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EVENTS: PARTY FOR THE PEOPLE, WINTERFEST 19 FILM: “ZERO DARK THIRTY,” “GANGSTER SQUAD” 24 CHOW HOUND: SOUPS AND SALADS ROUND-UP

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DANCE PREVIEW: THIS IS TANGO NOW 22 URBAN JOURNAL: FACING OUR GUN CULTURE

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INFECTED MUSHROOM • ONUINU • ANA EGGE • WALK THE MOON • HAEWA • AND MORE MUSIC, PAGE 12 JANUARY 16-22, 2013 Free

Greater Rochester’s Alternative Newsweekly

Vol 42 No 19

News. Music. Life.

All of these efforts have long track records of failure.” FEEDBACK, PAGE 2

Tops’ COMIDA coupon. NEWS, PAGE 4

Cuomo gets tough on guns. NEWS, PAGE 6

School plans due. NEWS, PAGE 5

Mind matters: Geva’s “Next to Normal.” THEATER REVIEW, PAGE 18

Nominations open for Theater Hall of Fame. DETAILS, PAGE 4

FEATURE | BY REBECCA RAFFERTY | PAGE 10 | PHOTO BY MARK CHAMBERLIN

Holding history, framing futures: RMSC at 100 All endeavors are precarious, and those which seek to last must weather the ebb and flow of cultural shifts, prosperity, and community needs. Even a space based on history must earn its place in the passage of time, and in doing so over the course of the past 100 years, the Rochester Museum and Science Center has had to shift its role from purely a keeper of historic record to a facilitator of the present and future community. RMSC is currently celebrating its centennial anniversary, and like the double-headed Janus,

is casting simultaneous stares both proudly backward at where the institution has been, and enthusiastically forward into the yet-to-be. Take a look back at what started out at The Rochester Museum, tasked with collecting our area’s history, and how it turned into a hands-on museum dedicated to educating both children and adults through a wide variety of programming.


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We welcome your comments. Send them to themail@rochester-citynews. com, or post them on our website, rochestercitynewspaper.com, our Facebook page, or our Twitter feed, @roccitynews. Comments of fewer than 350 words have a greater chance of being published, and we do edit selections for publication in print. We don’t publish comments sent to other media.

Obama’s missing urban agenda

On Mayor Tom Richards’ guest commentary, “Aid the Transformation of America’s Urban Areas”): Most of the discussion about improving urban areas focuses on various government “economic development” programs, whether they be tax breaks, outright grants, or periodic “master plans” drawn up by people who will never implement them because they don’t have the money. All of these efforts have long track records of failure. The only way to rebuild a city is through jobs, and the only way to create jobs is to make your community attractive for job creators. Right now, New York is at the bottom of the barrel when it comes to attracting business. Despite the governor’s endless self-congratulatory press conferences and catchy slogans about New York being open for business, the fact is we still have the highest taxes; most burdensome, anti-business regulations; the most confrontational unions; the highest utility costs, etc. Create the conditions for business to return and grow in Rochester, and you won’t be endlessly fretting about how to divide a shrinking pie. Unfortunately, encouraging business is about as attractive to the liberal Democrats who run our cities and our state as getting the hives. BOB S

Posted on rochestercitynewspaper.com There is no vision for Rochester. Residents are seen as revenue-makers (red-light cameras, parking fees, etc.) while out-of-town developers and big projects are seen as our “saviors.” There needs to be focus on locally and cooperatively owned businesses throughout the city, not just in gentrified areas. There needs to be a change in direction, and that opportunity is coming. DAVE ATIAS

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JANUARY 16-22, 2013

Consult with disability community

Let’s not be pushed over an imaginary “fiscal cliff.” As this country continually runs a deficit, it makes sense to look at many programs, including Medicaid and Medicare, to see whether or not savings can be achieved. For many years, ADAPT and others in the disability community have pushed for changes in the types of services that Medicaid and Medicare would fund in order to meet the needs of the people those programs are intended to serve. For example, allowing Medicaid to pay for attendant care in the home is a policy that ADAPT helped make possible. This change in policy improved people’s quality of life and saved money. If Congress wants to be fiscally and socially responsible with Medicare and Medicaid, they need to consider suggestions put forth from those in the disability community. KENYATTA DACOSTA, ROCHESTER

A lesson from Japan

I returned a few days ago from 11 days in Japan traveling through several areas teaching and speaking about nonviolence and sustainability. Many of the people I worked with had lives devastated in various ways by radiation in the Fukushima area after the March 2011 earthquake: Couples split up because of different views on safety of air and water for their children. Families forced to move, often losing most of their financial stability as a result, as well as their communities. Hundreds of people living in camps, waiting with dwindling hope for government support to help them re-settle. Public interest in their plight has faded. Distrust with government and other official assurances about safe levels of radiation in air, water, and food continues to grow. All of this feels relevant as the people of New York and its lawmakers consider hydrofracking. Some or many of the issues from Japan could become our issues as toxic chemicals enter our ground water, eco-system, food chains, and bodies. The abundant fresh waters of New York are such an extraordinary resource in a world that is becoming warmer and drier with each passing year. I hope we will choose not to pollute millions of gallons of that resource in shortsighted pursuit of natural

gas. I hope we will choose to look harder for solutions to long-term economic and energy issues. With the anxious eyes of Japanese parents still fresh in my mind, I hope we will choose to be good ancestors for our children and their children. KIT MILLER, BRIGHTON

Miller is director of the MK Gandhi Institute.

Moved by ‘Le Mis’

My experience with the movie adaptation of “Les Miserables” was quite different than Adam Lubitow’s (“Better on the Boards,” review, January 2). I was accompanied to the movie by my “son” and his friend, both foreign exchange students from China, and from the opening to the final scene, we were enthralled. I proudly admit that I sat there with tears in my eyes for most of the movie and several times had to put the hood of my sweatshirt over my head to avoid disturbing other moviegoers. In my opinion, this movie adaptation of a staged musical was perfect in every sense and the best movie adaptation of a staged musical of all time. Every role was perfectly cast, even minor characters. I am not a big fan of Russell Crowe – I agree with Mr. Lubitow that Crowe cannot sing – yet I found him perfect as Javert. I was especially enthralled with stage veteran Samantha Barks as Eponine, though Mr. Lubitow barely mentioned her. The filming of the movie was spectacular in every sense. The actors’ live singing added to the immediacy and richness of this film. I have recommended this film to several friends who would not be caught dead watching a musical, either on the stage or in a film. They came back to me and said they loved it. Les Miserables is not a disappointment. TONY PERRI, ROCHESTER

A correction

An editing change to a reader’s letter in our December 26 issue resulted in a headline (“Guns, Controls, and America”) that misrepresented the focus of the letter. The original title, “The Irony of the Massacre in Newtown,” more clearly emphasized the disparity between the reaction of the Newtown shootings and the individual killings in the nation’s cities. We regret the error.

News. Music. Life. Greater Rochester’s Alternative Newsweekly January 16-22, 2013 Vol 42 No 19 250 North Goodman Street Rochester, New York 14607-1199 themail@rochester-citynews.com phone (585) 244-3329 fax (585) 244-1126 rochestercitynewspaper.com Publishers: William and Mary Anna Towler Editor: Mary Anna Towler Asst. to the publishers: Matt Walsh Editorial department themail@rochester-citynews.com Features editor: Eric Rezsnyak News editor: Christine Carrie Fien Staff writers: Tim Louis Macaluso, Jeremy Moule Music editor: Willie Clark Music writer: Frank De Blase Calendar editor: Rebecca Rafferty Contributing writers: Paloma Capanna, Casey Carlsen, Roman Divezur, George Grella, Susie Hume, Andy Klingenberger, Dave LaBarge, Kathy Laluk, Michael Lasser, James Leach, Adam Lubitow, Ron Netsky, Dayna Papaleo, Suzan Pero, Rebecca Rafferty, Deb Schleede, David Yockel Jr. Editorial intern: Lillian Dickerson Art department artdept@rochester-citynews.com Art director/production manager: Matt DeTurck Designer: Aubrey Berardini Photographers: Frank De Blase, Michael Hanlon Advertising department ads@rochester-citynews.com Advertising sales manager: Betsy Matthews Account executives: Nancy Burkhardt, Tom Decker, Annalisa Iannone, William Towler Classified sales representatives: Christine Kubarycz, Tracey Mykins Operations/Circulation info@rochester-citynews.com Circulation manager: Katherine Stathis Distribution: Andy DiCiaccio, David Riccioni, Northstar Delivery, Wolfe News City Newspaper is available free of charge. Additional copies of the current issue may be purchased for $1, payable in advance at the City Newspaper office. City Newspaper may be distributed only by authorized distributors. No person may, without prior written permission of City Newspaper, take more than one copy of each weekly issue. City (ISSN 1551-3262) is published weekly by WMT Publications, Inc. Periodical postage paid at Rochester, NY (USPS 022-138). Send address changes to City, 250 North Goodman Street, Rochester, NY 14607. City is a member of the Association of Alternative Newsweeklies and the New York Press Association. Subscriptions: $35.00 ($30.00 for senior citizens) for one year. Add $10 yearly for out-of-state subscriptions: add $30 yearly for foreign subscriptions. Due to the initial high cost of establishing new subscriptions, refunds for fewer than ten months cannot be issued. Copyright by WMT Publications Inc., 2013 - all rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, photocopying, recording or by any information storage retrieval system without permission of the copyright owner.


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Facing our gun culture New York is toughening its gun-control laws, and that’s worth celebrating. But I’m not optimistic that we’ll go further – because we haven’t faced up to what our gun problem is. At both the state and federal level, the current focus is on “assault weapons.” And yes, guns of the kind that killed those children and adults in Newtown are a terrible problem. We should ban those weapons, and we should ban high-capacity magazines. But assault weapons, which are most often used in mass shootings, aren’t the only guns killing people. As tragic as those shootings are, deaths by assault weapons are dwarfed by the deaths from other guns. Are those victims any less precious? Are their deaths any less abhorrent? Many of those victims are African American and Hispanic. What does it say about this country that we get upset only when there are mass shootings of predominantly middle-class, predominantly white Americans, in a movie theater or a school? Where is the outrage when a single person is gunned down in the inner city? The United States’ gun problem is unique. Among the world’s wealthy countries, Charles Blow wrote in the Times recently, “America has the highest gun homicide rate, the highest number of guns per capita, and the highest rate of deaths due to assault.” From the Washington Post’s Fareed Zakaria: 32,000 people died from gunshots in the US in 2011. That’s 87.7 gun deaths every day. “The US gun homicide rate is 30 times that of France or Australia, according to the UN Office on Drugs and Crime,” Zakaria wrote, “and 12 times higher than the average for other developed countries.” It’s not that we have more people with mental illness, said Zakaria, because we don’t. And we’re not the only country with lots of violence in popular culture. The problem, Zakaria wrote, is the easy availability of guns. And from Jennifer Kabat on Salon. com: There are 88.8 firearms per 100 people in the US. Among the world’s wealthiest countries, 80 percent of firearm deaths take place in the US. And it’s far more likely that a gun in the home will be used for suicide than for self-defense. Our gun problem is complicated. The roots of the trauma in Newtown and Aurora, Colorado, presumably, are different than those of the almost daily shootings in America’s cities. And all of those are different from the gunshots of an angry, inebriated husband or friend – or a citizen who thinks a visitor to his neighborhood is up to no good. Or a child who finds a loaded gun at home.

It says a lot about our values when a gun manufacturer promotes a gun with an ad saying ‘Get your man card reissued.’”

What they all have in common is guns and their availability. And it doesn’t seem possible to talk about that without talking about America’s culture of violence. Numerous studies have indicated that violent entertainment – video games, TV shows, movies, music – doesn’t make the average person violent. But I am troubled by the growing pervasiveness of violence – graphic violence – in our culture. It demeans us. And it distorts our values. It says a lot about our values when a gun manufacturer – the manufacturer of the rifle that killed the children in Newtown and the firefighters in Webster – promotes the gun with an ad saying “Get your man card reissued.” Will we come to our senses about guns? It’s hard to think that we will, when the gun lobby resists even the most logical controls on assault weapons – and guns are considered a symbol of manhood. How can we hope for effective legislation? You can’t get rid of guns, Megan McArdle wrote on the Daily Beast last week, because there are too many of them, the opposition’s too widespread, and the Supreme Court says Americans have a constitutional right to own guns. But if the Constitution couldn’t be changed, we’d still have slavery. And think what the result would be if we had refused to move against polio or tobacco. Are we really helpless to deal with one of the biggest public-health issues this country faces?

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[ NEWS FROM THE WEEK PAST ]

Patent sale approved

Eastman Kodak received court approval to sell its patents, but the $527 million sale price is much less than the more than $2 billion the company expected. More than 1,000 patents will go to a consortium of major firms including Apple, Google, Samsung, Amazon, Facebook, and Microsoft.

MCC and Sports Centre settle

Monroe Community College forgave a large portion of the back rent owed to it by Monroe Community Sports Centre Corp. The college received $500,000 in back rent, forgiving $800,000. It also agreed to reduce the company’s rent. The college owns the land beneath the sports center.

Brighton pursues drilling ban

The Town of Brighton held a public hearing on its plan to ban oil and gas drilling, including fracking. The law would also ban drilling-related activities, such as disposal of drilling wastes or the underground storage of gas or oil.

Morelle gets a promotion

ed Joe Morelle as the chamber’s majority leader. Morelle, who is also chair of the Monroe County Democratic Committee, was first elected to the Assembly in 1990. His district covers Irondequoit, Brighton, and parts of the City of Rochester.

News

Legislators pursue ban on synthetic drugs

Republican County Legislators Steve Tucciarello and Rick Antelli introduced a proposal to ban synthetic drugs in Monroe County. The ban would apply to a list of chemical compounds, including products commonly known as bath salts or synthetic marijuana. Under the proposed law, anyone caught selling or possessing the substances would face a misdemeanor charge.

Naz dance event on hold

Nazareth College Arts Center has put its annual Dance Festival on a one-year hiatus for 2013. Organizers say they are looking to “re-imagine” the festival’s programming and timing before bringing it back in 2014. The festival debuted in 2010.

State Assembly Speaker Sheldon Silver appoint-

COMIDA gave Tops tax breaks to move just down the road in Henrietta. PHOTO BY MARK CHAMBERLIN

ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT | BY JEREMY MOULE

Tops’ COMIDA coupon The Tops store on Jefferson Road in Henrietta plans to move just down the road into another plaza. And it’s getting tax breaks to do it. Tops’ corporate business model calls for gas pumps at its stores, but pumps are prohibited at the current Jefferson Road location. The company wants to move to space at 1225 Jefferson Road, which is currently occupied by Frontier Communications. (It’s not clear where Frontier will go.) During its meeting Tuesday, the Monroe County Industrial Development Agency’s board

Attention Rochester theater community: Send us your nominations for the

2013 Rochester Theater

HALL OF FAME 4 CITY

JANUARY 16-22, 2013

approved sales tax incentives for the Tops move. The plaza owner, 1225 Jefferson LP, plans to spend $320,000 to renovate 55,000 square feet of space for Tops, while Tops plans to spend approximately $2 million. The sales tax incentives for Tops and for 1225 Jefferson LP are estimated at a total of $121,600, according to COMIDA. COMIDA documents also say that the project will retain the equivalent of 79 full-time jobs and, over the next three years, create the equivalent of 18 full-time jobs. Without the move the store would leave the town entirely, says

Henrietta Supervisor Mike Yudelson. For that reason, along with the jobs that Tops plans to add, Yudelson says he supports the benefits. But the incentives are the type that IDA critics often complain about. They’re supposed to be used to attract or retain businesses that could locate anywhere. Grocery stores, however, are retail operations that locate based on markets. If they think they can build a thriving business in a certain area, they’ll set up shop there. IDA critics often say that incentives aren’t necessary.

City Newspaper is getting ready to induct new members into the Rochester Theater Hall of Fame, and we need your nominations. We want you to tell us who you think is the best of the best in the local theater world. We want to hear about actors, directors, musicians, stage managers, set designers, costume designers, producers, and other prominent members of the Rochester theater scene. A panel of judges will select inductees based on their innovation, dedication, passion, quality of their work and their lasting contribution to local theater.

A panel of judges will select Inductees based on the following criteria: INNOVATION DEDICATION PASSION QUALITY OF WORK LASTING CONTRIBUTION TO LOCAL THEATER Inductees will be announced at the 2013 TheatreROCS Showcase, scheduled for Saturday, April 13, at the JCC’s Hart Theater.


“We don’t want to be disruptive and do that crazy shuffle-the-deck thing where we change everything around and discover three years later that academically nothing has changed and we’re in the same exact place.” [ ANITA MURPHY ]

EDUCATION | BY TIM LOUIS MACALUSO

EDUCATION | BY TIM LOUIS MACALUSO

Improvement plans due

No guarantee

The State Education Department issued a report last year that identified persistently low-performing schools and school districts. Priority schools are those with the lowest achievement, and focus schools are those at risk of becoming priority schools if preventive measures aren’t taken. The SED ranked Rochester’s schools among the worst of the worst. Out of the 60 schools in the district, Rochester has only four that are not priority or focus schools. And the district as a whole is considered a focus district. Before the month is over, Rochester schools Superintendent Bolgen Vargas has to submit individual plans to the SED for improving most of the district’s priority schools — some have plans already in progress — as well as an overall plan for improving the district. Most of the district’s plans will take one of two approaches. The whole school reform model involves an entire redesign that can include changes to a school’s leadership and improvements to the quality of instruction. The transformational approach entails building on the schools’ strengths. For example, James Wilson Foundation and Commencement High School, which already offers an International Baccalaureate program, would strengthen that program, says Anita

Murphy, the district’s deputy superintendent of operations. Vargas is recommending closing School 30, another SED option. The school’s English Bolgen Vargas. Language Arts FILE PHOTO proficiency is 7 percent. Though the SED gives district leaders several approaches to choose from, Vargas says there is one that he will never pursue: phasing out lowperforming schools as new schools are phased in. “We don’t want to be disruptive and do that crazy shuffle-the-deck thing where we change everything around and discover three years later that academically nothing has changed and we’re in the same exact place,” Murphy says. Expanding the school day is also a requirement for all priority schools, Murphy says. The district will provide extra instruction time to give students the time they need to learn, she says, instead of relying on intervention at a later time to help students catch up. The latter approach has frozen the district in a permanent mode of remedial instruction, Murphy says.

submissions Submissions should be 400-500 words in an essay format. In the essay, please describe why your nominee deserves this award, citing specific examples of the person's work and how they meet the criteria above. You may nominate yourself, or another member of the local theater community.

EMAIL Nominations TO:

Send nominations to:

e-mail to eric@rochester-citynews.com with the subject line “Rochester Theater Hall of Fame.”

Rochester Theater Hall of Fame c/o City Newspaper 250 N Goodman St. Rochester, NY 14607

Cost of War AFGHANISTAN TOTALS —

2,175 US servicemen and servicewomen and 1,081 Coalition servicemen and servicewomen have been killed in Afghanistan from the beginning of the war and occupation to January 14. Statistics for Afghan civilian casualties are not available. American casualties from December 29 to January 10: -- Sgt. Aaron X. Wittman, 28, Chester, Va. SOURCES: iraqbodycount.org,

Rochester schools Superintendent Bolgen Vargas’s announcement last weekend that children who live within a half-mile of their neighborhood elementary school are guaranteed placement in that school — the “Home School Guarantee” — may have been misleading. The announcement comes with some conditions, and no new policy has been approved. | The district’s Parent Preference-Managed Choice policy, which was last revised in 2008, does not provide guarantees regarding student placement, according to school board President Malik Evans and board member Willa Powell. | The policy offers preference to students meeting the proximity requirement for 60 percent of the available seats in their neighborhood school. Evans said he would not have used the word “guarantee.” | Vargas has also assured families with children entering kindergarten from one of the district’s school-based pre-k programs that they will have priority for placement in that school after families who live within a half-mile of the school. | Mayor Tom Richards immediately praised Vargas’s announcement, but it’s unclear if Richards understood that Vargas was merely talking up a pre-existing policy. | City Hall has long received complaints from parents reluctant to buy a house in the city without assurance about which school their child will attend.

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Submissions are due by Friday, February 15. Questions or concerns? can be addressed to eric@rochester-citynews.com OR VISIT www.rochestercitynewspaper.com

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GUN CONTROL | BY JEREMY MOULE

New York gets tougher on guns The State Senate passed a new ban on assault weapons Monday. The Assembly was still debating on Tuesday afternoon, but is almost certain to approve the legislation. The legislation grandfathers in military-style weapons already owned by New Yorkers. But the latter is subject to a new permitting requirement. The assault weapons ban is part of a larger gun law package put forward by Governor Andrew Cuomo. The package also includes a stricter ban on high-capacity magazines, measures to track ammunition sales, and tougher penalties for gun crimes. Momentum has been building in New York and nationally for new laws and policies to keep military-style weapons out of civilians’ hands. Cuomo made gun control a significant part of his State of the State speech last week. The high-energy address was full of new initiatives for Upstate economic development, longer school days, higher minimum wage, and other plans. He also proposed a legislative package addressing gender equality. But the gun issue took priority. Cuomo isn’t alone when it comes to advocating for new gun control measures in New York. Rochester Police Chief James Sheppard, speaking shortly before Cuomo took the stage for the State of the State, said New York can and should lead the nation in addressing gun violence. The District Attorneys Association of the State of New York released its own list of proposed gun law reforms, including a stricter ban on high-capacity magazines and tracking ammunition purchases. And at the federal level, the White House and some members of Congress have vowed to push for a new federal ban on assault weapons. Vice President Joe Biden has presented recommendations for new gun policies to President Barack Obama. Obama says he will release specifics sometime this week. New York enacted an assault weapons ban

in 2000, basing it on a federal law in place from 1994 to 2004. But that state ban was full of loopholes: the same problem plagued the now-expired federal statute. (Once Cuomo signs the new legislation, many of the provisions will take effect immediately and replace the 2000 law.) The state’s laws have banned certain guns, but otherwise relied on a two-feature test for any semiautomatic gun with a detachable magazine. If the weapon had any two features from a list — things like a 6 CITY

JANUARY 16-22, 2013

pistol grip, threaded barrel, flash suppressor, or folding stock — it was illegal. New Yorkers Against Gun Violence and other gun control groups pushed the state to adopt a single-feature test, and the new ban uses that criteria. New York should also appoint someone to identify new or redesigned weapons covered in the new ban, says Jackie Hilly, executive director of New Yorkers Against Gun Violence. But the likely new law does not appear to do that. “That’s really a critical thing because if you don’t, then you’re in the position of having to change the statute every time you turn around, which is impractical,” Hilly says. New York already banned high-capacity magazines, which are frequently used in mass shootings. The new legislation lowers the existing capacity limit from 10 rounds to seven, and closes a loophole that allowed the sale and possession of high-capacity magazines made before 1994. It’s easy to determine the year of manufacture for a gun, since all firearms are stamped with serial numbers, says Laura Cutilletta, a senior staff attorney with the Law Center to Prevent Gun Violence. Magazines, however, have no serial number and there’s no other reliable way to determine when they were made. “It makes a lot of sense not to allow that loophole,” Cutilletta says. The new legislation also requires instant background checks for ammunition purchases and a ban on ammo purchases over the Internet. Previously, New York had few restrictions on ammo purchases, aside from a minimum age requirement and bans on certain types of bullets. The gun legislation includes other measures

beyond the assault weapons and clip bans to counter gun violence. Cuomo and Senate Republicans wanted harsher penalties for gun crimes and several

(right) Governor Andrew Cuomo unveiled a comprehensive gun law package on Monday night. It includes a tougher assault weapons ban. FILE PHOTO

(above) The state’s new assault weapons ban would cover AR-15 style rifles, which were used in the Webster and Newtown, Connecticut, shootings. FILE PHOTO

are included. Among them: a mandatory life sentence without parole for murder of a first responder. The legislation also includes provisions to standardize the pistol permit process across the state. And to keep your grandfathered-in assault weapon, you’ll need a permit, too. Permit holders have to recertify every five years. Permits with renewal requirements could be an effective way to curb illicit gun use, says John Klofas, a criminal justice professor at RIT who has studied crime guns in Rochester, because they help law enforcement keep track of lost or stolen guns. (In Rochester, most crime guns are pistols and many have changed hands several times.) New York should require periodicallyrenewed permits for all gun owners, Cutilletta says. It’s a way for the system to catch people who may no longer be able to legally own guns, she says. “Basically, it’s about responsibility,” she says. “We believe that if you want to own a gun, it’s your responsibility to the public to make sure that you are taking safeguards so that your gun is not going to end up at a crime scene.”

The new legislation creates a gun records database, though the information will not be made public. It also requires background checks for all gun sales, including private transactions. And it includes new provisions to help keep guns away from people who mental health professionals say may pose a danger to themselves or others. The legislation also includes an expansion of Kendra’s Law, which was sought by Republicans. The law allows a court to mandate outpatient treatment for people with mental illness who pose a threat to public safety.


ARTS | BY ERIC REZSNYAK

A week of ups and downs for RPO It’s been an eventful week in the ongoing saga of the Rochester Philharmonic Orchestra. Hundreds showed up to a public meeting on Thursday, January 10, to support recently ousted music director Arild Remmereit and discuss issues with the RPO Board of Directors. And on Monday, January 14, the orchestra announced that it had signed a new four-year agreement with its musicians union and released encouraging financial numbers. The January 10 meeting held by a group identified as RPO Community Supporters featured the first public comments by Remmereit since the RPO Board announced in November that it would be ending his four-year contract two years early. Remmereit did not directly speak about the firing, but instead expressed his vision for the orchestra. His attorney, Glenn Pezzulo, later confirmed that Remmereit has not been paid since December; the RPO has cited breach of contract. The crux of the meeting featured speakers explaining to the crowd that while they had little power to reverse the decision to terminate Remmereit’s contract, they could get involved in determining the future of the RPO board. Speakers encouraged all RPO members — those who have donated $75 or more — to attend the January 23 general meeting at which new board members will be elected. While meeting organizers are pushing for an alternate slate of nominees to be considered at the meeting, RPO spokesman Mark Berry said this was not realistic given organization bylaws. Still, group organizers made it clear that they are looking at the long view, and are already eyeing the following year’s board elections. Regardless of the drama, the orchestra had a good weekend with two sold-out concerts in Kodak Hall featuring jazztrumpet sensation Chris Botti. Berry says that the RPO exceeded single-ticket sales goals for the concert by more than $35,000. That’s in addition to a 16 percent increase in single-ticket sales for the RPO’s 2012 holiday programming, with revenue totals slightly under $590,000 and attendance at more than 27,000 over the course of 10 performances, according to Berry. Those figures are important, Berry says, because it reflects what he termed an “outpouring of support” since the Remmereit controversy started, and since news was leaked that the RPO will report

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FINE ASIAN CUISINE Fresh Baked Sweet & Savory Pastries SERVING DIM SUM All Day, Every Day Arild Remmereit. PHOTO BY SCOTT HAMILTON

an operating deficit of $750,000 for the just-concluded fiscal year. Berry said that the RPO’s Annual Campaign for the current fiscal year is $184,000 ahead of last year’s campaign at this point. On Monday, January 14, the RPO also announced that it had signed a new four-year agreement with the orchestra musicians. Wesley Nance, co-chair of the Musicians’ Negotiating Committee, said in a statement that it calls for “painful concessions” in the first two years, with restorations in years three and four. Nance also said in the statement that the contract was ratified by more than 75 percent of the RPO musicians. While specific details about the new contract were not disclosed, RPO’s Berry confirmed that the first two years would feature truncated summer concert seasons, and that the contracts called for changes in health-care coverage for both the musicians and RPO administrative staff.

798 S. Clinton Ave. 585-319-3249 Sun–Thurs: 10am - 9:30pm, Fri & Sat: 10am – 10:30pm

2160 Penfield Rd (Rts 250 & 441) • 586-4134 2245 Empire Blvd • Webster • 787-4700 845 E. Ridge Rd • Irondequoit • 697-0615

A Clinical Research Study for COPD

Are you a current or former smoker with COPD? A local research study is offering no-cost study treatment for COPD, emphysema, and chronic bronchitis Compensation may be available for participation. No-cost study-related care.

Consider joining a study for COPD. Take the first step. See if you qualify.

Contact AAIR Research Center at: (585) 442-1980 or Email: research@aair.info AAIR Research Center

300 Meridian Centre Suite 305, Rochester NY 14618

www.aairresearch.com rochestercitynewspaper.com

CITY 7


CITY’s

WINTER GUIDE 2

0

1

3

Online and at newsstands everywhere

JANUARY 23

CITY SEEKS WINTER/SPRING

INTERNS

Are you a hard-working, fun-loving college student with a passion for journalism or photography? City Newspaper is looking for interns in our photography and editorial departments for the winter/spring semester. Candidates should have prior experience, must be college students, and must work for college credit (NOTE: internships are unpaid). Get a chance to work in the City office and gain real-world experience.

EDITORIAL PROSPECTS Send a resume, clips, and a cover letter explaining what you can bring to the City team to eric@rochester-citynews.com

PHOTO PROSPECTS Send a resume, photo samples (no more than 20), and a cover letter to artdept@rochester-citynews.com DEADLINE: FRIDAY JAN. 18th

For more Tom Tomorrow, including a political blog and cartoon archive, visit www.thismodernworld.com

URBAN ACTION NO PHONE CALLS, PLEASE

This week’s calls to action include the following events and activities. (All are free and open to the public, unless otherwise noted.)

Lecture on human trafficking Several faith organizations will sponsor “The Global to Local Phenomenon of Human Trafficking,” at 7 p.m. on Wednesday, January 16, at 363 Penfield Road. Human trafficking is a $32 billion a year industry that involves sexual exploitation, sex tourism, forced labor, and child soldiers. Moses Robinson of the Rochester Police Department is the event’s guest speaker.

Talk on reproductive rights

The Genesee Valley Civil Liberties Union and Planned Parenthood of the Rochester/Syracuse Region will present “The State of Reproductive Health Care in New York: What Needs to Change,” 8 CITY

JANUARY 16-22, 2013

at 7 p.m. on Wednesday, January 23. Katharine Bodde, policy counsel for the NYCLU, will talk about legislative initiatives to support New Yorkers’ ability to make meaningful reproductive health-care decisions. The event is at First Unitarian Church, 220 Winton Road South.

Discussion about downtown’s future The Rochester Regional Community Design Center will present “Destination Downtown” at 7 p.m. on Tuesday, January 22. Joseph Minicozzi, principal architect with Urban3 in Asheville, NC, will share his experience as a developer of public interest projects. Heidi Zimmer-Meyer, president of Rochester Downtown Development Corporation, will discuss current projects. The event is at Gleason Works auditorium, 1000 University Avenue. Tickets: $15, www.rrcdc. org or at the door. Free student admission.

Stand up for Democracy

Move to Amend-Rochester presents “Party for the People-Stand Up for Democracy” from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. on Sunday, January 20. The event combines information and news analysis with entertainment on issues threatening democracy from lack of affordable health care to the financial industry. The event is at the Water Street Music Hall, 204 North Water Street. Donations accepted.


Dining

Pictured left: a spinach salad with goat cheese and fruit; pictured right: the honey-lime shrimp salad – both from Magnolia’s. PHOTOS BY MATT DETURCK

Never say diet [ CHOW HOUND ] BY DAYNA PAPALEO

Every January they strike, maybe in your neighborhood, too: roving troublemakers who break into my house, wash my clothes in scalding water, then throw them into the dryer on its hottest setting. How else to explain the increased snugness of my jeans? Well, I guess it could be the fallout from that Bacchanalian bender that I embarked on right around Thanksgiving. I mean Halloween. Fine; it was Labor Day. Get off my back. Whatever the reason, many people begin damage control once the caloric onslaught of the holidays wanes, which inevitably means smarter food choices. Now, I’m certainly not a nutritionist, but most sentient adults are working with a basic knowledge of what’s good for you and what isn’t. Obviously, the wisest idea is to prepare your own food at home, but read on for some places around town where filling soups and sprawling salads make for a truly satisfying meal option when you get that restaurant itch. First, a few pro tips: watch out for those cream-based soups, politely request the dressing on the side if possible, and beware of

deep-fried anything on top of your salad. And please let us know about your favorite soup and salad spots. Oh, one more thing: enjoy! Magnolia’s Deli & Café (366 Park Ave., 271-7380, magnoliascafe.com) celebrates its 10th anniversary this year, and a peek at the menu reveals that Magnolia’s is very serious about salads. There are more than 15 mealworthy combinations of fruits, vegetables, and proteins available, like the Golden Spinach ($9.25), with Golden Delicious apples, pineapple, walnuts, goat cheese, and red onion, offered with honey mustard or Italian dressing. On my last visit I couldn’t resist a special called Winter Wonderland ($10.50), an eye-popping mélange of spring greens, sliced almonds, cranberries, pomegranate seeds, mandarin oranges, and feta, topped with a grilled chicken breast and served with balsamic vinaigrette. The handful of soups available was pretty tempting as well. Where Han Noodle is all white and bright, its brand-new suburban counterpart Bistro Han (687 Moseley Road, Perinton; 223-7333, bistrohan.com) is more akin to its moodier cousin, with jet-black furnishings, sexy swaths

of red, and awesome dandelion-esque lamps that look as though you could blow on them to make a wish. Han Noodle and Bistro Han serve many of the same dishes — including those luscious steamed buns filled with braised pork belly, scallions, shallots, peanuts, and pickles ($5) — but I was happy to find my old Chinese restaurant standby, subgum wonton soup ($8), a pristine-looking broth teeming with roast pork, shrimp, chicken, and an array of colorful veggies along with a few plump dumplings. Most people don’t associate Italian restaurants with lighter fare, but Tony D’s Coal-Fired Pizza (288 Exchange Blvd., 3406200, tonydsrochester.com) offers some yummy options for anyone craving the flavors of Italy but hoping to steer clear of carbs. On the menu right now is a roasted vegetable salad ($12) with bell peppers, fennel, radicchio, eggplant, and onions, topped with gorgonzola, toasted almonds, and moscato vinaigrette, but I usually go for the Sicilian-style calamari salad ($11), a simple, elegant blend of tender squid, onions, celery, olives, lemon, and olive oil served over mixed greens. And keep in

mind that Tony D’s delicious chicken wings ($8/$16) are roasted, not fried. The menu at the popular South Wedge mainstay Ming’s Noodles & Cuisines of Asia (1038 S. Clinton Ave., 244-0985, mingsnoodle.com) has grown positively massive over the years, but I generally gravitate toward the same dish: Soba Tofu Noodle Soup ($6.50), filled with a generous helping of tofu, a gaggle of vegetables, and tasty buckwheat noodles. Of course Ming’s also offers the Big Three (that’s wonton, hot and sour, and egg drop soups), but here you’ll also find lesser-known soups like the comforting West Lake minced beef soup ($2.55/$5.25) along with concoctions spanning the Far East, such as Vietnam’s famous pho ($6.50-$7.95), Thailand’s spicy tom yum noodle soup ($6.50-$7.95), and Japan’s umami-rich miso soup ($1.75-$3.50). Half Moon Creative Salads (2900 Monroe Ave., 248-4964 and 202 High Point Drive, Victor, 425-4711, halfmoonsalads.com) takes its name from the English translation for mezzaluna, the semicircular bladed utensil that chops together the goodies in Half Moon’s creations. This is cool for two reasons: 1. There’s a little bit of everything in each bite; and 2. No more unwieldy pieces of lettuce tracking dressing all over your face. Choose from salads like Le Café ($8.79 for the 24 oz. “half head”), containing arugula, red onion, artichoke hearts, sliced almonds, hard-boiled egg, bean sprouts, sun-dried tomatoes, and crumbled bleu cheese, or dream up your own from dozens of ingredients. Bonus: all the nutritional information about the salads can be found at Half Moon’s website. “I was surprised that Americans have been so slow to embrace the cooking of Korea,” culinary doyenne Ruth Reichl said a New York Times Magazine article from last October. She’s right, but I’ve been doing my part at Sodam Korean Restaurant (900 Jefferson Road, Building 1, 475-9810, sodamkoreanrestaurant.com), which turns out excellent food in a nondescript building at the Genesee Regional Market. My fellow soup lovers ought to put Sodam on their radar; beyond the menu listing for soup and noodles there are a wide variety of broth-based hot pots, with hearty filler like beef short ribs, pork, seafood, and vegetables. On a recent gray day I was totally charmed by Duk Mandu Gook ($9.95), a homey, traditional Korean soup thickened with egg and containing beef, dumplings, scallions, roasted seaweed, and chewy, thinly sliced rice cake. Chow Hound is a food and restaurant news column. Do you have a tip? Send it to food@ rochester-citynews.com. rochestercitynewspaper.com

CITY 9


Holding historY

and

Framing futures the rmsc today

rochester museum and Science Center

AT 100

FEATURE | BY REBECCA RAFFERTY

All endeavors are precarious, and those that seek to last must weather the ebb and flow of cultural shifts, prosperity, and community needs. Even a space based on history must earn its place in the passage of time, and in doing so over the course of the past 100 years, the Rochester Museum and Science Center has had to shift its role from purely a keeper of historic record to a facilitator of the present and future community. RMSC is currently celebrating its centennial anniversary, and like double-headed Janus, is casting simultaneous stares both proudly backward at where the institution has been, and enthusiastically forward into the yet-to-be.

10 CITY JANUARY 16-22, 2013

During the course of any given month, there are a staggering number of opportunities to engage with programs, exhibitions, and recreational events offered by RMSC. Visitors to the main museum on East Avenue can learn about geological and anthropological history, taking us from the Ice Age, to the contact between native people in our region and colonists, to the innovators who built the boom town we now call home. In the “Adventure Zone” exhibition hall, kids can experiment with all manner of interactive exhibits focusing on physics, electricity, water cycles, and elements of weather. The “Expedition Earth” exhibits teach visitors about the ever-changing earth with a particularly local focus. Upper galleries feature the social histories of our region and beyond, with dioramas that reveal the lives of Native Americans, early settlers, and African Americans during the pursuit of freedom on the Underground Railroad. Adults may take in a lecture on a wide range of subjects by local and visiting scholars. The planetarium offers regular star shows, astronomical events, and films projected on the dome, laser shows set to popular music, as well as the continuous opportunity on Saturday nights to view the cosmos through the telescope (assuming the weather cooperates). The museum-run Cumming Nature Center in Naples offers a year-round series of hikes and special events, many of which contextualize and celebrate local flora and fauna.

a house for rochester’s history “In 1912, we were an agency of the city, and our home was at Edgerton Place, where the city headquarters was,” says Kate Bennett, current president of RMSC, which in 1912 was founded as simply The Rochester Municipal Museum. “We were side-by-side with the Rochester Public Library, the Rochester Historical Society, and we just learned recently that the zoo was there as well.” The initial idea behind creating a museum, Bennett says, was to collect and preserve

important artifacts that tell the story of the Rochester region, and to provide a sense of place and history to the people who lived here. “Today, we still care deeply still about providing a sense of place,” says Bennett, who has been with the RMSC since 1996. But the journey to the present has shifted toward a focus on getting youth excited about science and technology education. In the 1940’s, a donation of land and funding made by Edward Bausch, son of Bausch & Lomb founder John Jacob Bausch, who lived where the planetarium stands today, moved the museum from Edgerton Place to its current home on East Avenue. The Women’s Council, the museum’s network of volunteers that still exists today, helped pack and move the collection. Today that collection stands upward of 1.2 million objects. After Rochester experienced race-related rioting in 1964, “the city found itself in the situation where it needed to pay attention to citizens that really needed its support,” says Bennett. An analysis was conducted by the Center for Governmental Research Inc. regarding who was using the libraries, the zoo, and the museum, and the results suggested that the whole county used those institutions. So in 1968, Monroe County took on the responsibility of managing the museum and its compatriots. “We became at that point a public-private partnership with the county,” says Bennett. At roughly the same time, a gift from the Strasenburgh family helped build the Strasenburgh Planetarium, which “helped us create an institution that would help people imagine space travel,” says Bennett, “and to excite the kids about science, technology, engineering, and math.” In the 1970’s, the RMSC campus grew again with the addition of the Cunningham House, which is used for executive offices and private events, the Eisenhart Auditorium, and the building that now houses the Genesee Community Charter School.

ups, downs, and changes During the Great Depression the museum became very small, with very few people


(opposite) Detail shots from the Rochester Museum and Science Center campus. PHOTOS BY MARK CHAMBERLIN AND WILLIE CLARK

1) The ox yoke pictured here was the Rochester Museum’s first collection object. PHOTO COURTESY ALBERT R. STONE NEGATIVE COLLECTION, RMSC 2) Detail from one of the many dioramas included in the “At The Western Door” exhibit at RMSC. PHOTO BY WILLIE CLARK 3) Kate Bennett, current president of the Rochester Museum and Science Center. PHOTO PROVIDED

working on staff, says Bennett. “The director at the time, Arthur Parker, created a very smart program that got some federal money through a Works Progress Administration project, and enabled us to work with Native Americans to create objects that came into the museum collection.” Some of those items were traded with other museums, which helped the Rochester Museum build a more robust collection. More recently, after September 11, 2001, there were cutbacks through county and state funding that were difficult to manage and overcome, says Bennett. “We’ve brought the budget back up and increased our earned revenue, and admissions represent a bigger percent of our budget than before,” she says. But because RMSC holds the county’s and city’s collection in trust for the community, it also receives some funding from the county. In 1988, the museum added the Elaine Wilson Hall, the current entrance to the museum, and a whole new series of exhibition halls were added in the 1990’s, including “Adventure Zone” and “Expedition Earth.” The 2006 addition of the third-floor Riedman Gallery, where RMSC hosts its traveling exhibitions, required an actual physical addition to the museum building. Over the years the focus of the museum also grew and shifted. “We have always had a focus on Rochester and a sense of place — history, geologic history, environmental history, as well as the anthropology, who has lived here in this

region,” says Bennett. But in the 1990’s, the trustees and the county wanted the museum to tackle the issue of science literacy, and provide more open-ended learning opportunities. “From our point of view, science isn’t about the facts of science, but the inquiry into answers,” says Bennett. “People are eager for us to make a difference in the lives of children,” she says. The museum has always been geared toward children’s education, about giving people opportunities to learn at their own pace, and fueling an enthusiasm for learning, says Bennett. There were very few hands-on exhibits when RMSC hired Bennett in the mid-1990’s, but “when we had traveling exhibits, that would add hands-on components,” she says. RMSC now boasts more than 150 interactive exhibits and entire exhibit halls that have hands-on, open-ended-question types of opportunities, such as the simulated paleontological dig in “Expedition Earth.” In building modern exhibits and programming, “we concentrate on ways that we can help stimulate the economy,” Bennett says, “so we make sure that our plans are helping the community grow and become what it can become in the future.” Though RMSC offers a lot from the historical perspective, “the STEM programming strengthens the educational process of our community,” says Andrew Meloni, who has served as chairman of the board of trustees since June 2001 and a museum trustee for 10

years. STEM is an increased emphasis on education in the areas of science, technology, engineering, and math, and is one result of the American Competitiveness Initiative set in motion in 2006 under the George W. Bush administration. The STEM Education Coalition includes organizations such as the RMSC, which serve to supplement what schools can offer children in our community in these fields, and in recent decades STEM has shifted the trajectory of RMSC’s exhibitions and programming. Recent examples of STEM-based exhibitions include the “Titanic” exhibit from 2009, which focused on technical elements — as well as the experiences of different classes of people — of the ill-fated ship, and the “Our Body” exhibit, held in 2010, which featured installations of real human bodies with their biological systems laid bare for open exploration. Though the museum has an overt focus on children’s education, Bennett stresses the importance of the institution for adults as well. “When the museum was looking to create itself on East Avenue, the leaders went out and convinced the community that a community without a major museum is like an amnesia patient,” says Bennett. “It helped people understand the importance of it, that this was the university of the common man,” she says. “You can come in at any level.”

philanthropy, then and now “So much of our growth and change has been done through magnificent generosity of individuals in this community who wanted to help us bring a program to fruition,” says Bennett. Today, RMSC includes seven buildings and 14 acres, plus the Cumming Nature Center located south of the thruway near Naples that covers 900 acres. John Carver is the vice chairman of the museum’s board, and serves on every committee except finance. Since 2000, Carver has also been a member of the Technical Advisory Group, a network of volunteers who use their expertise to design and build interactive exhibits based on ideas generated by museum staff. When it comes to TAG projects, “the only thing the museum has to pay for is materials,” Carver says. Like so many people raised in this region, Carver remembers visiting the museum as a child, but he became involved in supporting it through his mother-in-law, Eleanor Eisenhart Morris. In the past, philanthropists such as Carver’s wife’s family donated large sums of money to support the institution and to help it continues on page 16

“This is the university of the common man. rmsc president You can come in at any level.”

kate bennett

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 11


Upcoming

Music

[ JAZZ/FUNK ]

Audioinflux CD Release Party Friday, February 22. Lovin’ Cup. 300 Park Point Dr. $5-$7. 9 p.m. 292-9940. [ POP/ROCK ]

Big Leg Emma Friday, March 8. Water Street Music Hall. 204 N. Water St. $12-$14. 9 p.m. 352-5600. waterstreetmusic.com [ POP/ROCK ]

All Time Low Tuesday, April 30. Main Street Armory. 900 East Main St. $25-$30. 5:30 p.m. 232-3221. rochestermainstreetarmory.com

Ana Egge

THURSDAY, JANUARY 17 ABILENE BAR & LOUNGE, 153 LIBERTY POLE WAY 8:30 P.M. | $8 | 232-3230, ABILENEBARANDLOUNGE.COM [ FOLK ] Despite her laundry list of accomplishments, you have probably never heard of Ana Egge. This Brooklynbased, Saskatchewan-born troubadour is not your cookiecutter alt-country artist. Her unique sound synergizes boisterous electric guitars and the somewhat more soothing folk sounds of mandolin and fiddle. The result is a garagecountry-rock kind of feel; it’s visceral and demonstrative. A deft narrative frame structures her songs, while the music seems to put contemporary and traditional folk aesthetic into perfect balance. Lucinda Williams once called Egge the “folk Nina Simone.” Her seventh, and most recent, album, “Bad Blood,” was produced by Steve Earle and recorded at Levon Helm Studio in Woodstock. — BY DAVID YOCKEL, JR.

Trash Wave Revue Volume II SATURDAY, JANUARY 19 BUG JAR, 219 MONROE AVE. 9 P.M. | $6-$8 | BUGJAR.COM [ ROCK ] The success of Volume I has led to Volume

II. Trash Wave isn’t so much a line-up of similar bands gathering around the same bonfire, but more a meeting of like-minded attitudes. That’s really what it’s supposed to be about, anyhow. That way bands like the heavy melodic Pink Elephant, the angular indie sound of Muler, the crush of Babayaga, along with Clamfight and The Ginger Faye Bakers can get together for a killer show without having to explain a goddamned thing. — BY FRANK DE BLASE

CITY’s

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12 CITY JANUARY 16-22, 2013


WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 16 [ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ] Dady Brothers. Johnny’s Irish Pub, 1382 Culver Rd. 2240990. 8 p.m. Free. The Last Bison w/Hollands, The Moho Collective. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 2929940. 8 p.m. $10-$12.

January Thaw 2013 SATURDAY, JANUARY 19 WATER STREET MUSIC HALL, 204 N. WATER ST. 8 P.M. | $10-$12 | WATERSTREETMUSIC.COM [ JAM/WORLD BEAT ] It’s hard to believe that the groove

godfather, Tony Cavagnaro, has been gone six years. But the ripples in the pond the late, great Buddhahood founder still spread through his band. The sound endures with the Buddhahood sporting some new Buddha blood, and through all of the musicians he touched directly in the genre he helped establish here. January Thaw celebrates the man’s music and continues his spirit with proceeds going to Tony Cavagnaro’s Young Musicians Scholarship Fund at the Hochstein School of Music. Joining the Buddhahood on this bill will be Mosaic Foundation, The John Payton Project, AudioInflux, and a pile of groovy guests. — BY FRANK DE BLASE

Rochester Women’s Community Chorus SATURDAY, JANUARY 19 ST. ANNE CHURCH, 1600 MOUNT HOPE AVE. 7:30 P.M. | $5-$10 | 234-4441, THERWCC.ORG [ CHORAL ] You have to love a choral group with

a mission statement to “use music as a vehicle for messages of peace, hope, understanding, and cooperation.” The four-part Rochester Women’s Community Chorus is that group, and this week it is bringing us music to put a little sunshine in our day. The tune list for “Here Comes the Sun” will include “Blue Skies,” “Dock of the Bay,” and “I Got the Sun in the Morning.” — BY PALOMA A. CAPANNA

Cosmic Shakedown played Saturday, January 12, at California Brew Haus. PHOTO BY FRANK DE BLASE

Blue suede Britannica [ REVIEW ] BY FRANK DE BLASE

The Roc City Pro Jam — the now-weekly open jam that rotates through different venues — has reached its plateau. This is a wonderfully organic event that takes on a professional-player edge without getting too high tone. Anyone can get up and play, but you’ve got to step high to live up to the level of talent present. Each jam is groove- or beat-centric to exalted heights, and within these goalposts it shines supernova bright. But to avoid musicians getting too comfy, some melody needs to be introduced. It could be freeform freak-out, classic Sinatra, Gregorian chant, anything, but it’s structured where there’s an additional challenge and the endings don’t resemble a plane overshooting the runway. Members from local bands like The Goods, AudioInflux, the Teressa Wilcox Band, and Teagan and the Tweeds all got up and played in various configurations on the Skylark stage Tuesday, January 8. My suggestion is to give the recently assembled ensembles a chance to get their assorted ya-ya’s out, rocks off, and grooves on, but throw them a curve ball. Metal mavens? Give them a reggae beat. Long-winded jammers? Assign them a three-minute pop tune. And so on. Remember, it’s all one big

song, and we’re all trying to carve out our own little piece. Things got all shook up Thursday night as Albany’s Lustre Kings hosted the annual Elvis birthday bash at the Dinosaur, where a host of Rochester rockabilly glitterati tore into their equivalent to the great American songbook. Doghouse bassists Brian Williams and Big Mike Woolhaver spanked the bottom end while the Bradley brothers Todd (Hi-Risers, bass) and Mark (saxophone, Essentials, Salamanders) tore it up Memphis style while flipped-southpaw guitar-slinger Bobby Henrie played the part of blue suede Britannica, digging up early Sun Records gems as well as cinematic cuts from the king’s stab at Tinseltown. Saturday night I headed to the California Brew Haus where an all-day hard rock line-up had been pummeling away since 4 in the afternoon. I arrived around 10 p.m. to catch Cosmic Shakedown, a trio from Buffalo. The band was straight-ahead hard rock except for the hooks it centered two songs around. It was reminiscent of the thump and twang skeleton laid forth by Son House, or more recently Jack White or The Black Keys. I dug it, and will dig it again.

BEST NEIGHBORHOOD BAR A UNIQUE NEIGHBORHOOD BAR!

L&MES LAN

[ JAZZ ] Double Standard. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. 6625555. 6 p.m. Free. Jim Nelson. Lemoncello, 137 West Commercial St. 3858565. 7:30 p.m. Free. Stringplicity. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 7:30 p.m. Free. Vince Ercolamento& Joe Chiappone Jazz Quartet. Murph’s Irondequoit Pub, 705 Titus Ave. 342-6780. 8 p.m. Free. [ POP/ROCK ] Cairo w/Rash, The Blood & Bone Orchestra. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. $5-$7. The DeVills w/Heatseeker and Cory Kesselring. Tala Vera, 155 State St. 546-3845. 9 p.m. $5-$7. Haewa. Temple Bar and Grille, 109 East Avenue. 4029802. 9 p.m. Call for info. Teagan Ward Duo. Dinosaur Bar-B-Que, 99 Court St. 9 p.m. Free.

THURSDAY, JANUARY 17 [ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ] Ana Egge. Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. 8:30 p.m. $8. The Blues Project ft. Gordon Munding and friends. The Beale New Orleans Grille and BarSouth Ave., 693 South Ave. 271-4650. Third Thursday of every month, 7 p.m. Free. Cammy Enaharo, Matthew Corey & The SoulStars, Kevin Plane Band. Tala Vera, 155 State St. 546-3845. 8 p.m. $5. continues on page 15

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rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 13


Music BUY - SELL

Sterling Silver, Flatware, Tea Sets, Broken Gold, Costume Jewelry

MIKE DEMING ANTIQUES 1458 Monroe Ave. formerly Stanley’s Flowers Mon-Sat 11-6 PM

244-1999 • Theantiqueguy.com

Local rock group Haewa prefers playing live to studio recording. “It’s a living, breathing thing when we play,” says drummer Riley Dichairo. PHOTO PROVIDED

Haewa do you say? Haewa W/SPACE FUSION THURSDAY, JANUARY 24 STICKY LIPS BBQ JUKE JOINT, 830 JEFFERSON ROAD 8 P.M. | $5 | STICKYLIPSBBQ.COM REVERBNATION.COM/HAEWA [ PROFILE ] BY FRANK DE BLASE

Haewa can be better described by what it isn’t. The group jams, but it isn’t a jam band. It circles psychedelic rock, but doesn’t get lost in the ether. It’s a rock ’n’ roll band that doesn’t adhere to merely the one, the four, and the five. It’s odd, but not intentionally obtuse. Haewa is barely out of the gate. It’s a young rock band — roughly two years old — made up of three musicians — all roughly 20 years old — that has a seasoned attitude behind a seasoned sound that belies its age. Since the band formed, music has consumed its members in much the same way a drum set crowded bassist (then-drummer) Ben Chilbert’s dorm room. Chilbert and current drummer Riley Dichairo met at Monroe Community College. “You couldn’t fit anything else in the room,” says Dichairo. “It was the bed, the desk, drums.” 14 CITY JANUARY 16-22, 2013

Chilbert switched to bass and Dichairo started banging on the drums. In searching for a guitarist they joined the ranks of the dateless and desperate and musicians looking for musicians on Craigslist in search of a guitar player. Out popped the weirdos. “I had some really creepy people call me,” Chilbert says. One prospective band mate they didn’t call back immediately was already angry with them. On top of that, he couldn’t play. “He came over and started trying to write right away,” says Chilbert. “I was like, ‘I don‘t even know what kind of music you play.’ It sounded like alternative prog rock…he couldn’t play notes to save his life, just power chords. So I never called him back and he left me a lot of hateful text messages.” There was no love connection. Dichairo says, “It’s worse than dating. “It’s dating on a whole other level.” In the meantime, guitarist Collin Jones

was getting his own dose of rock ’n’ roll reality. He had abandoned studies to go on a national tour playing guitar with an international band. Dates were booked, gelt was guaranteed, the works. And then… “It ended in failure,” says Jones. “It was actually a horrible experience. It

hardly got off the ground and just kind of ended in North Carolina.” By the time he saw Dichairo and Chilbert’s ad on the internet he was still a little gun shy. “We all harp on the freedom of the styles we all play,” says Chilbert. “But we’re all into funk, reggae, psychedelia, electronica. We all have our ground roots, but we respect and enjoy the other genres of music. And I put that in the Craigslist ad and ended it with, ‘We don’t fuck around.’” Jones saw the ad and dug it. And thus began Haewa. Most bands you ask shun the shoehorn, protest the pigeon hole. But any band that plays today is arriving at the dance after it has been underway quite a while. There isn’t anything truly new. However, Haewa attacks this esoterically, not by avoiding assorted influences, but rather by tapping into their spirits. “Instead of specific licks,” says Dichairo, “I think we channel the energy of our influences.” Dichairo in particular embodies this as self-taught musician. “I took one lesson in my whole life,” he says. “And I hated it.” Though Haewa squeezed out “Deadwet

Soundwaves” — a six-song CD — last year, all three members make the distinction between Haewa the live act and Haewa the studio band. “We want to play live music,” Dichairo says. “It’s a living, breathing thing when we play it.” The band has begun recording shows and plans on making them available to its fans. The freedom is apparent in the band’s live shows, where Jones says there is more room for improvisation. A studio recording will only give you the same experience every time. Cilbert finds it difficult to let go. “It’s hard being satisfied with your work,” he says. ‘“To say, ‘OK, I like this.’” Perhaps they have set the bar a little high for themselves. “We want it to be a masterpiece,” Dichairo says. What else does Haewa want? “We want to be everywhere,” Dichairo says. “On the airways, in your home. We want you to come to our home, which is the stage.”


CITY

EDM/HOUSE | INFECTED MUSHROOM

ELECTRONICA | ONUINU

Coming to Rochester from Israel by way of L.A., Infected Mushroom is here to infect you — with the beat. Side effects may include unconsciously doing the “Night at the Roxbury” thing. Mushroom has been consistently rated one of the top acts in the EDM scene. As self-proclaimed purveyors of psychedelic trance, the act presents a light-and-sound extravaganza meant to confuse the senses. The du will bring the turntables and no doubt a few Macbooks, and if you don’t come out of it sweaty, then clearly you did not get the point. One Nightclub favorites DJs Richie Salvaggio and Jameson Alexander will be opening the evening up with some mid-tempo electro and house mixes.

Portland, Oregon-based multi-instrumentalist Dorian Duvall, a.k.a. Onuinu (pronounced “On you in you”) calls his genre disco-hop. Maybe that description is too limiting, as his trio creates ambient electro-pop that’s both expansive and beautiful. Singer-guitarist-composer Duvall crafts the lush electronic arrangements that embellish the melodies at the heart of its tunes as band members add live synths and percussion to keep things fresh. Debut CD “Mirror Gazer” has subtle nuances — particularly on trippy single “Ice Palace” — that make me hear something new every time. Onuinu feels like an up-and-comer and music insiders at Portland’s Willamette Week newspaper voted it among the Top 10 best new groups of 2012. With Light Feelings and PK.

Infected Mushroom performs Thursday, January 17, 9 p.m. at Main Street Armory, 900 E. Main St. $20. 2323221, rochestermainstreetarmory.com. — SUZAN PERO

Onuinu performs Sunday, January 20, 9 p.m. at the Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. $6-$8. 454-2966, bugjar.com. — BY ROMAN DIVEZUR

THURSDAY, JANUARY 17

Windsor Folk Family. Acanthus Café, 337 East Ave. 585-3195999. 10:30 p.m. Call for info.

Colm Gannon & John Blake. McGraw’s Irish Pub, 146 W Commercial St. 348-9091. 7 p.m. $10. Jim Lane. Murph’s Irondequoit Pub, 705 Titus Ave. 342-6780. 8 p.m. Free. [ BLUES ] The Beale Street Blues Band. Sticky Lips BBQ Juke Joint, 830 Jefferson Rd. 292-5544. 8 p.m. $5. Double Take Blues Band. Dinosaur Bar-B-Que, 99 Court St. 9 p.m. Free. Uncle Ralph”s BBQ Blues Band. Pane Vino Ristorante, 175 N. Water St. 232-6090. 8 p.m. Free. [ CLASSICAL ] Eastman at Washington Square Lunchtime Concerts. 1st Universalist Church, 150 S. Clinton Ave. 274-1400. 12:15 p.m. Free. [ JAZZ ] Dave Chisholm Jazz Orchestra. Acanthus Café, 337 East Ave. 585-319-5999. 7 p.m. Call for info. Deborah Branch. Lemoncello, 137 West Commercial St. 3858565. 6 p.m. Free. Eastman Jazz. Acanthus Café, 337 East Ave. 585-319-5999. Call for info. Fred Vine. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 7:30 p.m. Free.

Jim Nelson. Prosecco Italian Restaurant, 1550 New York 332. 924-8000. 6 p.m. Call for info. John Palocy Trio. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. 6625555. 6 p.m. Free. Quintopus. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. 8 p.m. $10. Ted Nicolosi and Shared Genes. Roncones Italian Restaurant, 232 Lyell Ave. 458-3090. 6 p.m. Free. [ REGGAE/JAM ] Reggae Thursday. Pure Night Club, 117 Liberty Pole Way. 454-7230. 10 p.m. $5 before 11 pm. [ POP/ROCK ] Five Alarm Open Jam. Firehouse Saloon, 814 South Clinton. 319-3832. 9 p.m. Call for info.

FRIDAY, JANUARY 18 [ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ] Collin Jones Music. The Cottage Hotel, 1390 Pittsford Mendon Road. 585-624-1390. 9 p.m. InsideOut w/Karin’s Pride. McGraw’s Irish Pub, 146 W Commercial St. 348-9091. 6 p.m. Free. Johnny Bauer. Back Nine Grill, 3500 East Ave. 585-267-7031. 9 p.m. 21+. Free. Ralph Louis. Rochester Plaza Hotel, 70 State St. 546-3450. 6 p.m. Free.

[ BLUES ] Mama Hart Band w/Marty Roberts. Johnny’s Irish Pub, 1382 Culver Rd. 224-0990. 9 p.m. Free. Steve Grills & The Roadmasters. Dinosaur Bar-B-Que, 99 Court St. 10 p.m. Free. [ CLASSICAL ] Wilmot Wind Quintet. Nazareth College Wilmot Recital Hall, 4245 East Avenue. 389-2700. 7:30 p.m. Free. [ JAZZ ] Fred Costello & Roger Eckers Jazz Duo. Charley Brown’s, 1675 Penfield Rd. 385-9202. 7:30 p.m. Free. Marco Amadio. Prosecco Italian Restaurant, 1550 New York 332. 924-8000. 7 p.m. Call for info. Mark Cassara Band w/Bobby DiBaudo Duo. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. 662-5555. 5:30 p.m. Free. Michael Vadala Trio. Lemoncello, 137 West Commercial St. 385-8565. 6:30 p.m. Free. Norman Tibbils. Lemoncello, 137 West Commercial St. 3858565. 6:30 p.m. Free. Sofrito. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 8:30 p.m. Free. The Student Union. Tala Vera, 155 State St. 546-3845. 8:30 p.m. $5-$7.

Sunny Brown Band. Prosecco Italian Restaurant, 1550 New York 332. 924-8000. 7 p.m. Call for info. The Swooners. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. 662-5555. 5:30 p.m. Free. Ted Nicolosi and Shared Genes. The Pultneyville Grill, 4135 Mill St. (315) 589-4512. 7 p.m. Free. Tinted Image. Pane Vino Ristorante, 175 N. Water St. 232-6090. 6:30 p.m. Free. [ R&B ] Coupe de Villes. Sticky Lips BBQ Juke Joint, 830 Jefferson Rd. 292-5544. 8:30 p.m. $3. [ HIP-HOP/RAP ] Joe Budden w/Emilio Rojas. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N. Water Street. 325-5600. 7:30 p.m. $20-$25. [ POP/ROCK ] 33 Black Angels, Pillow Fight Accident. Boulder Coffee Co. Alexander St., 100 Alexander St. 454-7140. 8 p.m. Free. Adam Kramer’s B-Day Show w/Silverfish, Archimedes, continues on page 16

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FRIDAY, JANUARY 18

RMSC at 100 continues from page 11

A rendering of proposed renovations to the RMSC campus on East Avenue, including an enclosed walkway to link the Strasenburgh Planetarium with the main museum, and a fountain. IMAGE PROVIDED

grow. Today, philanthropy isn’t only about well-off individuals and families providing funding for specific goals of a community institution, but also about time and expertise donated by individuals with a specific skill set, such as those engineers in TAG who volunteer to actualize hands-on exhibits. Carver’s personal favorite project that he has helped bring to fruition is the interactive replica of Erie Canal Lock 32, which can be found in the “Adventure Zone.” Kids who engage with this exhibit learn about the mechanics of the locks by moving a boat around the display by letting water in and out of the locks, and earn a stamp for their Erie Canal Heritage Trail passport. TAG is in the process of creating a replacement the 10-year-old exhibit, which Carver says requires a great deal of maintenance. But you don’t have to have a specific area of expertise to volunteer at the museum, just a willingness to lend a hand. The current volunteer pool includes the Women’s Council, student interns, board members, and various committees supplements what can be accomplished by the 74 people on museum staff.

looking to the future It’s easy to feel excited when talking with RMSC staff about the institution’s future endeavors, and how they apply to Rochester’s current culture. On January 19, the Riedman Gallery will host a new traveling exhibition, “Race: Are We Really So Different?” which focuses on actual biological, social, and cultural differences, as well as race as a social construct. The aim of the exhibition for RMSC is to educate people about facts, dash myths, and engage the community in an ongoing discussion. The exhibit will continue through April 28. [For information about related events held in Rochester in the coming weeks and months, see the “Facing Race” sidebar.] “We started looking at the exhibit as an opportunity several years ago,” says Bennett. RMSC engaged with Rochester Institute of Technology during preliminary discussions, and together met with Action for a Better Community’s James Norman, “who suggested to us that we work with the RISE Coalition, which allows a number of people of different backgrounds of race and ethnicity to come 16 CITY JANUARY 16-22, 2013

together and work toward a common goal,” says Bennett. That goal is to work to improve issues of disparity in Rochester. “The exhibition is one thing, but we knew that the community needed more than a four-month touring exhibition to solve the issues that we have in this community,” says Bennett. In addition to information and interactive elements, such as guessing a person’s race based on hearing a voice, the museum is setting up opportunities to encourage focused and continued discussion. For example, city and suburban and rural school groups will see the exhibit together, then sit in a room together to have facilitated conversations about what they saw. Not a purely black-and-white issue, the endeavor seeks to engage people of all races and ethnicity in Rochester, and RMSC has reached out to Asian-Pacific organizations and communities, has sought Ganondagan State Historic Site’s involvement, as well as that of various Hispanic organizations. RMSC has also reached out to churches, libraries, and other community spaces to build a lecture and discussion calendar of programming, and plans to create a summit at the conclusion of the exhibition in order to “put a stake in the ground and allow us to say this is how we’re going to make improvements and this is who is going to work on these ideas going forward,” says Bennett. “If we can all put our shoulders to the wheel, we can make progress,” she says. “We know that we’ll be a more creative community, ultimately, if we embrace and celebrate our diversity.” In addition to the “Race” exhibit, RMSC will host one other traveling exhibit in 2013, as well as exhibitions designed and built here in Rochester. Currently, the museum is building an electricity theater that will feature a Tesla coil in it, which is projected to be ready for a June debut, and was funded through the Centennial Gala held in September 2012. In the fall, RMSC will open a construction exhibit, created collaboratively with local construction companies. This exhibit will enable the museum to tell the story of the building of the Golisano Sustainability Building at RIT, as it will feature videos of continues on page 26

Kaleidoscopes, I Can’t Stop Wondering, and Josh Mordecai. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. $5-$7. Among Criminals w/Nevergreen. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N. Water Street. 325-5600. 9 p.m. $5-$10. James Oddy. Boulder Coffee Co. – Park Ave., 739 Park Ave. 697-0235. 8 p.m. Free. Old School Thrash Show. Pineapple Jack’s, 485 Spencerport Rd. 247-5225. 9:30 p.m. Call for info. Randall and the Late Night Scandals. Monty’s Krown, 875 Monroe Ave. 271-7050. 10 p.m. $3-$5. Rover’s Holiday Hangover w/ Hoobastank, The Dirty Heads. Main Street Armory, 900 E. Main St. 232-3221. 5:30 p.m. $10-$20. Run For The Roses. Montage Music Hall, 50 Chestnut St. 232-1520. 9 p.m. Call for info. Something Else. Brickwood Grill, 250 Monroe Ave. 7308230. 10 p.m. Call for info. Teagan & The Tweeds. Nashvilles, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. 334-3030. 9 p.m. Call for info. The Front w/The Good Trip Band ft. Angelo Rose. Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. 6 p.m. $4-$7.

SATURDAY, JANUARY 19 [ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ] Candelo. Tapas 177 Lounge, 177 Saint Paul St. 262-2090. 11 p.m. Free. Ellis w/JoAnn Vacarro. Cafe Veritas at First Unitarian Church, 220 Winton Road South. 7:30 p.m. $10-$18. An Evening with Jeff Slutsky and Friends. Bread & Water Theatre, 243 Rosedale St. 2715523. 8 p.m. Food donation (monetary also accepted). Jim Lane. The Brewery, 8 West Main St. 624-7870. 9 p.m. Free Jim Lane. Murph’s Irondequoit Pub, 705 Titus Ave. 342-6780. 8 p.m. Free. Mo’ Mojo. Harmony House, 58 East Main St. 8 p.m. $12. Trace Wilkins & Ken Snyder. McGraw’s Irish Pub, 146 W Commercial St. 348-9091. 8 p.m. Free. [ BLUES ] Dan Schmitt & The Shadows. Johnny’s Irish Pub, 1382 Culver Rd. 224-0990. 8 p.m. Free. Natalie B Band w/Dave Riccioni. The Garland House, 7547 W Ridge Rd. 637-4640. 9 p.m. Free. [ CLASSICAL ] Rochester Women s Community Chorus: Here Comes the Sun. St. Anne Church, 1600 Mt. Hope Ave. 7:30 p.m. $5-$10. [ COUNTRY ] Rebel’s Posse. Nashvilles, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. 334-3030. 9 p.m. Call for info.

POP/PUNK | WALK THE MOON

Relying on the strength of one single from a self-released album is one path to successfully garnering a major-label record deal, but it certainly isn’t the easiest. Then again, most singles aren’t as arresting as “Anna Sun” from Cincinnati quartet Walk the Moon, nor are most videos quite so eye grabbing as the track’s accompanying viral visual aid. The success of the band’s self-titled label debut has propelled it to major supporting gigs across the country, and now to its own headlining shows. Employing an ebullient pop-punk sound, the band’s anthemic guitar riffs and sing-a-long choruses lend an attractive aura to shows, where the band members’ practice of painting their faces has become a tradition. They happen to bring along enough to share with the crowd, too. Pacific Air also plays. Walk the Moon plays Wednesday, January 23, 8 p.m. at Water Street Music Hall, 204 N. Water St. $18-$20. Waterstreetmusic.com. — BY DAVE LABARGE [ DJ/ELECTRONIC ] DeeDee’s Wild College Party w/ Kiki, Joey, Miranda, Claire, and DJ Mighty Mic. Tilt Nightclub & Ultralounge, 444 Central Ave. 232-8440. 10 p.m. 21+ free before 11 p.m. [ JAZZ ] Annie Wells. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 8:30 p.m. Free. Fred Costello & Roger Eckers Jazz Duo. Charley Brown’s, 1675 Penfield Rd. 385-9202. 7:30 p.m. Free Fred Costello & Roger Eckers Jazz Duo. Charley Brown’s, 1675 Penfield Rd. 385-9202. 7:30 p.m. Free. A Night out for Cora ft. Jerry Falzone, Chris Wilson, Warren Paul, and Bill Welch. JCC Rochester, 1200 Edgewood Ave. 7:30 p.m. $10-$20+. Ted Nicolosi and Shared Genes. Jasmine’s Asian Fusion, 657 Ridge Rd. 216-1290. 6:30 p.m. Free. The White Hots. The Beale New Orleans Grille and Bar-South Ave., 693 South Ave. 2714650. 6:30 p.m. Call for info. [ R&B ] Timothy Mitchum, Michael Vadala Trio. Tala Vera, 155 State St. 546-3845. 8 p.m. $5-$7. [ REGGAE/JAM ] January THAW Concert 2013 ft. The Buddhahood. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N. Water St. 585-325-5600. 7 p.m. $10-$12.

January Thaw: The Buddhahood & Friends. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N. Water Street. 3255600. 8 p.m. $10-$12. [ POP/ROCK ] Barn Dogs. Dinosaur Bar-BQue, 99 Court St. 10 p.m. Free. Beneath Hell’s Sky. California Brew Haus, 402 Ridge Rd. West. 621-1480. Call for info. Danny Nguyen Band. Brickwood Grill, 250 Monroe Ave. 7308230. 10 p.m. Call for info. The Fox Sisters, El Destructo, Dan Frank and the True Believers. Monty’s Krown, 875 Monroe Ave. 271-7050. 10 p.m. $3-$5. Inneriot and Friends. Montage Music Hall, 50 Chestnut St. 232-1520. 8 p.m. $8. Krypton 88. Firehouse Saloon, 814 South Clinton. 319-3832. 9 p.m. $4. LastNote. Sticky Lips BBQ Juke Joint, 830 Jefferson Rd. 2925544. 9 p.m. Free. MoChester. Jukebox, 5435 W. Ridge Rd. 352-4505. 10 p.m. Call for info. Out on the Tiles. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. 9 p.m. $5-$7. Steve Geraci. Boulder Coffee Co. - Alexander St., 100 Alexander St. 454-7140. 8 p.m. Free. Trash-Wave Revue: Volume II: Pink Elephant w/ Muler, Clamfight, Babayaga, and The Ginger Faye Bakers. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. 21+. $6-$8.


West Webster Fire Dept. Benefit Show. Pineapple Jack’s, 485 Spencerport Rd. 247-5225. 6 p.m. 21+. $10.

SUNDAY, JANUARY 20 [ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ] April Verch. Tango Cafe, 389 Gregory St. 271-4930. 7 p.m. Call for info. Celtic Music Sundays w/Dave North. Temple Bar and Grille, 109 East Ave. 232-6000. 7 p.m. Free. [ BLUES ] Gap Mangione Solo Piano Series. Strathallan, 550 East Ave. 461-5010. 6 p.m. Free.

[ CLASSICAL ] A Corelli Celebration. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. 244-5835. 5:30 p.m. $5-$10. Musical Mystery Tour. Hochstein Performance Hall, 50 N Plymouth Ave. 454-4596. 2 p.m. $2-$10. Solo Lute Music from the Early Classical Period: Chris Wilke, 13-course lute. Nazareth College Wilmot Recital Hall, 4245 East Avenue. 389-2700. 3 p.m. Free. [ DJ/ELECTRONIC ] Onuinu w/Light Feelings, PK. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. $6-$8.

[ POP/ROCK ] Lovin’ Cup’s Holiday Miracle ft. ZBTB, Moon Zombies, Two for the Road. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. Call for info. West Webster Fire Dept. Benefit DAY-2. Pineapple Jack’s, 485 Spencerport Rd. 247-5225. 3 p.m. $10.

MONDAY, JANUARY 21 [ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ] The Coyote Brothers. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 7:30 p.m. Free. Lovin’ Cup Idol Auditions. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 2929940. 8 p.m. Call for info.

CITY Newspaper presents

[ JAZZ ] Johnny Cummings. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. 6625555. 5:30 p.m. Free. Smugtown Stompers, Carol Mulligan. Green Lantern Inn, One East Church St. 381-7603. 6:30 p.m. $12.

TUESDAY, JANUARY 22 [ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ] Johnny Bauer. The Cottage Hotel, 1390 Pittsford Mendon Rd. 624-1390. 7 p.m. Free Steve Lyons. Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. 8 p.m. Free.

[ BLUES ] Bluesday Tuesday Blues Jam. P.I.’s Lounge, 495 West Ave. 8 p.m. Call for info. [ JAZZ ] Norman Tibbils. Lemoncello, 137 West Commercial St. 3858565. 6 p.m. Free Norman Tibbils. Lemoncello, 137 West Commercial St. 385-8565. 6:30 p.m. Free. Scott Krier. Prosecco Italian Restaurant, 1550 New York 332. 924-8000. 6 p.m. Call for info. Ted Nicolosi and Shared Genes. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. 662-5555. 6 p.m. Free.

Readings, Reiki, Runes and Reflexology

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[ POP/ROCK ] LastNote w/Typewriter, Adam Clark. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. $5-$7.

Light Works! Wellness & Psychic Faire

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[ REGGAE/JAM ] Roc City Pro Jam. Richmond’s Tavern, 21 Richmond Street. (585) 270-8570. 9 p.m. Call for info.

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I Have Called You by a New Name Jan. 20 Guest Speaker Thomas Warfield "Walking in the Light of Creative Altruism" Music by Connie Deming

Sunday Celebration 11:00 a.m. Music, Meditation and Message Children's Program

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rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 17


Theater

Art Exhibits

Lyndsay Ricketson, Catherine Porter, and Bob Gaynor (left to right) in “Next to Normal.” PHOTO BY GREG MOONEY, COURTESY OF THE ALLIANCE THEATRE, ATLANTA

In your head “Next to Normal” THROUGH FEBRUARY 10 GEVA THEATRE CENTER, 75 WOODBURY BLVD. TICKETS START AT $25 | 232-4382, GEVATHEATRE.ORG [ REVIEW ] BY ERIC REZSNYAK

“Next to Normal,” the Tony and Pulitzer prize-winning musical currently on stage at Geve Thatre, is simply one of the most intense, emotional productions that I have experienced in quite some time. The show — written by Brian Yorkey, with music by Tom Kitt and directed by Scott Schwartz — is not without its (very small) flaws. But it gets so very much brilliantly right, making for a show that is bursting with energy and packed with hard-hitting emotional moments. It is a show that feels very current, very now, and which has an almost universal appeal. If you don’t know the plot of “Next to Normal,” try to avoid any finding out about it. Going in blind allows the show to have maximum impact. In the beginning, it seems like it’s a musical about modern middle-class American life. Mom is frazzled trying to juggle the million facets of everyday existence. Dad feels completely disconnected from his wife, 18 CITY JANUARY 16-22, 2013

and has no idea what she’s saying half the time. Daughter is a compulsive overachiever with some serious social awkwardness. Son is basically absent. But life plods along more or less normally until Mom has an episode that necessitates a visit to the psychopharmacologist, and then it’s better living through chemistry — which maybe isn’t really living at all. Then comes the twist, and the play becomes something much more real, much more revelatory, and much more heartbreaking. Without going into detail, “Next to Normal” is ultimately a play about mental illness and the devastating impact it can have on the afflicted and their families. While the case in the play is extreme, it’s likely that almost any audience member can relate in some way, and the cast and crew do an astonishing job making it all seem very real. By intermission on opening night, there were many patrons with watery eyes walking around the lobby, almost dazed. “Next to Normal” is a rock musical, which means it will appeal to younger audiences. But that shouldn’t scare off fans of traditional musical theater. The live band led by Musical Director Don Kot features guitars, bass, and synth, but the nearly 30 songs are lovely — although perhaps not individually memorable — and fit perfectly into the story at hand.

The music in its own way reflects the family and its crisis, with parts being picked up and carried by certain members of the cast before being passed on to others. At times the songs themselves felt like intimate dances. So much of the show feels effortless — albeit at times emotionally grueling — and that’s why it’s frustrating when it tries too hard to appear “edgy” or “cool.” The opening number is meant to set the tone, introduce the characters and their defining qualities, and stake a claim that this is a different kind of musical. It accomplishes all of that, but it also throws in some lyrics that are intended solely to shock (“We’re the perfect loving family/If they say we’re not then fuck ‘em”). I’m not a prude, but it feels forced compared to 90 percent of the text in the rest of the play, which sounds like things people would actually say to one another. But truthfully, aside from some minor tone issues, there is very little to criticize about this production. The cast is superb, led by Catherine Porter as Diana, the mother and the central figure in the show. Porter performed the role Diana in the Broadway production of “Next to Normal,” and it shows. The control she has over her voice borders on the operatic, as she lets loose, pulls back, jumps octaves — it’s astonishing. Lyndsay Ricketson also turns in a spectacular performance as Natalie, the daughter. Ricketson has a lot to work with in this character — teenaged awkwardness, some very legitimate resentment at her parents, and terror at what is very likely in store for her. She has a firm grasp on all of it, and her singing voice is equally as strong. As Dan, the father, Bob Gaynor has a lovely singing voice, but it was showing obvious strain on opening night. His voice didn’t pierce the way most musical-theater voices do, but he has a warm tone that I could listen to all day. He starts the show fairly stoic, but as the situation builds so does his performance. By the end of the show both he and Porter seemed totally emotionally drained. Cary Tedder plays Gabe, the son, and Jordan Craig is Henry, the teenaged daughter’s love interest. Both are talented young actors with expressive voices. Tedder’s character is fascinating, and likely polarizing. Personally I felt dread every time he came on stage, but that’s a testament to his performance rather than a condemnation of it. Craig is flawless throughout. Both of them, however, are forced to wear some distractingly bad wigs for some reason. Kevin Rigdon’s set is an entire house, minus the plumbing, with a front that opens up to the audience. It’s basically a life-sized Barbie Dream House — which is almost certainly the intention. It also makes smart use of Geva’s trap door and hydraulic lift for some insanely fast mini-set changes.

[OPENING] Alice in the Looking Glass: Illustrations and Artists’ Books 1865-2012. Jan. 21-Aug. 16. Rush Rhees Library, University of Rochester, River Campus Through Aug 16. Rare Books & Special Collections, Rush Rhees Library. Mon-Fri 9 a.m.5 p.m., Sat 11 a.m.-3 p.m 275-4477. Art Faculty Showcase. Jan. 17-Feb. 15. Davison Gallery, Cultural Life Center, Roberts Wesleyan College, 2301 Westside Dr Through Feb 15. Reception Jan 17, 5-7 p.m 594-6442. roberts.edu. Dead End City Art Show II. Jan. 19-Feb. 28. Crossroads Coffee House, 752 S. Goodman St. Through Feb 28. Reception Jan 19, 6-10 p.m. with music by The Pickpockets. 244-6787. kccrossroadscoffee.com. “Design in the Working World: The Alumni Graphic Design Exhibit.” Wednesdays-Sundays Nazareth College Colacino Gallery, 4245 East Ave. Through Mar 1. Hours Wed-Sun noon-5 p.m. Reception Jan 18 5-8 p.m 389-5073. naz.edu/ art/colacino-art-gallery. (en)Gendered Juried Art. Jan. 23-Feb. 27. Rush Rhees Library, University of Rochester, River Campus Through Feb 27. Gallery at the Art and Music Library. Mon-Fri 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Opening Fri Jan 18, 5-7 p.m rochester.edu/ college/wst. “Good Work” Illustration Invitational. Tuesdays-Sundays Nazareth College Arts Center, 4245 East Ave Through Mar 1. Hours Sun and Tue-Thu noon-5 p.m., Fri-Sat noon-8 p.m. Reception Jan 18 5-8 p.m 389-5073. naz.edu/art/ arts-center-gallery. Ray Easton and Jean K Stephens. Tuesdays-Saturdays Oxford Gallery, 267 Oxford St. Through Feb 23. Tue-Fri noon-5 p.m., Sat 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Reception February 2 5:30-7:30 p.m 271-5885. oxfordgallery.com. Tom Kim Solo Photography, “Text and Texture” and “Neil Montanus & James Montanus: A Glimpse of the World.” Wednesdays-Sundays High Falls Fine Art Gallery, 60 Browns Race. Through Feb 28. Wed-Fri 11 a.m.-5:30 p.m., Sat 12-5:30 p.m., Sun 1-5 p.m. Reception Sunday Jan 20, 3-6 p.m 325-2030. centerathighfalls.org. [CONTINUING] AAUW Art Forum, 494 East Ave. Off the Wall VII Members Exhibit. Mondays-Fridays, 10 a.m.-2 p.m Continues through Apr 19 by appointment only. Reception Dec 16 2-4 p.m 244-9892. Art/Music Library Gallery, University of Rochester River Campus. Phillia Yi. Through Jan 18. Th.rough Jan 18. rochester.edu. Arts Council for Wyoming County, 31 S Main St. “Local Color”. Through March 8. Through Mar 8. Reception Mar 8 6-8 p.m 237-3517. artswyco.org.


Arts & Cultural Council, 277 N Goodman St. Four Artists: Hanlon – Kettavong – Packard – Sellers. Mondays-Fridays Through Jan 25. Mon–Fri 10 a.m.-4 p.m. 473-4000. artsrochester.org. The Assisi Institute, 1400 North Winton Rd. “Toothpick World” by Stan Munro. TueThu noon-6 p.m., Fri noon-8 p.m., Sat 11 a.m.-4 p.m $5 suggested donation. 4425010. assisi-institute.org. Black Radish Studio, 274 N Goodman St. “Being Close to Far Away,” new work by Misha Tulek. Through Jan. 31. Through Jan 31. Mon-Fri 10-6 p.m., Sat 12-6 p.m. 4131278. blackradishstudio.com. Book Arts Center, 713 Monroe Ave. Alphabet Soup: Student Show. Through Jan. 31. Letterpress Printed Type Specimens. Through Jan 31. 244-1730. geneseearts.org. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. Roc The Casbah: A Tribute to the Clash. Through Jan. 31, 8 p.m.2 a.m. THE LOBBY PRESENTS. Vintage Propaganda from the Collection of Jim Malley (Mercury Posters) and Clayton Cowles illustrations of The Clash Community Darkroom Gallery, 713 Monroe Ave. “Kaleidoscope”. Through March 2. 271-5920. Equal=Grounds, 750 South Ave. “Beautiful Ruins” by Paula Peters Marra. Through Jan. 31. gallery@ equalgrounds.com. The Firehouse Gallery at Genesee Pottery, 713 Monroe Ave. Ten-Nineteen: Return to Station. Through Feb. 10. 244-1730. geneseearts.org. George Eastman House, 900 East Ave. “60 from the 60s.” Tuesdays-Sundays Through Jan 27. Tue-Sat 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Sun 11 a.m.-5 p.m $5-$12. 271-3361. eastmanhouse.org. Grass Roots Gallery, Hungerford Bldg, 1115 E Main St, suite 157. “The Boy from Saturn: The Paintings of Sean Madden”. Through Jan. 19. Through Jan 19. clownvomit.org 802-5741. thegrassrootsgallery@gmail.com. Hirsute Salon and Gallery, 51 Atlantic Ave. “If the Shoe Fits,” Artwork by Carmine Monzo. Wednesdays-Fridays Through Jan 18. Wed-Fri 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Free. 585-2441111. info@frankiesteinz.com. Image City Photography Gallery, 722 University Ave. “The Magic of Light 2013”. Wednesdays-Sundays Through Jan 20. Wed-Sat 11 a.m.7 p.m., Sun 12-4 p.m. imagecityphotographygallery.com. International Art Acquisitions, 3300 Monroe Ave. “Palms” by Bonnie Wolsky-Farid. Through Jan. 31. Through Jan 31. Mon-Fri 10 a.m.-9 p.m., Sat 10 a.m.-6 p.m., Sun noon-5 p.m 264-1440. internationalartacquisitions.com. I-Square Visions, 693 Titus Ave. “Tactile Art: The Warmth and Beauty of Fiber”. Through Feb. 14. Trunk sales Saturdays through end of show, 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Artists’ talk Jan 23, 7-9 p.m zannebrummer@gmail.com. Joe Brown Gallery in the Printing & Pat Rini Rohrer Gallery, 71 S Main St . The 8th Annual Studio II Exhibit. Through Feb. 22. Through Feb 22. 394-0030. prrgallery.com.

Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. “American Roadtrip” by Beth Bailey. Through Feb. 1. Through Feb 1. 258-0400. thelittle.org. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. “Changing Hands: Art Without Reservation 3” Contemporary Native North American Art. Through Feb 10. Sat Nov 17 Wed-Sun 11 a.m.-5 p.m., Thu until 9 p.m $5-$12. 2768900. mag.rochester.edu. My Sister’s Gallery, 505 Mt Hope Ave. “MAPS” by Gianna Stewart. Through Feb. 17. Through Feb 17. Free. 546-8400. EpiscopalSeniorLife.org. Nan Miller Gallery, 3450 Winton Place. Montreal artist Celine Brossard. Through Jan. 31. Tue-

Sat 10 a.m.-5 p.m 292-1430. nanmillergallery.com. New Deal Gallery, 4 Livingston County Campus. Expressions of the Civil War. Tuesdays-Saturdays, 5 p.m. In recognition of the 150th Anniversary. Hours: Wed, Fri 1-4 p.m., Thu 1-7:30 p.m., Sat 11 a.m.-3 p.m. 2436785. livingstonarts.org. Phillips Fine Art, 248 East Ave. Fourth Annual Collector’s Show and Sale. TuesdaysSaturdays Through Jan 31. Tue-Fri 12-6 p.m., Sat 12-5 p.m., or by appt. 232-8120. Plastic, 650 South Ave. The Art of J Nevadomski and Allie Hartley. ongoing. Tue-Sat 11 a.m.-7 p.m. 563-6348. plasticforever.com.

University Gallery, James R Booth Hall, RIT, Lomb Memorial Dr. Neil Montanus. Mondays-Saturdays MonThu 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Fri-Sat 10 a.m.-2 p.m. 475-2404. jleugs@rit.edu. Williams Gallery at First Unitarian Church, 220 S Winton Rd. “Passages” by Anca Seger. Through Feb. 24, 12-2 p.m. Through Feb 24. Daily 10 a.m.-2 p.m., 4:30-8 p.m Free. 271-9070. Williams-Insalaco Gallery at FLCC, 3325 Marvin Sands Dr. Paintings by Debra Stewart. Through Jan. 18. Through Jan 18. Mon-Thu 8:30 a.m.-9 p.m., Fri 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m., Sat-Sun noon-5 p.m 7851369. flcc.edu.

Wood Library, 134 North Main St. “Chronopiscus: Time and the Fish” by Ren Vasiliev. Through Feb. 1. Through Feb 1. 394-1381. woodlibrary.org.

[TUE., JANUARY 22]

Art Events

Comedy

[SAT., JANUARY 19]

[THU., JANUARY 17]

Art Night, Closing Reception for “The Boy From Saturn.”. 6-8 p.m. Grass Roots Gallery, suite 157, Hungerford Bldg, 1115 E. Main St., Suite 248 Bring whatever your project you are working on. Stick around for a glass of wine or beer and listen to live jazz 8-11 p.m., for the closing reception of “The Boy from Saturn” a Sean Madden Solo Show thegrassrootsgallery@ gmail.com.

Benefit for West Webster FD. Jan. 17. Comedy Club, 2235 Empire Blvd. 671-9080. thecomedyclub.us.

Mary Beth Dolan art presentation. 7:30 p.m. Chapel Oaks, St. Ann’s Community, 1550 Portland Ave irondequoitartclub.org.

[FRI., JANUARY 18] The Cast of Impractical Jokers. Jan. 18-19. Comedy Club, 2235 Empire Blvd. 671-9080. thecomedyclub.us. continues on page 20

In Memory of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. "I have a dream that my ...children will not be judged by the color of their skin, but by the content of their character." We salute the following students for the example they have set with their lives in school and in the community by living the ideals of Martin Luther King, Jr.

Martin Luther King Recipients 2013 #1 #4 #5 #7 #8 #9 #10 #12 #15 #16 #17 #19 #28 #30 #33 #34 #35 #36 #41 #42

- Narionna Nunez - Deja Cotton - Djeynaba Thiam - Kelsoy Hucks - Jadas Porter - Tanya Smith - Ronald Wilcox - Mariangelis Gonzalez - Sa Hnei - Darriel Bruce - Tamareon Warfield - Dwayne Gunn - Zaira Rolle Knox - Yadisha Morales-Garcia - Jose Binet - Anzeria Snow - Ingrid Diaz - I’Yanna Thomas - Cienna Wilson Neal - Johnny Oeun

Celebrating 30 years of outstanding students!

#44 - Kayla Valentin #45 - Chan-Socphentra Salcido #50 - Alyssa Housel #52 - Nah’zere Smith #53 - Bryce Majors #57 - Ashlyn Gomez #58 - Unique Fair Smith Charlotte H.S. - Ciera Caldwell East H.S. - Tyrone Respress Jr. Edison H.S. - Muhanuka Thierry Integrated Arts and Technology H.S. - Yaritza Nieves Monroe H.S. - Bernard Rodgers Northwest College Preparatory H.S. - Selena Harris Rochester Early College International H.S. - Cherokee Lovett Rochester International Academy - Fonoun Muthana Rochester STEM H.S. - Darien Thompson School of the Arts - Sidnee McDonald Wilson Foundation Academy - Adrianna Allen Wilson Commencement Academy - Qwaheem Marshall Young Mothers and Interim Health Academy - Tiffany Zambrona

The 30th annual Martin Luther King tribute awards ceremony will be held at East High School, on January 22nd, 6:30pm. The Public is invited.

Rochester Teachers Association Human Relations Committee rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 19


ART | “DEAD END CITY ART SHOW II” On Saturday, January 19, Crossroads Cafe (52 S. Goodman St.) will host a reception for “Dead End City Art Show II,” featuring the work of several Rochester-based artists, including Major Tony Nelson, J Barnabas Lake, Noah Scheuerman, Katie Mickunas, Alex Gauldin, Rachel Nika, Robert Frank, Julia Eddy, Shane Bates, Erin Riedel, Olga Tzogas, and others. The reception takes place 6-10 p.m., and music will be provided by The Pickpockets and Black Bandit (A.K. Williams). The show will remain on view through February 28. Admission is free, but donations for the musicians are appreciated opening night. For more information, call 244-6787 or visit xroadscoffeehouse.com. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY

Comedy Geva Comedy Improv: Swords & Sandals: An Improvised Fantasy Epic. Jan. 18-19, 8:30 a.m. Geva Theatre Center, 75 Woodbury Blvd $10. 232-4382. gevacomedyimprov.org. Improv Comedy Battles. 9:30 p.m. The Pillar Theater, VIP Studio (Suite D106) Village Gate Square, 274 N. Goodman St $5. 797-9086. improvvip.com. [SAT., JANUARY 19] Comedy Platypus. 9:30 p.m. The Pillar Theater, VIP Studio (Suite D106) Village Gate Square, 274 N. Goodman St $5. 797-9086. improvvip.com. Command Performance. 7:30 p.m. The Pillar Theater, VIP Studio (Suite D106) Village Gate Square, 274 N. Goodman St $5. 797-9086. improvvip.com.

Dance Events [FRI., JANUARY 18] Third Friday Singles Dance. 8 p.m.-midnight. Green Lantern Inn, One East Church St. The Neutral Ground Peer Support Organization. Music by DJ Joetta of Go Sounds $7 requested donation. 3817603. neutralground1.com. Garth Fagan Dance offers Free Dance Classes. 10 a.m.2:45 p.m. Garth Fagan Dance Studios, 50 Chestnut St. More information on the site 4543260. garthfagandance.org. Identidad: This is Tango Now. Jan. 19-20. School of the Arts, 45 Prince St Sat 8 p.m., Sun 2 p.m $10-$20. 324-3535. sotarochester.org. [WED., JANUARY 23] In Studio Series: New York Cityscapes. 6:30 p.m. Rochester City Ballet Studios, 1326 University

Ave. An evening featuring an open rehearsal with all new choreography and a discussion between artistic director Jamey Leverett and the RPO’s Jeff Tyzik, composer of New York Cityscapes Free, RSVP. 461-5850. rochestercityballet.com.

Festivals [SUN., JANUARY 20] Mendon Ponds Winterfest. 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Mendon Ponds Park, Douglas Road Activities, demos, food. Free. 753-7275. monroecounty.gov/parks.

Kids Events [FRI., JANUARY 18]

FESTIVAL | MENDON PONDS WINTERFEST Though the frigid air, the treacherous ice, the permeating slush, and the weak winter sun give us plenty to whine about, Rochesterians do know how to have a blast in the wintertime. Whether you’re a cold-season enthusiast or need a little inspiration to get outdoors, the annual Mendon Ponds Park Winterfest has plenty of activities to help you beat the seasonal blahs. On Sunday, January 20, from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., head to Mendon Ponds Park (Douglas Road in Mendon) for the 18th Annual Winterfest, at which visitors can enjoy demonstrations and activities outdoors as well as within heated lodge. The family-friendly events include horse and wagon rides, free cross-country ski lessons and tours, snowshoeing, snowshoe and sled-dog races, crafts, and demonstrations by outdoor retailers. Refreshments will be available at the Nature Center, Stewart Lodge, and East Lodge, and most venues are handicapped accessible. You can enter the park from either Route 65 (Clover Street) or Pittsford-Mendon Center Road. Programs will be available at each of the lodges. Admission is free. For more information, call 753-7275 or visit mendonpondswinterfest.org. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY N. Plymouth Ave. Geared for families with children ages 2-10 $2 per child ages 3 and up, $5 per adult, $10 per family. 4544596. hochstein.org.

Winnie-the-Pooh Day: The Tigger Movie. 3:30 p.m. Brighton Memorial Library, 2300 Elmwood Ave. 7845300. brightonlibrary.org.

[MON., JANUARY 21]

[SAT., JANUARY 19]

[TUE., JANUARY 22]

American Girl History Club: Meet Samantha: An American Girl By Susan S. Adler. 2 p.m. Lift Bridge Book Shop, 45 Main St Free. 637-2260. liftbridgebooks.com.

Evening Craft Series for Tweens: Snowman Garland. 6:30-7:30 p.m. Gates Public Library, 902 Elmgrove Rd. Ages 8-13 Free, register. 247-6446.

Family Tree Fun. 2-3 p.m. Henrietta Public Library, 455 Calkins Rd Ages 6 and up with their parents and grandparents. Register. 359-7092.

[WED., JANUARY 23]

Lego Travel Adventure. Jan. 19-20 and Jan. 19-May 12. The Strong National Museum of Play, 1 Manhattan Square Through May 12. Opening weekend Sat Jan 19 11 a.m.-4, Sun Jan 20 1-4 p.m Included in admission: $11-$13. 2632700. museumofplay.org.

Lectures

[SUN., JANUARY 20] Family Fun Craft Day: Create a beautiful snowflake!. 1:304:30 p.m. Central Library, Children’s Center, 115 South Ave. Ages 3+. Free. 4288150. libraryweb.org. Musical Mystery Tour. 2-4 p.m. Hochstein Music Hall, 50

20 CITY JANUARY 16-22, 2013

Family Movie: Brave. 2 p.m. Brighton Memorial Library, 2300 Elmwood Ave. 7845300. brightonlibrary.org.

Amerks Player Appearance. 6:30-7:30 p.m. Henrietta Public Library, 455 Calkins Rd. Register. 359-7092.

[WED., JANUARY 16] Reflecting on Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.. 6:30 p.m. Penfield Public Library, 1985 Baird Rd. Free, register. 340-8720. [THU., JANUARY 17] The 40+ Job Search; Debunking the Myths. 9:30 a.m.-noon. Gates Public Library, 902 Elmgrove Rd. Free, register. 247-6446. “Haiti’s Contemporary Peasant Movement: Struggles and Triumphs” by Toni PressleySanon. 4-6 p.m. Carlson

Auditorium, RIT Campus, Lomb Memorial Dr Conable Distinguished Lecture Series in International Studies Free. bnlgla@rit.edu rit.edu. Martin Luther King Jr. Commemorative Address. 6 p.m. University of Rochester Strong Auditorium, River Campus. Featuring Melissa Harris-Perry. rochester.edu. [MON., JANUARY 21] Opera Guild Lecture Series: “Donizetti’s Luci Di Lammermoor”. 7-9 p.m. Brighton Memorial Library, 2300 Elmwood Ave. With Rosalba Pisaturo. Free. 7845300. brightonlibrary.org. [TUE., JANUARY 22] Reshaping Rochester: Destination Downtown. 7-9 p.m. Gleason Works Auditorium, 1000 University Ave. With Joseph Minicozzi and Heidi Zimmer-Meyer $15, free to students. rrcdc.org. Tuesday Topics: Celebrating the Season for Nonviolence: How Nonviolent Principles and Practices Can Enhance Your Work and Community Life. 12:12-12:52 p.m. Central Library, Kate Gleason Auditorium, 115 South Ave. With Kit Miller. 428-8350. libraryweb.org. [WED., JANUARY 23] Color Brighton Green: Beyond the Blue Box - Recycling at the Monroe County EcoPark.

SPECIAL EVENTS | MLK JR DAY EVENTS Many events and lectures will be held this week in honor of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s birthday and his important ongoing legacy in civil rights. The following events are just a few that will be offered by area institutions and organizations. For more events, search our events calendar at rochestercitynewspaper.com. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY MSNBC Political Analyst Melissa Harris-Perry will deliver the University of Rochester’s MLK Commemorative Address on Thursday, January 17, at 6 p.m. in Strong Auditorium on the River Campus. The free lecture will focus on racial issues, religious questions, and gender concerns related to American politics. The annual address kicks off the university’s Black History Month celebration. For more information, visit rochester.edu. The 29th Annual Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Gospel Song Fest, featuring a 300-Voice Community Choir, will take place Saturday, January 19, at 6 p.m., at Aenon Baptist Church (175 Genesee St.). The event is free and open to the public, and is presented by The Black Student Caucus and the Program for Black Church Studies at Colgate Rochester Crozer Divinity School. For more information, visit crcds.edu/the-29th-annualdr-martin-luther-king-jr-gospel-song-fest/. The Rochester Museum and Science Center (657 East Ave.) will celebrate Rochester’s culture in honor of Martin Luther King Jr. Day Saturday, January 19, through Monday, January 21, noon-4 p.m. Visitors can participate in hands-on activities, and enjoy music, dance, and art by performing groups from our city. The program will tie in RMSC’s new exhibition, “RACE: Are We So Different?” The event is included in regular museum admission: $13 for adults, $12 for seniors and college students with ID, $11 for ages 3-18, and free for kids under 3 and RMSC members. For more information, call 271-4320, or visit rmsc.org. Nazareth College (4245 East Ave.) will host Dr. Molefi Kete Asante, professor emeritus of African-American studies at Temple University, as the keynote speaker during its annual celebration of MLK Day on Monday, January 21. In addition to the free 4:30 p.m. lecture, held in Callahan Theatre in the Arts Center, the day will be filled with events including an 11:30 a.m. commemoration service in King’s honor in the Golisano Academic Center Linehan Chapel, which will feature student speakers, singers, inspirational readings and dance. For more information, visit naz.edu. The Annual Martin Luther King, Jr. Day Celebration at St. John Fisher College will take place Monday, January 21, 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m. in the Cleary Family Auditorium at St. John Fisher College (3690 East Ave.). This year’s theme will be “All Freedom to Ring for All God’s Children,” and the Hon. Stephen T. Miller, Rochester City Court Judge and executive pastor of the Church of Love Faith Center, Inc., will serve as the keynote speaker. The celebration will also include a dance performance by Fisher students, poetry readings, and a scholarship presentation. The event is free and open to the public. For more information, visit sjfc.edu.


6:30 p.m. Brighton Memorial Library, 2300 Elmwood Ave. 784-5300. brightonlibrary.org. Inaugural Lecture, Institute for Popular Music. 7 p.m. Rush Rhees Library, University of Rochester, River Campus Jocelyn Neal will deliver the Inaugural Lecture, entitled “Ladies Love Country Boys: Gendered Narratives and the Meaning of Country Music.” A reception will follow Free. 275-9397. Roe v Wade Anniversary Program: The State of Reproductive Health Care in NY. 7 p.m. First Unitarian Church, 220 S Winton Rd. Free. 748-1850. rochesterunitarian.org.

Literary Events

Through March 8. Rush Rhees Library, University of Rochester, River Campus Through Mar 8. Seward Room, Department of Rare Books and Special Collections. Mon-Fri 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Sat 11 a.m.-3 p.m 275-4477.

[SAT., JANUARY 19]

[THU., JANUARY 17]

Recreation

1812 Traveling Quilts. Tuesdays, Saturdays, Sundays, 12-4 p.m Webster Museum, 18 Lapham Park 26 quilts newly-made, but true to 1812-period quilting patterns, fabrics and colors and Great Lakes Seaway Trail “storyteller” interpretive panels on “America’s second war for independence.”. 585-2653308. webstermuseum.org.

“Race: Are We So Different?”. Jan. 19-April 28. Rochester Museum and Science Center, 657 East Ave. Through Apr 28. faceraceroc.org. Included in admission: $11-$13. 2711880. rmsc.org.

[WED., JANUARY 16] Bear Hollow Trail Trek. 10 a.m. Letchworth State Park, 1 Letchworth State Park Bring a lunch. $8 parking fee. 493-3625. Cross-Country Skiing and Snowshoeing. Sundays Cumming Nature Center, 6472 Gulick Rd. Trails open Wed-Fri 9 a.m.-3:30 p.m., Sat-Sun 9

a.m.-4:30 p.m $3, $10 per family. 374-6160. rmsc.org. [SAT., JANUARY 19] Beginner Birder Trip: Irondequoit Bay, Lakeshore, Genesee River Outlet. 8:30 a.m. Meet at Irondequoit Bay Outlet, bring spotting scope if you have one 264-1704. rochesterbirding.com. GVHC Hike. noon. Dryer Rd Park lot, Victor. Strenuous 6-7 mile hike 323-1911. gvhchikes.org. Saturday Snowshoeing. 1-3 p.m Helmer Nature Center, 154 Pinegrove Ave No Jan 12 $3$5, free to children under 12. 336-3035. westirondequoit.org/ helmer.htm.

Tai Chi Open House. Every other day, 11 a.m. The Rochester T’ai Chi Ch’uan Center, 80 Rockwood Pl. Sat 11 a.m.-noon, Mon 6-8 p.m Free. 461-0130. rtccc@juno. com. rtccc.com. Wilderness Guided Hike. 10 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Cumming Nature Center, 6472 Gulick Rd. Vigorous Pace. This may be a snowshoe hike (weather permitting), so visitors are encouraged to bring their own or rent them at the CNC. $3, $10/family requested donation, free to members. 374-6160. rmsc.org. Wilderness Guided Hike (Vigorous Pace). 10 a.m.12:30 p.m. Cumming Nature Center, 6472 Gulick Rd.

$3, $10/family requested donation. 374-6160. rmsc.org. Winter Tours of Mt Hope Cemetery. third Saturday of every month, 1 p.m Mount Hope Cemetery, 1133 Mt. Hope Avenue $5, members and children under 16 free with adult. 461-3494. fomh.org. [SUN., JANUARY 20] GVHC Hike. 1 p.m. Turning Pt Park lot, end of Boxhart St, off Lake Ave. Moderate 5 mile hike Free. 224-5140. gvhchikes.org.

[WED., JANUARY 16] Book Discussion: The Girl Who Fell From the Sky. 7-8:30 p.m. Brighton Memorial Library, 2300 Elmwood Ave. 7845300. brightonlibrary.org. Pure Kona Poetry Readings. 7 p.m. Acanthus Café, 337 East Ave. Local poets gather to read their latest works Free. 3195999. acanthuscafe.com. [THU., JANUARY 17] Science Fiction Book Group: “Welcome to the Monkey House” By Kurt Vonnegut. 6:30 p.m. Lift Bridge Book Shop, 45 Main St Free. 6372260. liftbridgebooks.com. [FRI., JANUARY 18] Reading and Signing featuring Brockport Author Mark DuPre. 7 p.m. Lift Bridge Book Shop, 45 Main St Free. 637-2260. liftbridgebooks.com. [SAT., JANUARY 19] Jane Austen Society. 1 p.m. Barnes and Noble, Pittsford Plaza Discussion of Pride and Prejudice on the 200th anniversary of its publication Free. 473-4973. Reading: Mary Khazak Grant. 2 p.m. Books Etc., 78 W. Main St. Free. 474-4116. books_ etc@yahoo.com. Saturday Author Salon featuring And So I Say Next: “When Frogs Turn Out to Be Toads, Throw Them Back in the Dating Pond!” By J Philippone. 2-4 p.m. Lift Bridge Book Shop, 45 Main St Free. 637-2260. liftbridgebooks.com. [SUN., JANUARY 20] Poetry Reading: Rufino C Pabico and Alan Lawton. 4 p.m. Books Etc., 78 W. Main St. 474-4116. books_etc@ yahoo.com.

Museum Exhibit [WED., JANUARY 16] Baby It’s Cold Outside!. Tuesdays-Thursdays The Rochester Historical Society, Rundel Memorial Building, 2nd floor, 115 South Ave. Through Mar 14. Tue-Wed 10 a.m.-3 p.m., Thu 11 a.m.-3 p.m. An exhibit of beautiful cold weather clothing $3-$5, members free. 428-8470. rochesterhistory.org. A Presidential Voice: The History of Presidential Speechwriting. rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 21


Dance

Special Events [WED., JANUARY 16] Geeks Who Drink Pub Quiz. 8 p.m. Scotland Yard Pub, 187 Saint Paul St Free. 7305030. scotlandyardpub.com.

may not like it, it may make you feel uncomfortable, but it’s there to move you, to make you feel. Come without any expectations; come with an open mind and heart,” she says. “We’re creating something different for audiences,” Ghi says. “I would love them to actually forget that they are seeing a tango show. Experience a moment with the artist, the music. The history is created in the present between the audience and the dancer.” European and African cultures were

The creators of “This is Tango Now,” coming to School of the Arts this weekend, seek to expand traditional definitions of the Latin dance. PHOTO PROVIDED

Dance, dance, revolution “This is Tango Now: Identidad” SATURDAY, JANUARY 19-SUNDAY, JANUARY 20 SCHOOL OF THE ARTS, 45 PRINCE ST. SATURDAY 8 P.M. & SUNDAY 2 P.M. $10-$20 | FRIENDSOFSOTA.ORG [ FEATURE ] BY CASEY CARLSEN

Mention tango dancing and most people immediately imagine some variation of a woman in red sauntering seductively across stage, whirled in close and dipped low by a darkly sensual partner. This, to most people, is tango. But Fernanda Ghi and her husband Guillermo Merlo, creators of “This is Tango Now,” seek to break this stereotype. For them, it is not enough to simply present what tango is. Their mission is to go beyond defining tango to actually utilizing it as an artistic medium to convey meaning beyond what is inherent in the dance itself. “Tango is a rich and theatrical art form,” Ghi said by phone recently from her Boston home. “There are so many stereotypes about what tango is. We wanted to dispel those by focusing on what tango is doing now. We use tango as a tool to express different stories. This is one of the first times tango has been used in this way.” 22 CITY JANUARY 16-22, 2013

“This is Tango Now: Identidad” was created by Ghi and Merlo along with musician-anthropologist Alfredo Minetti. The music for the production was composed by tango masters Osvaldo Pugliese and Astor Piazzolla. Light, sound, music, puppetry, and Argentine tango are all used to tell the story of a beautiful marionette struggling for freedom from her puppet master. This combination of art forms is virtually unheard of in tango, as is the use of props. Ghi and Merlo both began studying tango

as children growing up in Buenos Aires, Argentina. By 1998, both were in the United States performing in the dance show “Forever Tango,” which won the Tony for Best Choreography that same year. In 1999, the couple created their own company, Tango Dream, which toured successfully for six years, including twomonth stints in Tokyo every year. The Japanese, Ghi says, passionately embrace tango. And their culture’s attitude towards art, she says, is on par with her own. “The Japanese producers would tell audiences to ‘empty your glass of water and let us fill it,’” Ghi says. “In America, too often people think art is to educate them. It’s not about education. Art is an expression. You

both influential in the early formation of tango. The dance originated in lower-class districts of Buenos Aires and Montevideo and was first dubbed “tango” in the 1890’s. In the early 20th century, dancers and orchestras from Buenos Aires traveled to Europe; the first European tango craze took place in Paris. By 1913 it had crossed the Atlantic to New York City. There are many different forms of tango in existence today. The one closest to that originally danced in Argentina and Uruguay is commonly considered to be the most authentic. “This is Tango Now” fuses traditional tango with flamenco and hip-hop. According to Ghi, tango hit its golden period during the 1940’s and 50’s in Argentina, then declined after Juan Peron’s government lost power. Military dictatorships banned public gatherings and economic depression was rife. Rock and roll gained in popularity because it did not require people to gather in the same way. By the 1980’s, however, people were in love with the dance again. The flashy international hit “Tango Argentina” vastly broadened tango’s audiences. “People went crazy,” Ghi says. “And it was hugely profitable. Professionals — doctors and lawyers — quit their jobs to become tango dancers.” Then, the 2000 economic crisis brought tango even more to the social forefront — especially for the younger generation. “It became a full-blown social phenomena again,” Ghi says. “Everyone was doing it. Young people felt free to embrace it for themselves because their parents had not done so during the military rule of their own youth. People were trying to rediscover themselves and tango was a means to do that.” Ghi, Merlo, and the four other dancers in “This is Tango Now: Identidad” may very well reshape your take on tango this weekend. So come with your glass empty and let them fill it up.

Highland Park Winter Farmers Market. 3 p.m Cornell Cooperative Extension of Monroe County, 249 Highland Ave Free. highlandwintermarket.com. [THU., JANUARY 17] Ghost Hunting. 7-8:30 p.m. Henrietta Public Library, 455 Calkins Rd Local writer and ghost hunter Ralph Esposito will discuss ghosts, haunting, and some of the paranormal investigations he has conducted. Register. 359-7092. [FRI., JANUARY 18] Film: “Color Adjustment”. 7 p.m. Baobab Cultural Center, 728 University Ave. Discussion follows screening Free, RSVP. 563-2145. thebaobab.org. Pasta Dinner to Benefit West Webster Fire Department. 5:30-8 p.m. Halpern Education Center in Webster, 695 Bay Road, Webster. $10 donation per person, register. 256-7515. hillside.com. [SAT., JANUARY 19] 25th Anniversary Celebration The Episcopal Church of St Luke & St Simon Cyrene. 6 p.m. Radisson Riverside Hotel, 120 East Main St. Gala event. siyahamba.eventbrite. com. $35, register. 3776443. twosaints.org. 3 Heads Brewing 2nd Anniversary Party at CB’s Brewing. 5 p.m. CB’s Brewing Company, 300 Village Sq. Blvd. 624-4386 x232. swolf@cbsbrewing. com. cbsbrewing.com. Big Sale. 9 a.m.-2 p.m. 127 Railroad St. Art, books, clothes, handmade soap, zines, more facebook.com/ smugtownmushrooms. The Jason Bishop Show. 8 p.m. Nazareth College Arts Center, 4245 East Ave Illustionist. Pre-performance lecture at 7 p.m $35-$50. 389-2170. artscenter.naz.edu. RMSC Celebrates Rochester’s Culture in Honor of Martin Luther King Jr. Day. Jan. 19-21, 12-4 p.m. Rochester Museum and Science Center, 657 East Ave. Included in admission: $11-$13. 2714320. rmsc.org. Rochester Singleton’s Monthly Dinner. 6 p.m. Keenan’s Restaurant, 1010 E. Ridge Rd. Register by Jan 16 Cost of food. 533-1188. Winter Blast. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Abundance Cooperative Market, 62 Marshall St. Demos, sampling, door prizes, new deli items and more 2013.abundance.coop. [SUN., JANUARY 20] 2nd Annual Martin Luther King Day Youth Celebration. 4 p.m. Edgerton Community Center, 41 Backus St. 4286769. cityofrochester.gov.


THEATER | PERFORMANCES OF 2 PAGES/2 VOICES Get to know local emerging writers at Writers & Books and Geva Theatre Center’s presentation of “2 Pages/2 Voices,” an evening of short story plays written by area writers and read by area actors. The event held Tuesday, January 22, at 8 p.m. at Geva Theatre Center (75 Woodbury Blvd.), is the culmination of the annual challenge issued to Rochester writers to create a play that is not more than two pages in length and contains no more than two characters. This year’s special stipulation was that submissions must include the word “border.” The reading is free and open to the public, and will feature works by eight to 10 winners. For more information, call 473-2590 or visit wab.org. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY Irish Roots for the Whole Family. 2 p.m. St. John Fisher College, 3690 East Ave Wilson Formal Lounge. $10. sjfc.edu. Move to Amend Rochester: Party for the People. 1-4 p.m. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N. Water St. 348-7264. movetoamendrochester.org. Movie Night: Films With a Vegetarian or Social Justice Theme. 5:30 p.m. Brighton Town Park Lodge, 777 Westfall Rd 5:30 p.m. vegan potluck, 7 p.m. program. $3, free to members. 234-8750. rochesterveg.org. [MON., JANUARY 21] Annual Martin Luther King, Jr. Day Celebration. 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m. St. John Fisher College, 3690 East Ave. Free. sjfc.edu. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Celebration. Noon. Redeem Bethel Church of God in Christ, 4494 Rt. 104, Williamson. mcwood4@msn.com. First Annual Martin Luther King Jr Day of Service. Jan. 21. jsheppard@harrisbeach.com. Martin Luther King Day: Blackstorytelling League of Rochester. 10:30 a.m. Brighton Memorial Library, 2300 Elmwood Ave. All ages welcome. Arrive early, seating is limited 784-5300. brightonlibrary.org. MLK DAY. Jan. 21. Nazareth College, 4245 East Ave. Commemoration Service 11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. in the Golisano Academic Center Linehan Chapel. 4:30 p.m. lecture in Arts Center by Dr. Molefi Kete Asante. Free. naz.edu. Presidential Inaugural Gala. 6-11 p.m. Harro East Ballroom, 155 N. Chestnut St. Formal attire $20, 1199 SIEU members $10. 244-0830. shirleybarnes@1199.org. [TUE., JANUARY 22] East Side Winter Market. 3-6 p.m 2555 Baird Rd, Penfield.

348-9022. mbartolotta001@ rochester.rr.com. Rochester Singleton’s Library Film Event: Travelogue Firm. 1 p.m. Fairport Library, 1 Village Landing 266-8192.

SPECIAL EVENT | THE JASON BISHOP SHOW The prestige and teasing mystery surrounding illusionists of the past are the undying legacies for the illusionists of today, even if their act’s soundtracks have been replaced with rock and pop music, and capes have long gone out of fashion. On Saturday, January 19, illusionist Jason Bishop will bring his awardwinning act to Nazareth College Arts Center (4245 East Ave.), and in addition to a thrilling performance, he will transform a $1 bill into a $100 note for one lucky audience member. The family-friendly show takes place at 8 p.m., and will include double levitations and close-up sleight of hand projected onto LCD screens. Prior to the show, Bishop will lead a lecture at 7 p.m. in the Peace Theater (room A14), located in the lower level of the Arts Center. Tickets to The Jason Bishop Show are $35-$50, and can be reserved by calling 389-2170, or by visiting artscenter.naz.edu. Don’t forget to bring your dollar bills! — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY

Sports

Theater Audition

[FRI., JANUARY 18]

[FRI., JANUARY 18]

Rochester Americans v Syracuse Crunch. 7:05 p.m. Blue Cross Arena, One War Memorial Square $15-$20. 800-7453000. ticketmaster.com.

“The Merchant of Venice”. 7 p.m. SPoT Coffee, 200 East Ave. Roberts Wesleyan College / The Rochester Underground Theatre Company. Please prepare a short, comedic, Shakespearean monologue, of no longer than 2 minutes. It is encouraged, but not necessary. Readings can be provided. Please bring a picture and resume, if available. Questions may be posted to: http://on.fb. me/11wWG1F. 585-6134600. spotcoffee.com.

[MON., JANUARY 21] Rochester Americans v Hamilton Bulldogs. 1:05 p.m. Blue Cross Arena, One War Memorial Square $15-$20. 800-7453000. ticketmaster.com.

Theater “12 Angry Men”. MuCCC, 142 Atlantic Ave Through Jan 19. Thu-Sat 7:30 p.m., Sun 2 p.m. Special preview Jan 9, $5 at door for ages 25 and under. $5-$12. 234-1254. muccc.org. “Ages Ago” and “Happy Arcadia”. Christ the Good Shepherd Church, 1000 N Winton Rd Through Jan 20. Off-Monroe Players. Two one-act plays by Gilbert & Sullivan. Thu-Sat 8 p.m., Sun 2 p.m. We ask that you bring a canned or dry goods donation. Free, donations accepted. 232-5570. off-monroeplayers. org. “My Gal Patsy”. Jan. 1820. Downstairs Cabaret Theatre Center, 540 E. Main St Fri-Sat 8 p.m., Sun 3 p.m $29-$33. 325-4370. downstairscabaret.com. “Next to Normal”. Geva Theatre Center, 75 Woodbury Blvd Through Feb 10. Wed Jan 16-Thu 7:30 p.m., Fri 8 p.m., Sat 4 & 8:30 p.m., Sun 2 p.m. (Sunday Salon) & 7 p.m., Tue-Wed Jan 23 7:30 p.m Tickets start at $25. 2324382. gevatheatre.org

[SAT., JANUARY 19] Host a Rochester-based current events and affairs talk show. 1-4 p.m. RCTV Studios, 21 Gorham St 325-1238. rctv15.org. Vagina Monologes Open Casting Call. 12-3 p.m. Planned Parenthood, 114 University Ave facebook.com/ vdayrochester. [TUE., JANUARY 22] Auditions. 5:30 p.m. Great Lakes Productions. Spotlight Studio, 3 Railroad St., Fairport. Looking for Female singers & actors, ages 1830 for stage and interactive Shows, some roles available for all other ages. All paid positions Free, call for appointment. 865-4200. joeyandmaria.com.

Divinity School, 1100 South Goodman St. 271-1320. digitalrochester.com. Family Development Class: “Don’t Make Me Say It Again!”. 6-8 p.m. Mental Health Association, 320 N Goodman St. For parents of school-age children Free, RSVP. 325-3145 x131. mharochester.org 6-8 p.m. Mental Health Association, 320 N Goodman St. For parents of school-age children Free, RSVP. 325-3145 x131. mharochester.org. [THU., JANUARY 17] Altered Books with Martha Schermerhorn, two-part class. 6:30-8:30 p.m. Brighton Memorial Library, 2300 Elmwood Ave. Free, register. 784-5300. brightonlibrary.org. Community Labyrinth Walk with free energy work, chair massage, and music. 7-9 p.m. First Unitarian Church, 220 S Winton Rd Fifteen minute orientation from 7:007:15 p.m. Handicapped Accessible Free, donations accepted. 392-3601. kwhipple@rochester.rr.com. rochesterunitarian.org. Shaman Drumming. 6:30 p.m. Books Etc., 78 W. Main St. 474-4116. books_etc@ yahoo.com. [SAT., JANUARY 19]

[WED., JANUARY 16]

10 Steps to a Healthier You. 10 a.m New York Wine & Culinary Center, 800 South Main St. $10 per class. 3947070. nywcc.com.

Digital Rochester’s Goal Setting for Sales 2013. 7:30 a.m. Colgate Rochester Crozer

Cooking with Herbs. 10 a.m.-noon. Hansen Nature Center, 1525 Calkins Rd.

Workshops

SPECIAL EVENT | MOVE TO AMEND PARTY FOR THE PEOPLE Move to Amend Rochester is a group of local citizens working to add an amendment to the United States Constitution that would enable Congress to control political spending. Though endeavors such as these take time, a key element in affecting change is large-scale public education on a subject with which we are not necessarily properly concerned. On Sunday, January 20, Move to Amend will hold “Party for the People,” an educational seminar in the form of a variety show coinciding with the anniversary of the Supreme Court’s decision in Citizens United v. FEC. The event will take place at Water Street Music Hall (204 N. Water St.), 1-4 p.m., and seeks to connect the influence of big money on our democratic processes to derivative but more tangible issues that impact everyone, such as health care and the food supply. Speakers and performers include Mel Braverman, Assembly Member Mark Johns, BIODANCE, Warren Loeffler (pictured with Missy Pfohl Smith of BIODANCE), Mike Deming, James Caldwell, Emily Good, Bill McKibben (via video), Dr. Ted Brown and Sue Ladwig, Dr. Ted Barrett, Judy Bellow, Armani Tweed, Amanda Ashley, and others. The event is free to attend and a cash bar will be available. For more information, call Sam Fedele at 348-7264 or visit movetoamendrochester.org. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY Free, register. 359-7044. sites.google.com/site/ hansennaturecenter. Introduction to Zen Meditation Workshop. 9:15 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Rochester Zen Center, 7 Arnold Park Vegetarian lunch included $60, $45 for students. 4739180. rzc.org. Racial Justice Training. 9 a.m. Spiritus Christi Church, 121 North Fitzhugh St. Suggested donation $20. 325-1180. Myrabrown@ frontier.com. SpiritusChristi. org. The Simple Sewn Book with Martha Schermerhorn. Jan. 19. High Falls Fine Art Gallery, 60 Browns Race. $10, register. 325-2030. centerathighfalls.org. [SUN., JANUARY 20] Level 1 Improv Comedy Classes. 1-4 p.m The Pillar Theater, VIP Studio (Suite D106) Village Gate Square, 274 N. Goodman St. $60 for series. 797-9086. VIP@ improvVIP.com.

[TUE., JANUARY 22] African World History Class. 7:30-9 p.m. Baobab Cultural Center, 728 University Ave. $5 donation requested per session. baobab.center@yahoo. com. thebaobab.org. Cooking Class: A Table for Two. 6 p.m. Class at 6 p.m., dinner served at 8:30 p.m $220 per couple, register. 315-364-8888. innsofaurora.com/food-wine/ cooking-classes. Family Development Class: “YOU Make a Difference.”. 12:30-2:30 p.m. Mental Health Association, 320 N Goodman St. For parents of children up to 5 years old Free, RSVP. 325-3145 x131. mharochester.org.

GETLISTED get your event listed for free e-mail it to calendar@rochestercitynews.com. Or go online to rochestercitynewspaper.com and submit it yourself!

Smugtown Mushrooms Winter Classes. Jan. 20. Smugtown Mushrooms, 127 Railroad St. Medicinal Mushrooms. smugtownmushrooms.com. rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 23


Movies Theaters Searchable, up-to-the-minute movie times for all area theaters can be found at rochestercitynewspaper.com, and on City’s mobile website.

Film

Brockport Strand 93 Main St, Brockport, 637-3310, rochestertheatermanagement.com

Canandaigua Theatres 3181 Townline Road, Canandaigua, 396-0110, rochestertheatermanagement.com

Cinema Theater 957 S. Clinton St., 271-1785, cinemarochester.com

Culver Ridge 16 2255 Ridge Rd E, Irondequoit  544-1140, regmovies.com

The hunt for Osama bin Laden [ REVIEW ] BY GEORGE GRELLA

Dryden Theatre 900 East Ave., 271-3361, dryden.eastmanhouse.org

Eastview 13 Eastview Mall, Victor 425-0420, regmovies.com

Geneseo Theatres Geneseo Square Mall, 243-2691, rochestertheatermanagement.com

Greece Ridge 12 176 Greece Ridge Center Drive 225-5810, regmovies.com

Henrietta 18 525 Marketplace Drive 424-3090, regmovies.com

The Little 240 East Ave., 258-0444 thelittle.org

Movies 10 2609 W. Henrietta Road 292-0303, cinemark.com

Pittsford Cinema 3349 Monroe Ave., 383-1310 pittsford.zurichcinemas.com

Tinseltown USA/IMAX 2291 Buffalo Road 247-2180, cinemark.com

Webster 12 2190 Empire Blvd., 888-2624386, amctheatres.com

in short, our government betrayed some of the most important concepts that defined America, that emphasized the exceptionalism that the “Zero Dark Thirty” conservatives constantly bray about. (R), DIRECTED BY KATHRYN BIGELOW Based on events from recent history and NOW PLAYING with characters based on real people, the film documents the decade-long search for the man Despite all the praise heaped upon “Zero Dark Bush initially wanted “dead or alive,” but later Thirty” by the usual heapers, the movie should declared irrelevant. To establish the motivation really awaken audiences to the moral failure for its long story, it begins with an aural montage of an American foreign policy created by the of voices from the tragedy of the World Trade administration of George W. Bush. We all grew Center, then moves through time and space to up in a nation that did not torture prisoners, a CIA base in the Middle East, where an agent, kidnap people off the streets, send prisoners to Dan (Jason Clarke), conducts a distressing other countries to be tortured by foreign experts, interrogation of a shackled al-Qaeda prisoner, arrest suspects without charges, refuse them legal assistance, and imprison them indefinitely; which goes on for some days and many movie minutes. He beats the man, denies him food, drink, and sleep, locks him in a small box, and of course, employs that favorite technique, waterboarding. Although halfheartedly neutral in its approach, the script inclines toward justification of all those methods that the practitioners, with a nice sense of Jessica Chastain in “Zero Dark Thirty.” PHOTO COURTESY SONY PICTURES

ATTENTION FILM FANS

euphemism, called “enhanced interrogation,” and most of us call torture. The main character, a CIA agent known only as Maya (Jessica Chastain), exhibits some faint distaste at her first view of the beatings, but mostly remains impassive throughout; Dan, on the other hand, carries out his job with coldblooded and ruthless detachment. At one point in a meeting of senior agents, someone sorrowfully mentions that after all the negative publicity about Abu Ghraib and Guantánamo Bay, they must employ other methods of obtaining information. To her credit, Maya pursues her own investigation by other means, depending upon different kinds of questioning, following a complicated thread of al-Qaeda connections and familial relationships to determine exactly how Obama bin Laden communicates with his men. She also combines human intelligence — undercover observers and agents — with the agency’s considerable arsenal of technology, including satellites, electronic monitoring, and telephone intercepts; as she works through the careful examination of evidence, the application of logical analysis, and some leaps of imagination, her search becomes a kind of detective story. Throughout the many years of her investigation, she encounters a number of obstacles, including suicide bombings, assassination attempts, and postings to other parts of the world. Her most difficult problems, however, occur within the Agency itself, where her supervisors refuse to accept her interpretation of

CITY Newspaper is no longer running film times in print. Instead, you can find accurate, up-to-the-minute times for all area theaters on rochestercitynewspaper.com. Keep reading CITY every week for film reviews, blurbs, & theater information and post your own reviews online!

24 CITY JANUARY 16-22, 2013


Hollow bullets [ REVIEW ] BY ADAM LUBITOW

“Gangster Squad” (R), DIRECTED BY RUBEN FLEISCHER NOW PLAYING

events and the information she gathers. She works to convince them of her conclusions about Osama bin Laden’s hideout in Pakistan, then harasses and hectors them for months before the head of the Agency and, presumably, the president himself sign off on the mission to attack his compound. The movie’s success depends mostly on its procedural content, the depiction of the nuts and bolts of espionage and the methods by which Maya and her colleagues track down their quarry. Like “Argo,” another film about a complicated, dangerous Middle Eastern mission, “Zero Dark Thirty” sustains a terrific tension even though the audience knows the outcome. The long sequence showing the attack of the Navy SEALS on Osama bin Laden’s compound, much of it filmed through night vision goggles, also features another euphemism, collateral damage, as the SEALS kill some women and children in their search through the buildings. Despite its gritty authenticity in style and subject, it’s hard to believe that a relatively lowlevel agent like Maya could browbeat her bosses relentlessly and obnoxiously, especially considering the Agency’s history as a haven for Ivy Leaguers drunk on patriotism. Jessica Chastain appears handcuffed by a script that provides almost no context for her character and actions; she exhibits very little emotion, maintaining a constant deadpan in just about every situation. Much of her performance matches the laborious literalness of the director’s approach, a long slog through some exciting history.

Noir is a genre that’s tough to get right, particularly in our self-consciously referential age. Don’t embrace the genre fully, and it’s just a run-of-the-mill thriller featuring a bunch of nattily dressed people with a fondness for tommy guns; go too far the other direction, and it quickly turns into exaggerated parody (supposing, of course, that that’s not precisely what you’re aiming for, see: “Sin City). “Gangster Squad,” from director Ruben Fleischer (best known for the horrorcomedy “Zombieland”) manages to land squarely in the middle of the spectrum, coming across like the brain-damaged lovechild of “L.A. Confidential” and “The Untouchables”. It’s a film torn about which direction it wants to head, as Fleischer constantly seems to be fighting his instinct to turn the film into a live-action cartoon á la Warren Beatty’s “Dick Tracy.” In late 1940’s Los Angeles, ruthless mobster Mickey Cohen (a gleefully over-the-top Sean Penn) runs the town, building an empire funded largely through

Josh Brolin in “Gangster Squad.” PHOTO COURTESY WARNER BROS. PICTURES

gambling, prostitution and drugs. His money and power has given him the means to buy off nearly every member of the justice and law-enforcement systems, allowing him to conduct his illegal business dealings with impunity. But one seemingly incorruptible chief of police (played by living cartoon character, Nick Nolte), refuses to stand idly by as he loses his city to the criminal element. He assigns his most trusted and loyal man, Sgt. John O’Mara (Josh Brolin), the task of putting together a covert force of lawmen to engage in guerrilla warfare against Cohen in the hopes of taking apart his operations, piece by piece. Together they will be known as... (dun dun dun!) The Gangster Squad! The screenplay, credited to Will Beall, based (one assumes extremely loosely) on the book by Paul Lieberman, provides each of the five men who join the cause only one or two defining attributes. There’s Ryan Gosling’s Sgt. Jerry Wooters, supposedly a smooth-talking ladies’ man, though that characterization is halfhearted at best, since we see him fall in love with the first woman he sets eyes on. Next is Officer Coleman Harris (Anthony Mackie), a black cop sick of the toll drugs are taking on his neighborhood. Then there’s Officer Max Kennard (Robert Patrick), the old-timer of the bunch and an Old West gunslinger type. He brings along an inexperienced partner, Navidad Ramirez (Michael Peña), who is Mexican and…uh...Mexican. Rounding out the group is Officer Conway Keeler (the always welcome Giovanni Ribisi), a family man and the techie of the team. The actors do what they can with the material they’re given, but there’s only so much to be done with such severely underwritten roles. Hardly any of the men get their one defining hero moment, which is necessary for these types of characters to make any sort of impression. Brolin pulls

off O’Mara’s bullheaded determination to succeed at any cost and he feels the most at home of any of the actors in the macho, pulpy world they’re thrown into. Bucking at least one of the conventions of the genre, Brolin’s pregnant wife isn’t relegated to nagging her husband to give up on his mission and stay home with his family. She’s actually given the opportunity to take a slightly more active role in the proceedings, acting as adviser to her husband, hand-selecting the officers he should approach to join his squad. Emma Stone, playing Cohen’s girlfriend, Grace Faraday (whom Gosling falls for), is what I suppose passes for the femme fatale of this story, but she’s lacking the dangerous element that define the most memorable characters of the archetype. She and Gosling have the misfortune of possessing mannerisms and personalities that feel decidedly contemporary, making them stick out in the period setting. But they do look great. In fact, the costuming and production design is the one thing “Gangster Squad” gets right, for the most part. Fleischer’s direction tosses in all the modern filmmaking gimmicks: slowmotion, freeze-frames, long tracking shots, and a digitized car chase that looks great, but is rendered nearly incomprehensible through some shoddy editing. He also can’t resist piling on the gore: chopped-off hands, bodies burned and ripped in half, even a drill to the head. It’s as if he knew the script wasn’t there, so he had to distract his audience with as much flash as his budget would afford him. It all adds up to the feeling that everyone involved was content to go through the motions, settling for playing dress up in fancy clothes. If the outside is as sleek and pretty as possible, maybe no one will notice that it’s utterly hollow on the inside.

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 25


Film Previews

RMSC at 100

Full film reviews available at rochestercitynewspaper.com.

continues from page 16

people in the process of building and interviews with them about their trade. Another upcoming exhibit is “Inventing Futures,” for which RMSC will redesign the third floor of its main building. The exhibit’s aim is “stimulating Rochester’s inventive and entrepreneurial spirit, celebrating what made Rochester Rochester, and stimulating the next generation of inventors and entrepreneurs,” says Bennett. The museum is currently working through the process of fundraising, and has partnered with RIT’s Center for Innovation and O’Connell Electric on exploring some inventing strategies. The exhibit will feature eight to nine display areas which may focus on optical, electrical, or mechanical inventions. “We want to teach people that invention is something that can be learned — it’s not simply up to geniuses to invent, that it’s a process that can be learned,” says Bennett. “And you can improve all sorts of things in your life by inventing solutions. We want people to understand that that’s an option you have, to think deeply and contribute,” she says.

renovations and other developments

WHAT ARE YOU DOING TODAY?

CITY NEWSPAPER’s

DAILY CHOICES

NEW EVENTS EVERY DAY, ONLINE AT ROCHESTERCITYNEWSPAPER.COM Every morning City Newspaper’s calendar editors give their picks for the most interesting events of the day, everything from concerts to exhibits, theater shows to festivals!

26 CITY JANUARY 16-22, 2013

Many RMSC staff members gushed about the upcoming renovation to the campus, which will link the main museum building with the planetarium. This “Gateway Building” will be a mostly glass construction, serving as the new main entrance and front desk to both buildings, sheltering visitors who wish to travel between buildings from Rochester’s inclement weather. RMSC is also planning an upgrade for the planetarium, which involves revamping the decades-old equipment to make programming more engaging to visitors, says board member Meloni. These plans are still in their infancy, however, and like all of the renovations, are contingent upon an ambitious capital campaign. RMSC will also embark on a program that applies the material from the successful summer camps and educational school-break programming to distance-learning activities. Other than school groups, the largest percentage of attendees to the RMSC are parents with kids, says Carver. Next year, RMSC is planning an initiative to have volunteers on hand to engage with visitors in an informal way, asking them questions about an exhibit, and providing information. The upcoming programs, formal and informal alike, reflect the spirit of the Rochester Museum and Science Center’s long history of seeking to assist the Rochester community in connecting with its past, engaging with its present, and developing its future.

facing “race” From January 19 through April 28, RMSC will host a traveling exhibit, “RACE: Are We Really So Different?” which looks at the story of race from biological, cultural, and historical points of view. The exhibit will present the everyday experiences of race, the science of human variation, and the history of the idea of race, and will include hands-on activities for all ages, a 3-D animation of our molecular selves, a scanner which will enable visitors to add their skin tone to a mosaic of other visitors’ scans, and a challenge to match voices with the faces of people of different races. The exhibit is included in museum admission ($11-$13, free to kids under age 3 and museum members). RMSC is located at 657 East Ave. and is open Monday-Saturday 9 a.m.-5 p.m. and Sunday 11 a.m.-5 p.m., with extended hours until 9 p.m. on select Thursdays (January 31, February 14 & 28, March 14 & 28, and April 25). In the coming weeks and months, the Rochester community will be presented with many opportunities to have crucial continued conversations with one another about race relations in our home city at a variety of forums. A number of community dialogues, films, musical performances, and other events will be held at libraries and community centers. The following are a few highlights to represent the types of events that will take place. For a complete schedule of related events, visit faceraceroc.org, or search “race” at our online calendar at rochestercitynewspaper.com. Friday, January 18, 7-9 p.m.: Film: “Color Adjustment” The Baobab Cultural Center (728 University Ave.). This 1992 film traces 40 years of race relations through the lens of prime time entertainment, scrutinizing television’s racial myths and stereotypes. Sunday, January 20, 4-5 p.m.: MLK Youth Event Edgerton Community Center’s Stardust Ballroom (41 Backus St.). Thursday, January 24, 7-9 p.m.: Community Dialogue Series: Race & Politics The Baobab Cultural Center (728 University Ave.). Panel discussion. Friday, February 15, 11:30 a.m.-2 p.m.: Chinese New Year Networking Luncheon, Celebrating the Year of the Snake! Golden Port Restaurant (105 Gibbs St.). College/ community networking opportunity. $10. 224-3271, timothy.cosgriff@esc.edu. Saturday, February 23: 6 p.m.: 11th Annual Black Heritage Gala Rochester Plaza (70 State St.) $50, register. 428-9857, blackheritagerochester.org.

[ OPENING ] BROKEN CITY (R): Private eye Mark Wahlberg gets in over his head when a mayor (Russell Crowe) hires him to tail his cheating wife (Catherine ZetaJones) in this crime thriller. Also starring Jeffrey Wright, Kyle Chandler, and Barry Pepper. Brockport, Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Greece Ridge, Henrietta, Pittsford, Tinseltown, Webster THE LAST STAND (R): Arnold Schwarzenegger is back on the big screen, playing a former LAPD officer who’s the last barrier to preventing a drug kingpin from crossing the Mexican border, in popular Korean director Kim Ji-woon’s English-language debut. With Forest Whitaker, Johnny Knoxville, Peter Stormare, and Zach Gilford. Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Greece Ridge, Henrietta, Tinseltown, Webster MAMA (PG-13): Guillermo del Toro produced this supernatural thriller about two little girls who lived alone in the woods for five years before being rescued. Their new adopted parents soon discover that the girls may not have returned alone. Starring Jessica Chastain. Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Greece Ridge, Henrietta, Tinseltown, Webster RUST AND BONE (R): French director Jacques Audiard follows up his critically acclaimed crime saga, “A Prophet” with an unconventional love story between a brooding street fighter and a whale trainer (Marion Cotillard, in a Golden Globenominated performance) who lost her legs in an orca attack. [ CONTINUING ] ANNA KARENINA (PG-13): This opulent adaptation of the Tolstoy classic, from director Joe Wright and Oscar-winning screenwriter Tom Stoppard, stars Keira Knightley as one of literature’s best-known adulteresses, married to Jude Law’s aristocrat but consumed by an affair with Aaron TaylorJohnson’s dashing cavalry officer. Cinema ARGO (R): Director Ben Affleck co-stars with John Goodman, Bryan Cranston, and Kyle Chandler in the once-classified true tale of a CIA exfiltration expert who hatches a daring plan to free six Americans hiding at the home of the Canadian ambassador during the 1979 Iran hostage crisis. Cinema, Culver, Eastview, Greece Ridge, Henrietta, Tinseltown DJANGO UNCHAINED (R): Quentin Tarantino’s latest exploitation extravaganza, this time starring Jamie Foxx as a former slave out to rescue his


wife from the clutches of an evil plantation owner. Also starring Leonardo DiCaprio, Christoph Waltz, and Samuel L. Jackson. Culver, Eastview, Greece Ridge, Henrietta, Little, Tinseltown. GANGSTER SQUAD (R): A stylish 1950’s-era crime drama from Ruben Fleischer (the director of “Zombieland”) about a group of undercover LAPD detectives attempting to take down mob kingpin Mickey Cohen by any means necessary. Starring Ryan Gosling, Sean Penn, Josh Brolin, Emma Stone, and Nick Nolte. Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Greece Ridge, Henrietta, Pittsford, Tinseltown A HAUNTED HOUSE (R): Spoofing the genre “found footage” horror films, this movie (written by and starring Marlon Wayans) promises to deliver loads of timely, pointedly hilarious satire. That, or an endless parade of painfully unfunny references to films in a genre that already past its peak. Hard to say which. Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Greece Ridge, Henrietta, Tinseltown THE HOBBIT: AN UNEXPECTED JOURNEY (PG-13): The first installment of Peter Jackson’s long-awaited adaptation of the “Lord of the Rings” prequel, chronicling Bilbo Baggins’ adventures in Middle Earth. Brockport,

Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Greece Ridge, Henrietta, Pittsford, Tinseltown HYDE PARK ON HUDSON (R): Bill Murray plays FDR in this period drama about the love affair between the president and his distant cousin Margaret Stuckley. With Laura Linney and Olivia Williams. Little, Pittsford THE IMPOSSIBLE (PG13): Naomi Watts and Ewan McGregor star in this grueling drama, based on a true story, about a family separated and struggling to survive in the aftermath of the massive Indian Ocean tsunami of 2004. Pittsford, Tinseltown JACK REACHER (PG-13): Tom Cruise: action hero. Based on the popular series of novels by Lee Child, about one bad-ass homicide investigator. Culver, Eastview, Henrietta, Tinseltown LES MISÉRABLES (PG13): The hugely popular, long-running stage musical based on the Victor Hugo novel comes to the big screen courtesy of “King’s Speech” director Tom Hooper. With Hugh Jackman, Russell Crowe, Amanda Seyfried, and Anne Hathaway. Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Greece Ridge, Henrietta, Little, Pittsford, Tinseltown

LIFE OF PI (PG): Ang Lee continues his unpredictable streak with an eye-popping adaptation of Yann Martel’s acclaimed novel, now a 3D adventure about a young man who survives a shipwreck and finds himself on a lifeboat with an orangutan, a hyena, an ailing zebra, and a Bengal tiger. Culver, Greece Ridge, Henrietta, Pittsford, Tinseltown LINCOLN (PG-13): Daniel Day-Lewis channels our 16th President for Steven Spielberg, focusing on the last few months of the Great Emancipator’s life, which includes the Union’s victory in the War Between The States and the abolition of slavery. Co-starring Tommy Lee Jones, Jared Harris, and Sally Field. Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Greece Ridge, Henrietta, Pittsford, Tinseltown MONSTER’S INC. 3-D (G): Adventures in babysitting with lovable monsters Mike Wazowski and James “Sulley” Sullivan, now busting out into the third dimension in this Pixar re-release. Tinseltown THE OTHER SON (PG-13): This French drama from writerdirector Lorraine Levy tells the story of two young men, one Israeli and one Palestinian, who

Up,” this time focusing on Paul Rudd and Leslie Mann’s characters and the joys and pains of married life. Also featuring Jason Segal, Megan Fox, Chris O’Dowd, and Lena Dunham. Henrietta, Tinseltown THE TWILIGHT SAGA: BREAKING DAWN, PART 2 (PG-13): Honestly, if you need a description, you’re not interested. Culver Suraj Sharma in “Life of Pi.” PHOTO COURTESY FOX 2000 PICTURES discover they were accidentally switched at birth. Cinema PARENTAL GUIDANCE (PG): Grandparents Billy Crystal and Bette Midler look after their kids’ children. Hijinks ensue, likely concluded with a lesson about the importance of family. Brockport, Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Greece Ridge, Henrietta, Tinseltown SILVER LININGS PLAYBOOK (R): Lovably unstable mental patients Bradley Cooper and Jennifer Lawrence fall for one another and learn to ballroom dance in this likely Oscar contender from David O. Russell. With Robert De Niro and Jacki Weaver. Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Greece Ridge, Henrietta, Little, Pittsford, Tinseltown

SKYFALL (PG-13): Bond 23 brings back Daniel Craig as 007, now directed by Oscar winner Sam Mendes and trying to prevent bad guy Javier Bardem from taking down Judi Dench’s M. With Ben Whishaw, Ralph Fiennes, and Albert Finney. Henrietta TEXAS CHAINSAW 3D (R): In yet another sequel to the 70’s horror classic, another group of unsuspecting teenagers are preyed upon by Leatherface and his trusty chainsaw, but this time their limbs will seem to fly out of the screen. Starring no one you’ve ever heard of. Canandaigua, Culver, Henrietta, Tinseltown THIS IS 40 (R): Judd Apatow’s sort-of follow-up to “Knocked

WRECK-IT RALPH (PG): John C. Reilly, Sarah Silverman, and Jane Lynch provide a few of the voices in this animated comedy about a video-game bad guy who dreams of becoming a hero, even if it means upending the status quo at the arcade. Brockport, Canandaigua, Culver, Henrietta, Tinseltown ZERO DARK THIRTY (R): Director Kathryn Bigelow and writer Mark Boal follow up their Oscar-winning “The Hurt Locker” with this likely Best Picture contender, examining the decade-long hunt to capture Osama Bin Laden. Starring Jessica Chastain, Joel Edgerton, Kyle Chandler, and Jason Clarke. Brockport, Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Greece Ridge, Henrietta, Little, Pittsford, Tinseltown

For information: Call us (585) 244-3329 Fax us (585) 244-1126 Mail Us City Classifieds 250 N. Goodman Street Rochester, NY 14607 Email Us classifieds@ rochester-citynews.com EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY

All real estate advertised in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act, which makes it unlawful, “to make, print, or publish, any notice, statement, or advertisement, with respect to the sale or rental of a dwelling that indicates any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin.” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under the age of 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertisement for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. Call the local Fair Housing Enforcement Project, FHEP at 325-2500 or 1-866-671-FAIR. Si usted sospecha una practica de vivienda injusta, por favor llame al servicio legal gratis. 585-325-2500 - TTY 585-325-2547.

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 27


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Automotive ALWAYS BETTER Higher cash for your Junk Cars, Trucks and Vans. From $200-$800 or more for newer. Running or not. With free towing. Also free removal of any unwanted model in any condition. Call 585-305-5865 CASH FOR CARS Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888-4203808 www.cash4car.com (AAN CAN) FOR SALE 4 Blizzak Winter Tires on Alloy wheels for Mazda RX-8 or similar $250. btowler@ rochester-citynews.com

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Events GUN SHOW - J.W. Jones Fire Hall - 54 Liechester St. Route 36 Caledonia. Midway between Batavia and Rochester, Saturday January 19th 9am-4pm; Sunday January 20th 9am-3pm. www. nfcshows.com.

For Sale BEANIE BABIES (TY) 1997, 1998 Light blue Elephant (Peanuts), Twigs, Squealer, Iggy and Rainbow with the mixed up name tags. & more! $4 - $8 585-880-2903 All $49.99 BOOK ENDS of races horses with jockey’s carved in wood, Christmas gift. $25 585-8802903 BRONZE COLOR metal horse, nice size 13” long, 10” high with engraved saddle, horse lover gift $25 585-880-2903 DOG & CAT HOUSES Kennels, porch steps, do it yourself kits. Quick assembly 585-752-1000 $49 Jim GERMAN SHEPHERD Plaque on chain. Carved head on real wood. (said, beware!) Nice gift $20.00 585-880-2903 TV RCA 35” with remote control. Excellent condition $25 585-225-5526

Groups Forming DIFFERENT DRUMS GAY GIRLS GROUP. (proudly, progressively, conservative flavor]. Why great divider Obama the Marxist reelected? Answer: “Liberalism is

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28 CITY JANUARY 16-22, 2013

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Place your real estate ad by calling 244-3329 ext. 23 or rochestercitynewspaper.com Ad Deadlines: Friday 4pm for Display Ads Monday at noon for Line ads a mental disorder!” Elections have consequences- prices for gas/food/commodities rising significantly beginning 2013. PREPARE!!! Obama Sucks. 585-747-2699

Jam Section 2 TROMBONE PLAYERS NEEDED to play with one of Rochester’s Finest Big Bands. Must read. (Great Charts). Able to rehearse every other Wednesday 585-442-7480 BASSIST AVAILABLE: Electric, Acoustic. All styles. Mature, Reliable and Professional. Able to rehearse and open for gigs. Call 585-260-9958 fstone@ rochester.rr.com CALLING ALL MUSICIANS OF ALL GENRES the Rochester Music Coalition wants you! Please register on our website. For further info: www. rochestermusiccoalition.org info@rochestermusiccoalition. org 585-235-8412 EXP. DRUMMER Strong vocals to join (keyboard)/ (keyboard bass) who also sings lead. To form duo (Retro Pop/Dance/ Jazz). Must be willing to shop the musical product around to get gigs 585-426-7241

MEET OTHER MUSICIANS any instrument, male singer- jam together- coffee house, private gigs, I play keys Call Martin 585-266-6337 MEN ENJOY SINGING Fun with the Chorus of the Genesee, Sing, learn, perform, share laughs and libation! Guest night Tuesday at 7 PM. Stop in at 58 E Main St, Webster. Call 585698-7784 R & B SOUL BANDS seek employment, experienced groups, already performing, seek new jobs. Contact Bobby 585328-4121 ROCK STAR, MR. ROCHESTER, lead vocalist, is looking to form band (Classic Rock) with lead guitarist, bassist, drummer & rhythm guitars Covers & originals 585-473-5089 THE GREGORY KUNDE CHORALE is looking for male voices. Call for an audition now to join our fourteenth season! Info Line 377 7568 or visit our website www. gregorykundechorale.org

VENDORS OF QUALITY ANTIQUES Consider a wonderful New Antique Center in Downtown Owego. Visit www. earlyowegoantiquecenter.com Call Fran@ 607-239-8353 or email: lantalek@stny.rr.com for vendor space XMAS Wool/Flannel Army Blanket donations needed! Gift new blankets to “Sunday Circle” knitters/crocheters to decorate for poor patients of R.P.C. Contact Mary at mgrant@ frontier.com.

Miscellaneous BUY REAL VIAGRA, Cialis, Levitra, Staxyn, Propecia & more... FDA- Approved, U.S.A. Pharmacies. Next day delivery avaiable. Order online or by phone at viamedic.com, 800467-0295 FREE DENTAL CLEANING MCC Sophomore Dental Hygiene student looking for volunteer patients

continues on page 30

EXPERIENCED LEAD VOCALS Seeks employment. Pat experience Inkspots, Platters, Drifters, James Brown among many. Leroy Harris. Contact Bobby 585-328-4121 Specialties, classics, R&B Soul.

Find your way home with TO ADVERTISE CONTACT CHRISTINE TODAY!

CALL 244-3329 X23 OR EMAIL CHRISTINE@ROCHESTER-CITYNEWS.COM

198 Elmgrove Rd, Greece, NY 14626 Open Sunday the 20th from 2-4pm Spencerport Schools! 3bdrm Ranch w/Attached Garage. Conveniently Located to Parks & Shopping. Home Has Eat-In Kitchen & Formal Dining Area. Fireplace, Neutral Décor. Private, Deep Backyard with 2-Tiered Deck. Appliances Can Stay. $99,900 MLS: R197272 PC#04458

Wonderful in the Wedge

896 South Avenue

The South Wedge is a vibrant and exciting neighborhood, filled with award-winning bistros, shops, and restaurants, home to many young artists and entrepreneurs who are lovingly restoring its charming old houses. Consider the two story house with the large Victorian porch at 896 South Avenue. Historic details on the porch, windows and interior woodwork combine with recent renovations to provide character and the conveniences and space to suit modern needs. From the wraparound porch, one enters a small hall with a coat rack, then a room that is half of a double parlor and functions as an entrance foyer but could also serve as an office. Tall windows provide lots of light here and in the other half of the parlor. Refinished hardwood floors and handsome woodwork are found in both rooms. The first floor also features a bedroom suite, with a nice-sized bedroom and a new adjoining bath/ laundry room, perfect for visitors, a teen who wants a private space, or for a housemate. The eat-in kitchen combines the best of the old with the new—a tin ceiling and old cabinetry seamlessly join with the new. The formal dining room affords plenty of space and has a large bay window with a big window seat perfect for a cozy reading nook or a collection of houseplants. Upstairs is another bedroom suite, a large front bedroom, a smaller middle room with a linen closet that could be a nursery, dressing

Ryan Smith 585-201-0724

Search. Buy. Sell.

A cooperative effort of City Newspaper and RochesterCityLiving, a program of the Landmark Society.

Looking For...

EXPERIENCED FEMALE JAZZ Vocalist looking for a pianist or a small group to perform music from the 30’s to today, with a Mad Men era emphasis! Serious musicians only. 233-5551

RochesterSells.com

HomeWork

room or office, and a new bathroom. A stained glass window lights the stairway. There is a full basement and a small, partly fenced backyard just right for relaxing but not requiring a lot of work for a busy owner. The detached two-car garage and wide driveway provide plenty of parking. At 1650 square feet, this charming house is perfect for a young family, a busy professional who needs an easy commute, or a couple who are downsizing and looking for convenient city living. The roof and utilities were replaced in 2005 and all appliances stay with the house. Close to Highland Hospital and Highland Park, an easy bike ride to Strong Hospital and the University of Rochester, it also qualifies for a University of Rochester employee housing grant, making the $124,900 asking price even more affordable. This neighborhood is handy to so many urban delights that it epitomizes what city living can offer, with plenty of public transport and a conveniently walkable environment. Enjoy the Lilac Festival without the hassle of parking and meet all the people who love and protect this neighborhood. Visit rochestercityliving.com/ property/R196522 or contact Sue Drouin of Nothnagle Realtors at 585-389-4021 to see it. by Barbara Parks Barbara lives in the 14621 Neighborhood.

P Kulaga Pat 5585-368-7119

ppkulaga@nothnagle.com

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 29


I’m very pleased with the calls I got from our apartment rental ads, and will continue running them. Your readers respond — positively!” - M. Smith, Residential Management > page 29 interested in complimentary dental cleaning. Must be 2+ years since last professional cleaning. Call 585-314-0398 and leave a message for Leslie S. HAS YOU BUILDING SHIFTED OR SETTLED? Contact Woodford Brothers Inc, for straightening, leveling, foundation and wood frame repairs at 1-800-OLDBARN. www.woodfordbros. com. “Not applicable in Queens county” REACH 5 MILLION hip, forwardthinking consumers across the U.S. When you advertise in alternative newspapers, you become part of the local scene and gain access to an audience you won’t reach anywhere else. christine@rochester-citynews.com RIT PHOTOJOURNALISM STUDENT Seeking American raised adopted S. Koreans for portrait series. Contact me for more info at m.burkhartt@gmail.com, my website: www.mattburkhartt.com SAWMILLS from only $3997MAKE MONEY & SAVE MONEY with your own bandmil Cut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship. FREE Info & DVD www.NorwoodSawmills.com/300N 1-800-578-1363 Ext.300N TAKE VIAGRA? Stop paying outrageous prices! Best prices... VIAGRA 100MG, 40 pills+/4 free, only $99.00. Discreet shipping, Power Pill.1-800-374-2619

Notices WORKING HARD? SNAP CAN WORK FOR YOU! Find out if you may be eligible for SNAP – the new name for the Food Stamp Program. Call MCLAC NOEP at (585) 295-5624 or (585) 295-5626. Prepared by a project of Hunger Solutions New York, USDA/FNS & NYSOTDA. This institution is an equal opportunity provider.

Lost and Found LOST 14x20 inch canvas portrait man and tropical birds. Artwalk vicinity zips 14620, 14618, 14607. Reward. Margot Fass 733-0563

Wanted to Buy BUYING / SELLING BUYING/ SELLING- gold, gold-filled, sterling silver, silver plate, diamonds, fine watches (Rolex, Cartier, Patek Philippe)coins, paintings, furs, estates. Call for appointment 917-696-2024 JAY

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aid if qualified- Job Placement Assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance (866)296-7093 DRIVER - $0.03 quarterly bonus, plus $0.01 increase per mile after 6 and 12 months. Daily or Weekly pay. CDL-A, 3 months current exp. 800-414-9569 www.driveknight. com DRIVER - DAILY OR WEEKLY PAY $0.01 increase per mile after 6 months and 12 months. Choose

CITY SEEKS WINTER/SPRING

INTERNS

Are you a hard-working, fun-loving college student with a passion for journalism or photography? City Newspaper is looking for interns in our photography and editorial departments for the winter/spring semester. Candidates should have prior experience, must be college students, and must work for college credit (NOTE: internships are unpaid). Get a chance to work in the City office and gain real-world experience.

your hometime. $0.03 Quarterly Bonus. Requires 3 months recent experience. 800-414-9569nwww. driveknight.com DRIVERS - HIRING EXPERIENCED / INEXPERIENCED TANKER DRIVERS! Earn up to $.51/mile! New Fleet Volvo Tractors! 1 Year OTR Exp. Req.-Tanker Training Available. Call Today: 877-8826537 www.OakleyTransport.com EQUITY RESEARCH ANALYST Fairport, NY, Manning & Napier Advisors, LLC. Generate actionable long-term investment ideas in publicly traded equities across market capitalizations, geographies and sectors. Conduct research, prepare reports, and present investment recommendations to senior management. Resume to Nicole Kier, Manning & Napier Advisors, LLC, 290 Woodcliff Drive, Fairport, NY 14450. $$$HELP WANTED$$$ Extra Income! Assembling CD cases from Home! No Experience Necessary! Call our Live Operators Now! 1-800-405-7619 EXT 2450 http://www.easywork-

greatpay.com (AAN CAN) LIVE LIKE A POPSTAR. Now hiring 10 spontaneous individuals. Travel full time. Must be 18+. Transportation and hotel provided. Call Loraine 877-777-2091

Volunteers A SECOND THOUGHT Resale Shop in East Rochester is accepting applications for volunteer sale associates and online researchers. Shop benefits people with disabilities in Guatemala. Call (585) 340-2000. CATHOLIC FAMILY CENTER needs volunteers to help people apply for citizenship. The commitment is 2.5 hrs per mth one evening a month. Training is provided. For more information call Nate at (585) 546-7220 ex 4854. FOSTER PARENTS WANTED! Monroe County is looking for adults age 21 and over to consider opening their homes to foster children. Call 334-9096 or visit www.MonroeFosterCare.org.

EDITORIAL PROSPECTS Send a resume, clips, and a cover letter explaining what you can bring to the City team to eric@rochester-citynews.com

PHOTO PROSPECTS Send a resume, photo samples (no more than 20), and a cover letter to artdept@rochester-citynews.com NO PHONE CALLS, PLEASE

Real Estate Section ON PAGE 29

To Advertise Call Christine at 585.244.3329 x 23

Openings for Full Time, Part Time & Relief Positions Available If you’re looking for a position which offers HUGE Rewards & Great Benefits please visit our website to apply at: www.lifetimeassistance.org or in person at 425 Paul Road ~ Rochester, New York 14624 Please complete the application & we will do all the rest! You can expect to receive a call from a Human Resource representative to schedule an interview for January 22, 2013

GREAT BENEFITS:

Generous Paid Time Off (PTO), Tuition Reimbursement, Competitive Salaries, Medical & Dental, Life Insurance, Retirement Plans (401a & 403b), Referral Bonus and Work Life Balance Qualifications: High School Diploma or equivalent with six months of related experience or one full year of college education in human services. Subject to Background checks including; Fingerprinting, New York State Child Abuse Registry, and Driver’s License (if position required driving). Must meet LAI’s Vehicle Operator Requirements. Physical ability to lift up to 50 pounds. Must be able to successfully complete all required trainings including but not limited to First Aid, CPR, Medication Administration and SCIP (Strategies for Crisis Intervention Prevention) 30 CITY JANUARY 16-22, 2013


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EMPLOYMENT / CAREER TRAINING HERITAGE CHRISTIAN STABLES, a therapeutic horsemanship program for children and adults with developmental disabilities, is looking for volunteers to serve as horse leaders and side walkers. Call Kim Kennedy at (585) 340-2016 or email kkennedy@ heritagechristianservices.org LIFESPAN’S OMBUDSMAN PROGRAMS looking for volunteers to advocate for individuals living in long-term care settings. Please contact call 585.287.6378 or e-mail dfrink@lifespan-roch.org for more information LITERACY VOLUNTEERS OF ROCHESTER needs adult tutors to help adults who are waiting to improve their reading, writing, English speaking, or math skills. Call 473-3030, or check our website at www.literacyrochester. org ROCHESTER CARES is looking for volunteers interested in joining us to make a difference in Rochester!! One time and recurring volunteer opportunities with a wide range of organizations. www.rochestercares. org/calendar.php

SCHOOL #12 999 South Ave. is looking for reading & math volunteers, English & Spanish. Training provided. Call Vicki 585461-4282 UNITED WAY Volunteer Fundraiser needed. Verification Phone Calling & Data Management. Strong interpersonal skills; attention to detail; strong verbal and written communication skills. Call 2426547 VOLUNTEERS NEEDED for the Men’s Emergency Winter Shelter at Dimitri House. Please call us at 325-1796 for more information or to volunteer your time. VOLUNTEERS NEEDED to depict evangelistic opportunities by means of performing skits in a Church environment. Professional acting not a requirement. This is done in a small Church setting. Contact Pastor Ron @ 585-9576155 WOMEN: ROCHESTER HABITAT is looking for women 18 years+ to help build a house with a single mother. Visit rochabitat.org or call 546-1470

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Legal Ads [ LEGAL NOTICE ] 6721 Lakehouse Associates LLC (“LLC”) filed Arts. of Org. with Secy.of State of NY (SSNY) on December 12, 2012. Office Location: Monroe County. SSNY designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 3055 BrightonHenrietta Town Line Road, Rochester, New York 14623. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ LEGAL NOTICE ] Dental Office 2024 LLC filed Arts. of Org. with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/28/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to 369 Highland Avenue, Rochester, NY 14620. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ LEGAL NOTICE ] Name of limited liability company: Sterilizer Technical Specialists East LLC (“LLC”). The fictitious name under which the LLC will do business in New York is: STS East LLC. Date Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (“SSNY”) November 19, 2012. LLC organized in Delaware on November 9, 2012. NY county location: Monroe. SSNY designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to 1777 E. Henrietta Road, Rochester, New York 14623. Address required to be maintained in jurisdiction of organization or if not required, principal office of LLC: 874 Walker Road, Suite C, Dover, Delaware 19904. Copy of formation document on file with: the Secretary of State of Delaware, P.O. Box 898, Dover, Delaware 19903. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ LEGAL NOTICE ] Notice of formation of a limited liability company (LLC). Name: SUKHENKO DESIGN, LLC. Article of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on December 20, 2012. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to the LLC, 1013 Hard Rock Road, Webster NY 14580. Purpose: For any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] 113 JZ, LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed

with the SSNY on 11/20/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: James Zisouski, 53 Main St., Brockport, NY 14420. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] 1634 BHTL LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 11/6/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, Attn: Bruce Coleman, P.O. Box 10608, Rochester, NY 14692. General Purposes.

NY Secy. of State (SS) on December 26, 2012. LLC’s office is in Monroe County. SS is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS shall mail a copy of any process to LLC’s principal business location at 14 West Ham Circle, North Chili, NY 14514. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ]

D Napolitano, LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 12/13/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Dominic T. Napolitano, 1337 Schlegel Rd., Webster, NY 14580. General Purposes.

Index No. 2012-5762 SUPREME COURT STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF MONROE ESL Federal Credit Union Plaintiff, vs. Estate of Marion T. Dalba, Vincent A. Dalba, as Executor; People of the State of New York; United States of America; Doreen Dalba; Oscar Arnada, Defendants. Pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale dated December 21, 2012 and entered herein, I, the undersigned, the Referee in said Judgment named, will sell at public auction in the front vestibule of the Monroe County Office Building, 39 West Main Street, Rochester, New York, County of Monroe, on February 13, 2013 at 10:30 a.m., on that day, the premises directed by said Judgment to be sold and therein described as follows: ALL THAT TRACT OR PARCEL OF LAND, situate in the Town of Greece, County of Monroe and State of New York, known as 184 Stoneycreek Drive, Rochester, NY 14616; Tax Account No. 059.152-62 described in Deed recorded in Liber 9378 of Deeds, page 229. Said premises are sold subject to any state of facts an accurate survey may show, zoning restrictions and any amendments thereto, covenants, restrictions, agreements, reservations, and easements of record and prior liens, if any, municipal departmental violations, and such other provisions as may be set forth in the Complaint and Judgment filed in this action. Judgment amount: $106,447.49 plus, but not limited to, costs, disbursements, attorney fees and additional allowance, if any, all with legal interest. DATED: January 2013 Dennis Gruttadaro, Esq., Referee LACY KATZEN LLP Attorneys for Plaintiff 130 East Main Street Rochester, New York 14604 Telephone: (585) 324-5767

[ NOTICE ]

[ NOTICE ]

DJ BURNS PROPERTIES LLC (LLC) filed Arts. of Org. with

Index No. 2012-6268 SUPREME COURT STATE OF NEW YORK

[ NOTICE ] 56 JZ, LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 11/20/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: James Zisouski, 53 Main St., Brockport, NY 14420. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] 60-62 JZ, LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 11/20/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: James Zisouski, 53 Main St., Brockport, NY 14420. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] Chi Soo Design LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 11/26/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 72 Knollwood Dr, Roch, NY 14618. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ]

32 CITY JANUARY 16-22, 2013

COUNTY OF MONROE ESL Federal Credit Union Plaintiff, vs. Gary J. Lisman; Jackie Ward; Claire Howe; Katie Burke, Defendants. Pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale dated January 2, 2013 and entered herein, I, the undersigned, the Referee in said Judgment named, will sell at public auction in the front vestibule of the Monroe County Office Building, 39 West Main Street, Rochester, New York, County of Monroe, on February 11, 2013 at 10:30 a.m., on that day, the premises directed by said Judgment to be sold and therein described as follows: ALL THAT TRACT OR PARCEL OF LAND, situate in the City of Rochester, County of Monroe and State of New York, known as 51-53 Morningside Park, Rochester, NY 14607; Tax Account No. 122.53-2-7 described in Deed recorded in Liber 6116 of Deeds, page 182. Said premises are sold subject to any state of facts an accurate survey may show, zoning restrictions and any amendments thereto, covenants, restrictions, agreements, reservations, and easements of record and prior liens, if any, municipal departmental violations, and such other provisions as may be set forth in the Complaint and Judgment filed in this action. Judgment amount: $139,403.05 plus, but not limited to, costs, disbursements, attorney fees and additional allowance, if any, all with legal interest. DATED: January 2013 Joanne L. Best, Esq., Referee LACY KATZEN LLP Attorneys for Plaintiff 130 East Main Street Rochester, New York 14604 Telephone: (585) 324-5767 [ NOTICE ] JAS PRO PROPERTIES LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 11/7/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 57 James Moore Circle, Hilton, NY 14468. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] JGMAC Associates LLC (LLC) filed Arts.of Org. with NY Secy. of State (SS) on December 21, 2012 LLC’s office is in Monroe County. SS is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS shall mail a copy of any process to LLC’s principal business location at 116 LaSolis

Drive, Rochester, NY 14626. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] JJC3 LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 1/9/13. Office in Monroe Co. SSNY desig. agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 233 Chestnut Hill Dr., Rochester, NY 14617, which is also the principal business location. Purpose: Any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] KIWI TANGOS, LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 12/11/12. Office in Monroe Co. SSNY desig. agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 2255 Lyell Ave., Rochester, NY 14606, which is also the principal business location. Purpose: Any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] MENTAL HEALTH COUNSELING CONNECTIONS PLLC, a domestic PLLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 12/19/12. Office location: Monroe. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the PLLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The PLLC, P.O. Box 16721, Rochester, NY 14616. Purpose: Mental Health Counselor [ NOTICE ] NICHOLAS CHARLES NY HOLDINGS LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 12/7/12. Office in Monroe Co. SSNY desig. agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 2255 Lyell Ave., Rochester, NY 14606, which is also the principal business location. Purpose: Any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Not. of Form. of Bordner Enterprises LLC. Art. of Org. filed by Sect’y of State (SSNY) on 11/19/2012. LocationMonroe County. The SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY may mail any process to LLC: 4045 East Ave., Rochester, NY 14618. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice is hereby given that a license, number not yet assigned, for a full on premise beer, wine & liquor license

has been applied for by Basen, INC dba Lakesider’s Bar & Grill, 4783 – 4785 Lake Ave, Rochester NY 14612, County of Monroe, City of Rochester for a restaurant/bar. [ NOTICE ] Notice is hereby given that a license, number not yet assigned, for a full on premise beer, wine & liquor license has been applied for by PARMA JOHNNYS LLC dba PARMA JOHNNY, 1600 LYELL AVE SUITE E., Rochester NY 14606, County of Monroe, for a restaurant. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Form. of DRY CLEAN FASHIONS, LLC (the “LLC”). Art. of Org. filed with Secretary of the State of NY (SSNY) on 12/10/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, 937 Chili Ave, Rochester, NY 14611. Purpose: any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Form. of GENESEO HOUSING, LLC (the “LLC”). Art. of Org. filed with Secretary of the State of NY (SSNY) on 12/24/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, 2041 Penfield Rd, Penfield, NY 14526. Purpose: any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Form. of MATHEW FAMILY FL, LLC (the “LLC”). Art. of Org. filed with Secretary of the State of NY (SSNY) on 12/21/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, 21 Runnymede Ct, Rochester, NY 14618. Purpose: any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Form. of MATHEW FAMILY NY, LLC (the “LLC”). Art. of Org. filed with Secretary of the State of NY (SSNY) on 12/21/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, 21 Runnymede Ct, Rochester, NY 14618.

Purpose: any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Form. of URIM MEDIA, LLC (the “LLC”). Art. of Org. filed with Secretary of the State of NY (SSNY) on 12/26/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, 460 Glide St, #1, Rochester, NY 14606. Purpose: any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Folio Consulting, LLC. Art. of Org. filed Sec’y State (SSNY) on 10/12/12 . Office Loc: Monroe Co. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail of process to: 76 Westland Ave, Rochester, NY 14618. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of 9 MECHANIC STREET LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/12/12. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 95 Allens Creek Rd., Ste. 300, Rochester, NY 14618. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Evans & Fox LLP at the princ. office of the LLC. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of BP Villa Associates, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/6/12. Office location: Monroe Co. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Robert Marshall, 150 Allens Creek Rd, Rochester, NY 14618, also the Registered Agent. Purpose: any lawful activities [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of MD3 SPORT LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 12/13/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 62 Monroe Street, Honeoye Falls,, NY 14472. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of 1310 WALL ROAD,

LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/17/12. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 860 Shoemaker Rd., Webster, NY 14580. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of 20 Pine 1909 LLC Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State on 12/31/12. Office location: Monroe County. Principal business address: 195 Dickinson St., Rochester, NY 14621. Secy. of State designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. Secy. Of State shall mail process to: 265 Purdue Court, Paramus, NJ 07652. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of 225 EAST MAIN STREET LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/12/12. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 95 Allens Creek Rd., Ste. 300, Rochester, NY 14618. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Evans & Fox LLP at the princ. office of the LLC. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of 3385 MAIN STREET LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/12/12. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 95 Allens Creek Rd., Ste. 300, Rochester, NY 14618. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Evans & Fox LLP at the princ. office of the LLC. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of 749 Rutgers, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/3/12. Off. loc.: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, c/o Sammy Feldman, 3445 Winton Place, Ste. 228, Rochester, NY 14623. Purpose: any lawful activity.


Legal Ads [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of AJ COSTELLO GROUP LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/17/12. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: One Airport Way, Ste. 300, Rochester, NY 14624. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Ashley Family Farm, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/30/12. Off. loc.: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 700 Powers Bldg., Rochester, NY 14604. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Aus & Ang Snead LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 8/16/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 116 Polaris St. Rochester, NY 14606. Purpose: any lawful activity [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Button Lofts, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/3/12. Off. loc.: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, c/o Sammy Feldman, 3445 Winton Place, Ste. 228, Rochester, NY 14623. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of COSTELLO ENTERPRISES LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/12/12. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: One Airport Way, Ste. 300, Rochester, NY 14624. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the princ. office of the LLC. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of DAVE JACKZON PROPERTIES LLC Arts.

of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/13/2012. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 115 Briar Wood Lane, Rochester, NY 14626. Purpose: any lawful act [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of DHD 1530 Jefferson, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/3/12. Off. loc.: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, c/o Sammy Feldman, 3445 Winton Place, Ste. 228, Rochester, NY 14623. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of DJF PARTNERS, LLC. Art. Of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/30/12. Office in MONROE County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, 14 Bay Point Circle Rochester, NY 14622. Purpose: Recruiting Services [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of ETE Properties, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/13/2012. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 330 Little John Way, Webster, NY 14580. Purpose: any lawful act [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Garden Village, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/27/12. Off. loc.: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, c/o Sammy Feldman, 3445 Winton Place, Ste. 228, Rochester, NY 14623. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of GREENDYKE FINE ART, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/07/12. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 110-C

Linden Oaks, Rochester, NY 14625. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Peter M. Greendyke at the princ. office of the LLC. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of GV Apartments, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/27/12. Off. loc.: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, c/o Sammy Feldman, 3445 Winton Place, Ste. 228, Rochester, NY 14623. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of IS L Properties, LLC amended to IZ Levy Properties, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/21/12. Off. Loc.: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, c/o Sammy Feldman, 3445 Winton Place, Ste. 228, Rochester, NY 14623. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Kingsland, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/27/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The Company, 92 River Rd., Summit, NJ 07901, also the principal office address. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of limited liability company (LLC). Name: GORGEVIEW PROPERTIES LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Sec. of State of N.Y. (SSNY) on October 29, 2012. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to: Steven E. Cuthbert, 124 Gorsdline Street, Rochester, New York 14613. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of limited liability company (LLC). Name: TRANQUIL HEART WELLNESS, LLC. Articles of Organization

filed with Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on November 6, 2012 and a Certificate of Correction filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on November 29, 2012. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to: 70 St. Andrews Boulevard, Fairport, NY 14450. Purpose: Any lawful act or activity. Loren H. Kroll, LLC. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of MAMASAN’S MT. HOPE, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/30/12. Off. loc.: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, c/o Le-Thi-Be Walters, 2800 Monroe Ave., Rochester, NY 14618. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Media Connection, LLC filed under the original name The Media Connection, LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 12/19/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 10 Cross Ridge Rd., Pittsford, NY 14534. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Monroe Managing Member, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/21/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Mr. Mark Rosen, The Solomon Organization, 92 River Rd., Summit, NJ 07901, also the principal office address. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of Oaster & Associates LLC, Art. Of Org. filed with the Secy. of State (SSNY) on 02/09/10. Office location Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to 15 Schoen Pl., Pittsford, NY 14534. Purpose: Any lawful activity.

[ NOTICE ]

[ NOTICE ]

Notice of Formation of RED-Rochester, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State on 11/19/12. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. bus. addr.: 640 Quail Ridge Dr., Westmont, IL 60559. Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. Purpose: all lawful purposes.

Notice of Formation of T&M PROPERTIES OF NEW YORK, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/07/12. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 1452 Martensia Rd., Farmington, NY 14225. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the princ. office of the LLC. The regd. agent of the company upon whom and at which process against the company can be served is Timothy DeLucia, 1452 Martensia Rd., Farmington, NY 14225. Purpose: Any lawful activity.

[ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of STAY & PLAY DOG HOTEL & DAYPLAY LLC. Art. Of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/08/12. Office in MONROE County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, 983 John Leo Dr. Webster, NY 14580. Purpose: Dog Care

[ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of The Lady and the Snowman LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 9/18/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 409 Peck Rd.,

Spencerport, NY 14559. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of THL 20 Pine 1913 LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State on 12/31/12. Office location: Monroe County. Principal business address: 195 Dickinson St., Rochester, NY 14621. Secy. of State designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. Secy. Of State shall mail process to: 265 Purdue Court, Paramus, NJ 07652. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Thruway Park Drive Mini Storage LLC. Arts. of Org. filed Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/21/12. Off. loc.: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o The LLC, 648 Gallup Road, Spencerport, NY 14559. Purpose: any lawful activity.

[ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of VASALOS HOLDING CO. LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/29/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, 1239 Lake Point Dr., Webster, NY 14580. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of YOUth ROChester, LLC, Art. of Org. were filed with NY Dept. of State on 11/14/2012. Office loc.: Monroe. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process may be served and shall mail process to: PO Box 60194, Rochester, NY 14606. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Qual. of Equator Holdings LLC, Auth. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 11/1/12. Office loc.: Monroe County. LLC

cont. on page 34

FORECLOSURE OF TAX LIENS BY THE CITY OF ROCHESTER STATE OF NEW YORK SUPREME COURT COUNTY OF MONROE

IN THE MATTER OF THE FORECLOSURE OF TAX LIENS PURSUANT TO TITLE 4 OF PART E OF ARTICLE IX OF THE CHARTER OF THE CITY OF ROCHESTER.

LIST OF DELINQUENT TAXES AS OF JULY 1, 2012 PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that on December 12, 2012, the Corporation Counsel of the City of Rochester filed in the office of the Monroe County Clerk a list of parcels of property on which the City of Rochester holds a lien for taxes, assessments, fees or other charges which is at least one year old and which the City of Rochester intends to foreclose by an action in rem pursuant to Title 4 of Part E of Article IX of the Charter of the City of Rochester. A copy of that list was published on December 12, 2012. The foreclosure list contains as to each such parcel: 1. The tax account number and address; 2. The name of the last known owner; 3. The amount of each tax lien, except for a $155.00 charge which has been added to each tax lien pursuant to Section 9-123(A)(3)of the City Charter but which is not reflected on the printed list. All persons having an interest in the real property described in the foreclosure list are hereby notified that the filing of the list constitutes the commencement by the City of Rochester of an action in the Supreme Court, Monroe County, to foreclose the tax liens therein described by an action in rem and that the list constitutes a notice of pendency of action and a complaint by the City of Rochester against each parcel of land therein described to enforce the satisfaction of such tax liens. This action is brought against the real property only. No personal judgment will be entered in this action for the delinquent taxes, assessments, fees or other charges.

A copy of the foreclosure list has been filed in the office of the City Treasurer and will remain open for public inspection up to and including February 19, 2013, which is the redemption deadline date. Any person may on or before that date redeem any parcel on the foreclosure list by paying to the City Treasurer the amount of all delinquent taxes, assessments, fees and other charges stated on the foreclosure list, plus the $155.00 charge referred to above, plus accrued interest and late payment charges. Any person having any interest in any parcel on the foreclosure list may, at any time up to the redemption deadline date, serve a verified notice of interest or an answer upon the Corporation Counsel setting forth in detail the nature and amount of his interest or any defense or objection to the foreclosure. The notice of interest or answer must also be filed in the office of the Monroe County Clerk. Where a valid notice of interest is served, the parcel will be held for a foreclosure auction pursuant to Section 9-143 of the City Charter. Any person who fails to redeem or to serve a notice of interest or an answer by the redemption deadline date shall be barred thereafter from asserting his interest in the pending foreclosure action, and judgment in foreclosure may be granted without regard for, and in extinguishment of, the interest of any such person.

ROBERT J. BERGIN Corporation Counsel rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 33


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org. in MA 12/14/11. SSNY desig. as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of proc. to PO Box 2324, Nantucket, MA 02584. MA off. addr.: 69 Fairgrounds Rd., Nantucket, MA 02554. Cert. of Org. on file: Sec. of the Commonwealth, 1 Ashburton Pl., Boston, MA 02108. Purp.: any lawful activities.

Notice of Qualification of DYNAMAX IMAGING, LLC. Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/29/12. Office location: Monroe County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 10/24/12. Princ. office of LLC: 37 Coach Side Ln., Pittsford, NY 14534. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Gregory J. Mascitti, Esq., c/o LeClairRyan, 70 Linden Oaks, Ste. 210, Rochester, NY 14625, regd. agent upon whom and at which process may be served. DE addr. of LLC: 2711 Centerville Rd., Ste. 400, Wilmington, DE 19808. Arts. of Org. filed with Jeffrey W. Bullock, Secy. of State of DE, Div. of Corps., John G. Townsend Bldg., 401 Federal St. - Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: Any lawful activity.

[ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of Bluetone Communications, LLC. Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 1/2/13. Office location: Monroe County. LLC formed in OH on 10/22/12. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011. OH and principal business address: 7775 Walton Pkwy., New Albany, OH 43054. Cert. of Org. filed with OH Sec. of State, 180 E. Broad St., 16th Fl., Columbus, OH 43215. Purpose: all lawful purposes.

[ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of Horizon Labs LLC. Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on

12/26/12. Office location: Monroe County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 12/12/12. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: National Registered Agents, Inc., 111 Eighth Ave., NY, NY 10011, also the registered agent. Principal office address: 930 Carter St., Rochester, NY 14621. Address to be maintained in DE: c/o National Registered Agents, Inc., 160 Greentree Dr., Ste. 101, Dover, DE 19904. Arts of Org. filed with the DE Secretary of State, John G. Townsend Bldg., 401 Federal St., Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of Q Management Services LLC. Fictitious name: Q Management Services Group LLC. Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/31/12. Office location: Monroe County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 12/12/12. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served.

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SSNY shall mail process to: National Registered Agents, Inc., 111 Eighth Ave., NY, NY 10011, also the registered agent. Principal office address: 2300 Buffalo Rd., Rochester, NY 14624. Address to be maintained in DE: c/o National Registered Agents, Inc., 160 Greentree Dr., Ste. 101, Dover, DE 19801. Arts of Org. filed with the DE Secretary of State, John G. Townsend Bldg., 401 Federal St., Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of TOP25 - 500 CENTER PLACE DRIVE LLC. Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 12/10/12. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. bus. addr.: 5221 N. O’Connor Blvd., Ste. 600, Irving, TX 75039. LLC formed in DE on 12/4/12. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. DE addr. of LLC: 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. [ NOTICE ] The name of the Limited Liability Company is “SRT Palisades Properties LLC”. The date of filing of The Articles of Organization with the Department of State was December 19, 2012. The office of the Company is located in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as the Agent of the Company upon whom process may be served, and the Secretary of State shall mail a copy of any process against the Company served upon him or her to 626 Beach Avenue, Rochester, NY 14612. The business purpose of the Company is to engage in any lawful act or activity for which Limited Liability Companies may be organized under the laws of the State of New York. [ NOTICE ] TINY HOPES, LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 12/19/12. Office in Monroe Co. SSNY desig. agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 2255 Lyell Ave., Rochester, NY

34 CITY JANUARY 16-22, 2013

14606, which is also the principal business location. Purpose: Any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] TWIN CAPITAL PROPERTIES, LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 8/20/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Dawn Siciliano, 436 Bartell Ln., Webster, NY 14680. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] VNotice of Formation of Jefferson Road DOT, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/28/12. Off. loc.: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, c/o Sammy Feldman, 3445 Winton Place, Ste. 228, Rochester, NY 14623. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of 5543 ROUTE 14, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/21/12. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 679 Hightower Way, Webster, NY 14580. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] Custom Promo LLC filed Articles of Organization with the New York Department of State on November 30, 2012. Its office is located in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent of the Company upon whom process against it may be served and a copy of any process shall be mailed to 2340 Brighton Henrietta Road, Rochester, NY 14623. The purpose of the Company is any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] Name: FLOUR MAGAZINE LLC. Arts. Of Org. filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 11/26/2012. Office Location: Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail

a copy of process to: C/O FLOUR MAGAZINE LLC, One East Main Street, 10th Floor, Rochester, New York 14614. Purpose: Any Lawful Purpose. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] Notice of Formation of 216 MAGNOLIA, LLC. Articles o f Organization filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/27/2012. Office location: Monroe County SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to principal business location: The LLC, 15 Grace Marie Drive, Webster, NY 14580. Purpose: any lawful activity [ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] Phillips Route Sales LLC filed Articles of Organization with the New York Department of State on 11/14/2012. Its office is located in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent of the Company upon whom process against it may be served and a copy of any process shall be mailed to 65 Heinz St Hilton NY 14468. The purpose of the Company is any lawful activity. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION 16531655 E. MAIN, LLC ] Articles of Organization filed with Secretary of State of NY (“SSNY”) on 12/14/2012. Office in Monroe County. SSNY designated agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to LEGAL COUNSEL, C/O Applied Image Inc., 1653 E. MAIN ST., ROCHESTER, NY 14609. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY ] KAI TRADING COMPANY, LLC filed Articles of Organization with the New York State Department of State on January 10, 2010. Its office is to be located in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent of the company upon whom process against it may be served, and a copy of any process shall be mailed to 40 Harrison Street, Rochester, New York 14605. The purpose of the company is any lawful business. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY ] Notice of formation of Bratton Properties, LLC.

Articles of Organization filed with the New York Secretary of State on November 5, 2012. The office of the LLC is in Monroe County . The New York Secretary of State is designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. The Secretary of State shall mail a copy of such process to 67 North Avenue, Webster, New York 14580. The LLC is organized to engage in any lawful activity for which an LLC may be formed under the NY LLC law. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LLC ] J.J. Bell Constructors, LLC has filed articles of organization with the New York Secretary of State on November 26, 2012. Its principal place of business is located at 200 Buell Road, Rochester, New York in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent upon whom process may be served. A copy of any process shall be mailed to 200 Buell Road, Suite A-8, Rochester, New York 14624. The purpose of the LLC is to engage in any lawful activity for which Limited Liability Companies may be organized under Section 203 of the New York Limited Liability Company Law. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LLC ] Ramar Stair & Railing, LLC has filed articles of organization with the New York Secretary of State on December 13, 2012. Its principal place of business is located at 432 Portland Avenue, Rochester, New York in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent upon whom process may be served. A copy of any process shall be mailed to 432 Portland Avenue, Rochester, New York 14605. The purpose of the LLC is to engage in any lawful activity for which Limited Liability Companies may be organized under Section 203 of the New York Limited Liability Company Law. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LLC ] ReTech Services, LLC has filed articles of organization with the New York Secretary of State on January 10, 2013. Its principal place of business is located at 7 Cross Meadow Lane, Pittsford, New York in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent upon whom process may

be served. A copy of any process shall be mailed to at 7 Cross Meadow Lane, Pittsford, New York 14534. The purpose of the LLC is to engage in any lawful activity for which Limited Liability Companies may be organized under Section 203 of the New York Limited Liability Company Law. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LLC ] Rochester Wellbeing, LLC has filed articles of organization with the New York Secretary of State on December 10, 2012 with a date of formation of January 1, 2013. Its principal place of business is located at 2851 Clover Street, Pittsford, New York in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent upon whom process may be served. A copy of any process shall be mailed to 2851 Clover Street, Pittsford, New York 14534. The purpose of the LLC is to engage in any lawful activity for which Limited Liability Companies may be organized under Section 203 of the New York Limited Liability Company Law. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LUCKY SQUIRREL PARTNERS, L.P. ] Notice of formation of Limited Partnership (“L.P.”). Certificate of Limited Partnership filed with Sec. of State of NY (“SSNY”) on December 19, 2012. Office location: 18 Parkview Manor Circle, Honeoye Falls, NY 14472, Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent of L.P. upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of any process to the L.P. at 18 Parkview Manor Circle, Honeoye Falls, NY 14472. The names and addresses of each general partner are available from the SSNY. The latest date upon which the L.P. is to dissolve is December 31, 2037. Purpose: property management and to engage in any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF ROSE CIRCLE, LLC ] First: Rose Circle, LLC, a Limited Liability Company, filed Articles of Organization with the Secretary of State of New York on December 6, 2012 Second: The county within this state in which the office of the limited liability company is to be located is Monroe. Third:The street


Legal Ads address of the principal business location is: 24 Old Country Lane, Fairport, New York 14450. Fourth: The Secretary of State is designated as agent of the limited liability company upon whom process against it may be served. The post office address within or without this state to which the Secretary of State shall mail a copy of any process against the limited liability company served upon him or her is: 24 Old Country Lane, Fairport, New York 14450. Fifth: The purpose of the business of Rose Circle, LLC is any lawful purpose [ NOTICE OF INTENT TO REQUEST RELEASE OF FUNDS (NOIRROF) ] January 16, 2013 – Date of Publication New York State Housing Trust Fund Corporation (HFTC) 38-40 State Street Albany, New York 12207 (518)4023392 On or about January 24, 2013, the New York State Housing Trust Fund Corporation (HFTC) will submit a request to the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) for the release of HOME funds under Title II of the CranstonGonzalez National Affordable Housing Act (NAHA) of 1990, in accordance with section 288 (42 U.S.C. 12838), to undertake a project known as FIS Acquisition and Rehabilitation II, for purposes of This program involves the acquisition, substantial rehabilitation and resale to low/moderate income buyers of 10 vacant single family structures located in City of Rochester. Buyers must be first tine with total household income at or below 80% Area Median Income (AMI) adjusted for household size. The activities proposed are Categorically Excluded under HUD regulations at 24 CFR Part 58 from National Environmental Policy Act Requirements. An Environmental Review Record (ERR) that documents the environmental determinations for this project is on file at: The Urban League of Rochester Economic Development Corp. 312 State Street, Rochester, NY 14608 and may examined or copied weekdays -10:00 A.M. to 3:00 P.M. PUBLIC COMMENTS Any individual, group, or agency may submit written comments on the ERR to Heather Spitzberg, Esq. Environmental Analysis

Unit, NYS Housing Trust Fund Corporation, 38-40 State Street, Albany, NY 12207. All comments received by January 23, 2013 will be considered by HTFC prior to authorizing submission of a request for release of funds. RELEASE OF FUNDS HTFC certifies to HUD that Heather Spitzberg, Esq. in her capacity as Certifying Officer consents to accept the jurisdiction of the Federal Courts if an action is brought to enforce responsibilities in relation to the environmental review process and that these responsibilities have been satisfied. HUD’s approval of the certification satisfies its responsibilities under NEPA and related laws and authorities, and allows HTFC to use Program funds. OBJECTIONS TO RELEASE OF FUNDS HUD will consider objections to its release of funds and HTFC’s certification received by February 8, 2013 or for a period of fifteen days following its actual receipt of the request (whichever is later) only if they are on one of the following bases: (a) the certification was not executed by the Certifying Officer of HTFC; (b) HTFC has omitted a step or failed to make a decision or finding required by HUD regulations at 24 CFR Part 58; (c) the grant recipient or other participants in the project have committed funds or incurred cost not authorized by 24 CFR Part 58 before approval of a release of funds by HUD; or (d) another Federal agency acting pursuant to 40 CFR Part 1504 has submitted a written finding that the project is unsatisfactory from the standpoint of environmental quality. Objections must be prepared and submitted in accordance with the required procedures (24CFR Part 58) and shall be addressed to Director of Community Planning and Development U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development 26 Federal Plaza New York, New York 102780068 Potential objectors should contact HUD to verify the actual last day if the objection period. Heather Spitzberg, Esq. Certifying Officer January 16, 2013 Date of Publication [ NOTICE OF SALE ] Index No. 201114780 SUPREME COURT STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF

MONROE ESL Federal Credit Union Plaintiff, vs. Todd C. VanOcker a/k/a Todd VanOcker; Marcy A. VanOcker; ESL Federal Credit Union; LVNV Funding LLC APO Sears; Emily VanOcker and Kimberly VanOcker, Defendants. Pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale dated January 2, 2013 and entered herein, I, the undersigned, the Referee in said Judgment named, will sell at public auction in the front vestibule of the Monroe County Office Building, 39 West Main Street, Rochester, New York, County of Monroe, on February 6, 2013 at 10:00 a.m., on that day, the premises directed by said Judgment to be sold and therein described as follows: ALL THAT TRACT OR PARCEL OF LAND, situate in the Town of Gates, County of Monroe and State of New York, known as 105 Dearcop Drive, Rochester, NY 14624; Tax Account No. 119.08-1-3 described in Deed recorded in Liber 6937 of Deeds, page 58 Said premises are sold subject to any state of facts an accurate survey may show, zoning restrictions and any amendments thereto, covenants, restrictions, agreements, reservations, and easements of record and prior liens, if any, municipal departmental violations, and such other provisions as may be set forth in the Complaint and Judgment filed in this action. Judgment amount: $29,062.78 plus, but not limited to, costs, disbursements, attorney fees and additional allowance, if any, all with legal interest. DATED: January 2013 Richard H. Holzberg, Esq., Referee LACY KATZEN LLP Attorneys for Plaintiff 130 East Main Street Rochester, New York 14604 Telephone: (585) 324-5767 [ REFEREE’S NOTICE OF POSTPONED SALE IN FORECLOSURE ] Index. No. 20115941 STATE OF NEW YORK SUPREME COURT COUNTY OF MONROE ANTONIO MASCI and IGINIO MASCI,Plaintiffs, vs. DAVID OLIVER, CINDY SAWDEY, CHRIS BRENNER, MIKE CATALANO, KEVIN DALLIMORE, JAMIE LINKE, JEFF VANDELUYSTER and JASON J. HELMER, Defendants PLEASE TAKE NOTICE

THAT In pursuance of a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale dated November 16, 2012, and an Order Appointing Successor Referee dated January 3, 2013, duly made and entered in the office of the County Clerk of Monroe County, I, the undersigned Referee named in said Order, will sell (said sale originally set for 9:00 a.m. on December 27, 2012 at the Monroe County Office Building, 39 West Main Street in the City of Rochester) at public auction on Tuesday, January 22, 2013 in the front vestibule of the Monroe County Building, 39 West Main Street, in the City of Rochester, County of Monroe and State of New York, at 9:30 am, the premises described in the Judgment as follows: All that tract or parcel of land situate in the Town of Webster, County of Monroe and State of New York, being part of Town Lot 48, Section 13, Range 4, known as Lots 230, 231 and 232 of Shoecraft Farms as shown on a map of said subdivision made and filed in the Monroe County Clerk’s Office in Liber 258 of Maps at page 22 and 23. Also, all that tract or parcel of land situate in the Town of Webster, County of Monroe and State of New York, being part of Town Lot 48, Section 13, Range 4, known as Lot R153A of the Shoecraft Farms Subdivision, as shown on a map of said subdivision made and filed in the Monroe County Clerk’s Office in Liber 278 of Maps at page 8. Approximate amount of judgment: $672,439,97, plus interest, disbursements, fees and costs from the date of the Referee’s Report, October 17, 2011. Premises will be sold subject to provisions of filed Judgment Index Number 20115941. Mortgaged Premises:1133-1135 Shoecraft Road 11391141 Shoecraft Road 1143-1145 Shoecraft Road Defendants, 1147-1149 Shoecraft Road Town of Webster, NY. DATED: January 16, 2013 Eileen E. Buholtz, Esq. Successor Referee Charles J. Genese Attorney at Law Post Office Box 688 Webster, New York 14580 Telephone No. (585) 670-9583

Fun

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