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Among the comments on the mayor’s security detail (Feedback, January 15) was one troubling question: “Have any of you guys ever been to her neck of the woods?” From our home on the east end of downtown, my wife and I frequently travel to that neck of the woods. I feel compelled to react strongly to that type of verbal redlining of the part of the northeast off of Clifford Avenue. Recently we have eaten at restaurants on Culver Road and Parsells. My wife attends church on Culver and buys pastries at Savoia Bakery. Former students and colleagues live on Bedford, Longview, Ellison, Greeley, Vermont, Rocket, and Hazelwood. City featured a positive column of a house on Ferris Street. On the way to and from senior softball leagues in Irondequoit, I always drive down Webster, Bay, and Clifford in the summer and fall. As a Democratic committeeman, and in a New York State Assembly primary, I have walked the streets of that neighborhood frequently. So enough with the loose slanders about the diverse Beechwood neighborhood – Zip code 14609, mostly – which has a lot to recommend it. Take a look and patronize a business in that neck of the woods. JAMES KRAUS

Time to act on the environment

A coal-washing facility is built right on the banks of a river that supplies over a quarter of a million people with drinking water. A frackwater impoundment in the watershed supplying Pittsburgh collapses,

sending 400,000 gallons of fracking waste into the city’s drinking water, and an entire city is on bottled water for three months. Enbridge Energy is operating a tar-sands pipeline under the Mackinac Straits in the Great Lakes, water supply to millions. Inergy corporation is seeking dumping permits for an industrial facility to liquefy natural gas on Seneca Lake, water supply for over 100,000. The New York State Department of Environmental Conservation has yet to promise it will not allow fracking operations around Canadice and Hemlock Lakes – our water supply. The DEC has permitted the dumping of radioactive fracking solids from Pennsylvania in the Genesee watershed. Charleston, West Virginia, is coming to you. Imagine no water, no cooking, no bathing, no laundry, no drinking water except for bottled water – if you can get it. What does it take to get you to act? We are in a fight with the fossil fuel industry for our lives. There are over a hundred organizations in New York working to convert our state to renewable energy and defend our right to clean water. They could use your money, and they could use you. Your children, friends, and family look to you for protection. Get up. Get moving. JOHN KASTNER

Casinos’ effects

I would assume that any casino built near Rochester would include a hotel (“Group Pushes Back on Possible Seneca Casino,” News Blog). I had friends who loved playing the machines at Batavia. They tried Seneca Niagara, and when offered free rooms, they completely abandoned the Batavia racino. All these places compete fiercely against one another and if a big hotel and casino went up in Henrietta, I wouldn’t be surprised if both Batavia and Finger Lakes went out of business. Governor Cuomo wants to bring more casinos to more people so he can be absolutely sure as few people as possible are going out of state for their gambling. And he

doesn’t seem to care who gets hurt in the process. I urge ALL residents to get behind [former Mayor] Johnson on this one. MICHAEL BURTON

Warren’s beginning

I find Mayor Warren’s recent comments on her first two weeks in office convincing (“Warren Explains Security,” News Blog). The vitriol and personal attacks against her on the internet are disgusting and painful for me to read, and her desire for a security detail makes good sense. It’s certainly her choice. At the same time, hiring her uncle was dumb, and the whole speeding business is just stupid. Her reactions to the predictable uproar were poor. So, what’s going on? Well, her grandfather (one of the most important people in her life) suffered a stroke and died just as she was taking office. My father died almost exactly a year ago, and even though we knew he was dying months in advance, I was in shock. I wasn’t getting hate mail, and I wasn’t taking over the reigns of New York’s third largest city. If Mayor Warren wasn’t in shock then she isn’t human. Mayor Warren’s been in politics for quite a few years. I’ve seen her run meetings at City Council. She does a good job. She’s neither an idiot nor a fool. I’m sure she’s ambitious (that goes with the job), but I choose to believe that she’s trying hard to make Rochester a better place. Occam’s razor suggests that, when faced with competing hypotheses, the hypothesis with the fewest assumptions should be selected. What are the hypotheses here? 1) Mayor Warren is David Gantt’s evil minion who pretended to be competent for years so that she could rapaciously descend on Rochester and extract trivial sums of money in the clumsiest way possible. 2) She made a bunch of bad decisions after the twin shocks of her grandfather’s death and taking office. I’ve got to go with the second choice. JIM MAYER

News. Music. Life. Greater Rochester’s Alternative Newsweekly January 29 - February 4, 2014 Vol 43 No 21 250 North Goodman Street Rochester, New York 14607-1199 themail@rochester-citynews.com phone (585) 244-3329 fax (585) 244-1126 rochestercitynewspaper.com facebook.com/CityNewspaper twitter.com/roccitynews On the cover: Mayor Lovely Warren at her public inauguration at the Auditorium Theatre. Photo by John Schlia. Publishers: William and Mary Anna Towler Editor: Mary Anna Towler Asst. to the publishers: Matt Walsh Editorial department themail@rochester-citynews.com Features editor: Eric Rezsnyak News editor: Christine Carrie Fien Staff writers: Tim Louis Macaluso, Jeremy Moule Music editor: Willie Clark Music writer: Frank De Blase Calendar editor: Rebecca Rafferty Contributing writers: Paloma Capanna, Casey Carlsen, Roman Divezur, George Grella, Laura Rebecca Kenyon, Andy Klingenberger, Dave LaBarge, Kathy Laluk, Adam Lubitow, Nicole Milano, Ron Netsky, Dayna Papaleo, Suzan Pero, Rebecca Rafferty, David Raymond, David Yockel Jr. Art department artdept@rochester-citynews.com Art director/production manager: Matt DeTurck Designers: Aubrey Berardini, Mark Chamberlin Photographers: Mark Chamberlin, Frank De Blase Advertising department ads@rochester-citynews.com Sales operations: Matt Walsh New sales development: Betsy Matthews Account executives: Nancy Burkhardt, Tom Decker, Christine Kubarycz, William Towler Classified sales representatives: Christine Kubarycz, Tracey Mykins Operations/Circulation kstathis@rochester-citynews.com Circulation manager: Katherine Stathis Distribution: Andy DiCiaccio, David Riccioni, Northstar Delivery, Wolfe News City Newspaper is available free of charge. Additional copies of the current issue may be purchased for $1 each at the City Newspaper office. City Newspaper may be distributed only by authorized distributors. No person may, without prior written permission of City Newspaper, take more than one copy of each weekly issue. City (ISSN 1551-3262) is published weekly by WMT Publications, Inc. Periodical postage paid at Rochester, NY (USPS 022-138). Address changes: City, 250 North Goodman Street, Rochester, NY 14607. Member of the Association of Alternative Newsweeklies and the New York Press Association. Annual subscriptions: $35 ($30 senior citizens); add $10 for out-of-state subscriptions. Refunds for fewer than ten months cannot be issued. Copyright by WMT Publications Inc., 2014 - all rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, photocopying, recording or by any information storage retrieval system without permission of the copyright owner.


ALL WE NEED IS 3 2 WORDS

URBAN JOURNAL | BY MARY ANNA TOWLER

Still seeking solutions to city school problems The Rochester school district will be getting a lot of new attention in the early part of this year. Mayor Lovely Warren made education a key issue in her campaign, and I assume it won’t be long before she starts acting on the initiatives she laid out. The University of Rochester is hosting a Presidential Symposium on Revitalizing K-12 Education in February. And Van White, the Rochester school board’s new president, has appointed four committees whose job will be, in his words, to “identify solutions to the district’s most pressing problems.” All that focus is good, and I’d like to be more hopeful than I am. But we’ve been through all this before. The cast of characters in the school district changes, but the outcome hasn’t improved. The committees appointed by Van White are supposed to come up with solutions to four key challenges facing the school district: concentrated poverty, student achievement, parental involvement, and school and community safety. White wants the committees to identify solutions and budget priorities in time for them to be included in the district’s 201415 budget, which the school board will vote on in May. He’s also asking for public input. I don’t have any fresh ideas in terms of solutions – nothing that people haven’t raised before, anyway. But I do have some thoughts about what we need to do to before we embark on any solutions – if we want to be successful. So here are those thoughts: Since my husband and I moved here in 1965, the poverty of the city has increased pretty steadily. So has the racial segregation of the Rochester school district. And the district’s student achievement and graduation rates have plummeted. A succession of superintendents (eight, plus two interims, since 1965) and a succession of school board members and presidents have had big plans, high hopes, great expectations, great confidence, great enthusiasm. None of them have been able to reverse the slide down. We’ve had a succession of reforms and blue-ribbon committees and position papers and community-involvement plans, and things have just kept getting worse. We’ve closed schools and opened new ones. We’ve created magnet schools. We’ve carved big schools into clusters of small schools. We’ve tried reorganizing schools into junior-senior highs, into middle

Successions of superintendents and school boards have had high hopes. None have been able to reverse the slide down.” schools and high schools, into K-6, K-8. We’ve introduced new curriculum. We’ve launched turn-around plans. We’ve pushed volunteerism, business partnerships, mentoring, extended days. And things have gotten worse. Concentrated poverty is obviously a major factor. It’s not our only problem, but there’s no denying that it has a terrible impact on many of the district’s students and their families. We can’t get rid of the poverty concentration overnight, however. And, in fact, we can’t deal with it successfully without vastly improving our children’s educational achievement. Nor can we throw up our hands and say those children are doomed to failure: doomed to get out of school without the knowledge and skills to get a decent job, contribute to society, and live a fulfilling life. What kind of educational system will it take to give Rochester’s children the knowledge and skills they need? And what’s keeping us from providing it? To single out only concentrated poverty as an obstacle and to single out only money as a solution is a cop-out. Both are important. But focusing only on them keeps us from asking the hard questions. It keeps us from being honest about the other changes we need to make. It lets us keep pointing fingers and wasting time, and wasting the future of tens of thousands of Rochester’s children in the process. So let me ask some questions. What kinds of teachers and principals does the school district need if we are going to overcome the impact of poverty continues on page 7

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[ NEWS FROM THE WEEK PAST ]

ASAR says no confidence in Vargas

Eighty-seven percent of the members of the Association of Supervisors and Administrators of Rochester, the union that represents city school district principals and administrators, say they have no confidence in Superintendent Bolgen Vargas. Lack of a strategic plan and instructional leadership, poor communication, and chronic changes in management are some of the reasons given for the vote.

Veep visits MCC

Vice President Joe Biden and his wife, Dr. Jill Biden, visited Monroe Community College’s Applied Technology Center on West Henrietta Road to talk about workforce development and education. In recent years, MCC officials have worked with local businesses to train and place a new crop of middle-skills workers.

Audits reveal charter school problems

Audits by New York State Comptroller Thomas DiNapoli’s raised concerns about two local charter schools. An audit of Eugenio Maria de Hostos Charter School showed

that school officials entered into building leases and contracts with organizations that have ties to members of the board or their families or friends. An audit of True North Rochester Preparatory Charter School found that school officials did not consistently comply with the law regarding criminal background checks of employees.

News EDUCATION | BY TIM LOUIS MACALUSO

NYSUT against Common Core

Budget gap grows for Rochester schools

The largest teachers union in the state, New York State United Teachers, withdrew its support of the curriculum referred to as Common Core. The statewide rollout of the Common Core has been controversial and riddled with problems. NYSUT wants a three-year moratorium on Core-related teacher evaluations and test scores.

Hill resigns

Reggie Hill, uncle to Rochester Mayor Lovely Warren, resigned as the city’s director of executive services. Warren’s appointment of Hill set off accusations of nepotism and was due to be reviewed by the city’s ethics board. The status of that review now is unclear. Warren spokesperson Christine Christopher said Hill didn’t want to be a distraction to Warren.

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A little over a month ago, Rochester schools Superintendent Bolgen Vargas cautioned school board members about a budget gap for the 2014-2015 school year that could top $30 million. But he revised that projected gap to $42 million at a recent board meeting. Vargas said the increase became apparent after hearing Governor Andrew Cuomo’s state budget presentation last week. Vargas said that Rochester will benefit from more state funding for universal full-day pre-K — something Vargas has envisioned for some time. The district’s budget has thus far supported mostly half-day pre-K. But much of the boost in state funds — about $6.3 million — will go to city charter schools, Vargas said. And that reflects a trend. As more charter schools open and more city school students enroll in them, the district’s overall budget may look the same, he said, but the amount going to city school students is actually decreasing.

“The growth of charter schools is a significant threat to the Rochester school system,” Vargas said. The widening budget gap is coming just as newly elected school board President Van White has formed four committees to brainstorm ideas to improve student performance. White said he wants to use the feedback from the committees to help prioritize next year’s budget. Vargas said that district families and educators need to lobby lawmakers in Albany for more resources to help close the $42 million gap. But board Vice President Cynthia Elliott said that the district needs to examine its labor agreements and negotiate cost reductions. “We need to push back on our unions and ask them to sacrifice,” Elliott said. “Before we go to Albany, we have to tell them, ‘You’ve got to give up some of the money.’”

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“Leaving the seats vacant takes away residents’ voices. Right now, that means residents of the 134th district don’t have an Assembly member representing their interests during budget discussions.” FORMER STATE ASSEMBLY MEMBER BILL REILICH

POLITICS | BY JEREMY MOULE

Vacancies rob voters The sign still hangs above Bill Reilich’s former State Assembly office on West Ridge Road. But the lights are off and calls won’t be answered. Reilich, a Republican, resigned his Assembly seat after winning the race for Greece town supervisor last year. The seat will stay vacant until Governor Andrew Cuomo calls a special election to fill it. Reilich and Greece Democratic Committee leader David Garretson say they want Cuomo to set that election as soon as possible. “The folks in my town don’t have a representative,” Garretson says. Residents of Parma and Ogden are in the same situation, since Reilich’s old district, the 134th, includes those towns, too. The seat is one of a total of 11 Assembly and Senate vacancies awaiting action by the governor. But Cuomo has been reluctant to set the special elections because new vacancies keep emerging, and he says he wants to wait for the situation to stabilize. “If you have to do special elections, they’re very expensive to do because you basically have to run a separate election, obviously,” Cuomo said recently on the

Capitol Pressroom radio program. “So it’s not something you want to do lightly.” But leaving the seats vacant takes away residents’ voices, Reilich says. Right now, that means residents of the 134th district don’t have an Bill Reilich’s empty office in the Greece Towne Centre plaza. Assembly member PHOTO BY JEREMY MOULE representing their interests during budget discussions. Reilich and Garretson say there is It’s unlikely that a special election also the matter of constituent services. could be held in time for a newly-elected Representatives’ offices frequently help Assembly representative to participate in people with a variety of issues, such as budget talks. But the Legislature passes problems with unemployment checks and bills throughout the year. disability assistance. In a recent statement, Assembly If Cuomo is concerned about the cost Speaker Sheldon Silver also called on of special elections, Reilich says, he could Cuomo to set the special elections. set them to coincide with the June 24 “We have many important issues to federal primary. But even that scenario consider and a strong democracy demands is not ideal in terms of timing. The State that New York conduct special elections as Legislature’s regular session ends in June. soon as possible in order to fill these seats,” he said in the statement.

POLITICS | BY JEREMY MOULE

Slaughter’s foes It looks like House Representative Louise Slaughter, who represents the 25th Congressional District, could face at least two opponents in her bid for re-election this year. Gates Supervisor Mark Assini, a Republican, and Marine Corps veteran Tim Dean, who plans to run as an independent, both say they plan to take on the wellknown and powerful Dem. Assini says he believes in reaching across party lines. He worked with Syracuse Mayor Stephanie Miner, co-chair of the state Democratic Party, to make sure a pension proposal floated last year by Governor Andrew Cuomo didn’t get off the ground, he says. “Washington is broken, there’s no doubt about it,” Assini says. “There’s no collaboration, no compromise.” And he says that unlike most other Republicans, he’s willing to entertain changes to the Affordable Care Act instead of demanding outright repeal. Congress should look to the Canadian and British health-care systems to see what’s worked there, he says. Dean says he can connect with voters who are sick of their representatives voting along party lines. He says he wants to repeal the Affordable Care Act and to restore the cost-of-living adjustment for retired military veterans. Dean says he won’t vote for any proposed laws that restrict guns. “I will govern by the Constitution without condition,” he says.

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PUBLIC SAFETY | BY TIM LOUIS MACALUSO

City of the gun If you scan the Internet for crime data about Rochester, you’ll find dozens of press releases from the US Department of Justice. The lead sentences read pretty much the same: pleads guilty to homicide with a firearm. Guilty for transporting a firearm to Rochester from another state. Guilty to robbery involving a firearm. There have been more than 175 killings in Rochester over the last five years, according to the Rochester Police Department. The deadliest year was 2013, with 42 homicides. And most of the homicides involved guns.

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JANUARY 29 - FEBRUARY 4, 2014

But as senseless and tragic as these events are, the number of homicides doesn’t begin to show the magnitude of gun-related violence in cities such as Rochester. It doesn’t include shootings, robberies, gun trafficking, and other gun-related crimes. The proliferation of guns and gunrelated violence are serious issues for local law enforcement. Where do all of the guns come from? How do they get into the hands of criminals? And what happens to the guns recovered at crime scenes? These are the kinds of questions that a team of officers from the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives were prepared to answer at a recent Tuesday Topics event at the Rochester Central Library. In a telephone interview prior to the event, ATF public information officer Charles Mulham talked about Rochester’s gun problem. The ATF is a law enforcement agency that

operates under the US Department of Justice and has offices in major cities throughout the country. Rochester, for instance, has a team of officers that closely coordinates with local law enforcement and the ATF’s larger office in New York City. It’s ATF officers’ job to protect communities from acts of arson, bombing, and terrorism. They’re also charged with preventing illegal trafficking of alcohol and tobacco. But one of the agency’s most important responsibilities, Mulham says, is preventing the illegal use and trafficking of firearms, usually referred to as handguns and long guns, such as shotguns. The ATF uses a variety of tactics, Mulham says, such as recovering and tracing illegal guns. “It’s not uncommon in New York City alone to have 12,000 weapons traced a year,” he says. The ATF traced about 1,200 guns that were recovered in Rochester in 2012, he says. But first, Rochester ATF officers have to acquire the guns. Some guns are found at crime scenes. Others are confiscated through search warrants and during arrests. And almost every metropolitan police department in the

country, including the Rochester Police Department, holds periodic gun buyback programs where residents turn in unwanted, and frequently unregistered, weapons. The ATF obtains guns of all different models and quality, Mulham says. Some are old and cheap, he says, and some are expensive, sophisticated weapons. But the majority are small, inexpensive, and easy-toconceal handguns, he says. Long guns are also common in this area, he says, and they’re a particularly dangerous street weapon. “Normally, a 28-inch shotgun will be sawed off to bring it down to a 14-inch barrel to make it easier to hide,” Mulham says. “But the bullets will hit the air faster and spread and cause more damage.” The Rochester ATF team gleans information from the guns, Mulham says. That information is usually sent to the New York City office for tracing. “Weapons have identifying marks,” he says. “All firearms manufacturers, domestic or foreign, leave some kind of identification like a serial number. Some countries have what are called proof marks, a symbol or number.” Criminals often try to scratch off the serial number or even drill away the identifying marks on the guns, Mulham says, but it usually doesn’t work. The information can be used to determine everything from the make, model, and age of the gun to the state, city, and address where it was last sold. Tracing the origins can provide leads to other important information, such as crimes involving the weapon and possible suspects involved in the crimes. The question many Rochester residents have is how do so many illegal guns get into

the city in the first place? Where do they all come from? Mulham says that most communities are either a market or a source for guns. In many instances, he says, a New York resident will go down to a Southern or Midwestern state with more relaxed gun laws to purchase weapons cheaply, or have someone there purchase them with the intent to resell them to a third party.

ATF public information officer Charles Mulham says that the Rochester ATF team coordinates with the New York City office to trace guns recovered in Rochester. PROVIDED PHOTO

Then the guns are transported to New York and resold at a significant markup. “In this fairly basic example, the purchaser committed federal offenses,” Mulham says. But Rochester is a bit unusual compared to most cities in the state, he says. The Rochester ATF team finds that most guns recovered here are traced back to Rochester. “Rochester is more of a market within, as opposed to a market that needs a [gun] source,” he says. “The weapons are already here in Rochester and this area of the state.” That means that an abundant supply of guns exists in the community, Mulham says, and acquiring something small and cheap isn’t difficult. Like every consumer purchase, he says, guns fulfill a need. “Narcotics and guns go hand and hand,” he says. Whether the people are major or minor drug dealers, Mulham says, they all want to protect themselves and their business. Sections of Rochester’s northeast quadrant are notorious for their drug-related gang activities, he says. “Gangs can take on different appearances,” Mulham says. “In Rochester, they are more like crews of young men. When you have high poverty and low graduation rates, that’s a perfect recipe for high crime rates.”


City school problems continues from page 3

concentration? What’s the quality of the current staff? What improvements do we need? What has to change to get them? What kind of education support services – the services that the district’s administrative staff provide – are needed? What’s the quality of the current staff? What improvements are needed? What has to change to get them? What community support services do students’ families need? What’s the quality of the services we offer now? What improvements are needed? What collaboration? What new services are needed? What do parents need to do better? What are they not doing that they should be doing? Are some of them not well educated enough themselves to set expectations and to support their children educationally? Do all parents take responsibility for their children’s behavior and achievement? And what can parent activists do about that? And what about the students themselves? Do they bear any responsibility for doing better? Do they know what changes they need to make themselves? We do have answers to some of those questions – partial answers, anyway. Teachers and administrators have complained for years about lack of adequate training, frequent changes in curriculum and programs, widespread student discipline problems, and lack of parent involvement. District audits and other investigations have found absurd lapses in simple school management: failure to take attendance, for instance, and a records-keeping system that marks students present if no attendance is taken. Superintendent Bolgen Vargas, who has asked area colleges and universities to take over the management of some of Rochester’s schools, says the district’s bureaucracy is “overwhelming” and that the district is too badly broken to fix by itself. We also know that many Rochester children start school without the language skills and other basics that they need; they’re behind from Day 1, and they don’t catch up. We know that the community doesn’t provide enough help to make up for those deficits. We know that many Rochester children start school with serious physical and mental health problems. And we know that they aren’t getting enough help. I believe that the vast majority of parents want their children to succeed in school. I believe that the vast majority of teachers and administrators and other school staff want to do a good job. That’s the raw material. What do we need to do to turn that raw material into a successful school district? The answer can’t come from outside observers. We’ve tried that before. The answer

The public has lost confidence in the district: in its teachers, its administrators, its school board. The blame-deflecting just looks like an excuse.” needs to come from self-analysis. Everybody in the district community – teachers, parents, students, administrators, service providers, city residents – needs to start with a frank assessment of themselves and their peers. There are problems in every area, and for too many years we’ve tried to fix them by finding fault and imposing solutions from the outside. That hasn’t worked. Selfanalysis won’t work, either, if the goal is self-protection. Teachers and administrators have to admit that some of their peers are not good at their job and shouldn’t be there. Parents and community activists have to admit that some parents are doing a bad job raising their children – that some children’s language and behavior is out of bounds, and that teachers deserve respect, from their children and from parents. You get the picture. Everybody in the community needs to take a good, hard look at themselves and their peers. They need to talk about the hard subjects. No more mincing words. No alibies and justifications. And no more asking for money. Not now. What we need right now is for each peer group to come up with solutions for the problems in their own backyard. The public has lost confidence in the Rochester school district: in its teachers, its administrators, its school board. All of the blame-deflecting just looks like an excuse. And the charter school movement – making big inroads in Rochester – is one result of that. Superintendent Vargas has said that the district doesn’t have much time left. He’s right. If we don’t fix things, the state will start taking over some of our schools. And charter schools will keep opening and siphoning off students. And families who can afford to will keep moving out of the city. And the back-to-the-city momentum that seems to be flickering right now will burn out. And 10 years from now, Rochester’s problems – the concentration of poverty, the unemployment, the violence, the fiscal problems – will be much, much worse. We’ve let that go on for decades. We owe it to the current generation of children to stop it. rochestercitynewspaper.com

CITY 7


WARREN’S

HONEYMOON

INTERVIEW | BY CHRISTINE CARRIE FIEN

Rochester’s new mayor tries to overcome early bad publicity. The press pack —a handful of reporters and photojournalists — decides it’s time for the big move: the breach of the third floor at City Hall, where Mayor Lovely Warren resides, fortified behind a wall of staffers and one laid-back security guard. The pack has been cooling its heels downstairs going on three hours, hoping Warren or her spokesperson will come out to address the latest development in the new mayor’s speeding scandal. By this point, it had been confirmed that Warren’s driver was stopped for speeding on the Thruway. A second stop — on the same day — was suspected. (Eventually, it was acknowledged that they’d been stopped twice.) After some shouting and microphone-pointing, the press gets its way and lines up, firing-squad style, across from Warren’s office. But it’s a meager victory; Warren says she won’t talk about the traffic stops or why she let everyone believe it had happened only once. Warren’s only been in office a few weeks; this cannot be the honeymoon she hoped for. If rubbernecking is your thing, you’ve had a lot to look at. Along with the speeding scandal, Warren faced accusations of nepotism for hiring PHOTO BY JOHN SCHLIA

8 CITY

JANUARY 29 - FEBRUARY 4, 2014

her uncle as her security chief, prompting an investigation by the city’s ethics board. (Warren’s uncle, Reggie Hill, resigned late last week.) Warren husband’s criminal record as a youthful offender was exposed. And it was revealed that Spencer Ash, Warren’s pick to lead the city’s Department of Neighborhood and Business Development, had been charged with driving while intoxicated last year. (Ash, a city attorney at the time, pleaded guilty to a lesser charge.) Another knock: Warren’s choice for city corporation counsel, T. Andrew Brown, plans to stay active in his private law practice. It’s an unusual move that has many in the legal community concerned about the potential for conflicts of interest, especially since Brown’s firm, Brown & Hutchinson, frequently represents people suing the City of Rochester. (City Council sought an opinion on the Brown appointment from the Harris Beach law firm. The firm says that the appointment is ethically sound and doesn’t violate the City Charter.) It’s been a rapid and distressing succession of unflattering headlines for Warren, whose upset victory last fall made history and whose talk of restoring city neighborhoods and


rescuing Rochester families from a dismal school district gave hope to the less fortunate half of the “two Rochesters” Warren so often speaks of. The bad publicity also threatened to overshadow some of the good news to come out of City Hall, such as the coming of a grocery store to the East End. Warren also got credit for helping end a stalemate in the County Legislature, which salvaged a bunch of projects, including a city Costco store. Warren says that people are missing the point. Her husband’s record, for example, was sealed. So the real story, Warren says, is who leaked a sealed record and why. “When it comes down to it, family, in politics, is generally off the table,” she says. “But for me, it’s something different.” And the incident with Spencer Ash occurred when Tom Richards was mayor. So why, Warren asks, does it become a problem only after she takes office? It is true that the much of the venom coming Warren’s way via social media is unsettling, racist, sexist, and disgusting. And Warren says she’s gotten threats, including threats against her young daughter. Even the “lighter” stuff on social media is laden with schadenfreude. “People say, ‘If you were white, this wouldn’t happen,’” Warren says. “And I don’t like to think like that. I like to think better of our city, of our world. But it’s just something that I’m faced with, something that I’ll deal with. I’ll go forward, because my goal is to do great things for our city.” Warren plans to go forward with her campaign promise to create an education office in City Hall. She’s also set on adding police stations to combat crime and improve police-community relations. She is most passionate when she talks about getting people to see the city and its challenges from a different perspective — that of Rochester’s most impoverished residents. Warren talked about the challenges she faces and her plans for the city in a couple of

recent interviews with City. The following is an edited version of those discussions. CITY: Do you think you’ve gotten off to a rocky start?

“I THINK THAT WE ARE IN SUCH ACRISIS HERE, WE NEED ALL THE HELP THAT WE CAN GET.”

Warren: I think there’s something else going on here. All these things are not about me. They’re not about my leadership. Spencer [Ash], at the time, was a city attorney. So why wouldn’t it come out, “City attorney charged with a DWI?” But it’s attributed to me. In the paper, it’s “Lovely Warren’s appointee…” [Regarding her husband] How many people in this city plead guilty to a particular crime as a youthful offender, and to have this come out… How does that affect his employment? Even when it comes down to the security detail: you look at people wanting me to die. Wishing that I was poisoned. It has become such a racial barrier, and a distraction. I have moved on. I’ve got other business to talk about. But do you wish you had been upfront about the fact that there were actually two traffic stops?

I’m not talking about that anymore. How is T. Andrew Brown keeping his stake in his law firm not a conflict of interest?

Christopher Thomas, who was part of the transition team, did extensive legal research based on the case law and everything, and there was no conflict as long as [Brown] and his firm put up a firewall. Any clients that had anything against the city, [Brown] had to ask to be removed from those cases. He would have to get rid of those [cases] and remove himself and his firm. The firm would have to disclose to the court that they had to be removed as counsel. I’ve seen a memo that was prepared from Chris Thomas before we even extended the offer to Andrew that there

“OUR CHILDREN NEED TO SEE THAT THERE’SA WAY OUT .”

would be no conflict and there was nothing wrong with this. It’s widely presumed that James Sheppard resigned as police chief last year because you wouldn’t have kept him on. Why not? He was popular, did a ton of community outreach, and if there are cultural problems within the police department, he really wasn’t given enough time to change that.

It was the chief ’s choice. I didn’t ask him to stay, I didn’t ask him to leave. The chief came in to me and he said, “Look, I’m tired. I’ve been doing this job for 30 years. I think I’ve given everything that I can give at this point in time. I want to take a break, so I’m going to retire.” That was his decision. I didn’t say “You have to go,” or anything. He also had indicated that early in the summer, before the primary, he was thinking about retiring. So that wasn’t a decision I made for him. But if he didn’t want to retire, would you have kept him?

It doesn’t matter. Speaking of police, Richards put money in the current city budget to study adding police stations. But it sounds like you’re skipping the study and going right ahead with a reorganization, from two stations to four.

We’re going to utilize [that money] to figure out exactly how much it would cost, how we could actually implement this four-quadrant system. The interim chief has done a lot of work and has lot of background on studying this. And it’s something that not only our police department and members of our police union have called for, but it’s also something that our residents have called for. The $50,000 was for figuring out if we should do this. I don’t think we need to study if we should do this. We know that we should. We need to figure out how much it’s going to cost.

What we’re doing now is not the best way of policing our city, and we’ve heard that from not only the people that are on the ground, but the people that receive the services. So we have to do this. What are your thoughts about the city’s red-light camera program? There’s been controversy, including the fact that despite numerous stops, city employees aren’t required to pay the fine.

I know that this is up for review [the contract between the city and Redflex expires on December 1, 2014], and I believe that the legislation in the state of New York sunsets this year. I think it’s something that we have to study to see, did it do what we said [it would], and that was to reduce accidents. I’m going to talk to City Council about not extending the contract until we do a study on the feasibility, long term, and is it giving us what we expected as it pertains to safety. There are concerns, and I know that some people on Council have concerns. Is the equipment working properly? I know there was an issue with [the timing of yellow lights] — have those been corrected? Are people actually paying? So I think that before we make a decision, we need to have some more information. You got credit for rescuing the Costco project, along with the rest of the projects in the county’s capital program, from partisan gridlock. And people are talking about a new era of cooperation between the city and the county. How do you know this relationship won’t be one-sided? After all, the county doesn’t have the best record in terms of its treatment of the city.

Our city residents are fifth in the nation for childhood poverty. When we look at the Costco project, over 1,000 full-time jobs will be there. We [will] have over 1,500 construction jobs. Look at MCC — the downtown campus — the potential to do startup businesses continues on page 10

rochestercitynewspaper.com

CITY 9


WARREN continues from page 9

there; the potential to do innovative, educational ideas. We know that we have a skill-set deficiency here with middle skills in our manufacturing companies. Expanding MCC’s program to help city residents be able to go through training programs and get good paying jobs — the opportunity is there. So when I look at [the county’s capital program] and how that benefits the city, I look at, how does that benefit the person that lives on Avenue D? When we look at jobs, especially retails jobs like Costco — it’s on a really good bus route where city residents can get there. So you have to look at the bigger picture. The city and the county are working on other things, like the county chargebacks to the city as it pertains to the traffic control devices and the housing of unarraigned inmates. Those issues are not off the table. Actually, one has been solved. We just haven’t released that because we want to release it as a package deal. Where else do you think the county can help the city?

When it comes to social services. When it comes to workforce development dollars. Those are dollars that the county controls. Are there ways in which we can partner, since a lot of people that are affected by those particular programs live in the city? I’m looking forward to sitting down with Kelly Reed [the county’s human services commissioner] and her team to talk about ways in which we can look at social services, and how they provide services to city residents. People have said to me, it’s so degrading, how they’re talked to [at social services]. One of the things I would talk to them about is to do sort of a “mystery shopper” — I got that from [the TV show] “Undercover Boss.” Sometimes you really need to just be the other person and see how they’re being treated. What’s the process like? Are we truly providing the best service we can to the residents that are the most vulnerable? Education was at the heart of your mayoral campaign. When do you expect to create your education office at City Hall? And would the head of that office have classroom teaching experience, or be more of a policy person?

It most likely will be something created in the budget. Part of that is, we need to have someone who is a full-time grants writer. 10 CITY JANUARY 29 - FEBRUARY 4, 2014

“THE PEOPLE THAT SIT AROUND THE TABLE ARE THE PEOPLE LEAST AFFECTED BY WHAT’S HAPPENINGON THE STREETS IN EVERYDAY LIFE.” It’s to really work at giving parents choices: working with city schools, charter schools, parochial schools to give city residents choices and information about our city. [He or she will be] more of a policy person. Not that the person wouldn’t have some experience in education. But more, how do we work with these different types of educational institutions? How to utilize what we have — our recreation centers — in a way that enhances our children’s educational life. In the summertime, we have 300, 400 kids who attend some of our recreation centers a day, so how do we bring programming in there that will help with that loss of math and reading skills over the summer? Who can we partner with? Who has money for this? That type of thing. In addition to the full-time grants writer, you mentioned that there would be another person in this new department. What would he or she do?

The other person will look at, how do

we work with charter schools, national charters to bring them here? How do we get information to parents about the schools that are coming here? For example, there will be four new charter schools in Rochester opening in the fall. How many parents know about that? How many parents really see those as an option? So that’s the type of stuff that we need to get to our parents so that they can make an informed decision. How will you go about recruiting charters for Rochester?

We have people here that are doing it already. You work with people like Joe Klein [founder of E3-Rochester, an organization that plans to bring charters to Rochester], people like Carrie Remis [an advocate for parents and charter schools]. It won’t necessarily be our job to go to these different cities, but to look at these different models and say, “Have you looked at

what’s happening in Philadelphia? Have you looked at what’s happening in New Orleans?” How do we look at those cities that have had issues around urban education and see if some of their people want to come here and help us? How do you be a liaison? One of the major issues here with charter school is, where are they housed? People say, “You have a lot of vacant buildings. Why can’t you use one of those?” Well, to bring those up to code, to now have a gymnasium, a cafeteria, all the amenities that you need for a school, it costs a lot of money. Is there a way you can work with your foundations to develop a revolving loan fund? Are there ways we can work with the city school district to see if they will allow some of these charters to utilize some of their facilities that are half empty? What do you think of Superintendent Bolgen Vargas’s plan to have area colleges take over city schools?

I think that we are in such a crisis here,


Local ring leader admits to selling band substances

“YOU HAVE TO LOOK AT THEBIGGER PICTURE .” we need all the help that we can get. It’s interesting that he’s saying, “Look, we can’t do this by ourselves.” And that’s what I’ve been saying. We need help. And if help is with our colleges, if help is with our charter schools… But we can’t shoot in the dark with this stuff. We need to figure out how to implement those things that can help the 30,000 students that we have in the city school district and the other thousands of students that we have in our city. It’s no secret that your talk of focusing neighborhoods during the campaign set the business community a bit on edge. Some are worried about progress downtown stagnating. Do you intend to shift resources from downtown to the neighborhoods?

No, I don’t think so. The residents and neighbors I talk to want neighborhoods to be safe, to be clean, their streets to be paved. If you plant more trees in areas…. So there are little aesthetic improvements that you can do. Maybe there are ways where you can do sort of a mayor’s challenge for corridors. You can help with some matching dollars for exterior improvements with paint and other things. Making sure you’re demolishing dilapidated housing. Really, those little things that can go a long way in making people feel better about the community that they live in. You’ve said that you want the Rochester Broadway Theatre League to build its new performing arts center downtown. And you’ve floated the idea of pairing it with a downtown movie theater, putting a surcharge on the movie theater tickets to cover the arts center’s operating shortfalls. What if the surcharge doesn’t raise enough? And wouldn’t a new downtown movie theater hurt the Little Theatres?

Look, if you’re a City of Rochester resident and you want to go see a Number 1 blockbuster, there’s nowhere you can go in the city to see it. Our residents should be able to experience the greater parts of life without having to be subjected to the fact that there’s no place for them to go in the city and watch a blockbuster.

The Little Theatre, usually the films they get are Sundance films that are just being released. Smaller films. They wouldn’t even show the same type of movies at all. [The Little does show first-run, popular films. The Little’s offerings this month have included “Philomena,” “Nebraska,” “American Hustle,” “August: Osage County,” and “Inside Llewyn Davis.”] And the performing arts center? It belongs downtown. The RBTL, when you look at the amount of money they generate, from hotel stays to restaurants to people coming from all over the region to see our shows…. I think [the operating deficit] is something that we have to look at. Talk with RBTL and a developer: “How much money can we raise for this? What is expected from government, if anything? How can we make it work?” We are the city of the arts. We need to highlight our assets and have a “We can do this” spirit. In the summertime, why don’t we have people along Main Street, performing? Not necessarily panhandling, but performing. Liven up our atmosphere and don’t leave it to mischief. It’s not about why it can’t work; it’s how can you make it work in the most fiscally responsible way? Some people were taken aback when you threw that downtown waterpark idea out there.

What I was saying was, we have a lot of standalone gems like The Strong museum. And we don’t market it and package it in such a way that really helps us maximize our visitors and our tourists. So how do you look at that asset and build upon it? So I said, “What if we did a waterpark next to The Strong?” And from that it came, “Oh, we’re getting a waterpark.” The point was not necessarily that we’re building a waterpark, but we have to build on our assets. To be able to say that our community embraces families and within a five-day stretch families will be able to have a great time and do something different each day. A recent report by the Community Foundation and ACT Rochester painted a

grim picture of the situation in Rochester regarding concentrated poverty. It says that for an unfortunate combination of reasons and historical trends, Rochester’s poverty is unique and profound. How do you even begin to address that?

If people aren’t educated and they don’t have access to good jobs, then they’re stuck in a desolate situation. So you start to make people feel better about where they live, about their neighborhoods, about their services. You start to look at ways in which you can give parents choices about their child’s educational outcomes. You start to look at attracting companies to Rochester, and you see how you can get your small companies to become mid-sized companies to become large companies. You go back to basics. Don’t look at it as, there’s nothing we can do to help solve this issue. But how do we? What are the little things we can do to really move the mark? The people that sit around the table are the people least affected by what’s happening on the streets in everyday life. Not that those people don’t care, but you see things from your frame of reference. A perfect example: when the Greater Rochester [Health] Foundation first started to do neighborhood programs like Project HOPE, they said, “Oh, yeah, we’re going to bring in doctors and we’re going to do blood pressures and we’re going to do all types of health screening.” And one resident said, “Look, I have rats in my basement. I don’t care about my blood pressure.” Many of the health disparities in neighborhoods are really connected to the environment in which [people] live, and so we have to look at it [through] a different lens. I think that’s why the Health Foundation, many of their programs [ended up being] very successful. They haven’t gone in and tried to say, “We know what’s best for this neighborhood.” At the end of the day, if you get buy-in from the people that have to live there every day, the results will be that much greater. Some of the things that our children have to face on a daily basis, they need to know that you can be born and raised in the city and you don’t have to be a victim of your circumstance. Our children need to see that there’s a way out. You’re not alone.

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For more Tom Tomorrow, including a political blog and cartoon archive, visit www.thismodernworld.com

URBAN ACTION This week’s calls to action include the following events and activities. (All are free and open to the public, unless otherwise noted.)

Tavis Smiley at RIT

RIT will present a talk by author, talk-show host, and civil rights advocate Tavis Smiley on Thursday, January 30. Smiley will give the keynote address at the 2014 Expressions of King’s Legacy from noon to 2 p.m. at the Gordon Field House and Activities Center. Doors open at 10:30 a.m. Later the same day, Smiley will

moderate a community panel discussion for the “State of Race in Rochester: 50 Years after the July ’64 Race Riots.” The event will be held from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. at East High School, 1801 East Main Street.

Talk on Islam and Christianity

St. Mary Church will host “What can Islam teach us about Christian faith?” a conversation with Muhammad Shafiq and Deacon George Dardess at 7 p.m. on Thursday, January 30. Shafiq is the director of the Hickey Center for Interfaith Dialogue at Nazareth Col-

lege, and Dardess is the author of several books on Muslim-Christian dialogue. The event will be held at the church’s Dugan Center, 15 St. Mary’s Place.

Book discussion

The Moving Beyond Racism book group will meet at 7 p.m. on Monday, February 3, to discuss “Bloody Done Sign My Name” by Timothy Tyson. The autobiography is a look at the author’s reconciliation with his Southern roots. The group meets at Barnes & Noble, Pittsford Plaza. It’s not necessary to have read the book to join the group.

Correcting ourselves

There is some confusion over the “Policing the police” story in the January 15 issue. All civilian complaints against the police are investigated by the Professional Standards Section of the Rochester Police Department. Only very specific cases are then reviewed by the Civilian Review Board. Normal time for a CRB panel to convene and render decisions is two weeks. Updates on cases are provided by the Professional Standards Section, not the Center for Dispute Settlement, which runs the CRB. In the 2014 Winter Guide article on area hot chocolates, we accidentally transposed two digits in the phone number for New Roots Coffeehouse. The correct number is 453-8228. 12 CITY JANUARY 29 - FEBRUARY 4, 2014


Dining and the vittles range from inspired bar food like kung pao calamari and surf-n-turf sliders to soups to salads to burgers, plus a creative roster of daily specials, such as a recent dish of mussels steamed with onions and housemade chorizo in a buttery Bass Ale broth. Fireside Grill also offers a full bar, including an interesting assortment of craft cocktails. Call 486-4611 to learn more, or visit firesidegrillsportsbar.com. Hopefully you’ve been in training for International Eat Ice Cream for Breakfast Day on February 1, because Moonlight

Beef and stout pot pie with whiskey-ginger vegetables and colcannon (left) and reuben fritters (right) from McColley's in Spencerport. PHOTOS BY MARK CHAMBERLIN

Setting the bar [ CHOW HOUND ] BY DAYNA PAPALEO

So while the other suburbs seem to be busy opening a frozen-yogurt shop in every strip mall, the tiny village of Spencerport (population 3,601, according to the 2010 census) may be slowly morphing into a culinary mecca. You’ll encounter excellent barbecue, homey Italian, Mexican both classic and nuevo, a nifty new-American bistro, and most recently the adorably convivial McColley’s, which general manager Jules Suplicki describes as “a pub from the British Isles.” Stepping into McColley’s feels more County Cork than Western New York thanks to rich, dark woods and a ceiling thatched in the style of a European country cottage. You obviously wouldn’t be a regular on your very first visit, but it’s impossible not to feel instantly welcome: a wee nook that might accommodate several pub-goers or a cluster of acoustic musicians, a good-sized bar, and a cozy dining room where you can tuck into McColley’s relatively healthy spin on traditional pub fare. You won’t find a deep-fryer in the kitchen; everything on the

menu is, in Suplicki’s words, “baked, braised, pan-fried, or grilled.” The possibly addictive reuben fritters ($8.50), for instance, are packed with corned beef and sauerkraut and accompanied by Thousand Island dressing and have the consistency of a crab cake. The hand-cut sweet-potato wedges ($5) enjoy some quality time in the oven before you dunk ’em in honey mustard. There’s also housemade hummus ($6) as well as tomatobased (and Guinness-kissed) Manhattan clam chowder ($5). And, of course, McColley’s serves up pub-style comfort foods like shepherd’s pie ($12) and cider salmon ($13) — look for kid versions of a few dishes — plus daily specials ranging from salads to vegetarian-friendly fare. You might know Suplicki from her 16 years at The Old Toad. The career move to Spencerport allows the westside resident to work closer to her home and poses a fresh challenge for Suplicki, who is keen to see if she can grow a successful pub in an unproven market. So far, the response has been “absolutely great,” she says. “It’s taken off so much faster than I ever thought possible.”

Named in honor of owner Matt Brooks’ Scottish mum, McColley’s is also one of the few local spots west of the Genesee to specialize in craft beers, with rotating draft and bottle selections, along with wines and a carefully chosen array of single-malts and blended whiskeys. Suplicki reports that McColley’s plans to do beer-pairing dinners in the future, but for now she and her crew are getting to know their many new friends. “The locals are embracing of it all,” says Suplicki. “People come up to me and say, ‘Thanks for coming to Spencerport.’” McColley’s is located at 89 S. Union St., Spencerport. It is open Monday-Thursday 11:30 a.m.-10:30 p.m.; Friday-Saturday 11:30 a.m.-12:30 a.m. Food prices range from $4 to $13. For more information, call 617-4279, or visit mccolleys.com.

Quick bites

In need of someplace to watch the Super B — er, the big game? Check out Fireside Grill & Sports Bar, now open in the old FDR’s Restaurant at 3939 E. Henrietta Road. There are 17 TVs scattered around the roomy space,

Creamery, 36 West Ave., Fairport, will be celebrating from 7:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. with cereal toppings, breakfasty ice-cream flavors like the popular maple bacon, and door prizes. Proceeds from the event benefit Holy Childhood; call 223-0880, or do some advance work at moonlightcreamery.com. The Buffalo chicken wing turns 50 in 2014, and there may be no better way to honor the iconic (and occasionally brutal) food than with a viewing of “The Great Chicken Wing Hunt,” a documentary by Lyons native Matt Reynolds. The film follows Reynolds and an eclectic gang of wing connoisseurs as they roam the land in search of the finest specimen of its kind. Screenings take place at the Little Theatre, 240 East Ave., Saturday, February 1, at 3 p.m. and 7 p.m. Tickets are $6-$8; visit thelittle.org to get ’em. The Owl House is throwing a Chinese New Year’s Party on Monday, February 3, at 7 p.m., with as much attention paid to the vegetarian revelers as the carnivorous ones. The family-style feast will showcase dishes like char siu pork shoulder with ginger pickled cabbage and fried tofu with spicy ginger-sesame glaze, and both vegan and gluten-free items will be available. The dinner costs $25 per person; call 360-2920 for reservations, and get further details at the Owl House’s Facebook page. Aspiring liquor barons may want to avail themselves of “Introduction to Craft Distilling,” a seminar and workshop by Black Button Distilling’s Jason Barrett that breaks down the fundamentals of operating a craft distillery. On Saturday, February 22, 10 a.m.-4 p.m., attendees will learn about the art and science behind the process, along with insight into the business end of getting a distillery up and running. Tuition is $150 per person, with a very limited number of spaces available. Visit blackbuttondistilling. com for more information. Chow Hound is a food and restaurant news column. Do you have a tip? Send it to food@ rochester-citynews.com. rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 13


Upcoming [ POP/ROCK ]

Music

X Ambassadors Tuesday, April 8. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. $10-$12. 9 p.m. 454-2966. bugjar.com [ POP/ROCK]

The Used/Taking Back Sunday Wednesday, April 9. Main

Street Armory, 900 East Main St. $30-$35. 7 p.m. 232-3221. rochestermainstreetarmory.com [ COUNTRY ]

The Charlie Daniels Band Sunday, June 1. Main Street Armory, 900 East Main St. $35-$40. 7 p.m. 232-3221. rochestermainstreetarmory.com

Jason Isbell

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 1 THE SMITH OPERA HOUSE, 82 SENECA ST., GENEVA 8 P.M. | $20-$24 | THESMITH.ORG [ COUNTRY ] Jason Isbell is well known for being part of the popular country band Drive-By Truckers, where he was the lead singer and guitarist for six years. Not long after leaving the band, Isbell released his first solo album, “Sirens of the Ditch,” on which he explored a more blues-infused country sound. After the release of his first solo album, Isbell collaborated with the band 400 Unit, and released an album that presented yet another sound — this time, combining his penchant for the blues with a new love for sad country ballads. After taking a break from the spotlight for a few years, Isbell returned in 2013 with a new album called ”Southeastern.” — BY LEAH CREARY

Goodbyemotel FRIDAY, JANUARY 31 THE LITTLE THEATRE, 240 EAST AVE. 9 P.M. | $10 | THELITTLE.ORG [ POP/ROCK ] Even when Melbourne, Australia’s Goodbyemotel unplugs there is still bristling electricity that comes off weightless, atmospheric, and ethereal. When things get plugged back in, it’s downright enchanting. And just as picturesque as this may sound, Goodbyemotel (currently residing in the Big Apple) is now presenting its 4D Experience, which, though visual onstage projections and lighting, creates a cinematic sensation even more apparent and infinitely cool. — BY FRANK DE BLASE

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Church is in session Reverend Horton Heat “Rev” Victory Records

Kim and Reggie Harris SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 1 CAFÉ VERITAS AT FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH, 220 WINTON ROAD SOUTH 7:30 P.M. | $10-$18 | CAFEVERITAS.ORG [ FOLK ] Philly natives Kim and Reggie Harris will

grace Café Veritas for the venue’s February concert. The husband and wife duo produced numerous recordings, including “Steal Away: Songs of the Underground Railroad,” which explores, among other themes, the concept of music as a tool of freedom. The Harris’ repertoire is stocked with historical tunes: traditional African-American spirituals, civil rights songs, and originals that draw influences from genres including classical, folk, jazz, gospel, and pop. — BY ROMAN DIVEZUR

On this 11th studio album, The Reverend Horton Heat further cements his position in the rockabilly/neo-rockabilly/ psychobilly pantheon. The situation or small problem faced with this album is the fact that Heat’s style, energy, and lyrical humor are uniquely his own. Nobody plays like this cat. But the challenge here is to keep it fresh. On “Rev,” Heat and his band do just that while still indirectly drawing upon themselves as an influence. Where anyone immersed in the style will hear riffs quoted from legends like Link Wray and Bill Haley, those snippets bounce around the ether with runs and fills and gloriously disjointed riffs that are the Reverend’s trademark. The songs on “Rev” — all 13 of ’em — aren’t quite as anthemic as some of Heat’s earlier efforts (“Bad Reputation” still makes me nuts). But the dexterity and locomotive speed on this effort make it a great record to introduce a new fan to Reverend Horton Heat’s output, just as much as it goes well in the collection of those who have knelt in his church for years. Play it loud. Amen. — BY FRANK DE BLASE

[ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ] Joe Baia. Sticky Lips BBQ Juke Joint, 830 Jefferson Rd. 585-292-5544. stickylipsbbq. com. 6:30 p.m. Free. Rob & Gary Acoustic. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. 248-4825. woodcliffhotelspa.com. 5:30 p.m. Free. [ BLUES ]

Foodlink Event with The Blues Poisers. Johnny’s Irish

Pub, 1382 Culver Rd. 2240990. johnnysirishpub.com. Call for info. Sarah Horner Duo. Dinosaur Bar-B-Que, 99 Court St. 3257090. dinosaurbarbque.com. 8 p.m. Free. [ DJ/ELECTRONIC ]

DJ Reign and Ladies Night. Captain’s Attic, 37 Charlotte St. 546-8885. Call for info. DJ Adam. Nashvilles, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. Henrietta. 334-3030. nashvillesny.com. Call for info. House Dj. Richmond’s Tavern, 21 Richmond Street. 2708570. richmondstavern.com. 8 p.m. Free. Ladies Nite: High Heels and Mini Skirts New Wave Wednesdays. Club Clarissas,

293 Clarissa St. 232-3430. 10 p.m. 21+. Call for info.

Retro Game Night ft. Silver Crash, Love’s Secret Domain, IRENICS, A.I.G.L., DJ Cinch, and DJ Yaggerrr. Vertex Night

Farewell Drifters TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 4 ABILENE BAR & LOUNGE, 153 LIBERTY POLE WAY TIME AND TICKETS TBA | ABILENEBARANDLOUNGE.COM [ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ] Farewell Drifters is a folk-rock quartet that combines a love for 60’s pop with a traditional folk sound. Rather than embracing a “stomp, strum, and sing” sound like popular bands such as Mumford & Sons and The Avett Brothers, the band has chosen to work with a structured, layered pop aesthetic in addition to the folk sound — employing intricate vocal harmonies and catchy melodies that are reminiscent of, and inspired by, beloved songwriter Brian Wilson’s work.

Club, 169 N. Chestnut St. 2325498. 7 p.m. Call for info. Teen Set 45 Party. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. Free. Why Not Wednesday. Eclipse Bar & Grill, 374 Thurston Rd. 502-922-6567. 10 p.m. Call for info.

CITY

MUSIC

[ JAZZ ]

FEATURES, REVIEWS, CHOICES, & CONCERTS

ROCHESTERCITYNEWSPAPER.COM/MUSIC

Night Trane. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. East Rochester. 662-5555. bistro135.net. 6 p.m. Free. continues on page 17

— BY LEAH CREARY

EASTMAN SCHOOL OF MUSIC PRESENTS MusicLine:

585-274-1100

facebook.com/ConcertsAtEastman

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 29 EASTMAN WIND ENSEMBLE MARK DAVIS SCATTERDAY, CONDUCTOR The Central Winds, guest ensemble Music of Schwantner, Maslanka, and more Kodak Hall at Eastman Theatre, 8 p.m. Free

ANNEX A804 STEVEN DAIGLE, STAGE DIRECTOR; PAUL O’DETTE, MUSIC DIRECTOR; BENTON HESS, CONDUCTOR Tickets $20 general public (discounts with U/R ID) Pre-performance talk one hour before the opera starts

THURSDAY, JANUARY 30, SOLD OUT FRIDAY, JANUARY 31, SOLD OUT SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 1, SOLD OUT SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 2, SOLD OUT

FRIDAY, JANUARY 31 EASTMAN-ROCHESTER CHORUS AND EASTMAN PHILHARMONIA William Weinert, conductor; Athene Mok, soprano; Keely Futterer, soprano; Nathaniel McEwen, tenor; Marc Webster,

EASTMAN OPERA THEATRE - HANDEL'S SERSE

bass; Joel Balzun, bass Haydn's The Creation Kodak Hall at Eastman Theatre, 8 p.m. Free SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 2 FACULTY ARTIST SERIES - CHARLES CASTLEMAN, VIOLIN WITH BARRY SNYDER, PIANO Music of Mozart, Piazzolla, Prokofiev, and more Kilbourn Hall, 3 p.m. Tickets $10 general public (free with U/R ID)

MONDAY, FEBRUARY 3 GRADUATE CHAMBER ORCHESTRA Jungho Kim, Boon Hua Lien, Joseph Stepec, conductors Concerto concert featuring Sam Um, percussion and Kevin Jiaqi Zhao, saxophone Kodak Hall at Eastman Theatre, 8 p.m. Free TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 4 IN MEMORY OF TATIANA TCHEKINA Oleh Krysa, Mikhail Kopelman, violin; Barry Snyder, piano; Carol Rodland, viola; Steven Doane, Rosemary Elliott, cello

Music of Prokofiev, Arensky, and Tchaikovsky Kilbourn Hall, 8 p.m. Free WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 5 EASTMAN SCHOOL SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA NEIL VARON AND CHAOWEN TING, CONDUCTORS Music of Dvorak, Papatrechas, and Tchaikovsky Kodak Hall at Eastman Theatre, 8 p.m. Free

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 15


Music

Local band The Swooners fuses jazz standards with pop accessibility. The universally appealing sound is getting the act booked all over town. PHOTO PROVIDED

There’s a swoon out tonight The Swooners EVERY THURSDAY 5:30-8:30 P.M. HORIZONS @ WOODCLIFF HOTEL & SPA, ROUTE 96, PERINTON FREE | 381-4000, THESWOONERS.COM [ FEATURE ] BY FRANK DE BLASE

FANTASY: It was early one enchanted evening not too long ago, as I rolled the Caddy up to the razzle and dazzle of the supper club. I got out, straightened my tie, shot my cuffs, and tossed the keys to the valet. I ankled over to the door where music from the swingin’ band on stage assailed as the doorman pulled back the velvet rope, greeting me warmly by name. Inside was a slick affair; cats in hats and pretty kitties lined the bar with their chosen poisons and assorted arm charms. The waitresses were ample samples of divine pulchritude; even the ugly ones were gorgeous. The Swooners were onstage giving it all a sweet, swinging, subtle soundtrack. REALITY: It was ass-chapping cold as I drove the van out to Bistro 135 in East Rochester. I got salt on my pants 16 CITY JANUARY 29 - FEBRUARY 4, 2014

after wiping out on the sidewalk and I accidentally zipped my beard into my jacket. I walked into the joint as it bristled with several dozen conversations from the smart set. I’ll stick to the first paragraph’s description of the wait staff; they were beautiful…and so was the music. The Swooners were perched on the balcony overlooking the serene scene at Bistro 135, giving it a palpable ebb and flow. Singer Mark Bader intoned nonchalantly with Harry Connick, Jr.-esque phrasing as he contributed to the beat via the cajon he straddled (the band is joined by drummer Paul Mastriani on its bigger gigs). Willy O’Riley tickled the ivories, creating notes that cascaded like rain. And Chris Potter’s guitar slinked and hummed throughout. It was the perfect band for whichever introduction to this article you prefer. The Swooners have been playing it cocktail cool since November 2011. It happened like this: The Moho Collective’s guitarist Kurt Johnson had a monthly solo gig at Bistro 135. Management suggested he flesh it out a bit and put a band together. That’s when pianist O’Riley and vocalistpercussionist-bassist Bader got the call.

“We got together that day,” says O’Riley. “Before the show and ran a couple tunes. Then we came here and did a three-hour gig.” That three-hour gig was punctuated with charted material as well as standards they all knew. “We had charts,” Bader says. “I had performed jazz stuff before, back in high school. So I had a few standards up my sleeve.” But he didn’t have a name for the trio up his sleeve. When a young fan inquired, they scrambled and came up with The Swooners on the spot. Johnson recorded one of the band’s live sets

as a demo, resulting in the band securing gigs at jazzy joints like The Lodge @ Woodcliff, Pomodoro, The Strathallan, Pane Vino, as well as Bistro 135. Soon the band was everywhere. While Johnson was on tour with Moho Collective, The Swooners had guitarist Chris Potter sub in. Things went so well that when Johnson returned, O’Riley and Bader chose to keep Potter. It was an obvious and amicable decision. “There were no hard feelings,” Bader says. “Kurt couldn’t play all the dates because of his Moho commitments.”

The Swooners pressed on as a jazz trio with a dash of pop accessibility and fun. That pop toned down a bit of the cerebral leanings indicative of some jazz — some jazz that may confound the casual listener. But at the same time the trio didn’t want to alienate the jazzers. “If you’re talking about strict jazz fans,” O’Riley says, “I think we’ve struggled sometimes with whether or not we’re authentic enough for them. I think the reason we’ve gotten booked as much as we have is because we add a new element to it with the singing.” Bader agrees. “The harmonies especially,” he says. “And we do some jazz versions of non-jazz songs.” “We do standards because they’re common ground for us,” Potter says. “But we use them to launch into other things.” Other things that Bader, the primary songwriter, doesn’t necessarily see as jazz at all, including cuts on the band’s new CD, “Old’sCool.” “I would say it’s 100 percent pop songwriting,” Bader says. “The sound is reminiscent of jazz, there’s some swing… When I say pop, I mean it’s accessible, simple to a degree, and there’s a definite form.” “It’s vintage pop,” says O’Riley. “It’s pop, but pop from different eras. Obviously our whole shtick is playing vintage and old school styles…there’s something about time that ages music, that makes it more acceptable and more cool.” But there’s no second guessing the audience.

When the band plays live, sometimes The Swooners’ sound is ignored or dismissed as atmosphere, other times it’s a party. “We do play a lot of gigs around town where we’re wallpaper,” says Bader. “It feels really good to play for a crowd that’s attentive.” Like when the band got hired to play the University of Rochester senior ball. “We figured, ‘OK, college kids, we gotta play some party music,’” says O’Riley. “We tried a few modern things and they weren’t really responding. Then we busted out all our swing songs and all of a sudden it was a humungous dance party.” “I think that’s the first time we thought we’d run out of swing tunes,” Potter says. What is truly remarkable about this band is its casual elegance, its sub-strata effervescence. These cats play hot music, and do so Popsicle cool — you could even say jazzsicle cool. This just adds to the band’s universal appeal. It’s for everyone, even the kids. “I’m of the philosophy that music should be clean,” says Bader. “PG to the sense that a kid won’t hear anything dirty, but an adult may be able to read into. I totally believe in double entendre.”


WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 29

love

LOOKING FOR

[ POP/ROCK ]

Emma Ate the Lion w/Blue Lazerz. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. $6-$8.

Grrr!. Little Theatre Café, 240

East Ave. 7:30 p.m. Free. Haewa. Temple Bar and Grille, 109 East Ave. 2326000. templebarandgrille. com. 10 p.m. Free. Lotus. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N. Water St. 325-5600. waterstreetmusic.com. 7 p.m. $22-$25.

IN ALL THE RIGHT

PLACES

THURSDAY, JANUARY 30

JAZZ | ETHNIC HERITAGE ENSEMBLE

[ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ] Jim Lane. Murph’s Irondequoit Pub, 705 Titus Ave. Irondequoit. 342-6780. 8 p.m. Free.

When percussionist Kahil El’Zabar returned to Chicago from a trip to Ghana in 1972, he had a vision for a new sound: the fusion of American jazz with traditional African music. He realized that vision when he formed the Ethnic Heritage Ensemble. Since then El’Zabar has recorded and toured with Stevie Wonder and worked with Julie Taymor and Garth Fagan on the Broadway version of “The Lion King,” but he always come back to the EHE. At Lovin’ Cup he’ll be joined by the group’s other two members, Chicago jazz greats Ernest Khabeer Dawkins on saxophone and Corey Wilkes on trumpet. But it might seem like there are four members when Wilkes plays two trumpets at once.

Deborah Magone w/Jimmy Whitake. Bar Louie, 98 Greece

Ridge Center Drive. 797-1054. barlouieamerica.com. 8:30 p.m. Call for info.

Salsa Night presented by Essence of Rhythm. Lovin’ Cup,

300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. lovincup.com. 8 p.m. $5-$10. [ BLUES ]

Big D Duo. Dinosaur Bar-BQue, 99 Court St. 325-7090. dinosaurbarbque.com. 8 p.m. Free. [ CLASSICAL ]

Eastman at Washington Square Lunchtime Concerts. First

Univeralist Church, 150 S. Clinton Ave. 274-1400. 12:15 p.m. Free. RPO: An Evening in Paris. Kodak Hall at Eastman Theater, 60 Gibbs St. Thursday: 7:30 p.m., Saturday: 8 p.m. $15-$92. [ DJ/ELECTRONIC ] DJ Matt. Nashvilles, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. Henrietta. 3343030. nashvillesny.com. Call for info. DJ Mikey. 140 Alex Bar & Grill, 140 Alexander St. 256-1000. 140alex.com. Call for info.

Floorwax: Thursday Night Dance Craze. Lux Lounge, 666 South

Ave. 232-9030. lux666.com. 10 p.m. Free. Karaoke at Panorama. Panorama Night Club & Sports Bar, 730 Elmgrove Rd. 2472190. 9 p.m. Free. Thirsty Thursday’s. TC Riley’s, 200 Park Point Dr. 272-9777. tcrileysparkpoint.com. 10 p.m. Call for info.

Thursday Night Dance Craze Contest W/Floorwax. Lux

Lounge, 666 South Ave. 232-9030. lux666.com. Last Thursday of every month, 10 p.m. Free. Thursday Night Shakedown. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 11 p.m. Free.

Tiki Thursdays: Shotgun Music DJ. McGhan’s Pub, 11

W. Main St. Victor. 924-3660. 7:30 p.m. Free.

The Ethnic Heritage Ensemble performs Wednesday, February 5, 8:30 p.m. at Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Drive. $18-$20. lovincup.com. — BY RON NETSKY Tilt-a-Whirl Drag Show.. Tilt Nightclub & Ultralounge, 444 Central Ave. 232-8440. facebook.com/Tiltnightclub. 11:15 p.m. & 12:30 a.m. $3. For the Love Thursdays. Love Nightclub, 45 Euclid St. 2225683. 10 p.m. 18+. $3-$12. [ R&B ]

Mitty & The Followers. Pane Vino Ristorante, 175 N. Water St. 232-6090. panevinoristorante. com. 8 p.m. Free. [ HIP-HOP/RAP ]

The Professor of Rap Album Release. Record Archive, 33 1/3

Rockwood St. 7 p.m. Call for info. [ POP/ROCK ]

Courtesy Drop w/Bloom, Hideout, and Ghost Righter. Bug

Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 8:30 p.m. $8-$10. Five Alarm Open Jam. Firehouse Saloon, 814 S. Clinton Ave. 3193832. thefirehousesaloon.com. 9 p.m. Call for info. The Goods. Sticky Lips BBQ Juke Joint, 830 Jefferson Rd. 585292-5544. stickylipsbbq.com. 9 p.m. Free. Luke Dowler. Boulder Coffee Co., 100 Alexander St. 454-7140. bouldercoffeeco.com. 8 p.m. Call for info.

Jim Lane. 58 Main, 58 N. Main St. Brockport. 637-2383. 58main.com. 8 p.m. Free. Jon Lewis. Boulder Coffee Co., 100 Alexander St. 454-7140. bouldercoffeeco.com. 8 p.m. Call for info. JT & Me. BLU Bar & Grill, 250 Pixley Rd. 750-2980. blurochester.com. 5 p.m. Call for info. The Lonely Ones. Sticky Lips BBQ Juke Joint, 830 Jefferson Rd. 585-292-5544. stickylipsbbq.com. 9:30 p.m. $5. Mike Pullano. The Argyle Grill at Eagle Vale Golf Club, 4344 Nine Mile Point Rd. Fairport. 3772452. eaglevale.com/argyle-grill. 7 p.m. Call for info. Pan de Oro. Havana Cabana, 289 Alexander St. 232-1333. havanacabanaroc.com. 10 p.m. Call for info. Peg and “The Fiddler!”. Hatter’s Pub, 5 West Main St. Webster. 872-1505. pegdolan. us. 8 p.m. Free. The Prickers. Montage Music Hall, 50 Chestnut St. 2321520. themontagemusichall. com. 9 p.m. Call for info. Ralph Louis. Rochester Plaza Hotel, 70 State St. 546-3450. rochesterplaza.com. 6 p.m. Free.

VALENTINE’S DAY is almost upon us, and Rochester lonelyhearts are asking:

w he r e do L m e e t m y m atc h ?

YOU TELL US! ARE YOU PART OF A COUPLE?

Tweet @roccitynews or post on our Facebook wall with the Rochester-area location where YOU met your special someone. We’ll use the data to create an interactive map on rochestercitynewspaper.com with the most romantic spots in town!

YOU COULD WIN! One of the responses will be picked at random to win a valentine's prize package that includes: 2 tickets to the Feb. 14 performance of "Sister Act" at the Auditorium Theatre (presented by Rochester Broadway Theatre League)

Dinner for 2 at Nikko Restaurant (3 courses with wine pairings) approx. $150 value

continues on page 18

FRIDAY, JANUARY 31 [ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ] goodbyemotel. Record Archive, 33 1/3 Rockwood St. 4 p.m. Call for info. rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 17


FRIDAY, JANUARY 31

[ REGGAE/JAM ]

Spiritual Rez. Lovin’ Cup,

300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. lovincup.com. 9 p.m. $5-$8. Thunder Body. Finger Lakes Casino & Racetrack, 5857 Rt. 96. Farmington. 924-3232. fingerlakesracetrack.com. Call for info.

Turner Brown. McGraw’s Irish

Pub, 146 W Commercial St. East Rochester. 348-9091. mcgrawsirishpub.com. 8 p.m. Free. Wes Aikens. Boulder Coffee Co., 739 Park Ave. 697-0235. bouldercoffeeco.com. 8 p.m. Call for info.

[ POP/ROCK ]

5Head w/Well Worn Boot, Wrong Tree. Bug Jar, 219

[ BLUES ]

Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. $10-$14.

Big Mike & The Motivators.

Alyssa Trahan. Lemoncello,

The Beale, 1930 Empire Blvd. Webster. 216-1070. thebealegrille.com. 7 p.m. Call for info.

Gap Mangione New Blues Band. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. 248-4825. woodcliffhotelspa.com. 7:30 p.m. Free.

Steve Grills & The Roadmasters.

Dinosaur Bar-B-Que, 99 Court St. 325-7090. dinosaurbarbque. com. 10 p.m. Free.

[ CLASSICAL ] Ying Quartet. First Baptist Church of Rochester, 175 Allens Creek Rd. 244-2468. fbcrochester.net. 7:30 p.m. Free, donations accepted. [ DJ/ELECTRONIC ]

Chill Out Fridays Happy Hour.

Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. lovincup.com. 5:30 p.m. Free.

Aggy Dune, Ambrosia Salad, Miss Darienne Lake, Kasha Davis, and DJ Blake. 140 Alex

Bar & Grill, 140 Alexander St. 256-1000. 140alex.com. Call for info. DJ Energon. Vertex Night Club, 169 N. Chestnut St. 232-5498. 10 p.m. $3-$8.

Femme Fatale Fridays Ladies Night ft. DJ Divine.

Renaissance Cafe & Lounge, 719 S. Plymouth Ave. (585) 451-1000. 9 p.m. Free.

Fresh Meat Fridays w/Samantha Vega, DJ Mighty Mic. Tilt

Nightclub & Ultralounge, 444 Central Ave. 232-8440. facebook. com/Tiltnightclub. 11:15 p.m. & 12:30 a.m. $4-$12. Lube After Dark. Quaker Steak & Lube, 2205 Buffalo Rd. 6979464. quakersteakandlube.com/ Rochester_NY. 9:30 p.m. Free.

Make Em Sweat Fridays: Make Em Dance Edition ft. DJ 6:30, Nick Kage. Club Network, 420

Central Ave. 232-1390. 10 p.m. Guys free until 10:30 p.m., girls free until 11:30 p.m. 21+.

Myra J Birthday Bash ft. Nick Kage. T Jay’s Lounge, 622 Lake Ave. 10 p.m. 21+. Ladies $15 before 11 p.m., guys $10.

Photo Shoot Fridaze ft. Nick Kage. T Jay’s Lounge, 622 Lake

Ave. 10 p.m. 21+. $5-$10. Reggaeton w/DJ Carlos. La Copa Ultra Lounge, 235 W. Ridge Rd. 254-1050. lacopaultralounge. com. 10 p.m. Free.

sad hour: all sad songs. all on vinyl.. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 5 p.m. 21+. Free.

137 West Commercial St. East Rochester. 385-8565. lemoncello137.com. 7 p.m. Free.

CLASSICAL | ROCHESTER PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA: AN EVENING IN PARIS

“French music is a dream of the senses,” according to Claude Debussy, who wrote one of music’s dreamiest and most sensual pieces in his “Prelude to the Afternoon of a Faun.” That very piece starts off this weekend’s “Evening in Paris” concert by the RPO, led by Fabien Gaubel (pictured) , music director of the Quebec Symphony Orchestra. After the Debussy you can enjoy the Grammy-nominated violinist Philippe Quint in SaintSaëns’s “Violin Concerto No. 3” and Ravel’s sizzling evocation of Gypsy fiddling, “Tzigane.” The concert concludes with Stravinsky’s “Firebird” Suite. It’s not music by a Parisian, but it was first performed there in 1910, and it’s still dazzling. The Rochester Philharmonic Orchestra performs Thursday, January 30 and Saturday, February 1, 8 p.m. at Kodak Hall at Eastman Theatre, 60 Gibbs St. $15-$92. rpo.org. — BY DAVID RAYMOND Facelife Fridays ft. Aggy Dune, Ambrosia Salad, Darienne Lake, and Kasha Davis. 140 Alex Bar

& Grill, 140 Alexander St. 2561000. 140alex.com. 11 p.m. & midnight. Call for info. Trancesend and Victor Gig. Love Nightclub, 45 Euclid St. 2225683. 10 p.m. 21+, 18+ after 2 a.m. $6-$20.

We Don’t Hate We Just Hustle Clothing Line Website Launch Party ft. DJ Grand Imperial.

Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. 276-8900. mag. rochester.edu. 10 p.m. $20. [ JAZZ ]

Bobby DiBaudo Trio. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. East Rochester. 662-5555. bistro135. net. 6 p.m. Free. Fred Costello & Roger Ekers Jazz Duo. Charley Brown’s,

1675 Penfield Rd. 385-9202. charleybrownspenfield.com. 7:30 p.m. Free. Gian Carlo Cervone Trio. Pultneyville Grill, 4135 Lake Rd. Pultneyville. 315-589-4512. pultneyvillegrill.com. 7 p.m. Reservations recommended. Call for info.

Jazz Thursdays ft. The David Detweiler Trio. Next Door Bar

& Grill, 3220 Monroe Ave. 2494575. nextdoorbarandgrill.com. Thursday: 5 p.m., Friday and Saturday: 8 p.m/. Free.

Last Friday Jazz Heritage Series w/Dr. Carl Atkins and Culture Clash. Baobab Cultural Center,

728 University Ave. 7 p.m. $10.

18 CITY JANUARY 29 - FEBRUARY 4, 2014

Marco Amadio. Pane Vino

Ristorante, 175 N. Water St. 2326090. panevinoristorante.com. 6:30 p.m. Free. Matthew Sieber Ford Trio. Tapas 177 Lounge, 177 St. Paul St. 262-2090. tapas177.com. 4:30 p.m. Free.

The Mighty Dry and High w/ Paradigm Shift. Abilene Bar &

Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. abilenebarandlounge. com. 6 p.m. $5.

The Joe Santora Trio w/Curtis Kendrick & Emily Kirchoff.

Michael’s Valley Grill, 1694 Penfield Rd. (585) 383-8260. michaelsvalleygrill.com. Free. The Russell Fielder Quartet. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 8:30 p.m. Free. Sam Borges Duo. La Casa, 93 Alexander St. 585-730-5025. https://facebook.com/pages/LaCasa/148219738674006. 6:30 p.m. Call for info. Ted Nicolosi and Shared Genes. Glengarry Inn at Eagle Vale, 4400 Nine Mile Point Road, Rt 250. Fairport. 598-3820. EagleVale. com. 7 p.m. Free. [ R&B ]

Anonymous Willpower. Smokin’

Joe’s Bar & Grill, 425 Lyell Ave. 9 p.m. Call for info. [ HIP-HOP/RAP ]

Slap Weh Fridays ft. Blazin Fiyah. Eclipse Bar & Lounge,

372 Thurston Rd. 235-9409. Call for info.

Divinex w/Before The Foundation. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N. Water St. 3255600. waterstreetmusic.com. 6:30 p.m. $10.

Friday Night Live ft. The Fabulous Richmonds House Band, Jeff Cosco, Dino & Fickle 93.3. Richmond’s

Tavern, 21 Richmond Street. 270-8570. richmondstavern. com. 4 p.m. Free.

goodbyemotel 4D Live Show Experience. Little Theatre, 240 East Ave. 8:30 p.m. $10.

Knight Patrol. Pineapple

Jack’s, 485 Spencerport Rd. Gates. 247-5225. facebook. com/PineappleJacks. 10 p.m. Call for info.

Rexx w/Six Ways to Sunday, Mark Cecchinni. Firehouse

Saloon, 814 S. Clinton Ave. 3193832. thefirehousesaloon.com. 9 p.m. 21+. $5.

Smooth Talkers w/Marty Roberts. Johnny’s Irish Pub, 1382 Culver Rd. 224-0990. johnnysirishpub.com. 5 p.m. Free.

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 1 [ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ] Acoustic Saturdays. Rush Church, 6200 Rush Lima Rd. Rush. 568-2178. thecafearoma. com. First Saturday of every month, 7 p.m. Free. Big Blue House. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. lovincup.com. 9 p.m. Call for info. Brian Rath. Boulder Coffee Co., 100 Alexander St. 4547140. bouldercoffeeco.com. 8 p.m. Free. Catch & Release. McGraw’s Irish Pub, 146 W Commercial St. East Rochester. 3489091. mcgrawsirishpub.com. 8 p.m. Free. Jim Lane. The Overtime Grill, 4670 Dewey Ave. 865-2490. 8 p.m. Free. Jon Akers. Flaherty’s Webster, 1200 Bay Rd. Webster. 6710816. flahertys.com. Call for info. Kari Todesco. Boulder Coffee Co., 739 Park Ave. 697-0235. bouldercoffeeco.com. 8 p.m. Call for info.

Kim and Reggie harris w/ Steve Gretz, Leslie Lee, and Perry Cleaveland. Cafe Veritas at First

Unitarian Church, 220 Winton Road South. 7:30 p.m. $10-$18.

Sofrito. Havana Cabana,

289 Alexander St. 232-1333. havanacabanaroc.com. 10 p.m. Call for info. [ BLUES ]

Gap Mangione New Blues Band. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa,

199 Woodcliff Dr. 248-4825. woodcliffhotelspa.com. 7:30 p.m. Free. Krista Hartwig. The Beale, 1930 Empire Blvd. Webster. 216-1070. thebealegrille.com. 7 p.m. Call for info. [ CLASSICAL ]

Reiner Eschbach. La Casa, 93

Alexander St. 585-730-5025. https://facebook.com/pages/LaCasa/148219738674006. 6:30 p.m. Call for info. RPO: An Evening in Paris. Kodak Hall at Eastman Theater, 60 Gibbs St. Thursday: 7:30 p.m., Saturday: 8 p.m. $15-$92. [ DJ/ELECTRONIC ]

Blue Label Saturdays ft. DJ Andy Fade and DJ Bobby Base. Flat Iron Café, 561 State St. 454-4830. flatironcafe.net. Call for info.

Aggy Dune, Ambrosia Salad, Miss Darienne Lake, Kasha Davis, and DJ Blake. 140 Alex

Bar & Grill, 140 Alexander St. 256-1000. 140alex.com. Call for info. DJ Darkwave. Vertex Night Club, 169 N. Chestnut St. 232-5498. 10 p.m. $3-$8.

The 140 Alex Cabaret ft. Poison Waters, DJ Solid Bear. 140 Alex

Bar & Grill, 140 Alexander St. 256-1000. 140alex.com. 11:30 p.m. Call for info.

Jameson Alexander, Rob Morley. Love Nightclub, 45 Euclid St. 222-5683. 10 p.m. 21+, 18+ after 2 a.m. $6-$20. La Selva. Tilt Nightclub & Ultralounge, 444 Central Ave. 232-8440. facebook.com/ Tiltnightclub. 10 p.m. Call for info. Ladies on Demand Saturday ft. Quan Da Bomb, DJ G Nynce, DJ Big Bully, Mikey Pressure. T

Jay’s Lounge, 622 Lake Ave. 10 p.m. 21+. Ladies free until 11:30 p.m., guys $10 until midnight.

Poke Dem Saturdays ft. Team Lion Paw, The Money Green Theme, Nick Kage, and Wavey. Trinities Restaurant, 36 W. Main St. 319-4047. 10 p.m. $5-$10. Saturday Night Ladies Night. BLU Bar & Grill, 250 Pixley Rd. 247-0079. blurochester.com. 9 p.m. Call for info. [ JAZZ ]

David Werberig. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. Call for info. Frank’s Rat Pack. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. East Rochester. 662-5555. bistro135.net. 6 p.m. Free. Fred Costello & Roger Ekers Jazz Duo. Charley Brown’s,

1675 Penfield Rd. 385-9202. charleybrownspenfield.com. 7:30 p.m. Free.

Jazz Thursdays ft. The David Detweiler Trio. Next Door Bar

& Grill, 3220 Monroe Ave. 2494575. nextdoorbarandgrill.com. Thursday: 5 p.m., Friday and Saturday: 8 p.m/. Free.

The Joe Santora Trio w/Curtis Kendrick & Emily Kirchoff.

Michael’s Valley Grill, 1694 Penfield Rd. (585) 383-8260. michaelsvalleygrill.com. Free. Ryan from El Rojo Jazz. Lemoncello, 137 West Commercial St. East Rochester. 385-8565. lemoncello137.com. 6:30 p.m. Free. The Strings. The Rabbit Room, 61 N. Main St. Honeoye Falls. 582-1830. thelowermill.com. 7:30 p.m. Free. Two for the Road. Pane Vino Ristorante, 175 N. Water St. 2326090. panevinoristorante.com. 6:30 p.m. Free. The White Hots. Pultneyville Grill, 4135 Lake Rd. Pultneyville. 315589-4512. pultneyvillegrill.com. 6:30 p.m. Call for info. [ POP/ROCK ]

Aggressive Betty, Beneath Hell’s Sky, Broken Minds Spoken Without Regret. Montage Music Hall, 50 Chestnut St. 232-1520. themontagemusichall.com. 8 p.m. $7-$9.

FOWLS w/The Branch Davidians, Barbarossa, and Secret Pizza. Bug Jar, 219

Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. $6-$8.

The Isotopes Karaoke w/ SacCannon CD Release Party. Firehouse Saloon, 814

S. Clinton Ave. 319-3832. thefirehousesaloon.com. 9 p.m. 21+. $6. John Payton Project. Dinosaur Bar-B-Que, 99 Court St. 3257090. dinosaurbarbque.com. 10 p.m. Free. Knight Patrol. Daisy Dukes, 2235 Empire Blvd. Webster. 671-4880. 9 p.m. Call for info. Oxford Train. Sticky Lips BBQ Juke Joint, 830 Jefferson Rd. 585-292-5544. stickylipsbbq. com. 10 p.m. Free.

Tribute to Black Leadership Event. Frederick Douglass

Community Resource Center, 36 King St. 5:30 p.m. Call for info. UMB Band. Nola’s Restaurant & Nightclub, 4775 Lake Ave. 6633375. nolasweb.com. 9 p.m. Call for info. Warehouse. Richmond’s Tavern, 21 Richmond Street. 270-8570. richmondstavern. com. 9 p.m. Free.

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 2 [ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ]

Celtic Music Sundays. Temple

Bar and Grille, 109 East Ave. 232-6000. templebarandgrille. com. 7 p.m. Free. Fandango at the Tango. Tango Cafe, 389 Gregory St. 271-4930. tangocafedance.com. 7:30 p.m. Free, donations accepted Tango Cafe, 389 Gregory St. 271-4930. tangocafedance.com. 7:30 p.m. Free, donations accepted.


Meet the Artist Concert Series!

[ CLASSICAL ]

Compline, Candlelight Concert ft. Thomas Gaynor, Jacob Fuhrman, Zachary Zwahlen. Christ Church,

ELDAR

141 East Ave. 454-3878. christchurchrochester.org. 8:30 p.m. Free, donations accepted. Community Peace Celebration. Hochstein Performance Hall, 50 N Plymouth Ave. 454-4596. hochstein.org. 4 p.m. Free, food donations accepted.

Tues. Feb 11th • 7pm Tickets: $25 Athena Performing Arts Center

BONERAMA

Wed. March 26th • 7:30pm Tickets: $20 Greece Olympia High School Auditorium

Live Music: Amanda Mole, organ. George Eastman House,

900 East Ave. 3 p.m. Free w/ museum admission.

Salon Concert Series at Asbury First: Rebecca Penneys (piano), Mikhail Kopelman (violin), and Stefan Reuss (cello). Asbury

First United Methodist Church, 1050 East Ave. 271-1050 x103. asburyfirst.org. 2 p.m. $35, free for students.

Sister Cities Live-Streaming Concert w/The Hochstein Youth Symphony Orchestra. Hale Auditorium, Roberts Cultural Life Center, Roberts Wesleyan College, 2301 Westside Dr. 1 p.m. $5. [ DJ/ELECTRONIC ]

Boasy Sundaze. Club Clarissas,

293 Clarissa St. 232-3430. Call for info.

Ship Wrecked Sunday’s ft. DJ Trancesend. Captain’s Attic, 37

Charlotte St. 546-8885. 21+. Call for info.

Tequila Sundays ft. DJ Andy Fade. Flat Iron Café, 561 State

St. 454-4830. flatironcafe.net. 10 p.m. Call for info. [ JAZZ ]

Bill Slater. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. 2484825. woodcliffhotelspa.com. 7:30 p.m. Free. [ POP/ROCK ]

Big Game Tailgate Party w/ Knight Patrol. Nola’s Restaurant & Nightclub, 4775 Lake Ave. 663-3375. nolasweb.com. 2 p.m. Call for info.

Tickets can be purchased online at www.jazz901.org and by calling 585-966-2660 REGGAE | SPIRITUAL REZ

Just when you figure Spiritual Rez is simply a straight-up reggae outfit, in comes the deep-dish groove. For close to 10 years now, this six-piece grooveasaurus has traversed the States bringing roots reggae, and detours into jazzy funk, to the people. The group is seriously talented, and you’ll smile with your feet. Spiritual Rez performs Friday, January 31, 9 p.m. at Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Drive. $5-$8. lovincup.com. — BY FRANK DE BLASE [ POP/ROCK ]

Lovin Cup Idol. Lovin’ Cup,

300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. lovincup.com. Free.

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 4 [ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ]

The Farewell Drifters. Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. abilenebarandlounge.com. Call for info. [ BLUES ]

Bluesday Tuesday Blues Jam. P.I.’s Lounge, 495 West

Ave. 8 p.m. Call for info.

The Dirty Pennies w/ Guntrouble, Fish God. Bug

John Valenti w/MD Woods, EYEWAY, Sunken Cities. Bug

Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. $6-$8.

Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. $5-$7. Teagan Ward . The Beale, 693 South Ave. 271-4650. thebealegrille.com. 7:30 p.m. Call for info.

MONDAY, FEBRUARY 3

[ CLASSICAL ]

In Memory of Tatiana Tchekina. [ CLASSICAL ]

John Feeley, guitar. Eastman East Wing Hatch Recital Hall, 26 Gibbs St. 8 p.m. $10. [ DJ/ELECTRONIC ] 12th Planet. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N. Water St. 325-5600. waterstreetmusic. com. 8 p.m. $22. Magic City Monday’s. Louie’s Cordial’s Lounge, 392 Lyell Ave. 254-2844. 7 p.m. $5 before 10 p.m. [ JAZZ ]

Jim Nugent Trio. Bistro 135,

135 W. Commercial St. East Rochester. 662-5555. bistro135. net. 6 p.m. Free.

Kilbourn Hall, 26 Gibbs St. esm. rochester.edu. 8 p.m. Free. [ JAZZ ]

Mark Bader & Chris Potter. Bistro 135, 135

W. Commercial St. East Rochester. 662-5555. bistro135.net. 6 p.m. Free. Roses & Revolutions. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. 248-4825. woodcliffhotelspa.com. 5:30 p.m. Free.

[ POP/ROCK ]

Men Behaving Badly. The Titus

Tavern, 692 Titus Ave. 2705365. titustavern.com. 7 p.m. Call for info. Pro Jam. Richmond’s Tavern, 21 Richmond Street. 2708570. richmondstavern.com. 8 p.m. Free.

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 5 [ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ] Dave McGrath. Dinosaur Bar-B-Que, 99 Court St. 3257090. dinosaurbarbque.com. 8 p.m. Free. Derek Knott. Sticky Lips BBQ Juke Joint, 830 Jefferson Rd. 585-292-5544. stickylipsbbq. com. 6:30 p.m. Free. Rob & Gary Acoustic. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. 248-4825. woodcliffhotelspa. com. 5:30 p.m. Free.

Do you have osteoarthritis knee pain?

Do you have trouble sleeping?

If you answered “yes” to these questions, you may qualify for research being conducted at the University of Rochester. The purpose is to investigate whether improving sleep can improve the immune system and reduce pain. • Participants must be 50–75 years of age and in generally good physical and psychological health. • No study medications are involved • Study participants receive up to $400 for study participation.

For more information, please call (585) 273-4700, or email us at: mindbody@urmc.rochester.edu

[ JAZZ ]

The Ethnic Heritage Ensemble.

Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. lovincup.com. 8:30 p.m. $18-$20. Roses & Revolutions. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. East Rochester. 662-5555. bistro135. net. 6 p.m. Free. [ POP/ROCK ]

Tinsel Teeth w/Lamby, Televisionaries, and Tuurd. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. $7-$9.

Ted Nicolosi and Shared Genes. Angus House &

Lounge, 2126 Five Mile Line Rd. Penfield. 218-2005. AngusHouseandLounge.com. 6:30 p.m. Free. rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 19


Art Some people want to tell a story; others want the story to be felt, a solid presence trailing experience like an un-pinnable shadow. Visually, Stewart’s playful, inventive figures draw deeply from the pool of history, taking style cues from ancient artifacts and popular cultures alike, depicting figures who are one with animals as well as tools and toys and games; all that is experienced becomes incorporated into identity and then a literal extension of the self. In his statement, the artist says he assimilates the information “based on intuition and a spontaneous response to the magic of the imagination.” What is most fascinating about Stewart’s work is the agelessness depicted in the beings. The combination of controlled gesture, bewildered or spacegazing expressions, and playfully irreverent adornments lend the figures a sense of existing freely, unmarred by the strict constraints that bind, compartmentalize, and define our existences at every age. Stewart is fascinated by the work of children and of folk and outsider artists, and his own work is influenced by what he calls honest and passionate communication unencumbered by strict training. Still, it is imbued with a sophistication in form and gesture derived only from focused study.

Bill Stewart’s sculpture, “Mountain Man,” is part of his “Shaman-isms” exhibit, hosted by Axom Gallery. PHOTO PROVIDED

Pop primitivism “Shaman-isms” NEW CERAMIC SCULPTURE BY BILL STEWART THROUGH APRIL 12 AXOM GALLERY, 176 ANDERSON AVE., 2ND FLOOR. 232-6030 EXT.23, AXOMGALLERY.COM WEDNESDAY-SATURDAY NOON-5 P.M., AND BY APPOINTMENT [ REVIEW ] BY REBECCA RAFFERTY

Where do we end, and where does the world begin? What divides the past, present, and future, and what are the means by which we may access one position from another? Do such lines truly exist, or are they perceived for the sake of making some sense of it all? And from where do we derive our power? Sculptor Bill Stewart’s new body of work, currently on view at 20 CITY JANUARY 29 - FEBRUARY 4, 2014

Axom Gallery, explores the poetry and madness of all of this experience through tall totems and mask-like wall pieces. Twenty works are formed with largely oily-glazed terracotta, and spangled here and there with the odd bright details. Blocky forms are broken up visually by plenty of texture and patterning. “A hypersensitive surface forces the viewer to absorb much more information than under normal circumstances,” says the artist in a provided statement. The story of each of the works “can be narrated or observed on a visceral level,” he says. Body decoration and costuming are drawn from “a kaleidoscope or mosaic of images,” narratives built “using assembled information obtained from innumerable sources over an extended period of time,” with roots in personal experience and events both actual and fictional.

The giant shaman beings are propped like dolls on a base with a pole, legs dangling and giving the feeling that the figure might hop down and interact with the viewer. Hats serve as a powerful signifier of some unspoken role, and often serve to literally obscure the figures’ already mysterious countenances. The figure in “The Elders New Socks” has rough, pumice-like hair, outstretched hands, striped knee socks, and bears a cluster of figures suspended from a wide brim attached to his forehead. This motif of mini figures is a recurring visual cue throughout the body of work. “Mountain Man” wears roller skates, his skirt covered in a pattern of six-legged critters. Upon his head, a rough dirt-hill helmet is crowned with what looks to be a house, surrounded by birds winging here and there. The trickster is ever an intriguing cultural archetype, and more popular than ever due to Tom Hiddleston’s arrestingly sympathetic Loki in the “Thor” and “Avengers” film franchises. Stewart’s “Trickster” figure stands with arms outstretched together, his hat topped with a circular blade, eyes mismatched and inscrutable, his face extended in a tongue — or a trunk —

and barbed with the starburst form familiar from a slippery game of jacks. In the center of the gallery space, two black boats rest on pedestals, each bearing a couple of figures. In “Shaman and the Rabbit,” a figure stands with gesturing arms outstretched behind a small, alert creature. A crudely formed, small figure hangs from the Shaman’s pointed witch hat. Shoelaces also hang down like thin braids, partially obscuring the face. The other boat piece, “Wisdom Keepers,” features two figures standing with their arms out, hats entirely obscuring their faces, black cord hair hanging down, with small black and red figures anchored to one of the hats by hooks. “Shadow Caster” wears platform shoes, has a painted face hidden by shoelace locks, and a colorful game of ring toss going on his pointed hat. Figures swarm the skirt, and the character hails something unseen with one hand while offering what could be a pitted stone or peanut with the other. If Stewart’s works resemble the bizarre, it

is perhaps because we are too far removed from assigning our own significance to our decisions, too unaccustomed to generating our own phenomena, too immersed in the empty customs of the here and now. Very old signifiers were pregnant with symbolism, and modern modes of dress and action are by and large bereft of personalized meaning. A number of masks adorn the gallery walls, embodying everything from strange bird-men to the four cardinal directions. These heads are more often than not adorned with wondering mouths, singing tiny o’s, and frequently feature whimsical elements such as polka-dots, appendageladen headdresses, or long pendulumlike pieces suspended from their chins. “Untitled 4” has a long tunnel-shaped mouth, a cannon or a musical instrument — or both, depending on who’s looking. Ever the odd one, the shaper of dream realities, escaper of tangibility, “Sandman” is depicted here as a rough-built, graybrown, unglazed terracotta form mounted on a wall. A vague face emerges from the mud, and smooth, smaller figures are attached by hooks, but also covered in rough mud. The whole ensemble looks uncertain if it will return to the earth, or linger a while longer. An artist talk will be held at Axom Gallery on Tuesday, April 8, 7-9 p.m.


Art Exhibits [ OPENING ] Barnes & Noble, 3349 Monroe Ave. Penfield Art Association Winter Juried Show. Through Mar 1. Mon-Saturday 9 a.m.10 p.m., Sunday 9 a.m.-9 p.m. Reception and awards Feb 3, 7-9 p.m. 586-6020. penfieldartassociation.com. Bertha V.B. Lederer Gallery, Brodie Hall, I College Dr., Geneseo. Two Solo Exhibits: Seven Words & Slavery by Juan Carlos Llera/ New Work by Constance Mauro. Through Mar 8. Tue-Thu 12:303:30 p.m., Fri-Sat 1-5 p.m. Reception: Jan 31, 5-7 p.m. 2455813. hawkins@geneseo.edu. geneseo.edu/galleries. Frederick Douglass Community Resource Center, 36 King St. Second Annual Tribute to Black Leadership. Artwork by Johnnie Lee Smith. The Leadership Painting series will travel: Jan 30: Annual Expressions of King’s Legacy Celebration at RIT, Feb 16: Black History Family Day on February 16 at the Memorial Art Gallery, and Black Heritage Month: An Evening of Art & Jazz at City Hall Link Gallery and Atrium. youtu.be/9mLQDDoCdgk. Geisel Gallery, Bausch & Lomb Place, One Bausch & Lomb Place. “Arena Visions” by Arena Art Group. Through Mar 26. MonFri 7 a.m.-7 p.m., Sat 7 a.m.-2 p.m. Reception Feb 13, 5-7 p.m. zannebrunner@gmail.com. thegeiselgallery.com. Hartnett Gallery, Wilson Commons, University of Rochester, River Campus. “The Museum of Failure” by Caitlin Cass. Through Feb 23. Tue-Fri 11 a.m.-7 p.m., Sat-Sun noon-5 p.m. blogs. rochester.edu/hartnett. International Art Acquisitions, 3300 Monroe Ave. “A Rose is a Rose..or Not” David Kerstetter, Linda Kall, Ning Lee, and Janet Richardson. Through Feb 28. Mon-Fri 10 a.m.-9 p.m., Sat 10 a.m.-6 p.m., Sun 12-5 p.m. 264-1440. internationalartacquisitions.; “Roses Forever” by David Kerstetter. Through Feb 28. MonFri 10 a.m.-9 p.m., Sat 10 a.m.-6 p.m., Sun 12-5 p.m. 264-1440. internationalartacquisitions. RIT Bevier Gallery, 90 Lomb Memorial Dr., Booth Building 7A. Rochester-Finger Lakes Middle and High School Art Exhibition. Through Feb 24. Mon-Fri 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m., Mon-Thu 7-9 p.m., Sat 1-4:30 p.m., Sun 2-4:30 p.m. Jan 31, 5-5:30 p.m. award ceremony, and 5:30-7 p.m. opening reception. RIT’s University Gallery (adjacent to Bevier Gallery). 475-2646. Roc Brewing Co., 56 S. Union St. Dude’s Night Out Anniversary Show. Through Mar 31. Reception Jan 31, 6 p.m. 7949798. rocbrewingco@gmail.com. thedudesnightout.com. St John Fisher College, 3690 East Ave. “Remains to be Seen,” an exhibit of wood engravings by Steven Lee-Davis. Through Mar 28. St. John Fisher College, Lavery Library, Lower Level Gallery. Reception Feb 13, 5-8 p.m. Artist lecture on printmaking: 7-8 p.m. 385-8139. Williams-Insalaco Gallery at FLCC, 3325 Marvin Sands Dr. “Fire & Ice” by Barbara McPhail. Through Feb 27. Mon-Thu 8:30 a.m.-9 p.m., Fri 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m., Sat-Sun non-5 p.m. Jan 30: demo 11

ART | “FIRE & ICE”

It’s too easy for us to take our environment for granted. Regional artist Barbara McPhail’s drawings and prints celebrate the beauty of the Delaware River Valley, but her work also promotes the preservation of that region, and others across the country, that have been targeted by energy companies who want to use hydraulic fracturing — better known as “fracking” — to get at what’s below the surface. A collection of McPhail’s artwork will be displayed in an exhibit, “Fire & Ice,” that opens at Williams-Insalaco Gallery 34 (Finger Lakes Community College, 3325 Marvin Sands Drive, Canandaigua) on Thursday, January 30. The artist will demonstrate her unique printmaking process from 11 a.m. to noon in room C429, an artist’s talk will take place 1-3 p.m., followed by a reception from 4 to 6:30 p.m. All events are free to attend. The exhibit continues through February 27. Gallery hours are Monday-Thursday, 8:30 a.m.-9 p.m.; Friday 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m.; and Saturday-Sunday, noon-5 p.m. For more information, call 785-1369 or email gallery34@flcc.edu. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY a.m.-noon, artist talk 1-3 p.m., reception 4-6:30 p.m. 7851369. gallery34@flcc.edu. [ CONTINUING ] 1975 Gallery, 89 Charlotte St. “Boys vs Girls 2” Through Feb 8. Held at 1975 Gallery (89 Charlotte St.) and The Yards (5052 Public Market). 1975ish.com, attheyards.com. 1975ish.com. ARTISANworks, 565 Blossom Rd. “Richard Quataert: The Arresting Image.” Through Apr 20. Fri-Sat 11 a.m.-6 p.m., Sun 12-5 p.m. 288-7170. artisanworks.net. Arts & Cultural Council for Greater Rochester, 277 N Goodman St. Four Artists. Through Jan 29. Jeanne Raffer Beck, William Keyser, Laura Wilder, and Shamira Nicolas. 473-4000. artsrochester.org. A.R.T.S. Gallery, 321 East Ave. “The Good Shepherd” Original watercolors and prints by Joyce Morgan, 90 year old great- grandmother and former missionary. Through Jan 31. 729-9916. AsIs Gallery, Sage Art Center, Wilson Blvd. “(En)Gendered: Works and Words: Dialogues in Intersectionality.” Through Jan 31. sageartcenter.com/asisgallery/. Axom Gallery, 176 Anderson Ave., 2nd floor. “Shaman-isms: New Ceramic Sculpture by Bill Stewart.” Through Feb 22. 2326030 x23. axomgallery.com. Books Etc., 78 W. Main St. Macedon. “Paint, Pastels and Photographs.” Through Feb 28. Work by Mark Smith, Sid Lorraine, and John Cieslinski. 474-4116. books_etc@yahoo.com. Bridge Art Gallery University of Rochester Medical Center,

300 Crittenden Blvd. “Stillness & Dance.” Through Feb 28. 275-3571. facebook.com/ BridgeArtGallery.URMC. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. The Lobby Presents: Topher Martin. Through Feb 5. 8 p.m.-2 a.m. lobbydigital.com. Community Darkroom Gallery, 713 Monroe Ave. “Visual Discourse.” Through Mar 31. Photographs by Community Darkroom Photographers. Mon 9 a.m.-9:30 p.m., Tue-Thu 9 a.m.6:30 p.m., Fri 12-5 p.m., Sat 10 a.m.-5:30 p.m. 271-5920. geneseearts.org. Crossroads Coffeehouse, 752 S Goodman St. The Artwork of Bethany Williams and Allie Hartley. 244-6787. xroadscoffeehouse.com. Cumming Nature Center, 6472 Gulick Rd. Marsh Madness: Wonders of Wetlands. Through May 4. Wed-Fri 9 a.m.–3:30 p.m., Sat-Sun 9 a.m.–4:30 p.m. 374-6160. rmsc.org. Firehouse Gallery at Genesee Pottery, 713 Monroe Ave. “Hand to Hand.” Through Jan 31. An exhibit featuring the work of the Center’s printmaking, letterpress, and ceramics teachers. MonWed 10 a.m.-9:30 p.m., Thu 10 a.m.-9:30 p.m., Fri 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Sat noon-5 p.m. Reception Jan 10, 6-9 p.m. 244-1730. geneseearts.org. Friendly Home’s Memorial Gallery, 3165 East Ave. Tracie Doerner. Through Feb 28. Daily 10 a.m.-5 p.m. friendlyhome.org. Gallery R, 100 College Ave. The Art of Deception. Dec 20Jan 31. Closing reception Jan 31, 7-9:30 p.m. 256-3312. galleryr99@gmail.com. galleryr. cias.rit.edu.

George Eastman House, 900 East Ave. “Lossless.” Through Feb 16. 271-3361. eastmanhouse.org. H&R Block Premium Office, 1100 Long Pond Rd., Suite 103, Country Village Center. Exhibit and Sale of Fine Art by Suburban Rochester Art Group. Through Apr 15. 227-0780. facebook.com/ SuburbanRochester Art Group. Image City Photography Gallery, 722 University Ave. “A Sense of Peace.” Through Feb 23. TuesSat 12-6 p.m., Sun noon-4 p.m. Receptions Fri Jan 31, 8;30 p.m., and Fri Feb 7, 5-9 p.m. 4821976. dano@rochester.rr.com. imagecityphotographygallery.com. International Art Acquisitions, 3300 Monroe Ave. Fluid Motion.” On view: “Reverence,” among the original oil on canvas by British artist Paul Bennett. Through Jan 31. Mon-Fri 10 a.m.-9 p.m., Sat 10 a.m.-6 p.m., Sun 12-5 p.m. internationalartacquisitions. Livingston Arts Center, 4 Murray Hill Dr. Mt. Morris. “An Ideal Spot” bt Amie Alden. Through Feb 1. A photo exhibition of the evolution of Murray Hill, Mt. Morris by Amie Alden, Livingston County Historian. 243-6785. info@livingstonarts.org. Lower Link Gallery, Central Library, 115 South Ave. Art of the Book. Artist Books and Altered Books. 428-8053. libraryweb.org/artofthebook. Main Street Arts, 20 W Main St., Clifton Springs. “Being Human” Group Show.. Through Feb 28. 315-4620210. mstreetarts@gmail.com. mainstreetartsgallery.com. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. “Redefining the Multiple: 13 Contemporary Japanese Printmakers.” Through Mar 16 in Grand Gallery with “New Beginnings: Japanese Prints of the 1950s, 60s, and 70s.” Also Lockhart Gallery through May 4: “Eduardo Paolozzi’s “General Dynamic F.U.N.” Also Lucy Burne Gallery through Feb 19: “Portraits, Patterns, & Projects: Adult Student Show.” Wed-Sun 11 a.m.-5 p.m., Thu until 9 p.m. 276-8900. mag.rochester.edu. Mercer Gallery at Monroe Communtiy College, 1000 E. Henrietta Rd. “Good Work: The Illustration Art Invitational.” Through Feb 20. Curated by David Cowles and Kathy Calderwood. 292-2021. monroecc.edu/go/mercer/. Mill Art Center & Gallery, 61 N Main St, Honeoye Falls. Art Crescendo: Mill Gallery 2013 Members Exhibition. Through Feb 15. Monday 11 a.m.-3 p.m., Tue 2-5 p.m., Wed 11 a.m.-5 p.m., Thu 11 a.m.-8 p.m., Fri 11 a.m.-3 p.m., Sat 11 a.m.-3 p.m. millartcenter.com. My Sister’s Gallery, 505 Mt Hope Ave. Transient Walls Art Show by Gianna Stewart. Through Feb 16. Open daily 10 a.m.-8 p.m. Reception Jan 9, 4-6 p.m. 5468439 x3102. Nan Miller Gallery, 3450 Winton Place. Albert Paley on Park Ave. Tue-Sat 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Six dynamic Albert Paley maquettes (small studies) designed for his most ambitious sculpture installation, Paley on Park Avenue. Also on display are Paley’s furniture designs, mixmedia pieces by Red Wolf, and new original works by Adam Colangelo and Eduard Gurevich. 292-1430. nanmillergallery.com.

Nazareth College Arts Center Gallery, 4245 East Ave. “Insight: The Inner Nature of Things.” Through Mar 7. Curated by artist Elizabeth Lyons and featuring the work of sculptors Francesca Lalanne, Mahine Rattonsey, Kate Roberts, and Jennifer Schinzing. Sun and Tues-Thu noon-5 p.m., Fri-Sat noon-8 p.m. 389-5073. naz.edu/art/arts-center-gallery. Nazareth College Colacino Gallery, 4245 East Ave. “This Heirloom.” A multi-media exhibition of film-inspired collages by Mara Ahmed. Through Feb 7. Wed-Sun noon5 p.m. 389-5073. naz.edu/art/ colacino-art-gallery. Orange Glory Café, 240 East Ave. Watson Art Show? This! Mon-Fri 11 a.m.-3 p.m. A collection of drawings, prints, & collages by Watson, a Rochester illustrator. 232-7340. Outside the Box Art Gallery, Bldg 9, The Canal Works, 1000 Turk Hill Rd. “Winter Reflections.” Through Jan 31. Sun-Mon 8 a.m.-5 p.m., Tue-Wed 8 a.m.-10 p.m., Thu-Sat 8 a.m.-11 p.m. 645-2485. outsidetheboxag.com. Oxford Gallery, 267 Oxford St. Patricia Tribastone and Ray Hassard. Through Mar 1. Tue-Fri noon-5 p.m., Sat 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Reception Feb 1, 5-7 p.m. 2715885. oxfordgallery.com. Record Archive, 33 1/3 Rockwood St. Altered States of Rochester: A Neo-colorist series of paintings by Darren Thomas Brennessel. recordarchive.com.; “AC/ DC/CC: An Art Collection by David Cowles, Clayton Cowles, Alison Cowles.” 244-1210. recordarchive.com. Rosalie “Roz” Steiner Art Gallery, Genesee Community College, One College Rd. “Interactions of Time and Substance,” Landscape Paintings by Leigh Yardley. Through Feb 28. Mon & Wed-Fri 10 a.m.-4 p.m. 3430055 x6490. genesee.edu/ campuslife/arts/gallery/. Rush Rhees Library, University of Rochester, River Campus. “(En) Gendered Juried Art.” Art & Music Library. Through Feb 27. Mon-Fri 9 a.m.-5 p.m. rochester. edu/college/wst.; “Nurturing Inquiry.” Rare Books and Special Collections Department. Through Feb 28. Mon-Fri 9 a.m.-5 p.m. 275-4477. rochester.edu. The Shoe Factory Art Co-op, 250 N Goodman St. Featuring artwork by local artists. Open First Fridays, 6-9 p.m. Second Saturdays, 12-4 p.m., and Wednesdays, 12-5 p.m. 7320036. shoefactoryarts.com. Spectrum Gallery, 100 College Ave. Lana Pejovic’s New Work. Through Jan 31. Tue & Thu 9 a.m.-8 p.m., Wed & Fri 9 a.m.-6 p.m., Sat 10 a.m.-2 p.m. 4614447. spectrumgalleryroc.com. Tap & Mallet, 381 Gregory St. Dudes Night Out Presents: Dudes on Tap. 473-0503. tapandmallet.com. Tower Fine Arts Center, SUNY Brockport, 180 Holley St. “Andrew Au: Life Industries,” and “Amy Cheng: Irrational Exuberance.” Through Feb 23. 395-2787. brockport.edu/ finearts. Williams Gallery at First Unitarian Church, 220 S Winton Rd. “A Journey in Search of Beauty and Understanding” works by Francis Coleman. Through Feb 17. Mon-Fri 10 a.m.-2 p.m.

and 4:30-7 p.m. Reception Feb 10, 5:30 p.m. 271-9070. rochesterunitarian.org/music_ arts_gallery.html. Williams-Insalaco Gallery at FLCC, 3325 Marvin Sands Dr. Alumni Biennial Exhibition: The Art, Music, and Poetry of Rand Darrow. 785-1369. flcc.edu.

Call for Artwork [ WED., JANUARY 29 ] 6x6x2014. Through April 20. Rochester Contemporary Arts Center, 137 East Ave. 6”x6” Artwork entries due Apr 20, or postmarked by Apr 19. No glitter! 461-2222. info@ rochestercontemporary.org. Call for Art. Ongoing. Outside the Box Art Gallery, Bldg 9, The Canal Works, 1000 Turk Hill Rd. Ongoing. The gallery is currently seeking artists working in all media. We are offering several exciting exhibit options. Please include the following in your email: 3 to 5 jpeg images representative of your style, artists statement and short bio 6452485. outsidetheboxag@gmail. com. outsidetheboxag.com. Call for Art. Ongoing. Main Street Arts, 20 W. Main St., Clifton Springs. The gallery is currently seeking artists working in all media. Please include the following in your email: - 3 to 5 jpeg images of current work Artist statement - CV/Resume Kindly indicate whether you are submitting available work or work that is representative 315-4620210. mstreetarts@gmail.com. mstreetarts@gmail.com. Call for Artists. Ongoing. 4614447. spectrumgalleryroc.com. Call for Artists to Interview for TV. Ongoing. Show: The Art of rctv-15. 201-292-7937. team@ foreveraryes.com. Calling All Local Artists. Ongoing. Lori’s Natural Foods, 900 Jefferson Rd Artists wanted to participate in our consignment program. Email a bit about you and your work 424-2323. stephanie@lorisnatural.com. lorisnatural.com. Edible Books Annual Festival and Competition. Through March 29. Central Library, 115 South Ave. Deadline Mar 29. Event held Apr 6. 428-8350. rebecca.fuss@ libraryweb.org. For the LOVE of (sub)urban ART; an exploration of the urban/surban life. Through Feb 1. Outside the Box Art Gallery, Bldg 9, The Canal Works, 1000 Turk Hill Rd. Submission deadline Feb 1. Exhibitions Feb 7-28 at Outside the Box Art Gallery, 1000 Turk Hill Rd., Bldg #9, Fairport, and Create Art 4 Good Studios, 1115 East Main St., Rochester. Drop off submissions: @Outside the Box Art Gallery; during regular gallery hrs. Jan 25-31, or @Create Art 4 Good Studios; Jan 26 4-8 p.m., Jan 28 4-8 p.m., Feb 1 9 a.m.-1 p.m $15 for two pieces. 6452485. Susan@CreateArt4Good. org, outsidetheboxag@gmail. com. outsidetheboxag.com. Geva’s 20th Annual Regional Writers Showcase. Through Jan. 31. Plays for consideration must be submitted between January 17 and January 31 to Writers & Books. Regional Writers Showcase to be held on April 21 and April 28, 2014 in the Fielding Nextstage at Geva 2321366 x3034. gevatheatre.org. continues on page 23

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brothers. They love each other, but they have loved power and power plays just as much, and it has turned them into political animals who nearly destroy each other. The ending of the play is elegiac, as Henry and Eleanor change from a magnificent royal “we” to a middleaged couple who start tallying up their mistakes and asking what more there is to life. (It is no surprise that James Goldman also wrote the book for the Stephen Sondheim musical “Follies”).

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Fred Nuernberg and Patricia Lewis in Out of Pocket Productions’ “The Lion in Winter,” now on stage at MuCCC. PHOTO BY COLIN HUTH PHOTOC4

Political animals “The Lion in Winter” BY OUT OF POCKET PRODUCTIONS THROUGH FEBRUARY 1 MUCCC, 142 ATLANTIC AVE. $10-$20 | 866-811-4111, MUCCC.ORG [ REVIEW ] BY DAVID RAYMOND

“I could listen to you lie for hours,” says Henry II to his wife, Eleanor of Aquitaine, during one of their frequent tussles in “The Lion in Winter.” In this play the characters do little else but lie to each other, but they do it with style. This James Goldman play was first produced on Broadway in 1966 and made into a celebrated movie; I think its reputation has faded a bit since then, but the Out of Pocket Productions presentation now running at MuCCC reveals a play very much worth revival. Kudos to director Stephanie Roosa for choosing it, and staging it very ably. As the play opens, it is Christmas 1183. Henry II (Fred Nuernberg) is 58 — elderly by medieval standards. This particular lion is feeling rather wintry, and thinking about his possible successor among his three sons: Richard (Adam Petzold), Geoffrey (Brad Craddock), and John (Zak West). Also on his mind are his mistress Alais (Ruth Bellavia), who also happens to be betrothed to Richard, and his wife, Eleanor (Patricia Lewis), visiting for the holiday (he has imprisoned her, due to her inconvenient habit of leading civil wars against her husband). 22 CITY JANUARY 29 - FEBRUARY 4, 2014

Henry wants the youngest, John, to succeed him; Eleanor wants their oldest, Richard. They are all prepared to scheme, scratch, bite, bitch, and connive until they get what they want. Goldman brings all of them, and also King Philip II of France (Carl Del Buono), to Chinon Castle to celebrate Christmas, and have at each other. Royal bad behavior, particularly of the

European variety, has long been an appealing subject for movies, plays, and TV; it can be very entertaining to see grand people be nasty to each other. Goldman’s pace and tone are brisk and bitterly witty; with all these quaintly dressed folks hurling quips at each other, a few scenes in “The Lion in Winter” sound like a Noel Coward rewrite of “Richard III.” The play itself is kind of an odd duck, very unusual for an American playwright in the mid-1960’s, with no references or parallels to politics of the time that I can see. But Goldman obviously enjoyed the challenge of making these characters compellingly theatrical, and on the whole he succeeded. Whatever else it may be, this play is a good time for actors. I won’t spoil the various checkmates, counterplans, and reversals, which are as engaging as anything you’d see on BBC America (and probably presented more clearly). But I can say that in Goldman’s telling, all the political scheming is the result of strong and frustrated love between husband and wife, parents and sons, and

Goldman likes Henry and Eleanor so much that they tend to overshadow the rest of the play. These parts call for local theater royalty, and get it in the perfectly cast Fred Nuernberg and Patricia Lewis. Nuernberg has a sonorous, slightly aged speaking voice that is a pleasure to listen to, and enough of the kingly manner to be a convincing monarch. (This part was originally played on Broadway by the Music Man himself, Robert Preston.) He definitely has a match in Eleanor, whose many emotions, from steely charm to maternal concern to brooding over the age, are hit perfectly by Lewis. The rapport between these two actors is evident from their first moment together onstage, and their last scene is one of the best bits of acting you’ll see on a local stage. Adam Petzold is a Richard who can barely keep his anger in check (as we learn in the course of the play, he has a lot to be angry about), and Zak West makes an appealingly bratty adolescent John (far from being the “walking pustule” described by Richard). Geoffrey is the typical overlooked middle child; Goldman doesn’t draw him in much detail at all, but Brad Craddock fills in the lines well to create a cold, intellectual character. The three men create a convincingly scary energy in their scenes together; it’s not hard to believe that the brothers can’t stand each other. Ruth Bellavia is a lovely and touching figure as Alais and Carl Del Buono makes an interestingly enigmatic Philip II, who is as political an animal as the rest of them; I wished Goldman had given both these characters a bit more to do. But to paraphrase Eleanor, “What High Middle Ages historical comedy-drama doesn’t have its ups and downs?” When the royal family is in full cry, “The Lion in Winter” has a satisfying spring in its step.


Comedy Club, 911 Brooks Avenue $20 328-6000. jokefactorycomedyclub.com. [ SAT., FEBRUARY 1 ] Mike Birbiglia “Thank God for Jokes.” 9 p.m. University of Rochester Strong Auditorium, River Campus $7-$10 2755911. urochestertickets.com.

Dance Events

DANCE | “BALLET: RCB STYLE”

This week, the Rochester City Ballet will showcase the diverse facets of the company when it presents “Ballet: RCB Style,” a program in four parts, at Nazareth College Arts Center (4245 East Ave.). The performance includes pieces ranging from classical to contemporary to cuttingedge, including the pas de deux from “Cinderella,” the “Alpine Garden” section from “Bravo! Colorado,” the pas de odalisque from “Le Corsair,” and the world premiere of RCB’s newest piece, “InCantation,” a collaboration between composer Adrienne Elisha, double-bassist James VanDemark, and RCB artistic director Jamey Leverett. The show kicks off on Friday, January 31, at 7:30 p.m., and continues Saturday, February 1, with shows at 2 & 7:30 p.m. Following each performance, audience members will have the chance to talk with Leverett, VanDemark, Elisha, and company dancers during a Q&A segment. Tickets range from $25 to $40 and may be purchased online at artscenter.naz.edu or by phone at 389-2170. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY

Art Exhibits Go Art. Ongoing. The GeneseeOrleans Regional Arts Council is seeking artists interested in exhibiting their work in four galleries 343-9313. info@goart. org. goart.org. Junior Duck Stamp Contest. Through March 15. Montezuma National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Center, 3395 US Route 20 East Open to K-12. Deadline Mar 15 315-568-5987. Tasha_Daniels@fws.gov fws. gov/juniorduck/. “Love Letters & Fruits of Passion”. Through Feb 5. Dichotomy Rochester, 371 Park Ave. Dichotomy Rochester seeks artists to participate in “Love Letters” an upcoming exhibit featuring passion themed mail art. Opens February First Friday the 7th from 5-9pm, show runs until Feb 28. Participation guidelines: Artists may submit one piece. Work should be submitted through a postal service to Dichotomy Rochester, 371 Park Ave Rochester, NY 14607. Work not suitable for all age groups will only be exhibited at the show’s opening. Artists are asked to include their name or signature somewhere on the piece. Artists may use the theme word “passion” to inspire their submission. All works received become the property of Dichotomy Rochester and will be sold for $20 each to reduce hosting costs. “Love Letters” will be accompanied by “Fruits of Passion,” a new collection of functional themed works by Dichotomy craftspeople info@dichotomyrochester. dichotomyrochester.com.

Art Events [ FRI., JANUARY 31 ] Exhibition Tour: “Redefining the Multiple.” 2 p.m. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. Included in gallery admission: $5-$12. 276-8900. mag. rochester.edu. [ SAT., FEBRUARY 1 ] Art Supplies Flea Market. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Outside the Box Art Gallery, Bldg 9, The Canal Works, 1000 Turk Hill Rd. 645-26452485485. outsidetheboxag@ gmail.com. Balloon Manor 2014: The VERY Tall Tale of Jack and his Beanstalk. Feb. 1-9. Sibley Building atrium, 25 Franklin St. Construction takes place Feb 1-4. Balloon Manor on display Feb 5-9. Viewing hours are 10 a.m.-7 p.m. during both the construction and finished display periods. Popping party Feb 10, 5:30 p.m. ($10 admission) Free admission balloonmanor.com. Second Annual Seconds Sale. 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Turk Hill Craft School, 1000 Turk Hill Rd. 2231930. turkhillcrafts@gmail.com. turkhillcraftschool.com. [ WED., FEBRUARY 5 ] Thirst 4 Art. 6:30-9 p.m. Napa Wood Fired Grill, 573 South Clinton Ave. $35, register. 3298933. thirst4art.com.

Comedy [ THU., JANUARY 30 ] Gemini. Jan. 30-Feb. 1. Comedy Club, 2235 Empire Blvd Webster Thu 7:30 p.m., Fri-Sat 7:30 & 10 p.m $9-$12. 671-9080. thecomedyclub.us. [ FRI., JANUARY 31 ] Rain Pryor. Jan. 31-Feb. 1, 8 p.m. Joke Factory

[ FRI., JANUARY 31 ] Ballet: Rochester City Ballet Style. 7:30 p.m. Nazareth College Arts Center, 4245 East Ave $25-$40 389-2170. artscenter.naz.edu. Cobblestone Arts Center Dance Company. 9:55-10:30 a.m. Cobblestone Arts Center, 1622 New York 332 Cobblestone Arts Center Dance Company will rehearse and perform dances with students with disabilities from the Canandaigua Middle School 727-2438. CobblestoneArtsCenter.com. [ SAT., FEBRUARY 1 ] English Country Dancing from Jane Austen’s Era. noon. Central Library, Kate Gleason Auditorium, 115 South Ave. Free 4288140. mfraser@libraryweb.org. libraryweb.org. [ SUN., FEBRUARY 2 ] Zydeco Lesson and Dance. 2:30-5 p.m. Tango Cafe, 389 Gregory St. $5. 305-1144. tangocafedance.com.

Kids Events [ FRI., JANUARY 31 ] Anonymous Otaku Anime Club. 3:30-5 p.m. Seymour Library, 161 East Ave., Brockport Grades 6-12 Free. 637-1050. seymourlibraryweb.org. What’s a Whistlepig? 4 p.m. Helmer Nature Center, 154 Pinegrove Ave. Ever see a groundhog up close & personal? Join HNC for a Groundhog’s Day Celebration. Visit with a real whistle pig while you learn all about them! For kids in K-2 $5$7 336-3035. [ SAT., FEBRUARY 1 ] GGH Kids. Grossmans Garden & Home, 1801 Fairport Nine Mile Point Rd . Penfield 11 a.m. Ages 4-12. Different activities each week explore the joy of gardening 377-1982. grossmans.com. Saturday Family Fun on Snowshoes. First Saturday of every month, 10-11:30 a.m Cumming Nature Center, 6472 Gulick Rd. Guided snowshoe hike followed by children’s nature movie in Riedman Theater $3, $10 per family. 374-6160. rmsc.org. Young Ladies’ St Valentine’s Day Tea. Feb. 1. The Refinement Studio, 55 Canterbury Rd. Ages 5-8 11 a.m.-1 p.m., ages 9-11 2-4 p.m $35, register 244-2228. therefnementstudio.com. [ SUN., FEBRUARY 2 ] Family Fun Craft: Groundhogs. 1:30-4 p.m. Central Library, Children’s Center, 115 South Ave. 428-8150. libraryweb.org.

Lectures [ WED., JANUARY 29 ] Visit the 10 Best Parks in Western New York. 7 p.m. Irondequoit Library, Helen McGraw Branch, 2180 E. Ridge Rd Our area

boasts many wonderful parks. Benn Forsyth has selected his ten favorites and will take us on a tour Free, register. 336-6060. mcgrawbr@libraryweb.org. [ THU., JANUARY 30 ] Expressions of Kings Legacy Featuring Tavis Smiley. 12-2 p.m. RIT Gordon Field House, One Lomb Memorial Drive 475 4121. rit.edu/news. Israel Speaker Series: Anat Hoffman. 7:30 p.m. Temple B’rith Kodesh, 2131 Elmwood Ave. “Women of the Wall: From the Back of the Bus to the Top of the Agenda” Free. 461-0490. jewishrochester.org. Stage Whispers: Conversations with Theater Professionals. 10 a.m. Tower Fine Arts Center, SUNY Brockport, 180 Holley St. Jan 30: David Mason “A Working Actor’s Work” Free. 395-2787. brockport.edu/ finearts. [ FRI., JANUARY 31 ] Charles Augustus Thompson Lecture Series. 4 p.m. Rush Rhees Library, University of Rochester, River Campus Hawkins-Carlson Room. Kaye Whitehead rochester.edu/college/ kearnscenter/thompsonseries. Rochester Academy of Science Anthropology Lecture. 7:30 p.m. First Unitarian Church, 220 S Winton Rd Dr. Marie-Henrietta Gates “Kinet Hoyuk (Turkey) and the Archaeology of Eastern Mediterranean Seaports.” 6709709. rasny.org. [ SAT., FEBRUARY 1 ] Football Basics. noon. Rochester Brainery, Village Gate, 274 N Goodman St. $25. 730-7034. rochesterbrainery.com. Hopefulness Through History. Feb. 1. Rochester Baha’i Center, 693 East Avenue 6 p.m. potluck, 7 p.m. Professor Njeru Murage will present an overview of the historical processes and forces operating in our world, their direction and destination. Free 461-3272. monkgeorge@yahoo.com. Struggling to Win: Anarchists Building Popular Power in Chile Speaking Tour. 7-9 p.m. Flying Squirrel Community Space, 285 Clarissa St. $5-$10 suggested donation. 678-6870. thesquirrel.org. TEDxAllendaleColumbiaSchool. 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Allendale Columbia School, 519 Allens Creek Rd. Free, application required 381-4560. martijn@ tedxallendalecolumbiaschool.org. [ SUN., FEBRUARY 2 ] Cindy DeCarolis on Biofeedback. 4 p.m. Books Etc., 78 W. Main St Macedon 474-4116. books_ etc@yahoo.com. What’s Up: Jessica Marten on Yayoi Kusama’s “Statue of Venus Obliterated by Infinity Nets.” 2 p.m. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. Included in gallery admission: $5-$12. 2768900. mag.rochester.edu. [ MON., FEBRUARY 3 ] Opera Lecture & Listening Series. 7 p.m Brighton Memorial Library, 2300 Elmwood Ave. Feb 3: Bad Girls in Opera, presented by Carol Crocca Free. 784-5300. brightonlibrary.org. [ TUE., FEBRUARY 4 ] Panel Discussion: History of the African American Struggle in Rochester. 7 p.m. Nazareth

LECTURE | SCIENCE ON THE EDGE: GREAT WHITE SHARKS

If the act of placing tracking tags on any wild animal involves a bit of risk, then having tagged almost 40 great white sharks places you firmly into badass territory. This week, meet a man who has done just that: Marine Fisheries scientist and author Gregory Skomal (pictured), will present “‘JAWS’ Revisited: New insights into the Ecology of the White Shark in the North Atlantic” at Rochester Museum and Science Center (657 East Ave.) as part of the Richard C. Shultz Science on the Edge Lecture Series. Skomal’s research has been featured on Discovery Channel’s immensely popular “Shark Week” programming, and his talk will cover the evidence that white sharks have expanded their foraging strategies, which has given researchers more predictable access to the animals. The event takes place on Wednesday, February 5, at 7:30 p.m. Tickets are $15 for adults, and $8 for students (through grade 12 or college students with valid college ID). Next up in the series, on February 19, is “Recent Activities and Discoveries of the Mars Rovers Opportunity and Curiosity,” presented by Cornell University’s Robert Sullivan. Visit rmsc.org for more details. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY College Shults Center, 4245 East Ave. Free. naz.edu. Tuesday Topics. Feb. 4. Central Library, Kate Gleason Auditorium, 115 South Ave. 12:12-12:52 p.m. Feb 4: Emergence of Allergies with Carolina Marcus. Feb 11: Emerging Needs of Non-Profit Organizations in the Current Economy with Anne Marie Cook and Joyce Strazzabosco. Feb 18: Emerging Science: the Next Big Thing with Jim Sydor and Tom Battley. Feb 25: The Emerging Arts Scene in Rochester with Bleu Cease. Mar 4: Emerging Health Care Reform with Art Streeter Free. 428-8325. libraryweb.org.

Literary Events

[ WED., FEBRUARY 5 ] Beatles Celebration Lecture: The Beatles and Their Gear. 7 p.m. University of Rochester, River Campus Dewey Hall 1-101. With Andy Babiuk. 2759397. rochester.edu/popmusic. Science on the Edge Lecture Series.. 7:30 p.m. Rochester Museum and Science Center, 657 East Ave. Feb 5: Gregory Skomal: “’JAWS’ Revisited: New Insights into the Ecology of the White Shark in the North Atlantic” Feb 19: Robert Sullivan: “Recent Activities and Discoveries of the Mars Rovers Opportunity and Curiosity” Apr 16: Sara Brenner: “Nanotechnology Landscape: Health, Safety, and Nanomedicine Applications” $7-$14 each lecture, $20-$35 for the series. 697-1942. rmsc.org.

[ FRI., JANUARY 31 ] Book Signing: “What the Dog Said and Other Adventures in Everyday Life” by Joanne Brokaw. 6-8 p.m. McGraw’s Irish Pub, 146 W Commercial St East Rochester 348-9091. joannebrokaw.com/. Joanne Brokaw book release: happy hour party for Rochester Hope For Pets. 6-8 p.m. McGraw’s Irish Pub, 146 W Commercial St East Rochester Book signing party, raffles 3489091. mcgrawsirishpub.com.

[ WED., JANUARY 29 ] Read with Seymour: “How it All Began” by Penelope Lively. 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Seymour Library, 161 East Ave., Brockport Free. 637-1050. seymourlibraryweb. org. [ THU., JANUARY 30 ] Poems for Lunch. noon. Central Library, 115 South Ave. Free. 428-8375. carol.moldt@ libraryweb.org. libraryweb.org. Pure Kona Open Mic Poetry Series. 7-10 p.m. The Greenhouse Café, 2271 E. Main St. 270-8603. ourcoffeeconnection.org.

[ MON., FEBRUARY 3 ] Moving Beyond Racism Book Group. 7 p.m. Barnes & Noble, 3349 Monroe Ave. February selection: “Blood Done Sign My Name” by Timothy B. Tyson. Everyone is welcome whether or not you have read continues on page 24

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 23


skate schedules. 428-7541. cityofrochester.gov/mlkmp. Lee’s landing Trek. 10 a.m. Letchworth State Park, 1 Letchworth State Park . Castile Meet at Visitor Center, bring lunch $8 parking fee. 493-3625.

THEATER | “ROCK OF AGES”

You have to wonder about how heavily our ideas about navigating love are influenced by pop culture. This week, Broadway smash hit “Rock of Ages” brings this concept to the stage in its most literal sense. This funny, feel-good love story is set in the Sunset Strip of 1987, where the story of a small-town girl and a big-city dreamer is told through the 80’s hit songs by iconic rockers Journey, Styx, REO Speedwagon, Foreigner, Pat Benatar, Whitesnake, and many others. The show features 28 classic rock anthems, including “Don’t Stop Believin’,” “We Built This City,” “The Final Countdown,” “Wanted Dead or Alive,” “Here I Go Again,” “Harden My Heart,” “Can’t Fight this Feeling,” “Renegade,” and “I Want To Know What Love Is.” “Rock of Ages” will be performed at Auditorium Theatre (885 E. Main St.) for two nights only on Thursday, January 30, at 7:30 p.m., and Friday, January 31, at 8 p.m. Tickets range from $35 to $55, and are available by calling 800-745-3000 or through ticketmaster.com and the Theatre Box Office. For more information, visit rbtl.org. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY

Literary Events the book Free 288-8644. mbrbookinfo@aol.com. [ TUE., FEBRUARY 4 ] Lift Bridge Writers’ Group. 6:30 p.m. Lift Bridge Book Shop, 45 Main St Free. 637-2260. liftbridgebooks.com. New Ground Poetry Night. First Tuesday of every month, 7:30 p.m. Equal=Grounds, 750 South Ave. Poets, add your name to the sign-up sheet when you arrive. The lineup is first come, first on stage. The evening’s emcee will introduce you when it’s your turn. Each poet has five minutes (or three poems, whichever comes first.) Depending on the number of poets participating, there’ll be an intermission half way through the evening to give everyone a chance to stretch their legs and grab some fresh coffee. 242-7840. facebook. com/newgroundpoetry. R-SPEC meeting. First Tuesday of every month, 7 p.m. Writers of speculative fiction meet once a month to discuss craft Free. r-spec.org.

Museum Exhibit [ WED., JANUARY 29 ] “Downton Abbey, Rochester Style.” Through March 6. The Rochester Historical Society, Rundel Memorial Building, 2nd floor, 115 South Ave. Through Mar 6. Tue-Wed 10 a.m.–3 p.m. and Thu 11 a.m.–3 p.m. Also Sats Jan 11 & 25 and Feb 8 & 22, 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Local costumes, finery and household objects from 1915-1930s to give you an idea of how residents of this fair city were living their lives

during that time $5 per adult, $3 per child under 18 428-8470. rochesterhistory.org. Math Midway. Through March 17. Rochester Museum and Science Center, 657 East Ave. Through Mar 17 Included in museum admission $11$13, free to kids under 2 and members 271-1880. rmsc.org. [ SAT., FEBRUARY 1 ] Animation. Feb. 1-April 27. The Strong National Museum of Play, 1 Manhattan Square Through Apr 27. Mon–Thu 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Fri-Sat 10 a.m.-8 p.m., Sun noon-5 p.m Included in museum admission $13, free to kids under 2 and members 2632700. museumofplay.org.

Recreation [ WED., JANUARY 29 ] Cross Country Skiing and Snowshoeing. Cumming Nature Center, 6472 Gulick Rd. WedFri 9 a.m.-3:30 p.m., Sat-Sun 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m Suggested donations of 3$ per person, 10$ per family. 374-6160. rmsc.org. Ice Skating. Through March 31. Genesee Valley Sports Complex, 131 Elmwood Ave. The rink season will run through March 2014 (closing date TBA). Open skate schedule: Sun 2:303:45 p.m., Mon-Fri noon-1:15 p.m., Fri (16+) 10-11:15 p.m., Sat 5-6:15 p.m. Adult skate Tue-Thu 10:30-11:45 a.m $2-$7.50. 428-7889. cityofrochester.gov/gvpsc/ Ice Skating. Through March 15. Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Park, 1 Manhattan Square. Ice rink at 353 Court St. Visit site for complete list of open

24 CITY JANUARY 29 - FEBRUARY 4, 2014

[ SAT., FEBRUARY 1 ] 2014 Southside Little League Registration. 11 a.m. South Ave Recreation Center, 999 South Avenue Registration for Spring 2014 Southside Little League tee-ball, softball, and baseball programs (from 11am to 2pm) for boys and girls ages 4-12 who live or attend school in the Southside region (City areas east of the Genesee River and south of East Avenue). A Chartered member of Little League since 1954, Southside Little League is a youth sports organization that emphasizes fundamentals, fitness, friends, family, and fun 585-428-6015. southsidelittleleague@live.com. GVHC Event. 10 a.m. Cobbs Hill Park, 100 Norris Drive Moderate 3 mile hike Free 802-999-8554. gvhchikes.org. Novice Nature Ski Hike. 1 p.m. Letchworth State Park, 1 Letchworth State Park . Castile Meet at Trailside Lodge $8 parking fee. 493-3625. Saturday Snowshoeing. 1 p.m. Helmer Nature Center, 154 Pinegrove Ave $3-$5 336-3035. Winter Wonder Walk. 2:30 p.m. Letchworth State Park, 1 Letchworth State Park . Castile Meet at Trailside Lodge $8 parking fee. 493-3625. [ SUN., FEBRUARY 2 ] 14th Annual Y-Tri. 8 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Carlson MetroCenter YMCA, 444 E Main St. $45, $90/ 3 person team, register 3252880. rochesterymca.org/y-tri. Family Nature Walk. 10 a.m Letchworth State Park, 1 Letchworth State Park . Castile Meet at Trailside Lodge. Jan 19: Denton Brook. No Jan 26. Feb 2: Groundhog’s Day and Frozen Bogs. Feb 9: Three Sister’s Waterfalls (meet at Castile Entrance). Feb 16: Pine Pond $8 parking fee. 493-3625. GVHC Event. 9:30 a.m. Mendon Ponds Park, Douglas Road . Mendon Moderate 4-5 mile hike, east Esker. Park at Stewart Lodge lot, Douglas Rd Free 2273180. gvhchikes.org 1 p.m. GVHC Event. Easy/moderate 4 mile XC ski hike. Park at Stewart Lodge lot, Douglas Rd Free 953-5100. gvhchikes.org 1 p.m. Mendon Ponds Park, Douglas Rd. Mendon Moderate 5 mile hike, mendon ponds north central trails Free 475-0923. gvhchikes.org. Intermediate Nature Ski Hike. 2:30 p.m. Letchworth State Park, 1 Letchworth State Park . Castile Meet at Trailside Lodge $8 parking fee. 493-3625. Rochester Birding Trip: Avon & Lima Rural Tour. 3 p.m. Meet at Tops Plaza in Avon on rte.s 5 & 20, two miles west of 1-390 671-9639, 503-2534. rochesterbirding.com. Shadow Day with Genesee Valley Nordic Ski Patrol. 9:30 a.m. & 1 p.m. Mendon Ponds Park, Douglas Road . Mendon gvnsp.org. [ WED., FEBRUARY 5 ] Snow Cheap Trail Races. Every other Wednesday Cobbs Hill

Park, 100 Norris Drive 6:45 p.m. registration, 7:15 p.m. race start $12 single race, $50 for all races, register cityofrochester. gov/winteradventures.

Special Events [ WED., JANUARY 29 ] Adult Craft Club. 7-8:45 p.m. Seymour Library, 161 East Ave., Brockport Free. 637-1050. seymourlibraryweb.org. Civil Air Patrol Orientation Night. 7:15 p.m. Rochester Composite Squadron, CAP, 2035 N Goodman St., Irondequoit 3172077. caprcs.org. Digital Rochester: Social Media Advertising. 7:30-9 a.m. The Inn on Broadway, 26 Broadway runmyclub.com/dr/ eventcalendar.asp?id=208090 $25-$35, register. 232-3595. digitalrochester.com. Film: “Where Is God When Life Turns Tough?” 7 p.m. Lifetree Cafe, 1980 Culver Rd. John Stumbo, a healthy ultramarathoner who was suddenly attacked by an undiagnosable, life-threatening illness 2881875. gtcpastor@juno.com. lifetreecafe.com. Geeks Who Drink Pub Quiz. 8 p.m. Scotland Yard Pub, 187 Saint Paul St Free. 730-5030. scotlandyardpub.com. Rochester Business Networking Event. 7:30-9 a.m. Bonadio and Company, 171 Sullys Trail rochester-tipclub-january2014. eventbrite.com/. Rochester Winos Pairing. 6:309:30 p.m. Blu Wolf Bistro, 657 Park Ave $30, register rochesterwinos.com. Film Screenings. Jan. 29-30, 6-8 p.m. Film director Fred Kuwornu will be present. Jan 29: “Inside Buffalo” UR River Campus-Lattimore 201, Jan 30: “18 IUS Soli” at Shultz Center Forum, Nazareth College, 4245 East Ave 3892468. [ THU., JANUARY 30 ] CDL Training for Agriculture Producers Informational Meeting. 7:30 p.m. Cornell Cooperative Extension of Genesee County, 420 East Main St 343-3040 x132. Finger Lakes Wine Pairing Dinner. Jan. 30. 75 North St., Auburn. Benefit for Finger Lakes Musical Theatre Festival $45, register 315-253-4531. hiauburn.com. History Alive. 6:30 p.m. Books Etc., 78 W. Main St Macedon 474-4116. books_etc@yahoo. com. Lincoln Tours. 1 & 3 p.m. Seward House Historic Museum, 33 South St., Auburn. 315-2521283. sewardhouse.org. Max at the Gallery Tapas Night. 5-8 p.m. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. Live music, wine, beer, tapas for purchase Included in admission: $2.50-$6. 2768900. mag.rochester.edu. PRSA Rochester Program: When Communications Meets Legal. 12-1:30 p.m. Mario’s, 2740 Monroe Ave. $20-$30, register 271-1111. prsarochester.org. Remembering FDR. Jan. 30-31. Brighton Memorial Library, 2300 Elmwood Ave. Fri 7 p.m. screening: “Hyde Park on Hudson” Sat noon book review: “FDR and the Jews” 784-5300. brightonlibrary.org.

RECREATION | Y-TRI

If you need a little help with your fitness resolution, consider joining the 14th annual indoor triathlon, also known as the Y-Tri, held at the Carlson MetroCenter YMCA (444 E. Main St.) on Sunday, February 2, 8 a.m.-12:30 p.m. The three-event race consists of a 15-minute pool swim, a 15-minute stationary bike ride, and a 15-minute indoor track run/walk. Rather than achieving the best time, the goal for each event is to cover the greatest distance within 15 minutes. Individuals of all fitness levels are welcome to participate in this low-pressure triathlon in a controlled setting, but the event is limited to 126 participants. Early registration is encouraged. Single individuals may participate for $45, and three-person teams may register for $90. Complimentary child care is available during the race for participants with children ages 6 months to 12 years old. Awards to individual winners will be presented to top finishers in each group, including male, female, master male (over 40) and master female (over 40), and to three-person teams. All proceeds will benefit the YMCA of Greater Rochester’s Invest in Youth Campaign, which helps ensure all youth and families have access to the YMCA’s life-changing programs. For more information, visit rochesterymca.org/y-tri or call 325-2880. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY Sema. 7:30 p.m. Sufi Order of Rochester Center for Sufi Studies, 494 East Ave. Carriage House of AAUW An evening of music, song, poetry and inspiration in the Sufi tradition Free 248-0427. zaynab@frontiernet.net. sufiorderofrochester.org. Stammtisch. Every other Thursday, 5 p.m. Genesee Brew House, 25 Cataract St. 2639200. joeburch11@gmail.com. geneseebeer.com/brew-house. [ FRI., JANUARY 31 ] The Canandaigua Chamber’s 104th Annual Dinner & Membership Meeting. 5:30 p.m. Finger Lakes Community College, 3325 Marvin Sands Dr $50, register 394-4400 x203. esnow@canandaiguachamber. com. canandaiguachamber.com. EYP Circle Breakfast. 7:30-8:45 a.m. George Eastman House, 900 East Ave. With Elaine Spaull Free. eyp@geh.org. We Don’t Hate We Just Hustle Clothing Line Website Launch Party. 10 p.m. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. The Black Ink Crew, Teddy Ruks, and comedian Rob Campbell $20 276-8900. wedonthatewejusthustle.com. [ SAT., FEBRUARY 1 ] 2nd Annual Health and Wellness Fair. 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Greece Community and Senior Center, 3 Vince Tofany Blvd. Free samples, information sessions, demonstrations, children’s

games, blood pressure checks, hearing tests, raffles, prizes, book signings, and more Free admission. 227-7272. greecechamber.org. Annual Pottery Second Sale. 11 a.m. Turk Hill Craft School, 1000 Turk Hill Rd. Shop our wares, tour the studio and gallery 2231930. turkhillcrafts@gmail.com. turkhillcraftschool.com. East Side Winter Farmer’s Market. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Indoors at 2555 Baird Rd., Penfield. eastside.activities@rochester. rr.com. Fleet Feet Sports New Location Opening. 9 a.m. Culver Road Armory, 155 Culver Rd., Suite 110. Free group runs, the kick-off of new training programs, refreshments, special offers and giveaways fleetfeetrochester.com. “The Great Chicken Wing Hunt.” 3 & 7 p.m. Little Theatre, 240 East Ave. thelittle.org. In Person: Scott McGee of Turner Classic Movies. 8 p.m. George Eastman House, 900 East Ave. Screening of “Bullitt” followed by discussion. $6-$8 271-3361. eastmanhouse.org. Laser Shows. Rochester Museum and Science Center, 657 East Ave. 8 p.m. Led Zeppelin, 9:30 p.m. Dave Matthews One show $6-$7, both. $9-$11. 271-1880. rmsc.org. Life Learners Toastmasters Club #4323 Open House. First


Saturday of every month, 5 p.m. Legacy at Blossom, 100 McAuley Rd. Speaking and leadership club. Every first and third Saturday of the month. Life Learners Toastmasters Club #4323 Open House 5-6:30 p.m. January 18, 2014. Free 585359-0459. Higherself1875@ yahoo.com. Roc Out With Your Crock Out. 3-7 p.m. Roc Brewing Co., 56 S. Union St Bring a crockpot dish to pass 794-9798. rocbrewingco@gmail.com. rocbrewingco.com. Scandinavian Lutefisk and Meatball Dinner. 6 p.m. The Lutheran Church of the Incarnate Word, 597 East Avenue The Scandinavian Heritage Society [Sons of Norway] will prepare and serve a traditional dinner of LUTEFISK and MEATBALLS, complete with vegetables, and the Norwegian dessert lefse $20-$12. 213-0359. lsandvik@ gannett.com. Star Wars Day. 2-4 p.m. Henrietta Public Library, 455 Calkins Rd All ages. Meet various costumed characters 359-7092. libraryweb.org. A Star Wars Spectacular. 11 a.m. Lift Bridge Book Shop, 45 Main St The force will be with you as you visit our starship stations for fun and games. Free stuff to take home Free, register. 637-2260. liftbridgebooks.com. Team Trivia. 7 p.m. Irondequoit High School, 260 Cooper Rd. Teams of up to six players compete against other teams $60 per team 336-3035. Telescope Viewing. Rochester Museum and Science Center, 657 East Ave. Clear skies providing. From Dark til about 10 p.m Admission is free 703-9876. rmsc.org. Valentine’s Day Shopping Bazaar. 3 p.m. Bush Mango Drum & Dance, 34 Elton St. Free 420-8699. traciadedeji@gmail.com. shoprochestersmallbusiness. com. [ SUN., FEBRUARY 2 ] Brighton Winter Farmers’ Market. 1 p.m Brookside Community Center, 220 Idlewood Rd. Live music 269-8918. info@ brightonfarmersmarket.org. brightonfarmersmarket.org. PeaceArt Community Peace Celebration. 4 p.m. Hochstein Performance Hall, 50 N Plymouth Ave. indiegogo.com/ projects/peaceart-communitypeace-celebration. Donations welcome. 454-4596. facebook. com/events/411197912342745/. Penfield Farmers’ Market. 9 a.m.1 p.m. Grossmans Garden & Home, 1801 Fairport Nine Mile Point Rd . Penfield 377-1982 x224. grossmans.com. [ MON., FEBRUARY 3 ] Common Core: Get The Facts on School Reform. 6-7 p.m. Monroe Branch Library, 809 Monroe Ave Please join us for this presentation by parents for parents. Learn the facts about the reform movement and what these changes mean to children 428-8202. rocp2p@gmail.com. libraryweb.org. Thinkin’ & Drinkin’: The Bug Jar’s Trivia Night. 8:30-9:30 p.m. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 21+. Prizes: $20 / $10 / $5 bar tabs for the first, second, and third place teams. Doors at 7:30 p.m Free. bugjar.com.

THEATER | “THAT’S WHAT FRIENDS ARE FOR”

The stars who popularize hit songs aren’t always the ones who penned them. For more than three decades, the powerhouse duo of composer Burt Bacharach and lyricist Hal David topped pop charts with dozens of hits, and won six Grammy awards and three Oscars along the way. Many of Bacharach’s 73 Top 40 hits were written specifically for Dionne Warwick, but Bacharach/David collaborations also helped define the careers of Gene Pitney, Dusty Springfield, The Carpenters, Tom Jones, and Simple Minds. JCC Centerstage (1200 Edgewood Ave.) is currently presenting an original work, “That’s What Friends Are For,” featuring 33 Bacharach classics, including “Wishin’ and Hopin’,” “Walk On By,” “Always Something There to Remind Me,” “What the World Needs Now Is Love,” “What’s New Pussycat?,” “The Look of Love,” “One Less Bell to Answer,” “Do You Know the Way to San José?,” “Raindrops Keep Fallin’ on My Head,” “Alfie,” “I’ll Never Fall in Love Again,” and the show’s title track. Performances kick off this week on Saturday, February 1, at 8 p.m., and continue Sunday at 2 p.m., with additional performances on Thursdays at 7 p.m., Saturdays at 8 p.m., and Sundays at 2 p.m. through February 16. Tickets are $26, $18 for students, and JCC members save $2. Call 461-2000 x.235 to reserve your seat and visit jcccenterstage.org for more information. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY [ TUE., FEBRUARY 4 ] Eat. Drink. Critique. The RAF Super Bowl Ad Replay. Feb. 4. Burgundy Basin Inn, 1361 Marsh Rd. Registration & networking: 4-5 p.m., panel discussion 5-6:30 p.m. Includes food and 1 drink $20-$45, register 248-2660. rafconnect.org/superbowl. Tuesday Taco Trivia. 9-11 p.m. Temple Bar and Grille, 109 East Ave. 232-6000. templebarrochester@gmail.com. templebarandgrille.com. [ WED., FEBRUARY 5 ] Better Breathers Club. First Wednesday of every month, 2-3:30 p.m. The Northfield, 4560 Nine Mile Point Rd., Fairport. 377-5350. yourcaremedicalsupply.com. Sycamore Trail Trek. 10 a.m. Letchworth State Park, 1 Letchworth State Park . Castile Meet at Sycamore Trailhead on River Road. Bring a lunch $8 parking fee. 493-3625. Twist & Shout: Balloon Twisters Convention. Feb. 5-9. Radisson Riverside Hotel, 120 East Main St. $325, $160 under age 12, register 261-7094. balloonconvention.com.

Sports [ SAT., FEBRUARY 1 ] Harlem Globetrotters. 2 p.m. Blue Cross Arena, One War Memorial

Square $18-$115 800-7453000. ticketmaster.com.

Theater 2 Pages/2 Voices Performances. Writers and Books, 740 University Ave Free joef@wab. org wab.org. “Black Pearl Sings!” Through Feb. 9. Geva Theatre Center, 75 Woodbury Blvd. Through Feb 9. Wed Jan 29-Fri 7 p.m. Sat 2:30 & 7:30 p.m., Sun 3 p.m., Wed Feb 5, 7 p.m. Wed Feb 5-Fri 7 p.m., Sat 2:30 & 7:30 p.m., Sun 3 p.m Tickets start at $30 2324382. gevatheatre.org. “Boeing Boeing.” Through Feb. 8. Blackfriars Theatre, 795 E. Main St. Through Feb 8. Thu 7:30 p.m., Fri-Sat 8 p.m., Sun 2 p.m $28.50-$36.50. 454-1260. blackfriars.org. “Good Rockin’ Live: A Salute to Sun Records.” Downstairs Cabaret at Winton Place, 3450 Winton Place Wed-Thu 7 p.m., Fri 8 p.m., Sat 4 & 8 p.m $23-$33 325-4370. downstairscabaret.com. The Hornets’ Nest Playreading Series: “The Envelope.” Geva Theatre Center, 75 Woodbury Blvd. Free, register 232-4382. gevatheatre.org. “Into the Woods.” Through Feb. 9. A Magical Journey Through Stages, Auditorium Center, 875 E. Main St. Through feb 9. Fri-

Sat 7:30 p.m., Sun 2 p.m. The Sunday, February 2 matinee is followed by a brief “Talkback” session with the cast and crew $13-$16 935-7173. mjtstages. com. “Last Gas.” Geva Theatre Center, 75 Woodbury Blvd Through Feb 2. Wed Jan 29, 7:30 p.m., Thu 7:30 p.m. (sign interpreted), Fri 8 p.m., Sat 4 & 8 p.m., Sun 2 p.m. (Sunday Salon). Tickets start at $25. 232-4382. gevatheatre.org. “The Lion in Winter” by James Goldman. MuCCC, 142 Atlantic Ave. Through Feb 1. Fri Jan 24Sat 7:30 p.m., Sun 2 p.m. Thu Jan 30-Sat 7:30 p.m $15 866811-4111. muccc.org. “Menopause the Musical.” Rochester Auditorium Theatre, 885 E. Main St. Feb 4, 7:30 p.m. Starting at $37.50 222-5000. mail@rbtl.org. New Play Festival Readings. Feb. 5-9. MuCCC, 142 Atlantic Ave. Wed-Sat 7:30 p.m., Sun 2 p.m. Wed “Still We Wait” by Truc Doan. Thu “Professor Pomfret’s Recognition Scene” by Shirley Ricker. Fri “The Weekends” by Katherine Royal. Sat “The Cell” by Maria Brandt. Sun Three Short Plays by Manuel Igrejas $8-$10 per show. spencer@ spencerchristiano.com. muccc.org. “Peter Pan.” Webster Thomas High School, 800 Five Mile Line Rd. Fri Jan 31, 7:30 p.m., Sat 2 & 7:30 p.m. $6-$22. 234-1069. webstertheatreguild.org. “Rock of Ages.” Auditorium Theatre, 885 E. Main St. Thu 7:30 p.m., Fri 8 p.m. $35-$55. 800-745-3000. ticketmaster. com. “That’s What Friends Are For.” Through Feb. 16. JCC Rochester, 1200 Edgewood Ave. Through Feb 16. Sat Feb 1, 8 p.m., Sun 2 p.m. Thu Feb 6, 7 p.m., Sat 8 p.m., Sun 2 p.m. Thu Feb 13, 7 p.m., Sat 8 p.m., Sun 2 p.m. $18-$26. 461-2000. jcccenterstage.com.

Theater Audition [ WED., JANUARY 29 ] Gilbert & Sullivan’s “Ruddigore.” Through 7 p.m. Salem United Church of Christ, 60 Bittner St. Please come with a prepared selection from the Gilbert & Sullivan repertoire, or comparable piece in English. Accompanist and character readings provided off-monroeplayers.org. Regional Playwrights Festival Submission. Through Jan. 31. Geva Theatre Center, 75 Woodbury Blvd. Plays for consideration may be submitted betwen Jan 17 and Jan 31. wab. org, gevatheatre.org. [ SAT., FEBRUARY 1 ] Ballet Prestige’s “Swan Lake.” 2 p.m. RAPA’s East End Theatre, 727 East Main St. 2-3 p.m. for ages 9-13 (no pointe shoes), 3-5 p.m. for ages 14 and up (pointe shoes required). Dancers who participate must enroll in Ballet Prestige classes. 7041903. katiepolaski@yahoo.com. balletprestigerochester.com.

Workshops [ WED., JANUARY 29 ] Family Development Class: “Wise Choices.” Ongoing, 12:30-2:30 p.m. Mental Health Association, 320 N Goodman St. For

parents of school-age children Free, RSVP 325-3245 x131. mharochester.org. Jewelry Making 101: Linked Bead Necklace. 7 p.m. Rochester Brainery, Village Gate, 274 N Goodman St. $22 730-70-34. info@rochesterbrainery.com. rochesterbrainery.com. Winter Plant Pruning. 7 p.m. Rochester Brainery, Village Gate, 274 N Goodman St. $15 7307034. info@rochesterbrainery. com. rochesterbrainery.com. [ THU., JANUARY 30 ] Family Development Class: “The Motivation Breakthrough.” 5-7 p.m. Mental Health Association, 320 N Goodman St. For parents of school-age children 325-3245 x131. mharochester.org. Rochester Makerspace Open Nights. 6-10 p.m. Rochester Makerspace, 850 St. Paul St. #23 Bring a project to work on or something to show others, help work on the space, or just get to know the venue Free. 210--0075. rochestermakerspace.org. Tamron Sensational Shots Photography Seminar. 7 p.m. Rowe Photo, 1737 Mt Hope Ave. $24.95, register 422-8230. rowefoto@rochester.rr.com. [ FRI., JANUARY 31 ] Family Development Class: “When the Chips Are Down.” 10 a.m.noon. Mental Health Association, 320 N Goodman St. For parents of school-age children. Free, RSVP 325-3245 x131. mharochester.org. Literacy Volunteer Tutor Training Workshop. 9 a.m.-noon. Literacy Volunteers of Rochester, 1600 South Avenue Free 473-3030. literacyrochester.org. [ SAT., FEBRUARY 1 ] Empowerment Workshops for Women and Girls. Feb. 1. Brighton Town Park, 777 Westfall Rd. With Marjorie Baker Price. “My Magic Mirror,” for young girls ages 8-12, 10:30 a.m.–11:30 a.m. $18. An author signing will follow the girls’ workshop from 11:30 a.m.–noon. Adult workshop: “Your Magic Mirror: An Empowerment Workshop for Self-Healing, Recovery and Transformation” 1-3 p.m. $36 621-8794. Marjorie@ centeringtools.com. [ SUN., FEBRUARY 2 ] A Day of Heartwork. 9 a.m.-7 p.m. The Assisi Institute, 1400 North Winton Rd. Meditations and heartwork exercises that help participants move through the self-created barriers that prevent them from having what they really want, much more quickly than is possible in weekly therapy sessions. Scholarships and work-study are available for those who qualify and apply for these opportunities $100, register 473-8731. awakentheheart. rochester.ny@gmail.com. awakentheheart.org. Going Beyond the Headlines: Engaging in Conversations, From Exploration to Expression. 6-9 p.m Gandhi Institute for Nonviolence, 929 S. Plymouth Ave. 6 weeks, held Sundays Jan 12-Feb 23 703-9230. gpayne2@ur.rochester.edu. facebook.com/events/674157302602345/?ref=5. Mushrooms 101. 2 p.m. Smugtown Mushrooms, 127

Railroad St. Donations welcome. smugtownmushrooms.com. [ MON., FEBRUARY 3 ] Beginner Pilates Mat and Cardio Class. 8:30-9:30 a.m Irondequoit Community Center, 154 Pinegrove Ave. Improve core strength and skeletal alignment with a combination of basic Classical Pilates Mat-work and cardio exercises based on dance. Private Classical Pilates apparatus sessions also available by appointment at 236-4227. $55, register 3366070. irondequoit.org. Family Development Class: “How to Say NO to Your Child.” 12:30-2:30 p.m. Mental Health Association, 320 N Goodman St. For parents of school-age children Free, RSVP 325-3245 x131. mharochester.org. Lift Yourself Up with Essential Oils. 6:30 p.m. Rochester Brainery, Village Gate, 274 N Goodman St. $25 730-7034. rochesterbrainery.com. Spanish Pronunciation for Non-Native Speakers. 7 p.m. Rochester Brainery, Village Gate, 274 N Goodman St. $15. 730-7034. info@ rochesterbrainery.com. rochesterbrainery.com. [ TUE., FEBRUARY 4 ] Buddhist Book Discussion Group. 7 p.m. Amitabha Foundation, 11 South Goodman St. By donation. 451-7039. NY@ amitabhafoundation.us. amitabhafoundation.us. Community Labyrinth Walk. 7-9 p.m. First Unitarian Church, 220 S Winton Rd Free, donations accepted 392.3601. rochesterunitarian.org. Improvisation Workshop. 6 p.m Rochester Community TV (RCTV15), 21 Gorham St. First class free, $30-$40 for all four 325-1238. RWashington@ rctvmediacenter.org. rctv15. org. Leveraging LinkedIn For Businesses and Professionals. 7 p.m. Rochester Brainery, Village Gate, 274 N Goodman St. $15 730-7034. rochesterbrainery.com. [ WED., FEBRUARY 5 ] “Journey from Religion to Spirituality” with Rev Lori Satubitz. 6:30 p.m. First Universalist Church, 150 South Ave. Free, register. 546-2826. uuroc.org. Family Development Class: “Raising Your Spirited Child” (Part 1 of 3). 5-7 p.m. Mental Health Association, 320 N Goodman St. For parents of children of all ages Free, RSVP 325-3245 x131. mharochester.org. Story Planning. 6:30 p.m. Rochester Brainery, Village Gate, 274 N Goodman St. $15. 730-7034. rochesterbrainery.com. Wedding Budgeting. 7 p.m. Rochester Brainery, Village Gate, 274 N Goodman St. $15. 730-7034. rochesterbrainery.com.

GETLISTED get your event listed for free e-mail it to calendar@rochestercitynews.com. Or go online to rochestercitynewspaper.com and submit it yourself!

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 25


Movies Theaters Searchable, up-to-the-minute movie times for all area theaters can be found at rochestercitynewspaper.com, and on City’s mobile website.

Film

Brockport Strand 93 Main St, Brockport, 637-3310, rochestertheatermanagement.com

Canandaigua Theatres 3181 Townline Road, Canandaigua, 396-0110, rochestertheatermanagement.com

Cinema Theater 957 S. Clinton St., 271-1785, cinemarochester.com

Culver Ridge 16 2255 Ridge Rd E, Irondequoit  544-1140, regmovies.com

Dryden Theatre 900 East Ave., 271-3361, dryden.eastmanhouse.org

Eastview 13 Eastview Mall, Victor 425-0420, regmovies.com

Geneseo Theatres Geneseo Square Mall, 243-2691, rochestertheatermanagement.com

Greece Ridge 12 176 Greece Ridge Center Drive 225-5810, regmovies.com

Henrietta 18 525 Marketplace Drive 424-3090, regmovies.com

The Little 240 East Ave., 258-0444 thelittle.org

Movies 10 2609 W. Henrietta Road 292-0303, cinemark.com

Pittsford Cinema 3349 Monroe Ave., 383-1310 pittsford.zurichcinemas.com

Tinseltown USA/IMAX 2291 Buffalo Road 247-2180, cinemark.com

Webster 12 2190 Empire Blvd., 888-262-4386, amctheatres.com

Vintage Drive In 1520 W Henrietta Rd., Avon 226-9290, vintagedrivein.com

Film Previews on page 28

The monster trudges on “I, Frankenstein”

sense because the reanimated corpse, assembled from various body parts, serves as the alter ego of (PG-13), DIRECTED BY STUART BEATTIE the mad scientist who made him. NOW PLAYING The name of the menace assumes a special importance in his latest cinematic incarnation, [ REVIEW ] BY GEORGE GRELLA “I, Frankenstein.” The monster himself, played by Aaron Eckhart, narrates the movie, supplying a good deal of exposition, explaining his history, Although not nearly so prolific in its progeny as the nature of his revenge on Victor Frankenstein, another 19th-century novel, “Dracula,” Mary and his alienation from mankind; as he says, he Shelley’s “Frankenstein” has generated numerous possesses a body and a brain, but lacks a soul, adaptations to the screen, beginning with the something he more or less unknowingly searches classic 1931 version, starring Boris Karloff as the for throughout the film. monster. Since that time, both audiences and Although that concept provides a certain filmmakers have confused the creature and his amount of interest and even sympathy, the movie creator, so that the title often incorrectly refers turns extremely weird, introducing a supernatural to the monster. The confusion makes a kind of component when the monster encounters two groups of warring entities, the Gargoyle Order and the Demons. The Gargoyles, formed under the direction of the Archangel Michael, their queen (Miranda Otto) explains, while regarded by humans as mere architectural decorations, both assume human form and also Aaron Eckhart and Yvonne Strahovski in “I, Frankenstein.” PHOTO COURTESY metamorphose into

winged creatures who fight their sworn enemies, the Demons, with swords and axes and other medieval paraphernalia. As their name suggests, the Demons come straight out of Hell and return there forever when the Gargoyles kill them. Learning of the monster’s history, the queen names him Adam and hopes he will join their fight to save mankind from the spawn of Hell. For 200 years, however, Adam chooses solitude, dispatching numerous demons on his own before he finally enlists on the side of the good guys. Mixing in with all this nonsense, the Demons, under the command of Naberius (Bill Nighy) in their human form run a sophisticated laboratory — it is a Frankenstein flick, after all — where another scientist, the lovely Terra (Yvonne Stahovski), attempts to repeat Frankenstein’s creation of life. Naberius wants to reanimate thousands of corpses, infuse them with the souls of demons, defeat the Gargoyles, and annihilate mankind. Instead of the foaming retorts, the burbling cylinders, the flashing lights, the lightning, this lab employs a collection of modern electrical devices and surgical instruments, an odd contrast to the Gothic buildings and medieval weapons. Although the writer-director kindly acknowledges Mary Shelley’s contributions to his picture, he bases his particular interpretation on a graphic novel, which explains a great deal about the film. For one thing, it features that familiar combination of violent action, dark lighting (the sun never shines

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Spy games “Jack Ryan: Shadow Recruit” (PG-13), DIRECTED BY KENNETH BRANAGH NOW PLAYING

“Bettie Page Reveals All” (R), DIRECTED BY MARK MORI SCREENS FRIDAY & SUNDAY AT THE DRYDEN [ REVIEW ] BY ADAM LUBITOW

in “I, Frankenstein”), and a kind of juvenile pretentiousness. The characters frequently intone thoughts that they apparently believe contain philosophical depth and significance. Throughout the movie Adam fights a number of battles against the Demons, who then are, as they say, “descended” in a fountain of fire to the depths where they clearly belong. The Gargoyles, on the other hand, if killed by Demons, are “ascended” in a pillar of light to Heaven: it’s a great place to go, but you have to die to get there. Naturally an array of the required special effects and stunt work intensify all this spectacular action, culminating in the customary Armageddon that contemporary Hollywood loves so dearly. As in most horror/science-fiction/fantasy spectaculars, human performance counts for very little, and the cast meets those expectations quite well. Aaron Eckhart snarls and glowers throughout until he finally achieves his unusual quest — to find a name, to possess a soul, to acquire a companion. Everybody else performs in a generally functional manner, entirely acceptable for the form and entirely appropriate for their ridiculous assignments. The monster who lumbers through the dreams of Hollywood and the nightmares of viewers may now personify the strangest version of that composite creature, and despite the ambitions of the graphic novelist, without the pathos of Boris Karloff. That humming you hear is Mary Shelley, bless her, spinning in her grave at about 3500 RPM.

After a 12-year absence, Jack Ryan, Tom Clancy’s popular CIA analyst hero, returns to the big screen in Kenneth Branagh’s “Jack Ryan: Shadow Recruit.” Paramount Pictures’ latest attempt to reboot the series of films that began back in 1990 with John McTiernan’s “The Hunt For the Red October,” this new film recasts Ryan a young man early in his career. While the film’s story is about as by-the-numbers as you can get, Branagh’s fine direction and a game cast, led by Chris Pine, helps keep things mindlessly entertaining. A speedy introduction traces Jack Ryan’s path from economics grad student in London to military hero following his decision to enlist after the events of September 11, 2001. Injured on a mission, he’s honorably discharged, and while being nursed back to health with the help of a pretty medical student named Cathy (Keira

Chris Pine in “Jack Ryan: Shadow Recruit.” PHOTO COURTESY PARAMOUNT PICTURES

Knightley), he’s approached by William Harper (Kevin Costner) about possible employment with the Central Intelligence Agency. The film then jumps forward some years to find Ryan, now an analyst for the CIA, assigned to an undercover position on Wall Street in order to keep an eye on financial dealings that might be linked to terrorist funding. It’s not long before he does indeed uncover some shady business that leads back to a Russian firm run by Viktor Cherevin (played by Branagh himself). The CIA flies Ryan out to Moscow to investigate Cherevin further, but when his driver promptly attempts to kill him, signs point to a sinister plot. Cue the spy escapades. Though the specifics of Cherevin’s plan rapidly become impenetrable, Branagh keeps things speeding along fast enough that it doesn’t really matter. He’s a competent director of action, and there’s a nicely staged hotel-room attack that’s absolutely thrilling, though deeply indebted to the type of messy, quick-cut fight sequences popularized by the “Bourne” movies. The script by Adam Cozad and David Koepp is thin, but sprinkles in just enough character details (that introduction is a wonder of economical storytelling) that it’s not hard to become invested in our hero’s fate. It all holds together fairly well, at least until it reaches the third act and the film resorts to standard action movie clichés. Ryan evolves from scared newbie agent to indestructible man of action far too quickly, and by the time he’s racing against the obligatory ticking time bomb and singlehandedly chasing down bad guys on his motorcycle, it’s hard to not roll your eyes. Thankfully there’s still a fair amount of fun to be had with all the trappings of the spy genre, complete with goofy code names and phrases like “the snowball is rolling” whispered through walkie-talkies. The fourth actor to play this character, Pine capably fills the shoes of those who came before (Alec Baldwin, Harrison Ford, and Ben Affleck, respectively). He makes for an appealing lead, capably conveying

the character’s balance of brain and brawn, and toning back the cockiness he brings to Captain Kirk in the “Star Trek” films in order to portray a man who is over his head in the world of cloak-and-dagger espionage. Keira Knightley gets slightly more to do than the standard girlfriend role (but only slightly). She’s a likeable screen presence despite being saddled with “when are we going to get married?” dialogue and a rather spotty American accent. Costner turns in fine work in the veteran agent role, and Branagh makes for a menacing heavy, even with an accent that’s perilously close to “moose and squirrel” territory. Director Mark Mori pays earnest tribute to an icon in the new documentary, “Bettie Page Reveals All,” screening this weekend at the Dryden Theatre. Page was a hugely popular pin-up model in the late 40’s and early 50’s; what made her unique (besides her considerable beauty) was the way she made her sexuality seem utterly wholesome. To tell Page’s life story, Mori utilizes archival photos and video, along with extensive talking-head interviews with everyone from Hugh Hefner to burlesque artist Dita Von Teese. But the film’s major selling point is narration from Page herself, created using audio from interviews conducted shortly before her death in 2008. Page makes for a compelling and candid storyteller. Although the film is frequently amateurish from a technical standpoint, it is never better than when Page is allowed to speak for herself. With a charming Nashville drawl, Page tells her story and explains why she chose to leave modeling behind right at the peak of her career. Sadly, the picture she paints of her life post-modeling is rather bleak, including a lengthy battle with mental illness. But things turned around when her photos experienced a resurgence in popularity in the early 1980’s, as the public rediscovered her, recognizing the role she played in ushering in the sexual revolution and leading to the immense following she has today.

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 27


Film Previews Full film reviews available at rochestercitynewspaper.com.

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[ OPENING ] BETTIE PAGE REVEALS ALL (2012): This documentary examines the life of the iconic 1950s pinup model. Dryden (Fri, Jan 31, 8 p.m.; Sun, Feb 2, 2 p.m.) BULLITT (1968): Steve McQueen stars as a San Francisco cop is assigned to protect at all costs a witness who’s set to testify against a dangerous underworld kingpin. Dryden (Sat, Feb 1, 8 p.m.) CARBIDE AND SORREL (1963): Following WWII, a worker attempts to rebuild the cigarette factory where he made his living in this comedy from East Germany. Dryden (Tue, Feb 4, 8 p.m.) THE GREAT CHICKEN WING HUNT (NR): This locally made documentary follows a ragtag group of oddballs on a quest to find the world’s best chicken wing. Little (Sat, Feb 1, 3 & 7 p.m.) LABOR DAY (PG-13): Jason Reitman (“Up in the Air”) directs this story about a 13-year-old boy, his reclusive mother, and the escaped convict who seeks shelter in their home. Starring Kate Winslet, Josh Brolin, Tobey Maguire, Clark Gregg, and James Van Der Beek. Culver, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece, Henrietta, Tinseltown LOVE AND DEATH (1975): Woody Allen directs and stars in this parody of Russian literature, about a hapless serf who’s drafted into the Napoleonic War. Also starring Diane Keaton. Dryden (Wed, Jan 29, 8 p.m.) OSCAR NOMINATED ANIMATION SHORTS (NR): This annual program collects all five Academy Award nominees for Best Animated Short Film. Little OSCAR NOMINATED DOCUMENTARY SHORTS (NR): This annual program collects all five Academy Award nominees for Best Documentary Short. Little OSCAR NOMINATED LIVE-ACTION SHORTS (NR): This annual program collects all five Academy Award nominees for Best LiveAction Short Film. Little THAT AWKWARD MOMENT (R): Zac Efron, Miles Teller (“The Spectacular Now”) and Michael B. Jordan (“Fruitvale Station”) play three best friends who make a pact to stay single, but find honoring that pact more difficult than expected. Culver, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece, Henrietta, Tinseltown, Webster WILD AT HEART (1990): Nicholas Cage and Laura Dern star as outlaw lovers in David Lynch’s Palm d’Or winning film. Dryden (Thu, Jan 30, 8 p.m.) [ CONTINUING ] 12 YEARS A SLAVE (R): Chiwetel Ejiofor stars in this film based on the true story of Solomon Northup, a free black man kidnapped and sold into slavery. Also starring Michael Fassbender, Sarah Paulson, Brad Pitt, and Benedict Cumberbatch. Culver, Henrietta, Pittsford, Tinseltown

28 CITY JANUARY 29 - FEBRUARY 4, 2014

AMERICAN HUSTLE (R): David O. Russell directs this black comedy inspired by the ABSCAM scandal of the 1970s, which involved the entrapment of several high-profile U.S. politicians. Starring Christian Bale, Amy Adams, Bradley Cooper, Jennifer Lawrence, and Jeremy Renner. Culver, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece, Henrietta, Little, Pittsford, Tinseltown, Webster ANCHORMAN 2: THE LEGEND CONTINUES (PG-13): Ron Burgundy and the rest of the Channel 4 news team return, ready to take New York, and the first 24-hours news channel, by storm. Starring Will Ferrell, Paul Rudd, Steve Carell, Christina Applegate, and Kristen Wiig. Henrietta, Greece, Webster AUGUST: OSAGE COUNTY (R): A family reunites following a tragedy, and tensions rise as they’re forced to live with one another under the same roof. Adapted from the Pulitzer Prize-winning play. Starring Meryl Streep, Julia Roberts, Chris Cooper, and Benedict Cumberbatch. Little, Eastview, Henrietta, Pittsford, Tinseltown, Webster CAPTAIN PHILLIPS (PG-13): Paul Greengrass directs the true story of Richard Phillips, the captain of a cargo ship attacked by Somali pirates in 2009. Starring Tom Hanks and Catherine Keener. Cinema, Movies 10 DALLAS BUYERS CLUB (R): Matthew McConaughey stars in this true story about a homophobic cowboy who decides to organize an illegal underground network to get HIV meds to patients, after he tests positive for the disease. With Jared Leto and Jennifer Garner. Culver, Eastview, Henrietta, Pittsford, Tinseltown FROZEN (PG): A young princess goes on an epic journey to find her sister, whose powers have trapped their kingdom in an eternal winter in this animated Disney musical. With the voices of Kristen Bell, Idina Menzel, Jonathan Groff, and Josh Gad. Brockport, Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece, Henrietta, Pittsford, Tinseltown, Webster GIMME SHELTER (PG-13): Vanessa Hudgens stars as a pregnant teen trying to survive on the streets after fleeing her abusive mother. With Rosario Dawson, Brendan Fraser, and James Earl Jones. Henrietta HER (R): Spike Jonze directs this story about a lonely writer who strikes up a romantic relationship with his new operating system. Starring Joaquin Phoenix, Amy Adams, and Scarlett Johansson. Eastview, Henrietta, Pittsford, Webster THE HOBBIT: THE DESOLATION OF SMAUG (PG-13): In the second installment of Peter Jackson’s epic trilogy, hobbit Bilbo Baggins continues his quest to help a group of dwarves reclaim their homeland, and confronts a mighty dragon in the process. Culver, Eastview, Geneseo, Henrietta, Tinseltown I, FRANKENSTEIN (PG-13): See review on page 26. Culver,

Geneseo, Greece, Henrietta, Tinseltown, Webster INSIDE LLEWYN DAVIS (R): A young singer navigates through the Greenwich Village folk folk scene of the 1960s, in this drama from the Coen bothers. Starring Oscar Isaac, Carey Mulligan, John Goodman, and Justin Timberlake. Little THE INVISIBLE WOMAN (R): Ralph Fiennes directs this story about the relationship between author Charles Dickens and his mistress, an 18-year-old actress named Nelly Ternan. With Felicity Jones and Kristin Scott Thomas. Pittsford, Cinema JACK RYAN: SHADOW RECRUIT (PG-13): See review on page 27. Greece, Henrietta, Pittsford, Tinseltown, Webster THE LEGEND OF HERCULES (PG13): Kellan Lutz stars in this epic origin story of the mythical Greek hero. Culver, Tinseltown, Webster LONE SURVIVOR (R): The true story of the ill-fated mission by a team of Navy SEALS to capture a high-ranking Taliban leader. Starring Mark Wahlberg, Taylor Kitsch, Emile Hirsch, and Ben Foster. Culver, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece, Henrietta, Pittsford, Tinseltown, Webster NEBRASKA (R): Bruce Dern stars as an elderly Missouri man convinced he’s won a million dollars in a sweepstakes, and Will Forte is the son who reluctantly agrees to drive him to Nebraska to collect his winnings. With Bob Odenkirk, Stacy Keach, and June Squibb. Culver, Little, Pittsford, Tinseltown THE NUT JOB (PG): A ragtag group of furry critters plan to rob a nut store so they’ll have food for winter, in this animated heist comedy. With the voices of Will Arnett, Liam Neeson, and Maya Rudolph. Culver, Geneseo, Greece, Henrietta, Tinseltown, Webster RIDE ALONG (PG-13): Kevin Hart agrees to spend 24 hours riding along with his police detective, soon-to-be brother-in-law in order to prove himself worthy of marrying the man’s sister. With Ice Cube, John Leguizamo, and Laurence Fishburne. Culver, Eastview, Greece, Henrietta, Tinseltown, Webster SAVING MR. BANKS (PG13): Tom Hanks and Emma Thompson star in this behindthe-scenes story of Walt Disney’s struggle to to convince author P.L. Travers to allow him to adapt her popular children’s novel, “Mary Poppins.” Greece, Henrietta, Little, Pittsford, Tinseltown THE SECRET LIFE OF WALTER MITTY (PG): Ben Stiller directs and stars in this adaptation of James Thurber’s story, about a man who dreams of a life of adventure and finally gets to actually live it. With Kristen Wiig, Sean Penn, and Adam Scott. Cinema THE WOLF OF WALL STREET (R): Martin Scorsese directs and Leonardo DiCaprio stars in the outrageous true story of Jordan Belfort, a corrupt stockbroker brought down by the FBI. Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Greece, Henrietta, Pittsford, Tinseltown


Classifieds For information: Call us (585) 244-3329 Fax us (585) 244-1126 Mail Us City Classifieds 250 N. Goodman Street Rochester, NY 14607 Email Us classifieds@ rochester-citynews.com EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY

All real estate advertised in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act, which makes it unlawful, “to make, print, or publish, any notice, statement, or advertisement, with respect to the sale or rental of a dwelling that indicates any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin.” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under the age of 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertisement for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. Call the local Fair Housing Enforcement Project, FHEP at 325-2500 or 1-866-671-FAIR. Si usted sospecha una practica de vivienda injusta, por favor llame al servicio legal gratis. 585-325-2500 - TTY 585-325-2547.

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Land for Sale ABANDONED NY FARM! ABSOLUTE SALE! JAN 25TH & 26TH! 23 Tracts! 8ac- $19,900 15ac- $29,900 25ac- $39,900 Next to State Land, stream, pond, incredible views! House, barn! Stunning country setting! Call :(888) 905-8847 to register! NewYorkLandandLakes.com

NYS LAND FOR SALE 8.6 Acres/$19,995 With Financing! Beautiful Ridge Top Maple Forests With Evergreens, Wild Apple Trees, Babbling Brook & Major Deer Trails. Easy Access Off Rt 13. Minutes To Salmon River Fishing & State Game Lands. Call Now: 1-800229-7843 or email info@ landandcamps.com

Commercial/ Office Space PARK AVENUE Retail/ Multi Use /Commercial. Putting together a center. An array of stores under one roof. Perfect for home goods, full jewelry store, furniture store, shoe store, specialty shops, coffee shop, full time art studios, sales and service business (such as computer), etc. Not limited to except-No Restaurants. Starting at 300 sq. ft.spots.Can accommodate up to a 5,000 sq.ft space. .Please call Mike (585)615-8066.

Vacation Property SEBASTIAN, FLORIDA Affordable custom factory constructed homes $45,900+, Friendly community, No Real Estate or State Income Taxes, minutes to Atlantic Ocean. 772-581-0080, www.beach-cove. com. Limited seasonal rentals

Adoption ADOPT: The stork didn’t call; we hope you will! Loving, happy family seeking to adopt baby to complete our family. Contact Robin/Neil:  866-303-0668, www.rnladopt.info PREGNANT? THINKING OF ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families Nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions. 866-413-6293. Void in Illinois/New Mexico/ Indiana (AAN CAN)

Automotive ALWAYS BETTER Higher cash for your Junk Cars, Trucks and Vans. From $200-$800 or more for newer. Running or not. With free towing. Also free removal of any unwanted model in any condition. Call 585-305-5865

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Groups Forming ATTENTION FLASH SOCCER FANS! The Western NY Flash Mob is gathering to prepare for the 2014 season. Join us! For more info find us on Facebook or contact us wnyflashfans@gmail. com

Jam Section CALLING ALL MUSICIANS OF ALL GENRES the Rochester Music Coalition wants you! Please register on our website. For further

KEYBOARD PLAYER needed to play with one of Rochester’s finest Big Bands. Great charts able to rehearse a few Weds. during the months of (April-November) effective 04/15/2014 585-4427480 KEYBOARDIST to join existing band, originals, covers, jazz, funk R&B 585-328-4121 rlbullock@ frontier.com biggem982@gmail. com MEET OTHER MUSICIANS. Jam & Play out, call & say hello, any level & any age ok. I play keyboards - organ B3 Style Call 585-266-6337 Martino SINGER, LEAD & BACKGROUND VOCALS. Mostly original written material. R & B, jazz, funk, learn, record, perform

continues on page 31

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We placed an ad in City Newspaper advertising the availability of two office suites in my office building at 55 Canterbury Road in the city. The response was excellent. Both spaces were leased within 30 days of the ad running in City Newspaper.” - DOUGLAS C. BURKHARDT, FIRST REALTY COMPANY

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Legal Ads [ LEGAL NOTICE ]

[ NOTICE ]

Notice of Formation of The Other Side of the Fence Property Management LLC. Art. of Org. filed with Sec’y of State (SSNY) 11/25/2013. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 51 Belltower La. Pittsford, NY 14534. Purpose: any lawful activity.

Articles of Organization of limited liability company, Jones Development West, LLC ( LLC) were filed with the Department of State on November 22, 2013. Certificate of Change was filed with Department of State on December 19, 2013. Monroe County is the county within which it will have its office; its principal business address is 683 Gillett Rd. Spencerport, New York 14559 The LLC has designated the Secretary of State of New York as it agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. 683 Gillett Road, Spencerport, New York 14559 is the post office address to which the Secretary of State shall mail a copy of any process against the LLC. The purpose of the LLC is the ownership and management of commercial real estate.

[ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] NEXTSTEPU RETAIL CENTERS LLC filed Articles of Organization with the Secretary of State of New York (“SSNY”) on September 27, 2013. Principal office location: Monroe County. SSNY is the designated agent upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Phillips Lytle LLP, 1400 First Federal Plaza, Rochester, NY 14614. The purpose of the LLC is to engage in any lawful activity. The LLC is managed by one or more members. [ NOTICE ]

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Notice of Formation of Upstate Mechanical Systems, LLC. Arts of Org. filed with Secy. Of State of N.Y. (SSNY) on 1/14/2014. Office Location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 258 Somershire Drive, Rochester, NY 14617. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Upstate MUA Chiropractic, PLLC. Arts of Org. filed with Secy. Of State of N.Y. (SSNY) on 11/15/13. Office Location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of PLLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 309 Exchange Blvd., STE 100, Rochester, NY 14608. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] 329 CULVER ROAD LLC, a domestic LLC, filed with the SSNY on 11/25/2013. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Michael Veltri, 29 Coral Burst Crescent, Webster, NY 14580. General Purpose.

30 CITY JANUARY 29 - FEBRUARY 4, 2014

[ NOTICE ] BARK PLACE BAKERY, LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 12/18/2013. Office in Monroe Co. SSNY desig. agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 1935 Clinton Ave. North, Rochester, NY 14621, which is also the principal business location. Purpose: Any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Capital Gaming, LLC (LLC) filed Arts. of Org. with NY Secy. of State (SS) on 11/7/2013. LLC’s office is in Monroe Co. SS is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS will mail a copy of any process to LLC’s principal business location at 400 Andrews St., Ste. 500, Rochester, NY 14604. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Faith Street Film Partners II, LLC (LLC) filed Arts. of Org. with NY Secy. of State (SS) on December 20, 2013. LLC’s office is in Monroe Co. SS is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS will mail a copy of any process to LLC’s principal business location at 147 Regatta Dr., Webster, NY 14580. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Index No. 2013-2891 SUPREME COURT STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF MONROE ESL Federal Credit

cont. on page 33


Place your real estate ad by calling 244-3329 ext. 23 or rochestercitynewspaper.com Ad Deadlines: Friday 4pm for Display Ads Monday at noon for Line ads > page 29

Miscellaneous

Notices

2014 season Bobby, 585-3284121 rlbullock@frontier.com biggem982@gmail.com

HAS YOU BUILDING SHIFTED OR SETTLED? Contact Woodford Brothers Inc, for straightening, leveling, foundation and wood frame repairs at 1-800-OLDBARN. www.woodfordbros. com. “Not applicable in Queens county”

You work hard. SNAP works too! Find out if you may be eligible for SNAP by calling (585) 295-5624 or (585) 295-5626. LAWNY, Inc. ® Monroe County Nutrition Outreach & Education Program. Prepared by a project of Hunger Solutions New York, USDA/FNS and NYSOTDA. This institution is an equal opportunity provider.

THE GREGORY KUNDE CHORALE is looking for male voices. Call for an audition now to join our fourteenth season! Info Line 377 7568 or visit our website www. gregorykundechorale.org

Music Services PIANO LESSIONS In your home or mine. Patient, experienced instructor teaching all ages, levels and musical styles. Call Scott: 585- 465-0219. Visit www. scottwrightmusic.com

SAWMILLS from only $4897.00MAKE & SAVE MONEY with your own bandmill- Cut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship. FREE Info/DVD:  www. NorwoodSawmills.com 1-800578-1363 Ext.300N VIAGRA 100mg, 40 pills+/4 free, only $99.00. Save Big  Now,  Discreet shipping. VIAGRA 100MG, 40 pills+/4 free, $99.00. Save Big  Now,  Discreet shipping. 1-800491-9065  Today!

K-D Moving & Storage Inc.

Experience in office & household moving and deliveries

Big or small, we do them all

473-6610 or 473-4357 23 Arlington St. NY D.O.T.#9657

KdMovingandStorage.com

Find your way home with TO ADVERTISE CONTACT CHRISTINE TODAY!

CALL 244-3329 X23 OR EMAIL CHRISTINE@ROCHESTER-CITYNEWS.COM 1481 Bushwood Circle, Webster:

$389,900, 5 beds, 3.5 baths, 2890 ft2, 2.5 car garage, in-law apt, in-ground pool, treed yard with a stream, etc.... A must see - Call Ryan @ 585-201-0724, Re/Max Realty Group 218-6802.

Ryan Smith 585-201-0724

HomeWork A cooperative effort of City Newspaper and RochesterCityLiving, a program of the Landmark Society.

Classic Elegance on Canterbury 277 Canterbury Road The Colonial Revival style brick home at 277 Canterbury Road is located in the heart of Rochester’s popular Park Avenue / Monroe Avenue neighborhoods. Close to shops, restaurants, the Monroe Branch Library, the YMCA, and convenient to downtown, this spacious 3,262 square foot home has many special features that promote gracious living. Symmetrical bay windows frame the center doorway, which is surmounted with a portico. The distinctive front door has original leaded and stained glass panels; it opens into a tile-floored entrance vestibule with two coat closets; that, in turn, opens into the front hall. The large living room, 13 by 25 feet, is to the right, and the generous dining room is to the left. Your attention is drawn to the gleaming hardwood floors and deep crown molding found throughout the house. The living room, with its substantial brick fireplace flanked by leaded glass windows, will be ideal for family gatherings, or even a house concert. Through an open doorway is the sunfilled den, with attractive wooden blinds. The formal dining room also has leaded glass windows. Its handsome chandelier will sparkle over a dining room table. The dining room opens into the breakfast room that has an unusual built-in sideboard, an ideal place to display heirloom china. The updated kitchen has new appliances and room for a table and chairs. Folding doors open to reveal the washer and dryer—a time saver for a

busy family. The powder room, original to the house, is found in the back hallway, which also has a door to the back stairway. The ample stairway in the front hall leads upstairs to four bedrooms and two full baths. The large master bedroom boasts a fireplace and a window seat. There are two big closets and a master bathroom with a decorative tile floor, a tub and a marble shower. The rest of the second floor offers three more light-filled bedrooms as well as several linen closets with built-in shelves. A stairway leads up to the finished third floor, where light spills in from the dormer windows and built-in drawers and shelves abound. The two carpeted rooms and the full bath would make a good retreat for teenagers. Other features are the brand new tear-off roof, the full basement, the partially fenced backyard and the two-car detached garage. The lot, approximately 50 by 147 feet, offers room for a vegetable or flower garden. The selling price is $269,900; contact David Thomas Flaherty at The Cannan Group of RE/MAX Plus for more information: David@ thecannangroup.com or 585-766-5555. by Mitzie Collins Mitzie teaches music history and hammered dulcimer at the Eastman Community Music School and is a long-time member of The Landmark Society.

Ryan Smith

Search. Buy. Sell.

NYS Licensed Real Estate Salesperson

201-0724 RochesterSells.com

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 31


I’m very pleased with the calls I got from our apartment rental ads, and will continue running them. Your readers respond — positively!” - M. Smith, Residential Management EMPLOYMENT / CAREER TRAINING

Employment AIRLINE CAREERS begin here– Get FAA approved Aviation

Maintenance Technician training. Financial aid for qualified students– Housing available.Job placement

Monroe Community Hospital! Hiring CNA’s on all units for all shifts Competitive FT and PD, wkend/hol positions with enhanced pay options. All levels of experience welcome. Nurturing work environment. Excellent benefits. EOE. Send resumes to: 435 E. Henrietta Road Rochester NY 14620 Or visit www.monroehosp.org

assistance. Call AIM 866-2967093

Volunteers BECOME A DOCENT at the Rochester Museum & Science Center Must be an enthusiastic communicator, Like working with children. Learn more at http://www.rmsc.org/Support/ Volunteer Or call 585-697-1948

BRIGHTEN A LIFE. Lifespan’s The Senior Connection program needs people 55+ to volunteer to make 2 friendly phone calls / 2 visits each month to an older adult Call Katie 585-244-8400 x 152 FOSTER PARENTS WANTED! Monroe County is looking for adults age 21 and over to consider opening their homes to foster children. Call 334-9096 or visit www.MonroeFosterCare.org.

REGIONAL TEACHER RECRUITMENT for participating Cattaraugus and Allegany County Schools for the 2014-15 school year. Teacher Interview Day: April 23, 2014 Register at WWW.CABOCES.ORG

EOE/AA

LITERACY VOLUNTEERS OF ROCHESTER needs adult tutors to help adults who are waiting to improve their reading, writing, English speaking, or math skills. Call 473-3030, or check our website at www.literacyrochester. org MCC DENTAL STUDENT Seeking patients who haven’t had a cleaning in 3+ years and would like a complimentary cleaning. MEALS ON WHEELS Needs Volunteers for :Meal delivery. Clerical work and answering phones, scheduling volunteers to deliver routes. For more information visit our website at www.vnsnet.com or call 7878326. SCHOOL #12 999 South Ave. is looking for reading & math volunteers, English & Spanish. Training provided. Call Vicki 585-461-4282 SCHOOL LIBRARY VOLUNTEERS needed at Pinnacle #35 School on Field St. Former library experience preferred but not necessary. Please contact

Ike Nielsen, school volunteer coordinator, at 271-4583 x2291 and ask to be a library volunteer. ST. JOSEPH’S HOUSE invites volunteers to live and work at our soup kitchen/shelter. This is essential, rewarding, hard work. Call Tim @ 314-1962

Business Opportunities START A HOME BASED BUSINESS. Part-time or FullTime. Serious inquires only. 585271-3243

Career Training AIRLINE CAREERS begin here - Get trained as FAA certified Aviation Technician. Housing and Financial aid for qualified students. Job placement assistance. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance 877-492-3059 (AAN CAN)

NOW HIRING EVENING CLERKS $13.57/hr + benefits and $300 signing bonus** HOURS: Monday through Friday 3:30pm-Midnight Occasional overtime/weekends as needed REQUIREMENTS: Ability to type 45 WPM Ability to lift 40 lbs Great references and positive attitude! Apply online today!! Please visit www.medscribe.com and submit an online application referencing job #117132 Take charge of your career with these immediate opportunities with possible hire by a growing international firm. To see a complete list of our job openings, including day shift clerical positions, visit our website. **Call 585-586-0790 for details 535 Willowbrook Office Park, Fairport, NY 14450

medjobs@medscribe.com www.medscribe.com

32 CITY JANUARY 29 - FEBRUARY 4, 2014


Legal Ads > page 30 Union, Plaintiff, vs. Timothy M. Skeval; John Schmidt; Defendants. Pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale dated January 14, 2014 and entered herein, I, the undersigned, the Referee in said Judgment named, will sell at public auction in the front vestibule of the Monroe County Office Building, 39 West Main Street, Rochester, New York, County of Monroe, on February 20, 2014 at 10:00 a.m., on that day, the premises directed by said Judgment to be sold and therein described as follows: ALL THAT TRACT OR PARCEL OF LAND, situate in the Town of Gates, County of Monroe and State of New York, known as 52 Foxshire Lane, Rochester, NY 14606, Tax Account No. 104.14-2-35 described in Deed recorded in Liber 8137 of Deeds, page 369; lot size 54.01 x 193.67. Said premises are sold subject to any state of facts an accurate survey may show, zoning restrictions and any amendments thereto, covenants, restrictions, agreements, reservations, and easements of record and prior liens, if any, municipal departmental violations, and such other provisions as may be set forth in the Complaint and Judgment filed in this action. Judgment amount: $129,627.64 plus, but not limited to, costs, disbursements, attorney fees and additional allowance, if any, all with legal interest. DATED: January 2014 Lori Robb Monaghan, Esq., Referee LACY KATZEN LLP Attorneys for Plaintiff 130 East Main Street Rochester, New York 14604 Telephone: (585) 324-5767 [ NOTICE ] JLOR DEVELOPMENT, LLC, a domestic LLC, filed with the SSNY on 11/21/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Jeffrey & Lora Partyka, 1420 Countyline Rd., Kendall, NY 14476. General Purpose. [ NOTICE ] LIN COMMERCIAL PROPERTIES, LLC, a domestic LLC, filed with the SSNY on 1/9/14. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail

process to The LLC, P.O. Box 16572, Rochester, NY 14616. General Purpose. [ NOTICE ] MASON WEALTH MANAGEMENT LLC (LLC) filed Arts. of Org. with NY Secy. of State (SS) on 1/9/2014. LLC’s office is in Monroe Co. SS is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS shall mail a copy of any process to 1880 Winton Road South, Ste. 8, Rochester, NY 14618. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Name: JOSE JOE’S LLC. Arts. Of Org. filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 1/17/2014. Office Location: Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to: C/O JOSE JOE’S LLC, One East Main Street, 10th Floor, Rochester, New York 14614. Purpose: Any Lawful Purpose. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Form. of GREENBOX SALES, LLC (the “LLC”). Art. of Org. filed with Secretary of the State of NY (SSNY) on 12/16/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, 2041 Penfield Rd, Penfield, NY 14526. Purpose: any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Rochester Consulting Services LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) OCT 07, 2013. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 1903 Manitou Road Spencerport NY 14559. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of THE MARLEY GROUP OF UPSTATE NEW YORK, LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 09/27/2013. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to PO Box 869 Penfield NY, 14526. Purpose: any lawful activities.

[ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of This Is Edvin LLC. Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 11/04/2013. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 41 Branchbrook Drive, Henrietta, NY 14467 . Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of 167 Barton St, LLC. Art of Org filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 1-4-14. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 1151 S Plymouth Ave, Apt 2, Rochester, NY 14608. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Advanced Facility Management LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/24/13 Office location: Monroe County. Principal office of LLC: 1133 Webster Rd. Webster, NY 14580. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to The LLC at the principal office of the LLC. Purpose: Any lawful activity.

September 18th, 2013. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to C/O United States Corporation Agents, Inc. 7014 13th Avenue, Suite 202. Brooklyn, NY 11228. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Davio Pharma Consulting, LLC. Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) October 9, 2013. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to: c/o United States Corporation Agents, Inc., 7014 13th Avenue, Suite 202, Brooklyn, NY 11228. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of EYF GROUP, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 01/13/14. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Corporation Service Co., 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207, regd. agent upon whom and at which process may be served. Purpose: Any lawful activity.

[ NOTICE ]

[ NOTICE ]

Notice of Formation of BELLA HOMES OF NY, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 01/16/14. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 71 Watersong Trail, Webster, NY 14580. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity.

Notice of Formation of Glick Glove & Safety, LLC. Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 1/8/2014. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to PO Box 411, Victor NY 14564. Purpose: any lawful activities.

[ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Bevel LLC. Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 10-172013. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 20 Office Park Way, Pittsford, NY 14534. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Black Label Athletics LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY)

[ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of GREAT TAVERN PITTSFORD PARTNERS, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/19/13. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 2851 Clover St., Pittsford, NY 14534. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of IRON HORSE HEALTHCARE LLC.

Art. Of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/4/2013. Office in Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, 1798 Trellis Circle Webster, NY 14580. Purpose: Any lawful purpose [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of JackAdam LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 01/06/14. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 291 Buell Rd., Rochester, NY 14624. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of JARM PROPERTIES, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/30/2013. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 1704 Penfield Rd., Penfield, NY 14526. Purpose: any lawful act. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of JN Management Company, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/24/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, c/o Sammy Feldman, 3445 Winton Place, Suite 228, Rochester, NY 14623. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Kane’s Cosmetic Teeth Whitening, LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) on 12/20/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 104 Glenmont Drive, Rochester, NY 14617. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Kiehle and Kearney Properties, LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 10/03/2013. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated

as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to, The LLC, 5093 East Lake Rd., Livonia, NY 14487 . Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of LEGACY CONSTRUCTION & EIFS LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 01/16/14. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Corporation Service Co., 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207, regd. agent upon whom and at which process may be served. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of LiDestri Properties Management, LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 12/11/2013. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 815 W. Whitney Road, Fairport, NY 14450. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Limited Liability Company 1. Name of the Limited Liability Company is Mevs Properties LLC. 2. Articles of Organization were filed by Department of State of New York on January 9, 2014. 3. County of office: Monroe 4. The Company does not have a specific date of dissolution. 5. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent upon whom process against the Company may be served. The address to which process shall be mailed: 3220 Elmwood Ave, Rochester, NY 14618. 6. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY. NAME: MAZAL PROPERTIES AT ROCHESTER, LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 11/26/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to the LLC, 72-14 136th Street,

Flushing, New York 11367. Purpose: For any lawful purpose.

Rd, Livonia, NY 14487. Purpose: any lawful activities.

[ NOTICE ]

[ NOTICE ]

Notice of Formation of LLC Tungsten Corporate Advisors, LLC. Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) December 18, 2013. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 114 Upper Mountain Ave. Montclair, NJ 07042. Purpose: any lawful activities.

Notice of Formation of Pillar of Strength Fabrication LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 4/05/2011. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process toThe LLC, 146 Halstead St. STE-101, Rochester N.Y. 14610. Purpose: any lawful activities.

[ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of LONG MEMORY CONSULTING LLC. Art. Of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/16/2013. Office in Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, 160 Buckland Ave Rochester, NY 14618. Purpose: Any lawful purpose [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of NEURON FARMS LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 12/31/2013. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to INCORP SERVICES, INC. ONE COMMERCE PLAZA 99 WASHINGTON AVE., STE 805-A ALBANY, NY 12210-2822 . Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of OR TUR, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/13/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Corporation Service Co., 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207, regd. agent upon whom and at which process may be served. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Papa’s Auto Center, LLC. Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 12/04/2013. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to the LLC 5093 East Lake

[ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Planet Construction LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) on April 2nd 2013. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 382 Glenwood Av. Rochester NY 14613. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Prime East Haven, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 1/13/14. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, c/o Sammy Feldman, 3445 Winton Place, Ste. 228, Rochester, NY 14623. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Prime Storage Five, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 1/13/14. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, c/o Sammy Feldman, 3445 Winton Place, Ste. 228, Rochester, NY 14623. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Tali Holdings, LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 1/3/14. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 33 University Ave., Rochester, NY 14605. Purpose: any lawful activities.

cont. on page 34

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 33


Legal Ads > page 33 [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of Timvan MEDIA, LLC. Art. of Org filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 11/15/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may

be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 78 Genesee View Trl, Rochester, NY 14623 Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of ULA’S AUTOMOTIVE LLC Art. of Org. filed

Sec’y of State (SSNY) December 4, 2013. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 2244 Clifford Ave. Rochester, NY 14609. Purpose: any lawful activities.

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Chat Rooms LOOKING FOR A SPRING FLING or the Love of your Life? Call LiveWire 585-333-3003! Meet 100’s of Guys and Girls! Fast, Fun and 100% FREE! You must be18+ to call

[ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of VandeSande Controls Engineering, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/11/13, becoming effective on 01/01/14. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 11 Erie Crescent, Fairport, NY 14450. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity.

[ NOTICE ]

Notice of Qualification of International Distribution Network, LLC. App. for Auth. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) 1/6/14. Office location: Monroe County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 8/14/12. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 13995 Diplomat Drive, Ste. 300, Farmers Branch, TX 75234. DE address of LLC: 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Arts. of Org. filed with DE Secy. of State, 401 Federal St., Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: any lawful act or activity.

Notice of Qualification of WinnDevelopment Company Limited Partnership. App. for Auth. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/19/12. Office location: Monroe County. LP formed in Massachusetts (MA) on 5/29/12. SSNY designated as agent of LP upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the MA address of LLC: c/o WinnCompanies, 6 Faneuil Hall Marketplace, Boston, MA 02109. Name/ address of each genl. ptr. available from SSNY. Cert. of LP filed with MA Secy. of State, One Ashburton Place, Ste. 1710, Boston, MA 02108. Purpose: any lawful activity.

[ NOTICE ]

[ NOTICE ]

Notice of Qualification of Kerry Court Danvers LLC. Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 12/16/13. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. bus. addr.: 235 Moore St., Hackensack, NJ 07601. LLC formed in MA on 10/2/12. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. MA addr. of LLC: c/o National Registered Agents, Inc., 155 Federal St., Ste. 700, Boston, MA 02110. Cert. of Org. filed with MA Sec. of State, One Ashburton Pl., Boston, MA 02108. Purpose: all lawful purposes.

PowerSirj Productions LLC Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State (SSNY) on 11/26/2013. The SSNY is designated as the PowerSirj Productions LLC agent upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to: P.O. Box 19754, Rochester, New York 14619. Office Location: Monroe County. Purpose: Any lawful activities.

[ NOTICE ]

[ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of Sonehan Danvers LLC. Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 12/16/13. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. bus. addr.: 235 Moore St., Hackensack, NJ 07601. LLC formed in MA on 10/2/12. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may

34 CITY JANUARY 29 - FEBRUARY 4, 2014

be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. MA addr. of LLC: c/o National Registered Agents, Inc., 155 Federal St., Ste. 700, Boston, MA 02110. Cert. of Org. filed with MA Sec. of State, One Ashburton Pl., Boston, MA 02108. Purpose: all lawful purposes.

[ NOTICE ] Priory of Ten LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 12/31/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 8 Alder Bush, Rochester, NY 14624. Purpose: Any lawful activities [ NOTICE ] Regional Enterprises, LLC (LLC) filed Arts. of Org. with NY Secy. of State (SS) on 11/ 21/2013. LLC’s office is in Monroe Co. SS is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS will mail a copy of any

process to LLC’s principal business location at 400 Andrews St., Ste. 500, Rochester, NY 14604. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Rochester Residential Properties, LLC filed Art. Of Org. with Sec’y of State on 9/20/13. Office Location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 144 Village Landing #192, Fairport, NY 14450. Purpose: Any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] THE PITTSFORD TAP & GRILLE, LLC (LLC) filed Arts. of Org. with NY Secy. of State (SS) on 1/9/2014. LLC’s office is in Monroe Co. SS is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS shall mail a copy of any process to PO Box 23503, Rochester, NY 14692. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] TIMFIRE ENTERPRISES LLC, a domestic LLC, filed with the SSNY on 1/22/14. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Eric Firenze, 512 Long Pond Rd., Rochester, NY 14612. General Purpose. [ NOTICE ] UPSTATE BUSINESS INTERIORS, LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 12/9/13. Office in Monroe Co. SSNY design. Agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to The LLC 1230 Thistleberry LN Webster, NY 14580. Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] Community Playhouse LLC filed Articles of Organization with the New York Department of State on 11/22/13. Its office is located in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent of the Company upon whom process against it may be served and a copy of any process shall be mailed to 17 Mulberry Street, Rochester NY 14620. The purpose of the Company is any lawful business.

[ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] ENTHEOS ENERGY LLC filed Articles of Organization with the Secretary of State of New York (“SSNY”) on January 8, 2014. Principal office location: Monroe County. SSNY is the designated agent upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Phillips Lytle LLP, 1400 First Federal Plaza, Rochester, NY 14614. The purpose of the LLC is to engage in any lawful activity. The LLC is managed by one or more members. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] GLORI BEAD, LLC filed Articles of Organization with the Secretary of State of New York (“SSNY”) on November 27, 2013. Principal office location: Monroe County. SSNY is the designated agent upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Phillips Lytle LLP, 1400 First Federal Plaza, Rochester, NY 14614. The purpose of the LLC is to engage in any lawful activity. The LLC is managed by one or more members. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] NEXT STEP LEARNING SOLUTIONS LLC filed Articles of Organization with the Secretary of State of New York (“SSNY”) on October 3, 2013. Principal office location: Monroe County. SSNY is the designated agent upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Phillips Lytle LLP, 1400 First Federal Plaza, Rochester, NY 14614. The purpose of the LLC is to engage in any lawful activity. The LLC is managed by one or more members. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] NEXT STEP MEDIA SOLUTIONS LLC filed Articles of Organization with the Secretary of State of New York (“SSNY”) on November 1, 2013. Principal office location: Monroe County. SSNY is the designated agent upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Phillips Lytle LLP, 1400 First Federal Plaza, Rochester, NY 14614. The purpose of the LLC is to engage in any lawful activity. The LLC is managed by one or more members.

[ Notice of Formation of 120 LINDEN OAKS PARTNERS LLC ] Arts. Of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on Nov. 19, 2013. Office location: Monroe Co., NY. Princ. Office of LLC: 120 Linden Oaks Dr., Ste. 200, Rochester, NY 14625. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Princ. Office of LLC. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ Notice of Formation of GMR MOBIL LLC ] Arts. Of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on Dec. 19, 2013. Office location: Monroe Co., NY. Princ. Office of LLC: 120 Linden Oaks Dr., Ste. 200, Rochester, NY 14625. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Princ. Office of LLC. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY ] The name of the limited liability company is 57th Street Productions LLC. The Articles of Organization were filed with the NY Secretary of State on December 23, 2013. The office of the LLC is located in Monroe County, New York State. The NY Secretary of State is designated as the agent of the LLC upon whom process may be served. A copy of the process served shall be mailed to 140 Meadow Drive, Rochester NY 14618. The LLC is managed by a manager. The purpose of the LLC is any lawful business. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LLC ] 190 Culver LLC has filed articles of organization with the New York Secretary of State on January 14, 2014 with an effective date of formation of January 14, 2014. Its principal place of business is located at 1599 Highland Avenue, Rochester, New York in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent upon whom process may be served. A copy of any process shall be mailed to 1499 Highland Avenue, Rochester, New York 14618. The purpose of the LLC is to engage in any lawful activity for which Limited Liability Companies may be organized under Section 203 of the New


Legal Ads York Limited Liability Company Law. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LLC ] 500 Whitney Road, LLC has filed articles of organization with the New York Secretary of State on December 12, 2013 with an effective date of formation of December 12, 2013. Its principal place of business is located at 2124 Baird Road, Penfield, New York in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent upon whom process may be served. A copy of any process shall be mailed to 2124 Baird Road, Penfield, New York 14526. The purpose of the LLC is to engage in any lawful activity for which Limited Liability Companies may be organized under Section 203 of the New York Limited Liability Company Law. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LLC ] 83 Rutgers, LLC has filed articles of organization with the New York Secretary of State on November 22, 2013 with an effective date of formation of November 22, 2013. Its principal place of business is located at 1599 Monroe Avenue, Rochester, New York in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent upon whom process may be served. A copy of any process shall be mailed to 1599 Monroe Avenue, Rochester, New York 14618. The purpose of the LLC is to engage in any lawful activity for which Limited Liability Companies may be organized under Section 203 of the New York Limited Liability Company Law. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LLC ] CDE&T Partners, LLC has filed articles of organization with the New York Secretary of State on January 2, 2014 with an effective date of formation of January 2, 2014. Its principal place of business is located at 3300 Monroe Avenue, Suite 301, New York in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent upon whom process may be served. A copy of any process shall be mailed to 3300 Monroe Avenue, Suite 301, Rochester, New York 14618. The purpose of the LLC is to engage in any lawful activity for which Limited Liability Companies may

be organized under Section 203 of the New York Limited Liability Company Law. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF VILLAGE LEARNING STUDIO, LLC ] The name of the Limited Liability Company is Village Learning Studio, LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the New York Secretary of State on 1/7/2014. The office of the LLC is in Monroe County. The New York Secretary of State is designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. The Secretary of State shall mail a copy of such process to 21 Boughton Ave., Pittsford, NY 14534, The LLC is organized to engage in any lawful activity for which an LLC may be formed under NY LLC Law. [ NOTICE OF SALE ] SUPREME COURT COUNTY OF MONROE, COUNTRYWIDE HOME LOANS, INC., Plaintiff, vs. DAVID A. YOUNG, CATHERINE E. YOUNG, ET AL., Defendant(s). Pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale duly filed on December 17, 2008, I, the undersigned Referee will sell at public auction at the front steps of the Monroe County Office Building, 39 West Main Street, Rochester NY on March 03, 2014 at 10:00 a.m., premises known as 354 Conrad Drive, Rochester, NY . All that certain plot, piece of land, with buildings and improvement thereon erected, situate, lying and being in the Town of Greece, County of Monroe and State of New York, Section 60.58, Block 1 and Lot 5. Premises will be sold subject to provisions of filed Judgment Index #6815/08 Alexander Korotkin, Esq., Referee Berkman, Henoch, Peterson, Peddy & Fenchel, P.C., 100 Garden City Plaza, Garden City, NY 11530, Attorneys for Plaintiff. [ REFEREE’S NOTICE OF SALE IN FORECLOSURE ] SUPREME COURT – COUNTY OF MONROE FAMILY FIRST FEDERAL CREDIT UNION, 2620 Browncroft Blvd., Rochester, New York 14625, Plaintiff against MICHAEL P. MCCOOEY, POLLY A. MCCOOEY, et al Defendant(s). Pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale dated on January

2, 2014. I, the undersigned Referee will sell at public auction at the Monroe County Clerks Office, 39 West Main Street, Rochester, N.Y. on the 13th day of February, 2014 at 10:00 a.m. All that tract or parcel of land, situate in the Town of Perinton, County of Monroe and State of New York. Premises known as 19 Caywood Lane, Fairport, N.Y. 14450. (Section: 166.09, Block: 2, Lot: 42). Approximate amount of lien $ 233,263.52 plus interest and costs. Premises will be sold subject to provisions of filed judgment and terms of sale. Index No. 3441-13. Sharon K. Sayers, Esq., Referee. Davidson Fink LLP Attorney(s) for Plaintiff 28 East Main Street – Suite 1700 Rochester, N.Y. 146141990 (585) 760-8218 [ SUMMONS ] Index No. 2013-9868 STATE OF NEW YORK SUPREME COURT COUNTY OF MONROE WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A. Plaintiff vs. ANY UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES, DISTRIBUTEE OR SUCCESSORS IN INTEREST OF THE LATE ALBERT V. CARVER, IF LIVING, AND IF ANY BE DEAD, ANY AND ALL PERSONS WHO ARE SPOUSES, WIDOWS, GRANTEES, MORTGAGEES, LIENORS, HEIRS, DEVISEES, DISTRIBUTEES OR SUCCESSORS IN INTEREST OF SUCH OF THEM AS MAY BE DEAD, AND THEIR SPOUSES, HEIRS, DEVISEES, DISTRIBUTEES AND SUCCESSORS IN INTEREST, ALL OF WHOM AND WHOSE NAMES AND PLACES OF RESIDENCE ARE UNKNOWN TO PLAINTIFF, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA BY THE INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, NEW YORK STATE DEPARTMENT OF TAXATION AND FINANCE, And JOHN DOE, Defendants, This is an attempt to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. To the above named Defendants: You are hereby summoned to answer the complaint in this action and to serve a copy of your answer, or if the complaint is not served with this summons, to serve a notice of appearance on the plaintiff’s

attorneys within thirty days after the service of this summons, exclusive of the day of service, and in case of your failure to appear or answer, judgment will be taken against you by default for the relief demanded in the complaint. NOTICE YOU ARE IN DANGER OF LOSING YOUR HOME If you do not respond to this summons and complaint by serving a copy of the answer on the attorney for the mortgage company who filed this foreclosure proceeding against you and filing the answer with the court, a default judgment may be entered and you can lose your home. Speak to an attorney or go to the court where your case is pending for further information on how to answer the summons and protect your property. Sending a payment to your mortgage company will not stop this foreclosure action. YOU MUST RESPOND BY SERVING A COPY OF THE ANSWER ON THE ATTORNEY FOR THE PLAINTIFF (MORTGAGE COMPANY) AND FILING THE ANSWER WITH THE COURT. Dated: 1/8/2014 The foregoing summons is served upon you by publication pursuant to an order of Hon. J. Richard Dollinger , Justice of the Supreme Court of the State of New York, signed the 2nd day of January, 2014, Rochester, New York. The object of this action is to foreclose a mortgage on the following property: Tax I.D. No. 121.75-1-42 ALL that tract or parcel of land, situate in the City of Rochester, County of Monroe and State of New York, being Lot #16 on the South side of Wilmington (formerly Asbury) Street, said Lot #16 being 35 feet front and 121.13 feet in depth, as laid down on a map of the Webster and Salmon Resubdivision of part of Town Lot #52, in the Town of Brighton (now the City of Rochester), made by William C. Gray, Surveyor and filed in the Monroe County Clerk’s Office in Liber 9 of Maps at page 21. These premises are also known as 93 Wilmington Street, Rochester NY, 14620 Richard S. Mullen, Esq. Woods Oviatt Gilman LLP Attorneys for Plaintiff 700 Crossroads Building 2 State Street Rochester, New York 14614

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January 29 - February 4, 2014 - City Newspaper