Page 1

DEC. 6 2017, VOL. 47 NO. 14

PERSPECTIVES

Cedric Alexander on police and the community Profile, page 8


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We welcome your comments. Send them to themail@rochester-citynews.com or post them with articles on our website, rochestercitynewspaper.com. Those of fewer than 350 words have a greater chance of being published; we edit selections for publication in print, and we don’t publish comments sent to other media.

Employers can make mass transit a high priority

On our article about the Regional Transit System’s study of its current bus system and bus routes (“Rochester’s Changed. Now It’s Transit’s Turn): A

stakeholder category that is not mentioned strongly enough here is employers. Pactiv and Del Lago have admirably included van pools into their recruitment and planning, as they are located far from the Rochester population base. But there are employers within Monroe County who could also encourage workers and potential workers to use transit by making it a priority. Many job seekers cannot reasonably consider certain employers because the plant is two miles from the nearest bus stop, or the route does not match the employer’s start times. People lose jobs when transportation options fall through, which further impacts our most vulnerable workers. If we make van pools a priority, we can hugely impact the people who want to work but have difficulty getting there.

machines, and elevators. I’ve been on a two-year waiting list for my disability hearing and have no choice but to live on DSS until the hearing materializes – and if I finally win it, three more months of DSS taking a chunk of my settlement money along with the attorneys. After rent, food, and utilities, my monthly cash totals $32 a month. I cannot afford to take the bus or even get necessities at the Dollar Tree. And now my apartment building is in danger of being eliminated due to downtown “revitalization.” I have been pushed out of every decent neighborhood I have ever lived in as a good, quiet, and clean tenant, due to high rents, budget requirements, and landlords putting potential tenants through credit and background checks and refusing any kind of government aid as rent, even though it is a guaranteed monthly payment. JUNI MOON

Revitalizing downtown is definitely a must. I’m just not sure we need owgoods.org to give tax breaks to the wealthiest PITTSFORD PLAZA 387-0070 developers to get it done. It will definitely take money to get it done, but I believe low-interest loans and matching grants for updates and renovating are enough. Rochester desperately needs the tax revenue, so giving tax breaks to those who can afford a $300,000+ condo downtown is not the fairest idea, but I can see how it’s enticing on both sides. Those are the people with more disposable income CHRISTINA FRASER to spend on the surrounding businesses, so enticing them is a On Urban Journal’s “A Question genuinely good idea. But I also for City Hall: Who Is Downtown EXCLUSIVE ADVERTISING PROOF: PLEASE REVIEW IMMEDIATELY! believe there are many who truly rtiser: One World Goods For?”: I live in subsidized housingUSE NOTICE: This ad is designed for EXCLUSIVE USE DON'T DELAY! If there are any necessary corrections, please call at once. want to live downtown regardless. d size: 1-8V downtown as a disabled senior. I in the City Newspaper. Any illustrations, photographs, copy writing, I think there’s a good middle Date: 12-6-17 cannot get employment, even with a design elements or any other content ground, if those with the integrity s rep: BM degree, because I am over 55. There is the SOLE PROPERTY of City OR FAX 244-1126 Newspaper and may not be used in know-how, plus community and ption: Christmas are not that many living situations This ad will run as shown unless we are advised any other publication without the ed on: JW2 City Newspaper.leaders, would just get together to by noon of the Monday preceding publication. for people like me; manyconsent haveof long discuss the best options instead of waiting lists, others have bedbugs, allowing back-office dealings directly slumlords, and drug- and alcoholwith the mayor. addicted neighbors. There is also senior subsidized JOSE PEO housing that reject good tenants over credit ratings and that Land trusts are keep their apartments out of helping people reach for DSS recipients by keeping their rents just over around the US budget requirements, even while On housing activists’ efforts to help advertising that they take DSS. residents avoid eviction through the use of Many buildings are in crimeland trusts (“Housing Trust Gears Up”): ridden neighborhoods, are dirty, Thank you for sharing the great work and have broken windows, washing by Liz McGriff, Take Back the Land,

244-3329

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and City Roots Community Land Trust to bring new and viable options for permanently affordable housing to Rochester. There are over 250 community land trusts across the country. The largest is Champlain Housing Trust in Burlington, Vermont, with 565 owner-occupied homes and 2200 apartments in its portfolio. It was launched in 1984 with a $200,000 seed grant from the administration of thenBurlington Mayor Bernie Sanders. In 2008, Champlain CLT won the prestigious United Nations World Habitat Award, recognizing its innovative, sustainable programs. It’s time for the City of Rochester to get on the bandwagon! JULIE GELFAND

Try enforcement before lowering speed limits

On the Healthi Kids Coalition’s push for lower speed limits on neighborhood streets: There definitely is a speeding

problem on city streets. I typically go 35, and I am almost always the slowest and am passed regularly. But reducing the speed limit to 25 isn’t the answer. Keep it at 30, but aggressive traffic enforcement is needed. On a number of city streets, the norm is 35-45. Some go slower, a few go faster. Let’s work on slowing drivers down to the current speed limit first, before taking the limit down further. #Aggressive traffic enforcement. BRIAN KEITH

Where are local stories that were ‘censored’?

On our publication of the Project Censored list: Great article; we waited a long time for a local article about nationally ignored news stories in 2016. I wonder how long we will have to wait for a local story about the local news which was not reported in 2017 – like conflict of interest in state economic development money or police brutality in Rochester or even the legal victories of residents against the city over the points system? These are just a few of the things we seem to have missed, and there is much, much more. ALEX WHITE

News. Music. Life. Greater Rochester’s Alternative Newsweekly December 6 - 12, 2017 Vol 47 No 14 250 North Goodman Street Rochester, New York 14607-1199 themail@rochester-citynews.com phone (585) 244-3329 fax (585) 244-1126 rochestercitynewspaper.com facebook.com/CityNewspaper twitter.com/roccitynews instagram.com/roccitynews On the cover: Photograph by Ryan Williamson Publishers: William and Mary Anna Towler Editor: Mary Anna Towler Editorial department themail@rochester-citynews.com Arts & entertainment editor: Jake Clapp Staff writers: Tim Louis Macaluso, Jeremy Moule Arts & entertainment staff writer: Rebecca Rafferty Music writer: Frank De Blase Calendar editor: Kurt Indovina Contributing writers: Roman Divezur, Daniel J. Kushner, Kathy Laluk, Adam Lubitow, Amanda Fintak, Mark Hare, Alex Jones, Katie Libby, Ron Netsky, David Raymond, Leah Stacy Art department artdept@rochester-citynews.com Art director/Production manager: Ryan Williamson Designers: Renée Heininger, Jacob Walsh Advertising department ads@rochester-citynews.com New sales development: Betsy Matthews Account executives: Christine Kubarycz, William Towler, David White Classified sales representatives: Tracey Mykins Operations/Circulation kstathis@rochester-citynews.com Business manager: Angela Scardinale Circulation manager: Katherine Stathis Distribution: David Riccioni, Northstar Delivery City Newspaper is available free of charge. Additional copies of the current issue may be purchased for $1 each at the City Newspaper office. City Newspaper may be distributed only by authorized distributors. No person may, without prior written permission of City Newspaper, take more than one copy of each weekly issue. City (ISSN 1551-3262) is published weekly by WMT Publications, Inc. Periodical postage paid at Rochester, NY (USPS 022-138). Address changes: City, 250 North Goodman Street, Rochester, NY 14607. Member of the Association of Alternative Newsweeklies and the New York Press Association. Annual subscriptions: $35 ($30 senior citizens); add $10 for out-of-state subscriptions. Refunds for fewer than ten months cannot be issued. Copyright by WMT Publications Inc., 2017 - all rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, photocopying, recording or by any information storage retrieval system without permission of the copyright owner.

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URBAN JOURNAL | BY MARY ANNA TOWLER

Republicans’ tax plan as a nation-shaper In the midst of the bad news gushing out of Washington, it’s been tempting to find a bit of hope in the plea bargain of former Trump insider Michael Flynn. There seemed at least the possibility that Flynn’s testimony might lead to Trump’s downfall. In reality, though, no matter what Flynn says and no matter how long Donald Trump is president, unless Trump and Kim Jong-un start launching missiles at each other, the madness in the White House isn’t our biggest problem. The Republicans in Congress are. I don’t think the Republicans care two hoots and a bow-wow whether Donald Trump remains president or not. If he leaves before the end of his term, a smarter, more rational Mike Pence will replace him. If Trump stays, Republicans will continue to get what they want. The tax bill headed toward passage is a perfect illustration. Republicans in Congress wrote this thing, and its features include such features as big tax cuts for wealthy taxpayers, smaller deductions for low- and middle-income taxpayers, elimination of a key part of Obamacare, and taxes on tuition waivers and similar aid that university graduate students get. Big corporations get big tax cuts. And as The American Prospect and other sites have noted, some business executives have no intention of using the savings to raise employees’ pay or expand their business and hire more people. They themselves have said that they’ll use it to boost shareholders’ dividends and invest in mergers and acquisitions. Numerous media have told the story of the Wall Street Journal event last month where corporate executives were asked to raise their hands if they planned to use the tax cut to invest in their company. Few did so. And lurking in the House version (but not the Senate’s): cuts and repeals of benefits that renewable-energy companies have depended on. Gas and oil companies get tax breaks. The House bill removes the ban on political activity by churches and other taxexempt institutions. Both the House and the Senate bills allow drilling in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. Not surprisingly, the tax cuts are just the first step in a two-step conservative plan to shape the country’s laws and spending to conform to their ideology. Since the tax cuts will result in deficits, something will have to plug the hole. And Paul Ryan, Marco Rubio, and other prominent Republicans have already said they have their eyes on cuts in Medicare,

Donald Trump and the madness in the White House isn’t our biggest problem. The Republicans in Congress are.” Medicaid, Social Security, and other safety-net benefits. And don’t forget the impact on the federal courts, where, thanks to Republicans’ deliberate slowdown in confirmations, more than 100 vacancies existed when Trump was sworn in. Trump has already nominated 59 replacements – a pace that is “breakneck actually,” NPR’s Scott Simon noted on Saturday’s Weekend Edition, “unmatched since the Nixon era nearly 50 years ago.” Federal judges have lifetime appointments, and a few of them may end up on the Supreme Court. It’ll be surprising if Republicans don’t approve almost anybody Trump wants. Republicans, Thomas Mann and Norman Ornstein wrote in Sunday’s Times, have been “rationalizing and enabling” Donald Trump’s behavior “in hopes of salvaging key elements of its ideological agenda: cutting taxes for the wealthy (as part of possibly the worst tax bill in American history), hobbling the regulatory regime, gutting core government functions, and repealing Obamacare without any reasonable plan to replace it.” The Republican Party, they wrote “has done unique, extensive, and possibly irreparable damage to the American political system.” The Republican Party of today is not the party of Lincoln or Theodore Roosevelt. It’s not even the party of Richard Nixon or Ronald Reagan. But it’s the party in charge. And thanks to years of careful gerrymandering, it looks like the Republican Party of today, backed by friends and donors in all the right places, will be in charge for a very long time. rochestercitynewspaper.com

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[ NEWS IN BRIEF ]

XRIJF names three headliners

Seal, Béla Fleck & The Flecktones, and Alison Krauss will be among the headliners of the 2018 Xerox Rochester International Jazz Festival, organizers announced on Tuesday. R&B singer-songwriter Seal will perform Friday, June 22 ($70-$115); banjoist Béla Fleck will lead The Flecktones on Tuesday, June 26 ($40-$85); and country singer-songwriter Alison Krauss performs Wednesday, June 27 ($70$115). Tickets go on sale Friday, December 8, 10 a.m., at rochesterjazz.com and 454-2060.

City, coalition sign agreement on body cameras

GIVE THE GIFT OF GRILLING

Mayor Lovely Warren and leaders of the Coalition for Police Reform - Community Justice Advisory Board signed an agreement giving the coalition better access and input into the Rochester Police Department’s body-worn camera program. Coalition members will be enrolled in RPD’s Police Training Advisory Committee so they can learn how the body-camera program is administered; they’ll get expedited responses to Freedom of Information Law requests about the program; the RPD’s deputy chief of community relations, Wayne Harris, and coalition mem-

bers will meet quarterly to discuss the program; and Harris will be a non-voting member of the coalition’s governing body.

News

UR updates status of investigation

A report on the investigation into sexual harassment complaints against the University of Rochester will be issued by January 12, according to a statement by the UR Board of Trustees. The trustees formed a committee to conduct an independent investigation into the complaints, the UR’s response, and its policies and procedures. Meanwhile, hundreds of faculty members at competing schools have signed an on-line letter discouraging prospective students from considering a UR degree program.

REFUGEES | BY JEREMY MOULE

Number of local refugees plummets

Rhinos benched for 2018

The Rochester Rhinos are taking a year off after failing to raise the $1.3 million the team’s owners said they needed. Last month the men’s soccer team’s owners asked community members to buy season tickets and businesses to consider sponsorships. Residents and businesses did rally to support the team but one of the owners’ big asks, a share of the county’s hotel-motel tax revenue, was turned down.

Local activists protested President Trump’s immigration policy earlier this year. FILE PHOTO

SOMETHING FOR EVERYONE ON YOUR LIST!

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The global refugee crisis has been Cronin Grant, a spokesperson getting worse over the past several for the organization. The center years. More than 65 million sponsors all refugees who resettle in people have been forced from their the Rochester area; many of them homes by political instability, war, are Bhutanese, Iraqi, or Congolese. persecution, or extreme poverty. The national numbers follow a Some live in different parts of their similar pattern. In October 2016, homeland; others risk crossing 9,945 refugees resettled in the US, borders to reach the relative relief of compared to 1,248 refugees this refugee camps and settlements. past October. But right at the beginning “At a time of great danger and of his term, President Donald great need, we are not responding Trump moved to greatly restrict with love or caring,” Cronin Grant refugees’ entry into the US. Former says of the Trump administration President Barack Obama had set refugee policies. the cap at 110,000 refugees for the Catholic Family Center is 2017 fiscal year, but Trump issued getting ready to roll out a campaign an executive order in January intended to build support for halving it. And he set the cap at refugees by helping the public 45,000 refugees for 2018. understand who the refugees Here’s what those restrictions are. The Center is preparing a look like so far in the Rochester series of short vignettes on local area: From January 1 to November refugees, which will be available at 30 this year, the Catholic Family seetheirstories.org sometime over Center received and resettled 397 the next couple of weeks, Cronin compared 1,111will fordo thea reading, Grant says. Versions will also air on NYrefugees, Times best selling to author same period in 2016, says Kathy some television stations. followed by a Q&A and book signing.

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A new report notes that Rochester’s police oversight process “was part of the first wave of civilian oversight in the first half of the 20th century” and that “many communities have moved beyond or enhanced this approach with other forms of monitoring.”

POLICE | BY MARY ANNA TOWLER

Council prepares to tackle police oversight system Rochester may be ready to try to change the way it handles complaints about police misconduct – including having some sort of independent investigation of those complaints. Pressure for major reform of the city’s police oversight process has been building for months. And in a statement late last week, as she released a report by the Center for Governmental Research, City Council President Loretta Scott said Council will work “over the next few weeks to develop possible changes” to the current process. Council will hold public meetings in early 2018 to get comments on those changes, Scott said. Council “anticipates that these changes will be substantive and will ultimately require legislation,” she said. And she said Council hopes to vote on legislation in April “so that changes can take effect on July 1, 2018, with the start of the new fiscal year.” Currently, investigations into police conduct are handled by police themselves. A panel of civilians reviews those investigations, but it doesn’t conduct the investigations. The panel has limited power, and little about the investigations is made public.

Activists have pushed for decades for more transparency and for more civilian involvement in the investigations, but there’s been little change. One reason is that many kinds of change in oversight are subject to collective bargaining agreements with the police union. In addition, state civil service law protects the confidentiality of police officers’ personnel records related to evaluation of their performance. But reform has also been limited because in the past, few city officials have felt that substantial change was necessary. That may have changed. In an interview on Friday, Scott emphasized that she thinks the city will move more quickly than it has in the past, and she said she is “hopeful” that the change will include a more independent investigation of complaints about police misconduct. The CGR report, which was commissioned by City Council earlier this year, analyzes the current civilian review process and also looks at how several other cities are handling complaints about police misconduct. Among them are cities in New

parkleigh

York State that have more civilian involvement in police oversight than Rochester has, even though they have to negotiate work conditions with their police unions and have to operate under the same restrictions that state law imposes. The report doesn’t include recommendations about what Rochester should do; Council didn’t ask for recommendations, said CGR project director Erika Rosenberg. It does note that Rochester’s oversight process “was part of the first wave of civilian oversight in the first half of the 20th century” and that “many communities have moved beyond or enhanced this approach with other forms of monitoring.” Community leaders who have been pushing for reform seemed generally satisfied with CGR’s report, although Barbara Lacker-Ware – co-author of an extensive report on Rochester’s oversight system and police use of force – said she wishes CGR’s study had included oversight programs of cities outside of New York State. She said she recognized the importance of focusing on cities that

215-235 park avenue · 244-4842

City Council President Loretta Scott: “Council anticipates that changes will be substantive.” FILE PHOTO

operate under the restrictions of New York’s civil service laws. But, she said: “California has very similar laws, and I could name five cities that have very comprehensive, cutting-edge processes. We’re hoping we can get that across to City Council. A lot more can be done.” And, she said, a lot can be done within the restrictions of the state law. Any meaningful reform has to include five points that activists have been pushing for, Lackercontinues on page 12

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CITY 5


GOVERNMENT | BY JEREMY MOULE

Dinolfo’s budget: too good to be true? County Executive Cheryl Dinolfo makes some very important investments in her 2018 budget proposal. The plan includes roughly $3 million to add 30 Child Protective Services caseworkers, restores $1.7 million for services that have been proven to reduce child abuse and neglect, and boosts child day-care funding by $1.6 million. These are the very investments that community members, children’s advocates, and County Legislature Democrats have been asking for, in some cases for several years. They’ve sought increased day-care funding so that more struggling parents can work and become self-sufficient. They’ve asked for preventive services funding because not only do the programs help overwhelmed parents, but the children in those families also tend to do better in school down the road. And Child Protective Services caseloads have been a concern for some time; more caseworkers mean more people to take on difficult, complex work. The groups say they have been pleased to see the additional resources. Members of the In advance of the 2015 Monroe County executive election, faith leaders from across Monroe County called on the next exec to increase the number of Children’s Agenda, a local advocacy group children served by subsidized day-care. FILE PHOTO that analyzes the county budget every year, were thrilled when Dinolfo announced the those cases, then comes up with a projection prosecuted to how they’re detained or Dinolfo’s 2018 budget does include $3.2 additional CPS staff in October, for example. for use in the budget, he says. transported by sheriff’s offices, according to million in revenue from the Seneca-New And they were also pleased when they learned DHS employees have focused on helping the state’s Raise the Age website. York casino revenue sharing agreement, that her budget added funding for preventive people find work instead of relying on public The county’s probation department, Franklin says. But county officials know services; the organization and some faith assistance, Franklin says. And with the local which supervises juvenile offenders, did that the money is iffy. So they came up with leaders had been preparing to press the economy improving, more people have been add funding for two additional officers in a plan: they devoted the money to paying county on the issue. able to transition to employment, he says. preparation for the change, Franklin says. their pension costs. But the advocates and Democrats If the county gets Seneca casino revenue (Critics say the job-search requirements – The department is getting state funding to tempered their praise for the investments in 2018 – or has some other sort of windfall, imposed by federal and state governments, as offset those additions, since state officials with a dose of wariness. The funding had to such as higher-than-expected sales tax well as the county – can be onerous.) vowed to cover counties’ incremental costs collections – it’ll use the money toward its come from somewhere, and their worry has “Rather than say, ‘Hey DHS, great job associated with Raise the Age, he says. pension obligations. If the money doesn’t been that the Dinolfo administration pulled saving money; we’re going to take that for The county Department of Human come through, the county will defer $3.2 the money from other social services. And something else,’ we kept that in the DHS Services provides some services to juvenile million worth of pension costs, which it the Department of Human Services budget budget,” Franklin says. So they’ve basically had offenders. What sort of adjustments the can then pay back gradually over 10 years, does show some substantial funding decreases the ability to take any savings and invest them department may have to make for Raise the Franklin says. alongside the increases: public assistance in other areas if Human Services, he says. Age aren’t clear, since the state hasn’t provided The county has deferred pension benefits drop by $3 million, for example. The county is projecting slightly fewer counties with specific guidance or regulations. payments through that mechanism, which Democrats aren’t raising alarms yet, but even public assistance cases next year. If caseloads the state allows, for the past few years. after last week’s budget hearings they still have do exceed what the county budgets, Earlier this year, the county learned Officials are trying not to do that this year, questions about some of the funding shuffles officials will have to find additional funding that it wouldn’t be getting $4 million Franklin says. in Human Services, says Democratic Minority somewhere else in the Human Services in payments it was expecting through a Leader Cynthia Kaleh. They also have broader department or from some other area of casino revenue-sharing agreement between Legislators will dig deeper into the budget during the County Legislature’s concerns about staffing or salary increases in county operations, Franklin says. New York State and the Seneca Nation. Ways and Means Committee meeting a couple of county departments; about the Brigit Hurley, a policy analyst for the The Senecas argue that the agreement has inclusion of casino revenue in the budget, and Children’s Agenda, says her organization is expired – state officials disagree – and that at 5:30 p.m. Thursday, December 7. about some of the assumptions the budget happy with the increases for Child Protective it no longer needs to give the state a cut of Democrats in particular tend to use that meeting to deeply scrutinize the finer points makes about public assistance caseloads. Services, preventive services, and child dayits gambling revenue. of the exec’s budget proposal. “It’s just not a clear picture,” says Kaleh. care subsidies. But she says she was surprised This year, the county was able to plug the The meeting, which doubles as a public that the budget doesn’t include more on $4 million hole left by the casino revenue hearing on the budget, happens in the Bob Franklin, the county’s chief financial Raise the Age, a statewide change in the way loss through a stroke of luck. County sales legislature’s chambers in the County Office officer, says the reduction in funds for 16- and 17-year-olds are prosecuted for nontax revenues for 2017 are on track to top Building, 39 West Main Street. temporary assistance benefits is “math violent crimes. projections by $5 million, Franklin says. So driven.” The county looks at the number The program could affect the county for 2017, the sales tax surplus basically offsets The full legislature will most likely vote on the budget during its December 12 meeting. of active cases it has and the average cost of in a few ways, from how the youths are the casino revenue shortfall. 6 CITY

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Perspectives:

CEDRIC ALEXANDER ON POLICE AND THE COMMUNITY CRIMINAL JUSTICE | BY TIM LOUIS MACALUSO // PHOTOS BY RYAN WILLIAMSON

C

edric Alexander’s office is sparse and uncluttered. There are the usual mementos, awards, and framed diplomas you find in most executive offices. The American flag stands behind his desk, and a black and white photo of him sitting near President Obama is strategically placed on a shelf, as if to oversee what goes on in the room. Alexander replaced Carlos Carballada as deputy mayor earlier this year, and nearly every branch of city government reports to him. But his title may not adequately describe his position. He and the mayor have known each other for years; he obviously admires her, and he seems to be both an adviser and confidant.

“I HAVE AN OPPORTUNITY TO BE IN A CITY THAT I KNOW HAS THE SPIRIT TO EVOLVE INTO SOMETHING TRULY, TRULY GREAT.” Among the areas he oversees is the work of the Rochester Police Department. He’s had plenty of preparation for that role; he served as deputy police chief and interim police chief under former Mayor Bill Johnson. He’s a 40-year law-enforcement veteran, has a doctorate in clinical psychology, and has often appeared on

CNN as a guest commentator – usually on matters dealing with policing. Tall and fit for a man in his early 60’s, he tends to stare at you with an intensity that can be a little intimidating. Maybe that comes from the weight of the subjects he’s often asked about: shootings of unarmed black men and attacks on police officers.

In 2015, an Obama administration official asked Alexander to be a member of the president’s Task Force on 21st Century Policing – a milestone in an already storied career. He is wholly committed to policing as a public service, the vital role of protecting and nurturing communities. But Alexander hasn’t escaped sharp criticism. Law enforcement – and media, too, for that matter – have turned to him in times of crisis involving communities of color. That’s placed him squarely in the intersection between “black lives matter” and “blue lives matter” sentiments. After he wrote an opinion piece for CNN, “Attacks on Police Are an Attack on Community,” someone posted this online comment: “Absolutely no one should be harmed unnecessarily during an encounter with police. That said, I find it ironic that every police death is viewed as an earth shattering tragedy while the victims of rogue cops are swept under a rug, have their name dragged through the mud, and very rarely see justice. The lack of concern for the abuse meted out by police is staggering. Black lives matter, all lives matter, but apparently, cops lives matter more.” continues on page 10 rochestercitynewspaper.com

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But Alexander is hardly an ally of rogue cops, and he says he understands where that kind of criticism comes from. In a recent interview, he talked at length about the need for improving the relationship between police and communities of color, the increasing expectations we’re placing on law enforcement, and the country’s failure to adequately address mental health problems. Given his background and the breath of his new duties, it’s hardly a stretch to picture him as a potential successor to Mayor Lovely Warren, if she pursued another office. Alexander insists he didn’t return to Rochester with a political motive in mind, though. “I came back here because I have a footprint here,” Alexander said. “I have an opportunity at this time in my life to be in a city that I know has the spirit to evolve into something truly, truly great.” While Alexander’s responsibilities don’t include overseeing the police department, clearly his criminal justice knowledge and experience will be valuable. And in our interview with him, we focused on that area. The following is an edited version of that conversation. Alexander rose to national attention three

years ago, during the unrest following the police shooting of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri. At the time, Alexander was public safety director for DeKalb County, Georgia, a large metropolitan area that includes a small slice of Atlanta. He was also president of the National Organization for Black Law Enforcement, and in that role, he reached out to Ferguson Police Chief Tom Jackson. “On the night that Michael Brown was killed,” said Alexander, “I had been president for a month maybe, a few weeks literally. Being the national president of NOBLE, I felt some responsibility in terms of what we were beginning to see take place there, and that was to reach out to the local leadership and police.” Jackson agreed to meet Alexander, and when several local news stations learned about it, their reporters flew with him to Ferguson. CNN – which is headquartered in Atlanta – was already on site. “The city was really tense, hugely tense at that point,” Alexander said. “Throughout the course of that weekend, I ended up being interview by ABC World News, NBC Nightly News, CNN, MSNBC, the whole gamut. My weekend was filled with discussing the challenges between police and community relations.” As a result, Alexander became a regular guest commentator on CNN, and he still gets calls from media concerning policing. The events in Ferguson also led to his participation on President Barack Obama’s Task Force on 21st Century Policing, whose 11 members included law enforcement and civil rights experts. 10 CITY DECEMBER 6 - 12, 2017

“We traveled to three cities across this country: to DC twice, Phoenix, and Cincinnati,” Alexander said. “Some of the best minds in the country in psychology, sociology, criminology, civil rights leaders, human rights leaders, LGBTQ groups, were involved.” After 60 days, the group produced a report that included recommendations for changing police tactics, with the aim of improving police-community relations. It’s clear from reading the report, whose introduction quotes Obama, that the president was concerned both about civil unrest and about the credibility of the criminal justice system. “We met with President Obama at the White House,” Alexander said, “and he spent two hours with us. It was incredible, because the guy is known not to spend two hours with anybody, including world leaders. But he spent two hours with this task force, and when he came into that meeting you could tell he had read every word of that document. He was just as familiar with that document as we were.”

“As we continue to evolve and we use body cameras and we’re doing diversity training and we’re doing bias training and we’re doing de-escalation training: all these things benefit police and the community over time.” The Task Force report also recommends some form of civilian oversight of police departments, but they can take different forms, Alexander said. Every community is different, he said. “Some communities say that they would benefit from having an independent civilian review board after a police-involved incident” such as a shooting, Alexander said. “Then there are other communities that say: No, we don’t need it; in our community, we have the full faith and trust in our criminal justice system, from law enforcement to the courts. “Then there may be other communities that are much more challenged around the issue of police trust and legitimacy, such as here in Rochester.”

“WE WANT OUR POLICE OFFICERS TO MANAGE EVERY CONCEIVABLE THING THAT OCCURS PERFECTLY, AND THEY CAN’T. THEY’RE HUMAN BEINGS.” By far the most important recommendation in

the report is the need for officers to build trust and legitimacy, Alexander said. “Law enforcement culture,” says the report, “should embrace a guardian – rather than a warrior – mindset to build trust and legitimacy both within agencies and with the public.” We asked Alexander whether he believes that level of trust exists in Rochester. “No,” he said, “there is a lot of room for growth and trust in this community.” Warren, he said, “knows how serious this is,” and he pointed to Warren administration programs like Clergy on Patrol as examples of current efforts to bridge the relationship between police and community. The Obama Task Force report says that law enforcement agencies should have clear and comprehensive polices on the use of force, including de-escalation training. The Rochester Police Department is getting this training, Alexander said, but training isn’t a single program. “It’s ongoing,” he said. “There’s no end point to training and then you move on. No; training has to continue, because it’s like a perishable skill. If you don’t use it and practice it, you lose it.

“The whole idea is not to pin someone with what went wrong,” Alexander said, “but to look at what we’re doing and determine how we can do better. If there is blame to be placed anywhere, we have to make sure that blame goes to the right places. “So we have to have individuals who are looking for truth and justice in a balanced way. And they have a commitment to making sure that people in this community are treated fairly based on their complaint. And they have the added responsibility of making sure that the officer who may be under scrutiny is treated in a very fair and balanced way.” “Those two entities are partners to each other,” Alexander said. “Police and the communities they serve are partners, and this is vitally important but sometimes gets lost in this conversation. You cannot have a community without police, and you cannot have police without a community.” “I think we still have an opportunity,” Alexander said, “to explore 21st century ideas about how we create a civilian review board that is going to be mutually accepted by most of the community and by the police and by the mayor’s administration.

“Transparency is key to having trust develop. Transparency is where trust comes from. If it’s believed that something has been hidden from you, how can you trust what you can’t see? You can’t.” “There has to be honesty,” Alexander said. “There has to be truth, and there has to be inclusivity with people from the community. And also from police who need to sit on the board. They have to balance each other out to develop a kind of leadership that the community feels good about. That it’s not a board out to attack police. It’s a board that’s out to seek the truth and what’s fair and equitable.” Alexander, like the mayor he works for, stressed the difficult job and difficult circumstances police officers face. “We want our police officers to manage every conceivable thing that occurs perfectly,” he said. “And they can’t. They’re human beings.” A few years ago, many activists in communities across the country, including

those in Rochester, were pressing for police officers to wear body cameras. Obama provided funding for cities to acquire them. The verdict on how useful they are and what they tell us is still out, however. “They do give you an added piece of information that we did not have,” Alexander said. “The camera sees what the camera sees, and it records what occurs. But it’s an additional piece of evidence that can be used to help determine if someone is right or wrong. It gives some added description of what occurred when you come up against a he said-she said situation. “But this is what we have to keep in mind: It’s just an additional piece of information that we didn’t have. It is not the end-all or be-all. Depending on when an event occurred, you always have to consider when the camera went on and how much of an event it captured. Out of its totality, it may capture a piece of it.” Also providing a piece of information, Alexander said: the people with cellphones making videos of an incident. “This is good for the police and the community,” Alexander said. “What we’re looking for is what happened? How did it happen? How did it evolve and how was it concluded? And that’s what everyone involved is trying to do – reach a conclusion about what happened.” Police officers, criminologists, and psychologists have not always worked

collaboratively, which makes Alexander’s background as a clinical psychologist unique, says former Mayor Bill Johnson. Alexander was ahead of his time, says Johnson. “He is someone who has really worked hard to apply his expertise directly to the community, and not be just theoretical,” says Johnson. “He counseled officers, and I relied on him quite a bit to help me understand


When help was offered, it was miniscule. “We’re seeing a larger group of people with drug problems that are not black and brown using and dying from this horrific drug. It leaves the impression in some communities that you didn’t give a damn when my mom or uncle or brother or dad had an addiction, and they’re serving all these years for a small amount of crack cocaine.” Alexander draws a distinction, however, between the people who are using drugs and those who are selling them: “Now those people who have large quantities of drugs, people who are clearly selling and not using, now I agree that the hammer needs to come down on them. There needs to be appropriate punishment. Absolutely and positively.” Local police departments don’t act in a vacuum. They’re affected by national

Cedric Alexander: “There is a lot of room for growth and trust in this community.” PHOTO BY RYAN WILLIAMSON

why young people would pursue a life of crime. We were always struggling with intervention strategies.” Alexander’s broad understanding shows up when he talks about such things as the public’s perception of crime. “You could tell me that robberies are down by 50 percent,” he said. “But if I’m someone who just got hit over the head and my wallet was taken from me, you’re not going to tell me that robberies are down 50 percent.” His breadth of understanding also shows up when he talks about Rochester’s high rate of gun violence. “There are definitely guns out there,” he said. “They’re coming from the black market, guns that have been stolen from homes and cars. You can get guns in a variety of different ways without ever having to step foot in a gun store or show. “But here’s the other important thing to understand about gun violence in our city: We may hear that a shooting occurred on some block in the city. Let me tell you something, you can walk down that street and knock on doors and you’re going to find some criminal element. But you’ll also find some very fine citizens in these neighborhoods, and these are the people who hold these communities together.” “People are there because that’s where they can afford to be, that’s where they have to be, and in many cases, you’ll find that’s where they want to be,” Alexander said. “They’ve lived there for years, for generations, and they think, ‘Why should I have to move? This is my home.’ They still keep their grass cut. They still keep their house painted, despite

what may be going on around them. And our public safety has to be there for them to help us fight crime.” Alexander is particularly concerned about the

country’s failure to help people with mental health problems. And he said he is especially troubled by the movement during the last 30 years toward criminalizing people with mental health problems. “The whole mental health issue is something I am going to be exploring in a much deeper way in the new year,” he said. “Back in 2005, myself and former Mayor Bill Johnson developed the Emergency Disturbed Person Response Team. That was a response to in-custody deaths that had been experienced by the Rochester Police Department.” “We learned that the police did nothing wrong in any of those events,” Alexander said. But they also learned that the department was seeing more and more people who were struggling with untreated mental illness. That was about 12 years ago, he said, and the situation has grown worse. “As communities have become more challenged, as poverty has become more entrenched, and as employment in this country changed, we’re seeing more social ills and mental health issues,” Alexander said. “But we have to find a way to make sure that we’re sending people to the right place or person for help. Police often come in contact with people with mental health problems, but jail is usually not the first place for them to go.” The country is also facing a major problem with drug addiction, Alexander said.

“There’s a North Clinton in every city, and it’s not just in our city,” he said. “We have a large population in this country of people who have addictions. Police are overwhelmed, and we’re constantly chasing those who are selling the drugs and those who are trying to acquire the drugs. It’s constant. We have a serious addiction problem in this country, and we’re facing new challenges, especially in this opioid crisis.” The city is trying to clean up problem areas and, within the resources it has, introduce more treatment options. “But the problem is, we have that going on, and we also have a lot of other things going on that we have to attend to in terms of calls for service,” Alexander said. The explosion of opioid addiction is adding to the problem – although there’s a difference in how the opioid crisis is being treated in comparison to the crack cocaine epidemic of the late 80’s and early 90’s. That difference hasn’t gone unnoticed in communities of color, Alexander said. “Well, it just doesn’t involve black and brown people anymore: that’s what you want me to say. But it is true. You go back to the war on drugs from the late 1980’s to the early 90’s, and I could have an addiction, and if I was caught using crack, rocks, or whatever, I wasn’t offered any treatment. Off to jail you go. “But now there’s a shift in the country, and it’s not criminalized to the same extent. We’re trying to find a way to treat people, which is what we should have been doing for the last 30 years. You had whole communities in this country, communities of color, that got demonized and criminalized with addiction.

policy and by the tone that presidents and other government officials set. Given Alexander’s national experience and his obvious deep admiration for President Obama, we asked for his thoughts about the actions of the new administration. It’s been a challenge watching the current administration’s effort to erase virtually everything Obama did, Alexander said. But then he echoed many of the themes of Obama’s presidency: unity, responsibility, and respect for the institution of the presidency. And he brought up a comment made by a white Johannesburg official when Alexander was in South Africa to train police chiefs there: “He looked like he may have been of German heritage,” Alexander said, “but he was so committed to making that country work. He said to me, ‘Your President Trump is something.’ “It wasn’t a complimentary remark, and what I said to him was, ‘Yes, we have our challenges in our country. But one thing I will not do is, I will not stand on foreign soil and talk badly about any American president. Now what else do you want to talk about?’” “We’re going to have an opportunity to go back to the polls in three years,” Alexander said. “In the meantime, we all have a responsibility as Americans to not allow ourselves to be divided by race, religion, sexual orientation, or anything else, because here’s what’s funny about America: One week you have Charlottesville and you have people duking it out on the street, and two weeks later you have Houston and you have everybody coming to help. That’s who we are as a nation.”

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 11


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Coalition for Police Reform co-chair Lewis Stewart: A “sustainable” independent staff and budget are crucial. FILE PHOTO

Ware said: The city has to establish a police accountability board that is an independent office of city government; the board has to conduct its own investigations, and the board has to have the power to issue subpoenas for testimony and evidence about police conduct. And, she said, the board has to have “final say over discipline to be imposed on police officers when civilian complaints have been sustained,” and it has to have the power to study the police department’s practices and policies and make recommendations for change.” The Rev. Lewis Stewart, president of United Christian Leadership Ministry and co-chair of the Coalition for Police Reform, agreed that the five points are “ideal,” but, he said, having a civilian board impose discipline rather than the chief won’t happen until state civil service law is changed. The bottom line for him, Stewart said, is the creation of a budgeted staff office and a director of a civilian review process, with trained investigators, subpoena power, and “a sustainable staff and a sustainable budget.” The city needs to budget at least half a million dollars a year, he said, “to have a working staff and a director to really push this type of system.” Given the protection that the police union contract provides, police buy-in is likely to be key to some of the changes. As part of its research, CGR interviewed Police Chief Michael Ciminelli, police officer Henry Favor, and police union president Michael Mazzeo. But while the CGR report notes that Ciminelli seemed receptive to change, there seemed to be “little support within the law enforcement community of strengthening civilian review,” it said.

For more Tom Tomorrow, including a political blog and cartoon archive, visit www.thismodernworld.com

URBAN ACTION This week’s calls to action include the following events and activities. (All are free and open to the public, unless otherwise noted.)

Dreamers tell their stories

The Rochester Committee on Latin America and University of Rochester Dreamers will present “Pass a Clean Dream Act and Protest Temporary Protected Status (TPS): a Call for Action!” on Wednesday, December 6. UR Dreamer students will share their experiences of being undocumented or “DACAmented,” which refers to President Obama’s effort to

protect young people from deportation under the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program. The Trump administration is ending DACA and TPS, and Dreamers are advocating for legislation that protects the lives they have created in the US. The event will be held at Downtown Presbyterian Church, 121 North Fitzhugh Street, at 7 p.m.

Film looks local shooting’s aftermath

The Little Theatre will premiere “Move,” a documentary film about the 2015 shootings at the Boys and

Girls Club of Rochester. The film looks at the community’s response to gun violence and the effort to reclaim a neighborhood after three young men were killed. “Move” is director Tam Little’s first film project. Little, who is from Rochester, has experience in business administration and currently consults with companies about employee training and development needs. The film’s showing is part of the Little Theatre’s One Take: Stories through the Lens Series and the Black Cinema Series. “Move” will be shown at 7 p.m. on Tuesday, December 12, and on Friday, December 15. Tickets: $9.

PSST. Want the scoop on local schools?

Check our education section for updates on the RCSD.

/ NEWS


Dining & Nightlife

Brad and Kyle Kennedy opened K2 Brothers Brewing on Empire Boulevard in early December. PHOTOS BY JACOB WALSH

K2 Brothers Brewing is all about family K2 Brothers Brewing

1221 EMPIRE BOULEVARD, PENFIELD 413-1997; K2BREWING.COM WEDNESDAY AND THURSDAY, 11 A.M. TO 10 P.M.; FRIDAY AND SATURDAY, 11 A.M. TO MIDNIGHT; SUNDAY, 11 A.M. TO 8 P.M. [ FEATURE ] BY CHRIS OSBURN

K2 Brothers Brewing is truly a family affair — which is perhaps unsurprising, given that the brewery’s name alludes to siblings. The New York State Farm/Micro Brewery, owned and operated by brothers Kyle and Brad Kennedy, officially opened its doors on Saturday, December 2. The brewery focuses primarily on American-Style beers. “We love our IPAs and that is where we started…especially the New England style IPAs,” Brad says. Even though the pair enjoy lighter beers, Kyle’s wife Brittney prefers porters and stouts, so they are brewing a few here and there — with a slightly dryer American-style finish — to satisfy different tastes. “Our Jalapeño Cream Ale has also become a favorite,” Brad says. K2 has 11 beers on tap, including their Scotch Ale, Galaxy IPA, and New England-Style Double IPA.

K2's amber ale.

Being a family brewery, they aim to have something for everyone. Along with beer, they’ll also will be serving NYS craft mixed drinks, some using their own beer, NYS ciders, and NYS wines. “We will also be

carrying NYS craft soda and offer soda tastings for kids,” Brad says. The idea to open a brewery was born over a year ago on one of their back porches. “From that moment, we started writing the business plan and pitching to banks,” Brad says. This conversation didn’t come out of nowhere. Kyle has been homebrewing as a hobby since 2011, and when Brad moved his family to Penfield, the brothers began to brew for fun on the weekends. Brad also has a degree in chemistry, which aided in perfecting their brewing process. Together they began experimenting with different styles and recipes, and soon they were sharing with friends and family. Everyone loved their beers, so they decided to go into business. When opening any business, whether it be a brewery, coffee shop, or a skating rink, nothing is guaranteed to go smoothly. “We hit snags, but working together and always being with family helps a lot,” Kyle says. “We push through and work harder because we are family.” The family atmosphere goes beyond just the brothers themselves: Their father,

a general contractor, oversaw all the renovations; their mother is their accounts manager and handles all the bookkeeping; and their wives handle event planning, graphic design, and the website. “It’s truly a team effort,” Brad says. The renovated building is two floors with 4,800 square footage on each for a total of 9,600 square feet. The current operation will only take up the first floor, with half of the space as a tap room and the other half as the brewery itself. Eventually, as the business grows, the brothers plan to remodel the second floor. “We planted ourselves in a great place to grow,” Brad says. “The dream is to open the upstairs with a deck as a private party room where patrons can enjoy the view of the bay.” The brewery also has a large fenced-in outdoor space which will be renovated into a beer garden just in time for spring 2018. K2 Brewery is located on Empire Boulevard which Brad says in an up-andcoming area with the new Waters Edge Apartments, and gets a decent amount of traffic coming through. “The view of the bay is what really sold us,” he says. “Having the marina across the street is an amazing bonus.” In terms of food, the brothers decided to try something a little unique in the world of craft brewing. It’s fairly common to see food trucks parked in front of breweries — this is a relationship that benefits both the brewery and food vendor. K2 takes this relationship one step further: “We partnered with Midnight Smokin’ BBQ, currently a food truck, to lease our kitchen,” Kyle says. Midnight Smokin’ will serve ribs, pulled pork, brisket, and other barbecue favorites while K2 provides the beer. In recent years, a number of breweries have popped up in the Rochester area. That might make some people wonder where exactly K2 fits into the nowsaturated market. “The Rochester beer scene is a real community,” Kyle says. “This is not the norm across the country and we are thankful to be a part of such an encouraging, close knit community where brewers get together, talk shop openly, and are friends.” They brothers are excited to open the doors and share their passion for craft beer with the community, their friends, and family. “We are looking forward to sharing our beer and drinks with the Rochester community, which has supported us more than we could have ever imagined through this entire process,” Kyle says. rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 13


Upcoming [ FUNK ] Turkuaz. Saturday, January 27. Anthology, 336 East Avenue. 9:30 p.m. $16.50-$18. anthologylive.com; turkuazband.com.

Music

[ CELTIC ROCK ]

Enter the Haggis. Sunday, February 18. Funk ‘N Waffles,

204 North Water Street. 7 p.m. rochester.funknwaffles.com; enterthehaggis.com. [ METAL ] Anthrax. Friday, May 2. Dome Arena, 2695 East Henrietta Road. 6:30 p.m. $30. therocdome.com; anthrax.com.

Katie Von Schleicher WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 13 BUG JAR, 219 MONROE AVENUE 9 P.M. | $9 | BUGJAR.COM; K-V-S.NET

[ INDIE POP ] With an honest, commanding voice that

encroaches into just about every crevice of her latest record, “Shitty Hits,” Brooklyn-based singer-songwriter Katie Von Schleicher has staked her claim as one of the most exciting solo acts currently going. Songs like “The Image,” “Midsummer,” and “Life’s a Lie” are magnificent compositions that call to mind the expert chamber pop of Camera Obscura but with Fiona Apple’s haunting persistence. Perhaps “Shitty Hits” is a confusing title to grasp upon completing the record (which is excellent), but the name actually fits: these songs are bona fide hits, but slightly askew and warped, and ultimately better for it. Playing with Juicy Connotation and The Sugargliders. — BY ALEXANDER JONES

UNO the Activist SUNDAY, DECEMBER 10 PHOTO CITY IMPROV, 543 ATLANTIC AVENUE 6 P.M. | $20 | TECSHOWS.COM; SOUNDCLOUD.COM/678UNO [ HIP-HOP ] Rapper UNO the Activist, aka Young Shyne,

is straight out of Zone 3, Atlanta. He’s armed to the teeth with ubiquitous auto-tuned, Southern hip-hop ballads — and fueled by copious amounts of liquid codeine. In fall 2016, UNO was shot inside of an Uber, but he bounced back from the trauma to release the EP “Sorry for the Wait (Brooke’s Interlude)” and his full-length “Live. Shyne. Die.” With Thouxanbanfauni and Warhol.SS. — BY AMANDA FINTAK

PHOTO BY CHRIS BAKER

Join us for Rob Linton’s 15th Christmas Eve Celebration DECEMBER 24th LIVE from 8 p.m. – 12 a.m. We take requests, play great holiday jazz, blues and big band music! ROCHESTER’S 24 HOUR JAZZ STATION STREAMING LIVE 24/7/365 AT JAZZ901.ORG 14 CITY DECEMBER 6 - 12, 2017


[ ALBUM REVIEWS ]

[ WED., DECEMBER 6 ]

The Results

JAZZ

“No, Really” Self-released facebook.com/theresults

Musica Nova MONDAY, DECEMBER 11 KILBOURN HALL, 26 GIBBS STREET 8 P.M. | FREE | 274-1000; ESM.ROCHESTER.EDU; DIETER-MACK.DE [ CLASSICAL ] Composers Arnold Schoenberg and

Anton Webern were lions of 20th century modernisms, championing serialism and a groundbreaking approach to harmony and dissonance. This Sunday, the Brad Lubman-led ensemble Musica Nova will interpret these twin titans of atonality. The student group will perform Schoenberg’s Chamber Symphony No. 1 and Webern’s “Five Pieces for Orchestra,” as well as contemporary composer Dieter Mack’s 2007 work, “Kammermusik V.” Mack will be present to conduct his work as a special guest; Vicky Shin will also conduct. — BY DANIEL J. KUSHNER

Khia SATURDAY, DECEMBER 9 FUNK ‘N WAFFLES, 204 NORTH WATER STREET 10 P.M. | $20-$45 | ROCHESTER.FUNKNWAFFLES. COM; KHIATHUGMISSES.COM [ HIP-HOP ] Florida-based “femcee” Khia may only

have one hit, but she definitely left a lasting impression. Her raunchy, catchy 2002 single, “My Neck, My Back (Lick It),” off her debut album “Thug Misses” hit Top 40 stations and dance clubs across the globe. She went to on to record six more albums. Khia hasn’t stopped at music though; she co-hosts on “The Queen’s Court,” a weekly web series discussing hip-hop and pop culture. The subjects often spark viral arguments between her and fellow female rappers — Trina being her latest target. Performing alongside TS Madison and Peachez. Hosted by Jusss Kelly. — BY AMANDA FINTAK

The Rita Collective. Little

Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 258-0400. thelittle.org. 7-9 p.m.

One of the jobs of a music critic, as I see it, is to rein in some of the hyperbole while letting fly with some of their own. However, in the case of Rochester’s The Results’ new album, “No, Really,” the band is way better than the hype. A few classic clichés and metaphors sprinkled about would actually take the steam out of The Results’ attack. So let’s try our best. First of all: Buy this record. It’ll fit nicely on the shelf between Stiff Little Fingers and The Queers (yeah, I know it’s not alphabetical). Need more? OK … “No, Really” is a guitar-driven, snide and snotty collection of non-ironic punk rock. I say “punk” in reference to the speed, volume, gang vocals, and attitude — The Results can play. The band takes a detour right from the start with a cool, hip-hop breakdown on the tune “Black Confetti,” and later, it kicks into a slow Skynyrd groove on “Reaper’s Hook,” which frankly caught me pleasantly off guard. Punk, Southern rock, hip-hop. That ain’t no hype. — BY FRANK DE BLASE

POP/ROCK

Big Blue House. B-Side, 5

Liftbridge Lane. Fairport. 585315-3003. fairportbside.com. 7-10 p.m. Lespecial, Backup Planet. Funk ‘n Waffles, 204 N Water Street. 585-448-0354. 9 p.m. $10.

[ THU., DECEMBER 7 ] ACOUSTIC/FOLK The Crawdiddies. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 258-0400. thelittle.org. 7-9 p.m. Steve West. Brown Hound Downtown, 500 University Ave. 506-9725. brownhoundbistro. com. 6-8 p.m. JAZZ

Mark Kellogg. Joe Bean

Luke Cornwell

Coffee Roasters, 1344 University Ave. 532-7942. joebeanroasters.com. 8-10 p.m. $5.

“Wallop Dollop” Self-released lukecornwell.bandcamp.com

Sometimes you’ve got to listen to an artist and allow them to ferment in your ears lest you pass judgement too quickly. It’s kind of like when I first heard Ween; I wanted to kill that guy. “What’s with all this shrieking?” Well, I’m older now (and I do yoga), so the homicide is virtually all gone from me. It’s a good thing because I just discovered the new EP from Newark musician Luke Cornwell, “Wallop Dollop,” a record full of acoustic-based, thrash folk, what-the-fuck that I love because of the visceral feeling it gives me. Ten years ago, I wouldn’t have been as receptive. Cornwell doesn’t have a bad voice, but he’s a bad singer. Case in point: the song “Like Me,” where he shifts from lonesome croon, to an upper register flatness, back to a croon. And it totally works. The lyrics are a cross between a pre-teen kid on way too much trucker speed and the Red Headed Stranger’s type of brilliant syncopation after a bong hit. It’s as if Cornwell were out of breath. “Wallop Dollop” will raise the eyebrows of those around you, and you may hate it, but that’s what good music is capable of doing. — BY FRANK DE BLASE

POP/ROCK

Bob Bunce’s Rural Delivery.

Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. abilenebarandlounge.com. 8 p.m. $5. Mammal Dap, Seepeoples. Funk ‘n Waffles, 204 N Water Street. 585-448-0354. 9 p.m. $5-$7.

[ FRI., DECEMBER 8 ] ACOUSTIC/FOLK

Holiday Relief Concert. Sticky Lips Pit BBQ, 625 Culver Rd. 585-288-1910. stickylipsbbq. com. 7-10 p.m. Featuring The Tabletop Three, Connie Deming, and Miche Fambro. Money raised for local relief charities. continues on page 16

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 15


Music

Watkins & The Rapiers.

Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. abilenebarandlounge.com. 7 p.m.

Do you prefer writing with someone?

I like it better. I tend to come up with a lot of ideas, and when I can’t finish those ideas, I get frustrated and throw them out. So now I try to recycle them and bring them to Alex instead. What about the new record?

This will be my second full-length record. But I’m going to consider it my first album because I have a label now. I haven’t really announced it, but people in Rochester can probably guess what’s going on. I just put out the one song and didn’t say anything about the record — so you can say there’s probably a record coming next spring. Probably?

Probably.

What’s it like?

It’s fuller than anything I’ve done. It’s more rock than folk, I guess. In the past, I went through a phase where I was obsessed with sounding psychedelic and having a million sounds going on at once. It became a bit overwhelming, and I decided I want to go back to being more minimalistic: guitar, bass, drums, harp. Mikaela Davis recently signed with Rounder Records and released a new single, "Little Bird." There's a new album coming "probably" in the spring. PHOTO BY ERIKA MUGGLIN

Psychedelic lullaby Mikaela Davis NEW YEAR’S EVE WITH PLEISTOCENE AND ANAMON SUNDAY, DECEMBER 31 RADIO SOCIAL, 20 CARLSON ROAD 7 P.M. | $13 | RADIO-SOCIAL.COM; MIKAELADAVIS.COM [ INTERVIEW ] BY FRANK DE BLASE

Mikaela Davis carves out her sound, awash in color, on a big sky canvas and in the heads of her fans. Her gentle voice delivers the particulars while her harp paints the theme. It’s an indie rock twilight scene — or a psychedelic lullaby that puts you awake and allows you to dream. Addressing the 25-year-old Rochester singer and harpist’s music as anything but achingly beautiful is impossible. Davis has toured Europe a number of times, most recently as a support act with Bon Iver, and she and her band — drummer Alex Coté; bassist Shane McCarthy; and the recently added Alan Murphy on keys — pinball coast to coast in the US as well. Davis recently inked a deal with Rounder Records and has an album due to drop sometime in the spring, but Davis is coy with the particulars. We did get some answers when she stopped down to CITY HQ for an interview. An edited transcript follows. 16 CITY DECEMBER 6 - 12, 2017

CITY: How much does that harp weigh? Mikaela Davis: It’s not bad, really;

probably around 90 pounds. And it’s awkwardly shaped. So it doesn’t fit neatly in the overhead compartment?

I have to rent harps when I go to Europe. I once saw you tell an audience to be quiet and listen. Given the gentleness of the harp, does that happen often?

No, that doesn’t happen a lot. I think the reason that happened is we were at a brew pub and the sound was bouncing off the walls. Honestly, I don’t care if people are talking when I’ve got the full band, but that night we had switched to an acoustic show — harp, mandolin, and guitar — and I asked people to be quiet and listen to the band, because we were playing quieter. You’re definitely not a typical bar band.

No, not at all. I tend to tour with people who have a super respectful audience, and they’re used to listening. The new cut “Little Bird” you released from your forthcoming album has no rhyme scheme.

I never noticed that. Cool. It was written with Alex Coté. He co-wrote four songs on the new album. Typically, how do you write?

It’s different every time.

Do you think you incorporate the harp backwards to other bands, who utilize it as an afterthought or spice?

I like to consider the harp as part of the band, as just another guitar. I don’t want to make me playing the harp such a big deal. I’m a songwriter and I happen to play the harp. How do you manage to balance between the fading sadness and a pervading happiness in your songs?

My songs tend to be personal, and I tend to write songs when I’m trying to work something out in my head or I’m just bummed out or depressed or something. Sad times make for good songs. I think I have a few songs that are happy. The song “Little Bird” is about my mom. How do you like working in the star-maker machine?

The business aspect of the music industry is tough. I have a manager and a whole team. They’re amazing. But it’s hard when people are telling you, “You have to write this kind of song if you want to be on radio” or this or that. And to me, the whole reason I got into writing songs is because it was something I felt — not like, “I need to write this song so it can get 10,000 plays.”

BLUES

Albert Cummings. Sticky

Lips BBQ Juke Joint, 830 Jefferson Rd. 585-292-5544. stickylipsbbq.com. 9-11 p.m. $20-$23.

Bill Dresnack and Bruce Blaine. Boulder Coffee Cafe

and Lounge, 100 Alexander St. 454-7140. bouldercoffeeroaster. com/. 8-10 p.m. Happy Hour with Da Vines. Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. abilenebarandlounge.com. 5:30 p.m. CLASSICAL

Eastman Phiharmonia/EastmanRochester Chorus. Kodak Hall at Eastman Theater, 60 Gibbs St. 8 p.m. Featuring the work of Holst, Finzi, and Vaughan Williams.

From Seeds Benefit Concert & Auction. Flower City Arts Center, 713 Monroe Ave. 271-5920. rochesterarts.org. 6-9 p.m. Proceeds will benefit 40x40 Photography Fundraiser. $40.

Winter String Quartet Seminar. Ciminelli Formal Lounge – Eastman School of Music, Gibbs Street. 7-9 p.m. JAZZ

Trio East. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 258-0400. thelittle.org. 8-10 p.m.

REGGAE/JAM Deadgrass. Funk ‘n Waffles, 204 N Water Street. 585-448-0354. 9 p.m. $10-$15. POP/ROCK B42K. 585 Rockin Burger Bar, 250 Pixley Road. 5852470079. 8:30-11:30 p.m. $5. FlashBamPow. Firehouse Saloon, 814 S. Clinton Ave. 319-3832. thefirehousesaloon.com. 9:30 p.m.-1:30 a.m. $5. The Flood. Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. abilenebarandlounge. com. 9:30 p.m. $5.

Kopps, The Demos, Humble Braggers. Bug Jar,

219 Monroe Ave. 8 p.m. $10.

Paul Strowe Happy Hour Show. B-Side, 5 Liftbridge

Lane. Fairport. 585-315-3003. fairportbside.com. 5-7 p.m.

[ SAT., DECEMBER 9 ]

What’s the easiest thing to do for you?

The easiest thing is the actual act of performing on stage with my friends, my band. We’re just having fun.

ACOUSTIC/FOLK Connie Deming. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 258-0400. thelittle.org. 8-10 p.m.

What’s the latest dream you’ve had?

I’ve been having really vivid dreams lately, stress dreams. In one, I’m trapped in a building and the world is ending. The land was getting crashed over by water. I was stuck, but I had my cat.

CLASSICAL

Annual Holiday Concert. Ingle

Auditorium at RIT, 1 Lomb Memorial Drive. 585-475-4121. rit.edu/cla/finearts/. 7:30 p.m.


Chamber Music Class Recital. Ciminelli Formal Lounge – Eastman School of Music, Gibbs Street. 3:30 p.m.

Graduate Chamber Music Seminar. Eastman East Wing

Hatch Recital Hall, 26 Gibbs St. 3:30 p.m. HFCCB Holiday Extravaganza. Honeoye Falls-Lima Middle School, 619 Quaker Meeting House Rd. 624-7100. hfccb.org. 7:30-9:30 p.m. Honors Chamber Music Recital. Eastman East Wing Hatch Recital Hall, 26 Gibbs St. 8 p.m.

Publick Musick: Rejoice! St. Paul’s Evangelical Lutheran Church, 28 Lincoln St. Pittsford. 244-5835. publickmusick.org. 7:30 p.m. Music of the Italian Baroque for the Christmas Season. $20. Woodwind Quintet Recital. Eastman East Wing Hatch Recital Hall, 26 Gibbs St. 1:30 p.m. DJ/ELECTRONIC

Signal > Noise: v3.3: Steve Mizek & Savile. Photo City

Improv & Comedy Club, 543 Atlantic Ave. residentadvisor.net. 10 p.m.-2 a.m. $15-$20. JAZZ

Jimmie Highsmith. Joe Bean

Coffee Roasters, 1344 University Ave. 532-7942. joebeanroasters. com. 9-11 p.m. $5.

SMEOP: Notes From Underground. Small World

Books, 425 North St. 232-6970. 8 p.m. Hosted by Deb, Maisha & Nicholas Moore. $10 donation. HIP-HOP/RAP

Loud, Live, & in Color: Peachez, Khia, TS Madison. Funk ‘n Waffles, 204 N Water Street. 585-448-0354. rochester. funknwaffles.com. 10 p.m. $20-$30.

POP/ROCK Dokken. The Historic German House Auditorium, 315 Gregory Street. 585-563-6241. thehistoricgermanhouse. tunestub.com. 8 p.m. $35.

Handsome Jack, Dangerbyrd, Jivviden, Giner Faye Bakers.

Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 8 p.m. $7. Jack & the Jukebox. Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. abilenebarandlounge. com. 9 p.m. $5. The Time Bandits. The Angry Goat Pub, 938 Clinton Ave. 4131125. 10 p.m.-1 a.m.

[ SUN., DECEMBER 10 ] CLASSICAL

Annual Holiday Concert.

University of Rochester Alumni and Advancement Center, 300 East River Rd. rocnewhorizons. org. 2 p.m. Chanukah and Christmas favorites.

Compline, performed by the Schola Cantorum. Christ

Church, 141 East Ave. 4543878. christchurchrochester.org. 9-9:30 p.m. continues on page 20 rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 17


18 CITY DECEMBER 6 - 12, 2017


rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 19


N E W S PA P E R ’ S

Intensive Chamber Music Recital. Eastman East Wing Hatch Recital Hall, 26 Gibbs St. 7 p.m.

RTOS December Theater Organ Concert. Rochester

Auditorium Theatre, 885 E. Main St. 234-2295. rtosonline.org. 2:30 p.m. $15.

JOE G. I met a girl one night on Bumble. She was cute and seemed like she had a lot going for her. We hit it off and I suggested dinner. We went to an Italian restaurant for our first/last date called Rocco's on Monroe/Marshall St. She brought with her a pumpkin spice latte from starbucks up the road. We sat at the bar and I even remember the bartenders name (Christian). She had her cup sitting on the bar like that was a normal thing. She told the bartender how hungry she was and that all she wanted was spaghetti and meatballs while she casually sipped her drink. He suggested an appetizer and she made it a point to order another meal to go for later. When she got her meal she chewed with her

2ND PLACE:

ABBY P.

CONTEST

JAZZ

Christmas with Cordancia.

Artisan Works, 565 Blossom Road. 288-7170. cordancia. org. 2-3 p.m. A funny, jazzy reimagining of The Nutcracker. Music and story by Matt Osika. $12.

mouth wide open, smacking her lips. This was followed by a litany of ‘Mmmm’s” and “Nom’s” I thought I was dating the fucking cookie monster! When we were done she licked her plate clean of all sauce. Everyone that had to walk past the bar to get into the dining area did double takes and what only lasted about a solid minute felt like an hour. The bartender kept asking her how she liked her meal in an attempt to have her come to her senses, but she had no shame in her feeding frenzy. Embarrassed, I never went back to that restaurant since. I cringe at the thought that there is a fool that had a worst date than me, if so they deserve to win this contest.

3RD PLACE

BRIAN P.

...CONGRATULATIONS? To read all of the submissions, visit rochestercitynewspaper.com

POP/ROCK

Enter the Haggis. Riviera

Theater, 4 Center St., Geneseo. geneseoriviera.com. 7 p.m. Presented by Fanatics Pub.

Sun Parade, Great Red, Daily Milestone. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 8 p.m. $10-$12.

[ MON., DECEMBER 11 ] ACOUSTIC/FOLK

Happy Hour with Stormy Valle. Record Archive, 33 1/3 Rockwood St. 244-1210. 5-8 p.m. Watkins & The Rapiers. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 258-0400. thelittle.org. 7-9 p.m. POP/ROCK

CLASSICAL | MUSICA NOVA

Hailing from the Second Viennese School, composers Arnold Schoenberg and Anton Webern were lions of 20th century modernisms, championing serialism and a groundbreaking approach to harmony and dissonance. This Sunday, the Brad Lubman-led ensemble Musica Nova will interpret these twin titans of atonality at the Eastman School of Music. The student group will perform Schoenberg’s Chamber Symphony No. 1 and Webern’s “Five Pieces for Orchestra,” as well as contemporary composer Dieter Mack’s 2007 work, “Kammermusik V.” Mack’s stylistic approach is both sparse and evocative, resulting in music that is simultaneously beautiful and opaque. Mack will be present to conduct his work as a special guest; Vicky Shin will also conduct. Musica Nova will perform Monday, December 11, at Eastman School of Music’s Kilbourn Hall, 26 Gibbs Street. 8 p.m. Free. 274-1000; esm.rochester.edu; dieter-mack.de. — BY DANIEL J. KUSHNER

Songwriters in the Round: Katie Preston, Tori Hosier, Ben Morey. Funk ‘n Waffles,

204 N Water Street. 585-4480354. 7 p.m. $5.

[ TUE., DECEMBER 12 ] BLUES 3x88. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 258-0400. thelittle.org. 7-9 p.m. REGGAE/JAM

Dead Night with Roc and Rye Band. Funk ‘n Waffles, 204 N Water Street. 448-0354. 8 p.m. METAL

Metal Meltdown Happy Hour. Record Archive, 33

1/3 Rockwood St. 244-1210. recordarchive.com. Second Tuesday of every month, 6-8 p.m. Metal virtual reality games, metal beers, metal prizes, and thrashing movies. POP/ROCK

The Black Lillies. Abilene

Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. abilenebarandlounge.com. 8 p.m. Where’s Walden, Sour Club. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 8 p.m. $10-$12.

20 CITY DECEMBER 6 - 12, 2017

PHOTO BY MATT WITTMEYER

PHOTO PROVIDED

BLUES | ALBERT CUMMINGS

New England guitar slinger Albert Cummings let’s fly with a fiery fleet-fingered display. He ably wrings the neck on his guitar at any tempo, but it all truly shines on the slow blues, where he riffs blindingly brilliant and smooth. Clearly influenced by Stevie Ray Vaughan and the Kings (Albert and Freddie), Cummings brings plenty of his own mojo to the altar. Albert Cummings plays Friday, December 8, at Sticky Lips Juke Joint, 830 Jefferson Road. 9 p.m. $20. stickylipsbbq.com; albertcummings.com. — BY FRANK DE BLASE


Looking for unique gifts for family and friends? The Greater Rochester area is full of them!

GIFT GUIDE shop local for the holidays You'll find the best in holiday gift ideas at the locally owned, independent businesses featured in this Home for the Holidays gift guide!

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 21


C E L E B R A T I N G 2 01 6 100TH ANNIVERSARY of our

NATIONAL PARKS

HAVE FUN FEEL GOOD BUY STUFF parkleigh

215 - 235 park avenue • 244-4842

Her colors are purple. read the store name, so ed – bold letters ) and with a r you come up with will be fine.

e background COULD be light

HOLIDAY SALE! 30% OFF (reg price)

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A unique gift…

PAINTINGS COLLAGES SERIGRAPHS WOVEN ART BLANKETS LYNNE FELDMAN | STUDIO 3-3 250 NORTH GOODMAN ST. Artist@lynnefeldman.com www.WrapYourselfinArt.com www.LynneFeldman.com

22 CITY DECEMBER 6 - 12, 2017

ADD SOME MAGIC TO YOUR HOLIDAYS AT

MYTHIC TREASURES WHERE MAGIC HAPPENS! 274 N. GOODMAN ST. · VILLAGE GATE · 266-8350 · MYTHICTREASURES.COM COME TO OUR PSYCHIC FAIRE EVERY SECOND SATURDAY!


UNIQUE GIFTS... AT UNIQUE LOCAL RETAILERS Hodaka Pottery Handmade Functional Pottery

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Holiday Open Studio / Gallery Hours December 6 & 8: 1pm-6pm December 9 & 10: 10am-4pm December 12 &13: 1pm-6pm Or by appointment: 738-8604

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Bring in this Ad Buy any one ornament,

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Computer assembled in Taiwan? Repairs done out of state? Customer Service Calls to India? Why not have it all done in Rochester?

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rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 23


SHOP LOCAL FOR THE HOLIDAYS Beautiful gift boxes filled with handmade treasures from our orchards and farm to your family and friends. Available for pick up at our charming market in Holley and for shipping nationwide. Our market is filled with delicious preserves, pickles and chutneys that we have created all season long from our harvests. Displayed amidst our selections of lovely table linens and wreaths—made of preserved flowers from our fields and greens from our forests. 585.638.8838 www.hurdorchards.com 17260 Ridge Rd Holley NY 14470

open seven days a week through December 24th, excepting Thanksgiving Day Christmas Teas Nov. 29th - Dec. 16th

Fair trade

GIFTS

for the Whole Family from around the World

flutes & cases · kids’ gifts · wall hangings · jewelry ponchos · nativities · ornaments · instruments and a little of everything! See

for photos of more gifts!

25 Gibbs Street (Across from Java’s) 423-0816 • Open Tues - Sun

24 CITY DECEMBER 6 - 12, 2017


HOLIDAY

CHEER!

wine & liquor experts 373 Park Avenue • 473-1937

Bring Cheesy Eddie’s to your holiday celebrations!

We make desserts that make memories! 602 South Ave • (585) 473-1300 Mon-Fri: 8am - 6pm • Sat: 9am-4pm cheesyeddies.com

CONTEMPORARY PAINTINGS & SCULPTURE JUDY & PETER GOHRINGER

GIFTS FOR THE HOLIDAYS! JUDYG JUD JUDYGOHRINGER.COM YGOHRI HRINGE NGER R.COM C OM FIRST FRIDAYS & SECOND SATURDAYS BY APPOINTMENT & BY CHANCE 703-6839 • 250 NORTH GOODMAN STREET STUDIO 300 IN THE ANDERSON ARTS BUILDING

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 25


Participating merchants giving crazy sales - visit all the stores on the passport & be entered to win a Gift Basket with lots of goodies from BROCKPORT MERCHANTS We have lots of Toys, Gifts and Games for all ages. Our focus is fun, unique and educational. 99 cent shipping through the holidays Stop in or visit online: liftbridgebooks.com | (585)-637-2260

December 9th: Saturday Author Salon 12pm Jeanne Gehret; 2pm Patricia Cost & Michael Peres Richard Aerni Carolyn Dilcher-Stutz Pottery and Sculpture The Hungerford Building

1115 E. Main St. Suite 106, Door 5

Showroom Hours: 10-4 daily, or by appt. Holiday Open House and Sale Dec 9-10 ¡ 10-4 (both days)

www.richardaerni.com

26 CITY DECEMBER 6 - 12, 2017


UNIQUE GIFTS... AT UNIQUE LOCAL RETAILERS

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SALE GOOD THROUGH 12/12/17

Retirement Sale Now in Progress 40% consideration offered on our large inventory of colored-stone and handmade jewelery. Thanks for all the friendships made over the past 17 years. 45 East Avenue • 585-454-0060

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700 Park Ave. Rochester, NY 14607 Mon - Fri. Noon-6, Sat Noon - 4 Phone: 585.442.2260 • northfieldgoldsmiths.com rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 27


SHOP LOCAL FOR THE HOLIDAYS ELVES AND PEOPLE

ARTIST MEET AND GREET! AT WHITMAN WORKS COMPANY DECEMBER 8TH FROM 6-9 PM.

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28 CITY DECEMBER 6 - 12, 2017

TUES-SAT 11-7 SUN NOON-5


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rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 29


It's not too late to find a unique HANDMADE GIFT at the

TEA POTTERY at The Hungerford 1115 E. Main St · Rochester, NY door 2 · studio 420 OPEN STUDIO HOURS December 6, 7, 8 1 - 6 pm · December 9 & 10 10am - 4pm December 12, 13, 14 1-6pm · or by appointment · 469 8217

GIFT GUIDE SHOPPING AT HOME FOR THE HOLIDAYS: The best gifts come from locally owned independent businesses 30 CITY DECEMBER 6 - 12, 2017


Theater

Eric Schutt and Abby Rice star in “First Date: The Broadway Musical Comedy” at JCC CenterStage. PHOTO PROVIDED

Based on a true story “First Date: The Broadway Musical Comedy” REVIEWED SATURDAY, DECEMBER 2 CONTINUES THROUGH SUNDAY, DECEMBER 17 JCC CENTERSTAGE, 1200 EDGEWOOD AVENUE TICKETS START AT $27 | 461-2000; JCCROCHESTER.ORG [ REVIEW ] BY LEAH STACY

There are a few “firsts” in life that almost everyone can relate to: first day of school, first kiss, first home — the list goes on. But perhaps the “first” that draws the most entertaining anecdotes is a first date (even more so if it’s a blind date). The co-creators of “First Date: The Broadway Musical Comedy” had a story or two of their own, so Alan Zachary and Michael Weiner (music and lyrics), along with Austin Winsberg (book), decided to write an entire show centered on a blind date. “First Date: The Broadway Musical Comedy” played on Broadway from August 2013 to January 2014, with Zachary Levi (“Tangled,”

TV’s “Chuck”) and Krysta Rodriguez (Broadway’s “The Addams Family,” TV’s “Smash”) in the leading roles. The tuneful tale follows nervous, nice guy financial investor Aaron Goldfarb (played at CenterStage by Eric Schutt) and confident, hip art museum curator Casey Clark (Abby Rice) on their first date, a setup orchestrated by Casey’s sister, Lauren, and her husband, Kevin. A five-member ensemble — Alex Black, Megan Colombo, Sammi Cohen, Dylan Tomas Kastel, and Ashley Jake Wegman — plays almost 20 supporting characters through the course of the show as Aaron and Casey navigate past relationships, current advice, and future consequences. The show opens with “The One,” a number dedicated to dating horror stories. The vocals were a little pitchy at first, but smoothed as the actors relaxed into the first few minutes of the performance. The company is young, energetic, and massively talented. (Many of the faces will look familiar to CenterStage patrons, as more than half the cast members performed in “Titanic: The Musical” together earlier this year.) Rice and Schutt make a convincing pair and project strong onstage chemistry. This isn’t the first time they’ve played at stage romance: in “Titanic” last May, the duo played star-crossed, lower class Irish lovers.

Here, they portray polar opposites as Rice embodies manic pixie dream girl Casey, who can’t commit to anyone other than a bad boy, and Schutt takes a less dominating role as the sensitive, once-jilted Aaron. (It’s not unlike watching “500 Days of Summer” in musical form, if it only lasted for one date.) But of course, Schutt and Rice can really, really sing — and that’s what makes the 1 hour and 40 minute show worth seeing. The supporting cast can sing, too, and they have to flex their acting muscles. In primarily the role of Aaron’s best friend, Gabe, Alex Black plays an overly masculine character with a soaring voice and crisp movement. Ashley Jake Wegman spends most of his stage time as the well-meaning, sassy waiter who writes his own music on the side. (Wegman also choreographed the show, which shows in his flawless execution of each dance number.) Megan Colombo is at her most hilarious as Grandma Ida, Aaron’s Jewish family matriarch returned from the dead to stop Aaron from dating a non-Jewish girl (a la “Fiddler on the Roof ”). Sammi Cohen shines as both clingy ex-girlfriend Allison and the Google Girl (“The World Wide Web is Forever”). In the role of Casey’s BFF Reggie, Dylan Tomas Kastel takes full advantage of having the catchiest song in the show (“Bailout”) but is equally scene stealing as Future Son and Rocker Guy. JCC CenterStage producer and artistic director Ralph Meranto has assembled a strong cast that capitalizes on this witty show at every moment; an important factor for a local premiere that most patrons haven’t encountered. A four-piece band, led by musical director Matt Wegman, excels as the music moves from rap to ballad to rock riff. Scenic designer Eric Williamson has fabricated an attractive, modern restaurant where the entire show takes place; and Toni Elderkin’s lighting creates ambience for the many breakout scenes. When Meranto welcomed the audience on Saturday, he asked if anyone was on a first date. A few hands slipped up quickly, followed by nervous laughter. Then, Meranto asked who hadn’t been on a first date in a long time. Nearly half the audience raised their hands, digits sparkling with engagement rings and wedding bands. Though the concept of dating may be nostalgia for many, “First Date: The Broadway Musical Comedy” provides a charming, irreverent evening of entertainment, which is exactly what most audience members want during the holiday season. CenterStage has routinely chosen non-Christmas specific shows that still feel festive and cheery, and this show falls in line nicely with that goal.

Additional positions posted at www.marycariola.com Mary Cariola Children’s Center is hiring staff to work in the residential, community and school programs. These opportunities are both Part Time and Full time.

• Direct Support Professional • Residential Aides • Teacher Aides • Special Education Teachers Mary Cariola is a NYS licensed school for students with disabilities, serving students Pre-K to 21

1000 Elmwood Ave., Suite 100, Rochester, NY 14620 (585) 271-0761 Follow @CariolaCareers on social media

A

rreim eim m

iing ng oof TThe he

Nutcracker

Sunday 12/10 at 2pm ARTISANworks

Tuesday 12/12 at 7pm Pittsford Barnes & Noble

www.cordancia.org rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 31


Art

ILLUSTRATION BY RYAN WILLIAMSON

The first supper “And, Ain’t I a Woman: A Long Table Conversation and Installation” SATURDAY, DECEMBER 9, 3 P.M. TO 7 P.M. GALLERY 74, 215 TREMONT STREET $15-$25; REGISTER BY FRIDAY, DECEMBER 8 | AINTIAWOMAN.BPT.ME [ PREVIEW ] BY REBECCA RAFFERTY

While there are a limited (but important) amount of concrete things we can do to challenge racist and sexist national policies, our ability to creatively tackle inequity on local levels is just about boundless. Arts community organizer Rachel DeGuzman is continuing her series of creative forums, “At the Crossroads: Activating the Intersection of Art and Justice,” on Saturday, December 9, with the audience-interactive performance “And, Ain’t I a Woman: A Long Table Conversation and Installation.” As New York State celebrates 100 years of women’s suffrage, the event takes into consideration that the movement excluded black women and that intersectionality in

discussions of women’s issues is still a major issue. “And, Ain’t I a Woman” will make space for women of color to speak about contemporary issues and their own experiences. Inspired by the “Long Table” performancediscussion hybrids by artist Lois Weaver, DeGuzman invited several WOC involved in the arts, education, and social justice — Amanda Chestnut, Reenah Golden, Tokeya Graham, Mara Ahmed, Jazzelle Bonilla, Erica Bryant, N’Jelle Gage-Thorne, Tianna Mañón, Debora McDell-Hernandez, Annette Ramos, and Gaynelle Wethers — to join her in a free-form, “dinner table” discussion about the intersection of race and gender. After the first 30 minutes of talk, audience members can tap someone on the shoulder and take their place to join the continued conversation. “Generally, even discussions of diversity are usually through a white lens,” DeGuzman says. “I thought it was important for them to start and hold the conversation, the first part of it, and then anyone can come join the conversation. It’s disruptive, because that’s not what we usually experience.” Named for abolitionist and Civil and Women’s Rights advocate Sojourner Truth’s speech — which was leveled at black men who weren’t for women’s suffrage and

32 CITY DECEMBER 6 - DECEMBER 12, 2017

white women who didn’t see black women as worthy of the vote — the performance also takes inspiration from DeGuzman’s observations about the current lack of inclusiveness in discussions of women’s issues. For example, she says, at many of the postelection women’s marches, women wearing Black Lives Matter T-shirts were booed and instructed that “this wasn’t their march.” We rarely speak of abolitionist Frederick Douglass outside of the context of his friendship with Susan B. Anthony, DeGuzman says. And while Rochester claims them both as historic heroes, we tend to gloss over Anthony’s advocacy that women should get the vote before black people, and the fact that Douglass moved to Washington, D.C., after an arsonist burned his Rochester house to the ground. And though the North likes to put some space between itself and the South ideologically, Sojourner Truth was born a slave in New York State. “So these are provocations for me thinking these are important conversations for us to have,” DeGuzman says. “In the midst of us having a really important interrogation of sex, we can’t forget the history of intersectionality” issues in Rochester. DeGuzman says that while the event

won’t be moderated, there is some planned structure. Attendees will arrive and mingle over cheese and desserts and wine, coffee, or tea, check out Amanda Chestnut’s installations, and have the opportunity to sharpie answers onto a wall of provocative questions. She’s also asking those who register to bring articles or items about race and gender that they’d like to share, which she plans to send to the attendees afterward as an opportunity to carry the discussion into the future. And attendees are invited to bring photos of women of color — whether family or someone they’re inspired by — to place on a Chestnut’s altar installation for the duration of the show. Before the discussion, Golden and Graham will share a spoken word performance that uses Truth’s speech as a connective thread, followed by a screening of “Visual Activist,” a short film by Zanele Muholi and produced by HumanRightsWatch, which explores the dangers faced by black South African lesbians. There are only two rules to the Long Table conversation: no filibustering, and when people tap someone, they have to let them finish what they’re saying before taking their seat. “We’re exploring things that we don’t have answers for without a predetermined outcome of what’s going to happen,” DeGuzman says. Gallery 74 is a community space, set within a neighborhood on the edge of Cornhill. DeGuzman says she’s grateful that director Ralph Thompson was open to hosting this event. “Not everybody wants racism talked about in their spaces,” she says, “and not everybody wants, in the home of Susan B. Anthony, to challenge that whole idea of the Suffrage Movement being all positive.” She adds that it’s ahistoric to think that it was. The location also takes issues of class into consideration — “Why does all art have to happen in certain neighborhoods?” she says. “That’s really important to me, to go to the neighborhood instead of saying, ‘You come from the community, you have to come to our neighborhoods to see things that are supposed to be inclusive of you.” DeGuzman underscores that the event is an experimental, open-ended performance piece using equity and partnership as values, with an emphasis on trust. “You can’t just ask for equity, you have to model it,” she says. Depending on how this one goes, DeGuzman says she envisions organizing another long table discussion in 2018.


rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 33


Arts & Performance Art Exhibits [ OPENING ] A Different Path Gallery, 27 Market St. Brockport. Works by D Scally and J Retallack. Through Jan. 4. Opening reception Fri., Dec. 8, 12-4 p.m. 637-5494. differentpathgallery.com. My Sister’s Gallery at the Episcopal Church Home, 505 Mt. Hope Ave. Visions for the Season. Through Jan. 21. Opening reception Thurs. Dec. 14, 5-7 p.m. A display of photography by members of Camera Rochester. 546-8400. EpiscopalSeniorLife.org. Oxford Gallery, 267 Oxford St. Holiday Exhibit. Through Jan. 13. Holiday themed paintings by Patricia Tribatone, Anthony Dungan, Rosemary Lyons, and more. Williams Gallery at First Unitarian Church, 220 S Winton Rd. Nature’s Beauty. Through Jan. 15. Opening reception Thurs. Dec. 7, 6-8 p.m. Photography by Joseph Woody. [ CONTINUING ] 1570 Gallery at Valley Manor, 1570 East Ave. ‘Tis the Season. Through Jan. 1. Artwork and crafts by Cheryl and Don Olney. 546-8400. EpiscopalSeniorLife.org. Art Museum of Rochester, 610 Monroe Ave. “Beast” Through Dec. 31. Paintings by Rochester native Alexander Spacher. Thursday 5 to 11 p.m., Friday through Sunday, 5 p.m. to 1 a.m. 615-9015. artmuseumofrochester.com. Axom Gallery, 176 Anderson Ave., 2nd floor. NARTCAN. Through Dec. 16. An exhibition consisting of a collection of artwork by and about people dealing with substance use. 232-6030 x23. axomgallery.com. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. The Lobby Presents. Through Dec. 31. Art by Flour Pail Kids, Black Cat Horror Memes, and Stormy Made. Live music followed by DJ CPT. Central Library, Children’s Center, 115 South Ave. 2017 Art of the Book Exhibit. Through Dec. 31. Featuring the art of the book: artists books and altered books. Davis Gallery at Houghton House, 1 King’s Lane. Geneva. Thread Bare. Through Dec. 15. Mixed media by Kate Kretz. Davison Gallery, Cultural Life Center, Roberts Wesleyan College, 2301 Westside Dr. Angle of Repose. Through Dec. 16. Artwork by Colleen Buzzard. 594-6120. roberts.edu. Flower City Arts Center, 713 Monroe Ave. From the Seeds of Cucumber Alley. Through Dec. 21. Celebrating 40 Years of Photography. A display photographs by volunteers and staff. 271-5920. rochesterarts. org.; Good Things.. Come in Small Packages. Through Dec. 21. An exhibit and sale dedicated to small, finely crafted ceramic art. 271-5183. rochesterarts.org. Gallery Q, 100 College Ave. Take the Long Way Home. Through Jan. 25. Work by Nancy Topolski and Allen C. Topolski. Gallery r, 100 College Ave. Patricia Russotti: Marking 34 CITY DECEMBER 6 - DECEMBER 12, 2017

PHOTO BY CHARA DOW

HOLIDAY | HOLIDAY BAZAAR AT THE MARKET Alright, now that it’s December, there’s not much time left to procrastinate — I’m mainly writing that for myself — to get together gifts for the holiday season. CITY always endorses conscious gift-giving, or even giving your time to help a neighbor, and we hope you’ll keep local makers and artists at the top of your sources list. This weekend and next (December 9 and 10, and December 16 and 17), The Yards Collective will host its Holiday Bazaar at The Market with more than a dozen local makers, music, and food for sale from The Red Fern. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. each day. Also, the Rochester Public Market will have its Holidays at the Market event on December 10, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., with more arts and crafts vendors, decorations, and holiday food for sale. facebook.com/attheyards. — BY JAKE CLAPP

Matters in Time. Through Jan. 21. Photography and installation by Patricia Russotti. 585-256-3312. galleryr.rit.edu. GO ART! Seymour Place, 201 E Main St. Batavia. Cabel and Zen. Through Feb. 3, 2018. An exhibit of Photography and Illustration by Jim Burns. 343-9313. ghallock@goart.org. goart.org. Image City Photography Gallery, 722 University Ave. Holiday Show 2017. Through Dec. 23. Photography by Dick Bennett, Carl Crumley, Steve Levinson, Gil Maker, and more. imagecityphotographygallery.com. International Art Acquisitions, 3300 Monroe Ave. Dance With the Sugarplum Fairy. Through Dec. 31. Ballet paintings by Marcella Gillenwater. 264-1440. internationalartacquisitions.com. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. Kiyochika & Japan, Transformed. Japanese art prints from the Arthur R. Miller Collection. 276-8900. mag.rochester.edu.; Wendell Castle: Remastered. Through Dec. 31. The first to showcase the digitally crafted works of Wendell Castle. 276-8900. mag.rochester.edu. Mercer Gallery at Monroe Communtiy College, 1000 E. Henrietta Rd. Indigenous Environmental Activism in Art. Through Dec. 14. Showcases how Indigenous artists are raising awareness of environmental issues. 2922021. monroecc.edu. My Sister’s Gallery at the Episcopal Church Home, 505 Mt. Hope Ave. Remembrances. Through Dec. 10. A display of watercolors by Pam LoCicero. 546-8400.

EpiscopalSeniorLife.org. Patricia O’Keefe Ross Gallery at St. John Fisher, 3690 East Ave. ELEMENTS. Through Jan. 5. Recent works by Jappie King Black, Bill Stephens, and Bill Judkins. Penfield Arts Center, 2131 Five Mile Line Rd. Tree Hugs. Through Dec. 14. Pen and ink artist Kristina Hutch Matthews. 7643493. penfieldartscenter@gmail. com. penfieldartscenter.com. RIT Bevier Gallery, 90 Lomb Memorial Dr., Booth Building 7A. After the Ball. Through Jan. 6. Exhibition focuses on selected costumes from the annual Beaux Arts Ball. Schweinfurth Art Center, 205 Genesee St. Quilts=Art=Quilts. Through Jan. 7. A display of quilts. 315-255-1553. myartcenter.org. SUNY Geneseo, 1 College Rd. Perennial Reflections. Through Dec. 11. Plant Dyes, Slow Stitch & Fiber Art by Evelyn J Kitson. geneseo.edu. The Clover Center for Arts and Spirituality, 1101 Clover St. The work of Carl Chiarenza. Through Jan. 1. Also featuring work by Connie Hindero, Neal McDannel, and Anne Marcello. 473-3200. clovercenteroffice@ gmail.com. theclovercenter.com. Tower Fine Arts Center, SUNY Brockport, 180 Holley St. Thinking About Drawing. Through Dec. 8. Curated by Jim Morris. Work that demonstrates ideas and processes related to drawing. 395-2787. brockport.edu. Ugly Duck Coffee, 89 Charlotte St. Sequin Fix. Through Jan. 1. Art by Lauren Ceike.


rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 35


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IT’S ALL HAPPENING IN THE WEDGE 36 CITY DECEMBER 6 - DECEMBER 12, 2017

Call for Participants [ MON., DECEMBER 11 ] Sing with the Rochester Oratorio Society. 6:30-9 p.m Asbury First United Methodist Church, 1050 East Ave 4732234. rossings.org.

Art Events [ THU., DECEMBER 7 ] African Percussion & Dance Ensemble. 6:30 p.m. Fireside Lunge, Student Alumni Union (585) 475-2411. [ SAT., DECEMBER 9 ] 40th Annual Holiday Open Studio and Sale. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Richard Aerni Studio, The Hungerford Bldg. 1115 E. Main St. #106. Pottery, sculpture, blown glass, prints, drawings, soups, savories, and door prizes 429-0211. richard@richardaerni.com. richardaerni.com. And, Ain’t I a Woman: A Long Table Conversation. 3-7 p.m. Gallery 74, 215 Tremont St, Building 3, 3rd Floor A performance of dinner table conversation where everyone seated at the table is a guest performer. Inspired by the legacy of Sojourner Truth $25. aintiawoman. brownpapertickets.com. Anderson Alley Artists Open Studios. Second Saturday of every month, 12-4 p.m Anderson Arts Building, 250 N. Goodman St. 201-910-1603. andersonartsbuilding@gmail. com. andersonalleyartists.com. Holiday Bazaar at the Market. 10 a.m.-2 p.m The Yards, 50-52 Public Market Local vendors, music, and refreshments attheyards@gmail.com. theyardsrochester.com. Second Saturday as Hungerford. Second Saturday of every month, 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Hungerford Building, 1115 E. Main St. Meet 20+ artists in their studios. Enter at Door #2. Many studios will be giving demonstrations 469-8217. Second Saturdays. Second Saturday of every month, 3-6 p.m. Cornerstone Gallery, 8732 Main St., Honeoye. A variety of open venues in Honeoye Falls baierpottery.com. [ SUN., DECEMBER 10 ] Opening Art Reception with Allison McDonald. 4-6 p.m. 540WMain, 540 W. Main Street 420-8439. 540westmain.org.

Comedy [ WED., DECEMBER 6 ] The Future Feature Show. 8-10 p.m. Comedy at the Carlson, 50 Carlson Rd Featuring Todd Gursslin, Zach Minisce, Justin Brown, and Jesse Winterhalter. Hosted by Jimmy LeChase $9. 426-6339. carlsoncomedy.com. The Improv Plate. First Wednesday of every month, 7-9 p.m Johnny’s Pub & Grill, 1382 Culver Rd. Free. 607760-0422. brokencouch.com. [ FRI., DECEMBER 8 ] Guy Torry. 8 & 10:30 p.m. Comedy Club, 2235 Empire Blvd Webster $25-$30. [ SUN., DECEMBER 10 ] Laughs for Lollypop. 7-8:30 p.m. Comedy at the Carlson,

PHOTO PROVIDED

COMEDY | BRAD WILLIAMS Never expect Brad Williams to be PC in his delivery, but for good reason: there are things that make us unique, we should own them, and we should laugh about them. A large chunk of Williams’ energetic, smooth comedy centers on being a dude with dwarfism and how it shapes his perspective — on sex, relationships, family, race, comedy, and culture. He’s a genuine bro; a straightforward guy coming from a good place who wants to have a good time and spread a little joy. And it’s brought him a lot of success recently with two really popular Showtime specials, 2015’s “Fun Size” and last year’s “Daddy Issues.” Brad Williams plays Comedy @ The Carlson on Thursday, December 7, through Saturday, December 9. 7:30 p.m. each night; and 10 p.m. on Friday and Saturday. $12-$20. carlsoncomedy.com; bradwilliams.com. — BY JAKE CLAPP

PHOTO PROVIDED BY TRUE MARKETING

THEATER | ‘A CHRISTMAS STORY: THE MUSICAL’ Grab your glasses and pink bunny costume — “A Christmas Story” is coming back to Rochester. The touring musical based on the 1983 movie of the same name follows Ralphie Parker, a bespectacled kid in 1940s Indiana as he tries to scheme his way to getting the perfect gift: an official Red Ryder Carbine-Action 200-Shot Range Model Air Rifle — despite warnings that he’ll shoot his eye out. In his misadventures he comes across a maniacal mall Santa, an infamous Leg Lamp, and a triple-dog-dare to lick a freezing flagpole. “A Christmas Story” will be performed at the Rochester Auditorium Theatre (885 East Main Street) on Tuesday through Thursday, December 12-14, at 7:30 p.m.; Friday, December 15, at 8 p.m.; Saturday, December 16, at 2 and 8 p.m.; and Sunday, December 17, at 1 and 6:30 p.m. Tickets start at $38 and can be purchased by calling 2225000 or at ticketmaster.com. — BY KATHY LALUK


rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 37


50 Carlson Rd $10. 4266339. comedycarlson.com.

Volunteers Needed E-cigarette users Earn $100 by participating in our study! You may be eligible if: • You are between the ages of 18-65 years • You have been using e-cigarettes only, or non-smokers.

/ THEATER

Contact Call our Research Coordinator 585-273-2843

[ TUE., DECEMBER 12 ] Backdraft II: Laughdraft. 8-11 p.m Firehouse Saloon, 814 S. Clinton Ave. 902-2010. thefirehousesaloon.com.

Dance Events [ WED., DECEMBER 6 ] Kizomba Dance Classes. 6:307:30 p.m Roc Kizomba Studios (Fedder Building), 1237 E Main Street $15-$50. 7381782. rochesterkizomba@ gmail.com. rockizomba.com. [ THU., DECEMBER 7 ] Moscow Ballet’s Great Russian Nutcracker. 7-9 p.m. Rochester Auditorium Theatre, 885 E. Main St. $31.00$71.00. 222-5000. mail@rbtl. org. rbtl.org. [ SUN., DECEMBER 10 ] USA Dance: Holiday Gala Ball. 6-9 p.m. Temple Sinai, 363 Penfield Road . Penfield $10-$15. 585-381-6890. flowercityballroom.org.

Locally grown!

[ MON., DECEMBER 11 ] International Folk Dance Club of Rochester. 7:30-10 p.m. JCC of Greater Rochester, 1200 Edgewood Avenue Located in JCC’s Dance Studio. Circle line couple dances from around the world. Beginners welcome $7-$8. 315-926-5652. jccrochester.org.

Theater

• Christmas Christm mas Trees • Wreaths • Amaryllis • Centerpieces

• Poinsettias • Paperwhites • Greens/Pine Rope

Free Delivery for Christmas Trees Within 5 Miles LOCATED NEAR ELLISON PARK • OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK

485 LANDING ROAD NORTH • 482-5372 *installation not included

38 CITY DECEMBER 6 - DECEMBER 12, 2017

A Christmas Carol. Through Dec. 24. Geva Theatre Center, 75 Woodbury Blvd Opens Nov. 30. Through Dec. 24. No shows Monday and select Tuesdays; show times vary $12.50-$84. A Christmas Story: The Musical. Tue., Dec. 12, 7:30-9:30 p.m. Rochester Auditorium Theatre, 885 E. Main St. 222-5000. mail@rbtl.org. rbtl.org. First Date. Through Dec. 17. JCC of Greater Rochester, 1200 Edgewood Avenue Through Dec. 17. Thurs. Dec. 7, 14, 7 p.m. Sat. Dec. 9, 16, 8 p.m. Sat. & Sun. Dec. 10, 16, 17, 2 p.m $29. 5854212000. jcccenterstage.org. The Grinch. Fri., Dec. 8, 7-8:30 p.m., Sat., Dec. 9, 7-8:30 p.m. and Sun., Dec. 10, 2-3:30 p.m. Cobblestone Theatre, 1622 State Route 332 . Farmington $12. 398-0220. sarah.cobblestonearts@gmail. comcobblestoneartscenter.com. Meet Me in St. Louis. Through Dec. 17. Lyric Theater, 440 East Ave Through Dec. 17. Fri. & Sat. Dec. 8, 9, 15, 16, 7:30 p.m. Sat. & Sun. Dec. 9, 10, 17, 2 p.m $15-$23.50. thelyric-theatre.ticketleap.com. Octavia. Through Dec. 9. Todd Theatre, University of Rochester, River Campus Through Dec. 9. Wed.-Sat. Nov. 30, Dec. 1, 2, 6, 7, 8, 9, 7 p.m. Sun. Dec. 3, 2 p.m $15. rochester.edu/theater. Scrooge Macbeth. Fri., Dec. 8, 7:30 p.m. and Sat., Dec. 9, 7:30 p.m. Masonic Lodge, 133 S. Union Street, Spencerport Through Dec. 16. Fri. & Sat. Dec. 8, 9, 15, 16, 7:30 p.m. Additional 2 p.m. show Sat. Dec. 16 $14.

PHOTO PROVIDED BY RMSC

MUSEUM | THE SCIENCE OF ‘RIPLEY’S BELIEVE IT OR NOT’ Ever wonder how you measure up against the world’s tallest man? Well, let’s just say you’re going to need a really big selfie stick to get a snapshot with a model of Robert Wadlow, who stood 8 feet 11 inches tall! It’s part of The Science of “Ripley’s Believe it or Not” on display at RMSC (657 East Avenue) through January 2. Brave kids (and adults) can crawl through a life-size model of the largest prehistoric snake, get an up-close look at a calf with two faces, and check out a portrait of Albert Einstein made entirely out of toast. RMSC is open Monday through Saturday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.; and Sunday, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. RMSC will host a symposium of anthropologists Kristin Doughty, Robert J. Foster, and Hirokazu Miyazaki on Wednesday, December 6, from 7:30 to 9 p.m., who will share the considerations and responsibilities involved in representing unfamiliar cultural differences in with the general public. Admission to this event ($5-$10) includes pre-lecture museum exploration from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. Bring oddities and curious items from your attic or basement to be appraised this weekend at the Bizarre Buying Bazaar. Saturday, December 9, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. and Sunday, December 10, 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Free with regular museum admission: $12-$14. 271-4320; rmsc.org. — BY KATHY LALUK

Community Activism

mass shooting at Rochester’s Boys and Girls Club $9. thelittle.org.

[ WED., DECEMBER 6 ] Fight for $15 Rally for Fair Scheduling. 4:30 p.m. Location: Pittsford Plaza.

Kids Events

[ SAT., DECEMBER 9 ] Food Not Bombs Sort/Cook/ Serve Food. 3-6 p.m. St. Joseph’s House of Hospitality, 402 South Ave. 585-232-3262.

Festivals [ SAT., DECEMBER 9 ] Mystical Gateways Psychic Faire. Second Saturday of every month, 10 a.m.-5 p.m Mythic Treasures, Village Gate Square 274 North Goodman Street Featuring readers, healers and vendors 2668350. mythictreasures@ rochester.rr.com. mythictreasures.com.

Film [ TUE., DECEMBER 12 ] Move. 7 p.m. The Little Theatre, 240 East Avenue Documentary about the 2015

[ WED., DECEMBER 6 ] Book and Beast. 11-11:30 a.m. Seneca Park Zoo, 2222 St. Paul St 336-7213. senecaparkzoo.org. [ SAT., DECEMBER 9 ] Polar Express Train Rides. 11:15 a.m.-6 p.m Medina Railroad Museum, 530 West Ave. An one-hour train ride. Featuring songs, actors, cookies, hot chocolate, and more $35-$50. 798-6106. medinarailroad.com.

Holiday 8th Annual “Bells on the Hill”. Sun., Dec. 10, 4-5 p.m. Colgate Rochester Crozer Divinity School, 1100 S. Goodman St Includes singing of carols, ringing of the chapel bells, and seasonal goodies 340-9643. crcds.edu. Annual Cookie Sale. Sat., Dec. 9, 9 a.m.-1 p.m. West Bloomfield Congregational


Have fun. Feel good. Buy stuff.

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215-235 park avenue ¡ 244-4842

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40 CITY DECEMBER 6 - DECEMBER 12, 2017

We’ve got a bonus feature online from Adam Lubitow. / MOVIES


Church, 9035 Rts 5 & 20. W. Bloomfield 624-1313. wbccoffice@rochester.rr.com. wbccucc.org. Breakfast with Santa. Sat., Dec. 9, 8:30-9:30, 10-11 & 11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. and Sun., Dec. 10, 8:30-9:30, 10-11 & 11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Seneca Park Zoo, 2222 St. Paul St $17.50-$19.50. 336-7200. senecaparkzoo. org/event/breakfast-with-santa/ Sun., Dec. 10, 9:30 & 11 a.m. I-Square, 400 Bakers Park . Irondequoit Breakfast includes omelet station, waffles, quiche, and more. Admission includes pictures with Santa $24. 2661068 Sun., Dec. 10, 9:3010:30 & 10:30-11:30 a.m. Bay View Family YMCA, 1209 Bay Rd 341-3223. Cookies & Cocoa with Santa. Sun., Dec. 10, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. AutismUp, 180 Linden Oaks Drive Visit with Santa in a safe, sensory-friendly setting at AutismUp $10 per family. 2489011. autismup.org. A Downtown Abbey Holiday. Fri., Dec. 8, 7-9 p.m. Edmund & Carolyn Lyon Historic Mansion, 1441 East Ave. Proceeds will benefit the loop Ministries Urban Food Pantry Program $40. raom.org. East Rochester Christmas Festival. Sat., Dec. 9, 10:30 a.m.-4 p.m. East Rochester Eyer Building, 317 Main St East Rochester Live music, games, crafts, food, raffles, pizzelle “throw-down,” Santa and Mrs. Claus, and more 586-3553. doreen.dinardo2@gmail.com. erchamber.org. A Holiday Concert by The Roc City Ringers. Sat., Dec. 9, 2-3 p.m. Irondequoit Public Library, 1290 Titus Ave 336-6060. aholland@libraryweb.org. irondequoitlibrary.org. A Jane Austen Christmas. Tue., Dec. 12, 7 p.m. Perinton Historical Society & Fairport Museum, 18 Perrin St Fairport Yuletide Traditions During the Regency Era 223-3989. info@ perintonhistoricalsociety.org. perintonhistoricalsociety.org. Mason Cookie Jar Mix Gift. Sat., Dec. 9, 2:30-4 p.m. Victor Farmington Library, 15 W. Main St Victor $10. 924-2637. victorfarmingtonlibrary.org. Meet Krampus. Sat., Dec. 9, 5-7 p.m. Record Archive, 33 1/3 Rockwood St. Pop-ups with local artists, treats, bone chilling drink specials, and more recordarchive.com. Meet Santa. Sat., Dec. 9, 1-3 p.m. Record Archive, 33 1/3 Rockwood St. Music, movies, gifts, and more. Nativity Scene Display. Sat., Dec. 9, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. St. Luke’s Episcopal Church Fairport, 77 Country Corner Lane . Fairport Display of more than 100 Nativity Scenes from around the world 2232796. ckveronda@gmail.com. stlukesfairport.org. Senior Christmas Luncheon. Tue., Dec. 12, 11:30 a.m.-2 p.m. Bay View Family YMCA, 1209 Bay Rd $13. 341-4076. Tuba Christmas. Sat., Dec. 9, 4-5 p.m. Kodak Hall at Eastman Theater, 60 Gibbs St 509-2596. rochestertubachristmas.org. Wigilia a Traditional Polish Christmas Eve Dinner. Sat., Dec. 9, 5 p.m. St. John

PHOTO PROVIDED

ART | COSTUMES FROM THE BEAUX ARTS BALL RIT’s University Gallery on October 27 hosted its second annual Beaux Arts Ball, for which all first year RIT Design, Art, and Crafts students create functional costumes using limited materials, basing their designs on art history research. The ball has a history dating as far back as the 1950’s; RIT lecturer Graham Carson revived the event in 2016 after years of dormancy.

A VIDEO SERIES ON ROCHESTER'S RICH COMMUNITY OF ARTISTS

A selection of the colorful, imaginative costumes are on display at Bevier Gallery (James E. Booth Hall 7A, 73 Lomb Memorial Drive) through January 6. Admission is free. Hours are Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.; and Saturday, noon to 4 p.m. Hours may vary on holidays, so call ahead before visiting. 475-2646; cias.rit.edu/bevier-gallery. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY

Fisher College, 3690 East Ave $30-$35. 230-0363. polishheritagerochester.org.

Special Events [ SAT., DECEMBER 9 ] End of the Year Party, Book Launch, and Membership Drive. 2-6 p.m. Visual Studies Workshop, 31 Prince St. Roberley Bell will be giving a reading, holiday card stations, food and drinks, films screenings, and more 4428676. vsw.org. PopUp Vegan Cupcake Bar. 11 a.m.-2 p.m. 540WMain, 540 W. Main Street 420-8439. 540westmain.org.

Workshops [ THU., DECEMBER 7 ] Old Timey Jam. Every third Thursday, 6:30 p.m. Bernunzio Uptown Music, 122 East Ave bernunzio.com.

Culture Lectures [ SUN., DECEMBER 10 ] Sunday Forum: Challenges to Our Democracy. 9:45-10:45 a.m. Downtown United Presbyterian Church, 121 N. Fitzhugh Street 325-4000. downtownpresbyterian.org.

Literary Events [ SAT., DECEMBER 9 ] Book Signing: Nancy Lane. 2-4 p.m. Pat Rini Rohrer Gallery, 71 S. Main St Canandaigua.

[ MON., DECEMBER 11 ] Peter Conners Reading & Book Signing. 7:30-10:30 p.m. The Angry Goat Pub, 938 Clinton Ave. Peter will be reading from his latest book “Cornell 77: The Music, The Myth, and The Magnificence of The Grateful Dead’s Concert At Barton Hall” 413-1125. theangrygoatpub.com.

Museum Exhibit [ WED., DECEMBER 6 ] The Science of Ripley’s Believe It or Not!. Through Jan. 2, 2018. Rochester Museum and Science Center, 657 East Ave. Through Jan. 2. Collection of intriguing objects and astonishing artifacts from Ripley’s Believe It or Not!. rmsc.org. Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: Secrets of the Sewer. Through Jan. 1, 2018. The Strong National Museum of Play, 1 Manhattan Square Through Jan. 1 410-6365. museumofplay.org. Timepiece Tales. Through Dec. 23. Perinton Historical Society & Fairport Museum, 18 Perrin St Fairport Features clocks of various types and sizes from the collection of The Reverend Garth Brokaw 223-3989. info@ perintonhistoricalsociety.org. PerintonHistoricalSociety.org. [ SUN., DECEMBER 10 ] Winning the Vote: The Women of Greece. 1:30-4 p.m Greece Historical Society & Museum, 595 Long Pond Rd. Through Dec. 17. Exhibit focuses on women of Greece who supported women’s suffrage 225-7221. greecehistoricalsociety.org.

ROCHESTERCIT YNEWSPAPER.COM rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 41


Movie Theaters Searchable, up-to-the-minute movie times for all area theaters can be found at rochestercitynewspaper.com, and on City’s mobile website.

Movies

Brockport Strand 93 Main St, Brockport, 637-3310, rochestertheatermanagement.com

Canandaigua Theatres 3181 Townline Road, Canandaigua, 396-0110, rochestertheatermanagement.com

Cinema Theater 957 S. Clinton St., 271-1785, cinemarochester.com

Culver Ridge 16 2255 Ridge Rd E, Irondequoit  544-1140, regmovies.com

Dryden Theatre 900 East Ave., 271-3361, dryden.eastmanhouse.org

Eastview 13 Eastview Mall, Victor 425-0420, regmovies.com

Geneseo Theatres Geneseo Square Mall, 243-2691, rochestertheatermanagement.com

Greece Ridge 12 176 Greece Ridge Center Drive 225-5810, regmovies.com

Henrietta 18 525 Marketplace Drive 424-3090, regmovies.com

The Little 240 East Ave., 258-0444 thelittle.org

A word to the Wiseau “The Disaster Artist”

(R), DIRECTED BY JAMES FRANCO OPENS FRIDAY, DECEMBER 8 [ INTERVIEW ] BY ADAM LUBITOW

If you’re a connoisseur of “so bad it’s good” cinema, you’ve likely heard of “The Room,” a bizarro 2003 indie widely considered to be one of the worst movies ever made. It tells the supposedly heart-tugging story of Johnny (played by the film’s writer-director-producer Tommy Wiseau), a successful, All-American guy whose happy life collapses when his beloved girlfriend cheats on him with his best friend (Greg Sestero). Except Wiseau doesn’t appear

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to have the first clue of how actual human beings behave, so what he comes up with is a masterpiece of unintentional comedy. Cue a frenzied cult following and raucous midnight screenings all across the country. Now comes “The Disaster Artist,” a film adaptation of the autobiographical book by Sestero, which chronicles his unlikely friendship with Wiseau, his experiences making “The Room,” and watching it grow into an infamous classic of crap cinema. Directed by James Franco (who also stars as Wiseau), “The Disaster Artist” is a hilarious and surprisingly moving tribute to the power of friendship and the creative drive. CITY spoke by phone with screenwriters Scott Neustadter and Michael H. Weber about adapting such a strange tale, the mysterious origins of Tommy Wiseau, and why audiences all over the world have connected with his story.

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Dave and James Franco in “The Disaster Artist.” PHOTO COURTESY A24

42 CITY DECEMBER 6 - DECEMBER 12, 2017

CITY: This is the first time either of you have worked from a real-life story. How does that change your writing process compared to a

story that’s just straight-up fiction? Weber: We like adaptations. There are confines

to them, where you can’t stray too far. And with a true story, it felt like we were using a similar muscle. (...) Greg Sestero pointed out a few times we thought we’d made up lines for Tommy, they turned out to actually be things Tommy said. Which is both a compliment and then also a little bit scary that we were so in that guy’s head that things we were inventing turned out to be real. One of the things that defines Tommy is how much of his background remains shrouded in mystery. At any point in the process did either of you attempt to get any answers from him, or did you just not even try? Neustadter: I think we made a conscious choice

early on that to demystify Tommy would have negative consequences on the enjoyment of fans of the project. And it seemed like the kind of thing where it’s far more interesting that he wants this mystery to exist than it would be to give you a number of like, the day he was born. Or he’s from this place. Isn’t it more interesting that he worked so hard to create this aura of mystery around him? I think that’s the kind of thing we wanted to preserve. Weber: And the fact is Greg doesn’t ask those questions either until late in our story. Where he’s trying to figure out “is this guy really my friend or not? Would my friend do this to me?” So those questions really serve the best purpose at the moment the friendship is fracturing. Neustadter: I will say we have no idea where


Get on up [ BONUS FEATURES ] BY ADAM LUBITOW

that money comes from. We have zero idea. One of the reasons the movie works so well is the way it both finds humor in Tommy, but also treats him with a lot of affection. How did you go about finding the right tone? How conscious were you of not coming across as mean-spirited at any point? Neustadter: I think we were never derisive about

it. I think we kind of related to these guys. We were people who wanted to be in the film business and wanted to write movies. That was our dream and we shared it. That’s how our friendship started, and we related to this sort of sheer stick-to-itiveness that they had. And it doesn’t really matter whether the thing they made wins Oscars or makes a lot of money. They made this extraordinary thing that people are still talking about 15 years later. And so that’s the approach we had to it. I mean we’re envious of what they’ve made. [Laughs]

On the night of August 19, 2015, the jovial atmosphere that followed a basketball game at the Rochester Boys & Girls Club on Genesee Street was shattered when several individuals opened fire on the crowd outside, leaving three dead and four others injured. The senseless and horrific tragedy shocked the city, and left a community reeling. The new locally-produced documentary “Move,” from first-time filmmaker Tam Little, chronicles that mass shooting, but from the tragedy seeks to inspire change and spur viewers to take action. A personal connection to Lentory Johnson, the mother of shooting victim Johnny “J.R.” Johnson led Little to begin work on a video memorializing his life. Deciding to expand the scope of her project, she reached out to the families of the other young men who were killed that night: Jonah Barley and Raekwon Manigault. “I wanted to put a face and a name — I wanted to humanize them and let everyone know that there were people that loved them,” Little says. “They were cared for, they had lives, they had a future.”

What is it that strikes a chord with people about “The Room” and Tommy himself, and now this film? Weber: You know, the movie’s about friendship

ultimately. Which I think is something everyone can relate to. The movie’s also about having big dreams and going after your dreams even when the world tells you no. So I think that we’re attempting to tackle some big, relatable stuff in telling Tommy and Greg’s story. Visit rochestercitynewspaper.com for an extended version of this interview.

Genesee Street in the aftermath of the 2015 shooting at the Boys & Girls Club. FILE PHOTO

Through interviews with the families of the three victims, Little paints a moving portrait of young lives tragically cut short, and the hole their deaths left behind. But as she heard the stories of those families, she grew determined to create something even more ambitious. Moving past the crime itself, “Move” covers the trials of three men accused of carrying out the shootings, before transitioning into an exploration of the aftermath and its effect on the victims’ families and neighborhoods. As they attempt to cope with the devastation, many are galvanized to join the antiviolence movement. Little turns her camera on groups like Kick the Violence, Save Our Youth, and several others that work to stop further bloodshed and have a positive impact on their community. By showcasing their work, Little hopes that viewers will be inspired to take action against the country’s ongoing epidemic of gun violence. “What I’m showing are the grassroots initiatives that sprung up and that are continuing to go on,” Little says. “I wanted to make sure I captured that and didn’t just say, ‘this was a tragedy.’ Yes, it was a tragedy. Yes, people’s lives were lost. But what are we doing about it? “It’s called ‘Move’ because I want people to get up and move. To use their God-given gifts, talents, and passions to not just reduce gun violence, but to make their communities safer. To do things in their neighborhoods and in their schools. Because this type of violence affects everybody.” The One Take Documentary Series and The Black Cinema Series will screen “Move” at the Little Theatre (240 East Avenue) on Tuesday, December 12, and Friday, December 15, at 7 p.m. Panel discussions are scheduled for each screening. The panel following Tuesday’s

screening will include Lentory Johnson, Chiara Smith of SOY (Save our Youth), and Quartermaine Titus. Friday’s panelists will be Anita Barley (mother of Jonah Barley), Tammy Burnett (mother of Raekwon Manigault), and Marlon Dixon, founder of Kick the Violence. Tickets $4-$9. 258-0400; thelittle.org.

Coming Attractions:

The Rochester Jewish Film Festival and the JCC will host the local premiere of the documentary “Bombshell: The Hedy Lamarr Story” on Sunday, December 10, at 6 p.m. Incorporating a recently unearthed 1990 audio interview with Lamarr, director Alexandra Dean allows the actress herself to tell her own story, detailing how she worked as a starlet by day, and by night aided the Allied war effort by brainstorming a new system of wireless communication. The idea laid the groundwork for GPS, WiFi, cell phones, and other technologies. The screening will be held at the JCC Hart Theater (1200 Edgewood Avenue). Tickets $5-$10. 461-2000; rjff.org. WXXI and Friends of Ganondagan will present a free screening of “Secrets of Spanish Florida — A Secrets of the Dead Special” at the Little Theatre (240 East Avenue) on Monday, December 11, at 6:30 p.m. The documentary follows a team of researchers exploring America’s lesser known roots as they study the Spanish colonists responsible for creating the United States’ first permanent European settlement in Florida back in 1565. The film will be followed by a discussion moderated by Dr. Donald Grinde, professor of American Studies and History at the University at Buffalo. 258-0400; thelittle.org. Have information about an upcoming film event or screening? Send details to adam. lubitow@gmail.com.

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Celebrate the Holidays In the Neighborhood of the Arts!

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Classifieds For information: Call us (585) 244-3329 Fax us (585) 244-1126 Mail Us City Classifieds 250 N. Goodman Street Rochester, NY 14607 Email Us classifieds@ rochester-citynews.com EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY

All real estate advertised in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act, which makes it unlawful, “to make, print, or publish, any notice, statement, or advertisement, with respect to the sale or rental of a dwelling that indicates any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin.” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under the age of 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertisement for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. Call the local Fair Housing Enforcement Project, FHEP at 325-2500 or 1-866-671-FAIR. Si usted sospecha una practica de vivienda injusta, por favor llame al servicio legal gratis. 585-325-2500 - TTY 585-325-2547.

Automotive 1990 BUICK CENTURY 77K org., new brakes, new tires, inspected. $900 585-328-4848 DONATE YOUR CAR to Wheels For Wishes, benefiting Make-A-Wish. We offer free towing and your donation is 100% tax deductible. Call 917-336-1254 Today!

For Sale BROTHER COMPACTRONIC 300M Electric Typewriter, Brand New $49.99 Les at 585-410-1409 BROWN WOOD SHELF open in back. 3 ft long, 28” high $15.585880-2903 END TABLE - Living room, real wood, wicker bottom shelf, great sixe $45 585-880-2903 EXOTIC HOUSE PLANTS, indoor, 10 plants 2 for $3 585-490-5870 HAMILTON BEACH - food processor $12. 585-225-5526 KID’S BIKES - one with training wheels $8 each or BO 585-2255526 METAL DESK - on wheels, as hole for computer or lamp cords. 32” w. also lower shelf, room for a chair $15 585-880-2903

PORTABLE KEROSENE HEATER Kero - World model KW-11F, used once in windstorm. In box , have receipt, includes 5 gallons of Kerosene $160 Gloria 585-2547352

PSST. Out of touch? Out of tune? See our music reviews from Frank De Blase.

TAN WOOD SHELF DVD, book, has a ledge in back to hold DVD, 28” lomg, 29” tall, shiny finish $15 858-880-2903 TOPOGRAPHIC MAPS - A complete set of NY State, For hiking, hunting or finding your house on them! $8 each or BO for set. 585-746-7054

Jam Section BRIAN S. MARVIN Lead vocalist, looking for an audition to join band, cover tunes, originals and has experience with bands 585259-3717 CALLING ALL MUSICIANS OF ALL GENRES the Rochester Music Coalition wants you! Please register on our website. For further info: www.rochestermusiccoalition.org info@rochestermusiccoalition.org 585-235-8412

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www.KDmoving.com 44 CITY DECEMBER 6 - 12, 2017

Join Us for our Multi-Generational

CHANUKAH PARTY!

Saturday, December 16th 5:30pm - Latke tasting contest 6:15pm - Songs, Candle-lighting & Latkes/donuts TEMPLE BETH DAVID RSVP: office@tbdrochester.org 2131 Elmwood Avenue · Door A · Second Level (Use Eastside Parking Lot) TBD is an egalitarian, welcoming congregation


Find your way home Real Estate Section

HomeWork A cooperative effort of City Newspaper and RochesterCityLiving, a program of the Landmark Society.

IN PRINT AND ONLINE CLASSIFIEDS

ROCHESTERCITYNEWSPAPER.COM Greece; 3065 Mt Read Blvd. $84,900 Townhome, part of Pine Ridge Townhome development. Features; Private Driveway, ATTACHED GARAGE, Bright/Open floor plan, Living room w/cathedral ceilings, skylights & corner fireplace. Updates; 2007 thermopane windows/sliding glass patio doors. New counter tops 2013. New Furnace, A/C, & Water Heater (2016). All kitchen appliances included. Patio doors lead to large private fenced-in patio. Remax Realty Group 585-218-6802

Ryan Smith

NYS Licensed Real Estate Salesperson 201-0724

Prime Property on the Parkway

RochesterSells.com

137 Seneca Parkway

CITY TOWNHOMES FOR SALE

HIGHLY DESIRABLE EAST END JUST STEPS TO HART’S LOCAL GROCERS

Seneca Parkway in the Maplewood neighborhood is quite possibly one of the most scenic streets in the city. A tree-lined median—an element of the City’s parks system designed by landscape architect Frederick Law Olmsted—alongside amazing architectural gems creates a dramatic streetscape. The early 20th century home at 137 looks out over this elegant landscape. The 2,304 square foot house has been divided into two units, one on the first floor and one on the second. The first floor unit is accessed from the main entrance on the front porch. The rich architectural detailing starts here with the original front door and leaded glass sidelight, which open to an entrance vestibule. Entering the front hall, the living room is on the left and the first bedroom is to the right. Hardwood floors, original doors and hardware, and moldings are present throughout the unit.

ONLY 6 OF 10 UNITS LEFT • • • •

Act now to customize your unit Tax savings for owner occupants Hassle free association living Energy Star construction

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Attached Garage + outside parking 2-4 BRs, 2 ½ baths, 1430-2250 SF Front porches & private patios Preferred financing from M&T Bank

The living room, which can be closed off from the hallway with pocket doors, has a bay window and fireplace. Proceeding through a set of leaded glass pocket doors brings you to the formal dining room. Beyond the dining room is a fully updated kitchen. An updated full bath and the second bedroom are also located at the rear of the house. A coat closet in the central hall rounds out the unit.

The second floor unit makes use of the original staircase, which has been enclosed and incorporated into the unit, to create a cozy, light-filled space. Like the first floor, this unit also has two bedrooms, an updated kitchen and bath, a formal dining room, living room, hardwood floors, and original details. The property has an unfinished attic, plenty of room for off-street parking, a large garage, and separate utilities for the two units. 137 Seneca Parkway is located in the heart of the Maplewood neighborhood, just a few blocks from Maplewood Park. With easy access to 104 to get across town or Lake Ave. to get downtown, the rest of the city is at your fingertips. The Maplewood Neighborhood Association is a tightknit, active group with regular meetings and events. For the right buyer, looking to take on the responsibility of being a landlord, this property could be an excellent opportunity for an owner occupant. 137 Seneca Parkway is listed at $159,900. For more information, contact Ashley Nowak with Howard Hanna Real Estate Services at 585-472-3016. by Caitlin Meives Caitlin is the Preservation Planner at The Landmark Society.

OPEN HOUSE SAT. & SUN. 2 - 5 PM

FOR MORE INFO/APPOINTMENT: KIM RUSSELL 465-3829 THE COMPLETE OFFERING TERMS ARE IN AN OFFERING PLAN AVAILABLE FROM SPONSOR. | File No. H17-0003.

66 CHARLOTTE ST. • A HOME LEASING COMMUNITY • CHARLOTTESQUAREROC.COM rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 45


EMPLOYMENT / CAREER OPPORTUNITIES Employment AIRLINE CAREERS START Here – Get trained as FAA certified Aviation Technician. Financial aid for qualified students. Job placement assistance. Call AIM for free information 866-296-7094 VISITING ASSISTANT PROFESSOR Of Media Management at St. John Fisher College. We invite applications for a full time faculty member to teach applied media research, analytics, media economics, advertising, strategic communication, and business communication at the undergraduate and graduate level. Qualifications: Doctorate preferred. M.S., M.A., or M.B.A. considered. Previous industry and teaching experience also preferred. Position begins Fall 2018. Applicants from diverse groups encouraged to apply. Apply: https://jobs.sjfc. edu/applicants/jsp/shared/ frameset/Frameset. jsp?time=1510194408469 or https://jobs.sjfc.edu/

Volunteers BECOME A DOCENT at the Rochester Museum & Science Center Must be an enthusiastic communicator, Like working with children. Learn more at http://www. rmsc.org/Support/Volunteer Or call 585-697-1948

CARING FOR CAREGIVERS Lifespan is looking for volunteers to offer respite to caregivers whose loved ones have been diagnosed with early stage Alzheimer’s Disease. For details call Eve at 244-8400

PSST. Can’t decide on where to eat? Check with our dining writers for vetted grub.

CATHOLIC FAMILY CENTER is seeking a volunteer with graphic design experience to help with fliers and signage for multiple events this summer and fall. Flexible schedule. Please contact cgill@ cfcrochester.org or call 262-7044. Contact Urban League Of Rochester today to become a mentor to the youth in our community! Email Charisma Dupree at cdupree@ulr. org to get started. MEALS ON WHEELS needs YOU to deliver meals to YOUR neighbors in need. Available weekdays between 11:30 AM and 1:00 PM? Visit our website at www.vnsnet.com or call 274-4385 to get started!

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OPERA GUILD OF Rochester needs a volunteer to assist with newsletter publication, and event helpers for the annual recital and opera presentations. For details see home page at operaguildofrochester.com. SENECA PARK ZOO Society seeking volunteers and docents for ongoing involvement or special events. Roles available for all interests. Contact Volunteers@ senecazoo.org to learn more. ST. JOHN’S HOME s looking for volunteers to transport residents on Tuesday mornings to and from Catholic Mass within our home. Please call volunteer office at 7601293 for more information.

Join our sales team!

City Newspaper is seeking a confident, enthusiastic, high-energy person for advertising sales. Sales experience essential; media sales experience a plus. Send resume to: btowler@rochester-citynews.com

Thinking about peace & social justice? Looking for a quiet place? Try Quaker meeting. Sundays at 11:00 am Rochester Friends Meeting 84 Scio Street (downtown) Rochester NY 14607 325-7260 • rochesterquakers.org

LO L HE / JOBS 46 CITY DECEMBER 6 - 12, 2017


Legal Ads [ NOTICE ] \ Notice of formation of AHV HOLDINGS LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/3/2017. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 375 Averill Ave., Rochester, NY 14620. Purpose: any lawful act [ NOTICE ] 122 Winterroth LLC Arts of Org. filed SSNY 10/3/17. Office: Monroe Co. SSNY design agent of LLC upon whom process may be served & mail to POB 30071 Rochester, NY 14603 General Purpose [ NOTICE ] 243-245 Augustin LLC Arts of Org. filed SSNY 10/16/17. Office: Monroe Co. SSNY design agent of LLC upon whom process may be served & mail to Po Box 30071 Rochester, NY 14603 General Purpose [ NOTICE ] 750 PANNELL ROAD, LLC Arts of Org. filed with Sec’y of State (SSNY) on Nov 3,2017. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to 9 Little Spring Run, Fairport, N.Y. 14450. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] BBPY Properties LLC Filed 10/4/17 Office: Monroe Co. SSNY designated as agent for process & shall mail to: 30 Embassy Drive, Rochester, NY 14618. Purpose: all lawful [ NOTICE ] C3 Evolution Group, LLC Arts of Org. filed SSNY 10/5/17. Office: Monroe Co. SSNY design agent of LLC upon whom process may be served & mail to 1325 Klem Rd Webster, NY 14580 General Purpose [ NOTICE ] Christopher Haitz LLC, Arts of Org. filed with Sec. of State of NY (SSNY) 10/19/2017. Cty: Monroe. SSNY desig. as agent upon whom process against may be served & shall mail process to 5549 Clinton Street Rd., Bergen, NY 14416. General Purpose. [ NOTICE ] Craul Properties LLC Arts of Org. filed SSNY 10/13/17. Office: Monroe Co. SSNY design agent of LLC upon whom process may be served & mail to Christopher L Ruff 12 Southcross Trl Fairport, NY 14450 General Purpose [ NOTICE ] Creme De La Creme

Diamonds LLC, Arts of Org. filed with Sec. of State of NY (SSNY) 10/17/2017. Cty: Monroe. SSNY desig. as agent upon whom process against may be served & shall mail process to 2250 West Ridge Rd., Ste. 300, Rochester, NY 14626. General Purpose., Arts of Org. filed with Sec. of State of NY (SSNY) 10/17/2017. Cty: Monroe. SSNY desig. as agent upon whom process against may be served & shall mail process to 2250 West Ridge Rd., Ste. 300, Rochester, NY 14626. General Purpose. [ NOTICE ] ERPilates, LLC, Arts of Org. filed with Sec. of State of NY (SSNY) 7/31/2017. Cty: Monroe. SSNY desig. as agent upon whom process against may be served & shall mail process to Ethan Richardson, 21 Lynwood Dr., Rochester, NY 14618. General Purpose.

To place your ad in the LEGAL section, contact Tracey Mykins by phone at (585) 244-3329 x10 or by email at legals@rochester-citynews.com [ NOTICE ] Kr Partners, LLC Arts of Org. filed SSNY 9/27/17. Office: Monroe Co. SSNY design agent of LLC upon whom process may be served & mail to 90 State St #700-40 Albany, NY 12207 RA: S I Mahalakshmi Cheruvu 146 Greystone Ln #5 Rochester, NY 14618 General Purpose [ NOTICE ] Maayan LLC Arts of Org. filed SSNY 11/6/17. Office: Monroe Co. SSNY design agent of LLC upon whom process may be served & mail to 550 Latona Rd #D419 Rochester, NY 14626 General Purpose [ NOTICE ] Medy LLC Arts of Org. filed SSNY 11/6/17. Office: Monroe Co. SSNY design agent of LLC upon whom process may be served & mail to 550 Latona Rd #D419 Rochester, NY 14626 General Purpose

[ NOTICE ]

[ NOTICE ]

GADIR LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 11/7/2017. Office in Monroe Co. SSNY desig. agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 550 Latona Rd., Ste. D-419, Rochester, NY 14626, which is also the principal business location. Purpose: Any lawful purpose.

Normandy River Estates, LLC Arts of Org. filed SSNY 11/8/17. Office: Monroe Co. SSNY design agent of LLC upon whom process may be served & mail to 1120 Sw Shorebrook Dr Normandy Park, WA 98166 RA: Aveon Realty Management, Inc. 32 Hampton Oval New Rochelle, NY 10805 General Purpose

[ NOTICE ] GRAY-BLEIBERG INVESTMENTS VIII, A CALIFORNIA LIMITED PARTNERSHIP filed an Application for Authority with the Department of State of NY on 10/19/2017. Jurisdiction: CA, and the date of its formation is 6/1/1991. Office location in NYS: Monroe. The Secretary of State of NY (“SSNY”) is designated as agent upon whom process against it may be served. The address to which the SSNY shall mail a copy of such process is: c/o Andrew Tickle, 793 S. Goodman St., Rochester, NY 14620 The address in its jurisdiction if required or the office address: 793 S. Goodman St., Rochester, NY 14620. A copy of the Arts. of Org. may be obtained from CA Secretary of State, 1500 11th St., Sacramento, CA 95814. The list of names and addresses of all general partners is available from the Secretary of State. The purpose of the LP is any lawful act [ NOTICE ] KAD Specialty Foods LLC, Arts of Org. filed with Sec. of State of NY (SSNY) 10/18/2017. Cty: Monroe. SSNY desig. as agent upon whom process against may be served & shall mail process to 17 Lianne Dr., Rochester, NY 14626. General Purpose.

[ NOTICE ] NOTICE AND BRIEF STATEMENT OF NATURE OF ACTION CONSUMER CREDIT TRANSACTION SUPREME COURT OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF MONROE Index No. 2017004721 M&T Bank, Plaintiff, -against- ILONA D. MATTHEWS, individually and as heir-at-law to the Estate of HELEN D. MATTHEWS (deceased); LEON MATTHEWS, III, individually and as heirat-law to the Estate of HELEN D. MATTHEWS (deceased); VERITA MARY MATTHEWS, individually and as heir-at-law to the Estate of HELEN D. MATTHEWS (deceased); ALL UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES AND PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVES OF HELEN D. MATTHEWS AND ANY OF HER SUCCESSORS IN RIGHT, TITLE AND INTEREST; et al., Defendants. TO THE DEFENDANT(S): LEON MATTHEWS, III, individually and as heir-at-law to the Estate of HELEN D. MATTHEWS (deceased) and ALL UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES AND PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVES OF HELEN D. MATTHEWS AND ANY OF HER SUCCESSORS IN RIGHT, TITLE AND INTEREST, et al. YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED and

required to serve upon plaintiff’s attorneys an answer to the complaint in this action within twenty (20) days after the service of this Summons, exclusive of the day of service, or within thirty (30) days after service is complete if the Summons is not personally delivered to you within the State of New York. The United States of America, if designated as a defendant in this action, may answer or appear within sixty (60) days of service hereof. In case of your failure to answer, judgment will be taken against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. Trial is desired in the County of MONROE. The basis of venue designated above is that the real property, which is the subject matter of this action, is located in the County of MONROE, New York. NOTICE: YOU ARE IN DANGER OF LOSING YOUR HOME IF YOU DO NOT RESPOND TO THIS SUMMONS AND COMPLAINT BY SERVING A COPY OF THE ANSWER ON THE ATTORNEY FOR THE MORTGAGE COMPANY WHO FILED THIS FORECLOSURE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU AND FILING THE ANSWER WITH THE COURT A DEFAULT JUDGMENT MAY BE ENTERED AND YOU CAN LOSE YOUR HOME. SPEAK TO AN ATTORNEY OR GO TO THE COURT WHERE YOUR CASE IS PENDING FOR FURTHER INFORMATION ON HOW TO ANSWER THE SUMMONS AND PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY. SENDING A PAYMENT TO YOUR MORTGAGE COMPANY WILL NOT STOP THIS FORECLOSURE ACTION. YOU MUST RESPOND BY SERVING A COPY OF THE ANSWER ON THE ATTORNEY FOR THE PLAINTIFF (MORTGAGE COMPANY) AND FILING THE ANSWER WITH THE COURT. The foregoing Summons is served upon you by publication pursuant to an order of Hon. Daniel J. Doyle, Justice of the Supreme Court of the State of New York, signed on the 18th day of October, 2017 in Rochester, New York and to be duly entered in the MONROE County Clerk’s Office, in Rochester, New York. The Nature of this action pertains to a note and mortgage held by Plaintiff on real property owned by the above named defendants as specified in the complaint filed in this action. The above named defendants have failed to comply with the terms and provisions of the said mortgage and said instruments secured by said mortgage, by failing and omitting to pay the balance due and owing and the Plaintiff has commenced a foreclosure action.

Plaintiff is seeking a judgment foreclosing its mortgage against the real property and premises which situates in the Town of Gates, County of Monroe and State of New York and is commonly known as 58 Cheshire Lane, Rochester, New York 14624 and all other relief as to the Court may seem just and equitable. DATED: October 27, 2017 SCHILLER, KNAPP, LEFKOWITZ & HERTZEL, LLP BY: WILLIAM B. SCHILLER, ESQ. Attorneys for Plaintiff 950 New Loudon Road Latham, New York 12110 Telephone: (518) 7869069 49775-1 [ NOTICE ] Notice is hereby given that an alcohol beverage license,pending , has been applied for to consume beer & wine at retail in a restaurant under the Alcoholic Beverage Control Law at 319 EXCHANGE BLVD ROCHESTER, NY 14608 in Monroe County for on premises consumption. *ARTURO MARTINEZ DBA MI BARRIO BURRITO PLACE [ NOTICE ] Notice is hereby given that an Order entered by the Supreme Court, County of Monroe on the 28th day of November, bearing Index Number 17/9977, a copy of which may be examined in the office of the Monroe County Clerk, located at 39 West Main Street, Rochester, New York, grants me the right to assume the name of Izabela Grace Berry. My present address is 564 Granger Circle Webster, New York 14580. The date of my birth is June 29, 2015 - born in New Britain, Connecticut; my present name is Izabela G. DeMelloBerry. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Form. of YELLOW BULL, LLC (the “LLC”). Art. of Org. filed with Secretary of the State of NY (SSNY) on 11/16/17. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, 195 Pearson Ln, Rochester, NY 14612. Purpose: any lawful purpose.

[ NOTICE ]

[ NOTICE ]

Notice of Formation of 151 Saratoga, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/27/17. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, c/o Sammy Feldman, 3445 Winton Place, Ste. 228, Rochester, NY 14623. Purpose: any lawful activity.

Notice of formation of CLOUD GRIFFIN HOLDINGS, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/20/2012. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 45 Exchange Blvd., 3rd Fl., Rochester NY 14614. Purpose: any lawful act.

[ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of 845-491 SOUTH & GOOD HOLDINGS LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/3/2017. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 375 Averill Ave., Rochester, NY 14620. Purpose: any lawful act [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of AUTOMATED BOOKS, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/20/17. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Bernadette S. Davis, 5B Myrtlewood Drive, Henrietta, NY 14467. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Autumn Winds LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 11/08/17. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 116 Janes Road, Rochester, NY 14612. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Brighton Consulting Associates, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/30/17. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o The LLC, 3445 Winton Place, Ste. 228, Rochester, NY 14623. Purpose: any lawful activity.

[ NOTICE ]

[ NOTICE ]

Notice of Formation of GDK Consulting LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) on 10/11/2017. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 315 Westminster Road Rochester, New York 14607. Purpose: any lawful activities.

Notice of Formation of Brighton Property Management, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/30/17. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o The LLC, 3445 Winton Place, Ste. 228, Rochester, NY 14623. Purpose: any lawful activity.

[ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of CRAZY MO GUITAR LLC. Art.of Org. filed Secretary of State of NY (“SSNY”) 11/14/2017. Office location: Monroe Co. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 80 Guinevere Dr., Rochester, NY 14626. Purpose: any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of DAJ V, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/15/17. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: David A. Julian, 1358 E. Ridge Road, Rochester, NY 14612. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of DO Enterprises of NY, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/20/17. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o The LLC, 59 North Main St., Hoyeoye Falls, NY 14472. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of FLATIRON FARM, LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 8/24/17. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 508 RUSHHENRIETTA TL RD, W. HENRIETTA, NY 14586 . Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of GRAY CABIN LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/13/2017. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 1111 Ogden Parma Townline Rd., Spencerport, NY 14559. Purpose: any lawful act [ NOTICE ]

Notice of Formation of HUMUS BELT LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 10/25/2017. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 378 ROCKINGHAM ST, ROCHESTER, NY 14620 . Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of JG AG & TURF, LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 8/25/17. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 508 RUSHHENRIETTA TL RD, W. HENRIETTA, NY 14586 . Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of JPC Property Group LLC. Art. Of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 11/13/2017. Office Location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 51 Belltower Lane, Pittsford, NY 14534. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of LATTA HOME IMPROVEMENTS LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 9/26/2017. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 2474 Latta Rd., Rochester NY 14612. Purpose: any lawful act. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of Limited Liability Company (LLC). Name: Spring Street Holdings LLC. Articles of Organization filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on November 21, 2017. Office location, Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to: P.O. Box 30278, Rochester NY 14603 Purpose: any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of MDM MAC Properties Farmington LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/6/2017. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 1000 Sanford Rd. N, Churchville, NY 14428. Purpose: any

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rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 47


Legal Ads > page 47 lawful act

Rochester NY 14622 . Purpose: any lawful activities.

[ NOTICE ]

[ NOTICE ]

Notice of Formation of NAPWEST LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/2/17. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 186 Vineyard Drive, Rochester, NY 14616. Purpose: any lawful activity.

Notice of Formation of RONSON TRUCKING LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/19/17. Office location: Orleans County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Corporation Service Co., 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207. Purpose: Any lawful activity

[ NOTICE ]

[ NOTICE ]

Notice of formation of NBREW ENTERPRISES LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/13/2017. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 689 Regina Dr., Webster, NY 14580. Purpose: any lawful act

Notice of formation of SLAY BEAUTY BAR, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 5/6/2016. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 346 East Ridge Rd., Rochester, NY 14621. Purpose: any lawful act

[ NOTICE ]

[ NOTICE ]

Notice of formation of Ogden Heavy Equipment, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/26/2017. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, c/o 4 Turner Dr., Spencerport, NY 14559. Purpose: any lawful act.

Notice of Formation of STONEWOOD PARK, LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) on 11/14/2017. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 2300 BUFFALO ROAD, Rochester, New York 14624. Purpose: any lawful activities.

[ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of River Fox, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/19/2017. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 54 Valley View Dr., Brockport, NY 14420. Purpose: any lawful act. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of ROC HEALTH & WELLNESS CENTER, LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 11/17/2017. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to ELISSA L JOHNSON 32 WEBBER CIRCLE ROCHESTER, NY 14626 . Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Rochester Kettle Corn LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 10/25/2017. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 36 Cranbrooke Dr

[ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of SWAN DIVE 289, LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) on 11/14/2017. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 289 Alexander Street, Rochester, New York 14607. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of THORN STREET PROPERTIES LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) on 10/20/2017. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 530 VOSBURG ROAD, WEBSTER, NY 14580. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of TL Properties, LLC, Art of Org filed with Sec’y of State (SSNY) 11/3/2017. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of PLLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 292 Hamlin Center Road, Hilton, NY 14468. [ NOTICE ]

48 CITY DECEMBER 6 - 12, 2017

To place your ad in the LEGAL section, contact Tracey Mykins by phone at (585) 244-3329 x10 or by email at legals@rochester-citynews.com

Notice of Formation of Tuxedo Corner, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/17/17. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 9 Bramblewood Circle, Rochester, NY 14624. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of WILY HOLDINGS LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/1/2017. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 375 Averill Ave., Rochester, NY 14620. Purpose: any lawful act [ NOTICE ] NSRE Holdings, LLC, Arts of Org. filed with Sec. of State of NY (SSNY) 10/20/2017. Cty: Monroe. SSNY desig. as agent upon whom process against may be served & shall mail process to 3485 Big Ridge Rd., Spencerport, NY 14559. General Purpose. [ NOTICE ] Raz Vicerabin LLC Arts of Org. filed SSNY 10/19/17. Office: Monroe Co. SSNY design agent of LLC upon whom process may be served & mail to 178 Waverly Pl #2F New York, NY 10014 General Purpose [ NOTICE ] Rochester Property Services LLC Arts of Org. filed SSNY 2/12/16. Office: Monroe Co. SSNY design agent of LLC upon whom process may be served & mail to 228 Miramar Rd Rochester, NY 14624 General Purpose [ NOTICE ] ROXANNE A. LOWENGUTH, DDS, MS, PLLC (PLLC) filed Arts. of Org. with NY Secy. of State (SS) on 9/12/17. PLLC’s office is in Monroe Co. SS is designated as agent of PLLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS shall mail a copy of any process to PLLC at 2401 Monroe Avenue, Rochester, NY 14618. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Steven Braun, LLC Arts of Org. filed SSNY 11/9/17. Office: Monroe Co. SSNY design agent of LLC upon whom process may be served & mail to 3 Red Plank Way Rochester, NY 14624 General Purpose [ NOTICE ] Value Management Solutions, LLC (LLC) filed Arts. of Org. with NY Secy. of State (SS)

on October 12, 2017. LLC’s office is in Monroe Co. SS is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS will mail a copy of any process to 145 Culver Rd., Suite 100, Rochester NY 14620. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Vibebin LLC Arts of Org. filed SSNY 10/3/17. Office: Monroe Co. SSNY design agent of LLC upon whom process may be served & mail to 379 Broadway #2A Brooklyn, NY 11211 General Purpose [ NOTICE } Notice of formation of Klein and Coh LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/09/17. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Alyssa Cohen, 110 Covington Rd, Rochester, NY 14617. Purpose: any lawful act [ Notice of Formation ] 17 Lockwood LLC (“LLC”) filed Articles of Organization with the NY Sec. of State (“SSNY”) on 11/8/17. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall forward service of process to 417 Sundance Trail, Webster, NY 14580. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] Bernard Birnbaum Companies - LLC (“LLC”) filed Articles of Organization with the NY Sec. of State (“SSNY”) on 8/22/17. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall forward service of process to 2850 Clover Street, Pittsford, NY 14534. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] Birnbaum Real Estate - LLC (“LLC”) filed Articles of Organization with the NY Sec. of State (“SSNY”) on 7/19/17. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall forward service of process to 2850 Clover Street, Pittsford, NY 14534. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] Hops and Hemp - LLC (“LLC”) filed Articles of Organization with the NY Sec. of State (“SSNY”) on 10/10/17. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against

it may be served and shall forward service of process to 2850 Clover Street, Pittsford, NY 14534. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] NOTICE OF FORMATION of Borderland Advisors LLC, Articles of Organization filed with Secretary of State of NY (SSNY) on November 3rd, 2017. Office location: Ontario County. SSNY designated as agent upon whom process against it may be served. The address to which the SSNY shall mail a copy of any process against the LLC served upon him is C/O the LLC, 66 Cobble Creek Rd. Victor, NY 14564. Term: perpetual. Purpose: any lawful act or activity for which LLC’s may be organized under the NY LLC Law. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] Rite Care Child Development Center L.L.C. filed Articles of Organization with the New York Department of State on October 16, 2017. Its office is located in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent of the Company upon whom process against it may be served and a copy of any process shall be mailed to 32 Yorktown Dr, Rochester, NY 14616. The purpose of the Company is daycare. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] Venture 8, LLC (“LLC”) filed Articles of Organization with the NY Sec. of State (“SSNY”) on 8/29/17. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall forward service of process to 2850 Clover St., Pittsford, NY 14534. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] Whitney Hill Farm LLC (“LLC”) filed Articles of Organization with the NY Sec. of State (“SSNY”) on 10/17/17. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall forward service of process to 2500 Whitney Road East, Fairport, NY 14550. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY ] The name of the LLC is CP 671 Park Ave LLC. The Articles of Organization were filed with the NY Secretary of State on 11/3/17. The LLC office is located in Monroe County. The NY Secretary of State is designated as the agent of the LLC upon

whom process may be served, and the address a copy shall be mailed is 135 Corporate Woods Ste 300 Rochester NY 14623. The LLC is managed by a manager. The purpose of the LLC is any lawful business. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY ] The name of the LLC is NP 671 Park Ave LLC. The Articles of Organization were filed with the NY Secretary of State on 11/7/17. The LLC office is located in Monroe County. The NY Secretary of State is designated as the agent of the LLC upon whom process may be served, and the address a copy shall be mailed is 135 Corporate Woods STE 300 Rochester NY 14623. The LLC is managed by a manager. The purpose of the LLC is any lawful business.

as agent upon whom process may be served. A copy of any process shall be mailed to 100 Timarron Trail, Rochester, NY 14612. The purpose of the LLC is to engage in any lawful activity for which Limited Liability Companies may be organized under Section 203 of the New York Limited Liability Company Law. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF TAG ALLIANCE, LLC ] Art. of Org. filed with SSNY 11/3/2017 Office Location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated Agent of LLC to whom process may be served. SSNY may mail copy of process to 91 CLARDALE DRIVE, ROCHESTER, NY 14616. Purpose of LLC: Any lawful activity.

[ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LLC ]

[ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF THE GARDENS AT FIELDSTONE 1-38.11 LLC ]

49 Bay Street, LLC has filed articles of organization with the New York Secretary of State on 11/3/2017, with an effective date of formation of 11/3/2017. Its principal place of business is located in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent upon whom process may be served. A copy of any process shall be mailed to 49 Bay St., Rochester, NY 14605. The purpose of the LLC is to engage in any lawful activity for which Limited Liability Companies may be organized under Section 203 of the New York Limited Liability Company Law.

The name of the Limited Liability Company is The Gardens at Fieldstone 1-38.11 LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the New York Secretary of State on 11/8/2017. The office of the LLC is in Monroe County. The New York Secretary of State is designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. The Secretary of State shall mail a copy of such procesds to 2833 Ridge Road West, #26461, Rochester, NY 14626.The LLC is organized to engage in any lawful activity for which an LLC may be formed under the NY LLC Law.

[ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LLC ]

[ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF WILBOS, LLC ]

898 Ridge Road LLC filed articles of organization with the New York Secretary of State on 7/17/2003, with an effective date of formation of 7/17/2003. Its principal place of business is located in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent upon whom process may be served. A copy of any process shall be mailed to 8 Skytop Lane, Pittsford, NY 14534. The purpose of the LLC is to engage in any lawful activity for which Limited Liability Companies may be organized under Section 203 of the New York Limited Liability Company Law. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LLC ] Joseph R. Properties L.L.C. has filed articles of organization with the New York Secretary of State on 10/11/2017, with an effective date of formation of 10/11/2017. Its principal place of business is located in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated

Wilbos, LLC (the “LLC”) filed Articles of Organization with NY Secretary of State (SSNY) 11/1/17. Office location: Monroe County, NY. Principal business location: 3 Fitzmot Glen, Pittsford, NY 14534. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 3 Fitzmot Glen, Pittsford, NY 14534. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING ] NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a public hearing pursuant to Article 18-A of the New York State General Municipal Law will be held by the County of Monroe Industrial Development Agency d/b/a Imagine Monroe Powered By COMIDA (the “Agency”) on the 18th day of December, 2017 at 10:00 a.m., local time, in the Main Meeting Room at the Henrietta Town Hall, 475 Calkins Road, Henrietta, New York 14467, in connection

with the following matter: 2695 APARTMENTS II LLC, a New York limited liability company, for itself or an entity formed or to be formed (collectively, the “Company”) has requested that the Agency assist with a certain Project (the “Project”), consisting of: (A) the acquisition by lease, license or otherwise, of an interest in a portion of an approximately 34.67-acre parcel of land located on Lehigh Station Road in the Town of Henrietta, New York [Tax Map No. 176.090-0002001.100] (the “Land”); (B) the construction thereon of a 249-unit apartment complex comprised of: four (4) 32-unit apartment buildings with 6 auxiliary 11-unit garages and one 22-unit auxiliary garage; nine (9) 10-unit apartments buildings; two (2) 5-unit ranch buildings; two (2) 4-unit ranch buildings, three (3) 3-unit ranch buildings, two (2) 2-unit ranch buildings; and related improvements including a maintenance shed, dog park and pavilion (collectively, the “Improvements”), and (C) the acquisition and installation therein, thereon or thereabout of certain machinery, equipment and related personal property (the “Equipment” and, together with the Land and the Improvements, the “Facility”). The Facility will be initially operated and/ or managed by the Company. The Agency will acquire an interest in the Facility and lease the Facility to the Company. The financial assistance contemplated by the Agency will consist generally of the exemption from taxation expected to be claimed by the Company as a result of the Agency taking an interest in, possession or control (by lease, license or otherwise) of the Facility, or of the Company acting as an agent of the Agency, consisting of: (i) exemption from state and local sales and use tax with respect to the qualifying personal property portion of the Facility, (ii) exemption from mortgage recording tax with respect to any qualifying mortgage on the Facility, and (iii) exemption from general real property taxation with respect to the Facility, which exemption shall be offset, in whole or in part, by contractual payments in lieu of taxes by the Company for the benefit of affected tax jurisdictions. A copy of the Company’s application, containing the Benefit/ Incentive analysis, is


Legal Ads available for inspection at the Agency’s offices at 8100 CityPlace, 50 West Main Street, Rochester, New York 14614 during normal business hours, Monday through Friday, and will be available for inspection and review at the above-scheduled Public Hearing. The Agency will at the above-stated time and place hear all persons with views in favor of or opposed to either the location or nature of the Facility, or the proposed financial assistance being contemplated by the Agency. In addition, at, or prior to, such hearing, interested parties may submit to the Agency written materials pertaining to such matters. Dated: December 6, 2017 COUNTY OF MONROE INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT AGENCY D/B/A IMAGINE MONROE POWERED BY COMIDABy: Jeffrey R. Adair, Executive Director [ NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING ] NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a public hearing pursuant to Article 18-A of the New York State General Municipal Law will be held by the County of Monroe Industrial Development Agency d/b/a Imagine Monroe Powered By COMIDA (the “Agency”) on the 18th day of December, 2017 at 11:00 a.m., local time, at the Irondequoit Town Hall, 1280 Titus Avenue, Rochester, New York 14617, in connection with the following matter: LPPA 1, LLC, a New York limited liability company, or an entity formed or to be formed (collectively, the “Company”) has requested that the Agency assist with a certain Project (the “Project”), consisting of: (A) the acquisition of a leasehold interest in a portion of an aggregate approximately 24.82-acres of land located at 951 and 1027 Thomas Avenue and 45 Pattonwood Drive, each in the Town of Irondequoit, New York together with 1007, 1015, 1025 and 1035 Thomas Avenue and 25 Stutson Street, each in the City of Rochester, New York (collectively, the “Land”); (B) the construction on the Land of a 125unit multi-family apartment development, comprised of two (2) 4-story, 52-unit multi-family apartment buildings with ground level parking and one (1) 3-story mixeduse building with 14-units of multifamily apartments and 8,000 square feet of commercial space on the first floor, a 2-story

club house with 7 dwelling units with a pool (collectively, the “Improvements”); and (C) the acquisition and installation therein, thereon or thereabout of certain machinery, equipment and related personal property (the “Equipment” and, together with the Land and the Improvements, the “Facility”). The Facility will be initially operated and/ or managed by the Company. The Agency will acquire a leasehold interest in the Facility and lease the Facility back to the Company. The Company will operate the Facility during the term of the lease. At the end of the lease term the Agency’s leasehold interest will be terminated. The Agency contemplates that it will provide financial assistance (the “Financial Assistance”) to the Company in the form of sales and use tax exemptions and a mortgage recording tax exemption, consistent with the policies of the Agency, and a partial real property tax abatement. The Agency will, at the above-stated time and place, present a copy of the Company’s Application (including the Benefit/Incentive analysis) and hear all persons with views in favor of or opposed to either the location or nature of the Facility, or the proposed financial assistance being contemplated by the Agency. In addition, at, or prior to, such hearing, interested parties may submit to the Agency written materials pertaining to such matters. Dated: December 6, 2017 COUNTY OF MONROE INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT AGENCY D/B/A IMAGINE MONROE POWERED BY COMIDA By: Jeffrey R. Adair, Executive Director [ NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING ] NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a public hearing pursuant to Article 18-A of the New York State General Municipal Law will be held by the County of Monroe Industrial Development Agency d/b/a Imagine Monroe Powered By COMIDA (the “Agency”) on the 19th day of December, 2017 at 11:45 a.m., local time, at the Ebenezer Watts Conference Center, 49 S. Fitzhugh Street, Rochester, New York 14614, in connection with the following matter: 49 STONE STREET LLC, a New York limited liability company, or an entity formed or to be formed (collectively, the “Company”) has requested that the

To place your ad in the LEGAL section, contact Tracey Mykins by phone at (585) 244-3329 x10 or by email at legals@rochester-citynews.com Agency assist with a certain Project (the “Project”), consisting of: (A) the acquisition of a leasehold interest in an approximately 0.22-acre parcel of land located at 49 Stone Street in the City of Rochester, New York 14604 [Tax Map No.: 121.230-0002027] (the “Land”); (B) the renovation and repurposing of the existing approximately 30,245± squarefoot building thereon (the “Existing Improvements”) into a mixed-use facility consisting of 21 onebedroom and studio apartments with street-level commercial space (collectively, the “Improvements”); and (C) the acquisition and installation therein, thereon or thereabout of certain machinery, equipment and related personal property including, but not limited to, new high efficiency furnaces, air conditioning, inunit washers/dryers and a rooftop deck (the “Equipment” and, together with the Land, the Existing Improvements and the Improvements, the “Facility”). The Facility will be initially operated and/or managed by the Company. The Agency will acquire a leasehold interest in the Facility and lease the Facility back to the Company. The Company will operate the Facility during the term of the lease. At the end of the lease term the Agency’s leasehold interest will be terminated. The Agency contemplates that it will provide financial assistance (the “Financial Assistance”) to the Company in the form of sales and use tax exemptions and a mortgage recording tax exemption, consistent with the policies of the Agency. The Agency will, at the above-stated time and place, present a copy of the Company’s Application (including the Benefit/Incentive analysis) and hear all persons with views in favor of or opposed to either the location or nature of the Facility, or the proposed financial assistance being contemplated by the Agency. In addition, at, or prior to, such hearing, interested parties may submit to the Agency written materials pertaining to such matters. Dated: December 6, 2017 COUNTY OF MONROE INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT AGENCY D/B/A IMAGINE MONROE POWERED BY COMIDA By: Jeffrey R. Adair, Executive Director [ Notice of Service by Publication ] North Carolina, Mecklenburg County

District Court Division 17-CvD-15980 Kathy Owens-Vs- Robert Hector Owens TO: Robert Hector Owens, Defendant TAKE NOTICE that a pleading seeking relief against you has been filed in the above-entitled action, wherein the plaintiff is seeking an absolute divorce. YOU ARE required to make defense to such pleading not later than January 11, 2018, exclusive of said date, and upon your failure to do so, the party seeking service against you will apply to the Court for summary judgment for the relief sought on or after the week of January 29, 2018. This November 13, 2017. John G. Walker,(State Bar ID # 4520), PO Box 472344, Charlotte, NC 28247 [ SUMMONS AND NOTICE ] SUPREME COURT OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF MONROE Index No. E2017000218 TOWER DBW II TRUST 20122, SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO TOWER DBW II TRUST 2013-1, Plaintiff, v. The heirs-atlaw, next of kin, distributees, executors, administrators, assignees, lienors, creditors, successorsin- interest and generally all persons having or claiming under, by or through LAWRENCE C. BUTTACH, by purchase, inheritance, lien or otherwise of any right, title or interest in and to the premises described in the complaint herein, and all creditors thereof, and the respective wives, or widows of his, if any, all of whose names and addresses are unknown to plaintiff; EDWARD T. LINDSAY II; ROCHESTER GAS AND ELECTRIC COMPANY; CITY OF ROCHESTER; NEW YORK STATE DEPARTMENT OF TAXATION AND FINANCE; UNITED STATES OF AMERICA; TERESA R. APSEY, AS PRESUMPTIVE HEIR-AT-LAW OF LAWRENCE C. BUTTACH and “JOHN DOE #2” THROUGH “JOHN DOE #100”, Defendants. TO THE ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANTS: YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED to answer the complaint in the above-entitled foreclosure action, and to serve a copy of your answer on Plaintiff’s attorney within thirty (30) days after the service of this summons, exclusive of the day of service or within thirty (30) days after completion of service where service is made in any other manner than by personal service within the State. The United

States of America, if designated as a defendant in this action, may answer or appear within sixty (60) days of service hereof. In case of your failure to appear or answer, judgment will be taken against you by default for the relief demanded in the complaint. Monroe County is designated as the place of trial. The basis of venue is the location of the subject premises. Dated: November 15, 2017 TO THE ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANTS: The foregoing summons is served upon you by publication, pursuant to an Order of Honorable Daniel J. Doyle, a Justice of the Supreme Court, dated November 6, 2017, and filed with supporting papers in the Monroe County Clerk’s Office. This is an action to foreclose tax liens encumbering the property known as 113 Frey Street, City of Rochester, New York and identified as tax account no.: 060.44-1-8 (the “Tax Parcel”). The relief sought is the sale of the Tax Parcel at public auction in satisfaction of the tax liens. In case of your failure to appear, judgment may be taken against you in the sum of $5,996.76, together with interest, costs, disbursements and attorneys’ fees of this action, and directing the public sale of the Tax Parcel. PHILLIPS LYTLE LLP Anthony J. Iacchetta Attorneys for Plaintiff Tower DBW II Trust 2012-2, successor by merger to Tower DBW II Trust 2013-1 28 East Main Street Suite 1400 Rochester, New York 14614 Telephone: (585) 238-2000 [ SUMMONS ] SUPREME COURT STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF MONROE Index No. 2017-6612 ESL Federal Credit Union, Plaintiff, vs. David E. Carson, Deceased, and any persons who are heirs or distributees of David E. Carson, Deceased, and all persons who are widows, grantees, mortgagees, lienors, heirs, devisees, distributees, successors in interest of such of them as may be deceased, and their husbands, wives, heirs, devisees, distributees and successors of interest all of whom and whose names and places of residence are unknown to Plaintiff; ESL Federal Credit Union; B&L Wholesale Supply Inc.; North Star Capital Acquisition LLC; United States of America; People of the State of New York; “John Doe” and/or “Mary Roe”, Defendants. Location

of property to be foreclosed: 152 Daley Boulevard, Town of Irondequoit, Monroe County, New York TO THE ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANTS: YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED to answer the Complaint in the above action and to serve a copy of your Answer on the Plaintiff’s attorney within twenty (20) days after the service of this Summons, exclusive of the day of service, or within (30) days after completion of service where service is made in any other manner than by personal delivery within the State. The United States of America, if designated as a Defendant in this action, may answer or appear within sixty (60) days of service hereof. In case of your failure to appear or answer, judgment will be taken against you by default for the relief demanded in the Complaint. Monroe County is designated as the place of trial. The basis of venue is the location of the mortgaged premises. NOTICE: YOU MAY BE IN DANGER OF LOSING YOUR HOME If you do not respond to this Summons and Complaint by serving a copy of the Answer on the attorney for the mortgage company who filed this foreclosure proceeding against you and filing the Answer with the Court, a default judgment may be entered and you can lose your property. Speak to an attorney or go to the Court where your case is pending for further information on how to answer the Summons and protect your property. Sending a payment to your mortgage company will not stop this foreclosure action. YOU MUST RESPOND BY SERVING A COPY OF THE ANSWER ON THE ATTORNEY FOR THE PLAINTIFF (MORTGAGE COMPANY) AND FILING THE ANSWER WITH THE COURT. DATED: June 26, 2017 MATTHEW RYEN, ESQ. Lacy Katzen, LLP Attorney for Plaintiff Office and Post Office Address The Granite Building 130 East Main Street Rochester, New York 14604 Telephone: (585) 3245767 [ SUMMONS ] SUPREME COURT STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF MONROE Index No. 2017-5857 ESL Federal Credit Union, Plaintiff, vs. Lillian D. Snell, Deceased, and any persons who are heirs or distributees of Lillian D. Snell, Deceased, and all persons who are widows, grantees, mortgagees, lienors, heirs, devisees, distributees, successors

in interest of such of them as may be deceased, and their husbands, wives, heirs, devisees, distributees and successors of interest all of whom and whose names and places of residence are unknown to Plaintiff; United States of America; People of the State of New York; “John Doe” and/or “Mary Roe”, Defendants. Location of property to be foreclosed: 211 LaVerne Drive, Town of Greece, Monroe County, New York TO THE ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANTS: YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED to answer the Complaint in the above action and to serve a copy of your Answer on the Plaintiff’s attorney within twenty (20 days after the service of this Summons, exclusive of the day of service, or within (30 days after completion of service where service is made in any other manner than by personal delivery within the State. The United States of America, if designated as a Defendant in this action, may answer or appear within sixty (60 days of service hereof. In case of your failure to appear or answer, judgment will be taken against you by default for the relief demanded in the Complaint. Monroe County is designated as the place of trial. The basis of venue is the location of the mortgaged premises. NOTICE: YOU MAY BE IN DANGER OF LOSING YOUR HOME If you do not respond to this Summons and Complaint by serving a copy of the Answer on the attorney for the mortgage company who filed this foreclosure proceeding against you and filing the Answer with the Court, a default judgment may be entered and you can lose your property. Speak to an attorney or go to the Court where your case is pending for further information on how to answer the Summons and protect your property. Sending a payment to your mortgage company will not stop this foreclosure action. YOU MUST RESPOND BY SERVING A COPY OF THE ANSWER ON THE ATTORNEY FOR THE PLAINTIFF (MORTGAGE COMPANY AND FILING THE ANSWER WITH THE COURT. DATED: June 5, 2017 MATTHEW RYEN, ESQ. Lacy Katzen, LLP Attorney for Plaintiff Office and Post Office Address The Granite Building 130 East Main Street Rochester, New York 14604 Telephone: (585 324-5767 NATURE AND OBJECT OF ACTION: The object of the above action is to foreclose a mortgage held by Plaintiff recorded in the Monroe County Clerk’s Office on November 17, 2008 in Liber 22083 of Mortgages, page

221 in the amount of $85,500.00. TO THE ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANTS, The plaintiff makes no personal claim against you in this action except for Lillian D. Snell. To the above named Defendants: The foregoing Summons is served upon you by publication pursuant to an Order of the Hon. Daniel J. Doyle, a Justice of the Supreme Court of the State of New York, dated October 24, 2017 and filed along with the supporting papers in the Monroe County Clerk’s Office. This is an action to foreclose a mortgage. The premises is described as follows: All that tract or parcel of land situate in the Town of Greece, County of Monroe and State of New York, in Lot #12 of the Second Division of Lots, Township 2, Short Range, being designated as Lot #54 on a map of Dewey Meadows Section 3 which map is filed in the Monroe County Clerk’s Office in Liber 100 of Maps, Page 71. Said Lot #54 is situated on the east side of LaVerne Drive, is 70 feet front and rear and 111.97 feet deep, all as shown on said map. Tax Acct. No.: 060.49-1-13 Property Address: 211 LaVerne Drive, Town of Greece, Monroe County, New York [ SUPPLEMENTAL SUMMONS ] Index No. 2017005701 STATE OF NEW YORK SUPREME COURT – COUNTY OF MONROE JPMORGAN CHASE BANK, N.A., Plaintiff, -vs- THE HEIRS AT LARGE OF DOREEN EWELL A/K/A DOREEN F. EWELL, deceased, and all persons who are husbands, widows, grantees, mortgagees, lienors, heirs, devisees, distributees, successors in interest of such of them as may be dead, and their husbands and wives, heirs, devisees, distributees and successors of interest of all of whom and whose names and places are unknown to Plaintiff; LYNDA EWELL-LANSBERRY; KELLY ELLSMORE; JILL ST. JOHN; UNITED STATES OF AMERICA; NEW YORK STATE DEPARTMENT OF TAXATION AND FINANCE; “JOHN DOE” AND “JANE DOE” said names being fictitious, it being the intention of Plaintiff to designate any and all occupants of premises being foreclosed herein, Defendants. Mortgaged Premises: 91 POMONA DRIVE, GREECE NY 14616 A/K/A ROCHESTER NY 14616 TO THE ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANT(S): YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED to answer the Complaint in the above entitled action and to serve a copy of your Answer on the plaintiff’s attorney within twenty (20) days of the service

cont. on page 50

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Legal Ads > page 49 of this Summons, exclusive of the day of service, or within thirty (30) days after service of the same is complete where service is made in any manner other than by personal delivery within the State. The United States of America, if designated as a defendant in this action, may answer or appear within sixty (60) days of service hereof. Your failure to appear or answer will result in a judgment against you by default for the relief demanded in the Complaint. In the event that a deficiency balance remains from the sale proceeds, a judgment may be entered against you, unless the Defendant obtained a bankruptcy discharge and such other or further relief as may be just and equitable. NOTICE YOU ARE IN DANGER OF LOSING YOUR HOME If you do not respond to this summons and complaint by serving a copy of the answer to the attorney for the mortgage company who filed this foreclosure proceeding against you and filing the answer with the court, a default judgment may be entered and you can lose your home. Speak to an attorney or go to the court where your case is pending for further information on how to answer the summons and protect your property. Sending payment to your mortgage company will not stop this foreclosure action. YOU MUST RESPOND BY SERVING A COPY OF THE ANSWER ON THE ATTORNEY FOR THE PLAINTIFF (MORTGAGE COMPANY) AND FILING THE ANSWER WITH THE COURT. That this action is being amended to include the Heirs at Large of Doreen Ewell a/k/a Doreen F. Ewell, as said individual is deceased, and Lynda Ewell-Lansberry, Kelly Ellsmore, and Jill St. John, as possible heirs to the Estate of Doreen Ewell a/k/a Doreen F. Ewell, deceased.

That this action is also being amended to include United States of America and New York State Department of Taxation and Finance as necessary parties to this action. MONROE County is designated as the place of trial. The basis of venue is the location of the mortgaged premises. Dated: August 7, 2017 Mark K. Broyles, Esq. FEIN SUCH & CRANE, LLP Attorneys for Plaintiff Office and P.O. Address 28 East Main Street, Suite 1800 Rochester, New York 14614 Telephone No. (585) 232-7400 Section: 060.80 Block: 3 Lot: 2 NATURE AND OBJECT OF ACTION The object of the above action is to foreclose a mortgage held by the Plaintiff recorded in the County of MONROE, State of New York as more particularly described in the Complaint herein. TO THE DEFENDANT, the plaintiff makes no personal claim against you in this action. To the above named defendants: The foregoing summons is served upon you by publication pursuant to an order of HON. DANIEL J. DOYLE, Justice of the SUPREME Court of the State of New York, dated September 6, 2017 and filed along with the supporting papers in the MONROE County Clerk’s Office. This is an action to foreclose a Mortgage. ALL THAT TRACT OR PARCEL OF LAND, situate in the Town of Greece, County of Monroe and State of New York, being part of subdivision of lots, numbered two and three on Town Lot No. 57, said laid down and described on a map of “Pomona Gardens” made by Bryan and Corkhill, Surveyors, in August, 1924, and filed in Monroe County Clerk’s Office on August 21, 1924 in Liber 60 of Maps, page 6, and particularly described as follows: Being Lot No. 125, as the same is laid down on said map of Pomona Gardens and

To place your ad in the LEGAL section, contact Tracey Mykins by phone at (585) 244-3329 x10 or by email at legals@rochester-citynews.com

situate on the south side of Pomona Drive. Mortgaged Premises: 91 Pomona Drive, Greece NY 14616 a/k/a Rochester NY 14616 Tax Map/Parcel ID No.: Section: 060.80 Block: 3 Lot: 2 of the TOWN of GREECE, NY 14616 [ SUPPLEMENTAL SUMMONS ] SUPREME COURT OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF MONROE Plaintiff designates MONROE as the place of trial situs of the real property INDEX NO. 2017-7889 U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, Plaintiff Vs. RONALD CAVIGLIANO, if living, and if she/he be dead, any and all persons unknown to plaintiff, claiming, or who may claim to have an interest in, or general or specific lien upon the real property described in this action; such unknown persons being herein generally described and intended to be included in the following designation, namely: the wife, widow, husband, widower, heirs at law, next of kin, descendants, executors, administrators, devisees, legatees, creditors, trustees, committees, lienors, and assignees of such deceased, any and all persons deriving interest in or lien upon, or title to said real property by, through or under them, or either of them, and their respective wives, widows, husbands, widowers, heirs at law, next of kin, descendants, executors, administrators, devisees, legatees, creditors, trustees, committees, lienors and assigns, all of whom and whose names, except as stated, are unknown to plaintiff; NEW YORK STATE DEPARTMENT OF TAXATION AND FINANCE; UNITED STATES OF AMERICA – INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE; TOWN OF IRONDEQUOIT;

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ROBERT CAVIGLIANO; RALPH CAVIGLIANO JR, ‘’JOHN DOE #1’’ through ‘’JOHN DOE #12,’’ the last twelve names being fictitious and unknown to plaintiff, the persons or parties intended being the tenants, occupants, persons or corporations, if any, having or claiming an interest in or lien upon the premises, described in the complaint, Defendants. To the above-named Defendants YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED to answer the complaint in this action and to serve a copy of your answer, or, if the complaint is not served with this summons, to serve a notice of appearance on the Plaintiff’s Attorney within 20 days after the service of this summons, exclusive of the day of service (or within 30 days after the service is complete if this summons is not personally delivered to you within the State of New York) in the event the United States of America is made a party defendant, the time to answer for the said United States of America shall not expire until (60) days after service of the Summons; and in case of your failure to appear or answer, judgment will be taken against you by default for the relief demanded in the complaint. NOTICE YOU ARE IN DANGER OF LOSING YOUR HOME If you do not respond to this summons and complaint by serving a copy of the answer on the attorney for the mortgage company who filed this foreclosure proceeding against you and filing the answer with the court, a default judgment may be entered and you can lose your home. Speak to an attorney or go to the court where your case is pending for further information on how to answer the summons and protect your property. Sending a payment to the mortgage company will not stop the foreclosure action. YOU MUST RESPOND BY SERVING A COPY OF THE ANSWER ON THE ATTORNEY FOR THE PLAINTIFF (MORTGAGE COMPANY) AND FILING THE ANSWER WITH THE COURT. Dated: November 6, 2017 RAS Boriskin, LLC Attorney for Plaintiff BY: HEDVA D. HAVIV, ESQ. 900 Merchants Concourse, Suite 106 Westbury, NY 11590 516-280-7675 [ SUPPLEMENTAL SUMMONS ] SUPREME COURT OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK, COUNTY OF MONROE – NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE LLC,D/ B/A CHAMPION MORTGAGE COMPANY, Plaintiff, against

50 CITY DECEMBER 6 - 12, 2017

SUSAN GUY, AS HEIR TO THE ESTATE OF STANLEY C. LAMPERT, JR.; RONALD LAMPERT, AS HEIR TO THE ESTATE OF STANLEY C. LAMPERT, JR., PATRICIA BULMER, AS HEIR TO THE ESTATE OF STANLEY C. LAMPERT, JR.; UNKNOWN HEIRS TO THE ESTATE OF STANLEY C. LAMPERT, JR., any and all persons unknown to plaintiff, claiming, or who may claim to have an interest in, or general or specific lien upon the real property described in this action; such unknown persons being herein generally described and intended to be included in the following designation, namely: the wife, widow, husband, widower, heirs at law, next of kin, descendants, executors, administrators, devisees, legatees, creditors, trustees, committees, lienors, and assignees of such deceased, any and all persons deriving interest in or lien upon, or title to said real property by, through or under them, or either of them, and their respective wives, widows, husbands, widowers, heirs at law, next of kin, descendants, executors, administrators, devisees, legatees, creditors, trustees, committees, lienors and assigns, all of whom and whose name, except as stated, are unknown to plaintiff, SECRETARY OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT; NEW YORK STATE DEPARTMENT OF TAXATION AND FINANCE; UNITED STATES OF AMERICA; and JOHN DOE AND JANE DOE #1 through #7, the last seven (7) names being fictitious and unknown to the Plaintiff, the persons or parties intended being the tenants, occupants, persons or parties, if any, having or claiming an interest in or lien upon the mortgaged premises described in the complaint, DefendantsIndex no. 17-6219. Original filed with Clerk June 16, 2017 Plaintiff designates Monroe County as the place of trial. The Basis of Venue is that the subject action is situated in Monroe County Premises: 52 New Gate Dr. Henrietta, NY 14467 TO THE ABOVENAMED DEFENDANTS: YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED to answer the Complaint in this action and to serve a copy of your answer, or, if the Complaint is not served with this Summons, to serve a notice of appearance on the Plaintiff’s Attorney(s) within 20 days after the service

of this Summons, exclusive of the day of service (or within 30 days after the service is complete if this Summons is not personally delivered to you within the State of New York); the United States of America may appear or answer within 60 days of service hereof; and in case of your failure to appear or answer, judgment will be taken against you by default for the relief demanded in the Complaint.. NOTICE-YOU ARE IN DANGER OF LOSING YOUR HOME – If you do not respond to this summons and complaint by serving a copy of the answer on the attorney for the mortgage company who filed this foreclosure proceeding against you and filing the answer with the court, a default judgment may be entered and you can lose your home. Speak to an attorney or go to the court where your case is pending for further information on how to answer the summons and protect your property. Sending a payment to the mortgage company will not stop the foreclosure action. YOU MUST RESPOND BY SERVING A COPY OF THE ANSWER ON THE ATTORNEY FOR THE PLAINTIFF (MORTGAGE COMPANY) AND FILING THE ANSWER WITH THE COURT. We are attempting to collect a debt. Any information obtained will be used for that purpose. The foregoing summons is served upon you by publication pursuant to an order of the Honorable Daniel J. Doyle dated October 20, 2017. The object of this action is to foreclose a mortgage and covering the premises known as 52 New Gate Dr., Henrietta, NY 14467 located at Section 176.15, Block 2, Lot 23 Pincus Law Group, PLLC, George J. Weissinger, Esq. Attorneys for Plaintiff 425 RXR Plaza Uniondale, NY 11556, 516 699-8902 [ SUPPLEMENTAL SUMMONS WITH NOTICE ] SUPREME COURT OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF MONROE Index No.2017-3196 FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAGE ASSOCIATION (“FANNIE MAE”), A CORPORATION ORGANIZED AND EXISTING UNDER THE LAWS OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Plaintiff, -against-ANDREW YOUNG AS HEIR AT LAW TO THE ESTATE OF LEO YOUNG A/K/A LEO H. YOUNG, BRIDGET HARRIGAN AS HEIR AT LAW TO THE ESTATE OF LEO YOUNG A/K/A LEO H. YOUNG, KELLEY

MILLER AS HEIR AT LAW TO THE ESTATE OF LEO YOUNG A/K/A LEO H. YOUNG, MONROE COUNTY DIVISION OF SOCIAL SERVICES, THE UNKNOWN HEIRS AT LAW TO THE ESTATE OF LEO YOUNG A/K/A LEO H. YOUNG , WEGMANS FOOD MARKETS, INC., CITIBANK (SOUTH DAKOTA) NA AND SACOR FINANCIAL, INC. AS ASSIGNEE OF NATIONAL CREDIT ACCEPTANCE, INC., and “John Doe” and/ or “Jane Doe” # 1-10 inclusive, the last ten names being fictitious and unknown to plaintiff, the persons or parties intended being the tenants, occupants, persons or corporations, if any, having or claiming an interest in or lien upon the premises described in the complaint, Defendants. Plaintiff designates Monroe County as the place of trial based on the location of the mortgaged premises in this action. We are attempting to collect a debt, and any information obtained will be used for that purpose. To the abovenamed defendants: YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED to answer the complaint in this action and to serve a copy of your answer, or, if the complaint is not served with this summons, to serve a notice of appearance, on the plaintiff’s attorneys within twenty (20) days after the service of this summons, exclusive of the day of service (or within thirty (30) days after the service is complete if this summons is not personally delivered to you within the State of New York) or within (60) days after service of this summons if it is the United States of America; and in case of your failure to appear or answer, judgment will be taken against you by default for the relief demanded in the complaint. To: KELLEY MILLER AS HEIR AT LAW TO THE ESTATE OF LEO YOUNG A/K/A LEO H. YOUNG The foregoing supplemental summons is served upon you by publication pursuant to an Order of the Honorable Daniel J. Doyle, Justice of the Supreme Court of the State of New York, Monroe County, dated the 18 day of October, 2017 and duly entered in the office of the Clerk of the County of Monroe, State of New York. NOTICE YOU ARE IN DANGER OF LOSING YOUR HOME If you do not respond to this summons and complaint by serving a copy of the answer on the attorney for the mortgage company who filed this foreclosure proceeding against you and filing the answer with the court, a default judgment may

be entered and you can lose your home. Speak to an attorney or go to the court where your case is pending for further information on how to answer the summons and protect your property. Sending a payment to your mortgage company will not stop this foreclosure action. YOU MUST RESPOND BY SERVING A COPY OF THE ANSWER ON THE ATTORNEY FOR THE PLAINTIFF (MORTGAGE COMPANY) AND FILING THE ANSWER WITH THE COURT. NOTICE OF NATURE OF ACTION AND RELIEF SOUGHT This is an action to foreclose a mortgage lien on the premises described herein. The object of the above captioned action is to foreclose a Mortgage to secure $54,000.00 and interest, recorded in the Office of the County Clerk of Monroe County on March 20, 1998 in Book 13687, Page 143, which mortgage was assigned to CitiMortgage, Inc. by assignment of mortgage dated November 19, 2012, which was recorded in the Office of the County Clerk of Monroe County on December 3, 2012 in Liber 1718, Page 682, which mortgage was further assigned to Federal National Mortgage Association by assignment of mortgage dated February 20, 2014, which was recorded in the Office of the County Clerk of Monroe County on February 27, 2014 in Book 1750, Page 580, which mortgage was modified by a Loan Modification Agreement dated August 14, 2003, to modify said mortgage to an amount of $55,912.51 (said Loan Modification Agreement is not in a recordable form and the taxes will be duly paid under 258(a) of New York State’s Tax Law), covering premises known as 203 ELECTRIC AVENUE, ROCHESTER, COUNTY OF MONROE, STATE OF NEW YORK 14613 (SECTION 090.580, BLOCK 1, LOT 2). The relief sought in the within action is a final judgment directing the sale of the premises described above. Premises situate lying and being in the City of Rochester, designated on a map the McKee Place as Lot 272 which map is filed in Monroe County Clerk’s Office in Liber 9 of Maps at page 37. Said lot 272 fronts 40 feet on the south side of Electric Avenue, and is the same in width through and 119.5 feet deep. Dated: Roslyn Heights, New York DAVID A. GALLO & ASSOCIATES LLP Rosemarie A. Klie, Esq. Attorneys for Plaintiff 99 Powerhouse Road Roslyn Heights, NY 11374 (516) 277-6900


Fun [ NEWS OF THE WEIRD ] BY THE EDITORS AT ANDREWS MCMEEL SYNDICATION

News That Sounds Like a Joke

White people living in Lawrenceville, Georgia, had the chance of a lifetime on Nov. 16 to attend a “Come Meet a Black Person” event sponsored by Urban MediaMakers, a group for filmmakers and content creators. Cheryle Moses, who founded the group, said she read in a 2013 study that most white people don’t have any nonwhite friends. “I want to do my part to change things,” she told The Washington Post. “I have never met a black person,” one person commented on Moses’ Facebook post. “What do you recommend I bring that they would like?” Later, WXIA-TV reported that more the two dozen people showed up to share chili and cornbread, but fewer than a half-dozen were white.

Unclear on the Concept

The Detroit Police Department got a little carried away on Nov. 9 while trying to address a persistent drug problem on the city’s east side. Two undercover special ops officers from the 12th Precinct were posing as drug dealers on a street corner when undercover officers from the 11th Precinct arrived and, not recognizing their colleagues, ordered the 12th Precinct officers to the ground. Shortly, more 12th Precinct officers showed up and the action moved to a house where, as Fox 2 News described it, a turf war broke out as officers from the two precincts engaged in fistfights with each other. An internal investigation is underway, and the police department has declined comment.

Rude Awakening

A family in Vero Beach, Florida, were rudely awakened early on Nov. 11 when Jacob Johnson Futch, 31, climbed onto their roof to, as he later told authorities, carry out a meeting with an agent of the Drug Enforcement Agency. WPTV reported the family didn’t know Futch and called Indian River Sheriff’s deputies to say that someone was stomping on their roof, yelling and howling. When

asked, Futch admitted injecting methamphetamines earlier that morning. He was charged with trespassing and held in the Indian River County jail.

The Continuing Crisis

An unnamed man in Frankfurt, Germany, called police 20 years ago to report his Volkswagen Passat missing, believing it had been stolen. In November, the car was found just where the driver had left it, according to Metro News -- in a parking garage that is now scheduled to be demolished. Police drove the 76-year-old to the garage to be reunited with his car, which is unfit to drive, before sending it off to the scrap heap.

Flying Solo

Office workers at Cambridge Research Park in Waterbeach, Cambridgeshire, England, feared the worst as they rushed outside on Nov. 13 after watching a hot air balloon crash into a fence in their parking lot. Strangely, no one was in the basket of the balloon, although the gas canister was still running. Eyewitness Jack Langley told Metro News: “Either they had bailed out and jumped out before crashing or the balloon escaped from its mooring lines.” Cambridgeshire Police later discovered the balloon had taken off when the pilot got out of the basket to secure it to the ground.

Crime Report In the wee hours of Nov. 5, before the McDonald’s in Columbia, Maryland, had opened, a woman reached through the drive-thru window and tried to pour herself a soda, but she couldn’t reach the dispenser. The Associated Press reports that, rather than driving down the road to a 24-hour restaurant, she can be seen on surveillance video squeezing herself through the drive-thru window, pouring herself a soda and collecting a box full of unidentified items before taking off. The thief remains at large.

A Perfect Ten Puzzle by J. Reynolds

No. 509

Across 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 1. One of the Simpsons 15 16 14 5. Skim, as milk 10. Reactor part 18 19 17 14. ___ and aahs 20 21 22 15. Deposed leader, perhaps 23 24 25 26 27 16. Carbon monoxide's 28 29 30 31 32 lack 17. Spanish liqueur 36 37 38 39 33 34 35 18. One of the Osmonds 40 41 42 19. Malicious look 20. Ten 44 45 43 23. Close call 48 49 46 47 24. Pines 28. Zippy flavors 50 51 52 53 54 55 56 32. Full range 57 58 59 60 33. Blood-typing letters 36. Least cooked 64 65 61 62 63 39. Facts and figures 67 68 66 40. Ten 43. Vegetarian staple 70 71 69 44. Take to one's heart 45. "My country" 71. Former Speaker 13. "To ___ is human ..." 41. Skedaddle follower Gingrich 42. Body build 21. Visibly upset 46. It may be at your 47. Churchyard tree in 22. Top secret? Down fingertips "Romeo and Juliet" 25. Eligible for Mensa 48. Guitar attachment 1. Does nothing 49. Warning label word 26. ___-frutti 50. Flushed appearance 2. Charged, in a way 51. Sentimental sort 27. Doesn't fold 3. Hindu deity 53. Castle trenches 52. Mall binge 29. Specify 4. Declare with 57. Ten 54. Tequila source 30. Jack-o'-lantern confidence 61. Atlas section 55. Lost on purpose feature 5. Actress Moore 64. Search for arms 56. Tour of duty 31. Ships 6. Midterm, for one 65. Hindu wrap 58. Andes capital 33. Following 66. Pastrami purveyor 7. Send packing 59. Mail org. 67. Adagio and allegro 8. Most-wanted invitees 34. Ecological 60. Playlet community 9. Saw things 68. Baker's need 61. Do sums 35. Erased 10. Boulder locale 69. Farmer's place, 62. "I told you so!" 37. Cooking fat 11. Keats creation in song 63. In poor health 70. Brewer's need 12. 1973 Supreme Court 38. Autocrat until 1917 decision name

[ LAST WEEK’S SOLUTION ON PAGE 46 ]

[ LOVESCOPE ] BY EUGENIA LAST ARIES (March 21-April 19): Your passionate mood and engaging banter will make you irresistible in social settings. Don’t waste your amorous appeal sitting at home all alone. Get out and see whom you encounter. Love at first sight is quite possible if you engage in new life experiences and playful interactions. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Don’t confuse love with loneliness. Putting up with someone you don’t like for the fear of being alone will not lead to inner warmth and joy. Take a pass if you don’t feel the spark and mental connection to whoever approaches you. Choose instead of waiting to be picked.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): You’re too hot and enticing to be alone, but also too fickle and playful to settle down. Mix and mingle until you find the partner that intrigues you as much as you do him or her. Mutual admiration and constant mental stimulation is your ticket to a long-lasting relationship. CANCER (June 21-July 22): Engage in a project that requires you to experience life in order to have a better understanding of what you are trying to accomplish. You will cross paths with someone who has an interesting take on what you are doing as well as an interest in you.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Your emotions will be difficult to hide, so don’t bother trying. Your openness and vulnerability will attract someone who is special and empathetic to your concerns, as well as quick to suggest you spend more time getting to know one another better. Don’t hold back; enjoy the moment. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Choose wisely when it comes to love. Steer clear of anyone bragging about his or her accomplishments. If someone has to impress you with flash, money or other superficial offerings, you are likely the victim of some sort of swindle. Don’t let a smooth talker steal your heart.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Take an interest in learning something new or engaging in a pastime that will encourage you to get fit and have some fun. Give someone pressing you to spend time together a chance. Not everyone is as good on a first date as you are. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): You’ll meet some interesting characters this week if you travel about and engage in lectures, trade shows and most of all conversations that intrigue you. Share life stories, and you’ll discover someone from a different background has plenty of similarities that will bring you closer together.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Someone trying to take advantage of you will be deceptive. Don’t put up with any nonsense or persuasive pressure to do something you don’t want to do. Look for a partner who shares your interests and concerns, and you can build a long and stable relationship. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Don’t move too fast when it comes to love. You may want to settle down, but unless you are with the right person you are wasting time. Take a moment to observe whether he or she is portraying what you want or who he or she truly is.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Take control of what you want and whom you are with. Don’t feel obligated to put up with someone who drags you down or stifles your imagination and ability to follow your dreams. Search for the partner who is just as innovative and willing to experiment and experience life. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Truth matters, especially when it comes to love and romance. Ask questions and be willing to share information about your life. If someone you meet isn’t as forthcoming as you are, you should reconsider your choice of partners and keep looking. Take control instead of being controlled.

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