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MAR. 7 2018, VOL. 47 NO. 27

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Feedback We welcome your comments. Send them to themail@rochester-citynews. com, or post them on our website, rochestercitynewspaper.com, our Facebook page, or our Twitter feed, @roccitynews. For our print edition, we select comments from all three sources; those of fewer than 350 words have a greater chance of being published, and we do edit selections for publication in print. We don’t publish comments sent to other media.

Cyclists and motorists

Regarding the article on the road diet on East Avenue (“Towns, DOT at Impasse on Bike Lanes): 1) Whether the right lane is marked as a bike lane — or is left unmarked as a shoulder — has significant legal and operational differences. A bike lane is a lane, and unless there is more than one lane marked for turning right, drivers turning right are required by law to merge into the rightmost lane before turning. Merging requires yielding to whomever is already using that lane. That user has right of way: first come; first served. It’s unsafe and illegal for a driver to turn across a through lane without first merging into that lane. The roadway is that portion of a highway that is improved and intended for travel. A shoulder is not part of the roadway, and cyclists using the shoulder have no roadway rights. Because the shoulder is not a lane, drivers do not need to merge onto a shoulder to turn right, which means they don’t need to yield to whomever is already using the shoulder. On the other hand, since most drivers don’t know about these subtle differences, cyclists are at risk whether the space they use is marked as a bike lane or left unmarked as a shoulder. This is especially dangerous if the cyclists are moving faster than motor traffic, which often happens. 2) Cyclists sometimes get pushback from the motoring community on the grounds that they are blocking the roadways or slowing the progress of motor traffic. Ironically, for the East Avenue road diet, cyclists are being encouraged to get out onto the roadway in an effort to do just that — slow down motor traffic. ROBERT COOPER

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Reviewing our review of ‘Black Panther’

It’s hard to know where to begin with James A. Brown’s uneven review of “Black Panther,” in which he criticizes the film’s “uneven” relationship with stereotypes . But I’ll cite two sentences near the end. “The film justifies Killmonger’s actions by using a few ham-fisted nods to American slavery.” No, it doesn’t. We know from the first time we see him in the museum that Killmonger is not a good guy. But the film simply doesn’t demonize him the way I suppose Brown expects a superhero film to do. It actually shows his human motivation. But he’s clearly not a hero. Secondly: “N’Jobu... conspired to commit terrorism and this could easily be read as reflective of the stereotype that American black males are inherently violent.” Yeah, I guess, or it could just portray a reasonable expectation of what black Americans are up against when put in the context of the mythical nevercolonized Wakanda. To the last sentence of the review: “... I cannot confuse exuberance for a cultural moment with excellence,” I say, Mr. Brown, you don’t know excellence when you see it. WILLIAM PRUITT

The RPO’s programming diversity

A recent letter in CITY concerning the 2018-19 RPO season intrigued me. Not altogether correctly, it complains of an almost complete absence from the orchestra’s programming of works by women and composers of color. Tellingly, the letter overlooks the Jennifer Higdon Harp Concerto scheduled for September 20 and 22 and the work of African-American composers that feature prominently in the scheduling of the RPO’s “Pops” series. And there’s the rub. The letter suggests that orchestral music suitable for Rochester Philharmonic Orchestra performance resides solely in the past. Not a single living composer is cited in the letter. They are still around. Next season’s programming includes three: Jennifer Higdon, Patrick Harlin, and Jeff Tyzik.

That really is not enough, but it is something! And it is three more than recognized by this letter. JAMES WILLEY

Editor’s note: The previous letter writer did mention that the RPO season includes one work by a woman composer. That’s the Higdon concerto.

The US needs common-sense gun restrictions

I try to listen to both sides of the gun issue, and have at various times sided with one or the other. One thing commonly heard from the pro-gun side is that anyone intent on killing large numbers of people will find some way to do it, making the banning certain types of firearms futile. This idea needs further scrutiny. Sure, there are examples of mass killings done by means other than large capacity rapid-fire guns; Oklahoma City and the Boston Marathon come to mind. But we must ask ourselves if most killings at populated venues were done by people so determined to commit mass murder that they would have gone to any length, inconvenience be damned, to accomplish it. I’m not convinced most of them would have done so. Isn’t it more likely that these killers are simply opportunists? Like a knife or gun pulled out to settle an argument, we must examine whether it was the easy access to efficient killing machines that spurred the atrocities committed with them. In most cases the killers either already owned the firearms or had an easy path to acquiring them. I’m not advocating an outright ban on semi-automatic firearms. But some common-sense restrictions need to be in place. The words “well regulated’ would not have been put into the 2nd Amendment if the founders had envisioned a personal right to unrestricted access to any and all firearms along with unlimited ammunition. JOHN C. SULLIVAN

Wind power is the best counter to climate change

Everyone should be working to help bring as much wind energy to our area as possible. As someone

who has been researching wind energy on scientific sites for a few years, I have come to the conclusion that wind energy is the best way to stop or at least slow down climate change. As with all forms of energy there are concerns, but overall, wind energy is our best chance for action with the least environmental dangers. My community is one with a proposed wind project, and I am working hard to ensure that the project moves forward. The concern that wind turbines are “eye pollution” is the kind of argument that has historically been common during times of progress. Everyone had a problem with powerlines and poles when they were first proposed, but we barely notice them anymore and they brought about wonderful changes for everyone. Cell towers, radio towers, and microwave towers are not attractive, but no one is going to give up their cellphone. Sometimes progress is perceived as ugly, but in hindsight the advantages far outweigh the negatives. I personally find the turbines beautiful, peaceful, and a sign of hope, and I am not alone. The argument that wind power is subsidized is another misrepresentation. All forms of energy are subsidized. And an active campaign to spread false information about renewable energy is funded and backed by the fossil fuel industry. I suggest folks read Jane Mayer’s book “Dark Money” for more information about the moneyfunneling system set up by the Kochs and fossil fuel interests. Wind energy is a good choice for a viable change from fossil fuels that pollute the earth. Humans, birds, animals, vegetation, water, and the air are all affected by the mining, drilling, and burning of fossil fuels. There will come a day when our children and future generations will ask us: “Why, when you knew what fossil fuels were doing to our world and you knew what could be done to limit their damage, did you do nothing? Why did you fight against cleaner energy forms?” I will be able to say I did everything I could to ensure them a cleaner, livable earth. What will your answer be? SUSAN CAMPBELL

News. Music. Life. Greater Rochester’s Alternative Newsweekly March 7 - 13, 2018 Vol 47 No 27 250 North Goodman Street Rochester, New York 14607-1199 themail@rochester-citynews.com phone (585) 244-3329 fax (585) 244-1126 rochestercitynewspaper.com facebook.com/CityNewspaper twitter.com/roccitynews instagram.com/roccitynews On the cover: Illustration by Ryan Williamson Publishers: William and Mary Anna Towler Editor: Mary Anna Towler Editorial department themail@rochester-citynews.com Arts & entertainment editor: Rebecca Rafferty Staff writers: Tim Louis Macaluso, Jeremy Moule Music editor: Jake Clapp Music writer: Frank De Blase Calendar editor: Katherine Stathis Contributing writers: Roman Divezur, Daniel J. Kushner, Kathy Laluk, Adam Lubitow, Amanda Fintak, Mark Hare, Alex Jones, Katie Libby, Ron Netsky, David Raymond, Leah Stacy Digital Editor: Kurt Indovina Art department artdept@rochester-citynews.com Art director/Production manager: Ryan Williamson Designers: Renée Heininger, Jacob Walsh Advertising department ads@rochester-citynews.com New sales development: Betsy Matthews Account executives: William Towler, David White Classified sales representatives: Tracey Mykins Operations/Circulation kstathis@rochester-citynews.com Business manager: Angela Scardinale Circulation manager: Katherine Stathis Distribution: David Riccioni, Northstar Delivery City Newspaper is available free of charge. Additional copies of the current issue may be purchased for $1 each at the City Newspaper office. City Newspaper may be distributed only by authorized distributors. No person may, without prior written permission of City Newspaper, take more than one copy of each weekly issue. City (ISSN 1551-3262) is published weekly by WMT Publications, Inc. Periodical postage paid at Rochester, NY (USPS 022-138). Address changes: City, 250 North Goodman Street, Rochester, NY 14607. Member of the Association of Alternative Newsweeklies and the New York Press Association. Annual subscriptions: $35 ($30 senior citizens); add $10 for out-of-state subscriptions. Refunds for fewer than ten months cannot be issued. Copyright by WMT Publications Inc., 2018 - all rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, photocopying, recording or by any information storage retrieval system without permission of the copyright owner.

@ROCCITYNEWS


URBAN JOURNAL | BY MARY ANNA TOWLER

City is supercharging its riverfront plans This week city officials will start getting public comments on yet another plan for Rochester’s future. Called ROC the Riverway, it’s a vast, detailed plan full of ideas to give the public better access to the Genesee River as it passes through downtown Rochester – and to capitalize on the river as a unique resource. This isn’t the first plan the city has come up with focused on the river, but it’s the most extensive one I can remember. And to call it “bold” would be an understatement. The public cost itself – $500 million – pretty much takes your breath away. But money aside, for the most part it’s not unrealistic. If we can afford it – or at least its key parts – it could be a really important way to boost economic development, to make Rochester a magnet for new residents and new businesses.

It’s a much better economic development idea than, say, a casino. If you care about the city, try to attend one of the public meetings, the first of which is on Thursday (4 to 6 p.m. at the Monroe Community College downtown campus). Stay informed about the plan as it progresses and gets refined, and plan to share your thoughts with city officials. There’ll be plenty of skeptics, some of them the usual gloomy Rochester critics. I’ve done my own eyebrow raising as I looked through the plan. A pedestrian bridge across the top of the High Falls? Seriously? Maybe I’ll be convinced about that, though. And there’s plenty to applaud about ROC the Riverway, beyond its comprehensive approach to capitalizing on the river in very creative ways. Especially noteworthy is the attention paid to areas of the city that are often ignored in Grand Plans. At the southwestern end, the plan calls for enhancing public riverfront land near the PLEX neighborhood. At the northeastern end, it calls for a variety of passive and active recreation spaces – and it proposes making the connection between downtown and Rochester’s close-in northeast neighborhood much more open and attractive. Trails, bridges, parks: all good stuff. They’re the kinds of things other cities have used to improve their quality of life. And they’re the kinds of things that city residents of all kinds want – including the young professionals that Rochester hopes to attract. Two concerns, though. One, of course, is that $500 million cost. Not all of it will have to come from the city (the state has already pledged $50 million), but whatever the sources, city officials will have to be sure that spending the public’s money will be a good investment.

Trails, bridges, parks: The city hopes to capitalize on the presence of the Genesee River in some very creative ways.

Another: The population of this region isn’t growing appreciably. Nearly all of the new folks moving into downtown are moving from somewhere nearby. Things like new parks and the ability to bike for miles along the river will help make downtown a more interesting, fun place to live and work. But at the same time the city is creating those things, our suburbs will be creating new parks, new recreation facilities, new housing. This region’s sprawl and inter-municipal sibling competition is wasteful, and it has held us back. But it’s not going away. And the folks analyzing ROC the Riverway will have to keep that in mind. Every bit as important: the “new city” that ROC the Riverway spawns has to be a city for everybody. One of the goals of this plan is to generate millions of dollars of new private investment. That investment can’t be simply for the well-to-do. It can’t exacerbate the affordable-housing shortage, which is already a serious problem in Rochester. I like ROC the Riverway. I like its creativity, and its enthusiasm. And I like its goal of making the river more accessible. There are ways to do it right. I think city officials want it done right. That can happen if the right protections are built in at the start. rochestercitynewspaper.com

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News RENDERING PROVIDED

DEVELOPMENT | BY MARY ANNA TOWLER

Arts center plan rebooted At a Tuesday press conference, city officials in effect rebooted plans for a theater and apartment building on Midtown’s Parcel 5. The basics of the plan remain the same: A 3000seat theater, owned and operated by the Rochester Broadway Theatre League, and a 150-unit apartment building by Morgan Management. What’s new: Additional “entertainment venues”: possibly an I-Max type movie theater, as well as new outdoor performance space, including a “green roof” with space for events. The open space between Parcel 5 and Elm Street will be preserved as public space. Also new: former Chamber of Commerce President Sandy Parker will head a team charged with fundraising and other pre-construction efforts. Previously, RBTL President Arnie Rothschild headed those efforts. The issue of funding remains. The estimated cost of the theater center is $85 million. Paychex founder Tom Golisano pledged $25 million for the theater a year ago, but RBTL has not announced additional commitments since then. Officials say that overall, funding will come “mostly through private contributions.” A downtown performing arts center has been a priority for Warren, who stresses its ability not only to create jobs but also to bring an hundreds of thousands of people downtown each year. The movie theater was added to the arts center to address concerns that the highly visible building would be dark part of the year when RBTL has no big touring shows scheduled. In addition, Warren is asking City Council to commission a national firm to evaluate concerns about the RBTL theater competing with local arts venues. Warren is also asking Council for support for the overall project.

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FILE PHOTO

IMMIGRATION | BY JAKE CLAPP

Hernandez case shows holes in policy The detainment of Abigail Hernandez by Immigration and Customs Enforcement has exposed holes in Rochester’s Sanctuary City policy, immigrant rights activists say. Hernandez, 21, was arrested and charged with making a terroristic threat against East High School after she allegedly posted threatening language on the school’s Facebook page on February 15. Hernandez came to the US from Mexico with her parents when she was 3, and qualified for protections under the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program. She was arraigned in City Court and was set to be released on bail, but then ICE took her into

custody. She now faces deportation. The handling of Hernandez’s case “exposes serious weaknesses in the Sanctuary resolution,” said Metro Justice, ROCitizen, and Rochester Democratic Socialists of America in a joint statement. Rochester updated its Sanctuary City status in February 2017, outlining that city personnel, including police, will not inquire about people’s immigration status. Rochester Police Deputy Chief LaRon Singletary says RPD did not notify ICE or inquire about Hernandez’s immigration status. But when people are arrested and booked in New York State, their information,

including fingerprints, is entered into a statewide database called eJustice. ICE and other law enforcement agencies has access to that database and can issue a detainer for people it believes can be subject to removal from the US, as was the case with Hernandez. A database like eJustice is useful in policing, but it creates a challenge for cities trying to extend protections to undocumented immigrants. “This is sort of the issue with Sanctuary-type terminology,” says Camille Mackler, director of immigration legal policy at the New York Immigration Coalition. “There isn’t a bubble where ICE can’t come in. It’s not a fortress.”


Community choice aggregation, an arrangement where local governments band together and contract with energy suppliers on behalf of their residents and smaller businesses, gives governments a powerful tool to support local renewable energy, if it’s implemented in the right way.

CLIMATE ACTION | BY JEREMY MOULE

Activists wary of new energy offering The state gives local governments a pretty powerful tool for helping their residents and businesses buy renewable energy, and Brighton resident Sue HughesSmith has campaigned hard to get local elected officials to use it. But now Smith is worried that a new initiative may undercut those efforts. The state’s mechanism, called community choice aggregation (CCA), allows local governments to band together and contract with energy suppliers on behalf of their residents and smaller businesses, which would buy the power. It would provide a way for Rochester-area governments to support local renewable generation projects on a broad scale, which is why Hughes-Smith and other members of the Rochester People’s Climate Coalition have advocated for it. But Smith says that a CCA project organized by two statewide municipal associations could get in the way. “What matters is how we implement this,” she says. Under a typical CCA structure, a group of local governments hires an administrator, who runs the program and helps line up energy suppliers. The local governments have to approve any supply contracts.

The Climate Coalition has been working closely with Joule Assets, a firm that helped set up the state’s first CCA program in Westchester County. Joule would, by default, offer communities a choice between an all-renewables supply or a supply that uses a broader mix of generation, including nuclear and natural gas-power plants, Hughes-Smith says. The firm also wants to directly incorporate smaller renewables projects, such as community-scale solar arrays, and technologies such as energy storage, right into its default offerings by directly buying their power. The company sees that approach as a way to support existing projects and encourage the development of new ones. That’s attractive to HughesSmith and other climate coalition members, who see such projects as key to cleaning up New York’s power grid. Joule Assets is currently seeking state Public Service Commission approval to serve as CCA administrator for the villages of Brockport and Lima, as well as the Town of Geneva. But the state Association of Towns and the New York Conference of Mayors and Municipal Officials recently sent a letter to government officials across the state

Brockport Mayor Margay Adams says village officials seized on a group power purchasing arrangement to help support renewable energy development. FILE PHOTO

saying they’re partnering to form a CCA of their own and invited them to join. The associations are working with another firm, Good Energy, and the groups tout energy cost savings for governments, residents, and businesses as the primary benefit. Good Energy also helped set up the Westchester County CCA. It recently received Public Service Commission approval to work with a handful of towns in Central New York and the Capital Region. It’s plan is to line up energy through the largest providers –

ESCO’s – as a way to cut costs. It does offer municipalities the ability to work in renewable energy credits and it raises the potential for local governments and energy customers to buy from local renewables and energy storage projects. But Hughes-Smith says she doesn’t believe Good Energy’s approach to renewables, especially local projects, is as strong as Joule’s. Brockport Mayor Margay Blackman also has concerns about the municipal continues on page 12

PSST. Can’t decide on where to eat? Check with our dining writers for vetted grub.

/ FOOD

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The Riverway Trail south of the Douglass-Anthony bridge would be widened and improved. RENDERINGS PROVIDED BY THE CITY OF ROCHESTER

DEVELOPMENT | BY TIM LOUIS MACALUSO

Rochester could just as well have been called Genesee River City, considering the essential role it has played in the region’s history and economy. Even before the falls powered the city’s many flour mills in the early 1800’s, which made Rochester one of the country’s first boomtowns, the river had been the lifeblood of the Seneca people for centuries. Now city officials are looking to the Genesee River again, this time to unlock the future of downtown. Governor Andrew Cuomo announced last week that he’s committing $50 million to an initiative that city officials are calling ROC the Riverway. Rochester at last may be poised to join cities around the country that have capitalized on their waterfront, arguably their most important natural asset, to revitalize their downtowns. “We’ve known for years that we have to revitalize the river,” says Mayor Lovely Warren’s chief of staff, Alex Yudelson. Revitalizing the river was a central theme of a 2016 report from the urban planning think tank, the Rose Center for Public Leadership. But the value of a revitalized riverfront had been the refrain of a chorus of visiting mayors, urban planners, and consultants for decades. A small army of urban planning gurus from California to Tennessee have almost invariably looked at the river with a mix of awe and incredulousness – like, hey, Rochester, what are you waiting for?

DISCUSSING THE PLAN

The first of a series of public meetings on the ROC the Riverway plan is this week: 4 to 6 p.m. Thursday, March 8, at MCC’s downtown campus, 321 State Street. The full plan is on the City of Rochester website, and the public can also post comments there: www.cityofrochester.gov/roctheriverway/.

Alex Yudelson. PHOTO BY RENÉE HEININGER

If we’ve been waiting for something transformative, ROC the Riverway just might be it. The initiative takes a comprehensive look at the city’s riverfront potential and proposes nearly 30 interrelated projects designed to leverage the river’s natural attraction and draw people downtown. If done right, these projects could become magnets for recreation, light retail, dining, arts, and education. A 12-person advisory panel led by the co-chairs of the Finger Lakes Regional Economic Development – Monroe Community College president Anne Kress

and Chamber of Commerce CEO (and former Rochester mayor) Bob Duffy – is overseeing the initiative. The panel will hold a series of public meetings to get community input. The first is this week: from 4 to 6 p.m. Thursday, March 8, at MCC’s downtown campus, 321 State Street. The public can also post comments at www.cityofrochester.gov/roctheriverway/. “We are compiling all of these projects in a sort of focused way, similar to the way the Buffalo Billion was used in part to revitalize that city’s waterfront,” Yudelson says. Don’t look for a new high rise or much in the way of brick and mortar development, he says. “This is not about new developments. There are really only about four to five of these projects that are what you might call new mixed-use office and retail sites. But most of this, almost all of it, is about how to best use public space.” While there is almost always some skepticism about redevelopment, and its costs compared to its benefits, Yudelson says that ROC the Riverway has one overarching purpose. “The goal here is to bring vibrancy

downtown,” he says. “That’s what it really boils down to: creating excitement.” Some of the excitement has already started with the redevelopment of much of Main Street, he says. For the first time in decades, downtown Rochester is seeing its population grow, and builders don’t seem at all concerned about overdevelopment, he says. But the river’s potential hasn’t begun to be tapped, he says. A vibrant riverfront will attract more people to live downtown and spur small business growth, he says. It will also reassure people who have already made the investment in downtown that they made the right move, that the area is only going to continue to grow and improve, he says. Yudelson thinks that in the lead-up to Mayor Warren’s re-election, many people thought she was concerned only with building a performing arts center on Parcel 5. “And that wasn’t the case,” he says. “Her priorities have always been the economy and creating jobs. Revitalizing downtown has always been the goal, and the river is just an integral part of that. Sure, a performing rochestercitynewspaper.com

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ROC the Riverway envisions adding pedestrian bridges spanning the Genesee.

THE

PROJECTS

In ROC the Riverway, city officials envision an extensive network of trails, parks, bridges, and other public spaces along the Genesee River – and sometimes crossing it. The estimated public cost: $500 million, which officials hope will both enhance life in the city and attract new residents, businesses, and millions of dollars of private investment. The plan includes a “management entity” that would work with state and local organizations to get the projects done. The group would be responsible for involving the community, overseeing public investment, getting state and philanthropic money, creating programs and events, marketing, and recruiting businesses. The estimated cost for its operation: $10 million. The plan itself consists of 26 separate projects, created over more than decade. The projects are detailed below, starting at the southern end of the Riverway. The color of each project indicates when the city anticipates its creation. Italicized titles are those the city says have the highest priority.

0-3 YEARS

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3-5 YEARS

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A major upgrading to Charles Carroll Plaza is a priority for city officials.

South River RESTORE THE SHORE

The site: Land on the west side of the river adjacent to the PLEX neighborhood in southwest Rochester. $15 million public investment, $200 million potential private investment. The proposal: Clear overgrowth along the river to provide more public space and a better view of the river, improve the existing Riverway Trail, reconstruct the floodwall, and create access for kayaks, canoes, and a water taxi.

RECHARGING THE TRAIL

The site: The Riverway Trail from the University of Rochester area north to downtown. $5 million public investment. The proposal: Widen and improve the trail on both sides of the river, create separate pedestrian and bicycle paths, and add pedestrian amenities and river crossings.

WATER LANDINGS The sites: Riverside land from Genesee Valley Park to Corn Hill Landing. $3 million public investment. The proposal: Create a series of water landings on both sides of the river that can accommodate bikes, kayaks, canoes, pedal boats, and water taxis.

GENESEE GATEWAY

The site: Genesee Gateway Park. $3 million public investment. The proposal: Improve and redevelop the existing, underused park on the east side of the river south of the Douglass-Anthony Bridge, with public art and space for community events, to create “a vibrant playful, urban waterfront experience.”

LINK TO THE RIVER

The site: Underutilized land on the east side of the river adjacent to the Spectrum headquarters on Mt. Hope Avenue. $8 million public investment, $70 million potential private investment. The proposal: Combine private development of vacant land with improvements of the public land along the river.

The proposal: Slightly realign Court Street by the arena to provide better access for loading. Renovate the arena, create a riverfront promenade and other public enhancements.

RIVERSIDE DEVELOPMENT Make land south the Blue Cross Arena available for private mixed-use development, including a parking garage with a rooftop garden.

BRIDGE THE GENESEE

The site: South of the Douglass-Anthony Bridge. $16 million public investment. The proposal: Create a pedestrian bridge, with two islands, connecting the east and west sides of the river.

Downtown

CHILD’S BASIN

The site: West side of the river between Broad Street and Main Street. $5 million public investment. The proposal: Create a pedestrian connection between the Blue Cross Arena and Main Street – midblock between Exchange and the river – with sidewalks, plantings, and lighting

AQUEDUCT RE-IMAGINED & LIBRARY NORTH TERRACE CONVENTION CENTER The site: The Broad Street aqueduct and land on EXPANSION the east side of the river between the Riverside Convention Center and the Rundel Library. $43 million public investment and $106 potential private investment. The proposal: Remove Broad Street across the river – which is now actually a deck on top of the 1840’s Erie Canal aqueduct. In its place on the aqueduct, create a pedestrian walkway, with water or greenspace, large enough for community events. On the east side, stabilize and improve the library’s north terrace to create outdoor public space for a café, library programs, and other uses.

ARENA ON THE RIVER

The site: The Blue Cross Arena and land southward. $45 million public investment and $22 million potential private investment.

The site: Riverside Convention Center. $125 million public investment. The proposal: Renovate the convention center and add 130,000 square feet, with exhibit and meetings space and a glass-enclosed ballroom along the river.

RIVERWAY, BROAD TO MAIN

The site: East side of the river northward from Broad to Main Street. $10 million public investment. The proposal: Create a pedestrian bridge along the river in that block, providing a walkway from Main Street southward past the Thomson Reuters building to the new Aqueduct Park.


Near the Riverway Trail’s southwest end, a parklike area would be created.

MAIN STREET RESURGENCE

The site: Main Street through the center city. $9 million public investment. The proposal: Improve the look and feel of downtown’s major thoroughfare, with public art, ‘urban play’ installations, lighting, signage, and other elements.

RIVERWAY MAIN TO ANDREWS

The site: East side of the river northward from Main to Andrews Street. $5 million public investment. The proposal: Create an accessible walkway along the river between Main, the pedestrian bridge across the river, and Andrews Street.

CHARLES CARROLL PLAZA

The site: The park along the west side of the river north of Main Street. $25 million public investment. The proposal: Dramatically improve this vastly underused riverside public park, with regrading, improved views of the river, and plans for increased events and activities.

RIVERFRONT REBORN

The site: Land along the west side of the river north of Andrews Street. $10 million public investment. $50 million potential private investment. The proposal: Turn this large vacant parcel, formerly an RG&E site, into a mixed use private development: residential, commercial, and

offices, with a public pedestrian walkway along the river.

MILL STREET CONNECTION

The site: The pedestrian tunnel under the Inner Loop connecting downtown proper with the High Falls area. $3 million public investment. The proposal: Make the existing pedestrian tunnel more accessible and attractive by widening it and adding lighting and public art.

BRIDGE THE LOOP

The site: St. Paul Street in the area of the Inner Loop. $16 million public investment. The proposal: Add streetscape enhancements – landscaping, intersection improvements, bike lanes, and a pedestrian walkway across the Inner Loop to provide a stronger, more attractive link between downtown and the area north of the Loop.

WELCOME CONNECTION

The site: St. Paul Street in the CSX railroad underpass area. $40 million public investment. The proposal: Transform what is now an uninviting connection between downtown and the city’s northwest neighborhoods into a more open area, including expanding the railroad bridge to provide better access to truck traffic on St. Paul.

High Falls region OVER THE FALLS BRIDGE The site: Upper Falls waterfall rim. $28 million public investment. The proposal: Build a pedestrian bridge across the gorge to provide overhead views of the falls.

PRESERVING PONT DE RENNES

The site: The current bridge connecting the east and west sides of the river in the High Falls area. $9 million public investment. The proposal: Provide important structural repairs to the 1898 wrought-iron bridge, formerly used for vehicular traffic and now converted into a popular pedestrian bridge.

TREE TOP TRAIL

The site: The east side of the Genesee Gorge roughly between the Genesee Brewery and Smith Street. $8 million public investment, $20 million potential private investment. The proposal: Build a bridge-like trail that rises literally to tree-top level for viewing the gorge. Encourage private investment to extend the eastside trail northward, create a similar trail on the west side of the river, and add recreational possibilities such as rock-climbing walls, hanging trails, and obstacle rope courses.

The proposal: Transform this prime location into a major public riverside attraction, with park-like areas, outdoor entertainment offerings, trails and walkways, and restored buildings used for environmental and history-related uses.

CONNECT THE GORGE

The site: Across the river from Beebee Station northwestward to Smith Street. $7 million public investment. The proposal: Create a pedestrian bridge to provide an additional river crossing and scenic viewing site.

HIGH FALLS ADVENTURE The site: Gorge-side land on the east side of the river. $30 million public investment. The proposal: Clean up a large, vacant parcel north of Smith Street to create an outdoor recreational area, with green space, entertainment space, a skate park, and a multipurpose athletic field.

RUNNING TRACK BRIDGE

The site: Across the river north of the High Falls Adventure site. $5 million public investment. The proposal: Convert the existing, abandoned railroad bridge into a pedestrian bridge that connects to the El Camino Trail on the east side.

BEEBEE FLATS

The site: The former RG&E generating plant on the west side of the gorge and the small island in the river. $17 million public investment, $17 million potential private investment. rochestercitynewspaper.com

CITY 9


arts center could bring thousands of people downtown, but there has to be more for them to experience once we get them here.” In that respect, ROC the Riverway is just a starting point, a first phase of the much broader Local Waterfront Revival Plan that was developed several years ago with the river, Lake Ontario, and portions of the Erie Canal in mind, says Yudelson. Mayor Warren sees ROC the Riverway as a catalyst, Yudelson says, something that will attract more private investment, similar to what’s happened on Main Street with projects like Sibley Square. ROC the Riverway should be seen as a potential $500 million project over 10 to 15 years, one that could ultimately have a major economic impact, Yudelson says. A potential $500 million project? For a cash-strapped city – in a state that will surely face increased money problems, given federal cutbacks – how likely is it that we’ll ever see a $500 million project? Yudelson agrees that that’s an optimistic figure: the “Cadillac” plan, as he calls it. The city is starting with the optimum, for the full plan and for its individual projects. As long as the initial plans are sound, the first $50 million in state funding is assured, and state officials say more could come later. Nor will all of the money have to come from the city and the state. City officials anticipate partnerships with other governments and other sources. ROC the Riverway consists of three distinct

pieces. The downtown segment includes a wide variety of riverside projects along both sides of the river, from I-490 north to the Inner Loop: improving existing parks, adding riverside pedestrian walkways, improving the Convention Center and the Blue Cross Arena, adding new pedestrian and bike pathways across the river. Probably the most controversial element of the downtown segment is the reimagining

of the Erie Canal Aqueduct, Yudelson says. The aqueduct was built in the 1840’s, and it’s listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The structure was built to serve as a waterway and later served as the old subway bed. Its surface is now used as the Broad Street Bridge. The ROC the Riverway plan calls for removing vehicular traffic, making the aqueduct a pedestrian bridge, and either re-watering part of the surface or converting it to greenspace. As city officials are aware, for years there’s been interest in keeping the aqueduct covered and using it both as a walkway and for small retail or exhibits. Using it as an open pedestrian space instead “is something for the public to discuss,” Yudelson says. The downtown segment of ROC the Riverway, Yudelson says, is Mayor Warren’s Number 1 priority. “This is what she wants to tackle first, because it would have the greatest impact,” he says. “It would truly be transformative.” The river’s redevelopment potential hardly stops there, though. The High Falls district north of downtown offers possibly the most interesting views of the Genesee. But the area has long suffered from a sense of being cut off from downtown, says Yudelson. Thanks to a mishmash of railroad tracks, the Inner Loop, on-ramps, tunnels, and bridges, it can seem intimidating to try to walk between the Main Street area and the High Falls. Much of the work planned for this area focuses on linking the High Falls District to downtown, making the area more pedestrian friendly, and enhancing access to the river gorge. The former RG&E Beebee Station and its property would be developed for public use. And on the west side of the river, a Tree Top Trail would give visitors aerial views of the river, the gorge, and the falls. The third area of riverfront development is south of downtown where the river flows past the University of Rochester and the PLEX neighborhood. The concept here

GUIDING THE PLAN A ROC the Riverway advisory board, composed of representatives of community groups, businesses, and government, will conduct public meetings and will review and prioritize proposals for public and private investments along the riverfront. Chairing the board will be the co-chairs of the Finger Lakes Regional Economic Development Council: Monroe Community College president Anne Kress and Chamber of Commerce president (and former Rochester mayor) Bob Duffy. The other panel members: Lisa Baron, Greentopia Clement Chung, ROC City Coalition Veronica Dasher, Rochester Gas & Electric Shawn Dunwoody, artist Jim Howe, The Nature Conservancy Norman Jones, City of Rochester Nichole Malec, Constellation Brands Eugenio Marlin, Ibero American Action League Mary Beth Popp, North American Breweries Heidi Zimmer-Myer, Rochester Downtown Development Corporation 10 CITY MARCH 7 - 13, 2018


The aqueduct would be converted to an open pedestrian bridge with parklike amenities.

includes a pedestrian bridge to connect the east and west sides of the river. A pair of man-made islands would be created in the river, and the bridge might have a moving structural component that would swing open and allow boats to pass through. Both sides of the river would be prepared for future private development with plenty of public space. At the south end, Yudelson says, the city hopes to see a more naturallooking shoreline and boat launches for small crafts, canoes, and kayaks. The river shouldn’t be something to appreciate only visually, he says. What will distinguish this area from the others is the opportunity for water-related recreation where residents and visitors can play and physically interact with the river, he says. An underlying theme in all three areas of development is connectivity, Yudelson says. The city has numerous walkways and trails – some more useable than others. But in many instances, they’re not connected, and creating a continuous pedestrian and bikefriendly passages is extremely important, Yudelson says. When ROC the Riverway is completed, downtown must be seamlessly connected to riverfront development to the north and the south, he says. Many Rochesterians will likely find ROC

the Riverway exciting. And it’s reasonable to turn to the Genesee River as a way to boost the city’s attraction and quality of life. But Rochester has a history of designing grand plans. It also has a history of over-reach and failure to follow through. And beyond its price tag, this particular plan has some formidable obstacles, starting with public buy-in. Rochesterians’ skepticism – about their city and about public officials – is plentiful. New plans also frequently create a tug-of-war between people who welcome development and those who don’t. How realistic is the plan? While city officials agree that it’s not likely that every one of the ROC the Riverway projects will be created – and some may end up less expansive than the plan envisions – the plan is as real as we want it to be, says Vincent Esposito, regional director for Empire State

Development. The $50 million in state funds could be just a beginning, he says; more can be tapped if the initial ROC the Riverway projects are successful. The first step is getting public reaction to the full plan. After that, the ROC the Riverway Advisory Council will refine the plan, probably whittle it down, select the first projects, and send its recommendations to the governor’s office for his approval. One thing is clear; Rochester is experiencing unprecedented growth in its downtown corridor, and the city and other downtown interests want to keep that momentum going. Capitalizing on the Genesee River, making it the centerpiece of the city’s downtown vitality, is not an unreasonable idea. And it’s not original, either. It’s been successful in many cities with similar assets. The riverfront development needs to help encourage life downtown after 5 p.m. and through all four seasons. That’s a tall order, but whatever projects are identified and finally approved need to include those that will encourage a year-round attraction to downtown. And we learned from the city’s earlier attempt at redeveloping the High Falls district into an entertainment center that the marketplace needs to guide itself. After years of struggle and some business failures, the district has successfully transitioned into a smart mix of offices and residential properties that are unique and desirable. And perhaps most important is collaborating on a plan that will be so successful that it leads to further development. The advisory board is there for guidance, Yudelson says. And the city has developed renderings to serve only as a visual aid, he says. No final designs have been completed, and there’s plenty of time for public engagement. “The Genesee River has been pivotal to the city’s development for centuries,” Esposito says. “The question is how do we maximize the river’s potential right now? This is going to be exciting.”

CITY Newspaper presents

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Energy continues from page 5

associations’ effort. Village officials have pursued aggregation in part because of the potential costs savings for Brockport residents and businesses, she says. But they’re also very keen on securing renewable energy, she says. Serving the Rochester Community That’s what they found appealing about for over 30 years! the approach laid out by Joule and the Climate Coalition. The village was the first Monroe County community to approve CCA, and it’s the only one that has, to date. Some of the bigger towns, including Brighton, Irondequoit, and Pittsford are working on enabling laws and haven’t settled on an administrator. The City of Rochester is also working toward a CCA program, and Mayor Lovely Warren has characterized the mechanism as a way to bring clean energy to city residents. But none of those communities have selected an Savings & Checking • Loans • Financial Education administrator yet. In Rochester’s case, Warren has said the city will issue a request for proposals. Brighton has a proposed enabling law that lists supporting renewables as a goal, 395 Gregory Street (between Clinton & South) www.genesee.coop • 585-461-2230 as well. The Town Board has scheduled a public hearing on that law for 7 p.m. on Wednesday, March 14, at Brighton Town Hall, 2300 Elmwood Avenue. But the whole point of CCA is strength in numbers, since communities are basically buying energy in bulk. Local climate activists and at least some municipal officials want to use the mechanism to get renewables and encourage new clean energy development. They believe that EXCLUSIVE USE NOTICE: ADVERTISING PROOF: PLEASE REVIEW IMMEDIATELY! Genesee Coop FCU hasat the to fordoEXCLUSIVE that USE This adplan is designed DON'T DELAY! If there are any necessary corrections,Joule please call once. better 1-8V in the City Newspaper. Any illustrations, and the more communities that join photographs, copy writing, design 3-7-18 up with it, the moreelements effective itcontent can or any other DW is the SOLE PROPERTY of City OR FAX 244-1126be. But the municipal associations’ Newspaper and may not be used in Locally Grown This ad will run as shown unless we are advised has the potential any other publication without the program to attract JW consent of City Newspaper. by noon of the Monday preceding publication. local governments, too. “I think there’s a real chance it might undermine” the efforts of RPCC and Joule, Blackman says of the municipal associations’ program.

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For more Tom Tomorrow, including a political blog and cartoon archive, visit www.thismodernworld.com

URBAN ACTION This week’s calls to action include the following events and activities. (All are free and open to the public, unless otherwise noted.)

ROCLA focuses on Venezuela

The Rochester Committee on Latin America will present “What’s the Matter with Venezuela?” on Wednesday, March 7. Alexander Main, senior associate for international policy at the Center for Economic Policy and Research, Washington, DC, will talk about the political and economic crises gripping Venezuela. Many of the country’s problems have been attributed to the late socialist dictator Hugo Chávez. But Main contends that there are multiple reasons for the country’s current state, including its relationship with the US. The talk will be held at Downtown Presbyterian Church, 121 North Fitzhugh Street, at 7 p.m.

What now for #MeToo?

The Rochester Institute of Technology’s sociology and anthropology departments will host “The Silence Breakers at RIT” on Thursday, March 8. The #MeToo movement has shaken male-dominated establishment cultures in Hollywood, politics, education, media, and business. Two women at the University of Rochester, Celeste Kidd and Lindsay Wrobel, have been especially outspoken about their experience with sexual harassment, and have filed a lawsuit against the university. Kidd and Wrobel will discuss the significance of the #MeToo movement and its future. The event will be held at the RIT Student Alumni Union, 1 Lomb Memorial Drive, from 3:30 p.m. to 5 p.m.

Examining health care in New York

The Rochester chapter of Interfaith Impact of New York will present “A Better Prescription for Health Care in New York State, on Sunday, March 11. Carol Tegas, executive director of Finger Lakes Performing Provider System, will review the current state of health care in New York. Harry Bronson, New York State Assembly member, will talk about the politics of health care, and Rohith Palli, Rochester Campaign for New York Health, will make the case for single-payer, universal health care. The event will be held at the First Unitarian Church, 220 South Winton Road, from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m.


Dining & Nightlife

Bobo’s Chicken Shack owner Devon Crittenden offers soul food in the neighborhood where he grew up, lost and re-found his way. PHOTO BY JACOB WALSH

Heart and soul food Bobo’s Chicken Shack 532 JOSEPH AVENUE TUESDAY THROUGH SATURDAY, 2 TO 8 P.M.; SUNDAY, 2 TO 6:30 P.M. 285-2881; FACEBOOK.COM/BOBOSCHICKENSHACK [ FEATURE ] BY PETE WAYNER

When I stopped by Bobo’s Chicken Shack over the weekend, owner Devon “Bobo” Crittenden listed off the details harrying him that particular day: Tax season, employee turnover, a foot of snow and an AWOL plowman, and a squirrel in the exhaust duct (safely dislodged before opening). “That had me contemplating on whether I should open or not, but I pushed through, opened, and had a successful, great day,” he says. These are the hassles any restaurateur in Rochester deals with on a given March day. But Crittenden also has another stack of cards, piled up over his 33 years, that has taken a different level of grit to push through, resulting in his Joseph Avenue restaurant entering its fifth year of business. Bobo’s is recognized on Facebook, Yelp, and Google as one of the best spots in the city for soul food. The story of soul food is one of perseverance and faith that traces its origins to the slave

shacks of the rural South. Using what was available and affordable, black cooks developed culinary techniques for fried chicken, greens, ham hocks, cornbread, chitlins, candied yams, and black-eyed peas, to name a few. During the Great Migration that cuisine moved north and in the 1940’s gained the moniker “soul food,” demarcating it from Southern food in general, (or, even broader, “comfort food”) and stamping it a specific part of historically Black culture. As Crittenden drove to the Rochester Public Market on Saturday morning, his Cadillac sedan mirroring the gray of the sky, the words perseverance and faith keep coming up. He bought shrimp, yams, chicken, greens, and other supplies he’d need that day in a quantity that filled his car. He makes this trip every day except Monday, the only day Bobo’s is closed. “My mother was murdered,” he says. “So my grandma raised us and I been with my grandma ever since I was seven.” He states this as a simple biographical truth while prepping yams and shrimp in the kitchen that makes up half of his restaurant. The other half is a waiting area for customers with several chairs and a wall covered with pictures, including a portrait of his grandmother. “That’s how I learned to fry chicken,” he says. “You know, she was a southern lady from Alabama and one thing about them

Alabama women — they sure know how to fry some chicken,” he said. “I always wanted to cook like her because when she cooked, it brought people together.” Crittenden slowly gained his grandmother’s trust in the kitchen beginning when he was 12, and by the time he was 14, she sat at the end of the kitchen table and directed him. “I was always trying to add a little more,” he says. “Her shit — she was diabetic — it was good, don’t get me wrong, but it was bland.” Despite his time in the kitchen, he says, he wanted a taste of life outside the house; a desire that resulted in him being shot in the chest by a .25 pistol when he was 18. Frustrated with his antics on the street, his grandmother kicked him out of the house. He finished recovering from his wounds in a homeless shelter and later got an apartment, only to be arrested for drugs and guns on the premises. In jail, Crittenden remembered the God he heard so much about when his grandmother took him and his three siblings to church. “That was my breaking point,” he says. “I said: ‘I give up, Lord. You get me out of this one and I’ll change my life,’ and yes, you know, he got me out of it — and I didn’t look back ever since.” Opening Bobo’s was a particular test of faith for Crittenden. After eight years at University

of Rochester, where he worked as a lab animal technician in the School of Medicine and Dentistry, he unexpectedly lost his job. “So I was like, this really may be the best time for me to chase my dreams,” he says. “It was the work of God.” For a year, Crittenden rode the bus around the city looking for the perfect location for his restaurant. “But mind you, I didn’t have any money,” he says, adding that he believed “God already had the plan situated.” He says knew he could make a living nourishing his neighborhood on his grandmother’s recipes. And, he said, failure wasn’t an option. After finding a landlord he calls “an angel,” and with the help of some supportive friends and the Urban League of Rochester, Crittenden was able to open his doors in the same neighborhood where he grew up, lost his mom, learned to cook, nearly lost his life and his freedom, and found his way back. Crittenden now wants to set an example for the next generation in the neighborhood. “You can sell something legal and be a boss,” he said. Newcomers, he says, should try the restaurant’s namesake. The chicken comes fried to a crispiness that withstands a drenching of Bobo’s sweet and smoky homemade sauce — a recipe he developed when he was high. “That was back in my day, man,” he says, adding that he’s been sober for two years. Fried pork ribs are a novelty worth mentioning here, too — it’s a favorite among Bobo’s regulars and certainly a supporting cast member to the chicken. When it comes to sides, Bobo’s mac and cheese has a stick-to-the-ribs satisfaction that tastes, oddly, even better the second day (portions are so big there may be leftovers). Yams are bathed in a sweet, vanilla-tinged glaze. Collard greens offer a savory refuge, with a classic, earthy bitterness from the smoke and salt of ham hocks hidden inside. Shrimp, which can be added to a combo and served over rice, are plump and snappy in texture, with a dash of Cajun flavors in the mix. Finally, included in each meal is a square of Bobo’s sweet bread, a vanilla-flavored crumbling pound cake; a kiss sending the diner to that inevitable post-meal nap. Dinners and combination plates range from $12 to $21 and include a choice of two sides, rice, sauce, and sweet bread. Crittenden says his next goal is to expand to a sit-down space, but for now, it’s useful to call in your order ahead of time. If you can’t get a call through, the food is worth the 15- to 25-minute wait. “When you’re looking at your child eating some fried chicken,” he says, “and you get to see their face and know they’re making that face because of the chicken, and you’re making that same face, that’s a joy.” rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 13


Upcoming [ ROOTS ]

Music

David Lindley. Sunday, April 15. The Little Theatre, 240 East Avenue. 8 p.m. $20. thelittle.org; davidlindley.com [ METAL ] Obituary. Thursday, May 10. Main Street Armory, 900 East Main Street. 6 p.m. $25. mainstreetarmory.com; obituary.cc. [ ROCK ] ZZ Top. Saturday, June 23. CMAC, 3355 Marvin Sands Drive. 7 p.m. $35-$85. cmacevents.com; zztop.com.

Jonathan Richman

SATURDAY MARCH 10 SKYLARK LOUNGE, 40 SOUTH UNION STREET 10 P.M. | $18-$23 | ABILENEBARANDLOUNGE.COM; JONATHANRICHMAN.BANDCAMP.COM [ POP ] As a Modern Lover, he penned one of my favorite tunes, “Roadrunner.” As a solo artist, he’s cracked me up half a dozen times or so. Jonathan Richman accompanies himself not so much as a songwriter than as an adroit storyteller strapped to a guitar. Throughout the course of a set, he’ll move from obscurities, like Ronnie Dawson’s “Rockin’ Bones,” to his own songs about dancing at lesbian bars and taking the bus. It’s David Sedaris meets Simon and Garfunkel. — BY FRANK DE BLASE

Carole’s Kings THURSDAY, MARCH 8, THROUGH SUNDAY, MARCH 11 DOWNSTAIRS CABARET, 3450 WINTON PLACE $30-$33 | DOWNSTAIRSCABARET.COM [ POP ] Carole’s Kings adds a twist to King’s music by rearranging it for a live theatrical performance, with added choreography and witty exchanges between the singers and audience members. The show covers King’s hits, like “The Locomotion,” “You’ve Got a Friend,” “I Feel the Earth Move,” and other timeless classics that will probably leave you with a bit of nostalgia. Combining King’s music with the comedic writings of Chicago’s Second City, orchestrations from the composers of Jersey Boys, and a cast from Broadway, the show sends up a tribute to one of the most successful female songwriters in the US. Thursday at 7 p.m.; Friday and Saturday at 8 p.m.; Sunday at 3 p.m. — BY KATIE HALLIGAN

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[ ALBUM REVIEWS ]

[ WED., MARCH 7 ]

The Plague

COUNTRY

“Hope for the Future” Recover Records theplagueofficial.com

Miss E FRIDAY, MARCH 9 DINOSAUR BBQ, 99 COURT STREET 10 P.M. | FREE | DINOSAURBARBQUE.COM; FACEBOOK.COM/MISSEMUSIC [ BLUES ] Miss E hits all the hits from a setlist that

includes British blues (Stones, Butterfield) down to the rock heavyweights (Cream, Ram Jam) who call the blues “dad.” A mere trio, Miss E and The Resonators is a classic bar band in every sense of the word. — BY FRANK DE BLASE

Jan the Actress THURSDAY, MARCH 8 BUG JAR, 219 MONROE AVENUE 9 P.M. | $10 | BUGJAR.COM; JANTHEACTRESS.BANDCAMP.COM [ GARAGE ROCK ] Jan the Actress may just be a trio,

but its sound is fully immersive. With Eric Witkowski on guitar and vocals, Darren DeWispelaere on drums, and Frank Ashcraft on bass, the trio paints an garage rock picture that becomes somewhat meditative. Jan the Actress’ first demos were released in February 2017, and its latest single, “Functioneer and His Appendages,” was released that May. There is a general embrace of confusion and delirium, which is reflected in the lyrics, melodies, and in the visual aesthetic. Jan the Actress blends electronic textures with dreamy vocals, revealing an ethereal sonic landscape that offers introspective transcendence for any listener. Playing with Toward Space and Buffalo Sex Change. — BY KATIE HALLIGAN

Our Own Worst Enemy. Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. abilenebarandlounge.com. 7:30 p.m. $5.

If there was one word to describe The Plague’s new CD, “Hope For The Future,” it would be “dichotomy.” It’s hard and heavy the first minute; swift and slick the next. And the vocals come in two different shades as well: growling guttural and sung sweet. The drums, they’re huge throughout. As a whole, The Plague — made up of members of former Warped Tour darlings Third Estate — holds up nicely as the production adds an element of control. That’s so things don’t go completely nuts. And the cyborg sound effects — holding the silence at a safe distance in the cracks between the cracks on each of the 13 cuts — adds to an actual overall hope for the future. The guitars are big and bad, and it’s only when the vocals get monstrous and acidic that The Plague comes off hardcore. When the words are actually sung it seems to lighten the band’s framework where they can really take off and fly. — BY FRANK DE BLASE

Margaret Explosion. Little

Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 258-0400. thelittle.org/cafe. 7-9 p.m. POP/ROCK

Frends, Darb Jansen, The Fearsome Leap, The Stone Lows. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe

Ave. 454-2966. bugjar.com. 9 p.m. $7/$9.

[ THU., MARCH 8 ] BLUES

Johnny Nicholas. Abilene

Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. abilenebarandlounge.com. 8:30 p.m. $10. CLASSICAL

Haewa

EARS Visiting Composer Series. Eastman East Wing

“Floating at the Bottom” Self-released haewamusic.net

Sometimes psychedelic music can come on a little strong, where listening to it — and understanding it — winds up being a bit daunting. But Rochester-based psych supergroup Haewa opens up “Floating at the Bottom” with a splendid flourish of listener-friendly color you can practically taste and see. This new disc is five choice cuts of salacious sonics. It’s positively lush in its treatment and doesn’t rely solely on the depth of the production to carry it on through. “Floating at the Bottom” is heavier and more complex than Haewa’s previous endeavors, but it still manages to fly swiftly and unfettered, ultimately creating a beautiful and concise piece of music. This is smile-inducing rock ‘n’ roll that comes on huge, yet does not crush with overblown stunts bands in this genre often get caught up in. Big isn’t the same as loud, as exhibited by Haewa’s largess on this record. It’s heavy but full of dexterity and strength. When’s the last time you spun a platter that made you this happy? This is one fabulous record. — BY FRANK DE BLASE

JAZZ

Hatch Recital Hall, 26 Gibbs St. 8-10 p.m. Featuring repertoire pieces, new works, and student compositions. RPO; Emily Birsan. Kodak Hall at Eastman Theater, 60 Gibbs St. 454-2100. rpo.org. 7:30 p.m. Performing Berg’s “Seven Early Songs” and Mahler’s Symphony No. 4. Emily Birsan, soprano. Conducted by Ward Stare. $24-$104. JAZZ

David Bixler & Friends. Joe

Bean Coffee Roasters, 1344 University Ave. 532-7942. joebeanroasters.com. 8-10 p.m. $5. POP/ROCK

Ghostwriter, Trevor Lake.

Skylark Lounge, 40 South Union St. 270-8106. theskylarklounge.com. 9 p.m. $5. Kung Fu, Ocular Panther. Anthology, 336 East Ave. 4841964. anthologylive.com. 8 p.m. $15. continues on page 17

Fresh Cuts Head to rochestercitynewspaper.com for our music series debuting new tracks by local musicians and bands

/ FRESH CUTS rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 17


Music

The Demos puts its trust in the producer to make a bigger sound. PHOTO BY KRIT UPRA

That’s the song The Demos WITH CORDIAL SINS AND THE STEDWELLS FRIDAY, MARCH 9 BUG JAR, 219 MONROE AVENUE 8 P.M. | $8-$10 | BUGJAR.COM FACEBOOK.COM/THEDEMOSMUSIC [ FEATURE ] BY FRANK DE BLASE

The Demos is truly a well-oiled, melodydriven, music machine. Mixing some Merseybeat with a little nice and poppy rock ‘n’ roll, the band is a sing-a-long personified. After releasing the Mikey James-produced EP “Paramount Clouds” in 2016, The Demos took a little downtime and went through some lineup changes. “Now we’re in full throttle mode, you could say,” says lead singer Jason Milton. Along with Milton, The Demos includes Caela Moore on keys; Jeremiah O’Reilly, guitar; R.J. Papaleo, drums; and Callan Saunders, bass. In its little over 10-year history, The Demos has gone from quintet down to a duo and back to a quintet again. Its success is in how it holds on loosely to its songs and how they are created, allowing for outside influence to permeate and

16 CITY MARCH 7 - 13, 2018

guide. We’re talking outside influence like The Mercies’ Mikey James. James works in layers of pristine orchestration with lo-fi leanings; it’s salty and sweet. “The thing I like about Mikey James is he’s so eclectic,” Milton says. “He brought a lot of stuff to the table that wasn’t necessarily in our wheelhouse. He brought in a lot of aspects we weren’t used to.” James’s production added a new electric accessibility which boosted the sparkle, while The Demos’ melodious flow tempered James with more organic sounds. So it’s interesting what pairing The Demos is doing next in the studio: “We’re in the studio now with Dan Armbruster,” Milton says. “He’s producing some tracks for us.” It’s a collaborative collision between two opposing poles: the Joywave largess that Armbruster brings, bumping into The Demos’ plaintive, harmony-soaked sound. The band is thrilled. “It’s good,” says Callan Saunders. “It’s nice to have this outside-input influence.” But rest assured, The Demos are strong enough to maintain its own identity, even with all this influence flying around and the Joywave front man at the wheel.

“Something he said right off the bat,” Milton says, “‘You guys have to sound like you. You have to sound like The Demos.’ Which was great because sometimes I think bands get caught in a situation where they’re working with a producer and the producer puts on a little too much of his own flavor. But Dan likes us for who we are.” “We now have a lot of tools at our disposal,” O’Reilly adds. “And a lot of resources. But it’s also nice to have someone add their skills and their artistic eye. He’s just a super-creative guy with out-of-thebox ideas.” There’s a mutual trust between Armbruster and The Demos. They’ve known each other since playing in bands in their teens. “But we have different musical interests,” Milton says. “We thought we’d bring stuff to the table and that he’d never heard of. And he’d do the same. We’re so close to these songs that we never know half the time.” It’s beneficial to have an objective opinion that hasn’t heard a particular song as many times as the song’s writer has. Saunders says the collaboration between Armbruster and The Demos will yield an EP.

“The idea behind the EP,” he says, “is to put new music out at a faster rate. We’d love to put out an album, but it’s tough being independent and not having a ton of resources. We could save up all the songs we’ve written. But that might take a year.” The band says it’s listening to a lot of different music now — more than it ever has — and consequently the range of influences is broader. And as the band would no doubt mature and grow over the span of that year, it would threaten the continuity between the older and younger tunes. “I don’t think we’ve changed at all,” Milton says. “I think we’ve matured.” “That’s doubtful,” says Saunders. The Demos have already completed the Northeast leg of a sold-out tour opening for Joywave. Milton says the audience gets what the band is doing. “Their fans are music people,” he says. Music people that recognize a good song when they hear it, even when The Demos can’t. Milton is stymied. “You know what’s funny?” he says. “I don’t think you ever know if you have a good song — because I don’t think that a song was that good when I wrote it. That’s why it’s cool to have a producer there to say, ‘That’s the song.’”


The Tombstone Hands, Hot Mayonnaise. Funk ‘n Waffles,

204 N Water Street. 448-0354. funknwaffles.com. 9 p.m. $5.

Toward Space, Buffalo Sex Change, Jan the Actress. Bug

Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 454-2966. bugjar.com. 9 p.m. $8/$10.

[ FRI., MARCH 9 ] BLUES

Steve Grills & the Roadmasters. Skylark Lounge,

40 South Union St. 270-8106. theskylarklounge.com. 10 p.m. $5. CLASSICAL

Studio Orchestra. Kilbourn Hall,

26 Gibbs St. esm.rochester.edu. 8-10 p.m. JAZZ

French Conexion. Joe Bean Coffee Roasters, 1344 University Ave. 532-7942. joebeanroasters.com. 9 p.m. $5. R&B/ SOUL

Vanishing Sun. Bop Shop

Records, 1460 Monroe Ave. 271 3354. vanishingsun.com. 7 p.m. AMERICANA

Kubick’s Rubes. Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. abilenebarandlounge. com. 6 p.m. POP/ROCK

Mr. Monkey. Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. abilenebarandlounge. com. 9:30 p.m. $5. Our Friends Band, Spring Street Family. Funk ‘n Waffles, 204 N Water Street. 448-0354. funknwaffles.com. 9:30 p.m. $5/$7.

Tobey Village House Band. Firehouse Saloon, 814 S. Clinton Ave. 319-3832. thefirehousesaloon.com. 9 p.m. $5.

[ SAT., MARCH 10 ] ACOUSTIC/FOLK Connie Deming. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 258-0400. thelittle.org. 8-10 p.m. BLUES

Joe Beard & His Band. B-Side,

5 Liftbridge Lane. Fairport. 3640688. fairportbside.com. 8 p.m. CLASSICAL

RPO; Emily Birsan. Kodak Hall

at Eastman Theater, 60 Gibbs St. 454-2100. rpo.org. 8 p.m. Performing Berg’s “Seven Early Songs” and Mahler’s Symphony No. 4. Emily Birsan, soprano. Conducted by Ward Stare. $24-$104.

PHOTO PROVIDED

DOOM METAL | Conan Although it may seem blasphemous to doom metal purists, the Liverpool-based “caveman battle doom” trio Conan has graduated beyond the Power of the Riff. What its records offer instead is a fascinating question: What if the feedback — the almost Zen-like, monolithic slabs of noise and atmosphere that carry the riff from point A to B — is the real attraction? Conan’s songs, often stretching beyond the 10-minute mark, integrate all the fantasy violence you’d expect from the band’s name, but its sheer heaviness is marked even more by a surprisingly restrained, brutalist approach. It’s like watching your own head get cut off by a flaming sword but slowed down 500 percent. Conan will play with The Ditch and The Delta and The Highest Leviathan on Wednesday, March 7, at Photo City Improv, 543 Atlantic Avenue. 8 p.m. $18 (over 21); $20 (under 21). facebook.com/photocityimprovcomedyclub; hailconan.com. — BY ALEXANDER JONES

REGGAE/JAM

Soule Monde, The English Project. Funk ‘n Waffles, 204 N Water Street. 448-0354. funknwaffles.com. 9 p.m. $10/$13. AMERICANA

Rosie Newton & The Green Mountain Playboys. Abilene Bar

& Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. abilenebarandlounge. com. 9 p.m. $10. POP/ROCK

King Buffalo, Continental Drifft, CD-Rom. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe

Ave. 454-2966. bugjar.com. 9 p.m. $8/$10. The Weight Band. Anthology, 336 East Ave. 484-1964. anthologylive.com. 8 p.m. Featuring members of The Band, Levon Helm Band, & Rick Danko Group. $25.50-$30.

Seneca St. Geneva. (315) 7897716. thesmith.org. 7:30 p.m. $10-$30. JAZZ

Fred Costello & Roger Eckers Jazz Duo. Charley Brown’s, 1675 Penfield Rd. 385-9202. charleybrownspenfield.com.

Hochstein Performance Hall, 50 N Plymouth Ave. 624-1301. chambermusicrochester.org. 3:30 p.m. $35. JAZZ

Jon Seiger & The All Stars. Funk

‘n Waffles, 204 N Water Street. 448-0354. funknwaffles.com. 3 p.m. HIP-HOP/RAP

Volatile, Golden, Rodagues,

Bahiri, MF SKUM. Funk ‘n Waffles, 204 N Water Street. 448-0354. funknwaffles.com. 7 p.m. $10.

[ MON., MARCH 12 ] ACOUSTIC/FOLK

Songwriters in the Round with Katie Preston. Funk ‘n Waffles,

204 N Water Street. 448-0354. funknwaffles.com. 7 p.m. $5. BLUES

[ SUN., MARCH 11 ]

VOCALS

Cantus. Smith Opera House, 82

CLASSICAL

Society for Chamber Music in Rochester: A Couple of Couples.

ACOUSTIC/FOLK

Acoustic Brunch wtih Chris Bethmann. Funk ‘n Waffles,

204 N Water Street. 448-0354. funknwaffles.com. noon. Kinloch Nelson. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 258-0400. thelittle.org/cafe. 7-9 p.m.

Stormy Valle. Record Archive, 33 1/3 Rockwood St. 244-1210. 5-8 p.m.

[ TUE., MARCH 13 ] ACOUSTIC/FOLK 3X88. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 258-0400. thelittle. org. 7-9 p.m. Three pianists of different styles come together to share new songs, and tell stories. rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 17


Literature I couldn’t remember word-for-word the conversations. I wouldn’t let my characters speak. There was really no story arch because I was just writing down everything I could remember. Even though I didn’t remember everything that had been said, I could use creative license to recreate conversations to the best of my knowledge and memory. What was important was maintaining that emotional truth in the story. I was able to tap into my imagination to create these moments and let my characters speak. Capturing the voice of your inner child can require tremendous vulnerability. How did you find the voice of five-year-old Reyna? The little girl who points to her bellybutton to remember where she comes from?

Well, she’s still inside of me. That’s really how it is. Have you read Sandra Cisneros? The short story “Eleven” says no matter how old you get there’s still that nine-year-old inside you, that 10-year-old inside you, that five-year-old inside you. You fit like — you know those Russian dolls that fit inside each other? That’s how she describes how we age. I find that to be very true. When I write, I don’t have a hard time tapping into my fiveyear-old self, my 10-year-old self, my teenage self, because they’re all inside me.

Reyna Grande’s “The Distance Between Us” is the 2018 Rochester Reads pick. PHOTO PROVIDED

The Mexican immigrant experience 2018 Rochester Reads REYNA GRANDE “THE DISTANCE BETWEEN US: A MEMOIR” ROCHESTER APPEARANCES MARCH 28 TO MARCH 30 473-2590; WAB.ORG

and book talks. Information on events, discussions, and workshops leading up to her visit can be found at wab.org. CITY spoke via phone with Grande in advance of her visit about her writing process and the experience that informed her book. Below is the abridged interview; to find the full story, visit rochestercitynewspaper.com.

[ INTERVIEW ] BY RACHEL CRAWFORD

Writers & Books last year announced that “The Distance Between Us,” a novel by award-winning author Reyna Grande, as the selection for its 2018 Rochester Reads program. In her memoir, Grande recounts her harrowing experience as a child living in Mexico in extreme poverty and her journey to the United States as an illegal immigrant. Grande will be visiting Rochester from March 28-30 for a series of readings, book signings, 18 CITY MARCH 7 - 13, 2018

CITY: I’m curious about the difference between your writing processes from novels to a memoir — how do you maintain literary merit in a memoir? Grande: I think the first draft of “The

Distance Between Us” was a complete mess. Because I was coming from novel writing, that’s what I knew how to do. When I started writing from memory, I felt limited because I was writing about my own experiences. In the first draft there wasn’t much dialogue because

In the beginning of the book you mention the peso had been devalued 45% to the U.S. Dollar — and that was in young Reyna’s account. These concepts are almost impossible for a child to grasp, yet they directly affected her world. What are some of the changes you’re seeing now between U.S.-Mexico relations that continue to affect your hometown of Iguala?

Well I have to say that the biggest one is the drug addiction in this country has such a tremendous impact on my hometown. My home state of Guerrero grows fifty percent of the poppies for the heroin trade. My home state, and especially my hometown, is surrounded by poppy fields. There is the cartel and people are being forced to work in the poppy fields. That’s why there’s so much instability down there. The drug epidemic greatly affects Mexico and creates a lot of corruption over there because the drug market is probably the biggest source of income besides oil and remittances. It’s a billion dollar industry. It creates a lot of corruption and violence. How does the novel help improve the various, harmful stigmas of illegal immigrants?

Well, I think that when you hear politicians talk about immigration, a lot of times the issue is discussed in terms of politics or the economy. It’s also important to keep in mind that we’re talking about human beings. When I wrote this book, I was writing for readers who do not have a lot of

information, to get an insight. Make people think about what counts as immigration and why people leave their homes behind. I feel that when people are allowed to come here as refugees it’s mostly because of war or a political situation they were involved in, but an economic refugee is looked down upon. Poverty is a consequence of this capitalist society that we live in and a very uneven society where few people have a lot and a lot of people don’t have much. There are places like Mexico and a lot of other countries where a lot of people don’t have much and a lot of times they’re victims to their governments but also foreign governments that come in and create instability; economic instability especially. So I guess for me it’s just writing about my experience with poverty and how that led to all of the things that happened with my family. The memoir notes the vastly different struggles that exist in Mexico versus those in the States. But some of the most touching moments in “The Distance Between Us” are those that everyone can relate to: sibling rivalry, favoritism, jealousy, or just wanting to make your parents proud. How does the memoir connect all readers to the Grande family?

I feel the poverty part is something that readers can relate to because there are a lot of poor people in the U.S. even though we don’t want to talk about it. But there’s a lot of poverty here. Also family dysfunction is an experience that many people can relate to. I think that’s something that affects all cultures. And then the experience and being a young person and trying to figure out your place in the world. I think that’s also universal. The sequel to “The Distance Between Us” comes out this year. Is there anything you can tell us that we can look forward to in that memoir?

I’m always being asked: What happened after? When I do school visits and readings, that’s always the question people ask me. I thought that I would write this book because a lot of Latino literature is focused on the teenage years. But there’s not a lot that focuses on the college years. Students of color have a different experience in college than white students. Junot Díaz wrote an essay called “MFA vs. POC” and he writes about that experience. I guess the theme of the book is my search for a home and belonging. The second story line in there is about my pursuit of my writing dream. It’s about my search to belong and trying to find the home that I had longed for all these years and realizing that I was going to have to build my own home because nobody else was going to give it to me.


Arts & Performance Art Exhibits

130 White St 957-4117. stepstem.com.

[ OPENING ] Art Museum of Rochester, 610 Monroe Ave. Yelling: The First Payette Art Exhibition. Through March 31. Art by Dustyn & Erin Payette. 880-6543. Whitman Works Co., 1826 Penfield Road. Penfield. Natural Flows:The Gentle Watercolors of Steve Sidare. Through March 31. Artist reception on Sat., Mar. 10, 6-9pm. whitmanworks.com. WNY PhotoWalkers Gallery Opening. March 10, 1-4 p.m. The Blue Barn Cidery, 928 Manitou Road. 957-1479. bluebarncidery.com.

Kids Events

[ CONTINUING ] 1570 Gallery at Valley Manor, 1570 East Ave. Reveal II. Through Apr. 1. A display of ceramic sculptures & mixed media by Richard Harvey and Nancy Valle. 546-8400. episcopalseniorlife.org. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. The Lobby Presents: Billy T. Lyons farewell art exhibition. Through Apr. 3. Art based on memories from growing up poor and in drug-abused households in Rochester. 454-2966. bugjar.com. A Different Path Gallery, 27 Market St. Brockport. Hat Matters. Through Mar. 31. Opening reception Mar. 9, 7 p.m. Investigates relationships between headdress & women’s experiences through multiple artistic media. 637-5494. differentpathgallery.com. Gallery 96, 604 Pittsford-Victor Road. Local Camera Clubs. Through Apr. 7. Photography from six local camera clubs. thegallery96.com. Gallery r, 100 College Ave. Controlled Trauma: Ten Years of Surgical Photography. Through Mar. 25. Opening reception Fri., Mar. 2, 6-9 p.m. 256-3312. galleryr.rit.edu. GO ART! Seymour Place, 201 E Main St. Batavia. The Kite Boy. Through Apr. 7. Acrylic exhibit by Alex Segovia. Artist reception Sat. Apr. 15, 6-8 p.m. 343-9313. goart.org. International Art Acquisitions, 3300 Monroe Ave. Still Life Expressions. Through March 31. Original still lifes by contemporary Canadian artist Sam Paonessa. 264-1440. internationalartacquisitions.com. Makers Gallery and Studio, 34 Elton Street. From the Archive. Through Mar. 10. A selection of work from 1992 to 2000 by Bill Santelli. 507-3569. RIT Bevier Gallery, 90 Lomb Memorial Dr., Booth Building 7A. Plakookee. Through Mar. 10. A collaboration between Rachel Debuque & Justin Plakas. Sculpture, installation, photography, and more. 4752646. plakookee.com. The Gallery @ Art & Music Library, Rush Rhees, 755 Library Road. Wreckage: Timothy Pauszek. 275-4476. megan. scheffer@rochester.edu. Visual Studies Workshop, 31 Prince St. Go-Rilla Means War. Through Mar. 16. Digitized 35mm footage salvaged from a now demolished black civil rights theater in Brooklyn, NY. 442-8676. vsw.org.

[ MON., MARCH 12 ] After School Nature Explorers. 4-6 p.m Harris Whalen Park, 2126 Penfield Rd. $60. 8618127. Running Wild After School. 4-6 p.m Harris Whalen Park, 2126 Penfield Rd. $60. 861-8127.

Recreation PHOTO BY MIKE MEAGHER

PHOTO PROVIDED

SPECIAL EVENT | NAUGHTY 90’S NIGHT BURLESQUE

ART | ‘DALE KLEIN: PULL THROUGH’

I don’t know if people are ever going to retire the phrase “party like it’s 1999,” but since it’s been two decades, the 90’s are technically vintage. Which means nostalgic. So bust out your JNCO jeans, crop tops, wallet chains, and flannels, and join Pretty Kitties Burlesque and Bombshell Belly Dance for Naughty 90’s Night at ButaPub. The winner of the costume contest will be awarded a 90’s inspired gift basket.

Printmaker Dale Klein’s work sensitively responds to Western New York’s industrial decline as a microcosm of wider phenomena happening with our planet. Provided info states that she sees entropy as inevitable — as we carry out our destruction, “the planet will carry on, just possibly without the human race.” Klein’s aquatint and etchings form realistic portraits of steel wreckage from the demolition of Kodak buildings and industrial scrap piles in expanses of rural environments, each wasteland being reclaimed by the inevitable new growth of resilient flora.

Naughty 90’s Night takes place on Friday, March 9, at 11 p.m. (doors at 10 p.m., student performances at 10:30 p.m.) at ButaPub, 315 Gregory Street. Admission is $5. 563-6241; facebook.com/prettykittiesburlesque. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY

Williams Gallery at First Unitarian Church, 220 S Winton Rd. Expanding Dimensions: Large Works by The Arena Art Group. Through April 9. Opening reception Fri., Mar 9, 6-8pm. 271-9070.

Call for Participants [ SAT., MARCH 10 ] Call for Mural Artists. March 10, noon. Cobblestone Arts Center, 1622 NY Route 332. 398-0220. sarah. cobblestonearts@gmail.com. cobblestoneartscenter.com.

Art Events [ SAT., MARCH 10 ] Second Saturdays. 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Hungerford Building, 1115 E. Main St. Enter at Door #2. 469-8217. Second Saturdays. 12-4 p.m. Anderson Arts Bldg, 250 N. Goodman St. 749-0370. andersonalleyartists.com. Second Saturdays. 3-6 p.m. Cornerstone Gallery, 8732 Main St., Honeoye. baierpottery.com.

Comedy [ WED., MARCH 7 ] Clean Comedy Night. March 7, 5:30 p.m. Comedy at the Carlson, 50 Carlson Rd Benefit for Holy Childhood featuring Ross Bennett, Al Smith, Dan Kulp, James Ashbery $12. 426-6339. carlsoncomedy.com. [ FRI., MARCH 9 ] Robert Kelly. March 9, 7:30 & 10 p.m. Comedy at the Carlson, 50 Carlson

[ SAT., MARCH 10 ] Guided Hike at Webster Park. March 10, 10 a.m. Webster Park, Holt Rd. at Lake Rd. 340-8655. penfieldrec.org. Hike: In Search of Owls. March 10, 1 p.m. Sterling Nature Center, 15380 Jenzvold Rd (315) 947-6143. cayugacounty.us.

Rd $12-$20. 426-6339. carlsoncomedy.com. [ SAT., MARCH 10 ] Lola Land Filipino Concert. March 10, 6-8 p.m. Davison Gallery, Cultural Life Center, Roberts Wesleyan College, 2301 Westside Dr $38-$88. 489-9716. [ TUE., MARCH 13 ] Backdraft II: Laughdraft. 8-11 p.m Firehouse Saloon, 814 S. Clinton Ave. 902-2010. thefirehousesaloon.com.

Dance Events [ FRI., MARCH 9 ] Cinderella. March 9, 7:30 p.m. Nazareth College Arts Center Callahan Theater, 4245 East Ave. Through March 11. Fri & Sat., Mar 9 & 10: 7:30pm; Sat., Mar 10: 2pm; Sun., Mar 11: 4pm $37-$47. 389-2170. artscenter@naz.edu. [ SAT., MARCH 10 ] Creating Refuge: BhutaneseNepali Life in Rochester, NY. March 10, 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Rochester Museum and Science Center, 657 East Ave. $13-$15. (270) 777-5960. rmsc.org.

Theater Damn Yankees the Musical. Fridays-Sundays RAPA, Kodak Center, 200 W. Ridge Rd. Through Mar. 18. Fri. & Sat. Mar. 10, 16, 17, 7:30 p.m. Sun. Mar. 11, 18, 2 p.m 2540073. RAPAtheatre.org. Big Wigs Luck Be A Lady. Fri., March 9, 8-10 p.m. & Sat., March 10, 8-10 p.m. Blackfriars Theatre, 795 E. Main St $25. 454-1260. blackfriars.org.

Meetings [ WED., MARCH 7 ] Rochester Preservation Board meeting. March 7, 6 p.m. Rochester City Council Chambers, 30 Church St 428-6510. [ THU., MARCH 8 ] Genesee Transportation Council board meeting. March 8, 8:30 a.m. Brighton Town Hall, 2300 Elmwood Ave 232-6240. gtcmpo.org.

“Pull Through” continues through March 28 at Geisel Gallery (second floor mezzanine of Legacy Tower, 1 Bausch & Lomb Place). A reception will be held on Friday, March 9, 6 to 8 p.m. Free. Gallery hours are Monday through Friday, 7 a.m. to 7 p.m.; Saturday, 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. thegeiselgallery.com; dalekleinart.com. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY

Blasted. Fridays, Saturdays, 7:30 p.m. & Sundays, 2 p.m Bread & Water Theatre, 172 West Main St Through March 11. Fri. & Sat., Mar 2, 3, 9, & 10: 7:30pm. Sun., Mar. 4 & 11: 2pm $8-$14. 538-9684. breadandwatertheatre.org. Buyer & Cellar. Sat., March 10, 8 p.m. JCC Hart Theatre, 1200 Edgewood Ave. Through March 25. Sat., Mar. 10, 17, & 24: 8pm; Sun., Mar 11, 18, & 25: 2pm; Thur., Mar. 15 & 22: 7pm $20-$29. 461-2000. jcccenterstage.org. Decades Rewind. Thu., March 8, 7:30-9:45 p.m. Rochester Auditorium Theatre, 885 E. Main St. Celebrate the hits of the 60s, 70s & 80s. $42-$49. 222-5000. rbtl.org. The Diary of Anne Frank. Through March 18. Geva Theatre Center, 75 Woodbury Blvd Through March 18. Directed by David Ira Goldstein, starring Ann Arvia $25-$52. 232-4382. gevatheatre.org. The Sunset Limited. Thu., March 8, 7:30 p.m., Fri., March 9, 7:30 p.m., Sat., March 10, 7:30 p.m. & Sun., March 11, 2 p.m. MuCCC, 142 Atlantic Ave $12. muccc.org. We Don’t Live on Mars. Wed.Sat., 7 p.m. Todd Theatre, University of Rochester, River Campus $8-$15. 275-4959. sas.rochester.edu/theatre. Witness for the Prosecution. Fri., March 9, 7:30-10 p.m., Sat., March 10, 2-4:30 & 7:3010 p.m. & Sun., March 11,

Special Events

2-4:30 p.m. A Magical Journey Through Stages, Auditorium Center, 875 E. Main St $13. 935-7173. mjtstages.com.

Community Activism [ SAT., MARCH 10 ] Food Not Bombs Sort/Cook/ Serve Food. 3-6 p.m. St. Joseph’s House of Hospitality, 402 South Ave. 585-232-3262.

Frederick Douglass [ WED., MARCH 7 ] Frederick Douglass’s Rochester: Mapping His Tracks in Our City. Through Aug. 31. Central Library, 115 South Ave. 4288150. rochistory.wordpress.com. Frederick Douglass’s World. Through Aug. 31. University of Rochester, River Campus rochester.edu. No Soil Better: Art and the Living Legacy of Frederick Douglass. 1-5 p.m Rochester Contemporary Art Center, 137 East Ave. Through Mar. 18. Featuring work reflecting how Douglass has been memorialized and the importance of his legacy today. $2. 461-2222. rochestercontemporary.org. [ SAT., MARCH 10 ] Black History Inspires Leadership in Science & Technology. March 10, 3-5 p.m. Wachuku Foundation for Humanitarian Aid,

[ WED., MARCH 7 ] 2018 Veterans Stand Down. March 7, 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Harro East Ballroom, 155 N. Chestnut St. 295-7818. vocroc.org. Happiest Hour. March 7, 5:309:30 p.m. The Strong National Museum of Play, 1 Manhattan Square $15. 263-2700. museumofplay.org. [ THU., MARCH 8 ] International Women’s Day: Immigration’s Impact on Us. March 8, 5-8 p.m. American Assoc. of University Women, 494 East Ave. 275-8779. [ FRI., MARCH 9 ] CURE Childhood Cancer Association: Trivia Night. 6-9 p.m. Perinton VFW, 300 Macedon Road . Fairport Dinner provided by Carrabba’s Italian Grill $40. 473-0180. curekidscancer.com. [ SAT., MARCH 10 ] Star Party. March 10, 5-10 p.m. Cumming Nature Center, 6472 Gulick Rd. $3. 2714320. rmsc.org. Vegan Pop-Up Cupcake Bar. March 10, 11 a.m.-2 p.m. 540WMain, 540 W. Main Street 420-8439. 540westmain.org.

Literary Events [ FRI., MARCH 9 ] Amanda Adams Booking Signing. March 9, 5:30 p.m. Mood Makers Books, 274 Goodman St. N Author of the “Sangrita Club” moodmakersbooks.com. Find more listings online at rochestercitynewspaper.com

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 19


Movie Theaters Searchable, up-to-the-minute movie times for all area theaters can be found at rochestercitynewspaper.com, and on City’s mobile website.

Movies

Brockport Strand 93 Main St, Brockport, 637-3310, rochestertheatermanagement.com

Canandaigua Theatres 3181 Townline Road, Canandaigua, 396-0110, rochestertheatermanagement.com

Cinema Theater 957 S. Clinton St., 271-1785, cinemarochester.com

Culver Ridge 16 2255 Ridge Rd E, Irondequoit  544-1140, regmovies.com

Dryden Theatre 900 East Ave., 271-3361, dryden.eastmanhouse.org

Eastview 13 Eastview Mall, Victor 425-0420, regmovies.com

Woman on the verge “A Fantastic Woman”

(R), DIRECTED BY SEBASTIÁN LELIO OPENS FRIDAY, MARCH 9, AT THE LITTLE THEATRE AND PITTSFORD CINEMA

Geneseo Theatres Geneseo Square Mall, 243-2691, rochestertheatermanagement.com

[ PREVIEW ] BY ADAM LUBITOW

Greece Ridge 12

Fresh off its win for Best Foreign Language Film at the Academy Awards this past weekend, “A Fantastic Woman” is set to arrive in local theaters on Friday. The drama from Chilean director Sebastián Lelio tells the story of a headstrong young transgender woman named Marina — the fantastic woman of the title — as she faces down a world that seems unwilling to see her that way.

176 Greece Ridge Center Drive 225-5810, regmovies.com

Henrietta 18 525 Marketplace Drive 424-3090, regmovies.com

The Little 240 East Ave., 258-0444 thelittle.org

Movies 10 2609 W. Henrietta Road 785-3335, rochestermovies10.com

Pittsford Cinema 3349 Monroe Ave., 383-1310 pittsford.zurichcinemas.com

Tinseltown USA/IMAX 2291 Buffalo Road 247-2180, cinemark.com

Webster 12 2190 Empire Blvd., 888-262-4386, amctheatres.com

Vintage Drive In 1520 W Henrietta Rd., Avon 226-9290, vintagedrivein.com

As the film begins, Marina (Daniela Vega) has a happy life working as a waitress and nightclub singer in Santiago, Chile, living with her adoring older lover Orlando (Francisco Reyes). Early on, we see the couple enjoy a wonderful evening celebrating Marina’s birthday, during which he promises her a trip to the beautiful Iguazu Falls. But their happiness comes to an abrupt end later that night, when Orlando wakes up complaining of a headache and collapses. Marina rushes him to the hospital, but he suffers a fatal aneurysm. Suddenly Marina is left to pick up the pieces and find a path forward without him. She’s immediately treated like a criminal by the doctors at the hospital, and soon detectives arrive to interrogate her about the circumstances of Orlando’s death. As Marina faces their probing questions, we get a glimpse of the endless series of microaggressions and outright hostility that members of the trans community face on a daily

Daniela Vega in “A Fantastic Woman.” PHOTO COURTESY SONY PICTURES CLASSICS

basis. Despite her protestations, one detective repeatedly refers to her as Daniel, the name still on her ID. But even that seems preferable to what she’ll come to face over the coming days. Unable to grieve for her lover in peace, Marina also faces the disdain of Orlando’s family, who want her out of their lives as soon as possible. His son, Bruno (Nicolás Saavedra) demands she vacate the flat she shared with Orlando and takes custody of their dog. Then there’s Orlando’s ex-wife Sonia (Aline Küppenheim) who, while asking that Marina hand over the keys to her ex-husband’s car, calls her a “chimera” and her relationship with Orlando a “perversion,” before forbidding Marina to attend the wake or funeral. The individuals who mean well aren’t much better, including a female investigator (Amparo Noguera) from the sex crimes division who subjects Marina to a humiliating physical exam, convinced that she must have been in an abusive relationship or been exploited in some way. It’s seemingly impossible to imagine that she and Orlando would have shared a happy life together like any other couple. Throughout the film Marina faces bigotry, cruelty, and discrimination, but miraculously keeps her composure. It’s at times upsetting to watch, but Lelio tells the story with empathy and compassion; Marina’s unyielding strength helps the film avoid descending into bleakness. Like Lelio’s 2013 comedy “Gloria,” this is another

PSST. Looking for more movie reviews?

We’ve got a bonus feature online from Adam Lubitow.

WHAT’S GOING ON? Find extended event listings online.

/ MOVIES / EVENTS 20 CITY MARCH 7 - 13, 2018


Difficult people “The Party” (R), DIRECTED BY SALLY POTTER OPENS FRIDAY, MARCH 9 [ PREVIEWS ] BY ADAM LUBITOW

character study about a strong-willed female protagonist who refuses to let society push her to the margins. The film’s bold blend of romance and melodrama with a bit of noir-tinged intrigue hint at the influence of the films of Pedro Almodóvar — as does the colorful, textured lensing from cinematographer Benjamín Echazarreta. There are sympathetic people in Marina’s life, like her sister (Trinidad González) and vocal instructor (Sergio Hernández). Orlando’s brother, Gabo (Luis Gnecco), is the one member of his family to treat her with even a modicum of decency, but there’s no one in her life she can really confide in. As a result, Marina mostly keeps her emotions to herself, though Lelio peppers the film with fantastical visual discursions that give us a peek into her inner thoughts and feelings. But this is Marina’s story and hers alone, and as such Daniela Vega remains at the center of every frame. This is only the second screen role for Vega, and hers is a magnetic, luminous performance. She’s quite a discovery, and one can only hope that plum roles continue to come her way, because she deserves to be a star. With the radiant Vega as its emotional core, “A Fantastic Woman” becomes a vibrant tale of self-assertion. In contrast to many trans stories in the movies, this isn’t a story about the discovery of oneself; over the course of the film we get to know Marina quite well, but the narrative’s power comes from that fact that she’s always known exactly who she is.

The idea of the dinner party that goes horribly wrong has served as the premise to any number of versatile, genre-spanning narratives over the years. Written and directed by Sally Potter, “The Party” offers little to break the mold of what’s come before, but thanks to a first-rate cast it still manages to be a reasonably entertaining, sharp-tongued farce of love, class, and politics. The film begins as a group of friends gather together for a dinner party at the London home of Janet (Kristin Scott Thomas) on the occasion of her recent appointment to a high-profile government position. While Janet busies herself in the kitchen, her professor husband Bill (Timothy Spall) sets about drinking himself into a stupor before the guests even begin to arrive. First through the door is caustic April (Patricia Clarkson) and her New Age-y German husband Gottfried (Bruno Ganz), whom she seems to despise. Next comes docile academic Martha (Cherry Jones), whose more high-strung

Kristin Scott Thomas in “The Party.” PHOTO COURTESY ROADSIDE ATTRACTIONS

wife, Jinny (Emily Mortimer), has just found out she’s pregnant with triplets. Finally, there’s Tom (Cillian Murphy) a coke-snorting financer who at first seems somewhat out of place amongst the rest of the attendees. It’s soon apparent that this world-class collection of narcissists are each hoarding secrets that they’re just dying to get off their chests. Bringing them together is a recipe for disaster, and the inevitable parade of revelations are all it takes for the group’s mask of bourgeois civility to come crashing down as they start to unravel one by one. A barbed comedy of manners, “The Party” is reminiscent of Jean Renoir’s “The Rules of the Game” or Yasmina Reza’s “God Of Carnage” (as well as its 2011 film adaptation). It’s unabashedly theatrical, with the rough around the edges, lo-fi vibe of a 90’s indie. Shot in clean, crisp black and white by Russian cinematographer Aleksei Rodionov, the film makes great use of the enclosed spaces in which the characters find themselves. Each one of the veteran performers commit to their roles with gusto. They work well together, selling the hell out of the material even if the script’s Brexit-era political commentary and social satire can be ham-fisted. The characters have a tendency to blurt things out when it’s convenient, and without much in the way of motivation, so the dialogue never comes across as anything resembling what a real living human being would ever say. But at a spry 71 minutes, the film is snappy enough that there’s never much time to dwell on its faults. Still, “The Party” is surprisingly slight compared to what one expects from Potter, whose filmography is peppered with formally daring gambits like her adaptation of Virginia Woolf’s genderbending “Orlando,” and “Yes,” a romantic drama told entirely in iambic pentameter. “The Party” is the kind of soirée that’s fun enough while it lasts, but that you find yourself struggling to recall the next day.

“The Insult” (R), DIRECTED BY ZIAD DOUEIRI NOW PLAYING AT THE LITTLE THEATRE

Directed by Lebanese filmmaker Ziad Doueiri (“The Attack”), “The Insult” is a thorny morality play about life in the Middle East, as a minor altercation between two men ends up in a court case that ignites long-simmering tensions and anger which eventually threatens to tear their country apart. Tony (Adel Karam) is a hot-headed but hard-working auto mechanic, and a devotee of his country’s rightwing Christian politics. One day, he’s hosing down the terrace of the Beirut apartment he shares with his pregnant wife, Shirine (Rita Hayek). Due to an improperly installed drainpipe, the water ends up splashing down onto construction foreman Yasser (Kamel El Basha), a Palestinian refugee. An annoyed Yasser orders his men to fix the gutters without Tony’s permission, but Tony smashes the new drain to pieces, incensed by what he perceives as a slight against him. He demands an apology, but Yasser refuses to give it. Neither man backs down, allowing their pride to escalate a petty dispute into a tense and eventually violent confrontation. The resulting trial opens up old wounds throughout the country’s population, leading to even more terrible repercussions. As we learn of the suffering and injustice each man has endured throughout their lives, it’s clear that their lingering anger has fueled their every move, conspiring to keep them engaged in seemingly never-ending conflict. In delving into Lebanon’s complicated history, Joëlle Touma’s script sometimes strains to make its points. But as it puts forth an ultimately optimistic view of humanity, “The Insult” gathers potency to become an affecting plea for empathy and understanding.

CITY NEWSPAPER PRESENTS

A THREE-WEEK PROGRAM FOR CAMPS & FAMILY RESOURCES

COMING March 14, 21, and 28 rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 21


Classifieds For information: Call us (585) 244-3329 Fax us (585) 244-1126 Mail Us City Classifieds 250 N. Goodman Street Rochester, NY 14607 Email Us classifieds@ rochester-citynews.com EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY

All real estate advertised in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act, which makes it unlawful, “to make, print, or publish, any notice, statement, or advertisement, with respect to the sale or rental of a dwelling that indicates any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin.” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under the age of 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertisement for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. Call the local Fair Housing Enforcement Project, FHEP at 325-2500 or 1-866-671-FAIR. Si usted sospecha una practica de vivienda injusta, por favor llame al servicio legal gratis. 585-325-2500 - TTY 585-325-2547.

Real Estate Auctions CHEMUNG COUNTY TAX Foreclosed Real Estate Auction: 100+ Lots. Wednesday, March 28, 2018. Registration: 7:00AM - Auction Start: 9:00AM. Holiday Inn Elmira-Riverview, 760 E. Water Street, Elmira, NY 14901 PreAuction Bidder Seminar: Thursday, March 15, 2018, at 6:00PM. For complete information, visit www. auctionsinternational.com or call 800-536-1401, Ext. 110

Land for Sale FARM ESTATE SELL-OFF! 28 ac - $46,900 Stream, pond, stonewalls, great hunting! Near major upstate NY lakes! 888-479-3394 NewYorkLandandLakes.com LENDER ORDERED SALE! 20 ac - $39,900 Pond, stream, woods, wildlife. 6 miles from Cooperstown, NY! Twn rd, utils. Terms avail. 888-644-0366 NewYorkLandandLakes.com

Home Services DEALING WITH WATER DAMAGE requires immediate action. Local professionals that respond immediately. Nationwide and 24/7. No Mold Calls 1-800-760-1845

Carpentry CALL EMPIRE TODAY® to schedule a FREE in-home estimate on Carpeting & Flooring. Call Today! 1-800-496-3180

Green Services HELP YOUR LOCAL economy and save money with Solar Power! Solar Power has a strong Return on Investment, Free Maintenance, Free Quote. Simple Reliable Energy with No Out of Pocket Costs. Call now! 800-678-0569

Automotive #1 ALWAYS BETTER CASH PAID for most Junk Cars, Trucks and Vans. Any condition, running or not. Always free pick up and usually same day service. Call 585-305-5865 1990 BUICK CENTURY 77K org., new brakes, new tires, inspected. $900 585-328-4848 DONATE YOUR CAR to Wheels For Wishes, benefiting Make-A-Wish. We offer free towing and your donation is 100% tax deductible. Call 917-3361254 Today!

For Sale 3 LEVI - boot cut jeans 30’ x 30”. Excellent 585-586-6484 $25 each END TABLE - Living room, real wood, wicker bottom shelf, great sixe $45 585-880-2903 FISHER X-C SKIIS 190cm. please leather boots, low cut 585-586-6484 $40 NAILS - GALVANIZED smooth shank, length 1 3/4 in. Approx. 7 lbs., free. 585.663.6983 SADDLE RACK - Metal, storage under. Brand New .$45 585-880-2963 SAWMILLS FOR ONLY $4397.00MAKE & SAVE MONEY with your own bandmill- Cut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship! FREE Info/ DVD: www.NorwoodSawmills.com 1-800-567-0404 Ext.300N

22 CITY MARCH 7 - 13, 2018


Adorable Ranch in Exceptional Condition. All majors updated; roof, furnace, AC, water heater, insulation, siding, etc... This home features; large fenced yard, deck, HUGE family room, finished basement with a full bath, hardwoods, updated kitchen, and more.

K-D Moving & Storage Inc.

HomeWork A cooperative effort of City Newspaper and RochesterCityLiving, a program of the Landmark Society.

46 years of office and household moving and deliveries

473-6610 or 473-4357

Ryan Smith

NYS Licensed Real Estate Salesperson 201-0724

RochesterSells.com

23 Arlington Street NY D.O.T.#9657/ USDOT 1644177NY

www.KDmoving.com

Find your way home with TO ADVERTISE CONTACT TRACEY TODAY! CALL 244-3329 X10 OR EMAIL TMYKINS@ROCHESTER-CITYNEWS.COM

SMALL END TABLE, hardwood v-good 585-586-6484 $30 SOFA BROWN, LEATHER, Three cushion, 6’4”L, 24”D, back height from floor 3’. E/C, very slightly used. Purchased early summer $1600. Sell for $700.00 or reasonable offer 585-663-6983

Garage and Yard Sales RUMMAGE SALE Huge selection! Housewares, clothes, furniture, books, etc. Friday March 16 and Saturday March 17 10 AM to 5 PM Church of Epiphany 3285 Buffalo Rd, Gates

Miscellaneous DISH NETWORK - Satellite TV Over 190 Channels now ONLY $59.99/ mo! 2 year price guarantee, FREE Installation, FREE Streaming. More of what you want! Save HUNDREDS over Cable and DIRECTV. Add Internet as low as $14.95/mo! 1-800-943-0838 DISH NETWORK- SATELLITE Television Services. Now Over 190 channels for ONLY $49.99/mo! HBOFREE for one year, FREE Installation, FREE Streaming, FREE HD. Add Internet for $14.95 a month. 1-800-373-6508 (AAN CAN) DO YOU HAVE CHRONIC KNEE OR BACK PAIN? If you have insurance, you may qualify for the perfect brace at little to no cost. Get yours today! 1-800-510-3338 KILL BED BUGS & THEIR EGGS! Buy Harris Bed Bug Killers/KIT Complete Treatment System. Available: Hardware Stores, The Home Depot, homedepot.com (AAN CAN) KILL BED BUGS! Buy Harris Bed Bug Killers/ KIT Complete Treatment System. Available: Hardware Stores. The Home Depot, homedepot.com. Try Harris Guaranteed Roach Killers Too! KILL ROACHES - GUARANTEED! Buy Harris Roach Tablets with Lure. Odorless, Long Lasting. Available: Hardware Stores, The Home Depot, homedepot.com (AAN CAN) OXYGEN - ANYTIME. Anywhere. No tanks to refill. No deliveries. Only 2.8 pounds! FAA approved! FREE info kit: Call 1-855-730-7811

Looking For... CONTACT WITH RELATIVES THOMAS ROBERT ALLEN & MABEL WHITE. Formerly resided 107 Miller St, Ithaca NY. (buried Rochester NY, Mount Hope Cemetery) Canadian/Toronto connection in the 1880’s. Any information, please call Dick 423-344-1118

Everything old is new

24 Rowley St.

Location, location, location! Built in 1874, the house at 24 Rowley Street has it all. Tucked on a quiet, tree lined street, it sits at the western end of the proposed Park Avenue Historic District. This District would make it possible for homeowners to take advantage of the New York State Historic Homeowners Tax Credit program, which provides tax credits worth 20% of qualified rehabilitation work done to owner-occupied homes. Possible tax credits aside, this house is perfectly placed to enjoy all the great events and opportunities that the city of Rochester and the Park Avenue area have to offer. In addition, it has off-street parking in an attached garage for convenience and shelter from Rochester’s winters. The front yard is enclosed with a low iron fence, which adds charm and memories of its past. The back and side yards are enclosed with a taller privacy fence. There is a front porch for socializing and an enclosed side porch perfect for outdoor dining or reading. There is a mature tree in the backyard that provides a shady, serene haven. Many raised beds along the fence line and large stone slabs in the yard create an area that would require minimal upkeep while still offering multiple opportunities for landscaping, plantings, and entertainment. The privacy fence encloses the yard, making it seem like a private park in the city. Upon entrance, there is a central hallway that opens to the living room on the right and the main staircase on the left. It ends in the dining

room at the back of the house. Touches of the house’s history are everywhere. Much of the wood flooring and doors are original to the house. The living room has beautiful floor to ceiling front windows, a fireplace, and double wooden and glass doors that lead to the side deck. The dining room includes a full length wooden corner cabinet with glass paneled doors. The kitchen has been updated with tile flooring, granite counter tops, and stainless steel appliances. The full basement has a lot of potential for creating usable space beyond just storage or laundry facilities. Throughout the house, many windows bring in an abundance of natural light. The main staircase and upper hallways are wide and spacious. Three bedrooms and a large updated full bath complete the upstairs. The main bedroom at the front of the house features a large walk-in closet. 24 Rowley Street has 1,408 square feet and is listed at $199,900. For more information, contact Ashley Nowak with Howard Hanna Real Estate Services at 585-472-3016. For information on the proposed Park Avenue Historic District, you can visit www. landmarksociety.org/parkave or contact Caitlin Meives at The Landmark Society of Western New York. by Terri Littlefield Terri is a Landmark Society volunteer.

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rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 23


cont. from page 23

Jam Section

Mind Body Spirit

BRIAN S. MARVIN Lead vocalist, looking for an audition to join band, cover tunes, originals and has experience with bands 585-259-3717

MAKE THE CALL TO START GETTING CLEAN TODAY. Free 24/7 Helpline for alcohol & drug addiction treatment. Get help! It is time to take your life back! Call Now: 855-7324139 (AAN CAN)

CALLING ALL MUSICIANS OF ALL GENRES the Rochester Music Coalition wants you! Please register on our website. For further info: www.rochestermusiccoalition.org info@rochestermusiccoalition.org 585-235-8412 EXPERIENCED DRUMMER Looking to join band playing clubs, festivals & parties. Call Bob, leave message 585-705-3142 FRESH, FUNKY, R&B/neo-soul/jazzrock project, looking for bassist. Song list includes Whinehouse, Badu, Daft punk etc. Practice in Irondequoit Mondays @ 6. 2ndstreetsymphony@gmail.com GROOVY, JAZZY, FUNKY new group in search of a Keyboard player. Playing Winehouse, Badu, daft punk. Practice in Irondequoit Mondays @ 6. 2ndstreetsymphony@gmail.com JACKSON KELLY KE3 guitar with hard case. $449 585-381-0768 MESA BOOGIE - Rect-o-Verb guitar amplifier. $74 931-0768

MEDICARE DOESN’T COVER all of your medical expenses. A Medicare Supplemental Plan can help cover costs that Medicare does not. Get a free quote today by calling now. Hours: 24/7. 1-800-730-9940

Attorneys LUNG CANCER ? And Age 60+? You And Your Family May Be Entitled To Significant Cash Award. Call 866951-9073 for Information. No Risk. No Money Out Of Pocket.

Financial Services DENIED CREDIT?? - Work to Repair Your Credit Report With The Trusted Leader in Credit Repair. Call Lexington Law for a FREE credit report summary & credit repair consultation. 855-620-9426. John C. Heath, Attorney at Law, PLLC, dba Lexington Law Firm. (AAN CAN)

EMPLOYMENT / CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

Employment AIRLINE CAREERS START Here – Get trained as FAA certified Aviation Technician. Financial aid for qualified students. Job placement assistance. Call AIM for free information 866-296-7094 CHARITY FUNDRAISERS NEEDED! Participants are assigned Host PUBLIC Venues 2 to 3 Days a week in their region as a greeter to passersby patrons. Representative offers help info, memberships, or a patriotic item for a donation. Must have car and be willing to travel. Seniors and Veterans encouraged. Base wage, bonus, and mileage paid. Call 866.212.5592 or email to; Jely@veteransoutreach.org INSTALLERS NEEDED American Carpet and Home Depot looking for experienced installers. We offer competitive Pay rate scale. Must own your own van and proper tools. Contact Rodney 716-583-1468 LS3P IS SEEKING a Specifications Writer for our office in Charlotte, NC. Qualified applicants possess a Bachelor’s or Associates Degree in design or construction related field preferred. An ideal candidate will have 5-7 years of experience in assembling specifications for projects of wide ranging design and scope. http://www.ls3p.com/opportunities/ RELATED MANAGEMENT is currently seeking a highly experienced Maintenance Technician for a 195 unit affordable housing unit in Rochester, NY. Please email averhoof@related.com with a resume for consideration. UNIVERSITY OF ROCHESTER Lecturer - Rochester, New York. Teach courses in Portuguese language, and language teaching and learning methodologies at the university level. Provide oversight of daily language center operations. Send resume to Sarah Van Munster, 222 Lattimore Hall, Rochester, NY 14627.

Volunteers Advocate, Empower, Educate NYS Long-Term Care Ombudsman Program seeks volunteers to help ensure quality of care for nursing home and assisted living residents.

24 CITY MARCH 7 - 13, 2018

Next training: April 2018. Contact: 585-287-6378 or email: dfrink@ lifespan-roch.org BECOME A DOCENT at the Rochester Museum & Science Center Must be an enthusiastic communicator, Like working with children. Learn more at http://www. rmsc.org/Support/Volunteer Or call 585-697-1948 CARING FOR CAREGIVERS Lifespan is looking for volunteers to offer respite to caregivers whose loved ones have been diagnosed with early stage Alzheimer’s Disease. For details call Eve at 244-8400 Contact Urban League Of Rochester today to become a mentor to the youth in our community! Email Charisma Dupree at cdupree@ulr.org to get started. MEALS ON WHEELS needs YOU to deliver meals to YOUR neighbors in need. Available weekdays between 11:30 AM and 1:00 PM? Visit our website at www.vnsnet.com or call 274-4385 to get started! OPERA GUILD OF Rochester needs a volunteer to assist with newsletter publication, and event helpers for the annual recital and opera presentations. For details see home page at operaguildofrochester.com. SENECA PARK ZOO Society seeking volunteers and docents for ongoing involvement or special events. Roles available for all interests. Contact Volunteers@senecazoo.org to learn more. ST. JOHN’S HOME s looking for volunteers to transport residents on Tuesday mornings to and from Catholic Mass within our home. Please call volunteer office at 7601293 for more information.

Career Training AIRLINE CAREERS begin here – Get started by training as FAA certified Aviation Technician. Financial aid for qualified students. Job placement assistance. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance 800-725-1563 (AAN CAN)

Legal Ads [ LAOILTEE.COM, LLC ]

[ NOTICE ]

[ NOTICE ]

[ NOTICE ]

Laoiltee.com, LLC filed Articles of Organization with the New York Department of State on 11/29/2017. Its office is located in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent of the Company upon whom process against it may be served and a copy of any process shall be mailed to 19A Veldor Park, Rochester, NY 14612. The purpose of the Company is apparel .

Deborah Essler LLC Arts of Org. filed SSNY 12/29/17. Office: Monroe Co. SSNY design agent of LLC upon whom process may be served & mail to PO Box 16546 Rochester, NY 14616 General Purpose

Notice is hereby given that an alcohol beverage license,pending, has been applied for. To consume beer, wine, & liquor at retail in a Mexican restaurant, under the Alcoholic Beverage Control Law, at 155 STATE STREET ROCHESTER, NY. In Monroe County for on premises consumption. *ISMAEL AGUIRRE INTERPRISES CORP *DBA* EL SAUZA MEXICAN RESTAURANT

Notice of Formation of Acorn Café, LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 02/09/18. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 85 High Tech Drive, Rush NY 14543. Purpose: any lawful activities.

[ LEGAL NOTICE ] NOTICE OF FORMATION OF Wilson Digital, LLC. LLC filed Articles of Organization with the NYS DOS on November 28, 2017. Office location: Monroe County. The Sec. of State is designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. The address to which the Secretary of State shall mail a copy of any process shall be 7014 13th Ave, Ste 202 Brooklyn, NY 11228. Purpose of LLC: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] 1600 PORTLAND AVENUE LLC (LLC) filed Arts. of Org. with NY Secy. of State (SS) on 1/18/2018. LLC’s office is in Monroe County. SS is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS shall mail a copy of any process to LLC’s principal business location at 1600 Portland Avenue, Rochester, NY 14621. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] 3327 Brighton-Henrietta LLC (LLC) filed Arts. of Org. with NY Secy. of State (SS) on August 28, 2017. LLC’s office is in Monroe Co. SS is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS will mail a copy of any process to 162 Buttonwood Dr., Hilton, NY 14468. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] 570 LEXINGTON AVE LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 01/31/18. Office: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to the LLC, 570 Lexington Avenue, Rochester, NY 14613. Purpose: Any lawful purpose [ NOTICE ] BLUE ANVIL NATIONAL CONTRACTORS LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 03/01/18. Office: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to the LLC, 326 East Avenue, Rochester, NY 14604. Purpose: Any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] BOT LINKS LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 02/07/18 Office in Monroe Co. SSNY design. Agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to The LLC 100 Boxart ST Ste. 234 Rochester, NY 14612. Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Bpg Associates, LLC Arts of Org. filed SSNY 1/4/18. Office: Monroe Co. SSNY design agent of LLC upon whom process may be served & mail to 1121 N. Winton Rd Rochester, NY 14609 General Purpose [ NOTICE ] Cusco/Lima LLC Arts of Org. filed SSNY 10/11/17. Office: Monroe Co. SSNY design agent of LLC upon whom process may be served & mail to US Corp Agents, Inc. 7014 13th Ave #202 Brooklyn, NY 11228 General Purpose

[ NOTICE ] Deejaz Management LLC Arts of Org. filed SSNY 12/7/17. Office: Monroe Co. SSNY design agent of LLC upon whom process may be served & mail to Legalcorp Solutions, LLC 11 Broadway #615 New York, NY 10004 General Purpose [ NOTICE ] DUNNS SMALL ENGINE REPAIR LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 01/18/2018. Office loc: Orleans County. SSNY has been designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: James E Dunn, 3178 Oak Orchard Rd, Albion, NY 14411. Purpose: Any Lawful Purpose. [ NOTICE ] EMC Compliance LLC, Arts of Org. filed with Sec. of State of NY (SSNY) 1/29/2018. Cty: Monroe. SSNY desig. as agent upon whom process against may be served & shall mail process to 6 Erie Crescent, Fairport, NY 14450. General Purpose. [ NOTICE ] HAMSA REAL ESTATE LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 8/22/2016. Office in Monroe Co. SSNY desig. agent of LLC whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Michael Santariello, Esq., 200 Canal View Blvd., Ste. 206, Rochester, NY 14623. Purpose: Any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] IT’S OK. IT’S A CRUISE, LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 2/13/2018. Office in Monroe Co. SSNY desig. agent of LLC whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail process to 607 Palmyra Rd., PO Box 884, Pittsford, NY 14534, which is also the principal business location. Purpose: Any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] LOWDEN POINT CAPITAL LLC (LLC) filed Arts. of Org. with NY Secy. of State (SS) on 2/14/2018. LLC’s office is in Monroe County. SS is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and SS shall mail a copy of such process to 73 State Street, 3rd Floor, Rochester, NY 14614. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Maya Lighting, LLC filed Articles of Organization with the NY Secretary of State (“SSNY”) on May 16, 2017. Office is located in Monroe County and its principal business location is 400 Andrews Street Suite 360, Rochester NY 14604. SSNY is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. NYSS shall mail a copy of any process to 400 Andrews Street Suite 360, Rochester NY 14604. Purpose is to engage in any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Mollimoo, LLC Arts of Org. filed SSNY 1/31/18. Office: Monroe Co. SSNY design agent of LLC upon whom process may be served & mail to Viktoriya Napora 1439 Plank Rd Webster, NY 14580 General Purpose [ NOTICE ] Not. of Form. of MCB Holdings, LLC. Art. of Org. filed by Sec’y of State (SSNY) 2/8/18. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY DESIGNATED AS AGENT OF LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY may mail a copy of any process to 316 Valley Road, Rochester, NY 14618. Purpose: Any lawful activity.

[ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Brahm Properties LLC; Art of Org filed with Sec’y of State (SSNY) 2/13/2018; Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 135 Windmill Trail, Rochester, New York 14624. Purpose: Any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of 102 State Street, LLC (the “LLC”). Articles of Organization filed with the NY Secy of State (“SOS”) on 2/2/18. The office of the LLC is in Monroe County. SOS is designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SOS shall mail a copy of such process to P. O. Box #444, Brockport, NY 14420. The LLC is formed to engage in any lawful activity for which an LLC may be formed under the NY LLC law. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of 114 West Ave, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 1/8/2018. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 114 West Ave., Rochester, NY 14611. Purpose: any lawful act [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of 127 CONKEY AVE ROCHESTER LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 1/5/2018. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 3118 N. Ventura Rd., Oxnard, CA 93036. Purpose: any lawful act [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of 28 Lawrence Street Associates, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 2/20/18. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 268 Milburn Street, Rochester, NY 14607. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of 3 Industrial Park Circle, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 1/8/2018. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 3567 Sweden Walker Rd., Brockport, NY 14420. Purpose: any lawful act [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of 38 STATE STREET LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 1/22/2018. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o Chad R. Hayden, Esq., 1634 Lehigh Station Rd., Henrietta, NY 14467. Purpose: any lawful act

[ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Amitas Properties of Richfield, LLC. Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 11/28/17. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to the LLC at 4 Epping Wood Trl, Pittsford, NY 14534. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Autumn Leaves Enterprises, LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) January 4, 2018. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 502 North Ave, Hilton NY, 14468. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of BAILEY’S SEPTIC SERVICE, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 02/21/18. Office location: Orleans County. Princ. office of LLC: 1443 Oak Orchard Rd., Waterport, NY 14571. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, 232 W. Park St., Albion, NY 14411. Purpose: Any lawful activity [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of BAMF Management II LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 1/31/2018. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 22 Ryder Cup Circle Pittsford, NY 14534 . Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of BAMF Management III LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 2/2/2018. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 22 Ryder Cup Circle Pittsford, NY 14534 . Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Castleman Road LLC Art. Of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) February 21, 2018. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 859 Rolins Run, Webster, NY 14580. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Charisma Yoga Bar, LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) February 7, 2018. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 114 N Main St, Fairport, NY 14450. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Chordia Consulting, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 2/6/18. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail


Legal Ads process to: The LLC, 245 Georgian Court Road, Rochester, NY 14610. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Dancing Crowns LLC Art. of Org. filed Secy’s of State (SSNY) 01/24/2018. Office location Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 500 Winchester St., Rochester NY 14615. Purpose: any lawful activities [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of David Jackson Team, LLC. Articles of Organization filed with the New York Department of State on 12/20/2017. Its office is located in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent upon whom process against the Company may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to: 550 Latona Rd. Ste. C301, Rochester, New York 14626. The purpose of the Company is any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] NOTICE OF FORMATION OF DOMESTIC LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY; Name of LLC: CMS Transport of Western NY, LLC; Date of filing: 1/19/18; Office of the LLC: Monroe Co.; The NY Secretary of State has been designated as the agent upon whom process may be served. NYSS may mail a copy of any process to the LLC at 60 Endicar Drive, Rochester, New York 14622; Purpose of LLC: Any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of EMS Tactical Group LLC ​ Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 02/07/2018​ . Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 21 Elm Street, Webster NY 14580 .​ Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Fundere Consulting, LLC. Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) January 30, 2018. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to: 12 Trotters Field Run, Pittsford, NY 14534. Purpose: any lawful activities [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of HAVENS LAW PLLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) February 7, 2018. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of PLLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 760 Chili Avenue Extension, Churchville, NY 14428. Purpose: Practice the profession of law.

[ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of iKON Amusement & Travel LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 12/13/17. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 295 Chili Scottsville Rd, Churchville, NY 14428 . Purpose: any lawful activities [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of iKON Ice Cream LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 2/15/18. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of In the Balance Health Coaching, LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 1/22/2018. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 116 Holley Brook Drive, Penfield, New York 14526. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of JNM Industries, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 1/10/2018. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 114 West Ave., Rochester, NY 14611. Purpose: any lawful act [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of JPowell Services LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 11/16/2017. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to Corporate Filings of New York 90 State St. STE 700, Office 40 Albany NY 12207 . Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Live, Work, Life Management, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 2/23/18. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, c/o Sammy Feldman, 3445 Winton Place, Ste. 228, Rochester, NY 14623. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of MACABEE REPUBLIC LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/5/2017. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served.

To place your ad in the LEGAL section, contact Tracey Mykins by phone at (585) 244-3329 x10 or by email at legals@rochester-citynews.com SSNY shall mail process to: Charles Switzer, 464 State St., Rochester, NY 14608. Purpose: any lawful act. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Market Seafood LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 2/5/18. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Premier Seafood, LLC, c/o Sammy Feldman, 3445 Winton Place, Ste. 228, Rochester, NY 14623. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Marqee Finds LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 2/9/18. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 22 Hidden Wood Drive, Rochester, NY 14616. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Monroe Air, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 2/12/18. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o The LLC, Attn: Paul Adams, 3445 Winton Place, Ste. 228, Rochester, NY 14623. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Monroe and Wayne Construction, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 2/20/18. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, Attn: Steven Meyer, 60 Browns Race, Rochester, NY 14614. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of NeighborHOOD Scholar LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 01/29/2018. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 362 Whispering Pines Circle Rochester, NY 14612 . Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Newnew Beauty Bar LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 08/28/2017. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 908 Bay Street Rochester, NY 14609. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Prism Dental Laboratories LLC. Arts. of Org. filed

with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 1/24/18. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 3592 Monroe Avenue, Pittsford, NY 14534. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Relentless Forward Progress Consulting, LLC. Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) October 25, 2017. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to the LLC at PO Box 23954, Rochester, NY 14692. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of RMP DEVELOPMENT, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 1/4/2018. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 706 East Ave., Rochester, NY 14607. Purpose: any lawful act [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of RMP PROPERTY MANAGEMENT, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 1/2/2018. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 706 East Ave., Rochester, NY 14607. Purpose: any lawful act [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of ROCHESTER BEER PARK LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/26/2017. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 375 Averill Ave., Rochester, NY 14620. Purpose: any lawful act [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of ROSCO RENOVATIONS LLC. Art.of Org. filed Secretary of State of NY (“SSNY”) 2/14/2018. Office location: Monroe Co. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 61 Wilmer St., Rochester, NY 14607. Purpose: any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of RTECH CONSULTING, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 2/20/18. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 34 Tannon Drive North, Fairport, NY 14450. Purpose: any lawful activity.

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Notice of Formation of Tux Cat Entertainment LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 02-092018. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 500 Winchester St. Rochester, NY 14615. Purpose: any lawful activities.

Sarratori Holding LLC (LLC) filed Arts. of Org. with NY Secy. of State (SS) on August 28, 2017. LLC’s office is in Monroe Co. SS is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS will mail a copy of any process to 162 Buttonwood Dr., Hilton, NY 14468. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity.

119 Clifton LLC Arts of Org. filed SSNY 1/16/18. Office: Monroe Co. SSNY design agent of LLC upon whom process may be served & mail to POB 30071 Rochester, NY 14603 General Purpose

[ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of TEPCOGLASS, LLC Appl. for Auth. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 02/14/18. Office location: Monroe County. LLC formed in Texas (TX) on 12/29/17. Princ. office of LLC: 11210 Ables Ln., Dallas, TX 75229. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Corporation Service Co., 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207-2543. Cert. of Form. filed with TX Secy. of State, James E. Rudder Bldg., 1019 Brazo, Austin, TX 78701. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] OWLU LLC. Filed 1/12/18. Office: ORLEANS Co. SSNY designated as agent for process & shall mail to: 662 Bauder Park Dr, Alden, NY 14004. Purpose: General. [ NOTICE ] Quincy 9193 LLC Arts of Org. filed SSNY 2/6/18. Office: Monroe Co. SSNY design agent of LLC upon whom process may be served & mail to Po Box 30071 Rochester, NY 14603 General Purpose [ NOTICE ] RED RIVER VALLEY PROPERTIES LLC, a domestic LLC, filed with the SSNY on 2/2/2018. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served, SSNY shall mail process to RED RIVER VALLEY PROPERTIES LLC, 160 Olivia Drive, Rochester, NY 14626 General Purpose. [ NOTICE ] Revolution Studio & Wellness Bar, LLC (LLC) filed Arts. of Org. with NY Secy. of State (SS) on 12/8/2017. LLC’s office is in Monroe Co. SS is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS will mail a copy of any process to 9 Bryden Pk., Webster, NY 14580. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Rochester Lead Automotive, LLC (LLC) filed Arts. of Org. with NY Secy. of State (SS) on December 26, 2017. LLC’s office is in Monroe Co. SS is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS will mail a copy of any process to 76 Anderson Ave., Rochester, NY 14607. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity.

[ NOTICE ] Sisu Counseling and Consulting LLC Arts of Org. filed SSNY 11/1/17. Office: Monroe Co. SSNY design agent of LLC upon whom process may be served & mail to 411 Parsons Acres Ontario, NY 14519 General Purpose [ NOTICE ] SMJF EDGEWOOD LLC (LLC) filed Arts. of Org. with NY Secy. of State (SS) on 1/17/2018. LLC’s office is in Monroe County. SS is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS shall mail a copy of any process to LLC’s principal business location at 717 Landing Road North, Rochester, NY 14625. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] SMJF EDGEWOOD REALTY LLC (LLC) filed Arts. of Org. with NY Secy. of State (SS) on 1/17/2018. LLC’s office is in Monroe County. SS is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS shall mail a copy of any process to LLC’s principal business location at 717 Landing Road North, Rochester, NY 14625. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity [ NOTICE ] Toni Essler LLC Arts of Org. filed SSNY 12/29/17. Office: Monroe Co. SSNY design agent of LLC upon whom process may be served & mail to Po Box 16120 Rochester, NY 14616 General Purpose [ NOTICE ] Ua2us Transport, LLC Arts of Org. filed SSNY 10/30/17. Office: Monroe Co. SSNY design agent of LLC upon whom process may be served & mail to 180 Sedgley Park West Henrietta, NY 14586 General Purpose [ NOTICE ] VR Playground LLC, Arts of Org. filed with Sec. of State of NY (SSNY) 11/21/2017. Cty: Monroe. SSNY desig. as agent upon whom process against may be served & shall mail process to Russell Tartaglia, 362 Shore Acres Dr., Rochester, NY 14612. General Purpose. [ NOTICE ] Wetmore Rentals LLC, Arts of Org. filed with Sec. of State of NY (SSNY) 2/12/2018. Cty: Monroe. SSNY desig. as agent upon whom process against may be served & shall mail process to 155 Edgerton St., Rochester, NY 14607. General Purpose.

[ NOTICE } Coastal Vendor, LLC Arts of Org. filed SSNY 11/13/17. Office: Monroe Co. SSNY design agent of LLC upon whom process may be served & mail to 116 S Ridge Trail Fairport, NY 14450 General Purpose [ NOTICE } Notice of Formation of RUSH PRESERVE LLC Cert. of Conversion filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 02/02/18, converting PINNACLE PARTNERSHIP to RUSH PRESERVE LLC. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 2729 Pinnacle Rd., Rush, NY 14543. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE OF APPLICATION ] Notice is hereby given that a license, number pending, for beer, wine and cider, has been applied for by the undersigned to sell beer, wine and cider at retail in a public golf club under the Alcoholic Beverage Control Law at 643 Kendall Road, Town of Riga, County of Monroe for on premises consumption. County of Monroe Churchville Park Golf Course Lawrence A. Staub, Jr. – Director of Parks [ Notice of Formation ] 1980 East Avenue LLC (“LLC”) filed Articles of Organization with the NY Sec. of State (“SSNY”) on 2/6/18. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall forward service of process to 11 Pierceon Court, Penfield, NY 14526. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ Notice of Formation ] 291 S. Plymouth, LLC (“LLC”) filed Articles of Organization with the NY Sec. of State (“SSNY”) on 7/11/17. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall forward service of process to 15 Fairhaven Road, Rochester, NY 14610. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ Notice of Formation ] Bureau SC LLC (“LLC”) filed Articles of Organization with the NY Sec. of State (“SSNY”) on 12/26/17. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall forward service

of process to 30 Rhinecliff Drive, Rochester, NY 14618. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ Notice of Formation ] D&T Rents Auburn LLC (the “LLC”) filed Articles of Organization with the NY Sec. of State (“SSNY”) on 2/9/18. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall forward service of process to P.O. Box 92280, Rochester, NY 14692. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] Name: 2088 FIVE MILE LINE PROPERTY, LLC. Arts. Of Org. filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 02/21/2018. Office Location: Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to: C/O 2088 FIVE MILE LINE PROPERTY, LLC, 2088 Five Mile Line Road, Penfield, New York 14526. Purpose: Any Lawful Purpose. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] Name: JADE GAFF, LLC. Arts. Of Org. filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 02/26/2018. Office Location: Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to: C/O JADE GAFF, LLC, One East Main Street, 10th Floor, Rochester, New York 14614. Purpose: Any Lawful Purpose [ Notice of Formation ] Treahy Consultation Services LLC (“LLC”) filed Articles of Organization with the NY Sec. of State (“SSNY”) on 12/27/17. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall forward service of process to 25 Sanibel Drive, Fairport, NY 14450. Purpose: any lawful activity [ Notice of Formation } The Woolbright Group, LLC (“LLC”) filed Articles of Organization with the NY Sec. of State (“SSNY”) on 2/14/18. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall forward service of process to 667 Midship Circle, Webster, NY 14580. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY ] The name of the LLC is ROC The Mic Productions, LLC. The Articles of Organization were filed with the NY Secretary of State on 2/16/18. The LLC office is located in Monroe County. The NY Secretary of State is designated as the agent of the LLC upon whom process may be

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Legal Ads served, and the address a copy shall be mailed is 299 Avalon Dr Rochester NY 14618. The LLC is managed by a manager. The purpose of the LLC is any lawful business. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY ] The name of the LLC is WallByrd LLC. The Articles of Organization were filed with the NY Secretary of State on 1/31/18. The LLC office is located in Monroe County. The NY Secretary of State is designated as the agent of the LLC upon whom process may be served, and the address a copy shall be mailed is 10 Cedarwood Cir Pittsford NY 14534. The LLC is managed by a manager. The purpose of the LLC is any lawful business [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LLC ] Girlboss Developments LLC filed articles of organization with the New York Secretary of State on 02/13/2018 with an effective date of formation of 02/13/2018. Its principal place of business is located in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent upon whom process may be served. A copy of any process shall be mailed to 218 MacIntosh Dr., Rochester, NY 14626. The purpose of the LLC is to engage in any lawful activity for which Limited Liability Companies may be organized under Section 203 of the New York Limited Liability Company Law. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF The Bodhisattva Way, LLC ] Notice of formation of Limited Liability Company (“LLC”). Articles of Organization filed with Sec. of State of NY (“SSNY”) on February 21, 2018. Office location: c/o Reformation Lutheran Church, 111 North Chestnut Street, Rochester, NY 14604, Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as

agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of any process to the LLC, c/o Reformation Lutheran Church, 111 North Chestnut Street, Rochester, NY 14604. Purpose: to engage in any lawful activity. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF WILMORITE REALTY LLC ] Wilmorite Realty LLC (the “LLC”) filed Articles of Organization with NY Secretary of State (SSNY) 1/22/18. Office location: Monroe County, NY. Principal business location: 1265 Scottsville Rd, Rochester, NY 14624. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to CT Corporation System, 111 Eighth Avenue, NY, NY 10011 which is also the registered agent upon whom process may be served. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING ] NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a public hearing pursuant to Article 18-A of the New York State General Municipal Law will be held by the County of Monroe Industrial Development Agency d/b/a Imagine Monroe Powered By COMIDA (the “Agency”) on the 19th day of March, 2018 at 10:00 a.m., local time, in the Hojack Room at the Webster Town Hall, 1000 Ridge Road, Webster, New York 14580, in connection with the following matter: MORGAN PUBLISHER APARTMENTS, LLC, a New York limited liability company, or an entity formed or to be formed (collectively, the “Company”) has requested that the Agency assist with a certain Project (the “Project”), consisting of: (A) the acquisition of a leasehold interest in a portion of an approximately 30.45-acre parcel of

To place your ad in the LEGAL section, contact Tracey Mykins by phone at (585) 244-3329 x10 or by email at legals@rochester-citynews.com

land located at 875 Publishers Parkway in the Town of Webster, New York (the “Land”); (B) the construction thereon of (i) a threestory, 74-unit apartment building comprised of 1- and 2-bedroom apartments, (ii) 135 two-bedroom townhomes situate in 36 buildings with each townhome to include a 1- or 2-car garage, (iii) a community center and (iv) 3 covered garage buildings with 55 parking spaces for tenants of the apartment building (collectively, the “Improvements”); and (C) the acquisition and installation therein, thereon or thereabout of certain machinery, equipment and related personal property (the “Equipment” and, together with the Land and the Improvements, the “Facility”). The Facility will be initially operated and/ or managed by the Company. The Agency will acquire a leasehold interest in the Facility and lease the Facility back to the Company. The Company will operate the Facility during the term of the lease. At the end of the lease term the Agency’s leasehold interest will be terminated. The Agency contemplates that it will provide financial assistance (the “Financial Assistance”) to the Company in the form of sales and use tax exemptions and a mortgage recording tax exemption, consistent with the policies of the Agency, and a partial real property tax abatement. The Agency will, at the above-stated time and place, present a copy of the Company’s Application (including the Benefit/Incentive analysis) and hear all persons with views in favor of or opposed to either the location or nature of the Facility, or the proposed financial assistance being contemplated by the Agency. In addition, at, or prior to, such hearing, interested parties may

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submit to the Agency written materials pertaining to such matters. Dated: March 7, 2018 COUNTY OF MONROE INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT AGENCY D/B/A IMAGINE MONROE POWERED BY COMIDA By: Jeffrey R. Adair, Executive Director [ NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING ] NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a public hearing pursuant to Article 18-A of the New York State General Municipal Law will be held by the County of Monroe Industrial Development Agency d/b/a Imagine Monroe Powered By COMIDA (the “Agency”) on the 20th day of March, 2018 at 11:45 a.m., local time, at the Ebenezer Watts Conference Center, 49 S. Fitzhugh Street, Rochester, New York 14614, in connection with the following matter: C&P Equities, LLC, a New York limited liability company, or an entity formed or to be formed (collectively, the “Company”) has requested that the Agency assist with a certain Project (the “Project”), consisting of: (A) the acquisition of a leasehold interest in an approximately 5-acre parcel of land located at 655 Driving Park Avenue in the City of Rochester, New York 14613 [Tax Map No. 090.800-0002-003] (the “Land”) together with the approximately 100,000± squarefoot building located thereon (the “Existing Improvements”); (B) the renovation and modernization of the Existing Improvements including, but not limited to, office build-outs, security systems updates, factory dividing walls, dock installation and exterior improvements (collectively, the “Improvements”); and (C) the acquisition and installation therein, thereon or thereabout of certain machinery, equipment and related personal property (the “Equipment” and, together with the Land, the Existing Improvements and the Improvements, the “Facility”), to be subleased to various small business tenants for office, manufacturing and warehousing uses. The Facility will be initially operated and/ or managed by the Company. The Agency will acquire a leasehold interest in the Facility and lease the Facility back to the Company. The Company will operate the Facility during the term of the lease. At the end of the lease term the Agency’s leasehold interest will be terminated. The

26 CITY MARCH 7 - 13, 2018

Agency contemplates that it will provide financial assistance (the “Financial Assistance”) to the Company in the form of sales and use tax exemptions and a mortgage recording tax exemption, consistent with the policies of the Agency, and a partial real property tax abatement. The Agency will, at the above-stated time and place, present a copy of the Company’s Application (including the Benefit/Incentive analysis) and hear all persons with views in favor of or opposed to either the location or nature of the Facility, or the proposed financial assistance being contemplated by the Agency. In addition, at, or prior to, such hearing, interested parties may submit to the Agency written materials pertaining to such matters. Dated: March 7, 2018 COUNTY OF MONROE INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT AGENCY D/B/A IMAGINE MONROE POWERED BY COMIDA By: Jeffrey R. Adair, Executive Director [ NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING ] NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a public hearing pursuant to Article 18-A of the New York State General Municipal Law will be held by the County of Monroe Industrial Development Agency d/b/a Imagine Monroe Powered By COMIDA (the “Agency”) on the 19th day of March, 2018 at 11:30 a.m., local time, at the Irondequoit Town Hall, 1280 Titus Avenue, Rochester, New York 14617, in connection with the following matter: 1733 RIDGE RD LLC, a New York limited liability company, or an entity formed or to be formed (collectively, the “Company”) has requested that the Agency assist with the development of a certain project to be known as “Skyview on the Ridge” starting with Phase I which consists of: (A) the acquisition of a leasehold interest in a portion of an approximately 36.68acre parcel of land located at Medley Center Parkway in the Town of Irondequoit, New York 14622 [Tax Map Nos.: 092.05-1-86, 092.051-85.111, 092.05-184, 092.05-1-85.2 and 092.05-1-87.1] (collectively, the “Land”) together with a portion of the existing vacant Irondequoit Mall located thereon (the “Existing Improvements”); (B) the renovation of approximately 100,000 square feet of interior space (formerly the food court) within the Existing Improvements to be used as model

space to show potential tenants together with the installation of a new roof, exterior landscaping improvements and filling/re-striping the parking lot (collectively, the “Improvements”); and (C) the acquisition and installation therein, thereon or thereabout of certain machinery, equipment and related personal property (the “Equipment” and, together with the Land and the Improvements, the “Facility”); all for use as multi-tenant office, mixed-use and flex space. The Facility will be initially operated and/or managed by the Company. The Agency will acquire a leasehold interest in the Facility and lease the Facility back to the Company. The Company will operate the Facility during the term of the lease. At the end of the lease term the Agency’s leasehold interest will be terminated. The Agency contemplates that it will provide financial assistance (the “Financial Assistance”) to the Company in the form of sales and use tax exemptions and a mortgage recording tax exemption, consistent with the policies of the Agency, and a partial real property tax abatement. The Agency will, at the above-stated time and place, present a copy of the Company’s Application (including the Benefit/Incentive analysis) and hear all persons with views in favor of or opposed to either the location or nature of the Facility, or the proposed financial assistance being contemplated by the Agency. In addition, at, or prior to, such hearing, interested parties may submit to the Agency written materials pertaining to such matters. Dated: March 7, 2018 COUNTY OF MONROE INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT AGENCY D/B/A IMAGINE MONROE POWERED BY COMIDA By: Jeffrey R. Adair, Executive Director [ PUBLIC NOTICE ] Katyasi LLC Arts of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 11.25.2016. Office: Monroe. SSNY design. Agent of LLC upon whom process may be served and shall mail copy to 919 North Market Street, Suite 425; Wilmington, DE 19899. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ SUMMONS WITH NOTICE ] SUPREME COURT OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF MONROE INDEX NO. 2016/11789- SYLVIA B. MORALES Plaintiff, against -WILTON A. NUNEZ ALBERTO, Defendant. Plaintiff designates Monroe County as the place

of trial. . The basis of venue is the residence Plaintiff resides at: 15 Savannah Street, Apt. 1B Rochester, New York 14607 ACTION FOR A DIVORCE To the above-named Defendant: YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED to serve a notice of appearance, on the Plaintiff’s Attorney within 20 days after the service of this summons, exclusive of the day of service (or within 30 days after the service is complete if this summons is not personally delivered to you within the State of New York); and in case of your failure to appear, judgment may be taken against you by default for the relief demanded in the notice set forth below. Pursuant to Domestic Relations Law § 255, effective October 9, 2009, notice is hereby given that once the judgment of divorce is signed, a party hereto may or may not be eligible to be covered under the other party’s health insurance plan, depending on the terms of the plan. NOTICE OF ENTRY OF AUTOMATIC ORDERS (D.R.L. 236) Rev. 1/13 FAILURE TO COMPLY WITH THESE ORDERS MAY BE DEEMED A CONTEMPT OF COURT PURSUANT TO the Uniform Rules of the Trial Courts, and DOMESTIC RELATIONS LAW § 236, Part B, Section 2, both you and your spouse (the parties) are bound by the following AUTOMATIC ORDERS, which have been entered against you and your spouse in your divorce action pursuant to 22 NYCRR §202.16(a), and which shall remain in full force and effect during the pendency of the action unless terminated, modified or amended by further order of the court or upon written agreement between the parties: (1) ORDERED: Neither party shall transfer, encumber, assign, remove, withdraw or in any way dispose of, without the consent of the other party in writing, or by order of the court, any property (including, but not limited to, real estate, personal property, cash accounts, stocks, mutual funds, bank accounts, cars and boats) individually or jointly held by the parties, except in the usual course of business, for customary and usual household expenses or for reasonable attorney’s fees in connection with this action. (2) ORDERED: Neither party shall transfer, encumber, assign, remove, withdraw or in any way dispose of any tax deferred funds, stocks or other assets held in any individual retirement accounts, 401K accounts, profit sharing plans, Keogh accounts, or any other pension or retirement account, and the parties shall further refrain from applying for or requesting the payment of retirement benefits or annuity payments of any kind, without the consent of the other party in writing, or upon further order of

the court; except that any party who is already in pay status may continue to receive such payments thereunder. (3) ORDERED: Neither party shall incur unreasonable debts hereafter, including, but not limited to further borrowing against any credit line secured by the family residence, further encumbrancing any assets, or unreasonably using credit cards or cash advances against credit cards, except in the usual course of business or for customary or usual household expenses, or for reasonable attorney’s fees in connection with this action. (4) ORDERED: Neither party shall cause the other party or the children of the marriage to be removed from any existing medical, hospital and dental insurance coverage, and each, and each party shall maintain the existing medical, hospital and dental insurance coverage in full force and effect. (5) ORDERED: Neither party shall change the beneficiaries of any existing life insurance policies and each party shall maintain the existing life insurance, automobile insurance, homeowners and renters insurance policies in full force and effect. IMPORTANT NOTE: After service of the Summons with Notice or Summons and Complaint for divorce, if you or your spouse wishes to modify or dissolve the automatic orders, you must ask the court for approval to do so, or enter into a written modification agreement with your spouse duly signed and acknowledged before a notary public. Dated: February 16, 2018 GILBERT R. PEREZ, ESQ. Attorney for the Plaintiff 30 West Broad Street Suite 203 Rochester, New York 14614 585325-4732 NOTICE: The nature of this action is to dissolve the marriage between the parties, on the grounds of DRL §170(7) (The relationship between the Plaintiff and Defendant has broken down irretrievably for a period of at least six months). The relief sought is a Judgment of Absolute Divorce in favor of the Plaintiff dissolving forever the bonds of matrimony between the parties in this action. The nature of any ancillary or additional relief demanded is: Declaring Plaintiff’s separate property. Awarding Plaintiff counsel fees, expert fees, and other litigation expenses. Granting each party the right to resume the use of any maiden name or other premarriage surname. Awarding Plaintiff such other and further relief as to the court may seem just and proper, together with the costs and disbursements of this action.


Fun

[ LAST WEEK’S SOLUTION ON PAGE 22 ] [ NEWS OF THE WEIRD ] BY THE EDITORS AT ANDREWS MCMEEL SYNDICATION

Wait, What?

Police in Mainz, Germany, responded to an apartment building after cries were heard from within one unit early on Feb. 17, The Associated Press reported. When they arrived, officers found two men, the 58-year-old tenant and a 61-year-old visitor, “hopelessly locked up” with a mannequin dressed as a knight and a large remote-controlled car. The men were too drunk to explain how they had become entangled, and one officer remarked that “the whole thing would have remained a funny episode” if the younger man had not become “more than impolite.” He now faces a charge of insulting officers.

People Different From Us

Metro News reported on Feb. 20 that travelers “remained silent” for 20 minutes while a fellow passenger on a Ural Airlines flight from Antalya, Turkey, to Moscow used the air vent above her seat to dry a pair of underwear. Witnesses reported that the woman showed no shame and that “everybody was looking with interest and confusion.” Debate raged later, however, after video of the woman was posted online, with one commenter speculating that “maybe the takeoff was sort of extreme, so now she has to dry those.” rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 27


28 CITY MARCH 7 - 13, 2018

CITY Newspaper, March 7, 2018  

Greater Rochester's Alternative Newsweekly

CITY Newspaper, March 7, 2018  

Greater Rochester's Alternative Newsweekly