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EVENTS: “12 ANGRY MEN,” ISLAND TOUCH BACHATA 19 FILM: “HYDE PARK ON HUDSON,” “THE IMPOSSIBLE” 24 RESTAURANT REVIEW: ACANTHUS CAFÉ 11 GUEST COMMENTARY: THE POOR AND OBAMA’S AGENDA

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CROSSWORD, NEWS OF THE WEIRD 35

NATALIE B • THE MOHO COLLECTIVE • MIDGE URE • THE SOFT MOON • FATHER JOHN MISTY • AND MORE MUSIC, PAGE 12 JANUARY 9-15, 2013 Free

Greater Rochester’s Alternative Newsweekly

Vol 42 No 18

News. Music. Life.

I feel like a stranger in my own home town.” MUSIC REVIEW, PAGE 13

Money challenges for waterfront project. NEWS, PAGE 5

Recognizing Rochester’s African-American landmarks. NEWS, PAGE 6 ENVIRONMENT | BY JEREMY MOULE | PAGE 8 | PHOTO ILLUSTRATION BY MATT DETURCK

Sixty looks at the turbulent 60’s. ART REVIEW, PAGE 18

Nominations open for Rochester Theater Hall of Fame. DETAILS, PAGE 12

Great Lakes: progress and problems The Great Lakes are much better than they used to be in terms of the presence of toxic pollutants like mercury and DDT. But they still face an evolving list of environmental threats and problems. Lake Ontario continues to struggle with nutrient pollution. When substances — phosphorous, for example — enter the water, they act as fertilizer for algae. The resulting blooms cause water-quality problems; one high-visibility consequence is the frequent closings at Ontario and Durand-Eastman beaches.

But the health of Lake Ontario and the Great Lakes overall will be aided by research. And recently, two SUNY professors have made important and useful findings. Joe Makarewicz, an environmental science professor at SUNY Brockport, has identified some nutrient sources in the Genesee River watershed, which empties into Lake Ontario. And Sam Mason, an associate professor of chemistry at SUNY Fredonia, has identified an emerging pollutant in the Great Lakes: plastics.


Feedback We welcome your comments. Send them to themail@rochester-citynews. com, or post them on our website, rochestercitynewspaper.com, our Facebook page, or our Twitter feed, @roccitynews. Comments of fewer than 350 words have a greater chance of being published, and we do edit selections for publication in print. We don’t publish comments sent to other media.

Remembering Karen Grella

WHAT ARE YOU DOING TODAY?

CITY NEWSPAPER’s

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NEW EVENTS EVERY DAY, ONLINE AT ROCHESTERCITYNEWSPAPER.COM Every morning City Newspaper’s calendar editors give their picks for the most interesting events of the day, everything from concerts to exhibits, theater shows to festivals!

2 CITY

JANUARY 9-15, 2013

As discussed in Mary Anna Towler’s fine tribute in the December 19 edition, the Rochester community recently lost Karen Grella, one of its most ardent and passionate advocates for urban, public education. Serving as a member of the Rochester school board from 1980 to 1996, Karen’s enduring legacy includes the creation of both the School of the Arts and the International Baccalaureate program at Wilson. At the same time, one of Karen’s path-breaking accomplishments has been less well-remembered. With Karen playing an instrumental role, in December 1991 the RCSD became the first district in the nation to ban military recruitment on its campuses because gay students were prohibited from enlisting. Spurred by the local gay community, in 1990 the board examined the recruiting practices of the military. After a series of public meetings, the board determined the practices were in direct conflict with the board’s anti-bias mandate, which forbade any organization with a written policy of discrimination based on sexual orientation. As Karen would tell the New York Times, “How would it look to our students if we said discrimination is wrong, but in the military’s case it’s OK?” At the time, Karen and the board feared public backlash. Fortunately, most Rochesterians accepted the decision as fair and commendable, and the policy was implemented largely without incident. A countering lawsuit, which named Karen as an appellant, was rejected by the New York State Court of Appeals. Twenty years ago, Karen had modest expectations about the impact of the board’s decision: “We realize this is just a little policy by a little school district and it isn’t going to change the stance of the Defense Department.” I think, as time has passed, Karen sold short the achievement. The early1990’s saw a number of school districts, colleges, and uni-

versities follow — at least indirectly — the board’s model. The historic decision even merited praiseworthy mention in Howard Zinn’s iconic A People’s History of the United States. Finally, 20 years later, Congress has completely eliminated sexual orientation as a bar to service. Today, any gay student in the RCSD can proudly join the Armed Services with far less fear of discrimination and recrimination. Without people like Karen Grella who took the first step, it might not have been possible. DAVID KRAMER, BRIGHTON

The writer is a Fellow at the Nazareth College Center for Public History

Mayor misrepresented facts

In his January 2 guest commentary (“Aid the Transformation of America’s Urban Areas”), Rochester Mayor Tom Richards said, “Before we can put one book on a library shelf or one cop on a beat, the entire property-tax levy has been exhausted by the cost of pensions and the state-mandated $119.1 million payment to the city school district.” Once again, I must admonish our colleagues at City Hall to stop misrepresenting the facts. For 95 years, the state has required that the big cities collect property taxes “on behalf of ” their school districts. Why? Because the cities had already developed complete education systems, and because the cities already had a system for collecting taxes when the state mandated public education. Don’t believe me? Look at your city tax bills over the last 10 years; “School Tax Levy” has always been there. Smaller school districts were on their own to figure out how to collect the taxes, and what their boundaries would be. They also had both the freedom and the responsibility to put their school tax levy to a vote. The only thing that changed was that when Governor Spitzer ushered in the Contract for Excellence funding for schools, which promised a phase-in of adequate funding for education, he turned to the cities and said, in essence, if the state steps up and fulfills its constitutional obligation to fund a “sound basic education,” we expect the cities to maintain their current effort and not use this new money as an opportunity to reduce the local commitment to education. Since then, the state has reneged on the Contract for

Excellence. The phase-in of new funding was stopped, and then reversed. Even so, the city’s contribution to the Rochester City School District budget remains only 17 percent of the whole. Nearly all the funding for suburban schools comes directly from the local property tax base, so it hardly seems fitting for the city to bemoan its share of the burden for education. The city and the school district have one common interest: advocating that the state address the inequities created by a tax system that allows high wealth and high poverty tax bases, but demands the same services be provided without the same resources. Richards lumps school aid in with the cost of pensions as if these issues were two sides of the same coin. Rising pension costs are real, and the city school district is struggling under the weight of those costs as well. But it is unfair to add pension costs and education aid together to make the statement he makes. It is inappropriate to perpetuate the myth that the city has been burdened with an unfair financial obligation to the city school district. WILLA POWELL, ROCHESTER

Powell is a commissioner on the Rochester Board of Education

West Webster in the news

On whether the media went overboard in its coverage of the shooting deaths of two West Webster firefighters: “The coverage of the Webster shootings (as with those of Newtown) quickly ceased being a conveyance of the news and quickly became a ghoulish and self-serving rehash of a few facts as the media paraded the victims as part of their quest for higher ratings and readership/viewership.” CHAIM DELOYE

Posted on rochestercitynewspaper.com

Too many Morelles?

On Joe Morelle recommending his son for a seat in the Monroe County Legislature: “Of all the qualified and experienced candidates in the county it is ridiculous of Morelle to recommend junior for the County Legislature. Political offices aren’t hereditary, Joe.” BART

Posted on rochestercitynewspaper.com

News. Music. Life. Greater Rochester’s Alternative Newsweekly January 9-15, 2013 Vol 42 No 18 250 North Goodman Street Rochester, New York 14607-1199 themail@rochester-citynews.com phone (585) 244-3329 fax (585) 244-1126 rochestercitynewspaper.com Publishers: William and Mary Anna Towler Editor: Mary Anna Towler Asst. to the publishers: Matt Walsh Editorial department themail@rochester-citynews.com Features editor: Eric Rezsnyak News editor: Christine Carrie Fien Staff writers: Tim Louis Macaluso, Jeremy Moule Music editor: Willie Clark Music writer: Frank De Blase Calendar editor: Rebecca Rafferty Contributing writers: Paloma Capanna, Casey Carlsen, Roman Divezur, George Grella, Susie Hume, Andy Klingenberger, Dave LaBarge, Kathy Laluk, Michael Lasser, James Leach, Adam Lubitow, Ron Netsky, Dayna Papaleo, Suzan Pero, Rebecca Rafferty, Deb Schleede, David Yockel Jr. Editorial intern: Lillian Dickerson Art department artdept@rochester-citynews.com Art director/production manager: Matt DeTurck Designers: Aubrey Berardini, Mark Chamberlin Photographers: Mark Chamberlin, Frank De Blase, Michael Hanlon Advertising department ads@rochester-citynews.com Advertising sales manager: Betsy Matthews Account executives: Nancy Burkhardt, Tom Decker, Annalisa Iannone, William Towler Classified sales representatives: Christine Kubarycz, Tracey Mykins Operations/Circulation info@rochester-citynews.com Circulation manager: Katherine Stathis Distribution: Andy DiCiaccio, David Riccioni, Northstar Delivery, Wolfe News City Newspaper is available free of charge. Additional copies of the current issue may be purchased for $1, payable in advance at the City Newspaper office. City Newspaper may be distributed only by authorized distributors. No person may, without prior written permission of City Newspaper, take more than one copy of each weekly issue. City (ISSN 1551-3262) is published weekly by WMT Publications, Inc. Periodical postage paid at Rochester, NY (USPS 022-138). Send address changes to City, 250 North Goodman Street, Rochester, NY 14607. City is a member of the Association of Alternative Newsweeklies and the New York Press Association. Subscriptions: $35.00 ($30.00 for senior citizens) for one year. Add $10 yearly for out-of-state subscriptions: add $30 yearly for foreign subscriptions. Due to the initial high cost of establishing new subscriptions, refunds for fewer than ten months cannot be issued. Copyright by WMT Publications Inc., 2013 - all rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, photocopying, recording or by any information storage retrieval system without permission of the copyright owner.


GUEST COMMENTARY | BY MARVIN MCMICKLE

The national agenda must focus on the poor During President Obama’s first term and again in his successful re-election campaign, virtually nothing was said or done about people in the United States who are trapped in a cycle of poverty and despair. The focus was on middle class families and their concerns. This is not to say that the nation should ignore its need for a strong and vibrant middle class. But another sector of our society is being overlooked and underserved: individuals and families living in poverty. The true character of our society is not defined by the tax breaks we give the wealthy or the tax incentives we give the middle class. The truest character of our society involves how we care for the poorest and neediest people among us. These are the ones Jesus referred to as “the least of these.” President Obama has largely ignored the issue of poverty. Mitt Romney actually showed contempt for people living in poverty with his 47-percent comments, implying that all people living in poverty want nothing more than government funded entitlement programs. I can vividly remember growing up in a single-parent home in an impoverished neighborhood in the inner city of Chicago. I know from personal experience that Mitt Romney’s comments paint a false picture about people living in poverty. The issue is not about people desiring government-sponsored entitlement programs; the issue is people desiring help in creating stronger and more stable families, jobs that pay a living wage, access to health care, safe and effective public schools and, most of all, an enlightened and progressive criminal justice system. President Obama should charge the relevant Cabinet officers and government agencies to consider a national emphasis on programs like Nurse-Family Partnership, a program created right here in Rochester. This program has a proven track record of improving the health of expectant mothers and equipping them to be effective parents. This results in children with reduced rates of child abuse, lower rates of criminal behavior and arrest, and a higher success rate in school. The intervention of one nurse with one family can often mean the difference between another generation being born into a cycle of persistent poverty, or children being able to finally escape poverty and have a chance to attain a bright future. The investment made in such a program today can result in enormous savings to our society in years to come.

The truest character of our society involves how we care for the poorest and neediest people among us.”

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Reducing criminal behavior is especially important, because a felony conviction is the single greatest contributor to persistent poverty in this country. As revealed in Michelle Alexander’s book “The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness,” the United States not only requires people to serve their time through incarceration or parole. Those same people are then haunted and hindered for the rest of their lives. A felony conviction limits them in terms of further education, future employment, military service, the right to vote, home ownership, and a stable family life: all of the things that are essential to climbing out of poverty. To add insult to injury, the vast majority of felons in this country are non-violent drug offenders who would be better served by referral to a drug treatment program. That means an annual $5,000 cost per patient and no felony record to complicate their future, as compared to incarceration at an annual cost of $25,000 per inmate followed by a lifetime of poverty-prolonging prohibitions. Finally, President Obama must keep working to defend the programs that serve the poor, the sick and the needy; these cannot be cut no matter what argument is made for retaining tax cuts and shelters for our country’s most affluent. It was not entitlement programs serving the poor that created this mess, it was two wars over the last nine years that have cost this country $15 billion every month since 2003. Our nation is not made strong when the defense budget is bloated with spending items that are neither requested nor required by the Pentagon. We will only have a stronger and safer nation when the voices of the poor are heard and when the policies that can dramatically reduce poverty are funded and implemented. Dr. McMickle is president of Colgate Rochester Crozer Divinity School.

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CITY 3


[ NEWS FROM THE WEEK PAST ]

Joe Morelle, the sequel

Joe Morelle Jr. was appointed to the Monroe County Legislature seat left vacant by the resignation of Ted O’Brien, who won election to the State Senate. Morelle Jr. was selected by the Irondequoit Democratic Committee and recommended to the Legislature president by his father, county Democratic Committee chair Joe Morelle Sr. Critics say the appointment is pure nepotism. Meanwhile, State Assembly Speaker Sheldon Silver is considering Morelle Sr., an Assembly member, for majority leader.

LeBeau out as stadium manager

An events company run by James LeBeau will no longer operate Frontier Field. The stadium is owned by Monroe County, but overseen by a separate authority. That agency’s board chose not to renew the contract after the state cited LeBeau’s company for violating prevailing wage laws, reported the Democrat and Chronicle. The county and the Rochester Red Wings will now operate the stadium, the article says.

B&L’s sale drawing suitors

A possible sale of Bausch and Lomb has attracted

serious interest from Abbott Laboratories, Johnson and Johnson, and Sanofi, reports Bloomberg. B&L’s parent company, Warburg Pincus, is asking $10 billion for the Rochester-based eye care company. Merk and Pfizer have also shown interest.

News

Kodak’s legal problems mount

Beleaguered and bankrupt Eastman Kodak Company is being sued by Kyocera Corporation for allegedly infringing on more than a dozen US patents involving Kyocera’s digital cameras and printers. Kyocera says the alleged infringement will cause irreparable damage.

RECYCLING | BY JEREMY MOULE

Changes coming for recycling center

Pre-K for New York

Governor Andrew Cuomo’s Education Reform Commission has recommended an expansion of pre-K services, and Cuomo supports the recommendation. The commission called for full-day pre-k to be available, at minimum, in all high-needs school districts. But there are some concerns with the recommendation: parents do not by law have to send their children to pre-K, and the costs to the state would jump dramatically.

The two-box recycling system may be history soon. Your back says thank you. PHOTO BY CHRISTINE CARRIE FIEN

CITY SEEKS WINTER/SPRING

INTERNS

Are you a hard-working, fun-loving college student with a passion for journalism or photography? City Newspaper is looking for interns in our photography and editorial departments for the winter/spring semester. Candidates should have prior experience, must be college students, and must work for college credit (NOTE: internships are unpaid). Get a chance to work in the City office and gain real-world experience. 4 CITY

JANUARY 9-15, 2013

The company that operates the county-owned Mill Seat landfill now also runs Monroe’s recycling center. Waste Management was awarded through a competitive process the 10-year recycling center contract late last year, and took over operations on January 1. Cascades Recovery ran the center for 10 years — through two, five-year contracts — and also submitted a proposal to continue the arrangement. County officials selected Waste Management’s proposal for several reasons. Mike Garland, director of the county’s Department of Environmental Services, says one benefit of the choice is financial: the recycling facility operator will give the county more money for every ton of recyclables it takes in. Other benefits are logistical, Garland says. One defining factor was Waste Management’s commitment to update the county’s recycling process and equipment, Garland says. Specifically, the company will convert the center’s dual-stream

operations to single-stream sorting. In a dual-stream process, the hauler separates paper from plastic and metal. This is typically done by customers before they put out their bins for pickup. In a single-stream process, everything goes into the same bin and the sorting happens at the recycling facility. The simplicity of single-stream recycling tends to increase the amount that residents recycle, says Frank Regan, chair of the Rochester Sierra Club chapter’s Zero Waste Committee. But as a trade-off, there’s a risk that other recyclables may contaminate the paper, he says. The county does expect singlestream recycling to boost residential recycling compliance, Garland says. And single-stream sorting technology is established enough now that the county is confident in it, he says.

EDITORIAL PROSPECTS Send a resume, clips, and a cover letter explaining what you can bring to the City team to

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“The numbers are going to be very large, and that’s one of the biggest hurdles we have: the funding for environmental cleanup and demolition, as well as new street infrastructure. It’s big money.” [ MARK GREGOR ]

DEVELOPMENT | BY CHRISTINE CARRIE FIEN

Money challenges for waterfront project It’s difficult to view the abandoned campus in the Flint Street area of southwest Rochester and not see the possibilities, as well as the clearly daunting challenges. The 25-acre industrial ghost town is on the western bank of the Genesee River between the Ford Street bridge and the recently reopened railroad bridge crossing. It’s secluded, spacious, and the riverfront view is wide open and gorgeous. “You can envision this being a kind of stunning place,” says Mark Gregor, manager of environmental quality for the City of Rochester. “We think it has huge potential.” But the buildings on the former Vacuum Oil site, largely untouched since the refinery closed in the 1930’s, are falling apart and defaced by graffiti. And the site itself is covered in debris and plagued by environmental issues. “This is the last stretch of the Genesee River south of downtown that has not reached its potential both as a recreational asset and from the standpoint of development,” Gregor says. The city, working with concerned neighborhood groups, has put together a long-range master plan for the site. It includes residential and mixed-use development, amphitheater, grocery store, water access, streetscape improvements, and more projects

phased in over many years. But the challenges are significant. The extent of the environmental damage from the site’s former refinery and The Vacuum Oil site. junkyard FILE PHOTO hasn’t yet been determined, for example. “We haven’t really done an exhaustive investigation of the nature and extent of contamination,” Gregor says. “There are areas that we don’t even know if there is significant contamination.” The city will need the cooperation of the ad hoc group of current and former owners to determine who is responsible for what and what role each will play in the redevelopment of the site, he says. “The numbers are going to be very large,” Gregor says, “and that’s one of the biggest hurdles we have: the funding for environmental cleanup and demolition, as well as new street infrastructure. It’s big money.”

GUN CONTROL | BY TIM LOUIS MACALUSO

Granny-no-guns

Cost of War AFGHANISTAN TOTALS —

2,174 US servicemen and servicewomen and 1,079 Coalition servicemen and servicewomen have been killed in Afghanistan from the beginning of the war and occupation to January 7. Statistics for Afghan civilian casualties are not available. American casualties from December 24 to 29: -- Pfc. Markie T. Sims, 20, Citra, Fla. iraqbodycount. org, icasualties.org, Department of Defense

SOURCES:

Despite the recent shootings that left two Rochester-area firefighters dead, gun-related injuries and deaths are nothing new to this area. | Mass shootings in suburban malls and schools tend to grab national media attention, but gun violence, as most mayors of US cities can testify, is almost a daily occurrence. | Locally and nationally, the country may be reaching a tipping point in public opinion that could lead to stricter gun control legislation. | Some Rochester-area grandmothers have joined a national effort, Grandmothers Against Guns, to promote a petition seeking strict gun control, says Enid Ryen, a Rochester-area grandparent. | The petition, which will be forwarded to President Obama, Congressional representatives, and members of the US Senate, demands a ban on assault weapons, limits on the number of guns that can be purchased at one time, and universal background checks for buyers. | “This gun violence is not what we hoped to leave to our grandchildren,” Ryen says. “The gun lobby has been less than useful.” | The petition, which anyone can sign, can be found at http://signon.org/sign/grandmothers-against. And Representative Louise Slaughter has a link to the petition on her website: www.VoteLouise.com.

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HISTORY | BY TIM LOUIS MACALUSO

Preserving Rochester’s African American past When local historian David Anderson met with Wayne Goodman, executive director of the Landmark Society of Western New York, he brought along a series of photos. They showed the former Adams Street home of James and Bessie Hamm, early 20th-century advocates of education for African American children, as it went from vital institution to vacant lot. “It’s incumbent upon on our organization to prevent that [kind of thing] from happening,” Goodman says. A small state grant out of the $96 million recently awarded to the Finger Lakes region for economic development will help preserve landmarks important to the region’s African American history. It will be a challenge, Goodman says, because many of the sites are not typical. They could be street corners, he says, or vacant lots. “When people think of preservation, they often think of the big beautiful homes on East Avenue,” he says. “But many of the sites important to the African American community are not going to be beautiful old homes.”

Goodman says the African American Landmarks Project is as much about understanding and preserving heritage as it is about preserving structures. Heritage has value, he says, and it can be easy to overlook. “What we’ve seen over the last couple of decades is that heritage can become the spark for smart growth and sustainable economic development,” Goodman says. The project will begin with a listening tour in the African American community with residents, clergy, community leaders, and others. “Everyone knows this is the city of Frederick Douglass, but it is so much more than that,” says Cindy Boyer, the Landmark Society’s director of public programs. For example, many people don’t know that Clarissa Street was once the business and cultural heart of Rochester’s African American community, Boyer says. In the 1950’s, it became a jazz and entertainment hub. Understanding heritage also requires knowing the individuals who helped shape it, she says. And there are so many

Potential landmark? A Hamilton street home once owned by Frederick Douglass. FILE PHOTO

important names that aren’t familiar to the wider Rochester community, Boyer says. One such name: Cynthia Fitzpatrick, an activist and daughter of slaves who helped break up blockbusting in the 19th Ward. Blockbusting was a practice used to make homeowners sell their property cheaply out of fear that blacks were moving into the neighborhood.

The African American Landmark Project is an example of being proactive and preventing losses like the Hamm house, says Larry Francer, the Landmark Society’s associate director of preservation. Once the sites and individuals have been identified, the state grant pay for feasibility studies to determine, for example, how a building can be repurposed.

approves the schools selected for upgrading and the rationale behind the choices, says Anita Murphy, the district’s deputy superintendent of administration. The SED has changed its approach to modernizing the state’s big school districts from the years when the money was flowing, she says. The SED will want a plan that also looks at academic performance, enrollment projections, and the schools’ adaptability. And many of the schools Vargas has selected to modernize have been labeled priority schools by the SED — meaning there’s an urgent need for a turnaround strategy. Vargas’s plan has to support those considerations, too, Murphy says. Getting everyone to agree on a plan will be difficult, and there is a risk that the district will keep losing students even after spending millions on upgrades. And critics of the plan fear the proposed school closings will hurt some neighborhoods. Parents want

smaller schools and fewer large campuses that consolidate multiple schools, they say. But Murphy told board members that the SED would never allow the district to demolish old school buildings and rebuild them in the same locations with the same low enrollment. Board President Malik Evans and board member Van White say it’s hard for them to concede the district is shrinking because past enrollment projections have changed. Vargas says he is doing his best to create a plan that slows the district’s loss of students, especially to charter schools. The district is not in direct competition with charter schools, he says, but officials still had to contemplate their impact when they developed the new plan. More charter schools are expected to open in the city, and some will undoubtedly serve the same neighborhoods where the district is targeting school improvements.

EDUCATION | BY TIM LOUIS MACALUSO

The bumpy path to a smaller RCSD When Rochester schools Superintendent Bolgen Vargas initially presented his proposal for the $675 million next phase of the schools modernization program, he said the district must eliminate unneeded space. But at a special board meeting last week, he took the conversation one step further. “I’m telling teachers, parents, and administrators to look at the district smaller,” Vargas said. “We are planning for a much smaller school district.” The blunt characterization of the state of the district caught some school board members by surprise. That’s partly because the plan Vargas proposed, which recommends closing five schools, is starkly different from what school officials envisioned when the reconstruction project began in 2007. Vargas’s plan more closely reflects how the city’s population loss has changed neighborhoods and the school system. 6 CITY

JANUARY 9-15, 2013

But instead of a clear strategy for building a 21st century school district, Vargas’s plan borders on a 200-page nexus of government regulations and neighborhood issues that go beyond the physical condition of the buildings. Designing a leaner RCSD while using many of the existing buildings and infrastructure is a formidable task, Vargas said. The needs the buildings served when they were built have changed. For example, some of the services schools provide, such as health care and bilingual instruction, were not even imagined 60 years ago. And neighborhoods that once needed multiple schools can, in some cases, barely support one today. Vargas’s team also had to incorporate dozens of requirements imposed by the State Education Department, which will vet the final plan and its costs. Getting the maximum reimbursement from the state for the decadelong project depends on whether the SED


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CITY 7


ENVIRONMENT

BY JEREMY MOULE

Great Lakes:

progress and problems

The Great Lakes are much better than they used to be in terms of the presence of toxic pollutants like mercury and DDT. Pollutants persist, but in much lower concentrations. New laws and a healthy amount of public awareness have helped restore the lakes. But challenges still exist; the Great Lakes face an evolving list of environmental threats and problems. Two ongoing projects, both the work of SUNY professors, shed light on a couple of issues pertinent to Lake Ontario. The first deals with an established problem in the lake. Joe Makarewicz, an environmental science professor at SUNY Brockport, has found that small wastewater treatment plants along the Genesee River may contribute significantly to Lake Ontario’s ongoing nutrient pollution problems. Lake Ontario’s nutrient issues will get extra attention this year from US and Canadian officials. They will gather information on the lake, which will be used for environmental and natural resource programs, says John Martin, a spokesperson for the Environmental Protection Agency. The work on Lake Ontario will include studies of nutrient levels in tributaries as well as a study of the Rochester Embayment, a recessed area stretching from Riga to Webster. And this past summer, Sam Mason, an associate professor of chemistry at SUNY Fredonia, began an effort to document the extent of plastics pollution in the Great Lakes. She’s working with the 5 Gyres Institute, which has studied plastics pollution in the oceans. Mason traveled several of the Great Lakes, collecting samples. She found that in some places, the concentration of plastic pieces exceeds what 5 Gyres documented in the oceans. And while Mason hasn’t tested Lake Ontario, she predicts that it could have among the highest plastics concentrations of the Great Lakes. Lake Ontario’s nutrient levels have

long vexed researchers and government 8 CITY

JANUARY 9-15, 2013

regulators. The levels are much lower than a few decades ago, and that’s created a visible difference: lake waters are clearer, particularly away from the near-shore areas. But phosphorous and other forms of nutrient pollution still cause problems in the lake. Ontario Beach Park and Durand-Eastman Park are frequently closed to swimming in the summer, with nutrient pollution as a contributing factor. Other factors include water quality and bacterial counts. The nutrients essentially fertilize algae blooms. The algae, in turn, cloud the water and provide an environment for bacteria to grow. Many of the worst, most direct pollution sources are gone. Governments sunk millions of dollars over a period of decades into improving wastewater infrastructure and treatment plants. And the state has implemented laws restricting phosphorous-containing products, ranging from laundry detergents to fertilizers. (In July, a new state law takes effect banning commercial operations from possessing or using dishwasher detergents containing phosphorous.) More recently, researchers and government officials have focused on indirect sources of nutrient pollution, including fertilizer runoff from farm fields and lawns: viewed as a major culprit. But SUNY Brockport’s Makarewicz, who’s studying the Genesee River under a grant from the US Department of Agriculture, has found that there are still some direct sources of nutrient pollution. “People are asking, at least on the scientific side, ‘Well why is the embayment having such a problem? Why isn’t it recovering like the rest of the lake is?’” Makarewicz says. The Genesee River and its watershed start in northern Pennsylvania’s Allegheny Plateau and cut through the western part of New York before emptying into Lake Ontario. Approximately 25 small wastewater treatment plants are located in the watershed, Makarewicz says. Each of the plants treats fewer than 1 million gallons of water per day. And because of that, their water discharges are held to a lower standard than the effluent from larger municipal plants, such as Van Lare.

(above) Researchers have found plastic microbeads in the Great Lakes. PHOTO PROVIDED (right) Joe Makarewicz, a SUNY Brockport professor, is researching sources of nutrient pollution in the Genesee River. FILE PHOTO

“What those rules don’t consider is that when you add up 25 of them, they’re well over 1 million gallons per day,” Makarewicz says. The plants aren’t breaking any rules, he says. The problem is that the regulations don’t consider the cumulative impact of the smaller plants. And the plants can contribute a significant amount of nutrient pollution. For example, Black Creek carries about 16,000 kilograms of phosphorus to the Genesee River each year and some of that makes it into the lake. Approximately 18 percent of the 16,000 kilograms comes from wastewater treatment plants, Makarewicz says. To improve the Genesee River’s water quality, it may make sense to try to reduce the nutrient contributions from the wastewater treatment plants, Makarewicz says. A cleaner Genesee River means cleaner water flowing into Lake Ontario. That may mean taking a look at the permitting process for the smaller plants and, in particular, reviewing their cumulative discharges.

The world’s oceans have several garbage

patches: massive areas of swirling ocean currents where plastic pieces accumulate. The Great Lakes have a similar problem, but no one examined the issue until SUNY Fredonia’s Mason came along. She saw an opportunity to incorporate the work into a class she teaches. She reached out to the 5 Gyres Institute, which has extensively studied plastics pollution in the Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian oceans, about borrowing equipment to collect samples. Coincidentally, the institute had been interested in studying the Great Lakes, says Marcus Ericksen, its director. This past summer, Mason and her students set out on the US Brig Niagara,


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Ericksen says there’s evidence that PCB’s will transfer from plastics ingested by seabirds into the birds’ organs. The researchers say they want to better

(above) The plastic microbeads found in the Great lakes often measure one-third of a millimeter to 1 millimeter in diameter. PHOTO PROVIDED

(left) High nutrient levels in the near-shore areas of Lake Ontario encourage algae growth, which contributes to swimming bans. FILE PHOTO

travelling on three lakes: Superior, Huron, and Erie. They collected seven or eight samples from each lake. Each sample represented a segment of water equal in surface area to roughly two football fields. While Mason found some larger pieces of plastic — cigarette pack wrappers and broken bottle caps, for example — she mostly found pieces between one-third of a millimeter and 1 millimeter in diameter. Those fragments are called microplastics. Mason and her team haven’t taken samples

from Lake Ontario, though Mason says she hopes to do so this summer. Ontario will likely be a bigger focus in 2014, she says. But she hypothesizes that Lake Ontario could have some of the highest concentrations of plastic pieces in the Great Lakes. The lakes form a system and they flow into each other. Since Ontario is at the end of the chain, the water from the other lakes flows into it. Mason and her collaborators at the 5 Gyres Institute are troubled by the amount of plastics in the samples, particularly

samples from Lake Erie. One of the samples represented a concentration of plastic pieces that was double the highest sample taken from an ocean garbage patch. The researchers say the effects of plastic pollution are uncertain and that more research is needed. “This is like any environmental issue: it’s going to take time for enough data to get in to really get an idea how prominent or how important this issue is for the Great Lakes,” Mason says. Mason and Ericksen have identified issues for further examination. For example, they suspect that some marine wildlife might eat the plastic fragments because the fragments resemble fish eggs in shape and size. But they have to confirm that. When ingested, the pieces can cut the animals’ throat or stomach and can also cause ulcers, Ericksen says. But they also have questions about the relationship between plastic fragments and existing pollutants. Chemicals like DDT and PCB’s can adhere to the plastics, so the question is whether they’re adhering to the samples from the Great Lakes. Another researcher is testing the samples to determine that, Mason says.

understand how the plastics are getting into the water and how they’re moving in the Great Lakes system. They suspect that the bigger pieces are washing into the water from land. But the microplastics may be entering via a different route. Mason and 5 Gyres staff are exploring the possibility that many of the microplastic fragments are actually microbeads from common beauty products. Think in terms of the exfoliating microbeads in a face wash. The plastic pieces may be too small for wastewater treatment plants to filter out, so they remain in the plants’ treated discharge. This summer, Mason plans to have SUNY students across the state look at wastewater treatment plant discharge to see if they can find microbeads. Ultimately, data from the studies can be used to determine effective approaches to address plastics pollution in the Great Lakes. For example, the studies may convince beauty product companies to stop using plastic microbeads, Ericksen says. Personal responsibility will also be a key issue. Decreasing the amount of plastics in the Great Lakes may come down, in part, to educating consumers about recycling, avoiding certain product ingredients, and steering clear of singleuse plastic products. “We are making these choices when we go to the grocery store, as we live our lives on a day-to-day basis to contribute to this plastic problem,” Mason says.

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CITY 9


For more Tom Tomorrow, including a political blog and cartoon archive, visit www.thismodernworld.com

URBAN ACTION This week’s calls to action include the following events and activities. (All are free and open to the public, unless otherwise noted.)

Guantanamo vigil

Anti-war activists will hold a “Close Guantanamo” vigil from 4 p.m. to 5 p.m. on Friday, January 11, at 12 Corners in Brighton. The protestors are asking for the immediate closure of the prison. The public is welcome to join the vigil.

Regional transit planning meeting

The Genesee Transportation Council will hold a planning committee meeting for the Genesee-Finger Lakes region at 10 a.m. on Thursday, January 10. The US Department of Transportation requires metro planning meetings for cities to qualify for federal highway and transit funds. The meeting is at the state transportation office, 1530 Jefferson Road. Information: www. gtcmpo.org. 10 CITY JANUARY 9-15, 2013

Finger Lakes sustainability planning begins

The first round of public meetings for the Cleaner Greener Communities Finger Lakes Regional Sustainability Plan will be held on Tuesday, January 15, at the Genesee County Building 2, at 3837 West Main Street in Batavia; at Hobart & William Smith Colleges library in Geneva; and on Wednesday, January 15, at RIT’s Golisano Institute for Sustainability. All of the meetings are from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. The New York State Energy Research and Development Authority provided $900,000 to a coalition of Upstate counties and organizations to develop plans to reduce carbon emissions, increase energy savings, and spur economic development. Information: www.sustainable-fingerlakes.org.

Film on Shakur’s life

Spiritus Christi Church will show “Detroit’s Native

Son,” a documentary film about Yusef “Bunchy” Shakur at 7 p.m. on Wednesday, January 9. The film examines Shakur’s experience of going from street thug to prisoner to community leader and author. The film will be shown at 121 North Fitzhugh Street, and will be followed by a discussion.

Talk on invasive species

The Messiah Lutheran Church men’s breakfast will host a discussion about invasive species at 8:30 a.m. on Saturday, January 12. June Summers of the Genesee Valley Audubon Society will discuss environmental problems such as the ash borer. The event is at 4301 Mt. Read Boulevard. Admission: $4. Registration requested: 865-1866.


Dining

The chicken salad plate (pictured left) and pan-seared banana peppers (pictured right) from Acanthus Cafe. PHOTOS BY MATT DETURCK

All things, great and small Acanthus Café 337 EAST AVE. 319-5999, ACANTHUSCAFE.COM MONDAY 11 A.M.-4 P.M.; TUESDAY-WEDNESDAY 11 A.M.-10 P.M.; THURSDAY 11 A.M.-MIDNIGHT; FRIDAY-SATURDAY 11 A.M.-2 A.M. [ REVIEW ] BY JAMES LEACH

A few days before Christmas, my newborn dining companion and I were having lunch at Acanthus Café on East Avenue. She was having breast milk. I was enjoying an uber-fresh plate of chicken salad and a bowl of steaming hot mushroom soup while entertaining a hope that there might be massive brownies full of fudge and caramel for dessert. The restaurant was quiet, only a scattering of diners were still there wrapping up a late lunch before hurrying out into the snowy afternoon. The baby stayed asleep. Apart from the lack of a brownie — the last one had left with another customer — it was a perfect lunch. Flash back to the previous weekend, two days before the baby was born. My 8-yearold dining companion, my then-pregnant wife, and I were having dinner at Acanthus, playing Apples to Apples while sharing plates of potato skins stuffed with bacon and cheese,

a salad full of bleu cheese, pears, and candied walnuts, a transcendent bowl of cream of broccoli soup, and a burger. The first real snow of the season was already starting to fall. Acanthus can, often, accommodate many of your basic needs, and sometimes anticipate needs you didn’t know you had — like games to keep a restless dining companion occupied while he waits for dinner, or a new set of silverware between courses. At a bit under 6 months old, Allison Mayer’s Acanthus Café is an ambitious undertaking for the East and Alexander neighborhood. Neither coffee house nor rowdy bar like many of its neighbors, but hoping to attract some subset of both crowds, the restaurant incorporates elements of lounge and coffee shop along with some of the trappings of a fine-dining establishment. The dining room sports incredibly high ceilings, but the way the space is lit and painted you might never notice. It feels cozy and a little eclectic in a hip way, the undulating bar topped with inset bits of stone and recycled porcelain, the tables and chairs stylishly mismatched. Mayer has even absorbed elements of her former coffee shop, Upper Monroe’s Living Room Café, into the design, devoting a red-painted back room to comfy

leather chairs and couches, and a bookshelf chock-full of board games and popular novels. As you might expect from a place that tries to

be all things to all people, Acanthus does some things very, very well and others a bit less well. Service on my first visit was almost stunningly good, our server even going so far as to replace our silverware between courses (something I always appreciate and did not at all expect in this setting) and getting the kitchen to split a shared salad without me having to ask her to do so. The service on our second visit was both less efficient and more intrusive; all the dishes we ordered were delivered at the same time, water glasses went unfilled, and dirty plates stayed on the table right up until we asked for the check. Happily, on my third visit things improved dramatically. Manager Rob Braden waited on us himself (it was a slow-ish afternoon and he was holding down the front of the house) with an easy affability that made two sleep-deprived parents of a newborn both relaxed and very happy. By and large, the food that comes out of Acanthus’ kitchen is quite good — but again, not all things are equally good. The restaurant’s chef excels at appetizers, soups, and salads. His entrees, though, were less than

spectacular. On our first visit, we started with pan-seared banana peppers stuffed with ricotta and mascarpone topped with gorgeously caramelized onions and sautéed red and yellow peppers ($5.99). The dish was far more interesting and complex than appearances suggested. The sweetness of the onions and peppers highlighted the creamysalty cheese, which in turn was leavened by the subtle heat and meaty texture of the banana peppers. Stuffed potato skins ($6.99) filled with mashed potato and a bubbly mixture of cheese, sour cream (or perhaps even crème fraiche, it was hard to tell), and generous bits of crispy bacon were similarly wonderful, and a real treat on a cold afternoon. Less good was a marinated pork tenderloin and mango skewer served atop an indifferent salad of orzo and vegetables dressed with vinaigrette ($10.99 for three skewers). The pork was tough and a bit dry despite the marinade in which it had been soaking, and lacked a general sense of having been grilled. On our second visit, it was also the entrée that disappointed: a “Doc Yager” burger (presumably in honor of the eponymous tattoo shop next door; $7.99) was bone dry and topped with far too much gooey cheddar, the bun too large, and the advertised mango salsa entirely absent. Happily, everything else we had for dinner that night was wonderful. A bowl of cream of broccoli soup (and the bowl of cream of mushroom I had on a subsequent visit) rescued those casserole staples from Campbell’s, showing a depth of flavor and careful attention to teasing out the best from each ingredient that transformed the mundane into the sublime. On my first two visits, I avoided the chicken salad plate ($5.99). This was a mistake. The chef at Acanthus creates a light and brightly flavored dressing of mayonnaise, shallot, honey, tarragon, a bit of citrus, and dried cranberries for color and a bit of sweetness. The result is closer to a cold Thai salad than the bland mess usually stuffed between two pieces of white bread. Attractive to look at, it was even better to eat, and delightful scooped up in scraps of Romaine lettuce leaves. Being a former coffee-shop owner, Mayer excels in desserts, offering an array of tasty sweets. None are better than the Ghirardelli brownies with caramel ($2.50). Fudgy and dark, but not too sweet, heated for a few seconds they become what my wife described as “the perfect food” for both chocoholics and those who want to keep them happy through long sleepless nights of nursing.

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 11


Upcoming [ POP/ROCK ] Shinedown, Three Days Grace, P.O.D. Friday. February 22. Blue Cross Arena, 1 War Memorial Square. $30$40. 7 p.m. 758-5300. bluecrossarena.com [ POP/ROCK ] The Demos Album Release Show Friday, March 1. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. $6-$8. 9 p.m. 454-2966. bugjar. com. Limited entry for unders.

Music

[ POP/ROCK ] Green Day Monday, April 1. Blue Cross Arena, 1 War Memorial Square. $27.50-$62. 7:30 p.m. 758-5300. bluecrossarena.com

Father John Misty

SATURDAY, JANUARY 12 WATER STREET MUSIC HALL, 204 N. WATER ST. 8 P.M. | $15-$17 | WATERSTREETMUSIC.COM [ ACOUSTIC FOLK ] There are a few talking points

frequently mentioned when discussing Father John Misty. You’ll often hear mention of his involvement as former drummer for indie powerhouse Fleet Foxes, and you’re sure to learn of previous solo efforts under his abbreviated given name, J. Tillman. Almost as if in anticipation of these nuggets of history, Tillman takes a clerical bent on “Fear Fun” to rewrite his own history on this, his eighth solo album overall, but first as Father John Misty. Drawing inspiration from his chosen home of Los Angeles, Tillman fashions a creation myth, building his reinvention slowly while expanding on the impetus for the change, all while making motions to earn himself a pious following. — BY DAVE LABARGE

Brother Bear THURSDAY, JANUARY 10 DUBLAND UNDERGROUND, 315 ALEXANDER ST. 10 P.M. | $5-$10 | 232-7550 [ ELECTRONIC ] Brother Bear heads east from Buffalo to

rock the basement at Dub Land and bust out his best mix of house and electronic samples. It’s a bit seamy, but totally catchy, and those who worry they aren’t going to get their dub on can be assured that’s all in the cards, too. Keto will be representing in the club as always, as well as a fun mix of DJs upstairs and down, including Mic See and DJ Fracture, as well as Conjur and Drop Dead. — BY SUZAN PERO

Attention Rochester theater community: Send us your nominations for the

2013 Rochester Theater

HALL OF FAME 12 CITY JANUARY 9-15, 2013

City Newspaper is getting ready to induct new members into the Rochester Theater Hall of Fame, and we need your nominations. We want you to tell us who you think is the best of the best in the local theater world. We want to hear about actors, directors, musicians, stage managers, set designers, costume designers, producers, and other prominent members of the Rochester theater scene. A panel of judges will select inductees based on their innovation, dedication, passion, quality of their work and their lasting contribution to local theater.

A panel of judges will select Inductees based on the following criteria: INNOVATION DEDICATION PASSION QUALITY OF WORK LASTING CONTRIBUTION TO LOCAL THEATER Inductees will be announced at the 2013 TheatreROCS Showcase, scheduled for Saturday, April 13, at the JCC’s Hart Theater.


WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 9 [ BLUES ] Buford Duo. Dinosaur BarB-Que, 99 Court St. 9 p.m. Free.

Red Letter Statement FRIDAY, JANUARY 11 CLUB AT WATER STREET MUSIC HALL, 204 N. WATER ST. 6:30 P.M. | $10-$12 | 325-5600, WATERSTREETMUSIC.COM [ ALTERNATIVE/ROCK ] This Rochester-based band is, in part, named after the practice of marking holy days in red letters in church calendars. Although Red Letter Statement may not be the paradigm of piousness, its six members have devoted themselves to cranking out uptempo, alternative rock. The band’s bio consists of two sentences: “We don’t play dubstep or sample anything. We use actual instruments.” All sarcasm aside, the real guitar work is fast-paced and deliberate. The genuine drums are hard-hitting and prolific. And the chugging bass lines lead to some devilish rhythms. RLS incorporates all the trademarks of 21st century post-hardcore music. The subtle use of vocal harmony and the occasional guttural howl recall genre stalwarts such as Thursday and Taking Back Sunday. — BY DAVID YOCKEL, JR.

Blood and Bone Orchestra WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 16 BUG JAR, 219 MONROE AVE. 9 P.M. | $5-$7 | 454-2966, BUGJAR.COM [ JAZZ ] As I’ve said before, Blood and Bone Orchestra rides the fringe of the fringe. It’s a loosely structured amalgamation of structured vacillation. It’s wonderfully abstract and iconoclastic. Love it, hate it, but you can’t deny it — this is “free” jazz at its finest. Cairo and Rash also perform. — BY FRANK DE BLASE

Funk Nut played at Firehouse Saloon on Sunday, January 6. PHOTO BY FRANK DE BLASE

The blues, the shadow, and the steam

[ JAZZ ] Amadna Ashley. The Cottage Hotel, 1390 Pittsford Mendon Rd. 624-1390. 9:30 p.m. Free. The Dan Montgomery Quintet. Tala Vera, 155 State St. 5463845. 8 p.m. $5. Soul Express. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. 6625555. 6 p.m. Free. Stringplicity. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 7:30 p.m. Free. Vince Ercolamento& Joe Chiappone Jazz Quartet. Murph’s Irondequoit Pub, 705 Titus Ave. 342-6780. 8 p.m. Free.

[ REVIEW ] BY FRANK DE BLASE

Ventured into the unavoidable void of the west side on Friday, where broken bottles twinkle like suicidal stars and women on the financially motivated stroll ask for the time as a ploy for money. It’s bleak, I tell you. But within this shabby Shangri-La beat the hearts of two excellent venues pumping out real American music to those who live there, and those that come from the surrounding burbs to get down. With the wife and her sidekick in tow, we hit Sandra’s Saloon on Smith Street, where the Mike Snow Band was laying down a flurry of country and western in this beautiful urban honky-tonk. Snow draws from the Willie and Waylon and George and Buck songbooks of rural bang ’n’ twang, and he is the most countryist cat this town has to offer since Dave Donnelly died in 2011. What a voice. As if that weren’t enough, we climbed into the midnight caboose and headed over to Smokin’ Joe’s on Lyell for some down and dirty blues from Dan Schmitt & the Shadows with special guest Joe Beard. The place was packed. The steam heat fogged the windows like a Roman

submissions Submissions should be 400-500 words in an essay format. In the essay, please describe why your nominee deserves this award, citing specific examples of the person's work and how they meet the criteria above. You may nominate yourself, or another member of the local theater community.

EMAIL Nominations TO:

Send nominations to:

e-mail to eric@rochester-citynews.com with the subject line “Rochester Theater Hall of Fame.”

Rochester Theater Hall of Fame c/o City Newspaper 250 N Goodman St. Rochester, NY 14607

bath house on Valentine’s Day. Schmitt solos with and around lush chord patterns. The music swings for sure, and it jumps, too. It served as a perfect back to Beard’s forth: a bare-bones tone that is both soothing and sinister. And though Beard intoned, “I feel like a stranger in my own home town,” there was nowhere else any of us needed to be but right there at Smokin’ Joe’s with the blues and the Shadows and the steam. The good folks at Gig Link threw an all-day party Sunday at the Firehouse Saloon on South Clinton to benefit the families of the victims of the Christmas Eve shootings in Webster. The place was already jumping by the time I made the scene. Funk Nut was rocking a deep-dish groove full of jazz, soul, and funk. Moon Zombies followed with a multi-media extravaganza that at times resembled a tantrum. Again this was funk, but with a breakneck edge and abandon. The band stomped around as if it were trying to get the flubber on their soles to kick in. Give it time and I predict this band will be playing air born.

[ POP/ROCK ] Hal Jordan w/Doses, Scholar, and The Setbacks. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 7:30 p.m. $6-$9.

THURSDAY, JANUARY 10 [ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ] Ahura Mazda. Boulder Coffee Co. – Park Ave., 739 Park Ave. 697-0235. 6 p.m. Call for info. Barbarossa, No Direction, Jumpstart Jacoby. Tala Vera, 155 State St. 546-3845. 9 p.m. $5. Bluegrass Jam. Bernuzio Uptown Music, 122 East Ave. 473-6140. 7 p.m. Call for info. Jim Lane. Murph’s Irondequoit Pub, 705 Titus Ave. 342-6780. 8 p.m. Free. John Dady. McGraw’s Irish Pub, 146 W Commercial St. 348-9091. 7 p.m. Free. [ CLASSICAL ] Eastman at Washington Square Lunchtime Concerts. 1st Universalist Church, 150 S. Clinton Ave. 274-1400. 12:15 p.m. Free. continues on page 15

Submissions are due by Friday, February 15. Questions or concerns? can be addressed to eric@rochester-citynews.com OR VISIT www.rochestercitynewspaper.com

CITY

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CITY: How’d you get started?

Natalie B: I’ve been singing since high school. I was in a couple of rock bands in my 20s that never really went anywhere.

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Where did you first hear the blues?

THURS.JAN 17: SINGER-SONGWRITER

“ANA EGGE”

I started going the open jam at The Landing in Fairport about three years ago and I started singing the blues there. I really enjoyed he energy it gave. I formed the Natalie B Band last year out of the excellent musicians I met there.

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What is it about the blues that grabs you?

What I liked was that rock was so based in the blues, and I had been missing the point where rock ‘n’ roll had come from, like B.B. King. Or the women like Koko Taylor and Ruth Brown. Blues is essentially a black, maledominated genre. How did you break in?

WWW.ROCHESTERCITYNEWSPAPER.COM

I grew up in the country. We didn’t have a lot, we were working class, I was a single mother for a while. I could relate to the hardship in the blues

CITY

But it seems the sadder the tale, the more gruesome the heartbreak, the more joyful the blues.

Acanthus EVENTS

Beer and Wine, Espresso, Daily Lunch Specials, Appetizers, Small-Plate dinners

Tuesdays

Open Mic Comedy Night See Facebook for more details.

Pure Kona Poetry Night Wednesdays 7-11pm

Thursdays Eastman Jazz Live Music

That’s the therapy in it. That’s what it does. It makes you feel better. While the blues might be based in sadness, local blues rocker Natalie B responds to the music’s therapeutic nature. “It makes you feel better,” she says. PHOTO BY DOMENIC ROSSI

FRIDAY, JANUARY 11 DINOSAUR BAR-B-QUE, 99 COURT ST. 10 P.M. | FREE | 325-7090, DINOSAURBARBQUE.COM REVERBNATION.COM/NATALIEBBAND

THURSDAY 01/10:

Scott Topel Jazz 7pm FRIDAY 01/11:

Garwood and Bones ROCK 10:30pm THURSDAY 01/17:

Dave Chisholm Jazz Orchestra 7pm FRIDAY 01/18:

Windsor Folk Family 10:30pm FRIDAY 01/25:

Anonymous Willpower 10:30pm No cover charge

337 East Avenue • 319-5999

Mon: 11am–4pm, Tues–Wed: 11am-10pm, Thurs: 11am-Midnight, Fri-Sat: 11am-2am, Closed Sunday

14 CITY JANUARY 9-15, 2013

I’ll hear a word or a phrase — somebody passing by will say something that I think is cool, and I’ll write from that.

Queen B Natalie B Band

[ INTERVIEW ] BY FRANK DE BLASE

New Year’s Eve 2013. Sticky Lips Juke Joint. There I was, doing my best Guy Lombardo/Dick Clark/Lenny Bruce mashup to toast the lucky new year. When all of a sudden amidst the champagne, prime rib, noise makers, and confetti canons, a firecracker appeared on stage with The Pubic Market Band. She was a blonde in a little blue sequined dress, and she exploded into a gorgeous wail we all call the blues. The rough-and-tumble alto encounter lasted a mere two songs, and left the crowd

How do you write your original songs? What’s your process?

What do you bring to the blues?

licking their chops for more. No sweat, I told them. She’s Natalie B, and you can catch her all over town. Natalie B — the B stands for Bartholomew — is relatively new on the Rochester music scene, though she’s been singing since her teens. Frequent visits to open-mic night at The Landing in Fairport lit the 34-year-old’s blue fuse. She recently placed third in the Western New York Blues Society’s Memphis Bound competition in Buffalo, and she will perform in Memphis with her band later this month. After that it’s into Sammy G’s studio to hammer out a platter of original blues rockers. And this is only the beginning. This blues mama — a mother of two, to be exact — sat down for an interview to discuss the blues and why she’s got ’em. An edited transcript of the conversation follows.

I definitely have a rock edge. I like taking classics like Ruth Brown and making them a little harder, a little edgier. And I like to shake it. I like to get the audience involved. I like to talk to the audience. I have a song where I call out people’s names and get them involved in the whole show. That’s what I bring. That’s what I like.


THURSDAY, JANUARY 10 [ DJ/ELECTRONIC ] Island Touch Bachata Invasion presented by Essence of Rhythm. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. 8 p.m. $5. [ JAZZ ] Fred Vine. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 7:30 p.m. Free. John Palocy Trio. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. 6625555. 6 p.m. Free. Ted Nicolosi and Shared Genes. Roncones Italian Restaurant, 232 Lyell Ave. 458-3090. 6 p.m. Free. [ REGGAE/JAM ] Reggae Thursday. Pure Night Club, 117 Liberty Pole Way. 4547230. 10 p.m. $5 before 11 pm. [ POP/ROCK ] Elvis Bday Bash w/The Lustre Kings. Dinosaur Bar-B-Que, 99 Court St. 9 p.m. Free. Fat City. Sticky Lips BBQ Juke Joint, 830 Jefferson Rd. 2925544. 9:45 p.m. Free. Five Alarm Open Jam. Firehouse Saloon, 814 South Clinton. 319-3832. 9 p.m. Call for info. Ocupanther. Skylark Lounge, 40 South Union St. 270-8106. 9 p.m. Call for info. The Soft Moon w/Majical Cloudz. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 8:30 p.m. $8-$10.

FRIDAY, JANUARY 11 [ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ] Ahura Mazda. Boulder Coffee Co. - Alexander St., 100 Alexander St. 454-7140. 8 p.m. Call for info. CCE Session Second Friday. McGraw’s Irish Pub, 146 W Commercial St. 348-9091. 5 p.m. Free. Jim Lane. 58 Main, 58 N. Main St. 585-637-2383. 8 p.m. Free Jim Lane. Murph’s Irondequoit Pub, 705 Titus Ave. 342-6780. 8 p.m. Free. Mansfield Ave w/Earthtones. Johnny’s Irish Pub, 1382 Culver Rd. 224-0990. 5 p.m. Free. Ralph Louis. Rochester Plaza Hotel, 70 State St. 546-3450. 6 p.m. Free. [ BLUES ] Deborah Magone. Sticky Lips BBQ Juke Joint, 830 Jefferson Rd. 292-5544. 8:30 p.m. $5. Natalie B Band. Dinosaur Bar-BQue, 99 Court St. 10 p.m. Free. [ CLASSICAL ] RPO ft. Chris Botti. Kodak Hall at Eastman Theater, 60 Gibbs St. 8 p.m. Jeff Tyzik, conductor. Chris Botti, trumpet. $25-$175. [ DJ/ELECTRONIC ] Bang Fridays. ONE Nightclub and Lounge, 1 Ryan Alley. 5461010. Call for info. Call for info.

ALTERNATIVE | THE SOFT MOON/MAJICAL CLOUDZ

I’m going to tell you it’s alternative up there, but people, what we have ourselves here is some industrial/New Wave mix in the finest, darkest veins. While The Soft Moon comes from the Bay Area, the band’s music is clearly dragged screaming out from the depths of a crevasse found under a rock. It even has a song about spiders. It very much fits in with a night skulking, putting your eyeliner on and lacing up your corset. It’s music to sway eerily to, but seems to mostly linger on instrumentals that can make you fall out of time and space. Majical Cloudz opens up this portal with a smooth mix of keyboard-based electronica. It’s so smooth you might even be able to let the band woo your date for you, with surprisingly subtle touches that keep you coming back for more. After the bands, the Shakedown DJs will be there to rocket you back to reality with some snappy beats. The Soft Moon and Majical Cloudz play Thursday, January 10, 8:30 p.m. at the Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. $8-$10. 454-2966, bugjar.com. — BY SUZAN PERO Chill Out Fridays Happy Hour. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. 5:30 p.m. Free. DJ Bac Spin. Plush, 151 St. Paul St. 232-5650. 8 p.m. Call for info. DJ Blake. 140 Alex Bar & Grill, 140 Alexander St. 585-2561000. 10 p.m. Call for info. DJ Cedric. Vertex Nightclub, 169 North Chestnut St. 2325498. 10 p.m. $3-$8. DJ Energon. Vertex Nightclub, 169 North Chestnut St. 2325498. 10 p.m. $3-$8. Fresh Meat Fridays w/Samantha Vega, DJ Mighty Mic. Tilt Nightclub & Ultralounge, 444 Central Ave. 232-8440. 11:15 p.m. & 12:30 a.m. $4-$12. Latino Heat Fridays. Heat Nightclub, 336 East Ave. 8990620. 10 p.m. Call for info. Lube After Dark.. Quaker Steak & Lube, 2205 Buffalo Rd. 6979464. 9:30 p.m. Free. Reggaeton w/DJ Carlos. La Copa Ultra Lounge, 235 W. Ridge Rd. 254-1050. 10 p.m. Free. Sexy Fridays w/DJ Wizz. Pure Night Club, 117 Liberty Pole Way. 454-7230. 10 p.m. Call for info.

Sofrito. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 8:30 p.m. Free. Ted Nicolosi and Shared Genes. The Glengarry Inn @ Eagle Vale, 4400 Fairport 9 Mile Point Rd. 598-3820. 7 p.m. Free. [ KARAOKE ] Karaoke at Pineapple Jack’s. Pineapple Jack’s, 485 Spencerport Rd. 247-5225. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke w/Cody. Nashvilles, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. 3343030. 5 p.m. Free. Karaoke at Flaherty’s Webster. Flaherty’s Webster, 1200 Bay Rd. 671-0816. 9 p.m. Call for info. Karaoke by Dan & Sherri. Barnard Restaurant & Party House, 360 Maiden Ln. 585663-1250. 8 p.m. Free. Karaoke w/Krazy George. Scotland Yard Pub, 187 Saint Paul St. 730-5030. 10 p.m. Call for info. Karaoke w/Summer Bob. Shorts Bar & Grill, 35 N. Main St. 388-0136. 10 p.m. Free. continues on page 16

[ JAZZ ] Bob Sneider. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. 662-5555. 6 p.m. Free. Fred Costello & Roger Eckers Jazz Duo. Charley Brown’s, 1675 Penfield Rd. 385-9202. 7:30 p.m. Free. rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 15


FRIDAY, JANUARY 11 [ HIP-HOP/RAP ] Biscuit Art Opening Ft. Husky. Record Archive, 33 1/3 Rockwood St. 6 p.m. Free. [ POP/ROCK ] Bowla Cheats w/Upstate. Montage Music Hall, 50 Chestnut St. 2321520. 8 p.m. Call for info. Burn Unit, Panacea. Pineapple Jack’s, 485 Spencerport Rd. 247-5225. 9:30 p.m. Call for info. The Clockmen, Why the Wires. Monty’s Krown, 875 Monroe Ave. 271-7050. 10 p.m. $3-$5. Experimental Sandwich. Jukebox, 5435 W. Ridge Rd. 352-4505. 9 p.m. Call for info. Family Funktion and the Sitar Jams w/Craig Snyder Fusion Quartet. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. 9 p.m. $3-$5. Local Compilation Release: Attic Abasement, Autoverse, Veluxe, Kitty Snowpants, Autoverse, Routine Involvements, Gifted Children, Cavalcade, and White Woods. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 8 p.m. Call for info. Moon Zombies, The Moho Collective. Tala Vera, 155 State St. 546-3845. 8 p.m. $5. Red Letter Statement. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N. Water Street. 325-5600. 6:30 p.m. $10-$12. Taran. Nashvilles, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. 334-3030. 9 p.m. Call for info.

SATURDAY, JANUARY 12 [ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ] Ache. Tapas 177 Lounge, 177 Saint Paul St. 262-2090. 11 p.m. Free. Bethesda. Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. Call for info.

Cu-Cu ft. RJ. SPoT Coffee, 200 East Ave. 585-613-4600. 7 p.m. Free. Crossmolina. McGraw’s Irish Pub, 146 W Commercial St. 348-9091. 7 p.m. Free. Father John Misty. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N. Water Street. 325-5600. 8 p.m. $15-$17. James Oddy. Boulder Coffee Co. - Alexander St., 100 Alexander St. 454-7140. 8 p.m. Free. Warehouse. Flaherty’s Webster, 1200 Bay Rd. 671-0816. Call for info. [ BLUES ] John Cole Blues Band. Sticky Lips BBQ Juke Joint, 830 Jefferson Rd. 292-5544. 9 p.m. Free. Phil Petroff & Natural Fact. Dinosaur Bar-B-Que, 99 Court St. 10 p.m. Free. [ CLASSICAL ] RPO ft. Chris Botti. Kodak Hall at Eastman Theater, 60 Gibbs St. 8 p.m. Jeff Tyzik, conductor. Chris Botti, trumpet. $25-$175. [ COUNTRY ] Custom Taylor Band. Nashvilles, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. 3343030. 9 p.m. Call for info. Wendell Ferguson. Greece Baptist Church, 1230 Long Pond Rd. 225-6160. 8 p.m. $17-$20. [ DJ/ELECTRONIC ] DJ Big Reg. Plush, 151 St. Paul St. 232-5650. 10 p.m. Call for info. DJ Darkwave. Vertex Nightclub, 169 North Chestnut St. 2325498. 10 p.m. $3-$8. DJ Trancesend. Decibel Lounge., 45 Euclid St. 754-4645. 10 p.m. $5. La Selva. Tilt Nightclub & Ultralounge, 444 Central Ave. 232-8440. 10 p.m. Call for info.

ROCK | HOMEGROWN II

POP/ROCK | MIDGE URE

It’s easy to bitch and moan about this town, especially this time of year. But rock ’n’ roll isn’t part of the problem; it’s the solution. Lovin’ Cup’s Homegrown II event celebrates all things Rochester: local beer, local vendors, and especially home-bred music. There will be something for just about everybody. You’ve got Celtic punk enthusiasm with The Sisters Of Murphy; Southern blues boogie a la the Allmans with The Filthy Brothers Blues Band; jam with a seriously sinister lyricism with Friday in America; monster instrumental gods The Moho Collective (pictured); balls-to-the-wall rock ’n’ roll with Teagan and the Tweeds; big, beautiful jam rock with The Niche; and the deep soul groove of Audio Influx. All that’s missing is you…

Midge Ure’s eight-year tenure as lead singer of Ultravox made the Glasgow-born singer a New Wave darling for anyone old enough to remember synth-pop classics “Vienna” and “Reap The Wild Wind.” But it’s Ure’s contribution toward Band Aid — he and Bob Geldof co-wrote “Do They Know It’s Christmas?” and formed the project that raised money for Ethiopian famine relief during the mid-1980’s — that has cemented him among the rock ‘n’ roll saints. Midge Ure is cool like that, and his illustrious career continues to inspire romantic ideals and endless possibilities.

Homegrown II takes place Saturday, January 12, noon-2 a.m. at Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point. $10-$15. lovincup.com. — BY FRANK DE BLASE Latino Saturdays w/DJ Bobby Base. Pure Night Club, 117 Liberty Pole Way. 454-7230. 10 p.m. Call for info. [ JAZZ ] Andy Calabrese Trio. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. 6625555. 6 p.m. Free.

Annie Wells. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 8:30 p.m. Free. Fred Costello & Roger Eckers Jazz Duo. Charley Brown’s, 1675 Penfield Rd. 385-9202. 7:30 p.m. Free. Ted Nicolosi and Shared Genes. Roncones Italian Restaurant, 232 Lyell Ave. 458-3090. 6 p.m. Free.

Ure performs Sunday, January 13, 8 p.m. at Water Street Music Hall, 204 N Water St. $20. waterstreetmusic.com. — BY ROMAN DIVEZUR [ HIP-HOP/RAP ] Young Jeezy. Main Street Armory, 900 E. Main St. 232-3221. 8 p.m. Girls 18+, Guys 21+. $35-$60. [ POP/ROCK ] Dark Charley & Friends. Monty’s Krown, 875 Monroe Ave. 2717050. 10 p.m. $3-$5. Exposed Festival’s WinTour 2013. California Brew Haus, 402 Ridge Rd. West. 621-1480. 6 p.m. $10-$12.

Fire Red, Solstice Dream, Until Silence. Tala Vera, 155 State St. 546-3845. 9 p.m. $5. Haewa. The Firehouse Saloon, 814 South Clinton. 402-9802. 9 p.m. Call for info. Homegrown II. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. noon. $10-$15. Loud & Proud. Pineapple Jack’s, 485 Spencerport Rd. 247-5225. 10 p.m. Call for info.

A Clinical Research Study for COPD

Are you a current or former smoker with COPD? A local research study is offering no-cost study treatment for COPD, emphysema, and chronic bronchitis Compensation may be available for participation. No-cost study-related care.

Consider joining a study for COPD. Take the first step. See if you qualify.

Contact AAIR Research Center at: (585) 442-1980 or Email: research@aair.info AAIR Research Center

300 Meridian Centre Suite 305, Rochester NY 14618

www.aairresearch.com 16 CITY JANUARY 9-15, 2013


SUNDAY, JANUARY 13 [ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ] Celtic Music Sundays. Temple Bar and Grille, 109 East Ave. 2326000. 7 p.m. Free.

Jamaican R E S TA U R A N T & C AT E R I N G

Now Open 7 Days!

ROCHESTER’S BEST BAR FOR BEER Voted by CITY News Readers 2008-2012! & BeerAdvocate.com 381 Gregory St. 14620 (585) 473-0503 • Tapandmallet.com

[ HIP-HOP/RAP ] ReeceQ. Dubland Underground, 315 Alexander St. 232-7550. 10 p.m. 21+. $5. [ POP/ROCK ] Midge Ure w/Right The Stars. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N. Water Street. 325-5600. 8 p.m. $20.

MONDAY, JANUARY 14

[ DJ/ELECTRONIC ] Manic Mondays Dance Night. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 11:30 p.m. Free. Manic Mondays Retro Dance Night: Dr. Hamburger. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. 21+ free, $10 unders.

TUESDAY, JANUARY 15

133 Gregory St. • 585.473.3663 Eatatpeppapot.com

@tapandmallet

[ CLASSICAL ] Christmas Echoes ft. The Amadeus Chorale. Chapel Oaks, St. Ann’s Community, 1550 Portland Ave. 2 p.m. Free, donations welcomed. William Warfield - A Legacy of Music Benefit Concert. Kilbourn Hall, 26 Gibbs St. 4 p.m. $10-$15.

[ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ] Lovin’ Cup Idol Auditions. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 2929940. 8 p.m. Call for info.

Join us for Marley Monday Reggae music, games, vegetarian menu

271-4930

389 Gregory St. Rochester www.tangocafedance.com

Ballroom - Swing – Salsa Casino Rueda – Argentine Tango and more!

Learn. Dance. Have Fun.

SOUTH WEDGE area businesses & restaurants

Mikaela Davis w/Right Turn Racer, The Michael Vadala Trio. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. Limited entry for unders. $6-$8. Mr. Mustard. Johnny’s Irish Pub, 1382 Culver Rd. 224-0990. 8 p.m. Free. The Surge. Captain Jack’s Goodtime Tavern, 8505 Greig St. 315-483-9570. 9 p.m. Call for info. Yards Experimental/Continental Breakfasts Closing Show feat. CJ Boyd, NASA Sent Wolves, and Hnossa. The Yards, 50-52 Public Market. 7:30 p.m. $5 suggested donation.

[ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ] Andy Conly. Boulder Coffee Co. Alexander St., 100 Alexander St. 454-7140. 8 p.m. Free. Johnny Bauer. The Cottage Hotel, 1390 Pittsford Mendon Rd. 6241390. 7 p.m. Call for info. [ BLUES ] Bluesday Tuesday Blues Jam. P.I.’s Lounge, 495 West Ave. 8 p.m. Call for info.

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 17


Art the simplest of gestures. Also included in the show are detail shots, taken in Chicago and Rome, of graffiti and post-industrial decay. They showcase remnant textures on the cities’ surfaces that silently support the personality of places; ubiquitous minutiae that is rarely in the forefront of our focus. Arnold Newman’s portraits of hot-at-thetime celebrities or aging people of note have a tender tone to them, and his exploration of “environmental portraiture” made use of the sitter’s personal surroundings and belongings to tell a more intimate story. A wizened subject in “Bravo Stravinsky” is seated at a desk studying sheet music and dwarfed by the large checkerfloored room, his glasses and cane resting on the desk top next to him. Boxer Sugar Ray Robinson sits before a desk with many photos on a mantle behind him while an elderly Eleanor Roosevelt stands behind a mountain of papers and before a wall filled with other images. Jean Cocteau is surrounded by stacks of papers and drawings, the window behind him open to a Paris street.

An image of dissent by Benedict J. Fernandez, included in the “60 From the 60’s” exhibition, currently up at George Eastman House. PHOTO PROVIDED

A decade in review “60 From the 60’s” THROUGH JANUARY 27 GEORGE EASTMAN HOUSE, 900 EAST AVE. 271-3361, EASTMANHOUSE.ORG TUESDAY-SATURDAY, 10A.M.-5 P.M., SUNDAY 11 A.M.-5 P.M. | $5-$12 [ REVIEW ] BY REBECCA RAFFERTY

Anyone who lived through the 1960’s remembers the period as one marked with tumult, conflict, and social revolution; a time of youth breaking out of the constricting 1950’s ideals and trying to reshape their world. For many who were born after this time, the 1960’s as a decade have become a thing of fascination, a period rife with changes we take for granted, and before which it is difficult to imagine living in such an alien American society. The current exhibit at George Eastman House features 60 prints from the 1960’s by 10 significant photographers from that era, including Harry Callahan, Benedict J. Fernandez, Hollis Frampton, Betty Hahn, Robert Heinecken, Mary Ellen Mark, Roger Mertin, Arnold Newman, Aaron Siskind, and Garry Winogrand. Supplemental materials, including books, magazines, and camera 18 CITY JANUARY 9-15, 2013

models used by specific photographers, are also included in the show. Robert Heinecken’s work is the first viewers encounter upon entering the Brackett-Clark Gallery. Because of his unique way of working, and the fact that he seldom used a camera, it is arguable that Heinecken was less of a photographer and more of a collage artist. A series of photolithograph prints from his “Are You Rea?” portfolio explores the feminine form amid themes of eroticism and violence, while appropriating images sourced from the massmedia magazine medium. Heinecken experimented with layering transparencies of several juxtaposed images and negatives to create an often suggestive, simmering tension, and tempt the viewer to spend some time visually sorting out the layered components. This exhibit also includes his “Figure Interiors (Mushrooms),” which features a lady-shaped silhouette with a mycological filling. Mary Ellen Marks’ compelling images of

people on the street include the self-possessed youngster in “Girl in Trabzon, Turkey” and “The Man Who Won the Moustache Contest, Istanbul, Turkey,” featuring a character with a mighty mouth brow with ends twisted into twin exclamation points. Marks’ black-and-

white focus tends toward the gritty aspects of life, whether showcasing poverty or the underbelly of international city scenes, and she compassionately captures both the vulnerability and the dignity in her subjects’ direct gazes. An untitled image features an emaciated doll of a woman washing at a sink in a broken-down bathroom, dollars poking from her bikini top, her face and chest smeared with what might or might not be paint. “Heroin Addict Behind a Door, London,” from the series “London Junkies,” features a young man with a far-off expression and a needle in his arm, medicine deployed. In a different shot, two young boys — faces twisted in the uncertainty of indoctrinated patriotism — hold an American flag that half shields their father’s face in “Father and Sons with Flag, Loyalty Day Parade, New York City,” from Marks’ “Pro-Vietnam Demonstration” series. Aaron Siskind’s work in this show is more

playful, with three images from his “Terrors and Pleasures of Levitation” series, in which three men with their backs to the viewer have been shot from below in various stages of rising and falling against a solid white background, emphasizing their forms and nearly abstract shapes and lending a dreamlike quality to

Coming from a fine arts and design background rather than photojournalism or portraiture, Betty Hahn’s image speak to the haziness of memory. The artist experimented with historic processes, injecting a nostalgic tone into her work. “My Sisters — Negative and Positive” is one of Hahn’s gum bichromates on paper, with overlapping images of young girls on a porch in green-hued negative and on a car hood in blue-hued positive. In “D.M. & A.,” a man, his shadow, and his dog are captured in a park near some woods as anonymously as the title. Before moving on to experimental filmmaking, Hollis Frampton created images that ranged from portraits of artists in their cluttered or clean industrial spaces to abstract snapshots in his “Junk & Rubble” and “Word Picture” series, many of which have a humorous or absurd tone to them. From this latter category is “No,” which is a simple image of the word with a slash mark through it. The social unrest of the 60’s was documented in Benedict J. Fernandez’s stark black and white work. Fernandez captured heavy emotion and strength, got to know and photographed subjects on both sides of various conflicts, and collected the images in books such as “In Opposition” and “Images of American Dissent in the Sixties.” “Pentagon Demonstration, Washington, D.C.” shows a crowd of military men, their young faces belying a range of emotions, guns pointed directly at the camera. In another image, a group of dissenters are frozen in time, yelling, clapping, and flashing peace signs behind a police barrier. Fernandez’s knack for including all sides of experience is shown off in “Riots, Newark New Jersey,” in which a man at a stand sits behind glass, while the reflection from the street shows buildings and military men passing by. Bitter faces of protestors in one image contrast with Dr.


Art Exhibits

Martin Luther King Jr.’s calm resolve in another, captured directly head-on as he marched at the United Nations Building in 1967. And a comically covered-in-snow Allen Ginsberg stands huddled outside wearing a sign that reads “Pot is Fun.” Harry Callahan traveled extensively to

photograph his three main themes of portraits, architecture, and landscape in unfamiliar places. His portraits of women on the streets of Rome and Chicago, wearing mixed patterns and suits, are strangers whose beauty and tastes were immortalized by a stranger. Oddly striking are his simple images of divided-up land plots in growing suburbia. “166 Providence” is a shot between two houses, featuring a ridiculous mash-up of tiny fences bordering tiny properties, making plain the absurdity of staking untrusting claims on little yards and thereby rendering them nearly useless. Painter and photographer Ed Ruscha’s artist books further discuss this encroachment of development across the land, documenting continuous stretches of streets or dozens of examples of a particular subject neatly within accordion-folded folios entitled “Twentysix Gasoline Stations,” “Thirtyfour Parking Lots,” or “Some Los Angeles Apartments.” Every building on the Sunset Strip is displayed, unfolded, ringing the pedestal that holds the other closed books, and wryly pointing to a certain bleakness in city life.

Prolific street photographer Gary Winogrand’s

work is enigmatic and peeks into private lives, but doesn’t quite gain us access to those worlds. In New York City, he captured women talking on the street with ultra-serious expressions. In Los Angeles, Winogrand’s viewfinder reached over a disaffected female car passenger to focus on the driver, a man with a broken and bandaged nose. In his photo from Cape Kennedy, we are treated to the scene of a crowd peering high above the picture plane, only puffs of smoke visible. There is a strong sense of things about to happen, or heavy aftermath within these images. But like any true glimpse at others, there is little explanation of the story lines. Roger Mertin’s straightforward images range from women in adverts on the streets of Rochester and Corning, to a dollhouse in Chicago separated from a silhouetted line of real houses by a short curtain. In a nearby case, viewers get a teasing look at “Plastic Love Dream: An Exhibition of Photographs,” Mertin’s series of black-and-white photographs “that show a fantastical world of naked female bodies in stasis,” per the exhibition information. The work includes dark images of the bright bodies of two models in woods and fields, anonymous and suggestive, as if offered by nature and stumbled upon. The work is accompanied by an essay by Robert Sobieszek on Mertin’s intensions to explore the male’s vision of the female nude’s relationship to the erotic.

[ OPENING ] “Chronopiscus: Time and the Fish” by Ren Vasiliev. Jan. 10-Feb. 1. Wood Library, 134 North Main St. Through Feb 1. Reception Jan 10, 5-8 p.m. 394-1381. woodlibrary.org. The 8th Annual Studio II Exhibit. Jan. 11-Feb. 22. Pat Rini Rohrer Gallery, 71 S Main St Through Feb 22. Reception Jan 11, 6-8 p.m 394-0030. prrgallery.com. Alphabet Soup: Student Show. Jan. 11-31. Joe Brown Gallery in the Printing & Book Arts Center, 713 Monroe Ave. Letterpress Printed Type Specimens. Through Jan 31. Reception Jan 11, 6:30-9:30 p.m 2441730. geneseearts.org. Art by Biscuit. Fri., Jan. 11, 6 p.m. Record Archive, 33 1/3 Rockwood St. Music by Husky. recordarchive.com. Ten-Nineteen: Return to Station. Jan. 11-Feb. 10. The Firehouse Gallery at Genesee Pottery, 713 Monroe Avenue A 40 year retrospective exhibition featuring the work of ceramic artists, teachers, and students associated with the Genesee Pottery throughout its history 244-1730. geneseearts.org. “Tactile Art: The Warmth and Beauty of Fiber.” Jan. 14Feb. 14. I-Square Visions, 693 Titus Ave. Through Feb 14. Reception Jan 14, 7-9 p.m. Ten Artists’ work from the Weavers Guild of Rochester. Trunk sales Saturdays through end of show, 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Artists’ talk Jan 23, 7-9 p.m zannebrummer@gmail.com. [ CONTINUING ] AAUW Art Forum, 494 East Ave Off the Wall VII Members Exhibit. MondaysFridays, 10 a.m.-2 p.m Continues through Apr 19 by appointment only. Reception Dec 16 2-4 p.m 244-9892. Arts & Cultural Council, 277 N. Goodman St Four Artists: Hanlon – Kettavong – Packard – Sellers. Mondays-Fridays Through Jan 25. Mon–Fri 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Reception Jan 10 6 p.m 473-4000. artsrochester.org. Art/Music Library Gallery, University of Rochester River Campus Phillia Yi. Through Jan. 18. Through Jan 18. rochester.edu. Art and Vintage on Main, 101 Main St. “Lost Infinity” the works of Brett Maurer and Matthew Tully Dugan. ongoing. artandvintageonmain.com. Axom Gallery, 176 Anderson Ave., 2nd floor “Kurt Moyer: New Arcadia,” A Solo Exhibition of Paintings. Wednesdays-Saturdays, 12-5 p.m Through Jan 12 2326030 x23. axomgallery.com.

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continues on page 20 rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 19


ART | NEW OPENINGS Not every art opening takes place on First Friday, which is good, because who can see 20 shows in one night and appreciate what they saw? The following spaces will host receptions for new shows on Friday, January 11. Admission is free unless otherwise noted. For more art events taking place this week, visit rochestercitynewspaper.com and search our calendar. The Firehouse Gallery at Genesee Center for the Arts and Education (713 Monroe Ave.) will host “Ten-Nineteen: Return to Station,” (pictured) a 40-year retrospective exhibition featuring the work of ceramic artists, teachers, and students who have been associated with Genesee Pottery throughout its history. The show will be held through February 1, with a reception on January 11, 6-9 p.m. For more info, call 244-1730, or visit geneseearts.org. Also opening at the Genesee Center, in the Joe Brown Gallery in the Printing & Book Arts Center, is “Alphabet Soup: Student Show,” an exhibit of a variety of letterpressprinted type specimens. The show opens January 11, 6:30-9:30 p.m., and continues through January 31. For more information, call 244-1730, or visit geneseearts.org. Axom Gallery (176 Anderson Ave., 2nd floor) will host a “Blueprint” Benefit Event for Foodlink on January 11, 5-8 p.m. Artists and donors have contributed items that incorporate the color blue within the design, and local businesses have donated gift certificates for an auction to benefit Foodlink. The gallery will also donate 10 percent of the sale of any paintings in the current show by artist Kurt Moyer sold that evening. Tickets are $10-$20. For more information, call 232-6030 x 22 or visit axomgallery.com. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY

Art Exhibits Black Radish Studio, 274 N. Goodman “Being Close to Far Away,” new work by Misha Tulek. Through Jan. 31. Through Jan 31. Mon-Fri 10-6 p.m., Sat 12-6 p.m. Reception Jan 4, 6-10 p.m 413-1278. blackradishstudio.com. Books Etc., 78 W. Main St. “Catching Dreams.” Through Jan. 13. Featuring the work of Bonnie Evangelista, Becky Harris and Chris Horn Free. 474-4116. books_etc@ yahoo.com. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. THE LOBBY PRESENTS. Roc The Casbah: A Tribute to the Clash. Through Jan. 31, 8 p.m.-2 a.m. Vintage Propaganda from the Collection of Jim Malley (Mercury Posters) and Clayton Cowles illustrations of The Clash $7 opening night only. Community Darkroom Gallery, 713 Monroe Ave.

“Kaleidoscope.” Through March 2. 271-5920. Equal=Grounds, 750 South Ave. “Beautiful Ruins” by Paula Peters Marra. Through Jan. 31. gallery@ equalgrounds.com. George Eastman House, 900 East Ave. “60 from the 60s.” Tuesdays-Sundays Through Jan 27. Tue-Sat 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Sun 11 a.m.5 p.m $5-$12. 271-3361. eastmanhouse.org. Grass Roots Gallery, suite 157, Hungerford Bldg, 1115 E. Main St., Suite 248 “The Boy from Saturn: The Paintings of Sean Madden.” Through Jan. 19. Through Jan 19. Receptions Jan 4, 6-10 p.m. and Jan 5, 8-11 p.m. Live music by Nod. clownvomit.org 8025741. thegrassrootsgallery@ gmail.com. Hirsute Salon and Gallery, 51 Atlantic Ave “If the Shoe Fits,” Artwork by Carmine Monzo.

20 CITY JANUARY 9-15, 2013

Wednesdays-Fridays Through Jan 18. Wed-Fri 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Reception Dec 14, 7-9 p.m Free. 585-244-1111. info@frankiesteinz.com. Image City Photography Gallery, 722 University Ave. “The Magic of Light 2013.” Wednesdays-Sundays Through Jan 20. Wed-Sat 11 a.m.-7 p.m., Sun 12-4 p.m. Reception Fri Jan 4 imagecityphotographygallery. com. International Art Acquisitions, 3300 Monroe Ave. “Palms” by Bonnie Wolsky-Farid. Through Jan. 31. Through Jan 31. Mon-Fri 10 a.m.-9 p.m., Sat 10 a.m.-6 p.m., Sun noon-5 p.m 264-1440. internationalartacquisitions. com. I-Square Visions, 693 Titus Ave. “VOYAGEz” artworks by Zanne Brunner. MondaysSaturdays Through Jan 10. Mon-Thu 10 a.m.-2 p.m., Sat 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Reception Dece 15, 7-9 p.m brunner@ gmail.com. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. “American Roadtrip” by Beth Bailey. Through Feb. 1. Through Feb 1. Reception Jan 6, 5-7 p.m 258-0400. thelittle.org. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. Through Feb 10: “Changing Hands: Art Without Reservation 3” Contemporary Native North American Art. In Lockhart Gallery: “Framing Edo: Masterworks from Hiroshige’s One Hundred Famous Views.” Wednesdays-Sundays Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. Wed-Sun 11 a.m.-5 p.m., Thu until 9 p.m $5-$12. 276-8900. mag. rochester.edu. My Sister’s Gallery, 505 Mt. Hope Ave. “MAPS” by Gianna Stewart. Through Feb. 17. Through Feb 17. Reception Jan 10, 5-7 p.m Free. 546-8400. EpiscopalSeniorLife.org. Nan Miller Gallery, 3450 Winton Place Montreal artist Celine Brossard. Through Jan. 31. Tue-Sat 10 a.m.-5 p.m 292-1430. nanmillergallery.com. New Deal Gallery, 4 Livingston County Campus Expressions of the Civil War. Tuesdays-Saturdays, 5 p.m. In recognition of the 150th Anniversary. Hours: Tue, Wed, Fri 1-4 p.m., Thu 1-7:30 p.m., Sat 11 a.m.-3 p.m. After November 12: Closed Tuesdays. 243-6785. livingstonarts.org. Phillips Fine Art, 248 East Ave. Fourth Annual Collector’s Show and Sale. TuesdaysSaturdays Through Jan 31. Tue-Fri 12-6 p.m., Sat 12-5 p.m., or by appt. Reception Jan 1, 1-3:30 p.m 232-8120. Roc Brewing Co., 56 S. Union St Carla Bartow. ongoing. Opening Fri Oct 19, 7-10 p.m. carlasswanktank. blogspot.com. 794-9798.

rocbrewingco@gmail.com. rocbrewingco.com. Rochester Contemporary Arts Center, 137 East Ave. 22nd Annual Members Exhibition. WednesdaysSundays Through Jan 13. Wed-Sun 1-5 p.m. 461-2222. rochestercontemporary.org. Rush Rhees Library, University of Rochester, River Campus Memorial Art Gallery: 100 Years of Art for the Community. Through Sep. 30. Through Sep 30, 2013. mag. rochester.edu. University Gallery, James R. Booth Hall, RIT, Lomb Memorial Dr Neil Montanus. Mondays-Saturdays Mon-Thu 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Fri-Sat 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Closed Dec 22Jan 6. Reception Dec 13, 5-7 p.m 475-2404. jleugs@ rit.edu. Williams-Insalaco Gallery at FLCC, 3325 Marvin Sands Dr Paintings by Debra Stewart. Through Jan. 18. Through Jan 18. Mon-Thu 8:30 a.m.-9 p.m., Fri 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m., Sat-Sun noon-5 p.m 7851369. flcc.edu. The Yards, 50-52 Public Market “Continental Breakfasts: a three year photographic collaboration.” Tuesdays, Thursdays, Saturdays, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. and Sat., Jan. 12, 6-10 p.m Photos by Lisa Barker and Anna Peters Wehking. Closing Reception Jan 12, 7:30 p.m attheyards@gmail. com. continentalbreakfasts. wordpress.com.

Call for Artwork [ WED., JANUARY 9 ] 6x6x2013. Through April 21. Rochester Contemporary Arts Center, 137 East Ave. 461-2222. rochestercontemporary.org. Call for Art. Through Jan. 26. Visual Studies Workshop, 31 Prince Street Accepting artists/craftspeople to sell their work/services during fiction reading/craft fair sponsored by Cobblestone School. The Feb. 2 (2 - 4 p.m.) event will be held at the Visual Studies Workshop on Prince Street. Past vendors have included henna tattooing, organic soaps and cosmetics, and jewelry. The charge for a booth is $30 (585) 442-8676. bkinh130@ cs.com. vsw.org. The EROG-IN-US show. Through March 29. Submit work to be considered for inclusion in week-long erotic and courtship-themed art shows at Tajze, dates: April 5th, 12th, 19th, and 26th $15 fee. 615-5523. jadedseed.com. Jane Austen Short Story Contest. Through Jan. 31. Submit stories (in print or email) to Wood Library Librarian, Ron Kirsop, rkirsop@pls-net.org by January 31, 2013. Entries

DANCE | ISLAND TOUCH BACHATA Rochester is currently covered in snow, but you can help create a hot little tropical realm on Thursday, January 10, by attending Essence of Rhythm’s Island Touch Bachata Explosion. The event kicks off with a 7-9 p.m. workshop and dancing with the Island Touch team at Rhythm Society Urban Wellness Studios (90 Bittner St.). You’ll learn Dominican style Bachata 7-8 p.m., followed by “Touch” Style Bachata 8-9 p.m. Tickets are $25 in advance or $30 at the door. The evening continues with an Island Touch Bachata Invasion Party at Lovin’ Cup Bistro (300 Park Point Drive), 9 p.m.-1 a.m. DJ El Tiguere Del Mambo will keep the tunes fresh and the audience will enjoy a special performance by Ataca Jorgie y La Alemana. Tickets for this segment are $5 before $11 p.m., or $10 after, and the party is open to ages 18+ with ID. For more information, call 749-6006 or visit rhythm-society.org. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY must include the following information: Name, address, grade, school, phone number, and parent’s name. More info: 394-1381. woodlibrary.org. A Photographer’s Path 16. High Falls Fine Art Gallery, 60 Browns Race. Drop off up to 3 photographic works on Feb 6-10 for March-April show. $20 entry fee 325-2030. centerathighfalls.org. Rochester Movie Makers Mind2Movie 72 Hour Film Competition. Through Jan. 17, 6:30 p.m. The Space, Hungerford Bldg, 1115 E. Main St., Suite 248. rochestermoviemakers.org. Submissions Sought for Geva Theatre’s Annual Young Writers Showcase. Through March 5. Geva Theatre Center, 75 Woodbury Blvd Deadline March 5. 232-1366 x3034. youngwriters@gevatheatre.org. gevatheatre.org.

Comedy

Art Events

[ TUE., JANUARY 15 ] Laugh Riot Underground: Stand-Up Comedy Showcase. 9-11 p.m. Dub Land Underground, 315 Alexander St. Free. laughriotcomedy. com.

[ FRI., JANUARY 11 ] “Blueprint” Benefit Event for Foodlink. 5-8 p.m. Axom Gallery, 176 Anderson Ave., 2nd floor Donate items that incorporate the color blue somewhere in the design. Local businesses are encouraged to donate gift certificates to the auction. AXOM Gallery will be donating 10% of the sale of any paintings by artist Kurt Moyer, sold that evening, which all contain the color blue! Prepurchase tickets for event by Jan 7 $10-$20, register. 2326030 x 22. robin@robinmuto. com. iidany.org/register.

[ WED., JANUARY 9 ] Unleashed! Improv. 7:30 p.m. The Space, Hungerford Bldg, 1115 E. Main St., Suite 248 facebook.com/ unleashedimprov. [ THU., JANUARY 10 ] Goo House at the Yards. 8 p.m. The Yards, 50-52 Public Market Featuring Colin Burgess, Mikey Heller, Jon Schuta, Lucas Gardner, Anna Hall, Dewey Lovett, Vasia Ivanov, Puddles the Cat Comedian, a wizard, Kyle Vorbach, Charlie Wildey, and YOU! Music by Routine Involvements and Garden Fresh Free. attheyards@gmail. com. attheyards.com. Jimmy Shubert. Jan. 10-12. Comedy Club, 2235 Empire Blvd. Thu 7:30 p.m., Fri-Sat 7:30 & 10 p.m $9-$12. 6719080. thecomedyclub.us.

Dance Events [ THU., JANUARY 10 ] Island Touch Bachata Explosion. 7 p.m.-2 a.m. 7-9 p.m. workshop and dancing at Rhythm Society Urban Wellness Studios, 90 Bittner St., $25 in advance, $30 at door. Island Touch Bachata Invasion Party at Lovin’ Cup Bistro, 300 Park Point Dr., 9 p.m.-1 a.m., $5


before $11 p.m., $10 after 18+ with ID. 749-6006. [ SUN., JANUARY 13 ] Old Time Community Square Dance. 6 p.m. Summerville Presbyterian Church, 4845 Saint Paul Blvd. $10 requested, ages 10 and under free. (585) 342-4242. office@ summervillechurch.org. SummervilleChurch.org.

Kids Events [ SAT., JANUARY 12 ] Acorn Adventures. second Saturday of every month, 1011:30 a.m Helmer Nature Center, 154 Pinegrove Ave

Pre-schoolers. $6 per session. 336-3035. westirondequoit. org/helmer.htm. First Aid Basics. 1-3 & 3-5 p.m. Gates Public Library, 902 Elmgrove Rd. Ages 11-18. This course meets requirements for several Boy Scout/Girl Scout badges. Free, register. 247-6446. epictrainings.com. Free Ice Skating Lessons. noon. Manhattan Square Park Ice Rink, 353 court St. Ages 4-12 Free, register. 428-7541. cityofrochester. gov/skating. Make a Fast Friend. 11 a.m.3 p.m. Rochester Museum and Science Center, 657 East

Ave. Learn about greyhounds. Included in admission: $11$13. 271-1880. rmsc.org. Nature Explorers. second Saturday of every month, 12:30-2:30 p.m Helmer Nature Center, 154 Pinegrove Ave Grades 2-4. $7 per session. 336-3035. westirondequoit.org/helmer. htm. [ SUN., JANUARY 13 ] Bebop to Bach Concert Series. second Sunday of every month, 2 p.m The Harley School, 1981 Clover St $5$10, register. 442-1770 x3049. tsmith@harleyschool. org. harleyschool.org.

CITY Newspaper presents

Mind Body Spirit & Workshops

Family Fun: Game Day. 1:30-4:30 p.m. Central Library, Children’s Center, 115 South Ave. Ages 3+ and families. Free. 428-8150. libraryweb.org.

Lectures [ THU., JANUARY 10 ] The 40+ Job Search; Debunking the Myths. 9:30 a.m.-noon. Gates Public Library, 902 Elmgrove Rd. It’s not chronological age that influences hiring; it’s the misperceptions/myths. You cannot change your age, you can change stereotypical perspectives. Presented

by RochesterWorks!. Free, register. 247-6446. “Focus 45” Lunchtime Lecture. 12:15-1 p.m. George Eastman House, 900 East Ave. Todd Gustavson talks about the single-lens reflex camera $3-$6. 2713361. eastmanhouse.org. Protecting Yourself Against Fraud and Identity Theft. 6:30-8:30 p.m. Henrietta Public Library, 455 Calkins Rd Tina Longwell presents critical information on how to protect yourself from fraud and identity theft. Register. 359-7092.

[ SAT., JANUARY 12 ] “Photo Presentation on the Soo Locks, Mackinac Island & other Northern Michigan Places.” 10 a.m.-noon. The Former Custom’s House, Formerly the Tapecon Building) 10 Latta Rd 621-6179. info@ geneseelighthouse.org. geneseelighthouse.org. [ SUN., JANUARY 13 ] My Personal Paris. 2:30 p.m. Penfield Public Library, 1985 Baird Rd. Free. 3408720. penfieldlibrary.org. continues on page 22

A JOURNEY OF AWAKENING A TEN WEEK COURSE IN

PRACTICAL PHILOSOPHY INTERACTIVE, EXPERIENTIAL, and INFORMAL How to be at peace, now? By making peace with the PRESENT MOMENT. The present moment is the field on which the game of life happens. It cannot happen anywhere else.

THE SOLUTION TO YOUR RESOLUTION

– Eckhart Tolle, Philosopher/Author.

Wednesdays, beginning January 16, 2013 From 7-9:30p.m. at the AAUW House, 494 East Ave. Rochester. • Free Parking Tuition: $100, cash or check Mail to: School of Applied Philosophy, P.O. Box 525, Pittsford, NY 14534; or from 6:15-6:45pm on your first night of attendance.

585-288-6430 • www.practical-philosophy.org

SCHOOL OF APPLIED PHILOSOPHY Not for profit. Non Sectarian, Provisional Charter: NYS ED. Dept. Since 1989

Healing for your Body and Mind! BEYOND MASSAGE

Rosen Method Bodywork for relief of physical AND emotional pain such as anxiety and depression, for recovery from a painful past, for re-connecting in your body to your deeper self, for getting "unstuck" and creating the life you want.

Training for CEUs available. Anais Salibian, MA, LMT | (585) 586-1590 awareness-heals.com | innerjourneyarts.com

FREE TRIAL I Have Called You by a New Name OPEN HOUSE Sat., Jan. 12th • 5:30pm-8:30pm

Cha Cha Fox Trot Salsa Swing Tango Waltz 1060 University Ave | 271-6840 Livehappyrochester.com

White Stone Ceremony Receive your personal stone from Jerusalem Jan. 13th, 11:00 a.m.

Unity

Sunday Celebration 11:00 a.m. Music, Meditation and Message Children's Program

Christ Church Unity Church of the Daily Word.

We welcome you!

55 Prince St., Rochester, NY 14607 • www.unityrochester.org • 585-473-0910

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 21


Literary Events

EXHIBIT | 1812-STYLE QUILTS The Webster Museum (18 Lapham Park, Webster) is currently showing an exhibit featuring 26 newly made quilts that are true to 1812 period quilting patterns, fabrics, and colors. Accompanying each quilt are Great Lakes Seaway Trail “storyteller” interpretive cards, which share factual history represented by the quilt, or an imagined tale of a family sending a loved one off to war. The quilts come from the Great Lakes Seaway Trail War of 1812 Traveling Exhibit, which will tour the United States and Canada through 2014. Much of the War of 1812 was fought along a strategic shoreline, now The Great Lakes Seaway Trail, which follows the St. Lawrence River, Lake Ontario, Niagara River, and Lake Erie in New York and Pennsylvania. This exhibit includes 20 American-made “cot-to-coffin” quilts from 11 states and six Canadian-made quilts from three provinces. Among the works in the exhibit is a quilt with blocks hand-dyed with berries, tea, and coffee, and another with more than 5,000 pieces. The exhibit will be open to the public through January 20, on Tuesdays, Thursdays, Saturdays, and Sundays noon-4 p.m., or by appointment. Admission is free, but donations are accepted. For more information or to arrange a tour, call 315-265-3308 or visit webstermuseum.org. For more details on traveling the Great Lakes Seaway Trail byway, visit seawaytrail.com. If you’re a quilter, consider entering your work that showcases a favorite driving destination for the Great Lakes Seaway Trail’s Beauty of the Byways Quilt Show taking place this March. For details, visit seawaytrail.com/quilting. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY

Lectures [ MON., JANUARY 14 ] Monday Lecture Series: “The Anthony Brothers in Kansas.” 12 & 2 p.m. Susan B. Anthony Museum & House, 17 Madison St Noon luncheon and lecture for $25 or 2 p.m. tea and lecture for $15 susanbanthonyhouse.org. Opera Guild Lecture Series: American Opera with Carol Crocca. 7-9 p.m. Brighton Memorial Library, 2300 Elmwood Ave. Free. 784 5300. brightonlibrary.org. Travelogue: Hadrian’s Wall and Northern England. 2-3 p.m. Gates Public Library, 902 Elmgrove Rd. With Ken and Judy Harbison 2476446. [ TUE., JANUARY 15 ] Nicole VanGorder-Pratt on Active Goal Setting. 11:45 a.m.-1:40 p.m. Cerame’s Italian Villa, 3450 Winton Place. $18, RSVP. 690-9047.

Opera Guild Lecture Series: “Donizetti’s Luci Di Lammermoor.” 7:30-9 p.m. Italian American Community Center, 150 Frank Dimino Way Free. 594-8882. operaguildofrochester@ gmail.com. iaccrochester. org. Take Stock in the Market. 6:30-8 p.m. Gates Public Library, 902 Elmgrove Rd. Free, register. 247-6446. Tuesday Topics: Presentation on Geva Theatre Center’s “Next to Normal” with cast. 12:12-12:52 p.m. Central Library, Kate Gleason Auditorium, 115 South Ave. 428-8350. libraryweb.org. [ WED., JANUARY 16 ] Reflecting on Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. 6:30 p.m. Penfield Public Library, 1985 Baird Rd. Anthropology, History, Political Science, and Sociology Free, register. 340-8720.

22 CITY JANUARY 9-15, 2013

[ WED., JANUARY 9 ] Pure Kona Poetry Readings. 7 p.m. Acanthus Café, 337 East Ave. Local poets gather to read their latest works Free. 319-5999. acanthuscafe.com. Reading Jane (and Other Female Authors). 3:30 p.m. Books Etc., 78 W. Main St. 474-4116. books_etc@ yahoo.com. Women Who Love to Read: “Mudbound” By Hillary Jordan. 7 p.m. Lift Bridge Book Shop, 45 Main St 637-2260. liftbridgebooks. com. [ THU., JANUARY 10 ] Annie And Joe’s Eclectic Book Group: “The Scarlet Letter” by Nathaniel Hawthorne. 7 p.m. Lift Bridge Book Shop, 45 Main St Free. 637-2260. liftbridgebooks.com. General meeting on the future of the Greater Rochester Russell Set. 7 p.m. Writers and Books, 740 University Ave $3, free to members. 415-5925. tmadigan@rochester.rr.com. wab.org. [ SAT., JANUARY 12 ] Book Reading: “Adirondack Trail of Gold” by Larry Weill. 2 p.m. Barnes & Noble, Greece, 330 Greece Ridge Center Dr. Free. 227-4020. bn.com. Susan Deer Cloud Poetry Intensive Workshop. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Writers and Books, 740 University Ave $50-$60, register. steveh@ wab.org. wab.org. [ SUN., JANUARY 13 ] Author Signing: “ Heaven in the Orchard” by Ted Auble. 1-3 p.m. Lift Bridge Book Shop, 45 Main St 6372260. liftbridgebooks.com. Book Signing: “Man in the Music: The Creative Life of Michael Jackson” by Joseph Vogel. 2-3 p.m. Central Library, Kate Gleason Auditorium, 115 South Ave. 428-8350. libraryweb.org. Poetry Reading: Stephen Lewvandowski and Bill Pruitt. 4 p.m. Books Etc., 78 W. Main St. 474-4116. books_etc@yahoo.com. [ TUE., JANUARY 15 ] Book Discussion: The Girl Who Fell From the Sky. 1:30-3 p.m. Brighton Memorial Library, 2300 Elmwood Ave. 784-5300. brightonlibrary.org. Readers Theater: “Romeo and Juliet.” 6:30 p.m. Books Etc., 78 W. Main St. 474-4116. books_etc@ yahoo.com.

Recreation [ WED., JANUARY 9 ] Cross-Country Skiing and Snowshoeing. Sundays

Cumming Nature Center, 6472 Gulick Rd. Trails open Wed-Fri 9 a.m.-3:30 p.m., Sat-Sun 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m $3, $10 per family. 3746160. rmsc.org. Open Ice Skating. ongoing. Manhattan Square Park Ice Rink. Daily 12-1:30 p.m., 1:50-3:20 p.m. Adults Only daily 3:40-5:10 p.m., 5:30-7 p.m. (Fri-Sat til 8:50 p.m.). 428-7541. cityofrochster.gov/skating. Senior Snowshoe Sojourn. 9:30-10:30 a.m. Cumming Nature Center, 6472 Gulick Rd. $3, $10 per family. 374-6160. rmsc.org 9:3010:30 a.m. Cumming Nature Center, 6472 Gulick Rd. Easy Pace. $3, $10/ family requested donation, free to members. 374-6160. rmsc.org. Skiing and Snowboarding. Mondays-Sundays Bristol Mountain Resort, 5662 New York 64 Through Mar 10. Mon-Fri 9 a.m.-10 p.m., Sat-Sun 8 a.m.-10 p.m Lift tickets begin at $45. 3746000. fun@bristolmt.com. bristolmountain.com. [ THU., JANUARY 10 ] Kisil Point Trek. 10 a.m. Letchworth State Park, 1 Letchworth State Park Carpool from Silver Lake Outlet Bridge. Bring lunch. $8 parking fee. 493-3625. [ FRI., JANUARY 11 ] Winter Warrior Training Program. Tuesdays, Saturdays Tuesdays at 6 p.m. at Fleet Feet Sports Brighton, 2210 Monroe Ave. Fridays at 6 p.m. at Fleet Feet Sports Ridgeway, 2522 Ridgeway Ave., Saturdays at 8 a.m. (locations change each week). $10. 697-3338. training@ fleetfeetrochester.com. [ SAT., JANUARY 12 ] Guided/Ski Hike at Ellison Park. 10 a.m. Bring crosscountry skis or snowshoes; if there is now snow, a hike will take place. Participants should meet at the north side of the parking lot off of Blossom Road. Look for the hike signs Free, register. 340-8655, option 6. GVHC Hike. 10 a.m. Whiting Road Nature Preserve lot on Whiting Road, moderate/ hilly 5 mile hike. 201-0065. gvhchikes.org. Novice Nature Ski Hike. Sundays, 1 p.m. Letchworth State Park, 1 Letchworth State Park Meet at Trailside Lodge. $8 parking fee. 4933625. Rochester Birding Trip: Lakeshore Plains West. 9 a.m. Meet at Braddock Bay State park on East Manitou Rd. in Greece 730-2553. rochesterbirding.com. Saturday Snowshoeing. 1-3 p.m Helmer Nature Center, 154 Pinegrove Ave No Jan 12 $3-$5, free to children

RECREATION | ELLISON PARK HIKE/CROSS COUNTRY SKI Outdoor exercise is a great way to chase away those winter blues. The Penfield Trails Committee will offer a guided ski/hike at Ellison Park in Penfield on Saturday, January 12. Participants should meet at the north side of the parking lot off Blossom Road at 10 a.m. Bring crosscountry skis or snowshoes for a winter wonderland hike that will follow the mostly flat portions of the park on the north side of Blossom Road. If the shy winter sun chances to embolden and diminish the downy terrain, a hike will take place instead of snowshoeing or skiing. Participation in the hike is free, but participants are asked to pre-register by calling Penfield Recreation at 340-8655, option 6. For more information, email srenner@penfield.org or visit penfield.org. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY under 12. 336-3035. westirondequoit.org/helmer. htm. Sierra Club-Cross Country Ski or Hike. 1-4 p.m. Mendon Ponds Park, Douglas Road Join Val Rice and naturalist, Peter Debes, to learn about what is happening in the world of nature, above and below the snow. Terrain is moderate and the pace easy. Come prepared to hike if the snow is gone or icy. Or just join us at 3:15 at the Pittsford Pub to meet like-minded outdoors folks. Meet at intersection of Canfield and Douglas Roads at the Sierra Club sign 734-4981. Vintage Snowmobile Show. 9 a.m. Tanner Valley Golf Course, 4040 Tanner Road VINTAGE SNOWMOBILE SHOW January 12, 2013 9 AM – 4 PM. Chicken BBQ 11 AM – Gone, raffle. Hosted by Toad Hollow Trail Riders Snowmobile Club @ Tanner Valley Golf Course, 4040 Tanner Road, Syracuse. Registration: one sled $5.00; two or more sleds $10.00 Vendor Fee $10.00 315-415-5025. see above. 315-415-5025. [ SUN., JANUARY 13 ] Family Nature Walk: Three Sisters Waterfalls. 10 a.m. Letchworth State Park, 1 Letchworth State Park Meet at Castile Entrance Gate. $8 parking fee. 493-3625. GVHC Hike. 1 p.m. Durand Golf Course Lot, moderate 5 mile hike. 247-9237. gvhchikes.org. Intermediate Nature Ski Hike. 2:30 p.m. Letchworth State Park, 1 Letchworth

State Park Meet at Trailside Lodge. $8 parking fee. 4933625. [ WED., JANUARY 16 ] Bear Hollow Trail Trek. 10 a.m. Letchworth State Park, 1 Letchworth State Park Bring a lunch. $8 parking fee. 493-3625. Snow Cheap Trail Races. Every other Wednesday, 6:30 p.m Cobbs Hill Park, 100 Norris Drive $10 per race. fleetfeetrochester.com.

Special Events [ WED., JANUARY 9 ] Geeks Who Drink Pub Quiz. 8 p.m. Scotland Yard Pub, 187 Saint Paul St Free. 7305030. scotlandyardpub.com. Get Totally Plugged In. 5:30 p.m. Strathallan, 550 East Ave Join members of the American Marketing Association (AMA) of Rochester for a night of networking. Free for AMA members, $10 for nonmembers. 461-5010. amarochester.org. Highland Park Winter Farmers Market. 3 p.m Cornell Cooperative Extension of Monroe County, 249 Highland Ave Free. highlandwintermarket.com. Nerd Nite 5. 7 p.m. Veritas Wine Bar, 217 Alexander St. nerdnite.com. Screening and discussion of the documentary “Detroit’s Native Son” with Yusef Shakur. 7 p.m. Spiritus Christi Church, 121 North Fitzhugh St. 325-5260. Myrabrown@ frontier.com. youtube.com/ watch?v=tphaRNcaqU8.


[ THU., JANUARY 10 ] Abundance Theory. 6:30 p.m. Books Etc., 78 W. Main St. Participants study how to practice positive thinking. 474-4116. books_etc@ yahoo.com. “Bread Time Stories” with Chet Fery. 7:30 p.m. Morgan-Manning House, 151 Main St Each person will go home with a loaf of bread he made that day 637-3645. Rochester Board of Education/Community Conversation. 6:30 p.m. Central Office Building, Central Office Building, 131 West Broad St Jan 12: School Choice Expo at the Riverside Convention Center; Jan 16: Coffee & Conversation with the Superintendent. More to follow. rcsdk12.org. [ FRI., JANUARY 11 ] Film: “Slavery by Another Name.” 7 p.m. Baobab Cultural Center, 728 University Ave. A 90-minute documentary that challenges one of Americans’ most cherished assumptions: the belief that slavery in this country ended with the Emancipation Proclamation. Free, RSVP. 563-2145. thebaobab.org. Monthly General Meeting. 6:30 p.m. Italian American Sport Club, 1250 Buffalo Rd., Gates. Appetizers, meeting, dinner $20, RSVP. 464-9160. iascofrochester. com. [ SAT., JANUARY 12 ] 3rd Annual Chili Tasting. Jan. 12-13, 11 a.m.5 p.m. JD Wine Cellars, 1339 Eddy Rd The chili tasting features 2 gourmet chili dishes prepared and expertly paired with JD Wine Cellars wines or nonalcoholic juices. Guests can select an additional wine to sample while visiting the tasting room this weekend $10. 3159864202. winery@longacrefarms.com. jdwinecellars.com. Big Sale. 9 a.m.-2 p.m. 127 Railroad St. Art, books, clothes, handmade soap, zines, more facebook.com/ smugtownmushrooms. Jammin’ at the J Annual Gala. 7 p.m. JCC Rochester, 1200 Edgewood Ave. The event benefits the JCC’s programs for children and seniors. 461-2000 x1210. jccrochester.org. Rochester Birding Association Annual Dinner. 6 p.m. Summerville Presbyterian Church, 4845 St. Paul Blvd. Bring a dish to share. $5 donation, RSVP. 248-8959. blmakd@ frontiernet.net. School Choice Expo. 9 a.m.3 p.m. Rochester Riverside Convention Center, 123 E Main St rcsdk12.org.

Voice of the Citizen Series: Seeking Solutions to Violence. 6-8 p.m. Carter Street Community Center, 500 Carter St 428-7890. cityofrochester.gov.

Sports [ WED., JANUARY 9 ] Rochester Americans v. Syracuse Crunch. 7:05 p.m. Blue Cross Arena, One War Memorial Square $15-$20. 800-745-3000. ticketmaster.com.

THEATER | “12 ANGRY MEN” Sure, getting that notice in the mail to serve as a juror is annoying and inconvenient, but many of us don’t take the fact that another person’s fate is being placed in our hands seriously enough. Reginald Rose’s 1954 teleplay, “12 Angry Men,” is perhaps best known in its 1957 film manifestation of the same name, starring Henry Fonda. The story immerses viewers in a drama that takes place when a teenager stands trial for the fatal stabbing of his father. What seems like an openand-shut case becomes complicated when one of the jurors attempts to open the others’ eyes to a different interpretation of the facts. This still-relevant, tense play asks audiences to reconsider the American justice system with regards to race equity and the meaning of our civic responsibility as jurors. John Borek presents a staging of “12 Angry Men” at the MuCCC (142 Atlantic Ave.), directed by Michael Arve, and starring Roger Gans in Henry Fonda’s role. The show kicks off Thursday, January 10, and continues through January 19. Tickets are $10 in advance for all, $20 general admission at the door, or $15 for seniors and students at the door. To reserve you ticket, call 234-1254, or visit muccc.org for more info. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY [ SUN., JANUARY 13 ] Bridal Expo. 12-4 p.m. Rochester Riverside Convention Center, 123 E Main St Free tickets at website. RochestersLargestBridalShows.com. “B.Y.O.T” (Bring Your Own Train). 11 a.m.-4 p.m New York Museum of Transportation, 6393 E. River Rd Bring your HOgauge train and operate it on the museum’s huge layout $2-$3. 533-1113. nymtmuseum.org. Gothic Cathedral Tour. 2 p.m. St. Michael’s Church, 869 N. Clinton Ave Donations accepted. 3254041. sfxcrochester.org. Long Season Winter Farmers’ Market. 1 p.m. Brookside Center, 220 Idlewood Road Indoor farmers’ market. 2698918. The Power of Empowerment. Jan. 13, 11:30 a.m. Inn on the Lake, 770 South Main St. Brunch will be served $35 Individual $30 Students $25 Seniors (55+). (585) 545-9270. [ MON., JANUARY 14 ] Film: “Shooting Beauty.” 6 & 8 p.m. Little Theatre, 240 East Ave. “Dialogue on Disability” series with WXXI and Al Sigl. The 6 p.m.

screening will be followed by a discussion with the film’s producer Courtney Bent who will join the audience via Skype to talk about her film Free. wxxi.org/dod. [ TUE., JANUARY 15 ] Community Arts Performance Night. 5:30-8 p.m. School #12, 999 South Ave. To benefit Hurricane Sandy relief efforts in NYC. Featuring Borinquen Dance, Frederick Douglass Club Orators, HIP Poetry, Rhythm Factory, Crazy Pitches, Rumberos Cubanos, Classical Friends, Panameños, more $5 suggested dontaion. falconworks.com. East Side Winter Market. 3-6 p.m 2555 Baird Rd, Penfield. 348-9022. mbartolotta001@ rochester.rr.com. Mineral Monthly Meeting. 7-9 p.m. Brighton Town Hall, 2300 Elmwood Ave Visitors are welcome. The speaker will be Dr. Tony Vodacek from RIT. The topic will be “ Remote Sensing of Geohazards in the African Rift Valley 288-5683. mineralvp@rasny.org. rasny. org/mineral. Rochester Food Not Bombs Dance Party Benefit. 9 p.m. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. $3-$5. tinyurl.com/ TurntUpBugJarjan15.

[ FRI., JANUARY 11 ] Rochester Americans v. Hamilton Bulldogs. 7:05 p.m. Blue Cross Arena, One War Memorial Square $15-$20. 800-745-3000. ticketmaster.com.

Theater “12 Angry Men.” MuCCC, 142 Atlantic Ave Through Jan 19. Thu-Sat 7:30 p.m., Sun 2 p.m. $5-$12. 2341254. muccc.org. “Ages Ago” and “Happy Arcadia.” Christ the Good Shepherd Church, 1000 N Winton Rd Through Jan 20. Off-Monroe Players. Two one-act plays by Gilbert & Sullivan. Thu-Sat 8 p.m., Sun 2 p.m. Bring a canned or dry goods donation. Free, donations accepted. 2325570. off-monroeplayers.org. “Motherhood: The Musical.” Downstairs Cabaret at Winton Place, 3450 Winton Place Thu 7 p.m., Fri 8 p.m., Sat 5 & 8:30 p.m., Sun 3 p.m $26-$39. 3254370. downstairscabaret. com. “Next to Normal.” Through Jan. 16. Geva Theatre Center, 75 Woodbury Blvd Through Feb 10. Previews Tue-Thu 7:30 p.m., Fri 8 p.m., Sat 2 p.m. (open captioned performance). Opening Sat 8 p.m. Performances Sun 2 & 7 p.m., Tue 6 p.m., Wed Jan 16 7:30 p.m Tickets start at $25. 232-4382. gevatheatre.org Jan. 16-23. Geva Theatre Center, 75 Woodbury Blvd Through Feb 10. Wed Jan 16-Thu 7:30 p.m., Fri 8 p.m., Sat 4 & 8:30 p.m., Sun 2 p.m. (Sunday Salon) & 7 p.m., Tue-Wed Jan 23 7:30 p.m Tickets start at $25. 2324382. gevatheatre.org.

Theater Audition [ WED., JANUARY 9 ] Playwrights/Playreadings. Through 7-9 p.m. The Geneva Theatre Guild is holding open auditions to cast a number of short original plays to be included in this year’s production of Playwrights/Playreadings. There are multiple male and female roles available for all age ranges. All experience levels are welcome and no memorization is required.

Auditions will be held on January 9th at the Presbyterian Church, 24 Park Place, Geneva. Scripts will be provided for cold readings. The plays will be presented as readings in front of live audiences on February 1st, 2013 at the Geneva Library and on February 2nd and 3rd at Torrey Park Grill 315-5737345. gtglive.org. [ THU., JANUARY 10 ] A Midsummer Night’s Dream. Jan. 10-11, 4-7 p.m. Geva Theatre Center, 75 Woodbury Blvd Young actresses needed, ages 6-11. Auditionees should come to the audition with a headshot or photograph to be left with the director and will be required to sing a lullaby, or “Twinkle, Twinkle Little Star” as if they were helping a baby to sleep. By appointment only, call to schedule. 232-1366 x3047. gevatheatre.org.

Workshops [ WED., JANUARY 9 ] Workshop: Facing Race, Embracing Equity Initiative. 8:30 a.m.-noon. Asbury First United Methodist Church, 1050 East Ave Free, register. 341-4346. itorres@racf.org. faceraceroc.org. [ THU., JANUARY 10 ] Alzheimer’s Association of Rochester Presents Neighbors Next Door: Living with Alzheimer’s, for Caregivers. 6:30 p.m. Brighton Memorial Library, 2300 Elmwood Ave. 784-5300. brightonlibrary. org. Family Development Class: “Introduction to Cyber Safety.” 6-8 p.m. Mental Health Association, 320 N Goodman St. For parents of children of all ages Free, RSVP. 3253145 x131. mharochester.org. [ SAT., JANUARY 12 ] 10 Steps to a Healthier You. 10 a.m New York Wine & Culinary Center, 800 South Main St Keep your New Year’s resolutions with Chef Jeff’s tips, tricks and recipes. Each class has a different theme and a sample of the menu demonstrated will be served $10 per class. 394-7070. nywcc.com. Creating Garden Maps Using Microsoft WORD. 10 a.m.-noon. Hansen Nature Center, 1525 Calkins Rd. Free, register. 359-7044. sites.google.com/site/ hansennaturecenter. Soap Making. 1-4 p.m. Mooseberry Soap Company in the Cytec Warehouse, 2555 Baird Rd., Penfield. Class fee includes $25 deposit and soap supplies (may be asked to bring spoon and pot) $68, RSVP. 348-9022. customer. service@mooseberrysoap.com. [ SUN., JANUARY 13 ]

The Alternative Book with Martha Schermerhorn. Jan. 13. High Falls Fine Art Gallery, 60 Browns Race. $10 each workshop. 325-2030. centerathighfalls.org. Level 1 Improv Comedy Classes. 1-4 p.m The Pillar Theater, VIP Studio (Suite D106) Village Gate Square, 274 N. Goodman St No experience needed. $60 for series. 797-9086. VIP@ improvVIP.com. [ MON., JANUARY 14 ] Bookbinding with Carol Henshaw. 6:30-8:30 p.m. Wood Library, 134 North Main St. Recommended for ages 10 and up or as young as 8 with a parent $3 per person or $5 per parent and child. 394-1381. woodlibrary.org. Cooking Class: “Hyatt Regency” with Dustin Muroski. 6-8:30 p.m. The Culinary Center at Vella, 237 PittsfordPalmyra Rd $85, register. 421-9362. vellaculinarycenter. com. Family Development Class: “How to Say NO to Your Child.” 12:30-2:30 p.m. Mental Health Association, 320 N Goodman St. For parents of school-age children Free, RSVP. 325-3145 x131. mharochester.org. [ TUE., JANUARY 15 ] African World History Class. 7:30-9 p.m. Baobab Cultural Center, 728 University Ave. $5 donation requested per session. baobab.center@yahoo. com. thebaobab.org. Chorus of the Genesee: Free Singing Lessons. 6-7 p.m. Harmony House, 58 East Main St 698-7784. Family Development Class: “The First Years Last Forever.” 12:30-2:30 p.m. Mental Health Association, 320 N Goodman St. For parents of children up to 5 years old Free, RSVP. 325-3145 x 131. mharochester.org. Health Insurance Open House for Rochester’s Uninsured. 2-5 p.m. Threshold at the Community Place, 135 Parsells Ave. 1-888-3433547. fideliscare.org. Tools for Simple Website Development. 6:30-8 p.m. Wood Library, 134 North Main St. Free, register. 394-1381. woodlibrary.org. [ WED., JANUARY 16 ] Family Development Class: “Don’t Make Me Say It Again!” 6-8 p.m. Mental Health Association, 320 N Goodman St. For parents of school-age children Free, RSVP. 3253145 x131. mharochester.org.

GETLISTED get your event listed for free e-mail it to calendar@rochestercitynews.com. Or go online to rochestercitynewspaper.com and submit it yourself!

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 23


Movies Theaters Searchable, up-to-the-minute movie times for all area theaters can be found at rochestercitynewspaper.com, and on City’s mobile website.

Film

Brockport Strand 93 Main St, Brockport, 637-3310, rochestertheatermanagement.com

Canandaigua Theatres 3181 Townline Road, Canandaigua, 396-0110, rochestertheatermanagement.com

Cinema Theater 957 S. Clinton St., 271-1785, cinemarochester.com

Culver Ridge 16 2255 Ridge Rd E, Irondequoit  544-1140, regmovies.com

The president and his women [ REVIEW ] BY GEORGE GRELLA

Dryden Theatre 900 East Ave., 271-3361, dryden.eastmanhouse.org

Eastview 13 Eastview Mall, Victor 425-0420, regmovies.com

Geneseo Theatres Geneseo Square Mall, 243-2691, rochestertheatermanagement.com

Greece Ridge 12 176 Greece Ridge Center Drive 225-5810, regmovies.com

Henrietta 18 525 Marketplace Drive 424-3090, regmovies.com

The Little

“Hyde Park on Hudson” (R), DIRECTED BY ROGER MICHELL NOW PLAYING

Hard on the heels of the Civil War epic “Lincoln,” a very different picture shows a very different president in a very different era. A sort of limited biopic, “Hyde Park on Hudson” concentrates on a few years in the life of Franklin Delano Roosevelt, focusing mostly on domestic events and the people surrounding him in the late 1930’s; strangely, it pays scant attention to the great problems of that difficult and dangerous time.

240 East Ave., 258-0444 thelittle.org

Movies 10 2609 W. Henrietta Road 292-0303, cinemark.com

Pittsford Cinema 3349 Monroe Ave., 383-1310 pittsford.zurichcinemas.com

Tinseltown USA/IMAX 2291 Buffalo Road 247-2180, cinemark.com

Webster 12 2190 Empire Blvd., 888-2624386, amctheatres.com

Based, as the script informs us, on a true story, and narrated by Daisy (Laura Linney), the most important character after FDR himself, the movie takes place in the location of the title, where the president spent summer vacations. A distant cousin of FDR — fifth or sixth, as she says — who also lives in Hyde Park, Daisy cares for her invalid aunt and apparently lives an isolated life, until the president (Bill Murray) summons her to visit one summer day. They chat, or rather she listens to him talk, he shows her his stamp collection, and they begin a friendship. Over the course of several summers — the movie never aspires to exactness — the relationship with the young woman grows into something more romantic. He takes her whizzing through the countryside in his specially equipped car, shows her a cottage he built for his private times, and eventually, though the script only reveals it in a retrospective reference, they become lovers. Throughout her relationship with the president and his family, Daisy

Laura Linney and Bill Murray in “Hyde Park on Hudson.” PHOTO COURTESY FOCUS FEATURES

ATTENTION FILM FANS

occupies a position somewhere between the servants and his official entourage; she also becomes a confidante of a man who clearly enjoys the company of a young woman to whom he can speak frankly about matters beyond the burdens of office. She becomes something of a fixture in the Roosevelt household, tolerated and accepted by Eleanor (Olivia Williams), FDR’s secretary and mistress Missy (Elizabeth Marvel), and even his horrible mother (Elizabeth Williams). Everything in the picture coalesces somewhat comically around the state visit of King George VI (Samuel West) and Queen Elizabeth (Olivia Colman), the first English monarchs to set foot in their former colony, in 1939. Their connection to the central events of the narrative and the reason for their trip actually provide the most engaging parts of the movie, combining the film’s historical and emotional subjects. At Hyde Park their presence accidentally leads to Daisy’s disillusioning discovery that, as Missy puts it, she “shares” the president with her. Apprehensive about the visit, the king and queen disdain the manners of their American cousins and misunderstand the country itself. They come to America, as the king says, with hat in hand, begging for aid in the war that everyone knows looms on the horizon; as history shows and the picture, alas, does not, in the face of considerable opposition Roosevelt actually exercised enormous cleverness to help

CITY Newspaper is no longer running film times in print. Instead, you can find accurate, up-to-the-minute times for all area theaters on rochestercitynewspaper.com. Keep reading CITY every week for film reviews, blurbs, & theater information and post your own reviews online!

24 CITY JANUARY 9-15, 2013


Live through this [ REVIEW ] BY ADAM LUBITOW

“The Impossible” (PG-13), DIRECTED BY JUAN ANTONIO BAYONA NOW PLAYING

Great Britain in the years before the United States entered World War II. Some of the movie’s problems involve its almost exclusive focus on the personal, with little attention to domestic politics, the Great Depression, and the spread of Fascism, matters that must have preoccupied the president in 1939, but barely earn a mention. It also shows Roosevelt as something of a victim of the strong women in his life, from his mother to Eleanor to Missy; no wonder the quiet, passive Daisy appeals to him. Some of its most pleasant moments show FDR bonding with the insecure, self-doubting young king, plying him with drink, inspiring him with confidence, and providing fatherly advice. He sympathizes with his paralyzing stammer by alluding indirectly to his own handicap as the crippled victim of polio, in some pathetic moments carried by his attendants, never photographed in his wheelchair, always affecting that jaunty posture, and of course, behaving with admirable courage. A surprising choice to play Roosevelt, Bill Murray performs competently, if not brilliantly, imitating all the gestures and mannerisms shown in all the familiar photographs, documentary films, and newsreel footage. He conveys some of FDR’s charm and good humor, but perhaps a result of the director’s conception, none of the commanding presence of the man who led the nation through the Great Depression and later, World War II, one of the giants of the 20th century.

The term “disaster movie” tends to conjure up thoughts of summer blockbusters; disposable entertainments designed to excite audiences with endless scenes of CGI-enhanced destruction. They’re usually the type of movies that want us to root for the survival of the main characters while simultaneously asking us to ignore the offscreen deaths of hundreds of thousands, whether they meet their doom at the hands of invading aliens, undetected volcanoes, or a giant asteroid. Thanks to the talented director Juan Antonio Bayona, “The Impossible” — despite a terrible title — is something else entirely: an often harrowing drama that places audiences squarely in the path of the devastating Indian Ocean tsunami that claimed the lives of more than 230,000 people in December 2004. In his hands, the tsunami becomes less a thrilling spectacle we can watch while munching on popcorn in the safe cocoon of a darkened theater, and more of a

Naomi Watts and Tom Holland in “The Impossible.” PHOTO COURTESY APACHES ENTERTAINMENT

legitimately horrifying experience we feel we’ve somehow managed to live through. “The Impossible” tells true story of the Belón family. Maria, Henry, and their three young sons were spending their Christmas vacationing in Thailand when fate intervened and put them in the middle of one of the worst natural disasters in recorded history. Though separated, the entire family fought to survive and eventually reunite with one another, in a remarkable demonstration of the capacity for the human spirit to carry on despite seemingly insurmountable odds. Inexplicably, the film transforms the Spanish Belóns into WASPy Brits, played by Naomi Watts and Ewan McGregor in the roles of Maria and Henry, respectively. One could (and probably should) debate the reasoning behind the change, which somehow makes a story about an event that impacted hundreds of thousands of Thais, Indians, Indonesians, and Sri Lankans, all about a family of pretty white people. It’s particularly odd considering the film was largely a Spanish production. Bayona himself claims that the decision was made to make the story more universal, and that the nationalities of the protagonists weren’t important, but one can’t help sensing the intervening hand of a box-office-minded studio executive. But maybe I’m just being cynical. Regardless of the reasons for their casting, Watts and McGregor both turn in phenomenal performances that are admirably absent of the vanity that typically accompanies such films, where the actors appear attractively disheveled, hair mussed just so, a carefully placed scratch on one cheek so as not to detract from their movie-star good looks. Here, the actors look like they’ve been through hell. These are physically demanding roles, but the actors never lose sight of the real people they portray. Parents who decide to see the film will likely find it hard not to put themselves in Maria or

Henry’s shoes. Despite the strong work of the leads, the film’s best performance belongs to young actor Tom Holland as the eldest son, who must call upon strength beyond his years in order to act as his severely injured mother’s protector. Though aided by capable actors, the film is first and foremost Bayona’s show. Obviously calling on his background in horror (he’s previously best known for the 2007 ghost story, “The Orphanage”), he brings a unique sensibility — a sort of “reality horror” — to the film and demonstrates an astonishing level of control over the material. He steers clear of schmaltz for the most part, and the few indulgences toward the end of the film feel earned after what the characters (and the audience) have been through. Created mostly through the use of scale models, the stunning 10-minute tsunami sequence is a visceral, terrifying experience that left quite a few people in the theater I was in visibly shaken. I was surprised to find that the film didn’t make the shortlist of possible Best Visual Effects nominees for this year’s Oscars. Apparently that wing of the Academy only chooses to highlight films that are carried by their special effects, rather than ones where the effects support the story. Still, I’d expect to see the film receive recognition in several of the below-theline categories. The sound design in particular is speaker-rattlingly effective. Perhaps most impressively, while “The Impossible” is clearly about one specific family’s fight for survival, Bayona never ignores the scope of what’s happening. The Belóns may be surrounded by thousands of nameless extras, but Bayona finds ways to call attention to them as well. It’s never enough to pull focus from the main characters, but just enough so that they register, reminding us that we’re watching just one story among hundreds of thousands, many of which didn’t end with a happy, tear-filled reunion.

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 25


Film Previews Full film reviews available at rochestercitynewspaper.com. [ OPENING ] GANGSTER SQUAD (R): A stylish 1950’s-era crime drama from Ruben Fleischer (the director of “Zombieland”) about a group of undercover LAPD detectives attempting to take down mob kingpin Mickey Cohen by any means necessary. Starring Ryan Gosling, Sean Penn, Josh Brolin, Emma Stone, and Nick Nolte. Canandaigua, Culver, Geneseo, Greece Ridge, Pittsford, Tinseltown, Webster A HAUNTED HOUSE (R): Spoofing the genre “found footage” horror films, this movie (written by and starring Marlon Wayans) promises to deliver loads of timely, pointedly hilarious satire. That, or an endless parade of painfully unfunny references to films in a genre that already past its peak. Hard to say which. Canandaigua, Culver, Greece Ridge, Tinseltown, Webster ZERO DARK THIRTY (R): Director Kathryn Bigelow and writer Mark Boal follow up their Oscar-winning “The Hurt Locker” with this likely Best Picture contender, examining the decade-long hunt to capture Osama Bin Laden. Starring Jessica

Chastain, Joel Edgerton, Kyle Chandler, and Jason Clarke. Brockport, Canandaigua, Culver, Geneseo, Greece Ridge, Little, Pittsford, Tinseltown, Webster [ CONTINUING ] ANNA KARENINA (PG-13): This opulent adaptation of the Tolstoy classic, from director Joe Wright and Oscar-winning screenwriter Tom Stoppard, stars Keira Knightley as one of literature’s best-known adulteresses, married to Jude Law’s aristocrat but consumed by an affair with Aaron Taylor-Johnson’s dashing cavalry officer. ARGO (R): Director Ben Affleck co-stars with John Goodman, Bryan Cranston, and Kyle Chandler in the once-classified true tale of a CIA exfiltration expert who hatches a daring plan to free six Americans hiding at the home of the Canadian ambassador during the 1979 Iran hostage crisis. Cinema DJANGO UNCHAINED (R): Quentin Tarantino’s latest exploitation extravaganza, this time starring Jamie Foxx as a former slave out to rescue his wife from the clutches of an evil plantation owner. Also starring Leonardo DiCaprio, Christoph Waltz, and Samuel L. Jackson. Canandaigua, Culver, Geneseo, Greece

Ridge, Little, Pittsford, Tinseltown, Webster FLIGHT (PG-13): Robert Zemeckis’s first live-action film since 2000’s “Cast Away” is a drama with Don Cheadle, John Goodman, and Denzel Washington as an airline pilot who saves a flight from crashing, only to have the ensuing investigation into the equipment malfunction reveal something troubling. THE GUILT TRIP (PG-13): Seth Rogen and Barbra Streisand play a mother and son taking a cross-country road trip together. Zany, Semitic hijinks ensue, likely concluded with a lesson about the importance of family. Culver, Greece Ridge, Tinseltown HITCHCOCK (R): Anthony Hopkins takes on the title role in this biopic that uses the filming of 1960’s “Psycho” as a backdrop for a love story between the Master of Suspense and wife Alma Reville (Helen Mirren). Co-starring Scarlett Johansson, Danny Huston, and Jessica Biel. THE HOBBIT: AN UNEXPECTED JOURNEY (PG-13): The first installment of Peter Jackson’s long-awaited adaptation of the “Lord of the Rings” prequel, chronicling Bilbo Baggins’ adventures in Middle Earth. Brockport, Canandaigua, Culver,

Geneseo, Greece Ridge, Pittsford, Tinseltown, Webster HYDE PARK ON HUDSON (R): Bill Murray plays FDR in this period drama about the love affair between the president and his distant cousin Margaret Stuckley. With Laura Linney and Olivia Williams. Little, Pittsford THE IMPOSSIBLE (PG-13): Naomi Watts and Ewan McGregor star in this grueling drama, based on a true story, about a family separated and struggling to survive in the aftermath of the massive Indian Ocean tsunami of 2004. Pittsford, Tinseltown JACK REACHER (PG-13): Tom Cruise: action hero. Based on the popular series of novels by Lee Child, about one badass homicide investigator. Canandaigua, Culver, Greece Ridge, Tinseltown, Webster LES MISÉRABLES (PG-13): The hugely popular, longrunning stage musical based on the Victor Hugo novel comes to the big screen courtesy of “King’s Speech” director Tom Hooper. With Hugh Jackman, Russell Crowe, Amanda Seyfried, and Anne Hathaway. Canandaigua, Culver, Geneseo, Greece Ridge, Little, Pittsford, Tinseltown, Webster LIFE OF PI (PG): Ang Lee continues his unpredictable

streak with an eye-popping adaptation of Yann Martel’s acclaimed novel, now a 3D adventure about a young man who survives a shipwreck and finds himself on a lifeboat with an orangutan, a hyena, an ailing zebra, and a Bengal tiger. Culver LINCOLN (PG-13): Daniel Day-Lewis channels our 16th President for Steven Spielberg, focusing on the last few months of the Great Emancipator’s life, which includes the Union’s victory in the War Between The States and the abolition of slavery. Co-starring Tommy Lee Jones, Jared Harris, and Sally Field. Canandaigua, Culver, Greece Ridge, Pittsford, Tinseltown, Webster MONSTER’S INC. 3-D (G): Adventures in babysitting with lovable monsters Mike Wazowski and James “Sulley” Sullivan, now busting out into the third dimension in this Pixar re-release. Tinseltown THE OTHER SON (PG-13): This French drama from writer-director Lorraine Levy tells the story of two young men, one Israeli and one Palestinian, who discover they were accidentally switched at birth. PARENTAL GUIDANCE (PG): Grandparents Billy Crystal and Bette Midler look after

their kids’ children. Hijinks ensue, likely concluded with a lesson about the importance of family. Canandaigua, Culver, Greece Ridge, Tinseltown, Webster PLAYING FOR KEEPS (PG13): Gerard Butler stars in this romantic comedy as a former sports star who starts coaching his kid’s team as a way to get his life together. Horny soccer moms ensue. With Jessica Biel, Catherine Zeta-Jones, and Uma Thurman. PROMISED LAND (R): Gus Van Sant adds his voice to the fracking debate with this drama, written by and starring Matt Damon and John Krasinski, about a salesman hoping to convince a small rural town to let his company to drill for natural gas. Also starring Frances McDormand, Rosemarie DeWitt, and Hal Holbrook. Canandaigua, Culver, Greece Ridge, Pittsford, Tinseltown, Webster RISE OF THE GUARDIANS (PG): Hugh Jackman, Alec Baldwin, and Isla Fisher provide some of the voices for this animated adventure about what happens when Jack Frost joins up with Santa Claus, The Tooth Fairy, and others to prevent an evil spirit from taking over the world.

A ROCHESTER PREMIERE! The Diana Kelly Tango Series at School of the Arts

THIS IS

NOW

Created by Fernanda Ghi, Guillermo Merlo and Alfredo Minetti A beautiful marionette longs for freedom from her puppeteer and a stunning battle for dominance ensues. World-class Argentine tango, gorgeous imagery and ever-changing moods are the hallmarks of this mysterious and whimsical tale of identity... an exquisitely-crafted theatrical experience.

ALLEN MAIN STAGE THEATRE Januar y 19 — 8:00 PM Januar y 20 — 2:00 PM

TICKETS $20 Adults $10 Students At Wegmans or through SOTA

School of the Arts • 45 Prince Street • Rochester, NY 14607 For tickets: 585-324-3535 • www.sotarochester.org

26 CITY JANUARY 9-15, 2013


A scene from “A Haunted House.” PHOTO COURTESY OPEN ROAD FILMS SILVER LININGS PLAYBOOK (R): Lovably unstable mental patients Bradley Cooper and Jennifer Lawrence fall for one another and learn to ballroom dance in this likely Oscar contender from David O. Russell. With Robert De Niro and Jacki Weaver. Little, Pittsford, Tinseltown SKYFALL (PG-13): Bond 23 brings back Daniel Craig as 007, now directed by Oscar winner Sam Mendes and trying to prevent bad guy Javier Bardem from taking down Judi Dench’s M. With Ben Whishaw, Ralph Fiennes, and Albert Finney. Culver

TEXAS CHAINSAW 3D (R): In yet another sequel to the 70’s horror classic, another group of unsuspecting teenagers are preyed upon by Leatherface and his trusty chainsaw, but this time their limbs will seem to fly out of the screen. Starring no one you’ve ever heard of. Brockport, Canandaigua, Culver, Geneseo, Greece Ridge, Tinseltown, Webster THIS IS 40 (R): Judd Apatow’s sort-of follow-up to “Knocked Up,” this time focusing on Paul Rudd and Leslie Mann’s characters and the joys and pains of married

life. Also featuring Jason Segal, Megan Fox, Chris O’Dowd, and Lena Dunham. Canandaigua, Culver, Greece Ridge, Tinseltown, Webster THE TWILIGHT SAGA: BREAKING DAWN, PART 2 (PG-13): Honestly, if you need a description, you’re not interested. Cinema, Culver WRECK-IT RALPH (PG): John C. Reilly, Sarah Silverman, and Jane Lynch provide a few of the voices in this animated comedy about a video-game bad guy who dreams of becoming a hero, even if it means upending the status quo at the arcade. Culver

For information: Call us (585) 244-3329 Fax us (585) 244-1126 Mail Us City Classifieds 250 N. Goodman Street Rochester, NY 14607 Email Us classifieds@ rochester-citynews.com EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY

All real estate advertised in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act, which makes it unlawful, “to make, print, or publish, any notice, statement, or advertisement, with respect to the sale or rental of a dwelling that indicates any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin.” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under the age of 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertisement for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. Call the local Fair Housing Enforcement Project, FHEP at 325-2500 or 1-866-671-FAIR. Si usted sospecha una practica de vivienda injusta, por favor llame al servicio legal gratis. 585-325-2500 - TTY 585-325-2547.

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 27


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Improvements for your home from foundations to roofs and everything in between, including: • Remodeling and Additions • Kitchens and Baths • Finished Basements • All types of flooring including radiant heat • Windows and Siding

• Garages, Patios, Decks & Pools • Handyman services for small jobs • Masonry and Concrete • Emergency repairs and storm damage - WE WORK WITH YOUR INSURANCE COMPANY

703-7738

SUN WORLD CONSTRUCTION

& MASONRY

WINTER IS HERE!

INSULATION SPECIALIST

for all your weatherizing needs.

Time to clean your chimney!

Blown Fiberglass & Cellulose Spray foam • Energy audits

• Chimney Cleaning • Chimney Repairs • Brick Steps Repaired • Founda�on Repairs • Concrete Repairs & New Walks Installed • Chimney Pain�ng • Chimneys Rebuilt • Chimney Re-lining

(585) 328-3832

Michael Mincher Serving Monroe County since 1977

Fully Insured

100% ABSOLUTE DUST-FREE Ceilings & walls. $25.00 Seniors Discount. Repaired, Installed. Textured, Swirled, Sunburst. Water damage specialist. Insurance work. Free es mates. 45 years experience.

American Plaster & Drywall

585-225-6590

Affordable Home Improvements All Phases of Home Improvements • Bath • Kitchen • Basement • Windows/Doors • Roofing • Siding

Fully insured

Call

414-3692

BOTTOM LINE PRICING - Owner On Every Job!

ATTENTION

HOME SERVICE PROVIDERS

Did you know that City Newspaper Readers spent OVER $90 MILLION DOLLARS on home improvements in the LAST 12 MONTHS? Call Christine today to advertise

585-244-3329 ext. 23

28 CITY JANUARY 9-15, 2013

♥ADOPT:♥ A Beautiful Home, Laughter, Love, Art, Music, Many Opportunities, Stayhome Mom waits for 1st baby. Expenses paid Elaine ♥1-800561-9323♥ PREGNANT? CONSIDERING ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families Nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions 866-4136293.

Automotive ALWAYS BETTER Higher cash for your Junk Cars, Trucks and Vans. From $200-$800 or more for newer. Running or not. With free towing. Also free removal of any unwanted model in any condition. Call 585-305-5865 CASH FOR CARS Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888-420-3808 www.cash4car.com (AAN CAN)

*special excludes all previous work.

FULLY INSURED, FREE ESTIMATES

585-734-8444

> page 27

DEPENDABLE INTERIOR & EXTERIOR PAINTING & STAINING

*Business, *Criminal Justice, *Hospitality, Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEC certified. Call 888-2018657www.CenturaOnline.com

Events **AKRON GUN SHOW** Newstead Fire Hall- 5691 Cummings Road, Akron NY- 1/4 Mile off Route 5 on Cummings Road (across from Liesurewood Campgrounds). January 12-13, 2013. Public Hours: Sat 9-4, Sun 9-3. www.nfcshows.com

For Sale BEANIE BABIES (TY) 1997 Light blue Elephant (Peanuts), Twigs, Squealer, Iggy and Rainbow with the mixed up name tags. & more! $4 - $8 585-880-2903 All $49.99 BOOK ENDS of races horses with jockey’s carved in wood, Christmas gift. $25 585-8802903

FOR SALE 4 Blizzak Winter Tires on Alloy wheels for Mazda RX-8 or similar $250. btowler@ rochester-citynews.com

BRONZE COLOR metal horse, nice size 13” long, 10” high with engraved saddle, horse lover gift $30 585-880-2903

Education

DOG & CAT HOUSES Kennels, porch steps, do it yourself kits. Quick assembly 585-752-1000 $49 Jim

ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from home. *Medical,

MIND BODY SPIRIT

THINK • MOVE • BREATHE DANCE • HEAL • SEARCH STRETCH • STENGHTHEN

GERMAN SHEPHERD Plaque on chain. Carved head on real wood. (said, beware!) Nice gift $20.00 585-880-2903 TV RCA 35” with remote control. Excellent condition $25 585-225-5526

K-D Moving & Storage Inc.

TO ADVERTISE CALL CHRISTINE AT 244.3329 x23 See Page 21 of this week’s issue

Experience in office & household moving and deliveries

Big or small, we do them all

473-6610 or 473-4357 23 Arlington St. NY D.O.T.#9657

KdMovingandStorage.com


Place your real estate ad by calling 244-3329 ext. 23 or rochestercitynewspaper.com Ad Deadlines: Friday 4pm for Display Ads Monday at noon for Line ads Jam Section 2 TROMBONE PLAYERS NEEDED to play with one of Rochester’s Finest Big Bands. Must read. (Great Charts). Able to rehearse every other Wednesday 585-442-7480 BASSIST AVAILABLE: Electric, Acoustic. All styles. Mature, Reliable and Professional. Able to rehearse and open for gigs. Call 585-260-9958 fstone@ rochester.rr.com CALLING ALL MUSICIANS OF ALL GENRES the Rochester Music Coalition wants you! Please register on our website. For further info: www.rochestermusiccoalition. org info@rochestermusiccoalition. org 585-235-8412 EXP. DRUMMER Strong vocals to join (keyboard)/ (keyboard bass) who also sings lead. To

form duo (Retro Pop/Dance/ Jazz). Must be willing to shop the musical product around to get gigs 585-426-7241

learn, perform, share laughs and libation! Guest night Tuesday at 7 PM. Stop in at 58 E Main St, Webster. Call 585-698-7784

EXPERIENCED FEMALE JAZZ Vocalist looking for a pianist or a small group to perform music from the 30’s to today, with a Mad Men era emphasis! Serious musicians only. 233-5551

R & B SOUL BANDS seek employment, experienced groups, already performing, seek new jobs. Contact Bobby 585328-4121

EXPERIENCED LEAD VOCALS Seeks employment. Pat experience Inkspots, Platters, Drifters, James Brown among many. Leroy Harris. Contact Bobby 585-328-4121 Specialties, classics, R&B Soul.

MEN ENJOY SINGING Fun with the Chorus of the Genesee, Sing,

A cooperative effort of City Newspaper and RochesterCityLiving, a program of the Landmark Society.

ROCK STAR, MR. ROCHESTER, lead vocalist, is looking to form band (Classic Rock) with lead guitarist, bassist, drummer & rhythm guitars Covers & originals 585-473-5089 THE GREGORY KUNDE CHORALE is looking for male voices. Call for an audition now to join our fourteenth season! Info Line 377 7568 or visit our website www. gregorykundechorale.org

MEET OTHER MUSICIANS any instrument, male singer- jam together- coffee house, private gigs, I play keys Call Martin 585-266-6337

HomeWork

continues on page 30

Find your way home with

A House to Call Home

225 Elmtree Road Even on a chilly and dreary winter day, 225

Elmtree Road offers a warm welcome. Situated

cabinet space, and fabulous retro charm for mid-century modern aficionados.

on a generous corner lot in the city’s Charlotte neighborhood, the early 20th century Dutch

TO ADVERTISE CONTACT CHRISTINE TODAY!

CALL 244-3329 X23 OR EMAIL CHRISTINE@ROCHESTER-CITYNEWS.COM

RochesterSells.com

1348 Brookedge, Hamlin Open Sunday January 13th from 2-4pm " Wow" Large Great Room with Wood Flooring, Open to Eat in Kitchen Area! Formal Dining Room, Master Bedroom Fits King Size Bed. Furnace, Air Conditioning, Hot Water Heater in 2007. Siding in 2009. 28' Deep 2 Car Garage. Extra Wide Driveway. Landscaped Yard. Lovely Patio. 3bdrm, 1.5 bath. $118,900

Ryan Smith 585-201-0724

MLS: R198317PC 2912

Colonial Revival style home welcomes you in with its curb appeal and historic character. Inside, the care that has been paid to this home is obvious. Each room radiates warmth, with hardwood floors, unpainted crown molding and baseboards, and unpainted leaded glass windows and doors. Improvements and updates were meticulously installed and historic details were carefully maintained by the same family for over 50 years. The front entrance opens to a sizeable vestibule (complete with coat closet, original tile floor, leaded glass windows, and beautiful doors). The vestibule, in turn, opens to a

Search. Buy. Sell.

P Kulaga Pat 5585-368-7119

ppkulaga@nothnagle.com

spacious central hallway. Straight ahead is

A private driveway and detached two-car garage are situated around the corner, behind the house and the private backyard. A path through the yard leads to a rear entrance and mudroom, a special treat in a house this vintage. From here, steps lead down to the spacious basement or up to the kitchen. The lot is situated on a quiet street in a quiet neighborhood, with easy access to Lake Avenue, schools, and Turning Point Park.

a powder room. To the left is the living room, which runs from the front to the back of the house. Plenty of windows and a brick wood-

Selling Homes one o time yardd at a time.

Upstairs are three bedrooms and a full bath. The master bedroom is a treasure, with two sets of windows, his and her closets, and access to an enclosed (and heated) three season porch. The unfinished attic offers a large open space—perfect for storage or a blank canvas for an expanding family.

burning fireplace add warmth and loads of natural light. Off the living room is the sunroom typical of Colonial Revival style homes. This wood-paneled room offers a retreat for a home office or a cozy den. To the right of the hall is the formal dining room, which, like the living room, features a large bay window. The kitchen can be accessed from here or the main hall. Spacious and open, the kitchen has enough room for a table, plenty of

This warm, inviting, and lovingly maintained home has just under 2000 square feet. Reduced to $109,900 this property is priced to sell and ready for a new family to call it home. For more information, visit rochestercityliving. com/property/R194357, contact Michael Coriddi of Park Avenue Realtors, at 585-7521011, or see this wonderful home for yourself during the open house this Sunday, 1-3 p.m. by Caitlin Meives Caitlin is the Preservation Planner at The Landmark Society.

Tamara Lynn Bald • Your Real Estate Coach Realtor® • 585-857-1616 • TamaraLynnBald@gmail.com

706 East Avenue • Rochester NY 14607 rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 29


I’m very pleased with the calls I got from our apartment rental ads, and will continue running them. Your readers respond — positively!” - M. Smith, Residential Management > page 29

Lost and Found LOST 14x20 inch canvas portrait man and tropical birds. Artwalk vicinity zips 14620, 14618, 14607. Reward. Margot Fass 733-0563

Looking For... XMAS Wool/Flannel Army Blanket donations needed! Gift new blankets to “Sunday Circle” knitters/crocheters to decorate for poor patients of R.P.C. Contact Mary at mgrant@ frontier.com.

Miscellaneous FREE DENTAL CLEANING MCC Sophomore Dental Hygiene student looking for volunteer patients interested in complimentary dental cleaning. Must be 2+ years since last professional cleaning. Call 585314-0398 and leave a message for Leslie S. HAS YOU BUILDING SHIFTED OR SETTLED? Contact Woodford Brothers Inc, for straightening, leveling, foundation and wood frame repairs at 1-800-OLDBARN. www.woodfordbros.com. “Not applicable in Queens county”

REACH 5 MILLION hip, forward-thinking consumers across the U.S. When you advertise in alternative newspapers, you become part of the local scene and gain access to an audience you won’t reach anywhere else. christine@ rochester-citynews.com SAWMILLS from only $3997MAKE MONEY & SAVE MONEY with your own bandmil Cut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship. FREE Info & DVD www.NorwoodSawmills. com/300N 1-800-578-1363 Ext.300N TAKE VIAGRA? Stop paying outrageous prices! Best prices... VIAGRA 100MG, 40 pills+/4 free, only $99.00. Discreet shipping, Power Pill.1-800-3742619

Notices WORKING HARD? SNAP CAN WORK FOR YOU! Find out if you may be eligible for SNAP – the new name for the Food Stamp Program. Call MCLAC NOEP at (585) 295-5624 or (585) 295-5626. Prepared by a project of Hunger Solutions New York, USDA/FNS & NYSOTDA. This institution is an equal opportunity provider.

EMPLOYMENT / CAREER TRAINING

Employment AIRLINE CAREERS - Become an Aviation Maintenance Tech. FAA approved training. Financial aid if qualified – Housing available. Job placement assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 877-492-3059 AIRLINES ARE HIRING Train for hands on Aviation Career. FAA approved program. Financial

aid if qualified- Job Placement Assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance (866)296-7093 AN INTERNATIONAL COMPANY Expanding in your area seeks serious individuals interested in pt/ft business opportunity call 570 856 1315 or e-mail nansk55@gmail.com or visit www.goherbalife.com/decnorm/ en-US

CITY SEEKS WINTER/SPRING

INTERNS

Are you a hard-working, fun-loving college student with a passion for journalism or photography? City Newspaper is looking for interns in our photography and editorial departments for the winter/spring semester. Candidates should have prior experience, must be college students, and must work for college credit (NOTE: internships are unpaid). Get a chance to work in the City office and gain real-world experience.

Together We Are One

2 9 V I C K PA R K A RO C H E S T E R , N Y

Sunday Services 10:30 AM

OWNERS OPERATORS - CDL CLASS A. STILL WAITING FOR THAT END OF THE YEAR BONUS? If you qualify and have documented proof of your pending Safety, Miles, or any other bonus... WE WILL MATCH IT!! Dedicated Customer, NoTouch Freight. Lease Purchase Program w/ payment assist. Call Jennifer: 866-242-4974 DriveForGreatwide.com or Text GREATWIDE to 30364 Hablamos Espanol -Belinda (866-258-1003)

Volunteers A SECOND THOUGHT Resale Shop in East Rochester is accepting applications for volunteer sale associates

and online researchers. Shop benefits people with disabilities in Guatemala. Call (585) 3402000. CATHOLIC FAMILY CENTER needs volunteers to help people apply for citizenship. The commitment is 2.5 hrs per mth one evening a month. Training is provided. For more information call Nate at (585) 546-7220 ex 4854. FOSTER PARENTS WANTED! Monroe County is looking for adults age 21 and over to consider opening their homes to foster children. Call 334-9096 or visit www.MonroeFosterCare. org. HERITAGE CHRISTIAN STABLES, a therapeutic horsemanship program for children and adults with developmental disabilities, is looking for volunteers to serve as horse leaders and side walkers. Call Kim Kennedy at (585) 3402016 or email kkennedy@ heritagechristianservices.org

EDITORIAL PROSPECTS Send a resume, clips, and a cover letter explaining what you can bring to the City team to eric@rochester-citynews.com

PHOTO PROSPECTS P LY M O U T H S P I R I T UA L I S T C H U R C H

$$$HELP WANTED$$$ Extra Income! Assembling CD cases from Home! No Experience Necessary! Call our Live Operators Now! 1-800-4057619 EXT 2450 http://www. easywork-greatpay.com (AAN CAN)

Send a resume, photo samples (no more than 20), and a cover letter to artdept@rochester-citynews.com NO PHONE CALLS, PLEASE

Has Immediate Openings!

We are looking for Assistant Managers for our Residential program. If you want to make a difference and love working with people, we want you! We require an Associates Degree in Human Services AND one year of experience working with individuals with intellectual and/or other disabilities, please apply today! Go to www.arcmonroe.org, information tab and current opportunities tab. EOE

All Message Service & Free Spiritual Healing Third Weds ~ 7 PM ~ Séances ~ Classes ~ Gallery Reading ~ For more information and schedules www.plymouthspiritualistchurch.org Robin Higgins, Pastor ~ Phone: 585.271.1470

Openings for Full Time, Part Time & Relief Positions Available If you’re looking for a position which offers HUGE Rewards & Great Benefits please visit our website to apply at: www.lifetimeassistance.org or in person at 425 Paul Road ~ Rochester, New York 14624 Please complete the application & we will do all the rest! You can expect to receive a call from a Human Resource representative to schedule an interview for January 22, 2013

GREAT BENEFITS:

Generous Paid Time Off (PTO), Tuition Reimbursement, Competitive Salaries, Medical & Dental, Life Insurance, Retirement Plans (401a & 403b), Referral Bonus and Work Life Balance Qualifications: High School Diploma or equivalent with six months of related experience or one full year of college education in human services. Subject to Background checks including; Fingerprinting, New York State Child Abuse Registry, and Driver’s License (if position required driving). Must meet LAI’s Vehicle Operator Requirements. Physical ability to lift up to 50 pounds. Must be able to successfully complete all required trainings including but not limited to First Aid, CPR, Medication Administration and SCIP (Strategies for Crisis Intervention Prevention) 30 CITY JANUARY 9-15, 2013


Rent your apartment special third week is

FREE

Place your ad by calling 244-3329 ext. 23 or rochestercitynewspaper.com Ad Deadlines: Friday 4pm for Display Ads Monday at noon for Line ads

EMPLOYMENT / CAREER TRAINING LITERACY VOLUNTEERS OF ROCHESTER needs adult tutors to help adults who are waiting to improve their reading, writing, English speaking, or math skills. Call 473-3030, or check our website at www. literacyrochester.org ROCHESTER CARES is looking for volunteers interested in joining us to make a difference in Rochester!! One time and recurring volunteer opportunities with a wide range of organizations. www. rochestercares.org/calendar.php SCHOOL #12 999 South Ave. is looking for reading & math volunteers, English & Spanish. Training provided. Call Vicki 585-461-4282 UNITED WAY Volunteer Fundraiser needed. Verification Phone Calling & Data Management. Strong interpersonal skills; attention to detail; strong verbal and written communication skills. Call 242-6547 VOLUNTEERS NEEDED for the Men’s Emergency Winter Shelter

at Dimitri House. Please call us at 325-1796 for more information or to volunteer your time. VOLUNTEERS NEEDED to depict evangelistic opportunities by means of performing skits in a Church environment. Professional acting not a requirement. This is done in a small Church setting. Contact Pastor Ron @ 585-957-6155 WOMEN: ROCHESTER HABITAT is looking for women 18 years+ to help build a house with a single mother. Visit rochabitat. org or call 546-1470

Business Opportunities HELP WANTED make extra money in our free ever popular homemailer program, includes valuable guidebook! Start immediately! Genuine! 1-888292-1120 www.howtoworkfromhome.com

HELP WANTED!!! MAKE $1000 A WEEK mailing brochures from home! FREE Supplies! Helping Home Workers since 2001! Genuine Opportunity! No Experience required. Start Immediately! www.mailing-usa. com (AAN CAN) START NOW! OPEN RED HOT DOLLAR, DOLLAR PLUS, MAILBOX, DISCOUNT PARTY, DISCOUNT CLOTHING, TEEN STORE, FITNESS CENTER FROM $51,900 WORLDWIDE! WWW.DRSS16.COM 1-800518-3064

Career Training ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home. *Medical, *Business, *Criminal Justice, *Hospitality. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV authorized. Call 800481-9472 www.CenturaOnline. com

Hiring? GET THE RESULTS YOU NEED AT ABOUT HALF THE PRICE OF OTHER PAPERS! To advertise in our

EMPLOYMENT SECTION call Christine at

244-3329 ext. 23 today!

CITY Housemate(s) Wanted: Housemate(s) Wanted:

On behalf of two young ladies and their famlies, Lifetime Assistance Inc, a leader in the provision of services to persons with Developmental Disabilities, is looking for house mate(s) who are interested in sharing a home, in Henrietta, and their lives with two young ladies. In exchange for sharing a home, providing support and assistance as needed, the housemate(s) would share the home of the ladies and receive a stipend. Some responsibilities of the housemate(s) would include, monitoring nutrition and dietary needs, implementing communication techniques, and community involvement. The two ladies enjoy music, dancing and the arts and are looking for housemate(s) who shares similar interest. The ladies are looking for the housemate(s) to move in within the next six months. The housemate(s) would move into the ladies home. The housemate(s) would be required to attend training and become certified as a Family Care Provider through Lifetime Assistance Family Care Services. IF YOU ARE INTERESTED, please contact Maria Rugg, Associate Director, to discuss this incredible opportunity, at Lifetime Assistance Inc. At 784-3059. rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 31


Legal Ads [ LEGAL NOTICE ] 6721 Lakehouse Associates LLC (“LLC”) filed Arts. of Org. with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on December 12, 2012. Office Location: Monroe County. SSNY designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 3055 Brighton-Henrietta Town Line Road, Rochester, New York 14623. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ LEGAL NOTICE ] Name of limited liability company: Sterilizer Technical Specialists East LLC (“LLC”). The fictitious name under which the LLC will do business in New York is: STS East LLC. Date Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (“SSNY”) November 19, 2012. LLC organized in Delaware on November 9, 2012. NY county location: Monroe. SSNY designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to 1777 E. Henrietta Road, Rochester, New York 14623. Address required to be maintained in jurisdiction of organization or if not required, principal office of LLC: 874 Walker Road, Suite C, Dover, Delaware 19904. Copy of formation document on file with: the Secretary of State of Delaware, P.O. Box 898, Dover, Delaware 19903. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ LEGAL NOTICE ] Notice of formation of a limited liability company (LLC). Name: SUKHENKO DESIGN, LLC. Article of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on December 20, 2012. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to the LLC, 1013 Hard Rock Road, Webster NY 14580. Purpose: For any lawful purpose. [ LEGAL NOTICE ] Notice of formation of SBG Properties LLC. Arts. Of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State on 11/19/12. Off. loc.: Monroe Co. Sec. of State designated as agent of LLC upon whom process may be served and shall mail process to: 15 Sunleaf Drive, Penfield, NY. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] 113 JZ, LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 11/20/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: James Zisouski, 53 Main St., Brockport, NY 14420. General Purposes.

[ NOTICE ] 1634 BHTL LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 11/6/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, Attn: Bruce Coleman, P.O. Box 10608, Rochester, NY 14692. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] 56 JZ, LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 11/20/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: James Zisouski, 53 Main St., Brockport, NY 14420. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] 60-62 JZ, LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 11/20/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: James Zisouski, 53 Main St., Brockport, NY 14420. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] Articles of Organization of limited liability company. Beat the Wave, LLC (LLC) were filed with the Department of State on November 9, 2012. Monroe County is the county within which it will have its office; its principal business address is 103 River Street, Rochester, New York 14612. Its purpose is to serve, or provide services to foreign parents and their high school and college age students who attend educational institutions in the United States within the metropolitan area of Rochester, New York. The LLC has designated the Secretary of State of New York as its agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. 103 River Street, Rochester, New York 14612 is the post office address to which the Secretary of State shall mail a copy of any process against the LLC

against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 144 Village Landing #192, Fairport, NY 14450. Purpose: Any lawful purpose.

SSNY shall mail copy of process to 2255 Lyell Ave., Rochester, NY 14606, which is also the principal business location. Purpose: Any lawful purpose.

[ NOTICE ] Index No. 2012-6268 SUPREME COURT STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF MONROE ESL Federal Credit Union Plaintiff, vs. Gary J. Lisman; Jackie Ward; Claire Howe; Katie Burke, Defendants. Pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale dated January 2, 2013 and entered herein, I, the undersigned, the Referee in said Judgment named, will sell at public auction in the front vestibule of the Monroe County Office Building, 39 West Main Street, Rochester, New York, County of Monroe, on February 11, 2013 at 10:30 a.m., on that day, the premises directed by said Judgment to be sold and therein described as follows: ALL THAT TRACT OR PARCEL OF LAND, situate in the City of Rochester, County of Monroe and State of New York, known as 51-53 Morningside Park, Rochester, NY 14607; Tax Account No. 122.53-2-7 described in Deed recorded in Liber 6116 of Deeds, page 182. Said premises are sold subject to any state of facts an accurate survey may show, zoning restrictions and any amendments thereto, covenants, restrictions, agreements, reservations, and easements of record and prior liens, if any, municipal departmental violations, and such other provisions as may be set forth in the Complaint and Judgment filed in this action. Judgment amount: $139,403.05 plus, but not limited to, costs, disbursements, attorney fees and additional allowance, if any, all with legal interest. DATED: January 2013 Joanne L. Best, Esq., Referee LACY KATZEN LLP Attorneys for Plaintiff 130 East Main Street Rochester, New York 14604 Telephone: (585) 324-5767

[ NOTICE ] NICHOLAS CHARLES NY HOLDINGS LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 12/7/12. Office in Monroe Co. SSNY desig. agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 2255 Lyell Ave., Rochester, NY 14606, which is also the principal business location. Purpose: Any lawful purpose.

[ NOTICE ] Chi Soo Design LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 11/26/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 72 Knollwood Dr, Roch, NY 14618. General Purposes.

[ NOTICE ] JAS PRO PROPERTIES LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 11/7/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 57 James Moore Circle, Hilton, NY 14468. General Purposes.

[ NOTICE ] First Residential Properties, LLC has filed Art. Of Org. with the Sec’y of State on 11/1/12. Office Location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process

[ NOTICE ] KIWI TANGOS, LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 12/11/12. Office in Monroe Co. SSNY desig. agent of LLC upon whom process may be served.

32 CITY JANUARY 9-15, 2013

[ NOTICE ] Not. of Form. of Bordner Enterprises LLC. Art. of Org. filed by Sect’y of State (SSNY) on 11/19/2012. Location- Monroe County. The SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY may mail any process to LLC: 4045 East Ave., Rochester, NY 14618. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice is hereby given that a license, number not yet assigned, for a full on premise beer, wine & liquor license has been applied for by Basen, INC dba Lakesider’s Bar & Grill, 4783 – 4785 Lake Ave, Rochester NY 14612, County of Monroe, City of Rochester for a restaurant/bar. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Form. of DRY CLEAN FASHIONS, LLC (the “LLC”). Art. of Org. filed with Secretary of the State of NY (SSNY) on 12/10/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, 937 Chili Ave, Rochester, NY 14611. Purpose: any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Form. of GENESEO HOUSING, LLC (the “LLC”). Art. of Org. filed with Secretary of the State of NY (SSNY) on 12/24/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, 2041 Penfield Rd, Penfield, NY 14526. Purpose: any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Form. of MATHEW FAMILY FL, LLC (the “LLC”). Art. of Org. filed with Secretary of the State of NY (SSNY) on 12/21/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, 21

Runnymede Ct, Rochester, NY 14618. Purpose: any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Form. of MATHEW FAMILY NY, LLC (the “LLC”). Art. of Org. filed with Secretary of the State of NY (SSNY) on 12/21/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, 21 Runnymede Ct, Rochester, NY 14618. Purpose: any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Form. of URIM MEDIA, LLC (the “LLC”). Art. of Org. filed with Secretary of the State of NY (SSNY) on 12/26/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, 460 Glide St, #1, Rochester, NY 14606. Purpose: any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of 9 MECHANIC STREET LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/12/12. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 95 Allens Creek Rd., Ste. 300, Rochester, NY 14618. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Evans & Fox LLP at the princ. office of the LLC. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of BP Villa Associates, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/6/12. Office location: Monroe Co. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Robert Marshall, 150 Allens Creek Rd, Rochester, NY 14618, also the Registered Agent. Purpose: any lawful activities [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of 1310 WALL ROAD, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/17/12. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 860 Shoemaker Rd., Webster, NY 14580. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of 20 Pine 1909 LLC Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State on 12/31/12.

Office location: Monroe County. Principal business address: 195 Dickinson St., Rochester, NY 14621. Secy. of State designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. Secy. Of State shall mail process to: 265 Purdue Court, Paramus, NJ 07652. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of 225 EAST MAIN STREET LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/12/12. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 95 Allens Creek Rd., Ste. 300, Rochester, NY 14618. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Evans & Fox LLP at the princ. office of the LLC. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of 3385 MAIN STREET LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/12/12. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 95 Allens Creek Rd., Ste. 300, Rochester, NY 14618. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Evans & Fox LLP at the princ. office of the LLC. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of 749 Rutgers, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/3/12. Off. loc.: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, c/o Sammy Feldman, 3445 Winton Place, Ste. 228, Rochester, NY 14623. Purpose: any lawful activity.

[ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Aus & Ang Snead LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 8/16/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 116 Polaris St. Rochester, NY 14606. Purpose: any lawful activity [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Brody Brighton Holdings, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/16/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The Company, 92 River Rd., Summit, NJ 07901, also the principal office address. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Button Lofts, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/3/12. Off. loc.: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, c/o Sammy Feldman, 3445 Winton Place, Ste. 228, Rochester, NY 14623. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Clemente Greece Holdings, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/16/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The Company, 92 River Rd., Summit, NJ 07901, also the principal office address. Purpose: any lawful activities.

[ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of AJ COSTELLO GROUP LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/17/12. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: One Airport Way, Ste. 300, Rochester, NY 14624. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity.

[ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of COSTELLO ENTERPRISES LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/12/12. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: One Airport Way, Ste. 300, Rochester, NY 14624. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the princ. office of the LLC. Purpose: Any lawful activity.

[ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Ashley Family Farm, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/30/12. Off. loc.: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 700 Powers Bldg., Rochester, NY 14604. Purpose: any lawful activity.

[ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of DAVE JACKZON PROPERTIES LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/13/2012. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 115 Briar Wood Lane,

Rochester, NY 14626. Purpose: any lawful act [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of DHD 1530 Jefferson, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/3/12. Off. loc.: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, c/o Sammy Feldman, 3445 Winton Place, Ste. 228, Rochester, NY 14623. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of ETE Properties, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/13/2012. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 330 Little John Way, Webster, NY 14580. Purpose: any lawful act [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Garden Village, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/27/12. Off. loc.: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, c/o Sammy Feldman, 3445 Winton Place, Ste. 228, Rochester, NY 14623. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of GREENDYKE FINE ART, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/07/12. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 110-C Linden Oaks, Rochester, NY 14625. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Peter M. Greendyke at the princ. office of the LLC. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of GV Apartments, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/27/12. Off. loc.: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, c/o Sammy Feldman, 3445 Winton Place, Ste. 228, Rochester, NY 14623. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Kingsland, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/27/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The Company, 92 River


Legal Ads Rd., Summit, NJ 07901, also the principal office address. Purpose: any lawful activities.

92 River Rd., Summit, NJ 07901, also the principal office address. Purpose: any lawful activities.

[ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of Limited Liability Company (LLC). Name: TACS, LLC. Articles of Organization filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on October 22, 2012. Office location, Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to: 728 East Ave., Brockport, NY 14420. Purpose: any lawful purpose.

[ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of Oaster & Associates LLC, Art. Of Org. filed with the Secy. of State (SSNY) on 02/09/10. Office location Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to 15 Schoen Pl., Pittsford, NY 14534. Purpose: Any lawful activity.

[ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of limited liability company (LLC). Name: GORGEVIEW PROPERTIES LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Sec. of State of N.Y. (SSNY) on October 29, 2012. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to: Steven E. Cuthbert, 124 Gorsdline Street, Rochester, New York 14613. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of limited liability company (LLC). Name: TRANQUIL HEART WELLNESS, LLC. Articles of Organization filed with Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on November 6, 2012 and a Certificate of Correction filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on November 29, 2012. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to: 70 St. Andrews Boulevard, Fairport, NY 14450. Purpose: Any lawful act or activity. Loren H. Kroll, LLC. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of MAMASAN’S MT. HOPE, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/30/12. Off. loc.: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, c/o Le-Thi-Be Walters, 2800 Monroe Ave., Rochester, NY 14618. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Monroe Managing Member, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/21/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Mr. Mark Rosen, The Solomon Organization,

[ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Owen Webster Holdings, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/16/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The Company, 92 River Rd., Summit, NJ 07901, also the principal office address. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Queued LLC. Art. of Org. filed SSNY on 9/27/12. Office: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY may mail copy of any process to LLC: 190 Presque St. Rochester, NY 14609 Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of RED-Rochester, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State on 11/19/12. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. bus. addr.: 640 Quail Ridge Dr., Westmont, IL 60559. Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. Purpose: all lawful purposes. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Rose Dream Homes LLC. Arts. of Org. filed Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/19/12. Off. loc.: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o Robert G. Lamb, Jr., Esq., 1 East Main St., 510 Wilder Bldg., Bldg. 1, Rochester, NY 14614. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of SO ROCHESTER INVESTORS, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/16/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served.

SSNY shall mail process to c/o Mark S. Rosen, The Solomon Organization, 92 River Rd., Summit, NJ 07901. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of STAY & PLAY DOG HOTEL & DAYPLAY LLC. Art. Of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/08/12. Office in MONROE County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, 983 John Leo Dr. Webster, NY 14580. Purpose: Dog Care [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of T&M PROPERTIES OF NEW YORK, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/07/12. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 1452 Martensia Rd., Farmington, NY 14225. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the princ. office of the LLC. The regd. agent of the company upon whom and at which process against the company can be served is Timothy DeLucia, 1452 Martensia Rd., Farmington, NY 14225. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of THL 20 Pine 1913 LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State on 12/31/12. Office location: Monroe County. Principal business address: 195 Dickinson St., Rochester, NY 14621. Secy. of State designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. Secy. Of State shall mail process to: 265 Purdue Court, Paramus, NJ 07652. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Thruway Park Drive Mini Storage LLC. Arts. of Org. filed Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/21/12. Off. loc.: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o The LLC, 648 Gallup Road, Spencerport, NY 14559. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of VASALOS HOLDING CO. LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/29/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, 1239 Lake Point Dr., Webster, NY 14580. Purpose: Any lawful activity.

[ NOTICE ] Notice of Qual. of Equator Holdings LLC, Auth. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 11/1/12. Office loc.: Monroe County. LLC org. in MA 12/14/11. SSNY desig. as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of proc. to PO Box 2324, Nantucket, MA 02584. MA off. addr.: 69 Fairgrounds Rd., Nantucket, MA 02554. Cert. of Org. on file: Sec. of the Commonwealth, 1 Ashburton Pl., Boston, MA 02108. Purp.: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of DYNAMAX IMAGING, LLC. Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/29/12. Office location: Monroe County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 10/24/12. Princ. office of LLC: 37 Coach Side Ln., Pittsford, NY 14534. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Gregory J. Mascitti, Esq., c/o LeClairRyan, 70 Linden Oaks, Ste. 210, Rochester, NY 14625, regd. agent upon whom and at which process may be served. DE addr. of LLC: 2711 Centerville Rd., Ste. 400, Wilmington, DE 19808. Arts. of Org. filed with Jeffrey W. Bullock, Secy. of State of DE, Div. of Corps., John G. Townsend Bldg., 401 Federal St. Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of Horizon Labs LLC. Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/26/12. Office location: Monroe County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 12/12/12. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: National Registered Agents, Inc., 111 Eighth Ave., NY, NY 10011, also the registered agent. Principal office address: 930 Carter St., Rochester, NY 14621. Address to be maintained in DE: c/o National Registered Agents, Inc., 160 Greentree Dr., Ste. 101, Dover, DE 19904. Arts of Org. filed with the DE Secretary of State, John G. Townsend Bldg., 401 Federal St., Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of Q Management Services LLC. Fictitious name: Q Management Services Group LLC. Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/31/12. Office location: Monroe County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 12/12/12. SSNY

designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: National Registered Agents, Inc., 111 Eighth Ave., NY, NY 10011, also the registered agent. Principal office address: 2300 Buffalo Rd., Rochester, NY 14624. Address to be maintained in DE: c/o National Registered Agents, Inc., 160 Greentree Dr., Ste. 101, Dover, DE 19801. Arts of Org. filed with the DE Secretary of State, John G. Townsend Bldg., 401 Federal St., Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of Simplifile LC. Fictitious name: Simplifile E-Recording LLC. Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/6/12. Office location: Monroe County. LLC formed in Utah (UT) on 6/26/02. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 4844 North 300 West, Ste. 202, Provo, UT 84604, also the principal office address and the address

to be maintained in UT. Arts of Org. filed with the UT Division of Corporations and Commercial Code, 160 East 300 South, P.O. Box 146705, Salt Lake City, UT 84114-6705. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of TOP25 - 500 CENTER PLACE DRIVE LLC. Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 12/10/12. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. bus. addr.: 5221 N. O’Connor Blvd., Ste. 600, Irving, TX 75039. LLC formed in DE on 12/4/12. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. DE addr. of LLC: 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: all lawful purposes. [ NOTICE ] The name of the Limited Liability Company is “SRT Palisades

Properties LLC”. The date of filing of The Articles of Organization with the Department of State was December 19, 2012. The office of the Company is located in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as the Agent of the Company upon whom process may be served, and the Secretary of State shall mail a copy of any process against the Company served upon him or her to 626 Beach Avenue, Rochester, NY 14612. The business purpose of the Company is to engage in any lawful act or activity for which Limited Liability Companies may be organized under the laws of the State of New York. [ NOTICE ] TINY HOPES, LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 12/19/12. Office in Monroe Co. SSNY desig. agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 2255 Lyell Ave., Rochester, NY 14606, which is also the principal business location. Purpose: Any lawful purpose.

[ NOTICE ] TWIN CAPITAL PROPERTIES, LLC, a domestic LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 8/20/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Dawn Siciliano, 436 Bartell Ln., Webster, NY 14680. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Jefferson Road DOT, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/28/12. Off. loc.: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, c/o Sammy Feldman, 3445 Winton Place, Ste. 228, Rochester, NY 14623. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] Custom Promo LLC filed Articles of Organization with the New York Department of State on November 30, 2012. Its office is located in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated

cont. on page 34

FORECLOSURE OF TAX LIENS BY THE CITY OF ROCHESTER STATE OF NEW YORK SUPREME COURT COUNTY OF MONROE

IN THE MATTER OF THE FORECLOSURE OF TAX LIENS PURSUANT TO TITLE 4 OF PART E OF ARTICLE IX OF THE CHARTER OF THE CITY OF ROCHESTER.

LIST OF DELINQUENT TAXES AS OF JULY 1, 2012 PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that on December 12, 2012, the Corporation Counsel of the City of Rochester filed in the office of the Monroe County Clerk a list of parcels of property on which the City of Rochester holds a lien for taxes, assessments, fees or other charges which is at least one year old and which the City of Rochester intends to foreclose by an action in rem pursuant to Title 4 of Part E of Article IX of the Charter of the City of Rochester. A copy of that list was published on December 12, 2012. The foreclosure list contains as to each such parcel: 1. The tax account number and address; 2. The name of the last known owner; 3. The amount of each tax lien, except for a $155.00 charge which has been added to each tax lien pursuant to Section 9-123(A)(3)of the City Charter but which is not reflected on the printed list. All persons having an interest in the real property described in the foreclosure list are hereby notified that the filing of the list constitutes the commencement by the City of Rochester of an action in the Supreme Court, Monroe County, to foreclose the tax liens therein described by an action in rem and that the list constitutes a notice of pendency of action and a complaint by the City of Rochester against each parcel of land therein described to enforce the satisfaction of such tax liens. This action is brought against the real property only. No personal judgment will be entered in this action for the delinquent taxes, assessments, fees or other charges.

A copy of the foreclosure list has been filed in the office of the City Treasurer and will remain open for public inspection up to and including February 19, 2013, which is the redemption deadline date. Any person may on or before that date redeem any parcel on the foreclosure list by paying to the City Treasurer the amount of all delinquent taxes, assessments, fees and other charges stated on the foreclosure list, plus the $155.00 charge referred to above, plus accrued interest and late payment charges. Any person having any interest in any parcel on the foreclosure list may, at any time up to the redemption deadline date, serve a verified notice of interest or an answer upon the Corporation Counsel setting forth in detail the nature and amount of his interest or any defense or objection to the foreclosure. The notice of interest or answer must also be filed in the office of the Monroe County Clerk. Where a valid notice of interest is served, the parcel will be held for a foreclosure auction pursuant to Section 9-143 of the City Charter. Any person who fails to redeem or to serve a notice of interest or an answer by the redemption deadline date shall be barred thereafter from asserting his interest in the pending foreclosure action, and judgment in foreclosure may be granted without regard for, and in extinguishment of, the interest of any such person.

ROBERT J. BERGIN Corporation Counsel rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 33


Legal Ads > page 33 as agent of the Company upon whom process against it may be served and a copy of any process shall be mailed to 2340 Brighton Henrietta Road, Rochester, NY 14623. The purpose of the Company is any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] Name: FLOUR MAGAZINE LLC. Arts. Of Org. filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 11/26/2012. Office Location: Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to: C/O FLOUR MAGAZINE LLC, One East Main Street, 10th Floor, Rochester, New York 14614. Purpose: Any Lawful Purpose. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] Notice of Formation of 216 MAGNOLIA, LLC. Articles o f Organization filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/27/2012. Office location: Monroe County SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall

mail process to principal business location: The LLC, 15 Grace Marie Drive, Webster, NY 14580. Purpose: any lawful activity [ NOTICE OF FORMATION 1653-1655 E. MAIN, LLC ] Articles of Organization filed with Secretary of State of NY (“SSNY”) on 12/14/2012. Office in Monroe County. SSNY designated agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to LEGAL COUNSEL, C/O Applied Image Inc., 1653 E. MAIN ST., ROCHESTER, NY 14609. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION CROSBY ABSTRACTING SERVICES, LLC ] NOTICE OF FORMATION Crosby Abstracting Services, LLC Articles of Organization filed with Sec’y of State (SSNY) on 11/14/12. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to c/o the Company, 14 Red Lion Road, Henrietta, NY 14467. Purpose: Any lawful activity.

[ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF 36 JEFF, LLC ] The name of the Limited Liability Company is 36 Jeff, LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the New York Secretary of State on 5/8/2008. The office of the LLC is in Monroe County. The New York Secretary of State is designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. The Secretary of State shall mail a copy of such process to PO Box 25454, Rochester, NY 14623. The LLC is organized to engage in any lawful activity for which an LLC may be formed under NY LLC Law. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY ] Notice of formation of Bratton Properties, LLC. Articles of Organization filed with the New York Secretary of State on November 5, 2012. The office of the LLC is in Monroe County . The New York Secretary of State is designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. The Secretary of State shall mail a copy of such process to 67 North Avenue, Webster, New York 14580. The LLC

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is organized to engage in any lawful activity for which an LLC may be formed under the NY LLC law. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LLC ] J.J. Bell Constructors, LLC has filed articles of organization with the New York Secretary of State on November 26, 2012. Its principal place of business is located at 200 Buell Road, Rochester, New York in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent upon whom process may be served. A copy of any process shall be mailed to 200 Buell Road, Suite A-8, Rochester, New York 14624. The purpose of the LLC is to engage in any lawful activity for which Limited Liability Companies may be organized under Section 203 of the New York Limited Liability Company Law. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LLC ] Ramar Stair & Railing, LLC has filed articles of organization with the New York Secretary of State on December 13, 2012. Its principal place of business is located at 432 Portland Avenue, Rochester, New York in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent upon whom process may be served. A copy of any process shall be mailed to 432 Portland Avenue, Rochester, New York 14605. The purpose of the LLC is to engage in any lawful activity for which Limited Liability Companies may be organized under Section 203 of the New York Limited Liability Company Law. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LLC ] Rochester Wellbeing, LLC has filed articles of organization with the New York Secretary of State on December 10, 2012 with a date of formation of January 1, 2013. Its principal place of business is located at 2851 Clover Street, Pittsford, New York in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent upon whom process may be served. A copy of any process shall be mailed to 2851 Clover Street, Pittsford, New York 14534. The purpose of the LLC is to engage in any lawful activity for which Limited Liability Companies may be organized under Section 203 of the New York Limited Liability Company Law. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LUCKY SQUIRREL PARTNERS, L.P. ] Notice of formation of Limited Partnership (“L.P.”). Certificate of Limited Partnership filed

34 CITY JANUARY 9-15, 2013

with Sec. of State of NY (“SSNY”) on December 19, 2012. Office location: 18 Parkview Manor Circle, Honeoye Falls, NY 14472, Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent of L.P. upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of any process to the L.P. at 18 Parkview Manor Circle, Honeoye Falls, NY 14472. The names and addresses of each general partner are available from the SSNY. The latest date upon which the L.P. is to dissolve is December 31, 2037. Purpose: property management and to engage in any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF PITWEB CMM, LLC ] The name of the Limited Liability Company is PITWEB CMM, LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the New York Secretary of State on 11/13/2012. The office of the LLC is in Monroe County. The New York Secretary of State is designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. The Secretary of State shall mail a copy of such process to 7 Mount Eagle Drive, Penfield, NY 14526. The LLC is organized to engage in any lawful activity for which an LLC may be formed under NY LLC Law. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF ROSE CIRCLE, LLC ] First: Rose Circle, LLC, a Limited Liability Company, filed Articles of Organization with the Secretary of State of New York on December 6, 2012 Second: The county within this state in which the office of the limited liability company is to be located is Monroe. Third:The street address of the principal business location is: 24 Old Country Lane, Fairport, New York 14450. Fourth: The Secretary of State is designated as agent of the limited liability company upon whom process against it may be served. The post office address within or without this state to which the Secretary of State shall mail a copy of any process against the limited liability company served upon him or her is: 24 Old Country Lane, Fairport, New York 14450. Fifth: The purpose of the business of Rose Circle, LLC is any lawful purpose [ NOTICE OF SALE ] Index No. 2011-14780 SUPREME COURT STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF MONROE ESL Federal Credit

Union Plaintiff, vs. Todd C. VanOcker a/k/a Todd VanOcker; Marcy A. VanOcker; ESL Federal Credit Union; LVNV Funding LLC APO Sears; Emily VanOcker and Kimberly VanOcker, Defendants. Pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale dated January 2, 2013 and entered herein, I, the undersigned, the Referee in said Judgment named, will sell at public auction in the front vestibule of the Monroe County Office Building, 39 West Main Street, Rochester, New York, County of Monroe, on February 6, 2013 at 10:00 a.m., on that day, the premises directed by said Judgment to be sold and therein described as follows: ALL THAT TRACT OR PARCEL OF LAND, situate in the Town of Gates, County of Monroe and State of New York, known as 105 Dearcop Drive, Rochester, NY 14624; Tax Account No. 119.08-1-3 described in Deed recorded in Liber 6937 of Deeds, page 58 Said premises are sold subject to any state of facts an accurate survey may show, zoning restrictions and any amendments thereto, covenants, restrictions, agreements, reservations, and easements of record and prior liens, if any, municipal departmental violations, and such other provisions as may be set forth in the Complaint and Judgment filed in this action. Judgment amount: $29,062.78 plus, but not limited to, costs, disbursements, attorney fees and additional allowance, if any, all with legal interest. DATED: January 2013 Richard H. Holzberg, Esq., Referee LACY KATZEN LLP Attorneys for Plaintiff 130 East Main Street Rochester, New York 14604 Telephone: (585) 324-5767 [ NOTICE OF SALE ] Index No. 2012-1749 SUPREME COURT STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF MONROE ESL Federal Credit Union Plaintiff, vs. Gregory A. Taggart; Linda A. Taggart; Board of Directors of Hickory Ridge Homeowners Association; Seth Taggart, Defendants. Pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale dated December 10, 2012 and entered herein, I, the undersigned, the Referee in said Judgment named, will sell at public auction in the front vestibule of the Monroe County Office Building, 39 West Main Street, Rochester, New York, County of Monroe, on January 16, 2013 at 10:00 a.m., on that day, the premises directed by said Judgment to be sold and therein described as follows: ALL THAT TRACT

OR PARCEL OF LAND, situate in the Town of Perinton, County of Monroe and State of New York, known as 138 Selborne Chase, Fairport, NY 14450, Tax Account No. 179.08-1-49, described in Deed recorded in Liber 9479 of Deeds, page 48; lot size 80 x 154. Said premises are sold subject to any state of facts an accurate survey may show, zoning restrictions and any amendments thereto, covenants, restrictions, agreements, reservations, and easements of record and prior liens, if any, municipal departmental violations, and such other provisions as may be set forth in the Complaint and Judgment filed in this action. Judgment amount: $154,066.70 plus, but not limited to, costs, disbursements, attorney fees and additional allowance, if any, all with legal interest DATED: December 2012 Mark M. Greisberger, Esq., Referee LACY KATZEN LLP Attorneys for Plaintiff 130 East Main Street Rochester, New York 14604 Telephone: (585) 324-5767 [ NOTICE OF SALE ] Index No. 2012-2588 SUPREME COURT STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF MONROE ESL Federal Credit Union Plaintiff, vs. Thomas A. Randazzo; Capital One Bank USA NA; Midland Funding LLC, doing business in New York as Midland Funding of Delaware LLC; “John Doe” and/or “Mary Roe” Defendants Pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale dated December 6, 2012 and entered herein, I, the undersigned, the Referee in said Judgment named, will sell at public auction in the front vestibule of the Monroe County Office Building, 39 West Main Street, Rochester, New York, County of Monroe, on January 16, 2013 at 11:00 a.m., on that day, the premises directed by said Judgment to be sold and therein described as follows: ALL THAT TRACT OR PARCEL OF LAND, situate in the Town of Gates, County of Monroe and State of New York, known as 318 Wolcott Avenue, Rochester, NY 14606, Tax Account No. 104.09-4-48, described in Deed recorded in Liber 6716 of Deeds, page 283; lot size .12 acres. Said premises are sold subject to any state of facts an accurate survey may show, zoning restrictions and any amendments thereto, covenants, restrictions, agreements, reservations, and easements of record and prior liens, if any, municipal departmental violations, and such other

provisions as may be set forth in the Complaint and Judgment filed in this action. Judgment amount: $15,421.65 plus, but not limited to, costs, disbursements, attorney fees and additional allowance, if any, all with legal interest. DATED: December 2012 Victoria M. Lagoe, Esq., Referee LACY KATZEN LLP Attorneys for Plaintiff 130 East Main Street Rochester, New York 14604 Telephone: (585) 324-5767 [ NOTICE OF SALE ] Index No. 2012-6323 SUPREME COURT STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF MONROE ESL Federal Credit Union, f/k/a Eastman Savings and Loan Association, Plaintiff, vs. Kenneth R. Drayton; Mary Lou Drayton, Defendants. Pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale dated December 7, 2012 and entered herein, I, the undersigned, the Referee in said Judgment named, will sell at public auction in the front vestibule of the Monroe County Office Building, 39 West Main Street, Rochester, New York, County of Monroe, on January 16, 2013 at 10:30 a.m., on that day, the premises directed by said Judgment to be sold and therein described as follows: ALL THAT TRACT OR PARCEL OF LAND, situate in the Town of Hamlin, County of Monroe and State of New York, known as 59 Ketchum Road, Hamlin, NY 14464, Tax Account No. 014.021-16, described in Deed recorded in Liber 5070 of Deeds, page 71; lot size 1.20 acres. Said premises are sold subject to any state of facts an accurate survey may show, zoning restrictions and any amendments thereto, covenants, restrictions, agreements, reservations, and easements of record and prior liens, if any, municipal departmental violations, and such other provisions as may be set forth in the Complaint and Judgment filed in this action. Judgment amount: $113,589.45 plus, but not limited to, costs, disbursements, attorney fees and additional allowance, if any, all with legal interest. DATED: December 2012 Gary Muldoon, Esq., Referee LACY KATZEN LLP Attorneys for Plaintiff 130 East Main Street Rochester, New York 14604 Telephone: (585) 324-5767


Fun [ NEWS OF THE WEIRD ] BY CHUCK SHEPHERD

Updating “The Smell of Napalm in the Morning”: A cosmetics company in Gaza recently began selling a fragrance dedicated to victory over Israel and named after the signature M-75 missile that Hamas has been firing across the border. “The fragrance is pleasant and attractive,” said the company owner, “like the missiles of the Palestinian resistance,” and comes in masculine and feminine varieties, at premium prices (over, presumably, the prices of ordinary Gazan fragrances). Sympathizers can splash on victory, he said, from anywhere in the world.

Government in Action

— The Philadelphia Traffic Court has been so infused with ticket-fixing since its founding in 1938 that a recent Pennsylvania Supreme Court report on the practice seemed resigned to it, according to a November Philadelphia Inquirer account. One court employee was quoted as defending the favoritism as fair (as long as no money changed hands) on the grounds that anyone could get local politicians to call a judge for him. Thus, said the employee, “It was the (traffic) violator’s own fault if he or she didn’t know enough” to get help from a political connection. Traffic Judge Christine Solomon, elected in November 2011 after a career as a favor-dispensing “ward healer,” said the ticket-fixing was “just politics, that’s all.” — More than 200 school districts in California have covered current expenses with “capital appreciation bonds,” which allow borrowers to forgo payments for years -- but at some point require enormous balloon payments. A Los Angeles Times investigation revealed

that districts have borrowed about $3 billion and thus are on the hook for more than $16 billion. “It’s the school district equivalent of a payday loan,” said California State Treasurer Bill Lockyer, a former school board member who said he’d fire anyone who sought such loans. (Some defenders of the loans pointed to schools’ occasional need for immediate money so they could qualify for federal matching grants -- which, to the districts, would be “free” money.) — One of the principal recommendations following the Sept. 11 attacks was that emergency and rescue personnel have one secure radio frequency on which all agencies that were merged into the Department of Homeland Security could communicate. In November, the department’s inspector general revealed that, despite $430 million allotted to build and operate the frequency in the last nine years, it remains almost useless to DHS’ 123,000 employees. The report surveyed 479 workers, but found only one who knew how to find the frequency, and 72 percent did not even know one existed (and half the department’s radios couldn’t have accessed it even if employees knew where to look). — Remember Alaska’s “Bridge to Nowhere”?: In November, the Anchorage Daily News reported the Army Corps of Engineers is building a harbor on the Aleutian native community’s island of Akutan, even though there is no road away from it. Thus, reported KUCB Radio, the only way to get into or out of the harbor is by boat. Any connector road to the only town on the island is “likely years in the future,” according to the Daily News. As well, there is no assurance that the largest business in the area, Trident Seafoods, would ever use the harbor.

[ LAST WEEK’S SOLUTION ON PAGE 30 ]

[ LOVESCOPE ] BY EUGENIA LAST ARIES (March 21-April 19): Protect your heart. Don’t be too quick to believe what someone tells you. Chemistry can lead to trouble if you don’t have similar goals, interests, background or needs. Ask questions before you decide to become intimately involved. Only entertain serious candidates with something to offer. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Whether you are traveling, taking a course or socializing with industry people, you will turn heads and interest potential partners. Step into the limelight, and your popularity will grow and your reputation

will be enhanced. Be bold and show off a little. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): You’ll have plenty of opportunities to meet someone special, but making a decision will not be easy. Expect someone to pressure you into moving too quickly. Don’t lead anyone on or give in to an impulsive temptation. Take your time. CANCER (June 21-July 22): You’ll attract serious candidates for a long-term relationship. Look for the qualities that you find most appealing and the partner that has as much to offer you as you do in return. It’s the ability to share and to give and take equally that will

make this union work. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Proceed with caution, especially if you find that you are attracted to someone at work. You must abide by company rules if you want to keep your position and your reputation. Outside interests or reconnecting with someone from your past is a better choice. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Do the things you enjoy most, and you will meet someone special. Networking or participating in events or activities that allow you to use your skills will bring you in contact with someone who can match you every step of the way.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Don’t be too quick to jump into a relationship with someone because of what you think you can gain. Not everyone you meet will have as much to offer as portrayed. Do your homework, and refuse to settle for someone for the wrong reason. Ulterior motives are present. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): You’re ready to settle down. Looking for the right partner will be easy if you stick to those you meet through friends, reputable dating services or while engaging in an activity you find exhilarating. Let your intuition guide you to the right partner.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Emotional deception will lead you in the wrong direction. Don’t fall for the package when it’s what’s inside that counts. An impulsive move will lead to a sticky situation that is difficult to walk away from. Avoid intimacy that leads to a poor choice. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Set your standards high. Vocalize what you are looking for and your intentions should you find the right person. It’s communication coupled with set goals, good ethics and longterm plans that will help you attract someone sharing your concerns and lifestyle.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Experimenting with love may be enticing but will end up with plenty of restrictions that will not go over well long-term. Keep your distance, don’t make promises and, most of all, be forthright about the way you feel and how you want to live your life. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Expect to face emotional ups and downs if you continue to date the same type of partner. Living in the past or trying to get back together with someone who treated you poorly will only lead to more sorrow. Pick a partner based on more than chemistry.

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36 CITY JANUARY 9-15, 2013


January 9-15, 2013 - City Newspaper