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MAY 30 2018, VOL. 47 NO. 39

Perspectives

JEAN CARROLL The former YWCA president on white Americans, race, and women in poverty INTERVIEW, PAGE 8


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NFL rule aims to silence protest

Would women have the right to vote today if they were told by men to only protest inside their homes? Would African-Americans have equal protection under the law if the Civil Rights movement had been confined to the churches? Would the students of Parkland accomplish anything in terms of gun reform if they were ordered to keep their opinions inside school walls? The history of nonviolent social reform is a history of doing what is needed without asking for permission. On May 23, NFL team owners approved a policy giving players the option of staying in the locker room during the national anthem if they don’t wish to stand during the ceremonies. Players who choose to be on the field during the anthem will be required to stand. If they don’t, their team will be penalized by the NFL. How will the players respond? Will they take their protest against racism, police brutality, and systemic injustice inside where no one can see them or will they resist the order to obey and risk being fined or even fired? One thing is clear. The NFL owners acted with genuine cowardice. Their call to get attention back on football is blatantly hypocritical. As if football is all they care about. As if selling beer, cars, merchandise, sex, and tourism is not part of the NFL package. The NFL owners say it is important for players 2 CITY

MAY 30 - JUNE 5 , 2018

to honor the flag, anthem, and moment. They say the NFL-sponsored community programs is how real change will be made. They say all players must stand on the field because that is what fans want. They say their decision respected everybody’s point of view the best they could. The owners say a lot. But what do the players say? What say do they have? What rights do they have to express their concerns peacefully? Who silenced their voice? As with every major social justice movement in this country, from women’s suffrage to the Parkland students fighting for gun reform, the only way voices of dissent are heard is for dissent to happen. The NFL owners have tried to silence their players’ protest by hiding it in the locker room. They have tried to make this move about football when it is really about their own personal interests. And they have tried to take the attention off the issue, by making the issue more about the players than about what they are kneeling for. The line has been drawn. Who dares cross it? GEORGE CASSIDY PAYNE

Addressing our gun violence

I have a potential remedy for the gun violence infesting our country. On both a state and federal level, we should do the following: 1) Assess civil and criminal liability on people who own the guns most commonly used in mass shootings and who, for one reason or another, demonstrate negligence in how these weapons are obtained and used; 2) Require liability insurance for the high powered guns. If you have to buy insurance for boats, businesses, etc., why not guns? DAVID HENNELLY

News. Music. Life. Greater Rochester’s Alternative Newsweekly May 30 - June 5, 2018 Vol 47 No 39 250 North Goodman Street Rochester, New York 14607-1199 themail@rochester-citynews.com phone (585) 244-3329 fax (585) 244-1126 rochestercitynewspaper.com facebook.com/CityNewspaper twitter.com/roccitynews instagram.com/roccitynews On the cover: Photograph by Ryan Williamson Publishers: William and Mary Anna Towler Editor: Mary Anna Towler Editorial department themail@rochester-citynews.com Arts & entertainment editor: Rebecca Rafferty Staff writers: Tim Louis Macaluso, Jeremy Moule Music editor: Jake Clapp Music writer: Frank De Blase Calendar editor: Kate Stathis Contributing writers: Roman Divezur, Daniel J. Kushner, Kathy Laluk, Adam Lubitow, Amanda Fintak, Mark Hare, Alex Jones, Katie Libby, Ron Netsky, David Raymond, Leah Stacy Digital editor: Kurt Indovina Art department artdept@rochester-citynews.com Art director/Production manager: Ryan Williamson Designers: Renée Heininger, Jacob Walsh Advertising department ads@rochester-citynews.com New sales development: Betsy Matthews Account executives: William Towler, David White Classified sales representatives: Tracey Mykins Operations/Circulation kstathis@rochester-citynews.com Business manager: Angela Scardinale Circulation manager: Katherine Stathis Distribution: David Riccioni, Northstar Delivery City Newspaper is available free of charge. Additional copies of the current issue may be purchased for $1 each at the City Newspaper office. City Newspaper may be distributed only by authorized distributors. No person may, without prior written permission of City Newspaper, take more than one copy of each weekly issue. City (ISSN 1551-3262) is published weekly by WMT Publications, Inc. Periodical postage paid at Rochester, NY (USPS 022-138). Address changes: City, 250 North Goodman Street, Rochester, NY 14607. Member of the Association of Alternative Newsweeklies and the New York Press Association. Annual subscriptions: $35 ($30 senior citizens); add $10 for out-of-state subscriptions. Refunds for fewer than ten months cannot be issued. Copyright by WMT Publications Inc., 2018 - all rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, photocopying, recording or by any information storage retrieval system without permission of the copyright owner.

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URBAN JOURNAL | BY MARY ANNA TOWLER

Creating a fair city: lessons for Rochester What kind of city should Rochester be? What kind of downtown? I keep coming back to those questions because Rochester seems to be at an important turning point right now. Investors continue to be interested in development in the city, particularly downtown. And if downtown grows stronger, the rest of the city may, too. But that isn’t guaranteed. If downtown becomes primarily a home for upperincome residents, less affluent people will be kept out. Some of Rochester’s current new downtown development includes affordable housing, but not all of it. And the redevelopment of the Cadillac Hotel is resulting in the loss of low-income units. Rochester has a serious affordable housing shortage. Who should build more? Who’ll pay for it? Where should it go? Who makes sure it’s of good quality? We’re not the only city wrestling with these questions. Cities like New York, San Francisco, and Seattle have a severe housing crisis, brought on by strong growth in both economy and population. In all three cities, many residents have been priced out of the housing market in neighborhood after neighborhood. Rochester’s affordable housing problem isn’t that extreme, but it’s serious, and so far we haven’t developed a comprehensive, community-wide plan to deal with it. Affordable housing is a big topic right now in publications that concentrate on urban issues. In a series of CityLab articles, excerpted from his book “The New Urban Crisis,” Richard Florida has argued that as US cities prosper, we need to make sure everyone benefits. Florida has made a name for himself by urging city leaders to attract what he calls the “creative class” – tech workers, “knowledge workers,” artists. In an April 2017 CityLab article, “The Roots of the New Urban Class,” he admitted that focusing exclusively on attracting “creatives” has had a dark side, resulting in gentrification, higher housing costs, and inequality. In a May CityLab 2017 article, he warned against what he called “winnertake-all urbanism,” in which, he says, some places benefit from the new growth “while many more stagnate or fall further behind.” “If we are to again enjoy a widely shared and sustainable prosperity,” Florida wrote, “we must become a more fully and fairly urbanized nation.” Florida has developed a strategy he’s calling “urbanism for all,” and he has set out five “pillars” – ways to achieve it. Among them: “Build more affordable rental housing.”

Making sure that cities are inclusive is critical, says Richard Florida. And that will require the involvement of universities, developers, everybody.

Making sure that cities are inclusive is critical, he says. And, he wrote in a May 2018 CityLab article, “Revisiting the New Urban Crisis”: “It will require all of the parties that were involved in the urban revival to reorient their missions toward inclusivity.” Universities and medical centers, Florida pointed out, have played a big role in revitalizing cities. (That’s certainly been the case in Rochester.) But, Florida said, “too often, the changes they produce only benefit the affiliates of those institutions. Instead of providing subsidized housing to faculty and students, universities should also help local residents afford increasingly desirable areas.” Developers – “who have benefited so mightily from the urban revival and the subsequent rise in real estate values” also have to be involved, Florida said, so that their development areas don’t become “isolated pockets of wealth.” Developers, he said, could set aside some of their units for affordable housing in exchange for incentives, for instance. And local businesses can work with nonprofits and city governments to create affordable and low-income housing. Rochester activists have been pushing city officials to rethink their approach to downtown development, and some officials seem receptive. As I mentioned in a previous column, the uncertainty about the Morgan apartment proposal at Parcel 5 provides a good opportunity to slow down and assess where downtown is heading. Articles like Florida’s can provide some outside perspective. So, too, can the work taking place in other cities. Among them, Detroit, which I’ll bring up in a future column. rochestercitynewspaper.com

CITY 3


EDUCATION | BY TIM LOUIS MACALUSO

News

School board commits to fixing special ed Rochester school board members agreed last week to implement the recommendations of its Special Advisory Committee on Special Education, which are aimed at overhauling the failing department. Chief among those recommendations is entering into a legally enforceable consent decree “containing specified consequences should the district fail to substantially comply with its obligations.” The agreement is between the Rochester City School District and Empire Justice Center. Before the agreement was hammered out, Empire Justice had threatened to sue the district, as it did 30 years ago, to force improvements in services for special ed students. The agreement stipulates that within three years, the district will become fully compliant with all state and federal obligations to students with disabilities, and that it will meet specific milestones for compliance during that time. The district will appoint a “special” or “master educator” for outside oversight and accountability. The Advisory Committee cited a lengthy list of problems with the district’s special education department, including widespread communication problems with parents, lack of trained staff, insufficient programs to meet the needs of students, disproportionate suspensions of students with disabilities, serious shortage of bilingual special education teachers and staff, and over-classification of students needing special ed services. The Advisory Committee was led by new board member Melanie Funchess. Board president Van White said late last week that while he agrees with many of the committee’s recommendations, he has concerns about the consent decree. He said he fears that it will encourage district staff to meet the minimum requirements for compliance instead of going above and beyond them.

FREDERICK DOUGLASS | BY JAKE CLAPP

School 12 may finally get a ‘Douglass’ name

David Anderson: A name change would give Rochester “the opportunity to create a ‘renaissance’ campus, a center of learning.” FILE PHOTO

For most of the 25 years Frederick Douglass and his family spent in Rochester, they lived in a home on South Avenue. There was a farm, an orchard, and a barn on the land that, at the time, was on the outskirts of Rochester. It was a good spot for a home that frequently sheltered freedom seekers moving through the area along the Underground Railroad. Today, School 12 is on that spot, but the building is named after the 20th century politician James PB Duffy. For years, a community group has led an effort to have the school renamed to honor the Douglass family. And that change could happen soon. The Rochester school board held a public meeting last week to discuss the name change, and the comments were overwhelmingly positive, says board president Van White. The school board is considering taking an additional step to share the idea with School 12’s schoolbased planning committee, and a final vote on the name change could happen at the board meeting in June, White says.

To petition for a school name change, community members have to collect 100 signatures, but a petition for this change was submitted with more than 300. Two people did speak against the change during last week’s meeting. One objected to any change at all, and the other was hesitant because the March death of 14-year-old Trevyan Rowe, a School 12 student, was still fresh in people’s minds. The petition drive started about seven weeks ago, said Dr. David Anderson, a member of the national Frederick Douglass Bicentennial Commission and chair of the Rochester-Monroe County Freedom Trail commission, but it was part of a string of efforts going back more than 15 years. Anderson is also a founding member of Akwaaba, the Heritage Associates. The organization conducts tours, educational presentations, and reenactments of historical figures from the 19th century, specifically those involved in the fight for freedom, as a way to share lessons from that period. continues on page 12

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4 CITY

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The new theater will be expensive, and the arts leaders are concerned about where that money will come from – and whether the city might have to subsidize the theater’s operations, a consultant says. That could reduce money available to other arts organizations.

DEVELOPMENT | BY TIM LOUIS MACALUSO

Arts groups have jitters about RBTL theater plan A consultant studying the potential impact of a new theater at Parcel 5 gave City Council members a brief update last week. And it was clear from his discussion that many of the city’s arts organizations are still very concerned about the proposed new venue for the Rochester Broadway Theater League: its financial viability and its effect on them. In response to arts leaders’ concerns, earlier this year the city hired Connecticutbased AMS Planning and Research to study the issue. Part of its charge was to analyze the impact of new performing arts centers in comparable-sized cities. AMS was also asked to speak with leaders of the Rochester arts community, and at a meeting of City Council’s Arts and Culture Committee on May 23, Ray Cullom, an AMS sub-contractor, talked about what he had learned so far. AMS consultants have talked with officials at the Rochester Philharmonic Orchestra, Rochester City Ballet, Blackfriars Theatre, Downstairs Cabaret Theatre, the Rochester Museum and Science Center, Geva, and the Strong National Museum of Play, among others, Cullom said. Virtually all of them said there is a need for smaller

venues downtown. Space for smaller performances is not included in the RBTL proposal, however. Finding new sources of financial support in a competitive market are huge concerns for the arts leaders, Cullom told Council members. The new theater will be expensive, and the arts leaders are concerned about where that money will come from – and whether the city might have to subsidize the theater’s operations, he said. That could reduce money available to other arts organizations. They’re also concerned about losing patrons and donations to RBTL once a new venue is built, he said. Cullom said it’s not unusual for cities like Rochester to see a “bump” in development and improvements in arts and cultural centers after a large venue is built. A new theater can attract patrons from around the region and doesn’t have to drain smaller venues, he said. There’s an opportunity to increase attendance and grow the audience for arts and culture, he said. While the RBTL venue has been referred to as a performing arts center, it would be an auditorium, not a center, Cullom said. And while there

Concept drawings for a new downtown theater for the Rochester Broadway Theatre League at Parcel 5. ARTWORK PROVIDED

has also been some talk of having an IMAX movie theater incorporated in the building to provide extra financial support for the project, a movie theater will not work in the space, Cullom said. Movie theaters need completely different building and sound technology than auditoriums built for Broadway shows, he said. Some of the officials from the city’s other arts institutions complained that the planning process for a performing arts center on Parcel 5 has been

“opaque,” Cullom said. But Mayor Lovely Warren’s chief of staff Alex Yudelson, who was also at the meeting, said the project is still in the initial planning phase and at least of some of the ideas – such as a movie theater or a rooftop green space – are just ideas. The people helping raise money for an RBTL theater need a concept to work with, Yudelson said. “Not a lot has been solidified,” Yudelson said. “It’s hard to raise money on a hypothetical.”

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6 CITY

MAY 30 - JUNE 5 , 2018

COMMUNITY | BY JAKE CLAPP

Hyper-local groups: Buy Nothing, just ask The concept is pretty simple: If you have an item you want to share, to give away, you just make a post on Facebook. Or maybe you need something particular, like baby clothing; all you need to do is ask. With dozens, sometimes hundreds, of people involved in a hyper-local Buy Nothing group, chances are you’ll have some luck. Buy Nothing groups, which operate through individual Facebook pages for specific neighborhoods and small areas, work through the gift economy. You join a group on Facebook, and then you can post a message that you’re giving away an item or service, or if you’re in need of something, ask. Everything is free. The only rules are that you have to be over 21, live in the area encompassed by the Facebook group, not belong to another Buy Nothing community, and are approved by a group administrator. And, of course, you should be civil and friendly. There are currently 12 Buy Nothing groups in the Greater Rochester Area. “There’s a three-fold purpose in the Buy Nothing group,” says Kristine Fredrick, the administrator for the Facebook group encompassing the South Wedge, Swillburg, and Highland Park. “The aim is to build a stronger community, keep things out of the landfill, and decrease consumerism.” On Saturday, June 2, the local Buy Nothing groups will co-host the first Rochester Free-for-All, an event with around 20 tables where people can give away items or take away anything that’s of use. The Free-for-All is open to everyone, and will take place from 10:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Thomas P. Ryan Recreation Center, 530 Webster Avenue. For most of the day, there will be a per-household limit of two grocery bags worth of smaller items and one large item (something requiring more than one person to carry). The Buy Nothing Project started in July 2013 with two people, Rebecca Rockefeller and Liesl Clark, in Bainbridge Island, Washington. Giveaways through the Internet aren’t anything new — Craigslist has been a long-time go-to for free items — and the gift economy has been growing through the 2000’s, thanks to organizations like The Freecycle Network, which started in 2003. But Rockefeller and Clark wanted to emphasize the participants’ immediate community. One of the Buy

Amy Cavalier started Rochester’s first Buy Nothing Facebook group, for the Beechwood, Homestead Heights, and Culver-Winton area, in November 2016. That group now has more than 380 members. PHOTO BY JACOB WALSH

Nothing Project’s goals is to break down consumerism, but it also aims to make sure neighbors know one another. People don’t always know who lives on their block, or around the corner, Frederick says, but when you’re giving things away or accepting gifts, it’s a faceto-face interaction. “This is an opportunity for people looking for a way to build community that they might not have thought about before,” Fredrick says. The Buy Nothing Project now has groups in 20 countries, with hundreds of thousands of users. Amy Cavalier, a marketing and communications professional, started Rochester’s first Buy Nothing group in

November 2016 for the Beechwood, Homestead Heights, and Culver-Winton area. That group now has 383 members; there are 295 people in the South Wedge group, 368 in Pittsford, and 280 in East Irondequoit. The smallest Facebook group, in Corn Hill, has 40 members. Cavalier, who is also an organizer for the Rochester Free-for-All, leads a Rochester minimalists group and, she says, she was starting to look for a way to create a sharing community. She had a wheelbarrow, an ice cream maker, and a bread maker gathering dust, but she couldn’t rationalize just outright getting rid of them. The minimalists group wasn’t the


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Flower City Days at the Market Sunday, June 3, 8 a.m.ǧͪ p.m. right forum, so she started looking for other ideas and asking friends. A friend in Portland turned her on to the Buy Nothing Project. The groups have taken off over the last year and a half, Cavalier says. Baby items have become popular things to give, as have dishes, clothing, gardening tools, and used electronics. Food is a big one, too, especially spices and homegrown items. Cavalier says she has seen a 6-foot by 6-foot map of Monroe County in the 1960’s given away, and Fredrick tells a story about giving an aquarium setup to a science teacher. And there is some junk. “You’d be surprised who takes it,” Cavalier says. “I’ve given away Pabst Blue Ribbon beer. I’ve given away chocolate Easter bunnies.” Requests have also gone beyond physical items, like asking for rides or help with child care. You can’t promote your business, but you can offer skills like painting and yard work, Fredrick says. Or you can ask for or give a “gift of time” when difficult personal situations arise. Local Buy Nothing group administrators also occasionally work together, Cavalier says. An administrator volunteers with No One Left Behind, an organization that resettles Afghan and Iraqi interpreters who have helped US military, and when a need for a household item comes up, people put out the call in the Buy Nothing groups. The Rochester Free-for-All, Cavalier says, is an opportunity to get the various local groups together, and it’s a way to raise awareness about the Buy Nothing concept. If a neighborhood doesn’t have a group, anyone can start one: There’s an application form through the Buy Nothing Project at buynothingproject. org, and the organization will help. “I think people are waking up and recognizing that the only way to take back your power is to step outside of consumerism, and then kind of be a community again,” Cavalier says. More information about local Buy Nothing groups, can be found at buynothingproject.org/find-a-group. Search “Rochester’s First Free-for-All” on Facebook for the event’s page.

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CITY 7


Perspectives

JEAN CARROLL 8 CITY

MAY 30 - JUNE 5 , 2018


INTERVIEW | BY TIM LOUIS MACALUSO

Jean Carroll, who stepped down from the presidency of the YWCA of Rochester and Monroe County at the end of April, has been a champion of women’s issues for more than 30 years, especially those of poor women of color. She’d be the first to say she doesn’t have all the answers to the problems those women face. But Carroll’s personal and professional lives have overlapped in ways that have given her insight into such issues as racism, sexism, and poverty. In three decades with the YW, she led the organization through some particularly tough times: cutting expenses and steering it away from its older, image as a charity and aiming it squarely toward social change. Out went money-drains like the YW’s swimming pool, with its high heating costs, and Camp Onanda near Canandaigua, in favor of more housing and services for women. And the local YW embraced the YWCA’s national “Stand against Racism” campaign. Carroll is married to Ben Douglas, an African-American who has served on both the Rochester school board and City Council. Their long marriage produced their two biracial children, both of whom are now grown. Carroll tends to talk about racism as if it were an invader, an interloper in the American subconscious that can disguise itself in a multitude of ways – and can even leave the impression that it doesn’t exist. Though she says she and Douglas were fortunate in that both of their families have supported their marriage, she developed a keen sense of the severe damage racism causes from seeing how it affects the people she loves most. That doesn’t make her an expert on racism, she says, but it strengthened her resolve to face it. In a recent interview, Carroll talked at length about the devastating impact of poverty and racism on women of color in Rochester and the barriers those women face in getting out of poverty. And she talked about finding her own voice, as a white woman, to advocate on their behalf. The following is an edited version of that interview. CITY: What concerns you most when you reflect on your work with women, particularly women of color? What have you seen them struggling with most?

CARROLL: The issue many women of color in Rochester are dealing with is poverty. And along with poverty, there’s the stress from living in poverty. Poverty is not the same for women of color as it is for white women. There are so many more barriers for women of color, and a lot of those barriers have to do with the environment they find themselves confined to: raising children on their own, poor housing, challenges with evictions, domestic violence, and sexual abuse. The trauma that comes from living in that type of environment wreaks havoc on your

Ben Douglas and Jean Carroll: Both of their families embraced their bi-racial marriage, but, Carroll says, they know they’re fortunate. PHOTO BY RYAN WILLIAMSON

health and on your nervous system. We look at people and say that they’re resilient and they can survive this if they want to. But most people don’t have multiple traumas coming at them at the same time. Maybe you’ve found a place to live where the person who was abusing you can no longer get to you, but now you’re having trouble paying the rent. So what happens? You get evicted at the end of the month. Where do you go so that you don’t end up homeless? Maybe it’s back to the person who was abusing you. There are just so many challenges for women of color living in poverty. And I don’t know if it’s a lack of understanding or a lack of will in seriously addressing it. There’s still a lot of blaming that goes on and a lack of listening to the voices of women in poverty to understand why they are there. I think the barriers to success are not things the women we serve have a lot of control over. The barriers to success are often people who are in positions of privilege but lack the knowledge and skills to engage with women who are different from them. If it was just up to the women to make some changes in their lives, don’t you think it would have happened a long time ago? It’s not that they don’t put in the effort, time, desire, and hard work to change their lives. That’s a myth. They do, and they keep trying and trying. But so often people in power are like: Well, you know, it doesn’t have any effect on me, so, I’m sorry, but…. Here’s the thing: It definitely does have an effect on everyone. It impacts the broader

community. I’ll give you an example. You hear employers lament all the time: “We can’t find people to fill these jobs that we have.” Well, why is that? Maybe we have to figure out how to create a path for women in poverty that works for them. How do we create more win-wins for women in poverty and businesses so that their economic situations get healthier and are sustainable? Some people will hear that and say, Look, there are consequences to making bad decisions. You made the decision to get pregnant at 16 and not to finish school. Why should I pay for your mistake?

I would say that the person making that statement should think back to when they were 16 and ask themselves how capable they were in making those kinds of decisions. What was around them that influenced them to make appropriate decisions? What kind of environment did they live in? What role models did they have? But more importantly, what did they see as their future? Very often, the young women you might say “made a choice” to get pregnant were experiencing something else: They didn’t see a different future for themselves. At 16, they’ve already experienced a great deal of trauma. They may be homeless. They may be living on someone’s couch. Their mother may be suffering from addiction. So they’re looking around and thinking, This is my life. They don’t see a way out. It’s not a decision about doing what’s right. There’s no strategy to it.

All women are sold the bill of goods about Prince Charming: There’s a man that’s coming along to rescue them. And these women may not have any experience with what a healthy relationship is. When your boyfriend is making you feel good because you’re his and being his means that he gets to control everything you do, that’s not a healthy relationship. If you don’t understand the power dynamics in a relationship, that can lead to unintended things like a pregnancy at 16. Understanding what a healthy relationship is means having the confidence to say to yourself that you are worthy, and you deserve someone who respects you. You deserve someone who will not put you in a situation where your future is impaired because you could become pregnant at 16. A lot of this is about having someone to talk to about these types of things, which is what we do at the YW. It’s about having a different perspective to help you make the best decisions for you. If you compare this to the #MeToo movement: you have adult professional women in jobs who for so many years have put up with sexual harassment and sexual abuse because they felt it would endanger their future. Now imagine being 16 and having thE strength and courage to call out people who may be endangering your future. Then consider what happens if you’re a young woman of color. continues on page 10 rochestercitynewspaper.com

CITY 9


A YWCA LEGACY: SUPPORTING WOMEN Many people associate the YWCA with health and fitness, but that’s not how it started. “Since it was founded in 1883 in Rochester, it’s always been about empowering women,” says Jean Carroll, who recently stepped down from leading the Rochester organization. Like the YMCA, the YW started during the Industrial Revolution. And both supported people who moved from rural areas to cities in search of work. “Both organizations played a big role in that effort,” Carroll says. “So a lot of this was about finding housing when you came to the wicked city.” The other part of the organizations’ early effort was helping the new urban arrivals develop jobs skills, Carroll says, because many people were trying to transition from farm work to factory or office work. Given the country’s history with racism, many YWCA’s were on the front lines of striving for racial equity. The YWCA cafeterias were among the first places where women of color were served in public areas, Carroll says. In the mid-20th century, the Y offered dorm-style rooms to women. But by the late 1960’s, the Rochester Y had to reexamine its mission and the services it offered women. There was a steady increase in poverty in Rochester during her tenure at the Y, Carroll says. As the Y has responded to community needs, housing has become one of its main services. The Y had 42 housing units in its downtown facility when Carroll assumed leadership. Now there are 146 units, some in the downtown Y and some in two others off site, serving women who need emergency housing due to issues like domestic violence and addiction recovery. And, Carroll says, “We now see more families.” The Rochester Y also provides school programs for teens and young adult women. One of them, “Be Prepared, Be Responsible,” is often part of high school sexual health classes, but the programs aren’t limited to school settings, Carroll says. Above: The cornerstone to the YWCA building was set in 1947 on North Clinton Ave. by Hattie M. Strong. PHOTO PROVIDED

10 CITY MAY 30 - JUNE 5 , 2018

Children at the YWCA in 1959: The Y’s offerings used to include fitness classes for children and adults and a summer camp for girls. PHOTO PROVIDED

If you say no, almost anything can happen. We’ve had instances at the YWCA where the mother’s boyfriend was sexually abusing that 16-year-old girl, and he was the father of her child. What do you do then? How do you handle that? Where will you live? It gets very complex when you have no resources. Many people are inclined to blame poor people for being poor: “My family was poor, too. But I pulled myself up by the boot straps, so why can’t they?”

People need to reflect on who helped them. Was it your parents? Yes, but was it only your parents? Was it your Girl Scout troop? Was it the lady at the end of the block who had the resources to pay you to mow her lawn? There were a lot of people in your life that contributed to your success. People who think they pulled themselves up by their bootstraps don’t recognize that often white privilege was playing a role. And white privilege has been operating for hundreds of years in this country. That has not been the case for people of color. There are a lot of things people can change. You can change your hairstyle. You can change the way you dress. But you can’t

change the color of your skin. It doesn’t matter whether you’re poor or rich. People who are not white are called upon to prove themselves every day at a level that white people have never had to do. My parents were both Irish immigrants, and they had a fourth-grade and eighth-grade education, but they were white. They spoke English. Their kids were not without challenges, but they were successful. Unfortunately, because of our history, people of color today experience constant micro-aggressions. I know a young woman, a professional woman, a woman of color, who went with her family to a travel agency to plan a vacation. When they walked into the travel agent’s office, the agent said to them, “I think it would be best if you looked online for vacation opportunities. You can get some really good deals that way.” There was an immediate assumption, without even taking a moment to talk to them, that they couldn’t afford a vacation because they were people of color. They were a successful family, but because they were a family of color they were automatically seen as low income and not worthy of the agent’s services or time.

This unconscious bias is all around us, and it’s so much a part of the water that we drink. It’s not something white people have to think about. It’s part of what life is in America, and it’s become normalized. But it’s not normal. Being married to someone who is AfricanAmerican has given me a bit of a window into understanding. And having two children of mixed race also has been part of my experience. When the national office called upon us to use the “Eliminating Racism and Empowering Women” logo, that was a conscious decision at the national level. They felt that if we were going to empower all women, we also had to be dedicated to eliminating racism. I was very fearful about taking that on. I felt like, here we are doing this great work, and at least half of the women we serve at the YWCA are women of color. So I am thinking: We’re already doing it. We have housing. We have services to help teens. Aren’t we eliminating racism by providing the services that women need? And the answer that I got from women of color was, “No, that is not enough.” These women were saying, We are not simply a charitable organization. We need to be an organization that’s committed to social change.


That internal work is still an ongoing challenge for the organization itself. That’s not a criticism. That’s to say that all of this is an ongoing process. It’s never finished. What was it like for you and Ben to be together when you got married?

Among the changes during Carroll’s tenure leading the YWCA: elimination of “money drains” like the swimming pool, shown here in an early Y photo. PHOTO PROVIDED

I really did think to myself, what do I know about it? Yes, I knew something, but really, what do I know? I’m a white woman. How do I begin to articulate the experience of a person of color? And I was really nervous about coming back to Rochester and even putting this new logo on my building, because I was thinking that there are organizations out there like the NAACP, Action for a Better Community, and the Urban League that would see it and say to me, “Who do you think you are?” But they didn’t do that. Maybe it was because I’ve always been conscious of having more women of color on my board of directors to help build relationships with these organizations. I was still having this concern, OK, what do I say about this? There is a book, “Witnessing Whiteness,” by Shelly Tochluk. She’s a teacher, and she really hit the nail on the head in terms of where the critical issue of race is in this country. And she raises these questions: What can white people do? What is the role of white people in advancing racial equity? Her book gave me a framework with which to move forward. She helped me to articulate what I think about this. Many white people would almost reflexively agree with your anti-racism message, but how dO you know whether you’re really changing attitudes? For instance, what happens when the black family moves in to the house next door?

Or what happens to the young black man who comes into your store? Or you’re trying to fill a job

opening and you’re looking at resumes and the name on the resume is Shekeena; what happens? There are many approaches to this, but the approach we’re taking is educational, where people can come together and learn together across race and ethnicity. How often do we really have the opportunity to engage in a conversation about race with somebody who is of a different race? How do you even begin that conversation? Race is one of those things we don’t talk about, like religion, politics, and how much money you make. What we’re attempting to do is to get that conversation about racism going across boundaries, because we are so segregated. Even if you have people of color in your workplace, those kinds of conversations from a white person’s standpoint are fraught with landmines. It’s fearful going into that territory, because often you lack knowledge about “the other.” How do you get knowledge about the other unless you seek that out? How are you going to interact with people in your workplace when you don’t really have the knowledge and skills to do that? We decided we would provide opportunities for people to do that. It’s not something new. When Bill Johnson was mayor, he created the Bi-racial Partnership in the early 90’s. But it wasn’t sustained. It’s about building awareness. Many people don’t know about our real history. You hear people say, “Well, slavery and all that happened a long time ago. We’re past all of that, aren’t we?” And the answer is, of course, no, we’re not.

The Federal Housing Authority was set up after the Great Depression to help people buy a home. It was especially helpful to the GI’s after World War II. But efforts were also made to make it difficult for people of color to have access to those loans. So when people think about their own personal history, they can relate to the fact that maybe their parents or grandparents were beneficiaries of these low-interest home mortgages and home ownership. And because they had that, they were able to build wealth and transfer it to their children and grandchildren. The more you can help people see how their family was treated differently, the more likely they are to understand racial inequity. Sure, their families may have had hardships, but they were still treated differently because they were white. Becoming knowledgeable of authentic and honest history is critical to building understanding about racism, but it’s not enough. You still have to build your skills about how to have this conversation. For instance, do you interrupt someone when they say something that’s racist? Do you say, “That’s a racist comment,” and put them on the defensive? This whole thing requires a lot of courage. It requires humility. When we came out with our new logo “Eliminating Racism and Empowering Women,” some board members said: “That’s so negative. Can’t we say something like ‘Encouraging Diversity’?” No, it’s not same thing.

Honestly, we were very fortunate. Maybe we lived in our own little bubble. But we both had families who were very accepting, and we knew that wasn’t the case for everyone. We’ve had experiences that weren’t positive. And I have experienced some of the challenges that people of color experience because I was with a person of color. What’s funny about this were my first reactions; I did what most white people do. We’d be waiting in line in a restaurant and people would get seated ahead of us, and Ben would groan. He would say, “I’m really getting annoyed with this,” and I would say “Well, maybe they had reservations. There’s probably some other reason for it.” He’s had many experiences of being overlooked and treated as less than because of his skin color. Part of this was a learning experience for me, because we’re taught that every achievement in life is about individual merit. Well, that’s a lot of crap. I know that’s true from just his day-to-day life and some of his work experience as well. I have a much greater understanding of what happens in the workplace than I ever would have had if I wasn’t married to him. I have a great appreciation not only for the micro-aggressions that happen, but the outright discriminatory practices that continue to play out. What was it like to walk into a store with your bi-racial children? Did people think they were your children?

No, not all the time. I remember once we were at Hersheypark, and we’re doing the usual family thing with the kids, and we were waiting in line. And the guy in front of me saw me and said, “Oh, are they Fresh Air kids?” I had this great dream of one day starting a multi-racial child care center at the Y, and it was just so hard to do, because a child care center is really a privilege that is in most cases limited to people who are middle income and above. And if they are middle income and above, are they willing to have their children be with children who are low income? No. People will say it’s a class issue, but that’s just a way of making themselves feel comfortable. This way they don’t have to have the real conversations, and they don’t have to do the hard learning that’s involved in understanding racism. We need to turn the table and be able to go directly to that conversation and ask: “How did so many people of color end up being low income? Why is that? Why is there such a disproportion?” And no, it’s not because they aren’t working hard. rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 11


School 12 continues from page 4

“I see that as critical to understanding how and why we stumble and fumble with current issues, such as racial segregation and underperformance,” Anderson said in an email. That is a key element in the effort to “persuade elected officials to name School 12,” he said, “so that it reflects the experiences of the family that resided at that location for more than 20 years.” The city’s South Avenue library branch, which is part of the same building complex as School 12, was renamed the Frederick Douglass Community Library in 2016. The Frederick Douglass Recreation Center is on the other side of the school. By changing the school’s name to Douglass, Anderson said, “Rochester would have the opportunity to create a ‘renaissance’ campus, a center of learning, especially, for families and the teachers of their children.” A new name hasn’t yet been settled on, but there’s a lot of support for either naming the school for Anna Murray Douglass — an active conductor on the Underground Railroad and Frederick Douglass’s wife of 44 years — or using the names of both Frederick and Anna Douglass. “Anna Murray was as committed to the cause of abolition of slavery as her husband,” Kenneth Morris Jr. wrote in a letter to the school board. Morris is the great-great-greatgrandson of Frederick and Anna Douglass and is president of the Frederick Douglass Family Initiatives. “It is vitally important to continue to lift up the life and legacy of our great American hero, Frederick Douglass,” Morris wrote. “It is equally as important to elevate the heroine who shared the burdens of life with him and made his work possible. Of the more than 50 schools in the Rochester City School District, only three are named after women. The Douglass home on South Avenue was their second in Rochester. For their first four years here, the family lived on Alexander Street, near what is now East Avenue. In 1852, they built a new home on South Avenue and lived there for two decades before a fire destroyed the home on June 2, 1872. A definitive explanation for the fire has never been known, but it’s commonly believed to have been the work of an arsonist. Anderson has spoken in the past about the need for incorporating more of Douglass’s works into Rochester curriculum. And school board President Van White echoed that sentiment. “This idea doesn’t have to stop at signage changes outside that building,” White said. “This can be as big as people can imagine it. We have a wonderful example of how you can imagine beyond the struggle, beyond your current situation. Frederick Douglass is that example.” 12 CITY MAY 30 - JUNE 5 , 2018

For more Tom Tomorrow, including a political blog and cartoon archive, visit www.thismodernworld.com

URBAN ACTION This week’s calls to action include the following events and activities. (All are free and open to the public, unless otherwise noted.)

relationships with others, living in harmony, and respecting the planet. The event will be held at Downtown United Presbyterian Church, 121 North Fitzhugh Street, at 7 p.m.

ROCLA will hear lessons from LWV will hold the Andes annual meeting The Rochester Committee on Latin America will present a program titled “When the Condor and the Eagle Meet: Solidarity Delegations as a Way to Create a Better World” on Wednesday, June 6. Nazareth College Professor Esperanza Roncero will share her experience of living in the Andes for many years and what she learned about the indigenous culture, which is steeped in spirituality. Roncero will talk about what the modern Western capitalist society can learn from indigenous peoples’ values and practices, which emphasize building

The League of Women Voters of the Rochester Metropolitan Area will hold its annual meeting on Thursday, June 7. The League conducts and sponsors studies and holds public events focused on democracy and government. It also conducts the local Fair Campaign Practices Initiative to provide oversight of political candidates’ campaigns. Women interested in joining the League are welcome at the June 7 event, which will be held at Locust Hill Country Club, 2000 West Jefferson Road in Pittsford, from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. Cost: $10. Reservations: 262-3730.

The League will co-sponsor a District 25 Democratic Primary Debate with WROC News on Friday, June 15. The program will broadcast live on WROC-TV Channel 8 from 7 to 8 p.m.

Dem hopefuls will speak at candidate event

Democrats hoping to succeed Louise Slaughter in Congress will take part in a candidate forum on June 1, sponsored by the Rochester People’s Climate Coalition, Faith Communities Alliance of Greater Rochester, and the Rochester area League of Women Voters. The event will take place at Mt. Olivet Baptist Church, 141 Adams Street, from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. The four will compete in a Democratic Primary on June 26.


Dining & Nightlife a.m. to 10 p.m.; Friday and Saturday, 7 a.m. to midnight; and Sunday, 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. Find them at localsonly311.com or on Facebook.

Quick bites

Set to open in June, Locals Only will source its food, booze, and coffee beans from New York State farms, distilleries, and roasters. PHOTO BY RENÉE HEININGER

Embracing all things local in the East End [ CHOW HOUND ] BY KATIE LIBBY

The East and Alexander area has typically been more of nighttime destination than a place to stop for coffee or to grab a quick lunch during the workweek. But the recent opening of Pop Roc, a cereal and coffee bar on East Avenue, and the soon-to-be-open Locals Only (311 Alexander Street) will hopefully breathe new life to the area before the sun goes down. General Manager Sapphire Courchaine, Head Chef Adam Pastecki, and Bar Manager Keanan O’Brien have been working for the past year to create an all-in-one stop for those that live and work in the area. Locals Only will house a coffee and juice bar, full kitchen, and cocktail bar and offer patrons the opportunity to grab-and-go or sit down and eat. “It’s going to be a quick service concept,” says Pastecki, “there’s a lot of foot traffic in this neighborhood and for people that don’t want to sit and hang out they can just grab something and get out of here.” The emphasis, as the name of the business clearly states, is to celebrate all things local. “Local farmers, local distilleries, local roasters, we’re trying to get all that good energy from New York together,” Courchaine says. The business is backed by owners Louie Maier, Doug Saraci, and Gaetano Abbate, who have pretty much given their

management team free rein of the concept and execution, as long as they create a beautiful space. The design is modern and minimalist, and they have worked with the UUU Art Collective to commission a mural by local artist Muhammad Zaman. Courchaine has worked the coffee scene in Rochester for several years with stints at Joe Bean and Boxcar, and says her goal is to give the customer a unique coffee experience. “I want it to be more culinary-inspired, different syrups and flavors and sauces,” she says. They’ll source their beans from multiple roasters from New York State and rotate on a monthly basis, opening with New York Citybased roaster City of Saints. The food program headed by Pastecki will feature breakfast, lunch, brunch, and a small plate dinner service. Counter service will be available Monday through Friday, with table service available on Friday and Saturday evenings. While their menu is still in development, Pastecki’s core concept is keeping the ingredients seasonal with many vegan and vegetarian options available. For brunch, look for a chicken and waffle special, along with steak and eggs. The bar has 12 taps, and not just for beer — they’ll offer a few cocktails on tap as well. Locals Only (311 Alexander Street) is slated to open in June. They will be open Monday from 7 a.m. to 2 p.m., Tuesday through Thursday, 7

The Cub Room (739 South Clinton Avenue) and Iron Smoke Distillery have teamed up to host 80s Whiskey Brunch on Sunday, June 3, from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. at The Cub Room. Music from the era of Aqua Net and tasty guitar licks will be performed by Tommy Brunett & The Whiskey Soaked Scoundrels. Eighties attire encouraged, but not required. Call 363-5694 to make a reservation. The Rochester Historical Society will host its second History Happy Hour lecture series at Nox: Craft Cocktails & Comfort Food (302 North Goodman Street, Village Gate) on Friday, June 8, from 6 to 9 p.m. Members of the Rochester Historical Society will be talking about The Erie Canal and the Making of Rochester. There is no cover charge and there will be food and drink specials all night long with all proceeds going to the Rochester Historical Society. 471-8803. Casa Larga (2287 Turk Hill Road) will host a Farmer’s Market Quick Pickles class on Sunday, June 10, from 2:30 to 4:30 p.m. Maggie Klee, owner of Real Delicious Kitchen, will teach participants new knife skills and how to make your own quick pickles. All supplies are provided and you’ll leave with two jars of pickles and a recipe packet. Tickets are $40 and can be purchased at casalarga.com. Rohrbach Buffalo Road Brewpub (3895 Buffalo Road) will host a Take Me Out to the Ball Game-themed food and beer pairing dinner on Tuesday, June 12, from 6 to 8 p.m. Tickets are $45 and include a guided tour of the brewery and a five-course dinner. All reservations must be made by June 5 and entrée choice is made at the time of reservation. Visit rohrbachs.com/events or call 594-9800 to book your reservation.

Openings

The Beer Hall Grill & Taps has replaced Stoneyard American Beer Hall & Grill at 1517 Empire Boulevard. Mario’s will be reopening in the former Bazil Restaurant at 1384 Empire Boulevard. Named Mario’s Homemade Pasta Kitchen, the restaurant’s new focus includes fresh, handmade pasta and is slated to open in June. Look for updates at mariospasta.com.

Closings

Orbs Restaurant and Bar (758 South Avenue) has closed. The Old Stone Tavern will be moving into the space at an undisclosed date. Chow Hound is a food and restaurant news column. Do you have a tip? Send it to food@ rochester-citynews.com. rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 13


Upcoming [ SINGER-SONGWRITER ]

Music

Bill Kirchen: “Songs and Stories.” Saturday, June 16. Bop Shop, 1460 Monroe Avenue. 8 p.m. $20. bopshop.com; billkirchen.com. [ SOUL ]

Ruby Velle & The Soulphonics. Wednesday, June 20. George Eastman Museum, 900 East Avenue. 6 p.m. $8-$10. eastman.org; rubyvelleandthesoulphonics.com. [ ROOTS ]

The Suitcase Junket. Thursday, August 9. Abilene Bar and Lounge. 8 p.m. $12-$15. abilenebarandlounge.com; thesuitcasejunket.com.

Tigue

SATURDAY, JUNE 2 BUG JAR, 219 MONROE AVENUE 8 P.M. | $10 | BUGJAR.COM; TIGUEMUSIC.COM [ EXPERIMENTAL ] If you’re looking for music that feels like discovering a sixth sense, Tigue has unique powers and might just be the answer. You’ll be hard pressed to be able to compare the Brooklyn-based band (and Eastman School alums) to anyone else. Tigue is a trio of percussionists creating music that is abstract, minimalistic, and easy to get lost in. Tigue’s music is made to be felt, not mulled-over, and by default, these dreamy tunes are made to be danced to. CD-ROM and Juicy Connotation will also perform. 21 and older show. — BY KATIE PRESTON

Geneva Music Festival THURSDAY, MAY 31, THROUGH SUNDAY, JUNE 17 VARIOUS LOCATIONS $25-$175 | 315-521-1623; GENEVAMUSICFESTIVAL.COM [ CLASSICAL/JAZZ ] There’s a lot to love about the concerts

at this year’s Geneva Music Festival. With a full slate of dynamic performances by compelling artists, fans of chamber music can hear works by Bach, Britten, Dvořák, Fauré, Schoenberg, and more — featuring such artists as violinist Jinjoo Cho, pianist Michelle Cann, the Cavani Quartet, and festival director Geoffrey Herd on the violin. Other nonclassical highlights include a Friday, June 8, concert featuring Broadway actor Syndee Winters, of “Hamilton,” performing a tribute to Lena Horne entitled “LENA: A Moment with a Lady”; the centennial of jazz great Thelonious Monk will also be celebrated when the legendary musician’s son, drummer and composer T.S. Monk, performs on Saturday, June 9 (joined by Winters). Concerts at various locations in Geneva, Auburn, Canandaigua, and Skaneateles. — BY DANIEL J. KUSHNER

THE PHOTO BY CATALINA KULCZAR

JAZZ CRUISES ANNOUNCED FOR 2018! TICKETS ON SALE NOW! online at www.jazz901.org

● Smugtown Stompers onJune 11 ● Jimmie Highsmith Jr. onJuly 9 ● The Blues Cruise returns with Hanna and The Blue Hearts onSeptember 10! For more info & tickets: jazz901.org or 585-966-2660 14 CITY MAY 30 - JUNE 5, 2018

THE

word REVIEWS, PREVIEWS, & RUMINATIONS FROM MUSIC WRITER FRANK DE BLASE ONLY AT ROCHESTERCITYNEWSPAPER.COM


[ ALBUM REVIEWS ]

[ WED., MAY 30 ]

Noah Preminger and Rob Garcia

ACOUSTIC/FOLK

“Chopin Project” Connection Works Records noahpreminger.com

Bloodshot Bill WEDNESDAY, MAY 30 ABILENE BAR AND LOUNGE, 153 LIBERTY POLE WAY 8 P.M. | $10 | ABILENEBARANDLOUNGE.COM; BLOODSHOTBILL.COM [ ROCKABILLY ] Greasy lone wolf Bloodshot Bill sounds

like a mixture of pomade, Nervous Norvus, Frogman Henry, Hasil Adkins, and The Phantom. His voice is positively elastic as he shifts his song selection from crooners to screamers to heartbreakers. The energy is intense. He’s a one-man band that sounds like a 10-man band. It’s gonna get steamy. — BY FRANK DE BLASE

Samantha Fish SATURDAY, JUNE 2 FLOUR CITY STATION, 170 EAST AVENUE 7 P.M. | $15-$35 | FLOURCITYSTATION.COM; SAMANTHAFISH.COM [ BLUES ROCK ] Samantha Fish may seem angelic at first

glance, but she’s actually a scrappy rock ‘n’ roll vixen. Raised by a musical family in Kansas City, Missouri, Fish switched from drums to guitar around age 15, and self-released her first album by the time she was 20. She has since released five studio albums. Fish went for a vintage R&B vibe on her March 2017 album, “Chills & Fever,” and then quickly switched it up with more soulful, roots-y songwriting on “Belle of the West,” released in November. She has a gritty voice, with the fiery passion of Janis Joplin and a warm, melismatic lower range, shining brightest when it opens up into its higher register as each song builds. Supported by horns, drums, and bass, Fish’s music is a romp-stomping party that fans of contemporary blues, Americana, garage rock, and roots music can all equally enjoy. — BY KATIE HALLIGAN

Alex Myth & Owen Eichensehr. Sticky Lips

BBQ Juke Joint, 830 Jefferson Rd. 585-292-5544. stickylipsbbq.com. 6:30 p.m.

Consider the great composers in jazz: Charlie Parker, Thelonious Monk, Duke Ellington, Frédéric Chopin … Chopin? He might not have known it, but with great chord structures and gorgeous melodies, Chopin has become a favorite of jazz musicians. The latest evidence is Noah Preminger and Rob Garcia’s “Chopin Project.” Preminger is a fast-rising young saxophonist and Garcia a first-call drummer on the Brooklyn jazz scene. They are joined on this project (part of the “Dead Composers Club”) by two excellent musicians, guitarist Nate Radley and bassist Kim Cass. When I first listened to this album, it sounded like a straight-ahead set, with great heads and adventurous improvisation. Then I created a playlist with all of Chopin’s original nocturnes and preludes positioned before each corresponding track (Rubinstein, meet Preminger!) and that was a revelation. Chopin, of course, was brilliant, but it is fascinating to hear where Preminger and Garcia take his compositions. There are so many highlights: the runaway bass and drum solo on Prelude No. 8, the varied guitar tones and solos throughout, and the saxophone taking wonderful rides on every theme.

CLASSICAL Springfest. Eastman Community Music School, 10 Gibbs St. esm.rochester. edu. Through June 3. Full schedule online. JAZZ

Margaret Explosion. Little

Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 258-0400. 7-9 p.m. AMERICANA

JJ Grey & Mofro, Freddy & Francine. Funk ‘n Waffles,

204 N Water Street. 448-0354. 8 p.m. $30/$35. POP/ROCK

— BY RON NETSKY

Big Logic & The Truth Serum. Dinosaur Bar-B-Que, 99 Court St. 325-7090. dinosaurbarbque.com. 9 p.m.

Steve Slagle “Dedication” Panorama Records

Steve Slagle is a master of the saxophone slur, and on his new album, “Dedication,” he employs it brilliantly in his melodic improvisations. Slagle began his career in the mid-1970’s in the bands of Machito, Ray Barretto, and Lionel Hampton and went on to play with Jack McDuff and Carla Bley before forming his own bands with Mike Stern and Dave Stryker. He has also worked frequently with fellow saxophonist Joe Lovano. Slagle is also an excellent composer, which is evident from the album’s infectious opening cut, “Sun Song,” dedicated to — and written in the style of — Sonny Rollins. As indicated by the title, all of the album’s tunes are dedications, to a genre (Brazilian music in the case of his lovely “Triste Beleza”) or to a person (“Sofi,” dedicated to his young daughter). Special guest Stryker contributes a beautiful ballad, “Corazon,” and some excellent guitar solos. Slagle has superb support throughout from Lawrence Fields on piano; Scott Colley, bass; Roman Diaz, percussion; and Bill Stewart, drums. — BY RON NETSKY

The Kara Fink Band, The Daily Milestone, No Big Deal. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe

Ave. 9 p.m. $6/$8. Subsentry. Record Archive, 33 1/3 Rockwood St. 5-8 p.m.

[ THU., MAY 31 ] BLUES

Bike Night: Mikey C. & Chuck DeRose. Dinosaur

Bar-B-Que, 99 Court St. 3257090. dinosaurbarbque.com. 6 p.m. CLASSICAL

Eastman at Washington Square. First Universalist

Church of Rochester, 150 Clinton Ave S. 5462826. esm.rochester.edu/ community. 12:15-12:45 p.m. Hornist Erin Futterer and her quartet. continues on page 18

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Music

The Rochester Women's Community Chorus rehearses for its upcoming 40th anniversary concert. The performance, "How Can I Keep From Singing?," takes place Saturday, June 2. PHOTO BY JACOB WALSH

Can’t help but sing Rochester Women’s Community Chorus 40TH ANNIVERSARY CONCERT: “HOW CAN I KEEP FROM SINGING?” SATURDAY, JUNE 2 THE HARLEY SCHOOL, 1981 CLOVER STREET 7:30 P.M. | $12 ADULTS; $10 STUDENTS AND SENIORS; $6 CHILDREN THERWCC.ORG; 376-7464

[ FEATURE ] BY DAVID RAYMOND

The choral rehearsal begins like any other: singers gather, and their excited, friendly chatter gradually settles down as the director guides the singers through breathing, stretching, and vocal warmups. The focus and the concentration grow as the women pay attention to balance and blend, tuning and tempos. The rehearsal space contains nearly 50 women, swaying and listening to each other as one, and achieving every choral director’s ideal: not one of them has her head in her music. The Rochester Women’s Community Chorus, under its artistic director Kristy Houston, is meeting for its customary Tuesday 16 CITY MAY 30 - JUNE 5, 2018

evening rehearsal and preparing for its 40th anniversary concert, which will take place June 2. The music is melodic, inspiring, and fun. But much more than music is being made here. The RWCC 40th anniversary concert will also include some of the group’s history — and the RWCC’s long history reflects some gradual but significant changes in society. Deborah Wachspress, a recently retired music teacher, did not found the group, but her leadership shaped RWCC into what it is today. The organization had its informal beginning in 1979 as the Rochester Womyn’s Community Chorus. “The original mission,” Wachspress says, “was to use music to espouse feminism. The songs were composed by women. The lyrics used gender-neutral pronouns. The group was anti-patriarchal. All decisions, including musical ones, were decided by consensus.” That group disbanded in 1984, but Wachspress revived it, with some fundamental changes, in the fall of 1985. She renamed it “Women’s Community Chorus” and began choosing the music herself, before establishing a music selection committee. The group has always been a non-auditioned chorus.

“I attended music school with Nick Williams, the founder of the Rochester Gay Men’s Chorus. In fact, RGMC provided us with our first opportunity to perform, in December 1985 at Downtown United Presbyterian Church.” At that concert, the RWCC consisted of just five women. Since that modest beginning, the group has given concerts twice a year, for 33 years and counting. “It was never officially a lesbian chorus,” Wachspress says. “It was a community chorus for women. Externally, LGBT politics didn’t really play a role. Internally, there were always varied viewpoints about how political we should be, what organizations we should perform for, and where we should sing.” Kristy Houston calls her predecessor “a master at the ‘community’ part of ‘community chorus.’” Under Wachspress and Houston, RWCC has performed at women’s coffeehouses; college campuses; political rallies; exchange concerts with other women’s choruses; national festivals; and benefit concerts for, among many others, Foodlink, Willow Domestic Violence Center, ArtPeace, Making Strides Against Breast Cancer, and Water for South Sudan.

The RWCC has also served as an extended family for its members. “We provided comfort, food, and music for the family of a singer who took her own life,” Wachspress says. “We sang around deathbeds and at funerals for too many of our members. Women made lifelong friends, and some met lifetime partners. Women dealing with trauma, mental health issues, or physical issues felt safe. Women who were transitioning could come and sing a lower part if necessary. Women ‘came out’ to family members because of our nurturing environment.” RWCC’s informality is ideal for women balancing family lives and careers who also want to take part in musical and social activities. One of those women was Kristy Houston, who joined the chorus in 2006. “I was new to Rochester and to New York State,” she says, “and RWCC was a musical opportunity and a welcoming community. I saw so many women who wear many hats — jobs of every sort, caretakers for various generations of their family, community leaders — spending their precious free time coming together with others to create beautiful music.” Houston teaches instrumental music at The Harley School. “Leading RWCC has allowed me to indulge my love of choral music in a way I don’t get to during the day,” she says. “I have always told my students that Rochester has a wealth of opportunities for people to fill their soul with music, in whatever kind of group fits them. “We’re bucking the trend for community choral music organizations,” she adds. “The average age of our singers is definitely below the national average. I attribute that to the emphasis on social connections, as well as the diversity of our musical repertoire.” Houston calls the RWCC 40th anniversary concert “our greatest hits.” It will be a sampler of the group’s repertoire, whose focus has remained consistent: messages of hope, acceptance, and inclusion that struck a chord in 1980’s America and are needed even more today. That repertoire also includes world music, favorite songs by writers like Holly Near, and the group’s signature song, a commissioned piece by Elizabeth Alexander called “What’s Keeping You from Singing?” “One of my favorite pieces from this concert,” Houston says, “is Fred Small’s ‘Everything Possible,’ a lullaby sung to a child. It includes the lyric: ‘You can be anybody you want to be, you can love whomever you will. You can travel any country where your heart leads, and know I will love you still.’”


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21ST ANNUAL

Outdoor Expo Presented by the Genesee Valley Chapter of the Adirondack Mountain Club

Sat, June 9th • 9:30-3:30

Mendon Ponds Park FREE! No sales…Just a good time! www.adk-gvc.org/expo

See what the outdoors has to offer for fun and exercise. Meet local outdoor clubs and vendors. Workshops on hiking, camping, paddling & biking. Crafts and a petting zoo for the kids. Food and Ice Cream will be available. Something for the whole family!

Geneva Music Festival: Jinjoo Cho & Hyun Soo Kim: La Fin de Siecle. Gearan Center

for the Performing Arts, 327 Pulteney St. Geneva. 315-7813000. 7:30 p.m. $25. JAZZ

The Djangoners. Little Theatre

Café, 240 East Ave. 258-0400. 7-9 p.m.

Eastman-Rochester New Horizons: Big Band & Chorus.

Kilbourn Hall, 26 Gibbs St. 734-9110. esm.rochester.edu. 6-7 p.m. Ott & Davis. Via Girasole Wine Bar, 3 Schoen Place. Pittsford. 641-0340. viagirasole.com. 7 p.m. Free. POP/ROCK

It’s a Thrill, Molice, Kind of Kind. Funk ‘n Waffles, 204 N

Water Street. 448-0354. 9 p.m. $5/$7. Sofa Kings. Fairport B-Side, 5 lift bridge lane. Fairport. 364-0688. 7 p.m. Thurlow. ButaPub, 315 Gregory St. 585-563-6241. butapub.com. 10 p.m.

[ FRI., JUNE 1 ] SPONSORED BY EXPO FRIENDS

ACOUSTIC/FOLK Lauren O’Brien. The Greenhouse Café, 2271 E. Main St. 270-8603. ourcoffeeconnection.org. 7 p.m. With Lisa Bianco on guitar. CLASSICAL

Geneva Music Festival: A Transfigured Night. Gearan

Center for the Performing Arts, 327 Pulteney St. Geneva. 315781-3000. 7:30 p.m. $25. COUNTRY

The Healing Committee.

Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. abilenebarandlounge.com. 6 p.m. JAZZ

The Big Jazz Small Band. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 258-0400. 8-10 p.m. The Stan Martinelli Project. Via Girasole Wine Bar, 3 Schoen Place. Pittsford. 641-0340. viagirasole.com. 7 p.m. REGGAE/JAM

The Buddhahood. Lux Lounge, 666 South Ave. 232-9030. lux666.com. 9 p.m. $5 POP/ROCK

Carole’s Kings. Downstairs

Cabaret at Winton Place, 3450 Winton Place. 8 p.m. $30-$33. Jayson Dodson Band. Firehouse Saloon, 814 S. Clinton Ave. 3193832. thefirehousesaloon.com. 9 p.m. $5. Nuthin Fancy. Nashvilles, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. Henrietta. 3343030. nashvillesny.com. 9 p.m. $5. 18 CITY MAY 30 - JUNE 5, 2018

PHOTO PROVIDED

HIP-HOP | A-F-R-O

Hip-hop traditionalist A-F-R-O (All Flows Reach Out) is a talented young emcee from Los Angeles. In 2014, at only 16 years old, he gained national recognition by winning a YouTube freestyle competition held by his favorite rapper, R.A. the Rugged Man — now his mentor and this tour’s headliner. The “old soul” rapper pays his respects to his heroes of the “Golden Age of Hip-Hop” era by continuing to push the art of style and flow. His low, bassy, hit-yourface voice and intricate wordplay is a breath of fresh air in a time of mumble rap and autotune. A-F-R-O performs with R.A. the Rugged Man and Mooney Faugh on Monday, June 4, at Funk ‘N Waffles, 204 North Water Street. 7 p.m. $20-$25. funknwaffles.com; a-f-r-o.bandcamp.com. — BY AMANDA FINTAK

The Stedwells (EP Release), The Dirty Pennies, The Good Neighbors. Flour City Station, 170 East Ave. 9 p.m. $8.

Tryst. 585 Rockin Burger Bar,

250 Pixley Road. 247-0079. trystband.com. 8-11 p.m. $5. The Well, Pony Hand, OHS. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 8 p.m. The Looby First Friday art opening with AIREN, Danny Cocuzza, Dip Dripper, & Gasto FFL. $7.

[ SAT., JUNE 2 ] ACOUSTIC/FOLK Jon Itkin. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 258-0400. 8-10 p.m. CLASSICAL

Keeping Your Head. St. Anne

Church, 1600 Mt. Hope Ave. 766-3084. 8-10 p.m. The Peril & Power of Sacred Choral Music in the English Renaissance performed by Musica Spei. VOCALS

Spring Concert of Young Voices. Hochstein

Performance Hall, 50 N Plymouth Ave. 454-4596. hochstein.org. 3 p.m. JAZZ

Andy Calabrese, Chet Catallo.

Via Girasole Wine Bar, 3 Schoen Place. Pittsford. 6410340. viagirasole.com. 7 p.m.

POP/ROCK

The Ben Vaughn Quartet. ,.

9:30 p.m. $5.

Carole’s Kings. Downstairs Cabaret at Winton Place, 3450 Winton Place. 4 p.m. $30-$33. Swing-a-Billy Dance Concert with Miss Paula & the Twangbusters. Harmony

House, 58 East Main St. Webster. ROCkabillyHop.com. 7 p.m. $10-15.

[ SUN., JUNE 3 ] ACOUSTIC/FOLK

Acoustic Brunch with Matt McCloskey. Funk ‘n Waffles, 204 N Water Street. 448-0354. noon. CLASSICAL

Classical Guitar Night. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 258-0400. 7-9 p.m.

Geneva Music Festival: Cavani Collage. Gearan Center for the Performing Arts, 327 Pulteney St. Geneva. 315-7813000. 2 p.m. Poet Mwatabu Okantah with the Cavani String Quartet. $25.


Schumann’s Fourth. Hochstein Performance Hall, 50 N Plymouth Ave. 454-4596. hochstein.org. 2 p.m. Juliana Athayde, violin; W. Peter Kurau, horn. Conducted by Michael Butterman. $24-$37. Spiritoso!. Canandaigua Academy, 435 East St, Canandaigua. hochstein.org. 3 p.m. Finger Lakes Concert Band Spring Concert. $5.

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POP/ROCK

Carole’s Kings. Downstairs Cabaret at Winton Place, 3450 Winton Place. 3 p.m. $30-$33. Igor & The Red Elvises. Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. abilenebarandlounge.com. 6 p.m. $15. Marty Roberts & Donny Conga. Marge’s Lakeside Inn,

4909 Culver Rd. 323-1020. margeslakesideinn.com. 4-8 p.m.

[ MON., JUNE 4 ] ACOUSTIC/FOLK Jackson Cavalier. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 258-0400. 7-9 p.m. BLUES

Stormy Valle. Record Archive, 33 1/3 Rockwood St. 244-1210. 5-8 p.m. JAZZ

David Murray & Kahil El’Zabar Duo. Bop Shop

Records, 1460 Monroe Ave. 271-3354. bopshop.com. 8 p.m. $15-$25.

LOCATED NEAR ELLISON PARK • OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK PHOTO PROVIDED

POP | CLASSICAL MYSTERY TOUR

Classical Mystery Tour, a Beatles tribute act that will be backed by the Rochester Philharmonic Orchestra, is celebrating the 50th anniversary of two genre-changing albums: “Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band” and “The White Album.” Jeff Tyzik will lead the orchestra. Each of the four main musicians looks and sounds exactly like The Beatles, down to every little detail, including small mannerisms, vocal inflections, period-correct costumes, and original instruments. The cynosure of the stage is the psychedelic light show that accompanies the music, incorporating footage of The Beatles. One-time moments such as the trumpet solo in “Penny Lane” and the screaming of strings at the end of “A Day in the Life” are performed exactly as they were recorded with the help of the orchestra. This show is a living replica of Beatles music that fans of all ages can enjoy.

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Classical Mystery Tour will perform Friday, June 1, and Saturday, June 2, at Kodak Hall at Eastman Theatre, 60 Gibbs Street. 8 p.m. $24-$110. rpo.org; classicalmysterytour.com. — BY KATIE HALLIGAN

POP/ROCK

Flaw, Smile Empty Soul, Eve To Adam, Kaleido, Talia. Montage Music Hall, 50 Chestnut St. 232-1520. the montagemusichall.com. 6 p.m. $17-$20.

[ TUE., JUNE 5 ] JAZZ

Grove Place Jazz Project. Downstairs Cabaret Theatre, 20 Windsor St. 325-4370. downstairscabaret.com. 7 p.m. $10.

June Jazz Combos: Jeff Campbell Trio. Central Library of Rochester and Monroe County, 115 South Avenue. 428-8451. libraryweb.org. 12-1 p.m. R&B/ SOUL

Funk Night with Mother Funkin Planets. Funk ‘n Waffles, 204 N Water Street. 448-0354. Every other Tuesday, 8 p.m. POP/ROCK

The Unfortunates, Rut, Miles Down Below. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. $6/$8.

PHOTO BY DEREK BREMNER

METAL | COMBICHRIST

They call it “aggrotech.” It’s high on the aggro meter, that’s for sure, and the tech is relentlessly regimented by the drums. The band is Combichrist; put together by the Scandinavian-born, US-based Andy LaPlegua. Combichrist is full of perfect driving beats and crunchy guitar on songs that are a celebration of excess in all categories. Angrier and looser than White Zombie. Combichrist plays with Wednesday 13, Night Club, Prison, and Death Valley High on Tuesday, June 5, at Montage Music Hall, 50 Chestnut Street. 6 p.m. $25. themontagemusichall.com; combichrist.com. — BY FRANK DE BLASE rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 19


Literature

Writers & Books Executive Director Kyle Semmel. PHOTO PROVIDED

Rung by rung Writers & Books launches “The Ladder,” a new literary conference

The Ladder literary conference SATURDAY, JUNE 16, FROM 8 A.M. TO 7 P.M. (LUNCH IS PROVIDED) ROCHESTER RIVERFRONT HOTEL, 120 EAST MAIN STREET $190-$220 | 473-2590 | WAB.ORG ONLINE REGISTRATION DEADLINE IS MONDAY, JUNE 11 PHONE AND IN-PERSON REGISTRATION ONLY BEGINS TUESDAY, JUNE 12 [ PREVIEW ] BY DANIEL J. KUSHNER

Writers are all too familiar with dry spells, creative roadblocks, and blank-page totalitarianism. The analogies are plentiful, and for good reason. But once victory is claimed — finished manuscript raised triumphantly in the air — what next? In part, this is exactly the question that Writers & Books and its Executive Director Kyle Semmel want to answer with the new literary conference called The Ladder. The June 16 conference at Rochester Riverfront Hotel will be a marathon: a day-long boot 20 CITY MAY 30 - JUNE 5, 2018

camp featuring the expertise of more than 40 literature industry professionals — published writers, editors, agents, and assorted panelists among them — and 12 different workshops, all designed to help writers up their game. “It’s not just for those who are looking for a publisher,” Semmel says. “It’s also for those who are looking at developing their craft. This is a networking opportunity among local writers, it’s an opportunity to witness panels that discuss, for example, character and fiction and prose. So it’s not just about finding an agent. In fact it’s quite a mishmash, in a good way, of various things that are on the publishing ladder, which is why we’re calling it The Ladder.” The Writers & Books website identifies the “four rungs” of that ladder as “Write, Edit, Connect, and Publish,” and the individual workshops are wide-ranging. In “How a Book Happens,” local writer Leslie C. Youngblood will be joined by Disney-Hyperion Senior Editor Laura Schreiber to discuss the process of producing Youngblood’s forthcoming young adult novel “Love Like Sky,” including “point-of-sale to editorial to cover design,” Semmel says. The discussion will be moderated by writer and Monroe Community College professor Tokeya Graham.

There are other panels about how to develop your literary characters, how to catch the eye of a literary agent, and even a seminar by Rochester lawyer Mark A. Costello about book publishing contracts and copyright do’s and don’ts. Practical advice is clearly of paramount importance at The Ladder, as is insight into underrepresented writers and communities, as evidenced by the poignant panel talk “A Divided City: Navigating, Race, Gender, and Class in the Rustbelt,” featuring writers Rachel McKibbens, Reenah Golden, and Lu Highsmith. “I believe that exposing writers to practical information about navigating the realm of traditional publishing is something many people are looking for,” Graham says. “Being exposed to writers of color who are often overlooked is another element that helps attendees learn stories of populations who are often stereotyped. There is power in witnessing writers on the margins amplify their own voices.” When asked about what logistical and creative concerns The Ladder might seek to address, Graham says she doesn’t see a set agenda, but instead an open discussion: “I am not sure that the conference aims to ‘solve’ issues, but rather highlight various

experiences and expertise in the writing arena. But by no means is the conference the end stop. I would like to think of it as a launch point for many different perspectives to be shared.” Semmel wants writers to come away from the conference feeling refreshed and excited about the process.” The intention is to create opportunity,” he says. As extensive as The Ladder is, opportunity is tempered by the financial realities of mounting such a series of events. Admission to the conference is $190 for existing members of Writers & Books, and $220 for the general public. That said, partial scholarships are available for those looking to offset costs, and Semmel is looking to secure more sponsors to help provide more scholarship funding in future years while keeping the admission cost from increasing. The scope of the conference, which extends beyond June 16, is also designed to create opportunities. Semmel sees The Ladder as an emerging festival, and to that end, 18 different literary readings will be staged in the week leading up to the conference, from Saturday, June 9, through Sunday, June 17. The venues are diverse — from Cafe 1872 to Rochester Contemporary Art Center, Three Heads Brewing, and The Spirit Room — as are the featured writers, who include Chen Chen, Sarah Freligh, Kristen Gentry, Jeff Spevak, and many others. The Ladder is much more than a mere networking opportunity with a goal of publication as the end-all, be-all, and Semmel’s vision for what the conference can be, as well as how writers participate in it, is clear. “It’s not just about ‘Well, I’m gonna get an agent, I’m gonna sell my book,’” Semmel explains. “It’s about being part of a community, and I think that in terms of a mindset that all writers should have — and certainly people who are attending this conference — is ‘I’m part of a community, and we are in this together.’ Because the literary world and the publishing world, it’s not an easy place to be. It’s hard to crack it, it’s hard to sell books once you do crack it.” For all the facets of the literature industry that will be covered at The Ladder, the conference is ultimately about the writing itself. “The craft of writing, which is itself not an easy thing, is still a rewarding thing and it’s worth the effort just to do,” Semmel says. “So I think the mindset that people should go into this with is: ‘You know, I’m here because I’m serious about my craft, serious about what I’m doing, and I want to get better.’” Note: CITY’s A&E Editor Rebecca Rafferty is serving as one of the panelists during the conference.


Arts & Performance Art Exhibits [ OPENING ] Create Art 4 Good, 1115 E. Main Street, Suite #203, Door #5. Jonathan Schnapp: Uncharted Tails. 210-3161. CreateArt4Good.org. Gallery At Edward Jones, 88 Elm Street. Rochester Have I Loved. Photography show by Judy Lombard. 227-2170. Geisel Gallery, Second Floor Rotunda, Legacy Tower, One Bausch & Lomb Place. Shane Durgee. shanedurgee.wixsite. com/gallery. George Eastman Museum, 900 East Ave. David Levinthal: War, Myth, Desire. INeRT PReSS, 1115 East Main Street. Hubert Agnolle The Electric Interior. Books, prints, & photography exhibit. Enter at Door #5. 482-0931. inertpress@gmail.com. International Art Acquisitions, 3300 Monroe Ave. Margaret Reule: Women in Color. 264-1440. Lumiere Photo, 100 College Ave. Any Hidden Indication. Mixed media works by Ash Hrim & Nathan Tomlinson. Rochester Contemporary Art Center, 137 East Ave. 6x6x2018. Preview May 28June 1. Opening party June 2, 4-10 pm. Sales begin 7:30 pm with buyer’s choice raffle. Buying opens once raffle ends. Please call to purchase tickets. 461-2222. rochestercontemporary.org. Stephen Merritt Studio, 222 Hermitage Rd. Irondequoit. Art in June 2018. Works by Dan Malczewski, Tom Markusen, Joni Monroe, & Stephen Merritt. 342-3086. Steve Carpenter Gallery & Art Center, 176 Anderson Ave. 14th Annual Summer Exhibition. more than 60 Original Works in all varieties of media. 469-0702. The Yards, 50-52 Public Market. The Yards Resident Member Showcase. attheyards@gmail.com. attheyards.com. [ CONTINUING ] ART EXHIBITS 1570 Gallery at Valley Manor, 1570 East Ave. Reflections & Reminiscences. 770-1960. 540WMain, 540 W. Main Street. Brightscapes: The Way To Beauty. Works by May featured artist Mike Kraus. 732-0002. 540westmain.org. Axom Gallery, 176 Anderson Ave., 2nd floor. BLACK5 WHIT35 COLOR3D5. New Work by Kurt Ketchum. 2326030 x23. axomgallery.com. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. The Lobby Presents: Art Liquidation Sale 2.0. Through May 30. New art from Ax. bugjar.com. Cobblestone Arts Center, 1622 New York 332. Oil Paintings & Drawings by Lennie Muscarella. Through June 10. 389-0220. bestfootforwardkids.com.

PHOTO PROVIDED

DANCE | GARTH FAGAN DANCE Garth Fagan Dance is synonymous with the Rochester arts scene. A local fixture since 1970, Fagan and company continue to churn out contemporary choreography in which elements of Afro-Caribbean dance and ballet have equal footing. This Friday and Saturday, the Joseph Avenue Arts and Culture Alliance will present benefit concerts featuring the dance troupe at the JCC of Greater Rochester. Garth Fagan Dance will perform on Friday, June 2, at 5 p.m., and Saturday, June 3, at 2 p.m., at the Louis S. Wolk JCC of Greater Rochester, 1200 Edgewood Avenue. Tickets are free but reservations are recommended at 461-2000. garthfagandance.org; jccrochester.org; josephavearts.org. — BY DANIEL J. KUSHNER

A Different Path Gallery, 27 Market St. Brockport. Brockport Artists Guild Members 7th Annual Exhibition. 637-5494. differentpathgallery.com/. DL Home + Garden, 283 Central Avenue. Bob Kolbrener: Photographer of the American West. Firehouse Gallery at Flower City Arts Center, 713 Monroe Ave. Imprinted: New work by Kelly Justice. New slipcast porcelain vessels & wall pieces. 2715183. rochesterarts.org. Flower City Arts Center, 713 Monroe Ave. More from The Birth of the Universe. 2441730. geneseearts.org.; The Walkers: Photographs by Alyssa M. DeWitt. In the Photography Gallery. 2441730. rochesterarts.org. Gallery 384, 384 East Ave. Artworks by Fine Arts Majors at MCC. Ganondagan Visitor Center, 7000 County Road 41. Hodinöhsö:ni’ Women: From the Time of Creation. Exhibiting the ways Hodinöhsö:ni’ women have appeared and worked to sustain their culture of equity, justice, and the power of thinking. 621-8794. ganondagan.org. Geisel Gallery, Second Floor Rotunda, Legacy Tower, One Bausch & Lomb Place. Can’t Talk Without a Pencil: Watercolors by Leo Dodd. Through May 31. thegeiselgallery.com. Genesee Valley Council on the Arts, 4 Murray Hill Dr. Mt. Morris. Jim Burns: Hammer

& Nails | Rich Della Costa: Remnants, Remains & Memory. gvartscouncil.org. George Eastman Museum, 900 East Ave. Dreaming in Color: The Davide Turconi Collection of Early Cinema. Through June 24. A unique collection of more than 23,000 original nitrate frames of 35mm films from the early years of cinema (1897– 1915). eastman.org. Image City Photography Gallery, 722 University Ave. Betsy Phillips: The Face of Time. International Art Acquisitions, 3300 Monroe Ave. Boxed Flower. Through May 31. Hours Monday through Friday, 10 a.m. to 9 p.m., Saturday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., Sunday, noon to 5 p.m. 264-1440. Kaleidoscope Collective, 936 Exchange St., Building A. UnFolded: The Visionary Art of Nature. Featuring the geometry & patterns found throughout nature. 727-9920. Link Gallery at City Hall, 30 Church St. Creating our Legacy: Works by Longze Zhang, Olivia Kim, Melissa Huang. Presented by the Asian Pacific American Association of Greater Rochester. 271-5920. apaaroc.org. continues on page 22

GETLISTED get your event listed for free e-mail it to calendar@rochestercitynews.com. Or go online to rochestercitynewspaper.com and submit it yourself!

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 21


FIRST

FRIDAY

#FirstFridayROC

6x6x2018 International Small Art Phenomenon - Preview Rochester Contemporary Art Center 137 East Ave. 6:00 PM to 9:00 PM Achroous at Cat Clay Cat Clay 1115 E Main St, Ste 242 5:00 PM to 9:00 PM Any Hidden Indication Lumiere Photo 100 College Ave. 6:00 PM to 9:00 PM Black5 Whit35 Color3d5 AXOM Gallery Exhibition Space 176 Anderson Ave., Suite #303 6:00 PM to 9:00 PM Bringing in The Summer Fun | at StudioRAD StudioRAD 46 Mount Hope Ave 6:00 PM to 10:00 PM First Friday at 1255 Lofts 1255 Lofts 1225 University Avenue 6:00 PM to 9:00 PM First Friday at Abundance Abundance Food Co-op Gallery 571 South Ave. 6:00 PM to 9:00 PM First Friday at Knoblauch Studio Knoblauch Studio 29 Halstead St 5:00 PM to 9:00 PM

First Friday

Sponsored by

Citywide Gallery Night

June 1 • 6-9pm FirstFridayRochester.org First Friday at Steadfast Steadfast 200 East Avenue 6:00 PM to 9:00 PM First Friday at The Gallery The Gallery 321 East Avenue 6:00 PM to 9:00 PM First Friday at Writers and Books Writers & Books 740 University Ave. 6:00 PM to 9:30 PM God's and Gladiators Encore Show Nox Cocktail Lounge 302 North Goodman St. 6:00 PM to 9:00 PM Landscapes Constance Mauro Studio 1115 East Main St., Hungerford Building 6:00 PM to 9:00 PM

Photographic Landscapes by Andrew Jurman Nu Movement 716 University Ave. 6:00 PM to 9:00 PM Resident Members Showcase The Yards Gallery Space 50 Public Market Way 6:00 PM to 10:00 PM Rochester Have I Loved Gallery at Edward Jones 88 Elm Street 6:00 PM to 9:00 PM Shirley Dawson Reading and Book Signing Richard Margolis Art + Architectural Photography 250 North Goodman St., 4th Floor #9 6:00 PM to 9:00 PM

Softly Spoken The Gallery at Creative Framing and Lisa McCarty Photosites and Hernease Editions Printing Davis A Womb Of My Own 1472 Monroe Ave. Visual Studies Workshop Gallery 5:00 PM to 9:00 PM 31 Prince St. 6:00 PM to 9:00 PM The Face of Time featuring Betsy Phillips Meet the Author Image City Photography Gallery Military History Society 722 University Ave. 250 North Goodman St., 201 5:00 PM to 9:00 PM 6:00 PM to 9:00 PM Virgina Bacheler. Ceramics! Pat Collins: A Variety of Expressions Gallery 4 – 8 Gallery Q 250 North Goodman St. #4-8 100 College Ave. 6:00 PM to 9:00 PM 6:00 PM to 9:00 PM

22 CITY MAY 30 - JUNE 5, 2018

Main Street Arts, 20 W. Main St., Clifton Springs. Land & Sea. Paintings, drawings, sculpture, prints, & photographs by 28 artists inspired by the natural world. 315-462-0210. mainstreetartsgallery.com.; Student Paintings 2018: Colorful Creations. 315-462-0210. mainstreetartsgallery.com. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. Bill Viola: Martyrs–Earth, Air, Fire, & Water. Four hi-def monitors, each featuring a single figure who sustains the impact of one of the four classical elements. 276-8900. mag.rochester.edu.; Wards of Time: Photographs of Antiquities by Larry Merrill. 276-8900. mag.rochester.edu.; Nosferatu (The Undead). Film installation by NYC artist Javier Téllez focusing on cinema & mental illness. 276-8900. mag.rochester.edu. MuCCC Gallery Space, 142 Atlantic Ave. Oil Paintings by Tina Motiwala & Margaret Piscitello. muccc.org. My Sister’s Gallery at the Episcopal Church Home, 505 Mt. Hope Ave. Photographic Montages & Assemblages by Roslyn Rose. Opening reception May 31, 5-7pm. New Deal Gallery, 4 Livingston County Campus. Mount Morris. The Healing Properties of Art. Jim Burns, photography; Rich Della Costa, mix media. 243-6785. NuMovement, 716 University Avenue. Photographic Landscapes by Andrew E. Jurman. Opening Reception June 1, 6-9pm; closing reception July 6, 6-9pm. 7042889. numvmnt.com. Ontario County Historical Society Museum, 55 North Main St., Canandaigua. Art in Bloom. 394-4975. ochs.org. Oxford Gallery, 267 Oxford St. Ode to Joy. Featuring interpretations of “Ode to Joy” by more than 50 artists. Patricia O’Keefe Ross Gallery at St. John Fisher, 3690 East Ave. Artifaks of the Artist’s Imagination. Perinton Historical Society & Fairport Museum, 18 Perrin St. Fairport. David Marsh, A Life of Courage. 223-3989. info@ perintonhistoricalsociety.org. PerintonHistoricalSociety.org. Rush Rhees Library, University of Rochester, River Campus. Queer Territories: Staking a Claim in US History. St. John’s Home, 150 Highland Ave. Sheridan Vincent. Photographic exhibit “Rochester Favorites,” through May 31. 760-1293. stjohnsliving.org. Visual Studies Workshop, 31 Prince St. Hernease Davis: A Womb of My Own (Mistakes Were Made in Development). Through June 29 in the VSW Gallery. Artist talk June 16, 7pm. 442-8676.; Photosites by Lisa McCarty. Video & print installations in Project Space One. Open studio June 1, 6-9pm. 442-8676. Wayne County Council for the Arts, 108 W. Miller St. Newark. William DeMott: A Newer Kite. Whitman Works Co., 1826 Penfield Road. Penfield. Subsequent Songs: Art by Peggy Kehoe.

PHOTO BY PARIS VISONE

COMEDY | BRANDIE POSEY Los Angeles-based comedian Brandie Posey — who also co-hosts the popular podcast “Lady to Lady” — returns to Rochester this Thursday for a headlining set at Photo City Improv. Having released her punchy debut album “Opinion Cave” in 2016, Posey is cynical and self-aware, but also good-natured even as she subtly tackles issues like gender, class, and other matters of social consciousness. If you prefer your stand-up comedy to be intelligent, acerbic, and conversational, you won’t be disappointed. Local comedians Madelein Smith, Kara Maillie, and Andrea Springer will perform in support, with Woody Battaglia as MC. Brandie Posey will perform on Thursday, May 31, at Photo City Improv, 543 Atlantic Avenue. 8 p.m. $10-$15. 451-0047. brandieposey.com; facebook.com/photocityimprovcomedyclub. — BY DANIEL J. KUSHNER

Williams Gallery at First Unitarian Church, 220 S Winton Rd. It’s on My Mind: Work by Antonia Orlando. Through June 4. 820-0085.

Call for Artwork [ WED., MAY 30 ] “Beer Is Art” Contest. Through July 1. Sager Beer Works, 46 Sager Dr Suite E Sager Beer Works, a Rochester brewery-pub opening in fall 2018, seeks art for permanent display. Entries due July 1 2453006. info@sagerbeerworks. com. sagerbeerworks.com. 2018 Finger Lake Plein Air Festival Community Paint Out. Through June 8. Downtown Canandaigua, 115 S. Main Street . Canandaigua Artists will have two timed hours during the Plein Air Festival to create artworks to be judged for prizes. Pre-registration required $10. 396-0300. fingerlakespleinair.com. Corn Hill Arts Festival Emerging Artists Expo. Through June 1. Seeking young artists ages 1525 to exhibit creations at the Corn Hill Arts Festival, July 14 & 15. cornhillartsfestival.com/ emergingartists/. Initial Stages & Fine Lines. Through Aug. 15. A Different Path Gallery, 27 Market St Brockport All age groups & styles are eligible (mediums restricted to pen & ink, graphite, charcoal, and pastel) to exhibit work that features Initial Stages ( preliminary sketches) & Fine Lines

(finished work). Deadline August 15 $20. 637-5494. differentpathgallery.com. Play/Ground. Through June 24. Rochester Contemporary Art Center, 137 East Ave. Seeking proposals for interactive, multi-sensory, experiential installations for an event organized by RESOURCE:ART taking place in a former Medina high school $25. 4612222. artplaygroundny.com. Portfolio Showcase 2018, a Juried Exhibit. Through June 3. Image City Photography Gallery, 722 University Ave. Through June 3. Each entrant to submit a portfolio of eight images on CD or online to be selected for the exhibit running Aug 7-Sept 2 ImageCityPhotographyGallery.com.

Call for Participants [ WED., MAY 30 ] BOA Short Fiction Prize. Through May 31. BOA Editions is accepting submissions through May 31. Winner receives publication in Spring 2020, plus a $1,000 honorariom $25. boaeditions.org. continues on page 23

GETLISTED get your event listed for free e-mail it to calendar@rochestercitynews.com. Or go online to rochestercitynewspaper.com and submit it yourself!


GO ART!’s Picnic in the Park. Through June 30. GO ART!, 201 E Main St . Batavia Artisan & Craft vendor applications due June 30 343-9313. info@ goart.org. goart.org. ImageOutWrite Literary Journal. Through June 15. ImageOut, 274 North Goodman Street LGBTQ authors & allies invited to submit original literary works. Submissions due June 15 271-2640. office@imageout. org. imageout.org/press.php. Night of 10s. Through June 30. Mood Makers Books, 274 Goodman St. N The Sankofa Theatre Fest seeks entries for an evening of 10-minute plays. Works should be comedic, use 1-3 actors, & pertain to some aspect of African American life moodmakersbooks.com.

Art Events [ WED., MAY 30 ] Art Show & Sale. Through June 30. Maplewood Family YMCA, 25 Driving Park Avenue 787-4086. Softly Spoken: The Art of Karen Frutiger. Through June 30. The Gallery at Creativ Framing and Editions Printing, 510 State Street Through June 30 545-1723. creativframingeditionsprinting@ gmail.com. [ FRI., JUNE 1 ] Achroous. June 1, 5-9 p.m. Cat Clay, 1115 E. Main St., Suite 242 New work by Jenna Consiglio 414-5643. catclay.com. Anderson Arts Open Studios. First Friday of every month, 6-9 p.m. Anderson Arts Building, 250 N. Goodman St. andersonartsbuilding@gmail. com. andersonartsbuilding.org. First Friday. June 1, 5-8 p.m. Paula Crawford Gallery, 11 Goodman Street North 7495329. pcrawford21@gmail. com. paulacrawfordart.com. First Friday at Gallery Q. First Friday of every month, 6-9 p.m. Gallery Q, 100 College Ave . First Friday Grand Opening. June 1, 6-9 p.m. Lush Light Creative Agency, 1255 University Ave, Suite 147 . First Friday at the Paula Crawford Gallery. First Friday of every month. Paula Crawford Gallery, 11 Goodman Street North 749-5329. pcrawford21@gmail.com. paulacrawford.com. Gallery Talk with Photographer David Levinthal. June 1, noon. George Eastman Museum, 900 East Ave. With museum admission. Hungerford Open Studios. First Friday of every month, 6-9 p.m. Hungerford Building, 1115 E. Main St. Enter Door #2. Katherine Donahue: Sweet Tweets. June 1, 3-7 p.m. Laughing Gull Chocolates, 1868 E. Main St. Opening reception featuring Avian art confections 417-5858. Laughinggullri@gmail.com. laughinggullchocolates.com. MAGsocial DeTour: Game of Thrones. June 1, 6-7 p.m. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. $10. 276-8900. mag.rochester.edu.

Community Activism

PHOTO BY DALE KAKKAK

[ FRI., JUNE 1 ] Community Forum on Public Health Challenges in Lyell Otis Neighborhood. June 1, 8:30 a.m.-noon. Lake Avenue Baptist Church, 72 Ambrose St With local elected officials Mayor Lovely A. Warren, Monroe County Sheriff Todd Baxter, City Councilmember Molly Clifford, NYS Assemblymember Harry B. Bronson, & City Police Chief Michael Ciminelli. Panel discussion, presentations, break-out sessions, and Opioid Overdose Training 233-3699.

PHOTO BY LAP CHUNG

LECTURES | HODINÖHSÖ:NI’ WOMEN

RECREATION | EL CAMINO TRAIL 5K WALK

Summer programming at Ganondagan continues this weekend with two events held the State Historic Site. Scheduled for Saturday is “Around the Table: Conversations About Hodinöhsö:ni’ Women from Creation to Today,” a discussion that compares the spiritual, economic, social, and political roles of Hodinöhsö:ni’ and Euro-American women. Sally Roesch Wagner (author, historian and former executive director of the Matilda Joslyn Gage House) and Mohawk Clanmother Louise McDonald will reflect on the impact Hodinöhsö:ni’ women had on the American Women’s Rights movement. The cost to attend is $10 for the general public and $5 for Friends of Ganondagan members.

Five years ago the Thomas R. Frey Trail at El Camino was created, the 2.25 mile walkable urban greenspace offering fitness and fresh air opportunities as well as an annual 5K Walk event. This week a special 5K Walk will commemorate the trail’s anniversary on National Trails Day, supported by Genesee Land Trust, Conkey Cruisers, and Project HOPE of the Ibero-American Development Corporation. The self-paced walk will feature entertainment along the route, speakers, and lunch provided in the park, and participants can sign up for summer programming and activities. And there will be alternative 1K, 2K, or 3K route lengths.

And on Sunday, botanist, teacher, mother, and author Robin Wall Kimmerer (pictured) will give an interactive presentation on the gifts of plants, titled “Realizing Peace through the Natural World. Kimmerer will explore the ways native plants can be used for food, materials, medicine, and beauty, and how we can reciprocate by caring for the plants. A book signing and light Iroquois White Corn lunch follows the presentation. Afterward, Finger Lakes Forest Therapy will lead a sensory walk on Ganondagan’s trails. The presentation, lunch, and trail walk cost $40 for the general public, or $35 for Friends of Ganondagan members. Register: 7421690; ganondagan.org/Events-Programs.

The El Camino Trail 5K Walk takes place on Saturday, June 2, beginning and ending at Conkey Corner Park, 92 Conkey Avenue. Registration opens at 8 a.m. and the walk kicks off at 10 a.m. There’s no registration fee but donations are encouraged; proceeds will go toward completing El Camino by transforming the Trestle over the Genesee River and extending the trail to the west side and into High Falls. myelcamino.org. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY

“Around the Table Conversations about Hodinöhsö:ni’ Women” takes place Saturday, June 2, 1 to 3 p.m.; and “Realizing Peace Through the Natural World” is scheduled for Sunday, June 3, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., at Ganondagan State Historic Site and Seneca Art & Culture Center at Ganondagan, 7000 County Road 41 in Victor. 742-1690; ganondagan.org/Events-Programs. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY

evan@peerless.events. historicgermanhouse.com. [ SUN., JUNE 3 ] Comedy Cocoon. 6:30 p.m. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. bugjar.com. [ TUE., JUNE 5 ] Gilbert Gottfried. June 5, 7:30 p.m. Comedy at the Carlson, 50 Carlson Rd $20.

Dance Events Social Axom with Kurt Ketchum. June 1, 6-9:30 p.m. Axom Gallery, 176 Anderson Ave., 2nd floor First Friday closing party for BLACK5 WHIT35 COLOR3DS 232-6030 x23. axomgallery.com. [ TUE., JUNE 5 ] 7th Annual Finger Lakes Plein Air Competition & Festival. June 5-10. City of Canandaigua, Main Street . Canandaigua Free exhibition & sale at Sonnenberg Gardens on June 10 fingerlakespleinair.com.

Comedy [ WED., MAY 30 ] Farm Team Comedy Showcase #3. May 30, 8-10 p.m. Three Heads Brewing, 186 Atlantic

Ave Presented by Comedy @ The Carlson. Feat. Dan Maslyn, James Fedkew, and Justin Brown. Hosted by Vinnie Paulino $5. 426-6339. contact@carlsoncomedy.com. [ THU., MAY 31 ] Brandie Posey. May 31, 8 p.m. Photo City Improv, 543 Atlantic Ave With Andrea Springer, Kara Maillie, & Madeline Smith $10/$15. Luenell. May 31-June 2, 7:30 p.m. Comedy at the Carlson, 50 Carlson Rd $15-$20. [ FRI., JUNE 1 ] John Henton, Travis Blunt, Joel James, TALENT. June 1, 8 & 10:30 p.m. The Historic German House Auditorium, 315 Gregory Street $25-$35. 563-6241.

[ SAT., JUNE 2 ] Garth Fagan Dance. June 2, 5 p.m. JCC of Greater Rochester, 1200 Edgewood Avenue Joseph Avenue Arts & Culture Alliance.. 421-2000. garthfagandance.org.

Theater 13: The Musical. Fri., June 1, 6 p.m. Lyric Theatre, 440 East Ave Proceeds benefit Owens House Crisis Nursery in Rochester $10-$25. The Accidental Hero. Thu., May 31, 7 p.m., Fri., June 1, 8 p.m., Sat., June 2, 8 p.m. and Sun., June 3, 3 p.m. $25. The Fantastic Mr. Fox. Fri., June 1, 7 p.m., Sat., June 2, 2 & 7 p.m. and Sun., June 3, 2 p.m. School of the Arts, 45 Prince St 324-3535.

[ SAT., JUNE 2 ] Food Not Bombs Sort/Cook/ Serve Food. 3:30-6 p.m. St. Joseph’s House of Hospitality, 402 South Ave. 232-3262. [ TUE., JUNE 5 ] Protecting Communities of Color: How Diverse and Grassroots Movements are Changing the World. June 5, 7-9 p.m. Carlson Commons, 70 Coretta Scott Crossings With Fred Tutmam, Riverkeeper.

Festivals [ THU., MAY 31 ] Rochester Greek Festival. May 31-June 3, 11 a.m.-11 p.m. Annunciation Greek Orthodox Church, 962 East Ave (585) 244-3377. rochestergreekfestival.com.

Home for Christmas, 1944. Sat., June 2, 4 p.m. Downstairs Cabaret Theatre, 20 Windsor St Reading performed by playwright Patrick Dewane, grandson of main character $5. 325-4370. downstairscabaret.com. Little Shop of Horrors. Fri., June 1, 7:30-9:30 p.m. and Sat., June 2, 7:30-9:30 p.m. MuCCC, 142 Atlantic Ave $12. 232-4382. Living in Exile. May 30-June 2, 7:30 p.m. and Sun., June 3, 2 p.m. MuCCC, 142 Atlantic Ave Open Road Theatre $16/$19. Steel Magnolias. Wednesdays, 7:30 p.m., Thursdays, 7:30 p.m., Fridays, 8 p.m., Saturdays, 4 & 8:30 p.m., Wed., May 30, 2 p.m. and Sun., June 3, 2 p.m Geva Theatre Center, 75 Woodbury Blvd Through June 3 $25-$59.

Theater Audition [ MON., JUNE 4 ] David Harrower’s “Blackbird”. June 4, 7:30 p.m. MuCCC, 142 Atlantic Ave Seeking the female lead 305-9240.

[ FRI., JUNE 1 ] 22nd Annual Sulphur Springs Festival. June 1, 5-10 p.m. Downtown Clifton Springs, Main Street . Clifton Springs Free. 462-8200. info@ cliftonspringschamber.com. 64th Annual St. Rita Fiesta. June 1, 5-10 p.m. St. Rita’s Church, 1008 Maple Drive . Webster 671-1100. saintrita.org. Fairport Canal Days Art Festival. June 1, 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Village of Fairport, Lift Bridge Lane fairportcanaldays.com. Rochester Greek Festival. Through June 3, 11 a.m.-11 p.m. Annunciation Greek Orthodox Church, 962 East Ave (585) 244-3377. rochestergreekfestival.com. [ SAT., JUNE 2 ] 22nd Annual Sulphur Springs Festival. June 2, 10 a.m.7:30 p.m. Downtown Clifton Springs, Main Street . Clifton Springs Free. 462-8200. info@ cliftonspringschamber.com. 64th Annual St. Rita Fiesta. June 2, 2-10 p.m. St. Rita’s Church, 1008 Maple Drive . Webster 671-1100. saintrita.org. Fairport Canal Days Art Festival. June 2, 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Village of Fairport, Lift Bridge Lane fairportcanaldays.com. continues on page 24

GETLISTED get your event listed for free e-mail it to calendar@rochestercitynews.com. Or go online to rochestercitynewspaper.com and submit it yourself!

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 23


Rochester Greek Festival. Through June 3, 11 a.m.-11 p.m. Annunciation Greek Orthodox Church, 962 East Ave (585) 244-3377. rochestergreekfestival.com.

[ MON., JUNE 4 ]

Tree Peony Festival of Flowers. June 2, 9 a.m.4 p.m. Linwood Gardens, 1912 York Rd. $10/$15. linwoodgardens1912@gmail. com. linwoodgardens.org.

[ TUE., JUNE 5 ]

Wildlife Festival & Artisan Vendors. June 2, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Letchworth State Park, 1 Letchworth State Park . Castile With Park entry fee. 259-7112. rocwildlife.com. [ SUN., JUNE 3 ] Fairport Canal Days Art Festival. June 3, 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Village of Fairport, Lift Bridge Lane fairportcanaldays.com. Rochester Greek Festival. Through June 3, 11 a.m.-11 p.m. Annunciation Greek Orthodox Church, 962 East Ave (585) 244-3377. rochestergreekfestival.com. Tree Peony Festival of Flowers. June 3, 9 a.m.4 p.m. Linwood Gardens, 1912 York Rd. $10/$15. linwoodgardens1912@gmail. com. linwoodgardens.org.

Film [ WED., MAY 30 ] Tomka & His Friends. May 30, 7:30 p.m. Dryden Theatre, 900 East Ave Special introduction by Regina Longo, director of the Albanian Cinema Project $5-$10. 271-4090.

South Pacific. June 4, 1:30 p.m. Dryden Theatre, 900 East Ave Senior Matinee.. Free for 55+. 271-4090. Alive Inside. June 5, 7 p.m. Cinema Theatre, 957 S. Clinton Ave. Reel Mind Theatre & Film Series. Preceded by short concert by the Forget Me Nots at 6:30 $8. 271-1785. reelmindfilmfest.com. The Shakedown. June 5, 7:30 p.m. Dryden Theatre, 900 East Ave Silent Tuesday.. $5-$10. 271-4090.

PHOTO BY GERRY GEER

ART | ROCO’S “6X6” A mainstay event for the Rochester Contemporary Art Center since 2008, the annual fundraising exhibition “6x6” returns this week with the opening party at 4 p.m. Billed as “The International Small Art Phenomenon,” the 2018 iteration of the RoCo show features 3,278 artists and their works, all on six by six-inch squares. Specifically dubbed “6x6x2018,” it’s a great way to begin an art collection or add to your existing acquisitions. Opening party attendees can be among the first to purchase a piece, each at $20. A raffle to determine the first 20 buyers will take place at 7:30 p.m.; non-raffle purchases will begin at 8 p.m. “6x6x2018” opens on Saturday, June 2, at RoCo, 137 East Avenue. 4 p.m. to 10 p.m. $12, advance ticket purchasing recommended. You can preview this year’s set of works online now, and the exhibit continues through July 16. 461-2222. roco6x6.org. — BY DANIEL J. KUSHNER

[ THU., MAY 31 ] Desert Hearts. May 31, 7:30 p.m. Dryden Theatre, 900 East Ave Presented in partnership with ImageOut $5-$10. 271-4090.

[ FRI., JUNE 1 ]

[ SAT., JUNE 2 ]

Claire’s Camera. June 1, 7:30 p.m. Dryden Theatre, 900 East Ave $5-$10. 271-4090.

Pan Tadeusz: The Last Foray in Lithuania. June 2, 7:30 p.m. Dryden Theatre, 900 East Ave $5-$10. 271-4090.

Frederick Douglass [ WED., MAY 30 ] Frederick Douglass’s Rochester: Mapping His Tracks in Our City. Through Aug. 31. Central Library, 115 South Ave. 428-8150. rochistory.wordpress.com. Frederick Douglass’s World. Through Aug. 31. University of Rochester, River Campus rochester.edu.

Kids Events [ WED., MAY 30 ] Science + You. Through Aug. 5. Rochester Museum & Science Center, 657 East Ave. rmsc.org. [ SAT., JUNE 2 ] Gem Fest. June 2, 10 a.m.5 p.m. Canandaigua Civic Center, 250 North Bloomfield Road . Canandaigua Hosted by Wayne County Gem & Mineral Club $3. 585-396-7230. gcccexecdirector@rochester. rr.com. wcgmc.org. Saturday Night Live. June 2, 5-8:30 p.m. JCC Rochester,

1200 Edgewood Ave. Ages 5-12: swimming, pizza, & movie with other kids $20/$35. 461-2000. Woofstock 2018: Local Rescue & Shelter Benefit. June 2, 12-7 p.m. Americana Vineyards Winery, 4367 East Covert Road Free with donations. 387-6801.

Recreation [ SAT., JUNE 2 ]

[ MON., JUNE 4 ] Marketing Monday. First Monday of every month, 6-7:30 p.m Create Art 4 Good, 1115 E. Main Street, Suite #203, Door #5 A gathering of local entrepreneurs to discuss ideas, share insight, and inspire one another $5. 2103161. CreateArt4Good.org. [ TUE., JUNE 5 ] Reimagine RTS Phase 3: Public Information Session. June 5, 6-7:30 p.m. Edgerton Community Center, 41 Backus St A presentation about Phase 3 will be given. RTS representatives will be on hand to answer any of your questions 428-6769. myrts. com/reimagine.

ROC the MAP! Rochester Map Adventure. June 2, 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Fleet Feet Sports, 155 Culver Rd A 3 or 5-hour tour on bike or foot to answer Rochester neighborhood trivia, sponsored by the Rochester Orienteering Club. Pre-registration required $20. 310-4762.

Special Events

[ SUN., JUNE 3 ]

[ WED., MAY 30 ]

Inspiration: A Festival of Art & Nature. June 3, 11 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Sterling Nature Center, 15380 Jenzvold Rd Featuring a craft fair, local authors & artists, children’s activity tent, bake sale, and live music from John & Cathy Cadley, and The Tug Hill Players 947-6143. snc@co.cayuga. ny.us. facebook.com/ sterlingnaturecenter.

Food Truck Rodeo. May 30, 5-9 p.m. Rochester Public Market, 280 N. Union St. Live music by Tommy Brunett Band.

[ MON., JUNE 4 ] Maker’s Lab Drop-In. 6-8 p.m Irondequoit Public Library, 1290 Titus Ave 336-6062. aholland@libraryweb.org.

Meetings [ WED., MAY 30 ] Reimagine RTS Phase 3 PopUp Sessions. May 30, 4-6 p.m. RTS Transit Center, 60 St. Paul St. 585-288-1700. monroe@myRTS.com. myrts.com/reimagine.

[ THU., MAY 31 ] 2018 State of the County Address. May 31, 7:05 p.m. Frontier Field, 1 Morrie Silver Way redwingsbaseball.com. CITY Newspaper’s Best Busker Contest. May 31, 5-9 p.m. South Wedge, South Wedge facebook.com/ events/2102803519998837/.

continues on page 25

GETLISTED get your event listed for free e-mail it to calendar@rochestercitynews.com. Or go online to rochestercitynewspaper.com and submit it yourself!

CITY Newspaper presents

Mind • Body • Spirit TO ADVERTISE IN THE MIND BODY SPIRIT SECTION CALL BETSY AT 244.3329 x27 OR EMAIL BETSY@ROCHESTER-CITYNEWS.COM

24 CITY MAY 30 - JUNE 5, 2018


Patio Party. 5:30-8:30 p.m Casa Larga Vineyards, 2287 Turk Hill Rd Fairport Live music, food trucks, craft beer, & wine $10. 223-4210. casalarga.com. Reshaping Rochester Meet & Greet: Katrina JohnstonZimmerma. May 31, 5-7 p.m. Ox & Stone, 282 Alexander St. Pre-registration required. $15. 287-6933. oxandstone@gmail. com. rrcdc.org.

Law Enforcement Torch Run. June 1, 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Flame of Hope (Special Olympics torch) run will begin at Gates Town Hall and travel to the the Liberty Pole. Music & Food Truck Rodeo. June 1, 4:30-8 p.m. Penfield Amphitheater, 3100 Atlantic Ave Penfield 340-8655. penfield.org.

African Drumming. Baobab Cultural Center, 728 University Ave. Youth: 9:30-10:30am; Adults: 10:45am-12:15pm. Behind the Scenes at Rose Hill Mansion. First Saturday of every month, 11 a.m Rose Hill Mansion, 3373 New York 96A, Geneva $6-$10. 315-789-3848. genevahistoricalsociety.com.

UJAMAA Marketplace. June 2, 1-5 p.m. Baobab Cultural Center, 728 University Ave.

[ SAT., JUNE 2 ]

Zoobilation 2018. June 2, 5:30-11 p.m. Seneca Park Zoo, 2222 St. Paul St $150/$175. [ SUN., JUNE 3 ] PHOTO PROVIDED

COMEDY | KAREN WILLIAMS Cleveland-based comedian, actor, and writer Karen Williams is also a diversity trainer and inspirational lecturer, whose HaHA Institute (Humor and Healing Arts) offers workshops that aim to build self-awareness and self-confidence, and encourage tolerance and respect. Riffing in a standup routine on the continuous letter additions to the LGBTQ+ group, she said: “C is for curious…who the fuck isn’t curious? And their allies, so who’s left? The haters. I hope one day we can just say ‘human beings,’ and that’ll cover it.” Williams will be in Rochester this week for a night of comedy presented by ImageOut at Comedy @ The Carlson. Rochester-based singer-songwriter Meg Gehman & The Influence will open.

[ SAT., JUNE 2 ] Adoption Event. noon. Pet Adoption Network, 4261 Culver Rd. 338-9175. petadoptionnetwork.org.

Technology Help with Teen Tech Tutors. 4-6 p.m Irondequoit Public Library, 1290 Titus Ave 336-6060. aholland@libraryweb.org.

Winton Wobble Bar Crawl. June 2, 1 p.m. Starting at Club Soda at 1pm.

[ FRI., JUNE 1 ] History on Tap. June 1, 5-9 p.m. Genesee Country Village & Museum, 1410 Flint Hill Rd Mumford With more than 25 vendors from local brewers, vintners & cideries, live music by The Crooked North, lawn games, food trucks & more. Free shuttle rides from Radio Social. Reservations required $10-$25. 538-6822. gcv.org.

sky offered from dark to 10pm. Weather permitting; call after 7:30pm to confirm evening’s viewing 697-1945. rmsc.org/ strasenburghplanetarium.

Karen Williams performs on Wednesday, June 6, at Comedy @The Carlson, 50 Carlson Road. 7 p.m. $16-$20. imageout.org; tickettailor.com/events/imageout/162142/#. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY

Rochester’s First Free-forAll. June 2, 10:30 a.m.-3 p.m. Thomas P. Ryan Community Center, 530 Webster Ave. Presented by Monroe County’s Buy Nothing Communities.

Bring & receive goods for free. Contact amycavalier@ hotmail.com if you will be bringing items. Telescope Viewing. Strasenburgh Planetarium, 657 East Avenue Views of the night

CollectorFest Monthly. June 3, 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Webster Columbus Center, 70 Barrett Dr. Cards & collectibles, hosted by Ernie’s Cards 872-6090. collectorfestmonthly.com. Flower City Days at the Market. 8 a.m.-2 p.m Rochester Public Market, 280 N. Union St. Museum Book Sale. June 3, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. New York Museum of Transportation, 6393 E. River Rd Included with admission. [ MON., JUNE 4 ] Technology Help with Teen Tech Tutors. 4-6 p.m Irondequoit Public Library, 1290 Titus Ave 336-6062. aholland@libraryweb.org.

Workshops [ WED., MAY 30 ] Katrina Johnston-Zimmerman: Sparking Change - Women in Design. May 30, 12-1:30 p.m. Rochester Regional Community Design Center, 1115 E. Main St. Reshaping Rochester Lunch & Learn. Pre-registration required $20. 271-0520. rrcdc.org.

I Can’t Talk to Them!. June 2, 1-5 p.m. Gandhi Institute for Nonviolence, 929 S. Plymouth Ave. Nonviolent communication Requested donation of $30-50. 463-3266. gandhiinstitute.org.

Stories from the Negotiating Front Line: Implementing a Treaty is Messy. June 2, 7 p.m. Rochester Baha’i Center, 693 East Avenue Col. Peter Engstrom shares his story about involvement with the Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty. Preceded by potluck dinner at 6pm 355-5773. secretary@lsaroc.org.

Literary Events [ SAT., JUNE 2 ]

[ SUN., JUNE 3 ] Traditional English Tea & Taxes Round Table Discussion. 4-5 p.m Tinsley Agency, 258 Alexander Street Reservation required 420-8985. ctinsley@ farmersagent.com.

Words on the Verge: Leslie Youngblood. June 2, 5-7 p.m. A Different Path Gallery, 27 Market St Brockport A reading of works 637-5494. differentpathgallery.com/. [ SUN., JUNE 3 ]

[ TUE., JUNE 5 ] Personal Defense & Safety. June 5, 11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. Diplomat Party House, 1956 Lyell Ave Hosted by ROC Power Group. Presentation by County Sheriff Todd Baxter. Includes lunch. Registration required $25. 647-1566. rocpowergroup.com.

Realizing Peace Through the Natural World. June 3, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Ganondagan State Historic Site, 7000 County Road 41 Robin Kimmerer presentation & book signing, Iroquois White Corn light lunch, forest therapy nature Walk $35/$40. 742-1690. ganondagan.org.

Culture Lectures

Museum Exhibit

[ SAT., JUNE 2 ]

Take It Down! Organizing Against Racism. Ongoing. Rochester Museum & Science Center, 657 East Ave. This exhibit shows how pickaninny art perpetuates racism by denying the humanity of black children. Presented in partnership with the City of Rochester 2714320. rmsc.org.

[ WED., MAY 30 ]

Around the Table Conversations: Hodinohsoni’ Women from Creation to Today. June 2, 1-3 p.m. Ganondagan State Historic Site, 7000 County Road 41 Author Sally Roesch Wagner & Mohawk Clanmother Louise lead an open discussion on the largely unrecognized impact Hodinöhsö:ni’ women had on leaders of the Women’s Rights movement $8/$10. 742-1690. ganondagan.org.

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done much to deepen the character at its center. Too often it feels like the kind of blatant fan service that “Star Wars” agnostics complain take up too much real estate in these new films. “Solo” expects us to already be invested in Han right from the jump, simply because of who he will eventually become. It’s a testament to Ehrenreich’s charming performance that by the end, we do care about the character; given the thankless task of stepping into an iconic role, Ehrenreich finds a way to make it his own. It helps that he’s surrounded by a fantastic ensemble, all giving wonderful performances. I eagerly await a time when the “Star Wars” series can move beyond films like “Solo,” which merely give audiences more of what they already know they love. It’s a great big universe out there, and sticking to the same familiar characters and plots only ends up making it feel that much smaller. An extended version of this review is online at rochestercitynewspaper.com.

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“The Rider” (R), DIRECTED BY CHLOÉ ZHAO OPENS FRIDAY, JUNE 1 Alden Ehrenreich as Han Solo and Joonas Suotamo as Chewbacca in “Solo: A Star Wars Story.” PHOTO COURTESY LUCASFILM

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A boy and his wookie “Solo: A Star Wars Story” (PG-13), DIRECTED BY RON HOWARD NOW PLAYING [ REVIEW ] BY ADAM LUBITOW

Like “Rogue One” before it, “Solo: A Star Wars Story” is one in a series of anthology films set in the “Star Wars” universe, meant to tell standalone stories separate from the main episodic films. Based on these first two entries, these films have instead become a chance for their makers to take some beloved aspect of the “Star Wars” franchise and fill in its backstory by answering questions no one really had. Providing the origin story of roguish smuggler Han Solo (played here by Alden Ehrenreich), “Solo” feels like the result of its writers being handed a checklist of events they had to include, and their job was simply to create a narrative that could connect them. So we get the defining moments that led to Han becoming the scruffy looking nerf herder we know and love, as embodied by Harrison Ford in the earlier films: we see him becoming friends with Chewbacca (Joonas Suotamo), encountering Lando Calrissian (a scene-stealing Donald Glover), getting to fly

the Millennium Falcon for the first time, and making the Kessel Run in less than 12 parsecs. The results are messy and uneven, but whereas “Rogue One” could be a selfserious slog, “Solo” at least has some fun along the way, while never quite justifying its existence. The film’s at its best when it foregrounds its appealing performances and leans into the narrative’s slight Western vibe and heist movie elements. We pick up during Han’s early days navigating the criminal underworld on his home planet Corellia alongside his childhood sweetheart Qi’ra (Emilia Clarke). Together, they have dreams of making it on their own, but during an attempt to finally leave the planet, the pair end up separated. Han enlists with the Imperial armed forces, before joining up with a band of outlaws led by Beckett (Woody Harrelson) and Val (Thandie Newton). Hoping to earn enough to make his way back to Qi’ra, he agrees to a risky mission that eventually lands the entire band of thieves in the crosshairs of gangster Dryden Vos (Paul Bettany). There’s a lot crammed into “Solo,” and screenwriters Jonathan and Lawrence Kasdan treat the plot like a puzzle that needs to be filled in piece by piece until the expected picture emerges. But once we get that final picture, none of the individual pieces have

A mournful, elegiac ode to the American Midwest, Chloé Zhao’s “The Rider,” blends narrative and documentary as it observes the life of Brady Blackburn (Brady Jandreau, playing a loosely fictionalized version of himself), a rodeo rider recovering from a nearfatal head injury after being thrown from a bull. His doctors warn him that continuing to ride might kill him, but the rodeo is the one thing that gives his life meaning, and he can’t bring himself to give it up. Brady lives on the South Dakota Pine Ridge Reservation with his father (Tim Jandreau) and autistic younger sister Lilly (Lilly Jandreau), who each exert pressures on him in their own way. He’s protective and unyieldingly patient around Lilly; she seems one of the few people he’s able to let his guard down around. Meanwhile, his father pushes him to find a new way to make himself useful. The effects of Brady’s injury manifest in an unusual way: his hand tightens up unpredictably, and he finds himself literally unable to let go of things. But eventually he’s hired to break in a new horse, and there are lovely sequences where Zhao lets us watch him work. We see his natural way with horses, and the freedom he feels in the saddle. Some of the film’s most emotional scenes come during Brady’s visits with his best friend Lane (Lane Scott), another rider left paralyzed and unable to speak after suffering his own accident. Their scenes bring a piercing authenticity to a story about the elemental conflict that arises when the very thing that makes a person who they are might also be their undoing.


Classifieds For information: Call us (585) 244-3329 Fax us (585) 244-1126 Mail Us City Classifieds 250 N. Goodman Street Rochester, NY 14607 Email Us classifieds@ rochester-citynews.com EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY

All real estate advertised in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act, which makes it unlawful, “to make, print, or publish, any notice, statement, or advertisement, with respect to the sale or rental of a dwelling that indicates any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin.” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under the age of 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertisement for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. Call the local Fair Housing Enforcement Project, FHEP at 325-2500 or 1-866-671-FAIR. Si usted sospecha una practica de vivienda injusta, por favor llame al servicio legal gratis. 585-325-2500 - TTY 585-325-2547.

Land for Sale ABUTS STATE LAND! 20 acres- $44,900. Beaver Pond. Cooperstown Lake Region, 3 hrs NY City! 21 tracts avail in all. 5 to 50 acres. June 2nd & 3rd. Terms. 888701-7509 newyorklandandlakes. com FARM ESTATE SALE! 10 acres$26,900. Cooperstown Lake Region, 3 hrs NY City! 21 tracts avail in all. 5 to 50 acres. June 2nd & 3rd. Terms. 888-479-3394 newyorklandandlakes.com HARDWOOD FOREST! 50 acres$89,900. Abuts State Land, brook. Cooperstown Lake Region, 3 hrs NY City! 21 tracts avail in all. 5 to 50 acres. June 2nd & 3rd. Terms. 888476-4569 newyorklandandlakes. com WOODED GETAWAY 5 acres$19,900. Cooperstown Lake

Region, 3 hrs NY City! 21 tracts avail in all. 5 to 50 acres. June 2nd & 3rd. Terms. 888-905-8847 newyorklandandlakes.com

Real Estate Services REAL ESTATE ATTORNEY Buy/ Sell Mortgage Promblems. Attorney & Real Estate Bkr, PROBATE/ CRIMINAL/BUSINESS- Richard H. Lovelll, P.C., 10748 Cross Bay, Ozone Park, NY 11417 718-8359300 lovelllawnewyork@gmail.com

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#1 ALWAYS BETTER CASH PAID for most Junk Cars, Trucks and Vans. Any condition, running or not. Always free pick up and usually same day service. Call 585-3055865

LUNG CANCER ? And Age 60+? You And Your Family May Be Entitled To Significant Cash Award. Call 866951-9073 for Information. No Risk. No Money Out Of Pocket.

2011 SILVER PRIUS 65,400 miles Excellent condition, exterior and interior Brakes like new! Michelin X tires mounted on spoked alloy rims Michelin X-Ice winter tires mounted on steel rims $ 11,350 585-2338967

VIAGRA & CIALIS! 60 pills for $99. 100 pills for $150 FREE shipping. Money back guaranteed! Call Today: 800-404-024

DONATE YOUR CAR to Wheels For Wishes, benefiting Make-AWish. We offer free towing and your donation is 100% tax deductible. Call 917-336-1254 Today!

BRIAN S. MARVIN Lead vocalist, looking for an audition to join band, cover tunes, originals and has experience with bands 585-2593717

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CONGA PLAYER - / percussionist, looking for work in J jazz, Afro Cuban Jazz or any other musical group. Peter 585-210-6087

1-SET BILLIARD BALLS: 15 Balls and 2 cue balls. Hard resin, $50 585-723-8134 EXOTIC HOUSE PLANTS, indoor, 10 plants 2 for $3 585-490-5870 SAWMILLS FOR ONLY $4397.00MAKE & SAVE MONEY with your own bandmill- Cut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship! FREE Info/DVD: www. NorwoodSawmills.com 1-800-5670404 Ext.300 TWIN BED FRAME metal with Wood headboard $47 585-490-5870

Garage and Yard Sales City SE - Highland Park Neighborhood Wide Yard Sale. Goodman, Rockingham, Mulberry, Meigs St. to name a few. Over 30 households. Sat 6/9 9-4pm. Rain or Shine!

Miscellaneous DISH TV $59.99 For 190 Channels +$14.95 High Speed Internet. Free Installation, Smart HD DVR Included, Free Voice Remote. Some restrictions apply. Call 1-800-9430838 Guaranteed Life Insurance! (Ages 50 to 80). No medical exam. Affordable premiums never increase. Benefits never decrease. Policy will only be cancelled for non-payment. 855686-5879. HAVE AN IDEA for an invention/new product? We help everyday inventors try to patent and submit their ideas to companies! Call InventHelp®, FREE INFORMATION! 888-4877074

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Mind Body Spirit Attention Viagra users: Generic 100 mg blue pills or Generic 20 mg yellow pills. Get 45 plus 5 free $99 + S/H. Guaranteed, no prescription necessary. Call 877-845-8068. Medicare doesn’t cover all of your medical expenses. A Medicare Supplemental Plan can help cover costs that Medicare does not. Get a free quote today by calling now. Hours: 24/7. 1-800-730-9940 OXYGEN- ANYTIME. ANYWHERE No tanks to refill. No deliveries. The All-New Inogen One G4 is only 2.8 pounds! FAA approved! FREE info kit: 866-971-2603 PENIS ENLARGEMENT PUMP Get Stronger & Harder Erections Immediately. Gain 1-3 Inches Permanently & Safely. Guaranteed Results. FDA Licensed. Free Brochure: 1-800-354-3944 www. DrJoelKaplan.com (AAN CAN)

Attorneys LUNG CANCER? - And Age 60+? You And Your Family May Be Entitled To Significant

Financial Services DENIED CREDIT?? - Work to Repair Your Credit Report With The Trusted Leader in Credit Repair. Call Lexington Law for a FREE credit report summary & credit repair consultation. 855-620-9426. John C. Heath, Attorney at Law, PLLC, dba Lexington Law Firm. (AAN CAN)

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 27


/ EMPLOYMENT

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Career Opportunities PAID IN ADVANCE Make $1000 Weekly Mailing Brochures From Home Genuine Opportunity. Helping home workers since 2001! Start Immediately!

Volunteers BECOME A DOCENT at the Rochester Museum & Science Center Must be an enthusiastic communicator, Like working with children. Learn more at http:// www.rmsc.org/Support/Volunteer

Join the New York State Workforce

Or call 585-697-1948

As a Licensed Practical Nurse (LPN)! Salary range: $38,113 to $46,772

Contact Urban League Of Rochester today to become a mentor to the youth in our community! Email Charisma Dupree at cdupree@ulr.org to get started.

Finger Lakes DDSO is seeking LPNs in Monroe, Livingston, Ontario, Wayne, Wyoming, & Yates counties.

MEALS ON WHEELS needs YOU to deliver meals to YOUR neighbors in need. Available weekdays between 11:30 AM and 1:00 PM? Visit our website at www.vnsnet.com or call 2744385 to get started!

Minimum Qualifications: Must have a current license and registration to practice in New York State, or limited permit to practice in NYS, or an application on file for a limited permit to practice in NYS. For exam application: OPWDD Finger Lakes DDSO Human Resources Management Office - Hiring Unit 620 Westfall Road, Rochester, NY 14620 Phone: (585) 461-8800 Email: opwdd.sm.FL.hiring@opwdd.ny.gov

As a Direct Support Professional! Salary range: $32,325 to $44,311 Finger Lakes DDSO will be continuously administering the Civil Service Exam for Direct Support Professionals throughout Monroe, Wayne, Ontario, Seneca, Yates, Livingston, Wyoming, Schuyler, Steuben, and Chemung counties. Minimum Qualifications: High School Diploma or GED equivalent, you must have a valid license to operate a motor vehicle in New York State at the time of the appointment and continuously thereafter. For exam application: OPWDD Finger Lakes DDSO Human Resources Management Office - Hiring Unit 620 Westfall Road, Rochester, NY 14620 Phone: (585) 461-8800 Email: opwdd.sm.FL.hiring@opwdd.ny.gov An Affirmative Action Equal Opportunity Employer

28 CITY MAY 30 - JUNE 5, 2018

PROFESSIONAL CONTRACT PHOTOGRAPHER WANTED A local public entity is seeking to contract with an experienced photojournalist. Candidate must provide a photographic portfolio for review which shows experience capturing public events, press conferences and photo journalistic subjects. Candidate must be able to provide their own transportation when needed and be available to photograph subjects throughout the Rochester community at relatively short notice. Compensation will be on a contract basis. Please submit resume to Box 280, City Newspaper 250 N. Goodman Street, Rochester, NY 14607 or e-mail resume marked for Box 280 to classifieds@rochester-citynews.com CITY Newspaper is not the employer

OPERA GUILD OF Rochester needs a volunteer to assist with newsletter publication, and event helpers for the annual recital and opera presentations. For details see home page at operaguildofrochester.com. SENECA PARK ZOO Society seeking volunteers and docents for ongoing involvement or special events. Roles available for all interests. Contact Volunteers@ senecazoo.org to learn more. ST. JOHN’S HOME is Looking for a musician to volunteer every other week, for roughly an hour and lead sing-a-longs with a small group of residents. Please call volunteer office at 760-1293 for more information. VOLUNTEER DRIVERS ARE KEY – some of our neighbors need a ride to the doctor. Do you have time to help? Call Lifespan 2448400, x142 Volunteer needed Volunteer to teach local residents basic computer skills or complete computer-essential tasks. Learn more at https://digital. literacyrochester.org/volunteer

VOLUNTEERS NEEDED at Operation Buildup. We surprise Veterans with donated vehicles. Automotive skills are a plus but all volunteers are welcome. Call 585-226-3925

Career Training AIRLINE CAREERS begin here – Get started by training as FAA certified Aviation Technician. Financial aid for qualified students. Job placement assistance. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance 800-725-1563 (AAN CAN)

ARE YOU Take the first step toward finding the newest member of your team.

CALL

(585) 730-2666

OR EMAIL

david@rochestercitynews.com

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Legal Ads [ LEGAL NOTICE ] JEWELL ENTERPRISES LLC, a domestic Limited Liability Company (LLC) filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on May 14, 2018. NY office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of any process against the LLC served upon him/her to the LLC, 146 Crossgates Road, Rochester, NY 14606. General purposes. [ LEGAL NOTICE } Kendricks Tree & Landscaping, LLC (“LLC”) filed Arts. of Org. with Secy. of State of NY (“SSNY”) on May 22, 2018. Office Location: Monroe County. SSNY designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to 8 Meadow Cove Road, Pittsford, New York 14534. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] ACD Real Estate Holdings, LLC, Arts of Org. filed with Sec. of State of NY (SSNY)

4/20/2018. Cty: Monroe. SSNY desig. as agent upon whom process against may be served & shall mail process to Attn: Manager of LLC, 1505 Shoecraft Rd., Penfield, NY 14526. General Purpose. [ NOTICE ] AMERICAN AERIAL TREE SERVICE, LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 4/19/2018. Office in Monroe Co. SSNY desig. agent of LLC whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail process to 2935 Culver Rd., Rochester, NY 14622. Purpose: Any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Bonnie Brook Family Foundation, LLC (LLC) filed Arts. of Org. with NY Secy. of State (SS) on 4/27/18. LLC’s office is in Monroe Co. SS is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS will mail a copy of any process to 7 Woodcliff Terrace, Fairport, NY 14450. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Compass Evaluation and Consulting LLC. Arts. of

Org. filed with the SSNY on 05/02/18. Office: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to the LLC, 15 Sandpiper Lane Pittsford NY 14534. Purpose: Any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] DEJOY CHIROPRACTIC PLLC (PLLC) filed Arts. of Org. with NY Secy. of State (SS) on 5/8/2018. PLLC’s office is in Monroe Co. SS is designated as agent of PLLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS shall mail a copy of any process to 95 Allens Creek Road, Bldg. 1, Ste. 313, Rochester, NY 14618. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Emandsee, LLC filed 3/1/18. Monroe Co. SSNY design agent for process & shall mail to 117 W. Commerical St Po Box 187 E. Rochester NY 14445 General Purpose [ NOTICE ] GRAND OAKS GLN, LLC (LLC) filed Arts. of Org. with NY Secy. of

State (SS) on 4/12/2018. LLC’s office is in Monroe Co. SS is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS shall mail a copy of any process to 1 Fishers Road, Pittsford, NY 14534. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Hazel Transmedia Lab, LLC (LLC) filed Arts. of Org. with NY Secy. of State (SS) on 5/4/18. LLC’s office is in Monroe Co. SS is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS will mail a copy of any process to 21 Van Cortland Dr., Pittsford, NY 14534. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] LEGAL NOTICE OF FORMATION OF Irondequoit Holdings LLC: LLC filed Articles of Organization with the NYS DOS on January 3, 2018. The DOS is designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. The office of the LLC and address to which the Secretary of State shall mail a copy of

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any process shall be 49 Parkmere Rd Rochester, NY 14617 Monroe County. The purpose of the LLC is to engage in any business permitted under law. [ NOTICE ] Matthews Enterprising LLC filed SSNY 4/25/18. Monroe Co. SSNY design agent for process & shall mail to Matthew Kaskins 364 Timothy Ln #11 Ontario NY 14519 General Purpose [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Auberon Group, LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 03/23/18. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 23 Bending Creek Rd., Apt. 2, Rochester NY 14624 . Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Gallup LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 04/18/2018 . Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 644 Gallup Rd, Spencerport, NY 14559. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ]

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Notice of Formation of 214-216 Cypress Street, LLC. Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 5/17/2018. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to the LLC at 497 Willow Glen Cir., Simi Valley, CA 93065. Purpose: any lawful activities.

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Notice of Formation of 61-C Monroe Avenue, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 4/30/18. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 6685 Camden Hill Drive, Victor, NY 14564. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of 674 Ridge Road, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 4/19/18. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 674 Ridge Road, Webster, NY 14580. Purpose: any lawful activity.

[ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of 9 East Street, LLC. Articles of Organization filed with Sec. of State of New York (SSNY) on 5/8/18. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process served to 9 East Street, LLC, 220 Culver Rd. Apt. 1, Rochester, NY 14607. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of a Limited Liability Company (LLC) C&A Invest Rochester LLC Articles of Organization filed by the Department of State of New York on: 04/30/2018 Office location: County of Orleans Purpose: Any and all lawful activities Secretary of State of New York (SSNY ) is designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to: 1525 Monroe Orleans County Line Road, Kendall, NY 14476 [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of Albion BTS Retail, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 1/30/2018. Office location, County of Orleans. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 14600 Detroit Ave., Ste. 1500, Lakewood, OH 44107. Purpose: any lawful act.

shall mail copy of process to CHIMAERA PROPERTIES LLC, C/O THOMAS S. GRAFF, 31 TYNEDALE WAY, NORTH CHILI, NY 14514. Purpose: any lawful activity [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Comfy Art LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 1/08/2018. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 127 Roslyn St., Rochester, NY, 14619. Purpose: any lawful activities [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Confident Couriers Company, LLC. Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 3/23/2018. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 140 Lozier st Rochester NY 14611. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of CUTTING EDGE EXPERTS, LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 3/12/18. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 780 N. CLINTON AVE ROCHESTER NY 14605 . Purpose: any lawful activities.

[ NOTICE ]

[ NOTICE ]

Notice of Formation of Amitas Properties of Wellsville, LLC. Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 03/22/18. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to the LLC at 4 Epping Wood Trl, Pittsford, NY 14534. Purpose: any lawful activities.

Notice of Formation of ENEROC Custodial, LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 5/7/18. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 510 Clinton Square Rochester NY 14604 .Purpose: any lawful activities.

[ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of CALLOWAY’S MEDICAL TRANSPORTATION LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 05/07/18. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 54 Knollbrook Rd Apt 33 Brighton, NY 14610. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] NOTICE OF FORMATION OF CHIMAERA PROPERTIES LLC Articles of Organization filed with Secretary of State of NY (“SSNY”) on 05/07/2018. Office in Monroe County. SSNY designated agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY

[ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of Flower City Threads, LLC Art of Org. filed with SSNY 3/23/2018 Office Location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated Agent of LLC to whom process may be served. SSNY may mail copy of process to 32 Meadowlark Drive, Penfield, Rochester, NY 14526. Purpose of LLC: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of GREEN ZEBRA CATERING, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 05/08/18. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, 3 Moss Creek Ct., Pittsford, NY 14534.

Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Hippity Hip, LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 12/1/2017. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 131 Gregory Street, Rochester NY 14620 . Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Increase Sales Digital, LLC Art. of Org. filed with Sec’y of State (SSNY) March 13, 2018. Office location. Monroe County. SNNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 850 St. Paul St, Suite 30, Rochester, NY 14605. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of J R Thomas Enterprises, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 5/18/18. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 682 Arnett Blvd., Rochester, NY 14619. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of KOVAC’S Transport, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 04/04/18. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 273 Ford Ave., Rochester, NY 14606. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Ladybugs Play, LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 4/30/18. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 55 Aspen Drive, Rochester, NY 14625 . Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of LINCOLN INDUSTRIAL PARK LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 05/10/2018. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 121 LINCOLN AVE; ROCHESTER, NY 14609 . Purpose: any lawful activities.

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 29


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[ NOTICE ]

Notice of Formation of Lou Blu Properties LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 04/23/2018. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 17 Washington Ave Pittsford NY 14534 . Purpose: any lawful activities.

Notice of Formation of Rochester Consulting Associates, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 5/1/18. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o The LLC, 3445 Winton Place, Ste. 228, Rochester, NY 14623. Purpose: any lawful activity.

[ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of McWingo Property, LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 0216-18. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to Harrington Ent., llc, 4078 Flakes Mill Rd, Decatur, GA. 30034 . Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of MMJC CAPITAL, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 04/16/18. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 15 Loch Loyal Ct., Penfield, NY 14526. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of NCL AUTO BODY LLC. Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) MAY 15, 2018. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to the LLC at 1692B LYELL AVENUE, ROCHESTER, NY 14606. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Ontario Homes Sales, LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 03/26/2018. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 160 Despatch Dr., East Rochester, NY 14445. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Rhythm A Hope LLC. Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) April 19, 2018. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to the LLC at 87 Woodgreen Drive Pittsford NY 14534. Purpose: any lawful activities including socializing for encouraging charity

[ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Roctricity LLC, Arts. of Org. filed Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) 5-1-18. Office, Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process copy to 758 South Ave. Rochester, NY 14620. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of THE PRESCOTT TEAM LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) on 5/11/2018. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 530 VOSBURG ROAD, WEBSTER, NY 14580. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] T&T Lawn and Landscaping, LLC, Arts of Org. filed with Sec. of State of NY (SSNY) 4/30/2018. Cty: Monroe. SSNY desig. as agent upon whom process against may be served & shall mail process to Tina Schuth, 4317 Canal Rd., Spencerport, NY 14559. General Purpose. [ NOTICE } Clarington Property LLC (“LLC”) filed Articles of Organization with the NY Sec. of State (“SSNY”) on 4/30/18. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall forward service of process to 262 Willowen Drive, Rochester, NY 14609. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE } Notice of Formation of CTC Cleaning Services, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 5/18/18. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 682 Arnett Blvd., Rochester, NY 14619. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE } Notice of Formation of K.W. BRODEN, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of

30 CITY MAY 30 - JUNE 5, 2018

To place your ad in the LEGAL section, contact Tracey Mykins by phone at (585) 244-3329 x10 or by email at legals@rochester-citynews.com State of NY (SSNY) on 4/27/18. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 1346A Pittsford Mendon Road, Mendon, NY 14506. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ Notice of Formation ] 10th Fairway LLC (“LLC”) filed Articles of Organization with the NY Sec. of State (“SSNY”) on 4/26/18. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall forward service of process to 590 Allens Creek Road, Rochester, NY 14618. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ Notice of Formation ] 114 South Union Street LLC (“LLC”) filed Articles of Organization with the NY Sec. of State (“SSNY”) on 5/3/18. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall forward service of process to Craig Jensen, 54 South Union Street, Rochester, NY 14607. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ Notice of Formation ] CPW Property Holdings LLC (“LLC”) filed Articles of Organization with the NY Sec. of State (“SSNY”) on 4/30/18. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall forward service of process to 37 Richmond Street, Rochester, NY 14607. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] Name: DT CULVER HOLDINGS LLC. Arts. Of Org. filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 05/10/2018. Office Location: Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to: C/O DT CULVER HOLDINGS LLC, One East Main Street, 10th Floor, Rochester, New York 14614. Purpose: Any Lawful Purpose. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] Name: HARRISON STREET BONEYARD LLC. Arts. Of Org. filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 05/07/2018. Office Location: Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to: C/O HARRISON STREET BONEYARD LLC,

One East Main Street, 10th Floor, Rochester, New York 14614. Purpose: Any Lawful Purpose [ Notice of Formation ] Name: TWBC HOLDINGS LLC. Arts. Of Org. filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 04/27/2018. Office Location: Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to: C/O TWBC HOLDINGS LLC, One East Main Street, 10th Floor, Rochester, New York 14614. Purpose: Any Lawful Purpose. [ Notice of Formation ] Name: WAYNE CONSULTANCY LLC. Arts. Of Org. filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 04/30/2018. Office Location: Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to: C/O WAYNE CONSULTANCY LLC, One East Main Street, 10th Floor, Rochester, New York 14614. Purpose: Any Lawful Purpose [ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] New York Paralegal SVS LLC filed Arts. of Org. with Sec. of State on 03/19/18. Office Loc: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY may mail copy of process to 93 Chesterfield Drive, Rochester, NY 14612. The purpose of the company is any lawful activity. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] Tech Buyers Group LLC (“LLC”) filed Articles of Organization with the NY Sec. of State (“SSNY”) on 5/9/18. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall forward service of process to 1157 Fairport Road, Fairport, NY 14450. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION LLC ] Notice is hereby given that Natural ReLeaf, LLC, a Limited Liability Company, filed Articles of Organization with the Secretary of State on May 17, 2018. The principal office is located in the County of Monroe, State of New York, and the Secretary of State was designated as agent upon whom process against it may be served. The address to which the Secretary of State shall mail a copy of any process against

the limited liability company is: 2 Kings Lacey Way, Fairport, New York 14450. The purpose of the company is to engage in any lawful activity for which a company may be organized under §203 of the Limited Liability Company Law. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF CAVALCADE EVENTS, LLC ] The name of the Limited Liability Company is Cavalcade Events, LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the New York Secretary of State on 04/30/2018. The office of the LLC is in Monroe County. The New York Secretary of State is designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. The Secretary of State shall mail a copy of such process to William Alexander, Esq., One South Clinton Ave., Suite 1000, Rochester, NY 14604. The LLC is organized to engage in any lawful activity for which an LLC may be formed under the NY LLC Law. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILTY COMPANY ] Notice of Formation of 1379 Long Pond Road LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) on December 22, 2006. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to LLC at 1379 Long Pond Road, Rochester, NY 14626. Purpose: Any lawful activities. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILTY COMPANY ] Notice of Formation of Buntsy’s Neighborhood Food & Drink LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) on April 18, 2018. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to LLC at 8 Pierce Street, Webster, NY 14580. Purpose: Any lawful activities. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LLC ] Jay’s Dry Bulk, LLC filed articles of organization with the New York Secretary of State on 4/11/18 with an effective date of formation of 4/11/18. Its principal place of business is located in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent upon whom process may be served. A copy of any process shall be mailed to 1869 Turk Hill Rd., Fairport, NY 14450. The purpose of the LLC is to engage in any lawful activity

for which Limited Liability Companies may be organized under Section 203 of the New York Limited Liability Company Law. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LLC ] Notice is hereby given that Rock Beach Aquatics, LLC a Limited Liability Company, filed Articles of Organization with the Secretary of State on April 13, 2018. The principal office is located in the County of Monroe, State of New York, and the Secretary of State was designated as agent upon whom process against it may be served. The address to which the Secretary of State shall mail a copy of any process against the limited liability company is: 80 Rock Beach Road, Rochester, NY 14617. The purpose of the company is to engage in any lawful activity for which a company may be organized under §203 of the Limited Liability Company Law. [ Notice of Formation of VICTOR EAST AUTO GROUP LLC ] Arts. Of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on April 16, 2018. Office location: Monroe Co., NY. Princ. Office of LLC: 120 Linden Oaks Drive, Ste 200, Rochester, NY 14625. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Princ. Office of LLC. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [NOTICE] Notice of formation of OPTIMIZER SERVICES, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 2/27/2018. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 1890 Harris Rd., Penfield, NY 14526. Purpose: any lawful act [ PUBLIC NOTICE ] AT&T proposes to modify an existing facility (new tip heights 91’) on the building at 150 Highland Ave, Rochester, NY (20180920). Interested parties may contact Scott Horn (856-809-1202) (1012 Industrial Dr., West Berlin, NJ 08091) with comments regarding potential effects on historic properties. [ PUBLICATION NOTICE OF ORGANIZATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY ] The name of the Limited Liability Company is Double Four Development LLC, its Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State on April 25, 2018; the County within

New York in which its office is to be located is Monroe; the Secretary of State has been designated as agent upon whom process may be served; the post office address to which the Secretary of State shall mail the process is 154 Cobblestone Court Drive, #171, Victor, New York 14564; the purpose of its business is to conduct any lawful business under law [ SUPPLEMENTAL SUMMONS ] Index No. 2015002600 STATE OF NEW YORK SUPREME COURT – COUNTY OF MONROE U.S. BANK TRUST, N.A., AS TRUSTEE FOR LSF9 MASTER PARTICIPATION TRUST, Plaintiff, -vs- THE HEIRS AT LARGE OF ANDREA J. RIVOLI A/K/A ANDREA RIVOLI, DECEASED, and all persons who are husbands, widows, grantees, mortgagees, lienors, heirs, devisees, distributees, successors in interest of such of them as may be dead, and their husbands and wives, heirs, devisees, distributees and successors of interest of all of whom and whose names and places are unknown to Plaintiff; THERESA OLCOTT, ANDREA JO HAMMOND, MICHAEL RIVOLI A/K/A MICHAEL J. RIVOLI A/K/A MICHAEL J. RIVOLI, SR., DEBRA DELVECCHIO, JENNIFER RIVOLI, SUSAN CLAWSON, THOMAS RIVOLI, AND MICHELLE RIVOLI, AS POSSIBLE HEIRS TO THE ESTATE OF ANDREA J. RIVOLI A/K/A ANDREA RIVOLI, DECEASED; WORLDWIDE ASSET PURCHASING LLC ASI CHASE MANHATTAN BANK, NA; SUMMIT FEDERAL CREDIT UNION; NEW YORK STATE DEPARTMENT OF TAXATION AND FINANCE CIVIL ENFORCEMENT REGION 1B; MAIN STREET ACQUISITION CORP.; UNITED STATES OF AMERICA; NEW YORK STATE DEPARTMENT OF TAXATION AND FINANCE; “JOHN DOE” AND “JANE DOE” said names being fictitious, it being the intention of Plaintiff to designate any and all occupants of premises being foreclosed herein, Defendants. Mortgaged Premises: 50 DONNA ROAD, ROCHESTER NY 14606 TO THE ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANT(S): YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED to answer the Complaint in the above entitled action and to serve a copy of your Answer on the plaintiff’s attorney within twenty (20) days of the service of this Summons, exclusive of the day of service, or within thirty (30) days after service of the same is complete where service is made in any manner

other than by personal delivery within the State. The United States of America, if designated as a defendant in this action, may answer or appear within sixty (60) days of service hereof. Your failure to appear or answer will result in a judgment against you by default for the relief demanded in the Complaint. In the event that a deficiency balance remains from the sale proceeds, a judgment may be entered against you, unless the Defendant obtained a bankruptcy discharge and such other or further relief as may be just and equitable. NOTICE YOU ARE IN DANGER OF LOSING YOUR HOME If you do not respond to this summons and complaint by serving a copy of the answer to the attorney for the mortgage company who filed this foreclosure proceeding against you and filing the answer with the court, a default judgment may be entered and you can lose your home. Speak to an attorney or go to the court where your case is pending for further information on how to answer the summons and protect your property. Sending payment to your mortgage company will not stop this foreclosure action. YOU MUST RESPOND BY SERVING A COPY OF THE ANSWER ON THE ATTORNEY FOR THE PLAINTIFF (MORTGAGE COMPANY) AND FILING THE ANSWER WITH THE COURT. That this action is being amended to include the Heirs at Large of Andrea J. Rivoli a/k/a Andrea Rivoli, deceased, and Theresa Olcott, Andrea Jo Hammond, Michael Rivoli a/k/a Michael J. Rivoli a/k/a Michael J. Rivoli, Sr., Debra Delvecchio, Jennifer Rivoli, Susan Clawson, Thomas Rivoli, and Michelle Rivoli, as possible heirs to the Estate of Andrea J. Rivoli a/k/a Andrea Rivoli, deceased. That this action is also being amended to include Worldwide Asset Purchasing LLC ASI Chase Manhattan Bank, NA, Summit Federal Credit Union, New York State Department of Taxation and Finance Civil Enforcement - Region 1B, United States of America, and New York State Department of Taxation and Finance as necessary parties to the action. MONROE County is designated as the place of trial. The basis of venue is the location of the mortgaged premises. Dated: March 5, 2018 Mark K. Broyles, Esq. FEIN SUCH & CRANE, LLP Attorneys for Plaintiff Office and P.O. Address 28 East Main Street, Suite 1800 Rochester, New York 14614 Telephone No. (585) 232-7400 Section: 103.07 Block: 1 Lot: 1 NATURE AND OBJECT OF ACTION The object of the above action is


to foreclose a mortgage held by the Plaintiff recorded in the County of MONROE, State of New York as more particularly described in the Complaint herein. TO THE DEFENDANT, the plaintiff makes no personal claim against you in this action. To the above named defendants: The foregoing summons is served upon you by publication pursuant to an order of HON. J. SCOTT ODORISI, Justice of the SUPREME Court of the State of New York, dated March 14, 2018 and filed along with the supporting papers in the MONROE County Clerk’s Office. This is an action to foreclose a Mortgage. ALL THAT TRACT OR PARCEL OF LAND situate in the Town of Gates, County of Monroe and State of New York, known as Lot R-44 of the Ruby Gates Subdivision as shown on a map filed in Monroe County Clerk’s Office in Liber 155 of Maps, page 45 on September 25, 1962 SAID Lot No. R-44 is situate on the north side of Donna Road and is of the dimensions as shown on said mao. Mortgaged Premises: 50 DONNA ROAD, ROCHESTER NY 14606 Tax Map/Parcel ID No.: Section: 103.07 Block: 1 Lot: 1 of the TOWN of GATES, NY 14606

[ Supplemental Summons ] SUPREME COURT OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF Monroe County Public Administrator as Administrator C.T.A. for the Estate of Wesley R. Baumbarger, Sr., a/k/a Wesley Baumbarger a/k/a Wesley Ray Baumbarger, Sr. a/k/a Wesley Raymond Baumbarger, Mark Raymond Baumbarger as Specific Devisee in the Last Will and Testament of Wesley R. Baumbarger a/k/a Wesley R. Baumbarger, Sr., if living and if he be dead, any and all persons who are spouses, widows, grantees, mortgagees, lienor, heirs, devisees, distributees, or successors in interest of such of the above as may be dead, and their spouses, heirs, devisees, distributees and successors in interest, all of whom and whose names and places of residences are unknown to Plaintiff, United States of America-Internal Revenue Service, New York State Department of Taxation and Finance, Defendants. Index #: 1991/2014 Filed: 5/1/2018 SECOND SUPPLEMENTAL SUMMONS Plaintiff designates Monroe County as the place of trial. Venue is based

upon the County in which the mortgaged premises is situated. TO THE ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANT(S): YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED to answer the Complaint in this action and to serve a copy of your Answer or, if the Complaint is not served with this Summons, to serve a Notice of Appearance on the attorneys for the plaintiff within twenty (20) days after service of this Summons, exclusive of the day of service; or within thirty (30) days after service is complete if this Summons is not personally delivered to you within the State of New York; or within sixty (60) days if it is the United States of America. In case of your failure to appear or answer, judgment will be taken against you by default for the relief demanded in the Complaint. NOTICE OF NATURE OF ACTION AND RELIEF SOUGHT THE OBJECT of the above captioned action is to foreclose a Mortgage to secure $43,537.00 and interest, recorded in the Office of the Monroe County Clerk on October 15, 2008, in Book 22047 page 32, covering premises known as 63 Electric Avenue, Rochester, NY 14613. The relief sought in the within action is a final judgment directing the sale of

Fun

the premises described above to satisfy the debt secured by the Mortgage described above. NOTICE YOU ARE IN DANGER OF LOSING YOUR HOME If you do not respond to this summons and complaint by serving a copy of the answer on the attorney for the mortgage company who filed this foreclosure proceeding against you and filing the answer with the court, a default judgment may be entered and you can lose your home. Speak to an attorney or go to the court where your case is pending for further information on how to answer the summons and protect your property. Sending a payment to your mortgage company will not stop this foreclosure action. YOU MUST RESPOND BY SERVING A COPY OF THE ANSWER ON THE ATTORNEY FOR THE PLAINTIFF (MORTGAGE COMPANY) AND FILING THE ANSWER WITH THE COURT. Dated: Bay Shore, New York April 25, 2018 FRENKEL, LAMBERT, WEISS, WEISMAN & GORDON, LLP BY: Linda P. Manfredi Attorneys for Plaintiff 53 Gibson Street Bay Shore, New York 11706 (631) 969-3100 Our File No.: 01-068965F00

FORECLOSURE OF TAX LIENS BY THE CITY OF ROCHESTER STATE OF NEW YORK SUPREME COURT COUNTY OF MONROE IN THE MATTER OF THE FORECLOSURE OF TAX LIENS PURSUANT TO TITLE 4 OF PART E OF ARTICLE IX OF THE CHARTER OF THE CITY OF ROCHESTER.

LIST OF DELINQUENT TAXES AS OF JULY 1, 2017 PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that on April 25, 2018, the Corporation Counsel of the City of Rochester filed in the office of the Monroe County Clerk a list of parcels of property on which the City of Rochester holds a lien for taxes, assessments, fees or other charges which is at least one year old and which the City of Rochester intends to foreclose by an action in rem pursuant to Title 4 of Part E of Article IX of the Charter of the City of Rochester. A copy of that list was published on April 25, 2018. The foreclosure list contains as to each such parcel: 1. The tax account number and address; 2. The name of the last known owner; 3. The amount of each tax lien, except for a $250.00 charge which has been added to each tax lien pursuant to Section 9-123(A)(3)of the City Charter but which is not reflected on the printed list. All persons having an interest in the real property described in the foreclosure list are hereby notified that the filing of the list constitutes the commencement by the City of Rochester of an action in the Supreme Court, Monroe County, to foreclose the tax liens therein described by an action in rem and that the list constitutes a notice of pendency of action and a complaint by the City of Rochester against each parcel of land therein described to enforce the satisfaction of such tax liens. This action is brought against the real property only. No personal judgment will be entered in this action for the delinquent taxes, assessments, fees or other charges.

A copy of the foreclosure list has been filed in the office of the City Treasurer and will remain open for public inspection up to and including October 11, 2018, which is the redemption deadline date. Any person may on or before that date redeem any parcel on the foreclosure list by paying to the City Treasurer the amount of all delinquent taxes, assessments, fees and other charges stated on the foreclosure list, plus the $250.00 charge referred to above, plus accrued interest and late payment charges. Any person having any interest in any parcel on the foreclosure list may, at any time up to the redemption deadline date, serve a verified notice of interest or an answer upon the Corporation Counsel setting forth in detail the nature and amount of his interest or any defense or objection to the foreclosure. The notice of interest or answer must also be filed in the office of the Monroe County Clerk. Where a valid notice of interest is served, the parcel will be held for a foreclosure auction pursuant to Section 9-143 of the City Charter. Any person who fails to redeem or to serve a notice of interest or an answer by the redemption deadline date shall be barred thereafter from asserting his interest in the pending foreclosure action, and judgment in foreclosure may be granted without regard for, and in extinguishment of, the interest of any such person.

TIMOTHY R. CURTIN CORPORATION COUNSEL

[ LAST WEEK’S SOLUTION ON PAGE 27 ] [ NEWS OF THE WEIRD ] BY THE EDITORS AT ANDREWS MCMEEL SYNDICATION

Try the Decaf

In Hudson, Florida, Brandon Donald McCray, 47, came unglued on May 1 after discovering two of his socks missing. When suspicion fell on his roommate, Frank Smith, 53, McCray attacked him with a sword, according to WTVT. The attack continued as McCray also struck and injured two women living at the home. Pasco County Sheriff’s deputies said Smith nearly lost several fingers trying to defend himself. Deputies arrested McCray at a neighbor’s house on charges of attempted homicide and battery.

Make Art Great Again!

A French museum dedicated to the work of painter Etienne Terrus announced April 27 that more than half of its collection from the 19th-century artist are forgeries. The Terrus museum in Elne, where Terrus was born, gathered a group of experts to inspect the works after a visiting art historian noticed some of the paintings depict buildings that were not constructed until after Terrus’ death. In all, 82 paintings were determined to be fake. BBC News reported that the town’s mayor, Yves Barniol, called the situation “a disaster” and apologized to museum visitors. rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 31


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CITY Newspaper, May 30, 2018  

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CITY Newspaper, May 30, 2018  

Greater Rochester's Alternative Newsweekly