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Greater Rochester’s Alternative Newsweekly

Vol 42 No 22

AND MORE MUSIC, PAGE 12 •

News. Music. Life.

What needs to happen is public outcry.” FEEDBACK, PAGE 2

Eastman House wants second shot at vets club. NEWS, PAGE 6

Does Rochester need a hostel? NEWS, PAGE 4

Climate change cinema. NEWS, PAGE 5

Natural selections at Oxford Gallery. ART REVIEW, PAGE 24

FEATURE | BY ERIC REZSNYAK | PAGE 10 | PHOTO BY MIKE HANLON

Local plays link college, community, and theater Rochester has no shortage of live theater. And in a scene so crowded, some elements sometimes get lost. Consider our local college theater programs, as well as local playwrights, which rarely get significant community exposure. This month a production by the University of Rochester’s International Theatre Program will bring those two elements of the local theater scene together, as the UR stages a full production of a local playwright’s work for the first time in anyone’s memory.

Opening on Thursday, February 14, and continuing through February 24, the International Theatre Program will present “The Rochester Plays,” a two-part work by local writer Spencer Christiano. Although the plays are not necessarily set in Rochester — although they easily could be — they allow the UR to tap into the pool of talent in its backyard. It also gives an up-and-coming young playwright a larger and higher profile venue for his work.

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We welcome your comments. Send them to themail@rochester-citynews. com, or post them on our website, rochestercitynewspaper.com, our Facebook page, or our Twitter feed, @roccitynews. Comments of fewer than 350 words have a greater chance of being published, and we do edit selections for publication in print. We don’t publish comments sent to other media.

School reform doesn’t require a new system

Ralph Spezio’s essay suggesting that we create a new, formal process to make schools more community friendly had the right emotion and philosophy behind it, but it sounds desperate, and desperation is never a good foundation for change (“A Better Model for Neighborhood Schools,” Guest Commentary). More important, the community-governed schools he talked about can become real tomorrow, and we don’t need to recreate the process to do this. The Rochester school district has the power and expertise to improve schools. Central Office and the school board need to be stirred. If someone found taking on Central Office to be overwhelming, they could get teachers and administrators to articulate a New School Unit. This policy already exists but few have explored it. Finally, a group could pursue a charter school by pulling the trigger law. Parents can take over any school they want to if they vote to do this. The point is that methods for transforming city schools into ones that are more successful, genuine, and community governed already exist. There is no need to reinvent the wheel. There always will be intense opposition from Central Office to any idea that threatens their status. Why would anyone being paid $100,000 or more to tell people what to do be in favor of creating an alternative based on shared governance? The RCSD employs hundreds of administrators who are in the system for life. Many of them do not work in the trenches and have no desire to jump into the dirty work that must happen if schools are really going to get better. Spezio was right. The solutions need to start with those behind the school and living-room walls. Administrators dropping reforms from the sky will only make things worse, but creating a new system is not necessary. What needs to happen is public outcry. RCSD parents

On our blog on Bob Duffy’s comments about Lovely Warren considering a run for mayor: Regardless of what you may think of her prospects as mayor, Duffy’s “wait your turn” condescension toward a black woman who dares to think of running against a rich white male is astounding. Can anyone imagine a Republican politician saying something like that? The editorial writers at the D&C would be in high dudgeon, and charges of racism would come jumping off the pages of City. Yet for some reason, perhaps because he is a Democrat and Second Banana to Andrew Cuomo, he is escaping criticism. Yet another double standard from the news media in this town.

community was innovative, dynamic, and brought out the best in the musicians. And for that, Maestro Remmereit deserves some public credit from the RPO, which unfortunately to date he has not received. The RPO board’s decision to go in a different direction, based in large part on findings outlined in the Craviso report, was entirely within their prerogative, and board chair Elizabeth Rice articulated this point quite clearly. Not as clear however, was whether the specific recommendations for the RPO board have been implemented. If they have been, it should have been reported, as it will eliminate the confusion around roles and responsibilities that contributed to the current situation. If the recommendations have not been implemented in their entirety, they should be. Until we learn from and correct our mistakes, we will be destined to suffer yet again, bringing to mind something George Eliot said: “It is never too late to become what you might have been.”

BOB S.

JACK STEWART, BRIGHTON

need to start threatening to pull the charter trigger. Only then will the Central Office gods listen. JOHN BLISS, ROCHESTER

Bliss is the founder and former CEO of the Urban Choice Charter School.

Duffy and Warren

Posted on rochestercitynewspaper.com. If Warren does challenge Richards, it’s likely that other less qualified office seekers will also throw in their hats, once again creating a messy and contentious race, which no doubt will have long term implications for the entire community. And perhaps opening the door to someone who is not qualified to fill the position. This is not a gender or ethnicity contest, it’s about the value of continuity during these fiscally challenging times. How disruptive will it be for a new mayor and his/ her cabinet to get up to speed? The choice is, what’s best for the entire community, not just some sub-set of the community. FRANKSPEAK

Posted on rochestercitynewspaper.com.

Unanswered questions for the RPO

As ardent supporters of the RPO, my wife and I left the recent annual meeting disappointed. We had hoped that despite the obvious rift between RPO leadership and Maestro Remmereit, the packed forum, full with supporters, could have served to light a new flame of hope, instead of fanning further discord. Everyone on all sides, those pro-Arild and those against, agrees that the programming Maestro Remmereit introduced to our

Greening the bridge

On Friends of the GardenAerial’s proposal for High Falls: I’m sure the GardenAerial can provide an innovative, urban space. However, why invest so much energy into turning the Pont de Rennes bridge into a green space when it already is a green space? It is a fantastic and heavily used trail for walking, running, and biking. As a cyclist, I was perturbed by the seemingly random and scattered placement of plants and trees during Greentopia. I had to weave my bike through it, and it made me avoid the bridge on my commute to and from work. Hopefully the new design will be conscious of the fact that the bridge is already a successful urban green space, and will work to complement green transportation and exercise, rather than hinder it. BEN

Posted on rochestercitynewspaper.com.

I-Square, stalled

On the latest conflict over the I-Square proposal: This just sounds like an inexperienced developer who isn’t used to navigating the entitlements process. It may be stalled, but a project this big often takes 2-plus years. If the developers weren’t ready for that long of a commitment, they went into the process with the wrong impression. BRIAN

Posted on rochestercitynewspaper.com.

News. Music. Life. Greater Rochester’s Alternative Newsweekly February 6-12, 2013 Vol 42 No 22 250 North Goodman Street Rochester, New York 14607-1199 themail@rochester-citynews.com phone (585) 244-3329 fax (585) 244-1126 rochestercitynewspaper.com Publishers: William and Mary Anna Towler Editor: Mary Anna Towler Asst. to the publishers: Matt Walsh Editorial department themail@rochester-citynews.com Features editor: Eric Rezsnyak News editor: Christine Carrie Fien Staff writers: Tim Louis Macaluso, Jeremy Moule Music editor: Willie Clark Music writer: Frank De Blase Calendar editor: Rebecca Rafferty Contributing writers: Paloma Capanna, Casey Carlsen, Roman Divezur, George Grella, Susie Hume, Andy Klingenberger, Dave LaBarge, Kathy Laluk, Michael Lasser, James Leach, Adam Lubitow, Ron Netsky, Dayna Papaleo, Suzan Pero, Rebecca Rafferty, Deb Schleede, David Yockel Jr. Editorial intern: Jason Silverstein Art department artdept@rochester-citynews.com Art director/production manager: Matt DeTurck Designers: Aubrey Berardini, Mark Chamberlin Photographers: Mark Chamberlin, Frank De Blase, Michael Hanlon Advertising department ads@rochester-citynews.com Advertising sales manager: Betsy Matthews Account executives: Nancy Burkhardt, Tom Decker, Annalisa Iannone, William Towler Classified sales representatives: Christine Kubarycz, Tracey Mykins Operations/Circulation info@rochester-citynews.com Circulation manager: Katherine Stathis Distribution: Andy DiCiaccio, David Riccioni, Northstar Delivery, Wolfe News City Newspaper is available free of charge. Additional copies of the current issue may be purchased for $1, payable in advance at the City Newspaper office. City Newspaper may be distributed only by authorized distributors. No person may, without prior written permission of City Newspaper, take more than one copy of each weekly issue. City (ISSN 1551-3262) is published weekly by WMT Publications, Inc. Periodical postage paid at Rochester, NY (USPS 022-138). Send address changes to City, 250 North Goodman Street, Rochester, NY 14607. City is a member of the Association of Alternative Newsweeklies and the New York Press Association. Subscriptions: $35.00 ($30.00 for senior citizens) for one year. Add $10 yearly for out-of-state subscriptions: add $30 yearly for foreign subscriptions. Due to the initial high cost of establishing new subscriptions, refunds for fewer than ten months cannot be issued. Copyright by WMT Publications Inc., 2013 - all rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, photocopying, recording or by any information storage retrieval system without permission of the copyright owner.

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The next act for the RPO The two sides in the Rochester Philharmonic fight will likely be back in court soon. At first blush, a court ruling on Monday seemed to be a clear win for the RPO board: State Supreme Court Justice Kenneth Fisher basically tossed out requests from a group of dissident RPO members. Upset that the board fired music director Arild Remmereit, they had tried to get the organization’s annual meeting postponed so they could elect their own slate to the board. On Monday, Fisher sided with the board. But while the board issued a press release saying it was pleased, this isn’t the end of the story. The dissidents’ initial court actions dealt only with the holding of the annual meeting and election. That meeting has already taken place, on January 23, and Fisher ruled that much of what dissidents were asking for – permitting write-in votes at that meeting, extending the expiring terms of board members and officers, among other things – was now moot. But significantly, Fisher did not rule that the meeting and the election were void – because the dissidents had not asked for that. They can go back to court seeking that ruling. And earlier this week, their attorney, Eileen Buholtz, said she was preparing to do just that. I have mixed feelings about all of this. I believe the RPO board was correct in terminating Remmereit’s contract. But I also believe in democracy. The RPO’s bylaws make it difficult to mount opposition board candidates. And in this particular case, there was no real dissident movement until it was too late to run opposition candidates. The bylaws set the deadline for filing nominations, and by the time the board fired Remmereit, that date had passed. It’ll be interesting to see how the court rules in this next round. My hunch is that it will again side with the RPO leadership, not the dissidents. But if I were on that board right now, I’d be pushing for a far more democratic way to elect board members. I’d also take seriously reports of “a climate of fear” among the musicians. The RPO players should be at the core of everybody’s focus, and no player should feel threatened – not by a music director, not by a union, not by the board, not by other musicians. Everybody needs to start building trust among the RPO family. And if the court rules for the dissidents, and a new election is held, and the dissidents win? First of all, they won’t be in charge. Only 1/3 of the board seats will be up. There are still a few dissidents on the

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As the RPO board and its dissidents head back to court, some advice for both of the warring sides. board, but I’d bet there aren’t enough to form a majority after a new election. And so, some advice for the dissidents. Some of them insist that the RPO board and the CEO should never “interfere” with the work of the music director. But the board and the CEO must make sure that the books balance. And they also have a responsibility to step in if they’re concerned about how an employee is treating others – whether it’s the music director, the CEO, a board member, a secretary, or a musician. And no, personnel problems should not be aired widely. I’ve been troubled by the suggestion by some dissidents that employers should have different standards of behavior for “artists” than for other employees. As an out-of-town RPO supporter wrote me recently, that’s ridiculous. We should not tolerate abusive behavior from anyone, not in this day and age. It’s not ethical. And it doesn’t get the best from people. Finally, there’s been enough dissident talk about withdrawing financial support – even about urging governments to cut off funds. That will cripple the orchestra. This isn’t the first time the RPO has gone through this kind of drama. It will pass. The question is how strong the orchestra will be afterwards. That depends on all RPO supporters, but for the next year, it depends primarily on the board. And on the leadership of the dissidents.

rochestercitynewspaper.com

CITY 3

[ NEWS FROM THE WEEK PAST ]

MCC legislation advances

Legislation allowing Monroe County to buy space for a new MCC campus in the City of Rochester cleared two Legislature committees. The full body will vote on the legislation, which allows for the purchase of several buildings and part of a parking lot for approximately $3 million, during its February 12 meeting.

Fracking regs delayed?

Department of Environmental Conservation Commissioner Joe Martens told State Assembly members that the state could miss its February 27 deadline to finalize fracking regulations, according to media reports. Whether the department meets the deadline depends on when state Health Department Commissioner Nirav Shah finishes his health review on fracking.

IPO for B&L

Bausch and Lomb’s owner, Warburg Pincus LLC, has changed its focus from trying to sell B&L to launching an initial public offering of the company. Talk of an IPO for B&L followed some interest from companies like

Johnson & Johnson and Abbott Laboratories, but the companies did not appear to be in any rush to pay B&L’s $10 billion asking price. Warbus Pincus purchased B&L in 2007 for $2.9 billion.

News

Rochester’s got good credit

The City of Rochester received positive credit ratings from Moody’s Investors Services, Standard & Poor’s Rating Services, and Fitch Ratings. Mayor Tom Richards say the ratings are votes of confidence in the city.

TOURISM | BY JEREMY MOULE

Rochester duo says city needs hostel

Kodak patent sale completed

Eastman Kodak has completed the sale and licensing of its digital imaging patents. The transaction with a consortium of companies led by Intellectual Services and RPX gave Kodak $527 million. The deal allows Kodak to retain rights to use the 1,100 patents it sold, and it resolves the lawsuit between Kodak and the consortium, which includes some of the biggest names in the hightech industry, including Google, Apple, Samsung, and Adobe Systems.

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Does the City of Rochester need a hostel? Local residents Evan Lowenstein and Michael Lasota say it does. Hostels provide inexpensive lodging for travelers and are common in cities around the world — Buffalo and Syracuse each have one. Hostels typically provide a more social experience for travelers and tend to be popular with the younger crowd. They often have dormitory-style rooms — though many also have private rooms — and common kitchens so visitors can prepare their own food. Some hostels arrange group tours or outings for their guests. Lowenstein and Lasota say that some travelers seek out destinations with hostels, and that Rochester has the kinds of attractions, including museums and galleries, that could attract hostelers. The accommodations could also draw in people passing through the area, such as touring cyclists, they say. Lasota formerly managed the Pirate Haus Inn hostel in St.

Augustine, Florida, and the guests there included history buffs, tourists, and business travelers, he says. (Lowenstein is a local smartgrowth advocate.) “We feel like we’re missing out on this huge slice of travelers,” Lowenstein says. Some hostels are privately owned while others operate as nonprofits. Lasota and Lowenstein don’t have a specific plan for opening a Rochester hostel, and bringing the idea to fruition will cost money. They have discussed the idea with city and local tourism officials, and they say they got a warm reception. Right now, however, Lasota and Lowenstein are trying to build support and momentum for the idea. They’ve set up a website, www. rochostel.com, to start getting the word out.

Just as states have established common standards, Rochester has created a districtwide common core. For example: ninth-grade algebra will be the same at Monroe and Charlotte high schools. And students in one city school will receive the same level of art and music instruction as students in another.

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RCSD adopting ‘common core’ curriculum

RPO drama #2

While the New York City and Yonkers school districts have seen their graduation rates go up over the last few years, Rochester’s rate seems permanently stuck around 50 percent. And 27 of Rochester’s 60 city schools are among the lowest performing in the state. One reason for the gains in New York City and Yonkers, says Rochester schools Superintendent Bolgen Vargas, is the implementation of what educators call the “common core curriculum.” Rochester is about four years behind New York City implementing the initiative, he says. It’s unclear why it’s taken the district so long. About 45 states have adopted the curriculum, including New York. The premise: a seventh grader in Rochester should be able to move to a public school in Massachusetts and demonstrate the same knowledge in math, for example, as the students in that school. “It’s a clear set of standards,” says Anita Murphy, Rochester’s deputy superintendent of operations. “The standards say ‘This is what children at this grade should know and be able to do.’” The curriculum gives teachers a road map, Murphy says, but it’s not prescriptive;

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it doesn’t tell teachers how to teach. Just as the states have established common standards, Rochester has created a districtwide common core. For example: ninth-grade Anita Murphy. algebra will be the FILE PHOTO same at Monroe and Charlotte high schools. And students in one city school will receive the same level of art and music instruction as students in another. Murphy says the district’s teachers fell into a habit of offering students an assortment of course levels instead of the appropriate level, based on what it seemed like students could handle. For example, students would receive seventh-grade math instead of eighthgrade math, or pre-algebra instead of algebra. Remedial instruction was taking place, Murphy says, instead of the appropriate course work.

The attorney for dissidents upset over the firing of Rochester Philharmonic Orchestra music director Arild Remmereit are preparing to head back to court after a ruling on Monday that sided with the RPO board. | Attorney Eileen Buholtz said Tuesday morning that she’s preparing a new filing, asking the court to void the RPO’s annual meeting, which was held on January 23. She says she will ask that the court order the RPO board to set a new annual meeting and permit write-in votes for alternate candidates to the board. | In an earlier filing, the dissidents had wanted the court to delay the January 23 meeting. They also wanted the court to order expiring board members’ terms extended, and order the board to permit write-in candidates in the board election. But the court refused to issue a temporary restraining order delaying the meeting. | On Monday of this week, State Supreme Court Justice Kenneth Fisher ruled that most of the other dissidents’ requests were moot, because the meeting was already held. He did not rule on the validity of the January 23 meeting, because the dissidents had not requested a ruling on that issue.

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CITY 5

NEIGHBORHOODS | BY CHRISTINE CARRIE FIEN

Eastman House wants another shot at vets club

Morgan Management and the Eastman House are both interested in the Monroe Voiture property on University Avenue. PHOTO BY MARK CHAMBERLIN

A proposed apartment complex and a lingering dispute may keep the Eastman House from getting land the house director says is necessary for future expansion of the national historic landmark — one of two in the City of Rochester. (The other is the Susan B. Anthony house). Morgan Management has a contract with Monroe Voiture 111, a veterans organization, to purchase 933 University Avenue to build an apartment complex. Monroe Voiture owns the club, but several community groups use it as a meeting place. Morgan originally proposed building a four story, 110-unit apartment complex with a 118-space first-floor parking garage and a 3,400 square foot veterans’ clubhouse for Monroe Voiture. Morgan is revising the plans, however, after complaints by neighbors and neighborhood groups about the size, design, and other aspects of the project. “It’s kind of too early to talk about, but we feel that the project will fit much better with the revisions that we’re making,” says Kevin Morgan, vice president with Morgan Management. The property is adjacent to the Eastman House and house director Bruce Barnes says the proposed apartment complex would damage the aesthetic of the Eastman property and hurt its value. “It would very, very dramatically affect what people would see,” he says. “It’s only 20 feet from the property line, there are a number of trees they’d have to cut down. I think any apartment building that you would put there would be very jarring [and] would be a problem for us, frankly.” “The most important thing to us is that we don’t want someone to ruin the view from our national historic landmark property,” Barnes says. 6 CITY

FEBRUARY 6-12, 2013

But Kevin Morgan says the real reason Eastman officials are upset is because they failed to acquire the Monroe Voiture property when they had the chance. “From what the Eastman House has told us, they want the property for themselves regardless of what we do,” Morgan says. “They’ve admitted that they were sleeping at the switch. Unfortunately, now we’re caught in the middle of that. They’re going to oppose anything we do.” The Eastman properties and Monroe Voiture 111 are in the East Avenue Preservation District, which means the Morgan proposal has to get the approval of the city’s Preservation Board. The board had one fact-finding meeting on the proposal in January. Kevin Morgan says revised plans will likely be in front of the Preservation Board in March. Barnes says the Eastman House came close

to a deal with Monroe Voiture about three years ago, but it didn’t come together. “We let it slip away,” he says. “We didn’t handle the situation quite the way we should have.” Major expansion on Eastman’s current property would most likely be prohibited, Barnes says, because of the historic status of

Eastman’s house and grounds. So it’s logical, he says, to look to the Monroe Voiture property as potential growth space. Eastman could use the property for classrooms, a small dorm, storage, laboratories, or other purposes, Barnes says. “We’re going to need more space soon,” he says. “We’re close to out of space.” Morgan’s purchase of 933 University is contingent on getting the required approvals from the city for the apartment project. If the project doesn’t go through, Morgan can walk away. If that happens, Barnes says the Eastman House would like to step in. “I am optimistic that, in the event the deal with Morgan Management is terminated, the Monroe Voiture and George Eastman House would be able to reach a mutual acceptable arrangement under which the Monroe Voiture property would be transferred to George Eastman House, which would assure that the clubhouse would be well-maintained into the future,” wrote Barnes in a follow-up e-mail. But that might not be easy. Rene Vanmulem, club manager of Monroe Voiture 111, says Eastman officials wanted to “lock up” the Monroe Voiture property for 20 years in case they decided they wanted to use it, Vanmulem says, while offering Monroe Voiture little in return. The offer was an “insult,” he says, and quite different than what club members expected based on its discussions with Eastman officials. “Needless to say, our board of directors was not born yesterday and told them we were not in the least bit interested,” Vanmulem says. “There’s been no further discussion with the Eastman House since that time as far as them purchasing the property.”

Barnes, who was not with the Eastman House when the discussions with Monroe Voiture took place, says the club was offered long-term maintenance of its clubhouse as part of the deal, but the duration was unsatisfactory to Monroe Voiture’s board. If the Morgan project is approved, Monroe Voiture will get a new clubhouse out of the deal. That’s important, Vanmulem says, because the current building is old and maintenance is difficult for the membership. “It’s above and beyond our means,” he says. “So when the [Morgan] opportunity came along, it was too good for us to pass up.” Vanmulem says he agrees that Morgan’s initial designs were “pretty bland” and the project would have not provided a good backdrop to the Eastman property, “but given some time and the proper rendering, I think they can make the project work.” If the Morgan deal falls through, Monroe Voiture might consider discussions with the Eastman House, Vanmulem says, but it’s by no means a done deal. “They would very honestly be coming to us on our terms, not on theirs,” he says. “We’re going to be in the driver’s seat, so to speak.” Those terms haven’t been discussed, Vanmulem says, but they would be “substantial” and would likely include cash and repairs to the Monroe Voiture building. And there might be options beyond Morgan Management or the Eastman House, he says. Since the Morgan proposal was made public, other organizations have come forward with interest in the Monroe Voiture property, Vanmulem says. “There could be other choices at this point,” he says.

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CITY 7

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For more Tom Tomorrow, including a political blog and cartoon archive, visit www.thismodernworld.com

100th anniversary of murdered striker

The Ronald G. Pettengill Labor Education Fund will hold a memorial at 3:30 p.m. on Friday, February 8, for Ida Breiman, the 17-year-old worker who was murdered during the Rochester garment workers’ strike in 1913. The centennial ceremony is at Stonewood Cemetery (off Lake Avenue between Stonewood and Pearson).

GardenAerial plans The Rochester Sierra Club and Friends of GardenAerial will present “Creating Rochester’s Urban Green Space: Plans Unveiled” at 6:45 p.m. on Thursday, February 7. The project is designed to bring green space to the High Falls area. The meeting is at 81 Browns Race. Space is

limited, so RSVP is recommended: 234-1056.

Keystone protest in DC

Environmental groups will hold a national climate change rally at the National Mall in Washington, DC, on Sunday, February 17 ,to protest the Keystone XL pipeline. A bus will leave from Bushnell’s Basin park and ride at 2:30 p.m. and return on Monday, February 18, at 1 a.m. Cost is $60 per rider and there will be a collection for the driver. Rider fees and donations needed by Monday, February 11. Reservations: lci_msw@ hotmail.com. Mail checks to: Paul Sanders, 164 Penn Lane, Rochester 14625.

Third discussion in race series

The Friends and Foundation of the Rochester Public Library will present “Race: the Power of an Illusion,” a discussion with Timothy Weider, professor of education and sociology at Nazareth College,

at 5 p.m. on Thursday, February 7. The event is at the Central Library, 115 South Avenue.

HIV/AIDS testing AIDS Care will recognize National Black HIV/AIDS Awareness Day on Saturday, February 9, by offering free health screenings, including HIV and STD testing. The event is from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. at barbershops and hair salons throughout the city. For a complete list of locations: www.acrochester.org.

Talk on nonviolence

Progressives in Action will hold a meeting at 7 p.m. on Tuesday, February 12. Kit Miller, director of the MK Gandhi Institute for Nonviolence, will discuss “Nonviolence, Community Activism, and Leadership.” The meeting is at the Grapevine Restaurant, 122 East Chestnut Street, in East Rochester. The restaurant does not serve food at this time.

Dining

Eggplant with basil and tofu (left) and pumpkin curry with shrimp (right) from Thai Time Cuisine in Henrietta. PHOTOS BY MARK CHAMBERLIN

Mid-winter thaw Thai Time Cuisine 2171 W. HENRIETTA ROAD 270-5530, THAITIMEROCHESTER.COM MONDAY-THURSDAY 11 A.M.-9:30 P.M., FRIDAY-SATURDAY 11 A.M.-10 P.M. [ REVIEW ] BY JAMES LEACH

Thailand. In the depths of a brutal winter just the name of the place evokes a tropical breeze. Tom yum, larb kai, som tum, goong yang — even the sing-song names of dishes have a South Seas sort of playful languor to them. And the curries — the relatively safe yellow, the red the color of lava and not much cooler, deceptively mildlooking green — promise heat to warm you from the inside out. Thai food in the middle of February probably won’t thaw out your poor frozen toes, but it can make you briefly forget the privations of life up here in the frozen north. And that’s why one frigid Tuesday I found myself popping the lid off of a take-out container full of pumpkin-basil curry from our city’s newest Thai restaurant, Thai Time on Henrietta Road, inhaling a gust of steam perfumed

with the sweetness of pumpkin, the licorice bite of Thai basil, and a host of other spices as I picked up my fork and dug in. Thai Time, a venture by the husbandwife team of restaurant veterans Savat and Dao Tinawong, is a bit of a departure from the norm here in Rochester. You can find the usual yellow, red, and green curries. There’s pad thai if you want it. And there’s satay with peanut sauce, of course. But mixed in are several dishes you won’t find easily in our area. Som tum, a spicy salad of shredded green papaya and carrots in chili-lime dressing mixed with chopped tomato and dusted with peanuts, is not particularly hard to find around here, but everywhere else I’ve had it holds back on the fish sauce. Also known as nam pla, that unbelievably foul-smelling condiment essential to both Thai and Vietnamese food gives food depth once you do some fancy alchemy with it involving vinegar and lime juice. Leaving it out, or using too little, creates a one-dimensional dish. Savat Tinawong does not pull his punches, and the flavors in his som tum ($7.95) pop like July 4 fireworks, the chili almost dancing on your tongue.

His pumpkin-basil curry is also a marvel. Chunks of slow-roasted pumpkin stir-fried over intense heat with red curry paste, bell peppers, and a generous handful of Thai basil, this dish — particularly after it is finished with an infusion of coconut milk — is a guaranteed crowd-pleaser. Add in shredded pork or slices of lovingly prepared chicken breast (I will never understand how they make it so tender), and a bit of rice, and you might never need to eat anything else again, ever ($10.95 with chicken or pork). But then you’d be missing out on the larb kai ($8.95), my favorite Thai dish — offered at Thai Time and nowhere else in the Rochester area that I’ve yet found (if you know of others, do let me know). Larb kai is one of those deceptively simple dishes, not much more than a “salad” of ground chicken, chilis, fish sauce, and lime juice tossed with a bit of chopped shallot and sometimes scallions and served cold, often with lettuce leaves to use as scoops. What brings the dish together in some inscrutable way is an ingredient you will never see listed on the menu: toasted rice powder. I’m not sure exactly what difference it makes — it doesn’t really taste

like anything and its texture is merely gritty — but without it larb simply isn’t larb. As with everything else on the menu, Savat Tinawong takes a very judicious approach to this key ingredient, as well as the construction of his dressing, leaving just enough fish sauce aroma in the dressing to be pleasant but not cloying. Even the lettuce leaves are thoughtfully cut into easy foldable triangles, perfect for scooping up bite-sized portions of that amazing chicken. The first time I read through Thai Time’s menu, I was lulled into a sense of familiarity by the usual names for dishes, the singsong quality of the whole thing. And then I turned to the last page of the menu and ran headfirst into “Dad’s Best BBQ Pork” and “Mom’s Best BBQ Chicken.” I quickly checked the cover of the menu to make sure I was still in a Thai restaurant, and then ordered the pork. Based on a recipe developed by Dao Tinawong’s father, this tender, slow-roasted pork ($9.95) redolent of lemongrass and maybe a bit of galangal might inspire you to toss out your barbecue sauce and make a trip to the Asian grocery store for some new ingredients. Roasted and then grilled to give it a bit of smoke, the meat is cut across the grain in thick slices, each of which has a pinkish-red rim of spices that add savor to every bite. Served with rice and pickled carrots and daikon, it really is some of the best barbecued pork I’ve tasted in a long time. As I mentioned earlier, Thai restaurants

almost invariably invoke an almost tropical warmth, providing a January Thaw to both your body and your soul. And this, unfortunately, is where Thai Time fails miserably. The dining room is painted a dismal battleship grey, and what tiny amount of light that finds its way through the single window dies on the sill. On two visits, the heat in the dining room was apparently never on — on my second visit I was actually sitting next to the heater and touched it to find the radiator stone cold. And the service on my second visit, when I was the only person in the dining room at lunch time, was deplorable. Dishes went uncleared the whole meal. My fork disappeared at one point and I was unable to get a new one from the waitress sitting at the bar watching television for (I timed this) four minutes. I guess in the same way that some people have a face made for radio, Thai Time has service made for take-out.

rochestercitynewspaper.com

CITY 9

“THE ROCHESTER PLAYS” LINK COLLEGE, COMMUNITY, AND THEATER [ FEATURE ] BY ERI C R E Z S N YA K

ochester has no shortage of live theater. The city is home to professional organizations like Geva; semi-professional theaters like Downstairs Cabaret, Blackfriars, and the JCC Centerstage; nearly two dozen community theater troupes; several children’s theaters and improv-comedy groups; and national Broadway tours courtesy of the Rochester Broadway Theatre League. But in a scene so crowded, some elements sometimes get lost. Consider our local college theater programs, as well as local playwrights, which rarely get significant community exposure. This month, a production by the University of Rochester’s International Theatre Program will bring those two elements of the local theater scene together, as the UR stages a full production of a local playwright’s work for the first time in anyone’s memory. Opening on Thursday, February 14, and continuing through February 24, the International Theatre Program will present “The Rochester Plays,” a two-part work by local writer Spencer Christiano. Although the plays are not necessarily set in Rochester, they allow the UR to tap into the pool of talent in its back yard. It also gives an upand-coming young playwright a larger and arguably higher-profile venue for his work.

he process that brought “The Rochester Plays” to UR started several years ago. John Borek, who has worked with Christiano at the Multi-Use Community Cultural Center on Atlantic Avenue since 2010, got some of Christiano’s plays to Nigel Maister, artistic director of the University of Rochester International Theatre Program. The plays sat on Maister’s desk for several months, but when he got around to picking them up, “I read them and thought they were quite interesting, and this guy has some real talent,” Maister says. The plays tackle complicated issues, telling the story of a young single mother and her relationships with two men: one an ex-con trying to turn his life around, the other a suspected sexoffender with a host of prejudices and tensions. “The play is very much about stereotypes and preconceptions and how we deal with 10 CITY FEBRUARY 6-12, 2013

them and how they evolve,” Christiano says. We’re conditioned by the media and society to identify with the struggling ex-con and root for his success, Christiano says, but also to despise and fear a known sex offender. “So what does that say about our preconceptions for one criminal? Why does the ex-con get our support while the sex offender gets demonized?” In April 2012, Maister invited Christiano to a meeting to discuss the International Theatre Spencer Christiano, an alum of Aquinas Institute and SUNY Brockport, is the author of “The Rochester Plays,” as well Program staging his works as an artist-in-residence at MuCCC. PHOTO BY MIKE HANLON as part of its New Voices Initiative. New Voices is something Maister started thought the plays were edgy and dark and lot of things that can be blamed for that, but as head of the International Theatre Program provocative and worth exploring.” I’m more interested in addressing the problem in 2002. Every four years the department rather than pointing the finger.” commissions a new work which is developed, Christiano — a 2005 graduate of the written, and staged over the course of an ypically plays involved in the New Aquinas Institute who studied at both academic year. Voices Initiative are created from scratch and Monroe Community College and in the “The idea is to use the advantages of developed at the college. But “The Rochester theater department at SUNY Brockport — being in an academic-university setting to Plays” already existed, albeit by another says that after those initial readings, he put develop new work for the American theater,” name. Christiano first wrote and presented the “Sidewalk” plays on the shelf. “Then I Maister says. Previous productions in the the first part of what was initially called “The got a call from Nigel,” he says. New Voices Initiative include “The Hairy While the plays previously existed, both Dutchman” by Andy Bragen and “The Puzzle Sidewalk That Could Not Be Plowed” as a staged, script-in-hand reading at MuCCC Maister and Christiano say that in going Locker” by two-time Obie Award-winner W. in late 2010, and did a tandem reading through the creative process at University of David Hancock. of both parts in late 2011. After that he Rochester, they have been significantly changed. But a local playwright has never been part shelved the plays and went to work on other Maister paired Christiano with Samuel Marks, of the New Voices Initiative. In fact, as far projects, including the supernatural play “To a playwriting teacher at Rochester Institute of as Maister or Christiano know, a RochesterMy Friends: The Life and Death of George Technology, to work on the works last summer, based playwright has not had a work fully Eastman” and “Midnight on the Front Lawn and additional tweaks have been made since produced by the University of Rochester’s of Good an Evil: A Hypothesis,” which was rehearsals started in October 2012. theater program. inspired by the Emily Good-Rochester Police “Whenever you produce a new play there’s Working with a local playwright became inevitable cuts, changes, and additions,” Department controversy. a big attraction for Maister with this project. Christiano says. “And when there’s a good “A lot of my plays are about how we think “I thought it was great to do something that chemistry in the rehearsal room, good and why we think it,” Christiano says. “I was community based, that was tied to the chemistry between director, playwright, have a particular interest in the way that we Rochester community since he’s a local guy,” actors, stage managers, it becomes a symbiotic take in information, in the way that we’re Maister says. “I thought it was great as he’s relationship. The production changes to conditioned to take in information. There’s a a young guy, just out of undergraduate. I

“There’s a lot going on in college theater here that’s a real alternative to other theatrical life happening in the city.” — NIGEL MAISTER

one of the benefits of theater in an academic setting. Christiano says developing the plays under the auspices of UR has been a unique experience. “I’m not used to working with a budget,” Christiano says. “I mean, MuCCC’s great. It’s a black-box theater — a very large black-box theater — but there’s very little pressure at MuCCC to spend a lot of money on your production. The focus is on the work, the performances, and the community. The UR is basically an Ivy League school, so it has a budget, and they Nigel Maister is the artistic director of the University of Rochester spend it well. They International Theatre Program. PHOTO BY MIKE HANLON support the work that they do. I mean, we’ve support the play, at the same time the play got designers from changes to support the production…. So we New York, from London — these are people would change lines, cut lines, really just try to who have shows on Broadway right now.” streamline the play and make it go from my Christiano has also found working with head into a produceable work.” the student actors illuminating. To explain those kinds of changes, Maister “There’s a certain kind of fearlessness that references the character Matthew, an ex-con comes with being a student artist. And these trying to get his life on track, but who gets students are just jumping into this play,” he derailed by the events of the play. says. “It’s a tough work. There are a lot of “When we first got the text, it didn’t define lines. These characters are really difficult, and his journey as clearly as — I hope — it’s sometimes they can be hard to empathize defined now,” Maister says. “He was kind of with. That’s part of being an actor — learning stand-offish and aggressive at the start. I think to love your character.” he’s become more conflicted and slightly more “We’re all learning together, we’re all layered as a character. And thematically I developing together. It’s a really beautiful think that’s also impacted things.” process,” Christiano says. The learning process is part of what makes academic theater programs special. And yet, lmost all of the significant changes despite the fact that almost all of the major came as a part of the rehearsal process with universities in and around Rochester have the student actors, which Maister says is theater programs — some of them quite

well regarded — they’re often ignored by the community at large. “When I get asked what I do for a living, and I say that I run the theater program at UR, people say, ‘There’s a theater program there?’ Nobody knows we exist,” Maister says. “Actually we do really good work, and really interesting work, and work that is different from what’s on stage at Geva or JCC or Blackfriars. We work at a very high level, even if the work is done by students.” “We do get people from the community to come see the shows, but I would love to see more — especially people who are interested in theater,” Maister says. “There’s a high level of artists, the plays are edgy and fun. We do musicals, we do comedies — we do everything. I’d like to think we’re a bit of a hidden gem, waiting to be discovered, waiting for our moment. Whether this will be our moment remains to be seen.” Following “The Rochester Plays” the UR’s International Theatre Program will present a Festival of One-Act Plays in March and then stage Tennessee Williams’ “The Glass Menagerie” in April. “There’s a lot going on in college theater here that’s a real alternative, or an adjunct to what other theatrical life is happening in the city,” Maister says.

side from his work with “The Rochester Plays,” Christiano is an artist-in-residence at MuCCC, as well as the venue’s new play facilitator. Just as the UR is helping to give his work a broader audience, he is doing the same for other local playwrights. “MuCCC is this fantastic place for artists,” Christiano says. “There’s such a community there that will help you do whatever you want to do. There’s no fear — you can do new work and not worry about failure. You can do something edgy and not have to worry about offending people or getting blacklisted somehow. And everyone there just wants to help you succeed and help your play succeed, or whatever work you’re doing. MuCCC has been absolutely fundamental in my evolution as a playwright.”

As for his own future as a playwright, Christiano continues to have an interest in writing plays about Rochester. He doesn’t just want to be a local playwright; he wants his plays to deal with local issues. His upcoming projects include “Rails,” a trio of plays about Rochester’s railroads (specifically the Underground Railroad, the abandoned subway, and the Midtown Plaza monorail) and “Theater, Inc.,” which he describes as “an exploration of economic hardship and commercial compromise in theater, which is going to be a little more universal, but very local.” “I think that Rochester is a community that’s just rife with inspiration,” Christiano says. “If I was in another town I’d probably be writing about that town. But I think theater has a responsibility to speak to its community. It’s different from other media in that theater is always local. Theater is done because it’s here.” “Since I’m in Rochester and since I love Rochester, I’m interested in writing plays that will speak to a community,” Christiano says. “You can do the 7000th revival of ‘Guys & Dolls’ and the audience can love that, but where’s the lasting relationship? I can do a play for a Rochester audience and they can come see that, and after the show they can talk to me and tell me what they thought, and say what they like and didn’t like.” “I write about Rochester because I love Rochester, I love the people here,” he says. “I want Rochester audiences to feel this fantastic connection that I feel. It speaks to the audience that I want to speak to.”

“The Rochester Plays” UNIVERSITY OF ROCHESTER INTERNATIONAL THEATRE PROGRAM THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 14-FEBRUARY 24 TODD THEATRE, UR RIVER CAMPUS $7-$13 | 275-4088 ROCHESTER.EDU/THEATRE

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 11

Upcoming [ DUBSTEP ] Bassnectar Saturday, April 27. Main Street Armory. 900 East Main St. $35. 7 p.m. 232-3221. rochestermainstreetarmory.com [ POP/ROCK ] Fun. Saturday, July 13. CMAC. 3355 Marvin Sands Drive, Canandaigua. $25-$40. 8 p.m. 758-5330 [ COUNTRY ] Keith Urban Friday, August 9. CMAC. 3355 Marvin Sands Drive, Canandaigua. TBA. 758-5330

Music

Why?

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 10 WATER STREET MUSIC HALL, 204 N. WATER ST. 8 P.M. | $12-$15. | 325-5600, WATERSTREETMUSIC.COM [ INDIE RAP ] Why? begs a good question: why would we listen to rap without the booty shaking and fronting? Well, for one thing, because it’s awesome. Why? takes it down a peg, and if you’re expecting brain-melting bass, that’s not happening. With a lean toward folk-styled mixes, Why’s music can be a bit jarring but if you listen. It takes you through an interesting mental trip with odd snatches of built-in imagery. Bill-mate Astronautalis is much more electronic and eclectic, maybe even with a little bluesy streak, but he whips those lyrics faster than you would think. — SUZAN PERO

The Honeycutters MONDAY, FEBRUARY 11 ABILENE BAR & LOUNGE, 153 LIBERTY POLE WAY. 8 P.M. | $10 | 232-3230, ABILENEBARANDLOUNGE.COM [ AMERICANA ] This alt-country ensemble from

Asheville, North Carolina, reaped some real critical acclaim with the release of its first studio effort, “Irene,” in May 2009. The amazing breadth of the group’s sound is balanced by the soothingly sweet tones of singersongwriter Amanda Anne Platt and the inconspicuous, yet incredibly inspired, playing of lead guitarist/producer Peter James. The two have played as an acoustic duo, but the outfit’s true power is present when, helped out by Tal Taylor (mandolin), Ian Harrod (bass), and Jon Ashley (drums), they put the full-fledged, five-piece honky-tonk hurt on enraptured audiences. — BY DAVID YOCKEL, JR.

Attention Rochester theater community: Send us your nominations for the

2013 Rochester Theater

HALL OF FAME 12 CITY FEBRUARY 6-12, 2013

City Newspaper is getting ready to induct new members into the Rochester Theater Hall of Fame, and we need your nominations. We want you to tell us who you think is the best of the best in the local theater world. We want to hear about actors, directors, musicians, stage managers, set designers, costume designers, producers, and other prominent members of the Rochester theater scene. A panel of judges will select inductees based on their innovation, dedication, passion, quality of their work and their lasting contribution to local theater.

A panel of judges will select Inductees based on the following criteria: INNOVATION DEDICATION PASSION QUALITY OF WORK LASTING CONTRIBUTION TO LOCAL THEATER Inductees will be announced at the 2013 TheatreROCS Showcase, scheduled for Saturday, April 13, at the JCC’s Hart Theater.

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 6 [ BLUES ] Buford Duo. Dinosaur Bar-BQue, 99 Court St. 585-3257090. 9 p.m. Free. [ CLASSICAL ] Piano Competition Finals: Rachmaninoff Concerto No. 3. Kilbourn Hall, 26 Gibbs St. 7 p.m. Free.

Confederate Railroad FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 8 MAIN STREET ARMORY, 900 E. MAIN ST. 7 P.M. | $15-$45. | ROCHESTERMAINSTREETARMORY.COM [ COUNTRY ] These cats in Confederate Railroad used to

back up David Allan Coe and Johnny Paycheck. And for those of you in the honky-tonk know, it doesn’t get much more country than that. You can bemoan contemporary country music’s gentrification all you want, but there are still a few bands that keep the tonky in their honky and the “o” in their country. The Southern-rock leanings give the band additional crossover appeal. Its a boot-skootin’ hootenanny for a good cause, too, as portions of the proceeds go to the victims and families of the Christmas Eve shootings in Webster. — BY FRANK DE BLASE

Greater Rochester Choral Consortium SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 10 KODAK HALL AT EASTMAN THEATRE, 60 GIBBS ST. 4 P.M. | FREE | 303-6305, CHORAL-ROCHESTER.ORG. [ CHORAL ] Imagine a choral concert so great that

the number of singers scheduled to perform equals more than one-third of the seats at the Eastman Theatre. Imagine no more, as more than 800 singers from 19 choral groups in Rochester will descend upon the Kodak Hall to perform a 90-minute prism concert this weekend. It’s being called “A Taste of Song,” but it might better be described as a smorgasbord of what’s great about Rochester’s choral music scene. — BY PALOMA A. CAPANNA

[ DJ/ELECTRONIC ] DJ Adam. Nashvilles, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. 334-3030. Call for info. Call for info. Teen Set 45 Party. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. Midnight. Free. Y Not Wednesday w/DJ ET. Plush, 151 St. Paul St. 2325650. Call for info. Call for info.

This Life performed Saturday, February 2, at Lovin’ Cup. PHOTO BY FRANK DE BLASE

On the rocks [ REVIEW ] BY FRANK DE BLASE

Minor keys are like hot sauce on open wounds. When you want to kick that urge, that emotion, that thrill, that chill up a bit, nothing’s finer than going minor. Then there’s Rochester acoustic blues aficionado and virtuoso Fred Vine. Armed with a dreadnaught and a National Steel, Vine swings from the minor vine as the tunes dictate, but he maintains the music’s ominous burn when he sails into major territory. It’s all in the man’s fingertips. His finger style was loose yet flawless Thursday, January 31, at the Little Theatre Café. With legendary string bassist Brian Williams holding down the rhythm and walking the line, Vine struck me as a displaced ragtime piano player as much as he did a guitar slinger. The duo picked and plucked a handful of ragged gems as the audience nursed heat from coffee mugs. Waters got Muddy, as Vine and Williams traversed the dirt between The Delta, Chicago, and the snowy East Avenue corridor. After my wife and I dined as Mario’s guests Friday night, we headed to Abilene for a nightcap, which turned into a blasting cap with The Fools. Maybe it was the Rory Gallagher rave-up that spun me out right away, but I really

submissions Submissions should be 400-500 words in an essay format. In the essay, please describe why your nominee deserves this award, citing specific examples of the person's work and how they meet the criteria above. You may nominate yourself, or another member of the local theater community.

EMAIL Nominations TO:

Send nominations to:

e-mail to eric@rochester-citynews.com with the subject line “Rochester Theater Hall of Fame.”

Rochester Theater Hall of Fame c/o City Newspaper 250 N Goodman St. Rochester, NY 14607

dug the band’s set — a blend of blues and atmosphere on the rocks. I flew out into the upstate tundra to Lovin’ Cup Saturday night. It was so cold I actually saw a lawyer with his hands in his own pockets. Anyway, Low Flying Planes was on stage to keep us warm with its hot rock. This is a band that flies the original flag for the most part and shows huge potential as it comes into its own. Tonally speaking it could stand to smooth things out a bit, but the set rocked otherwise. This Life followed with its cerebral, piano-driven alt-rock. The band has a serious slant amidst its clever compositions and people seemed torn between dancing and listening. You can do both, you know.

[ JAZZ ] The Ethnic Heritage Ensemble. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. 8:30 p.m. $18-$20. Fred Stone. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 7:30 p.m. Free. Gary Chudyk. Prosecco Italian Restaurant, 1550 New York 332. 924-8000. 5:30 p.m. Call for info. Tinted Image. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. 585662-5555. 6 p.m. Free. Vince Ercolamento& Joe Chiappone Jazz Quartet. Murph’s Irondequoit Pub, 705 Titus Ave. 342-6780. 8 p.m. Free. [ R&B ] Amanda Ashley. Cottage Hotel of Mendon, 1390 Pittsford Mendon Road. 5856241390. first Wednesday of every month, 9:30 p.m. Call for info. [ POP/ROCK ] Envious Disguise, Friends U Can’t Kill, The Fevertones, Mouth Full, and End Process. Tala Vera, 155 State St. 5463845. 8 p.m. $5-$7. continues on page 15

Submissions are due by Friday, February 15. Questions or concerns? can be addressed to eric@rochester-citynews.com OR VISIT www.rochestercitynewspaper.com

CITY

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 13

Music Have trumpet, will travel Mike Kaupa Quartet FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 8 TOWER FINE ARTS CENTER, 180 HOLLEY ST., BROCKPORT 7:30 P.M. | $8-$15 | 395-2787, BROCKPORT.EDU [ FEATURE ] BY RON NETSKY

It’s 1990, and after playing concerts in Italy and Spain, trumpeter Mike Kaupa is at the top of the Eiffel Tower looking out over Paris with a band-mate. “I turned to him,” says Kaupa, “and said, ‘All we ever did to get here was practice. And we’re on the Eiffel Tower — woah!’” Kaupa still practices twice a day despite his busy schedule, teaching part-time at The Harley School and giving lessons at the Eastman School of Music’s Community Music School. His reputation brings him private students who have gone on to attend top schools like Berklee College of Music and New York University. He also leads workshops all over the country for the Institute for Creative Music. But most area jazz fans know Kaupa as a superb trumpeter with the Dave Rivello Ensemble and his own quartet, which plays at SUNY Brockport on Friday. Kaupa is soft-spoken, but don’t let that fool you. He’s capable of unleashing furious upper-register runs during solos. And, although he is a hard-bop player, he occasionally explores new frontiers, mic-ing his trumpet and putting it through a vocal processor pre-programed to add harmonies and effects. While growing up in Buffalo in the 1960’s

the music in Kaupa’s home was heavy on “West Side Story” and Frank Sinatra. He started piano lessons at the age of 6 but quit at 7. Then he fell under the spell of Leonard Bernstein and his “Young People’s Concerts” television series. “I asked my dad, ‘If I want to be a conductor, do I need to know how to play piano?’,” says Kaupa. “He said yes, so I started piano lessons again.” But he really had his heart set on a trumpet. His school allowed students to begin trumpet lessons at the age of 10 so, when he reached the magic age, his dad took him to the music store. He can still recall a strange premonition. “I knew when the 14 CITY FEBRUARY 6-12, 2013

case was opened what it would feel like to play it,” Kaupa says. Of course it took a long time before he could play it well. “I was lucky,” says Kaupa. “My brother knew some fingerings and I knew notes from piano lessons. At that age it’s glorious. I’m playing a few notes; I’m playing a tune with my saxplayer friend down the street. I didn’t hear that maybe it was out of tune. I just stuck with it.” At 16 his musical world expanded because of his high-school girlfriend and her family. “I was so lucky,” says Kaupa, “The Fadale family in Buffalo — they all played jazz.” His girlfriend’s mom had studied with Oscar Peterson and accompanied vocalist Mark Murphy. “I would go over to their house in West Seneca. From the sofa to the stereo there was a trail on the carpeting. It was worn out. They played ‘Kind of Blue’ for me — Miles Davis — and ‘My Funny Valentine.’ Up to that point I was a fan of Al Hurt, Herb Alpert, and Doc Severinsen. They’re great, but now I hear Miles Davis. They’re opening me up to new music.” The next stop on his musical journey was SUNY Fredonia. There was no jazz program but Kaupa and other players started a band. “There was no learning jazz for a grade, we learned from each other. We owned it,” he says. Kaupa moved into a house with musicians in Buffalo where he could jam until 4 a.m. and make connections. One of those led to a performance grant that took him to Rochester, where he quickly earned respect. Eastman professor Rayburn Wright offered to let him sit in on some jazz classes at the school, including one taught by Bill Dobbins that Kaupa found particularly valuable. Another significant educational experience came later. While he loves Davis’ playing, Kaupa’s main role models are saxophonists like Joe Lovano. “I like rhythmic playing,” says Kaupa. “If I can sound like that on trumpet, I’m happy.” When Kaupa met Lovano, he asked about the possibility of a lesson. “He says it will be 50 cents. I thought, Oh, yeah, 50 bucks. So we go to his loft where he plays drums like Elvin Jones and I play for him.” What did Kaupa learn? “He told me there’s more to life than eighth notes.”

Trumpeter Mike Kaupa has played with Ray Charles, Mel Torme, and many other jazz luminaries. PHOTO BY PAUL GRIGSBY

Kaupa lives in Brighton with his wife, Diana

Loberant-Kaupa, who works at Harris Beach, teaches piano, and is an artist. He still travels widely, including an occasional trip Europe to play and teach. Kaupa visited almost every state, all of the provinces of Canada, Mexico, and Japan when he toured from 1988 to 1991 with the Glenn Miller Orchestra. But the biggest thrill of his career came from a phone call in 1993 asking if he was “free two nights next week.” Ray Charles’ band was between trumpet players and they had heard about Kaupa. “First night in Toronto, there I was. The second tune had a trumpet solo and you had to walk out front. That was very exciting, knowing that Ray Charles is comping for you while you’re playing a solo,” Kaupa says. Another time, in 1988, Mel Tormé joined the Miller band for a television special. “When they did ‘American Patrol,’ he said, ‘Ladies and gentlemen, I’m going to play drums on this one’ and he played

better than any drummer in that band. He was swinging so hard. Toward the end there’s a trumpet solo. So now I’m hooking up with Mel Tormé,” Kaupa says. Despite brushes with the big time, Kaupa appreciates the Rochester scene. “I tell people: walk through the entrance of Eastman, walk through the halls for 10 minutes, leave, and you’re a better musician than when you walked in.” Besides, a teacher once told him if you go to New York your competition is Wynton Marsalis and Tom Harrell, so you’d better take an application for the post office. Sure enough, at a music store in New York, Kaupa ran into a trumpet player who was in Maynard Ferguson’s band. “He was so excited because he’d passed the first round of tests for a post-office job,” Kaupa says.

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WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 6 Eternal Summers w/ Josh Netsky, Spaceweather Shakes. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. $8-$12.

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 7 [ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ] Arbitration Sweets. Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. 9 p.m. Free. Cabbage & Baggage. McGraw’s Irish Pub, 146 W Commercial St. 348-9091. 7:30 p.m. Free. Jim Lane. Murph’s Irondequoit Pub, 705 Titus Ave. 342-6780. 8 p.m. Free. The Pickpockets. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 7:30 p.m. Free. Rochester Ukulele Support Group: Got Ukulele?. Bernuzio Uptown Music, 122 East Ave. 473-6140. 7 p.m. Donations appreciated. [ BLUES ] Dan Schmitt & The Shadows. Sticky Lips BBQ Juke Joint, 830 Jefferson Rd. 292-5544. 8 p.m. $5. Ezra & The Storm. Dinosaur Bar-B-Que, 99 Court St. 585325-7090. 9 p.m. Free. [ CLASSICAL ] Eastman at Washington Square Lunchtime Concerts. 1st Universalist Church, 150 S. Clinton Ave. 274-1400. 12:15 p.m. Free. RPO: Rhapsody in Blue. Kodak Hall at Eastman Theater, 60 Gibbs St. 7:30 p.m. $15-$82. [ DJ/ELECTRONIC ] 18+ Thursdays. ONE Nightclub and Lounge, 1 Ryan Alley. 5461010. 10 p.m. Free before 11, $3-$10 after. Cirque Du Rage. Pearl Nightclub, 349 East Ave. 757752-8370. 10 p.m. $12-$20. DJ Matt. Nashvilles, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. 334-3030. Call for info. Call for info. DJ Sal DeSantis. Center Cafe, 150 Frank Dimino Way. 5948882. 7 p.m. Call for info. Karaoke at Panorama. Panorama Night Club & Sports Bar, 730 Elmgrove Rd. 2472190. 9 p.m. Free. Revolution Thursdays. Grotto, 7 Lawrence St. 739-5377. Call for info. Thursday Night Shakedown.. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 11 p.m. Free. Tiki Thursdays: Shotgun Music DJ. McGhan’s Pub, 11 W. Main St. 924-3660. 7:30 p.m. Free. Tilt-a-Whirl Drag Show.. Tilt Nightclub & Ultralounge, 444 Central Ave. 232-8440. 11:15 pm & 12:30 am. $3. [ JAZZ ] Bob Henley. Prosecco Italian Restaurant, 1550 New York 332. 924-8000. 6 p.m. Call for info.

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Joywave is a study in limitless atmosphere and pop beauty. The Rochester band cranks out epic salvos that skate the razor between electronica and indie rock. It’s positively euphoric in headphones or blasting out of the dashboard with the car pointed everywhere in particular. The band’s latest, “Koda Vista,” is a snappy pleasure platter in Kodak yellow, and one of the best-sounding releases to come out of this dirty little city along the mighty Genesee. Catch Joywave’s joy waves before it heads to Austin for SXSW 2013. But that’s not all; Soviet Dolls and New Archery play as well. Joywave performs Thursday, February 7, 8:30 p.m. at the Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. $8-$10. bugjar.com. — BY FRANK DE BLASE Deborah Branch. Lemoncello, 137 West Commercial St. 3858565. 6 p.m. Free. Eastman Jazz. Acanthus Café, 337 East Ave. 585-319-5999. Call for info. John Palocy Trio. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. 585662-5555. 6 p.m. Free. Phat Cats. Pane Vino Ristorante, 175 N. Water St. 232-6090. 8 p.m. Free. Sonny Brown Band. The Rabbit Room, 61 N. Main St. 5821830. 7 p.m. Free. [ KARAOKE ] Karaoke at Center Cafe. Center Cafe, 150 Frank Dimino Way. 594-8882. 7 p.m. Free. Karaoke at Willow Inn. Willow Inn, 428 Manitou Rd. 3923489. 8 p.m. Free. Karaoke at Pineapple Jack’s. Pineapple Jack’s, 485 Spencerport Rd. 247-5225. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke at Brickwood Grill. Brickwood Grill, 250 Monroe Ave. 730-8230. 9 p.m. Call for info. Karaoke Night w/Debbie Randyn. Pittsford Pub, 60 N. Main St. 586-4650. 9:30 p.m. Free. Karaoke w/DJ Smooth. Club Clarissas, 293 Clarissa St. 2323430. Call for info. Karaoke w/George. Temple Bar and Grille, 109 East Ave. 2326000. 8 p.m. Free. Karaoke w/Shotgun Music. McGhan’s Pub, 11 W. Main St. 924-3660. Call for info. Free. Karaoke w/Summer Bob. Shorts Bar & Grill, 35 N. Main St. 3880136. 10 p.m. Free.

Karoake w/Cyd Scarlett. Victor Village Inn, 34 East Main Street. 925-5025. 8:30 p.m. Call for info. [ HIP-HOP/RAP ] DaShon Davidson. Tala Vera, 155 State St. 546-3845. 8 p.m. Call for info. [ REGGAE/JAM ] Reggae Thursday. Pure Night Club, 117 Liberty Pole Way. 4547230. 10 p.m. $5 before 11 pm. [ POP/ROCK ] Five Alarm Open Jam. Firehouse Saloon, 814 South Clinton. 319-3832. 9 p.m. Call for info. Joywave w/ Soviet Dolls, New Archery.. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 8:30 p.m. $8-$10. Joywave w/Soviet Dolls, New Archery.. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 8:30 p.m. $8-$10. Maria Betts Music, Enduring December. Firehouse Saloon, 814 South Clinton. 319-3832. Call for info.

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 8 [ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ] Adam Clark w/Luke Metzler, Susanna Rose. SPoT Coffee, 200 East Ave. 585-613-4600. 7 p.m. Free. continues on page 16

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 15

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Even Steven w/CCC Session, Carin’s Pride. McGraw’s Irish Pub, 146 W Commercial St. 348-9091. 8 p.m. Free. Frankie & Jewels. 140 Alex Bar & Grill, 140 Alexander St. 585256-1000. 9 p.m. Call for info. Geech Brothers. The Bistro at Towpath Cafe, 6 North Main St. 585 377-0410. 7 p.m. Free. Hypnotic Clambake. Sticky Lips BBQ Juke Joint, 830 Jefferson Rd. 292-5544. 8:30 p.m. $5. Ralph Louis. Rochester Plaza Hotel, 70 State St. 546-3450. 6 p.m. Free. [ BLUES ] Big Blue House. Lemoncello, 137 West Commercial St. 3858565. 7 p.m. Free. [ CLASSICAL ] Eastman Wind Ensemble 60th Anniversary. Kodak Hall at Eastman Theater, 60 Gibbs St. 8 p.m. Free. Gospel Fridays: Mt. Olivet Baptist Church Choir. City Hall, 30 Church St. 12:30 p.m. Call for info. Nazareth College Concert Band. Nazareth College Linehan Chapel, 4245 East Ave.,. 3892700. 7:30 p.m. Free. Rochester Celebrity Organ Recital Series: Stephen Tharp. Sacred Heart Cathedral, 296 Flower City Park. 8 p.m. $5-$10. RocMusic. 5:30 p.m. Freddie Thomas Learning Center (Room 121). 625 Scio St. Call for info. [ COUNTRY ] Confederate Railroad w/Closing Time, Justin Bachulak Band. Main Street Armory, 900 E. Main St. 232-3221. 7 p.m. West Webster Fire Department benefit. $15-$45. [ DJ/ELECTRONIC ] Bang Fridays. ONE Nightclub and Lounge, 1 Ryan Alley. 5461010. Call for info. Call for info. Chill Out Fridays Happy Hour. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. 5:30 p.m. Free. DJ Bac Spin. Plush, 151 St. Paul St. 232-5650. 8 p.m. Call for info. DJ Blake. 140 Alex Bar & Grill, 140 Alexander St. 585-2561000. 10 p.m. Call for info. DJ Cedric. Vertex Nightclub, 169 North Chestnut St. 2325498. 10 p.m. $3-$8. DJ Energon. Vertex Nightclub, 169 North Chestnut St. 2325498. 10 p.m. $3-$8. Fresh Meat Fridays w/Samantha Vega, DJ Mighty Mic. Tilt Nightclub & Ultralounge, 444 Central Ave. 232-8440. 11:15 p.m. & 12:30 a.m. $4-$12. Latino Heat Fridays. Heat Nightclub, 336 East Ave. 8990620. 10 p.m. Call for info. Lube After Dark.. Quaker Steak & Lube, 2205 Buffalo Rd. 6979464. 9:30 p.m. Free. Maxwell’s Customer Appreciation Night ft. DJ Super Star J, Super Crew DJ G.I. Maxwell’s Resto Lounge, 169 St. Paul St. 3255710. Call for info.

16 CITY FEBRUARY 6-12, 2013

METAL | DORO

Few musical genres can set my pulse racing like German metal. German bands — Accept, Rammstein, Scorpions — tend to balance aggression and melodies in a way that skews them toward symphonic and danceable angles. While most metal groups make me want to raise my fist and yell, German bands make me want to sing opera and swing my partner. Teutonic rock goddess Doro Pesch does most of her singing in English and falls into this camp of power ballads and old-school anthems. A Doro concert is a good-natured and gentle immersion into the realm of metal, but Pesch — who reminds me of Victoria’s Secret inspired by Ronnie James Dio — isn’t afraid to kick out the jams either. Sister Sin opens. Doro plays Friday, February 8, 8 p.m. at Montage Music Hall, 50 Chestnut St. $12-$15. frontgatetickets.com. — BY ROMAN DIVEZUR Reggaeton w/DJ Carlos. La Copa Ultra Lounge, 235 W. Ridge Rd. 254-1050. 10 p.m. Free. Sexy Fridays w/DJ Wizz. Pure Night Club, 117 Liberty Pole Way. 454-7230. 10 p.m. Call for info. T.G.I. Bucket Friday ft. DJ Jestyr, Dr. Jamo. Grotto, 7 Lawrence St. 739-5377. Call for info. [ JAZZ ] Electro Kings. Prosecco Italian Restaurant, 1550 New York 332. 924-8000. 7 p.m. Call for info. Fred Costello & Roger Eckers Jazz Duo. Charley Brown’s, 1675 Penfield Rd. 385-9202. 7:30 p.m. Free. Gian Carlo Cervone Trio. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 5:30 p.m. Free. Mike Jaupa Quartet. Tower Fine Arts Center Mainstage at The College at Brockport, 180 Holley Street. 7:30 p.m. $8-$15. Side Project. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. 585-6625555. 6 p.m. Free. Sofrito. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 8:30 p.m. Free. Ted Nicolosi and Shared Genes. Prime Steakhouse, 42 E Main St. 265-4777. 6:30 p.m. Free. Tinted Image. Pane Vino Ristorante, 175 N. Water St. 232-6090. 6:30 p.m. Free. [ R&B ] Turnip Stampede. Dinosaur BarB-Que, 99 Court St. 585-3257090. 10 p.m. Free.

We The People. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. 9 p.m. $3-$5. [ HIP-HOP/RAP ] Blackened Blues w/Garden Fresh, REXX. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. Limited entry for unders. $6-$8. [ REGGAE/JAM ] Thunder Body w/Kevin Kinsella, The American Moondogs. Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. 6 p.m. $8-$12. [ POP/ROCK ] BML, Minds Open Wide. Tala Vera, 155 State St. 546-3845. 8 p.m. $5. Brass Taxi. Pineapple Jack’s, 485 Spencerport Rd. 2475225. 10 p.m. Call for info. Doro w/Sister Sin. Montage Music Hall, 50 Chestnut St. 232-1520. 8 p.m. $12. Gang of Thieves w/Fever, Haewa. California Brew Haus, 402 Ridge Rd. West. 6211480. 9:30 p.m. Call for info. Hall Pass w/Dan Ripley. Nashvilles, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. 334-3030. 5 p.m. Call for info. Happy Hour: Ben Rossi & Friends. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 6 p.m. 21+. Free. Miles Watts, Brothers from Other Mothers. Sully’s Brickyard Pub, 240 South Ave. 232-3960. 5 p.m. Call for info. Teagan & The Tweeds w/ Earthtones. Johnny’s Irish Pub,

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 9 [ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ] Ache. Tapas 177 Lounge, 177 Saint Paul St. 262-2090. 11 p.m. Free. A.L.L. Acoustic. Boulder Coffee Co. – Park Ave., 739 Park Ave. 697-0235. 8 p.m. Free. Barry’s Crossing. Boulder Coffee Co. - Alexander St., 100 Alexander St. 202-1319. 7:30 p.m. Free. Bearfoot Brothers w/Cammy Enaharo, Emma Lane. SPoT Coffee, 200 East Ave. 585-6134600. 7 p.m. Free. Loren Barrigar and Mark Mazengarb. Greece Baptist Church, 1230 Long Pond Rd. 225-6160. 8 p.m. $17-$20. Marty Roberts. Flaherty’s Webster, 1200 Bay Rd. 6710816. Call for info. Mazarine Blue. Flaherty’s Honeoye Falls, 60 W. Main St. 497-7010. Call for info. The Ruddy Well Band. Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. 9:30 p.m. $5-$8. Ted McGraw. McGraw’s Irish Pub, 146 W Commercial St. 348-9091. 5:30 p.m. Free. [ BLUES ] Big Blue House. Lemoncello, 137 West Commercial St. 3858565. 7 p.m. Free. John Cole Blues Band. Johnny’s Irish Pub, 1382 Culver Rd. 224-0990. 8 p.m. Free. The Natalie B Band. Captain Jack’s Goodtime Tavern, 8505 Greig St. 315-483-9570. 9 p.m. Call for info. Steve Grills & The Roadmasters. Dinosaur Bar-B-Que, 99 Court St. 585-325-7090. 10 p.m. Free. [ CLASSICAL ] RPO: Rhapsody in Blue. Kodak Hall at Eastman Theater, 60 Gibbs St. 8 p.m. $15-$82. [ DJ/ELECTRONIC ] Dance Competition w/DJ. Nashvilles, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. 334-3030. 10 p.m. Call for info. DJ Big Reg. Plush, 151 St. Paul St. 232-5650. 10 p.m. Call for info. DJ Darkwave. Vertex Nightclub, 169 North Chestnut St. 2325498. 10 p.m. $3-$8. DJ Trancesend. Decibel Lounge., 45 Euclid St. 7544645. 10 p.m. $5. La Selva. Tilt Nightclub & Ultralounge, 444 Central Ave. 232-8440. 10 p.m. Call for info. Latino Saturdays w/DJ Bobby Base. Pure Night Club, 117 Liberty Pole Way. 454-7230. 10 p.m. Call for info. continues on page 18

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[ JAZZ ] Annie Wells. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 8:30 p.m. Free. Frank’s Rat Pack. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. 585662-5555. 6 p.m. Free. Fred Costello & Roger Eckers Jazz Duo. Charley Brown’s, 1675 Penfield Rd. 385-9202. 7:30 p.m. Free. Just Jazz Trio. Prosecco Italian Restaurant, 1550 New York 332. 924-8000. 6:30 p.m. Call for info. The Michael Vadala Trio w/ Colossus, Violet Honey. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. Limited entry for unders. $6-$8. Ted Nicolosi and Shared Genes. Glengarry Inn at Eagle Vale, 4400 Nine Mile Point Road, Rt 250. 588-3820. 7 p.m. Free. The White Hots. The Pultneyville Grill, 4135 Mill St. (315) 589-4512. Call for info. [ R&B ] Mojo Monkeyz. Sticky Lips BBQ Juke Joint, 830 Jefferson Rd. 292-5544. 9 p.m. Free. [ REGGAE/JAM ] Beenie Man. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N. Water St. 585325-5600. 10 p.m. $30-$50. The Buddhahood w/Inner Planets. Tala Vera, 155 State St. 546-3845. 9 p.m. $5-$7. [ POP/ROCK ] Belvedere. Jeffrey’s, 3115 E. Henrietta Rd. 486-4937. 9 p.m. Call for info. Daughtry & 3 Doors Down w/ Aranda. Main Street Armory, 900 E. Main St. 232-3221. 7 p.m. $39.50-$55. Inside Out. Richmond’s Tavern, 21 Richmond Street. (585) 270-8570. 10 p.m. Free. Me & The Boyz. Pineapple Jack’s, 485 Spencerport Rd. 247-5225. 10 p.m. Call for info. The Pop Show Band. Nola’s Restaurant & Nightclub, 4775 Lake Ave. 663-3375. 9 p.m. Call for info. Sonic Inception, Lupus, Intrinsic. California Brew Haus, 402 Ridge Rd. West. 6211480. 8 p.m. Call for info. Swamp Moose. Hamlin Station Bar & Grill, 52 Railroad Ave. 9642010. 8:30 p.m. Call for info. Upstate. Montage Music Hall, 50 Chestnut St. 232-1520. 8 p.m. Call for info.

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 10 [ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ] Celtic Music Sundays: Dave North. Temple Bar and Grille, 109 East Avenue. 585-2326000. 7 p.m. Free. Fandango at the Tango ft. The Crawdiddies. Tango Cafe, 389 Gregory St. 271-4930. 7:30 p.m. Free, tips accepted. [ CLASSICAL ] Bebop to Bach Concert Series: The Aureus Winds. The Harley 18 CITY FEBRUARY 6-12, 2013

ROCK | DAUGHTRY

You see? Something good can actually come out of “American Idol.” Season 5 finalist Chris Daughtry went on to form an eponymous band and release an eponymous record in 2006. The album went straight to No. 1 on the Billboard 200 chart, selling more than 4 million copies. Daughtry’s sound is a quasi-throwback to the late 90’s melodic, alternative-rock movement that arose in the wake of its heavier predecessors. Dig. And there’s a hometown homeboy link to the band as Uncle Plum’s Elvio Fernandes has played keyboards in the band since 2011. Three Doors Down and Aranda also perform. Daughtry performs Saturday, February 9, 7 p.m. at Main Street Armory, 900 E. Main St. $39.50-$55. rochestermainstreetarmory.com. — BY FRANK DE BLASE School, 1981 Clover St. 4421770. 2 p.m. $5. Brighton Symphony Orchestra: Winter Concert. Twelve Corners Presbyterian Church, 1200 S. Winton Rd. 244-8585. 3 p.m. Call for info. Community Organ Concert. Christ Episcopal Church, 36 S Main St. 586-1226. 4 p.m. Free, donations invited. Compline. Christ Church, 141 East Ave. 454-3878. 9 p.m. Donations accepted. Greater Rochester Choral Consortium: A Taste of Song. Kodak Hall at Eastman Theater, 60 Gibbs St. 4 p.m. Free. Hochstein Youth Symphony Orchestra & Philharmonia. Hochstein Performance Hall, 50 N Plymouth Ave. 454-4596. 7 p.m. $5. Third Presbyterian Church Food Cupboard Recital ft. Paige Kiefner, Matthew Swensen. Third Presbyterian Church, 4 Meigs St. 271-6513. 12:15 p.m. Free, donations accepted. [ JAZZ ] Day Break. Prosecco Italian Restaurant, 1550 New York 332. 924-8000. 5 p.m. Call for info. Music Through the Ages: WinterTunes. Visual Studies Workshop, 31 Prince Street. (585) 442-8676. 2 p.m. $10. [ KARAOKE ] Karaoke w/Cyd Scarlett. Jose & Willy’s, 20 Lakeshore Drive. 905-0222. 8:30 p.m

[ POP/ROCK ] Heatseeker w/Clockmen, Chika & The Wolves, and Flood Drinker. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. $5-$7. West Webster Fire Department Benefit. Flaherty’s Webster, 1200 Bay Rd. 671-0816. Call for info. Why? w/Astronautalis, Dream Tiger. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N. Water St. 585-3255600. 8 p.m. $12-$15.

MONDAY, FEBRUARY 11 [ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ] The Honeycutters. Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. 8 p.m. $10. Open Mic w/Dave McGrath. Johnny’s Irish Pub, 1382 Culver Rd. 224-0990. 7 p.m. Free. [ CLASSICAL ] ensemble.twenty.21 New 2012-13 Concert Series. Hilda D. Taylor Recital Hall at the Hochstein School of Music and Dance, 50 N. Plymouth Avenue. 957-0284. Feb. 12, 7:30 p.m. $15-$25. Penfield Symphony Orchestra: The Three R’s. Penfield High School, 25 High School Dr. 7:30 p.m. $12-$14. [ DJ/ELECTRONIC ] Manic Mondays Dance Night. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 11:30 p.m. Free. Manic Monday Retro Dance: C. Darren, DJ MaryKate. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. 21+. Free.

Synthetica. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 7:30 p.m. Free. [ JAZZ ] Alphonso Williams. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. 585662-5555. 5:30 p.m. Free. Ben Waara. Lemoncello, 137 West Commercial St. 3858565. 6 p.m. Free Lemoncello, 137 West Commercial St. 3858565. 6 p.m. Free. [ POP/ROCK ] Lovin’ Cup Idol: Singer/Songwriter Week Pt. II. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. Call for info.

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 12

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Dave Andreatta and Fred Neurnberg in “A Life in the Theatre,” now on stage at Blackfriars. PHOTO BY DAN HOWELL

Behind the scenes “A Life in the Theatre”

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THROUGH FEBRUARY 10 BLACKFRIARS THEATRE, 727 E. MAIN ST. $27 | 454-1260, BFTIX.ORG [ REVIEW ] BY ERIC REZSNYAK

Playwright David Mamet got straight to the point when he titled his 1977 work “A Life in the Theatre.” The play, a combination comedy/drama, gives the audiences snapshots of two theater actors at very different points in their careers. One, John, is young excited, sure that he’s on the way up, eager to learn (at first, at least). The other, Robert, has clearly been doing this for quite a long time, and while he at first enjoys having a kind of protégé to mold and play off of, he quickly grows disillusioned by all of the crushing little disappointments brought by both life and career. It’s an interesting work in that it doesn’t really include any kind of plot or resolution – it just shows you what it’s like to live this life. It’s decidedly less glamorous than TV or movies, or even theatrical works, would have us believe. The show primarily features backstage discussions between the two actors as they talk about their own work, their cast mates, critics, agents, auditions, wardrobe, scripts, and the like. Things start out sunny enough, and it’s not a

logical leap to suspect that Robert has interests in John that extend beyond just professional development. But those exchanges inevitably turn sour, first on Robert’s part and then on John’s, so that the bright back-and-forth banter marked by that signature Mamet dialogue becomes laced with spite. Interspersed with these vignettes are scenes of the actors performing in actual stage plays – a whole bunch of different plays, it seems – most of which go hilariously wrong due to missed sound cues, forgotten dialogue, or prop malfunctions. Anyone involved in the theater will probably groan in empathy as the actors do their best to soldier on, while fans of the theater will get a better perspective on just how delicate the craft is. And how stressful it must be to devote your life to it. David Runzo directs the show at Blackfriars, and he gets solid performances out of both of his actors, Fred Nuernberg as Robert and Dave Andreatta as John. Nuernberg is especially impressive in the play’s darker moments, which make Robert totally sympathetic even though he behaves like an ass for the majority of the show. Nuernberg is totally possessed of himself even as he plays an egotist – an egotist who may have absolutely no reason to think so highly of himself, given the

glimpses we get into his professional abilities. But you really do feel for the guy, even after he wastes perfectly good KFC in the midst of a backstage fit. Dave Andreatta delivers a very mannered performance as John. He seems prim and precise, even downright chipper in the beginning. That changes over time, as his ambition grows and his patience with Robert wanes. Andreatta is quite good at his few dramatic monologues and you almost wish that you could see more of them. He does need to work on projecting his voice, however. In the beginning of the play he was difficult to hear, especially over the theater’s heating unit. One of the issues with the play is that the actors have to undergo multiple quick changes, as scenes last only a few minutes apiece. Sometime it’s an easy transition, but with others they have to put on entirely new costumes and reappear on the other side of the stage. In the Blackfriars production I saw, some of these pauses went on longer than they should have, but that’s a function of the script more than the direction. I also found some of the incidental music terribly distracting, specifically the aggressively synthesized bits that could have been used in an “After School Special” in the 1980’s. It’s important to go into “A Life in the Theatre” not expecting a full story, but merely a character study. At first the scenes may feel disjointed; the script jumps from play to play, discussion to discussion with little or no connective tissue. And even seemingly major conflicts between the two characters are simply forgotten the next time we see them. But that is, it seems, very much life in the theater. These are people who willingly spend their lives pretending to be somebody else – anybody else. It takes a special breed to choose that line of work, and chances are we don’t appreciate them the way we should. Go out and hug an actor today.

Art Exhibits [ OPENING ] 2013 Member’s Exhibit: Freedom of Expression. WednesdaysSaturdays Livingston Arts Center, 4 Murray Hill Dr. Through Mar 2. Wed & Fri 1-4 p.m., Thu 1-7:30 p.m., Sat 11 a.m.-3 p.m 243-6785. livingstonarts.org. The Art of J. Nevadomski and Allie Hartley. ongoing. Lux Lounge, 666 South Ave Reception Feb 8 6-9 p.m 2329030. lux666.com. The Art of Jamie Lowes. Feb. 8-28. Plastic, 650 South Ave. Tue-Sat 11 a.m.-7 p.m. Reception Feb 8 6-9 p.m 563-6348. facebook.com/ plasticgrrl?fref=ts. Art Reflected: 1913-2013. Wednesdays-Sundays Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. Wed-Sun 11 a.m.-5 p.m., Thu until 9 p.m $5-$12. 276-8900. mag.rochester.edu. Artwork by Alexander Currier. Feb. 11-March 10. The Owl House, 75 Marshall St. Through Mar 10. Reception Feb 11 6-9 p.m. The bar will be open for service and light snacks will be served. Free raffle for a framed art piece by Alexander Currier will be held throughout the night. The winner will be contacted through e-mail Free. 585-360-2920. owlhouserochester.com. “Boys vs Girls.” Sat., Feb. 9, 6-10 p.m. Event at two galleries. One Dance Co. performances at 7 p.m. at 1975 Gallery, 89 Charlotte St. and 9 p.m. The Yards, 50-52 Public Market. 1975ish.com, attheyards.com. “Contrasts & Contours” Hamilton Aguiar.. Tuesdays-Saturdays Nan Miller Gallery, 3450 Winton Place Through Mar 2. Tue-Sat 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Reception Feb 13 6-9 p.m. Also Introducing regional sculptor Lucien Casartelli’s sophisticated, contemporary, mixed media sculptures. RSVP by 2/9 2921430. info@nanmillergallery. com. nanmillergallery.com. Exhibition of Recent Works by Kevin Carr. Sat., Feb. 9 and Feb. 9-March 4. Wood Library, 134 North Main St. Through Mar 4. Paintings and prints. Reception Feb 9, 3-5 p.m Free. 394-1381. Freedom of Expression: GVCA’s Annual Member’s Exhibit. Thu., Feb. 7, 5 & 7 p.m. Livingston Arts Center, 4 Murray Hill Dr. Free, donations appreciated. 243-6785. Heroes and Villains. ongoing. Record Archive, 33 1/3 Rockwood St. Reception Feb 8 6-9 p.m recordarchive.com. “If I Had a Camera.Re-Imagining Film and Media through a Feminist Lens.” Feb. 9-28. University of Rochester, River Campus Reception Feb 9 5-7 p.m 275-6948. sbai@rochester. edu. rochester.edu. Judd Williams: “Eccentrics.” Feb. 6-March 9. Axom Gallery, 176 Anderson Ave., 2nd floor Wed-Sat 12-5 p.m. and by appointment. Reception Feb 8 5:30-9 p.m 232-6030. axomgallery.com. “Seconds From the Flame” Seconds Sale. Feb. 8-23. Genesee Center for the Arts and Education, 713 Monroe Ave. Reception Feb 8 6-9 p.m 2441730. geneseearts.org.

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ART | “SILVER AND WATER” AND “DUTCH CONNECTION” Two new exhibitions will open at George Eastman House (900 East Ave.) this week. On Friday, February 8, spring comes early to East Avenue when the mansion’s conservatory and palm house will be filled with thousands of flowering bulbs for the annual exhibition “The Dutch Connection.” The event follows Mr. Eastman’s tradition of filling the house with blooms, including tulips, hyacinths, daffodils, freesias, amaryllis, and azaleas. Tropical orchids will be on display courtesy of the Genesee Region Orchid Society. It remains open through February 24. On Saturday, February 9, the new photo exhibition “Silver and Water” will open in the Eastman House’s Brackett Clark and South galleries. The installation, which consists of 19 very large prints by Los Angeles artist Lauren Bon, links the mountains of Southern California and the historic photographic industry of Rochester, NY, through an exploration of their shared connections to two basic elements: silver and water. Silver and water refer to the interconnected settlement of the American West, financing, mining, photography, the silver screen, and Hollywood. The prints are a product of the Liminal Camera, a gigantic pinhole device made out of a shipping container that contains both the camera operators and a processing facility. See the show through May 28. The Eastman House is open Tuesday-Saturday, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., and Sunday 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Admission is $5-$12, and free to members and kids age 12 and under. For more information, call 271-3361 or visit eastmanhouse.org. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY “Silver and Water.” TuesdaysSundays George Eastman House, 900 East Ave. Through May 26 Included in admission: $5-$12. 271-3361. eastmanhouse.org. “Springtime in Puglia and Bascilicata” by Joel Krenis. Sun., Feb. 10. Nazareth College, 4245 East Ave. Reception Feb 10 3-5 p.m. LeChase Lounge in Casa Italiana Free. 389-2468. casa@ naz.edu. Synthetic Combat; The Body Mind and Soul Abomination. Fri., Feb. 8, 6 p.m. Pandaman Toys, 209 Monroe Ave. Work by Emily Moore-Awad. Free. 420-8965. emily.moore.awad@gmail.com. pandamantoys.com. Thinking Outside the Box: Jen Born featuring works by Fairport HS students. Feb. 8-28. Gallery Salon & Spa, 780 University Ave. Reception Feb 8 7-9 p.m 271-8340. galleryhair.com. “Totems and Other Tributes to the Earth: Ceramic Works by Peter Gerbic.” MondaysSundays Williams-Insalaco Gallery at FLCC, 3325 Marvin Sands Dr Mon-Thu 8:30 a.m.9 p.m., Fri 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m., Sat-Sun noon-5 p.m. Artist talk Feb 7 2 p.m., reception

Feb 8 4-6:30 p.m 785-1369. flccconnects.com. [ CONTINUING ] AAUW Art Forum, 494 East Ave. Off the Wall VII Members Exhibit. Continues through Apr 19 by appointment only. 244-9892. Arts Council for Wyoming County, 31 S Main St. “Local Color”. Through Mar 8. Reception Mar 8 6-8 p.m 2373517. artswyco.org. The Assisi Institute, 1400 North Winton Rd. “Toothpick World” by Stan Munro. TueThu noon-6 p.m., Fri noon-8 p.m., Sat 11 a.m.-4 p.m $5 suggested donation. 4738731. assisi-institute.org. Aviv Cafe, 321 East Ave. “Nehemiah’s Wal”l by Deborah Ingerick. Through Feb 28. 729-9916. Barnes & Noble, 3349 Monroe Ave. Penfield Art Association Winter Show. Through Mar 1. Mon-Sat 9 a.m.-10 p.m., Sun 9 a.m.-9 p.m. 586-6020. penfieldartassociation.com. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. “What Fury Fiends Find” Adelin Karius: New Paintings continues on page 22

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Art Exhibits and Woodcuts. Through Mar 31. lobbydigital@gmail.com. lobbydigital.com. The Caroline Gallery, 159 Caroline St. Photo Exhibit to Benefit Women’s Rights in India. Through Feb 15. 2607607. joekewin@gmail.com. joekewin.com. Cat Clay, 1115 E Main Street, Suite 225. Hunk of Burnin’ Love. Through Mar 31. Glass & clay for your valentine by Paul Taylor & Clifton Wood 4145643. catclay.com. Community Darkroom Gallery, 713 Monroe Ave. “Kaleidoscope”. Through Feb. 23. 271-5920. Crossroads Coffee House, 752 S Goodman St. Dead End City Art Show II. Through Feb. 28. 244-6787. kccrossroadscoffee.com. Davis Gallery, Houghton House, Hobart and William Smith Colleges, 1 Kings Lane, Geneva. From 500 Sketches by Frank P. Phillips. Through Mar 9. Mon-Fri 9 a.m.-5 p.m, Sat 1-5 p.m. 315-781-3487. hws.edu/ academics/art/exhibitions.aspx. Davison Gallery, Cultural Life Center, Roberts Wesleyan College, 2301 Westside Dr. Art Faculty Showcase. Through Feb. 15. 594-6442. roberts. edu. The Firehouse Gallery at Genesee Pottery, 713 Monroe Ave. Ten-Nineteen: Return to Station. Through Feb. 10. 2441730. geneseearts.org. Gallery at the Art and Music Library, Rush Rhees Library, University of Rochester, River Campus. (en)Gendered Juried Art. Through Feb 27. Mon-Fri 9 a.m.-5 p.m. rochester.edu/ college/wst. George Eastman House, 900 East Ave. “Camera Obscura.” Through Apr 7. Tue-Sat 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Sun 11 a.m.-5 p.m $10-$12. 271-3361. eastmanhouse.org. Hartnett Gallery, Wilson Commons, University of Rochester, River Campus. Christopher Troutman: “Watching: US and Japan Drawing”. Through Feb 17. Tue-Fri 11 a.m.-7 p.m., Sat-Sun 12-5 p.m 275-4188. blogs. rochester.edu/hartnett. High Falls Fine Art Gallery, 60 Browns Race. Tom Kim Solo Photography, “Text and Texture” and “Neil Montanus & James Montanus: A Glimpse of the World.” Through Feb 28. Wed-Fri 11 a.m.-5:30 p.m., Sat 12-5:30 p.m., Sun 1-5 p.m. 325-2030. centerathighfalls.org. Image City Photography Gallery, 722 University Ave. “The Big Picture.” Through Feb 17. Wed-Sat 11 a.m.-7 p.m., Sun 12-4 p.m. 4821976. dano@rochester.rr.com. imagecityphotographygallery. com. International Art Acquisitions, 3300 Monroe Ave. Landscapes Revisted. Through Feb 21. 264-1440. internationalartacquisitions. com. I-Square Visions, 693 Titus Ave. “Tactile Art: The Warmth and Beauty of Fiber”. Through Feb 14. zannebrummer@ gmail.com.

KIDS | DISNEY ON ICE Nemo belongs in the ocean, Simba belongs in the African pride lands, and Buzz Lightyear thinks he belongs in outer space. But they will all be united on a skating rink — along with Mickey Mouse, Pinocchio, Jiminy Cricket and a host of other Disney stars — for the Disney on Ice show “100 Years of Magic,” which runs from Wednesday, February 6, to Sunday, February 10, at Blue Cross Arena (1 War Memorial Square). This retrospective performance brings decades of Disney favorites to the ice, featuring classic songs like “When You Wish Upon a Star” and “Under the Sea” and reenactments of everything from “Mulan” to “Beauty and the Beast” to “The Incredibles.” Tickets range from $10 for children ages 2 through 12 to $60 for adults, and are available at the Blue Cross Arena, through ticketmaster.com, or by calling 800-745-3000. For the schedule of performances, visit bluecrossarena.com. — BY JASON SILVERSTEIN Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. Enrique Mora. Through March 1. Through Mar 1 2580400. thelittle.org. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. Through Feb 10. “Changing Hands: Art Without Reservation 3” Contemporary Native North American Art. In Lockhart Gallery: “Becoming Modern:Armory Show Artists at MAG.” Through May 12. WedSun 11 a.m.-5 p.m., Thu until 9 p.m $5-$12. 276-8900. mag. rochester.edu. Mercer Gallery at Monroe Communtiy College, 1000 E Henrietta Rd. “A Reasonable Facsimilie”. Through Feb 22. Mon-Thu 11 a.m.-7 p.m., Fri 11 a.m.-4 p.m., other times by appt. 292-2021. monroecc. edu. My Sister’s Gallery, 505 Mt Hope Ave. “MAPS” by Gianna Stewart. Through Feb 17. Free. 546-8400. EpiscopalSeniorLife.org. Nazareth College Arts Center, 4245 East Ave. “Good Work” Illustration Invitational. Through Mar 1. Sun and Tue-Thu noon5 p.m., Fri-Sat noon-8 p.m. 389-5073. naz.edu/art/artscenter-gallery. Nazareth College Colacino Gallery, 4245 East Ave. “Design in the Working World: The Alumni Graphic Design Exhibit.” Through Mar 1. Hours Wed-Sun noon-5 p.m. 389-5073. naz.edu/art/ colacino-art-gallery. New Deal Gallery, 4 Livingston County Campus. Expressions of the Civil War. Wed & Fri 1-4 p.m., Thu 1-7:30 p.m., Sat 11 a.m.-3 p.m. 243-6785. livingstonarts.org. Oxford Gallery, 267 Oxford St. Ray Easton and Jean K Stephens. Through Feb 23. Tue-Fri noon-5 p.m., Sat

10 a.m.-5 p.m. 271-5885. oxfordgallery.com. Pat Rini Rohrer Gallery, 71 S Main St. The 8th Annual Studio II Exhibit. Through Feb. 22. Through Feb 22. Reception Jan 11, 6-8 p.m 394-0030. prrgallery.com. Rare Books & Special Collections, Rush Rhees Library, University of Rochester, River Campus. Alice in the Looking Glass: Illustrations and Artists’ Books 1865-2012. Through Aug 16. Mon-Fri 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Sat 11 a.m.-3 p.m 275-4477. RIT Bevier Gallery, 90 Lomb Memorial Dr., Booth Building 7A. Rochester-Finger Lakes Middle and High School Community Exhibition. Through Feb. 25. Mon-Fri 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m., Mon-Thu 7-9 p.m., Sat 1-4:30 p.m., Sun 2-4:30 p.m 475-2646. Rochester Contemporary Arts Center, 137 East Ave. Makers & Mentors. Through Mar 17. Wed-Sun 1-5 p.m. 461-2222. rochestercontemporary.org. Rosalie “Roz” Steiner Art Gallery, Genesee Community College, One College Rd. Through Mar 8: “Mediation and Negociations” by Elena Lourenco. Through Mar 13: “a*new*found*land” by Joe Ziolkowski. Mon, Wed, Thu Fri 10 a.m.-4 p.m., other times by appt 343-0055 x6616. stvierrico@genesee.edu. genesee.edu. Rush Rhees Library, University of Rochester, River Campus Memorial Art Gallery: 100 Years of Art for the Community. Through Sep 30, 2013. mag. rochester.edu. Spectrum Gallery at Lumiere Photo, 100 College Ave. Through March 16. 461-4447. lumierephoto.com.

Tower Fine Arts Center, SUNY Brockport, 180 Holley St. Monroe and Vicinity Biennial. Through Feb 24. 395-2487. brockport. edu/finearts. Valley Manor, 1570 East Ave. Light and Shadows. Through March 8. Mon-Fri 9 a.m.-5 p.m. 770-1923. West Side Gallery, SUNY Brockport, 180 Holley St. A Small Mild Memory: The BFA Exhibit of Nate Hodge. Through Feb 8 masiori.com. Williams Gallery at First Unitarian Church, 220 S Winton Rd. “Passages” by Anca Seger. Through Feb 24. Daily 10 a.m.-2 p.m., 4:30-8 p.m Free. 271-9070.

Art Events [ SAT., FEBRUARY 9 ] “Saturday Morning: A Cozy Event of Nostalgic Proportions.” 8-11 p.m. Grass Roots Gallery, suite 157, Hungerford Bldg, 1115 E. Main St., Suite 248 Artwork inspired by the simple happiness experienced as a kid on Saturday morning! Saturday, Feb 9th, 8-11pm Friday, Live Music by “Sweet T and Johnny B”. thegrassrootsgallery.com.

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Comedy [ THU., FEBRUARY 7 ] Steve Burr/Pam Werts. Feb. 7-9. Comedy Club, 2235 Empire Blvd. Thu 7:30 p.m., Fri-Sat 7:30 & 10 p.m $9-$12. 671-9080. thecomedyclub.us.

Dance Events [ WED., FEBRUARY 13 ] RRROX… Rochester Rhythm and Romance: Jazz Hugs and Tap Kisses. Feb. 13-17. Downstairs Cabaret Theatre Center, 540 E. Main St Wed 7 p.m. $25. 3254370. downstairscabaret.com.

Festivals [ SUN., FEBRUARY 10 ] Lakeside Winter Celebration. 11 a.m. Ontario Beach Park, 4799 Lake Ave. 428-7541. Free. 428-5990. cityofrochester.gov/ wintercelebration.

Kids Events [ WED., FEBRUARY 6 ] Disney On Ice Celebrates 100 Years of Magic. 7 p.m. Blue Cross Arena, One War Memorial SquarE. $10-$60. 1-800-745-3000. ticketmaster.com. [ SAT., FEBRUARY 9 ] “Bugsy Malone.” Through Feb. 10. A Magical Journey Through Stages, Auditorium Center, 875 E. Main St Through Feb 10. Fri-Sat 7:30 p.m., Sun 2 p.m $12-$15. 935-7173. mjtstages.tix.com. Honk!. Feb. 9-10, 2 p.m. Nazareth College Arts Center, 4245 East Ave Rochester Children’s Theatre $20-$25. 389-2170. artscenter.naz.edu. Lasers NASA Program. Feb. 9-10, 12-4 p.m. Rochester Museum and Science Center, 657 East Ave. Included in museum admission $11-$13. 697-1942. rmsc.org. Snow White and the Seven Dwarves. Feb. 9. JCC Rochester, 1200 Edgewood Ave. 1 p.m. and 3:30 p.m. (ASL interpreted). $11. 723-6080. tykestheatre.org. continues on page 24 rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 23

Art

Kids Events

“Tundra Pearl (White-Tailed Ptarmigan)” is a huddled, downy bird on a soft gray, almost shimmering ground, with glowing peach light around its shadow. It is strange to say out loud, but the glistening quality of the work nearly audibly emanates from the muffled silence of the scene.

“Shattered Silence (Red-Tailed Hawk and Crows)” by Ray Easton is part of the Oxford Gallery’s current exhibit. PHOTO PROVIDED

Feathers and focus found Ray Easton/Jean K. Stephens THROUGH FEBRUARY 23 OXFORD GALLERY, 267 OXFORD ST. 271-5885, OXFORDGALLERY.COM TUESDAY-FRIDAY NOON-5 P.M., SATURDAY 10 A.M.-5 P.M. [ REVIEW ] BY REBECCA RAFFERTY

The current exhibit at Oxford Gallery showcases the current works of two skillful Rochester-based artists, Ray Easton and Jean K. Stephens, whose gentle reverence for nature lends a breathtaking sweetness to each work. Through their eyes, we see nuance and minutiae as crucial and worthy of our attention. The artists have in common a supremely sensitive focus, and depict studied encounters with wild fauna and stumble-upon moments with fragile natural relics. When I visited the gallery to see the new show, owner Jim Hall said he was surprised by the compatibility of the pair, by how the works complemented one another. Ray Easton was a student of Jean K. Stephens’ husband, Bill Stephens, at Webster High School. Bill is another artist represented by Oxford Gallery, and Hall describes him as having had many students who are good practicing artists. Though Easton’s acrylic portraits of birds in their native element or in a faded atmosphere are near photorealistic in skill, there is a sort of mythic story quality to the scenes, and the birds are given individual personalities. For all of the crisp-capture of the works, there is also a breathing motion. 24 CITY FEBRUARY 6-12, 2013

Birds are quite reptilian, not only in physical nature, but in behavior as well. And though humans find projecting our own emotions and experiences on mammals to be irresistible, it is a bit harder to make those connections with most birds because they are so alien. Easton shares with viewers the fascination of tiny clockwork-esque, lizard-like beasties, cautious and seemingly about to dart away in his portraits of house wrens and in “The Hedgerow (White-Breasted Nuthatch),” in which we see a wee bird clinging vertically to a scrap of lichen-covered bark, tiny claws clutching. The larger birds of prey and scavengers are calculating and command feelings of awe. In Easton’s “Tales of the Tower,” a dizzinessinducing Kodak Tower pops up into the sky at a dusky hour, and startled pigeons take wing to avoid a darting peregrine falcon. The subject in “Hot Pursuit (Peregrine Falcon)” is caught in a sharp dive, and the subtle shapes in Easton’s darkening sky frame and emphasize the motion. In “Shattered Silence (Red-Tailed Hawk and Crows)” a glowingly vibrant blue-green atmosphere is soupy around a rough-bark tree, on which a hunched crow and annoyed hawk confront each other on a branch, and a second crow looks on from above. Easton includes feathered fellows found between the extremes of the speck-like swallows and the predation-prone. Hall finds Easton’s “Ladies First (Mallards)” particularly captivating in that it has an almost abstract quality — the heavy texture seen here is atypical for the artist — and an interesting perspective. Usually Easton has the viewers looking up at or across to his birds, but here we look down at the ducks as their velvety heads tentatively reach for strewn corn kernels.

If the two artists took a walk through the woods together, Easton would likely cast his stare up and around to the sky and trees, while Stephens would most certainly be looking down, careful of where she stepped. She would focus on finding paths and patterns within forms, and collecting the firm armatures of nature’s skeletal remnants in stone, shell, and bone. Only a couple of works in this show represent Stephens’ typical sweeping scenes that celebrate the wistful beauty of Upstate New York. “View from Bald Hill” is a lovely scene of a road cutting through trees and rolling hills. In many of this show’s works, the artist zooms in to focus on minutiae found in nature, often arranging forms to play with their meaning and subtly prod the viewer down her path of meditation. “Pearl” depicts an egg resting in a seashell, a theme of potential, preciousness, and fragility repeated in more gentle light in “Nestled,” and again in “Endearment,” in which crab claws frame yet another egg-withina-shell, this time atop a letter dated 1881. The bulk of Stephens’ oil paintings and pencil drawings in this particular show focuses on minutiae found in nature, the oftoverlooked white noise of the woods and trails, whether her masterful depiction of the beauty found in the forms of the craggy and cracked stone beneath our feet, or the repeated heartshape found in various natural forms. Of the former group, the show includes “At the Point,” in which Stephens has used vibrantly glowing blue details to make deep shadows even richer and to complement the warmer spectrum of color in the stone. “Iron Pool” is rusty in color, with a slight shimmer at the edge of the water. “Tumbled Path” zooms even closer to the smaller scales that are all around us but nearly invisible, and Stephens has depicted countless small stones in zigzagging paths between larger stones, with a vast range of color in patches of sunlight and shadow. Included the heart-shaped group are “Bone Heart,” formed of what looks to be two ribs, and “The Ennead,” which is a grid grouping of nine stones, each with a vague heart shape made much more obvious by the grouping. The dual fragility and hardiness of the symbol are summed up perfectly in the weathered “Sea Glass Heart,” a shape of delicate green translucence and light, and the sturdy “Blue Stone Heart,” with folds in its pitted, worn surface.

Superheroes Weekend. Feb. 9-10. The Strong National Museum of Play, 1 Manhattan Square Included in admission: $11-$13. 263-2700. museumofplay.org. [ SUN., FEBRUARY 10 ] Bebop to Bach Concert Series. second Sunday of every month, 2 p.m The Harley School, 1981 Clover St $5-$10/family, register. 442-1770 x3049. tsmith@harleyschool.org. harleyschool.org 2 p.m. Fairport’s Civil War Soldiers. 2:30 p.m. Perinton Historical Society & Fairport Museum, 18 Perrin St. Children in grades K-6 are invited to attend with an adult Free. 585-223-3989. PerintonHistoricalSociety.org. Goodwill Messengers: The George W. Cooper Doll Collection. 1:30-3 p.m. Central Library, Children’s Center, 115 South Ave. Ages 10+ 428-8150. libraryweb.org. Hot Air Balloons. 2-4 p.m. Helmer Nature Center, 154 Pinegrove Ave 336-3035. westirondequoit.org/helmer.htm. Purim Palooza. 2-4 p.m. JCC Rochester, 1200 Edgewood Ave. New this year: “Pay it Forward” workshops 461-0490. JewishRochester.org.

Lectures [ WED., FEBRUARY 6 ] Chile Today. 7 p.m. Downtown United Presbyterian Church, 121 N. Fitzhugh St. Free. 3254000. interconnect_mott@ frontiernet.net. Light Works! Presents Ethan Borg Chinese Medicine and More. 6:30 p.m. RIT Barnes & Noble, 100 Park Point. $5. 585-424-6777. meetup.com/ light-works. [ THU., FEBRUARY 7 ] The 40+ Job Search; Debunking the Myths. 9:30 a.m.-noon. Gates Public Library, 902 Elmgrove Rd. Free, register. 247-6446. Follow the Drinking Gourd: The Underground Railroad in Rochester. 7:30 p.m. St John’s Lutheran Church, 800 East Ridge Rd. $1 nonmembers. 336-7269. ggw.org/~ihsociety/. Race: The Power of an Illusion. 5-7 p.m. Central Library, Kate Gleason Auditorium, 115 South Ave. “The House We Live In.” Free. 428-8350. libraryweb.org. Sweatshop Workers Speak Out. 8:30 a.m. First Unitarian Church, 220 S Winton Rd. 2136000 x6294. labor-religion.org. “You Can Save Your Site and Eat it Too: A New Paradigm of Cultural Heritage Preservation.” 5 p.m. University of Rochester, River Campus, Morey Hall, room 321 anthro@mail.rochester.edu. rochester.edu/college/ATHS/ index.html. [ FRI., FEBRUARY 8 ] White Scripts and Black Supermen: Black Masculinities in Comic Books. 7 p.m. Baobab Cultural Center, 728 University Ave. thebaobab.org. [ SUN., FEBRUARY 10 ] Blue Danube: Budapest to Nurnberg. 2:30 p.m. Penfield Public Library, 1985 Baird Rd. Free, register. 340-8720. penfieldlibrary.org.

Jewish Influence on Hollywood’s Creation with Lester Friedman. 10:30 a.m. Temple EmanuEl, 2956 St. Paul Blvd. Free, register. 388-5212. emanuelrochester.org. Johannes Brahms: His Life and Loves. 2 p.m. Pittsford Community Library, 24 State St., Pittsford. Free. 249-5481. John Zogby: “The Political Landscape: 2013 and Beyond.” 4 p.m. Finger Lakes Community College, 3325 Marvin Sands Dr. $29-$39. 785-1386. gmeforum@flcc. edu. flcc.edu. [ MON., FEBRUARY 11 ] “The Battle of Gettysburg: 150 Years”. 7-8 p.m. Greece Public Library, 2 Vince Tofany Blvd. Learn how Rochester regiments participated in this battle Free, register. 225-8951. “South Asian Christianity: Experiences and Perspectives,” with Reverend Bishop Prince Singh. 2-4 p.m. Rochester Institute of Technology, 1 Lomb Memorial Dr. Skalny Room, Center for Religious Life mslgsh@rit.edu. Travelogue: Hadrian’s Wall with Ken Harbison. 2-3 p.m. Gates Public Library, 902 Elmgrove Rd. 247-6446. [ TUE., FEBRUARY 12 ] Tuesday Topics: Foodlink with Jerome Nathaniel. 12:12-12:52 p.m. Central Library, Kate Gleason Auditorium, 115 South Ave. 428-8350. libraryweb.org.

Literary Events [ WED., FEBRUARY 6 ] Pure Kona Poetry Readings. 7 p.m. Acanthus Café, 337 East Ave. Free. 319-5999. acanthuscafe.com. [ THU., FEBRUARY 7 ] Books Sandwiched-In: “Someone Knows My Name” by Lawrence Hill.. 12:10 p.m. Brighton Memorial Library, 2300 Elmwood Ave. 7845300. brightonlibrary.org. Reading & Reception. 7 p.m. Writers and Books, 740 University Ave “The Crows of Copper John: a History of Auburn Prison in Poems” by Patricia Roth Schwartz and “Hairy Lollipop” by David White $3-$4. wab.org. [ SAT., FEBRUARY 9 ] Book Reading: “Adirondack Trail of Gold” by Larry Weill. 4 p.m. Books Etc., 78 W. Main St. Free. 474-4116. books_ etc@yahoo.com. Sally Valentine Steinmiller and Kathy Johncox. 2 p.m. Books Etc., 78 W. Main St. 474-4116. books_etc@yahoo.org.

Recreation [ FRI., FEBRUARY 8 ] Pushups Instead of Pizza Friday Night Fitness. 6-8 p.m. F.I.T., 465 W. Commercial St., E. Rochester. $20-$25, register. adcouncilroch.org/events/ friday-night-fitness/. [ SUN., FEBRUARY 10 ] Winter Walk for Strong Kids. 10:30 a.m. Nazareth College Shults Center, 4245 East Ave. Raise a minimum of $10 in pledges. go.naz.edu/ winterwalk2013.

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KIDS | SUPERHERO WEEKEND Bring the kiddos to meet Spider-Man and Captain America at The Strong National Museum of Play (1 Manhattan Square) during Superheroes Weekend, which takes place Saturday and Sunday, February 9-10. Marvel Comics’ official superheroes will greet museum guests and pose for pictures. The event will also include how-to-draw workshops with comic-book experts, and a variety of superhero-themed activities.

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On Saturday, February 9, visitors can interact with SpiderMan 11 a.m.-3 p.m. and 3-6 p.m. Captain American will be in the house on Sunday, February 10, noon-5 p.m. On both days from noon to 4 p.m., kids can visit with PBS Kids’ Princess Presto and Super Why! A variety of comic-book artists — including Michael Borkowski, who has worked on animated series including “Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles,” “Dragon Tales,” and “Scooby-Doo,” and Rochester-based comic-book creator Stephen Lindsay — will share drawing and writing tips, display art, and sign autographs. In addition, visitors can explore the “American Comic Book Heroes: The Battle of Good vs. Evil” exhibit. All Superheroes Weekend activities are included with general admission fees, which are $11-$13. For more information, call 263-2700 or visit museumofplay.org. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY

Special Events [ WED., FEBRUARY 6 ] Rochester Board of Education/ Community Conversation. 7 p.m. Central Office Building, Central Office Building, 131 West Broad St., unless otherwise stated.Feb 6: State of Our Schools Address at All City High School, 180 Ridgeway Ave; Feb 7: Coffee & Conversation with the Superintendent; Feb 12: Coffee & Conversation with the Superintendent. rcsdk12.org. Valentine Gala for the Crisis Nursery Center of Rochester. 9 p.m. Max of Eastman Place, 25 Gibbs St. Cocktails and Auction at 6 p.m., dinner at 7:30 p.m., live auction at 9 p.m $125, register. 473-2464. [ THU., FEBRUARY 7 ] Finger Lakes Regional Economic Development Council: Report the the Community Luncheon. 11:45 a.m.-1:30 p.m. Hyatt Regency Rochester, 125 E. Main St With Joel Seligman and Danny Wegman $50, RSVP. 5466920. rddc@rddc.org. Free Film Showing, Discussion for 9500 Liberty. 7:15 p.m. University of Rochester, River Campus. Genrich-Rusling Room of LeChase Hall. Free. 276-5405. rochester.edu. Greater Rochester Area Cocktail Party. 5:30-7:30 p.m. Richmond’s Tavern, 21 Richmond Street Working

Families Party with Senator Ted O’Brien $125, $200 for two. (585) 270-8570. jlenney@workingfamilies.org. RichmondsTavern.com. The Lost World with live music by the Andrew Alden Ensemble. 7 p.m. The Little Theater, 240 East Ave. $10. 258-0400. Sierra Club Rochester Hosts Unveiling of High Falls Green Space Plan. 6-8:30 p.m. Friends of the GardenAerial at 81 Browns Race in Rochester. 234-1056. lci_msw@hotmail. com. facebook.com/SierraROC. [ FRI., FEBRUARY 8 ] Aquinas Institute Baseball Wine and Craft Brew Tasting Event. 7-10 p.m. Italian American Community Center, 150 Frank Dimino Way. $25. 594-8882. aqfundraiser@gmail.com. iaccrochester.org. Black Young Professionals Date Night Auction. 6:30 p.m. Vibe Lounge, 302 North Goodman St. $6-$10. 442-8423. ulr.org/ events/?event_id=28. Complete Ur Cool. 7:30 p.m. Faith Temple Apostolic Church, Arnett Youth fashion show $5 in advance, $7@ door, $10 VIP (freebies Included). 404-518-6025. Screening: “Maafa 21: Black Genocide in the 21st Century”. 6 p.m. Roberts Wesleyan College, 2301 Westside Dr 615-9551. info@fdfny.org. roberts.edu. continues on page 26 rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 25

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FESTIVAL | LAKESIDE WINTER CELEBRATION By now, many of us are probably ready to stay inside and just hibernate through the rest of winter. But the resilient Rochesterians who want to fully embrace the tundra can frolic and freeze together at the 29th Annual Lakeside Winter Celebration, held on Sunday, February 10, at Ontario Beach Park (4800 Lake Ave.) and the Port of Rochester Terminal (1000 N. River St.). This year’s celebration includes Rec on the Move, a recreation center with winter activities like hockey and snow bowling; the Lake Ontario Wine Festival, with $5 wine samples from across New York State; the annual Chilly Chili Challenge noon-3 p.m.; and a snow sculpture contest with cash prizes, centered on the all-too-appropriate theme of “Winter.” But for those who literally want to dive right into winter, the highlight will be the 13th Annual Polar Plunge at noon, with more than 1,000 brave souls jumping into Lake Ontario to raise funds for the New York Special Olympics. The Lakeside Winter Celebration runs 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Most events are free. For a full list of the day’s activities, visit cityofrochester.gov/wintercelebration. —BY JASON SILVERSTEIN

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[ SAT., FEBRUARY 9 ] Art Reflected Preview Dinner. 5:30 p.m. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. $100. 2768900. mag.rochester.edu. “Beautiful Africa.” 1-3 p.m. A fashion show featuring African attire by Tejan’s Out of Africa. Wilson Foundation Academy, 200 Genesee St. 262-8621. rcsdk12.org/BHM2013. Cayuga Lake Wine Trail’s 11th Annual Mardi Gras. Feb. 9-10. Cayuga Lake Wine Trail. $25, discounts for DD. 800-6845217. cayugawinetrail.com. Community Forum on Seedfolk Store in SWAN. 1-3 p.m. 270 Dr. Samuel McCree Way swanonline.org. Epilepsy Foundation’s 27th Chocolate Ball. 5:30 p.m.midnight. Rochester Riverside Convention Center, 123 E Main St $50 dance ticket only, admission 9 p.m $200, RSVP. rrcc.com. Fine Wine & Desserts, A Fundraiser. 11 a.m.-4 p.m. JD Wine Cellars, 1339 Eddy Rd. $10. (315) 986-4202. winery@longacrefarms.com. longacrefarms.com. Gay Alliance Red Ball: Ruby Masqueerade. 7 p.m. Auditorium Theatre, 885 Main St. Decorated masks available for $3, or bring your own. gayalliance.org/events/redball. html. $10-$15. 244-8640. redball@gayalliance.org. The Phantom of the Opera with live music by the Andrew Alden Ensemble. 3 p.m. The Little Theater, 240 East Ave. $10. 258-0400.

Red Cross Vegas Night. Feb. 9. Palmyra Moose Lodge, 3808 State Highway 31 Palmyra $25-$30. (315) 597-6046. redcross.org/ny/newark. Rochester Free School Organizing Meeting. 2-4 p.m. Flying Squirrel Community Space, 285 Clarissa St. flyingsquirrel.rocus.org. Spring 2013 Trunk Show. 2-6 p.m. Embrasse-Moi, 11 North Main St., Pittsford. Free, RSVP. 383-1170. parties@ embrasse-moi.com. Whiskey Wine and Dine. 6 p.m. Midvale Country Club, 2387 Baird Rd. $40, $75/ couple. 752-8004. Wine & Cheese Lovers Weekend. Feb. 9-10, 10 a.m. Keuka Lake Wine Trail, 2375 Route 14A. $18. (800) 440-4898. info@keukawinetrail.com. keukawinetrail.com. [ SUN., FEBRUARY 10 ] 14th annual Canandaigua Classic Antique Show and Sale. 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Finger Lakes Casino & Racetrack, 5857 Rt. 96. $5 admission. 924-3232. canandaiguaantiquesclassic. com. 3rd Annual Mad Hatter’s Tea Party. 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Mill Art Center & Gallery, 61 N Main St. Hosted by The Rabbit Room & Tallulah’s Fancy Free, RSVP. 582-1830. millartcenter.com. Chinese New year Celebration with Dancing Dragons. 1 p.m. Wok With You, 300 Park Point, Henrietta 427-8383 5 p.m. White Swan Asia Caffe, 798 S. Clinton Ave 319-3249. Downton Abbey Tea Party with WXXI. noon. Wood Library,

THEATER | “THE ADDAMS FAMILY” It’s hard to find a tale of murder, mayhem, and the macabre that the entire family can enjoy. But fear not: everyone can rejoice in the morbidity of “The Addams Family,” the classical comic strip turned into a hit Broadway musical that has now embarked on a national tour that brings it to the Auditorium Theatre (885 E. Main St.) through Sunday, February 10. The musical, based on the ghoulish cartoon family created by Charles Addams and written by “Jersey Boys” creators Marshall Brickman and Rick Elice, depicts the death-obsessed family attempting to appear “normal” when the teenaged Wednesday brings a boyfriend home for dinner. “The Addams Family” runs this week on Wednesday and Thursday at 7:30 p.m., Friday at 8 p.m., Saturday at 2 & 8 p.m., and Sunday at 1 & 6:30 p.m. Tickets range from $32.50 to $67.50, and can be purchased through rbtl.org or by calling 222-5000. — BY JASON SILVERSTEIN 134 North Main St. 394-1381. woodlibrary.org. First Annual Roc Awards Show. 6 p.m. Radisson Hotel Riverside, 120 E. Main St $20. 752-4045. rocroyalent.com. Gothic Cathedral Tour. 2 p.m. St. Michael’s Church, 869 N. Clinton Ave Donations appreciated. 325-4041. sfxcrochester.org. Home funerals and Green burials : Film Discussion Potluck. 5 p.m. Rochester Greenovation, 1199 East Main St. Free, bring a dish to pass and utensils, donations accepted. 506-6505. Rochester Polar Plunge 2013. 9 a.m. Charlotte Beach, 4650 Lake Ave Registration begins at 9 a.m., Plunge is at Noon. Raise $60. 586-7400 x109. 2013.kintera.org/rochesterPP. Unity House Tribute with Fonzworth Bentley. 7 p.m. Rochester Institute of Technology, 1 Lomb Memorial Dr. unitywww@gmail.com. rit. edu/news. [ MON., FEBRUARY 11 ] Conversations on Race. 6-8 p.m. Brighton Memorial Library, 2300 Elmwood Ave. 428-8350. brightonlibrary.org. Sweets for Your Sweet Sale. 6-9 p.m. Thread, 654 South Ave. Edible goods by Bake It or Cleave It and jewels by Interstellar Love Craft. Photobooth bakeitorcleaveit. com. [ TUE., FEBRUARY 12 ] The Flour City Dessert Auction. 6:30 p.m. The Smokestack Cowork, 429 State St. A fundraiser benefitting Love146 in the fight to end human trafficking. $5-$8. 414-7287. hi@smokestackcowork. com. flourcitydessertauction. wordpress.com.

One Take: Stories Through the Lens: “The Last Gladiators.” 7 p.m. Little Theatre, 240 East Ave. $10. 258-0400. thelittle. org.

Theater The Addams Family. Auditorium Theatre, 885 East Main Street Tue-Thu 7:30 p.m., Fri-Sat 8 p.m., Sun 1 p.m. www.tafontour.com. $32.50-$67.50. 222-5000. mail@rbtl.org. rbtl.org. The Agony and Ecstacy of Steve Jobs. Geva Theatre Center, 75 Woodbury Blvd. Through Feb 10. Wed Feb 6-Fri 7 p.m., Sat 3 & 8 p.m., Sun 3 p.m Tickets start at $30. 232-4382. gevatheatre.org. All This and Moonlight. The Space, Hungerford Bldg, 1115 E. Main St., Suite 248 At the Space Theatre (at Rochester Greenovation, 1199 East Main St.). Out of Pocket Productions. Fri-Sat 7:30 p.m., Sun 2 p.m. Wed Feb 13-Sat 7:30 p.m. $5 of the ticket price donated to Community Gardens of Foodlink. Food donations will also be welcomed at the door $15. 269-4673. outofpocketproductions.org. Annie and Al on the Erie Canal. Greece Community Center, 3 Vince Tofany Blvd. $2 donation. 225-7221. greeceny.gov/cs. Brighton Beach Memoirs. School of the Arts, 45 Prince St Fri 7 p.m., Sat 2 & 7 p.m., Sun 5 p.m 242-7682. sotarochester.org. “Cinderella.” Wayne Central High School Performing Arts Center, Rte. 350, Ontario. Fri 7 p.m., Sat 2 & 7 p.m $5-$8. tickets4cinderella@gmail.com. “Encore! Broadway Favorites of the American Songbook”. JCC Rochester, 1200 Edgewood Ave.

Theater Audition [ ONGOING ] Technical Director, Musical Director, Musicians Wanted. Feb. 6-April 24. Working Class Theatre Company is looking for a Technical Director, a Musical Director, and Musicians for their upcoming Summer 2013 production of The Fantasticks 643-0836. workingclasstheatre.net. [ MON., FEBRUARY 11 ] 33 Variations. 7 p.m. Blackfriars Theatre, 795 E. Main St Blackfriars bftix.org. “Charlie and the Chocolate Factory.” Feb. 11-12, 6:309:30 p.m. Rochester Institute of Technology, 1 Lomb Memorial Dr. NTID Performing Arts. Robert F. Panara Theatre. ntidtix@rit.edu. rit. edu/ntid/theatre.

Workshops [ WED., FEBRUARY 6 ] Super Bowl Ad Review. 4 p.m. Pomodoro, 3400 Monroe Ave.

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RECREATION | PUSHUPS INSTEAD OF PIZZA FRIDAY NIGHT FITNESS Did you know that working out is a natural way to fight depression? That includes seasonal-darkness-induced depression — I’m talking to you, Rochester. In related news, alcohol is a depressant. If your happy hour could use a little more glee, why not give it a healthy jump start? On Friday, February 8, join professional fitness trainer Anne Osovski as she leads a group through her popular iPhone workout app “Workout in a Bag,” a fun calorie-burning exercise routine. The event, which takes place 6-8 p.m. at F.I.T. (465 W. Commercial St., East Rochester), will include heartpumping music and lots of healthy surprises. The group workout begins at 6:15 p.m. The workout will be followed by a fitness after-party with nutritious refreshments, chair massages, healthy-cooking demos, raffle prizes, and giveaways. Tickets are $20 in advance and $25 at the door, with 100 percent of proceeds benefitting the Ad Council of Rochester and Bivona Child Advocacy’s Campaign to End Child Sexual Abuse. For more information or to register, call 442-0200 x202 or visit adcouncilroch.org/events/fridaynight-fitness. —BY REBECCA RAFFERTY $25 for Members; $40 for Non-Members. 703-4825. mypomodoro.com. Valentine’s Day Card Making Class with Joanne Lloyd. 7 p.m. Irondequoit Library, Helen McGraw Branch, 2180 E. Ridge Rd $10 supply fee. 336-6060. [ THU., FEBRUARY 7 ] Get Organized! with Ann Michael Henry. 6:30-8 p.m. Brighton Memorial Library, 2300 Elmwood Ave. 7845300. brightonlibrary.org. Good Agriculture Practices (GAP) training. Feb. 7-8. For produce growers in Genesee and Monroe counties 8:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m. Fire Training Facility, 7690 State Street, Batavia $60, register. 7355448. cjk37@cornell.edu. gaps.cornell.edu [ FRI., FEBRUARY 8 ] Borosilicate Glass: Couples Date Night. Feb. 8-9, 7-11 p.m. $150/per couple. rocafc.com. Friday Fling: Clay & Cabernet. 6:30-9:30 p.m. Genesee Center for the Arts and Education, 713 Monroe Ave. 244-1730. geneseearts.org. [ SAT., FEBRUARY 9 ] Integrated Pest Management. 10 a.m.-noon. Hansen Nature Center, 1525 Calkins Rd. Free admission, register. 359-7044. sites.google.com/ site/hansennaturecenter. Make Your Own Valentines Cards Drop-In. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Genesee Center for the Arts and

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Through Feb 17. Thu 7 p.m., Sat 8 p.m., Sun 2 p.m $18-$26. 461-2000. jcccenterstage.org. “Happy Valentines Day, or Take That, Cupid!”. Black Sheep Theatre, 274 N Goodman St., third floor, Studio D313 Through Feb 16. Fri-Sat 7:30 p.m., Sun 2 p.m $15. 8614816. blacksheeptheatre.org. James Judd’s Funny Stories. Downstairs Cabaret Theatre, 20 Windsor St $25. 3254370. downstairscabaret.com. “The Jewmaicans” by Jacqueline Moe. MuCCC, 142 Atlantic Ave $6 suggested, pay-what-you-will. muccc.org. “A Life in the Theatre.” Blackfriars Theatre, 795 E. Main St Through Feb 10. Thu Feb 7 7:30 p.m., Fri-Sat 8 p.m., Sun 2 p.m $27. 4541260. bftix.org. Love Letters. RAPA, 727 E. Main St Thu-Sat 7:30 p.m., Sun 2 p.m $15-$20. 325-3366. rapatheatre.org. “My Gal Patsy”. Downstairs Cabaret Theatre Center, 540 E. Main St Sat 8 p.m., Sun 3 p.m 325-4370. downstairscabaret.com. “Next to Normal”. Geva Theatre Center, 75 Woodbury Blvd Through Feb 10. Wed Feb 6-Thy 7:30 p.m., Fri 8 p.m., Sat 4 & 8:30 p.m., Sun 2 p.m. & 7 p.m. (closing performance). Tickets start at $25. 232-4382. gevatheatre.org. Royal Hunt of the Sun. NTID Dyer Arts Center, 52 Lomb Memorial Dr. Thu-Sat 7:30 p.m., Sun 2 p.m rit.edu/ntid/ theatre. Walk the Walk: Encounters with Rochester’s AfricanAmerican Ancestors. Mt. Olivet Baptist Church, 141 Adams St landmarksociety.org. “The Wild Party.” Nazareth College Arts Center, 4245 East Ave. Nazareth College Theatre League and students. Fri-Sat 9:30 p.m., Sun 7:30 p.m. Proceeds will benefit local arts charities $2-$7. 309-4437. wildpartynaz@gmail.com. artscenter.naz.edu.

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Education, 713 Monroe Ave. 244-1730. geneseearts.org. [ SUN., FEBRUARY 10 ] Art of Exotic 3rd Annual Valentine’s Day Extravganza. 10:30 a.m. Goddess Hour Dance & Fitness Studio, 1470 Monroe Ave. Ages 18+. $40. 224-0277. goddesshour.com. Smugtown Mushrooms Winter Classes. 127 Railroad St. Medicinal Mushrooms. smugtownmushrooms.com. [ MON., FEBRUARY 11 ] Family Development Class: “The First Key to Successful Parenting.” 12:30-2:30 p.m. Mental Health Association, 320 N Goodman St. For parents of children up to age 5. Free, RSVP. 325-3145 x131. mharochester.org. [ TUE., FEBRUARY 12 ] African World History Class. 7:30-9 p.m. Baobab Cultural Center, 728 University Ave. $5 donation. baobab.center@ yahoo.com. thebaobab.org. Family Development Class: “Don’t Make Me Say It Again!”. 12:30-2:30 p.m. Mental Health Association, 320 N Goodman St. For parents of school-age children Free, RSVP. 325-3145 x131. mharochester.org.

GETLISTED get your event listed for free e-mail it to calendar@rochestercitynews.com. Or go online to rochestercitynewspaper.com and submit it yourself!

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 27

Movies Theaters Searchable, up-to-the-minute movie times for all area theaters can be found at rochestercitynewspaper.com, and on City’s mobile website.

Film

Brockport Strand 93 Main St, Brockport, 637-3310, rochestertheatermanagement.com

Canandaigua Theatres 3181 Townline Road, Canandaigua, 396-0110, rochestertheatermanagement.com

Cinema Theater 957 S. Clinton St., 271-1785, cinemarochester.com

Culver Ridge 16 2255 Ridge Rd E, Irondequoit  544-1140, regmovies.com

Another take on the gangster [ REVIEW ] BY GEORGE GRELLA

Dryden Theatre 900 East Ave., 271-3361, dryden.eastmanhouse.org

Eastview 13 Eastview Mall, Victor 425-0420, regmovies.com

Geneseo Theatres Geneseo Square Mall, 243-2691, rochestertheatermanagement.com

Greece Ridge 12 176 Greece Ridge Center Drive 225-5810, regmovies.com

Henrietta 18 525 Marketplace Drive 424-3090, regmovies.com

The Little 240 East Ave., 258-0444 thelittle.org

Movies 10 2609 W. Henrietta Road 292-0303, cinemark.com

Pittsford Cinema 3349 Monroe Ave., 383-1310 pittsford.zurichcinemas.com

Tinseltown USA/IMAX 2291 Buffalo Road 247-2180, cinemark.com

Webster 12 2190 Empire Blvd., 888-2624386, amctheatres.com

veterans, their careers provide an unusual context for their activities in the film. The picture opens intercutting between “Stand Up Guys” Val (Pacino) going through the procedures (R), DIRECTED BY FISHER STEVENS of release from prison and his best friend NOW PLAYING Doc (Walken) painting landscapes in his shabby apartment, suggesting a drab sort One of the pleasures of the new movie of freedom contrasting with the gray walls “Stand Up Guys” involves the connections of confinement. When Doc meets Val at between the roles the actors occupy and the the prison gates the action starts along a actors themselves. The three stars, Al Pacino, predictable path, with Val learning how much Christopher Walken, and Alan Arkin, play the world has changed during his years in the aging criminals who reunite after working clink, and wanting to make up for at least together many years ago; watching them some of that lost time with booze and sex and in action, no viewer could ignore the fact drugs. That quest leads to some sequences that the trio themselves have logged decades of silly farce when Val chugs down a bottle in front of the camera. Veterans playing of Viagra so he can perform in his favorite brothel and ends up with an enduring erection that requires desperate treatment. In the midst of the comical events, the characters and action move within the shadow of death. A true stand-up guy, Val took the fall for his colleagues in Christopher Walken, Alan Arkin, and Al Pacino in “Stand Up Guys.”

crime, serving 28 years without ratting on his friends, but a mob boss named Claphands (really), played by Mark Margolis, intends to have him killed in revenge for the death of his son in the job that put Val in prison; making it worse, Doc is the hitman. Resigned to the task, Doc allows Val, who quickly realizes the situation, to enjoy his hours of freedom, his last hours of life. The pace picks up when Val and Doc steal a muscle car from some thugs, rescue their former driver, Hirsch (Alan Arkin), from a nursing home, and embark on a spree. Hirsch retains his old skills at the wheel, speeding all over Los Angeles, evading police pursuit, and enjoying his own visit to the brothel. Along the way the script piles on scenes and incidents to enliven the simple plot — a sweet moment when Val dances with a young woman in a bar, the rescue of a damsel in distress, revenge on a crew of thugs, and some time with a lovely young waitress (Addison Timlin) with a particular connection to Doc. The mixture of comedy and violent action provides enough substance for the movie and Doc’s dilemma contributes an unusual basis for suspense, but much of its entertainment grows from the performances of the three old pros impersonating three old pros. With some assistance from the crusty Arkin, Pacino supplies much of the silliness, but also articulates some serious philosophy

PHOTO COURTESY ROADSIDE ATTRACTIONS

284 Exchange St. 319-3388

ATTENTION FILM FANS

In Corn Hill Landing Thetapandtable.com

CITY Newspaper is no longer running film times in print. Instead, you can find accurate, up-to-the-minute times for all area theaters on rochestercitynewspaper.com.

Special Valentine’s Day Set Menu WITH Course Options 30 CRAFT BEERS • WINE • CRAFT COCKTAILS SEASONAL • LOCAL • NATURALLY RAISED MEATS

28 CITY FEBRUARY 6-12, 2013

MON-SAT: 11:30AM-2AM SUN: 4PM-12AM

Keep reading CITY every week for film reviews, blurbs, & theater information and post your own reviews online!

A testament to love [ REVIEW ] BY ADAM LUBITOW

“Amour” (PG-13), DIRECTED BY MICHAEL HANEKE OPENS FRIDAY

about their mutual past and their delicate present; Walken behaves very much like his straight man, maintaining a deadpan in numerous close-ups, saying little, supporting his craziness, but concealing a genuine anguish over his assignment and his personal situation. The actors, who have never appeared together before this movie, create a striking contrast — the wild, loquacious Val opposed to the steady, taciturn Doc — and a good team in crime. The characters finally solve their problems in a resolution that combines a good deal of sentimentality with an explosion of gunfire and glory. Both Val and Doc achieve something like redemption in a climactic sequence right out of “Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid.” Whatever elements of comedy and Western it employs and whatever else it accomplishes, “Stand Up Guys” demonstrates its indebtedness to the tradition of the gangster flick. Gangster films are brother films, and that relationship clearly defines the connection between Val and Doc; they also tend to follow a pattern of implacable fate, the doom that awaits Val at the hands of his friend, and actually awaits them both. It even includes the conventional scene of the gangsters acquiring new clothes, though in this case the pair break into a store and dress up in some classy stolen suits, a nice comical touch. It’s not “Little Caesar “or “The Godfather,” but it’s fun.

Austrian director Michael Haneke has become notorious over the years for his clinical, detached style of directing, which he often employs while telling stories that evoke a visceral, often intensely negative reaction in viewers. Whether it be the brutal torture of a family in his infamous “Funny Games” or the portrait of mentally unstable, masochistic music professor in “The Piano Teacher,” Haneke delights (some might say sadistically) in provoking his audience and upending expectations. He presents the most disturbing aspects of human behavior, presumably in the service of making a larger point about society as a whole, though more often it appears that he just likes getting a rise out of people. It’s tempting to say that he’s up to his old tricks once again with his latest film, “Amour.” And maybe he is, as he chronicles the slow, undignified death of a sweet, old woman in grueling detail. But despite the unpleasant subject matter, “Amour,” winner of the Palm d’Or at this year’s Cannes Film Festival and now a multiple Academy

Jean-Louis Trintignant in “Amour.” PHOTO COURTESY LES FILMS DU LOSANGE

Award nominee, emerges as one of the most moving and emotional cinematic experiences of the year. Veterans of the French New Wave, Emmanuelle Riva and Jean-Louis Trintignant play Anne and Georges, two retired music teachers, now in their 80s. They’ve obviously had a long, happy life together, and they’re still very much in love. They lead a quiet existence, filling their time with a shared passion for art and culture. But one morning over breakfast, Anne suddenly goes catatonic, freezing in mid-conversation, the light suddenly gone from her eyes. Georges panics, with good reason, but practically before he has a chance to act, his wife returns to him with no memory of what transpired. Concerned, they see a doctor, and learn that Anne has a blocked carotid artery that requires surgery. The diagnosis is only the first signal of her declining health and, when the surgery leaves half of her body paralyzed, it’s clear that Georges and Anne are facing the beginning of the end. Haneke has insisted in interviews that his intentions with “Amour” are sincere, explaining that he based the events of the film around his own personal experiences with an aunt who had become quite ill and suffered greatly. I’m choosing to take him at his word, but others might not be convinced. There’s certainly enough evidence to support the contrary. The first few minutes of the film lend themselves rather easily to the more cynical interpretation. The opening credits unfold in complete silence, punctuated at their end by policeman violently smashing open the door to the couple’s apartment, where they find Anne’s lifeless body neatly laid out upon the bed (it’s over this image that the film’s title, “Love,” appears). This is followed immediately by the flashback that makes up the bulk of the film, beginning with a curious two-minute shot, taken from the stage at a classical music concert we never actually see, with the camera aimed out at

the audience as they peer right back at us through the darkness of the theater. But it’s always a trap to play the game of inferring a director’s hidden intentions with a film, pretending to know without a doubt exactly what message they’re trying to send. In the end, what matters is the meaning that the audience finds in the film. Here, Haneke’s distanced viewpoint doesn’t feel detached, so much as he’s trusting the subject matter to speak for itself. He takes his time, using long, quiet takes that allow scenes to unfold slowly (save for one, vividly staged nightmare sequence). We don’t need extreme closeups on Riva or Trintignant’s pain to feel empathy. Most of us have lived through, or been close to someone who’s lived through events similar to these, and Haneke trusts his audience enough to not ladle on the sentimentality. Emmanuelle Riva and Jean-Louis Trintignant each play their roles with all the warmth and humanity that they require; they’re each legends for a reason. Riva has been getting the lion’s share of the awards season attention, but it’s Trintignant’s performance as devoted husband Georges that is the true soul of the film. “Amour” is often difficult to watch, and it takes a skilled director to create a film of such immense sadness and not make it feel like a soul-crushing ordeal to sit through. Instead the film has a vitality and respect for life coursing through its veins, and that’s largely due to the incredible performances Haneke is able to get from his actors. It’s a film that understands the emotional and physical demand that it takes to care for someone, in sickness and in health. It could be seen as its own sort of horror film, one which documents, in clear-eyed detail, our worst fears and an inescapable part of life that most of us would rather not think about. But ultimately it’s a testament to what it really means to love someone for a lifetime.

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 29

Film Previews Full film reviews available at rochestercitynewspaper.com.

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[ OPENING ] 2013 OSCAR NOMINATED ANIMATED SHORTS (NR): This annual program is your only chance to see all five of this year’s Oscarnominated animated short films together on one bill. Little 2013 OSCAR NOMINATED LIVE ACTION SHORTS (NR): All five of this year’s Academy Award nominees for Best Live Action Short, put together in one handy program for your viewing convenience. Little AMOUR (PG-13): An elderly man suddenly finds himself acting as caretaker to his ailing wife after she suffers a massive stroke in this multi-Oscar-nominated tearjerker from Austrian director Michael Haneke. Little, Pittsford IDENTITY THIEF (R): Hijinks ensue as Jason Bateman and Melissa McCarthy explore the lighter side of identity fraud in this comedy about a mild-mannered businessman who tracks down the con artist who’s been stealing from him. Also starring Jon Favreau, John Cho, and Amanda Peet. Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece Ridge, Henrietta, Pittsford, Tinseltown, Webster THE LAST GLADIATORS (R): Academy Award-winning documentarian Alex Gibney takes a look at the brutal world of enforcers (or goons) in ice hockey, and the career of legendary player Chris Nilan. Little (Tue, Feb 12, 7 p.m., $10) THE LOST WORLD (1925): The silent film adaptation of Arthur Conan Doyle’s novel, about a hidden land where prehistoric beasts still roam the earth. Come for the awesome stop-motion dinosaur effects, stay for the live score accompaniment by the Andrew Alden Ensemble. Little (Thu, Feb 7, 7 p.m., $10) THE PHANTOM OF THE OPERA (1925): The classic silent film about one particularly amorous opera house ghoul, screened with live modern score accompaniment from the Andrew Alden Ensemble. Little (Sat, Feb 9, 3 p.m., $10) SIDE EFFECTS (R): Steven Soderbergh’s latest (and possibly final) film, about a young couple whose lives are torn apart when one of them is put on a new anti-anxiety drug that has some deadly side effects. Starring Rooney Mara, Jude Law, Catherine Zeta-Jones, and Channing Tatum. Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece Ridge, Henrietta, Pittsford, Tinseltown, Webster TOP GUN: AN IMAX 3D EXPERIENCE (PG): Finally, your opportunity to check out all those beautifully shot volleyball scenes in eyepopping 3D, as the 80’s classic, starring Tom Cruise and Val Kilmer, gets a fancy new upgrade. Tinseltown [ CONTINUING ] ARGO (R): Director Ben Affleck costars with John Goodman, Bryan Cranston, and Kyle Chandler in the once-classified true tale of a CIA exfiltration expert who hatches a daring plan to free six Americans hiding at the home of the Canadian ambassador during the 1979 Iran hostage crisis. Cinema,

Culver, Eastview, Greece Ridge, Henrietta, Webster BROKEN CITY (R): Private eye Mark Wahlberg gets in over his head when a mayor (Russell Crowe) hires him to tail his cheating wife (Catherine ZetaJones) in this crime thriller. Also starring Jeffrey Wright, Kyle Chandler, and Barry Pepper. Tinseltown BULLET TO THE HEAD (R): Sylvester Stallone stars as a hitman who agrees to team up with a cop to take brutal revenge on the men who murdered their respective partners. Also starring Sung Kang and Christian Slater. Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Greece Ridge, Henrietta, Tinseltown, Webster DJANGO UNCHAINED (R): Quentin Tarantino’s latest exploitation extravaganza, this time starring Jamie Foxx as a former slave out to rescue his wife from the clutches of an evil plantation owner. Also starring Leonardo DiCaprio, Christoph Waltz, and Samuel L. Jackson. Culver, Eastview, Greece Ridge, Henrietta, Tinseltown GANGSTER SQUAD (R): A stylish 1950’s-era crime drama from Ruben Fleischer (the director of “Zombieland”) about a group of undercover LAPD detectives attempting to take down mob kingpin Mickey Cohen by any means necessary. Starring Ryan Gosling, Sean Penn, Josh Brolin, Emma Stone, and Nick Nolte. Brockport HANSEL & GRETEL: WITCH HUNTERS (R): A tongue-in-cheek

action-horror-comedy about the titular fairy tale brother and sister, now all grown up and battling witches professionally. Starring Jeremy Renner, Gemma Arterton, Peter Stomare, and Famke Janssen. Brockport, Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece Ridge, Henrietta, Tinseltown, Webster A HAUNTED HOUSE (R): Spoofing the genre “found footage” horror films, this movie (written by and starring Marlon Wayans) promises to deliver loads of timely, pointedly hilarious satire. That, or an endless parade of painfully unfunny references to films in a genre that already past its peak. Hard to say which. Brockport, Culver, Greece Ridge, Tinseltown THE HOBBIT: AN UNEXPECTED JOURNEY (PG-13): The first installment of Peter Jackson’s long-awaited adaptation of the “Lord of the Rings” prequel, chronicling Bilbo Baggins’ adventures in Middle Earth. Culver, Henrietta, Tinseltown THE IMPOSSIBLE (PG-13): Naomi Watts and Ewan McGregor star in this grueling drama, based on a true story, about a family separated and struggling to survive in the aftermath of the massive Indian Ocean tsunami of 2004. Pittsford, Webster LES MISÉRABLES (PG-13): The hugely popular, long-running stage musical based on the Victor Hugo novel comes to the big screen courtesy of “King’s Speech” director Tom Hooper. With Hugh Jackman, Russell

For information: Call us (585) 244-3329 Fax us (585) 244-1126 Mail Us City Classifieds 250 N. Goodman Street Rochester, NY 14607 Email Us classifieds@ rochester-citynews.com

Crowe, Amanda Seyfried, and Anne Hathaway. Culver, Eastview, Pittsford, Tinseltown, Webster LIFE OF PI (PG): Ang Lee continues his unpredictable streak with an eye-popping adaptation of Yann Martel’s acclaimed novel, now a 3D adventure about a young man who survives a shipwreck and finds himself on a lifeboat with an orangutan, a hyena, an ailing zebra, and a Bengal tiger. Culver, Henrietta, Pittsford LINCOLN (PG-13): Daniel Day-Lewis channels our 16th President for Steven Spielberg, focusing on the last few months of the Great Emancipator’s life, which includes the Union’s victory in the War Between The States and the abolition of slavery. Co-starring Tommy Lee Jones, Jared Harris, and Sally Field. Brockport, Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Henrietta, Pittsford, Tinseltown, Webster MAMA (PG-13): Guillermo del Toro produced this supernatural thriller about two little girls who lived alone in the woods for five years before being rescued. Their new adopted parents soon discover that the girls may not have returned alone. Starring Jessica Chastain. Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece Ridge, Henrietta, Tinseltown, Webster MONSTER’S INC. 3-D (G): Adventures in babysitting with lovable monsters Mike Wazowski and James “Sulley” Sullivan, now busting out into the third

dimension in this Pixar rerelease. Tinseltown MOVIE 43 (R): Irreverent comedy anthology film from producer Peter Farrelly, with a variety of writers and directors creating a series of interconnected short films starring the most crazypants cast I’ve ever seen, including: Emma Stone, Dennis Quaid, Elizabeth Banks, Common, Naomi Watts, Hugh Jackman, Halle Berry, Liev Schreiber, Anna Faris, Chris Pratt, Uma Thurman, John Hodgeman, Kate Winslet, and Bobby Cannavale, to name just a few. Canandaigua PARKER (R): Taylor Hackford (“Ray,” “The Devil’s Advocate”) directs Jason Statham in a crime thriller based the best-selling series of pulp novels by Donald Westlake, revolving around a ruthless criminal anti-hero. Also starring Jennifer Lopez, Nick Nolte, and Michael Chiklis. Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Greece Ridge, Henrietta, Tinseltown, Webster PARENTAL GUIDANCE (PG): Grandparents Billy Crystal and Bette Midler look after their kids’ children. Hijinks ensue, likely concluded with a lesson about the importance of family. Eastview, Henrietta PITCH PERFECT (PG-13): Anna Kendrick, Brittany Snow, and “Bridesmaids” scene-stealer Rebel Wilson lead the cast of this musical comedy about a loner who joins her college’s allgirl singing group and competes

against their male rivals in a campus competition. Movies 10 QUARTET (PG-13): Dustin Hoffman directs this comedy with a comedy stacked with veteran British actors (Maggie Smith, Michael Gambon, Billy Connolly) about a home for retired opera singers thrown into upheaval after the arrival of a diva. Little, Pittsford RUST AND BONE (R): French director Jacques Audiard follows up his critically acclaimed crime drama, “A Prophet” with an unconventional love story between a brutish street fighter and a whale trainer (Marion Cotillard, in a Golden Globenominated performance) who’s lost her legs in an orca attack. Cinema SILVER LININGS PLAYBOOK (R): Lovably unstable mental patients Bradley Cooper and Jennifer Lawrence fall for one another and learn to ballroom dance in this likely Oscar contender from David O. Russell. With Robert De Niro and Jacki Weaver. Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece Ridge, Henrietta, Little, Pittsford, Tinseltown, Webster SKYFALL (PG-13): Bond 23 brings back Daniel Craig as 007, now directed by Oscar winner Sam Mendes and trying to prevent bad guy Javier Bardem from taking down Judi Dench’s M. With Ben Whishaw, Ralph Fiennes, and Albert Finney. Movies 10 STAND UP GUYS (R): Career criminal Al Pacino has just been

released from prison after a 25year sentence, and teams up old with his old pals, Christopher Walken and Alan Arkin, for one last night of raising hell. Meanwhile, one of the men has secretly been assigned the task of bumping off his old friend. Henrietta, Pittsford WARM BODIES (PG-13): Nicholas Hoult stars in this apocalyptic romantic comedy as a zombie with a conscience who falls in love with a human girl, and may hold the key to saving what remains of humanity. Based on the cult novel by Isaac Marion. Costarring John Malkovich, Rob Corddry, and Dave Franco. Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece Ridge, Henrietta, Tinseltown, Webster WRECK-IT RALPH (PG): John C. Reilly, Sarah Silverman, and Jane Lynch provide a few of the voices in this animated comedy about a video-game bad guy who dreams of becoming a hero, even if it means upending the status quo at the arcade. Movies 10, Tinseltown ZERO DARK THIRTY (R): Director Kathryn Bigelow and writer Mark Boal follow up their Oscarwinning “The Hurt Locker” with this likely Best Picture contender, examining the decade-long hunt to capture Osama Bin Laden. Starring Jessica Chastain, Joel Edgerton, Kyle Chandler, and Jason Clarke. Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Greece Ridge, Henrietta, Pittsford, Tinseltown, Webster

BUILDING FOR LEASE IN CULTURAL DISTRICT

EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY

All real estate advertised in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act, which makes it unlawful, “to make, print, or publish, any notice, statement, or advertisement, with respect to the sale or rental of a dwelling that indicates any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin.” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under the age of 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertisement for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. Call the local Fair Housing Enforcement Project, FHEP at 325-2500 or 1-866-671-FAIR. Si usted sospecha una practica de vivienda injusta, por favor llame al servicio legal gratis. 585-325-2500 - TTY 585-325-2547.

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Patrick DeMay patrickdemay@hotmail.com 585.734.6422

Old School Charm Near the University 421 Rockingham Built in 1929 and mimicking the American Foursquare form, the house at 421 Rockingham Street has loads of charm. Centrally located in the desirable Highland Park Neighborhood of Rochester, it’s close to the University of Rochester, to I-490 and I-590, and the commercial amenities in the Swillburg and South Wedge neighborhoods. It is also within walking distance of the magnificent Highland Park—a bonus during the Lilac Festival (and every season of the year)! The first thing that catches your eye about the property (which is 1,476 square feet) is the open porch with wooden latticework columns—perfect for watching the world go by on a lazy summer evening. Brick steps lead up to the front door and stoop, with the porch set off to the side. As you enter the house into the main foyer there are hardwood floors with an inlay pattern. To the right is a cozy living room lit by a bay window and small leaded glass windows. Built-in bookcases with leaded glass doors flank the attractive wood-burning fireplace. Beyond the living room is a small, but serviceable dining room with hardwood floors and more leaded glass windows. A pleasant eat-in kitchen awaits you as you pass through the dining room. The kitchen is unusually large, with plenty of storage space and a large coat closet, and awaits a personal touch to bring it up to date and take full advantage of the large space. At the back

of the kitchen are a half-bath and the door to a private, enclosed backyard. The hallway through the kitchen leads you back to the main foyer and to the rooms upstairs. The generous master bedroom boasts another bay window, a ceiling fan, and beautiful, original glass doorknobs and unpainted wood doors (which are featured throughout the house). The two smaller bedrooms provide ample closet space. The wonderful thing about the second floor is that it contains an enclosed sleeping porch for adventurous children to explore, as well as an unfinished attic which can either be converted into a bedroom, or used to increase the amount of storage space. The bottom line is that this is an amazing house in a wonderful area of Rochester. For anyone who is willing to put in a little time, and lots of love, it will pay huge dividends. It has 3 bedrooms, 1.5 bathrooms, a detached single car garage, and is listed at $149,900. For more information visit rochestercityliving. com/property/R199004 or contact Greg Stefl of Vincent Associates, 585-330-9058. by Andrew Cowen Andrew is a Landmark Society volunteer currently living in Brighton. He spent the first 46 years of his life living in the Cobbs Hill neighborhood of Rochester.

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 33

I’m very pleased with the calls I got from our apartment rental ads, and will continue running them. Your readers respond — positively!” - M. Smith, Residential Management > page 33 Able to rehearse every oth¬er Wednesday 585-442-7480 BASSIST AVAILABLE: Electric, Acoustic. All styles. Mature, Reliable and Professional. Able to rehearse and open for gigs. Call 585-260-9958 fstone@ rochester.rr.com CALLING ALL MUSICIANS OF ALL GENRES the Rochester Music Coalition wants you! Please register on our website. For further info: www. rochestermusiccoalition.org info@rochestermusiccoalition. org 585-235-8412 EXP. DRUMMER Strong vocals to join (keyboard)/ (keyboard bass) who also sings lead. To form duo (Retro Pop/Dance/Jazz). Must be willing to shop the musical product around to get gigs 585426-7241 EXPERIENCED LEAD VOCALS Seeks employment. Pat experience Inkspots, Platters, Drifters, James Brown among many. Leroy Harris. Contact Bobby 585-328-4121 Specialties, classics, R&B Soul.

I SAY New Wave peaked in 1977-81. Who wants to play Blondie, The Cars, The Ramones, Squeeze, Elvis Costello, U2 and much more? I play bass. Craig. mooskamovers@aol.com MEET OTHER MUSICIANS any instrument, male singer- jam together- coffee house, private gigs, I play keys Call Martin 585-266-6337 MEN ENJOY SINGING Fun with the Chorus of the Genesee, Sing, learn, perform, share laughs and libation! Guest night Tuesday at 7 PM. Stop in at 58 E Main St, Webster. Call 585698-7784 R & B SOUL BANDS seek employment, experienced groups, already performing, seek new jobs. Contact Bobby 585328-4121 ROCK STAR, MR. ROCHESTER, lead vocalist, is looking to form band (Classic Rock) with lead guitarist, bassist, drummer & rhythm guitars Covers & originals 585-473-5089

continues on page 36

P LY M O U T H S P I R I T UA L I S T C H U R C H Together We Are One

2 9 V I C K PA R K A RO C H E S T E R , N Y

Sunday Services 10:30 AM All Message Service & Free Spiritual Healing Third Weds ~ 7 PM ~ Séances ~ Classes ~ Gallery Reading ~ For more information and schedules www.plymouthspiritualistchurch.org Robin Higgins, Pastor ~ Phone: 585.271.1470

34 CITY FEBRUARY 6-12, 2013

EMPLOYMENT / CAREER TRAINING

Employment AIRLINE CAREERS - Become an Aviation Maintenance Tech. FAA

approved training. Financial aid if qualified – Housing available. Job placement assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of

DEPUTY SHERIFF JAILOR Application deadline: February 27, 2013 Exam Date: April 13, 2013 Salary is $41,103-$64,269 annually Now Accepting Applications online at www.monroecounty.gov or 39 West Main Street, Suite 210. Candidates must be at least 18 years of age and must possess: High School Diploma or GED, Valid NYS Drivers License. Have no felony convictions and be able to pass a physical agility and medical test as well as a psychological and background investigation. Candidates must be in good physical condition and of good moral character and have a genuine interest in this rewarding career. 753-4705 / 753-4706 Download applications online at: (www.monroecounty.gov) www.monroecountysheriff.info The Monroe County Sheriff’s Department is an equal opportunity employer.

Maintenance 877-492-3059 AIRLINES ARE HIRING Train for hands on Aviation Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified- Job Placement Assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance (866)296-7093 DRIVER - QUALIFY for any portion of $.03/mile quarterly bonus: $.01 Safety, $.01 Production, $.01 MPG. Two raises in first year. 3 months recent experience. 800-4149569 www.driveknight.com HELP WANTED! Make extra money in our free ever popular homemailer program, includes valuable guidebook! Start immediately! Genuine! 1-888292-1120 www.howtoworkfromhome.com $$$HELP WANTED$$$ Extra Income! Assembling CD cases from Home! No Experience Necessary! Call our Live Operators Now! 1-800-4057619 EXT 2450 http://www. easywork-greatpay.com (AAN CAN)

LIVE LIKE A ROCKSTAR. Now hiring 10 spontaneous individuals. Travel full time. Must be 18+. Transportation and hotel provided. Call Shawn 800-716-0048 PAID IN ADVANCE! MAKE up to $1000 A WEEK mailing brochures from home! Helping Home Workers since 2001! Genuine Opportunity! No Experience required. Start Immediately! www.mailingstation.com (AAN CAN)

Volunteers A SECOND THOUGHT Resale Shop in East Rochester is accepting applications for volunteer sale associates and online researchers. Shop benefits people with disabilities in Guatemala. Call (585) 3402000. ARE YOU 55+ & interested in learning about local volunteer opportunities? Call RSVP! Many opportunities available. Help meet critical needs. Regular information sessions - call

Rent your apartment special third week is

FREE

Place your ad by calling 244-3329 ext. 23 or rochestercitynewspaper.com Ad Deadlines: Friday 4pm for Display Ads Monday at noon for Line ads

EMPLOYMENT / CAREER TRAINING 287-6377 or email jpowers@ lifespan-roch.org. CATHOLIC FAMILY CENTER needs volunteers to help people apply for citizenship. The commitment is 2.5 hrs per mth one evening a month. Training is provided. For more information call Nate at (585) 546-7220 ex 4854. DYNAMIC VOLUNTEER opportunities at the Zoo await you. If you love the Zoo, donate your time today. To learn more, visit the volunteer page of the Seneca Park Zoo’s Web site at www.senecaparkzoo.org FOSTER PARENTS WANTED! Monroe County is looking for adults age 21 and over to consider opening their homes to foster children. Call 334-9096 or visit www.MonroeFosterCare. org. HERITAGE CHRISTIAN STABLES, a therapeutic horsemanship program for children and adults with developmental disabilities, is looking for volunteers

to serve as horse leaders and side walkers. Call Kim Kennedy at (585) 3402016 or email kkennedy@ heritagechristianservices.org LIFESPAN’S OMBUDSMAN PROGRAMS looking for volunteers to advocate for individuals living in long-term care settings. Please contact call 585.287.6378 or e-mail dfrink@lifespan-roch.org for more information MCC DENTAL STUDENT Seeking patients who would like complimentary cleaning. This is FREE of exchange for your time! Contact Tina S. 585-902-8009 or email tinahygiene@gmail.com SCHOOL #12 999 South Ave. is looking for reading & math volunteers, English & Spanish. Training provided. Call Vicki 585-461-4282 UNITED WAY Volunteer Fundraiser needed. Verification Phone Calling & Data Management. Strong interpersonal skills; attention to detail; strong verbal and written

communication skills. Call 2426547 WOMEN: ROCHESTER HABITAT is looking for women 18 years+ to help build a house with a single mother. Visit rochabitat. org or call 546-1470

Career Training ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home. *Medical, *Business, *Criminal Justice, *Hospitality. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV authorized. Call 800481-9472 www.CenturaOnline. com

Hiring? GET THE RESULTS YOU NEED AT ABOUT HALF THE PRICE OF OTHER PAPERS! To advertise in our

EMPLOYMENT SECTION call Christine at

244-3329 ext. 23 today!

CITY

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 35

Legal Ads [ ARVINE-ELMWWOD LLC ]

> page 34 THE GREGORY KUNDE CHORALE is looking for male voices. Call for an audition now to join our fourteenth season! Info Line 377 7568 or visit our website www. gregorykundechorale.org

Lost and Found

XMAS Wool/Flannel Army Blanket donations needed! Gift new blankets to “Sunday Circle” knitters/crocheters to decorate for poor patients of R.P.C. Contact Mary at mgrant@ frontier.com.

Miscellaneous

MISSING DOG CHIHUAHUA Park/Goodman. Long haired chihuahua. Answers to Fuzzy. Golden fur. REWARD. Call 5204909. Missing since 1/30/13, 3am.

MIND BODY SPIRIT

THINK MOVE BREATHE DANCE • HEAL • SEARCH STRETCH • STENGHTHEN •

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TO ADVERTISE CALL CHRISTINE AT 244.3329 x23 See Page 19 of this week’s issue

BUY REAL VIAGRA, Cialis, Levitra, Staxyn, Propecia & more... FDA- Approved, U.S.A. Pharmacies. Next day delivery avaiable. Order online or by phone at viamedic.com, 800467-0295 FREE DENTAL CLEANING MCC Sophomore Dental Hygiene student looking for volunteer patients interested in complimentary dental cleaning. Must be 2+ years since last professional cleaning. Call 585-314-0398 and leave a message for Leslie S. HAS YOU BUILDING SHIFTED OR SETTLED? Contact Woodford Brothers Inc, for straightening, leveling, foundation and wood frame repairs at 1-800-OLDBARN. www.woodfordbros. com. “Not applicable in Queens county” SAWMILLS from only $3997MAKE MONEY & SAVE MONEY with your own bandmil Cut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship. FREE Info & DVD www.NorwoodSawmills. com/300N 1-800-578-1363 Ext.300N

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Professional Services DIVORCE or annulment in as little as one day. Over 50 years experience. 100% guarantee. From $995. All information at www.divorcefast.com

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To Advertise Call Christine at 585.244.3329 x 23 36 CITY FEBRUARY 6-12, 2013

Articles of Organization filed with Secretary of State of NY on 1/30/2013. Office in Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 1048 South Ave, Rochester, NY 14620. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ LEGAL NOTICE ] Consult a Registered Professional Nurse, PLLC. Art. of Org. filed with the NY Sec. of State (SSNY) on 1/10/13. Office in Monroe Co. SSNY Design. Agent of PLLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to Susan J. LaGaipa, RN, 20 El Centro Drive Rochester, NY 14609. Purpose: Practice of Registered Professional Nursing. [ LEGAL NOTICE ] Dental Office 2024 LLC filed Arts. of Org. with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/28/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to 369 Highland Avenue, Rochester, NY 14620. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ LEGAL NOTICE ] Notice of formation of a limited liability company (LLC). Name: SUKHENKO DESIGN, LLC. Article of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on December 20, 2012. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to the LLC, 1013 Hard Rock Road, Webster NY 14580. Purpose: For any lawful purpose. [ LEGAL NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Limited Liability Company 1) Name: Alliance4Accountability, LLC. 2) Articles of Organization were filed by Department of State of New York on December 13, 2012. 3) County: Monroe. 4) The Company does not have a specific date of dissolution. 5) the Secretary of State has been designated as an agent upon whom process against the Company may be served. The address to which the process shall be mailed: 5615 Buffalo Rd. Churchville, NY 14428. 6) Purpose: Any lawful activity.

[ NOTICE ] ACTION HERO, LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 1/11/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 106 Arvine Hts., Rochester, NY 14611. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] D Napolitano, LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 12/13/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Dominic T. Napolitano, 1337 Schlegel Rd., Webster, NY 14580. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] DJ BURNS PROPERTIES LLC (LLC) filed Arts. of Org. with NY Secy. of State (SS) on December 26, 2012. LLC’s office is in Monroe County. SS is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS shall mail a copy of any process to LLC’s principal business location at 14 West Ham Circle, North Chili, NY 14514. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] File No: JJ200897 VIRGINIA: IN THE VIRGINIA BEACH JUVENILE AND DOMESTIC RELATIONS DISTRICT COURT IN RE: James Shamarice HILL Juvenile, VIRGINIA BEACH DEPARTMENT OF HUMAN SERVICES, Petitioner, v. LASHAUNDA FLOYD, Respondent Party to be served: Lashaunda Floyd Last known address: 17 Morgan Street, Rochester, NY 14611 ORDER OF PUBLICATION The object of this suit is that on or about the 24th day of October, 2012, the Virginia Beach Department of Human Services petitioned this Court for the termination of the parental rights of LASHAUNDA FLOYD, mother of James Shamarice Hill, born December 26, 2011, in Norfolk, Virginia at Sentara Leigh Hospital; said termination being pursuant to VA CODE section 16.1-283 (C)(1), (C)(2). The consequences of termination are that a parent or parents forever relinquish all parental rights such as, but not limited to, the rights of visitation, consent to adoption, companionship,

association, education, discipline, guidance, the right to determine religious affiliation, all decision making concerning the child’s welfare and the responsibility for support. It is ORDERED that Lashaunda Floyd, mother of James Shamarice Hill, appear at the above named Court and protect her interests on or before March 20, 2013 at 10:00 a.m. Pamela Scott, Clerk of Court Dated: January 14, 2013 By :Glena Morgan , Deputy Clerk I ask for this: Christianna Dougherty-Cunningham, Esquire City Attorney’s Office 2401 Courthouse Drive, Room 260 Virginia Beach, VA 23456; Phone: (757) 385-4531, Fax: (757) 385-5687 [ NOTICE ] File No: JJ200897 VIRGINIA: IN THE VIRGINIA BEACH JUVENILE AND DOMESTIC RELATIONS DISTRICT COURT IN RE: James Shamarice HILL Juvenile, VIRGINIA BEACH DEPARTMENT OF HUMAN SERVICES, Petitioner, v. JILES HILL, Respondent. Party to be served: Jiles Hill Last known address: 17 Morgan Street, Rochester, NY 14611 ORDER OF PUBLICATION The object of this suit is that on or about the 24th day of October, 2012, the Virginia Beach Department of Human Services petitioned this Court for the termination of the parental rights of JILES HILL, father of James Shamarice Hill, born December 26, 2011, in Norfolk, Virginia at Sentara Leigh Hospital; said termination being pursuant to VA CODE section 16.1283 (C)(1), (C)(2). The consequences of termination are that a parent or parents forever relinquish all parental rights such as, but not limited to, the rights of visitation, consent to adoption, companionship, association, education, discipline, guidance, the right to determine religious affiliation, all decision making concerning the child’s welfare and the responsibility for support. It is ORDERED that Jiles Hill, father of James Shamarice Hill, appear at the above named Court and protect his interests on or before March 20, 2013 at 10:00 a.m. Pamela Scott, Clerk of Court Dated: January 14, 2013 By: Glena Morgan, Deputy Clerk I ask for this: Christianna Dougherty-Cunningham, Esquire City Attorney’s Office 2401 Courthouse Drive, Room 260 Virginia Beach, VA 23456; Phone:

(757) 385-4531, Fax: (757) 385-5687 [ NOTICE ] FLAMING SPADE PRODUCTIONS, LLC (LLC) filed Arts. of Org. with NY Secy. of State (SS) on 1/18/13. LLC’s office is in Monroe Co. SS is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS shall mail a copy of any process to LLC’s principal business location at 75 Conmar Dr., Rochester, NY 14609. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] HUDSON PLAZA LLC file Arts. of Org. with Sec’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/27/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to 11 Sturbridge Lane Pittsford, New York 14534. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Index No. 2012-5762 SUPREME COURT STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF MONROE ESL Federal Credit Union Plaintiff, vs. Estate of Marion T. Dalba, Vincent A. Dalba, as Executor; People of the State of New York; United States of America; Doreen Dalba; Oscar Arnada, Defendants. Pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale dated December 21, 2012 and entered herein, I, the undersigned, the Referee in said Judgment named, will sell at public auction in the front vestibule of the Monroe County Office Building, 39 West Main Street, Rochester, New York, County of Monroe, on February 13, 2013 at 10:30 a.m., on that day, the premises directed by said Judgment to be sold and therein described as follows: ALL THAT TRACT OR PARCEL OF LAND, situate in the Town of Greece, County of Monroe and State of New York, known as 184 Stoneycreek Drive, Rochester, NY 14616; Tax Account No. 059.152-62 described in Deed recorded in Liber 9378 of Deeds, page 229. Said premises are sold subject to any state of facts an accurate survey may show, zoning restrictions and any amendments thereto, covenants, restrictions, agreements, reservations, and easements of record and prior liens, if any, municipal departmental violations, and such

other provisions as may be set forth in the Complaint and Judgment filed in this action. Judgment amount: $106,447.49 plus, but not limited to, costs, disbursements, attorney fees and additional allowance, if any, all with legal interest. DATED: January 2013 Dennis Gruttadaro, Esq., Referee LACY KATZEN LLP Attorneys for Plaintiff 130 East Main Street Rochester, New York 14604 Telephone: (585) 324-5767 [ NOTICE ] JGMAC Associates LLC (LLC) filed Arts.of Org. with NY Secy. of State (SS) on December 21, 2012 LLC’s office is in Monroe County. SS is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS shall mail a copy of any process to LLC’s principal business location at 116 LaSolis Drive, Rochester, NY 14626. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] JJC3 LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 1/9/13. Office in Monroe Co. SSNY desig. agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 233 Chestnut Hill Dr., Rochester, NY 14617, which is also the principal business location. Purpose: Any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] JM SWEENEY FARMS, LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 1/8/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 30 Rolling Meadows Dr., Hilton, NY 14468. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] MENTAL HEALTH COUNSELING CONNECTIONS PLLC, a domestic PLLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 12/19/12. Office location: Monroe. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the PLLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The PLLC, P.O. Box 16721, Rochester, NY 14616. Purpose: Mental Health Counselor [ NOTICE ] Not. of Form. of Bordner Enterprises LLC. Art. of Org. filed by Sect’y of State (SSNY) on 11/19/2012. LocationMonroe County. The SSNY is designated as agent upon whom

Legal Ads process against the LLC may be served. SSNY may mail any process to LLC: 4045 East Ave., Rochester, NY 14618. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Not. of Form. of TYMACK GROUP LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with SSNY 1/3/13. Office: Monroe County. SSNY designated Agent of LLC to whom process may be served. SSNY may mail a copy of any process to LLC, 16 Marlands Road, Rochester, NY 14624. Purpose any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Notice is hereby given that a license, number not yet assigned beer. license has been applied for by Vista Golf LLC dba Mill Creek Golf, 128 Cedars Ave., Churchville, NY 14428, County of Monroe, for a snack bar at the turn of the 9th hole. [ NOTICE ] Notice is hereby given that a license, number not yet assigned beer. license has been applied for by Vista Golf LLC dba Mill Creek Golf, 128 Cedars Ave., Churchville, NY 14428, County of Monroe, for a golf pro shop. [ NOTICE ] Notice is hereby given that a license, number not yet assigned, a Beer. in a Golf Cart license has been applied for by Vista Golf LLC dba Mill Creek Golf, 128 Cedars Ave., Churchville, NY 14428, County of Monroe, for a golf cart. [ NOTICE ] Notice is hereby given that a license, number not yet assigned, for a full on premise beer, wine & liquor license has been applied for by Vista Golf LLC dba Mill Creek Golf, 128 Cedars Ave., Churchville, NY 14428, County of Monroe, for a restaurant. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Form. of DRY CLEAN FASHIONS, LLC (the “LLC”). Art. of Org. filed with Secretary of the State of NY (SSNY) on 12/10/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, 937 Chili Ave, Rochester, NY 14611. Purpose: any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Form. of GENESEO HOUSING,

LLC (the “LLC”). Art. of Org. filed with Secretary of the State of NY (SSNY) on 12/24/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, 2041 Penfield Rd, Penfield, NY 14526. Purpose: any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Form. of MATHEW FAMILY FL, LLC (the “LLC”). Art. of Org. filed with Secretary of the State of NY (SSNY) on 12/21/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, 21 Runnymede Ct, Rochester, NY 14618. Purpose: any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Form. of MATHEW FAMILY NY, LLC (the “LLC”). Art. of Org. filed with Secretary of the State of NY (SSNY) on 12/21/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, 21 Runnymede Ct, Rochester, NY 14618. Purpose: any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Form. of URIM MEDIA, LLC (the “LLC”). Art. of Org. filed with Secretary of the State of NY (SSNY) on 12/26/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, 460 Glide St, #1, Rochester, NY 14606. Purpose: any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Folio Consulting, LLC. Art. of Org. filed Sec’y State (SSNY) on 10/12/12 . Office Loc: Monroe Co. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail of process to: 76 Westland Ave, Rochester, NY 14618. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of L.D. Networking LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 1/3/2013. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process

to: The LLC, 79 Mission Hill Drive, Brockport, NY 14420. Purpose: any lawful act [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of BP Villa Associates, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/6/12. Office location: Monroe Co. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Robert Marshall, 150 Allens Creek Rd, Rochester, NY 14618, also the Registered Agent. Purpose: any lawful activities [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of MD3 SPORT LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 12/13/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 62 Monroe Street, Honeoye Falls,, NY 14472. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of 20 Pine 1909 LLC Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State on 12/31/12. Office location: Monroe County. Principal business address: 195 Dickinson St., Rochester, NY 14621. Secy. of State designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. Secy. Of State shall mail process to: 265 Purdue Court, Paramus, NJ 07652. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of 624 PITTSFORD VICTOR ROAD, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 01/25/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, 22 Ramsey Park, Rochester, NY 14610. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Aquarian Partners, L.P. Certificate filed Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 1/29/2013. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LP upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LP, 825 Allens Creek, Rochester, NY 14618. Name/address of each genl. ptr. available from SSNY. Term: until 12/31/2063. Purpose: any lawful activity.

[ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of CARRETTA LLC. Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) on 1/18/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY may mail a copy of any process to LLC, 145-G Gibbs St., Rochester, NY 14605. Purpose: any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of CONCAL, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 3/10/04. Off. loc.: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, c/o Silver & Feldman, Esqs., Attn: Sammy Feldman, Esq., 3445 Winton Place, Ste. 228, Rochester, NY 14623. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of DeCiantis Properties, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 01/25/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, 22 Ramsey Park, Rochester, NY 14610. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of DJF PARTNERS, LLC. Art. Of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/30/12. Office in MONROE County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, 14 Bay Point Circle Rochester, NY 14622. Purpose: Recruiting Services [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of ETE Properties, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/13/2012. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 330 Little John Way, Webster, NY 14580. Purpose: any lawful act [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Exium Partners, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State on 1/15/13. Office location: Monroe County. Sec. of State designated agent

of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: The LLC, 144 Village Landing, Suite 276, Fairport, NY 14450, principal business address. Purpose: any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of Forels LLC, Art. Of Org. filed with the Secy. of State (SSNY) on 03/18/11. Office location Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to 942 Gristmill Rdg Webster, NY 14580. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Garden Village, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/27/12. Off. loc.: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, c/o Sammy Feldman, 3445 Winton Place, Ste. 228, Rochester, NY 14623. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of GV Apartments, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/27/12. Off. loc.: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, c/o Sammy Feldman, 3445 Winton Place, Ste. 228, Rochester, NY 14623. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of IS L Properties, LLC amended to IZ Levy Properties, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/21/12. Off. Loc.: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, c/o Sammy Feldman, 3445 Winton Place, Ste. 228, Rochester, NY 14623. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of LWN Transport, LLC. Art of Org. filed with SSNY on 11/29/12. Office Loc: Monroe Co. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: United States Corporation Agents, Inc. 7014 13th Ave, Ste 202,

Brooklyn, NY 11228. Purpose: Any lawful activities [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of MD GORDON LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 01/04/13. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 40 Joseph Ave., Rochester, NY 14603. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. The regd. agent of the company upon whom and at which process against the company can be served is Michael Gordon, 40 Joseph Ave., Rochester, NY 14603. As amended by Cert. of Amendment filed with SSNY on 01/10/13, the name of the LLC is: MD GORDON FAMILY LLC. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Media Connection, LLC filed under the original name The Media Connection, LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 12/19/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 10 Cross Ridge Rd., Pittsford, NY 14534. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of MUNSON AND SULLY, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 01/24/13. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: Adam C. Smith, 8 Reginald Circle, Rochester, NY 14625. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of NART LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/17/2012. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o Law Office of Anthony A. Dinitto, L.L.C., 8 Silent Meadows Drive, Spencerport, NY 14559. Purpose: any lawful act [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of Oaster & Associates LLC,

Art. Of Org. filed with the Secy. of State (SSNY) on 02/09/10. Office location Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to 15 Schoen Pl., Pittsford, NY 14534. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Popeye Properties, LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 1/7/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 29 Walnut Dr., Penfield, NY 14626. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of RED-Rochester, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State on 11/19/12. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. bus. addr.: 640 Quail Ridge Dr., Westmont, IL 60559. Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. Purpose: all lawful purposes. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of STAY & PLAY DOG HOTEL & DAYPLAY LLC. Art. Of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/08/12. Office in MONROE County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, 983 John Leo Dr. Webster, NY 14580. Purpose: Dog Care [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of The Lady and the Snowman LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 9/18/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 409 Peck Rd., Spencerport, NY 14559. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of THL 20 Pine 1913 LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State on 12/31/12. Office location: Monroe County. Principal business address: 195 Dickinson St., Rochester, NY 14621. Secy. of State

designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. Secy. Of State shall mail process to: 265 Purdue Court, Paramus, NJ 07652. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Thruway Park Drive Mini Storage LLC. Arts. of Org. filed Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/21/12. Off. loc.: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o The LLC, 648 Gallup Road, Spencerport, NY 14559. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of TWIN TAVERN LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 01/10/13. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 1549 Lake Rd., Hamlin, NY 14464. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of UNDER THE LIGHTHOUSE LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 01/09/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, 1793 Manitou Rd., Spencerport, NY 14559. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of YOUth ROChester, LLC, Art. of Org. were filed with NY Dept. of State on 11/14/2012. Office loc.: Monroe. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process may be served and shall mail process to: PO Box 60194, Rochester, NY 14606. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of Bluetone Communications, LLC. Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 1/2/13. Office location: Monroe County. LLC formed in OH on 10/22/12. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY

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[ NOTICE ]

10011. OH and principal business address: 7775 Walton Pkwy., New Albany, OH 43054. Cert. of Org. filed with OH Sec. of State, 180 E. Broad St., 16th Fl., Columbus, OH 43215. Purpose: all lawful purposes.

Notice of Qualification of Manning & Napier Group, LLC. Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 1/17/13. Office location: Monroe County. LLC formed in DE on 6/24/11. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. DE address of LLC: 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes.

[ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of Horizon Labs LLC. Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/26/12. Office location: Monroe County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 12/12/12. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: National Registered Agents, Inc., 111 Eighth Ave., NY, NY 10011, also the registered agent. Principal office address: 930 Carter St., Rochester, NY 14621. Address to be maintained in DE: c/o National Registered Agents, Inc., 160 Greentree Dr., Ste. 101, Dover, DE 19904. Arts of Org. filed with the DE Secretary of State, John G. Townsend Bldg., 401 Federal St., Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: any lawful activities.

[ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of Q Management Services LLC. Fictitious name: Q Management Services Group LLC. Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/31/12. Office location: Monroe County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 12/12/12. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process

to: National Registered Agents, Inc., 111 Eighth Ave., NY, NY 10011, also the registered agent. Principal office address: 2300 Buffalo Rd., Rochester, NY 14624. Address to be maintained in DE: c/o National Registered Agents, Inc., 160 Greentree Dr., Ste. 101, Dover, DE 19801. Arts of Org. filed with the DE Secretary of State, John G. Townsend Bldg., 401 Federal St., Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] REBA NY, LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 1/23/2013. Office in Monroe Co. SSNY desig. agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 2255 Lyell Ave., Rochester, NY 14606, which is also the principal business location. Purpose: Any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] ROXBURY DOME LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 1/8/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon

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whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 11 Roxbury Ln., Pittsford, NY 14534. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] ROXBURY LAND LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 1/8/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 11 Roxbury Ln., Pittsford, NY 14534. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] The name of the Limited Liability Company is “SRT Palisades Properties LLC”. The date of filing of The Articles of Organization with the Department of State was December 19, 2012. The office of the Company is located in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as the Agent of the Company upon whom process may be served, and the Secretary of State shall mail a copy of any process against the Company served upon him or her to 626 Beach Avenue, Rochester, NY 14612. The business purpose of the Company is to engage in any lawful act or activity for which Limited Liability Companies may be organized under the laws of the State of New York. [ NOTICE ] TINY HOPES, LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 12/19/12. Office in Monroe Co. SSNY desig. agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 2255 Lyell Ave., Rochester, NY 14606, which is also the principal business location. Purpose: Any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] TWIN CAPITAL PROPERTIES, LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 8/20/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Dawn Siciliano, 436 Bartell Ln., Webster, NY 14680. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] WINDLASS PROPERTIES & HOLDINGS, LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 8/9/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is

38 CITY FEBRUARY 6-12, 2013

designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Leah M. Buttery, 8344 Ridge Rd W., Brockport, NY 14420. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ]] Notice of Formation of 5543 ROUTE 14, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/21/12. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 679 Hightower Way, Webster, NY 14580. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] Phillips Route Sales LLC filed Articles of Organization with the New York Department of State on 11/14/2012. Its office is located in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent of the Company upon whom process against it may be served and a copy of any process shall be mailed to 65 Heinz St Hilton NY 14468. The purpose of the Company is any lawful activity. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION 16531655 E. MAIN, LLC ] Articles of Organization filed with Secretary of State of NY (“SSNY”) on 12/14/2012. Office in Monroe County. SSNY designated agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to LEGAL COUNSEL, C/O Applied Image Inc., 1653 E. MAIN ST., ROCHESTER, NY 14609. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION BODYMIND FLOAT CENTER LLC ] Articles of Organization filed with Secretary of State of NY (“SSNY”) on 01/07/2013. Office in Monroe County. SSNY designated agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to BODYMIND FLOAT CENTER LLC, C/O DAVID BRICKMAN, 378 ROCKINGHAM ST., ROCHESTER, NY 14620. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY ] KAI TRADING COMPANY, LLC filed Articles of Organization

with the New York State Department of State on January 10, 2010. Its office is to be located in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent of the company upon whom process against it may be served, and a copy of any process shall be mailed to 40 Harrison Street, Rochester, New York 14605. The purpose of the company is any lawful business. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LLC ] ReTech Services, LLC has filed articles of organization with the New York Secretary of State on January 10, 2013. Its principal place of business is located at 7 Cross Meadow Lane, Pittsford, New York in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent upon whom process may be served. A copy of any process shall be mailed to at 7 Cross Meadow Lane, Pittsford, New York 14534. The purpose of the LLC is to engage in any lawful activity for which Limited Liability Companies may be organized under Section 203 of the New York Limited Liability Company Law. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LLC ] Rochester Wellbeing, LLC has filed articles of organization with the New York Secretary of State on December 10, 2012 with a date of formation of January 1, 2013. Its principal place of business is located at 2851 Clover Street, Pittsford, New York in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent upon whom process may be served. A copy of any process shall be mailed to 2851 Clover Street, Pittsford, New York 14534. The purpose of the LLC is to engage in any lawful activity for which Limited Liability Companies may be organized under Section 203 of the New York Limited Liability Company Law. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF Lucky Squirrel Partners, L.P. ] Notice of formation of Limited Partnership (“L.P.”). Certificate of Limited Partnership filed with Sec. of State of NY (“SSNY”) on December 19, 2012. Office location: 18 Parkview Manor Circle, Honeoye Falls, NY 14472, Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent of L.P. upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail

a copy of any process to the L.P. at 18 Parkview Manor Circle, Honeoye Falls, NY 14472. The names and addresses of each general partner are available from the SSNY. The latest date upon which the L.P. is to dissolve is December 31, 2037. Purpose: property management and to engage in any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF ROSE CIRCLE, LLC ] First: Rose Circle, LLC, a Limited Liability Company, filed Articles of Organization with the Secretary of State of New York on December 6, 2012 Second: The county within this state in which the office of the limited liability company is to be located is Monroe. Third:The street address of the principal business location is: 24 Old Country Lane, Fairport, New York 14450. Fourth: The Secretary of State is designated as agent of the limited liability company upon whom process against it may be served. The post office address within or without this state to which the Secretary of State shall mail a copy of any process against the limited liability company served upon him or her is: 24 Old Country Lane, Fairport, New York 14450. Fifth: The purpose of the business of Rose Circle, LLC is any lawful purpose [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF WESTMINSTER ST ROCHESTER-SODUS LAKE PROPERTIES, LLC] The name of the Limited Liability Company is Westminster St Rochester-Sodus Lake Properties, LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the New York Secretary of State on 12/23/2012. The office of the LLC is in Monroe County. The New York Secretary of State is designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. The Secretary of State shall mail a copy of such process to 1 Chase Square, Suite 1900, Rochester, New York 14604, Attn: William R. Alexander, , Esq.. The LLC is organized to engage in any lawful activity for which an LLC may be formed under NY LLC Law. [ SUMMONS WITH NOTICE ] Index No. 00094390 SUPREME COURT STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF HERKIMER

BEVERLY EARLSLEY, Plaintiff, against ROBERT P. EARLSEY, Defendant. Plaintiff designates HERKIMER COUNTY The basis of the venue is RESIDENCY OF THE PLAINTIFF. Plaintiff resides at: 2264 Higby Road Frankfort, NY 13340 County of HERKIMER. ACTION FOR DIVORCE To the above named Defendant: You are hereby summoned to serve a notice of appearance, on the Plaintiff’s Attorney(s) within 20 days after the service of this Summons, exclusive of the day of service (or within 30 days after the service is complete. If the summons is not personally delivered to you within the State of New York); and in case of your failure to appear or answer, judgment will be taken against you by default for the relief demanded in the notice set forth below. Dated: MARCH 10, 2011 Defendant’s Address ROBERT P. EARLSLEY 540 UTICA STREET BUFFALO, NEW YORK 13502 Longeretta Law Firm David A. Longeretta, Esg. Attorney for Plaintiff Office and Post Office Address 298 GENESEE STREET UTICA, NEW YIORK 13502 NOTICE: The nature of this action is to dissolve the marriage between the parties, on the grounds of Abandonment and No-Fault. The relief sought is: A judgment of absolute divorce, in favor of the Plaintiff, dissolving the marriage between the parties in this action. NOTICE TO DEFENDANT You may certain right under the laws of the State of New York to an equitable division of certain property held individually and jointly by you and your spouse during the term of your marriage; to receive maintenance from your spouse; and to receive support for the children of the marriage as part of this proceeding. These rights may be available to you whether or not a separation agreement has been entered into between you and your spouse. A failure to answer this Verified Complaint and to appear in this action may therefore result in a judgment of divorce being obtained against you, and additionally, a waiver of those rights.

Fun [ NEWS OF THE WEIRD ] BY CHUCK SHEPHERD

California activist Jonathan Frieman finally got his day in court in January, but a Marin County judge quickly rejected his argument that he is entitled to use the state’s carpool lanes accompanied only by a sheath of corporate papers in the passenger seat. (During the 2012 Republican primaries, Mitt Romney famously asserted a corporation’s general right under the law to be treated as a “person.”) The judge decided that the state legislature’s carpool law was intended only to reduce traffic clutter and that driving with no passenger except corporate papers was unrelated to that goal. Frieman told reporters that he had been carrying the papers around for years, hoping to be challenged.

Wall Street Journal dispatch -- because it can help philanderers keep their affairs from lovers’ prying eyes. The phones lack sophisticated tracking features -- plus, a buried “privacy” mode gives off only stealth signals when lovers call and leaves no trace of calls, texts or emails. A senior executive for Fujitsu said, “If Tiger Woods had (this phone), he wouldn’t have gotten in trouble.” — China’s national legislature passed a law in December to establish that people have a duty to visit their aged parents periodically. China’s rapid urbanization has not developed nursing homes and similar facilities to keep pace with the population, and sponsors of the law said it would give the parents a legal right to sue their children for ignoring them.

Cultural Diversity

Perspective

— The U.S. Congress may suffer dismal popularity ratings (less savory than head lice, according to one survey), but it is saintly compared to India’s legislatures, which contain six accused rapists at the state level and two in the national parliament. Thirty-six local officials, as well, have been charged with sexual assault (according to India’s Association for Democratic Reforms). In fact, the association reported in December that 162 of the lower house of Parliament’s 552 members currently face criminal charges. The problem is compounded by India’s notoriously paralyzed justice system, which practically ensures that the charges will be unresolved for years, if not decades. — Many Japanese men seem to reject smartphones in favor of a low-tech 2002 Fujitsu cellphone, according to a January

Generally, clients are held to account for their lawyers’ errors because the lawyers are their “agents,” but death row inmates might be treated differently, for they usually do not select or pay for their lawyers -- and because the stakes are so high. Alabama, though, looks at the problem unsympathetically, according to a January New York Times report. When an Alabama death row inmate misses an appeals-filing deadline only because of his lawyer’s error (in murder client Ronald Smith’s case, only because lawyer C. Wade Johnson was an oftenincapacitated methamphetamine addict), the client forgoes the appeal. The Smith case is currently before the U.S. Supreme Court. (Alabama also remains the only state in which judges overrule juries and impose the death penalty instead of life in prison.)

[ LAST WEEK’S SOLUTION ON PAGE 32 ]

[ LOVESCOPE ] BY EUGENIA LAST ARIES (March 21-April 19): Take a walk on the wild side, and try something or someone altogether different. You’ll be attracted to someone unique or who comes from a different background. Explore the possibilities and you will discover how diverse you can be when it comes to your personal lifestyle. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Take it slow when it comes to love and romance. You are far better off getting to know someone before you bump things up to an intimate level. Being cautious will help you sidestep a potentially difficult situation that can affect your status.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Not everyone will be as flippant or flirtatious as you, but that doesn’t mean you won’t attract attention. Keep your eyes open for someone watching you from a distance. The potential to develop a deep and meaningful relationship is in the stars. CANCER (June 21-July 22): You need to get out and socialize more or get involved in a hobby or activity that will bring you in contact with someone as warm, affectionate and loving as you. A serious commitment is likely if you make a move on someone sharing your likes and dislikes.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): You need a change of place, pace or comrades. Try a different form of entertainment, and you will find someone just as dynamic as you. Meeting your match is likely -- but only if you are willing to go into unfamiliar territory. Expand your interests. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): You’ll have better luck finding a suitable mate through work-related events. However, this may create some problems if you don’t go through the proper channels. Back away if the person you are attracted to moves too quickly or is overindulgent. Protect your position and choose wisely.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Take the initiative to voice your opinion and share in the conversation at social gatherings, and you will pique someone’s interest. A relationship based on differences will be difficult to resist, but it will be just as awkward to find common ground. Enjoy what you both have to offer. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Your initial attraction to someone isn’t likely to be physical. A feeling of closeness and an attraction to someone’s morals, ethics and principles can easily lead to true, deep, unconditional love. Let your relationship

develop naturally, and your physical passion will grow. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Too much action in the romance department can lead to trouble. Be careful not to let someone from your past jump back into your life without addressing the problems you encountered in the past. Deception and disillusionment are present. Slow down and consider the pros and cons. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): You’ll be attracted to someone offering something unique or unusual from any of your past partners. Don’t be afraid to experiment a little before making

up your mind. A change may not be to your liking once you get a taste of what’s to come. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): You are likely to attract someone who isn’t being honest with you. Before becoming intimate, find out about this person’s background and whether this partnership is a good fit for you. You may want to go it alone a little bit longer. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Get down to the facts before you indulge in an emotional situation that has the potential to go either way. Honesty and a plan to move forward will be your best bet and will work well for both you and the object of your affection.

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40 CITY FEBRUARY 6-12, 2013


February 6-12, 2013 - City Newspaper