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MAY 23 2018, VOL. 47 NO. 38

DISH

GUIDE INSIDE


21ST ANNUAL

Outdoor Expo Presented by the Genesee Valley Chapter of the Adirondack Mountain Club

Sat, June 9th • 9:30-3:30

Mendon Ponds Park FREE! No sales…Just a good time! www.adk-gvc.org/expo

See what the outdoors has to offer for fun and exercise. Meet local outdoor clubs and vendors. Workshops on hiking, camping, paddling & biking. Crafts and a petting zoo for the kids. Food and Ice Cream will be available. Something for the whole family!

SPONSORED BY EXPO FRIENDS

Feedback We welcome your comments. Send them to themail@ rochester-citynews.com, or post them on our website, rochestercitynewspaper.com, our Facebook page, or our Twitter feed, @roccitynews. Those of fewer than 350 words have a greater chance of being published, and we edit selections for publication in print. We don’t publish comments sent to other media.

Poverty’s cause

As usual, City Newspaper avoids the real problems of urban poverty. It just keeps pointing to racism and segregation and the like. When your high school drop-out rate is over 50 percent and you have the worst child-poverty rate in the state, you would think that the written word would address the educational crisis. Nah, let’s write an ideological article that compares Trump to Nixon. How about looking in your backyard, which doesn’t have any of those bad, bad Republicans, and look at what feeds this generational poverty. It ain’t Trump, and it wasn’t Nixon. It’s all local in the making and the elected incompetents are keeping it that way. The University of Rochester houses some of the best in academia, and in the shadows of this house of intellect is the Rochester school district, the very worst in New York State. No ingenuity, no creativity, zip. We just keep doing the same thing over and over, expecting different results. THAT is a crisis, but no, let’s talk political ideology, damn those Republicans. Do something about the RCSD and its inability to teach the way kids learn. It can be done, but why do it? There’s money in that poverty, you know. JOSH J. PORTE

Choosing allies

When the recent story about former Attorney General Eric Schneiderman’s alleged assaults on four women broke, feminists spoke out. Rochester National 2 CITY

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Organization for Women president Jaclyn Richard said the “dichotomy is disappointing.” New York City NOW president Sonia Ossorio called the claims “shocking and disappointing.” Twenty-five years ago, similar allegations were brought against Senator Bob Packwood, a Republican from Oregon. Feminist leaders at the time were more equivocal in their disapproval than those are today, but the Senate Ethics Committee voted to recommend his expulsion from the Senate. At the time, I wrote to the Rochester TimesUnion to praise their editorial, which had asked: “If Packwood had opposed abortion, would women have spoken out sooner? Would they be less tolerant of the way he treated them?” Women admitted they could not “afford to alienate him.” Mary Heffernan, founder of the National Abortion Rights Action League and one of his accusers, said, “For me, abortion rights was on the line.” The Packwood and Schneiderman cases shed light on the allies we accept, or tolerate, as long as they support us on one issue. As a prolife feminist who champions women and nonviolence in a consistent life way – opposing abortion, poverty, the death penalty, war, and all violence toward women – I spend my life trying to build bridges with those who have more common ground with me than discord. We owe it to ourselves and the people we elect to examine their entire character. We owe it to all women to not only elect more women, but to seek male allies we can trust, and not to assume that when candidates come out of the gate brandishing one label or another that we can trust them to champion women in all of their needs, and to defend their safety. SUZANNE SCHNITTMAN

News. Music. Life. Greater Rochester’s Alternative Newsweekly May 23 - 29, 2018 Vol 47 No 38 250 North Goodman Street Rochester, New York 14607-1199 themail@rochester-citynews.com phone (585) 244-3329 fax (585) 244-1126 rochestercitynewspaper.com facebook.com/CityNewspaper twitter.com/roccitynews instagram.com/roccitynews On the cover: Illustration by Jacob Walsh Publishers: William and Mary Anna Towler Editor: Mary Anna Towler Editorial department themail@rochester-citynews.com Arts & entertainment editor: Rebecca Rafferty Staff writers: Tim Louis Macaluso, Jeremy Moule Music editor: Jake Clapp Music writer: Frank De Blase Calendar editor: Kate Stathis Contributing writers: Roman Divezur, Daniel J. Kushner, Kathy Laluk, Adam Lubitow, Amanda Fintak, Mark Hare, Alex Jones, Katie Libby, Ron Netsky, David Raymond, Leah Stacy Digital editor: Kurt Indovina Art department artdept@rochester-citynews.com Art director/Production manager: Ryan Williamson Designers: Renée Heininger, Jacob Walsh Advertising department ads@rochester-citynews.com New sales development: Betsy Matthews Account executives: William Towler, David White Classified sales representatives: Tracey Mykins Operations/Circulation kstathis@rochester-citynews.com Business manager: Angela Scardinale Circulation manager: Katherine Stathis Distribution: David Riccioni, Northstar Delivery City Newspaper is available free of charge. Additional copies of the current issue may be purchased for $1 each at the City Newspaper office. City Newspaper may be distributed only by authorized distributors. No person may, without prior written permission of City Newspaper, take more than one copy of each weekly issue. City (ISSN 1551-3262) is published weekly by WMT Publications, Inc. Periodical postage paid at Rochester, NY (USPS 022-138). Address changes: City, 250 North Goodman Street, Rochester, NY 14607. Member of the Association of Alternative Newsweeklies and the New York Press Association. Annual subscriptions: $35 ($30 senior citizens); add $10 for out-of-state subscriptions. Refunds for fewer than ten months cannot be issued. Copyright by WMT Publications Inc., 2018 - all rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, photocopying, recording or by any information storage retrieval system without permission of the copyright owner.

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URBAN JOURNAL | BY MARY ANNA TOWLER

Bob Morgan, housing, and downtown’s future It isn’t good news for anybody when a major local developer is being investigated by the FBI. And when that developer is heavily involved in the dramatic upturn in downtown Rochester, it can be nerve-wracking. So the feds’ raid last week at Bob Morgan’s Perinton offices got a lot of attention. It sure got mine. I assume that even before the FBIMorgan news started breaking, most of us had our fingers crossed behind our backs about downtown. One block after another has been snapped up. One building after another is being converted to apartments. Is this a bubble? It feels solid. It really does. And when you’re downtown, you can see a difference: young adults on bikes, people walking dogs, people on skateboards…. Not by the thousands, no, but enough to be noticeable. But the population of this entire region is sluggish, so the new downtown apartments must be causing empty houses and apartments somewhere else. And still developers’ interest in downtown Rochester continues. Aren’t we overbuilding? I’ve talked to developers, bankers, and other people who know more about this field than I do, and they insist that we’re not. What, then, about Morgan? Does the FBI news jeopardize his developments? Morgan companies have numerous projects in the Rochester area, Buffalo, and Pennsylvania. And they’re especially heavily involved in downtown Rochester. Morgan, often with other local developers, is involved in apartment developments at Tower280, the Alliance Building, Riverwalk, and Inner Loop Site 2; multiple buildings in the St. Paul Quarter; 3 City Center and Legacy Tower office developments; the Gannett Building conversion; and the Hyatt Regency and Rochester Riverside hotels. And, of course, Morgan’s apartment tower is a key part of the plan for a performing arts center at Parcel 5. Is any of this at risk? First of all, nobody knows what will come of the FBI investigation, if anything. The feds are reportedly focusing on developments in Pennsylvania, not in Rochester. But several downtown observers eased my nervousness a little last week when they reminded me that, A) Morgan has numerous established, profitable projects and a good reputation with bankers and investors, and B) Morgan isn’t the only developer investing in downtown right now. Properties that are solid would attract interest from other companies.

The news about a prominent developer provides one more reason for city officials to assess the housing underway downtown.

The FBI thing will play out, and meanwhile, developments under way will continue. Except, maybe, Parcel 5. Private funding is still being sought for the performing arts center on that site, and any uncertainty about the project could raise a few questions. Frankly, this provides one more reason for city officials to take a deep breath and do some assessing, not only about the theater, its purpose, and its financing, but also about the housing underway downtown. Morgan’s Parcel 5 apartments would be another market-rate development. Do those projects still need subsidies? Shouldn’t new housing include units that are affordable in the true sense of the word? Who, and what, is downtown for?

Yet again, guns

Thanks to the carnage in the Santa Fe, Texas, high school, we can add 10 more names to the list of people killed by guns in US schools this year. Ten more to the list of individual deaths – homicides, accidents, suicides – that occur daily. And we can add one more inanity to the list of solutions offered by gun-rights advocates: fewer doors in schools. Provide more mental health services? Absolutely. But where’s the massive funding for research and treatment? And significantly, the teenage gunman in Santa Fe had shown no sign of mental illness previously. Also significantly: mental illness isn’t always a factor in gun deaths. Sensible gun control measures won’t violate the Second Amendment. They will save lives. But the politicians blocking gun control have made it clear: they value unrestricted access to guns more than they value lives. Thoughts and prayers are not enough. rochestercitynewspaper.com

CITY 3


[ NEWS IN BRIEF ]

More time sought for Cadillac tenants

Dozens of advocates for low-income affordable housing protested outside the Hotel Cadillac last week to try to prevent tenants from being evicted and facing homelessness. The protesters marched to the offices of DHD Ventures, the building’s new owner, before heading to Governor Cuomo’s local office to stage a sit-in. Housing activist Ryan Acuff reported afterward that a representative for Cuomo said the state is working on an agreement to extend the residents’ stay at the Cadillac past May 25, to give them more time to find housing.

Douglass gets UR degree

The University of Rochester awarded its first posthumous honorary degree on Sunday: a doctor of law degree to Frederick Douglass. Kenneth Morris Jr., the great-great-great-grandson of the abolitionist, orator, and journalist, accepted the degree. Douglass lived and worked in Rochester for 25

years, right at the time the UR was founded in 1850. The university houses the Frederick Douglass Institute for African and African American Studies, and a collection of Douglass’s papers and related materials is currently on display in Rush Rhees Library’s Department of Rare Books and Special Collections.

News

City budget plan: slight boost in spending, taxes

PARKS | BY JAKE CLAPP

Community forum set for downtown park

Mayor Lovely Warren unveiled a $539.6 million budget for 2018-19 last week, a 2.4 percent increase over last year’s budget and an increase of $43.37 in taxes and fees for the typical city homeowner. The budget would fund new public infrastructure work, new neighborhood police offices, additional staffing for the Arnett and Douglass branch libraries, and new programs at some recreation centers, among other initiatives. It also includes $50 million from Albany for the ROC the Riverway redevelopment along the Genesee River and improvements to the convention center.

Correcting ourselves A photo caption with a May 16 political article incorrectly identified a Democratic candidate. She is Jaclyn Richard, and she is running for the state Assembly seat held by Joe Morelle, not for Louise Slaughter’s Congressional seat.

Jason and Stefanie Schwingle of the Washington Square Park Community Association are leading a community brainstorming session for the downtown park on Saturday, June 2. PHOTO BY RENÉE HEININGER

Around 5,000 people packed Washington Square Park a few months ago for the Rochester March for Our Lives rally against gun violence. A year before, 2,000 people had gathered there a day after Donald Trump’s inauguration. For most of Rochester’s history, the space has been a natural meeting spot for rallies, marches, protests, and community events. But outside of a handful of events a year, Washington Square Park is relatively quiet. Although it’s surrounded by major businesses, two large churches, Geva Theatre Center, and several residential buildings, the park — which was designed by Frederick Law Olmsted — doesn’t draw much foot traffic on most days, says Jason Schwingle, president of the Washington Square Park Community Association. The association wants to discuss ways the park could become a more active space, and it will host a public brainstorming session on Saturday, June 2, 9 a.m. to 1

p.m., at 3 City Center, 180 South Clinton Avenue. (It’s open to the public, but RSVP’s are requested by Wednesday, May 23: email info@RocWashintonSquare.org or respond on Facebook.com/ ROCWashingtonSquare.) The association is a non-profit group that includes residents, business leaders, and organizations from the area around the park. For its park effort, it received a $15,000 grant from the Rochester Area Community Foundation and is working with the Community Design Center Rochester and Stantec design firm. CDCR and Stantec will compile a report on the park, along with feedback from the public session, and the community association hopes to use that to leverage support from the city, Schwingle says. “We want to all see how we can live together, work together, play together, and how we can respect the park’s history and make it useful,” Schwingle says.

MOIR A S LEMPERLE Licensed Real Estate Broker SALES & LEASING IN COMMERCIAL , INDUSTRIAL & RESIDENTIAL PROPERTIES MLEMPERLE@GMAIL .COM 585 -244 - 6749

4 CITY

MAY 23 - 29, 2018

987 MONROE AVE ROCHESTER, NY

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Taproot Collective, a local urban agriculture group, is starting First Market Farm to demonstrate what residential-scale gardens can accomplish. The urban homestead will serve as a food production space and a place for urban ag education.

URBAN AG | BY JEREMY MOULE

A farm grows near the Public Market The piles of debris sitting on a lot at the corner of Pennsylvania Avenue and First Street have a purpose. The broken-up stone curbing is being used to create raised garden beds. The black barrels at the back of the lot will be used to collect rainwater for irrigation. And the piles of wood lath? They’re from work on the house there. Two separate but related things are happening at 20 First Street, an L-shaped lot located directly across from the Public Market. Amber Powers and Greg Shear bought the property and are gutting and rehabbing the two-family house that’s on it. But Taproot Collective, an urban agriculture organization, is leasing one leg of the L from the couple and building its First Market Farm on the land. Powers helped found the organization and is active in it. Everything that’s happening at 20 First Street is meant to further urban agriculture in Rochester. And Taproot just received an $18,769 Seed Grant from Foodlink to develop First Market Farm, which will double as a food production space and a place for urban ag education. Before Taproot went to work on the project, collective members talked with

residents and leaders of the Marketview Heights neighborhood, through the Marketview Heights Collective Action Project. The group wanted to make sure that “it’s not just us doing stuff here, it’s us doing stuff with people here,” says farm director Leslie Knox. The neighbors provided the group with a lot of useful feedback, such as the importance of keeping some grapevines that were growing on a fence at the property’s edge, Powers says. And they had thoughts about where the zinnias ought to be planted, too. The urban homestead will have a spiral herb garden that, like the rest of the space, will be wheelchair accessible, says Knox. It’ll also have squash tunnels – wire mesh tunnels for growing squash – as well as a 15foot by 24-foot greenhouse, a composting area, and most likely some bees. The farm will use the raised gardens and greenhouse to grow food for Foodlink to distribute to emergency pantries and for neighbors to have. It’ll also start seeds for other urban gardens, particularly the Marketview Heights Collective Action Project’s Sofrito Garden on North Union Street and its Children’s Garden on First Street.

Leslie Knox and Amber Powers at First Market Farm near the Public Market. PHOTO BY RYAN WILLIAMSON

The farm will also partner with Flour City Pickers to distribute food and to compost unusable produce that the group gets in its collections from Public Market vendors. And this summer it’ll have some youth workers from the city’s Summer of Opportunity program, Knox says. First Market Farm will offer programs to teach people growing techniques and to share ways they can prepare what they grow. Powers hopes that she and Shear can have a learning space in the house, though for the time being they plan to keep it a two-family residence.

The site was chosen in part because of its proximity to the Public Market, which provides some additional programming opportunities, Powers says. But ultimately, Taproot hopes to demonstrate what residential-scale gardens can accomplish, to encourage people to grow food and ornamental plants in their neighborhoods, and to help their neighbors reap the communitybuilding benefits of urban agriculture, Powers and Knox say. “We’re building for generations,” Powers says.

EARLY HOLIDAY DEADLINES In observance of Memorial Day CITY Newspaper will have early deadlines for the issue of May 30 The holiday deadline for display and classified-display ads and all editorial

4 p.m. on Thursday, May 24

Our offices will be closed on Monday, May 28

For any questions, please contact themail@rochester-citynews.com rochestercitynewspaper.com

CITY 5


EDUCATION | BY MARY ANNA TOWLER

Another special ed reboot

Why can’t the school district get this right? Once again, the Rochester school district is under fire for failing the children who receive its special education services. And once again, district officials are considering another reform, one the school board could adopt this week. Rochester’s troubles with special education date back at least to 1981, when the Empire Justice Center filed a class action suit against the district, citing many of the same problems making the news now. As a result of the suit, the district operated under a court-supervised Consent Decree for more than two decades. That resulted in some improvement, apparently, but the problems continued after it ended. Since then, the district has been cited repeatedly for failing to comply with state and federal regulations. A year ago a study known as the Elliott report – commissioned by the district itself – lambasted the district, noting the same problems Rochester had been criticized for previously. And earlier this year, the Empire Justice Center threatened to sue the district again. Among the concerns: inappropriate classification of students; excessive suspensions; failure to provide services that are mandated by state and federal law; insufficient staff, particularly bilingual staff; poor training; poor accountability; poor communication with parents. A particularly tragic development put the district’s problems back in the news in March, when Trevyan Rowe, a 14-year-old special education student, walked away from school at the beginning of the school day and was found days later, drowned, in the Genesee River. Despite his not having attended any classes that day, two teachers had marked him present, and his mother wasn’t notified that he hadn’t arrived in school. District officials and the school board were already focusing on the problems in special education at the time of Trevyan’s death. In January, the school board created a Special Advisory Committee on Special Education to study the special education program and propose changes. Among its members were representatives of the special education program, parents and advocates of students with disabilities, and a representative from Empire Justice. New school board member Melanie Funchess, who is director of family engagement at the Mental Health Association, chairs the committee. The committee presented its report to the school board earlier this month, recommending that the district commit to 6 CITY

MAY 23 - 29, 2018

School board president Van White: “I think good, caring, intelligent, experienced people can sometimes get lost.” PHOTO BY RYAN WILLIAMSON

becoming “fully compliant with all its legal obligations” to students with disabilities within three years, with specific milestones and “specified consequences” for failure. At its meeting on Thursday, the board is likely to approve the recommendations, and then the district will embark on another attempt to improve its special education program. Why, after repeated, blistering reports, can’t the district get this right? And it isn’t lost on many district observers that the problems plaguing the special education program are symptomatic of the problems of the district as a whole. In an interview last week, two of the school board’s longest-serving members, board President Van White and Vice President Willa Powell, talked about the district’s special education problems. White has been on the board for 11 1/2 years and has been president since 2014. Powell has served for 18 1/2 years. Both have been there as a series of superintendents and special education administrators have tried to improve the program and its services. Both agreed that the district has failed repeatedly. But, they said, the district can do what it needs to do, despite the district’s high poverty rate and large number of children

from non-English-speaking homes. Has lack of money – a frequent concern for urban districts – been the problem? “To a limited degree,” Powell said, it has. Special education services are expensive, she said, and while the federal Individuals with Disabilities Education Act was to have funded 40 percent of districts’ special education costs, “right now, it delivers 16 percent,” she said. “The state kicks in something,” Powell said, but not enough to cover the costs. According to the Elliott report, however, Rochester spends almost $19,000 more per pupil than it spends on general education students. And it spends $4700 more per pupil in special education than Buffalo, Syracuse, and Yonkers do. The report says Rochester ranks high among urban districts in the amount of special services and special personnel for special ed students. And White added: “I’m not convinced that more money is the answer.” A major problem is that the district is woefully short of bilingual staff in its special education program. Dozens of different languages are spoken in Rochester students’ homes. The majority of the non-English

speaking families speak Spanish, and that number grew dramatically with the arrival of families from Puerto Rico after Hurricane Maria. Rochester isn’t the only district with a bilingual staff shortage, though. If you’re a special education teacher who speaks Spanish, said Van White, you can pretty much take your pick of jobs. The result: too few teachers and other staff can communicate easily with students and family members, which makes it hard for students to keep up and for parents to communicate with the district about their children. And communication is crucial for parents of children with special needs. White and Powell also cited a problem that outside assessments have highlighted: a lack of professional development for special ed staff. The district has a history of failing to train teachers and other staff adequately when it adopts new programs, new standards, and new curriculum. Related to that are the frequent changes in the district: change in staff, from top to bottom; change in buildings; change in structure. During Powell’s tenure on the school board, the district has had five different


superintendents; during White’s, there’ve been four. The short stay is unusual in suburban districts, but it’s the norm in many urban districts, and new superintendents frequently bring new approaches to education. The district’s Facilities Modernization Program – a years-long effort to upgrade school buildings – has also brought change, as students have been moved out of their schools into “swing space” in other buildings. That has added to the stress on special education staff, students, and families.

Another problem: The district classifies

students as having disabilities at a higher rate than the national rate. That rate has been growing as the number of students in the district has dropped. And a disproportionately high percentage of students in special education are African American. In addition, the district suspends African-American students at a higher rate than it does other students, and at a much higher rate than it suspends white students, according to the Elliott report. The same is true for black students in special education. Both new school board member Melanie Funchess and long-time board member Cynthia Elliott have charged that racism plays a role in the district’s special education failures. Seventy-four percent of the district’s teachers – and 82 percent of its special ed teachers – are white; 58 percent of the students are black, 28 percent Hispanic. Too many Rochester teachers don’t understand and respect children of color, Funchess and Elliott have said, and don’t feel comfortable with them. Research does show a correlation between white teachers and referrals of black students to special education, White said. “But can a white teacher understand the challenges or what brilliance the child has?” he said. “Yes.” And, he said: “Less than 1 percent of teachers coming out of college are African-American males. We cannot think that we’re going to fix this by automatically diversifying.” Powell and White also point to, in Powell’s words, “the soft bigotry of low expectations.” District staff talk about a lack of resources, Powell said, about children with lead poisoning, about tests that aren’t culturally appropriate, about the district’s high poverty rate and parents’ failure to make sure children are ready for school. While those challenges exist, however, they can lower staff’s expectations of students. White referred to a school he visited where he had been told he would be “blown away” by the quality of what was happening there. The reality: the students’ test scores were abysmal. “The bar of expectations is very low,” he said, “and for special-needs children, it’s even lower.”

School board vice president Willa Powell: The district suffers from “the soft bigotry of low expectations.” PHOTO BY RYAN WILLIAMSON

And, he said, “the accountability bar goes down with the expectations.” “I think good, caring, intelligent, experienced people can sometimes get lost,” White said. White pointed to Superintendent Barbara Deane-Williams’ emphasis on an “every child by face and name” philosophy. For too many people in the district, he said, students have become “digits.” School board members don’t operate the schools; they hire superintendents to do that. Boards are responsible for making sure their superintendents do the job well. But the special education problem exposes the challenges that school boards face overseeing large, high-poverty districts where leadership changes frequently. White gave this illustration, referring to the past two superintendents, Jean-Claude Brizard, who led the district from 2008 to 2011, and Bolgen Vargas, who led it from 2011 to 2015: “Jean-Claude said, ‘Special Education is a mess, and here’s my plan.’ Bolgen said, ‘Special education is a mess, and here’s my plan.’ We ask the question of the superintendent, and he says: ‘I’m on it. I’m on it.’” And, White said, “There was clearly proof that they were working on it.” “It wasn’t a situation where the superintendent wasn’t doing anything,” White said. “We were hiring the experts,” said White. And yet what the experts were doing didn’t improve things – or, in some cases

did, but the people responsible for leading the special education program left and their successors didn’t follow through. Or a new superintendent arrived and had new ideas. And some of the attempts to reform the department may have made matters worse. The Elliott report notes that there had been a “reorganization of the office of special education almost yearly for the past several years.” “The way we did it before,” White agreed, “did not produce results.” But this time, he insisted several times during the interview, will be different. For one thing, White said, Superintendent Barbara Deane-Wiliams’ background is not just in education, it’s in special education. And, White and Powell said, it’s significant that the board’s Special Advisory Committee on Special Education, with strong community input, is driving this latest reform effort. If the school board accepts the committee’s recommendations, the district will agree to a “legally enforceable Consent Decree” that will spell out specific consequences” for failing to meet its obligations within three years – “even if district senior leadership changes over the three years.” A Consent Decree may bring results that district leaders haven’t been able to. Powell calls a decree “a sword of Damocles” that keeps people’s attention focused. After the 1988 decree expired, she said, “the system atrophied.” In the end, though, success will still be up to the district’s superintendent, its central

office administrators, its special education staff, its principals, its teachers, its substitute teachers, its paraprofessionals. They will be the ones responsible for doing a better job educating thousands of the district’s children, properly assessing whether each child needs special education services, providing those services, and providing professional development, encouragement, leadership, and inspiration to the staff who work with the children. They will be responsible for adopting a philosophy of knowing “every child by face and name.” If the school board adopts the Special Advisory Committee’s recommendations this week, the district will have three years to turn things around. And during that three years, the Facilities Modernization Program will continue, new curriculum and new state regulations could be introduced, new children will enter the system, the school board may get new members – and the district may get a new superintendent. Deane-Williams’ three-year contract expires in August 2019. If she leaves, it will be up to the school board to find and hire a replacement, and to ensure that the new superintendent continues the efforts under way under a new, board-imposed reform. Tim Louis Macaluso contributed to the reporting for this article.

rochestercitynewspaper.com

CITY 7


For more Tom Tomorrow, including a political blog and cartoon archive, visit www.thismodernworld.com

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8 CITY

MAY 23 - 29, 2018

Mon - Sat 9-7:30pm • Sun 9-6pm

This week’s calls to action include the following events and activities. (All are free and open to the public, unless otherwise noted.)

Police oversight is topic of Saturday event

The social justice activist group Enough Is Enough will present a panel discussion, “Intersections of Rebellion and Accountability,” on Saturday, May 26. The program will focus on civilian review boards, discipline of police officers, and local activists’ efforts to overhaul how complaints about police misconduct are handled. The panelists will be Anthony Finnell, Sr., interim executive director of the Community Police Review Agency for Oakland, California, and a 23-year veteran of the Indianapolis Metropolitan Police Department; pastor Wanda Wilson, founder of Open Arms Christian Fellowship Ministries and a lead organizer in the effort to create a Rochester Police

Accountability Board; attorney Victor Monterrosa, Jr., a member of Newark, New Jersey’s, Civilian Complaint Review Board; and John Walker, pastor of the Christian Friendship Missionary Baptist Church in Rochester. They’ll share the struggles and history of police accountability efforts in Rochester, Newark, and Oakland. The event will be held at Antioch Missionary Baptist Church, 304 Joseph Avenue, from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. Suggested donation: $10.

New York’s health care problems, fixes

The Rochester Campaign for New York Health, Metro Justice, ROC Citizen, and the Rochester Democratic Socialists of America will hold a community meeting on health care reform on Wednesday, May 23. Assembly member Harry Bronson and physicians Alicia Bell, Amy Potter, Scott Hartmann will discuss the problems in the

current health care system and the need for a single-payer form of coverage in New York. The event will be held at the First Universalist Church, 150 South Clinton Avenue, at 6 p.m.

Solving issues in Lyell-Otis

At a half-day community meeting on Friday, June 1, public health, law enforcement, and elected officials and community leaders will discuss ways to tackle the Lyell-Otis neighborhood’s drug and prostitution problems. There’ll be discussions and breakout sessions, and officials from Trillium Health will provide training on treating an opioid overdose. The event, hosted by the Lyell-Otis Neighborhood Association and City Councilmember Molly Clifford, will be held at Lake Avenue Baptist Church, 72 Ambrose Street, 8:30 a.m. to noon. RSVP by Wednesday, May 23: whatsgoingonlyell@ gmail.com.


Consumables

Love Beets Managing Director Daniel Cross inspects the goods. PHOTO BY RENÉE HEININGER

The beet goes on… [ FEATURE ] BY MARY RICE

Walk into the reception area of the Love Beets factory in Eastman Business Park and the smell hits you immediately: dark, earthy, and unmistakably beet-y. Beyond the reception area, in a 100,000 square-foot facility, thousands and thousands of beets are tumbling down the production line, being prepared for shipment out to more than 9,000 stores all over the country. You may not know it, but beets are big business, and Rochester is something of a hub for the ruby-red vegetable. Love Beets USA, a joint venture between Fairport’s LiDestri Food & Beverage and British produce firm G’s Fresh Ltd., opened its North American headquarters in Rochester in 2016. The company employs about 125 full-time workers, with plans to add more in the next two years. Managing Director Daniel Cross pours me a cup of beet juice as I dig into one of the brand’s newest offerings: diced golden beets marinated in honey and vinegar. Sweet, tangy, and with just the right amount of crunch, the golden beets were surprisingly good all on their own, though they’d also work nicely in a salad or as an adornment to your avocado toast. The beet juice, available plain or flavored with ginger, was smooth, earthy, and slightly thick, not unlike a full-bodied red wine. Love Beets was founded in England in 2010 by husband and wife team Guy and Katherine Shropshire. Guy is a thirdgeneration vegetable grower; his grandfather, also named Guy, founded G’s Fresh in the

1960s. The Shropshires wanted to find a way to make beets more appealing to younger consumers, and began experimenting with different types of marinated beets. In October of 2010, the Shropshires brought their product to the Fancy Food Show in New York City. The brightly-colored veggies were well-received, and several attendees, upon sampling the product, said that they “love beets!”, Cross says. The name stuck, and G’s began exporting beets to the United States under the Love Beets name the following year. Guy and Katherine moved from England to the United States to build the brand, establishing a sales and marketing office outside of Philadelphia. The brand flourished, and by 2014 Love Beets was looking to establish a large production facility stateside. Though the company considered locations in other states, Love Beets ultimately selected Eastman Business Park in Rochester as the site for their new North American headquarters, partnering with LiDestri Foods in 2015 to become Love Beets USA LLC. Love Beets was attracted to Rochester for several reasons, Cross says. For starters, the area is the second-largest beet-producing region in the United States. (About half of conventional Love Beets products come from New York farms). The area also boasts a local labor force skilled in fields like robotics, engineering and agriculture, plus universities like RIT and Cornell that are open to working with business and industry. After moving into Eastman Business Park, Love Beets continued to expand its product

line, which now includes more than a dozen preparations of beets such as sweet chilimarinated baby beets, steamed plain beets, beet salsa, beet juice, and beet powder (great for smoothies, Cross says). Cross is aware that for some consumers, beets can be a hard sell. “I usually hear people say they had beets once as a child and had a bad experience,” he says, adding that most of the stories he hears involve mushy boiled beets prepared by an older relative. Even consumers who do enjoy beets are sometimes unsure what to do with them. “Beets are healthy and nutritious, but they’re difficult to prepare,” Cross says. Love Beets products are ready to eat and come in re-sealable packages, making them a more convenient choice for shoppers who don’t want to spend the time boiling or roasting. On their Instagram account, Love Beets offers plenty of serving suggestions: soups, salads, sandwiches — even desserts. “People ask, ‘What’s the occasion for eating a beet?’ But you can include it so easily in so many things,” Cross says. After the beet tasting, we don hard hats and safety glasses and Cross shows me around the factory floor. The facility runs around the clock, five days a week. We walk along the production line where beets are being washed, peeled, weighed, diced, shredded, steamed, and packaged. Cross pushes open a door marked “BALSAMIC” and shows me a vast and chilly room where pallets upon pallets of baby beets are marinating in white wine and balsamic vinegar. The beets will bathe in the marinade long enough to impart flavor but not so long that the beets become pickled, Cross says. He holds up a bag of beets that are almost finished marinating; the vegetables inside are covered in a thick purplish glaze. A forklift rolls by, leaving a bright red skid mark behind. The color is inescapable when you’re dealing with this many beets. Earlier this year Love Beets announced that they would be expanding their operations at Eastman Business Park, creating 100 new middle- and high-skilled jobs in 26 months. Cross says the company has plenty of room to grow in its current location — a good thing, given that beets are undergoing something of a renaissance in the US. The National Garden Bureau declared 2018 the Year of the Beet, in recognition of the vegetable’s growing popularity. The beet has even attained superfood status: they’re packed with fiber, vitamins A and C, iron, antioxidants, and some research shows they may even help control blood pressure, Cross says. Love Beets products are available locally at various supermarkets. More info: lovebeets.com.

MEET Agents Editors Authors Publishers WRITE • EDIT CONNECT • PUBLISH ELEVATE YOUR WRITING

JUNE 16TH 8AM-6:30PM

ROCHESTER RIVERSIDE HOTEL

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CITY 9


Upcoming [ BLUES ]

Music

Samantha Fish. Saturday, June 2. Flour City Station,

170 East Avenue. 7 p.m. $15-$35. flourcitystation.com; samanthafish.com. [ ROCK ]

The Dead Daisies. Wednesday, August 22. Montage

Music Hall, 50 Chestnut Street. 7 p.m. $25-$28. themontagemusichall.com; thedeaddaisies.com. [ ROCK ]

Parkway Drive. Friday, September 14. Main Street Armory,

900 East Main Street. 6 p.m. $29.50. mainstreetarmory.com; parkwaydriverock.com.

JJ Grey and Mofro Wednesday, May 30 Funk ‘N Waffles Music Hall, 204 North Water Street 8 p.m. | $30-$35 | rochester.funknwaffles.com; jjgrey.com [ BLUES ] JJ Grey & Mofro has been laying down salty grooves for more than 20 years. Complete with chunky horns and dense harmonies, Grey and his band are known for leaving their audience feeling like their ears just had a hearty meal. Grey’s powerful voice is only matched by the grit of his guitar, and both can wail. Inspired by the writing of Jack Kerouac and the music of The Isley Brothers, you can imagine the depth and girth of this band’s sound. This is a band that can pull off being both bad to the bone and good for the soul. Freddie & Francine will also perform. — BY KATIE PRESTON

Tatsuya Nakatani

Tuesday, May 29 Bop Shop Records, 1460 Monroe Avenue 8 p.m. | bopshop.com; tatsuyanakatani.com [ JAZZ ] Tatsuya Nakatani creates soundscapes unlike anything you’ve ever heard. A master percussionist, he employs many traditional drums, cymbals, gongs, etc., but he rarely uses them in a traditional manner. Nakatani wields his hand-crafted Kobo bow, playing the gong like a circular, metal, avant-garde cello. The range of sounds he coaxes is nothing short of otherworldly. $15 door; $10 students. — BY RON NETSKY PHOTO BY JAY SIMON

JAZZ CRUISES ANNOUNCED FOR 2018! TICKETS ON SALE NOW! online at www.jazz901.org

● Smugtown Stompers onJune 11 ● Jimmie Highsmith Jr. onJuly 9 ● The Blues Cruise returns with Hanna and The Blue Hearts onSeptember 10! For more info & tickets: jazz901.org or 585-966-2660 10 CITY MAY 23 - 29, 2018


[ WED., MAY 23 ]

[ ALBUM REVIEWS ]

Goron

ACOUSTIC/FOLK Paul Strowe. Fairport B-Side, 5 lift bridge lane. Fairport. 364-0688. 7-10 p.m.

“The Blood Bog” Self-released goron.bandcamp.com

Mineral Girls

Thursday, May 24 Vineyard Space, 836 South Clinton Avenue 7 p.m. | facebook.com/vineyardcommunityspace; themineralgirls.bandcamp.com

— BY FRANK DE BLASE

[ EMO ] Riding on the new wave of emo music,

Charlotte, North Carolina’s Mineral Girls carries the tradition of the genre’s complex chord structures and earnest, wailing vocals while still managing to feel new. This is a band that contains lo-fi punk elements, mixed with the darker sides of rock ‘n’ roll, giving them a Saddle Creek vibe that takes you back to the glory days of Cursive and Bright Eyes. Playing with Dollhands, Full Body, and Slumbers. $5 suggested donation. — BY KATIE PRESTON

Aborted

Monday, May 28 Flour City Station, 170 East Avenue 7 p.m. | $13-$15 | flourcitystation.com; facebook.com/Abortedofficial [ GRINDCORE ] With intercontinental membership

and a boundless affection for all things B-horror and gore related, Aborted has waved the “goregrind” banner high and proud since 1995 and shows no sign of stopping. Its most recent record, 2016’s “Retrogore,” is another peerless exercise in mind-bending riffs and Lynchian body horror — just what the doctor ordered. Psycroptic and Gutted Alive will also perform. 21 and older show. — BY ALEXANDER JOSEPH

MEET

It’s really an easy procedure: pop the CD in the dash and mash the play button. Give a couple of critical spins, let fly with what you like about the album or not, and then let the world know. One thing however that makes my job a little harder is all this streaming and the releasing of singles. Where can a guy get an album-length recording out there? Themes and segues are being forsaken, but Rochester heavies Goron’s new album, “The Blood Bog” offers a solution. The band has a meager two songs on this fresh, new platter, but Goron, in pure doom metal form, clock in at 20 epic minutes of music. Goron grinds low and slow so you can appreciate what it’s building and how. It’s like a Sabbath 45 played at 33 rpm. The music has a definite and defiant dirge to it yet the vocals are clean-cut save for a salacious splash of reverb. The whole affair is a study in restraint as any minute you’re waiting for the music to blow up in your face. It’s like listening on pins and coffin nails.

Downstairs Cabaret Theatre, 20 Windsor St. 325-4370. downstairscabaret.com. 7 p.m. $10. BLUES

Chris Duarte. Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. abilenebarandlounge.com. 8 p.m. $13/$17. Miles Watts & The Brothers from Other Mothers. Dinosaur

Bar-B-Que, 99 Court St. 3257090. dinosaurbarbque.com. 9 p.m. CLASSICAL

Brighton Symphony Orchestra: Portraits of America. Temple B’rith

Kodesh, 2131 Elmwood Ave. 490-9351. tbk.org. 7:30 p.m. Directed by Ric Jones, with vocalist Mary Wojciechowski.

A Girl Named Genny “Coming Home” Self-released agirlnamedgenny.com

JAZZ

Bossa Nova Bradley Brothers. Record Archive, 33

A Girl Named Genny’s first full-length album, “Coming Home,” feels a lot like getting behind the wheel on the first spring day. It’s a joyride. Shifting between bluegrass, Southern rock, folk, and everything in between, the album is like taking a twisting backroad, jumping from scene to familiar scene. No matter where the songs take you, there’s something warm about the album that evokes the feeling of a family reunion. Textured with banjo, fiddle, upright bass, and a surplus of harmonies, the album has layers that could only be noticed on a second, third, even fourth listen. On tracks like “Annabell,” which is starkly arranged, the rich three-part harmonies become their own instruments. From a boozy, sun-soaked toe-tapper or a banjo rager to an ominous gospel tune for modern times, each track is brimming with Americana spirit. All 12 tracks draw on stories of people who are down on their luck, whether stuck in the prison system, wayward at war, or broken-hearted. In an age when attention spans are shorter and radio singles are more common than LPs, this album defies the nature of reality, and it’s well worth sticking through to the end, maybe in a backyard somewhere and with a couple of Cream Ales. — BY KATIE PRESTON

JUNE 16TH 8AM-6:30PM

Rochester Folkus: Larry Hanks & Deborah Robins.

1/3 Rockwood St. 5-8 p.m.

Margaret Explosion. Little

Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 258-0400. 7-9 p.m. AMERICANA

Lost Dog Street Band, Mama’s Broke, The Ditch Diggers. Flour City Station,

170 East Ave. 8 p.m. $8/$10.

Swampcandy, The Vollmers.

Funk ‘n Waffles, 204 N Water Street. 448-0354. 8 p.m. $7/$10. METAL

Ingested, Bodysnatcher, Signs Of The Swarm.

Montage Music Hall, 50 Chestnut St. 232-1520. themontagemusichall.com. 6 p.m. $15/$17. continues on page 12

PSST. Out of touch? Out of tune? See our music reviews from Frank De Blase.

Agents, Editors, Authors, Publishers

MORE INFO AT WAB.ORG OR CALL 473-2590, EXT. 107 E-MAIL AT LADDER@WAB.ORG

/ MUSIC

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 11


Music

POP/ROCK

Luke Cornwell Trio, Sour Club, Yeah! Pete Johnson, Xora. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. $6/$8.

Your Daddy’s Rock & Roll. Sticky Lips BBQ Juke Joint, 830 Jefferson Rd. 585-292-5544. stickylipsbbq.com. 6:30 p.m.

[ THU., MAY 24 ] ACOUSTIC/FOLK

Amanda Lee Peers, Kara Fink, Julianne Cary, Shannon Vanderlann, Kelly Izzo, Nora Kaminski. Fairport B-Side, 5

lift bridge lane. Fairport. 3640688. 7 p.m. Epic Frail, Ben Haravitch. Bernunzio Uptown Music, 122 East Ave. bernunzio. com. Fourth Thursday of every month, 6 p.m. $5. Richie & Rosie, Aaron Lipp. Photo City Improv, 543 Atlantic Ave. 8 p.m. $7. CLASSICAL

Carmen in Concert. Kodak Hall

at Eastman Theater, 60 Gibbs St. 7:30 p.m. $24-$104.

Eastman-Rochester Chamber Ensemble. Kilbourn Hall, 26 Gibbs St. esm.rochester.edu. 4:30-5:30 p.m.

Eastman-Rochester New Horizons: Beginning Band.

The Goods was at the top of its game when it pulled the plug. Por Que? Whatever the reason, Moving Mountains emerged. PHOTO BY FRANK DE BLASE

Fresh mountain air [ FEATURE ] BY FRANK DE BLASE

Moving Mountains WEDNESDAY, JUNE 13 RECORD ARCHIVE BACKROOM LOUNGE, 33 1/3 ROCKWOOD STREET 6 P.M. | FREE | RECORDARCHIVE.COM

It’s sheer music biz savvy: A band celebrates 10 years together, releases a new CD, hires a new bass player, sets up a celebratory gig, and then breaks up. Pure genius. That’s precisely what Moving Mountains — then known as The Goods — did a year and a half ago. And the band — drummer Jeff “Woody” Woodruff; bassist Chris Meeker; Lou Chitty, keys; and guitarist Miles McHugh — was at the top of its game when it pulled the plug. “That does need an explanation, doesn’t it?” Woodruff says. “In November of 2016, we played a show at Three Heads Brewing to celebrate our 10th year anniversary as The Goods. We also released a four-song EP called “Departure,” which was a fitting title because that was our last show.” 12 CITY MAY 23 - 29, 2018

The band didn’t give a specific reason for the break up, but the subsequent hiatus didn’t last all that long. The band found itself holed up in its cluttered studio in Fairport, and what emerged in the coming months was a collection of songs that, perhaps, sounded like distant cousins to Goods material, with its plural beats and jam. But this new sound had a keener edge and progressive rock finesse and volume. There are a whole lot of fresh dynamics in there as well, with stretched out progressions and grooves. The quartet has taken its old, harmonious sound and re-tooled it, making it darker and, frankly, better. “That was on purpose,” says Lou Chitty. And it was made possible by the band members’ unorthodox approach to their instruments, starting with the drums. “I try to stay in touch with the groove no matter how fancy it gets,” Woodruff says. “My style is an amalgamation of rock, Afro-Cuban with traditional West African drum, and xylophone rhythms and melodies. I try to be a musical drummer and to be as melodic as I am rhythmic.” Woodruff gets a heap of help on the bottom end from Meeker, who lets his

Kilbourn Hall, 26 Gibbs St. 734-9110. esm.rochester.edu. 7-8 p.m. Springfest. Eastman Community Music School, 10 Gibbs St. esm.rochester.edu. -26. Full schedule online. COUNTRY

Western Centuries. Abilene Bar

fingers do the walking all over his fivestring bass. The guitar and keys are the progressive hot sauce that gets liberally slathered over the top. Both guitarist McHugh and keyboardist Chitty play their instruments in more of a supporting role, layering on texture and atmosphere. McHugh contributes his sound via a parade of stomp boxes at his feet. “I get a lot of comments on the number of pedals I have,” McHugh says, “usually from other players. But I’m trying to learn different combinations. I like to create different colors. Straight-up guitar sounds, everyone has heard those already. And with Woody’s drumming, there’s a lot going on. So instead of filling up those other spaces I play more like a keyboard.” With its sound as new as it is itself, Woodruff concedes Moving Mountains’ new approach is a balance between responsibility and freedom; the band plays them. “Artistically,” he says, “I feel there is more possibility.”

& Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. abilenebarandlounge. com. 8 p.m. $10. DJ/ELECTRONIC

DarkDaze Presents: The Sounding Of The Drums. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 8 p.m. $5/$7. JAZZ

The Djangoners. Little Theatre

Café, 240 East Ave. 258-0400. 7-9 p.m.

Eastman-Rochester New Horizons: Vintage Jazz. Kilbourn Hall, 26 Gibbs St. 734-9110. esm.rochester.edu. 7:45-8:45 p.m. POP/ROCK

Acid Raindance, The Hummingbirds, Walrus Junction.

Funk ‘n Waffles, 204 N Water Street. 448-0354. 8 p.m. $5/$7. Atkins Riot. Dinosaur Bar-BQue, 99 Court St. 325-7090. dinosaurbarbque.com. 9 p.m. Carole’s Kings. Downstairs Cabaret at Winton Place, 3450 Winton Place. 7 p.m. $30-$33. The Transport. Genesee Brew House, 25 Cataract St. 2639200. geneseebeer.com/brewhouse. 6-8 p.m.


PSST. Looking to be a better ally?

CITY Newspaper presents

Mind • Body • Spirit

Stay up to date with our coverage of racial & LGBTQ issues. / NEWS

est.

1927

TO ADVERTISE IN THE MIND BODY SPIRIT SECTION CALL BETSY AT 244.3329 x27 OR EMAIL BETSY@ROCHESTER-CITYNEWS.COM

ANNUALS • PERENNIALS • FERTILIZER • SEED • BAGGED MULCH STONE • BULK MULCH • LARGE SELECTION OF FINE POTTERY Delivery & Planting Services Available LOCATED NEAR ELLISON PARK • OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK

485 LANDING ROAD NORTH • 482-5372 WWW.CLOVERNURSERY.COM

Offering a full complement of

Landscaping Services For an estimate please call

(585) 244-1626

Gentle’s Farm Market 1080 Penfield Rd LOCAL*FRESH*TASTY | NOW OPEN FOR THE SEASON

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 13


Thurlow. ButaPub, 315 Gregory St. 585-563-6241. butapub.com. 10 p.m.

[ FRI., MAY 25 ] ACOUSTIC/FOLK Kenedy Jason. Fairport B-Side, 5 lift bridge lane. Fairport. 364-0688. 5 p.m. River Lynch. Sticky Lips Pit BBQ City Music Hall, 625 Culver Rd. 6 p.m. BLUES

The Brothers Blue. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 258-0400. 8-10 p.m. CLASSICAL

Eastman Rochester New Horizons Orchestra. Kodak

Hall at Eastman Theater, 60 Gibbs St. 734-9110. 7-9 p.m. Tchaikovsky, Dvorak, & a medley from “Hamilton.”. Springfest. Eastman Community Music School, 10 Gibbs St. esm.rochester.edu. May 26. Full schedule online. R&B/ SOUL The Foolz. Fairport B-Side, 5 lift bridge lane. Fairport. 3640688. 8 p.m. REGGAE/JAM

Kaleidoscope Sky, Noble Vibes. Funk ‘n Waffles, 204

N Water Street. 448-0354. 8 p.m. $5. AMERICANA

Blind Leading the Blind . Genesee Brew House, 25 Cataract St. 263-9200. geneseebeer.com/brewhouse. 6-8 p.m. The Tragedy Brothers . Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. abilenebarandlounge.com. 6 p.m. The Younger Gang. Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. abilenebarandlounge.com. 9:30 p.m. $8. POP/ROCK

5Head, The Krooks . Sticky

Lips Pit BBQ City Music Hall, 625 Culver Rd. 8:30 p.m. $5. Animus. Firehouse Saloon, 814 S. Clinton Ave. 3193832. thefirehousesaloon. com. 9:30 p.m. $5. Carole’s Kings. Downstairs Cabaret at Winton Place, 3450 Winton Place. 8 p.m. $30-$33.

The Menzingers, Made Violent, On The Cinder. Montage Music Hall, 50 Chestnut St. 232-1520. themontagemusichall.com. 7 p.m. $20-$23.

Mike Frazier, Tokyo Monsters, EyeSpy, Cheated Hearts. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 8 p.m. $7. 14 CITY MAY 23 - 29, 2018

PHOTO PROVIDED

ROCK | QUEENS OF THE STONE AGE The Queens of the Stone Age are the kings of the riff. Since its inception in 1996, the band has deconstructed heavy rock only to rebuild and super charge it. Besides front man and founder Josh Homme, the band’s revolving door policy has found QOTSA working with members of Screaming Trees, Nirvana, Soundgarden, Dinosaur Jr., and Monster Magnet. This is rock’s last stand. Queens of the Stone Age plays with Royal Blood on Friday, May 25, at The Dome, 2695 East Henrietta Road. 7 p.m. $45. therocdome.com; qotsa.com. — BY FRANK DE BLASE

Neil Vand Dorn Band (CD release), Friday In America, Ponder. Flour City Station, 170

East Ave. 9 p.m.

Queens of the Stone Age, Royal Blood. ROC Dome

Arena, 2695 East Henrietta Road. Henrietta. 585-3344000. therocdome.com. 7 p.m. $45. Tradewind. Dinosaur Bar-BQue, 99 Court St. 325-7090. dinosaurbarbque.com. 10 p.m. Walrus Junction. ButaPub, 315 Gregory St. 585-563-6241. butapub.com. 10:30 p.m.

[ SAT., MAY 26 ] ACOUSTIC/FOLK Connie Deming. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 258-0400. 8-10 p.m. BLUES

Bill Schmitt & The Bluesmasters. Bar Louie, 98

Greece Ridge Center Drive. 797-1054. barlouieamerica. com. 9 p.m. Deep Blue. Fatso’s, 1370 Buffalo Rd. 417-6960. 8 p.m. CLASSICAL

Carmen in Concert. Kodak

Hall at Eastman Theater, 60 Gibbs St. 8 p.m. $24-$104. Springfest. Eastman Community Music School, 10 Gibbs St. esm.rochester.edu. Full schedule online. JAZZ

The Klick. Sticky Lips BBQ

Juke Joint, 830 Jefferson Rd. 585-292-5544. stickylipsbbq. com. 9:30 p.m. $5.

POP/ROCK

Carole’s Kings. Downstairs

Cabaret at Winton Place, 3450 Winton Place. 8 p.m. $30-$33.

Continental Drifft, House Majority, Jan the Actress. ,. 10 p.m. $5.

Dracula Jones. Dinosaur Bar-

B-Que, 99 Court St. 325-7090. dinosaurbarbque.com. 10 p.m.

HarborLights, Periodic Table of Elements, Greg Best, Astraea. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 8 p.m. $7.

IJY (Ian & John Yeara). Sticky

Lips Pit BBQ City Music Hall, 625 Culver Rd. 8:45 p.m. $2. Late Earth. Firehouse Saloon, 814 S. Clinton Ave. 319-3832. thefirehousesaloon.com. 9:30 p.m. $5.

Nod, Methodist Bells, Sirens Image. Skylark Lounge, 40 South Union St. 270-8106. theskylarklounge.com. 8 p.m. $5.

[ SUN., MAY 27 ] ACOUSTIC/FOLK. Paul Strowe. The Titus Tavern, 692 Titus Ave. 270-5365. titustavern.com. 5-8 p.m. JAZZ

The Bobby Militello Quartet.

Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. 292-9940. lovincup.com. 7 p.m. $10. TRADITIONAL Pops on Pipes. Rochester Auditorium Theatre, 885 E. Main St. 234-2295. rtosonline. org. 2:30-5 p.m. Brett Valliant, presented by The Rochester Theater Organ Society. $15.


AMERICANA

Andrew Collins Trio (CD Release Party), Bitter Bells.

Funk ‘n Waffles, 204 N Water Street. 448-0354. 7 p.m. $5/$7. POP/ROCK

Carole’s Kings. Downstairs

Cabaret at Winton Place, 3450 Winton Place. 3 p.m. $30-$33.

[ MON., MAY 28 ] METAL

Aborted, Psycroptic, Gutted Alive. Flour City Station, 170

East Ave. 7:30 p.m. $13/$15. POP/ROCK

Igor & Red Elvises. Village of Palmyra, E Main St. Palmyra. 585-368-8081. 3 p.m.

Rozwell Kid, Prince Daddy & The Hyena, Total Yuppies, Carpool. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe

Ave. 9 p.m. $13/$15. Sam Nitsch. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 258-0400. 7-9 p.m. No cover.

[ TUE., MAY 29 ] CLASSICAL

Eastman-Rochester New Horizons Bands Annual Spring Concert. Kodak Hall at

Eastman Theater, 60 Gibbs St. 734-9110. 7-9 p.m. Springfest. Eastman Community Music School, 10 Gibbs St. esm.rochester.edu. June 3. Full schedule online. JAZZ

Grove Place Jazz Project.

Downstairs Cabaret Theatre, 20 Windsor St. 325-4370. downstairscabaret.com. 7 p.m. $10.

MARKET DISTRICT BUSINESS ASSOCIATION Cristallino Premium Ice 17 Richmond Street | 670-6310 www.cristallinoice.com "Clearly exceptional cocktail ice"

ELEMENTS On RAILROAD 153 Railroad Street | 270-1752

next to John Grieco: Lasting Art @elementsrailroad and Fb

Boxcar Donuts eatatboxcar.com | 270-5942 127 Railroad St, Suite 120. Open Tues-Sun Southern Inspired: Gourmet Donuts & Fried Chicken

Redi Imports Automotive & Alignment Services | 235-3444 144 Railroad Street rediimports.com

1115 East Main Street | 469-8217 Open Studios First Friday 6-9pm and Second Saturday 10am-3pm

REGGAE/JAM N Water Street. 448-0354. funknwaffles.com. Every other Tuesday, 8-11 p.m. AMERICANA

The Howlin’ Brothers. Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. abilenebarandlounge.com. 8 p.m. $10.

Letterpress Gift Shop Posters & Invitations

The Yards RPM 50-52 Public Market Way | 362-1977 Art gallery and studio space focusing on community engagement in Rochester

Fresh Juice Squeezed every Saturday at the Rochester Public Market in the new Winter Shed FOOD SERVICE DISTRIBUTOR

What you need is just a phone call away 20-22 Public Market | 423-0994

info at TheHungerford.com

Small Fry Art Studio 50 Public Market | 371-8063 smallfryart.studio Black Button Distilling 85 Railroad St. | 730-4512 blackbuttondistilling.com

Juan and Maria's

"Home of the Highly Addictive Spanish Foods"

DELIVERY • CATERING up to 25% OFF 303-1290 | juanandmarias.com

Java’s Cafe NON-STOP since 92

Tastings • Tours • Private Functions

City Newspaper (WMT Publications) 250 N. Goodman St. | 244-3329 rochestercitynewspaper.com

Tours • Tastings Private Parties 97 Railroad St. | 546-8020 | rohrbachs.com

Type High Letterpress 1115 E. Main St. | Suite 252 The Hungerford Building 281-2510 | typehigh.com

Full service auto repair • Foreign & Domestic

Art classes • Parties • Workshops

Dead Night w/ Roc & Rye Band. Funk ‘n Waffles, 204

John Grieco: Lasting Art 153 Railroad St. 802-3652 | objectmaker.com

Tim Wilkes Photography 9 Public Market | 423-1966 "Fine Architectural and Yacht Racing Imagery"

Warehouse 127 120 Railroad Street 506- 9274 | WH127.com

Furniture • Décor • One-of-a Kinds

Harman Hardwood Flooring Co.

"No one knows more about your hardwood floor."

29 Hebard Street | 546-1221 harmanfloors.com

Paulas Essentials “Essentials for the Soul” 415 Thurston Rd. & Public Market 737-9497 | paulasessentials.com

Rochester Self Storage 325-5000 | 14 Railroad St. Affordable storage solutions rochesternyselfstorage.com

Florida Nut House Tues., Thurs & Sat. | Indoor booth 53 Home of the Cinnamon Roasted Nuts, Boiled peanuts, Garlic and Cajun nuts

Hettie’s Delites Café Friends of Market | 325-5058

marketfriends@rochester.rr.com

1 Public Market | 445-8118 Thurs 9am-9pm Sat 6am-2pm | Sun 10am-4pm

POP/ROCK

Hot Mayo Bar Takeover: Jan the Actress, Cantelope, DJ Donnie Watckins. Bug Jar,

219 Monroe Ave. 9 p.m. $3.

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 15


Art

Betye Saar’s “Liberation of Aunt Jemima: Cocktail.” PHOTO BY JONATHAN DORADO, BROOKLYN MUSEUM

The revolution wasn’t realized “We Wanted a Revolution: Black Radical Women, 1965-85” THROUGH SUNDAY, MAY 27 ALBRIGHT-KNOX ART GALLERY, 1285 ELMWOOD AVENUE, BUFFALO TUESDAY THROUGH SUNDAY, 10 A.M. TO 5 P.M.; AND FRIDAY, MAY 25, 10 A.M. TO 8 P.M. $6-$12 | 716-882-8700; ALBRIGHTKNOX.ORG [ REVIEW ] BY REBECCA RAFFERTY

This week we’re shining a rare spotlight on an exhibit showing outside of Rochester. On view for a few more days 16 CITY MAY 23 - 29, 2018

at Buffalo’s Albright-Knox Art Gallery is “We Wanted a Revolution,” a massive exhibit on black women artists and their efforts to shift the racist and misogynist art world during the age of the Civil Rights and Black Power movements. The show title alludes to the desire to force change but also subtly indicates how much more work there is to be done. Think fast: Off the top of your head, how many American black women artists can you name? How many of them are household names? Hyperallergic in 2014 reported that only 30 percent of artists represented in commercial galleries in the US are women. It’s not easy to find much data specifically on black women artists. This year the same publication reported that a survey of the top 100 US artists by volume from the last 30 years included only three women of color: Kara Walker, Ellen Gallagher, and Mickalene Thomas.

Through artwork by dozens of artists (performance, film, and video art, as well as photography, painting, sculpture, and printmaking), curatorial information, and archival materials, “We Wanted a Revolution” forms a survey show that illustrates a wide view of the struggle black women artists were engaged in to gain representation in the art world. The show features pointed political work, like that of Betye Saar, including her 1971 derogatory language- and imagery-filled video “Colored Spade” and her 1973 “Liberation of Aunt Jemima: Cocktail,” an assemblage that converts a jug of wine with a racist label and Jemima’s red kerchief into a bottle bomb. It includes Lorraine O’Grady’s gelatin silver prints documenting her audacious performance of presence as “Mlle Bourgeoise Noire” (Miss Black Middle Class), a gender, race, and class critique in which she arrived uninvited to art openings at New Museum of Contemporary Art and Just Above Midtown Gallery in a gown made of white gloves, smiling as she demanded attention for black women artists. “We Wanted a Revolution” also includes work by black women artists who were not engaged in social and political work, but were overlooked by representation their white and male contemporaries enjoyed. The show is an exhaustive survey of a lot of work done in a short space of time — artist Amanda Chestnut and I spent nearly three hours at the gallery exploring just this exhibit, and we still weren’t able to examine every bit of work, let alone the many stations of archival material. Included in the stations of archives were the bylaws and newsletters of grassroots black art organizations, importantly revealing organizational tactics and spotlighting even more artists than the ones whose work is on the walls. There were letters of eloquent outrage sent to the heads of a gallery that chose in 1979 to show white male artist Donald Newman’s suite of abstract charcoal works titled “The N***** Drawings,” (my asterisks added) and the gallery’s weak response that it didn’t want to censor his work (the artist also offered the tired defense that the root of the slur refers to the dark of the charcoal). The volume of the show sets up any enthusiastic viewer for return visits, which isn’t necessarily possible for non-locals or those on strict budgets. My friend’s answer was to buy the sourcebook offered for sale at the gallery store. While this show is worth spending hours on and is an admirable start to reintroducing — or, for real, introducing — the public to these artists’ work and these important movements, our main critique was that it’s just too big. It tries to make what was a series of diverse artists and protest actions into a monolithic exhibit, compressing a rich few

Jan van Raay’s 1971 image “Faith Ringgold (right) and Michele Wallace (middle) at Art Workers Coalition Protest, Whitney Museum.” PHOTO COURTESY JAN VAN RAAY

decades of artistic expression and political action into a shallow glance. And while the exhibit opens with a timeline of important events, from Brown v. Board of Education to the 1985 police bombing of a black family in West Philadelphia, there are many missed opportunities within the exhibit itself to explore more deeply and concretely that art made as social and political protest during such a contentious era was deliberately closed out of wider art discussions and institutions — not to mention the ongoingness of this issue. In a dream scenario, my friend and I decided, we would turn this big show into many smaller, deeper exhibits that would be exhibited more frequently and widely. Our conversation shifted to a devil’s advocate defense of the show’s curators, Catherine Morris and Rujeko Hockley, who both work at Brooklyn Museum (which organized this exhibit). Perhaps their aim, in following the blockbuster exhibit model, was to draw a wider audience than a series of smaller shows would? We volleyed the problems of funding and the need for galleries and museums to come up with new models for engaging wider audiences, and enabling more people to see the shows — something that art houses are well aware of but haven’t yet assuaged. As we hit the road toward Rochester in time to make it to Saturday afternoon’s most recent edition of the “At the Crossroads: Activating the Intersection of Art and Justice” series (more on that event coming online), the irony wasn’t lost on us that this local series is specifically geared toward addressing the ongoing issue of representation and funding in the arts.


Check out the full calendar, including ongoing art exhibits, online at rochestercitynewspaper.com

Arts & Performance Art Exhibits [ OPENING ] Main Street Arts, 20 W. Main St., Clifton Springs. Land & Sea. Paintings, drawings, sculpture, prints, & photographs by 28 artists inspired by the natural world. 315-462-0210. mainstreetartsgallery.com. Softly Spoken: The Art of Karen Frutiger. Through June 30. The Gallery at Creativ Framing and Editions Printing, 510 State Street 545-1723. creativframingeditionsprinting@ gmail.com.

Call for Artwork 2018 Finger Lake Plein Air Festival Community Paint Out. Through June 8. Downtown Canandaigua, 115 S. Main Street . Canandaigua Artists will have two timed hours during the Plein Air Festival to create artworks to be judged for prizes. Pre-registration required $10. 396-0300. fingerlakespleinair.com. Corn Hill Arts Festival Emerging Artists Expo. Through June 1. Seeking young artists ages 1525 to exhibit creations at the Corn Hill Arts Festival, July 14 & 15. cornhillartsfestival.com/ emergingartists/. Play/Ground. May 23-June 24. Rochester Contemporary Art Center, 137 East Ave. Seeking proposals for interactive, multi-sensory, experiential installations for an event organized by RESOURCE:ART taking place in a former Medina high school $25. 4612222. artplaygroundny.com. Portfolio Showcase 2018, a Juried Exhibit. Through June 3. Image City Photography Gallery, 722 University Ave. Through June 3. Each entrant to submit a portfolio of eight images on CD or online to be selected for the exhibit running Aug 7-Sept 2 ImageCityPhotographyGallery.com. Rundel Terrace Public Art Installation. Through May 25. Central Library of Rochester, Rundel Auditorium, 115 South Ave Applications due by 2pm on May 25 to Brie Harrison, Library Finance Officer: brie. harrison@libraryweb.org 4287300. cityofrochester.gov.

Call for Participants [ WED., MAY 23 ] BOA Short Fiction Prize. Through May 31. BOA Editions is accepting submissions through May 31. Winner receives publication in Spring 2020, plus a $1,000 honorariom $25. boaeditions.org. ImageOutWrite Literary Journal. Through June 15. ImageOut, 274 North Goodman Street LGBTQ authors & allies invited to submit original literary works. Submissions due June 15 2712640. office@imageout.org. imageout.org/press.php. continues on page 20 rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 17


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Night of 10s. Through June 30. Mood Makers Books, 274 Goodman St. N The Sankofa Theatre Fest seeks entries for an evening of 10-minute plays. Works should be comedic, use 1-3 actors, & pertain to some aspect of African American life moodmakersbooks.com.

Art Events [ FRI., MAY 25 ] Final Fridays @ StudioRAD. Last Friday of every month, 6-11 p.m. StudioRAD, 46 Mount Hope Ave Hosted by Strange Entertainment 4698512. lisanudo@studiorad.org. studiorad.org. Monroe County Arts Networking Night. May 25, 6-8 p.m.

Anderson Arts Building, 250 N. Goodman St. Hosted by Genesee Valley Council on the Arts andersonartsbuilding@ gmail.com. gvartscouncil.org. [ SUN., MAY 27 ] Public Critique. Last Sunday of every month, 6:30-8:30 p.m. The Yards, 50-52 Public Market $5. attheyards@gmail. com. attheyards.com. [ TUE., MAY 29 ] Art Show & Sale. May 29June 30. Maplewood Family YMCA, 25 Driving Park Avenue 787-4086.

Farm Team Comedy Showcase #2. May 23, 8-11 p.m. Three Heads Brewing, 186 Atlantic Ave $5. 426-6339.

[ SUN., MAY 27 ] Comedy Cocoon. 6:30 p.m. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. bugjar.com.

[ THU., MAY 24 ] Raven. May 24-25, 8 p.m. Comedy at the Carlson, 50 Carlson Rd $15/$20.

Dance Events

[ SAT., MAY 26 ] Chris Alan. May 26, 8 p.m. Comedy at the Carlson, 50 Carlson Rd In the Rickels Room $12. Sky Sands. May 26, 8 p.m. Comedy at the Carlson, 50 Carlson Rd $12.

[ SAT., MAY 26 ] Exhilaration. May 26, 2 & 7 p.m. JCC of Greater Rochester, 1200 Edgewood Avenue Rochester Dance Theatre; works by Saint-Saens & Rene Aubry $10-$15. 421-2000. rdtny.org.

Theater Avenue Q. Thu., May 24, 7:30-9:30 p.m., Fri., May 25, 8-10 p.m., Sat., May 26, 8-10 p.m. and Sun., May 27, 2-4

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p.m. Blackfriars Theatre, 795 E. Main St Through May 27 $31.50-$39.50. 454-1260. blackfriars.org. Hamlet. Fridays, 7:30 p.m., Sundays, 2 p.m. and Saturdays, 7:30 p.m Lyric Theatre, 440 East Ave Presented by Screen Plays $15-$20. Steel Magnolias. Wednesdays, 7:30 p.m., Thursdays, 7:30 p.m., Fridays, 8 p.m., Sundays, 2 & 7 p.m., Tuesdays, 7:30 p.m. and Saturdays, 4 & 8:30 p.m Geva Theatre Center, 75 Woodbury Blvd Through June 3 $25-$59.

Theater Audition [ WED., MAY 23 ]

The Pirates of Penzance. May 23, 6:30 p.m. Geneseo Central School McCarthy Auditorium, 4050 Avon Road . Geneseo For Geneseo Community Players show, July 19-22. Leads & featured roles: please audition with a Gilbert & Sullivan piece; accompanist provided. Ensemble auditions: no prepared piece necessary; you will be checked for vocal range 991-8239.

Activism [ SAT., MAY 26 ] Intersections of Rebellion & Accountability. May 26, 1-3 p.m. Antioch Baptist Church, 304 Joseph Avenue Panel discussion focused on civilian

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review boards, disciplinary power, and the comparable struggles & histories for police accountability in Rochester; Newark, NJ; & Oakland, CA $10 suggested.

Festivals [ SAT., MAY 26 ] Tree Peony Festival of Flowers. May 26-27, 9 a.m.4 p.m. Linwood Gardens, 1912 York Rd. $10/$15. linwoodgardens1912@gmail. com. linwoodgardens.org.

Kids Events [ WED., MAY 23 ] Science + You. Through Aug.

5. Rochester Museum & Science Center, 657 East Ave. rmsc.org. [ SAT., MAY 26 ] Sky Sands. May 26, 4 p.m. Comedy at the Carlson, 50 Carlson Rd All ages family comedy show $9 Sky Sands. May 26, 8 p.m. Comedy at the Carlson, 50 Carlson Rd $12.

Meetings [ WED., MAY 23 ] Reimagine RTS Phase 3 Pop-Up Sessions. May 23, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. RTS Transit Center, 60 St. Paul St. 585-288-1700. monroe@myRTS.com. myrts. com/reimagine.

[ THU., MAY 24 ] Reimagine RTS Pop-Up Sessions. May 24, 4-6 p.m. RTS Transit Center, 60 St. Paul St. 585-288-1700. monroe@ myRTS.com. myRTS.com.

Special Events [ THU., MAY 24 ] Success in the City: Annual Benefit for Dress For Success Rochester. May 24, 6 p.m. Anthology, 336 East Ave $75. [ FRI., MAY 25 ] Flower City Days at the Market. May 25, 8 a.m.-2 p.m. Rochester Public Market, 280 N. Union St.

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[ MON., MAY 28 ] Memorial Day Ceremony of Remembrance. May 28, 10:30 a.m. Penfield Amphitheater, 3100 Atlantic Ave Penfield 340-8655. penfield.org. Memorial in Time of War: Remembrance & Hope. May 28, 9 a.m. Sister Cities Pedestrian Bridge, Genesee Riverway Trail A service of remembrance of the victims of the current wars.

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Film

Looking for more film? Extra movie content online.

Wilhelmenia Fernandez and Frédéric Andréi in “Diva.” PHOTO COURTESY RIALTO PICTURES

A new era begins [ PREVIEW ] BY ADAM LUBITOW

Art, intrigue, opera, and murder collide in unexpected ways in “Diva,” the 1981 thriller from French filmmaker Jean-Jacques Beineix. The film’s lurid plot finds a young Parisian postman named Jules (Frédéric Andréi) running for his life after coming into possession of two audio cassettes — the first a one-of-a-kind, and highly coveted, bootleg recording of his favorite opera singer; the other containing the testimony of a recently deceased call girl blowing the lid off a drug trafficking and prostitution ring overseen by a squad of corrupt police officers. Suddenly Jules finds himself pursued by crooked cops, murderous thugs, hitmen, and ruthless Taiwanese businessmen, and he’s got to keep one step ahead of them all if he wants to stay alive.

22 CITY MAY 23 - 29, 2018

With its thrilling set pieces, dreamy art direction, and neon-drenched cinematography, “Diva” took arthouses by storm when it hit the US in the summer of 1982. In addition to being a box office sensation, the film helped to usher in a new wave of French cinema that came to be known as “cinéma du look.” Films of the movement — which included work by directors Luc Besson (“Subway”) and Leos Carax (“Boy Meets Girl”), as well as Beineix — were characterized by their heightened style, striking imagery, and a freewheeling mix of high and pop culture. Rochester audiences certainly weren’t immune to the bold new vision “Diva” offered. When the film opened at the Little Theatre on July 28, 1982 (shortly after the theater was taken over by new owners

William Coppard, along with John and Pam Blampied) the public returned in droves for repeat viewings, eventually making “Diva” one of the longest running movies to ever play at the theater. According to records found by Little staff members, the film screened until at least April of 1983. This week, “Diva” makes a triumphant return to the theater thanks to The Little’s “Diva Festiva” event, where attendees will get to enjoy a live opera performance from soprano Kearstin Piper Brown, food, drink, and the centerpiece of the evening: a rare 35mm screening of the film itself. The event serves as a fundraiser for the extensive renovations set to restore The Little Theatre to its former glory, as well as a send-off of sorts for The Little’s main theater on East Avenue (Little 1) before it temporarily closes beginning May 29. (The theater is scheduled reopen in October). When looking for a film to close out this era of the theater, “Diva” seemed a natural fit, and Little PR Coordinator Scott Pukos hopes the screening will bring back fond memories for those who came out to see it during its original run. “It’s a big part of this theater’s history, and we want to really celebrate that before we start the renovations,” Pukos says. “We want to send people off with another good memory of the theater.” Facility Manager Jim Malley was one of those Rochesterians who found themselves captivated by “Diva” during its original run. He recalls seeing the film multiple times during its time at The Little, and felt the film’s aesthetic perfectly aligned with the emergence of the young media-savvy, MTV generation. “Being at the age where I was just out of college, it fit perfectly in that whole era for me,” he says. “It was a movie that seemed to have everything I liked: music, beautiful art, a cool story that wove into it all, and with a youthful, almost punk rock kind of feel to it.” The event is a great opportunity to revisit the film, but also to see how the mission of The Little has expanded over the years. “It shows what we do differently compared to the eighties,” Pukos says. “Now we’re having

live opera [with the movie], we’re having food, beer, and wine. It’ll be a little more of a party, and really highlights what we often do here, so it’s fitting.” The additions are a natural fit, Malley says, and finding new ways to spotlight the art form is something The Little has always done well. “Even back then, it was a place that just made me feel good. And then what it did inside — bringing the world and culture to me in a way that you couldn’t get anywhere else.” He says he’s happy to see that continue, and adds: “It’s got a great future ahead. It’s very exciting, and I’m glad to be a part of it.” The Little Theatre’s “Diva Festiva” will be held Thursday, May 24. Doors at 6 p.m. with musical performances leading up to the film at 7:30 p.m. Tickets $30, includes film, music performances, two drinks, hors d’oeuvres, and popcorn. thelittle.org.

Film Listings [ WED., MAY 23 ] The Lost Moment. May 23, 7:30 p.m. Dryden Theatre, 900 East Ave. $5-$10. 271-4090. [ THU., MAY 24 ] The Plastic Dome of Norma Jean. May 24, 7:30 p.m. Dryden Theatre, 900 East Ave. $5-$10. 271-4090. [ FRI., MAY 25 ] He Walked by Night. May 25, 7:30 p.m. Dryden Theatre, 900 East Ave. $5-$10. 271-4090. Winds of Change in Colonial Africa. May 25, 7 p.m. Baobab Cultural Center, 728 University Ave. baobabcultural.org. [ SAT., MAY 26 ] Sons of the Desert. May 26, 7:30 p.m. Dryden Theatre, 900 East Ave. $5-$10. 271-4090. [ SUN., MAY 27 ] Films from the Archive. May 27, 12:30-2 p.m. New York Museum of Transportation, 6393 E. River Rd 533-1113. Macbeth. May 27, noon. (Also Tue, May 29, 6 p.m.) The Little Theatre, 240 East Avenue Royal Opera House. Opera Guild of Rochester Meetup follows May 27 screening, 3:15-4:30pm $18$20. thelittle.org. [ TUE., MAY 29 ] The Murder of Fred Hampton. May 29, 7:30 p.m. Dryden Theatre, 900 East Ave UCLA Festival of Preservation Tour $5-$10. 271-4090.


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All real estate advertised in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act, which makes it unlawful, “to make, print, or publish, any notice, statement, or advertisement, with respect to the sale or rental of a dwelling that indicates any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin.” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under the age of 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertisement for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. Call the local Fair Housing Enforcement Project, FHEP at 325-2500 or 1-866671-FAIR. Si usted sospecha una practica de vivienda injusta, por favor llame al servicio legal gratis. 585-325-2500 - TTY 585-325-2547.

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Jam Section BRIAN S. MARVIN Lead vocalist, looking for an audition to join band, cover tunes, originals and has experience with bands 585-259-3717 CALLING ALL MUSICIANS OF ALL GENRES the Rochester Music Coalition wants you! Please register on our website. For further info: www.rochestermusiccoalition.org info@rochestermusiccoalition.org 585-235-8412 CONGA PLAYER - / percussionist, looking for work in J jazz, Afro Cuban Jazz or any other musical group. Peter 585-210-6087 FRESH, FUNKY, R&B/neo-soul/ jazz-rock project, looking for bassist. Song list includes Whinehouse, Badu, Daft punk etc. Practice in Irondequoit Mondays @ 6. 2ndstreetsymphony@gmail. com JACKSON KELLY KE3 guitar with hard case. $449 585-381-0768

Attention Viagra users: Generic 100 mg blue pills or Generic 20 mg yellow pills. Get 45 plus 5 free $99 + S/H. Guaranteed, no prescription necessary. Call 877-845-8068. Medicare doesn’t cover all of your medical expenses. A Medicare Supplemental Plan can help cover costs that Medicare does not. Get a free quote today by calling now. Hours: 24/7. 1-800-730-9940 OXYGEN- ANYTIME. ANYWHERE No tanks to refill. No deliveries. The All-New Inogen One G4 is only 2.8 pounds! FAA approved! FREE info kit: 866-971-2603 WERE YOU AN INDUSTRIAL TRADESMAN (machinist/ boilermaker/pipefitter etc) and recently diagnosed with LUNG CANCER? You may be entitled to a SIGNIFICANT CASH AWARD. Risk free consultation! 855-407-6931.

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rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 23


EMPLOYMENT / CAREER OPPORTUNITIES Employment Product Design Engineer,

EMPLOYMENT

CITY Newspaper’s employment section has been connecting local employers with local talent for years. Call David at (585) 730-2666 or email david@rochester-citynews.com to take the first step toward finding the newest member of your team.

Join the New York State Workforce As a Licensed Practical Nurse (LPN)! Salary range: $38,113 to $46,772 Finger Lakes DDSO is seeking LPNs in Monroe, Livingston, Ontario, Wayne, Wyoming, & Yates counties. Minimum Qualifications: Must have a current license and registration to practice in New York State, or limited permit to practice in NYS, or an application on file for a limited permit to practice in NYS. For exam application: OPWDD Finger Lakes DDSO Human Resources Management Office - Hiring Unit 620 Westfall Road, Rochester, NY 14620 Phone: (585) 461-8800 Email: opwdd.sm.FL.hiring@opwdd.ny.gov

As a Direct Support Professional! Salary range: $32,325 to $44,311 Finger Lakes DDSO will be continuously administering the Civil Service Exam for Direct Support Professionals throughout Monroe, Wayne, Ontario, Seneca, Yates, Livingston, Wyoming, Schuyler, Steuben, and Chemung counties. Minimum Qualifications: High School Diploma or GED equivalent, you must have a valid license to operate a motor vehicle in New York State at the time of the appointment and continuously thereafter. For exam application: OPWDD Finger Lakes DDSO Human Resources Management Office - Hiring Unit 620 Westfall Road, Rochester, NY 14620 Phone: (585) 461-8800 Email: opwdd.sm.FL.hiring@opwdd.ny.gov An Affirmative Action Equal Opportunity Employer

24 CITY MAY 23 - 29 , 2018

Council Rock Enterprises LLC designs Distribution Automation Networks, Rochester, NY. Communication with suppliers/ customers on product selection and integration. Work with manufacturing, testing departments, and suppliers to develop efficient designs. Document design solution required for building of prototypes and adoption of the design. Create 2-D and 3-D drawings, bills of materials. Develop designs for products relating to defined customer requirements and parameters. Up to 25% U.S. and international travel. Reference job #1406C, resume to Amy Moyer, Council Rock Enterprises LLC, 11 Centre Park, Rochester, NY 14614.

Research and Development Engineer, Council Rock Enterprises LLC designs Distribution Automation Networks, Rochester, NY. Design, development, and technical tasks required to maintain product line. Implement communication protocols such as IPv6, DNP3, IPv4, and Modbus in Linux environments. Design modules, interfaces, and related embedded systems. Design security features for embedded Linux systems. Up to 25% U.S. and international travel. Reference job #1406A, resume to Amy Moyer, Council Rock Enterprises LLC, 11 Centre Park, Rochester, NY 14614. Senior Systems Engineer, Council Rock Enterprises LLC designs Distribution Automation Networks, Rochester, NY. Propose solutions and technologies that meet customer requirements.

Help develop company offerings with respect to technologies and service capabilities. Develop Bill of Materials Definition and cost, Statements of Work, Service requirements, Overall network performance. Up to 25% U.S. and international travel. Reference job #1406B, resume to Amy Moyer, Council Rock Enterprises LLC, 11 Centre Park, Rochester, NY 14614.

Volunteers BECOME A DOCENT at the Rochester Museum & Science Center Must be an enthusiastic communicator, Like working with children. Learn more at http:// www.rmsc.org/Support/Volunteer Or call 585-697-1948 Contact Urban League Of Rochester today to become a mentor to the youth in our community! Email Charisma Dupree at cdupree@ulr.org to get started. MEALS ON WHEELS needs YOU to deliver meals to YOUR neighbors in need. Available weekdays between 11:30 AM and 1:00 PM? Visit our website at www.vnsnet.com or call 2744385 to get started! OPERA GUILD OF Rochester needs a volunteer to assist with newsletter publication, and event helpers for the annual recital and opera presentations. For details see home page at operaguildofrochester.com. SENECA PARK ZOO Society seeking volunteers and docents for ongoing involvement or special events. Roles available for all interests. Contact Volunteers@senecazoo.org to learn more. ST. JOHN’S HOME is Looking for a musician to volunteer every other week, for roughly an hour and lead sing-a-longs with a small group of residents. Please call volunteer office at 7601293 for more information. VOLUNTEER DRIVERS ARE KEY – some of our neighbors need a ride to the doctor. Do you have time to help? Call Lifespan 244-8400, x142

Real Estate Auctions LIVE PUBLIC AUCTION: Cayuga County, City of Auburn. 40+ Properties Available! Wednesday, June 6, 2018; Registration: 12:30PM; Auction Start: 2:00PM. Emerson Park Pavilion, 6914 E. Lake Road (RTE 38A), Auburn, NY 13021. Call 800536-1401, Ext. 110. Visit: www. auctionsinternational.com

Land for Sale High on a hill SCHOHARIE COUNTY 40 Acres, Awesome Views: $114K; 9.5 Acres, Great Views: $44K; 4.2 Acres: $24K, Owner Financing. www.helderbergrealty.com 518-861-6541 or 518-256-6344 LAND LIQUIDATION SALE! JUNE 2nd & 3rd. 21 Parcels from $19,900! Cooperstown Lake Region. Terms avail! 888-905-8847 to register. NewYorkLandandLakes.com

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FORECLOSURE OF TAX LIENS BY THE CITY OF ROCHESTER STATE OF NEW YORK SUPREME COURT COUNTY OF MONROE IN THE MATTER OF THE FORECLOSURE OF TAX LIENS PURSUANT TO TITLE 4 OF PART E OF ARTICLE IX OF THE CHARTER OF THE CITY OF ROCHESTER.

LIST OF DELINQUENT TAXES AS OF JULY 1, 2017 PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that on April 25, 2018, the Corporation Counsel of the City of Rochester filed in the office of the Monroe County Clerk a list of parcels of property on which the City of Rochester holds a lien for taxes, assessments, fees or other charges which is at least one year old and which the City of Rochester intends to foreclose by an action in rem pursuant to Title 4 of Part E of Article IX of the Charter of the City of Rochester. A copy of that list was published on April 25, 2018. The foreclosure list contains as to each such parcel: 1. The tax account number and address; 2. The name of the last known owner; 3. The amount of each tax lien, except for a $250.00 charge which has been added to each tax lien pursuant to Section 9-123(A)(3)of the City Charter but which is not reflected on the printed list. All persons having an interest in the real property described in the foreclosure list are hereby notified that the filing of the list constitutes the commencement by the City of Rochester of an action in the Supreme Court, Monroe County, to foreclose the tax liens therein described by an action in rem and that the list constitutes a notice of pendency of action and a complaint by the City of Rochester against each parcel of land therein described to enforce the satisfaction of such tax liens. This action is brought against the real property only. No personal judgment will be entered in this action for the delinquent taxes, assessments, fees or other charges.

A copy of the foreclosure list has been filed in the office of the City Treasurer and will remain open for public inspection up to and including October 11, 2018, which is the redemption deadline date. Any person may on or before that date redeem any parcel on the foreclosure list by paying to the City Treasurer the amount of all delinquent taxes, assessments, fees and other charges stated on the foreclosure list, plus the $250.00 charge referred to above, plus accrued interest and late payment charges. Any person having any interest in any parcel on the foreclosure list may, at any time up to the redemption deadline date, serve a verified notice of interest or an answer upon the Corporation Counsel setting forth in detail the nature and amount of his interest or any defense or objection to the foreclosure. The notice of interest or answer must also be filed in the office of the Monroe County Clerk. Where a valid notice of interest is served, the parcel will be held for a foreclosure auction pursuant to Section 9-143 of the City Charter. Any person who fails to redeem or to serve a notice of interest or an answer by the redemption deadline date shall be barred thereafter from asserting his interest in the pending foreclosure action, and judgment in foreclosure may be granted without regard for, and in extinguishment of, the interest of any such person.

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JEWELL ENTERPRISES LLC, a domestic Limited Liability Company (LLC) filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on May 14, 2018. NY office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of any process against the LLC served upon him/her to the LLC, 146 Crossgates Road, Rochester, NY 14606. General purposes.

Dasgupta consulting group LLC Arts of Org. filed SSNY 3/12/18. Office: Monroe Co. SSNY design agent of LLC upon whom process may be served & mail to 7 Woodgreen Dr Pittsford NY 14534 General Purpose

Living colour beauty LLC Arts of Org. filed SSNY 1/18/18. Office: Monroe Co. SSNY design agent of LLC upon whom process may be served & mail to 3244 Lyell Rd Rochester NY 14606 General Purpose

NY (SSNY) on 4/30/18. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 6685 Camden Hill Drive, Victor, NY 14564. Purpose: any lawful activity.

[ NOTICE ]

[ NOTICE ]

Matthews Enterprising LLC filed SSNY 4/25/18. Monroe Co. SSNY design agent for process & shall mail to Matthew Kaskins 364 Timothy Ln #11 Ontario NY 14519 General Purpose

Notice of Formation of 674 Ridge Road, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 4/19/18. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 674 Ridge Road, Webster, NY 14580. Purpose: any lawful activity.

[ NOTICE ] 1956 W. Henrietta Road, LLC, Arts of Org. filed with Sec. of State of NY (SSNY) 4/13/2018. Cty: Monroe. SSNY desig. as agent upon whom process against may be served & shall mail process to 1241 University Ave., Rochester, NY 14607. General Purpose. [ NOTICE ] ACD Real Estate Holdings, LLC, Arts of Org. filed with Sec. of State of NY (SSNY) 4/20/2018. Cty: Monroe. SSNY desig. as agent upon whom process against may be served & shall mail process to Attn: Manager of LLC, 1505 Shoecraft Rd., Penfield, NY 14526. General Purpose.

AMERICAN AERIAL TREE SERVICE, LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 4/19/2018. Office in Monroe Co. SSNY desig. agent of LLC whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail process to 2935 Culver Rd., Rochester, NY 14622. Purpose: Any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ]

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Bonnie Brook Family Foundation, LLC (LLC) filed Arts. of Org. with NY Secy. of State (SS) on 4/27/18. LLC’s office is in Monroe Co. SS is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS will mail a copy of any process to 7 Woodcliff Terrace, Fairport, NY 14450. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Compass Evaluation and Consulting LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 05/02/18. Office: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to the LLC, 15 Sandpiper Lane Pittsford NY 14534. Purpose: Any lawful purpose.

[ NOTICE ] DEJOY CHIROPRACTIC PLLC (PLLC) filed Arts. of Org. with NY Secy. of State (SS) on 5/8/2018. PLLC’s office is in Monroe Co. SS is designated as agent of PLLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS shall mail a copy of any process to 95 Allens Creek Road, Bldg. 1, Ste. 313, Rochester, NY 14618. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Emandsee, LLC filed 3/1/18. Monroe Co. SSNY design agent for process & shall mail to 117 W. Commerical St Po Box 187 E. Rochester NY 14445 General Purpose [ NOTICE ]

[ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Auberon Group, LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 03/23/18. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 23 Bending Creek Rd., Apt. 2, Rochester NY 14624 . Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ]

GRAND OAKS GLN, LLC (LLC) filed Arts. of Org. with NY Secy. of State (SS) on 4/12/2018. LLC’s office is in Monroe Co. SS is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS shall mail a copy of any process to 1 Fishers Road, Pittsford, NY 14534. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity.

Notice of Formation of Gallup LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 04/18/2018 . Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 644 Gallup Rd, Spencerport, NY 14559. Purpose: any lawful activity.

[ NOTICE ]

[ NOTICE ]

Hazel Transmedia Lab, LLC (LLC) filed Arts. of Org. with NY Secy. of State (SS) on 5/4/18. LLC’s office is in Monroe Co. SS is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS will mail a copy of any process to 21 Van Cortland Dr., Pittsford, NY 14534. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity.

Notice of Formation of 214-216 Cypress Street, LLC. Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 5/17/2018. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to the LLC at 497 Willow Glen Cir., Simi Valley, CA 93065. Purpose: any lawful activities.

[ NOTICE ] LEGAL NOTICE OF FORMATION OF Irondequoit Holdings LLC: LLC filed Articles of Organization with the NYS DOS on January 3, 2018. The DOS is designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. The office of the LLC and address to which the Secretary of State shall mail a copy of any process shall be 49 Parkmere Rd Rochester, NY 14617 Monroe County. The purpose of the LLC is to engage in any business permitted under law.

[ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of 2320 LYELL AVE LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 04/04/18. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, 48 Running Brook Ln., Rochester, NY 14626. Purpose: Any lawful activity [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of 61-C Monroe Avenue, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of

[ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of 9 East Street, LLC. Articles of Organization filed with Sec. of State of New York (SSNY) on 5/8/18. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process served to 9 East Street, LLC, 220 Culver Rd. Apt. 1, Rochester, NY 14607. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Amitas Properties of Wellsville, LLC. Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 03/22/18. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to the LLC at 4 Epping Wood Trl, Pittsford, NY 14534. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of AVO Resource Solutions LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 4/10/18. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 165 N. Water Street., Rochester, NY 14604 Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of BRASS BELL PROPERTY MANAGEMENT LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 04/05/18. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 1018 Bay Rd., Webster, NY 14580. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 25


Legal Ads > page 25 be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of CALLOWAY’S MEDICAL TRANSPORTATION LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 05/07/18. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 54 Knollbrook Rd Apt 33 Brighton, NY 14610. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] NOTICE OF FORMATION OF CHIMAERA PROPERTIES LLC Articles of Organization filed with Secretary of State of NY (“SSNY”) on 05/07/2018. Office in Monroe County. SSNY designated agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to CHIMAERA PROPERTIES LLC, C/O THOMAS S. GRAFF, 31 TYNEDALE WAY, NORTH CHILI, NY 14514. Purpose: any lawful activity [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Comfy Art LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 1/08/2018. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 127 Roslyn St., Rochester, NY, 14619. Purpose: any lawful activities [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Confident Couriers Company, LLC. Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 3/23/2018. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 140 Lozier st Rochester NY 14611. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of CUTTING EDGE EXPERTS, LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 3/12/18. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 780 N. CLINTON AVE ROCHESTER NY 14605 . Purpose: any lawful activities.

[ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Dei-Dei’s Love Baskets & Things LLC Art. Of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) on 4/12/2018. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 1 East Main Street, Rochester, New York 14614. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Engaging Diversity & Inclusion Consulting LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 6/12/17. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 3660 Monroe Avenue, #54, Pittsford, NY 14534. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of GREEN ZEBRA CATERING, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 05/08/18. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, 3 Moss Creek Ct., Pittsford, NY 14534. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Hippity Hip, LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 12/1/2017. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 131 Gregory Street, Rochester NY 14620 . Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Increase Sales Digital, LLC Art. of Org. filed with Sec’y of State (SSNY) March 13, 2018. Office location. Monroe County. SNNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 850 St. Paul St, Suite 30, Rochester, NY 14605. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of KOVAC’S Transport,

26 CITY MAY 23 - 29 , 2018

To place your ad in the LEGAL section, contact Tracey Mykins by phone at (585) 244-3329 x10 or by email at legals@rochester-citynews.com LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 04/04/18. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 273 Ford Ave., Rochester, NY 14606. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of LINCOLN INDUSTRIAL PARK LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 05/10/2018. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 121 LINCOLN AVE; ROCHESTER, NY 14609 . Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Lou Blu Properties LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 04/23/2018. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 17 Washington Ave Pittsford NY 14534 . Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of McWingo Property, LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 0216-18. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to Harrington Ent., llc, 4078 Flakes Mill Rd, Decatur, GA. 30034 . Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of MMJC CAPITAL, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 04/16/18. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 15 Loch Loyal Ct., Penfield, NY 14526. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Ontario Homes Sales, LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 03/26/2018. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to

160 Despatch Dr., East Rochester, NY 14445. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Patriot Industries LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 04/27/2016. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 451 Baker Rd. Churchville, NY 14428. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Rhythm A Hope LLC. Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) April 19, 2018. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to the LLC at 87 Woodgreen Drive Pittsford NY 14534. Purpose: any lawful activities including socializing for encouraging charity [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Rochester Consulting Associates, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 5/1/18. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o The LLC, 3445 Winton Place, Ste. 228, Rochester, NY 14623. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Roctricity LLC, Arts. of Org. filed Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) 5-1-18. Office, Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process copy to 758 South Ave. Rochester, NY 14620. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of The Alliance Ballroom at the Linc, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 4/9/18. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, c/o Sammy Feldman, 3445 Winton Place, Ste. 228, Rochester, NY 14623. Purpose: any lawful activity.

[ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of THE PRESCOTT TEAM LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) on 5/11/2018. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 530 VOSBURG ROAD, WEBSTER, NY 14580. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of WATER CHEMISTRY CONSULTANTS, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 2/21/2018. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 292 Coolidge Rd., Rochester, NY 14622. Purpose: any lawful act [ NOTICE ] NOTICE OF PUBLIC AUCTION being held at Chester’s Self Storage 600 W Broad St. Rochester NY 14608 on Thursday, June 14th at 12:00 pm . The following customers’ accounts have become delinquent so their item (s) will be auctioned off to settle past due rents. NOTE: Owner reserves the right to bid at auction, reject any and all bids, and cancel or adjourn the sale. Name of tenant: , Robert Donaldson unit 61 $328, Tashara Seawright unit 34 $368, Samuel Delregno unit 41 $308 [ NOTICE ] NOTICE OF PUBLIC AUCTION being held at Chesters Self Storage1037 Jay St,. Rochester NY 14611 on Thursday, June 7th at 12:00 am . The following customers’ accounts have become delinquent so their item (s) will be auctioned off to settle past due rents. NOTE: Owner reserves the right to bid at auction, reject any and all bids, and cancel or adjourn the sale. Name of tenant: , BRIAN CORREA LOPEZ UNIT 138 OWES 328, ANGELICA VEGA UNIT 235 OWES 169, JEANNETTE MENDEZ UNIT 230 OWES 328, GRADY ARLINE UNIT 303 OWES 178 [ NOTICE ] Shipping Resources Group LLC (LLC) filed Arts. of Org. with NY Secy. of State (SS) on 3/19/18. LLC’s office is in Monroe Co. SS is designated as agent of

LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS will mail a copy of any process to 25 Sunleaf Dr., Penfield, NY 14526. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] T&T Lawn and Landscaping, LLC, Arts of Org. filed with Sec. of State of NY (SSNY) 4/30/2018. Cty: Monroe. SSNY desig. as agent upon whom process against may be served & shall mail process to Tina Schuth, 4317 Canal Rd., Spencerport, NY 14559. General Purpose. [ NOTICE } Clarington Property LLC (“LLC”) filed Articles of Organization with the NY Sec. of State (“SSNY”) on 4/30/18. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall forward service of process to 262 Willowen Drive, Rochester, NY 14609. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE } Notice of Formation of K.W. BRODEN, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 4/27/18. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 1346A Pittsford Mendon Road, Mendon, NY 14506. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ Notice of Formation ] 10th Fairway LLC (“LLC”) filed Articles of Organization with the NY Sec. of State (“SSNY”) on 4/26/18. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall forward service of process to 590 Allens Creek Road, Rochester, NY 14618. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ Notice of Formation ] 114 South Union Street LLC (“LLC”) filed Articles of Organization with the NY Sec. of State (“SSNY”) on 5/3/18. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall forward service of process to Craig Jensen, 54 South Union Street, Rochester, NY 14607. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ Notice of Formation ] CPW Property Holdings LLC (“LLC”) filed

Articles of Organization with the NY Sec. of State (“SSNY”) on 4/30/18. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall forward service of process to 37 Richmond Street, Rochester, NY 14607. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] Name: DT CULVER HOLDINGS LLC. Arts. Of Org. filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 05/10/2018. Office Location: Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to: C/O DT CULVER HOLDINGS LLC, One East Main Street, 10th Floor, Rochester, New York 14614. Purpose: Any Lawful Purpose. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] Name: HARRISON STREET BONEYARD LLC. Arts. Of Org. filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 05/07/2018. Office Location: Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to: C/O HARRISON STREET BONEYARD LLC, One East Main Street, 10th Floor, Rochester, New York 14614. Purpose: Any Lawful Purpose [ Notice of Formation ] Name: TWBC HOLDINGS LLC. Arts. Of Org. filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 04/27/2018. Office Location: Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to: C/O TWBC HOLDINGS LLC, One East Main Street, 10th Floor, Rochester, New York 14614. Purpose: Any Lawful Purpose. [ Notice of Formation ] Name: WAYNE CONSULTANCY LLC. Arts. Of Org. filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 04/30/2018. Office Location: Monroe County. SSNY has been

designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to: C/O WAYNE CONSULTANCY LLC, One East Main Street, 10th Floor, Rochester, New York 14614. Purpose: Any Lawful Purpose [ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] New York Paralegal SVS LLC filed Arts. of Org. with Sec. of State on 03/19/18. Office Loc: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY may mail copy of process to 93 Chesterfield Drive, Rochester, NY 14612. The purpose of the company is any lawful activity. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] Tech Buyers Group LLC (“LLC”) filed Articles of Organization with the NY Sec. of State (“SSNY”) on 5/9/18. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall forward service of process to 1157 Fairport Road, Fairport, NY 14450. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] Urgent Care Now Medical PLLC filed Articles of Organization with the New York Dept of State on 9/08/11. Its office is located in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent of the Company upon whom process against it may be served and a copy of any process shall be mailed to 60 Barrett Dr, Suite A, Webster, NY 14580. The purpose of the Company is medical services. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF CAVALCADE EVENTS, LLC ] The name of the Limited Liability Company is Cavalcade Events, LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the New York Secretary of State on 04/30/2018. The office of the LLC is in Monroe County. The New York Secretary of State is designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. The Secretary of State shall mail a copy of such process to William Alexander, Esq., One South Clinton Ave., Suite 1000, Rochester, NY 14604. The LLC is organized to engage in


Legal Ads any lawful activity for which an LLC may be formed under the NY LLC Law. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILTY COMPANY ] Notice of Formation of 1379 Long Pond Road LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) on December 22, 2006. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to LLC at 1379 Long Pond Road, Rochester, NY 14626. Purpose: Any lawful activities. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILTY COMPANY ] Notice of Formation of Buntsy’s Neighborhood Food & Drink LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) on April 18, 2018. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to LLC at 8 Pierce Street, Webster, NY 14580. Purpose: Any lawful activities. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LLC ] Feathers Tribe Entertainment, LLC filed articles of organization with the New York State Secretary of State on 04/10/2018 with an effective date of formation of 04/10/2018. Its principal place of business is located in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent upon whom process may be served. A copy of any process shall be mailed to 44 Laurelcrest Drive, Spencerport, NY 14559. The purpose of the LLC is to engage in any lawful activity for which Limited Liability Companies may be organized under Section 203 of the New York Limited Liability Company Law [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LLC ] Jay’s Dry Bulk, LLC filed articles of organization with the New York Secretary of State on 4/11/18 with an effective date of formation of 4/11/18. Its principal place of business is located in Monroe County. The Secretary of State

has been designated as agent upon whom process may be served. A copy of any process shall be mailed to 1869 Turk Hill Rd., Fairport, NY 14450. The purpose of the LLC is to engage in any lawful activity for which Limited Liability Companies may be organized under Section 203 of the New York Limited Liability Company Law. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LLC ] Notice is hereby given that Rock Beach Aquatics, LLC a Limited Liability Company, filed Articles of Organization with the Secretary of State on April 13, 2018. The principal office is located in the County of Monroe, State of New York, and the Secretary of State was designated as agent upon whom process against it may be served. The address to which the Secretary of State shall mail a copy of any process against the limited liability company is: 80 Rock Beach Road, Rochester, NY 14617. The purpose of the company is to engage in any lawful activity for which a company may be organized under §203 of the Limited Liability Company Law. [ Notice of Formation of VICTOR EAST AUTO GROUP LLC ] Arts. Of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on April 16, 2018. Office location: Monroe Co., NY. Princ. Office of LLC: 120 Linden Oaks Drive, Ste 200, Rochester, NY 14625. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Princ. Office of LLC. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [NOTICE] Notice of formation of OPTIMIZER SERVICES, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 2/27/2018. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 1890 Harris Rd., Penfield, NY 14526. Purpose: any lawful act [ PUBLICATION NOTICE OF ORGANIZATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY ]

The name of the Limited Liability Company is Double Four Development LLC, its Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State on April 25, 2018; the County within New York in which its office is to be located is Monroe; the Secretary of State has been designated as agent upon whom process may be served; the post office address to which the Secretary of State shall mail the process is 154 Cobblestone Court Drive, #171, Victor, New York 14564; the purpose of its business is to conduct any lawful business under law [ Supplemental Summons ] SUPREME COURT OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF Monroe County Public Administrator as Administrator C.T.A. for the Estate of Wesley R. Baumbarger, Sr., a/k/a Wesley Baumbarger a/k/a Wesley Ray Baumbarger, Sr. a/k/a Wesley Raymond Baumbarger, Mark Raymond Baumbarger as Specific Devisee in the Last Will and Testament of Wesley R. Baumbarger a/k/a Wesley R. Baumbarger, Sr., if living and if he be dead, any and all persons who are spouses, widows, grantees, mortgagees, lienor, heirs, devisees, distributees, or successors in interest of such of the above as may be dead, and their spouses, heirs, devisees, distributees and successors in interest, all of whom and whose names and places of residences are unknown to Plaintiff, United States of America-Internal Revenue Service, New York State Department of Taxation and Finance, Defendants. Index #: 1991/2014 Filed: 5/1/2018 SECOND SUPPLEMENTAL SUMMONS Plaintiff designates Monroe County as the place of trial. Venue is based upon the County in which the mortgaged premises is situated. TO THE ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANT(S): YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED to answer the Complaint in this action and to serve a copy of your Answer or, if the Complaint is not served with this Summons, to serve a Notice of Appearance on the attorneys for the

plaintiff within twenty (20) days after service of this Summons, exclusive of the day of service; or within thirty (30) days after service is complete if this Summons is not personally delivered to you within the State of New York; or within sixty (60) days if it is the United States of America. In case of your failure to appear or answer, judgment will be taken against you by default for the relief demanded in the Complaint. NOTICE OF NATURE OF ACTION AND RELIEF SOUGHT THE OBJECT of the above captioned action is to foreclose a Mortgage to secure $43,537.00 and interest, recorded in the Office of the Monroe County Clerk on October 15, 2008, in Book 22047 page 32, covering premises known as 63 Electric Avenue, Rochester, NY 14613. The relief sought in the within action is a final judgment directing the sale of the premises described above to satisfy the debt secured by the Mortgage described above. NOTICE YOU ARE IN DANGER OF LOSING YOUR HOME If you do not respond to this summons and complaint by serving a copy of the answer on the attorney for the mortgage company who filed this foreclosure proceeding against you and filing the answer with the court, a default judgment may be entered and you can lose your home. Speak to an attorney or go to the court where your case is pending for further information on how to answer the summons and protect your property. Sending a payment to your mortgage company will not stop this foreclosure action. YOU MUST RESPOND BY SERVING A COPY OF THE ANSWER ON THE ATTORNEY FOR THE PLAINTIFF (MORTGAGE COMPANY) AND FILING THE ANSWER WITH THE COURT. Dated: Bay Shore, New York April 25, 2018 FRENKEL, LAMBERT, WEISS, WEISMAN & GORDON, LLP BY: Linda P. Manfredi Attorneys for Plaintiff 53 Gibson Street Bay Shore, New York 11706 (631) 969-3100 Our File No.: 01-068965F00

Fun

[ LAST WEEK’S SOLUTION ON PAGE 23 ] [ NEWS OF THE WEIRD ] BY THE EDITORS AT ANDREWS MCMEEL SYNDICATION

Inexplicable

Toronto police determined pranksters might have been behind their discovery on May 2 of a blue Honda Civic hanging from a rope under the Millwood Overpass Bridge, missing its windows, windshield and engine. Originally officials thought the burned-out car might be part of a movie shoot, but further research didn’t turn up any authorized filming in Toronto. “I’ve never seen anything like that before,” a passing cyclist told CTV News. “This is hilarious.” However, officers warned that if caught, the culprits could face charges.

Definition of Insanity

April 11 was a great day for Markiko Sonnie Lewis of Maple Heights, Ohio -- he got out of jail! Lewis, 40, served time in state prison for robbing a Cleveland Key Bank branch in November 2015. To celebrate, he returned to the same bank on April 12 and robbed it again, according to WIOI, taking about $1,000. Lewis was indicted on May 1 with one count of bank robbery.

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 27


May 2018 Sneak Peek: Saturday, May 26 Tuesday, May 29

28 CITY MAY 23 - 29 , 2018

June 2018 Sneak Peek: Thursday, June 14 Friday, June 15 Saturday, June 16


DISH


ROCHESTER BURGER WEEK

BROUGHT TO YOU BY

2 2018 DISH


CITY NEWSPAPER DISH 2018 PAGE 4 - EDIBLE EXCURSIONS Food tours highlight local offerings

PAGE 8 - FOOD FOR A FIGHT Going out to a protest? Fuel up right.

PAGE 10 - LET NOTHING GO TO WASTE A Q&A with Flower City Pickers

PAGE 14 - SPLIT CHECK Behind the east and west side dining split

On the cover: Illustration by Jacob Walsh Publishers: William and Mary Anna Towler Editorial department themail@rochester-citynews.com Special Sections editor: Adam Lubitow Contributing writers: Jake Clapp, Katie Libby, Pete Wayner Art department artdept@rochester-citynews.com Art director/production manager: Ryan Williamson Designers: Renée Heininger, Jacob Walsh

[ INTRODUCTION ] BY ADAM LUBITOW

Rochester’s food culture has never existed in a vacuum. Our dining scene is a rich and varied arena, subject to the influences of history, tradition, and shifting trends that shape the culinary landscape of a city. With that in mind, CITY tried something a little different with this year’s edition of DISH, focusing less on the food itself and more on the effect those myriad factors have had on creating the cuisine. Writer Pete Wayner takes a look at how geography has impacted Rochester’s restaurant landscape by delving into the age-old divide between the city’s east and west sides. Katie Libby, CITY’S Chow Hound, spotlights some regional food tours, which give diners a chance to explore the diversity of local cuisine while getting a sampling of the area’s history. And because even what we eat isn’t free from the influence of our country’s evershifting political climate, we also look at the city’s food culture through the lens of social justice and humanitarianism. Jake Clapp interviews the founder and acting director of Flower City Pickers about the group’s mission to help those in need by collecting leftover produce from the Rochester Public Market and redistributing it to shelters, soup kitchens, and food pantries all around the city. With everything that’s going on in the world today, activism is on the rise — and that’s a good thing. But all that protest and resisting can wear a person down, so CITY’s staff has put together some helpful nutrition tips to nourish the mind and body, while keeping your energy up and directed toward affecting change. Because you’ve got to heal yourself before you go out and heal the world. We always love hearing from readers, so join the conversation and leave any comments or feedback online at rochestercitynewspaper.com.

Advertising department ads@rochester-citynews.com New sales development: Betsy Matthews Sales representatives: Tracey Mykins, David White, William Towler Operations/Circulation kstathis@rochester-citynews.com Circulation manager: Katherine Stathis Distribution: David Riccioni, Northstar Delivery Dish 2018 is published by WMT Publications, Inc. Copyright by WMT Publications Inc., 2018 - all rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, photocopying, recording or by any information storage retrieval system without permission of the copyright owner.

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Walking food tours, like the Whistle Stop Dinners run by Boomtown Table (above), give an overview of an area’s history and dining options. Whistle Stop was one of the first food tours in Rochester, but is currently on hiatus. PHOTO COURTESY BOOMTOWN TABLE

Exploring local flavors and forging new friendships through walking food tours [ ROUND-UP ] BY KATIE LIBBY

Walking through a neighborhood, you’re able to find hidden gems that you wouldn’t be able to see if you were just driving by in your car, whether it be a pocket park you never knew was there or a small restaurant that ends up having the best Cuban sandwich in town. And sometimes, you might need a little guidance. Food tours — small, guided outings taking diners to various restaurants and bars — offer the unique opportunity to not only entice your palate but also explore neighborhoods in your city that you might not be familiar with. It also gives you a chance to meet new people who share an interest in finding the best fare that Rochester and its surrounding areas have to offer. As the gastronomical queen herself, Julia Child, said, “People who love to eat are the best people.” 4 2018 DISH

CITY has looked into food tours in Rochester and beyond and collected them for you below. All of these are walking tours, with the exception of the Rochester Pedal Tour. Each tour is a little different, so check the details, but generally ticket prices include a planned dish at each stop. If you know of any food tours that we missed, leave them in the comments below this article online at rochestercitynewspaper.com. The original concept for Flower City Food Tours was to entice diners to explore Schoen Place and Pittsford Village, but it has since expanded to include the Park Avenue neighborhood. Tours run weekly, May through November — Pittsford tours take place on Thursdays and Saturdays, and Park Avenue tours take place on Wednesdays and Sundays. Each tour runs for about three hours and costs $57 to $59, with a capacity of 12 people. Stops on the Park Avenue tour include F. Oliver’s, Magnolia’s Deli & Cafe, Baker Street Bakery, and more. If you’re interested in dining on (and near) the Erie Canal, the Pittsford tour has stops at Erie Grill and Pittsford Farms Dairy & Bakery. More information at flowercityfoodtours.com.

If you live in the city, there is a good chance you’ve been in your car behind a Rochester Pedal Tour, thinking to yourself, “I want to be mad, but they look like they’re having so much fun.” The popular bar crawl bike tour also offers a progressive dining tour. Peddlers can choose two different restaurants where they will preorder food so it’s ready when they get there. Participating restaurants include Ox and Stone, Char Steak & Lounge, ButaPub, and others. Dessert can either be brought on the bike or purchased and picked up at Sinful Sweets. The cost of the excursion, for up to 13 people, is about $265 plus the price of food. Tours are currently only available during the week as weekends are already sold out for the summer — however tours are offered all year round and the price is reduced after Thanksgiving weekend. Rochester Pedal Tours also has a Taco Tuesday Mixer for smaller groups that takes them to two different restaurants for tacos. More information at rochesterpedaltours. com/progressive-dinner.


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For those looking to get outside the city proper, Finger Lakes Food Tours offers a Canandaigua Uptown Food Adventure Tour. The tours are held on Friday and Saturdays, May through December, from 12 p.m. to 3 p.m. and are meant for all ages. Tickets are $65 and include stops at Eddie O’Brien’s, Sweet Solutions, Flavors Indian Restaurant, and more. Participants will also learn about the history of Canandaigua’s culture and architecture. You can purchase tickets and find out more information at flfoodtours.com. Warmer weather provides the perfect opportunity for a day trip outside of Rochester to experience more of the food Western New York has to offer. Sampling Syracuse runs a Discover Downtown Food Tour on Saturdays from 12 p.m. to 3 p.m., May through the first weekend in November. Downtown Syracuse has had a significant facelift over the years, making the area more accessible and appealing to students and young professionals. The goal of the food tour is to support local, family-owned businesses and also drop some knowledge about the history of the area. Tickets are $41 and include stops at six area restaurants, including the original Dinosaur Bar-BQue and Café Kubal. Each tour has a capacity of 13 people. Find out more at syracusefoodtours.com. Lewiston is only about an hour and a half drive east from Rochester, and Lewiston Food Tours offers both a Food Tasting and Historical Tour as well as a Prohibition Tour. The Food Tasting and Historical Tour stops at six restaurants, including some that were featured on The Food Network and The Travel Channel. The tour runs on Wednesdays and on the weekends from May through September. The cost is $53 for adults 12 and over and $35 for children under 12. Diners will also hear about Lewiston’s history, with ties to the Underground Railroad and the War of 1812. The Prohibition Tour includes food and drink and a history lesson about Prohibition Era Lewiston and runs on Fridays and Saturdays from June through September. Tickets are $59 for adults 21 and over and $35 for an alcohol-free tour

PHOTOS PROVIDED


for those 18 and older. Both tours have a capacity of 12 people. More information on both tours at lewistonfoodtours.com. Who says you can’t do two food tours in one weekend? That actually sounds like the ideal weekend for me. Niagara Culinary Tours offers both a Niagara on the Lake Foodie Tour and a Niagara Falls Food Tour: Beyond the Falls. The Niagara on the Lake tour runs from April 1 to November 20, Thursdays through Sundays. Tours start at 1 p.m. and tickets are $69. Participants will visit four to six restaurants in a three and a half to four kilometer (you are in Canada after all) loop — about two miles. The Beyond the Falls tour runs from May 18 to September 30 on Friday through Sunday at 2 p.m. Tickets are also $69 per person and include a guided tour of Niagara Parks along with the food experience. Both tours require tickets to be purchased in advance and have a capacity of 12 people. More information at niagaraculinarytours.com.

ROCHESTERCITYNEWSPAPER.COM 7


[ CRASH COURSE ] BY JACOB WALSH

It’s a chaotic time. Every week has felt like a month in the current news cycle. Let’s just say that a year of the Trump administration has left a lot of people fired up about a lot of issues. Dissent is the highest form of patriotism, and our right to protest is so important that it’s there in the first amendment -- right along with freedom of speech. So when something needs to change, lace up your boots, grab a sign, and get together with your allies to make your voices heard. But being out in Washington Square Park all day or marching down East Main Street is going to take energy, so remember to feed your body well. To help out, CITY has a few ideas on how to fuel up for your protest.

• Turns out that water is the key to everything (physical functioning, mental acuity, immortality, etc.) • Regular, coconut, or otherwise. Get some seltzer if water is too boring. Skip the Perrier, though; it’s probably not great to look bougie at a protest. • Key during moving demonstrations, especially during the hotter months. But map out your public restrooms.

• A big vat of chili never killed anybody. • Especially good for stationary displays of resistance. Gather ‘round for some slop, y’all. • Encourage a PYOP system (Provide Your Own Protein) and keep the base vegan so everyone can play.

• Avocado is business up front, p nutrient-rich, high in fiber, and rules. Don’t forget the cilantro.

• Bring a ton of hummus: It’s den and is a good anti-inflammator you’ll bring pine nuts, too.

8 2018 DISH

• Vegetables that hold lots of wate are a good way to keep your bell


• GORP: Granola, oats, raisins, and peanuts for when you’re feelin’ munchy. • Include a generous amount of good fats, like pistachios, cashews, and almonds.

• Big dumb carbs for a quick burst of energy.

• Make sure you have a nut-free option for members of your party with allergies. Sharing is caring, especially when it doesn’t involve anaphylaxis.

• Has real potential as a self-defense implement if push comes to shove.

party in the back. Business: They’re d good for your heart. Party: guacamole

nse, filling, can easily be made vegan, ry. Pita chips are key. If you’re smart,

er, like celery, carrots, and cucumbers, ly full and the rest of your body hydrated.

• Bread is generally a crowd-pleaser, and honestly everyone will like you more for bringing it.

• Even though the portability of bringing along your aeropress to a protest march is tempting, leave the single-cup nonsense at home. Strong, focused coffee is a potent diuretic and will dehydrate you pretty quickly -- besides, you should be sharing anyway. • Opt for a low-octane, cost-effective, large-format box of coffee to share with the members of your party. Don’t mess around with flavored coffee, that stuff is gross. • Non-dairy creamers like almond milk are a good thing to have on hand for your vegan and lactose-intolerant friends.

ROCHESTERCITYNEWSPAPER.COM 9


a wet baby diaper run over in the road, so that’s kind of what it looks like at the market in some places. And so not only is there food waste, but there’s also the problem of the packaging and recycling. CITY: I might be jumping ahead a little bit, but it sounds like a lot of solutions would need to take place on the front end, like how things are packaged, or how produce comes to the market to begin with. Humphrey: Exactly. We’re not a local

Flower City Pickers volunteers help sort food at the Public Market. PHOTOS COURTESY FLOWER CITY PICKERS [ INTERVIEW ] BY JAKE CLAPP

On an average Saturday, Flower City Pickers will collect between one and two tons of unwanted produce and food products from vendors around the Rochester Public Market. About 60 percent of that, says FCP founder Khoury Humphrey, is still good for human consumption — the rest of it can feed livestock or be composted — so the group sorts and redistributes the collected food to local shelters and hunger relief organizations. Since it started in January 2015, FCP has saved 300,000 pounds of food from being dumped into landfills. You might have seen the FCP bus parked in a corner of the Market, with volunteers hauling produce, sorting, and boxing up goods to go out to groups around Rochester. There’s a grading system: Food that receives an A (for “astonishing,” the group says) still has a relatively longer shelf life; a B (for “blemished”) graded item goes to organizations that will use it immediately, like Food Not Bombs, which serves healthy meals at St. Joseph’s House of Hospitality on Saturdays; and the C-grade (for “critter and compost”) products can help feed livestock or head to the compost pile. In general, American culture’s relationship to food is through a complicated, tangled, disconnected industry — it’s driven by convenience and the ability to get every kind of item at any time from any supermarket. “We very much rely on stores and Amazon.com and whatever to get produce and get everything that we need,” Humphrey says. “We’re not actually relying on our communities to provide what we need anymore.” Grassroots groups like FCP give Rochesterians a chance to get back to a 10 2018 DISH

personal understanding of where our food comes from and where it goes, while helping out those in need. You can learn more about Flower City Pickers, including about how to volunteer, at flowercitypickers.com. CITY spoke with Humphrey and FCP Acting Director Evan Zachary to learn more about what drives food waste at the Market, what the solution might be, and their thoughts about food activism in Rochester. An edited transcript of the conversation is below. CITY: What do y’all see as the biggest drivers of food waste at the Market? Khoury Humphrey: Most of it is the wholesalers.

I like to tell people if your food doesn’t have dirt on it, don’t buy it. You want your food to be dirty because that means that it’s local, it means it came from a farm. You want it to look a little wonky because somebody grew that. So a lot of the waste, at least food waste, from the Market comes from these people who have hardly any control over what they buy. Unfortunately it’s a vicious cycle, because it all comes down to numbers. All of the credibility and liability falls onto the individual vendors, and so what happens is a lot of this produce, instead of them selling it for the dollar deal, it’s just easier for them to buy another truck for a couple of thousand and just throw away old produce than it is to try to relocate it — or restore it with limited storage space available. Also the produce that is coming off these trucks is highly packaged. So these things are coming in boxes, and inside those boxes, there’s different packaging that absorbs wetness. There’s these different chemicals, and stuff that’s kind of like baby diapers. I don’t know if you’ve ever seen

culture and local society anymore. We want everything that we see in a travel magazine — instead of going and taking a vacation to a beach and having a pineapple, we can go to Wal-Mart and just buy a pineapple and watch “Gilligan’s Island” on TV and kind of simulate the same thing. Evan Zachary: Quickly just to add a couple things, to take us back to what is causing food waste at the market: I think it’s useful to segment what you mean when you say food waste, because there’s a couple of different stages of that process. When it doesn’t sell at the market and the vendors are no longer interested, there’s a certain extent of food waste associated with that. However, that it’s not viable for a retail setting doesn’t necessarily make it food waste yet. One of the reasons that so much of the food is going bad, that I’ve been made aware of by talking to some of the folks who physically

FCP redistributes unwanted food products from the Public Market to local shelters and hunger relief organizations.


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CITY: A lot of these issues are really tightly interconnected. How do you think these things can start to unravel and move forward? Zachary: The food waste issue — and the

FCP Founder Khoury Humphrey

transport stuff around the market, is the types of storage that’s available to the wholesalers within the market itself. A deficit of temperaturecontrolled storage is something that they struggled with, for example. So in the winter months, it’s challenging for them to prevent certain sections of their food inventory and storage from freezing. So that is one piece of it. To us, wasting food — the way Flower City Pickers looks at that — is sending it to a composter. Our top priority, and the way the Environmental Protection Agency prioritizes what you do with food waste, sets feeding people at the front of the line, basically at the top of the chain. The barriers to increased food recovery include transportation that’s available to us. There was a study done in Seattle over like four or six years that looked at food retailers and what their barriers to donation were. It specifically categorized what the limitations were; 46 percent of those vendors and retailers cited transportation constraints, distance, costs to the fleet as their biggest barrier. One other interesting thing is in that array of barriers, one thing that is decreasing — in terms of preventing retailers from donating — are liability concerns. Because as re-use increases as a common practice more people are interfacing and understanding the Good Samaritan Act, which is what sort of protects us. So the physical barriers, at this point, have kind of become a logistical puzzle as opposed to a legislative puzzle. 12 2018 DISH

unjust access to food — is a problem that runs up and down the supply chain in terms of how products are bid for and what food you are even able to be exposed to over the course of your development, based on where you live, what schools you go to, and things like that. But like with any issue relating to sustainability action at home, there’s a component of that. We recognize that to a certain extent we aren’t — well, not to a certain extent, in a whole extent — we’re not solving hunger. We’re sort of treating one of the symptoms of it in a way that is low impact. To get more at the root of why food insecurity is happening, you need to look at nutritional education and access to that information and access to exposure to those kinds of foods. But there’s also the pretty significant conditions in which someone might be exposed to those which are a little bit larger scale. It’s individual, it’s educational, but it’s also kind of systemic and economic.

FCP Acting Director Evan Zachary (left)

CITY: I wanted to pivot to a bigger view about food activism in Rochester. I wanted to get your general thoughts about how you see the scene here. Humphrey: There is a scene for it, I feel. There’s

actually a group that we work very closely with called Food Not Bombs. They come and pick up from us at the market and they use some of the food that wouldn’t normally have that long of a shelf life, and they use it the same day to cook and serve it. And they also get groceries out to people. Zachary: Taproot is a newer partner of ours, but we like to think of them as our neighbor. So the Taproot Collective does urban agriculture education workshops and consulting. Basically they’re attacking food deserts from the ground up by creating productive food spaces in settings where you wouldn’t normally find them. I know that they did just purchase a quarter acre at the corner of First and Pennsylvania — which is just a stone’s throw from where we are set up — that they’re now actively converting into this cool urban farm, and they have a grant to fund the construction of the greenhouse there. So you’re going to see a neat new addition to the Marketview Heights neighborhood when it comes to food security. We’re going to be working closely with them, taking some of the things that they grow there and distributing that to our network, as well as sending them our compost. We love that example because it’s sort of this instance of a really localized food processing system that is acceptable and pretty just.


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There’s a perception that west side food doesn’t match east side offerings. There might be some history behind that.

[ FEATURE ] BY PETE WAYNER

East-siders are snobs. West-siders are bumpkins. Welcome to Rochester. At least, that’s the stereotype, reinforced in the minds of those who entertain it every time a Chili visitor complains about small portion sizes or a Pittsford sojourner snuffles at a wine menu. Let’s just say, right up front, there are snobs on the west side of the Greater Rochester Area. And there are east side diners who refuse to accept something because it falls afield of their daily meat and potatoes. People are just people, regardless of geography — and yes, Jeremiah’s has west side, city, and east side locations, and Bee Sting sauce is teaching the world to sing. With that out of the way, different food and drink options are afforded to the different sides of the Genesee, and the levels of hype just don’t match. We hear about a parade of new places opening in the city, particularly on the east side and in the eastern suburbs. Buzzwords like “gastronomy,” “mouthfeel,” and “mindfully sourced” get tossed around like duck meat in a cassoulet, or if you like, tater tots in wing sauce. From the west side, we hear relatively little. A craft brewery may open to local acclaim, but limit your Yelp search to “Hot and New” and (aside from Chick-fil-A) there tends to be more buzz on the east side. So, what’s going on? Are new places just not opening up? If not, why not? Or is there actually an east side conspiracy to keep the press firmly entrenched? If you go back to the early days of Rochester, there was East Avenue and West Avenue (now West Main Street) branching out from the Genesee River. Based on “East Side, West Side: The Development of East and West Avenues in Rochester,” an online pathfinder published by the Central Library of Rochester and Monroe County, historian Blake McKelvey called East Avenue the “Avenue of Presidents” because of the number of business magnates that lived there. Their names are as familiar as their mansions, which still populate that picturesque promenade. Sibley, Powers, and of course, Eastman were some of the first real east-siders. 14 2018 DISH

The west side was much more middle class. And that’s not to say it wasn’t full of extraordinary people — Susan B. Anthony lived in a relatively modest house on the west side of the city. The library’s business directory for her neighborhood reveals railyards, canal yards, a prominent carriage factory, and small businesses like tobacconists, bakers, and druggists. Today, there’s some debate about what towns constitute Rochester’s west side. It’s generally agreed that Greece, Gates, and Chili are in. Parts of Irondequoit, Ogden (including Spencerport), and Sweden (including Brockport) are also usually included in the designation. It’s possible that these population demographics spread farther east and west, respectively, resulting in distinct cuisines. After all, the restaurants flourishing on the west side seem to place a premium on homespun values, like family and heritage, rather than the caprices of culinary trends. Staples like Agatina’s, Red Fedele’s Brookhouse, and Rohrbach Buffalo Road Brewpub started decades ago and still hold true to the ideals of family, tradition, and consistency — not necessarily fancy, but consistently good. Those ideals breed a loyal local following of regulars. “It’s people knowing people,” said John Urlaub, founder and owner of Rohrbach Brewing Company. “I look at our customers that come in on a Friday night and well over half come in every Friday night … their shoulders just drop, like, ‘I’m home.’ Our staff brings them their favorite beer before they even sit down.” Urlaub said he knew Red Fedele since he was a kid. Today, the Brookhouse proprietor still personally greets everyone walking into his restaurant, shaking hands, doling out hugs, and even sitting down at friends’ tables. It’s that kind of place. Then again, there are those that say an emphasis on good food and drink at fair prices is what drives traffic — not which side of the river you’re on. Stoneyard Brewing owner and founder Jay Nichols said in the 10 years since Stoneyard opened in Brockport, he’s not really thought about fitting into the west side.

“We appeal to all demographics — it could be an electrical contractor or a computer engineer — you kind of have something for everybody,” he said. That includes those with a taste for culinary adventure, apparently, as Stoneyard’s menu includes a rotating game burger, a menagerie of unusual ground meats like elk, yak, and camel. Stoneyard’s business philosophy seems to be working, as the brewery moved to a new, larger location in Brockport last year. And other places have opened on the west side in the last year as well — notably, Taste of Soul (also in Brockport), Casa Merlita Philippine Cuisine in Gates, and #Snap Burger & Fries in Gates. Still, as universal as the appeal of good food and beer may be, some concrete data can apparently block new places from opening up. Restaurants’ “method of picking a site becomes a little problematic,” said David Dunning, Supervisor for the Town of Chili. “Basically they put a pushpin in the map and draw circles in a 1-, 2-, and 3-mile radius and count rooftops, and if the rooftops aren’t there, they aren’t coming.” For a town full of farmland like Chili, with a population density of 729 people per square mile (compared to the city’s 5,885 people per square mile), that can indeed be problematic. Dunning said that method also ignores the fact that Chili gets significant through-traffic to the University of Rochester, Strong Memorial Hospital, and other west side towns. Whether the relative dearth of coverage is due to new restaurants opting out of the west side, the fact that existing restaurants are happy with their books of loyal regulars — and can afford to wait for new ones — or a historical divide as deep as the Genesee River itself, what is known is that the west side has some places worth visiting. Not only will you get a plate of great food, but you’ll be welcomed to the table like they’ve been expecting you. And so, let’s gather around those tables as unified Rochesterians, thankful for culinary diversity in our city. And also thankful that we’re better off than those clods in Buffalo and Syracuse.


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