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WHAT MAKES AMERICAN CUISINE?

CITY NEWSPAPER DISH 2017 PAGE 4 - A TASTE OF HOME Refugee-run restaurants in Rochester

PAGE 9 - INTO UNEXPECTED TERRITORY [ INTRODUCTION ] BY JAKE CLAPP

An interview with Radio Social Chef Steven Eakins

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PAGE 12 - BEER QUEST It makes sense that a country built by immigrants would have a cuisine that’s been shaped by a world of influences. There aren’t many purely American creations on our menus. Even apple pie comes from the Dutch. Sure, there are a small handful of exceptions, and there are dishes that have been so Americanized that they’re no longer recognizable as an import, but there really isn’t an American-style of cooking in the same vein as, say, French, Greek, or Indian cuisine. American dining isn’t easily defined because it is so many things at once. And we’re the better for it. In this year’s DISH, CITY’s writers dig a little into some of the cultures that are influencing the ways Rochesterians eat. The area has long been an important home for immigrants and refugees, and Rochester’s restaurants reflect all of those cultures coming together. There are millions of refugees fleeing unstable conditions in their home countries, and many have ended up in Rochester. Starting on page 4, writers Katie Libby and Rebecca Rafferty spotlight three refugees who have opened their own restaurants and share their heritage through food. There are already some unexpected things happening at Radio Social, but one of the more surprising aspects is its Israeli menu. On page 9, we have an interview with Executive Chef Steven Eakins, who explains why he dug into Israeli cuisine. Then, writer Daniel Kushner goes in search for rare beers and ciders, the kind of unique brew you can only find in one special location in Rochester. You’ll find that story on page 12. And as a bonus, on page 14, writer Kiara Alfonseca shares a special, family dessert recipe that always reminds her of spring.

Fantastic beers and where to find them

PAGE 14 - HOW TO MAKE... A recipe for habichuelas con dulce

On the cover: Illustration by Justyn Iannucci Publishers: William and Mary Anna Towler Editorial department themail@rochester-citynews.com Arts & Entertainment editor: Jake Clapp Special Sections editor: Dan Poorman Contributing writers: Kiara Alfonseca, Daniel J. Kushner, Katie Libby, Rebecca Rafferty Art department artdept@rochester-citynews.com Art director/production manager: Ryan Williamson Designers: Justyn Iannucci, Kevin Fuller Advertising department ads@rochester-citynews.com New sales development: Betsy Matthews Sales representatives: Christine Kubarycz, Tracey Mykins, David White, William Towler Operations/Circulation kstathis@rochester-citynews.com Circulation manager: Katherine Stathis Distribution: David Riccioni, Northstar Delivery Dish 2017 is published by WMT Publications, Inc. Copyright by WMT Publications Inc., 2017 - all rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, photocopying, recording or by any information storage retrieval system without permission of the copyright owner.

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REFUGEE-RUN RESTAURANTS ENHANCE ROCHESTER’S PALATE [ FEATURE ] BY KATIE LIBBY AND REBECCA RAFFERTY

Rochester is a city of refugees. They come from Syria, Cuba, Somalia, Iraq, Afghanistan, the Republic of Congo, Bhutan, Burma, Nepal, and elsewhere. In 2016, almost 1,200 new refugees arrived in Rochester, up from more than 750 people in 2015. There are as many reasons to leave home as there are problems in the world — people are forced to flee war, genocide, political oppression, natural disasters, lack of viable opportunities, and other devastations. Whatever the cause, refugees usually arrive with few material possessions, but carry with them a wealth of culture. And when they plant roots, some individuals gather the necessary ingredients to manifest and share a taste of home. The following refugees have set up shop in Rochester, offering traditional food — at times with multicultural twists — to their fellow refugee communities, as well as Americans who benefit from the ever increasing flavors.

JUST LIKE MAMA MADE

Natael Beshaat came to Rochester from Ethiopia in 2002 on a Diversity Visa. The Diversity Immigrant Visa Program is a lottery for citizens of countries that have low immigration rates to the United States. Up to 50,000 visas are given out annually through the program, and Beshaat had the golden ticket. Beshaat is the owner of Zemeta Ethiopian Restaurant (1015 South Clinton Avenue), 4 2017 DISH

but his affiliation with the restaurant actually started 13 years prior to him taking ownership. Beshaat came from Addis Ababa, the capital city in Ethiopia, to Rochester because his sponsor was based here. Back home he owned a barbershop. “I didn’t have any friends, I didn’t have any family” in Rochester, Beshaat says. He got a job as a dishwasher in the old restaurant where Zemeta is currently housed, and stayed with his sponsor for a few months before moving into a shared apartment. Later, he left the dishwashing behind for a better job opportunity. “After a year I was able to move into my own apartment, living the American life,” he says with a laugh. It was in that apartment that Beshaat would cook traditional Ethiopian food for his American friends. Beshaat opened UN Café and Hookah Lounge upstairs from where Zemeta currently is, and a store replaced the restaurant where he washed dishes. He started making food at the café, available only for take-out. “People started talking to me, ‘Why don’t you open your own restaurant? This is tasty food and the neighborhood needs someone like you,’” Beshaat says. Owning his own restaurant was always something he’d considered, so when the store moved out of the space below his café, Beshaat opened Zemeta. “The neighborhood provided a lot of support,” he says. The restaurant is named for his wife, who works alongside him in the kitchen, cooking traditional Ethiopian food. “We serve food to people here just the way we cook back home,” he says. Zemeta has a popular vegan buffet on Fridays and Saturdays, with a full menu also available with beef, chicken, and lamb entrees. The food


is served with the traditional Ethiopian bread, injera, a spongy, sour, flatbread. Beshaat’s parents owned a small restaurant back home and recently came for an extended visit to Rochester, spent time with their two grandchildren, and checked out the restaurant their son had opened. “It was an inspection to see how I made the food,” Beshaat says jokingly. His mother headed right to the kitchen and made everything the way that she makes it — showing Beshaat some tips along the way. In addition to the restaurant, Beshaat is still operating the café and hookah lounge upstairs and serving high test Ethiopian coffee. “Like they say, it’s a dream,” he says. “Your dream here can be anything. I was a dishwasher — a little guy — and now it’s the same building, the same place, I’m the owner. I can’t believe this. I wouldn’t be able to do this back home.” Zemeta Ethiopian Restaurant is open Monday through Saturday from 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. The buffet is available on Fridays and Saturdays all day. For more information, call 244-3344 or find them on Facebook.

THE INTERNATIONAL HUB

When Abdirisak Salat Urur left his hometown of Mogadishu in 1991, Somalia was in the beginning throes of a civil war that is still raging today. Like so many others, Urur and his family fled the war-begotten violence, famine, and disease in pursuit of safety and security. It was an indirect path that led Urur to Rochester, where he arrived in 2015 and opened Somali African Cuisine (480 West Main Street). In late 1991,Urur journeyed to a refugee camp in Kenya, the country where his three children were born, and which would become his new home until 2007 — the year that the Somali refugee count hit 1 million. At that time, his family relocated to the U.S., arriving in Kansas, Missouri. Despite horror and hardship, or perhaps because of it, Urur speaks of this period of time with the calmest demeanor, and seems like an unsinkable kind of man. “When you’ve never been to a country with another culture, having children with you, having nothing, you feel vulnerable and weak,” he says. “At the same time, you feel happy when people open their hands for you,

be there for you, as well as your family trying to help you with whatever they can.” Urur says the community in Missouri helped his family start fresh. “America is a wonderful country, with wonderful people,” he says. “I’m almost 60 years old, and I have seen different people on this earth, but Americans are very generous people.” Two of his children are grown — his daughter is in medical school and one son works in IT — and his youngest son graduates from high school this year. Though Urur moved to Rochester about two years ago, his family is still in Missouri, because he didn’t want to uproot his son. “It’s better to be where he started and made friends and is comfortable,” he says. Urur moved to town after he learned from Rochester-based friends that there is a Somali refugee population here, some of whom had been in Rochester for 20 years and didn’t know there was a community. “They were isolated, and didn’t have a place to see each other, to chill together, to chat,” he says. “And there was no traditional restaurant where they could get food from back home. So I said, ‘Let me try.’” Most of Urur’s customers are refugees, and his small, cozy restaurant serves as a gathering place for not just Somalis, but also refugees from Sudan, Eastern African and Arab nations, and from Pakistan. One corner of the room can get a little rowdy whenever there is a soccer game playing on the television. The menu includes tender, curried goat meat or curried chick en with rice; hummus; suqaar (finely diced, sautéed meat) with a sourdough anjero pancake; sambusas; and American dishes including chicken wings, a fried fish sandwich, and chicken and Philly steak wraps. Somali African Cuisine is open daily from 9 a.m. to 10 p.m. For more information, call 413-0441.

HALAL HOTS SPOT

Serkan Yagmur, owner of West Ridge Hots (584 West Ridge Road), was just 17 years old when his family moved from Turkey to the United States in 2002. He was still in school when his father applied for the green card lottery through the Diversity Immigrant Visa Program. The Yagmur family relocated from Çorum, a city in central Turkey. They left in pursuit of better opportunities in the U.S. continues on page 6 ROCHESTERCITYNEWSPAPER.COM 5


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“It was a good opportunity for me and my family,” he says, adding that they still return to Turkey to visit extended family. Yagmur says that he always liked the idea of working in the food business, but he hadn’t chosen a career path when his family relocated. “I didn’t have a plan of what I was going to do there, and then we came here, and started over,” he says. The Yagmurs initially landed in New York City before coming to Rochester. A contact hosted the family in his house for a month while Yagmur’s parents acquired jobs, and he took English classes at Franklin High School with other international students while he worked part-time. After years of working and adapting to life in the States, Yagmur became an American citizen in 2008. Before he opened West Ridge Hots in 2013, Yagmur worked at different restaurants to gain food service experience, including East Ridge Hots and Di Paolo Baking Company. The hots restaurant in particular influenced his decision to open one, but Yagmur offers some important variations on the Rochester standard. The menu is filled with what you might expect from a hots joint: all-American burgers, dogs, and fries, subs, wings, and wraps. But Yagmuralso offers halal options (the meat is entirely free of pork; and animals are slaughtered, by a Muslim, following methods set by Islamic law) for his Muslim customers. These menu items include chicken shish kabobs and a variety of gyro dishes, each served with rice pilaf, salad, and pita bread; a chicken shawarma dinner, characterized by chicken marinated in garlic, lemon juice, cumin, paprika, turmeric, and cinnamon; and even a cheeseburger plate made with halal meat. Yagmur employs six other people, including his sister and brother-in-law, and his father occasionally helps out. He says plans to open a second location by the end of the summer, and offer more vegetarian and Mediterranean dishes as well. West Ridge Hots is open Sunday through Thursday from 11 a.m. to 2 a.m. and Friday to Saturday from 11 a.m. to 4 a.m. For more information, call 287-5661 or visit westridgehots.com.


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RADIO SOCIAL 20 Carlson Road

Monday through Friday, 4:30 p.m. to midnight Saturday and Sunday, 11 a.m. to midnight

244-1484; radio-social.com [ CHEF INTERVIEW ] BY JAKE CLAPP

Radio Social is something different. The 42,000-square-foot space in the North Winton area was a former radio factory, and it now houses a new kind of social hub. Thirty-four bowling lanes; ping-pong, billiards, skee ball, and other games; furniture designed by Staach; a back lawn; and a full bar directed by Chuck Cerankosky — the co-owner of Good Luck and Cure, two of the best cocktail bars in Rochester. And then, a step further into unexpected territory, there’s the 80-seat restaurant serving an Israeli-inspired menu created by Steven Eakins. Eakins, a Fairport native, most recently worked for Marc Murphy’s Benchmarc Restaurants in New York City, as executive chef for Ditch Plains, Landmarc, and Kingside. He also competed on the Food Network show “Chopped” in 2013. The 34-year-old was lured back to Rochester at the beginning of this year to become Radio Social’s executive chef. For the Israeli-influenced menu, Eakins says he found inspiration in the history of Radio Social owner Dan Morgenstern and his

family. The Morgensterns came to the US from Israel in 1957, and Dan’s father was hired as a mechanic — and then manager, a few years later — at Clover Lanes on Monroe Avenue. Dan purchased the Clover Lanes business in 2014 when the Monroe Avenue property was sold — Daniele Family Companies plans to build a Whole Foods at that spot. Radio Social is something of a rebirth for Clover Lanes. CITY wanted to know more about Eakins’ plans for his Radio Social menu, so we asked a few questions over coffee back in early April. An edited transcript of that conversation follows. CITY: How did you get involved with Radio Social? I’m sure that’s a crucial part of you coming back to Rochester. Steven Eakins: When I left, there was always

an idea to make my way back at some point. It was just a matter of timing, feeling fulfilled going away and coming back with the right tools — mastering my craft, and being able to travel and enjoying myself while I was away. Living in New York City, it’s not that far away. I’ve been able to make trips back quite often in the past five years, and was able to build relationships in the hospitality industry here and get to know the scene in general. With that, I was able to build a relationship with Chuck Cerankosky, one of the owners of Good Luck and Cure. He’s the food and

beverage operator for Radio Social. A couple of years back, we did a pop-up night at Cure where we did dim sum and a dance party, and it packed the house. We had a good time. I always told him, “When there’s an opportunity, let’s talk.” So when this came about, he brought it to me in the fall, and I signed on in January. Why Israeli cuisine?

Through the process of understanding what the concept in general was going to be, and getting to know the Morgenstern family, and appreciating the history of their experience and their desire to evolve and create something that’s unprecedented for the area and would bring so many different people together in one big place, that drove the idea that we didn’t want to do something that was expected from a restaurant standpoint. We wanted to stand out. We took a trip to Israel over last month, and that was obviously an inspiring trip from all points of view. But traveling there and eating the food reminded me a lot of what New American cuisine is: it’s a crossroads or a melting pot of so many cultures. The idea of the Mediterranean, Middle Eastern flavor profiles fall hand-in-hand with what New American cooking is. Having the freedom to use a lot of different ingredients and techniques is something I’m really excited about. continues on page 10 ROCHESTERCITYNEWSPAPER.COM 9


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We’re going to do some things as far as different avenues, like we’ll have the gaming experience, so we’re going to have a snackinspired menu that will have some things that you might have expected, whether it be chicken wings, but the flavor profiles will be completely different — not your average Buffalo chicken wing with blue cheese. What are the mechanics of putting together this menu? You have this concept, then what happens?

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Conceptually, I’ve been working on this really since the fall, engulfing myself in the flavors and the culture, educating myself on different parts of the Mediterranean. The trip to Israel was really fundamental in telling the story — and interacting with people while I was there. The Morgensterns, they were able to take me into one of their family members’ home — it was an aunt of theirs — and we cooked all day long in her home. She lives in a Yemenite neighborhood right outside of Tel Aviv. So that day was fundamental in understanding dishes from start to finish. Now is the time we really start to get our hands dirty: we have a kitchen to work with, and I’ve started engulfing myself in the farms and the products that make up the Western New York area. Are you working with a lot of local farms?

Absolutely. I want to have a focus on everything that we can possibly use locally and seasonally. So are any Morgenstern family recipes going to make it into the menu?

Absolutely. We’re going to come from a genuine place. But we still want to have a modern, accessible, approachable style to what we’re doing. Israeli, and Mediterranean cuisine in general, is pretty vegetable-forward, plant-based dishes, and then moving into meats and fishes that are roasted over coals. So there’s still an American-style of eating, where you’re starting the meal with appetizers and vegetables, and then moving into meat or seafood entrees — grilled meat and grilled fish. Whenever you’re bringing a nonAmerican cuisine to American diners, how do you keep a balance to it all?

I think that falls hand-in-hand with the idea of coming back and engulfing myself in all of the farms in the area and the product and the ingredients that people are so familiar with. It could be something as simple as local tomatoes in the summer, that everyone knows — instead of dressing them with black pepper, maybe it’s a red chili from Turkey or a sumac from Israel, which adds a little brightness and acidity to the tomato. So using a sense of ingredients that are very familiar and seasonal and local so that people have a strong awareness of these things, but mixing in the flavor profiles that we’re working with on the way. In the back of your mind do you have to say, “OK maybe this dish will actually turn people off”?

It’s a valid point, but I think with the evolution of the hospitality community, there’s been an evolution of the guest, where people are willing to try more things, willing to try different things, willing to share things amongst the table so that everyone gets a taste. I think that’s vital.

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[ DRINKS FEATURE ] BY DANIEL J. KUSHNER

12 2017 DISH


Rochester loves its craft beer. From Three Heads Brewing to Lost Borough to Swiftwater, there are more destinations than ever for local beer connoisseurs to wet their whistles. And yet many beers get overlooked — seemingly too obscure or odd to be considered everyday elixirs. What follows is a non-comprehensive survey of seven beers and two ciders and where you can find them. All of the selections mentioned were available on tap at the time this article was written. Taps are changed frequently, so if the beverages below aren’t available, be sure to ask your bartender for similar recommendations. No conversation about beer in Rochester can begin without Genesee Brewery and the Genesee Brew House. The region’s signature beer maker has been at it for nearly 140 years, and while the “Red Eye” and Cream Ale are fixtures in local grocery stores, some of Genesee’s beers can only be found at the Brew House. One such variety is the 12 Horse Ale. At 5.1 percent ABV, this is Genny with a bit of a kick. Golden in color, with bright hops on the front end, the welcome presence of malts satisfies the palate on the back end. When in search of a rejuvenating, lighter beer, Genesee 12 Horse Ale is an exclusive treat you can only enjoy here in Rochester. The brewery’s Black Pilsner is also unique to the Brew House. This relatively light black lager (5 percent ABV) has plenty of substance. Replete with caramel overtones, semisweet malts, and a thick, milkshake-like head, this is a summer beer for stout drinkers. Jack Ryan’s Tavern is the kind of neighborhood bar you’d want to cozy up to after a long day at work for a lighthearted chat with friends. Jack’s is also an excellent place for IPA aficionados, with beers like Singlecut and Galaxy Andromeda on tap. Another option during a recent outing was Stone’s Tangerine Express IPA (6.7 percent ABV). Complete with a frothy head, this California IPA’s hops were ever-present without being overpowering. Most importantly, the sweet citrus of the tangerine provided a great counterbalance to the bitterness of the hops. Overall, the Tangerine Express is a refreshing option for beer drinkers who might be hesitant about IPAs. Since its inception, Tap and Mallet has been a go-to for craft beer enthusiasts. Boasting an extensive lineup of beers on tap, the South Wedge bar and restaurant can consistently be counted on for unexpected or left-of-center beers. On a visit to Tap and Mallet, I encountered two beers that could not have been more differ-

ent. First there was the SeaQuench from Dogfish Head, a Delaware-based brewery best known for its signature 60, 90, and 120-minute IPAs and its willingness to combine bizarre flavor profiles like Belgian-style white ale and red wine. At 4.9 percent ABV, the SeaQuench was a melange of Berliner Weisse, Gose, and Kolsch characteristics. The result was what I would describe as a sessionable sour beer. The sharp zest of lemon hit the palate right away, and while the taste was pucker-inducing, this is a beer one could enjoy on a long summer’s day. With its light effervescence and a flavor profile akin to a drier champagne, the SeaQuench is an effective cross between a porch-sipping shandy and a gratifying gose. On the opposite side of the spectrum was the Black Hole by Danish beer maker Mikkeller. This Imperial Stout weighed in at 13.1 percent ABV. If you like your beers to pack a wallop, this is your kind of beverage. There was plenty of roasted malt flavor, along with big bittersweet notes of cacao chocolate. Make no mistake, the Black Hole was a slow-sipper, with a little smokiness for added intrigue. There is a similar dichotomy at work at Joe Bean Coffee Roasters, one of the premier coffee shops in Rochester. Although Joe Bean’s reputation for high-quality espressos and detailoriented brewing methods is well-established, its peerless knack for truly unusual beer offerings is decidedly less well-known. Among the available beers during my last stop in was the Singlecut Beth Power Ballad, a sour beer with an impressive 12 percent ABV, made by a New York City-based brewery frequently praised for its IPAs. As opposed to the Dogfish Head SeaQuench, the Beth Power Ballad was more vinegary than tart. An initial sweetness from the blueberries used in the brewing process gave way to a fungal, kombucha-like sour taste. A dark red-to-purple color, the beer had a prominent blueberry flavor without being gimmicky. Pineapple is perhaps the last ingredient you’d expect to find in a stout, but that’s exactly what I got with the Danish stout To Øl Pineapple Express (10 percent ABV). An unobtrusive tartness bookended a smooth tasting experience akin to that of a brown ale or porter. The pineapple notes didn’t come through until the end, melding surprisingly well with the coffee essence of the stout and lending additional complexity. In a world with plenty of sweet, massproduced ciders like Angry Orchard and

Woodchuck to go around, ciders with more sophistication and nuance are in shorter supply. That’s where Mullers Cider House comes in. Spanish cider served there is an absolute must-try. On tap recently was the Riestra Sidra Natural, a lovely dry cider in which nothing was added to the fermentation process but the apples themselves. Semi-tart with lingering notes of olive oil and vinegar, the 6.5 percent ABV Riestra had just enough sweetness to even things out. For cider lovers craving something sweet, Mullers still has you covered. With Star’s Cinnamon Raisin, the sweetness struck me right away, but there were subtleties, too. At 6 percent ABV, the Cinnamon Raisin is a highly unusual nitro cider, in which nitrogen is used instead of carbon dioxide, giving it a velvety texture and exceptionally smooth taste from start to finish. Interestingly, the apples took a backseat to the cinnamon raisin flavor, which was balanced out by a slight pear-like sweetness at the end.

GENESEE BREW HOUSE 25 Cataract Street 263-9200; geneseebeer.com/brewhouse

Monday through Wednesday, 11 a.m. to 10 p.m.; Thursday through Saturday, 11 a.m. to 11 p.m.; Sunday, 11 a.m. to 10 p.m.

JACK RYAN’S TAVERN 825 Atlantic Avenue 288-9037; facebook.com/JackRyansTavern Monday through Friday, 3 p.m. to 2 a.m.; Saturday and Sunday, 12 p.m. to 2 a.m.

JOE BEAN COFFEE ROASTERS 1344 University Avenue 319-5279; joebeanroasters.com

Monday, 8 a.m. to 7 p.m.; Tuesday through Thursday, 8 a.m. to 10 p.m.; Friday and Saturday, 8 a.m. to 11:30 p.m.; Sunday, 8 a.m. to 7 p.m.

MULLERS CIDER HOUSE 1344 University Avenue 287-5875; mullersciderhouse.com

Monday through Thursday, 5 p.m. to 11 p.m.; Friday, 5 p.m. to 12 a.m.; Saturday, 12 p.m. to 12 a.m.; Sunday, 1 p.m. to 9 p.m.

TAP AND MALLET 381 Gregory Street 473-0503; tapandmallet.com

Monday through Saturday, 11:30 a.m. to 2 a.m.; Sunday, 4 p.m. to 12 a.m. ROCHESTERCITYNEWSPAPER.COM 13


CITY WRITER KIARA ALFONSECA SHARES HER FAMILY’S RECIPE FOR A FAVORITE SPRING DESSERT

14 2017 DISH


[ RECIPE ] BY KIARA ALFONSECA

When the smell of habichuelas con dulce (or sweet beans) comes drifting from the kitchen, you know it’s spring. It might be hard to imagine beans as a key component of a dessert, but this Dominican dish doesn’t last long in our household because of its subtle yet sweet flavor and thick texture, perfectly topped with milk cookies or animal crackers. Dominican roots — Taino, African, and Spanish — mix together for a popular, delicious Easter treat.

HABICHUELAS CON DULCE 4 cups of soft-boiled red kidney beans 6 cups of water for boiling the beans 2 cups of coconut milk 3 cups of evaporated milk 1/2 teaspoon of salt 1 cup of sugar 2 cinnamon sticks 10 cloves 1/2 pound of cubed-cut sweet potatoes 1/2 cups of raisins Animal cookies to garnish

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1. Beans and the water, in which they were boiled, are put in a blender and pureed. Get rid of skins and other solids by straining the beans. Pour the coconut milk, beans, evaporated milk, salt, sugar, vanilla, cinnamon, sweet potatoes, and cloves into a pot and cook on low heat. Stir often, until potatoes cook through.

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2. Add raisins and continue to simmer and stir for another 10 minutes. Remove cloves. Remove from heat and cool to room temperature. Cream will get thick as it chills. Before serving, chill and garnish with animal crackers. 3. Eat it up.

NEED SECONDS? Linda Seng, owner of Thai Mii Up, also shared her recipe for Khao Neow Ma Muang (or mango with sticky rice), a summer dessert in Thailand. Head over to rochestercitynewspaper.com for that recipe.

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CITY Newspaper DISH 2017  

In this year's DISH, CITY's writers dig a little into some of the cultures that are influencing the ways Rochesterians eat. The area has lon...

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