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EVENTS: ART OF THE STEAL, PIZZA CHALLENGE 21 FILM: “BROKEN CITY,” “RUST AND BONE” 24 RESTAURANT REVIEW: BAKED AND CARVED 11 CLASSICAL PREVIEW: “PROJECT LUDWIG” 16 ROCHESTER THEATER HALL OF FAME: NOMINATE NOW 12 CROSSWORD, NEWS OF THE WEIRD 35

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Greater Rochester’s Alternative Newsweekly

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Vol 42 No 20

AND MORE MUSIC, PAGE 12

News. Music. Life.

It’s not easy to go out and just get a roll of toilet paper.” NEWS, PAGE 4

The neighborhood schools tightrope. NEWS, PAGE 6

After the storm: the RPO’s future. URBAN JOURNAL, PAGE 3

Taking stock of the changing climate. NEWS, PAGE 5

Forty years of the Genesee Center. ART REVIEW, PAGE 20

SPECIAL SECTION | BY CITY FEATURE WRITERS | INSIDE | ILLUSTRATION BY AUBREY BERARDINI

Winter Guide 2013 Winter 2012-2013 has already made more of an impact than the previous two winters. By late December we had some serious snowfalls, bitter temperatures, and all of the attendant slush and ice. After a few years off, winter is back in Western New York. Instead of hiding from it and complaining, let’s make the most of it. There’s no question that Rochester is a sports town, and that remains true even when the ball fields are covered with snow. In this edition of Winter Guide get a look at sports played on ice, and where you can

check them out in and around Rochester. When’s the last time you took in a good bonspiel? Make sure to keep your calendar clear. There’s a lot going on in the next three months, from exciting regional premieres like the Broadway smash “Book of Mormon,” to concerts by buzz-worthy bands like Passion Pit. You’ll get the scoop on some outdoor activities, too, like the annual Lakeside Winter Celebration and maple-syrup weekends at area nature centers.


Feedback We welcome your comments. Send them to themail@rochester-citynews. com, or post them on our website, rochestercitynewspaper.com, our Facebook page, or our Twitter feed, @roccitynews. Comments of fewer than 350 words have a greater chance of being published, and we do edit selections for publication in print. We don’t publish comments sent to other media.

Analyzing the gun stats

I’m no gun nut. I do own one gun for home defense, but I don’t consider myself a part of the “gun culture.” Nevertheless, I find a lot of the gun-control arguments being tossed about these days to be specious. For example: “The US gun homicide rate is 30 times that of France or Australia, according to the UN Office on Drugs and Crime ... and 12 times higher than the average for other developed countries” (“Facing Our Gun Culture,” Urban Journal”). Who cares what the “gun” homicide rate is? Shouldn’t we be looking at the total homicide rate? If there’s evidence that the availability of guns tends to raise the overall homicide rate, then we’ve got something to discuss. But to compare our gun homicide rate to that of countries where most guns are illegal is like saying that homes that are wired for electricity tend to have more electricity-caused fires than homes that rely entirely on kerosene lamps and wood-burning stoves. It’s a meaningless statistic, because it tells us nothing about the overall risk of the ultimate danger, i.e., house fires. As to your final question, “Are we really helpless to deal with one of the biggest public-health issues this country faces?” I would say this. First, you’re defining the issue as “gun violence.” Again, I would argue that the issue is violence, period. And on that score, it’s important to remember that despite the horrific tragedies in Newtown, Webster, and elsewhere, violent crime rates have been steadily decreasing in the U.S. for decades. I don’t mean to minimize how terrible those events were, but to conclude from them that we’re facing a grave national crisis of gun violence reminds me of the hysteria over kidnapping that gripped many parents when they started putting photos of abducted kids on milk cartons. The crime itself hadn’t become more common; it had simply 2 CITY

JANUARY 23-29, 2013

been brought to the forefront of the public consciousness. Finally, even if one accepts the notion that guns – even legally owned guns – are the problem, we can do something about it. As you recognize, the Constitution can be amended. But for that to happen, there has to be some national consensus that we should do so. Right now, we don’t have anywhere near that kind of consensus. It may be a long time before we get there – maybe we never will – but that’s part of the price you pay for living in a society where the will of the people still matters. DAVE

Posted on rochestercitynewspaper.com

Moving on at the RPO?

It appears that the Rochester Philharmonic Orchestra will continue, at least for now, in a way that is sufficiently agreeable for most of the people associated with its operation, most of its musicians, and the majority of people who buy tickets and attend performances. So it goes, as Kurt Vonnegut might have said about the events experienced here, yet it is astonishing that many seem passively to accept the loss of Arild Remmereit on the podium. As for those who have protested and criticized the actions taken by the RPO board: so few apparently want to support this small community. People, by and large, are moving on, as they do after the sound and fury of almost any controversy, whether the subject is the treatment of a gifted artist, gun violence, social justice, or… what a long list it is. Henrik Ibsen observed (in “An Enemy of the People”) that “a minority may be right; a majority is always wrong.” MARTIN FASS, ROCHESTER

What about the fathers?

I read this commentary several times looking for the word “father” (“The National Agenda Must Focus on the Poor,” Marvin McMickle guest commentary). Didn’t find it anywhere. The cause of these social ills is the lack of fathers, and father figures, in the lives of those that are talked about in the article. The statistics below – from Larry Elder’s TownHall.com column “Gun Culture – What About the ‘Fatherless Culture?’” – say it all: “In 1965, Daniel Patrick Moynihan wrote ‘The Negro

Family: A Case for National Action.’ At the time, 25 percent of black children were born out of wedlock, a number Moynihan called alarming. Fast forward to the present, 72 percent of black children are now born out of wedlock. In fact, 36 percent of white children are born out of wedlock. Of Hispanic children, 53 percent are born outside of marriage.” The percentage of Asians born out of wedlock is a mere 17. What are Asians doing right, that everyone else is doing wrong? Until you fix the lack of fathers issue, nothing will change here. Shame on Dr. McMickle for talking around the problem, and avoiding talking about the source of poverty. A litany of new social programs will do nothing to ameliorate the poverty of values in many parts of our country that directly leads to monetary poverty. ANIMULE

Posted on rochestercitynewspaper.com

Entitlements?

A recent letter regarding entitlements notes the advantage of single-payer or “Medicare for all,” in contrast to “non-profit private insurance” with its considerably higher administrative costs (“These Aren’t ‘Entitlements,’” Feedback). Unfortunately, the writers confuse the neutral use of the word “entitlement” with a more biased usage when they take umbrage at their Medicare and Social Security being correctly referenced as such. The truth of the matter is that their Social Security benefits probably exceeded within five years what they paid in. The average Medicare benefit by the end of one’s lifespan is even more lopsided. Not to mention Medicaid, which provides even further benefits to upper and middle-class elderly as nursing homes routinely charge in excess of $100,000 a year. Indeed there is a class war, as noted by David Cay Johnston, which disproportionately benefits corporate interests and the richest among us. To suggest, however, that there is another class war against the elderly simply flies in the face of reality as younger generations struggle to maintain “greedy geezers” like myself who had the simple good fortune of having been born before 1945. IVAN LENNON, ROCHESTER

News. Music. Life. Greater Rochester’s Alternative Newsweekly January 23-29, 2013 Vol 42 No 20 250 North Goodman Street Rochester, New York 14607-1199 themail@rochester-citynews.com phone (585) 244-3329 fax (585) 244-1126 rochestercitynewspaper.com Publishers: William and Mary Anna Towler Editor: Mary Anna Towler Asst. to the publishers: Matt Walsh Editorial department themail@rochester-citynews.com Features editor: Eric Rezsnyak News editor: Christine Carrie Fien Staff writers: Tim Louis Macaluso, Jeremy Moule Music editor: Willie Clark Music writer: Frank De Blase Calendar editor: Rebecca Rafferty Contributing writers: Paloma Capanna, Casey Carlsen, Roman Divezur, George Grella, Susie Hume, Andy Klingenberger, Dave LaBarge, Kathy Laluk, Michael Lasser, James Leach, Adam Lubitow, Ron Netsky, Dayna Papaleo, Suzan Pero, Rebecca Rafferty, Deb Schleede, David Yockel Jr. Art department artdept@rochester-citynews.com Art director/production manager: Matt DeTurck Designers: Aubrey Berardini, Mark Chamberlin Photographers: Mark Chamberlin, Frank De Blase, Michael Hanlon Advertising department ads@rochester-citynews.com Advertising sales manager: Betsy Matthews Account executives: Nancy Burkhardt, Tom Decker, Annalisa Iannone, William Towler Classified sales representatives: Christine Kubarycz, Tracey Mykins Operations/Circulation info@rochester-citynews.com Circulation manager: Katherine Stathis Distribution: Andy DiCiaccio, David Riccioni, Northstar Delivery, Wolfe News City Newspaper is available free of charge. Additional copies of the current issue may be purchased for $1, payable in advance at the City Newspaper office. City Newspaper may be distributed only by authorized distributors. No person may, without prior written permission of City Newspaper, take more than one copy of each weekly issue. City (ISSN 1551-3262) is published weekly by WMT Publications, Inc. Periodical postage paid at Rochester, NY (USPS 022-138). Send address changes to City, 250 North Goodman Street, Rochester, NY 14607. City is a member of the Association of Alternative Newsweeklies and the New York Press Association. Subscriptions: $35.00 ($30.00 for senior citizens) for one year. Add $10 yearly for out-of-state subscriptions: add $30 yearly for foreign subscriptions. Due to the initial high cost of establishing new subscriptions, refunds for fewer than ten months cannot be issued. Copyright by WMT Publications Inc., 2013 - all rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, photocopying, recording or by any information storage retrieval system without permission of the copyright owner.


URBAN JOURNAL | BY MARY ANNA TOWLER

After the storm: the RPO’s future The Rochester Philharmonic Orchestra holds its annual membership meeting Wednesday afternoon (January 23), and given the controversy over Music Director Arild Remmereit, it may be quite an emotional event. That people are this engaged on this issue is a clear indication of Rochester’s strong interest in classical music, the RPO, and the new musical direction in which Remmereit has taken the orchestra. But emotions are so high, and the rancor is so deep, that the orchestra’s stability could be at risk. A lot will depend on the willingness in the RPO community, on both sides, to move beyond the hostility and find common ground. That will not be easy. As everyone interested in the RPO knows by now, the orchestra community has been torn by conflict centering on Remmereit, a conflict that has exploded since the board terminated his contract in November (a decision I continue to agree with). Remmereit supporters blame the board – particularly board president Betsy Rice – and the RPO’s CEO, Charlie Owens. They say that the board has not supported Remmereit and his initiatives – and that Owens and board leaders have been trying to get rid of Remmereit since he got here. Board leaders and their supporters say that Remmereit is the problem, that he has been harshly and openly critical of RPO staff and some musicians. And, they say, attempts to help him change that behavior have not succeeded. The orchestra’s musicians are also divided, with some supporting the board and some supporting Remmereit. And unfortunately, mistrust has been building among them as well. While word of the discord had been circulating for several months, it broke into public view with a September 30 article by Stuart Low in the Democrat and Chronicle. In it, Low discussed what he had learned from insiders about the growing conflict. And he quoted from a confidential report by Craviso & Associates, a New York City-based laborrelations firm that does a lot of work for symphony orchestras and their boards. As Low noted, RPO board leaders hired Craviso to help them deal with the conflict. Craviso interviewed Remmereit and Owens, as well as some board members, musicians, and RPO administrative staff members. The Craviso report said there was severe discord throughout the RPO, and it outlined the history of that discord and recommended solutions.

A lot will depend on the willingness to move beyond the hostility and find common ground. That will not be easy.” The board’s leaders say they followed Craviso’s advice, but that the discord, and Remmereit’s confrontational behavior and unwillingness to cooperate, continued. And they say that when the majority of board members decided that the situation showed no signs of improving, they voted to terminate Remmereit’s contract.

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Remmereit’s supporters – including

some who have been closely involved in the situation – disagree strongly with that assessment. During a January 10 meeting hosted by Remmereit supporters, former board members Gwen Sterns and Kishan Pandya – both of whom resigned over the conflict – charged that the board leadership’s handling of the conflict has been one-sided, aimed at Remmereit and ignoring concerns about Owens; that RPO funds were wasted on consultants; and that board members who questioned the leadership’s action were attacked and ostracized. And in an interview with me this past weekend, Pandya elaborated. Like other Remmereit supporters, Pandya is convinced that the board leadership wanted to get rid of Remmereit early on. The board’s executive committee has acted unilaterally in some key respects, he said. For instance, the Craviso report states that continues on page 7

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CITY 3


[ NEWS FROM THE WEEK PAST ]

D and C building for sale Gannett is selling the Democrat and Chronicle’s headquarters at 55 Exchange Boulevard. The D and C has downsized its staff and moved its printing presses to a site in Greece. Michael Kane, the paper’s president and publisher, said in a D and C article that the company wants to “find a modern space for a mobile and digital-friendly work force.”

New manager for Lilac Festival

Lilac Festival Incorporated, the nonprofit organization that holds the Lilac Festival each year, has selected the Springut Group to produce the 2013 event. The festival corporation solicited bids earlier this year and the prior producer, an event management company run by Jim LeBeau, didn’t participate, say media reports. The Lilac Festival runs from May 10 to May 19.

Zyra retires from Water Authority

end of December, but the Water Authority board accepted his resignation during a meeting last week. Zyra was hired by the authority in February 2010, shortly after he left the Legislature.

News

Xerox is a patent giant

Xerox says its patents filings increased by 17 percent in 2012. Researchers produced 1,215 US patents aimed at simplifying the way people work. Fuji-Xerox, a Japanese joint venture, produced nearly 700 patents. The combination made Xerox one of the world’s top 10 producers of patents last year.

Buy a library

The City of Rochester is looking for someone to buy and redevelop the former Pulaski Library building at 1151 Hudson Avenue. The library was built in 1931 and is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Budget constraints caused the library to close in 1994, and it has been vacant since.

Wayne Zyra, a Republican and former president of the County Legislature, retired from his job as a management analyst at the Monroe County Water Authority. Zyra’s last day was technically at the

A changing downtown needs a new plan to guide development, say city officials. This photo was taken on North Clinton, facing St. Paul. PHOTO BY MARK CHAMBERLIN DEVELOPMENT | BY CHRISTINE CARRIE FIEN

Designing downtown What downtown Rochester lacks, apparently, is sensuality. And toilet paper. The city’s Department of Planning and Zoning held a public meeting last week to get residents’ ideas for the future of downtown. The City of Rochester expects to have a new downtown master plan — essentially a document to guide development — in place by the end of the year. The last plan was approved in 2003, and downtown has changed a lot since then, said Marcia Barry, director of planning and zoning. At last week’s meeting, one speaker said that Main Street is a

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“cold place” that lacks sensuality: it’s all concrete and sharp corners, he said. He advocated widening the street and establishing a landscaped center corridor with benches. “It would make it a much more humane, emotionally attractive place,” he said. A few residents spoke of downtown having islands of activity with no glue to connect them — an observation that’s come up before in discussions of downtown planning. Barry said an important step will be to get people walking. More feet on the street would encourage development in the corridors between those islands, she said.

One young speaker said that downtown lacks “normal people things.” “It’s not easy to go out and just get a roll of toilet paper,” he said. “You can’t walk to the pharmacy. There’s a lot of good stuff, but we’re missing a lot.” Longstanding obstacles to the revitalization of downtown also came up, such as the perception that downtown is unsafe. Everyone agreed that the perception is unfair, but no one seemed to have ideas for changing it. An open house on the downtown master plan will be held from 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. on Wednesday, January 23, at City Hall, 30 Church Street.


The assessment says that large reductions in global greenhouse gas emissions are needed to avoid some of the worst climate impacts. In the Northeast, the average temperature could increase by as much as 4.5 degrees to 10 degrees Fahrenheit by 2080, if emissions continue to increase, the report says.

HISTORY | BY TIM LOUIS MACALUSO

ENVIRONMENT | BY JEREMY MOULE

Taking stock of the changing climate As the climate continues to change, the Rochester area can expect more frequent downpours, heat waves, and dry periods, according to the newly released draft National Climate Assessment. The document takes comprehensive national and regional views of climate trends. The assessment includes climate projections based on several greenhouse gas emissions scenarios. The document is meant to guide farmers, government officials, and other people and groups as they make decisions that could be affected by climate change, says David Wolfe, a lead author on the section dealing with the Northeast. The assessment cautions that, because of changes brought on by human activity, the past climate isn’t a reliable indicator of future conditions. “Climate change preparedness just makes good business sense at this point,” says Wolfe, a Cornell University professor. The practical applications for the data vary. For example, the assessment projects that, if greenhouse gas emissions keep increasing, Rochester will see more very hot days. Residents might consider that information as they decide whether to buy air conditioners. Farmers might use similar information to

decide whether they’ll invest in cooling systems for their dairy barns. The assessment doesn’t recommend policies for lawmakers, Wolfe says. But it does spell David Wolfe. out scientific facts PHOTO PROVIDED and observations that suggest broad action on greenhouse gas emissions is necessary. The assessment says that large reductions in global greenhouse gas emissions are needed to avoid some of the worst climate impacts. In the Northeast, the average temperature could increase by as much as 4.5 degrees to 10 degrees Fahrenheit by 2080, if emissions continue to increase, the report says. If emissions are reduced, the increase could be limited to 3 degrees to 6 degrees Fahrenheit. And the assessment emphasizes that poor and vulnerable populations are at higher risk for harm from some of the changes in climate. The assessment is available at www. globalchange.gov.

Presidential words The University of Rochester has assembled an exhibit on the history of presidential speechwriting. | The exhibit is comprised of more than 50 selections of presidential speeches from public and private collections, including a signed copy of President John F. Kennedy’s 1961 inaugural address, famous for the phrase, “Ask not what your country can do for you, ask what you can do for your country.” | Also on display is a copy of Abraham Lincoln’s first address to the nation, as well as letters, photographs, and correspondence of presidents including John Quincy Adams, Dwight D. Eisenhower, Theodore Roosevelt, and Bill Clinton. | Curt Smith, former speechwriter for President George H. W. Bush, was a co-curator for the project. Smith wrote Bush’s “Just War” speech and his speech for the 50th anniversary of the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor. | Some of the items in the exhibit are from Smith’s personal collection. | The exhibit runs now through Friday, March 8, at the UR’s Rush Rhees Library in the Rare Books and Special Collections Department. Hours are 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday, and 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Saturday. Information: 275-4477.

Cost of War The following people have been killed in the City of Rochester in recent weeks: -- Gregory Cooper, 24, Rochester SOURCE: Rochester Police Department ROCHESTER TOTALS —

AFGHANISTAN TOTALS —

2,176 US servicemen and servicewomen and 1,079 Coalition servicemen and servicewomen have been killed in Afghanistan from the beginning of the war and occupation to January 21. Statistics for Afghan civilian casualties are not available. American casualties from December 29 to January 16: -- Sgt. Aaron X. Wittman, 28, Chester, Va. -- Sgt. David J. Chambers, 25, Hampton, Va. SOURCES: iraqbodycount. org, icasualties.org, Department of Defense

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CITY 5


EDUCATION | BY TIM LOUIS MACALUSO

The neighborhood schools tightrope City school officials are grappling with a long-simmering problem: satisfying many parents’ desire for neighborhood schools, while not locking students into schools that are performing poorly. The Rochester school district currently operates under a school choice model in which schools are divided into three zones: northeast, northwest, and south. Parents select from the schools in their zone, which is based on where they live. But many residents and families want the district to return to the neighborhood schools system. They want assurance that if they purchase a house in a city neighborhood, their children can attend the neighborhood school. Bolgen Vargas is just the latest superintendent trying to make school choice and neighborhood schools — systems that are nearly polar opposites — somehow work together. “We hear that people want neighborhood schools,” he says. “We understand that, and we want that, too.” Vargas recently announced what he calls the “home school guarantee.” Children entering kindergarten who live within a halfmile of their neighborhood elementary school can attend that school, Vargas says. But the announcement is less a guarantee and more of a commitment to honor one component of the existing Parent Preference-Managed Choice policy. Vargas is trying to market the existing policy to families with children, but the public has grown skeptical because the policy comes with caveats. For example, the home school guarantee doesn’t cover older children transferring from another elementary school. And it doesn’t apply to high-demand schools with citywide enrollment like School 58. Still, Vargas says the existing policy, if it is better enforced, can accommodate demand for neighborhood schools without preventing families who favor choice from getting their top-pick schools. And he has the support of Mayor Tom Richards. Richards says he supports the neighborhood school guarantee, even though it’s not perfect. He says he wants parents and children to be able to say, “I’m moving into this neighborhood and I’m able to go to this school.” “I really think it’s important that people have a possessory interest toward their school and a possessory interest toward their neighborhood,” Richards says. But finding a way to balance both interests won’t be easy. And a lot hangs in the balance — stopping population loss, encouraging homebuyers to purchase in 6 CITY

JANUARY 23-29, 2013

city neighborhoods, and boosting the city’s tax revenue. For many prospective homebuyers, the idea of purchasing a house near a school they can’t be certain their children can attend is reason enough to purchase in the suburbs. And probably no one hears this more often than Richards. While some residents and parents may

find the placement process in city schools frustrating, Rochester didn’t adopt the school choice model by happenstance. The movement can be traced to economist and Nobel Prize winner Milton Friedman. His mid 1950’s essay “The Role of Government in Education” advocated giving families vouchers, allowing them to act as informed consumers. Competition would expose low-performing schools and showcase winners, Friedman wrote. No Child Left Behind, former President George W. Bush’s signature education legislation, was in many respects a tribute to Friedman’s essay. Under NCLB and its cousin, the Obama administration’s Race to the Top, Rochester can’t return exclusively to a neighborhood school model. With 27 out of its 60 schools designated by the State Education Department as failing, and all but four at risk of becoming failing schools, the Rochester school district must offer parents choice. Failure to do so can result in a loss of funding. But years into school choice — one of the pillars of education reform — part of the result of increased competition has been inconsistency and controversy. And critics say the policy has unintentionally lowered home values and tax assessments, and increased neighborhood transiency. And many parents, particularly those who are poor, find it hard to be engaged in their child’s school when it’s not near their home. And choice can create hardships for

Residents of the 19th Ward are aggressively fighting the district’s plans to permanently close some of their neighborhood schools, including School 16 (pictured). FILE PHOTO

students who want to stay after school to participate in sports or other activities. Rochester school officials are wrestling with additional problems, including high transportation costs from busing so many students. The district will budget $55 million for busing next year, says school board President Malik Evans — an expense that could be greatly reduced if more students walked to their neighborhood school. School board member Willa Powell, who

was an architect of the district’s school choice policy, says choice and neighborhood schools don’t have to be mutually exclusive. She says Vargas’s commitment to neighborhood schools is a step in the right direction. There should be seats available in almost all city schools for parents who register their children on time and meet the half-mile requirement, she says, since only a handful of schools have waiting lists. School 23 in the Park Avenue neighborhood and School 12 across from Highland Hospital are among the few elementary schools that are hotly pursued by neighborhood parents, she says. And with better planning, more seats can be made available for neighborhood students, Powell says. But there are kinks that have to be fixed, Powell says. For example, the district

is trying to make it easier for parents to enroll their children in their neighborhood pre-K program and stay with that school for kindergarten instead of having to re-register them, often in a different school. Difficulties will still arise, however, when parents move to the city or to a different neighborhood during the summer or in the middle of a school year. Or if they move into a neighborhood with a school nearby, but the school is beyond the half-mile limit. “I live in the Park Avenue neighborhood, but I’m 100 yards outside of School 23’s halfmile radius,” Powell says. And there are some neighborhoods, like Charlotte, where there may not be a neighborhood school within that radius. “The board needs to seriously expand the radius to at least three-quarters of a mile,” Powell says. “That would really help our parents a lot.” But neither Powell nor Vargas believes school choice versus neighborhood schools is a Coke or Pepsi debate. “It’s about quality,” Vargas says. “High-quality schools attract people to neighborhoods. And that’s [what] we’re working on.”


RPO’s future continues from page 3

the rift on the board must be healed and that the board’s executive committee “must achieve unanimity on the course of action going forward.” “It is the responsibility of this Executive Committee,” says the report, “to insure that their consensus translates into a firm commitment from the Board of Directors.” Instead, Pandya said in the interview, the executive committee moved ahead on its own, starting to implement Craviso’s recommendations before even showing the report to the rest of the board. And when he and others objected, Pandya said, they were shouted down and told that they were “out of order.” In subsequent meetings related to the conflict, board leaders’ discussions were weighted against Remmereit, Pandya said. “A long litany of charges were laid out against Arild,” Pandya said, “and none against Charlie. There was not a single incident at any board meeting or the informational sessions where the two were treated as equals.” Board leaders have said that while there was conflict between Owens and Remmereit, Owens worked to remedy it. The conflicts with Remmereit, however, continued, the board leaders say, to that point that some administrative staff resigned. Among many patrons of the RPO’s classical music concerts, the board’s decision has ignited anger. Remmereit and his programming have been extremely popular, and the orchestra has been performing beautifully. His supporters have pushed hard for him, signing petitions, holding a public meeting, writing letters to newspapers, and arguing that the wrong person has been under fire: that Remmereit should be kept and supported, and that CEO Owens should be fired and board chair Betsy Rice should be replaced. There’s little indication that any of that will happen. Remmereit and the RPO are in negotiations over how and when to end their relationship. The RPO has a plan for securing guest-conductor replacements if he doesn’t complete this concert season, says RPO spokesperson Mark Berry, and it’s in the process of planning next year’s season, selecting the music and securing guest conductors. Those guest conductors will include people who could be considered for appointment as the RPO’s next music director, Mark Berry says. This week’s annual meeting, then, could serve as a turning point. But it could also turn out to be such an emotionally charged event that it deepens the very real hostility in the larger RPO community. That

Craviso’s report emphasizes that both Owens and Remmereit are valuable and that the board should make every attempt to resolve the conflict and keep them both.” will not help the orchestra, and it’s the orchestra that all RPO supporters should be thinking about right now. The difference in opinion about the RPO is deep and emotional. And it is sincere. The primary interest of both sides is the Rochester Philharmonic Orchestra; I don’t have any doubt about that. But it may be worth fleshing out some pieces in this story. Immediately after Stuart Low’s September 30 story on the conflict, I started hearing concern from some RPO insiders that the article was one-sided. I tried repeatedly to get a copy of the Craviso report, and was unsuccessful, until last week. I now have a copy and have posted it on our website, rochestercitynewspaper.com. Readers can form their own conclusion, but to me, it bears out much of what board leaders have said, in terms of the genesis of the problem. According to the report, conflicts developed at the outset between Remmereit and other parts of the RPO family – not just between Remmereit and Owens but also between Remmereit and members of Owens’ staff and between Remmereit and board members. And while the report contains criticisms of Owens and of the RPO board, the majority relate to Remmereit. Those problems developed almost at the very beginning. Remmereit, who was appointed in September 2010, didn’t assume his role as music director until the 2011-2012 season. But in his capacity as director-designate, he began working with the RPO during the previous season, planning his first year. Some of that was done long-distance, while he was still in Vienna, but in December 2010, he came to Rochester and visited the RPO offices. And on that visit, according to the report, continues on page 8 rochestercitynewspaper.com

CITY 7


RPO’s future continues from page 7

“there were a series of exchanges between the Maestro and certain members of the administrative staff.” Following that, says the report, “The board concluded that the behaviors exhibited by the Music Director were in conflict with RPO values and unacceptable and placed Maestro Remmereit on notice that such behaviors were inconsistent with RPO values.” In February 2011, the board chair, who was then Suzanne Welch, “requested Maestro Remmereit to agree to a set of principles and guidelines for the future,” says the report. Remmereit the report says, didn’t “acknowledge any inappropriate behavior,” didn’t agree to Welch’s request, and didn’t agree to help build a “more collaborative environment within the administrative staff.” The board was concerned enough then that it discussed the issue and “the potential adverse impact it was having on the ability of the organization to function effectively going forward.” In the end, says the report, “the board reaffirmed the appointment of Maestro Remmereit,” but Remmereit has believed since then that the review showed that the board chair and Owens were trying to get rid of him. Some of Remmereit’s supporters insist that his opponents have exaggerated his aggressive style and that he should be applauded for pushing for excellence at the RPO. And some argue that his style is simply one of artistic temperament, something that often goes with the territory and has been the case with some previous talented music directors. Pandya also suggests that Remmereit’s accent and English skills may have caused staff to misinterpret his behavior. Whether he was too aggressive or not, the Craviso report says that his comments about the competency of some administrative staff members led to four of them resigning, all citing “the vocal critical opinions of the Music Director” as a “significant reason” for leaving. Remmereit’s supporters counter that the turnover on the administrative staff began long before Remmereit’s arrival: that it dates from Owens’ arrival in 2007. Many members of the administrative staff had left before Remmereit was hired, Pandya said in his interview with me, “but when a few people left because of Arild it was made into a huge problem.” The Craviso report’s comments about Remmereit aren’t entirely negative. It notes that while many musicians were concerned at first about Remmereit’s “approach and style,” after working with him for the first season, they had found him “exciting and challenging.” “While his style is direct and in some instances critical,” the report says, “overall the 8 CITY

JANUARY 23-29, 2013

Musicians’ experience has been a positive one; many feel he listens to their feedback and makes adjustments based on the feedback; and that the new repertoire he is bringing to them is a welcome artistic challenge.” And, the report said, “there is no question that he has made a positive impact on musicians, music making, and the Rochester community. He has shaken up the repertoire, been aggressive in promoting the RPO, and is fully engaged with the RPO’s efforts to create new sources of funding. His enthusiasm for the RPO is evident in the way he speaks and in his actions in support of the organization.” “He is,” says the report, “an important asset to the RPO.” But Craviso also adds that as the consultant’s analysis was nearing an end, there was a confrontation between Remmereit and the Orchestra Committee’s chair. That “raises the question,” says the report, of whether Remmereit’s “aggressive and confrontational behavior” was now spreading to his interaction with the musicians. The situation, says the report, should be “monitored.” It would be understandable if Remmereit’s concern about his future caused its own stress. Recently, some musicians have expressed dissatisfaction with Remmereit and have supported the board’s action terminating him. The Orchestra Committee, which represents the musicians, saying that the musicians “stand in support of our Board of Directors and Administrative Staff as we move forward together.” But others obviously still support Remmereit. In the January 10 meeting of his supporters, violinist John Sullivan gave an impassioned plea that Remmereit be kept on. Sullivan said he has been “musically inspired” by Remmereit. “This decision to turn our backs on Arild’s talent and vision,” Sullivan said, “has inflicted a serious wound on the collective psyche of our RPO family that will be very slow to heal – if, in fact, it ever does.” And on Monday, I received a long, detailed letter from RPO cellist Ingrid Bock, expressing strong support for Remmereit and saying that her own opinion and that of other proRemmereit musicians were not considered. The Orchestra Committee’s statement implied that the musicians were united when they are not, Bock says. I also received a strong letter supporting the RPO board’s action from Doug Prosser, the RPO’s principal trumpet. I have posted much of both letters on our website. A key figure in the conflict, certainly, is CEO Charlie Owens, whose resignation many Remmereit supporters are demanding. The

The Eastman Theatre, where the Rochester Philharmonic Orchestra performs most of its classical concerts. FILE PHOTO

report says that some board members believe that Owens “does not possess the skills and leadership qualities required of the institution given its current challenges.” It says that some musicians felt Owens was “too detached from them and their work and does not demonstrate an appreciation or knowledge of their contributions or the problems they may be having.” And, it says, some musicians say Owens hasn’t been visible “at rehearsals or after performances.” But the report also includes some complimentary statements about him. Owens became the RPO’s CEO “at a challenging time,” says the report, with the RPO (like many arts organizations) under financial stress because of the national economy. Under Owens leadership,” the report says, the RPO “has met those challenges better than most other orchestras in like circumstances.” In a survey of RPO employees, his staff had positive opinions about him, the report says. Craviso’s report emphasizes that both Owens and Remmereit are valuable and that replacing either of them would be difficult, and it says the board should make every attempt to resolve the conflict and keep them both. But it also says that the board should have timelines and benchmarks, and that by the end of 2012, the board should “reassess the situation” and make any decision “it determines is appropriate.” Craviso’s report is dated May 14, 2012. Since then, the conflict on the board and among RPO supporters has continued, as has

Differences of opinion are essential. But everybody will have to move past the current rancor and figure out how to get along.” the push to keep Remmereit in Rochester. At this point, that seems unlikely. But the dissidents’ other focus is replacing Owens and the members of the RPO board. Leaders of the dissidents are urging supporters to show up at Wednesday’s annual meeting, where about a third of the RPO’s board members will be elected. The RPO board is presenting a slate of eight nominees, six of whom are currently on the board. Under the RPO’s bylaws, the deadline for presenting an opposition slate was October 21, but the dissidents say they believe the bylaws provide for an alternate slate in some circumstances. Remmereit’s termination after the nomination deadline, they say, is grounds for a contested election. And they say that if they are not permitted to offer their slate for a vote, they’ll pursue legal action.


The organization and its orchestra are now

entering a significant period – one that may give everyone involved time to reassess and move forward. One thing is clear: the board majority that voted to terminate Remmereit will continue to be the majority. Even if dissidents are able to elect a full slate this week, they’ll be in the minority. They may very well still be in the minority, in fact, when the board chooses Remmereit’s successor, assuming that the board will want to make its selection within the next 12 to 18 months. But even as a minority, the dissidents will have an important voice, privately and publicly. Their concerns, and their deep support for the orchestra, could make them valuable board members. And in any organization, differences of opinion are not only positive, they are essential. But everybody will have to move past the current rancor and figure out how to get along. Despite this season’s turmoil, the next year and a half could be an exciting one for audiences. Some of the guest conductors we see may very well be prospective candidates for the music director’s position. So unless lawsuits start surfacing, prolonging the conflict, this next period has the potential to be a positive one. But a lot of things will have go to right. For one thing, the board must recommit to the new musical path that they started down when they hired Remmereit. And they must do that not only in words but in deed. The dissidents charge that board leaders don’t like Remmereit’s innovative programing. As board leaders look for a new music director, they must bring in candidates who embrace a new direction and have a record of innovation with other orchestras. The board must seek candidates with some experience as a music director. This position – which Remmereit had never held – involves more than leading an orchestra and selecting programs. It is a management position, requiring specific skills and temperament. And in American orchestras, it is a position that is responsible to a board of directors. Music directors must work with the board and with their orchestra’s administrative leaders – who have increasingly difficult financial demands. It is not a position that permits unilateral decisions. Second, all board members must conduct themselves appropriately. While three Remmereit supporters have resigned from the board, several others remain. Some of the former board members say they were treated disrespectfully, to put it mildly. That doesn’t serve anyone, least of all the orchestra. And bitter infighting on the board will hurt the

RPO Music Director Arild Remmereit: The board’s termination of his contract has caused dissension among patrons and musicians. FILE PHOTO

RPO’s ability to hire a talented, innovative music director who is willing to take risks. The RPO musicians have their own burden: rising above the tension, overcoming the division within their own ranks, and reminding concert-goers that as important as a music director is, they are the heart of the RPO and they can produce beautiful music under a variety of conductors. The musicians have recently signed a new contract, agreeing once again to pay cuts. That’s both an emotional and a financial investment in the RPO. And it’s an expression of their own interest in the orchestra and their faith in its future in this community. That needs to be foremost in the minds of board members and concert-goers on both sides of this conflict. Some Remmereit supporters have urged concert-goers to withhold their financial support and stop going to the concerts, even if they’ve already bought tickets. I’m not sure who that would hurt other than the musicians. The RPO board certainly knows the depth of unhappiness over this conflict. Seems to me that everyone interested in a healthy RPO future would be doing everything possible now to support the musicians – and to insure that the orchestra is able to hire the best new music director it can find. You can read the full Craviso Report and the letters by musicians Ingrid Bock and Douglas Prosser, and link to a video of the Remmereit supporters’ January 10 meeting – which includes statements by former board members Kishan Pandya and Gwen Sterns and RPO violinist John Sullivan – on our website, rochestercitynewspaper.com. rochestercitynewspaper.com

CITY 9


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URBAN ACTION This week’s calls to action include the following events and activities. (All are free and open to the public, unless otherwise noted.)

Holocaust survivor on film

The Lifetree Café will host a showing of “On Schindler’s List,” the true story of Leon Leyson, who was 13 years old when he was taken to work in a factory in Poland. The story of Oscar Schindler’s youngest holocaust survivor will be shown at 7 p.m. on Monday, January 28, at 1301 Vintage Lane in Greece.

Beyond the blue box

ColorBrightonGreen.org will present “Recycling Beyond the Blue Box: TerraCycle and the Monroe County Ecopark,” at 6:30 p.m. on Wednesday, January 23. Cheryl Bertou will explain how her son partnered with TerraCycle to reduce waste by recycling previously non-recyclable or hard-to-recycle waste and raised funds 10 CITY JANUARY 23-29, 2013

to build a school in South Sudan. The event is at Brighton Memorial Library, 2300 Elmwood Avenue.

Talk on Wall\Therapy

The Friends & Foundation of the Rochester Public Library will present “Wall\ Therapy in Rochester: the Visual Intervention of Public Art,” a talk by Ian Wilson, URMC assistant professor, at 12:15 p.m. on Tuesday, January 29. Wilson, who is curator of Wall\Therapy, will talk about how the project commissions artists to create large-scale murals to inspire and help rehabilitate communities. The event is in the Central Library’s Kate Gleason Auditorium, 115 South Avenue.

MCC talks about Kodak site

Monroe Community College will hold two public meetings to provide information about the college’s vision for a new downtown campus at

the Kodak headquarters on State Street, which MCC is in the process of acquiring. The meetings are at 6 p.m. on Thursday, January 24, and at 9 a.m. on Saturday, January 26. The meetings are at MCC’s Damon City Campus, 228 East Main Street. Registration is encouraged: collcommrelations@monroecc.edu.

Free physicals

The University of Rochester Medical Center will offer free physicals to people of all ages on Thursday, January 31, and Thursday, February 7. Children under 16 must be accompanied by a parent or guardian, and students ages 17 and 18 must bring a signed RCSD Physical Examination Parent Consent Form available online at www. rcsdk12.org/page/840. The physicals will be held at the School of Medicine and Dentistry, 415 Elmwood Avenue, starting at 6 p.m. Arriving early is advised. Doors open at 4:30 p.m. Information: 275-7203.


Dining blast of garlic and mustard. The bowl of corn chowder — again I wasn’t aware that I ordered it, but it was a good choice — was full of corn and bits of chicken suspended in a broth that was probably 9/10 cream. It made a nice dip for the tiny bits of crust that were all that remained of my sandwich after a few minutes of ravenous gnawing. Porteus’ take on a Reuben was similarly good, if not at all traditional. Corned beef and sauerkraut are key players, and there’s Swiss cheese, but the bread is a thinly sliced Italian rather than rye, and it’s pressed like a panini rather than grilled. The results are tasty, even superb — an illustration that sometimes you can play fast and loose with a recipe and have things come out OK. The same was not entirely true of the

Baked wings (pictured left) and a pork-loin sandwich (pictured right) at Baked and Carved, located inside Salinger’s on East Ave. PHOTOS BY MARK CHAMBERLIN

Out of your hands Baked and Carved INSIDE SALINGER’S, 107 EAST AVE. 454-7103, BAKEDANDCARVED.COM OPENS MONDAY-FRIDAY AT 11 A.M., SATURDAY AT 5 P.M. [ REVIEW ] BY JAMES LEACH

There are few things better than a really good sandwich. Haute cuisine and molecular gastronomy are all well and good, and sushi and ceviche surely have their proper place and time. But on a cold day in January, there are few things more satisfying to the soul than a well-composed sandwich and a bowl of steaming soup. That said, our town doesn’t enjoy an overabundance of great sandwich shops, and the good ones that have opened have tended not to last or, sadly, to fail of their initial promise. Two places in close proximity to the Federal Building on State Street succumbed last year. Others have come and gone. And through it all a tiny sandwich shop tucked into the back of an East Avenue bar has slowly gained a following among those in search of a fast, hearty lunch. Originally opened by the owner of the late O’Bagelo’s and Jim Panzerella, owner

of Salinger’s, Baked and Carved is a bit more than two years old and seems to be positioning itself for a long run in its slightly covert location. The only sign that there’s a restaurant hidden inside Salinger’s is a hand-lettered chalkboard outside the door, and on two of my three visits it was mostly hidden by a snow bank. Find your way into the restaurant, though, and you are in for a real treat. As your eyes adjust to the dimness inside (it is a bar, after all) your nostrils will flare, catching the aroma of roasting meat — some days it’s turkey, some pork loin, even roast beef. If you weren’t particularly hungry before you came in, you will be by the time you reach the counter and have to actually order rather than simply staring about hungrily sniffing the air. The menu at Baked and Carved is evolving under the supervision of the restaurant’s new manager, Jessica Porteus. She’s making what she described as “small changes” with a view toward making her “small place grow big.” Chief among those is her insistence that everything should be homemade. She makes her own breads, roasts her own meats, and concocts her various soups from scratch. She even rolls out dough and makes a pretty

good pizza that she sells by the slice to the bar crowd. The folks who drop in for lunch are looking for sandwiches for the most part, though, and while the menu is concise, it’s not skimpy, offering something for even the pickiest of eaters. I usually try to stick to the published menu at restaurants, thinking that it’s unfair to review something that my readers won’t be able to try for themselves. At Baked and Carved I abandoned the practice, in part because the specials menu is a testing ground for Porteus’ newest ideas, like the inspired combination of thinly sliced roast pork, provolone, roasted red peppers, and spinach slathered with a garlicky mayonnaise on Sicilian bread that I had on my first visit. I don’t even recall ordering the sandwich, and chances are good that I didn’t have much input into the process: Porteus is not shy about telling her customers what they want. For those who find decisions difficult she will gladly take matters into her own hands. That’s how I came to have that pork sandwich, and I’m glad that it worked out that way. The meat was tender, juicy, and nicely porky, the sauce added just the right

Baked and Carved interpretation of a Cuban sandwich. Traditionally made with roast pork, ham, cheese, and pickles, Porteus’ version substitutes a very saucy (and, it must be said, quite good) barbecued pulled pork for sliced pork roast. That sounds great until the sandwich is squashed under the panini press, forcing the sauce into the bread and causing it to leak out the sides, caramelizing and sometimes burning. The sandwich tastes great, but it’s an ungodly mess to eat, and the ham and cheese both get lost in the barbecue sauce. (I asked Porteus about the sandwich, and like so many things at Baked and Carved, she told me she’s working on refining the recipe to keep her own stamp on it but bring it closer to tradition.) For those looking for more pub-ish food, Baked and Carved also offers wings and burgers, the former better than the latter. Porteus doesn’t have a fryer, so her wings are slow roasted, concentrating their flavors and absorbing sauce rather than just being tossed in it at the end of the process. Meaty, spicy, and a bit addictive, I found myself wishing the bar opened earlier so that I could have a beer with them. The burger was less exciting. Good meat cooked to a nice medium rare, topped with judicious quantities of bacon and cheddar cheese as well as a fried egg and a dash of hot sauce, it had the potential for greatness, but it was entirely lost inside a bun that would satisfy your USDA grain requirement for a week — a problem endemic to our area, and one that marred an otherwise promising burger. Porteus assured me that she’s working on that, too, and I have every confidence that it will be even better next time.

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 11


Upcoming 2013 XEROX ROCHESTER INTERNATIONAL JAZZ FEST HEADLINERS: Friday, June 21: An Evening with Pink Martini ($55-$105) Saturday, June 22: An Evening with Willie Nelson & Family ($70-$105) Tuesday, June 25: David Byrne & St. Vincent ($70-$105) Wednesday, June 26: Breakfast in America w/Roger Hodgson of Supertramp ($70-$125) Thursday, June 27: Bob James & David Sanborn w/Steve Gadd ($40-$85) All shows will take place at 8 p.m. in Kodak Hall at Eastman Theatre. Tickets go on sale Friday January 25, at 10 a.m., through rochesterjazz.com.

Music

Grace Kelly Quintet

SATURDAY, JANUARY 26 HOCHSTEIN SCHOOL OF MUSIC, 50 N. PLYMOUTH AVE. 8 P.M. | $25-$42 | EXODUSTOJAZZ.COM [ JAZZ ] With her prodigious skills on alto and soprano saxophone, a then-teenaged Grace Kelly wowed audiences at both the 2010 and 2011 Xerox Rochester International Jazz festivals. When she wasn’t unleashing sax solos, she turned heads with her breezy vocal style. Now 20, Kelly — who has shared the stage with Lee Konitz and Phil Woods — has moved to a new phase in her career. On her most recent album, “Live At Scullers,” she has emerged a capable singer/songwriter who can supply her own urgent solos. Embracing everything from blues to fusion to funk, she still gets down with original instrumental arrangements of tunes like “Summertime.” — BY RON NETSKY

Bethesda SATURDAY, JANUARY 26 ABILENE BAR AND LOUNGE, 153 LIBERTY POLE WAY 8:30 P.M. | $5-$8 | ABILENEBARANDLOUNGE.COM [ AMERICANA ] Bethesda is a six-piece blend of

atmosphere and bittersweet Americana heartache. Even the Akron, Ohio, band’s frivolity is no match for its soaring, epic refrain. Though secular in practice, Bethesda curries belief in its listeners and restores faith in the hardest of hearts. The band is classic American roots with a nod to all of its sepia-toned prequels. Its music is all over television and the band is all over the map, having played at Bonnaroo and SXSW this past year. A new album is on the way in 2013. Pallavi also performs. — BY FRANK DE BLASE

Attention Rochester theater community: Send us your nominations for the

2013 Rochester Theater

HALL OF FAME 12 CITY JANUARY 23-29, 2013

City Newspaper is getting ready to induct new members into the Rochester Theater Hall of Fame, and we need your nominations. We want you to tell us who you think is the best of the best in the local theater world. We want to hear about actors, directors, musicians, stage managers, set designers, costume designers, producers, and other prominent members of the Rochester theater scene. A panel of judges will select inductees based on their innovation, dedication, passion, quality of their work and their lasting contribution to local theater.

A panel of judges will select Inductees based on the following criteria: INNOVATION DEDICATION PASSION QUALITY OF WORK LASTING CONTRIBUTION TO LOCAL THEATER Inductees will be announced at the 2013 TheatreROCS Showcase, scheduled for Saturday, April 13, at the JCC’s Hart Theater.


WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 23 [ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ] Daniel Bachman & Ian McColm. The Bop Shop, 1460 Monroe Ave. 2713354. 8 p.m. $10. John McConnell. Dinosaur Bar-B-Que, 99 Court St. 9 p.m. Free. Ommie Wise. Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. 8:30 p.m. $5-$8. Ronnie Lickers played Sunday, January 20, at Pineapple Jack’s. PHOTO BY FRANK DE BLASE

Reel Big Fish TUESDAY, JANUARY 29 WATER STREET MUSIC HALL, 204 N. WATER ST. 8 P.M. | $20-$24 | WATERSTREETMUSIC.COM [ SKA ] Ska is supposed to be about happy-sunny times, but Reel Big Fish decided to take a different track in its most recent album, “Candy Coated Fury.” It’s supposed to be funny, but even the band admits that it’s some spiteful stuff. It’s still insanely danceable, and I have no doubt “Everyone Else Is an A**hole” is going to be in the background of like every commercial ever soon enough. However, I found the disc a bit jarring. There is certain to be a mix of the old tunes as well as the new at this show. If you like to get your ska on there is no doubt this is where you need to be, pretending it’s not always cloudy in Rochester. — BY SUZAN PERO

RPO: Mozart and More THURSDAY, JANUARY 24 & SATURDAY, JANUARY 26 KODAK HALL AT EASTMAN THEATER, GIBBS STREET. THU 7:30 P.M., SAT 8 P.M. | $15-$82 | RPO.ORG [ CLASSICAL ] Wolfgang is in the house this weekend,

as guest conductor Yoav Talmi comes in to lead the RPO through a Mozart-inspired selection of works. Jennifer Higdon’s “Machine” leads off the program, just before Beethoven’s “Symphony No. 1.” RPO Principal Trombonist Mark Kellogg will be taking the lead on Larsson’s Concertino for Trombone, all leading up to Mozart’s “Symphony No. 40.” The program will fill Kodak Hall on Thursday and Saturday nights, and will stop at the Smith Opera House in Geneva as well on Friday, January 25. — BY WILLIE CLARK

T-Bone twang [ REVIEW ] BY FRANK DE BLASE

It was Lincoln, Nebraska, sometime in the mid-90’s, sometime in the mid-fall, when I ran into Replacements guitarist Slim Dunlap. We had both played shows in the city that night and wound up at the same dank motel (where I’m certain every room at one time or another was a crime scene). Me and my band mates sat and listened in awe as he spoke of rock ’n’ roll vampires, van fires, throwing up on the ceiling, throwing down, and other assorted sordid tales. It was here that he also imparted wisdom on our young, optimistic, impressionable minds. One nugget in particular: when you’re the support act on the bill, never, ever blow away the headliner. I didn’t agree at all — and neither did John Kingla as he warmed up for Americana warbler Ana Egge at Abilene Thursday, January 17. Kingla’s set was velvety soft and captivating as he built gorgeous melodies atop stark and strident strums of his Tennessee flat-top box. The place was cemetery silent as opposed to the volume war some shows get caught in as both the band and the crowd wrestle for aural dominance. Kingla joined Egge on stage and added

submissions Submissions should be 400-500 words in an essay format. In the essay, please describe why your nominee deserves this award, citing specific examples of the person's work and how they meet the criteria above. You may nominate yourself, or another member of the local theater community.

EMAIL Nominations TO:

Send nominations to:

e-mail to eric@rochester-citynews.com with the subject line “Rochester Theater Hall of Fame.”

Rochester Theater Hall of Fame c/o City Newspaper 250 N Goodman St. Rochester, NY 14607

some cool atmospheric guitar full of out-of-phase T-Bone twang and a rich and righteous tremolo. Ordinarily it’d be a safe bet that I’d go for the beautiful blonde with the nice getaway sticks, but Egge came off a little hollow and plain next to Kingla’s cool. It was Genesee Johnny’s debut Friday night at Lovin’ Cup as the man picked and sang around country and blues staples in Delta blues shoes. Touching upon Howlin’ Wolf, Muddy Waters, and Chuck Berry, Johnny kept it lean and mean with his assorted guitars and the throb of an amplified box he kicked at his feet. He was accompanied by an electric bassist who had apparently never heard these songs before, but whose ambitious attempts to stay on the road were raw and admirable. I know it ain’t easy, baby. Pineapple Jack’s held a heavy-sided tribute to the Webster firefighters on Sunday. Brock Thrasher and crew threw a splendid event full of bands like Push, Minds Open Wide, and The JJ Lang Band. The highlight for me was BML’s Ronnie Lickers joining Minds Open Wide for some added progressive metal muscle behind the drums. Bam!

[ DJ/ELECTRONIC ] DJ Adam. Nashvilles, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. 334-3030. Call for info. Call for info. Teen Set 45 Party. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. Midnight. Free. Y Not Wednesday w/DJ ET. Plush, 151 St. Paul St. 2325650. Call for info. Call for info. [ JAZZ ] Jim Nelson. Lemoncello, 137 West Commercial St. 3858565. 7:30 p.m. Free. Mark Bader. Prosecco Italian Restaurant, 1550 New York 332. 924-8000. 6 p.m. Call for info. Phatkatz Duo. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. 6625555. 6 p.m. Free. Stringplicity. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 7:30 p.m. Free. Vince Ercolamento& Joe Chiappone Jazz Quartet. Murph’s Irondequoit Pub, 705 Titus Ave. 342-6780. 8 p.m. Free. [ KARAOKE ] Italian American Karaoke. Italian American Community Center, 150 Frank Dimino Way. 5948882. 7:30 p.m. Free. Karaoke at Mayfield’s Pub. Mayfield’s Pub, 669 N Winton Rd. 288-7199. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke at Sanibel Cottage. Sanibel Cottage, 1517 Empire Blvd. 671-9340. 6 p.m. Free. continues on page 15

Submissions are due by Friday, February 15. Questions or concerns? can be addressed to eric@rochester-citynews.com OR VISIT www.rochestercitynewspaper.com

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rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 13


Music were going to play live, people get interested and moving to upbeat music. So I just forced myself to write that way. That was probably the hardest thing for me. Acker: It’s not super fast, it’s just up-tempo. It’s nice when people are there but it’s a whole different experience when people are going nuts, dancing and stuff.

CITY

What are some of the obstacles you’ve encountered?

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Yang: Alex had never written for violin before. He wasn’t really familiar with what the instrument was capable of, how many notes can be played at once, what different sounds can be produced.

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Yang: It made it interesting. It kind of helped with the transition of strictly reading notes and trying to make things up. I would get a feel for what he wanted. Local rock band Right Turn Racer includes an RPO violinist in its ranks. “There are more ways to attack a violin with a bow than there are to attack a guitar with a pick,” says one of the band’s songwriters. PHOTO PROVIDED

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Jeff Acker: Alex put an ad up on Craigslist.

Yang: The more that we go on, the more pedals I seem to accumulate. Actually, you can make a number of cool sounds without pedals. Hillis: I’ve learned there are more ways to attack a violin with a bow than there are to attack a guitar with a pick. There are a million more things to do to make the rhythms and textures more complex with the violin.

What was the gist of your ad?

Have you achieved what you set out to do?

Taking a right Right Turn Racer

Bar & Lounge

[ INTERVIEW ] BY FRANK DE BLASE

There are enough things working against a young band just starting out — lack of a unified direction, lack of an audience, lack of the filthy lucre promised at the end of the day, and a general aversion to facing reality. So you’d wonder why a band like Right Turn Racer would throw a suicide curve ball like, say, plugging in a violin and throwing into the line-up. Right Turn Racer — Alex Hillis, guitar and lead vocals; Perrin Yang (who also plays fourth chair in the first violin section for the Rochester Philharmonic Orchestra), electric violin; Jeff Acker, backing vocals and tambourine; Doug Cairns, bass; Ben Fried, drums; and Carly Plain, keyboards — plays to the fun side of odd. So it’s more indie than pop, though those from either camp can dig the band. The music is lighthearted and affable, and its non-stock elements — namely the violin and the music that ably surrounds it — contribute to its seriousness and also its frivolity. The band is currently in Redbooth Recording Studios with producer Brian Moore to bang out a five-song CD due to land in late April. Most of the band took a right turn and

Is the violin simply amplified or have you incorporated effects?

stopped by to discuss it all — as it stands so far — with City. An edited transcript of the conversation follows. CITY: What was the first right turn?

Alex Hillis: I wanted to start a band that had something a little different to offer the music scene. Specifically…

Hillis: I was looking for a violinist. To push you in different direction?

Hillis: Yeah, definitely. I love the violin. I intended it as an exploratory thing. It has definitely evolved the way we all play music. Because it’s not a typical rock instrument, did Perrin have to step it up or dumb it down?

Perrin Yang: I feel like I have definitely evolved, because it’s a totally different skill set. Little by little I’ve been able to get rid of the dots. So it’s been liberating?

Yang: Eventually it was freeing, but it’s still a different skill set I haven’t totally mastered. Your music isn’t typical, but it’s not some dissonant alien strain either.

Hillis: It’s definitely not weird. It’s catchy. I grew up listening to grunge, so I was always inclined to write slower songs. And I realized that if we

Hillis: Definitely. Every time we put a song together there’s this extreme level of excitement. Sometimes we’ll write a song and it’ll take a day, and then sometimes it’ll take three years to write a song. But in those times I write a song in a day usually I’m like, “Damn, you nailed it.” Do you ever butt heads creatively?

Hillis: There’s conflict but only he good kind of conflict. I am the worst stickler in the studio. But once you play live, you let all that go and hope that it’s muscle memory and you entertain yourself and the people. What do Yang’s orchestra mates in the RPO think of his involvement in a rock band?

Yang: They think it’s pretty cool that I’m doing something. Hillis: They’re jealous Acker: I’m waiting for the day he jumps out of his chair and starts playing one of our solos. Hillis: We’d like to do a RPO/Right Turn Racer show. We’ll write out all the music and the RPO can back us up on stage.


WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 23

Karaoke by Dan & Sherri. Barnard Restaurant & Party House, 360 Maiden Ln. 585663-1250. 8 p.m. Free. Karaoke w/Cyd Scarlett!. Norton’s Pub, 1730 Goodman Street North. 266-3570. 10 p.m. Karaoke w/Krazy George. Scotland Yard Pub, 187 Saint Paul St. 730-5030. 10 p.m. Call for info. Karaoke w/Summer Bob. Shorts Bar & Grill, 35 N. Main St. 3880136. 10 p.m. Free.

Karaoke at California Brew Haus. California Brew Haus, 402 Ridge Rd. West. 6211480. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke w/Cyd Scarlett. Jose & Willy’s, 20 Lakeshore Drive. 905-0222. 8:30 p.m. Karaoke w/Mark. Flipside Bar & Grill, 2001 E Main St. 2883930. 9 p.m. Free. [ OPEN MIC ] Open Acoustic Mic Night w/ Mandy. Shorts Bar & Grill, 35 N. Main St. 388-0136. 9 p.m. Free. Open Mic at Jeffrey’s. Jeffrey’s, 3115 E. Henrietta Rd. 4864937. 7 p.m. Call for info. Open Mic Jam Boulder Alexander St.. Boulder Coffee Co. - Alexander St., 100 Alexander St. 454-7140. 8 p.m. Open Mic w/Steve West. Muddy Waters Coffee House-Geneseo, 53 Main St. 243-9111. 7 p.m. Free. [ POP/ROCK ] Gringo Star w/Fowls, The Branch Davidians. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. $7-$9. Walk the Moon w/Pacific Air. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N. Water Street. 325-5600. 8 p.m. $18-$20.

THURSDAY, JANUARY 24 [ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ] Dad Brothers w/Karin’s Pride. McGraw’s Irish Pub, 146 W Commercial St. 348-9091. 7 p.m. Free. Jim Lane. Murph’s Irondequoit Pub, 705 Titus Ave. 342-6780. 8 p.m. Free. Pat Kane. McGraw’s Irish Pub, 146 W Commercial St. 3489091. 7 p.m. Free. Salsa Night presented by Essence of Rhythm. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. 9 p.m. $3-$5. [ BLUES ] John Payton Project. Dinosaur Bar-B-Que, 99 Court St. 9 p.m. Free. [ CLASSICAL ] Eastman at Washington Square Lunchtime Concerts. 1st Universalist Church, 150 S. Clinton Ave. 274-1400. 12:15 p.m. Free. Music for All. Kilbourn Hall, 26 Gibbs St. 3:30 p.m. Free. RPO: Mozart and More. Kodak Hall at Eastman Theater, 60 Gibbs St. Thursday: 7:30 p.m. Saturday: 8 p.m. Yoav Talmi, guest conductor. Mark Kellogg, trombone. $15-$82. [ DJ/ELECTRONIC ] 18+ Thursdays. ONE Nightclub and Lounge, 1 Ryan Alley. 5461010. 10 p.m. Free before 11, $3-$10 after.

[ R&B ] Anonymous Willpower. Acanthus Café, 337 East Ave. 585-319-5999. 10:30 p.m. Free.

ROCK | NIMROD WILDFIRE

ALTERNATIVE | THE USED, WE CAME AS ROMANS

With a name sounding a lot like a “Dick Tracy” character, Nimrod Wildfire is actually the current music outing of ex- Blue Avengers co-founder Bob Miller. With a bit of a British folk/rock feel, Nimrod Wilfire is a guitar-centric, thought-provoking, socially relevant project wrapped in deceptive simplicity. You’ll dig it.

The Used is marketed toward the Hot Topic set that isn’t quite all the way into such harsh things as My Chemical Romance. The Used is best taken with a line of pixie stick to mend that broken heart and a heavy ring of guy-liner. And yes, even the band has added some dub to the mix with its most recent album. The band is vaguely anthemic, as is the opening band, We Came As Romans. As is true of most rock post nu-metal, there will be plenty of screaming, highly attractive young men, and skillfully tapped-out guitar all night. Charming.

Nimrod Wildfire plays Friday, January 25, 9 p.m. at Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point. $3-$5. lovincup.com. — BY FRANK DE BLASE DJ Matt. Nashvilles, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. 334-3030. Call for info. Call for info. DJ Sal DeSantis. Center Cafe, 150 Frank Dimino Way. 5948882. 7 p.m. Call for info. Karaoke at Panorama. Panorama Night Club & Sports Bar, 730 Elmgrove Rd. 2472190. 9 p.m. Free. Revolution Thursdays. Grotto, 7 Lawrence St. 739-5377. Call for info. Thursday Night Shakedown.. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 11 p.m. Free. Tiki Thursdays: Shotgun Music DJ. McGhan’s Pub, 11 W. Main St. 924-3660. 7:30 p.m. Free. Tilt-a-Whirl Drag Show.. Tilt Nightclub & Ultralounge, 444 Central Ave. 232-8440. 11:15 pm & 12:30 am. $3. [ JAZZ ] Dave Chrisholm Trio. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. 662-5555. 6 p.m. Free. Dave Rivello Ensemble. Village Rock Cafe, 213 Main St. 5861640. 9 p.m. Free. Deborah Branch. Lemoncello, 137 West Commercial St. 3858565. 6 p.m. Free. Eastman Jazz. Acanthus Café, 337 East Ave. 585-319-5999. Call for info. Fred Vine. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 7:30 p.m. Free. Mike Pappert. Prosecco Italian Restaurant, 1550 New York 332. 924-8000. 6 p.m. Call for info. Ted Nicolosi and Shared Genes. Roncones Italian Restaurant, 232 Lyell Ave. 458-3090. 6 p.m. Free. [ REGGAE/JAM ] Reggae Thursday. Pure Night Club, 117 Liberty Pole Way.

454-7230. 10 p.m. $5 before 11 pm. [ POP/ROCK ] Athletics & Gates. Boulder Coffee Co. - Alexander St., 100 Alexander St. 454-7140. 8 p.m. Free. Five Alarm Open Jam. Firehouse Saloon, 814 South Clinton. 319-3832. 9 p.m. Call for info. Haewa. Sticky Lips BBQ Juke Joint, 830 Jefferson Rd. 2925544. 8 p.m. $5. The Inner Planets w/Jam Level 3, Shu Lace. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 8:30 p.m. $5-$7. The Sound Awake. Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. 9:30 p.m. $5-$8.

FRIDAY, JANUARY 25 [ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ] Boots n’ Shorts w/Bloom Carter. Sticky Lips BBQ Juke Joint, 830 Jefferson Rd. 292-5544. 8:30 p.m. Call for info. Collin Jones Music. Shamrock Jack’s, 4554 Culver Rd. 4029802. 9 p.m. Call for info. Frankie & Jewwels. Pineapple Jack’s, 485 Spencerport Rd. 2475225. 9:30 p.m. Call for info. Jim Lane. 58 Main, 58 N. Main St. 585-637-2383. 8 p.m. Free. Ralph Louis. Rochester Plaza Hotel, 70 State St. 546-3450. 6 p.m. Free. Walt O’Brien. The Bistro at Towpath Cafe, 6 North Main St. 585 377-0410. 7 p.m. Free. [ CLASSICAL ] Community Organ Concert. Immanuel Evangelical Lutheran Church, 131 W. Main St. 8725180. 7 p.m. Free, donations accepted.

The concert takes place Saturday, January 26, 6 p.m. at Water Street Music Hall, 204 N. Water St. $27.50$30.16 + w/ID, 13+ w/ guardian. waterstreetmusic.com. — BY SUZAN PERO [ COUNTRY ] The Beadle Brothers. Nashvilles, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. 3343030. 9 p.m. Call for info. [ DJ/ELECTRONIC ] Bang Fridays. ONE Nightclub and Lounge, 1 Ryan Alley. 5461010. Call for info. Call for info. Chill Out Fridays Happy Hour. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. 5:30 p.m. Free. DJ Bac Spin. Plush, 151 St. Paul St. 232-5650. 8 p.m. Call for info. DJ Blake. 140 Alex Bar & Grill, 140 Alexander St. 585-2561000. 10 p.m. Call for info. DJ Cedric. Vertex Nightclub, 169 North Chestnut St. 2325498. 10 p.m. $3-$8. DJ Energon. Vertex Nightclub, 169 North Chestnut St. 2325498. 10 p.m. $3-$8. Fresh Meat Fridays w/Samantha Vega, DJ Mighty Mic. Tilt Nightclub & Ultralounge, 444 Central Ave. 232-8440. 11:15 p.m. & 12:30 a.m. $4-$12. Latino Heat Fridays. Heat Nightclub, 336 East Ave. 8990620. 10 p.m. Call for info. Lube After Dark.. Quaker Steak & Lube, 2205 Buffalo Rd. 6979464. 9:30 p.m. Free. Reggaeton w/DJ Carlos. La Copa Ultra Lounge, 235 W. Ridge Rd. 254-1050. 10 p.m. Free. Sexy Fridays w/DJ Wizz. Pure Night Club, 117 Liberty Pole Way. 454-7230. 10 p.m. Call for info. [ JAZZ ] Amanda Ashley. Glengarry Inn at Eagle Vale, 4400 Nine Mile

Point Road, Rt 250. 5983820. 7 p.m. Call for info. Bobby DiBaudo Trio. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. 662-5555. 6 p.m. Free. Chris Wilson. Lemoncello, 137 West Commercial St. 3858565. 7 p.m. Free. Evyn & Brian Duo. Prosecco Italian Restaurant, 1550 New York 332. 924-8000. 7 p.m. Call for info. Fred Costello & Roger Eckers Jazz Duo. Charley Brown’s, 1675 Penfield Rd. 385-9202. 7:30 p.m. Free. Last Friday Jazz Heritage Series w/Dr. Carl Atkins and Culture Clash. Baobab Cultural Center, 728 University Ave. 7 p.m. $10. Marco Amadio. Pane Vino Ristorante, 175 N. Water St. 232-6090. 6:30 p.m. Free. Sofrito. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 8:30 p.m. Free. Ted Nicolosi and Shared Genes. Prime Steakhouse, 42 E Main St. 265-4777. 7 p.m. Free. The Westview Project. The Mendon House, 1369 Pittsford-Mendon Road. 585624-7370. 6 p.m. Free. [ KARAOKE ] Karaoke at Pineapple Jack’s. Pineapple Jack’s, 485 Spencerport Rd. 247-5225. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke w/Cody. Nashvilles, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. 3343030. 5 p.m. Free. Karaoke at Flaherty’s Webster. Flaherty’s Webster, 1200 Bay Rd. 671-0816. 9 p.m. Call for info.

[ REGGAE/JAM ] Benefit for Chris Mouldz ft.Project Weather Machine, The Tim Herron Corporation, The Buddhahood. Montage Music Hall, 50 Chestnut St. 2321520. 8 p.m. Call for info. Family Funktion and the Sitar Jams w/The Pat Maloney Syndrome. Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. 6 p.m. $5-$8. [ POP/ROCK ] Beyond Solomon and Saturn. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N. Water Street. 325-5600. 6:30 p.m. $10-$12 Water Street Music Hall, 204 N. Water St. 585-325-5600. 6:30 p.m. $10-$12. The DeVills, The Results, and Stygian. Monty’s Krown, 875 Monroe Ave. 271-7050. 9 p.m. 21+. $3. Happy Hour: Dan Ripley, Mike Brown. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 6 p.m. 21+. Free. Mike Schuler & Bradley Scheffield. SPoT Coffee, 200 East Ave. 585-613-4600. 7 p.m. Free. MoChester w/ Moon Zombies. A-Pub Live, 6 Lawrence St. 9:30 p.m. $5. Neptune’s Car. Boulder Coffee Co. – Park Ave., 739 Park Ave. 697-0235. 8 p.m. Free. Nimrod Wildfire. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. 9 p.m. $3-$5. Oceans of Insects, Ghostfeeder, Intrinsic, and Comedown. Tala Vera, 155 State St. 546-3845. 8 p.m. $5-$7. Right Turn Racer w/Last Minute, 6 String Roulette, The Reactions. Firehouse Saloon, 814 South Clinton. 319-3832. 8 p.m. $4. Smooth Talkers w/ Sinzibukwud. Johnny’s Irish Pub, 1382 Culver Rd. 2240990. 5 p.m. Free. continues on page 17

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 15


Classical Musical marathon “Project Ludwig” SUNDAY, JANUARY 27, 3 P.M. NAZARETH COLLEGE ARTS CENTER, 4245 EAST AVE. 3 P.M. | FREE | 389-2170, ARTSCENTER.NAZ.EDU [ PREVIEW ] BY PALOMA CAPANNA

Pianist Elinor Freer is candid about what draws her to Beethoven. “I find him to be one of the most difficult composers to perform,” she says. “I find it a real challenge. That’s one of the things that I’m drawn to — it’s exhausting to practice and perform.” Freer, piano, and Mimi Hwang, cello, will perform the five Beethoven sonatas for piano and cello in two recitals at Nazareth College, the first half of the two-part concert series taking place on Sunday, January 27, and the second concert being on Friday, March 22. “Project Ludwig: the Piano and Cello Sonatas of Beethoven” is a two-part program featuring the five sonatas for the instruments by Ludwig van Beethoven. Beethoven, a German composer who lived from 1770 to 1827, wrote extensively for solo piano, including 32 piano sonatas. Only five duo sonatas were written by Beethoven for piano and cello. According to Freer, Beethoven’s works can be thought of as falling into three periods: early, middle, and late. Beethoven’s loss of hearing began at the age of 26 (1796), approximately toward the end of the early period or beginning of the middle period. The five duo sonata works on the programs span all three periods of Beethoven’s life, and, according to Hwang, one can learn from the late works to help performance of the early works, and vice versa. The works also coincide with the emergence of the fortepiano into the modern pianoforte (or simply “piano”), and Freer will perform one concert on each instrument. Freer explains that the cello, as an instrument, is largely unchanged since Beethoven’s time except for strings and bow. The adjustment having to be made by Hwang is to tune the cello lower to accommodate the fortepiano.

how the pianist controls the volume of the sound, the articulation, and the pedaling. And, even though the pianoforte being used for the second concert is a modern instrument by a Belgian maker, Chris Maene, it was constructed based upon a Viennese instrument that would have been in existence around 1875 or so, according to Freer. Both instruments used in the concerts will be on loan from Eastman School of Music to Nazareth College. Hwang proposed these concerts to Freer because Hwang is working on learning all 19 of the Beethoven string quartets with the Amenda Quartet. “I was inspired by the work on the string quartets, and I thought I’d love to be able to do the duo sonatas with Elinor,” says Hwang. “Elinor and I have been friends for a while and we’ve always enjoyed playing with each other. When I asked her, she said yes right away.”

Freer says that there aren’t many composers whose works she would consider performing as a cycle, meaning in a complete set of a single format. For Freer, Shostakovich might be the only other composer she would consider for an “all-something” program. “Shostakovich has that same sort of diversity and incredibly wide span of emotional content as Beethoven,” she says. Two things fed into preparation for these programs. First, Freer had to consider the technical demands of performing allBeethoven programs. Then, Freer had to consider the notion of dedicating so much practice time to one specific type of work by one composer. “The piano parts are incredibly involved and virtuosic,” says Freer, who had previously studied and played three out of these five duo sonatas. “It’s extremely challenging to do a whole Beethoven program,” says Freer.

At a time when so much of the classical music world seems wrapped up in conversations over the performance values of older, iconic composers such as Beethoven versus modern and even untested composers, Freer says there’s a reason Beethoven continues to appear on programs and delight audiences. “You really can listen to an entire program of Beethoven and not get tired of it,” says Freer. “His genius of craftsmanship is something every composer respects and admires, whether they want to admit they are influenced by Beethoven or not.” Hwang adds that as a performer, “You can work on these masterpieces for a lifetime and enjoy them and learn new things about them all the time. You can keep digging and digging and finding new things.”

Freer calls it “revelatory” to have the

opportunity to seriously study several of the duo sonatas on the fortepiano. She says that there are differences between the fortepiano and the modern piano in 16 CITY JANUARY 23-29, 2013

“It’s the most challenging of any composer because it requires so much of you, both in terms of emotional and technical endurance. It’s like running a marathon.” Freer is finding that preparing for these Beethoven programs is giving her a “kind of euphoria” and a “sense of accomplishment.” She says, “Performing all of these sonatas has also given me a sense of wonder of the music and the diversity of the music. It has been an incredible, exhausting journey.” Also on the first concert program is one of Beethoven’s sets of variations for cello and piano. Hwang says that there are three such sets of variations for cello and piano, and she and Freer selected the one that they most enjoyed. Freer is an assistant professor of chamber music at the Eastman School of Music and a collegiate instructor in piano at the Eastman Community Music School. She has built a versatile career as a piano soloist and as a chamber musician, performing across the United States, Europe, and China. Highlights of Freer’s performance history include the Concertgebouw (Amsterdam) and the Valery Gergiev Festival (Rotterdam). Freer is coartistic director of the Skaneateles Festival with her husband, David Ying. Hwang is an assistant professor of chamber music at the Eastman School of Music and a lecturer of music at Nazareth College. She is a founding member of the Amenda Quartet and the Franciscan String Quartet. Her performances have taken her to concert halls throughout North America, Europe, and Asia, and she has performed with the Beijing Philharmonic, the Los Angeles Philharmonic, and the San Francisco Chamber Orchestra.

Pianist Elinor Freer and cellist Mimi Hwang will perform the five Beethoven sonatas for their respective instruments over two concerts at Nazareth College. PHOTO BY ALEX SHUKOFF


FRIDAY, JANUARY 25 Teressa Wilcox Band. Dinosaur Bar-B-Que, 99 Court St. 10 p.m. Free. White Woods Album Release Show w/Gin & Bonnets, The Big One, and Rat Train. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. $6-$8.

SATURDAY, JANUARY 26 [ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ] Accoustic Brew. Flaherty’s Webster, 1200 Bay Rd. 6710816. Call for info. Ache. Tapas 177 Lounge, 177 Saint Paul St. 262-2090. 11 p.m. Free. Adam Clark. Boulder Coffee Co. – Park Ave., 739 Park Ave. 697-0235. 8 p.m. Free. Atwater-Donnelly. Rochester Christian Reformed Church, 2750 Atlantic Ave. 7:30 p.m. $10-$18. Jeff Polino. The Bistro at Towpath Cafe, 6 North Main St. 585 377-0410. 7 p.m. Free. Jeff Slutsky. Lemoncello, 137 West Commercial St. 3858565. 7 p.m. Free. Jim Lane. Hamlin Station Bar & Grill, 52 Railroad Ave. 9642010. 8:30 p.m. Free. Rockwood Ferry Trio. Bernuzio Uptown Music, 122 East Ave. 473-6140. 7 p.m. Call for info. The Ruddy Well Band. Marshall Street Bar & Grill, 81 Marshall St. 10 p.m. Call for info. Travis Fitch. Flaherty’s Webster, 1200 Bay Rd. 6710816. Call for info. [ BLUES ] The Dirty Bourbon Blues Band. Monty’s Krown, 875 Monroe Ave. 271-7050. 10 p.m. $3$5. Ezra & The Storm. Johnny’s Irish Pub, 1382 Culver Rd. 224-0990. 8 p.m. Free. Joe Beard. Dinosaur Bar-BQue, 99 Court St. 10 p.m. Free. Natalie B Band w/Dave Riccioni. Daisy Dukes, 2235 Empire Boulevard. 671-4880. Call for info. [ CLASSICAL ] RPO: Mozart and More. Kodak Hall at Eastman Theater, 60 Gibbs St. Thursday: 7:30 p.m. Saturday: 8 p.m. Yoav Talmi, guest conductor. Mark Kellogg, trombone. $15-$82 [ COUNTRY ] The Beadle Brothers. Nashvilles, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. 334-3030. 9 p.m. Call for info. [ DJ/ELECTRONIC ] DJ Big Reg. Plush, 151 St. Paul St. 232-5650. 10 p.m. Call for info.

MONDAY, JANUARY 28

DJ Darkwave. Vertex Nightclub, 169 North Chestnut St. 232-5498. 10 p.m. $3-$8. DJ Trancesend. Decibel Lounge., 45 Euclid St. 7544645. 10 p.m. $5. La Selva. Tilt Nightclub & Ultralounge, 444 Central Ave. 232-8440. 10 p.m. Call for info. Latino Saturdays w/DJ Bobby Base. Pure Night Club, 117 Liberty Pole Way. 454-7230. 10 p.m. Call for info. Music Mix w/DJ. Captain Jack’s Goodtime Tavern, 8505 Greig St. 315-4839570. 9 p.m. Call for info.

[ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ] The Coyote Brothers. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 7:30 p.m. Free. Lovin’ Cup Idol Auditions. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 2929940. 8 p.m. Call for info.

JAZZ | CORY WEEDS QUARTET [ JAZZ ] Annie Wells. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 8:30 p.m. Free. Chris Wilson. Prosecco Italian Restaurant, 1550 New York 332. 924-8000. 7 p.m. Call for info. Exodus to Jazz: The Grace Kelly Quintet. Hochstein Performance Hall, 50 N Plymouth Ave. 454-4596. 8 p.m. $10-$42. Fred Costello & Roger Eckers Jazz Duo. Charley Brown’s, 1675 Penfield Rd. 385-9202. 7:30 p.m. Free. John Nyerges. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. 6625555. 6 p.m. Free. Pallavi w/Bethesda. Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. 8:30 p.m. $5-$8. Ted Nicolosi and Shared Genes. The Glengarry Inn @ Eagle Vale, 4400 Fairport 9 Mile Point Rd. 598-3820. 7 p.m. Free. The White Hots. The Pultneyville Grill, 4135 Mill St. (315) 589-4512. 6:30 p.m. Call for info. [ POP/ROCK ] Fire Red, Moon Zombies. Firehouse Saloon, 814 South Clinton. 319-3832. 9 p.m. 21+. $5. Good Rats. California Brew Haus, 402 Ridge Rd. West. 621-1480. Call for info. Heavy Metal Steve’s Birthday Show: Revelation, Pilgrim, Yarrow, and Blizaro. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 2 p.m. 21+. $6. Lethal Lorelei’s Birthday Bash. Montage Music Hall, 50 Chestnut St. 232-1520. 8 p.m. $5. Lovin Cup Unplugged Dinner Music Series: Katie Preston. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. 6 p.m. Free. Low Flying Planes, Dreams from Gin, Fleet Street. Tala Vera, 155 State St. 546-3845. 8 p.m. $5-$7. Mochester. Brickwood Grill, 250 Monroe Ave. 730-8230. 10 p.m. Call for info. Patrick Droney. Boulder Coffee Co. - Alexander St., 100 Alexander St. 454-7140. 8 p.m. Free.

Over the last two decades Cory Weeds has brought his bold saxophone sound to groups like People Playing Music, CRASH, The Night Crawlers, and The B3 Kings. In recent years he’s established his credentials as a leader on albums with top New York musicians like guitarist Peter Bernstein, organist Mike LeDonne, and drummer Joe Farnsworth. For his Bop Shop gig at Lovin’ Cup his featured guest will be trombonist Steve Davis, a former sideman with Art Blakey. The show takes place Sunday, Jan 27, 8 p.m. at Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Drive. $10-$12. lovincup.com. — BY RON NETSKY Roc City. Sticky Lips BBQ Juke Joint, 830 Jefferson Rd. 292-5544. 9 p.m. Free. Sossity Taylor’s Birthday Show: Blended Soundz w/DJ Eddie Cain. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. 9 p.m. $10. Take Action Tour feat. The Used w/We Came As Romans, Crown The Empire, and Mindflow. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N. Water St. 585325-5600. 6 p.m. $27.50$30. TeenSet Presents: The Grinders w/Clockmen, The Emersons, Rotten UK, and New Mike and the Fast Eddies. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. $6-$8. That Party Band. Pineapple Jack’s, 485 Spencerport Rd. 247-5225. 10 p.m. Call for info.

SUNDAY, JANUARY 27 [ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ] Celtic Music Sundays. Temple Bar and Grille, 109 East Ave. 232-6000. 7 p.m. Free. Irish Music Session. Johnny’s Irish Pub, 1382 Culver Rd. 224-0990. 5 p.m. Free. [ CLASSICAL ] Compline. Christ Church, 141 East Ave. 454-3878. 9 p.m. Free, donations accepted. Eastman at St. Michael’s: Voice vocal ensemble. St. Michael’s Church, 869 N. Clinton Ave. 325-4041. 2:30 p.m. Free, donations accepted. If Music Be the Food... Third Presbyterian Church, 4 Meigs

St. 271-6513. 7:30 p.m. Donations accepted. Pegasus: Voices of the Music. Downtown United Presbyterian Church, 121 N. Fitzhugh Street. 325-4000. 4 p.m. $10-$75. Project Ludwig I: The Piano and Cello Sonatas of Beethoven. Nazareth College Wilmot Recital Hall, 4245 East Avenue. 389-2700. 3 p.m. Free. RPO: A Mozart Family Affair. Hochstein Performance Hall, 50 N Plymouth Ave. 454-4596. 2 p.m. Andrew Constantine, guest conductor. Douglas Prosser, trumpet. Ilya Yakushev, piano. $10-$24. Society for Chamber Music in Rochester: The Antara Winds-a 30th Birthday Party. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. 276-8900. 7:30 p.m. $10-$30. [ JAZZ ] Day Break. Prosecco Italian Restaurant, 1550 New York 332. 924-8000. 5 p.m. Call for info. [ POP/ROCK ] Amanda Ashley. SPoT Coffee, 200 East Ave. 585-613-4600. 7 p.m. Free. Bop Shop presents: Cory Weeds Quartet. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 2929940. 8 p.m. $10-$12. Comedown Album Release w/ Anchorage Nebraska, Sonic Inception, and The DeVills. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. $5-$7.

[ DJ/ELECTRONIC ] Manic Monday Retro Dance: Michelle Z + DJ C. Darren. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. Free 21+, $10 unders. Manic Mondays Dance Night. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 11:30 p.m. Free. [ JAZZ ] Alphonso Williams. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. 6625555. 5:30 p.m. Free. Ben Waara. Lemoncello, 137 West Commercial St. 3858565. 6 p.m. Free.

TUESDAY, JANUARY 29 [ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ] Jim Lane. Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. 8 p.m. Free. [ BLUES ] Bluesday Tuesday Blues Jam. P.I.’s Lounge, 495 West Ave. 8 p.m. Call for info. [ CLASSICAL ] Kilbourn Concert Series Brooklyn Rider. Kilbourn Hall, 26 Gibbs St. 8 p.m. $10-$20. [ DJ/ELECTRONIC ] 2 Reason Tuesdays w/DJ Zio. Nathaniel’s Pub, 251 Exchange Boulevard. 2328470. Call for info. Free. DJ Ghetto Blaster. Club Clarissas, 293 Clarissa St. 232-3430. Call for info. DJ Kathy. Nashvilles, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. 334-3030. Call for info. Call for info. Old School Tuesdays. Grotto, 7 Lawrence St. 739-5377. Call for info. Free.

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 30 [ CLASSICAL ] Guest Recital - Dinosaur Annex. Kilbourn Hall, 26 Gibbs St. 8 p.m. $10. [ COUNTRY ] Big D. Dinosaur Bar-B-Que, 99 Court St. 9 p.m. Free. [ DJ/ELECTRONIC ] DJ Adam. Nashvilles, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. 334-3030. Call for info. Call for info. Teen Set 45 Party. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. Midnight. Free. Y Not Wednesday w/DJ ET. Plush, 151 St. Paul St. 2325650. Call for info. Call for info. [ JAZZ ] Amanda Ashley. Prosecco Italian Restaurant, 1550 New York 332. 924-8000. 6 p.m. Call for info. Jim Nelson. Lemoncello, 137 West Commercial St. 3858565. 7:30 p.m. Free . Stringplicity. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 7:30 p.m. Free. The Swooners. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. 6625555. 6 p.m. Free. Vince Ercolamento& Joe Chiappone Jazz Quartet. Murph’s Irondequoit Pub, 705 Titus Ave. 342-6780. 8 p.m. Free. [ POP/ROCK ] Underwater Bear Ballet w/ Barry, Greyhound Bandits. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. MIDNIGHT: Wolfkrieg Blitzer & His Mind People Present: Unzip your Human Suits. $6-$8.

[ JAZZ ] Ben Waara. Prosecco Italian Restaurant, 1550 New York 332. 924-8000. 6 p.m. Call for info. Kyle Vock Duo. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. 6625555. 6 p.m. Free. Norman Tibbils. Lemoncello, 137 West Commercial St. 385-8565. 6 p.m. Free. [ POP/ROCK ] Meanagers w/Chika & The Wolves, Baby Shark, and Black Bandit & The Stickups. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. $5-$7. Reel Big Fish. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N. Water St. 585-3255600. 8 p.m. $20-$24. rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 17


18 CITY JANUARY 23-29, 2013

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 19


Art includes pictures, quotes, and exhibit postcards to tell the Genesee Center’s 40year story from 1972 to 2012. More than 160 works showcase the vast variety of pottery techniques as well as aesthetic tastes and conceptual concerns of the artists who have been instructors, members, students, and artists-in-residence through the years. Originally founded by artist Maggie Smith

“Heavenly Dish” by Phyllis Kloda is part of the Genesee Pottery’s current 40-year retrospective show. PHOTO BY MARK CHAMBERLIN

Hand-built humble beginnings “Ten-Nineteen: Return to Station” THROUGH FEBRUARY 1 FIREHOUSE GALLERY, GENESEE CENTER FOR THE ARTS & EDUCATION, 713 MONROE AVE. 271-5183, GENESEEARTS.ORG MONDAY-FRIDAY 10 A.M.-5 P.M., SATURDAY NOON-4 P.M. [ REVIEW ] BY REBECCA RAFFERTY

This is a year for Rochester’s arts and cultural institutions to celebrate big anniversaries. Both the Memorial Art Gallery and the Rochester Museum and Science Center are continuing their 100th year of operation. In addition, a younger 20 CITY JANUARY 23-29, 2013

institution, the Genesee Center for the Arts and Education, is celebrating its 40th anniversary, and in doing so, is looking back to its humble beginnings as a pottery co-op. At a time when DIY business culture is once again on the rise, the current exhibit at the Firehouse Gallery at Genesee Center celebrates work by the founding members of the Genesee Pottery Co-op, as well as artists who have been involved along the Center’s journey to the present. The title of the show is drawn from a fireman’s code to return to the station, and refers to the history of the building, which was originally an 1895 fire house, complete with stables for the horses that pulled the fire wagon. The works in the exhibit are anchored by a timeline on the wall, which

in 1972, Genesee Pottery was a co-op based around one kickwheel, a kiln, an old bathtub for mixing clay, and a lot of DIY passion. The studio occupied the basement of 713 Monroe Avenue until 1974, when the building was purchased. The endeavor was launched with artists Art Devitalis, Harriet Heller, Susan McDuffie, Evelyn Lee, and others. With the passage of each decade, new talents joined and redefined the work produced at the studio. Today, the Genesee Center for the Arts and Education includes the Genesee Pottery studio, the Community Darkroom, and the Printing & Book Arts Center, each with its own studio space and gallery, and each offering work space and facilities to members and a year-round schedule of workshops to the community. One wall of the current show holds a wood grid of 40 cups, mugs, and chalices, from founder Maggie Smith’s 1970’s-era dreamy pastel-swirled chalice, to current resident artist Hannah Thompsett’s modern slipcast cup. The grid of growlers shows off the diversity of style, technique, and personality that the studio’s collective has injected into that simple object. Other works by Smith in this show include two tiles from the Wilcox Street door into the pottery studio, which are slabs of fired clay, each with a small frozen pool of pigment shimmering in the raw material.

After an internal schism, Genesee Pottery

reopened as a public space in 1990, and through that decade increased its focus on offering classes and services. In 1991, the studio embarked on its first artist-inresidence program, with Phyllis Kloda, also a former Genesee Center board member and the current Associate Dean for the School of the Arts, Humanities, and Social Sciences at SUNY Brockport. Her work is represented in this show with “Heavenly Dish,” a confection-like vessel covered in ornate forms and lushly painted scenes of culinary indulgence, and with three different representations of winged Marys looking lovely and dolled up, playfully nodding to a dual meaning in the title. Former artist-in-residence,

instructor, and studio manger Chea Peng’s “Vase” is a massive, striking work with dripping, earthy texture, and capped with a thick coat of bright red glaze. Not every piece in the show is a flashy feat of earthy engineering or mud made into highly decorative art. Many works, particularly early on, are rough-hewn, utilitarian, yet have a gorgeousness in their simplicity. “Vase” by the late Eddie Davis is the definition of earthy, a solid, raw form with crackled texture, balanced with a fragile, uneven lip and bits of shining glaze. Founding member Harriet Heller’s “Vase from Kiln Fire” is another raw work which resembles a hunk of volcanic stone, a relic from another fire. Each work holds some bit of fascination.

Former member Jackie Boe’s 1982 “Porcelain Jar” strikes a balance between a cream puff and a futuristic building. Former student and current studio manager Peter Pincus’s contemporary “Cup” combines various textures and shapes in a simple and elegant manner. Former student, renter, and member Elisa Root’s “Seated Woman in Purple” is a meditative, rough, pinched form with a splash of paint across her torso. Former artist-in-residence, instructor, and member Samantha Stumpf, is represented with two Raku tiles, each divided between a glazed part with detailing like frost, and an unglazed portion marked pitchy by the dancing flame. In 2006, the Genesee Center hosted its first national show, “History in the Making,” which included works by students across the country and was juried by Julie Galloway, director of the School of Art and professor at University of Montana, Missoula, and RIT professor Rick Hirsch. The current show follows an office and gallery renovation, addition of a gallery store, and a successful fundraiser last fall in which the community helped the Genesee Center fund a new kiln. For me, the show holds fragments of so many memories of great shows held at the space, by artists such as former artist-inresidence Bethany Krull, whose “Porcelain Spider” reflects her ghostly work’s focus on our dubious oscillation between fascination with, fear of, and control over other creatures. Former exhibiting artist and Nazareth professor Mitch Messina’s work, “Cog,” features three back-toback-to-back figures, rife with rivets and seams, supporting a heap of boulders and standing on an industrial pedestal, part of the machine themselves.


ART | HUNGERFORD ART OF THE STEAL Spring cleaning is coming early to the Hungerford Studios. Every once in awhile, it’s good to look around and assess the excess that surrounds us, and let go of what is no longer useful to us, offering it to others who will find renewed value in the items. Select studios in the Hungerford Building (1115 E. Main St.) will participate in an “Art of the Steal” Building Wide Clearance Sale on Friday and Saturday, January 25-26. Artists’ and artisans’ gently used materials, supplies, tools, equipment, and reference materials will be on clearance. In addition, a selection of original artwork there will also be available, framed or unframed, on clearance. Materials in many media will be offered, including clay, paint, fibers, glass, jewelry, prints, and more. As local artists’ works shift toward new directions, take the chance to score a piece from their older projects. The sale takes place 11 a.m.-4 p.m. each day and admission is free of charge. For more information, call 233-5645 or visit thehungerford.com. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY

Art Exhibits [ OPENING ] “Becoming Modern: Armory Show Artists at MAG”. TuesdaysSundays Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Avenue Through May 12. In Lockhart Gallery. Wed-Sun 11 a.m.-5 p.m., until 9 p.m. on Thu. Open school break hours Tue Feb 19 and Apr 2, 11 a.m.-5 p.m 276-8900. mag.rochester.edu. “The Big Picture”. Jan. 23-Feb. 17. Image City Photography Gallery, 722 University Ave. Through Feb 17. Wed-Sat 11 a.m.-7 p.m., Sun 12-4 p.m. Receptions Jan 25, 5-8:30 p.m. and Feb 1 5-9 p.m 4821976. dano@rochester.rr.com. imagecityphotographygallery. com. Christopher Troutman: “Watching: US and Japan Drawing”. Tuesdays-Sundays Hartnett Gallery, Wilson Commons, University of Rochester, River Campus Through Feb 17. Tue-Fri 11 a.m.-7 p.m., Sat-Sun 12-5 p.m 275-4188. blogs.rochester. edu/hartnett. (en)Gendered Juried Art. Jan. 23-Feb. 27. Rush Rhees Library, University of Rochester, River Campus Through Feb 27. Gallery at the Art and Music Library. Mon-Fri 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Opening Fri Jan 18, 5-7 p.m rochester.edu/college/wst. From 500 Sketches by Frank P. Phillips. Mondays-Saturdays Davis Gallery, Houghton House, Hobart and William Smith Colleges, 1 Kings Lane, Geneva. Through Mar 9. Mon-Fri 9 a.m.5 p.m, Sat 1-5 p.m. Reception Jan 25, 7-9 p.m 315-7813487. hws.edu/academics/art/ exhibitions.aspx.

“A Reasonable Facsimilie”. Mondays-Fridays Mercer Gallery at Monroe Communtiy College, 1000 E. Henrietta Rd Through Feb 22. Mon-Thu 11 a.m.7 p.m., Fri 11 a.m.-4 p.m., other times by appt. Reception Jan 25, 7 p.m 292-2021. monroecc.edu. [ CONTINUING ] AAUW Art Forum, 494 East Ave. Off the Wall VII Members Exhibit. Mondays-Fridays, 10 a.m.-2 p.m Continues through Apr 19 by appointment only. 244-9892. The Assisi Institute, 1400 North Winton Rd. “Toothpick World” by Stan Munro. Tue-Thu noon6 p.m., Fri noon-8 p.m., Sat 11 a.m.-4 p.m $5 suggested donation. 442-5010. assisiinstitute.org. Art and Vintage on Main, 101 Main St. “Lost Infinity” the works of Brett Maurer and Matthew Tully Dugan. ongoing. artandvintageonmain.com. Arts & Cultural Council, 277 N Goodman St. Four Artists: Hanlon – Kettavong – Packard – Sellers. Mondays-Fridays Through Jan 25. Mon–Fri 10 a.m.-4 p.m. 473-4000. artsrochester.org. Arts Council for Wyoming County, 31 S Main St. “Local Color”. Through March 8. Through Mar 8. Reception Mar 8 6-8 p.m 237-3517. artswyco.org. Black Radish Studio, 274 N Goodman. “Being Close to Far Away,” new work by Misha Tulek. Through Jan. 31. Through Jan 31. Mon-Fri 10-6 p.m., Sat 12-6 p.m. Reception Jan 4, 6-10 p.m 413-1278. blackradishstudio.com. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. Roc The Casbah: A Tribute to the

Clash. Through Jan. 31, 8 p.m.2 a.m. THE LOBBY PRESENTS. Vintage Propaganda from the Collection of Jim Malley (Mercury Posters) and Clayton Cowles illustrations of The Clash. The Caroline Gallery, 159 Caroline St. Photo Exhibit to Benefit Women’s Rights in India. Through Feb. 15. Through Feb 15. 260-7607. joekewin@gmail. com. joekewin.com. Community Darkroom Gallery, 713 Monroe Ave. “Kaleidoscope”. Through Feb. 23. 271-5920. Crossroads Coffee House, 752 S Goodman St. Dead End City Art Show II. Through Feb. 28. Through Feb 28. 244-6787. kccrossroadscoffee.com. Davison Gallery, Cultural Life Center, Roberts Wesleyan College, 2301 Westside Dr. Art Faculty Showcase. Through Feb. 15. Through Feb 15. Reception Jan 17, 5-7 p.m 594-6442. roberts.edu. Equal=Grounds, 750 South Ave. “Beautiful Ruins” by Paula Peters Marra. Through Jan. 31. gallery@equalgrounds.com. The Firehouse Gallery at Genesee Pottery, 713 Monroe Ave. TenNineteen: Return to Station. Through Feb. 10. 244-1730. geneseearts.org. George Eastman House, 900 East Ave. “60 from the 60s”. Tuesdays-Sundays Through Jan 27. Tue-Sat 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Sun 11 a.m.-5 p.m $5-$12. 2713361. eastmanhouse.org. High Falls Fine Art Gallery, 60 Browns Race. Tom Kim Solo Photography, “Text and Texture” and “Neil Montanus & James Montanus: A Glimpse of the World.”. Wednesdays-Sundays Through Feb 28. Wed-Fri 11 a.m.-5:30 p.m., Sat 12-5:30 p.m., Sun 1-5 p.m. 325-2030. centerathighfalls.org. International Art Acquisitions, 3300 Monroe Ave. “Palms” by Bonnie Wolsky-Farid. Through Jan. 31. Through Jan 31. Mon-Fri 10 a.m.-9 p.m., Sat 10 a.m.-6 p.m., Sun noon-5 p.m 264-1440. internationalartacquisitions.com. I-Square Visions, 693 Titus Ave. “Tactile Art: The Warmth and Beauty of Fiber”. Through Feb. 14. Artists’ talk Jan 23, 7-9 p.m zannebrummer@gmail.com. Joe Brown Gallery in the Printing & Book Arts Center, 713 Monroe Ave. Alphabet Soup: Student Show. Through Jan. 31. Letterpress Printed Type Specimens. Through Jan 31. Reception Jan 11, 6:30-9:30 p.m 244-1730. geneseearts.org. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. “American Roadtrip” by Beth Bailey. Through Feb. 1. Through Feb 1. Reception Jan 6, 5-7 p.m 258-0400. thelittle.org. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. Through Feb 10:“Changing Hands: Art Without Reservation 3” Contemporary Native North American Art. Wed-Sun 11 a.m.5 p.m., Thu until 9 p.m $5-$12. 276-8900. mag.rochester.edu. My Sister’s Gallery, 505 Mt. Hope Ave. “MAPS” by Gianna Stewart. Through Feb. 17. Free. 5468400. EpiscopalSeniorLife.org. Nan Miller Gallery, 3450 Winton Place. Montreal artist Celine Brossard. Through Jan. 31. Tue-Sat 10 a.m.-5 p.m 2921430. nanmillergallery.com.

Nazareth College Arts Center, 4245 East Ave. “Good Work” Illustration Invitational. Tuesdays-Sundays Through Mar 1. Hours Sun and Tue-Thu noon-5 p.m., Fri-Sat noon-8 p.m. Reception Jan 18 5-8 p.m 389-5073. naz.edu/art/artscenter-gallery. Nazareth College Colacino Gallery, 4245 East Ave. “Design in the Working World: The Alumni Graphic Design Exhibit.” Wednesdays-Sundays Through Mar 1. Hours Wed-Sun noon-5 p.m. 389-5073. naz.edu/art/ colacino-art-gallery. New Deal Gallery, 4 Livingston County Campus. Expressions of the Civil War. In recognition of the 150th Anniversary. Wed, Fri 1-4 p.m., Thu 1-7:30 p.m., Sat 11 a.m.-3 p.m. 243-6785. livingstonarts.org. Oxford Gallery, 267 Oxford St. Ray Easton and Jean K Stephens. Tuesdays-Saturdays Through Feb 23. Tue-Fri noon5 p.m., Sat 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Reception February 2 5:30-7:30 p.m 271-5885. oxfordgallery. com. Pat Rini Rohrer Gallery, 71 S Main St. The 8th Annual Studio II Exhibit. Through Feb. 22. Through Feb 22. Reception Jan 11, 6-8 p.m 394-0030. prrgallery.com. Phillips Fine Art, 248 East Ave. Fourth Annual Collector’s Show and Sale. Tuesdays-Saturdays Through Jan 31. Tue-Fri 12-6 p.m., Sat 12-5 p.m., or by appt. 232-8120. Rare Books & Special Collections, Rush Rhees Library, University of Rochester, River Campus. Alice in the Looking Glass: Illustrations and Artists’ Books 1865-2012. Through Aug. 16. Through Aug 16. MonFri 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Sat 11 a.m.-3 p.m 275-4477. Rosalie “Roz” Steiner Art Gallery, Genesee Community College, One College Rd. Mondays, Wednesdays-Fridays Jan 22-Mar 8: “Mediation and Negociations” by Elena Lourenco. Through Mar 13: “a*new*found*land” by Joe Ziolkowski. Mon, Wed, Thu Fri 10 a.m.-4 p.m., other times by appt 343-0055 x6616. stvierrico@genesee.edu. genesee.edu. Rush Rhees Library, University of Rochester, River Campus. Memorial Art Gallery: 100 Years of Art for the Community. Through Sep. 30. Through Sep 30, 2013. mag.rochester.edu. University Gallery, James R Booth Hall, RIT, Lomb Memorial Dr. Neil Montanus. MondaysSaturdays Mon-Thu 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Fri-Sat 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Closed Dec 22-Jan 6. 4752404. jleugs@rit.edu. Williams Gallery at First Unitarian Church, 220 S Winton Rd. “Passages” by Anca Seger. Through Feb. 24, 12-2 p.m. Through Feb 24. Daily 10 a.m.-2 p.m., 4:30-8 p.m Free. 2719070. Wood Library, 134 North Main St. “Chronopiscus: Time and the Fish” by Ren Vasiliev. Through Feb. 1. Through Feb 1. 3941381. woodlibrary.org.

Comedy [ FRI., JANUARY 25 ] 3 Guys Walk Into A Bar Present: The Chet Wild Show. 8 p.m.

FILM | “THE ROCKY HORROR PICTURE SHOW” Though I’ve seen the film countless times, I’ve never actually been to a “Rocky Horror Picture Show” screening, where the hosting theater encourages people to dress up (or down, actually) like the characters, get raunchy, and to throw things at the screen on cue. Well, dear readers, we have the opportunity this weekend, because the Cinema Theater (957 S. Clinton Ave.) will host a screening on Saturday, January 26, at 11:30 p.m. The event will feature a live cast. Admission is $5, or $3 for students with ID, and parking is available across the street at the 7-Eleven lot. Bust out your best bustier, your fishnets, high-heeled boots, and rouge, darlings. —BY REBECCA RAFFERTY Boulder Coffee Co. 454-7140. bouldercoffeeco.com. Lewis Black. 8 p.m. Auditorium Theatre, 885 East Main Street lewisblack.com. $35-$55. 222-5000. mail@rbtl.org. rbtl. org. [ SAT., JANUARY 26 ] Left for Dead Improv Comedy Showcase. 7:30 p.m. Bread & Water Theatre, 243 Rosedale St. $5-$7. 271-5523. facebook.com/ leftfordeadimprov. Mike Epps. 7 p.m. Auditorium Theatre, 885 East Main Street mikeepps.com $45-$49.50. 222-5000. mail@rbtl.org. rbtl. org. Nuts & Bolts Comedy Improv January Jam. 8 p.m. Downstairs Cabaret Theatre Center, 540 E. Main St $10 at the door or in advance. 3254370. downstairscabaret.org.

Dance Events [ WED., JANUARY 23 ] In Studio Series: New York Cityscapes. 6:30 p.m. Rochester City Ballet Studios, 1326 University Ave, An evening featuring an open rehearsal with all new choreography and a discussion between artistic director Jamey Leverett and the RPO’s Jeff Tyzik, composer of New York Cityscapes Free, RSVP. 4615850. rochestercityballet.com. [ SUN., JANUARY 27 ] Culture & Community Sundays: Sihir Belly Dance Ensemble. 1-2 p.m. Rochester Museum and Science Center, 657 East Ave. Included in museum admission $11-$13. 2714320. rmsc.org.

Festivals [ SAT., JANUARY 26 ] Light Works! Wellness & Psychic Faire – Readings, Reiki, Runes and Reflexology. 12:30 p.m. Brighton Town Park Lodge, 777 Westfall Rd Free admission. 271-0370. meetup. com/light-works.

Kids Events [ WED., JANUARY 23 ] Amerks Player Appearance. 6:30-7:30 p.m. Henrietta Public Library, 455 Calkins Rd An Amerks Hockey player and the Moose will be at the library to read a story, answer questions, and sign autographs. Register. 359-7092. Storybook Cooks: Stone Soup. 10-11 a.m. Greece Public Library, 2 Vince Tofany Blvd. Ages 3-5 Free, register. 2258951. [ THU., JANUARY 24 ] Bop Until You Drop, Family Dance Party. 10-10:30 a.m. Greece Public Library, 2 Vince Tofany Blvd. All ages Free. 225-8951. Wonderland MuVChat. 6-8 p.m. Celebrate Lewis Carroll’s un-birthday/almost birthday with weird and wild MuVChat event. Text back to the movie and watch your words appear on screen. Call for feature details. Grades 6-12 Free. 394-1381. woodlibrary.org. [ SAT., JANUARY 26 ] Junie B. Jones. Jan. 26-27. JCC Rochester, 1200 Edgewood Ave. Sat 2 & 4:30 p.m. (interpreted in ASL), Sun 11 a.m. & 2 p.m $15. 461-2000. tykestheatre.org. ZooMobile. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Rochester Museum and Science Center, 657 East Ave. Included in museum admission $11-$13. 271-1880. rmsc.org. [ MON., JANUARY 28 ] Tay House Troop 19 Sled Night/Open House. 7:30 p.m. Tay House, 85 Hillside Ave. Tay House Troop 19, a boy-led troop invites cub scouts, other interested boys ages 10-12 and parents. Free. 210-8163. tayhouse.org.

Lectures [ WED., JANUARY 23 ] Color Brighton Green: Beyond the Blue Box - Recycling at the continues on page 22

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 21


LECTURE | WILLIAM A. KERN LECTURE SERIES The William A. Kern Lecture Series will kick off on Wednesday, January 30, with a 2 p.m. lecture by Min-Ha Pham titled, “Personal Style Blogs and DIY Race: On Race, Aesthetics, and Capitalism.” The talk will examine influential personal style blogs, such as those kept by Susanna Lau (aka Susie Bubble) and Bryan Grey Yambao (aka BryanBoy) as a lens through which we might examine the new construction and value of race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, and class in the age of social media. The following day, Thursday, January 31, at 6 p.m., a second lecture in the Kern series will be offered by John Tagg, who will present “Discipline and Protest: Thinking Photography after Foucault.” Tagg’s talk will look at the emergence of photo theory and new kinds of theoretically informed photographic practice in the 1970’s, in a decade of social conflict and political activism in Britain. The lectures will take place in the Carlson Auditorium at Rochester Institute of Technology (Lomb Memorial Drive, Henrietta), and are free to attend. For more information, call 475-2057. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY

Lectures Monroe County EcoPark. 6:30 p.m. Brighton Memorial Library, 2300 Elmwood Ave. 784-5300. brightonlibrary.org. Conversations on Race. 5-7 p.m. Phillis Wheatley Public Library, 33 Dr. Samuel McCree Way 428-8212. gpayne2@ur.rochester.edu. gandhiinstitute.org. Inaugural Lecture, Institute for Popular Music. 7 p.m. Rush Rhees Library, University of Rochester, River Campus Jocelyn Neal will deliver the Inaugural Lecture, entitled “Ladies Love Country Boys: Gendered Narratives and the Meaning of Country Music.” A reception will follow Free. 275-9397. Roe v Wade Anniversary Program: The State of Reproductive Health Care in NY. 7 p.m. First Unitarian Church, 220 S Winton Rd Kartharine Bodde, Policy Counsel for the New York Civil Liberties Union. Free. 748-1850. rochesterunitarian.org. [ THU., JANUARY 24 ] The 40+ Job Search; Debunking the Myths. 9:30 a.m.-noon. Gates Public Library, 902 Elmgrove Rd. Free, register. 247-6446. “How to Cope with Life Changing Events” with Dennis Boike. 7:15 p.m. JCC Rochester, 1200 Edgewood Ave. Free. mendedheartsrochester.org. Race: The Power of an Illusion. 5-7 p.m. Central Library, Kate Gleason Auditorium, 115 South Ave. The Difference Between Us. 428-8350. libraryweb.org.

Social Security. 7-8:30 p.m. Henrietta Public Library, 455 Calkins Rd. Understand and maximize your SS benefit. Register. 359-7092. [ FRI., JANUARY 25 ] Astronomy Section: Joel Schmid on Planetary Imaging Processing. 7 p.m. Gosnell Hall, RIT, Lomb Memorial Dr scully@ rochester.rr.com. rasny.org. Sustainability Seminar: China’s Water and Energy. 2 p.m. University of Rochester, River Campus Dewey Hall, 2-110D. karen.berger@rochester.edu. rochester.edu. [ SAT., JANUARY 26 ] Nature of Montezuma Lecture Series:. 2-3:30 p.m. Montezuma National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Center, 3395 US Route 20 East Biologist, Jim Eckler, on short-eared owls. $3-$5. 315-568-5987 x229. Tasha_Daniels@fws.gov. World of Patents and Trademarks. 10:30 a.m. Penfield Public Library, 1985 Baird Rd. Free, register. 3408720. penfieldlibrary.org. [ SUN., JANUARY 27 ] “Down the Rabbit Hole with Alice” with Jeanne Harper. 2 p.m. Rush Rhees Library, University of Rochester, River Campus Free, RSVP. 275-4461. mengel@library. rochester.edu. Historic Brighton hosts SALON IV Talk on two distinguished Brighton based Architects. 2:30 p.m. Brighton Town Hall, 2300 Elmwood Ave C. Storrs Barrows and Donald Hershey: Masters of Mid-century Design by Mary Jo Lanphear, Free. 442-5313.

22 CITY JANUARY 23-29, 2013

“Photography in the Civil War Era” with Robert Keough. 3 p.m. Livingston Arts Center, 4 Murray Hill Dr. 243.6785. livingstonarts.org.

Poetry Reading: Donna Marbach and John Cieslinski. 4 p.m. Books Etc., 78 W. Main St. Free. 474-4116. books_ etc@yahoo.com.

[ MON., JANUARY 28 ] Leon Leyson, Schindler’s Youngers Holocaust Survivor. Jan. 28. Lifetree Cafe, 1301 Vintage Lane, Greece 723-4673. lifetreecafe@ sharethehope.org. Opera Guild Lecture Series: Introduction to Wagner’s Parsifal with Peter Dundas. 7-9 p.m. Brighton Memorial Library, 2300 Elmwood Ave. Free. 7845300. brightonlibrary.org.

[ TUE., JANUARY 29 ] An Evening of Storytelling with Rafe Martin. 7 p.m. Writers and Books, 740 University Ave $6$8. 473-2590. wab.org. Lift Bridge Writers’ Group. 6:30 p.m. Lift Bridge Book Shop, 45 Main St Free. 637-2260. liftbridgebooks.com.

[ TUE., JANUARY 29 ] Acting: Choices and Listening. 7 p.m. Pittsford Community Library, 24 State Street, Pittsford Award-winning actor and playwright Ed Scutt. Registration required Free. 2495481. Tuesday Topics: Wall\Therapy in Rochester: The Visual Intervention of Public Art. 12:12-12:52 p.m. Central Library, Kate Gleason Auditorium, 115 South Ave. Speaker: Dr. Ian Wilson, Assistant Professor, Department of Imaging Sciences, University of Rochester Medical Center, Curator of Wall\Therapy, and co-founder of the Synthesis Collaborative. Free. 428-8350. libraryweb.org. [ WED., JANUARY 30 ] “The Human Cost to India’s Race for Development” with Priyanka Borpujari. 7 p.m. Nazareth College Shults Center, 4245 East Ave. Free. 3892673. khansen7@zimbra.naz. edu. A Tale of 13 Rochesters with Benn and Sally Forsyth. 7 p.m. Irondequoit Library, Helen McGraw Branch, 2180 E. Ridge Rd Free, register. 336-6060. amy.henderson@libraryweb.org. William A. Kern Lecture Series: Featuring Min-Ha Pham. 2 p.m. Carlson Auditorium, RIT Campus, Lomb Memorial Dr Personal Style Blogs and DIY Race: On Race, Aesthetics, and Capitalism. Free. 475-2057.

Literary Events [ WED., JANUARY 23 ] Jane Austen and Her 200-YearOld Bestseller. 7 p.m. Pittsford Community Library, 24 State St., Pittsford. Registration required Free. 249-5481. Pure Kona Poetry Readings. 7 p.m. Acanthus Café, 337 East Ave. Local poets gather to read their latest works Free. 3195999. acanthuscafe.com. [ THU., JANUARY 24 ] History Reading Group: The Louisiana Purchase. 7-8:30 p.m. Writers and Books, 740 University Ave Free. 473-2590. wab.org. [ FRI., JANUARY 25 ] Shakespeare Unlimited Hosted by the Friends of Wood Library. 2-4 p.m. Wood Library, 134 North Main St. 394-1381. woodlibrary.org. [ SUN., JANUARY 27 ] Author Visit: Mairanne Langner Zeitlin, “Motherless Child”. 3 p.m. JCC Rochester, 1200 Edgewood Ave. $8-$11, register. 461-2000. jccrochester.org.

[ WED., JANUARY 30 ] Titles over Tea: “Let the Great World Spin” by Colum McCann. 7 p.m. Barnes & Noble, Greece, 330 Greece Ridge Center Dr. 227-4020. bn.com.

Museum Exhibit [ WED., JANUARY 23 ] Baby It’s Cold Outside!. Tuesdays-Thursdays The Rochester Historical Society, Rundel Memorial Building, 2nd floor, 115 South Ave. Through Mar 14. Tue-Wed 10 a.m.-3 p.m., Thu 11 a.m.-3 p.m. An exhibit of beautiful cold weather clothing $3-$5, members free. 428-8470. rochesterhistory.org. A Presidential Voice: The History of Presidential Speechwriting. Through March 8. Rush Rhees Library, University of Rochester, River Campus Through Mar 8. Seward Room, Department of Rare Books and Special Collections. Mon-Fri 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Sat 11 a.m.-3 p.m 2754477. “Race: Are We So Different?”. Through April 28. Rochester Museum and Science Center, 657 East Ave. Through Apr 28. faceraceroc.org. Included in admission: $11-$13. 2711880. rmsc.org. William Henry Seward Exhibit: American Politicians 1830s-1860s. Through Jan. 30. Rush Rhees Library, University of Rochester, River Campus Through Jan 30 in Rare Books and Special Collections Dept. Mon-Fri 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Sat 11 a.m.-3 p.m 275-4477.

Recreation [ WED., JANUARY 23 ] Open Ice Skating. ongoing. Manhattan Square Park Ice Rink. Daily 12-1:30 p.m., 1:503:20 p.m. Adults Only daily 3:40-5:10 p.m., 5:30-7 p.m. (Fri-Sat til 8:50 p.m.). 4287541. cityofrochster.gov/skating. [ FRI., JANUARY 25 ] Moonlight Snowshoe or Hike. 7-9 p.m. Helmer Nature Center, 154 Pinegrove Ave Ages 16+. $5-$7. 336-3035. westirondequoit.org/helmer.htm. [ SAT., JANUARY 26 ] Beginner Birder Trip: Mendon Ponds Park Songbird Trail. 9:30 a.m. Meet at the Visitor’s Center on Pond Rd. near Clover St., bring sunflower seeds and cameras 467-2474. rochesterbirding.com. GVHC Hike. 10 a.m. Black Creek Park by Woodside Lodge. Moderate 5 mile hike 7505547. gvhchikes.org. Saturday Snowshoeing. 1-3 p.m Helmer Nature Center, 154 Pinegrove Ave No Jan 12 $3-

LITERATURE | HUMAN LIBRARY Our community holds a wealth of resources, knowledge, experiences, and personality within its members, but access is contingent upon our willingness to connect with one another. Many have trouble getting out of our own specific routines and meeting new people. On Tuesday, January 29, 1-4 p.m., visit the Welles-Brown Room of the Rush Rhees Library (University of Rochester, River Campus) for a unique event that will offer visitors the opportunity to connect with many people from different backgrounds. The event is called “The Human Library,” and seeks to remind us not to judge a book by its cover. “Human Libraries began in Denmark in 2000 as a music festival,” says Mari Tsuchiya, senior library assistant and coorganizer of the event. “From there, the concept has spread through Europe, Australia and North America. We are the first academic library hosting the Human Library in New York.” The Human Library will provide a way for participants to reach out and connect with individuals in their community with whom they might not normally interact. Visitors to a library can “borrow” a Human Book (a volunteer willing to share stories with others) for 30 minutes, for one-on-one or small-group conversations. So far, the library has collected 18 Human Books, including “Vegan Activist,” “Volunteer Fire Chief,” “Afghan Higher Education Innovator,” and “Connected Wonder Woman” (pictured), whose heart stopped five years ago, and who was given a new bionic lease on life. The event is free to attend. For more information, call 275-5506 or email suchiya@library.rochester.edu. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY $5, free to children under 12. 336-3035. westirondequoit. org/helmer.htm. [ SUN., JANUARY 27 ] GVHC Hike. 10 a.m. Ellison Park, Blossom Rd, by Hazelwood Lodge Strenuous/ hilly 5 mile hike Free. 4893764. gvhchikes.org 11 a.m. Corbett’s Glen lot, 1008 Penfield Rd. Moderate 4 mile hike 544-3387. gvhchikes.org.

Special Events [ WED., JANUARY 23 ] Free Bank of America Homeowner Assistance Event. Jan. 23-24, 8 a.m. Hyatt Regency Rochester, 125 E. Main St Free. 1-855-2017426. bankofamerica.com/ homeownerevent. Geeks Who Drink Pub Quiz. 8 p.m. Scotland Yard Pub, 187 Saint Paul St Free. 730-5030. scotlandyardpub.com. Highland Park Winter Farmers Market. 3 p.m Cornell Cooperative Extension of Monroe County, 249 Highland Ave Free. highlandwintermarket.com. Rochester Philharmonic Orchestra membership meeting. 5 p.m. Eastman East Wing Hatch Recital Hall, 26 Gibbs St rpocommunity.wordpress.com.

[ THU., JANUARY 24 ] Community Dialogue: Race & Politics. 7 p.m. Baobab Cultural Center, 728 University Ave. Free, RSVP. 563-2145. thebaobab.org. Meeting of the Social Economy Working Group. 10 a.m. Foodlink, 1999 Mt. Read Blvd. Open meeting. facebook.com/ sewg.roch. Profiled: Race in Civic Circles. 7 p.m. Baobab Cultural Center, 728 University Ave. Free, RSVP. 563-2145. thebaobab.org. [ FRI., JANUARY 25 ] “Cypher Live!”. 6:30-8:30 p.m. Lutheran Church of the Reformation, 111 North Chestnut St. $3-$5, free to children age 10 and under. 454-3367. sue@artpeace.org. artpeace.org. Euchre Tournament. 7 p.m. Webster Columbus Center, 70 Barrett Dr. Cash prizes. Bring a dish to pass. A-M appetizer. N-Z dessert. Proceeds to benefit Prevention1st $10$15, register. (585)383-6541. prevention1st.org. Joe Bean Good Food Awards Celebration. 6-10 p.m. Joe Bean Coffee Roasters, 1344 University Ave. Food tasting, wine and beer, sweets, and


SPECIAL EVENT | IRONDEQUOIT PIZZA CHALLENGE Pizza is one of those culinary creations that seems simple enough, but is a beast with countless combinations, and everybody has their particular preferences. This weekend, you can weigh in on which local shop makes the best pie. The Irondequoit Pizza Challenge takes place Saturday, January 26, 4-6 p.m. Pizza shops from the Irondequoit area will battle it out “dough to dough” and the community will decide who has the best pizza. Two Ton Tony’s is the reigning overall champion, and will return this year to defend its title. The event takes place at Summerville Presbyterian Church (4845 St. Paul Blvd., near Lakeshore Boulevard), and admission is $5 for adults, $4 for seniors, $3 for children under 12, and $15 for families (four members). Proceeds will benefit Summerville Presbyterian Church. For more information, call Linda Hayes at 738-6685 or visit summervillechurch.org. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY coffee tastings Free. 2258951. joebeanroasters.com. Miss Puerto Rico Pageant Orientation. 6-8 p.m. Orientation is at Ibero Child Care Center, 777 Clifford Ave. Must be age 14-17, at least 50% Puerto Rican, enrolled in high school for an entire school year with a 3.0 GPA, single, never married and without child 217-2213. PAWSome Winter Challenge Fundraising Event. 7-11 p.m. Camp Eastman, 1558 Lakeshore Blvd. Donate or register by 1/24. crowdrise.com/ pawsomewinterchallenge. [ SAT., JANUARY 26 ] Annual Cancer Martial Arts Tournament. 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Casey Park Indoor Soccer Field, 6551 Knickerbocker Rd., Ontario. Free to spectators. kuksoolny.com. Annual Metro Justice Meeting. 1-3 p.m. First Unitarian Church, 220 S Winton Rd Free. 3252560. metrojustice.org. Art of the Steal. Jan. 26-27, 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Hungerford Building, 1115 E. Main St. 2335645. thehungerford.com. Big Sale. 9 a.m.-2 p.m. 127 Railroad St. Art, books, clothes, handmade soap, zines, more facebook.com/ smugtownmushrooms. Federation of German-American Societies Gala Ball. 6 p.m. Diplomat Party House, 1956 Lyell Ave Cocktails 6-7 p.m., dinner 7 p.m., dancing 8 p.m. Music by The Schwarzenegger Connection $27, RSVP. 2718669. smeitzle@rochester. rr.com. diplomatbanquetctr.com. The Irondequoit Pizza Challenge. 4-6 p.m. Summerville Presbyterian Church, 4845 Saint Paul Blvd $3-$15. 738-6685. office@summervillechurch.org. summervillechurch.org.

New Charter School Management Organization to Meet with Community Members. Jan. 26. 11 a.m.-1 p.m. at Freedom School, 630 N. Goodman St., 3-5 p.m. at St. Michael’s Church, 124 Evergreen St., also 9 a.m.-10:30 p.m. at Public Market 559-7699. j.elliot@pucschools.org. Partners & Pairings. 10 a.m.5 p.m. Finger Lakes Cheese Trail & Seneca Wine Trail. $15. flcheesetrail.com. “Rocky Horror Picture Show”. 11:30 p.m. Cinema Theatre, 957 S. Clinton Ave. $3-$5. 271-1785. facebook.com/ thecinematheater. See Me in My Office: A Swinging 60’s Soiree. 8-11 p.m. The Yards, 50-52 Public Market. Tickets include 2 libations at CURE (cash bar also available), nibbles by Bake it or Cleave it, atmosphere by The Yards. Vintage Attire encouraged $8-$10. attheyards@gmail. com. seemeinmyoffice. brownpapertickets.com/. The Snowbrawl. 8 p.m. Skylark Lounge, 40 South Union St Doors at 8 p.m., event at 9 p.m. Arm wrestling event to benefit Alternatives for Battered Women. Formal attire encouraged $5 suggested donation. 270-8106. rochesterbrawl@gmail.com. rochesterbrawl.wordpress.com. [ SUN., JANUARY 27 ] Motorcycle Swap Meet. 12-5 p.m. Hilton Fireman’s Exempts Building, 137 South Ave (Route 259), Hilton. $5 admission. 749-2603. abatenymonroe.org. [ MON., JANUARY 28 ] 2013 Community Performance series. fourth Monday of every month, 10:30-11:15 a.m. Cobblestone Arts Center, 1622 New York 332. January

28: Grease $5. 398-0220. cobblestonesrtscenter.com. Expressions of King’s Legacy Event. 12-8 p.m. Rochester Institute of Technology, 1 Lomb Memorial Dr. Keynote by economist Julianne Malveaux, 12-2 p.m.; “The Meeting,” one-act play, 4 p.m.; Three Mo’ Tenors musical performance, 7 p.m. RIT’s Ingle Auditorium and Robert F. Panara Theatre. Free, register. 475-6546. rit. edu/news. Rochester Board of Education/ Community Conversation. Central Office Building, Central Office Building, 131 West Broad St. Parent Advisory Council meeting. rcsdk12.org. Victor: Our History, Our Town, Our Memories. 2 p.m. Legacy at the Fairways, 681 High St. Free, RSVP. 924-7043. [ TUE., JANUARY 29 ] East Side Winter Market. 3-6 p.m 2555 Baird Rd, Penfield. 348-9022. mbartolotta001@ rochester.rr.com. Human Library. 1-4 p.m. Rush Rhees Library, University of Rochester, River Campus Welles-Brown Room. 275-5506. suchiya@library.rochester.edu. Rally to Raise the Minimum Wage! Get on the Bus!. 7:30 a.m. Rally in Albany, bus leaves from 167 Flanders St Free. 3252560. metrojustice.org. Sierra Nevada Ovila Belgian Beer Dinner. 6:30 p.m. Tap & Table, 284 Exchange St. $49 + gratuity. 319-3388. thetapandtable.com. Voice of the Citizen Series: Seeking Solutions to Violence. 6-8 p.m. Edgerton Community Center, 41 Backus St 4286769. cityofrochester.gov.

Sports [ FRI., JANUARY 25 ] 2013 Labatt Blue Canal Cup. Jan. 25-26, 8 a.m. Bushnell’s Basin. highfallshockey.com. Rochester Americans v. Wilkes Barre Scranton Penguins. 7:05 p.m. Blue Cross Arena, One War Memorial Square $15-$20. 800-745-3000. ticketmaster.com.

Theater The Agony and Ecstacy of Steve Jobs. Through Jan. 30. Geva Theatre Center, 75 Woodbury Blvd Through Feb 10. Previews Thu-Fri 7 p.m., Sat 3 p.m., Opening Sat 8 p.m., Performances Sun 3 p.m., Wed Jan 30 7 p.m Tickets start at $30. 232-4382. gevatheatre.org “Almighty God Bierce”. MuCCC, 142 Atlantic Ave Fri-Sat 7:30 p.m., Sun 2 p.m $12-$15. 2440960. muccc.org. “A Life in the Theatre”. Blackfriars Theatre, 795 E. Main St Through Feb 10. Fri Jan 25Sat 8 p.m., Sun 2 p.m.; Fri Feb 1-Sat 8 p.m., Sun 2 p.m.; Thu Feb 7 7:30 p.m., Fri-Sat 8 p.m., Sun 2 p.m $27. 454-1260. bftix.org. “Next to Normal”. Geva Theatre Center, 75 Woodbury Blvd Through Feb 10. Wed Jan 23Thu 7:30 p.m., Fri 8 p.m., Sat 4 & 8:30 p.m., Sun 2 p.m. (audio described) & 7 p.m., Tue 7:30 p.m., Wed Jan 30 2 & 7:30 p.m Tickets start at $25. 232-4382. gevatheatre.org

Rhythm & Rhyme. RAPA, 727 E. Main St A journey through the magical world of poetry, Broadway-style. Based on the humorous poetic works of children’s author and teacher, Bill Schoff Directed and Choreographed by Cara D’Emanuele $15. 218-5254. Rochester Fringe Play Reading Series: “Mr. Bundy.”. Blackfriars Theatre, 795 E. Main St Free admission, donations accepted. 5202940.

Theater Audition [ THU., JANUARY 24 ] “Into the Woods”. 5-7 p.m. The Evangelical Lutheran Church of the Reformation, 111 N Chestnut St. Auditions are open to current high school and college-age students. 454-3367. stageworksroc.org/ Auditions.html. [ SAT., JANUARY 26 ] “Singin’ In the Rain”. Jan. 26-27, 10 a.m. Merry-GoRound Playhouse, 6877 East Lake Rd. 315-255-1305. merrygoroundcasting@gmail. com. FingerLakesMTF.com/ employment/auditions. [ MON., JANUARY 28 ] “Utopia Ltd.”. Jan. 28-29, 7 p.m. Salem United Church of Christ, 60 Bittner St OffMonroe Players. Performances May 10-12, 17-19 Free. offmonroeplayers.org.

Workshops [ WED., JANUARY 23 ] Family Development Class: “When the Chips Are Down.”. 6-8 p.m. Mental Health Association, 320 N Goodman St. For parents of school-age children Free, RSVP. 325-3145 x131. mharochester.org. Home Brewing Techniques Class. 7 p.m Joe Bean Coffee Roasters, 1344 University Ave. $20. 3195279. joebeanroasters.com. [ THU., JANUARY 24 ] Beating the Winter Blahs. 2 p.m. Legacy at the Fairways, 681 High St. Free, RSVP. 924-7043. Comics Night Out. 6:30 p.m. Books Etc., 78 W. Main St. Please bring your own laugh/ applause meters Free. 4744116. books_etc@yahoo.com. Enameled Jewelry for Beginners. 5:30-7:30 p.m. Livingston Arts Center, 4 Murray Hill Dr. $30, $5 tool deposit, register. 2436785. liz@livingstonarts.org. Know the 10 Signs of Alzheimer’s disease. 6:30 p.m. Greece Public Library, 2 Vince Tofany Blvd. Free. 800-2723900. alz.org/rochesterny. Nazareth College Opera Workshop. 7:30 p.m. Callahan Theater at Nazareth College Arts Center, 4245 East Ave. Free. 389-2700. [ FRI., JANUARY 25 ] Decorative and Faux Painting Workshop Series with Rick Muto. Jan. 25-27. 176 Anderson Ave., 2nd Floor $300, register before 1/25. 232-6030 x24. rick@ rickmuto.com. rickmuto.com. [ SAT., JANUARY 26 ] 10 Steps to a Healthier You. 10 a.m New York Wine & Culinary Center, 800 South Main St

THEATER | “A LIFE IN THE THEATRE”/“MR. BUNDY” Darren Aronofsky’s film “Black Swan” showed the dark side and the insecurity surrounding the life of performance and aging out of that career. This week, get a comedic take on the subject with Blackfriars Theatre’s staging of David Mamet’s hilarious play, “A Life in the Theatre” (pictured). The show follows the lives of two actors: Robert, a self-important but insecure theater veteran, and John, an eager and young upand comer. “This is a funny and sad look at both the rise of a young actor and the downward spiral of an older actor who is past his prime,” says the play’s director, David Runzo. The family-friendly production kicks off at Blackfriars Theatre (795 E. Main St.) on Friday, January 25, 7:30 p.m., and continues through February 10. Performances take place Fridays and Saturdays at 8 p.m., Sundays at 2 p.m., as well as Thursday, February 7 at 7:30 p.m. Tickets are $17-$27 and are available in person at Blackfriars Theatre, online at blackfriars.org, or by calling 454-1260, and at the door if tickets remain. On Saturday, January 26, Blackfriars will also host a reading of “Mr. Bundy” as part of the Rochester Fringe Play Reading Series. This drama follows a set of parents who consider vigilance and vigilantism when they learn that their next-door neighbor is a convicted child molester. The reading takes place at 3 p.m., and admission is free, but donations are accepted. For more info, call 520-2940 or visit bftix.org/RocFringe.html. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY $10 per class. 394-7070. nywcc.com. Coptic Bookbinding. 12-3 p.m. Livingston Arts Center, 4 Murray Hill Dr. $40, register. 2436785. liz@livingstonarts.org. Light Works! Presents Angels and Crystals with Sage Walker. 9:45 a.m. Brighton Town Park Lodge, 777 Westfall Rd. $20, register. 271-0370. Wellness Macedon: Good Living. 2 p.m. Books Etc., 78 W. Main St. 474-4116. books_etc@ yahoo.com. [ SUN., JANUARY 27 ] The Album with Martha Schermerhorn. Jan. 27. High Falls Fine Art Gallery, 60 Browns Race. $10, register. 325-2030. centerathighfalls.org. Level 1 Improv Comedy Classes. 1-4 p.m The Pillar Theater, VIP Studio (Suite D106) Village Gate Square, 274 N. Goodman St. $60 for series. 797-9086. VIP@ improvVIP.com. Writing Circle with Author Emily White. 2-3:30 p.m. Brighton Memorial Library, 2300 Elmwood Ave. Free, register. 784-5300. brightonlibrary.org. [ MON., JANUARY 28 ] Camp Justice: Social Media Activism. 7-9 p.m. Metro Justice, 167 Flanders St. metrojustice.org.

Family Development Class: “Will My Child Still Love Me?”. 12:30-2:30 p.m. Mental Health Association, 320 N Goodman St. For parents of school-age children Free, RSVP. 325-3145 x131. mharochester.org. Screenwriting 101. 7 p.m. Pittsford Community Library, 24 State Street, Pittsford Free. 249-5481. unspokenword.net. Wondrous Winter Cooking: “One Pot Wonders.”. 6-8 p.m. Cornell Cooperative Extension of Monroe County, 249 Highland Ave $30, register. 461-1000. mycce.org/monroe. [ TUE., JANUARY 29 ] African World History Class. 7:30-9 p.m. Baobab Cultural Center, 728 University Ave. $5 donation requested per session. baobab.center@yahoo.com. thebaobab.org. Family Development Class: “Did You Hear What I Said?”. 6-8 p.m. Mental Health Association, 320 N Goodman St. Free, RSVP. 325-3145 x131. mharochester.org.

GETLISTED get your event listed for free e-mail it to calendar@rochestercitynews.com. Or go online to rochestercitynewspaper.com and submit it yourself!

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 23


Movies Theaters Searchable, up-to-the-minute movie times for all area theaters can be found at rochestercitynewspaper.com, and on City’s mobile website.

Film

Brockport Strand 93 Main St, Brockport, 637-3310, rochestertheatermanagement.com

Canandaigua Theatres 3181 Townline Road, Canandaigua, 396-0110, rochestertheatermanagement.com

Cinema Theater 957 S. Clinton St., 271-1785, cinemarochester.com

Culver Ridge 16 2255 Ridge Rd E, Irondequoit 544-1140, regmovies.com

The return of the private eye [ REVIEW ] BY GEORGE GRELLA

Dryden Theatre 900 East Ave., 271-3361, dryden.eastmanhouse.org

Eastview 13 Eastview Mall, Victor 425-0420, regmovies.com

Geneseo Theatres Geneseo Square Mall, 243-2691, rochestertheatermanagement.com

Greece Ridge 12 176 Greece Ridge Center Drive 225-5810, regmovies.com

Henrietta 18 525 Marketplace Drive 424-3090, regmovies.com

The Little

“Broken City” (R), DIRECTED BY ALLEN HUGHES NOW PLAYING

Whatever its originality in conception and execution, “Broken City” demonstrates, in its own unusual way, the durability of film genre conventions. The movie’s mixture of fictional and historical elements and its location in New York City provide a kind of verifiable background for a story of complicated schemes of manipulation and deceit, but its greatest strength derives from its fidelity to the familiar devices of its form.

240 East Ave., 258-0444 thelittle.org

Movies 10 2609 W. Henrietta Road 292-0303, cinemark.com

Pittsford Cinema 3349 Monroe Ave., 383-1310 pittsford.zurichcinemas.com

Tinseltown USA/IMAX 2291 Buffalo Road 247-2180, cinemark.com

Webster 12 2190 Empire Blvd., 888-2624386, amctheatres.com

The movie begins with an all-too-common event, a detective, Billy Taggart (Mark Wahlberg) shooting a suspect on a dark night, in an ambiguous situation that lands him on trial for murder. Although exonerated and praised by the mayor, Nicholas Hostetler (Russell Crowe), Taggart is dismissed from the force. When the picture reopens seven years later, he is working as a private detective in Brooklyn, barely scraping by as a peeper, a seedy voyeur snapping photos of straying spouses. Just before the end of his re-election campaign in a close race against Councilman Jack Valliant (Barry Pepper), the mayor summons Billy and offers him $50,000 to spy on his wife, Cathleeen (Catherine ZetaJones), to find out if she’s betraying him. Billy tails her and photographs her meetings with Valliant’s campaign manager (Kyle Chandler). When he hands the pictures to Hostetler, a couple of people warn him off, and Billy begins to realize that much more lies beneath the surface of an

Catherine Zeta-Jones and Russell Crowe in “Broken City.”

PHOTO COURTESY 20TH

adulterous affair, including political corruption and graft in the billions of dollars. Although the script never fully clarifies the financial complications, it maintains a powerful fidelity to its title. All the characters in that broken city apparently practice the dark arts of duplicity and deception in both the personal and political realms, and for the most part Billy serves as their major patsy and victim. The mayor, his wife, the police commissioner (Jeffrey Wright), even Billy’s long-time girlfriend (Natalie Martinez) all betray him in one way or another. The movie demonstrates some correspondence to contemporary history in its actions and people. Russell Crowe’s smug confidence and arrogant manner echo something of the personality of Mayor Ed Koch, while Barry Pepper, the rich, handsome Ivy Leaguer, resembles the late John Lindsay in both appearance and background. Even the gigantic housing deal that will evict lower-income residents to profit a developer and the mayor sounds like a classic Donald Trump stratagem. Beyond their connections to real life counterparts, the actors all make their characters as plausible as the situation that motivates them. Though he’s played a number of “good” characters in the past, Russell Crowe shows he can portray a clever, oily bad guy, and Catherine Zeta-Jones, who appears all too sparsely, demonstrates promise as a femme fatale right out of film noir. As in some previous

CENTURY FOX

ATTENTION FILM FANS

CITY Newspaper is no longer running film times in print. Instead, you can find accurate, up-to-the-minute times for all area theaters on rochestercitynewspaper.com. Keep reading CITY every week for film reviews, blurbs, & theater information and post your own reviews online!

24 CITY JANUARY 23-29, 2013


The dull pain of a fresh bruise [ REVIEW ] BY ADAM LUBITOW

“Rust and Bone” (R), DIRECTED BY JACQUES AUDIARD OPENS FRIDAY

films, Mark Wahlberg suggests that he may be a legitimate heir to the legacy of John Garfield as a tough, decent, working-class guy victimized by a decadent socio-economic class. Despite its references to recent history, the elegance of most of its interiors, and the fine exterior shots of New York City, the picture really depends upon a field of reference out of the rich past of Hollywood and 20th century fiction. “Broken City” repeats or updates many of the established devices of the American hard-boiled detective novel and the scores of movies the form spawned. In the great tradition, Billy Taggart’s low-rent office contrasts with the mayor’s palatial digs, as his own life differs drastically from the posh elegance of his clients and the people he investigates. His hardworking secretary (Alona Tal) trades wisecracks with him in the manner of numerous loyal, devoted, tough-talking female sidekicks in American detective fiction and film. He experiences the same uneasy relationship with the police and even suffers the same sorts of beatings and brutality of his predecessors in the novels of Dashiell Hammett and Raymond Chandler. Mark Wahlberg may not exactly rise to the level of Humphrey Bogart, but he occupies some of the same territory, repeats some of the same behaviors, and comprehends some of the same sense of moral ambiguity that governs his world. In “Broken City” he comes to understand the truth of Sam Spade’s wised-up and unillusioned remark in “The Maltese Falcon”: “Everybody’s got something to conceal.”

“Rust and Bone” is exactly the sort of love story you’d expect from Jacques Audiard, director of the brutal, Oscarnominated French crime drama, “A Prophet” — a filmmaker whose usual propensity is toward stories about thugs, hoodlums, and other angry young men. That is to say, it’s a violent, decidedly unromantic one. A rough-and-tumble portrait of two bruised, battered, and altogether broken individuals who find one another and form an unlikely bond, its story plays less like a sweet caress than a swift punch in the gut. As the film opens, brutish, downon-his-luck single father Ali (Matthias Schoenaerts, in a role not too far off from the troubled boxer he played in last year’s “Bullhead”) is traveling with his young son, Sam, leaving behind a bad situation with the boy’s mother to move in with his working-class sister and her husband in the French Riviera. Ali starts working as a bouncer at a dance club, where he meets Stephanie (Marion Cotillard, in a Golden

Matthias Schoenaerts and Marion Cotillard in “Rust and Bone.” PHOTO COURTESY SONY PICTURES CLASSIC

Globe-nominated performance), coming to her aid and driving her home after she’s assaulted during a bar fight. It seems as though she’s no stranger to this kind of trouble, and he leaves her with his phone number should she need his help again. Weeks later, Stephanie contacts Ali again. She’s been through an accident during a live show at the aquatic park where she works as a whale trainer, and she’s lost both of her legs. Now housebound, she’s lonely, depressed, and desperately in need of companionship. He comes to see her, and gets her out of the house by taking her to the beach, allowing her to see that life without her legs is possible. Gradually the two strike up a friendship, which eventually leads to sex, though at first it’s just “to see if it still works”. Their friends-with-benefits-style relationship mostly involves Stephanie texting Ali to see if he’s OP (their text code that means he’s free for a quick romp). What begins as a relationship of convenience — two people who have been damaged, emotionally and physically, finding comfort in one another — morphs into something deeper without either party realizing it. Ali and Stephanie’s problems perhaps boil down to rather simplistic solutions: she needs to feel desirable again, while he needs to find the correct way to channel his aggression and gift for smashing things with his fists. But the performances from each actor invest the characters with the complexity that the script sometimes lacks. Cotillard in particular delivers a quieter, more internal performance than one would expect in a role with such potential for Oscar-reel acting pyrotechnics. It should be noted that the digital removal of Cotillard’s legs is a convincing, seamless effect. Audiard remains somewhat detached from the material as a director, leaving us guessing as to what’s going on in the minds of his characters. There’s

no attempt here to make either of these characters particularly likeable, a decision which somehow feels very French. Stephanie is dour and somewhat manipulative even before her accident (though I appreciated the decision to avoid the cliché of making the handicapped Stephanie out to be a saint), while Ali is hot-headed and aggressive; a large, powerful creature capable of inflicting violence at any moment. Rather animalistic in nature, he always does what it takes to ensure his own survival. He clearly loves his son, but often neglects him, too. His relationship with Stephanie brings out a softer side of him, hinting that he does indeed have the capacity to care for another human being. Not for nothing is the fact that Stephanie made her living by training wild animals to obey guidelines inherently against their nature. This skill becomes useful to her as she accompanies Ali when he gets involved in a network of illegal, bare-knuckle street fights. Ostensibly he starts just to make money to support him and his son, but he admits to Stephanie that the main draw for him is the thrill and fun of the fights, and she finds herself captivated as well. As a director, Audiard is unusually attuned to the ways in which people wear the scars of the choices they’ve had to make as they move through life. Nominated for the Palme d’Or at the Cannes Film Festival, but completely snubbed when Oscar nominations were announced, “Rust and Bone” is an uneven, not easily digestible film. Like its characters, I found the sheer physicality of the film often thrilling to watch. Audiard finds the raw, beating heart at the center of this tough love story, infusing it with a fairy-tale-esque poetry. For all its flaws, it’s a film that sticks with you, not unlike the dull pain that comes with a fresh bruise.

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 25


avant garde to funk bop to big bands blues and beyond

Rochester’s 24 Hour Jazz Station Streaming Live 24/7/365 at Jazz901.org

WHAT ARE YOU DOING TODAY?

CITY NEWSPAPER’s

DAILY CHOICES

NEW EVENTS EVERY DAY, ONLINE AT ROCHESTERCITYNEWSPAPER.COM Every morning City Newspaper’s calendar editors give their picks for the most interesting events of the day, everything from concerts to exhibits, theater shows to festivals!

26 CITY JANUARY 23-29, 2013

Film Previews Full film reviews available at rochestercitynewspaper.com. [ OPENING ] BEST OF NY INT’L CHILDREN’S FILM FESTIVAL: KID FLIX MIX (NR): Short film program featuring audience and jury favorites from the 2012 New York Int’l Children’s Film Festival. Little (Sat, Jan 26, 10 a.m., $5) HANSEL & GRETEL: WITCH HUNTERS (R): A tongue-incheek action-horror-comedy about the titular fairy tale brother and sister, now all grown up and battling witches professionally. Starring Jeremy Renner, Gemma Arterton, Peter Stomare, and Famke Janssen. Brockport, Canandaigua, Geneseo, Tinseltown MOVIE 43 (R): Irreverent comedy anthology film from producer Peter Farrelly, with a variety of writers and directors creating a series of interconnected short films starring the most crazypants cast I’ve ever seen, including: Emma Stone, Dennis Quaid, Elizabeth Banks, Common, Naomi Watts, Hugh Jackman, Halle Berry, Liev Schreiber, Anna Faris, Chris Pratt, Uma Thurman, John Hodgeman, Kate Winslet, and Bobby Cannavale, to name just a few. Canandaigua, Tinseltown, Webster NEW YORK FILMMAKERS QUARTERLY (NR): Recurring series showcasing short films from local and New York State filmmakers. Little (Wed, Jan 23, 7 p.m. & Sat, Jan 26, 2 p.m., $5) PARKER (R): Taylor Hackford (“Ray,” “The Devil’s Advocate”) directs Jason Statham in a crime thriller based the best-selling series of pulp novels by Donald Westlake, revolving around a ruthless criminal anti-hero. Also starring Jennifer Lopez, Nick Nolte, and Michael Chiklis. Canandaigua, Tinseltown, Webster QUARTET (PG-13): Dustin Hoffman directs this comedy with a cast stacked with veteran British actors (Maggie Smith, Michael Gambon, Billy Connolly) about a home for retired opera singers thrown into upheaval after the arrival of a diva. Pittsford THE ROCKY HORROR PICTURE SHOW (1975): The Cinema brings back the midnight screening of this forevercult classic about sweet transvestites from transsexual Transylvania. Come in costume, bring the supplies, shout the lines, and shiver in antici…pation. Cinema (Sat., Jan. 26, 11:30 p.m.) RUST AND BONE (R): French director Jacques Audiard follows up his critically acclaimed crime drama, “A Prophet” with an unconventional love story between a brutish street fighter and a whale trainer


(Marion Cotillard, in a Golden Globe-nominated performance) who’s lost her legs in an orca attack. Little, Pittsford [ CONTINUING ] ANNA KARENINA (PG-13): This opulent adaptation of the Tolstoy classic, from director Joe Wright and Oscar-winning screenwriter Tom Stoppard, stars Keira Knightley as one of literature’s best-known adulteresses, married to Jude Law’s aristocrat but consumed by an affair with Aaron TaylorJohnson’s dashing cavalry officer. Cinema ARGO (R): Director Ben Affleck co-stars with John Goodman, Bryan Cranston, and Kyle Chandler in the onceclassified true tale of a CIA exfiltration expert who hatches a daring plan to free six Americans hiding at the home of the Canadian ambassador during the 1979 Iran hostage crisis. Cinema BROKEN CITY (R): Private eye Mark Wahlberg gets in over his head when a mayor (Russell Crowe) hires him to tail his cheating wife (Catherine Zeta-Jones) in this crime thriller. Also starring Jeffrey Wright, Kyle Chandler, and Barry Pepper. Brockport, Canandaigua, Geneseo, Pittsford, Tinseltown DJANGO UNCHAINED (R): Quentin Tarantino’s latest exploitation extravaganza, this

time starring Jamie Foxx as a former slave out to rescue his wife from the clutches of an evil plantation owner. Also starring Leonardo DiCaprio, Christoph Waltz, and Samuel L. Jackson. Little, Tinseltown GANGSTER SQUAD (R): A stylish 1950’s-era crime drama from Ruben Fleischer (the director of “Zombieland”) about a group of undercover LAPD detectives attempting to take down mob kingpin Mickey Cohen by any means necessary. Starring Ryan Gosling, Sean Penn, Josh Brolin, Emma Stone, and Nick Nolte. Geneseo, Pittsford, Tinseltown A HAUNTED HOUSE (R): Spoofing the genre “found footage” horror films, this movie (written by and starring Marlon Wayans) promises to deliver loads of timely, pointedly hilarious satire. That, or an endless parade of painfully unfunny references to films in a genre that already past its peak. Hard to say which. Canandaigua, Tinseltown THE HOBBIT: AN UNEXPECTED JOURNEY (PG-13): The first installment of Peter Jackson’s long-awaited adaptation of the “Lord of the Rings” prequel, chronicling Bilbo Baggins’ adventures in Middle Earth. Tinseltown THE IMPOSSIBLE (PG-13): Naomi Watts and Ewan

For information: Call us (585) 244-3329 Fax us (585) 244-1126 Mail Us City Classifieds 250 N. Goodman Street Rochester, NY 14607 Email Us classifieds@ rochester-citynews.com

A scene from “Mama.”

PHOTO COURTESY UNIVERSAL PICTURES

McGregor star in this grueling drama, based on a true story, about a family separated and struggling to survive in the aftermath of the massive Indian Ocean tsunami of 2004. Pittsford JACK REACHER (PG-13): Tom Cruise: action hero. Based on the popular series of novels by Lee Child, about one bad-ass homicide investigator. Cinema THE LAST STAND (R): Arnold Schwarzenegger is back on the big screen, playing a former LAPD officer who’s the last barrier to preventing a drug kingpin from crossing the Mexican border, in popular Korean director Kim Ji-woon’s

English-language debut. With Forest Whitaker, Johnny Knoxville, Peter Stormare, and Zach Gilford. Canandaigua, Geneseo, Tinseltown LES MISÉRABLES (PG-13): The hugely popular, long-running stage musical based on the Victor Hugo novel comes to the big screen courtesy of “King’s Speech” director Tom Hooper. With Hugh Jackman, Russell Crowe, Amanda Seyfried, and Anne Hathaway. Canandaigua, Geneseo, Little, Pittsford, Tinseltown LIFE OF PI (PG): Ang Lee continues his unpredictable streak with an eye-popping adaptation of Yann Martel’s

acclaimed novel, now a 3D adventure about a young man who survives a shipwreck and finds himself on a lifeboat with an orangutan, a hyena, an ailing zebra, and a Bengal tiger. Pittsford, Tinseltown LINCOLN (PG-13): Daniel Day-Lewis channels our 16th President for Steven Spielberg, focusing on the last few months of the Great Emancipator’s life, which includes the Union’s victory in the War Between The States and the abolition of slavery. Co-starring Tommy Lee Jones, Jared Harris, and Sally Field. Canandaigua, Pittsford, Tinseltown MAMA (PG-13): Guillermo del Toro produced this supernatural thriller about two little girls who lived alone in the woods for five years before being rescued. Their new adopted parents soon discover that the girls may not have returned alone. Starring Jessica Chastain. Canandaigua, Geneseo, Tinseltown MONSTER’S INC. 3-D (G): Adventures in babysitting with lovable monsters Mike Wazowski and James “Sulley” Sullivan, now busting out into the third dimension in this Pixar re-release. Tinseltown SILVER LININGS PLAYBOOK (R): Lovably unstable mental patients Bradley Cooper and Jennifer Lawrence fall

for one another and learn to ballroom dance in this likely Oscar contender from David O. Russell. With Robert De Niro and Jacki Weaver. Canandaigua, Little, Pittsford, Tinseltown SKYFALL (PG-13): Bond 23 brings back Daniel Craig as 007, now directed by Oscar winner Sam Mendes and trying to prevent bad guy Javier Bardem from taking down Judi Dench’s M. With Ben Whishaw, Ralph Fiennes, and Albert Finney. Cinema WRECK-IT RALPH (PG): John C. Reilly, Sarah Silverman, and Jane Lynch provide a few of the voices in this animated comedy about a video-game bad guy who dreams of becoming a hero, even if it means upending the status quo at the arcade. Tinseltown ZERO DARK THIRTY (R): Director Kathryn Bigelow and writer Mark Boal follow up their Oscar-winning “The Hurt Locker” with this likely Best Picture contender, examining the decade-long hunt to capture Osama Bin Laden. Starring Jessica Chastain, Joel Edgerton, Kyle Chandler, and Jason Clarke. Brockport, Canandaigua, Geneseo, Little, Pittsford, Tinseltown

BUILDING FOR LEASE IN CULTURAL DISTRICT

EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY

All real estate advertised in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act, which makes it unlawful, “to make, print, or publish, any notice, statement, or advertisement, with respect to the sale or rental of a dwelling that indicates any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin.” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under the age of 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertisement for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. Call the local Fair Housing Enforcement Project, FHEP at 325-2500 or 1-866-671-FAIR. Si usted sospecha una practica de vivienda injusta, por favor llame al servicio legal gratis. 585-325-2500 - TTY 585-325-2547.

-40 Car Off Street Parking -Prior Use Medical Training -1,500 Feet Warehouse

-4,000 Feet Office Space -Overhead Delivery Door -Lease Rate Under $7 per ft.

Prominent 707 Main St. Location For information – Owner Cell (585) 734-0613 rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 27


Home and Garden Professionals SUN WORLD CONSTRUCTION INSULATION SPECIALIST

for all your weatherizing needs. Blown Fiberglass & Cellulose Spray foam • Energy audits

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ERNEST W. PETERSON INC. DEPENDABLE INTERIOR & EXTERIOR PAINTING & STAINING

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American Plaster & Drywall

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WINTER IS HERE! Time to clean your chimney!

Home Services MASTER CHIMNEY & MASONRY See our ad under Home and Garden Professionals. Chimney Cleaning, Masonry Repairs, Foundation Repairs, Roof Leaks, Brick Steps Repaired. 585-7348444

Adoption ADOPT: 3+1=Happiness. Looking to adopt another little miracle and make our little Lucy a big sister. Contact Robin & Neil @ 866-3030668, http://www.rnladopt.info/. PREGNANT? CONSIDERING ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families Nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions 866-413-6293.

Automotive ALWAYS BETTER Higher cash for your Junk Cars, Trucks and Vans. From $200-$800 or more for newer. Running or not. With free towing. Also free removal of any unwanted model in any condition. Call 585-305-5865 CASH FOR CARS Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888-420-3808 www. cash4car.com (AAN CAN) FOR SALE 4 Blizzak Winter Tires on Alloy wheels for Mazda RX-8 or similar $250. btowler@rochestercitynews.com

K-D Moving & Storage Inc.

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HOME SERVICE PROVIDERS

Did you know that City Newspaper Readers spent OVER $90 MILLION DOLLARS on home improvements in the LAST 12 MONTHS? Call Christine today to advertise

585-244-3329 ext. 23

Education ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from home. *Medical, *Business, *Criminal Justice, *Hospitality, Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEC certified. Call 888-2018657www.CenturaOnline.com

Events GUN SHOW Canandaigua NY, Steamboat Landing BallroomJanuary 26-27, 2013** 205 Lakeshore Drive, Canandaigua. Public Hours: Sat 9-4 and Sun 9-3 www.nfcshows.com

For Sale BEANIE BABIES (TY) 1997, 1998 Light blue Elephant (Peanuts), Twigs, Squealer, Iggy and Rainbow with the mixed up name tags. & more! $4 - $8 585880-2903 All $49.99 BOOK ENDS of races horses with jockey’s carved in wood, Christmas gift. $25 585-880-2903 BRONZE COLOR metal horse, nice size 13” long, 10” high with engraved saddle, horse lover gift $25 585-880-2903 DOG & CAT HOUSES Kennels, porch steps, do it yourself kits. Quick assembly 585-752-1000 $49 Jim GERMAN SHEPHERD Plaque on chain. Carved head on real wood. (said, beware!) Nice gift $20.00 585-880-2903 TV RCA 35” with remote control. Excellent condition $25 585225-5526

Jam Section 2 TROMBONE PLAYERS NEEDED to play with one of Rochester’s Finest Big Bands. Must read. (Great Charts). Able to rehearse every other Wednesday 585-442-7480 BASSIST AVAILABLE: Electric, Acoustic. All styles. Mature, Reliable and Professional. Able to rehearse and open for gigs. Call 585-2609958 fstone@rochester.rr.com CALLING ALL MUSICIANS OF ALL GENRES the Rochester Music Coalition wants you! Please register on our website. For further info: www.rochestermusiccoalition.org info@rochestermusiccoalition.org 585-235-8412

• Chimney Cleaning • Chimney Repairs • Brick Steps Repaired • Founda�on Repairs • Concrete Repairs & New Walks Installed • Chimney Pain�ng • Chimneys Rebuilt • Chimney Re-lining

ATTENTION

28 CITY JANUARY 23-29, 2013

> page 27 Real Estate or State Income Taxes, minutes to Atlantic Ocean.  772581-0080, www.beach-cove.com. Limited seasonal rentals

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473-6610 or 473-4357 23 Arlington St. NY D.O.T.#9657

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EXP. DRUMMER Strong vocals to join (keyboard)/ (keyboard bass) who also sings lead. To form duo (Retro Pop/Dance/Jazz). Must be willing to shop the musical product around to get gigs 585-426-7241 EXPERIENCED LEAD VOCALS Seeks employment. Pat experience Inkspots, Platters, Drifters, James Brown among many. Leroy Harris. Contact Bobby 585-328-4121 Specialties, classics, R&B Soul. LOCAL GUTIARIST Long time player looking to put together a little project see what happens? Looking for keyboards, drummer, bass (upright?) If interested call Bear 420-9145


Place your real estate ad by calling 244-3329 ext. 23 or rochestercitynewspaper.com Ad Deadlines: Friday 4pm for Display Ads Monday at noon for Line ads MEET OTHER MUSICIANS any instrument, male singer- jam together- coffee house, private gigs, I play keys Call Martin 585266-6337 MEN ENJOY SINGING Fun with the Chorus of the Genesee, Sing,

learn, perform, share laughs and libation! Guest night Tuesday at 7 PM. Stop in at 58 E Main St, Webster. Call 585-698-7784 R & B SOUL BANDS seek employment, experienced groups, already performing, seek new jobs.

HomeWork A cooperative effort of City Newspaper and RochesterCityLiving, a program of the Landmark Society.

Contact Bobby 585-328-4121 ROCK STAR, MR. ROCHESTER, lead vocalist, is looking to form band (Classic Rock) with lead guitarist, bassist, drummer & rhythm guitars Covers & originals 585-473-5089

continues on page 30

Find your way home with

Here to work for you! Nino Vitale Real Estate Agent

Proudly serving the Rochester area.

CALL: 315-729-2005

email: ninovitale33@gmail.com web: vincent-associates.com

Sparkling Diamonds and Hardwood Floors 189 Colebourne Road Tree-lined Colebourne Road in Rochester’s North Winton Village neighborhood features many early 20th century Colonial Revival style houses and American Foursquare’s set on carefully maintained lawns. The large covered front porch at 189 Colebourne Road, complete with porch swing, is the perfect space for relaxing on warm summer days. The house, built in 1926, is entered from the porch, through a vestibule, and into the living room. The door separating the vestibule from the living room includes a leaded-glass window with a diamond design. Gleaming hardwood floors and unpainted gumwood trim are featured in almost every room. The living room has a large bay window and a brick-front fireplace. The fireplace has a decorative wooden mantelpiece and is flanked by built-in bookcases with leadedglass doors featuring a diamond design. The living room and adjacent dining room have crown molding. The cozy dining room is the perfect space for enjoying tasty meals with family and friends. This room offers access to the backyard patio through a sliding glass door and also an entrance to the kitchen. The recently remodeled, user-friendly kitchen has a grey ceramic tile floor and offers plenty of counter space for easy food preparation and cupboard space for storage. A second kitchen door, a solid wood pocket door, leads to the living room. The staircase to the second floor can be separated from the living room by a pocket

door with a leaded glass window. Upstairs are three bedrooms with large closets. The second floor hallway includes a built-in linen cabinet and drawers. The bathroom has a bathtub and shower. A second full bathroom with stall shower is available in the partially finished basement. The attic offers plenty of storage space. The spacious fenced-in backyard is the perfect size for playing outdoor games or for a dog to run and play. The recently built patio is an ideal area for enjoying meals and relaxing during Rochester’s warmer months. Space is available for planting colorful flowers around the front and backyard. The house is a short distance to several parks including Tryon Park and Ellison Park. Also nearby is the Winton Branch library, and many churches, restaurants, and businesses along North Winton Road. For more information about the North Winton Village neighborhood please visit northwinton.org. The lovingly cared-for 1,234 square foot house at 189 Colebourne Road is listed at $140,000. The property includes a two-car garage. For more information visit rochestercityliving.com/ property/R198572 or contact Tracie A. Cristofori of Nothnagle Realtors at 585.421.5137. by Padraic Michael Collins-Bohrer Mr. Collins-Bohrer enjoys studying Rochester history and architecture. He lives and works in Downtown Rochester.

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 29


Legal Ads [ LEGAL NOTICE ]

> page 29 THE GREGORY KUNDE CHORALE is looking for male voices. Call for an audition now to join our fourteenth season! Info Line 377 7568 or visit our website www. gregorykundechorale.org

Lost and Found LOST 14x20 inch canvas portrait man and tropical birds. Artwalk vicinity zips 14620, 14618,

14607. Reward. Margot Fass 733-0563

Looking For... VENDORS OF QUALITY ANTIQUES Consider a wonderful New Antique Center in Downtown Owego. Visit www.earlyowegoantiquecenter. com Call Fran@ 607-239-8353 or email: lantalek@stny.rr.com for vendor space XMAS Wool/Flannel Army Blanket donations needed! Gift new

P LY M O U T H S P I R I T UA L I S T C H U R C H Together We Are One

2 9 V I C K PA R K A RO C H E S T E R , N Y

Sunday Services 10:30 AM All Message Service & Free Spiritual Healing Third Weds ~ 7 PM ~ Séances ~ Classes ~ Gallery Reading ~ For more information and schedules www.plymouthspiritualistchurch.org Robin Higgins, Pastor ~ Phone: 585.271.1470

blankets to “Sunday Circle” knitters/crocheters to decorate for poor patients of R.P.C. Contact Mary at mgrant@frontier.com.

Miscellaneous BUY REAL VIAGRA, Cialis, Levitra, Staxyn, Propecia & more... FDA- Approved, U.S.A. Pharmacies. Next day delivery avaiable. Order online or by phone at viamedic.com, 800-467-0295 FREE DENTAL CLEANING MCC Sophomore Dental Hygiene student looking for volunteer patients interested in complimentary dental cleaning. Must be 2+ years since last professional cleaning. Call 585314-0398 and leave a message for Leslie S. HAS YOUR BUILDING SHIFTED OR SETTLED? Contact Woodford Brothers Inc, for straightening, leveling, foundation and wood frame repairs at 1-800-OLDBARN. www.woodfordbros.com. “Not applicable in Queens county” REACH 5 MILLION hip, forwardhinking consumers across the U.S. When you advertise in alternative newspapers, you become part of the local scene and gain access to an audience you won’t reach anywhere else. christine@ rochester-citynews.com SAWMILLS from only $3997MAKE MONEY & SAVE MONEY with your own bandmil Cut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship. FREE Info & DVD www. NorwoodSawmills.com/300N 1-800-578-1363 Ext.300N TAKE VIAGRA? Stop paying outrageous prices! Best prices... VIAGRA 100MG, 40 pills+/4 free, only $99.00. Discreet shipping, Power Pill.1-800-374-2619

Mind Body Spirit GOD GIFTED PSYCHIC Nicole Goodman. Solves all impossible problems. Specializes in reuniting lovers. 100% successful and guaranteed. See results in 8-12 hours. 1-866-524-6689

Notices WORKING HARD? SNAP CAN WORK FOR YOU! Find out if you may be eligible for SNAP – the new name for the Food Stamp Program. Call MCLAC NOEP at (585) 295-5624 or (585) 2955626. Prepared by a project of Hunger Solutions New York, USDA/FNS & NYSOTDA. This institution is an equal opportunity provider.

Wanted to Buy BUYING / SELLING BUYING/ SELLING- gold, gold-filled, sterling silver, silver plate, diamonds, fine watches (Rolex, Cartier, Patek Philippe)coins, paintings, furs, estates. Call for appointment 917696-2024 JAY

30 CITY JANUARY 23-29, 2013

6721 Lakehouse Associates LLC (“LLC”) filed Arts. of Org. with Secy.of State of NY (SSNY) on December 12, 2012. Office Location: Monroe County. SSNY designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 3055 BrightonHenrietta Town Line Road, Rochester, New York 14623. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ LEGAL NOTICE ] Consult a Registered Professional Nurse, PLLC. Art. of Org. filed with the NY Sec. of State (SSNY) on 1/10/13. Office in Monroe Co. SSNY Design. Agent of PLLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to Susan J. LaGaipa, RN, 20 El Centro Drive Rochester, NY 14609. Purpose: Practice of Registered Professional Nursing. [ LEGAL NOTICE ] Dental Office 2024 LLC filed Arts. of Org. with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/28/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to 369 Highland Avenue, Rochester, NY 14620. Purpose: any lawful activity.

December 20, 2012. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to the LLC, 1013 Hard Rock Road, Webster NY 14580. Purpose: For any lawful purpose. [ LEGAL NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Limited Liability Company 1) Name: Alliance4Accountability, LLC. 2) Articles of Organization were filed by Department of State of New York on December 13, 2012. 3) County: Monroe. 4) The Company does not have a specific date of dissolution. 5) the Secretary of State has been designated as an agent upon whom process against the Company may be served. The address to which the process shall be mailed: 5615 Buffalo Rd. Churchville, NY 14428. 6) Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] 113 JZ, LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 11/20/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: James Zisouski, 53 Main St., Brockport, NY 14420. General Purposes.

[ LEGAL NOTICE ]

[ NOTICE ]

Name of limited liability company: Sterilizer Technical Specialists East LLC (“LLC”). The fictitious name under which the LLC will do business in New York is: STS East LLC. Date Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (“SSNY”) November 19, 2012. LLC organized in Delaware on November 9, 2012. NY county location: Monroe. SSNY designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to 1777 E. Henrietta Road, Rochester, New York 14623. Address required to be maintained in jurisdiction of organization or if not required, principal office of LLC: 874 Walker Road, Suite C, Dover, Delaware 19904. Copy of formation document on file with: the Secretary of State of Delaware, P.O. Box 898, Dover, Delaware 19903. Purpose: any lawful activity.

56 JZ, LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 11/20/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: James Zisouski, 53 Main St., Brockport, NY 14420. General Purposes.

[ LEGAL NOTICE ] Notice of formation of a limited liability company (LLC). Name: SUKHENKO DESIGN, LLC. Article of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on

[ NOTICE ] 60-62 JZ, LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 11/20/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: James Zisouski, 53 Main St., Brockport, NY 14420. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] D Napolitano, LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 12/13/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Dominic T. Napolitano, 1337 Schlegel Rd., Webster, NY 14580. General Purposes.

[ NOTICE ] DJ BURNS PROPERTIES LLC (LLC) filed Arts. of Org. with NY Secy. of State (SS) on December 26, 2012. LLC’s office is in Monroe County. SS is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS shall mail a copy of any process to LLC’s principal business location at 14 West Ham Circle, North Chili, NY 14514. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] HUDSON PLAZA LLC file Arts. of Org. with Sec’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/27/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to 11 Sturbridge Lane Pittsford, New York 14534. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Index No. 2012-5762 SUPREME COURT STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF MONROE ESL Federal Credit Union Plaintiff, vs. Estate of Marion T. Dalba, Vincent A. Dalba, as Executor; People of the State of New York; United States of America; Doreen Dalba; Oscar Arnada, Defendants. Pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale dated December 21, 2012 and entered herein, I, the undersigned, the Referee in said Judgment named, will sell at public auction in the front vestibule of the Monroe County Office Building, 39 West Main Street, Rochester, New York, County of Monroe, on February 13, 2013 at 10:30 a.m., on that day, the premises directed by said Judgment to be sold and therein described as follows: ALL THAT TRACT OR PARCEL OF LAND, situate in the Town of Greece, County of Monroe and State of New York, known as 184 Stoneycreek Drive, Rochester, NY 14616; Tax Account No. 059.15-2-62 described in Deed recorded in Liber 9378 of Deeds, page 229. Said premises are sold subject to any state of facts an accurate survey may show, zoning restrictions and any amendments thereto, covenants, restrictions, agreements, reservations, and easements of record and prior liens, if any, municipal departmental violations, and such other provisions as may be set forth in the Complaint and Judgment filed in this action. Judgment amount: $106,447.49

cont. on page 32


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horse leaders and side walkers. Call Kim Kennedy at (585) 340-2016 or email kkennedy@ heritagechristianservices.org LIFESPAN’S OMBUDSMAN PROGRAM s looking for volunteers to advocate for individuals living in long-term care settings. Please contact call 585.287.6378 or e-mail dfrink@lifespan-roch.org for more information LITERACY VOLUNTEERS OF ROCHESTER needs adult tutors to help adults who are waiting to improve their reading, writing, English speaking, or math skills. Call 473-3030, or check our website at www.literacyrochester. org ROCHESTER CARES is looking for volunteers interested in joining us to make a difference in Rochester!! One time and recurring volunteer opportunities with a wide range of organizations. www. rochestercares.org/calendar.php SCHOOL #12 999 South Ave. is looking for reading & math volunteers, English & Spanish. Training provided. Call Vicki 585461-4282 UNITED WAY Volunteer Fundraiser needed. Verification Phone Calling & Data Management. Strong interpersonal skills; attention to detail; strong verbal and written communication skills. Call 2426547

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plus, but not limited to, costs, disbursements, attorney fees and additional allowance, if any, all with legal interest. DATED: January 2013 Dennis Gruttadaro, Esq., Referee LACY KATZEN LLP Attorneys for Plaintiff 130 East Main Street Rochester, New York 14604 Telephone: (585) 324-5767 [ NOTICE ] Index No. 2012-6268 SUPREME COURT STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF MONROE ESL Federal Credit Union Plaintiff, vs. Gary J. Lisman; Jackie Ward; Claire Howe; Katie Burke, Defendants. Pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale dated January 2, 2013 and entered herein, I, the undersigned, the Referee in said Judgment named, will sell at public auction in the front vestibule of the Monroe County Office Building, 39 West Main Street, Rochester, New York, County of Monroe, on February 11, 2013 at 10:30 a.m., on that day, the premises directed by said Judgment to be sold and therein described as follows: ALL THAT TRACT OR PARCEL OF LAND, situate in the City of Rochester, County of Monroe and State of New York, known as 51-53 Morningside Park, Rochester, NY 14607; Tax Account No. 122.53-2-7 described in Deed recorded in Liber 6116 of Deeds, page 182. Said premises are sold subject to any state of facts an accurate survey may show, zoning restrictions and any amendments thereto, covenants, restrictions, agreements, reservations, and easements of record and prior liens, if any, municipal departmental violations, and such other provisions as may be set forth in the Complaint and Judgment filed in this action. Judgment amount: $139,403.05 plus, but not limited to, costs, disbursements, attorney fees and additional allowance, if any, all with legal interest. DATED: January 2013 Joanne L. Best, Esq., Referee LACY KATZEN LLP Attorneys for Plaintiff 130 East Main Street Rochester, New York 14604 Telephone: (585) 324-5767 [ NOTICE ] JGMAC Associates LLC (LLC) filed Arts.of Org. with NY Secy. of State (SS) on December 21, 2012 LLC’s office is in Monroe County. SS is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served.

SS shall mail a copy of any process to LLC’s principal business location at 116 LaSolis Drive, Rochester, NY 14626. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] JJC3 LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 1/9/13. Office in Monroe Co. SSNY desig. agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 233 Chestnut Hill Dr., Rochester, NY 14617, which is also the principal business location. Purpose: Any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] JM SWEENEY FARMS, LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 1/8/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 30 Rolling Meadows Dr., Hilton, NY 14468. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] KIWI TANGOS, LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 12/11/12. Office in Monroe Co. SSNY desig. agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 2255 Lyell Ave., Rochester, NY 14606, which is also the principal business location. Purpose: Any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] MENTAL HEALTH COUNSELING CONNECTIONS PLLC, a domestic PLLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 12/19/12. Office location: Monroe. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the PLLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The PLLC, P.O. Box 16721, Rochester, NY 14616. Purpose: Mental Health Counselor [ NOTICE ] NICHOLAS CHARLES NY HOLDINGS LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 12/7/12. Office in Monroe Co. SSNY desig. agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 2255 Lyell Ave., Rochester, NY 14606, which is also the principal business location. Purpose: Any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Not. of Form. of Bordner Enterprises LLC. Art. of Org. filed by Sect’y of State (SSNY) on 11/19/2012. Location- Monroe County. The SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process


Legal Ads against the LLC may be served. SSNY may mail any process to LLC: 4045 East Ave., Rochester, NY 14618. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Not. of Form. of TYMACK GROUP LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with SSNY 1/3/13. Office: Monroe County. SSNY designated Agent of LLC to whom process may be served. SSNY may mail a copy of any process to LLC, 16 Marlands Road, Rochester, NY 14624. Purpose any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Notice is hereby given that a license, number not yet assigned, for a full on premise beer, wine & liquor license has been applied for by PARMA JOHNNYS LLC dba PARMA JOHNNY, 1600 LYELL AVE SUITE E., Rochester NY 14606, County of Monroe, for a restaurant. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Form. of DRY CLEAN FASHIONS, LLC (the “LLC”). Art. of Org. filed with Secretary of the State of NY (SSNY) on 12/10/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, 937 Chili Ave, Rochester, NY 14611. Purpose: any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Form. of GENESEO HOUSING, LLC (the “LLC”). Art. of Org. filed with Secretary of the State of NY (SSNY) on 12/24/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, 2041 Penfield Rd, Penfield, NY 14526. Purpose: any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Form. of MATHEW FAMILY FL, LLC (the “LLC”). Art. of Org. filed with Secretary of the State of NY (SSNY) on 12/21/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, 21 Runnymede Ct, Rochester, NY 14618. Purpose: any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Form. of MATHEW FAMILY NY, LLC (the “LLC”). Art. of Org. filed with Secretary of the State of NY (SSNY) on

12/21/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, 21 Runnymede Ct, Rochester, NY 14618. Purpose: any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Form. of URIM MEDIA, LLC (the “LLC”). Art. of Org. filed with Secretary of the State of NY (SSNY) on 12/26/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, 460 Glide St, #1, Rochester, NY 14606. Purpose: any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Folio Consulting, LLC. Art. of Org. filed Sec’y State (SSNY) on 10/12/12 . Office Loc: Monroe Co. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail of process to: 76 Westland Ave, Rochester, NY 14618. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of 9 MECHANIC STREET LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/12/12. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 95 Allens Creek Rd., Ste. 300, Rochester, NY 14618. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Evans & Fox LLP at the princ. office of the LLC. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of BP Villa Associates, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/6/12. Office location: Monroe Co. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Robert Marshall, 150 Allens Creek Rd, Rochester, NY 14618, also the Registered Agent. Purpose: any lawful activities [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of MD3 SPORT LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 12/13/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 62 Monroe Street, Honeoye

Falls,, NY 14472. Purpose: any lawful activities.

at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity.

[ NOTICE ]

[ NOTICE ]

Notice of Formation of 1310 WALL ROAD, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/17/12. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 860 Shoemaker Rd., Webster, NY 14580. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity.

Notice of Formation of Ashley Family Farm, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/30/12. Off. loc.: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 700 Powers Bldg., Rochester, NY 14604. Purpose: any lawful activity.

[ NOTICE ]

Notice of Formation of COSTELLO ENTERPRISES LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/12/12. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: One Airport Way, Ste. 300, Rochester, NY 14624. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the princ. office of the LLC. Purpose: Any lawful activity.

Notice of Formation of 20 Pine 1909 LLC Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State on 12/31/12. Office location: Monroe County. Principal business address: 195 Dickinson St., Rochester, NY 14621. Secy. of State designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. Secy. Of State shall mail process to: 265 Purdue Court, Paramus, NJ 07652. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of 225 EAST MAIN STREET LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/12/12. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 95 Allens Creek Rd., Ste. 300, Rochester, NY 14618. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Evans & Fox LLP at the princ. office of the LLC. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of 3385 MAIN STREET LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/12/12. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 95 Allens Creek Rd., Ste. 300, Rochester, NY 14618. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Evans & Fox LLP at the princ. office of the LLC. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of AJ COSTELLO GROUP LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/17/12. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: One Airport Way, Ste. 300, Rochester, NY 14624. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC

[ NOTICE ]

[ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of DJF PARTNERS, LLC. Art. Of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/30/12. Office in MONROE County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, 14 Bay Point Circle Rochester, NY 14622. Purpose: Recruiting Services [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of ETE Properties, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/13/2012. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 330 Little John Way, Webster, NY 14580. Purpose: any lawful act [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Exium Partners, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State on 1/15/13. Office location: Monroe County. Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: The LLC, 144 Village Landing, Suite 276, Fairport, NY 14450, principal business address. Purpose: any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of Forels LLC, Art. Of Org.

filed with the Secy. of State (SSNY) on 03/18/11. Office location Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to 942 Gristmill Rdg Webster, NY 14580. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Garden Village, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/27/12. Off. loc.: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, c/o Sammy Feldman, 3445 Winton Place, Ste. 228, Rochester, NY 14623. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of GREENDYKE FINE ART, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/07/12. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 110-C Linden Oaks, Rochester, NY 14625. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Peter M. Greendyke at the princ. office of the LLC. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of GV Apartments, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/27/12. Off. loc.: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, c/o Sammy Feldman, 3445 Winton Place, Ste. 228, Rochester, NY 14623. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of IS L Properties, LLC amended to IZ Levy Properties, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/21/12. Off. Loc.: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, c/o Sammy Feldman, 3445 Winton Place, Ste. 228, Rochester, NY 14623. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of limited liability company (LLC). Name: TRANQUIL HEART WELLNESS, LLC. Articles of Organization filed with Secretary of State of New York (SSNY)

on November 6, 2012 and a Certificate of Correction filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on November 29, 2012. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to: 70 St. Andrews Boulevard, Fairport, NY 14450. Purpose: Any lawful act or activity. Loren H. Kroll, LLC. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of LWN Transport, LLC. Art of Org. filed with SSNY on 11/29/12. Office Loc: Monroe Co. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: United States Corporation Agents, Inc. 7014 13th Ave, Ste 202, Brooklyn, NY 11228. Purpose: Any lawful activities [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of MD GORDON LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 01/04/13. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 40 Joseph Ave., Rochester, NY 14603. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. The regd. agent of the company upon whom and at which process against the company can be served is Michael Gordon, 40 Joseph Ave., Rochester, NY 14603. As amended by Cert. of Amendment filed with SSNY on 01/10/13, the name of the LLC is: MD GORDON FAMILY LLC. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Media Connection, LLC filed under the original name The Media Connection, LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 12/19/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 10 Cross Ridge Rd., Pittsford, NY 14534. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of Oaster & Associates LLC, Art. Of Org. filed with the Secy. of State (SSNY) on 02/09/10. Office location Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to 15 Schoen

Pl., Pittsford, NY 14534. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of RED-Rochester, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State on 11/19/12. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. bus. addr.: 640 Quail Ridge Dr., Westmont, IL 60559. Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. Purpose: all lawful purposes. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of STAY & PLAY DOG HOTEL & DAYPLAY LLC. Art. Of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/08/12. Office in MONROE County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, 983 John Leo Dr. Webster, NY 14580. Purpose: Dog Care [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of T&M PROPERTIES OF NEW YORK, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/07/12. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 1452 Martensia Rd., Farmington, NY 14225. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the princ. office of the LLC. The regd. agent of the company upon whom and at which process against the company can be served is Timothy DeLucia, 1452 Martensia Rd., Farmington, NY 14225. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of The Lady and the Snowman LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 9/18/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 409 Peck Rd., Spencerport, NY 14559. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of THL 20 Pine 1913 LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State on 12/31/12. Office location: Monroe County. Principal business address: 195

Dickinson St., Rochester, NY 14621. Secy. of State designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. Secy. Of State shall mail process to: 265 Purdue Court, Paramus, NJ 07652. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Thruway Park Drive Mini Storage LLC. Arts. of Org. filed Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/21/12. Off. loc.: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o The LLC, 648 Gallup Road, Spencerport, NY 14559. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of UNDER THE LIGHTHOUSE LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 01/09/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, 1793 Manitou Rd., Spencerport, NY 14559. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of YOUth ROChester, LLC, Art. of Org. were filed with NY Dept. of State on 11/14/2012. Office loc.: Monroe. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process may be served and shall mail process to: PO Box 60194, Rochester, NY 14606. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Qual. of Equator Holdings LLC, Auth. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 11/1/12. Office loc.: Monroe County. LLC org. in MA 12/14/11. SSNY desig. as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of proc. to PO Box 2324, Nantucket, MA 02584. MA off. addr.: 69 Fairgrounds Rd., Nantucket, MA 02554. Cert. of Org. on file: Sec. of the Commonwealth, 1 Ashburton Pl., Boston, MA 02108. Purp.: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of Bluetone Communications, LLC. Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 1/2/13. Office location: Monroe County. LLC formed in OH on 10/22/12. NY Sec. of State designated

cont. on page 34

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 33


Legal Ads > page 33 agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011. OH and principal business address: 7775 Walton Pkwy., New Albany, OH 43054. Cert. of Org. filed with OH Sec. of State, 180 E. Broad St., 16th Fl., Columbus, OH 43215. Purpose: all lawful purposes. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of Horizon Labs LLC. Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/26/12. Office location: Monroe County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 12/12/12. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: National Registered Agents, Inc., 111 Eighth Ave., NY, NY 10011, also the registered agent. Principal office address: 930 Carter St., Rochester, NY 14621. Address to be maintained in DE: c/o National Registered Agents, Inc., 160 Greentree Dr., Ste. 101,

Dover, DE 19904. Arts of Org. filed with the DE Secretary of State, John G. Townsend Bldg., 401 Federal St., Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of Q Management Services LLC. Fictitious name: Q Management Services Group LLC. Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/31/12. Office location: Monroe County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 12/12/12. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: National Registered Agents, Inc., 111 Eighth Ave., NY, NY 10011, also the registered agent. Principal office address: 2300 Buffalo Rd., Rochester, NY 14624. Address to be maintained in DE: c/o National Registered Agents, Inc., 160 Greentree Dr., Ste. 101, Dover, DE 19801. Arts of Org. filed with the DE Secretary of State, John G. Townsend Bldg., 401 Federal St., Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: any lawful activities.

[ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of TOP25 - 500 CENTER PLACE DRIVE LLC. Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 12/10/12. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. bus. addr.: 5221 N. O’Connor Blvd., Ste. 600, Irving, TX 75039. LLC formed in DE on 12/4/12. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. DE addr. of LLC: 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. [ NOTICE ] The name of the Limited Liability Company is “SRT Palisades Properties LLC”. The date of filing of The Articles of Organization with the Department of State was December 19, 2012. The office of the

Adult Services OVER 100,000 WEEKLY READERS

Company is located in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as the Agent of the Company upon whom process may be served, and the Secretary of State shall mail a copy of any process against the Company served upon him or her to 626 Beach Avenue, Rochester, NY 14612. The business purpose of the Company is to engage in any lawful act or activity for which Limited Liability Companies may be organized under the laws of the State of New York. [ NOTICE ] TINY HOPES, LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 12/19/12. Office in Monroe Co. SSNY desig. agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 2255 Lyell Ave., Rochester, NY 14606, which is also the principal business location. Purpose: Any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] TWIN CAPITAL PROPERTIES, LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 8/20/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Dawn Siciliano, 436 Bartell Ln., Webster, NY 14680. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ]

Available at over 700 locations all over Monroe County and beyond.

Notice of Formation of 5543 ROUTE 14, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/21/12. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 679 Hightower Way, Webster, NY 14580. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] Custom Promo LLC filed Articles of Organization with the New York Department of State on November 30, 2012. Its office is located in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent of the Company upon whom process against it may be served and a copy of any process shall be mailed to 2340 Brighton Henrietta Road, Rochester, NY 14623. The purpose of the Company is any lawful purpose.

34 CITY JANUARY 23-29, 2013

[ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] Phillips Route Sales LLC filed Articles of Organization with the New York Department of State on 11/14/2012. Its office is located in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent of the Company upon whom process against it may be served and a copy of any process shall be mailed to 65 Heinz St Hilton NY 14468. The purpose of the Company is any lawful activity. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION 1653-1655 E. MAIN, LLC ] Articles of Organization filed with Secretary of State of NY (“SSNY”) on 12/14/2012. Office in Monroe County. SSNY designated agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to LEGAL COUNSEL, C/O Applied Image Inc., 1653 E. MAIN ST., ROCHESTER, NY 14609. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION BODYMIND FLOAT CENTER LLC ] Articles of Organization filed with Secretary of State of NY (“SSNY”) on 01/07/2013. Office in Monroe County. SSNY designated agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to BODYMIND FLOAT CENTER LLC, C/O DAVID BRICKMAN, 378 ROCKINGHAM ST., ROCHESTER, NY 14620. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY ] KAI TRADING COMPANY, LLC filed Articles of Organization with the New York State Department of State on January 10, 2010. Its office is to be located in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent of the company upon whom process against it may be served, and a copy of any process shall be mailed to 40 Harrison Street, Rochester, New York 14605. The purpose of the company is any lawful business. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY ] Notice of formation of Bratton Properties, LLC. Articles of Organization filed with the New York Secretary of State on November 5, 2012. The office of the LLC is in Monroe County . The

New York Secretary of State is designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. The Secretary of State shall mail a copy of such process to 67 North Avenue, Webster, New York 14580. The LLC is organized to engage in any lawful activity for which an LLC may be formed under the NY LLC law. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LLC ] J.J. Bell Constructors, LLC has filed articles of organization with the New York Secretary of State on November 26, 2012. Its principal place of business is located at 200 Buell Road, Rochester, New York in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent upon whom process may be served. A copy of any process shall be mailed to 200 Buell Road, Suite A-8, Rochester, New York 14624. The purpose of the LLC is to engage in any lawful activity for which Limited Liability Companies may be organized under Section 203 of the New York Limited Liability Company Law. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LLC ] Ramar Stair & Railing, LLC has filed articles of organization with the New York Secretary of State on December 13, 2012. Its principal place of business is located at 432 Portland Avenue, Rochester, New York in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent upon whom process may be served. A copy of any process shall be mailed to 432 Portland Avenue, Rochester, New York 14605. The purpose of the LLC is to engage in any lawful activity for which Limited Liability Companies may be organized under Section 203 of the New York Limited Liability Company Law. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LLC ] ReTech Services, LLC has filed articles of organization with the New York Secretary of State on January 10, 2013. Its principal place of business is located at 7 Cross Meadow Lane, Pittsford, New York in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent upon whom process may be served. A copy of any process shall be mailed to at 7 Cross Meadow Lane, Pittsford, New York 14534. The purpose of the LLC is to engage in

any lawful activity for which Limited Liability Companies may be organized under Section 203 of the New York Limited Liability Company Law. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LLC ] Rochester Wellbeing, LLC has filed articles of organization with the New York Secretary of State on December 10, 2012 with a date of formation of January 1, 2013. Its principal place of business is located at 2851 Clover Street, Pittsford, New York in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent upon whom process may be served. A copy of any process shall be mailed to 2851 Clover Street, Pittsford, New York 14534. The purpose of the LLC is to engage in any lawful activity for which Limited Liability Companies may be organized under Section 203 of the New York Limited Liability Company Law. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LUCKY SQUIRREL PARTNERS, L.P. ] Notice of formation of Limited Partnership (“L.P.”). Certificate of Limited Partnership filed with Sec. of State of NY (“SSNY”) on December 19, 2012. Office location: 18 Parkview Manor Circle, Honeoye Falls, NY 14472, Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent of L.P. upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of any process to the L.P. at 18 Parkview Manor Circle, Honeoye Falls, NY 14472. The names and addresses of each general partner are available from the SSNY. The latest date upon which the L.P. is to dissolve is December 31, 2037. Purpose: property management and to engage in any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF ROSE CIRCLE, LLC ] First: Rose Circle, LLC, a Limited Liability Company, filed Articles of Organization with the Secretary of State of New York on December 6, 2012 Second: The county within this state in which the office of the limited liability company is to be located is Monroe. Third:The street address of the principal business location is: 24 Old Country Lane, Fairport, New York 14450. Fourth: The Secretary of State

is designated as agent of the limited liability company upon whom process against it may be served. The post office address within or without this state to which the Secretary of State shall mail a copy of any process against the limited liability company served upon him or her is: 24 Old Country Lane, Fairport, New York 14450. Fifth: The purpose of the business of Rose Circle, LLC is any lawful purpose [ NOTICE OF SALE ] Index No. 2011-14780 SUPREME COURT STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF MONROE ESL Federal Credit Union Plaintiff, vs. Todd C. VanOcker a/k/a Todd VanOcker; Marcy A. VanOcker; ESL Federal Credit Union; LVNV Funding LLC APO Sears; Emily VanOcker and Kimberly VanOcker, Defendants. Pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale dated January 2, 2013 and entered herein, I, the undersigned, the Referee in said Judgment named, will sell at public auction in the front vestibule of the Monroe County Office Building, 39 West Main Street, Rochester, New York, County of Monroe, on February 6, 2013 at 10:00 a.m., on that day, the premises directed by said Judgment to be sold and therein described as follows: ALL THAT TRACT OR PARCEL OF LAND, situate in the Town of Gates, County of Monroe and State of New York, known as 105 Dearcop Drive, Rochester, NY 14624; Tax Account No. 119.08-1-3 described in Deed recorded in Liber 6937 of Deeds, page 58 Said premises are sold subject to any state of facts an accurate survey may show, zoning restrictions and any amendments thereto, covenants, restrictions, agreements, reservations, and easements of record and prior liens, if any, municipal departmental violations, and such other provisions as may be set forth in the Complaint and Judgment filed in this action. Judgment amount: $29,062.78 plus, but not limited to, costs, disbursements, attorney fees and additional allowance, if any, all with legal interest. DATED: January 2013 Richard H. Holzberg, Esq., Referee LACY KATZEN LLP Attorneys for Plaintiff 130 East Main Street Rochester, New York 14604 Telephone: (585) 324-5767


Fun [ NEWS OF THE WEIRD ] BY CHUCK SHEPHERD

“Fulton Jail Will Get Working Cell Locks,” read the Dec. 19 Atlanta Journal-Constitution headline. The county commission serving Atlanta had finally voted to break a longstanding 3-3 tie that prevented buying new jailhouse locks -- even while knowing that inmates could jimmy the old ones at will and roam the facilities, threatening and assaulting suspects and guards. The three recalcitrant commissioners were being spiteful because a federal judge had ordered various improvements to the jail, costing $140 million so far, and the three vowed to spend no more. The 1,300 replacement locks will cost about $5 million -- but will not be installed right away.

The Entrepreneurial Spirit!

— The Chinese fashion designer “Ms. Lv” told China Newsweek in November that her sales had “quintupled” since she began using her 72-year-old grandfather to model her clothing styles for girls. “(It’s) helping my granddaughter,” Liu Xianping said. “I’m very old,” he said, and “I have nothing to lose.” — Challenging Business Plans: (1) British “medical illustrator” Emily Evans recently created eight pricy, bone china dinner plates emblazoned with the microscope images of tissue slides of the human liver, thyroid, esophagus and testicles ($60 per plate, $200 for a set of four). (2) In October, a shop in London’s St. Bart’s Pathology Museum ran a special sale of cupcakes as part of a sexually transmitted disease awareness campaign. Each pastry’s icing was crafted to resemble the lesions, boils and warts of gonorrhea and other maladies.

— Leading a “jerky renaissance” is Krave, a Sonoma, Calif., company creating nontraditional flavors such as turkey jerky and jerky flavored with basil citrus or lemon garlic. Actually, Krave points out, jerky is rich in protein, with low calories and fat (but with, admittedly, sky-high sodium) and could be reasonably pitched as a healthy snack. However, jerky’s main obstacle (a Krave competitor’s CEO told The Wall Street Journal in September) is “jerky shame,” in which some male consumers remain mortified that their girlfriends might see them enjoying the snack.

Science on the Cutting Edge

— Behold, the “McGyver” Spider: Biologist Phil Torres, working from the Tambopata national park in Peru, revealed in December that he had witnessed a tiny Cyclosa spider construct a replica of an eight-legged spider in a web made of leaves, debris and dead insects. Since the real spider was found nearby, Torres hypothesized that the wily arachnid had built a decoy to confuse predators. — Artist Maria Fernanda Cardoso, already known for her “circus” of performing fleas at Australia’s Sydney Festival 10 years ago, has since become a legitimate academic expert on the sex organs of fleas and other insects. She debuted the Museum of Copulatory Organs last year near Sydney, teaching visitors such esoterica as: In many insect species, females are promiscuous; snails are hermaphrodites in which one shoots sperm “darts” that form rigid chastity-belt-like blockages on his mate; and a male flea copulates for eight hours straight (but only mates three times in his life).

NOTE: Due to a mix-up we inadvertently ran the solution to the January 23 puzzle in the January 16 issue. You can find the solution to the January 9 puzzle on page 30 (top) and the solution to last week’s puzzle on page 30 (bottom).

[ LOVESCOPE ] BY EUGENIA LAST ARIES (March 21-April 19): Friendships should be your focus. Explore hobbies or activities that will lead to new acquaintances. Diversify a bit, and you will discover someone interesting enough to get to know better. Altering the type of partner you usually pick will help you discover new relationship possibilities. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Physical attractions are apparent, but getting along with someone or having the same views or goals may be another story. Don’t let chemistry lead you in a direction that will leave you feeling uncertain and

confused. Get to know who you are attracted to first. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Flirting with someone you find interesting will lead to experimenting with a different lifestyle than what you are accustomed to. Enjoy the change, but don’t agree to sign up for a lifetime if you don’t believe in the customs you must adopt. CANCER (June 21-July 22): You’ll be drawn to someone different from your usual type. Take your time and get to know more about the person, and you will build a great base in which to build a long-lasting relationship. Love is in the

stars. Savor the moment. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Put more time and effort into a personal relationship you want to explore seriously. Plan activities that you can do together to find out how compatible you are. It’s important that you share the same likes and dislikes if you want to spend a lifetime together. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): You’ve got all the right moves to attract the perfect partner. Refuse to let your emotions stand in the way of your personal progress with someone about whom you can’t stop thinking. Focus on love and enjoying time you spend with

that special someone. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Problems with communication may make it difficult for you to get to know someone who interests you. Don’t waste time traveling out of your vicinity when the there is someone special waiting for you to notice. Look around you, and you’ll spot an admirer. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Keep your standards high, even if you are feeling lonely. It’s better to be with someone willing to meet you halfway and contribute as much as you than to settle for someone trying to restrict or control your freedom. Look for an inspiring free spirit.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Be honest about your feelings or you will miss out on a chance to become involved with someone special. A change in the way you live is apparent if you are willing to experiment with someone from an unusual background. Communication will lead to love. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Offer what you have, and you will impress someone who will be an asset in your life. You don’t have to make an impulsive move. By showing stability, you will attract someone with the same morals, values and goals as you. Discuss your intentions and proceed slowly.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Experiment with different people, and you will find someone who shares your concerns and your desire to be free. An open-ended relationship will turn into the real deal -- one that can go the distance. Feeling comfortable with someone will lead to a loving future. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Getting involved in events and helping others will point you in the right direction when it comes to finding companionship. It’s the person who shares your beliefs, attitudes and concerns that will make you happy in other areas of your personal life.

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 35


36 CITY JANUARY 23-29, 2013


January 23-29, 2013 - City Newspaper