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AUG. 7 2019, VOL. 48 NO. 48

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INTIMACY DIRECTOR DEFINES CONSENT ON STAGE THEATER | PAGE 10


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Why the RCSD sued the city

Are the people of Rochester tired of the bad blood between the city and the School District (Urban Journal, July 30)? Yes. Does it matter who started it? Usually the referee of any such argument will tell you, “No.” But it does matter, when assigning blame, who is doing the escalating. From CITY’s article “RCSD vs City Hall Heads to Court This Week”: “The city also argues that because the issue is complex, ‘it is incumbent upon City leaders to educate the public about the referendum and the issues implicated therein prior to the November vote.’” This was the escalation that broke the camel’s back. The school board was prepared to sit tight and hope the voters did not give away their right to local control of schools. But then the mayor’s letter came out, and it was clear that she was putting her thumb on the scales. At that point we saw abuse of power at work, and misuse of taxpayer dollars. It was obvious that a campaign starting this early would only escalate as November approached. People were calling all school board members, pleading with us to ask the district attorney to intervene. 2 CITY

AUGUST 7 - 13, 2019

I believe distribution of this letter was a civil offense rather than a criminal one, and believe that we should have called the state comptroller for a ruling. His official opinions have the force of law for government entities such as school districts and municipalities. But we had two problems with waiting for that remedy to play out: 1) The Board of Elections needed the referendum language by August 5 in order to lay out and print all the ballots (including absentee ballots); 2) The comptroller was on vacation and could not possibly turn around our request for an opinion in time to stop further advocacy letters, YouTube videos, and robo-calls from being issued out of Church Street. Article 78 petition for injunctive relief was our only option. The school district has always been slow to punch back at City Hall attacks. We are well aware that every action we take to defend ourselves comes with the charge that we are only looking out for our own self-interest, that countermeasures will be considered a waste of taxpayer dollars, and that people will demand that we direct those resources back to the classroom. That’s why the board doesn’t hire media specialists or a bevy of legislative aides. We aren’t calling for a state takeover of city government, despite evidence that it could be run better. We should be granted the opportunity to defend ourselves when a co-equal government body takes steps to eliminate us, and we are attempting to do so in the most civil way at our disposal.

And the outcome seems to have justified our actions. The judge agreed with us, and the referendum question is now dead. WILLA POWELL, ROCHESTER

Powell is a member of the Rochester school board.

Write about the reformers

In visiting Washington, DC, recently, I took the opportunity to visit the “Squad’s” offices and voice my support for their outcry over the Trump administration’s incompetence. On two walls outside the entry door to Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez’s office, every inch was covered with notes, cards, and letters, with praise, from across the US and from other countries for her fight against the creeping rise of authoritarianism undermining our Constitutional democracy. In a recent Democratic candidates debate, moderator Jake Trapper seemed to undermine each speaker by attempting to pit them against each other and curtailing messages by cutting short their explanations. Tapper was a shameful and pointless imposition, a shill doing the bidding of his corporate bosses, who are likely interested only in commercial ratings. Political news on both sides of the spectrum has become impotent with its “got-chas,” insertion of artificial divisions, and news-cycle repetition of what is known. Your recent Urban Journal was, for me, more Tapper pointlessness. Simply scratching the ugly scab of general dislike for Trump’s administration and its

fundamentally flawed behavior is no longer sufficient. That the Trump administration and the GOP have bet the house on xenophobia, racism, nativism, and US and foreign voter suppression to win elections is to their detriment. Just as Tapper failed to permit candidates to elaborate their ideas and planned policies, you have ill-used your position, missing an opportunity to discuss how each candidate will unseat Trump’s administration. What AOC and the “Squad” have shown is that bold plans, staunch, nonname calling messaging, and clear-headed goals and objectives win support and elections. Donald Trump used open nastiness to state his case for a reformist message in 2016. Today those opposing him are also proposing a reformist message. Please, let’s support them. It’s real. Talk about their ideas and policy changes. Give them a voice; let’s hear the message. You’ve written sufficiently about Trump and the GOP’s message. Move on. Otherwise, you’re little more than a pointless corporate shill, echoing Tweets, scratching at scabs, and providing what is dead-end divisiveness. Advocate for what is positive about the reformist agenda by stating positions of those speaking truth to power. Provide analysis. If you want to be a force in the coming battle for the soul of America, quit being a shill. GL CHARPIED, PITTSFORD

Honoring Haney

I sadly note the recent death of fellow Tacoma Street resident Paul Haney.

Paul epitomized those who heeded JFK’s call to public service. Similarly, one could list local Republicans such as Frank Horton and Barber Conable who were not motivated by personal aggrandizement. IVAN LENNON, ROCHESTER

JUL. 31 2019, VOL. 48 NO. 47

News. Music. Life. Greater Rochester’s Alternative Newsweekly August 7 - 13, 2019 Vol 48 No 48 On the cover: Photograph by Renée Heininger 250 North Goodman Street Rochester, New York 14607-1199 themail@rochester-citynews.com phone (585) 244-3329 fax (585) 244-1126 rochestercitynewspaper.com Publisher: Rochester Area Media Partners, Norm Silverstein, chairman. William and Mary Anna Towler, founders Editor: Mary Anna Towler

FORFEITING BAIL NEW LAWS OVERHAUL NEW YORK'S FLAWED SYSTEM JUSTICE | PAGE 8

Correcting ourselves

“Forfeiting Bail,” the cover story in the July 31 CITY, contained typos that resulted in two incorrect sentences regarding an NYCLU report. The article should have said that over a five-year period, more than 1,900 people spent a week or more in Monroe County jail because they couldn’t afford their bail of $250 or less, and more than 4,700 people spent over a week in jail because they couldn’t afford their bail of $500 or less.

Editorial department themail@rochester-citynews.com Arts & entertainment editor: Rebecca Rafferty Staff writers: Tim Louis Macaluso, Jeremy Moule Music editor: Daniel J. Kushner Music writer: Frank De Blase Calendar editor: Kate Stathis Contributing writers: Rachel Crawford, Roman Divezur, Katie Halligan, Adam Lubitow, Ron Netsky, Katie Preston, David Raymond, Leah Stacy, Chris Thompson, Hassan Zaman Art department artdept@rochester-citynews.com Art director/Production manager: Ryan Williamson Designers: Renée Heininger, Jacob Walsh Advertising department ads@rochester-citynews.com Sales manager: Alison Zero Jones Account executives: Betsy Matthews, William Towler, David White Classified sales representatives: Tracey Mykins Operations/Circulation kstathis@rochester-citynews.com Business manager: Angela Scardinale Circulation manager: Katherine Stathis Distribution: David Riccioni, Northstar Delivery City Newspaper is available free of charge. Additional copies of the current issue may be purchased for $1 each at the City Newspaper office. City Newspaper may be distributed only by authorized distributors. No person may, without prior written permission of City Newspaper, take more than one copy of each weekly issue. City (ISSN 1551-3262) is published weekly 50 times minimum per year by by Rochester Area Media Partners, a subsidiary of WXXI Public Broadcasting. Periodical postage paid at Rochester, NY (USPS 022-138). Address changes: City, 250 North Goodman Street, Rochester, NY 14607. Member of the Association of Alternative Newsweeklies and the New York Press Association. Annual subscriptions: $35 ($30 senior citizens); add $10 for out-of-state subscriptions. Refunds for fewer than ten months cannot be issued. Copyright by Rochester Area Media Partners, 2019 - all rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, photocopying, recording or by any information storage retrieval system without permission of the copyright owner. @ROCCITYNEWS


URBAN JOURNAL | BY MARY ANNA TOWLER

The fight over the RCSD A massively destructive battle is underway in Rochester right now, and I can’t imagine that it will end well. On one side is the Rochester City School District and its allDemocratic school board, joined by local education activists, the teachers union, and Democratic State Assembly members Harry Bronson and Jamie Romeo. On the other side: Rochester Mayor Lovely Warren, Democratic State Assembly member David Gantt, Republican State Senator Rich Funke, and Chamber of Commerce President Bob Duffy. All of them insist that they’re fighting to help Rochester’s children. Criticism of the school district isn’t new, and some of it is absolutely deserved. The district doesn’t have a good track record fixing things it has control over: problems in its special education program, for instance. Poor staff training. Poor oversight. Curriculum problems. But the district’s biggest challenge – the concentrated poverty in which most of its students live – is way beyond its control. Rochester’s children won’t get the education they deserve until the community deals with the impact of poverty. That will take enormous resources, coming from throughout the broad community. And not everyone in the current fight is talking about that. The school district didn’t create the decades of concentrated poverty that have afflicted many city neighborhoods. Racism, government laws and regulations barring people of color and poor people in general from the suburbs: These are the cause of the city’s concentrated poverty. And you can trace much of the school district’s academic achievement problems to that poverty. This is not opinion. It is fact, documented by scores of studies. But dealing with poverty and its impacts is hard. It’s easier to throw stones at the school board and the teacher’s union and the parents. And so we have a raging fight, not over how to deal with the effects of poverty but over who should control the school district. Certainly the district needs a firm hand right now; otherwise, its very serious management problems will continue. And yes, good management – good training, good oversight, good curriculum – can improve academic achievement a bit. But that does nothing to address the concentrated poverty. There is a different path, of course. All of the warring factions – city and school district officials, Republican and Democratic state legislators, business

The Rochester City School District’s biggest problem isn’t who controls it. It’s the concentrated poverty so many of its children live in.” leaders, activists – could get together and begin to find ways to deal with the effects of concentrated poverty. One solution is something Mayor Lovely Warren has been pushing for: “community schools” with expansive wrap-around services such as health care and quality after-school programs. That’s expensive, though, and neither the school district nor the city can afford to foot the bill. Are state legislators willing to push for adequate state funding? Are local business leaders willing to lobby for that funding rather than joining Unshackle Upstate in its push for lower taxes? Are area colleges and universities willing to follow the University of Rochester’s example and partner with city schools, providing resources, expertise, and community leadership? Will the district and the teachers union embrace those partnerships? This community will never agree to a metropolitan school system. The community’s not interested in breaking down the barriers to low-income housing in the suburbs, either. So it’ll take a major investment in lessening the impact of poverty: investment in school staff, social services, child care, health care, housing. Many of the key players required for that

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CITY 3


[ NEWS IN BRIEF ]

Gannett merging with GateHouse

GateHouse and Gannett are on the verge of becoming the biggest newspaper company in the US. GateHouse announced Monday that the two companies have agreed to merge, meaning that the Democrat & Chronicle, the Rochester Business Journal, the Canandaigua Daily Messenger, the Daily Record, and USA Today will all have the same owner. GateHouse — technically its parent company, New Media Investment Group — will acquire Gannett under the terms of the agreement. Both companies have print media roots, but the press release from New Media plays up the digital news and marketing operations. The release says the merger will “accelerate the combined company’s digital transformation,” allow for efficiencies generating $275 million to $300 million worth of savings annually, and allow for newsroom investments. “Uniting our talented employees and complementary portfolios will enable us to expand our comprehensive, hyperlocal coverage for consumers, deepen our product offering for local businesses, and accelerate our shift from print-centric to dynamic multimedia

News

operations,” New Media Chairman and CEO Michael Reed says in the release. GateHouse is known for a near-constant acquisition of papers. It also has a reputation for consolidating operations where possible, which often leads to staff cuts. It merged some operations at the RBJ and Daily Record after it picked up the RBJ in 2016.

Reform plan OK, Elia tells RCSD

The Rochester City School District finally got a bit of good news from State Education Commissioner MaryEllen Elia. Last week, she approved the revised version of the district’s improvement plan. “Department staff have reviewed the revised action plan and determined that the recent submission provides a more cohesive vision for improvement than the version submitted in March,” Elia wrote in a letter address addressed to Board President Van White. The plan is based on recommendations Distinguished Educator Jaime Aquino laid out in a November 2018 report. Elia, who is leaving the job at the end of the month, blasted the district’s earlier submissions. The district still has to make minor revisions.

Deteriorating paint in older homes represents most of the risk of lead poisoning for young children in Monroe County. PHOTO FROM ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY

HOUSING | BY BRETT DAHLBERG

Lead levels drop; risks to kids remain The number of young children with elevated blood lead levels in Monroe County has dropped slightly, according to the latest numbers from the public health department. The percentage of children younger than 6 who tested positive for elevated blood levels last year was 1.14 percent, down a fraction of a percent from 2017. The data show that children living in the city – many of them children of color – are at a much higher risk of lead poisoning than others, says Mel Callan, who chairs the nonprofit advocacy group Coalition to Prevent Lead Poisoning. Of the 15 children

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with the highest blood lead levels, all but one lived in the city. There’s no safe level of lead in the blood, Callan says, but the higher the level, the greater the potential problems. “There’s a greater risk of reduction in IQ, behavior problems, inability to focus,” she says. “And a lot of these results can lead to juvenile delinquency, poor decision-making, and inability to learn.” Most of the risk of lead poisoning in Monroe County comes from the housing stock, Callan says, and the city has a large number of homes built before lead paint was outlawed. Old paint flakes off and ends up on

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the floor or other surfaces. Monroe County and the City of Rochester have made great strides toward reducing this risk, says Callan. City inspections of rental properties include tests for lead paint, for example. The proportion of children younger than 6 who had elevated blood lead levels was more than twice as high a decade ago as it is now. Still, Callan said, there’s more work to do. “We seem to have plateaued,” she said.

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A court bars a referendum on a state takeover of the Rochester City School District, a school board member tells the mayor to “shut up,” and the mayor posts a ‘letter to children’ saying that she’ll take the fight for to Albany.

POLITICS | BY TIM LOUIS MACALUSO, JEREMY MOULE, AND MARY ANNA TOWLER

Judge bars RCSD vote; city continues takeover push The war between City Hall and the Rochester City School District has intensified. On Friday, State Supreme Court Justice Scott Odorisi barred a citybacked referendum on a state takeover of the school district. In the wake of that ruling, the city filed a notice that it will appeal; longtime school board member Willa Powell posted a message on her Facebook page telling the mayor to “shut up and let us do our job”; and Mayor Lovely Warren continued her push for public support for a takeover, posting an “Open Letter to the Children of the City of Rochester” on the city’s website, saying she’ll take the fight to Albany. Odorisi’s decision was firmly on the side of the school district. He agreed with the district that the referendum is “advisory,” which previous court cases have prohibited. He said the city’s Local Law No. 4 – which removes language about the school board from the city’s charter and calls for the revisions to be put to a public vote – is invalid. And he blocked the city from “implementing a materially revised version” of that law. His decision was a major defeat for Warren, who earlier this year began a push to change the governance of the Rochester

school district, primarily by removing the school board. Even if voters had approved the referendum, indicating that they wanted the school board removed, city government has no power in that area. Only the state legislature can remove the board. In its response to the suit, the city had argued that it needed to change the City Charter in case the legislature did remove the board. Referring both to the state constitution and to several court cases, Odorisi emphasized that the state has overall responsibility for public schools and that school boards are “separate corporate bodies representing the state.” He quoted at length a Court of Appeals ruling that says public education is a state function and “shall be beyond control by municipalities and politics.” Odorisi found that a June 12 letter that Warren sent to 30,000 people about the referendum was “improper.” “The letter’s message is a loud and clear endorsement of the Referendum, and strongly suggests that the voter should be too,” he wrote. Taxpayers’ money, he said, “should not have been spent” on the letter. Odorisi also slapped down the city’s attempt to strip school board members of

their salaries. (Board members earn $26,245 a year, compared to City Council members’ salary of $35,000.) Reference to removing their salaries was included in Council’s change to the charter, but that was linked to the referendum. The day before Odorisi heard the arguments in the case, the city filed a Rochester Mayor Lovely Warren, addressing Rochester’s children in a video on the City of Rochester website. counterclaim, seeking CITY OF ROCHESTER to have the salaries In her “Open Letter to the Children removed, effective July of the City of Rochester,” Warren called 8 of this year, regardless of the outcome of Odorisi’s decision “a grave injustice” and the court case. said it is “just the most recent example Odorisi said there was insufficient where adults twist and abuse the law to evidence that Council intended that to happen, and he said there would have to protect themselves” at the expense of children and their families. She repeated be a new vote by Council on that issue. her argument that the school district’s For him to grant the city’s request, he suit was designed to prevent the public said, “would be a grave violation of the from expressing its opinion on a state separation of powers between the cotakeover. And she said she would “take equal branches of government.” this fight to the halls of Albany and “The importance of this issue cannot demand our legislators act.” be overstated,” Odorisi wrote, “and as such, necessitate the City Council’s meticulous re-evaluation.”

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CITY 5


MENTAL HEALTH | BY BETH ADAMS

‘A really deep sadness’: teenagers and suicide On a warm, sunny July morning in Parma Town Park, Connor Stevely is playing fetch with Ella Mae, a big, panting chocolate Lab. Despite the increasingly intense sun, the dog never seems to tire of the game. The Stevely family loves its pets – three dogs, a cat, and a hamster. But Ella Mae is special: She saved Connor’s life on December 2, 2017. That’s what Connor’s mother, Diane Stevely, believes. She and Connor’s younger sister, Morgan, had gone into town for a community Christmas party that night. Connor’s father, Greg, was at work. “We weren’t gonna be gone long,” Diane says. “And that’s when Connor overdosed. He passed out, and he was awakened by Ella licking his face.” When Connor regained consciousness, he called 911 and was rushed to the hospital. According to the National Institute for Mental Health, in 2017 suicide was the second leading cause of death for people between the ages of 10 and 34. Suicide rates among teenagers and young adults have been on the rise both nationally and locally in recent years. In Connor’s case, he overdosed on the antidepressant he had been prescribed two months earlier. He had also smoked marijuana that evening. Diane vividly remembers how she found her son in the hospital: “It was horrid. Tremors. Hallucinations.” It was, she says, “horrible to watch.” The antidepressant had been prescribed after Connor told his parents that his moodiness and time spent alone in his room were much more than the typical teenage challenges they assumed he was dealing with. Diane and Greg quickly got help for their son, going to the family pediatrician and to counselors at Hilton High School for help. “We had no idea at all Connor was suicidal,” Diane says, “or I wouldn’t have ever left him alone – especially with unlocked medication.” “I had never felt anything similar to it,” Connor says now, describing his emotions the night of his first suicide attempt. “It was a really deep sadness.” He was worried that he wasn’t going to pass his classes at school, and he was also troubled about a recent break-up with a girlfriend. “I had thought about suicide before,” he says, “but it was, ‘I can get through this.’ But that night, it was intense sadness.” Adolescents can become impulsive

during times of distress, which accounts for higher risk factors for suicide and 6 CITY

AUGUST 7 - 13, 2019

Connor Stevely: Talking about his anxiety “has helped the most.” PHOTO BY BETH ADAMS

suicidal ideation, says Megan Clifford, a psychotherapist and mental health first aid instructor. Well-meaning parents who want to protect their children from life’s difficulties, Clifford says, can unintentionally delay the development of coping skills and result in teenagers looking for ways to numb their pain. Connor’s second suicide attempt happened in April 2018, about four and a half months after the first one. It was another overdose. “It was gut-wrenching to see him in such a place where he wanted to leave us,” Diane says. “I think the pain is almost indescribable.” More than a year later, Connor, who is now 17, says he’s feeling stable. He spent weeks in a pediatric psychiatric inpatient facility at Strong Memorial Hospital. He passed all of his classes and exams at Hilton High School with the help of a social worker and a teacher’s assistant appointed by the district to work with him in the classroom. “With anxiety,” Connor says, “I think a lot of people get overwhelmed with the situation, and sometimes it’s just step by step: ‘What do I have to do first?’ And they’ve really helped me break it down so when I’m having anxiety about

school, or, say I have five things I have to do, they help me break it down: ‘Let’s do this first. Let’s do this next.’” Now Connor’s parents are trying to strike a balance between letting him be a teenager and keeping a close eye on him to make sure he’s all right. They frequently check on him in his room. Diane has learned what to look for. “You can most certainly tell when Connor is anxious,” she says. “He has signals that he sends out: shaking a leg, twirling his hair.” His parents had seen those signals before but didn’t recognize them for what they were. “If he’s shaking his leg really hard,” Diane says, “he’s really, really anxious.” And the family talks a lot. They talk about how Connor is feeling and what he’s doing to cope when the anxiety returns. The need to do that regularly is one of Connor’s biggest takeaways from the last two and a half years. “I don’t think boys and men talk about things like this, which they probably should,” he said. Connor says he felt disconnected from people before, but now he’s communicating in a different way. “One thing that I wish would have happened maybe earlier on was talking


more,” he says. “That’s one thing that has helped the most.” As he learns to manage the anxiety and sadness that plagued him starting in the fall of 2017, he’s taking a different approach to his relationships with friends and family members. He no longer has conversations in the way that he used to and many teens still do: by texting. “What someone could say over the phone was totally different than what they would say to you in person,” he says. “It’s just different, I think, in this day and age, where maybe you guys maybe talked about things more. You guys were face to face with people. I feel this generation might be a little disconnected from talking about things in person.” Maeve Reed understands where Connor’s

coming from. “I experience that as well,” she says, “not feeling that authentic connection when it’s behind a screen.” Reed is the founder and former youth executive director of Stop the Stigma ROC, a youth group dedicated to erasing the stigma around mental illness. Her best friend died by suicide when they were freshmen at Fairport High School.

“Not having those connections and building trust with other people through those deep connections can really make us feel like there’s no one there to reach out to when we’re struggling,” Reed says. Reed, who is now 18, realized when she was in eighth grade that social media was a source of negativity in her life, so she deleted her Instagram account. “It’s just a breeding ground for insecurity, for me, at least,” she says. “I don’t know if that’s how other people feel. I have a feeling it might be. It’s just full of me comparing myself to other people.” She knows that what she sees on social media is “just the best parts of people’s lives,” but, she says, “I can get into this little bubble where I’m like, ‘Oh my gosh, I’m not doing this. Oh my gosh, my selfies don’t look like that.’” In 2017, Governor Andrew Cuomo appointed a task force to study suicide prevention specifically for vulnerable demographic groups, including adolescents. Peter Wyman, professor of psychiatry at the University of Rochester Medical Center, cochairs the task force. Some social media sites and platforms do connect people who feel disconnected, Wyman says. Groups for LGBTQ youths are just one example.

Wyman’s research team is publishing a study this fall that looked at 40 schools. Students who were more connected to adults and felt that those adults were responsive to them had significantly lower rates of suicide attempts. An intervention program called Sources of Strength, based on more than a decade of Wyman’s research, has been implemented in more than 60 schools across New York State. Its goal is to enlist the help of students who are influential among their peers and encourage them to build healthy coping practices and better connections with adults. “And students may find those in different places,” Wyman says. “It may be an adult at school or an adult in the community. But hearing those examples from your peers who you feel are credible messengers can be a powerful tool.” The idea is that the attitudes and behaviors that are successful in preventing suicide can be normalized and accepted among peers. Clifford, the psychotherapist, recommends that parents talk openly with their children about their mental health and ask what’s going on if their behavior and daily habits seem unusual. Even asking direct questions about whether the child is contemplating suicide shouldn’t be avoided, she says.

“There’s absolutely no research that we have that indicates talking to someone about suicide directly puts that idea in their head,” she says. “A person is much more likely to be relieved when someone asks them if they’re thinking of hurting themselves.” As Connor Stevely gets ready to start his senior year at Hilton High School, he still deals with bouts of sadness and worry, but he also feels more supported and stable. And he says he’s grateful his attempts to take his life failed. “Looking back on it now,” he says, “what I would tell myself is, ‘It’s not worth it.’ Throughout my journey, I’ve learned that many people love me and many people are there for me.” His mother says she is proud of him. “I’ve seen him grow, which just makes my heart smile after everything we have been through,” Diane Stevely says. “Yeah, it’s amazing. He’s quite a young man.” (The National Suicide Prevention Lifeline (800-273-8255 ) is available 24 hours a day, seven days a week. It provides free, confidential support to people in distress and those who care about them.) Writer Beth Adams is a WXXI News reporter and host of “Morning Edition.”

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CITY 7


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effort are involved in the current fight. If the warring parties stopped their sniping and pulled together, this community might accomplish a lot. It’s easier, of course, to throw stones.

The word from Trump El Paso, Texas: 22 killed, an estimated 27 injured. The weapon: military-style rifle with a high-capacity magazine. Dayton, Ohio: 9 dead, an estimated 14 injured. The weapon: military-style rifle with a high-capacity magazine. Men, women, children... 31 dead, 41 injured... victims of the country’s latest mass shootings. On Monday, in a stunningly surreal performance, a president whose angry, racist tirades are his trademark, said the nation “must condemn racism, bigotry, and white supremacy.” “Hate,” he said, “has no place in America,” he said, and he talked about the need to “to build a culture that celebrates the inherent worth and dignity of every human life.” And then he urged action – not to deal with guns (which, he said, are not the problem) but

to deal with the internet, with social media. We must “stop the glorification of violence in our society,” he said, and pointed not to his own tweets and rally exhortations but to “the gruesome and grisly video games that are now commonplace.” And he made the predictable references to mental illness, not to urge funding for research, treatment, and affordable medication but to call for “red flag laws” to keep guns away from those with mental illness. The nation that the president called “a loving nation” is an outlier in its attitude toward instruments of violence. We could dramatically reduce the number of mass shootings with gun control laws that in no way would prevent people from owning guns for legitimate purposes. For reasons that are simply baffling, though, the nation’s leaders will not act. Not even in the face of the back-to-back “barbaric slaughters” of the past weekend. Actions are hard. Words are easy. And meaningless. Speak up. We encourage you to share your opinion with readers. Send comments to: feedback@rochester-citynews.com.


Dining & Nightlife

Clockwise from left: Vegetable rice and beef stew, El Cuchifrito's sought-after blood sausages, and Chicharron de cerdo. Inset: Two of El Cuchifrito's co-owners, Zaira Roldan and Eveyln Rodriguez. PHOTOS BY JACOB WALSH

Bring a friend to El Cuchifrito El Cuchifrito 1733 NORTON STREET TUESDAY THROUGH THURSDAY, 9 A.M. TO 8:30 P.M.; FRIDAY AND SATURDAY, 9 A.M. TO 11 P.M. 563-7243; FACEBOOK.COM/ELCUCHIFRITORESTAURANTANDLOUNGE [ REVIEW ] BY CHRIS THOMPSON

When I told a friend that I was on my way to a restaurant called El Cuchifrito, his eyes lit up. It gave him nostalgia for his summer days growing up in The Bronx. Food trucks, colloquially called cuchifritos, would set up shop throughout the boroughs, serving up all types of fried foods (also referred to as cuchifritos): chicken, fish, pork, beef, empanadas, rice, beans, etc. There would also be a whole line of them just outside of the stations all along the elevated 7 Line in Queens, serving up fast comfort food for people wanting a quick but hearty bite to eat. The food brings life to summer. My friend was elated that I would be checking out El Cuchifrito.

But since I am a bad friend, I did not take him along. I wanted all that food to myself. El Cuchifrito Restaurant & Lounge is just off North Goodman Street on Norton, basically a straight shot from downtown. Owners Zaira Roldan, Evelyn Rodriguez, and Eladio Roldan opened the doors in June, but the restaurant already feels like a neighborhood staple that has been there for years. The day I visited, it was bustling with a decent rotation of people coming in to sit and folks picking up take-away orders. Compared to the exterior, the interior is deceptively spacious; it felt like I’d entered a different dimension. The walls are decorated with vibrant murals that pay homage to the owners’ Puerto Rican roots. Sitting in the bright and cheery dining area, I almost forgot that a rainy Rochester day was just outside. When I eventually exited the restaurant, I half expected to open the door to a sandy beach and an ocean view. I should have brought my friend along, as there was plenty of food to go around. The aroma of the food hit me as soon as I entered the door, and I spotted a buffet that boasted

huge serving dishes of rice, pork loins, and pollo guisado (chicken stewed in vegetables and bullion), all steaming hot. To the right is a display case full of different flavored empanadillas. As I was so foolish as to have had a small sandwich at home before I went

to El Cuchifrito (never eat before embarking on a culinary adventure!), I only had a small entrée of arroz con habichuelas (rice and beans) with the pollo guisado ($4.50), and a chicken empanadilla ($2). The small portion was plenty, but I basically teased my body into yearning for more. The chicken absorbed the flavor of anything it touched, so I got a good taste of both my rice and the stew. I noticed that there was El Yucateco chili sauce on the table, and I thought that would be the best accent to my meal until co-owner Eladio Roldan suggested I also try their own house-made pineapple hot sauce. That made my meal perfect. The sweet-hot tang of their sauce, the hot-hot bite of the El Yucateco, and the bold taste of the already well-made food was what I needed. I was in food heaven. I look forward to coming back, as I’d only sampled the tip of the iceberg of what they have to offer. El Cuchifrito also boasts a full menu of sandwiches (including a Cubano, $6), lots of seafood items (such as crab, lobster, or conch empanadillas, $3 each), soups, appetizers, and small plates. Eladio Roldan has been in the Rochester area for 20 years, and says he and his colleagues had always wanted to open a restaurant. They saved up their money for a few years, found the ideal location on Norton, and got to work renovating the space to accommodate their vision. After months of remodeling the kitchen and putting the art on the walls, they were finally ready to open for business, but they did not stop moving. The day I visited, all three were still working hard, with Zaira at the register directly in front of customers, and Eladio and Rodriguez toiling in the kitchen, cooking and subsequently wafting the scent of gastronomic delight throughout the dining area. I felt a little bit guilty pulling any of them from their stations to talk. El Cuchifrito is up and off to a good start, and they already have short- and long-term plans for the space. The first thing Eladio intends to do is to extend the buffet bar so that it can accommodate more menu items for display and serving. They plan to build a bakery on the other side of the restaurant that will specialize in goods from Puerto Rico and Central America, which means even more confectionaries and other goods for patrons to enjoy and bring home. Farther into the future, they say they’d like to expand by building a second location in one of Rochester’s suburbs. rochestercitynewspaper.com

CITY 9


Emily Lipski and Alec Barbour rehearse an intimate scene under the direction of Jace Meyer-Crosby. PHOTO BY RENÉE HEININGER

10 CITY AUGUST 7 - 13, 2019


An ally for actors INTIMACY DIRECTOR DEFINES CONSENT ON STAGE THEATER | BY LEAH STACY

I

t’s a midsummer Thursday, the kind of evening where bursts of rain break through a sunset of pink and gold clouds. The hum of cicadas and the occasional rumble of a passing car fills the air outside the rural Ogden Presbyterian Church, where J.C. “Jace” Meyer-Crosby is leading a small group of actors in partnered warm-up exercises. But what’s happening is more involved than mere breathing or stretching. Meyer-Crosby is doing something that hasn’t been done in Rochester before this year. He’s an intimacy director, working to establish a safe, respectful, and creative environment for scenes that require close physical contact between performers. It’s a relatively new term in the arts world, let alone locally. “A few years ago, I was directing two different shows that had intimate aspects and one was amazing, but the other one didn’t go as well,” he says. “And I felt that some of the cast members may have been opened up to potential abuse. I realized we need a system and protocol for this, it can’t just be luck of the draw.”

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 11


Intimacy direction became a viable career with union standards in 2015, when three women founded Intimacy Directors International. According to the nonprofit’s website, the organization pioneers “the best practices for theatrical intimacy, simulated sex and performance nudity for theatre, TV and film,” and rigorously trains and certifies new intimacy directors and coordinators (In TV and film work, it’s referred to as an intimacy coordinator). Meyer-Crosby began doing research for training and education in 2016, and came across IDI then. The non-profit was just beginning to gain steam — a New York Times article about intimacy choreography at Toronto’s Stratford Festival came out in June 2017, and Rolling Stone and American Theatre Magazine both profiled IDI in October 2018. By that time, MeyerCrosby had applied to be an apprentice with IDI (his workshop photos are featured on the website). While the IDI work pre-dated the #MeToo movement, Meyer-Crosby credits that cultural conversation for the growing interest in his field. “#MeToo was the tidal wave that carried what was already going on with intimacy direction,” Meyer-Crosby says. “There’s something about breaking the silence — not even in terms of exposing abuse, but in terms of starting a conversation that people feel awkward talking about.” As of June 2019, there were approximately 60 people in the IDI apprenticeship program, along with 15 certified intimacy directors (four of whom are founders, the rest completed the apprenticeship program). MeyerCrosby is an apprentice in his first year, and completed his first three-day training at University of Illinois at UrbanaChampaign in August 2018. He was then invited to a teaching intensive in February of this year at the National Theatre Institute in Waterford, Connecticut, which is more about managing, diplomacy, and instructing within the theatrical setting. Since his initial training with IDI in 2018, Meyer-Crosby has worked on 12 shows with primarily Rochester-based companies, Ithaca College being the furthest away. Ralph Meranto, artistic director of the CenterStage Theater at the Jewish Community Center, champions both intimacy direction in shows and Meyer-Crosby’s work (most recently, the two worked together on “Oklahoma,” with another show planned for the fall). At one point, Meranto mass-emailed people in the performance community to let them know about Meyer-Crosby’s work, and that they should hire him. 12 CITY AUGUST 7 - 13, 2019

“Working with J.C. has been inspirational,” Meranto says. “He brings a comfort and trust to the process that actually allows the actors to push boundaries and results in a more realistic audience experience. I will never stage a show at JCC CenterStage that has intimate moments without this specialty, ever.”

D

uring the rehearsal in Ogden, Meyer-Crosby is dressed

casually in jeans, a floral collared shirt, and white tennis shoes. He stands confidently in the middle of the tiled church hall, working with six cast members from Classics Theater of Rochester’s production of “Mrs. Warren’s Profession” by George Bernard Shaw, which opens August 8 at the Multiuse Community Cultural Center. The plot includes a romance between a persistent young man and a spunky young woman, and since it’s a comedy, physical interaction between the two characters has the potential to create even stronger comedic moments. Before blocking (choreography of actions on stage) begins, Meyer-Crosby has the romantic duo establish boundaries regarding where they are comfortable being touched Left: Jace Meyer-Crosby. PHOTO BY RENÉE HEININGER

Below: A scene from Grey Noise Theatre Company's "Dog Sees God" featuring actors Hector Manuel and Rowan Collins. PHOTO BY ANNETTE DRAGON


or in contact with another body. Then, they repeat those boundaries back to their partner. For the female in the scene, the boundaries include chest and part of her torso; for the male, it’s mid-trunk and upper thighs. Once these boundaries are established, both partners must block and act scenes without touching the “off-limits” parts of the other person’s body. “Consent needs to be a major focus in the room when it comes to love scenes,” MeyerCrosby says. The exercises used in rehearsal are rooted in Meyer-Crosby’s standardized IDI training, which draws on five pillars of safe intimacy: context, communication, consent, choreography, and closure. IDI states that by following these pillars, an intimacy director “takes responsibility for the emotional safety of the actors.” “Actors not only feel more comfortable with what they are asked to do, but more comfortable expressing something they are not comfortable doing,” Meranto says. “It sets up a situation where there is trust speaking up.” Meyer-Crosby said that most intimacy directors come to the industry one of two ways: either they or someone they know has been in a bad situation, or it’s a fight director who was asked to handle violent sexual scenes, and then handed the rest of the intimacy work as well. “They realize pretty quickly: ‘Oh, I’m not qualified for this,’” Meyer-Crosby says. “And then they seek further training sometimes.” Such was the case for Syracuse native Alec Barbour, who now lives in Rochester and is currently an IDI apprentice (and yes, it’s rare for a city to have one intimacy director, let alone two). “It’s weird and awesome, whenever we’re hanging out with other IDI folks, they do a double take when they find out we’re in the same city,” Barbour says. “This sort of work — like fight directing — is much easier to do when you have someone to demo with, and someone who speaks the same physical language, too. Working with someone who has the pillars down is huge.” Barbour, who works frequently with Le Moyne College students in Syracuse, says actors (and student actors, especially) love doing this work as much as they love fight choreography. “They’ve never come to me with any reaction but ‘this is the best ever, more please,’” Barbour says. “A lot of acting training can be very abusive. Having something like this that

Jace Meyer-Crosby worked as intimacy director for JCC CenterStage's production of "Indecent." Pictured: Sara Michelle Penner and Maya Dwyer. PHOTO BY LOU SCHNEIDER

allows you to ruthlessly pursue your objective but respect the specific boundaries of your partner, scene, play, is tremendously liberating for a lot of actors.”

and they say they want to stay collaborative instead of competitive. “Above all, it’s about reminding young actors they’re not just a commodity and they have the ability to say no,” Barbour says. “The more we put it out there, and the more people feel they can say no, the more will, and that’s how the industry will change.” And while advocating for others feels natural at this point, MeyerCrosby spent the last few years experiencing what it means to find his own voice. Meyer-Crosby, who is transgender, was in an abusive marriage for years before deciding to transition. “I got married young, before I was ready, because in conservative circles, that’s what you do,” he says. “That environment kept me from a lot of the identity-forming other people my age were going through. The first place I really had the opportunity to find out who I was outside of that spouse was the theater.” Meyer-Crosby had always been involved in theater growing up, but marriage and school took precedence in his early 20s. “When I started doing community theater in Rochester after school, a lot of things I had been suppressing about myself for years became really apparent,” he says. “I tried to

“There’s something about breaking the silence — not even in terms of exposing abuse, but in terms of starting a conversation that people feel awkward talking about.”

Meyer-Crosby and Barbour are planning a consent and contact improv workshop for local performers at MuCCC on August 17,

come out as trans, but the abuse worsened as a response. Some friends in theater were radically loving and helped me get out of that environment and relationship.” In addition to his work in intimacy direction, Meyer-Crosby runs Grey Noise Theatre Company, and is gearing up for a Rochester Fringe Festival show, “Homo Familiarus,” which runs September 13 and 16. The production is a series of 11 short scenes about different types of human closeness. Meyer-Crosby wrote several of the scenes, and others are pulled from existing works. (Barbour will also work on that show as a second set of eyes and as intimacy director.) Meyer-Crosby will also have the chance to work as intimacy director under Geva Theatre Center’s new Director of Engagement and Associate Artistic Director, Pirronne Yousefzadeh, who has worked with the founders of IDI previously. Yousefzadeh and MeyerCrosby will work on “Queen,” which runs November 7-24. “I’m really privileged to be in a place where I can keep theater safe and nurturing, like it was for me,” Meyer-Crosby says. “And I get to make beautiful work — I’m a movement artist. I get to tell stories with peoples’ bodies and I’m privileged to do that even as my body goes through an awful lot of trauma. I’m an aide, an ally, and an advocate.” rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 13


Upcoming

Music

[ ROCK ] Styx Tuesday, November 12. Main Street Armory. 900 E. Main St. $45.50-$55.50. 8 p.m. 232-3221. mainstreetarmory.com; styxworld.com. [ PUNK-POP ]

New Found Glory With Hawthorne Heights and Free

Throw. Friday, November 15. Anthology. 336 East Ave. $25. 7 p.m. 484-1964. anthologylive.com; newfoundglory.com.

Will Henriksen

SATURDAY, AUGUST 10 SMALL WORLD BOOKS, 425 NORTH STREET 7 P.M. | $5-$10 SUGGESTED DONATION FACEBOOK.COM/SMALLWORLDBOOKS WILLHENRIKSEN.BANDCAMP.COM [ INDIE FOLK ] BLOOM: The Rochester Poetry Project is back with another installment of The Flytrap Series. The event features a bill of spoken-word artists supported by music performances. Philadelphia-based singer-songwriter Will Henriksen will be there, sharing his gently melodic songs. His discography has a rustic sensibility, with sincere musings on existential quandaries. This emotional tone evokes shades of Daniel Johnston, Conor Oberst, or even early J. Tillman. Henriksen’s new album, “Nothing Left Behind,” comes out August 8. — BY HASSAN ZAMAN

String Theory SUNDAY, AUGUST 11 THREE HEADS BREWING, 186 ATLANTIC AVENUE 3 P.M. | FREE | THREEHEADSBREWING.COM [ BLUEGRASS ] The first official “NOT(A) Festival, It’s a

Party!” is around the corner. As a community celebration of the Neighborhood of the Arts, the day-long event will feature events at various “hubs” throughout NOTA, from 10 a.m. through 7 p.m. Three Heads Brewing will serve as one of the hubs, presenting bluegrass 4-piece String Theory in the afternoon. Founded in 2001, the band has since garnered a local audience playing their distinct blend of Americana and folk rock tunes.

— BY HASSAN ZAMAN PHOTO BY ARI RATNER

SUMMER BLUES CRUISE Enjoy a two hour cruise, great food, and a cash bar on the Colonial Belle with

STEVE GRILLS

& THE ROADMASTERS

SEPT 9TH

Get your tickets TODAY! For more info & tickets: jazz901.org or 585-966-2660 14 CITY AUGUST 7 - 13, 2019

Join us!

Happy Hour

2-6pm and 8pm to close 7 days a week!

Taco Tuesday! $1 Tacos

is 1900 S. Clinton Ave ° Lac de Ville Plaza Every day t a a Open from 11am ° 340-6026 ° mesquitemexgrill.com a fiest


[ ALBUM REVIEWS ]

[ WED., AUGUST 7 ]

Taking Meds

ACOUSTIC/FOLK

‘I Hate Me’ Near Mint Records takingmeds.bandcamp.com

‘WOODSTOCK ROCS’ FRIDAY, AUGUST 9 PARK POINT AT RIT, 400 PARK POINT DRIVE 5 P.M. | $5 GENERAL; $25 VIP; FREE, AGES 16 AND OVER | LOVINCUP.COM [ CLASSIC ROCK ] It’s the 50th anniversary of Woodstock.

Rochester commemorates it with a concert featuring renowned regional musicians, paying homage to the music performed at the original, culture-shifting event in 1969. The lineup includes: Eli Flynn of Giant Panda Guerrilla Dub Squad, Dee Ponder and Avis Reese of Danielle Ponder & The Tomorrow People, and many more. There’ll also be an after-party at Lovin’ Cup, with jam rock outfit Haewa playing a set of Jimi Hendrix tunes. A portion of the proceeds will go to Veterans Outreach Center.

— BY HASSAN ZAMAN

Galactic THURSDAY, AUGUST 8 MLK JR. MEMORIAL PARK, MANHATTAN SQUARE, 353 COURT STREET 5:30 P.M. | $7 GENERAL; $35 VIP ROCHESTEREVENTS.COM/PARTY-IN-THE-PARK GALACTICFUNK.COM [ FUNK ROCK ] New Orleans-based funk collective Galactic

performs at such a pace, you’ll be tripping over yourself to keep up. Crossing electronic textures with punchy horns and overdriven guitar, the band can switch from anthemic ballads to high-energy jams with the crash of a cymbal. Galactic delivers a provocative mix of funk, rock ‘n’ roll, blues, and hip-hop. Adam Ezra Group and Junkyardfieldtrip will play in support.

— BY KATIE HALLIGAN

A hardcore-emo quartet originally formed in Rochester in 2012 and now based in Brooklyn, Taking Meds offers relief for the angst-ridden soul. Combining post-punk with alternative math rock, the band’s sixth release, “I Hate Me,” takes the listener on a densely packed thrill ride. Guitar-heavy arrangements are complemented by spatial choruses and lush backing harmonies, while soft singing and aggressive screams coexist on songs such as “Big Fish” and the title track. You can lose yourself in the explosive breakdowns of “Inseverable” and “Lifer.” Taking Meds will perform its LP release party with special guests DRUSE, Teenage Halloween, Coming Down, and Troubleshooter on Friday, August 9, 9 p.m. at Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Avenue. $8. Ages 18 and over (under 21, will call tickets only). 454-2966. bugjar.com. — BY KATIE HALLIGAN

Whirlin’ Jack Dervy ‘Lemon Sucker’ Self-released whirlinjackdervy.bandcamp.com

“Lemon Sucker,” the new LP and fifth Whirlin’ Jack Dervy release, “Lemon Sucker,” is a selfrecorded glimpse into local singer-guitarist Nick Schaefer’s melancholic, mesmerizing, and off-kilter world. The album features psychedelic, lo-fi production, accentuated by the Kurt Cobain-like scratch in Schaefer’s voice. Whirlin’ Jack creates musical irony by foiling sad lyrics with happy music in tunes such as “Nobody Wants to Be My Buddy.” The “Lemon Sucker” LP is the haunting reflection of a love-weary soul caught up in the same old cycles. Whirlin’ Jack Dervy & The Wily Tycoons will perform along with The Endless Mountain Derelicts and Late Earth on Friday, August 16, 9 p.m. at Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Avenue. $7. Ages 18 and over (under 21, will call tickets only). 454-2966. bugjar.com.

Grapes, Griddles, & Fiddles. Fox Run Vineyards, 670 State Rt. 14. Penn Yan. foxrunvineyards.com. 6-8 p.m.

Lakeshore at the Little: Chris Wilson. Little Café,

240 East Ave. 258-0400. 7 p.m. BLUES

The Fog. B-Side, 5 Liftbridge Lane. Fairport. 315-3003. 7 p.m.

Reverend Kingfish: House Party of the Damned. The Spirit Room, 139 State St. 397-7595. 8 p.m. CLASSICAL

Gateways Music Festival: Piano Recital. Hatch Hall,

26 Gibbs St. 274-3000. 3:30 p.m.

Skaneateles Festival: Hilary Hahn & Lera Auerbach. First

Presbyterian Church, 97 E Genesee St. Skaneateles. skanfest.org. 8 p.m. “Dreams & Visions.”. $28-$48/Free ages 12 & under. JAZZ

Ann Mitchell Jazz Trio. 80W, 7 Lawrence St. 730-4046. 7 p.m.

Concerts by the Shore: Greece Jazz Band. Ontario

Beach Park, 4799 Lake Ave. 865-3320. 7 p.m. METAL

Alice Cooper, Halestorm, Motionless in White. CMAC,

3355 Marvin Sands Dr. Canandaigua. cmacevents. com. 7 p.m. $10 & up. Bonfire. 585 Rockin Burger Bar, 250 Pixley Rd. 2470079. 7 p.m. AC/DC tribute.

— BY KATIE HALLIGAN continues on page 17

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 15


Music Gateway to diversity

KELLY HALL-TOMPKINS

CARLOS SIMON

The 2019 Gateways Music Festival brings together black classical musicians, including Music Director Michael Morgan, conductor Jeri Lynne Johnson, violinist Kelly Hall-Tompkins, and composer Carlos Simon. JOHNSON PHOTO BY VANESSA BRICENO PHOTOGRAPHY, ALL OTHER PHOTOS PROVIDED

Gateways Music Festival IN ASSOCIATION WITH EASTMAN SCHOOL OF MUSIC RUNS THROUGH SUNDAY, AUGUST 11 VARIOUS PRICES, TIMES, AND LOCATIONS VISIT GATEWAYSMUSICFESTIVAL.ORG FOR DETAILS [ FEATURE ] BY DANIEL J. KUSHNER

Attend virtually any orchestral concert in the country, and you’re likely to see a similar picture onstage: a sea of white performers, with very 16 CITY AUGUST 7 - 13, 2019

little racial diversity. The perception that classical music is predominantly a Caucasian pursuit has endured for several centuries, but that idea doesn’t reflect the current reality. The biennial, six-day celebration known as the Gateways Music Festival has brought black classical musicians together since 1993. The festival was founded by pianist and former Eastman School of Music professor Armenta Adams (Hummings) Dumisani. Rochester has hosted the Gateways since 1995, and the 14th iteration of the festival, presented in conjunction with the Eastman School, runs from August 6 through 11.

Led by the festival’s president and artistic director, Lee Koonce, this year’s series of concerts and events will take place at over 50 Rochesterarea venues. Over the course of six days, Gateways will feature over 100 American and international musicians. These artists include such conductors as Gateways Music Director Michael Morgan and Black Pearl Chamber Orchestra’s director Jeri Lynne Johnson, instrumentalists such as New York City-based violin soloist Kelly Hall-Tompkins, and Atlantaborn composer Carlos Simon. The festival will close with an August 11 performance at Kodak Hall from high-profile mezzo-soprano Denyce Graves and the Gateways Music Festival Orchestra, led by Morgan. The festival also highlights the historical contributions of important artists whose careers broke new ground for musicians of color in classical music. Differing from previous years, the 2019 festival will focus especially on the works of composer Florence Price, who lived from 1887 to 1953. She wrote in a wide variety of mediums: orchestral works such as symphonies and concertos; chamber music and numerous keyboard pieces; and choral works, arrangements of spirituals, and solo songs. Price stands out for “her fusion of obviously excellent classical training with extended jazz harmony,” Morgan says. Price’s Symphony No. 1 became the first symphony written by a black female composer to be played by a prominent American orchestra in 1933. Kelly Hall-Tompkins first became acquainted with the music of Florence Price when Hall-Tompkins performed Symphony No. 1 at a previous Gateways. This year, she will be the featured soloist in the August 10 performance of Price’s Violin Concerto No. 2, conducted by Jeri Lynne Johnson at Hochstein Performance Hall. “It’s everything that I love about the post-Romantic period, with a definitive American voice,” HallTompkins says of Price. “I find it to be a little bit Richard Strauss, a little bit 1940’s film music, and just a very unique voice that doesn’t exist in any other composer.” As an African-American female composer in the Jim Crow era, Price dealt with her share of racial and gender discrimination, and her music has only recently been performed more frequently. Gateways is well-positioned to give attention to composers who didn’t get it during their lifetime, Morgan says. Johnson thinks Price was hindered by a lack of available mentors and professional avenues to have her work performed, which kept her

JERI LYNNE JOHNSON

MICHAEL MORGAN

from producing even more music. Johnson sees mentoring as vital for new generations of minority classical musicians. “Having young musicians of color see themselves represented in orchestras and getting mentors of any ethnicity or background is an important thing,” she says. Johnson has struggled against racial biases in her own career. Despite what she felt was a strong showing as a finalist for a conductor position at a regional California orchestra in 2007, Johnson didn’t get the job. When she asked about the reason, she was told it was a matter of marketing: “You don’t look like what our audience expects the conductor to look like.” In response, Johnson founded the Black Pearl Chamber Orchestra the following year. She has since hired high-caliber musicians of varying ethnic backgrounds to change perceptions about


R&B/ SOUL

Latriste & Sam. Record

Archive, 33 1/3 Rockwood St. 244-1210. 5-8 p.m.

[ THU., AUGUST 8 ] what classical music should be and who should be performing it. “I think what’s odd about Black Pearl is not that we have musicians of color,” she says. “It’s that we have musicians of color in a concentration that demonstrates that it is not unusual; they are not hard to find.” Unfortunately, racially diverse ensembles like Black Pearl are uncommon in the world of classical music. But Morgan says Gateways provides a kind of support system, a rare context in which African American classical musicians are not in the minority. “In order to see that there is this community, this foundation, this history,” he says, “you have to bring people together as a reminder that they’ve always been there and that there are lots of them.” By embracing the vibrant professional community of black musicians in classical music, Gateways seems to be a festival that benefits the performers as much as it does the audience. “First and foremost, Gateways is about making great music and giving visibility to artists of color,” HallTompkins says. Composer Carlos Simon, who is participating in the festival for the first time, will hear the performance of a new orchestral arrangement of his gospelinspired “Amen!” co-commissioned by Morgan for Gateways. The composition is a kind of ode to the Pentecostal AfricanAmerican church, “a very spontaneous, very energetic, celebratory American experience,” Simon says. His compositions frequently address the realities of the black experience in America, both historically and currently. Musically, Simon cites gospel, jazz, Motown, and R&B as especially undervalued. “A lot of times, African-American culture is played down,” he says, “and a lot of times, we don’t have a true appreciation for what it’s done for American music.” Achieving more equitable representation for people of color in classical music, Simon says, begins with more inclusion at the administrative and artistic planning levels, as well as concerted efforts to establish longterm partnerships with musicians – such as a three-year composer residency rather than single concert engagement. “If you’re developing relationships with artists that are sustainable, then it becomes an issue of relationship, and not tokenism,” Simon says.

ACOUSTIC/FOLK Amanda Ashley. Via Girasole Wine Bar, 3 Schoen Pl. Pittsford. 641-0340. 7 p.m. Benny Bleu Residency. Little Café, 240 East Ave. 258-0400. 7-9 p.m. Sam Nitsch. B-Side, 5 Liftbridge Lane. Fairport. 315-3003. 7 p.m. AMERICANA

Jared & the Mill. Three Heads Brewing, 186 Atlantic Ave. 244-1224. 8 p.m. $10. Sunset Cruise: Todd Simonson. Schoen Place,

10 Schoen Pl. Pittsford. sampatch.org. 6:30-8:30 p.m. $16. JAZZ

Hochstein at High Falls: Hypnotic Clambake. Granite

Mills Park, 82 Browns Race. hochstein.org. 12:10 p.m. Rain location: MCC downtown, 2nd floor. Quintuple Jazz Ensemble. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. lovincup.com. 8 p.m. POP/ROCK

Ocular Panther, Haewa. Flour City Station, 170 East Ave. 413-5745. 10 p.m. $5. JunkYardFieldTrip. MLK Jr. Memorial Park, 1 Manhattan Sq. 5:30 p.m. Rain location: Anthology, 336 East Ave. $7. The Police: Live at Holleder Tribute. Record Archive, 33

1/3 Rockwood St. 244-1210. 6 p.m. St VIth. Lincoln Hill Farms, 3792 Rte 247. Canandaigua. lincolnhillfarms.com. 6 p.m. $7.

Widmore, Polllyanna, Chromaticam, Grape Soda.

Vineyard Community Space, 836 South Clinton Ave. 342-8429. 7 p.m. $5-$10 suggested. R&B/ SOUL

All-N-One Band. Brooks

Landing, 1500 S Plymouth Ave. brookslandingroc.com. 6-8 p.m.

[ FRI., AUGUST 9 ] ACOUSTIC/FOLK Alex Goettel. Via Girasole Wine Bar, 3 Schoen Pl. Pittsford. 641-0340. 7 p.m. Head to the Roots. B-Side, 5 Liftbridge Lane. Fairport. 315-3003. 5-7 p.m. rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 17


Jeff Riales. Fanatics, 7281 W Main St. Lima. 624-2080. 7 p.m. Serendipity. Greenhouse Café, 2271 E. Main St. 270-8603. 7 p.m.

Concert Listings, Music Reviews, Interviews & more. visit us at rochestercitynewspaper.com

AMERICANA

The Blind Owl Band, The Honey Smugglers. Lincoln

Hill Farms, 3792 Rte 247. Canandaigua. lincolnhillfarms. com. 6 p.m. $15/$20. Woody Pines Trio. Abilene, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. 9 p.m. $10.

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E 2019 R A U Q S E H T AGES CONCERT IN ISSION • ALL

$5 ADM AT 5:00 pm • T R A T S S R DOO

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ROCS:

O THE A T R IB U T E T NCERT O R IG IN A L CO

n all star nal, Featuring a vorite natio fa hester r u o y f o ns from Roc cast ia ic s u m l a nd loc regional, a

HAEWA

TO PERFORM A SET OF

JIMI HENDRIX

Arts

AT THE AFTER PARTY

Gardens AT T H E

AUGUST 17 & 18 10 am - 5 pm

Fine paintings, prints, ceramics, and jewelry, plus glass, photography, fabrics, woodworking and more at this highly acclaimed exhibition of over 100 artists. Music, performances, food, wine, and all the beauty and elegance of the Sonnenberg Estate. Admission $10/person, children under 12 are free. Free parking & shuttle. sonnenberg.org • (585) 394-4922 • 151 Charlotte St., Canandaigua 18 CITY AUGUST 7 - 13, 2019

CLASSICAL

Rochester Cello Society: Bach Suites. St. Thomas Episcopal

Church, 2000 Highland Ave. 410-7278. 7 p.m. JAZZ

With the Cows. Bop Shop

Records, 1460 Monroe Ave. 271-3354. 8 p.m. Poetry by Rick Petrie. $5-$10.

[ SAT., AUGUST 10 ]

[ SUN., AUGUST 11 ]

ACOUSTIC/FOLK Kennedy Jason. B-Side, 5 Liftbridge Lane. Fairport. 3153003. 5-7 p.m. Walt Atkinson. California Brew Haus, 402 W. Ridge Rd. 621-1480. 6:30 p.m.

ACOUSTIC/FOLK Maria Gillard Trio. Lincoln Hill Farms, 3792 Rte 247. Canandaigua. lincolnhillfarms. com. 2 p.m. $7.

BLUES

Duke Robillard. Fanatics, 7281 W Main St. Lima. 624-2080. 7 p.m. HotFrost. Bill Grays, 4870 Culver Road. 585-787-0150. 8 p.m. The White Hots. Little Café, 240 East Ave. 258-0400. 8 p.m. COUNTRY

Jason Aldean, Kane Brown, Carly Pearce, Dee Jay Silver.

CMAC, 3355 Marvin Sands Dr. Canandaigua. cmacevents. com. 7:30 p.m. $58 & up. JAZZ

POP/ROCK

Bands on the Bricks: Donna the Buffalo. Rochester Public

Market, 280 N. Union St. 6-10 p.m.

Brian Willson, Al Jardine, & Blondie Chaplin. del Lago

Resort & Casino, 1133 State Rte 414. Waterloo. (315) 946-1695. 8 p.m. $40 & up. Bryan Adams, Billy Idol. Darien Lake PAC, 9993 Allegheny Rd. Darien. darienlake.com/events. 8 p.m. $25 & up.

Cherry Bomb, Acoustic Brew, Ethos Unplugged Trio. 585

Rockin Burger Bar, 250 Pixley Rd. 247-0079. 6 p.m. Greg Townson. Abilene, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. 5:30 p.m.

Hootie & The Blowfish, Barenaked Ladies. CMAC,

3355 Marvin Sands Dr. Canandaigua. cmacevents. com. 8 p.m. $45 & up. Inside Out. B-Side, 5 Liftbridge Lane. Fairport. 315-3003. 8 p.m. Something Else. Flour City Station, 170 East Ave. 413-5745. 10 p.m. $5. Soul Encounter. Firehouse Saloon, 814 S. Clinton Ave. 319-3832. 10 p.m.

Theory of a Deadman, Tokyo Monsters, Not for Nothing, Noah’s Reign. Batavia Downs,

8315 Park Rd. Batavia. 343-3750. 5 p.m. $10 & up. VARIOUS

Whiskey & Tattoos Music Festival. 6 p.m. Photo City

Improv, 543 Atlantic Ave $12. 451-0047.

Bobbie Henrie & the Henhouse Boppers. Three

METAL

Baring Teeth, Cognizant, Waldhexen, Hallucination Realized. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. bugjar.com. 9 p.m. $10/$12. POP/ROCK

Trevor Lake. The Daily

Refresher, 293 Alexander St. 360-4627. 5-7 p.m.

[ MON., AUGUST 12 ] ACOUSTIC/FOLK

Lakeshore at the Little: Jerry Falzone, Jeff Riales, David M. Miller, Maria Sebastian. Little

Café, 240 East Ave. 258-0400. 7 p.m. BLUES

Heads Brewing, 186 Atlantic Ave. 244-1224. 8 p.m. $5. Jimmie Highsmith Jr.. Via Girasole Wine Bar, 3 Schoen Pl. Pittsford. 641-0340. 7:30 p.m.

JP Soars & The Red Hots.

NOISE/EXPERIMENTAL

Monroe Ave. bugjar.com. 9 p.m.

20th Annual Joe+N Day-Tour.

Various, Rochester. joedaytour. com. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. See website for schedule. POP/ROCK

Bar Louie Music Festival. Bar Louie, 98 Greece Ridge Center Dr. 797-1054. 11-midnight. $7/$10. Rael: The Music of Genesis. The Riviera, 4 Center St., Geneseo. 481-0036. 7 p.m. $29-$34. The Rods, House Majority. Rosen Krown, 875 Monroe Ave. 271-7050. 9 p.m. Smashing Pumpkins, Noel Gallagher’s High Flying Birds. Darien Lake PAC,

9993 Allegheny Rd. Darien. darienlake.com/events. 7 p.m. $30 & up. Wicked, Adrenaline. Pineapple Jack’s, 485 Spencerport Rd. Gates. 247-5225. 9 p.m. R&B/ SOUL

Taurus Savant. Nox, 302

Goodman St N. 6:30 p.m. $15. VARIOUS

Whiskey & Tattoos Music Festival. 6 p.m. Abilene, 153

Liberty Pole Way $5. 232-3230.

Fanatics, 7281 W Main St. Lima. 624-2080. 7 p.m. POP/ROCK

Clibbus, Aretheyyestheyare, Yippekiyay. Bug Jar, 219

[ TUE., AUGUST 13 ] ACOUSTIC/FOLK Charles Emanuel. Central Library, 115 South Ave. 428-8150. 12-1 p.m. BLUES

John Bolger Blues Band.

Penfield Amphitheater, 3100 Atlantic Ave. 6:30 p.m. Johnny Rawls. Fanatics, 7281 W Main St. Lima. 624-2080. 7 p.m. JAZZ

Gray Quartet Jazz Sessions.

The Spirit Room, 139 State St. 397-7595. 7:30-10 p.m. $5. Grove Place Jazz Project. Rochester Music Hall of Fame, 25 Gibbs St. rochestermusic. org. 7 p.m. $10. POP/ROCK

Alone I Walk, Forevers, McClane. Swan Dive, 289

Alexander St. 413-3306. 8 p.m. $8.

The Standby, The Joke’s On Us, Early Retirement. Vineyard Community Space, 836 South Clinton Ave. 342-8429. 6:30 p.m.


rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 19


Art

Detail of June Lee’s “Bystander” installation, part of “Crafting Democracy” at Central Library. PHOTO BY REBECCA RAFFERTY

Fight fire with fiber “Crafting Democracy: Fiber Arts and Activism” THROUGH OCTOBER 25 ANTHONY MASCIOLI GALLERY, RUNDEL MEMORIAL BUILDING, 115 SOUTH AVENUE MONDAY & WEDNESDAY, 10 A.M. TO 8:30 P.M.; TUESDAY & FRIDAY, 10 A.M. TO 6 P.M.; THURSDAY 11 A.M. TO 6 P.M. 428-7300; CURRENTSEEN.ORG

[ REVIEW ] BY REBECCA RAFFERTY

In 2017, the Memorial Art Gallery passed the Rochester Biennial baton to Rochester Contemporary Art Center. RoCo 20 CITY AUGUST 7 - 13, 2019

immediately rebranded the Biennial — which had been an invitational showcase of the work of six regional artists, exhibited in the MAG’s Grand Gallery — as a multivenue, collaborative, and interactive event,

building on coordinated the First Friday gallery openings that RoCo has spearheaded the past several years. In the first year of the rebranded biennial, RoCo, Visual Studies Workshop, and Gallery r each hosted simultaneous exhibits. Organizers wanted to encourage collaboration between mid-sized galleries, promote thoughtful and challenging work, and explore new curatorial models, said RoCo’s Executive Director Bleu Cease, in a 2017 interview with CITY. This year, organizers have further evolved the biennial into “Current Seen,” a string of contemporary visual arts exhibitions, popups, and installations of new public art that will unfold along East Avenue and Main Street, mostly during six First Fridays this fall, between October 6 and November 17. This geographic focus is meant to addresses the corridor as both a dividing line and a connective thread, Cease says. “Current Seen” is meant “to foster collaboration, help spaces achieve greater collective impact, celebrate the act of curation, and aid artists in reaching new expanded audiences,” Cease said in a provided statement. It includes more than 20 exhibitions and events organized by both experienced and emerging curators. Organizers will seek more collaborators as the event approaches. One exhibit in the “Current Seen” lineup is already on view at Central Library’s Rundel Memorial Building (the recent site of the “Stonewall: 50 Years Out” exhibit). “Crafting Democracy: Fiber Arts and Activism,” is a collection of subversive embroidery, soft sculpture, quilts, and other resistance art curated by two Rochester Institute of Technology professors, Hinda Mandell and Juilee Decker. The exhibit uses the language of traditionally women-oriented crafts to explore the 2016 presidential campaign and its (ongoing) aftermath as its main focus. Some of the works are finished products, created from the relics of specific responses to this administration, such as Jessica M. Skulty’s “Hear Our Voice” quilt that she crafted and used as a protest banner during the Inauguration Day Women’s March on Washington, DC. Scraps of dark fabric boldly spell out “Our health matters,” the words layered over a pink Venus symbol. Ellis Angel’s “Don’t Mourn, Organize,” is a different sort of quilt, made using strips of posters from the New York City Women’s March, woven and stitched together.

Other works will continue to evolve, such as Adrienne Sloan’s “The Unraveling.” Displayed upright against a picture of the Constitution, Sloan’s knitted American flag is in a state of deterioration. The artist plans to continuously unravel the work during the current administration, “as long as our civil and political rights continue to erode,” curatorial notes state. More than one artwork in the show makes mention to Donald Trump, Hillary Clinton, of course the knitted pink pussy hats, and women’s rights in particular. Other artists are concerned with historic and pervasive issues as they condemn police brutality, racism, and the whole rotten system, while challenging each of us to do better. In particular, June Lee’s installation, “Bystander,” is a powerful message to the masses. Two groups of 10 small figures are set up in a display case, facing one another, but not quite. Each of the resin cast figures is covered with a unique pattern of explosively colorful thread, and looks aloof in its own way: hands clasped behind backs or crossed over chests, and eyes cast off to the side or down at the ground. The work asks questions about our responsibility to one another, which are evident even before reading the provided statement about the individual’s duality as a distinct unit and a part of a collective. In all honesty they look like superheroes refusing to help. The exhibit’s curators are looking for fiber artists to contribute to a yarn installation for “The Corinthian Hall Craft Intervention,” planned for Wednesday, August 21, 9 to 11 a.m., at the Corinthian Street location of Oliva Kim’s Frederick Douglass statue. The work will be installed at the former site of a 19th-century civic center, where the Rochester Ladies AntiSlavery Sewing Society organized anti-slavery lectures and fund-raising bazaars, and where Douglass delivered his “What to the Slave is the Fourth of July?” speech. The curators also worked with RIT Press to create a catalog that accompanies “Crafting Democracy,” with essays that explore the greater context of craft activism. A reception for the exhibit will take place Monday, September 16, 4 to 6 p.m., in the library’s Harold Hacker Hall, with remarks by the exhibit’s curators and artists. Related programming includes the yarn installation, artist demos, book discussions, and events in the Children’s Center. For more information, call 428-8304 or visit roccitylibrary.org/location/central.


Not-a-festival It’s a party!

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SUNDAY, AUGUST 11TH 10AM - 7PM

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A celebration of what makes NOTA – The Neighborhood of the Arts – so unique! Plan on having a full day of fun with 7 hubs featuring

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shopping kids’areas AND MORE!

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The Hubs

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• Village Gate 10-7pm • Bachelor Forum 10-7pm • Memorial Art Gallery 10-2pm

V W H U Q S UR S H U W L H V  F R P  ‡  4 4 2 - 9 0 61

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• University Business Center 10-2pm

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• Gallery Salon 10-3pm • 1255 University 12-6pm • Three Heads 3-6pm

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FOR DETAILS SEE OUR FACEBOOK EVENT: “NOT(A) Festival - It’s a Party” & at NOTABA.ORG

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 21


PHOTO PROVIDED

THEATER | ‘MRS. WARREN’S PROFESSION’

FILM | ROCHESTER TEEN FILM FESTIVAL

The subject of sex work is divisive, and lots of people have a knee-jerk disdain for it that’s rooted in misogyny and control over women’s bodies and labor. George Bernard Shaw’s 1893 play “Mrs. Warren’s Profession” reflects the playwright’s stance that prostitution isn’t caused by moral weakness but systemic failure and economic need, and Shaw allows his title character to speak about her own life and experiences. Set in Edwardian England, the dark comedy tells the story of young college graduate Vivie, who in getting acquainted with her mother, discovers that she is a madam and former prostitute, and grapples with the implications of these truths. This month, Classics Theater of Rochester will present the four-act play, directed by James Landers.

The annual Rochester Teen Film Festival returns to The Little Theatre this week, featuring the work of young ubran, suburban, and rural filmmakers from this region and beyond. Finalists for this year’s iteration were selected by a jury, and include films from students at Allendale Columbia, Geneseo, Dake Junior High, Fairport, Penfield, Pittsford Sutherland, Edison Career and Technical High School, Randolph, and AP Mays Media in Miami, FL. In addition to having their films screened at the event, one filmmaker will receive the Philip Seymour Hoffman Award, in honor of the late Academy Award-winning actor and Fairport native. Other awards include the Marilyn O’Connor Award for best social justice film, the Alex Ketchek Award for best animated film; and awards for best documentary, best acting, best visual design, best original character design, best sound design, best art direction, best cinematography, and best special effects.

Thursdays through Saturdays, August 8-10 and August 15-17, at 7:30 p.m.; and Sunday, August 11, at 2 p.m. MuCCC, 142 Atlantic Avenue. Advance tickets are $15 for adults ($17 at the door), and $13 for seniors and students ($15 at the door). muccc.org. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY

Arts & Performance Art Exhibits [ OPENING ] Pat Rini Rohrer Gallery, 71 S. Main St. Canandaigua. Steve BonDurant: Summer Light & Inspirations. Aug. 9-Sep. 7. Reception Aug 9, 6-8pm. 394-0030. Visual Studies Workshop, 31 Prince St. Ephraim Asili: The Polaroid Project. Through Sep 1. vsw.org. [ CONTINUING ] ART EXHIBITS 1570 Gallery at Valley Manor, 1570 East Ave. Betsy Liano: Colorful Visions. Through Sep. 15. Reception Aug 16, 6-8pm. 546-8400. Anthony Mascioli Gallery, Central Library, 115 South Ave. Crafting Democracy: Fiber Arts & Activism. Through Oct. 25. Reception Sep 16, 4-6pm. 428-8350. Arts Center of Yates County, 127 Main St. Penn Yan. Art in the Finger Lakes. Through Aug 31. (315) 536-8226.

22 CITY AUGUST 7 - 13, 2019

Arts Council for Wyoming County, 31 S. Main St. Athesia Benjamin: Solid Before. Different Now. Through Aug 24. artswyco.org. AXOM Gallery, 176 Anderson Ave, 2nd Flr. Look at Us: The legacy of RIT School of Art & Design from the 1960’s. Through Sep 14. axomgallery.com. Barnes & Noble, 3349 Monroe Ave. Rochester Area Color Pencil Club Show. Through Aug. 30. 586-6020. Cobblestone Arts Center, 1622 NY 332. Paper Art. Through Aug. 11. 398-0220. Create Art 4 Good, 1115 E. Main St., Suite #203, Door #5. Integrated Voices: A Female Perspective. Through Aug 24. 210-3161. Dansville ArtWorks Gallery, 178 Main St. Dansville. Summer Exhibit. Through Aug 24; Don Sylor Retrospective: Images of the Coast. Through Aug 31. 335-4746. Flower City Arts Center, 713 Monroe Ave. Camera Phone Colloquy. Through Aug 17. 244-1730.

Thursday, August 8, 5:30 p.m. at The Little Theatre, 240 East Avenue. Free. 258-0400; thelittle.org. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY

Gallery Q, 100 College Ave. Gargoyle: The Sacred and the Profane. Through Aug. 29. 244-8640. Ganondagan State Historic Site, 7000 County Road 41. Hodinöhsö:ni’ Women: From the Time of Creation. $3-$8. ganondagan.org. Geisel Gallery, 2nd Floor Rotunda, Legacy Tower, One Bausch & Lomb Place. Barbara Mink: High Finish. Through Aug. 24. thegeiselgallery.com. George Eastman Museum, 900 East Ave. $5-$15. Tanya Marcuse: Woven. Through Jan 5.; The Art of Warner Bros Cartoons. Through Oct 6; Peter Bo Rappmund: Tectonics. . Through Jul 6. eastman.org. GO ART!, 201 E Main St. Batavia. Alex Segovia: Psychedilia. Through Sep 7. goart.org. Image City Photography Gallery, 722 University Ave. Portfolio Showcase 2019. Reception Aug 9, 5-8:30pm. Through Sep 1. 271-2540. INeRT PReSS, 1115 East Main St. Six Wives. Thursdays, 10 a.m.-3 p.m. and Second Saturday of every month, 10 a.m.-3 p.m. 482-0931.

International Art Acquisitions, 3300 Monroe Ave. Marcella Gillenwater: Passing Miles. Through Aug. 31. 264-1440. Little Café, 240 East Ave. Sharon Dwyer Buzard: Then & Now. Through Aug. 23. 258-0400. Lumiere Photo, 100 College Ave. The Recollector: A Decade of Collage by Jeff Suszczynski. Through Aug 31. Main Street Arts, 20 W. Main St., Clifton Springs. Beyond Ornamental: An Exhibition of Fine Jewelry. Through Aug 16. (315) 462-0210. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. Rochester Americana: The Watercolors of Karal Ann Marling. Through Oct 27; Peter Fischli & David Weiss: The Way Things Go. Through Aug 18.; 66th Rochester-Finger Lakes Exhibition. Through Sept 15. 276-8900. MuCCC Gallery, 142 Atlantic Ave. Tania Day Magallon. Through Aug. 31. muccc.org/ artgallery. My Sister’s Gallery at the Episcopal Church Home, 505 Mt Hope Ave. Beauty in Bloom. Through Sep. 15. Reception Aug 9, 2-3:30pm. 546-8400.

Ontario County Historical Society Museum, 55 North Main St., Canandaigua. Tell a Story Exhibit & Sale. Through Sep 26. ocarts.org. Phillips Fine Art & Frame Gallery, 1115 E Main St, Door 9. The Art of the Print. Through Aug 27. 232-8120. Rare Books & Special Collections, Rush Rhees Library, UR River Campus. Victoria: A Ruling Image. Through Oct. 5. 275-4461. RIT City Art Space, 280 East Main St. Process & Purpose. s. Through Aug 23. cityartspace. rit.edu. Rochester Contemporary Art Center, 137 East Ave. Heather Swenson: Observation Towers. Through Nov 3. 461-2222. Tennie Burton Museum, 1850 Rochester St. Lima. One Hundred Years of Hats Made & Worn in Lima. Sundays, 2-4 p.m. Through September 29. 624-1050. University Gallery, James E. Booth Hall, RIT, 166 Lomb Memorial Dr. Renewable Futures: The Cultivation & Propagation of Creativity Rooted in the 1960s. Artist discussion & reception Aug 10, 4:30-6:30pm. Through Aug 10. 475-2866. UUU Art Collective, 153 State St. Ludovic Nkoth: Inheritance. Through Sep 8. 434-2223. Wayne County Council for the Arts, 108 W. Miller St. Newark. Anything Goes!. Reception Aug 10, 4-6pm. Through Aug 31. wayne-arts.com. Whitman Works Co., 1826 Penfield Rd. Penfield. Curator’s Choice: A Collection of the Area’s Finest Artworks. Through Aug 24. 747-9999. William Harris Gallery, 3rd Floor Gannett Hall, RIT. RIT Photo Honors Show. Through Aug 30. 475- 2716. The Yards, 50-52 Public Market. Karrah Teague: Wrong Planet. Saturdays. Through Aug 11. attheyards.com.

Art Events [ THU., AUGUST 8 ] Renegade Tour: Woven. 6 p.m. George Eastman Museum, 900 East Ave. $5/$10. eastman.org. [ FRI., AUGUST 9 ] Irondequoit Art Stroll. 6-8 p.m. Irondequoit Library, 1290 Titus Ave Tour through town; maps at library 336-6062. Plein Air Painting & Potluck Supper. 4-7 p.m. Burroughs Audubon Nature Club, 301 Railroad Mills Rd Victor Bring table service & dish to pass facebook.com/banc.roc. [ SAT., AUGUST 10 ] Second Saturdays. Second Saturday of every month, 10 a.m.-3 p.m. The Hungerford, 1115 E Main St. 469-8217 3-6 p.m. Cornerstone Gallery, 8732 Main St., Honeoye. A variety of open venues in Honeoye Falls baierpottery.com.

Theater America’s Sweetheart of Song: A Tribute to Connie Francis. Sat., Aug. 10, 8 p.m. and Sun., Aug. 11, 3 p.m. Lyric Theatre, 440 East Ave $25/$35. Finger Lakes Opera: La Bohème. Fri., Aug. 9, 7:30 p.m. and Sun., Aug. 11, 2 p.m. Canandaigua Academy Theatre, 435 East St Canandaigua $40 & up. fingerlakesopera.org. Finger Lakes Opera: Opera HITS!. Sat., Aug. 10, 7:30 p.m. Canandaigua Academy Theatre, 435 East St Canandaigua $10-$35. fingerlakesopera.org. The Roommate. Thu-Sat. Aug. 8-10, 8 p.m., and Sun., Aug. 11, 2 p.m. Open captioning Aug 11. Bristol Valley Theater, 151 South Main St $14-$35. bvtnaples.org. Shakespeare in the Pines: As You Like It. Sun., Aug. 11, 2 p.m. Cumming Nature Center, 6472 Gulick Rd. Shake on the Lake $13/$15. rmsc.org. Summer Academy Showcase. Sat., Aug. 10, 1 p.m. Geva Theatre, 75 Woodbury Blvd gevatheatre.org.

Festivals Brockport Arts Festival. Sat., Aug. 10, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. and Sun., Aug. 11, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Downtown Brockport, Main St brockportartsfestival.com. Corn Festival. Sat., Aug. 10, 10 p.m. Avon Circle, Genesee St. avonrotary.org. German Fest. Fri., Aug. 9, 4-11 p.m. and Sat., Aug. 10, 4-11 p.m. Spencerport Exempts Fireman’s Club, 75 S. Union St Spencerport $5. Lincoln Hill Farms Brew Fest. Sat., Aug. 10, 1-10 p.m. Lincoln Hill Farms, 3792 Rte 247 . Canandaigua $50-$75. lincolnhillfarms.com. Not-A-Festival. Sun., Aug. 11, 10 a.m.-7 p.m. Neighborhood of the Arts, University & Goodman notaba.org. Pageant of Steam. Aug. 7-10, 8 a.m.-8 p.m. NY Steam Engine Association, 3349 Gehan Rd Canandaigua pageantofsteam.org. Palmyra Pirate Weekend. Fri., Aug. 9, 8-10 p.m. and Sat., Aug. 10, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Village of Palmyra, E Main St palmyrany.com. Sterling Renaissance Festival. Saturdays, Sundays, 11 a.m.-7 p.m Sterling, 15385 Farden Rd sterlingfestival.com.

Kids Events [ WED., AUGUST 7 ] Omnipresent Puppet Theater: Cosmic Joe & the Star Pirates. 2 p.m. Winton Branch Library, 611 N Winton Rd. 428-8204. Storybook Summer: Fly Guy. Through Aug. 9, 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Strong National Museum of Play, 1 Manhattan Sq. Story readings 1pm & 2pm $16. 263-2700.


[ THU., AUGUST 8 ] Exploration Stations!. 11 a.m.-3 p.m Central Library of Rochester & Monroe County, 115 South Ave 428-8150. [ FRI., AUGUST 9 ] Entomology: Bugs, Bugs, Bugs. 1 p.m. Sterling Nature Center, 15380 Jenzvold Rd (315) 9476143. Grease: The Musical. 7 p.m. Kodak Center Studio Theatre, 200 W Ridge Rd. $12. Legally Blonde Jr. 2 p.m. A Magical Journey Through Stages, 875 E. Main St $8. mjstages.com. PHOTO BY SEAN MACIEJEWSKI

SPORTS | NATIONAL SILVER BALL TOURNAMENT

RECREATION | ROCHESTER PRIDE HOCKEY SCRIMMAGE

Genesee Country Village & Museum is host to many exhibits and events that explore the historic culture of our region, and because of its comprehensive 19th-century base ball (that’s the old timey way it’s spelled) program, it also hosts one of the nation’s largest vintage base ball tournaments, the annual National Silver Ball Tournament. The tournament returns this weekend, featuring five men’s teams from the museum’s Silver Base Ball Park League facing seven teams from across the Midwest, Northeast, Mid-Atlantic, and Canada. Games begin at 5 p.m. on Friday, and continue 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Saturday and 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Sunday, followed by the Championship game at 2 p.m. In addition to 24 matches (with 1868 rules and equipment) over three days, visitors can catch an exhibition game of the museum’s two ladies’ teams on Sunday afternoon.

Rochester’s Pride Festival might be over for this year, but there are more events and activities in store for LGBTQ community. Formed in 2018, Rochester Pride Hockey aims to provide Rochester area residents the opportunity to play ice hockey with their peers, in an inclusive environment. Organizers are in the process of forming teams to compete in organized recreational hockey leagues, out-of-town LGBTQ hockey tournaments, and opportunities for new players to learn how to play. Toward that end, Rochester Pride Hockey is hosting a drop-in game this weekend, will continue to host social events, and will work in collaboration with the Never Ever League at Bill Gray’s Regional Iceplex, which teaches participants fundamental ice hockey skills.

Friday, August 9, through Sunday, August 11. Genesee Country Village and Museum, 1410 Flint Hill Road, Mumford. $10-$18 on Friday; half price admission on Saturday and Sunday; free admission to museum members, kids ages 3 and younger, and on Sunday for all Little League players who attend in uniform. 538-6822; gcv.org — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY

Sunday, August 11, 1:30 to 4:30 p.m. at Bill Gray’s Regional Iceplex, 2700 Brighton Henrietta Town Line Road. Free, RSVP. facebook.com/rocpridehockey; rochesterpridehockey.com. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY

[ SAT., AUGUST 10 ] Wild Tinker. 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Tinker Nature Park, 1525 Calkins Rd 359-7044. Wildlife Expo. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. ROC Dome Arena, 2695 East Henrietta Rd . $10-$35. World Lion Day. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Seneca Park Zoo, 2222 St. Paul St With admission: $9$12. 336-7200. [ SUN., AUGUST 11 ] Taleah’s Story Carnival. Second Sunday of every month, 2 p.m. The Avenue Blackbox Theatre, 780 Joseph Ave. avenuetheatre.org. [ MON., AUGUST 12 ] The Buds & The Bees. 11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Winton Branch Library, 611 N Winton Rd. 428-8204. Storybook Summer: Biscuit. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Strong National Museum of Play, 1 Manhattan Sq. Story readings 1pm & 2pm $16. 263-2700. [ TUE., AUGUST 13 ] SustainABLE & Building with Biology Days. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Rochester Museum & Science Center, 657 East Ave. rmsc.org.

Special Events [ FRI., AUGUST 9 ] ZooBrew. 5:30-9 p.m. Seneca Park Zoo, 2222 St. Paul St Ages 21+ $8 /$10. 336-7200. [ SAT., AUGUST 10 ] Star Party. 8 p.m. Cumming Nature Center, 6472 Gulick Rd. $4/$7. rmsc.org. Super Caturday Extravaganza. 2-6 p.m. Flour City Station, 170 East Ave Verona Street pet rescue benefit 413-5745.

Culture Lectures [ THU., AUGUST 8 ] Thursday Night History & Nature Walk: Lower Falls Gorge. 6 p.m. Maplewood Rose Garden, Lake Ave & Driving Pk . [ SAT., AUGUST 10 ] Walking Tour: Free at Last. 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Mount Hope Cemetery, 1133 Mt Hope Ave. $10. fomh.org.

Literary Events [ THU., AUGUST 8 ] George Rollie Adams: South of Little Rock. 7 p.m. Writers & Books, 740 University Ave $3/$6. wab.org. Poetry in the Pines. 5-7 p.m. Cumming Nature Center, 6472 Gulick Rd. $12. rmsc.org. [ TUE., AUGUST 13 ] Chen Chen & Catherine Faurot. 7 p.m. Writers & Books, 740 University Ave wab.org.

MORELISTINGS find CITY event listings online

visit rochestercitynewspaper.com for more event listings including art exhibits, theater and film listings!

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 23


24 CITY AUGUST 7 - 13, 2019


Film listings in calendar section Extra reviews online.

Film

Alice Englert in “Them That Follow.” PHOTO COURTESY 1091 FILMS

Poisonous intentions “Them That Follow” (R), DIRECTED BY BRITT POULTON AND DAN MADISON SAVAGE OPENS FRIDAY, AUGUST 9 [ PREVIEW ] BY ADAM LUBITOW

It requires a confident directorial hand to tell stories about little-understood subcultures with beliefs far outside the comfort zone of the average person. Say you’re making a film set in the world of snake-handling churches: It can

be tricky to find the right tone for such a tale, where it’s already a struggle for most viewers to understand a group of people whose faith leads them to test their devotion by getting handsy with live, venomous reptiles. There’s a fine line between making an attempt to truly understand what drives this behavior, and simply using it as an excuse to gawk in horror. There’s a natural instinct to veer toward the exploitation for effect. And while “Them That Follow” — the moody debut feature from filmmaking team Britt Poulton and Dan Madison Savage — doesn’t

always keep to the right side of that line, it remains a compelling story about the clash between spirituality and the messiness of life. The film centers on a poor, isolated community of evangelical snake handlers deep in the Appalachian Mountains. This particularly sect is led by pastor Lemuel Childs (the always great Walton Goggins). His daughter, Mara (Alice Englert) has been raised in the church, but is facing a crisis as her heart begins to lead her down a path that runs counter to her faith. Mara is engaged to be married to Garret (Lewis Pullman), a fellow member of the

church and a religious true believer. But when we see Mara shoplift a pregnancy test from the local convenience store, we surmise their impending marriage may face some complications. Especially when we learn of her closeness to her childhood sweetheart Augie (Thomas Mann), who’s begun to distance himself from the church and is already on thin ice with the community. Augie’s parents Hope (Olivia Colman) — who also goes by the name Sister Slaughter — and Zeke (Jim Gaffigan) struggle to accept that their son has become a nonbeliever. Lemuel, for his part, is quick to blame the work of Satan for any cracks that may develop within his congregation. We learn that if one does get bit during a service, it’s God’s way of testing you, and only the power of prayer can heal you. A trip to the hospital is the coward’s way out; a sign your faith isn’t strong enough to trust that God will spare your life. More practically, it’s also a side effect of the church’s rules against fraternizing with outsiders and a fear that any interaction might tip off the authorities — a problem for a church whose practices aren’t, strictly speaking, legal. The plot machinations can verge on melodramatic, but Poulton and Savage’s filmmaking maintains a steady hand on the emotion of their plot. At its heart this is a story about how young people raised within a religious group react when they no longer feel they fit in with the doctrine that’s been ingrained in them their entire lives. “Them That Follow” remains a slow burn for most of its running time, only for the last act to ratchet up the tension to near unbearable levels. Much of the film’s considerable suspense comes from the realization that it’s only a matter of time before one of these characters ends up on the wrong end of a pair of fangs — call it Chekov’s rattler. An extended version of this review is onine at rochestercitynewspaper.com.

CITY Newspaper presents

Mind • Body • Spirit TO ADVERTISE IN THE MIND BODY SPIRIT SECTION, CALL BETSY AT 244.3329 x27 OR EMAIL BETSY@ROCHESTER-CITYNEWS.COM

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 25


Classifieds For information: Call us (585) 244-3329 Fax us (585) 244-1126 Mail Us City Classifieds 250 N. Goodman Street Rochester, NY 14607 Email Us classifieds@ rochester-citynews.com

Automotive #1 ALWAYS BETTER CASH PAID for most Junk Cars, Trucks and Vans. Any condition, running or not. Always free pick up and usually same day service. Call 585-3055865 CASH FOR CARS! We buy all cars! Junk, high-end, totaled – it doesn’t matter! Get free towing and same day cash! NEWER MODELS too! Call 1-866-535-9689 (AAN CAN) DONATE YOUR CAR to Wheels For Wishes, benefiting Make-A-Wish. We offer free towing and your donation is 100% tax deductible. Call 585-507-4822 Today!

For Sale EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY

All real estate advertised in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act, which makes it unlawful, “to make, print, or publish, any notice, statement, or advertisement, with respect to the sale or rental of a dwelling that indicates any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin.” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under the age of 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertisement for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. Call the local Fair Housing Enforcement Project, FHEP at 325-2500 or 1-866-671-FAIR. Si usted sospecha una practica de vivienda injusta, por favor llame al servicio legal gratis. 585-325-2500 - TTY 585-325-2547.

HomeROCHESTER Services RESIDENTIAL REMODELING

Siding - Windows - Roofing Kitchen - Baths - Fences Remodeling. Specialized Tradesman. No Money Till Finished. (585) 442-4700

Bath & Kitchen Remodeling BATHROOM RENOVATIONS EASY, ONE DAY updates! We specialize in safe bathing. Grab bars, no slip flooring & seated showers. Call for a free in-home consultation: 888-657-9488.

26 CITY AUGUST 7 - 13, 2019

ANTIQUES Victorian shaving mirror $35, cranberry glass lamps $35 channel back arm chair, cherry legs $40. Chineses watercolors framed $25. Photographs available call 585-343-5946 ART SUPPLIES - picture frames with glass, various sizes $25-$45, Large quantities of dried pigment for encaustic. Carnauba and casting wax. Call 585 343 5946 BIKE - LADIES TREK, 8 speed, 17.2 FX15L. Cash $200 or B.O. 585-663-6983 BIKE ACCESSORIES - 6 ft. cable lock $6.00; Aurora helmet adult small $ 25.00; seat bag $ 1.00. 585.663.6983 CHINA CABINET - (36” by 18” by 75”)- $30 ,it has glass doors and mirrors in the back. 585-490-5870 CLOTHES CHEST (17.5”by43.5”by22”)-$37 585490-5872 DRESSER WITH MIRROR (17” by38” by30” ) -$40 585-4905872 EXOTIC HOUSE PLANTS 10 plants - $ 3 each 585-490-5872

For Sale Antique Corner Porcelin Sink with Side Attachments. Corner out 22’, sides 20” each $50. Call 585-442-8711 FOR SALE PICTURE Solid Wood Frames with glass, various sizes $25-$45, Call 585 343 5946 LIME STONE SLAB for garden bench 18.5x50x2” $40 Lime stone slab for hearth or bench 78x12x2” $50 Call 585 343 5946 LOWE ALPINE SYSTEMS Internal Frame pack, Navy, exc.,$30; 5866484. NEED FILING CABINETS? 4 drawer, legal size, good condition. $35 each, 8 available, Your pick up, downtown Rochester. Call Lawrence Heller @262-2304 Mon - Weds PERSIAN BLACK LAMBSWOOL coat. Excellent condition size m/L $35 585-343-5946 USED WOMAN’S BIKE $50Schwinn Transit, purple 26-inch 10-speed, fully loaded. Serfas gel seat, rearview mirror, helmet, chain lock. Cash. Mary 585-233-1770 WOMEN’S LAMB PERSIAN wool coat 1950 vintage excellent condition. Medium swing style at knee with ¾ sleeve $30

Garage and Yard Sales NEWFIELD 17th ANNUAL COMMUNITY YARD SALES: Over 50+ sales, Saturday, August 17, 9am until. Maps available day of sale at 363 Main Street, Newfield, NY 14867.

Miscellaneous A PLACE FOR MOM has helped over a million families find senior living. Our trusted, local advisors help find solutions to your unique needs at no cost to you. 1-855993-2495 (AAN CAN)


Place your ad by calling 244-3329 ext. 10 or rochestercitynewspaper.com Ad Deadlines: Friday 4pm for Display Ads Monday at noon for Line ads ATTENTION VIAGRA users: Generic 100 mg blue pills or Generic 20 mg yellow pills. Get 45 plus 5 free $99 + S/H. Guaranteed, no prescription necessary. Call Today 1-844-8795238 (AAN CAN) DISH TV $59.99 For 190 Channels NOW ONLY $59.99/mo! 2 yr price guarantee, FREE Installation! Save HUNDREDS over cable and DIRECTV. Add internet as low as $14.95/mo! Call Now: 1-800-3736508 (AAN CAN)

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KILL BED BUGS! Buy Harris Sprays, Traps, Kits, Mattress Covers. DETECT, KILL, PREVENT Available: Hardware Stores, The Home Depot, homedepot.com

Adoption

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ADVENTUROUS, COMPASSIONATE COUPLE looking to adopt a baby. Loving home, supportive family, fun, creative environment, expenses

continues on page 29

HOME SERVICES To advertise in the Home Services section, call Tracey at (585) 244-3329 x10 or email classifieds@rochester-citynews.com

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rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 27


/ EMPLOYMENT

NOW HIRING!

Call David at (585) 730-2666 or email david@rochester-citynews.com to take the first step toward finding the newest member of your team.

Employment Join the New York State Workforce As a Licensed Practical Nurse (LPN)! Salary range: $40,113 to $48,772

Finger Lakes DDSO is seeking LPNs!!

Now Hiring Professional School Bus Drivers

Minimum Qualifications: Must have a current license and registration to practice in New York State, or limited permit to practice in NYS, or an application on file for a limited permit to practice in NYS. For more information: Finger Lakes DDSO Human Resources Office: (585) 461-8800 Email: opwdd.sm.FL.hiring@opwdd.ny.gov NYS Office for People With Developmental Disabilities (OPWDD) Human Resources Management Office Finger Lakes DDSO, 620 Westfall Rd., Rochester, NY 14620 An Affirmative Action Equal Opportunity Employer

Join the New York State Workforce As a Direct Support Professional! Salary range: $32,325 to $44,311 Finger Lakes DDSO will be continuously administering the Civil Service Exam for Direct Support Professionals throughout Monroe, Wayne, Ontario, Livingston, Seneca, Yates, Wyoming, Steuben, Schuyler, and Chemung Counties.

Up to $18.50 per hour!

Minimum Qualifications: High School Diploma or GED equivalent, you must have a valid license to operate a motor vehicle in New York State at the time of the appointment and continuously thereafter.

To apply, please bring your photo ID to: 970 Emerson St., Rochester, NY 14606 PH: 585-458-3230

For exam application: Finger Lakes DDSO Human Resources Office: (585) 461-8800

Veterans, Stay-At-Home Parents, Grandparents and Retirees strongly urged to apply. EOE 28 CITY AUGUST 7 - 13, 2019

Email: opwdd.sm.FL.hiring@opwdd.ny.gov NYS Office for People With Developmental Disabilities (OPWDD) Human Resources Management Office Finger Lakes DDSO, 620 Westfall Rd., Rochester, NY 14620 An Affirmative Action Equal Opportunity Employer

iVEDiX, INC. SEEKS Lead 3D Animator for Pittsford, NY location. Design user interfaces for mobile applications, interactive learning / tutorial tools, presentation designs, and info visualization. Bachelor in Animation or Comp. Graphics. Apply: Kutty, iVEDiX, 11 Schoen Place, Pittsford, NY 14534 or kutty@ivedix.com JOB OPPORTUNITY $18.50 P/H NYC $15 P/H LI $14.50 P/H UPSTATE NY If you currently care for your relatives or friends who have Medicaid or Medicare, you may be eligible to start working for them as a personal assistant. No Certificates needed. (347)4622610 (347)565-6200

Volunteers BECOME A DOCENT at the Rochester Museum & Science Center Must be an enthusiastic communicator, Like working with children. Learn more at http:// www.rmsc.org/Support/Volunteer Or call 585-697-1948 MEALS ON WHEELS needs YOU to deliver meals to YOUR neighbors in need. Available weekdays between 11:30 AM and 1:00 PM? Visit our website at www.vnsnet.com or call 2744385 to get started! SENECA PARK ZOO Society seeking volunteers and docents for ongoing involvement or special events. Roles available for all interests. Contact Volunteers@senecazoo.org to learn more. ST. JOHN’S HOME Volunteer: Looking for a friendly greeter to sit in our front lobby and talk with both guests and residents, occasionally making a delivery to a resident’s floor. Call 760-1293 for more information. TRILLIUM HEALTH FOOD Cupboard needs volunteers every Wednesday and Friday 9 am–2 pm. Contact Kristen at kmackay@trilliumhealth.org or Jen at jhurst@trilliumhealth.org. Volunteer needed Volunteer to teach local residents basic computer skills or complete computer-essential tasks. Learn more at https://digital. literacyrochester.org/volunteer


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Jam BAND “FADE TO WHITE” playing music from recently departed musicians needs keyboard player. Please call 621-5488 CALLING ALL MUSICIANS OF ALL GENRES the Rochester Music Coalition wants you! Please register on our website. For further info: www.rochestermusiccoalition.org info@rochestermusiccoalition.org 585-235-8412 CONGA PLAYER - / percussionist, looking for work in Jazz, Afro Cuban Jazz or any other musical group. Peter 585-285-1654 ESTABLISHED DIXIELAND BAND seeks drummer to play daytime gigs at area senior-living communities. Must love playing for fun not money. tommyp7734@gmail.com ROCK/METAL TRIBUTE BAND needs drummer. Complete drum set & keys provided! Practice every other week in Greece. No rental or utility charges. 585-621-5488

Rochester Psychiatric Center ENHANCED SALARY DIFFERENTIALS Registered Nurse Opportunity Rochester Psychiatric Center is seeking registered nurses to move forward in our delivery of a person-centered, evidenced-based nursing practice.

No shift rotation Full-time and Part-time employment Benefits Include: • Paid Vacation, Personal Leave, and Holidays • NYS Retirement System • Deferred Compensation Plan • Major Medical Insurance /Prescription Drug Plans • Dental and Optical Plans • Enhanced Paid Educational Benefits Call/Send your resume to: RPC Human Resource Office 1111 Elmwood Avenue Rochester, New York 14620 (585) 241-1900 Fax: (585) 241-1981 E-mail: RPC-Human.Resources@omh.ny.gov AA/EOE

FIND WHAT WORKS FOR YOU. / EMPLOYMENT

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Attorneys FARMERS, LANDSCAPERS OR GARDENERS, did you or a loved one use Roundup Weed Killer and were diagnosed with NON-HODGKINS LYMPHOMA (Cancer)? You may be entitled to compensation. Call Attorney Charles Johnson 1-800-535-5727 LUNG CANCER ? And Age 60+? You And Your Family May Be Entitled To Significant Cash Award. No Risk. No Money Out Of Pocket. For Information Call 877-2254813 NEED HELP WITH Family Law? Can’t Afford a $5000 Retainer? Low Cost Legal Services- Pay As You Go- As low as $750-$1500Get Legal Help Now! Call 1-844821-8249 Mon-Fri 7am to 4pm PCT (AAN CAN) https://www. familycourtdirect.com/?network=1 NEED IRS RELIEF $10K - $125K+ Get Fresh Start or Forgiveness‎ Call 1-855-399-2890 Monday through Friday 7AM-5PM PST (AAN CAN)

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Name: EAST AVENUE HOLDINGS LLC. Arts. Of Org. filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 07/24/2019. Office Location: Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to: C/O EAST AVENUE HOLDINGS LLC, 3785 East Avenue, Rochester, New York 14618. Purpose: Any Lawful Purpose. [ NOTICE ] 110 LAGRANGE LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 7/31/2019. Office in Monroe Co. SSNY desig. agent of LLC whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail process to 110 Lagrange Ave., Rochester, NY 14613. Purpose: Any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] FIRST FEDERAL BANK, A FEDERAL SAVINGS BANK Notice of Filing of Bank Merger Application Notice is hereby given, under Section 303.65 of the Rules and Regulations of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC), that First Federal Bank, a Federal Savings Bank (Bank), 1300 McFarland Blvd. NE, Tuscaloosa, Alabama, will file an Interagency Bank Merger Act Application for FDIC approval to combine with Premium Mortgage Corp., 2541 Monroe Avenue, Rochester, New York (Premium), with First Federal Bank surviving. It is contemplated that all offices of the abovenamed institutions will continue to be operated. The proposed transaction is one part of a multistep transaction in which: (i) the Bank’s holding company, Southeastern Financial, Inc. (Southeastern) will be collapsed, with Southeastern’s shareholders temporarily becoming shareholders of the Bank; (ii) Premium will be merged with and into a merger subsidiary of the Bank (Merger Sub), with Merger Sub surviving, with the Bank’s shareholders receiving cash consideration in exchange for their shares in the Bank and with Premium’s shareholders receiving newly issued shares of the Bank; and (iii) Merger Sub, as the successor to Premium, will be consolidated into the Bank by means of the Bank’s purchase of all of Merger Sub’s assets and assumption of all of its liabilities. Any person wishing to comment on this application may file his or her comments in writing with the Regional Director of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation at the Atlanta Regional Office located at 10 10th Street, NW, Suite 800, Atlanta, GA 30309-3849 not later than August 11, 2019. The nonconfidential

portions of the application are on file in the FDIC’s New York Regional Office and are available for public inspection during regular business hours. Photocopies of the nonconfidential portion of the application file will be made available upon request. [ NOTICE ] Jockey Printing Co LLC, Arts of Org. filed with Sec. of State of NY (SSNY) 4/9/2019. Cty: Monroe. SSNY desig. as agent upon whom process against may be served & shall mail process to 110 Fairhill Dr., Rochester, NY 14618. General Purpose. [ NOTICE ] JWI ENTERTAINMENT TECHNOLOGIES LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 07/30/19. Office: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to the LLC, 1250 Central Park Avenue, Yonkers, NY 10704. Purpose: Any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] LIMITLESS ESTATES LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 7/17/2019. Office in Monroe Co. SSNY desig. agent of LLC whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail process to 215 Townsend St., Rochester, NY 14621. Purpose: Any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Main Street Cafe And Eatery LLC Arts of Org. filed SSNY 3/28/19. Office: Monroe Co. SSNY design agent for process & shall mail to 7783 Martin Rd Lima, NY 14485 General Purpose [ NOTICE ] Merlo Enterprises LLC, Arts of Org. filed with Sec. of State of NY (SSNY) 5/22/2019. Cty: Monroe. SSNY desig. as agent upon whom process against may be served & shall mail process to Law Office of Anthony Dinitto, LLC, 2250 West Ridge Rd., Ste. 300, Rochester, NY 14626-2805. General Purpose. [ NOTICE ] Mrkt Salon, LLC Arts of Org. filed SSNY 7/3/19. Office: Monroe Co. SSNY design agent for process & shall mail to Po Box 187 East Rochester, NY 14445 General Purpose [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of 1816 Drake Road LLC; Art of Org filed with Sec’y of State (SSNY) 7/10/2019; Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 16 Noble Drive, Spencerport, New York 14559. Purpose: Any lawful purpose.

[ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of 632 Lake Road, LLC. Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 7/24/19. Office location: Monroe Co. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 15 Cairn St, Rochester, NY 14611. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] NOTICE OF FORMATION of 9965 East Lake Road LLC. Articles of Organization filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on July 25, 2019. Location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent for service of process on LLC. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to: 75 Langpap Road, Honeoye Falls, NY 14472. Purpose: Any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ]

LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) on 07/26/19 Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to the LLC at 101 Stoneycreek Dr, Rochester, NY 14616. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of EMPOWERYOU RESTORATIVE SERVICES LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) on 4/29/2019. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 238 EDGERTON STREET, ROCHESTER, NY 14607. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ]

Notice of Formation of Angels Path LLC. Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 7/26/19. Office location: Monroe Co. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 11281 43rd Street North, Clearwater, FL 33762. Purpose: any lawful activities.

Notice of Formation of ETH Properties LLC. Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 07/15/2019. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to the LLC at 3438 Rush Mendon Rd., Honeoye Falls, NY 14472. Purpose: Real Estate.

[ NOTICE ]

[ NOTICE ]

Notice of formation of CAREGIVERS WITH A HEART, LLC. Art. Of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/24/18. Office in Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, 232 Mill Rd Rochester, NY, 14626. Purpose: Any lawful purpose

Notice of Formation of Pilato Law, PLLC. Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) on 06/17/2019. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of PLLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to the PLLC at 30 W. Broad St, Rochester, NY 14614. Purpose: Practice of law.

[ NOTICE ]

Notice of Formation of Price Logistics LLC. Art. Of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 07/08/2019. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to the LLC at 777 Mile Square Road, Pittsford, NY 14534. Purpose: any lawful activities.

Notice of Formation of CONTRACTING MADE SIMPLE, LLC. Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) July 12, 2019. Office location: Orleans County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to the LLC at 5 GEDDES STREET, APT B, HOLLEY, NY 14470. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] NOTICE OF FORMATION OF DOMESTIC LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY; Name of LLC: MJT LOGISTICS, LLC; Date of filing: July 24, 2019; Office of the LLC: Monroe Co.; The NY Secretary of State has been designated as the agent upon whom process may be served. NYSS may mail a copy of any process to the LLC at 361 Armstrong Road, Rochester, New York 14612; Purpose of LLC: Any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Elevate Your Edge,

[ NOTICE ]

[ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of R&M Gallo Auto LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 6/25/19. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 2069 Drake Road, Brockport, NY 14420. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Royal Wash Eastman, LLC. Articles of Organization filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 7/16/19. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 29


Legal Ads as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to principal business location: The LLC, 2851 Monroe Avenue, Rochester, NY 14618. Purpose: any lawful activity [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Siteworks Construction & Excavating, LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) on 06/27/19 Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to the LLC at 580 Shore Dr, W Henrietta, NY 14586. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Voelkel Statistical Services LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 6/14/19. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 6740 Pittsford-Palmyra Rd. #741, Fairport, NY 14450. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of Iconic IT LLC. App. for Auth. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 6/20/19. Office location: Monroe County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 4/4/19. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Capitol Services, Inc., 1218 Central Ave, Ste 100, Albany, NY 12205. DE address of LLC: 1675 S State St, Ste B, Dover, DE 19901. Arts. of Org. filed with DE Secy of State, 401 Federal St, Ste 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: any lawful act or activity. [ NOTICE ] Renobuilt Group LLC Art of Org filed with Sec. of State on NY (SSNY) 7-01-19. County: Monroe. SSNY desig. as agent upon whom process against may be served & shal mail process to the LLC at 1320 Buffalo Rd, Ste 218, Rochester, NY 14624. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Roosevelt Highway Realty LLC, Arts of Org. filed with Sec. of State of NY (SSNY) 5/22/2019. Cty: Monroe. SSNY desig. as agent upon whom process against may be served & shall mail process to 913 Roosevelt Hwy., Hilton, NY 14468.General Purpose. [ NOTICE ] SOLE DYNAMICS PHYSICAL THERAPY PLLC (PLLC) filed Arts. of Org. with NY Secy. of State (SS) on 6/20/2019. PLLC’s office is in Monroe Co. SS is designated as agent of PLLC upon whom process against it may be served.

SS shall mail a copy of any process to c/o the PLLC, 235 Fairport Road, East Rochester, NY 14445. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] 14607 LLC (“LLC”) filed Articles of Organization with the NY Sec. of State (“SSNY”) on 7/23/19. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail a copy of process to 121 Barrington St., Rochester, NY 14607. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] Belhseine Enterprises, LLC (“LLC”) filed Articles of Organization with the NY Sec. of State (“SSNY”) on 6/25/19. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail a copy of process to 745 Titus Avenue, Annex Building, Rochester, NY 14617. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] Belhseine Seneca Street, LLC (“LLC”) filed Articles of Organization with the NY Sec. of State (“SSNY”) on 7/24/19. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail a copy of process to 745 Titus Avenue, Annex Building, Rochester, NY 14617. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] Notice of Formation of Locredo LLC. Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 06/25/19. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to the LLC at 45 Crestview Dr, Pittsford, NY 14534. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY ] Notice of formation of Radio Social Opportunity Fund LLC. Art. of Org. filed by Sec. of State of NY (SSNY) on 07/22/19. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. NYSS shall mail process to: Dan Morgenstern, 114 St. Paul Street., Rochester, NY 14604. Purpose: to invest in qualified opportunity zone property or other lawful acts or activities. [NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LLC] J & J Fiber Communications, LLC filed articles of organization with the New York Secretary of State on 07/8/2019 with an

30 CITY AUGUST 7 - 13, 2019

To place your ad in the LEGAL section, contact Tracey Mykins by phone at (585) 244-3329 x10 or by email at legals@rochester-citynews.com effective date of formation of 07/8/2019. Its principal place of business is located in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent upon whom process may be served. A copy of any process shall be mailed to 189 Elmcroft Road, Rochester, NY 14609. The purpose of the LLC is to engage in any lawful activity for which Limited Liability Companies may be organized under Section 203 of the New York Limited Liability Company Law. [NOTICE OF FORMATION] A.B Brothers Transport LLC Arts of Org. filed SSNY 6/28/19. Office: Monroe Co. SSNY design agent for process & shall mail to 722 Lawrence Rd Hilton, NY 14468 RA: US Corp Agents, Inc. 7014 13 Ave #202 Brooklyn, NY 11228 General Purpose [NOTICE OF FORMATION] Carzoom.com LLC filed Articles of Organization with the NY Sec. of State (“SSNY”) on 7/11/2019. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail a copy of process to 941 Ridge Road, Webster, NY 14580. Purpose: any lawful activity. [NOTICE OF FORMATION] CDL Home Solutions, LLC filed Articles of Organization with the New York Department of State on 6/21/19. Its office is located in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent of the Company upon whom process against it may be served and a copy of any process shall be mailed to 2117 Buffalo Rd., #143, Rochester, NY 14624. The purpose of the Company is real estate investing company (buy and sell properties). [NOTICE OF FORMATION] Miles 2home Medical Transportation LLC Arts of Org. filed SSNY 3/18/19. Office: Monroe Co. SSNY design agent for process & shall mail to 62 Gillette St Rochester, NY 14619 RA: US Corp Agents, Inc. 7014 13 Ave #202 Brooklyn, NY 11228 General Purpose [NOTICE OF FORMATION] R. P. Fedder Industrial, LLC (“LLC”) filed Articles of Organization with the NY Sec. of State (“SSNY”) on 6/18/19. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail a copy of process to 865 Garnsey Road, Fairport, NY 14450. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE OF PETITION FOR CUSTODY ] DOCKET NO.: V-0442319 FAMILY COURT OF THE STATE OF NEW

YORK: COUNTY OF MONROE In the Matter of a Proceeding for Custody under Article 6 of the Family Court Act of child whose name Monesty Brown. Petitioner is Prudence C. Kirkpatrick. Respondents are: Craig Kimbo, Helen Brown and Deborah Brown. CRAIG KIMBO PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that a petition requesting an order of custody of a child whose first name is Monesty, who is alleged to be your daughter, and whose full name and date of birth is set forth in the petition for custody, has been filed with the Family Court for the State of New York, Monroe County. A hearing before Referee Julie A. Gordon on the petition will be held at the Family Court, located at 99 Exchange Blvd., 2nd Floor, Rochester, N.Y. 14614 on August 29, 2019 at 2:15 pm at which time and place all persons having any interest therein will be heard. PLEASE TAKE FURTHER NOTICE that pursuant to CPLR 3215 if you fail to appear on the above-stated date, a default hearing will be held on that date in which the Court may issue a default judgment against you as to the relief requested in the petition. [NOTICE] Articles of Organization with respect to St. Patricks Bar and Grill, LLC, a New York Limited Liability Company, were filed with the Secretary of State of the State of New York on June 20, 2019. The County in New York State where its office is located is Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent of St. Patricks Bar and Grill, LLC upon whom process against it may be served, and the post office address to which the Secretary of State shall mail a copy of any process against St. Patricks Bar and Grill, LLC served upon it is 14 Silco Hill, Pittsford, New York 14534. There are no exceptions adopted by the Company, or set forth in its Operating Agreement, to the limited liability of members pursuant to Section 609(a) of the Limited Liability Company Law of the State of New York. St. Patricks Bar and Grill, LLC is formed for the purpose of operating a bar and grill and for all other lawful activities that may be conducted by the Company. [NOTICE] Golden Coast Ventures LLC (“LLC”) filed Articles of Organization with the NY Sec. of State (“SSNY”) on 7/12/19. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail a copy of process to 366 Rock Beach Road, Rochester, NY 14617. Purpose: any lawful activity. [NOTICE] HEARTS MIND BODY & SOUL LLC (LLC) filed Arts. of Org. with NY Secy.

of State (SS) on 7/16/19. LLC’s office is in Monroe Co. SS is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS shall mail a copy of any process to LLC, 300 Hylan Drive, Suite 6, #149, Rochester, NY 14623. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity. [NOTICE] Notice of formation of 17 Baker Street, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 6/27/2019. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 863 Trimmer Rd, Spencerport, NY 14559. Purpose: any lawful act. [NOTICE] Notice of Formation of Affordable Electric LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 05/28/2019. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 504 Brooks Ave.,Rochester, NY 14619 . Purpose: any lawful activities. [NOTICE] Notice of formation of Apex Realty Solutions, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 6/26/2019. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o The LLC, 22 Santa Dr, Pittsford, NY 14534. Purpose: any lawful act. [NOTICE] Notice of formation of CANDA GROUP, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 7/15/2019. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 11 Wind Mill Rd, Pittsford, NY 14534. Purpose: any lawful act. [NOTICE] Notice of Formation of E. A. M. Services LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 06/20/2019 . Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 918 S. Goodman St. Rochester, NY 14620 . Purpose: any lawful activities. [Notice] Notice of Formation of GRAHAM MARQUIS NEW YORK LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 07/01/19. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, 1555 Lyell Ave., Ste. 168, Rochester,

NY 14606. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [NOTICE] Notice of Formation of Hill and Valley Creative LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 3/25/2019. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 1915 South Ave, Rochester, NY, 14620. Purpose: any lawful activities. [NOTICE] Notice of Formation of Jason G. Lee LLC. Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 7/2/19. Office location: Monroe Co. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Jason Lee, 1317 Cherry Laurel Circle, Webster, NY 14580, the registered agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. Purpose: any lawful activities. [NOTICE] Notice of Formation of LAW OFFICES OF JOHN ROBERT WEST, ESQ. PLLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 07/11/19. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of PLLC: One Bryden Park, Ste. 100, Webster, NY 14580. SSNY designated as agent of PLLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, One Bryden Park, Webster, NY 14580. Purpose: Law [NOTICE] Notice of Formation of Mint Services, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 6/27/19. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 1153 Woodsboro Farms, Webster, NY 14580. Purpose: any lawful activity. [NOTICE] Notice of Formation of Nation Production Enterprises LLC. Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) on 6/26/2019. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to the LLC at 78 Park Square Hilton NY 14468. Purpose: any lawful activities. [NOTICE] Notice of formation of PUTH ENTERPRISES LLC. Art.of Org. filed Secretary of State of NY (“SSNY”) 7/18/2019. Office location: Monroe Co. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 45 Windelin Drive, Henrietta, NY 14467. Purpose: any lawful purpose.

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Notice of Formation of RELEASE BODYWORK BOUTIQUE & SPA LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 7/1/2019. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to the LLC at 4 commercial st Rocheater, Ny 14614 . Purpose: any lawful activities.

Notice of Formation of The Tranquility Room LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 04/09/2019. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 484 Sherborne Rd, Webster, NY 14580 Purpose: any lawful activities.

[NOTICE] Notice of Formation of S&W RETIREMENT, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 7/8/19. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 762 Brooks Avenue, Rochester, NY 14619. Purpose: any lawful activity. [NOTICE] Notice of Formation of Simply 2 Cleann LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 01/15/2019. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 425 e ridge rd suit 67030, Rochester NY 14621 . Purpose: any lawful [NOTICE] Notice of Formation of ST. ANTHONY’S ASSOCIATES LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 07/09/19. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Home Leasing, LLC, 180 Clinton Sq., Rochester, NY 14604. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [NOTICE] Notice of Formation of ST. ANTHONY’S ASSOCIATES MM LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 07/09/19. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Home Leasing, LLC, 180 Clinton Sq., Rochester, NY 14604. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [NOTICE] Notice of formation of SUNY Steve, LLC (the “LLC”). Articles of Organization filed with the NY Secy of State (“SOS”) on 6/18/19. The office of the LLC is in Monroe County. SOS is designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SOS shall mail a copy of such process to 1262 Bay Shore Blvd., Irondequoit, NY 14609. The LLC is formed to engage in any lawful activity for which an LLC may be formed under the NY LLC law.

[NOTICE] Notice of Formation of Wellness Simplified LLC. Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 7/19/19. Office location: Monroe Co. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: the LLC, 4 Turret Court, Webster, NY 14580. Purpose: any lawful activities. [NOTICE] Notice of Formation of WOODCRAFT CUSTOM CARPENTRY LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 5/14/2019. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 33 Breckenridge dr. Rochester N.Y. 14626. Purpose: any lawful activities. [NOTICE] Red Iron Nation LLC Arts of Org. filed SSNY 5/28/19. Office: Monroe Co. SSNY design agent for process & shall mail to Erik Sorensen 140 Bent Oak Trail Fairport, NY 14450 General Purpose [NOTICE] Small World Market, LLC (LLC) filed Arts. of Org. with NY Secy. of State (SS) on May 20, 2019. LLC’s office is in Monroe Co. SS is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS will mail a copy of any process to 145 Culver Road, Suite 100, Rochester, NY 14620. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity. [ PUBLIC NOTICE ] Notice is hereby given that the undersigned will sell at Online Public Auction pursuant to New York State Lien Law, Article 8, Section 182, per order of River Campus Storage, 169 Flanders St, Rochester, NY atwww. bid13.com. The personal property described as household goods heretofore stored with the undersigned by Tisjan Wickham, Unit #103, beginning on Aug 28. All sales are subject to prior claim, postponement and/ or cancellation.


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