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EVENTS: FIRST FRIDAY, DRYDEN RE-OPENS 19 FILM: “DARK SKIES,” “SNITCH” 24 DINING: PRODUCTS MADE IN ROCHESTER

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GUEST COMMENTARY: POVERTY AND THE MINIMUM WAGE

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CROSSWORD, NEWS OF THE WEIRD 35

THE DEFTONES

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FEBRUARY 27 - MARCH 5, 2013 Free

KRISTEN FORD

• •

THEY MIGHT BE GIANTS

Greater Rochester’s Alternative Newsweekly

I THE BELIEVER •

Vol 42 No 25

AND MORE MUSIC, PAGE 12

News. Music. Life.

We don’t worry about limitations.” INDIGO GIRLS INTERVIEW, PAGE 14

Real answers to college debt crisis. FEEDBACK, PAGE 2

Morelle steps into MCC fray. POLITICS, PAGE 6

Drone attack. SOCIAL ART, PAGE 4

Reading is fundamental: Geva’s “Book Club Play.” THEATER REVIEW, PAGE 18

FEATURE | STORY AND PHOTOS BY KATHY LALUK | PAGE 10

Chills, thrills, and gills: ice fishing in Rochester Rochester is obviously known for its icy cold winters. But few would guess that, according to the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation, the Greater Rochester area is home to roughly 2000 sportsmen willing to trek out on frozen ponds, cut through the surface ice, and try to catch a fish on just about any pond or body of water that freezes over between December and March. On a good weekend, if conditions are right, you can easily find anywhere from 100 to

200 ice fishermen just on Sodus Bay — and just about as many on the next waterway and the next after that. Read on to learn about how this sport with ancient roots has changed — or not — with modern technology, how local anglers mitigate the sometimes treacherous conditions, and why they risk life and limb. (Pictured: local ice fisherman Tim Thomas on Hundred Acre Pond at Mendon Ponds Park.)


Feedback READ CITY ONLINE EVERY WEEK AT www.issuu.com/roccitynews

We welcome your comments. Send them to themail@rochester-citynews. com, or post them on our website, rochestercitynewspaper.com, our Facebook page, or our Twitter feed, @roccitynews. Comments of fewer than 350 words have a greater chance of being published, and we do edit selections for publication in print. We don’t publish comments sent to other media.

Students and college loans

Tim Macaluso’s recent article ignores the real issues behind massive student debt. Instead of parroting college administrators in blaming parents and students for their poor choices and lack of “financial discipline,” it might have mentioned this vicious cycle: Colleges have been able to inflate tuition costs way beyond even health-care costs because of the government-subsidized student loans themselves. The market for higher education would surely have dropped in the face of outrageous price increases, deterring students from going to college. But students can get subsidized student loans very easily, which they cobble together to pay staggering tuition costs. Meanwhile the colleges get paid up front, and crippling debt accumulation is the student’s problem. And the “too big to fail” banks who are the middlemen in these subsidized transactions are all too happy to play their role riskfree, since if students default, the banks will be reimbursed by the government. The government can then sell the loan to a collection agency, often owned by the same banks, adding their fees to bloated interest payments. Young people could avoid this rapacious cycle if only they could make a decent living without getting a college degree, but there are few alternatives. Meanwhile, those with their degrees are not coming out with high-paying jobs enabling them to service their debt, since this is the highest unemployment rate for college graduates ever recorded. Compounding this dire situation is this stunning fact: while interest rates are generally at an alltime low, with those on government debt currently pegged at 1.97 2 CITY

FEBRUARY 27 - MARCH 5, 2013

percent, interest rates on federal student loans, set by Congress, remain stuck at 6.8 percent, needlessly and disproportionately burdening students. Even if the entire studentloan machinery won’t be easily dismantled, these exorbitant interest rates can be reduced immediately. And it is in the nation’s best economic interest to do so, since reduced student-loan costs decrease the likelihood of default while stimulating the economy by freeing up income that can be spent in other sectors of the economy. The Center for American Progress has initiated a campaign to pressure Congress to lower student-loan interest rates. Also, the group Occupy Student Debt has organized a “Rolling Jubilee” strategy to buy off student debt, as well as a movement to empower student debtors to commit themselves to a massive nationwide “Debt Strike.” These offer some alternatives to simply blaming the victim or counseling despair. In the words to students from the still vibrant Occupy movement: “You are not a loan.” DOUG NOBLE, ROCHESTER

I almost threw the newspaper across the room (not your fault, City!) when I read U of R Burdick’s quote that a family with $100K income should be able to pay $20K to $25K per year for college costs. To what planet has the U of R campus moved? I’m sure there’s someone in the economics department that can inform Mr. Burdick of what $100K is after taxes –and then point out that $20K to $25K is in the range of 1/3 of actual take home pay. “It’s definitely not the time to go out and buy a house,” Burdick advises. I guess we’ll just live in our cars, then? Or is transportation – like to, you know, work? not as important as going to U of R either? U OF R ALUM

Posted on rochestercitynewspaper.com The investment in a fine arts degree should not be the same as the investment in an engineering degree, plain and simple. Universities need to adapt, because the system is broken in this country. The same way the health care industry is now being forced to adapt because they refused to change their own broken

system. Educators should be proactive about this! KEN APONTE

Posted on rochestercitynewspaper.com

Brighton’s larger than you think

I was startled to read that reviewer James Leach mistakenly placed Yummy Garden at the “epicenter” of Henrietta, because Yummy Garden is located in Brighton, not in Henrietta. Brighton is home to a wide variety of ethnic restaurants, from Amaya to Chen Garden, Fox’s to Seoul House, and many more. It is home to some of Rochester’s classic finedining restaurants, like Max Chophouse and Grinnell’s and to family diners like Charbroil and Jay’s Diner. Brighton is home to MCC, Michelina’s and West Henrietta Road, not just Brighton High School, Mario’s and the 12 Corners. Brighton is diverse, larger than you might think, and full of interesting restaurants. Whether you’re riding in Ellison Park or canoeing on the Erie Canal, shopping on Monroe Avenue or hiking in Corbett’s Glen, you’re enjoying some of the best that Brighton has to offer. Come visit us again soon, and stay for dinner! BILL MOEHLE, BRIGHTON

Moehle is supervisor of the Town of Brighton.

Pittsford and politics

I don’t live in the village of Pittsford, so I don’t have a horse in this race, so to speak (“Rare Political Rancor in Pittsford,” News). I do, however, frequently drive down Monroe Avenue, over the canal bridge, and past where the entrance to this Westport Crossing project would be built. Quite honestly, anyone with the slightest bit of sense can see that any project which would result in dozens (at least) of vehicles exiting this property onto Monroe Avenue (even if mandated to turn south) would result in frequent traffic tieups, as well as collisions from the semi-blind status of that exit. Any attempt to turn north from that property would be a near suicidal experience. ANGELA COOPER

Posted on rochestercitynewspaper.com

News. Music. Life. Greater Rochester’s Alternative Newsweekly February 27 - March 5, 2013 Vol 42 No 25 250 North Goodman Street Rochester, New York 14607-1199 themail@rochester-citynews.com phone (585) 244-3329 fax (585) 244-1126 rochestercitynewspaper.com Publishers: William and Mary Anna Towler Editor: Mary Anna Towler Asst. to the publishers: Matt Walsh Editorial department themail@rochester-citynews.com Features editor: Eric Rezsnyak News editor: Christine Carrie Fien Staff writers: Tim Louis Macaluso, Jeremy Moule Music editor: Willie Clark Music writer: Frank De Blase Calendar editor: Rebecca Rafferty Contributing writers: Paloma Capanna, Casey Carlsen, Roman Divezur, George Grella, Susie Hume, Andy Klingenberger, Dave LaBarge, Kathy Laluk, Michael Lasser, James Leach, Adam Lubitow, Ron Netsky, Dayna Papaleo, Suzan Pero, Rebecca Rafferty, Deb Schleede, David Yockel Jr. Editorial intern: Jason Silverstein Art department artdept@rochester-citynews.com Art director/production manager: Matt DeTurck Designers: Aubrey Berardini, Mark Chamberlin Photographers: Mark Chamberlin, Frank De Blase, Michael Hanlon Advertising department ads@rochester-citynews.com Advertising sales manager: Betsy Matthews Account executives: Nancy Burkhardt, Tom Decker, Annalisa Iannone, William Towler Classified sales representatives: Christine Kubarycz, Tracey Mykins Operations/Circulation info@rochester-citynews.com Circulation manager: Katherine Stathis Distribution: Andy DiCiaccio, David Riccioni, Northstar Delivery, Wolfe News City Newspaper is available free of charge. Additional copies of the current issue may be purchased for $1, payable in advance at the City Newspaper office. City Newspaper may be distributed only by authorized distributors. No person may, without prior written permission of City Newspaper, take more than one copy of each weekly issue. City (ISSN 1551-3262) is published weekly by WMT Publications, Inc. Periodical postage paid at Rochester, NY (USPS 022-138). Send address changes to City, 250 North Goodman Street, Rochester, NY 14607. City is a member of the Association of Alternative Newsweeklies and the New York Press Association. Subscriptions: $35.00 ($30.00 for senior citizens) for one year. Add $10 yearly for out-of-state subscriptions: add $30 yearly for foreign subscriptions. Due to the initial high cost of establishing new subscriptions, refunds for fewer than ten months cannot be issued. Copyright by WMT Publications Inc., 2013 - all rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, photocopying, recording or by any information storage retrieval system without permission of the copyright owner.


GUEST COMMENTARY | BY SUSAN ORR AND JAMES JOHNSON

Partisanship, poverty, and paychecks In his State of the Union address, President Obama issued a challenge: “Tonight, let’s declare that in the wealthiest nation on earth, no one who works full-time should have to live in poverty, and raise the federal minimum wage to $9 an hour.” On this he finds support from Governor Cuomo, who proposes increasing the New York State minimum wage because, among other things, it “reduces poverty.” Conservatives, of course, reject these proposed increases. Raising the minimum wage, they insist, will kill jobs, especially low-wage jobs. Commentator David Brooks made this claim on PBS immediately following the State of the Union address.

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Raising the minimum wage can make many people better off. But it’s unlikely to propel many households out of poverty.”

Susan Orr is assistant professor of political science at SUNY College at Brockport. James Johnson is professor of political science at the University of Rochester. They live in Hamlin. Mary Anna Towler is wrestling with a cold. Her Urban Journal returns next week.

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intervention, the Democratic case is overly optimistic. The federal poverty level for a family of four was $23,050 for 2012. Imagine, as President Obama suggests, we increase the federal minimum wage from $7.25 to $9 an hour. That means a full-time minimum wage worker would earn a gross annual income of $18,720. If she lives on her own, this would sustain her above the federal poverty level for individuals. But if the worker has a family, it obviously falls well short. Our point is not that the president and governor are wrong to recommend raising the minimum wage. Doing so, even to the levels being proposed, can make many people better off. But doing so is quite unlikely to propel many households out of poverty. This hardly is an abstract complaint. It is directly relevant to Rochester where, in 2011, the overall poverty rate stood at over 29 percent and where just over 43 percent of all children lived in poverty. Raising the minimum wage can go some way to mitigating economic hardship in the city. But it would be only a start. It is the least we can do.

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And House Speaker John Boehner quickly tried to puncture the president’s proposal: “When you raise the price of employment, guess what happens? You get less of it. At a time when American people are asking, ‘Where are the jobs?’ why would we want to make it harder for small employers to hire people?” Brooks and Boehner are pushing familiar talking points: minimum-wage legislation has negative consequences and there are better ways to address poverty. As is frequently the case, our politicians and media analysts are roundly mistaken. Consider the conservative reaction. Economists have great difficulty establishing any significant negative relation between modest increases in the minimum wage and declines in employment levels. Moreover, the common claim that low-wage workers are typically teenagers or are working part time – and so not “really” poor – is misleading. Projections conducted by the Economic Policy Institute regarding the impact of a higher federal minimum wage suggest a vast majority of those affected would be over 20. A majority would be women. Most would be working full time. And nearly 30 percent of those affected would be parents. Finally, conservatives often insist that targeted programs like the Earned Income Tax Credit are a better way to alleviate poverty than minimum wage legislation. This too is debatable. On the one hand, such tax policies largely represent a hidden subsidy to employers who are spared the burden of paying reasonable wages. On the other hand, they might actually dampen wages because employers assume, often erroneously, that their workers will be eligible for a tax break. For that reason tax credits are better understood as complementing rather than replacing minimum wage legislation. If conservative skepticism seems merely to mask basic resistance to government

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[ NEWS FROM THE WEEK PAST ]

Students can get condoms

The Rochester school district made condoms available free to high school students. The school board approved the controversial condom policy about a year ago after a 2010 county health report showed that new cases of HIV infection among area school-age youth had increased. Condoms are distributed only by school nurses, and students must complete a health course that includes information about HIV/ AIDS prevention before receiving them. Parents can opt out of having their children participate in the program.

RPO issue back in court

Attorney Eileen Buholtz, who is among the activists challenging the leadership of the Rochester Philharmonic Orchestra, filed a petition against the organization in New York State Supreme Court. The filing questions the legality of the RPO’s January 23 annual meeting and asks that the election held at that meeting be voided.

Minister runs for City Council The Reverend Marlowe Washington of Christ

Community Church announced that he will run for Rochester City Council this year. Washington said he is concerned about the devastating impact poverty and violence has on some neighborhoods. Former Mayor Bill Johnson will chair the campaign. All five at-large council members are up for election in November.

News SOCIAL ART | BY REBECCA RAFFERTY

College Town gets tax package

Domestic violence

The Monroe County Industrial Development Agency approved sales and mortgage tax exemptions for the $60.8 million College Town mixed-use development on Mount Hope Avenue. It also approved property tax exemptions to be offset by a payment-in-lieuof-taxes agreement.

Rochester’s Olympic surprise

The US Olympic Committee sent 35 cities, including Rochester, a letter asking if they’d be interested in hosting the 2024 Games. Rochester’s answer: probably not. Mounting a bid to host the Games would be very expensive and the city probably wouldn’t be able to meet infrastructure needs, such as 45,000 available hotel rooms, said a city spokesperson.

UR Senior Lecturer Heather Layton at work on the drone replica she and Nazareth Professor Brian Bailey have created. PHOTO BY J. ADAM FENSTER / UNIVERSITY OF ROCHESTER

Two Rochester artists have constructed an 18-foot-long rhinestone-laden replica of a US Predator drone, which will be shown as part of a multimedia exhibit opening Friday, March 1, at the Hampden Gallery at the University of Massachusetts Amherst. The installation, “Home Drone,” asks audiences to consider what life is like for people in Pakistan, Yemen, and Afghanistan living under the threat of US drone strikes, and to visualize living under the those same conditions. The creators of the project are Heather Layton, internationally known social intervention artist and senior lecturer at the University of Rochester, and Brian Bailey, professor of adolescence education with a focus on social justice at Nazareth College. Through their work, the artists say they seek to challenge xenophobia and consumerism and to shed light on the physical devastation as well as the psychologically terrorizing effect of living under the daily threat of sudden death or loss of loved ones. The artists hope to encourage peaceful relationships between people

in America and Pakistan with the drone replica, which in its appearance alludes both to American opulence and to the violence that supports it. “After visiting Pakistan, this topic became particularly important to us as we started to realize these drones are attacking people we now consider our friends,” Layton stated in a press release. The Amherst exhibit will also include videos of the 2012 presidential candidates debating drone strikes and of civilians protesting the strikes, as well as a massive map of drone attack sites superimposed over a drawing of Massachusetts, with images of American civilian casualties who would be killed along with drone targets. The American strikes begin with Boston, historically the center for rebels during the American Revolution. The artists chose Massachusetts partly for this reason, and hope to travel the exhibit in the future. More information on the exhibit is available at 413-545-0680 and rochester.edu/news.

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More offices and retail space and a 10-unit residential condominium building are planned for the land adjacent to the World War I-era armory on Culver Road. Developer Fred Rainaldi says he hopes to have the project completed by early next year.

Cost of War ROCHESTER TOTALS — The following people have been killed in the City of Rochester in recent weeks: -- Adjaukumar Graham, 31, Rochester. SOURCE: Rochester Police Department AFGHANISTAN TOTALS —

DEVELOPMENT | BY JEREMY MOULE

NEIGHBORHOODS | BY TIM LOUIS MACALUSO

Culver Armory, phase 2 The developer of the Culver Road Armory hopes to add a 40,000-square-foot commercial building and a five-story, 10-unit residential building to his complex, filling out his plans for the 10.4-acre site. For the commercial building, Fred Rainaldi Jr. plans a mix of professional offices and retail space in a 30,000-square-foot, two-story addition to an existing 10,000-square-foot structure southwest of the main building. The façade would include a mix of cedar and glass to complement the brick, cedar, and glass exterior of the main armory building. Each unit in the condominium would be about 2,300 square feet, with four spaces of parking: two underground and two above ground. The exterior would be a mix of natural stone and glass, and each unit would have two or three bedrooms and at least two balconies. City officials say the units will be priced at about $375,000 to $425,000, although Rainaldi declined to confirm pricing at the meeting. The building’s entrance would be on Belmont Street. Most of the residents who attended a neighborhood meeting last week seemed impressed with Rainaldi’s presentation, but some did have a few concerns. For example, one resident asked about the height of the condominiums. Rainaldi said they would be 72 feet tall: the commercial building would be

I-Square gets incentives

The Culver Road Armory. PHOTO BY MARK CHAMBERLIN

32 feet tall. The tallest part of the main armory building, in comparison, is about 50 feet. The site will require rezoning to a Planned Development District to permit a combination of mixed-commercial use and the residential complex, Rainaldi said. He wants to have the project completed by early next year, he said. Rainaldi’s father, Fred Rainaldi Sr., bought the World War I-era armory at 145 Culver Road across from Cobbs Hill Park in 2009 for about $1.5 million. The 100,000-square-foot structure underwent a massive multi-million dollar renovation that combined modern design elements with the armory’s historic character. The main building, which was redesigned for professional offices and specialty retailers, houses Alex and Ani, a fine jeweler, the restaurant Trata, and offices. Rainaldi says more tenants, including a café, will be moving in by the summer.

For I-Square, the third time was the charm. | Last week, the Irondequoit Town Board voted to support a PILOT – payment in lieu of taxes – for the proposed mixed-use project. It wasn’t the board’s first vote on the agreement. Last year, it approved a 10-year PILOT, though developers Mike and Wendy Nolan wanted a 25-year deal. And earlier this year the board tabled a resolution supporting a 15-year agreement with two 5-year extensions. | Last week’s vote, however, marked the first time that the board members and the Nolans were happy with the outcome. The Town Board unanimously backed a 15-year PILOT agreement with two 5-year extensions, as well as construction and job creation benchmarks. | Under the boardapproved terms, the first payment would be derived from the property’s $2.1 million base assessed value. I-Square’s payments to the town would increase 2.5 percent yearly. | The Monroe County Industrial Development Agency provides the PILOT, but the Town Board had to approve the terms. The resolution approved last week requires Town Board approval of the COMIDA deal if it “materially differs” from the terms it signed off on, said Supervisor Mary Joyce D’Aurizio.

UMI

2,177 US servicemen and servicewomen and 1,081 Coalition servicemen and servicewomen have been killed in Afghanistan from the beginning of the war and occupation to February 25. Statistics for Afghan civilian casualties are not available. No American casualties were reported after January 20. iraqbodycount. org, icasualties.org, Department of Defense

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POLITICS | BY JEREMY MOULE

Morelle steps into MCC fray Assembly member Joe Morelle is sharply questioning Monroe Community College’s plan to move its downtown campus. Morelle is not the only local elected official who has been skeptical of the plan; Mayor Tom Richards and County Legislature Democrats have been very critical of it. But Morelle’s involvement is adding to tensions over the plan. The college is counting on state funding for the move, and Morelle has a position of influence within state government. As the Assembly’s majority leader, he’s second in rank only to Speaker Sheldon Silver. And he’s not just questioning the short- and long-term costs of MCC’s plan. He’s also urging SUNY and the governor’s office to conduct independent analyses of MCC’s proposal, a request that college officials say is unusual. “I think it’s a concern to everyone with regard to his continued raising questions, there’s no doubt about that,” says Kenneth Goode, president of the college’s Board of Trustees. MCC wants to buy several buildings on Kodak’s State Street site and renovate them for use as the new campus. Earlier this month the County Legislature authorized the county, which owns all of MCC’s property, to buy the Kodak complex for just under $3 million. The county is negotiating the final terms of that sale. College officials expect the project to cost $72 million, half of which will be covered by the state. MCC officials have said that $30 million of the state funding is accounted for, via previous allocations, one of which would require a technical change for the college to receive it. That change would require the Assembly’s approval. Morelle, however, is skeptical of MCC’s funding claims. “I’m not saying it’s not there,” he says. “I just haven’t seen it.” Morelle also questions whether college officials have adequately studied operating costs at the Kodak site, especially the costs of operating and maintaining the on-site utilities plant. College officials have said that the buildings could, as an alternative, tie into the downtown steam heating district. “The question I’ve asked is how much does it cost to do any of that?” Morelle says. “That’s what I’d like to see an answer to before we decide to plunge into this thing.” He also says the college shouldn’t have dismissed a new proposal by WinnCompanies that could save the county and college money. The company says it can renovate the Sibley building for $57 million. The issues raised by Morelle echo the questions and concerns posed by Richards and Legislature Democrats. And like Richards and the Democrats, Morelle says that the 6 CITY

FEBRUARY 27 - MARCH 5, 2013

Sibley building would provide a campus that’s integrated into the heart of the city. The redevelopment of Midtown, along with a new bus station and RIT satellite campus opening up in the area, make the Sibley building a good option for an urban campus, he says. Morelle says that, over the years, he’s been involved with once-promising projects that haven’t panned out: Frontier Field, the fast ferry, and the soccer stadium. Richards has made similar comparisons recently and he says he agrees with Morelle that the state should do its own analysis. Morelle says that the state should examine construction and operating costs of MCC’s Kodak site proposal as compared to Winn’s Sibley building proposal. “If I’ve gotten to be more critical in my analysis and thinking, it’s having been burned several times by well-meaning people who just didn’t give us the right information,” Morelle says. But MCC officials say they are frustrated

that the same questions –which they say they’ve repeatedly answered the best they can – keep coming up. Goode says that college officials spent more than two years studying and analyzing potential campuses before deciding on the Kodak site. They looked at more than 18 potential locations, including the Sibley building, and hired outside experts and site selection consultants to evaluate them. And as part of the selection process, MCC looked at the cost of operating the sites, including the utilities costs. The county and the college are still negotiating the utilities with Kodak, which will determine whether MCC operates the plant. In a December 2011 update, college President Anne Kress wrote that the Kodak site would be cheaper to operate, even though it contains significantly more space. The current city campus is 200,000 square feet. The college is planning to buy 560,000 square feet at the Kodak site, which officials say would give programs and the student body room to grow. The school will only use 275,000 square feet initially.

State Assembly member Joe Morelle, who also chairs the Monroe County Democratic Party, is raising more questions about MCC’s plan for the Kodak site. FILE PHOTO

MCC spokesperson Cynthia Cooper says SUNY has assured the college administration and trustees that it supports the move to the Kodak site. As for the Winn proposal, Goode says he was stunned when the developers introduced the proposal at a County Legislature committee meeting. “We had bent over backwards to delay our decision to listen to them, which other proposals did not have that opportunity to do,” Goode says. “So we think they’ve been treated more than fairly with regard to explaining to us what they had to offer.” On February 15, Kress released another

open letter to push back against the continued questioning of the Kodak site. One of the issues she directly addressed was the state funding. “To correct continued misinformation, $25 million in state funds is already in place for this project,” she wrote. SUNY representatives have confirmed the funding in phone conversations, Cooper says. MCC accesses that money by submitting reimbursement invoices. In her letter, Kress also questioned why critics of the move are taking the Winn Companies’ proposal seriously. Winn originally presented an $85 million plan two years ago; Kress questions what the developer sacrificed to cut $28 million out of its plan. (WinnCompanies have said that the price is lower because they used a different layout.) Downtown Rochester is at a crucial point in its revitalization. New housing is being developed and several companies have moved

their offices or headquarters to the city. And the county has worked with the city to advance some of that development, especially through tax-incentive programs. But MCC’s downtown campus proposal is on the verge of becoming a political issue, if it isn’t one already. If Morelle pushes back against funding for the new MCC campus, is there a risk of a new city-county rift forming? One never materialized after Renaissance Square fell apart, but a new fight over a county-led project in the city could lead to new frustration. In October, the public got a glimpse what that dynamic might look like. At issue was a Monroe County Industrial Development Agency tax benefits package for WinnCompanies, which at the time was buying the Sibley building. Mayor Richards saw politics at play when the vote was delayed. But County Executive Maggie Brooks said the COMIDA board was just doing its due diligence on Winn’s application. COMIDA eventually approved the benefits. With city and county governments facing tight budgets, continued cooperation will be crucial. The two governments work together to provide some services to the community; for example, the county hires the city to run its 911 dispatch center. But over the years other commitments, such as county funding for downtown policing, have eroded. And Richards worries that if the Kodak site is more expensive to operate than the Sibley site, city residents will be harder hit by those costs because of the way the county funds MCC.


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URBAN ACTION This week’s calls to action include the following events and activities. (All are free and open to the public, unless otherwise noted.)

Lectures on faith, politics, and science

Nazareth College will present “Catholic Bioethics, Political Priorities, and the Common Good,” a lecture by Lisa Sowle Cahill at 7 p.m. on Thursday, February 28. Cahill will also give a lecture, “Jesus, Feminism, and Catholic Women,” at 1:30 p.m. on Friday, March 1. Both lectures will be held in the Otto A. Shults Community Center and are open to the public.

Talk about Palestinians

Christians Witnessing for Palestine will sponsor “Tea

Correcting ourselves

without Sugar is Not Tea: Palestinians Living Under Occupation,” a talk by Joyce and John Cassel at 7:45 p.m. on Thursday, February 28. The event will be held at the Islamic Center, 727 Westfall Road.

Book discussion on American Muslims

Moving Beyond Racism Book Group will discuss “American Islam” by Paul Barrett at 7 p.m. on Monday, March 4. The group will meet at Barnes and Noble, Pittsford Plaza.

Finger Lakes Sustainability Plan meeting

The final public meeting for the Cleaner, Greener, Finger Lakes Regional Sustainability Plan will be held at 5 p.m. on Thursday,

February 28. The plan will be submitted to the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority to compete for a portion of a $90 million fund for developing sustainability projects, such as reducing greenhouse gas emissions. The open house-style meeting will be held at 657 East Avenue.

ROCLA dinner

The Rochester Committee on Latin America will hold its annual rice and beans gala dinner and White Dove Awards at 5:30 p.m. on Friday, March 1. ROCLA will honor the Global Justice Ecology Project, which protects indigenous people, and Tom Ward from the Gates Presbyterian Church. The event will be held at 1049 Wegmans Road. Tickets: $20 to $40. Reservations: Gail Mott, 381-5606.

In the dining reviews for Thai Time (February 6 issue) and Yummy Garden Hot Pot (February 20 issue) we incorrectly stated that the restaurants are located in Henrietta. They technically fall within the borders of Brighton. 8 CITY

FEBRUARY 27 - MARCH 5, 2013


Dining

Penfield’s Yaya’s Yummys’ line of products includes Silly Tilly’s Tomato Spread and Caramel Apple Jam (left). Locally made Muesli Fusion comes in six varieties, including Classic Swiss (pictured, right), featuring grains, flax seeds, dates, raisins, almonds, and cranberries. PHOTOS BY MARK CHAMBERLIN

Eats from our streets [ CHOW HOUND ] BY DAYNA PAPALEO

If you ever happen to embark on a labelstudying spree like the one I’ve been on, you’ll no doubt find yourself impressed with the creativity and gumption of some of your proverbial neighbors, fellow Western New Yorkers who are making a go of it in the world of edible goods. And, the smart practice of locavorism notwithstanding, all of these homegrown products can be quite inspiring to anyone who has batted around the idea of a little food business of their own. This is the second installment in an ongoing “Made in Rochester” series that highlights locally made vittles. If there’s an area food company you think should be on our radar, please let us know by e-mailing food@rochester-citynews.com or by posting a comment on this article at rochestercitynewspaper.com. From the name you might suspect your kindly Greek grandmother has a secret side gig, but Yaya’s Yummys (yayasyummys.com) is a Penfield business that makes a wide array of jams and jellies (the Caramel Apple Jam is

innocently decadent), dips, olive oil blends, and baking mixes, with a website that provides a gaggle of recipe ideas and tips for using Yaya’s myriad products. And if you’re looking to raise money for your organization but don’t feel like peddling the usual gift wrap, magazines, or giant drums of popcorn, Yaya’s Yummys offers a fundraising program. Get Yaya’s Yummys at Red Bird Market or Deer Run Winery, or maybe look into hosting a Yaya’s Yummys party of your own. High-fructose corn syrup is not solely responsible for the obesity epidemic, but its complicity in the fattening of America is well documented. So the health conscious have turned to more wholesome sweetening options like honey, agave, and Hey Shuga! (heyshuga.com), a sugar-cane syrup derived through a natural enzymatic process that bio-mimics the one bees use to produce honey. Created by the Tejada family, this organic, GMO-free, gluten-free, vegan, and kosher cane syrup is a favorite of bakers and mixologists, and anyone hoping to cut back on their refined sugar consumption ought to check out Lil’ Shuga!, which intensifies the cane syrup with the addition of stevia

extract. You can find both Shuga! products at markets like Lori’s Natural Foods and Abundance Co-op. With roots in a small pasticceria in Sicily, Vigneri Chocolate (vigneri.com) began life in Rochester as a bakery before narrowing its focus to chocolate. The third generation of the Vigneri family is taking the concept further, harnessing the healthful properties of chocolate into the By Nature By Hand collection, a sort of trail mix anchored by chunks of antioxidant-loaded dark chocolate and bolstered with various nuts and dried fruits. Vigneri also makes holiday-themed chocolate — including huge Easter eggs called La Gigantes — and it will soon roll out Quarrels, chocolate intended to be paired with wine. Look for Vigneri products at places like Wegmans and Rosario Pino’s Artisan Foods. Victor’s MaD Foodz (madfoodz.com) makes “all-natural craft hot sauces,” meaning no artificial colors, additives, or preservatives. Whether you’re interested in spicing up meats and fish, or just doing a little dipping, there’s something for every heat tolerance in these citrus-based sauces. They range from

the mild Oh My, with a little warmth from jalapeño pepper; to the moderate singe of the chipotle-kissed Oh Wow and Oh Boy, featuring habanero; to the “massive” ghostpepper kick of the aptly named Oh Mama. Shop the MaD Foodz line at spots like Niblack, Nathaniel Square Corner Store, and Mileage Master. Recently served as part of the President’s Inaugural Luncheon in Washington, D.C., and named Best Honey in New York State at the 2012 New York State Fair, Pat Bono’s Seaway Trail Honey (seawaytrailhoney.com) comes from her small Wayne County apiary. The bees harvest the pollen from apple blossoms, buttercups, goldenrod, locust blossoms, and other wildflowers, their hard work made available unpasteurized and certified kosher. Get Seaway Trail Honey products from places like Simply New York Marketplace & Gifts, the Brighton Farmers’ Market, and the Little Bleu Cheese Shop. To clarify the difference between the two, muesli is granola’s raw, unprocessed cousin, and no one requires a lecture about the potential health benefits of grains in their natural state. With components like oats, flaxseed, fruits, and nuts, muesli can be eaten cold, perhaps after an overnight soak in milk, or prepared like oatmeal. Ian Szalinski launched his rapidly growing Muesli Fusion (mueslifusion.com) in late 2010 after noticing a lack of variety in storebought brands, and currently his company offers six different muesli blends, like the gluten-free Morning Zen, the proteinpacked Athlete Fuel, and An Ox, which features antioxidant-rich goji berries and cacao nibs. Muesli Fusion is available at retailers like Wegmans, RIT’s Global Village Market, and Hegedorn’s. Throughout history, salt has occupied an important place in civilization as a preservative, seasoning, and even a form of payment when one is worth his or her salt. (Read Mark Kurlansky’s fascinating “Salt” if this subject interests you.) Seneca Salt Company (java-gourmet.com), a division of Penn Yan’s Java-Gourmet, is harvesting its culinary flake salt right from a vein in Seneca Lake and offering it unadulterated as well as in blends with rosemary, matcha, vanilla, or lemon, and even a grapevine-smoked version. Look for Seneca Salt at shops like Parkleigh, The Nut House, and F. Oliver’s. Chow Hound is a food and restaurant news column. Do you have a tip? Send it to food@ rochester-citynews.com. rochestercitynewspaper.com

CITY 9


Chills,Icethrills, and gills fishing in Rochester FEATURE AND PHOTOS | BY KATHY LALUK

“C’mon! It’s OK — you won’t fall through.” The man in the green-and-brown hunting jacket and snow pants gestured for me to follow him onto the ice-covered pond. The last part of what he said made me pause. Why would he say something like that? But the knowing look in his eye, and the assurance in his voice, melted away my doubts. And so I stepped, cautiously, onto the ice. We crossed the pond — sans boat, raft, or doggy paddle — toward two figures dressed in black and yellow snowsuits. They were easy to spot across the vast, white tundra punctuated only by a few tents atop the ice. As we got closer, the skeleton masks over their faces came into sharper view, sending another frozen shockwave up my neck. But that quickly vanished as Tim Thomas bellowed out a hearty, “Hey there!” The strong handshake and pat on the back reassured me that today, I was not only among friendly ice fishermen. Today I actually was one of the ice fishermen in the Victory Baptist Church’s ice-fishing derby. And by the end of that day, I’d have the frostbitten toes and fingers — and a 14” northern pike — to prove it. Rochester is obviously known for its icy cold winters. But few would guess that, according to the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation, the Greater Rochester area is home to roughly 2000 sportsmen willing to trek out on frozen ponds, cut through the surface ice, and try to catch a fish on just about any pond or body of water that freezes over between December and March. On a good weekend, if conditions are right, you can easily find anywhere from 100 to 200 ice fishermen just on Sodus Bay — and just about as many on the next waterway and the next after that. For some, it’s a way to keep occupied during those long winter months, to get away from the noise and flurry of everyday life. For others, it’s a chance to compete against other anglers and experience the adrenaline that comes with it. And for others still, it’s a tradition, something passed onto them from their parents, something that’s in their blood.

when they were just 8 or 9 years old. The brothers are now in their mid-30s, with families of their own to pass along their fishing skills and know-how. “It started out as a hobby, just something to do, to get us outdoors. And for my brother and I, now it’s become a passion,” Tim Thomas says. The pair is now trying to spread that passion to anyone who wants to give ice fishing a try. The sport has grown steadily both nationally and locally, thanks in part to ever-advancing technology. Ice fishing was born, like many activities that have become modern-day hobbies, out of necessity. Native Americans would carve holes in sheets of ice with primitive axes, and use a spear to catch fish in order to survive the winter months. Over time, ice fishermen traded spears for hooks on fishing lines and those axes for ice augers, and now there are even underwater cameras wintertime anglers can use to check out the action below the ice. But while some of the equipment has evolved, many of the original ideas and principles of the sport remain the same. The most common pieces of modern ice-fishing equipment are jigging rods and tip-ups. Most people who have been fishing on ponds, lakes, and other bodies of water would recognize the jigging rod, which looks like a typical open-water fishing pole, just a little smaller

1

“It started out as a hobby, something to do to get us outdoors. And now it’s become a passion.” TIM THOMAS

“We were fishing pretty much from the time we were potty trained,” says Jeff Thomas, a local ice fisherman. He and his brother, Tim, learned to fish from their father

10 CITY FEBRUARY 27 - MARCH 5, 2013

(anywhere from 18” to 3’). Typically, anglers use a small piece of bait, like worms or minnows, in addition to lures on jigging rods to catch fish like sunfish, yellow and white perch, and blue gills, which are active in the winter. Anglers jerk the rod to make the bait dance, attracting fish. Tip-ups consist of a wood or plastic frame with a cross-shaped base, a spool of fishing line, and a thin piece of metal that goes between the spool and a flag. When a fish goes for the bait, it triggers the flag, sending it up in the air and signaling the fisherman that he’s got something on the line. Unlike jigging rods, once a fish is hooked through a tip-up, anglers will use their hands to pull up the line rather than a reel to drag the fish to the surface. A newer gadget, called the automatic fisherman, is kind of a combination of the two methods. The small 12” to 14” rod is spring-loaded and bent down toward the

2


water. When a fish goes for the bait, the rod does the work for you, hooking the fish, and flinging the tip of the rod up into the air. From there, the angler must reel in the fish. (Hey, you can’t have the equipment do all the work for you, right?) “Those are our newest toys,” says Tim Thomas. In the past two years, the Thomas brothers have turned pro, getting sponsorships from several fishing-gear companies. It means they get to test out the newest products on the market. Most modern-day winter fishermen use ice augers, which are large metal poles with a spiral blade attached to the bottom. And while it still involves manual labor, “It’s a hell of a lot easier than back in the day,” Tim Thomas says. And if you’re willing to spend the big bucks, there are battery-, gas-, and propane-powered augers. Those do all the work for you, but they’re a lot heavier and clunkier than manual augers.

3

4

5

You can ice fish pretty much anywhere that freezes over during the winter. That’s good news for area fishermen, since Rochester is surrounded by water. Places where ice fishermen tend to flock include Mendon Ponds Park, Braddock Bay, Irondequoit Bay, Sodus Bay, and some of the Finger Lakes (“Some of them don’t freeze over because they’re so deep,” says Tim Thomas). Depending on what kind of fish they’re going after and what body of water they’re on, fishermen lower their lures and bait down at different depths. While some fish stick close to the bottom of a water body, others swim right underneath the ice. Around here, most anglers target bigger fish like northern pike, walleye, rock bass, and smaller panfish. And since each fish has its own habits, each angler tailors his or her skills accordingly to outsmart the fish. “We’ve tried to go after perch with our pike tactics and it doesn’t work,” Tim Thomas says. “Every species has its own little quirks, their own little things that you have to know about and perfect in order to catch them.” Among those things is daylight. Most ice fishermen head out early in the morning when it’s still dark out. “When the sun comes up, the fish almost get spooked,” Tim Thomas says. He adds that cloudy weather can make the fish more inclined to bite. “[There are] tricks you just have to learn throughout the course of your fishing career,” says local angler Jim Redding. “There’s really no science to it.” He’s been ice fishing for the past five winters, using his father’s old tip-ups. He says he’s been relatively successful, catching several northern pike and more panfish than he can remember. But, “it’s hit and miss a lot of the time. If I had it down, I’d go pro,” he says. For Redding, it’s less about how successful he is at catching fish, and more about spending time with his son, Rick, and 7-year-old granddaughter Aliyah. This is Aliyah’s second full season on the ice. “So long as we can keep her warm, we stay out,” he says. “When she gets cold, it’s time to go home.” Aliyah spends most of her time in the family’s shanty, a small tent pitched on the ice to protect fishermen from the wind. But the second someone shouts “flag up!” she’s bolting across the ice to see what she’s caught. “I may be a girl, but I fish better than a boy,” Aliyah says. And she did just that at the Victory Baptist Church Sportsmen’s tournament on January 26, catching the second-biggest fish (for the record, her catch was 4 lbs., 2 oz., and 28” long).

6

1 | Jeff Thomas with his catch at Mendon Ponds Park. 2 | A manual ice auger allows anglers to cut through the

ice quickly and efficiently. But be careful: the blades are incredibly sharp.

3 | Brothers Jeff and Tim Thomas (left to right) with a northern pike caught at the Victory Baptist Church Sportsmen Ice Fishing Derby on Hundred Acre Pond at Mendon Ponds Park.

4 | Jim Redding (pictured right) sets up a tip-up while his granddaughter, Aliyah Redding (left), looks on. 5 | The New York State Department of Environmental Conser-

vation recommends that fishermen wait until there is 2” to 3” of black ice or 4” to 6” of white ice before venturing out with their equipment.

6 | Ice fishermen use shanties, like these set up on Hundred

Acre Pond at Mendon Ponds Park, to keep warm while fishing.

Weather adds another layer of variables to the sport. How

cold it gets — and how long it stays that way — can make the difference between a stellar ice-fishing season and a crapshoot. Locally, the winters have been inconsistent over the past few seasons. Last year, Tim Thomas says, was one of the worst seasons he could remember. “We barely got out at all,” he says. But just a year or two before that, the December chill came in early and stuck around through March, keeping the ice in great shape for ice fishing. It doesn’t take much to build up enough ice on local waterways for it to be safe to fish. According to state Department of Environmental Conservation recommendations, ice fishermen should wait until there is a minimum of 2” to 3” of black ice or 4” to 6” of white ice before venturing out with their equipment. But if temperatures yo-yo, which is often the case in Rochester, it can pose a problem. “Typically if you have temperatures in the teens and single digits, you’re going to be building 1” to 2” of ice per 24-hour period that it stays that cold,” says Tim Thomas. In ice-fishing, “black ice” has nothing to do with the hardto-see slick spots on roadways. Black ice is clearer, and sturdier. It’s the kind of stuff ice fisherman want to see. “It’s very hard, extremely dense, and can support a lot of weight with very little ice,” Tim says. About 1” of black ice is comparable to about 3” to 4” of “white ice” or “snow ice,” according to the continues on page 16 rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 11


Upcoming [ CLASSICAL ] RPO: Carnegie Hall Preview: Howard Hanson’s Merry Mount Wednesday April 10 and Friday April 12. RPO: Disney’s Fantasia Friday November 1 and Saturday, November 2. RPO: The Music of John Williams Thursday, May 9 and Friday, May 10. All concerts at Kodak Hall. Prices and times vary. Visit rpo.org for full 2013-14 series concert listings.

Music

Kristen Ford Band

FRIDAY, MARCH 1 TALA VERA, 155 STATE ST. 8:00 P.M. | $5 (OVER)/$7(UNDER) | 546-3845 [ INDIE/FOLK ] This Boston-based singer-songwriter has been praised for her multidimensional sound and dynamic live shows, which feature beat boxing, fervent lyrical appeal, improvisational songwriting, and a percussive approach to acoustic guitar. Ford, in the best possible way, is a genre train wreck, mixing the styles of reggae, indie, folk, and disco into a frenetic musical fold. Pretend that Ani DiFranco and Bob Marley had a child that goes bar-hopping with Isaac Brock and you’ll have a pretty good idea of Ford’s sonic journeys. — BY DAVID YOCKEL JR.

Now, Now THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 28TH THE BUG JAR, 219 MONROE AVE. 8:30 P.M. | $10-12 | 18+ | 454-2966 [ SHOEGAZE POP ] Minnesota-based Now, Now has come to kick back in our comparatively balmy climes. It will be a brief break from hanging with Minus the Bear on the Waves Overhead Spring Tour, with the band sharing some of its particularly cheery blend of pop and shoegaze, sung by covocalists Cacie Dalager and Jess Abbott. The topic matter in male hands would get creeper-tastic (especially “Dead Oaks” off the newest release, “Threads”). The evening will also feature a couple of local acts, including the indie folk of The Branch Davidians and some down-tempo instrumental electro noodlings from Precious Kindred. Show up early and stay late for Cultr Club at 11 p.m. — BY SUZAN PERO

In a panic without your CITY Newspaper at East Avenue Wegmans? Stay calm and carry on by picking up CITY at these nearby locations: Wegmans Pharmacy 1749 East Avenue Tops Supermarket 175 Winton Road R’s Market 2294 Monroe Avenue Abundance Cooperative 62 Marshall Street Country Club Diner 1743 East Avenue

12 CITY FEBRUARY 27 - MARCH 5, 2013

World Gym 1717 East Avenue Canaltown Coffee 1805 East Avenue Metro Retro 1241 Park Avenue Balsam Bagels 288 North Winton Road Jim’s Restaurant 233 North Winton Road

Ravioli Shop 260 North Winton Road Joe Bean Coffee 1344 University Avenue Pomodoro Grill 1290 University Avenue Record Archive 33 Rockwood Street and all other Greater Rochester Wegmans locations!


WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 27 [ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ]

Acoustic Open Jam hosted by The Druids. The Rabbit

Room, 61 N. Main St. 5821830. 7:30 p.m. Free. Dady Brotherrs. Johnny’s Irish Pub, 1382 Culver Rd. 224-0990. 8 p.m. Free. Frankie & Jewels. The Avenue Pub, 522 Monroe Ave. 2444960. 6 p.m. Call for info. [ CLASSICAL ]

RocMusic. ,. 5:30 p.m.

Lyman Brothers

Blue Jimmy brought the funky tonk to Sticky Lips Juke Joint Friday night. PHOTO BY FRANK DE BLASE

TUESDAY, MARCH 5 ST. MARY’S CHURCH, 15 ST. MARY’S PLACE 8 P.M. | FREEWILL OFFERING | 232-7140

[ JAZZ ]

[ CLASSICAL ] Brothers Zachary and Thatcher Lyman

will present a concert of music for trumpet and organ featuring works by Johann Baptist Georg Neruda and American composers Vincent Persichetti and David Sampson. Organist Thatcher Lyman will also perform solo organ works by Felix Mendelssohn and Anton Heiller. Thatcher is currently pursuing his DMA degree in organ performance at the Eastman School of Music, and Zachary Lyman is an associate professor of trumpet and music theory at Pacific Lutheran University in Washington, and actively performs in orchestral, chamber, and solo concerts. — BY PALOMA CAPANNA

The Deftones MONDAY, MARCH 4 MAIN STREET ARMORY, 900 E. MAIN ST. 7 P.M. | $30-$35 | ROCHESTERMAINSTREETARMORY.COM [ POP/ROCK ] At this stage of the band’s career, the members of Sacramento’s Deftones are wily veterans: churning out a solid album every few years and touring to throngs of both long-time as well as newly found fans. Over the course of seven records the band has stayed mostly true to its alternative metal roots, updating its heavy rock sound in increments. Always the most talented of its contemporaries, the band continues to stay relevant, producing music fans can find solace in, but never returning to what’s already been explored. — BY DAVE LABARGE

[ REVIEW ] BY FRANK DE BLASE

For me, the 1980s were the last stand for pop, before music got stupid, vapid, and insipid. That’s not to say that music of the “Me Decade” was for intellectuals. Let’s face it; we’re all a little blinded by science. But it’s amazing how those little Aquanetted, neon ditties get stuck in your head. People call it a guilty pleasure. Not me; as a recovering Catholic I don’t adhere to guilt or regret. If it sounds good it is good, even if the musical muckety-mucks disapprove. The Big ’80s got a rural dressing down Wednesday night at Abilene courtesy of Charlottesville, Virginia’s Love Canon. The band brandishes classic bluegrass artillery to tackle songs from The Human League, Don Henley, Bow Wow Wow, etc. I expected more non-commercial interpretations, but the band’s arrangements were identical — or damn close — to the originals. There was no “Like a Virgin”/”Foggy Mountain Breakdown,” no sanctified take on “The Devil Inside,” not even a yodeled “Girls Just Want to Have Fun.” How cool would that be? I mean, really. It’s been a while since I’ve caught the world beat/rootsicana of Bloomfield’s Blue Jimmy. These cats swung from honky

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1276 Fairport Rd. Fairport, NY 267-7002 Find us on

tonk to funky tonk while the Friday night crowd at Sticky Lips Juke Joint swung from the rafters. And as varied as this band gets — “Blister In The Sun,” hello? — it’s all strung out and strung together with some hell-bound, angelic harmony. Next, me and the Tin Man saddled up and rode up to Monty’s Krown for trash wave forefathers and godfathers Pink Elephant. This band is the missing link between grunge and whatever the hell we call hard rock today. By the time Abandoned Buildings Club took to the floor — the entire stage was reserved for the band’s two drum sets — the energy was high. The quartet ground low and slow like a junkie stripper with the guitar’s guttural grind going head-to-head with the twin drum bump and stomp. Saturday night at Skylark Lounge AudioInFlux was celebrating the release of “Here Comes The Audio,” a brash and bold new endeavor for these soulful, deep-dish groovsters. It’s a little more upbeat — the band has settled in on its identity and style — and the packed crowd lapped it up eagerly. The joint was jumpin,’ goin’ ’round and ’round.

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Bring your date and your favorite vino or beer for a unique night out!

Freddie Thomas Learning Center. 625 Scio St. Free, donations accepted.

Exotic ingredients infuse beef, lamb, and vegetarian dishes for lunch or dinner every day of the week. VEGETARIAN • COMBINATION DISHES BEEF • LAMB • CHICKEN DISHES LUNCH & DINNER • 7 DAYS A WEEK Coming Soon! Ethiopian Beer & Honey Wine 302 University Ave. (at N. Union near Main St) 285-6960 • MEDAETHIOPIANRESTAURANT.COM

L&MES LAN

Café, 240 East Ave. 7:30 p.m. Free. Mark Bader. Prosecco Italian Restaurant, 1550 New York 332. 924-8000. 6 p.m. Call for info. Night Trane. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. 585-6625555. 6 p.m. Free.

Vince Ercolamento& Joe Chiappone Jazz Quartet.

Murph’s Irondequoit Pub, 705 Titus Ave. 342-6780. 8 p.m. Free. [ HIP-HOP/RAP ]

Huey Mack w/OCD: Moosh & Twist. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N. Water St. 585325-5600. 7:30 p.m. $15. [ POP/ROCK ]

Big D. Dinosaur Bar-B-Que,

99 Court St. 585-325-7090. 9 p.m. Free. Darwin. Temple Bar and Grille, 109 East Ave. 2326000. 10 p.m. Free.

Thousand Foot Krutch w/ Love & Death, The Letter Black, Melia, and Cry to the Blind. Water Street Music

Hall, 204 N. Water St. 585325-5600. 6:30 p.m. $20.

White Woods, Folkfaces, and Solomon Blaylock. Tala

Vera, 155 State St. 546-3845. 8 p.m. $5. continues on page 15

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rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 13


Music Brighten a life! Lifespan’s Senior Connection matches volunteers 55+ with older adults who could benefit from a weekly phone call or visit by a friend.

Call Katie 287-6352 for info.

Goddesses of thunder The Indigo Girls W/THE SHADOWBOXERS SATURDAY, MARCH 2 HOCHSTEIN PERFORMANCE HALL 50 N. PLYMOUTH AVE. 8 P.M. | SOLD OUT GREENTOPIAFESTIVAL.COM INDIGOGIRLS.COM [ INTERVIEW ] BY CHRISTINE CARRIE FIEN

Amy Ray’s voice does it for me every time. Whether it’s delivering a pounding indictment of Holocaust complicity or letting her heart bleed all over an old lover, the sound that claws out of her throat is by turns plaintive, playful, violent, and raw — never passive or ambivalent. It is folk rock’s molten core. Ray is half of the durable and remarkably drama-free duo, the Indigo Girls. The Indigos play a sold out show at Hochstein

Performance Hall on Saturday, March 2, as part of the Greentopia Music series. Ray’s musical partner is sweet-voiced soprano Emily Saliers. The two seem equally matched in songwriting prowess and focus, often taking on religion, politics, and civil rights in sometimes nearly impenetrable — some would say overwrought — lyrics. The difference is that with a Saliers’ song, you know you learned something. With Ray’s, you take a beating. Saliers and Ray met in elementary school in DeKalb County, Georgia, and began performing together in high school. They became the Indigo Girls in the 1980’s, and have since sold more than 12 million albums. Ray also founded the independent label, Daemon Records, in 1990 and has put out several solo albums. Ray and Saliers are longtime activists for LGBT rights (both are openly gay), and many other political, social, and environmental causes. Ray called in recently for a chat about music, sexuality, and politics. An edited transcript of the conversation follows. CITY: Do you think people experience your music through the lens of your sexuality? And, if so, do you find that limiting? Amy Ray: I’m sure

people experience the music through the lens of our sexuality. I think that a lot of the time, and in rock ‘n’ roll, too, even if it’s a straight person you experience their music through the lens of their sexuality. But I The Indigo Girls — Amy Ray and Emily Saliers — are seasoned songwriters think the beauty and musicians who have sold more than 12 million records since debuting in of music is when the 1980’s. The politically charged duo performs this weekend as part of the it can transcend Greentopia Music series. PHOTO BY JEREMY COWART that. And I think 14 CITY FEBRUARY 27 - MARCH 5, 2013

there are moments when people take a song or a performance and they’re in it, and they’re so in touch with it that they’re experiencing it through the lens of their sexuality, instead of yours. And that’s the ultimate. That’s what you want. Obviously, being gay has a special sort of limitation attached to it in the eyes of the world. Maybe some people feel, “Well, I’m not going to be able to relate to that,” or something. I think it’s presented as a limitation by the media, often. I guess there are times when it’s frustrating to me. But I think at this point with me and Emily, we just kind of do what we do. We don’t worry about limitations. Many of the Indigo Girls’ songs have a political, religious, or social-justice bent. But your songwriting is darker than Emily’s. Have you ever had a song that she just refused to do?

I’ve definitely had songs that she didn’t really want to “go there” with, that I did as a solo song because of that. I think “Lucystoners” was a harder one for her, but it wasn’t for political reasons. [The lyrics criticize an editor of Rolling Stone.] I think she just felt like it was casting aspersions at Rolling Stone, and sort of unnecessarily. But we’re pretty aligned. I’d say there were moments when one of us felt a little stronger than the other about something; I might’ve just been more extreme than her. I’ve read that music has gotten increasingly bland since the 1970’s, and it sure feels that way. Where’s the energy? Where’s the anger?

I think there’s always been the homogenized kind of pop: acceptable artists who are manufactured and marketed. But there have always been these great artists who come along and do something different than that. Now I think it’s just harder. We haven’t figured out where those artists are, necessarily. They’re there: on the Internet, all over YouTube… I don’t know if people have time to weed through everything to find them. People have this sense that all they’re getting is this homogenized, boilerplate… [It’s] what they’re being served by the gatekeepers of the music media. continues on page 16


WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 27 Wilder Maker w/The Whale & The Warbler, Sky People, and Patrick Jaouen. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. $6-$8.

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 28 [ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ] Jim Lane. Murph’s Irondequoit Pub, 705 Titus Ave. 342-6780. 8 p.m. Free. Old Timey Jam. Bernuzio Uptown Music, 122 East Ave. 473-6140. 6:30 p.m. Call for info. Pat Kane. McGraw’s Irish Pub, 146 W Commercial St. 3489091. 7 p.m. Free.

Salsa Night presented by Essence of Rhythm. Lovin’

Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 2929940. 9 p.m. $5. [ BLUES ] Nightfall. The Beale New Orleans Grille and Bar-South Ave., 693 South Ave. 2714650. 7:30 p.m. Call for info. Uncle Ralph. Pane Vino Ristorante, 175 N. Water St. 232-6090. 8 p.m. Free. [ CLASSICAL ]

Eastman at Washington Square Lunchtime Concerts.

1st Universalist Church, 150 S. Clinton Ave. 274-1400. 12:15 p.m. Free. RPO: Exquisite Puccini. Kodak Hall at Eastman Theater, 60 Gibbs St. 7:30 p.m. Neil Varon, guest conductor. Karin Wolverton, soprano. Dinyar Vania, tenor. $15-$82. Stringplicity. The Rabbit Room, 61 N. Main St. 5821830. 7 p.m. Call for info.

METALCORE I I THE BREATHER

Christian bands tend to get a bad rap for being considered junior-varsity alternatives to the secular mainstream. But anyone who has heard I The Breather can testify that this group is neither meek nor lame. The Baltimore-based quintet is tough, fast, sonically out-of-control and blessed with the ability to make the abrasion sound beautiful. Chalk it up to divine intervention that I The Breather wraps its aggressive riffs around the catechism and makes it look so easy. This complex not-of-this-world music earned the group more than 1 million hits on YouTube for its single “Forgiven.” Expect a multitude of fans to descend upon Dub Land for a night of heavy worship. With Palisades, Wolves at the Gate, Thoughts in Reverse, Into the Harbor, and Define Normal. I The Breather performs Thursday February 28, 5 p.m. at Dub Land Underground, 315 Alexander St. $10-$12. 232-7550. — BY ROMAN DIVEZUR [ REGGAE/JAM ]

GypsyLand, Monkey Scream Project. Tala Vera, 155 State

St. 546-3845. 8 p.m. $5-$7. Reggae Thursday. Pure Night Club, 117 Liberty Pole Way. 4547230. 10 p.m. $5 before 11 pm. [ POP/ROCK ]

The Deadstring Brothers.

[ DJ/ELECTRONIC ]

Mario Bee, DJ Fracture w/ Skanntron, Artifice X, H1GH T3K, Blinkin, Attikka, and Vhos7. Dubland Underground,

315 Alexander St. 232-7550. 10 p.m. $5-$15.

Thursday Night Dance Craze w/DJ Keven Atoms, DJ Jim Kempkes. Lux Lounge, 666

South Ave. 232-9030. 9 p.m. Call for info. [ JAZZ ]

Ben Waara. Prosecco Italian

Restaurant, 1550 New York 332. 924-8000. 6 p.m. Call for info. Deborah Branch. Lemoncello, 137 West Commercial St. 3858565. 6 p.m. Free. John Palocy Trio. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. 585662-5555. 6 p.m. Free. Mike Kaupa. Monroe’s Restaurant, 3001 Monroe Avenue. (585) 348-9104. 6 p.m. Call for info.

Ted Nicolosi and Shared Genes. Roncones Italian

Restaurant, 232 Lyell Ave. 458-3090. 6 p.m. Free.

Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. 9 p.m. $5-$7. Five Alarm Open Jam. Firehouse Saloon, 814 South Clinton. 3193832. 9 p.m. Call for info. John Payton Project. Dinosaur Bar-B-Que, 99 Court St. 585325-7090. 9 p.m. Free.

Now, Now w/The Branch Davidians, Precious Kindred.

Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 8:30 p.m. $10-$12. The Public Market Band. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 7:30 p.m. Free. Rockwood Ferry. Sticky Lips BBQ Juke Joint, 830 Jefferson Rd. 292-5544. 8 p.m. $5.

Silversteinwith w/Glass Cloud, Issues, Like Moths to Flames, and Secrets. Water Street Music

Hall, 204 N. Water St. 585-3255600. 7 p.m. $15-$17.

First Friday w/The Wild Root String Band. Bernuzio Uptown

Music, 122 East Ave. 4736140. 7 p.m. Call for info. Jim Lane. 58 Main, 58 N. Main St. 585-637-2383. 8 p.m. Free. Ralph Louis. Rochester Plaza Hotel, 70 State St. 546-3450. 6 p.m. Free. [ BLUES ]

George Thorogood and The Destroyers w/The Slide Brothers. Smith Opera House, 82 Seneca St. (315) 7815483. 7:30 p.m. $38.

Steve Grills & the Roadmasters. Little Theatre

Café, 240 East Ave. 258-0400. 7:30 p.m. Free. [ COUNTRY ]

30 Shows In 30 Days Benefit Kick-Off Event. Sea Breeze Fire

Department, 4657 Culver Road. 315-573-5403. 7 p.m. Free. [ DJ/ELECTRONIC ]

Post First Friday w/Love Scenes, A Victory for Upfish, Drippers, Wild Gone Girls, and Modern Séance. Visual Studies

Workshop, 31 Prince Street. 4428676. 9 p.m. $5. continues on page 16

FRIDAY, MARCH 1 [ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ]

Dave North w/Carin’s Pride.

McGraw’s Irish Pub, 146 W Commercial St. 348-9091. 6 p.m. Free. rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 15


Goddesses

continues from page 11

state DEC. White ice is less dense and has a higher water content, so it takes more of it to support greater weight. “That’s where a lot of people get the misconception. They think, ‘Oh, there’s 2.5” of ice, we’re fine,’” says Tim Thomas. “But in reality, if it’s white ice, that can be dangerous.” The heavier the equipment you carry with you, the more ice you’ll need to support it. Plan on using a four-wheeler to lug some of your gear? Make sure there’s at least 5” or 6” of solid black ice. Add another 2” to 3” if you want to use a snowmobile. And though it’s physically possible to bring a car out onto the ice, Rochester’s waters typically don’t freeze deep enough to support that much weight, so state officials (and most of the fishermen I talked to) recommend that you leave your ride on shore. Also note that conditions can quickly change from safe to dangerous. Once this season Tim and Jeff Thomas were out on the ice with several other anglers, all crowded around a high-tech device called a flasher (it sends a signal, like sonar, through the water to show fishermen how close the fish are). “All of a sudden, there was 4” of water on top of the ice because of all the weight of us; the snow ice that was there was starting to cave in,” Tim Thomas says. “It just goes to show you… I mean, we had a good 4” of ice, but if it’s not the right kind and you get too much weight in one place, you can get into trouble.” While ice and snow go hand and hand for most of us, the latter is Kryptonite for ice fishermen. “As ice gets buried in snow, that snow acts like a blanket and insulator, and it diminishes the ice’s ability to form and its strength drastically,” Tim Thomas says. Other potential problems are underwater currents and springs that can thin the ice in places. “You don’t always know what’s happening underneath the ice,” he says. Redding tends to venture out onto smaller

waterways like the ones at Mendon Ponds Park and Cranberry Pond rather than the bigger ones. He says the ice on Sodus and Irondequoit bays is generally too inconsistent for him to risk it. “You can have 6” to 7” of ice in one spot and then 200 yards away, it’ll be open water,” he says. “That to me is just taboo.” Still, every year Redding and Tim Thomas say, someone falls through the ice. “They’re too eager to get out there, so they risk it,” Tim says. That’s why Matt Lochner, an avid ice fisherman who also works as a lieutenant for 16 CITY FEBRUARY 27 - MARCH 5, 2013

continues from page 14

There are a couple of records coming out that I think are really good. There’s a band called Mount Moriah, on Merge, which is a great label. They’re an interesting band because they’re rooted in a lot of different [genres]. Their players are from punk and hardcore and all these crazy scenes, but it’s like an Americana, beautiful, soft record [“Miracle Temple” is out February 26]. What are your thoughts about music reality shows like “American Idol”? Tim Thomas places a tip-up on the ice. A tip-up consists of a small wooden frame and flag that is triggered when a fish takes the bait on a corresponding hook and line.

the Monroe County and Wayne County sheriff’s departments, says better safe than sorry. “It’s not worth putting yourself in danger,” Lochner says. “We’re equipped and trained to handle water rescues, but we never want to have to use those skills.” “I have — knock on wood — never fallen in,” says Tim Thomas. Neither has his brother, nor any other angler I came upon.

When “American Idol” first started, sometimes I’d be like, “God, these people aren’t that good. I heard someone at the local bar who was better than that.” But it’s like the ante’s been upped and [the contestants] are getting better and better. I think there really are some special vocalists coming out of those arenas. But it changes the perspective that I think people have of what it takes to make it. It’s like this one shot of instant fame when really, the people who have long careers work really hard and for a really long time — they build something. Even people in pop do it that way. So sometimes I think it just kind of sends the wrong message. You guys have seemingly done it all. What’s left to accomplish?

But they’ve all heard stories about that sort of thing happening so they make sure they are prepared. The Thomas brothers not only carry a 25-foot-long rope, but they also carry ice picks, which are handles with a 1” metal spike on them. They clip onto your jacket or you can keep them in your pocket, so in case you do fall through, you have something the dig into the ice to get yourself back out. What you wear ice fishing is almost — if not more — important than what you bring on the ice with you. I found that out the hard way. My standard snow boots, snow pants, parka, gloves, and my dorky hat with earflaps were no match for the long hours out on the ice. While the seasoned anglers didn’t even seem to notice the frigid temperatures, I had lost all sensation in my fingers, feet, and face after about an hour. Those guys are tough — but they’re also outfitted for it. Wool socks, long johns, pants, sweatshirts (yes, plural), and full snowsuits were all being used. The best way to keep yourself warm, aside from bundling up, is to use a shanty, continues on page 26

I think Emily and I just want to keep making records and try to hone our songwriting even more. And I’d like to see a more successfully integrated music festival, in terms of gender and race. I don’t know if I could put that together myself. We played one a long, long time ago called Gathering of the Tribes. It was Queen Latifah, The Cramps, Soundgarden, Indigo Girls, Sinead O’Connor…It was this crazy bill: people of color, different kinds of music. It was a great idea, but then it kind of went away. I think there are really big music festivals that do that over a weeklong period, but they’re still not as integrated as they could be. I’d love to see that in my lifetime.

FRIDAY, MARCH 1 [ JAZZ ]

Bobby DiBaudo Trio. Bistro

135, 135 W. Commercial St. 585-662-5555. 6 p.m. Free.

Fred Costello & Roger Eckers Jazz Duo. Charley Brown’s, 1675 Penfield Rd. 385-9202. 7:30 p.m. Free. Gary Chudyk. Prosecco Italian Restaurant, 1550 New York 332. 924-8000. 6:30 p.m. Free.

Ted Nicolosi and Shared Genes. Prime Steakhouse, 42 E Main St. 265-4777. 6:30 p.m. Free. Uptown Groove. Prosecco Italian Restaurant, 1550 New York 332. 924-8000. 7 p.m. Call for info. [ HIP-HOP/RAP ]

Subsoil. Temple Bar and Grille,

109 East Ave. 232-6000. 10 p.m. Free. [ REGGAE/JAM ]

Conehead Buddha w/Nate Coffey & The New Brew. Water Street

Music Hall, 204 N. Water St. 585325-5600. 9 p.m. $5-$11. Reggae Nite. California Brew Haus, 402 Ridge Rd. West. 621-1480. 10 p.m. Call for info. [ POP/ROCK ]

Charit Way, 2 Legged Death Machine, Deeper Than The Ocean, Skooba, and local artist walk. Flying Squirrel

Community Space, 285 Clarissa St. 7 p.m. Call for info.

Cottage Jefferson EP Release Show w/Vince Dynamic, Attic Abasement, Dumb Angel, and Know Nothing. Bug Jar, 219

Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. Limited entry for unders. $6-$8. Deadstring Brothers. House of Guitars, 645 Titus Ave. 5443500. 6 p.m. Free.

The Deadstring Brothers w/ This Other Life. Abilene Bar &

Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. 6 p.m. $5-$7. Friday in America w/DJ Naps. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N. Water St. 585-325-5600. 9:30 p.m. $5-$11.

Kristen Ford Band w/Sean Michael Smith, Mikela Davis.

Tala Vera, 155 State St. 5463845. 8 p.m. $5-$7. Krypton 88. Firehouse Saloon, 814 South Clinton. 319-3832. 8 p.m. Call for info.

Miles Watts, Brothers from Other Mothers. Sully’s

Brickyard Pub, 240 South Ave. 232-3960. 5 p.m. Call for info.

Miranda Lambert w/Dierks Bentley, Lee Brice. Blue Cross Arena, One War Memorial Square. 758-5300. 7:30 p.m. $28-$52.75.

Music4Everyone Benefit Concert: This Life, The Bearfoot Brothers, and The Patrick Jaouen Band. Abilene

Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. 8 p.m. $5.

Raining Blood w/Metal Militia. Pineapple Jack’s, 485

Spencerport Rd. 247-5225. $5.


JAZZ | VLATKOVICH TRYYO

INDIE ROCK | THEY MIGHT BE GIANTS

PUNK | THE QUEERS

West Coast trombonist extraordinaire Michael Vlatkovich has played with stars like Peggy Lee, Brian Setzer, and Bryan Adams. His skillful sliding has also enlivened the soundtracks of movies like “The Mask,” “Jingle All The Way,” and John Cassavetes’ “The Tempest.” But when Vlatkovich takes the reins, he prefers to improvise on the wild side with his own Vlatkovich Tryyo. With Jonathan Golove on electric cello and Damon Short on drums, the group has a sound as eclectic as its unlikely combination of instruments.

The founding members of They Might Be Giants have been creating and playing music together for 30 years. While the line-up of the rest of the band has changed since the move to a full band in the early 90’s, John Flansburgh and John Linnell have been the linchpins, overseeing the group’s sound and direction. The Giants have sold more than 4 million records, won two Grammys, and recorded children’s albums. The group is nothing if not prolific. The band’s upcoming album — its 16th — will be released on March 5. But before that, the outfit brings its indie rock to The German House for a show on March 1. Washington, D.C. band Vandaveer opens the show.

Despite several break-ups over the years, The Queers have been playing Ramones-inspired punk rock since the early 1980’s. And though the comparisons make perfect sense, the band adds its own harmony and pop polish twists. With close to 40 members having gone in and out of its ranks, guitarist/lead vocalist Joe Queer is the one constant in the band. Bill mates the Anderson Stingrays — purveyors of the mighty three-chord punk rock, Queers disciples, and one of my favorite new Rochester bands — add mucho buzz-saw chaos. The Stingrays’ debut “Rock ’n’ Roll Party in Space” was produced by Joe Queer. The band recently contributed a tune to the Screeching Weasel tribute “Screech Like a Weasel” and has recently released its “Goon Squad” EP. Teenage Bottlerocket and Masked Intruder also add to loud fun.

The Vlatkovich Tryyo performs Monday, March 4, 8 p.m. at the Bop Shop, 1460 Monroe Ave. $10 donation requested. 271-3354, bopshop.com. — BY RON NETSKY Teagan & The Tweeds. Dinosaur Bar-B-Que, 99 Court St. 585325-7090. 10 p.m. Free. They Might Be Giants w/ Vandaveer. The German House Theater, 315 Gregory St. 4426880. 8 p.m. $30.50-$35.

SATURDAY, MARCH 2 [ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ] Beet Juice. Tala Vera, 155 State St. 546-3845. 8 p.m. Call for info. Candela. Tapas 177 Lounge, 177 St. Paul St. 585-262-2090. 11 p.m. Free. Collin Jones Music. Shamrock Jack’s, 4554 Culver Rd. 4029802. Call for info. Jim Lane.The Pint And Goblet Tavern, 300 Village Square. 624-4386. 6 p.m. Free. Jon Akers. Flaherty’s Webster, 1200 Bay Rd. 671-0816. Call for info. Ted McGraw. McGraw’s Irish Pub, 146 W Commercial St. 348-9091. 5:30 p.m. Free. [ BLUES ]

John Cole Blues Band. Dinosaur

Bar-B-Que, 99 Court St. 585325-7090. 10 p.m. Free.

[ CLASSICAL ] Connie Deming. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 258-0400. 8:30 p.m. Free.

The Lyric Chorale: “What’s in a Name? - Ten Years of Lyric”. St. Rita’s Church, 1008 Maple Drive. 671-1100. 7 p.m. $20. RPO: Exquisite Puccini. Kodak Hall at Eastman Theater, 60 Gibbs St. 8 p.m. Neil

Varon, guest conductor. Karin Wolverton, soprano. Dinyar Vania, tenor. $15-$82. [ COUNTRY ]

The Skiffle Minstrels. Sticky Lips BBQ Juke Joint, 830 Jefferson Rd. 292-5544. 9 p.m. Free.

They Might Be Giants perform Friday, March 1, 8 p.m. at the German House Theater, 315 Gregory St. $30.50-$35. Ticketfly.com. — BY ANDY KLINGENBERGER Hot Streak. Prosecco Italian

Restaurant, 1550 New York 332. 924-8000. 7 p.m. Call for info. Ted Nicolosi and Shared Genes. The Glengarry Inn @ Eagle Vale, 4400 Fairport 9 Mile Point Rd. 598-3820. 7 p.m. Free.

[ DJ/ELECTRONIC ]

DJ Big Reg. Plush, 151 St.

Paul St. 232-5650. 10 p.m. Call for info. DJ Darkwave. Vertex Nightclub, 169 North Chestnut St. 2325498. 10 p.m. $3-$8. DJ Trancesend. Decibel Lounge., 45 Euclid St. 7544645. 10 p.m. $5. Dynamic Saturdays. ONE Nightclub and Lounge, 1 Ryan Alley. 546-1010. Call for info. Call for info. La Selva. Tilt Nightclub & Ultralounge, 444 Central Ave. 232-8440. 10 p.m. Call for info.

Latino Saturdays w/DJ Bobby Base. Pure Night Club, 117

Liberty Pole Way. 454-7230. 10 p.m. Call for info. Saturday Night Ladies Night. BLU Bar & Grill, 250 Pixley Road. 247-0079. 9 p.m. Call for info. [ JAZZ ]

Bob Sneider. Bistro 135, 135

W. Commercial St. 585-6625555. 6 p.m. Free. El Rojo Jazz. Prosecco Italian Restaurant, 1550 New York 332. 924-8000. 7 p.m. Free.

Fred Costello & Roger Eckers Jazz Duo. Charley Brown’s, 1675 Penfield Rd. 385-9202. 7:30 p.m. Free.

[ REGGAE/JAM ]

Dopapod w/Haewa. Water Street

Music Hall, 204 N. Water St. 585-325-5600. 9 p.m. $10-$12. [ POP/ROCK ]

Black Ice, Motorcycle Club.

California Brew Haus, 402 Ridge Rd. West. 621-1480. 9 p.m. Call for info. Cowboy Mouth w/LastNote. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N. Water St. 585-325-5600. 8 p.m. $20-$25.

A Celebration of Francis Poulenc I. Nazareth College

Wilmot Recital Hall, 4245 East Avenue. 389-2700. 3 p.m. Free. Compline. Christ Church, 141 East Ave. 454-3878. 9 p.m. Free, donations accepted.

Eastman Chorale/Cordancia: J.S. Bach’s St. Matthew Passion. Asbury First United

Methodist Church, 1050 East Ave. 271-1050. 3 p.m. $5-$10.

Eastman-Ranlet Series: Pacifica Quartet. Kilbourn Hall,

Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. 9:30 p.m. $5-$8.

26 Gibbs St. 3 p.m. $10-$20. RPO: Music from Italy. Hochstein Performance Hall, 50 N Plymouth Ave. 454-4596. 2 p.m. $10-$24.

Lovin Cup Unplugged Dinner Music Series: Katie Preston.

[ JAZZ ]

Harmonica Lewinski w/Stoney Lonesome. Abilene Bar &

Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. 6 p.m. Free.

Single Bullet Theory w/Abhor, AFR, The Gutted, and Special Buddy Discount. Bug Jar, 219

Michael Vadala Trio. Prosecco Italian Restaurant, 1550 New York 332. 924-8000. 5 p.m. Call for info.

Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. Limited entry for unders. $6-$8.

[ POP/ROCK ]

SUNDAY, MARCH 3

Envious Disguise w/The Setbacks, The Results. Bug Jar,

[ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ]

Celtic Music Sundays: John Dady. Temple Bar and Grille, 109

East Ave. 232-6000. 7 p.m. Free. Fandango at the Tango.

The show takes place Tuesday, March 5, 9 p.m. at the

Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. $12-$15. 454-2966, Tango Cafe, 389 Gregory St. 271-4930. 7:30 p.m. Free, bugjar.com. — BY FRANK DE BLASE donations accepted. Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. Water Street Music Hall, 204 The Grey Hollow Road. Boulder N. Water St. 585-325-5600. 8 Coffee Co. – Park Ave., 739 Park 258-0400. 7:30 p.m. Free. p.m. $8-$10. Ave. 697-0235. 8 p.m. Free. Steve Lyons. Abilene Bar & [ DJ/ELECTRONIC ] Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. [ CLASSICAL ] Manic Monday Retro 232-3230. 8 p.m. Free.

219 Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. $5-$7.

MONDAY, MARCH 4 [ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ]

Watkins and The Rapiers. Little

Dance:David Lee Rad, DJ Cub, and Lulu. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe

Ave. 9 p.m. 21+. Free.

[ CLASSICAL ]

Lyman Brothers. St. Mary’s [ JAZZ ]

Ben Waara. Lemoncello, 137

West Commercial St. 385-8565. 6 p.m. Free. Jesse Collins Duo. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. 585662-5555. 5:30 p.m. Free. The Vlatkovich Tryyo. The Bop Shop, 1460 Monroe Ave. 2713354. 8 p.m. $10. [ POP/ROCK ] Deftones. Main Street Armory, 900 E. Main St. 232-3221. 7 p.m. $30-$35.

Lovin’ Cup Idol: Michael Jackson/Stevie Wonder Week. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. Call for info.

TUESDAY, MARCH 5

Church, 15 St. Mary’s Place. 232-7140. 8 p.m. Free, donations accepted. [ JAZZ ]

Bob Henley. Lemoncello, 137

West Commercial St. 385-8565. 6 p.m. Free. Gary Chudyk. Prosecco Italian Restaurant, 1550 New York 332. 924-8000. 5:30 p.m. Call for info.

Ted Nicolosi and Shared Genes. Bistro 135, 135 W.

Commercial St. 662-5555. 6 p.m. Bistro135.net. Free. [ POP/ROCK ]

Teenage Bottlerocket & The Queers w/Masked Intruder, The Anderson Stingrays. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. $12-$15.

[ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ] Jim Lane. The Cottage Hotel, 1390 Pittsford Mendon Rd. 624-1390. 7 p.m. Free. Johnny Bauer. The Cottage Hotel, 1390 Pittsford Mendon Rd. 624-1390. 7 p.m. Free.

Spirit Family Reunion w/Grand Canyon Rescue Episode. rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 17


Theater

Hoppy Hour

Sunday thru Thursday 9pm-11pm

$1 off

all

Beers A proud Park Ave Merchant since 1980 197 PARK AVENUE 442-4293 HOGANSHIDEAWAY.COM

Redhot & Blue of Yale University

The cast of “The Book Club Play,” now running on the Geva Theatre Mainstage. PHOTO BY KEN HUTH

Just shy of best-seller “The Book Club Play” THROUGH MARCH 17 GEVA THEATRE CENTER, 75 WOODBURY BLVD. TICKETS START AT $25 | 232-4382, GEVATHEATRE.ORG [ REVIEW ] BY ADAM LUBITOW

presents an afternoon of jazz a cappella

Sunday, March 10, 2013 at 3:00 PM St. Thomas’ Episcopal Church 2000 Highland Avenue Rochester, NY $10 suggested donation redhotandblueofyale.org SPONSORED BY:

120 Stonewood Ave. (Just off Lake Ave) 585.663.0430 1230 Lehigh Station Rd. (Henrietta) 585.334.5500 18 CITY FEBRUARY 27 - MARCH 5, 2013

Karen Zacarías’ “The Book Club Play” began life in 2008 and has continued to be workshopped, allowing the writer to polish and refine her script. It’s now five years later, but the current production, currently on Geva’s Mainstage through March 17, still has the feeling of a rough draft that hasn’t quite gelled together. Despite its flaws, however, the show is always entertaining, and there are enough glimmers of the smart, funny show it wants to be (thanks to some smart, snappy direction and a pitch-perfect cast) to make it a worthy addition to Geva’s lineup. The play has the feel of a farce without the overly convoluted plot. In fact, the plot is rather simple: A group of friends who are members of an informal book club, agree to allow themselves to become the subjects of a documentary by a renowned international filmmaker who’s making a movie about the culture of book clubs. Their meetings will be filmed by several cameras, operated remotely by the director.

Knowing that they’re constantly being watched, the group members try in vain to present the best version of themselves. Things don’t go as planned and, with the cameras rolling, they find themselves behaving in ways that are utterly at odds with how they’d like to be portrayed on film. Naturally, it isn’t too long before secrets come out and revelations are made. The members of the club each fall into specific types: Ana (Jessica Wortham) is the snobby, tightly-wound leader of the group (though there’s a bit of contention over whether or not she was the one who actually started the club). Her husband Rob (Tom Coiner) is a bit lazy, never bothering to read the assigned books. Jen (Kristen Mengelkoch) is an awkward, lonely paralegal, hoping to move on from a scandal in her past. Will (John Gregorio) is a prissy museum curator who also happens to be a former boyfriend of Ana and best friend to Rob. And Lily (Brett Robinson), the newest addition to the group, is younger than the rest. She’s perky, hip, and just happens to be the only black member of the book club. She fits in, but can’t help occasionally feeling that she may have been brought in solely to add to the group’s diversity. All five actors are great, fleshing out their characters enough to make them feel convincing as real human beings. That’s no

small feat in this type of broad comedy, where performances have to be cranked up to eleven and every other line needs to be shouted. It is a definite strength of the script, however, that every character is given their chance to shine. As if there weren’t enough stress being under the watchful eye of the documentary cameras, discord abounds after certain members of the group decide that they’d like to shake things up by broadening the club’s focus from the stuffy, classical novels they’ve been reading and branch out to more contemporary, popular books. Like “Twilight.” Then Jen decides to bring a new member into the group: Alex, an excitable professor of literature from the local college. All these rapid changes force Ana to attempt to re-exert control over the group, causing chaos in the ranks. Despite the relative simplicity of the plot, Zacarías adds too many ingredients to the pot. The documentary plotline too often feels contrived and unnecessary, and the best scenes are the ones that ignore that premise entirely. It’s as though she didn’t trust that her characters and their problems were interesting enough on their own and needed to heighten the drama. Interspersed periodically throughout the story we see interviews with the other documentary subjects, everyone from a Secret Service agent to a retired sky-diving librarian, each describing the role that books have played in their life. On their own, these scenes are interesting, raising questions about why we need books and the way they can shape us as individuals. But in the context of the play, they have a tendency to stop things dead. There’s also a too tidy epilogue where everything has to be tied up in a neat little package, but that’s a relatively minor complaint. The play’s script touches on some interesting ideas, and by far the best scene in the show revolves around a lengthy, somewhat heated discussion that the group gets into during one meeting about the novel “Twilight.” The characters bounce off one another, and the dialogue crackles as they defend their opinions, arguing over what exactly makes something “literature” and whether it’s right to discount a work just because it’s popular. If a book means so much to millions of people, doesn’t that mean that there’s something worthwhile there, no matter how poorly written it may be? The conversation feels like one that might actually occur at a book club meeting, and it’s done in such an entertaining way, subtly sprinkling a few intellectual thoughts amongst the oneliners and pratfalls, that it’s the one time the play truly lives up to its potential.


Art Exhibits [ OPENING ] Art Roc NY 2013 Showcase Closing Party. Thu., Feb. 28, 7-9 p.m. JGK Galleries, 10 Vick Park A Attend the Closing Party and fill out a ballot for a chance to win $100 toward an art purchse $10 tickets, RSVP. 734-6581. info@ jgkgalleries. jgkgalleries.com. “As ready as I’ll ever be,” new work by Andrew Cho. March 1-April 13. The Firehouse Gallery at Genesee Pottery, 713 Monroe Avenue Reception Fri Mar 1 6-9 p.m 244-1730. geneseearts.org. Bugzilla: Bigger Than The Beetles. Fri., March 1, 5-9 p.m. Cat Clay, 1115 E. Main Street, Suite 225 A group Thaw show celebrating insects, those harbingers of Spring 414-5643. catclay.com. Costa Rican Surf Culture, Photographic Exhbiition of Work by Mark Wiseman of Nomadic Arts. Fri., March 1, 6-10 p.m. Rochester Contemporary Arts Center, 137 East Ave. Upstairs studios rochestercontemporary.org. “From Thought to Image: Art Quilts of Nancy P. Hicks.” Feb. 28-April 7. Williams Gallery at First Unitarian Church, 220 S Winton Rd Mon-Fri 10 a.m.2 p.m., Thu 4:30-7:30 p.m. Reception Mar 24, 1:30-3:30 p.m nancyphicks.com. “It’s Black It’s White” New Drawings by Tim Mack. March 1-31. Equal=Grounds, 750 South Ave. Reception Mar 1 7-9 p.m Free. gallery@equalgrounds.com. Jack Wolsky. Mondays-Fridays Mercer Gallery at Monroe Communtiy College, 1000 E. Henrietta Rd Mon-Thu 11 a.m.-7 p.m., Fri 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Reception Feb 27, 7-9 p.m. Gallery Talk Wed Mar 6 at noon Free. 292-2021. kfarrell@ monroecc.edu. monroecc.edu/ go/mercer. Judd Williams: “Eccentrics.” Axom Gallery, 176 Anderson Ave, 2nd floor. Wed-Sat 12-5 p.m. and by appointment. First Friday Reception Mar 1 5:30-9:30 p.m. Reception Feb 8 5:30-9 p.m 2326030. axomgallery.com. Main Street Artists’ First Friday open studio show and sale. Fri., March 1, 5-9 p.m. Main Street Artists’ Gallery & Studio, 1115 E. Main St. Featured artist for March: Sandy Grana of Webster Music: Mike and Mel, contemporary sounds 233-5645. suzizeftingkuhn@gmail.com. mainstreetartistsgallery.com. “Modern Love A collection of Paintings” by Sam Snyder. March 1-31. SPoT Coffee, 200 East Ave. Reception: Mar 1 6-10 p.m 6134600. spotcoffee.com. Operation P.H.O.T.O. (People Helping Others Overcome). March 1-30. JGK Galleries, 10 Vick Park A Tue-Thu & Sat 11 a.m.-3 p.m., Mon-Fri by appt. First Fridays 6-9 p.m 734-6581. jgkgalleries.com. Painting Music by Local Artists. Fri., March 1, 6-9 p.m. Aviv Cafe, 321 East Ave Live music and open painting Free. 729-9916. “Precious Metals: New Paintings on Gold, Silver, and Copper” by Beverly Rafferty. Acanthus Café, 337 East Ave. Through March 24. Reception Mar 1 7:30-9 p.m 3195999. acanthuscafe.com. Rochester Area Fiber Artists (RAFA) presents: “Winter’s End.” Feb. 28-March 30. Mill Art Center & Gallery, 61 N Main St Reception Feb 28 6-8 p.m millartcenter.com.

Mar 1 6-10 p.m 413-1278. blackradishstudio.com.

ART | FIRST FRIDAY

Time to brave the bitter weather. March’s First Friday is a cabin-fever reliever, and promises a bunch of art receptions and even a literary scavenger hunt. Here are just a few highlights of cultural events taking place on March 1; visit firstfridayrochester.org or our online calendar at rochestercitynewspaper.com for more. Cat Clay at the Hungerford (1115 E. Main St., door 2, suite 225) will host “Bugzilla — Bigger than the Beetles,” (pictured) a one-night-only “Pop Up Roc” group “Thaw” show celebrating insects, the harbingers of spring that elicit perhaps the most mixed feelings among humans. Check out the collection of crawly crafts at the Friday reception, 5-9 p.m. Admission is free, and the show continues throughout March. For more information, call 414-5643 or visit catclay.com. Also at the Hungerford, the Grass Roots Gallery (door 1, suite 157) will host “REJUVENATE: A Winter Blues Remedy” on Friday, March 1, 6-10 p.m., and also Saturday, March 9, 7-11 p.m., when there will be live music by George Hogan and his band. At both events you can look forward to wine tastings, massage, and spa treatments, and more. For more info, email thegrassrootsgallery@gmail.com. Jolene Beckman will debut her new body of work, “Within the Wallpaper,” at Black Radish Studio (274 N. Goodman St., suite 501) Friday 6-10 p.m. The show will remain on view through March 29, and is free to visit. For more information, call 413-1278 or visit blackradishstudio.com. Axom Gallery (176 Anderson Ave., floor 2) will host an artist reception for the current show, “Judd Williams: Eccentrics,” a solo showing of the artist’s paintings and sculpture, on Friday 5:30-9:30 p.m. The artist will speak 7:30-8:30 p.m., and the show remains on view through March 9. The event is free to attend. For more information, call 232-6030 or visit axomgallery.com. Writers & Books (740 University Ave.) will host a themed party to kick off local events relating to this year’s “If All of Rochester Read the Same Book” pick, “Into the Beautiful North” by Luis Alberto Urrea, with music from Trio Los Claveles, Mexican food from Salena’s, and a First Friday Scavenger Hunt. The event is free and open to the public and takes place 7-9 p.m. For more information, call 4732590 or visit wab.org. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY “Salvador Dalí: Dante’s Divine Comedy.” Feb. 28-March 29. Tower Fine Arts Center, SUNY Brockport, 180 Holley St. MonFri 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Sun 1-4 p.m. Closed from March 16–24 for academic break. Reception Feb 28, 4-6 p.m 395-2805. brockport.edu/finearts. THAW Flux Annual. March 1-2. The Hungerford, 1115 E. Main St., studio 258, door 2. Fri Mar 1: 5-9 p.m., Mar 2 & 9: 11 a.m.3 p.m thehungerford.com.

“What Shape is White.” March 1-31. International Art Acquisitions, 3300 Monroe Ave. Featuring David Kerstetter, Monteiro Prestes, Peggy Corthouts, Edward Loedding. Mon-Fri 10 a.m.-9 p.m., Sat 10 a.m.-6 p.m., Sun 12-5 p.m Free. 264-1440. internationalartacquisitions.com. “Within the Wallpaper,” new work by Jolene Beckman. March 1-29. Black Radish Studio, 274 N. Goodman Mon-Fri 10 a.m.-6 p.m, Sat 12-6 p.m. Reception

[ CONTINUING ] 1975 Gallery, 89 Charlotte St. and The Yards 50-52 Public Market. Boys vs Girls. Through March 2. 1975ish.com, attheyards.com. Acanthus Café, 337 East Ave. “Precious Metals: New Paintings on Gold, Silver, and Copper” by Beverly Rafferty. Through March 24. Reception Mar 1 7:30-9 p.m 319-5999. acanthuscafe.com. AAUW Art Forum, 494 East Ave. Off the Wall VII Members Exhibit. Continues through Apr 19 by appointment only. 244-9892. Art & Music Library, Rush Rhees Library, University of Rochester, River Campus. (en)Gendered Juried Art. Through Feb 27. Mon-Fri 9 a.m.-5 p.m. rochester. edu/college/wst. Arts Council for Wyoming County, 31 S Main St. “Local Color.” Through March 8. Through Mar 8. Reception Mar 8 6-8 p.m 237-3517. artswyco.org. The Assisi Institute, 1400 North Winton Rd. “Toothpick World” by Stan Munro. Tue-Thu noon6 p.m., Fri noon-8 p.m., Sat 11 a.m.-4 p.m $5 suggested donation. 473-8731. assisiinstitute.org. Aviv Cafe, 321 East Ave “Nehemiah’s Wal”l by Deborah Ingerick. Through Feb. 28. 729-9916. Axom Gallery, 176 Anderson Ave, 2nd floor. Judd Williams: “Eccentrics.” Wed-Sat 12-5 p.m. and by appointment. First Friday Reception Mar 1 5:30-9:30 p.m. Reception Feb 8 5:30-9 p.m 2326030. axomgallery.com. Barnes & Noble, 3349 Monroe Ave. Penfield Art Association Winter Show. Through Mar 1. Mon-Sat 9 a.m.-10 p.m., Sun 9 a.m.-9 p.m. 586-6020. penfieldartassociation.com. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. “What Fury Fiends Find” Adelin Karius: New Paintings and Woodcuts. Through Mar 31. 8 p.m.-2 p.m. lobbydigital@gmail. com. lobbydigital.com. Cat Clay, 1115 E Main Street, Suite 225. Hunk of Burnin’ Love. Through Mar 31. Glass & clay for your valentine by Paul Taylor & Clifton Wood 4145643. catclay.com. Crossroads Coffee House, 752 S. Goodman St. Dead End City Art Show II. Through Feb 28. 2446787. kccrossroadscoffee.com. Davis Gallery, Houghton House, Hobart and William Smith Colleges, 1 Kings Lane, Geneva. From 500 Sketches by Frank P. Phillips. Through Mar 9. Mon-Fri 9 a.m.-5 p.m, Sat 1-5 p.m. 315-781-3487. hws.edu/ academics/art/exhibitions.aspx. Davison Gallery, Cultural Life Center, Roberts Wesleyan College, 2301 Westside Dr. All Juried Student Show. Through March 11. 594-6442. roberts.edu. Gallery r, 100 College Ave. “Continuance.” Through March 1. R.I.T. Alumni Exhibition, with Guest Curator Amy Vena 585256-3312. galleryr99@gmail.com. George Eastman House, 900 East Ave. “Silver and Water.” Through May 26 Included in admission: $5-$12. 271-3361. eastmanhouse.org. Hartnett Gallery, Wilson Commons, University of Rochester, River Campus.

Janice Jakielski “Being Here” Installation. Tue-Fri 11 a.m.-7 p.m., Sat-Sun 12-5 p.m. Closed Mar 9-16 for UR Spring Break 275-4188. blogs.rochester.edu/ hartnett. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. Enrique Mora. Through Mar 1 258-0400. thelittle.org. Livingston Arts Center, 4 Murray Hill Dr. 2013 Member’s Exhibit: Freedom of Expression. Through Mar 2. Wed & Fri 1-4 p.m., Thu 1-7:30 p.m., Sat 11 a.m.-3 p.m 243-6785. livingstonarts.org. Lux Lounge, 666 South Ave. The Art of J Nevadomski and Allie Hartley. ongoing. 232-9030. lux666.com. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. Through Mar 17: Art Reflected: 1913-2013. Lockhart Gallery Through May 12: “Becoming Modern: Armory Show Artists at MAG.” Wed-Sun 11 a.m.-5 p.m., Thu until 9 p.m $5-$12. 276-8900. mag. rochester.edu. My Sister’s Gallery, 505 Mt Hope Ave. “Art Therapy.” Through March 31, 10 a.m.-8 p.m. A display of wooden sculptures by Cheryl and Don Olney Free. Nan Miller Gallery, 3450 Winton Place. “Contrasts & Contours” Hamilton Aguiar. Through Mar 2. Tue-Sat 10 a.m.-5 p.m. 2921430. info@nanmillergallery.com. nanmillergallery.com. Nazareth College Arts Center, 4245 East Ave “Good Work” Illustration Invitational. Through Mar 1. Hours Sun and Tue-Thu noon-5 p.m., Fri-Sat noon-8 p.m. 389-5073. naz.edu/art/arts-center-gallery. Nazareth College Colacino Gallery, 4245 East Ave. “Design in the Working World: The Alumni Graphic Design Exhibit.” Through Mar 1. Hours Wed-Sun noon-5 p.m. 389-5073. naz. edu/art/colacino-art-gallery. The Owl House, 75 Marshall St. Artwork by Alexander Currier. Through Mar 10. 360-2920. owlhouserochester.com. Phillips Fine Art, 248 East Ave. Kurt Feuerherm “Timeless” Mixed Media and Landscapes. Tue-Fri 12-6 p.m., Sat 12-5 p.m. or by appt 232-8150. Plastic, 650 South Ave. The Art of Jamie Lowes. Tue-Sat 11 a.m.-7 p.m. 563-6348. facebook.com/plasticgrrl?fref=ts. Rare Books & Special Collections, Rush Rhees Library, University of Rochester, River Campus. Alice in the Looking Glass: Illustrations and Artists’ Books 1865-2012. Through Aug 16. Mon-Fri 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Sat 11 a.m.-3 p.m 275-4477. Record Archive, 33 1/3 Rockwood St. Heroes and Villains. ongoing. recordarchive.com. Rochester Contemporary Arts Center, 137 East Ave. Makers & Mentors. Through Mar 17. WedSun 1-5 p.m. New paintings, prints, and mixed media works by Kurt Feuerherm, Peter Monacelli, Patricia Dreher, and Kristine Bouyoucos. In Lab Space: Heather Swenson. 461-2222. rochestercontemporary.org. Rosalie “Roz” Steiner Art Gallery, Genesee Community College, One College Rd. Jan 22-Mar 8: “Mediation and Negociations” by Elena Lourenco. Through Mar 13: “a*new*found*land” by Joe Ziolkowski. Mon, Wed, Thu Fri 10 a.m.-4 p.m., other times by appt 343-0055 x6616. stvierrico@ genesee.edu. genesee.edu.

Spectrum Gallery at Lumiere Photo, 100 College Ave. “Brighton Country Homes and Architects.” Through March 16. 461-4447. lumierephoto.com. Starry Nites Café, 696 University Ave. “Let Them Eat Cake! Portraits of Pastries.” Through May 12. Free. 732-0036. studio212@shoefactoryarts.com. shoefactoryarts.com. University of Rochester, River Campus. “If I Had a Camera, Re-Imagining Film and Media through a Feminist Lens.” Through Feb. 28. 275-6948. sbai@rochester.edu. rochester. edu. Valley Manor, 1570 East Ave. Light and Shadows. Through Mar 8. Mon-Fri 9 a.m.-5 p.m. A black and white art show by family artists: Dick Roberts, Allison Roberts, and Eric Cady 770-1923. Visual Studies Workshop, 31 Prince St. PhotoBook Awards 2012. Through March 31. Reception Feb 26 7 p.m 4428676. vsw.org. Wood Library, 134 North Main St. Exhibition of Recent Works by Kevin Carr. Through Mar 4. Paintings and prints. Free. 394-1381. Thinking Outside the Box: Jen Born featuring works by Fairport HS students. Through Feb. 28 and Fri., March 1, 7-9 p.m. Gallery Salon & Spa, 780 University Ave. Reception Mar 1 7-9 p.m 2718340. galleryhair.com. Tom Kim Solo Photography, “Text and Texture” and “Neil Montanus & James Montanus: A Glimpse of the World.” WednesdaysSundays High Falls Fine Art Gallery, 60 Browns Race. Through Feb 28. Wed-Fri 11 a.m.-5:30 p.m., Sat 12-5:30 p.m., Sun 1-5 p.m. Reception Sunday Jan 20, 3-6 p.m 3252030. centerathighfalls.org. “Totems and Other Tributes to the Earth: Ceramic Works by Peter Gerbic.” Mondays-Sundays Williams-Insalaco Gallery at FLCC, 3325 Marvin Sands Dr Mon-Thu 8:30 a.m.-9 p.m., Fri 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m., Sat-Sun noon5 p.m. Artist talk Feb 7 2 p.m., reception Feb 8 4-6:30 p.m 7851369. flccconnects.com.

Art Events [ WED., FEBRUARY 27 ] Art Night. 6:30 p.m. Arts Council for Wyoming County, 31 S. Main St This Wednesday we will focus on creating projects for the annual 6x6 art show in Rochester, NY Free. 237-3517. artswyco.org. [ THU., FEBRUARY 28 ] The Marrilyn Byron Hand/ crafted Primitive Art Show. Feb. 28-March 2, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Macedon American Legion, 76 West Main St Free. 474-4116. books_etc@yahoo.com. [ FRI., MARCH 1 ] Annual Award Reception. March 1, 5:30-7:30 p.m. Livingston Arts Center, 4 Murray Hill Dr. Musical guests: Genesee Valley Children’s Choir and Richard Balkin and Amy Cochrane. Join us to congratulate recipients of Arts and Cultural Grants that serve Livingston County 243-6785. kalastein@livingstonarts.org. First Friday at the Schweinfurth Art Center. March 1, 5-8 p.m. Schweinfurth Art Center, 205 Genesee St. Families are continues on page 20

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 19


Royal Ball. March 2-3. The Strong National Museum of Play, 1 Manhattan Square Sat 11 a.m.-4 p.m., Sun 1-4 p.m $13, free to members and kids under 2 2632700. museumofplay.org. [ SUN., MARCH 3 ] Family Fun Game Day. March 3, 1:30-4:30 p.m. Central Library, Children’s Center, 115 South Ave. Ages 3-11 Free. 428-8150. libraryweb.org.

Lectures DANCE/ART | ROCHESTER DANCE PROJECT

Rochester Dance Project will bring the paintings of Jennissa Hart (pictured) to life through contemporary dance on Friday, March 1, at 7:15 p.m. The evening will also include student/ teacher demonstrations in ballroom dancing with live music, and takes place at the new multi-use space, Lessons at the Loft (708 University Ave.). The event is free and open to the public, and doors open at 6 p.m. Located in the historic Flatiron Building in the heart of the Neighborhood of the Arts, Lessons at the Loft is an artisan cooperative where all artists and teachers share an active role in supporting and sharing their art forms through classes, exhibitions, and curating local artists. The collective inhabits a space that was once a popular dance hall back in the early 1900’s. The current owner, Danielle Deuel, has kept the original floor perfectly intact. For more information on the event or classes, call 704-2889 or visit lessonsattheloft.com. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY

Art Events invited to view Both Ends of the Rainbow, and there will be family art making with Mike Schaaf. Free. 315-255-1553. mtraudt@schweinfurthartcenter. org. myartcenter.org. First Friday City Wide Gallery Night. first Friday of every month, 6-9 p.m. firstfridayrochester.org. Hungerford First Friday Open Studios/Galleries. first Friday of every month, 6-9 p.m thehungerford.com. “Rejuvinate: A Winter Blues Remedy.” March 1, 6-10 p.m. Grass Roots Gallery, suite 157, Hungerford Bldg, 1115 E. Main St., Suite 248 Vibrant art, massage, facials and lashes, wine tasting and more. Sat: Live music by George Hogan and his Band thegrassrootsgallery@gmail.com. [ SAT., MARCH 2 ] The Moho Collective: Lovin’ Art Release Show. March 2, 9 p.m. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. $3-$5. 292-9940. lovincup.com.

Comedy [ THU., FEBRUARY 28 ] Godfrey. Feb. 28-March 2. Comedy Club, 2235 Empire Blvd. Thu 7:30 p.m., Fri-Sat 7:30 & 10 p.m $9-$12. 6719080. thecomedyclub.us. [ SAT., MARCH 2 ] Polite Company: It Is Not Polite to Stare. March 2, 8 p.m. MuCCC, 142 Atlantic Ave $10$12. muccc.org.

Dance Events [ FRI., MARCH 1 ] “Dominant Voices” by Rochester Dance Project. March 1, 6 p.m. Lessons at the Loft, 708

University Ave. Rochester City Dance Project will bring the paintings of Jennissa Hart to life through dance! See contemporary dance at its best and enjoy lite refreshments, student / teacher demonstrations in ballroom dancing with live music!. Free. 704-2889. lessonsattheloft.com. Geomantics Dance Theater. March 1, 7 p.m. Physikos Movement, Village Gate, 302 N. Goodman St. With Richard Haisma & Dancers. Included: A special pre-showing of dances to be premiered May 9 -12 @ Downstairs Cabaret Theatre Center Free. projectivekinetics. org.

Kids Events [ WED., FEBRUARY 27 ] Auditions for ROC Stars Talent Series. Feb. 27. Thomas P. Ryan Community Center, 530 Webster Ave. Calling all singers, rappers, dancers, poets and visual artists ages 10-19. 4286360. harrist@cityofrochester. gov. cityofrochester.gov/ talentshows. [ FRI., MARCH 1 ] Anonymous Otaku: Anime Club. March 1, 3:30-5 p.m. Seymour Library, 161 East Ave. Grades 6-12 637-1050. seymourlibraryweb.org. [ SAT., MARCH 2 ] Aliens: Friend or Foe?. March 2-3, 12-4 p.m. Rochester Museum and Science Center, 657 East Ave. Also on Saturday: The Science of Building, 11 a.m.-4p.m Included in museum admission $11-$13. 271-1880. rmsc.org. Happy Birthday, Dr Seuss! March 2, 12-2 p.m. Seymour Library, 161 East Ave. Free, register. 6371050. seymourlibraryweb.org.

20 CITY FEBRUARY 27 - MARCH 5, 2013

[ WED., FEBRUARY 27 ] Conversations on Race: A Process of Discovery. 6-8 p.m. Winton Branch Library, 611 Winton Rd. North Free. 585748-7727. libraryweb.org. Harriet Tubman: Heroic Conductor of the Underground Railroad. 7 p.m. Irondequoit Library, Helen McGraw Branch, 2180 E. Ridge Rd Harriet Tubman escaped from slavery in Maryland and became a conductor on the Underground Railroad. At great risk to herself, she returned to the South numerous times and helped hundreds of slaves to freedom. Speaker Neil Frankel, a retired manager of engineering organizations, is currently writing a book about the slave years in America Free. 336-6060. libraryweb.org. Kristel Thornell Discusses Becoming a Writer. 7:30 p.m. Rush Rhees Library, University of Rochester, River Campus Hawkins-Carlson Room. Free parking is available in Library Lot Free. 275-4461. Panel: Polish History and the Uprising Against the Russian Empire. 7:30 p.m. University of Rochester, River Campus Sloan Auditorium, Goergen Hall, River Campus 275-9898. rochester. edu/colege/psc/cpces. [ THU., FEBRUARY 28 ] Does Your Job Search Need a Tune-Up?. 9:30 a.m.-noon. Gates Public Library, 902 Elmgrove Rd. Free, register. 247-6446. Profiled: Race in Civic Circles. 7 p.m. Baobab Cultural Center, 728 University Ave. How do attitudes about race affect our relationships with law enforcement? What actions can we take toward a more positive relationship between law enforcement and the community? Dialogue facilitated by members of the Rochester and law enforcement community and the Black Bar Association. Panel members for this discussion include: Mike Lopez, Esq. (Monroe County Public Defender’s Office), Sara L.Valencia, Esq. (former Monroe County Assistant District Attorney), Sergeant LaRon Singletary (Rochester Police Department) thebaobab.org. Renowned Ethicist Lisa SowleCahill to Speak on Catholicism and Social Issues. 7 p.m. Nazareth College Shults Center, 4245 East Ave. Renowned ethicist Lisa Sowle Cahill will present Catholic Bioethics, Political Priorities, and the Common Good on Thursday, February 28 at 7 p.m. and Jesus, Feminism, and Catholic Women on Friday, March 1 at 1:30 p.m. as part of the 20122013 Shannon Lecture Series Free. 389-2728. Screening of Martin Luther King Jr.’s “I Have a Dream” speech with discussion. 1 p.m. Finger Lakes Community College, 3325

Marvin Sands Dr Room A105 Free. flcc.edu. Shannon Lecture Series: Lisa Sowle Cahill. Feb. 28-March 1. Nazareth College Shults Center, 4245 East Ave. Feb 28, 7 p.m.: Catholic Bioethics, Political Priorities, and the Common Good; Mar 1, 1:30 p.m.: Jesus, Feminism, and Catholic Women Free. 389-2728. cbochen4@naz.edu. Spotlight on Luisa-Maria RojasRimachi. 5 p.m. Rush Rhees Library, University of Rochester, River Campus “Literature as a Window for Critical Cultural Learning: An Example.” 2754461. “Uncanny Debts” Lecture by Annie McClanahan. 6 p.m. Rush Rhees Library, University of Rochester, River Campus Robbins Library in Rush Rhees 275-4092. [ FRI., MARCH 1 ] English Lecture: Elaine Freedgood. March 1, 4:30 p.m. Rush Rhees Library, University of Rochester, River Campus Koller Collin Library within Rush Rhees 2759255. rochester.edu/college/eng. Sustainability Seminar: “Cities, Physics, and Sustainability” with Adam Frank. March 1, 2 p.m. University of Rochester, River Campus Dewey Hall 2-110D karen.berger@ rochester.edu. rochester.edu. [ SAT., MARCH 2 ] “Living and Working with Purpose and Passion: What I’ve Learned on My Road.” March 2, 6 p.m. Rochester Baha’i Center, 693 East Avenue His business card reads different than most: “Seeker, Author, Speaker, Innovator, Consultant.” Join social innovator, human-motivation researcher, and nationallyrecognized author Andrew Harrison (www.andrewharrison. info) as he shares wisdom from his book– “Love Your 84,000 Hours at Work: Stories on the Road from People with Purpose and Passion”– and describes his journey to writing his latest book about people who love their religion. At 6pm, feel free to bring a dish to pass as we come together to share a meal; the presentation begins around 7. Parking and entrance are on Oxford Street. Supervised activities for children are available during the presentation free; pot luck dinner at 6 pm, lecture at 7 pm. (585) 244-2220. Equality Uganda Lecture and Discussion with LGBTI Activist Luzau Balowa. March 2, 4:30 p.m. SUNY Geneseo, 1 College Rd. An Equality Uganda event at SUNY Geneseo will feature a lecture and discussion with LGBTI (Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Intersex) activist Luzau Balowa. Balowa has had an extensive career in civil rights campaigning for women’s rights, HIV/Aids prevention, and issues surrounding the LGBTI community in Uganda and PanAfrica The event is free and open to the public 585-245-5516. geneseo.edu. Rabbi Israel Meir Lau to speak. March 2, 8:30 p.m. JCC Rochester, 1200 Edgewood Ave. “Out of the Depths: The Story of a Child of Buchenwald Who Returned Home at Last.” $18, RSVP. 271-5690. secretary1675@gmail.com. Susan B. Anthony Institute Keynote. March 2, 1:15-2:15 p.m. Rush Rhees Library,

FILM | DRYDEN THEATRE RE-OPENS

Local film fans have had an especially rough winter since the George Eastman House’s Dryden Theatre, the premier archival cinema in the area, has been closed for an extensive remodel. The good news is that the wait is over, and the revamped Dryden will open Saturday, March 2, with a screening of Alexander Payne’s beloved 2004 film “Sideways.” The even better news is that Payne himself — he also directed “The Descendants,” “About Schmidt,” and “Election” — will be on hand for the event to introduce “Sideways,” and to hold a Q&A after the film. Dryden patrons will find much to be excited about with the renovations. A new, darker color scheme will make the space feel more intimate, the seats have been replaced with much more comfortable chairs, and a new digital projector has been installed, allowing the Dryden to continue to show the best in cinema in a variety of formats. Saturday’s events kick off at 5:30 p.m. with a first look at the renovated theater, and then a dinner in the Eastman House featuring wines inspired by “Sideways.” Tickets to this gala dinner cost $200. The screening begins at 8 p.m., and tickets for the film and Q&A cost $25-$30. The Eastman House is located at 900 East Ave. Additional events will be held this spring to celebrate the Dryden reopening, including a visit by Oscar-nominated director James Ivory on April 6. For more information on the Dryden or upcoming events visit eastmanhouse.org/dryden2013. — BY ERIC REZSNYAK University of Rochester, River Campus Hawkins-Carlson Room. “Work, Profit, and Care: Some Reflections From Feminist Economics” with Julie Nelson sbai@rochester.edu. [ SUN., MARCH 3 ] Voters Walk Enterprises Sunday Symposium. March 3, 2-4 p.m. Frederick Douglass Community Resource Center, 36 King St. March 3 featured guests: Reverend Mary Ramerman from Spiritus Christi Church speaking about the new 1872 Cafe and the wall of honor, Councilwoman Carolee Conklin will share information on Rochester’s Sister Cities program, and members from Voters Walk Enterprises will be sharing their entrepreneur experience. Original artwork by Voters Walk, raffles and time for socializing will be made during the program. March 10 featured guests: Eleanor Coleman speaking about the new Seed Folk Store coming to 540 W Main St, Barbara Hoffman presents Spring table-scapes, and Ruth Scott will speak about writing her memoirs. Original artwork by Voters Walk, raffles and time for socializing will be made during the program. There is no program charge Free, RSVP. 426-2739. voterswalk@ymail.com.

What’s Up Lecture: “The Herdle Sisters’ Travels” with Sue Nurse. March 3, 2 p.m. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. Included in museum admission $5-$12. 276-8900. mag.rochester.edu. [ TUE., MARCH 5 ] Forest Bathing. March 5, 7:30 p.m. Cornell Cooperative Extension of Monroe County, 249 Highland Ave Forest Bathing, presented by Dr. Les Moore. According to Dr. Moore, Shinrin-hoku or “forest bathing” is a short leisurely trip to a forest for its healing benefits. Free. 414-6511. mycce.org/. Tuesday Topics: “Quest for the Living God: Mapping Frontiers in the Theology of God” by Elizabeth A. Johnson.. March 5, 12:1212:52 p.m. Central Library, Kate Gleason Auditorium, 115 South Ave. Speaker: Sr. Beth LeValley Free. 428-8350. libraryweb.org.

Literary Events [ WED., FEBRUARY 27 ] Neilly Lecture: Kristel Thornell “Night Street.” 7:30 p.m. Rush Rhees Library, University of Rochester, River Campus Hawkins-Carlson Room 2754461.


Pure Kona Poetry Readings. 7 p.m. Acanthus Café, 337 East Ave. Local poets gather to read their latest works Free. 3195999. acanthuscafe.com. [ THU., FEBRUARY 28 ] Friends of BML Big Book Sale. Feb. 28-March 4. Brighton Memorial Library, 2300 Elmwood Ave. Feb 28 10 a.m.8:30 p.m. free to members, $5 entry for non members or $10 join at the door. Open to public: Fri-Sat 10 a.m.-5:30 p.m., Sun 1-3:30 p.m. (half price), Mon 10 a.m.-1 p.m. (fill a bag for $3) 784-5300. brightonlibrary.org. Science Fiction Book Group: “Among Others” by Jo Walton.. 7 p.m. Lift Bridge Book Shop, 45 Main St Free. liftbridgebooks.com. [ FRI., MARCH 1 ] First Fridays/Wide Open Mic. first Friday of every month, 7-9 p.m. Writers and Books, 740 University Ave Rochester’s longest running open mic welcomes poets, performers, and writers of all kinds. wab.org. “Into the Beautiful North” Party and Scavenger Hunt. March 1, 6-10 p.m. Writers and Books, 740 University Ave With music (romantic boleros) from Trio Los Claveles, Mexican food from Salena’s Free. 473-2590. wab.org. Literary Reading: Open Mike. March 1, 5 p.m. Different Path Art Gallery, 27 Market St Free. 637-5494. kweston@gmail.com. Oak Orchard Review Reading. March 1, 7-9 p.m. The Pillars Estate, 13800 West County House Rd., Albion 798-1688 x6616. info@oakorchardreview. com. Open Mike Night for poetry, fiction, and creative non-fiction. March 1, 5-7 p.m. A Different Path Gallery, 27 Market St. Attendees will be asked to sign up for a time-slot when they arrive. This event is open to all ages, and young writers are encouraged to attend. Readers are asked to bring a snack or drink to share if possible. Non-writers are encouraged to come to the event to support the readers and enjoy the gallery Free. 395-9833. differentpathgallery.com. [ SAT., MARCH 2 ] Saturday Author Salon featuring Craig Raleigh. March 2, 2 p.m. Lift Bridge Book Shop, 45 Main St liftbridgebooks.com. [ SUN., MARCH 3 ] Journaling for Success. March 3, 1:30 p.m. Books Etc., 78 W. Main St. 474-4116. books_etc@ yahoo.com. Local Author Sunday Series: Elizabeth Osta. March 3, 2-3 p.m. Central Library, Kate Gleason Auditorium, 115 South Ave. A special addition to the reading will be an Irish song performed by Rochesterian Kitty Forbush 4288350. libraryweb.org. [ MON., MARCH 4 ] Book Discussion: “The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society” by Maryanne Shaffer and Annie Burrows.. March 4, 4 p.m. Books Etc., 78 W. Main St. Free. 474-4116. books_etc@ yahoo.com. Moving Beyond Racism Book Group. March 4, 7 p.m. Barnes & Noble Pittsford Plaza, 3349 Monroe Ave. March selection: American Islam by Paul

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SUNGLASS SALE

KIDS | ROYAL BALL

The Queen of Play cordially invites all regional youngsters to engage in a magical weekend filled with fairytale fun at the National Museum of Play (1 Manhattan Square). Dress the kids in their courtly best, and bring them to the museum on Saturday, March 2, 11 a.m.-4 p.m., or Sunday, March 3, 1-4 p.m. Kids can play games, make crafts, try on chainmail, and meet the Fairy Godmother in person. On Saturday at 11 a.m., 1 p.m., and 3 p.m., there will be performances of “Beauty and the Beast,” a one-act opera presented by Rochester Lyric Opera. All weekend, kids can enjoy dance tunes from Nonesuch Early Music Ensemble, meet and receive autographs from illustrator Nancy Wiley and author Douglas Whelan, enjoy a “feast” at the royal banquet table, receive a bejeweled gift from The Fairy Godmother, create their own majestic attire and adornments, improve hand-eye coordination with Nerf “archery” in Sherwood Forest, tend to the dragons and unicorns in the Folkmanis puppet corner, and have their hair braided at Rapunzel’s Hair Salon.

40% DISCOUNT ON ALL SUNGLASS FRAMES

2929 Monroe Ave. 442-0123

Appointments Suggested

All Royal Ball activities are included with general museum admission fee, which is $13 for ages 2 and up, and free to kids younger than age 2. For more information, call 263-2700 or visit museumofplay.org. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY Barrett. Everyone is welcome whether or not you have read the book Free. 288-8644. mbrbookinfo@aol.com. [ TUE., MARCH 5 ] Book Discussion: “Into the Beautiful North” with Luis Alberto Urrea. March 5, 6:30-8 p.m. Seymour Library, 161 East Ave. Free, register. 637-1050. seymourlibraryweb.org. Lift Bridge Writers’ Group. 6:30 p.m. Lift Bridge Book Shop, 45 Main St Free. 637-2260. liftbridgebooks.com. Pat Mora Poetry Discussion. March 5, 7:30 p.m. Penfield Public Library, 1985 Baird Rd. Penfield poet Kathleen Wakefield will discuss the richly evocative poetry of Mexican-American poet Pat Mora, who is also a prolific author of children’s books for which she has won numerous awards Free, register. 340-8720. penfieldlibrary.org. Plutzik Reading Series: Poet Ellen Bryan Voigt. March 5, 5 p.m. Rush Rhees Library, University of Rochester, River Campus Welles-Brown Room 275-9255. rochester.edu/college/eng. R-SPEC meeting. first Tuesday of every month, 7 p.m. Barnes and Noble, Pittsford Plaza Writers of speculative fiction meet once a month to discuss craft Free. 585 278 7501. r-spec.org. [ WED., MARCH 6 ] Spring Writers Workshop with Angela Dailey. March 6, 6:30-8:30 p.m. Naples Public Library, 118 Main St, Naples

$10, register. 374-2757. napleslibrarydirector@owwl.org.

Museum Exhibit [ WED., FEBRUARY 27 ] Baby It’s Cold Outside!. TuesdaysThursdays The Rochester Historical Society, Rundel Memorial Building, 2nd floor, 115 South Ave. Through Mar 14. Tue-Wed 10 a.m.-3 p.m., Thu 11 a.m.-3 p.m. An exhibit of beautiful cold weather clothing $3-$5, members free. 4288470. rochesterhistory.org. A Presidential Voice: The History of Presidential Speechwriting. Through March 8. Rush Rhees Library, University of Rochester, River Campus Through Mar 8. Seward Room, Department of Rare Books and Special Collections. Mon-Fri 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Sat 11 a.m.-3 p.m 2754477. “Race: Are We So Different?.” Through April 28. Rochester Museum and Science Center, 657 East Ave. Through Apr 28. faceraceroc.org. Included in admission: $11-$13. 2711880. rmsc.org. “To My Valentine.” Through March 31. Rochester Museum and Science Center, 657 East Ave. Through Mar 31. Sun 11 a.m.-5 p.m., Mon-Sat 9 a.m.-5 p.m Included in admission: $11-$13. 271-1880. rmsc.org. “You’ve Got Mail.” Through March 8 and 3-4 p.m. Museum of Wayne County continues on page 22 rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 21


Feb. 28-March 3. Rochester Riverside Convention Center, 123 E Main St For kids this year, Red Wings mascot Spikes will be appearing Sat-Sun noon2 p.m. Show hours are Thu-Fri noon-10 p.m., Sat 10 a.m.-10 p.m., Sun 10 a.m.-7 p.m $3-$9, free to kids under 5 rrcc.com. Big Data: Making It Real. 7:30-9 a.m. Locust Hill Country Club, 2000 Jefferson Road $20-$25. digitalrochester.com. Open meeting of the Social Economy Working Group. 10 a.m. Foodlink, 1999 Mt. Read Blvd. Free. facebook.com/sewg.roch. SPECIAL EVENT | ORCHID SHOW & SALE

I know, it seems like this winter will never end. Every time you go outside snow is in the air, ice is on the ground, and your hair freezes. But spring really isn’t that far away. Get yourself excited for the return of flowers and warmer temps with Sonnenberg Gardens & Mansion State Historic Site’s annual Orchid Show & Sale, taking place Friday-Sunday, March 1-3, at the site in Canandaigua. The Sonnenberg greenhouses will be filled with all kinds of exotic orchid blooms. In addition to just seeing the pretty flowers (and getting some warm vibes from the greenhouses), educational seminars on orchid care will take place at 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. on Saturday and 2 p.m. on Sunday. Orchid varieties will also be for sale at the gift shop if you want to take one of the fancy flowers home. If you have orchids of your own that could use some TLC, repotting services will be available for a donation on Friday. Sonnenberg is located at 151 Charlotte St. in Canandaigua. The event runs 10 a.m.-5 p.m. each day, with wine tastings Saturday noon-4 p.m. and Sunday 1-4 p.m. Admission to the event is $5. For more information call 394-4922 or visit sonnenberg.org. — BY ERIC REZSNYAK

Museum Exhibit History, 21 Butternut St Inhouse philatalist Bob Briggs will be present on Feb 27 and Mar 6. Much of Briggs collection is on loan to the Museum for the exhibit, featuring stamps, postcards and letters Free. 315956-4943. waynehistory.org.

Recreation [ WED., FEBRUARY 27 ] Silver Lake Outlet Valley Trek. 10 a.m. Letchworth State Park, 1 Letchworth State Park $8 parking fee. 493-3625. Snow Cheap Trail Races. Every other Wednesday, 6:30 p.m Cobbs Hill Park, 100 Norris Drive $10 per race. fleetfeetrochester.com. [ SAT., MARCH 2 ] GVHC Hike. March 2, 10 a.m. Tryon Park Rd., strenuous/hilly 4 mile hike Free. 489-3764. gvhchikes.org March 2, 1 p.m. Greece Canal Ark, leisurely/ easy 3 mile hike Free. 3195794. gvhchikes.org. [ SUN., MARCH 3 ] Intermediate Nature Ski Hike. 2:30 p.m. Letchworth State Park, 1 Letchworth State Park Meet at Trailside Lodge. $8 parking fee. 493-3625.

Special Events [ WED., FEBRUARY 27 ] Beermasters Dinner with the Brewer.. 4:30-6:30 p.m. Stoneyard Bar & Grill, 1 Main

St, Brockport $40. 637-3390. stoneyardbarandgrill.com. Cheshire Anniversary. 5-11 p.m. Cheshire, 647 South Ave., upper. To mark the occasion, we will be releasing our oak barrel-aged Manhattan solerawinebar.com. February Meeting: Love as a Revolutionary Force. ongoing, 7 p.m. Flying Squirrel Community Space, 285 Clarissa St. Green Party of Monroe County gpomc. org. Geeks Who Drink Pub Quiz. 8 p.m. Scotland Yard Pub, 187 Saint Paul St Free. 730-5030. scotlandyardpub.com. Highland Park Winter Farmers Market. 3 p.m Cornell Cooperative Extension of Monroe County, 249 Highland Ave Free. highlandwintermarket.com. Peacework Organic Community Supported Agriculture Group Meeting. 6-7:30 p.m. Quaker Meetinghouse, 84 Scio St peaceworkcsa.org. Pull the Pork From the Pentagon. 1 p.m. Who: Metro Justice, Band of Rebels, Rochester Against War, and community supporters. What: Speak-out and Protest. Where: Federal Building, 100 State St metrojustice.org. Rochester Business Networking Event. 7:30-9 a.m. Bonadio and Company, 171 Sullys Trail Free. 224-0270. jimfox@tipclub.com. Urban Nights: Wall Street. 5:307:30 p.m. Wall Street, 330 East Ave $12-$15. rddc@rddc.org. [ THU., FEBRUARY 28 ] 28th annual Greater Rochester International Auto Show.

22 CITY FEBRUARY 27 - MARCH 5, 2013

[ FRI., MARCH 1 ] 20th Anniversary Advance Auto Parts-Tread City Tire Cavalcade of Cars. March 1-3, 5 p.m. The Fair & Expo Center, 2695 East Henrietta Rd. Adults $12 at the door. $10 Discount Tickets at all WNY Advance. 716-656-9734. fairandexpocenter.org. Annual Orchid Show. March 1-3, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Sonnenberg Gardens and Mansion State Historic Park, 151 Charlotte St On Friday there will be special orchid re-potting services (for donation) in the Greenhouse Planting Room. Enjoy educational seminars about orchids and orchid care from guest speakers on Saturday at 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. and Sunday at 2 p.m. A wide selection of orchids for sale in the gift shop. Wine tasting available on Saturday noon-4 p.m. and Sunday 1-4 p.m $5. 394-4922. sonnenberg.org. Fundraising Event and Silent Auction to Aid Cancer Survivors. March 1, 7-9:30 p.m. ARTISANworks, 565 Blossom Road $40, register. 487-3375. fertility.urmc.edu. Rochester Brainery Open House. March 1, 5-8 p.m. Rochester Brainery, 274 N. Goodman St rochesterbrainery.com. Rochester Committee on Latin America 25th Annual Rice & Beans Gala Fundraiser and Dinner. March 1, 5:30 p.m. Gates Presbyterian Church, 1049 Wegman Road. Honoring the Global Justice Ecology Project, an organization that confronts the environmental injustices perpetrated by economic domination, with the 2013 International White Dove Award. The gala fundraiser will include a Live Auction and a Silent Auction to benefit a sanitation project in Borgne, Haiti $20-$40, register. 381-5606. interconnect_mott@ frontiernet.net. rocla.us. [ SAT., MARCH 2 ] Big Sale. 9 a.m.-2 p.m. 127 Railroad St. Art, books, clothes, handmade soap, zines, more facebook.com/ smugtownmushrooms. Dryden Reopening Celebration with Alexander Payne. March 2, 5:30 p.m. George Eastman House, 900 East Ave. Screening of “Sideways” and @&A with director Alexander Payne. Dinner gala 5:30 p.m., screening 8 p.m $200 gala dinner, $25-$30 for screening & q&a eastmanhouse.org. EqualityUganda. March 2, 4:30 & 8 p.m. SUNY Geneseo, 1 College Rd. The event will include a free lecture with human rights activist, Luzau Balowa (4:30-6:30pm). This will be followed by a benefit concert performed by faculty from the music department, student performers & the Rochester Gay

Men’s Chorus (8:00-9:30pm). Money raised in this concert will be donated to Other Sheep. This not-for-profit organization seeks social inclusion for the Ugandan LGBTQI community $5.00-students / $20 - public (Benefit Concert Only). (585) 245 - 5824. saticketoffice. geneseo.edu. GALA Ball for Cracker Box Palace. March 2, 5:30 p.m. Captain Jack’s Goodtime Tavern, 8505 Greig St. 315-483-9570. captainjacksgoodtimetavern. com/events.htm. Lincoln Tours. Thursdays, 1 & 3 p.m. Seward House Historic Museum, 33 South St., Auburn. 315-252-1283. sewardhouse.org. March Media Mashup. March 2, 1-4 p.m. RCTV Studios, 21 Gorham St Activities, arts & crafts, studio tours, more. Free. rctv15.org. Psychic Fair. March 2-3. Radisson Hotel, 175 Jefferson Rd., Henrietta. Sat 11 a.m.-8 p.m., Sun 11 a.m.-6 p.m $7 admission good all weekend. 475-1910. Rochester Arc & Flame Center Open House. March 2, 11 a.m.4 p.m. Roc Arc & Flame Center, 125 Fedex Way Featuring glass blowing, glass bead making, glass fusing, metal welding, and blacksmithing demos by in-house instructors Free. 3497110. RocAFC.com. Scandanavian Lutefisk & Meatball Dinner. March 2, 6 p.m. The Lutheran Church of the Incarnate Word, 597 East Avenue Afternoon presentation My Trek to the South Pole will be shown by Eivind P Rynning at 4:30 pm. Scandinavian folk music will be provided by the new local trio VÄNNER [FRIENDS] $12-$20, free to preschool kids, RSVP. 425-2572. pepent1980@gmail.com. Shakespeare Monologue & Sonnet Competition: English Speaking Union. March 2, 1-3 p.m. MuCCC, 142 Atlantic Ave Light tea will be served. Donations appreciated. muccc. org. Speed Dating. March 2, 7 p.m. Vibe Lounge, 302 North Goodman St. Come out to enjoy a fulfilled night with other singles from the Rochester area. All participants will receive: a complimentary drink, entered into 2 raffles, appetizers and more. $35, register. 503-4506. verticalentertainmentny.com. [ SUN., MARCH 3 ] Jane Austen era Fashion Show. March 3, 1-3 p.m. Wood Library, 134 North Main St. Free. 3941381. woodlibrary.org. Wine & Culture Sunday. March 3, 2-5:30 p.m. Holiday Inn Airport, 911 Brooks Ave. 2-3 p.m. Beginner sign language lesson, 3-5:30 p.m. wine tasting, raffles, auctions, food, desserts $25, register. deafrotary.com. [ MON., MARCH 4 ] Thinkin’ & Drinkin’: The Bug Jar’s Trivia Night. first Monday of every month, 8-9 p.m. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 21+. Prizes: $20 / $10 / $5 bar tabs for the first, second, and third place teams. Doors at 7:30 p.m Free. bugjar.com. Water for Sudan. March 4, 7-8 p.m. Monroe Community College, 1000 E. Henrietta Rd With Salva Dut and John Predergast 2922534. monroecc.edu.

THEATER | FESTIVAL OF TEN

The Rochester area is awash with great live theater. But if you’re looking for something a little different, or if your attention span isn’t what it used to be, consider the biennial Festival of Ten, returning this weekend to SUNY Brockport. This theater festival features 10 plays that run for a mere 10 minutes. This year’s festival — the eighth put on by Brockport — includes plays titled “The Antichrist Cometh,” “Bloodmatch.com,” “What a Drag It Is,” “The Wilderness,” and “Defrost” (pictured). The SUNY Brockport Department of Theatre and Music Studies selected these entries from more than 400 submissions sent in from playwrights around the globe. A Playwrights Symposium will take place on Saturday, March 9, and feature an opportunity to network with theater professionals and learn from playwrights who focus in short plays. Festival of Ten VIII debuts Friday, March 1, 7:30 p.m. and runs through March 9 at the Tower Fine Arts Center Mainstage on Holley Street in Brockport. Other show times this weekend are Saturday, March 2, at 7:30 p.m. and Sunday, March 3, at 2 p.m. Tickets cost $8-$15. For more information call 395-2787 or visit brockport.edu. — BY ERIC REZSNYAK Whittling and Wood Carving with Chris Lubkemann. March 4, 6:30-7:30 p.m. Seymour Library, 161 East Ave. 6371050. seymourlibraryweb.org. Wishes on Main. March 4, 5 p.m. Art and Vintage on Main, 101 Main St. Fundraising/Networking event in support of Make-A-Wish hosted by Make-A-Wish’s newly formed young professional group, the New Leadership Council of Rochester. The art showcase and networking event will offer complimentary hors d’oeuvres and wine from area restaurants and distributors. Tickets are $20 cash or check at the door. Guest’s may arrive anytime throughout the event and sip, mingle, and learn more about wishes right here in Rochester $20 cash or check at door. 585-272-9474. artandvintageonmain.com. [ TUE., MARCH 5 ] East Side Winter Market. 3-6 p.m 2555 Baird Rd, Penfield. 348-9022. mbartolotta001@ rochester.rr.com. First Tuesdays March and Career Fair with Digital Rochester. March 5, 4:30 p.m. Radisson Riverside Hotel, 120 East Main St. digitalrochester.com/events/ corporate-member-career-fair/ Pre-registration is available here: https://www.runmyclub.com/dr/ eventcalendar.asp?id=207578. Free for DR Members, $5 Non Members. 585-261-7094. Tuesday Taco Trivia. 9-11 p.m. Temple Bar and Grille, 109 East Ave. Lots of giveaways, including hats, t-shirts, drinks, tacos - come alone or come with a team! $1.50 Beef Tacos, $2.50 Chicken Tacos, $2.50

Drafts except Guinness, $3 Bacardi Flavors 232-6000. templebarrochester@gmail. com. templebarandgrille.com.

Theater “The Book Club Play.” Geva Theatre Center, 75 Woodbury Blvd. Through March 17. Wed Feb 27-Thu 7:30 p.m., Fri 8 p.m., Sat 8:30 p.m., Sun 2 p.m. (Sunday Salon) and 7 p.m., Tue-Wed Mar 6 7:30 p.m Tickets start at $25. 232-4382. gevatheatre.org “Book of Mormon.” Through March 10. Rochester Auditorium Theater, 885 E. Main St. Tue-Thu 7:30 p.m., Fri 8 p.m., Sat 2 & 8 p.m., Sun 1 & 6 p.m SOLD OUT! Sign up for our newsletter for updates!. 222-5000. rbtl.org. “Chronus.” Bread & Water Theatre, 243 Rosedale St. Fri-Sat 8 p.m., Sun 3 p.m $6-$12. 271-5523. BreadandWaterTheatre.org. “Diabolo.” Nazareth College Arts Center, 4245 East Ave Suggested for ages 11+ and their families $12. 389-2170. artsceneter.naz.edu. “Festival of Ten.” Tower Fine Arts Center, SUNY Brockport, 180 Holley St. Mar 1-2 and 8-9 at 7:30 p.m., Mar 3 at 2 p.m. (sign language interpreted) $8$15. 395-2787. brockport.edu/ finearts. “Into the Woods.” East Rochester High School, 200 Woodbine Ave. Fri-Sat 7 p.m., Sun 2 p.m $5. 248-6389. “My Gal Patsy.” Downstairs Cabaret Theatre Center, 540 E. Main St Sat 8 p.m., Sun


3 p.m $29-$33. 325-4370. downstairscabaret.com. Playwright’s Play Readings. Geneva Theatre Guild. Geneva Public Library at 7 p.m. on Friday, February 1 followed by matinees on Saturday, Feb 2 and Sunday, Feb 3 at 2 p.m. at Torrey Park Grill $5. gtglive.org. Romance a play by David Mamet. MuCCC, 142 Atlantic Ave Through Mar 1. Limelight Productions. Thu-Sat 7:30 p.m., Wed Feb 27-Fri 7:30 p.m., Sat 7:30 p.m $10-$20. 585-5270884. limelightprod.org. “Tartuffe.” March 6-10. SUNY Geneseo, 1 College Rd. 8 p.m. (Sunday 2 p.m.). Alice Austin Theatre $10. 245-5833. geneseo.edu/bbo.

Theater Audition [ WED., FEBRUARY 27 ] “The Bald Soprano.” Through March 13. MuCCC, 142 Atlantic Ave Seeking three males aged 25-40. Rehearsal begins April 15th and performances are the last two week-ends in June at MuCCC 142 Atlantic Avenue, Rochester, New York. The female roles have been cast. Audition by appt 271-2087. michaelarve@yahoo.com. PUSH Physical Theatre. Feb. 27. PUSH is holding open auditions for actors, dancers and acrobats ages 16 and over Wed 7-9 p.m. and Thu 8-10 p.m. at PUSH studio at 359 West Bloomfield Road, Pittsford. Further details on web. Performers will be auditioning for ensemble and principal roles in the world premiere of the company’s

upcoming original work, Arc of Ages, opening at the JCC’s Hart Theatre, May 30-June 9 4157874. ChitChat@pushtheatre. org. pushtheatre.org. Seeking Musicians for Theater Productions. Through March 13. Downstairs Cabaret Theatre is seeking musicians (pianists / keyboardists, percussionists, bass players, guitarists, woodwind players, brass players) for upcoming productions. Learning / rehearsal fee and performance fee provided. Long-term work with many performances possible throughout the year (theatre operates year-round, and many shows are scheduled on open-ended runs). Also looking for subs for occasional dates 325-4370. dennis@ downstairscabaret.com. Technical Director, Musical Director, Musicians Wanted. Through April 24. Working Class Theatre Company is looking for a Technical Director, a Musical Director, and Musicians for their upcoming Summer 2013 production of The Fantasticks 643-0836. workingclasstheatre.net. [ SUN., MARCH 3 ] “Rent.” 7 p.m Blackfriars Theatre, 795 E. Main St Please come prepared with a selection from the show, or a contemporary musical theatre selection. Production runs from July 19-28, 2013 454-1260. bftix.org. [ MON., MARCH 4 ] “The Villain Took a Chip Shot.” March 4-5, 7 p.m. Penfield

Community Center, 1985 Baird Rd. Penfield Players. Roles are available for 4 men and 10 females of all ages 4241345. dkbarsel@gmail.com. penfieldplayers.org.

Workshops [ WED., FEBRUARY 27 ] ARC of Monroe Adult Transition Parent Program. 5-7 p.m. The Arc of Monroe, first-floor conference room, 2060 Brighton Henrietta Townline Road Free, RSVP. 730-6037. jdermody@ arcmonroe.org. arcmonroe.org. PREZI Workshop with Rajesh Barnabas. 6-7:30 p.m. RCTV Studios, 21 Gorham St. rctv15. org. Rochester Women’s Network Presents… Polish your VISUAL Elevator pitch. 5:30 p.m. Midtown Athletic Club, 200 E Highland Dr Hands-on Mini-Makeover ‘Playshop with Image Consultant Kay Noske. Consultant Kay Noske’s Movie Star Makeover® tricks and tips will make sure your look enhances your brand. Learn more about Kay and take the Star Style quiz at http://www. moviestarmakeover.com/ . Light refreshments will be provided. Registration Deadline: 2/26/13. More info – www.rwn.org or 271-4182. Members $20, nonmebers $30. 585-271-4182. midtown.com/clubs/rochesterathletic-tennis-club. [ THU., FEBRUARY 28 ] Dance Lessons. 7-8:30 p.m. Henrietta Public Library, 455 Calkins Rd Esther Brill will teach Louisiana dance hall,

honky tonk and swing. We’ll show off what we learned with a dance party during the last class. Register. 359-7092. [ FRI., MARCH 1 ] Meet and Greet with visiting artist Cory Lum from Honolulu Hawaii.. March 1, 6-8 p.m. Kuma Gama Studio, Hungerford Bldg, 1115 E. Main St., Door 2, Suite 228 A meet and greet with the artist 451-5674. codykroll.com. Unlicensed FM Radio Services. March 1, 7 p.m. Henrietta Fire Hall, 3129 East Henrietta Rd 210-8910. rochesterham.org. Windows 8. March 1, 3-4:30 p.m. Wood Library, 134 North Main St. Free, register. 394-1381. woodlibrary.org. [ SAT., MARCH 2 ] 10 Steps to a Healthier You. 10 a.m New York Wine & Culinary Center, 800 South Main St Keep your New Year’s resolutions with Chef Jeff’s tips, tricks and recipes. Each class has a different theme and a sample of the menu demonstrated will be served $10 per class. 394-7070. nywcc.com. Japanese Ceramics Workshop with visiting artist Cory Lum from Honolulu Hawaii.. March 2-3, 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Genesee Center for the Arts and Education, 713 Monroe Ave. Lum, also a Pulitzer-nominated photographer, is donating all of the work made during his visit to Rochester to Genesee Pottery Kiln Fund $50 one day, $80 two days, register, student discount available 2715183. pottery@geneseearts.org. geneseearts.org.

Rain and Bog Gardens. March 2, 10 a.m.-noon. Hansen Nature Center, 1525 Calkins Rd. Donations of used ink cartridges and cell phones accepted at the nature center for recycling Free, register. 359-7044. sites.google. com/site/hansennaturecenter. Smugtown Mushrooms Winter Classes. March 2. Smugtown Mushrooms, 127 Railroad St. Medicinal Mushrooms: Jan 20, Feb 10, Mar 3; Mushrooms 101: Feb 2, Mar 2; Radical Mychology: Feb 26, Mar 26 smugtownmushrooms.com. [ TUE., MARCH 5 ] African World History Class. 7:30-9 p.m. Baobab Cultural Center, 728 University Ave. The African World History class provides an ongoing experience of the contributions and achievements Africans and African-Americans have made throughout history. The class uses the historical experiences of African peoples to highlight the cultural values we share. Stay tuned and check the Baobab website for further details $5 donation requested per session. baobab.center@ yahoo.com. thebaobab.org. Chorus of the Genesee: Free Singing Lessons. 6-7 p.m. Harmony House, 58 East Main St 698-7784. Computer Tutoring. 4 p.m Arnett Branch Library, 310 Arnett Boulevard Adult Computer Tutoring and Instruction: Every Tuesday from 4-5pm the Adult Services Librarian will be available for one-onone computer help. Bring any project are working on, and we

will do our best to assist you. Remember to bring a disk or USB drive to save your files Free. 428-8214. Family Development Class: “The First Years Last Forever.” March 5, 12:30-2:30 p.m. Mental Health Association, 320 N Goodman St. For parents of children up to age 5 Free, RSVP. 325-3145 x131. mharochester.org. Filipino Night. March 5, 6:30 p.m. Books Etc., 78 W. Main St. Participants will meet to practice speaking any of the Filipino Languages 474-4116. books_etc@yahoo.com. A Journey of Wellness & Recovery. March 5, 11:30 a.m. Third Presbyterian Church, 4 Meigs St A program of Janssen Pharmaceuticals, Inc., designed to inspire people living with schizophrenia, schizoaffective, and bipolar disorder to take ownership of their mental health recovery journey so that they can live meaninful lives. Speaker: Leland (Lee) Stephan, Ma, LCSW, Community Health Network; Gallahue Mental Health Services Free. 325-3145. mharochester.org. You Can Grow Beautiful Violets. March 5, 6:30-7:30 p.m. Greece Public Library, 2 Vince Tofany Blvd. 225-8951. greecelibrary.org.

GETLISTED get your event listed for free e-mail it to calendar@rochestercitynews.com. Or go online to rochestercitynewspaper.com and submit it yourself!

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 23


Movies Theaters Searchable, up-to-the-minute movie times for all area theaters can be found at rochestercitynewspaper.com, and on City’s mobile website.

Film

Brockport Strand 93 Main St, Brockport, 637-3310, rochestertheatermanagement.com

Canandaigua Theatres 3181 Townline Road, Canandaigua, 396-0110, rochestertheatermanagement.com

Cinema Theater 957 S. Clinton St., 271-1785, cinemarochester.com

Culver Ridge 16 2255 Ridge Rd E, Irondequoit  544-1140, regmovies.com

Terror in the suburbs [ REVIEW ] BY GEORGE GRELLA

Dryden Theatre 900 East Ave., 271-3361, dryden.eastmanhouse.org

“Dark Skies”

Eastview 13

(PG-13), WRITTEN AND DIRECTED BY SCOTT STEWART NOW PLAYING

Eastview Mall, Victor 425-0420, regmovies.com

Geneseo Theatres Geneseo Square Mall, 243-2691, rochestertheatermanagement.com

Greece Ridge 12 176 Greece Ridge Center Drive 225-5810, regmovies.com

Henrietta 18 525 Marketplace Drive 424-3090, regmovies.com

Like the movies themselves, the haunted house, a favorite real estate of generations of horror, has come a long way from the gloomy castle or the dark Victorian pile; directors now relocate that spooky domicile to the more recognizable suburbs that proliferate and spread their interchangeable blandness across our great nation. The menace that once stalked the endless corridors of innumerable scary mansions now

The Little 240 East Ave., 258-0444 thelittle.org

Movies 10 2609 W. Henrietta Road 292-0303, cinemark.com

Pittsford Cinema 3349 Monroe Ave., 383-1310 pittsford.zurichcinemas.com

Tinseltown USA/IMAX 2291 Buffalo Road 247-2180, cinemark.com

Webster 12 2190 Empire Blvd., 888-2624386, amctheatres.com

lives in that nice three-bedroom, two-and-a half bath ranch house next door. “The Amityville Horror” may have initiated that historic move, but the three versions of “Poltergeist” probably transformed it into a fixed element of the genre. In its particular examination of contemporary suburban life, the new movie, “Dark Skies,” blends horror and science fiction while commenting on some aspects of the way we now live. Lacy and Daniel Barrett (Keri Russell and Josh Hamilton) live in a typical house on a typical street, where everything looks distressingly like everything else. The couple, along with their young sons Jesse (Dakota Goyo) and Sam (Kadan Rockett) face some familiar difficulties — Daniel has been laid off from his unspecified job, which appears to involve architecture, and Lacy works at the daunting task of selling real estate in a down market; 13-year-old Jesse, meanwhile, is hanging around with the wrong kids and dealing with the problems of puberty. All of these family issues erupt into the open when the Barretts start experiencing a series

Keri Russell in “Dark Skies.” PHOTO COURTESY DIMENSION FILMS

of strange and frightening phenomena. On several occasions an invisible intruder vandalizes their house: stealing food from the refrigerator, constructing a stack of canned goods, removing all their photographs from their frames. When they inform the police, the cops naturally disbelieve their story about some mysterious personage and blame the incidents on their children. The frights intensify as a flock of hundreds of birds crashes against the walls and windows of the house, and both children, and eventually both parents, suffer seizures and lapses of consciousness and memory. Lacy finally convinces Daniel of the danger and persuades him to accompany her to a consultation with Edwin Pollard (J.K. Simmons), a conspiracy nut and self-proclaimed expert on such phenomena. After hearing their story, he explains the nature of the menace and the reason for the attacks, a most dispiriting analysis. Pollard tells the Barretts that their attackers are aliens, “the Grays,” (really) from some other planet, who have inhabited the Earth for many years, randomly choosing human families to study and experiment on like laboratory specimens. Lacy and Daniel resolve to defend their children against the aliens, so they board up all the windows, arousing the mockery of their neighbors, buy a large, aggressive dog, and arm themselves with a serious shotgun for what turns out to be a climactic confrontation. Like any of the nutty conspiracy theories available on some of the stranger cable TV

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Between The Rock and a hard place [ REVIEW ] BY ADAM LUBITOW

“Snitch” (PG-13), DIRECTED BY RIC ROMAN WAUGH NOW PLAYING

channels, Pollard’s thesis explains a great many mysteries, from power outages to juvenile allergies to unexplained and unsolved disappearances. But the Grays, who only appear as attenuated, two-dimensional, spidery shadows in darkened rooms, suggest some other internal threat, the disintegration of the nuclear family, the concrete manifestation of all the tension and pain in the Barretts’ marriage, their troubled children, even the financial burden they can barely sustain. The sense of an unknown terror lurking in some sunny, placid neighborhood contrasts nicely with the familiar peaceful community settings and the smug illusion of comfort and conformity in the safe environs of the subdivision. That the terror grows from within appropriately suits the notion of a superficial and deluded belief in the security and solidity of the average American home in the average American town, while in reality forces beyond the normal threaten chaos and loss, financial disaster, and emotional devastation. The movie constantly shifted between the actual events the Barretts experience and the family’s frequent nightmares, as if no barrier existed between reality and dream, and the two worlds fuse in horror. While the whole family faces a dreadful menace, in the grand tradition of the form, the children are the most vulnerable, the most likely victims: youth and innocence provide no defense against dangers from without and within, which summarizes the despair at the heart of “Dark Skies.”

There’s no denying that Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson has come a long way from his days as a pro wrestler for the WWE. Since making the transition to film acting over ten years ago, he’s appeared in dozens of movies and has always maintained an immensely likeable screen presence. He’s got good looks, charisma to spare, and a personality that seems tailor-made for the action-comedy genre. But despite his efforts, his film career has never really caught fire, even with the success of 2011’s “Fast Five.” His latest film, “Snitch” is something of a departure for him: Despite its action-heavy advertising, the film is actually more a social justice drama than anything else, and one that allows Johnson to flex some acting muscle in a way he’s never quite been asked to before. Johnson plays John Matthews, owner of a small, successful construction company. Divorced,

Dwayne Johnson in “Snitch.” PHOTO COURTESY LIONSGATE/SUMMIT ENTERTAINMENT

John can afford to live in a gorgeous McMansion with his second wife and their young daughter, while his estranged ex-wife and teenage son, Jason (Rafi Gavron) have to live a bit more scrupulously and struggle to make due on their own. When Jason is arrested for possession of a significant amount of ecstasy tablets and charged with drug trafficking, John feels an immediate sense of guilt for not being more of a father to his son. He’s informed by his son’s lawyer that, because of the country’s harsh drug laws, Jason faces a sentence of ten years in prison. John, knowing his son won’t survive a prison sentence, is desperate to find a way to help his son in any way he can. Jason refuses to accept a deal to reduce his sentence, which would involve him setting up his friends to help prosecutors make more arrests, so his father uses his connections to get a meeting with high-powered, conservative district attorney, Joanne Keeghan (Susan Sarandon, in a typically solid, if somewhat one-dimensional performance) to make a new deal. John will infiltrate a drug ring himself, using his company’s trucks to transport for them, and then deliver the dealers over to the police. Searching through his employee records for any ex-convicts who might be able to provide him with the right connections, John settles on Daniel James (Jon Bernthal of TV’s “The Walking Dead”), a new hire with a record that includes arrests for drug distribution. Daniel now has a family, and has left his past behind him, but when John offers him twenty thousand dollars just to make the necessary introductions, he finds it hard to say no. The film is surprisingly frank about the

not entirely heroic things John is willing to do to save his son; it’s made clear that Daniel is a good man doing his best to turn his life around, and the way that John manipulates him into walking straight back into the world he’s trying to get away from isn’t shied away from. Though it’s hampered somewhat by a less than plausible premise (John is able to earn the trust of the local dealers awfully quickly) and a tendency toward self-importance, “Snitch” works remarkably well. The script, credited to Justin Haythe (“Revolutionary Road”) and the film’s director, Ric Roman Waugh, is heavy-handed with its message, that the “mandatory minimum” drug laws aren’t working and only result in the arrest of naive kids and first-time offenders. But it’s admirable that the film has something on its mind aside from gunfights and explosions, which is more than I expected walking into the theater. The middle section of the film, in which John and Daniel go about making themselves indispensable to local drug traffickers is the film’s strongest, even if it all happens a bit too easily (“Breaking Bad,” this ain’t). It’s almost a shame that the story devolves into a by-the-numbers action film by its end, with shootouts and car chases taking the place of a real dramatic resolution. Sure, they’re competently executed and exciting to watch, but it betrays everything that came before. The script makes a point to show early on that John Matthews isn’t a tough guy hero, but then proceeds to turn him into exactly that. We know that Johnson can make with the action, but with this film he proves he’s got some dramatic chops as well. And if this role isn’t enough for him to transition into a true movie star, well, there’s always “Fast and Furious 6.”

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 25


continues from page 16

Jeff and Tim Thomas watch their tip-ups for any activity on the Hundred Acre Pond at Mendon Ponds Park.

or small tent. Shanties range from small one-man getups to fully pimped-out eightperson huts. “You could have a serious party going on in one of those — a big mirror ball going ‘round the top,” say Tim Thomas. In all seriousness, even the smallest refuge from the wind and the cold can make a difference. “Let’s face it, though — the weather’s just nicer in the spring and summer,” says Jeff Thomas. Still, there are thousands of anglers across the state willing to brave the frigid temperatures for bragging rights, and if there’s the option, some prizes. That’s why the Thomas brothers started the first New York State Ice Pro-Am Tournament series this year. The tournament included events at Chatauqua Lake earlier this month, Sodus Bay last weekend, and one more on March 7-8 on Tupper Lake in the Adirondacks. If you want to get into ice fishing, head

to nearly any sporting goods store and be ready to drop about $75 to $100 on basic equipment and bait. Once you’ve got the equipment, though, the cost levels off to about $15 to $30 a trip when you factor in gas and travel costs. Jigging rods (about $5 to $15 for the rod and another buck or two for the jigs or lures) or tip-ups are your cheapest option, running about $10 to $30. Automatic fishermen run about $70 to $80 per set. State law allows up to five tip-ups and two jigging rods per angler on any given excursion. You also need a license to fish. A season-long (open-water or ice-fishing) license for New York state residents costs $14. For information on how to get your license, visit dec.ny.gov. And take a buddy with you — preferably someone who’s got some know-how. A quick online search will turn up dozens of local sportsman clubs, often called “rod and gun” clubs. For another easy way to track local anglers, visit iceshanty.com. The online forum and message board system covers 26 CITY FEBRUARY 27 - MARCH 5, 2013

the nation, but plug your location into the search bar and there’s no shortage of anglers ready to take the bait and take you out to try your hand at ice fishing. I found that out first-hand at the Victory Baptist Church Sportsmen’s Ice Fishing Derby, when some of the anglers I was interviewing suddenly handed me the fishing line and egged me on. I started to pull on the line, but it didn’t seem like I was reeling in anything. Then, a swift jerk on the other end. “Oh! There he is!” The other fisherman coached me along. “If he wants to go, let him go a little bit.” After about a 30-second dance of pulling and waiting, waiting a bit more, then pulling again, I could see the head of the fish just below the water’s surface through the small hole in the ice. I shrieked, but everyone else was clapping and cheering me on. “Now you gotta hold it for the picture,” the fisherman said. I’ll admit, I was a bit squeamish about a) taking my gloves off in the frigid temperatures, and b) holding the still living, wriggling fish with my bare hands. But soon, a small crowd had gathered to see what came out of the ice. So, with a little coaching from Tim Thomas, I picked the fish up just behind the gills and showed it off. After it was weighed and measured (I didn’t even come close to placing in the tournament), I gently slipped him back through the hole in the ice. The experience heightened my respect for the people who tackle this sport for fun. The camaraderie, that sense of respect for fellow anglers, and that willingness to teach someone new is part of the thrill of ice fishing. “We’ve got to keep people excited about ice fishing,” Tim Thomas says. “Most ice anglers learned from their parents or friends, so if we can keep that momentum going, we can keep the sport going and growing.”


Film Previews Full film reviews available at rochestercitynewspaper.com. [ OPENING ] 21 & OVER (R): Straight-arrow college student Jeff Chang decides to cut loose for the first time when his best friends plan a debaucherous night of celebrating in honor of his 21st birthday, putting his academic future in jeopardy. Canandaigua, Webster BURN: ONE YEAR ON THE FRONTLINES OF THE BATTLE TO SAVE DETROIT (NR): Documentary, produced by Denis Leary, following the firefighters of Detroit for one year as they fight to save their troubled city. Webster JACK THE GIANT SLAYER (PG-13): Bryan Singer directs this epic, action-adventure retelling of “Jack and the Beanstalk” starring Nicholas Hoult, Ewan McGregor, Stanley Tucci, Ian McShane, and Bill Nighy. Brockport, Canandaigua, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece Ridge, Henrietta, Pittsford, Webster Kai Po Che (NR): Three young friends struggle to find fame and fortune in India at the start of the new millennium, ultimately deciding to found a cricket academy. Based on the novel “The 3 Mistakes of my Life” by Chetan Bhagat. Henrietta THE LAST EXORCISM PART II (PG-13): Immediately following the events of the first film, the

sequel follows poor Nell Sweetzer (Ashley Bell) tries to start a new life for herself, only to find that the evil force that possessed her isn’t quite finished yet. Canandaigua, Geneseo, Webster PHANTOM (R): Ed Harris is the captain of a submarine facing off with KGB operative David Duchovny over control of the nuclear missile aboard his vessel in this Cold War-set thriller. Also starring William Fichtner and Lance Henriksen. Canandaigua, Henrietta [ CONTINUING ] AMOUR (PG-13): An elderly man suddenly finds himself acting as caretaker to his ailing wife after she suffers a massive stroke in this multi-Oscar-nominated tearjerker from Austrian director Michael Haneke. Little, Pittsford ARGO (R): Director Ben Affleck co-stars with John Goodman, Bryan Cranston, and Kyle Chandler in the once-classified true tale of a CIA exfiltration expert who hatches a daring plan to free six Americans hiding at the home of the Canadian ambassador during the 1979 Iran hostage crisis. Cinema, Eastview, Henrietta, Little, Pittsford BEAUTIFUL CREATURES (PG-13): Supernatural love story, based on the popular YA novel, about a boy, a pretty young witch, and the mysterious curse on her family that threatens to claim her soul. Starring Jeremy Irons, Emmy Rossum, Viola Davis, and Emma Thompson. Eastview

For information: Call us (585) 244-3329 Fax us (585) 244-1126 Mail Us City Classifieds 250 N. Goodman Street Rochester, NY 14607 Email Us classifieds@ rochester-citynews.com

DARK SKIES (PG-13): An escalating series of disturbing events seems to hint that a malevolent force has targeted a suburban family. Starring Keri Russell and J.K. Simmons. Canandaigua, Eastview, Greece Ridge, Henrietta DJANGO UNCHAINED (R): Quentin Tarantino’s latest exploitation extravaganza, this time starring Jamie Foxx as a former slave out to rescue his wife from the clutches of an evil plantation owner. Also starring Leonardo DiCaprio, Christoph Waltz, and Samuel L. Jackson. Canandaigua, Geneseo, Henrietta ESCAPE FROM PLANET EARTH (PG): Interplanetary space adventure abounds in this kid-friendly animated feature about a geeky blue-skinned alien who must travel to Earth to rescue his more heroic brother. Featuring the voice talents of Brandon Fraser, Jessica Alba, Rob Corddry, William Shatner, and Sarah Jessica Parker. Canandaigua, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece Ridge, Henrietta A GOOD DAY TO DIE HARD (R): John McLane is back in the fifth installment of the “Die Hard” franchise, this time teaming up with his CIA agent son to take down a group of Russian terrorists. Starring Bruce Willis, Jai Courtney, Sebastian Koch, and Mary Elizabeth Winstead. Canandaigua, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece Ridge, Henrietta

THE HOBBIT: AN UNEXPECTED JOURNEY (PG-13): The first installment of Peter Jackson’s long-awaited adaptation of the “Lord of the Rings” prequel, chronicling Bilbo Baggins’ adventures in Middle Earth. Cinema, Henrietta IDENTITY THIEF (R): Hijinks ensue as Jason Bateman and Melissa McCarthy explore the lighter side of identity fraud in this comedy about a mildmannered businessman who tracks down the con artist who’s been stealing from him. Also starring Jon Favreau, John Cho, and Amanda Peet. Canandaigua, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece Ridge, Henrietta, Pittsford THE IMPOSSIBLE (PG-13): Naomi Watts and Ewan McGregor star in this grueling drama, based on a true story, about a family separated and struggling to survive in the aftermath of the massive Indian Ocean tsunami of 2004. Pittsford LES MISÉRABLES (PG-13): The hugely popular, long-running stage musical based on the Victor Hugo novel comes to the big screen courtesy of “King’s Speech” director Tom Hooper. With Hugh Jackman, Russell Crowe, Amanda Seyfried, and Anne Hathaway. Pittsford LIFE OF PI (PG): Ang Lee continues his unpredictable streak with an eye-popping adaptation of Yann Martel’s acclaimed novel, now a 3D adventure about a young man who survives a

shipwreck and finds himself on a lifeboat with an orangutan, a hyena, an ailing zebra, and a Bengal tiger. Little, Pittsford LINCOLN (PG-13): Daniel Day-Lewis channels our 16th President for Steven Spielberg, focusing on the last few months of the Great Emancipator’s life, which includes the Union’s victory in the War Between The States and the abolition of slavery. Costarring Tommy Lee Jones, Jared Harris, and Sally Field. Pittsford QUARTET (PG-13): Dustin Hoffman directs this comedy with a comedy stacked with veteran British actors (Maggie Smith, Michael Gambon, Billy Connolly) about a home for retired opera singers thrown into upheaval after the arrival of a diva. Little, Pittsford SAFE HAVEN (PG-13): Attractive widower falls for equally attractive young woman on the run from her past. Adapted from a novel by Nicholas Sparks, so you pretty much know what to expect. Starring Josh Duhamel, Julianne Hough, and Cobie Smulders. Brockport, Canandaigua, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece Ridge, Henrietta, Pittsford SIDE EFFECTS (R): Steven Soderbergh’s latest (and possibly final) film, about a young couple whose lives are torn apart when one of them is put on a new anti-anxiety drug that has some deadly side effects. Starring Rooney Mara, Jude Law, Catherine Zeta-Jones,

and Channing Tatum. Eastview, Henrietta, Pittsford SILVER LININGS PLAYBOOK (R): Lovably unstable mental patients Bradley Cooper and Jennifer Lawrence fall for one another and learn to ballroom dance in this likely Oscar contender from David O. Russell. With Robert De Niro and Jacki Weaver. Brockport, Canandaigua, Eastview, Greece Ridge, Henrietta, Little, Pittsford SNITCH (PG-13): Dwayne Johnson infiltrates a drug ring as an undercover informant in order to clear the name of his wrongly convicted son. Also starring Susan Sarandon and Barry Pepper. Canandaigua, Eastview, Greece Ridge, Henrietta WARM BODIES (PG-13): Nicholas Hoult stars in this apocalyptic romantic comedy as a zombie with a conscience who falls in love with a human girl, and may hold the key to saving what remains of humanity. Based on the cult novel by Isaac Marion. Co-starring John Malkovich, Rob Corddry, and Dave Franco. Eastview, Geneseo, Greece Ridge, Henrietta ZERO DARK THIRTY (R): Director Kathryn Bigelow and writer Mark Boal follow up their Oscarwinning “The Hurt Locker” with this likely Best Picture contender, examining the decade-long hunt to capture Osama Bin Laden. Starring Jessica Chastain, Joel Edgerton, Kyle Chandler, and Jason Clarke. Henrietta, Pittsford

BUILDING FOR LEASE IN CULTURAL DISTRICT

EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY

All real estate advertised in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act, which makes it unlawful, “to make, print, or publish, any notice, statement, or advertisement, with respect to the sale or rental of a dwelling that indicates any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin.” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under the age of 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertisement for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. Call the local Fair Housing Enforcement Project, FHEP at 325-2500 or 1-866-671-FAIR. Si usted sospecha una practica de vivienda injusta, por favor llame al servicio legal gratis. 585-325-2500 - TTY 585-325-2547.

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Fully Insured

ERNEST W. PETERSON INC. DEPENDABLE INTERIOR & EXTERIOR PAINTING & STAINING

Professional Painting Service, 35 Years’ Experience

> page 27 Scenic Exeter River. 7 miles to ocean, 50 minutes to Boston! 603-772-5377 or email exeterriverlanding@comcast.net SEBASTIAN, FLORIDA Affordable custom factory constructed homes $45,900+, Friendly community, No Real Estate or State Income Taxes, minutes to Atlantic Ocean. 772-581-0080, www. beach-cove.com. Limited seasonal rentals

Adoption ADOPT - Our adopted son dreams of being a big brother! Loving family seeking baby; promises lifetime of happiness, security. Expenses paid. Angie/ Mike: www.angieandmikeadopt. com or call: 855-524-2542 ADOPT: Abundance of love awaits your precious newborn. Happily married couple promises to love and protect your baby. Expenses paid. Donna & Paul 1-877-ADOPT-41 www.DonnaandPauladopt.info ADOPT: Casting for ‘film’ of our lives! Needed: baby to complete family.  Loving, married, educated couple, wishing to adopt the star.  Natalie/David 1-877-FOR BABY. www.davidandnatalie.info ADOPTION: Stay-at-home wife and hardworking husband want to adopt and become Mommy and Daddy! Lots of relatives. Confidential; expenses paid. Rachel/ James 1-888-467-1645 PREGNANT? ANXIOUS? Get FREE, no-pressure, confidential counseling, guidance, financial assistance at our licensed agency; if families. Call

ATTENTION

HOME SERVICE PROVIDERS

Did you know that City Newspaper Readers spent OVER $90 MILLION DOLLARS on home improvements in the LAST 12 MONTHS? Call Christine today to advertise

585-244-3329 ext. 23

28 CITY FEBRUARY 27 - MARCH 5, 2013

Automotive ALWAYS BETTER Higher cash for your Junk Cars, Trucks and Vans. From $200-$800 or more for newer. Running or not. With free towing. Also free removal of any unwanted model in any condition. Call 585-305-5865 CASH FOR CARS Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888-420-3808 www.cash4car.com (AAN CAN) FOR SALE 4 Blizzak Winter Tires on Alloy wheels for Mazda RX-8 or similar $250. btowler@ rochester-citynews.com

Accounting & Tax Services I AM LOOKING FOR NEW CLIENTS. After more than 25 years I still enjoy doing taxes and helping my clients pay the minimum possible. Unlike H&R and other tax services I work year round and I answer my own phone. Call me LEW JONES, JONES TAX SERVICE 585-3815820 x27 1250 PITTSFORDVICTOR PITTSFORD RD. Pittsford, NY 14534

Education ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from home. *Medical, *Business, *Criminal Justice, *Hospitality, Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified. Call 888-2018657www.CenturaOnline.com

For Sale K-D Moving & Storage Inc.

BEANIE BABIES (TY) 1997, 1998 Light blue Elephant (Peanuts), Twigs, Squealer, Iggy and Rainbow with the mixed up name tags. & more! $4 - $8 585-880-2903 All $49.99 BOOK ENDS of race horses with jockey’s carved in wood, gift. $25 585-880-2903

FULLY INSURED FREE ESTIMATES

585-287-0692

Joy: 866-922-3678. www. ForeverFamiliesThroughAdoption.org.

Experience in office & household moving and deliveries

Big or small, we do them all

473-6610 or 473-4357 23 Arlington St. NY D.O.T.#9657

KdMovingandStorage.com

BRONZE COLOR vintage metal horse, nice size 13” long, 10” high with engraved saddle, horse lover gift $35 585-8802903 DOG & CAT HOUSES Kennels, porch steps, do it yourself kits. Quick assembly 585-752-1000 $49 Jim FOR SALE Lady’s Used Haband Pants Collection, $49 cash. 12 pairs: 8 rainbow colors size 16A stretch polyester, 2 dungarees, 2 size 18A corduroy. Phone (585) 413-0827. GERMAN SHEPHERD Plaque on chain. Carved head on real wood. (said, beware!) Nice gift $15.00 585-880-2903 PAINT never opened. 2 Gallon Behr Premium Moonlit Yellow $15 each 585-225-5526


Place your real estate ad by calling 244-3329 ext. 23 or rochestercitynewspaper.com Ad Deadlines: Friday 4pm for Display Ads Monday at noon for Line ads RIVAL-SEAL-A-MEAL used food processor for $35 cash. Vacuum bags meals in freezer/cooking bags. Stretch your budget! Attractive white appliance, with built-in compressor. Ph: 585413-0827 TV RCA 35” with remote control. Excellent condition $25 585-225-5526

Garage and Yard Sales GREAT INDOOR Garage SaleZeppa Auditorium at the German House, Saturday, March 9. 9:30 to 3:30. Lots of Vendors- Great Stuff!! Call 563-6241 for Vendor info or sale info. OUR LADY OF MERCY Huge Yard Sale and Bake Sale to benefit Mercy Crew. March 2 and 3rd 9am-5pm 1437 Blossom Road Rochester, NY 14610

you! Please register on our website. For further info: www. rochestermusiccoalition.org info@rochestermusiccoalition. org 585-235-8412 EXP. DRUMMER Strong vocals to join (keyboard)/ (keyboard bass) who also sings lead. To form duo (Retro Pop/Dance/ Jazz). Must be willing to shop the musical product around to get gigs 585-426-7241 EXPERIENCED LEAD VOCALS Seeks employment. Pat experience Inkspots, Platters, Drifters, James Brown among many. Leroy Harris. Contact Bobby 585-328-4121 Specialties, classics, R&B Soul. I SAY New Wave peaked in 1977-81. Who wants to play Blondie, The Cars, The Ramones, Squeeze, Elvis Costello, U2 and much

HomeWork A cooperative effort of City Newspaper and RochesterCityLiving, a program of the Landmark Society.

more? I play bass. Craig. mooskamovers@aol.com MEET OTHER MUSICIANS any instrument, male singer- jam together- coffee house, private gigs, I play keys Call Martin 585-266-6337 MEN ENJOY SINGING Fun with the Chorus of the Genesee, Sing, learn, perform, share laughs and libation! Guest night Tuesday at 7 PM. Stop in at 58 E Main St, Webster. Call 585698-7784 MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS (1955) Conn Trumpet (Coprion Bell) serial#517429 $800; (1960) Conn Trumpet (Director) $200; (1960) Wurlitzer Electric Piano model #200 serial #72828L $1500. All good condition 585-458-9722

continues on page 30

Move-In Ready on Merchants

70 Merchants Road A close-knit and inviting community awaits new residents at 70 Merchants Road in the Browncroft neighborhood in the Southeast quadrant of the city. The active Browncroft Neighborhood Association is one of the best amenities the home has to offer, while more traditional neighborhood amenities of restaurants, shopping, and a library are a short stroll away in the North Winton Business District.

Groups Forming DIFFERENT DRUMS GAY GIRLS GROUP. (proudly, progressively, conservative flavor). Why great divider Obama the Marxist reelected? Answer: “Liberalism is a mental disorder!” Elections have consequences- prices for gas/food/commodities rising significantly beginning 2013. PREPARE!!! Obama Sucks. 585-747-2699

Jam Section CALLING ALL MUSICIANS OF ALL GENRES the Rochester Music Coalition wants

Find your way home with

This beautiful Dutch Colonial Revival style home is immaculately maintained and retains all of its historic details while featuring the modern upgrades any homeowner would desire. The original gumwood trim throughout the home shines, including all of the original doors with glass knobs. All of the home’s leaded glass windows are beautiful reminders of the craftsmanship of the past. The attractive, original thin pine floors carry throughout the home.

TO ADVERTISE CONTACT CHRISTINE TODAY!

CALL 244-3329 X23 OR EMAIL CHRISTINE@ROCHESTER-CITYNEWS.COM

RochesterSells.com

27 W Boulevard Pkwy, Charlotte:

WONDERFUL HOME WITH ALL THE BEAUTY & CHARM! GREAT BIG BEDROOMS! GREAT KITCHEN WITH APPLIANCES INCLUDED, GREAT CUL-DE-SAC LOCATION! MANY MAJOR UPGRADES.

Ryan Smith 585-201-0724

Ryan Smith

Search. Buy. Sell.

While a columned front stoop welcomes visitors at the front of the house, the everyday entrance is located on the side, off of the driveway. Inside, stairs lead down to the basement or up to the main level of the home. Immediately to your left is the stunningly updated kitchen. This sun-filled and spacious, eat-in kitchen has gorgeous granite counter tops, a gas stove, an elegant, deep sink and abundant cupboards for storage. Currently, the owners use the dining room as a den, choosing to use the side sunroom as a bright, and cozy dining space. At the front

of the home, through the arched opening, is the traditional living room, complete with large windows and the incredible original fireplace with built-ins. Both doors from the living room are impressive original wood and leaded glass. Upstairs are three sunlit, good-sized bedrooms, with the same beautiful pine floors as the first level. The gorgeously updated main bathroom adds a spa feel to the historic charm of the rest of the home. Outside you will find a detached two-car garage and a backyard that has both an ample grassy area as well as a stone patio perfect for outdoor dining! The enclosed porch off the back of the home is perfect for three season usage. This immaculately maintained home at 70 Merchants Rd. is situated on a quiet, serene street near the Browncroft Rose Garden, but offers the incredible convenience of a central location. With I-590 so close, the entire city is just minutes away. With 1561 square feet, this Browncroft gem is listed at $159,900 and is looking for new owners to appreciate and love all of its historic details while enjoying its modern upgrades. To see more of this great house call realtor Carl Hopfinger of Red Barn Properties at 585-381-2222 or for a sneak peek visit rochestercityliving.com/property/R200452. by Anika Lindquist Anika is a Landmark Society volunteer.

NYS Licensed Real Estate Salesperson 201-0724 RochesterSells.com

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 29


I’m very pleased with the calls I got from our apartment rental ads, and will continue running them. Your readers respond — positively!” - M. Smith, Residential Management > page 29 R & B SOUL BANDS seek employment, experienced groups, already performing, seek new jobs. Contact Bobby 585328-4121 ROCK STAR, MR. ROCHESTER, lead vocalist, is looking to form band (Classic Rock) with lead guitarist, bassist, drummer & rhythm guitars Covers & originals 585-473-5089 THE GREGORY KUNDE CHORALE is looking for male voices. Call for an audition now to join our fourteenth season! Info Line 377 7568 or visit our website www. gregorykundechorale.org

Lost and Found LOOKING FOR KOHWE Ron the Photographer I bought you chinese gave you my card. 6901344 ron.rogers13@yahoo.com LOST CAT! Orange, Fluffy Female, 8 lbs., 10 years old. Please Call 585-747-5074 or 585-748-7146 PLEASE! We Miss Her

Looking For... XMAS Wool/Flannel Army Blanket donations needed! Gift new blankets to “Sunday Circle” knitters/crocheters to decorate for poor patients of R.P.C. Contact Mary at mgrant@ frontier.com.

Miscellaneous BUY REAL VIAGRA, Cialis, Levitra, Staxyn, Propecia & more... FDA- Approved, U.S.A. Pharmacies. Next day delivery avaiable. Order online or by phone at viamedic.com, 800467-0295

Must be 2+ years since last professional cleaning. Call 585-314-0398 and leave a message for Leslie S. HAS YOU BUILDING SHIFTED OR SETTLED? Contact Woodford Brothers Inc, for straightening, leveling, foundation and wood frame repairs at 1-800-OLDBARN. www.woodfordbros. com. “Not applicable in Queens county” LOOKING FOR White male for companionship, friendship. Ages between 38-55. Must be honest, caring and understanding. I like Summer Festivals, Shows, Dining-out, Day and weekend trips. Possible roommate situation. 585-2471335 LOOKING FOR NUDIST FRIENDS. SBIWM 55 Looking for singles and couples as nudist friends. Wide variety of interests: Nudism, Bike riding, Volleyball, Tennis, Movies, Comedy. I’m very open minded. Jim P.O. Box 20081, Rochester, NY 14602-0081 SAWMILLS from only $3997MAKE MONEY & SAVE MONEY with your own bandmil Cut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship. FREE Info & DVD www.NorwoodSawmills. com/300N 1-800-578-1363 Ext.300N

Professional Services DIVORCE or annulment in as little as one day. Over 50 years experience. 100% guarantee. From $995. All information at www.divorcefast.com

FREE DENTAL CLEANING MCC Sophomore Dental Hygiene student looking for volunteer patients interested in complimentary dental cleaning.

TO ADVERTISE IN OUR

HOME & GARDEN PROFESSIONALS SECTION

CALL CHRISTINE AT

244.3329 x23 OR EMAIL

CHRISTINE@ROCHESTER-CITYNEWS.COM SEE PAGE 28 OF THIS WEEK’S ISSUE

30 CITY FEBRUARY 27 - MARCH 5, 2013

EMPLOYMENT / CAREER TRAINING

Employment AIRLINE CAREERS - Become an Aviation Maintenance Tech. FAA

approved training. Financial aid if qualified – Housing available. Job placement assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 877-492-3059

PRN TO PART TIME ULTRASOUND TECH A Progressive mobile imaging company is looking for a Registered Ultrasound Tech for PRN to Part Time work. Hours are flexible. The majority of work is paid on call and per study. Candidates should be ARDMS registered with experience in Abdomen and Vascular highly preferred. If you are interested please forward your resume to:

Teresa Moore 200 Buell Rd. Rochester, NY 14624 Fax (585) 436-5340 • Email: tmoore@rochestermobilexray.com

AIRLINES ARE HIRING Train for hands on Aviation Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified- Job Placement Assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance (866)296-7093

LIVE LIKE A POPSTAR Now hiring 10 spontaneous individuals. Travel full time. Must be 18+. Transportation and hotel provided. Call Loraine 877-777-2091 (AAN CAN)

DELIVERY - DRIVERS/ Independent Contractors. Need reliable vehicles for same day delivery, call 1-800818-7958

MEDICAL RECEPTIONIST NEEDED For a doctor’s office in Brighton. Person must be goal oriented, professional, with good interpersonal skills. Two years experience preferred. Competitive salary with benefits including paid time off, 401K and FLEX. Background check, references required. For further details email resume and contact info to: this_project@rocketmail.com (no attachments)

DRIVER - $0.01 increase per mile after 6 months and 12 months. $0.03/mile quarterly bonus. Daily or Weekly pay. CDL-A, 3 months current exp. 800-414-9569 www. driveknight.com $$$HELP WANTED$$$ Extra Income! Assembling CD cases from Home! No Experience Necessary! Call our Live Operators Now! 1-800-405-7619 EXT 2450 http:// www.easywork-greatpay.com (AAN CAN) HELPWANTED! make extra money in our free ever popular homemailer program, includes valuable guidebook! Start immediately! Genuine! 1-888-292-1120 www. howtowork-fromhome.com (AAN CAN)

PAID IN ADVANCE! MAKE up to $1000 A WEEK mailing brochures from home! Helping Home Workers since 2001! Genuine Opportunity! No Experience required. Start Immediately! www.mailing-station. com (AAN CAN) PEER ADVOCATE SPECIALIST Housing Options Made Easy, Inc. currently has an opening for a fulltime and part-time Peer Advocate Specialist at our Monroe County Rochester, NY office. Candidates must demonstrate interpersonal communications skills and the ability to empathize with, relate to and effectively work with recipients of mental health services AND two years of active participation in mental health self-help activities, peer support or peer advocacy programs, or recipient run organizations or similar experiences or programs. Qualified candidates should forward resumes to: Housing Options Made Easy, Inc. C/O Earvetta Bizzell 1231 Delaware Ave, Suites 1&2 Buffalo, NY 14209 or at vetta@housingoptions.org

Volunteers ARE YOU 55+ & interested in learning about local volunteer opportunities? Call RSVP! Many opportunities available. Help meet critical needs. Regular information sessions - call 287-6377 or email jpowers@lifespan-roch.org. BRIGHTEN A LIFE. Lifespan’s Senior Connection matches volunteers 55+ with older adults who could benefit from a weekly phone call or visit by a friend. Call Katie 287-6352 for info. CATHOLIC FAMILY CENTER needs volunteers to help people apply for citizenship. The commitment is 2.5 hrs per mth one evening a month. Training is provided. For more information call Nate at (585) 5467220 ex 4854. DYNAMIC VOLUNTEER opportunities at the Zoo await you. If you love the Zoo, donate your time today. To learn more, visit the volunteer page of the Seneca Park Zoo’s Web site at www. senecaparkzoo.org FOSTER PARENTS WANTED! Monroe County is looking for adults age 21 and over to consider opening their homes to foster children. Call 334-9096 or visit www. MonroeFosterCare.org.


Rent your apartment special third week is

FREE

Place your ad by calling 244-3329 ext. 23 or rochestercitynewspaper.com Ad Deadlines: Friday 4pm for Display Ads Monday at noon for Line ads

EMPLOYMENT / CAREER TRAINING HERITAGE CHRISTIAN STABLES, a therapeutic horsemanship program for children and adults with developmental disabilities, is looking for volunteers to serve as horse leaders and side walkers. Call Kim Kennedy at (585) 340-2016 or email kkennedy@ heritagechristianservices.org LIFESPAN’S OMBUDSMAN PROGRAMS looking for volunteers to advocate for individuals living in long-term care settings. Please contact call 585.287.6378 or e-mail dfrink@lifespan-roch.org for more information LITERACY VOLUNTEERS OF ROCHESTER needs adult tutors to help adults who are waiting to improve their reading, writing, English speaking, or math skills. Call 473-3030, or check our website at www.literacyrochester.org LITERACY VOLUNTEERS OF ROCHESTER needs adult tutors to help adults who are waiting to improve their reading, writing, English speaking, or math skills. Call 473-3030, or check our website at www.literacyrochester.org MCC DENTAL STUDENT Seeking patients who would like complimentary cleaning. This is FREE of exchange for your time! Contact Tina S. 585-902-8009 or email tinahygiene@gmail.com ROCHESTER CARES is looking for volunteers interested in joining us to make a difference in Rochester!! One time and recurring volunteer opportunities with a wide range of organizations. www.rochestercares. org/calendar.php SCHOOL #12 999 South Ave. is looking for reading & math volunteers, English & Spanish. Training provided. Call Vicki 585461-4282 UNITED WAY Volunteer Fundraiser needed. Verification Phone Calling

& Data Management. Strong interpersonal skills; attention to detail; strong verbal and written communication skills. Call 2426547 VOLUNTEERS NEEDED for the Men’s Emergency Winter Shelter at Dimitri House. Please call us at 325-1796 for more information or to volunteer your time. VOLUNTEERS NEEDED to depict evangelistic opportunities by means of performing skits in a Church environment. Professional acting not a requirement. This is done in a small Church setting. Contact Pastor Ron @ 585-957-6155 WOMEN: ROCHESTER HABITAT is looking for women 18 years+ to help build a house with a single mother. Visit rochabitat.org or call 546-1470

Business Opportunities START NOW! OPEN RED HOT DOLLAR, DOLLAR PLUS, MAILBOX, DISCOUNT PARTY,$10 CLOTHING STORE, TEEN STORE, FITNESS CENTER FROM $53,900 WORLDWIDE! WWW.DRSS16.COM 1-800-518-3064

Career Training ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home. *Medical, *Business, *Criminal Justice, *Hospitality. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV authorized. Call 800-4819472 www.CenturaOnline.com TRACTOR TRAILER TRAINING Financial aid, Pell Grants, POST-911 GI Bill and housing, if qualified! National Tractor Trailer School, Liverpool, NY 1-800-243-9300 www.ntts.edu Consumer Information: www.ntts.edu/programs/disclosures

Legal Ads [ ARVINE-ELMWOOD LLC ] Articles of Organization filed with Secretary of State of NY on 1/30/2013. Office in Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 1048 South Ave, Rochester, NY 14620. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ HAN’S BEAUTY SUPPLY, LLC ] A Notice of Formation of a Limited Liability Company Han’s Beauty Supply, LLC filed Articles of Organization with the

Secretary of State of New York on January 10, 2013. As specified in the Certificate of Change filed with the Secretary of State on February 1, 2013, its office is located at 1671 Mt. Hope Avenue, Rochester, New York 14620, Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as an agent upon whom process against it may be served, and a copy of any process will be mailed to 1671 Mt. Hope Avenue, Rochester, New York 14620. Its business is to engage in any lawful activity for which limited liability companies may be organized under Section 203 of the New York Limited Liability Company Law.

[ LEGAL NOTICE ] Consult a Registered Professional Nurse, PLLC. Art. of Org. filed with the NY Sec. of State (SSNY) on 1/10/13. Office in Monroe Co. SSNY Design. Agent of PLLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to Susan J. LaGaipa, RN, 20 El Centro Drive Rochester, NY 14609. Purpose: Practice of Registered Professional Nursing.

Organization were filed by Department of State of New York on December 13, 2012. 3) County: Monroe. 4) The Company does not have a specific date of dissolution. 5) the Secretary of State has been designated as an agent upon whom process against the Company may be served. The address to which the process shall be mailed: 5615 Buffalo Rd. Churchville, NY 14428. 6) Purpose: Any lawful activity.

[ LEGAL NOTICE ]

[ LEGAL NOTICE SALON STYLETTO LLC ]

Notice of Formation of Limited Liability Company 1) Name: Alliance4Accountability, LLC. 2) Articles of

Notice of Organization: Salon Styletto, LLC was filed with SSNY on February 1, 2013. Office: Monroe County. SSNY

designated as agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. PO address which SSNY shall mail any process against the LLC served upon it: 43 Timberwood Drive, Hilton, NY 14468. Purpose is to engage in any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] ACTION HERO, LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 1/11/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 106 Arvine Hts., Rochester, NY 14611. General Purposes.

[ NOTICE ] ARCONTRACTORS, LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 1/14/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 74 Root Rd., Brockport, NY 14420. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] EQUITABLE ASSET MANAGEMENT (BLOCK 1-2013), LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 2/14/2013. Office in Monroe Co. SSNY desig. agent of LLC upon whom process may be

served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 2255 Lyell Ave., Rochester, NY 14606, which is also the principal business location. Purpose: Any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] File No: JJ200897 VIRGINIA: IN THE VIRGINIA BEACH JUVENILE AND DOMESTIC RELATIONS DISTRICT COURT IN RE: James Shamarice HILL Juvenile, VIRGINIA BEACH DEPARTMENT OF HUMAN SERVICES, Petitioner, v. LASHAUNDA FLOYD, Respondent Party to be served: Lashaunda Floyd Last known address: 17

Morgan Street, Rochester, NY 14611 ORDER OF PUBLICATION The object of this suit is that on or about the 24th day of October, 2012, the Virginia Beach Department of Human Services petitioned this Court for the termination of the parental rights of LASHAUNDA FLOYD, mother of James Shamarice Hill, born December 26, 2011, in Norfolk, Virginia at Sentara Leigh Hospital; said termination being pursuant to VA CODE section 16.1-283 (C)(1), (C)(2). The consequences of termination are that a parent or parents forever

cont. on page 32

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 31


Legal Ads > page 31 relinquish all parental rights such as, but not limited to, the rights of visitation, consent to adoption, companionship, association, education, discipline, guidance, the right to determine religious affiliation, all decision making concerning the child’s welfare and the responsibility for support. It is ORDERED that Lashaunda Floyd, mother of James Shamarice Hill, appear at the above named Court and protect her interests on or before March 20, 2013 at 10:00 a.m. Pamela Scott, Clerk of Court Dated: January 14, 2013 By :Glena Morgan , Deputy Clerk I ask for this: Christianna Dougherty-Cunningham, Esquire City Attorney’s Office 2401 Courthouse Drive, Room 260 Virginia Beach, VA 23456; Phone: (757) 385-4531, Fax: (757) 385-5687 [ NOTICE ] File No: JJ200897 VIRGINIA: IN THE VIRGINIA BEACH JUVENILE AND DOMESTIC RELATIONS DISTRICT COURT IN RE: James Shamarice HILL Juvenile, VIRGINIA BEACH DEPARTMENT OF HUMAN SERVICES, Petitioner, v. JILES HILL, Respondent. Party to be served: Jiles Hill Last known address: 17 Morgan Street, Rochester, NY 14611 ORDER OF PUBLICATION The object of this suit is that on or about the 24th day of October, 2012, the Virginia Beach Department of Human Services petitioned this Court for the termination of the parental rights of JILES HILL, father of James Shamarice Hill, born December 26, 2011, in Norfolk, Virginia at Sentara Leigh Hospital; said termination being pursuant to VA CODE section 16.1-283 (C)(1), (C)(2). The consequences of termination are that a parent or parents forever relinquish all parental rights such as, but not limited to, the rights of visitation, consent to adoption, companionship, association, education, discipline, guidance, the right to determine religious affiliation, all decision making concerning the child’s welfare and the responsibility for support. It is ORDERED that Jiles Hill, father of James Shamarice Hill, appear at the above named Court and protect his interests on or before March 20, 2013 at 10:00 a.m. Pamela Scott, Clerk of Court Dated: January 14, 2013 By: Glena Morgan, Deputy Clerk I ask for this: Christianna DoughertyCunningham, Esquire City Attorney’s Office 2401 Courthouse Drive, Room

260 Virginia Beach, VA 23456; Phone: (757) 385-4531, Fax: (757) 385-5687 [ NOTICE ] FLAMING SPADE PRODUCTIONS, LLC (LLC) filed Arts. of Org. with NY Secy. of State (SS) on 1/18/13. LLC’s office is in Monroe Co. SS is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS shall mail a copy of any process to LLC’s principal business location at 75 Conmar Dr., Rochester, NY 14609. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] HONALEE CHILDREN’S BOUTIQUE, LLC (LLC) filed Arts. of Org. with NY Secy. of State (SS) on 2/7/2013. LLC’s office is in Monroe Co. SS is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS shall mail a copy of any process to 56 North Main St., Pittsford, NY 14534. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] HUDSON PLAZA LLC file Arts. of Org. with Sec’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/27/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to 11 Sturbridge Lane Pittsford, New York 14534. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] JM SWEENEY FARMS, LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 1/8/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 30 Rolling Meadows Dr., Hilton, NY 14468. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] MARY CORCORAN PHOTOGRAPHY, LLC (LLC) filed Arts. of Org. with NY Secy. of State (SS) on 4/27/2011. LLC’s office is in Monroe Co. SS is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS shall mail a copy of any process to Corporation Service Company, 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207. Corporation Service Company is its registered agent located at 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207 upon whom process against the LLC may be served. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Name of LLC: Welcome Home Cinema LLC. Arts.

32 CITY FEBRUARY 27 - MARCH 5, 2013

of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State: 1/30/13. Office loc.: Monroe Co. Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o Business Filings Inc., 187 Wolf Rd., Ste. 101, Albany, NY 12205, regd. agt. upon whom process may be served. Purpose: any lawful act.

the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 1/24/2013. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, PO Box 30, Penfield NY 14526. Purpose: any lawful act.

[ NOTICE ]

Notice of Formation of 624 PITTSFORD VICTOR ROAD, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 01/25/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, 22 Ramsey Park, Rochester, NY 14610. Purpose: Any lawful activity.

Not. of Form. of Hare House Enterprises LLC. Art. of Org. filed with SSNY 2/21/13. County: Monroe. SSNY is designated Agent of LLC to whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 301 Willowbrooke Dr, Brockport, NY 14420. Purpose any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Not. of Form. of Roc Alternative, LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 2/11/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY may mail a copy of any process to LLC. 89 S Union St, Spencerport, NY 14559. Purpose: any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Not. of Form. of South Ave Wine & Liquor, LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 2/6/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY may mail a copy of any process to LLC. 313 Pearson Lane, Rochester, NY 14612. Purpose: any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Not. of Form. of TYMACK GROUP LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with SSNY 1/3/13. Office: Monroe County. SSNY designated Agent of LLC to whom process may be served. SSNY may mail a copy of any process to LLC, 16 Marlands Road, Rochester, NY 14624. Purpose any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of L.D. Networking LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 1/3/2013. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 79 Mission Hill Drive, Brockport, NY 14420. Purpose: any lawful act [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of 109 STRONG STREET, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with

[ NOTICE ]

[ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of A Healthy Bite, LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with Sec’y State (SSNY) on 1/31/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 110 Culver Pkwy, Rochester, NY 14609. Purpose: any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of ABBOTT TRENTO ONLINE MEDIA LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Sec’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 1/2/13. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 46 Rahway Lane, Rochester, NY 14606. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the princ. office of the LLC. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of American Homestead Storage LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/30/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: the LLC, 630 East Ave., Rochester, NY 14607, also the principal office address. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Aquarian Partners, L.P. Certificate filed Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 1/29/2013. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LP upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LP, 825 Allens Creek, Rochester, NY

14618. Name/address of each genl. ptr. available from SSNY. Term: until 12/31/2063. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of CARRETTA LLC. Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) on 1/18/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY may mail a copy of any process to LLC, 145G Gibbs St., Rochester, NY 14605. Purpose: any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of CONCAL, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 3/10/04. Off. loc.: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, c/o Silver & Feldman, Esqs., Attn: Sammy Feldman, Esq., 3445 Winton Place, Ste. 228, Rochester, NY 14623. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of DeCiantis Properties, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 01/25/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, 22 Ramsey Park, Rochester, NY 14610. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Exium Partners, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State on 1/15/13. Office location: Monroe County. Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: The LLC, 144 Village Landing, Suite 276, Fairport, NY 14450, principal business address. Purpose: any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of F. Zhang, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 2/5/13. Off. loc.: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o Sammy Feldman, 3445 Winton Place, Ste. 228, Rochester, NY 14623. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of Forels LLC, Art. Of Org.

filed with the Secy. of State (SSNY) on 03/18/11. Office location Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to 942 Gristmill Rdg Webster, NY 14580. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Greystone Vending LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/28/12. Office location: Monroe County. Principal office of LLC: 1133 Webster Rd. Webster, NY 14580. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to The LLC at the principal office of the LLC. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Jeremiahs Penfield LLC. Arts. of Org. filed Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 2/14/13. Off. loc.: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, c/o Sammy Feldman, 3445 Winton Place, Ste. 228, Rochester, NY 14623. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of limited liability company (LLC). Name: BLACKCOMB PROPERTIES LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Sec. of State of N.Y. (SSNY) on December 12, 2012. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to: The LLC, 10 Cambric Circle, Pittsford, New York 14534. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of LWN Transport, LLC. Art of Org. filed with SSNY on 11/29/12. Office Loc: Monroe Co. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: United States Corporation Agents, Inc. 7014 13th Ave, Ste 202, Brooklyn, NY 11228. Purpose: Any lawful activities [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of MD GORDON LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 01/04/13. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 40 Joseph Ave., Rochester, NY

14603. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. The regd. agent of the company upon whom and at which process against the company can be served is Michael Gordon, 40 Joseph Ave., Rochester, NY 14603. As amended by Cert. of Amendment filed with SSNY on 01/10/13, the name of the LLC is: MD GORDON FAMILY LLC. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of MUNSON AND SULLY, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 01/24/13. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: Adam C. Smith, 8 Reginald Circle, Rochester, NY 14625. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of NART LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/17/2012. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o Law Office of Anthony A. Dinitto, L.L.C., 8 Silent Meadows Drive, Spencerport, NY 14559. Purpose: any lawful act [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of OPEN BOOKINGS LLC. Art. Of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/13/12. Office in MONROE County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, 78 Rossmore St. Rochester, NY 14606 Purpose: Any lawful purpose [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Popeye Properties, LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 1/7/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 29 Walnut Dr., Penfield, NY 14626. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of ROYCO SO NY, LLC. Arts.

of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 01/30/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Mark S. Rosen, The Solomon Organization, 92 River Rd., Summit, NJ 07901. As amended by Cert. of Amendment filed with SSNY on 02/04/13, the name of LLC is: ROYCO NY, LLC. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Spectrum Creative Arts, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with SSNY on 1/23/13. Off. loc.: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 46 Durand Drive, Rochester, NY 14622. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Stream D, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State (SSNY) on 01/18/13. Office location Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to 31 Bracknell Circle, West Henrietta, NY 14586. Purpos:e Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of THE GENESEE EWE-ERY, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 02/08/13. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 64 Beckerman Pl., Rochester, NY 14620. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Joanne Albano-Vaugh at the princ. office of the LLC. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of TWIN TAVERN LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 01/10/13. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 1549 Lake Rd., Hamlin, NY 14464. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of UNDER THE LIGHTHOUSE LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 01/09/13. Office location:


Legal Ads Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, 1793 Manitou Rd., Spencerport, NY 14559. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of ADVISORS CAPITAL PLANNING LLC. Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/27/12. Office location: NY County. LLC formed in New Jersey (NJ) on 03/19/12. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to NJ addr. of the LLC: 777 Terrace Ave., Ste. 608, Hasbrouck Heights, NJ 07604. Arts. of Org. filed with NJ Dept. of Treasury, P.O. Box 628, Trenton, NJ 08646-0628. As amended by Cert. of Correction filed with SSNY on 02/13/13, office location is Monroe County. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of ATIS Elevator Inspections, LLC. Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 2/4/13. Office location: Monroe County. LLC formed in MO on 11/21/12. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. MO and principal business address: 8531 Page Ave., Ste. 140, St. Louis, MO 63114. Cert. of Org. filed with MO Sec. of State, 600 W. Main St., Jefferson City, MO 65101. Purpose: all lawful purposes. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of M&N Group Holdings, LLC. Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 1/31/13. Office location: Monroe County. LLC formed in DE on 6/30/11. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. DE address of LLC: 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of Manning & Napier Group, LLC. Authority

filed with NY Dept. of State on 1/17/13. Office location: Monroe County. LLC formed in DE on 6/24/11. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. DE address of LLC: 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of PIPELINE EQUIPMENT RESOURCES COMPANY, LLC. Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 01/28/13. Office location: Monroe County. LLC formed in New Jersey (NJ) on 07/02/12. Princ. office of LLC: 3900 Buffalo Rd., Rochester, NY 14624. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Corporation Service Co., 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207-2543. NJ addr. of LLC: 9 Mars Ct., Unit C-4A, Boonton, NJ 07005. Arts. of Org. filed with State Treasurer, Dept. of Treasury, Div. of Revenue and Enterprise Services, P.O. Box 628, Trenton, NJ 08646-0628. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of qualification of RIVERSIDE INVESTING, LLC. Authority filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 02/05/13. Office in MONROE County. Formed in UT on 11/07/12. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, 157 Moul Road Hilton, NY 14468. Purpose: Real Estate [ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of Rosswood Villa Apartments, LLC. Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 2/7/13. Office location: Monroe County. LLC formed in California (CA) on 1/22/1999. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o Registered Agent Solutions, Inc., 99 Washington Ave., Ste. 1008, Albany, NY 12260. Address to be maintained in CA: 9350 Wilshire Blvd., Ste. 302, Beverly Hills, CA 90212, also the principal office. Arts of Org. filed with the CA Secretary of State, 1500

11th St., Sacramento, CA 95814. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of Six Month Smiles, LLC. Fictitious name: Six Month Smiles, LLC (Delaware). Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 1/15/13. Office location: Monroe County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 1/8/13. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o Corporation Service Company, 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207-2543. Principal office: 35 Main St., Scottsville, NY 14546. Address to be maintained in DE: 2711 Centerville Rd., Ste. 400, Wilmington, DE 19808. Arts of Org. filed with the DE Secretary of State, John G. Townsend Bldg., 401 Federal St., Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] NOTICE OF SALE SUPREME COURT COUNTY OF MONROE MidFirst Bank, Plaintiff, against Ronnie J. Davis; Laura Davis, et al., Defendant(s). Pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale duly dated 12/17/2012 I, the undersigned Referee will sell at public auction at the County Office Bldg, at 39 W. Main St., Rochester, in the County of Monroe, State of New York on 03/26/2013 at 10:30AM, premises known as 132 West Filbert Street, East Rochester, NY 14445 All that certain plot piece or parcel of land, with the buildings and improvements erected, situate, lying and being in the Town/Village of East Rochester, County of Monroe and State of New York, SECTION: 152.21, BLOCK: 2, LOT: 6. Approximate amount of judgment $35,009.28 plus interest and costs. Premises will be sold subject to provisions of filed Judgment Index# 8066/2011. Paul A. Guerrieri, Esq., Referee FRENKEL LAMBERT WEISS WEISMAN & GORDON, LLP Attorney for Plaintiff, 53 Gibson Street, Bayshore, NY 11706 Dated: January 28, 2013 1017169 2/20, 2/27, 3/6, 03/13/2013 [ NOTICE ] REBA NY, LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 1/23/2013. Office in Monroe Co. SSNY desig. agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 2255 Lyell Ave., Rochester, NY 14606, which is also the principal business

location. Purpose: Any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] ROXBURY DOME LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 1/8/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 11 Roxbury Ln., Pittsford, NY 14534. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] ROXBURY LAND LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 1/8/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 11 Roxbury Ln., Pittsford, NY 14534. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] The Gamma Nu of Phi Kappa Tau Alumni, Inc. will be holding it’s annual membership meeting at 1:30 PM on Saturday, April 6th, 2013. The meeting will take place at the Chapter House (604 Charter’s Way, Rochester, NY 14623) to elect members of the Board of Directors and transact such other business which may come before the meeting. [ NOTICE ] WEBSTER PARTNERS, LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 1/15/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Stephen Webster, 1595 Elmwood Ave, Rochester, NY 14620. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] WINDLASS PROPERTIES & HOLDINGS, LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 8/9/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Leah M. Buttery, 8344 Ridge Rd W., Brockport, NY 14420. General Purposes. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] Name: BRU-BAG, LLC. Arts. Of Org. filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 02/13/2013. Office Location: Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to: C/O BRU-BAG, LLC, One East

Main Street, 10th Floor, Rochester, New York 14614. Purpose: Any Lawful Purpose. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] Notice of Formation of Daniele SPC, LLC. Articles of Organization filed with Sec. of State of NY (SSNY) on 2/1/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to principal business location: The LLC, 2740 Monroe Avenue, Rochester, NY 14618. Purpose: any lawful activity [ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] Notice of Formation of Modern Sales, LLC. Articles of Organization filed with Sec. of State of NY (SSNY) on 1/28/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to principal business location: The LLC, 4 Niagara Street, Rochester, NY 14605. Purpose: any lawful activity [ NOTICE OF FORMATION BODYMIND FLOAT CENTER LLC ] Articles of Organization filed with Secretary of State of NY (“SSNY”) on 01/07/2013. Office in Monroe County. SSNY designated agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to BODYMIND FLOAT CENTER LLC, C/O DAVID BRICKMAN, 378 ROCKINGHAM ST., ROCHESTER, NY 14620. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF PLLC ] Earlando Thomas, Physician, PLLC has filed articles of organization with the New York Secretary of State on February 19, 2013. Its principal place of business is located at 206 Mill Stream Run, Webster, New York 14580. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent upon whom process may be served. A copy of any process shall be mailed to 206 Mill Stream Run, Webster, New York 14580 The purpose of the PLLC is to practice the profession of medicine. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF WESTMINSTER ST ROCHESTER-SODUS LAKE PROPERTIES, LLC ] The name of the Limited Liability Company is Westminster St

Rochester-Sodus Lake Properties, LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the New York Secretary of State on 12/23/2012. The office of the LLC is in Monroe County. The New York Secretary of State is designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. The Secretary of State shall mail a copy of such process to 1 Chase Square, Suite 1900, Rochester, New York 14604, Attn: William R. Alexander, , Esq.. The LLC is organized to engage in any lawful activity for which an LLC may be formed under NY LLC Law. [ NOTICE OF SALE ] Index No. 2011-192 SUPREME COURT STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF MONROE ESL Federal Credit Union, Plaintiff, vs. Christine J. Butkowsky; Jean Butkowsky; Andrew Butkowsky Defendants. February 15, 2013 and entered herein, I, the undersigned, the Referee in said Judgment named, will sell at public auction in the front vestibule of the Monroe County Office Building, 39 West Main Street, Rochester, New York, County of Monroe, on March 27, 2013 at 9:00 a.m., on that day, the premises directed by said Judgment to be sold and therein described as follows: ALL THAT TRACT OR PARCEL OF LAND, situate in the Town of Parma, County of Monroe and State of New York, known as 662 Moul Road, Hilton, NY 14468; Tax Account No. 015.02-3-48.4, described in Deed recorded in Liber 8970 of Deeds, page 301; 1.79 acres. Said premises are sold subject to any state of facts an accurate survey may show, zoning restrictions and any amendments thereto, covenants, restrictions, agreements, reservations, and easements of record and prior liens, if any, municipal departmental violations, and such other provisions as may be set forth in the Complaint and Judgment filed in this action. Judgment amount: $137,460.41 plus, but not limited to, costs, disbursements, attorney fees and additional allowance, if any, all with legal interest. DATED: February 2013 Adrian J. Burke, Esq., Referee LACY KATZEN LLP Attorneys for Plaintiff 130 East Main Street Rochester, New York 14604 Telephone: (585) 324-5767 [ NOTICE OF SALE ] Index No. 2012-5976 SUPREME COURT

STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF MONROE ESL Federal Credit Union Plaintiff vs, Katherine I. Maggi, Defendants. Pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale dated February 15, 2013 and entered herein, I, the undersigned, the Referee in said Judgment named, will sell at public auction in the front vestibule of the Monroe County Office Building, 39 West Main Street, Rochester, New York, County of Monroe, on March 27, 2013 at 1:00 p.m., on that day, the premises directed by said Judgment to be sold and therein described as follows: ALL THAT TRACT OR PARCEL OF LAND, situate in the City of Rochester, County of Monroe and State of New York, known as 7 Rodenbeck Place, Rochester, NY 14620, Tax Account No. 121.742-37.001, described in Deed recorded in Liber 8372 of Deeds, page 424; lot size 70 x 80.62. Said premises are sold subject to any state of facts an accurate survey may show, zoning restrictions and any amendments thereto, covenants, restrictions, agreements, reservations, and easements of record and prior liens, if any, municipal departmental violations, and such other provisions as may be set forth in the Complaint and Judgment filed in this action. Judgment amount: $85,352.45 plus, but not limited to, costs, disbursements, attorney fees and additional allowance, if any, all with legal interest. DATED: February 2013 Gilbert Perez, Esq., Referee LACY KATZEN LLP Attorneys for Plaintiff 130 East Main Street Rochester, New York 14604 Telephone: (585) 324-5767 [ SUMMONS ] Index No. 2012-11232 SUPREME COURT STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF MONROE ESL Federal Credit Union Plaintiff, vs. Estate of Mary Ellen Pembrook, Melinda Ellis, individually and as Co-Executor of the Estate of Mary Ellen Pembrook; Lisa Brunette, Individually and as CoExecutor of the Estate of Mary Ellen Pembrook; Stephen Ellis; Thomas Ellis; Jerome John Pembrook, Deceased; and any persons who are heirs or distributees of Jerome John Pembrook, Deceased, and all persons who are widows, grantees, mortgagees, lienors, heirs, devisees, distributees, successors in interest of such of them as may be deceased, and their husbands, wives, heirs, devisees, distributees

and successors of interest all of whom and whose names and places of residence are unknown to Plaintiff; Strong Memorial Hospital; Videos Plus; Account Management Services LLC; New York State Department of Taxation and Finance, New York State Tax Commissioner; Fairlane Credit LLC; Workers Compensation Board of the State of New York; Georgia McCabe and Scott Brownstein; RAB Performance Recoveries, LLC; People of the State of New York; United States of America; “John Doe” and/or “Mary Roe”, Defendants. Location of property to be foreclosed: 153 Kings Lane, Town of Irondequoit, Monroe County, NY TO THE ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANTS: YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED to answer the Complaint in the above action and to serve a copy of your Answer on the Plaintiff’s attorney within twenty (20) days after the service of this Summons, exclusive of the day of service, or within (30) days after completion of service where service is made in any other manner than by personal delivery within the State. The United States of America, if designated as a Defendant in this action, may answer or appear within sixty (60) days of service hereof. In case of your failure to appear or answer, judgment will be taken against you by default for the relief demanded in the Complaint. Monroe County is designated as the place of trial. The basis of venue is the location of the mortgaged premises. NOTICE: YOU MAY BE IN DANGER OF LOSING YOUR HOME If you do not respond to this Summons and Complaint by serving a copy of the Answer on the attorney for the mortgage company who filed this foreclosure proceeding against you and filing the Answer with the Court, a default judgment may be entered and you can lose your property. Speak to an attorney or go to the Court where your case is pending for further information on how to answer the Summons and protect your property. Sending a payment to your mortgage company will not stop this foreclosure action. YOU MUST RESPOND BY SERVING A COPY OF THE ANSWER ON THE ATTORNEY FOR THE PLAINTIFF (MORTGAGE COMPANY) AND FILING THE ANSWER WITH THE COURT. DATED: October 9, 2012 MATTHEW RYEN, ESQ. Lacy Katzen LLP Attorneys for Plaintiff

cont. on page 34

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 33


Legal Ads > page 33 Office and Post Office Address 130 East Main Street Rochester, New York 14604 Telephone: (585) 324-5767 NATURE AND OBJECT OF ACTION: The object of the above action is to foreclose a mortgage bearing date the 26th day of November 1999, executed by Jerome John Pembrook to ESL Federal Credit Union to secure the sum of $30,000.00, and recorded in Liber 14740 of Mortgages at page 363 in the Office of the Clerk of the County of Monroe on the 21st day of December 1999, and a further mortgage bearing date the 13th day of March 2000, executed by Jerome John Pembrook to ESL Federal Credit Union to secure the sum of $39,700.00, and recorded in Liber 14839 of Mortgages at page 582 in the Office of the Clerk of the County of Monroe on the 3rd day of April 2000, which mortgages were consolidated by the Consolidation, Modification and Extension Agreement dated the 13th day of March 2000 and recorded April 3, 2000 in Liber 14839 of Mortgages at page 593 in the Office of

the Clerk of the County of Monroe on April 3, 2000 forming a single lien in the amount of $69,700.00. TO THE ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANTS, The plaintiff makes no personal claim against you in this action. To the above named Defendants: The foregoing Summons is served upon you by publication pursuant to an Order of the Hon. J. Scott Odorisi, a Justice of the Supreme Court of the State of New York, dated February 8, 2013 and filed along with the supporting papers in the Monroe County Clerk’s Office. This is an action to foreclose a mortgage. The premises is described as follows: ALL THAT TRACT OR PARCEL OF LAND, situate in the Town of Irondequoit, County of Monroe and State of New York, known and described as Lot 19 Kings Lane, as shown on a map of Kings Lane Subdivision filed in the Monroe County Clerk’s office in Liber 136 of Maps, Page 73. Tax Account No. 076.16-274 Property Address: 153 Kings Lane, Town of Irondequoit, Monroe County, New York

[ SUMMONS ] Index No. 2012-4817 STATE OF NEW YORK SUPREME COURT COUNTY OF MONROE WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A. Plaintiff vs. MICHAEL AMMERING and JOHN DOE Defendants This is an attempt to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. To the above named Defendants: You are hereby summoned to answer the complaint in this action and to serve a copy of your answer, or if the complaint is not served with this summons, to serve a notice of appearance on the plaintiff’s attorneys within thirty days after the service of this summons, exclusive of the day of service, and in case of your failure to appear or answer, judgment will be taken against you by default for the relief demanded in the complaint. NOTICE YOU ARE IN DANGER OF LOSING YOUR HOME. If you do not respond to this summons and complaint by serving a copy of the answer on the attorney for the mortgage

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company who filed this foreclosure proceeding against you and filing the answer with the court, a default judgment may be entered and you can lose your home. Speak to an attorney or go to the court where your case is pending for further information on how to answer the summons and protect your property. Sending a payment to your mortgage company will not stop this foreclosure action. YOU MUST RESPOND BY SERVING A COPY OF THE ANSWER ON THE ATTORNEY FOR THE PLAINTIFF (MORTGAGE COMPANY) AND FILING THE ANSWER WITH THE COURT. The foregoing summons is served upon you by publication pursuant to an order of Hon. J. Scott Odorisi , Justice of the Supreme Court of the State of New York, signed the 24th day of January, 2013, Rochester, New York. The object of this action is to foreclose a mortgage on the following property: ALL THAT CERTAIN LOT, PIECE OR PARCEL OF LAND, situate, lying and being in the City of Rochester, County of Monroe, and State of New York, being Lot #36, as shown on a map of the L. Bauer Tract on file in Monroe County Clerk’s Office in Liber 6 of Maps, Page 85. Said Lot #36 is situate on the east side of Karnes Street and is 40 feet wide front and rear and 125 feet deep as shown on said map. Subject to an easement given by George A. Gillette to Rochester Railway Light Company and others dated November 15th, 1913, and recorded in Monroe County Clerk’s Office in Liber 992 of Deeds at Page 357. Subject to all covenants, easements and restrictions, if any, affecting said premises. Being the same premises conveyed to the Mortgagor(s) herein by Deed to be recorded simultaneously herewith, this being a purchase money mortgage for the amount stated herein. A residence for one or two families only is located on this property. These premises are also known as 48 Karnes Street, Rochester, NY 14606. Natalie A. Grigg, Esq. Woods Oviatt Gilman LLP Attorneys for Plaintiff 700 Crossroads Building 2 State Street [ SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION ] Index No. 2012-5294 Filing Date: May 14, 2012 STATE OF NEW YORK SUPREME COURT COUNTY OF MONROE RBS Citizens, N.A. f/k/a Citizens Bank, N.A. Plaintiff vs.

34 CITY FEBRUARY 27 - MARCH 5, 2013

Robert Werner Citizens Bank, N.A. Fleet Real Estate Funding Corp. and “John Doe”, said name being fictitious and intended to include any and all parties having an interest in the mortgaged premises and not otherwise identified above, Defendants. TO THE ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANTS: YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED to answer the complaint in the above action and to serve a copy of your Answer on the plaintiff’s attorney within twenty (20) days after the service of this Summons, exclusive of the day of service, or within thirty (30) days after completion of service where service is made in any other manner than by personal delivery within the State. The United States of America, if designated as a defendant in this action, may answer or appear within sixty (60) days of service hereof. In case of your failure to appear or answer, judgment will be taken against you by default for the relief demanded in the complaint. Monroe County is designated as the place of trial. The basis of venue is the location of the mortgaged premises. Dated: February 21, 2013 /s/ David P. Martin David P. Martin, Esq.HARRIS BEACH PLLC Attorneys for Plaintiff 333 West Washington Street, Suite 200 Syracuse, NY 13202 (315) 423-7100 TO THE DEFENDANT, Fleet Real Estate Funding Corp.: The foregoing Summons is served upon you by publication pursuant to an Order of Honorable Justice Richard A. Dollinger, J.S.C. (Acting), dated February 5, 2013, and filed with the Complaint in the office of the Clerk of the County of Monroe in the City of Rochester, County of Monroe and State of New York. The nature of this action is to foreclose a mortgage bearing date June 25, 2007, executed by Robert Werner to Citizens Bank, N.A., to secure the sum of NINETYTHREE THOUSAND DOLLARS AND NO CENTS ($93,000.00), and recorded in Book of Mortgages 21328, at Page 0001, in the County of Monroe, on July 23, 2007. The premises hereinbefore referred to are described as follows: ALL THAT TRACT OR PARCEL OF LAND, situate in the Town of Clarkson, County of Monroe and State of New York, and being a part of Lot 4, Section 2, Township 4 of the triangular tract (so-called) bounded and described as follows: Beginning at a point on the northerly boundary of Ridge Road, also known as Route 104

and being 99 feet wide, at a distance of 100 feet westerly, measured along the said boundary, from its intersection with the division line between Lot 10 on the East and Lot 4 on the west, said division line being also the easterly line of a parcel of land described in a deed to Carl H. and Bessie A. Nellis recorded in the Monroe County Clerk’s Office in Liber 2142 of Deeds, page 537; running thence northerly parallel to the division line between said Lot 10 on the east and said Lot 4 on the west a distance of 200 feet to a point; running thence westerly parallel to the northerly boundary of the Ridge Road, a distance of 100 feet to a point; running thence southerly parallel to the first described boundary a distance of 200 feet to the northerly boundary of Ridge Road; running thence easterly along the northerly boundary of Ridge Road a distance of 100 feet to the point or place of beginning; containing 0.46 acres be the same more or less. Subject to all covenants, conditions, restrictions, reservations, easements and rights of way of record. Dated: February 21, 2013 /s/ David P. Martin David P. Martin, Esq. HARRIS BEACH PLLC Attorneys for Plaintiff 333 West Washington Street, Suite 200 Syracuse, NY 13202 (315) 423-7100 TO THE DEFENDANT, Fleet Real Estate Funding Corp.: That it appears from the public records that Fleet Real Estate Funding Corp., holds a lien which is adverse to Plaintiff’s interest and which remains open of public record as follows: a mortgage made by Helmut M. Rinans to American Home Funding, Inc. bearing date February 9, 1988 to secure the sum of FIFTY THOUSAND FOUR HUNDRED AND 00/100 DOLLARS ($50,400.00), and recorded in Book of Mortgages 8626, at Page 38, in the County of Monroe on February 10, 1988, which mortgage was assigned by American Home Funding, Inc. to Fleet Real Estate Funding Corp. by assignment bearing date February 11, 1988 and recorded in Book of Assignments of Mortgages 755, at Page 80, in the County of Monroe on August 16, 1989; That upon information and belief, the lien of the Fleet Mortgage has been paid in full, and is therefore, subordinate to the mortgage being foreclosed herein, and should be discharged of record. That the lien of the Fleet Mortgage should be declared invalid and

extinguished pursuant to Real Property Actions and Proceedings Law Article 15. That Plaintiff requests that the Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale state the following: ORDERED, ADJUDGED AND DECREED, that the lien which appears to be prior and adverse to the mortgage being foreclosed herein, namely the lien of Defendant Fleet Real Estate Funding Corp., is hereby declared invalid and extinguished pursuant to RPAPL Article 15; and it is further ORDERED, ADJUDGED AND DECREED, that Defendant Fleet Real Estate Funding Corp., and all persons or entities claiming by, through or under them, be and are hereby forever barred and foreclosed of and from all right, claim, lien, interest or equity of redemption in and to said Mortgage Premises; and it is further ORDERED, ADJUDGED AND DECREED, that the record be reformed to reflect that the lien of Defendant Fleet Real Estate Funding Corp., is invalid and extinguished, and upon granting and entering of a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale, a certified copy of same be presented to the Monroe County Clerk so the clerk may mark the mortgage made by Helmut M. Rinans to American Home Funding, Inc. bearing date February 9, 1988 to secure the sum of FIFTY THOUSAND FOUR HUNDRED AND 00/100 DOLLARS ($50,400.00), and recorded in Book of Mortgages 8626, at Page 38, in the County of Monroe on February 10, 1988, which mortgage was assigned by American Home Funding, Inc. to Fleet Real Estate Funding Corp. by assignment bearing date February 11, 1988 and recorded in Book of Assignments of Mortgages 755, at Page 80, in the County of Monroe on August 16, 1989, discharged of record. In the case of default, judgment shall be taken against you and ordering the mortgage made by Helmut M. Rinans to American Home Funding, Inc. bearing date February 9, 1988 to secure the sum of FIFTY THOUSAND FOUR HUNDRED AND 00/100 DOLLARS ($50,400.00), and recorded in Book of Mortgages 8626, at Page 38, in the County of Monroe on February 10, 1988, which mortgage was assigned by American Home Funding, Inc. to Fleet Real Estate Funding Corp. by assignment bearing date February 11, 1988 and recorded in Book of Assignments of Mortgages 755, at Page 80, in the County of Monroe on August

16, 1989, invalid and extinguished and discharged of record. [ SUMMONS WITH NOTICE ] Index No. 00094390 SUPREME COURT STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF HERKIMER BEVERLY EARLSLEY, Plaintiff, against ROBERT P. EARLSEY, Defendant. Plaintiff designates HERKIMER COUNTY The basis of the venue is RESIDENCY OF THE PLAINTIFF. Plaintiff resides at: 2264 Higby Road Frankfort, NY 13340 County of HERKIMER. ACTION FOR DIVORCE To the above named Defendant: You are hereby summoned to serve a notice of appearance, on the Plaintiff’s Attorney(s) within 20 days after the service of this Summons, exclusive of the day of service (or within 30 days after the service is complete. If the summons is not personally delivered to you within the State of New York); and in case of your failure to appear or answer, judgment will be taken against you by default for the relief demanded in the notice set forth below. Dated: MARCH 10, 2011 Defendant’s Address ROBERT P. EARLSLEY 540 UTICA STREET BUFFALO, NEW YORK 13502 Longeretta Law Firm David A. Longeretta, Esg. Attorney for Plaintiff Office and Post Office Address 298 GENESEE STREET UTICA, NEW YIORK 13502 NOTICE: The nature of this action is to dissolve the marriage between the parties, on the grounds of Abandonment and NoFault. The relief sought is: A judgment of absolute divorce, in favor of the Plaintiff, dissolving the marriage between the parties in this action. NOTICE TO DEFENDANT You may certain right under the laws of the State of New York to an equitable division of certain property held individually and jointly by you and your spouse during the term of your marriage; to receive maintenance from your spouse; and to receive support for the children of the marriage as part of this proceeding. These rights may be available to you whether or not a separation agreement has been entered into between you and your spouse. A failure to answer this Verified Complaint and to appear in this action may therefore result in a judgment of divorce being obtained against you, and additionally, a waiver of those rights.


Fun [ NEWS OF THE WEIRD ] BY CHUCK SHEPHERD Officials at England’s 12th-century St. Peter’s Church in Seaford, East Sussex, which is renowned for its eerie quiet, created a 30-minute CD recently of near-total silence, first as a small-scale fundraising project, but later for general sales (since word-of-mouth had attracted orders from as far away as Ghana). Those who have heard it said they could make out only the occasional squeaking of footsteps on the wooden floor (and the very distant hum of passing cars). Said one admiring parishioner, “People sometimes like to sit down and just have a bit of peace and quiet.”

Government in Action

— France has seen its wolf population gradually increase from near-extinction in the 1930s, but still classifies the predator as a “protected” species. However, sheep farmers increasingly complain that wolves’ attacks are reducing their herds. Therefore, in a recently proposed “National Wolf Plan,” the government boldly gave headline-writers around the world material for rejoicing: a national program to “educate” the wolves. Individual wolves known to have attacked sheep would be caught, marked and briefly detained, with the hope that they would learn their lesson from that trauma and from then on, pass up sheep and turn instead to rabbits, boar and deer. (Said one critic, “You might as well try to educate a shark.”) — Updates: The Treasury Department’s inspector general for tax administration revealed in January that twice as many fraudulent income tax refunds were paid to inmates in 2011 (173,000) as for the tax year 2010. However, the IRS claimed that the fraudulent returns it did manage to stop totaled $2.5 billion

(almost half of which was disingenuously claimed by two inmates). Also, the Department of Health and Human Service’s inspector general revealed in January that Medicare was illegally billed for $120 million from 2009 to 2011 for services used by inmates and illegal immigrants -- neither category of which is authorized to use Medicare. — Recurring Theme: As of January, New York City music teacher Aryeh Eller, 46, has almost reached a milestone in his battle with the Board of Education. Soon, he will have earned a million dollars in salary and benefits since the board removed him from the classroom 13 years ago and dispatched him to a light-duty “rubber room” after complaints of fondling and sexual harassment in the one year that he actually taught. An arbitrator had found insufficient evidence for his termination, but the board refuses to let him back in the classroom, fearing he is a danger to students.

People With Issues

Michael Selleneit, 54, pleaded guilty in January to several charges including attempted murder in an October 2011 attack on a neighbor, who Selleneit had declared was raping Selleneit’s wife -- “telepathically.” In fact, police said, Selleneit had been making that claim “for years,” though he had not taken action until October 2011. His wife, Meloney, was also charged, as she allegedly goaded her husband on, telling him to “go for it,” and even supplying the gun. Both spouses have been extensively examined by mental health professionals, and it turns out that Michael is the saner of the two. He had been ruled “competent” to stand trial, but Meloney has so far not been.

[ LAST WEEK’S SOLUTION ON PAGE 29 ]

[ LOVESCOPE ] BY EUGENIA LAST ARIES (March 21-April 19): Unpredictable, emotional mood swings will be an issue when it comes to love, romance and dating. Don’t invite someone into your life who shows possessive qualities, and don’t cling to someone who isn’t showing enough interest. You have to look for someone with a similar mindset. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): You will have plenty of romantic opportunity, but choosing who is best for you won’t be so easy. Expect potential partners to exaggerate or mislead you as to who they are and what they are all about. Don’t assume you are

being told the truth. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Deception, disillusionment and secret affairs are prevalent and must be considered if you plan to engage in an intimate relationship. Ulterior motives are likely to be behind the attention you are receiving. Slow down and get to know anyone showing interest before becoming involved. CANCER (June 21-July 22): You’ll be flooded with attention and will have your choice of partners if you travel, socialize or join interest groups. Open your heart and share your personal plans and intentions for the future. The person heading down a similar

path will be your best choice. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Expand your circle of friends and enjoy the company of lots of potential lovers before you decide to become up close and personal with one partner. Back away from anyone looking for a commitment, promise or contract. Freedom to come and to go as you please is necessary. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Overreacting, overindulging and overspending will all deter your chance to find the right lover. Avoid an entanglement with a colleague or someone with the potential to negatively influence your financial situation. Ask

questions and let friendship grow before becoming intimate. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Emotions will be close to the surface, leading you to believe that someone you meet is your perfect match. Don’t believe everything you are told or be too trusting of someone wanting too much too fast. Bide your time and trust in a good friend’s judgment. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): You’ll be impossible to resist. Take a look around -- the person you feel most drawn to will reciprocate. Love is on the rise, and utilizing your mysterious manner and unusual approach to life and love will attract

someone as unique as you. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Don’t jump into a relationship. You’ll attract partners who boast about what they have to offer or who try to belittle or control you. Stick to partners with whom you share a history. Partners who are excessive verbally, physically, emotionally or financially must be avoided. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Revisit an old partner, and find out if there is anything left to salvage. Maturity coupled with being at a different stage in your life will help you either move on or get back together. Either way, it will help to end the drought

that you’ve encountered. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Refuse to let anyone limit you. Freedom is important if you want your relationship with someone to last. If trust issues are present, you are inviting the wrong partners into your life. Know what you want before you engage in a relationship that is too confining. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Love is in the stars. Size up where you are personally, financially and emotionally, and consider what you need in your romantic life to compliment what you already have. Honesty, integrity and working toward the same goals will lead to a long-term commitment.

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 35


36 CITY FEBRUARY 27 - MARCH 5, 2013

Profile for Rochester City Newspaper

February 27 - March 5, 2013 - City Newspaper  

Cover: Ice fishing in Rochester | News: Morelle and MCC | Dining: Local products made in Rochester | Music: The Indigo Girls | Theater: "The...

February 27 - March 5, 2013 - City Newspaper  

Cover: Ice fishing in Rochester | News: Morelle and MCC | Dining: Local products made in Rochester | Music: The Indigo Girls | Theater: "The...

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