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EVENTS: BABES OF THE BRAWL, “SHREK THE MUSICAL” 21 URBAN JOURNAL: Lessons from Newt

3

THEater review: “The year of magical thinking” 24 CHOW HOUND: ZEPPA BISTRO, TEXAS BLUES BBQ 11 FILM: “THE ARTIST,” “HAYWIRE” 26 CROSSWORD 35

I mani W inds • T he M alcolm Moore B and • The B uddhahood • The Swooners • Bitchin’ K itchen • Children of B odom • and more music , pag e 12

JANUARY 25-31, 2012 Free

Greater Rochester’s Alternative Newsweekly

Vol 41 No 20

News. Music. Life.

Now, that takes a special kind of crazy.” MUSIC, PAGE 14

Hochul, Reed seem likely to survive. NEWS, PAGE 4

Little-noticed cuts may hurt neighborhoods. NEWS, PAGE 5

Grad rate drops. NEWS, PAGE 5

Jazz Fest 2012 headliners announced. news, PAGE 9

SPECIAL SECTION | BY CITY FEATURE STAFF | INSIDE | COVER BY MATT DETURCK

Winter Guide 2012 This season, winter came to Rochester on Friday, January 13, 2012. That’s appropriate, since prior to that it was starting to feel like a horror movie around here. You know, one of those thrillers where some slasher is lurking in the shadows, but he won’t actually make his move. He just taunts his potential victims. A light dusting of snow here, perhaps a bit of a frost there. But we were all waiting for that big final scare. So it was actually a relief to some when we got snow and ice that stuck around for a bit. At least the suspense was over. But the truth is, winter is actually great. The snow is beautiful. That chill in the air snaps

you awake. Sledding is the most fun adults can have without chemical enhancement. We will probably be complaining about it come March (or, realistically, by mid-February), but the reality is that winter brings with it countless opportunities that we cannot experience any other time of the year. For instance, ice surfing. There are dozens of locals who brave the elements (and the law) and paddle out to catch waves on Lake Ontario. Learn about it and other bizarre extreme winter sports in this year’s Winter Guide. You’ll also get City’s picks for great winter events, films, and more, inside.


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Feedback We welcome your comments. Send them to themail@rochestercitynews.com, or post them on our website, rochestercitynewspaper.com, our Facebook page, or our Twitter feed, @roccitynews. We edit selections for publication in print.

Romney and workers’ rights

In a democratic society, workers would have the right of peer review for any job-related evaluation, promotion, discipline, or termination. Absent that right, which is protected by a union, a boss can arbitrarily fire a worker. That is what happens in many enterprises run like capitalist dictatorships. Anybody who likes to fire people reveals their undemocratic beliefs, not to mention sadistic attitude. Mitt Romney does not believe in democracy. BILL MCCOY, ROCHESTER

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Fracking’s not a certainty

When Governor Andrew Cuomo announced no funding for gas-drilling regulators until the DEC decides whether to allow hydraulic fracturing, he provided a fracking reality check for those on both sides who assume that it will come soon. City reporter Jeremy Moule wrote that fracking will probably occur, and an Albany reporter wrote that reading 40,000 fracking letters will be a final hurdle before drilling is allowed; others have used “when” instead of “if ” fracking will come to New York State. It is still possible that even the Big Bucks will not force to happen something that is so wrong for people, the environment, and the bowels of the Earth. We hope that reporter Moule will have a chance to take a different stance. BYRNA WEIR, BRIGHTON

The threat from hydrofracking

A number of city readers commenting on hydrofracking seem not to mind sacrificing New York’s drinking water and natural beauty in favor of unrestricted use of energy and a handful of temp jobs. Perhaps if they had read recent issues of Scientific American and the  City

JANUARY 25-31, 2012

New York Times, they might think differently. There are enormous problems with horizontal, high-pressure, slick-water hydrofracking, documented in the experience of other states, where the practice has left permanent damage: the poisoned wells in Pennsylvania, reported in a front-page New York Times article, and the earthquakes in Oklahoma and Ohio, for example. Then there are the massive amounts of water required, four to five million gallons per well. Multiply that by the 2000 wells initially planned for New York, and the total floats around eight to 10 billion gallons of water permanently removed from use for farmers, wine makers, recreation, household consumption, and wildlife. Half of the fracking water — made “slick” with a toxic brew that includes diesel fuel, benzene, and toluene (an ingredient of model airplane glue) — will remain forever in the ground far below access by ordinary water wells. The other half of this polluted water gushes back up to the surface, where it must be kept away from lakes, streams, sewers, and wells for home use. The DEC says this will be accomplished in closed storage facilities that will never leak until it can be shipped by tanker trucks that will never be involved in accidents to Ohio, which will apparently be delighted to receive this deadly waste. The much vaunted economic boom in jobs and service industries will last about as long as the construction phase, perhaps two years. Once these facilities are operational, they will require only about 10 percent of the jobs initially created. These are likely to be filled by experienced operators, probably from Texas, where the technology was developed and to which paychecks will be sent home. In the meantime, farms will be abandoned, affected homeowners will move out, vacationers and outdoor enthusiasts will cease to come to the blighted landscapes. Wineries will fail, and the restaurants and motels that served vacationers will close. Wildlife will have to look elsewhere for clean water and suitable habitat or die. The earth’s population of humans continues to grow. At

some point, the oil will run out. We can’t afford to further thicken the atmosphere by burning more coal, and we can’t afford to waste our diminishing water on a desperate effort to glean more gas, which itself adds carbon to the atmosphere and fuels climate change. We can start by pursuing a simpler, less consumptive lifestyle by rejecting this supremely destructive technology and making a more sincere effort at developing alternative energy sources. JOHN KASTNER, ROCHESTER

Beer and water

On our blog on Ommegang brewery’s concerns about fracking and water contamination:

There has to be a time where we just say, “No. That is not an acceptable trade-off for electricity. Deal with it, corporations and consumers. You do not have an inalienable right to cheap electricity.” STUART BEDASSO

Ommegang asserts that it has the right to restrict the mineral owners from realizing their wealth — based on fear of a negative outcome for its own business? Perhaps Ommegang should purchase the mineral rights from the owners. CARLOS BRIONES

Whether Bud is made in St. Louis or Columbus, they buy local water and purify it through distillation and sell the excess back to the local utility cleaner than they got it. Ommegang can’t distill water? L TRUTHAN

Historically, the best finest breweries in the world are located where they are because of access to an ample supply of good water. We all would try to confront a threat to our livelihood. Large industrial breweries work on a different business model; Ommegang is not in that category. SOREN

News. Music. Life. Greater Rochester’s Alternative Newsweekly January 25-31, 2012 Vol 41 No 20 250 North Goodman Street Rochester, New York 14607-1199 themail@rochester-citynews.com phone (585) 244-3329 fax (585) 244-1126 rochestercitynewspaper.com Publishers: William and Mary Anna Towler Editor: Mary Anna Towler Asst. to the publishers: Matt Walsh Editorial department themail@rochester-citynews.com Features editor: Eric Rezsnyak News editor: Christine Carrie Fien Staff writers: Tim Louis Macaluso, Jeremy Moule Music editor: Willie Clark Music writer: Frank De Blase Calendar editor: Rebecca Rafferty Contributing writers: Kate Antoniades, Paloma Capanna, Casey Carlsen, Roman Divezur, George Grella, Susie Hume, Andy Klingenberger, Dave LaBarge, Kathy Laluk, Michael Lasser, James Leach, Ron Netsky, Dayna Papaleo, Rebecca Rafferty, David Yockel Jr. Editorial intern: Eric LaClair, Deb Schleede Art department artdept@rochester-citynews.com Production manager: Max Seifert Designers: Aubrey Berardini, Matt DeTurck Photographers: Frank De Blase, Matt DeTurck, Michael Hanlon Advertising department ads@rochester-citynews.com Advertising sales manager: Betsy Matthews Account executives: Tom Decker, Annalisa Iannone, William Towler Classified sales representatives: Christine Kubarycz, Tracey Mykins Operations/Circulation info@rochester-citynews.com Circulation Assistant: Katherine Stathis Distribution: Andy DiCiaccio, David Riccioni, Northstar Delivery City Newspaper is available free of charge. Additional copies of the current issue may be purchased for $1, payable in advance at the City Newspaper office. City Newspaper may be distributed only by authorized distributors. No person may, without prior written permission of City Newspaper, take more than one copy of each weekly issue. City (ISSN 1551-3262) is published weekly by WMT Publications, Inc. Periodical postage paid at Rochester, NY (USPS 022-138). Send address changes to City, 250 North Goodman Street, Rochester, NY 14607. City is a member of the Association of Alternative Newsweeklies and the New York Press Association. Subscriptions: $35.00 ($30.00 for senior citizens) for one year. Add $10 yearly for out-of-state subscriptions: add $30 yearly for foreign subscriptions. Due to the initial high cost of establishing new subscriptions, refunds for fewer than ten months cannot be issued. Copyright by WMT Publications Inc., 2011 - all rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, photocopying, recording or by any information storage retrieval system without permission of the copyright owner.


urban journal | by mary anna towler

Lessons from Newt Newt Gingrich now stands a good chance of being the Republican presidential nominee. I’m not sure politics can get any weirder than this. Gingrich is a long way from sewing up the nomination, obviously. But last week was quite a week. And Gingrich’s rise — his win in South Carolina, his lead in the Florida polls (at least as of early this week) — is particularly impressive given that Mitt Romney was leading in both states only days before Saturday’s South Carolina primary. Gingrich has also been closing in on Romney in nationwide polls. All this happened despite potentially devastating charges by Gingrich’s second wife. And he overtook Romney in the Florida polls despite Romney’s support by Florida establishment Republicans and his campaign’s presence there — and heavy spending —since last fall. Part of this was Romney’s own doing; he fumbled his responses to questions about his tax returns and the Bain Capitalrelated layoffs. As several conservative commentators have noted, he should have known he’d be asked about them. (“Both of these topics were big issues not merely in Romney’s 2002 gubernatorial campaign, but his 1994 Senate run,” wrote Jim Geraghty in The National Review. “How does a candidate get blindsided by 18-year-old handicaps?”) Gingrich is a better debater than Romney, but something else is at work. In his sharp comments, he is identifying with, and giving voice to, the concerns of many white, conservative voters. Those voters bristle at being called racist when they oppose entitlements. And when Gingrich defends his charge that Obama is a “Food Stamp president,” Geraghty wrote, he is giving “the fearless, unapologetic rebuke to that thinking they had been yearning to hear for years.” The Wall Street Journal added this: “Since Reagan, Republicans have had a President or nominee who was typically either tongue-tied or timid in defending their policies and principles. With Mr. Obama preparing a re-election assault on those principles, GOP voters understandably want a tenacious advocate. Voters sense that, whatever his other failings, Mr. Gingrich can match Mr. Obama on the issues and won’t go down without a fight.” It won’t be a surprise if at some point Gingrich flames out, handing the nomination, finally, to Romney. But these early days in the Republican campaign are raising important questions. Among them:

Hard-core conservative Republicans and evangelicals are in open rebellion against a candidate they consider a Republican Establishment choice. • Will the 2012 election worsen the divisions among Americans? Gingrich and other politicians are capitalizing on the feeling among many white Americans that their own economic problems are due to give-aways to African Americans and job stealing by immigrants. Democrats ought to be able to talk about fairness, wealth disparity, and Americans’ common bonds — and do it without appealing to voters’ baser instincts. But it is harder to get that message across in tough economic times than in good ones. • What will the Republican Party be like in the future? Clearly, hard-core conservative Republicans and evangelicals do not like Mitt Romney. And right now, they are in open rebellion against a candidate they consider a Republican Establishment choice. Are these early-state votes a signal that the rebels are in firm control of their party? In a New York Review of Books article in late September, when even the Iowa caucuses seemed far in the future, Michael Tomasky addressed that question. “Party establishments typically mitigate the more extreme impulses of the activist bases,” he wrote. “But this isn’t happening in today’s GOP.” Establishment Republicans in Congress are doing things they never would have done until a few years ago, Tomasky said, digging in their heels, for instance, on things they’ve gone along with before, like raising the debt limit. This is the result of the no-compromise, Tea Party freshmen. “A key thing to watch for, in determining the future of the Republican Party,” Tomasky said, “is whether this no-compromise base becomes a majority within the GOP electorate during next year’s primaries.” We’re into those primaries now. And next Tuesday, Florida may tell us a lot about where both the Republican Party and the nation are headed.

rochestercitynewspaper.com

City 


[ news from the week past ]

News This is what North American Breweries wants to do with the Cataract Street property. This image shows a brewery, visitors’ center, museum, and restaurant on the left. The remains of 13 Cataract are on the right. Part of the foundation of the building has been reincorporated as part of an outdoor festival site. The city’s Zoning Board gave NAB permission last week to tear down the old brew house at 13 Cataract.

Kodak files for Chapter 11

Eastman Kodak, a corporation almost synonymous with Rochester, filed for bankruptcy. The company was unable to raise the billions in cash it needed from the sale of digital imaging patents, and was forced to seek protection from its creditors under Chapter 11. Kodak was by far the Rochester region’s largest employer for years. The news, though expected, is especially troubling for Kodak retirees, who are concerned that their health-care benefits could be reduced.

Good news for Occupiers

City Court Judge Teresa Johnson dismissed

 City

POLITICS | BY JEREMY MOULE

Congressional redistricting factors are adding up

charges against 16 members of Occupy Rochester. The Occupiers were arrested last fall after they tried to stay in Washington Square Park past its 11 p.m. closing time. The Occupiers were charged with trespassing, and some faced an additional violation.

The House seats held by Kathy Hochul and Tom Reed are increasingly likely to survive redistricting. As part of the once-a-decade redistricting process, New York has to eliminate two congressional seats. That much was made clear by Census results released in late December 2010. Conventional wisdom was that a Republican seat Upstate and a Democratic seat in New York City would be cut.

Filling a $40 million hole

City schools Interim Superintendent Vargas is planning on reducing a $40 million budget gap for next year with the help of $10 million in state aid. That aid, however, is dependent on providing the State Education Department with an acceptable plan for evaluating the district’s teachers.

JANUARY 25-31, 2012

After her unexpected victory in a special election last May, Democratic Congress woman Kathy Hochul has become a high-profile representative. FILE PHOTO

The state legislators leading the redistricting process haven’t said which congressional districts will be eliminated. A proposal for the new districts could come any day now. However, State Assembly member John McEneny, who co-chairs a State Legislature redistricting committee, told the Buffalo News last week that a proposal probably won’t be ready for several weeks. Early speculation pointed to Hochul’s 26th District seat or Reed’s 29th District seat as potential Upstate targets. However, a series of events — some banal, some bizarre — have complicated

matters. For example: • Democratic House member Maurice Hinchey announced his retirement. Hinchey represents some of the most southern parts of the Southern Tier, including Ithaca and Binghamton. That paves the way for a new Southern-Tierfocused district that could combine part of Hinchey’s district and part of Reed’s district. His retirement could even affect a couple of Buffalo-area districts. • In February, Republican Chris Lee resigned at record speed after Gawker broke news about his continues on page 9


The cuts to the Rural and Neighborhood Preservation Programs will set back grassroots community improvement efforts, says Joan Roby-Davison, who served as executive director of Group 14621 for more than a decade. “This is going to leave neighborhoods in Rochester really without staff to support their efforts,” she says.

NEIGHBORHOODS | BY JEREMY MOULE

EDUCATION | BY TIM LOUIS MACALUSO

Little-noticed cuts may hurt neighborhoods

Grad rate drops

Governor Andrew Cuomo’s state budget proposal for 2012-2013 eliminates a pair of programs that directly impact urban neighborhoods. Cuomo’s plan cuts funding for the state’s Rural and Neighborhood Preservation Programs grants, which partially fund neighborhood groups like the South Wedge Planning Committee, Group 14621, North East Area Development, and South East Area Coalition. The budget also creates a new Foreclosure Relief Unit within the Department of Financial Services, seemingly at the expense of foreclosure legal assistance programs. The new unit would provide counseling and mediation services to help homeowners stay in their homes, say budget materials. David Newstadt, a spokesperson for the Department of Financial Services, says the program is still in the planning stages. The state’s Foreclosure Prevention Services Program provided grants to legal aid groups and housing organizations to assist homeowners facing foreclosure. The program’s out of money, however, and Cuomo’s proposal doesn’t include new funding. Subsequently, the legal aid group Empire Justice Center has dismissed two paralegals, says Becky Case, supervising attorney of the organization’s Foreclosure Prevention Unit. One paralegal worked cases, she says, while

Rochester school district officials predicted last year that the August graduation rate would increase from 51 percent in 2010 to an estimated 53 percent in 2011. And that was supposed to be a conservative estimate. But the 2011 rate instead fell to 49.4 percent, an estimate that includes the late summer graduates who take Regents exams in August. | The New York State Education Department has not released the official grad rates for 2011, but school board member Van White says he recently learned about the drop in rates during a telephone conversation with state officials. | “I don’t understand how [former] Superintendent Jean-Claude Brizard could present something to his supervisors, and it’s this way off,” White says. “If we can’t say to our community that we have a handle on our kids, they should throw all us bums out.” | District officials had no explanation for the revised estimate at a meeting on Monday night, but shoddy student attendance and tracking could be partly to blame for the persistently low grad rate, they said. | And the state is phasing in a “Regents diploma only” policy, which means that students entering as freshman in 2007 had to pass four Regents exams at 65 or better to graduate in 2011.

the other handled client intake and supported the attorneys. “We’re accepting very few clients from now on,” Case says. Foreclosures are often the result of financial problems, which Joan Roby-Davison. also means that the FILE PHOTO homeowner might not be able to afford legal assistance, Case says. If homeowners can’t afford attorneys, she says, they are at a disadvantage right from the start of proceedings. The cuts to the Rural and Neighborhood Preservation Programs will set back grassroots community improvement efforts, says Joan Roby-Davison, who served as executive director of Group 14621 for more than a decade. The city has 11 neighborhood preservation corporations, as they’re called. “This is going to leave neighborhoods in Rochester really without staff to support their efforts,” says Roby-Davison, now the executive director of Sector 4 Community Development Corporation, which does not receive Neighborhood Preservation Program funding. Roby-Davison says the programs have been cut before and then restored, and that there will be a lobbying effort to get the funding back.

Cost of War 4,484 US servicemen and servicewomen, 318 Coalition servicemen and servicewomen, and approximately 104,872 to 114,540 Iraqi civilians have been killed in Iraq from the beginning of the war and occupation to January 20. No American casualties were reported after November 14. IRAQ TOTALS —

AFGHANISTAN TOTALS

1,880 US servicemen and servicewomen and 995 Coalition servicemen and servicewomen have been killed in Afghanistan from the beginning of the war and occupation to January 20. Statistics for Afghan civilian casualties are not available. American casualties from January 11 to 18: -- Sgt. 1st Class Benjamin B. Wise, 34, Little Rock, Ark. -- Cpl. Jon-Luke Bateman, 22, Tulsa, Okla. -- Lance Cpl. Kenneth E. Cochran, 20, Wilder, Idaho -- Spc. Keith D. Benson, 27, Brockton, Mass. -- Cpl. Phillip D. McGeath, 25, Glendale, Ariz.. —

iraqbodycount. org, icasualties.org, Department of Defense SOURCES:

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rochestercitynewspaper.com

City 


INTERVIEW | BY TIM LOUIS MACALUSO

Building a vision for Rochester’s schools Construction will begin this summer on School 58, School 50, Charlotte, School 17, and Franklin. They are five of the 12 buildings selected for the $325 million first phase of the long anticipated effort to modernize Rochester’s aging schools. The massive $1.2 billion project was conceived about seven years ago. But after a succession of stops and starts, changes in superintendents, and multiple changes to the plan, the schools modernization program began to resemble a listing, big-government project desperate for a vision. Parents and community members have often asked about the reasoning for the project. Is it to rehab old buildings? Is it to help improve student achievement? Or is it to try and stop the erosion in student population as parents continue to seek alternatives to city schools? The schools modernization program is all of these things, say Interim Superintendent Bolgen Vargas and school board President Malik Evans. They say they want to shed the skin and bones of a decades-old school system and replace it with modern learning environments that can help teachers stimulate students, and stop the exodus of middle-class families to charter and suburban schools. “We want the district to improve, and you can’t do that unless you have a cornucopia of kids,” Evans said in a recent roundtable discussion. “You can’t have all poor black kids in a district and expect it to do well.” Bolgen and Evans are still grappling, however, with some persistent issues. For instance, former Superintendent Jean-Claude Brizard wanted to use the project to convert some elementary schools from K-6 to K-8. The changes mean some buildings will need more classrooms, while others will end up with extra space. The idea has drawn both praise and sharp criticism. And even though Vargas and Evans say the schools modernization program will help the district financially by reducing the amount of overall building space, closing schools is often an upsetting process for parents, students, and teachers. Success of the school modernization program will ultimately depend on careful implementation, Vargas said, something that’s been a problem for the district. Support for the rest of the project, he said, will likely depend on the success of phase one. In a recent interview, Vargas, Evans, senior director of operations Jerome Underwood, and chief of staff Mary Doyle talked about the meaning of the modernization program to the district and the city, going to a K-8 school model, and competing with other school districts for students. The following is an edited version of that discussion.

Construction and swing space CITY: Where does the schools modernization program stand? Jerome Underwood: We’re pretty much

looking to break ground in July on five schools in what we’re calling “phase 1-A of phase one.” Those schools are: School 58, Charlotte, School 50, School 17, and a smaller project at Franklin. In addition to those five schools is a district-wide technology upgrade that will start in those five schools. We’re looking to put Requests for Proposals out soon so the construction companies can start buying materials and be ready to go to work. As soon as school closes at the end of June, we want to get going. Does this mean students at these schools will have to go someplace else next year? Underwood: No, not students from every

school. School 58 is going to be a two-year project. That is the only two-year project out of those that I mentioned. Their swing space location will be the Franklin campus.  City

JANUARY 25-31, 2012

School 50 will be going to swing space at 595 Upper Falls Boulevard, which is currently School 6. But as you know, we’re closing School 6. We have not finalized the swing space location for School 17 yet. It will either be Jefferson or the Freddie Thomas campus. Charlotte’s swing space will be 175 Martin Street (formerly 690 St. Paul Street. The address changed). Our Young Men’s Leadership Academy is currently housed at Charlotte. They’re going to go to the Edison campus. At one point the school board was surprised to learn that swing space may require an additional $30 million. Can you explain how that happened and where it stands now? Underwood: In our swing space plan in

December 2010, I proposed closing Schools 2 and 6. The schools modernization program was not the only driver in that, but it was a significant driver. The board said no to closing 2 and 6. But the board did approve using Martin Street (690 St. Paul Street) for swing space.

2012

Phase ONE of schools modernization summer work schedule

SCHOOL 17

FRANKLIN CAMPUS

Budget: $19 million

Budget: $4.2 million

New classrooms Large building addition for cafeteria and gymnasium New vestibule and entranceway Expanded parking

Renovation of kitchen Adding handicapped-accessible entrances and elevator Renovation of lobby area Installing parking lot and bus loop

CHARLOTTE HIGH SCHOOL

SCHOOL 58

Budget: $19.4 million

Budget: $34.36 million

Replacing heating, plumbing, and electrical systems Asbestos abatement Replacing some doors and original windows Replacing roof

Adding 100,000 square feet Adding classrooms, gymnasium, and administrative space Replacing heating, plumbing, and electrical systems Asbestos abatement Replacing doors and windows Replacing roof

SCHOOL 50 Budget: $16.4 million Adding 53,331 square feet for classrooms, gymnasium, and kitchen Expanded parking

We needed swing space for some of our elementary schools, as well as some of our high schools. We lease a portion of 30 Hart Street, which was going to be swing space for two elementary schools. But in order for that to happen, significant build out of several floors would be needed to accommodate two schools. Typically, the landlord would do the build out and charge it back to us — the tenant — over the term of a 15-year lease. At that point in time, we didn’t have any idea about the costs involved. I received a proposal [from the landlord of 30 Hart Street] and, over the 15 years, the cost of that lease would be $30.6 million. Given that we are supposed be going into phase two of the project, but we are not absolutely certain that there will be a phase two, we didn’t think it was prudent to enter into a 15-year lease. We’re also facing a $40 million budget deficit for next year. So we came back and said, “We’ve got to do something to avoid that additional cost.” We proposed closing School 6. With a $40 million budget gap, what would the public perception be if we had to

lay people off while we were signing a 15-year lease to the tune of $30 million? Bolgen Vargas: We shouldn’t be incurring that extra cost when in fact we have the extra space. Initially you were talking about adding things like sports fields and other amenities. Are those still part of the project? Underwood: No. It’s a question of

affordability. We would like to, but the main emphasis is on academics. And $325 million seems like a large number, but it’s really a small number when you break it down by school. The reimbursement from the state on sports fields is not that great. We’re trying to leverage as much [reimbursement from the state] as possible, so we have to get as close to the classroom as we can.

K-8 schools CITY: How much of the schools modernization program is driven by the reconfiguration of schools from K-6 to K-8? Underwood: The real impetus was not going

to K-8; it was a declining building stock. There


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were some serious infrastructure needs that needed to be taken care of: boilers, roofs, and that type of stuff. Certainly there is work ahead to convert K-6 buildings to K-8 buildings. We’ve tried to balance those two needs. Vargas: I believe Mr. Brizard recommended going to the K-8 model about a year ago. And that’s part of the challenge when you have a long-term project like this. You have to make adjustments along the way, and that’s normal. But as we make changes, we have to communicate with the teachers and students so that the renovations accommodate their needs. We got a letter to the editor a few days ago asking, “Why are we doing this? What evidence is there that K-8 is better educationally?” Vargas: When it comes to educational

reform, people argue about the structure all the time. But at the end of the day, it’s about how you implement. For example, at Franklin High School at one point we changed to the small school units. We broke the big school model down. But I think the implementation was not done with the kind of fidelity that the small schools model called for. We have celebrated the introduction of reform efforts, but we haven’t been careful about making sure that we are indeed doing what we set out to do. This time around we’re monitoring. For example, with the new high schools, we just got a report that looks at how they’re doing. And we’re monitoring them very closely. The same thing is going to happen with the K-8 model. The implementation is crucial so that we can decide: Did we accomplish what we wanted? What we do know is that the K-8 model provides continuity and stability for students and families, and it’s something we can defend from an instructional perspective. If you look at the factors that contribute to student achievement, one of them, I would argue, is stability. The other is meeting the developmental needs of kids. It is well established that the needs of younger kids are more aligned with middle school kids, than when you place middle school kids with high school students. Having said that, it’s going to be very challenging given our building structures. Are teachers and neighbors on board with the proposed changes to these schools that are becoming K-8? Underwood: The only opposition I’m aware

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When the modernization program is finished, there will likely be fewer schools in the city school district, says Interim Superintendent Bolgen Vargas PHOTO by mike hanlon

of was at [School] 28. On the other projects, people are very excited, not only in the schools, but in the community. Again, this project is going to be transformative. I’m really excited about School 17. This school is probably going to have the widest community impact. We have a very involved principal along with strong community partners. The same is true of Schools 50 and 58. But I think 17 is exemplary. Vargas: At School 28, we were planning on adding a [third] floor to that building. But people who have been living in that neighborhood for years really didn’t want that. So we’re not doing that. And that’s one of the things about a project like this. There are going to be changes along the way, and that’s fine. Are all of the elementary schools going to become K-8 eventually? Malik Evans: That’s a hot topic. We’re going to

have to revisit this and have a community-wide conversation about it. Is it K-8 or not? We said we were going to see how it goes. Some people like K-8 and really want it. Others are saying, no, no, no. So we’re going to have to get some clarity pretty quickly. Most of the schools that have gone to K-8 have been very adamant and active about going to K-8. For example, at School 4, they have been very strong about going to K-8. On the west side, School 2 isn’t part of the modernization project, but they’re also very strong on the K-8 model. But it seems premature to say that all of the schools are going to go this way. continues on page 8

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Building a vision for Rochester’s schools continues from page 7

Are you looking at combining schools then? Won’t you end up with empty classrooms in some schools? Underwood: One of the express intents of the

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schools modernization project is to look at how efficiently we use our space. So as we look to convert some of our schools to K-8, it does exactly what you’re outlining. It creates some vacancy in other buildings. We’re constantly looking at increasing the utilization of our buildings. When we look at our enrollment, we’re losing population. So how much space do we really need? As we go through the project, we’re going to need buildings for swing space. We’re still in phase one, and we have phases two and three to come. But certainly when the project is completed, there are going to be buildings we should be able to give back to the city. Is it fair to say that you haven’t singled out schools to close even though you know you’re going to? Underwood: That’s correct. Vargas: This plan started six to seven years ago

and the district had more students than we have now. And this trend doesn’t look as if it is going to reverse itself any time soon. We know the district is going to have to reduce its footprint because of competition from charter schools and low population growth in the city. Common sense would tell us, particularly with our financial challenges, that we’re going to have to invest our money wisely. Evans: When we talk about closing schools, one of the things that we said we’re going to do this year and next is try to look long term so that we’re not coming to the community right before we’re going to close them. We need to give the community an overall educational plan so parents and students are not shocked and surprised. We know that we have a declining enrollment that is driving some of this. But on the flip side, I’m hoping we can reverse some of this by competing with charter and private schools, especially at the high school level because that’s where we lose a lot of our students. That’s why it’s so important that our Young Men’s Academy, Integrated Arts and Technology, Vanguard, and the other new schools succeed. It’s very important that we try to reduce our footprint. But we’re really going to have to compete, too. Look at Genesee Community Charter School. That’s a target audience. I look at this from the perspective of a Rochester citizen. Even if I wasn’t on the school board, I want more Rochester families to stay in the city. We’re 58 years from Brown v. Board of Education, but Rochester’s schools are still more segregated than they were before the ruling. That’s crazy, right?  City

JANUARY 25-31, 2012

Phase ONE projects and

Budgets 2013 SCHOOL 28 $20 million

SCHOOL 5 $17.73 million

MONROE HIGH SCHOOL $23.5 million

EAST HIGH SCHOOL $19.84 million City schools must compete with suburban and charter schools to keep middle-class families in the city, says school board President Malik Evans. file PHOTo

EDISON $22.2 million

DISTRICT-WIDE TECHNOLOGY UPGRADE

Part of our marketing strategy has to be to keep these middle-class families in the city. And we shouldn’t be doing it for altruistic reasons. We should be doing it because it makes sense from an academic standpoint. The districts that do well are the ones that have a racial-ethnic mix, and also a socioeconomic mix.

2014

School choice and neighborhood schools

$21 million

CITY: Have you talked at all about going back to neighborhood schools? People keep bringing that up. Vargas: Right now we have the school

choice plan, which conflicts with neighborhood schools. But we could make adjustments that promote choice and still allow for some type of neighborhood schools program. We would have to make certain adjustments to the policy. For example, we might have a situation where the child might not be able to go into fullday K from pre-K at a particular school without reapplying. That doesn’t make any sense. If we want stability, when a mom and a dad come to us, it should always be viewed as a longterm relationship. And we don’t view it that way. Another example deals with arts. To the extent that parents think you can only get arts in certain schools, you can’t argue with a family that says, “I’m going to move across town because that school has what I want for my child.”

Art and music in city schools CITY: Do you think art and music should be included in the basic curriculum? Evans and Vargas: Absolutely.

$12 million

SCHOOL 12 $15.65 million

THOMAS JEFFERSON HIGH SCHOOL

Vargas: To me, you have to start the

conversation with a vision. What are the essential components that every school must have? I think the community will tell you, for an elementary school not to have music and art is unacceptable. We have to make sure that we look at our budget to make sure that we make the adjustments necessary to fund our priorities. Evans: I had three siblings go through School of the Arts. They did well academically because they had that extra incentive to go to school. Kids who go to SOTA are so much more wideeyed and bushy-tailed to go to school because they have that extra programming in arts and music. I think we can have that same thing in other schools. Vargas: If we indeed want to keep families from moving away, we need to do something. Many parents tell me they’re leaving because they want their children to be exposed to more music and art. And they believe they can get that in the neighboring districts. And when you look at our neighboring districts, I can’t think of a single one that doesn’t have arts and music.


Congressional redistricting continues from page 4

Craigslist exploits. Lee had reportedly sent a racy photo of himself to a woman he was corresponding with. His resignation triggered a May special election in the traditionally Republican district, which Hochul, a Democrat, won. Hochul has become a highprofile freshman who’s worked hard to build support among her constituents. Democrats now might be eager to retain a seat for her. • Downstate, Democrat Anthony Weiner resigned after he, too, got busted sending racy photos to a woman. And not the woman he married. That happened in June, and in the subsequent special election a Republican won the seat. What was a safe Democratic district in New York City is now in Republican hands. Monroe County Democratic and Republican leaders say they want a congressional district that’s centered in

the county, instead of the four it’s now split between. The Census Bureau says the average population of a congressional district is about 710,767. Monroe County’s population is 744,344. Using Census numbers, then, most of the county would fit into a single district. The idea of a Monroe-centered district isn’t new. But if legislators agree to it, it could push back the borders of the 26th, 29th, or 25th Districts. One of the districts would still have to cross into Monroe County, since the population is larger than the size allowed for a single congressional district. But two districts would make for a less divided county, physically speaking.

MUSIC | BY WILLIE CLARK

Headliners announced for 2012 Jazz Fest

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The Xerox Rochester International Jazz Festival has announced four of the headliners for the festival’s 11th year, including a return for Norah Jones, who appeared at the first Jazz Fest. Joining Jones are Diana Krall, Dweezil Zappa, and Steve Martin & the Steep Diana Krall will appear on opening night of the 2012 Jazz Fest. Canyon Rangers. photo provided Krall, a Canadian a collaboration with producer Danger jazz pianist and singer, Mouse, is due out this spring. performs on the festival’s opening night, Also, as previously announced, singer, Friday, June 22 ($55-$120). Krall’s 1999 songwriter, and guitarist Bonnie Raitt release, “When I Look in Your Eyes,” was will play a pre-festival show at 8 p.m. on the first jazz album to be nominated for Sunday, May 27, at Kodak Hall at Eastman Album of the Year in 25 years. Dweezil Theatre, with Marc Cohn opening. Zappa ($40-$95), Frank Zappa’s son, will perform Zappa Plays Zappa, a tribute to his Tickets for all shows go on sale at 10 a.m. on Friday, January 27, via late father’s career, on Tuesday, June 26. rochesterjazz.com. Tickets will also be Actor, comedian, and musician Steve available in person at the Kodak Hall Oval Martin ($55-$105) will perform an Lobby Box Office from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. “Evening of Bluegrass and Comedy” on January 27 only. Order tickets by calling on Wednesday, June 27, with the Steep (585) 454-2060. All shows are at Kodak Canyon Rangers. Hall at Eastman Theatre. Singer Norah Jones($70-$125) makes her return to Rochester. Jones’ latest album, “Little Broken Hearts,” rochestercitynewspaper.com

City 


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(585) 473-8031 741 Monroe Avenue Rochester, NY 14607 For more Tom Tomorrow, including a political blog and cartoon archive, visit http://thismodernworld.com

Urban Action This week’s calls to action include the following events and activities. (All are free and open to the public, unless otherwise noted.)

Clergy for Obama meeting

Rochester Faith Community for Obama 2012 will hold a planning meeting at 1 p.m. on Thursday, January 26. The meeting is for Rochester-area clergy members. It will be held at First Genesis Church, 292 Hudson Avenue.

Nonviolence workshop

The MK Gandhi Institute for Nonviolence will hold “Introduction to Nonviolence,” an all-day workshop, 10 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., on Saturday, January 28. It will be held at the University of Rochester, Interfaith Chapel on the River Campus. Registration: 276-4962. Donations accepted.

Dyson to give MLK address

“Have We Discovered Warp Speed, Scotty?” a talk by Kevin McFarland, UR physics professor, at 12:12 p.m. on Tuesday, January 31. McFarland will share what he knows about the recent discovery of subatomic particles traveling faster than the speed of light. The talk will be held at the Central Library, Kate Gleason Auditorium, 115 South Avenue.

Talk on urban planning and design

Free breast cancer screening

The University of Rochester will host author and MSNBC political analyst Michael Eric Dyson to deliver UR’s 2012 Martin Luther King commemorative address at 6 p.m. on Friday, January 27. The event will be held in the Strong Auditorium on the River Campus. Dyson also hosts an hour-long news show on NPR.

The Rochester Regional Community Design Center will present “Transformation: Don’t be Afraid of It,” a talk by Peter Park, planning director for Denver. The meeting will be held at 7 p.m. on Tuesday, January 31, at Gleason Works, 1000 University Avenue.

McFarland vs. Einstein on physics

Friends of the Rochester Public Library will host 10 City JANUARY 25-31, 2012

Elizabeth Wende Breast Care will offer free mammograms for uninsured women only, age 40 and over, from 7 a.m. to noon on Saturday, January 28, at Elizabeth Wende Breast Care in Brighton, 170 Sawgrass Drive. Call 4422190


Dining like stuffed meatloaf, homemade chicken pot pies, and five different kinds of macaroni and cheese. One new addition to the menu is a sweet potato-encrusted chicken breast topped with caramelized onion apple glaze and sweet potato strings. Shea’s Grill is located at 6361 Knickerbocker Road in Ontario. Prices range from $8 to $21. It is open for dinner Tuesday-Saturday 5-9:30 p.m. and for brunch Saturday-Sunday 8 a.m.-3 p.m. For more information call 315-524-8367 or visit sheasgrill.com.

Cue up the ‘que

Baked oysters with shrimp-fennel-bacon-horseradish stuffing (pictured left) and linguine with clams (right) at Zeppa Bistro. PHOTOS BY MATT DETURCK

The dream team [ CHOW HOUND ] BY SUSIE HUME

As the old idiom goes, too many cooks spoil the broth. But throw two chefs with amazing pedigrees into the kitchen and you may have the recipe for success. That’s what local well-known chefs Seth Lindahl and Kenneth Holenbeck are hoping with their new venture, Zeppa Bistro, which opened its doors last week in the South Wedge. Lindahl, formerly of Max Chophouse, and Holenbeck, owner of Mise En Place, which Lindahl now co-owns, cooked up the partnership idea years ago when they worked alongside one another at Restaurant 2Vine. The new restaurant is situated in the space that formerly housed The Keg, a sports bar, grill, and music venue in the lower floor of Gregory Street’s historic German House. The German House itself is also now under Lindahl’s and Holenbeck’s management. “We both have a huge passion for this,” says Holenbeck. “We love the South Wedge neighborhood and the building is beautiful, so we really wanted to make it shine.” The pair extensively renovated the space, gutting the basement to its studs

and adding new floors and a ceiling. During the process they uncovered brick arches from the building’s original construction, which are now prominently featured in the restaurant design. The basement bistro is decorated mainly in neutral beiges and grays, allowing the richness of the wood tables, leather banquettes, and arched wood ceiling to stand out. The pair has also added a handicapped-accessible elevator. The restaurant — currently only open for dinner — features a menu of modern American dishes made with ingredients sourced from local purveyors, like Bolton Farms in Hilton. The menu includes a handful of pasta dishes, five different cuts of dry-aged steak, salads, starters, and specialty entrees. Some notable selections include a slow-cooked pork shoulder served with crispy polenta, rapini, and a natural au jus; fennel sausage sliders topped with fresh mozzarella, roasted peppers, and garlic Dijon aioli; seared Atlantic salmon served with lentils, salsify (a root with a flavor compared to oysters), carrot nage, frisee, and crispy shallots; and sides like polenta fries topped with parmesan and truffle oil,

or honey Dijon roasted Brussels sprouts. The restaurant also serves wine, beer, and specialty cocktails. In addition to the restaurant, Lindahl and Holenbeck also plan to use the German House theater upstairs as a catering hall that can accommodate up to 240 people, as well as the aptly named 47 Room, a back room for private parties of up to 47 people with a private entrance and bathroom. They will also continue to run concerts and events in the upstairs German House. Zeppa Bistro is located at 315 Gregory St. Prices range from $8 to $35. It is open Tuesday-Thursday 4:30-10 p.m. and Friday-Saturday 4:30-11 p.m. For more information call 563-6241 or visit its Facebook page.

Off East and to the east

Two-year-old casual gourmet restaurant Shea’s Grill moved earlier this month from its downtown location on East Avenue to the town of Ontario, childhood home to owner Mark Leenhout’s grandfather. The restaurant’s comfort-food menu has remained largely the same, with specialties

Texas-style barbeque joint Texas Blues BBQ opened last month in the former Bertino’s Italian Food To Go space on Monroe Avenue. The menu includes signature sandwiches, smoked meat platters, starters, combo plates, and sides. Sandwich selections include pulled pork, smoked beef, and brisket topped with a variety of items, from bacon to coleslaw. Smoked meat entrees include the usual suspects: pork ribs, beef brisket, pulled pork, and barbeque chicken (notably apple-brined before smoking), all of which are served with a homemade biscuit and a choice of two sides. Side selections include barbeque favorites like mashed potatoes with gravy, macaroni and cheese, fresh-cut fries, and barbequed beans, as well as lesser-seen treats like candied yams and sweet-potato fries. Texas Blues BBQ is located at 649 Monroe Ave. Prices range from $6 to $17. It is open daily 11 a.m.-12:30 a.m. For more information, call 319-4436.

Closed and coming soon

Mexican grill Casa Moreno (200 Park Point Drive) has closed. Patrons of the restaurant can still enjoy similar authentic offerings at the owners’ other restaurant, Blue Cactus Mexican Grille (5 Liftbridge Lane, in Fairport). The space will not be empty for long — an Aladdin’s Natural Eatery is slated to open there this spring. It will be the fourth location for the Mediterranean eatery in Rochester; current locations are 646 Monroe Ave., 8 Schoen Place in Pittsford, and 290 Exchange Blvd. Chow Hound is a restaurant and local food news column. Do you have a tip for our Chow Hound? Send it to food@rochester-citynews.com.

rochestercitynewspaper.com City 11


Upcoming [ Alt-Country ] Langhorne Slim Thursday, March 1. Abilene Bar and Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. Time TBA. $10. 232-3230. abilenebarandlounge.com.

Music

[ Pop/Rock ] Say Anything Tuesday, April 10. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N. Water St. 6 p.m. Price TBA. 325-5600. waterstreetmusic.com. [ Blues ] Bonnie Raitt Sunday, May 27. Kodak Hall at Eastman Theatre, 60 Gibbs St. 8 p.m. $55.50-$125.50. 454-2060. rochesterjazz.com.

The Malcolm Moore Band Sunday, January 29 Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Drive 7 p.m. | Free | lovincup.com [ Rock ] The Malcolm Moore Band’s tunes are

influenced by a range of eclectic musicians wide enough to include Thelonious Monk, David Bowie, Tom Waits, and Radiohead. Conceptually, the group’s recent album, “REANIMATION,” draws inspiration from the albums of Kate Bush (specifically “The Dreaming” and “Hounds of Love”) and the 1985 Terry Gilliam film, “Brazil.” You may find yourself absorbing some of the spiritual renewal that the album deals with when the band takes the stage Sunday night at Lovin’ Cup. — BY RON NETSKY

Leigh Howard Stevens Thursday, January 26 Hatch Recital Hall, Eastman School of Music, 26 Gibbs St. 8 p.m. | Free | 274-1100, esm.rochester.edu [ CLASSICAL ] Because Time magazine made the claim

in 1988 that Leigh Howard Stevens is “the world’s greatest classical marimbist,” my curiosity was piqued. Stevens created the four-mallet technique that broke through repertoire limitations for the instrument. On Thursday, Stevens will perform works by Bach, Tchaikovsky, Helble, and…Stevens. Stevens is also a composer and publisher, having founded Marimba Productions in 1979 to selfpublish his manual on four-mallet playing. He holds patents for keyboard-percussion designs through his company, Malletech. You can read more of his interesting story at mostlymarimba.com. — BY PALOMA CAPANNA

NEWS. MUSIC. DINING. ARTS & MORE. ALL SENT DIRECTLY TO YOU.

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Wednesday, January 25

Adam Ezra Group performed Saturday, January 21, at Water Street. photo by willie clark

A jam-packed evening

Instead of Sleeping

[ REVIEW ] BY WILLIE CLARK

Friday, January 27 Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 8 p.m. | $6-$8 | 454-2966 [ INDIE ROCK ] Since its formation in the winter of

2008, Instead of Sleeping has independently released two EP’s, one full-length album, and is currently working on a second LP. The catalog includes everything from three-minute, minimalistic, emo melodies to sprawling sonic adventures that demonstrate definite post-rock influences. The band has been playing with nationally respected acts such as fellow indie-experimenters The Dear Hunter, and through innovative live performances has cultivated an impactful, ethereal voice that resonates with the enlightened listener. Pearl White Ghosts and The Anderson Stingrays also perform. — BY DAVID YOCKEL JR.

Cry to the Blind Friday, January 27 Water Street Music Hall, 204 N. Water St. 6:30 p.m. | $10 | waterstreetmusic.com [ ROCK ] These modern rockers first burst on to the scene

by winning the Heineken Unsigned Talent Competition in Rochester in 2006. Cry to the Blind followed an auspicious inaugural year by being named XM Satellite Radio’s Artist of the Week in August 2007. Since then the band has turned its seemingly overnight success into staying power with emotional live performances alongside national acts such as Sevendust, 3 Doors Down, and Papa Roach. The show at Water Street is also the band’s CD release party for its sophomore effort, “From Now On.” — BY DAVID YOCKEL JR.

ROCHESTER

Friday night, along with the Rochester Philharmonic Orchestra, the Dave Bennett Sextet brought some of the best jazz improv I’ve seen this side of last year’s Xerox Rochester International Jazz Festival, and quite possibly the best clarinet playing I’ve seen ever. Bennett was a joy: charismatic, humorous, and one hell of a player. I don’t think it’s fair to say that he plays the clarinet. He wields it, crafting and controlling even the most extreme ranges of the instrument, making a believer out of even the most biased brass players (myself included). The RPO as a whole was slightly underutilized in this setting, and had a hard time competing with the louder dynamics of the sextet. But it was really Bennett in the spotlight. “Yesterday” was hauntingly beautiful, and you can’t go wrong with a rousing edition of “Sing, Sing, Sing.” Saturday was all about the jam. Night two of Max Creek’s annual back-to-back stint at Water Street was a potpourri of talent, all of which knew how to get up and get down with the best of them. Rochester natives T.A.O. opened up, and aside from Creek, was probably the closest band on the bill to the roots of groove-laden jam. I was impressed with what the group brought to the stage, and it had people dancing — and hula hooping — in no time.

But, the next two acts really stole the show. Boston-based Adam Ezra Group blended rock, funk, and Latin undercurrents with front man Ezra’s acoustic guitar-based singer-songwriter tendencies. What resulted was an energetic show that was part sweat, part groove, and all parts awesome. And The Prickers, well… This band is a rare gem that I can’t believe I haven’t had the pleasure of seeing before. Pedal steel, violin, banjo, trumpet, keyboard, bass, and drums blended into a folksy bluegrass stomp that was as much fun as any hoedown. The Naples-based band will be back in town next month, so keep an eye out, and bring your dancing shoes. Max Creek knows how to put on a show; the band’s tried-and-true approach has kept it jamming for 40 years, which is quite the accomplishment by any standard. Saturday night the group played what seemed like one long stream of musical consciousness that made me wonder how all the musicians manage to stay together for such lengths of time. Save for the short break in between sets, there was barely a moment of respite in the band’s nearly four-hour set, but things were a little too laid back for my tastes. The party didn’t finish until 2:30 a.m. A treat for true fans, but a little exhausting for the uninitiated.

[ Acoustic/Folk ] Dave McGrath. Cottage Hotel, 1390 Pittsford-Mendon Rd, Mendon, NY. dave@ davemcgrath.com. 7 p.m. Free.  Rob & Gary Acoustic. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. woodcliffhotelspa.com, 3814000. 5:30 p.m. Free.  Singers Session w/Andrew Fink. McGraw’s Irish Pub, 146 W Commercial St, East Rochester. mcgrawsirishpub.com, 3489091. 7 p.m. Free.  Thunder Body Medicine Wednesdays. Dub Land Underground, 315 Alexander St. facebook. com/thunderbody. 10 p.m. $5 21+, $10 unders.  Tommy Gravino. Rio Tomatlan, 5 Beeman St, Canandaigua. 394-9380. 6:30 p.m. Free. Salsa w/ Shelia dancing during the performance.  [ Blues ] Blackdog & the Powerlung Rangers. Sticky Lips BBQ Juke Joint, 830 Jefferson Rd. stickylipsbbq.com. 9 p.m. Free.  Open Blues Jam w/Nate Coffee. Beale Street Cafe, 693 South Ave. bealestreetcafe.com, 2714650. 7:30 p.m. Call for info.  [ DJ/Electronic ] DJ. One, 1 Ryan Alley. 5461010. 10 p.m. Free.  DJ Keyyo. TC Riley’s, 200 Park Point Dr. tcrileysparkpoint.com, 2729777. 10 p.m. Call for info.  Guest DJs. Vertex, 169 N Chestnut St. 232-5498. 10 p.m. $3-$8.  Teen Set 45 Party. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 542-8336. Midnight. Free. Y Not Wednesday w/DJ ET. Venu Resto-Lounge, 151 St Paul St. 232-5650. 10 p.m. Call for info.  [ Jazz ] Bob Hanley. Lemoncello, 137 W Commercial St, E continues on page 15

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Music — that combination of different tones, styles, and interpretations is what one hears when one hears Middle Eastern music on the radio,” says Spellman-Diaz. For Imani Winds, it’s not just about playing

Since classical composers did not typically write for woodwind quintets, like Imani Winds (pictured), the group commissions original compositions. PHOTO COURTESY Chris Carroll

Have no fear Imani Winds Tuesday, January 31 Kilbourn Hall, Eastman School of Music, 26 Gibbs St. 8 p.m. | $10-$20 | 274-1100, esm.rochester.edu [ PROFILE ] BY PALOMA CAPANNA

When Imani Winds comes to town, the group will be performing works by Pavel Haas, Brian DuFord, and Valerie Coleman, well as arrangements by Debussy and Stravinsky. Composers you may not know? Arrangements of the great masters? What’s that all about? According to Toyin SpellmanDiaz, “that” is the challenge facing the woodwind quintet. “First, picking a woodwind instrument — now, that takes a special kind of crazy,” says Spellman-Diaz, oboist for Imani Winds. “Our whole mission is to expand the repertoire of wind quintets into as many different sounds and styles as possible, be they European, American, African, or Latin American.” Imani Winds is Toyin Spellman-Diaz, oboe; Valerie Coleman, flute/composer; Jeff 14 City JANUARY 25-31, 2012

Scott, French horn/composer; Mariam Adam, clarinet; and Monica Ellis, bassoon. Founded in 1997,the quintet has performed all over the country and the world in its 15 years. The group has recorded six CDs, including 2005’s “The Classical Underground,” which received a Grammy nomination in 2006 in the category “Best Classical Crossover Album.” Spellman-Diaz acknowledges that the reputation of the group may precede the reputation of some of the composers on its programs. “We have developed a good reputation at this point,” she says. “Wherever we go, whether we’re speaking or teaching or giving a concert, we ask people to go on that journey with us and we do it with love. You can feel that every second. We’re giving you our feeling of vertigo, of stepping outside the box.” The imagery of a “box inside a circle” is

one that Spellman-Diaz has used before to explain the sensation of being a “classical cross-over.” “The quintet didn’t come into its own until the 20th Century. People didn’t think of asking the composers to write for it. Even Mozart, who was a great proponent of wind instruments, never

got around to the woodwind quintet. Nobody paid for him to write for one,” says Spellman-Diaz. To face the challenge of repertoire that doesn’t include the likes of Mozart, Beethoven, Brahms, Prokofiev, Shostakovich, or Saint-Saens, Spellman-Diaz credits three ingredients in the group’s recipe for success. First, be willing to perform works by unknown or little-known composers. Second, include musicians in the performance group who are composers. Third, mix vision with execution. “The repertoire was due for a change,” says Spellman-Diaz. “We’re happy to be one of the groups at the forefront.” Indeed, the Imani Winds website uses self-descriptors like “genre-blurring” and “bridging.” Recently, the group embarked on the “Zafir Project,” taking its title from a piece that the group previously commissioned, “Zafir,” by Palestinian composer Simon Shaheen. The purpose of the project is “unearthing sounds and creating possibilities on wind instruments not thought possible,” according to the group’s website. “Shaheen writes notes in between notes, works with rhythms not within classical music

whatever comes its way. Whether selecting a composer to commission or a piece of music to play, for this group it’s either unanimous or it’s not at all. “Our first priority is to have a composer we — and I do mean all five of us — like. We cannot have even one person feel even slightly wishy-washy about it,” says Spellman-Diaz. Spellman-Diaz describes the process of arriving at commissions and compositions as starting with group members Valerie Coleman and Jeff Scott. “They are constantly bringing in whatever is on their iPhone,” says Spellman-Diaz. “We are all constantly listening to different types of music to see if it would work or doesn’t work. There is a constant cycle of trying out new things and moving on.” There is, of course, the practical issue of money. “When you want to get a piece done, you go to the people who have the money,” says Spellman-Diaz. She points out that patrons of the art are not people living on Park Avenue, passing out money; it is a competitive process to win $10,000 contributions for commissions. “You have to go through the logistics of what will make an idea not just some farfetched crazy idea, but one that will come to fruition in some meaningful way,” says Spellman-Diaz. For the past two years, after commissioning “Zafir,” the group has been diving into sounds of the Middle East and Eastern Europe. Clarinetist Mariam Adam is half-Egyptian and half-Mexican. SpellmanDiaz has a friend who plays music from Persia. Members of the group are based in NYC, where she says “all sorts of cultures come together.” All this experimentation has put Imani Winds back into the recording studio. “We’ve been concertizing this music for a couple of years, and people really like what we’re playing and they’re asking for a recording,” says Spellman-Diaz. “We had to put it down. We couldn’t wait any longer.” Amidst all the detail, the conversation with Spellman-Diaz comes around to a simple synthesis of what it really takes to become such an unconventional success surrounded by the strictures of classical music: “Erase the fear — period.”


Wednesday, January 25 Rochester. lemoncello137. com, 385-8565. 6 p.m. Free. Chris Teal’s Open Jam. Tala Vera, 155 State St. tala-vera. com, 546-3945. 8 p.m. $3, free w/dinner.  El Rojo Jazz. Bistro 135, 135 W Commercial St,, East Rochester. bistro135.net, 662-5555. 6 p.m. Free.  Michael Vadala Trio w/ Mammal is a Mountain. Lovin’ Cup, Park Point @ RIT. lovincup.com, 292-9940. 7 p.m. Free.  Open Jam w/The King Bees. Beale Street Cafe, 693 South Ave. bealestreetcafe. com. 7:30 p.m. Free.  Paradigm Shift. Pomodoro Grill & Wine Bar, 1290 University Ave. 271-5000. 7:30 p.m. Free.  Robert Chevrier. Pomodoro Monroe Ave, 3400 Monroe Ave. 586-7000. 6:30 p.m. Free.  Uptown Groove. Little Theatre Cafe, 240 East Ave. thelittle. org. 7:30 p.m. Free.  [ Karaoke ] Karaoke. Elite Bar & Grill, 398 W Main St. 527-8720. 9 p.m. Free.  Karaoke. Pineapple Jacks, 485 Spencerport Rd. 247-5225. 9 p.m. Free.  Karaoke. Monty’s Korner, 363 East Ave. 263-7650. 9.30 p.m. Free.  Karaoke. Applebee’s-Fairport, 585 Moseley Rd, Fairport. 425-4700. 9 p.m. Free.  Karaoke. Mayfields Pub, 669 Winton Rd N. 288-7199. 9 p.m. Free.  Karaoke. Sanibel Cottage, 1517 Empire Blvd, Webster. 671-9340. 6 p.m. Free.  Karaoke. California Brew Haus, 402 Ridge Rd W. 621-1480. 8:30 p.m. Free.  Karaoke w/Jimmy C’s Music Machine ft. Johnny Rocker. Sully’s Pub, 242 South Ave. sullyspubonline.com. 8:30 p.m. Free.  Karaoke w/Mark. Flipside Bar & Grill, 2001 E Main St. 2883930. 8:30 p.m. Free.  Karaoke with Oltra Entertainment. Anchor Bar Marketplace. anchorsportsbar. com, 272-9333. Call for info.   [ Open Mic ] All About the Song Open Mic. Starry Nites Cafe, 696 University Ave. songwriter1955@gmail.com. 7:30 p.m. Free. Sign up at 7 p.m.  Open Acoustic Mic Night w/ Mandy. Shorts Bar & Grill, 35 N Main St, Fairport. 388-0136. 9 p.m. Free.  Open Jam w/Justin Gurnsey. Jukebox, 5435 Ridge Rd W, Spencerport. 352-4505. 10 p.m. Free.  Open Mic. Boulder Coffee Co-South Wedge, 100 Alexander St. 454-7140, bouldercoffeeco.com. 8 p.m. Free. 

R&B | Bitchin’ Kitchen

The Eastman School of Music has cooked up 13 more exceedingly talented musicians that have come together to form Bitchin’ Kitchen. This soulful store of funk and R&B aficionados, consisting of four vocalists (Tamar Greene and the Sue Chefs), a four-piece rhythm section, and five horn players (The Spice Rack), will be showing off its wares at Abilene this weekend. The group offers a diverse menu of tasty selections from Marvin Gaye and Stevie Wonder to The Beatles and Michael Jackson. The dishes just keep coming, and the band’s energetic stage presence will undoubtedly tickle anyone’s palate. Bitchin’ Kitchen performs Saturday, January 28, 9:30 p.m. at Abilene Bar and Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. $5-$6. 232-3230. — BY DAVID YOCKEL JR. Open Mic. Dr’s Inn Grill & Tap Room, 1743 East Ave. 2710820. 5 p.m. Free.  Open Mic w/Jam Shack Music. Stoneyard Bar & Grill, 1 Main St, Brockport. 6373390. 9 p.m. Free.  Open Mic w/Steve West. Muddy Waters Coffee House-Geneseo, 53 Main St, Geneseo. 243-9111. 7-10 p.m. Free.  [ Pop/Rock ] Bobby Henrie & the Goners. Dinosaur Bar-B-Que, 99 Court St. dinosaurbarbque. com. 9 p.m. Free.  The Dead Catholics w/Autoverse, Listen to Silverfish. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. bugjar.com, 454-2966. 9 p.m. $5-$7. 

Thursday, January 26 [ Acoustic/Folk ] Crossmolina. McGraw’s Irish Pub, 146 W Commercial St, East Rochester. mcgrawsirishpub.com, 3489091. 7 p.m. Free.  Dave McGrath. Sully’s Pub, 242 South Ave. 232-3960. 6 p.m. Free.  John Akers & Elvio Fernandes. Easy on East, 170 East Ave. 325-6490. 8 p.m. Free.  Nancy Perry. Mythos Cafe, 77 Main St, Brockport. 637-2770. 6 p.m. Free.  Paul Strowe. Cottage Hotel, 1390 Pittsford-Mendon Rd, Mendon, NY. 624-1390. 7-10 p.m. Free.  Reggae Night. Elite Bar & Grill, 398 W Main St. 527-8720. 9 p.m. Call for tix.  Uncle Plum’s Elvio w/ Frank. Rookies Sports Bar, Pittsford Colony Plaza 3400 Monroe Ave. therookiesbar. com, 385-7665. 9 p.m. Call for info. 

[ Blues ] Nate Coffee and the New Brew. Beale Street Cafe, 693 South Ave. bealestreetcafe. com, 271-4650. 7:30 p.m. Call for info.  [ Classical ] Eastman at Washington Square Noontime Concerts. First Universalist Church, Court St. & S.Clinton Ave. 2751400, esm.rochester. edu/community/calendars/ lunchtime. 12:15 p.m.-12:45 p.m. Free.  Nazareth College Opera Workshop. Nazareth College Arts Center, 4245 East Ave. 389-2700, go.naz.edu/musicevents. 7:30 p.m. Free.  RPO: Viennese New Year. Eastman Theatre-Kodak Hall, 60 Gibbs St. rpo.org. 7:30 p.m. $15-$75.  [ DJ/Electronic ] AVICII. Main Street Armory, 900 E Main St. rochestermainstreetarmory. com. 7:30 p.m. $50.  DJ Biggie. McKenzie’s Irish Pub, 3685 W Henrietta Rd. 334-8970. 9 p.m. Call for tix.  DJ Dorian. TC Riley’s, 200 Park Point Dr. tcrileysparkpoint.com, 2729777. Call for info.   DJ Noname. Vertex, 169 N Chestnut St. 232-5498. 10 p.m. $3-$8.  DJ Sal DeSantis. Center Cafe, 150 Frank DiMino Way. iaccrochester.org, 594-8882. 7 p.m. Call for info.  DJs Designer Junkies, Etiquette, Ginnis. One, 1 Ryan Alley. 546-1010. 10 p.m. $3.  L.A. Riots. Pearl Nightclub, 349 East Ave. factorynightlife. frontgatetickets.com. 10 p.m. $20.  Mostly 80’s Night. Hatter’s Pub, 5 W Main St, Webster. 872-1505. 6 p.m. Call for tix. 

Rootscollider. Dub Land Underground, 315 Alexander St. RIPROC@me.com. 10 p.m. $5 21+, $15 unders.  Soul Sides Record Listening Party. Good Luck, 50 Anderson Ave. 340-6161. 9 p.m. Free.  Thursday Night Shakedown. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 4542966, bugjar.com. 11 p.m. Free.  Tiki Thursdays: Shotgun Music DJ. McGhan’s, 11 W Main St, Victor, NY. 924-3660. 7:30 p.m. Free.  Tilt-a-Whirl Drag Show. Tilt Night Club, 444 Central Ave. 232-8440, tiltroc.com. 11:15 p.m. & 12:30 a.m. $3.  [ Jazz ] Adrian DiMatteo. Grill at Strathallan, 550 East Ave. strathallan.com, 454-1880. Call for info.   Anthony Gianavola. Lemoncello, 137 W Commercial St, E Rochester. lemoncello137.com, 3858565. 6 p.m. Free.  Bob Hanley. Prosecco Italian Restaurant & Bar, 1550 Route 332, Farmington. proseccoitalianrestaurant. com, 924-8000. 5:30 p.m. Call for info.  Hot Second ft. Will Zimmer. Tala Vera, 155 State St. tala-vera.com, 546-3945. 8 p.m. $5.  Jazz/Wine Happy Hour w/The Swooners. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. woodcliffhotelspa.com. 5:30 p.m. Free.  Joe Santora Trio w/Emily Kirchoff. Michael’s Valley Grill, 1694 Penfield R, Penfield. 383-8260. 7 p.m. Free.  Mambo Kings. Sticky Lips BBQ Juke Joint, 830 Jefferson Rd. stickylipsbbq.com. 9 p.m. Free.  Michael Vidala. Bistro 135, 135 W Commercial St,, East Rochester. bistro135.net, 662-5555. 6 p.m. Free.  Nate Rawls Group. Little Theatre Cafe, 240 East Ave. thelittle.org. 7:30 p.m. Free.  [ Karaoke ] Karaoke. Panorama Night Club, 730 Elmgrove Rd. 2472190. 9 p.m. Free.  Karaoke. Pineapple Jacks, 485 Spencerport Rd. 247-5225. 9 p.m. Free.  Karaoke. Jukebox, 5435 Ridge Rd W, Spencerport. 352-4505. 7:30 p.m. Free.  Karaoke. Applebee’s-Penfield, 1955 Empire Blvd, Webster. 787-0570. 9 p.m. Free.  Karaoke. GridIron Bar & Grill, 3154 State St, Caledonia. 5384008. 9 p.m. Free.  Karaoke. Center Cafe, 150 Frank DiMino Way. 594-8882. 7 p.m. Free.  Karaoke. Brickwood Grill, 250 Monroe Ave., Rochester, NY 14607. brickwoodgrill.com, 730-8230. 9 p.m. Call for info.  Karaoke w/DJ Smooth. Clarissa’s, 293 Clarissa St. 454-2680. 8:30 p.m. Free. 

Karaoke w/George, King of Karaoke. Temple Bar & Grille, 109 East Ave. 232-6000. 8 p.m. Free.  Karaoke w/Summer Bob. Shorts Bar & Grill, 35 N Main St, Fairport. 388-0136. 10 p.m. Free.  Karaoke w/Tim Burnette. Sevens, Rt 96, Farmington. 924-3232. 8-11 p.m. Free.  [ Open Mic ] Open Blues Jam w/Alex D & Jimmie Mac. PJ’s Lounge, 499 West Ave. 436-9066. 9 p.m. Free.  Open Jam w/Beau Ryan & Amanda Ashley. Firehouse Saloon, 814 Clinton Ave S. 244-6307. 9 p.m. Free.  Open Mic. Towpath Cafe, 6 N Main St, Fairport. 377-0410. 6:30 p.m. Free.  Open Mic at Park Ave Boulder. 739 Park Ave. inneriotband@yahoo.com. 8 p.m. Free. Open Mic w/Jed Curran & Steve Piper. Flipside Bar & Grill, 2001 E Main St. 288-3930. 8 p.m. Free.  Open Mic w/Mark Herrman. California Brew Haus, 402 Ridge Rd W. 6211480. 8 p.m. Free.  Songwriter’s Open Mic. Towpath Cafe, 6 N Main St, Fairport. 377-0410. 7 p.m. Free.  [ Pop/Rock ] Blast. Auditorium Theatre, 875 E Main St. rbtl.org. 7:30 p.m. $30-$50.  Inner Planets, Will Veeder. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. bugjar. com, 454-2966. 9 p.m. $5-$7.  Jackson Rohm. Johnny’s Irish Pub, 1382 Culver Rd. johnnysirishpub.com, 2240990. 7 p.m. Free.  Jeff Elliott. Irondequoit Ale House, 2250 Hudson Ave. 544-5120. 5 p.m. Free.  Jim Lane. Six Pockets, Ridge Hudson Plaza. 266-1440. 7 p.m. Free.  The Furries. Dinosaur Bar-B-Que, 99 Court St. dinosaurbarbque.com. 9 p.m. Free.  This Life, Darwin. Blueroom, 293 Alexander St. blueroomrochester.com, 7305985. 8 p.m. Call for info.  [ R&B ] The Champales. Abilene, 153 Liberty Pole Way. abilenebarandlounge.com, 232-3230. 8:30 p.m. $3 21+, $5 unders. 

Friday, January 27 [ Acoustic/Folk ] Cindy Sams and Jeff Cosco. Rookies Sports Bar, Pittsford Colony Plaza 3400 Monroe Ave. therookiesbar. com, 385-7665. 9 p.m. Call for info.  Dave McGrath. Mulconry’s Irish Pub & Restaurant, 17 Liftbridge Lane E, Fairport. 678-4516. 9 p.m. Free. 

Joan Burch & Jim Carroll. Artisan Coffeehouse, 2 Main Street, Scottsville, NY. artisancoffeehouse.com. 6:30 p.m. Free.  Jumbo Shrimp. Shooters Sports Bar & Grill, 1226 Fairport Rd. shootersny.com, 924-9914. Call for info.   Nick Leduc, Kris Anauo, Kevin Murray, and LastNote. Blueroom, 293 Alexander St. blueroomrochester.com, 7305985. 8 p.m. Call for info.  Nite Fall. Lemoncello, 137 W Commercial St, E Rochester. lemoncello137.com, 3858565. 7:30 p.m. Free.  Pat Kane. McGraw’s Irish Pub, 146 W Commercial St, East Rochester. mcgrawsirishpub.com, 3489091. 7 p.m. Free.  Ralph Louis. Rochester Plaza Hotel, 70 State St. rochesterplaza.com. 6 p.m. Free.  The Pat Maloney Syndrome w/Frankie and Jewels. Abilene, 153 Liberty Pole Way. abilenebarandlounge.com, 232-3230. 6 p.m. $4.  Tom Gravino. Tandoor of India, 376 Jefferson Rd. 427-7080. 7 p.m. Free.  Woody. Lift Bridge Book Shop, 45 Main St, Brockport, NY. 637-2260. 6 p.m. Free.  [ Blues ] Billy Joe & the Blues Gypsies w/Dave Riccioni. Six Pockets, Ridge Hudson Plaza. 2661440. 6-9 p.m. Free.  Coup D’Villes. Dinosaur Bar-B-Que, 99 Court St. dinosaurbarbque.com. 10 p.m. Free.  Dan Schmitt and the Shadows. Beale Street Cafe, 693 South Ave. bealestreetcafe.com, 2714650. 7:30 p.m. Call for info.  Luca Foresta. Beale Street Cafe-Webster, 1930 Empire Blvd, Webster. bealestreetcafe. com, 216-1070. 7:30 p.m. Call for info.  Soul On Tap w/Mojo Monkeyz. Johnny’s Irish Pub, 1382 Culver Rd. johnnysirishpub.com, 2240990. 5 p.m. Free.  [ Classical ] Nazareth College Opera Workshop. Nazareth College Arts Center, 4245 East Ave. 389-2700, go.naz.edu/musicevents. 7:30 p.m. Free. RPO: Shall We Waltz? Hochstein Performance Hall, 50 N Plymouth Ave. rpo. org. 7:30 p.m. $24.  [ Country ] David Pronko. Sandra’s Saloon, 276 Smith St. 546-5474. 9:30 p.m. Free.  [ DJ/Electronic ] DJ. Coach Sports Forum, 19 W Main St, Webster. 872-2910. 9 p.m. Call for tix.  DJ Bac Spin. Venu RestoLounge, 151 St Paul St. 2325650. 8 p.m. Call for info.  continues on page 16

rochestercitynewspaper.com City 15


Friday, January 27 DJ Cakeslayer. TC HooligansGreece, Greece Ridge Ctr. tchooligans.com, 225-7180. 4 p.m. Call for info.  DJ Cedric. Vertex, 169 N Chestnut St. 232-5498. 10 p.m. $3-$8.  DJ Mosart212. Lovin’ Cup, Park Point @ RIT. 292-9940. 6 p.m. Free.  DJ Vee. TC Riley’s, 200 Park Point Dr. tcrileysparkpoint.com, 272-9777. 10 P.M. Call for info.  Friday Night Salsa Party w/DJ Rivera. Tango Cafe, 389 Gregory St. 475-0249. 9 p.m. $5.  Jon Herbert, RipRoc. One, 1 Ryan Alley. 546-1010. 10 p.m. $3.  Lube After Dark. Quaker Steak and Lube, 2205 Buffalo Rd. 697.9464. 9:30 p.m. Free. Reggaeton w/DJ Carlos. La Copa Ultra Lounge, 235 W Ridge Rd. 254-1050. 10 p.m. Call for tix.  What A Drag w/Samantha Vega, Kyla Minx & Pauly. Tilt Night Club, 444 Central Ave. 2328440, tiltroc.com. 11:15 p.m. & 12:30 a.m. $4-$12. 

Jazz/R&B | Jammin’ at the J

The Swooners (pictured) excavate the Great American Songbook with no shortage of swing. The Bob Sneider Trio is upstate New York’s premier hard-bop guitar combo. Keyboardist-vocalist Todd East combines the styles of Ray Charles and Stevie Wonder in his R&B repertoire. And the University of Rochester YellowJackets take a cappella harmonies to new heights. They’ll all be living up to the program’s title Saturday night at Jammin’ at the J, the annual gala benefiting the Jewish Community Center. Jammin’ at the J takes place Saturday, January 28, 7:30 p.m. at the Jewish Community Center, 1200 Edgewood Ave. $150-$200. 461-2000, ext. 213. — BY RON NETSKY [ Karaoke ] Karaoke. Pineapple Jacks, 485 Spencerport Rd. 247-5225. 9 p.m. Free.  Karaoke w/Summer Bob. Shorts Bar & Grill, 35 N Main St, Fairport. 388-0136. 10 p.m. Free.  Karaoke w/Tina P. Norton’s Pub, 1730 N Goodman St. 2663570. 9 p.m. Free. 

[ Jazz ] Holiday. Prosecco Italian Restaurant & Bar, 1550 Route 332, Farmington. proseccoitalianrestaurant.com, 924-8000. 6:30 p.m. Call for info. Jimmie Highsmith, Jr. Tala Vera, [ Open Mic ] 155 State St. tala-vera.com, Open Mic. Rochester Institute 546-3945. 9 p.m. $5. Dinner of Technology-Java Wally’s, 90 required before 9 p.m.  Lomb Memorial Dr. 475-2562. Joe Santora Trio w/Emily 9 p.m. Free.  Kirchoff. Michael’s Valley Grill, 1694 Penfield R, Penfield. [ Pop/Rock ] 383-8260. 7 p.m. Free.  After Five. McGhan’s, 11 W Johnny Matt Band w/Jon Main St, Victor, NY. 924-3660. Seiger. Wegmans-Eastway, Call for info. Free.  1955 Empire Blvd, Webster. Beardage. Monty’s Krown 671-8290. 5:30 p.m. Free.  Lounge, 875 Monroe Ave. 271Last Friday Heritage Jazz Series: 7050. 9 p.m. $3-$5.  Thelonious Monk. Baobab Before the Foundation. Water Cultural Center, 728 University Street Music Hall, 204 N Water Ave. thebaobab.org. 7 p.m. St. waterstreetmusic.com, $10.  325-5600. 6:30 p.m. $10.  Ryan T Carey. Thali of India, Cry To The Blind. Water Street 3259 S Winton Rd. 427-8030. Music Hall, 204 N Water St. 7-9 p.m. Free.  waterstreetmusic.com, 325Sofrito. Little Theatre Cafe, 240 5600. 6:30 p.m. $10.  East Ave. thelittle.org. 8:30 Download. Nola’s BBQ, 4775 p.m. Free.  Lake Ave. nolasweb.com, 663Sossity Entertainment presents: 3375. 10 p.m. Call for info.  Art Beaty w/special guest Todd Gator Face. A-Pub Live, 6 East. Lovin’ Cup, Park Point @ Lawrence St. 262-2063. 10:30 RIT. lovincup.com, 292-9940. p.m. Free before 10 p.m., $5 9 p.m. $7 GA, $5 student.  after.  Soul Express. Woodcliff Hotel Hankering Harry and the City & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. Billies. California Brew Haus, woodcliffhotelspa.com, 381402 Ridge Rd W. 621-1480. 4000. 7:30 p.m. Free.  10 p.m. Call for info.  Ted Nicolosi and Shared Instead Of Sleeping w/Pearl Genes. Glengarry Inn at Eagle White Ghosts, The Anderson Vale, 4400 Nine Mile Point Stingrays. Bug Jar, 219 Road, Rt 250 Fairport NY. 598Monroe Ave. bugjar.com. 9 3820, EagleVale.com. 6:30 p.m. $6-$8.  p.m. Free. Melia - Anti-Bullying Tinted Image w/Happy Benefit. Montage Music Days. Bistro 135, 135 Hall, 50 Chestnut Plaza. W Commercial St,, East meliasmusic1@gmail.com. Rochester. bistro135.net, 6627:30 p.m. $7.00. 5555. 5 p.m. Free.  Sam Deleo. Perlo’s Italian Grill, Uptown Groove. Grill at 202 N Washington St, East Strathallan, 550 East Ave. Rochester. 248-5060. 6:30strathallan.com, 454-1880. Call 10:30 p.m. Free.  for info.   16 City JANUARY 25-31, 2012

Walri. Sticky Lips BBQ Juke Joint, 830 Jefferson Rd. stickylipsbbq.com. 9:30 p.m. Free.  [ R&B ] Old School R&B. Elite Bar & Grill, 398 W Main St. 5278720. 9 p.m. Call for tix.  Soul at the Cup. Lovin’ Cup, Park Point @ RIT. 292-9940. 9 p.m. Call for tix. 

Saturday, January 28 [ Acoustic/Folk ] Claudia Schmidt. Rochester Christian Reformed Church, 2750 Atlantic Ave., Penfield, NY. goldenlink.org. 7:30 p.m. $18; $15 for Golden Link members; $10 students. Dave McGrath. Jeffrey’s, 3115 E. Henrietta Rd., Henrietta. 486-4937. 9 p.m. Free.  Drew Kelly. Boulder Coffee Co. -Alexander Street. bouldercoffeeco.com. 8 p.m. Free.  Jumbo Shrimp. Johnny’s Irish Pub, 1382 Culver Rd. johnnysirishpub.com, 2240990. 8 p.m. Free.  Lovin’ Cup Unplugged Saturday Dinner Shows presents: Dave McGrath. Lovin’ Cup, Park Point @ RIT. lovincup.com, 292-9940. 6 p.m. Free.  Marty Roberts. Flaherty’s Webster, 1200 Bay Rd. flahertys.com, 671-0816. Call for info.   Mike & Sergei. Don’s Original Pub, 2055 Fairport Nine Mile Point Rd. 377-1040. Call for info.   Steve Bartolotta. Pittsford Pub, 60 S. Main St., Pittsford. 586-4650, pittsfordpub.net. 9 p.m.midnight. Free.  Ted McGraw. McGraw’s Irish Pub, 146 W Commercial St, East Rochester. mcgrawsirishpub.com, 3489091. 5:30 p.m. Free. 

Tom Gravino. Thali of India, 3259 S Winton Rd. 355-8206. 7 p.m. Free.  Trace Wilkins (Everheart). McGraw’s Irish Pub, 146 W Commercial St, East Rochester. mcgrawsirishpub.com, 3489091. 8 p.m. Free.  Unplugged Dinner Music Series. Lovin’ Cup, Park Point @ RIT. 292-9940, lovincup. com. 6 p.m. Free.  Windsor Folk Family. Tala Vera, 155 State St. tala-vera.com, 546-3945. 9 p.m. $5. Dinner required before 9 p.m.  [ Blues ] Bill Brown. Brown Hound Bistro, 6459 Rt 64, Naples. 374-9771. 7 p.m. Free.  Ezra and The Storm. Beale Street Cafe, 693 South Ave. bealestreetcafe.com, 2714650. 7:30 p.m. Call for info.  Joe Beard. Dinosaur Bar-B-Que, 99 Court St. dinosaurbarbque. com. 10 p.m. Free.  The Fakers. Beale Street CafeWebster, 1930 Empire Blvd, Webster. bealestreetcafe.com, 216-1070. 7:30 p.m. Call for info.  [ Classical ] Nazareth College Opera Workshop. Nazareth College Arts Center, 4245 East Ave. 389-2700, go.naz.edu/musicevents. 7:30 p.m. Free. RPO: Viennese New Year. Eastman Theatre-Kodak Hall, 60 Gibbs St. rpo.org. 8 p.m. $15-$77. 

WORLD-TERNATIVE | January Thaw

Put simply, buddhahood is the state of perfect enlightenment; whether local outfit The Buddhahood (pictured) achieves that in its music is a question that will go unanswered, but the eightpiece purveyors of “world-ternative” music continues to try and attain it. Meshing strains of funk, blues, and reggae (among other genres) into an pioneering amalgam of music, the band has been performing together since the mid-90’s, and continues to tour despite the loss of its leader, Tony Cavagnaro, in late 2007. The band plays its 4th Annual January Thaw concert this weekend, celebrating Cavagnaro’s birthday and life, with proceeds from the event benefitting A Caring Place. January Thaw takes place Saturday, January 28, 10 p.m. at Water Street Music Hall, 204 N. Water St. $5-$10. 325-5600, waterstreetmusic.com. — BY ANDY KLINGENBERGER

[ Hip-Hop ] C.R.E.E.P.S. Blueroom, 293 Alexander St. blueroomrochester.com, 7305985. 8 p.m. $7. 

East End Jazz Boys. Havana Moe’s, 125 East Ave. 3251030. 9 p.m. Free.  Holiday. Prosecco Italian Restaurant & Bar, 1550 Route 332, Farmington. proseccoitalianrestaurant. com, 924-8000. 6:30 p.m. Call for info. Jammin’ At The J. Jewish Community Center, 1200 Edgewood Ave. jccrochester. org/NewWebsite/gala.html. 7:30 p.m. $200 patron/$150 individual. See website for full line up.  Jazz Cafe. Monty’s Korner, 363 East Ave. 263-7650. 7:30 p.m. Free.  Jazz at Jazzy’s. Jasmine’s Asian Fusion, 657 Ridge Rd, Webster. 216-1290. 8:30-11 p.m. Free.  Joe Santora Trio w/Emily Kirchoff. Michael’s Valley Grill, 1694 Penfield R, Penfield. 383-8260. 7 p.m. Free.  Sofrito. Bistro 135, 135 W Commercial St,, East Rochester. bistro135.net, 662-5555. 6:30 p.m. Free.  Ted Nicolosi and Shared Genes. Prime Steak House 42 E Main St Webster, NY. 2654777, PrimeRochester.com. 6:30 p.m. Free. The White Hots. Lemoncello, 137 W Commercial St, E Rochester. lemoncello137. com, 385-8565. 8 p.m. Free.  Tinted Image. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. woodcliffhotelspa.com, 3814000. 7:30 p.m. Free. 

[ Jazz ] Alana Calhoon. Grill at Strathallan, 550 East Ave. strathallan.com, 454-1880. Call for info.   Connie Demming. Little Theatre Cafe, 240 East Ave. thelittle. org. 8:30 p.m. Free. 

[ Karaoke ] Karaoke. The Galley Restaurant, 94 S Union St, Spencerport. 352-0200. 8 p.m. Free.  Karaoke. 140 Alex, 140 Alexander St. 256-1000. 10:30 p.m. Free. 

[ Country ] Doublecross. Sticky Lips BBQ Juke Joint, 830 Jefferson Rd. stickylipsbbq.com. 10 p.m. Free.  [ DJ/Electronic ] Big Dance Party w/DJ Jon Herbert. Tilt Night Club, 444 Central Ave. 232-8440, tiltroc. com. 10 p.m. $3.  DJ Big Reg. Venu RestoLounge, 151 St Paul St. 2325650. 10 p.m. Call for info.  DJ Darkwave. Vertex, 169 N Chestnut St. 232-5498. 10 p.m. $3-$8.  DJ Lino. Nola’s BBQ, 4775 Lake Ave. nolasweb.com, 6633375. 9 p.m. Call for info.  DJ Mike Vickers. Six Pockets, Ridge Hudson Plaza. 2661440. 9 p.m. Call for info.  DJ Vee. TC Riley’s, 200 Park Point Dr. tcrileysparkpoint. com, 272-9777. 10 P.M. Call for info.  DJs Richie Salvaggio, Kalifornia. One, 1 Ryan Alley. 546-1010. 10 p.m. Free-$10. 

Karaoke. Pineapple Jacks, 485 Spencerport Rd. 247-5225. 9 p.m. Free.  Karaoke. Temple Bar & Grille, 109 East Ave. 232-6000. 10 p.m. Free.  Karaoke At The Lube. Quaker Steak and Lube, 2205 Buffalo Rd. 697.9464. 9:30 p.m. Free. Karaoke w/Andy & Kim. Norton’s Pub, 1730 N Goodman St. 266-3570. 10 p.m. Free.  Karaoke w/Summer Bob. Shorts Bar & Grill, 35 N Main St, Fairport. 388-0136. 10 p.m. Free.  Olympia Karaoke W/ Andy. Olympia Restaurant 2380 Lyell Ave. 429-6231. 9:30 p.m. Free. [ Open Mic ] Drum Joy: Drumming Circle. Christ Church Unity, 55 Prince St. 615-8296, tonermanny@frontiernet.net. 1-3 p.m. Free.  [ Pop/Rock ] 2012 January Thaw Concert w/The Buddhahood & Friends. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N Water St. januarythawconcert@yahoo. com. 10 p.m. $5.00 adv, $10.00 doors. Callanach w/Mike Zamiara. Lovin’ Cup, Park Point @ RIT. lovincup.com, 292-9940. 9 p.m. $5 GA, $3 student.  Keaton w/Tyranitar. Montage Music Hall, 50 Chestnut Plaza. themontagemusichall. com, 232-1520. 8 p.m. Call for info.  Mesh. TC Hooligans-Greece, Greece Ridge Ctr. tchooligans. com, 225-7180. 9:30 p.m. Free.  Peppi’s 67th Birthday Party w/ The Good Rats. California Brew Haus, 402 Ridge Rd W. 6211480. 10 p.m. Call for info. 


Polluted Moon. A-Pub Live, 6 Lawrence St. 262-2063. 10:30 p.m. Free before 10 p.m., $5 after.  Smalltown. Shooters Sports Bar & Grill, 1226 Fairport Rd. shootersny.com, 924-9914. Call for info.   Steve Bartolotta. Pittsford Pub, 60 S. Main Street, Pittsford. pittsfordpub.net, 586.4650. 9 p.m. Call for info.  The Extremists. Captain Jack’s Goodtime Tavern, 8505 Greig St, Sodus Point. captainjacksgoodtimetavern. com, 315-483-9570. 9 p.m. Call for info.  Tim Herron Corporation. Monty’s Krown Lounge, 875 Monroe Ave. 2717050. 9 p.m. $3-$5.  [ R&B ] Bitchin’ Kitchen. Abilene, 153 Liberty Pole Way. abilenebarandlounge.com, 232-3230. 9:30 p.m. 21+ $5, unders $6. 

Sunday, January 29 [ Acoustic/Folk ] Celtic Music. Temple Bar & Grille, 109 East Ave. 232-6000. 7 p.m. Free.  Southside Johnny & The Poor Fools. German House Theatre, 315 Gregory St. upallnightpresents.com. 7:30 p.m. $30.50-$35.  Traditional Irish Music Session. Johnny’s Irish Pub, 1382 Culver Rd. johnnysirishpub.com, 2240990. 5 p.m. Free.  [ Blues ] Open Blues Jam w/Nate Coffee. Beale Street Cafe, 693 South Ave. bealestreetcafe. com, 271-4650. 7 p.m. Call for info.  [ Classical ] Ella Cripps. Geneva on the Lake, 1001 Lochland Rd, Geneva. 800-3-GENEVA. 6:30-9 p.m. Free.  Going for Baroque Organ Recital. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. 2768900. 1 & 3 p.m. Free w/ admission.  Heard in America, 1900 -1920. Nazareth CollegeWilmot Recital Hall, 4245 East Ave. 389-2700, go.naz. edu/music-events. 3:00 p.m. Free.  RPO: Shall We Waltz? Hochstein Performance Hall, 50 N Plymouth Ave. rpo.org. 2 p.m. $24 GA, $10 student.  RTOS January Theater Organ Concert. Auditorium Theatre, 875 E Main St. 234-2295. 2:30 p.m. Admission to RTOS concerts for non-members is $15.  Schubert’s “Mass in G”. Greece United Methodist Church, 1924 Maiden Lane. 225-1880. 3 p.m. Free will offering.  The Classical Lute, Chris Wilke, lutist. Trinity Montessori School, 100

waterstreetmusic.com, 3255600. 6 p.m. $17.

Tuesday, January 31

Metal | Children of Bodom

Finland seems to crank out decent metal bands as quickly as it does cell phones, and no group sits higher on the totem pole of Finnish heavy metal than Children of Bodom. The band is led by lead singer-guitarist Alexi Laiho and drummer Jaska Raatikainen, both childhood friends who formed the group under a different name in 1993. Laiho is considered one of the genre’s most gifted axmen — he’s been voted as the best heavy metal guitarist by readers of publications in the United States and Great Britain. His band rechristened as Children of Bodom is celebrating its 15th anniversary North American tour and pretty much kicking it off right here in Rochester. With Eluveitie, Revocation, and Threat Signal. Children of Bodom perform Monday, January 30, 6 p.m. at Water Street Music Hall, 204 N. Water St. $17. waterstreetmusic.com. — BY ROMAN DIVEZUR Golden Flyer Drive. 266-7030. 3 p.m. Call for info. [ DJ/Electronic ] Old School DJ. Clarissa’s, 293 Clarissa St. 454-2680. 8 p.m. Free.  [ Jazz ] Bill Slater Solo Piano (Brunch). Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. woodcliffhotelspa.com, 3814000. Call for info. Free.  Red Carpet Sundays. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. redcarpetsundays.eventbrite.com. 6 p.m. $5 adv, $10 doors. 25+.  [ Karaoke ] Karaoke w/Brad London. Willow Inn, 428 Manitou Rd. 3923489. 9 p.m. Free.  [ Open Mic ] Acoustic Sunday w/Fred Goodnow. Brown Hound Bistro, 6459 Rt 64, Naples. 374-9771. 11 a.m. Free.  Open Country Jam. Sandra’s Saloon, 276 Smith St. 5465474. 4-8 p.m. Free.  Open Jam w/Bodega Radio. Jukebox, 5435 Ridge Rd W, Spencerport. 352-4505. 5 p.m. Free.  [ Pop/Rock ] Girls Rock! Rochester Fundraiser Show and Dance Party. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. bugjar.com, 454-2966. 9 p.m. $6-$8.  Junior Battles w/Chip’s Challenge, Crazy Fools. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. bugjar.com, 454-2966. 9 p.m. $5-$7.  Left on Red. Smokin’ Joe’s, 425 Lyell Ave. smokinjoesmusicbar. com, 647-1540. 7 p.m. Call for info.  The Malcolm Moore Band w/Chuck Campbell. Lovin’ Cup, Park Point @ RIT. lovincup. com, 292-9940. 6 p.m. Free. 

Monday, January 30 [ Blues ] Tony Gianavola. Beale Street Cafe, 693 South Ave. bealestreetcafe.com, 2714650. 7 p.m. Call for info.  [ DJ/Electronic ] Manic Mondays DJs. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 454-2966. 11 p.m. Free.  [ Jazz ] Gap Mangione & The Solo Piano Series. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. woodcliffhotelspa.com, 3814000. 5:30 p.m. Free. Mark Bader. Bistro 135, 135 W Commercial St,, East Rochester. bistro135.net, 6625555. 5:30 p.m. Free.  Mike Kaupa Duo Project. Little Theatre Cafe, 240 East Ave. thelittle.org. 7:30 p.m. Free.  Tony Gianavola. Beale Street Cafe, 693 South Ave. 2714650, bealestreetcafe.com. 7 p.m. Free.  [ Karaoke ] Karaoke w/Walt O’Brien. Flipside Bar & Grill, 2001 E Main St. 288-3930. 9 p.m. Free.  [ Open Mic ] Lovin’ Cup Idol: Live Auditions. Lovin’ Cup, Park Point @ RIT. lovincup.com, 292-9940. 8 p.m. Call for info.  Open Jam w/ Refreshunz. Clarissa’s, 293 Clarissa St. 232-3430. 8 p.m. Free.  [ Pop/Rock ] Dorkbox. Boulder Coffee Co. -Alexander Street. bouldercoffeeco.com. 8 p.m. Free.  Children Of Bodom w/ Eluveitie, Revocation, and Threat Signal. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N Water St.

[ Acoustic/Folk ] Baby Shark w/Cu-Cu, Gin & Bonnets, and Kirk Stevens. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. bugjar. com, 454-2966. 9 p.m. $5-$7. Chet Vincent. Boulder Coffee Co. -Alexander Street. bouldercoffeeco.com. 8 p.m. Free.  Jeff Elliott. Norton’s Pub, 1730 N Goodman St. 266-3570. 5-8 p.m. Free.  Johnny Bauer. Cottage Hotel, 1390 Pittsford-Mendon Rd, Mendon, NY. 624-1390. 7-10 p.m. Free.  Teagan Ward. Beale Street Cafe, 693 South Ave. bealestreetcafe.com, 2714650. 7 p.m. Call for info.  Ted Nicolosi and Shared Genes. Bistro 135, 135 W Commercial St,, East Rochester. 662-5555 www. Bistro135.net. 6 PM. Free. [ Classical ] Barbershop Harmony. Harmony House, 58 E Main St., Webster, NY. chorusofthegenesee.org. 7 p.m. Free. Open practices/try outs.  Rochester Women’s Community Chorus Open Rehearsals. Downtown Presbyterian Church, 121 N Fitzhugh St. therwcc.org, 2344441. 6:30 p.m. Free.  [ DJ/Electronic ] SIN Night. TC HooligansGreece, Greece Ridge Ctr. tchooligans.com, 225-7180. 9 p.m. Call for info.  [ Jazz ] Ballroom Dance Series w/live music. Edgerton Community Center, 41 Backus St. cityofrochester. gov/ballroomdanceseries. 7:30 p.m. $3. See website for full line up.  Norman Tibbils. Lemoncello, 137 W Commercial St, E Rochester. lemoncello137. com, 385-8565. 6 p.m. Free.  Scott Krier. Prosecco Italian Restaurant & Bar, 1550 Route 332, Farmington. proseccoitalianrestaurant. com, 924-8000. 6 p.m. Call for info.  Shared Genes. Bistro 135, 135 W Commercial St,, East Rochester. bistro135.net, 662-5555. 6 p.m. Free.  Tinted Image. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. woodcliffhotelspa.com, 3814000. 5:30 p.m. Free. [ Karaoke ] Karaoke. 140 Alex, 140 Alexander St. 256-1000. 10:30 p.m. Free.  Karaoke. Pineapple Jacks, 485 Spencerport Rd. 247-5225. 9 p.m. Free.  Karaoke. McKenzie’s Irish Pub, 3685 W Henrietta Rd. 3348970. 8 p.m. Free.  Karaoke w/DJ Vee. TC Riley’s, 200 Park Point Dr.

tcrileysparkpoint.com, 2729777. Call for info. [ Open Mic ] Golden Link Singaround. Twelve Corners Presbyterian Church, 1200 S Winton Rd. goldenlink. org. 7:30 p.m. Free.  Open Mic w/Dave McGrath and Jim Lane. TC HooligansWebster, Webster Woods Plz, Webster. 671-7180. 8 p.m. Free.  Open Mic w/Rapier Slices. Clarissa’s, 293 Clarissa St. 454-2680. 7-11 p.m. $3$5.  Open Mic w/String Theory. Johnny’s Irish Pub, 1382 Culver Rd. 224-0990, johnnysirishpub.com. 8 p.m. Free. [ Pop/Rock ] Carmine Appice. House of Guitars, 645 Titus Ave. houseofguitars.com, 544-3500. 6 p.m. Free.  Don Christiano - With A Little Help from My Friends: The Beatles Unplugged. Abilene, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 2323230, abilenebarandlounge. com. 8 p.m.  E Moore. Boulder Coffee Co. - Park Ave. bouldercoffeeco. com. 8 p.m. Free.  Egg Man’s Traveling Carnival. Hatter’s Pub, 5 W Main St, Webster. 872-1505. 6 p.m. Call for tix. 

Wednesday, February 1 [ Acoustic/Folk ] Dave McGrath. Cottage Hotel, 1390 Pittsford-Mendon Rd, Mendon, NY. dave@ davemcgrath.com. 7 p.m. Free.  Rob & Gary Acoustic. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. woodcliffhotelspa.com, 3814000. 5:30 p.m. Free.  Tommy Gravino. Rio Tomatlan, 5 Beeman St, Canandaigua. 3949380. 6:30 p.m. Free. Salsa w/Shelia dancing during the performance. [ Classical ] Carnegie Hall Preview Concert. Roberts Wesleyan Cultural Life Center, 2301 Westside Dr. mercuryoperarochester.org. 7:30 p.m. $10.  [ DJ/Electronic ] DJ. One, 1 Ryan Alley. 5461010. 10 p.m. Free.  Guest DJs. Vertex, 169 N Chestnut St. 232-5498. 10 p.m. $3-$8.  Teen Set 45 Party. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 542-8336. Midnight. Free. Y Not Wednesday w/DJ ET. Venu Resto-Lounge, 151 St Paul St. 232-5650. 10 p.m. Call for info.  [ Jazz ] Greg Chako. Lemoncello, 137 W Commercial St, E Rochester. lemoncello137.com, 385-8565. 6 p.m. Free.  Open Jam w/The King Bees. Beale Street Cafe, 693 South Ave. bealestreetcafe. com. 7:30 p.m. Free. 

Paradigm Shift. Pomodoro Grill & Wine Bar, 1290 University Ave. 271-5000. 7:30 p.m. Free.  Robert Chevrier. Pomodoro Monroe Ave, 3400 Monroe Ave. 586-7000. 6:30 p.m. Free.  Soul Express. Bistro 135, 135 W Commercial St,, East Rochester. bistro135.net, 6625555. Call for info. Free.  Uptown Groove. Little Theatre Cafe, 240 East Ave. thelittle. org. 7:30 p.m. Free. [ Karaoke ] Karaoke. Elite Bar & Grill, 398 W Main St. 527-8720. 9 p.m. Free.  Karaoke. Pineapple Jacks, 485 Spencerport Rd. 247-5225. 9 p.m. Free.  Karaoke. Monty’s Korner, 363 East Ave. 263-7650. 9.30 p.m. Free.  Karaoke. Applebee’s-Fairport, 585 Moseley Rd, Fairport. 4254700. 9 p.m. Free.  Karaoke. Mayfields Pub, 669 Winton Rd N. 288-7199. 9 p.m. Free.  Karaoke. Sanibel Cottage, 1517 Empire Blvd, Webster. 6719340. 6 p.m. Free.  Karaoke w/Jimmy C’s Music Machine ft. Johnny Rocker. Sully’s Pub, 242 South Ave. sullyspubonline.com. 8:30 p.m. Free.  Karaoke w/Mark. Flipside Bar & Grill, 2001 E Main St. 288-3930. 8:30 p.m. Free.  Karaoke with Oltra Entertainment. Anchor Bar Marketplace. anchorsportsbar. com, 272-9333. Call for info. [ Open Mic ] All About the Song Open Mic. Starry Nites Cafe, 696 University Ave. songwriter1955@gmail.com. 7:30 p.m. Free. Sign up at 7 p.m.  Open Acoustic Mic Night w/ Mandy. Shorts Bar & Grill, 35 N Main St, Fairport. 388-0136. 9 p.m. Free.  Open Jam w/Justin Gurnsey. Jukebox, 5435 Ridge Rd W, Spencerport. 352-4505. 10 p.m. Free.  Open Mic. Boulder Coffee CoSouth Wedge, 100 Alexander St. 454-7140, bouldercoffeeco. com. 8 p.m. Free.  Open Mic. Dr’s Inn Grill & Tap Room, 1743 East Ave. 2710820. 5 p.m. Free.  Open Mic w/Jam Shack Music. Stoneyard Bar & Grill, 1 Main St, Brockport. 637-3390. 9 p.m. Free.  Open Mic w/Steve West. Muddy Waters Coffee House-Geneseo, 53 Main St, Geneseo. 2439111. 7-10 p.m. Free.  [ Pop/Rock ] Teenage Mysticism w/Kurt Andrew, N. Moore, and The Helping Hands. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. bugjar.com, 4542966. 9 p.m. $6-$8. 

rochestercitynewspaper.com City 17


18 City JANUARY 25-31, 2012

rochestercitynewspaper.com City 19


18 City JANUARY 25-31, 2012

rochestercitynewspaper.com City 19


Art

“Stretched Thin” by Romy Hosford, part of “War & Consumerism.” PHOTO PROVIDED

Things falling apart “War & Consumerism” By Jeffrey Grubbs and Romy Hosford Through January 31 Davison Gallery, Roberts Wesleyan College, 2301 Westside Dr. Monday-Friday 11 a.m.-5 p.m., Saturday 1-4 p.m. 594-6442 | roberts.edu/davisongallery [ REVIEW ] BY REBECCA RAFFERTY

For a long time now, captains of industry and their pocket politicians have been playing with our anxieties, our insecurities, and this has resulted in catastrophic world-changing events as well as tragic outcomes on individual levels. The current exhibit at Roberts Wesleyan’s Davison Gallery challenges the asleep-atthe-wheel behavior of Americans, issuing a five-alarm wake-up call and a challenge to do better. “War & Consumerism” is a collaboration of the work of Jeffrey Grubbs and Romy Hosford that draws crucial parallels between Grubbs’s focus on war and Hosford’s concerns with cultural consumerism. “For us this exhibition is a cautionary tale regarding the intersection of war and consumerism,” Grubbs explains in the show’s press release. “It is our hope this provocative show explores some of America’s long-held cultural, ideological and moral beliefs.” In essence, the show tackles our complicated relationship with the world. The artists’ work individually deals with 20 City january 25-31, 2012

two separate (and timely) fears that we have: the fear of a cataclysmic end of the world, and the fear of losing the securities and comforts we have acquired. Paired, the bodies of work indicate not only how, through our material demands, we are complicit in atrocity toward others and in our own downfall, but how greedy puppet masters play on our fears and insecurities, egging on our nastier traits while we sleepwalk through life. Grubbs is associate professor and chair of the

Division of Visual Arts at Roberts, and works in many media. Each work in this show is distinct in style, serving the concepts the artist seeks to convey, regarding current global sociopolitical and -economic events. Various works echo humanity’s near obsession with the end of the world, informed by our pseudo understanding of various religious prophecies. On a massive canvas, Grubbs has built up an ominous acrylic and latex sky, crudeoil-colored and ready to trounce the living hell out of the tiny city below. Entitled “Day of Clouds,” the work is accompanied by a bible open to Zephaniah 2:2, warning of the fierce anger of the lord. “Shock and Awe” echoes the destruction, a monotype with graphite and dye on paper, black on black, a mushroom cloud. “2 Timothy 2:14” is a work of thickly applied oil on masonite, with two semiabstract, blazingly colored figures yelling at one another, paired with a passage: “For God did not give us a spirit of timidity, but a spirit of power, of love and of self discipline.” This work sets the tone for the show for me,

in that the opposite of love is a consuming, unbridled fear that, when untempered by our own will and sense, does not allow us to see others clearly, and act accordingly. Further back into the gallery, Grubbs gets political. “Black Gold” is a monotype black-on-black work on paper, depicting skeletons of adults and children trapped in oil, like extinct creatures, doomed by our reliance on it. On the wall opposite from “Day of Clouds” is the equally mammoth woodcuton-paper work, “Military Industrial Complex.” The red stripes bear patterns of bombs, guns, money, the smoking twin towers of the World Trade Center, soldiers, tanks, and planes, while the blue panel holds Eisenhower’s portrait among the stars. Grubbs shifts his focus on foreshadowing to a more recent version in this work: nearby, an MP3 player and headset offers a part of Eisenhower’s presidential farewell address, in which he prophetically warns Americans about the rise of the Military Industrial Complex. The danger of remaining permanently engaged in the production of armaments is that it causes permanent conflict. Eisenhower warned that wars would be created in order to keep the industry going. Hosford is assistant professor of visual arts

at Roberts, and works mainly in ceramics and fiber art, but includes elements of video installations in this show. While her work delves into the traditional expectations of women in relation to the home, the work particular to this show “explores ideas about consumerism in regards to the home and is a response to the housing crisis and the recent economic downturn,” per the artist’s statement. Like so many Americans in the past few years, the invisible inhabitants of Hosford’s domestic scenes have accumulated finery and watched it crumble, bereft of a sense of security. “The House and the Foreclosure” is a precarious stack of book-sized ceramic mattresses and pillows, decorated with pretty decals and stacked on a silver platter, topped with small house that is packed full with plaster flora. “Stretched Thin” is a jarring work in which a fancy couch split down the middle is reconnected with exaggeratedly long and draping stitches. Miniature dollhouse furniture and trappings are caught in webby threads; the whole scene speaks of ill-at-ease domesticity, where the rift is ignored and filled in with more and more. Hosford also contributed a photo series in which colorful and crumbling cakes have mini furniture poking into them, or

tiny houses balanced on the frosting. Pick your cliché cake phrase — my mother was reminded of the sociopathic gem, “let them eat cake.” In “Washed Up,” a bathtub and sink are positioned next to a cake wall, which is crumbling into the tub. In “The Things We Keep,” a print of an alley between rows of storage sheds becomes the canvas for shifting images of curbed furniture, piles of wood, garbage bags, junk, and treasures, indicating that we possess so much that it has to be stored off-site, or simply thrown away as its value to us shifts. Another claw-footed couch, entitled “Apart at the Seams,” has its back ripped off and raised up, held by strings from the ceiling, with lace and plaster flowers affixed to the damaged seams. This work faces “God Bless This Mortgaged Home,” a digital video projected into an ornate oval frame on the wall, which shows vignettes of destruction. In one scene, a house and a figurine couple are slowly flooded in a fish tank; in another, Monopoly houses tumble from the sky to crush the same pair. Together, Grubbs and Hosford’s works

force us to contemplate the meaning of “freedom,” and how the word is used rhetorically to sway us into certain actions and modes of living. The show is a vision of The End, opulence reduced to detritus, ready to be washed away in the flood, through no day of judgment is required. This is the result of living so desperately out of balance. We all want and deserve the same thing — a good life and safety. Differences in human groups mean little but have been exploited so we can be divided and conquered, and so that the less obviously conquered don’t feel too badly for the underdog. We believe that we have no control over the wars, but we do. We can vote with our dollars. We can live within our means, and thereby protect ourselves while not empowering massive banking corporations. We can research products and services and support ethical industries. We can refuse to support bad behavior. Astute viewers of this show will leave in search of new definitions, and their own pathways. The artists are urging us to look closer at our lives and our actions. Before I left I wandered over to “Days of Glory,” Grubbs’ lovely oil-on-canvas depicting a sunset over a field of thick and glowing brushstrokes. Not immediately, I spied two fallen soldiers crumpled in the field. Nearby, a dead horse materialized, leading the eye to the trail of dead flowing all the way to the horizon.


Art Exhibits [ OPENING ] Kim Waale: “I Need a Lullaby” Thu Jan 26. Hartnett Gallery, University of Rochester, Wilson Commons. Artist talk 4-5 p.m. in Gowen Room, Wilson Commons, River Campus; reception 5-7 p.m. in gallery. 275-4188, blogs. rochester.edu/Hartnett. “The Eclectic Palette of Dick Welch and Harriet Sutherland” Fri Jan 27. Image City Photography Gallery, 722 University Ave. 5-9 p.m. 482-1976, imagecityphotographygallery.com. Levon Sheppard “Allegorical ‘Visual Relationships’” Fri Jan 27. MCC Mercer Gallery, 1000 E. Henrietta Rd. 7-9 p.m. 292-2021, monroecc.edu/go/mercer/ “Reflections” 25 Paintings by Fairport HS Students Sat Jan 28. Hanging Around Frame & Art Gallery, 1276 Fairport Rd. Mon-Sat 6-10 p.m. 419-7027, framingrochester.com. [ CONTINUING ] 1570 Gallery at Valley Manor 1570 East Ave. Through Feb 17: “A Fraternity of Artists.” Mon-Fri 9 a.m.-5 p.m. and weekends by appt. 770-1923. 1975 Gallery at Surface Salon, 661 South Ave., Suite B. Through Jan 28: “Happy Hour,” New Works by Amanda Clarke. Visit site for hours. 1975ish.com Abbotts at the Kitchen Keg Café 72 St. Paul St. Ongoing: Photo exhibit of Puerto Rico. Info: 546-3116, abbottsdowntown@yahoo.com. Arts & Cultural Council Gallery 277 N Goodman St. Through Jan 27: “Another World” by Leonard Urso. Mon-Fri 10 a.m.-4 p.m. 4734000, artsrochester.org. Artisan Works 565 Blossom Rd. Ongoing: “Perspectives” by Robert Farber. | Third Sundays: Park Avenue Dance Company, 3 p.m. Fri-Sat 11 a.m.-6 p.m., Sun Noon-5 p.m. $8-$12. 288-7170, artisanworks.net. Baobab Cultural Center 728 University Ave. Continuing: Paintings by Ikahl. Thu-Fri 5:30-9 p.m., Sat 2-4 p.m. 563-2145, thebaobab.org. Barnes and Noble Gallery 3349 Monroe Ave, Pittsford. Jan 30Feb 28: Juried Show of Paintings by members of the Penfield Art Association. Mon-Sat 9 a.m.-10 p.m.; Sun 9 a.m.-9 p.m. 5866020, barnesandnoble.com. Black Radish Gallery Village Gate, D Entrance, 274 N. Goodman St. Through Jan 30: “Four by Fourteen” featuring Richard Harvey, Valerie Larson, Dan Neuberger, and Antoni Ooto. Mon-Fri 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Sat 12-5 p.m. arenaartgroup.com Books Etc. 78 W. Main St., Macedon. Through Feb 15: “Visions and Views,” work by Claudine Bartlett, Terry Mulee, and Stephen Thull. Wed-Sun Noon-5 p.m. 474-4116, books_ etc@yahoo.com. Bug Jar 219 Monroe Ave. Through Feb1: THE LOBBY Presents: “Remote Control” group exhibit. Mon-Sun 8 p.m.2 a.m. 454-2966, bugjar.com, lobbydigital.com

CIAS Dean’s Gallery Frank E. Gannett Hall, Bldg 7A-1060, Rochester Institute of Technology. Through Feb 29: “Paintings on Paper,” by Barbara Fox. Mon-Fri 9 a.m.-5 p.m. rit.edu. Community Darkroom Gallery 713 Monroe Ave. Through Mar 2: “Faceless,” group exhibit by Community Darkroom Monitors. Mon 9 a.m.-9:30 p.m.; Tue-Thu 9 a.m.-6:30 p.m.; Fri 12-5 p.m.; Sat 10 a.m.-5:30 p.m. 271-5920, geneseearts.org. Davison Gallery at Roberts Wesleyan College 2301 Westside Drive. Through Jan 31: Art Faculty Showcase: “War & Consumerism” by Jeffrey Grubbs and Romy Hosford. Mon-Fri 11 a.m.-5 p.m.; Sat 1-4 p.m. 594-6442, roberts. edu/davisongallery. A Different Path Gallery 27 Market St., Brockport. Through Jan 29: “Power of Portraits: Intimacy & Distance,” featuring Jolene Beckman, Sarah Hart, and Diane Elmslie. Wed-Fri 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Sat 10 a.m.-6 p.m., Sun 10 a.m.-4 p.m. 637-5494, differentpathgallery.com. Fusion Salon 333 Park Ave. Ongoing: “RetroGrade” with St. Monci and Hannah Betts. Mon & Tue 9 a.m.-8 p.m., Thu Noon-8 p.m., Fri 9a.m.-6 p.m., Sat 9 a.m.-4 p.m. 271-8120, fusionsalonnewyork.com. Gallery r 100 College Ave. Through Feb 19: “Invitational Exhibition: CIAS Faculty & Students.” Wed-Sun 1-5 p.m. galleryr.org. Genesee Center for the Arts and Education 713 Monroe Ave. Through Jan 28: “WinterCraft: Annual Holiday Sale.” Mon-Fri 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; Sat noon-4 p.m. 244-1730, geneseearts.org Genesee Co-op Federal Credit Union 395 Gregory St. Through Mar 30: The Work of Painter Susan Link. Mon-Wed 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; Thu-Fri 10 a.m.-6 p.m. 4612230, genesee.coop. George Eastman House 900 East Ave. Through Feb 19: “The Unseen Eye: Photographs from the W.M. Hunt Collection. | Ongoing: “Cameras from the Technology Collection,” and “The Remarkable George Eastman.” | Tue-Sat 10 a.m.5 p.m., Thu 10 a.m.-8 p.m., Sun 1-5 p.m. $4-$12. 2713361, eastmanhouse.org Gilded Square Picture Framing & Gallery 714 University Ave. Continuing: “Framed” artwork by Keith Uhrich & Michelle Michael. Tue-Fri 11 a.m.-5 p.m., Sat 11 a.m.-3 p.m. 461-2808, gildedsquare.com. Go Art! Albion Satellite Gallery 456 West Ave, Albion. Through Mar 5: Michael O’Keefe. Mon-Fri 9 a.m.4 p.m., Tue & Thu 9 a.m.-9 p.m. 774-7372. Go Art! Bank of Castile Main Gallery Seymour Place, 201 East Main St., Batavia. Through Feb 27: “The Art of Healing: Surviving Psychological Trauma.” Mon-Fri 9 a.m.-4 p.m. 343-9313, goart.org. Go Art! Batavia Satellite Gallery at the Genesee County Senior Center, 2 Bank St, Batavia. Through Mar 5: “Artwork in Ball Point Pen & Watercolors” group

ART | “Regarding Place: Photo Media Invitational”

In a world where the photograph has become perhaps the most ubiquitous and democratic artistic medium, ingenuity of concept and technique tends to stand out. This week, SUNY Brockport will debut an impressive new show entitled “Regarding Place: Photo Media Invitational,” with images by nationally respected artists Pinky Bass, Angela Kelly, Molly Landreth, and Suzanne E. Szucs. The show features four bodies of work that explore the photographic through the use of traditional, alternative, digital, video, audio, books, and online communities, per the press release. Included will be Bass’s “Contemplating My Internal Organs and Zodiac Perceptions,” Kelly’s “Catharsis: Images of Post-Conflict Belfast,” Landreth’s “Embodiment: A Portrait of Queer Life in America” (pictured), and Szucs’s “Breathing in Place” and “Sketch 4 I.D.” series. “This exhibit highlights the diversity of media and messages communicated through photo-based arts,” says the show’s curator, Kitty Hubbard, associate professor of art at Brockport, who has planned additional programming which will include lectures, Skype chats with artists, and workshops that will continue throughout the semester. The exhibit will be on view at the Tower Fine Arts Center Gallery (180 Holley St. in Brockport) through February 19. Gallery hours are Monday-Friday, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., and Sunday 1-4 p.m. For more information, call 395-2805 or visit Brockport.edu. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY show. Mon-Fri 9 a.m.-4 p.m. 343-9313, goart.org. Go Art! Medina Satellite Gallery at TheShirt Factory Café, 115 W Center St, Medina. Through Mar 5: Photography by Wendi Pencille. Mon-Fri 7 a.m.-9 p.m.; Sat 8 a.m.-9 p.m.; Sun 8 a.m.-3 p.m. 343-9313, goart.org. Go Art! Satellite Gallery on the Ridge at Leonard Oaks Estate Winery, 10609 Ridge Road, Medina. Through Mar 5: “Nature’s Spirit: Large Format Nature Landscape Photography” by Walter Jakubowski. Sun-Fri 12-6 p.m., Sat 10 a.m.-6 p.m. 343-9313, goart.org. Hanging Around Frame & Art Gallery 1276 Fairport Rd. Jan 28-Feb 29: “Reflections” 25 Paintings by Fairport HS Students. Mon-Sat 10 a.m.-4 p.m. 4197027, framingrochester.com. Hartnett Gallery University of Rochester, Wilson Commons. Jan 26-Feb 26: Kim Waale: “I Need a Lullaby.” Tue-Fri 11 a.m.-7 p.m.; Sat-Sun Noon-5 p.m. 275-4188, blogs.rochester.edu/Hartnett. High Falls Fine Art Gallery 60 Browns Race. Through Feb 24: “Play” group exhibit, “Excavating the Present, Unearthing Eternity: Nancy Valle Sculpture/Lisa Harris

Poetry,” “Photographer’s Saturday Salon,” also solo shows by Jim Mott, Phil Lange, Scott Grove. Wed-Fri 11 a.m.-5:30 p.m.; Sat Noon-5:30 p.m.; Sun 1-5 p.m. 325-2030, centerathighfalls.org. I-Square Visions 693 Titus Ave., Irondequoit. Through Feb 3: A Holiday Art Show. Mon-Fri 10 a.m.-2 p.m., Sat 11 a.m.-2 p.m. 943-1941. Image City Photography Gallery 722 University Ave. Jan 25-Feb 19: “The Eclectic Palette of Dick Welch and Harriet Sutherland.” Wed-Sat 11 a.m.-7 p.m.; Sun noon-4 p.m. 482-1976, imagecityphotographygallery.com. International Art Acquisitions 3300 Monroe Ave. Through Jan 31: Original drawings by French artist Henri Matisse. Mon-Fri 10 a.m.-9 p.m.; Sat 10 a.m.-6 p.m.; Sun Noon-5 p.m. 264-1440, internationalartacquisitions.com. Jembetat Gallery and Café 645 Park Ave. Ongoing: Art of the Dogon Mali. Daily 11 a.m.midnight. 442-8960, jembetat@ gmail.com. Little Theatre Café 240 East Ave. Through Feb 3: Jansa Bogdanovska. Sun 5-8 p.m. MonThu 5-10 p.m.; Fri-Sat 5-11 p.m. 258-0403, thelittle.org.

Livingston Arts Center 4 Murray Hill Drive. Through Feb 12: “Martin Luther King, Jr. and Peace.” Mon-Fri 1-5 p.m., Thu 1-8 p.m., Sat 11 a.m.-3 p.m., Sun 12-5 p.m. 243-6785, livingstonartscenter.org. Lux Lounge 666 South Ave. Ongoing: Works by Darren Brennessel, Caitlin Yarsky, and Tomas A. Fox. Mon-Thu 5 p.m.2 a.m.; Fri 4:30-2 a.m.; SatSun 9 p.m.-2 a.m. 232-9030, lux666.com. Memorial Art Gallery 500 University Ave. Lucy Burne Gallery: Through Feb 9: “Adult Student Show.” | “What’s Up” lecture, First Sundays, 2 p.m. | Ongoing exhibits: “At the Crossroads,” “Seeing America,” “Italian Baroque Organ,” “Brunswick Armor,” “Judaica.” | Wed-Sun 11 a.m.-5 p.m., Thu until 9 p.m., $5-$12. Thu night reduced price: $6 from 5-9 p.m. 276-8900, mag.rochester.edu. Mill Art Center & Gallery, 61 N Main St, Honeoye Falls. Through Feb 25: “Dry Pigments and Eggs,” paintings by Robert Wisner. MonFri & Sat 11 a.m.-3 p.m., Fri 11 a.m.-8 p.m. Free. 624-7740, millartcenter.com. MCC Mercer Gallery 1000 E. Henrietta Rd. Jan 27-Feb 24: Levon Sheppard “Allegorical ‘Visual Relationships’.” | Ongoing: Sibley Window Project (Main Street location): “Pursuit of Pleasure” by Carly Glenn Collier, Lindsey Collier Sears, Tharin Beeman, and Rachel Schooping. Mon-Thu 11 a.m.-6 p.m.; Fri 11 a.m.-4 p.m. 292-2021, monroecc.edu/go/mercer/ My Sister’s Gallery The Episcopal Church Home, 505 Mt. Hope Ave. Through Mar 9: “Some Things Old, Some Things New” mixed media by Cheryl and Don Olney. Daily 10 a.m.-8 p.m. 546-8439. Nazareth College Arts Center Gallery 4245 East Ave. Through Mar 10: “Enlightened Earth: The Ceramics Invitational.” Wed-Sun 1-8 p.m. 389-5073, naz.edu. Nazareth College Colacino Gallery 4245 East Ave. Through Mar 3: DeLucia & Winkie. Wed-Sat 12-5 p.m. 389-5073, naz.edu. Nazareth College Otto A Shults Center Lobby 4245 East Ave. Through Feb 19: “Polish Heroes: Those Who Rescued the Jews.” 8 a.m.-midnight. naz.edu. NTID Dyer Arts Center 52 Lomb Memorial Dr. Through Mar 2: “Paintings by Francis Marion Tuttle (1839-1910).” Mon-Thu 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m.; Fri 9 a.m.-7:30 p.m., Sat 1-3:30 p.m. 475-6884, ntid.rit.edu/dyerarts. Owl House 75 Marshall St. Continuing: “Broken Lenses,” photo show and fundraiser for the Roc City Park. Tue-Sun 11 a.m.-4 p.m. & 5-10:30 p.m. 360-2920, owlhouserochester.com. Oxford Gallery 267 Oxford St. Through Feb 18: “Curriculum Vitae,” work by Philip Bornarth and Wayne Williams. Tue-Fri Noon-5 p.m; Sat 10 a.m.-5 p.m. 271-5885, oxfordgallery.com. Pat Rini Rohrer Gallery 71 S Main St, Canandaigua. Through Feb 11: “The Annual Studio II Student/Teacher Exhibit.” Mon-

Tue 10 a.m.-6 p.m.; Wed-Fri 10 a.m.-8 pm.; Sat 10 a.m.-6 p.m.; Sun 12:30-4 p.m. 394-0030, prrgallery.com. Phelps Art Center 15 Church St., Phelps. Through Feb 25: Fourth Annual Ontario County Art Teachers Show. Thu-Sat 1-4 p.m. 315-548-2095, phelpsartcenter.com. Phillips Fine Art 248 East Ave. Through Jan 31: “Collectors’ Show & Sale.” Tue-Fri Noon-6 p.m.; Sat Noon-5 p.m. or by appt. 232-8120. Roberts Wesleyan B.T. Roberts Memorial Hall Art Gallery 2265 Westside Dr. Jan 23-Mar 23: “Reflections on Culture and Memories Lost,” works by Alberto Rey. Mon-Fri 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Roberts.edu. Record Archive 33 1/3 Rockwood St. Continuing: “Ancient Observations: Artwork by Allie Hartley.” Mon-Sat 10 a.m.-9 p.m., Sun noon-5 p.m. alayna@ recordarchive.com. Rochester Regional Community Design Center Hungerford Complex/E. Main Business Park. Door 3B. Continuing: “Corn Hill: What’s Next?” Mon-Fri 8:30 a.m.5:30 p.m. 271-0520, rrcdc.com. Roz Steiner Art Gallery 1 College Rd., Batavia. Through Feb 27: “Convivium” by ceramic artist Kala Stein. Mon-Fri 10 a.m.-4 p.m. 343-0055 x6448, genesee.edu. Sage Art Center UR River Campus. Through August 2012: Photo exhibit by Thomas Evans, curated by Jessica Holmes. Mon-Thu 9 a.m.-11p.m., Fri 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Sat-Sun 2-6 p.m. 273-5995, rochester.edu/ college/AAH/facilities/sage Spectrum Gallery at Lumiere Photo, 100 College Ave. Through Feb 25: Steven Foster. Mon-Fri 9 a.m.-6 p.m., Sat 10 a.m.-2 p.m. 461-4447, lumierephoto.com. Stella Art Gallery & Studio 350 West Commercial St., East Rochester. Continuing: “soulSELFspirit,” a collection of self portraits by local artists. Thu 9 a.m.-4 p.m., Fri 9 a.m.-9 p.m., Sat noon-9 p.m. stellaartgalleryandstudio.com. Strong Behavioral Health University of Rochester Medical Center, 601 Elmwood Ave. Continuing: “11/11/11: We Are One.” Visit site for hours. urmc. rochester.edu. Tower Fine Arts Center @ SUNY Brockport 180 Holley St. Jan 25-Feb 19: “Regarding Place: Photo Media Invitational.” MonFri 10 a.m.-4 p.m. 395-ARTS, brockport.edu. Wallace Library Rochester Institute of Technology, 1 Lomb Memorial Dr. Through March 23: “Books & Pieces: The Works of Scott McCarney. Email for details. 475-2408, ahfwml@rit.edu. [ CALL FOR ARTWORK ] Arts at the Gardens: Call for Vendors. Takes place August 20-21. Information: artsatthegardens.org. Call for Art: “The FacesofWomen.” Deadline February 2 for March continues on page 22

rochestercitynewspaper.com City 21


2012 taking place Wednesday February 22, 2012. Open to filmmakers aged 19 and under. Deadline January 31. Email real2reelfilms@gmail.com for entry form. Regional Writers Showcase. Submit January 23-February 7: one act or full length plays. Drop off or mail to Writers & Books, 740 University Ave., Rochester, NY 14607. Notification to winners in April, performances April 30 and May 7 at Geva. Information: 473-2590 x107. LECTURE | Science on the Edge 2012

With all of the mystique and panic surrounding the year 2012, perhaps it’s time to gain a little academic clarity on the matter. This week, the Rochester Museum and Science Center “Science on the Edge” lecture series continues with Anthony Aveni, Colgate professor of astronomy and Native American studies, who will speak on “The End of Time: The Maya Mystery of 2012.” Aveni’s Maya talk takes place Wednesday, February 1, at 7:30 p.m., at RMSC (657 East Ave.), and will explore the various theories and predictions that December 21, 2012 marks the end of the world as we know it, and speculate on why American pop culture is obsessive about cataclysmic events. RMSC’s 2012 “Science on the Edge” lecture series kicked off last week with UR professor Adam Frank’s discussion, “Twilight of the Big Bang: Revolutions in Human and Cosmic Time.” The series will continue with subjects ranging from extreme storm chasing to Madagascar’s vanishing ecosystems. Single lecture tickets are $15 for adults, $8 for students, with a $1 discount for members. For more information, call 697-1942 or visit rmsc.org. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY

Art Exhibits 2 exhibit. $25 entry fee for up to three pieces. For information, visit stellaartgalleryandstudio. com/gallery1/. Call for Art: MUG SHOTS 2012. Deadline February 25, noon, for March show. Submit up to two 5”x7” prints of your E+G Mug traveling, or staying at home. Ages 18+. All images must be for sale, priced at $15. For information, email gallery@ equalgrounds.com. Call for Art Proposals for New Roz Steiner Art Gallery at Genesee Community College. Individuals and groups working in all media are welcome to submit proposals. Submit bio, resume, digital JPEG samples to GCC Art Department Office, Art Gallery Committee, Genesee Community College, One College Road, Batavia, NY 14020. The new gallery will be ready for exhibitions beginning in early 2011. For more info, email hsjones@genesee.edu. Call for Emerging Film- and Videomakers. Ongoing. Submit films and videos to the monthly Emerging Filmmakers Series at the Little Theatre. Films of maximum 30 minutes must have been produced in New York State in the last two years. For more information, email emergingfilmmakers@yahoo. com. Call for Judges for NOTA Traffic Control Box Artwork. The Neighborhood of the Arts is seeking judges for artwork

applications corresponding to two traffic control boxes and two utility boxes located along University Ave. Judging is on a volunteer basis, will take place at the end of January, and should be completed in one or two sessions lasting approximately 1 hour. To be eligible for the first round of judging, interested parties must be either residents of the Neighborhood of the Arts or work in the neighborhood. For more information, contact Janet Collinge, NOTA RFP Coordinator for Traffic Control Box Art, JanetCollinge@aol.com. Call for Work. A Photographers Path Juried Exhibit, March-April at Center at High Falls Art Gallery. Drop off work Feb 15-19. $15 for up to 3 entries. Details: 3252030, swinslow@frontiernet.net. Central Library Offers Exhibit Opportunities for Artists at Lower Link Gallery. Space currently available free of charge. Applications available at libraryweb.org; call 428-8051 for more information. Fairport Canal Days Seventh Annual Poster Contest. Deadline February 1. For information, visit fairportcanaldays.com. National Writing and Arts Competitions for Deaf and Hardof-Hearing High School Students. Deadline March 15 for RIT’s SpiRIT Writing Contest. For entry forms and more information, visit rit.edu/NTID/WritingContestNR. REAL2REEL YOUTH FILM FESTIVAL (R2RYFF) is now accepting entries for R2RYFF

22 City january 25-31, 2012

Art Events [ Saturday, January 28 ] “Meet Me at the MAG” Open House. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. 2768900, mag.rochester.edu, 800-272-3900. 10 a.m.-noon. Free. Learn about monthly program offered by MAG and Alzhemer’s Association.

Comedy [ Wed., January 25 ] Open Mic Night Comedy. Boulder Coffee Co. at 739 Park Ave. 287-JAVA. 8 p.m. Free. [ Thursday, January 26Saturday, January 28 ] Guy Torry/Ralph Tetta. Comedy Club, 2235 Empire Blvd, Webster, NY 14580. 6719080, thecomedyclub.us. Thu 7:30 p.m., Fri-Sat 7:30 & 10 p.m. $9-$12. [ Friday, January 27 ] 3 Guys Walk Into A Bar Presents: Best of Boulder Comedy Showcase. Boulder Coffee Co-South Wedge, 100 Alexander St. 454-7140, 3guyswalkintoabar@gmail. com. 8-10 p.m. $5. Village Idiots: Comedy Platypus/Director’s Cut. Village Idiots Comedy Improv, 274 N Goodman St, VIP Studio D312. 797-9086, improvvip.com. 7:30/9:30 p.m. $5-$10 [ Saturday, January 28 ] Lisa Lampanelli. Auditorium Theatre, 875 E Main St. 800745-3000, ticketmaster.com. 8 p.m. $39.50. Village Idiots: Comedy Platypus/ Last Idiots Standing. Village Idiots Comedy Improv, 274 N Goodman St, VIP Studio D312. 797-9086, improvvip.com. 7:30/9:30 p.m. $5-$10. [ Wed., February 1 ] SEI presents: Harold Night. The Space Theater, Hungerford Building, 1115 East Main St., Door 2, Floor 2. 269-4673, thespacerochester.com. 7:309:30 p.m. $5, BYOB.

Festivals [ Saturday, January 28 ] Light Works! Wellness & Psychic Faire: Readings, Reiki, Runes, and Reflexology. Brighton Town Park Lodge, 777 Westfall Rd. lightworks@ frontier.com, meetup.com/lightworks. 10-11:30 a.m. Classes on Incense around the World or Tarot, 12:30-7 p.m. Wellness &

Psychic Faire. $5 for class, free admission at 12:30 p.m.

Kids Events [ Wednesday, January 25-Sunday, January 29 ] Disney on Ice presents “Treasure Trove.” Blue Cross Arena, 100 Exchange Blvd. 758-5300, 1-800-745-3000, disneyonice.com. Wed-Fri 7 p.m., Sat 11 a.m., 3 & 7 p.m., Sun 1 & 5 p.m. $15-$55. [ Thursday, January 26 ] Community Arts Academy After School Program Open House. Lutheran Church of the Incarnate Word, 597 East Ave. 473-7187. 5:30-7 p.m. Free, chili supper buffet $5/single, $15 family. [ Friday, January 27 ] “Are You My Mother?” ArtSmart Theatre For Young People. Smith Opera House, 82 Seneca St, Geneva. 315781-5483, thesmith.org. 10 a.m. & 7 p.m. $5. Build a Snowman. Henrietta Public Library, 455 Calkins Rd. 359-7092, hpl.org. 2-3 p.m. Free, register. [ Tuesday, January 31 ] Cookies in a Jar. Gates Public Library, 902 Elmgrove Rd., Gates. 247-6446. 6-7 p.m. Free, register. Ages 9-18. All materials will be provided. [ Tuesday, January 31Sunday, February 5 ] Shrek the Musical. Auditorium Theatre, 875 E Main St. 800745-3000, ticketmaster.com, info@rbtl.org. Tue-Thu 7:30 p.m., Fri 8 p.m. Sat 2 & 8 p.m., Sun 2 & 7 p.m. $32.50$64.50.

Lectures [ Wed., January 25 ] “Ghosts of a Glorious Past” with Donovan Shilling. Penfield Community Recreation Center, 1985 Baird Rd, Penfield. 340-8651, penfield.org. 11:30 a.m. $5. Lee Loomis and Haley Rotter of Energy Smart Communities Present. Brighton Memorial Library, 2300 Elmwood Ave. info@ColorBrightonGreen.org. 6:30 p.m. Free. [ Thursday, January 26 ] Collecting Vintage Postcards. Penfield Public Library, 1098 Baird Rd, Penfield. 381-5823, WNYPostcardClub.com. 7-8:30 p.m. Free, register. Rochester Chapter of WIFS presents “Conceive, Believe, Achieve” with Nicholas Palumbo and Kim Millman. Locust Hill Country Club, 2000 Jefferson Rd. wifs-rochester.org. 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m. $20, register. [ Friday, January 27 ] 2012 Martin Luther King Jr. Commemorative Address with Michael Eric Dyson. University of Rochester-Strong Auditorium, Fraternity Rd. rochester.edu. 6 p.m. Free. Cindy Patton discusses film work of AIDS activist

SPECIAL EVENT | Babes of the Brawl

Girls Rock! Rochester is dedicated to empowering young girls and helping break gender stereotypes. The ladies of the Broads Regional Arm Wrestling League are also dedicated to breaking gender stereotypes — and possibly your arm. This weekend the two organizations will team up for a fundraising concert and arm-wrestling competition with proceeds benefiting the Girls Rock! Summer Camp. What better way to spend an evening than by checking out live music by the Big Brain Cartel, Richard Snare, Green Dreams, and Baby Shark, and watching girls kick ass? There will also be crafts and raffles, as well as a dance party with DJ Tanner and DJ Lulu after the bands. Roc Girls Rock! will be held on Saturday, January 28, at 7:30 p.m. at the Bug Jar (219 Monroe Ave.). Tickets cost $10. For more information, visit girlsrockrochester.com. — BY ERIC LACLAIR John Greyson. University of Rochester-Rush Rhees Library, Library Rd. rochester. edu/news/show.php?id=3951. 5:30 p.m. Free. [ Sunday, January 29 ] Historic Brighton Salon III: Notable Brighton Architects. Brighton Town Hall, 2300 Elmwood Ave. historicbrighton. org. 2:30 p.m. Free. [ Monday, January 30 ] Guild Opera Lecture Series: “Twentieth Century Opera (It’s better than you think)” Carol Crocca. Brighton Memorial Library, 2300 Elmwood Ave. 784-5300, brightonlibrary.org. 7-9 p.m. Free. Restorative Rochester: “Hopes and Dreams for the Future” with Helen Boehm-Morelli. 111 Hillside Ave. 473-0970, info@ pirirochester.org. 7-9 p.m. Free, register. [ Tuesday, January 31 ] “Have We Discovered Warp Speed, Scotty?” with Kevin S. McFarland PhD. Central Library, 115 South Ave. 428-8150. 12:12-12:52 p.m. Free. 7th Annual Reshaping Rochester Series: “Transformation: Don’t Be Afraid of It!” Gleason Works Auditorium, 1000 University Ave. 271-0520, rrcdc.org. 7-9 p.m. $10. Peter J. Park, Planning Director for the city of Denver. The Main Event: Sports vs. Crisis. Mario’s Via Abruzzi, 2740 Monroe Ave. prsarochester.org. 12-1:30 p.m. $20-$30, register. [ Wed., February 1 ] Guatemala: Crafts and Resistance, Cultural Identity and Community. Downtown

Presbyterian Church, 121 N Fitzhugh St. 381-5606, interconnect_mott@frontiernet. net. 7 p.m. Free. Soren Staermose, Producer of “The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo.” Chester F. Carlson Center for Imaging Science, room 1125, Rochester Institue of Technology, Lomb Memorial Dr. 475-7327, coagla@rit.edu. 6 p.m. Free. The Basics: Memory Loss, Dementia and Alzheimer’s Disease. Nazareth CollegeShults Center, 4245 East Ave. dsteitz4@naz.edu. 7 p.m. Free. “The End of Time: The Maya Mystery of 2012” with Anthony Aveni. Rochester Museum and Science Center, 657 East Ave. 271-1880, rmsc.org. 7:30 p.m. $7-$15 single tickets.

Literary Event [ Wed., January 25 ] Book Group: Titles over Tea: “Super Sad True Love Story” by Gary Shteyngart. Barnes & Noble Greece, 330 Greece Ridge Center Dr. 227-4020, bn.com. 7 p.m. Free. Writing Class: instant poetry (just add words!) the breakdown. Creative Wellness Center, 320 N. Goodman Street Suite 201, Rochester, NY 14607. 325-3145 x100, mharochester.org. 1-3 p.m. Free admission. [ Thursday, January 26 ] Book Group: Classics: “The Hunchback of Notre Dame” by Victor Hugo. Barnes & Noble Greece, 330 Greece Ridge Center Dr. 227-4020, bn.com. 7 p.m. Free. Poetry Reading: Open Mic Poetry Night. Boulder


Coffee Co. at 739 Park Ave. bouldercoffeeco.com. 8 p.m. Free. [ Sunday, January 29 ] Book Discussion: Sunday Forum: Us and Them: America’s Four Gods by Paul Froese and Christopher Baker. Downtown Presbyterian Church, 121 N Fitzhugh St. 325-4000, downtownpresbyterian.org. 9:50-10:50 a.m. Free. Poetry Reading: Donna Marbach and Tom Holmes. Books Etc, 78 W Main St, Rt 31, Macedon. 474-4116, books_etc@yahoo. com. 4-5:30 p.m. Free. [ Monday, January 30 ] Poetry Reading: Free Speech Zone Series. Tango Cafe, 389 Gregory St. 260-9005, bit. ly/rochpoets. 8 p.m. Free. Featured poet or musician followed by open mic. [ Tuesday, January 31 ] Writing Class: Lifting Spirits Writers Guild. Lift Bridge Book Shop, 45 Main St, Brockport. 637-2260, liftbridgebooks.com. 6:30 p.m. Free.

Recreation FOR REPEATING WINTER ACTIVITIES, SEARCH OUR ONLINE CALENDAR. [ Saturday, January 28 ] GVHC Hike. Greece Canal Park, Elmgrove Rd, by Millennium Lodge. Bill S. 314-5266, gvhchikes.org. 1 p.m. Free. Moderate 4-5 mile hike. Owl Prowl. Sterling Nature Center, Off 104 East, Sterling. 315-947-6143, snc@ co.cayuga.ny.us. 7 p.m. Free. Saturday Snowshoe Hiking & Sports. Edgerton Community Center, 41 Backus St. cityofrochester. gov/winteradventures/. 1-3 p.m. Free. [ Sunday, January 29 ] GVHC Hike. Seneca Park Zoo lot, by playground. Jim K. 8657835, gvhchikes.org. 1 p.m. Free. Easy 5 mile hike, Seneca Park, Maplewood Park. Sunday Park Hikes: Seneca Park. Seneca Park Zoo lot, closest to St. Paul St. cityofrochester.gov/ winteradventures/. 1-2:30 p.m. Free. [ Wed., February 1 ] Snow Cheap Trail Race Series. Cobbs Hill Park at the corner of Culver Road and Norris Drive. 697-3338, fleetfeetrochester. com. Register 6:45 p.m. at Lake Riley Lodge, start time 7:15 p.m. Call for details.

Special Events [ Wed., January 25 ] 2012 Film Festival at Roberts Wesleyan College: “The Hammer.” Roberts Wesleyan College, Lake Lecture Auditorium in the Smith Science Center, 2301 Westside Dr. roberts.edu. 2012 Rochester Business Networking Kickoff Event.

THEATER | Big Wigs

What started as a dinner performance and drag show nearly seven years ago has since transformed in to a highenergy Las Vegas-style show featuring local entertainers Aggy Dune and Kasha Davis. Big Wigs features the dynamic drag duo bringing out their best impersonations of all your favorite divas. Cher, Tina Turner, Madonna, Dolly Parton, Joan Rivers, and many more will make appearances. Dune and Davis will bring their glittering talents to the Blackfriars Theatre (795 E. Main St.) this weekend for one night of big laughs, and of course, big hair. The duo will perform on Sunday, January 29, at 7 p.m. Tickets are available for $27. For more information, visit thebigwigsshow.com. — BY ERIC LACLAIR Bonadio and Company, 171 Sullys Trail, Pittsford. rochestertipclub-jan2012.eventbrite. com/. 7:30-9 a.m. Free. Beer Social: Sierra Nevada/ Ovila. Tap & Mallet, 381 Gregory St. inquiries@ tapandmallet.com. 8-9:30 p.m. $14. Highland Park Winter Farmers Market. Cornell Cooperative ExtensionRochester, 249 Highland Ave. highlandwintermarket.com. 3-6 p.m. Free admission. [ Thursday, January 26 ] Caged Alpha Monkey Racing. Tap & Mallet, 381 Gregory St. inquiries@tapandmallet.com. 8 p.m. Cost of beer. Frederick Douglass Toastmasters Club. 152 Baden St. 235-6460. 7 p.m. Free. No Boundaries: WalkFIT Info Session. Fleet Feet Sports, Erie Canal Commons, 2522 Ridgeway Ave., Greece. 6973338, fleetfeetrochester.com. 7:15 p.m. Free. Regional Economic Development Council: Report to the Community. Rochester Riverside Convention Center, 123 E Main St. 546-6920, rddc@rddc.org. 11:45 a.m.1:30 p.m. $45-$50, register. Screenings: “The World is Sick”; “The Pink Pimpernel”; and “The Ads Epidemic.” University of Rochester-Rush Rhees Library, Library Rd. rochester.edu/news/show. php?id=3951. 6 p.m. Free. Single Fun Raisers Happy Hour. Valicia’s Restorante, 2155 Long Pond Road. sandraconvertino@yahoo.com, singlefunraiser.org. 5-7 p.m. Free. Singles: Rochester’s Single Fun Raisers for people 40 and better. Slender Center’s 25th Anniversary Luncheon. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199

Woodcliff Dr. 381-6320, loseweight@slendercenter. com. Noon-1:30 p.m. $50, register. Special guest Ali Vincent from The Biggest Loser. Topics in Spirituality: Guardian Angels/Spirit Guides. Penfield Community Recreation Center, 1985 Baird Rd, Penfield. 340-8655, penfield. org. 7 p.m. $10, register. [ Friday, January 27 ] Annual MLK Dinner Gala Celebration. RIT Inn & Conference Center, 5257 W Henrietta Rd. USA.RBEA.Exec. Board@xerox.com. 6 p.m. $55, register. Guest speakers Dr. Iris Banister, Wakili Moore and Bill Davis Jr., Awards, Silent Auction, Networking, Dinner and Entertainment. [ Friday, January 27Saturday, January 28 ] “Rummaging at the Mill” Sale. Mill Art Center & Gallery, 61 N Main St, Honeoye Falls. 5821830, thelowermill.com. Fri 9 a.m.-8 p.m., Sat 9 a.m.-noon. Free admission. [ Friday, January 27Sunday, January 29 ] What Women Want Escape Weekend. Casa Larga Vineyards, 2287 Turk Hill Rd, Fairport. info@ whatwomenwantweekend. com. Three venues: PJ Party check in noon Jan 27-check out Jan 29, Red Carpet event at Fingerlakes Casino, Jan 28-5p.m.-midnight, New Trends Sale Sun Jan 29 9:30a.m.-4:30p.m. 1-2 night inclusive PJ party rates; email for deta. 8th Annual Escape Weekend for ROC Women, Featuring PJ parties, ABC TV Bachelors and the U of R Yellow Jackets at Red Carpet Bachelor Date Auction continues on page 24

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Theater

Special Events (incl 30 local bachelors), Disco Bash, Sunday New Trends day long Sale with 70 retailers at Casa Larga.

greatest need is to avoid what she calls the “vortex.” She tries to do so by falling back on her ability to organize everything. She makes lists, she tells her friends again and again that she’s “fine,” she tracks down hospital reports — and she insists on being present for her husband’s autopsy. She lets herself be talked out of it at the last minute. Both Didion’s writing and Pierce’s speaking

Ginni Harden Pierce in “The Year of Magical Thinking,” at Blackfriars.

photo courtesy dan howell

A night of magical acting “The Year of Magical Thinking” Through January 29 Blackfriars Theatre, 795 E. Main St. $27 | 454-1260, bftix.com [ REVIEW ] BY MICHAEL LASSER

I’ve never met Ginni Harden Pierce, yet I feel that I know, almost intimately, a dozen different people she has inhabited in utterly believable performances. A gifted creator of character, she has appeared on local stages for more than 40 years, bringing to life a wide range of personalities, never more vividly than in the heartbreaking one-woman show, Joan Didion’s “The Year of Magical Thinking,” now at Blackfriars Theatre. “You sit down to dinner,” Didion writes, “and life as you know it ends.” The randomness and inescapability of death haunt the book she wrote in 2004, the year after her husband, writer John Gregory Dunne, died of a heart attack. In 2006, she adapted it into a play, 24 City january 25-31, 2012

which she expanded to include the death of her daughter, Quintana, in 2005. When her father died, Quintana was unconscious from septic shock, the first of several dire illnesses, which led to her death at age 32. The play’s timeline reaches from just before Dunne’s heart attack to just after Quintana’s death, but it remains elusive because talk is distracted by whatever associations and images roil the mind. The connections are deeper than logic. The play is written as a one-sided conversation between a character named Joan Didion and an audience. In Pierce’s modulated, restrained portrayal, Didion is talking and also listening to herself talk. She comments, analyzes, revisits, and revises because she prizes herself for being a rational person. Yet all that breaks down under the denial of death that she entitles, ironically, the year of magical thinking. If you believe something strongly enough — magically enough — you can keep it from happening, even if it is inevitable. So Didion refuses to give away her husband’s shoes because he will need them when he returns. Didion’s

strike a perfect conversational pitch. Pierce’s tone is straightforward; she treats us as if we will understand. Occasionally her voice hardens and a few times she pauses at the edge of tears, but only once does her voice rise in anger. The surprise of it cracks like a whip. For almost two hours, Pierce’s voice is a revelatory instrument. She is aware that we are listening. It’s as if she, as Didion, is the author of her own script. Pierce also carries her script onstage with her. In a one-person play, the actor never gets to hide or even breathe. It hardly matters; you can do the job or you can’t. She has the character, the language, and the rhythm of the talk, but on opening night she did not have all the words. From time to time she stumbled or paused to find the next sentence, sometimes she read a passage, but the momentary lapse never destroyed character or atmosphere because her grasp was so sure. Just as Pierce conflates herself into Didion, so it’s hard to know where Pierce ends and director Barbara Biddy begins. It feels not quite like an actor taking direction, but a different kind of conversation in which both are attuned to the play and one another, an essential but hidden part of the undertaking. John Haldoupis’ set is appropriately simple. Quiet blues and greens on a three-level stage; two Adirondack chairs as much to hold us in place as to sit in, along with a small table and a bench; and some tall panels with stars blinking randomly behind them while the perfect sphere of the earth floats above everything else. Didion lives in a world of sophisticated affluence located on Manhattan’s Upper East Side and in Beverly Hills, with Prada bags, manicures at poolside, and private jets to take a perilously ill daughter from one coast to the other. People die because they do, not because they lack for care. Much more suggestively, two lines echo through the play: “You’re safe,” a mother tells her daughter. “I’m here now,” though she will learn that, as hard as you try, it’s never really true. Parents and daughter tell one another, “I love you more than even one more day.” It may be put to the test before it should have, but it articulates the sweet reassurance that roots the sorrow, the resistance, and the grief that begins before you recognize it.

[ Saturday, January 28 ] 5th Annual Seed & Houseplant Swap. Rochester Civic Garden Center, 5 Castle Park. 4735130, rcgc.org. 9:30 a.m.12:45 p.m. $15, register. 7th Annual Red Cross Vegas Night. Palmyra Moose Lodge #1420, 3808 Route 3, Palmyra. waynecountyredcross.org. 6:30 p.m. $25-$30. Black History Month Fashion Show. Central Office Building, 131 West Broad St., 3rd floor. 262-8525. 1-3 p.m. Free. Exclusive Preview Opening at Golf Play Café Golf Play Café, 6720 Pittsford-Palmyra Road. 624-5555, njones@ campgooddays.org. Noon2 p.m. $25, register. All proceeds from the Golf Play Café exclusive preview opening event will benefit Camp Good Days and Special Times. Film Event: “Hadewijch” and Paolo Cherchi Usai in Person. George Eastman House, 900 East Ave. 271-3361, eastmanhouse.org. 8 p.m. $6-$8. Jammin’ at the J Annual Gala. Jewish Community Center, 1200 Edgewood Ave. 4612000, jccrochester.org. 7:30 p.m. $150, register. Left of Center Stage Variety Show. Flying Squirrel, 285 Clarissa St. 678-6870, thesquirrel.org. 7:30-10 p.m. $3-$5 suggested donation. Missing Persons Awareness Day. Wilson Foundation Academy, 200 Genesee St. 406-8650. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Free, register. Roc Girls Rock: A Night of Music, Arm Wrestling, Crafts, and Dancing. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. girlsrockrochester. com. 7:30 p.m. $10. Screening: “Racing Dreams.” Little Theatre, 240 East Ave. 258-0400, thelittle.org. 10 a.m. $5. Sly Fox Total Tap Takeover / Pig Roast. Tap & Mallet, 381 Gregory St. inquiries@ tapandmallet.com. 11.30 a.m. until closing time. Pay as you go. Team Trivia. Irondequoit High School, 260 Cooper Rd. 3363035. 7-10 p.m. $60 per table of 6. The Filippino Amiercan Association of Rochester Spaghetti Dinner Fundraiser for Typhoon Sendong Victims. Sacred Heart Cathedral Community Center, 296 Flower City Park. Annabelle Sutter 269-4486. 5-9 p.m. $5-$9. [ Saturday, January 28Sunday, January 29 ] Magic the Gathering Prerelease for Dark Ascension. Millennium Games and


the Cyberstorm Lounge, 3047 West Henrietta Road, Henrietta. Mike@ Millenniumgames.com. Enter any of 4 separate events: Sat 10 a.m. or 6 p.m., Sun 10 a.m. or 6 p.m. $25. Screening: “Joffrey: Mavericks of American Dance.” Smith Opera House, 82 Seneca St, Geneva. 315-781-5483, thesmith.org. Sat 1:30 & 7 p.m., Sun 2 p.m. $6. [ Sunday, January 29 ] “Red Carpet Sundays.” Club R.O.A.R., 233 Mill St. redcarpetsundays.eventbrite. com. 6-11 p.m. $5-$10. Ages 25+. Live music, thousands in marketing and advertising giveaways to registered small businesses, come out and support a casual night of true business networking. [ Monday, January 30 ] Beyond Reading Screening: “Twilight: Eclipse.” Writers & Books, 740 University Ave. 4732590, wab.org. 7 p.m. Free. No Boundaries: WalkFIT Info Session. Fleet Feet Sports, 2210 Monroe Ave. 697-3338, fleetfeetrochester.com. 6 p.m. Free. Rochester Ken Russell Film Festival. Flying Squirrel, 285 Clarissa St. rochrussellfilmfest@ groups.facebook.com. 7-9 p.m. Free, donations benefit Occupy Rochester. “The Debussy Film.” [ Tuesday, January 31 ] Presentation on Shale Gas Development in Western NY. West Bloomfield Congregational Church, 9035 Route 5 & 20 West Bloomfield. communityinfocommittee@ gmail.com. 7 p.m. Free. [ Wed., February 1 ] Highland Park Winter Farmers Market. Cornell Cooperative ExtensionRochester, 249 Highland Ave. highlandwintermarket.com. 3-6 p.m. Free admission.

Sports [ Friday, January 27 ] U Prep Inaugural Boxing Bouts. U Prep, 180 Raines Park. 7522621. 7:30 p.m. first bell. $10. [ Saturday, January 28 ] NWA New York Presents WrestleBowl ‘12. Eagles Club, 1200 Buffalo Rd. 235-3180. Doors 5:30 p.m., bell time 6 p.m. $12-$15. [ Saturday, January 28Sunday, January 29 ] Volleyball Tournament Volley FX. Main Street Armory, 900 E Main St. rochestermainstreetarmory. com. 8 a.m.-9 p.m. Free.

Sun 3 p.m. $29-$40. 3254370, downstairscabaret.com.

Theater Auditions [ Through Wednesday, February 8 ] Finger Lakes Musical Theatre Festival Call for Submissions. Online. 315-2551305, fingerlakesmtf.com. Composers and playwrights may submit new musicals to the first edition of THE PITCH. Finalists will be notified on March 8, 2012.

THEATER | “Shrek the Musical”

When you think of a fairy tale, images of a beautiful princess being rescued by prince charming likely come to mind. Well, the Oscar-winning animated film “Shrek” turned that notion upside down when it debuted in 2001, having an unseemly ogre rescue the princess in peril. Now you can catch the likeable lug, loudmouth donkey, and the rest of the fairy-tale misfits on stage in “Shrek the Musical.” Featuring 19 all-new songs and a plotline derived from the animated hit, this musical is designed for audiences of all ages.

[ Mondays in January ] Rochester Oratorio Society announces auditions for its Spring, 2012 season. 4732234, ROSsings@atnmail. com, ROSsings.org. By appointment on Monday evenings, Jan 16-30. Free. Area vocalists with good musical skills are invited to join Rochester’s premier choral ensemble.

The Rochester Broadway Theatre League will bring in “Shrek” for a six-day stand at the Auditorium Theatre (885 E. Main St.). The show opens Tuesday, January 31, at 7:30 p.m., and closes on Sunday, February 5. Tickets are available for $32.50$64.50. For more information, including a full schedule of performances, visit rbtl.org. — BY ERIC LACLAIR

[ Tuesdays in January ] “No One Is Alone.” Rochester Women’s Community Chorus. Downtown Presbyterian Church, 121 N Fitzhugh St, 6:30 p.m. (rehearsals on Tuesdays). Free. therwcc.org.

Theater “Are You My Mother?” Fri Jan 27. ArtSmart Theatre For Young People. Smith Opera House, 82 Seneca St, Geneva. 10 a.m. & 7 p.m. $5. 315781-5483, thesmith.org. “Big Wigs: Hot Glam.” Sun Jan 29. Blackfriars Theatre, 795 E Main St. 7 p.m. $27. 454-1260, bftix.com. “Blast.” Thu Jan 26. Auditorium Theatre, 875 E Main St. 7:30 p.m. $30-$50.800-745-3000, ticketmaster.com, info@rbtl.org. “A Brief History of Women.” Thu Jan 26. InFusion Action Theatre. MuCCC, 142 Atlantic Ave. Thu-Sat 7:30 p.m., Sun 3 p.m. $10-$15. 7215397, 244-0960, muccc.org. Featuring the play “The White Whore and the Bit Player,” BioDance, and poets from The Beets. “Miss Abigail’s Guide to Dating, Mating and Marriage.” Thu Jan 26-Jan 29. Downstairs Cabaret at Winton Place, 3450 Winton Place. Thu 7 p.m., Fri-Sat 8 p.m., Sun 3 p.m. $29-$39. 325-4370, downstairscabaret. com. “Perfect Wedding.” Wed Jan 25-Feb1. Continues through Feb 12. Geva Theatre Center, 75 Woodbury Blvd. Wed Jan 25-Thu 7:30 p.m., Fri 8

p.m., Sat 4 & 8:30 p.m., Sun 2 p.m. (Audio-described) & 7 p.m., Tue 7:30 p.m., Wed Feb 1 2 & 7:30 p.m. Tickets start at $25. 232-4382, gevatheatre.org. “Second Time Around.” Fri Jan 27-Jan 28. Continues through Feb 4. Sisters of Saint Joseph. Geva Theatre Center, 75 Woodbury Blvd. Fri 7:30 p.m., Sat 2 & 7:30 p.m. $20. 232-4382, gevatheatre.org. “Shrek the Musical.” Tue Jan 31-Feb 1. Continues through Feb 5. Auditorium Theatre, 875 E Main St. Tue-Thu 7:30 p.m., Fri 8 p.m., Sat 2 & 8 p.m., Sun 2 & 7 p.m. $32.50-$64.50. 800-745-3000, ticketmaster. com, info@rbtl.org. “The Year of Magical Thinking.” Wed Jan 25-Jan 29. Blackfriars Theatre, 795 E Main St. Wed Jan 25-Thu 7:30 p.m., Fri-Sat 8 p.m., Sun 2 p.m. $17-$27. 454-1260, bftix.com. “Urinetown: The Musical.” Fri Jan 27-Jan 28. Webster Thomas High School, 800 Five Mile Line Rd., Webster. Fri 7:30 p.m., Sat 1:30 & 7:30 p.m. $14-$17. webstertheatreguild.org. “You Say Tomato, I Say Shutup.” Thu Jan 26-Jan 29.Continues through Jan 29. Downstairs Cabaret Theatre, 20 Windsor St. Thu Thu 7 p.m., Fri 8 p.m., Sat 5 & 8:30 p.m.,

Frontier customers:

[ Wed., January 25 ] “A Raisin in the Sun.” Geva Theatre Center, 75 Woodbury Blvd. 4-6 p.m. Free, by appointment. 232-1366, gevatheatre.org. Seeking two young African American males ages 9-12, to share 43 performances. Geva’s production of A Raisin in the Sun runs from February 21March 25, 2012. “Princess Ida” Off-Monroe Players. Salem United Church of Christ, 60 Bittner St. 7-9 p.m. Free. vanderbyl@rochester. rr.com, off-monroeplayers.org. [ Saturday, January 28Sunday, January 29 ] Central New York Auditions Weekend for 2012 Seasons. Merry-Go-Round Playhouse, 6877 East Lake Rd., Auburn. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Free. MGRPlayhouse. com, CortlandRep.org, HangarTheatre.org. Over 200 paid acting roles will be available. Merry-Go-Round Playhouse/Finger Lakes Musical Theatre Festival will hold their local auditions at Merry-Go-Round Playhouse located at 6877 East Lake Rd (Rt. 38A) in Emerson Park on Owasco Lake in Auburn, NY. The Hangar Theatre and Cortland Repertory Theatre will hold their local auditions at the Black Box Theatre of

Ithaca High School located at 1401 North Cayuga Street in Ithaca. [ Monday, January 30Tuesday, January 31 ] “Franny the Queen of Provincetown.” Bread & Water Theatre, 243 Rosedale St. 7-10 p.m. Free. 271-5523, breadandwatertheatre.org. Looking for men and women comfortable with drag and gay/ lesbian themes. [ Monday, January 30Thursday, February 2 ] “Elizabeth Rex.” Monroe Community College, Campus Theater, Building 4, 1000 E. Henrietta Rd., Brighton. 3-5 p.m. Free. 292-3317. [ Ongoing ] Gregory Kunde Chorale seeks singers. Call 377-7568 for audition. Free. Chamber singing with wide range of repertory. Tenor, bass voices. Accompanist provided. Genesee Valley Orchestra and Chorus seeks new members. 223-9006, info@gvoc.org. By appointment, auditions ongoing throughout the season. Free. The Lyric Chorale Auditions for Adult Singers. By appointment. 478-0778, lyricchorale.org. Free.

Workshops [ Wed., January 25 ] Training Series for Community Organizers. Nazareth College, 4245 East Ave. 389-2449, cupp@naz.edu. 5-7 p.m. $5/workshop, $25/5 or more, register. [ Thursday, January 26 ] Comics Night Out. Books Etc, 78 W Main St, Rt 31, Macedon. 474-4116, books_etc@yahoo. com. 7-9 p.m. Free. bring your own laugh/applause meters. Home Brewing Techniques/ Tasting Techniques. Joe Bean Coffee Roasters, 1344 University Ave. 319-5279, joebeanroasters.com. Thu 7-8:30 p.m., Sat 2-3:30 p.m. $25 per class. [ Saturday, January 28 ] Home Brewing Techniques/ Tasting Techniques. Joe Bean Coffee Roasters, 1344 University Ave. 319-5279, joebeanroasters.com. Thu 78:30 p.m., Sat 2-3:30 p.m. $25 per class. Intro to Sewing: Making a Throw-Pillow Cover. The Crafting Social, Hungerford Building, 1115 East Main St., Door 2, Floor 3, Studio D330. info@thecraftingsocial.

com, thecraftingsocial.com/ Events.html. 9:00 a.m.-1 p.m. $60, register. Learn to Meditate Workshop. Absolute Yoga Studio, Perinton Medical Center, 800 Ayrault Rd., Suite 200, Fairport. 223-4290. 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Free. Mindful Awareness: A Call to Inner Peace. St. Paul’s Roman Catholic Church, 783 Hard Rd., Webster. 671-2100, stpaulsrcc.org. 9 a.m.-noon. Free. Nonviolence Skills. University of Rochester-Interfaith Chapel, Wilson Blvd. 2764962, icaj2000@yahoo. com. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Free, donations accepted. Potato Chip Scarf Workshop. Helmer Nature Center, 154 Pinegrove Ave. 336-3035. 6-9 p.m. Call for details. Ages 12+ and adults. Urban Gardening. Winton Branch Library, 611 Winton Road N. cityofrochester.gov/ winteradventures/. 12-1 p.m. Free. Winter Education Series: “Tree Selection & Care for the Home Landscape.” Sonnenberg Gardens & Mansion State Historic Park, 151 Charlotte St, Canandaigua. 394-4922, sonnenberg.org. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. $18-$20, register. Writing Workshops. Present Tense Books, 101 Washington Ave., Batavia. 815-7640, presenttensebooks.com, infinitelycurious.us/Waterline. 11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m or 1:453:45 p.m. $89 for 5 sessions, register. [ Monday, January 30 ] Food & Wine Pairing, Mark Cupolo from Rocco Restaurant & Richard Piccolo Fine Wine Manager for Empire North Wine Distributors. Rosario Pino’s, 349 W Commercial St #1620, East Rochester. 2677405, rosariopinos.com. 6-8 p.m. $60-$90, register. [ Tuesday, January 31 ] Healthy Soups and Breads. Tops Cooking School, 3507 Mt Read Blvd. 663-5449, topsmarkets.com. 7-9 p.m. $20, register.

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Film Times Fri Jan 27-Thu Feb 2 Schedules change often. Call theaters or visit rochestercitynewspaper.com for updates.

Film

Brockport Strand 637-3310 89 Main St, Brockport THE DESCENDANTS: 7, 9:15; also Sat-Sun 1, 4; HAYWIRE: 7:15, 9:15; also Sat-Sun 1:15, 3:15, 5:15; WAR HORSE: 9:15; WE BOUGHT A ZOO: 7; also Sat-Sun 1:30, 4.

Cinema Theater 271-1785 957 S. Clinton St. THE MUPPETS: Fri-Sun 4:15; MY WEEK WITH MARILYN: 7; YOUNG ADULT: 8:40.

Culver Ridge 16 544-1140 2255 Ridge Rd E, Irondequoit THE ADVENTURES OF TINTIN (3D): 1:35, 7:15; ALVIN & THE CHIPMUNKS: CHIPWRECKED: 2:20, 5:15; BEAUTY & THE BEAST (3D): 2, 4:35, 7:05; CONTRABAND: 1:55, 4:50, 7:50, 10:35; A DANGEROUS METHOD: 1:45, 4:25, 6:55, 9:30; THE DESCENDANTS: 1:25, 4:05, 6:45, 9:35; EXTREMELY LOUD & INCREDIBLY CLOSE: 1:15, 4:10, 7:10, 10:05; THE GIRL WITH THE DRAGON TATTOO: 8; THE GREY: 1:20, 1:50, 4:15, 4:45, 7, 7:30, 9:45, 10:15; HAYWIRE: 2:15, 5:05, 7:35, 9:55; HUGO (3D): 4:20, 9:50; JOYFUL NOISE: 4:40, 10:25; MAN ON A LEDGE: 2:05, 4:55, 7:45, 10:20; MISSION IMPOSSIBLE: GHOST PROTOCOL: 1:30, 7:25; ONE FOR THE MONEY: 2:10, 5, 7:40, 10; RED TAILS: 1:40, 4, 4:30, 7:20, 9:40, 10:10; also open-captioned 1:10, 6:50; UNDERWORLD: AWAKENING (3D): 2:25, 5:10, 7:55, 10:30; WAR HORSE: 9:25;

Silence versus sound in cinema history [ REVIEW ] by George Grella

“The Artist” (PG-13), written and directed by Michel Hazanvicius Now playing

Perhaps fittingly, after playing for many weeks in various cities and winning a number of awards, including a Golden Globe from the most untrustworthy film critics’ organization of them all, “The Artist” crept rather quietly up to this region. Also fittingly, the picture, silent and shot in black and white, demonstrates an impressive unity of style and subject, since it deals with Hollywood’s transition from silent films to talkies

Dryden Theatre 271-3361 900 East Ave *NOTE: Film times for Wed 1/252/1* ROCK ‘N’ ROLL HIGH SCHOOL: Wed 1/25 8; THE GUNFIGHTER: Thu 8; THE INTERUPTERS: Fri 8, Sun continues on page 28

from 1927 to 1932. In its numerous allusions to other works and in its dependence upon a long tradition of movies about the movies, “The Artist” creates a charming act of homage to the American industry. Against the background of that transitional period, the simple story follows a familiar pattern, resembling all those versions of “A Star is Born,” in showing two opposing and intertwining trajectories, the decline of one performer’s career and the rise of another’s, and in this instance mixing in a modicum of humor with its large dose of pathos. It opens in 1927, with the successful premiere of a film starring George Valentin (Jean Dujardin), a star with Kinograph Studios; in a comic encounter he meets an adoring fan, Peppy Miller (Bérénice Bejo), a dancer whom he sees again working as an extra in his next picture. Just as that film gets underway, the studio boss, Al Zimmer (John Goodman), announces that Kinograph will join the movement to talking pictures. Like many other Hollywood people of the time,

Jean Dujardin and Bérénice Bejo in “The Artist.” PHOTO COURTESY THE WEINSTEIN COMPANY

Valentin dismisses the new technology as a gimmick, a fad that will soon fade away. When the studio sticks to its plan, he produces his own silent movie, which fails at the box office, while Peppy Miller, whose career advances meteorically, becomes a star of the new talking pictures. Valentin’s marriage fails along with his career, and he loses his money in the stock market crash; abandoned by everyone but his faithful chauffeur (played by James Cromwell) and his dog, he sinks into despair, burns his old films and attempts suicide. In the manner of the old silent flicks, everything turns out well in the end, of course, but along the way “The Artist” squeezes every drop of emotion out of that insubstantial material. Because of its reliance on the oldfashioned cinema techniques, the picture surely never really creates any commensurate responses in the audience; instead, it mostly evokes a kind of nostalgic laughter, a comic response to the pictures of the past. The movie in fact provides a kind of celebratory anthology of silent film methods. The acting styles, the lighting, the cinematography, the narrative methods all consciously recall a now distant past, the ancient history of the cinema. The performers convey their emotions through a number of exaggerated expressions and gestures, what Peppy Miller characterizes as “mugging” for the camera; the dashing, dapper George

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Fighting chance “Haywire” (R), directed by Steven Soderbergh Now playing

“The Interrupters” (R), directed by Steve James Screens Friday and Sunday at the Dryden

Valentin offers a lot of chiseled profile in the manner of the stars of that bygone era. The picture also augments the actors’ behavior with some well placed dialogue titles to explain those few bits that require more than a visual interpretation, and uses the familiar device of newspaper headlines to signal important events in George Valentin’s and Peppy Miller’s lives. The wipes between scenes and the frequent irising in and out to close or open a shot again repeat the techniques of silent film. Equally important, in the manner of the past, “The Artist” also features an impressive musical score, itself full of allusions; it includes not only echoes of the sprightly, bouncy popular tunes of the time, but even an outright theft of some of Bernard Herrmann’s memorable composition for “Vertigo.” In addition to all that fun, the two principals really carry the movie. Handsome in an old-fashioned movie star way, with patent leather hair, a pencil mustache, and that chiseled profile, Jean Dujardin moves smoothly through all his scenes, mugging on demand, but also expressing a good deal of emotion through the grace of his gestures. Of all the actors, Bérénice Bejo suggests the very essence of the old silent flicks — her wideeyed innocence, her extreme reactions, and a smile that simply lights up the screen sweetly sum up the genuine appeal of the good old days of the cinema.

Even if he were to get all the way up to “Ocean’s Eighty-Six,” I’d still classify Steven Soderbergh as an independent filmmaker. Soderbergh, of course, helped kick-start the current indie film phenomenon with 1989’s “Sex, Lies, and Videotape,” but one look at his eclectic filmography, with little-seen experimental larks studded amongst the moneymakers and the Oscar winners, demonstrates that the man stayed true to his art-house roots. His projects seem to alternate between the popular and the esoteric sensibilities; for every “Erin Brockovich” or “Traffic,” there’s a “Schizopolis” or “Che.” So hot on the heels of last fall’s big-budget thriller “Contagion” comes “Haywire,” a lean, crackling spy flick that makes an action star out of a successful athlete. Refreshingly, however, that athlete is a woman. And within the first 10 minutes, after a bone-crunching tussle in a diner

Gina Carano in “Haywire.” PHOTO COURTESY RELATIVITY MEDIA

with Channing Tatum, we understand why Soderbergh hired MMA fighter and former American Gladiator Gina Carano to star as black ops agent Mallory Kane. But we’re not sure why anyone would be gunning for Mallory, so “Haywire” attempts to explain it through a flashback leading up to Mallory’s current predicament. The pulpy, entertaining script by Lem Dobbs (he also wrote Soderbergh’s “The Limey”) offers up layer after needlessly twisty layer of a spiteful double-cross, seemingly masterminded by Mallory’s boss/former lover Kenneth (Ewan McGregor) and perhaps involving MI6 agent Michael Fassbender, behindthe-scenes power player Antonio Banderas, and government operative Michael Douglas. Or maybe not; I ain’t saying. As Mallory investigates the betrayal, the action globetrots from Barcelona to Dublin to a New Mexico reckoning, and we’re treated to nail-biting pursuits along with deftly choreographed fight scenes. (Soderbergh’s smart use of natural sound makes you realize how over-the-top some of that foley work can be.) Unsurprisingly, the physical stuff is where the charismatic Carano shines. She delivers her lines capably enough, if a bit uninflected, but when it’s time for Mallory to kick off her heels and kick ass, Carano’s background lends “Haywire” a credence with which other so-called action stars can’t compete. (I’m looking at you, Angelina Jolie.) Not only does she hold her own, but Carano actually looks like she can take a punch as well as she delivers them. Soderbergh also went this quasimeta route in 2009’s “The Girlfriend Experience,” casting porn starlet Sasha Grey as a high-end prostitute. As in that film, Soderbergh plays to his heroine’s strengths, letting the professional thespians do the heavy lifting. McGregor is slimy, Fassbender is slick, Banderas is shady, and Douglas is self-serving, but they’re all so totally watchable that we hang

on their every word. (Also, we’re really trying to puzzle out just what the hell is going on.) David Holmes’ pulsing, 70’sdetective-film score hits the right notes, while editor Mary Ann Bernard (a/k/a Soderbergh) and cinematographer Peter Andrews (yup, Soderbergh again) favor long, honest takes, letting the set pieces unfold organically. Soderbergh’s rumored retirement by 2013 would be a big loss to cinema, independent and otherwise. No. 5 on Time Magazine’s list of Top

10 Movie Performances of 2011 went to Ameena Matthews for her part in the riveting, crucial documentary “The Interrupters,” but that was no performance. Matthews is what’s known as a violence interrupter, going nose to nose with gang members and other unruly youth on the rough streets of Chicago in an effort to stanch that city’s welldocumented bloodshed. Like most of her colleagues at the CeaseFire organization, Matthews comes from a gang background (her jailed dad is an infamous Chicagoland gang leader), but now a mother, and married to an imam, the fearless, eloquent Matthews uses her firsthand wisdom and considerable cred to make a difference. Documentarian Steve James (he also made 1994’s “Hoop Dreams”) spends a year on the streets of Chicago with the violence interrupters, his unflinching camera trailing them as they attend both meetings and funerals, getting directly involved in the lives of the people they’re trying to help. It’s not always comfortable to watch, as powderkeg situations threaten to erupt beyond mere words and dedicated individuals like Matthews, Eddie Bocanegra, and Cobe Williams think on their feet, wrestling with egos, shortsightedness, and entrenched mindsets. “The Interrupters” doesn’t claim that there are easy answers or quick solutions, only inspiring souls willing to put themselves in harm’s way to preserve lives.

LA VIE DE BOHÈME

Tuesday, Jan. 31, 8 p.m. Aspiring poet Marcel Marx (André Wilms) finds camaraderie with an Albanian composer and an Irish painter (both played by Finnish actors) after getting evicted from his apartment, with the three struggling to survive despite their meager incomes and questionable talents. Kaurismäki’s loose literary adaptation is considered one of his best films. With cameos from Jean-Pierre Léaud, Louis Malle, and Sam Fuller. (Aki Kaurismäki, Finland 1992, 100 min.)

Photo courtesy Photofest

[ REVIEW ] BY DAYNA PAPALEO

FIVE EASY PIECES Movies for movie lovers, 6 nights a week. Kaurismäki

Wednesday, Feb. 1, 8 p.m. Bobby Dupea (Jack Nicholson) is a classically trained pianist from a highly cultured family, but you wouldn’t know it: he spends all his time in oil fields and bowling alleys, wavering about his proudly redneck girlfriend (Karen Black). When he goes home to see his family for the first time in years, he affirms his own alienation. (Bob Rafelson, US 1970, 98 min.)

You Don’t Know Jack

Film Info: 271-4090 l 900 East Avenue l Eastman House Café—stop in for a light dinner or dessert before the film. l Wi-Fi Hotspot l Sponsored by rochestercitynewspaper.com City 27


5; HADEWIJCH: Sat 8; LA VIE DE BOHÈME: Tue 8; ROCK ‘N’ ROLL HIGH SCHOOL: Wed 2/18.

Eastview 13 425-0420 Eastview Mall, Victor BEAUTY & THE BEAST (3D): 1:45, 4:20; CONTRABAND: 2, 4:55, 7:50, 10:25; THE DESCENDANTS: 1:05, 4:05, 6:55, 9:35; EXTREMELY LOUD & INCREDIBLY CLOSE: 1, 4, 7, 9:55; THE GIRL WITH THE DRAGON TATTOO: 10:05; THE GREY: 1:15, 4:15, 7:15, 10, 10:35; HAYWIRE: 1:50, 5, 7:20, 9:40; HUGO (3D): 1:40, 4:45, 7:45; JOYFUL NOISE: 4:25, 10:15; MAN ON A LEDGE: 1:35, 4:30, 7:40, 10:10; MISSION IMPOSSIBLE: GHOST PROTOCOL: 1:25, 7:10; ONE FOR THE MONEY: 1:30, 4:40, 7:30, 9:45; RED TAILS: 1:20, 4:35, 7:25, 10:20; SHERLOCK HOLMES: A GAME OF SHADOWS: 1:10, 4:10, 7:05; UNDERWORLD: AWAKENING (3D): 1:55, 4:50, 7:55, 10:30; WAR HORSE: 6:40, 9:50.

Geneseo Theatres 243-2691 Geneseo Square Mall BEAUTY & THE BEAST (3D): 6:45; also Sat-Sun 1, 5:10; CONTRABAND: 7:15; 9:20; also Sat-Sun 1, 3:05, 5:10; EXTREMELY LOUD & INCREDIBLY CLOSE: 7, 9:20; also Sat-Sun 1, 4; THE GREY: 7:10, 9:10; also Sat-Sun 1:30, 4; ONE FOR THE MONEY: 7, 9; also Sat-Sun 1, 3, 5; UNDERWORLD: AWAKENING: 7:10, 9:10; also Sat-Sun 1:10, 3:10, 5:10; WAR HORSE: 8:15; also Sat-Sun 2:35.

Greece Ridge 12 225-5810 176 Greece Ridge Center Dr. BEAUTY & THE BEAST (3D): 2:20, 4:35, 7; CONTRABAND: 2, 4:40, 7:50, 10:25; THE DESCENDANTS: 2:10, 4:50,

7:40, 10:30; EXTREMELY LOUD & INCREDIBLY CLOSE: 1:15, 4:10, 7:05, 10; THE GREY: 1:40, 4:30, 7:15, 10:05; HAYWIRE: 1:50, 4:20, 6:55, 9:35; JOYFUL NOISE: 1:25, 4:05, 6:50, 9:40; MAN ON A LEDGE: 2:15, 4:45, 7:25, 9:55; MISSION IMPOSSIBLE: GHOST PROTOCOL: 4:15, 10:20; ONE FOR THE MONEY: 2:25, 4:55, 7:35, 9:50; RED TAILS: 1:30, 4:25, 7:20, 10:10; SHERLOCK HOLMES: A GAME OF SHADOWS: 9:30; UNDERWORLD: AWAKENING (3D): 2:30, 5:05, 7:55, 10:15; WAR HORSE: 1:05, 7:10;

The Little 258-0400 240 East Ave. ALBERT NOBBS: 6:55, 9:25; also Sat-Sun 12:10, 3:45; THE ARTIST: 6:30, 8:50; also Sat-Sun 12:45, 3:15; A DANGEROUS METHOD: 7:15, 9:35; also Sat-Sun 12:30, 4; THE DESCENDANTS: 7:05 (no Thu), 9:45; also Sat-Sun 12, 3:30; THE IRON LADY: 6:45; also Sat-Sun 11:50 a.m., 2; RACING DREAMS: Sat 10 a.m.; SOPHOMORE: 9:05; also Sat-Sun 4:10.

Movies 10 292-5840 2613 W. Henrietta Rd. ANONYMOUS: 2:20, 5:10, 8; HAPPY FEET TWO: 2:45, 5:05, 7:35, 9:55; also in 3D 2, 4:25, 7:05, 9:25; IMMORTALS: 2:25, 4:55, 7:30, 10; JACK AND JILL: 2:05, 4:35, 7, 9:20; J. EDGAR: 2:35, 5:35, 8:35; PUSS IN BOOTS (3D): 2:10, 4:30, 7:10, 9:30; REAL STEEL: 2:30, 5:20, 8:10; THE SITTER: 2:40, 4:45, 7:40, 9:45; TOWER HEIST: 2:15, 4:40, 7:25, 9:50.

Pittsford Cinema 383-1310 3349 Monroe Ave. 3 SUPERSTARS IN BERLIN: Wed 7; ALBERT NOBBS: 1:40, 4:10,

28 City january 25-31, 2012

6:40; also Fri-Sat 9:10; THE ARTIST: 12, 2:20, 4:40, 7; also Fri-Sat 9:20; A DANGEROUS METHOD: 12:40, 3, 5:20, 7:40; also Fri-Sat 10; THE DESCENDANTS: 2, 4:30, 7:30; also Fri-Sat 9:55; EXTREMELY LOUD & INCREDIBLY CLOSE: 1:30, 4:20, 7:10; also Fri-Sat 9:50; THE GIRL WITH THE DRAGON TATTOO: 1:20, 4:45, 8; THE IRON LADY: 12:10, 2:30, 4:50, 7:20; also Fri-Sat 9:45; SHAME: 4:15; also Fri-Sat 9:30; TINKER TAILOR SOLDIER SPY: 1:10, 4, 6:50; also Fri-Sat 9:25; WAR HORSE: 1, 6:30.

Webster 12 888-262-4386 2190 Empire Blvd. BEAUTY AND THE BEAST (3D): 12:15, 2:20, 4:50, 7; also SatSun 10 a.m.; CONTRABAND: 12, 3, 5:20, 7:50; also Fri-Sat 10:20; THE DESCENDANTS: 2:10, 5:10, 7:40; also Fri-Sat 10:10; also Sat 11:30 a.m.; EXTREMELY LOUD & INCREDIBLY CLOSE: 1:30, 4:20, 7:20; also Fri-Sat 10; also Sat-Sun 10:40 a.m.; THE GREY: 2, 4:40, 7:30; also Fri-Sat 10:15; also SatSun 11:20 a.m.; HAYWIRE: 12:45, 3:15, 5:45, 8:15; also Fri-Sat 10:25; also Sat 10:30 a.m.; HUGO: 1:15, 7:10; THE IRON LADY: 1:40, 4:15, 7:05; also Fri-Sat 9:40; also Sat-Sun 11:10 a.m.; MAN ON A LEDGE (cc): 2:30, 5:30, 8; also Fri-Sat 10:30; also Sat-Sun 11:45 a.m.; MISSION IMPOSSIBLE: GHOST PROTOCOL: Fri-Sat 9:15; ONE FOR THE MONEY: 12:30, 2:45, 5, 7:15; also Fri-Sat 9:30; also Sat-Sun 10:15 a.m.; RED TAILS: 1:50, 4:30, 7:25; also Fri-Sat 10:05; also Sat-Sun 11 a.m.; UNDERWORLD: AWAKENING (3D): 1, 3:30, 5:55, 8:30; also Fri-Sat 10:30; Fri 11:50 a.m.; WAR HORSE: 4:05; also Fri-Sat 9:50; also Sat-Sun 10:05 a.m.

Film Previews Full film reviews available at rochestercitynewspaper.com. [ OPENING ] ALBERT NOBBS (R): Glenn Close leads a stellar cast, including Mia Wasikowska, Jonathan Rhys Meyers, and Janet McTeer, in this drama from Rodrigo García (“Mother and Child”) about a 19th-century Irishwoman masquerading as a man to find employment as a butler. Little, Pittsford A DANGEROUS METHOD (R): David Cronenberg’s pre-WWI period piece explores the friendship between psychologist Carl Jung (Michael Fassbender) and his mentor, Sigmund Freud (Viggo Mortensen), which complicates following Jung’s affair with a troubled Russian student (Keira Knightley). Culver, Little, Pittsford THE GREY (R): Liam Neeson and Dermot Mulroney star in the latest from Joe Carnahan (“The A-Team”), an adventure drama about an oil drilling team’s struggle to survive after their plane crashes in the Alaskan wilderness. Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece, Webster THE GUNFIGHTER (1950): This Western stars Gregory Peck as Jimmy Ringo, a reformed gunfighter forced to take on all comers when he rides into town to reunite with his estranged sweetheart. Dryden (Thu, Jan 26, 8 p.m.) HADEWIJCH (2009): The Curator’s Choice series returns with this drama from French writerdirector Bruno Dumont about a passionately religious young woman who is thrown out of her convent and sent back into the world because she’s too crazed with devotion. Dryden (Sat, Jan 28, 8 p.m.) THE INTERRUPTERS (2011): This riveting documentary directed by Steve James (“Hoop Dreams”) spends a year on the mean streets

of Chicago chronicling the efforts of the dedicated individuals trying to make a difference through an innovative anti-violence program. Dryden (Fri, Jan 27, 8 p.m., and Sun, Jan 29, 5 p.m.) MAN ON A LEDGE (PG-13): This heist thriller stars Sam Worthington (“Avatar”) as an ex-con attracting attention with his apparent suicide attempt while simultaneously masterminding the theft of a diamond. With Jamie Bell, Elizabeth Banks, Anthony Mackie, and Ed Harris. Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Greece, Webster ONE FOR THE MONEY (PG-13): This action rom-com is a Janet Evanovich adaptation starring Katherine Heigl as Stephanie Plum, a bail bondswoman chasing down a handsome cop from her past (Jason O’Mara). Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece, Webster ROCK ‘N’ ROLL HIGH SCHOOL (1979): The square administration at Vince Lombardi High will ban rock music unless Riff Randell (P.J. Soles) and the Ramones can stop them! Dryden (Wed, Jan 25, 8 p.m.) LA VIE DE BOHÈME (1992): Cameos from Jean-Pierre Léaud, Louis Malle, and Sam Fuller highlight Aki Kaurismäki’s loose adaptation of Henri Murger’s novel about the camaraderie amongst struggling artists in Paris. Dryden (Tue, Jan 31, 8 p.m.) [ CONTINUING ] CONTRABAND (R): Mark Wahlberg leads the cast of this crime drama about a former smuggler who gets sucked back into the criminal life after his brother-in-law botches a drug deal. With Kate Beckinsale, Giovanni Ribisi, Ben Foster, and J.K. Simmons. Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece, Webster EXTREMELY LOUD AND INCREDIBLY CLOSE (PG-13): It’s Jonathan Safran Foer’s acclaimed 2005

novel as adapted by director Stephen Daldry (“The Reader”), about a young boy searching NYC for the lock to match the key left him by his late father. Starring Sandra Bullock, Max von Sydow, and Tom Hanks. Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece, Pittsford, Webster JOYFUL NOISE (PG-13): Queen Latifah and Dolly Parton star in this feel-good flick about a small-town choir hoping to win a national competition. With Courtney B. Vance and Kris Kristofferson. Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Greece RED TAILS (PG-13): Cuba Gooding Jr., Terrence Howard, and Bryan Cranston star in veteran TV director Anthony Hemingway’s feature debut about the African-American soldiers in the experimental Tuskegee pilot training program and their contributions to the Allied victory in WWII. Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Greece, Webster SHAME (NC-17): The second film from British filmmaker Steve McQueen (“Hunger”) stars Michael Fassbender as a successful 30something New Yorker in the throes of a compulsive sex addiction. Costarring Carey Mulligan. Pittsford SOPHOMORE (NR): Rochester filmmaker Tim Beideck follows up 2005’s popular “Drivers Wanted” with this locally shot comedy about a group of high school kids navigating the tenth grade. With Patrick Warburton and Amanda Plummer. Little WAR HORSE (PG-13): First a children’s novel, then a Tonywinning play, now a Steven Spielberg epic about a young Englishman who gets mixed up in WWI as he tries to reclaim a beloved horse drafted for cavalry duty. With Emily Watson, Peter Mullan, and David Thewlis. Brockport, Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece, Pittsford, Webster


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Place your real estate ad by calling 244-3329 ext. 23 or rochestercitynewspaper.com Ad Deadlines: Friday 4pm for Display Ads Monday at noon for Line ads > page 29 NATIONAL ANIMAL WELFARE FOUNDATION SUPPORT NO KILL SHELTERS HELP HOMELESS PETS FREE TOWING, TAX DEDUCTIBLE, NON-RUNNERS ACCEPTED 1-866-912-GIVE

Education EARN COLLEGE ONLINE *Medical, *Business, *Criminal Justice. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV certified Call 888-2018657 www.CenturaOnline.com TEACH ENGLISH ABROAD! 4week TEFL course in Prague. Job assistance worldwide. We have over 1500 graduates teaching in 60+ countries! www. teflworldwideprague.com info@ teflworldwideprague.com

For Sale CURTAINS (pictures of horses, hounds on fox hunt, hook kind, 84” long, 2 pair $40 Green white, brown 585-880-2903 DOG & CAT HOUSES Kennels, porch steps, do it yourself kits. Quick assembly 585-752-1000 $49 Jim DOLL (NUN) 1950 13” high on stand, dressed in black and white outfit w/hood $25 BO Rochester 585-544-4155 EXERCISE SKI MACHINE $35, Irondequoit, 585-746-8756 GERMAN SHEPHERD PICTURE In wood frame . 13.5” x 22” 585-880-2903 $12 SWINGING SHUTTER WOOD DOOR(1) ONLY ONE. Like in Cowboy movies, 5’ 5” tall, 2’ 2” wide (pantry, closet) Hangs middle of door frame. $15 585880-2903

Jam Section BASS PLAYER “Late boomer” wants some musical fun without staying up too late. Like classic rock (especially Beatles), early New Wave, ska, and anything with horns. Craig mooskamovers@aol.com CALLING ALL MUSICIANS OF ALL GENRES - the Rochester Music Coalition wants you! Please register on our website. For further info: www. rochestermusiccoalition.org. info@rochestermusiccoalition.org. 585-235-8412 LOOKING FOR VOCALISTS to be part of vocal group. Doing originals and covers. 25 years and older. Please do not inquire if not serious and stable. Contact Bobby 585-328-4121

in all voice parts. The CoG performs a wide variety of musical styles from barbershop to Broadway, to patriotic and religious. Men of all ages. Contact Ed Rummler at 585385-2698.

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continues on page 32

• Evergreens • Hardwood Trees/Shrubs • Groundcovers Fruiting Shrubs • Variety packs perfect for urban/suburban yards

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A Must-See in Maplewood 1344 Lake Avenue The Maplewood neighborhood abounds with character—from public parks and tree-lined parkways, to impressive architectdesigned estates and more modest American Foursquares. The area is of such architectural significance that a portion of it is listed in the National Register of Historic Places. (One perk of National Register listing: homeowners in the Maplewood Historic District may qualify for the NYS historic homeowner tax credit program.)

mantle with side columns tops the woodburning fireplace. Twin bookcases and leaded glass windows flank the mantle. Glass French doors lead to the front porch, flooding the living room with light.

With a melding of Craftsman and Colonial Revival style influences, the brick house at 1344 Lake Avenue is no exception. Its brick construction is solid, angular and handsome. An open front porch with square brick columns faces the street. The main entrance is on the side, framed by wood columns. Streamlined landscaping complements the narrow lot and architectural features such as deep eaves, stone lintels and the porch’s brick bas relief.

The trip to the second floor—via the elegant front stairs or the rear staircase by the kitchen—includes a windowed landing and wide hall. Off the hall are four generous bedrooms with large closets. Beyond one bedroom is a sleeping porch overlooking the rear yard. Fine details reflect the quality of the house: glass doorknobs, deep built-in storage, closets with exterior windows, and a chute to the basement laundry room.

The interior is elegant and sophisticated. Only three or four families have called it home over its lifetime, an exclusive pride of ownership that accounts for its excellent condition. Immediately notable is the early tile floor of the vestibule, the tall ceilings, and the imposing staircase directly ahead. Striking woodwork throughout the first floor has never been painted or refinished. A glass pocket door leads to the formal dining room on the right, with beamed ceiling, chandelier, bay window and window seat, and swinging door to the kitchen. The room is large, warm and inviting.

A surprise awaits on the third floor: a very nicely finished bedroom with full bath and claw foot tub, plus immense storage and a cedar closet. The space is dramatic and bright.

The living room features the original hardwood floor. A very handsome, tall

New ceramic tile covers the floor from the foyer through the kitchen. The eat-in kitchen’s cabinets are in good condition, accented by black and white tile work

The property at 1344 Lake Ave. is listed for $99,950 through Marcia Glenn, Nothnagle Realtors, 585 381-0502. Visit rochestercityliving.com/property/R169302 for photos. The 0.14 acre property includes a detached brick two-car garage. by Elizabeth M. Teall Elizabeth, CFP, of Centra Financial Group, is a Landmark Society volunteer.

MUSICIANS, Soundman, Bands, Rappers, Singers, All styles Contact 585-285-8426 THE CHORUS OF THE GENESEE (CoG) has openings

rochestercitynewspaper.com City 31


CITY Newspaper presents

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levels and musical styles. Call Scott: 585- 465-0219. Visit www.scottwrightmusic.com

Wanted to Buy CASH FOR CARS! We Buy ANY Car or Truck ,Running or NOT! Damaged, Wrecked, Salvaged OK! Get a top dollar INSTANT offer today! 1-800-267-1591

BASS LESSONS Acoustic, electric, all styles. Music therory and composition for all instruments. Former Berklee and Eastman Teacher. For more information, call 413-1896 PIANO LESSONS In your home or mine. Patient, experienced instructor teaching all ages,

ADVERTISING SALES OPPORTUNITY SEEKING ONE OUTSTANDING SALES PROFESSIONAL. MUST BE ASSERTIVE, OUTGOING, SMART, IMAGINATIVE AND CONFIDENT. SALES EXPERIENCE AND PROVEN RECORD OF SALES ACHIEVEMENT A MUST. NEWSPAPER/MEDIA SALES A DEFINITE PLUS. SALARY PLUS COMMISSION PLUS BENEFITS.

SEND RESUME TO: Betsy Matthews, City Newspaper, 250 N. Goodman St., Rochester, NY 14607 OR EMAIL TO: bmatthews@rochester-citynews.com

Sunday Mass at St. Michael’s Church Sunday, January 29th at 4:00pm Music to Include:

Hebert Howells: Mine eyes for beauty pine Maurice Duruflé: Kyrie from Mass cum Jubilo Free Parking at St. Michael’s Church

Corner of Clinton & Clifford

St. Michael’s Singers

Anne Laver Music Director/Organ Alicia Messenger, cantor 32 City january 25-31, 2012


Legal Ads EMPLOYMENT / CAREER TRAINING

Employment

Volunteers

AIRLINES ARE HIRING Train for hands on Aviation Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified- Job Placement Assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance (866)296-7093

A SECOND THOUGHT Resale Shop in East Rochester is accepting applications for volunteer sale associates and online researchers. Shop benefits people with disabilities in Guatemala. Call (585) 3402000.

DRIVER- Weekly Hometime. Dry and Refrigerated. Daily Pay! 31 Service Centers. Local Orientation. Newer trucks. CDL-A, 3 months current OTR experience. 800-414-9569 www.driveknight.com $$$HELP WANTED$$$ Extra Income! Assembling CD cases from Home! No Experience Necessary! Call our Live Operators Now! 1-800-4057619 EXT 2450 http://www. easyworkjobs.com (AAN CAN) HIRING EXPERIENCED / INEXPERIENCED TANKER DRIVERS! Great Benefits and Pay! New Fleet Volvo Tractors! 1 Year OTR Exp. Req.- Tanker Training Available. Call Today: 877-882-6537 www. OakleyTransport.com LOCAL ENERGY COMPANY Is looking for energetic, enthusiastic sales individuals for a highly rewarding career opportunity. Please fax resumes to 716-524-6700. MALE DANCE INSTRUCTORS Needed. Dance experience perforable, but will train the right candidate. Call Fred Astaire Dance Studio at 2921240 to schedule interview today! WWW.FADSROCHESTER. COM MODEL Wanted by local sculpture studio. Competetiive pay. All types considered. please leave message. 241-0085. MOVIE EXTRAS People needed now to stand in the background for a major film Earn up to $300 per day. Exp not REQ. CALL NOW AND SPEAK TO A LIVE PERSON 877-426-8310 (AAN CAN)

MEALS ON WHEELS Needs Volunteers! Do you have an hour and a smile? Deliver meals during lunchtime to homebound neighbors. Interested? Call 7878326 to help. NEW FIBRO SUPPORT Group is seeking volunteers for all positions, long-term & shortterm Call Brenda 585-3413290 YMCA RPO: VOLUNTEER for Exciting Position Available at the Rochester Philharmonic Orchestra: Archive Committee Chair. Must have interest in the civic and cultural history of Rochester. (585) 454-7311 x 243 for details. SCHOOL #12 999 South Ave. is looking for reading & math volunteers, English & Spanish. Training provided. Call Vicki 585-461-4282 VOLUNTEERS NEEDED To assist with praise and worship. Living Waters Fellowship is a Christ centered nondenominational church in the early stages of development. Individuals, groups, and musicians are welcomed. Call 585-957-6155.

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RED GREEN LIVE Experience this hilarious one-man show. Fri., April 20th, 7pm, Riviera Theatre & Performing Arts Center, North Tonawanda. 6922413 or visit www.rivieratheatre. org www.redgreen.com

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CITY

[ AMCETD, LLC ] 1: The name of the Limited Liability Company is AMCETD, LLC. 2: The Articles of Organization were filed on December 13, 2011 with the Secretary of State. 3: The Office of the LLC is in Monroe County. 4: The Secretary of State has been designated as agent upon whom process against the Company is to be served. The address to which the Secretary of State shall mail process is: 17 Lanaray Park, Fairport, New York 14450. 5: The purpose of the business of the LLC is to engage in any lawful act or activity for which the LLC may be organized under the Limited Liabilty Law for the State of New York. [ LEGAL NOTICE ] Name of limited liability company: Building 29 LLC (“LLC”). Date Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (“SSNY”) December 19, 2011. LLC organized in Delaware on November 3, 2011. NY county location: Monroe. SSNY designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process c/o the LLC, One Circle Street, Rochester, New York 14607. Address required to be maintained in jurisdiction of organization or if not required, principal office of LLC: 874 Walker Road, Suite C, Dover, Delaware 19904. Copy of formation document on file with: the Secretary of State of Delaware, P.O. Box 898, Dover, Delaware 19903. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ LEGAL NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of GIGA Properties LLC, Arts. of Org. filed by Secy of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/8/2011. Office location: County of Monroe. SSNY designated as agent of the LLC upon which process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process served to GIGA Properties LLC, PO Box 17218, Rochester, NY 14617. Purpose of LLC: Any lawful activity. [ LEGAL NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Norton Commons LLC, Arts. of Org. filed by Secy of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/8/2011. Office location: County of Monroe. SSNY designated as agent of the LLC upon which process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process served to Norton Commons LLC, PO Box 17218, Rochester, NY 14617. Purpose of LLC: Any lawful activity. [ LEGAL NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of ROC PROPS LLC, Arts. of Org. filed by Secy of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/18/2011. Office

location: County of Monroe. SSNY designated as agent of the LLC upon which process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process served to ROC PROPS LLC, PO Box 67468, Rochester, NY, 14617. Purpose of LLC: Any lawful activity. [ LEGAL NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Valley Gorge Properties LLC, Arts. of Org. filed by Secy of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/8/2011. Office location: County of Monroe. SSNY designated as agent of the LLC upon which process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process served to Valley Gorge Properties LLC, PO Box 17218, Rochester, NY 14617. Purpose of LLC: Any lawful activity. [ LEGAL NOTICE PROALIGN, LLC ] Notice of Organization: Proalign, LLC was filed with SSNY on December 23, 2011. Office: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. PO address which SSNY shall mail any process against the LLC served upon it: 120 Allens Creek Rd., Rochester, NY 14618. Purpose is to engage in any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] 1697 MONROE LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 11/21/11. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Johnson Mullan & Brundage, 1399 Monroe Ave., Rochester, NY 14618-1005. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] 1704 MONROE LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 11/21/11. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Johnson Mullan & Brundage, 1399 Monroe Ave., Rochester, NY 14618-1005. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] aDesignedPath for usabilitySolutions, LLC, filed with NY Sec’y of State (SSNY) on 9/16/11. Location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of any process against the LLC served upon him/her to United States Corporation Agents Inc, 7014 13th Ave, Ste 202, Brooklyn NY 11228. Purpose: Any lawful activity.

[ NOTICE ] Cimetics Pest Solutions, LLC (LLC) filed Arts. of Org. with NY Secy. of State (SS) on 1/3/2012. LLC’s office is in Monroe Co. SS is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS shall mail a copy of any process to LLC’s principal business location at 250 Mill St. Ste. 309-311, Rochester, NY 14614. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity.

[ NOTICE ] Not. of Form. of FLAWLESS PROPERTIES, LLC, Art. of Org. filled Sec’y of State (SSNY) 4/11/2009. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY may mail a copy of any process to LLC. 231 Michigan Street, Rochester, NY 14606 Purpose: any lawful purpose

[ NOTICE ] CS-LT Acquisition, LLC (LLC) filed Arts. of Org. with NY Secy. of State (SS) on 12/15/2011. LLC’s office is in Monroe Co. SS is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS shall mail a copy of any process to LLC’s principal business location at 300 Lucius Gordon Dr., W. Henrietta, NY 14586. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity.

[ NOTICE ] Not. of Form. of Royal Service I LLC, Art. Of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 11/22/11. Office location Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY may mail a copy of process to 30 Mt. Hope Ave., Rochester, NY 14620. Purpose: any lawful purpose.

[ NOTICE ] CWH ENTERPRISES, LLC. filed Art. of Org. with NY Sec’y of State (SSNY) 9/13/11. Office is in Monroe County. SSNY is desig. agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy to the LLC, 59 Appleton St. Rochester, NY 14611. Any Lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] DARYL CARMICHAEL & ASSOCIATES LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 12/07/2010. Office in Monroe Co. SSNY desig. agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 551 Lexington Ave., Rochester, NY 14613, which is also the principal business location. Purpose: To engage in the business of land use, planning, construction management and design as well as any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] GBU ENTERPRISES, LLC (LLC) filed Arts. of Org. with NY Secy. of State (SS) on 12/8/11. LLC’s office is in Monroe Co. SS is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS shall mail a copy of any process to LLC, 53 Genesee Park Blvd., Rochester, NY 14611. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Not. Of Form. Of Documents Plus LLC. Art. Of Org. filed with NY Sec’y of State (SSNY) 9/12/11. County: Monroe. SSNY is designated Agent of LLC to whom process may be served. SSNY may mail a copy of any process to LLC, P.O. Box 31762, Rochester , NY 14603. Purpose any lawful activity

[ NOTICE ] Not. of Form. of SURE LUCK HOMES 015 LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 12/30/11. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY may mail a copy of any process to LLC. 2117 Buffalo Road, Suite 290, Rochester, NY 14624. Purpose: any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Not. of Form. of SURE LUCK HOMES 016 LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 12/30/11. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY may mail a copy of any process to LLC. 2117 Buffalo Road, Suite 290, Rochester, NY 14624. Purpose: any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Not. of Form. of SURE LUCK HOMES 017 LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 12/30/11. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY may mail a copy of any process to LLC. 2117 Buffalo Road, Suite 290, Rochester, NY 14624. Purpose: any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Not. of Form. of SURE LUCK HOMES 018 LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 12/30/11. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY may mail a copy of any process to LLC. 2117 Buffalo Road, Suite 290, Rochester, NY 14624. Purpose: any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Notice is hereby given that a license, number

not yet assigned, for a full on premise beer, wine & liquor license has been applied for by TG 2, INC. dba VIBE LOUNGE, 302 Goodman St., Suite 101 E, Rochester, NY 14607, County of Monroe, City of Rochester, for a Jazz Club. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of Accent Home Services, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Sec’y of State (SSNY) on 10/31/11. Office location: County of Monroe. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of any process to the LLC at 64 East Church Street, Fairport, New York 14450. LLC’s purpose: any lawful act. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of BROCKPORT GROUP ASSOCIATES LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/29/11. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 77 Place One Dr., Rochester, NY 14626. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Own & manage real property. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of ENCHANTED DIALYSIS, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/06/11. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 601 Hawaii St., El Segundo, CA 90245. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Corporation Service Co., 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207-2543. Purpose: Kidney dialysis services. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of JMF LANDSCAPING, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 01/06/12. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 61 Morningstar Dr., Rochester, NY 14606. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Jason Fowler at the princ. office of the LLC. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY. NAME: NORTHEAST CAPITAL VENTURES LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York on 9/6/2011.

cont. on page 34

rochestercitynewspaper.com City 33


Legal Ads > page 33 Office location: Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to the LLC, P.O. Box 10803, Rochester, New York, 14610. Purpose: For any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Merriman Properties, LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 12/8/11. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 18 Lambeth Loop, Fairport, NY 14450. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of MISSION COMMERCIAL REALTY LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 01/13/12. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 2479 Browncroft Blvd., Rochester, NY 14625. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC

at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of OVBT, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/1/11. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 124 S. Main St., Fairport, NY 14450. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of Passero Spoleta DesignBuild Maroc, LLC. Art. of Org. filed Secretary of State of NY (“SSNY”) 12/21/11. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of any process to c/o Spoleta Construction 7 Van Auker St., Rochester, NY 14608. Purpose: any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of PILLAR MEDIA ENTERPRISES, LLC Art. of Organization filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 11-03-11. Office of Location: Monroe County.

SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 2401 N. Clinton Avenue, Rochester, NY 14621. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of STEPHEN AND LYNN NATAPOW FAMILY LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/07/11. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 2300 Buffalo Rd., Bldg. 100D, Rochester, NY 14624. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Surrey Hill Properties, LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 12/21/11. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 18 Lambeth Loop, Fairport, NY 14450. Purpose: any lawful activities.

Adult Services OVER 100,000 WEEKLY READERS

Available at over 700 locations all over Monroe County and beyond.

[ NOTICE ] NOTICE OF FORMATION of SVT LLC (“LLC”) Art. of Org. filed with NY Secretary of State (“NYSOS”) on 12/20/2011, pursuant to Limited Liability Company Law Section 203. Office location: Monroe County. NYSOS designated as agent for LLC upon whom process against it may be served. NYSOS shall mail copy of process served to: 2070 Lyell Avenue, Rochester, NY 14606. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Trail Ready Communications, LLC. Art. of Org. filed with the Secretary of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/08/2011. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LCC to whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at 107 Probst Road, Pittsford, NY 14534. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of 1575 Marketplace Drive, LP. Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/28/11. Office location: Monroe County. LP formed in California (CA) on 11/22/11. SSNY designated as agent of LP upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The Partnership, 5900 Wilshire Blvd., Ste. 2600, Los Angeles, CA 90036, also the address to be maintained in CA. Name/address of genl. ptr. available from SSNY. Cert. of LP filed with CA Secy. of State, 1500 11th St., Sacramento, CA 95814. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of MLCFC 2006-4 PALMER BUILDINGS, LLC. App. for Auth. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 1/9/12. Off. loc.: Monroe County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 9/18/09. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, registered agent upon whom process may be served. DE address of LLC: 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Arts. of Org. filed with DE Secy. of State, 401 Federal St., Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of NRG Experimental, LLC. Authority filed with NY Dept. of State: 12/14/11. Office location: Monroe County. LLC formed in NC: 6/13/11. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process

34 City january 25-31, 2012

against it may be served and shall mail process to: 20 Piccadilly Sq., Rochester, NY 14625. NC addr. of LLC: 1700 Talbot Ridge St., Wake Forest, NC 27587. Cert. of Org. filed with NC Sec. of State, 1 S. Salisbury St., Raleigh, NC 27601. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of Rochester Silver Works, LLC. Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 9/23/11. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. bus. addr.: 750 W. Ridge Rd., Rochester, NY 14615. LLC formed in DE on 9/21/11. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. DE addr. of LLC: 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. [ NOTICE ] Rochester Bar Concepts LLC. filed Arts. of Org. with NY Dept. of State: 12/29/11. Office is in Monroe Co. SSNY is designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: 53 Landsdowne Ln., Rochester, NY 14618. Purpose any lawful act. [ NOTICE ] SMUGTOWN MUSHROOM COMPANY LLC filed Arts. of Org with Sec’y of State (SSNY) on 10/11/2011.Ooffice location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against may be served. SSNY shal mail process to 304 Ballad Ave., Rochester, NY 14626. Purpose: Any lawful act. [ NOTICE ] SPC PROPERTIES LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 10/18/11. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 750 Lee Rd, Greece, NY 14606. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] STONE ROAD PROPERTIES, LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 12/8/11. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, Attn: Mark Roskey, 626 Stone Rd., Rochester, NY 14616. General Purposes.

[ NOTICE ] Swick Properties, LLC (LLC). Art. of Org. filed with Sec’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/27/2011, Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent for LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process served to: 2471 Westside Dr., N. Chili NY, 14514. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE OF ARTHUR ALAN MEDIA, LLC ] Arthur Alan Media, LLC was filed with SSNY on 5/6/2011. Office: Monroe County, SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. P.O. address which SSNY shall mail any process against the LLC served upon SSNY: 1279 Chili Avenue, Rochester, New York 14624. Purpose is to engage in any lawful activity. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] Notice of Formation of Coffee and Garlic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with Sec’y of State (SSNY) on 12/16/11. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to LLC’s principal business location at 69 Rosedale Street, Rochester, NY 14620. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION BOODLEBAG, LLC ] Boodlebag, LLC was filed with SSNY on 12/21/2011. Office: Monroe County, SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. P.O. address which SSNY shall mail any process against the LLC served upon SSNY, 20 Castleman Road, Rochester, New York 14620. Purpose is to engage in any lawful activity. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF 88-90/1321, LLC ] The name of the Limited Liability Company is 8890/1321, LLC . Articles of Organization were filed with the New York Secretary of State on 1/13/2012. The office of the LLC is in Monroe County. The New York Secretary of State is designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. The Secretary of State shall mail a copy of such process to 30 Merriman St., Rochester, NY 14607. The LLC is organized to engage in any lawful activity for which an LLC may be formed under NY LLC Law. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY ] LIGHTFAB SPECIALTIES LLC has filed Articles of Organization with the Secretary of State on

November 30, 2011. Its office is located in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent upon whom process against it may be served and a copy of any process will be mailed to 40 Hytec Circle, Rochester, NY 14606. Its business is to engage in any lawful activity for which limited liability companies may be organized under Section 203 of the New York Limited Liability Company Act. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LLC ] DGA Vehicles, LLC has filed articles of organization with the New York Secretary of State on December 23, 2011. Its principal place of business is located at 333 W. Commercial Street, Suite 1500, East Rochester, New York in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent upon whom process may be served. A copy of any process shall be mailed to 333 W. Commercial Street, Suite 1500, East Rochester, New York 14445. The purpose of the LLC is to engage in any lawful activity for which Limited Liability Companies may be organized under Section 203 of the New York Limited Liability Company Law. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF PLLC ] Maxwell Boev Medical Group, PLLC has filed articles of organization with the New York Secretary of State on December 23, 2011. Its principal place of business is located at Parnall Office Bldg, Ste 304, 1445 Portland Avenue, Rochester, New York in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent upon whom process may be served. A copy of any process shall be mailed to Parnall Office Bldg, Ste 304, 1445 Portland Avenue, Rochester, New York 14621. The purpose of the PLLC is to practice the profession of medicine and the providing of medical services. [ NOTICE OF GENFRA PROPERTIES, LLC ] GenFra Properties, LLC was filed with SSNY on 11/16/2011. Office: Monroe County, SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. P.O. address which SSNY shall mail any process against the LLC served upon SSNY: P.O. Box 18041, Rochester, New York 14618. Purpose is to engage in any lawful activity. [ NOTICE OF ORGANIZATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY ] The name of the Limited Liability Company is New York Pioneer Holdings

LLC (the “Company”). The Articles of Organization of the Company were filed with the Secretary of State of New York on December 15, 2011. The office of the Company is located in Monroe County, New York. The Secretary of State of New York has been designated as agent upon whom process against the Company may be served. The address to which the Secretary of State shall mail a copy of any such process is P.O. Box 10495, Rochester, NY 14610. The business purpose of the Company is to engage in any lawful activity for which a limited liability company may be organized under Section 203 of the New York Limited Liability Law. [ NOTICE OF REGISTRATION ] Notice of registration of limited liability partnership (LLP). Name: Southeast Medical Associates, LLP (the Partnership). Certificate of Registration filed with the Secretary of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/08/11. NY principal office location: 100 CrossKeys Office Park, Fairport, NY 14450, Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the Partnership may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of any such process to: 100 CrossKeys Office Park, Fairport, NY 14450. Purpose/character of the Partnership: any and all lawful activities. [ NOTICE OF SALE ] Index No. 2010-11620 SUPREME COURT STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF MONROE ESL Federal Credit Union, Plaintiff vs. Daniel W. Taylor, New York State Commissioner of Taxation, ESL Federal Credit Union, HSBC Bank Nevada, N.A..; “Niva” Defendants. Pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale dated October 14, 2011 and entered herein, I, the undersigned, the Referee in said Judgment named, will sell at public auction in the front vestibule of the Monroe County Office Building, 39 West Main Street, Rochester, New York, County of Monroe, on February 9, 2012 at 10:00 a.m., on that day, the premises directed by said Judgment to be sold and therein described as follows: ALL THAT TRACT OR PARCEL OF LAND, situate in the Town of Greece, County of Monroe, State of New York, being a part of Great Lot Fourteen (14) bounded and described as follows: Beginning at a point in the center line of Long Pond Road at a distance of one thousand five hundred forty-two and thirty-


Legal Ads four hundredths feet (1,542.34) southerly from the center line of English Road; thence (1) easterly at an angle, in the southeast quadrant of eighty-nine degrees, fiftyfour minutes ten seconds (89º 54’ 10”) a distance of four hundred sixteen and sixty hundredths feet (416.60) to a point; thence (2) southerly at an angle in the southwest quadrant of ninety degrees five minutes and fifty seconds (90º 05’ 50”) a distance of ninety feet (90.00) to a point; thence (3) westerly at an angle in the northwest quadrant of eightynine degrees fifty-four minutes ten seconds (89º 54’ 10” a distance of four hundred sixteen and sixty hundredths feet (416.60) to a point; thence (4) northerly at an angle in the northeast quadrant of ninety degrees five minutes and fifty seconds (90º 05’ 50”) along the center line of Long Pond Road, a distance of ninety feet (90) to the point of beginning. Said premises is also known as Lot 1 of the Wolpert Subdivision as the same is shown on a map filed in the Monroe County Clerk’s Office in Liber 252 of Maps, Page 98; Tax Account No. 059.03-2-50.2; Property Address: 942 Long Pond Road, Town of Greece, New York Said premises are sold subject to any state of facts an accurate survey may show, zoning restrictions and any amendments thereto, covenants, restrictions, agreements, reservations, and easements of record and prior liens, if any, municipal departmental violations, and such other provisions as may be set forth in the Complaint and Judgment filed in this action. Judgment amount: $57,936.60 plus, but not limited to, costs, disbursements, attorney fees and additional allowance, if any, all with legal interest. DATED: January 2012 Leonard Rosner, Esq., Referee LACY KATZEN LLP Attorneys for Plaintiff 130 East Main Street Rochester, New York 14604 Telephone: (585) 324-5767 [ NOTICE OF SALE ] Index No. 2011-5287 SUPREME COURT STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF MONROE ESL Federal Credit Union, Plaintiff, vs) James P. Munnings; Catherine J. Munnings; GE Money Bank; Beneficial Homeowner Service Corporation, Defendants. Pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale dated January 17, 2012 and entered herein, I, the

undersigned, the Referee in said Judgment named, will sell at public auction in the front vestibule of the Monroe County Office Building, 39 West Main Street, Rochester, New York, County of Monroe, on February 22, 2012 at 12:30 p.m., on that day, the premises directed by said Judgment to be sold and therein described as follows: ALL THAT TRACT OR PARCEL OF LAND, situate in the Town of Greece, Monroe County, New York, being known and distinguished as Lot 23 of Section 3, of Green Gardens Subdivision as shown on a map thereof filed in Monroe County Clerk’s Office in Liber 94 of Maps, page 195. Said Lot No. 23, Section 3 is situate on the west side of Whitman Road and is 50 feet wide, front and rear and 163 feet deep. Tax Acct. No. 075.06-6-14 Property Address:140 Whitman Road, Town of Greece, New York Said premises are sold subject to any state of facts an accurate survey may show, zoning restrictions and any amendments thereto, covenants, restrictions, agreements, reservations, and easements of record and prior liens, if any, municipal departmental violations, and such other provisions as may be set forth in the Complaint and Judgment filed in this action. Judgment amount: $105,417.02 plus, but not limited to, costs, disbursements, attorney fees and additional allowance, if any, all with legal interest. DATED: January 2012 Thomas Solomon, Esq., Referee LACY KATZEN LLP Attorneys for Plaintiff 130 East Main Street Rochester, New York 14604 Telephone: (585) 324-5767 [ NOTICE OF SALE ] Index No. 20118827 SUPREME COURT STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF MONROE ESL Federal Credit Union, Plaintiff, vs. Jason S. Benny; Citifinancial Company DE ; GE Money Bank; RAB Performance Recoveries LLC,Defendants. Pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale dated January 11, 2012 and entered herein, I, the undersigned, the Referee in said Judgment named, will sell at public auction in the front vestibule of the Monroe County Office Building, 39 West Main Street, Rochester, New York, County of Monroe, on February 22, 2012 at 1:00 p.m., on that day, the premises directed by said Judgment to be sold and therein described as follows: ALL THAT TRACT OR PARCEL OF

LAND, situate in the town of Greece, County of Monroe and State of New York, bounded and described as Lot 594 on a map of “The Dewey Avenue Tract” a subdivision of the Moss Mosley Farm, made by G.R. Newell, Surveyor, in March, 1923 and filed in Monroe County Clerk’s Office in Liber 55 of Maps, page 20, to which map reference is made for a more particular description. Tax Account No. 060.48-5-1 Property Address: 129 Brayton Road, Town of Greece, New York Said premises are sold subject to any state of facts an accurate survey may show, zoning restrictions and any amendments thereto, covenants, restrictions, agreements, reservations, and easements of record and prior liens, if any, municipal departmental violations, and such other provisions as may be set forth in the Complaint and Judgment filed in this action. Judgment amount: $36,917.44 plus, but not limited to, costs, disbursements, attorney fees and additional allowance, if any, all with legal interest. DATED: January 2012 Mary Beth Feindt, Esq., Referee LACY KATZEN LLP Attorneys for Plaintiff 130 East Main Street Rochester, New York 14604 Telephone: 585 324-5767 [ SUMMONS ] INDEX NO. 11-7288 STATE OF NEW YORK SUPREME COURT COUNTY OF MONROE NEIGHBORWORKS Plaintiff vs. Any unknown heirs, devisees, distributees or successors in interest of the late Rudolph Redding, if living, and if any be dead, any and all persons who are spouses, widows, grantees, mortgagees, lienors, heirs, devisees, distributees or successors in interest of such of them as may be dead, and their spouses, heirs, devisees, distributes and successors in interest, all of whom and whose names and places of residence are unknown to Plaintiff; CHARLES MURRAY; LINDA D. MURRAY; CHARLES MURRAY, JR.; BARBARA J. REDDING; NEW YORK STATE DEPARTMENT OF TAXATION AND FINANCE; and UNITED STATES OF AMERICA BY THE INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, Defendants This is an attempt to collect a debt and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. To the above named Defendants: You are hereby summoned to

answer the complaint in this action and to serve a copy of your answer, or if the complaint is not served with this summons, to serve a notice of appearance on the plaintiff’s attorneys within thirty days after the service of this summons, exclusive of the day of service, and in case of your failure to appear or answer, judgment will be taken against you by default for the relief demanded in the complaint. NOTICE YOU ARE IN DANGER OF LOSING YOUR HOME If you do not respond to this summons and complaint by serving a copy of the answer on the attorney for the mortgage company who filed this foreclosure proceeding against you and filing the answer with the court, a default judgment may be entered and you can lose your home. Speak to an attorney or go to the court where your case is pending for further information on how to answer the summons and protect your property. Sending a payment to your mortgage company will not stop this foreclosure action. YOU MUST RESPOND BY SERVING A COPY OF THE ANSWER ON THE ATTORNEY FOR THE PLAINTIFF (MORTGAGE COMPANY) AND FILING THE ANSWER WITH THE COURT. Dated: September 7, 2011The foregoing summons is served upon you by publication pursuant to an Order of Hon. Elma A. Bellini, Justice of the Supreme Court of the State of New York, signed the 7th day of September, 2011 at Rochester, New York. The object of this action is to foreclose a mortgage on the following property:ALL THAT TRACT OR PARCEL OF LAND, situate in the City of Rochester, County of Monroe and State of New York, known and described as Lot No. 41 of the Samuel Blodgett’s Subdivision of Henry D. Schank’s Subdivision of part of Town Lot No. 42, as laid down on a map on file in the Monroe County Clerk’s Office in Liber 7 of Maps, page 94. Said lot fronts on the north side of Parsells Avenue in the City of Rochester and is 40 feet wide and 158 feet in depth. Subject to all easements and restrictions of record. These premises are also known as 416 Parcells Avenue, Rochester, New York 14609 John K. McAndrew, Esq. WOODS OVIATT GILMAN LLP Attorneys for Plaintiff 700 Crossroads Building 2 State Street Rochester, New York 14614

Fun [ rehabilitating mr. wiggles ] BY neil swaab

[ LAST WEEK’S SOLUTION ON PAGE 31 ]

rochestercitynewspaper.com City 35


36 City january 25-31, 2012

January 25-31, 2012 - CITY Newspaper  

Cover: Winter Guide 2012 | News: Building a vision for Rochester's schools | Chow Hound: Zeppa Bistro | Music: Imani Winds | Art: "War & Con...

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