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Affordable housing and concentrated poverty

I recently retired after spending 25 years trying to develop affordable housing in suburban Monroe County. The nonprofit development corporation for which I worked had a mission to develop one unit in the suburbs of Monroe County for every unit developed in the City of Rochester. This was one small step aimed at breaking down the concentration of poverty in Monroe County. In my 25 years we developed 144 units of affordable housing in Monroe County. That is about six per year. In the same period of time three times as many were developed in the City of Rochester. Why? As the recent Rochester Area Community Foundation report pointed out, most suburban communities lack land that is appropriately zoned. Suburban towns also find it politically difficult to rezone a parcel of land for multi-family use when people think it might be for affordable, multi-family units. The limited land appropriately zoned is very expensive. Regulations and policies of state and federal housing financing programs often favor developments in lowerincome, city neighborhoods. The deconcentration of poverty is not a funding priority. Developing more affordable housing in suburban locations will take 2 CITY

JANUARY 8-14, 2014

the cooperation of all levels of government. JULIE EVERITT

Are we driving less?

On a report by the US Public Interest Research Group that Rochesterians drove 400 million fewer miles in 2011 than in 2006 (“Shifting Gears,” News): Well – 400 million fewer miles of driving? Curious as to where they came up with that number. My guess is the major contributor is likely higher unemployment during the study period. (People who don’t work tend to drive fewer miles, as our daily commute makes up the bulk of time we spend behind the wheel.) In fact, area unemployment climbed from about 4.5 percent to 8.25 percent from 2006 to 2011. So the decrease in miles driven makes sense, because people aren’t going to drive to and from their former place of employment. Additionally, during that time, it’s likely that people started driving less by combining trips to the store to save on increased fuel costs, which rose from about $2.50 a gallon to $4 a gallon from 2006 to 2011. Yes, that’s a travel-habit change, but mainly out of economic necessity to try and stretch what disposable income people have. Unfortunately, RGRTA and the Genesee Transportation Council are attempting to capitalize on these numbers to justify their own existence and funding by saying, “Hey – more people are choosing to ride the bus” or “Hey – more people are taking their bikes.” Again – where do these numbers come from? Very few people are taking their bike to work to begin with, especially in February. So a .4 per cent increase probably means 10 more people are now biking to work, increasing the very small pool of a few hundred bike commuters. A handful more people doesn’t signal a major habit change. LESTER WILSON

News. Music. Life. Greater Rochester’s Alternative Newsweekly January 8-14, 2014 Vol 43 No 18 250 North Goodman Street Rochester, New York 14607-1199 themail@rochester-citynews.com phone (585) 244-3329 fax (585) 244-1126 rochestercitynewspaper.com facebook.com/CityNewspaper twitter.com/roccitynews On the cover: Parent Sarah Johns (right) with her daughters Emily and Lillian and Parents as Advocates instructor Susan Hall. Photo by Mark Chamberlin Publishers: William and Mary Anna Towler Editor: Mary Anna Towler Asst. to the publishers: Matt Walsh Editorial department themail@rochester-citynews.com Features editor: Eric Rezsnyak News editor: Christine Carrie Fien Staff writers: Tim Louis Macaluso, Jeremy Moule Music editor: Willie Clark Music writer: Frank De Blase Calendar editor: Rebecca Rafferty Contributing writers: Paloma Capanna, Casey Carlsen, Roman Divezur, George Grella, Laura Rebecca Kenyon, Andy Klingenberger, Dave LaBarge, Kathy Laluk, Adam Lubitow, Nicole Milano, Ron Netsky, Dayna Papaleo, Suzan Pero, Rebecca Rafferty, David Raymond, David Yockel Jr. Art department artdept@rochester-citynews.com Art director/production manager: Matt DeTurck Designers: Aubrey Berardini, Mark Chamberlin Photographers: Mark Chamberlin, Frank De Blase Advertising department ads@rochester-citynews.com Sales operations: Matt Walsh New sales development: Betsy Matthews Account executives: Nancy Burkhardt, Tom Decker, Christine Kubarycz, William Towler Classified sales representatives: Christine Kubarycz, Tracey Mykins Operations/Circulation kstathis@rochester-citynews.com Circulation manager: Katherine Stathis Distribution: Andy DiCiaccio, David Riccioni, Northstar Delivery, Wolfe News City Newspaper is available free of charge. Additional copies of the current issue may be purchased for $1 each at the City Newspaper office. City Newspaper may be distributed only by authorized distributors. No person may, without prior written permission of City Newspaper, take more than one copy of each weekly issue. City (ISSN 1551-3262) is published weekly by WMT Publications, Inc. Periodical postage paid at Rochester, NY (USPS 022-138). Address changes: City, 250 North Goodman Street, Rochester, NY 14607. Member of the Association of Alternative Newsweeklies and the New York Press Association. Annual subscriptions: $35 ($30 senior citizens); add $10 for out-of-state subscriptions. Refunds for fewer than ten months cannot be issued. Copyright by WMT Publications Inc., 2014 - all rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, photocopying, recording or by any information storage retrieval system without permission of the copyright owner.

URBAN JOURNAL | BY MARY ANNA TOWLER

So much hope: the Warren inauguration Lovely Warren was officially inaugurated as Rochester’s mayor on January 1, at the bedside of her dying grandfather, but her swearing in was repeated on Saturday at the Auditorium Theatre, so that the public could watch. It was quite an event, one packed with emotion and symbolism. The person now heading the most important government in Monroe County – and one of the most important governments in New York State – is an African-American woman, and the celebration paid tribute both to her and to her heritage. Christopher Thomas and dt ogilvie, who co-chaired Warren’s transition team, referred to Susan B. Anthony and Frederick Douglass and suggested that Warren’s election signifies that Rochester is fulfilling its destiny. Inaugural speakers included three black Rochesterians who preceded Warren in public office: Ruth Scott, the first AfricanAmerican woman elected to Rochester’s City Council and the first elected as Council president; Warren’s mentor, State Assembly member David Gantt, and Connie Mitchell, the first African American elected to the Monroe County Legislature’s predecessor, the Board of Supervisors. The inaugural address by Warren herself was hopeful and optimistic. Shaping it as an address to her 3-yearold daughter, Warren promised to try to “make things better”: to work to improve city schools, make neighborhoods safe, put people to work, lessen income disparity, improve downtown…. “I know this isn’t going to be easy,” she said. But, she said: “I’m going to fight for changes and outcomes with the determination of a parent defending a child. Because that is what I am doing – defending you and all our children.” That it won’t be easy is an understatement, of course. The high rate of poverty, unemployment, academic failure, and violence in Rochester’s inner city are a decades-old problem, and as Warren knows, good intentions won’t be enough. During Saturday’s celebration, I was struck by several speakers’ reference to the strength of African Americans, particularly of African-American women. Connie Mitchell recalled her own grandmother, “a tough, opinionated woman” who stood up for herself. “Where I came from,” said Mitchell, “women were strong, tough, and breadwinners,” she said. And Warren, Mitchell said, “grew up in a home with a strong female matriarch and a strong black male role model,” her grandfather. In her inaugural address, Warren talked about her grandfather’s strength, too. His

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Under the new mayor’s leadership, can Rochester do what so many other cities have not been able to? mother died when he was 3, Warren said, and his father “never really acknowledged him.” And rather than being able to go to school, he had to start working in the fields when he was only 7. But he and many, many others in Rochester, Warren said, overcame adversity “to make their little corner of the city we call home a better place.” “No matter where you start,” she said, “you can finish strong.” No matter where you start. Warren’s own story is an inspiring one, and her sense of hope and optimism are contagious. But the challenge is enormous. Under her leadership, can Rochester do what so many other cities have not been able to? Will we find a way to overcome the numbing effects of generations of concentrated poverty? Given the challenges, it’s hard for me to feel as optimistic as Warren does right now. But while hope and optimism don’t guarantee success, it’s hard to succeed without them. Warren has assembled what seems to be a talented, qualified team. There’s no question about her confidence and her strength. And she has focused on Rochester’s challenges in a way that no previous mayor has. She has the opportunity to take that focus to county and suburban residents and leaders and convince them to join her in her fight. And she has the opportunity to be a role model, not just for her daughter but for all Rochester children. We won’t know for years whether she’ll be successful. But the entire Greater Rochester region must hope she will, for her sake and for us all.

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CITY 3

[ NEWS FROM THE WEEK PAST ]

News ENVIRONMENT | BY CHRISTINE CARRIE FIEN

Trees for Mount Hope

Lovely Warren at her swearing in as the 67th mayor of the City of Rochester last Saturday. PHOTO BY JOHN SCHLIA SEE A SLIDESHOW OF MORE PHOTOS AT ROCHESTERCITYNEWSPAPER.COM

New dates for film festival

The High Falls Film Festival will be held from October 23 to October 26. There will also be a mini-fest on the dates originally set for the festival, April 25 and April 26. Festival board chair Malcolm Spaull says that the new dates allow the festival to choose films from other festivals held in August and September.

Matano leads local Catholics

Bishop Salvatore Matano became the Rochester Catholic Diocese’s ninth bishop. Matano, who replaced Bishop Emeritus Matthew Clark, previously led the Diocese of Burlington in Vermont. Matano inherits a diocese

4 CITY

Hundreds of trees in the historic Mount Hope Cemetery have fallen victim in recent years to weather, old age, and disease — about 250 trees since 2010. The comforting canopy of oaks, maples, spruces, and other tree varieties is a vital part of the aesthetic of the historic cemetery, officials say, so plans are under way to reforest Mount Hope.

that has faced significant challenges during the last 10 years, such as the consolidation of schools and churches.

Warren’s security flack

New Mayor Lovely Warren’s decision to hire a two-person personal security team blew up social media earlier this week. Some wondered why Warren needs security, so no other mayor has had it. Others cried nepotism because one of the security officers is Warren’s uncle. Warren said the security is necessary, and praised her uncle’s background. Reggie Hill is a retired state trooper and has provided security for some of New York’s governors.

JANUARY 8-14, 2014

A Japanese maple tree in Mount Hope Cemetery. FILE PHOTO

The City of Rochester and Friends of Mount Hope Cemetery are overseeing the project. A consultant will be hired to create a tree master plan, which will likely be implemented in stages over the course of several years, officials say. The city and the Friends group also hope to raise $70,000 through a public campaign to help fund the project. The campaign was launched on October 3, 2013 — the cemetery’s 175th birthday. As of December 27, approximately $9,500 had been raised. Many of the trees that were removed were Norway maples, officials say, which is an invasive species. “Because of that, they don’t live very long,” says Mary Gaudioso, who is assistant commissioner of the city’s Department of Environmental Services. “It appears that many were planted at about the same time.”

They were probably planted because they grow quickly, says JoAnn Beck, the city’s senior landscape architect. “The whole idea of managing the forest and reducing the pest species is kind of a modern idea,” she says. Mount Hope has a diverse palette of trees, Gaudioso says, so the master plan must preserve that variety. But the trees must also fit the character of the parts of the cemetery they’re planted in, she says. “In certain areas we have very tall trees, like oak trees,” Gaudioso says. “So if we’re replacing in that area, we’re looking for similar structure.”

The 180-acre property is home to UR’s laser lab, but is mostly undeveloped. UR officials are asking the Town of Brighton to rezone a chunk of that land so it can be developed.

DEVELOPMENT | BY JEREMY MOULE

UR making moves in Brighton A University of Rochester plan to build out its South Campus in Brighton is inching forward after several years on hold. Most of the 180-acre property, which is home to UR’s laser lab, is situated between East River and Crittenden roads. Besides the lab, it is generally undeveloped. UR officials are asking the Town of Brighton to rezone a chunk of that land so it can be developed according to the university’s long-range plan. The UR also wants the town to approve a new three-story Medical Center building on the South Campus, which would be used for outpatient imaging services and to provide some services for children with autism. University officials expect the building to be completed in 2015. The university is pursuing institutional planned development district zoning for the site, says Brighton Supervisor Bill Moehle, which would allow it to build residential, office, research, and clinical space. Last month, UR gave the town a draft environmental statement for the rezoning proposal. The Brighton Town Board will most likely refer the statement to a consultant this week for review. UR officials first proposed rezoning the property in 2005, and they included

that objective in the school’s 2008 campus master plan, says university spokesperson Sara Miller in an e-mail. But the proposal was put on hold when the economic crisis hit, she says. Moehle says that building out the site The University of Rochester plans to develop its South Campus will undoubtedly between East River and Crittenden roads (pictured). IMAGE COURTESY DIGITALGLOBE/GOOGLE impact the surrounding area. Adjacent neighborhoods have flooding University officials have also agreed and drainage problems, he says, so those to donate approximately 40 acres of land issues will need to be considered. on Crittenden to the town, Moehle says, Because of the potential impacts, the which will be used for a park. The land is town is treating the UR’s application adjacent to the Lehigh Valley Trail. as an incentive zoning proposal, which The university property is tax exempt, means that the town will want something but once it’s developed it will draw in exchange for the rezoning. The UR significantly on town services, Moehle and the town have already come to terms says. Town and UR officials are discussing on some details, Moehle says. some sort of financial support from the Traffic will be an issue, he says, and UR university to offset those costs, he says. has said it won’t put entrances to the site on Crittenden Road. The road isn’t designed to handle the traffic that would accompany the fully built-out campus, he says.

NYS drones

The Federal Aviation Administration says it wants to see drones sharing domestic airspace with commercial flights by 2015. And the FAA has designated six research sites around the country to help reach that goal, including one in New York. The sites will reportedly work on different aspects of drone use. Griffiss International Airport near Utica will be charged with determining how drones and passenger aircraft can avoid collisions, especially in the Northeast’s congested airspace. The FAA received 25 applications for the work, which is supposed to create 100,000 jobs and infuse the economy with $82 billion. —BY TIM LOUIS MACALUSO

Lej vacancies

The Monroe County Legislature has four vacant seats because the people elected to them have resigned for new local offices. Democratic Legislator Michael Patterson resigned to take a seat on Rochester City Council. And three Republican legislators vacated their seats: Mike Barker is now Perinton supervisor, Ciaran Hanna is on the Perinton Town Board, and Rick Antelli is Greece receiver of taxes. County Legislature Jeff Adair will have to appoint someone to each of these seats, and the appointee must be from the same party as the person who resigned. Typically, the party’s leadership recommends an appointee. Anyone appointed to the seats will have to run for election in November. —BY JEREMY MOULE

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CITY 5

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ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT | BY JEREMY MOULE

NY’s economic development Hunger Games

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JANUARY 8-14, 2014

In 2013, the I-Square mixed-use development in Irondequoit was awarded approximately $2.3 million in state funding through the Finger Lakes Regional Economic Development Council. PHOTO BY MARK CHAMBERLIN

Rochester Institute of Technology plans to renovate the Rochester Savings Bank building. FILE PHOTO

New York is three years into its economic development Hunger Games. The analogy between a fictional dystopian death match and Governor Andrew Cuomo’s signature economic development initiative isn’t entirely precise. While the Cuomo initiative pits regions of the state against each other in an annual competition for limited resources, nobody dies. And the distribution of resources has been equitable across New York’s 10 regions. Each has received approximately $220 million in state resources over the last three years, says Mark Peterson, CEO and president of Greater Rochester Enterprise and a member of the Finger Lakes Regional Economic Development Council. In the Finger Lakes region, 255 projects large and small have received awards totaling $224.8 million. The University of Rochester’s health care research supercomputer, for example, has been awarded $10.5 million over three years. Other awards, totaling a few thousand dollars each, have funded small programs for arts organizations. Cuomo portrays the councils as a way for regions to coordinate economic development efforts. He says that local leaders and business people know their regional economies best and that state agencies should take their cues from them. But the program has flaws, too. Some of the projects prioritized by the councils don’t get the funding or incentives they need. The state has been slow to pay out some of the awards. And though information about the awards and the progress on various projects is available — though a little digging is required — job creation data is not easily accessible. In a big-picture sense, the council approach is showing progress, say members of the Finger Lakes group. They say it’s helped

on that funding means the project will have to be reconfigured. “I think the project is still very solid and will go forward,” Peterson says. Most of the awards are paid out through reimbursements, and that’s posed another problem. The state has been slow to make some of the payments, Peterson says, and some projects are waiting on money. “No one knows how long it will take and that’s problematic for planning, it’s problematic for executing a strategy,” he says. Peterson uses the Finger Lakes Health Systems’ high blood pressure initiative as an example. The program was awarded a $300,000 grant from Empire State Development in 2011, he says, and the work is generally over. But the agency has yet to be reimbursed. Criticism has also been aimed at some of the projects themselves. The proposed Science Technology and Advanced Manufacturing Park in Genesee County has been criticized by antisprawl advocates. And the mixed-used College Town project in Rochester, which was advanced by UR officials, received a $4 million Empire State Development grant. UR President Joel Seligman is co-chair of the Finger Lakes council.

local government and economic development officials refine efforts to attract businesses and revitalize communities. The Finger Lakes council has gotten funding for research at UR and Rochester Institute of Technology, work force training programs, company expansions, housing projects, tourism initiatives, and downtown improvement projects, Peterson says. “I think we’ve focused in the right places,” says David Young, president of the Rochester Building and Construction Trades Council and the labor representative on the Finger Lakes council. In the 2013 awards, the state didn’t fund

one of the Finger Lakes council’s highest priority projects, a fermentation cluster at Eastman Business Park. The park and some private companies sought $3 million to build a facility that can convert plant materials into sugars, which could then be used to make biodegradable plastics, biofuels, and environmentally preferable chemicals. Council members saw a project that would bolster the work being done by several companies in the evolving business park. Eastman Business Park has been the region’s top priority for each of the past three years. Council members have decided to hold off on the fermentation cluster project for a year and continue discussions with the state, Peterson says. The state also declined to fund another regional priority: a proposed business accelerator at the old Genesee Hospital campus. The goal of the project is to help new businesses get off the ground. The project received $5 million in awards over the previous two years, and sought another $3 million. Peterson says missing out

The council’s priority-setting role has perhaps

been the biggest benefit to the region, Peterson says. It’s provided a formal structure for local government and business leaders to figure out where to concentrate economic development efforts, he says. Each year, the council reviews the resources that the state plans to offer, and that helps determine which projects the council will propose for funding. In 2011, the council successfully advanced a couple of dozen housing projects. And this year, it received funding for two specialized initiatives: the council’s Opportunity Agenda proposal; and

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an entrepreneurial services partnership between UR, RIT, and High Tech Rochester — a business incubator. The Opportunity Agenda centers on struggling neighborhoods in the City of Rochester’s troubled crescent, particularly the El Camino neighborhood. The plan is a targeted effort to improve the neighborhoods’ economic performance, and lays out potential investment opportunities in housing, community groups, health care, and job training programs. The council’s emphasis on Eastman Business Park, which has been transitioning from the former Kodak Park to a multi-tenant manufacturing and commercialization center, is also paying off. Young, the labor representative, says the park is the region’s greatest asset, but could be its biggest liability if neglected. Over the past three years, significant projects in the park have received awards. One of the key projects funded was a battery and energy storage consortium’s technology commercialization center, which received $3.5 million in the first year of the council program. Outside of the council process, state officials worked alongside local and federal officials to usher the park through Kodak’s bankruptcy. The state’s assistance resolving issues of liability for historic pollution at the site was crucial, Peterson says, and will help make the park more attractive for new tenants. The council has also brought in funding for community-centered projects, including revitalization efforts in downtown Rochester and infrastructure studies and improvements. This year, the I-Square mixed-use development in Irondequoit received two awards, totaling about $2.3 million, centered on environmental aspects of the project. And RIT received $1 million to renovate the former Rochester Savings Bank into the school’s Center for Urban Entrepreneurship. A planned expansion at the Rochester Public Market received a $500,000 grant from Empire State Development. It’s not high tech and nobody gets to announce that hundreds of jobs are coming to the area as a result. But it’s inexpensive, Peterson says, and helps accomplish several key goals. The popular market provides an urban community with access to inexpensive, fresh food and also gives farmers an opportunity to sell their goods. Expanding and improving the market will provide increased opportunity for both groups, Peterson says. “Those are the kinds of projects, when you can do that, that are really win-wins for everybody,” Peterson says.

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CITY 7

Powering up parents ............................................................... EDUCATION | BY TIM LOUIS MACALUSO

Brenda Coleman says her son LaBronze, 10, is intelligent and has an impressive vocabulary. And there are times when he is extremely talkative, she says. But Coleman says she has to keep LaBronze on a tight, consistent schedule. Any unusual variations can trigger serious behavioral problems, she says. When that happens, she says, “this house can get really rough for me.” LaBronze was diagnosed with autism about two years ago, Coleman says, and the adjustment has been challenging. “Dealing with an autistic child is difficult,” she says. “They don’t give you any eye contact, no expression to tell you what’s going on or what’s wrong with them. It’s really hard, because they can have a temper tantrum at any time.”

................................... Coleman also has two daughters. Christina is 7 and Rosalyn is 5. “My 5-year-old has global delays,” Coleman says. “She has difficulty understanding. Her speech and cognitive skills are behind where they should be. And she’s receiving help.” But Coleman says there came a time several months ago when she realized she needed help, too. She readily admits to being overwhelmed as a parent. Coleman took the advice of a neighbor who had heard about the Parents as Advocates program and says she decided find out more. Developing better parenting skills is important, Coleman says. But many parents don’t know what kind of support to ask 8 CITY

JANUARY 8-14, 2014

for, she says, or how to express themselves clearly and appropriately. “My kids have different social skills and learning styles because of their disabilities,” she says. “Being an older parent and starting to have my kids very late, it’s been hard. When you have a child that doesn’t have problems, it’s hard enough. But it’s 10 times harder when you’ve got a son that’s autistic and a daughter with delays. You have to figure out how to juggle all of this. You need help.” Parents as Advocates is a support program designed to help parents help their children have a positive school experience. The program, still in its pilot stage, is affiliated with the Hillside Family of Agencies.

Started in 2008, Parents as Advocates has many components, but teaching parents how to better communicate with their children’s teachers and principals and guiding them toward building productive relationships are recurrent themes. And often, it involves fairly basic concerns like scheduling parent-teacher conferences or improving attendance. But sometimes the issues that parents face are more complicated. For instance, when a teacher told one couple that their daughter might be held back due to her low reading skills, PAA worked with the parents on how to ask the teacher for feedback on how to improve their daughter’s reading.

The program is available at no cost to families who live in the City of Rochester and have a child entering kindergarten through third grade. The program sends state-certified teachers or what they refer to as parent educators to the home to work with parents in a familiar environment. The in-home visits also eliminate problems with transportation and child care. Coleman is about three months into the program. She says she is concerned that her lack of social skills may prevent her from helping her children get the support they need. She never developed those types of skills, she says. Her parents were older when she was born, she says, and she didn’t have a good relationship with her stepmother.

....................................... OPPOSITE PAGE: Parent Brenda Coleman (left) is just beginning to work with Parents as Advocates. THIS PAGE: Parent Sarah Johns (left) with Parents as Advocates instructor Susan Hall. PHOTOS BY MARK CHAMBERLIN

In a recent PAA session, parent educator Susan Hall talked with Coleman about Coleman’s interaction with her children’s teachers. “In certain areas, they’re good,” Coleman says. “But then in others, if you don’t speak up for yourself, they [school officials] will throw anything at you. And you end up sitting there wondering ‘Now what do I do?’” Coleman and her husband have been trying to move Rosalyn into a classroom with fewer students because they want her to receive more individualized support. “With 24 students with just one teacher, she is not going be where she needs to be,” Coleman says. But Coleman says she’s especially concerned about her son, LaBronze. She says she’s pleased that his teacher and principal have begun to view her as an involved parent. The relationshipbuilding techniques that she has learned from Hall seem to be working, she says. But LaBronze is still disruptive in class, she says. So Hall has been working with Coleman to find out what social support systems are available outside of school and in the community. Hall says she wants to link Coleman with a group of parents who are sharing similar experiences with their children at home and in school.

Hall says that parents like Coleman are more common than most people realize, and that they often feel isolated. “When you have kids like this, you can’t always talk about it,” Coleman says. “People sometimes are uncomfortable, and they may not want to talk about it with you.” Hall uses an evidence-based curriculum when working with parents that can take about 36 months to complete. It includes topics such as how to volunteer or help in your child’s school, how to volunteer if you’re a working parent, how to help your child with homework and create a positive attitude about school, how to help your child develop friends at school, and how to encourage your child to participate in extracurricular activities. But the area where many parents seem to need the most help, Hall says, is communicating with their children’s teachers and principals in a constructive way. Hall says working parents or parents who may have a limited education or had a troubled experience in school often feel uneasy speaking up to teachers. Often teachers don’t realize the position of power and authority they’re in, Hall says, which can make it difficult for some parents to express their needs. And sometimes teachers make inaccurate assumptions about a parent.

In a session with a different parent, Sarah Johns, Hall stresses the importance of meeting with her daughters’ teachers. Sarah and Ian Johns are working parents and their schedules make school meetings difficult. “We both try to get time off from work, but it’s tough because my job is very strict about time off,” Sarah Johns says. “Last year, he [Ian] did most of the parent-teacher conferences because I got denied on every one of them.” Their daughters attend different schools, which adds to the scheduling conflicts. Emily is in kindergarten in a city school and Lilian is a first grader in a private school. Hall worked with Sarah Johns on how to ask the schools for more notice about school functions, for example. Hall also stresses that good communication is mutual. She discusses with Johns some things that the girls’ teachers might want to know from the parents. For example, do the children have any food allergies? Do the parents tell the teachers when something unusual happens in the neighborhood that may be upsetting to the girls? Or do the girls have a heightened interest in something that perhaps the teachers could incorporate into a lesson to make it more interesting? “Let’s say it’s fishing,” Hall says. “If the teacher knows that the girls are really interested in fishing, they can integrate their personal experience into what they’re learning. It can be as simple as using little fish magnets or playing a game where the kids fish for letters.” The Johns have progressed well in the PAA

program, Hall says. And their interest in their daughters’ education and their trust in Hall are evident. They are exactly the engaged parents that city school officials having been saying for years that they need. “There’s more than 50 years of research that shows that students do better in school when their parents are engaged,” says Rochester schools Superintendent Bolgen Vargas. He says he is especially encouraged by programs like PAA because parents are in a sense the district’s customers. They should advocate for what they need, he says, and teachers and principals must be more responsive. It’s much worse for the district, Vargas says, when parents simply choose an alternative to city schools but give no explanation why.

More than 70 parents and children have gone through the PAA program. While it’s too soon to know if the program is successful, it’s largely an extension of another Hillside program, Parents as Teachers. And many of the parents who participated in that program requested PAA from Hillside. Both programs are partly funded by the Community Foundation, says Jennifer Leonard, president and executive director. Parents as Teachers emphasizes in-home visits, early intervention, and tailored support to the parents’ needs. Hillside adopted the Parents as Teachers program in Rochester from a model program in St. Louis. Similar programs exist throughout the US, with many educators and parents swearing to their effectiveness. They say that the programs provide an opportunity for early detection of developmental problems and that they reduce child abuse and neglect. And despite the cost of programs like Parents as Teachers, supporters say it’s dramatically less than the costs to society when children don’t graduate from high school and are unprepared for college or work. The program is frequently held up as one of the most productive ways to mitigate childhood poverty in the US. But not everyone is impressed. A 2002 study by SRI International and Widener University looked at the effectiveness of Parents as Teachers programs with lowincome parents and teachers, who are the most frequent participants. The study showed only modest gains in parental knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors. But the study also said that how the program is administered could determine its effectiveness. And parents must continually practice what they’ve learned, the study said. Hillside officials say that the effectiveness of PAT offshoots such as Parents as Advocates has to be viewed over the long term. The ultimate goal is to give parents another form of much-needed support, they say. Though Rochester is frequently referred to as a city that is “program rich” with dozens of nonprofit, private, and government-sponsored programs to help with the education of city children, the need here is great, says Mary Jo Brach, director of Hillside’s Family Resource Centers of Crestwood Children’s Center. “There’s not one answer,” Brach says. “I think we need a range of options.”

rochestercitynewspaper.com

CITY 9

BISTRO/AUDITORIUM AMERICAN BISTRO AT ITS BEST! Local Ingredients & Seasonal Menu

DAILY SPECIALS & SMALL PLATE ENTREES Happy Hours: Tues thru Fri 5-7pm

ZEPPA AUDITORIUM! Jan. 19th: The Buddahood Jan 24th: Rochester Original Music Series 315 GREGORY ST • 563-6241 IN THE HISTORIC GERMAN HOUSE ZEPPABISTRO.COM

For more Tom Tomorrow, including a political blog and cartoon archive, visit www.thismodernworld.com

URBAN ACTION This week’s calls to action include the following events and activities. (All are free and open to the public, unless otherwise noted.)

Talk on renewables

The Pittsford Public Library will host “100% Renewable Energy for NYS by 2030: Vision or Dream?” The talk by Hal Bauer, NYS Sierra Club at-large delegate, will be held from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. on Sunday, January 12. Transition to fossil-free energy is a goal of the Sierra Club, but the transition will not be turnkey and green shopping alone is not a solution.

Bauer’s talk will be held at the Pittsford Public Library, 24 State Street.

Film discussion on mental illness

The Lifetree Café will present “Mysteries of Mental Illness: One Woman’s Struggle to Regain Her Life,” at 7 p.m. on Monday, January 13. The film is about Karen McCracken, author of “Breaking Free from OCD.” The film will be followed by a discussion with a focus on recovery and management of mental illness, and dispelling negative stigmas. The event will be held at 1301 Vintage Lane, Greece.

Sustainable Saturday event

Rochester Greenovation will hold Sustainable Saturday from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. on January 11. The event will feature 60 artists, food vendors, green businesses, and presentations by environmental groups. It will be held at 1199 East Main Street.

CITY NEWS BLOG

POLITICS, PEOPLE, EVENTS, & ISSUES

rochestercitynewspaper.com/BLOGS/NEWSBLOG COMMENTING ON THE STATE OF ROCHESTER & BEYOND

10 CITY JANUARY 8-14, 2014

Dining The “al a Diabla” in the Jalisco a la Diabla ($16.50) foreshadows the dish’s spice. Shell-on shrimp are sautéed in a redpepper-tomato sauce. To get to the shrimp, you peel the shells at the table, getting your fingers slick with the sauce, making it pleasurably necessary to lick them clean. The first bite delivers a tomato-y sweetness and then — BAM! — a burst of heat that makes the nose run and the mouth pant.

Mole poblano (left) and caramel custard flan (right) from Rio Tomatlan in Canandaigua. PHOTOS BY MARK CHAMBERLIN

Southern comforts Rio Tomatlan Tequila Bar & Kitchen 5 BEEMAN ST., CANANDAIGUA 394-9380, RIOTOMATLAN.COM MONDAY 4-9 P.M., TUESDAY-SATURDAY 11 A.M.-10 P.M., SUNDAY NOON-9 P.M. [ REVIEW ] BY LAURA REBECCA KENYON

Tucked on a side street in Downtown Canandaigua is Rio Tomatlan, a restaurant specializing in cuisine from Mexico’s Pacific Coast. Owned by Rafael Guevara, the restaurant serves food that is fresh, complexly flavored, and delicious. You can taste the kitchen’s attention, dedication, and passion for cooking with each bite. If you time things right, you’ll be lucky to have Tamarie “Tam” Converse-Cataldo as your waitress; she will serve you with a hearty smile and a throaty laugh. Kevin Wade oversees the extensive bar, aiming to quench your thirst. Scores of tequilas and mezcals line the walls, ready to be sampled on their own, mixed into drinks, or consumed in flights. Don’t let a bad track record with tequila dissuade you from sampling — these offerings are worlds apart

from the shots you (and I) did during college. There are also other liquors, beers, sangria, Mexican sodas, and Mexican iced teas (a.k.a., agua frescas) from which to choose. The music and art at Rio Tomatlan are eclectic. The playlist, selected largely by Wade, includes everything from mariachi bands to The Pixies to Deer Tick to Arcade Fire. A monochromatic mural of a fierce, spearcarrying skeleton riding a giant, equally fierce rooster is painted across the entrance to the main dining room. The painting replicates the art found on bottles of Espolòn Blanco tequila (which, in itself, is a nod to both the art of José Guadalupe Posada and the Mexican Revolution). Two mixed-media pieces flank the dining area: at one end, a smoky-eyed Madonna holds a can of spray paint reverently; at the other, a ginger-haired mermaid casts a come-hither look across the room. That mermaid may be making eyes at the

food on your table. Crisp, house-fried tortilla chips beg to be heaped with fresh pico de gallo ($3.50). The diced tomatoes add a touch of sweetness, onions contribute pungency, hot peppers add piquancy, and cilantro brings bright greenness. It’s easy to polish off a basket

in a few minutes and, if you are sharing a basket with more than one person, you will find yourself silently plotting against your companions to get the last chip. An order of queso fundido ($8) includes four mini-tacos piled with chorizo, melted Oaxaca cheese, pico de gallo, and thin shreds of cabbage. They’re sloppy and lovely to eat. Biting into the taco, the queso stretches for a few inches before snapping, and juices from the chorizo run out onto your hand and the plate. There’s an aromatic heat in the sausage, a cool crunch from the cabbage, and a citrusy hit when the lime wedge garnish is put to good use. The shredded chicken in the mole poblano ($13) is piled high and topped with Oaxaca cheese, sesame seeds, pickled poblano, carrot, and red onions. On the side are fluffy white rice and three warm corn tortillas. Mole poblano, a classic sauce that includes chocolate, nuts, and peppers, is made with a long list of ingredients. It’s difficult to isolate the flavor of any one element; it’s also why, in Mexico, it is traditionally prepared only on special occasions. Here, the dish is done justice: the dark mole is rich and layered with flavor. Its spice sneaks up and tingles, then teases, the mouth with a hint of sweetness.

Guacamole ($7.50) is a special at Rio, which frustrates some diners. But good guacamole can’t be made without good avocados, and ripe avocados aren’t always available in Western New York. So when the kitchen gets great avocados, there’s great guacamole on the menu — and when it can’t, there is no guac to be had. (I have heard that some people will bring their own avocados and ask the kitchen to make guacamole for them. I don’t know if that’s worked out.) Flan ($4) is creamy and rich. There’s a hint of burnt sugar in the caramel, a whisper of bitterness against the milky and vanilla sweetness of the custard. Choco flan ($5) offers two long slices of dense and moist chocolate cake topped with flan, plated with fudgy, thick Oaxacan chocolate fondue sauce. Other recommend dishes include shrimp or tilapia ceviche ($7), green pozole ($5 or $9 depending on portion size), enchiladas rojas ($8.50), and pollo chipotle ($13). That said, it’s unlikely to go wrong ordering anything from the menu, including the tacos ($2.25), burritos ($3.25; look for “burros”), or chalupas ($8). Walking into Rio Tomatlan looking for a Doritos Loco Taco experience will disappoint in the same way walking into Dinosaur BBQ looking for a McRib sandwich will disappoint. There are no Mexican-American restaurant tropes to be found. No frozen margaritas from a slushie machine. No hardshell tacos filled with ground beef under a blanket of melted cheddar. No pile of tortilla chips covered in Cheez Whiz, dotted with olives and canned jalapeno rings. If you don’t know where to look, it can be challenging to find Rio Tomatlan. The hanging sign on Beeman Street facing Main Street/Route 332 is missing. The new, blue awnings have yet to be printed with the restaurant’s name. A large planter out front reads “El Rincon” — a reminder that Rio Tomatlan had been the second location of the Sodus restaurant owned by Guevara’s mother. Nevertheless, seek it out. The entrance is underneath the middle awning. It is more than worth the effort.

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 11

Upcoming [ HIP-HOP/RAP ] Migos Saturday, February 8. Main Street Armory, 900 East Main St. $25-$30. 8 p.m. 232-3221. rochestermainstreetarmory.com [ POP/ROCK ]

Heart Thursday, April 3. Auditorium Theatre, 885 East Main St. $60.50-$130. 7:30 p.m. 222-5000. rbtl.org

Music

[ POP/ROCK ]

Sea of Storms Wednesday, May 7. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave.

$6-$8. 9 p.m. 454-2966. bugjar.com

Third Presbyterian Church Chancel Choir SATURDAY, JANUARY 11, AND SUNDAY, JANUARY 12 THIRD PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH, 4 MEIGS ST. 4 P.M. | FREE-WILL OFFERING THIRDPRESBYTERIAN.ORG, 271-6537. [ CLASSICAL ] The Third Presbyterian Church will

present its bi-annual production of the “Boar’s Head and Yule Log Festival.” The production includes a cast and choir of more than 100, including a king and queen, lords and ladies, cooks and servants, dancers, woodsmen, and those who ushered in the Christ child. The Chancel Choir of the Third Church will perform, accompanied by organ, brass, strings, and percussion. A ringing of the hand bells and madrigals begins 30 minutes prior to each performance, and a reception will be held each night.

— BY PALOMA CAPANNA

Pseudo Youth SATURDAY, JANUARY 11 CALIFORNIA BREW HAUS, 402 RIDGE ROAD WEST 8 P.M. | $6-$8 | 621-1480 [ POP/ROCK ] Pseudo Youth came together when a group of four excellent musicians got tired of doing time on the cover-band treadmill. The quartet had something to say and started saying  — and playing  — it in 2012. The band soon fell into its own groove and sound; a melodious cacophony of hard rock and thick, chthonic hooks. The guitars’ crush is crowned with a heavy but not overly dramatic vocal delivery. Excellent modern rock, daddy-o.  — BY FRANK DE BLASE

CHORAL SINGERS – CHECK THIS OUT! The Lyric Chorale is seeking experienced singers on every part (SATB) for its Spring concert, which is Saturday, May 10th, at 7:30, St. Louis Church, Pittsford. Rehearsals will be Monday evenings from 7:30-8:30 p.m.(January 6 – March 24), and Mondays from 7:30-9:30 p.m. (April 7-May 5). The rehearsals are also held at St. Louis Church. The theme of the concert is “Toward the Light”, and we will be performing beautiful music of comfort and hope, exploring visions of the soul’s journey in this life and the next from the viewpoint of different poets and traditions. The featured work will be Morten Lauridsen’s Lux Aeterna, an absolutely gorgeous extended work for chorus and chamber orchestra. For this work, a lush, full chorus is needed. We would like to beef up our 35-voice chorus to around 45 voices. Interested singers should contact Chrisanne Yule, at yulecmusicnme@rochester.rr.com, or the choir’s website, at www.lyricchorale.org, and go to the audition link.

12 CITY JANUARY 8-14, 2014

LISTEN UP! CITY + SPOTIFY Check out our FREE Spotify playlist to listen to full tracks from bands in our weekly top concert picks, updated every Wednesday!

ROCHESTERCITYNEWSPAPER.COM /SPOTIFY

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 8

[ ALBUM REVIEWS ]

Miss Tess & The Talkbacks “The Love I Have For You” SIGNATURE SOUNDS misstessmusic.com

The Bon Ton Parade is now the Talkbacks, but Miss Tess — the queen up front — remains with her heart on her sleeve. Said heart is what influences Tess’s music. And on her new six-cover, oneoriginal platter “The Love I Have For You,” Tess gives a nod to the roots of her roots music with songs from artists that make perfect sense, like Hank Williams, and fringe material you may not expect, from musicians like Randy Newman and Bonnie Raitt. In terms of playing, it sounds like the band is leaning in a little heavier as Miss Tess shifts from the gentler, jazzier strain of previous efforts to a more honky-tonk troubadour wail. Drop the needle in this one and kick up some sawdust. — BY FRANK DE BLASE

The Fighting Jamesons SATURDAY, JANUARY 11 MONTAGE MUSIC HALL, 50 CHESTNUT ST. 8 P.M. | $10 | THEMONTAGEMUSICHALL.COM [ POP/ROCK ] Similar to acts like Flogging Molly, Dropkick Murphys, and The Pogues, Virginia-based The Fighting Jamesons takes a traditional Irish folk sound and intensifies it by combining folk instrumentation, such as banjo and fiddle, with a plugged-in, standard rock set-up. The Jamesons play updated versions of traditional Irish songs such as “Danny Boy” and “Drunken Sailor,” while also writing and playing original Celtic rock tunes. The band’s unexpected amalgamation of sounds, combined with its raw, relentless energy, make for a captivating and engaging live show. — BY LEAH CREARY

Abigail Williams WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 15 THE BUG JAR, 219 MONROE AVE. 9 P.M. | $10-$13 | BUGJAR.COM [ POP/ROCK ] Good lordy, if there is a sonic equivalent to a snakebite shot it’s probably Abigail Williams. Like a potent drink, the L.A.-based metal trio pulls you in and drags you along. I’m smitten with Abigail Williams’ ability to create music that is both abrasive and beautiful. Abigail Williams strips the symphonic down to its primal essence and sounds plausible either way. Even if you keep on the sunny side, you still might dig the tunes. With Erimha, Circus Grenade, The Gutted, and Arthurian Shield. — BY ROMAN DIVEZUR

Babayaga

L&MES LAN

I call it stoner rock with soul, metal on the outside with flesh and bone on the inside. It melts in your brain, not in your hands. Though Babayaga has been a part of the Upstate New York heavy scene for a while — collectively and with its members in other hard and heavy projects — the band certainly hasn’t oversaturated the market. It’s a rarified, low-down thrill to see this band stir things up, or to hear its new CD, “Been a Long Time Comin.’” This is an excellent studio representation of the band’s expertly controlled dynamics and dropped-D mischief. Following a heavy kick-off from the tune “Haggard,” “Been a Long Time Comin” weaves its way through varied time signatures as it amply shows off the band’s unwavering brutality and humor. I mean, come on — a song called “Sweet Queef ”? Hilarious. If a guitar wielded as a hammer, guttural vocals that still make sense, and drums that don’t quit sound like your thing, then Babayaga is your jam. — BY FRANK DE BLASE

Gibbs St. esm.rochester.edu. 7:30 p.m. Free. [ DJ/ELECTRONIC ]

DJ Reign and Ladies Night. Captain’s Attic, 37 Charlotte St. 546-8885. Call for info. DJ Adam. Nashvilles, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. Henrietta. 3343030. nashvillesny.com. Call for info.

293 Clarissa St. 232-3430. 10 p.m. 21+. Call for info. Teen Set 45 Party. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. Free. Why Not Wednesday. Eclipse Bar & Grill, 374 Thurston Rd. 502-922-6567. 10 p.m. Call for info. Y Not Wednesday w/DJ ET. Plush, 151 St. Paul St. 2325650. venurochester.com. Call for info. [ HIP-HOP/RAP ]

Word of Mouth Wednesday’s w/DJ Private Eye. Dubland Underground, 315 Alexander St. 232-7550. dublandunderground. wordpress.com. 10 p.m. 21+. $5. [ POP/ROCK ]

CITY

Amanda Ashley. Cottage

MUSIC C

FEATURES, REVIEWS, CHOICES, & CONCERTS

WINTER BEERS

Great lakes Genesee Bock Beer Anderson Valley Winter Solstice Magic Hat Heart of Darkness

L&M Lanes Gift Cards Now Available!

Any denomination - Great gift idea!

OPEN BOWLING NIGHTLY

[ CLASSICAL ]

Russian-American Friendship Concert. Kilbourn Hall, 26

Ladies Nite: High Heels and Mini Skirts New Wave Wednesdays. Club Clarissas,

“Been a Long Time Comin’” SELF-RELEASED

We Have the NHL TV Package A UNIQUE NEIGHBORHOOD BAR!

[ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ] Jumbo Shrimp. Dinosaur Bar-B-Que, 99 Court St. 3257090. dinosaurbarbque.com. 8 p.m. Free. The Reef Airs. Sticky Lips BBQ Juke Joint, 830 Jefferson Rd. 585-292-5544. stickylipsbbq. com. 6:30 p.m. Free.

873 Merc Merchants Rd. • 288-1210 www www.LMlanes.com Find us on

Hotel of Mendon, 1390 Pittsford-Mendon Rd. Mendon. 624-1390. cottagehotelmendon.com. Second Wednesday of every month, 9 p.m. Call for info.

ROCHESTERCITYNEWSPAPER.COM/MUSIC

continues on page 15

Meet the Artist Concert Series! ELDAR

Tues. Feb 11th • 7pm Tickets: $25 Athena Performing Arts Center

BONERAMA

Wed. March 26th • 7:30pm Tickets: $20 Greece Olympia High School Auditorium

Tickets can be purchased online at www.jazz901.org and by calling 585-966-2660 rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 13

Music

BREW & BEANS

Local band Funknut has three core members, and has rotated through several other members. Still, the sound remains big and funky. PHOTO PROVIDED

Keeping things fresh and funky Funknut CRAFT-ROASTED LOCALLY & ALWAYS FRESH!

200 East Ave • 613-4600

SPoTCOFFEE.COM

THURSDAY, JANUARY 9 STICKY LIPS JUKE JOINT, 830 JEFFERSON ROAD 9 P.M. | FREE | STICKYLIPSBBQ.COM FACEBOOK.COM/FUNKNUT [ PROFILE ] BY FRANK DE BLASE

Time to to turn turn Time up the the HEAT! HEAT! up THINK CALIENTE!! CALIENTE!! THINK See our website for more info

302 N. Goodman St. Village Gate, Rochester 256.5980

14 CITY JANUARY 8-14, 2014

Funknut is already the big band it will never be. Don’t get me wrong; the Funknut sound is big and soulful, nestled somewhere between Curtis and Sly and a persistent jazzy jam. This is the cry of a trio that can’t even get past trio as far as keeping permanent guns in its ranks. When Funknut came together in 2005, both keyboardist-vocalist Tony Gallicchio and drummer Tristan Greene functioned competently as a duo and didn’t initially seek to expand. They were happy as they were. “It was just keys and drums,” says Gallicchio. “I’d play a little bit of bass with the left hand and we started playing around.” The two met bassist Sean McLay and he signed on. And then there were three. But that was it; No. 4 in the line-up remains elusive. It has been a revolving cast spinning through a revolving door. “We’ve had a lot of great musicians as the fourth member, you know,” says Gallicchio. “Sort of in and out, a rotating cast of really great guitar players; people like Kurt Johnson,

Paul McCardle.” This shifting personnel approach leaves the band’s sound a little more open and less permanent, as if the charts weren’t written in ink. “It makes it flexible,” Gallicchio says. “It opens it up,” McLay says. “Because you can kind of change the flavor, based on who is sitting in that night.” Despite the obvious challenge presented by a revolving cast of characters, Gallicchio digs the funky unpredictability. “It would be nice,” Gallicchio says, “to have it with one person, where it’s locked in, and that’s the sound, and you’re all working together. But it’s still really cool to have someone change it up and put a new twist on some things.” According to Gallicchio, the same broad-net

approach applies when the band is in the studio. “We try to get as many people involved as possible,” he says. “Just because it’s way more fun.” With one CD, “Hit It,” to its credit, Funknut is currently in Acme Studios on Humboldt Street laying down the tracks for album No. 2, “Juicy.” At least, that’s the case when the band isn’t on the road or waiting for Gallicchio, who plays keyboards for rootsy road dogs Giant Panda Guerilla Dub Squad. Besides scheduling and just life in general, the process is slowed by the band’s attention to detail. McLay points the finger at Gallicchio.

“He’s kind of a perfectionist,” McLay says. “He likes to experiment with a lot of different textures. I also think Tony likes to come up with ideas on the fly — not necessarily just in the studio, either. We’ll do mixes, take them home, make notes, listen to them a while, sleep on them, and revisit them maybe a few weeks later and be like, ‘Maybe that didn’t work right, let’s try re-doing it.’” “We don’t have anyone telling us when it has to be done,” Gallicchio says. “And if we’re paying for it, we should really take the time and not regret a note, and enjoy everything.” Will those notes and their predictability cascade over live-show audiences who want to hear the songs as they are on a record? “We can change the interpretation of a tune that is, say, 4 years old and not play it as it was on the recording,” McLay says. “Even if we played it live that way back then. It’s always slowly evolving. We don’t want to get bored with it. We don’t want the audience to get bored with it.” “They’re into hearing it for what it can be,” Gallicchio adds. As for what the band can be — in looking at what will be Funknut’s future legacy — the band members look at the present as the group’s infancy. “This is the beginning of the best part,” Gallicchio says. “This is where it gets good. I can feel it, I can feel it.”

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 8 Grrr!. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 7:30 p.m. Free.

Sparx & Yarms w/Murdersuicide, Craig Marlow. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. $5-$7.

THURSDAY, JANUARY 9 [ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ] Bluegrass Jam. Bernunzio’s Uptown Music, 112 East Ave. 6:30 p.m. Call for info. Jim Lane. Murph’s Irondequoit Pub, 705 Titus Ave. Irondequoit. 342-6780. 8 p.m. Free. The Subject to Change. Boulder Coffee Co., 100 Alexander St. 454-7140. bouldercoffeeco.com. 7 p.m. Call for info. [ DJ/ELECTRONIC ] Killsound. Love Nightclub, 45 Euclid St. 222-5683. 10 p.m. 21+ free until 10 p.m., $3 after, unders $12 ($6 w/college ID).

[ JAZZ ]

Bossa Nova Jazz Thursdays ft. The Charles Mitchell Group.

Espada Brazilian Steak, 274 N. Goodman St. Village Gate. 473-0050. espadasteak.com. 6 p.m. Free. Funknut. Sticky Lips BBQ Juke Joint, 830 Jefferson Rd. 585292-5544. stickylipsbbq.com. 9 p.m. Free.

Jazz Thursdays ft. The David Detweiler Trio. Next Door Bar

& Grill, 3220 Monroe Ave. 2494575. nextdoorbarandgrill.com. Thursday: 5 p.m., Friday and Saturday: 8 p.m/. Free. John Palocy Trio. Bistro 135, 135 W. Commercial St. East Rochester. 662-5555. bistro135. net. 6 p.m. Free. Mary Wojciechowski. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 7:30 p.m. Free. Mike Kaupa. Monroe’s Restaurant, 3001 Monroe Avenue. 348-9104. 6 p.m. Call for info.

The Joe Santora Trio w/Curtis Kendrick & Emily Kirchoff.

Michael’s Valley Grill, 1694 Penfield Rd. (585) 383-8260. michaelsvalleygrill.com. Free. The Swooners. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. 2484825. woodcliffhotelspa.com. 5:30 p.m. Free. Teagan Taylor Trio. Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. abilenebarandlounge. com. 7:30 p.m. $5. [ POP/ROCK ]

Drivin’ Memphis. Dinosaur

Bar-B-Que, 99 Court St. 3257090. dinosaurbarbque.com. 8 p.m. Free. Five Alarm Open Jam. Firehouse Saloon, 814 S. Clinton Ave. 3193832. thefirehousesaloon.com. 9 p.m. Call for info.

Go Forth w/Amends, Rhema, Stick Figure Illustration, Vitalist, and Baku. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe

Ave. 7 p.m. $10-$12.

POP/ROCK | SPORTS

Ever since it formed in Rochester in 2010, the keyboard-driven Sports has skated that fine line between Elvis Costello’s angst, Squeeze’s gorgeous pop, Talking Heads’ quirk, and Rockpile’s hits and hooks. Just what I look for in a band; angst, quirk, hits, and hooks. In the truest sense of the over-used pop label, Sports is a pure pop band and one of the best pop bands you’ll ever hear. Just try and sit still. I dare you. Sports performs with Afro Nips and Muler Friday, January 10, 9 p.m., at the Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. $7$9. bugjar.com. — BY FRANK DE BLASE

FRIDAY, JANUARY 10 [ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ]

Brian Mulligan and The Lonesome Angels. Fanatics,

7281 W Main St. Lima. (585) 624 2080. 7:30 p.m. Free. Jim Lane. Norton’s Pub, 1730 N. Goodman St. 2663570. 6 p.m. Free. Landmark. Sticky Lips BBQ Juke Joint, 830 Jefferson Rd. 585292-5544. stickylipsbbq.com. 9:30 p.m. $3. Mike Pepper . McGraw’s Irish Pub, 146 W Commercial St. East Rochester. 348-9091. mcgrawsirishpub.com. 6 p.m. Free. Pan de Oro. Havana Cabana, 289 Alexander St. 232-1333. havanacabanaroc.com. 10 p.m. Call for info. Ralph Louis. Rochester Plaza Hotel, 70 State St. 546-3450. rochesterplaza.com. 6 p.m. Free. Reiner Eschbach. La Casa, 93 Alexander St. 585-730-5025. https://facebook.com/pages/LaCasa/148219738674006. 6:30 p.m. Call for info. [ BLUES ]

Ghost Peppers w/Greg Townson.

Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. abilenebarandlounge.com. 5:30 p.m. $5. [ CLASSICAL ]

RPO: Cirque Returns. Kodak Hall

[ DJ/ELECTRONIC ]

Aggy Dune, Ambrosia Salad, Miss Darienne Lake, Kasha Davis, and DJ Blake. 140 Alex

Bar & Grill, 140 Alexander St. 256-1000. 140alex.com. Call for info. DJ Energon. Vertex Night Club, 169 N. Chestnut St. 232-5498. 10 p.m. $3-$8. DJ Ryan McManus. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 6 p.m. 21+. Free.

Dubland’s Last Call Official Closing Party ft. RootsCollider, Mosaic Foundation, Neuroceptor. Dubland

Underground, 315 Alexander St. 232-7550. dublandunderground. wordpress.com. 7 p.m. $10-$15. [ JAZZ ]

Champagne & The Swoon Daddies. Bistro 135, 135

W. Commercial St. East Rochester. 662-5555. bistro135.net. 6 p.m. Free.

Jazz Thursdays ft. The David Detweiler Trio. Next Door Bar

& Grill, 3220 Monroe Ave. 2494575. nextdoorbarandgrill.com. Thursday: 5 p.m., Friday and Saturday: 8 p.m/. Free. Just Jazz Trio. Lemoncello, 137 West Commercial St. East Rochester. 385-8565. lemoncello137.com. 7 p.m. Free Lemoncello, 137 West Commercial St. East Rochester. 385-8565. lemoncello137.com. 7 p.m. Free. continues on page 16

at Eastman Theater, 60 Gibbs St. 8 p.m. $15-$92. [ COUNTRY ]

The Smokin’ Hogan Band.

Sandra’s Saloon, 276 Smith St. 585-285-6786. 9 p.m. Free. rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 15

FRIDAY, JANUARY 10

Free, donations accepted Tango Cafe, 389 Gregory St. 271-4930. tangocafedance.com. 7:30 p.m. Free, donations accepted.

Matthew Sieber Ford Trio. Tapas 177 Lounge, 177 St. Paul St. 262-2090. tapas177. com. 4:30 p.m. Free.

[ CLASSICAL ]

The Boar’s Head and Yule Log Festival. Third Presbyterian

The Joe Santora Trio w/Curtis Kendrick & Emily Kirchoff.

Michael’s Valley Grill, 1694 Penfield Rd. (585) 383-8260. michaelsvalleygrill.com. Free. The Russell Fielder Quartet. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 8:30 p.m. Free. Soul Express. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. 2484825. woodcliffhotelspa.com. 7:30 p.m. Free. Soul on Tap w/Earthtones. Johnny’s Irish Pub, 1382 Culver Rd. 224-0990. johnnysirishpub. com. 5 p.m. Free. Ted Nicolosi and Shared Genes. Glengarry Inn at Eagle Vale, 4400 Nine Mile Point Road, Rt 250. Fairport. 598-3820. EagleVale. com. 7 p.m. Free. [ R&B ]

The LPs. Smokin’ Joe’s Bar &

Grill, 425 Lyell Ave. 9 p.m. Call for info. [ POP/ROCK ]

American Moondogs, The Front and Pops Tom. Montage Music Hall, 50 Chestnut St. 232-1520. themontagemusichall.com. 8 p.m. Call for info.

Burn Unit, Banned From The Tavern. Pineapple Jack’s, 485 Spencerport Rd. Gates. 247-5225. facebook.com/ PineappleJacks. 9 p.m. Call for info.

Friday Night Live ft. Dino from Fickle 93.3, Jeff Cosco.

Richmond’s Tavern, 21 Richmond Street. 270-8570. richmondstavern.com. 4 p.m. Call for info. Ruby Shooz. Finger Lakes Casino & Racetrack, 5857 Rt. 96. Farmington. 924-3232. fingerlakesracetrack.com. Call for info. Sirsy w/Deft Heart. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. lovincup.com. 9 p.m. $3-$5. Small Town. T.C. Hooligans, 134 Greece Ridge Center Dr. 2257180. 9 p.m. Call for info. Something Else. Brickwood Grill, 250 Monroe Ave. 730-8230. brickwoodgrill.com. 10 p.m. Call for info. Sports w/The Afro Nips, Muler. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. $7-$9. Teagan & The Tweeds. Dinosaur Bar-B-Que, 99 Court St. 3257090. dinosaurbarbque.com. 10 p.m. Free.

SATURDAY, JANUARY 11

DUB/ELECTRONIC | DUB LAND’S LAST CALL: OFFICIAL CLOSING PARTY   Noteworthy Rochester venue Dub Land Underground will be closing its doors for good on January 11. The venue has put together an epic farewell show, full of some excellent local acts that are sure to give Dub Land a memorable send-off. Performing acts include Mosaic Foundation, Haewa (pictured), and RootsCollider, all of whom will be joined by DJs Riley Beat, NG, and DJ Mario Bee. The show, and music, will continue long into the night — so head out to support a great venue for its last hurrah.   Dub Land’s Last Call takes place on Friday, January 10, 7 p.m., at Dub Land Underground, 315 Alexander St. $10$15. 232-7550. — BY LEAH CREARY Family Friendly Music Series: Asbury First United Methodist Church Bell Choir. Arnett Branch

Library, 310 Arnett Boulevard. 428-8214. noon. Free. Jim Lane. Fazool’s Casual Italian Kitchen, 51 Market St. Brockport. 431-3072. 8:30 p.m. Free. Jon Lewis. Boulder Coffee Co., 739 Park Ave. 697-0235. bouldercoffeeco.com. 8 p.m. Call for info. Marty Roberts. Flaherty’s Webster, 1200 Bay Rd. Webster. 671-0816. flahertys.com. Call for info. Ryan Carey. La Casa, 93 Alexander St. 585-730-5025. https://facebook.com/pages/LaCasa/148219738674006. 6:30 p.m. Call for info. Sofrito. Havana Cabana, 289 Alexander St. 232-1333. havanacabanaroc.com. 10 p.m. Call for info. The Jane Mutiny. Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. abilenebarandlounge. com. 9:30 p.m. $5. Tumbao. Tapas 177 Lounge, 177 St. Paul St. 262-2090. tapas177. com. 11 p.m. Free. Wendell Ferguson. Greece Baptist Church, 1230 Long Pond Rd. 225-6160. 8 p.m. $17-$20. [ BLUES ]

[ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ] Brian Rath. Starry Nites Café, 696 University Ave. (585) 271-2630. starrynitescafe.com. 8 p.m. Free. Connie Deming. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 8:30 p.m. Free. Cut Off Tunes4Tay Fund Raiser. Hochstein Performance Hall, 50 N Plymouth Ave. 4544596. hochstein.org. 7:30 p.m. Donations accepted.

John Cole Blues Band. Dinosaur

Bar-B-Que, 99 Court St. 3257090. dinosaurbarbque.com. 10 p.m. Free. [ CLASSICAL ]

The Boar’s Head and Yule Log Festival. Third Presbyterian

Church, 4 Meigs St. 271-6513. thirdpresbyterian.org. 4 p.m. Free, donations accepted.

16 CITY JANUARY 8-14, 2014

RPO: Cirque Returns. Kodak Hall at Eastman Theater, 60 Gibbs St. 8 p.m. $15-$92. [ DJ/ELECTRONIC ]

Blue Label Saturdays ft. DJ Andy Fade and DJ Bobby Base.

Flat Iron Café, 561 State St. 454-4830. flatironcafe.net. Call for info. DJ Big Reg. Plush, 151 St. Paul St. 232-5650. venurochester. com. 10 p.m. Call for info.

Aggy Dune, Ambrosia Salad, Miss Darienne Lake, Kasha Davis, and DJ Blake. 140 Alex

Bar & Grill, 140 Alexander St. 256-1000. 140alex.com. Call for info. DJ Darkwave. Vertex Night Club, 169 N. Chestnut St. 2325498. 10 p.m. $3-$8.

he 140 Alex Cabaret ft. Poison Waters, DJ Solid Bear. 140 Alex Bar & Grill, 140 Alexander St. 256-1000. 140alex.com. 11:30 p.m. Call for info.

Jameson Alexander, Rob Morley. Love Nightclub, 45

Euclid St. 222-5683. 10 p.m. 21+, 18+ after 2 a.m. $6-$20. La Selva. Tilt Nightclub & Ultralounge, 444 Central Ave. 232-8440. facebook.com/ Tiltnightclub. 10 p.m. Call for info.

Poke Dem Saturdays ft. Team Lion Paw, The Money Green Theme, Nick Kage, and Wavey. Trinities Restaurant, 36

W. Main St. 319-4047. 10 p.m. $5-$10. Saturday Night Ladies Night. BLU Bar & Grill, 250 Pixley Rd. 247-0079. blurochester.com. 9 p.m. Call for info.

CLASSICAL | ROCHESTER PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA

Bach, Bach, Bach, and Handel – as in J.S. Bach, C.P.E. Bach, and J.C. Bach. And Handel. With cloud cover likely until March, there’s really no excuse not to take in a Sunday afternoon concert at Hochstein presented by musicians from the Rochester Philharmonic Orchestra. On January 12, Daniel Meyer will guest conduct, and concert mistress Juliana Athayde will be on violin as part of the “Baroque Sundays” series. The final concert in this series will be held March 23, featuring Brandenburg, Handel, and Haydn. The musicians of the Rochester Philharmonic Orchestra perform Sunday, January 12, 2 p.m. at the Hochstein School of Music & Dance, 50 N. Plymouth Ave. $25. rpo. org, 454-2100. — BY PALOMA CAPANNA [ JAZZ ]

Bob Sneider Trio. Bistro 135,

135 W. Commercial St. East Rochester. 662-5555. bistro135. net. 6 p.m. Free.

Fred Costello & Roger Ekers Jazz Duo. Charley Brown’s,

1675 Penfield Rd. 385-9202. charleybrownspenfield.com. 7:30 p.m. Free.

Jazz Thursdays ft. The David Detweiler Trio. Next Door Bar

& Grill, 3220 Monroe Ave. 2494575. nextdoorbarandgrill.com. Thursday: 5 p.m., Friday and Saturday: 8 p.m/. Free.

The Joe Santora Trio w/Curtis Kendrick & Emily Kirchoff.

Michael’s Valley Grill, 1694 Penfield Rd. (585) 383-8260. michaelsvalleygrill.com. Free. Special Blend. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. 2484825. woodcliffhotelspa.com. 7:30 p.m. Free.

Ted Nicolosi and Shared Genes.

Jasmine’s Asian Fusion, 657 Ridge Rd. Webster. 216-1290. JasmineAsianFusion.com. 6:30 p.m. Free. [ REGGAE/JAM ]

Homegrown Tre ft. Giant Panda Guerilla Dub Squad, Subsoil, Moho Collective. Lovin’ Cup,

300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. lovincup.com. noon. $15-$25.

[ POP/ROCK ] Bangarang. T.C. Hooligans, 134 Greece Ridge Center Dr. 2257180. 9:30 p.m. Call for info. Dog House. Johnny’s Irish Pub, 1382 Culver Rd. 2240990. johnnysirishpub.com. 8 p.m. Free.

Edenborn w/Yeyowulf, Cycles, and The Highest Leviathan. Bug

Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. $5-$7. The Fighting Jamesons. Montage Music Hall, 50 Chestnut St. 2321520. themontagemusichall.com. 8 p.m. $10-$12. Low Flying Planes. Sticky Lips BBQ Juke Joint, 830 Jefferson Rd. 585-292-5544. stickylipsbbq. com. 10 p.m. Free. MoChester. Brickwood Grill, 250 Monroe Ave. 730-8230. brickwoodgrill.com. 10 p.m. Call for info. Poison Whiskey. Finger Lakes Casino & Racetrack, 5857 Rt. 96. Farmington. 924-3232. fingerlakesracetrack.com. Call for info.

Reign ft. Adrianna Noone, ELUR. Main Street Armory,

900 E. Main St. 232-3221. rochestermainstreetarmory.com. 7 p.m. $15-$25. Springer. Pineapple Jack’s, 485 Spencerport Rd. Gates. 247-5225. facebook.com/ PineappleJacks. 10 p.m. Call for info. A Taste of Evil. Richmond’s Tavern, 21 Richmond Street. 270-8570. richmondstavern.com. 8 p.m. Call for info.

SUNDAY, JANUARY 12 [ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ]

Celtic Music Sundays. Temple

Bar and Grille, 109 East Ave. 2326000. templebarandgrille.com. 7 p.m. Free. Fandango at the Tango. Tango Cafe, 389 Gregory St. 271-4930. tangocafedance.com. 7:30 p.m.

Church, 4 Meigs St. 271-6513. thirdpresbyterian.org. 4 p.m. Free, donations accepted. Compline. Christ Church, 141 East Ave. 454-3878. christchurchrochester.org. 9 p.m. Free, donations accepted. RPO: Music of Bach and Handel. Hochstein Performance Hall, 50 N Plymouth Ave. 454-4596. hochstein.org. 2 p.m. $25.

William Warfield - A Legacy of Music: A benefit Concert for the William Warfield Scholarship Fund. Kilbourn Hall, 26 Gibbs St.

esm.rochester.edu. 4 p.m. $15. [ JAZZ ]

Bill Slater Solo Piano. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. 248-4825. woodcliffhotelspa. com. Call for info. Free. [ POP/ROCK ]

Cartella Family Benefit Show ft. Arkhem, Gunnar Stahl, Order of the Dead, and Heatseeker. Bug

Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. Call for info. Dave Richeone Band. Smokin’ Joe’s Bar & Grill, 425 Lyell Ave. 6:30 p.m. Call for info. Mr. Mustard. The Old Toad, 277 Alexander St. 232-2626. theoldtoad.com. 6 p.m. $5.

MONDAY, JANUARY 13 [ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ] Tickle Your Inkus. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 7:30 p.m. Free. [ POP/ROCK ]

Lovin’ Cup Idol: Live Auditions.

Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. lovincup.com. 8 p.m. Call for info.

TUESDAY, JANUARY 14 [ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ] Jim Lane. Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. abilenebarandlounge.com. 7 p.m. Free. Nightfall. The Titus Tavern, 692 Titus Ave. 270-5365. titustavern. com. 5 p.m. Call for info. [ POP/ROCK ]

J. Schnitt w/Archimedes, Crows and Jays, and Devall Music.

Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. $6-$8.

Art

Part of “The Art of Video Games”: “Mass Effect 2,” Casey Hudson, Director; Mac Walters, Drew Karpyshyn, Writers; Casey Hudson, Producer, Microsoft Xbox 360, 2010, Copyright 2010 Electronic Arts, Inc. All trademarks are the property of their respective owners. PHOTO PROVIDED

How do I jump? “The Art of Video Games” THROUGH JANUARY 19 EVERSON MUSEUM OF ART, 401 HARRISON ST., SYRACUSE $5-$10 | 315-474-6064, EVERSON.ORG SUNDAY, TUESDAY-FRIDAY NOON-5 P.M., SATURDAY 10 A.M.-5 P.M. [ REVIEW ] BY WILLIE CLARK

Are video games art? Noted film critic Roger Ebert went on record firmly saying no, they aren’t. But if you are among the Entertainment Software Association’s estimated 58 percent of Americans who play games, you might disagree with Ebert’s stance on the matter. “The Art of Video Games,” curated by Chris Melissinos, founder of Past Pixels, for The Smithsonian American Art Museum, is a traveling exhibit that attempts to get to the core of gaming and raise and answer questions surrounding the history and growth of gaming as an interactive art form. The bulk of the exhibit is experienced through short videos that accompany a walkable timeline of home-console systems. You’ll get a look at 80 games and a variety of consoles dating back to the

Atari VCS (represented by “Pac-Man,” “Space Invaders,” “Pitfall!,” and “Combat”), ColecoVision (a reminder that “Donkey Kong,” a Nintendo title, actually got its home start on a non-Nintendo system), and Intellivision. The exhibits run all the way through the DOS/Windows days (“DOOM II,” “Diablo II,” “Fallout,” “StarCraft”) and end with last-generation consoles Wii, PlayStation 3, and Xbox 360. While the games themselves could make strong arguments for the case of video games as art, their presentation in this exhibit doesn’t do them justice. Short video clips offer up tidbits about each title — such as the introduction of new gameplay mechanics, or placing the title in historical context — but they fail to go in-depth into any singular title or touch on the larger topic at hand. Oddly enough, for an exhibit called “The Art of Video Games,” there is only one small section that contains actual concept art, and the selections within it are odd. Personally, I was glad to see artwork from “The Lord of the Rings: Battle for Middle Earth II” (Windows, Xbox 360) and “Epic Mickey” (Wii) included, but the reliance on these titles actually hinders the overall message of the exhibit: both of those games rely on adapting other worlds to the gaming medium, not creating anything entirely new or unique.

The focus on Western audiences and Western gaming development, especially in the developer-interview section, also seems strange, especially since the gaming world was largely dominated by Japan for so long. I wonder if that was a conscious choice, or if some developers or game studios were simply more open to the idea of providing materials for the exhibit, thus skewing what was included. Some genre-defining, adult-oriented franchises, including “Grand Theft Auto” and “Call of Duty,” are also seemingly ignored. I can’t say for sure that it was due to their adult themes or other issues (the N64 classic “Goldeneye 007” can’t be displayed due to copyright restrictions, apparently), but it is worth noting nonetheless. Also, the total disregard of all handheld gaming devices is a grievous oversight, especially considering both the rapidly growing mobile-gaming sector, and that successful handheld devices tend to sell to more units than home consoles. The exhibit’s real goal seems to be less about exposing the art found within games, and more about hammering home that, yes, games themselves are an art form. Yet the exhibit largely ignores some of the most interesting aspects of gaming. No multiplayer games are playable (although

“Pac-Man,” “Super Mario Bros.,” “The Secret of Monkey Island,” “Myst,” and “Flower” are all playable as part of the exhibit). That seems like a perfect way to demonstrate the community and personto-person interaction that is practically unique to gaming. The whole concept of “the player” is also mostly ignored, save for one portion. The most interesting part of the exhibit is a three-panel display that shows the reactions of people playing various games. The games themselves aren’t shown, just the expressions of people playing them. It is interesting to experience gaming in reverse, and it also made me realize that I never actually get to see what I look like while playing games. Parts of the exhibit seem aimed at nostalgia-fueled gamers, while others seem an attempt to bring new people into the fold. But I’m not sure if it truly successfully appeals to either audience. Being able to actually play all of the games shown in video form would likely have been a technological and licensing nightmare, but without that interactive element, and the player interaction, the exhibit seems to be nothing more than an argument for how a new medium shouldn’t be displayed and treated as art in the same way as more traditional media. A video-based gallery format wasn’t the best choice, and there are many pieces of the larger gaming puzzle that simply aren’t well represented here. Looking at a video of a game and going, “Oh yeah, graphics have come a long way” does nothing to advance the discussion of games as culturally important art. What results is a cursory overview of a few top games from each era of the video game. But by not allowing people to play most of them, and lacking anything that touches on why people play games or the experiences players bring to them, the exhibit focuses too much on its overbearing message that games are in fact art, without ultimately convincing viewers as to why that is. It’s ultimately a non-interactive way to showcase and convey an interactive medium. If it can’t convince a gamer who already thinks of games as art, the exhibit — much like the game industry as a whole — has a lot of growing left to do.

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 17

ART | “MARSH MADNESS: WONDERS OF WETLANDS”/“BEING HUMAN”

Take a drive this week and check out two art exhibitions that tackle subjects of arguably equal mystery and fascination: one that celebrates nature, and another that explores human nature. “Marsh Madness: Wonders of Wetlands” is on view at the Hurst Gallery at Rochester Museum and Science Center’s Cumming Nature Center (6472 Gulick Road, Naples) through May 4. In addition to works by the Guild of Natural Science Illustrators that feature birds, turtles, plants, and other flora and fauna found in freshwater wetlands, a variety of taxidermy wildlife is on display. The gallery is open Wednesday-Friday, 9 a.m.-3:30 p.m., and Saturday-Sunday, 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Admission to the center is a suggested donation of $3 per person or $10 per family. For more information, call 374-6160 or visit rmsc.org. From January 11 through February 28, Main Street Arts (20 W. Main St., Clifton Springs) will present “Being Human,” which addresses themes of relationships, power, culture, and emotion in works of a variety of media by established and emerging artists. Featured makers include Kathy Calderwood, Robert J. Clarke, Maria Galens, Richard Harvey, Francesca Lalanne, Tom Lightfoot, Robert Ernst Marx, Colleen McCall, Mitch Messina, Edward Mullady, Anne Muntges (artwork pictured), Caitlin Pallischeck, Jose Enrique Portas, Mike Tarantelli, Wayne Williams, and Bill Wolff. A reception will be held Saturday, January 11, 4-7 p.m. Regular hours are Tuesday-Thursday, 11 a.m.-6 p.m., and Friday-Saturday, 11 a.m.-7 p.m. Admission is free. For more information, call 315-562-0210 or email mstreetarts@gmail.com. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY

Art Exhibits [ OPENING ] Arts & Cultural Council for Greater Rochester, 277 N Goodman St. Four Artists. Jeanne Raffer Beck, William Keyser, Laura Wilder, and Shamira Nicolas. Reception Jan 8, 5-7 p.m. 473-4000. artsrochester.org. AsIs Gallery, Sage Art Center, Wilson Blvd. “(En)Gendered: Works and Words: Dialogues in Intersectionality.” Through Jan 31. Reception Jan 17, time TBA. sageartcenter.com/asis-gallery/. Axom Gallery, 176 Anderson Ave., 2nd floor. “Shaman-isms: New Ceramic Sculpture by Bill Stewart.” Through Feb 22. Reception Jan 18, 5-8 p.m. 2326030 x23. axomgallery.com. Firehouse Gallery at Genesee Pottery, 713 Monroe Ave. “Hand to Hand.” Through Jan 31. An exhibit featuring the work of the Center’s printmaking, letterpress, and ceramics teachers. Mon-Wed 10 a.m.-9:30 p.m., Thu 10 a.m.-9:30 p.m., Fri 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Sat Noon5 p.m. Reception Jan 10, 6-9 p.m. 244-1730. geneseearts.org. I-Square Visions, 693 Titus Ave. Irondequoit. Fabrications: The Art of Fiber. Created by The Weavers Guild of Rochester. Through Feb

6. Mon-Thu 10 a.m.-2 p.m., Sat 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Reception Jan 17, 7-9 p.m. zannebrunner@ gmail.com. Joe Brown Gallery in the Printing & Book Arts Center, 713 Monroe Ave. “At the Riviera” by Amanda Chestnut. Jan 10, 6 p.m. 2441730. office@geneseearts.org. geneseearts.org. Main Street Arts, 20 W. Main St., Clifton Springs. “Being Human” Group Show. Through Feb 28. Reception Jan 11, 4-7 p.m. 315462-0210. mstreetarts@gmail. com. mainstreetartsgallery.com. Nazareth College Colacino Gallery, 4245 East Ave. “This Heirloom.” A multi-media exhibition of film-inspired collages by Mara Ahmed. Through Feb 7. Wed-Sun noon-5 p.m. Artist’s reception Jan 24 5:30-7:30 p.m., artist’s talk Jan 24 at 6.30 p.m. 389-5073. naz.edu/art/colacinoart-gallery. Rosalie “Roz” Steiner Art Gallery, Genesee Community College, One College Rd. “Interactions of Time and Substance,” Landscape Paintings by Leigh Yardley. Through Feb 28. Mon & Wed-Fri 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Receptions Jan 23, 12:30-1:30 p.m., and Jan 24, 5:30-7:30 p.m. 343-0055 x6490. genesee.edu/campuslife/ arts/gallery/.

18 CITY JANUARY 8-14, 2014

COMEDY | “A WELL-MANNERED NEW YEAR”

DANCE | STARDUST OPEN BALLROOM DANCE SERIES

In the immediate period following the holidays, we all have fresh new stories to laugh (and pretend not to cry) about. Comedy is all about finding the humor in commiserating over what’s strangely relatable — you know, “It’s funny ’cause it’s true.”

Oh, the weather outside is frightful, but inside we’ll twirl past nightfall. Grab your partner and dance away the winter blahs on Tuesday nights from November through May, in the century-old Stardust Ballroom at Edgerton Community Center (41 Backus St.). This elegant spot plays host to a weekly open ballroom dance with live music by a rotating group of bands. This Tuesday, January 14, the cheerful event will feature the Gate Swingers, and future weeks will include tunes by Alan Whitcomb, Nice-N-Easy, Bob Ames, Bradley Batz, and others. The events take place at 7:30 p.m., and admission is $3. For more information, call 428-6755, or visit cityofrochester.gov/ ballroomdanceseries. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY

On Saturday, January 11, Polite Ink Sketch & Improv will present “A Well-Mannered New Year” at MuCCC (142 Atlantic Ave.). The show will provide a combination of wacky sketches and improv based on audience suggestions, as well as singing and the occasional video short. Audience participation is key, so show up with your craziest comedic fodder about bad behavior and new beginnings, and be ready to share. The show takes place at 8 p.m. Tickets are $10 in advance, $12 at the door, and $8 for seniors. Reserve yours by calling 866-811-4111. For more information, visit muccc.org. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY Tabula Rasa Art Studio, 215 Tremont St. “Poverty Illustrated.” Jan 10, 7 p.m. Four local artists whose work carry different interpretations of poverty as a local and national crisis. With Zach Goetz, Cullen Wegman, Bruce Leonard Jackson, George Wegman. 939-4344. humanissimus.org. Williams Gallery at First Unitarian Church, 220 S Winton Rd. “A Journey in Search of Beauty and Understanding” works by Francis Coleman. Through Feb 17. Mon-Fri 10 a.m.-2 p.m. and 4:30-7 p.m. Reception Feb 10, 5:30 p.m. 271-9070. rochesterunitarian. org/music_arts_gallery.html. [ CONTINUING ] A.R.T.S. Gallery, 321 East Ave. “The Good Shepherd” Original watercolors and prints by Joyce Morgan, 90 year old great- grandmother and former missionary. Through Jan 31. 729-9916. Bridge Art Gallery University of Rochester Medical Center, 300 Crittenden Blvd. “Stillness & Dance.” Through Feb 28. Reception Jan 8, 5-6:30 p.m. 275-3571. facebook.com/ BridgeArtGallery.URMC. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. The Lobby Presents: Topher Martin. Through Feb 5. 8 p.m.-2 a.m. lobbydigital.com. Community Darkroom Gallery, 713 Monroe Ave. “Visual Discourse” Photography by Community Darkroom Photographers. Through Jan 10. Mon 9 a.m.-9:30 p.m., Tue-Thu 9 a.m.-6:30 p.m., Fri noon-5 p.m., Sat 10 a.m.-5:30 p.m. 271-5920. geneseearts.org. Creative Wellness Coalition Gallery, 320 N Goodman St, Suite 201. “Painting Big” Group Show. 325-3145 x144. mharochester.org.

Cumming Nature Center, 6472 Gulick Rd. Marsh Madness: Wonders of Wetlands. Through May 4. Wed-Fri 9 a.m.–3:30 p.m., Sat-Sun 9 a.m.–4:30 p.m. 374-6160. rmsc.org. The Episcopal Church Home, 505 Mt Hope Ave. Transient Walls Art Show by Gianna Stewart. Through Feb 16. Open daily 10 a.m.-8 p.m. Reception Jan 9, 4-6 p.m. 546-8439 x3102. Friendly Home’s Memorial Gallery, 3165 East Ave. Tracie Doerner. Through Feb 28. Daily 10 a.m.-5 p.m. friendlyhome.org. Fuego Coffee Roasters, 167 Liberty Pole Way. Images From the New Nature. Drawings, paintings, and sculpture by Robert Frank Abplanalp. 315244-2415. thinklikeme@gmail. com. Gallery R, 100 College Ave. The Art of Deception. Dec 20-Jan 31. Closing reception Jan 31, 7-9:30 p.m. 256-3312. galleryr99@ gmail.com. galleryr.cias.rit.edu. George Eastman House, 900 East Ave. Through Jan 12: “The History of Space Photography” and “Astro-Visions.” Through Feb 16: “Lossless.” Tue-Sat 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Sun 11 a.m.-5 p.m. 2713361. eastmanhouse.org. Hartnett Gallery, Wilson Commons, University of Rochester, River Campus. “Deconstructing Scapes” by Zahra Nazari. Through Jan 19. Tue-Fri 11 a.m.7 p.m., Sat-Sun noon-5 p.m. blogs.rochester.edu/hartnett. Image City Photography Gallery, 722 University Ave. “The Magic of Light.” Through Jan 26. Tues-Sat 12-6 p.m., Sun 12-4 p.m. 4821976. dano@rochester.rr.com. imagecityphotographygallery.com. International Art Acquisitions, 3300 Monroe Ave. Fluid Motion.” On view: “Reverence,” among the original oil on canvas by British artist Paul Bennett. Through Jan 31. Mon-Fri 10 a.m.-9 p.m., Sat

10 a.m.-6 p.m., Sun 12-5 p.m. internationalartacquisitions. Link Gallery at City Hall, 30 Church St. “See Us Now...Greater Rochester’s Asian-American Community” Exhibition. Through Jan 27. Mon-Fri 9 a.m.-5 p.m. 208-8614. info@apaaroc.org. cityofrochester.gov. Lower Link Gallery, Central Library, 115 South Ave. Art of the Book. Artist Books and Altered Books. 428-8053. libraryweb.org/ artofthebook. Mental Health Association, 320 N Goodman St. “Luminaria” Art lighting the path to wellness. Creative Wellness Coalition. 3253145 x144. Mill Art Center & Gallery, 61 N Main St. Honeoye Falls. Art Crescendo: Mill Gallery 2013 Members Exhibition. Through Feb 15. Monday 11 a.m.-3 p.m., Tue 2-5 p.m., Wed 11 a.m.-5 p.m., Thu 11 a.m.-8 p.m., Fri 11 a.m.-3 p.m., Sat 11 a.m.-3 p.m. millartcenter.com. Nan Miller Gallery, 3450 Winton Place. Albert Paley on Park Avenue. Tue-Sat 10 a.m.-5 p.m. 292-1430. nanmillergallery.com. Orange Glory Café, 240 East Ave. Watson Art Show? This! Mon-Fri 11 a.m.-3 p.m. 232-7340. Outside the Box Art Gallery, Bldg 9, The Canal Works, 1000 Turk Hill Rd. “Winter Reflections.” Through Jan 31. Sun-Mon 8 a.m.-5 p.m., Tue-Wed 8 a.m.-10 p.m., ThuSat 8 a.m.-11 p.m. 645-2485. outsidetheboxag.com. Oxford Gallery, 267 Oxford St. Annual Holiday Exhibit. Through Jan 11. 271-5885. oxfordgallery. com. Record Archive, 33 1/3 Rockwood St. Altered States of Rochester: A Neo-colorist series of paintings by Darren Thomas Brennessel. recordarchive.com. Roc Brewing Co., 56 S. Union St. Justin Fondrie Photography. 7949798. rocbrewingco@gmail.com. rocbrewingco.com. Rochester Contemporary Arts Center, 137 East Ave. 23rd Annual Members Exhibition. 461-2222. info@rochestercontemporary.org.

Rochester Regional Community Design Center, 1115 E Main St. “Connection: Spaces, Places, & the Urban Fabric.” Through Jan 10. Mon-Fri 9 a.m.-5 p.m. 2710520. rrcdc.org. Rush Rhees Library, University of Rochester, River Campus. “Nurturing Inquiry.” Rare Books and Special Collections Department. Through Feb 28. Mon-Fri 9 a.m.-5 p.m. 275-4477. rochester.edu. The Shoe Factory Art Co-op, 250 N Goodman St. Featuring artwork by local artists.. Open First Fridays, 6-9 p.m. Second Saturdays, 12-4 p.m., and Wednesdays, 12-5 p.m. 7320036. shoefactoryarts.com. Spectrum Gallery, 100 College Ave. Lana Pejovic’s New Work. Through Jan 31. Tue & Thu 9 a.m.-8 p.m., Wed & Fri 9 a.m.-6 p.m., Sat 10 a.m.-2 p.m. 4614447. spectrumgalleryroc.com. Starry Nites Café, 696 University Ave. Bruce Bozman: Island Color. 271-2630. shoefactoryarts@gmail.com. starrynitescafe.com. Williams-Insalaco Gallery at FLCC, 3325 Marvin Sands Dr. Alumni Biennial Exhibition: The Art, Music, and Poetry of Rand Darrow. 785-1369. flcc.edu.

Art Events [ FRI., JANUARY 10 ] Hand to Hand Open House. 6 p.m. Genesee Center for the Arts and Education, 713 Monroe Ave. Free 271-5183. office@geneseearts. org. geneseearts.org. [ SAT., JANUARY 11 ] Anderson Alley Artists Second Saturday Open House. Second Saturday of every month, 12-4 p.m Anderson Alley Building, 250 N. Goodman St eve@evebotelho.com. andersonalleyartists.com. Second Saturday: Vintage Japanese and Asian Textiles Trunk Show and Sale. 12-4 p.m. Anderson Alley Building, 250 N. Goodman St Studio #202 4423516. andersonalleyartists.com.

Open All Year

Comedy [ THU., JANUARY 9 ] Ralph Tetta. 7:30 p.m. Comedy Club, 2235 Empire Blvd Webster $9. 671-9080. thecomedyclub.us. [ FRI., JANUARY 10 ] Gary Conrad. Jan. 10-11, 8 p.m. Joke Factory Comedy Club, 911 Brooks Avenue $10. 328-6000. jokefactorycomedyclub.com. Mick Foley. Jan. 10-11, 7:30 & 10 p.m. Comedy Club, 2235 Empire Blvd Webster $20, register 671-9080. thecomedyclub.us. [ SAT., JANUARY 11 ] Greg Warren. 8 p.m. Auburn Public Theater, 8 Exchange St $13.50-$15 315-253-6669. auburnpublictheater.org. Polite Inc. Sketch & Improv Presents: A Well Mannered New Year. 8 p.m. MuCCC, 142 Atlantic Ave $8-$12 politecomdey@ gmail.com.

Dance Events [ TUE., JANUARY 14 ] Stardust Open Ballroom Dance Series. 7:30 p.m. Edgerton Community Center, 41 Backus St Big Band era live music $3 admission 4286755. cityofrochester.gov/ ballroomdanceseries.

Festivals [ SAT., JANUARY 11 ] The Boar’s Head and Yule Log Festival. 4 p.m. Third Presbyterian Church, 4 Meigs St. Free, donations accepted. 271-6513. clenti@ thirdpresbyterian.org. thirdpresbyterian.org.

Kids Events [ THU., JANUARY 9 ] Teen Movie Makers. 7-8:30 p.m. Seymour Library, 161 East Ave., Brockport Grades 6-12 Free. 637-1050. seymourlibraryweb. org. [ FRI., JANUARY 10 ] Winter Suncatchers. 3:30-4:30 p.m. Seymour Library, 161 East Ave., Brockport All ages welcome Free. 637-1050. seymourlibraryweb.org. [ SAT., JANUARY 11 ] Family Storybook Creative Workshop. Second Saturday of every month, 10 a.m. Spectrum Creative Arts, 3300 Monroe Ave. Free. 855-444-0201. spectrumcreativearts.org. Fashionistas Weekend. Jan. 1112. The Strong National Museum of Play, 1 Manhattan Square Sat 11 a.m.-4 p.m., Sun 1-4 p.m Included in museum admission: $13, free to kids under 2 and members 263-2700. museumofplay.org. Nature Explorers. 9 a.m. Helmer Nature Center, 154 Pinegrove Ave Program for kids in grades 2-4 336-3035. Role Playing Gamers Club. 10 a.m.-2 p.m Seymour Library, 161 East Ave., Brockport Ages 13+ Free. 637-1050. seymourlibraryweb.org. Tadpole Explorers. 9 a.m. Helmer Nature Center, 154 Pinegrove Ave Pre-school program for 2-year olds 336-3035.

IT’S WARM & COZY AT THE GRILL ENJOY THE NEW WINTER MENU Visit us online at:

SPECIAL EVENT | SPEAKEASY PARTY

Hoof it to the juice joint and spill the secret password. I swear, I heard there’ll be kittens galore. The Geneva Historical Society will host a speakeasy party on Friday, January 17, at beautiful Belhurst Castle on scenic Seneca Lake (4069 New York Route 41, Geneva). The event takes place 6-9 p.m., and will feature music, dancing, and period-inspired cuisine. Bring your greenbacks and play games of chance, such as Blackjack, Pull Tabs, or the Horse Wheel. Buy raffle tickets for 1920’s-themed gift baskets, and break out the pearls, fringe, vests, and pomade, because those who come in costume can enter the glad-rags contest.

PultneyvilleGrill.com

Only 25 Minutes From Rochester! 4135 Mill St. (Lake Road) Pultneyville, NY

(315) 589-4512

Tickets are $75, and can be purchased by calling 315-7895151. All proceeds will benefit the efforts of Geneva Historical Society, which seeks to preserve the stories of Geneva’s past. For more information, visit genevahistoricalsociety.com. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY [ SUN., JANUARY 12 ] Open House. noon. Trinity Montessori School, 100 Golden Flyer Drive Children 21 months through 12 years old Free 586-1044. lscarafile@trinitymontessori.org. trinitymontessori.org. [ MON., JANUARY 13 ] American Girl Club. 4:15-5 p.m. Henrietta Public Library, 455 Calkins Rd Kids ages 7-12 Free. 359-7092. K-2 Book Club. 4:30-5:15 p.m. Seymour Library, 161 East Ave., Brockport Free. 637-1050. seymourlibraryweb.org.

Lectures [ WED., JANUARY 8 ] Trekking in the Himalayas. 7:30 p.m. Morgan-Manning House, 151 Main St Free. 637-3645. morganmanninghouse.org. [ THU., JANUARY 9 ] An Astronaut’s Guide to Photography in Space. 6 p.m. Dryden Theatre, 900 East Ave. See NASA Astronaut Donald Pettit’s amazing collection of long-exposure outer space photos he calls “star trails” Included in museum admission: $5-$12. 271-4090. eastmanhouse.org. “Making Maple Syrup in Mendon” with Greg & Sheila Keyes. 7:30 p.m. Mendon Community Center, 167 N. Main St. Free. 624-5655. townofmendon.org. Social Security. 7-8:30 p.m. Henrietta Public Library, 455 Calkins Rd Register. 359-7092. [ SAT., JANUARY 11 ] “Gardening with Youth.” 12-1 p.m. Sully Branch Library, 530 Webster Ave cityofrochester.gov/ winteradventures. Roger Campbell on Natural Health. 2 p.m. Books Etc., 78 W. Main

St Macedon Free. 474-4116. books_etc@yahoo.com. [ SUN., JANUARY 12 ] Opera talk: Bob Heberger. 1 p.m. Temple B’rith Kodesh, 2131 Elmwood Ave. Umberto Giordano, Andrea Chenier Free 244-7060. tbk.org. Opera Talks: Beat the Blahs: The Haskell Rosenberg Memorial Series. 1 p.m Temple B’rith Kodesh, 2131 Elmwood Ave. Jan 12: Umberto Giordano, Andrea Chenier, with Bob Heberger. 3342323. operaguildofrochester.org. [ MON., JANUARY 13 ] Opera Lecture & Listening Series. 7 p.m Brighton Memorial Library, 2300 Elmwood Ave. Jan 13: Verdi’s Rigoletto, presented by Rosalba Pisaturo. Free. 7845300. brightonlibrary.org. [ TUE., JANUARY 14 ] Hidden Gems of Greater Western New York. 7 p.m. Greece Town Hall, one Vince Tofany Blvd. Greece. $2 donation to Greece Historical Society. 225-7221. greecehistoricalsociety@yahoo. com. Historic Talk: Los San Patricios. 7 p.m. St. John Fisher College, 3690 East Ave $10, free to Fisher community. rochesteriaci.org. Opera Lecture: Bad Boys: Villains, Drunkards, and Charlatans in Opera. 7:30-9 p.m. Italian American Community Center, 150 Frank Dimino Way With Art Axelrod 594-8882. iaccrochester.org. Tuesday Topics. 12:12-12:52 p.m. Central Library, Kate Gleason Auditorium, 115 South Ave. “Emerging Popularity of Public Markets” with Diane Eggert Free. 428-8325. libraryweb.org. [ WED., JANUARY 15 ] The Icarus Sessions. Third continues on page 20 rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 19

Theater

Lectures

The Off-Monroe Players��� upcoming production focuses on the dramas of William Gilbert. PHOTO BY MARTIN NOTT

Gilbert without Sullivan Off-Monroe Players FRIDAY, JANUARY 10-JANUARY 19 LUTHERAN CHURCH OF THE GOOD SHEPHERD, 1000 N. WINTON ROAD 232-5570, WWW.OFF-MONROEPLAYERS.ORG [ PREVIEW ] BY DAVID RAYMOND

Mention the name of Sir William S. Gilbert to most musical-theater fans, and their response is apt to be “…and Sullivan.” Gilbert and his composing partner Sir Arthur Sullivan are indeed best remembered as collaborators on more than a dozen operettas, including “HMS Pinafore,” “The Mikado,” and “The Gondoliers.” Considered the cream of Victorian musical theater, most of them are still performed frequently. While they have passed into posterity with their names yoked, or simply referred to as “G&S”, both Gilbert and Sullivan were famous in their own fields. Sullivan was a Victorian Leonard Bernstein, a respected conductor and successful composer of serious and light music. Gilbert’s waspish personality and satiric bent found their outlet in poetry, short stories, and dozens of plays; he was in fact the first British writer to be knighted for his service to the theater. The Off-Monroe Players have made a specialty of performing Gilbert and Sullivan since 1977, putting on two productions a year. Having cycled through the complete list several times over, the group recently began to investigate Gilbert’s dramatic output, which includes many plays — serious and comic, long and short — that are almost never performed anymore, but 20 CITY JANUARY 8-14, 2014

worthy of revival. This weekend, OffMonroe Players perform a unique triple bill of Gilbert’s one-act comedies at Lutheran Church of the Good Shepherd. When Gilbert wrote “No Cards” (1869) and

“Eyes or No Eyes, or The Art of Seeing” (1875), he was a 30something, up-andcoming writer. They were produced by a theatrical company called the German Reed Entertainments, founded by Thomas German Reed and his wife in 1855 as a means of bringing theater to the Victorian middle class, in an era when theater was considered anything but respectable. The Reeds gave employment to many writers and musicians, including Gilbert and Sullivan before their collaboration. The Reed aesthetic, and budget, was definitely “off Broadway”. Each “entertainment” had a single domestic setting, and was limited to five characters — or, to be exact, five actors who occasionally played different characters, as they do in “No Cards.” The Gilbertian twist here is that the disguised characters — one old, the other young and poor, vying for the hand of a wealthy young lady — aren’t very good at their disguises. “No Cards” also contains a couple of songs showing Gilbert’s nascent talent as a lyricist. (The title refers to the Victorian custom of presenting visiting cards on a social call.) “Eyes or No Eyes” shows Gilbert in the “topsy-turvy” vein he exploited with Sullivan, taking a ridiculous premise and spinning a supposedly logical story from it. This is a tale of an imaginary magic cloak and its effect on the abundant self-interests of two sisters, their suitors, and an elderly couple.

Both short plays would please the most respectable Victorian audience, but they are also definitely Gilbertian, containing abundant verbal wit, a healthy vein of silliness, and light, but occasionally sharp, satire of Victorian mores. Fans of Gilbert with Sullivan will recognize some familiar turns of phrase that recurred in “The Mikado” and other operettas. The final show on the OMP triple-bill is a brief parody of “Hamlet,” “Rosencrantz and Guildenstern,” which Gilbert wrote in 1874, long before Tom Stoppard had any ideas on the subject. This is a burlesque in the literary sense: a goof on a familiar literary work, a kind of “Saturday Night Live” sketch for Victorian Shakespeare fans — a group in which Gilbert definitely did not include himself. Gilbert’s Claudius is a failed playwright, and his Hamlet is a very funny parody of overripe Shakespearian rhetoric and acting. (Gilbert, an accomplished amateur actor, played Claudius in a 1904 benefit performance of “Rosencrantz and Guildenstern” whose cast also included Gilbert’s theatrical heir apparent, Bernard Shaw.) This Gilbertian triple bill is directed by

Albert Young and Charles Palella, who have long performing and directing resumes with Off-Monroe Players and other theater groups. (By the way, along with his other accomplishments, Gilbert was in many ways the first modern stage director, insisting that actors deliver his most outrageous lines with perfect naturalness and deadpan.) Gilbert’s plays are entertaining in themselves, but they also help promote the group’s inclusive philosophy. “Doing these plays is a way to bring people onstage who may not get the focus in our regular G&S productions,” says Young. The casts of all three plays include veteran Off-Monroe Players who are stepping out from the pirate or sailor or Japanese schoolgirl chorus for their close-ups, and given an opportunity to cut loose. Fans of the Off-Monroe Players still love Gilbert with Sullivan, and the group will not be neglecting the G&S canon. It presented “The Pirates of Penzance” in November, and rehearsals start for the spring production, “Ruddigore,” later this month. Any interested parties can join OMP shows, either performing or behind the scenes. Auditions are held for leading roles, but anyone can join the chorus — which plays an essential part in G&S.

Wednesday of every month, 7 p.m. Hanlon-Fiske Studios, 34 Elton St. Free. 705-6581. Rochester Academy of Science Mineral Lecture. 7 p.m. Brighton Town Hall, 2300 Elmwood Ave Door prizes and refreshments Free 288-5683. rasny.org.

Literary Events [ WED., JANUARY 8 ] Irondequoit Public Library Contemporary Book Discussion Group: “The Newlyweds” by Nell Freudenberger. Jan. 8-9. Irondequoit Library, Helen McGraw Branch, 2180 E. Ridge Rd Wed at 7 p.m. or Thu at 3 p.m 336-6060. [ THU., JANUARY 9 ] Pure Kona Open Mic Poetry Series. 7-10 p.m. The Greenhouse Café, 2271 E. Main St. 270-8603. ourcoffeeconnection.org. Rochester Bertrand Russell Forum. 7 p.m. Writers and Books, 740 University Ave Jan 9: Ted Lechman and Howard Blair on “Reason and Belief.” $3, free to members wab.org. [ TUE., JANUARY 14 ] Book Discussion: “How it All Began” by Penelope Lively. Jan. 14-15. Brighton Memorial Library, 2300 Elmwood Ave. Tue 1:30-3 p.m., Wed 7-8:30 p.m 784-5300. brightonlibrary.org. Fiction Writing Workshop. 7-8:30 p.m. Brighton Memorial Library, 2300 Elmwood Ave. With Jennifer Blanchard Register. 784-5300. brightonlibrary.org.

Recreation [ WED., JANUARY 8 ] Cross Country Skiing and Snowshoeing. Cumming Nature Center, 6472 Gulick Rd. Wed-Fri 9 a.m.-3:30 p.m., Sat-Sun 9 a.m.4:30 p.m Suggested donations of 3$ per person, 10$ per family. 374-6160. rmsc.org. Ice Skating. Through March 31. Genesee Valley Sports Complex, 131 Elmwood Ave. The rink season will run through March 2014 (closing date TBA). Open skate schedule: Sun 2:30-3:45 p.m., Mon-Fri noon-1:15 p.m., Fri (16+) 10-11:15 p.m., Sat 5-6:15 p.m. Adult skate Tue-Thu 10:3011:45 a.m $2-$7.50 428-7889. cityofrochester.gov/gvpsc/. Ice Skating. Through March 15. Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Park, 1 Manhattan Square. Ice rink at 353 Court St. Visit site for complete list of open skate schedules 428-7541. cityofrochester.gov/mlkmp. Snow Cheap Trail Races. Every other Wednesday Cobbs Hill Park, 100 Norris Drive 6:45 p.m. registration, 7:15 p.m. race start $12 single race, $50 for all races, register cityofrochester.gov/ winteradventures. [ FRI., JANUARY 10 ] Burroughs Audubon Nature Club: “The Winter Sky.” 7:30 p.m. St. John’s Meadows, Briarwood Building, Johnsarbor Drive East. Following a brief meeeting, Jackson Thomas will share his knowledge of astronomy, including telescopes and some of the amazing sights of the winter sky. 249-9489. [ SAT., JANUARY 11 ] Beginner and Meet-Up Group Ski. 10 a.m. Fellows Road

[ FRI., JANUARY 10 ] 2014 Rochester Spring Home Show. Jan. 10-12. RIT Gordon Field House, One Lomb Memorial Drive Fri 11 a.m.-8 p.m., Sat 10 a.m.-8 p.m., Sun 10 a.m.-6 p.m $10, children free. Buy tickets online to save $5 475 - 4121. rochesterhomeshow.com. Rochester Academy of Science Astronomy Section. 7-10 p.m. Rochester Institute of Technology, 1 Lomb Memorial Dr. Gosnell Hall, room A300. Brian Oyer on his recent trip to Kitt Peak Observatory Free. 301-3424. rasny.org. SPECIAL EVENT | 6TH ANNUAL NICE FESTIVAL

My buds didn’t have the time of day for any variety of sweet wine until I tasted ice wine, which is like having a featherlight and refreshing cloud kiss your tongue. The grapes that go into producing this treat are frozen while still on the vine, concentrating the sugars, which do not freeze, and are pressed from the frozen fruit. Locally made ice wine is the star of this week’s epi-curious festivities at New York Wine and Culinary Center (800 S. Main St., Canandaigua). The nICE Festival on Sunday, January 12, 1-5 p.m. will also feature seasonal wine tastings, cheese sampling, a chili competition, a hot-chocolate bar, and specialty desserts. And to prepare you for sporting celebrations, NYWCC chefs will demonstrate favorite tailgate party recipes. Tickets to the festival are $40 per person, which does not include the all-day cash bar. If you take the nICE Festival Chili Challenge class, held January 12, noon-2 p.m., your nICE Festival admission is included in the workshop price ($75; preregistration required). The teaching chef will split the class into teams that will create chili to be tasted and judged by festival participants. For more information or to register, call 394-7070, or visit nywcc.com. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY Park, Fairport. 750-7599. huggersskiclub.org. Guided Hike. 10 a.m.-noon. Ellison Park, Blossom Rd. Participants should meet at the north side of the parking lot off of Blossom Road. Look for the “Hike” signs. Please bring your own cross country skis or snowshoes 3408655, option 6. GVHC Event. 10 a.m. Lucian Morin Park, Empire Blvd. Strenuous/ hilly 4-5 mile hike Free 544-3387. gvhchikes.org. 1 p.m. Mendon Ponds Nature Center, Douglas Rd. Easy 4.5-5 mile hike Free 755-8323. gvhchikes.org. Identification Series Walk: The Joy of Winter Weeds. Second Saturday of every month, 10-11:30 a.m Cumming Nature Center, 6472 Gulick Rd. $3, $10 per family. 374-6160. rmsc.org. Saturday Snowshoeing. 1 p.m. Helmer Nature Center, 154 Pinegrove Ave $3-$5 336-3035. Winter in Washington Grove Forest. 9:30-11 a.m. Cobbs Hill Park, 100 Norris Drive Naturalist Peter Debes of the Friends of Washington Grove will uncover some signs of life and secrets of survival in the woods and help you to learn learn to recognize some of it’s old-timers by “barking up” some trees. Meets at the Nunda entrance to the Washington Grove off Cobb’s Hill Drive. Canceled if there are high winds. Dress for the weather. Handwarmers suggested phdebes@frontiernet.net.

/ Monroe County Line Road. A Family-friendly wintersports event featuring activities for all ages Free. 872-6116. websterridgerunners.com. GVHC Event. 8 a.m. Dryer Road Park, Dryer Rd. Very strenuous/ hilly 5-6 mile hike Free 7211175. gvhchikes.org Also 1 p.m. Braddock Bay Park, East Manitou Rd. Easy/moderate 6 mile hike, Baddock Bay/Cranberry Pond Free 730-7143. gvhchikes.org. XC Ski. Jan. 12. Durand Eastman Park, Zoo Rd. 11 a.m. free lesson for members, Noon intermediate ski 342-6182. huggersskiclub.org.

[ SUN., JANUARY 12 ] 2014 Webster Ridge Runners Annual Snowmobiling Picnic. 11 a.m. Farm Home of Dick & Sharon Weidman, 1111 Wayne

[ THU., JANUARY 9 ] Abundance Theory. 6:30 p.m. Books Etc., 78 W. Main St Macedon Free. 474-4116. books_ etc@yahoo.com.

Special Events [ WED., JANUARY 8 ] Geeks Who Drink Pub Quiz. 8 p.m. Scotland Yard Pub, 187 Saint Paul St Free. 730-5030. scotlandyardpub.com. ReCraft the Holidays EcoBazaar, Swap & Sustainable Saturday. Ongoing, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Rochester Greenovation, 1199 East Main St. Free admission 288-7564. events@ rochestergreen.com. The White Haven Tree of Remembrance. Through Jan. 12, 10 a.m. White Haven Memorial Park, 210 Marsh Rd. Place an ornament on the Tree of Remembrance. Be sure to remove ornament no later than Sunday, January 12 Free 586-5250. whitehavenmemorialpark.com.

[ SAT., JANUARY 11 ] Chili and Wine Tasting. Jan. 1112, 12-5 p.m. JD Wine Cellars, 1339 Eddy Rd. $6-$10 315-9864202. winery@longacrefarms. com. jdwinecellars.com. Christmas Tree Recycling. Jan. 11-12, 10 a.m.-noon. Tinker Nature Park, 1525 Calkins Rd. Please bring a donation of a non-perishable food item for the R-H Area Food Terminal when dropping off Tree. Please remove plastic tree bags, no wire wreathes. Chipper service donated by B&T Tree Service. Mulch from trees will be used to resurface nature trail at Tinker Nature Park 359-7044. East Side Winter Farmer’s Market.. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Indoors at 2555 Baird Rd., Penfield. Dec 1, 10 a.m. Soap-making basics (rsvp). Dec 15 Breakfast with Santa, 9-11:30 a.m. ($7-$12) eastside. activities@rochester.rr.com. In Person: Senior Curator of Motion Pictures Paolo Cherchi Usai presents “Drug War.” 8 p.m. Dryden Theatre, 900 East Ave $6-$8 271-3361. dryden. eastmanhouse.org. Rochester Homegrown Tre. 12-2 p.m. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. $15 advance, $25 at door. 292-9940. lovincup.com. Sustainable Saturday. 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Rochester Greenovation, 1199 East Main St. Featuring 60 artists, environmental groups, food vendors, green businesses, museums, and schools. Shop, donate items to keep them out of the landfill, talk with the organizations, buy some food and network with old and new friends 288-7564. rochestergreen.org. [ SUN., JANUARY 12 ] 6th Annual nICE Festival. 1-5 p.m. New York Wine & Culinary Center, 800 South Main St. $40 per person, all day cash bar. 3947070. nywcc.com. Brighton Winter Farmers’ Market. 1 p.m Brookside Community Center, 220 Idlewood Rd. 269-8918. info@brightonfarmersmarket.org. brightonfarmersmarket.org. Film: “The Great Confusion: The 1913 Armory Show.” 2 p.m. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. Included in gallery admission: $5-$12. 276-8900. mag.rochester.edu. Gothic Cathedral Tour. 2 p.m. St. Michael’s Church, 869 N. Clinton Ave Donations accepted 3254041. sfxcrochester.org. Penfield Farmers’ Market. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Grossmans Garden & Home, 1801 Fairport Nine Mile Point Rd . Penfield 377-1982 x224. grossmans.com. Sierra Club presentation: 100% Renewable energy for NYS by 2030: Vision or Dream. 2-4 p.m. Pittsford Community Library, 24

State St Pittsford Free 248-6275. phdebes@frontiernet.net. Stages’ Light the Lights to Hit the Heights. 2 p.m. A Magical Journey Through Stages, Auditorium Center, 875 E. Main St. Family-friendly fundraising event. Live auction, themed baskets, raffle, and a show. 9357173. mjtstages.com. [ MON., JANUARY 13 ] Rochester Makerspace Presentation. 6:30-8:30 p.m. Henrietta Public Library, 455 Calkins Rd. Free. 359-7092. Thinkin’ & Drinkin’: The Bug Jar’s Trivia Night. 8:30-9:30 p.m. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 21+. Doors at 7:30 p.m Free. bugjar.com. [ TUE., JANUARY 14 ] Rohrbach’s Food & Beer Pairing. Second Tuesday of every month, 6 p.m. Rohrbach’s Brewpub, 3859 Buffalo Rd $30, register. 594-9800. rohrbachs.com/ Rohrbachs-Brewpub.html. Tuesday Taco Trivia. 9-11 p.m. Temple Bar and Grille, 109 East Ave. 232-6000. templebarandgrille.com.

Theater “Bare: A Pop Opera.” RAPA’s East End Theatre, 727 East Main St. Jan 10-11, 7:30 p.m. $15. 3253366. evaughnjohnson@gmail. com. rapatheatre.org. “Good Rockin’ Live: A Salute to Sun Records.” Downstairs Cabaret at Winton Place, 3450 Winton Place. Thu 7 p.m., Fri 8 p.m., Sat 4 & 8 p.m., Sun 3 p.m $23-$33. 325-4370. downstairscabaret.com. “Kind Souls Chasing.” MuCCC, 142 Atlantic Ave. Jan 10, 7:30 p.m. Staged reading Pay what you will. 866-811-4111. muccc.org. “Last Gas.” Through Feb. 2. Geva Theatre Center, 75 Woodbury Blvd. Through Feb 2. Previews Wed Jan 8-Thu 7:30 p.m., Fri 8 p.m., Sat 2 p.m. (open captioned). Opening Sat Jan 11, 8 p.m. Performances Sun Jan 12, 2 & 7 p.m., Tue 6 p.m., Wed Jan 15, 2 & 7:30 p.m. Tickets start at $25 232-4382. gevatheatre.org. ���The Seussification of Romeo and Juliet & A Midsummer Night’s Dream.” School of the Arts, 45 Prince St. Fri 7 p.m., Sat 2 & 7 p.m., Sun 5 p.m. $5-$9. 2427682 x1551. sotarochester.org. “Sex and Death to the Age 14” by Spalding Gray. MuCCC, 142 Atlantic Ave. Jan 12, 7 p.m. Staged reading by Justin Rielly $5 866-811-4111. muccc.org. “Take Me Home.” Downstairs Cabaret Theatre, 20 Windsor St Thu 7 p.m., Fri 8 p.m., Sat 8:30 p.m., Sun 4 p.m $26-$33. 3254370. downstairscabaret.com. Three Comedic Charmers by William S Gilbert. Christ the Good Shepherd Church, 1000 N Winton Rd. Off-Monroe Players. Through Jan 18. Fri-Sat 8 p.m., Sun 2 p.m. Free. 232-5570. offmonroeplayers.org.

Theater Audition [ THU., JANUARY 9 ] Open Auditions for Auburn Public Chorus. 7:30-9 p.m. Auburn Public Studio, 108 Genesee St., Auburn. Please prepare 16-32 bars of any pop or musical theater selection and be prepared to sing it a capella (we will give you your starting note) 315-253-6669. auburnpublictheater.org.

THEATER | SPALDING GRAY’S “SEX AND DEATH TO THE AGE 14”

American actor and writer Spalding Gray was a master of the confessional monologue. That form of non-fiction narrative can be cathartic for the author, as well as the audience, in that we tend to find commonalities when we compare life notes. On Sunday, January 12, at 7 p.m., to mark the 10th anniversary of Gray’s death, a staged reading of Gray’s “Sex and Death to the Age 14” will be offered by playwrightperformer Justin Rielly at MuCCC (142 Atlantic Ave.). Gray’s inaugural monologue is a humorous and moving recollection of growing up in a Christian Scientist family in Rhode Island. The retelling of personal history includes experiences of those twin pillars, sex and death, filtered through the lens of an adult who is recollecting a young teen’s impressions of it all. Tickets cost $5 and can be purchased by calling 866-811-4111 or online at muccc.org. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY Rochester Gay Men’s Chorus “Makeover” first rehearsal. 7 p.m. Downtown United Presbyterian Church, 121 N. Fitzhugh Street The RGMC invites all who are interested in singing to attend for our upcoming Voice Placement for new members. The Voice Placement will be for our March 29th Concert - Makeover!. 3254000. thergmc.org. [ FRI., JANUARY 10 ] “Nunsense.” Jan. 10-12. The Footlight Fri 7 p.m. and Sun 2 p.m. Masonic Hall, 133 S Union St., Spencerport. Entrance at rear of Building off West Ave Municipal Lot 254-9090. [ SAT., JANUARY 11 ] “Talk.” 4:30-6 p.m. Village Gate Square, 274 N. Goodman St. Studio 1, second floor 271-7010. [ MON., JANUARY 13 ] “Only Once.” 6:30 p.m. Books Etc., 78 W. Main St Macedon Six men and six women are needed. Age is not an issue for these roles. Performance will be the weekend of July 21 474-4116. books_etc@ yahoo.com. “Sherlock Holmes.” Jan. 13-14. A Magical Journey Through Stages, Auditorium Center, 875 E. Main St. Grades 6-12. Performances March 21-23. 935-7173. mjtstages.com/auditions. [ WED., JANUARY 15 ] “Who Maid Who.” Jan. 15-16, 7:30 p.m. Greece Community and Senior Center, 3 Vince Tofany Blvd. Greece Paint Players. Cast calls for 4 men and 4 women of various adult ages. 621-5488. greeceny.gov/cs.

Workshops [ WED., JANUARY 8 ] “The Source of Human Good” by Henry Nelson Wieman. 7 p.m. First Universalist Church, 150 South

Ave. Exploration of UU Theology. Please R.S.V.P to reserve your place Free 546-2826. uuroc.org. Food as Medicine 101. 7 p.m. Rochester Brainery, Village Gate, 274 N Goodman St. $15 7307034. info@rochesterbrainery. com. rochesterbrainery.com. Reset-Recharge-Revive. 4:30 & 6 p.m. Mooseberry Café, 2555 Baird Rd., Penfield. Learn about whole food cleansing and detoxing your body while eating healthy foods, designed to regenerate you Free 315-427-2369. Natalia@ bareboneswellness.com. mooseberrycafe.com. [ THU., JANUARY 9 ] Cooking with Your Crockpot. 7 p.m. Penfield Public Library, 1985 Baird Rd. Free, register 340-8720. penfieldlibrary.org. [ SAT., JANUARY 11 ] Introduction to relief printing (woodblock). 11:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m. Rochester Makerspace, 850 St. Paul St. #23 $47.12, register 210-0075. rochestermakerspace.org. [ TUE., JANUARY 14 ] Family Development Class: “Systematic Training for Effective Parenting of Teens (Part 1 of 7)”. 5-7 p.m. Mental Health Association, 320 N Goodman St. A light dinner will be served Free, RSVP 3253245 x131. mharochester.org.

GETLISTED get your event listed for free e-mail it to calendar@rochestercitynews.com. Or go online to rochestercitynewspaper.com and submit it yourself!

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 21

Movies Theaters Searchable, up-to-the-minute movie times for all area theaters can be found at rochestercitynewspaper.com, and on City’s mobile website.

Film

Brockport Strand 93 Main St, Brockport, 637-3310, rochestertheatermanagement.com

Canandaigua Theatres 3181 Townline Road, Canandaigua, 396-0110, rochestertheatermanagement.com

Cinema Theater 957 S. Clinton St., 271-1785, cinemarochester.com

Culver Ridge 16 2255 Ridge Rd E, Irondequoit  544-1140, regmovies.com

Dryden Theatre 900 East Ave., 271-3361, dryden.eastmanhouse.org

Eastview 13 Eastview Mall, Victor 425-0420, regmovies.com

Geneseo Theatres Geneseo Square Mall, 243-2691, rochestertheatermanagement.com

Greece Ridge 12 176 Greece Ridge Center Drive 225-5810, regmovies.com

Henrietta 18 525 Marketplace Drive 424-3090, regmovies.com

The Little 240 East Ave., 258-0444 thelittle.org

Movies 10 2609 W. Henrietta Road 292-0303, cinemark.com

Pittsford Cinema 3349 Monroe Ave., 383-1310 pittsford.zurichcinemas.com

Tinseltown USA/IMAX 2291 Buffalo Road 247-2180, cinemark.com

Webster 12 2190 Empire Blvd., 888-262-4386, amctheatres.com

Vintage Drive In 1520 W Henrietta Rd., Avon 226-9290, vintagedrivein.com

Film Previews on page 24

GET

Fantasy and dream “The Secret Life of Walter Mitty”

heroic roles as flying through a storm, shooting down German aircraft, and performing delicate surgery. Everyday life triggers his fantasies — a (PG), DIRECTED BY BEN STILLER headline about a trial inspires him to see himself NOW PLAYING in a courtroom, passing a hospital leads to his surgical feat. The story ends with a characteristic Thurber touch of comic defeat. [ REVIEW ] BY GEORGE GRELLA The work seems a natural for the cinema, the art of dreams and daydreams; film quite The first movie based on James Thurber’s naturally exploits the transitions from a most famous short story, “The Secret Life of present reality to the insubstantial but far more Walter Mitty,” was adapted for the screen back satisfying subjects of memory and fantasy. in 1947, starring the multitalented Danny We all dream, after all. We all want to be the Kaye in the title role. Walter Mitty, a timid, heroes of our own lives. We all need to escape passive, henpecked husband, embarrassingly from what one of my favorite authors calls the incompetent at ordinary tasks, constantly falls deadly rhythm of our private thoughts. into daydreams in which he assumes such In this adaptation of the story Walter Mitty, played by Ben Stiller, works for Life magazine, in charge of the negatives their photographers submit from all over the world. He discovers that the magazine is folding, moving to an online version, which means he and many others will lose their Ben Stiller and Kristen Wiig in “The Secret Life of Walter Mitty.” PHOTO COURTESY 20TH CENTURY FOX

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jobs. Lonely, burdened by the cost of moving his mother (Shirley MacLaine) to an assisted-living facility, he tends to fall into a sort of trance. His fantasies feature him making a connection with Cheryl Melhof (Kristen Wiig), a young woman at the magazine, rescuing the inhabitants of a burning building, humiliating the arrogant executive in charge of the transition. Walter finds the opportunity to become a hero accidentally, when he searches for a lost negative from the magazine’s ace photographer, Sean O’Connell (Sean Penn), intended for the cover of the final issue. He takes off on a wild and unlikely journey looking for O’Connell, which takes him to Greenland, Iceland, Afghanistan, and the Himalayas. He travels by plane, boat, bicycle, helicopter, and even skateboard on his quest, encountering eccentric people and strange adventures along the way. Although the quest itself takes place in Walter’s “real” life, he often falls into his daydreams in the midst of what already seems a fantasy. In one of the oddest and funniest sequences, he encounters a drunken helicopter pilot singing in the only karaoke bar in Greenland, then discovers the guy can lead him to the photographer. The chopper promptly drops him in the sea, which leads to yet another series of adventures and fantasies. At times the director deliberately fuses and confuses Walter’s actual experiences on his unusual quest with his usual daydreams.

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Alone in the Lone Star State “Prince Avalanche” (R), DIRECTED BY DAVID GORDON GREEN SCREENS FRIDAY AND SUNDAY AT THE DRYDEN [ REVIEW ] BY ADAM LUBITOW

Although it toys with the visually fascinating concept of dreams and their possibilities in ordinary life, “The Secret Life of Walter Mitty” seldom explores the theme with the imagination it deserves. Walter’s search, the mysteries he must solve, the completely unsurprising pat ending, and the tiresomely predictable love between him and Cheryl simply overwhelm the notion of the dream life and its connections to what we like to regard as real life, that endlessly fascinating subject for the cinema. Ben Stiller has come more and more to resemble Woody Allen in the sense that he continues to play the same character over and over in all of his movies, an earnest, naïve victim of an assortment of nasty, plotting dopes, who ultimately triumphs, mostly through his own innocent good nature. His Walter Mitty is virtually interchangeable with the parts he played in “There’s Something About Mary,” “Meet the Parents,” “The Watch,” and so on. On the other hand, “Walter Mitty” provides him with a Mittyesque experience, directing a picture in which he plays the adventurous hero of his own fantasies, possibly a fantasy within a fantasy. Oddly, the sets play the most interesting part in the movie. The Time-Life building is the real thing, and the sequences in Greenland, Iceland, and the East look very real indeed, and employ people native to those regions. “Walter Mitty” may not be good, but it looks great.

The career trajectory of director David Gordon Green has been a singularly odd one. He first made a name for himself nearly 15 years ago, making indie dramas like “George Washington” and “All the Real Girls,” ruminative coming-of-age tales set in small Southern towns. But he went on to achieve more mainstream success in recent years for his raunchy stoner comedies, frequently starring James Franco, like “Pineapple Express” and “Your Highness.” It appears that we’re seeing a synthesis of the director’s seemingly disparate styles with “Prince Avalanche” — screening this weekend at the Dryden Theatre — which focuses on an occasionally profane bromance that would be right at home in his later work, examined through the sensitive lyricism of his earlier films.

Paul Rudd and Emile Hirsch in “Prince Avalanche.” PHOTO PROVIDED

Set in the late 1980’s, the film stars Paul Rudd and Emile Hirsch as Alvin and Lance, two mismatched road-crew workers making repairs on a winding stretch of forest road in Central Texas. The job will last for several months, and between the hours spent painting in the yellow lines and hammering in reflector poles, the two men are left to mostly fend for themselves, sharing a tent and hunting for their food. We learn that 30something Alvin has been working this particular job for some time. The significantly younger Lance is the brother of Alvin’s girlfriend, and he’s been hired only as a favor to her. The film functions as a dual character study, showing the different ways each man has for dealing with the isolation. Already a bit of an oddball, Alvin savors it, while the perpetually horny Lance goes a little stir crazy. With only each other for company (aside from a crazy old truck driver, played by the late Lance LeGault, who makes several stops to chat with the men as he passes by), the two men are forced to get along despite their differences, alternately supporting and infuriating one another. Green is a fantastic director of actors, and he gets wonderful performances out of his two leads. Frequently the only actors on screen for lengthy stretches of time, Rudd and Hirsch are forced to carry the film. The uptight Alvin is a slightly more serious role than we’re used to from Rudd, but he brings his usual charisma to the part, making him naturally sympathetic. Hirsch is able to make Lance’s naiveté and loutish ways amusing rather than obnoxious, and while his character isn’t far from the typical manchild we’ve seen so

often in the Apatow school of comedy, Hirsch finds the hidden layers. Together, the actors have a remarkably convincing chemistry. “Prince Avalanche” was shot on location at Bastrop State Park in Texas following the 2011 Bastrop County Complex fire, the most destructive wildfire in the state’s history. The naturalism of the film is aided in no small part by the use of those real locations. The stark backdrop of scorched earth and damaged trees are beautifully photographed by Green’s usual director of photography, Tim Orr, and it lends even the film’s more comedic moments a hint of melancholy. The musical score, by Explosions in the Sky and David Wingo, perfectly captures the mood. The setting leads to one of the more emotional moments in the film, a heartbreaking scene where Paul Rudd stumbles across an elderly woman digging through the rubble of her burned home. As he helps the woman search for a lost pilot’s license, she describes the experience as feeling as though she’s sifting through her own ashes. Supposedly, this scene was unplanned, added after the film’s crew came across the woman, Joyce Payne, at the remains of what was her actual home. I wouldn’t doubt this explanation for a second; her sadness is palpable, and the scene is one of the most powerful and moving depictions of grief I’ve seen in a film. Despite this focus on loss and loneliness, the film is frequently quite funny. But it’s that combination of sadness with humor that ultimately makes “Prince Avalanche” an unexpectedly sweet and affecting buddy comedy.

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Film Previews Full film reviews available at rochestercitynewspaper.com. [ OPENING ] AUGUST: OSAGE COUNTY (R): A family reunites following a tragedy, and tensions rise as they’re forced to live with one another under the same roof. Adapted from the Pulitzer Prize-winning play. Starring Meryl Streep, Julia Roberts, Chris Cooper, and Benedict Cumberbatch. Little, Eastview, Henrietta, Pittsford, Tinseltown, Webster DRUG WAR (2012): After he’s arrested, a drug cartel is coerced into turning informant against his former employers in this thriller from Hong Kong. Dryden (Sat, Jan 11, 8 p.m.) THE EPIC THAT NEVER WAS (1966): This film documents the production of the doomed 1937 film adaptation of “I, Claudius,” to find out why it was never completed. Dryden (Tue, Jan 14, 8 p.m.) ERASERHEAD (1977): David Lynch’s cult classic about a young married couple and their mutant newborn child. Dryden (Thu, Jan 9, 8 p.m.) HER (R): Spike Jonze directs this story about a lonely writer who strikes up a romantic relationship with his new operating system. Starring Joaquin Phoenix, Amy Adams, and Scarlett Johansson. Culver, Eastview, Greece, Henrietta, Pittsford, Tinseltown, Webster INSIDE LLEWYN DAVIS (R): A young singer navigates through the Greenwich Village folk folk scene of the 1960s, in this drama from the Coen bothers. Henrietta, Little, Pittsford, Tinseltown THE LEGEND OF HERCULES (PG13): Kellan Lutz stars in this epic origin story of the mythical Greek hero. Culver, Eastview, Greece, Henrietta, Tinseltown, Webster LIV AND INGMAR (2012): This documentary follows the love affair that blossomed between Swedish actress Liv Ullmann and director Ingmar Bergman. Dryden (Wed, Jan 8, 8 p.m.) LONE SURVIVOR (R): The true story of the ill-fated mission by a team of Navy SEALS to capture a high-ranking Taliban leader. Starring Mark Wahlberg, Taylor Kitsch, Emile Hirsch, and Ben Foster. Culver, Eastview, Greece, Henrietta, Pittsford, Tinseltown, Webster PRINCE AVALANCHE (2013): This offbeat comedy stars Paul Rudd and Emile Hirsch as road-crew workers tasked with making repairs to a road damaged in a massive wildfire. Dryden (Friday, Jan 10, 8 p.m.; Sun, Jan 12, 2 p.m.) [ CONTINUING ] 47 RONIN (PG-13): Keanu Reeves stars as the leader of an outcast band of samurai on a mission of vengeance for the murder of their master. Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Greece, Henrietta, Tinseltown, Webster. AMERICAN HUSTLE (R): David O. Russell directs this black comedy inspired by the ABSCAM scandal

24 CITY JANUARY 8-14, 2014

of the 1970s, which involved the entrapment of several high-profile U.S. politicians. Starring Christian Bale, Amy Adams, Bradley Cooper, Jennifer Lawrence, and Jeremy Renner. Culver, Eastview, Greece, Henrietta, Little, Pittsford, Tinseltown, Webster ANCHORMAN 2: THE LEGEND CONTINUES (PG-13): Ron Burgundy and the rest of the Channel 4 news team return, ready to take New York, and the first 24-hours news channel, by storm. Starring Will Ferrell, Paul Rudd, Steve Carell, Christina Applegate, and Kristen Wiig. Culver, Eastview, Geneseo, Tinseltown, Webster THE BOOK THIEF (PG-13): A young girl is sent to live with a foster family in WWII Germany in this adaptation of Markus Zusak’s popular novel. Starring Geoffrey Rush and Emily Watson. Movies 10 CLOUDY WITH A CHANCE OF MEATBALLS 2 (PG): The sequel to the animated adaptation of the popular children’s picture book, this time involving an island of food/animal hybrids. With the voices of Bill Hader, Anna Faris, James Caan, Kristen Schaal, Andy Samberg, and Neil Patrick Harris. Movies 10 FROZEN (PG): A young princess goes on an epic journey to find her sister, whose powers have trapped their kingdom in an eternal winter in this animated Disney musical. With the voices of Kristen Bell, Idina Menzel, Jonathan Groff, and Josh Gad. Brockport, Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece, Henrietta, Pittsford, Tinseltown, Webster GRUDGE MATCH (PG-13): Sylvester Stallone and Robert De Niro star as retired boxers who agree to one more fight to settle an old rivalry. With Kim Basinger, Alan Arkin, and Kevin Hart. Culver, Greece, Henrietta, Tinseltown THE HOBBIT: THE DESOLATION OF SMAUG (PG-13): In the second installment of Peter Jackson’s epic trilogy, hobbit Bilbo Baggins continues his quest to help a group of dwarves reclaim their homeland, and confronts a mighty dragon in the process. Brockport, Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece, Henrietta, Pittsford, Tinseltown, Webster THE HUNGER GAMES: CATCHING FIRE (PG-13): The middle chapter of The Hunger Games finds an uprising against the Capitol beginning as a result of the events in the first film. Starring Jennifer Lawrence, Josh Hutcherson, Woody Harrelson, Donald Sutherland, and Philip Seymour Hoffman. Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Greece, Henrietta, Tinseltown, Webster JACKASS PRESENTS: BAD GRANDPA (R): The Jackass gang is back for this hidden camera road trip movie, starring Johnny Knoxville as a very unconventional grandfather. Movies 10 JUSTIN BIEBER’S BELIEVE (PG): This concert film offers an “unprecedented” and “unfiltered” behind-the-scenes glimpse into the life of the pop

“music” star. Culver, Henrietta, Eastview, Tinseltown KILL YOUR DARLINGS (R): Daniel Radcliffe portrays Allen Ginsberg in this true story of obsession, drugs, poetry, and murder set in the early days of the Beat movement. With Dane DeHaan, Ben Foster, Michael C. Hall, Jennifer Jason Leigh, and David Cross. Cinema MANDELA: LONG WALK TO FREEDOM (PG-13): Idris Elba stars as former South African president Nelson Mandela in this biopic of the influential leader’s remarkable life. Culver, Henrietta,Tinseltown, Webster NEBRASKA (R): Bruce Dern stars as an elderly Missouri man convinced he’s won a million dollars in a sweepstakes, and Will Forte is the son who reluctantly agrees to drive him to Nebraska to collect his winnings. With Bob Odenkirk, Stacy Keach, and June Squibb. Henrietta, Little, Pittsford OUT OF THE FURNACE (R): Christian Bale stars as a downon-his-luck steel worker who takes matters into his own hands when his younger brother mysteriously goes missing. With Woody Harrelson, Casey Affleck, Zoe Saldana, and Forest Whitaker. Cinema PARANORMAL ACTIVITY: THE MARKED ONES (R): The popular horror franchise continues on, as a young Latino man is tormented by a mysterious demonic entity. Culver, Eastview, Greece, Henrietta, Tinseltown, Webster PHILOMENA (PG-13): Judi Dench stars in this drama about a journalist (Steve Coogan) who helps an elderly woman search for her son, who she was forced to put up for adoption decades earlier. Little, Pittsford SAVING MR. BANKS (PG13): Tom Hanks and Emma Thompson star in this behindthe-scenes story of Walt Disney’s struggle to to convince author P.L. Travers to allow him to adapt her popular children’s novel, “Mary Poppins.” Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Henrietta, Little, Pittsford, Tinseltown, Webster THE SECRET LIFE OF WALTER MITTY (PG): See full review on page 22. Brockport, Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Greece, Henrietta, Pittsford, Tinseltown, Webster THOR: THE DARK WORLD (PG13): The heroic Norse god is back, battling to save the world from a shadowy enemy intent on its destruction. Starring Chris Hemsworth, Tom Hiddleston, Natalie Portman, Idris Elba, and Christopher Eccleston. Cinema WALKING WITH DINOSAURS 3D (PG): A young dinosaur must rise to the occasion and lead his herd in this animated adventure story. Featuring the voices of Karl Urban, John Leguizamo, and Justin Long.Tinseltown, Webster THE WOLF OF WALL STREET (R): Martin Scorsese directs and Leonardo DiCaprio stars in the outrageous true story of Jordan Belfort, a corrupt stockbroker brought down by the FBI. Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Greece, Henrietta, Pittsford, Tinseltown

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All real estate advertised in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act, which makes it unlawful, “to make, print, or publish, any notice, statement, or advertisement, with respect to the sale or rental of a dwelling that indicates any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin.” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under the age of 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertisement for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. Call the local Fair Housing Enforcement Project, FHEP at 325-2500 or 1-866-671-FAIR. Si usted sospecha una practica de vivienda injusta, por favor llame al servicio legal gratis. 585-325-2500 - TTY 585-325-2547.

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MASTER CHIMNEY & MASONRY See our ad under Home and Garden Professionals. Chimney Cleaning, Masonry Repairs, Foundation Repairs, Roof Leaks, Brick Steps Repaired. 585-734-8444

****GUN SHOW -NEWSTEAD FIRE HALL**** 5691 Cummings Rd. Akron, NY 85 Tables! Saturday January 11th 9:00am-4:00pm & Sunday January 12th 9:00am-3:00pm Please Visit: nfgshows.com

Adoption

For Sale

PREGNANT? THINKING OF ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families Nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions. 866-413-6293. Void in Illinois/New Mexico/ Indiana (AAN CAN)

BEANIE BABIES (TY) 1997, 1998 Light blue Elephant (Peanuts), Twigs, Squealer, Iggy and Rainbow with the mixed up name tags. & more! $4 - $8 585-880-2903 All $49.99

Automotive ALWAYS BETTER Higher cash for your Junk Cars, Trucks and Vans. From $200-$800 or more for newer. Running or not. With free towing. Also free removal of any unwanted model in any condition. Call 585-305-5865 CASH FOR CARS Any Car/ Truck. Running or Not! Top

BABY STROLLER $7 585-4905870

DOG & CAT HOUSES Kennels, porch steps, do it yourself kits. Quick assembly 585-752-1000 $49 Jim EXERCISE BIKE Heavy duty excellent condition $42 585490-5870 GENUINE LENNOX Rosebud vase, white with gold trim $20 585-383-0405 GERMAN SHEPHERD sign on chain. Carved head on real wood. (says, beware!) Nice gift $20.00 585-880-2903 KENTUCKY DERBY POSTER 122 yr. May 4, 1996. Thick paper poster $5, Glass frame you can put it in $5 585-8802903 585-544-4155 KITCHEN TABLE 3/8 Thick round glass top table. 40” diameter. 41” high. $49 585490-5870 KITCHEN TABLE Round, glass. 41” diameter 31”t all with chrome frame $49 585-4905870 LARGE JEWELRY COLLECTION All kinds, old & new, retro, vintage, cameo’s, brooches, beads & more. Great pieces for jewelry designers too, 585-360-2895

NORDICTRACK $50 or best offer 585-663-6983 ROYAL PORTABLE TYPEWRITER with carrying case $50 585-383-0405 SNOWMAN, WOOD FACE 12” x 10” blue chin bow, black, red, white, blue cap, hangs. hanscrafted. $10 585-6636983

continues on page 26

Lost?

Find your way home with SEE OUR

Real Estate Section ON PAGE 27

To Advertise Call Christine at 585.244.3329 x 23

BOOK CASE dark mahogany 30” wide, 71” tall, 12” deep, 5 shelves $49 585-490-5870 BRASS HORSE FIGURINE 13” long, 10 1/2 tall. Has engraved saddle / mane/ detailed $25 585-880-2903 CHAPS, HORSEBACK RIDING wear over pants, child size, black, leather suede, VGC 28” long legs, 13 x14 waist, zippers on legs $12 585-880-2903

We placed an ad in City Newspaper advertising the availability of two office suites in my office building at 55 Canterbury Road in the City. The response was excellent. One of the two available spaces was leased within days, and we have active interest in the other space.” - DOUGLAS C. BURKHARDT, FIRST REALTY COMPANY

www.firstrealtyrochester.com

TO ADVERTISE IN OUR

HOME & GARDEN PROFESSIONALS SECTION CALL CHRISTINE AT

244.3329 x23 rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 25

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Affordable

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> page 25

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Clarence and the entire team would like to thank you for your business and wish all a Happy and Prosperous New Year! Satisfying Customers for over 30 Years

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Did you know that City Newspaper Readers spent OVER $90 MILLION DOLLARS on home improvements in the LAST 12 MONTHS? Call Christine today to advertise

585-244-3329 ext. 23

26 CITY JANUARY 8-14, 2014

ATTENTION FLASH SOCCER FANS! The Western NY Flash Mob is gathering to prepare for the 2014 season. Join us! For more info find us on Facebook or contact us wnyflashfans@gmail. com

Jam Section CALLING ALL MUSICIANS OF ALL GENRES the Rochester Music Coalition wants you! Please register on our website. For further info: www.rochestermusiccoalition. org info@rochestermusiccoalition. org 585-235-8412 CHURCH NEEDS KEYBOARDIST AND

DRUMMER. Gospel originals & classics. Pay at this time is volunteer, until we build up the church. Bobby 585-3284121 rlbullock@frontier.com biggem982@gmail.com KEYBOARD PLAYER needed to play with one of Rochester’s finest Big Bands. Great charts able to rehearse a few Weds. during the months of (April-November) effective 04/15/2014 585-442-7480 KEYBOARDIST to join existing band, originals, covers, jazz, funk R&B 585-3284121 rlbullock@frontier.com biggem982@gmail.com MEET OTHER MUSICIANS. Jam & Play out, call & say hello, any level & any age ok. I play keyboards - organ B3 Style Call 585-266-6337 Martino

Place your real estate ad by calling 244-3329 ext. 23 or rochestercitynewspaper.com Ad Deadlines: Friday 4pm for Display Ads Monday at noon for Line ads NEEDED MULTI INSTRUMENT MUSICIANS Bass, guitars, keys, horns. Must have equipt. & transportation & be avail. evenings. Bobby 585-328-4121 SINGER, LEAD & BACKGROUND VOCALS. Mostly original written material. R & B, jazz, funk, learn, record, perform 2014 season Bobby, 585-3284121 rlbullock@frontier.com biggem982@gmail.com THE GREGORY KUNDE CHORALE is looking for male voices. Call for an audition now to join our fourteenth season! Info Line 377 7568 or visit our website www. gregorykundechorale.org VOCALIST that can lead & background with other vocalists that do the same. Avail evenings, transportation, R & B, Funk, Jazz, Pop, Blues......Bobby 585328-4121 Experienced please.

Music Services PIANO LESSIONS In your home or mine. Patient, experienced

instructor teaching all ages, levels and musical styles. Call Scott: 585- 465-0219. Visit www.scottwrightmusic.com

WIRE! It’s Fun, Free and Easy! Call Now! (585)333-3003

HAS YOU BUILDING SHIFTED OR SETTLED? Contact Woodford Brothers Inc, for straightening, leveling, foundation and wood frame repairs at 1-800-OLDBARN. www.woodfordbros. com. “Not applicable in Queens county”

CASH FOR COINS! Buying ALL Gold & Silver. Also Stamps & Paper Money, Entire Collections, Estates. Travel to your home. Call Marc in NYC 1-800-9593419

SAWMILLS from only $4897.00- MAKE & SAVE MONEY with your own bandmillCut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship. FREE Info/ DVD:  www.NorwoodSawmills. com 1-800-578-1363 Ext.300N

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Find your way home with TO ADVERTISE CONTACT CHRISTINE TODAY!

Do you remember that song Mr. Rogers used to sing, “It’s a beautiful day in this neighborhood, a beautiful day for a neighbor, would you be mine, could you be mine?” While looking at the house for this article, I kept thinking of that song. Because if I were searching for a home, the first question I’d ask would be, “What is the neighborhood like and how are the neighbors?” The lovely house at 89 Ferris Street gets high marks in both! Located in the Beechwood neighborhood just off of Culver Road, there is easy access to locally owned businesses and all the amenities one would need. And as the realtor mentioned, “Anything off of Culver is a good location.” She also filled me in on the neighbors and they are a fine group of folks that have been keeping an eye on the property, so it sounds like a nice supportive environment has already been established.

CALL 244-3329 X23 OR EMAIL CHRISTINE@ROCHESTER-CITYNEWS.COM 1481 Bushwood Circle, Webster:

$389,900, 5 beds, 3.5 baths, 2890 ft2, 2.5 car garage, in-law apt, in-ground pool, treed yard with a stream, etc.... A must see - Call Ryan @ 585-201-0724, Re/Max Realty Group 218-6802.

Ryan Smith 585-201-0724

As for the house itself, it is chock full of charming features – three bedrooms, one and a half bathrooms, and 1,354 square feet full of them. Built in 1920, the home displays the quality craftsmanship and detailing typical of an American Foursquare, like the formal living and dining rooms with hardwood floors, which give a great feel to the main floor. There are beamed ceilings, leaded glass, gumwood trim and lots of nice built-ins throughout the house.

There is a very unusual built-in bench in the hallway and pocket doors, including one that separates the downstairs from the up. Added plusses like glass doorknobs are there, too. I especially liked the original tile in the bathroom and the fact that there was plenty of counter space in the kitchen. And there is a wood burning fireplace! The basement was dry and the attic had plenty of storage space. The house sits on a nice lot with a big front porch just screaming for a porch swing. An enclosed back porch and fully fenced-in large backyard will allow your pets a safe space to run and fetch and just hang out. The exterior has been recently painted and looks clean and fresh. And there is practically a new roof, to boot. All this can be yours for just $85,000. And you can almost hear Mr. Rogers finishing his song, “ . . . please won’t you be my neighbor?” Or perhaps it is one of the nice neighbors who keep a watch on the house! Contact Linda Wilson of Nothnagle Realtors (585-750-5034) to schedule your visit to 89 Ferris St. today. by Larry Francer Larry is a city resident and Associate Director of Preservation at The Landmark Society.

Ryan Smith

Search. Buy. Sell.

NYS Licensed Real Estate Salesperson

201-0724 RochesterSells.com

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 27

I’m very pleased with the calls I got from our apartment rental ads, and will continue running them. Your readers respond — positively!” - M. Smith, Residential Management EMPLOYMENT / CAREER TRAINING

Employment $1,000 WEEKLY!! MAILING BROCHURES From Home.

Helping home workers since 2001. Genuine Opportunity. No Experience required. Start Immediately www.

STAFF PSYCHOLOGIST: Evaluate and test multiple and varied client referrals. Prepare professional psychological reports. REQS: Psy.D or Ph.D plus 1 yr working in a clinical office setting in field of psychology. Job in Rochester, NY for Industrial Medicine Associates, P.C. Send cover letter, resume, and references to lynn.schmitz@ima-us.com.

mailingmembers.com (AAN CAN) AIRLINE CAREERS begin here– Get FAA approved Aviation

Hiring? GET THE RESULTS YOU NEED AT ABOUT HALF THE PRICE OF OTHER PAPERS! Call Christine at 244-3329 ext. 23 today!

CITY

Maintenance Technician training. Financial aid for qualified students– Housing available.Job placement assistance. Call AIM 866-2967093 EARN $500 A DAY Airbrush & Media Makeup Artists For: Ads - TV - Film - Fashion Train & Build Portfolio in 1 week. www. AwardMakeupSchool.com (AAN CAN)

HELP WANTED make extra money in our free ever popular homemailer program, includes valuable guidebook! Start immediately! Genuine! 1-888292-1120 www.easyworkfromhome.com (AAN CAN)

Volunteers BECOME A DOCENT at the Rochester Museum & Science Center Must be an enthusiastic

communicator, Like working with children. Learn more at http://www.rmsc.org/Support/ Volunteer Or call 585-6971948 BRIGHTEN A LIFE. Lifespan’s The Senior Connection program needs people 55+ to volunteer to make 2 friendly phone calls / 2 visits each month to an older adult Call Katie 585-244-8400 x 152 FOSTER PARENTS WANTED! Monroe County is looking for adults age 21 and over to consider opening their homes to foster children. Call 334-9096 or visit www.MonroeFosterCare.org. HABITAT FOR CATS — Help Trap-Neuter-Return cats on Tuesdays, in East Rochester, for an important grant project. Impact the number of owner-less cats living outside. All training provided. 585-787-4209 or habitat4cats@yahoo.com! HERITAGE CHRISTIAN STABLES, a therapeutic horsemanship program for children and adults with developmental disabilities, is looking for volunteers to serve as horse leaders and side walkers. Call Kim Kennedy at (585) 340-2016 or email kkennedy@ heritagechristianservices.org LITERACY VOLUNTEERS OF ROCHESTER needs adult tutors to help adults who are waiting to improve their reading, writing, English speaking, or math skills. Call 473-3030, or check our website at www. literacyrochester.org LITERACY VOLUNTEERS OF ROCHESTER needs adult tutors to help adults who are waiting to improve their reading, writing, English speaking, or math skills. Call 473-3030, or check our website at www. literacyrochester.org SCHOOL #12 999 South Ave. is looking for reading & math volunteers, English & Spanish. Training provided. Call Vicki 585461-4282 ST. JOSEPH’S HOUSE invites volunteers to live and work at our soup kitchen/shelter. This is essential, rewarding, hard work. Call Tim @ 314-1962

Business Opportunities START A HOME BASED BUSINESS. Part-time or FullTime. Serious inquires only. 585271-3243

Career Training AIRLINE CAREERS begin here - Get trained as FAA certified Aviation Technician. Housing and Financial aid for qualified students. Job placement assistance. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance 877-492-3059 (AAN CAN)

28 CITY JANUARY 8-14, 2014

Legal Ads [ LEGAL NOTICE ]

[ NOTICE ]

Notice of Formation of The Other Side of the Fence Property Management LLC. Art. of Org. filed with Sec’y of State (SSNY) 11/25/2013. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 51 Belltower La. Pittsford, NY 14534. Purpose: any lawful activity.

H&H Automotive, LLC (LLC) filed Arts. of Org. with NY Secy. of State (SS) on 4/15/2013. LLC’s office is in Monroe Co. SS is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS will mail a copy of any process to LLC’s principal business location at 358 Lighthouse Rd., Hilton, NY 14468. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity.

[ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Upstate MUA Chiropractic, PLLC. Arts of Org. filed with Secy. Of State of N.Y. (SSNY) on 11/15/13. Office Location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of PLLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 309 Exchange Blvd., STE 100, Rochester, NY 14608. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Articles of Organization of limited liability company, Jones Development West, LLC ( LLC) were filed with the Department of State on November 22, 2013. Certificate of Change was filed with Department of State on December 19, 2013. Monroe County is the county within which it will have its office; its principal business address is 683 Gillett Rd. Spencerport, New York 14559 The LLC has designated the Secretary of State of New York as it agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. 683 Gillett Road, Spencerport, New York 14559 is the post office address to which the Secretary of State shall mail a copy of any process against the LLC. The purpose of the LLC is the ownership and management of commercial real estate. [ NOTICE ] BARK PLACE BAKERY, LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 12/18/2013. Office in Monroe Co. SSNY desig. agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 1935 Clinton Ave. North, Rochester, NY 14621, which is also the principal business location. Purpose: Any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] FISCHER BACKFLOW PREVENTION & PLUMBING SERVICE LLC (LLC) filed Arts. of Org. with NY Secy. of State (SS) on 12/06/13. LLC’s office is in Monroe Co. SS is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS shall mail a copy of any process to PO Box 16391, Rochester, NY 14616. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity.

[ NOTICE ] Home Pros Contracting, LLC was filed with SSNY on September 25, 2013. Office: Monroe County, SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. P.O. address which SSNY shall mail any process against the LLC served upon SSNY: Home Pros Contracting, LLC, PO Box 24913, Rochester, New York 14624. Purpose is to engage in any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Mister Cat Records LLC (LLC) filed Arts. of Org. with NY Secy. of State (SS) on 1/8/2013. LLC’s office is in Monroe Co. SS is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS will mail a copy of any process to LLC’s principal business location at PO Box 25622, Rochester, NY 14625. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Name of Foreign LLC: D K Pinnakle Enterprises LLC. Auth. filed with NY Dept. of State: 9/25/13. Office loc.: Monroe Co. LLC formed in MI: 6/27/13. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o Business Filings Inc., 187 Wolf Rd., Ste. 101, Albany, NY 12205. MI addr. of LLC: 5281 Silverstone Dr., Comstock Park, MI 49321. Cert. of Org. filed with Director, Dept. of Licensing & Regulatory Affairs, PO Box 30054, Lansing, MI 48909. Purpose: any lawful act. [ NOTICE ] Name of LLC: Jim’s Akorn Acres, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State: 12/9/13. Office location: Monroe County. Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: 1301 Five Mile Line Rd., Webster, NY 14580. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice is hereby given that a license, number not yet assigned, for a full on premise beer, wine & liquor license has been applied for by SDW Promotions, Inc. dba ICON,117 Liberty Pole Way, Rochester, NY

14604 County of Monroe, for a bar. [ NOTICE ] Notice is hereby given that a license, number not yet assigned, for a full on premise beer, wine & liquor license has been applied for by DFC ENTERTAINMENT AND EVENTS LLC dba EAST ON EAST DFC, 170 East Ave, Rochester, NY 14604, County of Monroe, for a restaurant. [ NOTICE ] Notice is hereby given that a license, number not yet assigned, for a full on premise beer, wine & liquor license has been applied for by BFL ENTERPRISES CORP dba Club Onyx,1485 Mt. Read Blvd., Rochester, NY 14606, County of Monroe, for a restaurant & bar. [ NOTICE ] Notice is hereby given that a license, number not yet assigned, for a restaurant beer & wine license has been applied for by Triple Crown Sports Bar & Grill, LLC dba, Triple Crown Sports Bar & Grill, 1733 Norton Street, Rochester, NY 14609, County of Monroe, for a restaurant. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Form. of GREENBOX SALES, LLC (the “LLC”). Art. of Org. filed with Secretary of the State of NY (SSNY) on 12/16/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, 2041 Penfield Rd, Penfield, NY 14526. Purpose: any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of MEETRA SPA LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 11/19/2013. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to MEETRA SPA, LLC 74 LILAC DRIVE APT 3 ROCHESTER, NY 14620 . Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ]

of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 11/04/2013. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 41 Branchbrook Drive, Henrietta, NY 14467 . Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Davio Pharma Consulting, LLC. Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) October 9, 2013. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to: c/o United States Corporation Agents, Inc., 7014 13th Avenue, Suite 202, Brooklyn, NY 11228. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of DR. MICHAEL BANG, DDS, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/02/13. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of PLLC: 2300 Buffalo Rd., Ste. 300, Rochester, NY 14624. SSNY designated as agent of PLLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the PLLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Dentistry. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of East Henrietta 2755, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State on 11/22/13. Office location: Monroe County. Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: 590 Salt Rd., Suite 5, Webster, NY 14580, principal business address. Purpose: all lawful purposes. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of FSI BAY POINT LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/11/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Marco Q. Rossi, Esq., 48 Wall St., Ste. 1100, NY, NY 10005. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ]

Notice of Formation of THE MARLEY GROUP OF UPSTATE NEW YORK, LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 09/27/2013. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to PO Box 869 Penfield NY, 14526. Purpose: any lawful activeties.

Notice of Formation of FSI M Outparcel LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 5/31/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Marco Q. Rossi, Esq., 48 Wall St., Ste. 1100, NY, NY 10005. Purpose: any lawful activity.

[ NOTICE ]

[ NOTICE ]

Notice of Formation of This Is Edvin LLC. Art.

Notice of Formation of FSI SANDY CREEK FUEL,

LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/21/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Marco Q. Rossi, Esq., 48 Wall St., Ste. 1100, NY, NY 10005. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of GREAT TAVERN PITTSFORD PARTNERS, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/19/13. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 2851 Clover St., Pittsford, NY 14534. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of IRON HORSE HEALTHCARE LLC. Art. Of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/4/2013. Office in Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail

process to the LLC, 1798 Trellis Circle Webster, NY 14580. Purpose: Any lawful purpose [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of JN Management Company, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/24/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, c/o Sammy Feldman, 3445 Winton Place, Suite 228, Rochester, NY 14623. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Kane’s Cosmetic Teeth Whitening, LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) on 12/20/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 104 Glenmont Drive, Rochester, NY 14617. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of KEN & RUTH MICHAEL, LLC Arts. of Org. filed

with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 09/24/13. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 105 College Ave., Rochester, NY 14606. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of LAWRENCE PARK, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/26/13. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 7 Lawrence St., Rochester, NY 14607. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of LiDestri Properties Management, LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 12/11/2013. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 815 W. Whitney Road, Fairport, NY 14450.

Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY: ZARPENTINE CATERING, LLC filed Articles of Organization with the Secretary of the State of New York on November 22, 2013. The office of the limited liability company shall be located in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as the agent of the limited liability company upon whom process against it may be served and the Secretary of State shall mail a copy of any process served upon him or her c/o 2951 Mt. Read Boulevard, Rochester, New York 14616 [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of LLC Tungsten Corporate Advisors, LLC. Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) December 18, 2013. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 114 Upper Mountain Ave. Montclair, NJ 07042. Purpose: any lawful activities.

cont. on page 30

FORECLOSURE OF TAX LIENS BY THE CITY OF ROCHESTER STATE OF NEW YORK SUPREME COURT COUNTY OF MONROE

IN THE MATTER OF THE FORECLOSURE OF TAX LIENS PURSUANT TO TITLE 4 OF PART E OF ARTICLE IX OF THE CHARTER OF THE CITY OF ROCHESTER.

LIST OF DELINQUENT TAXES AS OF JULY 1, 2013 PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that on December 18, 2013, the Corporation Counsel of the City of Rochester filed in the office of the Monroe County Clerk a list of parcels of property on which the City of Rochester holds a lien for taxes, assessments, fees or other charges which is at least one year old and which the City of Rochester intends to foreclose by an action in rem pursuant to Title 4 of Part E of Article IX of the Charter of the City of Rochester. A copy of that list was published on December 18, 2013. The foreclosure list contains as to each such parcel: 1. The tax account number and address; 2. The name of the last known owner; 3. The amount of each tax lien, except for a $155.00 charge which has been added to each tax lien pursuant to Section 9-123(A)(3)of the City Charter but which is not reflected on the printed list.

A copy of the foreclosure list has been filed in the office of the City Treasurer and will remain open for public inspection up to and including February 23, 2014, which is the redemption deadline date. Any person may on or before that date redeem any parcel on the foreclosure list by paying to the City Treasurer the amount of all delinquent taxes, assessments, fees and other charges stated on the foreclosure list, plus the $155.00 charge referred to above, plus accrued interest and late payment charges.

Any person having any interest in any parcel on the foreclosure list may, at any time up to the redemption deadline date, serve a verified notice of interest or an answer upon the Corporation Counsel setting forth in detail the nature and amount of his interest or any defense or objection to the foreclosure. The notice of interest or answer must also be filed in the office of All persons having an interest in the real property described in the Monroe County Clerk. Where a valid notice of interest is the foreclosure list are hereby notified that the filing of the list served, the parcel will be held for a foreclosure auction constitutes the commencement by the City of Rochester of an pursuant to Section 9-143 of the City Charter. action in the Supreme Court, Monroe County, to foreclose the tax liens therein described by an action in rem and that the list Any person who fails to redeem or to serve a notice of constitutes a notice of pendency of action and a complaint by interest or an answer by the redemption deadline date shall be barred thereafter from asserting his interest in the the City of Rochester against each parcel of land therein pending foreclosure action, and judgment in foreclosure described to enforce the satisfaction of such tax liens. This action is brought against the real property only. No personal may be granted without regard for, and in extinguishment of, the interest of any such person. judgment will be entered in this action for the delinquent taxes, assessments, fees or other charges.

ROBERT J. BERGIN Corporation Counsel rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 29

Legal Ads > page 29 [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of LONG MEMORY CONSULTING LLC. Art. Of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/16/2013. Office in Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, 160 Buckland Ave Rochester, NY 14618. Purpose: Any lawful purpose [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of NEURON FARMS LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 12/31/2013. Office location: Monroe

County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to INCORP SERVICES, INC. ONE COMMERCE PLAZA 99 WASHINGTON AVE., STE 805-A ALBANY, NY 12210-2822 . Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of North Ridge 405, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State on 11/22/13. Office location: Monroe County. Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: 590 Salt Rd., Suite 5, Webster, NY 14580, principal business

address. Purpose: all lawful purposes. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Northpoint Automotive & Marine, LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 11/13/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 70 Cliff St., Rochester, NY 14608. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of OR TUR, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/13/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent

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of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Corporation Service Co., 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207, regd. agent upon whom and at which process may be served. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Rabbit Moon LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 11/27/2013. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 99 Van Voorhis Ave. Rochester NY 14617 Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of RIDDLE ASSOCIATES, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/3/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 555 North Winton Road, Rochester, NY 14610. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Ridge Road 5247, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State on 11/22/13. Office location: Monroe County. Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: 590 Salt Rd., Suite 5, Webster, NY 14580, principal business address. Purpose: all lawful purposes. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of TEMIDA, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/4/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC: 1146 Pittsford Mendon Center Road, Honeoye Falls, NY 14472.. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of ULA’S AUTOMOTIVE LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) December 4, 2013. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 2244 Clifford Ave. Rochester, NY 14609. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of VandeSande Controls Engineering, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/11/13, becoming effective on 01/01/14. Office location:

30 CITY JANUARY 8-14, 2014

Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 11 Erie Crescent, Fairport, NY 14450. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of Kerry Court Danvers LLC. Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 12/16/13. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. bus. addr.: 235 Moore St., Hackensack, NJ 07601. LLC formed in MA on 10/2/12. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. MA addr. of LLC: c/o National Registered Agents, Inc., 155 Federal St., Ste. 700, Boston, MA 02110. Cert. of Org. filed with MA Sec. of State, One Ashburton Pl., Boston, MA 02108. Purpose: all lawful purposes. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of Sonehan Danvers LLC. Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 12/16/13. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. bus. addr.: 235 Moore St., Hackensack, NJ 07601. LLC formed in MA on 10/2/12. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. MA addr. of LLC: c/o National Registered Agents, Inc., 155 Federal St., Ste. 700, Boston, MA 02110. Cert. of Org. filed with MA Sec. of State, One Ashburton Pl., Boston, MA 02108. Purpose: all lawful purposes. [ NOTICE ] Paul Novak Media LLC (LLC) filed Arts. of Org. with NY Secy. of State (SS) on 1/2/2013. LLC’s office is in Monroe Co. SS is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS will mail a copy of any process to LLC’s principal business location at 651 Cumberland Way, Webster, NY 14580. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] PowerSirj Productions LLC Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State (SSNY) on 11/26/2013. The SSNY is designated as the PowerSirj Productions LLC agent upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to: P.O. Box 19754, Rochester, New York

14619. Office Location: Monroe County. Purpose: Any lawful activities. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] Community Playhouse LLC filed Articles of Organization with the New York Department of State on 11/22/13. Its office is located in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent of the Company upon whom process against it may be served and a copy of any process shall be mailed to 17 Mulberry Street, Rochester NY 14620. The purpose of the Company is any lawful business. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF BTMPM, LLC ] BTMPM, LLC (the “LLC”) filed Articles of Organization with NY Secretary of State (SSNY) 11/22/13. Office location: Monroe County, NY. Principal business location: 1265 Scottsville Rd, Rochester, NY 14624. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to CT Corporation System, 111 Eighth Avenue, NY, NY 10011 which is also the registered agent upon whom process may be served. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY ] The name of the Limited Liability Company (LLC) is CERC-MS Properties, LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (“SSNY”) on November 22, 2013. Office location is Monroe County, New York. The SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. The SSNY shall mail a copy of any process to the LLC at 16 E. Main St., Suite 420, Rochester, NY 14614. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY ] The name of the Limited Liability Company (LLC) is CERC-LW Properties, LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (“SSNY”) on November 22, 2013. Office location is Monroe County, New York. The SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. The SSNY shall mail a copy of any process to the LLC at 16 E. Main St., Suite 420, Rochester, NY 14614. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY ] The name of the Limited Liability Company (LLC) is CERC-TL Properties, LLC.

Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (“SSNY”) on November 22, 2013. Office location is Monroe County, New York. The SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. The SSNY shall mail a copy of any process to the LLC at 16 E. Main St., Suite 420, Rochester, NY 14614. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY ] The name of the Limited Liability Company (LLC) is CERC-HL Properties, LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (“SSNY”) on November 22, 2013. Office location is Monroe County, New York. The SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. The SSNY shall mail a copy of any process to the LLC at 16 E. Main St., Suite 420, Rochester, NY 14614. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY ] The name of the Limited Liability Company (LLC) is CERC-DH Properties, LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (“SSNY”) on November 22, 2013. Office location is Monroe County, New York. The SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. The SSNY shall mail a copy of any process to the LLC at 16 E. Main St., Suite 420, Rochester, NY 14614. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY ] The name of the Limited Liability Company (LLC) is CERC-2L Properties, LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (“SSNY”) on November 22, 2013. Office location is Monroe County, New York. The SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. The SSNY shall mail a copy of any process to the LLC at 16 E. Main St., Suite 420, Rochester, NY 14614. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY ] The name of the limited liability company is 57th Street Productions LLC. The Articles of Organization were filed with the NY Secretary of State on December 23, 2013. The office of the LLC is located in Monroe County, New York State. The NY Secretary of State

is designated as the agent of the LLC upon whom process may be served. A copy of the process served shall be mailed to 140 Meadow Drive, Rochester NY 14618. The LLC is managed by a manager. The purpose of the LLC is any lawful business. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LLC ] 500 Whitney Road, LLC has filed articles of organization with the New York Secretary of State on December 12, 2013 with an effective date of formation of December 12, 2013. Its principal place of business is located at 2124 Baird Road, Penfield, New York in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent upon whom process may be served. A copy of any process shall be mailed to 2124 Baird Road, Penfield, New York 14526. The purpose of the LLC is to engage in any lawful activity for which Limited Liability Companies may be organized under Section 203 of the New York Limited Liability Company Law. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LLC ] 83 Rutgers, LLC has filed articles of organization with the New York Secretary of State on November 22, 2013 with an effective date of formation of November 22, 2013. Its principal place of business is located at 1599 Monroe Avenue, Rochester, New York in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent upon whom process may be served. A copy of any process shall be mailed to 1599 Monroe Avenue, Rochester, New York 14618. The purpose of the LLC is to engage in any lawful activity for which Limited Liability Companies may be organized under Section 203 of the New York Limited Liability Company Law. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LLC ] East Ridge CDE Properties, LLC has filed articles of organization with the New York Secretary of State on November 27, 2013 with an effective date of formation of November 27, 2013. Its principal place of business is located at 27 Center Crossing, Fairport, New York in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent upon whom process may be served. A copy of any process shall be mailed to 27 Center Crossing, Fairport, New York 14450. The purpose of the LLC is to engage in any lawful activity for which Limited Liability Companies may be organized under Section 203 of the New York Limited Liability Company Law.

Fun [ NEWS OF THE WEIRD ] BY CHUCK SHEPHERD During the 2012 presidential campaign, Mitt Romney caught criticism for his proposed California home with parking on an upper floor, requiring a car elevator. Much more elaborate elevator access will be available in the new Porsche Design Tower near Miami (opening in 2016 and already 80 percent sold out, according to a December report by Slate.com). The 132 oceanside units (in square footage from 4,300 to 17,000 and in price from $5.3 million to $32.5 million) include glass-walled, elevator-accessed spaces for two or four cars (for people who would rather admire their Bugattis and Maseratis than the Atlantic Ocean).

Can’t Possibly Be True

— Equality Under Law: (1) In December, Fort Worth, Texas, judge Jean Boyd sentenced teenager Ethan Couch to probation with no jail time for drunkenly killing four people in a car crash -- apparently accepting Couch’s “defense” that his affluent, permissive childhood had taught him irresponsibility. (WFAA-TV turned up a 2012 case in which Judge Boyd sentenced a 14-year-old black kid to prison for punching another boy who then fell, bumped his head and died.) (2) New York City prostitute murderer Rasheen Everett got a 29year sentence in December, despite his lawyer’s “defense” that the victim was merely a transgendered prostitute. (“Shouldn’t (29-year sentences) be reserved for people who are guilty of killing certain (higher) classes of individuals?”) — Tension over digital security is such that an alarming disclosure

made in 2004 (and largely ignored) can resurface on a website in 2013 and appear even more astonishing. At the height of the Cold War in the 1960s (and largely because of Pentagon-White House contentiousness), “safeguards” were installed to prevent rogue generals from launching nuclear war on their own. What today would be a “PIN” number was assigned to each missile, but Strategic Air Command generals mocked the PINs by setting each one to “00000000” -- a code that today would be ridiculed as naive. (Furthermore, “00000000” was then written out on each missile’s instructions, according to the former launch control officer who disclosed it in 2004.) — Many medical professionals are certain that Dr. Stanislaw Burzynski, 70, is a quack, treating cancer patients with expensive, FDA-unapproved substances, giving false hope to the terminally ill and in some cases diverting them from better-regarded treatments. However, according to a December USA Today investigation, Dr. Burzynski enjoys enthusiastic support from a small but dedicated group of patients, and neither regulators in Texas (where he is licensed) nor two juries (who turned back indictments against him) have been able to stop him. FDA regulators have been inconsistent toward him but appear to be gaining aggressiveness following recent inspections of his facilities. (Dr. Burzynski manufactures his own proprietary drugs, charging around $10,000 a month to patients who can pay.)

[ LAST WEEK’S SOLUTION ON PAGE 26 ]

[ LOVESCOPE ] BY EUGENIA LAST ARIES (March 21-April 19): Someone from your past may try to get back into your life. Keep your distance and avoid a repeat performance. Protect your heart and your reputation. Refuse to let anyone pressure you into something you don’t feel sure about doing. Bide your time and work on self-improvement, not partnerships. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Get out to singles’ functions or sign up for a dating service. The stars are aligned, and love is within reach. Don’t hesitate to approach someone of interest. The only thing standing between you and a great relationship is not being

a participant. Join in the fun to find love. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): The more involved you become in physical activities, the more likely you are to meet someone equally as active and looking for a similar type of relationship. Get out have fun, and you will attract attention and a social encounter that leads to love at first sight. CANCER (June 21-July 22): You’ll end up in a push-pull situation. If you aren’t willing to compromise, you will face rejection. If you give in too readily, you’ll be taken for granted. Balance is necessary if you are going to end up with

someone who wants to be with you forever. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Your heart is in the right place, but you may not be quite as willing to make a commitment as the person you fancy. Beware someone trying to trick you into a relationship that you aren’t ready to honor. Step back and don’t make promises you cannot keep. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Don’t feel you have to overspend to impress someone. In fact, you should be able to find a perfect partner based on who you are and the type of qualities you have to offer. Communication will lead to an emotional con-

nection and a whole lot more. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): You’ll be uncertain when it comes to love. Procrastinating will lead to trouble. If you like someone, say so; if you don’t, walk away. Honesty will count. Avoid anyone who is overbearing or excessive in any way. Protect your home, your assets and your heart. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Short trips, taking a course or getting out with friends will all lead to interesting personal encounters. Share your interests and thoughts, and someone will find you irresistible. Romance is on the rise, and love in the stars. Make your move, and reveal your intentions.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Activity will get you into the game of love. Participate in social events that require you to engage in physical movement like sports, dance or even attending a horse race or dog show. It’s involvement that will lead to connecting with that special person. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Don’t divulge too much personal information. Emotional upset and arguments are apparent. Sit back and let potential partners come to you. Listen diligently, but don’t make comments. Observation will be your best bet to figuring out whether someone is worth your while.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): You’ll be changeable when it comes to love. Someone from your past may still be holding your interest. To move forward, you need to resolve unfinished romantic business you are harboring. Face facts and go over the pros and cons of revisiting an old love. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): You’ve got everything going for you. Your charm and body language will lead the way into someone’s heart. All you have to do is get involved in a cause or an event you believe in, and you will discover what life and love are all about.

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