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JAN. 30 2019, VOL. 48 NO. 21

INSIDE


PSST. Want the scoop on local schools? Check our education section for updates on the RCSD.

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The wall and Donald Trump

/ NEWS

2 CITY

JANUARY 30 - FEBRUARY 5, 2019

The fictive phenomenon of the mercurial Donald Trump is better captured by works of fiction than by journalism. Two novels increasingly mentioned in this regard are Herman Wouk’s “The Caine Mutiny” and Herman Melville’s “Moby Dick.” Herman Wouk’s 1951 novel tells of a group of Navy officers who remove from command of the minesweeper Caine its volatile, erratic Captain Queeg. Played in the subsequent movie by Humphrey Bogart, Queeg nervously spins a pair of ball bearings in his hand while obsessing about his stolen strawberries. Trump’s own erratic behavior has led to talk about removing him from office through the 25th Amendment, which spells out a legal procedure to remove a president believed to be “unable to discharge the powers and duties of the office,” due to mental or physical incapacitation. Lately, Trump’s narcissistic obsession with his wall on the southern border is best exemplified by another fictional captain, Ahab, in Melville’s Moby Dick. In the very first chapter, the book’s narrator, Ishmael, refers to “the deeper meaning of that story of Narcissus, who because he could not grasp the tormenting ... image he saw in the fountain, plunged into it and was drowned.” Captain Ahab, similarly, sacrifices all and everyone in his vengeful quest for the white whale, projecting his own malice on this dumb beast. His self-delusion, notes Ishmael, “is the key to it all”: ... “the image of the ungraspable phantom of life,” through which Narcissus, and also

Ahab, constructs an ideal selfimage and an alternative reality, a redemption from impotence and insignificance. How to explain Trump’s wall and its overpowering, malicious meaninglessness? Later in the book, Ahab asks: “How can the prisoner reach outside except by thrusting through the wall? To me, the white whale is that wall ... Sometimes I think there’s naught beyond. But ‘tis enough. He tasks me; he heaps me; I see in him outrageous strength, with an inscrutable malice sinewing it.... Talk not to me of blasphemy.... I’d strike the sun if it insulted me.... Who’s over me? Truth hath no confines.” DOUG NOBLE

Donald Trump says a wall will keep the Mexicans out. Without getting into whether or not this is a good idea, consider whether it’ll be effective. Illegal immigrants are already crossing (and sometimes dying) in treks across deserts or over mountains. Given the challenges posed by Mother Nature in these remote areas, will the addition of a wall make that much of a difference? It seems unlikely. It’ll just drive up sales in grappling hooks, rope, ladders, or wire snips, depending on the type of wall or fence that’s constructed. So to protect the southern border, we will need to continue patrolling and enforcement. In fact, if we build a steel-slat fence, we’ll need to keep an eye on it, or we’ll soon find that scrappers have cut out sections of and recycled them for profit. So if we’re going to have to guard it anyway, why spend the money on a border wall? If it would save us money longterm, perhaps – but it won’t. It makes sense to have border fences near urban areas, but fences are already in such places. As cities build up, perhaps it’ll make sense to extend some of these

fences – and perhaps there are a few places where this would make sense now. But building a wall the entire length of the border seems a fool-headed, ineffective, ugly, environmentally-hostile, and expensive solution. Let’s figure out a sane compromise and get our government working again. PERETTE BARELLA

Am I the only one that thinks like this? I currently pay $1000 a month for health care (no dental, no eye care, no hearing care) with a $3700 deductible for my wife and me. So if I paid an extra, let’s say, $800 a month in taxes for single-payer health care for all and got all of the above, I’d be way ahead. And let’s cut the defense budget to help pay for it and for real infrastructure and real green jobs. And college for all. The president says 90 percent of the drugs come through the southern border, but the facts are that at least 95 percent of that comes over the border in trucks and cars at the legal border crossings. And much of the drugs carried over by illegal folks is pot that in most states, I hope, will soon be legal. Isn’t the wall a joke? Wake up, America! JON STADT

News. Music. Life. Greater Rochester’s Alternative Newsweekly January 30 - February 5, 2019 Vol 48 No 21 On the cover: Photograph by Ryan Williamson 250 North Goodman Street Rochester, New York 14607-1199 themail@rochester-citynews.com phone (585) 244-3329 fax (585) 244-1126 rochestercitynewspaper.com Publishers: William and Mary Anna Towler Editor: Mary Anna Towler Editorial department themail@rochester-citynews.com Arts & entertainment editor: Rebecca Rafferty Staff writers: Tim Louis Macaluso, Jeremy Moule Music editor: Daniel J. Kushner Music writer: Frank De Blase Calendar editor: Kate Stathis Contributing writers: Roman Divezur, Kathy Laluk, Adam Lubitow, Amanda Fintak, Mark Hare, Alex Jones, Katie Libby, Ron Netsky, David Raymond, Leah Stacy Art department artdept@rochester-citynews.com Art director/Production manager: Ryan Williamson Designers: Renée Heininger, Jacob Walsh Advertising department ads@rochester-citynews.com New sales development: Betsy Matthews Account executives: William Towler, David White Classified sales representatives: Tracey Mykins Operations/Circulation kstathis@rochester-citynews.com Business manager: Angela Scardinale Circulation manager: Katherine Stathis Distribution: David Riccioni, Northstar Delivery City Newspaper is available free of charge. Additional copies of the current issue may be purchased for $1 each at the City Newspaper office. City Newspaper may be distributed only by authorized distributors. No person may, without prior written permission of City Newspaper, take more than one copy of each weekly issue. City (ISSN 1551-3262) is published weekly 50 times minimum per year by WMT Publications, Inc. Periodical postage paid at Rochester, NY (USPS 022-138). Address changes: City, 250 North Goodman Street, Rochester, NY 14607. Member of the Association of Alternative Newsweeklies and the New York Press Association. Annual subscriptions: $35 ($30 senior citizens); add $10 for out-of-state subscriptions. Refunds for fewer than ten months cannot be issued. Copyright by WMT Publications Inc., 2019 - all rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, photocopying, recording or by any information storage retrieval system without permission of the copyright owner.

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URBAN JOURNAL | BY MARY ANNA TOWLER

Do you know how to fix Rochester’s schools?

What’s the answer to the problems in the Rochester school district? A lot of people think they have answers, and maybe some of them do. I hope so. Because this district is in deep trouble, and a lot of things are happening that will affect the future of the district and its children. Frankly, it’s hard to think of a time when the district has faced more challenges. And wrong decisions, by elected officials and the public, will have terrible consequences. A short list of what’s coming: 1) The current superintendent, Barbara Deane-Williams, leaves her job this week, half a year before the end of her contract. She’s the second superintendent in a row to leave because of intense board dissatisfaction with the person they had hired. The school board, which will pick Deane-Williams’ successor, is sharply divided. That could complicate the search – and it could limit the number and quality of applicants. 2) Four of the seven board seats are up for election in November, and board President Van White is running for City Court judge. White’s term isn’t up until 2021, but if he’s elected to City Court, he’ll leave the board in January. So the large majority of board members could be new next year. New blood is important, but so is institutional knowledge and experience. 3) New York’s primary elections used to be in September, but the state legislature has voted to hold them on the same day as federal primaries: June 25. As a result, political parties and potential candidates have little time to prepare. Local committees in the Monroe Democratic Party – the only party that has elected people to the school board in recent years – are screening candidates right now. And the party’s designating convention is on February 13. So the campaign season has already begun. 4) In the midst of all this, the district has to complete its response to Jaime Aquino’s report and send it to Education Commissioner MaryEllen Elia by February 8. The response is supposed to detail how the district plans to correct the problems Aquino cited. Elia and the Rochester-area state Regents have made it clear that if Elia doesn’t like what she gets, the state will step in in some way.

The city school district faces enormous challenges. Wrong decisions, by elected officials and the public, will have terrible consequences.

5) Also ready to step in in some way: Rochester Mayor Lovely Warren, who released a report last week summarizing the comments she got at her December public meetings about the school district. Among the conclusions: A strong majority of those at the meetings want City Hall, and the mayor herself, involved with the district. Warren’s talking about the possibility of some kind of partnership with the district, which presumably could range from the city expanding its own services in the schools – and perhaps helping pull in outside health-care and other specialties – to actual participation in the management of the district. It’s obvious that something has to change. But I worry that too many of us think this is less complicated than it is. The district has severe management problems, and the right superintendent should be able to deal with that. But two other problems won’t be easy to correct: poverty and racism. Both are having a terrible impact on the district and its children. Any plan – from the district or the mayor – that doesn’t address them head on will fail. And it’s not a good sign that many leaders, including the governor, think that urban school districts’ problems can be solved without more money. rochestercitynewspaper.com

CITY 3


[ POLITICS ] BY CITY NEWS STAFF

Dems gear up for intense campaign Local political parties began wrestling with a new challenge this week: Thanks to a brand-new state law, state primaries will be held the same day as the federal primaries. This year, that’s June 25, three months earlier than previously. For Democrats in the city, the challenge is particularly tough: assessing what is turning out to be an unusually large group of candidates under a tight deadline. Individual legislative-district committees started holding their designating meetings this week. All four City Council district seats will be on the ballot in November. Incumbents Adam McFadden (southwest district) and Michael Patterson (northeast) are seeking re-election. But two district Council members – Elaine Spaull in the East District and the Northwest District’s Mollie Clifford – aren’t running again. At least four people have expressed interest in Spaull’s seat, and five are reportedly interested in Clifford’s seat. Four seats are up on the Rochester school board, and one incumbent, Liz Hallmark, said this week that she won’t seek re-election. Longtime board member Willa Powell is seeking re-election. Beatriz Lebron, and Judith Davis, both of whom were appointed to fill unexpired terms, are running. And at last count, six other people have said they want to run for school board. Among them: a slate that includes Davis; Rochester educator and activist Howard Eagle; Andria Bryant, a member of the steering committee of MAMA, the Movement for Anti-Racist Ministry and Action; and Clifford Florence, the associate minister of the Central Church of Christ. In the County Legislature, two Democratic incumbents aren’t seeking reelection. One of them is James Sheppard, who represents the 23rd district. Several candidates have expressed interest in that seat. Mark Muoio, who currently represents the 21st legislative district, is running for a City Court seat instead; he works as the director of the Housing and Consumer Law Unit at the Legal Aid Society of Rochester. Three other people are also seeking designation for one of the two seats up on City Court: Melissa Barrett, who was recently appointed to the court by Mayor Lovely Warren; Rochester school board President Van White; and Aaron Frazier, an attorney with Harris Beach. Monroe Democrats will hold their designating convention on February 13.

News POLITICS | BY JEREMY MOULE

Cannabis opt-out would be all business

FILE PHOTO

CONGRATULATIONS!

New York is on the verge of ending its prohibition on cannabis, but legalization might not look the same in every part of the state. It will all depend on the final bills passed by the Legislature and signed by Governor Andrew Cuomo. The legalization proposal that Cuomo included in his budget – the Cannabis Regulation and Taxation Act – includes an opt-out provision for counties and the state’s larger cities. The concept was murky when Cuomo first mentioned it during his budget address earlier this month. One small section of his massive legalization bill, however, spells out the details. Under the governor’s proposal, county and city governments couldn’t prohibit anyone over 21 from possessing and consuming cannabis, which would be legal statewide. Cuomo’s bill would allow – with a state-issued license – a variety of commercial cannabis businesses involved in cultivating, processing, distributing, and selling cannabis. And it would allow counties, as well

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as cities with a population of more than 100,000, to pass laws blocking one or more types of allowed cannabis operations. In other words, if lawmakers agree to Cuomo’s proposed optout provision, Monroe County or the City of Rochester could, theoretically, block some or all recreational cannabis commerce within their boundaries. In a statement released immediately after the governor’s speech, Mayor Lovely Warren said the city has no intention of opting out. County Executive Cheryl Dinolfo is still evaluating the provision, says county spokesperson Jesse Sleezer. “We just don’t know enough about the opt-out yet,” he says. But if the county were to block some cannabis businesses, there could be a cost. The governor’s proposal includes a 2 percent tax on transaction between wholesalers and retail dispensaries. The counties would get the money based on purchases by dispensaries within their boundaries.


GOVERNMENT | BY JEREMY MOULE

Rochester theater leaders remember Barbara Biddy, founder of a gutsy theater that presented bold, far from safe productions written by esteemed playwrights and performed by local actors. “She was uncompromising, in the best possible way,” says Geva’s Mark Cuddy.

THEATER | BY DANIEL J. KUSHNER

Theater’s Barbara Biddy dies Barbara Biddy, a vital figure in the Rochester theater scene, died on December 27. As co-founder – along with her late husband Francis Biddy – and artistic director of Shipping Dock Theatre, Biddy developed a reputation for staging high-level productions of plays you wouldn’t typically see locally, written by esteemed playwrights like David Mamet and Tom Stoppard. CITY writer David Raymond remembers Biddy’s affinity for language being on display in her productions of the Stoppard plays “Arcadia” and “The Real Thing.” “She had high standards,” Raymond says. “The theater had high standards.” Shipping Dock, which operated for more than three decades, opened in 1980 in the rear of the Strasenburgh Planetarium, and later operated at St. John Fisher College and then on St. Paul Street. Under Biddy’s direction, it presented works that were bold and far from safe, performed by local actors. “She would do things that ‘serious actors’ would definitely want to challenge themselves doing,” Raymond says, “and I think they wanted to do them with her because they knew she would put on a good production.” Biddy’s direction of Mamet’s “Glengarry Glen Ross” and Athol Fugard’s “The Road to Mecca” were

particularly notable, Raymond says, for her ability to cultivate superior acting performances from her players. Shipping Dock Theatre gave audiences entertainment that could be edgy but was frequently thought-provoking. “Barbara Biddy and Shipping Dock Theatre left an important legacy on Rochester theater,” says JCC CenterStage Theatre’s artistic director and producer Ralph Meranto, “because they were willing to tackle some Shipping Dock’s Barbara Biddy in 1992. of the challenging issues and FILE PHOTO unconventional plays that others were not tackling at the time.” And, Meranto says, Biddy and Biddy’s work at Shipping Dock Shipping Dock “served as an inspiration to Theatre was an indispensable source of many of us theater producers and directors meaningful theater in Rochester, Cuddy over the years.” says. “The kinds of searing, serious plays Geva Theatre Center’s artistic director that she directed and produced there with Mark Cuddy recalls phone calls he had her husband were so right for the theater over the years with Biddy about theater, ecology in Rochester. I was very sad to see it and he also remembers her unflinching close, ultimately, because a thriving theater belief in what she valued in art. “She was community needs that kind of attention to uncompromising, in the best possible those challenging plays that Barbara really way,” Cuddy says. “She influenced a lot devoured and was passionate about.” of theater performers, especially actors, in A memorial service is to be held in Rochester over her time.” the spring.

State passes Child Victims Act For the first time, the state Senate has voted on the Child Victims Act, passing it unanimously. Governor Andrew Cuomo approves it, as he is expected to, the bill will greatly lengthen the statute of limitations for criminal and civil proceedings for a sexual offense against a child. That will allow the victims a chance to seek recourse as adults. The Senate and Assembly passed the bill late Monday afternoon. The Assembly has passed the legislation during each session over several years. Advocates for child sexual abuse victims, as well as abuse survivors, fought hard for the legislation. But the Catholic Church opposed a provision in the legislation that it fears could open the church up to a flood of civil lawsuits. In a March interview with the Buffalo News, New York Archbishop Cardinal Timothy Nolan said the church otherwise supports increasing the statute of limitations. The legislation that was passed Monday includes the provision that the church opposed. It would create a one-year window in which survivors could refile civil lawsuits that had previously been blocked because they’d been filed too late. Legislative leaders and Governor Andrew Cuomo had already reached agreement around the act prior to Monday’s vote.

rochestercitynewspaper.com

CITY 5


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During the last 20 years, marketers of nearly every product and service have put a lot of emphasis on reaching the youth market. That’s important, but when it comes to development and revitalizing cities, it’s the wrong approach and it will have lasting negative consequences, says Gil Penalosa founder of 8 80 Cities and president of Gil Penalosa and Associates, an urban-planning consulting firm. “We need to stop building cities for people who are 30 and athletic,” Penalosa says. If city planners pay more attention to creating environments that excite and meet the needs of people who are 8 years old and 80 years old instead, they will also create an environment that meets the needs of everyone, Penalosa says. Penalosa has advised officials in more than 350 cities around the world concerning his 8 80 Cities concept. He’ll be speaking in Rochester on Wednesday, January 30, at the Gleason Works Auditorium, 1000 University Avenue, at 7 p.m. The event is part of Community Design Center Rochester’s Reshaping Rochester lecture series, and it’s free and open to the public. ”I’ve been looking at this for some time now,” Penalosa says, “and I can tell you that people are remarkably similar no matter where you go,” he says. “The weather is different, the cultures are different, but people are very much the same.” And one of the biggest similarities he finds is that in most countries people are living much longer, and the cities they’re living in are not prepared for it. “The average age of an adult in the US 100 years ago was around 39 or 40, but more children born in the US today will live to see 100 than anyone imagined possible even 50 years ago,” Penalosa says. “But a concern for a lot of mayors is, ‘We have so many old people.’ I tell them, ‘That’s not your problem.’” When Penalosa is asked to evaluate the

needs of a city, he says he starts by looking at how that city treats its most vulnerable: young children, the elderly, and the poor. “The public sector has to be their guardian angel,” he says. It’s hard to address the needs of the most vulnerable citizens without first looking at access and mobility, Penalosa says. Instead of accommodating more cars on the road, urban planners should concentrate on looking for 6 CITY

JANUARY 30 - FEBRUARY 5, 2019

ways to get people outside and active, he says. Walking, biking, and taking public transit for longer distances has been relegated to the lower economic class in the US and Canada, he says. “And developing countries like China, Brazil, and Mexico are following the US devotion to cars and making the same mistake,” Penalosa says. “We should want our children to walk to school as much as possible and should want our older adults to be able to cross the street safely. We need to educate the public into thinking more like the people in Denmark. Every trip doesn’t require a car.” For Penalosa, the 8 80 Cities concept addresses multiple issues: physical health, mental health, preservation of the natural environment, and climate change. There are some great neighborhoods in every city, he says, but the Gil Penalosa is founder of Toronto-based 8 80 Cities. best examples of 8 80 cities PHOTO PROVIDED in the US are Boulder, Colorado, Portland, because too many of the intersections were Oregon, and New York City. They haven’t not designed to be safe for children and made the automobile their main priority, older adults. The priority was the driver he says. and the car. Portland and New York City have done “We should be lowering the speed limits a good job of creating interconnectedness and putting in better crosswalks with longer with their parks and public spaces, he says. lights and leaving enough time for people to They don’t just maintain their parks, they cross,” he says. “If the streets are wide, they manage them as if they were community need to have islands in the middle where centers with multiple uses, he says. people can stop without fear.” Toronto, where Penalosa lives, is good, Another concern for Penalosa is the he says. “But there’s more we could do to tendency of some city officials to remove become a great city for everyone.” benches from city streets or place them Penalosa tells urban planners and city primarily in parks located near wealthier officials to look at what he considers lowneighborhoods. hanging fruit before investing in huge projects. “I was in the downtown of a midwest Consider small changes and adaptations first city not long ago,” he says, “and I walked that aren’t terribly expensive and enable people eight or so blocks and didn’t see a single of every age to be as mobile as possible. For bench. When I asked how come there are instance, many crosswalks don’t give older no benches, the official I was with told adults enough time to cross the street safely. me that they removed them because they The priority for city officials too often is to attract the homeless.” keep the car traffic moving. That not only hurts the homeless, it In Toronto, Penalosa says, many people also deters older adults and families with are hit by cars while walking or biking children from walking.


Urban planners need to encourage residents to walk and bike more and drive less, says Gil Penalosa. PHOTO PROVIDED

The Open Streets Project, a collaboration

between 8 80 and Miami-based Street Plans, has become popular in cities around the world. And it’s a simple and inexpensive way to get the public accustomed to looking at streets and roads as something more than a place for cars, he says. With Open Streets, miles of streets that go through downtown areas as well as neighborhoods are closed off from vehicle traffic for the day so residents have unencumbered access to them. They become a pop-up promenade. Open Streets can be an annual or monthly event, says Penalosa. “Instead of being in a car, people are walking, skating, biking, and talking to people from neighborhoods that they only pass through on their way to somewhere else,” Penalosa says. “It’s a social experience that anyone of any age and any mobility can do.” Open Streets also shows people that the largest use of public space in just about any city is its streets and highways, Penalosa says. Most cities can always do with more green space, and Open Streets perfectly illustrates that once green space is lost, it’s extremely difficult to reclaim it for public use, he says. While people in the US might think of Open Streets events being held only in warm weather, they don’t have to be.

And, he says, northeastern cities like Rochester have to put more emphasis on clearing streets and sidewalks of snow and ice during the winter months. And he doesn’t think the job should be left to businesses and homeowners, because when sidewalks are not properly cleared, people will walk in the streets where it isn’t safe. And they won’t walk to the neighborhood store or restaurant. They’ll drive to the strip mall instead, he says. “Minneapolis has some of the best sidewalks and trails I’ve seen,” Penalosa says. “They’re always cleared so you can run, walk, or bike, and they’re used all the time.” The lack of attention to things like clearing sidewalks during winter is part of a larger problem, Penalosa says. Some cities have capitulated to an anti-winter mindset, he says. They jam their summer months with festivals, but they should consider creating a few events during the winter months. For instance, some cold-climate cities have ice sculpture competitions similar to the way some beach cities have sand sculpture competitions. “We need to be a lot smarter about how we use public space,” he says. “We really need to be thinking more in terms of multi-use of that space for different age groups. This is not the time for complacency.” rochestercitynewspaper.com

CITY 7


PSST. Is it worth a thousand words?

Check our art reviews from Rebecca Rafferty.

CITY Newspaper presents / ART

Mind • Body • Spirit

For more Tom Tomorrow, including a political blog and cartoon archive, visit www.thismodernworld.com

URBAN ACTION

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"TALK ON THE ART OF ROLFING" with John Botsford, Certified Advanced Rolfer

FRIDAY, FEB. 1 • 7pm The Clover Center for Arts & Spirituality 1101 Clover Street, corner of Highland Ave (enter yellow doors)

Rolfing is a form of bodywork which addresses pain in neck, shoulders, knees, lower back, etc. Come and see if Rolfing could work for you!

*FREE NECK MASSAGE AFTER THE TALK*

8 CITY

JANUARY 30 - FEBRUARY 5, 2019

This week’s calls to action include the following events and activities. (All are free and open to the public, unless otherwise noted.)

Symbiosis and climate change

ColorBrightonGreen.org will show the documentary film “Symbiotic Earth.” The film explores the 1960’s work of scientist Lynn Margulis and her theory that symbiosis – organisms living and working together – is the driver of evolution. Her view went against the prevailing scientific views of the time. The film argues that extreme capitalism has led to climate change, and that creating a sustainable, more symbiotic lifestyle is the way to reverse it. Organic farmer and author Elizabeth Henderson will lead a

discussion following the film: Tuesday, February 5, at the Greece Baptist Church, 1230 Long Pond Road, and on Wednesday, February 6, at the Brighton Memorial Library, 2300 Elmwood Avenue. The film will be shown at 6:30 p.m. both nights.

The meaning of consent

The Rochester Sexual and Reproductive Justice Task Force will present a workshop titled “Getting Beyond the Basics,” on the meaning of consent as it relates to sexual activity and everyday interactions with people, on Monday, February 4. Facilitators for the program will build on the experiences of the attendees and their interpretation of “consent.” The workshop will be held at the Flying Squirrel Community Space, 285 Clarissa Street, from 6 to

8 p.m. Suggested donation: $5, but no one will be turned away.

Improving city schools

Location19.org, an organization of parents and residents of the city’s southwest neighborhoods, will hold a public meeting on the Rochester school district’s receivership schools on Wednesday, February 6. The meeting will examine what the State Education Department receivership schools are. And there will be a review of a draft improvement plan for School 16. If the school, which was recently remodeled, doesn’t meet the state-required academic improvements, the SED could appoint an outside person or organization as a monitor. The meeting will be held at School 16, 321 Post Avenue, at 5:30 p.m.


Dining & Nightlife

Latin Fusion cuisine hits the ROC: Olla de Camarones al Ajillo (the Garlic Shrimp Bowl) with Plátanos Maduros (sweet plantains) at MamaJuana Roc. Inset: fresh-squeezed mango juice from the juice bar. PHOTOS BY RYAN WILLIAMSON

Dominican dining MamaJuana Roc Restaurant & Lounge 2260 CLIFFORD AVENUE TUESDAY THROUGH THURSDAY, 4 TO 10 P.M.; FRIDAY AND SATURDAY, 4 P.M. TO 1 A.M. 417-6898; MAMAJUANAROC.COM [ REVIEW ] BY CHRIS THOMPSON

The recently-opened MamaJuana is going to need a larger parking lot. From the outside, it looks like a small, unassuming mom-and-pop café across Clifford Avenue from Savoia Pastry Shoppe. Upon entering, I pleasantly realized how wrong I was. The first thing I saw was a mural of Dominican musicians Joseito Mateo and Juan Luis Guerra. Directly to the right is a brightly lit L-shaped bar, primed and ready to be stocked (when the liquor license comes through). Elvis Crespo’s “Suavamente” thumped throughout the restaurant. I wasn’t sure if I wanted to dance or eat, or both. MamaJuana owner Marcos Lopez showed me around the place, which is three times the size it appears from the street. The dining area

has plenty of seating for both large and small parties, and to the back is a small stage for a DJ or live band. The large center area is perfect for dancing. MamaJuana is primed to be a favorite weekly merengue spot. The entire area has a modern-yet-cozy feel, with its deep red and dark brown hues pulsing throughout, accented by bright tin panels on one wall and muted

fluorescent lighting on another. It looks as much like an upscale lounge in Flushing as it does a family restaurant. Again, I am conflicted as to whether to dance or dine. But Lopez says his main focus at this point is for people to eat. MamaJuana is meant to bring Latin Fusion to Rochester. There are plenty of restaurants in the area that focus on one style of Latinx cuisine, and they are delicious. MamaJuana’s goal, Lopez says, is to merge the traditional with the contemporary and make a new culinary palate for the city to enjoy. This is proven by the fact that you can order not only the signature MAMAfungo (plátanos smashed with choice of chicken, pork, or seafood, $10.99 to $14.99), you can also try their take on sushi rolls. The Flower City Roll ($14.99) is good for a healthy appetite. Like a Rochester plate in sushi form, it’s a rice roll with salami, fried potato, bucatini pasta, ground ribeye, and smoked Gouda, topped with Rochester meat sauce, diced onions, ketchup and mustard. The MamaJuanaRoc Roll ($13.99) is a white rice and sweet plátano roll with tempura chicken, avocado, and cream cheese, and it is topped with onions, tomato lime aioli, and cilantro.

As delectable as those choices were, I opted for the Olla de Camarones al Ajillo (the Garlic Shrimp Bowl, $15.99) and a side of Plátanos Maduros (sweet plantains $4.99). The plátanos were fried precisely the way I like them: the crisp of the outside was nearly paper thin, yielding to the warm, soft, and sweet center that melted on my tongue. The shrimp were juicy and larger than I expected, and the garlic oil they were cooked in was not overbearing. It took all my willpower to not take the remaining oil in the bowl to the head, but I settled for using it as a dip for my remaining plátanos. Lopez opened MamaJuana in midDecember after nearly a year of planning and construction. His background is in concert production, first producing small shows at venues, and eventually he put on large functions with both live acts and DJs. This explains my constant urge to dance. Lopez says his family came together to help him in all aspects: his younger brother is the head chef who designed the menu, his older brother is an architect who designed the interior, and many family members helped with construction. Lopez says he’d like to expand throughout the city in the next few years. If he puts as much effort into the next venue as he did into MamaJuana, Rochester will be blessed. rochestercitynewspaper.com

CITY 9


Upcoming

Music

[ METAL ]

As I Lay Dying Wednesday, March 20. Montage Music Hall. 50 Chestnut St. $26.50-$30. 7 p.m. 638-8163. themontagemusichall.com; asilaydying.com. [ R&B ]

Patti LaBelle Saturday, June 22. Kodak Hall at Eastman Theatre. 26 Gibbs St. $70-$115. 8 p.m. 454-2060. rochesterjazz.com; pattilabelle.com.

Eastman Philharmonia

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 1 KODAK HALL AT EASTMAN THEATRE, 26 GIBBS STREET 7:30 P.M. | FREE | EASTMANTHEATRE.ORG; AUGUSTAREADTHOMAS.COM [ CLASSICAL ] On Friday, Eastman Philharmonia and

conductor Brad Lubman will offer a powerhouse lineup of varied, bold symphonic statements. The orchestra will perform “Brio,” an explosive yet accessible work by Grammy winner and former Eastman professor Augusta Read Thomas (pictured), who will be the visiting composer as part of Eastman’s weekly Symposium on composition. The program will also include the late Oliver Knussen’s “Flourish with Fireworks,” along with Claude Debussy’s evocative, orchestral masterwork “La Mer” and Dmitri Shostakovich’s emotionally visceral Piano Concerto No. 1.

— BY DANIEL J. KUSHNER

Meg Gehman and The Influence SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 2 LOVIN’ CUP, 300 POINT PARK AVENUE 8 P.M. | $5 | LOVINCUP.COM; MEGGEHMAN.COM [ ROCK ] An old-school rock diva raised in New York City, singer-songwriter Meg Gehman now resides in Rochester and continues to perform deep-cut classics from the 1950’s onward, as well as her own blues rock originals. Gehman’s voice has the gritty attitude of Sharon Jones, the angelic softness of Joan Osborne, and the warm smokiness of Bettye LaVette, all with a soulful presence that cuts to the bone. Listeners can enjoy Latin-infused and funky soul covers and originals, filled with sophisticated jazz guitar solos and soothing bass lines that pulse through your veins. — BY KATIE HALLIGAN

PHOTO BY ANTHONY BARLICH

         

M  -M    :

. 10 CITY JANUARY 30 - FEBRUARY 5, 2019


[ ALBUM REVIEWS ]

[ WED., JANUARY 30 ]

Cannonball Adderley

CLASSICAL

‘Swingin’ in Seattle: Live at the Penthouse (1966-1967)’ Reel to Real Recordings cannonball-adderley.com

Bobby Henrie and the Goners SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 2 HARMONY HOUSE, 58 EAST MAIN STREET, WEBSTER 7 P.M. | $15 | CHORUSOFTHEGENESEE.ORG; FACEBOOK.COM/ BOBBYHENRIEANDTHEGONERS [ ROCK ‘N’ ROLL ] During his staggeringly short career, Buddy Holly played Rochester twice: once in January 1957 at the War Memorial, and again in January 1958 at the Auditorium Theatre. Tragically, Holly died in a plane crash at the age of 22, along with The Big Bopper and Ritchie Valens. This event inspired Don McLean, in 1971, to pen the iconic tune “American Pie” about the day the music died. Now get this: the fine folks at ROCkabilly Hop are teaming up with rockabilly heroes, Bobby Henrie and the Goners, to celebrate the bespectacled rocker with a rug-cuttin’ party. Get ready, Teddy. — BY FRANK DE BLASE

The Brother Brothers TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 5 ABILENE BAR AND LOUNGE, 153 LIBERTY POLE WAY 8 P.M. | $10 | ABILENEBARANDLOUNGE.COM; THEBROTHERBROTHERSMUSIC.COM [ FOLK ] The Brother Brothers are a pair of identical twins whose musical chemistry is so good, it’s hard to tell where one’s voice ends and the other’s voice begins. Celebrating the release of their debut full-length album, “Some People I Know,” The Brother Brothers blend their separate musical stories into one cohesive journey. David and Adam Moss perform soft and bittersweet folk lullabies, with acoustic guitar and violin. The lyrics are very personal, making the listener feel like family. — BY KATIE HALLIGAN

Julian “Cannonball” Adderley was not only one of the greatest alto saxophonists in jazz, he also led one of the greatest bands. That’s why the release of a newly discovered recording, culled from mid-1960’s radio broadcasts, is such a welcome treat. The sound is phenomenal, the repertoire is adventurous, and the personnel couldn’t be better. Adderley and his brother Nat Adderley(cornet) were as musically symbiotic as it gets. The rest of the band – pianist Joe Zawinul, bassist Victor Gaskin, bass and Roy McCurdy on drums – was top-notch. The music includes inventive originals like Zawinul’s “Hippodelphia” and “74 Miles Away.” Covers range from a fiery take on Hugh Martin and Ralph Blane’s “The Girl Next Door” to a beautiful rendition of Leonard Bernstein’s “Somewhere.”

Canadian Brass & Eastman Wind Ensemble. Kodak Hall

at Eastman Theatre, 60 Gibbs St. 7:30 p.m. $26-$71. CONTEMPORARY CLASSICAL

The Rita Collective. Little

Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 258-0400. 7 p.m. COUNTRY

Nate Michaels. B-Side, 5

Liftbridge Lane. Fairport. 315-3003. 7 p.m. JAZZ

The Djangoners. Record

Archive, 33 1/3 Rockwood St. 244-1210. 5-8 p.m.

— BY RON NETSKY POP/ROCK

Chilly’s Can of Jam. Temple

The Gil Evans Orchestra ‘Hidden Treasures Monday Nights, Volume One’ Bopper Spock Suns Music pledgemusic.com/projects/gil-evans-orchestra

The late, great arranger Gil Evans may be best known for “Sketches of Spain” and other albums he arranged for Miles Davis, but The Gil Evans Orchestra, broke new ground every Monday night at the Greenwich Village club Sweet Basil. Evans’ sons – Miles Evans (trumpet) and Noah Evans – have assembled many of the original players for a wildly kinetic session. The repertoire includes “Moonstruck” and “Eleven,” two Gil Evans compositions in their original arrangements. The former is a striking example of Evans’ unusual voicings, the latter a showcase for his bold ensemble writing. But perhaps most striking is his arrangement of Masabumi Kikuchi’s “Lunar Eclipse,” in which Evans transforms the orchestra into a gorgeous runaway train.

Bar & Grille, 109 East Ave. 232-6000. Last Wednesday of every month, 9 p.m. Televisionaries, Boy Jr. Skylark Lounge, 40 South Union St. 270-8106. 9 p.m. REGGAE/JAM

Rochester Reggae Revival.

Flour City Station, 170 East Ave. 413-5745. 9 p.m. $10.

[ THU., JANUARY 31 ] ACOUSTIC/FOLK

Charles Emanuel, Dave Chisholm. The Daily

Refresher, 293 Alexander St. 360-4627. 7 p.m. Old Timey Jam. Bernunzio Uptown Music, 122 East Ave. bernunzio.com. Every third Thursday, 6:30 p.m.

— BY RON NETSKY continues on page 13

PSST. Out of touch? Out of tune? See our music reviews from Frank De Blase.

/ MUSIC

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 11


Music Marc Blitzstein’s “Regina” and Sister Helen Prejean in the premiere of Jake Heggie’s “Dead Man Walking.” On February 10 in Eastman’s Kilbourn Hall, Graham and pianist Bradley Moore turn to the world of art song, performing a program that prominently features the music of French composers Fauré, Debussy, Ravel, and Poulenc. Thematically, the recital revolves around the subject of love, as articulated in the Robert Schumann song cycle “Frauenliebe und leben.” In a recent phone interview, Graham talked about her attraction to French music, her vocal style, and highlights from the upcoming concert. What follows is an edited version of that discussion. CITY: You’ve made a name for yourself as a keen interpreter of French repertoire. What is it about the language itself or French compositional styles that have resonated with you so strongly? Susan Graham: Well, I started out as a

Mezzo-soprano Susan Graham brings French-language repertoire, her specialty, to Eastman School of Music’s Kilbourn Hall on February 10. PHOTO BY DARIO ACOSTA

Do you think it also has to do with the distinctive timbre of your voice?

A French feast

12 CITY JANUARY 30 - FEBRUARY 5, 2019

pianist when I was young, studying piano for many, many years. And I was always very drawn to French Impressionism and sort of the unexpectedness of the harmonies of Debussy, for instance. And when I started singing, that just sort of spilled over, I think. And then the language: When I started taking voice lessons at age 16, the first song that my voice teacher in Midland, Texas gave me was “Après un rêve” by Fauré, which was a little ambitious for a 16-yearold girl in West Texas who really did not speak French. I don’t know, maybe she had some premonition. But it began sort of a lifelong love affair with French repertoire. And then of course as I got older, I really started to explore a lot of Berlioz. Sort of the language of storytelling, and the way that that language just feels to sing, somehow just suited me.

Susan Graham

[ INTERVIEW ] BY DANIEL J. KUSHNER

WITH PIANIST BRADLEY MOORE SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 10 KILBOURN HALL AT EASTMAN SCHOOL OF MUSIC, 26 GIBBS STREET 3 P.M. | $29-$40 EASTMANTHEATRE.ORG SUSANGRAHAM.COM

American mezzo-soprano Susan Graham has enjoyed a rich and successful operatic career, interpreting everything from French-language roles like Iphigénie in Gluck’s “Iphigénie en Tauride” and Didon in Berlioz’s “Les Troyens” to 20thcentury characters like the title role in

I do, I do. ‘Cause there’s an operatic category sort of known as falcone, which you, know, is French for “falcon.” It sort of requires a kind of clarion quality to the voice, and a kind of, sort of plangency that I think suits me. The other thing I like about French music is that it’s not overly sappy. It’s just like in French cuisine and French literature and French music: There’s nothing particularly extraneous. It’s just sort of what’s essential.


What makes the song cycle “Frauenliebe und leben” such a good focal point for this recital program of art songs you’ll be performing at Eastman?

First of all, it’s an iconic corner of the repertoire. Schumann songs are always really gratifying to sing. He has an economy of melody and harmony that is very cleverly used, and just right for whatever story he’s telling. I love the piano landscapes of Schumann as a pianist. It really appeals to me. “Frauenliebe und leben,” of course, is the love and life of a woman. It sort of outlines eight chapters in a woman’s love with this particular man. Who can’t relate to all that? It’s a universal theme. Is there a particular piece on the program that you would consider a hidden gem?

Yes – in the second group, I think it is – the John Dankworth setting of “Shall I compare thee to a summer’s day?” He wrote it for his wife, jazz singer Cleo Laine. It’s a modern song. And it’s got a real, contemporary – it’s not jazzy, but it certainly has a jazz feel to it, and certainly it’s open for jazz interpretations. I tend to stay on the slightly cleaner side, but it’s a gorgeous song and I love it. I’m always very happy at the point when that one pops up in the program. You’ve made it a point in your career to interpret 20th-century and contemporary American repertoire. Why is that important for you?

Well, we have to keep regenerating. We’ll all turn into dinosaur bones if we don’t keep the repertoire fresh, in conjunction with what are considered standard repertoire. Audiences want that. Artists want that, and audiences want that. They want fresh, new ideas.

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 13


Nathan Laube. St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, 25 Westminster Rd. 271-2240. stpaulsec.org. 7:30-8:30 p.m. Rochester Celebrity Organ Recital Series. $5-$12. RPO: Jon Nakamatsu, piano. Smith Opera House, 82 Seneca St. Geneva. thesmith.org. 7:30 p.m. $10-$35. Taihang Du, piano. Ciminelli Lounge, ESM, 100 Gibbs St. 5:30 p.m.

PA Line. B-Side, 5 Liftbridge Lane. Fairport. 315-3003. 8 p.m. Peter Mulvey, The Cadleys. Cafe Veritas at First Unitarian Church, 220 S Winton Rd. cafeveritas.org. 7:30 p.m. $10-$18. AMERICANA

The Dawn Timbers, Adrien & Ragechill, Jungle Steve. ButaPub, 315 Gregory St. 563-6241. 10 p.m.

DJ/ELECTRONIC

ExMag, Hybrid Beats. Flour City

Station, 170 East Ave. 413-5745. 9 p.m. $9/$15.

PHOTO BY SARAH SHATZ

CLASSICAL | RPO WITH JON NAKAMATSU

Music Director Ward Stare returns to the Rochester Philharmonic Orchestra podium this week with an unusually substantial program, the first of several coming up this year. After Vadym Kholodenko’s appearance earlier this month, you can hear another of the RPO’s favorite guests, Jon Nakamatsu, performing Beethoven’s Second Piano Concerto. This is probably the least-played but also the most charming of Beethoven’s five piano concertos. Bookending the Beethoven are Rachmaninoff’s impressively gloomy tone poem “The Isle of the Dead” and Stravinsky’s eternally provocative “The Rite of Spring.” Visit rochestercitynewspaper.com on Friday for a review of the concert. Rochester Philharmonic Orchestra presents “Nakamatsu + Stravinksy’s Rite of Spring” on Thursday, January 31 at 7:30 p.m. and Saturday, February 2 at 8 p.m., at Eastman Theatre’s Kodak Hall. $24-$106. 454-2100. rpo.org; jonnakamatsu.com. — BY DAVID RAYMOND

BLUES

The Side Doors. Dinosaur BBQ,

Record Archive, 33 1/3 Rockwood St. 244-1210. Last Thursday of every month, 5 p.m. With Genesee Johnny.

99 Court St. 325-7090. 9 p.m. Doors tribute. Wild Knights. Flour City Station, 170 East Ave. 413-5745. 8 p.m. $10/$15.

CLASSICAL

[ FRI., FEBRUARY 1 ]

Son House Blues Night.

RPO: Jon Nakamatsu, piano.

Kodak Hall at Eastman Theatre, 60 Gibbs St. 7:30 p.m. Pre-concert chats 1/2 hour prior. $24-$106. JAZZ

Drew Diekmann. Via Girasole Wine Bar, 3 Schoen Pl. Pittsford. 641-0340. 7 p.m. Tyler Westcott & Friends. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 258-0400. 7 p.m.

ACOUSTIC/FOLK Head to the Roots. B-Side, 5 Liftbridge Lane. Fairport. 315-3003. 5-7 p.m. Mary Monroe & Nate Coffee. Fanatics Pub & Pizza, 7281 W Main St. Lima. 624-2080. 8 p.m.

Old World Warblers, The Incantations. Lux Lounge, 666

South Ave. lux666.com. 9:30 p.m. $5.

Ben Rossi, Waiting for the Moon. Three Heads Brewing, 186 Atlantic Ave. 244-1224. 8 p.m. $5. Dave Riccioni. Pane Vino, 175 N. Water St. 232-6090. 7 p.m.

The Painted Birds, Jackson Cavalier. Abilene, 153 Liberty

Pole Way. 232-3230. 8 p.m. $5.

Fred Costello & Roger Eckers Jazz Duo. Charley Brown’s, 1675 Penfield Rd. 385-9202. 7:30-10 p.m. HIP-HOP/RAP

Smokin Buta Hip-Hop Showcase. ButaPub, 315

Gregory St. 563-6241. First Friday of every month, 9:30 p.m. $5. POP/ROCK

Baker Street, The Elementals. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. lovincup.com. 8:30 p.m. $5. Begging Angels. Bar Louie, 98 Greece Ridge Center Dr. 797-1054. 9 p.m. Big Logic & The Truth Serum. Johnny’s Pub, 1382 Culver Rd. 224-0990. 8:30 p.m. Con Artist. Montage Music Hall, 50 Chestnut St. 232-1520. 8 p.m. $7. John Payton Project. B-Side, 5 Liftbridge Lane. Fairport. 315-3003. 8 p.m. Mesh. Dinosaur BBQ, 99 Court St. 325-7090. 9:30 p.m. Mud Creek. Abilene, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. 9:30 p.m. Dead tribute. $5. The Sideways. Temple Bar & Grille, 109 East Ave. 232-6000. 10 p.m. R&B/ SOUL

The Brothers Blue. Little Theatre

Café, 240 East Ave. 258-0400. 8 p.m. Sherner & Simpson. Abilene, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. 5:30 p.m. CLASSICAL

Eastman Philharmonia. Kodak

Hall at Eastman Theatre, 60 Gibbs St. 7:30 p.m. August Read Thomas: Brio.

14 CITY JANUARY 30 - FEBRUARY 5, 2019

Steve Grills & the Roadmasters. Little Theatre

Café, 240 East Ave. 258-0400. 8 p.m. CLASSICAL

Girasole Wine Bar, 3 Schoen Pl. Pittsford. 641-0340. 7 p.m. REGGAE/JAM Photo City Improv, 543 Atlantic Ave. 451-0047. 10 p.m.

[ SAT., FEBRUARY 2 ] ACOUSTIC/FOLK Amy Montrois. WhichCraft Brews, 1900 Empire Blvd. Webster. 222-2739. 7 p.m.

Charles Emanuel, Cammy Enaharo. The Avenue Blackbox

Theatre, 780 Joseph Ave. avenuetheatre.org. 8 p.m. $15.

Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point Dr. lovincup.com. 8 p.m. $5. Rock-it-Science. Argyle Grill, 4344 Nine Mile Point Rd. 377-5200. 8 p.m.

Sastrugi, Stompbox, Toluca Lake, Wanderer. Bug Jar, 219

Monroe Ave. bugjar.com. 8 p.m. $7. Schism. Flour City Station, 170 East Ave. 413-5745. 9 p.m. Tool tribute. $15/$20. Teagan & The Tweeds. Three Heads Brewing, 186 Atlantic Ave. 244-1224. 8 p.m. $5. Tryst. Comedy @ the Carlson, 50 Carlson Rd. 426-6339. 9 p.m.

Zac Brown Tribute Band, Jumbo Shrimp. Anthology, 336

East Ave. 484-1964. 8 p.m. $12-$15.

A Festival of Trombones.

Nazareth College Arts Center, 4245 East Ave. 389-2170. 3 p.m Callahan Theater at Nazareth College Arts Center, 4245 East Ave. 389-2170. 3 p.m. RPO: Jon Nakamatsu, piano. Kodak Hall at Eastman Theatre, 60 Gibbs St. 8 p.m. Pre-concert chats 1/2 hour prior. $24-$106. COUNTRY

The Monica Hall Band, Divided By Zero. Nashvilles, 4853 W

VOCALS

A Celebration of Black History Month: RWC Gospel Choir, Baber A.M.E. Church Choir. Hale Auditorium, Roberts Cultural Life Center, Roberts Wesleyan College, 2301 Westside Dr. 7:30 p.m.

Trey McLaughlin & The Sounds of Zamar. Callahan

Theater at Nazareth College Arts Center, 4245 East Ave. 389-2170. 8 p.m. $25-$50.

Henrietta Rd. Henrietta. 334-3030. 8:30 p.m.

[ SUN., FEBRUARY 3 ]

DJ/ELECTRONIC

AMERICANA

Signal > Noise: God Particle Label Showcase. Photo City

Improv, 543 Atlantic Ave. 451-0047. 10 p.m. 4th year celebration with Sassmouth, Shawn Rudiman, Titonton Duvante, and Christina Chatfield. $15/$20. JAZZ

Buffalo Brass Machine.

Abilene, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. 9 p.m. $6.

Pops on Pipes. Auditorium

Theatre, 885 E. Main St. rtosonline.org. 2:30 p.m. $15/ Students free. CLASSICAL

Eastern Standard Trio.

Nazareth College Glazer Music Performance Center, 4245 East Ave. 389-2700. 3 p.m.

Hochstein Youth Symphony Orchestra, Philharmonia.

Fred Costello & Roger Eckers Jazz Duo. Charley Brown’s,

Hochstein Performance Hall, 50 N Plymouth Ave. 454-4596. 2 p.m. $5.

METAL

Museum, 900 East Ave. eastman.org. 3 p.m. With museum admission.

1675 Penfield Rd. 385-9202. 7:30-10 p.m.

The Stan Martinelli Project. Via

Bob Marley Birthday Bash. AMERICANA

POP/ROCK

JAZZ

BLUES

Meg Gehman & The Influence.

The Silence Broken, Diluted, Likewize, Murder in Rue Morgue, Aggressive Betty, For the Dead Travel Fast. Montage Music Hall, 50 Chestnut St. 232-1520. 7 p.m. $7/$10.

Joe Blackburn, Aeolian Pipe Organ. George Eastman

Schola Cantorum Compline. Christ Church, 141 East Ave. 454-3878. 9-9:30 p.m. SUNY Geneseo Wind Quintet. Doty Recital Hall, 1 College Circle. Geneseo. 245-5824. 3 p.m.

POP/ROCK

Alex Goettel. Via Girasole Wine

Bar, 3 Schoen Pl. Pittsford. 641-0340. 7 p.m.

Bobby Henrie & the Goners. Harmony House, 58 East Main St. Webster. 7 p.m. Buddy Holly Dance Party. $15. Diggler’s Bridge. Bar Louie, 98 Greece Ridge Center Dr. 797-1054. 9 p.m.

CONTEMPORARY CLASSICAL Salon Concert. Rochester Academy of Medicine, 1441 East Ave. raom.org. 2 p.m. Rebecca Penneys, piano; Mikail Kopelman, violin; Stefan Reuss, cello. $10-$35.

POP/ROCK

Sam Snyder. The Daily

Refresher, 293 Alexander St. 360-4627. 5-7 p.m. VOCALS

The Traveling Cabaret. Brighton Memorial Library, 2300 Elmwood Ave. 784-5310. 2 p.m.

[ MON., FEBRUARY 4 ] ACOUSTIC/FOLK Stormy Valle. Record Archive, 33 1/3 Rockwood St. 244-1210. 6 p.m. CLASSICAL

Andrew Bergevin, violin. Doty

Recital Hall, 1 College Circle. Geneseo. 245-5529. 7 p.m. Eastman Wind Orchestra. Kodak Hall at Eastman Theatre, 60 Gibbs St. 7:30 p.m.

Faculty Artist Series: Robert Morris, composer. Kilbourn

Hall, 26 Gibbs St. 274-1000. 7:30 p.m. $10. JAZZ

Mike Kaupa Quartet. Little

Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 258-0400. 7 p.m. VOCALS

Love Songs with John Williams. Out Alliance, 100

College Ave. 7 p.m.

[ TUE., FEBRUARY 5 ] ACOUSTIC/FOLK

The Brother Brothers. Abilene, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. 8 p.m. $10. CLASSICAL

Faculty Artist: Michael Burritt, percussion. Kilbourn Hall, 26 Gibbs St. 274-3000. 7:30 p.m. $10. Tuesday Pipes. Christ Church, 141 East Ave. 454-3878. 12-12:45 p.m. Uptown Tango. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 258-0400. 7 p.m. JAZZ

Grove Place Jazz Project.

Downstairs Cabaret Theatre, 20 Windsor St. 325-4370. 7 p.m. $10.


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F I N D O U T M O R E A B O U T E A C H O F O U R M E M B E R S AT W W W . N O TA B A . O R G 16 CITY JANUARY 30 - FEBRUARY 5, 2019


A HEARTWARMING

WINTER [ INTRO ] BY DANIEL J. KUSHNER

Winter, with its bitter-cold bite, is an inevitable reality in Rochester. But that doesn’t mean you have to retreat into hibernation. Our 2019 Winter Guide is a curated compilation of cold-weather ideas and activities to warm the soul and coax you out of the winter blues. A good way to get through the winter is to get out in it. There’s a surprising amount of life in winter, if you know what to look for. Rebecca Rafferty interviews a naturalist on page 18. For those curious about trying a new sport, on page 22 we offer a look at the Never Ever League, an adult hockey program in Rochester for beginners looking to learn the basics of the game and play recreationally. When you need an antidote to the outdoors, Pete Wayner has plenty of options for you on page 24 with his overview of winter drinks in Rochester, including a local take on a classic Rust Belt cocktail, warming craft beers, and the appropriately titled “Winter Elixir.” When you’re perfectly content to stay at home, Adam Lubitow shares nine bingeworthy TV series to watch as you while away the winter hours: page 26. And Kate Stathis’s “19 for ‘19,” on page 28, is a wide-ranging preview of thingsto-do in the next two months, from ice skating to concerts, children’s events to outdoor festivals. Whatever you decide to do this winter, stay warm, and enjoy the season. Do you have your own tips for a fun winter? Share them with us below the article online at rochestercitynewspaper.com.

INSIDE NATURE...................................... 18 SPORTS...................................... 22 BEVERAGES................................ 24 VIDEO. . ...................................... 26 PREVIEW................................... 28

Publishers: William and Mary Anna Towler Editorial department themail@rochester-citynews.com Arts & entertainment editor: Rebecca Rafferty Music editor: Daniel J. Kushner Special Sections editor: Adam Lubitow Contributing writers: Pete Wayner Art department artdept@rochester-citynews.com Art director/production manager: Ryan Williamson Designers: Renée Heininger, Jacob Walsh Advertising department ads@rochester-citynews.com New sales development: Betsy Matthews Sales Representatives: Bill Towler, David White Operations/Circulation kstathis@rochester-citynews.com Business manager: Angela Scardinale Circulation manager: Katherine Stathis Winter Guide is published by WMT Publications,

Inc. Copyright by WMT Publications Inc., 2019 - all rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, photocopying, recording or by any information storage retrieval system without permission of the copyright owner.

On the cover: Photograph by Ryan Williamson

rochestercitynewspaper.com

@ROCCITYNEWS WINTER GUIDE 2019 CITY 17


SIGNS OF LIFE ENCOUNTERS WITH WINTER WILDLIFE

[ NATURE ] BY REBECCA RAFFERTY

What sort of chains of events have you detected?

We’re deep in the cold-weather doldrums. And our quick, begrudging trips from home to work or the grocery store and back home again may leave us with a vague impression of a winter wasteland. At a glance, the landscape may seem hushed and abandoned compared to nature’s activity in the other seasons. Many birds migrate south, and many mammals may be hunkered down in hibernation mode. But there are still signs of wildlife around, if we know where to look and how to detect them, says Douglas Bassett, a naturalist at Letchworth State Park. Bassett, who’s been with Letchworth since 1973, leads year-round interpretive hikes in the park. In a recent interview, Bassett talked about the animals, plants, and indications of nature’s interconnected stories that can be read in the terrain. The following is an edited version of that conversation. There are loads of interpretive nature walks and themed wildlife events for all ages taking place throughout the rest of the winter at area nature centers, wildlife refuges, and parks. Check out our calendar at rochestercitynewspaper. com for listings of upcoming events.

We saw some bear tracks on one of our walks. You don’t see them that often. We didn’t have time then, so I came back to explore the tracks. I walked backward on the tracks, followed them for five miles, and it went all kinds of places I didn’t know a bear would go. It crossed logs, it crossed creeks, it did turns and twists I wouldn’t have necessarily chosen if I was walking through the woods. And in one spot it was going through a tangle of honeysuckle. I wouldn’t have bothered to go through a tangle, but it did. I would have gone around it. Not only did it go through it, at one point it rolled over on top of a honeysuckle and broke it, and pieces were there sticking out. I think it had an itch, and it was just rolling around on top of the honeysuckle. What about plants, and the challenge of identifying trees just by their bark?

CITY: Aside from the basics like squirrels, chickadees, and cardinals, what are some regional animals that stick around in the winter? Douglas Bassett: Well, we have over 15,000 organisms, so

to summarize, it’s whatever you’re looking at that’s exciting, and that changes every day. The winter snow brings you an opportunity, though, to have a nose like a fox. You can see what’s been there, you can see fox tracks, you can see raccoon tracks, possum tracks, and without the snow you wouldn’t know when they were there. With the snow, not only do you know who was there, you can tell by the age of the snow and what the conditions have been, how long ago it was there, and which direction it was going, where it stopped, and what it did. Winter walks give a whole opportunity to look into the life of animals, from shrews and mice all the way up to deer.

What do you think are the best scenarios and best practices to spot active wildlife?

Actual sightings of animals is always rare, and if you have more than one person, the rarer it becomes. So in groups, we hardly ever see animals up close. It might be far, we might see a coyote crossing a river, or a deer on a far bank, but we don’t usually see animals up close because of the sheer fact of numbers, movement, and noise. So if you’re by yourself, and you’re walking slowly, and stop often — if you’re stopped more than you are walking — you increase your chances of seeing something before it sees or smells you. 18 CITY JANUARY 30 - FEBRUARY 5, 2019

Can you elaborate a bit on indicators in the snow, such as tracks, and the age of the snow?

If we’ve had a recent dusting of snow, a track made in the morning would have a little dusting of snow in it. If there was no dusting of snow in the tracks, it’s pretty darn fresh, maybe only minutes or hours ago. If there’s been a melting condition, the tracks become melted and smooth. Of course, if you got a snow that happened five days after the track, the track has disappeared. So the timing of the snow, the depth of the snow, the conditions, the warmth all help in your process of knowing how long ago that animal was there. And when you’re looking at the track, you can tell the heel and the toe, so you can tell the direction of the track, and you can also tell by the gait whether the animal was walking, hopping, running, whether it was leaping. There’s a whole bunch of information, and none of it is there the rest of the year. What are some particular areas of interest for you? Do you have a specialty?

I’m a generalist. I know a little bit about a lot of things, expert of nothing. But the more you know, the more you know you don’t know. That’s how that story goes. I am always interested in the interrelationship of things: How one thing depends on another, how something feeds on this or that. The chain of events is always the intriguing thing for me.

The beauty of the bark is that it’s there year-round, and every single tree can be identified by its bark. But the challenge of that is the bark changes from when it’s a seedling to when it’s a sapling, to when it’s five, 10, 20, 50, 100, 200 years old. It goes through many changes. The bark of a tree is also different on the upside than from the downhill side: On the uphill side it stretches, on the downhill side it compresses, so on the same tree you could have more variation at one level than you could have between trees. So you’ve got to pull all of that together and notice the differences, how the bark is slightly different. The colors are all basically the same. Some are darker, some are lighter, some have hues toward red, yellow, or blue. Any other comments about particular plants?

The other thing we can often notice about the leaves on the plants is there’s a lot of other organisms on them, and they can sometimes create galls, or swelling structures you wouldn’t expect to see. [Galls are abnormal growths that occur on different parts of plants, caused by irritation to the plant cells from feeding or egg-laying by insects]. Plant galls are often an interesting feature in the winter. You can see the willow pine cone gall, for example, if you’re in a willow habitat. It looks like a pinecone, but what’s it doing on a willow? It’s the way the plant responds to the little midge that creates the gall. And then there’s other things that might utilize that gall. One of the most famous gall interactions is the goldenrod ball gall. It’s caused by little flies related to a fruit fly. But there’s a beetle that will eat things that are in that gall. It preys upon whatever is there. But it may not be the fly’s larvae. It may be a wasp. There’s a wasp whose only food in the world is that fly. And if that wasn’t complicated enough, there’s a wasp that only eats the wasp that eats the fly. And the beetle doesn’t care, it eats whatever’s in there. continues on page 20


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And then of course a downy woodpecker could tap into that gall and break it open, and get whatever is in there. There’s a whole microcosm of interrelationships. What are some of the most exciting winter life you’ve encountered in your years of studying nature up close?

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One time we followed an otter track, and you could see where instead of just going forward, it would take advantage of the topography. Where there was a little bit of a slope, it would slide. You could see the belly slide where it might slide five, 10 feet, and at one point it slid down an entire slope that must have been 30 or 40 yards. You could say it was having fun, you could say it was economizing, but when you got to a slope and saw that it had gone back up the slope and then come down again, you really had a hard time thinking it was doing anything other than having fun. What advice would you give to amateur naturalists for their best chances of witnessing wildlife, or keeping an eye out for indications of wildlife?

Best is to go slow, and bring a hand lens. Look at things closely, observe, and don’t worry necessarily about putting names on things. There’s things that I’ve seen again and again and I still don’t know what they are. But by observing them, taking the time to use all of your senses, you get to know some of the things that are around us a little bit better. What is a benefit of humans paying attention to the life that’s around them in the winter, as opposed to just holing up and hibernating ourselves?

It’s rooted to the human condition. We isolate ourselves from the world. We put ourselves in boxes: We call it business, we call it a car, we call it a house, and we separate ourselves from everything else the world has to offer. And by going out and taking this in, you get a connection of life, a purpose, of interconnectedness, that yes, your little actions may or may not have an immediate result, but everything does have an interconnectedness to everything else. And there is something, whether you can put your finger or words on it.


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WINTER GUIDE 2019 CITY 21


ICE SCHOOL YOU, TOO, CAN PLAY HOCKEY

[ SPORTS ] BY DANIEL J. KUSHNER

Ice hockey is the quintessential winter sport. The game requires a rare combination of strength and finesse, but the goal is simple: get the puck in the back of the other team’s net. And it all starts by stepping out onto the ice with skates on. But for people who never played the sport when they were growing up, or played it as kid only to abandon it later, the idea of taking up hockey as an activity – essentially from scratch – can be daunting. That’s where the Never Ever League, a year-round adult hockey program at Bill Gray’s Regional Iceplex, comes in. A comprehensive training class that spans 11 weeks and culminates in an organized hockey game, Never Ever teaches participants the fundamental skills and technical details of the game: skating, stickhandling with the puck, passing, shooting, and game scenarios. “The main thing is to just really get comfortable with skating first,” program director Tyler Fess says. In the first three weeks of classes, the players are focused mostly on skating before moving on to other core hockey skills. “But you really want to be like a sound skater,” Fess says, “so we’re always working on trying to get better strides, or better edgework, better balance.” Fess has found that a fear of falling and getting injured can be the biggest deterrent to people trying hockey and joining the program. “It doesn’t hurt that bad if you fall correctly, and you’re completely padded,” he says. “So what’s nice is, the first night, we teach you how to fall and stand back up.” With in-depth instruction and opportunity for one-on-one advice from the instructors, the Never Ever League champions a non-judgmental atmosphere. No checking of other players is allowed, and at any given session, players can be seen and heard encouraging one another. No one is belittled for making 22 CITY JANUARY 30 - FEBRUARY 5, 2019

Program Director Tyler Fess instructs Never Ever League participants on hockey basics. PHOTO BY RYAN WILLIAMSON

a mistake. And the instructors are patient and supportive. Along with the positive vibes, the Never Ever League benefits from being a coed program for anyone 18 years or older, adding diversity to a predominantly white, male sport. Recently, Fess has noticed more hockey parents – mothers in particular – participating in the program. “Now they have that interest of also trying to learn the game, just as their kid’s learning the game,” Fess says. “We teach them all the basics – fundamentals of skating, fundamentals of passing – just basic rules of the game and all of that. So once they get that background, it kind of rolls over with how their kid’s playing.” Though the environment at Never Ever League sessions is casual, the need for focus and determination is real. When honing their skills, players have to pay attention to numerous details simultaneously: the position of their skates, how they

hold the hockey stick, the position of the puck on the stick, and other technical aspects. At the end of 11 weeks, graduates of the program frequently decide to continue playing hockey formally. Three divisions have been added to the Iceplex Adult Hockey League to accommodate Never Ever graduates, Fess says. “After they learn through Never Ever, they want to keep playing hockey, form a team, and they jump into the adult league,” he says. Fess acknowledges that not everyone who graduates from the program decides to stick with the sport. “But at least they’ll still now be like a recreational skater, so they’ll be able to enjoy going to a public skate or something like that,” he says. “But more often than not, they are kind of funneling into the adult league and creating teams, and building friendships within the program.” The cost of participating in the Never Ever League includes a $250 program registration fee and, if needed, a $100 equipment rental kit with skates, a stick, helmet and cage, gloves, pads, an equipment bag. Players can opt to buy the kit at discounted rate of $255 after completing the program. Goalies who already own their own gear can get a $100 discount on their program registration. While Fess admits that hockey can be an expensive sport to play, flexible payment plans are available for those who can’t pay the entire program cost up-front. The Never Ever League at Bill Gray’s Regional Iceplex, 2700 Brighton Henrietta Town Line Road, has the following upcoming sessions: Thursdays, 9 p.m. to 10 p.m., February 21 to May 2; Fridays, 6:45 p.m. to 7:45 p.m., March 1 to May 10; Sundays, 5:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m., February 24 to May 12. For more information, call 424-4625 or go to billgraysiceplex.com/ nevereverleague.


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BEYOND THE TODDY WINTER DRINKS USED TO BE BIG. THIS WINTER IN ROCHESTER, THEY STILL ARE. [ BEVERAGES | BY PETE WAYNER

The 1971 edition of Playboy’s Bar Guide devotes an entire chapter to cold-weather tipples. “Nowadays any cool evening in the fall or winter is reason enough for filling the cups to the brim with grogs and nogs,” it says. Twenty-seven individual cocktails follow, from the Blue Blazer to the Sherried Scotch. But today, cocktail culture has shifted its focus to more summery fare. Classics like the daiquiri and margarita are undergoing a revival, and even the mid-century tiki boom is opening its tiny umbrella once again. Several area bars, however, have in true Rochester fashion dug into the snow and come up with offerings celebrating the current climate. At Cure, bartender and caretaker Donny Clutterbuck said the demand for hot toddies rose as temperatures fell. But there was a problem. “There was no ideological intent behind it. There was no motivation,” he said, comparing it to a pork sandwich versus a bánh mì. The toddy is simple: bourbon, lemon, honey, water, heat. For his motivation, Clutterbuck turned to the Tom and Jerry. “It’s a midwestern holiday cocktail,” he said. “Since Buffalo is the gateway to the Midwest, it’s been a pretty regular part of my growing up in the booze industry. I’ve never seen one in Rochester.” This hot cocktail begins with literal cake batter – whole eggs, sugar, vanilla, and a little rum – plus several spirits, almond, and coconut milk. All of this, Clutterbuck says, makes something better than the sum of those parts. “It reminds me of drinking the milk in the bottom of the best oatmeal you’ve ever had,” he said. The cocktail will be available until at Cure in the Rochester Public Market as long as the weather holds. Somewhat more fleeting are the current wintertime offerings at The Lost Borough Brewing Co. “Being as small as we are, we can be really fluid with the weather,” said founder and brewer Dan Western. The four-year-old Atlantic Avenue operation brews on a timetable of just a few weeks, meaning supply shifts with the temperature. “This winter has been – knock on wood – pretty mild for us so far,” said Western. But that hasn’t stopped him from brewing a few winter selections that will be on tap for at least another month. Gingerbread Ale has been a crowd favorite since Lost Borough opened its doors, he said. He adds ginger spice to brown ale, with a particular grain to add a bready note. “It tastes and smells like gingerbread in a glass,” he said. Lost Borough’s Russian Imperial Stout, a 12.2 percent ABV behemoth is also available for a few more weeks. Western ages it for more than a year, four months of it in Woodford Reserve barrels. The result, he said, is a thick mouthfeel with touches of coffee, oak, and vanilla. Even though these particular beers may not last the winter, Western already has his next one planned: a winter wheat beer, as yet unnamed, featuring notes of clove, banana, and coriander. 24 CITY JANUARY 30 - FEBRUARY 5, 2019

“It comes right down to balance and flavor profile,” Western said of his wintertime creations, adding that he finds a lot of winter specials overly spiced. “It’s like, am I drinking beer or am I drinking potpourri?” he said. The winter wheat will be light in body, possibly served with an orange slice, he said, and should be coming in late January.

The Espresso Negroni at Next Door by Wegmans PHOTO BY RYAN WILLIAMSON

Another establishment stepping away from the bleak midwinter menu is Next Door by Wegmans, on Monroe Avenue in Pittsford. Restaurant Manager Luis Florez said he and the bar staff spent two months developing the winter season cocktail menu. “This generation is being very adventurous, which allows us to play around with ingredients a little bit more than five or ten years ago,” he said. That sense of adventure, as well as proximity to the Next Door kitchen and Wegmans vendors, allowed Florez and his team to include a diversity of ingredients rarely seen in winter. For example, yuzu citrus juice is a key factor in the Winter Elixir, which is topped with a molded ice semisphere, mint sprig, and blackberries, with a snowfall of powdered sugar. “People now are looking for something more complex,” Florez said. “Keep my senses in as many directions as you can with that glass you’re putting in front of me.” Some of those directions are new takes on old classics. The Espresso Negroni features vermouth infused with espresso beans and a topping of coconut and Kerrygold whipped cream. These cocktails, like all the aforementioned seasonal drinks, seem to align on a singular purpose. “You want to make people happy,” said Florez. “You want them to talk about your place. You want them to say, ‘Oh my god, this smells like pine trees.’” And though these menus may not be exactly evergreen, they’ll be here for Rochesterians to quench their thirst and banish their chill, by filling cups to the brim like it’s 1971.

ALSO THIS WINTER

The Winter Elixer at Next Door by Wegmans PHOTO BY RENÉE HEININGER

Other bars around the city also feature wintertime offerings. Living Roots Wine & Co. is intermittently mulling some of its 2016 Finger Lakes Cabernet Franc and combining it with citrus and spices for a local take on a classic seasonal favorite. Co-founder Colleen Hardy said the mulled wine pairs perfectly with the snow globe-esque atmosphere of the University Avenue tasting room during the winter. And though it’s not on the regular menu, she said, its availability will be announced on Living Roots’ social media. The Spirit Room also has a full wintertime cocktail menu in addition to its regular array of craft cocktails, and The Old Toad is featuring mead as a seasonal special throughout the winter.


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WINTER GUIDE 2019 CITY 25


GENTLY DOWN THE STREAM BINGE YOUR WAY THROUGH THIS WINTER

[ VIDEO ] BY ADAM LUBITOW

Between network and cable television, and streaming services incessantly launching their own original programming, there’s such a constant deluge of visual media competing for our attention. It would be a challenge finding time for even a fraction of all that content. And while those same streaming services make it easier than ever to catch up on shows — both old and new — it can be overwhelming trying to decide what’s worth your time. With the holidays well past us and winter just winding up, now’s the perfect time to settle into your sofa for some quality bingewatching, and catch up with what you’ve been missing. To help you navigate the streaming wilderness, CITY’s put together a guide to some of the most bingeable series currently available through a variety of services. Of course, there’s loads more out there, so let us know what other series we should be adding to our queue. Each self-contained season of Ryan Murphy’s FX anthology series “American Crime Story” takes on a high-profile true crime event from the recent past. After tackling the OJ Simpson case in “The People v. OJ Simpson” in 2016, the series moved on to a slightly less well-known but no less fascinating story with “The Assassination of Gianni Versace: American Crime Story,” focusing on serial killer Andrew Cunanan and the 1997 murder of Italian fashion designer Gianni Versace.

Spacek and Bill Skarsgård (two actors who already have iconic roles in King adaptations, playing Carrie White and Pennywise the clown, respectively), as well as André Holland and Melanie Lynskey. One season, 10 episodes, Hulu.

Castle Rock. PHOTO COURTESY HULU

Working backward in time from the designer’s murder, each episode delves into the lives of those affected by Cunanan’s killing spree, from Versace’s family, to his other victims and their families, to the larger gay community of Miami Beach. And as it does, the series expands to become an expose on American homophobia and what it felt like to be gay in the early ’90s. Exploring the culture that created a killer like Cunanan, the series argues that as much progress as we’ve made,

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The hilarious and unrepentantly filthy animated series “Big Mouth” follows a group of preteens whose lives are in the process of being upended by the horror show that is puberty (personified by each kid’s “hormone monster” — literally a furry, horned monster that shows up at inopportune moments to wreak havoc). As gleefully obscene as “Big Mouth” can be (and seriously, I can’t stress enough how dirty this show is), it manages to find genuine heart and emotion in the idea that puberty was just as confusing, weird, and disgusting for everyone else as it was for you. Two seasons, 20 episodes, Netflix.

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it’s still not as much as we’d like to think. Two seasons, 19 episodes, Netflix. Inspired by characters and settings from the world of Stephen King’s novels, “Castle Rock” is named for the sleepy Maine town that provides the setting for a number of King’s stories, and as you may expect, the series is peppered with references to the horror master’s works. The storytelling can be messy, but the spine-tinglingly atmospheric series boasts wonderful performances from Sissy

This entry functions as a note to myself, because I never got around to watching FX’s acclaimed drama “The Americans,” which just ended its run this past May. The series stars Keri Russell and Matthew Rhys as KGB spies posing as a married American couple living in suburban Washington, DC. at the height of the Cold War. Everyone and my mother has raved about it, so plowing my way through the entire run is high on my list of things to do this winter. Six seasons, 75 episodes, Amazon Prime.


The Good Place. PHOTO COURTESY NBC UNIVERSAL

The most ambitious network sitcom I’ve ever seen, NBC’s “The Good Place” follows the struggles of four recently deceased human schmucks (Kristen Bell, William Jackson Harper, Jameela Jamil, Manny Jacinto) struggling through the afterlife and figuring out what it means to be a good person. Smart, funny, endlessly imaginative, and with one of television’s best ensembles (which also includes Ted Danson and D’Arcy Carden), the series might just be showrunner Michael Schur’s (“Parks and Recreation,” “Brooklyn 99”) crowning achievement. Three seasons, 39 episodes, Seasons 1 and 2 on Netflix, with the current third season on Hulu. Premiering in the summer of 2016, “BrainDead” was tragically cut down before it had a chance to really find an audience, but this one-and-done series is near and dear to my heart. The sci-fi political satire imagines what happens when there’s an outbreak of alien brain bugs in Washington, DC. Burrowing into people’s brains, the tiny critters cause their hosts to grow increasingly more combative and extreme in their beliefs, which is as good an explanation as any for the state of our political discourse these days.

Killing Eve. PHOTO COURTESY BBC AMERICA

Sadly, this was always going to be far too weird to survive on network television. One season, 13 episodes, Amazon Prime. A stylish conspiracy thriller from “Mr. Robot” mastermind Sam Esmail, “Homecoming” stars Julia Roberts as Heidi, a caseworker at a facility meant to help returning US soldiers prepare for their transition back into civilian life. In a separate storyline set four years later, Heidi’s working as a waitress, with no memory of ever

BrainDead. PHOTO COURTESY CBS

having worked on the program. It’s up to a determined investigator (Shea Whigham) to figure out exactly that the hell happened in between. Influenced by paranoid thrillers of the 1970s, “Homeland” zips by with fantastic performances from its cast, which also includes Bobby Cannavale, and Stephan James (“If Beale Street Could Talk”) as a soldier who Heidi of the past takes a particular interest in. One season, 10 episodes, Amazon Prime.

Premiering in April of last year, the first season of Phoebe Waller-Bridge’s deliciously entertaining “Killing Eve” pits M15 pencil pusher Eve Polastri (Sandra Oh) against ruthless assassin Villanelle (Jodie Comer) in an increasingly twisted game of cat and mouse. This dangerously playful dark comedy is a show I can’t stop recommending to people. Catch up before the new season premieres on BBC America April 7 at 8 p.m. One season, eight episodes, Hulu. A modern-day reboot of Norman Lear’s ’70s sitcom, “One Day at a Time” centers around three generations of a close-knit CubanAmerican family living together under one roof. Justina Machado and the great Rita Moreno anchor the heartfelt show, which brings a gratifyingly light touch to its tackling of hot-button issues from immigration and depression to sexism and LGBTQ rights. It’s a feel-good comedy that genuinely leaves you feeling good — even if it does take some adjustment to hearing a laugh track again. Two seasons, 26 episodes (with a new 13-episode season due February 8), Netflix.

WINTER GUIDE 2019 CITY 27


19 FOR ‘19 EVENTS TO TURN WINTER BLAHS INTO WINTER RA-CHA-CHAS [ PREVIEW ] BY KATHERINE STATHIS

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Perhaps you’ve heard that voice before, the one that says there’s nothing to do in Rochester. The one that says it’s too cold. The one that — wait, is that you? Do you still believe that malarkey? Now now. While weekly sessions of CITY Newspaper calendar therapy will help dispel these false beliefs, here’s something more immediate: 19 events for Winter 2019. Have one of your own? Feel free to add to our list at rochestercitynewspaper.com.

PERFORMANCE | 5TH ANNUAL BRONZE COLLECTIVE THEATRE FEST A melding of cultures through spoken word, storytelling, theater, and more will play out through this week-long festival celebrating collaborative art and performance by local Black/African Diasporic artists and producers. February 17 through 24 at MuCCC, 142 Atlantic Avenue. $15 advance, $20 door, or $50 for a week’s pass. muccc.org.

RECREATION | ICE SKATING It’s simply not winter without it, and the City of Rochester offers two options for skaters at any level, every day of the week: classic, heartof-the-city outdoor skating at Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Park at Manhattan Square, 353 Court Street (through March 17), and the indoor hockey rink experience at Genesee Valley Park Sports Complex, 131 Elmwood Avenue (through April 7). Complete schedules of open and adult skate sessions, fees, and events at cityofrochester.gov/skating.

SPECIAL EVENT | GROUNDHOG DAY Shadow or not, Rochester will be seeing groundhogs throughout the weekend. On February 2, the surreal “Groundhog Day” (1993) will be screened at The Cinema Theater (4:30 p.m., 7 p.m., and 9:15 p.m., 957 South Clinton Avenue. $5-$7, 271-1785), and at the Little Theatre (9:30 p.m., 240 East Ave, $4-$9, 258-0400). The next day, the Genesee Country Nature Center will host Groundhogs of the Genesee with workshops, hikes, and more. 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. 1410 Flint Hill Road, Mumford. $5 donation. 538-6822.

Saturday, February 2, at the Harmony House, 58 East Main Street, Webster. Workshops and dance tickets $15 each. rockabillyhop.com.

PERFORMANCE | SHIBUKI TAIKO DRUM ENSEMBLE Taiko drumming is a revered, centuries-old practice in Japan steeped in meaning and tradition. It wasn’t until recent decades that’s it been openly performed in the US, a fierce and celebratory rebuttal to darker aspects of our history. This Buffalo-based group will be on stage with the Odori-no-Kai Dance Troupe. Friday, February 8, at 7:30 p.m. Tower Fine Arts Center, 180 Holley Street, Brockport. $9-$17. 395-2787. fineartstix.brockport.edu

28 CITY JANUARY 30 - FEBRUARY 5, 2019

KIDS | HARLEM GLOBETROTTERS Comedy, agility, and amazing skill take it to the court as the Globetrotters make everyone feel like a kid again. More fun than the circus. Saturday, February 9, at the Blue Cross Arena, 1 War Memorial Square. 2 p.m. $26 and up. 454-5335. bluecrossarena.com.

SPECIAL EVENT | 35TH ANNUAL LAKESIDE WINTER CELEBRATION Revel in our chilly little section of the country’s northern border, with tractor-drawn carriage rides, a snow sculpture contest, chili challenge, fireworks, and lots more. If full immersion is more your style, consider The Polar Plunge, Sunday at noon, to benefit Special Olympics. Registration starts at 9 a.m. February 9 and 10 at Ontario Beach Park and the Port of Rochester Terminal. cityofrochester.gov/wintercelebration.

SPECIAL EVENT | ROCK-N-ROLL RUMMAGE SALE ROCkabilly Hop hosts a retro affair starting at noon with curated basement thrifting that promises fashions and goodies of the 1950’s and Mid-century Modern aesthetic, some with a punk twist. Upstairs at 2 p.m., the Rockabilly Dance Workshops begin, warming up for the 7 p.m. topper, Remembering Buddy Holly: A Winter Dance Party, with live music from Bobby Henrie and the Goners.

from the staff at the Printmaking & Bookarts Studio. Pro tip: Get there early. Then go back at 4:30 for the Chili Cook-off! Saturday, February 9, at Flower City Arts Center, 713 Monroe Avenue. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. 244-1730. rochesterarts.org.

MUSIC | QUEENS OF SOUL: SHAYNA STEELE ART | VALENTINE’S DAY CARD PRINTING Valentines reach new heights of handmadeness, with all sorts of specialized resources open to folks of any age. Learn

Jazz vocalist, songwriter, and Broadway actress Shayna Steele will set Kodak Hall to high heat as she channels the greats: Aretha, Tina, Patti, Gladys, and many more. Jeff Tyzik conducts the RPO in this Pops series feature. Saturday, February 16, at Kodak Hall at

KIDS | “LEAVES OF THE POETRY TREE” This dance production explores life’s themes and challenges, from the universal occupations of dreams, fear, and death, to navigating bullying, racial differences, and gender identity. Sounds like a job for music, poetry, and American Sign Language to take on. And they will. February 21 through February 24, Panara Theatre, RIT’s National Technical Institute for the Deaf, 52 Lomb Memorial Drive. $5$12. Thursday through Saturday, 7:30 p.m.; Sunday at 2 p.m. 475-6250 (v/tty). ntid.rit. edu/theatre/events/leaves-poetry-tree.

SPECIAL EVENT | ROCHESTER WINTER PARAFEST “Bone-chilling” reaches other dimensions in this immersive exploration of the paranormal, with ghost hunts, lectures, and appearances by authors and cast members of cable shows “Naked and Afraid,” “Ghosts of Shepherdstown,” “Paranormal Survivor,” and more. February 22 through February 24 at Valley Oak Event Center, 4242 Lakeville Road, Geneseo; The Avon Inn, 55 East Main Street, Avon. $15-$65. paratalkradio.com.

SPECIAL EVENT | NATIVE AMERICAN WINTER GAMES The Seneca know things about winter. Staying active and having fun are staples, and the Winter Games showcase so much to do, see, and learn. Dog sled demonstrations, snow boat races, snowshoeing, storytelling,


traditional crafts and games, and native foods make a memorable day, topped with a visit to the Seneca Art & Culture Center at Ganondagan. Saturday, February 23 at Ganondagan State Historic Site, 7000 County Road 41 (Boughton Hill Road), Victor. $10 per family suggested. 924-5848. ganondagan.org.

FILM | “DOCTOR ZHIVAGO” The 1965 David Lean epic has it all: forbidden love, war and revolution, stunning landscapes, inventive sets, Maurice Jarre’s sweeping score, and Omar Sharif’s scenestealing moustache – all on the big screen. Saturday, February 23, at the Dryden Theatre, 900 East Avenue. 7:30 p.m. $5-$10. 327-4800. eastman.org.

National Museum of Play, 1 Manhattan Square. 11 a.m.-4 p.m. $16. 263-2700. museumofplay.org.

ART | “LESSONS OF THE HOUR” MAG’s “Reflections on Place” is a three-part series of new media works by international artists, each exploring an element unique to Rochester. Second in the lineup is UK filmmaker Isaac Julien’s “Lessons of the Hour,” a multi-screen film (shot on Kodak 35 mm) and video installation inspired by the life of Frederick Douglass. Opens Sunday, March 3, and continues through May 12 at the Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Avenue. $6-$15. 473-6266. mag.rochester.edu.

MUSIC | RUBBLEBUCKET PERFORMANCE | “CROMANIA!” Crom Saunders presents his one-man comedy show, combining pop culture, literature, impersonations, word play, and American Sign Language with his signature eyebrows. Sunday, February 24, at the Lyric Theatre, 440 East Avenue. 7:30 p.m. $15 and $20. 622-4515. lyrictheatrerochester.org.

Rubblebucket is so much fun – why wait any longer? Wednesday, March 13, at Anthology, 336 East Avenue. $20/$25. 484-1964. anthologylive.com. rubblebucket.bandcamp.com.

SPECIAL EVENT | MAPLE WEEKEND

KIDS | FIT KIDS DAY Here’s a fine opportunity to prevent sprouts from forming on the couch. Kids can try out rock wall climbing, hip hop dance, pickleball, and more – as demonstrated by organizations that include Greater Rochester YMCA, the City of Rochester recreation department, and Rochester Accessible Adventures. Local sports team mascots will be there, and so will the Tooth Fairy. Always ready, that one. Saturday, March 1, at the Strong

Conclude winter – at last, it’s spring! – by celebrating New York State’s sweetest asset. Travelling most any direction from Rochester will lead to scenic maple farms, rustic sugar shacks, and cozy pancake houses – many with tours, kids’ activities, and all things maple – ready to delight. March 23-24 and March 30-31, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Maps and descriptions at nysmaple.com.

WINTER GUIDE 2019 CITY 29


30 CITY JANUARY 30 - FEBRUARY 5, 2019


Theater

Arts & Performance Art Exhibits

Tyrone Mitchell Henderson and Brittany Bellizeare in Geva’s world premiere production of “The Magician’s Daughter.” PHOTO BY GOAT FACTORY MEDIA ENTERTAINMENT

Love made visible “The Magician’s Daughter” REVIEWED SATURDAY, JANUARY 26 CONTINUES THROUGH FEBRUARY 10 THE FIELDING STAGE AT GEVA THEATRE CENTER, 75 WOODBURY BOULEVARD TICKETS START AT $25 | 232-4382; GEVATHEATRE.ORG [ REVIEW ] BY LEAH STACY

Continuing a movement of both new plays and female-focused works this season, Geva Theatre Center presents the world premiere of “The Magician’s Daughter” by Lila Rose Kaplan, a 30-something playwright whose works highlight women’s issues. Kaplan has penned a semi-autobiographical tale about a daughter’s relationship with her highfunctioning addict father. But even for the fortunate audience members who do not relate to a family member with addiction, this remains a play for everyone who’s ever had a father or daughter.

“The Magician’s Daughter” begins as a show-within-a-show. The magician, Prospero (Tyrone Mitchell Henderson), and his daughter, Miranda (Brittany Bellizeare), are getting ready to perform their magic act for the audience when Miranda (immediately breaking the fourth wall) announces to everyone she’s going to quit the act. (And if those names ring a bell, think Shakespeare’s “The Tempest.”). The show runs just about 90 minutes without an intermission, and Bellizeare and Henderson are the only cast members. While Bellizeare functions as a sole character throughout, Henderson takes on multiple roles. Miranda’s quest to find herself repeatedly reminds her of Prospero, or, as she refers to him, the “gravitational constant.” Bellizeare handles Miranda’s complicated persona with aplomb, leading the show’s energy from opening curtain but deferring to Henderson as the roles shift halfway through. She captures exquisitely the angst of a young 20-something coupled with the too-soon maturity of a child who’s witnessed addiction in a parental figure. Henderson’s performance is deceptive at first; just a ripple

in Bellizeare’s wake. When he pivots to a reinterpreted version of Prospero later in the show, Henderson hits a stride, fully embracing the difficult nuances of his role with care. The play is a classic coming-of-age story with a young heroine at the center, a refreshing take in a world where we “don’t hear enough from young women, and we hear too much from old men,” as Miranda says. As Prospero chastises Miranda later in the show, you “need to decide if this is a poem, a play, or a novel.” While that may be Kaplan acknowledging the narrative gets a little windy, she’s taken an almost Shakespearean-meets-Kafka approach to the hero’s journey. Halfway through the show, there’s a decided shift in the character development. And the dialogue between the two characters shifts to a Beckett-like rhythm. Here, the emotion is highest and the recounted trauma most exhausting. But at the heart of “The Magician’s Daughter” is a metamorphosis: the arc of a parent-child relationship, and the shifting identities that come during that journey. An extended verstion of this article is onine at rochestercitynewspaper.com.

[ OPENING ] Barnes & Noble, 3349 Monroe Ave. Penfield Art Association Winter Juried Show. Feb. 4-March 2. Reception & awards Feb 5, 7-9pm. 586-6020. penfieldartassociation.com. Bertha VB Lederer Gallery, Brodie Hall, 1 College Dr. SANKOFA: Hope of Renewal, the Art of Steve Prince. WednesdaysSaturdays. Reception Jan 30, 5-7pm. Through Mar 9. geneseo.edu/galleries. Davis Gallery at Houghton House, 1 King’s Lane. Geneva. Art & Labor: Works from the Collection. Fri., Feb. 1, 6-8 p.m. hws.edu/davisgallery. INeRT PReSS, 1115 East Main St. Paris Landmarks Circa 1905. Fri., Feb. 1, 5-9 p.m. 482-0931. International Art Acquisitions, 3300 Monroe Ave. Enrico Embroli: In My Thoughts ... Feb. 1-28, 10 a.m.-9 p.m. 264-1440. Lumiere Photo, 100 College Ave. Christopher Collins: Tessellation. Tuesdays-Sundays. Reception Feb 1, 6-9pm with performance by Ivory Lions. Through Feb 23. 461-4447. RIT City Art Space, 280 East Main St. A Day’s Gonna Come: Zach Dietl & Jacquelyn O’Brien. Fri., Feb. 1, 1-5 p.m. Reception Feb 1, 6-9pm. Through Feb 23. cityartspace.rit.edu. Rochester Contemporary Art Center, 137 East Ave. Eclipsing the Sun / a Biological Storm. Todd McGrain & Fola Akinola; Landscapes & the Unbuilt. Artist talk Feb 2, 1pm. Through Mar 16. $2.; Sweepings by Cory Card. Receptions Feb 1, 6-9pm. 461-2222. Studio 402, 250 N Goodman St, #402. Nancy Valle & Peter Veitch: Twenty Years Later. Feb. 1-24. Reception Feb 1, 6-9pm. Tower Fine Arts Center, 180 Holley St. Brockport. Continuity to Change: Recent History of American Abstraction. MondaysSaturdays, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. and Sundays, 1-4 p.m. Reception Jan 31, 4pm. 395-2805.

Call for Participants [ THU., JANUARY 31 ] The Douglass Project. 11 a.m.-2 p.m The Hungerford, 1115 E Main St. Studio #59, to complete the 13th copy of the Frederick Douglass statue. michelle.christen@gmail.com.

Art Events [ THU., JANUARY 31 ] Conversation with the Artists: Nate Larson & Marni Shindelman. 6 p.m. Dryden Theatre, 900 East Ave. $5/$10. eastman.org. [ FRI., FEBRUARY 1 ] Anderson Arts Open Studios. 6-9 p.m. Anderson Arts Building, 250 N. Goodman St. andersonartsbuilding.org. continues on page 33 rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 31


Art

Eastman Museum’s retrospective, “Nathan Lyons: In Pursuit of Magic,” includes his late-career color photos. PHOTO COURTESY ESTATE OF NATHAN LYONS

Ways of seeing “Nathan Lyons: In Pursuit of Magic” THROUGH JUNE 9 EASTMAN MUSEUM, 900 EAST AVENUE TUESDAY THROUGH SATURDAY, 10 A.M. TO 5 P.M.; SUNDAY 11 A.M. TO 5 P.M. $5-$15 | 327-4800; EASTMAN.ORG [ REVIEW ] BY REBECCA RAFFERTY

It’s hard to quantify the impact that photographer, curator, writer, and educator Nathan Lyons had on Rochester and the wider field of photography. His career began in his teens in his native New York City, with an enduring passion for photography and writing that developed into a dedication to educating others on visual literacy. His photographic practice and passion for education are inextricably linked. When Lyons died in 2016, he had shifted his lifelong focus on black and white images to the world of digital color photography. 32 CITY JANUARY 30 - FEBRUARY 5, 2019

Now through June 9, George Eastman Museum is presenting a major retrospective of Lyons’ work. It’s the first retrospective that focuses on his photographs as a whole, exhibiting his late-life shift to digital color photography alongside his early work. At the end of his life, Lyons began to work in digital color photography for the first time, but he didn’t get to finish that work, says Jamie M. Allen, associate curator in the Department of Photography at George Eastman Museum. Allen worked closely with Lyons to begin putting his color work in order when he fell ill, and after his death she worked with his wife, Joan Lyons, to finish arranging the images for the book that the exhibit is based on. “In Pursuit of Magic” includes 160 photographs and photobooks, offering a cohesive view of Lyons’ life’s work. The exhibit more or less moves chronologically through Lyons’ various bodies of work, beginning with photos he created right after graduating from college, from 1957 to 1963. These images flirt with abstraction, showcasing the influence of

avant-garde photographers he studied with, such as Aaron Siskind and Minor White. Even his work that has been called abstract offers clear cues about what we are looking at. For example, in an untitled image a saw blade is reduced to a bright, jagged crescent on a dark and textured background, but there’s no mistaking the object for anything else. Bits of signage, graphic symbols, graffiti, and murals appear in Lyons’ early images and remain important elements in his work throughout his life. This section of the show sets up the foundation for a couple of Lyons’ enduring interests, namely visual literacy and built environments, Allen says. “In his photographs of Chicago, you start to see architecture take a place in his photographs, but architecture layered along the city. And the idea that our mark-making as humans — murals, signage, all of those things — become elements of his photographs,” she says. Part of the quiet power of Lyons’ work is his simple capturing of oddities, which often

fall into the background as visual white noise in the urban setting. Lyons’ subtle sense of humor comes through in his cropping in on a just a few words painted on a cracked wall in an untitled 1957 image: “REACH FOR” and an arrow pointing to the left leaves an unanswered question, but the picture also serves to direct the viewers onward to the next image. The concept of sequencing, or Lyons’ ability to control the order that viewers encountered his images, was an ongoing point of fascination for him, and informed the ways he curated his work in exhibition and photobook format. Beyond a simple encounter with an image, sequencing allowed him to play with the relationships between different images. Another section of the show, “Riding 1st Class on the Titanic!” is named for Lyons’ second photobook, the title drawn from graffiti he captured in one of the images. Created between 1974 and 1998, these images are mostly presented as diptychs, and reveal his “deepening engagement with street art, signage, and graffiti,” the wall text says. But Lyons’ documentation of these markings, captured in specific moments in time, signifies more than the snapshots. “Taken together, the pictures are an incisive contemplation of the capacity of shared spaces to shape social behavior and prompt dialogue among anonymous correspondents,” the curators write in the wall text. New York City is a space in perpetual flux in any time, but after 9/11 Lyons’ hometown experienced a particularly dramatic shift in the visual landscape. He worked quickly to record his meditations on this tragedy, between 2001 and 2002, and published them in “After 9/11.” That photobook, and the segment of the show that represents that work, is filled with imagery that notes the various reactions to horror and mourning, including the explosion of screaming patriotism and shallow xenophobia. There’s so much to see in this exhibit — more sections are dedicated to other photobook works and sequencing explorations that Lyons created in the past two decades, building up to his works in color, created between 2010 and his death in 2016. Lyons created more than 500 color images in those few short years. And though introducing this new element into his work can be likened to learning a new language, there’s a certain seamlessness between his earlier work and his works in color. The subject matter remains the same. And the presence of color both underscores the overwhelming nature of the visual terrain and enhances the quieter, almost monochromatic shots of phrases such as “IN PURSUIT OF MAGIC,” stenciled on the sidewalks by some anonymous city dweller. An extended version of this article is online at rochestercitynewspaper.com.


PSST. Unlike Godot, we won't keep you waiting.

Collaborative Residency Final Showcase. 6-10 p.m. The Yards, 50-52 Public Market attheyards.com. Heartbreak Hungerford. 5-9 p.m. The Hungerford, 1115 E Main St. Willow donation appreciated. 414-5643. The Lobby Presents: You Still Up? 8 p.m. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. $2. bugjar.com. [ SAT., FEBRUARY 2 ] Meet the Artist: Gerry Szymanski. noon. Central Library of Rochester & Monroe County, 115 South Ave 428-8380. The Molok Afterparty: Object Offering & Puppetry Workshop. 8 p.m. The Spirit Room, 139 State St 3977595. themolok.com. [ SUN., FEBRUARY 3 ] 540 at the Yards Launch Party. 4-6 p.m. The Yards, 50-52 Public Market attheyards.com.

Comedy [ THU., JANUARY 31 ] K-Von. 7 p.m. Comedy @ the Carlson, 50 Carlson Rd $16$32. 426-6339. Moses Storm. 7:30 p.m. Comedy @ the Carlson, 50 Carlson Rd $9-$12. 426-6339. Ron White. 7:30 p.m. Auditorium Theatre, 885 E. Main St. $42+. rbtl.org. [ FRI., FEBRUARY 1 ] The Uncle Louie Variety Show. 8 p.m. Downstairs Cabaret at Winton Place, 3450 Winton Place $25/$30.

Always fresh theater content.

/ T H E AT E R PHOTO PROVIDED

WORKSHOP | THE MOLOK: PUPPETRY WORKSHOP

As part of the programming associated with “The Molok,” a live-action fantasy film being filmed partly in Rochester, Broadway puppeteer Leah Hofmann (“Warhorse,” “Something Rotten!” and “Big Fish”) will be in town this week to teach a puppetry movement workshop. Offered in four sessions and in partnership with Rochester Dance Theatre Director Erika Ruegemer, the workshop will feature the 13-foot live action puppet from the film. Participants will work directly with Hofmann on puppetry theory, techniques, improvisation, and ensemble performance. You’ll receive a certificate of completion and footage of your work, and top-performing students will have the opportunity to participate in a live showcase performance and will be considered for casting in the film. Bring dance or movement clothing and sneakers, a notebook, pen, towel, and water. Participants should have previous athletic, movement, or puppetry experience, and will be required to sign a waiver.

The Molok: Puppetry Workshop takes place Saturday, February 2, 9:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. and 2 to 5 p.m.; Sunday, February 3, 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. and 1:30 to 5 p.m. at Visual Studies [ SAT., FEBRUARY 2 ] Alex Moffat, Melissa Villaseñor, Workshop, 31 Prince Street. And the showcase performance and Anna Drezen, Sam Jay. 9 p.m. reception will be held Sunday, February 3, 6:30 to 9:30 p.m. $40 UR, Strong Auditorium, River per participant; bring an object offering for The Molok and get Campus $7-$15. 25% off the workshop price. The reception and performance are open to the public for cash donations or object offerings. xanderDance Events chauncey@gmail.com; search The Molok on eventbrite.com. [ FRI., FEBRUARY 1 ] — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY Winter Dance Gala. 7:30 p.m. Hochstein Performance Hall, 50 N Plymouth Ave. 454-4596.

[ SAT., FEBRUARY 2 ] Geneseo String Band Square Dance. 7-10 p.m. MacVittie College Union Ballroom, 10 MacVittie Circle. $3. 245-5824. Rattlesnake Revue: Singles & Sweethearts. 9:30 p.m. Iron Smoke Distillery, 111 Parce Ave Suite 5b . Fairport $5-$25. 337-0674. Saturday Nut Fever. 7:30 p.m. Flying Squirrel Community Space, 285 Clarissa St. Disco Fundraiser with DJ Kameron $5 suggested donation.

Theater Chicago. Tue., Feb. 5, 7:30 p.m. Auditorium Theatre, 885 E. Main St. $40+. rbtl.org. Forever Plaid. Sun., Feb. 3, 7:30 p.m. Bruce Legacy Theatre, 75 Stutson St. $18. 750-7588.

Gluck’s Orfeo ed Euridice. Sun., Feb. 3, 2 p.m. Opera Studio 804, Eastman School of Music, 26 Gibbs St. $24. 274-3000. Greater Tuna. ThursdaysSaturdays, 7:30 p.m. and Sundays, 2 p.m The Avyarium, 274 N Goodman St, # 242 $27/$32. wallbyrd.com. Hard Cell. Wednesdays, Thursdays, 7:30 p.m., Fridays, 8 p.m., Saturdays, 4 & 8 p.m., Wed., Jan. 30, 2 p.m. and Sun., Feb. 3, 2 p.m Geva Theatre, 75 Woodbury Blvd $25-$69. gevatheatre.org. Hitmakers: The British Are Coming. Sat., Feb. 2, 8 p.m. and Sun., Feb. 3, 3 p.m. JCC Hart Theatre, 1200 Edgewood Ave. Live open captioned performances Feb 10 & 13 $20-$33. 461-2000.

The Magician’s Daughter. Tuesdays-Fridays, 7 p.m., Saturdays, 2:30 & 7:30 p.m. and Sundays, 3 p.m Geva Theatre, 75 Woodbury Blvd $34-$38. gevatheatre.org. Musical:Women on the Verge of a Nervous Breakdown. Wed., Jan. 30, 7:30 p.m., Thu., Jan. 31, 7:30 p.m., Fri., Feb. 1, 7:30 p.m. and Sat., Feb. 2, 2 & 7:30 p.m. Wadsworth Auditorium, 1 College Circle., Geneseo $10/$15. 245-5824. Ordinary Days. Fridays, 8 p.m., Saturdays, 8 p.m. and Sundays, 2 p.m Blackfriars Theatre, 795 E. Main St $31.50-39.50. 454-1260. Yankee Tavern. Fri., Feb. 1, 7:30 p.m., Sat., Feb. 2, 7:30 p.m. and Sun., Feb. 3, 2 p.m. MuCCC, 142 Atlantic Ave Out of Pocket, Inc $13-$20. continues on page 36 rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 33


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PSST. Looking for more movie reviews?

Activism

We’ve got a bonus review online from Adam Lubitow.

[ WED., JANUARY 30 ] Reshaping Rochester: Creating Healthy & Vibrant Cities for All. 7 p.m. Gleason Works Auditorium, 1000 University Ave. Gil Penalosa, founder & chair: 8 80 Cities, Toronto. [ THU., JANUARY 31 ] Black Studies Now: A Roundtable with Hazel Carby. 4:30 p.m. UR Rush Rhees Library, 755 Library Rd Humanities Center 275-5804. Mental Health Disparities in the Black Community. 6:30 p.m. 540WMain, 540 W Main St $10. 420-8439. PHOTO PROVIDED Public Forum: Police ART | ‘DEAR JEFF’ Accountability Board Draft Legislation. 5:30-7 p.m. City Hall Atrium, 30 Church St Opening at Gallery Q this week is “Dear Jeff,” an exhibition of cityofrochester.gov.

collaborative photographic works by Out Alliance youth. The work is a result of a workshop the youth took last summer led by Nate Larson and Marni Shindelman (art duo Larson Shindelman), whose own project “#Mobilize,” is currently on view at George Eastman Museum through May 26. Using ideas [ SUN., FEBRUARY 3 ] drawn from Larson Shindelman’s work, the workshop focused Sunday Forum: Moving Towards on technology-driven mapping and social identity in the digital Self-Sufficiency. 9:45 a.m. age. Both exhibits contain ideas of social justice, social identity, Downtown Presbyterian Church, 121 N. Fitzhugh self-representation on social media, and the use of social St. Loriane Ngarambe, media as a platform to organize a group of people and protest. Community Engagement Specialist, Monroe Antipoverty The youth participants created their own images, which are Initiative 325-4000. collected in a book, “Dear Jeff,” and showcased in this exhibit. [ SAT., FEBRUARY 2 ] Food Not Bombs Sort/Cook/ Serve Food. 3:30-6 p.m. St. Joseph’s House of Hospitality, 402 South Ave. 232-3262.

FRIDAY

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First Friday

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Citywide Gallery Night

Kids Events

February 1 • 6-9pm FirstFridayRochester.org

A Day's Gonna Come RIT City Art Space 280 East Main St (Liberty Pole Plaza) 6:00-9:00pm

Hidden in Plain Sight Closing Reception Haus Capital Corporation 383 Park Avenue Suite B 6:00-9:00pm

Photography with a Purpose Nu Movement 716 University Ave. 6:00-9:00pm

About Time Richard Margolis Art + Architectural Photography 250 North Goodman St., 4th Floor #9 6:00-9:00pm

Kick-off Party for 19th Year of Rochester Reads Writers & Books 740 University Ave. 6:00-9:00pm

Shapely: Recent Paintings and Prints by Alan Singer AXOM Gallery Exhibition Space 176 Anderson Ave., Suite #303 6:00-9:00pm

An Opulence of Ottomans (ab·bre·vi·at·ed), an exhibition of prints by Myles Calvert Gallery at the Art & Music Library 755 Library Road 6:00-9:00pm Black AF February The Avenue Blackbox Theatre 6:00-9:00pm Color Therapy Anderson Alley Artists 250 N. Goodman St. 6:00-9:00pm Dear Jeff Gallery Q 100 College Ave. 6:00-9:00pm Eclipsing the Sun / a Biological Storm Rochester Contemporary Art Center 137 East Ave. 6:00-9:00pm First Friday at Main Street Artists Main Street Artists Gallery & Studio 31 Prince St. 6:00-9:00pm Meet and Greet with Amazing Metal Artist, John Hendry Sylvan Starlight Creations 50 State Street, Bldg C 6:00-9:00pm Heartbreak Hungerford The Hungerford 1115 East Main St., (at N. Goodman) 5:00-9:00pm heARTs Rochester Art Club 1115 East Main St., Studio #437-439 6:00-9:00pm

Landscapes and the Unbuilt Opening Reception Rochester Contemporary Art Center 137 East Ave. 6:00-9:00pm Live Music and Artwork by Richmond Futch Jr. The Gallery 321 East Ave. 6:00-9:00pm Love Potion # Mine Cat Clay 1115 East Main St., Ste 242 5:00-9:00pm Monotypes and Encaustic Paintings by Constance Mauro Constance Mauro Studio 1115 East Main St., Hungerford Building 6:00-9:00pm Nancy Valle & Peter Veitch 20 Years Later: Paintings and Ceramic Art Studio 402 in Anderson Arts Building 250 Goodman Street N, Studio 402 6:00-9:00pm Nationally Recognized Sand Artist Katie Jo Suddaby Tupelo Interiors 215 Norris Dr. 5:00-9:00pm Nature Therapy Gallery at Edward Jones 88 Elm St. 6:00-8:00pm Opening Reception: Kneeslappa Fuego Coffee Roasters 1 Woodbury Blvd. 6:00-9:00pm

36 CITY JANUARY 30 - FEBRUARY 5, 2019

Sustainable Homes Rochester. 1:30-3 p.m. Asbury “Dear Jeff” is on view at Gallery Q, 100 College Avenue #100, First United Methodist Church, 1050 East Ave from Friday, February 1, through Thursday, March 28. A cityofrochester.gov.

Spirit Animals: Art by the Boys and Girls Club of Rochester Gallery Ink, at Imprintable Ink Solutions 100 College Ave., Suite 130 5:00-9:00pm Sweepings by Cory Card Rochester Contemporary Art Center 137 East Ave. 6:00-9:00pm Tessellation: Paintings by Michael Christopher Collins Lumiere Photo 100 College Ave. 6:00-9:00pm The Brothers Blue and the Pastel Society at The Little The Little Theatre 240 East Ave. - Little Cafe 5:00-11:00pm The Yards January Residency Final Showcase The Yards Gallery Space 50 Public Market Way 6:00-10:00pm these are my rivers, works by Peter Monacelli Colleen Buzzard Studio 250 North Goodman St., 401 6:00-9:00pm Trees Image City Photography Gallery 722 University Ave. 5:00-9:00pm

[ FRI., FEBRUARY 1 ] Disney’s Little Mermaid. 7:30 p.m A Magical Journey Through Stages, 875 E. Main St $10/$13. mjstages.com. [ SAT., FEBRUARY 2 ] Clifford’s Valentine Fun. 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Strong National Museum of Play, 1 Manhattan Sq. $16. 263-2700. Library Carnival. 1-4 p.m. Central Library, 115 South Ave. 428-8150. [ SUN., FEBRUARY 3 ] Groundhogs of the Genesee. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Genesee Country Nature Center, 1410 Flint Hill Rd Mumford $5. 538-6822.

Recreation [ SAT., FEBRUARY 2 ] Weekend Wild Walks. 11 a.m Cumming Nature Center, 6472 Gulick Rd. rmsc.org.

Special Events [ THU., JANUARY 31 ] Expressions of King’s Legacy. 12-2 p.m. RIT Gordon Field House, One Lomb Memorial Drive rit.edu/diversity/rsvp. [ FRI., FEBRUARY 1 ] ZooBrrrew. 5-8:30 p.m. Seneca Park Zoo, 2222 St. Paul St $35/$40. 336-7200.

reception and artist talk is scheduled for Friday, February 1, 6 to 9 p.m. Free. Gallery hours are Monday and Friday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.; and Tuesday through Thursday, 9 a.m. to 8:30 p.m. 244-8640; outalliance.org. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY

[ SAT., FEBRUARY 2 ] Kohlfahrt: A Traditional German Cabbage Walk. Genesee Country Village & Museum, 1410 Flint Hill Rd Mumford Tours 1:45-4:00 p.m., followed by dinner $63-$70. gcv.org. Rock-n-Roll Rummage Sale. noon. Harmony House, 58 East Main St . Webster. Ujamaa Marketplace. First Saturday of every month, 1-5 p.m. Baobab Cultural Center, 728 University Ave. 563-2145. [ SUN., FEBRUARY 3 ] Galentines Party. 10 a.m.noon. Arbor Loft, 17 Pitkin St $40.

Culture Lectures [ FRI., FEBRUARY 1 ] Distinguished Humanist: Hazel Carby. 4 p.m. UR Rush Rhees Library, 755 Library Rd Hawkins Carlson Room 2755804. [ SUN., FEBRUARY 3 ] The Rochester & Sodus Bay Railway. noon. NY Museum of Transportation, 6393 E. River Rd $3/$4.

Literary Events [ THU., JANUARY 31 ] Classic Book Discussion: “One Hundred Years of Solitude” by Gabriel Garcia Marquez. 3-4 p.m. Irondequoit Library, 1290 Titus Ave 336-6060. [ FRI., FEBRUARY 1 ] Rochester Reads Kick-Off. 6-9:30 p.m. Writers & Books, 740 University Ave Bring items related to “American War” from participating First Friday venues to receive a free copy wab.org. [ SAT., FEBRUARY 2 ] Pski’s Porch. 8 p.m. Rosen Krown, 875 Monroe Ave. 271-7050. [ MON., FEBRUARY 4 ] Moving Beyond Racism Book Group. 7 p.m. Barnes & Noble, 3349 Monroe Ave. “Stranger: The Challenge of a Latino Immigrant in the Trump Era,” by Jorge Ramos 334-5971. [ TUE., FEBRUARY 5 ] Sweet Bites: A Taste of Poetry. 12-1 p.m. Penfield Public Library, 1985 Baird Rd. 340-8720.


Film

Jurnee Smollett-Bell in “Eve’s Bayou,” screening as part of the Dryden Theatre’s Black Female Filmmakers film series. PHOTO COURTESY LIONSGATE

Black History Month at the movies BHM screenings DRYDEN THEATRE, 900 EAST AVENUE EASTMAN.ORG/DRYDEN-THEATRE THE LITTLE THEATRE, 240 EAST AVENUE THELITTLE.ORG [ PREVIEW ] BY ADAM LUBITOW

Starting Thursday, February 7, and continuing throughout the month of February, George Eastman Museum and The Little Theatre will each be hosting film series in honor of Black

History Month. Spotlighting the unique voices of black filmmakers from around the world, these series get to the heart of what the movies do best, says Eastman Museum Curator of Film Exhibitions Jared Case. First, the Eastman Museum and The Little will partner for a screening of the 1991 feature “Daughters of the Dust” sponsored by the Rochester Association of Black Journalists. Set in 1902, the film is a lush and lyrical look at the Gullah community, a population descended from Central and West African enslaved people that existed for generations,

isolated from the mainland of Georgia and South Carolina. The plot finds a family coming together to celebrate their ancestors before some of them leave their home for the mainland. With this film, Julie Dash became the first African-American woman to direct a feature that received a general theatrical release in the US. The film served as a major influence for Beyoncé’s 2016 visual album “Lemonade.” A panel discussion follows the screening. (Thursday, February 7, 7:30 p.m.) Each Thursday evening, the Dryden Theatre’s Black Female Filmmakers series

will continue to screen films from pioneering filmmakers whose work has helped inspire the current crop of black female directors making waves in Hollywood, including Dee Rees, Ava DuVernay, Gina Prince-Bythewood, and Angela Robinson. Euzhan Palcy’s 1989 “A Dry White Season” was somehow only the first feature film produced by a major Hollywood studio (MGM) to be directed by a black woman. The film concerns a white middle-class teacher in South Africa whose comfortable life is upended when he asks questions about a young black boy who died in police custody, exposing him to the realities of the brutal apartheid regime. (Thursday, February 14, 7:30 p.m.) Before you check out her Harriet Tubman biopic due out late this year, make time for actress-turned-director Kasi Lemmons’ atmospheric Southern Gothic “Eve’s Bayou,” a haunting coming-of-age story following the dangerous chain of events that unfold after a young girl witnesses her beloved father (Samuel L. Jackson) having an affair. This was Roger Ebert’s pick as the best film of 1997. (Thursday, February 28, 7:30 p.m.) The Little Theatre’s series continues with the inspiring documentary “Don’t Be Nice,” which follows New York City’s Bowery Slam Poetry Team as they compete for the National Slam Poetry Championship in Atlanta during the summer of 2016. (Friday, February 15, 6:30 p.m., Little 1) On October 22, 1963, more than 250,000 students boycotted the Chicago Public Schools to protest racial segregation. Civil Rights documentary short “‘63 Boycott” acts as an oral history of the event, combining archival footage of the demonstration with current-day interviews with participants (all shot by director Gordon Quinn, who attended the protest as a 21-yearold). (Wednesday, February 27, 6:30 p.m., Little 5) An extended version of this article is online at rochestercitynewspaper.com.

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 37


Classifieds For information: Call us (585) 244-3329 Fax us (585) 244-1126 Mail Us City Classifieds 250 N. Goodman Street Rochester, NY 14607 Email Us classifieds@ rochester-citynews.com EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY

All real estate advertised in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act, which makes it unlawful, “to make, print, or publish, any notice, statement, or advertisement, with respect to the sale or rental of a dwelling that indicates any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin.” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under the age of 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertisement for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. Call the local Fair Housing Enforcement Project, FHEP at 325-2500 or 1-866-671-FAIR. Si usted sospecha una practica de vivienda injusta, por favor llame al servicio legal gratis. 585-325-2500 - TTY 585-325-2547.

Shared Housing NEED A ROOMMATE? Roommates.com will help you find your Perfect Match™ today! (AAN CAN)

Retirement Property SEBASTIAN FLORIDA (EAST/ COAST) Beach Cove is an Age Restricted Community where friends are easily made. Sebastian is an “Old Florida” fishing village with a quaint atmosphere yet excellent medical facilities, shopping and restaurants. Direct flights from Newark to Vero Beach. New manufactured homes from $114,900. 772-581-0080; www.beach-cove.com

Bath & Kitchen Remodeling BATHROOM RENOVATIONS EASY, ONE DAY updates! We specialize in safe bathing. Grab bars, no slip flooring & seated showers. Call for a free in-home consultation: 888-657-9488.

Automotive #1 ALWAYS BETTER CASH PAID for most Junk Cars, Trucks and Vans. Any condition, running or not. Always free pick up and usually same day service. Call 585-305-5865 DONATE YOUR CAR to Wheels For Wishes, benefiting MakeA-Wish. We offer free towing and your donation is 100% tax deductible. Call 585-507-4822 Today!

The Emporium SARIS 2 BIKE rack carrier Excellent condition - $50.00 585-223-7839

For Sale AMAZING SPIDER-MAN . issues #20 - #30 with annual #3. Most are higher grade. Call for details Rob 585-294-3001 CB SPORTS SKI jacket. Down filled, Gortex, blue/cream. Women’s medium. Excellent. $25.00. Call 586-6484.

COLLECTABLE VINTAGE ITEMS circa 1920: Cloth sugar bags Quaker, Sucrest, Domino, McCahan, Carlton—5 lb. $4.00, 10 lb. $8.00. Plain bags 2 for 25 cents. Paper advertising kite for Buster Brown shoes featuring Buster & his dog Teaque $4.00 Pillow cover 20in x 20in featuring St. Paul Minnesota Auditorium $ 10.00 585-663-6983. Leave message. LOWE ALPINE SYSTEMS Internal Frame pack, Navy, exc.,$30; 5866484. METAL DOG DISH 15” round, great for litter of puppies. $15 585-880-2903 NORTH FACE WINTER jacket, navy, very warm! Men’s small,excellent. $30.00 call 5866484. RECLINING CHAIR - pure wood $42 585-490-5870 SADDLE RACK - Metal, storage under. Brand New .$45 585-8802963 SAWMILLS FOR ONLY $4397.00MAKE & SAVE MONEY with your own bandmill- Cut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship! FREE Info/DVD: www. NorwoodSawmills.com 1-800567-0404 Ext.300 Tires (2- firestone) P225/60/ R16 M&S / Good Condition, $40 each or $75 for the pair 585880-2903 USED LAPTOP BRIEFCASE $20. All-black, soft light & roomy, partition—16”. Zippered Media compartments, removable shoulder strap, snap pocket—SD Card. Cash, Grant 585.233.1770.

Wanted to Buy FREON R12 WANTED: CERTIFIED BUYER will PAY CA$H for R12 cylinders or cases of cans. (312) 291-9169 www.refrigerantfinders.com

Miscellaneous A PLACE FOR MOM has helped over a million families find senior living. Our trusted, local advisors help find solutions to your unique needs at no cost to you. Call: 1-800-404-8852 ATTENTION VIAGRA USERS: Generic 100 mg blue pills or Generic 20 mg yellow pills. Get 45 plus 5 free $99 + S/H. Guaranteed, no prescription necessary. Call 877-845-8068.

ATTN Rochester food enthusiasts: CITY is looking to hire a seasoned food writer to join our roster. Must have availability to contribute on a semi-regular basis and passionately cover all things dining, nightlife, and consumable. If this sounds like you, please submit a resume and 3 - 5 writing samples to Rebecca Rafferty at rrafferty@rochester-citynews.com 38 CITY JANUARY 30 - FEBRUARY 5, 2019


Place your ad by calling 244-3329 ext. 23 or rochestercitynewspaper.com Ad Deadlines: Friday 4pm for Display Ads Monday at noon for Line ads DIRECTV CHOICE ALL -Included Package. Over 185 Channels! ONLY $45/month (for 24 mos.) Call Now-

CONGA PLAYER - / percussionist, looking for work in J jazz, Afro Cuban Jazz or any other musical group. Peter 585-285-1654

Get NFL Sunday Ticket FREE! CALL 1-888-534-6918 Ask Us How To Bundle & Save!

METAL TRIBUTE BAND needs drummer & bass player. ALL GEAR PROVIDED. Practice every other week. No rental or utility charges. 621-5488

DISH TV $59.99 For 190 Channels + $14.95 High Speed Internet. Free Installation, Smart HD DVR Included, Free Voice Remote. Some restrictions apply. Call Now: 1-800-373-6508 DISH TV $59.99. For 190 Channels $14.95 High Speed Internet. Free Installation, Smart HD DVR Included, Free Voice Remote. Some restrictions apply. Call 1-877-229-5789 EARTHLINK HIGH SPEED Internet. As Low As $14.95/ month (for the first 3 months.) Reliable High Speed Fiber Optic Technology. Stream Videos, Music and More! Call Earthlink Today 1-855-970-1623 GUARANTEED LIFE INSURANCE! (Ages 50 to 80). No medical exam. Affordable premiums never increase. Benefits never decrease. Policy will only be cancelled for non-payment. 855-686-5879. HEALTHCARE CAREER TRAINING ONLINE. Start a New Career in Medical Billing & Coding. Medical Administrative Assistant. To learn more, call Ultimate Medical Academy. 877-625-9048 (AAN CAN) IF YOU OR a loved one were diagnosed with ovarian cancer after use of TALC products such as Baby Powder or Shower to Shower, you may be entitled to compensation . Contact Charles H. Johnson 1-800-535-5727 LUNG CANCER ? And Age 60+? You And Your Family May Be Entitled To Significant Cash Award. Call 866-951-9073 for Information. No Risk. No Money Out Of Pocket. Spectrum Triple Play! TV, Internet & Voice for $29.99 ea. 60 MB per second speed. No contract or commitment. More Channels. Faster Internet. Unlimited Voice. Call 1-855-977-7198

Notices NEW LIFE EMERGENCY Food Cupboard has moved to Temple Beth Sholom, 1161 Monroe Ave, (entrance at back) serving 14607 and 14620 residents with ID with a free two day upply. Open 9:30noon, 2nd and 4th Thursdays.

Jam CALLING ALL MUSICIANS OF ALL GENRES the Rochester Music Coalition wants you! Please register on our website. For further info: www.rochestermusiccoalition.org info@rochestermusiccoalition.org 585-235-8412

PSST. Can’t decide on where to eat? Check with our dining writers for vetted grub.

REACH OUT @ROCCITYNEWS

Mind Body Spirit

@CITYNEWSPAPER

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Attorneys LUNG CANCER? - And Age 60+? You And Your Family May Be Entitled To Significant Cash Reward. Call 844-898-7142 for information. No Risk. No Money Out Of Pocket. (AAN CAN)

Computer Services COMPUTER ISSUES? FREE DIAGNOSIS by GEEKS ON SITE! Virus Removal, Data Recovery! 24/7 EMERGENCY SERVICE, In-home repair/On-line solutions. $20 OFF ANY SERVICE! 844-892-3990

Financial Services 70 YEARS OLD, kids are grown. Still need your life insurance? or is a big LIFE SETTLEMENT CASH PAYOUT smarter? Call Benefit Advance. 1-844-348-5810

P.S. Do you absolutely know where to eat? Can you write? Check out page 38.

/ FOOD

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 39


/ EMPLOYMENT

Call David at (585) 730-2666 or email david@rochester-citynews.com to take the first step toward finding the newest member of your team.

Employment

Join the New York State Workforce As a Licensed Practical Nurse (LPN)! Salary range: $40,113 to $48,772 Finger Lakes DDSO is seeking LPNs!! Travel positions based out of Monroe County available: Work four days on/three days off. All travel expenses reimbursed per New York State Travel Rules and Regulations. Minimum Qualifications: Must have a current license and registration to practice in New York State, or limited permit to practice in NYS, or an application on file for a limited permit to practice in NYS. For more information: Finger Lakes DDSO Human Resources Office: (585) 461-8800 Email: opwdd.sm.FL.hiring@opwdd.ny.gov NYS Office for People With Developmental Disabilities (OPWDD) Human Resources Management Office Finger Lakes DDSO, 620 Westfall Rd., Rochester, NY 14620 An Affirmative Action Equal Opportunity Employer

AIRLINES CAREERS - Start Here –Get trained as FAA certified Aviation Technician. Financial aid for qualified students. Job placement assistance. Call AIM for free information 866-296-7094 ASSISTANT MANAGER/BEAUTY SUPPLY (Rochester, NY): Provide support to manager to ensure daily store operations; Train staff regarding operational/procedural issues; Min. HS Diploma or GED/2 yrs exp. req’d; Mail resume to BSW DT Inc. 299 Upper Falls Blvd., Rochester, NY 14605 (Attn. KIL) JOB OPPORTUNITY : $17 P/H NYC - $14.50 P/H LI If you currently care for your relatives or friends who have Medicaid or Medicare, you may be eligible to start working for them as a personal assistant. No Certificates needed. (347)462-2610 (347)565-6200

Volunteers

SENECA PARK ZOO Society seeking volunteers and docents for ongoing involvement or special events. Roles available for all interests. Contact Volunteers@ senecazoo.org to learn more. VOLUNTEER DRIVERS ARE KEY – some of our neighbors need a ride to the doctor. Do you have time to help? Call Lifespan 2448400, x142 Volunteers wanted at St. John’s Home for Tuesday mornings and Thursday mornings, some weekends. Call 760-1293 for more information.

Business Opportunities HAVE AN IDEA for an invention/ new product? We help everyday inventors try to patent and submit their ideas to companies! Call InventHelp®, FREE INFORMATION! 888-487-7074

BECOME A DOCENT at the Rochester Museum & Science Center Must be an enthusiastic communicator, Like working with children. Learn more at http://www. rmsc.org/Support/Volunteer Or call 585-697-1948 MEALS ON WHEELS needs YOU to deliver meals to YOUR neighbors in need. Available weekdays between 11:30 AM and 1:00 PM? Visit our website at www.vnsnet.com or call 274-4385 to get started!

Mary Cariola Children’s Center Unlocking lifelong potential

Join the New York State Workforce As a Direct Support Professional! Salary range: $32,325 to $44,311 Finger Lakes DDSO will be continuously administering the Civil Service Exam for Direct Support Professionals throughout Monroe, Wayne, Ontario and Livingston Counties. Travel positions with our Direct Support Team now available: Work four days on/three days off. All travel expenses reimbursed per New York State Travel Rules and Regulations. Minimum Qualifications: High School Diploma or GED equivalent, you must have a valid license to operate a motor vehicle in New York State at the time of the appointment and continuously thereafter. For exam application: Finger Lakes DDSO Human Resources Office: (585) 461-8800 Email: opwdd.sm.FL.hiring@opwdd.ny.gov NYS Office for People With Developmental Disabilities (OPWDD) Human Resources Management Office Finger Lakes DDSO, 620 Westfall Rd., Rochester, NY 14620 An Affirmative Action Equal Opportunity Employer 40 CITY JANUARY 30 - FEBRUARY 5, 2019

Now Hiring! Full & Part-Time Positions At Mary Cariola Children’s Center you will be joining a team of talented educators and clinicians who set the standard in innovations that unlock lifelong potential for children, youth and young adults with developmental disabilities and complex medical needs. Whether it’s in the classroom, a residential home, a sensory room or physical therapy suite, you’ll be a part of an organization that celebrates milestones every single day. More than 650 employees share the same vision for our students and residents. Additional positions posted at www.marycariola.org 1000 Elmwood Ave., Suite 100 Rochester, NY 14620 • (585) 271-0761 Follow us on Facebook and Twitter @CariolaCareers Mary Cariola is the regional leader in personalized, interdisciplinary, evidence based education that inspires and empowers children and youth with complex developmental disabilities. Mary Cariola is a NYS Licensed School for Students with Disabilities ages 5-21

Find your way home Real Estate Section

BUILD WITH US TODAY! Mendon Estates in HF-L Schools is currently in the process of being approved. The 4 bedroom bath AND ONLINE CLASSIFIEDS IN 2.5 PRINT (with laundry on the 2nd floor) ROCHESTERCITYNEWSPAPER.COM Ellington II Model is Pictured and Priced: One of many build plans to choose from Gerber Homes website. Have a house to sell? Ask us how easy it is to build and sell today. Reserve your lot now! $292,355 Remax Realty Group (585) 248-0250

Ryan Smith

NYS Licensed Real Estate Salesperson 201-0724 RochesterSells.com


Legal Ads [ LEGAL NOTICE ] Bri-Mar Marketing Solutions LLC (“LLC”) filed Arts. of Org. with Secy. of State of NY (“SSNY”) on January 24, 2019. Office Location: Monroe County. SSNY designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to 1777 Penfield Road, Penfield, New York 14526. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] 38FOSTER LLC (LLC) filed Arts. of Org. with NY Secy. of State (SS) on 1/7/2019. LLC’s office is in Monroe Co. SS is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS shall mail a copy of any process to 26 Saginaw Drive, Rochester, NY 14623. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] 85 JAY STREET, LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 11/14/2018. Office in Monroe Co. SSNY desig. agent of LLC whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail process to 15 Sunview Dr., Rochester, NY 14624, which is also the principal business location. Purpose: Any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] CRP Properties LLC filed Articles of Organization with the New York Department of State on 11/7/2018. Its office is located in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent of the Company upon whom process against it may be served and a copy of any process shall be mailed to 3366 Clover Street Pittsford, NY 14534. The purpose of the Company is any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] LASTQUEST, LLC (LLC) filed Arts. of Org. with NY Secy. of State (SS) on 1/11/2019. LLC’s office is in Monroe Co. SS is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS shall mail a copy of any process to c/o the LLC, Attn: President, 39 Hyacinth Lane, Fairport, NY 14450. LLC’s

purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] LTech II, LLC (LLC) filed Arts. of Org. with NY Secy. of State (SS) on 12/20/18. LLC’s office is in Monroe Co. SS is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS will mail a copy of any process to 4 Commercial St., 4th Fl., Rochester, NY 14614. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Medi’S Auto Sales LLC Arts of Org. filed SSNY 11/28/18. Office: Monroe Co. SSNY design agent of LLC upon whom process may be served & mail to princ address 85 Donovan St Webster, NY 14580 RA: US Corp Agents, Inc. 7014 13 Ave #202 Brooklyn, NY 11228 General Purpose [ NOTICE ] MELD PROPERTIES LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 8/3/2018. Office in Monroe Co. SSNY desig. agent of LLC whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail process to 172 Talon Run, Rochester, NY 14612, which is also the principal business location. Purpose: Any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] MJ Cooper LLC, Arts of Org. filed with Sec. of State of NY (SSNY) 12/31/2018. Cty: Monroe. SSNY desig. as agent upon whom process against may be served & shall mail process to P.O. Box 393, 3740 Pittsford Palmyra Rd., Fairport, NY 14450-9995. General Purpose. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of 1 Prestige Transport LLC; Art of Org filed with Sec’y of State (SSNY) 1/11/2019; Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 3240 White Swan Drive, Rochester, New York 14626. Purpose: Any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of 5330 East, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y

To place your ad in the LEGAL section, contact Tracey Mykins by phone at (585) 244-3329 x10 or by email at legals@rochester-citynews.com of State of NY (SSNY) on 1/7/2019. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 55 Alliance Dr., Rochester, NY 14623. Purpose: any lawful act. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of ANNE D STEELE, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/21/2018. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 49 Clarkes Xing, Fairport, NY 14450. Purpose: any lawful act. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Baldrick Benjamin LLC. Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) on 09/13/18. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to the LLC at 1486 E Main Street Rochester, NY 14609 . Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of BARNES ROAD, LLC. Art. Of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 01/03/19. Office in Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, 14 1/2 Fireside Ln Fairport, NY, 14450. Purpose: Any lawful purpose [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Boone Properties, LLC. Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) on December 19, 2018. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to the LLC at 50 Old Hojack Lane, Hilton, NY 14468. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of CHACON MCB

TRUCKING, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 1/4/2019. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 1355 Middle Rd., Rush, NY 14543. Purpose: any lawful act. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Concept Property Services LLC. Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 12/3/18. Office location: Monroe Co. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: LegalCorp Solutions, LLC, 11 Broadway, Ste 615, NY, NY 10004, the registered agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] NOTICE OF FORMATION OF DOMESTIC LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY; Name of LLC: Gore Mountain Chalet, LLC; Date of filing: December 19, 2018; Office of the LLC: Monroe Co.; The NY Secretary of State has been designated as the agent upon whom process may be served. NYSS may mail a copy of any process to the LLC at P.O. Box 528, Fairport, New York 14450; Purpose of LLC: Any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of EMPIRE X-RAY & SILVER RECYCLING LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/15/18. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to David L. Bourne, P.O. Box 24785, Rochester, NY 14624. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Flower City Health Resources, LLC. Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 1/17/2019. Office location: Monroe Co. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to:

Celine Thompson, 88 Larkspur Lane, Rochester, NY 14622, the registered agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. Term: until 12/31/2040. Purpose: any lawful ac [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of FOUR BIRDS FLY LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) on 1/4/2019. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 696 PARK AVENUE, ROCHESTER, NY 14607. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of G.E. Mattern Associates LLC. Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) on 01/25/2019. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to the LLC at 5075 Lake Road South, Brockport, NY 14420 . Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of GREGORY SUMMIT PROPERTIES LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/20/2018. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o The LLC, 55 Branch Ave., Rochester, NY 14618. Purpose: any lawful act. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of HEY BABY, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 1/8/2019. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 169 Estall Rd., Rochester, NY 14616. Purpose: any lawful act. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Himalayan Housing, LLC. Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) on 12/24/2018. Office location:

Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to the LLC at 14 Doncaster Road, Rochester, NY 14623. Purpose: Real estate related lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Iron Griddle, LLC. Articles of Organization filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 1/22/2019. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to principal business location: The LLC, 26 Webster Road, Spencerport, NY 14559. Purpose: any lawful activity [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of KALEIDOSCOPE WELLNESS, LLC. Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) on 10/1/18. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to the LLC at 303 TROY RD, ROCHESTER, NY 14618. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of LANNI PLUMBING, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 01/16/19. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 650 Shumway Rd., Brockport, NY 14420. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to John P. Lanni at the princ. office of the LLC. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Lehigh Station Music LLC. Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 1/14/19. Office location: Monroe Co. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 31 Charissa Run, Rochester, NY 14623. Purpose: any lawful activities.

[ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of Limited Liability Company (LLC). Name: Griffith Holdings LLC. Articles of Organization filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on January 15, 2019. Office location, Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to: P.O. Box 10369, Rochester NY 14610 Purpose: any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] NOTICE OF FORMATION of MainOrchard Properties LLC. Articles of Org. filed with NY Secretary of State (NS): 11/20/2018; office in: Orleans County; NS is designated as agent upon whom process may be served; NS to mail copy of process to 2289 Oak Orchard River Rd., Waterport, NY 14571; purpose is any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of MCH TRUCKING, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 1/4/2019. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 61 Rockview Ter., Rochester, NY 14606. Purpose: any lawful act. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of MONTICO LLC. Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) on Dec. 17, 2018. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to the LLC at 26 Nicholson Street, Rochester, NY 14620. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of NGT PROPERTIES, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/15/2018. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 1599 Barrow

Hill Rd., Webster, NY 14580. Purpose: any lawful act. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of PR Properties Development LLC. Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) on 11/13/18. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to the LLC at1304 East Ridge Rd., Rochester NY 14621. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of RENT A SPACE LLC. Arts of Org, filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on December 21, 2018 Office Location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to princ. bus. Loc: 90 Centre Drive, Rochester, NY 14623; Purpose: any lawful activity [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Sarge’s Hauling & Excavating LLC. Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 1/4/19. Office location: Monroe Co. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 61 Landau Drive, Rochester, NY 14606. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of SMALL WORLD BOOKS, LLC. Art.of Org. filed Secretary of State of NY (“SSNY”) 1/1/2019. Office location: Monroe Co. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 425 North St., Rochester, NY 14605. Purpose: any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Terri Ann’s LLC. Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) on 1/11/19. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 41


Legal Ads to the LLC at P.O.Box 111, North Greece, NY 14515 . Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Tri City Transportation LLC. Art. Of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) on 11/27/18. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to the LLC at 74 Halford St. Rochester, NY 14611. The purpose of the Company is Medicaid Transportation. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Ubertas Group LLC. Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) on 1/10/19. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to the LLC at 45 Glenhill Dr Rochester, NY 14618. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] NOTICE OF FORMATION of Whiskey Delta Bravo LLC. Articles of Org. filed with NY Secretary of State (NS): 10/23/2018; office in: Orleans County; NS is designated as agent upon whom process may be served; NS to mail copy of process to 2289 Oak Orchard River Rd., Waterport, NY 14571; purpose is any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] NOTICE OF PUBLIC AUCTION being held at Chester’s Self Storage 1037 Jay St. Rochester NY 14611 on Thursday, 02/14/19 at 12:00 pm. The following customers’ accounts have become delinquent so their item (s) will be auctioned off to settle past due rents. NOTE: Owner reserves the right to bid at auction, reject any and all bids, and cancel or adjourn the sale. Name of tenant: Sylvia Blair #111 owes $328.00, Leslie Reese #134 owes $228.00, Maslah Samatar #331 owes $228.00, Wanda Colon #137 owes $298.00, Jimmy Walker #402 owes $128.00, James Rashad #217 $328.00, Lucella Hill #226 owes $228.00

[ NOTICE ] NOTICE OF PUBLIC AUCTION being held at Chester’s Self Storage 600 W Broad St. Rochester NY 14608 on Thursday, 02/14/19 at noon. The following customers’ accounts have become delinquent so their item (s) will be auctioned off to settle past due rents. NOTE: Owner reserves the right to bid at auction, reject any and all bids, Dana Gignac #6 owes $228.00, Bernadette Prseon #21 owes $328.00, Cassandra Steele #48 owes $308.00 [ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of CDAR CONSULTING & SOLUTION PARTNERS LLC (LLC). Appl. for Auth. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/7/18. Office location: Monroe County. LLC formed in Pennsylvania (PA) on 5/2/18. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to PA addr. of LLC: 1032 Diane Ln, Cheswick, PA 15024. Cert. of Org. filed with PA Dept. of State, PO Box 8722, Harrisburg, PA 17105-8722. Purpose is any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of GLM HYDRO LLC Appl. for Auth. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 01/23/19. Office location: Monroe County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 01/01/19. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Registered Agents Inc., 90 State St., Ste. 700, Office 40, Albany, NY 12207. DE addr. of LLC: 1201 N. Market St., Ste. 2300, Wilmington, DE 19801. Cert. of Form. filed with Secy. of State, Div. of Corps., John G. Townsend Bldg., 401 Federal St., Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of NY IROND SELF STORAGE, LLC Appl. for Auth. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/17/18. Office location: Monroe County. LLC formed in Delaware

42 CITY JANUARY 30 - FEBRUARY 5, 2019

To place your ad in the LEGAL section, contact Tracey Mykins by phone at (585) 244-3329 x10 or by email at legals@rochester-citynews.com (DE) on 12/12/18. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Corporation Service Co., 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207-2543. DE addr. of LLC: 251 Little Falls Dr., Wilmington, DE 19808. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Secy. of State, John G. Townsend Bldg., 401 Federal St., Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: Real estate investment in self storage facility. [ NOTICE ] NOTICE OF QUALIFICATION of Oak Orchard Media LLC (OOM). Application for Authority filed with NY Secretary of State (NS): 11/26/2018; office in: Orleans County; NS is designated as agent upon whom process may be served; NS to mail copy of process to 2289 Oak Orchard River Rd., Waterport, NY 14571; purpose is any lawful purpose; OOM organized in DE: 11/20/2018, filed with DE Secretary of State @ 401 Federal St. #4, Dover, DE 19901; OOM DE office @ CGI, 850 New Burton Rd., Ste. 201, Dover, DE 19904. [ NOTICE ] ONE EIGHTY REALTY LLC (LLC) filed Arts. of Org. with NY Secy. of State (SS) on 1/8/2019. LLC’s office is in Monroe Co. SS is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS shall mail a copy of any process to c/o the LLC, Attn: Member, 180 St. Paul Street, #406, Rochester, NY 14604. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Real Estate Advisors of New York, LLC filed Articles of Organization with the New York Department of State on 12/18/2018. Its office is located in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent of the Company upon whom process against it may be served and a copy of any process shall be mailed to 2171 Monroe Ave., Rochester, New York 14618. The purpose of the Company is any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Rochester 248 LLC. Art. of Org. filed with

the SSNY on 01/11/19. Office: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to the LLC, Hirschhorn, 4-03 4th Street, Fair Lawn, NJ 07410 Purpose: Any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] ROLLERKOASTER, LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 10/22/18 Office in Monroe Co. SSNY design. Agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to Richard C Oaster 99 Garden Drive Fairport, NY 14450. Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Spartan Guide, LLC, Arts of Org. filed with Sec. of State of NY (SSNY) 1/14/2019. Cty: Monroe. SSNY desig. as agent upon whom process against may be served & shall mail process to 41 Quentin Rd., Rochester, NY 14609.General Purpose. [ NOTICE ] TAHVEN ASSOCIATES, LLC (LLC) filed Arts. of Org. with NY Secy. of State (SS) on 1/18/2019. LLC’s office is in Monroe Co. SS is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS shall mail a copy of any process to 230 Alpine Drive, Rochester, NY 14618. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE OF ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION OF MARRIAGE ] IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF THE TWENTIETH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT IN AND FOR CHARLOTTE COUNTY, FLORIDA CIVIL ACTION CASE NO. 18-1578DR MYNISHA HILL, Petitioner/Wife, v. CALVIN CONNELL HILL, Respondent/ Husband To: CALVIN CONNELL HILL Respondent’s last known address: 674 MAIN STREET ROCHESTER, NY 14614 YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an action for Dissolution of Marriage has been filed against you and that you are required to serve a

copy of your written defenses, if any, to it on Mynisha Hill c/o Ruhl Law, whose address is 2191 Tamiami Trail, Suite A Port Charlotte, FL 33948 on or before 02/28/2019, and file the original with the clerk of this Court at 350 E. Marion Avenue Punta Gorda, FL 33950 before service on Petitioner or immediately thereafter. If you fail to do so, a default may be entered against you for the relief demanded in the petition. Copies of all court documents in this case, including orders, are available at the Clerk of the Circuit Court’s office. You may review these documents upon request. You must keep the Clerk of the Circuit Court’s office notified of your current address. (You may file Notice of Current Address, Florida Supreme Court Approved Family Law Form 12.915.) Future papers in this lawsuit will be mailed to the address on records at the clerk’s office. WARNING: Rule 12.285, Florida Family Law Rules of Procedure, requires certain automatic disclosure of documents and information. Failure to comply can result in sanctions, including dismissal or striking of pleadings. Dated: 01/24/19 CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT By: Roger Eaton Deputy Clerk [ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] 104-105 Elmore Drive, LLC (“LLC”) filed Articles of Organization with the NY Sec. of State (“SSNY”) on 12/20/18. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail a copy of process to 320 5th Avenue, 7th Floor, NY, NY 10001. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] Alex Serles Law, LLC filed Articles of Organization with the New York Department of State on 01/15/2019.

Its office is located in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent of the Company upon whom process against it may be served and a copy of any process shall be mailed to Alexander Norman Serles, One East Main Street, Ste. 707B, Rochester, NY 14614. The purpose of the Company is Legal Services. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] Birnbaum – State Street, LLC (“LLC”) filed Articles of Organization with the NY Sec. of State (“SSNY”) on 12/18/18. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail a copy of process to 2850 Clover Street, Pittsford, NY 14534. Purpose: any lawful activity.

against it may be served and shall mail a copy of process to 2 Continental Dr., Rochester, NY 14618. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY ] The name of the LLC is Citizen Media NYC LLC. The Articles of Organization were filed with the NY Secretary of State on January 8, 2019. The LLC office is located in Monroe County. The NY Secretary of State is designated as the agent of the LLC upon whom process may be served, and the address a copy shall be mailed is 135 Corporate Woods Ste 300 Rochester NY 14623. The LLC is managed by its member. The purpose of the LLC is any lawful business.

[ NOTICE OF FORMATION ]

[ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY ]

Notice of Formation of Royal Wash Canandaigua, LLC. Articles of Organization filed with Secy. Of State of NY (SSNY) on 1/15/2019. Office location: Monroe County SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to principal business location: The LLC, 2851 Monroe Avenue, Rochester, NY 14618. Purpose: any lawful activity

The name of the LLC is My Wine and Cheese Bar, LLC. The Articles of Organization were filed with the NY Secretary of State on 12/17/18. The LLC office is located in Monroe County. The NY Secretary of State is designated as the agent of the LLC upon whom process may be served, and the address a copy shall be mailed is 65 Cardiana Dr. Rochester NY 14612. The LLC is managed by a manager. The purpose of the LLC is any lawful business.

[ NOTICE OF FORMATION ]

[ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY ]

Notice of Formation of Royal Wash West Seneca, LLC. Articles of Organization filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on December 4, 2018. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to principal business location: The LLC, 2851 Monroe Avenue, Rochester, NY 14618. Purpose: any lawful activity [ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] Rochester Eat In LLC (“LLC”) filed Articles of Organization with the NY Sec. of State (“SSNY”) on 12/17/18. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process

The name of the LLC is ROC City Insurance Services, LLC. The Articles of Organization were filed with the NY Secretary of State on 1/17/19. The LLC office is located in Monroe County. The NY Secretary of State is designated as the agent of the LLC upon whom process may be served, and the address a copy shall be mailed is 34 Lakeview Park, Rochester NY 14613. The LLC is managed by a manager. The purpose of the LLC is any lawful business. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LLC ] Hedgeco Consulting LLC filed articles of organization with the New York Secretary of

State on 01/10/2019 with an effective date of formation of 01/10/2019. Its principal place of business is located in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent upon whom process may be served. A copy of any process shall be mailed to 9 Sylvan Glen, Fairport, NY 14450. The purpose of the LLC is to engage in any lawful activity for which Limited Liability Companies may be organized under Section 203 of the New York Limited Liability Company Law. [ SUPPLEMENTAL SUMMONS AND NOTICE ] SUPREME COURT OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF MONROE Index No. E2018000644 CHESWOLD (TL), LLC, Plaintiff, vs. ELINORA E. HOLMES; The heirsat-law, next of kin, distributees, executors, administrators, assignees, lienors, creditors, successorsin-interest and generally all persons having or claiming under, by or through MAJOR HOLMES, SR., by purchase, inheritance, lien or otherwise of any right, title or interest in and to the premises described in the complaint herein, and all creditors thereof, and the respective wives, or widows of his, if any, all of whose names and addresses are unknown to Plaintiff; TONYA HOLMES; MANUFACTURERS AND TRADERS TRUST COMPANY; MIDLAND FUNDING LLC DBI NEW YORK AS MIDLAND FUNDING OF DELAWARE LLC; US BANK AS CUSTODIAN FOR PFS FINANCIAL 1, LLC; PROPEL FINANCIAL 1, LLC; COUNTY OF MONROE; UNITED STATES OF AMERICA; NEW YORK STATE DEPARTMENT OF TAXATION AND FINANCE; TLF NATIONAL TAX LIEN TRUST 2017-1 AND “JOHN DOE #1” THROUGH “JOHN DOE #100”, Defendants. TO THE ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANTS: YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED to answer the amended complaint in the above-entitled foreclosure action, and


Legal Ads to serve a copy of your answer on Plaintiff’s attorney within thirty (30) days after the service of this summons, exclusive of the day of service or within thirty (30) days after completion of service where service is made in any other manner than by personal service within the State. The United States of America, if designated as a defendant in this action, may answer or appear within sixty (60) days of service hereof. In case of your failure to appear or answer, judgment will be taken against you by default for the relief demanded in the amended complaint. Monroe County is designated as the place of trial. The basis of venue is the location of the subject premises. Dated: December 6, 2018 TO THE ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANTS: The foregoing summons is served upon you by publication, pursuant to an Order of Honorable J. Scott Odorisi, a Justice of the Supreme Court, dated January 15, 2019, and filed with supporting papers in the Monroe County Clerk’s Office. This is an action to foreclose tax liens encumbering the property known as 315 First Street, City of Rochester, New York and identified as tax account no.: 106.43-210 (the “Tax Parcel”). The relief sought is the sale of the Tax Parcel at public auction in satisfaction of the tax liens. In case of your failure to appear, judgment may be taken against you in the sum of $5,211.78, together with interest, costs, disbursements and attorneys’ fees of this action, and directing the public sale of the Tax Parcel. PHILLIPS LYTLE LLP Anthony J. Iacchetta Attorneys for Plaintiff Cheswold (TL), LLC 28 East Main Street Suite 1400 Rochester, New York 14614 Telephone: (585) 238-2000 [ SUPPLEMENTAL SUMMONS AND NOTICE ] SUPREME COURT OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF MONROE Index No. E2018001352 AMERICAN TAX FUNDING, LLC, Plaintiff, v. PEDRO DEJESUS, SR.; PEDRO DEJESUS, JR., if living, or if he be

dead, his wife, heirsat-law, next of kin, distributees, executors, administrators, assignees, lienors, creditors, successorsin-interest and generally all persons having or claiming under, by or through said PEDRO DEJESUS, JR., by purchase, inheritance, lien or otherwise of any right, title or interest in and to the premises described in the complaint herein, and all creditors thereof, and the respective wives, or widows of his, if any, all of whose names and addresses are unknown to Plaintiff; RAMON RESTO; EFIGENIA RESTO; NEW YORK STATE DEPARTMENT OF TAXATION AND FINANCE; THE PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK; THE CITY COURT OF ROCHESTER; COUNTY OF MONROE; TOWER DBW II TRUST 20122, SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO TOWER DBW II TRUST 20131; US BANK AS CUSTODIAN FOR PFS FINANCIAL 1, LLC; PROPEL FINANCIAL 1, LLC AND “JOHN DOE #1” THROUGH “JOHN DOE #100,” Defendants. TO THE ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANTS: YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED to answer the amended complaint in the above-entitled foreclosure action, and to serve a copy of your answer on Plaintiff’s attorney within thirty (30) days after the service of this summons, exclusive of the day of service or within thirty (30) days after completion of service where service is made in any other manner than by personal service within the State. The United States of America, if designated as a defendant in this action, may answer or appear within sixty (60) days of service hereof. In case of your failure to appear or answer, judgment will be taken against you by default for the relief demanded in the amended complaint. Monroe County is designated as the place of trial. The basis of venue is the location of the subject premises. Dated: November 14, 2018 TO THE ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANTS: The foregoing summons is served upon you by publication, pursuant to

Fun an Order of Honorable J. Scott Odorisi, a Justice of the Supreme Court, dated January 22, 2019, and filed with supporting papers in the Monroe County Clerk’s Office. This is an action to foreclose tax liens encumbering the property known as 166 Glenwood Avenue, City of Rochester, New York and identified as tax account no.: 105.27-1-24 (the “Tax Parcel”). The relief sought is the sale of the Tax Parcel at public auction in satisfaction of the tax liens. In case of your failure to appear, judgment may be taken against you in the sum of $12,909.46, together with interest, costs, disbursements and attorneys’ fees of this action, and directing the public sale of the Tax Parcel. PHILLIPS LYTLE LLP Anthony J. Iacchetta Attorneys for Plaintiff American Tax Funding, LLC 28 East Main Street Suite 1400 Rochester, New York 14614 Telephone: (585) 238-2000 [ SUPPLEMENTAL SUMMONS AND NOTICE ] SUPREME COURT OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF MONROE Plaintiff designates Monroe County as the place of trial. The basis of venue is the situs of the real property. The address of the real property is 48 Riverview Place, Rochester, New York INDEX NO.E2018002341 EB 1EMINY, LLC, Plaintiff, -againstLISA POST, if living and if she be dead, any and all persons who may claim and devisees, distributees, legal representatives, successors and interest of the said defendants, all of whom and whose names and places of residence are unknown to the plaintiff and cannot after diligent inquiry be ascertained, AGNES SAMPLE, if living and if she be dead, any and all persons who may claim and devisees, distributees, legal representatives, successors and interest of the said defendants, all of whom and whose names and places of residence are unknown to the plaintiff and cannot after diligent inquiry be ascertained, US BANK AS CUSTODIAN FOR PFS FINANCIAL 1, LLC

A/K/A PROPEL TAX, TOWER DBW II TRUST 2013-1 A/K/A TOWER CAPITAL, AMERICAN TAX FUNDING, LLC, PROPEL FINANCIAL 1, LLC, COUNTY OF MONROE, PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA (WESTERN DISTRICT), Defendants. TO THE ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANTS: YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED to answer the Complaint in this action and to serve a copy of your answer, or if the Complaint is not served with this Summons, to serve a notice of appearance, on the Plaintiff’s attorney(s) within twenty (20) days after service of this Summons, exclusive of the day of service (or thirty (30) days after service is complete if this Summons is not personally delivered to you within the State of New York); and in case of your failure to appear or answer, judgment will be taken against you by default for the relief demanded herein. NOTICE YOU ARE IN DANGER OF LOSING YOUR HOME If you do not respond to this summons and complaint by serving a copy of the answer on the attorney for the tax lien holder who filed this foreclosure proceeding against you and filing the answer with the court, a default judgment may be entered and you can lose your home. Speak to an attorney or go to the court where your case is pending for further information on how to answer the summons and protect your property. Sending a payment to the tax lien holder will not stop the foreclosure action. YOU MUST RESPOND BY SERVING A COPY OF THE ANSWER ON THE ATTORNEY FOR THE PLAINTIFF (TAX LIEN HOLDER) AND FILING THE ANSWER WITH THE COURT. STAGG, TERENZI, CONFUSIONE & WABNIK, LLP Attorneys for Plaintiff 401 Franklin Avenue, Suite 300 Garden City, NY 11530 (516) 812-4500 The object of this action is To foreclose tax liens covering: 48 Riverview Place, Rochester, NY 14608 JUDGMENT IN THE APPROXIMATE AMOUNT OF $5,330.91 plus interest

[ LAST WEEK’S SOLUTION ON PAGE 38 ] rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 43


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13 • LABOR LYCEUM: The Gig Economy — Why You Should Care 29 • WORKERS MEMORIAL DAY

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2 • LABOR DAY PARADE 6 • 30th ANNUAL LABOR FILM SERIES, through Nov 1

OCTOBER

19 • LABOR LYCEUM: Smartphone Addiction and Labor Find details and updates in CITY’s events calendar and at

rochesterlabor.org ochesterlabor.or

Among Untrodden Ways through March 2

at

oxford gallery oxfordgallery.com 44 CITY JANUARY 30 - FEBRUARY 5, 2019

Profile for Rochester City Newspaper

CITY Newspaper, January 30 - February 5, 2019  

Greater Rochester's Alternative Newsweekly

CITY Newspaper, January 30 - February 5, 2019  

Greater Rochester's Alternative Newsweekly