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EVENTS: FEBRUARY BREAK ACTIVITIES, ROC CITY BREWFEST 20 URBAN JOURNAL: Politics, Obama, and Iran

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FILM: “SAFE HOUSE,” “THE VOW” 24 CROSSWORD, NEWS OF THE WEIRD 36

far from finished • dia frampton • zvi zeitlin • big mean sound machine • kingsley flood • and more music, page 12

FEBRUARY 15-21 , 2012 Free

Greater Rochester’s Alternative Newsweekly

Vol 41 No 23

News. Music. Life.

Give MCC the respect it deserves.” FEEDBACK, PAGE 2

Theater group in license flap. NEWS, PAGE 4

Sibley mystery solved. NEWS, PAGE 5

REVIEW: sandwiches, soups, and more at Lunch. DINING, PAGE 11

REVIEW: “Makers & Mentors” at Rochester Contemporary. ART, PAGE 19

COVER STORY | BY JEREMY MOULE | PAGE 8 | ILLUSTRATION BY MAX SEIFERT

The unseen enemies About a decade ago, a coalition of local government, public health, and community leaders decided to take on through education and advocacy the countywide problem of childhood lead exposure. The result: the number of children with lead poisoning in Monroe County decreased by 85 percent. That was one victory, though the struggle continues to keep those numbers down. There is, however, a plethora of chemicals and pollutants that, though unseen or unnoticed, can have significant effects on public health. Diesel truck exhaust can affect the

air people breathe, while lead paint dust is linked to developmental delays and a host of other problems. Those relationships are the driving force behind environmental health campaigns locally, regionally, and nationally. Babies and children are especially vulnerable to these threats, but they affect adults, too. There are three environmental health issues that have seen a number of developments recently: lead exposure, air quality, and the nation’s chemical policy. Those developments have been statistical, financial, and in public policy.


Feedback We welcome your comments. Send them to themail@ rochester-citynews.com, or post them on our website, rochestercitynewspaper.com, our Facebook page, or our Twitter feed, @roccitynews. We edit selections for publication in print.

Fracked roads

In his response to Jeremy Moule’s article “Gas Well Impacts Add Up” (December 28), Lenape Resources president John Holko wrote: “Yes, an ampedup natural gas industry will increase truck traffic. However, the operator is required to repair all roads where damage is caused, and in most cases post bonds.” (Feedback, January 11) Holko then complained that Moule failed to consult

“credible sources from the natural-gas industry.” While it’s true that no one has a right to destroy public property (roads, e.g.), and that theoretically those who do destroy such property can be held responsible for the cost of repairs, the reality is a bit more complicated than Mr. Holko indicates. To begin with, the road “agreements” that gas corporations sometimes enter into are just what the label implies: voluntary contracts. Some companies enter into them, and some do not. And even if a company chooses to do so, proving responsibility for road damage is extremely difficult: “My company’s truck didn’t do the damage; it just happened to be the last vehicle to use the road before it collapsed.”

And if that argument fails, a company can evade liability by claiming that “the road was X years old and already badly deteriorated before my trucks even began using it,” or that “the road was improperly constructed to begin with, so it’s not my fault that it failed when my trucks used it.” Thus suing to collect on a bond is exceedingly difficult, leaving municipalities vulnerable to exorbitant road repair expenses. Moreover, a bond is not a pot of money put up in advance by the company, which a municipality could conceivably hold onto as collateral in the case of damage to its roads. Rather, it is a contract stipulating that the company must pay for repairs only if damages can be proven. As noted

above, proving damages is no easy task. In addition to oversimplifying the liability issue, Mr. Holko ignores the potential magnitude of increased truck traffic. It takes approximately 1,000 roundtrip truck trips to frack a single lateral, and each well pad can have dozens of laterals. Thus a single pad with 20 laterals may generate as many as 40,000 drive-bys. Monroe County residents need to imagine what that might look, sound, and smell like when they attempt to vacation in the Finger Lakes, or simply drive to work in the morning. They also need to understand that the resulting massive increases in ground-level ozone, repeated exposure to which can cause permanent lung

damage and aggravate existing respiratory ailments, can travel up to 200 miles from the point of origin. If Mr. Holko wants to ensure that the fracking debate serves the public interest, he will surely want to include such pertinent information in his future statements. And if he is genuinely interested in ensuring that the debate is informed by “credible sources,” he will insist that such sources be truly independent — i.e., without a financial interest in the outcome — rather than being representatives from the gas industry and its lobbying groups, or academics conducting industry-funded studies.

no building in which they can take refuge. Fourth, the college’s Brighton campus has no more room for expansion. The school has indicated that it wants to transfer some courses to the downtown area and would have the opportunity to do that at the Kodak site. If, after doing their research, the board of trustees and administration believe that the interests of the students and the school are best served by moving to the Kodak site, then let them do so.

other ghetto, a great opportunity will have been missed. The mayor points out that there is no “safety” issue, as there will be a police station in the building. The fact that many students will come by public transport and that there will be a bus terminal next door seems another strong positive for the Sibley location.

of directors have voted to move from the very heart of downtown (the corner of Main and Clinton, itself a distressed area) to a greater downtown location. A location (the High Falls area) into which the City of Rochester has poured hundreds of thousands of dollars (millions?) to populate and energize over the past ten years. Now here comes a possible, natural way for the area (including Frontier Field) to blossom. I can’t imagine that this new facility would not be far superior for the community college’s purposes. And I would be much surprised if the school would not increase its population at this new site compared to where it is now. Notwithstanding Mayor Richards’ dogmatic stand and Klofas’s remarks on school safety, I hope that MCC stands firm, and leaves Sibley’s, knowing that the challenge for rebuilding the heart of downtown has just become even more complex.

purpose of this community college was to keep the tuition low so that student loans wouldn’t be necessary. If students worked during their summers in high school, saved, and worked part-time while attending MCC, they could graduate with little to no student loans. They would have an associate degree in their hands in order to enter the work force and go to night school at RIT or the UofR to further their education. What happened? Look at the board: dormitories, athletic fields, student union and deluxe book store, and the recruitment of foreign and out-of-town and out-ofstate students. Low to middle-income families can no longer afford to send their children to MCC, but their taxes increase for this facility. Where are the downtown campus students getting their tuition from? It is not fair to these students to have these huge loans to pay off when the original intent for a community college was a basic, simple way to further your education. What do we expect when the 1 percent run the colleges and haven’t a clue about the 99 percent trying to pay for it?

JORDAN KLEIMAN, RUSH

Kleiman is co-founder of Rush Citizens Concerned About Hydrofracking and is an associate professor of history at SUNY-Geneseo.

MCC and Sibley’s I take issue with John Klofas’s analysis of the MCC relocation problem (“MCC: Fight of Flight,” February 1). First of all, he works with the Metropolitan Forum, which deals with metropolitan issues, and thus he has what I believe is an internal bias toward keeping MCC in the Sibley location. Yes, safety is a Number 1 issue. I have spoken with people at the college who indicate that many females request an “escort” just to go to the parking garage because of safety issues. It is not the college’s responsibility to solve the city’s safety or economic problems. The school is there to provide an education in a safe and conducive atmosphere. Not only the board of trustees and the college administration but also students, including the president of the student body have spoken out in favor of moving the school to the vacant Kodak properties. Professor Klofas offers no factual support for his assertion that the problem will follow MCC to the Kodak site. First, Kodak has its own security detail. Second the Kodak area is private property. Third, why would the miscreants want to hang around the parking lot, especially in adverse weather, since there is  City

JAMES R. BOEHLER, ROCHESTER

Since the city is in the process of revitalizing the core of the city, MCC could make a large contribution as part of the eclectic mix of art, entertainment, and, if I can use the phrase, its intellectual vitality. Not only would it contribute to the upgrade of the core city, but it should be a plus for many of the students, as they would rub shoulders with a cosmopolitan population and be enriched by ideas and possibilities they experience nowhere else, particularly where many of the poor live. Isn’t education about changing people and raising expectations? If the students are simply packed into an-

FEBRUARY 15-21, 2012

DOUGLAS LYTTLE, PITTSFORD

The State Street location for MCC might well turn out to be more dangerous than downtown because, with ample parking, it will encourage car use, and car crashes are by far the leading cause of death and crippling injury to young people. Car crashes account for 33 percent of deaths in the 14-25 year old cohort, while homicide is responsible for only 15 percent of deaths. These are the facts. As to the non-criminal rowdiness on the streets, that’s something I think kids should learn to handle. (My kids did.) If you don’t have street smarts, you are denying yourself access to some of the most interesting and amusing parts of the world. SAM ABRAMS, ROCHESTER

Enough already! Give MCC the respect it deserves. Its president and its board

ANN BRAVERMAN, ROCHESTER

Klofas doesn’t point out that the taxpayers of this county responded to the need for a community college for low to middle-income families to educate their children. Look to the board as to what went wrong. The main

CS CAVALIERI

News. Music. Life. Greater Rochester’s Alternative Newsweekly February 15-21, 2012 Vol 41 No 23 250 North Goodman Street Rochester, New York 14607-1199 themail@rochester-citynews.com phone (585) 244-3329 fax (585) 244-1126 rochestercitynewspaper.com Publishers: William and Mary Anna Towler Editor: Mary Anna Towler Asst. to the publishers: Matt Walsh Editorial department themail@rochester-citynews.com Features editor: Eric Rezsnyak News editor: Christine Carrie Fien Staff writers: Tim Louis Macaluso, Jeremy Moule Music editor: Willie Clark Music writer: Frank De Blase Calendar editor: Rebecca Rafferty Contributing writers: Kate Antoniades, Paloma Capanna, Casey Carlsen, Roman Divezur, George Grella, Susie Hume, Andy Klingenberger, Dave LaBarge, Kathy Laluk, Michael Lasser, James Leach, Ron Netsky, Dayna Papaleo, Rebecca Rafferty, David Yockel Jr. Editorial intern: Deb Schleede, Alex Steingraber Art department artdept@rochester-citynews.com Production manager: Max Seifert Designers: Aubrey Berardini, Matt DeTurck Photographers: Frank De Blase, Matt DeTurck, Michael Hanlon Advertising department ads@rochester-citynews.com Advertising sales manager: Betsy Matthews Account executives: Tom Decker, Annalisa Iannone, William Towler Classified sales representatives: Christine Kubarycz, Tracey Mykins Operations/Circulation info@rochester-citynews.com Circulation Manager: Katherine Stathis Distribution: Andy DiCiaccio, David Riccioni, Northstar Delivery City Newspaper is available free of charge. Additional copies of the current issue may be purchased for $1, payable in advance at the City Newspaper office. City Newspaper may be distributed only by authorized distributors. No person may, without prior written permission of City Newspaper, take more than one copy of each weekly issue. City (ISSN 1551-3262) is published weekly by WMT Publications, Inc. Periodical postage paid at Rochester, NY (USPS 022-138). Send address changes to City, 250 North Goodman Street, Rochester, NY 14607. City is a member of the Association of Alternative Newsweeklies and the New York Press Association. Subscriptions: $35.00 ($30.00 for senior citizens) for one year. Add $10 yearly for out-of-state subscriptions: add $30 yearly for foreign subscriptions. Due to the initial high cost of establishing new subscriptions, refunds for fewer than ten months cannot be issued. Copyright by WMT Publications Inc., 2011 - all rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, photocopying, recording or by any information storage retrieval system without permission of the copyright owner.


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Will politics plunge us into war with Iran? The foreboding sense that we’re headed toward war in Iran keeps returning, like a bad case of the flu. The threat seemed to subside after George Bush left the White House, but now it’s back. And the presidential election campaign is adding its own tension — and risk. Israel hints that if we won’t attack Iran to stop its nuclear program, it will do it on its own. And according to a recent Washington Post article by David Ignatius, Defense Secretary Leon Panetta believes that “there is a strong likelihood” that Israel will attack Iran this spring. Mitt Romney says if he’s elected president, he’ll stop Iran from getting a nuclear weapon (though I haven’t seen him say how). Rick Santorum is clearer: he’ll attack. And a poll by The Hill last week found that 49 percent of likely US voters think we should use military force against Iran to keep it from obtaining a nuclear weapon. Only 31 percent were opposed. This after the disillusionment, weariness, and high costs of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. There seems no question but what the US is involved in covert activities in Iran. And it’s a good bet that the Israelis are the ones assassinating Iran’s nuclear scientists. Will the Israelis carry it a step further? Are they preparing to go to war? It almost doesn’t matter who attacks first. If it’s Israel, we’ll be drawn in, unquestionably. Iran will certainly strike back, and we won’t sit on the sidelines while this key ally is under fire. That this might happen is too horrible to contemplate. Think of the loss of lives: Iranian and Israeli lives, to start with. And then US lives. And others. Military. Civilian. Men, women, children. The Iranian government has faced its own people’s rebellion in the past, but there’s little reason to think that if we attack their country, the average Iranian will view us as a savior. And most certainly an attack on Iran will drive a wedge between us and many people in the region. And what about the financial cost? Much of Washington seems in a panic about the federal debt. How will we pay for a new war? (And let’s do ask every presidential candidate whether they would be willing to raise taxes to pay for a war against Iran.) Dealing with countries whose dictators voice hatred for other nations is hard enough under the best of

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It almost doesn’t matter whether Israel or the US attacks Iran first. If it’s Israel, we’ll be drawn in, unquestionably.” circumstances. I supported Barack Obama four years ago in part because I believed that he would be less belligerent than John McCain, that he would place a high value on diplomacy. For the most part, he has done that — and he continues to take criticism for it from Republicans. And now we are in an election campaign. And the warlike rhetoric is heating up. In a recent article in Newsweek, Niall Ferguson — Harvard professor, Hoover Institution Fellow, and Iranattack enthusiast — suggests that if Israel attacks Iran, President Obama will find it impossible not to rush to its side quickly, “to limit the effectiveness of Iranian retaliation.” Not to do so, writes Ferguson, would guarantee Obama’s defeat in November. We cannot control the conservative government of Israel. But we can talk. We can admonish. Obama has been doing that. He needs to continue — and to resist the political pressure to do otherwise. And those of us who oppose an attack on Iran need to speak out.

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A correction and clarification: In last week’s

column on the Obama-contraceptive controversy, I stated that the Catholic Church believes that “preventing pregnancy” is morally wrong. As some readers pointed out (and as I knew), the Catholic Church opposes pregnancy prevention by artificial means. I also said that Planned Parenthood provides breastcancer screening. I was referring to Planned Parenthood’s provision of breast exams; it does not provide mammograms.

rochestercitynewspaper.com

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[ news from the week past ]

Anthony House now a museum

The Susan B. Anthony House has received state approval as a museum. Anthony’s former residence at 17 Madison Street is expected to be renamed The Susan B. Anthony House and Museum. And the number of exhibits will be expanded to draw greater attention to Anthony’s contribution to women’s rights.

Gone in a flash

News

State Assembly Democrats offered legislation to move the primary date for state races to June 26. A federal judge previously ordered New York to hold its congressional and Senate primaries on that same date. Critics say the date doesn’t leave time for non-incumbents to mount an effective campaign.

THEATER | BY CHRISTINE CARRIE FIEN

Theater group in license flap

White’s not running

Kodak announced that it was getting out of the digital camera business. The company has produced consumer-oriented cameras for more than 120 years. Kodak says it will focus on desktop inkjet printing and online and retail photo printing.

Geraci nominated for judgeship

Primary dates in flux

Senator Chuck Schumer recommended Monroe County Court Judge Frank Geraci to fill a vacancy on the US District Court for the Western District of New York. Schumer had previously recommended former District Attorney Mike Green for the job, but the Senate never voted on Green’s nomination. Geraci must be appointed by President Barack Obama and confirmed by the Senate.

Citing unfinished business on the school board and family commitments, Van White says he will not run a primary against State Assembly member David Gantt this year. White, a member of the Rochester school board since 2007, says that now is not the time to leave that job. Graduation rates are expected to go down, and the district is in the middle of a superintendent search. White first attempted to challenge Gantt in 2010, but a court ruled that White did not have residency in Gantt’s Assembly district. Leah Camilleri as Persephone in Bread & Water Theatre’s 2011 production of “Polaroid Stories.” PHOTO PROVIDED

Six or seven years after first performing at New Life Presbyterian Church, Rochester’s Bread & Water Theatre group has been informed that it will need to shell out $475 for an entertainment license. J.R. Teeter, the group’s artistic director, said he received a letter from the Rochester Police Department’s License Investigation Unit on January 25, informing him of the license requirement. “I’ve been involved with theater groups all over the place in Rochester,” Teeter says. “No one ever talked to me about an entertainment license. I had never heard of it.” The $475 price tag is steep, he says, for a group with an annual budget under $15,000. The fee could curtail some of the theater’s programming and other activities, Teeter says. Many local theater groups perform in churches, he says, and the license requirement and fee could have a chilling effect on

their creativity, as well as hurt the churches that rely on the supplemental income from renting out their space. Teeter says the city seems to enforce the license requirement reactively — when someone calls to complain. City spokesperson Gary Walker says groups that advertise publicly and use revenue for their own benefit are required by city code to have an entertainment license. It’s nothing personal, he says. “We need to enforce the law evenly,” Walker says. And while Teeter says he thinks in the end it will fall to the church to get the license, Walker says it’s Bread & Water’s responsibility. “It’s their event,” he says. “It’s not a church function.” The intent, Walker says, is not to shut groups down. It’s to make sure venues are safe for the public, he says.

WE’RE BLOGGING EVERY WEEKDAY ABOUT LOCAL, STATE & NATIONAL ISSUES

newt gingrich • Andrew Cuomo Barack Obama • Tom Richards • Public schools Hydrofracking • The national debt THE CITY NEWSPAPER

NEWS BLOG  City

FEBRUARY 15-21, 2012

ANYTHING THAT HAS US THINKING

J O I N I N T H E C O V E R S AT I O N AT

www.rochestercitynewspaper.com/NEWS/BLOG


Cost of War

“There are a number of people who’ve been asking

4,484 US servicemen and servicewomen, 318 Coalition servicemen and servicewomen, and approximately 105,096 to 114,786 Iraqi civilians have been killed in Iraq from the beginning of the war and occupation to February 3. No American casualties were reported after November 14. IRAQ TOTALS —

for something different and saying it doesn’t work, and when I hear their rationale, a lot of times they’re just wrong. What I’ve learned is that a lot of people love to complain, but not many people like to do their homework.” [ Adam McFadden ]

POLICE | BY CHRISTINE CARRIE FIEN

TAXES | BY CHRISTINE CARRIE FIEN

Sharper eyes on the police

Sibley mystery solved

The committee reviewing Rochester’s police oversight system has broken up into smaller groups to evaluate the process from different points of view. The governance, police, and community groups will identify strengths and weakness of the oversight system, best ways to address those weaknesses, and then report back to the larger committee, says City Council member Adam McFadden, who co-chairs the committee with Police Chief James Sheppard. The oversight review committee was formed following two high profile and controversial arrests last year. Activist Emily Good, who was charged with obstruction after a verbal altercation with a Rochester police officer, and Monroe County Legislator Willie Lightfoot, who pleaded guilty to DWI, both complained about their treatment by police. Neither filed a complaint, though. They said they didn’t trust the system. Common grievances about the police oversight system are that it takes too long to resolve complaints and that there’s a lack of checks and balances. But McFadden, who chairs Council’s Public Safety Committee, says that many people who complain about the system don’t understand it. “There are a number of people who’ve been asking for something different and

saying it doesn’t work, and when I hear their rationale, a lot of times they’re just wrong,” he says. “What I’ve learned is that a lot of people love to complain, but not many people like to do Emily Good. FILE PHOTO their homework.” McFadden does agree that the process to resolve complaints takes too long. He says he knows people who’ve waited two years for a resolution. “The amount of time is just ridiculous,” McFadden says. “If I were a person who was physically abused by the police, I would never use the process. I would just get an attorney and sue the city.” And police officers have legitimate complaints about the system, too, McFadden says. “They don’t have access to see what they’re accused of,” he says. McFadden’s committee is expected to make its recommendations for changes to the oversight system to City Council in either May or June, he says. Council has to approve changes before they go into effect.

AFGHANISTAN TOTALS

1,891 US servicemen and servicewomen and 991 Coalition servicemen and servicewomen have been killed in Afghanistan from the beginning of the war and occupation to February 3. Statistics for Afghan civilian casualties are not available. American casualties from January 25 to February 1: -- Sgt. William C. Stacey, 23, Redding, Calif. -- Lance Cpl. Edward J. Dycus, 22, Greenville, Miss. —

Almost no topic raises as much anger and frustration locally than the money owed on the Sibley Building and why the city does not collect. | Building owner Rochwil Associates, a limited partnership and subsidiary of Wilmorite, owes the city more than $22 million through a tax agreement. | The reason the city doesn’t collect, says city spokesperson Gary Walker, is that there is no one to collect from. | It all goes back, Walker says, to former Mayor Tom Ryan and Wilmorite. Ryan needed Wilmorite’s help to save the Sibley Building, Walker says, but Wilmorite recognized that owning Sibley probably wouldn’t be a great business deal. So Rochwil was formed, and it essentially serves as a buffer between the city and Wilmorite. | Rochwil does not have Wilmorite’s deep pockets, Walker says, and because Rochwil is a limited partnership, Wilmorite isn’t legally responsible for Rochwil’s debt. Even if foreclosure did happen, he says, the city would be last in line to collect, behind Rochwil’s other creditors. | It would also mean that the city owns the building and would be responsible for all costs associated with that. | “The city does not want to be a landlord,” Walker says.

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Are you A Cancer Survivor

With Trouble Sleeping? We are seeking cancer survivors who are having difficulty falling or staying asleep for a study testing two methods for reducing sleep problems and fatigue.

EDUCATION | BY TIM LOUIS MACALUSO

Rankle over high textbook costs

How may you benefit

All participants will receive a behavioral treatment for sleep problems, at no charge, either as part of the study or after. Half of the participants will receive a drug called armodafinil that may be helpful in reducing daytime tiredness and fatigue.

Eligibility (partial list)

• Be between the ages 21 and 75 • Have finished radiation treatments and/or chemotherapy • Insomnia began or got worse with the onset of cancer or treatment

Please call Jenine Hoefler (585) 276-3559 or Joseph Roscoe, Ph.D. (585) 275-9962 at the University of Rochester James P. Wilmot Cancer Center for more information about this research study

RIO TOMATLAN

Monroe Community College’s book store sold nearly 47,000 used textbooks at discounted prices in 2011. But new textbooks still outsell used at MCC. PHOTO BY MATT DETURCK

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The excitement over getting into college often fades once students and parents start to realize the costs involved. And particularly irksome is the cost of textbooks. For most students, the added expense is a boil on a bigger abscess. Most reports show that undergraduate students can expect to pay between $700 and $1,000 annually on textbooks. Graduate students can expect to pay even more. For many students, textbooks will be some of the most expensive books they’ll ever purchase. Some titles, according to a CBS News report, can cost more than $500 if purchased new. And most students won’t use the books again once they’ve completed the class. During the last decade, complaints about textbook prices prompted a congressional investigation and advisory committee report to the Department of Education in 2007. And more than 30 states have looked at legislative solutions to reduce costs of college textbooks. But solving the problem is complicated, partly because fewer colleges want the responsibility of operating their bookstores, and the publishing industry is in transition. Most colleges and universities today contract the operation and management of their bookstores. And it’s a big industry, with millions of students and faculty members across the

US purchasing books every semester. Companies like Follett and Barnes and Noble are major players. For example, Barnes and Noble manages the lion’s share of college bookstores in the Rochester market. Its clients include the University of Rochester, St. John Fisher College, Nazareth College, Rochester Institute of Technology, and SUNY Brockport, says Cynthia Forman, a company manager. SUNY Geneseo’s bookstore is operated by Follett, says Mark Scott, campus auxiliary services director. The company orders the store’s entire inventory from books to snacks, and hires and manages the store’s employees. Under the majority of contracts, Scott says, the college receives a commission on most items sold in the store. And the goal, as it is with any business, he says, is profit. The store manager typically orders titles from publishers, and then prices the books to cover costs and to generate income. “There’s a markup and that varies,” Scott says. “It’s different at all places.” But most college administrators are aware, he says, of their students’ price sensitivities. “We hear about it all the time,” he says. Geneseo offers its students new, used, and rental options on textbooks. “There are some students who don’t want a book that anyone else has


There are some students who don’t want a book that anyone else has touched.” B eth K omoroske

touched,” says Beth Komoroske, Follett’s manager for Geneseo. There are many ways students can reduce textbook costs, but they all come with caveats. Students can usually buy a used book at their college store and save anywhere from 10 to 50 percent. And Komoroske, like most college bookstore managers, will buy many of the books back once students are finished with them, albeit at a reduced price. The market for used books is strong, but some students may find the notes left in the books by previous users distracting. And there is a risk for the retailer when buying used books back from students, Komoroske says. “Let’s say we bought 20 used books back and in the next semester students don’t buy them,” she says. “Then we’re stuck with them.” Unsold new books can be returned to the publisher, she says. Renting textbooks is another option. The student rents a hardcopy book from the bookstore and returns it at the end of the semester, says Virginia Geer-Mentry, director of Monroe Community College Association, the organization that manages MCC’s bookstore. “It’s a bit cheaper than buying a used book,” she says. While students don’t have to worry about reselling the book and recouping some of their money, they still have the responsibility of returning the book in reasonably good condition. Still, the majority of MCC’s textbook purchases for 2011 were new copies with 72,834 books sold, followed by used copies with 46,766 sold. Digital textbooks have been around for years, but they’re just now hitting their stride because the technology has improved. Students buy the digital books at their bookstore and enter a code for the title into their reader device.

Some companies like Barnes and Noble have gone one step further. The company has launched NOOK Study, its own free digital study reader application. NOOK Study can be downloaded onto a PC or Mac, with no special device or tablet required. And its eTextbooks, according to its website, are 60 percent less than a new hardcopy book. Barnes and Nobles also offers its own reader device, NOOK Reader, for about $139. Some colleges are also experimenting with customized digital publishing. Professors can create a version of the hardcopy title that fits their specific instructional needs, and the student downloads it. For example, maybe only a few chapters of a title are needed. Or maybe no book exists on the subject, and the reading material needs to be created. Though students have more options for reducing textbook costs than they’ve had in the past, the textbook market is still run to benefit the publishers and the colleges, says John McLenithan, assistant manager at Rochester Textbooks, an independent textbook retailer. And, he says, colleges can dampen the used book market by requesting new editions when they’re not needed. “The colleges are treated like customers, while students are recipients,” he says. Chiara Inglese, a senior at Nazareth College, buys used books online through sites like Amazon.com. She says she tries not to buy anything from college bookstores. Students have to begin looking for their required textbooks as soon as they register, she says, because finding the title and getting it delivered can take time. Inglese says she doesn’t like renting books. She says she would rather own her books than be responsible for something that doesn’t belong to her. And she says she’s not convinced that digital is a cost saver. If the reader device is lost or stolen, so is the textbook.

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City 


ENVIRONMENT | BY JEREMY MOULE

THE

N E E S UE NNE M I E S ublic concern about bisphenol A reached a tipping point several years ago. Cities, stores, even the Canadian government began banning or phasing out reusable water bottles and children’s products that were made using the chemical. BPA is an endocrine disruptor. Some scientists and health researchers suspect that the chemical is linked to a broad range of health issues, including developmental problems in children and reproductive problems later in life. For Rochesterians, the issue hit close to home. Some of the plastic bottles in question were made by Nalgene, a Penfield-based arm of Thermo Fisher Scientific. Local and national concern surged and the company, responding to market pressures, began making its bottles out of a different plastic: one that didn’t contain BPA. But BPA is only one of a plethora of chemicals and pollutants that, though unseen or unnoticed, can have significant effects on public health. Diesel truck exhaust can affect breathing air, while lead paint dust is linked to developmental delays and a host of other problems. Those relationships are the driving force behind environmental health campaigns locally, regionally, and nationally. Many of the campaigns focus on fetuses and children, since that’s when environmental factors have their greatest impacts on a person’s health. “From the perspective of researchers, I think that looking at the exposure of fetuses and young children to environmental contaminants is an increasingly important theme,” says Katrina Korfmacher, an associate professor in the University of Rochester’s Department of Environmental Medicine.  City

FEBRUARY 15-21, 2012

There are three environmental health issues that are of immediate concern to local and state advocates and researchers: lead exposure, air quality, and the nation’s chemical policy. And all have seen recent, significant developments, whether statistical, financial, and in public policy. Since at least the mid 1990’s, community

leaders and health officials have fought to bring down and keep down the number of Monroe County children exposed to lead. Part of that effort has been a partnership between government, health, medical, and community representatives. The Coalition to Prevent Lead Poisoning formed in 2000 and has conducted education and advocacy work around lead exposure. Its work, combined with changes in public policy and the law, led to an 85 percent decrease in reports of Monroe County children with elevated levels of lead in their blood, says Elizabeth McDade, the coalition’s program manager. There was, however, a slight uptick in 2010. Lead exposure happens primarily through dust from lead paint, making it a housing issue, McDade says. Lead is linked to a long list of health problems, ranging from learning disabilities and behavior problems in children, to kidney damage and memory loss in adults. Lead accumulates in the body over time and there is no way to remove it. “There are lifelong health deficits that go along with this,” McDade says. Anti-lead advocates worry that a recent budgetary decision by the county could jeopardize further progress in reducing lead exposure. The county used to require inspections of apartments and houses that were being rented to some public assistance

recipients. It contracted with the city to do that work, which included lead inspections. The county ended the program in 2010, but extended the funding. The extensions end this spring, however. The city, county, and coalition are looking for ways to collaborate on an effective inspection process, McDade says. Advocates have made the city a focus because of the city’s density and its older housing stock. The city’s oldest areas are most likely to be populated by the poor, putting them at a greater risk of exposure. At the national level, a Centers for Disease Control panel recently recommended lowering a key child lead-poisoning threshold. The panel recommended halving the lead concentration level at which doctors and public health officials should act. That could mean a large increase in the reported cases of children with elevated levels of lead in their blood. Air quality has steadily improved across

the country over the last few decades. In particular, particle pollution — fine soot, essentially — is less of a problem than it used to be. The reduction in particle pollution is largely due to regulations that cleaned up diesel fuel. The fuel is about 90 percent cleaner than it was a decade ago, says Michael Seilback, vice president for public policy and communications for the American Lung Association in New York. The Clean Air Act also contributed. But many metro areas still have ozone problems, including Monroe County. Ozone, a lung irritant, is formed through a combination of heat, sunlight, nitrogen oxides, and volatile

organic chemicals. The last two are byproducts of fossil fuel combustion: making ozone largely a result of motor vehicle traffic. Every year, the American Lung Association evaluates US counties’ air quality based on several factors, including the number of high ozone days. In 2011, the Lung Association gave Monroe County an F on ozone. Monroe had too many days when high ozone levels posed a threat to vulnerable populations, the report card said. Ozone can aggravate asthma, lung disease, and heart disease, and can be harmful to children and the elderly. It also disproportionately affects the poor. “What this report shows us is, yes the air is cleaner and it’s trending in the right direction, but based on the science, we know that there are too many days where that air pollution level is still too high and it’s putting people’s health at risk,” Seilback says. Air pollution can be tough to address, since it comes from many sources. For example, particulate pollution often comes from diesel engines or power plants, but it can also come from burning wood. And New York may have to contend with additional emissions sources — of ozonecausing gases, greenhouse gases, and particle pollution — if the state green-lights shale gas extraction by high-volume hydraulic fracturing. Drilling-related diesel generators, diesel-powered compressor stations, and truck traffic could mean that non-industrialized areas with no previous air quality problems become major pollution sources. And since emissions don’t just sit in one place, the pollution is a regional issue. Researchers in Texas and Pennsylvania have projected substantial increases of ozone-


causing gases in those regions. They’ve modeled the data based on known emissions figures from wells. The Lung Association hasn’t taken a position on fracking, but it does have concerns about the method’s potential to degrade air quality. The association has asked the State Department of Environmental Conservation to be proactive about monitoring the emissions, and to require, to the extent possible, filtering and emissions-reducing technologies. “What we’re asking is that we ensure that any process that moves forward is putting health before a quick profit,” says the Lung Association’s Seilback. Under federal law, companies don’t have to

prove that chemicals are safe before they put them on the market. That’s a problem that’s resulted in a variety of potentially harmful chemicals making their way into consumer products. BPA is one, along with classes of flame retardants. Environmental health advocates, researchers, and politicians are pushing for reforms to the nation’s chemical policy. Chemicals are regulated via the Toxic Substances Control Act, which was signed into law in 1976. There’s been no significant action since. “It was supposed to set up a process for evaluating chemicals and removing chemicals that were problematic: where scientific evidence showed that people were being harmed or that the environment was being harmed,” says Bobbi Chase Wilding, deputy director for Clean and Healthy New York, an environmental health advocacy group.

Reported cases of children with lead poisoning have dropped drastically in Monroe County over the past decade, says Elizabeth McDade, program manager for the Coalition to Prevent Lead Poisoning. PHOTO BY MATT DETURCK

But not all of that happened, she says. When TSCA became law, it restricted the production, use, and disposal of PCBs, asbestos, radon, and lead-based paint. It grandfathered in 62,000 chemicals, however, including BPA and phthalates, both of which are used in the production of plastics. There are now more than 80,000 chemicals in commerce, says Bernard Weiss, a professor in the University of Rochester’s Department of Environmental Medicine. But regulators and researchers only have a great deal of information of about a half-dozen of them, he says, and some awareness about the effects of a handful of others. “We just don’t know very much about most of these chemicals in the environment,” Weiss says. Even though TSCA was supposed to empower the Environmental Protection Agency, the agency remains essentially powerless, Chase Wilding says. For example, the EPA tried to ban asbestos in 1990, but the industry sued and the agency lost. The EPA hasn’t tried to ban anything since, Chase Wilding says. Part of the problem is that even if research shows a chemical is unsafe, under the current law it’s difficult to get that chemical off the market.

Chemicals tend to have their most significant health impacts on fetuses and small children, says Katrina Korfmacher, an associate professor of environmental medicine at the University of Rochester. PHOTO BY MATT DETURCK

Some lawmakers have tried to change that. The federal Safe Chemicals Act, which would require companies to prove the safety of any new chemical before it’s put on the market, is working its way through the Senate. Due to lack of action at the federal level, states are starting to react. In 2010, New York legislators passed a law to start phasing out BPA in certain children’s projects. Safer States, an advocacy group, says New York legislators might consider bills this year that would: • develop a publicly-available list of chemicals of concern and require that manufacturers disclose when their products contain those chemicals; • ban or restrict certain flame retardants; • restrict formaldehyde in beauty products. But the fact that states even have to act shows that the US needs a proactive approach to determining whether chemicals are toxic or unsafe, Chase Wilding says. “With a system that’s supposed to protect us so fundamentally broken and so fundamentally flawed, we think it’s critically important that the law be reformed and strengthened so people aren’t sitting around as guinea pigs,” she says.

rochestercitynewspaper.com

City 


Urban Action This week’s calls to action include the following events and activities. (All are free and open to the public, unless otherwise noted.)

Talk about breaking the political impasse

Rochester Friends Meeting House will host “Toward Nonviolent Revolution in America,” a talk by Robert Holmes, University of Rochester professor of philosophy. The event is at 7 p.m. on Wednesday, February 22, 84 Scio Street.

Film focuses on localization movement For more Tom Tomorrow, including a political blog and cartoon archive, visit http://thismodernworld.com

10 City FEBRUARY 15-21, 2012

The Brighton Town Hall will host the showing of “Economics of Happiness” at 7 p.m. on

Wednesday, February 22. The film looks at two movements headed in opposite directions. One emphasizes big government, globalization, and consolidation of economic power. The other emphasizes building on human capital, and ecologically sustainable economies that are local in nature. The film will be shown at 2300 Elmwood Avenue.

Marriage Equality getting organized

The New York Chapter of Marriage Equality activists will hold a town hall meeting and party at 6:30 p.m. on Thursday, February 16. Though NYS has legalized samesex marriage, help is needed to repeal DOMA and pass same-sex marriage legislation in other

states. The event will be held at Downtown United Presbyterian Church, 121 North Fitzhugh Street.

Veterans’ benefits explained

Vietnam Veterans of America Chapter 20 in cooperation with Monroe County, the VA, and Veterans Outreach Center will hold a “Veterans Benefits Workshop” on Saturday, February 25. The workshop is open to all men and women who have served in the US military and National Guard, and their spouses. There are two sessions: 9 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. and 1 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. Both will be held at Monroe Community Hospital, 435 East Henrietta Road. Information: Ken Moore, 576-9000.


Dining meticulously stripped of any blackened skin, was portioned very generously, and surprisingly the tomato was red rather than the pallid pink you usually see on sandwichshop sandwiches. The basil mayo was a nice touch. There wasn’t anything particularly exciting about the sandwich, but the way it was served made it clear that a lot of love for her customers went into it. Kind of like a sandwich your mom might have made you when you were a kid. Pilato’s soups, too, have that homey savor to

The Rio Monte panini (left) and a cup of corn chowder (right) from Lunch on State Street. PHOTOS BY MATT DETURCK

Counter culture Lunch 89 State St. 325-5453, lunchrochester.com Monday-Friday 11 a.m.-3 p.m. [ REVIEW ] BY JAMES LEACH

Magan Pilato stands behind the counter at Lunch, her sandwich shop at the intersection of Church and State streets, chatting up a customer as she rings up his order. She seems to know him pretty well. She knows the customer behind him by name, and suggests what he might want for lunch. The woman behind him also seems like a familiar face — Pilato asks about her kids. By the time I’m finished with a gooey grilled chicken-breast panini and a side of pasta salad, Magan Pilato knows me pretty well, too. The kindhearted and apparently omniscient waitress is a stock figure in American entertainment: Flo and Alice working the counter at Mel’s Diner, Darlene dishing up gossip and tuna hotdish at the Chatterbox Café in Lake Wobegon. Pilato, who not only runs the counter at Lunch, but also cooks and manages the business,

reinterprets the role of kindly waitress for the 21st century. And she makes a pretty darn good sandwich, too. Open for only seven months, Lunch delivers on its name. It does not aspire to be Lutece. It offers what Pilato described to me as “healthy food — organic and local as much as possible — at reasonable prices. Food that won’t leave you dragging for the rest of your afternoon at work.” Lunch has a compact menu of sandwiches, paninis, some salads, and soups, most of which Pilato makes herself in the restaurant’s small but serviceable open kitchen. She runs a few specials, and the soups rotate a bit — recently there has been corn chowder, cream of mushroom, and chicken noodle among others — but what Lunch really offers is reliability. You know what you are going to get from one day to the next. Once you’ve been going there for a few days, you might not even look at the menu. Or, then again, Pilato might know what you need and suggest it to you. Lunch is that kind of place. During my second meal at Lunch, on one of

the few truly blustery afternoons we’ve had this winter, I sat at the counter near the front

window. I was huddled over my bowl of corn chowder, warming my hands and watching the snow fall, when Pilato came over to check on me. Something in her expression made me wonder if she was about to tousle my hair. As I recall, when I was done, she did remind me to bundle up before I headed out the door. If that was all that Lunch had going for it, I’d probably still go back on a regular basis. But Pilato’s simple sandwiches, made with bread brought in daily from Baker Street Bakery on Park Avenue, and filled with fresh ingredients (Pilato even roasts her own red peppers because she’s not fond of the jarred variety), are a welcome change from the usual lockstep sandwich-chips-drink lines that shuffle in and out of local sub shops every day. Take the Rio Monte panini ($7.49), for instance. First of all, it’s a true panini: the bread squashed flat, the fresh mozzarella inside gooey and delicious. Second, the chicken tastes like chicken. Sure, she’s using chicken breasts that are notoriously bland, but if she’s not using organic chickens she’s certainly faking it well. The grilled breast on my sandwich was fat and moist, with the particular flavor that you only get from a happy bird. The roasted red pepper,

them (all soups, $3.25). The corn chowder I had on one visit was stick-to-your ribs thick, built on a rich stock, pureed, and then enriched with kernels of summerytasting corn, carrots, and perhaps a tiny bit of bacon. It was just the thing for a cold day. Her chicken soup, while not quite up to the standard of my mother-in-law’s (that’s a very high bar to clear, let me tell you) was still excellent, good for chasing off even the most belligerent and determined of viruses. Not everything works at Lunch, though. The “Lunch” BLT ($6.95) starts off promisingly enough with a generous layer of thick-cut, crispy bacon, mahogany hued and crunchy. As I mentioned, Pilato finds good tomatoes, which are essential to a BLT. The lettuce is lettuce. But then she starts tinkering with a good thing. A few slices of avocado aren’t a bad idea. They aren’t traditional, but avocado, bacon, lettuce, and tomato work well in a Cobb salad, so why not here? And then she puts goat cheese on it. I like goat cheese, I really do, but adding it to a BLT is like kissing through a thick blanket. You know something good is happening, but you can’t make out the details. All of the ingredients are still there, but the cheese reduces them to elemental units rather than allowing them to blend which is what happens in a good BLT. Fortunately, the BLT was the only misstep in my meals at Lunch, and Pilato’s homemade brownies ($1 each) go a long way toward making up for any shortcomings. Thick and fudgy with a sugary crust on top of a batter that hovers on the line between cake and pudding, each generously cut square cries out for a glass of milk and the time to savor it. Unfortunately, you can only visit Lunch at its namesake mealtime when most of us don’t have the time to linger. Get a couple to go and stretch Lunch into a late-night snack.

rochestercitynewspaper.com City 11


Upcoming [ Hip-Hop/Rap ] Rick Ross Sunday, March 11. Blue Cross Arena. One War Memorial Square. 7 p.m. $35-$103. 758-5300. bluecrossarena.com [ Country/Humor ] Kinky Friedman Tuesday, June 26. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N Water St. 7 p.m. $25. 325-5600. waterstreetmusic.com.

Music

[ Jazz ] Daryl Hall Thursday, June 28. Kodak Hall at Eastman Theatre. 26 Gibbs St. 8 p.m. $75-$115. 454-2060. Rochesterjazz.com.

Dia Frampton

Monday, February 20 Water Street Music Hall, 204 N Water St. 7 p.m. | $10-$13 | waterstreetmusic.com [ Pop ] Dia Frampton (no relation to Peter) gained

America’s attention as a contestant and eventual runnerup on NBC’s “The Voice” in 2011. Although the 24-yearold singer-songwriter did not win the title, she gained some market share — nearly half-a-million downloads of her tunes and a Top 20 single with “Inventing Shadows.” That’s what got her started as a solo artist after several years as a member of the band Meg & Dia. Frampton’s debut solo album, “Red,” was released in December to positive critical reviews. — BY ROMAN DIVEZUR

MoChester Saturday, February 18 Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. | $6-$8 | 454-2966 [ ROCK ] MoChester is a four-piece rock/pop group that

formed in Rochester in 2001. Last year the quartet made some major moves with the release of its debut album, “Stop and Go,” as well as the incorporation of its newest member, bass player Ben Overmyer. The band’s name was derived from the members’ devotion to the soulful grooves of Motown music and the city from which they hail. MoChester’s moxie is built upon a foundation of rock, pop, alternative, and even a hint of reggae. The resulting sound has garnered comparisons to mainstream powerhouses such as O.A.R. and Incubus. The group shares the bill with Waylon Speed, Dirty Wings, and Sonarmail. — BY DAVID YOCKEL JR.

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Wednesday, February 15 [ Acoustic/Folk ] Dave McGrath. Rookies Sports Bar, Pittsford Colony Plaza 3400 Monroe Ave. therookiesbar.com. 8 p.m. Free.  Reggae Lounge w/Ras Courtney of His Imperial Sounds. Abilene, 153 Liberty Pole Way. abilenebarandlounge.com, 232-3230. 8 p.m. Free.  Rob & Gary Acoustic. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. woodcliffhotelspa.com, 3814000. 5:30 p.m. Free.  The Dady Brothers. Johnny’s Irish Pub, 1382 Culver Rd. johnnysirishpub.com, 2240990. 7:30 p.m. Free.  Tommy Gravino. Rio Tomatlan, 5 Beeman St, Canandaigua. 394-9380. 6:30 p.m. Free. Salsa w/Shelia dancing during the performance. 

Is Thursday, February 16 Blue Room Center, 293 Alexander St. 9 p.m. | $5 | 730-5985

Kingsley Flood played Lovin’ Cup on Saturday, February 11. PHOTO BY WILLIE CLARK

[ JAM ] This unusual, three-piece jam band began

its musical journey in Upstate New York in the late 90’s, and since then has been touring coast to coast, fine tuning its style. The band’s live performances constantly amaze crowds with its wildly energetic, soulful vocals, astute musicianship, and the surprises created by the trio’s improvisational approach. With only three members and no guitarist, Is has broken the mold to which most jam bands adhere. Incessant noodling is replaced by seriously surging rhythms and a caravan of carefully crafted grooves that grows longer with every beat. — BY DAVID YOCKEL JR.

The Sim Redmond Band Friday, February 17 Water Street Music Hall, 204 N. Water St. 9 p.m. | $10-$12 | 325-5600, waterstreetmusic.com [ ROOTS ] For more than a decade now, The Sim

Redmond Band has been blazing a trail in the rootsrock musical landscape. Touring relentlessly with internationally acclaimed acts such as moe. and The Neville Brothers, SRB has sold thousands of albums in the United States and Japan. Although the group is based in Ithaca, its sonic identity has been cultivated using a mix of African and Jamaican flavors. Sim Redmond and company seamlessly fuse recognizable rock grooves with heaving reggae beats and decadently rich vocal harmonies. — BY DAVID YOCKEL JR. Bar & Lounge

High-water mark [ REVIEW ] BY WILLIE CLARK

Few things in life get me more excited than discovering a new band I can really dig into. It’s an even nicer surprise when said musical discovery comes completely out of nowhere, and I couldn’t be happier with my recent find in Kinglsey Flood, which played Saturday, February 11, at Lovin’ Cup. First up was local band The Jesus Rays. A three-piece group that centered around oldies — or classic-rock grooves, if you wish — the Rays didn’t really fit with the rest of the folksy bill. It also didn’t bring anything overly exciting or new to the table. Not my cup of tea, at least. Next up was Bethesda, which despite the name, is not from Maryland, but Ohio. The band put on a good old folksy jamboree, led by Shana Delaney on vocals. I could have used a little bit more of the faster stuff, and I had a hard time hearing the violin unless I really searched for it among everything else going on. But Bethesda did set the stage well for the likeminded folk onslaught that was to follow. Last up was Boston-based Kingsley Flood. It’s rare to see a band so enigmatic and able to fluctuate between genres; to

bring together so many different sounds but somehow make each of them its own. I’m not fond of writer cop-outs like “genre defying,” but Kingsley Flood was all over the place musically, and the audience was better off for it. At the most simple level Kingsley Flood is folk rock, but there was keyboard, trumpet, violin, saxophone, washboard, and even a makeshift garbagecan drum thrown in the mix. That’s on top of the constant electric guitar, bass, and acoustic guitar, and the result was a flood of energy and sound that washed over the listener, creating both a musical and energetic cohesion. The band moved effortlessly from country-laden stomps to catchy pop-rock anthems, while hitting almost every note in between. The band closed with its hook-laden, catchy-as-all-get-go, “I Don’t Wanna Go Home,” which stood as a fitting end-ofshow sentiment. You don’t discover bands this enjoyable live from the comfort of your couch. The time to go home did come, unfortunately, but I’ve already grabbed Kingsley Flood’s EP to keep the party going.

[ Blues ] Dirty Bourbon Blues Band. Dinosaur BarB-Que, 99 Court St. dinosaurbarbque.com, 3257090. 9 p.m. Free.  Open Blues Jam w/The King Bees. Beale Street Cafe, 693 South Ave. bealestreetcafe. com, 271-4650. 7:30 p.m. Call for info.  [ DJ/Electronic ] H(ear) Wax w/DJ Alykhan, Tom Kohn. Lovin’ Cup, Park Point @ RIT. lovincup.com, 292-9940. 9 p.m. Free.  [ Jazz ] Coffey Wachala Duo. Little Theatre Cafe, 240 East Ave. thelittle.org. 7:30 p.m. Free.  Greg Chako. Lemoncello, 137 W Commercial St, E Rochester. lemoncello137. com, 385-8565. 6 p.m. Free.  Michael Vidala Trio. Bistro 135, 135 W Commercial St,, East Rochester. bistro135. net, 662-5555. 6 p.m. Free.  Paradigm Shift. Pomodoro Grill & Wine Bar, 1290 University Ave. 271-5000. 7:30 p.m. Free.  Rick Holland Evan Dobbins Little Big Band. Tala Vera, 155 State St. tala-vera.com, 5463945. 8 p.m. Free w/dinner.  continues on page 14

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rochestercitynewspaper.com City 13


Music

Wednesday, February 15 Robert Chevrier. Pomodoro Monroe Ave, 3400 Monroe Ave. 586-7000. 6:30 p.m. Free.  

to be. We made a record we wanted to make, people didn’t like it, that’s OK. We’re still opening up for the bands, you know what I mean? Nothing changes. What made you want to do something so different for that album?

Boston street-punk outfit Far From Finished opens this weekend for The Queers. PHOTO courtesy todd pollock

A kick-ass rock and roll show Far From Finished w/The Queers, The Ataris Sunday, February 19 Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 8 p.m. | $10-$12 | 454-2966, bugjar.com [ INTERVIEW ] BY WILLIE CLARK

The Boston punk scene has given us many great bands over the years, and Far From Finished is another testament to Beantown’s mighty musical legacy. This weekend the band is opening for The Queers and The Ataris at the Bug Jar, bringing to the stage nearly 10 years of road-tested songs and experience. City recently spoke with Steve Neary, one of the founding members and vocalist for the group. Below is an edited transcript of the interview. CITY: How did Far From Finished get its start? Steve Neary: The band actually formed in

New York. We graduated high school, we decided to move to Boston. Once we got up to Boston we found some guys to play with and just started playing. Basically we had a common interest in bands like Stiff Little Fingers, old R&B, Tom Waits, punk rock, and singer-songwriter stuff that we liked. We just decided to form a band and go for it, kind of felt like we had nothing to lose. And now here we are almost 10 years later. We’re still the opening band; it’s all right, though. 14 City FEBRUARY 15-21, 2012

How did you come up with the name?

Just kind of throwing around a couple ideas, and it seemed like it would be fitting for what we were kind of going to be about. I’m not 100 percent sure what we’re about, but I think it’s definitely about dealing with what you’ve got and not giving up on yourself and what you want out of life, because it’s all there for the taking if you want it. Far From Finished kind of seemed like, I don’t know, a fitting title. It’s not really about the band, it’s about a perspective on life. Don’t give up, even though you might feel like you want to give up at points. How do you feel the band has changed since you first started?

Well first off, when we started we didn’t really know anything about music. We knew what music we liked, basically. We started as a streetpunk band, with a lot of street punk, “oi!” followers, stuff like that. Playing spots, hanging out, drinking 40s, stuff like that. Now we’ve committed to it, and musically we’ve definitely evolved as well. “East Side of Nowhere” was more like a street rock and roll record, “Living in the Fallout” was definitely a little bit more keen on the songwriting, paid a little bit more attention to the production, and really called in our skills at songwriting at that point. The next record, “Forgettable,” we took that even further, kind of in a new direction completely. Way more pianos, and Hammond organ, strings — it was something we wanted to do, we did it, we stand behind it. It wasn’t well received and we didn’t kind of expect it

I think we were kind of getting sick of that old word, “street punk,” getting thrown around, seeing a lot of holes in people’s characters. So we were like, we know what it’s like to be punk rock, and if people want to call themselves street punk, I don’t know if they are actually living on the street or homeless like we are, but we know what it’s like. So we don’t need to make a street-punk record — we can do it because we have been living like that for so many years. We can do whatever we want, and hopefully people like it. And people I think really did like that record, we still have people come up to us at shows and say, “Dude, I know people don’t like that record, but we think it’s awesome.” And it’s nice to hear people — the real fans of the band — they kind of get what we’ve come from and the struggle we’ve come through. And you have another new album you’re working on...

We recruited a new drummer and a new guitar player, and we have demoed about 10 songs right now. So it looks like we’re going to try to start recording if we can between tours. I’d like to release it in the fall. To talk about this record a bit, the songs we’re writing with the guys we have right now, it’s just fun. It’s a little bit more upbeat, just trying to hone in and listen to everyone’s ideas and not letting one person dictate what’s going on. This record is going to be a reflection of the band in its truest form. If you could describe FFF to someone who had never heard the band before, what would you say?

I say we really focus on putting on a good show. When we get up there, it’s a little release from life. I feel like I can be who I want to be for a half hour at a time. It’s a kick-ass rock and roll show. Musically it’s definitely a punk band that’s not afraid to step outside the label of punk, because it’s a long lost, silly label if you really think about it. I still think I’m a punk rocker, probably until I die I’ll think like that. I think the most important thing when it comes to music right now and being in a band, it’s not how many records you sell, because it doesn’t really matter. More importantly is what your live show is like. So that’s really our focus: to put on a great show and make people leave remembering who we are and what we have to say.

[ Pop/Rock ] Cruelty Free. Sticky Lips BBQ Juke Joint, 830 Jefferson Rd. stickylipsbbq.com. 9 p.m. Free.  Penetration w/Infernal Abyss, Hellcannon. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. bugjar.com, 4542966. 8 p.m. Call for info.  Rain: A Tribute to The Beatles. Auditorium Theatre, 875 E Main St. info@rbtl.org. 7:30 p.m. $30.00-$50.00. rbtl.org.

Thursday, February 16 [ Acoustic/Folk ] Dave McGrath. Cottage Hotel, 1390 Pittsford-Mendon Rd, Mendon, NY. 624-1390. 7 p.m. Free.  Jed Curran Band CD Release Party. Sticky Lips BBQ Juke Joint, 830 Jefferson Rd. stickylipsbbq.com. 9 p.m. $5.  John Akers & Elvio Fernandes. Easy on East, 170 East Ave. 3256490. 8 p.m. Free.  Nancy Perry. Mythos Cafe, 77 Main St, Brockport. 637-2770. 6 p.m. Free.  Paul Strowe. Cottage Hotel, 1390 Pittsford-Mendon Rd, Mendon, NY. 624-1390. 7-10 p.m. Free.  [ Blues ] Doubletake Blues Band. Dinosaur Bar-B-Que, 99 Court St. dinosaurbarbque.com, 3257090. 9 p.m. Free.  Son House Blues Night w/Gordon Munding. Beale Street Cafe, 693 South Ave. bealestreetcafe.com, 271-4650. 7:30 p.m. Call for info.  [ Classical ] Eastman at Washington Square Noontime Concerts. First Universalist Church, Court St. & S.Clinton Ave. 275-1400, esm.rochester.edu/community/ calendars/lunchtime. 12:15 p.m.-12:45 p.m. Free.  Lacey on Harp. Lemoncello, 137 W Commercial St, E Rochester. lemoncello137.com, 385-8565. 6 p.m. Free.  [ DJ/Electronic ] RIPROC Presents: Subsonik. Dub Land Underground, 315 Alexander St. RIPROC@me.com. 10 p.m. Free w/ticket or $5 for 21+; $10 more for under.  Thank You Thursdays. Pearl Nightclub, 349 East Ave. 3255660. 10 p.m. Call for info.  [ Jazz ] Annie Wells. Little Theatre Cafe, 240 East Ave. thelittle.org. 7:30 p.m. Free.  Bob Henley. Prosecco Italian Restaurant & Bar, 1550 Route 332, Farmington. proseccoitalianrestaurant.com, 924-8000. 6 p.m. Call for info.  Eros Guitar Duo. Bistro 135, 135 W Commercial St,, East Rochester. bistro135.net, 6625555. 6 p.m. Free.  Fred Costello & Roger Eckers Duo. Porto Bello Restaurant, 1369 Pittsford-Mendon Rd., Mendon. portobellomendon. com. 7:30 p.m. Free.  continues on page 16


rochestercitynewspaper.com City 15


Thursday, February 16 Jazz/Wine Happy Hour w/The Swooners. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. woodcliffhotelspa.com. 5:30 p.m. Free.  Joe Santora Trio w/Emily Kirchoff. Michael’s Valley Grill, 1694 Penfield R, Penfield. 383-8260. 7 p.m. Free.  Sonny Brown Band. Rabbit Room Restaurant, 61 N Main St, Honeoye Falls, NY. thelowermill.com. 7 p.m. Free.  Todd East. Pane Vino, 175 N Water St. panevinoristorante. com, 232-6090. 8:30 p.m. Free.  [ Karaoke ] Karaoke. Panorama Night Club, 730 Elmgrove Rd. 247-2190. 9 p.m. Free.  Karaoke. Pineapple Jacks, 485 Spencerport Rd. 247-5225. 9 p.m. Call for info.  Karaoke. Jukebox, 5435 Ridge Rd W, Spencerport. 352-4505. 7:30 p.m. Free.  Karaoke. Applebee’s-Penfield, 1955 Empire Blvd, Webster. 787-0570. 9 p.m. Free.  Karaoke. GridIron Bar & Grill, 3154 State St, Caledonia. 5384008. 9 p.m. Free.  Karaoke. Center Cafe, 150 Frank DiMino Way. 594-8882. 7 p.m. Free.  Karaoke. Brickwood Grill, 250 Monroe Ave. brickwoodgrill.com, 730-8230. 9 p.m. Call for info.  Karaoke. Willow Inn, 428 Manitou Rd. 392-3489. 8 p.m. Free.  Karaoke Night w/Debbie Randyn. Pittsford Pub, 60 North Main St., Pittsford, NY. pittsfordpub.net. 9:30 p.m. Free.  Karaoke w/DJ Smooth. Clarissa’s, 293 Clarissa St. 454-2680. 8:30 p.m. Free.  Karaoke w/George. Temple Bar & Grille, 109 East Ave. 232-6000. 8 p.m. Free.  Karaoke w/Summer Bob. Shorts Bar & Grill, 35 N Main St, Fairport. 388-0136. 10 p.m. Free.  Karaoke w/Tim Burnette. Sevens, Rt 96, Farmington. 924-3232. 8-11 p.m. Free.  Kiss-e-oke Thursdays. One, 1 Ryan Alley. oneclublife.com, 546-1010. 10 p.m. Call for info.  [ Pop/Rock ] City Light/Dividing the Skyline w/Forget Me In Vegas, Sans Ego, Nothing Personal, and Keaton. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N Water St. waterstreetmusic.com, 3255600. 6 p.m. $10.  Jeff Elliott. Irondequoit Ale House, 2250 Hudson Ave. 544-5120. 5 p.m. Free.  Jim Lane. Six Pockets, Ridge Hudson Plaza. 266-1440. 7 p.m. Free.  Rain: A Tribute to The Beatles. Auditorium Theatre, 875 E Main St. info@rbtl.org. 7:30 p.m.. $30.00-$50.00. rbtl.org. Red Wanting Blue. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. bugjar.com, 4542966. 8:30 p.m. $5-$7. 

[ Classical ] RPO: Mardi Gras: The Sounds of New Orleans. Eastman TheatreKodak Hall, 60 Gibbs St. rpo. org. 8 p.m. $15-$77. School of the Arts Choir. City Hall Atrium. cityofrochester. gov/bhm/. Noon. Free. 

ELECTRONIC | John Chowning

Eastman School of Music has had an electronic music program since 1981, a vintage that included the Radio Shack TRS-80 computer of black screens, green letters, and IF-THEN programming. American composer John Chowning (b. 1934) boasts a programming history that includes a patent from 1974 used by Yamaha for its GS1, a digital synthesizer released in 1981. Among his credentials, Chowning studied composition for three years with Nadia Boulanger in Paris and he was a founding director in 1973 of Stanford University’s Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics. You can sample Chowning’s works on YouTube, including “Stria” and “Phoné,” but, to give you a throw-back to 1971, why not show up at the concert, so that you can ask, “Is it live or is it Memorex?” John Chowning performs Wednesday, February 15, 8 p.m. at Kilbourn Hall, 26 Gibbs St. Free. 274-1100, eastman.rochester.edu. — BY PALOMA CAPANNA Shadows Fall. Montage Music Hall, 50 Chestnut Plaza. frontgatetickets.com, themontagemusichall.com. 7 p.m. $15.  iS w/Low Standards. Blueroom, 293 Alexander St. blueroomrochester.com, 7305985. 8 p.m. Call for info. 

Friday, February 17 [ Acoustic/Folk ] Chris Wilson. Prosecco Italian Restaurant & Bar, 1550 Route 332, Farmington. proseccoitalianrestaurant.com, 924-8000. 6 p.m. Free.  Cruelty Free w/Corey Bates Music. Tala Vera, 155 State St. tala-vera.com, 546-3945. 8 p.m. $5, dinner required in dining room before 9 p.m.  Dave McGrath. Quaker Steak & Lube, 2205 Buffalo Rd. 6979464. 9 p.m. Free.  Guinness Girls w/Kevin Reynolds & Ken Snyder, The Bucks of Oranmore. McGraw’s Irish Pub, 146 W Commercial St, East Rochester. mcgrawsirishpub. com, 348-9091. 5 p.m. Free.  Irish Music. Shamrock Jack’s, 4554 Culver Rd. 323-9310. 9 p.m. Free.  Jeff Slutsky. Boulder Coffee Co. -Alexander Street. bouldercoffeeco.com. 8 p.m. Free.  John Akers. Rookies Sports Bar, Pittsford Colony Plaza 3400 Monroe Ave. therookiesbar.com, 385-7665. 9 p.m. Call for info.  Maudin Maladies. Monty’s Krown Lounge, 875 Monroe Ave. 271-7050. 9 p.m. $3-$5.  Ralph Louis. Rochester Plaza Hotel, 70 State St. rochesterplaza.com. 6 p.m. Free. 

16 City FEBRUARY 15-21, 2012

Sarva Mangala. Artisan Coffeehouse, 2 Main St., Scottsville. artisancoffeehouse. com, 889-9730. Call for info. Free.  Sim Redmond Band w/The Prickers. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N Water St. waterstreetmusic.com, 3255600. 9 p.m. $10-$12.  Steve Johnson, Charity Nurse & Amanda Barton w/Eva and the Dog Boys. Abilene, 153 Liberty Pole Way. abilenebarandlounge. com, 232-3230. 6 p.m. 21+ $8, unders $10.  Tom Gravino. Tandoor of India, 376 Jefferson Rd. 427-7080. 7 p.m. Free.  [ Blues ] Billy Joe & the Blues Gypsies w/ Dave Riccioni. Six Pockets, Ridge Hudson Plaza. 266-1440. 6-9 p.m. Free.  Ezra & The Storm w/East High R&B Review. Johnny’s Irish Pub, 1382 Culver Rd. johnnysirishpub.com, 224-0990. 4 p.m. Free.  Gap Mangione New Blues Band. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. woodcliffhotelspa. com, 381-4000. 7:30 p.m. Free. Luca Foresta and the Electro Kings. Beale Street Cafe-Webster, 1930 Empire Blvd, Webster. bealestreetcafe.com, 216-1070. 7:30 p.m. Call for info.  Steve Grills & The Roadmasters. Dinosaur Bar-B-Que, 99 Court St. dinosaurbarbque.com, 3257090. 10 p.m. Free.  The Crawdiddies. The Moonshine BBQ, 1635 Penfield Rd. 203-1145. 6 p.m. Free.  The Deborah Magone Band. Pub 511, 511 E Ridge Rd. 2669559. 8 p.m. Call for info.  Third Degree. Beale Street Cafe, 693 South Ave. bealestreetcafe. com, 271-4650. 7:30 p.m. Call for info. 

[ Country ] Ghost Riders. Finger Lakes Racetrack, 5857 State Rd, Rt 96, Farmington, NY. 924-3232. 8 p.m. Call for info.  Mike Snow. Sandra’s Saloon, 276 Smith St. 546-5474. 9:30 p.m. Free.  [ DJ/Electronic ] HomiSide DJ’s. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. bugjar.com, 4542966. 8 p.m. $6-$8. Limited entry for unders.  The Facebook Friday Explosion. Venu Resto-Lounge, 151 St Paul St. 232-5650. 10 p.m. Call for info.  Video Mixing w/DJ Oltra. Decibel Lounge, 45 Euclid St. decibellounge.com, 754-4645. 10 p.m. Call for info.  [ Hip-Hop/Rap ] Subsoil w/Sloppy Joe -nDa Juice. Jukebox, 5435 Ridge Rd W, Spencerport. herbyonepresents@gmail.com. 10 p.m. $5.  Zak Downtown w/Bedroc. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N Water St. waterstreetmusic.com, 3255600. 6:30 p.m. $10.  [ Jazz ] Captain Marvel. Lemoncello, 137 W Commercial St, E Rochester. lemoncello137.com, 385-8565. 7 p.m. Free.  Fred Costello & Roger Eckers Duo. Charley Brown’s Restaurant, 1675 Penfield Rd. charleybrownspenfield.com. 7:30 p.m. Free.  Joe Santora Trio w/Emily Kirchoff. Michael’s Valley Grill, 1694 Penfield R, Penfield. 3838260. 7 p.m. Free.  Johnny Matt Band w/Jon Seiger. Wegmans-Eastway, 1955 Empire Blvd, Webster. 6718290. 5:30 p.m. Free.  Ryan T Carey. Thali of India, 3259 S Winton Rd. 427-8030. 7-9 p.m. Free.  Soul Express w/Bobby DiBaudo. Bistro 135, 135 W Commercial St,, East Rochester. bistro135.net, 662-5555. 5 p.m. Free.  Stringplicity. Little Theatre Cafe, 240 East Ave. thelittle.org. 8:30 p.m. Free.  Ted Nicolosi and Shared Genes. Pultneyville Grill, 4135 Mill St Williamson, NY 589-4512. 589-4512, PultneyvilleGrill.com. 7 p.m. Free. The Swooners. Pane Vino, 175 N Water St. panevinoristorante. com, 232-6090. 8 p.m. Free.  The Westview Project. Pomodoro Monroe Ave, 3400 Monroe Ave. mypomodoro.com. 7 p.m. Free.  [ Pop/Rock ] A Benefit for Shay w/Figure 8, Puddle, The Brunt, The Gowns, Storm the Bay, Mochester. California Brew Haus, 402 Ridge Rd W. 6211480. 8 p.m. $7. 

Hair Nation. Nola’s BBQ, 4775 Lake Ave. nolasweb.com, 6633375. 10 p.m. Call for info.  Kevin McCarthy. TC Riley’s, 200 Park Point Dr. tcrileysparkpoint. com, 272-9777. 6 p.m. Call for info.  Krypton 88. Mo’s Mulberry St, 191 Lee Rd. 647-3522. 8 p.m. Call for info.  Mulletude. Easy on East, 170 East Ave. 325-6484. 10 p.m. Free.  Run For The Roses. Montage Music Hall, 50 Chestnut Plaza. themontagemusichall.com, 2321520. 9 p.m. Call for info.  Sam Deleo. Perlo’s Italian Grill, 202 N Washington St, East Rochester. 248-5060. 6:30. Free.  Scott Danger Bravo w/ LastNote. Blueroom, 293 Alexander St. blueroomrochester. com, 730-5985. 9 p.m. Call for info.  Something Else. A-Pub Live, 6 Lawrence St. 262-2063. 10:30 p.m. Free before 10 p.m., $5 after. Streetwise. McGhan’s, 11 W Main St, Victor, NY. 924-3660. Call for info. Free.  Teagan & The Tweeds. Sticky Lips BBQ Juke Joint, 830 Jefferson Rd. stickylipsbbq.com. 9:30 p.m. Free.  The 80’s Hair Band. Anchor Bar Marketplace. anchorsportsbar. com, 272-9333. Call for info.   Tryst. TC Hooligans-Greece, Greece Ridge Ctr. tchooligans. com, 225-7180. 10 p.m. Call for info.  Type Music w/Darwin, Slip Madigan. Dub Land Underground, 315 Alexander St. 232-7550. 8 p.m. 21+ $5, unders $10.  [ R&B ] Coup de Villes. Six Pockets, Ridge Hudson Plaza. sixpockets.net, 266-1440. 9 p.m. Call for info. 21+. 

Saturday, February 18 [ Acoustic/Folk ] An Evening with Jeff Slutsky and Friends. Bread and Water Theatre. jeffslutskymusic.com, 721-1600. 7 p.m. Free. breadandwatertheatre. org. Donation of a can of food requested. Ben Sheridan. Montage Music Hall, 50 Chestnut Plaza. benjaminjsheridan@gmail.com. 7 p.m. $10 adv, $15 doors. 410.2752. Black Mountain Groove Clan w/The Lonely Ones. Boulder Coffee Co. -Alexander Street. bouldercoffeeco.com. 8 p.m. Free.  Greg Brown Concert. Oswego Music Hall @ McCrobie Bldg, 41 Lake St, Oswego, NY. oswegomusichall.org. 8:00 p.m. $25 adv, $30 doors. Children under 12 1/2 price. John & Mary and the Valkyries. Abilene, 153 Liberty Pole Way. abilenebarandlounge.com, 232-3230. 9:30 p.m. $8.  Meg Hutchinson. First Unitarian Church-Cafe Veritas, 220 Winton Rd S. robertgrolling@ yahoo.com. 8:00 p.m. $15 GA, $7 students w/ID.

Mike & Sergei w/Boland School of Irish Dance, Ted McGraw. McGraw’s Irish Pub, 146 W Commercial St, East Rochester. mcgrawsirishpub. com, 348-9091. 5:30 p.m. Free.  Mosaic Foundation w/Big Mean Sound Machine. Dub Land Underground, 315 Alexander St. 232-7550. 8 p.m. $5-$10.  Songwriters in the Round: John Cadley, Paul Swiatek, Taylor Buckley, Perry Cleaveland, Brian Coughlin. Tango Cafe, 389 Gregory St. 271-4930. 8 p.m. $8.  Steve Bartolotta. Pittsford Pub, 60 S. Main St., Pittsford. 5864650, pittsfordpub.net. 9 p.m.midnight. Free.  Tom Gravino. Thali of India, 3259 S Winton Rd. 355-8206. 7 p.m. Free.  Tumbao. Tapas 177 Lounge, 177 St Paul St. tapas177.com, 262-2090. 11 p.m. Free.  Unplugged Dinner Music Series. Lovin’ Cup, Park Point @ RIT. 292-9940, lovincup. com. 6 p.m. Free.  [ Blues ] Bill Brown. Brown Hound Bistro, 6459 Rt 64, Naples. 374-9771. 7 p.m. Free.  Gap Mangione New Blues Band. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. woodcliffhotelspa.com, 3814000. 7:30 p.m. Free. Industrial Blues Band. Beale Street Cafe-Webster, 1930 Empire Blvd, Webster. bealestreetcafe.com, 2161070. 7:30 p.m. Call for info.  John Cole Blues Band. Dinosaur Bar-B-Que, 99 Court St. dinosaurbarbque.com, 3257090. 10 p.m. Free.  Jony James. Sticky Lips BBQ Juke Joint, 830 Jefferson Rd. stickylipsbbq.com. 10 p.m. Free.  Trilogy. Beale Street Cafe, 693 South Ave. bealestreetcafe. com, 271-4650. 7:30 p.m. Call for info.  [ Classical ] Heritage Gospel Concert. Mt. Olivet Baptist Church, 141 Adams St. cityofrochester.gov. 6 p.m. Free.  RPO: Mardi Gras: The Sounds of New Orleans. Eastman TheatreKodak Hall, 60 Gibbs St. rpo. org. 8 p.m. $15-$77. RTOS February Theater Organ Concert. Auditorium Theatre, 875 E Main St. 234-2295. 2:30 p.m. $15 GA. Groups of 10+, $10 each. Students w/ID free. The Eastman Bunch. Auditorium Theatre, 875 E Main St. theatreorgans.com. 1:30 p.m. $15, $10 each for groups 10 or more, students w/ID.  [ DJ/Electronic ] Big Dance Party w/DJ Jon Herbert. Tilt Night Club, 444 Central Ave. 232-8440, tiltroc. com. 10 p.m. $3.  Black Sinatra w/Homiside, C.R.E.E.P.S. Blueroom, 293 Alexander St. blueroomrochester.com, 7305985. 8 p.m. Call for info. 


Sexy Saturdays w/DJ Wizz. Maxwell’s Resto Lounge, 169 St. Paul St. 3255710. Call for info. 21+.  [ Jazz ] Bob Sneider Trio. Bistro 135, 135 W Commercial St,, East Rochester. bistro135.net, 6625555. 7 p.m. Free.  East End Jazz Boys. Havana Moe’s, 125 East Ave. 3251030. 9 p.m. Free.  El Rojo Jazz. Lemoncello, 137 W Commercial St, E Rochester. lemoncello137.com, 385-8565. 7 p.m. Free.  Fred Costello & Roger Eckers Duo. Charley Brown’s Restaurant, 1675 Penfield Rd. charleybrownspenfield.com. 7:30 p.m. Free.  Jazz Cafe. Monty’s Korner, 363 East Ave. 263-7650. 7:30 p.m. Free.  Jazz at Jazzy’s. Jasmine’s Asian Fusion, 657 Ridge Rd, Webster. 216-1290. 8:30-11 p.m. Free.  Joe Santora Trio w/Emily Kirchoff. Michael’s Valley Grill, 1694 Penfield R, Penfield. 383-8260. 7 p.m. Free.  Sofrito. Little Theatre Cafe, 240 East Ave. thelittle.org. 8:30 p.m. Free.  Ted Nicolosi and Shared Genes. Prime Steak House 42 E Main St Webster, NY. 2654777, PrimeRochester.com. 6:30 p.m. Free. Tom Monti. Prosecco Italian Restaurant & Bar, 1550 Route 332, Farmington. proseccoitalianrestaurant.com, 924-8000. 5:30 p.m. Call for info.  William Joseph. SUNY Geneseo-Wadsworth Auditorium, Holcomb 203, Geneseo, NY. 245-5873. 8 p.m. $16.

[ Karaoke ] Karaoke. 140 Alex, 140 Alexander St. 256-1000. 10:30 p.m. Free.  Karaoke. Pineapple Jacks, 485 Spencerport Rd. 247-5225. 9 p.m. Call for info.  Karaoke At The Lube. Quaker Steak and Lube, 2205 Buffalo Rd. 697.9464. 9:30 p.m. Free. Karaoke w/Andy & Kim. Norton’s Pub, 1730 N Goodman St. 266-3570. 10 p.m. Free.  Karaoke w/Summer Bob. Shorts Bar & Grill, 35 N Main St, Fairport. 388-0136. 10 p.m. Free.  Kick-Ass Karaoke. Temple Bar & Grille, 109 East Ave. 2326000. 10 p.m. Free.  Olympia Karaoke w/ Andy. Olympia Restaurant, 2380 Lyell Ave. 429-6231. 9:30 p.m. Free. [ Pop/Rock ] 50/50 w/Weathered. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N Water St. waterstreetmusic.com, 3255600. 9:30 p.m. $10, ladies are free.  8 Days a Week. California Brew Haus, 402 Ridge Rd W. 6211480. 9:30 p.m. $5-$7.  Ballbreaker. Anchor Bar Marketplace. anchorsportsbar. com, 272-9333. Call for info.   Blackout Superstar. Montage Music Hall, 50 Chestnut Plaza. themontagemusichall.com, 232-1520. 8 p.m. Call for info.  Double Shot. Finger Lakes Racetrack, 5857 State Rd, Rt 96, Farmington, NY. 924-3232. 8 p.m. Call for info.  Flying Sideburns. Six Pockets, Ridge Hudson Plaza. sixpockets.net, 266-1440. 9:30 p.m. Call for info. 21+.  Free Ride. Jeffrey’s, 3115 E. Henrietta Rd., Henrietta. jeffreysbar.com, 486-4973. 9 p.m. Call for info. 

WORLD | Big Mean Sound Machine

If you’ve got an urge to be overpowered by funk, or want to check out an upbeat dance band with more members than Gogol Bordello, Big Mean Sound Machine should do the trick. The Ithaca-based instrumental group incorporates African and Latin beats with occasional doses of rock, jazz, and psychedelic elements to create its own thing — an indestructible groove that’s impossible to ignore. It’s the sort of combination that has long been the domain of world music, although like-minded American groups Antibalas and Ozomatli also share similar ideas. Add a proper singer, some protest lyrics a la Michael Franti, and viva la revolucion. Mosaic Foundation completes the bill. Big Mean Sound Machine performs Saturday, February 18, 8 p.m. at Dub Land Underground, 315 Alexander St. $5-$10. 232-7550. — BY ROMAN DIVEZUR Gary Rose (Skycoasters), Rob Smith (Zero Gravity). Flaherty’s Webster, 1200 Bay Rd. flahertys. com, 671-0816. Call for info.   Krypton 88 w/Black Top Daddies. Monty’s Krown Lounge, 875 Monroe Ave. 2717050. 9 p.m. $3-$5.  Me & The Boyz. Shooters Sports Bar & Grill, 1226 Fairport Rd. shootersny.com, 924-9914. Call for info.   Mitty & the Followers. Captain Jack’s Goodtime Tavern, 8505 Greig St, Sodus Point. captainjacksgoodtimetavern. com, 315-483-9570. 9 p.m. Call for info. 

Mud Creek. Johnny’s Irish Pub, 1382 Culver Rd. johnnysirishpub.com, 2240990. 8 p.m. Free.  Raining Blood w/Final Decline. Pub 511, 511 E Ridge Rd. 266-9559. 9 p.m. $5.00.  Refill. McKenzie’s Irish Pub - W. Henrietta Rd. mckenziesirishpub.com. 9 p.m. Free.  Something Else. A-Pub Live, 6 Lawrence St. 262-2063. 10:30 p.m. Free before 10 p.m., $5 after. Son of the Sun w/Animal Pants. Lovin’ Cup, Park Point @ RIT. lovincup.com, 292-9940. 9 p.m. $5 GA, $3 student. 

Springer. Pineapple Jacks, 485 Spencerport Rd. 247-5225. 10 p.m. $5. 21+.  Steve Bartolotta. Pittsford Pub, 60 S. Main Street, Pittsford. pittsfordpub.net, 586.4650. 9 p.m. Call for info.  Tonight We Feed w/Badon Hill. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N Water St. waterstreetmusic.com, 3255600. 6:30 p.m. $10.  Waylon Speed w/ MoChester, Dirty Wings, and Sonarmail. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. bugjar.com, 4542966. 9 p.m. $6-$8.  Whole Lotta Led. Nola’s BBQ, 4775 Lake Ave. nolasweb.com, 663-3375. 10 p.m. Call for info. 

Sunday, February 19 [ Acoustic/Folk ] CJGROOVIN Tap Dance Jam w/Live Music. Tango Cafe, 389 Gregory St. cheryljohnson@ cjgroovin.com. 2 p.m. Suggested Donation: $5. Performance followed by open dance floor. Celtic Music. Temple Bar & Grille, 109 East Ave. 232-6000. 10 p.m. Free.  [ Blues ] The Mighty High and Dry. Beale Street Cafe, 693 South Ave. bealestreetcafe.com, 2714650. 7 p.m. Call for info.  [ Classical ] Brass Banquet (First Muse Chamber Music). First Unitarian Church, 220 S Winton Rd. firstmuse.org. 7:30 p.m. $10 GA, $5 student, $20 family.  Going for Baroque Organ Recital. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. 276-8900. 1 & 3 p.m. Free w/admission.  The Twitter Concert. Nazareth College-Wilmot Recital Hall, 4245 East Ave. 389-2700,

go.naz.edu/music-events. 3:00 p.m. Free. The World of Gospel Radio Ministry. Miracle Deliverance Faith Center, 69 Whitney St. 334-6692. 3:30 p.m. $12$15.  University of Rochester Brass Choir: Organ and Brass Works. St Mary’s Church, 15 St Mary’s Pl. 273-5157. 3 p.m. Free.  [ Jazz ] Anthony Gianovola. Lemoncello, 137 W Commercial St, E Rochester. lemoncello137.com, 385-8565. 6 p.m. Free.  Bill Slater Solo Piano (Brunch). Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. woodcliffhotelspa.com, 3814000. Call for info. Free.  Captain Marvel. Prosecco Italian Restaurant & Bar, 1550 Route 332, Farmington. proseccoitalianrestaurant. com, 924-8000. 5 p.m. Call for info.  Footnote. Lovin’ Cup, Park Point @ RIT. lovincup.com. 7 p.m. Free. Jazz@Lovin’ cup presents: Footnote. Lovin’ Cup, Park Point @ RIT. lovincup.com, 292-9940. 7 p.m. Free.  [ Open Mic ] Acoustic Sunday w/Fred Goodnow. Brown Hound Bistro, 6459 Rt 64, Naples. 374-9771. 11 a.m. Free.  Open Country Jam. Sandra’s Saloon, 276 Smith St. 5465474. 4-8 p.m. Free.  Open Jam Session w/Rotating Themes. Tango Cafe, 389 Gregory St. 271-4930. 2 p.m. Free before 10 p.m., $5 after.  Open Jam w/Bodega Radio. Jukebox, 5435 Ridge Rd W, Spencerport. 352-4505. 5 p.m. Free.  continues on page 18

OUT OF

WORK? see employment • page 31

NEED A

WORKOUT? try yoga • mind body spirit page 30

OUT

WORKING? no time for maintenance? get help • home services page 28

rochestercitynewspaper.com City 17


Sunday, February 19 [ Pop/Rock ] Endyga. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N Water St. waterstreetmusic.com, 3255600. 5:30 p.m. $10.  My Heart to Fear w/The World Ends With You, Walking With Titans, Sleep Circadia, Praxia, and Jonestown. Flying Squirrel, 285 Clarissa St. thesquirrel.org. 4 p.m. $10-$12.  The Queers w/The Ataris, Far From Finished. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. bugjar.com, 4542966. 8 p.m. $10-$12. Limited entry for unders. 

Monday, February 20 [ DJ/Electronic ] Manic Mondays DJs. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 454-2966. 11 p.m. Free.  [ Jazz ] Bob DiBaudo Duo. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. woodcliffhotelspa.com, 3814000. 5:30 p.m. Free.  Mardi Gras Dixieland w/Black Diamond Express. Green Lantern Inn, 1 E Church St, Fairport. flowercityjazz.org. 6:30 p.m. $12.  Mark Bader. Bistro 135, 135 W Commercial St,, East Rochester. bistro135.net, 662-5555. 5:30 p.m. Free.  Russell Fielder Trio. Little Theatre Cafe, 240 East Ave. thelittle.org. 7:30 p.m. Free.  Tony Gianavola. Beale Street Cafe, 693 South Ave. 271-4650, bealestreetcafe.com. 7 p.m. Free. [ Open Mic ] Lovin’ Cup Idol - Beatles Night. Lovin’ Cup, Park Point @ RIT. lovincup.com, 292-9940. 8 p.m. Free.  [ Pop/Rock ] Dia Frampton w/Andrew Allen, Nick Dean. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N Water St. waterstreetmusic.com, 3255600. 7 p.m. $10.  Happy Hour Monday w/Jim Lane. Lemoncello, 137 W Commercial St, E Rochester. lemoncello137.com, 385-8565. 5 p.m. Free.  Vince Dynamic w/American Opera, Payton Marovich, and Cammy Enaharo. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. bugjar.com, 4542966. 8:30 p.m. $6-$8. 

Tuesday, February 21 [ Acoustic/Folk ] Fritz’s Polka Band. Sevens, Rt 96, Farmington. 924-3232. 12:302:30 p.m. Free.  Jeff Elliott. Norton’s Pub, 1730 N Goodman St. 266-3570. 5-8 p.m. Free.  Johnny Bauer. Cottage Hotel, 1390 Pittsford-Mendon Rd, Mendon, NY. 624-1390. 7-10 p.m. Free.  Reggae Night. Elite Bar & Grill, 398 W Main St. 527-8720. Call for info. [ Blues ] Dan Schmitt and the Shadows w/Teagan Ward. Beale Street Cafe, 693 South Ave. 18 City FEBRUARY 15-21, 2012

Underground, 315 Alexander St. facebook.com/bookituprochester. 7 p.m. $10-$14.

Wednesday, February 22

CLASSICAL | Zvi Zeitlin

An all-Schubert concert for strings and piano on a Sunday afternoon at Kilbourn Hall. It could only be made lovelier when the concert is a celebration of retirement after 45 years of teaching at the Eastman School of Music. Violinist Zvi Zeitlin will perform on the eve of his 90th birthday to culminate a career of teaching and performing, including more than 200 concerts for Allied troops stationed in the Middle East and Greece from 1943 to 1946, while he was a soldier in the Royal Air Force during WWII. Zeitlin was born in Dubrovna, Belarus, raised and educated in Israel, and, at age 11, became the youngest scholarship student to enter the Juilliard School. Zeitlin will be joined by Barry Snyder, piano; John Irrera and Samantha Moraes, violins; Kelsey Farr, viola; and Austin Fisher, cello. The Zvi Zeitlin Farewell Faculty Recital takes place Sunday, February 19, 3 p.m. at Kilbourn Hall, 26 Gibbs St. $10/free with UR ID. 274-1100, eastman.rochester.edu. — BY PALOMA CAPANNA bealestreetcafe.com, 2714650. 4 p.m. Call for info. Luca Foresta and the Electro Kings, Joe Beard. Beale Street Cafe-Webster, 1930 Empire Blvd, Webster. bealestreetcafe. com, 216-1070. 7:30 p.m. Call for info.  [ Classical ] Barbershop Harmony. Harmony House, 58 E Main St., Webster, NY. chorusofthegenesee.org. 7 p.m. Free. Open practices/try outs.  [ Jazz ] Ballroom Dance Series w/live music. Edgerton Community Center, 41 Backus St. cityofrochester.gov/ ballroomdanceseries. 7:30 p.m. $3. See website for full line up.  Jim Nugent. Bistro 135, 135 W Commercial St,, East Rochester. bistro135.net, 662-5555. 6 p.m. Free.  Tinted Image. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. woodcliffhotelspa.com, 3814000. 5:30 p.m. Free.  [ Karaoke ] Karaoke. 140 Alex, 140 Alexander St. 256-1000. 10:30 p.m. Free.  Karaoke. Pineapple Jacks, 485 Spencerport Rd. 247-5225. 9 p.m. Call for info.  Karaoke. McKenzie’s Irish Pub, 3685 W Henrietta Rd. 3348970. 8 p.m. Free.  Karaoke. Lemoncello, 137 W Commercial St, E Rochester. lemoncello137.com, 385-8565. 8 p.m. Free.  Karaoke w/DJ Vee. TC Riley’s, 200 Park Point Dr. tcrileysparkpoint.com, 2729777. Call for info.

[ Open Mic ] Golden Link Singaround. Twelve Corners Presbyterian Church, 1200 S Winton Rd. goldenlink. org. 7:30 p.m. Free.  Open Mic Night. Lovin’ Cup, Park Point @ RIT. lovincup. com, 292-9940. 8:30 p.m. Free.  Open Mic w/Dave McGrath and Jim Lane. TC HooligansWebster, Webster Woods Plz, Webster. 671-7180. 8 p.m. Free.  Open Mic w/Rapier Slices. Clarissa’s, 293 Clarissa St. 454-2680. 7-11 p.m. $3$5.  Open Mic w/String Theory. Johnny’s Irish Pub, 1382 Culver Rd. 224-0990, johnnysirishpub.com. 8 p.m. Free.  [ Pop/Rock ] Don Christiano .With a Little Help From My Friends-The Beatles Unplugged. Abilene, 153 Liberty Pole Way. abilenebarandlounge.com, 232-3230. 8 p.m. $2.  Egg Man’s Traveling Carnival. Hatter’s Pub, 5 W Main St, Webster. 872-1505. 6 p.m. Call for tix.  Rochester’s Greatest Fat Tuesday Party Ever w/ Download, Small Town, Atlas, Different Every Time, Wild Horses, Brian Lindsay Band, Up2Somethin. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N Water St. waterstreetmusic.com, 3255600. 5 p.m. $15-$20.  The Bad Kids. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. bugjar.com, 4542966. 9 p.m. $6-$8.  The Toasters w/Mrs. Skannotto, Fever, and Nyxon. Dub Land

[ Acoustic/Folk ] Reggae Lounge w/Ras Courtney of His Imperial Sounds. Abilene, 153 Liberty Pole Way. abilenebarandlounge.com, 232-3230. 8 p.m. Free.  Rob & Gary Acoustic. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. woodcliffhotelspa.com, 3814000. 5:30 p.m. Free.  Tommy Gravino. Rio Tomatlan, 5 Beeman St, Canandaigua. 3949380. 6:30 p.m. Free. Salsa w/Shelia dancing during the performance.  William Fitzsimmons w/ Denison Whitmer. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N Water St. waterstreetmusic.com, 3255600. 8 p.m. $15.  [ Blues ] Ezra & the Storm. Dinosaur Bar-B-Que, 99 Court St. dinosaurbarbque.com, 3257090. 9 p.m. Free.  Open Blues Jam w/The King Bees. Beale Street Cafe, 693 South Ave. bealestreetcafe. com, 271-4650. 7:30 p.m. Call for info.  [ DJ/Electronic ] Cultr Club Goes Goth w/Joywave DJ set. Vertex, 169 N Chestnut St. facebook.com/cultrclub. 10 p.m. $3 21+, $5 unders.  [ Jazz ] Chris Teal’s Open Jam. Tala Vera, 155 State St. tala-vera. com, 546-3945. 8 p.m. $3, free w/dinner.  Coffey Wachala Duo. Little Theatre Cafe, 240 East Ave. thelittle.org. 7:30 p.m. Free.  El Rojo Jazz. Bistro 135, 135 W Commercial St,, East Rochester. bistro135.net, 6625555. 6 p.m. Free.  Greg Chako. Lemoncello, 137 W Commercial St, E Rochester. lemoncello137.com, 385-8565. 6 p.m. Free.  Open Jam w/The King Bees. Beale Street Cafe, 693 South Ave. bealestreetcafe.com. 7:30 p.m. Free.  Paradigm Shift. Pomodoro Grill & Wine Bar, 1290 University Ave. 271-5000. 7:30 p.m. Free.  Robert Chevrier. Pomodoro Monroe Ave, 3400 Monroe Ave. 586-7000. 6:30 p.m. Free.  [ Pop/Rock ] El Destructo w/Matt Frank, Baby Shark. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. bugjar.com, 454-2966. 9 p.m. $5-$7.  [ R&B ] Mike Grady. Sticky Lips BBQ Juke Joint, 830 Jefferson Rd. stickylipsbbq.com. 9 p.m. Free. 


Art

“Voyager” by Ron Pokrasso, part of the “Makers & Mentors” exhibit now at Rochester Contemporary Art Center. PHOTO PROVIDED

Playing hide and seek with the id “Makers & Mentors” 2012 By Robert Ernst Marx, Ron Pokrasso and David Bumbeck Through March 18 Rochester Contemporary Art Center, 137 East Ave. 461-2222, rochestercontemporary.org Wed-Sun 1-5 p.m. | $1, free to members [ REVIEW ] BY REBECCA RAFFERTY

When one generation is connected to another through a chain of mentorship, it isn’t only technical skills that are conveyed; philosophies and the sparks for independent innovation are passed along as well. This is illustrated in the new edition of the fascinating “Makers and Mentors” series at Rochester Contemporary. The show features new and recent artworks by painter, and retired printmaker and professor, Robert Ernst Marx, as well as two of his former students, Ron Pokrasso and David Bumbeck. The spirit of the exhibition series is to reconnect old colleagues, and provide a “moment to shine a light on the importance of art education in our area,” says Rochester Contemporary Director Bleu Cease. Two of the featured artists were present for the February 5 artists’ talk. Marx and Pokrasso lamented that not many people are taught that passion is a better measure of success than anything. It’s crucial that artists are “passionate about the making,” Pokrasso says. Being an artist is a verb, more than a noun.

The trio of creators in this show conveys relatable inner and outer human experiences. Though each artist includes the human form in his work, all three artists resist literal portraiture, instead focusing on expression, saturation of hue, and gesture to convey that which is universal and recognizable. The results communicate more about emotion and state of being than specific identity ever could. Just as we mentally apprehend one another, these subjects and their states are captured in complicated flux; they are equally inner and outer portraits, shifting aspects suspended in the image. The 14 works by Ron Pokrasso in this show

are a seamless mix of techniques including intaglio, monotype, drawing, and collage, disparate media rallied together with form and narrative emerging from symbolic imagery. Figures caught by the inward tug of reverie interact, consciously or not, with the recurring, imposing form of a wrought-iron fence or a single, gnarled tree. A blanket of fallen leaves leads to a massive old tree in “Marker,” and three gravestoneshaped, text-filled objects emerge from the bottom of the work. Where they hit the central scene, they are colored like a triplet of setting suns in a sky of faded purple. “Newest Gate Keeper” contains a profile of a bearded man with the familiar gate before him, while below, twin clock chains and weights hang over two figures hidden by diagonal stripes. Pokrasso is interested in playing with partial obscurity, “by the notion of “here/not here,” of “pushing the portrait back,” he says. “It’s

not about, ‘Here I am,’ it’s about, ‘Look for me.’” Many of Pokrasso’s figures, as in “Fence Sitter,” cross their arms over their chests, seemingly not out of stubbornness, but specifically in a delicate gesture of cradling their ailing, indecisive selves. For his experimental figure-in-thelandscape work, David Bumbeck uses a much less subdued color palette than the other two artists. Thirteen ornately framed works include collages of images ranging from decorative paper to powdered-wigwearing ladies, and jarringly neon-sherbethued acrylic paintings, some with glitter. His painted people and objects are sharply contrasted with the stiff patterns and people in his collages. In “The Gift,” decorative floral paper is pasted over with classic ladies’ busts and faces, as well as a calm, blue-toned scene with a hand holding a sphere. Bumbeck’s works are enigmatic, offering a multidimensional, jumbled look into a world that chaotic minds have struggled to order, map, and categorize, while simultaneously peeking into the shambly minds themselves. Three boxed-in sections of Bumbeck’s collage and acrylic work, titled “Voyager,” depict a triple-eyed, transparent head containing a clear blue sky and ship sailing on a choppy sea, a moon and lightning bolt, and prismatic stripes. These electric-hued faces tend to be split down the center and alongside the nose, simultaneously creating forward-facing people and their profiles. Lost, fumbling souls dwell amid Robert

Marx’s dark, earthy palette, solitary or

loosely bound by cords of ambiguous relationships. What’s fascinating is that Marx rejected portraiture because he didn’t like the “sadness of the eye contact,” he says. It took him 20 years to figure out “what to do with people,” and in many ways, he says, he’s still figuring it out. The fragile ambiguity in Marx’s oeuvre is achieved through his process of painting, sanding down, and reworking each piece constantly — it may take him two to four years to finish a work — which serves to develop the emotional quality that permeates through the thick atmosphere of layers. His own presence in the work is cautious, watchful, wistful. During the February 5 gallery talk, audience members described visceral emotional reactions to Marx’s work — as did I. Marx’s part in the show includes 11 paintings, one bronze sculpture, and one graphite drawing, entitled “Separation,” which is a delicately drawn front-facing figure, with a second bust splitting off the side in profile, then disappearing. In Marx’s paintings, muddy backgrounds are infused with pulsing warmth, or permeating chills — his darknesses are never voids. “Hard and Skeptical” is a work of cool, blue-toned darkness, featuring a face with a white mask covering the lower-half, through which you can still detect a hardset mouth. Bands of circles emanate from each side of the head, perhaps representing information passing through. The circles clustering at the throat read like an energetic focus, where the voice is trapped. “Lost Illusions” has two forwardfacing figures, the head of the one at left surrounded by pale markings in a flurry of shock or unrest, and a white band sliding off the head and away. A spectral hand stretches across from the right to the abdomen area of the left figure. The person on the right is barely more than a face, and below, a mess of black marks replace the belly, as if this person is disturbed to the core. Marx’s works are powerful emblems of humanity’s frailty, faults, and foils, but his expressed frustrations and fears are paired with a compassionate rendering of human fragility. You can learn more about Marx and his process by watching the video interview at the exhibit, or online at rochestercontemporary.org. rochestercitynewspaper.com City 19


Kids | February Break Offerings:

February Break takes place at most area schools February 18-26. If you don’t want to be stuck in the house with the kids all week, here are some fun and interesting opportunities to keep the family busy. “I do not like them, Sam-I-Am. I do not like green eggs and ham.” If you loved growing up with Dr. Seuss like I did, then bring the little ones out to Dr. Seuss’s Birthday event at the National Museum of Play at The Strong (1 Manhattan Square) on Monday, February 20. With the mischievous Cat in the Hat as your guide, listen to some readings of classic Dr. Seuss books by the staff at WXXI staff, explore the museum by taking part in a Science Scavenger Hunt, create and decorate your own oversized Cat in the Hat hat to take home, and more. The event runs 11 a.m.-4 p.m., and is included with museum admission ($11-$13). For more info, visit museumofplay.org or call, 263-2700. Over at the Rochester Museum and Science Center (657 East Ave.), the Extreme Animal Kingdom — It’s Alive! events run Saturday, February 18-Sunday, February 26, noon-4 p.m. Activities tie in to the museum’s current “Extreme Mammals” exhibit, and include live visitations with animals each day. Kids can learn more about Greyhound Adoption of Rochester on Saturday or Sunday, February 25-26, or take part in a videoconference with sharks on Thursday, February 23. Activities are included in museum admission, $10-$12. For more information call 271-4320 or visit rmsc.org. For some additional live wildlife encounters, consider heading to the Braddock Bay Raptor Research at Braddock Bay Park (199 E. Manitou Road) for its Winter Wonders program on Tuesday, February 21, 10 a.m.-noon. Participants will take part in a wildlife detective walk, so be sure to bring some binoculars (or borrow a pair from BBRR) to spy some of the birds of prey. After the walk, warm up inside the lodge with stories and crafts. The cost of this event is a $2 donation (suggested) to benefit Braddock Bay Raptor Research. For more info, visit bbrr.org or call 267-5483. And even though it’s winter, there’s still plenty to do at Seneca Park Zoo (2222 St. Paul St.). Bundle up those little animals you have running around the house, and go on a winter safari. In fact, some of the animals in the zoo are much more active in the cooler winter weather. The zoo is currently open daily 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Admission costs $5-$8. For more information visit senecaparkzoo.org. –BY ALEX STEINGRABER

Art Exhibits [ OPENING ] “Jaded Seed Art Presents… Tabula Rasa: Renatus” Sat Feb 18. Tajze Wine and R&B Lounge, 139 State Street. 6-10 p.m. 423-0873. “Whimsical Art Trail” with work by Nancy Gong, Ingrid Hess, David Carlson, and Amy Brand Sat Feb 18. The Strong National Museum of Play, One Manhattan

Square. 1-4 p.m. 263-2700, thestrong.org. $11-$13. “Rebuilding: Life in El Sauce” photography by Kris Dresseen Tue Feb 21. Mill Art Center & Gallery, 61 N Main St, Honeoye Falls. 6-8 p.m. Free. 624-7740, millartcenter.com. [ CONTINUING ] 1570 Gallery at Valley Manor 1570 East Ave. Through Feb 17: “A Fraternity of Artists.” Mon-Fri

20 City february 15-21, 2012

9 a.m.-5 p.m. and weekends by appt. 770-1923. 1975 Gallery at Surface Salon, 661 South Ave., Suite B. Through Feb 29: “Happy Hour,” New Works by Amanda Clarke. Visit site for hours. 1975ish.com 2 Chic Boutique 151 Park Ave. Through Feb 29: Beyond the Racks: Pam Bernstein. Wed-Thu 11 a.m.-7 p.m., Fri 11 a.m.-6 p.m., Sat 11 a.m.-5 p.m. 2716111, 2chicboutique.com. Baobab Cultural Center 728 University Ave. Continuing: Paintings by Ikahl. Thu-Fri 5:30-9 p.m., Sat 2-4 p.m. 563-2145, thebaobab.org. Barnes and Noble Gallery 3349 Monroe Ave, Pittsford. Through Feb 28: Juried Show of Paintings by members of the Penfield Art Association. Mon-Sat 9 a.m.-10 p.m.; Sun 9 a.m.-9 p.m. 5866020, barnesandnoble.com. Black Radish Gallery Village Gate, D Entrance, 274 N. Goodman St. Through Mar 3: “Triptychs: Evolving Acts and Gestures” by Stuart Chait. MonFri 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Sat 12-5 p.m. arenaartgroup.com Bug Jar 219 Monroe Ave. Through Mar 31: THE LOBBY Presents: “New Paintings by William B. Hand.” Mon-Sun 8 p.m.- 2 a.m. 454-2966, bugjar. com, lobbydigital.com CIAS Dean’s Gallery Frank E. Gannett Hall, Bldg 7A-1060, Rochester Institute of Technology. Through Feb 29: “Paintings on Paper,” by Barbara Fox. Mon-Fri 9 a.m.-5 p.m. rit.edu. Colleen Buzzard Studio 250 North Goodman St., 401. Continuing: “Perturbations,” an installation by Colleen Buzzard. By appointment. buzzard@rochester.rr.com. Community Darkroom Gallery 713 Monroe Ave. Through Mar 2: “Faceless,” group exhibit by Community Darkroom Monitors. Mon 9 a.m.-9:30 p.m.; Tue-Thu 9 a.m.-6:30 p.m.; Fri 12-5 p.m.; Sat 10 a.m.-5:30 p.m. 271-5920, geneseearts.org. Crocus Clay Works Gallery Hungerford Building Door #2, Suite 225, 1115 E. Main St. Through Feb 25: “Residual Time: Thaw @ Crocus” handcrafted fine jewelry by Seth Michael Carlson. Tue-Wed 5-8 p.m., Sat 10 a.m.-3 p.m., or by appointment. 469-8217, crocusclayworks.com. Davison Gallery at Roberts Wesleyan College 2301 Westside Drive. Through Feb 25: “High Definition: Students Defining Art.” Mon-Fri 11 a.m.-5 p.m.; Sat 1-4 p.m. 594-6442, roberts. edu/davisongallery. Fusion Salon 333 Park Ave. Ongoing: “RetroGrade” with St. Monci and Hannah Betts. Mon & Tue 9 a.m.-8 p.m., Thu Noon-8 p.m., Fri 9a.m.-6 p.m., Sat 9 a.m.-4 p.m. 271-8120, fusionsalonnewyork.com. Gallery @ Equal=Grounds 750 South Ave. Through Feb 29: “Tenors: REDUX by Bracketed Exposures.” TueFri 7 a.m.-Midnight, Sat-Sun 10 a.m.-Midnight. gallery@ equalgrounds.com. Gallery r 100 College Ave. Through Feb 19: “Invitational Exhibition: CIAS Faculty & Students.” Wed-Sun 1-5 p.m. galleryr.org.

Geisel Gallery One Bausch & Lomb Place. Through Mar 12: “Interpretation of Site 3: g.a. Sheller, Elizabeth King Durand, and Constance Mauro.” Call for hours: 338-6000. Genesee Center for the Arts and Education 713 Monroe Ave. Through Feb 24: “Seconds from the Flame.” Mon-Fri 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; Sat noon-4 p.m. 244-1730, geneseearts.org Genesee Co-op Federal Credit Union 395 Gregory St. Through Mar 30: The Work of Painter Susan Link. Mon-Wed 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; Thu-Fri 10 a.m.-6 p.m. 461-2230, genesee.coop. George Eastman House 900 East Ave. Through Feb 19: “The Unseen Eye: Photographs from the W.M. Hunt Collection. | TueSat 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Thu 10 a.m.8 p.m., Sun 1-5 p.m. $4-$12. 271-3361, eastmanhouse.org Gilded Square Picture Framing & Gallery 714 University Ave. Continuing: “Framed” artwork by Keith Uhrich & Michelle Michael. Tue-Fri 11 a.m.-5 p.m., Sat 11 a.m.-3 p.m. 461-2808, gildedsquare.com. Hanging Around Frame & Art Gallery 1276 Fairport Rd. Through Feb 29: “Reflections” 25 Paintings by Fairport HS Students. Mon-Sat 10 a.m.-4 p.m. 419-7027, framingrochester.com. Hartnett Gallery University of Rochester, Wilson Commons. Through Feb 26: Kim Waale: “I Need a Lullaby.” Tue-Fri 11 a.m.-7 p.m.; Sat-Sun Noon-5 p.m. 275-4188, blogs.rochester. edu/Hartnett. High Falls Fine Art Gallery 60 Browns Race. Through Feb 24: “Play” group exhibit, “Excavating the Present, Unearthing Eternity: Nancy Valle Sculpture/Lisa Harris Poetry,” “Photographer’s Saturday Salon,” also solo shows by Jim Mott, Phil Lange, Scott Grove. Gallery closed through Feb 8. Wed-Fri 11 a.m.-5:30 p.m.; Sat Noon-5:30 p.m.; Sun 1-5 p.m. 325-2030, centerathighfalls.org. I-Square Visions 693 Titus Ave., Irondequoit. Through Mar 2: “Figurative Fusion.” Mon-Fri 10 a.m.-2 p.m., Sat 11 a.m.-2 p.m. 943-1941. Image City Photography Gallery 722 University Ave. Feb 22Mar 18: “Peter’s Picks 2010, A Retrospective.” | Through Feb 19: “The Eclectic Palette of Dick Welch and Harriet Sutherland.” Wed-Sat 11 a.m.-7 p.m.; Sun noon-4 p.m. 482-1976, imagecityphotographygallery.com. International Art Acquisitions 3300 Monroe Ave. Through Feb 29: Graphic works by French artist Marc Chagall. Mon-Fri 10 a.m.-9 p.m.; Sat 10 a.m.-6 p.m.; Sun Noon-5 p.m. 264-1440, internationalartacquisitions.com. JGK Galleries 10 Vick Park A. Through Mar 23: “Photocentric,” works by Joshua Hershman and Carrie Zeller. Tue, Thu, Sat-Sun 11 a.m.-3 p.m., Wed 4-8 p.m. 734-6581, jgkgalleries.com. Joe Bean Coffee Roasters 1344 University Ave., Suite 110. Continuing: “Revisiting Rochester.” Mon-Wed 7:30 a.m.7:30 p.m., Thu 7:30 a.m.-9 p.m., Fri 7:30 a.m.-10 p.m., Sat 9 a.m.-10 p.m., Sun 9 a.m.-4 p.m. 319-5279, joebeanroasters.com.

Festival | Ice Wine Festival

When I think winter, I think ice wine. On Saturday, February 18, from noon until 6 p.m., the 4th Annual New York Ice Wine Festival will be uncorked at Casa Larga Vineyards (2287 Turk Hill Road). The event allows participants to indulge in New York State ice-wine tastings, live entertainment, gourmet food, winery tours, and live ice-sculpting demos. Tickets cost $40 in advance and $50 at the door. Tickets are available at Wegmans, or online at casalarga.com. For more info, visit NYIceWineFestival.com or call, 223-4210. — BY ALEX STEINGRABER Kinetic Gallery SUNY Geneseo 1 College Circle. Through Mar 6: “Ingrid Ludt: Root Source.” MonThu 12:30-11 p.m.; Fri 12:30-8 p.m.; Sat 10 a.m.-8:30 p.m. kinetic@geneseo.edu. Lux Lounge 666 South Ave. Ongoing: Works by Darren Brennessel, Caitlin Yarsky, and Tomas A. Fox. Mon-Thu 5 p.m.2 a.m.; Fri 4:30-2 a.m.; SatSun 9 p.m.-2 a.m. 232-9030, lux666.com. Memorial Art Gallery 500 University Ave. Lucy Burne Gallery: In the Lockhart Gallery, Through May 6: Modern Icon: The Machine as Subject in American Art.” Wed-Sun 11 a.m.-5 p.m., Thu until 9 p.m., $5-$12. Thu night reduced price: $6 from 5-9 p.m. 276-8900, mag.rochester.edu. Mill Art Center & Gallery, 61 N Main St, Honeoye Falls. Feb 21-Mar 10: “Rebuilding: Life in El Sauce” photography by Kris Dresseen. | Through Feb 25: “Dry Pigments and Eggs,” paintings by Robert Wisner. Mon-Fri & Sat 11 a.m.-3 p.m., Fri 11 a.m.-8 p.m. Free. 6247740, millartcenter.com. MCC Mercer Gallery 1000 E. Henrietta Rd. Through Feb 24: Luvon Sheppard “Allegorical ‘Visual Relationships’.” Mon-Thu 11 a.m.-6 p.m.; Fri 11 a.m.-4 p.m. 292-2021, monroecc.edu/ go/mercer/ My Sister’s Gallery The Episcopal Church Home, 505 Mt. Hope Ave. Through Mar 9: “Some Things Old, Some Things New” mixed media by Cheryl and Don Olney. Daily 10 a.m.-8 p.m. 546-8439. Nan Miller Gallery 3450 Winton Place. Through Mar 19: New Works by Adam Colangelo, Elena Lobanowa, Linda Bigness, and introducing new artist Frank Hyder. Mon-Sat 10 a.m.-5 p.m. 292-1430, nanmillergallery.com. Nazareth College Arts Center Gallery 4245 East Ave. Through Mar 10: “Enlightened Earth: The Ceramics Invitational.” Wed-Sun 1-8 p.m. 389-5073, naz.edu. Nazareth College Colacino Gallery 4245 East Ave. Through Mar 3:

DeLucia & Winkie. Wed-Sat 12-5 p.m. 389-5073, naz.edu. Nazareth College Otto A Shults Center Lobby 4245 East Ave. Through Feb 19: “Polish Heroes: Those Who Rescued the Jews.” 8 a.m.-midnight. naz.edu. NTID Dyer Arts Center 52 Lomb Memorial Dr. Through Mar 2: “Paintings by Francis Marion Tuttle (1839-1910).” Mon-Thu 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m.; Fri 9 a.m.-7:30 p.m., Sat 1-3:30 p.m. 475-6884, ntid.rit.edu/dyerarts. Our House Gallery 783 South Ave. Through Feb 24: Art by Veterans. Fridays 2-5 p.m. veteransoutreachcenter.org/ galleryourhouse.asp Outside the Box Art Gallery Suite 104, The Box Factory, 6 N. Main St., Fairport. Through Feb 29: “Once Upon a Dumpster.” Call for details. 377-0132 Owl House 75 Marshall St. Opens Feb 13: “Caution! Danger!: Art Works by Adam Maida & Justin Iannucci.” Tue-Sun 11 a.m.-4 p.m. & 5-10:30 p.m. 360-2920, owlhouserochester.com. Oxford Gallery 267 Oxford St. Through Feb 18: “Curriculum Vitae,” work by Philip Bornarth and Wayne Williams. Tue-Fri Noon-5 p.m; Sat 10 a.m.-5 p.m. 271-5885, oxfordgallery.com. Phelps Art Center 15 Church St., Phelps. Through Feb 25: Fourth Annual Ontario County Art Teachers Show. Thu-Sat 1-4 p.m. 315-548-2095, phelpsartcenter.com. Ramón Santiago Studio and SC Fine Arts 179 Atlantic Ave. Continuing: “Retro Art: The Seventies!” Call for hours. 2026909, scfineartgallery.com. Roberts Wesleyan B.T. Roberts Memorial Hall Art Gallery 2265 Westside Dr. Through Mar 23: “Reflections on Culture and Memories Lost,” works by Alberto Rey. Mon-Fri 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Roberts.edu. Rochester Contemporary Arts Center 137 East Ave. Through Mar 18: “Makers & Mentors: Robert Ernst Marx, Ron Pokrasso, and David Bumbeck.” Wed-Sun 1-5


p.m., Fri 1-10 p.m. 461-2222, rochestercontemporary.org. $1. RIT Bevier Gallery 90 Lomb Memorial Drive. Booth Building, 7A. Through Feb 29: Middle & High School Exhibition. Mon-Fri 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m.; Mon-Thu 7-9 p.m.; Sat 1-4:30 p.m.; Sun 24:30 p.m. 475-2646. RIT Univeristy Gallery 90 Lomb Memorial Drive. Booth Hall. Through Mar 2: “20 Works of Art in the Age of Digital Replication” by Doug Manchee. Mon-Fri 9 a.m.-5 p.m.; Sat 10 a.m.-2 p.m. 475-2404. Rochester Regional Community Design Center Hungerford Complex/E. Main Business Park. Door 3B. Continuing: “Corn Hill: What’s Next?” Mon-Fri 8:30 a.m.5:30 p.m. 271-0520, rrcdc.com. Roz Steiner Art Gallery 1 College Rd., Batavia. Through Feb 27: “Convivium” by ceramic artist Kala Stein. Mon-Fri 10 a.m.-4 p.m. 3430055 x6448, genesee.edu. Rush Rhees Library Rare Books and Special Collections University of Rochester River Campus, Rush Rhees Library, Wilson Blvd. Through Aug 17: “Picturing AIDS and Its Publics,” educational AIDS posters from the Atwater Collection, and “Springing to Life: Moveable Books and Mechanical Devices.” Mon-Fri 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Sat 11 a.m.-3 p.m. 475-6766. Sage Art Center UR River Campus. Through August 2012: Photo exhibit by Thomas Evans, curated by Jessica Holmes. Mon-Thu 9 a.m.-11p.m., Fri 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Sat-Sun 2-6 p.m. 273-5995, rochester.edu/college/ AAH/facilities/sage The Shoe Factory Co-op 250 N. Goodman St., Studio 212. Through Feb 25: “Unconditional Love: Cats & Dogs.” Wed-Sat 12-5 p.m., second Saturdays 12-4 p.m. studio212@shoefactoryarts.com, shoefactoryarts.com. SPAS Gallery Rochester Institute of Technology, Gannett Bldg, 1 Lomb Memorial Dr. Through Feb 24: “Cloud Forest, Coffee, and

Special Event | Cruisin’ With Cupid

Attention all gay men looking for love: on Wednesday, February 22, at the Flour City Diner (2500 East Ave.), the Rochester Gay Men’s Chorus will present Cruisin’ With Cupid. This speed-dating-inspired event will give you a second chance to find that special someone. With cupid as your guide, you and your scorecard will spend seven minutes with a registered participant. Ask whatever questions you want. If you are feeling a bit bashful, head over to the cash bar and get some liquid confidence or complimentary appetizers. When the awkward gazes and nervous laughs are over, hand in your scorecard and go home. The Cruisin’ With Cupid folks will look over your cards and figure out the best matches. All contact info for your potential date will be sent via email the day after the event. This event starts at 6:30 p.m. and runs until 9:30 p.m. Register at the event or pre-register by e-mailing ascolaro@thergmc.org. Tickets for this event cost $20. For more info or to purchase a ticket, visit thergmc.org. — BY ALEX STEINGRABER Quetzal: Photographs by Fulvio Eccardi.” Mon-Fri 9 a.m.-6 p.m. 475-2616, rit.edu Spectrum Gallery at Lumiere Photo, 100 College Ave. Through Feb 25: Steven Foster. Mon-Fri 9 a.m.-6 p.m., Sat 10 a.m.-2 p.m. 461-4447, lumierephoto.com. Spot Coffee 200 East Ave. Continuing: Graffiti photographs by Mark Bangs. Mon-Thu 6 a.m.11 p.m., Fri 6 a.m.-midnight, Sat

7 a.m.-midnight, Sun 7 a.m.-11 p.m. 613-4600, spotcoffee.com. Stella Art Gallery & Studio 350 West Commercial St., East Rochester. Through Feb 29: “Intersecting Spaces: New Landscapes through Merged Imagery” paintings & photography by Elise Brooks. Thu 9 a.m.-4 p.m., Fri 9 a.m.-9 p.m., Sat noon-9 p.m. stellaartgalleryandstudio.com.

The Strong National Museum of Play One Manhattan Square. Feb 18-May 20: “Whimsical Art Trail” with work by Nancy Gong, Ingrid Hess, David Carlson, and Amy Brand. Mon-Thu 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Fri-Sat 10 a.m.-8 p.m., Sun 12-5 p.m. 263-2700, thestrong.org. $11-$13. Tajze Wine and R&B Lounge 139 State Street. Opens Feb 18: “Jaded Seed Art Presents… Tabula Rasa: Renatus.” Thu-Fri 5 p.m.-2 a.m., Sat-Sun 7 p.m.-2 a.m. 423-0873 Tower Fine Arts Center @ SUNY Brockport 180 Holley St. Through Feb 19: “Regarding Place: Photo Media Invitational.” Mon-Fri 10 a.m.-4 p.m. 395-ARTS, brockport. edu. Visual Studies Workshop 31 Prince St. Through Mar 18: “The Aesthetics of Atrocity: Survivor.” Thu 5-8 p.m., Sat-Sun noon-5 p.m. 442-8676, vsw.org. Wallace Library Rochester Institute of Technology, 1 Lomb Memorial Dr. Through March 23: “Books & Pieces: The Works of Scott McCarney. Email for details. 475-2408, ahfwml@rit.edu. Williams-Insalaco Gallery 34 at FLCC, 3325 Marvin Sands Dr., Canandaigua. Through Mar 9: “Sue Coe: 30-Year Retrospective Exhibition in Prints.” Mon-Thu 8:30 a.m.-9 p.m., Fri 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m., Sat-Sun noon-5 p.m. 3943500 x7369, gallery34@flcc.edu. The Yards 50-52 Public Market. Feb 11-25: “Mein Lebensart,” photographs by Jonathan Rutherford. Tue, Thu & Sat 10 a.m.-2 p.m. or by appt. attheyards@gmail.com. [ CALL FOR ARTWORK ] Arts at the Gardens: Call for Vendors. Takes place August 20-21. Information: artsatthegardens.org. Call for Art: MUG SHOTS 2012. Deadline February 25, noon, for March show. Submit up to two 5”x7” prints of your E+G Mug traveling, or staying at home. Ages

18+. All images must be for sale, priced at $15. For information, email gallery@equalgrounds.com. Call for Work. A Photographers Path Juried Exhibit, March-April at Center at High Falls Art Gallery. Drop off work Feb 15-19. $15 for up to 3 entries. Details: 325-2030, swinslow@frontiernet.net.

Art Events [ Wed., February 22 ] Larry Towell Slideshow with Live Music. Visual Studies Workshop, 31 Prince St. 442-8676, vsw. org. 7 p.m. Free. A folk music performance and photography slideshow by renowned Magnum photographer Larry Towell who has recently returned from photographing in Afghanistan and has published monographs on the Gaza Strip and the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina.

Comedy [ Wed., February 15 ] Search Engine Improv Presents Harold Night. The Space, 1115 E. Main St., The Hungerford Building, Door 2: Floor 2. Contact@ searchengineimprov.com. 7:30-9 p.m. $5, 2 for $5 with College ID. searchengineimprov.com/haroldteams/what-is-a-harold-team/. [ Thursday, February 16 ] 3 Guys Walk Into A Bar Presents: Shaun Murphy. Lovin’ Cup, Park Point @ RIT. 454-7140, 3guyswalkintoabar@gmail.com. 8-10:30 p.m. $5. [ Thursday, February 16Saturday, February 18 ] Alonzo Bodden/Chet Wild. Comedy Club, 2235 Empire Blvd, Webster. 671-9080, thecomedyclub.us. Thu 7:30 p.m., Fri-Sat 7:30 & 10 p.m. $9-$12. [ Friday, February 17 ] John Pinette: Still Hungry Tour. Harro East Ballroom, 155 Chestnut St. 888-512-SHOW,

dansmallspresents.com, or at Abilene, The Bop Shop, & Record Archive. 8 p.m. $39.75-$44.75. [ Saturday, February 18 ] Polite Company (Improv & Sketch Comdey) Debutant Ball. MuCCC, 142 Atlantic Ave. politecompanyimprov@gmail. com. Doors at 7:15 p.m., show starts at 8 p.m. $10 online, $12 at the door.

Dance Events [ Through Febraury 18 ] inspireDANCE Festival. University of Rochester, Wilson Blvd. rochester. edu/college/dance/events/. Many workshops and dance times. $7$20, some events free. [ Friday, February 17 ] Dance Performance by Heidi Latsky. University of Rochester River Campus, Spurrier Dance Studio. rochester.edu/college/ dance/events/. 7:30 p.m. $7-$10.

Dance Participation [ Friday, February 17 ] 30th Annual Teddi Dance for Love. St John Fisher College, 3690 East Ave. teddi@sjfc.edu, home.sjfc. edu/teddi. 8 p.m. Visit web for details. 24-hour dance marathon to benefit Camp Good Days and Special Times. Neutral Ground Singles Dance. Green Lantern Inn, 1 E Church St, Fairport. 234-2212, neutralground1.com. 8 p.m.midnight. $7 requested donation. Music by DJ Joetta. The Sweetheart Ball: ValentineThemed Swing Dance. Tango Cafe, 389 Gregory St. info@ groovejuiceswing.com. 7-11 p.m. Beginner lesson 7-8 p.m. $5. [ Tuesday, February 21 ] Stardust Ballroom Dance Series w/live music. Edgerton Community Center, 41 Backus St. cityofrochester.gov/ continues on page 22

rochestercitynewspaper.com City 21


2300 Elmwood Ave. 784-5300, brightonlibrary.org. 10:30 a.m. Free. Where Have All the Insects Gone? Sterling Nature Center, Off 104 East, Sterling. 315-9476143, snc@co.cayuga.ny.us. 1 p.m. Free.

Lectures

SPECIAL EVENT | Roc City Brewfest

Beer connoisseurs and casual beer drinkers alike will delight in the malty, hoppy goodness offered at the Roc City Brewfest. The current list of offerings features more than 30 different custom brews, meaning that any beer fan should be able to find a brew that he or she likes. While beer is of course the highlight of the event, this year’s festival will also celebrate Mardi Gras with live zydeco and cajun music by the Zydeco Trail Riders. And if your belly is not too full of beer, Armory Concessions will have food available. The Roc City Brewfest will be held at the Main Street Armory (900 E. Main St.), on Saturday, February 18, with sessions 1-4 p.m. and 6-9 p.m. Tickets are available for $35-$45, or $10 for designated driver tickets that include soda rather than beer. For more information, visit roccitybrewfest.com. — BY ERIC LACLAIR

Dance Participation ballroomdanceseries. 7:30 p.m. $3. See website for full line up.

Festivals [ Saturday, February 18 ] Federation of German-American Societies 37th Annual Mardi Gras. St. Mary’s Ukranian Orthodox Church, 3176 St. Paul Blvd., Irondequoit. Mary Margaret Carney 872-3172, rochestergerman.com. 6-11:30 p.m. $5-$10, register.

Kids Events [ Friday, February 17 ] 3rd Fridays at The Cypher. 111 N. Chestnut St. 802-2293, hollister_ susan@hotmail.com. 6:30-8:30 p.m. $3-$5, $10 includes t shirt. The Cypher will be having a show for the community every month on the third friday. At ArtPeace and The Cypher we would like for the community to join us for a wonderful event that the youth are putting together. There will be visual arts, music, theater, poetry and dance at the event. [ Saturday, February 18 ] Cool Kids: “Kids on the Block” Special Needs Puppets. The FORUM, GCC, One College Road, Batavia. 637-3984, 345-6832, generationcool.biz. 10 a.m. Free. Numbers League Superheroes Display Opens. Strong National Museum of Play, 1 Manhattan Sq. 263-2700, museumofplay. org. 10 a.m.-8 p.m. Included with museum admission: $11-$13. Meet Heroic Hot Dog, Curious Cool Cat, Digital Diva, and a host of colorful characters brought to life by Rochester artist Chris Pallace. Through Sunday, May 20, 2012. Science Saturday: National Engineers Week Super Science.

Rochester Museum and Science Center, 657 East Ave. 271-1880, rmsc.org. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Included with museum admission: $1012. Eastman Kodak Company and more! Local engineers from Kodak and other companies will be on hand to help with hands on demonstration of real life engineering applications. Tail Waggin Tutors. Central Library, 115 South Ave. 428-8150. 11 a.m.-noon. Free. Ages 4-12. [ Saturday, February 18Sunday, February 19 ] “The Hobbit.” Rochester Children’s Theatre. Nazareth College Arts Center, 4245 East Ave. 389-2170, boxoffice.naz. edu. 2 p.m. $11-$17. [ Saturday, February 18Sunday, February 26 ] Discover the Extreme Animal Kingdom During February Break. Rochester Museum and Science Center, 657 East Ave. 271-1880, rmsc.org. 12-4 p.m. Included with museum admission: $10-12. [ Monday, February 20 ] WXXI Celebrates Dr. Seuss’s Birthday. Strong National Museum of Play, 1 Manhattan Sq. 263-2700, museumofplay. org. 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Included with museum admission: $11-$13. [ Tuesday, February 21 ] Braddock Bay Raptor Research: Winter Wonders. Braddock Bay park, E. Manitou Rd. 267-5483, information@bbrr.org. 10 a.m.noon. $2 suggested donation. Caring for Elephants at Seneca Park Zoo. Brighton Memorial Library, 2300 Elmwood Ave. 784-5300, brightonlibrary.org. 2 p.m. Free. [ Wed., February 22 ] Bubble Trouble with Jeff Boyer. Brighton Memorial Library,

22 City february 15-21, 2012

[ Wed., February 15 ] Light Works! Presents Tom Moore Author of The Gentle Way. Barnes & Noble @ RIT, 100 Park Point Dr. lightworks@ frontier.com, meetup.com/lightworks. 6:30 p.m. networking, presentation 7 p.m. $5. Come at 6:30 to network and catch up from the holidays. Women’s Interfaith Coalition Monthly Program. Jewish Community Federation, 441 East Ave. carpediem_688@hotmail. com. 10-11:30 a.m. Free. [ Thursday, February 16 ] Floral Demonstration. Henrietta Public Library, 455 Calkins Rd. 359-7092, hpl.org. 7-8:30 p.m. Free, register. Jimmy Catalano from Kittelbergers Florist will demonstrate how to create different floral arrangements. Historic Voices Lecture Series: Upstate Green Business Network. United Nations Association of Rochester, 494 East Ave. 2243271, esc.edu/alumnievents. 5:30 p.m. networking hour, 6:30 p.m. lecture. Free, RSVP. “Water: The Golden Resource in Our Community, Country & the World.” Recyclebank Presentation. Brighton Memorial Library, 2300 Elmwood Ave. info@ ColorBrightonGreen.org. 6:30 p.m. Free. Religion and Classics Talk. University of Rochester-Rush Rhees Library, Library Rd. rochester.edu/rel. 4:30 p.m. Free. “Apollo Rejected: Apollo as the Archetypal Failed Lover in Ovid’s Metamorphoses” with Krishni Burns. Spotlight on..Series featuring Ryan Prendergast. University of Rochester-Rush Rhees Library, Library Rd. rochester.edu. 5 p.m. Free. Ryan Prendergast, Associate Professor of Modern Languages and Cultures, will be the guest speaker at the Spotlight On..Series. His topic is “Representing Errant Subjects: Monty Python, Don Quixote, and The Spanish Inquisition.” St. John Fisher College Lecture in Applied Anthropology: “Solving the Puzzle of Menopause.” St. John Fisher College, Golisano Gateway Midlevel, 2690 East Ave. sjfc.edu. 7 p.m. Free. [ Saturday, February 18 ] Behind the Scenes of the Dutch Connection with Amy Kinsey. George Eastman House, 900 East Ave. 271-3361, eastmanhouse. org. 1:15 p.m. Included with museum admission: $10-12. [ Sunday, February 19 ] Hydrofracking: What It Is, Where It Came From, and Why We Should Be Concerned About It. Brighton Town Park Lodge, 777 Westfall Rd. 234-8750. 5:30 p.m. vegan potluck dinner, 7 p.m. progra.m. $3 for nonmembers, bring vegan dish to pass.

[ Tuesday, February 21 ] “A New Life: Adapting to Life in America.” The Collge at Brockport Drake Memorial Library. wprince@brockport.edu. 7 p.m. Free. Lecture by Dr. Pilapa Esara, College at Brockport professor. Dr. Esara will address the challenges and successes of modern day refugees. Tuesday Topics: “There’s a Sucker Born Every Minute: Recreating the Cardiff Giant” with Ty Marshal. Central Library, 115 South Ave. 428-8350, libraryweb.org. 12:1212:52 p.m. Free. [ Wed., February 22 ] Susan B. Anthony Institute Reserach Seminar. University of Rochester, Lattimore Hall 540, River Campus. sbau@ rochester.edu. Noon. Free. “Remnants of Slavery on the Eve of Independence: Afro-Cuban Women Define Freedom, 18861900” with Takkata Brunson.

Literary Events [ Wed., February 15 ] Book Discussion: “Tinkers.” Brighton Memorial Library, 2300 Elmwood Ave. 784-5300, brightonlibrary.org. 7 p.m. Free. Book Discussion: Lunch Break Book Talks Presents: Patrick Crough. Writers & Books, 740 University Ave. 473-2590, wab. org. Noon. Free. Author of Chronicles of a Rochester Major Crimes Detective: Confronting Evil & Pursuing Truth. Book Group: Graphic Novel Book Club: “Black Hole” by Charles Burns. Lift Bridge Book Shop, 45 Main St, Brockport. 637-2260, liftbridgebooks.com. 6:30 p.m. Free. [ Thursday, February 16 ] Book Discussion: “Bel Canto” by Ann Patchett. Penfield Public Library, 1098 Baird Rd, Penfield. 340-8720, penfieldlibrary.org. 7-9 p.m. Free. Book Group: Science Fiction Book Club: “The City of Ember: The First Book of Ember” by Jeanne DuPrau. Lift Bridge Book Shop, 45 Main St, Brockport. 6372260, liftbridgebooks.com. 7 p.m. Free. Book Group: The Culinary Reading and Discussion Group. Writers & Books, 740 University Ave. 4732590, wab.org. 6-8 p.m. Free. [ Saturday, February 18 ] Book Discussion: Jane Austen Society: “Mansfield Park.” Barnes & Noble Pittsford, 3349 Monroe Ave. 473-4973. 1 p.m. Free. [ Sunday, February 19 ] Book Group: History Book Club: “The Opium War Through Chinese Eyes” by Arthur Wale. Lift Bridge Book Shop, 45 Main St, Brockport. 637-2260, liftbridgebooks.com. 2 p.m. Free.

SPECIAL EVENTS | Mardi Gras

Fat Tuesday is quickly coming upon us, and if you are looking to have a good time, and maybe get some beads, all you have to do is check out one of the many local Mardi Gras celebrations. On Saturday, and Sunday, February 18-19, the Cayuga Lake Wine Trail will host its 10th annual Mardi Gras Celebration. There will of course be wine tasting, but for this event there will be special wine and food pairings, beads galore, and chances to win prizes. Attendees can start at one of six wineries, but all 16 wineries on the trail will be participating in the events. Tickets are available for $20-$30. For more information, visit cayugawinetrail.com. The Federation of German American Societies will also be celebrating Mardi Gras on Saturday, February 18. The 37th annual Mardi Gras Karneval will be held at St. Mary’s Ukrainian Church (3176 St. Paul Blvd.) 6-11:30 p.m. There will be live music by Die Lustigen Almdudler, catering by Swan’s Market, and the crowning of the new Karneval Prinz and Princessin. Tickets are available for $5-$10. For more information, visit rochestergerman.com. If you are looking for something to do on Fat Tuesday itself (Tuesday, February 21), check out the March of Dimes Mardi Gras Celebration at Water Street Music Hall (204 N. Water St.), featuring live music from seven local bands. The party will start at 5 p.m., and tickets are available for $15-$20. For more information, visit rochestersmardigras.com. For more Mardi Gras events, check out our online events calendar at rochestercitynewspaper.com. — BY ERIC LACLAIR [ Wed., February 22 ] Book Discussion: Brown Bag Book Discussion Group: “Ender’s Game” by Orson Scott Card. Central Library, 115 South Ave. 428-8350, libraryweb.org. 12-1 p.m. Free. Book Reading: Brockport Writers Forum: Steve Fellner. SUNY Brockport, New York Room, Cooper Hall, 180 Holley St., Brockport. brockport.edu/ wforum/readings/spring12.html. 8 p.m. Free. Poetry Reading: Jacob Rakovan “Work in Progress.” Writers & Books, 740 University Ave. 4732590, wab.org. 7 p.m. Free.

Recreation

[ Monday, February 20 ] Poetry Reading: Free Speech Zone Series. Tango Cafe, 389 Gregory St. 260-9005, bit.ly/rochpoets. 8 p.m. Free. Featured poet or musician followed by open mic.

FOR RECURRING WINTER ACTIVITIES, BROWSE OUR ONLINE CALENDAR AT ROCHESTERCITYNEWSPAPER.COM.

[ Tuesday, February 21 ] Writing Class: Lifting Spirits Writers Guild. Lift Bridge Book Shop, 45 Main St, Brockport. 637-2260, liftbridgebooks.com. 6:30 p.m. Free.

[ Wed., February 15 ] Henrietta Garden Club Meeting. Henrietta Town Hall, 475 Calkins Rd, Henrietta. henriettagardenclub@gmail. com. 6:45 p.m. Free.

[ Thursday, February 16 ] Winter Birding by Car: Avon: Lima area. Meet at Tops Plaza in Avon on routes 5 & 20. Janet Miles 787-0507. Meet at 2 p.m. Free. [ Friday, February 17Sunday, February 19 ] 6th Annual Pro-Am Racquetball Tournament. Penfield Fitness and Racquet Club, 677 Panorma Trail West, Penfield. Keith LoPresto 586-7777, keith@penfieldfitness.com. Friday evening and Saturday and Sunday morning and afternoon. $40 1st event, $20 2nd event. [ Saturday, February 18 ] GVHC Hike. Durand Park, golf course lot. Paul & Fran 2273180, gvhchikes.org. 1 p.m. Free. Moderate 5 mile hike/ snowshoe, Durand west side. Guided Hikes. RMSC Cummings Nature Center, 6472 Gulick Rd, Naples. 374-6160, rmsc.org. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. $10 nonmembers, $5 snowshoe rental, register. Saturday Snowshoe Hiking & Sports. Adams Street Community Center, 85 Adams St. cityofrochester.gov/ winteradventures/. 1-3 p.m. Free.


Winter Fun Day. Sterling Nature Center, Off 104 East, Sterling. 315-947-6143, snc@co.cayuga. ny.us. 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Free. Winter Tours of Mount Hope Cemetery. 1133 Mt. Hope Ave. 461-3494, fomh.org. 1 p.m. $5, free to children, FOMH members. [ Sunday, February 19 ] Bounce/Roll/Skate Party. Main Street Armory, 900 E Main St. skateluvers@gmail.com. 7-11 p.m. $15, $20 per couple. 18+. GVHC Hike. Black Creek Park, Green Rd entrance. Pam N. 2245140, gvhchikes.org. 10 a.m. Free. Moderate 5 mile hike. Guided Walk: Winter Tree ID. Genesee Country Village & Museum, 1410 Flint Hill Rd, Mumford. 538-6822, gcv.org. 2 p.m. $4.50-$5.50, free to members. Sunday Park Hikes: Jones Park and Edgerton Park. Meet near corner of Plymouth Ave. and Lorimer St. cityofrochester.gov/ winteradventures/. 1-2:30 p.m. Free. [ Tuesday, February 21 ] Scout Out Nature: El Camino Trail Park. Meet at corner of Clifford and Conkey. cityofrochester.gov/ winteradventures/. 1-2 p.m. Free.

Special Events [ Wed., February 15 ] Film: “The Courageous Heart of Irena Sendler.” Nazareth CollegeShults Center, 4245 East Ave. naz. edu. 7 p.m. Free. Highland Park Winter Farmers Market. Cornell Cooperative Extension-Rochester, 249 Highland Ave. highlandwintermarket.com. 3-6 p.m. Free admission. Susan B. Anthony Birthday Luncheon w/Keynote by Arild Remmereit. Rochester Riverside Convention Center, 123 E Main St. 235-6124, susanbanthonyhouse.org. 121:30 p.m. $60, register. [ Thursday, February 16 ] Marriage Equality Town Hall & Kickoff Party. Downtown Presbyterian Church, 121 N Fitzhugh St. contact@meny.us. 6:30-8 p.m. Free. Reception and Program to Honor Outstanding African American Scholars in the Rochester City School District. Central Office Building, 131 West Broad St. 262-8525. 5-6:30 p.m. Free. Richard Gere to Receive George Eastman Award. George Eastman House, 900 East Ave. 271-3361 x218, eastmanhouse.org. 7 p.m. $125, RSVP, few tickets remain. Single Fun Raisers Happy Hour. Valicia’s Restorante, 2155 Long Pond Road. sandraconvertino@ yahoo.com, singlefunraiser. org. 5-7 p.m. Free. Singles: Rochester’s Single Fun Raisers for people 40 and better. Stage 13: Celebrating the Years. Finger Lakes Community College, 4355 Lakeshore Dr, Canandaigua. 785-1905. 12:30 p.m. Free. The Builder’s Bells: The Hopeman Chime and Carillon. University of Rochester-Rush Rhees Library-Rare Books and Special Collections, Library Rd. 671-7297. 12:05-12:20 p.m. Free. Whisper Tour, student carilloneurs will answer questions

org/communitycinema. 24 p.m. free. The story of a woman who refused to accept her assigned place in society. http://interactive.wxxi.org/ highlights/2011/11/daisy-batesfirst-lady-little-rock. [ Monday, February 20 ] Worldly Approach to Wine Seminar. Casa Larga Vineyards, 2287 Turk Hill Rd, Fairport. 2234210, casalarga.com. 6 p.m. $45-$55, register.

SPECIAL EVENTS | Black History Month

There are many events going on to celebrate Black History Month in Rochester. Here are just a few to get you started: The School of the Arts Choir will perform “Gospel Friday” in the City Hall Atrium (30 Church St.) on Friday, February 17. Presented by the City of Rochester’s Black Heritage Committee, the performance will begin at noon. Admission is free. For more information, visit cityofrochester.gov. On Saturday, February 18, AKOMA and Voices of Thunder will perform a “Heritage Gospel” concert at the Mt. Olivet Baptist Church (141 Adams St.). This event is free and will start at 6 p.m. For more information, visit akoma.org. Wrapping up the weekend, the annual Black History Month Family Day will be held on Sunday, February 19, at the Memorial Art Gallery (500 University Ave.). Featuring arts and crafts, storytelling, music, and dance, this event is suitable for all ages. The celebration will run from noon-5 p.m. Admission is free. For more information, visit mag. rochester.edu. — BY ERIC LACLAIR on the exhibit and playing the carillon, the bells will be played just prior to the tour at 11:45am. [ Friday, February 17 ] “What’s Going On? The Occupy Movement.” Baobab Cultural Center, 728 University Ave. 5632145, thebaobab.org. 7 p.m. Free, RSVP. Monthly Meeting of the Mineral section of the Rochester Academy of Science. Brighton Town Hall, 2300 Elmwood Ave. 288-5683, sbusschaert@msn.com, rasny. org/mineral. 7:30-9:30 p.m. Free. Dr. Asish Basu from the University of Rochester will talk about meteorites: “Rocks from Space.” Visitors welcome, door prizes and refreshments. [ Saturday, February 18 ] Black History Month Event. 890 N. Goodman St. 615-9551, info@fdfny.org, TFDF.org. 2-4:30 p.m. Free, register. Q & A with guest panelists. New York Ice Wine Festival. Casa Larga Vineyards, 2287 Turk Hill Rd, Fairport. 223-4210, casalarga.com. 12-6 p.m. $40 in advance, $50 at the door. RocCity Brewfest. Main Street Armory, 900 E Main St. rochestermainstreetarmory.com. 1 p.m. $10-$45. Rochester Singletons Monthly Dinner. Royal Dynasty, 1763 Empire Blvd., Webster. 342-6680. 6 p.m. Cost of food and drink, RSVP by 2/15. Star Show Opening: “2012: Fact or Fiction?” Rochester Museum and Science Center, 657 East Ave. 271-1880, rmsc.org. 1 p.m. Following shows Sat Feb 25, Mon

Feb 20 & Thu Feb 23 at 1 p.m. $8-$10. For ages 6 year to adult. “Vino Con Sabor” Wine Tasting Event. Strathallan Hotel, 550 East Ave. prfestival.com. 6 p.m. $25, register. Ages 21+. [ Saturday, February 18Sunday, February 19 ] Cayuga Lake Wine Trail’s 10th Annual Mardi Gras. Cayuga Lake Wine Trail. 800-684-5217, cayugawinetrail.com. Visit web for details. $25, register. [ Saturday, February 18Monday, February 20 ] Banff Mtn Film Fest. Rochester Institute of Technology, Lomb Memorial Dr. interactiveadventures.rit.edu. Doors 6:30 p.m., shows 7 p.m. $10-$16. Bristol Mt. Ski Patrol Hot Dog/ Veggie Burger Sale. Bristol Mt. Ski Resort, 5662 State Highway 64, Canandaigua. 374-1115. 10:30 a.m.-3 p.m. [ Sunday, February 19 ] “Red Carpet Sundays.” Club R.O.A.R., 233 Mill St. redcarpetsundays.eventbrite.com. 6-11 p.m. $5-$10. Ages 25+. Black History Month Family Day. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. 276-8900, mag. rochester.edu. 12-5 p.m. Free admission. Edibles Drag Brunch Buffet. Edibles, 704 University Ave. 2714910. Seatings at noon & 2 p.m. $22 brunch buffet & show, RSVP. WXXI’s Community Cinema: “Daisy Bates: First Lady of Little Rock.” WXXI, 280 State St. 258-0200, wxxi.

[ Tuesday, February 21 ] Perinton Historical Society Meeting. Fairport Museum, 18 Perrin St., Fairport. 223-2950. 7:30 p.m. Free. Sierra Club of Rochester: WetLands Committee. Al Sigl Center, 1000 Elmwood Ave. newyork.sierraclub.org/ rochester. 7:30-8:30 p.m. Free. [ Wed., February 22 ] Cruzin’ With Cupid: A Gay Speed Dating Event. Flour City Diner, 2500 East Ave. rgmc.ticketleap. com/cruzin-with-cupid/. 6:30-9:30 p.m. $20, register. Girls Day Out Sponsored by Young Women’s College Prep Charter School of Rochester. Adams Street Community Center, 85 Adams St. jgkourlias@ youngwomenscollegeprep.org. 1-6 p.m. Free. 11-15. Highland Park Winter Farmers Market. Cornell Cooperative ExtensionRochester, 249 Highland Ave. highlandwintermarket.com. 3-6 p.m. Free admission.

Sports [ Friday, February 17 ] Rochester Americans vs. Lake Erie Monsters. Blue Cross Arena, 100 Exchange Blvd. 800-745-3000, ticketmaster.com. 7:35 p.m. $12-$18. [ Saturday, February 18 ] RocCity Roller Derby: Year of the Dragon. Fair & Expo Center, 2695 East Henrietta Rd. rocderby.com. 6 p.m., doors at 5 p.m. $5-$15. Donate sample sized toiletries. Bout benefits Catholic Charities Community Services. Rochester Knighthawks vs. Washington Stealth. Blue Cross Arena, 100 Exchange Blvd. 800745-3000, ticketmaster.com. 7:30 p.m. $23-$29. [ Sunday, February 19 ] Rochester Americans vs. Hamilton Bulldogs. Blue Cross Arena, 100 Exchange Blvd. 800-745-3000, ticketmaster.com. 5:05 p.m. $12-$18. [ Monday, February 20 ] Rochester Razorsharks V. Dayton Air Strikers. Blue Cross Arena, 100 Exchange Blvd. 800-7453000, ticketmaster.com. 7:05 p.m. $23.75-$32.45. [ Wed., February 22 ] Rochester Americans vs. Hershey Bears. Blue Cross Arena, 100 Exchange Blvd. 800-745-3000, ticketmaster.com. 7:05 p.m. $11-$16.

Theater

An Afternoon of Song, Dance & Comedy Featuring the awardwinning Traveling Cabaret. Sat Feb

18. Legacy at the Fairways, 681 High Street, Victor. 2 p.m. Free, RSVP. 924-7043. “Almost, Maine.” Fri Feb 17-Feb 19, continues through Feb 26. Nazareth College Arts Center, 4245 East Ave. Fri-Sat 8 p.m., Sun 2 p.m. $10-$12. 389-2170, boxoffice.naz.edu. “Extremities.” Thu Feb 16. The Aegis Project. Stuart Steiner Theatre, Genesee Center for the Arts, Genesee Community College, 1 College Rd., Batavia. 7:30 p.m. $3. 345-6814, boxoffice@genesee.edu. “The Hobbit.” Sat Feb 18-Feb 19. Rochester Children’s Theatre. Nazareth College Arts Center, 4245 East Ave. 2 p.m. $11-$17. 389-2170, boxoffice.naz.edu. “None of the Above.” Thu Feb 16-Feb 18. Out of Pocket Productions. The Space Theater, Hungerford Building, 1115 East Main St., Door 2, Floor 2. Thu-Sat 7:30 p.m. $10-$15. Proceeds to benefit Lollypop Farms. 2694673, outofpocketproductions@ yahoo.com. “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest.” Fri Feb 17- Feb 18. School of the Arts (SOTA), 45 Prince St. Fri-Sat 7 p.m. $7-$9. 242-7682 x1551, sotarochester.org. “A Raisin in the Sun” Previews. Tue Feb 21-Feb 22. Through Mar 25. Geva Theatre Center, 75 Woodbury Blvd. Tue-Wed Feb 22 7:30 p.m. Tickets start at $25. 232-4382, gevatheatre.org. “A Snake in the Grass.” Thu Feb 16-Feb 18. Monsignor schnacky Community Center, St. Catherine of Siena, 26 Mendon Ionia Rd (Rte. 64), Mendon. Thu 7:30 p.m., Fri-Sat 8 p.m. $8-10, free to seniors Thu (RSVP). 6249333, saintcathonline.com, seniors 924-9235. “Tuesdays with Morrie.” Fri Feb 17-Feb 18. Seneca Community Player. Delavan Theatre, New York Chiropractic College Campus, Route 89, Seneca Falls. Fri-Sat 8 p.m. $10-$12. 315-568-9364. “Unrehearsed: A John Borek Performance Art Piece.” Thu Feb 16. MuCCC, 142 Atlantic Ave. 7:30 p.m. Pay what you will, suggested donation $6.244-0960, muccc.org. “You Say Tomato, I Say Shutup.” Fri Feb 17-Feb 18. Downstairs Cabaret Theatre, 20 Windsor St. Fri 8 p.m., Sat 5 & 8:30 p.m. $29-$36. 325-4370, downstairscabaret.com.

Theater Auditions [ Monday, February 20Tuesday, February 21 ] “Egad! The Woman in White” Penfield Players. Penfield Community Recreation Center, 1985 Baird Rd, Penfield. 7 p.m. Free. 359-1232, penfieldplayers. org. There are roles for four men and six women.

Workshops

Carlivati. 111 Hillside Ave. 4730970, info@pirirochester.org. 7-9 p.m. Free, register. [ Thursday, February 16 ] Community Labyrinth Walk with free energy work, chair massage and music. First Unitarian Church, 220 S Winton Rd. 469-4818, droller@rochester.rr.com. 7-9 p.m. Free, donations appreciated. Toastmasters Club 476. Holiday Inn, 911 Brooks Ave. 4585584, rochestertoastmasters. com. 6-8 p.m. Free. The oldest, continuously operational, public speaking and educational club, east of the Mississippi. [ Saturday, February 18 ] Gardening Class: All About Weeds. Hansen Nature Center, 1525 Calkins Rd., Henrietta. 359-7044. 10 a.m.-noon. Free, register by 2/17. Photography Class: Redux with Mark Whitney. Mark Whitney Photography, 1115 E. Main St., Suite 250. 270-8701, mark@ markwhitneyphotography.com. 1-4 p.m. $45, register. Protect Our Health, Not Their Wealth: Health Care is A Human Right Teach-In. 15 St. Mary’s Place, Dugan Center. 944-1043 or 325-2560. 1-2:30 p.m. Free. With Dr. Ted Brown, Finger Lakes Physicians for a National Health Program (FLPNHP) and Christine Wagner, SSJ, Executive Director of St. Joseph’s Neighborhood Center. The Art of Aware Touch for Couples: Deepening Your Relationship. Nurturing Hands Massage and Wellness Center, 640 Kreag Road, Suite 202. Anais Salibian 586-1590. 2-5 p.m. $120 for 3 week series, register. Learn how to use a listening touch to grow an intimacy and help each other’s bodies restore balance and well being. Continues Feb 25 and Mar 17. Urban Gardening. Charlotte Public Library, 3615 Lake Ave. cityofrochester.gov/ winteradventures/. 12-1 p.m. Free. [ Monday, February 20 ] Cooking Class: Jay Speranze from Tony D’s Coal Fired Pizza. Rosario Pino’s, 349 W Commercial St #1620, East Rochester. 2677405, rosariopinos.com. 6-8 p.m. $60-$90, register. [ Tuesday, February 21 ] Herbs in the Garden and Kitchen. Hansen Nature Center, 1525 Calkins Rd., Henrietta. 359-7044, naturecenter@henrietta.org. 10 a.m.-noon. Free, register. Indoor Seeding: Preparing for Next Season’s Harvest. Penfield Community Recreation Center, 1985 Baird Rd, Penfield. penfield. org. 6:30-8 p.m. $18, register. Readers Theater. Books Etc, 78 W Main St, Rte 31, Macedon. 4744116, books_etc@yahoo.com. 7-9 p.m. Free. Participants will be reading “The Tempest.”

[ Wed., February 15 ] Penmanship and Calligraphy Club. Barnes & Noble Pittsford, 3349 Monroe Ave. 586-6020. 7 p.m. Free. Rochester Season for Nonviolence: Community with Joan Mitchell and Jeanne rochestercitynewspaper.com City 23


Film Times Fri Feb 17-Thu Feb 23 Schedules change often. Call theaters or visit rochestercitynewspaper.com for updates.

Film

Brockport Strand 637-3310 89 Main St, Brockport GHOST RIDER: SPIRIT OF VENGEANCE: 7:10, 9:10; also SatThu 1:10, 3:10, 5:10; JOURNEY 2: THE MYSTERIOUS ISLAND: 7; also Sat-Thu 1, 3, 5; SAFE HOUSE: 7:10, 9:20; also Sat-Thu 1:30, 4; WOMAN IN BLACK: 9.

Canandaigua Theatres 396-0110 Wal-Mart Plaza, Canandaigua ALVIN & THE CHIPMUNKS: CHIPWRECKED: Sat-Thu 1; BIG MIRACLE: 5, 7; also Sat-Thu 1, 3; CHRONICLE: 5:15, 7:15, 9:15; also Sat-Thu 1:15, 3:15; THE DESCENDANTS: 7; also Sat-Thu 2:45; GHOST RIDER: SPIRIT OF VENGEANCE: 5:10, 7:10, 9:10; also Sat-Thu 1:10, 3:10; THE GREY: 9; JOURNEY 2: MYSTERIOUS ISLAND: 5, 7; also Sat-Thu 1, 3; ONE FOR THE MONEY: 5, 9:15; RED TAILS: 9; SAFE HOUSE: 4, 7:10, 9:20; also Sat-Thu 1:30; STAR WARS: EPISODE 1 (3D): 4, 7, 9:25; also Sat-Thy 1; THIS MEANS WAR: 5:10, 7:10, 9:10; also Sat-Thu 1:10, 3:10; THE VOW: 5, 7, 9; also Sat-Thu 1, 3; WOMAN IN BLACK: 5:10, 7:10, 9:10; also Sat-Thu 1:10, 3:10.

Cinema Theater 271-1785 957 S. Clinton St. THE ADVENTURES OF TIN TIN: Sat-Sun 2:15; also Fri-Sun, 4:30; WAR HORSE: Fri-Wed 7.

Culver Ridge 16 544-1140 2255 Ridge Rd E, Irondequoit CHRONICLE: 12:50, 3, 5:10, 7:40, 9:50; THE DESCENDANTS: 12:35, 4:15, 7:10, 9:55; EXTREMELY LOUD & INCREDIBLY CLOSE: 11:50 a.m., 6:40; GHOST RIDER: SPIRIT OF VENGEANCE: 4:05, 9:35; also in 3D 12:05, 12:55, 2:35, 5:05, 6:55, 7:35, 10:05; THE GREY: 2:50, 9:40; continues on page 26

The CIA in South Africa [ REVIEW ] by George Grella

imaginative ways, the political, social, even moral atmosphere in which they appear. For years, perhaps decades, for example, “Safe House” in both American and foreign movies (R), directed by Daniel Espinosa the CIA endures so negative a reputation Now playing — much of it deserved — that it serves as a useful conglomerate villain. Because of its So deeply embedded in its time and place, so history of destabilizing democratically elected much a part of the culture that surrounds it, so governments, assassinating political leaders, well attuned to the whispers of the Zeitgeist, its hysteria over Communism, and its failures cinema, in its popular incarnations, inevitably in the Cold War, the organization earned a reflects the attitudes of its audience. Throughout reputation as an enemy of freedom. At the same its history the film industry, always a profittime, ironically, a number of right-wing fanatics making enterprise, has responded to the needs suggested that the CIA worked to oppress and desires of its public, even addressing some of American citizens and even orchestrated the their concerns. No wonder, then, that so many Oklahoma City bombing. (Skeptics should read popular films apparently record, sometimes in some of the lunacy that lights up the Internet.) “Safe House,” the latest spy thriller dealing with the organization, uses a good deal of now-familiar material, adding a few new wrinkles but concluding in a manner that actually resembles a similar work, the highly entertaining Denzel Washington and Ryan Reynolds in “Safe House.” PHOTO COURTESY

1975 flick, “Three Days of the Condor.” Ryan Reynolds plays Matt Weston, a young, low-level CIA agent in South Africa whose job consists of maintaining a safe house, a refuge for people the organization needs to protect. He spends his time monitoring instruments and confirming signals, desperately trying to move up from his boring, lonely duties and get a real assignment in an important location. Weston’s life changes drastically when a team of interrogators brings in Tobin Frost (Denzel Washington), a rogue agent targeted by a group of unknown assassins, who has surrendered to the American consulate to escape his pursuers. On the run for a decade, Frost possesses some highly sensitive information about agents in services all over the world that the CIA wants to recover; to that end they begin enhanced interrogation, i.e., torture. Sadly, before they can accomplish more than a few waterboardings, Frost’s heavily armed pursuers breach the security of the safe house and all hell breaks loose. After Frost and Weston escape the chaos, the rest of their action consists mostly of a series of fierce gunfights, vicious hand-to-hand combat, and far too many spectacular car chases. As they speed toward another safe house, the pair leave a trail of demolished automobiles, dead enemies, and buckets of blood, some of it their own. In the midst of all this the veteran Frost and the novice Weston form something of a bond, and the young man proves himself a worthy ally.

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Sweet nothings [ REVIEW ] BY DAYNA PAPALEO

“The Vow” (PG-13), directed by Michael Sucsy Now playing

Throughout their relationship Frost instructs his companion/guard in the reality of espionage and treason, condemning the history and practices of his organization and predicting the danger that Weston will encounter from his own side. All the while, back at headquarters, Weston’s immediate boss, David Barlow (Brendan Gleason) and a group of executives and technicians track the pair and search for the person who betrayed the location of the safe house, and the fact of Frost’s secret information. Denzel Washington plays Tobin Frost with an understated passivity that borders on a really irritating smugness; he often seems amused to find himself in the movie and now and then even ready to leave it. Apparently a rising star, Ryan Reynolds never attains much in the way of plausibility and in fact, in a trajectory that should display a kind of initiatory experience, actually appears to diminish in maturity. The director employs an unusual visual pattern to tell a relatively familiar story, alternating the extraordinary number of violent events — all those pursuits, collisions, shootings, stabbings, clubbings, stranglings, etc. — with a constant series of tight close-ups of the actors’ faces. He apparently believes his constant switching from face to face, moving the camera ever closer all the while, conveys and sustains the high emotional intensity of the plot, but all the grainy close-ups only underline a kind of false excess that annoys more than it excites.

I just don’t know how to feel about Channing Tatum anymore, but it’s my weird job to figure it out. Since his breakthrough in 2006’s “Step Up,” Tatum has been so easy to mock, thanks to a parade of one-dimensional roles that didn’t call for very much in the way of either nuance or shirts. Yet I can’t help but notice that in his last few times out, Tatum seems to have gotten... well, if not better, at least less bad. (Though let’s be honest: that was really the only available option.) He can be rather charismatic when he’s not trying to emote, and he looks as though he was chiseled out of a block of marble, save for those adorably flawed bottom teeth jockeying for the lead in his mouth. Tatum isn’t unpleasant to watch, but neither is he quite there yet, as evidenced by his uneven work in “The Vow.” You can probably tell from both the calendar and the generically romantic title that “The Vow” is this year’s sappy

Channing Tatum and Rachel McAdams in “The Vow.” PHOTO COURTESY SCREEN GEMS

Valentine’s Day gift from Hollywood. Tatum plays Leo, who begins waxing philosophical in voiceover about how life is about “moments of impact,” both literal and figurative. It’s the former that we witness first in an unnecessarily detailed shot, as a truck rear-ends Leo’s car and sends his wife Paige (Rachel McAdams) through the windshield. And while Leo waits for Paige to come out of her coma, he flashes back to their meet-cute at a Chicago DMV, to their sweetly sexy courtship, to their guerrilla wedding at the Art Institute, and to their married contentment as bohemian artists. Unfortunately, once Paige finally regains consciousness, she doesn’t remember any of it, including Leo, her banged-up brain having essentially erased all memory of the last five years. “The Vow” is not a Nicholas Sparks adaptation, but it may as well be, following his MO of throwing strange, sudsy obstacles in the paths of his would-be lovers. So even though “The Vow” is actually inspired by a true story, there isn’t anything much odder than a husband having to re-woo his own wife, especially one whose last memory is that of being engaged to someone else. Paige’s amnesia also blocked out all recollection of a rift with her icy, moneyed parents (Sam Neill and Jessica Lange), who are itching for a second chance to get their sculptor daughter back under their roof and on her abandoned law-school path. Leo, meanwhile, flits around purposefully as he tries to help his wife piece together remembrances of her current life, like her daily routines, her creative passions, and her eternally doting husband. The five individuals (!) with a script credit on “The Vow” should be commended for not falling back on the

ol’ re-bonk to jog the memory, but all praise ends there. The characters are undeveloped stock clichés (Leo’s hipster inner circle is hilariously awful, looking like anonymous extras in a Volkswagen commercial), and the dialogue consists mostly of helpful exposition and corny romantic platitudes. And though Chicago sparkles especially brightly, the supporting performances, including the usually underrated Scott Speedman (“Barney’s Version”) as Paige’s slightly slimy yuppie ex, do not. But don’t dismiss the ill-used Lange, who stops clutching her pearls long enough to deliver a wrenching third-act monologue on commitment. Lange’s 11th-hour save adds a little weight to the film’s alleged Big Revelation, which is, quite honestly, neither of those things. As for Tatum, I’m afraid he’s here to stay; besides “Haywire” and “The Vow,” the man has THREE MORE FILMS scheduled to hit theaters before July 4. Tatum’s reliably adequate here; with his puppy-dog eyes and quivering pillow lips, he’s exactly what pop culture thinks women want. (See 2010’s swoony “Dear John” for additional evidence.) More importantly, he enjoys playfully charged chemistry with McAdams, and this singlehandedly redeems “The Vow.” McAdams, incidentally, rocks; she’s essentially playing two characters here — quirky, charming pre-accident Paige and uptight, blueberry-mojitodrinking, James-Patterson-loving postaccident Paige — and her frustration at not being able to reconcile the two is both palpable and heartbreaking. Even surrounded by those unsubtle supporting turns, Tatum and McAdams are able to keep their business surprisingly dignified; in short, not the melodramatic tear factory you may have been afraid of or hoping for.

THE GOLD RUSH

Friday, Feb. 17, 8 p.m., and Sunday, Feb. 19, 2 p.m. The most famous man in the world in his most famous role: a Yukon tramp with dreams of striking it rich and an unrequited crush on a beautiful dance hall girl. The dancing dinner rolls and the cabin on the cliff are only two of the brilliant set pieces in Chaplin’s newly restored masterpiece. Silent with synchronized orchestral score. (Charles Chaplin, US 1925, 95 min.)

WEEKEND Movies for movie lovers, 6 nights a week. New Restoration

Saturday, Feb. 18, 8 p.m., and Sunday, Feb. 19, 5 p.m. A picturesque postcard of provincial France gone homicidally wrong, Godard’s acid vision of a bourgeois apocalypse still packs a sick wallop. Nominally about a typical couple plotting to collect an inheritance (and dismember each other) over the course of a weekend, their plans are interrupted by roadside cannibals, automotive orgies, and a mounting sense of regret. (Week-end, Jean-Luc Godard, France 1967, 105 min., French w/subtitles.)

New Print

Film Info: 271-4090 l 900 East Avenue l Eastman House Café—stop in for a light dinner or dessert before the film. l Wi-Fi Hotspot l Sponsored by rochestercitynewspaper.com City 25


THE IRON LADY: 1, 4:20, 7:15, 10; JOURNEY 2: MYSTERIOUS ISLAND: 12:40, 5:25, 7:50; also in 3D 12:10, 2:30, 4:55, 7:20, 9:45; RED TAILS: 12:45, 4:25, 7:25, 10:25; SAFE HOUSE: 12, 2:40, 3:10, 5:20, 8, 9:30, 10:40; also open-captioned 12:30, 6:50; STAR WARS: EPISODE 1 (3D): 12:25, 4, 7, 10:10; THIS MEANS WAR: 12:15, 1:05, 2:45, 4:10, 5:15, 6:45, 7:45, 9:20, 10:15; UNDERWORLD: AWAKENING (3D): 3:05, 10:20; THE VOW: 12:20, 2:55, 5:30, 8:05, 10:35; WOMAN IN BLACK: 11:55 a.m., 2:25, 4:45, 7:05, 9:25.

Dryden Theatre 271-3361 900 East Ave *NOTE: Film times for Wed 2/15-2/22* THE KING OF MARVIN GARDENS: Wed 2/15 8; THE GOLD RUSH: Fri 8, Sun 2; WEEKEND: Sat 8, Sun 5; PORTRAIT OF JENNIE: Tue 8; CHINATOWN: Wed 2/22 8.

Eastview 13 425-0420 Eastview Mall, Victor BIG MIRACLE: 1:15, 6:55; CHRONICLE: 12:45, 2:55, 5:05, 7:25, 9:35; THE DESCENDANTS: 1:35, 4:35, 7:10, 9:55; EXTREMELY LOUD & INCREDIBLY CLOSE: 4:05, 9:45; GHOST RIDER: SPIRIT OF VENGEANCE: 1:50, 4:50, 7, 7:35, 9:30, 10:05; THE GREY: 1:25, 4:20, 7:05, 9:50; HUGO (3D): 1:10, 4; JOURNEY 2:

MYSTERIOUS ISLAND: 5:10; also in 3D 12:30, 2:50, 7:40, 10:20; SAFE HOUSE: 1:45, 4:45, 7:45, 10:30; THE SECRET WORLD OF ARRIETTY: 12:35, 3, 5:20, 7:50, 10:15; STAR WARS: EPISODE 1 (3D): 1:20, 4:15, 7:15, 10:10; THIS MEANS WAR: 12:40, 3:05, 5:30, 8, 10:35; THE VOW: 1:30, 4:30, 7:30, 10; WOMAN IN BLACK: 2:05, 4:25, 7:55, 10:25.

Geneseo Theatres 243-2691 Geneseo Square Mall CHRONICLE: 7:15; also Sat-Thu 1:15, 5; GHOST RIDER: SPIRIT OF VENGEANCE: 7:10, 9:10; also Sat-Thu 1:10, 3:10, 5:10; SAFE HOUSE: 7:10, 9:20; also Sat-Thu 1:30, 4; STAR WARS: EPISODE 1 (3D): 7, 9:25; also Sat-Thu 1, 4; THIS MEANS WAR: 7:10, 9:10; also Sat-Thu 1:10, 3:10, 5:10; THE VOW: 7, 9; also Sat-Thu 1, 3, 5; WOMAN IN BLACK: 9; also Sat-Thu 3.

Greece Ridge 12 225-5810 176 Greece Ridge Center Dr. CHRONICLE: 12:45, 3, 5:10, 7:30, 9:40; GHOST RIDER: SPIRIT OF VENGEANCE (3D): 12:50, 1:35, 4:25, 6:50, 7:25, 10; THE GREY: 4:20, 7:10, 10:15; JOURNEY 2: MYSTERIOUS ISLAND: 4:35; also in 3D 1:45, 7:15, 9:50; SAFE HOUSE: 1:20, 2:05, 4:15, 4:55, 7:05, 7:50, 9:45, 10:30; THE SECRET WORLD

26 City february 15-21, 2012

OF ARRIETTY: 12:30, 2:55, 5:15, 7:35, 9:55; STAR WARS: EPISODE 1 (3D): 1, 4, 7, 10:05; THIS MEANS WAR: 12:40, 3:05, 5:30, 8, 10:25; UNDERWORLD: AWAKENING: 1:25; THE VOW: 1:10, 1:55, 4:05, 4:45, 6:55, 7:40, 9:30, 10:10; WOMAN IN BLACK: 3:15, 9:35;

Henrietta 18 424-3090 525 Marketplace Dr. BIG MIRACLE: 1:45, 4:25; CHRONICLE: 12:40, 3:15, 5:35, 7:45, 10:05; THE DESCENDENTS: 12:50, 3:30, 6:55, 9:45; EK MAIN AUR EKK TU: 6:30, 9:10; GHOST RIDER: SPIRIT OF VENGEANCE: 4, 9:20, 11:45; also in 3D 12, 1:20, 2:40, 5:20, 6:40, 7:55, 10:40; THE GREY: 12:45, 3:35, 7:35, 10:30; HUGO (3D): 1:10; JOURNEY 2: MYSTERIOUS ISLAND: 1:25, 3:55; also in 3D 12:25, 2:50, 5:25, 7:50, 10:20; SAFE HOUSE: 12:55, 2:30, 3:40, 5:15, 6:35, 7:15, 8, 9:15, 10, 10:45, 11:50; THE SECRET WORLD OF ARRIETTY: 12:15, 2:45, 5:05, 7:30, 9:55, midnight; STAR WARS: EPISODE 1 (3D): 12:10, 3:10, 4:10, 6:20, 7:20, 9:25, 10:25; THIS MEANS WAR: 12:20, 1:30, 2:55, 4:20, 5:40, 6:50, 8:10, 9:30, 10:50, 11:55; THE VOW: 12:30, 1:50, 3, 4:30, 5:30, 7:05, 8:05, 9:40, 10:35, midnight; WOMAN IN BLACK: 12:05, 2:25, 4:50, 7:10, 9:35, midnight.

The Little 258-0400 240 East Ave. ALBERT NOBBS: 6:45, 9:20; also Sat-Sun 1:20, 3:50; THE ARTIST: 6:30, 8:50; also Sat-Sun 1:40, 4; A DANGEROUS METHOD: 7:15, 9:40; also Sat-Sun 1:30, 4:10; THE DESCENDANTS: 6:55, 9:30; also Sat-Sun 1:10, 3:40; OSCAR ANIMATED SHORTS: 7:05; also Sat-Sun 1:20; OSCAR LIVE ACTION SHORTS: 9:10; also Sat-Sun 3:10.

Movies 10 292-5840 2613 W. Henrietta Rd. ALVIN & THE CHIPMUNKS: CHIPWRECKED: 11:20 a.m., 1:50, 4, 6:50, 9:25; ARTHUR CHRISTMAS: 11:40 a.m., 2:30, 4:55, 7:30, 9:50; also in 3D 11:15 a.m., 1:55, 4:15, 7, 9:20; THE DARKEST HOUR: 7:05, 9:35; HAPPY FEET TWO: 12:05, 2:25, 4:45; JACK AND JILL: 11:50 a.m., 4:50, 9:55; THE MUPPETS: 11:30 a.m., 2, 4:30, 7:15, 9:45; NEW YEAR’S EVE: 2:05, 7:10; PUSS IN BOOTS (3D): 11:55 a.m., 2:10, 4:20, 6:55, 9:15; SHERLOCK HOLMES: A GAME OF SHADOWS: 11:25 a.m., 2:15, 5:05, 8:10; TWILIGHT: BREAKING DAWN 1: 11:45 a.m., 2:40, 5:20, 8; WE BOUGHT A ZOO: 11:35 a.m., 2:35, 5:25, 8:15.

Pittsford Cinema 383-1310 3349 Monroe Ave. THE ARTIST: 12, 2:15, 4:40, 7,

9:15; THE DESCENDANTS: 2, 4:35, 7:30, 9:55; EXTREMELY LOUD & INCREDIBLY CLOSE: 1:40, 7:15; THE GIRL WITH THE DRAGON TATTOO: 9:20; HUGO (3D): 1:05, 3:50, 6:40, 9:20; THE IRON LADY: 12:15, 2:30, 4:45, 7:10; SAFE HOUSE: 12:10, 2:35, 5:05, 7:40, 10:10; STAR WARS: EPISODE 1 (3D): 1, 3:55, 6:50; also Fri-Sat 9:45; THIS MEANS WAR: 12, 2:10, 4:30, 7:05, 9:25; TINKER TAILOR SOLDIER SPY: 4:20, 9:50; THE VOW: 12:05, 2:25, 4:50, 7:20, 9:40.

Tinseltown USA / IMAX 247-2180 2291 Buffalo Rd. BIG MIRACLE: 12, 2:35, 5:10, 7:45, 10:20; CHRONICLE: 12:35, 3, 5:30, 7:55, 10:05; GHOST RIDER: SPIRIT OF VENGEANCE: 1:30; also in 3D 12:15, 2:45, 4, 5:15, 6:30, 7:40, 9, 10:15; THE GREY: 12:45, 7:05; JOURNEY 2: MYSTERIOUS ISLAND: 1:15; also in 3D 3:45, 6:15, 8:45; also in 3D IMAX 12, 2:30, 5, 7:30, 10; RED TAILS: 8:30; SAFE HOUSE: 12:05, 1:30, 2:55, 4:20, 5:45, 7:10, 8:35, 10; THE SECRET WORLD OF ARRIETTY: 11:55 a.m., 2:25, 4:50, 7:15, 9:40; STAR WARS: EPISODE 1: 2; also in 3D 12:30, 3:45, 5:20, 7, 10:05; THIS MEANS WAR: 12:10, 1:25, 2:40, 3:55, 5:10, 6:25, 7:40, 8:55, 10:10; UNDERWORLD: AWAKENING: 3:30, 9:55; THE

VOW: 1, 2:20, 3:40, 5, 6:20, 7:45, 9:05, 10:20; WOMAN IN BLACK: 12:20, 2:50, 5:15, 7:50, 10:15.

Webster 12 888-262-4386 2190 Empire Blvd. THE ARTIST: 12, 2:20, 4:40, 7:25; also Fri & Sun-Thu 9:50; also Sat-Sun 11:45 a.m.; BEST PICTURE SHOWCASE: Sat 11 a.m.; BIG MIRACLE: 12:15, 2:45; CHRONICLE: 1:20, 3:30, 5:55, 8:30, 10:25; also Sat & Mon-Thu 10:45 a.m.; THE DESCENDANTS: 1, 3:45, 7:15, 10:05; also Sat & Mon-Thu 10:30 a.m.; GHOST RIDER: SPIRIT OF VENGEANCE: 12:30, 5:30, 10:30; also in 3D 3, 8; also Sat-Thu in 3D 10 a.m.; THE GREY: 5:10, 7:40, 10:15; JOURNEY 2: MYSTERIOUS ISLAND: 1:30; also in 3D 4:15, 7, 9:15; also Sat-Thu in 3D 11 a.m.; ONE FOR THE MONEY: Fri & Sun-Thu 5:45; SAFE HOUSE: 2:10, 5, 7:50, 10:35; also Sat-Thu 11:10 a.m.; SECRET WORLD ARRIETTY: 2, 4;20, 7:05, 9:30; also Sat-Thu 11:45 a.m.; STAR WARS: EPISODE 1 (3D): 1:10, 4:05, 7:10, 10:10; also Sat-Thu 10:10 a.m.; THIS MEANS WAR: 2:30, 4:50, 7:20, 9:40; also Sat-Thu 11:30 a.m.; THE VOW: 1:45, 4:30, 7:30, 10; also SatThu 11:20 a.m.; WOMAN IN BLACK: Fri & Mon-Thu 12:45, 3:15, 8:15, 10:20; also Sat 9:30; also Sun 10:30 a.m.


Film Previews Full film reviews available at rochestercitynewspaper.com. [ OPENING ] GHOST RIDER: SPIRIT OF VENGEANCE (PG-13): Nicolas Cage returns in this uneagerly awaited sequel as Johnny Blaze, whose fiery alter ego is called upon to prevent the Devil from taking human form. With Ciarán Hinds, Idris Elba, and the Highlander himself, Christopher Lambert. Brockport, Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece, Henrietta, Tinseltown, Webster THE GOLD RUSH (1925): It’s a new restoration of writer-director-star Charles Chaplin’s silent comedy classic about a lone prospector hunting for treasure (and love) in the Yukon Territory. Dryden (Fri, Feb 17, 8 p.m., and Sun, Feb 19, 2 p.m.) THE KING OF MARVIN GARDENS (1972): Jack Nicholson, Bruce Dern, and Ellen Burstyn star in Bob Rafelson’s Atlantic City crimedrama about a late-night DJ who gets dragged into his con-man brother’s real-estate scam. Dryden (Wed, Feb 15, 8 p.m.) PORTRAIT OF JENNIE (1948): Joseph Cotten and Jennifer Jones lead the cast of this romantic fantasy about the unusual relationship between a struggling artist and his mysterious muse. Dryden (Tue, Feb 21, 8 p.m.) THE SECRET WORLD OF ARRIETTY (G): Hayao Miyazaki co-wrote the screenplay for this animated reworking of Mary Norton’s “The Borrowers,” about a tiny

family whose anonymous life in a human family’s home changes once their daughter is discovered. Eastview, Greece, Henrietta, Pittsford THIS MEANS WAR (PG-13): McG’s first film since 2009’s “Terminator: Salvation” is this romantic action comedy starring Chris Pine and Tom Hardy as spies who go to battle for the love of Reese Witherspoon. Featuring Chelsea Handler and Angela Bassett. Culver, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece, Henrietta, Pittsford, Tinseltown, Webster WEEKEND (1967): This black comedy by Jean-Luc Godard tells of a bizarre trip to the country by a bourgeois French couple planning to murder each other. Dryden (Sat, Feb 18, 8 p.m., and Sun, Feb 19, 5 p.m.) [ CONTINUING ] ALBERT NOBBS (R): Glenn Close leads a stellar cast, including Mia Wasikowska, Jonathan Rhys Meyers, and Janet McTeer, in this drama from Rodrigo García (“Mother and Child”) about a 19th-century Irishwoman masquerading as a man to find employment as a butler. Little THE ARTIST (PG-13): From French writer-director Michel Hazanavicius comes the critically lauded Oscar frontrunner, a silent romance set in 1927 Hollywood about a movie star wondering if his career will end with the birth of talkies. With Golden Globe winner Jean Dujardin, John Goodman, and James Cromwell. Little, Pittsford, Webster

For information: Call us (585) 244-3329 Fax us (585) 244-1126 Mail Us City Classifieds 250 N. Goodman Street Rochester, NY 14607 Email Us classifieds@ rochester-citynews.com

BIG MIRACLE (PG): John Krasinski, Drew Barrymore, and Ted Danson star in this factbased romantic drama about a news reporter who enlists his activist ex-girlfriend in a quest to save a family of gray whales trapped by ice in the Arctic Circle. Canandaigua, Eastview, Henrietta, Tinseltown, Webster CHRONICLE (PG-13): The feature directing debut of Josh Trank (and written by John Landis’s son Max) is this sci-fi flick about a group of high school buddies who gain superhuman abilities and must decide whether to use them for good or evil. Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece, Henrietta, Tinseltown, Webster A DANGEROUS METHOD (R): David Cronenberg’s pre-WWI period piece explores the friendship between psychologist Carl Jung (Michael Fassbender) and his mentor, Sigmund Freud (Viggo Mortensen), which complicates following Jung’s affair with a troubled Russian student (Keira Knightley). Little THE DESCENDANTS (R): Alexander Payne’s long-awaited follow-up to 2004’s “Sideways” is this bittersweet comedy starring George Clooney as a father who travels to Hawaii to reconnect with his daughters but instead discovers a life-changing secret. With Matthew Lillard and Judy Greer. Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Henrietta, Little, Pittsford, Webster EXTREMELY LOUD AND INCREDIBLY CLOSE (PG-13): It’s Jonathan Safran Foer’s acclaimed 2005

Apartments for Rent LUXURY PENTHOUSE APARTMENT FOR SALE: 1400 East Ave. 2 Bd, 3 Ba, sunroom, den, 2018 sq. ft. Danielle Windus Cook Properties LLC. Call Kristen 733-1128 MONROE /ALEXANDER AREA 1 bedroom, $475 includes all. Coin laundry, quiet building. No pets. 330-0011 or 671-3806 NEIGHBORHOOD OF ARTS 1BDRM, 2 Level Apartment. Den/Office, Hardwoods, like new. Separate entrance, off-street-

novel as adapted by director Stephen Daldry (“The Reader”), about a young boy searching NYC for the lock to match the strange key left him by his late father. Starring Sandra Bullock, Max von Sydow, and Tom Hanks. Culver, Eastview, Pittsford THE GIRL WITH THE DRAGON TATTOO (R): David Fincher directs Steven Zaillian’s adaptation of Stieg Larsson’s popular novel about a journalist (Daniel Craig) investigating a missing person’s case with the help of the unpredictable young hacker Lisbeth Salander (Rooney Mara). With Robin Wright, Stellan Skarsgård, and Christopher Plummer. Pittsford THE GREY (R): Liam Neeson and Dermot Mulroney star in the latest from Joe Carnahan (“The A-Team”), an adventure drama about an oil drilling team’s struggle to survive after their plane crashes in the Alaskan wilderness. Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Greece, Henrietta, Tinseltown, Webster THE IRON LADY (PG-13): Meryl Streep reteams with “Mamma Mia” director Phyllida Lloyd for this dramatic look at the life of former British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher. Culver, Pittsford JOURNEY 2: THE MYSTERIOUS ISLAND (PG): Dwayne Johnson, Michael Caine, and Josh Hutcherson (“The Kids Are Alright”) star in this family adventure about a teen who goes looking for his explorer grandpa. Also starring Luis Guzmán and Vanessa Hudgens. Brockport,

Eastview, Greece, Henrietta, Tinseltown, Webster ONE FOR THE MONEY (PG-13): This action rom-com is a Janet Evanovich adaptation starring Katherine Heigl as Stephanie Plum, a bail bondswoman chasing down a handsome cop from her past (Jason O’Mara). Webster 2012 OSCAR-NOMINATED SHORT FILMS (NR): The animated and live-action films nominated for Academy Awards will be presented in two separate programs. Little RED TAILS (PG-13): Cuba Gooding Jr., Terrence Howard, and Bryan Cranston star in veteran TV director Anthony Hemingway’s feature debut about the African-American soldiers in the experimental Tuskegee pilot training program and their contributions to the Allied victory in WWII. Culver, Tinseltown SAFE HOUSE (R): Denzel Washington appears to be in sexy, swaggering bad-guy mode as Tobin Frost, a rogue CIA operative who becomes Ryan Reynolds’ problem when even badder guys come gunning for them. With Sam Shepard, Vera Farmiga, and Brendan Gleeson. Brockport, Culver, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece, Henrietta, Pittsford, Tinseltown, Webster STAR WARS: EPISODE 1 - THE PHANTOM MENACE 3D: Is this really necessary? Culver, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece, Henrietta, Pittsford, Tinseltown, Webster TINKER TAILOR SOLDIER SPY (R): Gary Oldman stars for Swedish director Tomas Alfredson (“Let

the Right One In”) as John le Carré’s timeless hero George Smiley, here on the trail of an MI6 mole who could be Tom Hardy (“Inception”), Irish treasure Ciarán Hinds, or Oscar winner Colin Firth. Pittsford UNDERWORLD: AWAKENING (R): This 3D entry into the series finds Kate Beckinsale back as the vinyl-clad immortal Selene, now up against... um... oh, who cares. Culver, Greece, Tinseltown THE VOW (PG-13): Take the lovable hunk from “Dear John” (Channing Tatum), add the tempestuous rich girl from “The Notebook” (Rachel McAdams), marry ‘em off, throw in a pinch of amnesia, and make him woo her all over again. Next, start crying. Culver, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece, Henrietta, Pittsford, Tinseltown, Webster WE BOUGHT A ZOO (PG): The latest from Cameron Crowe is based on the true story of a widower who rebuilds his life by resurrecting a dilapidated zoo. Starring Matt Damon, Scarlett Johansson, Thomas Haden Church, and Elle Fanning. Movies 10 THE WOMAN IN BLACK (PG13): Daniel Radcliffe’s first post-“Harry Potter” role is in this period thriller as a young lawyer who travels to a village to settle an estate and encounters a murderous g-g-ghost. With Ciarán Hinds and “Albert Nobbs” Oscar nominee Janet McTeer. Brockport, Culver, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece, Henrietta, Tinseltown, Webster

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Land for Sale NY SPORTSMAN & OUTDOOR FAMILY LAND BUYS! This is the best time ever!! 6AC-along

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Shared Housing ALL AREAS - ROOMMATES.COM. Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http://www.Roommates.com.

EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY

All real estate advertised in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act, which makes it unlawful, “to make, print, or publish, any notice, statement, or advertisement, with respect to the sale or rental of a dwelling that indicates any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin.” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under the age of 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertisement for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. Call the local Fair Housing Enforcement Project, FHEP at 325-2500 or 1-866-671-FAIR. Si usted sospecha una practica de vivienda injusta, por favor llame al servicio legal gratis. 585-325-2500 - TTY 585-325-2547.

CITY NE: 3bdrm Colonial. Porch, Frml Dining Rm, Modern Kitchen, Full Bath on 1st Floor. Up is a 2nd Floor Laundry, 3Bdrms another Full Bath. Side Entry "Mud" Room, 2 sets of Stairs, Walkout Basement, Full Attic. New Roof, Siding, Windows, Furnace! Pat Kulaga 368-7119 292-8500 PC45547 nothnagle/R175701

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Place your real estate ad by calling 244-3329 ext. 23 or rochestercitynewspaper.com Ad Deadlines: Friday 4pm for Display Ads Monday at noon for Line ads > page 27 snowmobile trail WAS: $29,995. NOW: $13,995. 52AC-Near Salmon River WAS: $69,995. NOW $49,995. 5AC-Beautiful woodlands & riverfront WAS: $69,995 NOW: $39,995. 97AC-Timber & trout stream WAS: $119,995 NOW: $99,995. In-house financing. Over 150 land bargains. Call 800-229-7843 Or visit www. LandandCamps.com NYS LAND WANTED Cash Buyer Looking for 2-3 farms or wood lots in your area. 25-1000 acres, cash deal, quick closing. No closing costs to you. Local NYS Forestry Company in business for over 20 years. Fully guaranteed. Call 800-229-7843 TUG HILL & SALMON RIVER Area 6 Acres WAS: $19,995 NOW: $12,995. 52 Acres WAS: $59,995. NOW: $49,995. Our #1 Properties for snowmobilers and fishermen. See property #1 at LandandCamps.com for pictures. Or call 800-229-7843.

Commercial/ Office Space UofR/ AIRPORT AREA Brick, Mixed use building. 6,000 sq.ft. of stores/ office plus 3 apartments. Owner must sell due to illness. Owner financing, no banks needed. 383-8888

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LOVE. Expenses paid. Ann & Scott. 1-888-772-0068 ADOPT: A happily married couple promises to cherish/unconditionally love your beautiful baby. Lovely home awaits near beaches, great schools.  lisa.joseph2008@ yahoo.com  Lisa/Joe 1-888-8494340. www.lisajoeadopt.info ADOPT: A loving, educated, well traveled couple hoping to adopt a newborn. Home filled with love,laughter. Nearby extended family awaits. Please call: Lisa/ Brian 1888-939-8399 www.Lbadopt.info ADOPT: Active, loving couple, stayat-home mom/doctor dad, hope to adopt a baby into home of love and opportunity.  Expenses Paid. Lori/Mike 1-888-499-4464. www. teachanddoc.com. ADOPTION DEVOTED FAMILY with open, generous hearts, promises your child unconditional love. Financially secure, expenses paid. Please consider us before deciding. Susan/ Patrick 1-877-266-9087. www. susanandpatrickadopt.com PREGNANT? CONSIDERING ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions 866-4136293 (Void in Illinois) (AAN CAN)

Automotive ALWAYS BETTER Higher cash for your Junk Cars, Trucks and Vans.

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Sunday Mass at St. Michael’s Church Sunday, February 19th at 4:00pm

The St. Michael’s Singers Hebert Howells: Like as the Hart Charles Stanford: O For a Closer Walk Free Parking at St. Michael’s Church

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The Luxury of Modest Living 163 Colonial Road In contrast to supersized houses fashionable in recent years, smaller dwellings cost less, have lower taxes, heating and maintenance expenses, and less environmental impact, especially if the dwelling has been around for the better part of a century. The attractive blue and white Colonial at 163 Colonial Road is one such home. Its recently painted original wood exterior, new roof and driveway, and attractive front landscaping all contribute to its curb appeal. Built in 1928, this house retains many original features, such as varnished gumwood trim and narrow plank oak floors throughout. The entrance vestibule has multi-paned glass doors and a small closet. Inside, the rooms are modest in size and recently painted in natural colors. The living room has three front windows and a small sunroom at one end—with windows on all sides, it is a bright, inviting place for a mug of coffee or a quiet read. At the other end of the living room, the staircase has an interesting cut-away wall and arch. Opposite the living room is the deep red formal dining room. The golden eat-in kitchen has recent cabinetry, a long counter, ceramic tiles and sliding glass doors leading to a brick patio. The grassy back yard is fully fenced and graced by two tall fir trees. There is no garage, but a new driveway and small shed. Upstairs a small hall with linen closet links three bedrooms and a full bath. The bathroom boasts original hexagonal floor

tiles, a handsome pedestal tub, wooden wainscoting, as well as a storage closet. There are two well-lit bedrooms with small closets. The third very small room with no closet is well suited for an office or could be converted to a walk-in closet. There is a bright and fully insulated walk-up attic. Currently a great storage space, it could be finished into a large room with slanting ceilings. The basement is another pleasant utility space, with painted floor and walls, laundry machines and a built-in workbench. This home is located in the CulverWinton-Main neighborhood, served by the North Winton Village Association. This affordable, accessible neighborhood of tree-lined streets and well-maintained older homes has many amenities and well-loved businesses. Furthermore, right across Winton Road is Tryon Park. With miles of wooded hilly trails, the park is a haven for hikers and birders. For more information on this neighborhood and park see rochestercityliving.com/neighborhoods/ culver-winton-main At 1,327 square feet on .14 acre, this home is listed for $109,900 with taxes of $3,804. For further information, contact Brian Callahan at Nothnagle Realtors at 585-381-0502. by Rebecca Webb Rebecca is a Landmark Society member and volunteer.

Anne Laver Music Director/Organ Alicia Messenger, cantor rochestercitynewspaper.com City 29


CITY Newspaper presents

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Discover The Power Within You Unity offers practical, spiritual teachings that empower abundant and meaningful living.

Sunday Celebration 11 a.m. Music, Meditation and Message Children’s Program Beginning Feb. 22: Study of the classic Unity book, Discover the Power within You by Eric Butterworth. See our website for details.

Unity

Christ Church Unity Church of the Daily Word.

We welcome you!

55 Prince St., Rochester, NY 14607 • www.unityrochester.org • 585-473-0910

ARGENTINE TANGO WORKSHOP Saturday, February 25th 6-7:30pm $60/person for current members $90/person for non members

Gift Certificates Available 3450 WINTON PLACE ROCHESTER, NY 14623 585-292-1240

30 City february 15-21, 2012

WWW.FADSROCHESTER.COM

other options. $15,000 obo. Call for details 585-880-2336.

Education ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from home. *Medical, *Business, *Criminal Justice, *Hospitality, Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEC certified. Call 888-2018657www.CenturaOnline.com

HOME SALE: Like New Sharper Image Steel Juicer $20, PC briefcase $10, sewing machine $25, paper cutter $5. Mary 585/413-0827.

Groups Forming

For Sale

GAY GIRLS OUT GROUP Social Marxist Obama liked by idiots and able bodied welfare recipients. Despised by patriotic Americans with brains and integrity. 585747-2699 www. lauraingraham. com

BABY WALKER on wheels, tray. Sides pull out with toys $10 5685880-2903

Jam Section

COPIER (Hewlitt Packard Office Jet Pro 1150C) Works well, uses color and black ink. Available at Staples. $45 585-544-4155 585-8802903

P LY M O U T H S P I R I T UA L I S T C H U R C H Together We Are One

2 9 V I C K PA R K A RO C H E S T E R , N Y

Sunday Services 10:30 AM All Message Service & Free Spiritual Healing Third Weds ~ 7 PM ~ Séances ~ Classes ~ Gallery Reading ~ For more information and schedules www.plymouthspiritualistchurch.org Robin Higgins, Pastor ~ Phone: 585.271.1470

BASS PLAYER needed to complete 4 piece group. Experience in ALL types of music. Contact Bob 58/5225-2193 LOOKING FOR VOCALISTS to be part of vocal group. Doing originals and covers. 25 years and older. Please do not inquire if not serious and stable. Contact Bobby 585328-4121 MUSICIANS, Soundman, Bands, Rappers, Singers, All styles Contact 585-285-8426 THE CHORUS OF THE GENESEE Needs all male voices for Spring Concerts; reading music NOT necessary; Tuesday evenings; we sing; we laugh; we train; we buy a visitors’ first beer. Call Ed Rummler 585-385-2698

Miscellaneous HAS YOUR BUILING SHIFTED OR SETTLED? Contact Woodford Brothers Inc, for straightening, leveling, foundation and wood frame repairs at 1-800-OLD-BARN www. woodfordbros.com. “Not applicable in Queens county” SAWMILLS from only $3997MAKE MONEY & SAVE MONEY with your own bandmil Cut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship. FREE Info & DVD www. NorwoodSawmills.com/300N 1800-578-1363 Ext.300N

Music Services PIANO LESSONS In your home or mine. Patient, experienced instructor teaching all ages, levels and musical styles. Call Scott: 585- 465-0219. Visit www. scottwrightmusic.com

Mind Body Spirit REIKI IN YOUR HOME!! I am a Reiki Master and would LOVE to help you feel your best! Fully insured Please call for rates and to schedule an appointment 315378-2077

Wanted to Buy CASH FOR CARS! We Buy ANY Car or Truck ,Running or NOT! Damaged, Wrecked, Salvaged OK! Get a top dollar INSTANT offer today! 1-800-267-1591


EMPLOYMENT / CAREER TRAINING

Employment ACTORS/MOVIE EXTRAS Needed immediately for upcoming roles $150-$300/day depending on job requirements. No experience, all looks. 1-800-560-8672 A-109 for casting times /locations. AIRLINES ARE HIRING Train for hands on Aviation Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified- Job Placement Assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance (866)296-7093 DRIVER - Up to $.42/mile plus $.02/mile safety bonus. Daily Pay. Weekly Hometime. Van and Refreigerated. CDL-A, 3 months recent esperience required 800414-9569 www.driveknight.com EARN EXTRA MONEY Delivering the new frontier telephone directories. Men & women 18 years and older w/insured vehicles needed to deliver in Rochester/ surrounding areas. We are also looking for office clerks and loaders. Delivery starts Feb 24th. Work a min of 6 daylight hrs per day/get paid within 72 hrs, upon completion of route. 1-800-9797978, 9 am to 5:30 pm M-F refer to job# 40000-C $$$HELP WANTED$$$ Extra Income! Assembling CD cases from Home! No Experience Necessary! Call our Live Operators Now! 1-800-405-7619 EXT 2450 http://www.easyworkjobs.com (AAN CAN) HIRING EXPERIENCED/ INEXPERIENCED TANKER DRIVERS! Great Benefits and Pay! New Fleet Volvo Tractors! 1 Year OTR Exp. Req.- Tanker Training Available. Call Today: 877-8826537 www.OakleyTransport.com

LAKE PLAINS 4-H seeks volunteers to work with youth on various projects. Share your interests with young people! Contact Aimee Widger aw254@ cornell.edu for more information. MEALS ON WHEELS Needs Volunteers! Do you have an hour and a smile? Deliver meals during lunchtime to homebound

neighbors. Interested? Call 7878326 to help. RPO: VOLUNTEER for Exciting Position Available at the Rochester Philharmonic Orchestra: Archive Committee Chair. Must have interest in the civic and cultural history of Rochester. (585) 454-7311 x 243 for details.

SCHOOL #12 999 South Ave. is looking for reading & math volunteers, English & Spanish. Training provided. Call Vicki 585-461-4282

ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS for one week only

INDUSTRIAL SEWERS Newtex is hiring experienced sewers for our Engineered Products Division in Victor, NY. Please apply online at www.newtex.com or Email: resume@newtex.com

Feb. 27th - Mar. 3rd

By mail or in person to: Newtex Industries Attn: HR 8050 Victor Mendon Road, Victor, NY 14564

For School Construction

FREE TUITION

Teacher Recruitment Job Fair

Come to: 1776 NORTH CLINTON AVENUE, ROCHESTER, NY (the old Maynards Building)

See website for details:

Daily from 9am until 6pm Monday thru Saturday

Training & Jobs

Must provide the following original documents at the time of application • Must be 18 years of age or older • High School Diploma with Transcripts or GED w/official Transcripts • Birth Certificate • Social Security Card • Valid Driver’s License with reliable transportation

For more information contact: Career Compliance & Placement Offices (585) 262-8714 • (203) 992-9002 175 Martin Street, Rochester, NY

Tuesday, May 22, 2012 Cattaraugus & Allegany County School Districts

www.CABOCES.ORG EOE/AA

America’s Navy:

A Global Force For Good

MALE DANCE INSTRUCTORS Needed. Dance experience perforable, but will train the right candidate. Call Fred Astaire Dance Studio at 292-1240 to schedule interview today! WWW. FADSROCHESTER.COM

Volunteers A SECOND THOUGHT Resale Shop in East Rochester is accepting applications for volunteer sale associates and online researchers. Shop benefits people with disabilities in Guatemala. Call (585) 340-2000. FOSTER PARENTS WANTED! Monroe County is looking for adults age 21 and over to consider opening their homes to foster children. Call 334-9096 or visit www.MonroeFosterCare.org.

LOOKING TO HIRE?

Become One! One Makes a Difference! Are you ready to make a difference in the lives of children or adults with developmental disabilities? “Become one”, join our team of enthusiastic, caring staff today! If you have a desire to make a difference, possess excellent people skills, and work directly with individuals to help them gain and maintain independence in their lives, then Lifetime Assistance Inc is the employer for you! We emphasize strengths, not limitations!

OPEN INTERVIEWS Tuesday FEBRUARY 21st, 9:00am-3:00pm TOWN OF BROCKPORT, at the BROCKPORT EXEMPTS 248 West Avenue Brockport, New York 14420 Our Employees Enjoy:

Transform your future and have a challenging career by joining the Navy Reserve Medical Officer Team. We have positions available in many rewarding healthcare fields including: • Nursing • Dentistry • Podiatry • Physician • Industrial and Environmental Health • Clinical Psychology • Healthcare Administration (Requirements may include a Bachelor’s, Masters or a Doctoral Degree to apply.)

The Navy offers excitement along with valuable job training. We have educational opportunities, medical and dental benefits, and professional experience that civilian employers value.

Active and Reserve Opportunities Are Available.

PLACE YOUR EMPLOYMENT AD WITH CITY NEWSPAPER!

Competitive Salaries, Medical, Dental, Life Insurance, Generous Paid Time Off, Tuition Reimbursement Programs, Referral Bonus Programs, Work Life Balance

Now, the need for health-care specialists is critical in the Navy.

SEE PAGE 31 TO CHECK OUT OUR EMPLOYMENT SECTION

To “Become One” of this dynamic team of professionals! Or to learn more about these openings and others please visit us online at www.lifetimeassistance.org

TO ADVERTISE CALL CHRISTINE AT 244.3329 x23

EOE

Join an elite group who serve their country by providing healthcare while maintaining their civilian employment.

Lifetime Assistance Inc. 425 Paul Road Rochester, NY 14624 • 585-426-4120

Call 1-800-242-3736 or email jobs_pittsburgh@navy.mil rochestercitynewspaper.com City 31


Legal Ads [ LEGAL NOTICE ] Name of limited liability company: Seneca Building of Monroe County LLC (“LLC”). Date Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (“SSNY”) February 1, 2012. LLC organized in Delaware on December 22, 2011. NY county location: Monroe. SSNY designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process c/o the LLC, One Circle Street, Rochester, New York 14607. Address required to be maintained in jurisdiction of organization or if not required, principal office of LLC: 874 Walker Road, Suite C, Dover, Delaware 19904. Copy of formation document on file with: the Secretary of State of Delaware, P.O. Box 898, Dover, Delaware 19903. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ LEGAL NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of GIGA Properties LLC, Arts. of Org. filed by Secy of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/8/2011. Office location: County of Monroe. SSNY designated as agent of the LLC upon which process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process served to GIGA Properties LLC, PO Box 17218, Rochester, NY 14617. Purpose of LLC: Any lawful activity. [ LEGAL NOTICE ] Notice of formation of IOOB MC, LLC, Arts. Of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State on 01/18/12. Off. loc.: Monroe Co. Sec. of State designated as agent of LLC upon whom process may be served and shall mail process to: 460 Buffalo Rd, Roch, NY. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ LEGAL NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Norton Commons LLC, Arts. of Org. filed by Secy of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/8/2011. Office location: County of Monroe. SSNY designated as agent of the LLC upon which process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process served to Norton Commons LLC, PO Box 17218, Rochester, NY 14617. Purpose of LLC: Any lawful activity. [ LEGAL NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of ROC PROPS LLC, Arts. of Org. filed by Secy of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/18/2011.

Office location: County of Monroe. SSNY designated as agent of the LLC upon which process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process served to ROC PROPS LLC, PO Box 67468, Rochester, NY, 14617. Purpose of LLC: Any lawful activity. [ LEGAL NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Valley Gorge Properties LLC, Arts. of Org. filed by Secy of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/8/2011. Office location: County of Monroe. SSNY designated as agent of the LLC upon which process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process served to Valley Gorge Properties LLC, PO Box 17218, Rochester, NY 14617. Purpose of LLC: Any lawful activity. [ LEGAL NOTICE ] Notice of formation of Good Smoke BBQ LLC filed articles of organization filed with the Secretary of State of N.Y. (SSNY) on December 29, 2011. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY has designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to the LLC, 81 Culver Parkway, Rochester, NY 14609. Purpose: Any lawful purpose. [ LEGAL NOTICE PROALIGN, LLC ] Notice of Organization: Proalign, LLC was filed with SSNY on December 23, 2011. Office: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. PO address which SSNY shall mail any process against the LLC served upon it: 120 Allens Creek Rd., Rochester, NY 14618. Purpose is to engage in any lawful activity. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF BUFFALO ROADS HOLDING, LLC LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY ] Notice of formation of BUFFALO ROADS HOLDING, LLC, a NYS LLC Formation filed with SSNY 02/08/2012. Its principal office is in Monroe County, NY. The Secretary of State has been designated as its agent and the address to which the SSNY shall mail a copy of any process against it is: The LLC, 837 Buffalo Road Rochester NY 14624. Purpose: Any lawful purposes.

32 City february 15-21, 2012

[ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF PARK 54 ENTERPRISES, LLC LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY ] Notice of formation of PARK 54 ENTERPRISES, LLC, a NYS LLC Formation filed with SSNY 01/26/2012. Its principal office is in Monroe County, NY. The Secretary of State has been designated as its agent and the address to which the SSNY shall mail a copy of any process against it is: The LLC, 54 Park Avenue Rochester NY 14607. Purpose: Any lawful purposes. [ NOTICE ] 1697 MONROE LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 11/21/11. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Johnson Mullan & Brundage, 1399 Monroe Ave., Rochester, NY 14618-1005. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] 1704 MONROE LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 11/21/11. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Johnson Mullan & Brundage, 1399 Monroe Ave., Rochester, NY 14618-1005. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] 1975 Cape Dory #OPDE0263M751, Andrew Hintenach, date of sale 02/15/12. Voyager Boat Sales [ NOTICE ] ABID REALTY, LLC a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 1/25/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Nabil Abid, 98 Timrod Dr., Rochester, NY 14617. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] aDesignedPath for usabilitySolutions, LLC, filed with NY Sec’y of State (SSNY) on 9/16/11. Location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail

a copy of any process against the LLC served upon him/her to United States Corporation Agents Inc, 7014 13th Ave, Ste 202, Brooklyn NY 11228. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Cimetics Pest Solutions, LLC (LLC) filed Arts. of Org. with NY Secy. of State (SS) on 1/3/2012. LLC’s office is in Monroe Co. SS is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS shall mail a copy of any process to LLC’s principal business location at 250 Mill St. Ste. 309-311, Rochester, NY 14614. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] DARYL CARMICHAEL & ASSOCIATES LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 12/07/2010. Office in Monroe Co. SSNY desig. agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 551 Lexington Ave., Rochester, NY 14613, which is also the principal business location. Purpose: To engage in the business of land use, planning, construction management and design as well as any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] DREAM CATCHER REAL ESTATE AND PROPERTIES LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 1/14/2010. Office in Monroe Co. SSNY design. Agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to Philippone Law Offices 31 E. Main St. Rochester, NY 14614. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Name of LLC: Schreiber Family Properties, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State on 1/9/12. Office loc.: Monroe County. Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: 366 Lydell Ave., Rochester, NY 14606. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Not. of Form. of Jennifer City Sales, LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 1/ 24/2012. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY

designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY may mail a copy of any process to LLC. 78 Eastland Ave, Rochester, NY 14618. Purpose: any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Not. Of Form. Of Shop Peppermint LLC. Art. Of Org. filed with NY Sec’y of State (SSNY) 01/30/12. County: Monroe. SSNY is designated Agent of LLC to whom process may be served. SSNY may mail a copy of any process to LLC,121 Fairfax Rd, Rochester , NY 14609.General Purpose [ NOTICE ] Not. of Form. of SURE LUCK HOMES 015 LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 12/30/11. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY may mail a copy of any process to LLC. 2117 Buffalo Road, Suite 290, Rochester, NY 14624. Purpose: any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Not. of Form. of SURE LUCK HOMES 016 LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 12/30/11. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY may mail a copy of any process to LLC. 2117 Buffalo Road, Suite 290, Rochester, NY 14624. Purpose: any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Not. of Form. of SURE LUCK HOMES 017 LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 12/30/11. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY may mail a copy of any process to LLC. 2117 Buffalo Road, Suite 290, Rochester, NY 14624. Purpose: any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Not. of Form. of SURE LUCK HOMES 018 LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 12/30/11. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY may

mail a copy of any process to LLC. 2117 Buffalo Road, Suite 290, Rochester, NY 14624. Purpose: any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Not. of Form. of ZTT ENTERPRISES, LLC. the Art. of Org. were filed Sc’y State (SSNY) 1/18/12. Office location Monroe County. SSNY designated as the agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to 75 Child St., Rochester, NY 14611. Purpose of LLC: any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Notice is hereby given that a license, number 3150655 for a full on premise beer, wine & liquor license has been applied for by Boulder At Brooks Landing Inc. dba Boulder At Brooks Landing , 960 Genesee St., Rochester NY 14611 County of Monroe, City of Rochester for a restaurant. [ NOTICE ] Notice is hereby given that a license, number 3151327, for beer, & wine license has been applied for by Joe Bean Coffee LLC , 1344 University Ave, Rochester, NY 14607, County of Monroe, City of Rochester, for a coffee bar.

Pkwy., Rochester, NY 14618. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity.

of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, c/o Sammy Feldman, 3445 Winton Place, Ste. 228, Rochester, NY 14623. Purpose: any lawful activity.

[ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of BEAKER BAILEY, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 01/19/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Bree A. Swain, 59 Chili Ave., Scottsville, NY 14546. Purpose: Any lawful activity.

[ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of HASMAN ASSOCIATES, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 01/17/12. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 56 Leamington Circle, Rochester, NY 14626. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity.

[ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of BROCKPORT GROUP ASSOCIATES LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/29/11. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 77 Place One Dr., Rochester, NY 14626. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Own & manage real property.

[ NOTICE ] Notice is hereby given that a license, number not yet assigned, for a beer & wine license has been applied for by SEOUL HOUSE LLC. dba SEOUL HOUSE, 2805 W. Henrietta Rd, Rochester, NY 14623, County of Monroe, Town of Brighton, for a restaurant.

[ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of BSMY LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 1/13/12. Off. loc.: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 465 Main St., Ste. 600, Buffalo, NY 14203. Purpose: any lawful activity.

[ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of Accent Home Services, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Sec’y of State (SSNY) on 10/31/11. Office location: County of Monroe. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of any process to the LLC at 64 East Church Street, Fairport, New York 14450. LLC’s purpose: any lawful act.

[ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of East Ave. Ventures, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 1/20/2012. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 1870 South Winton Road Suite 220, Rochester, NY 14618. Purpose: any lawful act

[ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of ARTISAN SOFTWARE CONSULTING LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 01/19/12. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 85 Southern

[ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of HANWOONG, LLC amended to SEOUL HOUSE, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 1/17/12. Off. loc.: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent

[ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Integrity Resources & Imaging Services, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 1/17/12. Off. loc.: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, c/o Sammy Feldman, 3445 Winton Place, Ste. 228, Rochester, NY 14623. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of JMF LANDSCAPING, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 01/06/12. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 61 Morningstar Dr., Rochester, NY 14606. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Jason Fowler at the princ. office of the LLC. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of MISSION COMMERCIAL REALTY LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 01/13/12. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 2479 Browncroft Blvd., Rochester, NY 14625. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of MOLINA PROPERTY


Legal Ads SOLUTIONS LLC. Art. Of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/20/11. Office in Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, 8 Fieldstone Ln. West Henrietta, NY 14586. Purpose: Any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of Passero Spoleta Design-Build Maroc, LLC. Art. of Org. filed Secretary of State of NY (“SSNY”) 12/21/11. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of any process to c/o Spoleta Construction 7 Van Auker St., Rochester, NY 14608. Purpose: any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of PILLAR MEDIA ENTERPRISES, LLC Art. of Organization filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 11-03-11. Office of Location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 2401 N. Clinton Avenue, Rochester, NY 14621. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of RCD PROPERTIES, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 01/27/12. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 90 Air Park Dr., Ste. 400, Rochester, NY 14624. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Real estate. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of ATLAS RESEARCH LLC. Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 01/23/12. Office location: Monroe County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 05/01/08. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Corporation Service Co., 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207-2543. DE addr. of LLC: 2711 Centerville

Rd., Wilmington, DE 19808. Arts. of Org. filed with DE Secy. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: One employee that teleworks from home. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of DFS Corporate Services LLC. Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 1/30/12. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. bus. addr.: 2500 Lake Cook Rd., Riverwoods, IL 60015. LLC formed in DE on 9/29/10. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. DE addr. of LLC: c/o The Corporation Trust Co., 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of MLCFC 2006-4 PALMER BUILDINGS, LLC. App. for Auth. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 1/9/12. Off. loc.: Monroe County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 9/18/09. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, registered agent upon whom process may be served. DE address of LLC: 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Arts. of Org. filed with DE Secy. of State, 401 Federal St., Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of Speedy Title & Appraisal Review Services LLC. App. for Auth. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/13/11. Off. loc.: Monroe County. LLC formed in DE on 12/14/04. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, registered agent upon whom process may be served. DE address of LLC: 1209

Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Arts. of Org. filed with DE Secy. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] PACE REAL ESTATE, LLC a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 1/9/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Vincent Pace, 1016 Penfield Rd., Rochester, NY 14625. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] PAZ PROPERTIES LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 12/20/11. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 33 Country Club Dr., Rochester, NY 14618. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] Rochester Bar Concepts LLC. filed Arts. of Org. with NY Dept. of State: 12/29/11. Office is in Monroe Co. SSNY is designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: 53 Landsdowne Ln., Rochester, NY 14618. Purpose any lawful act. [ NOTICE ] SMUGTOWN MUSHROOM COMPANY LLC filed Arts. of Org with Sec’y of State (SSNY) on 10/11/2011. Ooffice location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against may be served. SSNY shall mail process to 304 Ballad Ave., Rochester, NY 14626. Purpose: Any lawful act. [ NOTICE ] SPC PROPERTIES LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 10/18/11. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 750 Lee Rd, Greece, NY 14606. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] Swick Properties, LLC (LLC). Art. of Org. filed with Sec’y of State of NY (SSNY)

on 12/27/2011, Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent for LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process served to: 2471 Westside Dr., N. Chili NY, 14514. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] WorldTech IT, LLC (LLC) filed Arts. of Org. with NY Secy. of State (SS) on 2/8/2012 LLC’s office is in Monroe Co. SS is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS shall mail a copy of any process to LLC’s principal business location at c/o Jason M. Kiefer, Esq., 145 Culver Rd., Suite 100, Rochester, NY 14620. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] Notice of Formation of Coffee and Garlic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with Sec’y of State (SSNY) on 12/16/11. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to LLC’s principal business location at 69 Rosedale Street, Rochester, NY 14620. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION BOODLEBAG, LLC ] Boodlebag, LLC was filed with SSNY on 12/21/2011. Office: Monroe County, SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. P.O. address which SSNY shall mail any process against the LLC served upon SSNY, 20 Castleman Road, Rochester, New York 14620. Purpose is to engage in any lawful activity. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF 8890/1321, LLC ] The name of the Limited Liability Company is 8890/1321, LLC . Articles of Organization were filed with the New York Secretary of State on 1/13/2012. The office of the LLC is in Monroe County. The New York Secretary of State is designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. The Secretary of State shall mail a copy of such process to 30 Merriman St., Rochester, NY

14607. The LLC is organized to engage in any lawful activity for which an LLC may be formed under NY LLC Law. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY ] LIGHTFAB SPECIALTIES LLC has filed Articles of Organization with the Secretary of State on November 30, 2011. Its office is located in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent upon whom process against it may be served and a copy of any process will be mailed to 40 Hytec Circle, Rochester, NY 14606. Its business is to engage in any lawful activity for which limited liability companies may be organized under Section 203 of the New York Limited Liability Company Act. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LLC ] ClarkCo LLC has filed articles of organization

with the New York Secretary of State on January 20, 2012. Its principal place of business is located at 1335 Pittsford Mendon Road, Mendon, New York 14506 in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent upon whom process may be served. A copy of any process shall be mailed to P.O. Box 579, Mendon, New York 14506. The purpose of the LLC is to engage in any lawful activity for which Limited Liability Companies may be organized under Section 203 of the New York Limited Liability Company Law. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LLC ] DGA Vehicles, LLC has filed articles of organization with the New York Secretary of State on December 23, 2011. Its principal place of business is located at 333 W. Commercial Street, Suite 1500, East Rochester, New York in Monroe County. The Secretary of State

has been designated as agent upon whom process may be served. A copy of any process shall be mailed to 333 W. Commercial Street, Suite 1500, East Rochester, New York 14445. The purpose of the LLC is to engage in any lawful activity for which Limited Liability Companies may be organized under Section 203 of the New York Limited Liability Company Law. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF PLLC ] Maxwell Boev Medical Group, PLLC has filed articles of organization with the New York Secretary of State on December 23, 2011. Its principal place of business is located at Parnall Office Bldg, Ste 304, 1445 Portland Avenue, Rochester, New York in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent upon whom process may be served. A copy of any process shall be mailed to Parnall Office Bldg, Ste 304, 1445 Portland Avenue,

Rochester, New York 14621. The purpose of the PLLC is to practice the profession of medicine and the providing of medical services. [ NOTICE OF REGISTRATION ] Notice of registration of limited liability partnership (LLP). Name: Southeast Medical Associates, LLP (the Partnership). Certificate of Registration filed with the Secretary of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/08/11. NY principal office location: 100 CrossKeys Office Park, Fairport, NY 14450, Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the Partnership may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of any such process to: 100 CrossKeys Office Park, Fairport, NY 14450. Purpose/character of the Partnership: any and all lawful activities. [ NOTICE OF SALE ] Index No. 201111197 SUPREME

cont. on page 34

FORECLOSURE OF TAX LIENS BY THE CITY OF ROCHESTER STATE OF NEW YORK SUPREME COURT COUNTY OF MONROE

IN THE MATTER OF THE FORECLOSURE OF TAX LIENS PURSUANT TO TITLE 4 OF PART E OF ARTICLE IX OF THE CHARTER OF THE CITY OF ROCHESTER.

LIST OF DELINQUENT TAXES AS OF JULY 1, 2011 PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that on February 1, 2012 the Corporation Counsel of the City of Rochester filed in the office of the Monroe County Clerk a list of parcels of property on which the City of Rochester holds a lien for taxes, assessments, fees or other charges which is at least one year old and which the City of Rochester intends to foreclose by an action in rem pursuant to Title 4 of Part E of Article IX of the Charter of the City of Rochester. A copy of that list was published on February 1, 2012.

A copy of the foreclosure list has been filed in the office of the City Treasurer and will remain open for public inspection up to and including April 9, 2012, which is the redemption deadline date.

Any person may on or before that date redeem any parcel on the foreclosure list by paying to the City Treasurer the amount of all delinquent taxes, assessments, fees and other charges stated on the foreclosure list, plus the $155.00 charge referred to above, plus accrued interest The foreclosure list contains as to each such parcel: and late payment charges. 1. The tax account number and address; 2. The name of the last known owner; Any person having any interest in any parcel on the 3. The amount of each tax lien, except for a $155.00 foreclosure list may, at any time up to the redemption charge which has been added to each tax lien pursuant to deadline date, serve a verified notice of interest or an Section 9-123(A)(3)of the City Charter but which is not answer upon the Corporation Counsel setting forth in reflected on the printed list. detail the nature and amount of his interest or any defense or objection to the foreclosure. The notice of All persons having an interest in the real property described in interest or answer must also be filed in the office of the the foreclosure list are hereby notified that the filing of the list Monroe County Clerk. Where a valid notice of interest is constitutes the commencement by the City of Rochester of an served, the parcel will be held for a foreclosure auction action in the Supreme Court, Monroe County, to foreclose the pursuant to Section 9-143 of the City Charter. tax liens therein described by an action in rem and that the list constitutes a notice of pendency of action and a complaint by Any person who fails to redeem or to serve a notice of the City of Rochester against each parcel of land therein interest or an answer by the redemption deadline date described to enforce the satisfaction of such tax liens. This shall be barred thereafter from asserting his interest in action is brought against the real property only. No personal the pending foreclosure action, and judgment in judgment will be entered in this action for the delinquent foreclosure may be granted without regard for, and in taxes, assessments, fees or other charges. extinguishment of, the interest of any such person.

ROBERT J. BERGIN Corporation Counsel rochestercitynewspaper.com City 33


Legal Ads > page 33 COURT STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF MONROE ESL Federal Credit Union, Plaintiff, Marcella Louise Albanese, Individually and as Executrix of the Estate of Mary Louise Junior, a/k/a Mary L. Junior; People of the State of New York; United States of America Defendants. Pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale dated February 1, 2012 and entered herein, I, the undersigned, the Referee in said Judgment named, will sell at public auction in the front vestibule of the Monroe County Office Building, 39 West Main Street, Rochester, New York, County of Monroe, on March 14, 2012 at 11:00 a.m., on that day, the premises directed by said Judgment to be sold and therein described as follows: ALL THAT TRACT OR PARCEL OF LAND, situate in the Town of Hamlin, County of Monroe and State of New York, known and distinguished as part of Lot No. 3, Section No. 8, Town No. 4, of the Triangular Tract, bounded and described as follows: Commencing at a point in the centerline of the Hamlin Center Road 2069.5 feet west of its intersection with the centerline of the Drake Road; thence south a distance of 24.75 feet to an iron pipe, said point being the place of beginning; thence (1) southerly making an interior angle with

the south line of the Hamlin Center Road 91 degrees 31 minutes, a distance of 300 feet to a point; thence (2) westerly making an interior angle of 88 degrees 29 minutes, a distance of 300 feet to a point; thence (3) northerly making an interior angle of 91 degrees 31 minutes, a distance of 300 feet to a point; thence (4) easterly making an interior angle of 88 degrees 29 minutes, a distance of 300 feet along the south line of the Hamlin Center Road to the place of beginning. ALSO ALL THAT TRACT OR PARCEL OF LAND, situate in the Town of Hamlin, County of Monroe and State of New York, known and distinguished as part of Lot #3, Section #8, Town #4, of the Triangular Tract, bounded and described as follows: COMMENCING at a point in the centerline of the Hamlin Center Road 2069.5 feet west of its intersection with the centerline of the Drake Road; thence south a distance of 324.75 feet to an iron pipe, said point being the place of beginning; thence (1) southerly making an interior angle with the south line of the Hamlin Center Road of 91 degrees 31 minutes, a distance of 300 feet to a point; thence (2) westerly making an interior angle of 88 degrees 29 minutes, a distance of 300 feet to a point; thence (3)

northerly making an interior angle of 91 degrees 31 minutes, a distance of 300 feet to a point; thence (4) easterly making an interior angle of 88 degrees 29 minutes, a distance of 300 feet to the place of beginning.Tax Acct. No. 020.04-2-6; Property Address: 3545 Roosevelt Highway, Town of Hamlin, New York Said premises are sold subject to any state of facts an accurate survey may show, zoning restrictions and any amendments thereto, covenants, restrictions, agreements, reservations, and easements of record and prior liens, if any, municipal departmental violations, and such other provisions as may be set forth in the Complaint and Judgment filed in this action. Judgment amount: $73,060.00 plus, but not limited to, costs, disbursements, attorney fees and additional allowance, if any, all with legal interest. DATED: February 2012 Michael Guarino, Esq., Referee LACY KATZEN LLP Attorneys for Plaintiff 130 East Main Street Rochester, New York 14604 Telephone: (585) 324-5767 [ NOTICE OF SALE ] Index No. 2011-2601 SUPPREME COURT STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF MONROE ESL Federal Credit Union, Plaintiff, vs. Douglas Frasch, a/k/a Douglas R. Frasch Geri Ann Frasch; Mark

Adult Services

34 City february 15-21, 2012

Spychalski Lumber Company, Inc., d/b/a/ Stockham Lumber Co.; Capital One Bank USA, NA; FIA Card Services, N.A., Defendants. Pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale dated October 11, 2011 and entered herein, I, the undersigned, the Referee in said Judgment named, will sell at public auction in the front vestibule of the Monroe County Office Building, 39 West Main Street, Rochester, New York, County of Monroe, on March 9, 2012 at 9:15 a.m., on that day, the premises directed by said Judgment to be sold and therein described as follows: Tax Account No. 113.04-1-8.211 Property Address: 6419 Lake Road, Town of Sweden, Monroe County, New York Said premises are sold subject to any state of facts an accurate survey may show, zoning restrictions and any amendments thereto, covenants, restrictions, agreements, reservations, and easements of record and prior liens if any, municipal departmental violations, and such other provisions as may be set forth in the Complaint and Judgment filed in this action. Judgment amount: $217,466.45 plus, but not limited to, costs, disbursements, attorney fees and additional allowance, if any, all with legal interest. DATED: February 2012 John F. Speranza, Esq., Referee LACY KATZEN LLP Attorneys for Plaintiff 130 East Main Street, Rochester, New York 14604 Telephone: (585)324-5767 1. Subject Premises Description All that tract or parcel of land, situate in the Town of Sweden, County of Monroe and State of New York, being part of Lot 7, Section 5, Town 3 of the Triangular Tract and bounded and described as follows: Beginning at a point in the west line of the right of way of Lake Road (Route 19) which point is the southeast corner of lands conveyed to Regent Properties, Inc. by warranty deed recorded in Monroe County Clerk’s Office in Liber 3968 of Deeds at page 531, said point also lying on the north

line of Lot 7; thence south 89° 37’ 36” west a distance of 1954.81 feet to a point; thence south 01° 26’ 16” east a distance of 300 feet to a point; thence south 71° 20’ 03” west a distance of 2867.56 feet to a point; thence south 00° 36’ 59” east a distance of 95.75 feet to a point, said point being the southwest corner of Lot 7; thence north 89° 35’ 45” east along the south line of Lot 7 a distance of 1180.00 feet to a point; thence north 00° 24’ 15” west a distance of 379.94 feet to a point; thence north 71° 20’ 03” east a distance of 1013.44 feet to a point; thence north 89° 37’ 36” east a distance of 2565.11 feet to the west line of the Lake Road right of way; thence northerly along the west line of the Lake Road right of way and its various courses to the point or place of beginning. Excepting all that tract or parcel of land, situate in the Town of Sweden, County of Monroe, State of New York being a part of Town Lot 7, Section 5, Town 3 of the Triangle Tract and more particularly described as follows: Commencing from the point in the centerline of improvements of Lake Road which is distant northerly 238.1 feet, more or less, from the intersection of the centerline of Lake Road with the centerline of Reed Road; thence south 88° 59’ 14” west, a distance of 60.00 feet to a point in the westerly appropriation line of said Lake Road, it being the point of beginning; thence (1) northerly along the westerly line of Lake Road along a curve to the right having a radius of 7579.49 feet a distance of 247.85 feet to a point of intersecting with the northerly line of Town Lot 7; thence (2) south 89° 35’ 11” west along the northerly line of Town Lot 7 a distance of 880.00 feet to a point; thence (3) south 01° 56’ 58” east a distance of 247.84 feet to a point thence (4) north 89° 35’ 11” east a distance of 880.00 feet to the point of beginning and containing 5.0051 acres of land. All as shown on the map title Hale Subdivision by Cowie, Van Lare PC dated August 7, 1989 drawing number 89071. Also, Excepting

all that tract or parcel of land, being part of Town Lot 7 in the Town of Sweden, County of Monroe, State of New York, being more particularly described as follows: Beginning at the southwest corner of Town Lot 7, said point being northwest corner of lands now or formerly of Michael Pierce (tax parcel 128.020-01-021); thence N 00° 36’ 59” W, along the westerly line of Town Lot 7, a distance of 95.75 feet to a point; thence N 71° 20’ 03” E, along the southerly line of lands now or formerly of Jack Arend (tax parcel 113.040-01005.8) and lands now or formerly of Kathleen Spath (tax parcel 113.040-01-057), a distance of 2867.56 feet to a point; thence S 01° 26’ 16” E, a distance of 297.17 feet to a point; thence S 89° 37’ 36” W, along lands of Colby (tax parcel 113.040-01008.1) a distance of 585.74 feet to a point; thence S 71° 20’ 03” W, along lands now or formerly of Colby, a distance of 1013.44 feet; thence S 00° 24’ 15” E, a distance of 379.94 feet to a point on the southerly boundary of Town Lot 7 also being the northerly line of lands of Chris D. Zorn, said point being 136.84 feet easterly of the northwest corner of lands of Zorn; thence S 89° 35’ 45” W, a distance of 1180.00 feet to the point and place of beginning . [ NOTICE OF SALE ] Index No. 2011-5287 SUPREME COURT STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF MONROE ESL Federal Credit Union, Plaintiff, vs) James P. Munnings; Catherine J. Munnings; GE Money Bank; Beneficial Homeowner Service Corporation, Defendants. Pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale dated January 17, 2012 and entered herein, I, the undersigned, the Referee in said Judgment named, will sell at public auction in the front vestibule of the Monroe County Office Building, 39 West Main Street, Rochester, New York, County of Monroe, on February 22, 2012 at 12:30 p.m., on that day, the premises directed by said Judgment to be sold

and therein described as follows: ALL THAT TRACT OR PARCEL OF LAND, situate in the Town of Greece, Monroe County, New York, being known and distinguished as Lot 23 of Section 3, of Green Gardens Subdivision as shown on a map thereof filed in Monroe County Clerk’s Office in Liber 94 of Maps, page 195. Said Lot No. 23, Section 3 is situate on the west side of Whitman Road and is 50 feet wide, front and rear and 163 feet deep. Tax Acct. No. 075.06-6-14 Property Address:140 Whitman Road, Town of Greece, New York Said premises are sold subject to any state of facts an accurate survey may show, zoning restrictions and any amendments thereto, covenants, restrictions, agreements, reservations, and easements of record and prior liens, if any, municipal departmental violations, and such other provisions as may be set forth in the Complaint and Judgment filed in this action. Judgment amount: $105,417.02 plus, but not limited to, costs, disbursements, attorney fees and additional allowance, if any, all with legal interest. DATED: January 2012 Thomas Solomon, Esq., Referee LACY KATZEN LLP Attorneys for Plaintiff 130 East Main Street Rochester, New York 14604 Telephone: (585) 324-5767 [ NOTICE OF SALE ] Index No. 20118827 SUPREME COURT STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF MONROE ESL Federal Credit Union, Plaintiff, vs. Jason S. Benny; Citifinancial Company DE ; GE Money Bank; RAB Performance Recoveries LLC,Defendants. Pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale dated January 11, 2012 and entered herein, I, the undersigned, the Referee in said Judgment named, will sell at public auction in the front vestibule of the Monroe County Office Building, 39 West Main Street, Rochester, New York, County of Monroe, on February 22, 2012 at 1:00 p.m., on that day, the premises directed

by said Judgment to be sold and therein described as follows: ALL THAT TRACT OR PARCEL OF LAND, situate in the town of Greece, County of Monroe and State of New York, bounded and described as Lot 594 on a map of “The Dewey Avenue Tract” a subdivision of the Moss Mosley Farm, made by G.R. Newell, Surveyor, in March, 1923 and filed in Monroe County Clerk’s Office in Liber 55 of Maps, page 20, to which map reference is made for a more particular description. Tax Account No. 060.485-1 Property Address: 129 Brayton Road, Town of Greece, New York Said premises are sold subject to any state of facts an accurate survey may show, zoning restrictions and any amendments thereto, covenants, restrictions, agreements, reservations, and easements of record and prior liens, if any, municipal departmental violations, and such other provisions as may be set forth in the Complaint and Judgment filed in this action. Judgment amount: $36,917.44 plus, but not limited to, costs, disbursements, attorney fees and additional allowance, if any, all with legal interest. DATED: January 2012 Mary Beth Feindt, Esq., Referee LACY KATZEN LLP Attorneys for Plaintiff 130 East Main Street Rochester, New York 14604 Telephone: 585 3245767 [ ROC GEOTECHNICAL CONSULTING ENGINEERS, PLLC ] Notice of the formation of the above named Professional Limited Liability Company (“PLLC”) Articles of Organization filed with the Department of State of NY on 10/12/2011. Office Location: County of Monroe. . The Secretary of State of NY (“SSNY”) has been designated as agent of the PLLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of any such process served to: The PLLC, 227 Red Hickory Drive, Rochester NY 14626. Purpose: to practice professional engineering. .


Fun

[ rehabilitating mr. wiggles ] BY neil swaab

[ news of the weird ] BY CHUCK SHEPHERD

Can’t Possibly Be True — The varsity girls’ basketball teams at predominantly white Kenmore East High School near Buffalo, N.Y., have, for several years, apparently, psyched themselves up in a pre-game locker-room ritual by chanting, “One, Two, Three, (n-word (plural))!” before running out the door and onto the court. Although the white players this year called the use of the word a “tradition” (passed down from year to year), and not a racial “label,” the team’s only black player not surprisingly had a problem with it and reported it to school officials. According to a December Buffalo News report, it was always a players-only tradition, and no adult was aware of the chant, but upon learning of it, officials immediately imposed player suspensions and team penalties. — The U.S. Treasury Department’s inspector general for tax matters revealed in January that the IRS certified 331 prison inmates as registered “tax preparers” during a recent 12-month period, including 43 who were serving life sentences. None of the 43, and fewer than one-fourth of the total, disclosed that they were in prison. (The agency blamed a 2009 federal law intended to encourage online filing of tax returns, noting that “tax preparer” registration can now be accomplished online by passing a 120-question test.) (USA Today reported in February 2011 that prisoners filing false or fraudulent tax returns scammed the IRS for nearly $39.1 million in 2009.) — The Olympic Committee Will Not Be Calling: (1) Mr. Badr Al-Alyani told a Saudi Arabian newspaper in November that he was nearing the world record for squirting milk from his eye. The current champion, Mehmet Yilmaz of Turkey, reached 2.7 meters (almost 9 feet), and Al-Alyani reports one squeeze of 2.3 meters. He said he “will continue training.” (2) In San Francisco, there is an annual refereed “Masturbate-a-

thon,” and the supposed world record, set in 2009, is held by Masanobu Sato, who remained aroused for nine hours, 58 minutes. In a series of videos released recently, Sato calmly explained how he “practices” for about two hours every morning while his live-in girlfriend goes about her business (in one video, ironing). Sato said he trains by swimming twice a week and has “gained about (11 pounds) in muscle,” which helped him with “stamina.” — David Belniak, now serving 12 years in prison after pleading guilty to DUI manslaughter for killing a woman and her adult daughter and her husband in a Christmas Day 2007 car crash, filed a lawsuit from prison in January against the victims’ family, demanding justice from them in the form of compensation for medical expenses and his “pain” and “anguish.” Police records show Belniak was driving between 75 and 85 mph when he rear-ended the victims’ stopped car (and that he had alcohol, Xanax and cocaine in his system). Attorney Debra Tuomey, Belniak’s sister, represents him and called her brother’s imprisonment “government sanctioned assassination.”

Inexplicable — Not One Second Longer With That Wench: A man identified as Antonio C., 99, filed for divorce in December against his wife of 77 years, Rosa C., age 96, in Rome, Italy. According to an ANSA news agency report, Antonio became upset when he discovered 50-year-old letters from an affair Rosa once had. — Christopher Bolt pleaded guilty in September to felony destruction of property in Loudoun County, Va., for spray-painting more than 50 vehicles. Some were marked with the number “68,” which a sheriff’s detective explained was probably because Bolt had initially sprayed “69” but realized it “didn’t look right.”

[ LAST WEEK’S SOLUTION ON PAGE 30 ]

[ LOVESCOPE ] BY EUGENIA LAST ARIES (March 21-April 19): Get your feelings out in the open, and you’ll discover whether someone has a personal interest in you. Be open and honest about your likes and dislikes to see how much common ground you share. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): A secret romance will entice you. Before moving ahead, find out why you must hide your feelings from the rest of the world. If it revolves around a third party, you may want to rethink your next step. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): You’ll attract a lot of attention, but you will also be subjected to a posses-

sive partner. Leading someone to believe you have an interest when you don’t will end up making you look bad in front of someone you want to get to know better. CANCER (June 21-July 22): Express your feelings creatively, and you will entice an unusual suitor. What starts out as a friendship can turn into a passionate relationship with the potential to lead to a lifelong commitment. Don’t let a minor setback deter you from exploring a future together. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Love, intrigue and excitement are all up for grabs. Socializing, traveling and taking part in activities

you enjoy will lead to meeting someone who is perfect for you. Love at first sight will result in a lifestyle change. Follow through and enjoy the ride. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Keep your emotions tucked away or you may end up in a vulnerable position with someone who is eager to take advantage of you mentally, physically or financially. When it comes to love, commitment and relationships, stick to your standards, morals and ethics. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Sudden and unexpected relationship opportunities will appear,

leading to a whirlwind romance that intrigues and entices you and pulls at your heartstrings. Have faith in your judgment, and share your feelings, emotions and intentions. You will find out where you stand and where your relationship is heading. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Put your heart and soul into your personal life and happiness. Spend time exploring what potential partners have to offer you in terms of equality, support and sharing a life. Be sure your partnership enhances both you and your mate’s life goals and future prospects.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): You’ll have plenty of opportunity for romance, but make sure you look past the physical attributes that attract you to someone. Beauty is only skin deep, so take a closer look. Discover how much you have in common before you become intimate. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): You’ll get a false impression from someone who is pursuing you. Ask questions to find out who this person is and what ulterior motives may be lingering in the background. It’s better to be safe than sorry when it comes to affairs of the heart.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): A change of plans will lead to a change of heart. Someone who has been in and out of your life will give you reason to try again or to walk away for good. A good and honest relationship will lead to greater personal stability. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Honesty will be required if you want to make the right choice regarding love. A problem will develop due to a lack of common ground or because you come from different cultural backgrounds. Weigh the pros and cons before you become too attached.

rochestercitynewspaper.com City 35


36 City february 15-21, 2012

February 15-21, 2012 - CITY Newspaper  

Cover: The unseen enemies | News: Rankle over high textbook costs | Dining Review: Lunch | Music: Far From Finished | Art: "Makers & Mentor...

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