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ROC HEST

ER1O Rochesterians doing great things in the community PAGE 6

The Richards record.

Snowy owls everywhere.

Ramen comes to Rochester.

URBAN JOURNAL, PAGE 3

ENVIRONMENT, PAGE 4

DINING, PAGE 13

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We welcome your comments. Send them to themail@rochester-citynews. com, or post them on our website, rochestercitynewspaper.com, our Facebook page, or our Twitter feed, @ roccitynews. For our print edition, we select comments from all three sources; those of fewer than 350 words have a greater chance of being published, and we do edit selections for publication in print. We don’t publish comments sent to other media.

Think like the Flintstones

In mid-December, COMIDA gave tax breaks to Marketplace Mall, owned by the Wilmot family, whose worth exceeds $40 million. Cheers to the RushHenrietta School District for raising objections. Such tax breaks for retailers are of no benefit, except to the owners of the mall or business. We need only to witness the fiasco surrounding Medley Centre in Irondequoit. The tax breaks for Greece Ridge mall have resulted in the creation of restaurants. Those same businesses could open up anywhere if, in fact, there was a real demand for them not generated by the mall owners. In fact, when Greece was considering tax breaks, one of the Wilmots responded that if they were not afforded a tax break, the businesses would open up somewhere down the road. That’s called free enterprise and is at the foundation of our economy. Your newspaper lists at least once a month restaurants that are closing or have closed in the Greater Rochester area. Business owners in the small strip malls or in stand-alone properties don’t get these tax breaks. Why should the mall owners? Is it because they make handsome political contributions? Mall owners want to argue that the new restaurants or stores will hire people. Those same people would be hired if the businesses were located other than in the mall, and this would not be at a cost to taxpayers. Corporate welfare is still welfare. I hope the Rush-Henrietta School District fights this tooth and nail.

Across all forms of media, most works of futuristic fiction depict a world boasting tall buildings, advanced technology, flying cars, and dare I say it, personal hoverboards. Depending on the vision, you’ll either see tall, sleek buildings with domes and spires or flashing skyscrapers with trippy neon lights and holographic billboards. In neither case do you see the old movie theater from the silent era or a gutted, run-down library converted into a trendy eatery. My point is that art reflects life. And rarely when we as a society think of the future in broad strokes do we think about renovating old buildings and petitioning to halt demolition of an abandoned department store. And for good reason. To get to the future, we have to let go of the past. We are no longer showing reverence to nostalgia. We are choking on it. We mourn this building and that building, we lament the loss of Midtown, and we want penny candy to go back to being a penny. Any promising or innovative idea is halted in the name of planning, committees, and zoning. And petitions and protests. You know what is even better than seeing that old run-down warehouse on the corner? Not seeing it. Take a picture, slap it in an album, and move on. We can no longer afford to grasp onto these ghosts of architecture if we want to move forward, as a city, as a society. It’s stunting us and it’s dangerous. It wasn’t always this way. The New York State Fair originally touted “The World of Tomorrow.” Then it became tomorrow and we no longer reach for the future; we hold onto the past. Hover-boards? We can’t even wrap our brains around Segways. Not exactly the progress we were promised. Talking robot maids? How about refitting your bathtub instead? Our technology keeps getting smaller (our phones can play games!), and we fight to keep a dilapidated pile of brick and mortar up because it “looks retro.” What are we doing? If we want to live like the Jetsons, we have to stop thinking like the Flintstones. Let’s become innovative again. Why not us? Why not Rochester?

JAMES R. BOEHLER

TOM CZARNIAK

Stop tax breaks for retailers

Shocking board members

There is that classic scene in the movie “Casablanca” where the overacting Inspector Renault blows his whistle and shuts down Rick’s Café, exclaiming how “shocked, shocked he is to find gambling going on in this establishment.” Couldn’t help but think of that scene when City reported that Rochester School District Commissioner Melisza Campos expressed how disgusted and appalled she was with the rudeness she encountered as she tried to enroll her first child in three city schools. However, unlike the jaded inspector, she seemed genuinely surprised. While such a traumatic new-parent experience for a commissioner questions the wisdom of electing childless school board members in the first place, more important, who else on the board has not been listening when parents have been telling such emotional and discouraging stories at school board meetings for years and years? Of seven members, the school board presently has three commissioners who have never before interacted with this district as a parent. Rochester city schools are ranked last place in this state. Shocked, shocked, anybody? PETER KEENAN JR.

Who benefits from testing?

Regarding “Silver Says Hold Off on Sharing Student Data,” News Blog: There is absolutely no evidence that collecting students’ personal data will help identify students at risk of not graduating, track student progress, or allow for the personalizing of instruction. These are the responsibilities of teachers and administrators of a local school district. You know, the people who actually know the student. What the New York State Education Department and inBloom are offering is a service that no one needs. Ask the right question: Why do we need this? Race to the Top offered a revenue stream for those in the “education business.” “Students first”? Hardly. DOROTHY PETRIE

News. Music. Life. Greater Rochester’s Alternative Newsweekly January 1-7, 2014 Vol 43 No 17 250 North Goodman Street Rochester, New York 14607-1199 themail@rochester-citynews.com phone (585) 244-3329 fax (585) 244-1126 rochestercitynewspaper.com facebook.com/CityNewspaper twitter.com/roccitynews On the cover: Illustration by Matt DeTurck Photos by Mark Chamberlin, Larissa Coe, Ashleigh Deskins, Matt DeTurck, John Schlia, Gerry Szymanski Publishers: William and Mary Anna Towler Editor: Mary Anna Towler Asst. to the publishers: Matt Walsh Editorial department themail@rochester-citynews.com Features editor: Eric Rezsnyak News editor: Christine Carrie Fien Staff writers: Tim Louis Macaluso, Jeremy Moule Music editor: Willie Clark Music writer: Frank De Blase Calendar editor: Rebecca Rafferty Contributing writers: Paloma Capanna, Casey Carlsen, Roman Divezur, George Grella, Laura Rebecca Kenyon, Andy Klingenberger, Dave LaBarge, Kathy Laluk, Adam Lubitow, Nicole Milano, Ron Netsky, Dayna Papaleo, Suzan Pero, Rebecca Rafferty, David Raymond, David Yockel Jr. Art department artdept@rochester-citynews.com Art director/production manager: Matt DeTurck Designers: Aubrey Berardini, Mark Chamberlin Photographers: Mark Chamberlin, Frank De Blase Advertising department ads@rochester-citynews.com Sales operations: Matt Walsh New sales development: Betsy Matthews Account executives: Nancy Burkhardt, Tom Decker, Christine Kubarycz, William Towler Classified sales representatives: Christine Kubarycz, Tracey Mykins Operations/Circulation kstathis@rochester-citynews.com Circulation manager: Katherine Stathis Distribution: Andy DiCiaccio, David Riccioni, Northstar Delivery, Wolfe News City Newspaper is available free of charge. Additional copies of the current issue may be purchased for $1 each at the City Newspaper office. City Newspaper may be distributed only by authorized distributors. No person may, without prior written permission of City Newspaper, take more than one copy of each weekly issue. City (ISSN 1551-3262) is published weekly by WMT Publications, Inc. Periodical postage paid at Rochester, NY (USPS 022-138). Address changes: City, 250 North Goodman Street, Rochester, NY 14607. Member of the Association of Alternative Newsweeklies and the New York Press Association. Annual subscriptions: $35 ($30 senior citizens); add $10 for out-of-state subscriptions. Refunds for fewer than ten months cannot be issued. Copyright by WMT Publications Inc., 2014 - all rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, photocopying, recording or by any information storage retrieval system without permission of the copyright owner.

URBAN JOURNAL | BY MARY ANNA TOWLER

The Richards record Tom Richards, who leaves office this week, has been a clear-eyed, pragmatic mayor. He understands finances, understands development, understands business, understands government. And he operates from the basis of what he thinks will work and what is possible. In many respects, he’s been a steady-asyou-go kind of mayor, continuing the solid fiscal management of the three previous mayors. He hasn’t proposed grand projects. And he put his foot down on a couple of big ones created or supported by predecessors: the ferry and a performing arts center. That kind of administration isn’t glitzy, and some of his critics think he hasn’t had much vision. But Richards leaves office with a long list of accomplishments, both as mayor and as a key official in the Duffy administration. Some of them are indeed big attentiongrabbers, like getting the Midtown Plaza site cleared and development underway. Some got less public notice: developing a partnership with public-employee unions that resulted in a self-insured health-care plan, for instance, and getting police and firefighter unions to accept small salary increases and benefits changes. Some of Richards’ accomplishments are more subtle. He ended the City Hall practice of lobbing verbal attacks at the school district. He has recognized the importance of things like neighborhood libraries and recreation centers, qualityof-life services that have been sacrificed in some cash-strapped cities. And he has been an outspoken advocate for finding a better way to fund cities, disagreeing when Governor Andrew Cuomo insisted last spring that Upstate cities have been “papering over” their problems and that money isn’t the solution to their fiscal problems. Richards spoke sympathetically of union members and their benefits. “These people don’t have high salaries,” he told me during an interview after the governor’s attack on cities. “Fundamentally, providing benefits is a good thing.” The problem, he said, isn’t that public employees don’t deserve their pay and benefits; the problem is that cities can’t afford them because of our outmoded way of financing cities. We can’t continue to force cities to rely on the property tax, Richards said. Rochester has cut expenses, cut staff. It can’t cut its way to financial stability, he said, and new economic development won’t produce a tax base big enough to provide the services that its residents need.

Richards leaves office with a long list of accomplishments, both as mayor and as a key official in the Duffy administration.” Certainly one of his biggest accomplishments is helping build faith in the city – particularly in downtown Rochester – among developers and business owners. As Richards leaves office, the interest and the progress in downtown Rochester is obvious. New businesses continue to open. New housing developments were completed in 2013, and 14 more are either solid plans or already under way. And some of them are big: the 182-unit Tower at Midtown and the 250-unit Alexander Park. In addition to the efforts downtown, Richards’ administration has focused strong attention on city neighborhoods – resulting in public and private investments, his aides say, of two dollars there for every dollar invested downtown, in new housing, lead abatement, business assistance, and infrastructure. Property values have increased in several neighborhoods, and the city’s tax base is growing after years of decline. This isn’t something Richards did by himself. Neighborhood groups, city staff, political leaders, and business leaders share the credit. Nor did the downtown turnaround begin with Richards. Rochester has been exceptionally fortunate to have had a series of mayors who – despite suburban sprawl, manufacturing decline, and financial stress – have kept the city financially sound, and helped residents and business owners preserve and improve many of city neighborhoods. Downtown development tended to get the most public notice during the Richards years, and incoming mayor Lovely Warren says she will focus on the city’s neediest residents and their neighborhoods. That is critically important, and Warren will likely have the strong support of city residents as she tackles some of the toughest challenges any mayor can face. She will also have the solid base and stability that Richards has provided. And for that, Rochester owes a big debt to a dedicated, honorable public servant and his talented staff. rochestercitynewspaper.com

CITY 3

[ NEWS FROM THE WEEK PAST ]

Midtown Tower under new ownership

The title for the former Midtown Tower has been passed to its new owner, a partnership of Buckingham Properties and Morgan Management. The site has also been renamed “The Tower at Midtown.” The partnership will redevelop the tower for commercial, office, and residential use to the tune of $59 million. The project has received significant financial assistance, however.

New park site

The planned location of the Rochester skate park has moved from beneath the east side of the Douglass-Anthony bridge to Genesee Crossroads Park downtown. The RochesterSubway blog reports that the old site faced challenges, including bureaucratic red tape. The park would be used by skateboarders and BMX riders.

Reviewing the review

The Pittsford village board may hire a consultant to determine if a new environmental review is warranted for the controversial apartment complex proposed for 75 Monroe Avenue.

Some say the project has changed significantly and a new review is needed.

News

Detention center debate

Democrats in the Monroe County Legislature floated a plan to approve financing for a new children’s detention center. County officials say they need to borrow $9 million to buy space at the Industry Residential Center Campus in Rush, and to reimburse the state for renovations to that campus. Financing for the center project is caught up in a political battle between Legislature Dems and Republicans.

ENVIRONMENT | BY JEREMY MOULE

Snow birds

Snowy owls in Rochester? They’ve been delivering holiday cards to the area’s magic community, no doubt. Though the owls generally spend their winters far north of Rochester, they do show up in the area from time to time. And this year, snowy owls have been spotted across New York.

Spring sues Monroe County

Todd Spring, former director of Monroe Community Hospital, is suing the county for more than $3 million, according to media reports. Spring was fired after a state report accused him of mistreating a patient. Spring is suing for damages resulting from loss of earnings, loss of career opportunities, and damage to his reputation, his attorney told the Democrat and Chronicle. Snowy owl sightings are being reported around Rochester. PHOTO BY CARRIE ANN GRIPPO-PIKE

In Rochester, a few have been sighted at Braddock Bay and the Rochester airport, says June Summers, president of the Genesee Valley Audubon Society. Summers says that near the beginning of December, her friends counted 13 owls at spots around Monroe County. Cornell University ornithologist Chris Wood, quoted in Audubon Magazine, says it’s an extraordinary year for snowy owl sightings in the northern US. “Already we can see that this year is one of the biggest irruption years ever for snowy owl,” he says in the magazine. Snowy owls are grassland and tundra birds, Summers says, so they’re often found in open, flat areas. That’s why many of the local sightings happen along Lake Ontario or in farm fields. The owls can be tricky to spot, Summers says. At first glance, they often look like

slightly dirty blobs with yellow eyes, she says. Michael Burger, director of conservation and science for Audubon New York, says the owls tend to head south when their preferred food source, lemmings, becomes scarce. They’re hunting small mammals, he says, though if they’re near water they’ll eat ducks or other water birds. There is one unusual aspect to this year’s sightings, Summers says. Typically, the owls come in waves every three to five years. But the last influx of snowy owls visited Rochester just two years ago, in 2011, she says. Whether it’s just an aberration or a change in pattern will be interesting to see, Summers says.

Meet the Artist Concert Series! ELDAR

Tues. Feb 11th • 7pm Tickets: $25 Athena Performing Arts Center

BONERAMA

Wed. March 26th • 7:30pm Tickets: $20 Greece Olympia High School Auditorium

Tickets can be purchased online at www.jazz901.org and by calling 585-966-2660 4 CITY

JANUARY 1-7, 2014

Rich Perrin, executive director of the Genesee Transportation Council, says that people are increasingly interested in biking and public transportation. If those options are feasible, he says, people will use them. And local transportation planners are emphasizing projects to make those options easier.

Cost of War The following people have been killed in the City of Rochester in recent weeks: -- Charles Robinson, 27, Rochester -- Richard Clare, 37, Rochester SOURCE: Rochester Police Department ROCHESTER TOTALS —

AFGHANISTAN TOTALS —

TRANSPORTATION | BY JEREMY MOULE

POLITICS | BY TIM LOUIS MACALUSO

Shifting gears

Schools leadership

Rochesterians are spending less time driving and more time on bikes and buses, says a recent report from the US Public Interest Research Group. “Transportation in Transition” analyzed the country’s 100 largest urban areas to measure shifts in how people get around. Rich Perrin, executive director of the Genesee Transportation Council, says that people are increasingly interested in biking and public transportation. If those options are feasible, he says, people will use them. And local transportation planners are emphasizing projects to make those options easier, he says. “Really, what we’re trying to do is adjust our systems as people’s behaviors change,” says William Carpenter, CEO of the Rochester Genesee Regional Transportation Authority. Transit ridership saw the biggest shift locally; Rochester’s increase was the 13th largest nationwide, the report says. The RGRTA recorded 13.1 million trips in 2005 and 17.2 million in 2010, a 31.6 percent increase, the report says. Carpenter says that a growing downtown population has boosted ridership. And the $1 fare plays a role, too, he says. RGRTA’s routes are frequently reevaluated and reconfigured, Carpenter

says. In some cases, RGRTA works with large employers or institutions to develop and fund routes, he says, and to encourage employees to use FILE PHOTO the bus system. Other shifts detailed in the report aren’t as dramatic. For example, the Rochester area saw a .4 percent increase in the number of people who bike to work, which gave the city the eighth-largest increase nationwide, the report says. And Rochester drivers are logging fewer miles; they drove 400 million fewer miles in 2011 than in 2006, the report says. Rochester saw a 7.5 percent decrease in vehicle miles traveled per capita over that time period, which puts the city in 21st place nationwide. The 7.5 percent figure matches the national average. The report takes into account the population of an area so that shifts in transportation choices are true shifts and not the result of population growth.

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Rochester school board members will meet this week to elect a leadership team. | Van White, currently vice president of the board, says he wants the presidency. But White may face a challenge from board member Cynthia Elliott, if the rumors are to be trusted. | Malik Evans, the current president, is not seeking the post. | The contenders for vice president aren’t as clear. | Board members make $23,000 annually, while the board president makes about $30,000. | The new president will lead a group that is generally underappreciated and has few major successes to brag about. | Low graduation rates and low student performance, particularly among African American and Latino boys, continue to grind at the school district. And the new leadership team will also face increasing competition for students with charter schools, as well as a state Education Department growing increasingly impatient for improvement at the district. | If White becomes president, Superintendent Bolgen Vargas will have to work with a more assertive leader who may expect to see more of his ideas implemented and is less supportive of Vargas’s “We need the community’s help” narrative.

2,301 US servicemen and servicewomen and 1,109 Coalition servicemen and servicewomen have been killed in Afghanistan from the beginning of the war and occupation to December 27. Statistics for Afghan civilian casualties are not available. American casualties from December 17 to December 23: -- Sgt. Daniel M. Vasselian, 27, Abington, Mass. SOURCES: iraqbodycount. org, icasualties.org, Department of Defense

Auditions for

CLOSER THAN EVER

Lyrics by Richard Malby, Jr. and Music by David Shire Conceived by Steven Scott Smith. Originally produced off Broadway by Janet Brenner, Michael Gill and Daryl Roth.

January 6 & 7, 2013 from 7:00-10:00 pm. Reformation Lutheran Church 111 N. Chestnut St., Rochester, New York 14604 Sides and Music will be provided at the Auditions!

www.everyonestheatre.com for more information or find us on Facebook CLOSER THAN EVER is presented through special arrangement with Music Theatre International (MTI). All authorized performance materials are also supplied by MTI. 421 West 54th Street, New York, NY 10019 Phone: 212-541-4684 • Fax: 212-397-4684 • www.MTIShows.com

rochestercitynewspaper.com

CITY 5

10

THE

ROCHESTER BY THE CITY NEWSPAPER STAFF

BEHINDTHE-SCENES ROCHESTERIANS DOING GREAT THINGS THAT YOU SHOULD KNOW ABOUT

T

The Greater Rochester area is full of smart, talented people. People who make this a great place to live. While it would be impossible to shine the spotlight on all of them, this project — the Rochester 10 — is designed to bring some of the hard-working background players in our local scene into the forefront. We are in no way saying that these are the 10 (technically 11, as we’re featuring one creative duo) most important people

in Rochester. We’re not even saying that they’re necessarily the best at what they do. But every person on this list is contributing to life in Rochester in interesting, varied ways. One is responsible for booking some of the most interesting, offbeat music acts that come to town. One is helping to find shelter for our local homeless population. Another is creating low-cost, inventive dishes with a keen eye

on alternative wellness, while one of our other selections has been instrumental to making Rochester a major site for H.I.V./ AIDS vaccine research. Read on to get to know these interesting Rochester residents. Is there someone else you think deserves to be profiled? Please add his or her name to the comments section of this article at rochestercitynewspaper.com for future consideration.

Tim Avery MUSIC

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BY WILLIE CLARK PHOTO BY MATT DETURCK

You know the big names. The giant shows that come through — or skip coming to — one of Rochester’s larger venues. The radio plays them. The Justin Timberlakes. The Jay-Zs. The acts that don’t really need publicity to draw in huge crowds. But what about the little guys? The bands starting out? The ones who drove for miles and are sleeping on friends’ couches along the way? The ones that people haven’t heard about yet? Who keeps an eye out for them? Who keeps the flow of new and upcoming bands coming into Rochester, while also helping to develop our own local music scene? In Rochester, the man behind the beard, and behind that scene, is Tim Avery. Avery got his start in the band The Kitchen Sinks. He bought a PA system and starting playing, and putting together, shows in unconventional (and often unlicensed) venues such as the AV Space, The Landfill,

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JANUARY 1-7, 2014

Heather Roffe BY ERIC REZSNYAK PHOTO BY JOHN SCHLIA

DANCE

2

Although a relatively small subsection of the arts, Rochester’s dance scene is surprisingly vibrant. The well-regarded dance program at SUNY Brockport is an incubator for new talent. Internationally renowned troupe Garth Fagan Dance maintains its home on Chestnut Street. Myriad new, inventive troupes have emerged, dancing in wide-ranging styles. And opportunities like the multi-troupe Fabo Callabo, the Nazareth College Arts Center Dance Festival, and the Rochester Fringe Festival have given local dance groups high-profile opportunities to show their stuff. Heather Roffe is connected to it all. She currently serves as assistant professor of dance at Nazareth College, where she is working to develop the dance minor into a full-fledged major. Prior to that she taught dance at Brockport, SUNY Potsdam, Wells College, and Hobart and William Smith Colleges. She is also a member of the dynamic FuturPointe Dance ensemble, a former member of Garth Fagan Dance, and guest performer in other troupes. And her inspiring original choreography has been performed nationally, and drew raves at the 2013 Fringe Festival. But dance wasn’t Roffe’s initial career path. Although she has danced basically her entire life, she originally graduated college with a degree in business administration. Even as she worked in the marketing field, she taught dance in her off hours. “I woke up one day and the first thought I had was, ‘I can’t wait until this evening, to go work with my kids and teach them choreography. It made me stop and realize: What if that is what I do?” A revelatory residency with the Limon Dance Company clinched the deal and she pursued her master’s degree in dance. Since then she has worked as a dancer, a choreographer, and a teacher, all of which appeal to her in different ways. Finding a balance between the three takes effort, Roffe says; the attention is evident in her work. As a dancer she is lithe and precise. Her choreography is fascinating to behold, shifting from style to style. The movements are sometimes so different continues on page 10

The Treehouse, and the Shark Tank. The shows, and the number of attendees, just kept growing. It wasn’t about the money — Avery says that he often lost money on shows. Instead it was about the community and the bands. “All I care about is awesome music, having a great time, [and] putting together the best bill possible,” Avery says. In 2009, the Bug Jar — one of the few venues in Rochester putting on live music events virtually every night — brought on Avery as a booking agent. Although the venue is more traditional (and legally sanctioned), Avery tries to keep it as

much like a DIY venue as possible. It’s not uncommon for Avery to open up his apartment to touring bands (a mattress is a permanent part of his living room), even occasionally cooking breakfast for the musicians who make Rochester just one of many stops of their touring lives. There’s also a business side to it, and Avery has to balance bringing in acts that he wants and likes with bands that will draw people in. And while Rochester has a reputation for being a big college town, it isn’t quite that easy to get its spread-out, and mostly suburb-based, college populations into the city for live shows.

“We really aren’t a college town in terms of music,” Avery says. “You look at Buffalo. Why do Buffalo shows do so well? All those colleges are in the city. Those kids live in the city, they aren’t afraid of walking at night, they are close to the venues, and they are bigger colleges as well.” Avery says that a shuttle from colleges to venues during shows could help amend this problem. There’s still a lot of work to do to make Rochester’s live-music scene viable. Avery points to Philadelphia as a city with a growing and robust scene. “Here, when I ask people what they are doing, it’s either,

‘I’m going out drinking,’ or ‘I’m watching my TV shows,’” Avery says. “We as a city consuming music and consuming art, we are at risk of becoming Kenny G fans. We are at risk of becoming McDonald’s fans. We are at risk of becoming quietly irrelevant. And that, to me, is terrifying.” “We’ve got to get that kind of mindset into the population of Rochester,” Avery says. “Choice A is go to shows, support the scene, start bands. That’s what we have to be like if we want to blow up.”  continues on page 8 rochestercitynewspaper.com

CITY 7

THE ROCHESTER 10 continues from page 7

Gerry Hunt BY REBECCA RAFFERTY PHOTO BY ASHLEIGH DESKINS

3

Georgia native Gerald Hunt, who heads up the Frederick Douglass Resource Center, became involved in the Rochester community through his father, Reverend Errol Hunt, who in the 1990’s founded the Frederick Douglass Community Development Corporation. Reverend Hunt was the pastor of the Memorial AME Zion Church in Corn Hill. “When he arrived here, you had ‘urban renewal’ — vacant lots on either side of the church — so the neighborhood looked much different,” says the younger Hunt. “His vision was to revitalize the neighborhood.” Gerald Hunt says that the black community of Rochester has been, and still is, “held in a socioeconomic oppressive condition.” But he believes that creating a stronger black community with members who mutually lift one another is key. His father’s FDCDC had three objectives. Phase 1 was to create safe, secure, clean housing opportunities for first-time home buyers. In conjunction with the FDCDC, 21 single-family homes were built in Corn

CULTURE

Hill, “not exclusively for brown people,” says Hunt, “but everyone who bought a house for the first time were black folks, young black folks, which was good to see.” Phase 2 of the objective is cultural education. This particular part seeks to supplement Rochester’s urban education system, and to address our startlingly low graduation rates of black males. “I personally believe that the main ingredient, or component, that is missing or would make a direct impact in improving academic results is cultural education,” says Hunt. This is where the Frederick Douglass Resource Center comes in. While the majority of the students caught up in the Rochester City School District are children of color, says Hunt, “the entire scholastic paradigm is Eurocentric. That doesn’t make sense.” As a result, Hunt says there is a tangible “rejection of that paradigm by the students, and they check out. That’s a direct result of looking in the mirror and continues on page 19

Nick Bovenzi FOOD

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BY DAYNA PAPALEO PHOTO BY MARK CHAMBERLIN

“I don’t know if that’s something that people should find out. It’s really calculated.” That’s Nick Bovenzi, chef at Natural Oasis on Monroe Avenue, and he’s referring to exactly how much thought goes into the food he makes. Of course, any culinary professional worth his or her salt takes great care in the construction of a dish, but Bovenzi goes beyond technique and flavor to actually consider your body’s reaction to Natural Oasis’s vegan food. “Vegetables and grains” is how Bovenzi accurately — if humbly — describes his ingredient options, yet the way he combines them, in concert with certain herbs and spices, is rooted in

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JANUARY 1-7, 2014

Ayurvedic medicine. So the next time you’re savoring a delicious and inexpensive meal at Natural Oasis, please don’t let Bovenzi know that you’ve learned how beneficial it is for you, otherwise we might both get in trouble. The 33-year-old Rochester native made his bones under chefs like 2Vine’s Jerry Vorrasi and Good Luck’s Dan Martello. After a couple of unsatisfying stages in far-flung kitchens, Bovenzi returned home. In 2009 he approached Natural Oasis owner Solomon Kebede about expanding beyond the business’s all-day Ethiopian buffet. The rotating, 13-item menu as we now know it debuted in the spring of 2011 with an emphasis

Caterina Leone Mannino EDUCATION

BY TIM LOUIS MACALUSO PHOTO BY MARK CHAMBERLIN

5

When Rochester schools Superintendent Bolgen Vargas began developing his concept for expanded learning about two years ago, he turned to Caterina Leone Mannino, the district’s director of school innovation. Though somewhat controversial and difficult to implement, expanded learning can give students and teachers more time for instruction and extracurricular activities such as music, arts, and sports. But it is an enormous undertaking. The schedule changes can be stressful for students, parents, and teachers. And the results are not immediate. Students in more than 20 city schools now have longer days. And Mannino is charged with overseeing their progress, interacting with the state Education Department, and researching successful models around the country. It’s a high-pressure position for the 20year veteran of the education field, and a lot is at stake. Vargas has made expanded learning the foundation of his strategy to fundamentally transform the struggling school district. Mannino joined the Rochester school district in 2003, and she’s spent much of her time working on language and literacy development. It’s an especially important issue for city students, she says, since many enter school with serious deficiencies. “Teaching reading is not really about teaching kids to recognize a word,” she says. “It’s about teaching them how to interpret the world around them. Reading is the key that unlocks everything else.” Improving urban education is essential to breaking the cycle of poverty that snares generations of families in Rochester and in urban districts across the country, she says.

on fresh ingredients, affordability (dishes generally cost $4), French technique, and healthful syntheses. For Bovenzi, minimalism is key: “The pinnacle of cooking is to only have about four ingredients when you make something. If you can keep it simple on the plate, then people enjoy it and their body’s not totally taxed having all this different food.” The kitchen at Natural Oasis is an open one, and it’s not just to provide a focal point for the 30-seat dining room. “It shows the

people who the chef is,” he says, “and it gives you a chance to see the customer, too. Being able to see people while they eat is extremely important. If you look over and someone is kind of making a face, as a cook you know exactly what that face is. You can just pick it out, and you can attend to it immediately.” “They see me as I am, and I see them as they are,” says Bovenzi. “It’s really laid back.” Adding to that relaxed vibe is that unlike other restaurants, Natural Oasis, which also offers wellness products and services, doesn’t

rise and fall based on how many $4 dishes it sells. “There’s about five ways the business brings in money,” says Bovenzi. “The restaurant is only one of them. There’s never that pressure, and it’s a lot easier to make people comfortable.” Now, you won’t find much information about Natural Oasis online, a rarity in this internet age, and Bovenzi is totally fine with that. “We’re kind of outsiders,” says Bovenzi. “We have a certain clientele, we have a certain product to put out, and we survive by

Mannino, who is the first member of her family to graduate from college, tells students that it’s O.K. to struggle with something that’s hard to do. The worst thing teachers and parents can do, she says, is pity city students because they face so many hardships and excuse them from doing the hard work it takes to be successful. “So many of our kids have made it through obstacles many of us can’t even imagine,” Mannino says. “So how do we work with those strengths and that resilience that sometimes even they don’t realize they have? How do we put them on the path of lifelong learning?” Mannino stays in contact with some of her former students in Boston where she began her career. And she insists that teaching, despite the current tumultuous atmosphere in the education field, is still one of the most important and rewarding careers anyone can pursue. “You have to go and look back at the classroom and remember that you’re making a child’s life better,” she says. “We hear only about the district’s failures, but challenge is an opportunity.” Mannino says the public is beginning to recognize that good schools and teachers are only a part of the solution to improving education. Schools, affordable housing, and health care are interrelated, she says. “We’re pushing boundaries out of our comfort zones,” Mannino says. “How do we bring all of these resources in Rochester together? How do we build these relationships? That’s what we need to focus on.” 

meeting our customers and talking to them and being personable.” And just who are Natural Oasis customers? “Anyone can eat here,” says Bovenzi. “I don’t care if you’re vegan, I don’t care if you eat meat, I don’t care if you’re gluten-free; there’s no excuse why you can’t eat here except you don’t want to. And if you don’t want to, that’s cool, too.”  continues on page 10

rochestercitynewspaper.com

CITY 9

THE ROCHESTER 10 continues from page 9

Carvin Eison MEDIA

BY JEREMY MOULE PHOTO BY MATT DETURCK

6

Carvin Eison believes in the power of media. He’s spent 40 years producing films and television programs that tackle a variety of subjects. He’s served as a videographer for Garth Fagan Dance, produced a current affairs program, and recently released a film, “Shadows of the Lynching Tree,” that examines the history and lingering impacts of lynching in America. He worked at WXXI for 10 years and was also part of the team that produced “July ‘64,” a 2004 documentary about the 1964 race riots in Rochester. But Eison is also educating the next generation of producers, all with their own ideas and messages to broadcast. He does that in the classroom as an associate professor in SUNY Brockport’s Communications Department and in the community as general manager of Rochester Community Television, a job he’s had for 10 years. “I think in this modern world everyone ought to be able to produce pictures and sound in a credible way to send a message,” he says. And community television provides a platform for the public to do that, which is what he says he finds attractive about it. Community television gives people a voice, he says — one

Heather Roffe

continues from page 7

that it seems impossible that they spring from the same mind. That’s intentional. “With each new piece I’m trying to say something new, and that often leads to a different movement that comes out of me,” she says. “It’s hard to say different things when you’re using the same movement vocabulary.” Roffe’s choreography explicitly tackles social issues. The 2010 piece “Text Me” deals with modern communication and how disembodied it has all become. The “Fear” suite, performed as part of the 10 CITY JANUARY 1-7, 2014

that enables them to create programming focused on life in their community. A fundamental desire to ensure that people are media-literate is at the core of Eison’s educational efforts. He says he wants to make sure that people understand how messages are constructed and how they are designed to persuade. At RCTV, his focus has been on improving the quality of programming — a task that’s part technical, part conceptual. He ensures that the station provides the public with equipment capable of producing high-quality audio and video. He also works directly with producers to help them refine their messages and to develop compelling productions. The latter is all about getting people to think about what they want to say in a visual medium and how to do it clearly, he says. Eison is using his latest film project to teach documentary work to some producers. The project, which he’s calling “July ‘14,” is a follow-up to “July ‘64.” It’ll look at where the City of Rochester is in terms of health, education, and employment 50 years after the 1964 riots. “I feel that I have maybe two, three more big films to do if I’m lucky, but I want to teach other people so that tradition can continue on,” Eison says. 

2013 Fringe Festival, was inspired by the Trayvon Martin case. For Roffe, dance “is my way of processing what is going on around me in contemporary society. Rather than stating my opinion, I look at it in an abstract way and let people take their own ideas and experiences away from the pieces,” she says. She continues to choreograph new pieces, dance with FuturPointe, and develop the program at Nazareth. Roffe says that the increasingly fertile local dance scene is a creative boon in many ways,

especially when it comes to collaboration. But there is a catch. “There’s so much really interesting work happening here, which is great. But how do we get audiences to see it?” she asks. “We’re all trying to find ways of collaborating and supporting each other, but we also need to find ways to distinguish ourselves.” “So much funding for the arts has been cut,” Roffe says. “For small groups, grants are so competitive. Dance companies have to find a way to sustain ourselves.”

But how do you do that? One answer may come in the way Roffe is constructing the dance program at Nazareth. In addition to training students in movement and performance, she’s creating connections with the professional departments at the school, so that students learn massage, art therapy, and other skills that can help support them in their careers. Roffe herself is current reaping the benefits of a diverse education. “My business administration and marketing degrees are so helpful to have,” she says. “A lot of skills are coming into play.” 

Ryan Acuff BY JEREMY MOULE PHOTO BY GERRY SZYMANSKI

7

Some of Rochester’s homeless have traditionally sought shelter in the Civic Center Garage downtown. But the garage’s management wants them out. Local activist Ryan Acuff says the firm should back off until some sort of contingency plan is in place. The garage management — and the public for that matter — can’t arrest its way out of the problem, he says. Homelessness is a symptom of larger issues around housing, Acuff says, including an insufficient shelter system. Fundamentally, he says, everybody is entitled to a place to live. “There shouldn’t be anybody out in the cold in a county as rich as this one,” he says. Acuff is a familiar figure in local activist circles. He was heavily

ACTIVISM

involved in Occupy Rochester and is active with local police accountability groups and Genesee Valley Earth First. He also serves on the board of the Genesee Valley chapter of the New York Civil Liberties Union. But a lot of his time is spent on housing issues. Acuff is an advocate and case manager at the House of Mercy shelter. It’s through that job that he’s become involved in the Civic Center Garage issue. House of Mercy also works with St. Joseph’s House of Hospitality and St. Mary’s Parish on a Housing First initiative. The homeless are given a place to live and then paired with the services they need. continues on page 19

Dr. Michael Keefer MEDICAL

8

BY TIM LOUIS MACALUSO PHOTO BY JOHN SCHLIA

Earlier this year, the National Institutes of Health named the University of Rochester a Center for AIDS Research. The designation came with $7.5 million for H.I.V./AIDS research, and elevated the UR to the national stage when it comes to finding treatments and prevention routes for the disease. The competition for the CFAR designation is tough and only universities that already have considerable funding and research under way are seriously considered. The UR is now one of 18 CFAR institutions in the United States, and some of the credit for reaching this important milestone goes to Dr. Michael Keefer. Keefer is the director of the UR’s H.I.V. Vaccine Trial Unit. He’s been working on the search for an effective vaccine for much of his career. Prior to the UR’s CFAR designation, Keefer was the associate director for the administration of the H.I.V. Trials Network — monitoring a global effort involving multiple trials. There are many forms of H.I.V./ AIDS research, and they tend to generally fall into two categories:

treatments for people who are already living with H.I.V. or AIDS, and prevention to stop the virus or the disease from spreading. Keefer, who has consistently been one of the area’s most accessible authorities, says enormous progress has been made over the years in treating people with H.I.V./AIDS. People are living longer. And while the immediate goal used to be extending a patient’s life, research has now turned to understanding how H.I.V. impacts the aging process. Even though proper use of condoms is a highly effective way to prevent the spread of H.I.V., Keefer says, changing human behavior is not easy. So the hunt for a vaccine that prevents the contraction of the virus is still a critically important goal in the global medical research community. And Keefer has been instrumental in those efforts. Vaccine trials, which have been under way around the world for years, require long and complicated studies before human trials can begin. And Keefer has had his hopes dashed more than once. “We’re getting closer and closer,” he says.

Many Rochesterians have probably seen posters from Keefer’s department promoting awareness about the UR’s trials and seeking local volunteers for them. The posters appear throughout Rochester — from coffee shops to college campuses. Keefer says the first generation of vaccines may not work 100 percent of the time or may require use in combination with another medication. “There’s now more realistic talk of cures and visualizing a way to do this,” he says. Though Keefer is passionate about one day seeing H.I.V./AIDS eradicated, his career almost took a different turn. He earned his undergraduate degree in zoology at Miami University. “I thought I wanted to be a veterinarian,” he says. But he went to medical school instead, at a time when interest in infectious diseases was picking up because of the emerging AIDS epidemic. “It all just came together for me,” Keefer says.  continues on page 18 rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 11

For more Tom Tomorrow, including a political blog and cartoon archive, visit www.thismodernworld.com

URBAN ACTION This week’s calls to action include the following events and activities. (All are free and open to the public, unless otherwise noted.)

Immigration and border enforcement talk

The Rochester Committee on Latin America will present “The Border is Everywhere: Immigration History, Myth, and Current Reality,” at 7 p.m. on Wednesday, January 8. Grania Marcus, who has been involved with immigration issues in Florida, New York, and along the US-Mexico border for

more than 30 years, is the featured speaker. Border enforcement that involves deportation and family separations will be discussed. The event will be held at Downtown United Presbyterian Church, 212 North Fitzhugh Street.

January 9. The organization receives federal funding for highway and transit projects for the nine-county Rochester region. The meeting will be held at 47 South Fitzhugh Street.

Transit planning meeting

The Genesee Transportation Council, the metropolitan planning organization for the Genesee-Finger Lakes Region, will hold a planning committee meeting at 10 a.m. on Thursday,

CITY NEWS BLOG

POLITICS, PEOPLE, EVENTS, & ISSUES

rochestercitynewspaper.com/BLOGS/NEWSBLOG COMMENTING ON THE STATE OF ROCHESTER & BEYOND

12 CITY JANUARY 1-7, 2014

Dining such as Café Cibon’s Ashley Swan and Roam Café’s Tim Doane — then vote on their favorite dishes and cocktails. Tickets range from $15 to $125; visit dishcrawl.com/ rochester for all the details.

Resolution solution

If this year is the one in which you commit to becoming a more versatile cook, know that Rochester has no shortage of cheftaught classes. The instructor line-up at Rosario Pino’s (rosariopinos.com) includes 2Vine’s Gino Ruggiero on February 18 and Good Luck’s Tim Caschette on March 3, while Rochester Culinary at Vella (rochesterculinary.com) features seminars by the likes of Hedonist Artisan Chocolates’ Nathaniel Mich on January 27 and The Owl House’s Brian Van Etten on March 24.

Openings

The Buffalo-based Papaya Asian Kitchen & Bar recently opened a Rochester outpost in

Ramen with pork-bone broth, noodles, roasted pork, scallions, and egg from Furoshiki on Park Avenue. PHOTOS BY MATT DETURCK

Park and Berkeley redux [ CHOW HOUND ] BY DAYNA PAPALEO

Food-scene watchers are no doubt aware that the stateside ramen era has been in full effect for the last several years. While we noodleloving Rochesterians knew of a couple places where we could score piping-hot bowls of the Japanese comfort food, many of us held out hope for a ramen shop of our very own. Our silent prayers (and a few loud ones) have been answered in the form of a cozy new spot called Furoshiki, now open in the one-time Piranha space at the northeast corner of Park and Berkeley. For weeks the posters in Furoshiki’s windows promised a “Ramen Revolution,” and the first shot has finally been fired. If your only experience with ramen has been as part of the dorm diet, then forget about those wavy bricks of deep-fried starch and their ultra-salty mix-ins. The ramen ($9-$10) served by Chef Tom O’Brien at Furoshiki consists of toothsome noodles, savory broths, and enough customizable add-ons to ensure that this traditional soup makes for a satisfying meal. There are many variations on ramen in Japan, and Furoshiki offers a couple of the more well-known versions, like pork-bone and miso, as well as chicken, veggie, and kimchi ramen. Each hits the table with dedicated toppings, such

as corn, greens, and a soft-boiled egg, though there are a few ways to tweak the ramen to your specifications. Furoshiki, which is owned by Plum House proprietor Mark Teng, also serves up small plates like pork dumplings ($4), lettuce wraps ($5), and several kinds of skeweredand-grilled yakitori ($4-$5), as well as nicely composed salads and hearty sandwiches, with vegetarian choices at every turn. Furoshiki currently offers an array of beer and wine, and sake fans will definitely want to begin working their way through what Furoshiki claims is the widest selection in Rochester. Furoshiki is located at 682 Park Ave. It is open Monday 5-11 p.m., Tuesday-Saturday 11:30 a.m.11 p.m., and Sunday noon-9 p.m. Prices range from $2 to $10. For more information, call 7710499, or visit parkavenoodles.com.

Burger time

Meanwhile, on the southwest corner of Park and Berkeley, diners are learning how to unhinge their jaws in order to chow down on a towering burger at Blu Wolf Bistro. The space nearly unrecognizable from its former incarnation as Colie’s Café thanks to warm woods and moody lighting, Blu Wolf bills itself as a “neighborhood gastropub” and backs

up that claim with a menu that splits the difference between bar food and fine dining. Blu Wolf showcases a tempting range of starters, salads, and entrées, but the inventive assortment of half-pound burgers might be the main attraction here. Constructions include the Irish Nacho Burger ($15) and the Bloody Mary Burger ($12), as well as the signature Blu Wolf Burger ($35), which isn’t so much a meal as it is a challenge: two pounds of beef, meat hot sauce, cheddar, lettuce, tomato, onion, a mac-andcheese patty, and bacon, served with a pound of Blu Wolf’s beer-battered Bent Arm Fries and a milkshake. Conquer it in 30 minutes and Blu Wolf donates a portion of the price to a local charity. We’ll remember you fondly... Blu Wolf Bistro is located at 657 Park Ave. It is open Sunday-Wednesday 10 a.m.-midnight, and Thursday-Saturday 10 a.m.-2 a.m. Prices range from $6 to $29. For more information, call 2704467, or visit bluwolfbistro.com.

Battle lines

Battledish: Rochester is exactly what it

sounds like: a throwdown amongst local chefs for delicious bragging rights. Attendees at this Dishcrawl event, happening Saturday, February 8, 2-6 p.m., will wander Park Avenue sampling the creations of six chefs —

Marketplace Mall. The menu might be best described as Asian fusion, which basically means that it’s all fair game: mostly Thai and Japanese dishes, but obvious Korean, Vietnamese, and Chinese influences as well. To learn more call 272-7425 or visit papayarochester.com. Serving time-honored classics like cold beer and hot wings, The Scotch House Pub is the latest establishment to open its doors at 373 S. Goodman St., former home of Paradise Alley, KC Tea & Noodle, etc. Call 256-2811, or visit the Scotch House Pub’s Facebook page for more information. Brunello Wine Bar is now open at 663 N. Winton Road, offering globally sourced reds, whites, and sparklers by both the glass and bottle, along with a full bar and light fare via delivery from Merchants Pasta House. Get details at 441-9571, or visit brunellowinebar.com. The newest restaurant concept located in the 1 Ryan Alley space is casual fine dining at The Grill at One, which serves salads, small plates, pizzas, and entrées, along with a roster of burgers. Call 546-1010, or do some advance work at oneryan.com.

Closings

The Brooks Landing branch of California Rollin’ has closed. State Street Bakery and Eatery is now

closed at 165 State Street, though there are reportedly plans to reopen somewhere downtown in the coming weeks. Chow Hound is a food and restaurant news column. Do you have a tip? Send it to food@ rochester-citynews.com.

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 13

Upcoming [ POP/ROCK ] Buckcherry Thursday, February 13. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N. Water St. $20-$50. 7 p.m. 352-5600. waterstreetmusic.com [ POP/ROCK ]

Summer People Saturday, March 22. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. $8-$10. 9 p.m. 454-2966. bugjar.com.

Music

[ POP/ROCK ]

Asking Alexandria Wednesday, Mach 26. Main Street

Armory, 900 East Main St. $27.50-$33. 6:30 p.m. 232-3221. rochestermainstreetarmory.com

Woody Pines

THURSDAY, JANUARY 2 ABILENE BAR AND LOUNGE, 153 LIBERTY POLE WAY 8 P.M. | $TBA | ABILENEBARANDLOUNGE.COM [ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ] Asheville-based Woody Pines embraces antique influences that are rare to hear today, such as Cab Calloway, Frank Lemon, and Johnny Mercer. As a result, his music has a distinctive, vintage charm to it. While his sound is indeed unique, Pines and his band rarely stick to one genre, and instead present listeners with a wide variety of sounds, ranging from ragtime, to “lightning speed folk,” to old country blues. Pines’ music is lively and soulful, capturing a period of music history that is long gone, but clearly not forgotten. — BY LEAH CREARY

Sushioke: Karaoke hosted by Mark Lembroke THURSDAY, JANUARY 2 BANZAI SUSHI & COCKTAIL BAR, 682 SOUTH AVE., 10 P.M. | FREE | BANZAIROCHESTER.COM [ KARAOKE ] Skip the generic resolutions in 2014 and go for something out of the (bento) box — try sushioke! Harness your star power and head to Banzai Sushi & Cocktail Bar to sing your heart out with Mark Lembroke. Just remember: song choice is everything. Adele is great, but you can’t go wrong with a little “Sweet Caroline” or anything from more than a decade ago. — BY NICOLE MILANO

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WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 1

[ ALBUM REVIEWS ]

Wales Road “Radio Scripture” SPUN RECORDS www.walesroad.com

Adrien De L’Ange FRIDAY, JANUARY 3 BOULDER COFFEE CO., 100 ALEXANDER ST. 8 P.M. | FREE | BOULDERCOFFEE.INFO [ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ] Singer-songwriter Adrien De L’Ange presents a gentle, smooth sound, formed from a number of varying influences, including Paul Simon, Edward Sharpe and The Magnetic Zeroes, and 311. As a result, his music is reminiscent of several different genres. The common factors between all of his songs are an apparent love for creating music, and his soulful, velvety voice; both of which withstand his knack for musical experimentation. De L’Ange is not afraid to explore new musical frontiers, and a result, continually keeps his listeners on their toes. — BY LEAH CREARY

Teagan Taylor Trio FRIDAY, JANUARY 3 V PUB, 245 SOUTH MAIN ST., CANANDAIGUA 7 P.M. | $5 | 394-2890 [ JAZZ ] “Hello,” the breezy new album by the Teagan Taylor Trio, was recently nominated for Best Jazz Album of the year in the San Diego Music Awards, but the west coast combo has local roots. The group consists of Rochester native Tim Taylor and his twins, Teagan and Dylan. Going farther back, the twins’ grandfather, Gene Taylor, led a Rochester dance band from the 1960’s to the 1980’s. But enough about the past; Teagan not only has a voice reminiscent of Norah Jones, she’s also a formidable trumpet player. Dylan is no slouch on the bass, and Tim is a stylish guitarist who also plays trumpet. — BY RON NETSKY

Though the playing on “Radio Scripture” has matured and the production has tightened up, Rochester act Wales Road still wallows in its ever-present, ever-cool dichotomy between holy-roller lyricism and hellacious rocker wail. The overall musical theme on this, the band’s fifth studio offering, is control. With his voice divided between a sorrowful falsetto and a Leonard Cohen gravelly croon, Tommy Wales sings his heart out on 10 tracks of obvious Christian dedication and devotion. He’s not shy about his faith, but doesn’t beat the listener over the head with his testimony (that can’t be said about a lot of Christian rockers). Even when the band takes on popular hymns like “Holy, Holy, Holy,” “Swing Low, Sweet Chariot,” and “Amazing Grace” the message doesn’t overpower the messenger. Even more room is left with the band’s flirtations with pop subtlety, as opposed to its metal pedal-to-the-floor days of yore. Can I get an amen? — BY FRANK DE BLASE

Susan Krasner “Inside the Core” SELF-RELEASED www.susankrasner.com

[ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ] Dave McGrath. Dinosaur Bar-B-Que, 99 Court St. 3257090. dinosaurbarbque.com. 8 p.m. Free. [ DJ/ELECTRONIC ]

DJ Reign and Ladies Night. Captain’s Attic, 37 Charlotte St. 546-8885. Call for info. DJ Adam. Nashvilles, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. Henrietta. 3343030. nashvillesny.com. Call for info. Ladies Nite: High Heels and Mini Skirts New Wave Wednesdays. Club Clarissas,

293 Clarissa St. 232-3430. 10 p.m. 21+. Call for info. Teen Set 45 Party. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. Free. Why Not Wednesday. Eclipse Bar & Grill, 374 Thurston Rd. 502-922-6567. 10 p.m. Call for info. Y Not Wednesday w/DJ ET. Plush, 151 St. Paul St. 2325650. venurochester.com. Call for info. [ JAZZ ]

Even if you are unaware that Rochester musician Susan Krasner practices Integrated Kabbalistic Healing — or maybe you don’t know what that even is — it’s clear within about five seconds of listening to Krasner’ s pretty new disc that there’s a whole lot more going on beyond the cascading piano notes. On “Inside the Core” Krasner’s angularity and risk taking are dialed way back, yet there is still a jazzy curiosity that glimmers and glows throughout all 16 cuts. Gone as well is that New Age synthetic substitution of a coma in place of emotion. And as with the Yiddish interpretations on her previous album, “Threads,” there is no literal defining or explaining to distract the listener from Krasner’s lush ebb and flow. “Inside the Core” is elegant, mellow, and melancholy, but stops short of maudlin or minor-key predictability. It really is quite lovely. — BY FRANK DE BLASE

Bill Slater Solo Piano (Brunch). Woodcliff Hotel &

Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. 2484825. woodcliffhotelspa.com. Call for info. [ KARAOKE ]

Italian American Karaoke.

Italian American Community Center, 150 Frank Dimino Way. 594-8882. iaccrochester.org. 7:30 p.m. Free. Karaoke at Mayfield’s Pub. Mayfield’s Pub, 669 N. Winton Rd. 288-7199. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke at Sanibel Cottage. Sanibel Cottage, 1517 Empire Blvd. Webster. 6719340. sanibelcottage.net. 6 p.m. Free. Karaoke w/Cyd Scarlett. Jose & Willy’s, 20 Lakeshore Drive. Canandaigua. 905-0222. Joseandwillys.com. 8:30 p.m. Karaoke Wednesdays. Renaissance Cafe & Lounge, 719 S. Plymouth Ave. 4511000. 8 p.m. Free. continues on page 16

LISTEN UP! CITY + SPOTIFY We know you use Spotify. We know you read City Newspaper. So why not use both of them at the same time? Check out our FREE Spotify playlist to listen to full tracks from bands in our weekly top concert picks, updated every Wednesday! Listen on our site or grab links to the web & desktop versions of Spotify at ROCHESTERCITYNEWSPAPER.COM/SPOTIFY

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 15

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 1

[ OPEN MIC ]

Open Mic Jam Boulder Park Ave.. Boulder Coffee Co.,

Karaoke Wednesdays Christmas Party w/DJ Bonitillo. Flat Iron

[ OPEN MIC ]

739 Park Ave. 697-0235. bouldercoffeeco.com. 7:30 p.m. Free. Spot Coffee Open Mic. SPoT Coffee, 200 East Ave. 6134600. spotcoffee.com. 7 p.m. Call for info.

Open Acoustic Mic Night w/ Mandy. Shorts Bar & Grill, 35

[ POP/ROCK ]

Café, 561 State St. 454-4830. flatironcafe.net. First Wednesday of every month. Free.

N. Main St. Fairport. 388-0136. shortsfairport.com. 9 p.m. Free. Open Mic at Jeffrey’s. Jeffrey’s, 3115 E. Henrietta Rd. Henrietta. 486-4937. 7 p.m. Call for info.

Open Mic Jam Boulder Alexander St.. Boulder Coffee

Co., 100 Alexander St. 454-7140. bouldercoffeeco.com. 8 p.m. Open Mic w/Steve West. Muddy Waters Coffee House, 53 Main St. Geneseo. 2439111. mwcoffeehouse.com. 7 p.m. Free. [ HIP-HOP/RAP ]

Word of Mouth Wednesday’s w/DJ Private Eye. Dubland

Underground, 315 Alexander St. 232-7550. dublandunderground. wordpress.com. 10 p.m. 21+. $5. [ POP/ROCK ]

Drag Me to My Destiny ft. Destiny Spice. 140 Alex Bar

& Grill, 140 Alexander St. 2561000. 140alex.com. 11 p.m. Call for info.

THURSDAY, JANUARY 2 [ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ] Jim Lane. Murph’s Irondequoit Pub, 705 Titus Ave. Irondequoit. 342-6780. 8 p.m. Free. The Tabletop Three. Sticky Lips BBQ Juke Joint, 830 Jefferson Rd. 585-292-5544. stickylipsbbq. com. 9 p.m. Free.

Woody Pines, The Teagan Taylor Trio. Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153

Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. abilenebarandlounge.com. 8 p.m. Call for info. [ BLUES ]

John McConnell. Dinosaur BarB-Que, 99 Court St. 325-7090. dinosaurbarbque.com. 8 p.m. Free. [ DJ/ELECTRONIC ]

Party Monster Thursdays. ONE

Nightclub and Lounge, 1 Ryan Alley. 546-1010. oneclublife.com. 10 p.m. 18+. Call for info. DJ Matt. Nashvilles, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. Henrietta. 3343030. nashvillesny.com. Call for info. Karaoke at Panorama. Panorama Night Club & Sports Bar, 730 Elmgrove Rd. 2472190. 9 p.m. Free. Thirsty Thursday’s. TC Riley’s, 200 Park Point Dr. 272-9777. tcrileysparkpoint.com. 10 p.m. Call for info. Thursday Night Shakedown. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 11 p.m. Free. 16 CITY JANUARY 1-7, 2014

Do Something Krazy w/Fighting Tigers. Boulder Coffee Co.,

PUNK | PERFECT PUSSY

  Upstate New York and Syracuse natives Perfect Pussy burst onto the scene earlier this year, bringing with it a bold, disruptive sound that shocks as much as it astonishes. The band is fronted by lyricist/singer Meredith Graves, a youthful looking rebel with an intense, edgy voice, both lyrically and musically. With each song that the band presents, Graves’ voice is accompanied by a ring of pure noise, matching her intensity and adding to the exultant atmosphere of her lyrics. The band has recently garnered an impressive amount of positive attention, making it onto Best of 2013 lists from noteworthy publications such as Rolling Stone and Pitchfork, and will be releasing a full length album in the near future.   Perfect Pussy will perform with Potty Mouth, Ovlov, Green Dreams, and Cottage Jefferson Friday, January 3, 9 p.m., at the Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave., $6-$10, bugjar.com. — BY LEAH CREARY Tiki Thursdays: Shotgun Music DJ. McGhan’s Pub, 11

[ KARAOKE ]

Karaoke at Willow Inn. Willow

W. Main St. Victor. 924-3660. 7:30 p.m. Free. Tilt-a-Whirl Drag Show.. Tilt Nightclub & Ultralounge, 444 Central Ave. 232-8440. facebook. com/Tiltnightclub. 11:15 p.m. & 12:30 a.m. $3. For the Love Thursdays. Love Nightclub, 45 Euclid St. 2225683. 10 p.m. 18+. $3-$12.

Inn, 428 Manitou Rd. Hilton. 392-3489. 8 p.m. Free. Karaoke at Brickwood Grill. Brickwood Grill, 250 Monroe Ave. 730-8230. brickwoodgrill. com. 9 p.m. Call for info.

[ JAZZ ]

Karaoke Night w/Debbie Randyn. Pittsford Pub, 60 N.

Bossa Nova Jazz Thursdays ft. The Charles Mitchell Group.

Espada Brazilian Steak, 274 N. Goodman St. Village Gate. 4730050. espadasteak.com. 6 p.m. Free.

Jazz Thursdays ft. The David Detweiler Trio. Next Door Bar

& Grill, 3220 Monroe Ave. 2494575. nextdoorbarandgrill.com. Thursday: 5 p.m., Friday and Saturday: 8 p.m/. Free. Lap Giraffe w/MVT. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N. Water St. 325-5600. waterstreetmusic.com. 8:30 p.m. $7. Mike Kaupa. Monroe’s Restaurant, 3001 Monroe Avenue. 348-9104. 6 p.m. Call for info.

The Joe Santora Trio w/Curtis Kendrick & Emily Kirchoff.

Michael’s Valley Grill, 1694 Penfield Rd. (585) 383-8260. michaelsvalleygrill.com. Free. The Swooners. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. 2484825. woodcliffhotelspa.com. 5:30 p.m. Free.

Karaoke at Pineapple Jack’s. Pineapple Jack’s,

485 Spencerport Rd. Gates. 247-5225. facebook.com/ PineappleJacks. 9 p.m. Free.

Main St. Pittsford. 586-4650. thepittsfordpub.com. 9:30 p.m. Free.

Let Your Voice Be Heard Karaoke. Club Clarissas, 293

Clarissa St. 232-3430. Call for info. Karaoke w/George. Temple Bar and Grille, 109 East Ave. 232-6000. templebarandgrille. com. 8 p.m. Free. Karaoke w/Shotgun Music. McGhan’s Pub, 11 W. Main St. Victor. 924-3660. Free. Karaoke w/Summer Bob. Shorts Bar & Grill, 35 N. Main St. Fairport. 388-0136. shortsfairport. com. 10 p.m. Free. Karoake w/Cyd Scarlett. Victor Village Inn, 34 East Main Street. Victor. 925-5025. 8:30 p.m. Call for info.

Sushioke: Karaoke hosted by Mark Lembroke. Banzai Sushi

& Cocktail Bar, 682 South Ave. 473-0345. banzairochester.com. 10 p.m. Free.

100 Alexander St. 454-7140. bouldercoffeeco.com. 7 p.m. Call for info. Five Alarm Open Jam. Firehouse Saloon, 814 S. Clinton Ave. 3193832. thefirehousesaloon.com. 9 p.m. Call for info.

FRIDAY, JANUARY 3 [ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ] Adrien De L’Ange. Boulder Coffee Co., 100 Alexander St. 454-7140. bouldercoffeeco. com. 8 p.m. Free. Dave North w/Mike Pepper. McGraw’s Irish Pub, 146 W Commercial St. East Rochester. 348-9091. mcgrawsirishpub. com. 6 p.m. Free.

Happy Hour: Declan Ryan, Emma Lane. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave.

6 p.m. 21+. Free. Old Hippies. Sticky Lips BBQ Juke Joint, 830 Jefferson Rd. 585-292-5544. stickylipsbbq. com. 9:30 p.m. $3. Pan de Oro. Havana Cabana, 289 Alexander St. 232-1333. havanacabanaroc.com. 10 p.m. Call for info. Ralph Louis. Rochester Plaza Hotel, 70 State St. 546-3450. rochesterplaza.com. 6 p.m. Free. [ BLUES ]

Big Mike & The Motivators.

Dinosaur Bar-B-Que, 99 Court St. 325-7090. dinosaurbarbque. com. 10 p.m. Free.

Gap Mangione New Blues Band. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. 248-4825. woodcliffhotelspa.com. 7:30 p.m. Free. [ COUNTRY ]

DJ Klock. Montage Music Hall, 50 Chestnut St. 232-1520. themontagemusichall.com. 10 p.m. Call for info.

Potty Mouth w/Ovlov, Green Dreams, and Cottage Jefferson.

Fresh Meat Fridays w/Samantha Vega, DJ Mighty Mic. Tilt

SATURDAY, JANUARY 4

Renaissance Cafe & Lounge, 719 S. Plymouth Ave. (585) 451-1000. 9 p.m. Free. Nightclub & Ultralounge, 444 Central Ave. 232-8440. facebook. com/Tiltnightclub. 11:15 p.m. & 12:30 a.m. $4-$12. Lube After Dark. Quaker Steak & Lube, 2205 Buffalo Rd. 6979464. quakersteakandlube.com/ Rochester_NY. 9:30 p.m. Free.

Make Em Sweat Fridays: Make Em Dance Edition ft. DJ 6:30, Nick Kage. Club Network, 420

Central Ave. 232-1390. 10 p.m. Guys free until 10:30 p.m., girls free until 11:30 p.m. 21+.

Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. $6-$10.

[ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ] Acoustic Saturdays. Rush Church, 6200 Rush Lima Rd. Rush. 568-2178. thecafearoma. com. First Saturday of every month, 7 p.m. Free. Jon Akers. Flaherty’s Webster, 1200 Bay Rd. Webster. 6710816. flahertys.com. Call for info.

Singer/Songwriters in the Round ft. Maria Gillard, Ernie Lawrence, Jeff Riales, and Annie Wells. Cafe Veritas at First

Photo Shoot Fridaze ft. Ghetto Blasta. T Jay’s Lounge, 622 Lake

Unitarian Church, 220 Winton Road South. 7:30 p.m. $10-$18. Sofrito. Havana Cabana, 289 Alexander St. 232-1333. havanacabanaroc.com. 10 p.m. Call for info.

Facelife Fridays ft. Aggy Dune, Ambrosia Salad, Darienne Lake, and Kasha Davis. 140 Alex Bar

Mama Hart Band. Jeffrey’s, 3115

Ave. 21+. Ladies free until 11 p.m. Call for info. $10. Reggaeton w/DJ Carlos. La Copa Ultra Lounge, 235 W. Ridge Rd. 254-1050. lacopaultralounge. com. 10 p.m. Free.

& Grill, 140 Alexander St. 2561000. 140alex.com. 11 p.m. & midnight. Call for info. Trancesend and Victor Gig. Love Nightclub, 45 Euclid St. 2225683. 10 p.m. 21+, 18+ after 2 a.m. $6-$20.

[ BLUES ] E. Henrietta Rd. Henrietta. 4864937. 8:30 p.m. Free. [ CLASSICAL ]

Hochstein Homecoming Concert: Hochstein Alumni Orchestra,.

[ JAZZ ]

Hochstein Performance Hall, 50 N Plymouth Ave. 454-4596. hochstein.org. 7 p.m. Free, donations accepted.

Fred Costello & Roger Ekers Jazz Duo. Charley Brown’s,

[ DJ/ELECTRONIC ]

1675 Penfield Rd. 385-9202. charleybrownspenfield.com. 7:30 p.m. Free.

Jazz Thursdays ft. The David Detweiler Trio. Next Door Bar

& Grill, 3220 Monroe Ave. 2494575. nextdoorbarandgrill.com. Thursday: 5 p.m., Friday and Saturday: 8 p.m/. Free. Matthew Sieber Ford Trio. Tapas 177 Lounge, 177 St. Paul St. 262-2090. tapas177. com. 4:30 p.m. Free. Midnight City Duo. Lemoncello, 137 West Commercial St. East Rochester. 385-8565. lemoncello137.com. 7 p.m. Free.

The Joe Santora Trio w/Curtis Kendrick & Emily Kirchoff.

[ DJ/ELECTRONIC ]

Ted Nicolosi and Shared Genes. Pultneyville Grill, 4135

Nightclub and Lounge, 1 Ryan Alley. 546-1010. oneclublife.com. 21+. Call for info. Chill Out Fridays Happy Hour. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. lovincup.com. 5:30 p.m. Free. DJ Bac Spin. Plush, 151 St. Paul St. 232-5650. venurochester. com. 8 p.m. Call for info. DJ Blake. 140 Alex Bar & Grill, 140 Alexander St. 2561000. 140alex.com. 10 p.m. Call for info. DJ Energon. Vertex Night Club, 169 N. Chestnut St. 232-5498. 10 p.m. $3-$8.

W Henrietta Rd. Henrietta. 3343030. nashvillesny.com. 9 p.m. Call for info.

Femme Fatale Fridays Ladies Night ft. DJ Divine.

The Bronco Vic Band. Sandra’s Saloon, 276 Smith St. 585-2856786. 9 p.m. Free.

On the House Fridays. ONE

Knight Patrol. Nashvilles, 4853

Michael’s Valley Grill, 1694 Penfield Rd. (585) 383-8260. michaelsvalleygrill.com. Free.

Lake Rd. Pultneyville. 315589-4512. pultneyvillegrill.com. 6:30 p.m. Free. [ R&B ]

The LPs. Smokin’ Joe’s Bar &

Grill, 425 Lyell Ave. 9 p.m. Call for info. [ POP/ROCK ]

Friday Night Live ft. Dino from Fickle 93.3, Jeff Cosco. Richmond’s Tavern,

21 Richmond Street. 2708570. richmondstavern.com. 4 p.m. Free.

Blue Label Saturdays ft. DJ Andy Fade and DJ Bobby Base. Flat Iron Café, 561 State

St. 454-4830. flatironcafe.net. Call for info. DJ Big Reg. Plush, 151 St. Paul St. 232-5650. venurochester. com. 10 p.m. Call for info. DJ Blake. 140 Alex Bar & Grill, 140 Alexander St. 2561000. 140alex.com. 10 p.m. Call for info. DJ Darkwave. Vertex Night Club, 169 N. Chestnut St. 232-5498. 10 p.m. $3-$8. Upscale Saturdays. ONE Nightclub and Lounge, 1 Ryan Alley. 546-1010. oneclublife.com. First Saturday of every month. 21+. Call for info. Jameson Alexander, Rob Morley. Love Nightclub, 45 Euclid St. 222-5683. 10 p.m. 21+, 18+ after 2 a.m. $6-$20. La Selva. Tilt Nightclub & Ultralounge, 444 Central Ave. 232-8440. facebook.com/ Tiltnightclub. 10 p.m. Call for info.

Poke Dem Saturdays ft. Team Lion Paw, The Money Green Theme, Nick Kage, and Wavey.

Trinities Restaurant, 36 W. Main St. 319-4047. 10 p.m. $5-$10.

BLU Bar & Grill, 250 Pixley Rd. 247-0079. blurochester.com. 9 p.m. Call for info. [ JAZZ ]

Cousin Vinny. Salvatore’s Pizzeria

& Pub, 1217 Bay Road. Webster. 671-9420. 8 p.m. Free.

Fred Costello & Roger Ekers Jazz Duo. Charley Brown’s,

1675 Penfield Rd. 385-9202. charleybrownspenfield.com. 7:30 p.m. Free.

Jazz Thursdays ft. The David Detweiler Trio. Next Door Bar

& Grill, 3220 Monroe Ave. 2494575. nextdoorbarandgrill.com. Thursday: 5 p.m., Friday and Saturday: 8 p.m/. Free.

The Joe Santora Trio w/Curtis Kendrick & Emily Kirchoff.

Michael’s Valley Grill, 1694 Penfield Rd. (585) 383-8260. michaelsvalleygrill.com. Free. Ryan from El Rojo Jazz. Lemoncello, 137 West Commercial St. East Rochester. 385-8565. lemoncello137.com. 6:30 p.m. Free. Special Blend. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. 2484825. woodcliffhotelspa.com. 7:30 p.m. Free. The White Hots. Pultneyville Grill, 4135 Lake Rd. Pultneyville. 315589-4512. pultneyvillegrill.com. 6:30 p.m. Call for info. [ R&B ]

Mitty & The Followers.

Dinosaur Bar-B-Que, 99 Court St. 325-7090. dinosaurbarbque. com. 10 p.m. Free. [ POP/ROCK ]

Broken Mind Spoken. Montage

Music Hall, 50 Chestnut St. 2321520. themontagemusichall.com. 8 p.m. $7-$9. The Chairs. Sticky Lips BBQ Juke Joint, 830 Jefferson Rd. 585292-5544. stickylipsbbq.com. 10 p.m. Free.

Cindy Sams Band ft. Richard Gramm. Richmond’s Tavern, 21

Richmond Street. 270-8570. richmondstavern.com. 8 p.m. $5.

Comedown CD Release Show. Firehouse Saloon, 814

[ CLASSICAL ]

12th Night Celebration: Procession of the Three Kings, The Craighead/Saunders Baroque Organ, and the Christ Church Choir. Christ Church,

141 East Ave. 454-3878. christchurchrochester.org. 7 p.m. Free, donations accepted. Compline. Christ Church, 141 East Ave. 454-3878. christchurchrochester.org. 9 p.m. Free, donations accepted. Joe Blackburn, organ. George Eastman House, 900 East Ave. 3 p.m. Free w/museum admission.

Saloon, 276 Smith St. 585-2856786. 4 p.m. Free.

[ DJ/ELECTRONIC ] Boasy Sundaze. Club Clarissas, 293 Clarissa St. 232-3430. Call for info. Drink and Drag Sundays. ONE Nightclub and Lounge, 1 Ryan Alley. 546-1010. oneclublife.com. 8 p.m. 18+. Call for info.

Ship Wrecked Sunday’s ft. DJ Trancesend. Captain’s Attic, 37

Charlotte St. 546-8885. 21+. Call for info.

Tequila Sundays ft. DJ Andy Fade. Flat Iron Café, 561 State

Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. 248-4825. woodcliffhotelspa. com. Call for info. Free. [ POP/ROCK ]

Bar and Grille, 109 East Ave. 2326000. templebarandgrille.com. 7 p.m. Free.

Sponsored by

Citywide Gallery Night

January 3 • 6-9pm FirstFridayRochester.org

A.R.T.S Gallery at Aviv Cafe The Good Shepherd

Spectrum Gallery Lanna Pejovic's New Work

Artisan Direct Rochester Artisan Direct Gallery Night Out

The Shoe Factory Art Co-op New Year Art Exhibit

Nathaniel’s Pub, 251 Exchange Boulevard. 232-8470. Call for info. Free. DJ Ghetto Blaster. Club Clarissas, 293 Clarissa St. 232-3430. Call for info. DJ Kathy. Nashvilles, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. Henrietta. 3343030. nashvillesny.com. Call for info.

AXOM Gallery Exhibition Space Contemplating Nature

JANUARY HIGHLIGHTS:

Beth Brown Art & Design Studio Open Studio

• From the Depths of my Soul at Our House Gallery

Cat Clay Benefit: Healthy Sisters Soup & Bean

• The Hungerford at Hungerford Urban Artisans (HUA)

Gallery r The Art of Deception

• New Year Art Exhibit at The Shoe Factory Art Co-op

Tuesday Americano w/Bobby Base. Flat Iron Café, 561 State St.

Hungerford Urban Artisans (HUA) The Hungerford

[ DJ/ELECTRONIC ]

2 Reason Tuesdays w/DJ Zio.

454-4830. flatironcafe.net. Call for info. [ JAZZ ]

Mark Bader. Bistro 135,

• Healthy Sisters Soup & Bean at Cat Clay • Open Studio at Beth Brown Art & Design Studio • YessireeBOB at Richard Margolis Art + Architectural Photography

Nu Movement First Friday Event Our House Gallery From the Depths of my Soul

Penfield Rotary Big Band Swing Dance. Penfield Community

Richard Margolis Art + Architectural Photography YessireeBOB

Center, 1985 Baird Rd. Penfield. 340-8655. 7:30 p.m. $1. Roses & Revolutions. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. 248-4825. woodcliffhotelspa. com. 5:30 p.m. Free.

• 23rd Annual Members Exhibition at RoCo

Image City Photography Gallery The Magic of Light

135 W. Commercial St. East Rochester. 662-5555. bistro135.net. 6 p.m. Free.

Rochester Contemporary Art Center (RoCo) 23rd Annual Members Exhibition

[ REGGAE/JAM ]

Pro Jam. Richmond’s Tavern, 21 Richmond Street. 2708570. richmondstavern.com. 8 p.m. Free.

[ JAZZ ]

Bill Slater Solo Piano. Woodcliff

First Friday

Bluesday Tuesday Blues Jam.

P.I.’s Lounge, 495 West Ave. 8 p.m. Call for info.

[ POP/ROCK ] Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. abilenebarandlounge. com. Call for info.

So Last Year w/Outsider, Through the Crowd, Nerds in Denial, and Ghost Righter. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. Call for info.

Cindy and the Reinhardts w/ Ron LoCurdo, The Rhythm Dogs. Smokin’ Joe’s Bar & Grill, 425 Lyell Ave. 6:30 p.m. Call for info.

[ DJ/ELECTRONIC ]

Celtic Music Sundays. Temple

[ BLUES ]

Elvis’ Birthday Bash ft. The Lustre Kings. Abilene Bar &

Moonstriker, The Changing Light w/Alberto Alaska, Inneriot, and Wisdom Kids. Bug Jar, 219

[ ACOUSTIC/FOLK ]

TUESDAY, JANUARY 7

St. 454-4830. flatironcafe.net. 10 p.m. Call for info.

Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. $10-$12.

SUNDAY, JANUARY 5

Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. $6-$8.

[ COUNTRY ]

Open Mic hosted by The Smokin’ Hogan Band. Sandra’s

S. Clinton Ave. 319-3832. thefirehousesaloon.com. 9 p.m. Call for info. The Dungree’s. McGraw’s Irish Pub, 146 W Commercial St. East Rochester. 3489091. mcgrawsirishpub.com. 8 p.m. Free.

Monroe Ave. 9:30 p.m. $6-$8.

[ POP/ROCK ]

New Archery w/Authors, Sleepwalk Parade. Bug Jar, 219

FRIDAY

Saturday Night Ladies Night.

Fandango at the Tango. Tango Cafe, 389 Gregory St. 271-4930. tangocafedance.com. 7:30 p.m. Free, donations accepted Tango Cafe, 389 Gregory St. 271-4930. tangocafedance.com. 7:30 p.m. Free, donations accepted. Kari Todesco. Boulder Coffee Co., 100 Alexander St. 454-7140. bouldercoffeeco.com. 7 p.m. Call for info.

FIRST

SATURDAY, JANUARY 4

Mikaela Davis Album Release w/Maybird, Cammy Enaharo.

MONDAY, JANUARY 6 Magic City Monday’s. Louie’s Cordial’s Lounge, 392 Lyell Ave. 254-2844. 7 p.m. $5 before 10 p.m. [ OPEN MIC ]

Open Jam at Thirsty Frog. Thirsty Frog, 511 East Ridge Rd. 7305285. 1thirstyfrog.com. 9 p.m. Call for info.

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 17

continues from page 11

BY CHRISTINE CARRIE FIEN PHOTO BY MARK CHAMBERLIN

BY REBECCA RAFFERTY PHOTO BY LARISSA COE

Over the past few years, the emerging generations’ tone toward Rochester has shifted from one of defeated apathy toward one of adoration and faith and initiative. There is more vocal support for local businesses and creatives, and more pride in Rochester in general. Among the creative youth who are forging their own local-pride-path are Ajani Jeffries and Josiah Montalvo of Goldn Rd. The young entrepreneurs’ skateboarding-culture-influenced clothing company features a variety of strong, simple graphics, often with a colorful, cheerful nod to Rochester’s iconography, such as a branch of lilacs. Jeffries and Montalvo are both from Rochester — Jeffries is from the west side, and Montalvo is from the east side of the city. They met in the 7th grade while 18 CITY JANUARY 1-7, 2014

attending the School of the Arts, from which they graduated in 2011. It was there that Jeffries and Montalvo became interested in designing and selling clothing, beginning by stenciling t-shirts “which created a big buzz in school,” says Montalvo. The pair gradually evolved their business into Goldn Rd., taking the name from a misheard lyric in Jimi Hendrix’s song, “One Rainy Wish.” But the name also contains religious allusions, and nods to the golden road of success, says Jeffries. “We told ourselves in the beginning, ‘Let’s just try to have fun with this project, and be as creative as possible,’” he says. Jeffries and Montalvo create their designs on a computer, and tweak images for printing with the help of Evan Guerin of continues on page 24

Though she worked as Geva’s public relations director for a time, Christine Christopher says she had to take a job with state government to learn what drama and bad acting is really all about. “It was like a whole different world,” she says. Christopher’s career has taken her from the theater, to the state capitol as a legislative and media aide to Assembly member Susan John, to a Ku Klux Klan rally in northern Louisiana — as a filmmaker, not a participant — to a play date with future A-lister Josh Brolin. (A young Brolin visited her home while he was doing theater at Geva.) “It sounds glib, but I really mean it with my whole heart,” she says. “I’m so lucky that so many interesting people have offered me so many interesting things to do.” And Christopher will take on another new role in January when she becomes the City of Rochester’s director of communications. Christopher is a graduate of Fairport High School and currently lives in the Highland Park neighborhood in the City of Rochester. She owns the marketing and public relations agency Christopher Communications and is a co-producer and writer for the nonprofit Blue Sky Project. Blue Sky creates and distributes documentary films “focused on underreported social issues,” according to the organization’s website. Christopher estimates that through her company she has worked on at least 50 political campaigns over the course of her career. Her role with each campaign varies according to need, she says, but she is usually a strategist. Christopher was most recently communications chief

for Lovely Warren’s successful and historic campaign for Rochester mayor. Warren will be the city’s first female mayor, as well as its youngest when she takes office in January. “For me, this was not another job,” Christopher says. “I really feel that something incredible was accomplished. I just really believe in her and really believe in the direction she wants to take the city. “I feel that she has a way of inspiring people who need a dose of optimism in their life,” she says. “And when you look at Lovely and her life, it makes people think that they can be better.” Christopher says she chooses projects based on what moves her. And it’s clear that her experience making a documentary on the 1971 Attica prison uprising was profound, even life-changing. “Criminal Injustice: Death and Politics at Attica” focuses, Christopher says, on the politics behind the aftermath of the uprising and the retaking of the prison. The documentary has provoked a significant response, she says. It has also, she says, cast doubt on the official story behind the death of prisoner L.D. Barkley. Barkley, a Rochester resident and iconic face of the uprising, died during the retaking of the prison. Blue Sky’s documentary questions the official story, that Barkley was killed by a ricocheting bullet. “I learned that things are not always the way they seem,” Christopher says. “That you really do need to challenge and ask questions, even 40 years later. “It was a very profound experience and one that I don’t think I’ll ever set aside,” she says. 

Main Street Arts, 20 W Main St., Clifton Springs. “Being Human” Group Show. Through Feb 28. Reception Jan 11, 4-7 p.m. 315462-0210. mstreetarts@gmail.com. mainstreetartsgallery.com. Spectrum Gallery, 100 College Ave. Lana Pejovic’s New Work. Through Jan 31. Tue & Thu 9 a.m.-8 p.m., Wed & Fri 9 a.m.-6 p.m., Sat 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Reception Jan 3, 6-9 p.m. 461-4447. spectrumgalleryroc.com.

from page 8

seeing that-which-I-can’t-be. Whereas, you have children come into the Center’s library, and their eyes just light up. They see themselves,” he says. The Center, located on King Street, boasts a 130-seat auditorium with A/V capabilities and a gallery space that has hosted challenging exhibits of work by impressive young artists, as well as seasoned artists, such as Pepsy Kettavong. The Center has also hosted events to celebrate African and African-American heritage and culture, such as community forums, lectures by dignitaries such as Abiodun Oyewole of The Last Poets, political debates, African and AfricanAmerican film screenings, plays, live bands, dancers, poetry, and even wedding receptions and baby showers. Though Hunt heads up the Center, he says he doesn’t receive compensation for his work there, and the board doesn’t chase grants as a source of funding. “There’s one more leg on the stool my father has, and that is economic development,” says Hunt. “If the community is passionate about celebrating its culture, it should in fact support this cultural institution.” Hunt says that it’s not only feasible for the community to support important cultural endeavors, but that in the face of limited funding and competing institutions, it’s critical for it to learn to do so. “Rochester is rich in wealth. There are plenty of dollars in this community to run this center a hundred times over,” he says.  from page 11

Acuff is also heavily involved with Take Back the Land, an activist group based on the concept of housing as a human right. The local group has made a name for itself fighting against what it considers to be unjust foreclosures, winning a few highprofile battles over the past year. Take Back the Land organizes and joins with community members to resist evictions. Efforts often include a literal human blockade. Last month, on the heels of one such effort, a southwest Rochester woman’s house was deeded back to her by the bank. Take Back the Land’s approach draws attention to larger moral and ethical issues raised by some foreclosures, Acuff says. In particular, group members want the public to know when big banks — the ones that were bailed out by the government — kick people out of their homes, he says. But the group does something else that receives less public attention; it locates vacant, bank-foreclosed houses that it can move homeless people into. “We think the homes should be lived in while people are homeless, living on the street, living in shelters,” Acuff says. 

ART | FIRST FRIDAY

This First Friday promises exactly what we need right now: cozy comfort food, warmly colorful artwork, and a celebration of light amid these dismally dim days. Read on for our selections of choice art receptions, and don’t forget to check firstfridayrochester.org and the calendar at rochestercitynewspaper.com for more listings of art receptions. Admission is free unless otherwise specified. Cat Clay (Hungerford Building, 1115 E. Main St., door 2, suite 242) will host the annual “Winter Warmth, a Soup(er) Benefit” on Friday, January 3, 5-7 p.m. For a $20 donation, visitors may choose a handmade ceramic bowl (created by local artists including Richard Aerni, Carolyn Dilcher-Stutz, Hodaka Hasebe, Danielle Pagani, and Clifton Wood), and will receive a package of Healthy Sisters’ soup mix. There will be delicious appetizers and desserts for grazing, and 100 percent of the proceeds will benefit Healthy Sisters’ Soup & Bean Works, a non-profit that prepares women to re-enter the workforce. Following the benefit, Cat Clay will be open to First Friday. For more information, call 414.5643 or visit catclay.com. Image City Photography Gallery (722 University Ave.) will host “The Magic of Light,” featuring more than 170 photographs by 96 individuals. The show runs January 2-26, with receptions Friday, January 3, 5-9 p.m., and Saturday, January 4, 2-5 p.m. For more information, call Dan Neuberger at 482-1976 or visit imagecityphotographygallery.com. Lanna Pejovic’s colorful, abstracted “New Work” debuts at Spectrum Gallery (Lumiere Photo, 100 College Ave.) on Friday, January 3, with a reception taking place 6-9 p.m. The show will continue through January 31. For more information, call 461-4447 or visit lumierephoto.com. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY

Art Exhibits [ OPENING ] A.R.T.S. Gallery, 321 East Ave. “The Good Shepherd” Original watercolors and prints by Joyce Morgan, 90 year old great- grandmother and former missionary. Through Jan 31. Reception Jan 3, 6-9 p.m. Open painting bring your own supplies. Live music. 729-9916. Auburn Public Theater, 8 Exchange St. “Across the Board” by Noma Bliss. Jan 3, 5-8 p.m. Noma Bliss (artist) is collaborating with friends and family to design works of art that encourage people to express themselves. 315-253-6669. auburnpublictheater.org. Cat Clay, 1115 E Main Street, Suite 225. Winter Warmth, a Soup(er) Benefit. Jan 3, 5-7 p.m. Choose a handmade ceramic bowl and a package of Healthy Sisters’ soup mix, graze on delicious appetizers & desserts. 100% of the proceeds go to Healthy Sisters’ Soup & Bean Works, a non-profit that prepares women to re-enter the workforce.

Following the benefit, Cat Clay will be open to First Friday visitors. 4145643. catclay.com. The Episcopal Church Home, 505 Mt Hope Ave. Transient Walls Art Show by Gianna Stewart. Through Feb 16. Open daily 10 a.m.-8 p.m. Reception Jan 9, 4-6 p.m. 5468439 x3102. Friendly Home’s Memorial Gallery, 3165 East Ave. Tracie Doerner. Through Feb 28. Daily 10 a.m.-5 p.m. friendlyhome.org. Image City Photography Gallery, 722 University Ave. “The Magic of Light.” Through Jan 26. Tues-Sat 12-6 p.m., Sun 12-4 p.m. Receptions Fri Jan 3, 5-9 p.m. Sat Jan 4, 2-5 p.m. 4821976. dano@rochester.rr.com. imagecityphotographygallery.com. International Art Acquisitions, 3300 Monroe Ave. Fluid Motion.” On view: “Reverence,” among the original oil on canvas by British artist Paul Bennett. Through Jan 31. Mon-Fri 10 a.m.-9 p.m., Sat 10 a.m.-6 p.m., Sun 12-5 p.m. internationalartacquisitions.

[ CONTINUING ] Axom Gallery, 176 Anderson Ave., 2nd floor. Contemplating Nature: Works by Four Contemporary Painters. Connie Ehindero, Paul Garland, Kurt Moyer, Rick Muto. Through Jan 4. Wed-Sat 12-5 p.m. 232-6030 x23. axomgallery.com. Bridge Art Gallery University of Rochester Medical Center, 300 Crittenden Blvd. “Stillness & Dance”. Through Feb 28. Reception Jan 8, 5-6:30 p.m. 275-3571. facebook. com/BridgeArtGallery.URMC.; “Play.” urmc.rochester.edu. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. The Lobby Presents: Topher Martin. Through Feb 5. 8 p.m.-2 a.m. lobbydigital.com. Community Darkroom Gallery, 713 Monroe Ave. “Visual Discourse” Photography by Community Darkroom Photographers. Through Jan 10. Mon 9 a.m.-9:30 p.m., TueThu 9 a.m.-6:30 p.m., Fri noon-5 p.m., Sat 10 a.m.-5:30 p.m. 2715920. geneseearts.org. Creative Wellness Coalition Gallery, 320 N Goodman St, Suite 201. “Painting Big” Group Show. 3253145 x144. mharochester.org. Cumming Nature Center, 6472 Gulick Rd. Marsh Madness: Wonders of Wetlands. Through May 4. Wed-Fri 9 a.m.–3:30 p.m., Sat-Sun 9 a.m.–4:30 p.m. In an array of work created by members of the Guild of Natural Science Illustrators (GNSI), the show demonstrates the principal task of the science illustrator—to create accurate renderings of scientific subjects. In this exhibit, nearly forty scientific illustrations of birds, turtles, plants and other natural subjects found among the freshwater wetlands of Upstate New York and the Adirondacks are depicted in both traditional and digital formats. These illustrations precisely show proportions, coloration and anatomy of a subject. They communicate complex descriptive information in an aesthetically appealing way and aid the viewer by providing intricate detail. In addition to the artwork, a variety of taxidermy wildlife will be on display. 374-6160. rmsc.org. The Episcopal Church Home, 505 Mt. Hope Ave. “Camera Rochester Holiday Show.” Through Jan 5. Daily 10 a.m.-8 p.m. 546-8400. cotton@EpiscopalSeniorLife.org. episcopalseniorlife.org. Fuego Coffee Roasters, 167 Liberty Pole Way. Images From the New Nature. Drawings, paintings, and sculpture by Robert Frank Abplanalp. 315-244-2415. thinklikeme@gmail.com. Gallery R, 100 College Ave. The Art of Deception. Dec 20-Jan 31. Closing reception Jan 31, 7-9:30 p.m. 256-3312. galleryr99@gmail. com. galleryr.cias.rit.edu. George Eastman House, 900 East Ave. “The History of Space Photography” and “Astro-Visions.” Through Jan 12. Through Feb 16:“Lossless.” Tue-Sat 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Sun 11 a.m.-5 p.m. 2713361. eastmanhouse.org.

Hartnett Gallery, Wilson Commons, University of Rochester, River Campus. “Deconstructing Scapes” by Zahra Nazari. Through Jan 19. Tue-Fri 11 a.m.-7 p.m., Sat-Sun noon-5 p.m. blogs.rochester.edu/ hartnett. Link Gallery at City Hall, 30 Church St. “See Us Now...Greater Rochester’s Asian-American Community” Exhibition. Through Jan 27. Mon-Fri 9 a.m.-5 p.m. 208-8614. info@apaaroc.org. cityofrochester.gov. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. Scott Matyjaszek. thelittle.org. Lower Link Gallery, Central Library, 115 South Ave. Art of the Book. Artist Books and Altered Books. 428-8053. libraryweb.org/ artofthebook. Main Street Arts, 20 W Main St., Clifton Springs. “Fabulous Fibers.” Through Dec. WedSun 11 a.m.-7 p.m. 315-4620210. mstreetarts@gmail.com. mainstreetartsgallery.com. Mill Art Center & Gallery, 61 N Main St. Honeoye Falls. Art Crescendo: Mill Gallery 2013 Members Exhibition. Through Feb 15. Mon 11 a.m.-3 p.m., Tue 2-5 p.m., Wed 11 a.m.-5 p.m., Thu 11 a.m.-8 p.m., Fri 11 a.m.-3 p.m., Sat 11 a.m.-3 p.m. millartcenter.com. My Sister’s Gallery, 505 Mt Hope Ave. “Art Therapy” by Cheryl and Don Olney. Through Mar 31. Daily 10 a.m.-8 p.m. 546-8400. EpiscopalSeniorLife.org. Nan Miller Gallery, 3450 Winton Place. Albert Paley on Park Avenue. Tue-Sat 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Six dynamic Albert Paley maquettes (small studies) designed for his most ambitious sculpture installation, Paley on Park Avenue. Also on display are Paley’s furniture designs, mix-media pieces by Red Wolf, and new original works by Adam Colangelo and Eduard Gurevich. 292-1430. nanmillergallery.com. New Deal Gallery, 4 Livingston County Campus. Mount Morris. Expressions of the Civil War. In recognition of the 150th Anniversary. Also “The Faces of Michael Teres and Leslie Heen,” photographer Michael Teres and painter Leslie Heen in Apartment One. Wed & Fri 1-4 p.m., Thu 1-7:30 p.m., Sat 11 a.m.-3 p.m. 243-6785. livingstonarts.org. Orange Glory Café, 240 East Ave. Watson Art Show? This!. Mon-Fri 11 a.m.-3 p.m. A collection of drawings, prints, & collages by Watson, a Rochester illustrator. 232-7340. Outside the Box Art Gallery, Bldg 9, The Canal Works, 1000 Turk Hill Rd. “Winter Reflections.” Through Jan 31. Sun-Mon 8 a.m.-5 p.m., Tue-Wed 8 a.m.-10 p.m., ThuSat 8 a.m.-11 p.m. 645-2485. outsidetheboxag.com. Oxford Gallery, 267 Oxford St. Annual Holiday Exhibit. Through Jan 11. 271-5885. oxfordgallery.com. Pat Rini Rohrer Gallery, 71 S Main St. Canandaigua. Holidays at the Gallery. Through Jan 6. 394-0030. prrgallery.com. Record Archive, 33 1/3 Rockwood St. Altered States of Rochester: A Neo-colorist series of paintings by Darren Thomas Brennessel. recordarchive.com. Roc Brewing Co., 56 S. Union St. Justin Fondrie Photography. 7949798. rocbrewingco@gmail.com. rocbrewingco.com. Rochester Contemporary Arts Center, 137 East Ave. 23rd Annual continues on page 20 rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 19

Thu 7:30 p.m., Fri-Sat 7:30 & 10 p.m $12-$15. 671-9080. thecomedyclub.us.

Dance Events [ SUN., JANUARY 5 ] Zydeco Lesson and Dance. 2:30-5 p.m. Tango Cafe Dance Studio (3rd Floor Ballroom), 389 Gregory St., Rochester, NY $5. 305-1144.

Festivals RECREATION | WINTER RECREATION ROUND-UP

Here are a few opportunities for ice skating, snowshoeing, and cross-country skiing taking place this week. For more listings, visit the calendar at rochestercitynewspaper.com. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY Ice Skating. Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Park, 353 Court St. 428-7541, cityofrochester.gov/mlkmp. $2-$5, $14 for family of 4. $3 skate rental. Open Skate: Mon-Fri noon1:30 p.m., 3:40-5:10 p.m., 5:30-7 p.m., and 7:20-8:50 p.m. Sat noon-1:30 p.m., 1:50-3:20 p.m., 3:40-5:10 p.m., and 7:20-8:50 p.m. Sun noon-1:30 p.m., 1:50-3:20 p.m., 3:40-5:10 p.m., and 5:30-7 p.m. Adult Skate (Ages 18 and up, Jan 4 and after): Mon-Fri 1:50-3:20 p.m. Though the rink will be closed on New Year’s Day, it will resume the normal schedule for the rest of the week, unless reserved by a renter. Call ahead. Ice Skating. Genesee Valley Sports Complex, 131 Elmwood Ave. 428-7889, cityofrochester.gov/gvpsc. $2-$5, $14 family rate, $2.50 college student with ID. $3 skate rental, $3 skate and shoot, Open Skate: Sun 2:30-3:45 p.m. Mon-Fri noon1:15 p.m. Fri (16 and up) 10-11:15 p.m. (availability subject to change, call ahead). Sat 5-6:15 p.m. Cross Country Skiing and Snowshoeing. Cumming Nature Center, 6472 Gulick Rd., Naples. 374-6160, rmsc.org. $3 suggested donation, $10 per family. Wed-Fri 9 a.m.-3:30 p.m., Sat-Sun 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Saturday Snowshoeing. Helmer Nature Center, 154 Pinegrove Ave., Irondequoit. 336-3035. $3-$5. Saturday, January 4, 1 p.m.

Art Exhibits Members Exhibition. 461-2222. info@rochestercontemporary.org. Rochester Regional Community Design Center, 1115 E Main St. “Connection: Spaces, Places, & the Urban Fabric.” Through Jan 10. Mon-Fri 9 a.m.-5 p.m. 2710520. rrcdc.org. Rush Rhees Library, University of Rochester, River Campus. “Nurturing Inquiry.” Rare Books and Special Collections Department. Through Feb 28. Mon-Fri 9 a.m.-5 p.m. 275-4477. rochester.edu. The Shoe Factory Art Co-op, 250 N Goodman St. Featuring artwork by local artists. Open First Fridays, 6-9 p.m. Second Saturdays, 12-4 p.m., and Wednesdays, 12-5 p.m. 732-0036. shoefactoryarts.com. Skylark Lounge, 40 South Union St. Adult Art Show. 270-8106. theskylarklounge.com. Starry Nites Café, 696 University Ave. Bruce Bozman: Island Color. 271-2630. shoefactoryarts@ gmail.com. starrynitescafe.com. Tap & Mallet, 381 Gregory St. Dudes Night Out Presents: 20 CITY JANUARY 1-7, 2014

Dudes on Tap. 473-0503. tapandmallet.com. University of Rochester, River Campus. Chester Carlson and 75 years of Xerography. Through Jan 1. Carlson Science and Engineering Library. 275-4461. mengel@library.rochester.edu. rochester.edu. Williams-Insalaco Gallery at FLCC, 3325 Marvin Sands Dr. Alumni Biennial Exhibition: The Art, Music, and Poetry of Rand Darrow. 785-1369. flcc.edu.

Art Events [ FRI., JANUARY 3 ] Anderson Alley First Fridays. First Friday of every month, 6-9 p.m Anderson Alley Building, 250 N. Goodman St andersonalleyartists.com. First Friday City Wide Gallery Night. First Friday of every month, 6-9 p.m. firstfridayrochester.org.

Comedy [ THU., JANUARY 2 ] Guy Torry. Jan. 2-4. Comedy Club, 2235 Empire Blvd Webster

[ WED., JANUARY 1 ] Kwanzaa Celebrations. Through Jan. 1. First Community Interfaith Institute, Inc., 219 Hamilton St. Daily celebrations Dec 26-Jan 1 at 6 p.m. Finale: Kwanzaa feast held at St. John’s Home, 150 Highland Ave. Bring a dish to pass, no pork dishes. fciirochester.org.

Kids Events [ WED., JANUARY 1 ] Let’s Move! School-Break Week. Through Jan. 5. The Strong National Museum of Play, 1 Manhattan Square. Mon–Thu 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Fri-Sat 10 a.m.-8 p.m., Sun noon-5 p.m Included in museum admission $13.50, free to kids under 2 and members. 263-2700. museumofplay.org. Loom Bracelet Making. 10 a.m. & 1 p.m. The Refinement Studio, 55 Canterbury Rd. Ages 5-7 at 10 a.m., and ages 8-10 at 1 p.m $15 244-2228. therefinementstudio.com. .[ THU., JANUARY 2 ] Arts and Scraps. 10 a.m.-noon. Henrietta Public Library, 455 Calkins Rd. Ages 3+ with caregiver Free. 359-7092. New Year’s Tea Party. Jan. 2. The Refinement Studio, 55 Canterbury Rd. Girls ages 7-10 at 10 a.m., and boys ages 7-10 at 1 p.m $25. 244-2228. therefinementstudio.com. New Year’s Challenge. 10 a.m.9 p.m. Seymour Library, 161 East Ave., Brockport. All month long, come to the children’s room to pick up an entry form and join the challenge to try new things. Complete the task by the end of the month and win a prize Free. 637-1050. seymourlibraryweb.org. Winter Break Family Movie: “Ice Princess.” 2 p.m. Brighton Memorial Library, 2300 Elmwood Ave. Free. 784-5300. brightonlibrary.org. [ FRI., JANUARY 3 ] Anonymous Otaku Anime Club. 3:30-5 p.m. Seymour Library, 161 East Ave., Brockport Grades 6-12 Free. 637-1050. seymourlibraryweb.org. Cereal Box Collages. 2 p.m. Irondequoit Public Library, Evans Branch, 45 Cooper Rd Free, register. 336-6062. aholland@ libraryweb.org. Lego Club. 3-4:30 p.m. Seymour Library, 161 East Ave., Brockport Ages 6-12 Free, register. 6371050. seymourlibraryweb.org. Monster Jam. Jan. 3-5. Blue Cross Arena, One War Memorial Square Monster Jam shows are composed of three main fan-favorite elements: the pit party, racing and freestyle. Fri-Sat 7:30 p.m., Sun 2 p.m Tickets start at $10 for kids (ages 2-12)

and $20 for adults 758-5300. kimber@pinckneyhugo.com. bluecrossarena.com. Winter Break Family Movie: “Ella Enchanted.” 2 p.m. Brighton Memorial Library, 2300 Elmwood Ave. Free. 784-5300. brightonlibrary.org. [ SAT., JANUARY 4 ] Wildlife Friends-y. 2 p.m. Village of Macedon. Carol Kildoyle will explain to young people what animals do in the wintertime. Participants will then make wildlife feeders using peanut butter and birdseed at the American Legion Free, register 474-4116. books_etc@yahoo. com. [ MON., JANUARY 6 ] Music and Movement for Preschoolers. 10:15-10:45 a.m. Henrietta Public Library, 455 Calkins Rd Ages 2-5 Free, register. 359-7092. Read to Annie the Shih-Tzu. 3:30 p.m Brighton Memorial Library, 2300 Elmwood Ave. Free. 7845300. brightonlibrary.org. Teen Writing Group. 5-6:30 p.m. Henrietta Public Library, 455 Calkins Rd Grades 7-12 Free, register. 359-7092 7-8:30 p.m. Seymour Library, 161 East Ave., Brockport Grades 6-12 Free 637-1050. seymourlibraryweb. org. Widget the Reading Dog and Her Pal Joey. 3-4 p.m Seymour Library, 161 East Ave., Brockport Free. 637-1050. seymourlibraryweb.org.

Lectures [ SUN., JANUARY 5 ] Opera Talk: Agneta Borgstedt. 1 p.m. Temple B’rith Kodesh, 2131 Elmwood Ave. Johann Strauss Jr. Die Fledermans Free 244-7060. tbk.org. Opera Talks: Beat the Blahs: The Haskell Rosenberg Memorial Series. 1 p.m Temple B’rith Kodesh, 2131 Elmwood Ave. Jan 5: Johann Strauss Jr, Die Fledermaus, with Agneta Borgstedt. 334-2323. Agneta. Bor gstedt@rochester.rr.com. operaguildofrochester.org. What’s Up: Dolores Jackson Radney on “Gospel Song.” 2 p.m. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. Included in gallery admission: $5-$12. 276-8900. mag.rochester.edu. [ MON., JANUARY 6 ] Opera Lecture & Listening Series. 7 p.m Brighton Memorial Library, 2300 Elmwood Ave. Jan 6: Anger & Extreme Frustration Expressed in Opera, presented by Agneta D. Borgstedt. 784-5300. brightonlibrary.org. [ WED., JANUARY 8 ] Trekking in the Himalayas. 7:30 p.m. Morgan-Manning House, 151 Main St Free. 637-3645. morganmanninghouse.org.

Literary Events [ THU., JANUARY 2 ] Books Sandwiched In: “Faith” by Jennifer Haigh. 12:10-1 p.m. Brighton Memorial Library, 2300 Elmwood Ave. Sandwiches are welcome; coffee and tea will be available Free. 784-5300. brightonlibrary.org. Pure Kona Open Mic Poetry Series. 7-10 p.m. The Greenhouse Café, 2271

THEATER | “BARE: A POP OPERA”

“Bare: A Pop Opera” is a dramatic coming-of-age rock musical that tells the story of gay high-school seniors at a Catholic boarding school and addresses issues of bullying and acceptance. The show explores personal identity and body acceptance, two issues that directly correspond to how powerful and capable we feel. OFC Creations and the Rochester Association for Performing Arts will present “Bare” at RAPA’s East End Theatre (727 E. Main St.) this week. The show takes place Friday and Saturday, January 3-4, and Thursday through Saturday, January 9-11, at 7:30 p.m. Talkback sessions with the Rochester Gay Straight Alliance Youth Group, “Bare” cast members, and representatives from the Rochester MCC Open Arms Church will be held directly following the performances on January 4 and 11. Tickets are $15 and available online at rapatheatre.org, at all area Wegmans, by calling the RAPA East End Theatre Box office at 325-3366, and at the door one hour before curtain. For more information, visit rapatheatre.org. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY E. Main St. 270-8603. ourcoffeeconnection.org. [ FRI., JANUARY 3 ] First Fridays/Wide Open Mic. First Friday of every month, 7-9 p.m. Writers and Books, 740 University Ave Rochester’s longest running open mic welcomes poets, performers, and writers of all kinds. wab.org. [ SUN., JANUARY 5 ] Journaling for Success. 1:30 p.m. Books Etc., 78 W. Main St Macedon Free. 474-4116. books_etc@yahoo.com. [ MON., JANUARY 6 ] Books Sandwiched In: “Argo” By Antonio Mendez and Matt Baglio. 12:10-1 p.m. Brighton Memorial Library, 2300 Elmwood Ave. Free. 784-5300. brightonlibrary.org. Moving Beyond Racism Book Group. 7 p.m. Barnes & Noble, 3349 Monroe Ave. January Selection: “1491” by Charles Mann. Everyone is welcome whether or not you have read the book. Join us for a safe, stimulating discussion. Free 2888644. mbrbookinfo@aol.com. Pen and Ink: Writers of the 1920s. 7 p.m. Geneva Historical Society, 543 South Main St A collaborative program with Geneva Public Library 315-789-5151. info@ genevahistoricalsociety.com. genevahistoricalsociety.com. [ TUE., JANUARY 7 ] New Ground Poetry Night. First Tuesday of every month, 7:30 p.m. Equal=Grounds, 750 South Ave. Poets, add your name to the sign-up sheet when you arrive. The lineup is first come, first on stage. The evening’s emcee will introduce you when it’s your

turn. Each poet has five minutes (or three poems, whichever comes first.) Depending on the number of poets participating, there’ll be an intermission half way through the evening to give everyone a chance to stretch their legs and grab some fresh coffee 242-7840. facebook.com/ newgroundpoetry. R-SPEC meeting. First Tuesday of every month, 7 p.m. Writers of speculative fiction meet once a month to discuss craft Free. r-spec.org. Traitors or Patriots? A Story of the German Anti-Nazi Resistance. 1-2:30 p.m. Brighton Memorial Library, 2300 Elmwood Ave. With author Lou Eltscher. Free. 7845300. brightonlibrary.org. [ WED., JANUARY 8 ] Irondequoit Public Library Contemporary Book Discussion Group: “The Newlyweds” by Nell Freudenberger. Jan. 8-9. Irondequoit Library, Helen McGraw Branch, 2180 E. Ridge Rd. Wed at 7 p.m. or Thu at 3 p.m. 336-6060.

Museum Exhibit [ WED., JANUARY 1 ] “Downton Abbey, Rochester Style.” Through March 6. The Rochester Historical Society, Rundel Memorial Building, 2nd floor, 115 South Ave. Through Mar 6. Tue-Wed 10 a.m.–3 p.m. and Thu 11 a.m.–3 p.m. Also Sats Jan 11 & 25 and Feb 8 & 22, 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Local costumes, finery and household objects from 1915-1930s to give you an idea of how residents of this fair city were living their lives during that time $5 per adult, $3 per child under 18. 428-8470. rochesterhistory.org.

Little Builders. Through Jan. 5. The Strong National Museum of Play, 1 Manhattan Square. MonThu 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Fri-Sat 10 a.m.-8 p.m., Sun noon-5 p.m. Closed Nov 28 and Dec 25 $13, free to members and kids under 2 263-2700. museumofplay.org.

Parranderos De Rochester followed by DJ Bobby Base 4544830. prfestival.com. Weaving and Fiber Arts Center Open House. 1-4 p.m. Weaving & Fiber Arts Center, Piano Works Mall, Studio 1940, 349 West Commercial St 377-2955. weaversguildofrochester.org.

Recreation [ WED., JANUARY 1 ] Cross Country Skiing and Snowshoeing. Cumming Nature Center, 6472 Gulick Rd. Wed-Fri 9 a.m.-3:30 p.m., Sat-Sun 9 a.m.4:30 p.m Suggested donations of 3$ per person, 10$ per family. 374-6160. rmsc.org. First Day Hikes. 1 p.m. Letchworth State Park, 1 Letchworth State Park. Castile Meet at Trailside Lodge half hour early to register. Hot chocolate and cookies at 3 p.m. Two levels: families with younger children and families with older children $8 parking fee. 493-3625. GVHC Event. 10 a.m. Pittsford Plaza, Monroe Ave. Easy/ moderate 5 mile hike, Pittsford loop Free 475-0923. gvhchikes. org. Ice Skating. Through March 31. Genesee Valley Sports Complex, 131 Elmwood Ave. The rink season will run through March 2014 (closing date TBA). Open skate schedule: Sun 2:30-3:45 p.m., Mon-Fri noon-1:15 p.m., Fri (16+) 10-11:15 p.m., Sat 5-6:15 p.m. Adult skate Tue-Thu 10:30-11:45 a.m $2-$7.50 4287889. cityofrochester.gov/gvpsc/ Through March 15. Ice Skating. Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Park, 1 Manhattan Square. Ice rink at 353 Court St. Visit site for complete list of open skate schedules 428-7541. cityofrochester.gov/mlkmp. Year List Jump-Start. 8 a.m. Durand Eastman Park, Zoo Rd. Bird watching event by Rochester Birding Association. Meet at 8 a.m. in one of the several parking lots on the west side of the outlet at the north end of Irondequoit Bay or at 8:45 a.m. in the Lake Shore Boulevard parking area between Log Cabin Road and Zoo Roads. Free. 671-9639. rochesterbirding.com. [ SAT., JANUARY 4 ] GVHC Event. Jan. 4. Ellison Park, Blossom Rd. Hazelwood lodge. Moderate 5 mile hike Free 5443387. gvhchikes.org. Novice Nature Ski Hike. 1 p.m. Letchworth State Park, 1 Letchworth State Park . Castile Meet at Trailside Lodge $8 parking fee. 493-3625. Saturday Snowshoeing. 1 p.m. Helmer Nature Center, 154 Pinegrove Ave $3-$5 336-3035. Winter Wonder Walk. 2:30 p.m. Letchworth State Park, 1 Letchworth State Park . Castile Meet at Trailside Lodge $8 parking fee. 493-3625. [ SUN., JANUARY 5 ] Family Nature Walk. 10 a.m. Letchworth State Park, 1 Letchworth State Park . Castile Meet at Visitor Center $8 parking fee. 493-3625. GVHC Event. 9 a.m. Whiting Road Nature Preserve, Whiting Rd. Moderate/hilly 5 mile hike Free 469-0327. gvhchikes.org. Intermediate Nature Ski Hike. 2:30 p.m Letchworth State Park, 1 Letchworth State Park .

SPECIAL EVENT | MONSTER JAM

If I was an old, beaten-up car, and on my last tie rods, I’d definitely want to go out as crash-fodder for a demolition derby before being scrapped. Ring in the New Year with a smashing good time at the Monster Jam demolition derby, which returns to the Blue Cross Arena (1 War Memorial Square) this week. At about 12 feet tall and around 12 feet wide, monster trucks are custom-designed behemoths that sit atop 66-inch-tall tires and weigh at least 10,000 pounds. They are capable of bursts of speed up to 100 miles per hour, can fly up to 130 feet — the length of more than 14 cars side by side — and up to 35 feet in the air. Popular trucks and drivers expected at this year’s event include “Grave Digger” and Gary Porter, “Monster Mutt” and Whit Tarlton, “Aftershock” and Western New York native Bob Robbins, “Illuminator” and Jay Snyder, and “Rap Attack” and Dave Rappach (pictured). The event begins Friday, January 3, at 7:30 p.m. Shows will also be held Saturday, January 4, at 7:30 p.m., with a pit party 4-6 p.m., and Sunday, January 5, at 2 p.m., with a pit party 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. At the pit parties, fans can meet the drivers, get autographs, take photos with the trucks, and participate in other family-friendly events. There is no pit party on opening night. Tickets start at $20 for adults and $10 for children ages 2-12, and can be purchased by calling 800-745-3000 or by visiting ticketmaster.com. For more information, visit bluecrossarena.com. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY Castile Meet at Trailside Lodge $8 parking fee. 493-3625.

Special Events [ WED., JANUARY 1 ] Better Breathers Club. First Wednesday of every month, 2-3:30 p.m. The Northfield, 4560 Nine Mile Point Rd., Fairport. 377-5350. yourcaremedicalsupply.com. Free Spaghetti Dinner. 2-5 p.m. Covenant United Methodist Church, Culver Rd Reservations are not required. Everyone is welcome 654-8115. Geeks Who Drink Pub Quiz. 8 p.m. Scotland Yard Pub, 187 Saint Paul St Free. 730-5030. scotlandyardpub.com. ReCraft the Holidays EcoBazaar, Swap & Sustainable Saturday. Ongoing, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Rochester Greenovation, 1199 East Main St. Free admission. 288-7564. events@ rochestergreen.com. [ FRI., JANUARY 3 ] Geneva Night Out: Tags and Starlets, Fashion and Radio Programs of the 1920s. 5-8 p.m. Smith Opera House, 82 Seneca St . Geneva 315-789-5151. genevahistoricalsociety.com. Rochester Amateur Radio Association January Club Meeting. 7 p.m. Henrietta Fire Hall, 3129 E. Henrietta Rd. Topics: QSL

Cards & Towers 210-8910. kc2pcd@rochester.rr.com. [ SAT., JANUARY 4 ] East Side Winter Farmer’s Market. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Indoors at 2555 Baird Rd., Penfield. Dec 1, 10 a.m. Soap-making basics (rsvp). Dec 15 Breakfast with Santa, 9-11:30 a.m. ($7-$12) eastside. activities@rochester.rr.com. Life Learners Toastmasters Club #4323 Open House. First Saturday of every month, 5 p.m. Legacy at Blossom, 100 McAuley Rd. Speaking and leadership club. Every first and third Saturday of the month. Life Learners Toastmasters Club #4323 Open House 5-6:30 p.m. January 18, 2014. Free. 359-0459. Higherself1875@yahoo.com. Miss Flower City Scholarship Pageant - Rochester & Western NY’s official preliminary competion for Miss New York and Miss America. 6 p.m. JCC Rochester, 1200 Edgewood Ave. $15 5331077. missflowercity@gmail.com. missflowercity.org. Telescope Viewing. Rochester Museum and Science Center, 657 East Ave. Clear skies providing. From Dark til about 10 p.m Admission is free 703-9876. rmsc.org. Trulla Navideña. 7 p.m. Flat Iron Café, 561 State St. Join us as we celebrate the New Year and Three Kings Day Parranda style. Live Music provided by:

[ SUN., JANUARY 5 ] Brighton Winter Farmers’ Market. 1 p.m Brookside Community Center, 220 Idlewood Rd. 269-8918. info@brightonfarmersmarket.org. brightonfarmersmarket.org. Penfield Farmers’ Market. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Grossmans Garden & Home, 1801 Fairport Nine Mile Point Rd . Penfield 377-1982 x224. grossmans.com. [ MON., JANUARY 6 ] Thinkin’ & Drinkin’: The Bug Jar’s Trivia Night. 8-9 p.m. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 21+. Doors at 7:30 p.m Free. bugjar.com. [ TUE., JANUARY 7 ] Screening: “Valkyrie.” 6:30 p.m. Brighton Memorial Library, 2300 Elmwood Ave. Free. 784-5300. brightonlibrary.org. Spanish Night. 6:30 p.m. Books Etc., 78 W. Main St Macedon Free. 474-4116. books_etc@ yahoo.com. Tuesday Taco Trivia. 9-11 p.m. Temple Bar and Grille, 109 East Ave. 232-6000. templebarrochester@gmail.com. templebarandgrille.com.

Sports [ WED., JANUARY 1 ] Rochester Lancers v Missouri Comets. 3 p.m. Blue Cross Arena, One War Memorial Square. $10$15, children 12 and under free. 758-5300. rochesterlancers.com.

Theater “Bare: A Pop Opera.” RAPA’s East End Theatre, 727 East Main St. Jan 3-4 & 9-11, 7:30 p.m. Talk back sessions with the Rochester Gay Straight Alliance Youth Group, Bare cast members, and representatives from the Rochester MCC Open Arms Church will be held directly following the performances on January 4 & 11 $15 325-3366. evaughnjohnson@gmail.com. rapatheatre.org. “Good Rockin’ Live: A Salute to Sun Records.” Downstairs Cabaret at Winton Place, 3450 Winton Place. Thu 7 p.m., Fri 8 p.m., Sat 4 & 8 p.m., Sun 3 p.m $23-$33 325-4370. downstairscabaret.com. “Last Gas.” Through Feb. 2. Geva Theatre Center, 75 Woodbury Blvd. Through Feb 2. Previews Tue Jan 7-Thu 7:30 p.m., Fri 8 p.m., Sat 2 p.m. (open captioned). Opening Sat Jan 11, 8 p.m. Performances Sun Jan 12, 2 & 7 p.m., Tue 6 p.m., Wed Jan 15, 2 & 7:30 p.m. Thu 7:30 p.m., Fri 8 p.m., Sat 4 & 8:30 p.m., Sun 2 p.m. (Sunday Salon) & 7 p.m., Tue-Wed Jan 22, 7:30 p.m. Thu 7:30 p.m., Fri 8 p.m., Sat 4 & 8:30 p.m., Sun 2 p.m. (audio described) & 7 p.m., Tue-Wed Jan 29, 7:30 p.m., Thu 7:30 p.m. (sign interpreted), Fri 8 p.m., Sat 4 & 8 p.m., Sun 2 p.m. (Sunday Salon) Tickets start at $25 2324382. gevatheatre.org. “M.I.A.” MuCCC, 142 Atlantic Ave. Fri 7:30 p.m., Sat 2 & 7:30 p.m., Sun 2 p.m .$12-$15 866-8114111. muccc.org.

“Peter Pan.” Barnes & Noble, 1070 Ridge Rd. Preview performance, balloon sculptor, stories. Tell cashier you’re there with Peter Pan and a portion of your sales will benefit Webster Theatre Guild. m.ciaccia22@ gmail.com. “Take Me Home.” Downstairs Cabaret Theatre, 20 Windsor St. Fri 8 p.m., Sat 8:30 p.m., Sun 3 p.m $26-$33. 325-4370. downstairscabaret.com.

Theater Audition [ WED., JANUARY 1 ] 2 Pages/2 Voices. Through Jan. 3. Writers and Books, 740 University Ave Each play must be no more than 2 pages and contain no more than 2 characters, and include the word “fox” Submissions due January 3, 2014. Winning plays announced January 16. Performances January 27, 8 p.m wab.org. [ FRI., JANUARY 3 ] “The Little Mermaid” Children’s Theater Auditions. 4:30 p.m. Best Foot Forward, 100 Cobblestone Court Dr. Ages 4-12. No experience necessary. Please bring a photo and be prepared to sing and recite for placement in the show. Rehearsals once a week, show in April Free to audition but is a tuition based program. 401-8186. vanessa@ BestFootForwardKids.com. BestFootForwardKids.com. [ SAT., JANUARY 4 ] “The Wizard of Oz” Children’s Theater Auditions. 1 p.m. Best Foot Forward, 100 Cobblestone Court Dr. For Children 4-9 & 10-17 can be part of this full scale theater production. No experience necessary. 1-3 pm both days. Bring a photo of yourself & sing a song & recite Free to audition but is a tuition based program. 401-8186. vanessa@BestFootForwardKids. com. BestFootForwardKids. com. [ SUN., JANUARY 5 ] “Reign: The Pageant.” 10 a.m. Aquinas Institute, 1127 Dewey Ave. Project RULE, the new anti-bullying campaign will host its first pageant, January 5th at the Acquinas Institute. Visit www.projectrule. org for information on how to enter the pageant. Project RULE is looking for its next spokesperson to RULE by inspiration not intimidation. If you think you have what it takes, enter to win today. $95 218-9125. info@projectrule.org. projectrule.org. [ MON., JANUARY 6 ] “Closer Than Ever.” Jan. 6-7, 7 p.m. Lutheran Church of the Reformation, 111 North Chestnut St. Everyone’s Theatre Co. Cast: 3 men and 2 women. Ages range from 30’s to 50’s. All sides and music will be provided at the auditions Free 727-1373. everyonestheatre.com.

Workshops [ WED., JANUARY 1 ] Family Development Class: “Wise Choices.” Ongoing, 12:30-2:30 p.m. Mental Health Association, 320 N Goodman St. For parents of school-age children Free, RSVP 325-3245 x131. mharochester.org.

[ MON., JANUARY 6 ] Beginner Pilates Mat and Cardio Class. 8:30-9:30 a.m Irondequoit Community Center, 154 Pinegrove Ave. Improve core strength and skeletal alignment with a combination of basic Classical Pilates Matwork and cardio exercises based on dance. Private Classical Pilates apparatus sessions also available by appointment at 2364227. $55, register 336-6070. irondequoit.org. Cobbs Hill Drum Circle. 7 p.m. Pure Path, 40 Humboldt St. We’re getting the drums warmed up for summer drumming at Cobbs Hill at 40 Humboldt Street at Pure Path. Come around to the back of the building. Go to the door that has the small awning on top. Love donations accepted. Bring your drums and there will be some instruments to share. All levels of drumming are welcome 5687324. Succulent Gardens: Terrarium Workshop. 7 p.m. Rochester Brainery, Village Gate, 274 N Goodman St. $30 730-7034. info@rochesterbrainery.com. rochesterbrainery.com. [ TUE., JANUARY 7 ] Behavioral Interviewing: The Art and the Science. 6:30 p.m. Rochester Brainery, Village Gate, 274 N Goodman St. $15 7307034. info@rochesterbrainery. com. rochesterbrainery.com. Buddhist Book Discussion Group. 7 p.m. Amitabha Foundation, 11 South Goodman St. By donation. 451-7039. NY@ amitabhafoundation.us. amitabhafoundation.us. Leadership Retreat: “Arrogance and Humility in Leadership.” 7:45 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Monroe Golf Club, 155 Golf Ave. $325/ person; $225/person from a non-profit organization; $200/ person for three or more from one organization. Cost includes breakfast, a buffet lunch, and materials 381-9577. leadershipcoachinginc.com. [ WED., JANUARY 8 ] “The Source of Human Good” by Henry Nelson Wieman. 7 p.m. First Universalist Church, 150 South Ave. Exploration of UU Theology. Please R.S.V.P to reserve your place Free 5462826. uuroc.org. Food as Medicine 101. 7 p.m. Rochester Brainery, Village Gate, 274 N Goodman St. $15 7307034. info@rochesterbrainery. com. rochesterbrainery.com. Photography: Small Cameras: Big Pictures. 6:30 p.m. Rochester Brainery, Village Gate, 274 N Goodman St. $15. 730-7034. info@rochesterbrainery.com. rochesterbrainery.com. Reset-Recharge-Revive. 4:30 & 6 p.m. Mooseberry Café, 2555 Baird Rd Penfield Learn about whole food cleansing and detoxing your body while eating healthy foods, designed to regenerate you Free 315-427-2369. Natalia@ bareboneswellness.com. mooseberrycafe.com.

GETLISTED get your event listed for free e-mail it to calendar@rochestercitynews.com. Or go online to rochestercitynewspaper.com and submit it yourself!

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 21

Movies Theaters Searchable, up-to-the-minute movie times for all area theaters can be found at rochestercitynewspaper.com, and on City’s mobile website.

Film

Brockport Strand 93 Main St, Brockport, 637-3310, rochestertheatermanagement.com

Canandaigua Theatres 3181 Townline Road, Canandaigua, 396-0110, rochestertheatermanagement.com

Cinema Theater 957 S. Clinton St., 271-1785, cinemarochester.com

Culver Ridge 16 2255 Ridge Rd E, Irondequoit  544-1140, regmovies.com

Dryden Theatre 900 East Ave., 271-3361, dryden.eastmanhouse.org

Eastview 13 Eastview Mall, Victor 425-0420, regmovies.com

Geneseo Theatres Geneseo Square Mall, 243-2691, rochestertheatermanagement.com

Greece Ridge 12 176 Greece Ridge Center Drive 225-5810, regmovies.com

Henrietta 18 525 Marketplace Drive 424-3090, regmovies.com

The Little 240 East Ave., 258-0444 thelittle.org

Movies 10 2609 W. Henrietta Road 292-0303, cinemark.com

Pittsford Cinema 3349 Monroe Ave., 383-1310 pittsford.zurichcinemas.com

Tinseltown USA/IMAX 2291 Buffalo Road 247-2180, cinemark.com

Webster 12 2190 Empire Blvd., 888-262-4386, amctheatres.com

Vintage Drive In 1520 W Henrietta Rd., Avon 226-9290, vintagedrivein.com

Film Previews on page 24

Greed is good “The Wolf of Wall Street”

In short, there’s no hint of the director’s famous mean streets and all they comprehend. (R), DIRECTED BY MARTIN SCORSESE At the same time, despite the apparent NOW PLAYING departures from many of his previous works, the picture demonstrates a number of familiar [ REVIEW ] BY GEORGE GRELLA Scorsese touches. To begin with, the movie deals with a gang of criminals, albeit of the whiteInitially, the heavily hyped Martin Scorsese collar variety, an unscrupulous group of stock film, “The Wolf of Wall Street,” seems an manipulators and swindlers, the kind of people unusual effort for the director of so many who regularly populate the daily headlines. dark, urban crime stories rich in violence Based on the memoir of Jordan Belfort, the and ethnicity. The rollercoaster ride of his actual leader of that actual gang of crooks, in latest movie offers a different set of subjects, many ways it resembles another fact-based situations, and characters — no cops, no Scorsese film, the gangster flick “GoodFellas.” mobsters, no shootings, stabbings, and In a voice-over narration — another Scorsese beatings, no sense of a troubled Catholicism. favorite — Jordan Belfort (Leonardo DiCaprio), sounding a good deal like Ray Liotta and often addressing the audience directly, begins with an account of his enormous monetary success, listing his grand houses, his six cars, his yacht, and his stunning trophy wife (Margot Robbie), then flashes back to his early days as a fledgling Jonah Hill and Leonardo DiCaprio in “The Wolf of Wall Street.” PHOTO COURTESY PARAMOUNT PICTURES

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stockbroker with a legitimate Wall Street firm. Almost as soon as it begins, his career ends with the 1987 stock market collapse, but Belfort finds work in a sleazy Long Island boiler room operation, selling penny stocks to naïve investors, and fleecing them for all they’re worth. His success at the boiler room leads him to found his own firm of swindlers with his faithful sidekick Donnie Azoff (Jonah Hill), launching him and his cohorts into the financial stratosphere. Most of the movie concentrates on Belfort’s meteoric rise and the ways he and his firm of greedy wastrels spend their astonishing wealth. The stockbrokers consume mountains of cocaine, a whole pharmacopeia of uppers, downers, and in-betweeners, various morphine derivatives, and the great favorite of the era, Quaaludes. Belfort lists all the substances he ingests, then ranks the genres of prostitutes he and his colleagues hire, according to appearance, talents, and likelihood of infection. Throughout the film he combines the sex with the drugs, frequently snorting cocaine off the naked bodies of gorgeous women. When he journeys to Switzerland to hide $20 million in cash, he creates a sort of portable orgy, attempting drug-crazed sexual assaults on the female flight attendants. A kind of comic decadence pervades most of his interactions with his employees, who dance and sing and chant along with their leader, glorying in the millions they make by pumping up stock prices and

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rochestercitynewspaper.com/MOVIES rochestercitynewspaper.com/MOVIETIMES

Too many spoonfuls of sugar “Saving Mr. Banks” (PG-13), DIRECTED BY JOHN LEE HANCOCK NOW PLAYING

“At Berkeley” (NR), DIRECTED BY FREDERICK WISEMAN SCREENS FRIDAY AT THE DRYDEN [ REVIEW ] BY ADAM LUBITOW

overselling worthless paper; he pays a secretary $10,000 to have her head shaved in front of the whole firm and in one precious moment, he and his partners discuss the rules of dwarf-tossing, a betting game they play in the film. The movie runs three hours, lengthened by far too many repeated scenes of Belfort exhorting his people to make even more millions, showing off his $40,000 watch, his $5,000 suit, tearing up $100 bills for confetti, and simply glorying in an entirely disgusting display of joyful greed. Matching the excessiveness of the subject, the actors, including DiCaprio, play their parts with considerable exaggeration; in one relatively brief sequence, Matthew McConaughey turns in a wonderfully quirky performance, advising Belfort that the keys to success are cocaine and masturbation. Distressingly, especially for a Scorsese picture, “The Wolf of Wall Street” establishes no moral center, barely hinting at the smug, audacious criminality of Belfort’s work — he served time in prison — and never mentioning the lives he ruined. Nor does the script even hint at the continuing illegality of what a Republican presidential aspirant called vulture capitalism. Worst of all, it seems highly likely that the glamorous presentation of stock fraud and its benefits for its practitioners — the expensive luxuries, the untrammeled decadence, the wallowing in sex and drugs, the jubilant celebrations of sheer greed — will inspire a whole new generations to seek an MBA and a job on Wall Street.

It is often said that history is written by the victors, and that viewpoint goes a long way in explaining the slightly bitter taste left in my mouth by “Saving Mr. Banks,��� John Lee Hancock’s (“The Blind Side”) otherwise charming retelling of the behind-the-scenes battle to make Disney’s “Mary Poppins.” It’s expected that liberties will be taken with the facts in any film that claims to be “based on a true story,” but there’s something vaguely distasteful about Disney setting out to tell its own triumphant story of gaining the rights to “Poppins” from its reluctant author. The film begins just after P.L. Travers (Emma Thompson) has finally agreed to fly from Britain to Los Angeles in order meet with Walt Disney (Tom Hanks). Their meeting is the culmination of Disney’s 20-year pursuit of the rights to “Mary Poppins,” and the author has finally relented because, frankly, she needs the money. She is invited to act

Tom Hanks and Emma Thompson in “Saving Mr. Banks.” PHOTO COURTESY WALT DISNEY PICTURES

as consultant on the film, meeting with screenwriter Don DaGradi (Bradley Whitford) and songwriters Richard and Robert Sherman (Jason Schwartzman and B.J. Novak) as they negotiate with her exactly what changes they’ll be allowed to make to her story. She’s adamant that Mary Poppins not be turned into one of Disney’s “silly cartoons.” Scenes of their planning sessions, in which Travers refuses to budge, making occasionally ridiculous demands (at one point insisting that the color red be removed from the movie completely), alternate with flashbacks to the author’s childhood in Australia growing up with a doting, but deeply depressed, father (played with charm by Colin Farrell). Writers Kelly Marcel and Sue Smith offer up the explanation (based on one hypothesis put forth in Valerie Lawson’s biography of Travers, “Mary Poppins, She Wrote”) that the author’s reluctance to part with her creation was the result of a lack of closure in her relationship with her father, who was so inspirational to her writing. This clearcut interpretation is symptomatic of the film’s need to iron out the nuances of the story it sets out to tell. Though we know how things must inevitably turn out, giving up creative control of her work being a therapeutic process for Travers seems far too tidy. As is the way the film makes sure to end with the film’s premiere, conveniently avoiding the fact that Travers was vocal in her displeasure with the finished product. So many things about “Saving Mr. Banks” feel calculated, from cringeinducing moments like Mickey Mouse himself taking Travers’ hand to escort her into the premiere, right on down to the fact that the film’s opening has been timed to coincide with the 50th anniversary Blu-ray release of “Mary Poppins.” This all sounds like I’m being overly hard on the film, which admittedly gets a lot of things right, namely Emma Thompson’s wonderful performance as P.L. Travers. In her hands, the author is prickly, with a

sharp tongue, but a sadness behind her eyes hints at a life that has known more than its share of disappointments. She captures the heartbreak and doubt that comes with giving up control of a work that’s deeply personal. Hanks does a fine job as Walt Disney, alternately warm and exasperated. But while the script allows him moments that show Disney was first and foremost a businessman, like almost everything in the film, it doesn’t probe any deeper. Worlds away from the beer bongs and hazing rituals typically associated with films about college life, Fred Wiseman’s sprawling “At Berkeley” immerses us in life at one of the country’s most renowned public institutes of higher learning. Utilizing his strictly observational style (it’s refreshing in the current climate of documentary features that too often tell you exactly what to think), the filmmaker trains his cameras on the lecture halls, theaters, research labs, stadiums, and boardrooms of the University of California campus, allowing us to see first-hand how every aspect of the school functions. Filmed in 2010 during a tumultuous time of budget cuts and tuition increases, with state funding providing only 16 percent of the school’s massive $1.9 billion budget, we sit in on meetings with administrators as they scramble to figure out how to make up the difference while still delivering on the promise of a world-class education. The exhaustive (and sometimes exhausting) film reveals itself to be a compelling examination of the state of our country’s educational system, as it shows the rippling effects these cuts have on life at the university. It all culminates in a student-led protest for lowered tuition rates, and the suspense comes from having seen first-hand why those demands are all but impossible to meet. The four-hour runtime may be daunting, but the engrossing classroom debates that eventually spill out into the real world prove as thrilling as any car chase or shootout in the best summer blockbuster.

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 23

Film Previews Full film reviews available at rochestercitynewspaper.com. [ OPENING ] AMÉLIE (2001): Director Jean-Pierre Jeunet’s whimsical fable about a young woman who makes it her life’s mission to make others happy. Dryden (Wed, Jan 1, 2 p.m.) AT BERKELEY (2013): Celebrated director Frederick Wiseman takes an in-depth look at life on the campus of UC Berkeley as students, administrators, and faculty scramble to deal with budget cuts and tuition increases. Dryden (Fri, Jan 3, 7 p.m.) BETTIE PAGE REVEALS ALL (2012): This documentary examines the life of the most infamous pinup model of the 1950s, narrated by Bettie Page herself. Featuring interviews with Hugh Hefner, Dita Von Teese, Rebecca Romijn, and Christina Aguilera, among others. Dryden (Thu, Jan 2, 2 p.m.) THE ELEPHANT MAN (1980): John Hurt stars as a heavily disfigured man who lives as a side-show freak in David Lynch’s acclaimed drama. With Anthony Hopkins, Anne Bancroft, and John Gielgud. Dryden (Thu, Jan 2, 8 p.m.) THE LAST DAYS ON MARS (2013): On the final days of their mission exploring the Red Planet, a group of astronauts face a threat to their very survival. Starring Liev Schreiber, Elias Koteas, and Olivia Williams. Dryden (Sat, Jan 4, 8 p.m.; Sun, Jan 5, 2 p.m.) PARANORMAL ACTIVITY: THE MARKED ONES (R): The popular horror franchise continues on, as a young Latino man is tormented by a mysterious demonic entity. Culver, Eastview, Greece, Henrietta, Tinseltown PHASE IV (1974): The only film directed by famed designer Saul Bass, this film imagines a future in which intelligent ants wage war on the human race. Dryden (Tue, Jan 7, 8 p.m.)

[ CONTINUING ] 47 RONIN (PG-13): Keanu Reeves stars as the leader of an outcast band of samurai on a mission of vengeance for the murder of their master. Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Greece, Henrietta, Tinseltown, Webster. AMERICAN HUSTLE (R): David O. Russell directs this black comedy inspired by the ABSCAM scandal of the 1970s, which involved the entrapment of several high-profile U.S. politicians. Starring Christian Bale, Amy Adams, Bradley Cooper, Jennifer Lawrence, and Jeremy Renner. Culver, Eastview, Greece, Henrietta, Little, Pittsford, Tinseltown, Webster ANCHORMAN 2: THE LEGEND CONTINUES (PG-13): Ron Burgundy and the rest of the Channel 4 news team return, ready to take New York, and the first 24-hours news channel, by storm. Starring Will Ferrell, Paul Rudd, Steve Carell, Christina Applegate, and Kristen Wiig. Brockport, Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Geneseo, Pittsford, Tinseltown, Webster THE BEST MAN HOLIDAY (R): In this follow-up to 1999’s “The Best Man,” a group of college friends reunites for Christmas after 15 years apart. Starring Taye Diggs, Morris Chestnut, Terrence Howard, Nia Long, and Sanaa Lathan. Cinema DELIVERY MAN (PG-13): Vince Vaughn stars as a man who learns that due to a mixup at the fertility clinic, his donations 20 years prior have resulted in him being the father of 533 children. Also starring Cobie Smulders and Chris Pratt. Cinema DHOOM 3 (NR): A young man seeks revenge for the murder of his father in this Hindi action thriller. Henrietta FROZEN (PG): A young princess goes on an epic journey to find her sister, whose powers have trapped their kingdom in an eternal winter in this animated Disney musical. With the voices of Kristen Bell, Idina Menzel, Jonathan Groff, and Josh

Gad. Brockport, Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece, Henrietta, Pittsford, Tinseltown, Webster GRAVITY (PG-13): Sandra Bullock and George Clooney play astronauts who becomes stranded in space after a shuttle accident, in Alfonso Cuarón’s sci-fi thriller. Eastview GRUDGE MATCH (PG-13): Sylvester Stallone and Robert De Niro star as retired boxers who agree to one more fight to settle an old rivalry. With Kim Basinger, Alan Arkin, and Kevin Hart. Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Greece, Henrietta, Tinseltown, Webster THE HOBBIT: THE DESOLATION OF SMAUG (PG-13): In the second installment of Peter Jackson’s epic trilogy, hobbit Bilbo Baggins continues his quest to help a group of dwarves reclaim their homeland, and confronts a mighty dragon in the process. Brockport, Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece, Henrietta, Pittsford, Tinseltown, Webster THE HUNGER GAMES: CATCHING FIRE (PG-13): The middle chapter of The Hunger Games finds an uprising against the Capitol beginning as a result of the events in the first film. Starring Jennifer Lawrence, Josh Hutcherson, Woody Harrelson, Donald Sutherland, and Philip Seymour Hoffman. Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Greece, Henrietta, Tinseltown, Webster JUSTIN BIEBER’S BELIEVE (PG): This concert film offers an “unprecedented” and “unfiltered” behind-the-scenes glimpse into the life of the pop “music” star. Culver, Henrietta, Eastview, Tinseltown MANDELA: LONG WALK TO FREEDOM (PG-13): Idris Elba stars as former South African president Nelson Mandela in this biopic of the influential leader’s remarkable life. Culver, Henrietta, Pittsford, Tinseltown, Webster NEBRASKA (R): Bruce Dern stars as an elderly Missouri man convinced he’s won a million dollars in a sweepstakes, and Will Forte is the son

who reluctantly agrees to drive him to Nebraska to collect his winnings. With Bob Odenkirk, Stacy Keach, and June Squibb. Little, Pittsford OUT OF THE FURNACE (R): Christian Bale stars as a down-on-his-luck steel worker who takes matters into his own hands when his younger brother mysteriously goes missing. With Woody Harrelson, Casey Affleck, Zoe Saldana, and Forest Whitaker. Cinema SAVING MR. BANKS (PG-13): See full review on page 23. Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Henrietta, Little, Pittsford, Tinseltown, Webster THE SECRET LIFE OF WALTER MITTY (PG): Ben Stiller directs and stars in this adaptation of James Thurber’s story, about a man who dreams of a life of adventure and finally gets to actually live it. With Kristen Wiig, Sean Penn, and Adam Scott. Brockport, Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Greece, Henrietta, Pittsford, Tinseltown, Webster THOR: THE DARK WORLD (PG-13): The heroic Norse god is back, battling to save the world from a shadowy enemy intent on its destruction. Starring Chris Hemsworth, Tom Hiddleston, Natalie Portman, Idris Elba, and Christopher Eccleston. Culver, Henrietta TYLER PERRY’S A MADEA CHRISTMAS (PG-13): Madea gets roped into helping a friend pay her daughter a visit in the country. Hijinks ensue. Starring Tyler Perry, Kathy Najimy, Chad Michael Murray, and Larry the Cable Guy. Canandaigua, Culver, Henrietta, Tinseltown, Webster WALKING WITH DINOSAURS 3D (PG): A young dinosaur must rise to the occasion and lead his herd in this animated adventure story. Featuring the voices of Karl Urban, John Leguizamo, and Justin Long. Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Henrietta, Tinseltown, Webster THE WOLF OF WALL STREET (R): See full review on page 22. Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Greece, Henrietta, Little, Pittsford, Tinseltown

Jeffries & Montalvo

from page 18

Galaxy Graphics, where Goldn Rd.’s goods are screen printed. They try to release new clothing lines for each season, just as it’s done in the international fashion world. “But it’s also based on the money in our pockets,“ says Jeffries. Jeffries and Montalvo are both employed at pizza shops at the moment to supplement their income, and are saving up to purchase sewing and embroidery machines and screen-printing equipment of their own. “We know how to do everything, we just don’t have the equipment,” says Jeffries. They plan to expand their currently offered range of shirts, tank tops, hoodies, sweaters, and beanies, to include other items, such as flannels and jeans. In the past, the clothing has been offered at Krudco Skate Shop, a natural connection since Goldn Rd. sponsors skateboarders and other artists with free clothing and by publicly supporting them in what they do. But Jeffries and Montalvo recently began renting their own space at 159 Caroline Street, where they host pop-up shops. Jeffries and Montalvo are also in the midst of planning the Goldn Rd. 5K, set to take place on June 22 at Cobb’s Hill Reservoir. They’re currently working on gathering partnerships with indie businesses in Rochester, and plan to use the event to build awareness and support for the indevelopment Roc City Skate Park. “Our goal is really to bring light to Rochester, to promote this place and its people,” says Jeffries. “We want to be one of the reasons people here get exposure outside of the city.” 

Do you have osteoarthritis knee pain?

Do you have trouble sleeping?

If you answered “yes” to these questions, you may qualify for research being conducted at the University of Rochester. The purpose is to investigate whether improving sleep can improve the immune system and reduce pain. • Participants must be 50–75 years of age and in generally good physical and psychological health. • No study medications are involved • Study participants receive up to $400 for study participation.

For more information, please call (585) 273-4700, or email us at: mindbody@urmc.rochester.edu 24 CITY JANUARY 1-7, 2014

Classifieds For information: Call us (585) 244-3329 Fax us (585) 244-1126 Mail Us City Classifieds 250 N. Goodman Street Rochester, NY 14607 Email Us classifieds@ rochester-citynews.com EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY

All real estate advertised in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act, which makes it unlawful, “to make, print, or publish, any notice, statement, or advertisement, with respect to the sale or rental of a dwelling that indicates any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin.” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under the age of 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertisement for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. Call the local Fair Housing Enforcement Project, FHEP at 325-2500 or 1-866-671-FAIR. Si usted sospecha una practica de vivienda injusta, por favor llame al servicio legal gratis. 585-325-2500 - TTY 585-325-2547.

Apartments for Rent

Shared Housing

MAPLEWOOD PARK AREA Bright, clean, spacious twobedroom upper. EIK, W/W, appliances, W/D, on-streetparking, near shopping, buslines. No pets. $600/mo. plus utilities. 453-9768

ALL AREAS - ROOMMATES. COM. Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http://www.Roommates.com.

Vacation Property

of any unwanted model in any condition. Call 585-305-5865

SEBASTIAN, FLORIDA Affordable custom factory constructed homes $45,900+, Friendly community, No Real Estate or State Income Taxes, minutes to Atlantic Ocean. 772-581-0080, www.beachcove.com. Limited seasonal rentals

Home Services MASTER CHIMNEY & MASONRY See our ad under Home and Garden Professionals. Chimney Cleaning, Masonry Repairs, Foundation Repairs, Roof Leaks, Brick Steps Repaired. 585-734-8444

Automotive ALWAYS BETTER Higher cash for your Junk Cars, Trucks and Vans. From $200-$800 or more for newer. Running or not. With free towing. Also free removal

CASH FOR CARS Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888-4203808 www.cash4car.com (AAN CAN)

Auctions AUCTIONS: Buy or sell at AARauctions.com. Contents of homes, businesses, vehicles and real estate. Bid NOW! AARauctions.com Lights, Camera, Auction. No longer the best kept secret.

For Sale BABY STROLLER $7 585-4905870 BEANIE BABIES (TY) 1997, 1998 Light blue Elephant (Peanuts), Twigs, Squealer, Iggy and Rainbow with the mixed up name tags. & more! $4 - $8 585-880-2903 All $49.99 BOOK CASE dark mahogany 30” wide, 71” tall, 12” deep, 5 shelves $49 585-490-5870

BRONZE HORSE FIGURINE 13” long, 10 1/2 tall. Has engraved saddle / mane/ detailed $25 585-880-2903 CHAPS, HORSEBACK RIDING wear over pants, child size, black, leather suede, VGC 28” long legs, 13 x14 waist, zippers on legs $12 585-880-2903 DOG & CAT HOUSES Kennels, porch steps, do it yourself kits. Quick assembly 585-752-1000 $49 Jim EXERCISE BIKE Heavy duty excellent condition $42 585490-5870 GENUINE LENNOX Rosebud vase, white with gold trim $20 585-383-0405 GERMAN SHEPHERD sign on chain. Carved head on real wood. (says, beware!) Nice gift $20.00 585-880-2903 KITCHEN TABLE 3/8 Thick round glass top table. 40” diameter. 41” high. $49 585490-5870 KITCHEN TABLE Round, glass. 41” diameter 31”t all with chrome frame $49 585-4905870

LARGE JEWELRY COLLECTION All kinds, old & new, retro, vintage, cameo’s, brooches, beads & more. Great pieces for jewelry designers too, 585360-2895 NORDICTRACK $50 or best offer 585-663-6983 PORCELAIN FIGURINE (German Shepherd) for 50’s or 60’s $25 585-880-2903 ROYAL PORTABLE TYPEWRITER with carrying case $50 585-383-0405 SNOWMAN, WOOD FACE 12” x 10” blue chin bow, black, red, white, blue cap, hangs. hanscrafted. $10 585-6636983

Groups Forming ATTENTION FLASH SOCCER FANS! The Western NY Flash Mob is gathering to prepare for the 2014 season. Join us! For more info find us on Facebook or contact us wnyflashfans@ gmail.com

continues on page 26

We placed an ad in City Newspaper advertising the availability of two office suites in my office building at 55 Canterbury Road in the City. The response was excellent. One of the two available spaces was leased within days, and we have active interest in the other space.” - DOUGLAS C. BURKHARDT, FIRST REALTY COMPANY

www.firstrealtyrochester.com

Find your way home with TO ADVERTISE CONTACT CHRISTINE TODAY!

CALL 244-3329 X23 OR EMAIL CHRISTINE@ROCHESTER-CITYNEWS.COM

181 Mount Vernon Ave. Great Charming Little Victorian. Large Lot, Garage, Garden. 2bdrm, 1ba. Updated Kitchen, HW floors throughout, Fresh paint throughout. Wood-burning stove. Basement has high ceiling, can be used as workshop/studio. Walking distance to Highland Park. $119,900

1481 Bushwood Circle, Webster:

$389,900, 5 beds, 3.5 baths, 2890 ft2, 2.5 car garage, in-law apt, in-ground pool, treed yard with a stream, etc.... A must see - Call Ryan @ 585-201-0724, Re/Max Realty Group 218-6802.

Ryan Smith 585-201-0724

Prudential Discover Real Estate Jeannine Meilman 585-503-5968

Ryan Smith

Search. Buy. Sell.

NYS Licensed Real Estate Salesperson

201-0724 RochesterSells.com

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 25

Home and Garden Professionals Season’s Greetings from

WWW.COMPLETEPAINTING.NET

Clarence and the entire team would like to thank you for your business and wish all a Happy and Prosperous New Year! Satisfying Customers for over 30 Years

Once Over

> page 25

Jam Section

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HOME SERVICE PROVIDERS

Did you know that City Newspaper Readers spent OVER $90 MILLION DOLLARS on home improvements in the LAST 12 MONTHS? Call Christine today to advertise

585-244-3329 ext. 23

26 CITY JANUARY 1-7, 2014

CALLING ALL MUSICIANS OF ALL GENRES the Rochester Music Coalition wants you! Please register on our website. For further info: www. rochestermusiccoalition.org info@rochestermusiccoalition. org 585-235-8412 KEYBOARD PLAYER needed to play with one of Rochester’s finest Big Bands. Great charts able to rehearse a few Weds. during the months of (April-November) effective 04/15/2014 585-442-7480 MEET OTHER MUSICIANS. Jam & Play out, call & say hello, any level & any age ok. I play keyboards - organ B3 Style Call 585-266-6337 Martino

NEEDED MULTI INSTRUMENT MUSICIANS Bass, guitars, keys, horns. Must have equipt. & transportation & be avail. evenings. Bobby 585-3284121 THE GREGORY KUNDE CHORALE is looking for male voices. Call for an audition now to join our fourteenth season! Info Line 377 7568 or visit our website www. gregorykundechorale.org VOCALIST that can lead & background with other vocalists that do the same. Avail evenings, transportation, R & B, Funk, Jazz, Pop, Blues...... Bobby 585-328-4121 Experienced please.

Place your real estate ad by calling 244-3329 ext. 23 or rochestercitynewspaper.com Ad Deadlines: Friday 4pm for Display Ads Monday at noon for Line ads Music Services PIANO LESSIONS In your home or mine. Patient, experienced instructor teaching all ages, levels and musical styles. Call Scott: 585- 465-0219. Visit www. scottwrightmusic.com

Miscellaneous DONATE YOUR CAR to Wheels For Wishes, benefiting MakeA-Wish. We offer free towing and your donation is 100% tax deductible. Call 917-336-1254 Today! HAS YOU BUILDING SHIFTED OR SETTLED? Contact Woodford Brothers Inc, for straightening, leveling, foundation and wood frame repairs at 1-800-OLDBARN. www.woodfordbros. com. “Not applicable in Queens county” MEN’S LIFESTYLE MEDICATIONS FDA Approved - USA Pharmacies. Remote TeleMedicine Physician. Safe • Secure • Discreet. Calls Taken 7 days per week Call ViaMedic: 888-786-0945 Trusted Since 1998 (AAN CAN) SAWMILLS from only $4897.00- MAKE & SAVE MONEY with your own bandmillCut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship. FREE Info/ DVD:  www.NorwoodSawmills. com 1-800-578-1363 Ext.300N VIAGRA 100MG 40 pills+/4 free, only $99.00. Save Big Now, Discreet shipping. Call 1-800-374-2619 Today! (AAN CAN)

K-D Moving & Storage Inc.

Experience in office & household moving and deliveries

Big or small, we do them all

473-6610 or 473-4357

WHY BE ALONE FOR THE NEW YEAR? Meet new friends or start a new relationship! Call LIVE WIRE! It’s Fun, Free and Easy! Call Now! (585)3333003

Looking For... FREE YARN NEEDED! Please donate your yarn to Sunday Circle knitting hats scarves and mittens for the poor. Arrange pickup. Call and leave message 585/413-0827

HomeWork A cooperative effort of City Newspaper and RochesterCityLiving, a program of the Landmark Society.

Wanted to Buy CASH FOR COINS! Buying ALL Gold & Silver. Also Stamps & Paper Money, Entire Collections, Estates. Travel to your home. Call Marc in NYC 1-800-959-3419

Caledonia Tavern with Great Potential 3092 Main Street Over the river and through the woods to Caledonia we go! Hitch up your horseless carriage and take a scenic drive out to the picturesque village of Caledonia to see the Clark-Keith House, one of the most important, early 19th century buildings in Livingston County. A magnificent limestone residence located at 3092 Main Street, it was originally constructed c. 1827 as a tavern that provided lodging for travelers journeying to western New York on Route 5. Today, the tavern’s original ballroom with elegant arches, three fireplaces, and decorative woodwork survives on the second floor. Pioneer settler John R. Clark erected this landmark building near the Big Springs, a major water source that provided the community’s first inhabitants with power for mills to grind wheat and saw lumber. During Clark’s ownership, the building housed a blacksmith shop on the ground floor, a carriage/sleigh/ woodworking shop, and the community’s first school. Throughout the 19th century, the building was the refuge for many travelers and commercial businesses. It became the “Railroad House” by the late 1830s, providing travelers on the Caledonia/Scottsville horse railroad with a place to rest and drink. The Post Office was located in the building, where mail was passed through the “wicket” (still visible) to a small room adjoining the bar. By the 1920s, the Keith family, publisher’s of Caledonia’s weekly newspaper, purchased the building and lived here into the early 21st

century. Now known as the Clark-Keith House, its extensive architectural details remain intact throughout. The exceptional front entrance, with sophisticated woodwork, opens into a large center hall with original staircase. Three parlors and a dining room include elegant mantels, a tin ceiling, Federal style trim, and the original “beehive” bake oven. Several additional rooms here offer the opportunity for designing a modern kitchen with ample storage space. The original ballroom on the second floor has been divided into four bedrooms and a bathroom. During the 1930s, the remarkable architecture of the house was documented via photographs and measured drawings by the Federal government’s Historic American Buildings Survey program, now housed in the Library of Congress and available online. In 1998, the house was listed in the State and National Registers of Historic Places, which qualifies it for significant tax credits if rehabilitated as a residence or income-producing property. A unique “fixer-upper,” the house will require significant masonry repairs and interior rehabilitation. This exceptional property, with private residence or commercial potential and 2,880 square feet, is listed at $69,900. For more information, contact Pamela M. Dickson, Nothnagle Realtors, at 585-737-9470. by Cynthia Howk Landmark Society staff member Cynthia Howk enjoys exploring our region’s many historic communities and scenic by-ways.

23 Arlington St. NY D.O.T.#9657

KdMovingandStorage.com rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 27

I’m very pleased with the calls I got from our apartment rental ads, and will continue running them. Your readers respond — positively!” - M. Smith, Residential Management EMPLOYMENT / CAREER TRAINING

Employment $1,000 WEEKLY!! MAILING BROCHURES From Home. Helping home workers since 2001. Genuine Opportunity. No Experience required. Start Immediately www. mailingmembers.com (AAN CAN) EARN $500 A DAY Airbrush & Media Makeup Artists For: Ads

- TV - Film - Fashion Train & Build Portfolio in 1 week. www. AwardMakeupSchool.com (AAN CAN) HELP WANTED make extra money in our free ever popular homemailer program, includes valuable guidebook! Start immediately! Genuine! 1-888292-1120 www.easyworkfromhome.com (AAN CAN)

Volunteers BECOME A DOCENT at the Rochester Museum & Science Center Must be an enthusiastic communicator, Like working with children. Learn more at http://www.rmsc.org/Support/ Volunteer Or call 585-6971948 BRIGHTEN A LIFE. Lifespan’s The Senior Connection program

Hiring? GET THE RESULTS YOU NEED AT ABOUT HALF THE PRICE OF OTHER PAPERS! To advertise in our

EMPLOYMENT SECTION call Christine at

244-3329 ext. 23 today!

CITY

needs people 55+ to volunteer to make 2 friendly phone calls / 2 visits each month to an older adult Call Katie 585-244-8400 x 152 FOSTER PARENTS WANTED! Monroe County is looking for adults age 21 and over to consider opening their homes to foster children. Call 334-9096 or visit www. MonroeFosterCare.org. HABITAT FOR CATS — Help Trap-Neuter-Return cats on Tuesdays, in East Rochester, for an important grant project. Impact the number of ownerless cats living outside. All training provided. 585-7874209 or habitat4cats@yahoo. com! HERITAGE CHRISTIAN STABLES, a therapeutic horsemanship program for children and adults with developmental disabilities, is looking for volunteers to serve as horse leaders and side walkers. Call Kim Kennedy at (585) 340-

2016 or email kkennedy@ heritagechristianservices.org LITERACY VOLUNTEERS OF ROCHESTER needs adult tutors to help adults who are waiting to improve their reading, writing, English speaking, or math skills. Call 473-3030, or check our website at www. literacyrochester.org

Business Opportunities START A HOME BASED BUSINESS. Part-time or FullTime. Serious inquires only. 585-271-3243

LITERACY VOLUNTEERS OF ROCHESTER needs adult tutors to help adults who are waiting to improve their reading, writing, English speaking, or math skills. Call 473-3030, or check our website at www. literacyrochester.org SCHOOL #12 999 South Ave. is looking for reading & math volunteers, English & Spanish. Training provided. Call Vicki 585-461-4282 ST. JOSEPH’S HOUSE invites volunteers to live and work at our soup kitchen/shelter. This is essential, rewarding, hard work. Call Tim @ 314-1962

Give yourself the gi of a rewarding career

Let us help you find a full or part me career, supporng individuals with developmental disabilies. Immediate openings: Senior Residence Manager and Full-Time/Part-Time Direct Support posions Evening training schedule is available in January Our employees enjoy flexible schedules, excellent benefits, paid training, tuion reimbursement, generous paid me off and a supporve work environment. Visit our website for more informaon at:

www.lifemeassistance.org EOE

28 CITY JANUARY 1-7, 2014

Legal Ads [ LEGAL NOTICE ] Shorewater Group V, LLC (“LLC”) filed Arts. of Org. with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on November 13, 2013. Office Location: Monroe County. SSNY designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 1761 S.E. 7th Street, Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33316. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ LEGAL NOTICE ] Shorewater Group VI, LLC (“LLC”) filed Arts. of Org. with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on November 13, 2013. Office Location: Monroe County. SSNY designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 1761 S.E. 7th Street, Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33316. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE [ Notice of Formation of Upstate MUA Chiropractic, PLLC. Arts of Org. filed with Secy. Of State of N.Y. (SSNY) on 11/15/13. Office Location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of PLLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 309 Exchange Blvd., STE 100, Rochester, NY 14608. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of PAZ GROUP, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/12/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Corporation Service Co., 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207, regd. agent upon whom and at which process may be served. Purpose: Any lawful activity.

county within which it will have its office; its principal business address is 683 Gillett Rd. Spencerport, New York 14559 The LLC has designated the Secretary of State of New York as it agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. 683 Gillett Road, Spencerport, New York 14559 is the post office address to which the Secretary of State shall mail a copy of any process against the LLC. The purpose of the LLC is the ownership and management of commercial real estate. [ NOTICE ] BARK PLACE BAKERY, LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 12/18/2013. Office in Monroe Co. SSNY desig. agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 1935 Clinton Ave. North, Rochester, NY 14621, which is also the principal business location. Purpose: Any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] FISCHER BACKFLOW PREVENTION & PLUMBING SERVICE LLC (LLC) filed Arts. of Org. with NY Secy. of State (SS) on 12/06/13. LLC’s office is in Monroe Co. SS is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS shall mail a copy of any process to PO Box 16391, Rochester, NY 14616. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Golden View Ranch, LLC, Arts of Org filed with SSNY on 11/13/13. Off. Loc.: Monroe County, SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to: The LLC, 2888 Sweden-Walker Rd., Brockport, NY 14626. Purpose: to engage in any lawful act.

[ NOTICE ]

[ NOTICE ]

57 ERIE, LLC, a domestic LLC, filed with the SSNY on 11/12/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to The LLC, 39 State St., Brockport, NY 14420. General Purpose.

H&H Automotive, LLC (LLC) filed Arts. of Org. with NY Secy. of State (SS) on 4/15/2013. LLC’s office is in Monroe Co. SS is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS will mail a copy of any process to LLC’s principal business location at 358 Lighthouse Rd., Hilton, NY 14468. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity.

[ NOTICE ] Articles of Organization of limited liability company, Jones Development West, LLC ( LLC) were filed with the Department of State on November 22, 2013. Certificate of Change was filed with Department of State on December 19, 2013. Monroe County is the

[ NOTICE ] Home Pros Contracting, LLC was filed with SSNY on September 25, 2013. Office: Monroe County, SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. P.O. address which SSNY

shall mail any process against the LLC served upon SSNY: Home Pros Contracting, LLC, PO Box 24913, Rochester, New York 14624. Purpose is to engage in any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Mister Cat Records LLC (LLC) filed Arts. of Org. with NY Secy. of State (SS) on 1/8/2013. LLC’s office is in Monroe Co. SS is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS will mail a copy of any process to LLC’s principal business location at PO Box 25622, Rochester, NY 14625. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Name of Foreign LLC: D K Pinnakle Enterprises LLC. Auth. filed with NY Dept. of State: 9/25/13. Office loc.: Monroe Co. LLC formed in MI: 6/27/13. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o Business Filings Inc., 187 Wolf Rd., Ste. 101, Albany, NY 12205. MI addr. of LLC: 5281 Silverstone Dr., Comstock Park, MI 49321. Cert. of Org. filed with Director, Dept. of Licensing & Regulatory Affairs, PO Box 30054, Lansing, MI 48909. Purpose: any lawful act. [ NOTICE ] Name of LLC: Jim’s Akorn Acres, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State: 12/9/13. Office location: Monroe County. Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: 1301 Five Mile Line Rd., Webster, NY 14580. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice is hereby given that a license, number not yet assigned, for a full on premise beer, wine and liquor license has been applied for by G & X Enterprises Inc. dba,Tllted Kilt Restaurant , 1175 Jefferson Rd, Rochester, NY, 14623, County of Monroe, Town of Henrietta for a restaurant. [ NOTICE ] Notice is hereby given that a license, number not yet assigned, for a full on premise beer, wine & liquor license has been applied for by SDW Promotions, Inc. dba ICON,117 Liberty Pole Way, Rochester, NY 14604, County of Monroe, for a bar. [ NOTICE ] Notice is hereby given that a license, number

not yet assigned, for a full on premise beer, wine & liquor license has been applied for by DFC ENTERTAINMENT AND EVENTS LLC dba EAST ON EAST DFC, 170 East Ave, Rochester, NY 14604, County of Monroe, for a restaurant. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Form. of GREENBOX SALES, LLC (the “LLC”). Art. of Org. filed with Secretary of the State of NY (SSNY) on 12/16/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, 2041 Penfield Rd, Penfield, NY 14526. Purpose: any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of MEETRA SPA LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 11/19/2013. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to MEETRA SPA, LLC 74 LILAC DRIVE APT 3 ROCHESTER, NY 14620 . Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of THE MARLEY GROUP OF UPSTATE NEW YORK, LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 09/27/2013. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to PO Box 869 Penfield NY, 14526. Purpose: any lawful activeties. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of This Is Edvin LLC. Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 11/04/2013. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 41 Branchbrook Drive, Henrietta, NY 14467 . Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of BRICK ROAD LLC, filed with the Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/8/2013, County office location: Monroe, SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to The LLC, 34 Solmar Drive, Rochester, NY 14624. Purposes: Any lawful activity.

[ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Davio Pharma Consulting, LLC. Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) October 9, 2013. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to: c/o United States Corporation Agents, Inc., 7014 13th Avenue, Suite 202, Brooklyn, NY 11228. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of DR. MICHAEL BANG, DDS, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/02/13. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of PLLC: 2300 Buffalo Rd., Ste. 300, Rochester, NY 14624. SSNY designated as agent of PLLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the PLLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Dentistry. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of East Henrietta 2755,

LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State on 11/22/13. Office location: Monroe County. Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: 590 Salt Rd., Suite 5, Webster, NY 14580, principal business address. Purpose: all lawful purposes. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of EJE Newcomb LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State on 10/31/13. Office location: Monroe County. Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: Michael A. Newcomb, 4 Schoen Place, Pittsford, NY 14534, principal business address. Purpose: all lawful purposes. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of FSI BAY POINT LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/11/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated

as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Marco Q. Rossi, Esq., 48 Wall St., Ste. 1100, NY, NY 10005. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of FSI M Outparcel LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 5/31/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Marco Q. Rossi, Esq., 48 Wall St., Ste. 1100, NY, NY 10005. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of FSI SANDY CREEK FUEL, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/21/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Marco Q. Rossi, Esq., 48 Wall St., Ste. 1100, NY,

NY 10005. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of GREAT TAVERN PITTSFORD PARTNERS, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/19/13. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 2851 Clover St., Pittsford, NY 14534. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of IRON HORSE HEALTHCARE LLC. Art. Of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/4/2013. Office in Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, 1798 Trellis Circle Webster, NY 14580. Purpose: Any lawful purpose

cont. on page 30

FORECLOSURE OF TAX LIENS BY THE CITY OF ROCHESTER STATE OF NEW YORK SUPREME COURT COUNTY OF MONROE

IN THE MATTER OF THE FORECLOSURE OF TAX LIENS PURSUANT TO TITLE 4 OF PART E OF ARTICLE IX OF THE CHARTER OF THE CITY OF ROCHESTER.

LIST OF DELINQUENT TAXES AS OF JULY 1, 2013 PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that on December 18, 2013, the Corporation Counsel of the City of Rochester filed in the office of the Monroe County Clerk a list of parcels of property on which the City of Rochester holds a lien for taxes, assessments, fees or other charges which is at least one year old and which the City of Rochester intends to foreclose by an action in rem pursuant to Title 4 of Part E of Article IX of the Charter of the City of Rochester. A copy of that list was published on December 18, 2013. The foreclosure list contains as to each such parcel: 1. The tax account number and address; 2. The name of the last known owner; 3. The amount of each tax lien, except for a $155.00 charge which has been added to each tax lien pursuant to Section 9-123(A)(3)of the City Charter but which is not reflected on the printed list.

A copy of the foreclosure list has been filed in the office of the City Treasurer and will remain open for public inspection up to and including February 23, 2014, which is the redemption deadline date. Any person may on or before that date redeem any parcel on the foreclosure list by paying to the City Treasurer the amount of all delinquent taxes, assessments, fees and other charges stated on the foreclosure list, plus the $155.00 charge referred to above, plus accrued interest and late payment charges.

Any person having any interest in any parcel on the foreclosure list may, at any time up to the redemption deadline date, serve a verified notice of interest or an answer upon the Corporation Counsel setting forth in detail the nature and amount of his interest or any defense or objection to the foreclosure. The notice of interest or answer must also be filed in the office of All persons having an interest in the real property described in the Monroe County Clerk. Where a valid notice of interest is the foreclosure list are hereby notified that the filing of the list served, the parcel will be held for a foreclosure auction constitutes the commencement by the City of Rochester of an pursuant to Section 9-143 of the City Charter. action in the Supreme Court, Monroe County, to foreclose the tax liens therein described by an action in rem and that the list Any person who fails to redeem or to serve a notice of constitutes a notice of pendency of action and a complaint by interest or an answer by the redemption deadline date shall be barred thereafter from asserting his interest in the the City of Rochester against each parcel of land therein pending foreclosure action, and judgment in foreclosure described to enforce the satisfaction of such tax liens. This action is brought against the real property only. No personal may be granted without regard for, and in extinguishment of, the interest of any such person. judgment will be entered in this action for the delinquent taxes, assessments, fees or other charges.

ROBERT J. BERGIN Corporation Counsel rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 29

Legal Ads > page 29 [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of KEN & RUTH MICHAEL, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 09/24/13. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 105 College Ave., Rochester, NY 14606. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of LAWRENCE PARK, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/26/13. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 7 Lawrence St., Rochester, NY 14607. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may

be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of LiDestri Properties Management, LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 12/11/2013. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 815 W. Whitney Road, Fairport, NY 14450. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY: ZARPENTINE CATERING, LLC filed Articles of Organization with the Secretary of the State of New York on November 22, 2013. The office of the limited liability company shall be located in Monroe County. The

Secretary of State has been designated as the agent of the limited liability company upon whom process against it may be served and the Secretary of State shall mail a copy of any process served upon him or her c/o 2951 Mt. Read Boulevard, Rochester, New York 14616 [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of LLC Tungsten Corporate Advisors, LLC. Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) December 18, 2013. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 114 Upper Mountain Ave. Montclair, NJ 07042. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of North Ridge 405, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State

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on 11/22/13. Office location: Monroe County. Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: 590 Salt Rd., Suite 5, Webster, NY 14580, principal business address. Purpose: all lawful purposes. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Northpoint Automotive & Marine, LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 11/13/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 70 Cliff St., Rochester, NY 14608. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Rabbit Moon LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 11/27/2013. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 99 Van Voorhis Ave. Rochester NY 14617 Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of RIDDLE ASSOCIATES, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/3/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 555 North Winton Road, Rochester, NY 14610. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Ridge Road 5247, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State on 11/22/13. Office location: Monroe County. Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: 590 Salt Rd., Suite 5, Webster, NY 14580, principal business address. Purpose: all lawful purposes. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Stone Street Pub, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/13/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, c/o Sammy Feldman, 3445 Winton Place, Ste. 228, Rochester, NY 14623. Purpose: any lawful activity.

30 CITY JANUARY 1-7, 2014

[ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of TEMIDA, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/4/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC: 1146 Pittsford Mendon Center Road, Honeoye Falls, NY 14472.. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of ULA’S AUTOMOTIVE LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) December 4, 2013. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 2244 Clifford Ave. Rochester, NY 14609. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Upstate Wireless Communications, LLC Arts. Of Org. filed with Sec’y of State (SSNY) on 08/22/23. Office Location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to LLC’s principal business location at 268 Sandringham Rd, Rochester, NY 14610. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of VandeSande Controls Engineering, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/11/13, becoming effective on 01/01/14. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 11 Erie Crescent, Fairport, NY 14450. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of Kerry Court Danvers LLC. Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 12/16/13. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. bus. addr.: 235 Moore St., Hackensack, NJ 07601. LLC formed in MA on 10/2/12. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. MA addr. of LLC: c/o National

Registered Agents, Inc., 155 Federal St., Ste. 700, Boston, MA 02110. Cert. of Org. filed with MA Sec. of State, One Ashburton Pl., Boston, MA 02108. Purpose: all lawful purposes. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of Rochester Rattlers, LLC. Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 11/14/13. Office location: Monroe County. LLC formed in MA on 11/12/13. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. MA and principal business address: 20 Guest St., Boston, MA 02135. Cert. of Org. filed with MA Sec. of the Commonwealth, One Ashburton Pl., 17th Fl., Boston, MA 02108. Purpose: all lawful purposes. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of Sonehan Danvers LLC. Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 12/16/13. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. bus. addr.: 235 Moore St., Hackensack, NJ 07601. LLC formed in MA on 10/2/12. NY Sec. of State designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom process may be served. MA addr. of LLC: c/o National Registered Agents, Inc., 155 Federal St., Ste. 700, Boston, MA 02110. Cert. of Org. filed with MA Sec. of State, One Ashburton Pl., Boston, MA 02108. Purpose: all lawful purposes. [ NOTICE ] of Formation of Ontario Properties of NY LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 10/28/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 1456 E River Rd Rochester, NY 14623. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Paul Novak Media LLC (LLC) filed Arts. of Org. with NY Secy. of State (SS) on 1/2/2013. LLC’s office is in Monroe Co. SS is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS will mail a copy of any process to LLC’s principal business location at

651 Cumberland Way, Webster, NY 14580. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] PowerSirj Productions LLC Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State (SSNY) on 11/26/2013. The SSNY is designated as the PowerSirj Productions LLC agent upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to: P.O. Box 19754, Rochester, New York 14619. Office Location: Monroe County. Purpose: Any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] PSD, LLC has filed articles of organization with the New York Secretary of State on November 19, 2013. Its principal place of business is located at 768 Clinton Avenue South, Rochester, New York in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent upon whom process may be served. A copy of any process shall be mailed to 768 Clinton Avenue South, Rochester, New York 14620-1402. The purpose of the LLC is to engage in any lawful activity for which Limited Liability Companies may be organized under Section 203 of the New York Limited Liability Company Law. [ NOTICE ] THE GROOMER’S OUTLET, LLC, a domestic LLC, filed with the SSNY on 9/11/13. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to The LLC, Attn: LLC Manager, 3160 E. Henrietta Rd., Henrietta, NY 14460. General Purpose. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] Community Playhouse LLC filed Articles of Organization with the New York Department of State on 11/22/13. Its office is located in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent of the Company upon whom process against it may be served and a copy of any process shall be mailed to 17 Mulberry Street, Rochester NY 14620. The purpose of the Company is any lawful business. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF BTMPM, LLC ] BTMPM, LLC (the “LLC”) filed Articles of Organization with NY Secretary of State (SSNY) 11/22/13.

Office location: Monroe County, NY. Principal business location: 1265 Scottsville Rd, Rochester, NY 14624. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to CT Corporation System, 111 Eighth Avenue, NY, NY 10011 which is also the registered agent upon whom process may be served. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY ] The name of the Limited Liability Company (LLC) is CERC-MS Properties, LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (“SSNY”) on November 22, 2013. Office location is Monroe County, New York. The SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. The SSNY shall mail a copy of any process to the LLC at 16 E. Main St., Suite 420, Rochester, NY 14614. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY ] The name of the Limited Liability Company (LLC) is CERC-LW Properties, LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (“SSNY”) on November 22, 2013. Office location is Monroe County, New York. The SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. The SSNY shall mail a copy of any process to the LLC at 16 E. Main St., Suite 420, Rochester, NY 14614. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY ] The name of the Limited Liability Company (LLC) is CERC-TL Properties, LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (“SSNY”) on November 22, 2013. Office location is Monroe County, New York. The SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. The SSNY shall mail a copy of any process to the LLC at 16 E. Main St., Suite 420, Rochester, NY 14614. Purpose: any lawful activity.

Legal Ads [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY ] The name of the Limited Liability Company (LLC) is CERC-HL Properties, LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (“SSNY”) on November 22, 2013. Office location is Monroe County, New York. The SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. The SSNY shall mail a copy of any process to the LLC at 16 E. Main St., Suite 420, Rochester, NY 14614. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY ] The name of the Limited Liability Company (LLC) is CERC-DH Properties, LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (“SSNY”) on November 22, 2013. Office location is Monroe County, New York. The SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. The SSNY shall mail a copy of any process to the LLC at 16 E. Main St., Suite 420, Rochester, NY 14614. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY ] The name of the Limited Liability Company (LLC) is CERC-2L Properties, LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (“SSNY”) on November 22, 2013. Office location is Monroe County, New York. The SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. The SSNY shall mail a copy of any process to the LLC at 16 E. Main St., Suite 420, Rochester, NY 14614. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY ] The name of the limited liability company is 57th Street Productions LLC. The Articles of Organization were filed with the NY Secretary of State on December 23, 2013. The office of the LLC is located in Monroe County, New York State. The NY Secretary of State is designated as the agent of the LLC upon whom process may be served.

A copy of the process served shall be mailed to 140 Meadow Drive, Rochester NY 14618. The LLC is managed by a manager. The purpose of the LLC is any lawful business. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LLC ] 500 Whitney Road, LLC has filed articles of organization with the New York Secretary of State on December 12, 2013 with an effective date of formation of December 12, 2013. Its principal place of business is located at 2124 Baird Road, Penfield, New York in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent upon whom process may be served. A copy of any process shall be mailed to 2124 Baird Road, Penfield, New York 14526. The purpose of the LLC is to engage in any lawful activity for which Limited Liability Companies may be organized under Section 203 of the New York Limited Liability Company Law. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LLC ] East Ridge CDE Properties, LLC has filed articles of organization with the New York Secretary of State on November 27, 2013 with an effective date of formation of November 27, 2013. Its principal place of business is located at 27 Center Crossing, Fairport, New York in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent upon whom process may be served. A copy of any process shall be mailed to 27 Center Crossing, Fairport, New York 14450. The purpose of the LLC is to engage in any lawful activity for which Limited Liability Companies may be organized under Section 203 of the New York Limited Liability Company Law. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF Roc Rooms & Rentals LLC ] Articles of Organization with Secretary of State of NY on 4/30/2008. Office in Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC at 1048 South Ave, Rochester, NY 14620. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE OF SALE ] Index No. 2013-2055 SUPREME COURT STATE OF NEW YORK

COUNTY OF MONROE ESL Federal Credit Union Plaintiff, vs. Estate of Ronald J. Nothnagle, Peter J. Nothnagle, as Executor and Individually; Suzanne Steiner; People of the State of New York; United States of America, Defendants. Pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale dated November 8, 2013 and entered herein, I, the undersigned, the Referee in said Judgment named, will sell at public auction in the front vestibule of the Monroe County Office Building, 39 West Main Street, Rochester, New York, County of Monroe, on January 8, 2014 at 10:30 a.m., on that day, the premises directed by said Judgment to be sold and therein described as follows: ALL THAT TRACT OR PARCEL OF LAND, situate in the Town of Webster, County of Monroe and State of New York, known as 261 Park Lane Drive, Webster, NY 14580; Tax Account No. 078.06-271 described in Deed recorded in Liber 9177 of Deeds, page 529. Said premises are sold subject to any state of facts an accurate survey may show, zoning restrictions and any amendments thereto, covenants, restrictions, agreements, reservations, and easements of record and prior liens, if any, municipal departmental violations, and such other provisions as may be set forth in the Complaint and Judgment filed in this action. Judgment amount: $68,605.32 plus, but not limited to, costs, disbursements, attorney fees and additional allowance, if any, all with legal interest. DATED: November 2013 Todd J. W. Wisner, Esq., Referee LACY KATZEN LLP Attorneys for Plaintiff 130 East Main Street Rochester, New York 14604 Telephone: (585) 324-5767 [ NOTICE OF SALE ] Index No. 2013-6629 SUPREME COURT STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF MONROE ESL Federal Credit Union, Plaintiff vs. Rodney B. Malone; Royce Malone; Amanda Malone, Defendants. Pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale dated November 12, 2013 and entered herein, I, the undersigned, the Referee in said Judgment named, will sell at public auction in the lobby of the Monroe County Clerk’s Office located at 39 West Main Street, Rochester, New York, County of Monroe, on January 14, 2014 at 11:00 a.m., on that day,

the premises directed by said Judgment to be sold and therein described as follows: ALL THAT TRACT OR PARCEL OF LAND, situate in the Town/Village of East Rochester, County of Monroe and State of New York, known as 322 East Elm Street, East Rochester, NY 14445; Tax Account No. 152.231-49, described in Deed recorded in Liber 10613 Page 502; lot size 40 x 121.Said premises are sold subject to any state of facts an accurate survey may show, zoning restrictions and any amendments thereto, covenants, restrictions, agreements, reservations, and easements of record and prior liens, if any, municipal departmental violations, and such other provisions as may be set forth in the Complaint and Judgment filed in this action. Judgment amount: $96,147.49 plus, but not limited to, costs, disbursements, attorney fees and additional allowance, if any, all with legal interest. DATED: November 2013 Daniel Mastrella, Esq., Referee LACY KATZEN LLP Attorneys for Plaintiff 130 East Main Street Rochester, New York 14604 Telephone: (585) 324-5767

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[ NOTICE OF SALE ] SUPREME COURT COUNTY OF MONROE WELLS FARGO BANK, NA, Plaintiff, against Dorothy M. Coleman, et al., Defendant(s). Pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale duly dated 10/24/2013 I, the undersigned Referee will sell at public auction at the Front Steps Of The Monroe County Office Building, 39 West Main Street, City of Rochester, State of New York on 01/13/2014 at 10:00AM, premises known as 94 Adrian Road, Rochester, NY 14622 All that certain plot piece or parcel of land, with the buildings and improvements erected, situate, lying and being in the Town of Irondequoit, County of Monroe and State of New York, SBL No.: 62.19-3-54. Approximate amount of judgment $87,796.62 plus interest and costs. Premises will be sold subject to provisions of filed Judgment Index# 2012-13710. Michael A. Burger, Esq., Referee Gross, Polowy & Orlans, Attorney for Plaintiff, P.O. Box 540, Getzville, NY 14068 Dated: November 14, 2013 1070836

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