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EVENTS: JOEL MCHALE, MIND2MOVIE CHALLENGE 19 FILM: “PARKER,” “MOVIE 43” 22 CHOW HOUND: BRICK, BAKE IT OR CLEAVE IT 11 GUEST COMMENTARY: MODEL FOR NEIGHBORHOOD SCHOOLS

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ROCHESTER THEATER HALL OF FAME: NOMINATE NOW 12 CROSSWORD, NEWS OF THE WEIRD 31

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Greater Rochester’s Alternative Newsweekly

Vol 42 No 21

TAMIR HENDELMAN

AND MORE MUSIC, PAGE 12

News. Music. Life.

Hank Mobley never had to worry about straps falling down.” MUSIC REVIEW, PAGE 13

I-Square in limbo. NEWS, PAGE 5

Sing the vehicle electric. NEWS, PAGE 9

Fringe Fest 2013 details. NEWS, PAGE 5

Geva’s “Steve Jobs” hits Apple core. THEATER REVIEW, PAGE 18

PUBLIC SAFETY | BY CHRISTINE CARRIE FIEN | PAGE 6 | PHOTO BY MIKE HANLON

Second chance for controversial fire program The tension, the sense that others saw him as different somehow — less — was a millstone that Lieutenant Lawrence “Shawn” Brumfield says he carried every day for about half of his 15-year career as a Rochester firefighter. Brumfield was part of the second class of students to graduate from a firefighter trainee program formerly at East High School. The purpose of the program was to introduce interested

East students to a potential career in the fire service, and to also increase racial and gender diversity in the RFD’s ranks — a longtime goal of city officials. Somewhere along the line, though, the program stumbled. Those directly involved say bumps in the road are to be expected when you’re trying something new and innovative. But others suspect something more underhanded, and systemic.


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Feedback We welcome your comments. Send them to themail@ rochester-citynews.com, or post them on our website, rochestercitynewspaper.com, our Facebook page, or our Twitter feed, @roccitynews. Comments of fewer than 350 words have a greater chance of being published, and we do edit selections for publication in print. We don’t publish comments sent to other media.

Seeing the toll of violence

Subsequent to the sad and tragic events in Newtown, Connecticut, can we open our hearts and minds to a larger perspective than the predominate discussion of recent weeks? Instead of madly rushing, once again, with vengeful minds for the “easy solution” to gun-violence, can we be inwardly quiet, enabling ourselves to ponder certain facts that indicate how deeply violent matters truly are in our culture? Yes, it’s true that the loss of one child is too many. However, a glimpse, if you will: According to the US Centers for Disease Control, in 1993: 614,000 American children were physically abused, 500,000 were sexually abused, 532,000 were emotionally abused, 507,000 were physically neglected, and 585,000 were emotionally neglected. Five hundred sixty-five thousand of these, the most vulnerable among us, were killed or seriously injured. There are no words. Each of us must enter this deep river, open our eyes, open our minds, open our hearts, and see it. DOUG HOENER, ROCHESTER

RPO and Remmereit

Discussion of the RPO board’s decision to fire Maestro Arild Remmereit, effective immediately, lit up our website. I hate to say it but this will really damage Rochester’s ability to get a truly outstanding new music director to succeed Remmereit. I don’t want to get into a blame game, but it is incredibly 2 CITY

JANUARY 30 - FEBRUARY 5, 2013

disappointing that this whole conflict and all its bloody details played out in the press. TV35

Posted on rochestercitynewspaper.com This is really an enormous battle over very small stakes. Many people in this community have never attended an RPO concert because they don’t like classical music and they never will. What we need now is a new conductor who gets along with the board and a board that can get along with our conductor. We must cut our losses, staunch the bleeding, reverse this ridiculous bickering over minor issues, and return the orchestra to the heights it deserved under Maestro Seaman. STEVE

Posted on rochestercitynewspaper.com Remmereit is not the real problem. Ensuring that the RPO even exists three years from now is the elephant in the corner that the board is not capable of addressing. It is much more fun to waste board time and energy on personality differences than the real hard-core fiscal crisis. LARRY CHAMPOUX

Posted on rochestercitynewspaper.com

Downtown’s future

The City of Rochester is creating a new master plan to guide development downtown. Rochester is still attempting to learn how to move forward with zoning and development guidelines that support private investment, create walkable neighborhoods, avoid mistakes like parking garage dead zones, and plan for the convenience of urban living. Will it take another 50 years to achieve these goals? WILLSVOICE

Posted on rochestercitynewspaper.com Downtown is an empty husk. Move a university campus with student housing down there or something. Bring some life back. JESSE

Posted on Twitter

News. Music. Life. Greater Rochester’s Alternative Newsweekly January 30 - February 5, 2013 Vol 42 No 21 250 North Goodman Street Rochester, New York 14607-1199 themail@rochester-citynews.com phone (585) 244-3329 fax (585) 244-1126 rochestercitynewspaper.com Publishers: William and Mary Anna Towler Editor: Mary Anna Towler Asst. to the publishers: Matt Walsh Editorial department themail@rochester-citynews.com Features editor: Eric Rezsnyak News editor: Christine Carrie Fien Staff writers: Tim Louis Macaluso, Jeremy Moule Music editor: Willie Clark Music writer: Frank De Blase Calendar editor: Rebecca Rafferty Contributing writers: Paloma Capanna, Casey Carlsen, Roman Divezur, George Grella, Susie Hume, Andy Klingenberger, Dave LaBarge, Kathy Laluk, Michael Lasser, James Leach, Adam Lubitow, Ron Netsky, Dayna Papaleo, Suzan Pero, Rebecca Rafferty, Deb Schleede, David Yockel Jr. Editorial intern: Lillian Dickerson Art department artdept@rochester-citynews.com Art director/production manager: Matt DeTurck Designers: Aubrey Berardini, Mark Chamberlin Photographers: Mark Chamberlin, Frank De Blase, Michael Hanlon Advertising department ads@rochester-citynews.com Advertising sales manager: Betsy Matthews Account executives: Nancy Burkhardt, Tom Decker, Annalisa Iannone, William Towler Classified sales representatives: Christine Kubarycz, Tracey Mykins Operations/Circulation info@rochester-citynews.com Circulation manager: Katherine Stathis Distribution: Andy DiCiaccio, David Riccioni, Northstar Delivery, Wolfe News City Newspaper is available free of charge. Additional copies of the current issue may be purchased for $1, payable in advance at the City Newspaper office. City Newspaper may be distributed only by authorized distributors. No person may, without prior written permission of City Newspaper, take more than one copy of each weekly issue. City (ISSN 1551-3262) is published weekly by WMT Publications, Inc. Periodical postage paid at Rochester, NY (USPS 022-138). Send address changes to City, 250 North Goodman Street, Rochester, NY 14607. City is a member of the Association of Alternative Newsweeklies and the New York Press Association. Subscriptions: $35.00 ($30.00 for senior citizens) for one year. Add $10 yearly for out-of-state subscriptions: add $30 yearly for foreign subscriptions. Due to the initial high cost of establishing new subscriptions, refunds for fewer than ten months cannot be issued. Copyright by WMT Publications Inc., 2013 - all rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, photocopying, recording or by any information storage retrieval system without permission of the copyright owner.


GUEST COMMENTARY | BY RALPH SPEZIO

A better model for neighborhood schools Once again in Rochester, there are calls for a return to neighborhood schools. While it is important to create neighborhood elementary schools within urban villages where possible, and to align accountability, consolidate services, and make it all transparent, my experience brings me to conclude that for a future system of education to be successful and sustainable, the direct community of each urban neighborhood school must be authentically involved in governing that school. I call this model for authentic community ownership and responsibility the Community Accredited Schools Model. This concept is naturally symbiotic with democratically elected school board governance. Although the New York State Education Department is responsible for public education curriculum and standards, the delivery of that curriculum varies, depending on different individual needs. Each community has many similarities, but also many differences. The culture of one neighborhood can be quite different from the community just a few streets away. Successful schools and successful communities must be an integral part of one another and made culturally relevant. The residents and parents of each community have a vision for the schools that embrace their children, and they can easily formalize this vision into specific expectations for behavioral and performance outcomes. Combining their vision with those expectations would create formal assessments of the neighborhood school, establishing an on-going, authentic community school accreditation system. A joint body, co-chaired by a community member (tied to the neighborhood association) and the school principal would serve as the governance framework to monitor and sustain this collaboration. A simple reaccreditation process would take place every three or four years, and a community grade would be made public each year. Communities would have a much stronger say in the selection and retention of their school principals. Because each community would have much more responsibility in creating the vision for their community school, the neighborhood school would finally be the real center of a healthy urban village and would become the beacon of the community, not the fortress on the hill. When the parents and residents of a community are allowed to have authentic shared ownership of their children’s school, they feel they have a personal investment

For many years the community has been used to having things done to it instead of with it.”

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in their children’s school. When they have investment, they automatically have engagement leading to commitment. When the flame of community engagement is lit, the positive power of individual parental influence is unleashed and focused upon their child’s success within the educational system. Tragically, this power has been greatly underestimated. Not only is it underestimated, it is very often not allowed to happen. Community accredited school status would be celebrated as the gold standard for school-community effectiveness. The Community Accredited Schools Model would not diminish but would validate and enhance the effectiveness of the superintendent, school principals, and classroom teachers. This model would create the structure for the essential working partnerships of parents, teachers, administrators, and residents. It would facilitate surround-care neighborhood schools that would finally report, respond, and be accountable to the needs of the communities in which they serve. Years ago, under former Superintendent Peter McWalters and union president Adam Urbanski, the district attempted to create a similar model. But when superintendents change, the district’s focus can change, and the McWalters-Urbanski model wasn’t sufficiently anchored in the community to be sustained. When it comes to urban schools, for many years the community has been used to having things done to it instead of with it, so the Community Accredited Schools Model will need to be guided and nurtured at every juncture. Superintendents, school board commissioners, and mayors come and go, but each community is there forever. The Community Accredited Schools Model places the shared ownership, control, and responsibility where it belongs and provides a structure for sustainability and replication of best practice. Spezio is a retired principal of School 17 in the Rochester school district and is a founding member of the Coalition to Prevent Lead Poisoning. rochestercitynewspaper.com

CITY 3


[ NEWS FROM THE WEEK PAST ]

RPO fires Remmereit

The board of the Rochester Philharmonic Orchestra fired Music Director Arild Remmereit, effective immediately. The board had previously voted to end Remmereit’s contract early; he would’ve finished with the orchestra in August. In a written statement, the RPO board said that Remmereit had failed to live up to his contractual obligations since late November. A search for a new director is under way.

Warren could run Rochester City Council President Lovely Warren said she’s considering a run for mayor, even if incumbent Mayor Tom Richards decides to seek re-election. The City of Rochester is heavily Democratic so the winner of the Democratic primary is almost guaranteed a victory in the general election.

Brighton bans fracking

The Brighton Town Board passed a law banning gas and oil drilling and all related activities. The ban covers high-volume hydraulic fracturing, which energy companies want to use to extract natural gas from deep shale formations in New York. Brigh-

ton’s law also prohibits the storage of drilling waste within the town.

News

Unemployment rate jumps

Rochester’s unemployment rate experienced one of its biggest upward ticks in months, from 7.4 percent in November 2012 to 8 percent in December 2012. The year-to-year rate was also up: unemployment was 7.5 percent in December 2011. While Monroe County’s unemployment rate has remained below 8 percent, Orleans County in the Rochester region had one of the highest rates in the state at 10 percent.

Brooks submits MCC legislation

County Executive Maggie Brooks submitted legislation that, if approved by the Legislature, would authorize Monroe Community College to acquire new space for a downtown campus. The referral would authorize MCC to buy several buildings on Kodak’s State Street Site, as well as part of a parking lot. The legislation says the purchase price would be just shy of $3 million.

Friends of the GardenAerial envision an arboretum on the Pont de Rennes bridge in High Falls. PHOTO BY MARK CHAMBERLIN

DEVELOPMENT | BY JEREMY MOULE

Greening High Falls Friends of the GardenAerial has new renderings for its plan to remake the High Falls area into an urban green space. Representatives of the organization will unveil conceptual drawings for three installations during a February 7 event organized by the local Sierra Club. GardenAerial representatives will present concepts for an arboretum on the Pont de Rennes bridge, a winter garden in the High Falls gorge, and a bridge over the falls. The idea is to get people thinking about the gorge’s potential, says Benjamin Woelk, Friends of the GardenAerial’s

Preschool - Grade 6

associate director of administration and community engagement. “These are all just one possibility of what could be,” Woelk says. The group does not have a cost estimate for the project. The Pont de Rennes concept includes an elevator to the lower gorge — and the gorge could have trails, Woelk says. And the winter garden could include a section devoted to preserving native, endangered plants, he says. High Falls has an important place in Rochester’s history. It was a power source for the city’s early industries

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and, in a way, has been the heart of the city. But public engagement with the gorge has been limited, Woelk says. The GardenAerial project is aimed at making the High Falls gorge something the public can use, he says. The Sierra Club event will be held at the Friends of the GardenAerial offices at 81 Browns Race. Networking starts at 6 p.m. and the presentation begins at 6:45 p.m. Organizers ask that anyone interested in attending RSVP due to limited space. Call (585) 234-1056 or e-mail lci_msw@hotmail.com.


Irondequoit Town Board member Deborah Essley says town officials ultimately want one of two things: to have representation during Mike Nolan’s negotiations with COMIDA, or to have Nolan’s benchmarks — the dates he expects to complete each of I-Square’s seven buildings — in writing.

DEVELOPMENT | BY JEREMY MOULE

ARTS | BY CITY NEWS STAFF

I-Square in limbo

Fringe Fest 2013

If the I-Square project in Irondequoit moves forward, it may not be in the form initially proposed, says the project’s developer, Mike Nolan. Last week, the Irondequoit Town Board tabled a resolution to approve a payment-inlieu-of-taxes agreement for I-Square, a proposed commercial and retail development near the corner of Cooper Road and Titus Avenue. Last year, the Town Board rejected Nolan’s request for a 25-year PILOT deal, opting instead for a 10-year plan — angering Nolan and I-Square’s supporters. But town officials and Nolan had productive talks after that vote, says Irondequoit Supervisor Mary Joyce D’Aurizio, and Nolan subsequently satisfied many of the town’s concerns about financing and the project’s business plan. So Nolan was back in front of the board last week to get his 25-year agreement: actually 15 years with two five-year extensions. If the resolution had passed, it would’ve negated the 10-year deal. But Nolan says the resolution contained a paragraph he never agreed to, dealing with his plan to apply for a PILOT through the Monroe County Industrial Development Agency. Basically, any deal Nolan negotiated with COMIDA would’ve had to come back to the Irondequoit Town Board for approval.

(COMIDA has the ability to orchestrate an overarching PILOT agreement that would cover town, school, and county taxes.) Nolan said the provision would only cause further delay for Mike Nolan. PHOTO BY the project, and asked MARK CHAMBERLIN to have the paragraph removed. But Town Board members said removing the paragraph amounted to a change substantial enough to warrant further review, and tabled the vote. “They’re making a grave mistake today,” Nolan told reporters after the meeting. Board member Deborah Essley says town officials ultimately want one of two things: to have representation during Nolan’s negotiations with COMIDA, or to have Nolan’s benchmarks — the dates he expects to complete each of the project’s seven buildings — in writing. Town officials say they value the I-Square project and hope negotiations will continue. Nolan says he doesn’t know what his next move will be.

Cost of War AFGHANISTAN TOTALS —

2,177 US servicemen and servicewomen and 1,080 Coalition servicemen and servicewomen have been killed in Afghanistan from the beginning of the war and occupation to January 28. Statistics for Afghan civilian casualties are not available. American casualties from January 16 to 20: -- Sgt. Mark H. Schoonhoven, 38, Plainwell, Mich. iraqbodycount. org, icasualties.org, Department of Defense

SOURCES:

The First Niagara Rochester Fringe Festival will expand for its second run in Rochester. The dates for the 2013 festival are September 19 to September 28, expanding from a five-day festival to a 10-day showcase spanning two weekends. | “We more than doubled our estimated audience in our debut year,” says Fringe Fest producer Erica Fee. “We were hoping for 15,000 and at least 33,000 came.” | Highlights from last year’s festival included the aerial troupe Bandaloop performing on the side of the 21-story HSBC Plaza, and performances by the Harlem Gospel Choir and comedian Patton Oswalt. There were more than 180 performances, a mix of local and national acts, of 120 productions in 22 venues. The performances covered visual art, theater, dance, comedy, magic shows, film, music, and family friendly fare. | This year’s festival will, again, make use of approximately 20 venues in downtown Rochester. More details, including headliners and a complete schedule, will be announced at a later date. | For those looking to participate in the festival, performance applications will open up on February 11 and be accepted on a rolling basis until April 12. Information: rochesterfringe.com/performers/how-to-apply

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CITY 5


SECOND CHANCE FOR CONTROVERSIAL FIRE PROGRAM

PUBLIC SAFETY | BY CHRISTINE CARRIE FIEN PHOTOGRAPHY | BY MIKE HANLON

There were no slurs, no outright harassment. Nobody even called him a name, as far as he can remember. But the tension, the sense that others saw him as different somehow — less — was a millstone that Lieutenant Lawrence “Shawn” Brumfield says he carried every day for about half of his 15-year career as a Rochester firefighter. “It wasn’t everybody, but it was enough to be a disturbance,” he says. “It almost translated into you starting to doubt yourself.” Brumfield was part of the second class of students to graduate from a firefighter trainee program formerly at East High School. The purpose of the program as it existed then was to introduce interested East students to a potential career in the fire service, and to also increase racial and gender diversity in the RFD’s ranks — a longtime goal of city officials.

Lawrence Brumfield: fitting in at the RFD wasn't easy.

Somewhere along the line, though, the program stumbled. And part of the fallout, Brumfield says, was a divide between the East program graduates who went on to become firefighters and some of the rest of the RFD’s rank and file. Those directly involved with the East program say bumps in the road are to be expected when you’re trying something new and innovative. Improvements have

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JANUARY 30 - FEBRUARY 5, 2013

been made and will continue to be made, they say, as the program evolves. But others suspect something more underhanded, and systemic. The leadership of the fire union questions whether students in the East High program were held to a different, possibly lower standard than the candidates who joined the department via the traditional route — just so the city could meet diversity goals. “You’ve got to be competent in this job,” says union president Jim McTiernan. “If something goes wrong, it’s not a paper cut. Somebody can die.” And McTiernan and others say they worry that the same problems will plague the latest iteration of the program, which kicked-off this school year. The Career Pathways to Public Safety Initiative, which replaced the East program, provides job information and training in the fields of fire, police and security services, emergency communications, and emergency medical technology to interested juniors and seniors in the Rochester school district. The program is now held at the Rochester Educational Opportunity Center downtown. “This goes back to, what are we doing to kids?” McTiernan says. “What are you willing to do, to get numbers for some reason, to children? Are we putting kids [in these programs] who really don’t know what’s going on, to satisfy some adult goals? That’s the real question.” THE EAST PROGRAM DID HAVE SUCCESS

stories. Brumfield, only the fourth black male in the history of the RFD to make lieutenant, is one example. Former Rochester Fire Chief John Caufield says that approximately 10 percent of the department is currently made up of graduates of the East program.

But housing the program at East and limiting it to East students narrowed the pool of potential participants. And a program that was supposed to be for the best and brightest seems to have lowered the bar at some point. “I don’t think anybody really was completely satisfied with the level of success we had there,” Caufield says. “When you have a decreased number of students applying, and certainly there’s always been pressure to have a viable program at East High, we did find ourselves having a real difficult time recruiting quality students. We were forced to consider kids who really didn’t meet the mark. Did some get through? Possibly.” But both Mayor Tom Richards and Caufield point out that every recruit, whether you’re talking about the old program or the new, still has to successfully complete the intense, 24-week fire academy before becoming a firefighter. Unqualified candidates are sure to be weeded out there, they say. “[Those] standards have only gotten more rigorous over the years,” Caufield says. According to data provided by Molly Clifford, the city’s director of fire administration, 91 students from the East fire program passed the required exam from 1995 until that program ended in June 2012. Of those, 71 went on to the fire academy, and 48 are currently members of the Rochester Fire Department. Clifford, who wasn’t with the RFD for the bulk of the East program, says it appears that baseline standards for that version of the program weren’t always strictly followed. “It wasn’t a conspiracy,” she says. “People really want to help these kids. They want them to be successful. And I think the problem was people tried to support them and get them through in a way that didn’t help in the long term and made it very challenging for them when they got to the academy to be able to keep up.” “We recognize that we’re not doing the kids any favors if you prop them up,” Clifford adds.


Students listen to instructor Mike Marcano during a law enforcement class, part of the Career Pathways Program.

FIRE UNION PRESIDENT MCTIERNAN SAYS

the East graduates who went on to become firefighters were treated the same as everyone else. Once they got through the academy, he says, they had proved their mettle. But Brumfield says that’s not the case, because he lived it. He says he believes the color of his skin and distrust of the East program caused some to view him with suspicion or contempt. “They felt we weren’t up to par, or we didn’t deserve it because of the route we came, ‘You didn’t get here how I got here, so you don’t deserve to be in that spot,’” Brumfield says. “It was something new; people didn’t understand it. And the confusion led for some to animosity. Some of it was based on ignorance; people were making assumptions about people they didn’t know.” The pushback made him second-guess himself and his choices, Brumfield says. “I couldn’t buy into it,” he says. “I would say past half my career, I still wasn’t sure this is what I wanted to do.” Clifford says you have to be careful not to paint the whole fire department with the same broad brush, and that the majority of Rochester firefighters were and will be welcoming to graduates of the city school district’s fire program. “As a rule, the firefighters are very open to everybody,” she says. “I think there may be a small group of people who cast aspersions on these kids. I absolutely think that if these students are successful in the city school program and in the academy, everyone will have a completely open mind about their ability to be firefighters.” Brumfield says it was only when he realized that other people’s negativity had nothing to do with him, that he settled into the job — about seven years into his career. “I got to the point where I felt good in myself,” he says. “When I got there, then all of the outside noise didn’t matter. That’s when everything started to pan out for me.” THE UNION HAS PRACTICAL AND

philosophical qualms about the fire training program, both when it was at East and the redesigned program at the REOC. McTiernan says the city is snatching up

vulnerable youngsters and setting them on a career path that serves the city’s selfinterest. Students are eligible for the Career Pathways program in their junior year of high school. “I wouldn’t let my child in that program,” McTiernan says. “I think it’s terrible. I didn’t come to this job limiting myself to this is what I was going to do after high school. I finished college. I had a career. I decided this was what I was going to do when I was 28 years old.” Teenagers aren’t physically or mentally ready for the rigors of fire training, he says. Mayor Richards says he resents any implication that the city is exploiting young people for its own ends. “I know Jimmy [McTiernan] is a world-famous psychologist,” Richards says sarcastically, “and I appreciate his input on this issue.” One of the reasons the city and the school district broadened the program to include police, emergency communications, and EMT is so young people have options, Richards says. And the rigorous nature of the program might motivate students in other areas of their lives, he says. The students in the REOC program also receive guidance in life skills like money management. “We’ve done a good thing here,” Richards says. “And with all due respect, many of the people in the union made this choice at 18 years old, when they were in high school.” The union should be supportive, he says, because the students who decide to pursue firefighting after graduating from the program really know what they’re getting into: they’ll be better prepared, and less likely to wash out at the academy. The union also has questions about the test the REOC students have to take to become firefighters. Union members were told when the East program began, McTiernan says, that the students would be taking the same exam as everyone else. But that didn’t end up being the case.

Students Teodoro Santiago and Melissa Calkins practice CPR during class.

“They did take a different test, it’s true,” Richards says. “Whether it [was] easier or not is not clear. I’m not willing to say it was easier.” (Caufield says opinions on the test’s difficulty are subjective. Tassie Demps, director of career and technical education for the Rochester school district, says the test was not easier.) Officials worried, Richards says, that the students would get tired of waiting for the traditional process to play out and would find other employment, join the military, anything but become a Rochester firefighter. That would negate some of the value of the program, he says. Richards says he made a commitment to significantly improve racial and gender parity in the fire department, and the testing issue was part of that, as was revamping the overall hiring process for the RFD. “We’ve been talking about this for a decade or more,” he says. “And for some reason it never got resolved. We just simply decided, this is going to get resolved.” The changes, according to city officials, are producing results. The most diverse recruit class ever is currently training at the fire academy. (In 2010, the RFD had 407 white males, 11 white females, 37 black males, 40 Hispanic males, and one Hispanic female.) The students in the redesigned program will be given a city-created test. Demps says the city used to create and administer

a number of employment exams for various jobs, but it became cost-prohibitive. The city still creates local exams for select public-safety jobs, she says, and the rest take civil service tests. At the core of the union’s concerns seems to be a lack of communication. McTiernan and other members of the union say they were given only one perfunctory meeting with city officials about the new program — and that wasn’t until after the Career Pathways program had been up and running for months. “It was embarrassing for them,” McTiernan says. “Nobody can answer our questions. All we hear is [the students] won’t be taking the same test. And that is unacceptable. Nobody on this job cares whether you’re white, black, green, purple, or pink, as long as you can do the job. That’s all there is to it.” FORTY-TWO STUDENTS — JUNIORS AND

seniors — are enrolled in the Career Pathways to Public Safety program this school year. To participate, they need a 2.0 grade-point average in their core subjects, 93 percent attendance, parental consent, school counselor sign off, and two letters of recommendation. They must also participate in an interview. continues on page 8

rochestercitynewspaper.com

CITY 7


FIRE PROGRAM continues from page 7

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JANUARY 30 - FEBRUARY 5, 2013

Students Amina Avjam and Abismael Juniors take a career education for the city Diaz train on the 911 call awareness course, school district. “They center simulator. spending nine weeks will have a job.” on each discipline in the program: police, NOW THAT BRUMFIELD fire, emergency has settled into his role as communications, a Rochester firefighter, he and emergency medical technology. The says he feels an obligation to help those who purpose is to expose them to each field so come after him. Firefighting has historically they can pick one in which to job train in been the territory of white males, and it also their senior year. tends to run in families. Many people in the fire service have fathers, grandfathers, and The students wear uniforms, and the brothers who are firefighters, too. school has a paramilitary feel — the students stand at attention when someone enters the Former Chief Caufield says that legacy classroom. Late students are made to write perception is probably always going to be a 250-word essays or do 100 pushups; most barrier to recruiting people of color to the choose the pushups. fire department. The program’s coordinator, Robert “You tell a young black boy that he can Poles, is a retired recruiter for the Rochester be a firefighter, but you don’t have any black Police Department, and instructors include firefighters. Or they don’t see them,” Brumfield public-safety professionals with decades in says. “They always see black drug dealers.” their chosen fields. In addition to classroom The school district fire program is a work, students do job shadowing, ridegood thing, he says, because it provides alongs, field trips, and other activities. never-before-contemplated opportunities Students are also provided with mentors for some young people. from their chosen career paths. “You had a lot of people [in the East “We’re breaking new ground by program] who turned their lives around because they had something to reach out providing new opportunities for our young for,” he says. people,” Poles says. “If we can just get a couple of kids through and people see it, this Brumfield wanted to be doctor before his thing is going to catch fire. We’re going to father pressured him into the fire training need more classrooms. I really believe that.” program at East High. His father worked at East, Brumfield says, and was impressed by Poles says the program is already the program. Brumfield says he hasn’t given paying off. The Monroe County up on medicine entirely; he’s in graduate Sheriff ’s Office contacted him about school now to become a nurse practitioner. candidates for internships, he says, But he says he doesn’t have immediate plans praising the REOC students’ maturity to leave the fire service. and the quality of their resumes. Some students who successfully “Because there are not too many people of complete the program will be immediately color in the ranks, I think it’s important for eligible for jobs. Graduates of the police everyone who gets there to trail blaze as far as program will be certified security guards. they can,” Brumfield says. “I don’t want to be And Rural/Metro, the city’s ambulancefire chief, but I think that I owe it to myself service provider, says it will hire all and to those behind me to [go] as far as I can. students who successfully pass the EMT I believe I was placed in the situation I’m in certification training. because I have something to give.” “It will be a direct hire,” says Beverly Gushue, director of career and technical


TRANSPORTATION | BY JEREMY MOULE

Charging ahead Fairport’s municipal electric company got its first electric vehicle about a decade ago: a Ford pickup truck with a bed full of lead-acid batteries. The village and the utility it operates have a longstanding policy of embracing electrified vehicles, says village administrator Ken Moore, and Fairport has several hybrid vehicles — thankfully, much more advanced than that first truck — in its fleet. And now the village, through its electric company, plans to install a publicly accessible electric vehicle charging station. Fairport isn’t the only local government in Monroe County with interest in electric vehicle infrastructure. Several communities, with the backing of state and federal programs, have plans to install charging stations. Penfield is getting its second station. Local officials say that providing stations builds up infrastructure for the cars and shows the public that the technology is mature and viable. “There really is a big push for infrastructure not only in New York State but across the country,” says Anne Spaulding, energy and sustainability manager for the City of Rochester, which plans to install seven charging stations. “If you think about it, if there weren’t any gas stations around, who would buy a gasolinepowered vehicle?” The electric and plug-in hybrid vehicle market is growing. Technology improvements and lower sticker prices could encourage more people to replace their old cars with electrified vehicles. So could high gas prices. But consumer confidence in electric vehicle technology is still an issue. Allelectric vehicles like the Nissan Leaf struggle against consumer “range anxiety,” a fear that a depleted battery could leave drivers stranded somewhere, says David Keefe, coordinator at Genesee Region Clean Communities. But if people start to see charging stations, Keefe says, their confidence increases. Genesee Region Clean Communities has a grant program to encourage local communities to install charging stations; the organization is part of the US Department of Energy’s Clean Cities program, and its broader mission is to advance alternative energy vehicles. Fairport and the Town of Perinton have each applied for $1,000 grants. The state also encourages electric vehicle infrastructure development. During his State of the State speech earlier this month, Governor Andrew Cuomo called for more charging stations, and Cuomo’s budget proposal includes grants and tax credits for charging infrastructure. The Town of Penfield opened its first

charging station in April. The idea came

from the town’s Energy and Environment Advisory Committee, which is made up of residents with backgrounds in those issues. The station is located at the town’s Community Center, which was chosen because it’s a center of resident activity, says Supervisor Tony LaFountain. The location is convenient for residents and makes the technology visible, he says. Vehicle charging equipment and installation often runs several thousand dollars, though costs can significantly vary. In Penfield’s case, advisory committee member Bob Kanauer donated the station and town crews did the installation work. (While Penfield’s station can only charge one car at a time, other models can serve multiple vehicles at once.) The station was installed in conjunction with a solar-powered sewer pumping station, and that facility’s panels generate more electricity than the pumping facility uses, LaFountain says. The extra electricity is dumped into the electric grid and the town gets paid for it. Those credits are covering the cost of the vehicle charging station, which has used approximately $80 worth of electricity since April, LaFountain says. And Penfield officials found out last week that Genesee Region Clean Communities is giving the town a $1,000 grant to install a charging station at Town Hall. LaFountain says Town Hall gets a lot of traffic and that the adjacent athletic fields and amphitheater are big draws in the fair weather. The town doesn’t charge for use of its station, though with a second station coming, that may eventually change. Fairport doesn’t plan to charge for use of its station, either, administrator Moore says. The stations don’t use a lot of electricity, he says, and the village utility’s electric costs are low, so it shouldn’t be a big expense.

The Town of Penfield has a public charging station for electric vehicles and plug-in hybrids at its Community Center. PHOTO BY MARK CHAMBERLIN

Rochester officials say they’ll install a system of charging stations across the city. Spaulding, the city’s energy and sustainability manager, says the stations should be up and running by October. The city plans to spend $285,000 to put stations at seven different locations. The New York State Energy Research and Development Authority awarded the city a $228,000 grant for the project. City officials are finalizing the station locations — they’re looking at four parking garages, City Hall, the Public Market, and the Port of Rochester — and developing installation plans. They want to make sure the stations are in places where they’re likely to be used, Spaulding says. Electric vehicle drivers will probably have to pay to use the city stations. Spaulding says the city expects to charge, but that officials haven’t figured out the details yet. The ability for people to reserve a spot will also be an important component of the city’s charging station network. That’s especially important considering some of the stations will probably go into public parking garages. In one potential arrangement, an electric or plug-in hybrid vehicle owner who works downtown could reserve a charger-equipped spot on a monthly basis and then pay an added fee to cover charging costs, Spaulding says. Part of the Rochester project involves collecting data — information such as the

types of vehicles using the stations as well as energy use — for the NYSERDA. Fairport has picked a location for its proposed station: a public lot downtown, adjacent to Fairport Village Landing. Moore, the village administrator, says residents will benefit from having more transportation options. But for now, electric vehicles face a chicken-and-egg scenario, Moore says. Charging stations won’t be widely available until more electric vehicles are on the roads. But people won’t buy electric vehicles until there are charging stations. “So we will be doing our share and getting one up,” Moore says. Spaulding says Rochester officials want to do their part to reduce harmful emissions and petroleum use. And Penfield’s LaFountain says the town is being proactive by preparing for and encouraging electric vehicle adoption. Otherwise, it’ll have to play catch up. “We were just looking at, ‘Can we walk before we run?’ — not knowing where this industry ultimately is going to go, other than it’s going to grow,” LaFountain says.

rochestercitynewspaper.com

CITY 9


For more Tom Tomorrow, including a political blog and cartoon archive, visit www.thismodernworld.com

URBAN ACTION This week’s calls to action include the following events and activities. (All are free and open to the public, unless otherwise noted.)

India’s growing pains

Nazareth College will present “The Human Cost to India’s Race for Development,” a lecture by journalist Priyanka Borpujari, at 7 p.m. on Wednesday, January 30. The lecture will be held at the Shults Center Forum.

SEAC meeting

The South East Area Coalition will meet at 7 p.m. on Wednesday, January 30, to discuss the future goals of the organization. The meeting is at the New Life Church, 243 Rosedale Street.

Correcting ourselves

Report on the area economy

The Rochester Downtown Development Corporation will present the Regional Economic Development Council’s Report to the Community on Thursday, February 7. The event is from 11:45 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. at the Hyatt Regency Rochester, 125 East Main Street. Tickets: $45 RDDC members, $50 non-members. Reservations: Karen Hite, 546-6920.

Talk on algae power

Friends and Foundation of the Rochester Public Library will present “The Science and Business of Treating Wastewater with Algae” at 12:12 p.m. on Tuesday, February 5. RIT associate professor Jeffrey Lodge will talk about how a student’s use of algae to

create biodiesel fuel led to a method for cleaning wastewater. The talk will be held at 115 South Avenue.

Fracking discussion in York

The York Concerned Citizens and Landowners Association will present a discussion on hydrofracking with Richard Young, SUNY Geneseo professor of geological sciences, at 7 p.m. on Thursday, January 31. The event will be held at York Town Hall, 2668 Main Street, York, NY.

Conversations on race

The Friends and Foundation of the Rochester Public Library will host “Conversations on Race” at 6 p.m. on Wednesday, January 30. The event will be held at the Greece Public Library, 2 Vince Tofany Boulevard in Greece.

The “Dead End City Art Show II” preview in the January 16 issue included incorrect information about the show’s venue. It took place at Crossroads Coffeehouse, which is located at 752 S. Goodman Street. 10 CITY JANUARY 30 - FEBRUARY 5, 2013


Dining and maple-bacon, Carter says that special holiday flavors will include cinnamon Red Hot and pink grapefruit marmalade, along with other sweet treats like salted caramels and crèmes brûlée. According to Carter, the ultimate dream for Bake It or Cleave It is its very own pâtisserie. “I wouldn’t mind doing this all the time,” says Carter. “It makes me happy. And it makes other people happy.” You can get a taste of Bake It or Cleave It at the Sweets For Your Sweet Sale on Monday, February 11, from 6-9 p.m. at Thread, 654 South Ave. For more information, or to place an order, call 812430-8661 or visit bakeitorcleaveit.com.

Hop to it

Aspiring brewmasters might want to look in to the new Fairport Brewing Company; it’s offering classes on the art and science of crafting beer, with a beginner Extract Brewing Class for $59 on Tuesday, February 5, at 6 p.m., and an advanced All-Grain Class for $159 on Saturday, February 23, at 9 a.m. Visit fairportbrewing.com to learn more.

A Mediterranean pizza (left) and the dining room (right) at Brick on Monroe Avenue in Pittsford.

PHOTOS BY MARK CHAMBERLIN

p.m. Food prices range from $7-$21. For more information, call 225-2725 or visit brickwoodfiredpizza.com.

The 19th Annual Chilly Chili Challenge goes down from noon to 3 p.m. on Sunday, February 10, as part of the 29th Annual Lakeside Winter Celebration at Ontario Beach Park. It’s open to both professional and amateur cooks, but there are a couple Health Department hoops to jump through; visit cityofrochester.gov/chili to learn the requirements. And you’ve got to register by February 3, so there’s no time to dawdle!

The sweet life

Open

Brick by brick [ CHOW HOUND ] BY DAYNA PAPALEO

Well, it’s the elephant in the dining room, so let’s acknowledge it. The building at 2833 Monroe Avenue has not had the greatest luck; recent history is littered with the names of restaurants — think Mundo Grill, PaRe, and the Monroe Diner — that have tried to make a go of it at that address. It’d be tempting to blame their demises on the location, an admittedly hectic stretch of pavement. But sometimes all it takes it the right fit, and in the case of first-time restaurateur Peter Burrill’s Brick Wood Fired Pizza, so far, so good. “It’s been a whirlwind,” says chef Bryan Cohen. “We’ve been busy from the moment we opened the door.” A quick glance around the warm, open space on an especially bonechilling Tuesday evening illustrated Cohen’s point: colleagues chowing down on burgers in the corner, girlfriends chatting over glasses of wine at the bar, a family with two teens who abandoned their texting in favor of a pipinghot pizza. Yet the eyes can’t help but be drawn to the big wood-burning oven that anchors the room. Running at around 700 degrees, it’s busy with tasks like baking pizzas and roasting chicken wings. That’s also where you’ll usually

find Cohen — a veteran of pie-centric eateries like Pizza Café, Napa, and Dragonfly — doing what he adores. Created with housemade white or wheat dough, there are more than 15 different pizzas on Brick’s menu, ranging from the classic Margherita ($8 for a 10” pie/$16 for 16”) to a Clams Casino pie ($12/$20) with whole baby clams, crispy bacon, bread crumbs, asiago and mozzarella cheeses. (And expect the selection to rotate; “I’ve got at least a hundred in my head,” says Cohen.) But you’ll find ample opportunity to use utensils as well, whether you’re in the mood for steak or salmon, or perhaps fashioning your own pasta dish from a bevy of shapes, sauces, and toppings. In the coming weeks, Brick, which features about 20 draft beers and a couple dozen wines, will offer separate menus for lunch and dinner, with the former incorporating more sandwiches and salads. There are already nascent plans to open another Brick or two, a concept that Cohen describes as “family casual, but just a touch upscale.” Brick Wood Fired Pizza is located at 2833 Monroe Ave. It is open MondayThursday 11 a.m.-10 p.m., Friday-Saturday 11 a.m.-midnight, and Sunday noon-9

Chili weather

“It’s always been with me; I just never did anything with it,” Angie Carter says of her love for all things culinary. Up until now, that is; despite the demands of both a full-time and part-time jobs, Carter and co-owner Hannah Betts have launched Bake It or Cleave It, a catering venture that specializes in French macarons and other handcrafted confections, along with savory offerings that can be customized to a specific event or theme. “I want to challenge myself creatively,” Carter says, specifically citing the undertaking of providing nibbles for art openings and achieving a kind of symmetry between the work and the food. Luckily, you don’t have to be throwing a party to indulge in Bake It or Cleave It’s delicious wares. This year, instead of phoning in Valentine’s Day with a dozen roses and a heartshaped Whitman’s Sampler, why not let Carter and Betts change things up for you? Besides popular macarons like dark chocolate-espresso

The first of the three new eateries scheduled for the Sagamore on East Avenue has opened. Camarella’s (130 East Ave., 5637912, camarellas.com) serves breakfasty items along with sandwiches, wraps, salads, soups, pasta, and baked goods. Self-serve frozen yogurt, along with myriad toppings, finally reaches the city thanks to Yolishous (it rhymes with “delicious”), a new shop at 647 Park Ave. Find out more by calling 225-5474, or visit yolishous.com.

Closed

A sad farewell to one of the last of the old-school steakhouses: Scotch ‘N’ Sirloin recently closed its doors in Winton Place after 40 years in business. The Syracuse location remains open. Chow Hound is a food and restaurant news column. Do you have a tip? Send it to food@ rochester-citynews.com. rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 11


Upcoming [ CELTIC ROCK ] The Tossers w/Continental Wednesday, March 13. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N. Water St. 8 p.m. $12-$15. Waterstreetmusic.com. [ ROCK ] A Day To Remember w/Of Mice and Men, Chunk! No Captain Chunk! Wednesday, March 27. Main Street Armory, 900 E. Main St. 6:30 p.m. $30-$35. Rochestermainstreetarmory.com.

Music

[ COUNTRY ] Kenny Chesney w/Eli Young Band, Kacey Musgraves Wednesday, August 21. CMAC, 3355 Marvin Sands Drive, Canandaigua. 7 p.m. $32.50-$85. Cmacevents.com.

Eternal Summers

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 6 BUG JAR, 219 MONROE AVE. 9 P.M. | $10-$12 | 454-2966, BUGJAR.COM [ ROCK ] A look at Eternal Summers’ Bandcamp page

to see how the band describes its own music is revealing. Between “face melt” and “future punk” you get the sense of what’s in store when the newly minted trio takes the stage, having honed its live show opening for the likes of Nada Surf. The Roanoke, Virginia, band’s most recent release, last summer’s “Correct Behavior,” showcased the outfit’s ability to craft tight, contagious songs. Local songwriter Josh Netsky, along with Spaceweather Shakes, both open the show. — BY ANDY KLINGENBERGER

Tamir Hendelman FRIDAY AND SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 1-2 PENFIELD HIGH SCHOOL AUDITORIUM, 25 HIGH SCHOOL DRIVE 7:30 P.M. | $6-$10 | TAMIRHENDELMAN.COM [ JAZZ ] Barbra Streisand can afford to have any pianist on the planet as her key back-up musician. Her choice: Tamir Hendelman. Since graduating from the Eastman School of Music in 1993, Hendelman has stretched out with the Clayton-Hamilton Jazz Orchestra and also backed singers like Diana Krall and Gladys Knight. If that’s not enough, the great Oscar Peterson once called his solos “exhilarating and thoughtful.” When Hendelman takes the stage for a two-night stint at Penfield High School he will be joined by a variety of ensembles full of talented kids in the process of being turned on to jazz. — BY RON NETSKY

Attention Rochester theater community: Send us your nominations for the

2013 Rochester Theater

HALL OF FAME 12 CITY JANUARY 30 - FEBRUARY 5, 2013

City Newspaper is getting ready to induct new members into the Rochester Theater Hall of Fame, and we need your nominations. We want you to tell us who you think is the best of the best in the local theater world. We want to hear about actors, directors, musicians, stage managers, set designers, costume designers, producers, and other prominent members of the Rochester theater scene. A panel of judges will select inductees based on their innovation, dedication, passion, quality of their work and their lasting contribution to local theater.

A panel of judges will select Inductees based on the following criteria: INNOVATION DEDICATION PASSION QUALITY OF WORK LASTING CONTRIBUTION TO LOCAL THEATER Inductees will be announced at the 2013 TheatreROCS Showcase, scheduled for Saturday, April 13, at the JCC’s Hart Theater.


WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 30 [ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ] Acoustic Open Jam hosted by The Druids. The Rabbit Room, 61 N. Main St. 5821830. 7 p.m. Free. [ CLASSICAL ] Guest Recital - Dinosaur Annex. Kilbourn Hall, 26 Gibbs St. 8 p.m. $10. Grace Kelly performed Saturday, January 26, as part of the Exodus to Jazz series. PHOTO PROVIDED

Winter Creek Fest FRIDAY AND SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 1-2 WATER STREET MUSIC HALL, 204 N WATER ST. 7:30 P.M. | $15-$25 | WATERSTREETMUSIC.COM [ ROCK ] Chances are you or someone you know has

laced up his shoes, buttoned his fly, and danced to Creek’s improvised blend of rock, jazz, reggae, folk, bluegrass, and blues. Forty-two years is a long time to make friends, and Max Creek’s train keeps on rolling. The Connecticut-based quintet retains an intact core of John Rider (bass, vocals), Scott Murawski (guitars, vocals), Mark Mercier (keyboards, vocals) and has recently added Jamemurrell Stanley (percussion) and Bill Carbone (drums). Max Creek — the original Northeast jam band —headlines Winter Creek Fest, a two-night stand that also features local groups Friday In America, Fire Wheel, Bowla Cheats, Cravin’ Bliss, Third Wind, and Axis Armada. — BY ROMAN DIVEZUR

Swagglerock THURSDAY, JANUARY 31 DUBLAND UNDERGROUND, 315 ALEXANDER ST. 10 P.M. | $5-$15, 18+ | 232-7550 [ ELECTRONIC ] While this outfit’s mixes can tend

toward the nasty, it’s got an undeniable catchy swing that is certainly worth sticking around for. The night also features a whole grab bag of other DJs, including Skanntron, MK, and GhettoTronics. GhettoTronics has decided to set up a slower jam, with an interesting dubby/electronic mix. As always, DJs will be scattered upstairs and down to keep Pontillos shaking (I like my pizza infused with the beat). — BY SUZAN PERO

Princess of jazz [ REVIEW ] BY RON NETSKY

Singer/saxophonist Grace Kelly took the stage at Hochstein Performance Hall Saturday night surrounded by Pete McCann on guitar; Evan Gregor, bass; and Jordan Perlson, drums. All three bespectacled men wore drab, everyday clothing, which served to focus most of the attention on Kelly in her chain-link miniskirt. She looked great, but it was a bit disconcerting to watch a beautiful 20-yearold woman who seemed to have the musical soul of a 1950’s hard-bop sax player. Let’s just say Hank Mobley never had to worry about straps falling down. The Exodus To Jazz series, which had to cancel several concerts due to poor ticket sales just a few months ago, drew an enthusiastic audience of 426 for the Kelly show, its second-largest ever. Kelly gave patrons an excellent concert, mixing her saxophone prowess with jazz vocals and examples of her contemporary songwriting. The songwriting was the only uneven element, ranging from the beautifully composed “Eggshells” to the cliché-ridden “Don’t Box Me In.” The good news is her new material is her best. “Autumn Song,” an instrumental meant to evoke leaves changing colors and falling from trees, actually kind of conjured up that image. A New Orleansstyle blues march nicely captured the

submissions Submissions should be 400-500 words in an essay format. In the essay, please describe why your nominee deserves this award, citing specific examples of the person's work and how they meet the criteria above. You may nominate yourself, or another member of the local theater community.

EMAIL Nominations TO:

Send nominations to:

e-mail to eric@rochester-citynews.com with the subject line “Rochester Theater Hall of Fame.”

Rochester Theater Hall of Fame c/o City Newspaper 250 N Goodman St. Rochester, NY 14607

flavor of early jazz. And her ability to win over an audience with her playful personality has never been stronger. Rochester jazz fans have had a rare opportunity with Kelly. She performed at the Xerox Rochester International Jazz Festival in both 2010 and 2011, so many in the audience were seeing her for the third time in three-and-a-half years. We’ve watched as she’s grown from a teen-aged wunderkind into a formidable, mature saxophonist. Kelly mixed it up nicely throughout her sets, shifting between full-band instrumentals and vocal tunes. On her freescatting rendition of “Bye Bye Blackbird,” in which she riffed about how good it was to be back in Rochester, she was accompanied only by Gregor on bass. She also pared down the sound with a fine saxophone and bass version of Thelonious Monk’s “’Round Midnight.” But the highlights of the night for me were two classics transformed by Kelly into irresistible funk. Bill Withers’ “Ain’t No Sunshine” received a gritty treatment punctuated by Kelly’s best solo flight of the night. The final tune, George Gershwin’s “Summertime,” sounded more like the “Theme From Shaft” due to McCann’s ubiquitous wah-wah guitar. But it somehow worked.

[ COUNTRY ] Big D. Dinosaur Bar-B-Que, 99 Court St. 9 p.m. Free. [ DJ/ELECTRONIC ] DJ Adam. Nashvilles, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. 334-3030. Call for info. Call for info. Teen Set 45 Party. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. Midnight. Free. Y Not Wednesday w/DJ ET. Plush, 151 St. Paul St. 2325650. Call for info. Call for info. [ JAZZ ] Amanda Ashley. Prosecco Italian Restaurant, 1550 New York 332. 924-8000. 6 p.m. Call for info. Captain Marvel w/Rochester Hand Drum Circle. Tala Vera, 155 State St. 546-3845. 6 p.m. Free before 9:30 p.m., $5 after. Jim Nelson. Lemoncello, 137 West Commercial St. 3858565. 7:30 p.m. Free. Stringplicity. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 7:30 p.m. Free. The Swooners. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. 585662-5555. 6 p.m. Free. Vince Ercolamento& Joe Chiappone Jazz Quartet. Murph’s Irondequoit Pub, 705 Titus Ave. 342-6780. 8 p.m. Free. [ KARAOKE ] Italian American Karaoke. Italian American Community Center, 150 Frank Dimino Way. 5948882. 7:30 p.m. Free. continues on page 15

Submissions are due by Friday, February 15. Questions or concerns? can be addressed to eric@rochester-citynews.com OR VISIT www.rochestercitynewspaper.com

CITY

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 13


Music Our man, Thursday Acoustic Basement Tour

How’d you wind up solo and

FEAT. GEOFF RICKLY, VINNIE CARUANA, KOJI, BRIAN MARQUIS TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 5 BUG JAR, 219 MONROE AVE. 7:15 P.M. | BUGJAR.COM GEOFFRICKLY.COM

I came into this acoustic thing a little bit by accident. A promoter in Dallas invited me down to be part of this singer-songwriter series he had. And I was like, “Eh, I’m not crazy about it.” But while I was down there and learning how to play guitar so I could do it, I started writing some other stuff and thought I’d record it, because I liked it. I didn’t want to start another career, so I recorded it and gave it away. Then Acoustic Basement asked me to do this Warped Tour thing and I was like, “I’ll do half of it for fun, this isn’t going to be a regular thing for me --- I’ve got a job screenwriting and I write commercials.” But it went great and by the end I was like, I could do this.  

[ INTERVIEW ] BY FRANK DE BLASE

READ THIS ISSUE OF CITY ONLINE ON ISSUU FOR FREE! • READ THE ENTIRE PAPER, COVER TO COVER • LINK TO SPECIFIC PAGES • BROWSE BACK ISSUES & SPECIAL SECTIONS

After an almost 15-year run, emo/alternative/ hardcore darlings Thursday called it a day in 2012, initially calling it simply a hiatus. But reality set in and frontman Geoff Rickly pulled the plug — literally. He has since started to explore his acoustic side. Rickly is coming to town as a part of The Acoustic Basement Tour, an unplugged offshoot of the Warped Tour, the popular summertime traveling punk-rock carnival where lyrics and songs in general often get blown out of the water by seething mosh pits, volume, and body heat. Despite its six-album discography and being cited as a major influence on bands in the hardcore/post-hardcore scene, Thursday never fully emerged from the underground. Qualities that got overlooked, or perhaps buried, in the musical chaos are now being brought to the light by Rickly and his lone guitar. Now the songs have nowhere to get lost and nowhere to hide. Rickly gave us a jingle to discuss the difference between a hiatus and a break-up, getting comfortably unplugged, and his band’s influence on those who didn’t get it. An edited transcript of our conversation follows. CITY: So is Thursday really kaput?

Geoff Rickly: Yeah, it looks that way. I guess I could imagine some situation where we’ll play a show at some point in the future. We just really said “hiatus” so we would never feel guilty if we did do another show, but not because we were just taking a break. I felt it was a little misleading to say “hiatus.” We broke up.   What was behind the break up?

CHECK IT OUT NOW ON YOUR COMPUTER, PHONE OR TABLET

Personal health issues of one of the members. And we had a good run, almost 15 years. So why change now? And I think most of our fans feel we ended on our strongest record and it was like, Well, maybe this is all happening for a reason. We’re not going to ruin our legacy by bringing in a new member or release a shitty record and go out with a whimper.

ISSUU.COM /ROCCITYNEWS

And undo your cool?

Exactly. Some bands wait too long and undo their cool and it’s like, you don’t get it back, you know?

14 CITY JANUARY 30 - FEBRUARY 5, 2013

unplugged?

How was it received?  Geoff Rickly, formerly of the hardcore band Thursday, is now The first tour was crazy exploring acoustic music. PHOTO BY STEPHEN MCGILL packed theaters. I thought, “I like doing this. This is great.” Are you working against what you were? So I started writing more songs. And then I’m totally working against Geoff they offered this tour with Koji and Brian; from Thursday. “Yes, I will definitely do this.”

How do you write for this compared to Thursday?

It is so different because the way I used to write for Thursday, I’d come up with a riff in my head that I could hum, I’d find a guitar and I’d show it to the band. And they’d say, “We see what you’re trying to play, but it’s not what you were playing.” I had such great players to lean on, it was a crutch. And now I actually have to commit to playing well to get the ideas out of my head and sounding good. It’s really scary. Aside from the obvious shift in volume, how are the songs different?

I’m Geoff from Thursday, so I’m going to sound like Geoff from Thursday. The things I care about are the same. The songs are soft, not loud, but they still end up in the same emotional territory. But on the other side of it, when I would scream my head off [in Thursday], I was still buried under five musicians playing at top volume. And now, I can go super quiet and the whole theater will be silent. And then when I let out a scream, it shocks people. They react to a singer and a guitar like speech; as if I’m talking to them or yelling or telling them a secret. They connect even though they may not know why.

Ultimately, what was Thursday’s impact on hardcore?

It’s hard to measure. If you were young in the early 2000’s, there was a pretty inescapable cultural impact it had. You could say there was an underground vein of hardcore that had no hopes of ever being commercial. And when Thursday stumbled into being a really huge band at the time and suddenly this whole generation of younger kids came up wanting to sound like us --- like My Chemical Romance, The Used, Story of the Year… Thursday isn’t a household name, but we had such an impact on the scene, for better or for worse.   What do you think of these younger bands?

I think they took from Thursday what was least important and made it the most important. And they ignored everything like the post-modern theory, or narrative as a device that works with the thematic construct of a song… the things that I, being a lit major, thought were really cool. So the short answer is, they sound like Thursday. The long answer is, they have nothing to do with Thursday. It’s disappointing, but at the same time it’s an ego trip.


WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 30 Karaoke at Mayfield’s Pub. Mayfield’s Pub, 669 N Winton Rd. 288-7199. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke at Sanibel Cottage. Sanibel Cottage, 1517 Empire Blvd. 671-9340. 6 p.m. Free. Karaoke at California Brew Haus. California Brew Haus, 402 Ridge Rd. West. 6211480. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke w/Cyd Scarlett. Jose & Willy’s, 20 Lakeshore Drive. 905-0222. 8:30 p.m. Karaoke w/Mark. Flipside Bar & Grill, 2001 E Main St. 2883930. 9 p.m. Free. [ OPEN MIC ] Open Acoustic Mic Night w/ Mandy. Shorts Bar & Grill, 35 N. Main St. 388-0136. 9 p.m. Free. Open Mic at Jeffrey’s. Jeffrey’s, 3115 E. Henrietta Rd. 4864937. 7 p.m. Call for info. Open Mic Jam Boulder Alexander St.. Boulder Coffee Co. Alexander St., 100 Alexander St. 454-7140. 8 p.m. Open Mic w/Steve West. Muddy Waters Coffee HouseGeneseo, 53 Main St. 2439111. 7 p.m. Free. [ POP/ROCK ] Haewa. Temple Bar and Grille, 109 East Avenue. 402-9802. Call for info. Underwater Bear Ballet w/ Barry, Greyhound Bandits. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. MIDNIGHT: Wolfkrieg Blitzer & His Mind People Present: Unzip your Human Suits. $6-$8.

THURSDAY, JANUARY 31 [ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ] Dave McGrath. The Cottage Hotel, 1390 Pittsford Mendon Rd. 624-1390. 7 p.m. Free. Hiroya Tsukamoto. Bernuzio Uptown Music, 122 East Ave. 473-6140. 7 p.m. Call for info. Jim Lane. Murph’s Irondequoit Pub, 705 Titus Ave. 3426780. 8 p.m. Free. Temperamental Falcons w/ The Silver Threads, Rebecca Davis. Tala Vera, 155 State St. 546-3845. 7 p.m. $5. [ CLASSICAL ] Eastman at Washington Square Lunchtime Concerts. 1st Universalist Church, 150 S. Clinton Ave. 274-1400. 12:15 p.m. Free. Eastman Opera Theatre George Frederic Handel’s Orlando. Eastman School of Music, 26 Gibbs St. 2741000. Thur-Sat: 7:30 p.m., Sunday: 2 p.m. $10-$20. Hey Dude After Hours 1st Anniversary Celebration: The Campbell Brothers w/Chis Beard. Sticky Lips BBQ Juke Joint, 830 Jefferson Rd. 2925544. 8 p.m. $10-$15.

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The musical project that would become Temperamental Falcons was conceived by Andy Schmitz and Jeff Coles Smith toward the end of 2009. Over the next year, Schmitz and Smith wrote and recorded a slew of songs, fashioning an interesting new take on the ever-expansive genre of indie-folk. In November 2010, Brian Richards, of Mountain Town Music in Park City, Utah, heard some of these raw recordings and was impressed. Soon after, Richards invited them to play at the Sundance Film Festival in 2011. The invitation spurred the duo to procure more musicians. Schmitz’s wife, Lisa, joined the group, adding another vocal talent as well as a keyboardist. Meghan and Chris Cameron, who at the time made up the band Hellcat Maggie, also came aboard bringing along the ukulele, bass, and a bunch of songs they had written. The line-up, and its intriguing collection of talent, started simmering at Sundance and now boils over with an energetic and ethereal sound they like to call “Atmosphericana.” Rochester-roots rockers The Silver Threads open the bill. Temperamental Falcons perform Thursday, January 31, 7 p.m. at Tala Vera, 153 State St. $5. 546-3845, tala-vera. com. — BY DAVID YOCKEL, JR. [ DJ/ELECTRONIC ] 18+ Thursdays. ONE Nightclub and Lounge, 1 Ryan Alley. 5461010. 10 p.m. Free before 11, $3-$10 after. DJ Matt. Nashvilles, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. 334-3030. Call for info. Call for info. DJ Sal DeSantis. Center Cafe, 150 Frank Dimino Way. 5948882. 7 p.m. Call for info. Karaoke at Panorama. Panorama Night Club & Sports Bar, 730 Elmgrove Rd. 2472190. 9 p.m. Free. Revolution Thursdays. Grotto, 7 Lawrence St. 739-5377. Call for info. Thursday Night Shakedown.. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 11 p.m. Free. Tiki Thursdays: Shotgun Music DJ. McGhan’s Pub, 11 W. Main St. 924-3660. 7:30 p.m. Free. Tilt-a-Whirl Drag Show.. Tilt Nightclub & Ultralounge, 444 Central Ave. 232-8440. 11:15 pm & 12:30 am. $3. [ JAZZ ] Deborah Branch. Lemoncello, 137 West Commercial St. 3858565. 6 p.m. Free. Eastman Jazz. Acanthus Café, 337 East Ave. 585-319-5999. Call for info. Fred Vine. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 7:30 p.m. Free.

John Palocy Trio. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. 585662-5555. 6 p.m. Free. Phat Cats. Pane Vino Ristorante, 175 N. Water St. 232-6090. 8 p.m. Free. Ted Nicolosi and Shared Genes. Roncones Italian Restaurant, 232 Lyell Ave. 458-3090. 6 p.m. Free [ KARAOKE ] Karaoke at Center Cafe. Center Cafe, 150 Frank Dimino Way. 594-8882. 7 p.m. Free. Karaoke at Willow Inn. Willow Inn, 428 Manitou Rd. 3923489. 8 p.m. Free. Karaoke at Pineapple Jack’s. Pineapple Jack’s, 485 Spencerport Rd. 247-5225. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke at Brickwood Grill. Brickwood Grill, 250 Monroe Ave. 730-8230. 9 p.m. Call for info. Karaoke Night w/Debbie Randyn. Pittsford Pub, 60 N. Main St. 586-4650. 9:30 p.m. Free. continues on page 16

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THURSDAY, JANUARY 31 Karaoke w/DJ Smooth. Club Clarissas, 293 Clarissa St. 2323430. Call for info. Karaoke w/George. Temple Bar and Grille, 109 East Ave. 2326000. 8 p.m. Free. Karaoke w/Shotgun Music. McGhan’s Pub, 11 W. Main St. 924-3660. Call for info. Free. Karaoke w/Summer Bob. Shorts Bar & Grill, 35 N. Main St. 3880136. 10 p.m. Free. Karoake w/Cyd Scarlett. Victor Village Inn, 34 East Main Street. 925-5025. 8:30 p.m. Call for info. [ OPEN MIC ] 5 Alarm Open Jam. The Firehouse Saloon, 814 S. Clinton Ave. 5853193832. 9 p.m. Call for info. Open Mic at Towpath Cafe. Towpath Cafe, 6 N. Main St. 377-0410. 6:30 p.m. Free. Open Mic Jam Boulder Park Ave.. Boulder Coffee Co. – Park Ave., 739 Park Ave. 697-0235. 7:30 p.m. Free. Open Mic w/Steve Piper. Flipside Bar & Grill, 2001 E Main St. 288-3930. 9 p.m. Free. Open Mike w/Mark Herrmann. California Brew Haus, 402 Ridge Rd. West. 621-1480. 8 p.m. Free. Spot Coffee Open Mic. SPoT Coffee, 200 East Ave. 585-6134600. 7 p.m. Call for info. [ REGGAE/JAM ] Reggae Thursday. Pure Night Club, 117 Liberty Pole Way. 4547230. 10 p.m. $5 before 11 pm. [ POP/ROCK ] C.J. Boyd w/Gaybot, Rash. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 8:30 p.m. Limited entry for unders. $6-$8. Five Alarm Open Jam. Firehouse Saloon, 814 South Clinton. 3193832. 9 p.m. Call for info. Our Friends Band. Dinosaur Bar-BQue, 99 Court St. 9 p.m. Free. West Webster Fire Department Tribute Concert w/Mesh, Paul Cummings w/the Crossroads Project, That Party Band, Big Eyed Phish, and Divided By Zero. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N. Water St. 585-325-5600. 6 p.m. $15-$30.

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 1 [ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ] Dave McGrath. Tackles on the Bay, 372 Manitou Rd. 3923370. 6:30 p.m. Free. Dave North w/Karin’s Pride. McGraw’s Irish Pub, 146 W Commercial St. 348-9091. 6 p.m. Free. Johnny Bauer. Victor Village Inn, 34 East Main Street. 585-9245025. 9 p.m. 21+. Call for info. Peg Dolan and “The Fiddler!”. Barry’s Old School Irish, 2 W. Main St. 545-4258. 7 p.m. Free. The Prickers w/The Cabin Killers. Sticky Lips BBQ Juke Joint, 830 Jefferson Rd. 292-5544. 8:30 p.m. $10-$15.

Yarms, Benny Beyond. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. $4-$8. Max Creek w/Friday In America, Fire Wheel, Bowla Cheats. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N. Water St. 585-325-5600. 7:30 p.m. $15-$25. The Reactions. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. 9 p.m. $3-$5. St. Louis School Rock the Arts Benefit Concert. St. Louis School, 11 Rand Place. 6:30 p.m. $5.

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 2

CLASSICAL | CRAIGHEAD MEMORIAL CONCERTS

JAZZ | ETHNIC HERITAGE ENSEMBLE

A cherished member of the Eastman School of Music organ community, David Craighead, died last March, and on Friday, February 1, the ESM Organ Department is presenting a two-location memorial concert in his honor. The first program will be held at Christ Church at 6 p.m. on the Craighead-Saunders organ, which was constructed based upon a 1776 model by Adam Gottlob Casparini. The second program will be at St. Paul’s Episcopal Church (8 p.m.) on the 1927 E.M. Skinner organ. Organists from all over the country are scheduled to perform, including Dean Billmeyer, Mel Butler, Susan Ferré, William Trafka, David Mulbury, and Cindy Lindeen-Martin. Speakers will also offer reflections upon Craighead’s career at ESM (spanning 1955-1992) and his roles as an international organist, pedagogue, and church musician.

In 1972 percussionist extraordinaire Kahil El’Zabar traveled from his home in Chicago to the University of Ghana. He returned with a mission: to fuse aspects of Black American music with traditional African music. El’Zabar, who was already a force on Chicago’s vibrant jazz scene, formed the Ethnic Heritage Ensemble. Since then he’s branched out to record and tour with Stevie Wonder and work with Julie Taymor and Garth Fagan on “The Lion King,” but he’s never left the EHE. When the ensemble takes the stage at Lovin’ Cup, El’Zabar will be joined by two of the brightest stars in the Chicago pantheon: saxophonist Ernest Khabeer Dawkins and the trumpeter Corey Wilkes who, on his last visit to Rochester, expertly played two trumpets at once.

Christ Church is located at 141 East Ave., St. Paul’s Episcopal Church is at 25 Westminster Road. Admission is free, but donations will be accepted to benefit the Craighead Scholarship Fund at the Eastman School of Music. Call 271-6513 ext. 109 for info or visit esm.rochester.edu. — BY PALOMA A. CAPANNA Ralph Louis. Rochester Plaza Hotel, 70 State St. 546-3450. 6 p.m. Free. Sons of Synergy. Jeffrey’s, 3115 E. Henrietta Rd. 486-4937. 9 p.m. Call for info. [ BLUES ] Big Blue House w/Rob Rioia Experience. Johnny’s Irish Pub, 1382 Culver Rd. 224-0990. 5 p.m. Free. Dirty Bourbon Blues Band. Dinosaur Bar-B-Que, 99 Court St. 10 p.m. Free. Eric and the Bluesbirds. The Beale New Orleans Grille and Bar-South Ave., 693 South Ave. 271-4650. 7 p.m. Free. The Fools w/This Other Life. Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. 6 p.m. $4-$7. [ CLASSICAL ] Eastman Opera Theatre - George Frederic Handel’s Orlando. Eastman School of Music, 26 Gibbs St. 274-1000. Thur-Sat: 7:30 p.m., Sunday: 2 p.m. $10-$20 Embracing Modernity: Beata Golec, piano. Nazareth College Wilmot Recital Hall, 4245 East Avenue. 389-2700. 7:30 p.m. Free. Memorial Concert for David Craighead. Christ Church

16 CITY JANUARY 30 - FEBRUARY 5, 2013

(141 East Ave.): 6 p.m. St Paul’s Episcopal Church (25 Westminster Rd.): 8 p.m. Call for info. RPO: New York Cityscapes. Kodak Hall at Eastman Theater, 60 Gibbs St. 8 p.m. Jeff Tyzik, conductor. Rochester City Ballet Jamey Leverett, director. $15-$82. [ DJ/ELECTRONIC ] Bang Fridays. ONE Nightclub and Lounge, 1 Ryan Alley. 5461010. Call for info. Call for info. Chill Out Fridays Happy Hour. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. 5:30 p.m. Free. DJ Bac Spin. Plush, 151 St. Paul St. 232-5650. 8 p.m. Call for info. DJ Blake. 140 Alex Bar & Grill, 140 Alexander St. 585-2561000. 10 p.m. Call for info. DJ Cedric. Vertex Nightclub, 169 North Chestnut St. 2325498. 10 p.m. $3-$8. DJ Energon. Vertex Nightclub, 169 North Chestnut St. 2325498. 10 p.m. $3-$8. Fresh Meat Fridays w/Samantha Vega, DJ Mighty Mic. Tilt Nightclub & Ultralounge, 444 Central Ave. 232-8440. 11:15 p.m. & 12:30 a.m. $4-$12. Latino Heat Fridays. Heat Nightclub, 336 East Ave. 8990620. 10 p.m. Call for info.

The Ethnic Heritage Ensemble plays Wednesday, February 6, 8:30 p.m. at Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Drive. $18$20. lovincup.com. — BY RON NETSKY Lube After Dark.. Quaker Steak & Lube, 2205 Buffalo Rd. 6979464. 9:30 p.m. Free. Reggaeton w/DJ Carlos. La Copa Ultra Lounge, 235 W. Ridge Rd. 254-1050. 10 p.m. Free. Sexy Fridays w/DJ Wizz. Pure Night Club, 117 Liberty Pole Way. 454-7230. 10 p.m. Call for info. [ JAZZ ] 43rd Annual Penfield Jazz Fundraiser Concert ft. Tamir Hendelman. Penfield High School, 25 High School Dr. 7:30 p.m. $6-$10. Champagne & The Swooners. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. 585-662-5555. 6 p.m. Free. Fred Costello & Roger Eckers Jazz Duo. Charley Brown’s, 1675 Penfield Rd. 385-9202. 7:30 p.m. Free. Marco Amadio. Pane Vino Ristorante, 175 N. Water St. 232-6090. 6:30 p.m. Free. Shades of Blue. Lemoncello, 137 West Commercial St. 3858565. 6:30 p.m. Free. Sofrito. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 8:30 p.m. Free. Ted Nicolosi and Shared Genes. The Pultneyville Grill, 4135 Mill St. (315) 589-4512. 7 p.m. Free. Uptown Groove. Prosecco Italian Restaurant, 1550 New York 332. 924-8000. 6:30 p.m. Call for info. [ KARAOKE ] Karaoke at Pineapple Jack’s. Pineapple Jack’s, 485

Spencerport Rd. 247-5225. 9 p.m. Free Karaoke w/Cody. Nashvilles, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. 3343030. 5 p.m. Free. Karaoke at Flaherty’s Webster. Flaherty’s Webster, 1200 Bay Rd. 671-0816. 9 p.m. Call for info. Karaoke by Dan & Sherri. Barnard Restaurant & Party House, 360 Maiden Ln. 585663-1250. 8 p.m. Free. Karaoke w/Cyd Scarlett!. Norton’s Pub, 1730 Goodman Street North. 266-3570. 10 p.m. Karaoke w/Krazy George. Scotland Yard Pub, 187 Saint Paul St. 730-5030. 10 p.m. Call for info. Karaoke w/Summer Bob. Shorts Bar & Grill, 35 N. Main St. 3880136. 10 p.m. Free [ HIP-HOP/RAP ] I$hy w/Red Inc., Pat Buchanan’s Hearse. Tala Vera, 155 State St. 546-3845. 8 p.m. $5-$7. [ POP/ROCK ] 49 Days. Acanthus Café, 337 East Ave. 585-319-5999. Call for info. Eyeslave. Montage Music Hall, 50 Chestnut St. 232-1520. Call for info. $7. Landmark. Boulder Coffee Co. Alexander St., 100 Alexander St. 454-7140. 8 p.m. Call for info. The Lobby Presents: Adelin Katius (art opening) w/Dream Girls, Ghost Country, Sparx &

[ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ] All Acoustic. Towpath Cafe, 6 N. Main St. 377-0410. 7 p.m. Free. Barry’s Crossing. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. 4 p.m. Free. Dang!. Sticky Lips BBQ Juke Joint, 830 Jefferson Rd. 2925544. 9 p.m. Free. Friends Unplugged. Flaherty’s Webster, 1200 Bay Rd. 6710816. Call for info. Michael W. Lasota. Starry Nites Café, 696 University Ave. 8 p.m. Free. [ BLUES ] The Crawdiddies. The Beale New Orleans Grille and BarSouth Ave., 693 South Ave. 271-4650. 7:30 p.m. Free. Mama Hart Band. The Landing Bar and Grille, 30 Fairport Village Landing. 425-7490. 10 p.m. Free. [ CLASSICAL ] Barnes & Noble Bookfair & Concert. Barnes & Noble, 3349 Monroe Ave. 586-6020. 10 p.m. Call for info. Eastman Opera Theatre George Frederic Handel’s Orlando. Eastman School of Music, 26 Gibbs St. 274-1000. Thur-Sat: 7:30 p.m., Sunday: 2 p.m. $10-$20 RPO: New York Cityscapes. Kodak Hall at Eastman Theater, 60 Gibbs St. 8 p.m. Jeff Tyzik, conductor. Rochester City Ballet Jamey Leverett, director. $15-$82 [ DJ/ELECTRONIC ] DJ Big Reg. Plush, 151 St. Paul St. 232-5650. 10 p.m. Call for info. DJ Darkwave. Vertex Nightclub, 169 North Chestnut St. 2325498. 10 p.m. $3-$8. DJ Trancesend. Decibel Lounge., 45 Euclid St. 7544645. 10 p.m. $5. Dynamic Saturdays. ONE Nightclub and Lounge, 1 Ryan Alley. 546-1010. Call for info. Call for info. Ghostfeeder. Montage Music Hall, 50 Chestnut St. 2321520. 8 p.m. $7. La Selva. Tilt Nightclub & Ultralounge, 444 Central Ave. 232-8440. 10 p.m. Call for info. Latino Saturdays w/DJ Bobby Base. Pure Night Club, 117 Liberty Pole Way. 454-7230. 10 p.m. Call for info. Music Mix w/ DJ. Captain Jack’s Goodtime Tavern, 8505 Greig


[ JAZZ ] 43rd Annual Penfield Jazz Fundraiser Concert ft. Tamir Hendelman. Penfield High School, 25 High School Dr. 7:30 p.m. $6-$10. Annie Wells. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 8:30 p.m. Free. Bob Sneider. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. 585-6625555. 6 p.m. Free. El Rojo Jazz. Lemoncello, 137 West Commercial St. 3858565. 7 p.m. Free. Fred Costello & Roger Eckers Jazz Duo. Charley Brown’s, 1675 Penfield Rd. 385-9202. 7:30 p.m. Free Hot Streak. Prosecco Italian Restaurant, 1550 New York 332. 924-8000. 6:30 p.m. Call for info. Prime Time Funk: Ralph Ortiz Memorial Show. Ray Ray’s Bar & Grill, 2260 Clifford Ave. 4131661. 9:30 p.m. $10. The Swooners. Brickwood Grill, 250 Monroe Ave. 730-8230. 10 p.m. Call for info. Ted Nicolosi and Shared Genes. Jasmine’s Asian Fusion, 657 Ridge Rd. 216-1290. 6:30 p.m. Free. The White Hots. The Pultneyville Grill, 4135 Mill St. (315) 589-4512. Call for info.

[ R&B ] Mitty & The Followers. Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. 9:30 p.m. $4-$7. [ POP/ROCK ] Mansfield Ave. Flaherty’s Honeoye Falls, 60 W. Main St. 497-7010. Call for info. Max Creek w/Carvin’ Bliss, Thurd Wind, Axis Armada. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N. Water St. 585-325-5600. 7:30 p.m. $15-$25. MoChester. Richmond’s Tavern, 21 Richmond Street. (585) 270-8570. 10 p.m. $5. Moon Zombies. Pineapple Jack’s, 485 Spencerport Rd. 247-5225. 9 p.m. 21+. $5. Punkrockaerobics! w/King Vitamin. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 7 p.m. $5-$7. Second Trip, Counter Pursuit, The Red Lion. Tala Vera, 155 State St. 546-3845. 8 p.m. $5-$7. Shakin’ Bones. Johnny’s Irish

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 5

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 3

[ BLUES ] Bluesday Tuesday Blues Jam. P.I.’s Lounge, 495 West Ave. 8 p.m. Call for info.

[ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ] Celtic Music Sundays: John Dady. Temple Bar and Grille, 109 East Ave. 232-6000. 7 p.m. Free. [ CLASSICAL ] An Afternoon with Clara and Robert. Trinity Montessori School, 100 Golden Flyer Drive. 586-1044. 2:30 p.m. $10. Compline. Christ Church, 141 East Ave. 454-3878. 9 p.m. Free, donations accepted. Eastman Opera Theatre George Frederic Handel’s Orlando. Eastman School of Music, 26 Gibbs St. 2741000. Thur-Sat: 7:30 p.m., Sunday: 2 p.m. $10-$20. Eastman-Ranlet Series - Ying Quartet. Kilbourn Hall, 26 Gibbs St. 3 p.m. $10-$20. Musical Reflections: Beverly Smoker, piano. Nazareth College Wilmot Recital Hall, 4245 East Avenue. 389-2700. 3 p.m. Free. RPO: Feel the Beat. Hochstein Performance Hall, 50 N Plymouth Ave. 454-4596. 2 p.m. Michael Butterman, conductor. Shodekeh, beatboxer. Hochstein School of Music Percussion Ensemble. $10-$15. [ KARAOKE ] Karaoke w/Cyd Scarlett. Jose & Willy’s, 20 Lakeshore Drive. 905-0222. 8:30 p.m

MONDAY, FEBRUARY 4 [ DJ/ELECTRONIC ] Manic Monday Retro Dance:David Lee Rad, DJ Cub. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. Free. Manic Mondays Dance Night. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 11:30 p.m. Free. Synthetica. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 7:30 p.m. Free. [ JAZZ ] Ben Waara. Lemoncello, 137 West Commercial St. 3858565. 6 p.m. Free. Jesse Collins Duo. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. 585662-5555. 5:30 p.m. Free. [ KARAOKE ] Karaoke w/Walt O’Brien. Flipside Bar & Grill, 2001 E Main St. 288-3930. 9 p.m. Free. [ OPEN MIC ] Open Jam at Thirsty Frog. Thirsty Frog, 511 E. Ridge Rd. 7305285. 9 p.m. Call for info.

[ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ] Johnny Bauer. The Cottage Hotel, 1390 Pittsford Mendon Rd. 624-1390. 7 p.m. Call for info.

[ DJ/ELECTRONIC ] 2 Reason Tuesdays w/DJ Zio. Nathaniel’s Pub, 251 Exchange Boulevard. 2328470. Call for info. Free. DJ Ghetto Blaster. Club Clarissas, 293 Clarissa St. 232-3430. Call for info. DJ Kathy. Nashvilles, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. 334-3030. Call for info. Call for info. Old School Tuesdays. Grotto, 7 Lawrence St. 739-5377. Call for info. Free. [ JAZZ ] Gary Chudyk. Prosecco Italian Restaurant, 1550 New York 332. 924-8000. 5:30 p.m. Call for info. Norman Tibbils. Lemoncello, 137 West Commercial St. 3858565. 6 p.m. Free. Ted Nicolosi and Shared Genes. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. 585-662-5555. 6 p.m. Free. [ KARAOKE ] Karaoke at 140 Alex. 140 Alex Bar & Grill, 140 Alexander St. 585-256-1000. 10:30 p.m. Free. Karaoke with Tina P.. Wintonaire, 628 Winton Road North. 730-8350. 9 p.m. Free. [ OPEN MIC ] Golden Link Singaround. Twelve Corners Presbyterian Church, 1200 S. Winton Rd. 244-8585. 7:30 p.m. Free. Open Mic Night. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. 8:30 p.m. Free Open Mic w/String Theory. Johnny’s Irish Pub, 1382 Culver Rd. 224-0990. 8 p.m. Free. [ POP/ROCK ] Acoustic Basement Tour ft. Geoff Rickly w/Vinnie Caruana, A Loss for Words, Koji, and Brian Marquis. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 7:15 p.m. $12$32. Artisan Craft and Music Night ft. Todd Bradley. Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. 6 p.m. Free.

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[ KARAOKE ] Karaoke at Pineapple Jack’s. Pineapple Jack’s, 485 Spencerport Rd. 247-5225. first Saturday of every month, 9 p.m. Call for info Karaoke at 140 Alex. 140 Alex Bar & Grill, 140 Alexander St. 585-256-1000. 10:30 p.m. Free. Karaoke w/Cyd Scarlett!. Norton’s Pub, 1730 Goodman Street North. 266-3570. 10 p.m. Kick-Ass Karaoke. Temple Bar and Grille, 109 East Ave. 2326000. 10 p.m. Free.

Pub, 1382 Culver Rd. 2240990. 8 p.m. Free. Teagan & The Tweeds. Dinosaur Bar-B-Que, 99 Court St. 10 p.m. Free. This Life, Low Flying Planes. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. 9 p.m. $3-$5.

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February 1 • 6-9pm FirstFridayRochester.org

A.R.T.S Gallery at Aviv Cafe Artistically Revealing the Spirit Arts Art and Vintage on Main (AVoM) The Life & Work of Seth Bachmann and Friends Bernunzio Uptown Music Garden Fresh Cat Clay Hunk of Burnin' Love Chartreuse Studios LAY3RS Colleen Buzzard Studio Momentum Creative Wellness Coalition Mark Bangs Gallery r Fluidity Headz Up Hats Hat Quarium Hungerford Urban Artisans (HUA) First Friday Image City Photography Gallery THE BIG PICTURE JGK Galleries Art Roc NY 2013 Showcase LESSONS at the LOFT February Open House Rochester Art Club First Friday Rochester Contemporary Art Center (RoCo) Makers & Mentors

Spot Coffee On the Other Side The Crafting Social Good Karma Social: Blankets for Children. The Gallery@Equal=Grounds Khoury Humphrey's Unframed The Lobby at Bug Jar ART OPENING The Shoe Factory Art Co-op Art is for Lovers Writers & Books First Friday February T H I S M O N T H O N LY

1570 Gallery at Valley Manor Lights and Shadows: Family Art Show Hedonist Artisan Chocolates Hedonist Valentine's Day Chocolate Tasting The Caroline • Women's Photo Exhibit FEBRUARY 1 HIGHLIGHTS:

• Makers & Mentors at Rochester Contemporary Art Center (RoCo) • First Friday at Hungerford Urban Artisans (HUA) • Hunk of Burnin' Love at Cat Clay • Seth Bachmann & Friends at AVoM • Lights and Shadows: Family Art Show at 1570 Gallery at Valley Manor • Good Karma Social at The Crafting Social • First Friday at Rochester Art Club • LAY3RS at Chartreuse Studios • On the Other Side at Spot Coffee • Artistically Revealing the Spirit Arts at A.R.T.S

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 17


Theater

Art Exhibits

Remi Sandri in “The Agony and the Ecstasy of Steve Jobs,” now on stage at Geva Theatre Nextstage. PHOTO BY CHRIS HOLDEN

Peeling the Apple “The Agony and the Ecstasy of Steve Jobs” THROUGH FEBRUARY 10 GEVA THEATRE NEXTSTAGE, 75 WOODBURY BLVD. TICKETS START AT $30 | 232-4382, GEVATHEATRE.ORG [ REVIEW ] BY ADAM LUBITOW

The complete title of “The Agony and the Ecstasy of Steve Jobs,” the one-man show currently being performed at Geva’s Nextstage theater, has a brief addendum attached to it: “Version 2.0.” This small, but not insignificant addition refers to the fact that the one-man show — a polemic meant to call attention to the inhumane working conditions at Foxconn, the factory in Shenzhen, China where Apple’s line of products (along with most of the world’s electronics) are produced — had to be altered from its original version by its author, Mike Daisey. The writer got himself into a bit of trouble shortly after he began performing the monologue, when, following an appearance on the popular public-radio show “This American Life,” it came to light that certain facts contained in the piece were not entirely true. The problem wasn’t simply that Daisey fudged a few facts for the sake of dramatic effect; that in itself isn’t necessarily an issue if you’re out to create an entertaining bit of theater. The problem lay in the fact that he was attempting to pass off the show as hard journalism, and a work entirely of nonfiction. 18 CITY JANUARY 30 - FEBRUARY 5, 2013

After all, as a journalist, you don’t get points for writing stories that are “mostly true.” Following the controversy that erupted in the wake of this revelation, Daisey revised his work, cutting out the offending material as well as making reference to the controversy itself within the piece. Daisey chose to open source the monologue, putting its text online, free of charge, as a way to encourage productions like this one, staged in theaters across the country. Geva’s production has been adapted from that revised version of Daisey’s monologue, with an actor, Remi Sandri, playing the role of Mike Daisey. In the show currently at Geva, Daisey describes his experience visiting the massive Shenzhen plant, where nearly half-a-million workers are employed, observing what he can of the conditions of the factory. His experiences in China are interspersed with a rundown of the career of Steve Jobs and his involvement in the rise and fall (and, of course, rise again) of Apple computers, explaining exactly how the company got to be in the market-leading position it enjoys today. It doesn’t provide the most flattering portrait of Jobs, describing the beloved entrepreneur as a “visionary asshole” and a ruthless businessman (in all fairness, that portrayal is apparently not untrue). The show has become so inextricably linked

with its creator that it’s odd to see it performed by an actor playing the role of Mike Daisey. Indeed, during the talkback following the performance, many audience members continued to address Sandri as though he

himself had written the monologue, despite his repeated attempts to set them straight. Daisey is a talented writer, and Sandri makes the most of the role, clearly relishing the words he’s been given to deliver. He gives a charismatic performance, and because of him the material is even more entertaining then it probably has any right to be. The monologue tends to hammer home its points, and it can at times feel like a lecture. Most of the cut material consisted of Daisey’s supposed one-on-one interactions with the factory workers, including underage children and an elderly man whose hands had been mangled by the machinery he operated, and by all accounts those were the original monologue’s most powerful moments. In version 2.0, those moments have been reduced to brief, generalized mentions of crowds of workers eager to share their stories, though we never hear them. It’s not hard to see why Daisey chose to add those fabricated anecdotes. It’s difficult to judge without having seen that original production, but learning what was excised from the monologue’s text helps pinpoint exactly what it feels like the show is now missing: the human heart at the center of Daisey’s entire argument. A large screen above the stage projects motion graphics and title cards throughout the piece. The images can be somewhat on the nose (at one point, a skull is superimposed over the Apple logo), but the effect goes a long way in helping break up the monologue, which would otherwise simply be a sea of words crashing over the audience. It’s a canny staging decision on the part of the show’s production team. A proverb shown on the screen as the show opens boils down the ultimate idea behind the show: “If you want to enjoy a good steak, don’t visit the slaughterhouse.” It’s clearly Daisey’s hope to wake people up, asking us why so many don’t know how their precious things are made, or if we simply made a conscious decision not to think about it. While it’s hard to argue with Daisey’s assertion that it’s important that people acknowledge these realities, as the Shenzhen factory, and others like it, have gotten widespread coverage in the media since the monologue was first produced, it’s less clear how much of an impact his words can still have. In its current version, “The Agony and the Ecstasy of Steve Jobs��� often feels like an intriguing, well-intentioned experiment rather than a wholly satisfying evening of theater. However, judging by the reaction during that post-performance Q&A, many in the audience seemed to be unaware of Apple’s production practices, so clearly the monologue continues to serve its purpose, educating the public and shining a light on the true, unseen (or ignored) cost of our materialistic, gadget-driven culture.

[ OPENING ] Art Roc NY 2013 Showcase. Fri., Feb. 1. JGK Galleries, 10 Vick Park A Reception Feb 1, 6-9 p.m 734-6581. jgkgalleries.com. Enrique Mora. Feb. 2-March 1. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. Through Mar 1 258-0400. thelittle.org. February First Friday at Main Street Artists’ Studio. Fri., Feb. 1, 5-9 p.m. Main Street Artists’ Gallery & Studio, 1115 E. Main St. Featured artist for February: Miriam Owens of Irondequoit, Music: Jazz by Ralph DeBergalis & Co 233-5645. suzizeftingkuhn@gmail.com. mainstreetartistsgallery.com. “Fluidity” Closing Reception. Fri., Feb. 1, 6-9 p.m. Gallery r, 100 college ave 256-3312. galleryr99@gmail.com. Hunk of Burnin’ Love. Feb. 1-March 31. Cat Clay, 1115 E. Main Street, Suite 225 Through Mar 31. Reception Feb 1 5-9 p.m. Glass & clay for your valentine by Paul Taylor & Clifton Wood 414-5643. catclay.com. Landscapes Revisted. Feb. 1-21. International Art Acquisitions, 3300 Monroe Ave. Through Feb 21. Featuring Marcella Gillenwater, Linda Kall, John Baughman, Monteiro Prestes, Sam Paonessa, Athanase Pell 264-1440. internationalartacquisitions.com. Light and Shadows. Feb. 1-March 8. Valley Manor, 1570 East Ave. Through Mar 8. MonFri 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Reception Feb 1, 6-8 p.m. A black and white art show by family artists: Dick Roberts, Allison Roberts, and Eric Cady 770-1923. Makers & Mentors. Wednesdays-Sundays Rochester Contemporary Arts Center, 137 East Ave. Through Mar 17. Wed-Sun 1-5 p.m. New paintings, prints, and mixed media works by Kurt Feuerherm, Peter Monacelli, Patricia Dreher, and Kristine Bouyoucos. In Lab Space: Heather Swenson. Reception Jan 31 6-10 p.m. & Feb 1 6-10 p.m 461-2222. rochestercontemporary.org. Monroe and Vicinity Biennial. Jan. 31-Feb. 24. Tower Fine Arts Center, SUNY Brockport, 180 Holley St. Through Feb 24. Reception Jan 31, 4-6 p.m 3952487. brockport.edu/finearts. “Nehemiah’s Wal”l by Deborah Ingerick. Feb. 1-28. Aviv Cafe, 321 East Ave Through Feb 28. Reception Feb 3, 6-9 p.m. Poetry by Arin Taylor. Live music and open painting 729-9916. Oxford Gallery, 267 Oxford St. Ray Easton and Jean K Stephens. Tuesdays-Saturdays and Sat., Feb. 2 Through Feb 23. Tue-Fri noon-5 p.m., Sat 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Reception February 2 5:30-7:30 p.m 271-5885. oxfordgallery.com. ReOpening the Space. Fri., Feb. 1, 6 p.m. Rochester Greenovation, 1199 East Main St. Join us as we celebrate the grand re-opening of The Space, half gallery, half performing arts venue Free. 288-7564. rochestergreen.org. “What Fury Fiends Find” Adelin Karius: New Paintings and


ART | MONROE & VICINITY BIENNIAL The sixth Monroe and Vicinity Biennial art show, on the SUNY Brockport campus, will celebrate the work of four distinguished upstate New York artists: Bruce Adams, Sarah Sutton, Holly Greenberg, and Bill Hastings (artwork pictured). An opening reception will be held Thursday, January 31, 4-6 p.m. at the Tower Fine Arts Center Gallery, and the show will continue to be displayed through February 24. The gallery is located at 180 Holley St., Brockport, and is open Monday-Friday 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Sunday 1-4 p.m. Admission is free. Parking is available at the Tower Fine Arts Center and requires a permit on weekdays, which can be acquired at the Raye H. Conrad Welcome Center for a cost of $4. For more information, call 395-2805 or visit brockport.edu/finearts. — BY ADAM LUBITOW Woodcuts. Feb. 1-March 31, 8 p.m.-2 a.m. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. Through Mar 31. Reception Feb 1 8 p.m.-2 p.m. Live music and album release for Sparx & Yarms and Dream Girls, also Ghost Country and Benny Beyond. $4 lobbydigital@gmail.com. lobbydigital.com. [ CONTINUING ] AAUW Art Forum, 494 East Ave. Off the Wall VII Members Exhibit. Mondays-Fridays, 10 a.m.-2 p.m Continues through Apr 19 by appointment only. 244-9892. Art and Vintage on Main, 101 Main St. “Lost Infinity” the works of Brett Maurer and Matthew Tully Dugan. ongoing. . artandvintageonmain.com. Arts Council for Wyoming County, 31 S Main St. “Local Color”. Through Mar 8. Reception Mar 8 6-8 p.m 2373517. artswyco.org. The Assisi Institute, 1400 North Winton Rd. “Toothpick World” by Stan Munro. Tue-Thu noon6 p.m., Fri noon-8 p.m., Sat 11 a.m.-4 p.m $5 suggested donation. 442-5010. assisiinstitute.org. Barnes & Noble, 3349 Monroe Ave. Penfield Art Association Winter Show. Through March 1. Through Mar 1. Mon-Sat 9 a.m.-10 p.m., Sun 9 a.m.-9 p.m. Reception and awards: Feb 3, 2-4 p.m 586-6020. penfieldartassociation.com. Black Radish Studio, 274 N Goodman. “Being Close to Far Away,” new work by Misha Tulek. Through Jan. 31. Through Jan 31. Mon-Fri 10-6 p.m., Sat 12-6 p.m. Reception Jan 4, 6-10 p.m 413-1278. blackradishstudio.com. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. Roc The Casbah: A Tribute to the Clash. Through Jan. 31, 8 p.m.-2 a.m. THE LOBBY

PRESENTS. Vintage Propaganda from the Collection of Jim Malley (Mercury Posters) and Clayton Cowles illustrations of The Clash $7 opening night only. The Caroline Gallery, 159 Caroline St. Photo Exhibit to Benefit Women’s Rights in India. Through Feb. 15. 2607607. joekewin@gmail.com. joekewin.com. Community Darkroom Gallery, 713 Monroe Ave. “Kaleidoscope”. Through Feb. 23. 271-5920. Crossroads Coffee House, 752 S Goodman St. Dead End City Art Show II. Through Feb. 28. Through Feb 28. 244-6787. kccrossroadscoffee.com. Davis Gallery, Houghton House, Hobart and William Smith Colleges, 1 Kings Lane, Geneva. From 500 Sketches by Frank P Phillips. MondaysSaturdays Through Mar 9. Mon-Fri 9 a.m.-5 p.m, Sat 1-5 p.m. 315-781-3487. hws.edu/ academics/art/exhibitions.aspx. Davison Gallery, Cultural Life Center, Roberts Wesleyan College, 2301 Westside Dr. Art Faculty Showcase. Through Feb. 15. Through Feb 15. Reception Jan 17, 5-7 p.m 594-6442. roberts.edu. Equal=Grounds, 750 South Ave. “Beautiful Ruins” by Paula Peters Marra. Through Jan. 31. gallery@equalgrounds. com. The Firehouse Gallery at Genesee Pottery, 713 Monroe Ave. TenNineteen: Return to Station. Through Feb. 10. 244-1730. geneseearts.org. Gallery at the Art and Music Library, Rush Rhees Library, University of Rochester, River Campus. (en)Gendered Juried Art. Through Feb. 27. Through Feb 27. Mon-Fri 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Opening Fri Jan 18, 5-7 p.m rochester.edu/college/wst.

Hartnett Gallery, Wilson Commons, University of Rochester, River Campus. Christopher Troutman: “Watching: US and Japan Drawing”. Tuesdays-Sundays Through Feb 17. Tue-Fri 11 a.m.-7 p.m., Sat-Sun 12-5 p.m 275-4188. blogs.rochester. edu/hartnett. High Falls Fine Art Gallery, 60 Browns Race. Tom Kim Solo Photography, “Text and Texture” and “Neil Montanus & James Montanus: A Glimpse of the World.” Through Feb 28. WedFri 11 a.m.-5:30 p.m., Sat 125:30 p.m., Sun 1-5 p.m. 3252030. centerathighfalls.org. Image City Photography Gallery, 722 University Ave. “The Big Picture”. Through Feb. 17 and Fri., Feb. 1. Through Feb 17. Wed-Sat 11 a.m.-7 p.m., Sun 12-4 p.m. Receptions Jan 25, 5-8:30 p.m. and Feb 1 5-9 p.m 4821976. dano@rochester.rr.com. imagecityphotographygallery. com. International Art Acquisitions, 3300 Monroe Ave. “Palms” by Bonnie Wolsky-Farid. Through Jan. 31. Through Jan 31. Mon-Fri 10 a.m.-9 p.m., Sat 10 a.m.-6 p.m., Sun noon-5 p.m 264-1440. internationalartacquisitions.com. I-Square Visions, 693 Titus Ave. “Tactile Art: The Warmth and Beauty of Fiber”. Through Feb. 14. zannebrummer@gmail.com. Joe Brown Gallery in the Printing & Book Arts Center, 713 Monroe Ave. Alphabet Soup: Student Show. Through Jan. 31. Letterpress Printed Type Specimens. Through Jan 31. 244-1730. geneseearts.org. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. Through Feb 1:“American Roadtrip” by Beth Bailey. 2580400. thelittle.org. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Avenue. Through Feb 10: “Changing Hands: Art Without Reservation 3” Contemporary Native North American Art.” In Lockhart Gallery through May 12: “Becoming Modern:Armory Show Artists at MAG.” Wed-Sun 11 a.m.-5 p.m., Thu until 9 p.m $5-$12. 276-8900. mag. rochester.edu. Mercer Gallery at Monroe Communtiy College, 1000 E Henrietta Rd. “A Reasonable Facsimilie”. Mondays-Fridays Through Feb 22. Mon-Thu 11 a.m.-7 p.m., Fri 11 a.m.-4 p.m., other times by appt. 292-2021. monroecc.edu. Nan Miller Gallery, 3450 Winton Place. Montreal artist Celine Brossard. Through Jan. 31. TueSat 10 a.m.-5 p.m 292-1430. nanmillergallery.com. Nazareth College Arts Center, My Sister’s Gallery, 505 Mt. Hope Ave. “MAPS” by Gianna Stewart. Through Feb. 17. Free. 5468400. EpiscopalSeniorLife.org. 4245 East Ave. “Good Work” Illustration Invitational. Tuesdays-Sundays Through Mar 1. Hours Sun and Tue-Thu noon-5 p.m., Fri-Sat noon-8 p.m. Reception Jan 18 5-8 p.m 389-5073. naz.edu/art/artscenter-gallery. Nazareth College Colacino Gallery, 4245 East Ave. “Design in the Working World: The

Alumni Graphic Design Exhibit.” Through Mar 1. Hours Wed-Sun noon-5 p.m. 389-5073. naz. edu/art/colacino-art-gallery. New Deal Gallery, 4 Livingston County Campus. Expressions of the Civil War. Tuesdays-Saturdays, 5 p.m. In recognition of the 150th Anniversary. Hours: Tue, Wed, Fri 1-4 p.m., Thu 1-7:30 p.m., Sat 11 a.m.-3 p.m. After November 12: Closed Tuesdays. 243-6785. livingstonarts.org. Oxford Gallery, 267 Oxford St. Ray Easton and Jean K Stephens. Tuesdays-Saturdays and Sat., Feb. 2 Through Feb 23. Tue-Fri noon-5 p.m., Sat 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Reception February 2 5:30-7:30 p.m 271-5885. oxfordgallery.com. Pat Rini Rohrer Gallery, 71 S Main St. The 8th Annual Studio II Exhibit. Through Feb. 22. Through Feb 22. Reception Jan 11, 6-8 p.m 394-0030. prrgallery.com. Phillips Fine Art, 248 East Ave. Fourth Annual Collector’s Show and Sale. Tuesdays-Saturdays Through Jan 31. Tue-Fri 12-6 p.m., Sat 12-5 p.m., or by appt. Reception Jan 1, 1-3:30 p.m 232-8120. Rare Books & Special Collections, Rush Rhees Library. Rush Rhees Library, University of Rochester, River Campus. Alice in the Looking Glass: Illustrations and Artists’ Books 1865-2012. Through Aug. 16. Through Aug 16. Mon-Fri 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Sat 11 a.m.-3 p.m 275-4477. Rosalie “Roz” Steiner Art Gallery, Genesee Community College, One College Rd. Art Shows. Mondays, WednesdaysFridays Jan 22-Mar 8: “Mediation and Negociations” by Elena Lourenco. Through Mar 13: “a*new*found*land” by Joe Ziolkowski. Mon, Wed, Thu Fri 10 a.m.-4 p.m., other times by appt 343-0055 x6616. stvierrico@genesee. edu. genesee.edu. Rush Rhees Library, University of Rochester, River Campus. Memorial Art Gallery: 100 Years of Art for the Community. Through Sep. 30. Through Sep 30, 2013. mag.rochester.edu. University Gallery, James R Booth Hall, RIT, Lomb Memorial Dr. Neil Montanus. MondaysSaturdays Mon-Thu 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Fri-Sat 10 a.m.-2 p.m. 475-2404. jleugs@rit.edu. West Side Gallery, SUNY Brockport, 180 Holley St. A Small Mild Memory: The BFA Exhibit of Nate Hodge. Through Feb. 8. Through Feb 8 masiori. com. Williams Gallery at First Unitarian Church, 220 S Winton Rd. “Passages” by Anca Seger. Through Feb. 24, 12-2 p.m. Through Feb 24. Daily 10 a.m.-2 p.m., 4:30-8 p.m Free. 271-9070. Wood Library, 134 North Main St. “Chronopiscus: Time and the Fish” by Ren Vasiliev. Through Feb. 1. 394-1381. woodlibrary.org.

FILM | MIND2MOVIE FILM SCREENING Two weeks ago, 14 intrepid teams of Rochester-area filmmakers were given only 72 hours to write, film, edit, and produce a five-minute short film utilizing an assigned character, prop, and situation. Now, on Monday, February 4, the results of their labors will be screened for the public at the Cinema Theater (957 S. Clinton Ave) thanks to the Rochester Movie Makers. The films have been reviewed by a panel of judges, and following the screening cash prizes will be awarded for the first- and second-place films, as well as a special prize for editing. The first-prize film will also have the opportunity to be screened at the Rochester High Falls Film Festival in April. Tickets cost $5 and can be purchased online at rochestermoviemakers.org, or at the door the night of the event for cash only. — BY ADAM LUBITOW Hungerford First Friday Open Studios/Galleries. first Friday of every month, 6-9 p.m thehungerford.com. “Saturday Morning: A Cozy Event of Nostalgic Proportions”. 6-10 p.m. Grass Roots Gallery, suite 157, Hungerford Bldg, 1115 E. Main St., Suite 248 Artwork inspired by the simple happiness experienced as a kid on Saturday morning! Friday, Feb. 1st , 6-10pm Saturday, Feb 9th, 8-11pm Friday, Live Music by “Sweet T and Johnny B”. grassrootsgallery@gmail. com. thegrassrootsgallery.com. [ SAT., FEBRUARY 2 ] Makers & Mentors Artists’ Talk. 1 p.m. Rochester Contemporary Arts Center, 137 East Ave. $1. 461-2222. rochestercontemporary.org. [ TUE., FEBRUARY 5 ] February Artisan Craft & Music Night. 6-10 p.m. Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way Handmade gifts for sale and music by Todd Bradley of the Hi-Risers 232-3230. info@abilenebarandlounge. com. abilenebarandlounge. com.

Comedy [ THU., JANUARY 31 ] Dave Foley. Jan. 31-Feb. 2. Comedy Club, 2235 Empire Blvd. Thu 7:30 p.m., Fri-Sat 7:30 & 10 p.m $25. 671-9080. thecomedyclub.us.

Art Events

[ FRI., FEBRUARY 1 ] Joel McHale. 8 p.m. Rochester Institute of Technology, 1 Lomb Memorial Dr. Field House $17-$43. campuslife.rit.edu/ freezefest.

[ FRI., FEBRUARY 1 ] First Friday City Wide Gallery Night. first Friday of every month, 6-9 p.m. firstfridayrochester.org.

[ SAT., FEBRUARY 2 ] Polite Company: Please Die, Thank You. 8 p.m. MuCCC, 142 Atlantic Ave $10-$12. muccc.org.

Unleashed! Improv: Ground Hog Day. 7:30 p.m. JCC Rochester, 1200 Edgewood Ave. $5-$8. 461-2000. facebook.com/ unleashedimprov.

Dance Events [ THU., JANUARY 31 ] Free Intro Class for SambaBelly. 6 p.m. Goddess Hour Dance & Fitness Studio, 1470 Monroe Ave. Free. 2240277. info@goddesshour.com. goddesshour.com. [ FRI., FEBRUARY 1 ] “New York City Scapes”. 8 p.m. Kodak Hall at Eastman Theater, 60 Gibbs St $15-$79. 4615850. rochestercityballet.com. [ SAT., FEBRUARY 2 ] Groundhog Day Square Dance with the Geneseo String Band. 8 p.m. SUNY Geneseo, 1 College Rd. $1-$3, under 12 free 2455516. geneseo.edu.

Festivals [ FRI., FEBRUARY 1 ] Freezefest. Feb. 1-3. Rochester Institute of Technology, 1 Lomb Memorial Dr. Some free, some paid events. campuslife.rit.edu/ freezefest. [ TUE., FEBRUARY 5 ] Lakeside Winter Celebration. 11 a.m. Ontario Beach Park, 4799 Lake Ave Enjoy horsedrawn carriage rides, dog sled team, frostbiter sailboat races, Rec on the Move van with children’s activities and music by George Hogan. · Lake Ontario Wine Festival, 12 Noon-4 pm, Celebrate the tastes of our region. · Chilly Chili Challenge, 12 Noon-3 pm, Eat or Compete! · Polar Plunge 12 Noon, Preregister at www.polarplunge.net · Snow Sculpture Contest 9 am-2 pm, Theme: Winter (Reg. 9 amnoon) · Don’t Forget Ice Skating! Genesee Valley Park Indoor Ice continues on page 20

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 19


Festivals

Race: The Power of an Illusion. 5-7 p.m. Central Library, Kate Gleason Auditorium, 115 South Ave. Jan 31: The Story We Tell. Free. 428-8350. libraryweb.org. William A. Kern Lecture Series: Presenting John Tagg. 6 p.m. Carlson Auditorium, RIT Campus, Lomb Memorial Dr. Free. 585-475-2057.

Rink, 131 Elmwood Ave., 4287889 or Manhattan Square Ice Rink Court & Chestnut Sts., Downtown, 428-7541. Free. 428-5990. cityofrochester.gov/ wintercelebration.

Kids Events [ WED., JANUARY 30 ] Lego Travel Adventure. Through May 12. The Strong National Museum of Play, 1 Manhattan Square Through May 12. Opening weekend Sat Jan 19 11 a.m.-4, Sun Jan 20 1-4 p.m Included in admission: $11-$13. 263-2700. museumofplay.org. [ THU., JANUARY 31 ] Movin’ and Groovin’. 10-10:30 a.m. Greece Public Library, 2 Vince Tofany Blvd. Ages 18 months to 3 years old with an adult Free, register. 225-8951. Toastmasters and Youth Leadership Intro Meeting. 6:30 p.m. Brighton Memorial Library, 2300 Elmwood Ave. Free, register. 784-5300. brightonlibrary.org. [ FRI., FEBRUARY 1 ] “Busgy Malone”. Feb. 1-3. A Magical Journey Through Stages, Auditorium Center, 875 E. Main St Through Feb 10. Fri-Sat 7:30 p.m., Sun 2 p.m $12-$15. 935-7173. mjtstages.tix.com. What’s a Whistlepig?. 4-5:30 p.m. Helmer Nature Center, 154 Pinegrove Ave $5-$7. 336-3035. westirondequoit. org/helmer.htm. [ SAT., FEBRUARY 2 ] Free Ice Skating Lessons. noon. Manhattan Square Park Ice Rink, 353 court St. Ages 4-12 Free, register. 428-7541. cityofrochester.gov/skating. “Honk!” Feb. 2. Nazareth College Arts Center, 4245 East Ave Sat Feb 2 2 p.m., Sun Feb 3 2 p.m.; Sat Feb 9 2 & 7 p.m., Sun Feb 10 2 p.m $15-18. 389-2170. artscenter.naz.edu. [ SUN., FEBRUARY 3 ] Scoop-A-Bowl Sundae Party. 2 p.m. Brighton Memorial Library, 2300 Elmwood Ave. Ages 5-11 with a caregiver Free, register. 784 5300. brightonlibrary.org. [ MON., FEBRUARY 4 ] Ideas and Authors: “The Forgotten Garden” by Kate Morton. 7-8:30 p.m. Gates Public Library, 902 Elmgrove Rd. 247-6446. [ WED., FEBRUARY 6 ] Disney On Ice Celebrates 100 Years of Magic. 7 p.m. Blue Cross Arena, One War Memorial Square. $10-$60. 1-800-7453000. ticketmaster.com.

Lectures [ WED., JANUARY 30 ] Conversations on Race: A Process of Discovery. 6-8 p.m. Greece Public Library, 2 Vince Tofany Blvd. 225-8951. “The Human Cost to India’s Race for Development” with Priyanka Borpujari. 7 p.m. Nazareth College Shults Center, 4245 East Ave. Free. 389-2673. khansen7@zimbra.naz.edu.

COMEDY | JOEL MCHALE, DAVE FOLEY, MORE Countless scientific studies have been performed by highly respected researchers the world over, proving the various health benefits of laughter. At least, that sounds like something that might actually be true. If nothing else, busting a gut is sure to raise your body heat and help keep you warm during the freezing cold temperature we’re experiencing. With that in mind, there’s a ton of great live comedy shows happening around Rochester this week. Here are some of the highlights. Comedian Joel McHale (pictured), of TV’s “Community” and “The Soup” will be performing as part of RIT’s annual Freezefest celebration, with a show on Friday, February 1, at the RIT Gordon Field House. Doors at 7 p.m. and the show starts at 8 p.m. Tickets are $43 for the general public, $17 for students, and can be purchased at the Field House box office or online at rittickets.com. For further details, go to cab.rit.edu. “The Kids in the Hall” and “Newsradio” star Dave Foley will be performing stand-up shows for three nights at The Comedy Club in Webster on Thursday, January 31, at 7:30 p.m., Friday, February 1, at 7:30 & 10 p.m., and Saturday, February 2, at 7:30 & 10 p.m. Tickets cost $25. The Comedy Club is located at 2235 Empire Blvd. Tickets can be purchased at the box office or online at thecomedyclub.us. On Saturday, February 2, Polite Company Improv is celebrating its one-year anniversary with “Please Die, Thank You,” a masquerade ball and murder-mystery-themed show at MuCCC (142 Atlantic Ave). It’s sure to be a drop dead funny evening of killer improv and sketch comedy. The show begins at 8 p.m. and tickets are for sale online at muccc.org for $10 in advance, or $12 at the door. Unleashed! Improv, Rochester’s premier Chicago-style improv troupe, will be performing its monthly comedy show, “Unleash Your Shadow,” on Saturday, February 2, at the Jewish Community Center. The show starts at 7:30 p.m. and tickets cost $5-$8 and can be purchased at the door or by calling 461-2000 ext 235. The JCC is located at 1200 Edgewood Ave. Comedian James Judd brings his utterly unique perspective on life and family back to the Downstairs Cabaret with his brandnew show, “James Judd’s Funny Stories.” Performances will be at the 20 Windsor Street theater on Friday, February 1, and Saturday, February 2, at 8 p.m. The show continues through February 17. Tickets cost $25 general admission and are available at the door or in advance by calling 325-4370. Visit downstairscabaret.com for details. — BY ADAM LUBITOW A Tale of 13 Rochesters with Benn and Sally Forsyth. 7 p.m. Irondequoit Library, Helen McGraw Branch, 2180 E. Ridge Rd Free, register. 336-6060. amy.henderson@libraryweb.org. William A. Kern Lecture Series: Featuring Min-Ha Pham. 2 p.m. Carlson Auditorium, RIT Campus, Lomb Memorial Dr Free. 475-2057.

20 CITY JANUARY 30 - FEBRUARY 5, 2013

[ THU., JANUARY 31 ] The 40+ Job Search; Debunking the Myths. 9:30 a.m.-noon. Gates Public Library, 902 Elmgrove Rd. Free, register. 247-6446. Alzheimer’s Association: The Basics. 6:30-8 p.m. Gates Public Library, 902 Elmgrove Rd. Free, register. 247-6446.

[ SAT., FEBRUARY 2 ] From Stumbling Blocks to Stepping Stones: Overcoming 5 Key Barriers to Happiness and Well-Being. 6 p.m. Rochester Baha’i Center, 693 East Avenue The motivation to find and live the good life is as old as humankind, yet it is only in the past fifteen years that scientists have launched a systematic investigation into what enables human beings to flourish. Join Dr. Susan Thompson as she illumines five key barriers to happiness and well-being, and shows how you can turn those stumbling blocks into stepping stones toward a more enriched, fulfilled, and satisfied life. Dr. Thompson is a tenured professor at Monroe Community College free; please bring a dish to pass if joining us for dinner. 2442220. rochesterbahai.org. Procrastination. 10:30 a.m. Penfield Public Library, 1985 Baird Rd. Joani Hardy, a Penfield resident and certified professional organizer, will identify the different styles of procrastination and help you learn to beat the “demon of delay.” REGISTRATION begins Friday, January 18 Free. 3408720. penfieldlibrary.org. [ SUN., FEBRUARY 3 ] “Driven to Emancipation: President Lincoln & The Abolition of Slavery” by Dr. Justin Behrend. 3 p.m. Livingston Arts Center, 4 Murray Hill Dr. 243-6785. livingstonarts.org. [ MON., FEBRUARY 4 ] Opera Guild Lecture Series: Heroic Women in Opera with Agneta D. Borgstedt. 7-9 p.m. Brighton Memorial Library, 2300 Elmwood Ave. Free. 7845300. brightonlibrary.org. Opera Guild of Rochester Lecture/Listening: Heroic Women in Opera. 7 p.m. Brighton Memorial Library, 2300 Elmwood Ave. Enhance your knowledge and appreciation of opera. Presented by Agneta Borgstedt 784-5300. brightonlibrary.org. [ TUE., FEBRUARY 5 ] Claire McCurdy: “Japan 20112012: The Triple Disasters and the Humanitarian Response.” 10 a.m.-noon. Rochester Institute of Technology, 1 Lomb Memorial Dr. Ingle Auditorium. Free. 475-6362. bebdar@rit.edu. HLAA Rochester Chapter Meetings. Feb. 5. St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, East Ave. 11 a.m. Emergency situations for hard of hearing people, 7 p.m. Ears to the future: How wireless can connect the hearing impaired community 266-7890. hlaa-rochester-ny.org. President’s Forum Series: Cecile Richards. 7:30 p.m. Vandervort Room of the Scandling Campus Center, Hobart & William Smith Colleges, Geneva. hws.edu.

Science on the Edge Series: “Be Careful What you Wish For: The Creation of the “RACE: Are We So Different?” Exhibit and Project” with Yolanda T. Moses. 7:30 p.m. Rochester Museum and Science Center, 657 East Ave. $7-$15. 697-1942. rmsc.org. Tuesday Topics: The Science and Business of Treating Wastewater with Algae with Jeffrey Lodge. 12:12-12:52 p.m. Central Library, Kate Gleason Auditorium, 115 South Ave. 428-8350. libraryweb.org. [ WED., FEBRUARY 6 ] Light Works! Presents Ethan Borg Chinese Medicine and More. 6:30 p.m. RIT Barnes & Noble, 100 Park Point Ethan received his Masters in Acupuncture and Oriental Medicine from the New England School of Acupuncture. Ethan has received training in Chinese, Japanese, and Korean acupuncture as well as Chinese herbal medicine. Ethan also has developed a product to help promote health called Qi Infusions, that are medical Qi Gong infused oils that can be taken at home. Ethan has a wide range of products and services to help promote healing and well being. Find out about all that he offers at this meeting. Network at 6:30 p.m. and presentation at 7 p.m $5. 585-424-6777. meetup.com/light-works.

Literary Events [ WED., JANUARY 30 ] Jane Austen Short Story Contest (Canandaigua Centennial Event). Wood Library, 134 North Main St. Wood Library will host a month-long short story contest for teens centered around the Jane Austen style Free. woodlibrary.org/teen/ janeaustenstory/. Pure Kona Open Mic. 7:30 p.m. Acanthus Café, 337 East Ave. Free. 585-319-5999. acanthuscafe.com. Pure Kona Poetry Readings. 7 p.m. Acanthus Café, 337 East Ave. Local poets gather to read their latest works Free. 3195999. acanthuscafe.com. Titles over Tea: “Let the Great World Spin” by Colum McCann. 7 p.m. Barnes & Noble, Greece, 330 Greece Ridge Center Dr. 227-4020. bn.com. [ THU., JANUARY 31 ] Book Kick-off: “Sex and Manifest Destiny: The Urge That Drove Americans Westward” by Martin Naparsteck. 7 p.m. Writers and Books, 740 University Ave $3-$4. 4732590. wab.org. [ FRI., FEBRUARY 1 ] First Fridays/Wide Open Mic. first Friday of every month, 7-9 p.m. Writers and Books, 740 University Ave Rochester’s longest running open mic welcomes poets, performers, and writers of all kinds. wab.org. Reading: “Kodak Elegy: A Cold War Childhood” by William Merrill Decker. 7 p.m. Barnes and Noble, Pittsford Plaza 585 278 7501. bn.com. [ SAT., FEBRUARY 2 ] Literary Reading featuring Chris Norment. 5-7 p.m. Different Path Art Gallery, 27 Market St Author of “In the

Memory of the Map.” Free. 637-5494. chrissygreenny@ gmail.com. facebook.com/ ADifferentPathGalleryFallWinterReadingSeries. Literary Reading: Christopher Norment. 5 p.m. A Different Path Gallery, 27 Market St. “In the Memory of the Map.” free. 637-5494. [ SUN., FEBRUARY 3 ] Pleasures of the Line. 2 p.m. Pittsford Community Library, 24 State Street, Pittsford Join Kitty Jospe, poet and docent at the Memoral Art Gallery, for a presentation of image and word to explore the possibility of lines and what they can mean for you. Registration required. Fisher Meeting Room Free. 249-5481. [ MON., FEBRUARY 4 ] Books Sandwiched-In: Ellen Polimeni discusses “Bruce” by Peter Carlin. noon. Wood Library, 134 North Main St. 394-1381. woodlibrary.org. Moving Beyond Racism Book Group. 7:30 p.m. Barnes & Noble Pittsford Plaza, 3349 Monroe Ave. February Selection: Code Talker by Chester Nez Everyone is welcome whether or not you have read the book. Join us for a safe, stimulating discussion. Free. 469-8249. mbrbookinfo@aol.com. [ TUE., FEBRUARY 5 ] Lift Bridge Writers’ Group. 6:30 p.m. Lift Bridge Book Shop, 45 Main St Free. 637-2260. liftbridgebooks.com. [ WED., FEBRUARY 6 ] NXT Chapter Book Group: “The Games” by Ted Kosmatka. 7-8:30 p.m. Wood Library, 134 North Main St. Feel free to bring suggestions for future reads. Coffee will be provided. Ages 20ish - 30ish 394-1381. woodlibrary.org.

Museum Exhibit [ WED., JANUARY 30 ] Baby It’s Cold Outside!. Tuesdays-Thursdays The Rochester Historical Society, Rundel Memorial Building, 2nd floor, 115 South Ave. Through Mar 14. Tue-Wed 10 a.m.-3 p.m., Thu 11 a.m.-3 p.m. An exhibit of beautiful cold weather clothing $3-$5, members free. 428-8470. rochesterhistory.org. A Presidential Voice: The History of Presidential Speechwriting. Through March 8. Rush Rhees Library, University of Rochester, River Campus Through Mar 8. Seward Room, Department of Rare Books and Special Collections. Mon-Fri 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Sat 11 a.m.-3 p.m 2754477. “Race: Are We So Different?”. Through April 28. Rochester Museum and Science Center, 657 East Ave. Through Apr 28. faceraceroc.org. Included in admission: $11-$13. 2711880. rmsc.org. William Henry Seward Exhibit: American Politicians 1830s-1860s. Through Jan. 30. Rush Rhees Library, University of Rochester, River Campus Through Jan 30 in Rare Books and Special Collections Dept. Mon-Fri 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Sat 11 a.m.-3 p.m 275-4477. [ THU., JANUARY 31 ] Dean Channing. 6 p.m. Prosecco Italian Restaurant,


Chestnut Street $12-$15. 5466920. rddc@rddc.org.

SPECIAL EVENT | FREEZEFEST AT RIT Rochester Institute of Technology celebrates the winter season with its annual Freezefest, three fun-filled days of activities. This year the event runs from Friday, February 1, through Sunday, February 3, and there’s really something for everyone to enjoy. Planned events include everything from a Sausage and Sauerkraut Festival to hockey games, ice-sculpture demos to something called PuppyFest, which is bound to be adorable. There’s also a 5k race, and possibly most exciting of all is the Quidditch Winter Games — but they better be serving butterbeer at the refreshment stands. All Freezefest events are held on the RIT campus and are free to students, but may have a general-admission fee for the public. For a complete list of events, visit campuslife.rit.edu/ freezefest. — BY ADAM LUBITOW 1550 New York 332 Call for info. 924-8000. [ FRI., FEBRUARY 1 ] Opening: “Brotherhood: Freemasonry in Geneva”. 5-8 p.m. Geneva Historical Society, 543 South Main St 315-789-5151. info@ genevahistoricalsociety.com. genevahistoricalsociety.com. “To My Valentine.” Feb. 1-March 31. Rochester Museum and Science Center, 657 East Ave. Through Mar 31. Sun 11 a.m.5 p.m., Mon-Sat 9 a.m.-5 p.m Included in admission: $11$13. 271-1880. rmsc.org.

Recreation [ WED., JANUARY 30 ] Cross-Country Skiing and Snowshoeing. Sundays Cumming Nature Center, 6472 Gulick Rd. Trails open Wed-Fri 9 a.m.-3:30 p.m., Sat-Sun 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m $3, $10 per family. 374-6160. rmsc.org. Roc Cirque presents Whirly Wendsday. 7 p.m. genesee valley park, elmwood ave. 683-5734. [ SAT., FEBRUARY 2 ] Saturday Snowshoeing. 1-3 p.m Helmer Nature Center, 154 Pinegrove Ave No Jan 12 $3$5, free to children under 12. 336-3035. westirondequoit.org/ helmer.htm. [ SUN., FEBRUARY 3 ] 13th Annual Y-Tri. Feb. 3. Carlson MetroCenter, 444 East Main St $45, $90 for teams. rochesterymca.org. GVHC Hike. 10 a.m. Powder Mills Park Rand Lodge lot, moderate/hilly 4 mile hike 4893764. gvhchikes.org.

Special Events [ WED., JANUARY 30 ] Adult Transition Parent Program Meeting. 5-7 p.m.

Arc of Monroe, 2060 Brighton Henrietta Townline Rd 2710660. arcmonroe.org. Creating a Culture of Peace: Rochester in 20 Years. 7-9 p.m. Interfaith Chapel, University of Rochester, River Campus rochesterbethechange.org. Geeks Who Drink Pub Quiz. 8 p.m. Scotland Yard Pub, 187 Saint Paul St Free. 730-5030. scotlandyardpub.com. Highland Park Winter Farmers Market. 3 p.m Cornell Cooperative Extension of Monroe County, 249 Highland Ave Free. highlandwintermarket.com. National Meat Week. Through Feb. 2. upnymeat@gmail.com. meatweek.com/cities/rochester. Rochester Business Networking Event. 7:30-9 a.m. Bonadio and Company, 171 Sullys Trail Free. 224-0270. rochester-tipclubjan2013.eventbrite.com/. Rochester Winos Wine and Food Pairing. 6:30 p.m. Joey’s Pasta House, 1789 Penfield Rd., Penfield. $30-$35, register. rochesterwinos.com. Saunders College Town Hall Meetings. Jan. 30-31. Rochester Institute of Technology, 1 Lomb Memorial Dr. Wed 5:30 p.m. at RIT, Thu 8 p.m. at 40 Franklin St 475-2176. dpelliccia@ saunders.rit.edu. A Season for Nonviolence Opening. 4 p.m. Liberty Pole, Main, East, & Franklin Streets gandhiinstitute.org. [ THU., JANUARY 31 ] La Maison Francaise African Film Series: Women of Islam. 8 p.m. La Maison Francaise at Nazareth College, 4245 East Ave. Free. 389-2685. Screening: “The Central Park Five.” 6:30 p.m. Little Theatre, 240 East Ave. Free. 258-0400. wxxi.org. Urban Nights. 5:30-7:30 p.m. Rochester Educational Opportunity Center, 161

[ FRI., FEBRUARY 1 ] Conversations Art on Chocolate collection tasting. 6-9 p.m. Hedonist Artisan Chocolates, 674 South Ave 461-2815. hedonistchocolates.com. Friends of Strong Annual Wine Tasting. Feb. 1. Hyatt Regency Rochester, 125 E. Main St $50. 275-2450. Hops & Pots Second Sale. 12-5 p.m. Turk Hill Craft School, 1000 Turk Hill Rd. Great one of a kind, handmade pottery at awesome prices Shop our wares and stop at the Fairport Brewery for a drink 223-1930. turkhillcrafts@gmail.com. turkhillcraftschool.com. Rochester Amateur Radio Association: Solar Spectrography. 7 p.m. Henrietta Fire Hall, 3129 East Henrietta Rd kc2pcd@ rochester.rr.com. Susan B. Anthony Legacy Dinner. 6 p.m. University of Rochester, River Campus Meliora Ballroom $25-$45. 2758799. rochester.edu/sba. “A Taste of Soul.” 5:30-7:30 p.m. East High School, 1801 E Main St. Free, register. 2628621. rcsdk12.org/atasteofsoul. [ SAT., FEBRUARY 2 ] 9th Annual What Women Want New Trends Show & Sale. 9:30 a.m. Casa Larga Vineyards, 2287 Turk Hill Rd. $5, group discounts available. 899-9151. whatwomenwantweekend.com. Big Sale. 9 a.m.-2 p.m. 127 Railroad St. Art, books, clothes, handmade soap, zines, more facebook.com/ smugtownmushrooms. Occupy Your Health. 11 a.m.-5 p.m. 84 Scio St. OccupyYourHealthROC@gmail. com. Psychic Fair. Feb. 2-3. Radission Hotel, 175 Jefferson Rd., Henrietta. Sat 11 a.m.-8 p.m., Sun 11 a.m.-6 p.m $7 admission for weekend. 4751910. Stories and Sundries Fair featuring Rafe Martin. 2-4 p.m. Visual Studies Workshop, 31 Prince St. All proceeds benefit Cobblestone School 442-8676. vsw.org. [ SUN., FEBRUARY 3 ] Super Bowl Party to benefit Pitty Love Rescue. 5:30 p.m. Richmond’s Tavern, 21 Richmond Street. 270-8570. RichmondsTavern.com. [ MON., FEBRUARY 4 ] Rochester’s first barre fitness studio grand opening. 9 a.m. Roc the Barre Studio, 274 Goodman St. N. Suite D 212. Free open level classes 9:30-10:30am, 11am-12pm, Free Express Barre Cardio 12:30-1:10pm. Grand opening evening features: Free class 6:30-7:30pm and give a ways in drawings after class. 851-1807. info@rocthebarrerochester.com. rocthebarrerochester.com. [ TUE., FEBRUARY 5 ] East Side Winter Market. 3-6 p.m 2555 Baird Rd, Penfield. 348-9022. mbartolotta001@ rochester.rr.com. First Tuesdays February with Digital Rochester. 5:30 p.m. Links Bar & Grill, 6720 Pittsford-Palmyra Road$5 for

Non Members. 585-598-2663. digitalrochester.com. Is It Too Loud? Protecting Your Child’s Hearing. 5:30 p.m. Perinton Recreation Center, 1350 Turk Hill Road $10. 585223-5050. info@harthearing. com. harthearing.com. Voice of the Citizen Series: Seeking Solutions to Violence. 6-8 p.m. Cobbs Hill Park, 100 Norris Drive cityofrochester.gov.

Sports [ FRI., FEBRUARY 1 ] Rochester Americans v Toronto. 7:05 p.m. Blue Cross Arena, One War Memorial Square $15-$20. 800-847-5217. ticketmaster.com. [ SAT., FEBRUARY 2 ] Dodge Ball Tournament and Martial Arts Demonstration. 2 p.m. Fund raiser for USA IFKK Martial Arts Team representing the USA in April 2013 at the World knock down championships in Europe $20 per person, $100 per team of 6 406-6193. Harlem Globetrotters. 2 p.m. Blue Cross Arena, One War Memorial Square Tickets start at $33. 800-745-3000. ticketmaster.com.

Theater The Addams Family. Through Feb. 10. Auditorium Theatre, 885 East Main Street Tue-Thu 7:30 p.m., Fri-Sat 8 p.m., Sun 1 p.m. www.tafontour.com. $32.50-$67.50. 222-5000. mail@rbtl.org. rbtl.org. The Agony and Ecstacy of Steve Jobs. Geva Theatre Center, 75 Woodbury Blvd Through Feb 10. Wed Jan 30-Fri 7 p.m., Sat 3 & 8 p.m., Sun 3 p.m., Tue-Wed Feb 6 7 p.m Tickets start at $30. 232-4382. gevatheatre.org “Alice and the Hatter”. Fri-Sat 7 p.m., Sun 2 p.m. Greece Arcadia High School, 120 Island Cottage Road, Greece. $5-$7. alicecastandcrew2013@ gmail.com. “Encore! Broadway Favorites of the American Songbook”. JCC Rochester, 1200 Edgewood Ave. Through Feb 17. Sat 8 p.m., Sun 2 p.m $18-$26. 4612000. jcccenterstage.org. Greece Arcadia High School Drama Club Presents “Alice and the Hatter”. Greece Arcadia High School, 120 Island Cottage Rd. $5-$7. 966-3054. James Judd’s Funny Stories. Downstairs Cabaret Theatre, 20 Windsor St $25. 325-4370. downstairscabaret.com. Kings and Quees Musical Black History Month Event. RAPA, 727 E. Main St “Kings and Queens” will include a performance by Rochester’s own Grammy Award performer and actor, Timothy Mitchum, Jr. and feature an ensemble cast of local talent $18. (585) 298-8117. “A Life in the Theatre”. Blackfriars Theatre, 795 E. Main St Through Feb 10. Fri Jan 25Sat 8 p.m., Sun 2 p.m.; Fri Feb 1-Sat 8 p.m., Sun 2 p.m.; Thu Feb 7 7:30 p.m., Fri-Sat 8 p.m., Sun 2 p.m $27. 454-1260. bftix.org. “Next to Normal”. Geva Theatre Center, 75 Woodbury Blvd Through Feb 10. Wed Jan 30 2 & 7:30 p.m., Thu 7:30 p.m.

RECREATION | THE Y-TRI Earn your free pass to act like a couch potato without the guilt on Super Bowl Sunday by starting the morning participating in The Y-Tri, an indoor triathlon to benefit the YMCA of Greater Rochester. The triathlon is a three-event race consisting of a 15-minute swim, 15-minute stationary bike ride, and a 15-minute indoor track run — the individual or team covering the greatest distance in that time wins. The event begins at 8 a.m. and will be held at the Carlson MetroCenter at 444 E. Main St. Cost to participate is $45 for an individual or $90 for a team. For more details visit http:// rochesterymca.org/locations/carlson or call 325-2880. — BY ADAM LUBITOW (sign interpreted), Fri 8 p.m., Sat 4 & 8:30 p.m., Sun 2 p.m. (Sunday Salon), Tue-Wed Feb 6 7:30 p.m Tickets start at $25. 232-4382. gevatheatre.org RIT Global Union Presents: Unification 2013. Rochester Institute of Technology, 1 Lomb Memorial Dr. $5 Students $8 General $10 at the door. 4756943. ritglobalunion.com. “She Will Have Her Way” by Justin Rielly. MuCCC, 142 Atlantic Ave Pay what you will. muccc.org.

Workshops [ WED., JANUARY 30 ] Family Development Class: “Winning at Parenting”. 6-8 p.m. Mental Health Association, 320 N Goodman St. Free. 325-3145 x131. mharochester.org. Home Brewing Techniques Class. 7 p.m Joe Bean Coffee Roasters, 1344 University Ave. $20. 3195279. joebeanroasters.com. Meditation Workshop. 7 p.m. Pittsford Community Library, 24 State St. Registration required Free. 249-5481. [ THU., JANUARY 31 ] The Basics: Aging, Dementia and Alzheimer’s. 6:30 p.m. Gates Public Library, 902 Elmgrove Rd. Free. 800-272-3900. alz. org/rochesterny. [ SAT., FEBRUARY 2 ] 10 Steps to a Healthier You. 10 a.m New York Wine & Culinary Center, 800 South Main St $10 per class. 394-7070. nywcc.com. Karen Gould: Loving with Detachment. 2 p.m. Books Etc., 78 W. Main St. Free. 474-4116. books_etc@yahoo.com. Planning Annual Flower Beds at the Tinker Homestead. 10 a.m.noon. Hansen Nature Center, 1525 Calkins Rd. Free, register. 359-7044. sites.google.com/ site/hansennaturecenter. Smugtown Mushrooms Winter Classes. Feb. 2. Smugtown

Mushrooms, 127 Railroad St. Medicinal Mushrooms: Jan 20, Feb 10, Mar 3; Mushrooms 101: Feb 2, Mar 2; Radical Mychology: Feb 26, Mar 26 smugtownmushrooms.com. [ SUN., FEBRUARY 3 ] Chapbooks for Poetry Workshop. 10 a.m. A Different Path Gallery, 27 Market St. A workshop on handmade books. It is a fun way to publish your own work, create gifts, and learn a new craft! Martha Schermerhorn teaches this 3 hour workshop $30. 6375494. [ MON., FEBRUARY 4 ] Family Development Class: “Twenty Minutes to Effective Parenting Communication Skills.” 12:30-2:30 p.m. Mental Health Association, 320 N Goodman St. Free. 3253145 x131. mharochester.org. Screenwriting 101. 7 p.m. Pittsford Community Library, 24 State Street, Pittsford Free. 249-5481. unspokenword.net. [ TUE., FEBRUARY 5 ] African World History Class. 7:30-9 p.m. Baobab Cultural Center, 728 University Ave. $5 donation requested per session. baobab.center@yahoo.com. thebaobab.org. Beading Class w/ Kelley Allen of Kelley’s Beading. 6:30-8:30 p.m. Wood Library, 134 North Main St. Free, register. 3941381. woodlibrary.org. Family Development Class: “Who’s Listening?”. 6-8 p.m. Mental Health Association, 320 N Goodman St. Free. 3253145 x131. mharochester.org.

GETLISTED get your event listed for free e-mail it to calendar@rochestercitynews.com. Or go online to rochestercitynewspaper.com and submit it yourself!

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 21


Movies Theaters Searchable, up-to-the-minute movie times for all area theaters can be found at rochestercitynewspaper.com, and on City’s mobile website.

Film

Brockport Strand 93 Main St, Brockport, 637-3310, rochestertheatermanagement.com

Canandaigua Theatres 3181 Townline Road, Canandaigua, 396-0110, rochestertheatermanagement.com

Cinema Theater 957 S. Clinton St., 271-1785, cinemarochester.com

Culver Ridge 16 2255 Ridge Rd E, Irondequoit  544-1140, regmovies.com

Dryden Theatre 900 East Ave., 271-3361, dryden.eastmanhouse.org

Eastview 13 Eastview Mall, Victor 425-0420, regmovies.com

Geneseo Theatres Geneseo Square Mall, 243-2691, rochestertheatermanagement.com

Greece Ridge 12 176 Greece Ridge Center Drive 225-5810, regmovies.com

Henrietta 18 525 Marketplace Drive 424-3090, regmovies.com

The Little

The third time around [ REVIEW ] GEORGE GRELLA

“Parker” (R), DIRECTED BY TAYLOR HACKFORD NOW PLAYING

Like many prolific popular genre novelists, the late Donald E. Westlake published under a variety of pseudonyms; although known mostly as a mystery writer, he also dabbled in other forms, like science fiction and film, including the screenplay for “The Grifters,” based on the Jim Thompson novel. His best books, written as Richard Stark, however, deal with a professional criminal, known only as Parker, a lone wolf who constantly finds himself the target of other

240 East Ave., 258-0444 thelittle.org

Movies 10 2609 W. Henrietta Road 292-0303, cinemark.com

Pittsford Cinema 3349 Monroe Ave., 383-1310 pittsford.zurichcinemas.com

Tinseltown USA/IMAX 2291 Buffalo Road 247-2180, cinemark.com

Webster 12 2190 Empire Blvd., 888-2624386, amctheatres.com Jason Statham in “Parker.” PHOTO COURTESY FILMDISTRICT

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criminals as well as the police. Smart, hard, and relentless, Parker always triumphs against overwhelming odds and a multitude of enemies. The novels move with such urgency and the character displays so much paradoxical appeal that they seem a natural for the screen. The first Parker film, and still the best, “Point Blank,” appeared way back in1967 and starred the memorable Lee Marvin; that flick, remade as “Payback” in 1999, starred Mel Gibson (to paraphrase Lloyd Bentsen, Mel, you’re no Lee Marvin). Featuring the British action star Jason Statham in the title role and based on a different Stark novel, the new movie, “Parker,” follows much the same plot as its predecessors. It begins with an elaborate caper, an armed robbery of more than $1 million in cash from an unusual source, the daily take at the Ohio State Fair, a setting that provides the opportunity for some nicely contrasting images of people participating in the various games,

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contests, and amusements, and a gang of thieves holding workers at gunpoint while emptying a series of safes. Disguised as a priest, Parker, who orchestrates the immensely complicated job, calms the frightened employees and avoids any bloodshed. In one of the many flashbacks that interrupt and thicken the straightforward plot, he articulates his code: no stealing from ordinary people and no violence against the innocent. After the success of the dazzling scheme, everything, as usual, falls apart. Melander (Michael Chiklis), the leader of Parker’s four accomplices, recruited by his girlfriend’s father (Nick Nolte), demands that Parker accompany them on another big job, a $50 million jewel robbery overseen by the mob. When Parker refuses, the gang shoots him and leaves him for dead. In keeping with Hollywood’s skill at process, the best sequences in the film show exactly how Parker manages to survive his terrible injuries and track down his enemies. Clever and opportunistic, he hotwires a series of automobiles, recognizes the kind of guy likely to possess weapons he can steal, shoots a number of people, and works his way across the country from Ohio to Palm Beach, where his erstwhile colleagues construct their elaborate caper. He plans to even the score and take their huge jewelry haul while he’s at it. With a false identity as a Texas oilman, in Palm Beach he meets a real estate agent,

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A low point for lowbrow [ REVIEW ] BY ADAM LUBITOW

“Movie 43” (R), BY VARIOUS DIRECTORS NOW PLAYING

Leslie Rodgers (Jennifer Lopez), which not only opens up the possibility of a romantic complication, but also provides a guided tour of the lavish mansions of the fabulously wealthy. When not seeing the sights with Lopez, Parker concocts his own scheme and defends himself in a tremendously violent and gushingly bloody fight with an assassin. Bookended by two big capers, with a terrific, straight-ahead charge in the middle, “Parker” never softens its intensity or slackens its pace. Even though its protagonist steals for a living, kills in cold blood when he must, and leaves a trail of the dead and wounded in his wake, he still inspires the audience to take his side: he wins them over through his sheer, dogged, indomitable dedication. Much of the success of the movie derives from the performance of Jason Statham, a most convincing Parker, who maintains an icy control, displays great resourcefulness, and absorbs an amazing amount of punishment. He endures beatings, stabbings, shootings, loses gallons of blood, but never surrenders; in his own way a man of honor, he carries out his revenge as a matter of principle. Finally, the real measure of his strength derives not from the bullet holes, the stab wound in his chest, the knife through his hand, the four broken ribs, the constellation of contusions and lacerations, but from his resistance to Leslie Rodgers’s advances: a man who can refuse Jennifer Lopez is really tough.

Comedy anthology movies have been out of fashion for quite some time, and there doesn’t seem to be much point to bringing them back now. After all, if anyone truly has the desire to watch a collection of skits of varying degrees of humorousness, websites like YouTube and Funny or Die offer more than you could ever watch in a lifetime. So against all reason, along comes “Movie 43” a star-studded throwback to films like “The Kentucky Fried Movie,” “The Groove Tube,” and “Amazon Women on the Moon,” hoping to bring the genre screaming into the modern era. Those films are without a doubt uneven, but each contains at least a few moments of brilliance, something that sadly can never be said for the utterly brainless, unfunny “Movie 43.” Supposedly this film has been in the works for nearly four years, with participants working on their segments whenever they had some downtime between real projects. You’d think over the course of four years, the assembled collection of writers and directors would have been able to produce one legitimately funny idea. Instead, we’re subjected to segment after segment of tasteless gross-out

Kate Winslet and Hugh Jackman in “Movie 43.” PHOTO COURTESY RELATIVITY MEDIA

humor. You’ll never see another movie as obsessed with bodily fluids as this one. That type of humor has its place, no doubt, but to make it work you at least need to come up with something original. Likewise, complaining about the racist, misogynistic, and homophobic humor throughout “Movie 43” seems like an exercise in futility, but even that “out to offend everyone” brand of comedy can be funny if it’s presented in the right way. Here, it’s just presented, often in the most obvious, lifeless way possible. I wish the film really were as outrageous and willing to push the boundaries as it thinks it is. Instead it’s the sort of offensive that’s so lazy and unimaginative that it ends up just being boring. The segments are tied together through a loose framing story, in which a talentless filmmaker (Dennis Quaid) desperately pitches movie idea to a studio executive, played by Greg Kinnear. Each skit is supposedly one of the filmmaker’s many film proposals, but that doesn’t really matter; it’s just a clothesline on which to hang the various, otherwise unrelated, skits. Supposedly, the international version of the film has a completely different framing device, involving a group of teenagers scouring the internet for an infamous, banned video known as “Movie 43”. The film avoids becoming a total boys club through the inclusion of a single female director, the lovely and talented Elizabeth Banks. Perhaps not so surprisingly, her segment, about a middle-school date that goes terribly awry when the young girl (Chloë Grace Moretz) suddenly gets her first period, is the only one that attempts to make any kind of a point. That point happens comes through the use of a dumb fart joke, but when the bar is this low, it earns points just for trying. But by far the most successful segment stars Naomi Watts and Liev Schreiber as parents who take the homeschooling of their child to its logical extreme, deciding

to give him the emotionally scarring experience that a public school education would provide. Unfortunately, like every other skit in the film, it peters out somewhere in the middle before limping across the finish line. Aside from two appreciably offbeat commercials, one about tampons and the other a PSA about children living inside machines, the other segments offer gradually diminishing returns. Brett Ratner’s segment, in which Johnny Knoxville and Seann William Scott take a leprechaun (played inexplicably by Gerard Butler) hostage, is a lowpoint. When the other sketches include one that’s literally one long poop joke, that’s a real achievement. It goes without saying that the film completely squanders a cast overflowing with talent. (I haven’t even mentioned appearances from the likes of Halle Berry, Richard Gere, Bobby Cannavale, Kristen Bell, John Hodgeman, Uma Thurman, and Emma Stone.) Every actor is allowed some poor choices throughout his or her career, but the mind positively reels over what the directors had on all these stars to make them agree to participate. It’s interesting, and perhaps a tad troubling, to note that in a recent interview with Entertainment Weekly, Liev Schreiber mentioned that when shooting occurred, he was unaware the short was going to be used in a film. Incidentally, if for some reason you decide you must go see this film (and I recommend that you don’t), do yourself a favor and avoid the movie’s red band trailer, unless you want to have the handful of decent jokes completely spoiled for you. On the other hand, if you’ve ever longed to see Oscar-winner Kate Winslet star alongside current Academy Award nominee Hugh Jackman in a skit about a woman set up on a blind date with a seemingly perfect man, only to discover that he’s got a giant pair of testicles growing out of his neck, you may have just found nirvana.

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 23


Film Previews Full film reviews available at rochestercitynewspaper.com. [ OPENING ] BULLET TO THE HEAD (R): Sylvester Stallone stars as a hitman who agrees to team up with a cop to take brutal revenge on the men who murdered their respective partners. Also starring Sung Kang and Christian Slater. Canandaigua, Eastview, Tinseltown, Webster THE CENTRAL PARK FIVE (NR): Acclaimed documentarian Ken Burns examines the 1989 case of five black and Latino teenagers wrongly convicted of raping a white woman in Central Park. Little (Thu, Jan 31, 6:30 p.m.) STAND UP GUYS (R): Career criminal Al Pacino has just been released from prison after a 25year sentence, and teams up old with his old pals, Christopher Walken and Alan Arkin, for one last night of raising hell. Meanwhile, one of the men has secretly been assigned the task of bumping off his old friend. Pittsford WARM BODIES (PG-13): Nicholas Hoult stars in this apocalyptic romantic comedy as a zombie with a conscience who falls in love with a human girl, and may hold the key to saving what remains of humanity. Based on the cult novel by Isaac Marion. Costarring John Malkovich, Rob Corddry, and Dave Franco. Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview,

Geneseo, Greece Ridge, Henrietta, Tinseltown, Webster [ CONTINUING ] ARGO (R): Director Ben Affleck co-stars with John Goodman, Bryan Cranston, and Kyle Chandler in the once-classified true tale of a CIA exfiltration expert who hatches a daring plan to free six Americans hiding at the home of the Canadian ambassador during the 1979 Iran hostage crisis. Cinema, Culver, Henrietta, Webster BROKEN CITY (R): Private eye Mark Wahlberg gets in over his head when a mayor (Russell Crowe) hires him to tail his cheating wife (Catherine ZetaJones) in this crime thriller. Also starring Jeffrey Wright, Kyle Chandler, and Barry Pepper. Brockport, Canandaigua, Geneseo, Greece Ridge, Henrietta, Pittsford, Tinseltown, Webster DJANGO UNCHAINED (R): Quentin Tarantino’s latest exploitation extravaganza, this time starring Jamie Foxx as a former slave out to rescue his wife from the clutches of an evil plantation owner. Also starring Leonardo DiCaprio, Christoph Waltz, and Samuel L. Jackson. Culver, Eastview, Greece Ridge, Henrietta, Little, Tinseltown, Webster GANGSTER SQUAD (R): A stylish 1950’s-era crime drama from Ruben Fleischer (the director of “Zombieland”) about a group of undercover LAPD detectives attempting to take down mob

For information: Call us (585) 244-3329 Fax us (585) 244-1126 Mail Us City Classifieds 250 N. Goodman Street Rochester, NY 14607 Email Us classifieds@ rochester-citynews.com

kingpin Mickey Cohen by any means necessary. Starring Ryan Gosling, Sean Penn, Josh Brolin, Emma Stone, and Nick Nolte. Culver, Henrietta, Tinseltown, Webster HANSEL & GRETEL: WITCH HUNTERS (R): A tongue-in-cheek action-horror-comedy about the titular fairy tale brother and sister, now all grown up and battling witches professionally. Starring Jeremy Renner, Gemma Arterton, Peter Stomare, and Famke Janssen. Brockport, Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece Ridge, Henrietta, Tinseltown, Webster A HAUNTED HOUSE (R): Spoofing the genre “found footage” horror films, this movie (written by and starring Marlon Wayans) promises to deliver loads of timely, pointedly hilarious satire. That, or an endless parade of painfully unfunny references to films in a genre that already past its peak. Hard to say which. Brockport, Culver, Greece Ridge, Henrietta, Tinseltown THE HOBBIT: AN UNEXPECTED JOURNEY (PG-13): The first installment of Peter Jackson’s long-awaited adaptation of the “Lord of the Rings” prequel, chronicling Bilbo Baggins’ adventures in Middle Earth. Culver, Eastview, Henrietta, Tinseltown, Webster THE IMPOSSIBLE (PG-13): Naomi Watts and Ewan McGregor star in this grueling drama, based on a true story, about a family separated and struggling to survive in the aftermath of the

massive Indian Ocean tsunami of 2004. Pittsford JACK REACHER (PG-13): Tom Cruise: action hero. Based on the popular series of novels by Lee Child, about one bad-ass homicide investigator. Cinema THE LAST STAND (R): Arnold Schwarzenegger is back on the big screen, playing a former LAPD officer who’s the last barrier to preventing a drug kingpin from crossing the Mexican border, in popular Korean director Kim Ji-woon’s English-language debut. With Forest Whitaker, Johnny Knoxville, Peter Stormare, and Zach Gilford. Cinema LES MISÉRABLES (PG-13): The hugely popular, long-running stage musical based on the Victor Hugo novel comes to the big screen courtesy of “King’s Speech” director Tom Hooper. With Hugh Jackman, Russell Crowe, Amanda Seyfried, and Anne Hathaway. Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Geneseo, Henrietta, Pittsford, Tinseltown, Webster LIFE OF PI (PG): Ang Lee continues his unpredictable streak with an eye-popping adaptation of Yann Martel’s acclaimed novel, now a 3D adventure about a young man who survives a shipwreck and finds himself on a lifeboat with an orangutan, a hyena, an ailing zebra, and a Bengal tiger. Culver, Henrietta, Pittsford LINCOLN (PG-13): Daniel Day-Lewis channels our 16th President for Steven Spielberg, focusing on the last few months

24 CITY JANUARY 30 - FEBRUARY 5, 2013

RUST AND BONE (R): French director Jacques Audiard follows up his critically acclaimed crime drama, “A Prophet” with an unconventional love story between a brutish street fighter and a whale trainer (Marion Cotillard, in a Golden Globenominated performance) who’s lost her legs in an orca attack. Little, Pittsford SILVER LININGS PLAYBOOK (R): Lovably unstable mental patients Bradley Cooper and Jennifer Lawrence fall for one another and learn to ballroom dance in this likely Oscar contender from David O. Russell. With Robert De Niro and Jacki Weaver. Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece Ridge, Henrietta, Little, Pittsford, Tinseltown, Webster WRECK-IT RALPH (PG): John C. Reilly, Sarah Silverman, and Jane Lynch provide a few of the voices in this animated comedy about a video-game bad guy who dreams of becoming a hero, even if it means upending the status quo at the arcade. Tinseltown, Webster ZERO DARK THIRTY (R): Director Kathryn Bigelow and writer Mark Boal follow up their Oscarwinning “The Hurt Locker” with this likely Best Picture contender, examining the decade-long hunt to capture Osama Bin Laden. Starring Jessica Chastain, Joel Edgerton, Kyle Chandler, and Jason Clarke. Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece Ridge, Henrietta, Little, Pittsford, Tinseltown, Webster

BUILDING FOR LEASE IN CULTURAL DISTRICT

TO ADVERTISE IN OUR

EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY

All real estate advertised in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act, which makes it unlawful, “to make, print, or publish, any notice, statement, or advertisement, with respect to the sale or rental of a dwelling that indicates any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin.” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under the age of 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertisement for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. Call the local Fair Housing Enforcement Project, FHEP at 325-2500 or 1-866-671-FAIR. Si usted sospecha una practica de vivienda injusta, por favor llame al servicio legal gratis. 585-325-2500 - TTY 585-325-2547.

of the Great Emancipator’s life, which includes the Union’s victory in the War Between The States and the abolition of slavery. Co-starring Tommy Lee Jones, Jared Harris, and Sally Field. Brockport, Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Henrietta, Tinseltown, Webster MAMA (PG-13): Guillermo del Toro produced this supernatural thriller about two little girls who lived alone in the woods for five years before being rescued. Their new adopted parents soon discover that the girls may not have returned alone. Starring Jessica Chastain. Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece Ridge, Henrietta, Tinseltown, Webster MOVIE 43 (R): See review on page 23. Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Greece Ridge, Henrietta, Tinseltown, Webster PARKER (R): See review on page 22. Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Greece Ridge, Henrietta, Tinseltown, Webster PARENTAL GUIDANCE (PG): Grandparents Billy Crystal and Bette Midler look after their kids’ children. Hijinks ensue, likely concluded with a lesson about the importance of family Eastview, Henrietta QUARTET (PG-13): Dustin Hoffman directs this comedy with a cast stacked with veteran British actors (Maggie Smith, Michael Gambon, Billy Connolly) about a home for retired opera singers thrown into upheaval after the arrival of a diva. Little, Pittsford

HOME & GARDEN PROFESSIONALS -40 Car Off Street Parking -Prior Use Medical Training -1,500 Feet Warehouse

-4,000 Feet Office Space -Overhead Delivery Door -Lease Rate Under $7 per ft.

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SECTION CALL CHRISTINE AT

244.3329 x23


Place your real estate ad by calling 244-3329 ext. 23 or rochestercitynewspaper.com Ad Deadlines: Friday 4pm for Display Ads Monday at noon for Line ads Retirement Property

DOG & CAT HOUSES Kennels, porch steps, do it yourself kits. Quick assembly 585-752-1000 $49 Jim

Reliable and Professional. Able to rehearse and open for gigs. Call 585-260-9958 fstone@rochester. rr.com

EXETER, NH- 55+ New homes from $69,900-$129,000 2br/2ba Along Scenic Exeter River. 7 miles to ocean, 50 minutes to Boston! 603-772-5377 or email exeterriverlanding@comcast.net

FOR SALE: Used Asus Eee 10.1” Netbook- Built-in Web Cam - $175 cash. Phone 585-4130827 Leave name & number

CALLING ALL MUSICIANS OF ALL GENRES the Rochester Music Coalition wants you! Please register on our website. For further info: www.rochestermusiccoalition. org info@rochestermusiccoalition. org 585-235-8412

SEBASTIAN, FLORIDA Affordable custom factory constructed homes $45,900+, Friendly community, No Real Estate or State Income Taxes, minutes to Atlantic Ocean.  772-581-0080, www. beach-cove.com. Limited seasonal rentals

Home Services MASTER CHIMNEY & MASONRY See our ad under Home and Garden Professionals. Chimney Cleaning, Masonry Repairs, Foundation Repairs, Roof Leaks, Brick Steps Repaired. 585-7348444

Adoption PREGNANT? ANXIOUS? Get FREE, no-pressure, confidential counseling, guidance, financial assistance at our licensed agency; if families. Call Joy: 866-922-3678.  www. ForeverFamiliesThroughAdoption. org.

Automotive ALWAYS BETTER Higher cash for your Junk Cars, Trucks and Vans. From $200-$800 or more for newer. Running or not. With free towing. Also free removal of any unwanted model in any condition. Call 585-305-5865 CASH FOR CARS Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888-420-3808 www. cash4car.com (AAN CAN) FOR SALE 4 Blizzak Winter Tires on Alloy wheels for Mazda RX-8 or similar $250. btowler@rochestercitynews.com

Events **GUN SHOW** Alexander Fireman’s Recreation Hall- Route 28 (Thruway exit 48). Alexander, NY Sunday, February 3. Public Hours: 8am- 3pm, 102 tables! www.nfcshows.com

For Sale BEANIE BABIES (TY) 1997, 1998 Light blue Elephant (Peanuts), Twigs, Squealer, Iggy and Rainbow with the mixed up name tags. & more! $4 - $8 585880-2903 All $49.99 BOOK ENDS of races horses with jockey’s carved in wood, Christmas gift. $25 585-880-2903 BRONZE COLOR metal horse, nice size 13” long, 10” high with engraved saddle, horse lover gift $25 585-880-2903

GERMAN SHEPHERD Plaque on chain. Carved head on real wood. (said, beware!) Nice gift $20.00 585-880-2903 MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS: (1955) Conn Trumpet (Coprion Bell) serial#517429 $800; (1960) Conn Trumpet (Director) $200; (1960) Wurlitzer Electric Piano model #200 serial #72828L $1500. All good condition 585-458-9722 TV RCA 35” with remote control. Excellent condition $25 585225-5526

Groups Forming DIFFERENT DRUMS GAY GIRLS GROUP. (proudly, progressively, conservative flavor]. Why great divider Obama the Marxist reelected? Answer: “Liberalism is a mental disorder!” Elections have consequences- prices for gas/food/ commodities rising significantly beginning 2013. PREPARE!!! Obama Sucks. 585-747-2699

Jam Section 2 TROMBONE PLAYERS NEEDED to play with one of Rochester’s Finest Big Bands. Must read. (Great Charts). Able to rehearse every other Wednesday 585-4427480 BASSIST AVAILABLE: Electric, Acoustic. All styles. Mature,

K-D Moving & Storage Inc.

EXP. DRUMMER Strong vocals to join (keyboard)/ (keyboard bass) who also sings lead. To form duo (Retro Pop/Dance/Jazz). Must be willing to shop the musical product around to get gigs 585426-7241 EXPERIENCED LEAD VOCALS Seeks employment. Pat experience Inkspots, Platters, Drifters, James Brown among many. Leroy Harris. Contact Bobby 585-328-4121 Specialties, classics, R&B Soul. LOCAL GUTIARIST Long time player looking to put together a little project see what happens? Looking for keyboards, drummer, bass (upright?) If interested call Bear 420-9145 MEET OTHER MUSICIANS any instrument, male singer- jam together- coffee house, private gigs, I play keys Call Martin 585266-6337 MEN ENJOY SINGING Fun with the Chorus of the Genesee, Sing, learn, perform, share laughs and

continues on page 26

MIND BODY SPIRIT

THINK • MOVE • BREATHE DANCE • HEAL • SEARCH STRETCH • STENGHTHEN

TO ADVERTISE CALL CHRISTINE AT 244.3329 x23

Experience in office & household moving and deliveries

Big or small, we do them all

473-6610 or 473-4357

See Page 32 of this week’s issue

HomeWork A cooperative effort of City Newspaper and RochesterCityLiving, a program of the Landmark Society.

All the Comforts of Home 229 Trafalgar Street The English poet Edith Sitwell once said, “Winter is the time for comfort, for good food and warmth, for the touch of a friendly hand and for a talk beside the fire: it is the time for home.” Indeed! Yes, we all complain about Rochester’s long, frosty winters, but we do so while delighting in hunkering down with the unique wintertime comforts of home and hearth. Built in 1925 and located in the heart of the picturesque Sibley Tract in the 19th Ward, 229 Trafalgar Street exudes warmth and comfort. Arriving from the front entrance into a small foyer, an original hexagonal tile floor offers a practical yet decorative area for snowy boots, while a built-in closet has enough space for everyone’s coats, mittens, and hats. Even in January, a leaded glass window illuminates this area with natural light. Through a handsome wooden door is the living area, where a wood-burning fireplace invites you to curl up with a book from the built-in bookcase. A door on the other side of the mantel leads to a pretty side porch—a quiet place to read or gather, come spring. Crown moldings, paneled wooden doors, leaded glass windows, narrowplank hardwood floors, faceted glass doorknobs, and varnished wood moldings are preserved throughout the home. A particularly special feature on the first floor is the small office or sitting room overlooking the backyard. The original windows with arched wooden casings here are a vintage treat.

Beyond the dining room is the kitchen, with ample cupboard space and ceramic tile backsplash and counters. From here, there’s easy access to the backyard for summertime entertaining. The property also features perennial gardens and a spacious two-car garage. The stairway to the second floor is accessed through the living room and separated by a pair of French doors—it’s a gorgeous corner and practical, too, for keeping upstairs sleepers dozing peacefully while fireside revelry continues below. The upstairs features three charming bedrooms, including a spacious master suite with an adjoining room that mirrors the bonus room on the first floor. This room would make a perfect music room or a cozy nursery. The home’s full bathroom retains its built-in medicine cabinet and hexagonal tile floor and is adjacent to a linen closet with drawers for additional storage. Priced at $89,500, this 1716-square foot dwelling is perfect for your long winter’s nap! University of Rochester employees may qualify for up to $9,000 in down payment and closing cost assistance through the University’s Home Ownership Incentive Program. For more information on this property, visit rochestercityliving.com/ property/R198685 or contact Adrienne Kllc, of RE/MAX Realty Group, at (585)-3179043 to schedule a showing. by Sarah Nguyen Hooper Sarah is a proud city resident.

23 Arlington St. NY D.O.T.#9657

KdMovingandStorage.com rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 25


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Did you know that City Newspaper Readers spent OVER $90 MILLION DOLLARS on home improvements in the LAST 12 MONTHS? Call Christine today to advertise

585-244-3329 ext. 23

26 CITY JANUARY 30 - FEBRUARY 5, 2013

libation! Guest night Tuesday at 7 PM. Stop in at 58 E Main St, Webster. Call 585-698-7784 R & B SOUL BANDS seek employment, experienced groups, already performing, seek new jobs. Contact Bobby 585-328-4121 ROCK STAR, MR. ROCHESTER, lead vocalist, is looking to form band (Classic Rock) with lead guitarist, bassist, drummer & rhythm guitars Covers & originals 585-473-5089 THE GREGORY KUNDE CHORALE is looking for male voices. Call for an audition now to join our fourteenth season! Info Line 377 7568 or visit our website www. gregorykundechorale.org

Lost and Found LOST 14x20 inch canvas portrait man and tropical birds. Artwalk vicinity zips 14620, 14618, 14607. Reward. Margot Fass 733-0563

Looking For... XMAS Wool/Flannel Army Blanket donations needed! Gift new blankets to “Sunday Circle” knitters/crocheters to decorate for poor patients of R.P.C. Contact Mary at mgrant@frontier.com.

Miscellaneous BUY REAL VIAGRA, Cialis, Levitra, Staxyn, Propecia & more... FDAApproved, U.S.A. Pharmacies. Next day delivery avaiable. Order online or by phone at viamedic. com, 800-467-0295

*special excludes all previous work.

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Improvements for your home from foundations to roofs and everything in between, including:

> page 25

FREE DENTAL CLEANING MCC Sophomore Dental Hygiene student looking for volunteer patients interested in complimentary dental cleaning. Must be 2+ years since last professional cleaning. Call 585314-0398 and leave a message for Leslie S.

HAS YOU BUILDING SHIFTED OR SETTLED? Contact Woodford Brothers Inc, for straightening, leveling, foundation and wood frame repairs at 1-800-OLDBARN. www.woodfordbros. com. “Not applicable in Queens county” SAWMILLS from only $3997MAKE MONEY & SAVE MONEY with your own bandmil Cut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship. FREE Info & DVD www.NorwoodSawmills. com/300N 1-800-578-1363 Ext.300N TAKE VIAGRA? Stop paying outrageous prices! Best prices... VIAGRA 100MG, 40 pills+/4 free, only $99.00. Discreet shipping, Power Pill.1-800-374-2619

Professional Services DIVORCE or annulment in as little as one day. Over 50 years experience. 100% guarantee. From $995. All information at www.divorcefast.com

Accounting & Tax Services I AM LOOKING FOR NEW CLIENTS. After more than 25 years I still enjoy doing taxes and helping my clients pay the minimum possible. Unlike H&R and other tax services I work year round and I answer my own phone. Call me - Lew Jones, JONES TAX SERVICE 585-381-5820 x27 1250 PITTSFORD-VICTOR PITTSFORD

Wanted to Buy BUYING / SELLING BUYING/ SELLING- gold, gold-filled, sterling silver, silver plate, diamonds, fine watches (Rolex, Cartier, Patek Philippe) coins, paintings, furs, estates. Call for appointment 917696-2024 JAY


I’m very pleased with the calls I got from our apartment rental ads, and will continue running them. Your readers respond — positively!” - M. Smith, Residential Management EMPLOYMENT / CAREER TRAINING

Employment AIRLINE CAREERS - Become an Aviation Maintenance Tech. FAA

approved training. Financial aid if qualified – Housing available. Job placement assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of

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WWW.CABOCES.ORG EOE/AA

Maintenance 877-492-3059 DRIVER - $0.03 quarterly bonus, plus $0.01 increase per mile after 6 and 12 months. Daily or Weekly pay. CDL-A, 3 months current exp. 800-4149569 www.driveknight.com DRIVERS - HIRING EXPERIENCED / INEXPERIENCED TANKER DRIVERS! Earn up to $.51/mile! New Fleet Volvo Tractors! 1 Year OTR Exp. Req.-

Tanker Training Available. Call Today: 877-882-6537 www. OakleyTransport.com HELP WANTED! Make extra money in our free ever popular homemailer program, includes valuable guidebook! Start immediately! Genuine! 1-888292-1120 www.howtoworkfromhome.com $$$HELP WANTED$$$ Extra Income! Assembling CD cases

Hiring? GET THE RESULTS YOU NEED AT ABOUT HALF THE PRICE OF OTHER PAPERS!

CITY

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from Home! No Experience Necessary! Call our Live Operators Now! 1-800-405-7619 EXT 2450 http://www.easywork-greatpay.com (AAN CAN) LIVE LIKE A POPSTAR Now hiring 10 spontaneous individuals. Travel full time. Must be 18+. Transportation and hotel provided. Call Loraine 877-777-2091 PAID IN ADVANCE! MAKE up to $1000 A WEEK mailing brochures from home! Helping Home Workers since 2001! Genuine Opportunity! No Experience required. Start Immediately! www.mailingstation.com (AAN CAN)

Volunteers A SECOND THOUGHT Resale Shop in East Rochester is accepting applications for volunteer sale associates and online researchers. Shop benefits people with disabilities in Guatemala. Call (585) 340-2000. CATHOLIC FAMILY CENTER needs volunteers to help people

apply for citizenship. The commitment is 2.5 hrs per mth one evening a month. Training is provided. For more information call Nate at (585) 546-7220 ex 4854. FOSTER PARENTS WANTED! Monroe County is looking for adults age 21 and over to consider opening their homes to foster children. Call 334-9096 or visit www.MonroeFosterCare.org. HERITAGE CHRISTIAN STABLES, a therapeutic horsemanship program for children and adults with developmental disabilities, is looking for volunteers to serve as horse leaders and side walkers. Call Kim Kennedy at (585) 340-2016 or email kkennedy@ heritagechristianservices.org LIFESPAN’S OMBUDSMAN PROGRAMS looking for volunteers to advocate for individuals living in long-term care settings. Please contact call 585.287.6378 or e-mail dfrink@lifespan-roch.org for more information

continues on page 28

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 27


Rent your apartment special third week is

Place your ad by calling 244-3329 ext. 23 or rochestercitynewspaper.com Ad Deadlines: Friday 4pm for Display Ads Monday at noon for Line ads

FREE

EMPLOYMENT / CAREER TRAINING > page 27 LITERACY VOLUNTEERS OF ROCHESTER needs adult tutors to help adults who are waiting to improve their reading, writing, English speaking, or math skills. Call 473-3030, or check our website at www. literacyrochester.org MCC DENTAL STUDENT Seeking patients who would like

complimentary cleaning. This is FREE of exchange for your time! Contact Tina S. 585-902-8009 or email tinahygiene@gmail.com ROCHESTER CARES is looking for volunteers interested in joining us to make a difference in Rochester!! One time and recurring volunteer opportunities with a wide range of organizations. www. rochestercares.org/calendar.php

CITY SEEKS WINTER/SPRING

INTERNS

Are you a hard-working, fun-loving college student with a passion for journalism or photography? City Newspaper is looking for interns in our photography and editorial departments for the winter/spring semester. Candidates should have prior experience, must be college students, and must work for college credit (NOTE: internships are unpaid). Get a chance to work in the City office and gain real-world experience.

EDITORIAL PROSPECTS Send a resume, clips, and a cover letter explaining what you can bring to the City team to eric@rochester-citynews.com

PHOTO PROSPECTS Send a resume, photo samples (no more than 20), and a cover letter to artdept@rochester-citynews.com NO PHONE CALLS, PLEASE

SCHOOL #12 999 South Ave. is looking for reading & math volunteers, English & Spanish. Training provided. Call Vicki 585461-4282 UNITED WAY Volunteer Fundraiser needed. Verification Phone Calling & Data Management. Strong interpersonal skills; attention to detail; strong verbal and written communication skills. Call 242-6547 VOLUNTEERS NEEDED for the Men’s Emergency Winter Shelter at Dimitri House. Please call us at 325-1796 for more information or to volunteer your time. VOLUNTEERS NEEDED to depict evangelistic opportunities by means of performing skits in a Church environment.

Professional acting not a requirement. This is done in a small Church setting. Contact Pastor Ron @ 585-957-6155 WOMEN: ROCHESTER HABITAT is looking for women 18 years+ to help build a house with a single mother. Visit rochabitat.org or call 546-1470

Career Training ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home. *Medical, *Business, *Criminal Justice, *Hospitality. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV authorized. Call 800-481-9472 www. CenturaOnline.com

DEPUTY SHERIFF JAILOR Application deadline: February 27, 2013 Exam Date: April 13, 2013 Salary is $41,103-$64,269 annually Now Accepting Applications online at www.monroecounty.gov or 39 West Main Street, Suite 210. Candidates must be at least 18 years of age and must possess: High School Diploma or GED, Valid NYS Drivers License. Have no felony convictions and be able to pass a physical agility and medical test as well as a psychological and background investigation. Candidates must be in good physical condition and of good moral character and have a genuine interest in this rewarding career. 753-4705 / 753-4706 Download applications online at: (www.monroecounty.gov) www.monroecountysheriff.info The Monroe County Sheriff’s Department is an equal opportunity employer.

Openings for Full Time, Part Time & Relief Positions Available If you’re looking for a position which offers HUGE Rewards & Great Benefits please visit our website to apply at: www.lifetimeassistance.org or in person at 425 Paul Road ~ Rochester, New York 14624 Please complete the application & we will do all the rest! You can expect to receive a call from a Human Resource representative to schedule an interview for January 22, 2013

GREAT BENEFITS:

Generous Paid Time Off (PTO), Tuition Reimbursement, Competitive Salaries, Medical & Dental, Life Insurance, Retirement Plans (401a & 403b), Referral Bonus and Work Life Balance Qualifications: High School Diploma or equivalent with six months of related experience or one full year of college education in human services. Subject to Background checks including; Fingerprinting, New York State Child Abuse Registry, and Driver’s License (if position required driving). Must meet LAI’s Vehicle Operator Requirements. Physical ability to lift up to 50 pounds. Must be able to successfully complete all required trainings including but not limited to First Aid, CPR, Medication Administration and SCIP (Strategies for Crisis Intervention Prevention) 28 CITY JANUARY 30 - FEBRUARY 5, 2013

Legal Ads [ LEGAL NOTICE ] Consult a Registered Professional Nurse, PLLC. Art. of Org. filed with the NY Sec. of State (SSNY) on 1/10/13. Office in Monroe Co. SSNY Design. Agent of PLLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to Susan J. LaGaipa, RN, 20 El Centro Drive Rochester, NY 14609. Purpose: Practice of Registered Professional Nursing.

with NY Secy. of State (SS) on December 26, 2012. LLC’s office is in Monroe County. SS is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS shall mail a copy of any process to LLC’s principal business location at 14 West Ham Circle, North Chili, NY 14514. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ]

Dental Office 2024 LLC filed Arts. of Org. with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/28/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to 369 Highland Avenue, Rochester, NY 14620. Purpose: any lawful activity.

FLAMING SPADE PRODUCTIONS, LLC (LLC) filed Arts. of Org. with NY Secy. of State (SS) on 1/18/13. LLC’s office is in Monroe Co. SS is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS shall mail a copy of any process to LLC’s principal business location at 75 Conmar Dr., Rochester, NY 14609. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity.

[ LEGAL NOTICE ]

[ NOTICE ]

Notice of formation of a limited liability company (LLC). Name: SUKHENKO DESIGN, LLC. Article of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on December 20, 2012. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to the LLC, 1013 Hard Rock Road, Webster NY 14580. Purpose: For any lawful purpose.

HUDSON PLAZA LLC file Arts. of Org. with Sec’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/27/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to 11 Sturbridge Lane Pittsford, New York 14534. Purpose: any lawful activity.

[ LEGAL NOTICE ]

[ LEGAL NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Limited Liability Company 1) Name: Alliance4Accountability, LLC. 2) Articles of Organization were filed by Department of State of New York on December 13, 2012. 3) County: Monroe. 4) The Company does not have a specific date of dissolution. 5) the Secretary of State has been designated as an agent upon whom process against the Company may be served. The address to which the process shall be mailed: 5615 Buffalo Rd. Churchville, NY 14428. 6) Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] D Napolitano, LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 12/13/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Dominic T. Napolitano, 1337 Schlegel Rd., Webster, NY 14580. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] DJ BURNS PROPERTIES LLC (LLC) filed Arts. of Org.

[ NOTICE ] Index No. 2012-5762 SUPREME COURT STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF MONROE ESL Federal Credit Union Plaintiff, vs. Estate of Marion T. Dalba, Vincent A. Dalba, as Executor; People of the State of New York; United States of America; Doreen Dalba; Oscar Arnada, Defendants. Pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale dated December 21, 2012 and entered herein, I, the undersigned, the Referee in said Judgment named, will sell at public auction in the front vestibule of the Monroe County Office Building, 39 West Main Street, Rochester, New York, County of Monroe, on February 13, 2013 at 10:30 a.m., on that day, the premises directed by said Judgment to be sold and therein described as follows: ALL THAT TRACT OR PARCEL OF LAND, situate in the Town of Greece, County of Monroe and State of New York, known as 184 Stoneycreek Drive, Rochester, NY 14616; Tax Account No. 059.152-62 described in Deed recorded in Liber 9378 of Deeds, page 229. Said premises are sold subject to any state of facts an accurate survey may show, zoning restrictions and any amendments thereto, covenants, restrictions, agreements, reservations, and easements of record


Legal Ads and prior liens, if any, municipal departmental violations, and such other provisions as may be set forth in the Complaint and Judgment filed in this action. Judgment amount: $106,447.49 plus, but not limited to, costs, disbursements, attorney fees and additional allowance, if any, all with legal interest. DATED: January 2013 Dennis Gruttadaro, Esq., Referee LACY KATZEN LLP Attorneys for Plaintiff 130 East Main Street Rochester, New York 14604 Telephone: (585) 324-5767 [ NOTICE ] Index No. 2012-6268 SUPREME COURT STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF MONROE ESL Federal Credit Union Plaintiff, vs. Gary J. Lisman; Jackie Ward; Claire Howe; Katie Burke, Defendants. Pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale dated January 2, 2013 and entered herein, I, the undersigned, the Referee in said Judgment named, will sell at public auction in the front vestibule of the Monroe County Office Building, 39 West Main Street, Rochester, New York, County of Monroe, on February 11, 2013 at 10:30 a.m., on that day, the premises directed by said Judgment to be sold and therein described as follows: ALL THAT TRACT OR PARCEL OF LAND, situate in the City of Rochester, County of Monroe and State of New York, known as 51-53 Morningside Park, Rochester, NY 14607; Tax Account No. 122.532-7 described in Deed recorded in Liber 6116 of Deeds, page 182. Said premises are sold subject to any state of facts an accurate survey may show, zoning restrictions and any amendments thereto, covenants, restrictions, agreements, reservations, and easements of record and prior liens, if any, municipal departmental violations, and such other provisions as may be set forth in the Complaint and Judgment filed in this action. Judgment amount: $139,403.05 plus, but not limited to, costs, disbursements, attorney fees and additional allowance, if any, all with legal interest. DATED: January 2013 Joanne L. Best, Esq., Referee LACY KATZEN LLP Attorneys for Plaintiff 130 East Main Street Rochester, New York 14604 Telephone: (585) 324-5767 [ NOTICE ] JGMAC Associates LLC (LLC) filed Arts.of Org. with NY Secy. of State (SS) on December 21, 2012 LLC’s office is in Monroe County.

SS is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS shall mail a copy of any process to LLC’s principal business location at 116 LaSolis Drive, Rochester, NY 14626. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] JJC3 LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 1/9/13. Office in Monroe Co. SSNY desig. agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 233 Chestnut Hill Dr., Rochester, NY 14617, which is also the principal business location. Purpose: Any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] JM SWEENEY FARMS, LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 1/8/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 30 Rolling Meadows Dr., Hilton, NY 14468. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] MENTAL HEALTH COUNSELING CONNECTIONS PLLC, a domestic PLLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 12/19/12. Office location: Monroe. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the PLLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The PLLC, P.O. Box 16721, Rochester, NY 14616. Purpose: Mental Health Counselor [ NOTICE ] Not. of Form. of Bordner Enterprises LLC. Art. of Org. filed by Sect’y of State (SSNY) on 11/19/2012. Location- Monroe County. The SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY may mail any process to LLC: 4045 East Ave., Rochester, NY 14618. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Not. of Form. of TYMACK GROUP LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with SSNY 1/3/13. Office: Monroe County. SSNY designated Agent of LLC to whom process may be served. SSNY may mail a copy of any process to LLC, 16 Marlands Road, Rochester, NY 14624. Purpose any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Form. of DRY CLEAN FASHIONS, LLC (the “LLC”). Art. of Org. filed with Secretary of the State of NY (SSNY) on 12/10/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY

has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, 937 Chili Ave, Rochester, NY 14611. Purpose: any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Form. of GENESEO HOUSING, LLC (the “LLC”). Art. of Org. filed with Secretary of the State of NY (SSNY) on 12/24/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, 2041 Penfield Rd, Penfield, NY 14526. Purpose: any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Form. of MATHEW FAMILY FL, LLC (the “LLC”). Art. of Org. filed with Secretary of the State of NY (SSNY) on 12/21/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, 21 Runnymede Ct, Rochester, NY 14618. Purpose: any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Form. of MATHEW FAMILY NY, LLC (the “LLC”). Art. of Org. filed with Secretary of the State of NY (SSNY) on 12/21/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, 21 Runnymede Ct, Rochester, NY 14618. Purpose: any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Form. of URIM MEDIA, LLC (the “LLC”). Art. of Org. filed with Secretary of the State of NY (SSNY) on 12/26/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, 460 Glide St, #1, Rochester, NY 14606. Purpose: any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Folio Consulting, LLC. Art. of Org. filed Sec’y State (SSNY) on 10/12/12 . Office Loc: Monroe Co. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail of process to: 76 Westland Ave, Rochester, NY 14618. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of 9 MECHANIC STREET

LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/12/12. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 95 Allens Creek Rd., Ste. 300, Rochester, NY 14618. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Evans & Fox LLP at the princ. office of the LLC. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of L.D. Networking LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 1/3/2013. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 79 Mission Hill Drive, Brockport, NY 14420. Purpose: any lawful act [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of BP Villa Associates, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/6/12. Office location: Monroe Co. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Robert Marshall, 150 Allens Creek Rd, Rochester, NY 14618, also the Registered Agent. Purpose: any lawful activities [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of MD3 SPORT LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 12/13/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 62 Monroe Street, Honeoye Falls,, NY 14472. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of 1310 WALL ROAD, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/17/12. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 860 Shoemaker Rd., Webster, NY 14580. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of 20 Pine 1909 LLC Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State on 12/31/12. Office location: Monroe County. Principal business address: 195 Dickinson St., Rochester, NY 14621. Secy. of State designated

as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. Secy. Of State shall mail process to: 265 Purdue Court, Paramus, NJ 07652. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of 225 EAST MAIN STREET LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/12/12. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 95 Allens Creek Rd., Ste. 300, Rochester, NY 14618. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Evans & Fox LLP at the princ. office of the LLC. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of 3385 MAIN STREET LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/12/12. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 95 Allens Creek Rd., Ste. 300, Rochester, NY 14618. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Evans & Fox LLP at the princ. office of the LLC. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of AJ COSTELLO GROUP LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/17/12. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: One Airport Way, Ste. 300, Rochester, NY 14624. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of CONCAL, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 3/10/04. Off. loc.: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, c/o Silver & Feldman, Esqs., Attn: Sammy Feldman, Esq., 3445 Winton Place, Ste. 228, Rochester, NY 14623. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of COSTELLO ENTERPRISES LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/12/12. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: One Airport Way, Ste. 300, Rochester, NY 14624. SSNY designated as agent of

LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the princ. office of the LLC. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of DJF PARTNERS, LLC. Art. Of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/30/12. Office in MONROE County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, 14 Bay Point Circle Rochester, NY 14622. Purpose: Recruiting Services [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of ETE Properties, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/13/2012. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 330 Little John Way, Webster, NY 14580. Purpose: any lawful act [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Exium Partners, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State on 1/15/13. Office location: Monroe County. Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: The LLC, 144 Village Landing, Suite 276, Fairport, NY 14450, principal business address. Purpose: any lawful purpose.

Off. loc.: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, c/o Sammy Feldman, 3445 Winton Place, Ste. 228, Rochester, NY 14623. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of IS L Properties, LLC amended to IZ Levy Properties, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/21/12. Off. Loc.: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, c/o Sammy Feldman, 3445 Winton Place, Ste. 228, Rochester, NY 14623. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of LWN Transport, LLC. Art of Org. filed with SSNY on 11/29/12. Office Loc: Monroe Co. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: United States Corporation Agents, Inc. 7014 13th Ave, Ste 202, Brooklyn, NY 11228. Purpose: Any lawful activities [ NOTICE ]

Notice of formation of Forels LLC, Art. Of Org. filed with the Secy. of State (SSNY) on 03/18/11. Office location Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to 942 Gristmill Rdg Webster, NY 14580. Purpose: Any lawful activity.

Notice of Formation of MD GORDON LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 01/04/13. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 40 Joseph Ave., Rochester, NY 14603. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. The regd. agent of the company upon whom and at which process against the company can be served is Michael Gordon, 40 Joseph Ave., Rochester, NY 14603. As amended by Cert. of Amendment filed with SSNY on 01/10/13, the name of the LLC is: MD GORDON FAMILY LLC. Purpose: Any lawful activity.

[ NOTICE ]

[ NOTICE ]

Notice of Formation of Garden Village, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/27/12. Off. loc.: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, c/o Sammy Feldman, 3445 Winton Place, Ste. 228, Rochester, NY 14623. Purpose: any lawful activity.

Notice of Formation of Media Connection, LLC filed under the original name The Media Connection, LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 12/19/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 10 Cross Ridge Rd., Pittsford, NY 14534. Purpose: any lawful activities.

[ NOTICE ]

[ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of GV Apartments, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/27/12.

[ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of NART LLC Arts. of

Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/17/2012. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o Law Office of Anthony A. Dinitto, L.L.C., 8 Silent Meadows Drive, Spencerport, NY 14559. Purpose: any lawful act [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of Oaster & Associates LLC, Art. Of Org. filed with the Secy. of State (SSNY) on 02/09/10. Office location Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to 15 Schoen Pl., Pittsford, NY 14534. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Popeye Properties, LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 1/7/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 29 Walnut Dr., Penfield, NY 14626. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of RED-Rochester, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State on 11/19/12. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. bus. addr.: 640 Quail Ridge Dr., Westmont, IL 60559. Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. Purpose: all lawful purposes. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of STAY & PLAY DOG HOTEL & DAYPLAY LLC. Art. Of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/08/12. Office in MONROE County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, 983 John Leo Dr. Webster, NY 14580. Purpose: Dog Care [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of The Lady and the Snowman LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 9/18/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of

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NY 14559. Purpose: any lawful activity.

LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 409 Peck Rd., Spencerport, NY 14559. Purpose: any lawful activity.

[ NOTICE ]

[ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of THL 20 Pine 1913 LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State on 12/31/12. Office location: Monroe County. Principal business address: 195 Dickinson St., Rochester, NY 14621. Secy. of State designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. Secy. Of State shall mail process to: 265 Purdue Court, Paramus, NJ 07652. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Thruway Park Drive Mini Storage LLC. Arts. of Org. filed Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/21/12. Off. loc.: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o The LLC, 648 Gallup Road, Spencerport,

Notice of Formation of TWIN TAVERN LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 01/10/13. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 1549 Lake Rd., Hamlin, NY 14464. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of UNDER THE LIGHTHOUSE LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 01/09/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, 1793 Manitou Rd., Spencerport, NY 14559. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of YOUth ROChester, LLC, Art. of Org. were filed

with NY Dept. of State on 11/14/2012. Office loc.: Monroe. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process may be served and shall mail process to: PO Box 60194, Rochester, NY 14606. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of Bluetone Communications, LLC. Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 1/2/13. Office location: Monroe County. LLC formed in OH on 10/22/12. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011. OH and principal business address: 7775 Walton Pkwy., New Albany, OH 43054. Cert. of Org. filed with OH Sec. of State, 180 E. Broad St., 16th Fl., Columbus, OH 43215. Purpose: all lawful purposes. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of Horizon Labs LLC. Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/26/12. Office

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location: Monroe County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 12/12/12. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: National Registered Agents, Inc., 111 Eighth Ave., NY, NY 10011, also the registered agent. Principal office address: 930 Carter St., Rochester, NY 14621. Address to be maintained in DE: c/o National Registered Agents, Inc., 160 Greentree Dr., Ste. 101, Dover, DE 19904. Arts of Org. filed with the DE Secretary of State, John G. Townsend Bldg., 401 Federal St., Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of Manning & Napier Group, LLC. Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 1/17/13. Office location: Monroe County. LLC formed in DE on 6/24/11. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. DE address of LLC: 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of Q Management Services LLC. Fictitious name: Q Management Services Group LLC. Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/31/12. Office location: Monroe County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 12/12/12. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: National Registered Agents, Inc., 111 Eighth Ave., NY, NY 10011, also the registered agent. Principal office address: 2300 Buffalo Rd., Rochester, NY 14624. Address to be maintained in DE: c/o National Registered Agents, Inc., 160 Greentree Dr., Ste. 101, Dover, DE 19801. Arts of Org. filed with the DE Secretary of State, John G. Townsend Bldg., 401 Federal St., Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] REBA NY, LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 1/23/2013. Office in Monroe Co. SSNY desig.

30 CITY JANUARY 30 - FEBRUARY 5, 2013

agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 2255 Lyell Ave., Rochester, NY 14606, which is also the principal business location. Purpose: Any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] The name of the Limited Liability Company is “SRT Palisades Properties LLC”. The date of filing of The Articles of Organization with the Department of State was December 19, 2012. The office of the Company is located in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as the Agent of the Company upon whom process may be served, and the Secretary of State shall mail a copy of any process against the Company served upon him or her to 626 Beach Avenue, Rochester, NY 14612. The business purpose of the Company is to engage in any lawful act or activity for which Limited Liability Companies may be organized under the laws of the State of New York. [ NOTICE ] TINY HOPES, LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 12/19/12. Office in Monroe Co. SSNY desig. agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 2255 Lyell Ave., Rochester, NY 14606, which is also the principal business location. Purpose: Any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] TWIN CAPITAL PROPERTIES, LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 8/20/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Dawn Siciliano, 436 Bartell Ln., Webster, NY 14680. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of 5543 ROUTE 14, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/21/12. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 679 Hightower Way, Webster, NY 14580. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] Phillips Route Sales LLC filed Articles of Organization with the New York Department of State on 11/14/2012. Its office is located in Monroe

County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent of the Company upon whom process against it may be served and a copy of any process shall be mailed to 65 Heinz St Hilton NY 14468. The purpose of the Company is any lawful activity. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION 1653-1655 E. MAIN, LLC ] Articles of Organization filed with Secretary of State of NY (“SSNY”) on 12/14/2012. Office in Monroe County. SSNY designated agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to LEGAL COUNSEL, C/O Applied Image Inc., 1653 E. MAIN ST., ROCHESTER, NY 14609. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION BODYMIND FLOAT CENTER LLC ] Articles of Organization filed with Secretary of State of NY (“SSNY”) on 01/07/2013. Office in Monroe County. SSNY designated agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to BODYMIND FLOAT CENTER LLC, C/O DAVID BRICKMAN, 378 ROCKINGHAM ST., ROCHESTER, NY 14620. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY ] KAI TRADING COMPANY, LLC filed Articles of Organization with the New York State Department of State on January 10, 2010. Its office is to be located in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent of the company upon whom process against it may be served, and a copy of any process shall be mailed to 40 Harrison Street, Rochester, New York 14605. The purpose of the company is any lawful business.

Companies may be organized under Section 203 of the New York Limited Liability Company Law. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LLC ] Rochester Wellbeing, LLC has filed articles of organization with the New York Secretary of State on December 10, 2012 with a date of formation of January 1, 2013. Its principal place of business is located at 2851 Clover Street, Pittsford, New York in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent upon whom process may be served. A copy of any process shall be mailed to 2851 Clover Street, Pittsford, New York 14534. The purpose of the LLC is to engage in any lawful activity for which Limited Liability Companies may be organized under Section 203 of the New York Limited Liability Company Law. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LUCKY SQUIRREL PARTNERS, L.P. ] Notice of formation of Limited Partnership (“L.P.”). Certificate of Limited Partnership filed with Sec. of State of NY (“SSNY”) on December 19, 2012. Office location: 18 Parkview Manor Circle, Honeoye Falls, NY 14472, Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent of L.P. upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of any process to the L.P. at 18 Parkview Manor Circle, Honeoye Falls, NY 14472. The names and addresses of each general partner are available from the SSNY. The latest date upon which the L.P. is to dissolve is December 31, 2037. Purpose: property management and to engage in any lawful purpose.

[ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LLC ]

[ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF ROSE CIRCLE, LLC ]

ReTech Services, LLC has filed articles of organization with the New York Secretary of State on January 10, 2013. Its principal place of business is located at 7 Cross Meadow Lane, Pittsford, New York in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent upon whom process may be served. A copy of any process shall be mailed to at 7 Cross Meadow Lane, Pittsford, New York 14534. The purpose of the LLC is to engage in any lawful activity for which Limited Liability

First: Rose Circle, LLC, a Limited Liability Company, filed Articles of Organization with the Secretary of State of New York on December 6, 2012 Second: The county within this state in which the office of the limited liability company is to be located is Monroe. Third:The street address of the principal business location is: 24 Old Country Lane, Fairport, New York 14450. Fourth: The Secretary of State is designated as agent of the limited liability

company upon whom process against it may be served. The post office address within or without this state to which the Secretary of State shall mail a copy of any process against the limited liability company served upon him or her is: 24 Old Country Lane, Fairport, New York 14450. Fifth: The purpose of the business of Rose Circle, LLC is any lawful purpose [ NOTICE OF SALE ] Index No. 2011-14780 SUPREME COURT STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF MONROE ESL Federal Credit Union Plaintiff, vs. Todd C. VanOcker a/k/a Todd VanOcker; Marcy A. VanOcker; ESL Federal Credit Union; LVNV Funding LLC APO Sears; Emily VanOcker and Kimberly VanOcker, Defendants. Pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale dated January 2, 2013 and entered herein, I, the undersigned, the Referee in said Judgment named, will sell at public auction in the front vestibule of the Monroe County Office Building, 39 West Main Street, Rochester, New York, County of Monroe, on February 6, 2013 at 10:00 a.m., on that day, the premises directed by said Judgment to be sold and therein described as follows: ALL THAT TRACT OR PARCEL OF LAND, situate in the Town of Gates, County of Monroe and State of New York, known as 105 Dearcop Drive, Rochester, NY 14624; Tax Account No. 119.081-3 described in Deed recorded in Liber 6937 of Deeds, page 58 Said premises are sold subject to any state of facts an accurate survey may show, zoning restrictions and any amendments thereto, covenants, restrictions, agreements, reservations, and easements of record and prior liens, if any, municipal departmental violations, and such other provisions as may be set forth in the Complaint and Judgment filed in this action. Judgment amount: $29,062.78 plus, but not limited to, costs, disbursements, attorney fees and additional allowance, if any, all with legal interest. DATED: January 2013 Richard H. Holzberg, Esq., Referee LACY KATZEN LLP Attorneys for Plaintiff 130 East Main Street Rochester, New York 14604 Telephone: (585) 324-5767


Fun [ NEWS OF THE WEIRD ] BY CHUCK SHEPHERD

Updates

— Almost-extinct vultures may be making a comeback within the Parsi community of Mumbai, India, after a pain reliever (diclofenac) nearly wiped it out. Parsis’ Zoroastrian religion requires “natural” body disposals (no cremation or burial) of humans and cattle, and bodies have always been ritually laid out for the hungry birds, but the community has also come to rely on diclopfenac in hospitals and for cattle. When News of the Weird last mentioned the problems (in 2001), vultures were dying out from kidney damage caused by the drug, and bodies were piling up. (Parsis were exploring using solar panels to burn the corpses.) However, according to a November New York Times dispatch, clerics are reporting modest success in weaning Parsis off of diclofenac, and the vultures appear more plentiful. — “Washington State, Known for ...”: When a man died of a perforated colon in 2005 in Enumclaw, Wash., while having sex with a horse (at what news reports suggested was a “bestiality farm”), the legislature passed the state’s first antibestiality law, which was used in 2010 in another “farm” case, in Bellingham, 110 miles from Enumclaw. A British man had sex with several dogs on the property of Douglas Spink, who had allegedly arranged the trysts, and the man was convicted and deported, but Spink was not charged (though instead was re-imprisoned for an earlier crime). In November 2012, with Spink nearing release, prosecutors filed bestiality charges using evidence from 2010, involving “four stallions, seven largebreed male dogs” and “13 mice, each coated with a lubricant.” According to the Bellingham Herald, Spink (acting as his own lawyer) denounced state officials and “the bigotry behind the (law).”

Recurring Themes

— Least Competent Criminals: Peter Welsh, 32, and Dwayne Doolan, 31, weren’t the first burglars to try breaking into a building by smashing through the adjoining basement wall, but they might be the clumsiest. Their target, on New Year’s Eve, was Wrights Jewellers in Beaudesert, Australia, but trying to smash the front window failed, as did smashing the rear doors, which were actually those of another store. They finally settled on the basement option, but absentmindedly broke through the opposite-side wall and wound up in a KFC restaurant. (Undaunted, according to police, they robbed the KFC of about $2,600.) — Once again, a public library has been sued for gently asking a patron to leave because his body odor was provoking complaints. George Stillman, 80, filed a $5.5 million lawsuit in October against the New York Public Library for feeling “humiliat(ed)” by the staff of the St. Agnes branch in Manhattan. Stillman said he views body odor (his and others’) as mere “challenge(s) to the senses” and “a fact of life in the city.” Actually, he had also denied that he had any body odor at all, but a New York Post reporter, interviewing him about the lawsuit, said she noted “a strong odor.” — Drunk drivers often try to avoid hitand-run charges by claiming that they did not realize they hit anything, but their odds drop if there is a dead pedestrian lodged in the windshield, as with Sherri Wilkins, 51, who was arrested in Torrance, Calif., in November, 2.3 miles from the crash scene, after other drivers finally persuaded her to stop. (Wilkins, it turned out, is a “rehabilitated” drug user who worked as a counselor at a Torrance drug treatment center and who claimed to have been sober for 11 years.)

[ LAST WEEK’S SOLUTION ON PAGE 26 ]

[ LOVESCOPE ] BY EUGENIA LAST ARIES (March 21-April 19): Pressure won’t work, but conversation will. Take time to get to know the people you meet first. Not many move as quickly as you do, and assuming that the person who interests you is as ready as you are to move forward will not turn out well. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Put a hop into your step and a twinkle in your eye, and you will be difficult to resist. Actions will speak louder than words, so do your best to please any potential partner. Don’t be afraid to show your true feelings. GEMINI (May 21-June 20):

You’ll make an impression by sharing your vision and words of wisdom. Talk of innovative plans coupled with some interesting demands will have the partner of your choice coming back for an encore. Live in the moment, and love unconditionally. CANCER (June 21-July 22): A serious approach to love will send out a signal that you are ready to take the next step and make a long-lasting promise to the right person. Don’t be surprised if the dynamics of a relationship change quickly. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): You’ll be attracted to unusual partners.

A change of activity will bring you in contact with people from different backgrounds who will perk your interest and give you something to consider with regard to love, marriage and a new approach to the way you live. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): You may not be as practical as usual when it comes to love. Proceed with caution, and think twice before you make a move on someone who may be off-limits. An unconventional relationship may be attractive initially, but in time it will cause stress. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Get out and have fun. Enjoy unusual

forms of entertainment and people who live on the edge. The experience will help you recognize where you fit in and the type of person you should be looking for when it comes to finding a partner. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Sit back and observe whoever interests you. You don’t need to rush into anything -- in fact, you are best to be secretive about your private life while you discover more about whoever piques your interest. Your attentive behavior will make you more appealing. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): You may want to review past

relationships before you jump into new and unfamiliar territory. Having a little history can make your life easier and satisfy a longing you have to revisit the one who got away. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Put your heart into everything you do, including your pursuit of love. Giving out a vibe that shows you are looking for a long-term relationship will attract partners who are heading in the same direction. Have your checklist ready, and let the games begin! AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Not everyone will be honest

with you regarding his or her status. You’ll have to do your due diligence before you give in to temptation. Keep an open mind and a free-spirited attitude, and you will spare your heart from being tormented by a flirt. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Get involved in projects that interest you, and you will find love. Sharing your concerns with others will show your empathetic, compassionate side, making you more attractive to someone who feels the same way. An emotional connection will lead to a long-term relationship.

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January 30 - February 5, 2013 - City Newspaper