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EVENTS: ROC CITY BREWFEST, FEBRUARY BREAK EVENTS 20 FILM: “SIDE EFFECTS,” “IDENTITY THIEF” 24 CHOW HOUND: ANGUS HOUSE & LOUNGE, MEDA ETHIOPIAN 11 URBAN JOURNAL: OUR STRESSED CITY

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Greater Rochester’s Alternative Newsweekly

THE STYLISTICS

Vol 42 No 23

AND MORE MUSIC, PAGE 12

News. Music. Life.

I knew he could do it, I just didn’t realize how well.” MUSIC REVIEW, PAGE 13

Utilities deal under review. NEWS, PAGE 9

Here’s what Vargas meant. NEWS, PAGE 4

Historic boost for 19th Ward? NEWS, PAGE 5

Alarm Will Sound brings back 1969. CLASSICAL, PAGE 19

COVER STORY | BY TIM LOUIS MACALUSO | PAGE 6 | ILLUSTRATION BY MARK CHAMBERLIN

Degrees of debt Melissa Nicholson had a bachelor’s and a master’s degree in education, and zero job prospects. “I discovered I couldn’t get a job just being certified to teach elementary school,” she says. “But I thought, ‘Even though I’m swamped in loans already, there’s no way I can turn back now that I’ve come this far.’” Nicholson went on to earn a post-graduate certification, but still hasn’t landed a permanent teaching job. She owes about $80,000 in student loans. It’s not hard to find people — some still in college and recent graduates — with $20,000 to

$100,000 in student loans. Some economists call student debt the next economic crisis, warning that the bubble may be about to burst. The Federal Reserve Bank of New York reports that unpaid debt on student loans is about $902 billion, but the Consumer Finance Protection Bureau says it tops $1 trillion. Some college administrators and financial aid officers say the problem of student debt is vastly overstated, but many students, parents, and educators strongly disagree.


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Feedback Send comments to themail@rochester-citynews.com, or post them on our website, rochestercitynewspaper. com, our Facebook page, or our Twitter feed, @roccitynews. We edit selections for publication in print.

Dissidents group isn’t ‘small’

The RPO board’s arrogant referral to the RPO Community Supporters as a “small group” is just as ridiculously inappropriate as calling the New York State delegation to Congress small! In both cases, these small groups represent constituencies that are immensely larger; that’s how representative democracy works! DAVID PERLMAN, BRIGHTON

Time to reform ‘employment at will’

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While many people are unaware of its existence, the employment-at-will doctrine allows employers to do what the title implies: hire and fire employees at will, with a few limited exceptions. It is incredible that a workplace legal principle from the Reconstruction era has survived basically unscathed into the 21st century, with little modification. The doctrine was devised in 1877 by Horace Gray Wood. Incredibly, as an intellectual basis of the doctrine, Wood analyzed master and slave relationships in formulating a lasting policy for arbitrating employer and employee relationships. Do we really want to base our employer-employee relationships on an archaic and repugnant plantation mentality originating from the Jim Crow-era South? Of course, we should not, and that’s why this long-standing policy cries out for reform. In the current era of lavish tax breaks for corporations, we continue to see companies lay off and under-employ taxpaying Americans in a greed-driven race to the bottom. In the last few years we have seen laws that take away employee rights, passed through movements substantially financed by multi-billionaires such as Charles and David Koch. The employment-at-will doctrine has been a willing accomplice in the assault on the American worker. The employer has no duty to articulate just cause when dismissing an employee – no cause at all is just fine under American law, except in certain defined cases of discrimination. “No cause” firings should be unacceptable and illegal in the 21st

century, but unfortunately, this practice is allowed to continue. Many “right to work” laws are being passed by states other than New York. In my opinion, these laws are best characterized as a right to work for a lot less pay, no benefits, and few, if any, employee protections under law. I guess this is what is meant when it is said that right-to-work states are business friendly. With friends like them, the taxpaying American worker needs no enemies. One again, the employment-at-will doctrine aids these abuses. We in New York can do something to change this policy, which has become a festering wound impeding employee well-being and, in the long run, hampering a strong and sustained economic recovery. If there are problems in the employee selection process, it is up to the employer to fix them. It is much easier to hire carefully than to correct the damage done by those already hired. The slash-and-burn approach to employee firings and layoffs should be unacceptable and illegal in the modern era. We have great universities and colleges within New York State to tackle these issues; the U of R, RIT, Syracuse University, and Cornell are just a few of the outstanding institutions in our area that strive to change our workplaces for the better. It is long past time to reform the repressive employment-at-will doctrine. Let’s get to work. MICHAEL BERTOLONE, GREECE

Bertolone is past executive vice president of the Monroe County Law Enforcement Association.

Fight fracking

Although the media reports the contention on both sides of the fracking issue, we do not hear the proven implications of the effects of fracking on the environment and public health. The gas industry has told us repeatedly that the practice is environmentally benign, but I ask readers to take a day trip to Pennsylvania just across the border to see the manifest destruction of state forest and Bureau of Land Management land. The hundreds of thousands of truck loads of water off to be mixed with carcinogens and neurotoxins to mitigate drilling have taken an incredible toll on Pennsylvania’s environment. In Greene County, Pennsylvania, Whitely Creek can be lit on fire because of methane coming up through the bedrock that has been tapped via fracking.

Fracking wastewater is in the millions of gallons per well, contains neurotoxins, carcinogens, and can often be radioactive. This water is either recycled, injected in deep abandoned wells, or is sent to municipal wastewater treatment plants that are only equipped to filter human pathogens, yet they still release the water into streams and rivers to be utilized downstream for the next towns’ water supply, including drinking water. Another means of disposing of the toxic salty water is spraying it on roads to de-ice them, which ends up in our wells and watersheds. And if fracking is safe, why has it been singled out in the 2005 energy bill to be exempt from environmental law? I urge people to get involved in the movement to prevent hydrofracking in New York State. SCOTT TOPEL, MENDON

Consider abortion’s toll, too

In “Seeing the Toll of Violence” (Feedback), Doug Hoener rightly reminds us that in the wake of the shootings in Newtown, we need to open our hearts and minds to a wider discussion of how violence is impacting our children and culture. Mr. Hoener points to the hundreds of thousands of children who are subjected to cruel neglect and abuse every year at the hands of adults. While the number of reported incidence of violence against these small victims certainly baffles the mind, the number of pre-born children who succumb to the fatal violence of legalized abortion is above 1.2 million each year in the United States alone. By framing abortion within a discussion of “choice” or “women’s equality,” some people, including our own governor, have been lulled into the false sense that the killing of tiny human beings is something other than barbaric, or at the very least something every women should embrace. As Governor Cuomo and others move to greatly expand abortion access in New York as part of his so-called “Women’s Equality Act,” New Yorkers have an opportunity to reverse this trend of heinous violence by telling him and our legislators that enough is enough. We must no longer be willing to stand silent while children die violent deaths at the hands of abortionists. KELLY BRUNACINI, RUSH

Brunacini is executive director of Feminists Choosing Life of New York.

News. Music. Life. Greater Rochester’s Alternative Newsweekly February 13-19, 2013 Vol 42 No 23 250 North Goodman Street Rochester, New York 14607-1199 themail@rochester-citynews.com phone (585) 244-3329 fax (585) 244-1126 rochestercitynewspaper.com Publishers: William and Mary Anna Towler Editor: Mary Anna Towler Asst. to the publishers: Matt Walsh Editorial department themail@rochester-citynews.com Features editor: Eric Rezsnyak News editor: Christine Carrie Fien Staff writers: Tim Louis Macaluso, Jeremy Moule Music editor: Willie Clark Music writer: Frank De Blase Calendar editor: Rebecca Rafferty Contributing writers: Paloma Capanna, Casey Carlsen, Roman Divezur, George Grella, Susie Hume, Andy Klingenberger, Dave LaBarge, Kathy Laluk, Michael Lasser, James Leach, Adam Lubitow, Ron Netsky, Dayna Papaleo, Suzan Pero, Rebecca Rafferty, Deb Schleede, David Yockel Jr. Editorial intern: Jason Silverstein Art department artdept@rochester-citynews.com Art director/production manager: Matt DeTurck Designers: Aubrey Berardini, Mark Chamberlin Photographers: Mark Chamberlin, Frank De Blase, Michael Hanlon Advertising department ads@rochester-citynews.com Advertising sales manager: Betsy Matthews Account executives: Nancy Burkhardt, Tom Decker, Annalisa Iannone, William Towler Classified sales representatives: Christine Kubarycz, Tracey Mykins Operations/Circulation info@rochester-citynews.com Circulation manager: Katherine Stathis Distribution: Andy DiCiaccio, David Riccioni, Northstar Delivery, Wolfe News City Newspaper is available free of charge. Additional copies of the current issue may be purchased for $1, payable in advance at the City Newspaper office. City Newspaper may be distributed only by authorized distributors. No person may, without prior written permission of City Newspaper, take more than one copy of each weekly issue. City (ISSN 1551-3262) is published weekly by WMT Publications, Inc. Periodical postage paid at Rochester, NY (USPS 022-138). Send address changes to City, 250 North Goodman Street, Rochester, NY 14607. City is a member of the Association of Alternative Newsweeklies and the New York Press Association. Subscriptions: $35.00 ($30.00 for senior citizens) for one year. Add $10 yearly for out-of-state subscriptions: add $30 yearly for foreign subscriptions. Due to the initial high cost of establishing new subscriptions, refunds for fewer than ten months cannot be issued. Copyright by WMT Publications Inc., 2013 - all rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, photocopying, recording or by any information storage retrieval system without permission of the copyright owner.


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Our stressed city It’s not a coincidence that the City of Rochester has the state’s highest poverty rate, a high murder rate, and schools with tragically low graduation rates. Nor is it a coincidence that Rochester has a serious financial problem. And last month, Mayor Tom Richards made the obligatory annual trip to Albany to ask for money. The governor’s answer: Sorry. Live within your means. Rochester and other Upstate cities need to restructure, Cuomo told the Albany Times-Union after Richard’s Albany visit. “The answer is not an additional, ongoing subsidy on a fundamental economic model that doesn’t work,” Cuomo said. “The Rochester problem, or an Upstate cities problem – if it was a corporation in a private-sector setting, you would be talking about restructuring.” Restructuring? Like what? Dismantling the police department? Eliminating the recreation centers? Not plowing the streets? There’s been talk of financial control boards for Rochester and other Upstate cities (Buffalo is already operating under one). A control board could do some things city officials can’t do, legally: freeze salaries and renegotiate pensions, for instance. That would cut some costs. But Richards doesn’t want a control board. It wouldn’t fix what’s broken. In a discussion with me last week, Richards noted New York City’s experience under a control board in the late 1970’s. New York had been mismanaged, Richards said, and there was a recession. “But that’s not our problem,” Richards said. Rochester’s problem is structural: “an 18th-century revenue system” funding our 21st-century needs. In the early 1900’s, we had a strong industrial base, and property taxes provided enough money to pay for the services residents and businesses needed. That’s not at all the case now. To note one big example: 10 years ago, Kodak paid more than $13 million a year in property taxes. That’s now down to less than $3 million. As middle-income residents have moved out of the city, as property has been abandoned, as property values have dropped, the city’s property-tax revenue has dropped. The need for services, though, has not. That’s not going to change substantially. At a January 28 hearing in Albany, Richards complimented Cuomo for providing some help, like pension tier changes and economic development aid.

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The governor’s take on Upstate cities doesn’t seem much different than Gerald Ford’s ‘drop dead’ attitude toward New York City. And in his discussion with me, he didn’t criticize the governor. “He’s got his own problems,” Richards said. Well, yes. But Cuomo’s attitude is disturbing. Ultimately, he told the TimesUnion, Upstate mayors will shape up: “Right now, it’s easy to say, ‘I need money: State, give me a check, please.’ That’s the easy solution.” And, he said, when the state doesn’t do that, “I think they’ll do what they have to do to balance the books.” Doesn’t seem much different than Gerald Ford’s “drop dead” attitude toward New York City. Cuomo’s right, of course: if we don’t get help, Upstate mayors will do what they have to do – even if that wipes out desperately needed services. Even if it drives more people and more businesses out of the city. The mayors will have no other choice. Most of the region’s poor people live in the City of Rochester. Most of its poorest children go to school in Rochester. A lot of the region’s tax-exempt property is in the city, and city taxpayers fund the police and fire services that protect those properties. “If urban areas are going to bear a disproportionate burden for society,” Richards said, “then society has to help pay for it.” And, he added: “The economic development for Upstate will ultimately fail if the urban areas fail. You can run, but you can’t hide. We are still the center of this area, and there’s no way that Upstate will be successful if all the urban areas are in crisis.” “Whether we want to deal with it,” Richards said, “we’ve got to deal with it.” What’s the solution? “I don’t see any other way than that the state makes a more substantial contribution to urban areas,” Richards said. Yep. And it would help if the governor led on this issue.

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Attention Rochester theater community: Send us your nominations for the

2013 Rochester Theater

HALL OF FAME City Newspaper is getting ready to induct new members into the Rochester Theater Hall of Fame, and we need your nominations. We want to hear what you think about actors, directors, musicians, stage managers, set designers, costume designers, producers, and others prominent members of the Rochester theater scene.

A panel of judges will select Inductees based on the following criteria: INNOVATION DEDICATION PASSION QUALITY OF WORK LASTING CONTRIBUTION TO LOCAL THEATER

Inductees will be announced at the 2013 TheatreROCS Showcase, scheduled for Saturday, April 13, at the JCC’s Hart Theater.

SUBMISSIONS should be 400-500 words in an essay format. In the essay, please describe why your nominee deserves this award, citing specific examples of the person's work and how they meet the criteria above. You may nominate yourself, or another member of the local theater community. EMAIL Nominations TO:

Send nominations to:

e-mail to eric@rochester-citynews.com with the subject line “Rochester Theater Hall of Fame.”

Rochester Theater Hall of Fame c/o City Newspaper 250 N Goodman St. Rochester, NY 14607

Submissions are due by Friday, February 22. more info www.rochestercitynewspaper.com

CITY

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[ NEWS FROM THE WEEK PAST ]

Election scorecard

The 2013 local races are beginning to take shape. Mayor Tom Richards announced he’ll run again and faces potential challenges from City Council President Lovely Warren and Rochester business owner Alex White. Warren is weighing a primary challenge to Richards, and White is seeking the Green Party nod to run in the general election. White has run, unsuccessfully, for mayor and for City Council in the past.

Dems want gun ban

County Legislature Democrats introduced legislation banning the public from carrying guns in county buildings. Current policy exempts people with concealed carry permits, a distinction Democrats say their proposal would eliminate. The proposed legislation exempts law enforcement personnel.

I-Square deal set for vote

Irondequoit officials and I-Square developers Mike and Wendy Nolan reached an agreement on a tax incentive plan for the project. Media reports say the Nolans and the town have agreed to terms for a payment-in-

lieu-of-taxes agreement that could last up to 25 years. The Town Board will meet February 19 to vote on the deal.

News

MCC vote expected

County Legislators were expected to pass a referral Tuesday night authorizing the purchase of several buildings at Kodak’s State Street site for approximately $3 million. The buildings would be renovated and for a new Monroe Community College city campus. But WinnCompanies, the owner of the Sibley building, the city campus’s current home, was seeking a 60-day delay on the vote so it could present its own campus proposal.

EDUCATION | BY TIM LOUIS MACALUSO

Patience running out for city schools? Rochester schools Superintendent Bolgen Vargas’s warning in his recent State of our Schools speech that the community faces its “last chance” to turn around the city’s troubled district left many people wondering what, exactly, he meant. In an interview after the event, Vargas said he wasn’t trying to be provocative when he made the comment. Success is still possible, he said, but time is running out because the community is losing faith in the district’s capabilities.

Downtown casino talks

The Seneca Nation of Indians wants to develop a casino in downtown Rochester, according to a recent report in the Buffalo News. The Senecas are negotiating with the state for an extension of an exclusivity zone agreement in Western New York, and a Rochester casino is part of the negotiations, says the News.

RCSD Superintendent Bolgen Vargas says the district risks losing the support of families and the broader community. FILE PHOTO

“It’s our last chance to show some improvement,” he said. “Families and the community will not continue to support us.” Vargas said he hasn’t received any specific warnings from the State Education Department, but did say that greater government oversight is possible if the Rochester school district didn’t begin to show progress. “They’ve been nothing but supportive,” he said. But the situation is dire. Rochester has the lowest graduation rate — 48 percent — of all of the state’s big five school districts, with 55 schools on the state’s list of schools in urgent need of improvement. And during

his speech, Vargas said the district’s graduation rate could get worse before it gets better because the state has steadily raised academic standards over the last four years. The district will continue to focus on improving student attendance, achieving reading proficiency by third grade, early childhood and pre-K education, and expanding the school day to reverse years of academic decline, Vargas said. He also said he wants to make the city’s neighborhood schools so attractive to parents that they will not feel compelled to explore other options, such as charter schools.

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“From an economic development perspective, we see the 19th Ward as a neighborhood that’s ripe to take advantage of the Homeowner Tax Credit because they’ve got a lot of great architecture that’s pretty intact, really great pockets.” [ CAITLIN MEIVES ]

NEIGHBORHOODS | BY CHRISTINE CARRIE FIEN

DEVELOPMENT | BY JEREMY MOULE

Historic boost for Rochester’s 19th Ward?

Looking to land bank

Four areas in Rochester’s 19th Ward may become National Historic Districts, which would make certain homeowners eligible for tax savings. These would be the first such districts in the neighborhood. “From an economic development perspective, we see the 19th Ward as a neighborhood that’s ripe to take advantage of the Homeowner Tax Credit because they’ve got a lot of great architecture that’s pretty intact, really great pockets,” says Caitlin Meives, preservation planner with the Landmark Society. “This can also highlight the 19th Ward as a great neighborhood to live in.” The area with the best potential to earn the designation is what’s known as the Sibley Tract, Meives says. That would include Wellington, Woodbine, and Rugby avenues, as well as Aberdeen Street. Other potential districts are Inglewood Drive at Thurston Road; a small section in the area of Chili and West avenues; and another small pocket at Arvine Heights and Elmwood Avenue, north of Genesee Valley Park. The boundaries are preliminary and may change, say representatives of the 19th Ward Community Association, and not all of the

homes within the boundaries would be “contributing” members of the district. Contributing members are homes with significant historic integrity, meaning there haven’t LaShay Harris. PHOTO been a lot of changes BY MARK CHAMBERLIN to their exteriors. Contributing homeowners are eligible for the state Homeowner Tax Credit, the main advantage to being in a National Historic District, Meives says. The homeowners would be eligible for savings when investing a certain amount in rehabilitation work. They would also get some money back on routine repairs like roof replacement, Meives says. The Landmark Society did the initial legwork, Meives says, and now it’s up to the 19th Ward Community Association to pursue the designations through the State Historic Preservation Office. LaShay Harris, head of the Community Association, says having the districts would strengthen the entire neighborhood.

City officials have asked the state for permission to form a land bank to help address vacant, abandoned, and taxdelinquent properties. | Last week, Rochester Mayor Tom Richards announced that the city had submitted a formal application to Empire State Development, the state’s economic development agency. The application proposes creating the Rochester Land Bank, a nonprofit corporation that would be operated by the city. A state law enacted in 2011 allows a limited number of local governments to set up land banks, pending state approval. | Land banks have more leeway than governments to acquire and transfer properties. | The application says the Rochester Land Bank would take title to approximately 25 vacant, abandoned, or underutilized houses each year for the first two years of operation. It would supply the houses to HOME Rochester, a Greater Rochester Housing Partnership program that rehabs vacant single-family properties and sells them to first-time buyers. | A press release from the city says that a typical house demolition costs the city about $25,000. A house can be rehabbed through HOME Rochester for less money, officials say, and doing so puts the property back on the tax rolls.

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Cost of War The following people have been killed in the City of Rochester in recent weeks: -- Edline Chun, 73, Rochester.

ROCHESTER TOTALS —

SOURCE: Rochester Police Department

— 2,177 US servicemen and servicewomen and 1,080 Coalition servicemen and servicewomen have been killed in Afghanistan from the beginning of the war and occupation to February 11. Statistics for Afghan civilian casualties are not available. No American casualties were reported after January 20.

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Melissa Nicholson had a bachelor’s and a master’s degree in education, and zero job prospects. “I discovered I couldn’t get a job just being certified to teach elementary school,” she says. “But I thought, ‘Even though I’m swamped in loans already, there’s no way I can turn back now that I’ve come this far.’” Nicholson, who wants to teach in the Rochester City School District, went on to earn a post-graduate certification to teach English as a second language. Though her ESL certification has made her more marketable, she says, she still hasn’t landed a permanent teaching job. Nicholson now owes about $80,000 in student loans, and will soon be faced with a $600 monthly payment. For now, she’s surviving on what she makes as a substitute teacher, and she estimates she could be 61 before she pays off her student debt. It’s not hard to find people — some still in college and recent graduates — with $20,000 to $100,000 in student loans. All it takes is a query over Twitter or Facebook, and the responses from the financially weary appear with startling speed. Some economists call student debt the next economic crisis, warning that the bubble may be about to burst. The Federal Reserve Bank of New York reports that unpaid debt on student loans is about $902 billion, but the Consumer Finance Protection Bureau says it tops $1 trillion. Some college administrators and financial aid officers say the problem of student debt is vastly overstated, but many students, parents, and educators strongly disagree. Some students and former students say their debt is so high that even if they are fortunate enough to get a job in this sluggish economy, they will still have to postpone major life decisions like marriage and having children. Others say their debt is unsustainable, and question whether they’ll ever be able to pay it off. As of 2012, more than 850,000 student loans were in default. 6 CITY

FEBRUARY 13-19, 2013

Deb Schleede graduated from the

Rochester Institute of Technology last year with an undergraduate degree in journalism and nearly $80,000 in student loans. “I completely exhausted federal and state aid,” she says. “Because I had a single mom, I did get what I consider a very decent amount of aid. But RIT is expensive and it didn’t cover all of it.” Though Schleede hasn’t been able to find a job in journalism, she does work full time in retail. She says she tries not to think about her debt because it overwhelms her. “One of my loans is $516 a month, and when you add them all together, it’s more than I make in one pay period,” she says. “I would have to be making more than $60,000 a year to make the payments comfortably.” The student loan crisis raises many questions: What are the implications of all this debt on the US economy? How can these young people ever hope to purchase big-ticket items like houses and cars? Is the debt fair? The nonprofit Center for American Progress reports that 81 percent of AfricanAmerican students and 61 percent of Latino students who earned bachelor’s degrees last year graduated with debt. And most important: the cost of tuition at four-year public and private colleges, according to CFAP, has increased by more than 1,000 percent over the last three decades, putting the rising cost of higher education on

par with the rising cost of health care. Is it good policy in a global economy to have the cost of a college education outpace the rate of inflation? Most economists shudder at the thought. Some economists, however, say it’s OK for students to have some debt — it gives them skin in the game. And higher education should be left to the forces of the free market, they say. The problem with that argument is that the playing field isn’t level. Students can defer their debt, but student loans are among the few debts in the US that can’t be discharged through bankruptcy.

Aid, or the FAFSA form. Most institutions’ websites will direct applicants to the form. UR students and parents who need financial assistance may receive some help from the UR, but Burdick says they may also be expected to borrow money. “There’s a share of students marching through here who can expect to graduate owing $30,000 to the federal government,” Burdick says. “Any other borrowing above that amount by our definition is an elected choice.” And for a degree from the UR, he says, some debt is not excessive. Burdick cites a lack of financial discipline on the part of some students and parents as one of the main problems. And he says the basic financial aid calculations that institutions use hasn’t changed much in 40 years. “A family with an income of $100,000 with two children, and one of them in college, can typically afford to spend $20,000 to $25,000 [annually] on college expenses,” he says. “It’s not comfortable, but it’s doable. It’s definitely not the time to go out and buy a house.”

Administrators and financial aid officers at

some institutions have their own view of the student debt problem. Jonathan Burdick, dean of admissions and financial aid at the University of Rochester, says about 50 percent of the UR’s students are from families who can afford to pay for their children’s education. Every college has some percentage of students who don’t have to borrow, Burdick says. Otherwise, financing college requires navigating a maze of federal and state loans, private lender loans, grants, and scholarships. The search for aid typically begins with filing a Federal Application for Student

Marci Saunders-Arnett is more than $15,000 in debt after attending two community colleges.


More loans go to undergraduate students, says Samantha Veeder, Nazareth College's director of financial aid.

But some parents are assuming debt and not making the sacrifices necessary to pay their portion of the bill, Burdick says. “It’s the same category of debt from a moral standpoint as credit card debt,” he says. “You’re choosing not to change your lifestyle at all, but you’re assuming a pretty heavy level of extra debt responsibility toward college.” Burdick says he’s worried that some discretionary debt is being lumped with college-related debt. “Somewhere in there somebody is making a choice,” he says. “I’m sympathetic and all because of the recession, but the choices being made seem to have changed a bit.” Samantha Veeder, director of financial aid at Nazareth College, agrees. During the more than 20 years she has worked in financial aid, she says she’s watched the public’s attitude toward debt change. “People respond to debt differently,” she says. “If a student takes the maximum in federal loans — about $27,000 — the monthly payment is going to be about $300 a month for 10 years. If you can receive a good four-year education at or under $30,000, you’ve done well; you’ve made an excellent investment in yourself and your career. Some parents won’t even blink an eye at $30,000, and others will say, ‘Absolutely not. You are not coming out of college $30,000 in debt.’” And Veeder cites another problem: many children and parents are not financially literate.

“I say this with my own child in mind: kids don’t understand money,” she says. “They don’t know how to balance a checkbook. They don’t know how to open a bank account. They only know how to spend.” Like many higher ed institutions, Nazareth is putting more emphasis on educating students about their loan commitments. But Veeder says it’s still a challenge. “Generally speaking, especially with freshmen and sophomores, they’re not listening,” she says. “They’ll sign whatever they have to sign: ‘just give me the loan.’” But for those students and parents who are financially savvy, Veeder says she’s seeing a reaction that’s relatively new. “This generation of parents wants to know the outcome,” she says. “’What’s the return on investment? If my child goes $30,000 into debt, is he going to get a job?’” The high cost of college may be causing some students to reassess the purpose of education and the value of a bachelor’s degree. Should they go to college to develop critical thinking and innovation, or to train for a job? Should they pursue what they most enjoy or be more pragmatic? And should college administrators be expected to justify their tuitions with some quantification of how many of their graduates are employed in their chosen fields? This is where the financial piece between students and school administrators gets a little

sketchy. With an economy struggling to emerge from one of the country’s worst recessions, the job market is especially chilly for recent graduates. A lot depends on the fields students choose, Veeder says. A student leaving Nazareth with a graduate degree in physical therapy, for example, is much more likely to find employment sooner and at a higher starting salary than a teacher at this time, she says. “I have friends who have degrees, but they’re working two and three jobs to pay for it,” says recent graduate Deb Schleede. “Some are thinking of going back to college to get a master’s. I’m very honest with them about the situation I’m in, and I caution them to think about the finances involved with it, and make sure they understand they’re not going to get rid of their debt easily.” It’s difficult to gauge how much financial

“I feel like my whole generation is drowning in debt.” how she would repay her loans and have enough money to live on. “I didn’t look at what I would be making, and here’s what would go toward groceries, car, and rent,” Nicholson says. She says she followed the conventional advice given to young people: go to college and pursue your passion. She says she knew

x 10,000

Out of about $1 trillion in student loans, only 37% of borrowers between 2004 and 2009 were paying on time and not seeking deferments. 41 % of students are delinquent at some point or 2 out of 5. As of 2012, there were 850,000 loans in default.

or career counseling Between 2004 and 2009, 33% of students receive or DELINQUENT students who quit or left college how much they need, without a degree or credential became since every student is delinquent, and 26% of them defaulted DEFAULTED different. Amanda Ott on their loans. went to cosmetology school and still owes The number of students dropping out of the $10,000 she college is on the rise. borrowed to become a hairdresser. She works Compared to the $1 trillion in student loans, full time in a shop the US budgeted about $850 billion in near RIT and says 2013 for national security. she’s on track to earn her bachelor’s degree in education at SUNY Brockport in 2015. teaching isn’t a high-paying career, but it Ott figures she owes about $30,000, and wasn’t until she was already in debt that she says she doesn’t remember receiving financial learned more about the field. And while or career counseling. changing direction is possible, it often requires “I think if I had received it, I would going further into debt. have gone to a community college for two “It’s [debt] sort of the challenge of years first,” she says. “The debt becomes my generation,” Nicholson says. “Unless you want to be a pharmacist or a nuclear a means to an end, and you’re not really engineer or one of these other high-paid considering the implications of the debt at professionals, it’s not a good situation. the time.” But I don’t know what the alternative is. Substitute teacher Melissa Nicholson says she never sat down and calculated continues on page 8 what she would make as a teacher and rochestercitynewspaper.com

CITY 7


Degrees of debt continues from page 7

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Deb Schleede is a recent graduate with nearly $80,000 in student loans.

Among people my age, you just assume there is debt. I feel like my whole generation is drowning in debt.” Ballooning student debt has put some

college officials on the defensive. Though administrators say that the number of nonmedical students with excessively high debt is still small, the issue is shining a spotlight on the staggering cost of a college education. And the question that nearly everyone asks: Why is it so high? “The inflation factor is huge,” says the UR’s Burdick. “But we’re now operating in a global environment, and this is a research university. If we’re not willing to pay $300,000 a year for a superstar economist or a million dollars for a leading scientist, some other university is.” And much of a university’s expenses are fixed, he says. “There’s no way we can get the benefits of a Ford [Motor Company] that could ship 80 percent of its manufacturing to some low-wage place,” he says. “We’re a services business and just about all of those services are performed right here.” Amit Batabyal, a professor of economics at RIT, says that advances in technology don’t always translate to significant cost savings in higher education. “You still require dormitories and you still require lecture rooms,” he says. The problem is exacerbated by parents’ and students’ high expectations of the college experience, he says. RIT is making an effort to keep tuition increases down through internal cost-savings and efficiencies, Batabyal says, and he

predicts that online education will transform higher education. “A student, let’s say, in Pakistan can take a course by Amit at RIT,” he says. “This is the wave of the future.” Batabyal says Americans have put all students on one track that leads to college. While it’s true that higher education leads to better paying jobs and more stable employment, it’s also true that the US has failed to give students more vocational school options, he says. Germany has been able to maintain a sizeable manufacturing base that provides workers with a reasonable income, Batabyal says. “In Germany, a significant number of kids don’t go to college, but Germany has a number of vocational schools,” he says. “That as a society is something we’ve failed to do.” But Batabyal is most concerned with federal and state spending priorities that have recently confronted an anti-tax culture. “Higher education is being tested in ways that it hasn’t before,” he says. “Cash-strapped states are whittling down their support for student aid. This increases reliance on debt. State governments are going to have to decide if it makes sense to decrease their support for education and increase their investment in things like prisons. It’s a very lopsided investment.” The result is higher education that’s increasingly unaffordable to many Americans, Batabyal says, which drives unemployment and underemployment.


ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT | BY JEREMY MOULE

Utilities deal under review When Recycled Energy Development agreed to buy and operate the utilities at Eastman Business Park, many local business and government leaders were relieved. Local and state officials consider Eastman Business Park a key economic development asset. And the utility system — especially the cheap and plentiful electricity generated on the site — is a large part of what makes the park attractive to high-tech businesses. If the deal goes through — and the general feeling is that it will — Recycled Energy Development will buy the utility system from Kodak, which owns the business park and is currently working to emerge from bankruptcy. Officials with both companies say RED has the experience and resources to ensure stable utilities at the park. But before it can take ownership of the utilities, RED has to navigate a regulatory gauntlet. The deal cleared its first hurdle last month when a federal bankruptcy court gave Kodak permission to sell the plant to RED. Now, the state Public Service Commission has to sign off on the sale. The PSC review is under way and last week PSC started accepting public comments on the proposed sale. Comments are due by April 1, and the earliest the commission could approve the sale is the middle of April.

“We have not put any timeframe on it,” says Christopher Veronda, a spokesperson for Kodak. “It’s really something for the PSC to determine what they believe is appropriate.” The commission oversees certain utilities in New York, including electricity and steam. Its review will focus on several factors, including RED’s technical expertise and whether the company has sufficient financial resources to run the plant, says a

Kodak wants to sell the utilities at Eastman Business Park to Recycled Energy Development. FILE PHOTO

fact sheet that Governor Andrew Cuomo’s office sent to business park tenants. The commission will also assess RED’s capacity to provide reliable service to customers at reasonable rates. RED will need approvals from other state agencies, too. For example, the deal involves the transfer of environmental permits, which must be approved by the State Department of Environmental Conservation. RED also plans to convert the coal-fired boilers that power the utilities to a natural gas system, and that requires a separate regulatory approval. When the conversion work happens depends on the pace of all of the regulatory reviews. The Finger Lakes Regional Economic Development Council met last week at

Eastman Business Park (Kodak Park in its former life); the agenda included an update on and tour of the park. During the update, council co-chair Joel Seligman, president of the University of Rochester, asked the Regional Economic Development Council’s board to reaffirm that the business park is its chief economic development priority. That’s the council’s way of telling state officials to direct focus and resources to the park. Lieutenant Governor Bob Duffy told the council and audience members that the state is committed to the park success. The Eastman Business Park is the biggest industrial park in the state and has significant potential for Upstate economic development, he said. Many of the park’s tenants are hightech businesses employing skilled workers and paying good wages. And they also have potential to add manufacturing jobs in a region that needs them. Duffy and state economic development officials say the state will invest in the park, though state officials haven’t offered details. “Everybody understands how important this [the business park] is,” Duffy said. The park is drawing a variety of tenants, including biofuels companies, medical device makers, and solar tech companies. It’s also home to the New York Battery and Energy Storage Technology Consortium’s commercialization center. Many of the firms are growing and are part of industry sectors that local leaders want to see thrive. There are roughly three dozen tenants in the park, about a dozen of which are large users of utilities, says Kodak’s Veronda. And Kodak, a heavy utilities user itself, would become one of RED’s customers. Veronda says the deal with RED would ensure reliable utilities at attractive rates.

If RED gets the OK to purchase the

Eastman Business Park’s utilities, it would be responsible for upgrading the power plant to meet new state and federal air-quality standards for industrial boilers. The new standards will be in effect by 2017 and there was concern about Kodak’s ability to make the necessary upgrades. RED could keep the existing coalfired boilers online and retrofit them with emissions control technologies. But instead it’ll replace them with natural gas-fired boilers; natural gas burns cleaner than coal. The company plans to invest $40 million to $80 million over five years for the upgrades. The natural gas upgrades would also provide economic benefits for the operator and tenants. The boilers generate steam, which is what powers the various utilities. It’s already an efficient system, says RED’s President and CEO Sean Casten. But the natural gas generators would make it more efficient and improve output, he says. “The rates are better, the environmental signature is better,” Casten says. It’s likely that the new boilers would produce some surplus electricity, which RED would sell to customers outside of the park; that income would help lower rates for business park tenants, Casten says. The state is facilitating discussions with potential buyers, Casten says. RED laid out its plans in a filing with the Public Service Commission. But the conversion plans have to undergo a regulatory review of their own, separate from the sale proceedings. The conversion would also require an expanded supply of natural gas to the business park, so the full conversion couldn’t happen until a new pipeline is built, Casten says. In that case, the switch may happen in phases, he says. As for the question of rates, RED has told business park tenants that it’s willing to commit, via contracts, to the same amount and structure that Kodak used. Casten says that commitment would give the park’s tenants some certainty about rates, which they can use in their planning. It’ll also let the state know that the company isn’t going to take advantage of the tenants by raising rates, and that it’s willing to put its commitment in writing, Casten says.

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CITY 9


URBAN ACTION This week’s calls to action include the following events and activities. (All are free and open to the public, unless otherwise noted.)

Bourgeois returns to Rochester

For more Tom Tomorrow, including a political blog and cartoon archive, visit www.thismodernworld.com

Correcting ourselves

The February 6 cover story on “The Rochester Plays” included an incorrect end date for the works. They will run through March 2.

10 CITY FEBRUARY 13-19, 2013

Upstate New York Call to Action will present “Priest Speaks His Conscience: the Struggle for Justice and Gender Equality in the Catholic Church,” at 7 p.m. on Wednesday, February 20. The Rev. Roy Bourgeois, a priest in the Maryknoll order for 46 years, was recently excommunicated because he refused to be silenced about his support for the ordination of women priests. The event is at Christ the Good Shepherd Lutheran Church, 1000 Winton Road North.

Squirrel massacre protest

Friends of Animals and other animal rights

groups will hold a protest against the Holley Squirrel Slam from 3 p.m. to 6 p.m. on Saturday, February 16. People concerned about the humane treatment of animals are encouraged to meet at the Holley Fire Department, 7 Thomas Street in Holley. Information: www. FriendsofAnimals.org.

Talk on African youth issues

Nazareth College will host “Youth in Africa: Challenges and Hopes for the Future,” a lecture by Babacar Fall at 6 p.m. on Wednesday, February 13. Fall is a history professor at the University Cheikh Anta Diop in Dakar. He has studied economic and political issues related to youth in three African countries. Fall’s talk is at the Nazareth College Golisano Academic Center.

CSA fairs

NOFA-NY, a statewide organization of farmers, consumers, gardeners, and businesses committed to creating a regionally sustainable food and farm system, will hold two community supported agriculture fairs. The first is from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. on Saturday, February 16, at the Public Library, 115 South Avenue. The second is from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. on Sunday, February 24, at the New York Wine and Culinary Center, 800 South Main Street in Canandaigua.

Frack film

Anti-fracking activists will show the documentary film “Gasland” on Sunday, February 17. The film shows the issues and concerns associated with the technology for gas removal known as fracking. It's at Calvary St. Andrews Presbyterian Church, 68 Ashland Avenue, after the 10 a.m. service.


Dining CSA Fair, where you can chat with local

farmers and compare share options. The Rochester CSA Fair takes place Saturday, February 16, 1-3 p.m. at the Bausch & Lomb Public Library Building, 115 South Ave. Visit nofany.org to learn more.

A matter of taste

Vino Con Sabor (translation: “wine with

taste”) is the name of the Puerto Rican Festival’s third annual tasting event, which pairs New York State wines with a three-course meal of Puerto Rican cuisine and offers attendees the opportunity to purchase their favorite wines directly from the wineries themselves. Vino Con Sabor begins at 6 p.m. on Saturday, March 9, at the Rochester Plaza, 70 State St. Tickets are $40 and available at prfestival.com

Better with age Flat iron skewers (left) and grilled scallops (right) from Penfield's Angus House & Lounge. PHOTOS BY MARK CHAMBERLIN

It’s what’s for dinner [ CHOW HOUND ] BY DAYNA PAPALEO

If you’ve ever tried to corral your nearest and dearest for a restaurant meal, then you already know that factors like dietary restrictions, moral choices, and personal tastes can make deciding on someplace a total chore. Paula Catalano comes from a huge family that enjoys going out to eat, and she found that more often than not they’d wind up at one of the chains in an effort to make everyone happy. “It wasn’t easy to find a place that has a good mix of food,” says Catalano. So she created the “comfortable but upscale” spot she had in mind. Located at the Four Corners of Penfield in a lovely historical building that formerly housed Kam Wah Chinese Restaurant, Angus House & Lounge might be best described as a steakhouse with an Italian influence, and it’s clear from the name that Angus House takes its meat very seriously. The steaks and burgers are all Certified Angus Beef, meaning that the beef has to pass stringent USDA specifications on such factors as marbling and fat thickness. “It’s top of the line, never frozen,” says Catalano. “If I offer high quality for a reasonable price, then everybody wins.” Incidentally, is there anything better on a bone-chilling night than braised beef short ribs redolent of red wine and served atop warming basil polenta ($22)? Or an organic

roasted half-chicken with dried cherrycornbread dressing ($16)? The Angus House menu is lavish with comfort food, whether you’re looking to tuck in to one of the many steak options, classic shrimp scampi ($22), or grilled scallops served with crispy pancetta, wild mushroom risotto, and asparagus ($23). The starters and salads reflect the Italian steakhouse concept as well, with artichoke Francese ($9), two different calamari preparations, an antipasto platter ($14), and juicy flat-iron skewers ($12) served over arugula, Gorgonzola, and addictively sweet horseradish-roasted grape tomatoes. Angus House serves weekday lunch, offering a few sandwiches and wraps alongside many of the evening’s appetizers and entrées, such as Paula’s Eggplant Caprese ($9), which incorporates goat cheese and sundried tomato into the expected flavors. (“We make it at home and I wanted to share it,” says Catalano.) There’s a 60-person private party room available, but the Angus House kitchen, headed by chefs Tim Mayo and Scott Wilson, is up for some offsite catering, too. Angus House & Lounge is located at 2126 Five Mile Line Road, Penfield. It is open MondayThursday 11 a.m.-10 p.m., Friday 11 a.m.-11 p.m., Saturday 4-11 p.m., and Sunday 4-9 p.m. Food prices range from $6-$40. For more information, call 218-2005 or visit the Facebook page.

Eat with your hands

At the risk of sounding ignorant, I’m not entirely sure what I ate at Meda Ethiopian Bar & Restaurant, my friend and I having settled on the generous Meda Special Combo for two ($17.99). What I do know is that it was delicious and I can’t wait to go back. The combo featured a couple of different kinds of lentils, one with a subtle curry and the other seasoned with the aromatic spice blend known as berbere; some tender collard greens; two different lamb preparations; and a beef dish that I wanted more of. Everything was artfully arranged on a platter covered with injera, the spongy, pleasantly tangy flatbread that doubles as an eating utensil. All the items on the platter — plus many more — are available a la carte as well, and vegetarians have their own combo options. Meda Ethiopian Bar & Restaurant is located at 302 University Ave. It is open Monday-Sunday 11 a.m.-11 p.m. Food prices range from $7.50 to $17.99. For more information, call 2856960 or visit medaethiopianrestaurant.com.

Share and share alike

It’s not too early to start dreaming about summer’s bounty of fresh fruits and vegetables, and anyone interested in Community Supported Agriculture should join the Northeast Organic Farming Association of New York for the Rochester

South Wedge cocktail bar Cheshire will celebrate its first anniversary Wednesday, February 27, 5-11 p.m. with the release of its oak-barrel-aged Manhattan, a process meant to soften the edges and add a little complexity to the drink. Call 232-4909 or visit the Facebook page of Cheshire’s sister business, Solera Wine Bar, to learn more.

Well done

Kudos to Joe Bean Coffee Roasters (1344 University Ave., 319-5279, joebeanroasters.com), which last month received national honors as part of the Good Food Awards for its Pachi coffee, brewed from beans sustainably sourced from a single farm in Nicaragua. And congratulations to Hedonist Artisan Chocolates (674 South Ave., 4612815, hedonistchocolates.com), whose Valentine’s Day prep got a whole lot busier when a panel of respected culinary voices sang the praises of Hedonist’s salted caramels in a recent New York Times piece. 

Familiar places

Craft Café is now serving breakfast, lunch,

baked goods, and coffee drinks in the space that until recently housed Roc River Coffee Co., 234 Andrews St. Call 2323653 or visit craftcaferochester.com for more information. Shema Sushi has closed its doors on Main Street in Webster but is scheduled to resurface before too long in the old Gusto location, 277 Alexander St. Stay tuned... Chow Hound is a food and restaurant news column. Do you have a tip? Send it to food@ rochester-citynews.com. rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 11


Upcoming [ POP/ROCK ] Phillip Phillips Thursday, April 25. St. John Fisher College. 3690 East Ave. $20. 8:30 p.m. sjfc.edu/springevent. [ POP/ROCK ] James McCartney Tuesday, May 14. Lovin’ Cup. 300 Park Point Dr. $15. 8 p.m. 292-9940.

Music

[ POP/ROCK ] Hollywood Undead Friday, May 24 Main Street Armory. 900 East Main St. $25. 7 p.m. 232-3221. rochestermainstreetarmory.com

“Re:Percussion”

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 17 FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH, 220 WINTON ROAD SOUTH. 7:30 P.M. | $5-$10 ($20 FAMILY) | 271-9070, FIRSTMUSE.ORG [ CLASSICAL CROSSOVER ] If you’re like me and you’ve

had it up to your ears with grey skies, get up off your sofa and turn your cabin fever into foot-stomping, bodymoving percussion fever. This weekend composer and percussion guru Ivan Trevino leads Rebecca Gilbert, flute, Melissa Matson, viola, and Kathleen Murphy Kemp, cello, in a concert that includes the world premiere of his “Chamber Riffs.” The program also includes an adaptation of J.S. Bach’s “Gamba Sonata in G Major.” And, if I still haven’t grabbed you, how about “Taming the Ox” by composer Stephen Rush, who will be part of the performance. — BY PALOMA A. CAPANNA

Absolutes FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 15 BUG JAR, 219 MONROE AVE. 9 P.M. | $7-$9 | BUGJAR.COM [ GARAGE ROCK ] Rochester’s The Absolutes keep this town’s garage-rock tradition alive with killer stomp and rave. With a dash more pop than The Sonics and a less live mayhem than The Chesterfield Kings, this young band has mastered the sound’s relentless throb and wail. This is music to be experienced live to begin with, and the Absolutes are absolutely one of the best at producing it. Though I love the band’s original tunes, I’d love to hear them do The Invictas’ hit “The Hump.” Wouldn’t you? Sports and Green Dreams will be shakin the shack as well. — BY FRANK DE BLASE

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WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 13 ACOUSTIC/FOLK Dave McGrath. Dinosaur Bar-B-Que, 99 Court St. 585325-7090. 9 p.m. Free. Traditional Irish Session w/ Cathy & Lynn. McGraw’s Irish Pub, 146 W Commercial St. 348-9091. 7 p.m. Free. JAZZ Nick Finzerr CD Release Show. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. 9:30 p.m. $3-$5. The band Upstate played at Montage Music Hall Friday, February 8. PHOTO BY FRANK DE BLASE

Michaela Anne TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 19 ABILENE BAR & LOUNGE, 153 LIBERTY POLE WAY 8 P.M. | FREE 21+/$3 UNDER | 232-3230, ABILENEBARANDLOUNGE.COM [ AMERICANA ] This self-managing, self-promoting folk

siren currently hails from Brooklyn, but grew up as part of a globetrotting military family. Despite changing addresses as much as she changed her socks, Michaela Anne still found time to satisfy her musical appetites by studying the violin, piano, and guitar. This combination of landscapes, physical and auditory, has informed a well-seasoned sound that skillfully fuses country, blues, and folk. Anne’s young career has already seen critical acclaim for her 2011 album “To Know Where,” as well as comprehensive tours of both coasts, where she has played with the likes of Frontier Ruckus and Michael Daves. — BY DAVID YOCKEL, JR.

Mitty & The Followers THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 14 STICKY LIPS BBQ JUKE JOINT, 830 JEFFERSON ROAD 8 P.M. | $5 | 292-5544, STICKYLIPSBBQ.COM [ R & B/SOUL ] Eric “Mitty” Moore — a.k.a the

Ambassador of Soul — leads this powerful, energetic R & B outfit with solid, sophisticated bass lines and a staggering vocal range. Stevie Lyons adds the right amount of spice with his edgy, Southern-rockish guitar work, while Sammy “G” controls the keys with a sound dripping with blues and gospel influences. Rounding out the mix is drummer Paul Mastriani whose unassuming but steady rhythmic approach is the perfect foundation for this soulful reimagining of your mama’s Motown. — BY DAVID YOCKEL, JR.

UMI

Rock ’n’ roll roustabout [ REVIEW ] BY FRANK DE BLASE

I knew he could do it, I just didn’t realize how well. Bassist Todd Bradley has the chops and the pipes for sure, as he demonstrates as a a member of popular Rochester trio The Hi-Risers. But Thursday, February 7, at Abilene, armed with an acoustic and those aforementioned vocal cords (a foundation-rumbling collision between Ernest Tubb and Barry White), Bradley wove his way in and around songs by Dion, Buddy Holly, and of course The Hi-Risers. Often, a lone troubadour in a bar is background, a bed track for the alcoholfueled come-ons and the get-losts, or it can be loud and over bearing. Bradley was neither as he anchored the elusive drum-less beat and crooned casually. I’m tired of working in metaphors for the cold, so let’s just say that I went out for some rock ’n’ roll minus my nuts Friday night. The music made its way out on to the street. It was experimental Sandwich wrapping up its set at Montage Music Hall. The band had a groovy back and forth that hinted lightly at reggae or reggae-influenced bands like Sublime without all the sunshine and peace. Upstate followed with a solid set of jammed-out progressiveness. I want to describe the band as slightly psychedelic-

leaning, but wonder if the light and fog visuals planted that seed. Too late, Upstate is psychedelic, and an open-minded unit unafraid to try anything. The crowd was light but that seemed to have little bearing on the band’s collective thrill and output. The love flowed as copiously as the cream ale at Skylark Lounge on Sunday for Rochester rock ’n’ roll scenester Rebecca Lieving, who is currently battling cancer. Tons of people wedged their way into the joint to wish her well, support the cause, and dig on the bands that donated their time and tunes. Babayaga kicked things off loud and proud. It’s odd to hear a band his heavy with sunlight streaming through the windows. It somehow seems out of context. Despite the priceless look of alarm on the faces of those unfamiliar with the band, it sounded mighty and malevolently cool. The Sisters of Murphy followed, but the daylight had no impact here as this band simply belongs in a bar any time of day or night. SOM has that keen balance of tradition and rock ’n’ roll roustabout that has the music converting others outside the Gaelic scene. You can’t help but dance and drink a little faster. Get well soon, Rebecca. Rochester rock ’n’ roll — and its rock ’n’ rollers — love you and need you.

POP/ROCK Divinex w/Veracult, Tarantula, Experiment #27. Tala Vera, 155 State St. 546-3845. 8 p.m. $5-$7. Rash w/ Cuss, AEATH. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. $6-$8.

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 14 ACOUSTIC/FOLK Jim Lane. Murph’s Irondequoit Pub, 705 Titus Ave. 342-6780. 8 p.m. Free. Joe Mooney. McGraw’s Irish Pub, 146 W Commercial St. 348-9091. 7 p.m. Free. The Pickpockets. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 7:30 p.m. Free. Serge w/Steve Melcher & Drew Moore. The Rabbit Room, 61 N. Main St. 5821830. 6 p.m. Free. DJ/ELECTRONIC Kiss 106.7 1st Ever Valentine’s Day Stop Light Party. Grotto, 7 Lawrence St. 739-5377. 10 p.m. Call for info. JAZZ Cafe Music w/Shades of Red Piano Trio. Hochstein Performance Hall, 50 N Plymouth Ave. 454-4596. 7 p.m. $5-$10. Deborah Branch. Lemoncello, 137 West Commercial St. 385-8565. 6 p.m. Free. continues on page 15

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Music

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Local band Pink Elephant grew out of The Indras, but is definitely its own project, playing in its own subgenre: "trash wave." PHOTO PROVIDED

The Pink Elephant in the room Pink Elephant PART OF THE VALENTINE’S DAY MASSACRE W/THE GRINDERS, MINDS OPEN WIDE, CLYDE, BABAYAGA, MEG, STEVE & GRIMEY, THE FOX SISTERS SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 16 BUG JAR, 219 MONROE AVE. 9 P.M. | $5 | BUGJAR.COM REVERBNATION.COM/PINKELEPHANTJAMS [ PROFILE ] BY FRANK DE BLASE

Like a fat lady in skinny jeans, bands spend a great deal of time forcing themselves into genres, shoehorning the music into classifications that don’t fit, or shunning genres altogether. Nobody wants to be pigeonholed; they want to be unique, creating their own music with their own custom caption. Rochester ’s Pink Elephant could be considered heavy rock, psychedelic, perhaps even a bit stoner, but that wasn’t good enough. So just as big girls found stretch pants, the band came up with its own perfect fit: trash wave. Initially coined when a multi-band show (Trash Wave Revue) that the band put together needed a title, Pink Elephant has since grown to accept, embody, and define this heavy sub-genre. “We wanted to have something that said Rochester specifically,” says guitarist Nick Walters. “You think of trash plates and a general sense of dinginess to the city. It sort of 14 CITY FEBRUARY 13-19, 2013

applies to that sort of ugly, noisy dude rock. A mash-up of the different underground rock movements from the last 30 years: punk, postpunk, garage rock…loud, sordid.” Pink Elephant’s sound is loose, urgent, with a seething undertow and magnetism. Think a less pissed-off Fugazi or a more coherent Melvins. It’s fun despite its anger, it’s streamlined despite its weight, and it’s loud despite everything else. “Definitely loud,” adds guitarist Eric Witkowski, who founded the band when the material he was writing outgrew his band The Indras. “I was going through the third incarnation of The Indras,” Witkowski says. “Which was not in the ‘trash wave vein.’ It was much heavier stuff.” Witkowski had seen Walters playing with The Black Arrows, The Clockmen, and Inugami and dug his style. “I liked his control of noise,” Witkowski says, adding that Walters is “just a great noise-guitar player. His control of space on stage was awesome. And that’s what I was looking to move toward.” Witkowski snagged Indras’ bassist Greg Wilcox and drummer Mike Fuhr and Pink Elephant was born. “It’s kind of like the fourth incarnation of The Indras without the old material,” Witkowski says. But Pink Elephant is definitely its own entity, not simply an un-

Indras affair. As a songwriter it’s just another way Witkowski compartmentalizes. “I tend to write a lot of songs,” says Witkowski. “And I have to fish out which ones are Pink Elephant, which ones are solo, or which ones are a band that hasn’t formed yet. I still try to think what I want Pink Elephant to be.” Walters finds himself stretching out too, but more within the confines of this band exclusively. “This is the most I’ve ever been a lead guitar player in a band,” he says. “I’ve been the only guitar player, but that’s much different. Now I’m just focusing on leads and pushing myself to do things that aren’t quite that obvious and keep things interesting.” The band has one self-titled three-song EP out now, with studio plans for more goodies pending. Shows in Philadelphia and Boston are on the calendar and another Trash Wave Revue show -- the third, actually -- is scheduled for April, when Pink Elephant is willing to share membership under the title “trash wave.” It’s not just theirs. “We’ve got bragging rights maybe,” Walters says. “But anybody’s free to use it.” As Pink Elephant continues to search and grow within its songwriting, the stage show is where it needs to be; no shtick, no frills, just a Pink Elephant in the room. “We’re not too ironic,” Walters says. “Or tongue in cheek. We’re just playing pretty straightforward passionate rock ’n’ roll.”


THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 14 Eastman Jazz. Acanthus Café, 337 East Ave. 585-319-5999. Call for info. Marco Amadio. Pane Vino Ristorante, 175 N. Water St. 232-6090. Thursday: 8 p.m., Friday: 6:30 p.m. Free. The Mike Kaupa Quartet. Tower Fine Arts Center Mainstage at The College at Brockport, 180 Holley Street. 7:30 p.m. $8-$15. The Swooners. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. 585-6625555. 5:30 p.m. Free. Ted Nicolosi and Shared Genes. Roncones Italian Restaurant, 232 Lyell Ave. 458-3090. 6 p.m. Free. The Westview Project. The Mendon House, 1369 Pittsford-Mendon Road. 585624-7370. Free. R&B Mitty and The Followers. Sticky Lips BBQ Juke Joint, 830 Jefferson Rd. 292-5544. 8 p.m. $5. Valentine’s Day: Rhythm Dogs. Dinosaur Bar-B-Que, 99 Court St. 585-325-7090. 9 p.m. Free. POP/ROCK Natalia Zukerman: Dusty Valentine. Genesee Community College, 1 College Road. 5853430055. 7 p.m. $6-$12. Port Chuck. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N. Water St. 585-3255600. 8 p.m. $41.20-$257.50. Singles Rule Love-pocalypse Concert w/The Moon Zombies, The Alphonso Williams Band, DJ Tanner. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. 9 p.m. $3-$5. Valentine’s Day Punk Rock Heartbreak: Timeshares w/ Declan Ryan, Keeler. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 8:30 p.m. $6-$8. Valentine’s Day Show ft. The Results, Dan Frank and The True Believers, Cory Kesselring, and Anchorage Nebraska. Tala Vera, 155 State St. 546-3845. 8 p.m. Free.

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 15 ACOUSTIC/FOLK 8 Days a Week w/Carin’s Pride Open Session. McGraw’s Irish Pub, 146 W Commercial St. 348-9091. 6 p.m. Free. Feel the Love ft. Jim Drew. Towpath Cafe, 6 N. Main St. 377-0410. 7 p.m. Free. Grrr!. The Rabbit Room, 61 N. Main St. 582-1830. 7 p.m. Free. Jim Lane. Murph’s Irondequoit Pub, 705 Titus Ave. 342-6780. 8 p.m. Free Barry’s Crossing. Barry’s Old School Irish, 2 W. Main St. 202-1319. 7 p.m. Free. Ralph Louis. Rochester Plaza Hotel, 70 State St. 546-3450. 6 p.m. Free. BLUES John Cole Blues Band. Dinosaur Bar-B-Que, 99 Court St. 585325-7090. 10 p.m. Free.

CITY Newspaper presents

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The Art of Aware Touch Couples deepening your relationship Feb 23rd 10 a.m. - 5 p.m. This workshop is for pairs (couples, friends, relatives) who want to open their hearts to each other while practicing self-awareness, moving from stress to safety and well-being.

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You pay what works best for you. ROCK | THE RESULTS PRESENT VALENTINE’S DAY

If you’re looking to spice up your plans for Valentine’s Day, Tala Vera offers a line-up of three groups that are bound to wow your music-loving boo. The Results (pictured) rock the continuum between typical band and super-awesome guitarbass-drums combo. The quintet’s grooves are subtle while its tempos are energetic and the guitar solos blistering. The Results jump around and cite Jack White and Jet as influences. I hear that and some Meat Puppets, too. Grunge kings Anchorage Nebraska sure feel like one of the hardest-working bands on the local scene. Neither snow nor sleet nor rain keeps Anchorage Nebraska from the swift completion of its appointed gig. This Valentine’s Day show also features a set of solo acoustic serenades from members of both groups. With folk-punk singer-songwriter Cory Kesselring. It all goes down Thursday, February 14, 8 p.m. at Tala Vera, 155 State St. Free. tala-vera.com. – BY ROMAN DIVEZUR

COUNTRY The Jane Mutiny w/Teagan and Lou. Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 2323230. 6 p.m. $4-$7.

Commercial St. 385-8565. 7 p.m. Free. Marco Amadio. Pane Vino Ristorante, 175 N. Water St. 232-6090. Thursday: 8 p.m., Friday: 6:30 p.m. Free. Mark Cassara Band w/Bobby DiBaudo Duo. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. 585-6625555. 5:30 p.m. Free. Miche Fambro. Bernuzio Uptown Music, 122 East Ave. 473-6140. 7 p.m. Donations accepted. Sofrito. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 8:30 p.m. Free. Ted Nicolosi and Shared Genes. Pultneyville Grill, 4135 Mill St, Williamson, NY. pultneyvilleGrill. com. 7 p.m. Free. The Westview Project w/Doug Stone, sax. Pomodoro-University Ave., 1290 University Ave. 2715000. 7 p.m. Free.

DJ/ELECTRONIC Tainted Love III Blood Lust. Grotto, 7 Lawrence St. 7395377. 10 p.m. Call for info.

R&B 70’s Soul Jam. Auditorium Theatre, 885 East Main Street. 222-5000. 7 p.m. $44.50 - $50.00.

JAZZ Cool Club Jazz Trio. Prosecco Italian Restaurant, 1550 New York 332. 924-8000. 6 p.m. Call for info. Fred Costello & Roger Eckers Jazz Duo. Charley Brown’s, 1675 Penfield Rd. 385-9202. 7:30 p.m. Free. Gian Carlo Cervone Trio. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 5:30 p.m. Free. Luca Foresta & Electro Kings. Lemoncello, 137 West

POP/ROCK Alex Patrick’s Birthday Show ft. The Absolutes, Sports, Green Dreams, and TeenSet DJ’s. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. $7-$9. continues on page 16

CLASSICAL Gospel Fridays: School of the Arts Choir. City Hall, 30 Church St. 12:30 p.m. Free. Peter Blum. 7:30 p.m. 2555 Baird Rd, Penfield, Cytec Corporation Warehouse, entrance through Mooseberry Cafe. $20. A Romantic Evening with Brahms. Nazareth College Wilmot Recital Hall, 4245 East Avenue. 3892700. 7:30 p.m. Free. RPO: Classic Bond. Kodak Hall at Eastman Theater, 60 Gibbs St. 8 p.m. Carl Davis, guest conductor. Mary Carewe, vocalist,. $15-$82.

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God is Love! Open to Receive and Give Weekly guided meditations during Lent Release stress and open to the Presence

Sunday Celebration 11:00 a.m. Music, Meditation and Message February focus on relationships Children's Program

Feb 13, 20, 27, 6:30-7:30 p.m.

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FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 15 The Dead Catholics w/The JJ Lang Band, Burning Bridge, and Michele Sestito. Tala Vera, 155 State St. 546-3845. 8 p.m. $5. Galileo Band. California Brew Haus, 402 Ridge Rd. West. 621-1480. 9 p.m. Call for info. Gavin and Pyntch. Boulder Coffee Co. – Park Ave., 739 Park Ave. 697-0235. 8 p.m. Call for info. Loud & Proud. Pineapple Jack’s, 485 Spencerport Rd. 247-5225. 10 p.m. Call for info. Rexx w/Thandroid & The Impossible Monkey, Scream Project. Firehouse Saloon, 814 South Clinton. 319-3832. 8 p.m. $4. Rockabilly Rumble w/Krypton 88, The Swooners. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. 9 p.m. $3-$5. Something Else. Brickwood Grill, 250 Monroe Ave. 7308230. 10 p.m. Call for info. Spacejunk. Montage Music Hall, 50 Chestnut St. 2321520. 8 p.m. Call for info. Surge. Nashvilles, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. 334-3030. 9 p.m. Call for info. Teagan & The Tweeds. Sticky Lips BBQ Juke Joint, 830 Jefferson Rd. 292-5544. 8:30 p.m. $5. Timeline w/East High All Stars. Johnny’s Irish Pub, 1382 Culver Rd. 224-0990. 4 p.m. Free. Valentine’s Day Concert/ Fundraiser. Cobblestone Arts Center, 1622 New York 332. 389-0220. 7 p.m. $10-$30. Your Own Reflection w/Young Blood, Red Letter Statement. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N. Water St. 585-325-5600. 6:30 p.m. $10-$12.

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 16 ACOUSTIC/FOLK Acoustic Brew. Flaherty’s

COUNTRY Zac Brown Tribute Band. Nashvilles, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. 334-3030. 9 p.m. Call for info. DJ/ELECTRONIC Feti-Uary: Grown & Sexy. Club Clarissas, 293 Clarissa St. 2323430. Call for info. JAZZ Annie Wells. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 8:30 p.m. Free. Fred Costello & Roger Eckers Jazz Duo. Charley Brown’s, 1675 Penfield Rd. 385-9202. 7:30 p.m. Free. Gap Mangione. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. 585-6625555. 6 p.m. Free. Luca Foresta & Electro Kings. Lemoncello, 137 West Commercial St. 385-8565. 7 p.m. Free. Marco Amadio. Prosecco Italian Restaurant, 1550 New York 332. 924-8000. 7 p.m. Call for info. Ted Nicolosi and Shared Genes. Jasmine’s Asian Fusion, 657 Ridge Rd. 216-1290. 6:30 p.m. Free. The White Hots. The Pultneyville Grill, 4135 Mill St. (315) 5894512. Call for info.

SOUL/R&B | THE STYLISTICS

CLASSICAL | BRASS AND BAGPIPES

Philadelphia soul sensation The Stylistics came together in 1968 after members of The Percussions and the Monarchs joined forces. With lead vocalist Russell Thomkins, Jr.’s nasally falsetto, the group let out a string of unforgettable gems including “Stop, Look, Listen (To Your Heart),” “You Are Everything,” and its biggest hit, “You Make Me Feel Brand New,” which went to No. 2 on the Billboard Charts in 1974. An updated version of the group comes to town as part of The Superstars of the 70’s Soul Jam — and a good excuse to sustain Valentine’s Day one more day — with The Emotions, The Blue Notes, Blues Magic, The Main Ingredient, and Cuba Gooding Senior.

Joining forces in a single concert event are the University of Rochester Brass Choir and the Rochester Scottish Pipes and Drums. The big sounds of the concert will include fanfares, marches, hymns, and traditional pipe band selections like “Scotland the Brave” and “Amazing Grace.” The UofR Brass Choir is led by founder and director Josef Hanson, and is a 32-member ensemble. Since 1919, the Rochester Scottish Pipes & Drums has been dedicated to the presentation and preservation of traditional Scottish pipe music. The true Scottish plaid of the uniform of the corps is taken from the 42nd Highland Division, the Black Watch of the British Army, by special permission of Her Majesty, Queen Elizabeth II.

The jam goes down Friday, February 15, 7 p.m. at the Auditorium Theatre, 885 E. Main St. $44.50-$50. rbtl.org. — BY FRANK DE BLASE

Bring on the Brass and the Bagpipes! Takes place Sunday, February 17, 3 p.m. at St. Mary’s Church, 15 St. Mary’s Place. Free. 273-5157. — BY PALOMA A. CAPANNA

OPEN MIC Regional A Capella Competition. Nazareth College, 4245 East Ave. 389-2097. 8 p.m. $12-$15.

Webster, 1200 Bay Rd. 6710816. Call for info. Songwriters in the Round ft. Paul Swiatek, John Cadley, Brian Coughlin, Taylor Buckley, and Perry Cleaveland. Tango Cafe, 389 Gregory St. 271-4930. 8 p.m. $9. Candela. Tapas 177 Lounge, 177 Saint Paul St. 262-2090. 11 p.m. Free. Galtee Mountain Boys w/Ted McGraw. McGraw’s Irish Pub,

Rod MacDonald w/Maria Gillard. Cafe Veritas at First Unitarian Church, 220 Winton Road South. 7:30 p.m. $10-$18. Serge & Friends. The Rabbit Room, 61 N. Main St. 5821830. 7 p.m. Free.

R&B Mardi Gras Chili Party w/Mitty & the Followers. Captain Jack’s Goodtime Tavern, 8505 Greig St. 315-483-9570. 8 p.m. Call for info.

146 W Commercial St. 3489091. 5:30 p.m. Free. Hot Day at the Zoo. Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. 9:45 p.m. $7-$10. Jon Akers. Flaherty’s Honeoye Falls, 60 W. Main St. 4977010. Call for info. Lovin Cup Unplugged Dinner Music Series: Matt Sauer. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. 6 p.m. Free.

BLUES Joe Beard. Dinosaur Bar-B-Que, 99 Court St. 585-325-7090. 10 p.m. Free.

Out of the Blue. Sticky Lips BBQ Juke Joint, 830 Jefferson Rd. 292-5544. 9 p.m. Free. CLASSICAL RPO: Classic Bond. Kodak Hall at Eastman Theater, 60 Gibbs St. 8 p.m. Carl Davis, guest conductor. Mary Carewe, vocalist,. $15-$82.

HIP-HOP/RAP Monster Music. House of Guitars, 645 Titus Ave. 5443500. 6 p.m. Free.

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POP/ROCK Ben Proctor Band. Boulder Coffee Co. - Alexander St., 100 Alexander St. 454-7140. 8 p.m. Call for info. The DeVills, Heatseeker, Vinyl Orange Ottoman. Firehouse Saloon, 814 South Clinton. 319-3832. 8 p.m. 21+. $5. Extended Family, Teressa Wilcox Band. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. 9 p.m. $3-$5. Frank Madonia and Friends. Towpath Cafe, 6 N. Main St. 377-0410. 7 p.m. Free. Haewa. Dub Land Underground, 315 Alexander St. 402-9802. 9 p.m. Call for info. John Valenti and the Sidelong Glances. SPoT Coffee, 200 East Ave. 585-613-4600. 7 p.m. Free. Ken Kosmicki. Boulder Coffee Co. – Park Ave., 739 Park Ave. 697-0235. 8 p.m. Call for info. Marge’s Pajama Party w/Todd Bradley. Marge’s Lakeside Inn, 4909 Culver Rd. 323-1020. 8 p.m. 21+. Free. Mochester. Brickwood Grill, 250 Monroe Ave. 730-8230. 10 p.m. Call for info. Run for the Roses. Montage Music Hall, 50 Chestnut St. 232-1520. 9 p.m. Call for info. Sisters of Murphy. Johnny’s Irish Pub, 1382 Culver Rd. 224-0990. 8 p.m. Free. Springer. Pineapple Jack’s, 485 Spencerport Rd. 247-5225. 10 p.m. Call for info. That 80’s Hairband. Nola’s Restaurant & Nightclub, 4775 Lake Ave. 663-3375. 10 p.m. Call for info. Triple Play. Hamlin Station Bar & Grill, 52 Railroad Ave. 9642010. 8:30 p.m. Call for info. Valentine’s Day Massacre ft. The Grinders, Minds Open Wide, Clyde, Babayaga, Meg Steve & Grimey, Pink Elephant, and The Fox Sisters. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. 21+. $5.

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 17 ACOUSTIC/FOLK Celtic Music Sundays: Brian Clancy. Temple Bar and Grille, 109 East Ave. 232-6000. 7 p.m. Free. Laura Cortese w/Dietrich Strause. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. 8 p.m. $10-$15. BLUES Bryan Lee and the Blues Power Band. Midtown Athletic Club, 200 E Highland Dr. 461-2300. 2 p.m. Free. CLASSICAL “David and the Three Goliaths” ft. Bonita Boyd, flute; Patrica Sunwoo, violin; Bonnie Choi, harpsichord. Wilmot Recital Hall Nazareth College, 4245 East Avenue. 389-2700. 3 p.m. Free. First Muse Chamber Music: Mid-Winter re:Percussion. First Unitarian Church, 220 S Winton Rd. 271-9070. 7:30 p.m. $5-$10.

ELECTRO POP | LITTLE SPOON, EYEWAY

With breathy vocals and interesting synthy bits, Little Spoon will dig a little hole in your ear and nest there. It’s chill and slow, true, but solidly in the same vein as Pictureplane, plus all the dreamy keyboards you could ever hope for. If you’re all stuffed up, all the better to get your cough syrup on and come out for a show (the booze kills the bugs, don’cha know). Local artist Eyeway is all the girl with a guitar you could ever need, plus a little more, and a little folk should prove a good mix, as will the piano stylings of John Valenti. TeenSet will be on hand after the bands with all the cool 45s. The show takes place Wednesday, February 20, 8 p.m. at the Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. $6-$8.18+. 454-2966, bugjar.com.— BY SUZAN PERO Universtiy of Rochester Brass Choir: Brass and Bagpipes. St. Mary’s Church, 15 St. Mary’s Place. 232-7140. 3 p.m. Free; freewill offering suggested. DJ/ELECTRONIC Big Gigantic. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N. Water St. 585-3255600. 7:30 p.m. $17-$22. City Harvest Black w/Ian Downey is Famous, Tugboat, and Tony Nelson. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. $5-$7. JAZZ Michael Vadala Trio. Prosecco Italian Restaurant, 1550 New York 332. 924-8000. 5 p.m. Call for info. POP/ROCK A Fragile Tomorrow w/The Corrections, Nick Young. Richmond’s Tavern, 21 Richmond Street. (585) 2708570. 7 p.m. $5.

MONDAY, FEBRUARY 18 JAZZ Ben Waara. Lemoncello, 137 West Commercial St. 3858565. 6 p.m. Free Lemoncello, 137 West Commercial St. 3858565. 6 p.m. Free. Black Diamond Express. Green Lantern Inn, One East Church St. 381-7603. 6:30 p.m. $12. Jesse Collins Duo. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. 585662-5555. 5:30 p.m. Free.

HIP-HOP/RAP Drumzoo. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N. Water St. 585325-5600. 7:30 p.m. $10-$15. POP/ROCK Lovin’ Cup Idol: Billy Joel/Elton John Week. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. Call for info. Passion Pit w/Matt and Kim. Main Street Armory, 900 E. Main St. 232-3221. 7 p.m. $30-$35.

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 19 ACOUSTIC/FOLK Michaela Anne. Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. 8 p.m. Free 21+, $3 unders. CLASSICAL Alarm Will Sound. Kodak Hall at Eastman Theater, 60 Gibbs St. 8 p.m. $15-$25. DJ/ELECTRONIC Turnt Up Tuesday MoTown Throwdown, ft. DJ Alykhan, Vampyre Eyes, and Andy Riot and the Sockhoppers. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. $3-$5.

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 17


Classical

New-music group Alarm Will Sound, which includes several Eastman School of Music alums, presents a concert event featuring music from 1969 next week. PHOTO PROVIDED

Moving into the future, through the door marked “1969” Alarm Will Sound TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 19 KODAK HALL AT EASTMAN THEATRE, 60 GIBBS ST. 8 P.M. | $15-$25 | 454-2100, ESM.ROCHESTER.EDU [ PREVIEW ] BY PALOMA CAPANNA

They’re calling it a “Rochester homecoming” on the Alarm Will Sound website. Indeed, for founding members of the ensemble, Alan Pierson and Gavin Chuck, the February 19 concert is precisely this. Pierson and Chuck graduated from the Eastman School of Music in 2006, and the years in between have been a rapid climb to the inner circle of coveted spots on the “New Music” scene within the classical-music world. Next week, Alarm Will Sound brings its original performance piece “1969” to the stage of Kodak Hall at Eastman Theatre. Infused with musical selections from John Lennon, the Beatles, Karlheinz Stockhausen, Leonard Bernstein, Luciano Berio, and Yoko Ono, the Alarm Will Sound production of “1969” is anything but musicians seated in chairs on a stage, playing piece by piece. “1969 is a multi-media event where we’ve woven together video, action, and music, 18 CITY FEBRUARY 13-19, 2013

specifically music written in 1969 in response to the upheavals going on at the time,” says Chuck. “What’s interesting about that period and those people is that they felt that music could and should be at the center of social transformation. Our show revisits the question, Can music be at the center of social change?” Even before there was Alarm Will Sound, Pierson and Chuck were at the center of the contemporary evolution of classical music while studying at the Eastman School of Music. Chuck says, “I remember sitting in Spot Coffee, and before we were even a group we were talking about our identity and what we wanted to do. And right at the top of that list was to renovate the concert experience, not to have just the conventional set-up where people come in and sit down to hear piece after piece.” Pierson shares Chuck’s clear philosophy, and says, “I think part of what we said Alarm Will Sound was going to be about was to be genre agnostic. That’s no longer a crazy idea, but it was, at the time. The idea of that meeting in 1969 of avant-garde new music and avantgarde pop music is equally the modern story of Alarm Will Sound.” Pierson and Chuck found the atmosphere at ESM to be supportive of their tendencies toward new music. While students, they

founded OSSIA, a student-run, new music group with a continued, strong presence at ESM. Chuck says, “My experience at Eastman was not that it was that conservative or, if there was a strong conservative strain, there was still room for us to react to it.”’ Listening to Chuck, his reverence for the musical figures of the late 1960’s is apparent. “I feel like the environment we live in today was created by people like Lennon and Stockhausen talking to each other,” he says. “Maybe that kind of cross-genre or crosspollination didn’t happen in the immediate years following 1969, but for us – as a young generation, doing that music now – it’s really like a lost promise fulfilled.” After graduating from ESM, Pierson and Chuck started Alarm Will Sound and began making unusual composer pairings for concert performances. Pierson says that the idea for “1969” began in a conducting workshop, where he played with the idea of a concert organized around a single year. “Something I’ve always been interested in is how to organically connect really different kinds of music in ways that feel like a whole,” says Pierson. “1969 was one of the years I started looking at. Then I made a list of what music was written in 1969. The anecdote of the meeting between

Stockhausen and the Beatles came out and that became the nucleus of the whole show.” For one of the other members of Alarm Will Sound, Matt Marks, his work centered on creating an orchestration of the Beatles’ “Revolution No. 9,” which Marks describes as “their weirdest and longest piece from the ‘White Album.’” “It’s a taped piece with crazy sounds, recordings, some music – it’s a big sound collage about eight or nine minutes long,” says Marks. “To mainstream audiences, it’s notorious for being the worst Beatles song, but, as far as contemporary art music goes, it’s a huge piece of experimental and tape music.” Marks’ assignment was not insignificant. He didn’t have access to anything other than the finished album recording, so he listened to it hundreds of times in all different ways to deconstruct the noise. Marks arrived at a methodology of left-forward, left-backwards, right-forward, and right-backwards, reflecting left and right tracks and whether sound was playing forwards or backwards. When his reaction was “what is this crazy air shit going on?,” Marks pulled down the meter and used digital audio stretching or filters until he could “hear it.” He even set out a type of written or graphic score for the piece. “There was a tension of not wanting to make the orchestration not sound like the London Symphony Orchestra plays the Beatles,” says Marks. “I tried to hear the sounds as music and appreciate the sounds on their own terms. I let each sound come to me and then I let those sounds connect.” Even with all of these musical ideas stretching back to the time of the band’s formation, the explorations of Alarm Will Sound evolved even further into fully staged productions for the 20-member group, working with a staging director, Nigel Maister. “Alarm Will Sound is introducing a heightened element into many of their concerts,” says Maister, co-creator and director of “1969.” “They use theatricalized staging for music that originally did not have a performative element in it, but they are extracting it from the music.” The challenge for Maister, the artistic director of the University of Rochester’s International Theatre Program, is to take what may sound “quite challenging and quite daunting” to the average listener and translate it into physical space to create a more intense and engaging experience, while not messing with the tradition. He also faces the constraints of 18 to 20 musicians on stage, some of whom carry big instruments or who play instruments that should be played sitting down. “These guys are very open as far as musicians go, but they still are very trained to do what


Art Exhibits

musicians do,” says Maister. “The quality of the technique is obviously paramount to them. There’s a push and pull about what can this piece be and how perfect does it have to sound. I’ve had to learn how to adapt my expectation and the way I work them; they’ve have to adapt the way they play.” Maister, who considers new music circles to be embracing of all elements across genres from pop to classical, says, “It would be arrogant to say Alarm Will Sound opened this door to XYZ, but I would hope that Alarm Will Sound, in conjunction with other new-music ensembles and some orchestras as well, have opened the door to experiencing the totality of music in a new way, to explode the boundaries of what is accepted musical practice.” In his interview, Chuck acknowledged a

persistent, even if diminished, divide between popular music and culture and classical music and culture. Chuck says this doesn’t bother him too much. “Our responsibility as artists is to find and do what we find compelling and hope the audience will be invited to lean forward and meet us half way,” says Chuck. “I’m quick to say that I love all those masterpieces by Brahms and Beethoven, but I want somehow to communicate to my contemporaries that they can do the same thing for somebody 200 years from now by being engaged with new music. The highest calling you could have is to transform the world, no merely to copy it.” Speaking with Pierson, Chuck, and Marks, the individual interviews all came down to questions of whether Alarm Will Sound is picking up where the earlier crossgenre explorations failed for the likes of iconic composers like Lennon, the Beatles, Stockhausen, Bernstein, and others. Is Alarm Will Sound picking up where they left off? Where will this wave of cross-genre musical productions lead? What will people say in 50 years about Alarm Will Sounds’ “1969?” Pierson says it’s “not for me to say” what magnitude of impact a group like Alarm Will Sound has and will continue to have on music, but he is willing to say, “We’ve been raised at a time when there wasn’t really another group like this. There was a need for it. There was all this good music being written and we had the support – we had Eastman and [composer] Steve Reich. And we had the benefit of 1969 being our past. They were trailblazers opening up a new territory that needed time to be understood so that generations later could grow up living in that territory – not breaking into it. When the characters in 1969 started to make these connections, it wasn’t natural. Now, it feels much more natural. Now it’s not your grandfather’s new music.”

[ OPENING ] “Contrasts & Contours” Hamilton Aguiar.. Tuesdays-Saturdays Nan Miller Gallery, 3450 Winton Place Through Mar 2. Tue-Sat 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Reception Feb 13 6-9 p.m. Also Introducing regional sculptor Lucien Casartelli’s sophisticated, contemporary, mixed media sculptures. RSVP 2921430. info@nanmillergallery.com. nanmillergallery.com. [ CONTINUING ] AAUW Art Forum, 494 East Ave Off the Wall VII Members Exhibit. Continues through Apr 19 by appointment only. 244-9892. Art and Music Library, Rush Rhees Library, University of Rochester, River Campus. (en)Gendered Juried Art. Through Feb 27. Mon-Fri 9 a.m.-5 p.m. rochester.edu/college/wst. Arts Council for Wyoming County, 31 S Main St. “Local Color”. Through Mar 8. Reception Mar 8 6-8 p.m 237-3517. artswyco.org. Arts & Cultural Council, 277 N Goodman St. Gift of the Magi: A Sojourn Through African Iconography. Clyde Morgan 4734000. artsrochester.org. The Assisi Institute, 1400 North Winton Rd. “Toothpick World” by Stan Munro. Tuesdays-Saturdays Tue-Thu noon-6 p.m., Fri noon8 p.m., Sat 11 a.m.-4 p.m $5 suggested donation. 473-8731. assisi-institute.org. Aviv Cafe, 321 East Ave. “Nehemiah’s Wall” by Deborah Ingerick. Through Feb 28. 7299916. Axom Gallery, 176 Anderson Ave, 2nd floor. Judd Williams: “Eccentrics.”. Through March 9. Wed-Sat 12-5 p.m. and by appointment. 2326030. axomgallery.com. Barnes & Noble, 3349 Monroe Ave. Penfield Art Association Winter Show. Through March 1. Mon-Sat 9 a.m.-10 p.m., Sun 9 a.m.-9 p.m. 586-6020. penfieldartassociation. com. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. “What Fury Fiends Find” Adelin Karius: New Paintings and Woodcuts. Through March 31, 8 p.m.-2 a.m. Through Mar 31. lobbydigital@ gmail.com. lobbydigital.com. The Caroline Gallery, 159 Caroline St. Photo Exhibit to Benefit Women’s Rights in India. Through Feb 15. 260-7607. joekewin@ gmail.com. joekewin.com. Cat Clay, 1115 E. Main Street, Suite 225 Hunk of Burnin’ Love. Through Mar 31. Glass & clay for your valentine by Paul Taylor & Clifton Wood 414-5643. catclay.com. Community Darkroom Gallery, 713 Monroe Ave. “Kaleidoscope”. Through Feb. 23. 271-5920. Crossroads Coffee House, 752 S. Goodman St. Dead End City Art Show II. Through Feb 28. 2446787. kccrossroadscoffee.com. Davison Gallery, Cultural Life Center, Roberts Wesleyan College, 2301 Westside Dr. Art Faculty Showcase. Through Feb 15. 5946442. roberts.edu. Gallery Salon & Spa, 780 University Ave. Thinking Outside the Box: Jen Born featuring works by Fairport HS students. Through Feb. 28. 271-8340. galleryhair.com. Genesee Center for the Arts and Education, 713 Monroe Ave. “Seconds From the Flame” Seconds Sale. Through Feb. 23. 244-1730. geneseearts.org. continues on page 20 rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 19


ART | “TOTEMS AND OTHER TRIBUTES TO THE EARTH: CERAMIC WORKS BY PETER GERBIC” Last week, the Williams-Insalaco Gallery 34 at Finger Lakes Community College (3325 Marvin Sands Drive, Canandaigua) opened a show of work by Middlesex artisan and former FLCC ceramics professor, Peter Gerbic. The show, “Totems and Other Tributes to the Earth: Ceramic Works by Peter Gerbic,” consists of elegantly formed minimonolith works of earthy tones and textures. Gerbic was a member of the Rochester Folk Art Guild and studied with Franz Wildenhain, one of the founders of the School for American Crafts at the Rochester Institute of Technology. The artist “intertwines the natural and instinctual with symbolic references,” says Barron Naegel, assistant professor of art and director of the Williams-Insalaco Gallery 34. The exhibit will remain on view through March 15. Gallery hours are Monday-Thursday, 8:30 a.m.-9 p.m.; Friday 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m.; and Saturday-Sunday, noon-5 p.m. For more information, call 785-1369 or visit flccconnects.com. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY

Art Exhibits

2, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. $5-$12. 2768900. mag.rochester.edu. Mercer Gallery at Monroe Communtiy College, 1000 E Henrietta Rd. “A Reasonable Facsimilie”. Through Feb 22. Mon-Thu 11 a.m.-7 p.m., Fri 11 a.m.-4 p.m., other times by appt. 292-2021. monroecc.edu. My Sister’s Gallery, 505 Mt. Hope Ave. “MAPS” by Gianna Stewart. Through Feb 17. 5468400. EpiscopalSeniorLife.org. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. Enrique Mora. Through March 1. Through Mar 1 2580400. thelittle.org. Livingston Arts Center, 4 Murray Hill Dr. 2013 Member’s Exhibit: Freedom of Expression. Through Mar 2. Wed & Fri 1-4 p.m., Thu 1-7:30 p.m., Sat 11 a.m.-3 p.m 243-6785. livingstonarts.org. Lux Lounge, 666 South Ave. The Art of J Nevadomski and Allie Hartley. Ongoing. 232-9030. lux666.com. Nazareth College Arts Center, 4245 East Ave. “Good Work” Illustration Invitational. Through Mar 1. Hours Sun and Tue-Thu noon-5 p.m., Fri-Sat noon-8 p.m. 389-5073. naz.edu/art/ arts-center-gallery. Nazareth College Colacino Gallery, 4245 East Ave. “Design in the Working World: The Alumni Graphic Design Exhibit.” Through Mar 1. Hours Wed-Sun noon-5 p.m. 389-5073. naz.edu/ art/colacino-art-gallery. New Deal Gallery, 4 Livingston County Campus. Expressions of the Civil War: In Recognition of the 150th Anniversary. Continues TFN Wed, Fri 1-4 p.m., Thu 1-7:30 p.m., Sat 11 a.m.-3 p.m 243-6785.

George Eastman House, 900 East Ave. “Silver and Water”. Through May 26 Included in admission: $5-$12. 271-3361. eastmanhouse.org. Hartnett Gallery, Wilson Commons, University of Rochester, River Campus. Christopher Troutman: “Watching: US and Japan Drawing”. Through Feb 17. Tue-Fri 11 a.m.-7 p.m., Sat-Sun 12-5 p.m 275-4188. blogs. rochester.edu/hartnett. High Falls Fine Art Gallery, 60 Browns Race. Tom Kim Solo Photography, “Text and Texture” and “Neil Montanus & James Montanus: A Glimpse of the World.”. Through Feb 28. Wed-Fri 11 a.m.-5:30 p.m., Sat 12-5:30 p.m., Sun 1-5 p.m. 3252030. centerathighfalls.org. Image City Photography Gallery, 722 University Ave. “The Big Picture”. Through Feb 17. Wed-Sat 11 a.m.-7 p.m., Sun 12-4 p.m. 4821976. dano@rochester.rr.com. imagecityphotographygallery.com. International Art Acquisitions, 3300 Monroe Ave. Landscapes Revisted. Through Feb 21. 264-1440. internationalartacquisitions.com. I-Square Visions, 693 Titus Ave. “Tactile Art: The Warmth and Beauty of Fiber”. Through Feb 14. zannebrummer@gmail.com. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. Art Reflected: 1913-2013. In Lockhart Gallery through May 12: “Becoming Modern: Armory Show Artists at MAG.” Wed-Sun 11 a.m.-5 p.m., Thu until 9 p.m. Open school break hours Tue Feb 19 and Apr 20 CITY FEBRUARY 13-19, 2013

Oxford Gallery, 267 Oxford St. Ray Easton and Jean K Stephens. Through Feb 23. Tue-Fri noon-5 p.m., Sat 10 a.m.-5 p.m. 2715885. oxfordgallery.com. The Owl House, 75 Marshall St. Artwork by Alexander Currier. Through Mar 10. 585-360-2920. owlhouserochester.com. Pat Rini Rohrer Gallery, 71 S Main St. The 8th Annual Studio II Exhibit. Through Feb 22. Reception Jan 11, 6-8 p.m 3940030. prrgallery.com. Phillips Fine Art, 248 East Ave. Kurt Feuerherm “Timeless” Mixed Media and Landscapes.. Tue-Fri 12-6 p.m., Sat 12-5 p.m. or by appt 232-8150. Plastic, 650 South Ave. The Art of Jamie Lowes. Through Feb. 28. Tue-Sat 11 a.m.-7 p.m. 563-6348. facebook.com/ plasticgrrl?fref=ts. Rare Books & Special Collections, Rush Rhees Library, University of Rochester, River Campus. Alice in the Looking Glass: Illustrations and Artists’ Books 1865-2012. Through Aug 16. Mon-Fri 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Sat 11 a.m.-3 p.m 275-4477. Record Archive, 33 1/3 Rockwood St. Heroes and Villains. Ongoing. Reception Feb 8 6-9 p.m recordarchive.com. Rochester Contemporary Arts Center, 137 East Ave. Makers & Mentors. Through Mar 17. WedSun 1-5 p.m. New paintings, prints, and mixed media works by Kurt Feuerherm, Peter Monacelli, Patricia Dreher, and Kristine Bouyoucos. In Lab Space: Heather Swenson. Reception Jan 31 6-10 p.m. & Feb 1 6-10 p.m 461-2222. rochestercontemporary.org. RIT Bevier Gallery, 90 Lomb Memorial Dr, Booth Building 7A. Rochester-Finger Lakes Middle and High School Community Exhibition. Through Feb. 25. Mon-Fri 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m., MonThu 7-9 p.m., Sat 1-4:30 p.m., Sun 2-4:30 p.m 475-2646. Rosalie “Roz” Steiner Art Gallery, Genesee Community College, One College Rd. Through Mar 8: “Mediation and Negociations” by Elena Lourenco. Through Mar 13: “a*new*found*land” by Joe Ziolkowski. Mon, Wed, Thu Fri 10 a.m.-4 p.m., other times by appt 343-0055 x6616. stvierrico@ genesee.edu. genesee.edu. Spectrum Gallery at Lumiere Photo, 100 College Ave. “Brighton Country Homes and Architects.”. Through March 16. 461-4447. lumierephoto.com. Tower Fine Arts Center, SUNY Brockport, 180 Holley St. Monroe and Vicinity Biennial. Through Feb 24. 395-2487. brockport.edu/finearts. University Gallery, James R Booth Hall, RIT, Lomb Memorial Dr. Neil Montanus. Mon-Thu 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Fri-Sat 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Closed Dec 22-Jan 6. Reception Dec 13, 5-7 p.m 475-2404. jleugs@rit.edu. University of Rochester, River Campus. “If I Had a Camera: ReImagining Film and Media through a Feminist Lens.”. Through Feb. 28. 275-6948. sbai@rochester. edu. rochester.edu. Valley Manor, 1570 East Ave. Light and Shadows. Through Mar 8. Mon-Fri 9 a.m.-5 p.m. A black and white art show by family artists: Dick Roberts, Allison Roberts, and Eric Cady 770-1923.

Williams Gallery at First Unitarian Church, 220 S Winton Rd. “Passages” by Anca Seger. Through Feb 24. Daily 10 a.m.-2 p.m., 4:30-8 p.m Free. 271-9070. Williams-Insalaco Gallery at FLCC, 3325 Marvin Sands Dr. “Totems and Other Tributes to the Earth: Ceramic Works by Peter Gerbic.”. Mon-Thu 8:30 a.m.-9 p.m., Fri 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m., Sat-Sun noon-5 p.m. 7851369. flccconnects.com. Wood Library, 134 North Main St. Exhibition of Recent Works by Kevin Carr. Through Mar 4. Paintings and prints. 394-1381.

Art Events [ THU., FEBRUARY 14 ] Eye of the Beholder: Community Art Night. 7 p.m. Finger Lakes Community College Honors House, 4340 Lakeshore Dr., Canandaigua. 7 p.m $2, free to students with ID. 785-1367.

Comedy [ THU., FEBRUARY 14 ] John DiCrosta/Brian Herberger. Feb. 14-16. Comedy Club, 2235 Empire Blvd. Thu 7:30 p.m., FriSat 7:30 & 10 p.m $7-$10. 6719080. thecomedyclub.us.

Dance Events [ WED., FEBRUARY 13 ] RRROX… Rochester Rhythm and Romance: Jazz Hugs and Tap Kisses. Feb. 13-17. Downstairs Cabaret Theatre Center, 540 E. Main St Wed 7 p.m. Thu 5:30 & 7:30 p.m., Fri-Sat 5:30 & 8 p.m., Sun 2 & 4 p.m. Special “Tappy Hour” 5:30 p.m. shows on Valentine’s Day, February 15 and 16. $25. 325-4370. downstairscabaret.com. [ THU., FEBRUARY 14 ] inspireDANCE Festival. Feb. 14-19. University of Rochester, River Campus Workshops, performances, demos, more. Festival pass $18-$25, individual tickets are $5-$15 273-5150. rochester.edu. [ FRI., FEBRUARY 15 ] MAD (Movement and Dance) Festival. Feb. 15-17. Nazareth College Arts Center, 4245 East Ave Classes are $5 each or $25 for six 389-2163. naz.edu/ theatre-arts/mad-festival. The Metallic Series. Feb. 15-16, 7:30 p.m. MuCCC, 142 Atlantic Ave $8-$10. reddirtdance.com. Neutral Ground Singles Dance. 8 p.m.-midnight. Green Lantern Inn, One East Church St. Music by DJ Joetta of Go Sounds $7 requested donation. 381-7603. neutralground1.com. Third Annual Sweetheart Ball. 8-11 p.m. Tango Cafe, 389 Gregory St. Groove Juice Swing. Beginner lesson at 7 p.m $6. 271-4930. groovejuiceswing.com. [ SAT., FEBRUARY 16 ] Garth Fagan Dance Valentine’s Day Dinner and Dance. 6:30 p.m. Garth Fagan Dance Studios, 50 Chestnut St $150 per person, RSVP. 454-3260. garthfagandance.org. Illstyle & Peace Producations Performance: Impossible. 8 p.m. University of Rochester, River Campus $5-$15. 273-5150. rochester.edu.

DANCE | INSPIREDANCE FESTIVAL Philadelphia-based hip-hop dance troupe IllStyle & Peace Productions will perform its “Impossible” show at the University of Rochester’s third annual “inspireDANCE Festival” this weekend. The festival, which will take place Thursday, February 14, through Tuesday, February 19, will offer nearly 30 workshops and a variety of performances. Illstyle & Peace Productions (pictured) is a multicultural dance company rooted in contemporary and old-school hip-hop. Their performance will take place Saturday, February 16, at 8 p.m., in Strong Auditorium (University of Rochester, River Campus), and will showcase the troupe’s diverse mix of dance and performance styles including tap, ballet, house dancing, DJing, and beatboxing. Tickets are $15, or $5 for students. The group will also teach workshops during the run of the festival. The inspireDANCE Festival was launched in 2011 by Arielle Friedlander ’11, as a part of her Kauffman Entrepreneurial Year project, and is organized through the Program of Dance and Movement at the University of Rochester. This year’s offerings include contemporary, hip-hop, jazz, tap, ballet, Salsa, West African, Jamaican, Middle Eastern, Capoeira, T’ai Chi, Qi Gong, and more. Festival Club Passes, which allow participants to attend classes, workshops, and performances, are available for $18 through February 14, and $25 afterward. For a full festival schedule, visit rochester.edu/college/dance/index. php/inspiredance/, and to learn more about Illstyle & Peace Productions, visit pentacle.org/metro_illstyle_media.php. To purchase tickets and registration, or for more information, call 273-5150. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY Mardi Gras Masquerade Ball. 7:30 p.m. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. Rochester’s own fiery hot jazz band, the Roc City Stompers, will lure you into a night of masked mayhem on the dance floor with live music from 8:30-11:30pm. Learn to Charleston from experienced Groove Juice Swing instructors during the free beginner lesson 7:30-8:30pm. Festive attire is encouraged: feathers, sequins, bright colors and of course, masks! $12 general/ $10 with student ID. 845-706-2621. groovejuiceswing.com. Shen Yun. 7:30 p.m. Rochester Auditorium Theatre, 885 E. Main St. Ages 4+. $50-$150. 877-519-0905. mail@rbtl.org. ticketmaster.com. [ TUE., FEBRUARY 19 ] Stardust Ballroom Dance Series. 7:30 p.m Edgerton Community Center, 41 Backus St $3. 428-6769. cityofrochester.gov/ ballroomdanceseries.

Festivals [ SAT., FEBRUARY 16 ] The fifth annual New York Ice Wine & Culinary Festival. 11 a.m. Casa Larga, 2287 Turk Hill Road. casalarga.com.

Kids Events [ WED., FEBRUARY 13 ] Lego Travel Adventure. Through May 12. The Strong National Museum of Play, 1 Manhattan Square Through May 12. Opening weekend Sat Jan 19 11 a.m.-4, Sun Jan 20 1-4 p.m Included in admission: $11-$13. 263-2700. museumofplay.org. [ THU., FEBRUARY 14 ] Anti-Valentine’s Day Teen Night. 6-8 p.m. Wood Library, 134 North Main St. Grades 6-12 Free, register. 394-1381. woodlibrary.org. Bop Until You Drop Family Dance Party. 10-10:30 a.m. Greece Public Library, 2 Vince Tofany Blvd. For children and adults of all ages Free. 225-8951. Free Youth Admission Days. 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Seneca Park Zoo, 2222 St. Paul St Purchase one adult admission and get one free youth admission senecaparkzoo.org. [ FRI., FEBRUARY 15 ] Winter Break Specials. Feb. 1524. Adventure Landing, 3340 West Ridge Rd. Enjoy 60 arcade tokens for $10, 100 arcade tokens for $15 or 300 arcade


KIDS | FEBRUARY BREAK EVENTS It’s tempting to sit around and do nothing when you get a break from school. But kids can choose instead to spend this February break learning about film, science, or transportation at two special museum events. Beats nothing, doesn’t it? Starting on Saturday, February 16, the Rochester Museum and Science Center (657 East Ave.) debuts “Movie Magic,” a program of hands-on film events that runs through Sunday, February 24. Each day, from noon to 4 p.m., kids can explore their favorite films – and the art of filmmaking itself – in a variety of themed workshops and demonstrations. The first event, running this Saturday and on Sunday, is “Robotics,” a program where kids can explore the world of robotics in movies like “Transformers” and “Wall-E” and build robots of their own. Other events include an animation workshop on Tuesday, February 19; an activity about the science of superheroes and their gadgets on Friday, February 22; and programs about the “Twilight,” “Star Wars” and “Harry Potter” series. There will also be daily pyrotechnic demonstrations at 1 p.m. Each event is included with museum admission: $13 for adults, $12 for seniors and college students, $11 for ages 3 to 18 and free for museum members and children under 3. For tickets and the full “Movie Magic” schedule, visit rmsc.org. As a delightful detour in the ongoing “LEGO Travel Exhibition” at the Strong National Museum of Play (1 Manhattan Square), the museum will present its Travel-tastic School Break Week from Saturday, February 16, through Sunday, February 24. The program features a display of vintage vehicles and transportation artifacts from the museum’s collections, and also includes a full-size off-road baja vehicle constructed by Rochester Institute of Technology students. This special exhibit is included with museum tickets: $13 for general admission and free for museum members and children under 2. Visit museumofplay.org for more info and events. — BY JASON SILVERSTEIN tokens for $40, throughout the entire Winter Break! No coupon required 225-5093. sdarr@ adventurelanding.com.

Rochester Museum and Science Center, 657 East Ave. Included in museum admission $11-$13. 271-1880. rmsc.org.

[ SAT., FEBRUARY 16 ] “Blackbeard the Pirate.”. Feb. 16. JCC Rochester, 1200 Edgewood Ave. 1 p.m. and 3:30 p.m. (ASL interpreted) $11. 461-2000. tykestheatre.org. February Break: Movie Magic!. Feb. 16-24, 12-4 p.m. Rochester Museum and Science Center, 657 East Ave. Feb 16-17: Robotics, Feb 18: Harry Potter, Feb 19: Cartoons, Feb 20: Pirates of the Caribbean. 271-1880. rmsc.org. School Break Week. Feb. 16-24. The Strong National Museum of Play, 1 Manhattan Square Mon-Thu 10 a.m.-5 p.m., FriSat 10 a.m.-8 p.m., Sun noon-5 p.m Included in museum admission $11-$13. 263-2700. museumofplay.org. Science Saturday: Mars Rocketry. 10 a.m.-3 p.m.

[ SUN., FEBRUARY 17 ] Family Movie: Ponyo. 1:30-3 p.m. Central Library, Children’s Center, 115 South Ave. 428-8150. [ TUE., FEBRUARY 19 ] Rockin’ ‘n’ Frolickin’ with Mike Kornrich Duo. 10:30 a.m. Brighton Memorial Library, 2300 Elmwood Ave. 5300. brightonlibrary.org.

Lectures [ WED., FEBRUARY 13 ] Institute for Popular Music Lecture. 7 p.m. Rush Rhees Library, University of Rochester, River Campus Talk on Civil war era music by James Davis (SUNY Fredonia) entitled “Maryland, My Maryland: Regionalism, Patriotism, and the Song of a Divided Nation.” The evening will

include live performances of the music discussed. A reception will follow Free. 275-9397. Legal Considerations Related to Leasing and Construction. 10 a.m.-noon. Arts & Cultural Council, 277 N. Goodman St $50, $10 for members of the Arts Council, register. 473-4000 x206. artsrochester.org. Nerd Nite. 7 p.m. Veritas Wine Bar, 217 Alexander St. $5 suggested donation this month to Depression & Bipolar Support Alliance. 262-2336. facebook. com/NerdNiteRochester. SUNY Geneseo All-College Hour Distinguished Speaker Series: Michaela Walsh. 2:30 p.m. SUNY Geneseo, 1 College Rd. “Founding A Movement: Women’s World Banking”. The speech will held in the MacVittie Union Ballroom Free. 245-5516. geneseo.edu. TEDuary 13th: What Turns You On?. 7 p.m. The Daily Refresher, 293 Alexander St. Free. 585360-4627. facebook.com/ TEDxFlourCity. “Youth in Africa: Challenges and Hopes for the Future” with Babcar Fall.. 6 p.m. Nazareth College Golisano Academic Center, 4245 East Ave. Room 38. A reception at 7 p.m. will follow the lecture Free. (650) 644-8600. mlebret5@naz.edu. [ THU., FEBRUARY 14 ] Focus 45 Lunchtime Lecture: Representing Eastman House on Turner Classic Movies.. 12:15-1 p.m. George Eastman House, 900 East Ave. $3-$6. eastmanhouse.org. Local Historic Happenings in the 1600s. 2:30 p.m. Penfield Community Center, 1985 Baird Rd. Includes both days, Feb 14 & Mar 14 $5. 340-8655. penfieldrec.org. Rochester Birding Association General Meeting. 7:30 p.m. Brighton Town Hall, 2300 Elmwood Ave Amy Kahn: Birding in Israel and Jordan rochesterbirding.com. [ FRI., FEBRUARY 15 ] Blacking Up: Hip Hop’s Remix of Race and Identity. 7 p.m. Baobab Cultural Center, 728 University Ave. Includes interviews with Amiri Baraka, author of Blues People; Russell Simmons, CEO of Def Jam Records; Chuck D of Public Enemy; Power (Oli Grant), manager of the Wu-Tang Clan; rapper Vanilla Ice; and Paul Mooney, a comedian and writer for “The Dave Chapelle Show.” Dialogue follows film; facilitator TBA Free, register. thebaobab.org. Looking Ahead and Moving Forward: Rev Dr. Marvin A. McMickle. 12:50 p.m. R. Thomas Flynn Campus Center Building, 1000 E. Henrietta Rd monroecc.edu. [ SUN., FEBRUARY 17 ] Peter Blum Lecture. 2-4:30 p.m. The Purple Door Soul Source, 3259 Winton Road S. $20-register. 427-8110. purpledoorsoulsource.com. Program on Green/Alternative Energy. Feb. 17. Brighton Town Park Lodge, 777 Westfall Rd Low Energy Homes: Green Daily Living with Bill Labine. 5:30 p.m. vegan potluck dinner, 7 p.m. program $3, free to members. rochesterveg.org. [ MON., FEBRUARY 18 ] A Day in the Life of an Elephant Zookeeper. 7 p.m. Pittsford

Community Library, 24 State Street, Pittsford Free, register. 249-5481. [ TUE., FEBRUARY 19 ] Heroes in the Attic: The Untold Story of Two Civil War Soldiers. 7:30 p.m. Perinton Historical Society & Fairport Museum, 18 Perrin St. Free. 585-223-3989. PerintonHistoricalSociety.org. “Starting Points” with Richard Harvey. 6 p.m. Steve Carpenter Gallery & Art Center, 175 Anderson Ave. $5 donation, free to MYFSG members. 758-1410. nyfigurestudyguild.com. Tuesday Topics: Ghosts of the Rundel Library Building. 12:1212:52 p.m. Central Library, Kate Gleason Auditorium, 115 South Ave. Free. 428-8350. libraryweb.org.

Literary Events [ WED., FEBRUARY 13 ] Irondequoit Public Library Contemporary Book Discussion Group: “Killing Lincoln” by Bill O’Reilly.. Feb. 13-14. Irondequoit Library, Helen McGraw Branch, 2180 E. Ridge Rd Wed 7 p.m., Thu 3 p.m 336-6060. libraryweb.org. Pure Kona Poetry Readings. 7 p.m. Acanthus Café, 337 East Ave. Local poets gather to read their latest works Free. 319-5999. acanthuscafe.com. [ THU., FEBRUARY 14 ] The Greater Rochester Russell Set. 7 p.m. Writers and Books, 740 University Ave David White on Russell’s Continuing Presence in Philosophical Theology $3, free to members. tmadigan@ rochester.rr.com. wab.org. Just Poets Open Mic: Charles Cote. 7 p.m. Barnes and Noble, Pittsford Plaza 585 278 7501. thejustpoets.wordpress.com. [ SAT., FEBRUARY 16 ] Book Reading: “Adirondack Trail of Gold” by Larry Weill. 4 p.m. Books Etc., 78 W. Main St. 4744116. books_etc@yahoo.com. Book Release: “The Happy HooHa” by M.E. Nesser. 4-6 p.m. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. An open-house style event, followed by a Q&A session for the author about some of her hysterical moments as a The Rochester Premier 10 minute Brazilian. 2929940. lovincup.com. Jane Austen Society of Rochester. 1 p.m. Barnes and Noble, Pittsford Plaza Edith Lank will speak on her Austen collection and Austen Family Gossip 585 278 7501. bn.com. Poetry: Soul & Spirit with Dr. Patricia H. Marino. 10 a.m.-2:30 p.m. Staybridge Suites Hotel, 1000 Genesee St Banquet brunch $20-$25, register. Saturday Author Salon: “The Qaakil” by Bill Nielsen.. 2-5:30 p.m. Lift Bridge Book Shop, 45 Main St 637-2260. liftbridgebooks.com. [ MON., FEBRUARY 18 ] Graphic Novel Book Club: “Treasury of Victorian Murder.”. 7 p.m. Lift Bridge Book Shop, 45 Main St 637-2260. liftbridgebooks.com. [ TUE., FEBRUARY 19 ] Readers Theater: “Romeo and Juliet”. 6:30 p.m. Books Etc., 78 W. Main St. 474-4116. books_ etc@yahoo.com.

SPECIAL EVENT | VALENTINE’S DAY EVENTS There are plenty of reasons to dread Valentine’s Day on Thursday, February 14. If you’re in a relationship, you have to worry about making the right reservation, buying the right gifts, and upping the ante from last year. If you’re single, you might just feel like staying in bed for the day. But there’s no reason to let love get you down – whatever your relationship status, there are plenty of simple, lovely ways to spend this year’s Hallmark holiday. For starters, you can learn about the 200-year history of valentines – from the homemade cutouts of the 1800’s to turnof-the-century telegram messages to the commercial cards of today – at the “To My Valentine” exhibit (pictured) at the Rochester Museum and Science Center (657 East Ave.). See how love evolved from a handmade art to a mass-produced industry in an exhibit that features chromo prints, picture postcards, watercolor sketches, comic greetings, and other affectionate arts dating from the 1830’s through the 1980’s. “To My Valentine” continues through March 31, and is free with museum admission: $13 for adults, $12 for seniors and college students, $11 for ages 3 through 18 and free for children under 3 and all museum members. For a full list of museum events, visit rmsc.org or call 271-1880. You can spread the love by helping to fill a giant heart of valentines at the Valentine’s Day Drop-In at White Haven Memorial Park (210 County Road, Pittsford). From 2 to 4 p.m., lovers of all ages can drop in to the park’s All Seasons Gathering Room to contribute or create their own valentines to the collective White Haven Heart. Supplies are available for those who want to make their own cards, and there will also be free treats for all. Visitors are urged to call in advance at 586-8232 to reserve supplies and sweets. Get serenaded and get on the dance floor at Rochester Rhythm and Romance: Jazz Hugs and Tap Dances, a musical valentine at the Downstairs Cabaret Theatre Center (540 E. Main St.). At 7 p.m. on Wednesday, February 13, enjoy one hour of tap choreography and romantic jazz standards by Bill Evans, Cheryl Johnson and Courtney World. Guest artists from the SUNY Brockport Department of Dance also perform. Rochester Rhythm and Romance will also be held on Thursday February 14 at 5:30 & 7:30 p.m., FridaySaturday, February 15-16, at 5:30 & 8 p.m., and Sunday, February 17, at 2 & 4 p.m. Tickets are $25 and advance reservations are recommended. For more info, call 325-4370 or visit downstairscabaret.com. — BY JASON SILVERSTEIN

Museum Exhibit [ WED., FEBRUARY 13 ] Baby It’s Cold Outside!. Tuesdays-Thursdays The Rochester Historical Society, Rundel Memorial Building, 2nd floor, 115 South Ave. Through Mar 14. Tue-Wed 10 a.m.-3 p.m., Thu 11 a.m.-3 p.m. An exhibit of beautiful cold weather clothing $3-$5, members free. 428-8470. rochesterhistory.org.

Dutch Connection: George Eastman’s House in Winter Bloom. Tuesdays-Sundays George Eastman House, 900 East Ave. Through Feb 24. Included in admission: $5-$12. 271-3361. eastmanhouse.org. A Presidential Voice: The History of Presidential Speechwriting. Through March 8. Rush Rhees Library, University of Rochester, River Campus Through Mar continues on page 22

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 21


Museum Exhibit

[ SUN., FEBRUARY 17 ] GVHC Hike. 10 a.m. Easy/ moderate 5 mile hike, Seneca Park loop Free. 544-3387. gvhchikes.org.

8. Seward Room, Department of Rare Books and Special Collections. Mon-Fri 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Sat 11 a.m.-3 p.m 2754477. “Race: Are We So Different?”. Through April 28. Rochester Museum and Science Center, 657 East Ave. Through Apr 28. faceraceroc.org. Included in admission: $11-$13. 2711880. rmsc.org. “To My Valentine.”. Through March 31. Rochester Museum and Science Center, 657 East Ave. Through Mar 31. Sun 11 a.m.-5 p.m., Mon-Sat 9 a.m.-5 p.m Included in admission: $11-$13. 271-1880. rmsc.org. “You’ve Got Mail.”. Feb. 13-March 8. Museum of Wayne County History, 21 Butternut St Opening night Feb 13 7 p.m. with guest speaker Preston E. Pierce 315-946-4943. waynehistory.org.

[ TUE., FEBRUARY 19 ] Fitness Fundraiser during February Break. Feb. 19-21. Cobblestone Arts Center, 1622 New York 332 Schedule at bestfootforwardkids.com. Free, donations appreciated. 3980220. bestfootforwardkids.com.

Special Events

On Wednesday, February 13, The Daily Refresher (293 Alexander St.) will host “TEDuary 13th: What Turns You On?” Guest speakers include Todd Pagano, associate professor and director of the Laboratory Science Technology program at Rochester Institute of Technology’s National Technical Institute for the Deaf, who was named 2012 U.S. Professor of the Year by the Council for Advancement and Support of Education and the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching. Also presenting will be Danielle Raymo and Stephanie Rankin, founders of the Rochester Brainery (rochesterbrainery.com), a place to take and teach classes that is set to open in the Village Gate in March. The talks will be followed by informal discussions, drink specials, and raffles for local businesses. The event will take place at 7 p.m. and is free to attend. For more information, call 360-4627, or visit thedailyrefresher.com or facebook.com/TEDxFlourCity. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY

[ WED., FEBRUARY 13 ] Cross-Country Skiing and Snowshoeing. Sundays Cumming Nature Center, 6472 Gulick Rd. Trails open Wed-Fri 9 a.m.-3:30 p.m., Sat-Sun 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m $3, $10 per family. 374-6160. rmsc.org. [ SAT., FEBRUARY 16 ] The 2nd Annual Hiker’s Jamboree.. 10 a.m. Penfield Town Hall, 3100 Atlantic Ave. Indoor Hike Free, register. 3772129. penfield.org. GVHC Hike. 9 a.m. Moderate/hilly 5 mile hike, Durand Park west Free. 227-3180. gvhchikes.org. Saturday Snowshoeing. 1-3 p.m Helmer Nature Center, 154 Pinegrove Ave No Jan 12 $3$5, free to children under 12. 336-3035. westirondequoit.org/ helmer.htm. Wilderness Guided Hike. 10 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Cumming Nature Center, 6472 Gulick

Rd. Vigorous Pace. This may be a snowshoe hike (weather permitting), so visitors are encouraged to bring their own or rent them at the CNC. $3, $10/family requested donation, free to members. 374-6160. rmsc.org.

Winter Tours of Mount Hope Cemetery. third Saturday of every month, 1 p.m Mount Hope Cemetery, 1133 Mt. Hope Avenue $5, members and children under 16 free with adult. 461-3494. fomh.org.

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[ THU., FEBRUARY 14 ] February Meeting: Love as a Revolutionary Force. ongoing, 7 p.m. Flying Squirrel Community Space, 285 Clarissa St. Green Party of Monroe County gpomc. org. Recognition of Outstanding African American Scholars in the Rochester City School District, and Award for Service in the African American Community. 5-6:30 p.m. Central Office Building, Central Office Building, 131 West Broad St Third-floor conference room. Performances by the School No. 30 Choir, School of the Arts, and Frederick Douglass Orators 2628621. rcsdk12.org/BHM2013. Tapas for 2. 5 & 8 p.m. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. Tapas for 2 in the Memorial Art Gallery Pavilion - get 6 tapas items, 2 Champagne Passion cocktails, free Gallery admission for 2, and 20% off Hedonist Chocolates at the Gallery Store for only $25. Admission to the pavilion is free, and live jazz is

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[ WED., FEBRUARY 13 ] Susan B. Anthony Birthday Luncheon. 12-1:30 p.m. Rochester Riverside Convention Center, 123 E Main St Honoring Dr. Suzan Johnson Cook $60. 279-7490 x10. susanbanthonyhouse.org. World Premiere of “Comfort Zone.”. 7-9 p.m. Little Theatre, 240 East Ave. $10. 258-0400. greentopiafestival.com/film.

DINING HOT SPOT!

LECTURE | TEDUARY 13TH: WHAT TURNS YOU ON? Quick! What’s the sexiest organ in the body? If you really think about it, it’s definitely the brain. Whatever your relationship status this Valentine’s Day, it’s the mind that matters most. Treat yourself to a little mental stimulation at TEDxFlourCity’s first TEDSalon, which promises the same intellectual enthusiasm as the day-long talks in an intimate setting, with adult beverages.

included!. $25 for two. (585)4736629. mag.rochester.edu. A Valentine Evening. 6-8 p.m. Mooseberry Cafe, 2555 Baird Road Live music, food & wine, cake, chocolates, and a special valentine soap $50 for two, $30 for one, RSVP. 348-9022. mooseberrycafe.com. Valentine Schmalentine. 9 p.m.-2 a.m. Lux Lounge, 666 South Ave Shots through the heart drink specials. 232-9030. lux666.com. Valentine’s Day. 6 p.m. Little Theatre, 240 East Ave. $20 includes movie, soda, and popcorn. $50 includes movie, soda, popcorn, and a donation for Center For Youth young men’s New Beginning Program. Cafe opens at 6 p.m., music by the Pickpockets starts at 7:30 p.m RSVP. 473-2464. centerforyouth.net. Valentine’s Dinner. Feb. 14. Seatings from 5:30-9 p.m. Brown Hound Bistro, 6459 State Rte. 64, Naples. $50 plus beverages, tax, and gratuity. 374-9771. brownhoundbistro.com. [ FRI., FEBRUARY 15 ] Day of the Arts. Feb. 15-16. University of Rochester, River Campus The two-day series of events combines dance, music, theatre, art, and culture. edu/ arts/. Soul-utations Message Event. 7-9 p.m. The Purple Door Soul Source, 3259 Winton Road S $45, register. 427-8110. purpledoorsoulsource.com. String Up Your Gift: A Fundraiser for the Niagara Falls Youth Ministry. 7 p.m. Gallery One Fine Arts, 2575 East Henrietta Rd. Talent showcase $10. 713-8865. Valentine’s Concert. 7 p.m. Cobblestone Arts Center, 1622 New York 332 $15-$30. 3980220. cobblestoneperformingartscenter.com. [ SAT., FEBRUARY 16 ] Banff Mountain Film Festival. Feb. 16-18. Rochester Institute of Technology, 1 Lomb

Memorial Dr. $10-$16. 4752628. tom.connelly@rit.edu. Big Sale. 9 a.m.-2 p.m. 127 Railroad St. Art, books, clothes, handmade soap, zines, more facebook.com/ smugtownmushrooms. Four-Legged Friends Winter Homecoming Gala. 6:30 p.m. Irondequoit Country Club, 4045 East Avenue l$75/ticket if ordered by 2/12/13, $125 at door. 953-1184. irondequoitcc. org. Friends of Animals Squirrel Shooting Protest. 3-6 p.m. Holley Fire Department, 7 Thomas St., Holley friendsofanimals.org. Hazzard County Squirrel Slam. Feb. 16. Holley, NY. Squirrel hunt. Weigh-ins at 5-6 p.m. at Holley Fire Dept $10. holleyfire. com/. Northeast Organic Farming Association CSA Fair. 1-3 p.m. Central Library, 115 South Ave. 585-428-8150. nofany.org/ csafair. Roc City Brewfest. 1-4 & 6-9 p.m. Main Street Armory, 900 E. Main St. $35-$45, $10 DD tickets. 232-3221. roccitybrewfest.com. Rochester Academy of Science Astronomy Section. 1-5 p.m. Farash Center, 8355 County Rd. 14, Ionia. Open House and solar observing. Free. 315-1850. amcgover@rochester.rr.com. Rochester Amateur Radio Association: FCC exams for ham radio licenses. third Saturday of every month, 10 a.m RIT campus, Building GLE Room 3139 [Park in lot J]. Bring a pen and pencil, two forms of ID including one with a picture. If you are upgrading: Bring your original, and a copy, of your current amateur radio license; or unexpired Certificates of Completion Free. 289-3801. ken@w2krh.com. Seedfolk Store Community Forum. 1-3 p.m. Southwest Community Center, 540 West Main Street. swanonline.org. Sweet Sensation Weekend. Feb. 16-17, 9:30 a.m.-6 p.m.

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Reservations for weekends and large parties are highly recommended. Please call during normal business hours. MONDAY & TUESDAY: Closed WEDNESDAY & THURSDAY: 4:30PM - 10PM FRIDAY & SATURDAY LUNCH: 11:30AM - 3PM FRIDAY & SATURDAY DINNER: 4:30PM - 11PM SUNDAY BRUNCH: 11:30AM - 3PM SUNDAY DINNER: 4:30PM - 9PM Located at 274 North Goodman St. (In the Village Gate) Rochester, NY 14607

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Cobblestone Farm Winery & Vineyard, 5102 State Rte. 89, Cayuga Lake Wine Trail, Romulus Free. 315-549-8797. cobblestonefarmwinery.com. [ SUN., FEBRUARY 17 ] Nazareth College to Show Italian Film: Benvenuti al Sud. 3 p.m. Nazareth College, 4245 East Ave. On Sunday, February 17th, Casa Italiana at Nazareth College. Introduction provided by Frank Lanzafame, Ph.D. in the LeChase Lounge in Casa Italiana Free. 389-2468. Rochester Rally 2013 FIRST Robotics event. 9 a.m. Penfield High School, 25 High School Dr Rochester Rally is a pre-season FIRST Robotics event. Free. firstrochester.org. [ TUE., FEBRUARY 19 ] Appraising Your Treasures. 6-7 p.m. Greece Public Library, 2 Vince Tofany Blvd. Bring ONE small hand held item to be appraised. Good photos of furniture etc. will be considered. No weapons please Free, register. 225-8951. Rochester Academy of Science, Mineral Section. 7-9 p.m. Brighton Town Hall, 2300 Elmwood Ave Richard Batt, Ph.D., Associate Professor, Earth Sciences & Science Education Dept., Buffalo State College, will speak on “Geology of Iceland.” Door prizes and refreshments. Visitors welcome Free. 288-5683. rasny.org. [ WED., FEBRUARY 20 ] Rochester Winos Wine and Food Pairing. 6:30-9 p.m. Joey’s Pasta House, 1789 Penfield Rd., Penfield $30, register. rochesterwinos.com.

Sports [ FRI., FEBRUARY 15 ] Americans v Houston Aeros. 7:05 p.m. Blue Cross Arena, One War Memorial Square $15-$20. 800-745-3000. ticketmaster.com.

SPECIAL EVENT | ROC CITY BREWFEST There is a traditional Irish blessing that goes: “May the saddest day of your future be no worse than the happiest day of your past.” Whether you’re at your happiest or saddest on Saturday, February 16, you’ll find plenty of comfort at the Roc City Brewfest at the Main Street Armory (900 E. Main St.). From 1 to 4 p.m. and 6 to 9 p.m., the Irish and the want-to-be-Irish can sample a wide variety of craft brews and wines, while also enjoy food vendors and live music. Tickets are $35 in advance through roccitybrewfest.com and $45 at the door. If you’re already planning to be a little too generous with your sampling, designated driver tickets will be available at the door for $10. — BY JASON SILVERSTEIN [ SAT., FEBRUARY 16 ] Bad Medicine IV Wrestling. 6:30 p.m. Phelps community Center, 8 Banta St., Phelps $10-$12. 315-331-6922. Rochester Lancers v Syracuse Silver Knights. 1 p.m. Blue Cross Arena, One War Memorial Square $10. 872-5425. rochesterlancers.com. [ SUN., FEBRUARY 17 ] Rochester Americans v Hershey Bears. 3:05 p.m. Blue Cross Arena, One War Memorial Square $15-$20. 800-7453000. ticketmaster.com.

Theater All This and Moonlight. The Space Theatre, 1199 Main St. At the Space Theatre (at

Rochester Greenovation, 1199 East Main St.). Out of Pocket Productions. Fri-Sat 7:30 p.m., Sun 2 p.m. Wed Feb 13-Sat 7:30 p.m. $5 of the ticket price donated to Community Gardens of Foodlink. Food donations will also be welcomed at the door $15. 269-4673. outofpocketproductions.org. Book Club Play. Through Feb. 20. Geva Theatre Center, 75 Woodbury Blvd Through Mar 17. Previews Feb 19-21 7:30 p.m., Feb 22 8 p.m., Feb 23 2 p.m. (open-captioned) 2324382. gevatheatre.org. Brighton Beach Memoirs. School of the Arts, 45 Prince St Fri 7 p.m. Sat 2 & 7 p.m., Sun 5 p.m 242-7682. sotarochester.org.

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“Chronus.”. Bread & Water Theatre, 243 Rosedale St. Fri-Sat 8 p.m., Sun 3 p.m $6-$12. 271-5523. BreadandWaterTheatre.org. “Encore! Broadway Favorites of the American Songbook”. JCC Rochester, 1200 Edgewood Ave. Thu 7pm, Sat 8 p.m., Sun 2 p.m $18-$26. 461-2000. jcccenterstage.org. “Happy Valentines Day, or Take That, Cupid!”. Black Sheep Theatre, 274 N Goodman St., third floor, Studio D313 $15. 8614816. blacksheeptheatre.org. James Judd’s Funny Stories. Downstairs Cabaret Theatre, 20 Windsor St Thu 7:30 p.m., FriSat 8 p.m., Sun 3 p.m $25. 3254370. downstairscabaret.com. “Plaza Suite.”. Nazareth College Arts Center, 4245 East Ave Through Feb 24. Fri-Sat 8 p.m., Sun 2 p.m $10-$12. 389-2170. artsceneter.naz.edu. “The Rochester Plays.”. Todd Theatre, University of Rochester, River Campus Part I: Attraction Opens: Thursday, February 14 at 8 p.m. and continues Feb 16, Feb 20, Feb 22, Feb 17, and Mar 1 at 8 p.m., and Feb 23-24 at 3 p.m. Part II: Escape Opens: Friday, February 15 at 8 p.m. and continues Feb 21, Feb 23-24, Feb 28, and Mar 2 at 8 p.m., and Feb 17 at 3 p.m $7-$13. 2754088. rochester.edu/theatre. “The Zoo Story.”. Tower Fine Arts Center, SUNY Brockport, 180 Holley St. Thu 7:30 p.m., Fri 7:30 p.m. followed by a talkback with the director and cast, Sat 7:30 p.m $2.50. 395-2787. brockport.edu/finearts.

Theater Audition [ WED., FEBRUARY 13 ] “Legally Blonde”. Feb. 13-14, 6-8 p.m. A Magical Journey Through Stages, Auditorium Center, 875 E. Main St Grades 8-12 935-7173. mjtstages.com/auditions. Technical Director, Musical Director, Musicians Wanted. Through April 24. Working

Class Theatre Company is looking for a Technical Director, a Musical Director, and Musicians for their upcoming Summer 2013 production of The Fantasticks 643-0836. workingclasstheatre.net. [ MON., FEBRUARY 18 ] Auditions for Out of Pocket Productions production of Joanna McClelland Glass’s “Palmer Park”. 7 p.m. The Harley School, 1981 Clover St Part are available for three white men and three white woman, age 30 and above, and two African-American men and two African-American women, age 30 and above. Those auditioning should prepare a brief monologue and will be asked to read from the script. Show dates will be May 10-May 18 269-4673. outofpocketproductions.org. [ TUE., FEBRUARY 19 ] “The Grapes of Wrath.”. 7 p.m. Genesee Community College Dansville, 31 Clara Barton St., Dansville. Performances of The Grapes of Wrath at the Dansville campus are set for April 12, 13, and 14, 2013 243-6785.

Workshops [ WED., FEBRUARY 13 ] Family Development Class: “Raising Your Spirited Child.”. 6-8 p.m. Mental Health Association, 320 N Goodman St. For parents of children of all ages 325-3145 x131. mharochester.org. [ THU., FEBRUARY 14 ] Abundance Theory. 6:30 p.m. Books Etc., 78 W. Main St. 4744116. books_etc@yahoo.com. Green Party February Meeting: Love as a Revolutionary Force. 7 p.m. Flying Squirrel Community Space, 285 Clarissa St. Free. 455-2167. [ SAT., FEBRUARY 16 ] Community Film Festival and Discussion. 9 a.m. Spiritus Christi Church, 121 North Fitzhugh St. A community Dialogue on the

intersections of race and class philosophies inherent in our structures unveiled in Hurricane Katrina. Free to the public. 3251180. Myrabrown@frontier.com. SpiritusChristi.org. Healthy Eating For a Better Life. third Saturday of every month, 12:30 p.m Arnett Branch Library, 310 Arnett Boulevard. Free. 428-8214. Healthy Eating Series: The Glycemic Index as part of Healthy Eating and Weight Loss. 12:30 p.m. Arnett Branch Library, 310 Arnett Boulevard The Glycemic Index. Free. 428-8214. Light Works! Presents Sounds for Healing Workshop with Peter Blum. 10 a.m. The Purple Door Soul Source, 3259 Winton Road S. $80, register. 585-427-8110. meetup.com/light-works. Rochester Academy of Science Life Sciences Section. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Rochester Museum and Science Center, 657 East Ave. Herbarium. RSVP. 334-0977. epixley@ rochester.rr.com. [ TUE., FEBRUARY 19 ] African World History Class. 7:30-9 p.m. Baobab Cultural Center, 728 University Ave. $5 donation requested per session. baobab.center@yahoo.com. thebaobab.org. Family Development Class: “Introduction to Cyber Safety.”. 12:30-2:30 p.m. Mental Health Association, 320 N Goodman St. For parents of children of all ages Free, RSVP. 325-3145 x131. mharochester.org. [ WED., FEBRUARY 20 ] Fight Like a Girl with Rita Parker. 7 p.m. Irondequoit Library, Helen McGraw Branch, 2180 E. Ridge Rd Free, register. 336-6060.

GETLISTED get your event listed for free e-mail it to calendar@rochestercitynews.com. Or go online to rochestercitynewspaper.com and submit it yourself!

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Movies Theaters Searchable, up-to-the-minute movie times for all area theaters can be found at rochestercitynewspaper.com, and on City’s mobile website.

Film

Brockport Strand 93 Main St, Brockport, 637-3310, rochestertheatermanagement.com

Canandaigua Theatres 3181 Townline Road, Canandaigua, 396-0110, rochestertheatermanagement.com

Cinema Theater 957 S. Clinton St., 271-1785, cinemarochester.com

Culver Ridge 16 2255 Ridge Rd E, Irondequoit  544-1140, regmovies.com

Dryden Theatre 900 East Ave., 271-3361, dryden.eastmanhouse.org

Eastview 13 Eastview Mall, Victor 425-0420, regmovies.com

Geneseo Theatres Geneseo Square Mall, 243-2691, rochestertheatermanagement.com

Greece Ridge 12 176 Greece Ridge Center Drive 225-5810, regmovies.com

Henrietta 18 525 Marketplace Drive 424-3090, regmovies.com

The Little

Medicine, ethics, and mystery [ REVIEW ] BY GEORGE GRELLA

“Side Effects” (R), DIRECTED BY STEVEN SODERBERGH NOW PLAYING

Foreign visitors who notice all those pharmaceutical advertisements on television often remark that Americans seem a sickly people. The innumerable diseases that afflict our population — in Hamlet’s words, the thousand ills that flesh is heir to — apparently however meet their match in those glossy commercials, which promise treatments for such problems as allergies, arthritis, diabetes, headaches, low testosterone, and our old friend, erectile

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dysfunction. At the same time, the commercials also warn against a nightmare of possible side effects — blindness, deafness, stroke, nausea, diarrhea, constipation (simultaneously?), suicidal thoughts, and of course, death, making the whole business of medication a grand adventure. The new medical thriller “Side Effects” addresses the current reality of prescription drugs, physician responsibility, and patient suffering both directly and indirectly, with some surprising twists and turns beneath its deceptively simple situation. Along the way it shows some of the methods of both the pharmaceutical companies and the doctors who sometimes work as much for them as for their patients. The movie opens with the camera moving along a trail of bloodstains, then jumps back in time three months to show the history, the people, and events leading up to that moment. Emily Taylor (Rooney Mara) visits her husband, Martin (Channing Tatum), serving out the end of a four-year sentence for insider trading (they finally caught one!), but instead of celebrating his imminent release, complains to her

Rooney Mara in “Side Effects.” PHOTO COURTESY OPEN ROAD FILMS

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mother-in-law, her friends, and her boss that she still suffers from a serious and lengthy depression. That depression soon drives her to a suicide attempt, which lands her in the hospital and brings her in contact with the hospital psychiatrist, Dr. Jonathan Banks (Jude Law). For much of the movie Banks treats her with both consultations and a familiar assortment of medications like Prozac and Zoloft, but nothing seems to cure her profound melancholy and almost complete inability to participate in normal life. When a pharmaceutical representative enlists Banks in a clinical trial of a new drug, Ablixa, for a handsome fee, he prescribes it for Emily, which leads to the side effects of the title and an explanation of the bloodstains. The picture keeps shifting its focus and perspective, moving through the expected demonstration of the dangers associated with medications to a courtroom discussion of criminal liability while under the influence of prescription drugs. With that shift, Dr. Banks becomes the major character and the target of possible legal challenges, an ethics investigation, and a reviled figure in the New York tabloids. When a former patient’s parents write a slanderous letter accusing him of sexual relationship with their daughter, and later, some compromising photographs surface, his partners and even his wife (Vanessa Shaw) turn against him. To clear his name and find out the truth behind the accusations against him, against the advice of the district attorney and everyone else, Banks decides to pursue his own investigation,


Freely given [ REVIEW ] BY ADAM LUBITOW

“Identity Thief ” (R), DIRECTED BY SETH GORDON NOW PLAYING

which becomes something of an obsession. He employs the tools of his trade, including personality analysis, more drugs, and most important, consultations with Emily’s former psychiatrist, Dr. Victoria Siebert (Catherine ZetaJones), who, as he discovers, holds the keys to unlocking the whole case. “Side Effects” actually changes from a medical thriller to a finely constructed detective story, integrating the dubious tactics of the pharmaceutical industry with the history of Emily’s illness and her previous treatments, and even the practices of Wall Street stock manipulators. The doctor’s investigation uncovers complicated layers of motive and action that depend upon the side effects of Ablixa with a far different meaning from the movie’s initial promise. It constantly exploits the thriller’s penchant for metamorphosis, as numerous elements turn out to be not at all what they seem. Although complicated and even unlikely in some moments, the film’s controlled pace and the solid performances of the cast create an atmosphere of urgency and plausibility. As both detective and doctor, Jude Law provides an increasing sense of obsession and desperation, while Rooney Mara somehow maintains a constant sorrowful deadpan in every scene, the dull affectlessness of the deeply depressed. Perhaps the greatest directorial triumph lies in Steven Soderbergh’s transformation of the voluptuous Catherine Zeta-Jones into a plain, repressed psychiatrist rather than the most beautiful shrink in cinema: we’ve come a long way from Sigmund Freud.

There’s a scene late in “Identity Thief ” in which Diana, the titular brassy, loud-mouthed thief, played by Melissa McCarthy, gets herself spruced up with a salon makeover, and we’re meant to marvel at how nicely she cleans up, and what a pretty woman she is underneath the clown-like makeup in which she shellacks herself. The thing is, McCarthy’s innate likeability and natural beauty shines through in every moment she’s on screen, even through the giant fluffed-up hair and pounds of eyeshadow, so the scene comes across as completely unnecessary. It’s characteristic of this scatter-shot comedy that doesn’t trust the talents of its appealing stars. Instead it chooses to pile on increasingly ridiculous situations and supposedly hilarious hijinks. A professional con artist, Diana is a serial identity thief whose latest victim is mild-manned financial analyst Sandy Patterson (Jason Bateman). Taking advantage of

Melissa McCarthy and Jason Bateman in “Identity Thief.” PHOTO COURTESY

Sandy’s androgynous name (which the movie finds hilarious to repeatedly make fun of, and it gets less funny every time), Diana steals his credit card number, racking up thousands of dollars in debt and getting herself into trouble with the police in Florida. Back in Denver, Sandy finds himself arrested for Diana’s transgressions, and after fighting to prove his innocence, demands that the police track down Diana and bring her to justice. When the investigator informs him that interstate prosecution could take up to a year, and with his new job in jeopardy, Sandy decides that his best option is to travel to Florida and bring her back to Colorado himself. Once he does find her, the film becomes an odd-couple road-trip comedy in the vein of “Planes, Trains, and Automobiles,” only significantly less funny. Naturally, Sandy isn’t the only one keen to get his hands on Diana. She’s somehow also managed to incur the wrath of a drug dealer, who sends a couple of gun-toting criminals (Genesis Rodriguez and rapper T.I.) to take her out, as well as a redneck bounty hunter, played by Robert Patrick, eager to collect the reward for capturing her. For all the screen time devoted to these side characters (the film clocks in at a lengthy two hours), the side plots don’t really go anywhere and exist solely to add some urgency to Sandy and Diana’s trek before disappearing in the most anticlimactic resolution possible. Director Seth Gordon (“The King of Kong: A Fistful of Quarters,” “Horrible Bosses”) orchestrates events with workmanlike skill, attempting to liven things up periodically, particularly with a well-staged car

chase. But writer Craig Mazin (“Scary Movie 3,” “The Hangover Part II”) doesn’t seem to be quite sure what tone he wants the movie to take, alternating awkwardly between outrageously crude adult comedy and heartwarming pathos. The script bends over backwards to make Diana into a sympathetic character, whose crimes are meant to cover the fact that she’s using the money to fill the lonely void in her life. Her low self-esteem leads her to feel that she has to buy the respect of others. The film’s two leads do what they can to sell the material. Jason Bateman is adept at playing his usual straight-man role, reacting to the growing chaos surrounding him with exasperated disbelief. It’s a performance that is not without its charms, but it’s a role he could play in his sleep. This is clearly McCarthy’s show, and she nearly single-handedly saves the movie. This is her first starring role since her career took off with the massive success of “Bridesmaids” (even earning an Oscar nomination along the way), and she makes the most it. There’s no doubt that she fully commits to the part, and the eagerness and enthusiasm with which she throws herself into the physical comedy is a joy to watch. While the scenes of Diana pouring out her sad sob story aren’t necessary, McCarthy finds ways to make them work. She displays a vulnerability in those scenes that proves she’s got serious dramatic chops as well. The movie doesn’t need to work as hard as it does to make Diana likeable, McCarthy takes care of that all on her own. Now, she just needs to start choosing the kind of projects that are worthy of her considerable talents.

UNIVERSAL PICTURES

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 25


Film Previews Full film reviews available at rochestercitynewspaper.com.

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[ OPENING ] BEAUTIFUL CREATURES (PG-13): Supernatural love story, based on the popular YA novel, about a boy, a pretty young witch, and the mysterious curse on her family that threatens to claim her soul. Starring Jeremy Irons, Emmy Rossum, Viola Davis, and Emma Thompson. Brockport, Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece Ridge, Henrietta, Tinseltown, Webster BEST PICTURE OSCAR MARATHONS (Various Ratings): Cinemark, Regal, and AMC theater chains are each holding marathon viewings of all nine of the 2013 Best Picture nominees, split over two weekends. The order of their lineup varies, so check each theater’s listings. Henrietta, Tinseltown COMFORT ZONE (NR): This documentary from three Rochester natives explores the effects of global warming and climate change on a local level. Little (Wed, Feb 13, 7 p.m.) ESCAPE FROM PLANET EARTH (PG): Interplanetary space adventure abounds in this kid-friendly animated feature about a geeky blue-skinned alien who must travel to Earth to rescue his more heroic brother. Featuring the voice talents of Brandon Fraser, Jessica Alba, Rob Corddry, William Shatner, and Sarah Jessica Parker. Culver, Greece Ridge, Henrietta, Tinseltown, Webster A GOOD DAY TO DIE HARD (R): John McLane is back in the fifth installment of the “Die Hard” franchise, this time teaming up with his CIA agent son to take down a group of Russian terrorists. Starring Bruce Willis, Jai Courtney, Sebastian Koch, and Mary Elizabeth Winstead. Brockport, Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece Ridge, Henrietta, Pittsford, Tinseltown, Webster LA BAYADÈRE (Ballet): The Russian Bolshoi Ballet company performs choreographer Marius Petipa’s seminal work, about the love between a warrior and a scared dancer. Little (Sun, Feb 17, 12:00 p.m. & Tue, Feb 19, 6:30 p.m.) $20 general admission, $18 members/ seniors/students. SAFE HAVEN (PG-13): Attractive widower falls for equally attractive young woman on the run from her past. Adapted from a novel by Nicholas Sparks, so you pretty much know what to expect. Starring Josh Duhamel, Julianne Hough, and Cobie Smulders. Brockport, Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece Ridge, Henrietta, Pittsford, Tinseltown, Webster [ CONTINUING ] 2013 OSCAR NOMINATED ANIMATED SHORTS (NR): This annual program is your only chance to see all five of this year’s Oscar-nominated animated short films together on one bill. Little 2013 OSCAR NOMINATED LIVE ACTION SHORTS (NR): All five of this year’s Academy Award nominees for Best Live Action Short, put together in one handy program for your viewing convenience. Little AMOUR (PG-13): An elderly man suddenly finds himself acting as caretaker to his ailing wife after she suffers a massive stroke in this multi-


Oscar-nominated tearjerker from Austrian director Michael Haneke. Little, Pittsford ARGO (R): Director Ben Affleck co-stars with John Goodman, Bryan Cranston, and Kyle Chandler in the once-classified true tale of a CIA exfiltration expert who hatches a daring plan to free six Americans hiding at the home of the Canadian ambassador during the 1979 Iran hostage crisis. Cinema, Eastview, Henrietta, Webster BROKEN CITY (R): Private eye Mark Wahlberg gets in over his head when a mayor (Russell Crowe) hires him to tail his cheating wife (Catherine ZetaJones) in this crime thriller. Also starring Jeffrey Wright, Kyle Chandler, and Barry Pepper. Cinema, Movies 10 BULLET TO THE HEAD (R): Sylvester Stallone stars as a hitman who agrees to team up with a cop to take brutal revenge on the men who murdered their respective partners. Also starring Sung Kang and Christian Slater. Canandaigua, Culver, Tinseltown DJANGO UNCHAINED (R): Quentin Tarantino’s latest exploitation extravaganza, this time starring Jamie Foxx as a former slave out to rescue his wife from the clutches of an evil plantation owner. Also starring Leonardo DiCaprio, Christoph Waltz, and Samuel L. Jackson. Culver, Henrietta FLIGHT (PG-13): Robert Zemeckis’s first live-action film

since 2000’s “Cast Away” is a drama with Don Cheadle, John Goodman, and Denzel Washington as an airline pilot who saves a flight from crashing, only to have the ensuing investigation into the equipment malfunction reveal something troubling. Movies 10 HANSEL & GRETEL: WITCH HUNTERS (R): A tongue-in-cheek action-horror-comedy about the titular fairy tale brother and sister, now all grown up and battling witches professionally. Starring Jeremy Renner, Gemma Arterton, Peter Stomare, and Famke Janssen. Canandaigua, Culver, Greece Ridge, Henrietta, Tinseltown, Webster HERE COMES THE BOOM (PG-13): Kevin James, Salma Hayek, and Henry Winkler lead the cast of this comedy about a biology teacher who tries to raise much-needed funds for his cash-strapped school by becoming a successful MMA fighter. Movies 10 THE HOBBIT: AN UNEXPECTED JOURNEY (PG-13): The first installment of Peter Jackson’s long-awaited adaptation of the “Lord of the Rings” prequel, chronicling Bilbo Baggins’ adventures in Middle Earth. Culver, Henrietta, Tinseltown HOTEL TRANSYLVANIA (PG): The first animated feature from “Samurai Jack” creator Genndy Tartakovsky showcases the voice talents of Adam Sandler as good ol’ Dracula, now a hotelier working to keep his daughter (Selena Gomez) away from a

For information: Call us (585) 244-3329 Fax us (585) 244-1126 Mail Us City Classifieds 250 N. Goodman Street Rochester, NY 14607 Email Us classifieds@ rochester-citynews.com

charming backpacker (Andy Samberg). Movies 10 IDENTITY THIEF (R): Hijinks ensue as Jason Bateman and Melissa McCarthy explore the lighter side of identity fraud in this comedy about a mildmannered businessman who tracks down the con artist who’s been stealing from him. Also starring Jon Favreau, John Cho, and Amanda Peet. Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece Ridge, Henrietta, Pittsford, Tinseltown, Webster THE IMPOSSIBLE (PG-13): Naomi Watts and Ewan McGregor star in this grueling drama, based on a true story, about a family separated and struggling to survive in the aftermath of the massive Indian Ocean tsunami of 2004. Pittsford LES MISÉRABLES (PG-13): The hugely popular, long-running stage musical based on the Victor Hugo novel comes to the big screen courtesy of “King’s Speech” director Tom Hooper. With Hugh Jackman, Russell Crowe, Amanda Seyfried, and Anne Hathaway. Eastview, Pittsford, Webster LIFE OF PI (PG): Ang Lee continues his unpredictable streak with an eye-popping adaptation of Yann Martel’s acclaimed novel, now a 3D adventure about a young man who survives a shipwreck and finds himself on a lifeboat with an orangutan, a hyena, an ailing zebra, and a Bengal tiger. Culver, Pittsford

LINCOLN (PG-13): Daniel Day-Lewis channels our 16th President for Steven Spielberg, focusing on the last few months of the Great Emancipator’s life, which includes the Union’s victory in the War Between The States and the abolition of slavery. Costarring Tommy Lee Jones, Jared Harris, and Sally Field. Pittsford MAMA (PG-13): Guillermo del Toro produced this supernatural thriller about two little girls who lived alone in the woods for five years before being rescued. Their new adopted parents soon discover that the girls may not have returned alone. Starring Jessica Chastain. Canandaigua, Culver, Greece Ridge, Tinseltown PLAYING FOR KEEPS (PG-13): Gerard Butler stars in this romantic comedy as a former sports star who starts coaching his kid’s team as a way to get his life together. Horny soccer moms ensue. With Jessica Biel, Catherine Zeta-Jones, and Uma Thurman. Movies 10 RISE OF THE GUARDIANS (PG): Hugh Jackman, Alec Baldwin, and Isla Fisher provide some of the voices for this animated adventure about what happens when Jack Frost joins up with Santa Claus, The Tooth Fairy, and others to prevent an evil spirit from taking over the world. Movies 10 QUARTET (PG-13): Dustin Hoffman directs this comedy with a comedy stacked with veteran British actors (Maggie Smith, Michael Gambon, Billy Connolly) about a home for retired opera

singers thrown into upheaval after the arrival of a diva. Little, Pittsford SIDE EFFECTS (R): Steven Soderbergh’s latest (and possibly final) film, about a young couple whose lives are torn apart when one of them is put on a new anti-anxiety drug that has some deadly side effects. Starring Rooney Mara, Jude Law, Catherine Zeta-Jones, and Channing Tatum. Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece Ridge, Henrietta, Little, Pittsford, Tinseltown, Webster SILVER LININGS PLAYBOOK (R): Lovably unstable mental patients Bradley Cooper and Jennifer Lawrence fall for one another and learn to ballroom dance in this likely Oscar contender from David O. Russell. With Robert De Niro and Jacki Weaver. Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Greece Ridge, Henrietta, Little, Pittsford, Tinseltown, Webster SKYFALL (PG-13): Bond 23 brings back Daniel Craig as 007, now directed by Oscar winner Sam Mendes and trying to prevent bad guy Javier Bardem from taking down Judi Dench’s M. With Ben Whishaw, Ralph Fiennes, and Albert Finney. Movies 10 STAND UP GUYS (R): Career criminal Al Pacino has just been released from prison after a 25year sentence, and teams up old with his old pals, Christopher Walken and Alan Arkin, for one last night of raising hell. Meanwhile, one of the men has secretly been assigned the task of bumping off his old friend. Cinema

TEXAS CHAINSAW 3D (R): In yet another sequel to the 70’s horror classic, another group of unsuspecting teenagers are preyed upon by Leatherface and his trusty chainsaw, but this time their limbs will seem to fly out of the screen. Starring no one you’ve ever heard of. Movies 10 THE TWILIGHT SAGA: BREAKING DAWN, PART 2 (PG-13): Honestly, if you need a description, you’re not interested. Movies 10 WARM BODIES (PG-13): Nicholas Hoult stars in this apocalyptic romantic comedy as a zombie with a conscience who falls in love with a human girl, and may hold the key to saving what remains of humanity. Based on the cult novel by Isaac Marion. Co-starring John Malkovich, Rob Corddry, and Dave Franco. Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece Ridge, Henrietta, Tinseltown, Webster WRECK-IT RALPH (PG): John C. Reilly, Sarah Silverman, and Jane Lynch provide a few of the voices in this animated comedy about a video-game bad guy who dreams of becoming a hero, even if it means upending the status quo at the arcade. Movies 10 ZERO DARK THIRTY (R): Director Kathryn Bigelow and writer Mark Boal follow up their Oscar-winning “The Hurt Locker” with this likely Best Picture contender, examining the decade-long hunt to capture Osama Bin Laden. Starring Jessica Chastain, Joel Edgerton, Kyle Chandler, and Jason Clarke. Culver, Eastview, Henrietta, Pittsford, Webster

BUILDING FOR LEASE IN CULTURAL DISTRICT

EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY

All real estate advertised in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act, which makes it unlawful, “to make, print, or publish, any notice, statement, or advertisement, with respect to the sale or rental of a dwelling that indicates any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin.” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under the age of 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertisement for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. Call the local Fair Housing Enforcement Project, FHEP at 325-2500 or 1-866-671-FAIR. Si usted sospecha una practica de vivienda injusta, por favor llame al servicio legal gratis. 585-325-2500 - TTY 585-325-2547.

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28 CITY FEBRUARY 13-19, 2013

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Automotive ALWAYS BETTER Higher cash for your Junk Cars, Trucks and Vans. From $200-$800 or more for newer. Running or not. With free towing. Also free removal of any unwanted model in any condition. Call 585-305-5865 CASH FOR CARS Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888-420-3808 www. cash4car.com (AAN CAN) FOR SALE 4 Blizzak Winter Tires on Alloy wheels for Mazda RX-8 or similar $250. btowler@rochestercitynews.com

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Place your real estate ad by calling 244-3329 ext. 23 or rochestercitynewspaper.com Ad Deadlines: Friday 4pm for Display Ads Monday at noon for Line ads (Peanuts), Twigs, Squealer, Iggy and Rainbow with the mixed up name tags. & more! $4 - $8 585880-2903 All $49.99 BOOK ENDS of races horses with jockey’s carved in wood, gift. $25 585-880-2903 BRONZE COLOR vintage metal horse, nice size 13” long, 10” high with engraved saddle, horse lover gift $25 585-880-2903 DOG & CAT HOUSES Kennels, porch steps, do it yourself kits. Quick assembly 585-752-1000 $49 Jim FOR SALE: Used Asus Eee 10.1” Netbook- Built-in Web Cam - $175 cash. Phone 585-4130827 Leave name & number GERMAN SHEPHERD Plaque on chain. Carved head on real wood. (said, beware!) Nice gift $20.00 585-880-2903 KENTUCKY DERBY T-shirt 1998, XL, New $12.00 585-880-2903 MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS: (1955) Conn Trumpet (Coprion Bell) serial#517429 $800; (1960) Conn Trumpet (Director) $200; (1960) Wurlitzer Electric Piano model #200 serial

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continues on page 30

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A cooperative effort of City Newspaper and RochesterCityLiving, a program of the Landmark Society.

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124 Croydon Road is a traditional Dutch Colonial Revival style house, built in 1930 in Rochester’s Browncroft neighborhood. From the exterior, the architecture of the home fits in with the neighborhood and surrounding houses. But enter through the small front vestibule and you are in an open, bright contemporary space (that, nonetheless, still retains the charm and detail of an older home). Just beyond the entrance, natural light from the many windows pours into the large living room, enhancing the cream-colored walls, white cabinets and woodwork. A painted brick fireplace and shelving provide a focal point and a cozy spot to gather around. Imagine a winter evening with the firelight softly playing on the white surfaces. The living room opens to a spacious dining room where light yellow walls bring a sense of calm that will add to any diner’s pleasure. A pair of French doors allows additional light into the room and leads to a backyard deck and a detached two car garage. The adjoining updated kitchen offers efficient work space and a breakfast island. Tucked behind the kitchen is a half bath. A pocket door in the living room separates the stairs from active living space—an attractive and practical feature that allows families to shut the noise from downstairs off from the sleeping children above. Upstairs are three bedrooms and a full bath. An extra large closet off the master bedroom provides

space for hanging clothes as well as a large area of shelving for storage. Follow the stairs up to the third floor: the attic has been converted into a bright, spacious carpeted office/den filled with light from a skylight and small window. All this in 1,650 square feet! 124 Croydon Road is within the Browncroft Historic District, which is listed in the National Register of Historic Places and eligible for the New York State Historic Homeowner Tax Credit Program. The Browncroft neighborhood occupies land originally part of the Brown Brothers Nursery, which specialized in fruit and ornamental trees. In 1912, Charles J. Brown began to subdivide his land to develop residential lots. His vision was to create a park-like subdivision planted with shade trees, ornamental shrubs, bulbs and flowers on the public right of way. To learn more about Charles J. Brown’s vision for and development of the community see www.browncroftna.org/subdivision. Today, the very active Browncroft Neighborhood Association strives to maintain and improve the quality of living in the Browncroft area. 124 Croydon Road is offered at $189,900. For more information visit rochestercityliving. com/property/R199444 or contact Carola Smith-Grasso with Nothnagle Realtors at 764-4308 (cell) or 389-4029 (office). by Lea Kemp Lea is Librarian/Archivist at Rochester Museum & Science Center.

NYS Licensed Real Estate Salesperson 201-0724 RochesterSells.com

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 29


I’m very pleased with the calls I got from our apartment rental ads, and will continue running them. Your readers respond — positively!” - M. Smith, Residential Management > page 29 EXPERIENCED LEAD VOCALS Seeks employment. Pat experience Inkspots, Platters, Drifters, James Brown among many. Leroy Harris. Contact Bobby 585-328-4121 Specialties, classics, R&B Soul. I SAY New Wave peaked in 1977-81. Who wants to play Blondie, The Cars, The Ramones, Squeeze, Elvis Costello, U2 and much more? I play bass. Craig. mooskamovers@aol.com MEET OTHER MUSICIANS any instrument, male singer- jam together- coffee house, private gigs, I play keys Call Martin 585-266-6337 MEN ENJOY SINGING Fun with the Chorus of the Genesee, Sing, learn, perform, share

laughs and libation! Guest night Tuesday at 7 PM. Stop in at 58 E Main St, Webster. Call 585698-7784

Lost and Found

R & B SOUL BANDS seek employment, experienced groups, already performing, seek new jobs. Contact Bobby 585-328-4121

LOOKING FOR KOHWE Ron the Photographer I bought you chinese gave you my card. 6901344 ron.rogers13@yahoo.com

ROCK STAR, MR. ROCHESTER, lead vocalist, is looking to form band (Classic Rock) with lead guitarist, bassist, drummer & rhythm guitars Covers & originals 585-473-5089 THE GREGORY KUNDE CHORALE is looking for male voices. Call for an audition now to join our fourteenth season! Info Line 377 7568 or visit our website www. gregorykundechorale.org

LOST CAT! Orange, Fluffy Female, 8 lbs., 10 years old. Please Call 585-747-5074 or 585-748-7146 PLEASE! We Miss Her MISSING DOG CHIHUAHUA Park/ Goodman. Long haired chihuahua. Answers to Fuzzy. Golden fur. REWARD. Call 520-4909. Missing since 1/30/13, 3am.

Looking For... XMAS Wool/Flannel Army Blanket donations needed! Gift new blankets to “Sunday Circle” knitters/crocheters to decorate for poor patients of R.P.C. Contact Mary at mgrant@ frontier.com.

Miscellaneous BUY REAL VIAGRA, Cialis, Levitra, Staxyn, Propecia & more... FDA- Approved, U.S.A. Pharmacies. Next day delivery avaiable. Order online or by phone at viamedic.com, 800467-0295 FREE DENTAL CLEANING MCC Sophomore Dental Hygiene student looking for volunteer patients interested in complimentary dental cleaning. Must be 2+ years since last professional cleaning. Call 585314-0398 and leave a message for Leslie S. HAS YOU BUILDING SHIFTED OR SETTLED? Contact Woodford Brothers Inc, for straightening, leveling, foundation and wood frame repairs at 1-800-OLDBARN. www.woodfordbros. com. “Not applicable in Queens county” IF YOU USED THE MIRENA IUD between 2001-present and suffered perforation or embedment in the uterus requiring surgical removal, or had a child born with birth defects you may be entitled to compensation. Call Johnson Law and speak with female staff members 1-800-535-5727

CITY

Newspaper’s

MIND  BODY  SPIRIT THINK, MOVE, BREATHE, DANCE, HEAL, SEARCH, STRETCH, STENGHTHEN, RELAX [ See Page 15 of this week’s issue ] TO ADVERTISE CALL CHRISTINE AT 244.3329 x23 30 CITY FEBRUARY 13-19, 2013

SAWMILLS from only $3997MAKE MONEY & SAVE MONEY with your own bandmil Cut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship. FREE Info & DVD www.NorwoodSawmills. com/300N 1-800-578-1363 Ext.300N

Professional Services DIVORCE or annulment in as little as one day. Over 50 years experience. 100% guarantee. From $995. All information at www.divorcefast.com

EMPLOYMENT / CAREER TRAINING

Employment

Tech. FAA approved training. Financial aid if qualified – Housing available. Job placement assistance.

AIRLINE CAREERS - Become an Aviation Maintenance

DEPUTY SHERIFF JAILOR Application deadline: February 27, 2013 Exam Date: April 13, 2013 Salary is $41,103-$64,269 annually Now Accepting Applications online at www.monroecounty.gov or 39 West Main Street, Suite 210. Candidates must be at least 18 years of age and must possess: High School Diploma or GED, Valid NYS Drivers License. Have no felony convictions and be able to pass a physical agility and medical test as well as a psychological and background investigation. Candidates must be in good physical condition and of good moral character and have a genuine interest in this rewarding career. 753-4705 / 753-4706 Download applications online at: (www.monroecounty.gov) www.monroecountysheriff.info The Monroe County Sheriff’s Department is an equal opportunity employer.

Uncommon Schools

CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 877-492-3059 AIRLINES ARE HIRING Train for hands on Aviation Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualifiedJob Placement Assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance (866)296-7093 DRIVER - $0.01 increase per mile after 6 months and 12 months. Choose your hometime. $0.03 Quarterly Bonus. Requires 3 months recent experience. 800-4149569 www.driveknight.com ENGINEERING LEADER Communications Projects, Rochester, NY, GE MDS, LLC. Act as the technological point person for the communications projects business including development, planning, execution and post salesservice. Exp to include TCP/IP applicable to industrial/utility radio networks. Travel 15-20% (domestic and international). Reference job #1406. Resume to Zeynep Dilek, GE MDS,

ROCHESTER PREP

Are you an educator looking to make a difference and prepare students for college? JOIN THE ROCHESTER PREP TEAM AT OUR UPCOMING

Speed Interviewing Event! ALL

Middle School ELA, Science, and Math Teachers AND

Experienced Elementary School Teachers Are encouraged to a€end! The Speed Interviewing Event will be on

Saturday, March 2nd, 9am-11am at Rochester Prep Charter School – Brooks Campus (630 Brooks Ave. Rochester, NY 14619)

To register for the event,

Middle School applicants email a resume to msinterview@rochesterprep.org Elementary School applicants email a resume to esinterview@rochesterprep.org BY WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 27TH If you are unable to a“end, but are s”ll interested in working at Rochester Prep, apply online at www.uncommonschools.org/careers.


Rent your apartment special third week is

FREE

Place your ad by calling 244-3329 ext. 23 or rochestercitynewspaper.com Ad Deadlines: Friday 4pm for Display Ads Monday at noon for Line ads

EMPLOYMENT / CAREER TRAINING LLC, 175 Science Parkway, Rochester, NY 14620. EOE

Immediately! www.mailingstation.com (AAN CAN)

HELP WANTED! Make extra money in our free ever popular homemailer program, includes valuable guidebook! Start immediately! Genuine! 1-888292-1120 www.howtoworkfromhome.com

Volunteers

you. If you love the Zoo, donate your time today. To learn more, visit the volunteer page of the Seneca Park Zoo’s Web site at www.senecaparkzoo.org

A SECOND THOUGHT Resale Shop in East Rochester is accepting applications for volunteer sale associates and online researchers. Shop benefits people with disabilities in Guatemala. Call (585) 340-2000.

FOSTER PARENTS WANTED! Monroe County is looking for adults age 21 and over to consider opening their homes to foster children. Call 334-9096 or visit www. MonroeFosterCare.org.

ARE YOU 55+ & interested in learning about local volunteer opportunities? Call RSVP! Many opportunities available. Help meet critical needs. Regular information sessions - call 287-6377 or email jpowers@ lifespan-roch.org.

HERITAGE CHRISTIAN STABLES, a therapeutic horsemanship program for children and adults with developmental disabilities, is looking for volunteers to serve as horse leaders and side walkers. Call Kim Kennedy at (585) 3402016 or email kkennedy@ heritagechristianservices.org

$$$HELP WANTED$$$ Extra Income! Assembling CD cases from Home! No Experience Necessary! Call our Live Operators Now! 1-800-4057619 EXT 2450 http://www. easywork-greatpay.com (AAN CAN) LIVE LIKE A ROCKSTAR. Now hiring 10 spontaneous individuals. Travel full time. Must be 18+. Transportation and hotel provided. Call Shawn 800-716-0048 PAID IN ADVANCE! MAKE up to $1000 A WEEK mailing brochures from home! Helping Home Workers since 2001! Genuine Opportunity! No Experience required. Start

CATHOLIC FAMILY CENTER needs volunteers to help people apply for citizenship. The commitment is 2.5 hrs per mth one evening a month. Training is provided. For more information call Nate at (585) 546-7220 ex 4854. DYNAMIC VOLUNTEER opportunities at the Zoo await

LIFESPAN’S OMBUDSMAN PROGRAMS looking for volunteers to advocate for individuals living in long-term care settings. Please contact call 585.287.6378 or e-mail dfrink@lifespan-roch.org for more information

LITERACY VOLUNTEERS OF ROCHESTER needs adult tutors to help adults who are waiting to improve their reading,

writing, English speaking, or math skills. Call 473-3030, or check our website at www. literacyrochester.org

LITERACY VOLUNTEERS OF ROCHESTER needs adult tutors to help adults who are waiting

continues on page 32

Hiring? GET THE RESULTS YOU NEED AT ABOUT HALF THE PRICE OF OTHER PAPERS! To advertise in our

EMPLOYMENT SECTION call Christine at

244-3329 ext. 23 today!

CITY Drivers Wanted If you’re looking to make a difference in the lives of the individuals we serve, have the essential requirements and want to seize this great opportunity please feel free to visit our website at: www.lifetimeassistance.org or stop by 425 Paul Road Rochester, New York Employees Enjoy Great Benefits:

Generous Paid Time off, Medical, Dental, Tuition Reimbursement program, Competitive Salaries, Life Insurance, Referral Bonus Programs, Retirement Plans 401a & 403b

Have appointments in the middle of the day? Not a problem!

Drivers work split shifts in the early mornings and afternoons Great opportunity for students, retirees & stay at-home Moms Higher pay for those with experience, CDL or 19A Perform work in the operation of a vehicle to assure safe and comfortable transportation of individual’s to and from Day Programs, assist individuals on entry/exit from vehicles as necessary Qualifications: Valid New York State Driver’s License, CDL license is preferred, Must meet LAI vehicle operator requirements, Must frequently lift, and/or move up to 50 pounds and occasionally lift or transfer up to 100 pounds to successfully perform the essential functions of the job. May be required to meet OPWDD Level II S.C.I.P (Strategies for Crisis Intervention and Prevention) requirement EOE rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 31


EMPLOYMENT / CAREER TRAINING > page 31 to improve their reading, writing, English speaking, or math skills. Call 473-3030, or check our website at www. literacyrochester.org MCC DENTAL STUDENT Seeking patients who would like complimentary cleaning. This is FREE of exchange for your time! Contact Tina S. 585-902-8009 or email tinahygiene@gmail.com ROCHESTER CARES is looking for volunteers interested in joining us to make a difference in Rochester!! One time and recurring volunteer opportunities with a wide range of organizations. www. rochestercares.org/calendar.php SCHOOL #12 999 South Ave. is looking for reading & math volunteers, English & Spanish. Training provided. Call Vicki 585-461-4282 UNITED WAY Volunteer Fundraiser needed. Verification Phone Calling & Data Management. Strong interpersonal skills; attention to detail; strong verbal and written communication skills. Call 242-6547

WOMEN: ROCHESTER HABITAT is looking for women 18 years+ to help build a house with a single mother. Visit rochabitat.org or call 546-1470

Career Training ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home. *Medical, *Business, *Criminal Justice, *Hospitality. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV authorized. Call 800481-9472 www.CenturaOnline. com TRACTOR TRAILER TRAINING Experience it, financial aid, Pell Grants, POST- 911 GI Bill and housing, can be yours if qualified! National Tractor Trailer School [NTTS] 1-800243-9300 www.ntts.edu Consumer Information: www. ntts.edu/programs/disclosures

VOLUNTEERS NEEDED for the Men’s Emergency Winter Shelter at Dimitri House. Please call us at 325-1796 for more information or to volunteer your time. VOLUNTEERS NEEDED to depict evangelistic opportunities by means of performing skits in a Church environment. Professional acting not a requirement. This is done in a small Church setting. Contact Pastor Ron @ 585-957-6155

Legal Ads [ ARVINE-ELMWOOD LLC ] Articles of Organization filed with Secretary of State of NY on 1/30/2013. Office in Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 1048 South Ave, Rochester, NY 14620. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ LEGAL NOTICE ] Consult a Registered Professional Nurse, PLLC. Art. of Org. filed with the NY Sec. of State (SSNY) on 1/10/13. Office in Monroe Co. SSNY Design. Agent of PLLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to

Susan J. LaGaipa, RN, 20 El Centro Drive Rochester, NY 14609. Purpose: Practice of Registered Professional Nursing. [ LEGAL NOTICE ] Dental Office 2024 LLC filed Arts. of Org. with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/28/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to 369 Highland Avenue, Rochester, NY 14620. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ LEGAL NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Limited Liability Company 1) Name: Alliance4Accountability, LLC. 2) Articles of

32 CITY FEBRUARY 13-19, 2013

Organization were filed by Department of State of New York on December 13, 2012. 3) County: Monroe. 4) The Company does not have a specific date of dissolution. 5) the Secretary of State has been designated as an agent upon whom process against the Company may be served. The address to which the process shall be mailed: 5615 Buffalo Rd. Churchville, NY 14428. 6) Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ LEGAL NOTICE SALON STYLETTO LLC ] Notice of Organization: Salon Styletto, LLC was filed with SSNY on February 1, 2013. Office: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. PO

address which SSNY shall mail any process against the LLC served upon it: 43 Timberwood Drive, Hilton, NY 14468. Purpose is to engage in any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] ACTION HERO, LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 1/11/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 106 Arvine Hts., Rochester, NY 14611. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] ARCONTRACTORS, LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 1/14/13. Office

location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 74 Root Rd., Brockport, NY 14420. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] D Napolitano, LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 12/13/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Dominic T. Napolitano, 1337 Schlegel Rd., Webster, NY 14580. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] DJ BURNS PROPERTIES LLC (LLC) filed Arts. of

Org. with NY Secy. of State (SS) on December 26, 2012. LLC’s office is in Monroe County. SS is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS shall mail a copy of any process to LLC’s principal business location at 14 West Ham Circle, North Chili, NY 14514. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] File No: JJ200897 VIRGINIA: IN THE VIRGINIA BEACH JUVENILE AND DOMESTIC RELATIONS DISTRICT COURT IN RE: James Shamarice HILL Juvenile, VIRGINIA BEACH DEPARTMENT OF HUMAN SERVICES, Petitioner, v. LASHAUNDA FLOYD,

Respondent Party to be served: Lashaunda Floyd Last known address: 17 Morgan Street, Rochester, NY 14611 ORDER OF PUBLICATION The object of this suit is that on or about the 24th day of October, 2012, the Virginia Beach Department of Human Services petitioned this Court for the termination of the parental rights of LASHAUNDA FLOYD, mother of James Shamarice Hill, born December 26, 2011, in Norfolk, Virginia at Sentara Leigh Hospital; said termination being pursuant to VA CODE section 16.1-283 (C)(1), (C)(2). The consequences of termination are that a parent or parents forever relinquish all parental

rights such as, but not limited to, the rights of visitation, consent to adoption, companionship, association, education, discipline, guidance, the right to determine religious affiliation, all decision making concerning the child’s welfare and the responsibility for support. It is ORDERED that Lashaunda Floyd, mother of James Shamarice Hill, appear at the above named Court and protect her interests on or before March 20, 2013 at 10:00 a.m. Pamela Scott, Clerk of Court Dated: January 14, 2013 By :Glena Morgan , Deputy Clerk I ask for this: Christianna Dougherty-Cunningham, Esquire City Attorney’s Office 2401 Courthouse Drive, Room 260 Virginia


Legal Ads Beach, VA 23456; Phone: (757) 385-4531, Fax: (757) 385-5687 [ NOTICE ] File No: JJ200897 VIRGINIA: IN THE VIRGINIA BEACH JUVENILE AND DOMESTIC RELATIONS DISTRICT COURT IN RE: James Shamarice HILL Juvenile, VIRGINIA BEACH DEPARTMENT OF HUMAN SERVICES, Petitioner, v. JILES HILL, Respondent. Party to be served: Jiles Hill Last known address: 17 Morgan Street, Rochester, NY 14611 ORDER OF PUBLICATION The object of this suit is that on or about the 24th day of October, 2012, the Virginia Beach Department of Human Services petitioned this Court for the termination of the parental rights of JILES HILL, father of James Shamarice Hill, born December 26, 2011, in Norfolk, Virginia at Sentara Leigh Hospital; said termination being pursuant to VA CODE section 16.1283 (C)(1), (C)(2). The consequences of termination are that a parent or parents forever relinquish all parental rights such as, but not limited to, the rights of visitation, consent to adoption, companionship, association, education, discipline, guidance, the right to determine religious affiliation, all decision making concerning the child’s welfare and the responsibility for support. It is ORDERED that Jiles Hill, father of James Shamarice Hill, appear at the above named Court and protect his interests on or before March 20, 2013 at 10:00 a.m. Pamela Scott, Clerk of Court Dated: January 14, 2013 By: Glena Morgan, Deputy Clerk I ask for this: Christianna Dougherty-Cunningham, Esquire City Attorney’s Office 2401 Courthouse Drive, Room 260 Virginia Beach, VA 23456; Phone: (757) 385-4531, Fax: (757) 385-5687 [ NOTICE ] FLAMING SPADE PRODUCTIONS, LLC (LLC) filed Arts. of Org. with NY Secy. of State (SS) on 1/18/13. LLC’s office is in Monroe Co. SS is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS shall mail a copy of any process to LLC’s principal business location at 75 Conmar Dr., Rochester, NY 14609. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] HUDSON PLAZA LLC file Arts. of Org. with Sec’y

of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/27/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to 11 Sturbridge Lane Pittsford, New York 14534. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] JGMAC Associates LLC (LLC) filed Arts.of Org. with NY Secy. of State (SS) on December 21, 2012 LLC’s office is in Monroe County. SS is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS shall mail a copy of any process to LLC’s principal business location at 116 LaSolis Drive, Rochester, NY 14626. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] JJC3 LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 1/9/13. Office in Monroe Co. SSNY desig. agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 233 Chestnut Hill Dr., Rochester, NY 14617, which is also the principal business location. Purpose: Any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] JM SWEENEY FARMS, LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 1/8/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 30 Rolling Meadows Dr., Hilton, NY 14468. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] MARY CORCORAN PHOTOGRAPHY, LLC (LLC) filed Arts. of Org. with NY Secy. of State (SS) on 4/27/2011. LLC’s office is in Monroe Co. SS is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS shall mail a copy of any process to Corporation Service Company, 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207. Corporation Service Company is its registered agent located at 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207 upon whom process against the LLC may be served. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] MENTAL HEALTH COUNSELING CONNECTIONS PLLC, a domestic PLLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 12/19/12. Office location: Monroe. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the PLLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The PLLC, P.O. Box

16721, Rochester, NY 14616. Purpose: Mental Health Counselor [ NOTICE ] Name of LLC: Welcome Home Cinema LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State: 1/30/13. Office loc.: Monroe Co. Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o Business Filings Inc., 187 Wolf Rd., Ste. 101, Albany, NY 12205, regd. agt. upon whom process may be served. Purpose: any lawful act. [ NOTICE ] Not. of Form. of TYMACK GROUP LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with SSNY 1/3/13. Office: Monroe County. SSNY designated Agent of LLC to whom process may be served. SSNY may mail a copy of any process to LLC, 16 Marlands Road, Rochester, NY 14624. Purpose any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Notice is hereby given that a license, number not yet assigned beer. license has been applied for by Vista Golf LLC dba Mill Creek Golf, 128 Cedars Ave., Churchville, NY 14428, County of Monroe, for a snack bar at the turn of the 9th hole. [ NOTICE ] Notice is hereby given that a license, number not yet assigned beer. license has been applied for by Vista Golf LLC dba Mill Creek Golf, 128 Cedars Ave., Churchville, NY 14428, County of Monroe, for a golf pro shop. [ NOTICE ] Notice is hereby given that a license, number not yet assigned, a Beer. in a Golf Cart license has been applied for by Vista Golf LLC dba Mill Creek Golf, 128 Cedars Ave., Churchville, NY 14428, County of Monroe, for a golf cart. [ NOTICE ] Notice is hereby given that a license, number not yet assigned, for a full on premise beer, wine & liquor license has been applied for by Vista Golf LLC dba Mill Creek Golf, 128 Cedars Ave., Churchville, NY 14428, County of Monroe, for a restaurant. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Form. of DRY CLEAN FASHIONS, LLC (the “LLC”). Art. of Org. filed with Secretary of the State of NY (SSNY) on 12/10/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY has

been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, 937 Chili Ave, Rochester, NY 14611. Purpose: any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Form. of GENESEO HOUSING, LLC (the “LLC”). Art. of Org. filed with Secretary of the State of NY (SSNY) on 12/24/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, 2041 Penfield Rd, Penfield, NY 14526. Purpose: any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Form. of MATHEW FAMILY FL, LLC (the “LLC”). Art. of Org. filed with Secretary of the State of NY (SSNY) on 12/21/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, 21 Runnymede Ct, Rochester, NY 14618. Purpose: any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Form. of MATHEW FAMILY NY, LLC (the “LLC”). Art. of Org. filed with Secretary of the State of NY (SSNY) on 12/21/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, 21 Runnymede Ct, Rochester, NY 14618. Purpose: any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Form. of URIM MEDIA, LLC (the “LLC”). Art. of Org. filed with Secretary of the State of NY (SSNY) on 12/26/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, 460 Glide St, #1, Rochester, NY 14606. Purpose: any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Folio Consulting, LLC. Art. of Org. filed Sec’y State (SSNY) on 10/12/12 . Office Loc: Monroe Co. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail of process to: 76 Westland Ave, Rochester, NY 14618. Purpose: any lawful activities.

[ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of L.D. Networking LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 1/3/2013. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 79 Mission Hill Drive, Brockport, NY 14420. Purpose: any lawful act [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of MD3 SPORT LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 12/13/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 62 Monroe Street, Honeoye Falls,, NY 14472. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of 109 STRONG STREET, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 1/24/2013. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, PO Box 30, Penfield NY 14526. Purpose: any lawful act. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of 20 Pine 1909 LLC Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State on 12/31/12. Office location: Monroe County. Principal business address: 195 Dickinson St., Rochester, NY 14621. Secy. of State designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. Secy. Of State shall mail process to: 265 Purdue Court, Paramus, NJ 07652. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of 624 PITTSFORD VICTOR ROAD, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 01/25/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, 22 Ramsey Park, Rochester, NY 14610. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of ABBOTT TRENTO ONLINE MEDIA LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Sec’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 1/2/13. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 46

Rahway Lane, Rochester, NY 14606. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the princ. office of the LLC. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of American Homestead Storage LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/30/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: the LLC, 630 East Ave., Rochester, NY 14607, also the principal office address. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Aquarian Partners, L.P. Certificate filed Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 1/29/2013. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LP upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LP, 825 Allens Creek, Rochester, NY 14618. Name/address of each genl. ptr. available from SSNY. Term: until 12/31/2063. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of CARRETTA LLC. Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) on 1/18/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY may mail a copy of any process to LLC, 145-G Gibbs St., Rochester, NY 14605. Purpose: any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of CONCAL, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 3/10/04. Off. loc.: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, c/o Silver & Feldman, Esqs., Attn: Sammy Feldman, Esq., 3445 Winton Place, Ste. 228, Rochester, NY 14623. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of DeCiantis Properties, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 01/25/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, 22 Ramsey Park,

Rochester, NY 14610. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of DJF PARTNERS, LLC. Art. Of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/30/12. Office in MONROE County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, 14 Bay Point Circle Rochester, NY 14622. Purpose: Recruiting Services [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of ETE Properties, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/13/2012. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 330 Little John Way, Webster, NY 14580. Purpose: any lawful act [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Exium Partners, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State on 1/15/13. Office location: Monroe County. Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: The LLC, 144 Village Landing, Suite 276, Fairport, NY 14450, principal business address. Purpose: any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of Forels LLC, Art. Of Org. filed with the Secy. of State (SSNY) on 03/18/11. Office location Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to 942 Gristmill Rdg Webster, NY 14580. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Garden Village, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/27/12. Off. loc.: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, c/o Sammy Feldman, 3445 Winton Place, Ste. 228, Rochester, NY 14623. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of GV Apartments, LLC. Arts. of

Org. filed Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/27/12. Off. loc.: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, c/o Sammy Feldman, 3445 Winton Place, Ste. 228, Rochester, NY 14623. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of IS L Properties, LLC amended to IZ Levy Properties, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/21/12. Off. Loc.: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, c/o Sammy Feldman, 3445 Winton Place, Ste. 228, Rochester, NY 14623. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of limited liability company (LLC). Name: BLACKCOMB PROPERTIES LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Sec. of State of N.Y. (SSNY) on December 12, 2012. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to: The LLC, 10 Cambric Circle, Pittsford, New York 14534. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of LWN Transport, LLC. Art of Org. filed with SSNY on 11/29/12. Office Loc: Monroe Co. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: United States Corporation Agents, Inc. 7014 13th Ave, Ste 202, Brooklyn, NY 11228. Purpose: Any lawful activities [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of MD GORDON LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 01/04/13. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 40 Joseph Ave., Rochester, NY 14603. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. The regd. agent of the company upon whom and at which process against the company can be served is Michael Gordon, 40 Joseph Ave., Rochester, NY 14603. As amended by Cert. of

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Legal Ads > page 33 Amendment filed with SSNY on 01/10/13, the name of the LLC is: MD GORDON FAMILY LLC. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Media Connection, LLC filed under the original name The Media Connection, LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 12/19/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 10 Cross Ridge Rd., Pittsford, NY 14534. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of MUNSON AND SULLY, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 01/24/13. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: Adam C. Smith, 8 Reginald Circle, Rochester, NY 14625. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall

mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of NART LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/17/2012. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o Law Office of Anthony A. Dinitto, L.L.C., 8 Silent Meadows Drive, Spencerport, NY 14559. Purpose: any lawful act [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of Oaster & Associates LLC, Art. Of Org. filed with the Secy. of State (SSNY) on 02/09/10. Office location Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to 15 Schoen Pl., Pittsford, NY 14534. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Popeye Properties, LLC,

Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 1/7/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 29 Walnut Dr., Penfield, NY 14626. Purpose: any lawful activities.

against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Mark S. Rosen, The Solomon Organization, 92 River Rd., Summit, NJ 07901. As amended by Cert. of Amendment filed with SSNY on 02/04/13, the name of LLC is: ROYCO NY, LLC. Purpose: Any lawful activity.

[ NOTICE ]

[ NOTICE ]

Notice of Formation of RED-Rochester, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State on 11/19/12. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. bus. addr.: 640 Quail Ridge Dr., Westmont, IL 60559. Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. Purpose: all lawful purposes.

Notice of Formation of The Lady and the Snowman LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 9/18/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 409 Peck Rd., Spencerport, NY 14559. Purpose: any lawful activity.

[ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of ROYCO SO NY, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 01/30/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process

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[ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of THL 20 Pine 1913 LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State on 12/31/12. Office location: Monroe County. Principal business address: 195 Dickinson St., Rochester, NY 14621. Secy. of State designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. Secy. Of State shall mail process to: 265 Purdue Court, Paramus, NJ 07652. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of TWIN TAVERN LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 01/10/13. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 1549 Lake Rd., Hamlin, NY 14464. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of UNDER THE LIGHTHOUSE LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 01/09/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, 1793 Manitou Rd., Spencerport, NY 14559. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of YOUth ROChester, LLC, Art. of Org. were filed with NY Dept. of State on 11/14/2012. Office loc.: Monroe. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process may be served and shall mail process to: PO Box

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60194, Rochester, NY 14606. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of ATIS Elevator Inspections, LLC. Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 2/4/13. Office location: Monroe County. LLC formed in MO on 11/21/12. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. MO and principal business address: 8531 Page Ave., Ste. 140, St. Louis, MO 63114. Cert. of Org. filed with MO Sec. of State, 600 W. Main St., Jefferson City, MO 65101. Purpose: all lawful purposes. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of Bluetone Communications, LLC. Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 1/2/13. Office location: Monroe County. LLC formed in OH on 10/22/12. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011. OH and principal business address: 7775 Walton Pkwy., New Albany, OH 43054. Cert. of Org. filed with OH Sec. of State, 180 E. Broad St., 16th Fl., Columbus, OH 43215. Purpose: all lawful purposes. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of Horizon Labs LLC. Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/26/12. Office location: Monroe County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 12/12/12. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: National Registered Agents, Inc., 111 Eighth Ave., NY, NY 10011, also the registered agent. Principal office address: 930 Carter St., Rochester, NY 14621. Address to be maintained in DE: c/o National Registered Agents, Inc., 160 Greentree Dr., Ste. 101, Dover, DE 19904. Arts of Org. filed with the DE Secretary of State, John G. Townsend Bldg., 401 Federal St., Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of M&N Group Holdings, LLC. Authority filed with NY Dept. of State

on 1/31/13. Office location: Monroe County. LLC formed in DE on 6/30/11. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. DE address of LLC: 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes.

SSNY shall mail process to: National Registered Agents, Inc., 111 Eighth Ave., NY, NY 10011, also the registered agent. Principal office address: 2300 Buffalo Rd., Rochester, NY 14624. Address to be maintained in DE: c/o National Registered Agents, Inc., 160 Greentree Dr., Ste. 101, Dover, DE 19801. Arts of Org. filed with the DE Secretary of State, John G. Townsend Bldg., 401 Federal St., Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: any lawful activities.

[ NOTICE ]

[ NOTICE ]

Notice of Qualification of Manning & Napier Group, LLC. Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 1/17/13. Office location: Monroe County. LLC formed in DE on 6/24/11. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. DE address of LLC: 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes.

REBA NY, LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 1/23/2013. Office in Monroe Co. SSNY desig. agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 2255 Lyell Ave., Rochester, NY 14606, which is also the principal business location. Purpose: Any lawful purpose.

[ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of PIPELINE EQUIPMENT RESOURCES COMPANY, LLC. Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 01/28/13. Office location: Monroe County. LLC formed in New Jersey (NJ) on 07/02/12. Princ. office of LLC: 3900 Buffalo Rd., Rochester, NY 14624. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Corporation Service Co., 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207-2543. NJ addr. of LLC: 9 Mars Ct., Unit C-4A, Boonton, NJ 07005. Arts. of Org. filed with State Treasurer, Dept. of Treasury, Div. of Revenue and Enterprise Services, P.O. Box 628, Trenton, NJ 08646-0628. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of Q Management Services LLC. Fictitious name: Q Management Services Group LLC. Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/31/12. Office location: Monroe County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 12/12/12. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served.

[ NOTICE ] ROXBURY DOME LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 1/8/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 11 Roxbury Ln., Pittsford, NY 14534. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] ROXBURY LAND LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 1/8/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 11 Roxbury Ln., Pittsford, NY 14534. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] WEBSTER PARTNERS, LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 1/15/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Stephen Webster, 1595 Elmwood Ave, Rochester, NY 14620. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] WINDLASS PROPERTIES & HOLDINGS, LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 8/9/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Leah M. Buttery, 8344 Ridge Rd W., Brockport, NY 14420. General Purposes.

[ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of 5543 ROUTE 14, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/21/12. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 679 Hightower Way, Webster, NY 14580. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] Phillips Route Sales LLC filed Articles of Organization with the New York Department of State on 11/14/2012. Its office is located in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent of the Company upon whom process against it may be served and a copy of any process shall be mailed to 65 Heinz St Hilton NY 14468. The purpose of the Company is any lawful activity. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION BODYMIND FLOAT CENTER LLC ] Articles of Organization filed with Secretary of State of NY (“SSNY”) on 01/07/2013. Office in Monroe County. SSNY designated agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to BODYMIND FLOAT CENTER LLC, C/O DAVID BRICKMAN, 378 ROCKINGHAM ST., ROCHESTER, NY 14620. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY ] KAI TRADING COMPANY, LLC filed Articles of Organization with the New York State Department of State on January 10, 2010. Its office is to be located in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent of the company upon whom process against it may be served, and a copy of any process shall be mailed to 40 Harrison Street, Rochester, New York 14605. The purpose of the company is any lawful business. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LLC ] ReTech Services, LLC has filed articles of organization with the New York Secretary of State on January 10, 2013. Its principal place of business is located at 7 Cross Meadow Lane, Pittsford, New York in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated


Legal Ads as agent upon whom process may be served. A copy of any process shall be mailed to at 7 Cross Meadow Lane, Pittsford, New York 14534. The purpose of the LLC is to engage in any lawful activity for which Limited Liability Companies may be organized under Section 203 of the New York Limited Liability Company Law. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LLC ] Rochester Wellbeing, LLC has filed articles of organization with the New York Secretary of State on December 10, 2012 with a date of formation of January 1, 2013. Its principal place of business is located at 2851 Clover Street, Pittsford, New York in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent upon whom process may be served. A copy of any process shall be mailed to 2851 Clover Street, Pittsford, New York 14534. The purpose of the LLC is to engage in any lawful activity for which Limited Liability Companies may be organized under Section 203 of the New York Limited Liability Company Law. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LUCKY SQUIRREL PARTNERS, L.P. ] Notice of formation of Limited Partnership (“L.P.”). Certificate of Limited Partnership filed with Sec. of State of NY (“SSNY”) on December 19, 2012. Office location: 18 Parkview Manor Circle, Honeoye Falls, NY 14472, Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent of L.P. upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of any process to the L.P. at 18 Parkview Manor Circle, Honeoye Falls, NY 14472. The names and addresses of each general partner are available from the SSNY. The latest date upon which the L.P. is to dissolve is December 31, 2037. Purpose: property management and to engage in any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF ROSE CIRCLE, LLC ] First: Rose Circle, LLC, a Limited Liability Company, filed Articles of Organization with the Secretary of State of New York on December 6, 2012 Second: The county within this state in which the office of the limited liability company is to be located is Monroe. Third:The street address of the principal business

location is: 24 Old Country Lane, Fairport, New York 14450. Fourth: The Secretary of State is designated as agent of the limited liability company upon whom process against it may be served. The post office address within or without this state to which the Secretary of State shall mail a copy of any process against the limited liability company served upon him or her is: 24 Old Country Lane, Fairport, New York 14450. Fifth: The purpose of the business of Rose Circle, LLC is any lawful purpose [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF WESTMINSTER ST ROCHESTER-SODUS LAKE PROPERTIES, LLC ] The name of the Limited Liability Company is Westminster St Rochester-Sodus Lake Properties, LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the New York Secretary of State on 12/23/2012. The office of the LLC is in Monroe County. The New York Secretary of State is designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. The Secretary of State shall mail a copy of such process to 1 Chase Square, Suite 1900, Rochester, New York 14604, Attn: William R. Alexander, , Esq.. The LLC is organized to engage in any lawful activity for which an LLC may be formed under NY LLC Law. [ SUMMONS ] Index No. 2012-4817 STATE OF NEW YORK SUPREME COURT COUNTY OF MONROE WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A. Plaintiff vs. MICHAEL AMMERING and JOHN DOE Defendants This is an attempt to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. To the above named Defendants: You are hereby summoned to answer the complaint in this action and to serve a copy of your answer, or if the complaint is not served with this summons, to serve a notice of appearance on the plaintiff’s attorneys within thirty days after the service of this summons, exclusive of the day of service, and in case of your failure to appear or answer, judgment will be taken against you by default for the relief demanded in the complaint. NOTICE YOU ARE IN DANGER OF LOSING YOUR HOME. If you do not respond to this summons and complaint

by serving a copy of the answer on the attorney for the mortgage company who filed this foreclosure proceeding against you and filing the answer with the court, a default judgment may be entered and you can lose your home. Speak to an attorney or go to the court where your case is pending for further information on how to answer the summons and protect your property. Sending a payment to your mortgage company will not stop this foreclosure action. YOU MUST RESPOND BY SERVING A COPY OF THE ANSWER ON THE ATTORNEY FOR THE PLAINTIFF (MORTGAGE COMPANY) AND FILING THE ANSWER WITH THE COURT. The foregoing summons is served upon you by publication pursuant to an order of Hon. J. Scott Odorisi , Justice of the Supreme Court of the State of New York, signed the 24th day of January, 2013, Rochester, New York. The object of this action is to foreclose a mortgage on the following property: ALL THAT CERTAIN LOT, PIECE OR PARCEL OF LAND, situate, lying and being in the City of Rochester, County of Monroe, and State of New York, being Lot #36, as shown on a map of the L. Bauer Tract on file in Monroe County Clerk’s Office in Liber 6 of Maps, Page 85. Said Lot #36 is situate on the east side of Karnes Street and is 40 feet wide front and rear and 125 feet deep as shown on said map. Subject to an easement given by George A. Gillette to Rochester Railway Light Company and others dated November 15th, 1913, and recorded in Monroe County Clerk’s Office in Liber 992 of Deeds at Page 357. Subject to all covenants, easements and restrictions, if any, affecting said premises. Being the same premises conveyed to the Mortgagor(s) herein by Deed to be recorded simultaneously herewith, this being a purchase money mortgage for the amount stated herein. A residence for one or two families only is located on this property. These premises are also known as 48 Karnes Street, Rochester, NY 14606. Natalie A. Grigg, Esq. Woods Oviatt Gilman LLP Attorneys for Plaintiff 700 Crossroads Building 2 State Street [ SUMMONS WITH NOTICE ]

STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF HERKIMER BEVERLY EARLSLEY, Plaintiff, against ROBERT P. EARLSEY, Defendant. Plaintiff designates HERKIMER COUNTY The basis of the venue is RESIDENCY OF THE PLAINTIFF. Plaintiff resides at: 2264 Higby Road Frankfort, NY 13340 County of HERKIMER. ACTION FOR DIVORCE To the above named Defendant: You are hereby summoned to serve a notice of appearance, on the Plaintiff’s Attorney(s) within 20 days after the service of this Summons, exclusive of the day of service (or within 30 days after the service is complete. If the summons is not personally delivered to you within the State of New York); and in case of your failure to appear or answer, judgment will be taken against you by default for the relief demanded in the notice set forth below. Dated: MARCH 10, 2011 Defendant’s Address ROBERT P. EARLSLEY 540 UTICA STREET BUFFALO, NEW YORK 13502 Longeretta Law Firm David A. Longeretta, Esg. Attorney for Plaintiff Office and Post Office Address 298 GENESEE STREET UTICA, NEW YIORK 13502 NOTICE: The nature of this action is to dissolve the marriage between the parties, on the grounds of Abandonment and No-Fault. The relief sought is: A judgment of absolute divorce, in favor of the Plaintiff, dissolving the marriage between the parties in this action. NOTICE TO DEFENDANT You may certain right under the laws of the State of New York to an equitable division of certain property held individually and jointly by you and your spouse during the term of your marriage; to receive maintenance from your spouse; and to receive support for the children of the marriage as part of this proceeding. These rights may be available to you whether or not a separation agreement has been entered into between you and your spouse. A failure to answer this Verified Complaint and to appear in this action may therefore result in a judgment of divorce being obtained against you, and additionally, a waiver of those rights.

Fun

[ LAST WEEK’S SOLUTION ON PAGE 30 ]

Index No. 00094390 SUPREME COURT

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February 13-19, 2013 - City Newspaper