to the human resources function through his/her professional qualifications and leadership skills as well as project the highest levels of integrity. Superior interpersonal communication and presentation skills as well as proven organizational skills are required. BA/BS degree from an accredited college/university. MBA/MA/PHR or SPHR preferred. Certification in MBTI a plus. If you are looking for a great opportunity to develop and implement HR strategy, work for an organization that believes in work/life balance for employees and creates change in our community, please send your cover letter, resume and salary requirements to humanresources@team.uwrochester.org or Human Resources, United Way of Greater Rochester, 75 College Ave., Rochester NY 14607 by March 18, 2011.

40 City march 16-22, 2011

DO YOU EARN $800 in a day? Your Own Local Candy Route! 25 machines and candy All for $9995. 877-915-8222 All Major Credit Cards Accepted!

Career Training CDLA Training (Tractor Trailer) See the country, experience new chal­lenges Learn to Earn $36-$45,000 avr 1st year (per grad employers) Conditional pre-hires (prior to training), financial aid, housing if qualified._ National Tractor Trailer School Liverpool or Buffalo, NY Branch 1-888-243-9320 www.ntts.edu

SEEKING ONE OUTSTANDING SALES PROFESSIONAL. MUST BE ASSERTIVE, OUTGOING, SMART, IMAGINATIVE AND CONFIDENT. SALES EXPERIENCE AND PROVEN RECORD OF SALES ACHIEVEMENT A MUST. NEWSPAPER/MEDIA SALES A DEFINITE PLUS. SALARY PLUS COMMISSION PLUS BENEFITS.

SEND RESUME TO: Betsy Matthews, City Newspaper, 250 N. Goodman St., Rochester, NY 14607 OR EMAIL TO: bmatthews@rochester-citynews.com

Home Health Aides Make a Difference! Responsible for providing leadership in developing and executing human resources strategy that aligns with overall strategic direction of the organization, specifically in the areas of succession planning, talent management, change management, organizational and performance management, training and development, and compensation. Providing strategic leadership by articulating human resource needs and plans to members of the leadership team.

AGENCY OPPORTUNITIES Available NOW... Be an Allstate Agency Owner. No company out there offers a fasterto-market op­portunity like Allstate. Join one of the most recognized brands in American To find out how call 1- 877-711-1015 or visit www. allstateagent.com

ADVERTISING SALES OPPORTUNITY

Contact Ed Hanna (716) 998-8478 Ed.Hanna@combined.com

United Way of Greater Rochester

Business Opportunities

HCR Home Care has been making a difference for over 30 years by providing superior home health services in the comfort of our patients’ homes! Become part of our legacy!

Why HCR? • Start a career with health care • Competitive Wages • Respectful work environment • Employee Stock Ownership Program

• Free HHA training and certification • Mileage reimbursement • Health/Dental insurance • Flexible schedule

Immediate need for full- and part-time weekend aides (work 32 hours, get paid for 40!), and on-call aides. Other select shifts available! Apply now at www.HCRhealth.com Mail resume to: HCR Home Care at: 85 Metro Park, Rochester, NY 14623 You may also fax to 585-272-8871 Must be 18 years old and have a reliable vehicle.

EOE/AAP

ROUTE SERVICE DRIVER M-F 8:00am-4:30pm

Responsible for driving and Transporting materials to/from Customer’s locations to shredding Operation. Acts as primary point of Contact for CSS directly with the customer. $9.54-$13.51 per hr. May be required To Drive overnights per month. Benefits Include; Medical, Dental, Retirement, Tuition reimbursement, and other incentives to qualified applicants High School diploma or equivalent Must have a clean/valid NYS Drivers License and meet LAI Vehicle Operator Requirements. Must be able to Consistently lift up to125 lbs. and Be able to push/pull up to 250 lbs As needed. Must pass drug-screening test. Apply online www.lifetimeassistance.org or visit us at Lifetime Assistance Inc 425 Paul Road, Rochester, NY 14624 585-426-4120 EOE


Legal Ads > page 39 County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. PO ad­dress which SSNY shall mail any process against the LLC served upon him: 1221 Pittsford- Victor Rd., Pittsford, NY 14534. Purpose is to en­gage in any lawful activ­ity. [ LEGAL NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of a Limited Liability Company (LLC): M. WERKLER PROPERTIES, LLC, Articles of Organization filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 02/01/2011. Office Location: Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom pro­cess against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to: C/O M. WERKLER PROPERTIES LLC, 160 Cedarwood Office Park, Fairport, NY 14450. Purpose: Any Lawful Purpose. [ LEGAL NOTICE ] ALTON WOODLANDS FAMILY L.P. filed a Certificate of Limited Partnership in New York on February 11, 2011. The Partnership’s office is in Monroe County. The Secretary of State had been named as agent for service of process against the partnership and shall mail such pro­cess to 124 Moul Road, Hilton, New York 14468. The name and business address of the general partner is available from the Secretary of State, The partnership will dis­solve on or before December 31, 2040. The L.P. is formed to carry on any business for which a limited partnership may be formed in New York. [ NOTICE OF SALE ] Index No. 2010-10751 SUPREME COURT STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF MONROE ESL Federal Credit Union,Plaintiff vs Kenneth S. Palumbo; Stacy L. Vaiana, a/k/a Stacy Palumbo; Capital One Bank; ESL Federal Credit Union, Defendants. Pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale dated February 16, 2011 and entered herein, I, the undersigned, the Referee in said Judgment named, will sell at public auction in the front vestibule of the Monroe County Office Building, 39 West Main Street, Rochester, New York, County of Monroe, on March 30, 2011 at 2:00 p.m., on that day, the premises directed by said Judgment to be sold and therein described as follows: ALL THAT TRACT OR PARCEL OF LAND, situate in the Town of Greece, County of Monroe and State of New York, known and described as Lot Number 46 of the Picturesque Acres Subdivision Section Number 5, as shown on a map of said subdivision filed in the Monroe County Clerk’s Office on March 2, 1962, in Liber 153 of

Maps, at page 5. Said Lot Number 46 fronts 90 feet on the south side of El Mar Drive in said subdivision, is the same width in rear and 150 feet in depth throughout, all as shown on said map. The grantor herein also conveys to the grantee the right to use El Mar Drive, Picturesque Drive, and Marie Elaina Drive as a means of ingress and egress to and from Mt. Read Boulevard, which streets are shown on the maps of Picturesque Acres Subdivision, Sections Nos. 5, 3, 2 and 1, filed in the Monroe County Clerk’s Office which said streets the grantor reserves the right to dedicate to the Town of Greece, New York. Tax Account No. 060.051-4 Property Address: 220 El Mar Drive, Town of Greece, New York Said premises are sold subject to any state of facts an accurate survey may show, zoning re­strictions and any amendments thereto, covenants, restrictions, agreements, reserva­tions, and easements of record and prior liens, if any, municipal depart­mental violations, and such other provisions as may be set forth in the Complaint and Judgment filed in this action. Judgment amount: $83,910.08 plus, but not limited to, costs, dis­ bursements, attorney fees and additional al­lowance, if any, all with legal interest. DATED: February 2011 Aaron J. Sperano, Esq., Referee LACY KATZEN LLP Attorneys for Plaintiff 130 East Main Street Rochester, New York 14604 Telephone: (585) 324-5767 [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF MP-OE LLC ] MP-OE LLC filed Arts of Org with NYS on 2/14/11. Its principal office is in Monroe County, New York. The Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) has been designated as its agent and the post of­fice address to which the SSNY shall mail a copy of any process against it is c/o the LLC, 39 Keswick Way, Fairport, NY 14450. Purpose: Any lawful pur­pose. [ NOTICE OF SALE ] Index No. 2010-6805 SUPREME COURT STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF MONROE ESL Federal Credit Union, Plaintiff vs. Any persons who are heirs or distributees of George H. Ochenrider, Deceased, and all per­sons who are wives, wid­ows, grantees, mortga­gees, lienors, heirs, de­visees distributees, suc­cessors in interest of such of them as may be deceased, and their hus­bands, wives, heirs, de­visees, distributees and successors of interest all of whom and whose names and places of res­idence are unknown to Plaintiff; People of the State of New York; United States of America; “John Doe” and/ or “Mary Roe”, Defendants.

Pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale dated February 17, 2011 and entered herein, I, the undersigned, the Referee in said Judgment named, will sell at public auction in the front vestibule of the Monroe County Office Building, 39 West Main Street, Rochester, New York, County of Monroe, on March 31, 2011 at 10:00 a.m., on that day, the premises directed by said Judgment to be sold and therein described as follows: ALL THAT TRACT OR PARCEL OF LAND, situ­ ate in the City of Rochester, County of Monroe, and State of New York, known and described as follows: Beginning at the north­west corner of Beach and Jewell Streets and extending northerly in the west line of Jewell Street a distance of Sixty-four (64) feet to a point; thence westerly in a line parallel with the north line of Beach Street a dis­tance of fifty-four (54) feet; thence southerly a distance of sixtyfour (64) feet to the northerly line of Beach Street; thence easterly a distance of fif­tyfour (54) feet to the place of beginning. Tax Acct. No. 091.61-3-16 Property Address: 50 Beach Street, City of Rochester, New York Said premises are sold subject to any state of facts an accurate survey may show, zoning re­strictions and any amendments thereto, covenants, restrictions, agreements, reserva­tions, and easements of record and prior liens, if any, municipal depart­mental violations, and such other provisions as may be set forth in the Complaint and Judgment filed in this action. Judgment amount: $22,405.90 plus, but not limited to, costs, dis­ bursements, attorney fees and additional al­lowance, if any, all with legal interest. James M. Byrnes., Esq., Referee LACY KATZEN LLP Attorneys for Plaintiff 130 East Main Street Rochester, New York 14604 Telephone: (585) 324-5767 [ NOTICE OF SALE ] Index No. 2010-9210 SUPREME COURT STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF MONROE ESL Federal Credit Union, Plaintiff, vs.Wilson S. Sheffet; Dawn S. Sheffet; New York State Commissioner of Taxation and Finance; United States of America; Brittany Sheffet,Defendants. Pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale dated February 23, 2011 and entered herein, I, the undersigned, the Referee in said Judgment named, will sell at public auction in the front vestibule of the Monroe County Office Building, 39 West Main Street, Rochester, New York, County of Monroe, on March 31, 2011 at 10:30 a.m., on that day, the premises directed by said Judgment to be sold and therein described as follows: ALL THAT TRACT OR PARCEL OF LAND, situ­ ate in the Town of Ogden, County of Monroe and State of New York, bounded

and described as follows: Beginning at a point in the center line of Ogden Center Road which is approximately 302.70 feet east of the west boundary of the Amos Irish Farm and which point is the south­west corner of property conveyed by said Amos H. Irish to Pat De Croce, Jr. by deed recorded in Monroe County Clerk’s Office in Liber 4077 of Deeds, page 548; thence north along the west line of the De Croce property a distance of 400 feet to an iron pipe at the north­west corner of the De Croce property; thence west at right angles a dis­tance of 100 feet to an iron pipe; thence south at right angles a distance of 400 feet to the center line of Ogden Center Road; thence east along the center line of Ogden Center Road a distance of 100 feet to the place of beginning, in accordance with a map dated September 25, 1970 made by Elwood D. Dobbs, Licensed Surveyor. Tax Account Number 102.011- 26Property Address: 102 Ogden Center Road, Town of Ogden, NY Said premises are sold subject to any state of facts an accurate survey may show, zoning re­strictions and any amendments thereto, covenants, restrictions, agreements, reserva­tions, and easements of record and prior liens, if any, municipal depart­mental violations, and such other provisions as may be set forth in the Complaint and Judgment filed in this action. Judgment amount: $113,502.56 plus, but not limited to, costs, dis­bursements, attorney fees and additional al­lowance, if any, all with legal interest. Charles Pilato, Esq., Referee LACY KATZEN LLP Attorneys for Plaintiff 130 East Main Street Rochester, New York 14604 Telephone: (585) 324-5767 [ NOTICE OF SALE ] Index No. 2010-11623 SUPREME COURT STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF MONROE ESL Federal Credit Union, Plaintiff, vs. Deborah L. Curthoys, Defendants. Pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale dated February 23, 2011 and entered herein, I, the undersigned, the Referee in said Judgment named, will sell at public auction in the front vestibule of the Monroe County Office Building, 39 West Main Street, Rochester, New York, County of Monroe, on March 30, 2011 at 1:30 p.m., on that day, the premises directed by said Judgment to be sold and therein described as follows: ALL THAT TRACT OR PARCEL OF LAND, situ­ate in the Town of Perinton, County of Monroe and State of New York, being a part of the Lot 42 in said Town and more particularly de­scribed as Lot 7 of the Whitney Farms Subdivision, Section 1, as shown on a map thereof

filed in Monroe County Clerk’s Office in Liber 168 of Maps, page 53. Said Lot 7 is situate on the north side of Whitney Road and is of the di­mensions as shown on said map. Tax Account No. 153.05-2-53 Property Address: 1132 Whitney Road East, Town of Perinton, New York Said premises are sold subject to any state of facts an accurate survey may show, zoning re­strictions and any amendments thereto, covenants, restrictions, agreements, reserva­tions, and easements of record and prior liens, if any, municipal depart­mental violations, and such other provisions as may be set forth in the Complaint and Judgment filed in this action. Judgment amount: $128,127.62 plus, but not limited to, costs, dis­ bursements, attorney fees and additional al­lowance, if any, all with legal interest. George A. Schell, Jr., Esq., Referee LACY KATZEN LLP Attorneys for Plaintiff 130 East Main Street Rochester, New York 14604 Telephone: (585) 324-5767 [ NOTICE OF SALE ] SUPREME COURT STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF MONROE ESL Federal Credit Union, Plaintiff, vs. Paul M. Meyer; Kathleen R. Moran; ESL Federal Credit Union; “John Doe” and/or”Mary Roe”,Defendants,Index No. 2010-9211 Pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale dated February 17, 2011 and entered herein, I, the undersigned, the Referee in said Judgment named, will sell at public auction in the front vestibule of the Monroe County Office Building, 39 West Main Street, Rochester, New York, County of Monroe, on April 6, 2011 at 9:00 a.m., on that day, the premises directed by said Judgment to be sold and therein described as fol­lows: ALL THAT TRACT OR PARCEL OF LAND, situ­ate in the Town of Irondequoit, County of Monroe and State of New York, known and de­scribed as follows: The southerly part of Lot 39, Huntington Hills Tract, as shown on a map of said Huntington Hills Tract, filed in the Monroe County Clerk’s Office in Liber 49 of Maps, page 16 and 17. Said southerly part of Lot 39 is more particularly described as follows: Commencing at a point distant 122.53 feet southerly of the north line of Lot 39 as measured along a road or lane lying to the east of said Lot 39. Said point of commenc­ing being further de­scribed as distant 122.53 feet southerly of the northeast corner of Lot 39; thence westerly along a line 120 feet southerly of the north line of Lot 39 and parallel to said north line of Lot 39 a distance of 267.19 feet to the east line of Hoffman road thence southerly along the east

line of Hoffman Road a distance of 115.94 feet to a point of curvature; thence con­tinuing southerly along the east line of Hoffman Road a distance of 141.60 feet to a point; thence continuing south­erly along the east line of Hoffman Road 98.65 feet to the point of intersec­tion of the east line of Hoffman Road with the northerly line of a lane or right of way shown on said tract map; thence along the northerly line of said lane or right of way and forming an interior angle of 50º 9’, a dis­tance of 109.74 feet to a point of curvature; thence continuing along the northwesterly and westerly side of said lane or right of way, a distance of 62.46 feet to a point; thence continuing north­erly along the westerly line of said lane or right of way a distance of 184.06 feet to the place of be­ginning. Excepting, how­ever and reserving right of way and easement re­served in Liber 2623 of Deeds at page 351. ALSO ALL THAT TRACT OR PARCEL OF LAND, situate, lying and being in the Town of Irondequoit, County of Monroe, State of New York, being the extreme southerly portion of Lot 39, Huntington Hills Tract, as shown on a map of said tract filed in the Monroe County Clerk’s Office in Liber 49 of Maps, page 16 and 17, bounded and de­scribed as follows: Commencing at the point of intersection of the south line of Lot 39 with the east line of Hoffman Road; thence northeast­erly along a lane or road­way and forming an inte­rior angle of 55º 53’ 45” a distance of 124.78 feet along the easterly line of said roadway to a point; thence continuing on a curve having a radios of 79.52 feet along the southerly line of a road or lane to a point distant 201.22 feet northwesterly from the southeast cor­ner of Lot 39, measured along the southerly line of a road or lane to the southeast corner of Lot 39; thence westerly along the south line of Lot 39 a distance of 331.86 feet to the place of beginning, excepting and reserving however, from said last above described parcel so much of the southerly portion of Lot 39, as was conveyed for the purpose of laying a road or lane ly­ing northerly of said par­cel above described by instrument recorded in the Monroe County Clerk’s Office in Liber 2418 of Deeds page 365. Also conveying that par­cel in the Town of Irondequoit, County of Monroe, State of New York, which is the frac­tional share in and to the Common Areas and for­mer Garden Plots as pro­vided in Conveyance of Common Areas of Hunting Hills Subdivision to Owners of Residential Lots therein dated April 28, 1976 and recorded in Monroe County Clerk’s Office in Liber 5015 of Deeds, page 67. Tax Acct. No.: 077.06-1-10

Property Address: 478 Hoffman Road, Town of Irondequoit, New York Said premises are sold subject to any state of facts an accurate survey may show, zoning re­strictions and any amendments thereto, covenants, restrictions, agreements, reserva­tions, and easements of record and prior liens, if any, municipal depart­mental violations, and such other provisions as may be set forth in the Complaint and Judgment filed in this action. Judgment amount: $148,737.23 plus, but not limited to, costs, dis­ bursements, attorney fees and additional al­lowance, if any, all with legal interest. DATED: March 2011 Adrian J. Burke, Esq., Referee LACY KATZEN LLP Attorneys for Plaintiff 130 East Main Street Rochester, New York 14604 Telephone: (585) 324-5767 [ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] Name: Brochures Unlimited Advertising LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Secretary of State of New York(SSNY) on 12/15/2010. Office Location: Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom pro­cess against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to: The LLC, 340 Parma-Center Rd., Hilton, NY 14468.Purpose: Any Lawful Purpose. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LAST TOOL FACTORY LLC ] Last Tool Factory LLC (the “LLC”) filed Articles of Organization with the NY Department of State on March 9, 2011, pur­ suant to Section 203 of the NY Limited Liability Company Law. The office of the LLC is located in Monroe County, NY. The principal business loca­tion of the LLC is 55 Fessenden Street, Rochester, NY. The NY Secretary of State has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served and the Secretary of State has been directed to forward service of process to 55 Fessenden Street, Rochester, NY. The pur­pose of the LLC is to en­gage in any lawful busi­ness purpose for which limited liability companies may be organized under the law. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LLC ] Pizzeria 5, LLC has filed articles of organization with the New York Secretary of State on March 8, 2011 with an effective date of forma­tion of March 8, 2011. Its principal place of busi­ness is located at 697 Audley End, Webster, New York in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designat­ed as agent upon whom process may be served. A copy of any process shall be mailed to 697 Audley End, Webster, New York 14580. The purpose of the LLC is to engage in any lawful

ac­tivity for which Limited Liability Companies may be organized under Section 203 of the New York Limited Liability Company Law. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of limited liability company (LLC). Name: THYROFF PORTSMOUTH, LLC. Articles of Organization filed with Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on January 21, 2011. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of pro­cess to: 16 Van Buren Road, Pittsford, NY 14534. Purpose: Any lawful act or activity. Loren H. Kroll, LLC. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of ATTN Enterprise, LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 1/7/11. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of pro­cess to 1615 Long Pond Rd., Rochester, NY 14626. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of ARC WGGRCNY001, LLC. Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 01/28/11. Office location: Monroe County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 01/24/ 11. Princ. office of LLC: 106 York Rd., Jenkintown, PA 19046. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Corporation Service Co. (CSC), 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207. DE addr. of LLC: c/o CSC, 2711 Centerville Rd., Ste. 400, Wilmington, DE 19808. Arts. of Org. filed with DE Secy. of State, Div. of Corps., 401 Federal St., Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: Any lawful ac­tivity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of DAMIAN PROPERTIES LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 1/21/ 2011. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 1101 Telephone Road, Rush NY 14543. Purpose: Any lawful act. [ NOTICE ] 31 ERIE LLC, a domes­tic Limited Liability Company (LLC), filed with the Sec of State of NY on 1/18/11. NY Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom pro­cess against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of any pro­cess against the LLC served upon him/her to James Zisovski, 1 Main St., Brockport, NY 14420. General Purposes.

cont. on page 42

rochestercitynewspaper.com City 41


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Legal Ads > page 41 [ NOTICE ] 51 MONROE LLC, a do­mestic Limited Liability Company (LLC), filed with the Sec of State of NY on 1/18/11. NY Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom pro­cess against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of any pro­cess against the LLC served upon him/her to James Zisovski, 1 Main St., Brockport, NY 14420. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] Not. of Form. of Senior Home Connection LLC, Art. Of Org. filed NY Sec’y of State (SSNY) 1/27/11 Office Location: Monroe County SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of any process to LLC. 223 Darla Drive, Brockport, NY 14420. Purpose: Any lawful activity [ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of CFC Holdings LLC. Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 1/20/11. Office location: Monroe County. LLC formed in Wisconsin (WI) on 2/23/10. SSNY desig­nated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o National Registered Agents, Inc., 875 Ave. of the Americas, Ste. 501, NY, NY 10001, also the reg­istered agent. Principal office address: 2600 Fernbrook Lane, Ste. 138, Plymouth, MN 55447. Address to be maintained in WI: c/o Lakeview Equity Partners, LLC, 700 North Water St., Ste. 630, Milwaukee, WI 53202. Arts of Org. filed with WI Secy. Of State, 345 W. Washington Ave., Madison, WI 53703. Purpose: any lawful ac­tivities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Groove Juice Swing LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 1/6/11. Office location: Monroe Co. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o National Registered Agents, Inc., 875 Avenue of the Americas, Ste. 501, NY, NY 10001, also the reg­ istered agent. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] NOTICE OF FORMATION OF A LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY. The name of the limited liability com­pany is Dead Ringer, LLC (“LLC”). Articles of Organization filed with Secretary of State of NY (“SSNY”) on 01/24/2011. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom pro­cess against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of any process to The LLC, 1500 Jefferson

42 City march 16-22, 2011

Road, Rochester, New York 14623. Purpose: To engage in any lawful ac­tivity. Principal business location: 1500 Jefferson Road, Rochester, New York 14623. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of, MAGICAL PHONES, LLC Art. of Organization filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 12/ 13/10. Office of Location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 45 Exchange Blvd. Rochester, NY 14614. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Colossal Coating, LLC, Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 10/ 27/10. Office in Monroe Co. SSNY design. agent of LLC upon whom pro­cess may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 129 Roslyn St., Rochester, NY 14619, which is also the principal; location. Purpose: Any lawful pur­pose. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Arcuri Contractors, LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 2/4/11. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of pro­cess to 45 Waldo Ave., Rochester, NY 14609. Purpose: any lawful ac­tivities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Innovative Contracting Services, LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 2/1/11. Office lo­cation: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 276 Gnage Lane, Rochester, NY 14612. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Not. Of Form. Of Wolf Clan LLC Art. Of Org. filed with Sec’y of the State of NY (SSNY) 1/31/ 11. County: Monroe. SSNY is designated agent of LLC to whom process may be served. SSNY may mail a copy of any process to LLC, P.O. Box 92614 Rochester, NY 14692. Purpose: any law­ful activity.

LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 1/ 28/11. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 2890 Church Rd., Hamlin, NY 14464. Purpose: any lawful ac­tivities. [ NOTICE ] NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY. NAME: 2828 BAIRD ROAD, LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 02/16/11. Office lo­cation: Monroe County. SSNY has been desig­nated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to the LLC, 19 Turnberry Lane, Pittsford, New York 14534. Purpose: For any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Paladino Tool Sales, LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 6/ 30/10. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 91 Westcombe Park, West Henrietta, NY 14586. Purpose: any lawful ac­tivities. [ NOTICE ] Not. of Form. of AMAREL PRECISION CONSULTANTS LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 2/4/2011. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY may mail a copy of any process to LLC. 4 Breezewood Ct, Fairport, NY 14450. Purpose: any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of WILLIAM HOLDING BUILDERS, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/17/2010. Office loca­ tion, County of Monroe. SSNY has been desig­nated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 50 Mission Hill Drive, Brockport NY 14420. Purpose: Any lawful act.

[ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of ILLY LLC, Arts. of Org. filled with NY Sec’y of State (SSNY) on 2/9/11. Office location: in Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to 6 Astronaut Dr. Rochester, NY 14609. Purpose: any lawful activities

[ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of BURNING BUSH LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/17/2010. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom pro­cess against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 2139 Westside Drive, Rochester NY 14624- 2007. Purpose: Any law­ful act.

[ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Simply Solar Systems,

[ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of limited liability company

(LLC). Name: THYROFF AURORA, LLC. Articles of Organization filed with Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on January 31, 2011. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to: 16 Van Buren Road, Pittsford, NY 14534. Purpose: Any lawful act or activity. Loren H. Kroll, LLC. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of CHARWOOD COMMERCIAL REALTY, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 02/23/11. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 90 Air Park Dr., Ste. 400, Rochester, NY 14624. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to The Parrinello Law Firm, LLP, 36 W. Main St., Ste. 400, Rochester, NY 14614. Purpose: All aspects of commercial real estate. [ NOTICE ] C.A.K.E. Creating Assets and Sharing Knowledge, LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 7/21/2010. Office in Monroe Co. SSNY de­sign. Agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to The LLC 3375 Elmwood Ave Rochester, NY 14610. Purpose: Any lawful ac­tivity. [ NOTICE ] Name: 180 Consulting LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 03/01/2011. Office Location: Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom pro­cess against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to: Gallo & Iacovangelo LLC, 39 State St. STE 700, Rochester, NY 14614. Purpose: Any Lawful Purpose. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of OAKBRIDGE DISTRIBUTION LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 1/4/2011. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom pro­cess against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 284 Cottage St., Rochester NY 14611. Purpose: Any lawful act. [ NOTICE ] TJMJ PROPERTIES, LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 3/3/ 2011. Office in Monroe Co. SSNY desig. agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of pro­cess to 2784 Homestead Rd., #130, Santa Clara, CA 95051. Purpose: Any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of RocNyReInv II, LLC Arts.

of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 1/14/2011. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom pro­cess against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 15 North Mill St., Nyack NY 10960 and the reg. agent at that ad­ dress is Corporate Creations Network Inc.. Purpose: any lawful act. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of RocNyReInv I, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 1/14/2011. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom pro­cess against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 15 North Mill St., Nyack NY 10960 and the reg. agent at that ad­dress is Corporate Creations Network Inc.. Purpose: any lawful act. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of CAMP-ROSSEN LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of N.Y. (SSNY) on 1/19/11. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o Deborah Rossen Knill, 111 Edgemoor Rd., Rochester, NY 14618, registered agent upon whom process may be served. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] TYMAS ENTERPRISES LLC, a domestic Limited Liability Company (LLC), filed with the Sec of State of NY on 1/11/11. NY Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is desig­ nated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of any process against the LLC served upon him/her to Robert Cobb, 53 Sanshorn Dr., Rochester, NY 14617. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Form. of a Limited Liability Company: WL EVERETT, LLC (the “LLC”). Art. of Org. filed with Secretary of the State of NY (SSNY) on 1/28/11. Office loca­tion: Monroe County. SSNY has been desig­nated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, 4 Sawyer Lane, Spencerport, NY 14559. Purpose: any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Rhinecliff Consulting LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 11/3/2010. Office in Monroe Co. SSNY de­sign. Agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to Eileen Lindblom 38 Rhinecliff Drive Rochester, NY 14618. Purpose: Any lawful activity.


Fun

[ rehabilitating mr. wiggles ] BY neil swaab

[ news of the weird ] BY CHUCK SHEPHERD

New York University arts professor Wafaa Bilal had his camera surgically removed in February — the one that was implanted in the back of his skull in November to record, at 60second intervals, the places he had left behind (beamed to and archived by a museum in Qatar). The camera had been mounted under his skin, braced by three titanium posts, but his body very painfully rejected one of the posts, and his temporary solution is to merely tie the camera to the back of his neck (even though that work-around is unsatisfactory to him because it represents a lesspersonal “commitment” to the art). In the future, he said, communication devices like his will routinely be part of our bodies.

The Entrepreneurial Spirit — Till Krautkraemer’s New York City beverage company MeatWater creates dozens of flavors of water for the upscale market of hearty gourmets who would like their daily salads, or shellfish, or goulash from a bottle instead of from a plate. Among his new flavors introduced in January, according to an AOL News report, were poached salmon salad water and a Caribbean shrimp salad water that can double as a vodka mixer. Old standbys include Peking duck water, tandoori chicken water, bangers ‘n’ mash water, and Krautkraemer’s favorite, German sauerbraten water. — Sell What You Know: In December, a company in eastern Ukraine (a country known for hard drinking) announced a “drinking buddy” service in which, for the equivalent of about $18, it would

supply a barroom companion for the evening, “qualified” to discuss politics, sports, women, etc., and even to offer psychological counseling if appropriate. — Not Your Father’s Scotch: (1) The Panamanian company Scottish Spirits recently introduced a straight Scotch whisky in 12-ounce cans, for a market of mobile drinkers who prefer not to invest in a whole bottle. The international Scotch whisky trade association expressed alarm. (2) At Clive’s, of Victoria, British Columbia, Glenfiddich Scotch whisky is only one ingredient in the signature cocktail “Cold Night In,” which, according to a January New York Times review, combines “molecular mixology” and comfort food. An especially buttery grilled-cheese sandwich is soaked overnight in the Scotch, along with Mt. Gay rum and Lillet Blanc wine. Following a brief freeze to congeal any remaining fat, and double-straining, it is ready to serve -- with a celery stick and other garnishments. — “Vulva Original,” from a German company, VivaEros, is the “scent of a beautiful woman,” reported in Harper’s magazine in August 2010, and selling as a fragrance concentrate for the equivalent of about $35 for a small roll-on container. (Its promotional video is of a lavishly photographed gym scene, with a handsome male, observing a beautiful female working out on a stationary bike, followed afterward by the male’s gently sniffing the seat.) “The female smell of intimacy,” promised VivaEros, “triggers sexual attraction and desire,” which men can address “more intensely during self-stimulation.”

[ LAST WEEK’S SOLUTION ON PAGE 37 ]

[ LOVESCOPE ] BY EUGENIA LAST ARIES (March 21-April 19): Get involved in an unusual event or activity and you will attract lots of attention. Someone looking for a serious relationship will stick close to you. You’ll know instantly whether or not this per­ son is right for you. Prospects are looking exceptionally good. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Live and learn. The type of partner you meet this week will end up disappointing you. Expect an overrated opinion, coupled with a great storyteller to sweep you off your feet initially. Unfortunately, the truth will not measure up to what you’ve been led to believe.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): You’ll have more than one partner who interests you this week. As long as you are honest about who you are seeing and what you are looking for, there won’t be a problem. However, if you mislead someone who is truly interested, you aren’t likely to get a second chance. CANCER (June 21-July 22): Brag­ ging on your part or on the part of the person you are attracted to will not bring you closer together. Listen and question rather than boast about what you have to of­ fer. Quiet pursuit and passionate innuendos are all it will take to attract true love.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Nothing will stand between you and an adoring partner, mesmerized by your charming and enter­ taining personality. This is the perfect time to meet someone who can match you on every count spiritually, emotionally, mentally and financially. Pre­ pare to make a promise. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Get out socialize and stop worrying about find “the one” for the time being. It’s when you aren’t looking that someone will waltz into your life and sweep you off your feet. Have fun with friends and engage in the types of activities you enjoy the most.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): The more involved you are with something you feel strongly about or want to reform, the better your chance will be of finding someone who shares your beliefs and values. You need a compatible partner in order to maintain the perfect balance necessary to your emotional well-being. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Don’t feel pressed to find someone or you are likely to be taken advantage of. Work at building a friendship first and slowly work your way into a one-on-one relationship, if it appears that the person you are with is genuine. An insincere gesture is apparent.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Host a party and you will meet someone tagging along with an acquaintance or neighbor. What you have to offer will be out in the open, so focus on what the person who draws you the most has to bring to the table. Instant romance is in the stars. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Nothing will fall into place when it comes to love this week. A misunderstanding will lead to a change of heart or the realization that there are too many obstacles to over­ come to make a go of it with the person you meet.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Someone from your past is likely to want you back. Set some ground rules before you open up emotionally. The sec­ ond time around it has to be for all or nothing. If a commitment is not included in the deal, it’s best to take a pass. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): You may be tricked into a secret affair. Make sure you know the status of the person you meet before you get too involved to back away. Your work and responsibilities will suffer if you get caught up in a love triangle. Spare your heart and move on.

rochestercitynewspaper.com City 43


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44 City march 16-22, 2011


March 16-22, 2011 - CITY Newspaper