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JAN. 10 2018, VOL. 47 NO. 19


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Filling space downtown without retail

On Urban Journal’s “How Will We Fill Up Downtown’s Retail Space?”: I think the best use

of the ground-level retail space would be stores that cater to the day-to-day needs of working professionals, as well as nightlife and cultural attractions. People will tend to go to Henrietta to buy things like television sets and furniture, but electronics stores, officesupply stores, bars and lunch spots, and stores that sell things like button-up shirts and briefcases seem promising. So do some supermarket-type options. Maybe downtown is a better location for a Whole Foods than the Clover Lanes site: less competition in the area and possibly appealing to urban professionals not originally from Rochester and unfamiliar with Wegmans. Also maybe some stores that have their own magnetic field / appeal such as Urban Outfitters and Apple. I could see the JCC, a gym, or other adult recreational space opening a successful location downtown. Businesses that cater to the food-truck movement in Rochester would be great; the planned kitchen incubator seems like the perfect kind of business to have a mixed retail and professional presence downtown. I think it is unlikely that a lot of people will move to live downtown. People like open space and the more established residential neighborhoods. If they go downtown, it is for a purpose, usually work or going out 2 CITY

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on the town, and I think the ground level space should cater to that. Flex space that can accommodate a wide variety of purposes is a great idea, as well as restaurants, bars, and other “fun” places to be. In the summer, it’s fun to walk around downtown, especially if something like Party in the Park is going on. Downtown is very walkable, and there’s an intrigue that “entertaining” businesses could definitely contribute to, and benefit from. AUSTIN RETZLAFF

There is a solution for vacant retail space in downtown Rochester that has been working in downtown Buffalo: “pop-up retail.” KEVIN YOST

Rochester’s DACA students

On a reader’s concerns about immigrants in Rochester with DACA – Deferred Action for Childhood Arrival – status:

What is missing in the reader’s flinty analysis is that homeless vets and unemployment and undocumented immigrants – all three – are the effects of corporate salaries and shareholder-profit concerns. There are enough jobs for everyone if CEO’s would lop one zero off their yearly salaries. Furthermore, unless the reader would like to earn a dollar an hour and live in a trailer without heat and pick her own produce for dinner, I suggest that she be somewhat thankful to the people who do. LINDA PRATT

DACA students should be encouraged to stay. The real problem, is the MS-13 gangs that are taking over Southern cities. My son is a police officer in the Washington DC area. They are the ones actually causing problems. Dreamers are good citizens. MS-13 is frightening. There is a difference, and these kids need our support. JULIA WOEHRLEN

News. Music. Life. Greater Rochester’s Alternative Newsweekly January 10 - 16, 2018 Vol 47 No 19 250 North Goodman Street Rochester, New York 14607-1199 themail@rochester-citynews.com phone (585) 244-3329 fax (585) 244-1126 rochestercitynewspaper.com facebook.com/CityNewspaper twitter.com/roccitynews instagram.com/roccitynews On the cover: Design by Jacob Walsh Publishers: William and Mary Anna Towler Editor: Mary Anna Towler Editorial department themail@rochester-citynews.com Arts & entertainment editor: Rebecca Rafferty Staff writers: Tim Louis Macaluso, Jeremy Moule Music editor: Jake Clapp Music writer: Frank De Blase Calendar editor: Kurt Indovina Contributing writers: Roman Divezur, Daniel J. Kushner, Kathy Laluk, Adam Lubitow, Amanda Fintak, Mark Hare, Alex Jones, Katie Libby, Ron Netsky, David Raymond, Leah Stacy Art department artdept@rochester-citynews.com Art director/Production manager: Ryan Williamson Designers: Renée Heininger, Jacob Walsh Advertising department ads@rochester-citynews.com New sales development: Betsy Matthews Account executives: William Towler, David White Classified sales representatives: Tracey Mykins Operations/Circulation kstathis@rochester-citynews.com Business manager: Angela Scardinale Circulation manager: Katherine Stathis Distribution: David Riccioni, Northstar Delivery City Newspaper is available free of charge. Additional copies of the current issue may be purchased for $1 each at the City Newspaper office. City Newspaper may be distributed only by authorized distributors. No person may, without prior written permission of City Newspaper, take more than one copy of each weekly issue. City (ISSN 1551-3262) is published weekly by WMT Publications, Inc. Periodical postage paid at Rochester, NY (USPS 022-138). Address changes: City, 250 North Goodman Street, Rochester, NY 14607. Member of the Association of Alternative Newsweeklies and the New York Press Association. Annual subscriptions: $35 ($30 senior citizens); add $10 for out-of-state subscriptions. Refunds for fewer than ten months cannot be issued. Copyright by WMT Publications Inc., 2018 - all rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, photocopying, recording or by any information storage retrieval system without permission of the copyright owner.

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URBAN JOURNAL | BY MARY ANNA TOWLER

A reflection of America: the president doesn’t read The big news of the past week has been Michael Wolff’s tell-all, inside-the-Trump-White-House book, “Fire and Fury.” Hordes of Americans dashed out and bought it, even though newspapers and magazines and websites had already pulled out all the juicy stuff. Apparently, some of what’s in it is important, some not, but for anybody concerned about the present occupant of the White House, the book promises to be riveting, satisfying – and confirming. We’re not crazy. He is. We have to take some of the book’s revelations with a grain of salt, because Wolff himself has a less-than-stellar reputation. New York Times writer Michael Grynbaum offered this quote from the late Times’ media columnist David Carr, writing about an earlier Wolff book: “Historically, one of the problems with Wolff’s omniscience is that while he may know all, he gets some of it wrong.” Still, Wolff’s focus on the president’s intellect and his decision-making process is important. And similar stories have been told by others who have seen Trump in action. We can argue about whether Donald Trump is sane and stable. But if the early excerpts from the book are any indication, Wolff simply reinforces one thing we should already know: This president is not at all qualified to lead the country. Intelligence, knowledge of history, intimate familiarity with the Constitution, a deep understanding of the nations and cultures of the world: these should be basic requirements. A lot has already been written about Trump’s dislike of reading, and “Fire and Fury” apparently adds to the evidence. In The Atlantic, David Graham quotes this segment from the book, from an e-mail from Trump economic adviser Gary Cohn: “It’s worse than you can imagine... Trump won’t read anything – not one-page memos, not the brief policy papers, nothing.” Trump does get the news – from Fox and Friends, which is both Trump-friendly and closely aligned with Trump on current issues. But while we’re snorting about what we learn from “Fire and Fury,” should we ask how much better the rest of us are? In getting his news from television, Trump is simply mimicking the US population. That’s where most Americans get their news, according to a Pew Research report last summer. Television news, tough – even unbiased, “mainstream” television news – simply skims the surface of important developments. Print ranks fourth out of four among Americans’ news sources, behind television,

While we’re snorting about what we learn from ‘Fire and Fury,’ should we ask how much better the rest of us are?” online, and radio, in that order. It may be encouraging that online ranks high, and we may read more than this president does, but as a country, on the left and the right, we’re getting lazy. We’re also getting very selective in our reading, and in what we turn to as an online news source. Among the top five cable networks this past fall: the opinionated Fox and MSNBC. And while it’s still a minority choice, 18 percent of Americans now rely on social media as one of their news sources. We can’t possibly learn enough this way to be good citizens. But it’s quick and easy. Why read a daily newspaper – why subscribe to a local daily and a national daily and read them both – if you can scan the headlines on websites and get the really important stuff from Facebook? As a print journalist, I’m not an impartial observer in this discussion, obviously. And I hope I’m right in thinking that whatever form journalism survives in, 50 years from now Americans will still think it’s important. But I do worry when I look at the data in the Pew research and think about how complicated the world will continue to be. Presidents can’t get the news they need from Tweets and TV snippets and Fox and Friends or Rachel Maddow. And neither can citizens. “We are what we read,” to quote a book review from Sunday’s New York Times. And I’m worried about what we’re reading, and how little. rochestercitynewspaper.com

CITY 3


[ NEWS IN BRIEF ]

Vote delayed on Cobbs Hill apartments

The City Planning Commission postponed a vote until Thursday on a controversial proposal to replace the apartments at Cobbs Hill Village. After hearing testimony lasting until 11:45 Monday night from supporters and opponents of Rochester Management’s expansion plan, the Commission decided to reconvene for a vote on Thursday, January 11, at 5 p.m. at City Hall. Rochester Management wants to demolish the six single-story apartment buildings, which house low-income seniors, and replace them with eight two- and three-story buildings for seniors. Rochester Management says the current buildings are outdated and that the new complex will help address an affordable housing shortage. Critics say the project will negatively impact the adjacent park, the current buildings can be updated satisfactorily, and rates in the new buildings will be too high.

New leaders chosen for legislature, Council, schools

Local governments elected their leaders as 2018 began. Irondequoit Re-

publican Joe Carbone is the County Legislature’s new president, and Penfield Republican Debbie Drawe is vice president. Carbone, who was formerly vice president, succeeds Anthony Daniele, who was term-limited on the legislature. On Rochester’s City Council, Loretta Scott was re-elected president, and Adam McFadden is the new vice president, succeeding Dana Miller. And on the Rochester school board, Van White was re-elected president, and Willa Powell was elected vice president, succeeding Cynthia Elliott.

News ART NEWS | BY JAKE CLAPP

Rochester groups plan a full year of Douglass

County joins opioid lawsuit

Monroe County is joining a group of other New York counties, including Erie, in a nationwide lawsuit against opioid makers. The county hired the national firm of Simmons Hanly Conroy, which is representing many of the counties in the case. In a press release, County Executive Cheryl Dinolfo said the county wants to recoup costs related to the opioid crisis for the benefit of local taxpayers. The larger case argues that opioid makers, marketers, and distributors misled the public and doctors about the safety and addictiveness of the prescription drugs.

Carvin Eison introduces the “Re-Energizing the Legacy of Frederick Douglass” project during a ceremony at Hochstein School of Music and Dance. PHOTO BY RENÉE HEININGER

Frederick Douglass lived in Rochester for nearly 30 years, and during his lifetime, the abolitionist, social reformer, speaker, and writer was a prominent figure in American political action and had important discussions about race and slavery with President Lincoln. For much of the recent past, however, that history hasn’t been as widely acknowledged in Rochester. Thanks to a large, diverse group of local organizations, that’s changing. More than 35 arts, cultural, educational, and civic groups — from large institutions to small neighborhood associations — have planned a year of events to celebrate Douglass’s life and work in observance of the 200th anniversary of his birth. The Frederick Douglass Bicentennial Commemoration Committee unveiled the events last week during a ceremony at Hochstein School of Music and Dance, the former church where a funeral service for Douglass was held. Officials of the

City of Rochester and Monroe County also proclaimed 2018 as “The Year of Frederick Douglass.” In a lot of ways, committee organizers say, the Bicentennial Committee and the year’s worth of events represent the culmination of widespread concern about the lack of awareness of Douglass’s legacy and Rochester’s place in his life. Born into bondage in 1818 — he chose February 14 as his birthday — Douglass escaped to freedom in 1838 and lived in Rochester from 1843 to 1872, publishing his newspaper, The North Star, here. The Bicentennial Committee’s efforts, led by Rochester Community Television and Rochester Contemporary Art Center, are part of a larger project, “Re-Energizing the Legacy of Frederick Douglass,” which will include an art exhibit and the erection of statues of Douglass in public spaces. continues on page 12

Start the New Year off on a Sweet Note! with Get Caked Goodies!

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/ FOOD


The Ibero-American Development Corporation is partnering with the Rochester Police Department and the Rochester Institute of Technology in an ambitious three-year effort. The goal: to crush the open-air heroin market that has plagued the North Clinton area of the city for decades.

NEIGHBORHOODS | BY TIM LOUIS MACALUSO

North Clinton starts a major cleanup The Rochester Police Department documented 179 heroin-related incidents last October – either sales or use – in just one location in the North Clinton area near St. Michael’s Church. Although it was the worst hot spot for heroin activity in the neighborhood, it was just one of nearly three dozen such sites that the RPD identified during a 30-day surveillance. That led to a color-coded map of the North Clinton area’s street grid. The map is speckled with dots, red and yellow ones showing locations with the severest activity in the neighborhood. So much heroin moved along one stretch of North Clinton Avenue near Clifford Avenue that that section of the map looks like a pinkish dab of watercolors. The RPD’s research is part of an ambitious effort by the Ibero-American Development Corporation to crush the open-air heroin market that has plagued the North Clinton area for decades. IADC has partnered with the RPD and Rochester Institute of Technology’s Center for Public Safety Initiatives to launch CLEAN: the Community Law Enforcement and Assistance Network Target Area effort. The three-year program, which is being funded by the

Department of Justice, focuses on a roughly 30-street area of the city. CLEAN is still in the planning phase, says Miguel Meléndez, special projects director for IADC. But it will involve several tactics, such as having stronger police presence in the hot spots, connecting addicts to health and recovery services, and removing trees, bushes, and hiding areas where drug activity currently can take place undetected. “The people in this neighborhood, they sympathize with the addicts,” Meléndez says, “but they also feel victimized seeing people in their backyards or picking up 300 needles in Miguel Meléndez, special projects director for Ibero-American Development Corporation: People in the vacant lot next door.” the neighborhood feel victimized. PHOTO BY JOSH SAUNDERS Most of the drug buyers are coming from outside the area, he says. And although some of the drug sellers live residents believe it had an impact. the vacancies,” Meléndez says. And a in the North Clinton area, most come different dynamic is needed to improve IADC is coupling the CLEAN in from all over county – as if they’re the area other than relying solely on law program with a plan for a $28 million commuting to work, he says. enforcement, he says. Increasing the affordable-housing project. The 90-unit Law enforcement officers sent a letter to project, called Pueblo Nuevo, is not number of engaged residents will help the owners of vehicles spotted in the North a single construction site. The plan is revitalize streets and shed the area of the Clinton Avenue and Conkey Avenue area neglected and abandoned appearance it designed instead to fill in many of the in a prior crackdown, informing them has in some places. vacant lots that remained after the city that their vehicles were seen in a known demolished numerous homes in the area. “We don’t want this neighborhood to drug trafficking area, Meléndez says. That “We believe that part of the drug look the part of a place where drugs are tactic may be used again, he says, because sold,” he says. market’s long history has to do with

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CITY 5


POLITICS | BY MARY ANNA TOWLER AND JEREMY MOULE

Cuomo unveils big ideas; housing activists want action As usual, Governor Andrew Cuomo’s State of the State speech last week was full of big proposals – seemingly fuller than usual, maybe because he’s ready to run for another term, maybe because he has his eye on the White House. Whatever the reason, Cuomo had a lengthy wish list, packed with a few things he can do on his own and lots that the state legislature will have to agree with. On the whole, it was a strongly progressive list, one that he introduced by focusing on “the old, persistent problems of sexism, racism, and homelessness.” He wants the state to enact “a strict, new, uniform code of sexual harassment policies” covering all levels of government. He proposed prohibiting the use of taxpayers’ money to settle sexual harassment and misconduct charges against public officials; prohibiting non-disclosure agreements by state and local governments involving sexual harassment cases. He wants state pension funds invested only in companies that have “adequate female and minority representation in management or on the board of directors.” He called for reforms in the state’s bail system, which, he said, is “biased against the poor,” and for speeding up the criminal justice system. He wants to expand job training for minority youth. He offered a variety of environmental proposals: ending state pension fund investment in fossil-fuel industries, fighting toxic algae and other pollutionrelated problems. The opioid crisis, terrorism, voter registration, protection of collective bargaining, New York City’s subway system, pre-kindergarten, middle-class taxes, college costs, downtown revitalization, tourism, the federal tax plan’s impact on New Yorkers: Cuomo had proposals addressing all of them. Rochester would benefit from many of those proposals. In a statement after the speech, City Council members singled out Cuomo’s criminal-justice ideas, including bail reform, expedited trials, and stronger programs to help former inmates make the move from incarceration to a productive life. Mayor Lovely Warren praised his focus on homelessness. Some of the governor’s proposals will likely get enough support to pass in New York’s fractious state legislature. Others might, if Cuomo dedicates the necessary energy and pressure. But Cuomo doesn’t always put enough pressure behind his words. One area that will require much more than words: the state’s growing need for more affordable housing. In his speech, Cuomo 6 CITY

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noted that the state’s problem of homeless has grown worse, and he referred to his time heading the US Housing and Urban Development department in the Clinton administration, putting together a plan “to solve homelessness.” “We always believed that this was a momentary problem,” he said, “that it was just an anomaly, that this could not go on.” The number of homeless people dropped in many parts of the country, he said, “but now the problem has come back with a vengeance.” The issue hasn’t been neglected by the state’s housing advocates, who have been pushing for help for homeless people. On the day of Cuomo’s State of the State speech, the advocates kicked off a “Housing Justice for All” campaign with a protest in Albany. In an interview after Cuomo’s speech, Rochester’s Ryan Acuff, an activist with Take Back the Land, said the campaign has three goals: increasing tenants’ rights, expanding affordable housing, and fully funding public housing. On tenants’ rights: Tenants in New York

City and some downstate counties have basic protections that don’t exist here. “We want to level the playing field,” Acuff said. “We want to expand all of those protections across the state.” Among them: requiring landlords to have “just cause” for evicting tenants – things like tenants’ failure to pay rent or a landlord needing to move into the apartment, Acuff said. The State of New Jersey, for instance, has statewide from arbitrary evictions. “It prevents a lot of abuses and people being displaced,” Acuff said. The housing-justice advocates want Upstate cities to be able to pass rent stabilization laws, something state law permits for New York City and several surrounding counties but not elsewhere. They also want Rochester to create a housing court – to which tenants could take cases against landlords – as New York City and Buffalo have done. “A lot of people are living in very poor conditions,” Acuff said, “and the housing stock is deteriorating.” And even though there are laws about habitability and health, tenants have little ability to see that they’re enforced, Acuff said. Acuff and members of the new CityWide Tenant Union pushed for a housing court at a press conference in Rochester on Monday, calling attention to severe problems in apartments in Southview Towers and a building at 690 Dewey Avenue.

Ryan Acuff: State government is the entity that can best raise money for housing. PHOTO BY JACOB WALSH

On affordable housing: Cuomo frequently announces a lot of numbers, Acuff said in the interview last week – this many billion for affordable housing – but a lot of it ends up being tax breaks for developers and doesn’t benefit the people who need the housing. One need: “permanent supportive housing” (housing coupled with social services for residents) “focused on people that need it most: people that are homeless or at risk of homeless,” Acuff said. “And we need massive, massive amounts.” A good local example of permanently affordable public housing that should be expanded, Acuff said, is Eastman Commons on Dewey Avenue, where low-income residents – some of them referred from homeless shelters – get good, permanent housing and access to social services. Both the city and Monroe County have formal plans to end homelessness, Acuff said, so there’s at least consensus about the need to invest in it. But state government, he said, is the entity that can best raise the money for it. Another need: preserving the affordable housing that exists. Some of the management contracts for affordable housing expire after 20 or 30 years. After that, Acuff notes, the buildings can become market-rate housing.

Public housing or land trusts, Acuff said, are the way to get the most out of public investment and preserve affordable housing for the long-term. But public housing provided through housing authorities needs to be adequately funded, Acuff said, so that units aren’t lost because of maintenance problems. And the amount of public housing needs to be expanded, he said. Most of the state’s money for affordable housing goes to privately owned projects, Acuff said. That needs to change, he said. Doing what the housing-justice coalition calls for require money – lots of money – and legislative action. And getting the money will be particularly challenging, not only because of the competition from other big-ticket proposals on the governor’s wish list but also because of the impact of the Republican tax plan and Trump administration actions on states like New York. A lot will depend on the governor. “I think if he wants to get these things done, he can make them happen, from the legislative perspective,” Acuff said. What the activists hope to do is to highlight “that this is something that can’t be ignored anymore,” Acuff said. “This is a major crisis all over the state. There’s no place, whether New York City or Upstate, that’s exempt from this major housing crisis.”


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CITY 7


LOCAL MALLS SHOP NEW APPROACHES DEVELOPMENT | BY JEREMY MOULE | PHOTOS BY RYAN WILLIAMSON

A thin film of dust covers the floor in the main foyer of the old Irondequoit Mall. It shows no footprints and generally gives the impression that nobody’s been through the place in a while. That’s not surprising: the mall has been closed to the public since 2009, except Macy’s and Sears, which owned their own space and closed more recently. The complex, last known as Medley Centre, is a dormant 916,000-square-foot shell of brick, concrete, metal, and glass. It’s a ghost town. Signs still hang over the shops: the unilluminated gray glass tubes of the Subway logo, the gold World of Science lettering. The iconic carousel and a children’s play area are quiet and still. These things are relics from the shopping center’s brief and rather tragic life. Wilmorite opened it in 1990, around the peak of America’s love affair with malls. A subsequent out-of-town owner, developer Scott Congel, shut it down in 2009, ostensibly to redevelop it into a grand shopping and entertainment destination that never materialized. 8 CITY

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Congel failed to follow through on promised investments and exhausted almost every bit of goodwill that locals extended to him. The mall’s past is sad, but its future is unwritten. Former Irondequoit Dodge co-owner Angelo Ingrassia bought the mall at auction in 2016; a court had ordered the Monroe County Sheriff ’s office to seize and sell it in order to pay a debt Congel owed. Ingrassia, who is partnering with developers Frank Perticone and Robert Morgan, picked up Irondequoit Mallslash-Medley Centre at a pivotal moment for malls. The partners rolled out their vision for redeveloping the complex during a press conference in late August. Skyview on the Ridge, as it’s now called, will remain a commercial center, but the plan is to make it into something other than a shopping mall. “We are ready to adapt this space to whatever a company needs,” Ingrassia said in a press release handed out during the August announcement for Skyview. “We are offering

‘flex space’ and can build to specifications. With trends moving away from traditional in-store shopping to online buying, we know that companies will need more distribution centers and warehouse locations for their products. We can combine office space, light assembly, distribution, and warehousing all in one location.”

For the first phase of the project, the developers plan to divide up the anchor spaces and a 300,000 square foot wing to suit the needs of new tenants. Flaum Management did something similar when it bought the former Macy’s building in 2014, after the store closed. The firm now leases it to Conduent, which uses the space for a call center. Skyview’s developers are talking about transforming the renovated and reconfigured spaces into creative office layouts with shared meeting and work areas; with cafes and coffee shops; and possibly with restaurants, child care centers, a fitness center, or a movie theater. Skyview will even house the Town of Irondequoit’s new community center, since Ingrassia and company are donating 50,000 square feet for it. The space spans both levels and has its own entrance on the East Ridge Road side of the complex. Officials are clearly excited about the opportunity, and it is a symbolic win for the town. It’s finally getting something


Left and above: the former Macy's space at Marketplace Mall will be converted into smaller outlet shops.

tangible out of the dead mall that’s caused it, and its residents, so much frustration. Assembly Majority Leader Joe Morelle and Senator Rich Funke have secured a combined $2.1 million in discretionary funding for the project, which they announced in December. The town has already hired architectural consultants and put together a community advisory board to help steer the project. Officials expect to release an initial plan for the center early this year. “We’ve always seen the need, but we’ve never been able to get off the starting line,” Irondequoit Supervisor Dave Seeley said during an event inside the Skyview shell announcing the community center funding. But the donation also provides a practical benefit to the developers: an anchor. The community center will bring a steady stream of people into the complex and add a sense of vibrancy that could prove attractive to companies looking for an office location, as well as any restaurant or retail business eyeing space at Skyview. Ingrassia declined an interview request from CITY, just as he has requests

from other local media. Outside of Ingrassia’s remarks during the August press conference, he and his partners have said little about Skyview, even though it’s getting $2 million in state economic development grants to help with the project’s $11 million first phase. The plans Ingrassia, Perticone, and Morgan have for Skyview aren’t some kind of moonshot. Developers and mall owners across the country have successfully repurposed dead or dying malls for all kinds of uses. Google has office space in Mountain View, California, that was once a dead mall. Simply put, the owners adapted, which is what Ingrassia, Perticone, and Morgan are trying to do with Skyview. “These properties, while they may not have the same opportunity for retail that they once did, they still are strong properties that can serve different needs,” says Jonathan Murray, director of marketing and research for the Rochester office of global real estate firm CBRE. “In the case of Medley Centre, you’ve got large boxes on the ends that

The new owners of the former Medley Centre, which will now be called Skyview on the Ridge, are looking for commercial tenants, not necessarily new stores. rochestercitynewspaper.com

CITY 9


The former Macy's at Marketplace Mall

can accommodate a large office user or perhaps some kind of light industrial use, or a community center, I guess. It’s something that we are seeing in lots of different communities.” Big news organizations in recent years

have devoted a lot of ink and screen space proclaiming the death of the mall or a retail apocalypse. But really, only some malls are dying. A report by Fung Global Retail & Technology, a well-known retail research and analysis firm, says that larger, highend malls are performing well and will continue to. In other words, Eastview Mall probably isn’t going anywhere soon. The Fung Global analysts also say, however, that they believe about 30 percent of US malls – primarily smaller, underperforming centers – need to close. Jonathan Murray, director of marketing and research for the Rochester office of global real estate firm CBRE, explains the problem simply. The United States reached a point about 20 years ago where it was overbuilt with mall space. A lot of the malls that had been operating 10 CITY JANUARY 10 - 16, 2018

on the fringe for years just haven’t been able to make it. And that’s partially what happened with Irondequoit Mall and its Medley Centre successor. Sure, Irondequoit Mall was hurt by public perceptions of crime, but both iterations were done in by the rise of Greece Ridge Mall and the construction of a big, new retail plaza in Webster. A succession of owners just couldn’t turn the Irondequoit mall into something that could compete. The odds that Skyview could come back as a traditional shopping center were small anyway. Malls as a whole are at a point where they need to evolve. We’re all pretty familiar with the basic story of present-day retail, the one in which online shopping has completely reshaped the way consumers buy clothing, electronics, sporting goods, cars, books and music, and even groceries. It’s the same story in which Amazon’s annual sales more than doubled from $61 billion in 2012 to $136 billion in 2016. Compare Amazon’s annual sales to those of department store icon Sears. Its parent company – Sears Holding Corp.

also owns Kmart – reported $39.9 billion in sales and net losses of $930 million in 2013, and $22.1 billion in sales and a net loss of $2.2 billion in 2017. It’s a mainstay on retail death-watch lists, as is JC Penney. Some of the big department store chains that serve as traditional mall anchors have been shutting down stores and pulling out of markets entirely. And when they leave, mall owners need to figure out ways to fill the space. When Bon Ton pulled out of the Rochester market, Wilmorite recruited Von Maur to open a ritzy store in Eastview. In Marketplace, Wilmorite didn’t fill the former Bon Ton with another store; it signed on a go-kart raceway as the new tenant. Wilmorite is now transitioning Marketplace into an outlet mall, a move meant to seize on the mall’s existing success as a shopping destination and growing consumer demand for “brand name merchandise at substantial savings,” the company said in a 2016 press release. “Outlet shopping is the only growth sector in bricks and mortar retail due

to its strong appeal to a wide range of demographic audiences from millennials to shoppers in their mid-40’s and beyond,” Outlet Resource Group principal Lisa Wagner said in that same release. Wilmorite hired that firm to help with Marketplace’s transition. The switch actually positioned Wilmorite to absorb the recent loss of Macy’s, which closed its store in late 2017. Wilmorite bought the property, which Macy’s owned, and plans to break the space up into smaller outlet stores. It did something similar at Greece Ridge when Bon-Ton left, converting the 145,000 square foot box into 27,000 of store and restaurant space. The company seems to have found a formula that works at Eastview. It’s done a few expansion projects over the years and regularly adds new upscale retailers. The area around Eastview seems to be very attractive to retailers, as well, says CBRE’s Murray. Dennis Wilmot, Wilmorite’s vice president of leasing, didn’t return calls requesting an interview about its Rochester-area malls.


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Medley Centre closed to the public in 2009.

So what does the future hold for malls? There is no one answer, but plenty of well-informed people have thoughts. The analysts at Fung Global note that online retailers such as Amazon and Warby Parker have opened physical stores, and they expect other “e-commerce” companies to do the same. Likewise, they expect big retail brands to keep pushing into online sales. Fung and other industry trend watchers expect that online retail will level off, since some consumers prefer to shop at stores out of convenience and a sense of reassurance. Stores allow customers to get their purchases immediately, and they also offer a simple, direct way to return purchases. The International Council of Shopping Centers, a trade group, points to consumer surveys that show customers spend more money with retailers who have a nearby physical presence. Shoppers also consider whether a retailer has a store nearby before they make online purchases. Those attitudes could work in physical retail’s favor.

And as online sales grow, sellers are giving more thought to the so-called last mile of delivery. Plenty of retail number crunchers see a role for brick and mortar stores to serve as collection points for customer orders. Click and collect, as the practice is often known, is a way for sellers to cut down on the time and expense of getting an item to a customers, the ICSC argues. These national and global trends matter for Rochester’s malls, which will see any trends and changes trickle down into their stores and tenant mixes. The region’s retail real estate market is performing well presently, Murray says. The amount of retail space has remained relatively flat, and the vacancy rate at the end of 2017 was lower than at the end of 2016, he says. Still, should any of the local malls lose their viability, they don’t have to sit idle or become burdens on communities. Retail is “a demand-driven business,” Murray says, “and if there isn’t demand for retail at a specific location, you still have this piece of infrastructure, this building, that can satisfy a lot of alternative uses. So it comes down to the owner getting creative and figuring out what will work.” rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 11


Douglass

continues from page 4

RoCo Executive Director Bleu Cease. PHOTO BY RENÉE HEININGER

It’s extraordinary, says RCTV General Manager Carvin Eison, that “so many organizations, institutions, and individuals in this community have come together to celebrate Frederick Douglass and the legacy of what Frederick Douglass means, and to attempt to apply his ideology, his thinking, his writings, to the problems that we face as a community.” Upcomingevents include a North Star Players theater production, “No Struggle, No Progress,” at MuCCC, January 16 to 20; a Landmark Society event February 9, at Memorial AME Zion Church; a lecture at the Eastman Museum on Douglass and photography on February 10; a “Women in the World of Frederick Douglass” discussion at the Central Library on February 10; a birthday celebration on February 10 at the Rochester Academy of Medicine; and a performance of “Times in the Life of Frederick Douglass” on February 15 at MuCCC during the 2018 Bronze Collective Theatre Fest. The city is hosting information about the committee and a calendar of bicentennial events at cityofrochester.gov/ frederickdouglass200. Work on the “Re-Energizing the Legacy of Frederick Douglass” project got started last year, Eison says, when there was a flash celebration at Douglass’s grave site in Mt. Hope Cemetery for his 199th birthday. Eison and Bleu Cease, Rochester Contemporary’s executive director and another of the Douglass celebration organizers, had worked together in 2014 when RCTV and RoCo hosted the video project “Question Bridge” and decided to work together again to plan a commemoration of Douglass’s 200th birthday. Eison says he just wanted to learn more about Douglass himself. He began doing research on Douglass and in the process met Ken Morris Jr., a descendent of both Douglass and Booker T. Washington and co-founder of the Frederick Douglass Family Initiatives. Support for a large celebration 12 CITY JANUARY 10 - 16, 2018

began to broaden out, from local arts and cultural organizations to the city, county, media, and civic and social justice groups. The “Re-Energizing” project will also have two key arts-related events: “No Soil Better,” an exhibition at RoCo of contemporary artists interpreting Douglass’s legacy, and a series of life-sized statues, replicas of the Sidney W. Edwards sculpture of Douglass in Highland Park, that will be placed around Rochester. The 6-foot-tall statues will be made by artist John David Vincent and placed in locations significant to Douglass’s life, and there are plans for a self-guided walking and driving tour of the locations. The Douglass monument, the first statue in the US dedicated to a black person, was erected in 1899 in front of the Rochester’s New York Central Railroad Station. But in 1941, the statue was moved to Highland Park. “I love the notion that the first civicfunded statue of an African-American in the country was at the center of the city,” says RoCo’s Bleu Cease. “People were on a train coming through Rochester in the 1900’s. They would see a statue of an African-American man. It’s a profound bit of Rochester history. And I always felt it could be celebrated more.” This spring, the county will move the monument from its place in Highland Bowl to a more visible park location, at the corner of South Avenue and Robinson Drive. Before the move, on the evening of February 14, RIT’s Big Shot team — a nighttime photography project — will organize a “Shine a Light on Douglass” event to create a photo that will be hung in RoCo’s “No Soil Better” exhibition. The “No Soil Better” exhibit will be up from February 2 through March 18 and will feature works by a range of artists to “update” Douglass’s legacy and “engage with today’s artists through today’s technologies and techniques and media to make new, contemporary monuments,” Cease says.

For more Tom Tomorrow, including a political blog and cartoon archive, visit www.thismodernworld.com

URBAN ACTION This week’s calls to action include the following events and activities. (All are free and open to the public, unless otherwise noted.)

Preserving towns and villages Historic Pittsford and the Pittsford Village Comprehensive Plan Steering Committee will present “Historic Preservation in the 21st Century: What Will Pittsford Look Like in 10 Years?” on Wednesday, January 10. Wayne Goodman, executive director of the Landmark Society of Western New York, will discuss ways villages like Pittsford can protect their architectural heritage while also building economically sustainable communities. The event will be held at the Pittsford Community Library, 24 State Street, Pittsford, at 7 p.m.

Meetings focus on canal’s clear-cutting

The Rochester People’s

Climate Coalition will hold two public meetings next week on the plan to remove trees along segments of the Erie Canal. Speakers will include representatives of the Canal Corporation and the town supervisors of Brighton, Pittsford, and Perinton. Discussion topics will include the proposed cut locations, clear-cutting’s impact on the environment, and why a State Environmental Quality Review process isn’t planned. The dates: Wednesday, January 17, at the Perinton Community Center, 1350 Turk Hill Road, and Thursday, January 18, at Pittsford Mendon High School, 472 Mendon Road. Both start at 6 p.m.

Supporting racial justice

Showing Up for Racial Justice (SURJ ROC) will hold a meeting on Monday, January 15, to support racial justice organizations led by people of

color. The discussion will focus on how to educate the public about white supremacy and white privilege. The meeting will be held at the Flying Squirrel Community Space, 285 Clarissa Street, at 7 p.m.

Analyzing race and poverty

ACT Rochester will hold two workshops this week on its recent report, “Hard Facts: Race and Ethnicity in the Nine-County Greater Rochester Area.” The report uses local data to detail the barriers to educational and economic success faced by people from different races. The programs will be at Asbury First United Methodist Church, 1050 East Avenue, from 7 to 9 p.m. Thursday, January 11, and from 8:30 to 10:30 a.m. Friday, January 12. Registration: www.actrochester.org.


Dining & Nightlife

Evoke Healthy Foods founder Ian Szalinski. PHOTOS BY RYAN WILLIAMSON

It starts with breakfast Evoke Healthy Foods EVOKEFOODS.COM AVAILABLE AT LOCAL GROCERY STORES [ FEATURE ] BY MARY RICE

If you’re feeling a little weighed down after the annual holiday cookie exchange and one too many champagne toasts, a local health foods brand has a few ideas about how you can set yourself straight in 2018 — by starting with breakfast. Evoke Healthy Foods has been making natural and organic muesli since

2011, and has grown from a single stall at the Rochester Public Market to a national brand with products in some 2,500 stores. Founder and President Ian Szalinski says a bowl of muesli is a nutritional powerhouse that can keep anyone full and energized throughout the day. A popular breakfast staple in much of Europe, muesli — which means “mix” in Swiss German — is a blend of whole grains (typically oats), fruits, nuts, and seeds, which is eaten cold with milk or yogurt, or cooked like oatmeal. Though it may bear close resemblance to granola, don’t be fooled — granola gets its

crunch from being coated in sugars and oils and baked, while muesli is comprised of entirely raw ingredients. It was originally invented around 1900 by Swiss physician Maximilian Bircher-Benner as a dietary supplement for his patients. Evoke’s line of muesli range from the Classic Swiss blend of oats, raisins, almonds, and cranberries to more modern combinations. The Antioxidant muesli contains superfoods like cacao nibs, goji berries, and walnuts, while Athlete Fuel adds in pumpkin seeds and cashews. Most of Evoke’s muesli products are certified organic and several are gluten-free. Compared to conventional American breakfast cereals, muesli is a nutritionally dense food loaded with fiber, protein, and complex carbohydrates, Szalinski says. The recommended serving size for Evoke muesli is just one-third of a cup, a stark difference from other cereals which may allot a cup or more per serving. “If you put a cup of Special K in a blender you’ll see it’s all air,” he says. Szalinski himself first encountered muesli in high school, when he participated in a snowboarding competition in Switzerland. Muesli was served every morning, and he found it to be ideal for fueling his active lifestyle. Back home, Szalinski says he found few muesli options on American shelves, and those available were low-quality versions that were heavy on sugary dried fruits. He would often make his own additions at breakfast, adding nuts or seeds, but saw there was a bigger opportunity in the market to bring more diverse types of muesli to the cereal aisle. Szalinski founded Evoke (then called Muesli Fusion) in 2011, when he was just 23. He rented production space on Atlantic Avenue and began selling muesli at the Rochester Public Market in February of that year. As owner-operator, Szalinski handled everything from production to packaging and marketing. He remembers his first sales day well: in the freezing rain, he sold seven bags of muesli and says he felt “absolutely ecstatic.” In his first year of business, Szalinski had some early success selling his muesli to health food stores both locally and nationally. His story was picked up by National Public Radio, sparking what he says is still his biggest-ever day of sales. Since then, his business has continued to grow. In 2014, Muesli Fusion rebranded to become Evoke Healthy Foods — a move which Szalinski says leaves the door open for the brand to go beyond muesli. And the business has received outside investment, including $50,000 from Buffalo-based venture development organization Launch NY.

Szalinski anticipates even more growth as muesli starts to go mainstream, helped along by food trends that emphasize whole foods and eschew sugars, preservatives, and unpronounceable additives. Still, he’s aware that for many American consumers, muesli is an unfamiliar product. Helpfully, each bag of Evoke muesli is printed with suggestions about how to eat it. The most straightforward approach is to soak the cereal in milk overnight for a creamy, ready-to-eat breakfast, but it can also be sprinkled into smoothies and baked goods. Evoke is no longer a one-man show, but Szalinski still keeps his operation slim. He works remotely with two sales reps and outsources muesli production to three contract manufacturers in Albany, Atlanta, and Wisconsin. He himself keeps Evoke muesli at his desk and eats it twice a day, every day, for breakfast and as a snack. He says he doesn’t get tired of it, and doesn’t think other people will either. “People are very habitual about breakfast,” Szalinski says, noting that while we may seek novelty and variety in lunch or dinner, most don’t have any issue with eating a similar breakfast each day. When you’re trying to get out the door to work, it helps if your breakfast is quick and convenient, he says. To that end, Evoke launched a new line of single-serve muesli packs this past summer in flavors like Cocoa Cherry Chia and Cinna-muesli. Evoke’s muesli is sold in grocery stores (including all Wegmans stores) all over the East Coast from Massachusetts to Florida, and as far west as California. Locally, you can also find Evoke at Hart’s Local Grocers, Abundance Cooperative Market, and Lori’s Natural Foods. rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 13


Upcoming [ HARD ROCK ]

Music

Stitches and Statements. Saturday, January 20. Montage Music Hall, 50 Chestnut Street. 7 p.m. $8. themontagemusichall.com. [ COUNTRY ]

The Amy Hazard Band. Saturday, February 17. Lovin’ Cup, 300 Park Point. 8 p.m. $5. lovincup.com; amyhazard.com. [ NU METAL ] Papa Roach. Wednesday, April 18. Main Street Armory, 900 East Main Street. 6 p.m. $38.50-$300. mainstreetarmory.com; paparoach.com.

Guster

THURSDAY, JANUARY 11 ANTHOLOGY, 336 EAST AVENUE 7:30 P.M. | $27.50 | ANTHOLOGYLIVE.COM; GUSTER.COM [ ALTERNATIVE ROCK ] Ever since Guster released “Lost

and Gone Forever” almost two decades ago, there’s been a strong bond between the band and Rochester fans. Guster has made Rochester a regular tour stop, and Flower City Gusterrhoids have flocked in droves to the band’s shows. When the quartet rolls into town this weekend, it will be Guster’s first performance of 2018 and the first show since it completed recording its eighth studio album in Canada. This being a Guster concert, expect catchy songs that you can sing along to and mainstays like drummer Brian Rosenworcel’s hand percussion — it’s one of rock ‘n’ roll’s mighty spectacles. The Demos will also perform. — BY ROMAN DIVEZUR

Nu Band SUNDAY, JANUARY 14 BOP SHOP RECORDS, 1460 MONROE AVENUE 8 P.M. | $20 GENERAL; $10 STUDENTS | 271-3354; BOPSHOP.COM [ JAZZ ] After decades of presenting some of the most quirky and wonderful concerts in Rochester, there are several CD’s titled “Live at the Bop Shop.” The first album to bear that name was released by Nu Band, an avant-garde group about to make its fourth appearance at the record store. If you are a fan of top instrumentalists steeped in group improvisation, Nu Band is for you. When the group’s original, revered trumpeter, Roy Campbell, passed away in 2014 the band soldiered on, recruiting another adventurous trumpeter, Thomas Heberer, to join Mark Whitecage on saxophones; Joe Fonda, bass; and Lou Grassi, drums. — BY RON NETSKY

p r The e s e n t s

PHOTO BY ZOE-RUTH ERWIN

World Famous

Glenn Miller Orchestra!

The Glenn Miller Orchestra is an icon of the swing and big band sounds of the war era! General admission: $20 / 25 Tickets: www.jazz901.org and at the door evening of the show.

Valentine’s Day • Wed. Feb. 14th • 7:30 pm at the Greece Central Performing Arts Center 14 CITY JANUARY 10 - 16, 2018


[ WED., JANUARY 10 ]

[ ALBUM REVIEWS ]

Roger Kuhn

“Blues and Country” Self-released rogerkuhn.bandcamp.com

NastyNasty FRIDAY, JANUARY 12 PHOTO CITY IMPROV, 543 ATLANTIC AVENUE 8 P.M. | $15-$20 FACEBOOK.COM/PHOTOCITYIMPROVCOMEDYCLUB; FACEBOOK.COM/NASTYNASTYBASS. [ ELECTRONIC ] Hailing from San Jose, California, NastyNasty (Jasper Reeder) blends the likes of dubstep, glitch-hop, 2-step, and noise, resulting in a uniquely contemporary, electronic hardstyle. Proudly eliciting the screwface in audiences, Reeder has supported electronic heavyweights Bassnectar and Zed’s Dead. NastyNasty’s latest record, “Broken Moon,” was released in October 2016 on the German label Saturate Records. Proko and Digital Ethos will also perform on the first night of Photo City’s anniversary weekend. — BY SUNNY ZAMAN

The Lustre Kings WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 10 DINOSAUR BAR-B-QUE, 99 COURT STREET 9 P.M. | FREE | DINOSAURBARBQUE.COM; LUSTREKINGS.COM [ ROCKABILLY ] All the reported sightings from the mouth-breathers at the Wal-Mart aside, the King is dead. Long live the King. If he were still on this side of the grass, Elvis Presley would be 93 years old. Uh-huh. He was the gateway to rock ‘n’ roll, and was a pill-popper before pill-poppin’ was cool. Well, in keeping with Elvis’s timelessness, Albany’s loyal subjects to the throne, The Lustre Kings bring its Elvis birthday bash tour to Rochester. This has become quite the annual event with all the local glitterati invited to sit in with the band. Behold. — BY FRANK DE BLASE

Intrepid bluesman Roger Kuhn is back with a highly anticipated new one he calls “Blues and Country.” Kuhn has that rare gift of sounding the same in the studio as he does on some random street corner in downtown Rochester. That’s right: we’ve got ourselves a for sure busker here. And Kuhn’s a good ‘un, too — he’s a fearless and unpredictable one. The problem is that this new record, “Blues and Country,” it ain’t done. I’m not sure what the hurry was all about. The tone and attitude, as well as the digits and slide dexterity, are all there. But these are all shuffles that aren’t supposed to dominate like instrumentals. Still, some tunes manage to make it through without the added dimension of a story, like “Revelator Blues,” the best of the bunch along with “New Stella Blues” and “Barrett Place Blues.” What’s missing is Kuhn’s voice and its witty, self-deprecating Upstate drawl. Of the album’s 14 tracks, just three have lyrics. Kuhn’s rhythm and bump serves the air well, but it begs for words to slither about his Delta slide boogie, where he’s received the most influence. “Blues and Country” has its moments and Kuhn’s appeal is there, but the album needed to stay on the grill a little longer. — BY FRANK DE BLASE

Personal Blend “Ride” Self-released personalblend.bandcamp.com

BLUES

The Juke Kings. Little

Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 258-0400. thelittle.org. 7-9 p.m. Upward Groove. Temple Bar and Grille, 109 East Ave. 232-6000. templebarandgrille.com. 10 p.m. POP/ROCK

Belmont, So Last Year, Maple Hill, Ghost Righter.

Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. bugjar.com. 8 p.m. $8-$10.

Elvis Birthday Bash with the Lustre Kings. Dinosaur Bar-

B-Que, 99 Court St. 3257090. dinosaurbarbque. com. 9 p.m. Paul Strowe. B-Side, 5 Liftbridge Lane. Fairport. 585-315-3003. fairportbside.com. 7-10 p.m.

Rocky Burning Band, Loaded Goat, Bone Bunn.

I thought I knew what I was getting into when the guitar kicked off Rochester band Personal Blend’s new EP, “Ride.” It hinted at a poppy, straight-ahead, guitar-driven party, but 45 seconds later the whole band deconstructs into a reggae groove. It’s a groove that’s shallow at first, but swimming rapidly into the deep end. By track three, the band adds some pumping organ to the one-drop. It chills and chops majestic. But purity is not the main focus, so the dub additives and the uninhibited swirling take on a cool psychedelic free fall that’s fun to groove to … or hell, just relax and listen.

*

ACOUSTIC/FOLK Brothers Blue. Downstairs Cabaret Theatre, 20 Windsor St. 325-4370. downstairscabaret.com. 7 p.m. $10.

— BY FRANK DE BLASE

Fresh Cut: Newly formed indie pop band Gold Koa, a collaboration between singersongwriter Cammy Enaharo and Oh Manitou’s Kamara Robideau and Matt Battle, is debuting its first song, “Little Lost,” an infectious dance tune that’s great for fighting off the winter blues. Go check out the single at rochestercitynewspaper.com.

Funk ‘n Waffles, 204 N Water Street. 585-448-0354. rochester.funknwaffles.com. 8 p.m. $5.

[ THU., JANUARY 11 ] ACOUSTIC/FOLK Bluegrass Jam. Bernunzio Uptown Music, 122 East Ave. 473-6140. bernunzio. com. Second Thursday of every month, 6:30-8 p.m. Jim Lane. Murph’s Irondequoit Pub, 705 Titus Ave. Irondequoit. 342-6780. 8 p.m. Old Main. Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. abilenebarandlounge.com. 8 p.m. $7. continues on page 17

A VIDEO SERIES ON ROCHESTER'S RICH COMMUNIT Y OF ARTISTS ONLY AT ROCHESTERCITYNEWSPAPER.COM

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 15


Music BURRITO PLACE

Hughes, Little Screamin’ Kenny — I’ve covered his songs all my life — Little Joe Washington, Grady Gaines, Lavelle White, Allison Fisher, Townes Van Zandt, Jerry Lightfoot. All the fun late night jams. I was hooked instantly. No hope of recovery.

FORMERLY PAOLA’S BURRITO PLACE

BUY ONE BURRITO GET ONE HALF OFF

When did you pick up the guitar?

My mom had guitars — two Martins and a 1970’s Rosewood Strat. And there was a flea market piano, my aunt’s coronet, and my friends’ gear when they’d leave it after our after-school “rehearsals.” I started playing piano, but the guitar was far more portable. The reason I play bare-knuckled is due to the scratches I put on my mom’s ‘41 Martin going through my Pete Townshend windmill phase. I started playing at age 8 and was grounded from ever using a pick at age 10. When I’m home from tour, I’ll play songs my mom taught me on her guitar and see where the noodling takes me. That guitar has songs already inside of it ready to be strummed out.

319 EXCHANGE BLVD., CORN HILL 585-271-3655

MON-SAT 11AM-10PM • SUN. 12PM - 8PM

PSST. Unlike Godot, we won't keep you waiting.

Which do you prefer: a little juke joint or a big festival stage?

Always fresh theater content.

Carolyn Wonderland remembers being grounded as a kid from ever using a pick on her mom's 1941 Martin guitar. PHOTO PROVIDED

Carolyn in Wonderland Carolyn Wonderland TUESDAY, JANUARY 16, AND WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 17 ABILENE BAR & LOUNGE, 153 LIBERTY POLE WAY 8 P.M. | $25-$30 ABILENEBARANDLOUNGE.COM; CAROLYNWONDERLAND.COM [ INTERVIEW ] BY FRANK DE BLASE

/ THEATER 16 CITY JANUARY 10 - 16, 2018

My love of Carolyn Wonderland began with my love of Johnny Winter, in particular, a love for his 1973 recording of Rick Derringer’s “Still Alive and Well.” That song has been my litmus test for blues artists who wring some rock into the stew along with their own blood and sweat. When Wonderland performed at the Xerox Rochester International Jazz Festival in 2009, she played “Still Alive and Well” — she tore it up in the process. I bounced and squealed like a 12-year-old kid on trucker speed and a pogo stick. And thus began said love affair. Born in Houston in 1972, Wonderland voraciously got into music through the instruments her mother had in the house. By the time she was a teenager, the blues bug had bit. In 2011 she moved to Austin, and spent a spell living out of her van since she was working more on the road than at home. Onstage, Wonderland is full of six-string

heat and sings with such passion it’s as if she’d crashed a gospel rehearsal. Whether it’s a shoebox honky-tonk or a huge outdoor affair, Wonderland routinely blows doors clean off at the hinges. It’s like, “Here’s your head; thanks for coming.” CITY had a chance to speak with Wonderland and discuss being grounded for using picks, putting her own twist on Pearl, and looking out for that elusive Mick Taylor riff. An edited transcript follows. CITY: Are you a singer that plays guitar or a guitar player that sings?

Carolyn Wonderland: As luck would have it, in a room full of guitar players, I’m a singer. And in a room full of singers, I’m a guitar player. Sometimes I’ll just whistle, play trumpet, sit near a piano, or bang on something. In our band, I try to make everyone sing. I love hearing our drummer, Kevin Lance, and bassist, Bobby Perkins, hollering along. This trip, y’all are in for a treat. We’ve kidnapped our good friend Shelley King to come sing and play with us, too. When did you first hear the blues?

Sneaking out to bars in Houston as a teenager. Blues bars seldom carded women carrying guitars in. I would borrow cars and fill them up with gas or buy tickets and drinks for friends’ older siblings if they’d take me. My favorites were some of Houston’s best. From Joe “Guitar”

Both, for different reasons. I love festivals because I believe, as evidenced by the actions of my youth, that one shouldn’t have to be 21 to hear live music. I love that kids will get up and dance without having to “loosen up” first, and that they are quite honest about how they dig or don’t dig what you’re playing. I like bars and other venues because I don’t have to censor my sailor mouth. But there’s something so right about a truly blue show on occasion. If you had one song to pick as your favorite, what would it be?

Ravel’s “Bolero.” Angélique Kidjo’s version. That, or pretty much anything Levon Helm ever sang. What’s on your bucket list?

Not sure. I am just pleasantly surprised I still get away with this. It’s as if no one has caught on or really tried that hard to stop me yet. I hope to play more with friends, stay healthy, and have a balance of road and home life. How do you feel your sound has changed or matured over the years?

The more you play, the less you suck at it. I hope it’s improved some. To me, it just feels like after 30 years the notes have gotten easier to find and it’s fun to learn new changes and ways into and out of phrases. Sometimes it’s nice to be immature and throw a wrench in here or there to make each other giggle on stage. Be on the lookout — listen out — for the misplaced Mick Taylor riff this tour. A hundred years from now what will they be saying about Carolyn Wonderland?

I hope it’s not my arrest record. But I haven’t lived every day yet.


Stringplicity. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 258-0400. thelittle.org. 7-9 p.m. Travis Fitch. 585 Rockin Burger Bar, 250 Pixley Road. 5852470079. 5-8 p.m. CLASSICAL

Eastman at Washington Square. ,. esm.rochester.edu/

community. 12:15-12:45 p.m.

Third Thursday Concerts.

Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. 276-8900. mag.rochester.edu. Every third Thursday, 7:30 p.m. Made possible by Rippey Endowed Trust. Included w/ museum admission. POP/ROCK Krypton 88. B-Side, 5 Liftbridge Lane. Fairport. 585315-3003. fairportbside.com. 7-10 p.m. Mike Pullano. Via Girasole Wine Bar, 3 Schoen Place. Pittsford. 641-0340. viagirasole.com. 7-10 p.m.

Folkfaces, Big Jazz Small Band. Funk ‘n Waffles, 204 N

Water Street. 585-448-0354. rochester.funknwaffles.com. 8 p.m. $10-$15.

[ FRI., JANUARY 12 ] JAZZ

Fred Costello & Roger Eckers Jazz Duo. Charley Brown’s, 1675 Penfield Rd. 385-9202. charleybrownspenfield.com. REGGAE/JAM

Space Junk, SKYwalker. Funk ‘n Waffles, 204 N Water Street. 585-448-0354. rochester. funknwaffles.com. 9:30 p.m. $5. POP/ROCK

PHOTO COURTESY RPO

SPECIAL EVENT | ‘E.T. THE EXTRA-TERRESTRIAL’ IN CONCERT

The Rochester Philharmonic Orchestra wants you to phone home and “be good” in the New Year. The RPO will perform the iconic music of John Williams live in accompaniment of Steven Spielberg’s beloved sci-fi family film, “E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial.” Telling the story of a young boy and his life-changing friendship with a lost, lonely alien, the film boasts an Oscar-winning score that contains some of Williams’ most rousing and magical compositions. Here’s hoping the concession stand’s stocked with plenty of Reece’s Pieces for intermission. Matthew Kraemer will guest conduct. The RPO will perform the score to “E.T.” on Friday, January 12, and Saturday, January 13, at Kodak Hall at Eastman Theatre, 60 Gibbs Street. 7 p.m. $24-$110. 454-2100; rpo.org. — BY ADAM LUBITOW

BLUES

Bill Schmitt and the Bluesmasters. Bar Louie, 935

Jefferson Rd. Henrietta. 4173610. 9 p.m.-midnight. Dirty Bourbon Blues Band. B-Side, 5 Liftbridge Lane. Fairport. 585-315-3003. fairportbside.com. 8-11 p.m. The Jess Novak Band. Dinosaur Bar-B-Que, 99 Court St. 325-7090. dinosaurbarbque.com. 10 p.m.

Backyard Chemistry. Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. abilenebarandlounge.com. 9:30 p.m. $5. Boss Tweed. Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. abilenebarandlounge.com. 6 p.m. David Bowie Tribute Show. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 7 p.m.-2 a.m. Performances by Hunky Dory, and Grease Creepers, and DJ set to follow. $5. Hey Mabel. B-Side, 5 Liftbridge Lane. Fairport. 585-315-3003. fairportbside.com. 8-11 p.m. Jumbo Shrimp. 585 Rockin Burger Bar, 250 Pixley Road. 5852470079. 8:30-11:30 p.m. $5.

CLASSICAL

[ SAT., JANUARY 13 ]

Jane Mutiny & Friends Birthday Bash. Abilene

ACOUSTIC/FOLK Tough Old Bird. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 258-0400. thelittle.org. 8-10 p.m.

I Dream A World. The Clover

Center for Arts and Spirituality, 1101 Clover St. 473-3200. therwcc.org. 7:30-9:30 p.m. Bring a non-perishable item for our Food Drive. $6-$15. JAZZ

Fred Costello & Roger Eckers Jazz Duo. Charley Brown’s,

1675 Penfield Rd. 385-9202. charleybrownspenfield.com. Nate Coffey. Via Girasole Wine Bar, 3 Schoen Place. Pittsford. 641-0340. viagirasole.com. 7-10 p.m. POP/ROCK

Druse, California Cousins, Dais, Chrmr, Derelict Vessel.

Murmur: A Tribute to R.E.M.. Funk ‘n Waffles, 204 N Water Street. 585-448-0354. rochester.funknwaffles.com. 9 p.m. $10. Rebels Posse. 585 Rockin Burger Bar, 250 Pixley Road. 5852470079. 8:30-11:30 p.m. $5.

[ SUN., JANUARY 14 ] ACOUSTIC/FOLK

Acoustic Brunch: Weber Music. Funk ‘n Waffles, 204 N Water Street. 585-448-0354. rochester.funknwaffles.com. noon. CLASSICAL

2nd Sunday Choral Vespers for Epiphany . The Lutheran Church of the Incarnate Word, 597 East Avenue. 244-6065. MusicAtIncarnateWord.org. 7-8:30 p.m.

Compline, performed by the Schola Cantorum . Christ Church, 141 East Ave. 454-3878. christchurchrochester.org. 9-9:30 p.m.

Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. bugjar.com. 8 p.m. $8.

Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. abilenebarandlounge.com. 8:30 p.m. $5. rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 17


SOUTH WEDGE

area businesses & restaurants

Eastman Organ Community Concert. St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, 25 Westminster Rd. 271-2240. esm.rochester. edu. 4 p.m. Freewill offering will benefit the Eastman organ department student travel fund.

[ MON., JANUARY 15 ] ACOUSTIC/FOLK

Happy Hour with Stormy Valle . Record Archive, 33 1/3 Rockwood St. 244-1210. 5-8 p.m. POP/ROCK

Haewa, Pine Needle Soul, and Joe Driscoll. Funk ‘n Waffles, 204 N Water Street. 585-448-0354. rochester. funknwaffles.com. 9 p.m. $10.

McKinley James. Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. abilenebarandlounge.com. 8 p.m. $5. The Mighty High and Dry. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 258-0400. thelittle.org. 7-9 p.m. Songwriters in the Round: Katie Preston. Funk ‘n

MEMBER OWNED, LOCALLY GROWN! Serving the Rochester Community for over 30 years!

Your place for first opportunities and second chances. Savings & Checking • Loans • Financial Education

SINGER-SONGWRITER | SAM NITSCH

Rochester musician Sam Nitsch is a talented multi-instrumentalist, but it’s the man’s voice that’ll hook you and pull you in. It’s thoughtful and honest and plain, which cradles his songs leaving them to breathe emotionally — and maybe dusted with just a pinch of sadness. It’s indie rock with a smile on its dial. Sam Nitsch plays Wednesday, January 17, at Sticky Lips BBQ City Music Hall, 625 Culver Road. 9 p.m. Free. stickylipsbbq.com; samnitschmusic.com. — BY FRANK DE BLASE

PSST. Feel passionate about something we've written? We welcome the discussion.

Waffles, 204 N Water Street. 585-448-0354. 7 p.m. Songwriters share their stories, what inspires them, and new music. $5.

[ TUE., JANUARY 16 ] JAZZ

3x88: Annie Wells, Katie Preston, and Amanda Ashley. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 258-0400. thelittle.org. 7-9 p.m.

Grove Place Jazz Project. 395 Gregory Street (between Clinton & South) www.genesee.coop • 585-461-2230

TIME FOR WINE & SPIRITS The only liquor store in the South Wedge! M, T, W 12-8pm Th, F, Sat 12-9pm Closed Sundays

661 South Avenue • 413-3826

18 CITY JANUARY 10 - 16, 2018

Downstairs Cabaret Theatre, 20 Windsor St. 325-4370. downstairscabaret.com. 7 p.m. Featuring a different set of Eastman School of Music Students and other area jazz artisans every Tues. $10. POP/ROCK

Carolyn Wonderland. Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. abilenebarandlounge.com. 8 p.m. $25-$30.

Ugly Sun, Sour Club, Citizens Against People, The Stone Lows. Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. bugjar.com. 8 p.m. $7-$9.

/ OPINIONS


PSST. Out of touch? Out of tune? See our music reviews from Frank De Blase.

/ MUSIC

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 19


Theater

The North Star Players rehearsing “No Struggle, No Progress,” which will be staged at MuCCC January 16 through January 20. PHOTO COURTESY TONY VALLE

Lasting legacy “No Struggle, No Progress” TUESDAY, JANUARY 16, THROUGH FRIDAY, JANUARY 19, AT 7:30 P.M.; SATURDAY, JANUARY 20, AT 4 P.M. MUCCC, 142 ATLANTIC AVENUE $8-$15 | 455-0380; MUCCC.ORG [ INTERVIEW ] BY DANIEL J. KUSHNER

Two hundred years have passed since trailblazing abolitionist and famous Rochesterian Frederick Douglass was born. And while his bicentennial is cause for celebration, it’s also a sobering reminder: It’s 2018 and mass incarceration of African Americans and police brutality are still national maladies; civil rights advocates from Black Lives Matter to professional athletes are still maligned and marginalized for protesting peacefully; the Southern strategy and other forms of voter suppression are still actively utilized; the debate over the appropriateness of Confederate monuments still rages across states and social media alike. In a modern era that at times seems to eerily echo Jim Crow, the legacy of Frederick Douglass is critically relevant. 20 CITY JANUARY 10 - 16, 2018

Enter the North Star Players and stage director David A. Shakes, whose multidisciplinary theatrical presentation “No Struggle, No Progress” — running from January 16 through January 20 at the MuCCC — honors Douglass and his enduring message of liberation and equality through music, dance, images, and of course the words of Douglass himself. The North Star Players will be joined by notable collaborators: Trumpeter Herb Smith of the Rochester Philharmonic Orchestra and Thomas Warfield, dancer and professor at National Technical Institute for the Deaf. Douglass scholars will also contribute. CITY connected with Shakes via email to ask him about Douglass’s enduring impact and the approach of “No Struggle, No Progress” in presenting his story. An edited version of the interview follows. CITY: How does the story of Frederick Douglass necessitate a multimedia exposition? David A. Shakes: “No Struggle, No Progress”

pays tribute to Frederick Douglass through the of mediums of dance, music, song, oratory, and poetry to give presence and voice to ways people of color interpret, understand, and express the value of his life and legacy. It is a holistic literacy of

African American people in the diaspora. Multimedia makes his message accessible to today’s audiences, especially young people. Frederick Douglass used writing, orality, photography, and his personal travels as his mediums of his day, to be explored and used to advance his messages and worldview. How do the guest performances from Thomas Warfield and Herb Smith enhance the storytelling?

Thomas Warfield and Herb Smith are artistic workers and artists. They are examples of artists inspired by the social justice of Douglass, who go beyond the boundaries of “art for art’s sake” to stir the soul, to seek the humanity in non-verbal ways. Douglass seems to be a historical figure about whom the general public only has a cursory understanding. Our collective knowledge about the man and his legacy can often be summed up in a sentence or two. How does the work address this?

“No Struggle, No Progress” presents an opportunity to look at the life of Frederick Douglass through the voices and eyes of fellow freedom fighters as well as through his own words and letters. Learning about him is a grand undertaking. The more we

learn, the more we recognize that we don’t know enough. Are there any misconceptions about Douglass that this work aims to dispel?

No, we aim to enhance his legacy for it is a complex legacy. The relevance of his prophetic words, visionary leadership, and brilliant analysis of the enslavement of African peoples and its effect on our nation is profound. What have we yet to learn from Douglass as a society that might help us alleviate institutionalized racial justice?

We have learned that our work to increase moral integrity is far from over; we must remain ever vigilant in working for justice, dignity, and truth. We must be willing to struggle to reach the goal of progress and to confront head-on racial injustice everywhere. Visit this story at rochestercitynewspaper.com to view more images and a video spotlighting David Shakes from our art/WORK series.


Arts & Performance Art Exhibits [ OPENING ] Flower City Arts Center, 713 Monroe Ave. Where Turkeys Go to Die. Through Feb. 25. Opening reception Fri., Jan. 12, 6-9 p.m. Photographs by David Corbin. 244-1730. rochesterarts.org. GO ART! Seymour Place, 201 E Main St. Batavia. Light over Dark: The Art of Sean Madden. Through Mar. 3. 343-9313. ghallock@goart.org. goart.org. Main Street Arts, 20 W. Main St., Clifton Springs. Dream State. Through Feb. 16. Opening reception Jan. 13, 4-7 p.m. Paintings, sculpture, and photography by Matt Duquette, Bill Finger, Carrianne Hendrickson, and Lin Price. 315-462-0210. mainstreetartsgallery.com. Rosalie “Roz” Steiner Art Gallery, Genesee Community College, One College Rd. The Chromatic Nude. Through Feb. 16. Opening reception Thurs. Jan 25, 12:30 p.m. Paintings by Michael Price. genesee.edu/gallery. Whitman Works Co., 1826 Penfield Road. Penfield. Radiance: Luminaries by Mark Groaning. Through Jan. 31. Opening reception Sat. Jan. 13, 6-9 p.m. Works by multi-media artist Mark Groaning focused on his Luminaries collection. 747-9999. whitmanworks.com. [ CONTINUING ] 1570 Gallery at Valley Manor, 1570 East Ave. All Natural. Through Feb. 18. A display of nature and landscape by Peter Blackwood. 546-8400. episcopalseniorlife.org. Axom Gallery, 176 Anderson Ave., 2nd floor. Embracing the Landscape. Through Jan. 13. Paintings by Rick Muto. 2326030 x23. axomgallery.com. Davison Gallery, Cultural Life Center, Roberts Wesleyan College, 2301 Westside Dr. Landscape. Through Feb. 15. Opening reception and artist talk Fri. Jan. 12, 5-7 p.m. Art by Constance Mauro and Judy Gohringer. 594-6442. Gallery 384, 384 East Ave. Winsome Winter Wishes. Through Jan. 28. Art by Wendy Menzie, Margaret Miyake, and more. Gallery Q, 100 College Ave. Take the Long Way Home. Through Jan. 25. Work by Nancy Topolski and Allen C. Topolski. Gallery r, 100 College Ave. Patricia Russotti: Marking Matters in Time. Through Jan. 21. Photography and installation by Patricia Russotti. 585-256-3312. galleryr.rit.edu. GO ART! Seymour Place, 201 E Main St. Batavia. Cabel and Zen. Through Feb. 3, 2018. An exhibit of Photography and Illustration by Jim Burns. 343-9313. ghallock@goart.org. goart.org. International Art Acquisitions, 3300 Monroe Ave. Vanishing Horizon. Through Jan. 31. Watercolors by Arno Arrak. internationalartacquisitions.com. Lumiere Photo, 100 College Ave. You Want it Darker. Through Jan. 31. Works by JFK/AJVK and Sasha Rose Herbert. Live music by Matt Sauer and Eric Witkowski. 461-4447.

PHOTO PROVIDED

LECTURE | ‘THE THREE ERIE CANALS’ The Erie Canal is currently in a bicentennial period — construction on the canal broke ground in 1817 near Rome and was celebrated as complete in 1825 — but 2018 also marks the 100th year since the completion of the New York State Barge Canal. The Perinton Historical Society, on Tuesday, will host a lecture about the three eras of the Erie Canal, from “Clinton’s Ditch” of the early-1800’s and the enlarged canal system completed in 1862 to the current barge canal system. Speaker Bruce Schwendy, a retired manufacturing engineer who has long studied the canal and regularly travels it on a 40-foot houseboat, will discuss the canal’s history and its folklore in “The Three Erie Canals.” “The Three Erie Canals: History and Folklore” will take place Tuesday, January 16, at the Fairport Public Library, 1 Fairport Village Landing. 7 p.m. Free, but reservations required. 223-9091; fairportlibrary.org. — BY JAKE CLAPP

ART BY BILL FINGER

ART | ‘DREAM STATE’ Main Street Arts Gallery is opening 2018 with an invitational exhibition of work by four artists that explores the personal territory of unreality, reverie, and the push and pull of time and space. “Dream State” includes symbol-laden paintings by Buffalo artist Matt Duquette, surreal photographs by Bill Finger of Seattle, hybrid human and animal ceramic sculptures by Rochester artist Carrianne Hendrickson, and paintings of figures in the shifting substance of landscapes and domestic scenes by Lin Price of Ithaca. An opening reception will be held Saturday, January 13, 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. “Dream State” continues through February 16 at Main Street Arts, 20 West Main Street, Clifton Springs. Gallery hours are Tuesday through Saturday, 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Free. 315-462-0210; mainstreetartsgallery.com. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 21


Art

“Nature in the Time of Technology,” a layered, digitally-manipulated work by JFK/AJVK currently on view at Lumiere Photo. PHOTO PROVIDED

New blood “You Want It Darker” THROUGH JANUARY 31 LUMIERE PHOTO, 100 COLLEGE AVENUE, ENTRANCE IN REAR OF BUILDING TUESDAY THROUGH FRIDAY, 9 A.M. TO 6 P.M., AND SATURDAY, 10 A.M. TO 2 P.M. FREE | 461-4447; LUMIEREPHOTO.COM [ ROUND-UP ] BY REBECCA RAFFERTY

Following a heart attack in February 2017, Lumiere Photo founder Bill Edwards came to the grim conclusion that he had to close up shop in the end of March. Lumiere remained partially operational for months while Edwards focused on healing and discussed selling the business to potential buyers. Throughout 2017 Lumiere still offered digital printing and limited framing services to customers, but against the odds, the business is fully operational once more, and last week hosted its second First Friday event since returning to full-time hours in late November. Despite the brutal temperatures, a dedicated crowd came out for the reception 22 CITY JANUARY 10 - 16, 2018

for “You Want It Darker,” an exhibit of layered, digitally-manipulated “emotional landscapes” by JFK/AJVK (the art appellation of John Kosboth) and Sasha Rose Herbert’s large-format photomontages from her “Inbeneath” series. The evening also included live music by Matt Sauer and Eric Witkowski and a poetry reading by Harlow Crandall. Installed on the walls of the business space, JFK/AJVK’s work is a dreamy crash of faces and places that reads like a remix of reverie and imagination, and pairs well with Herbert’s enigmatic, interrupted and repetition-heavy imagery that’s installed in the building’s long hallway. In addition to offering framing, the business provides digital retouching and fine art and wide-format printing services. The team plans to get its online store up and running in a matter of weeks; , through the web, they’ll offer frame and mat kits as well as archival supplies and accessories. Edwards retained his role as president of Lumiere and oversees the overall business. Framing Manager Rheytchul Kimmel runs the day-to-day business of designing with customers, ordering supplies, housing, matting and framing works, and installation

if the customer desires. Nikki Miller is handling digital printing services and Ginny Byers is the off-site accountant. Lumiere began participating in First Friday art openings again in December: “Welcome Back” featured paintings by Diane Elmslie and Jeana Bonacci-Roth. Going forward, the space will host monthly art openings, with music and poetry readings at least every other month — with steppedup frequency beyond First Fridays as the weather improves. Kimmel says that artists should watch Lumiere’s Facebook page for calls for work that will include opportunities to participate in gallery shows, pop-up shops, music events, and more.

The Yards Collaborative Residency SATURDAYS IN JANUARY, 10 A.M. TO 2 P.M. THE YARDS, 50-52 PUBLIC MARKET WAY FREE | 362-1977; THEYARDSROCHESTER.COM

The 2018 edition of The Yards Collaborative Residency kicked off over the weekend with

open studio hours during which visitors could chat with this round’s artists as they settled into the space. Now in its sixth year, the residency draws not only local makers but also artists from elsewhere, like Caleb Sarvis, who’s based in Myrtle Beach. Sarvis says he’s interested in how individual memories and experiences impact how his work is interpreted differently by each viewer. His current paintings incorporate elements of typography and stylized shapes, as well as stream-of-consciousness observations in hand-written cursive. Brooklyn-based artist Annalisa Barron will be creating wearable and performative sculpture, including an optical Theremin that will be played by Rochester-based soundscape and spoken word outfit, The Velvet Noose, whose members Alyson Trombulak and Harold Taddy are also taking part in the residency. In the group of Rochester-based artists is Christie Nesbit, who creates collages and assemblages reflecting her concern with the coexistence of joy and pain within memories. The work has a distinctly vintage tone to it — she gets her materials by treating consignment shops, antique stores, and estate sales like an art supply store. Rose Richter creates intricate portraits of natural elements — frogs, birds, and bugs — using charcoal she harvests directly from the fire. Accustomed to drawing sketchbook-sized paper, Richter says she’s interested in making more impactful, larger-than-life drawings during this residency. Lisa Marie Rickman is planning to create ink, watercolor, and gold leaf illustrations that merge the myths and aesthetic styles of her dual heritage — her mother is Dominican and her father is German — to create a new pantheon that represents various archetypes. At the moment she’s engaged in researching and doing warm-up sketches. Rebecca Lomuto wasn’t yet set up in the common space when I visited — her own studio is at The Yards — but you can read CITY’s profile on Lomuto and her work in the most recent Emerging Artists feature at rochestercitynewspaper.com. The public can track the artists’ progress each Saturday in January from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. At the residency’s conclusion, a First Friday studio showcase will be held Friday, February 2, from 6 p.m. to 11 p.m. Visit the online version of this piece for more images from “You Want It Darker,” a video of Harlow Crandall’s poetry reading, photos of The Yards residency, and more.


My Sister’s Gallery at the Episcopal Church Home, 505 Mt. Hope Ave. Visions for the Season. Through Jan. 21. A display of photography by members of Camera Rochester. 546-8400. EpiscopalSeniorLife.org. The Owl House, 75 Marshall St. Aura and Stock. Through Feb. 19. Art by Rebecca Aloisio. 3602920. owlhouserochester.com. Oxford Gallery, 267 Oxford St. Holiday Exhibit. Through Jan. 13. Holiday themed paintings by Patricia Tribatone, Anthony Dungan, Rosemary Lyons, and more. Williams Gallery at First Unitarian Church, 220 S Winton Rd. Nature’s Beauty. Through Jan. 15. Photography by Joseph Woody.

Art Events [ WED., JANUARY 10 ] Genesee Valley Plein Air Painters 2018 Art Show. Through Feb. 1. Barnes & Noble, 3349 Monroe Ave. Through Feb. 1. Features 75 paintings created by artist members in the Greater Rochester 586-6020. gvpap.com. [ FRI., JANUARY 12 ] Winter’s Warmth: A Soup(er) Benefit. 5-7 p.m. Cat Clay, 1115 E. Main St., Suite 242 Admission gets you a hand-made bowl and a package of Healthy Sister’s soup mix. 100% of proceeds are donated to Healthy Sisters Soup & Bean Works $20. 414-5643. catclay.com. [ SAT., JANUARY 13 ] Anderson Alley Artists Open Studios. Second Saturday of every month, 12-4 p.m Anderson Arts Building, 250 N. Goodman St. 201-910-1603. andersonartsbuilding@gmail. com. andersonalleyartists.com. Second Saturday as Hungerford. Second Saturday of every month, 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Hungerford Building, 1115 E. Main St. Meet 20+ artists in their studios. Enter at Door #2. Many studios will be giving demonstrations 469-8217. Second Saturdays. Second Saturday of every month, 3-6 p.m. Cornerstone Gallery, 8732 Main St., Honeoye. A variety of open venues in Honeoye Falls baierpottery.com.

Roc MLK Comedy Festival. 8:30 p.m. Comedy Club, 2235 Empire Blvd Webster Fri. Jan. 12, 8:30 p.m. Sat. Jan. 13, 8:30 p.m. & 1:30 p.m. Featuring Talent, Chris Thomas, Artie Rob, and Black Ernie $25. 671-9080. theitsjustcomedyclub-com. [ SAT., JANUARY 13 ] Polite Ink. Sketch & Improv presents: Making Our Mark. 7:30-9:30 p.m. MuCCC, 142 Atlantic Ave $10-$15. politeink.com. [ TUE., JANUARY 16 ] Backdraft II: Laughdraft. 8-11 p.m Firehouse Saloon, 814 S. Clinton Ave. 902-2010. thefirehousesaloon.com.

Jess Hilarious. 7:30 & 10 p.m. Comedy Club, 2235 Empire Blvd Webster $30. theitsjustcomedyclub-com.

Dance Events [ MON., JANUARY 15 ] International Folk Dance Club of Rochester. 7:30-10 p.m. JCC of Greater Rochester, 1200 Edgewood Avenue Located in JCC’s Dance Studio. Circle line couple dances from around the world. Beginners welcome $7-$8. 315-926-5652. jccrochester.org.

Community Activism [ SAT., JANUARY 13 ] Food Not Bombs Sort/Cook/ Serve Food. 3-6 p.m. St. Joseph’s House of Hospitality, 402 South Ave. 585-232-3262. [ MON., JANUARY 15 ] Learn about SURJ ROC. 7 p.m. Flying Squirrel Community Space, 285 Clarissa St. Find out what showing up for racial justice is and learn what they do.

Film [ WED., JANUARY 10 ] The Rebound. 6:30-8:30 p.m. The Little Theatre, 240 East

Avenue Part of Dialogue on Disability special programming 258-0200. interactive.wxxi.org.

Special Events [ FRI., JANUARY 12 ] Baby, it’s Cold Outside: Ambush 48 at Side Bar. 6-9 p.m. Side Bar, 242 South Ave Ambush is a monthly rotating happy hour for LGBTQ+ women to gather and celebrate our community 585-454-2477. doyle.jen17@ gmail.com. facebook.com/ ambushrochester. [ SAT., JANUARY 13 ] Family Sleepover at the Zoo. 6:15 p.m. Seneca Park Zoo, 2222 St. Paul St $60. 3367213. senecaparkzoo.org.

Theater The Devil, the Witch, and the Blacksmith. Through Jan. 13. MuCCC, 142 Atlantic Ave Tues.-Sun. Jan. 10, 11, 13, 8 p.m. Starring David Jacobs. Directed by Kevin Dedes $15$25. 454-9371. muccc.org.

Theater Audition [ SUN., JANUARY 14 ] Two Boys Kissing Auditions. 4 p.m. Blackfriars Theatre, 795 E. Main St Auditions and callbacks will consist of cold reads from the script. No monologues are necessary 4541260. blackfriars.org/auditions.

In Memory of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. "I have a dream that my ...children will not be judged by the color of their skin, but by the content of their character." We salute the following students for the example they have set with their lives in school and in the community by living the ideals of Martin Luther King, Jr.

Martin Luther King Recipients 2018 #2 - Damyra Allison

#28 - Aaliyah McNeil

East Lower School - Khalil Bostick

#4 - Mya Fleming

#33 - Anthony Hernandez

Rochester International Academy (Elementary) - Blnd Abdullah

#7 - Honour Patterson

#34 - Arianna Diaz

Wilson Foundation Academy - Monique Carlton

#8 - Normarys Beltran

#39 - Christopher Andrades

#58 (Secondary) - Luis Clausell

#9 - Yaniel Corporan Perez

#41 - Michael Sosa-Velez

East Upper School - Joel Alicea

#10 - Pratik Magar

#42 - Annabellee Quintana

Edison Career and Technology H.S - Leyla Negron Integrated Arts and Technology H.S - Abner Lopez

#12 - Camryn McFadden-Olivier #43 - Nyla Henry

Leadership Academy For Young Men - Tykem Wilson

Call for Participants

#15 - Paw T Moo

#44 - Aaliyah Matos

[ MON., JANUARY 15 ] Sing with the Rochester Oratorio Society. 6:30-9 p.m Asbury First United Methodist Church, 1050 East Ave 4732234. rossings.org.

#16 - Sariah Brooks

#45 - Azmhire Rollins

#17 - Arianna Dorado

#46 - Jermaine Williams

#19 - Alexis Hatchett

#50 - Masengesho Irasubiza

Comedy

#20 - Xavier Mewborn

#53 - Quentin Nowden

School Without Walls - Samyla Seymour

[ THU., JANUARY 11 ] Brooks Wheelan. 7:30 p.m. Comedy at the Carlson, 50 Carlson Rd Thurs.-Sat. Jan. 11, 12, 13, 7:30 p.m. Additional 10 p.m. show Fri. & Sat. Jan. 12, 13 $12-$17. carlsoncomedy.com.

#23 - Rafiah Musa

#57 - DeMani Scott Foster

Vanguard Collegiate High School - Ty-Asia Edwards

#25 - Evette Owens

#58 (Elementary) - Hope Reddington Home/Hospital Program - Jayleen Barnes Quirindongo

[ FRI., JANUARY 12 ] Comedy Night to Benefit Generation Two. 7:30-9 p.m. Jefferson Avenue School, 303 Jefferson Ave. $15. 388-0925. G2Rochester.org.

Celebrating 35 years of outstanding students!

Monroe High School - Shayla Harper Northeast High School - Yaumira Hernandez Rochester International Academy (Secondary) - Dafeer Muthana School of the Arts - Keeazhia Thompson

The 35th annual Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. tribute awards ceremony will be held at School of the Arts, on January 16, 2018 at 6:30 pm. The Public is invited.

Rochester Teachers Association Human Relations Committee rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 23


Movie Theaters Searchable, up-to-the-minute movie times for all area theaters can be found at rochestercitynewspaper.com, and on City’s mobile website.

Movies

Brockport Strand 93 Main St, Brockport, 637-3310, rochestertheatermanagement.com

Canandaigua Theatres 3181 Townline Road, Canandaigua, 396-0110, rochestertheatermanagement.com

Cinema Theater 957 S. Clinton St., 271-1785, cinemarochester.com

Culver Ridge 16 2255 Ridge Rd E, Irondequoit  544-1140, regmovies.com

Dryden Theatre 900 East Ave., 271-3361, dryden.eastmanhouse.org

Hot off the presses “The Post”

(PG-13), DIRECTED BY STEVEN SPIELBERG OPENS FRIDAY, JANUARY 12

Eastview 13 Eastview Mall, Victor 425-0420, regmovies.com

Geneseo Theatres

[ PREVIEW ] BY ADAM LUBITOW

Geneseo Square Mall, 243-2691, rochestertheatermanagement.com

Greece Ridge 12 176 Greece Ridge Center Drive 225-5810, regmovies.com

Henrietta 18 525 Marketplace Drive 424-3090, regmovies.com

The Little 240 East Ave., 258-0444 thelittle.org

For the past year, it’s been tempting to try and parse every movie that’s hit theaters, reading each superhero origin story, goofy comedy, and earnest drama for signs of how it relates to or comments on the age of Trump. And there’s good reason for that — the endless bumbling, corruption, and lies of the current administration has saturated every aspect of our daily lives to the point where it’s subsumed all else. If you can make it a single day — let

Movies 10 2609 W. Henrietta Road 292-0303, cinemark.com

Pittsford Cinema 3349 Monroe Ave., 383-1310 pittsford.zurichcinemas.com

Tinseltown USA/IMAX 2291 Buffalo Road 247-2180, cinemark.com

Webster 12 2190 Empire Blvd., 888-262-4386, amctheatres.com

Vintage Drive In 1520 W Henrietta Rd., Avon 226-9290, vintagedrivein.com

alone an hour or two — without worrying about whether the malignant cheez doodle in office is going to lead us into nuclear war with a tweet or erase the rights of marginalized citizens with a flick of his pen, you’re an infinitely stronger person than I. But the reality is that most of these movies have been in production for years before they reach audiences, likely making any connection they have to our precise moment in time a mere coincidence. All this to say that “The Post” hits theaters with a unique advantage: rushed into production just this past May, it’s one of the first narrative films to be made directly in response to the Trump presidency. Directed by Steven Spielberg, the film stars Meryl Streep and Tom Hanks — basically the Holy Trinity of modern prestige filmmaking — in a sort of prequelslash-originstory to “All the President’s Men,” as the film focuses on the 1971 showdown between The Washington Post and President Nixon over the publishing of the Pentagon Papers.

Tom Hanks, Meryl Streep, and the cast of “The Post.” PHOTO COURTESY 20TH CENTURY FOX

PSST. Looking for more movie reviews?

We’ve got a bonus feature online from Adam Lubitow.

/ MOVIES 24 CITY JANUARY 10 - 16, 2018

Leaked by military analyst Daniel Ellsberg (Matthew Rhys) to the New York Times, the papers consist of 22 years’ worth of documents chronicling American involvement in Vietnam. They paint a very different portrait of the war than had been portrayed to the American public, essentially proving that the government has been lying about the state of things, putting on a good face as it sent more and more of the nation’s sons off to die for the cause. The New York Times is the first to go to press, but when they’re served with a federal injunction, the Washington Post has an opportunity to run with the story. Left to face the question of whether or not to publish stolen government documents is Katherine Graham (Streep), the former socialite turned publisher of the Post (the first woman in the country to hold such a position), who inherited the business from her husband after his untimely suicide. Katherine faces pressure from Editorin-Chief Ben Bradlee (Hanks, reliably good) an old-school newspaperman who believes in the responsibility of the press, while the rest of the paper’s board implore her to play it safe. This critical juncture comes just as the Post is first going public. It’s no longer just a small, regional paper, but a true business with investors to consider. One of the things Liz Hannah’s script does so well is illustrating the ways media organizations must constantly balance their civic duties while keeping an eye on the bottom line. After all, journalists can’t hold anyone to account if they don’t have a job.


Mystery machines “Solver” (NR), DIRECTED BY XANDY SMITH OPENS FRIDAY, JANUARY 12 [ BONUS FEATURES ] BY ADAM LUBITOW

“The Post” tells the story of a free press duking it out against a corrupt administration and, coming at a time when journalism is again under aggressive attack, calling the film “topical” is understating things considerably. The film also lines up with a moment when the culture is uniquely focused on the experiences of women. As the film becomes the story of how Graham (a figure mostly left out of “All the President’s Men”) finally comes into her own, finding her voice after years of being the lone woman in rooms filled with condescending, powerful men, Streep makes the most of the role. Rounding out the cast is a murderers’ row of distinguished actors, including Bob Odenkirk, Bruce Greenwood, Carrie Coon, Jesse Plemons, Sarah Paulson, Bradley Whitford, Tracy Letts, and Michael Stuhlbarg (who deserves some sort of prize for having appeared in no fewer than three likely Best Picture nominees in 2017), all putting in solid work in roles of varying size and importance. In seeking to tackle our country’s current climate, Spielberg has faced criticism that his film is too on the nose. But if he wants to make it impossible for anyone watching the film to miss the point he’s trying to make, well, it’s hard to argue there’s anything wrong with that. “The Post” is populist filmmaking in the best sense: rousing, impeccably crafted, and always riveting. It’s an instruction manual for media organizations on how to carry on in tough times, an essential tribute to the role of journalists, and a powerful defense of the free press and the First Amendment.

Taking inspiration from the world of puzzles, mysteries, and the problemsolving thrills of escape rooms, the entertaining new indie adventure film “Solver” was shot over the summer of 2016 in Greater Rochester locations, including Honeoye Falls and Mendon. Writer-producer Jack Kelley, a Mendon native, describes the film as “National Treasure” or “The Da Vinci Code” on a micro-budget scale, explaining that the types of codes and puzzles depicted in those films have always held a special place in his imagination. “When I think about the idea of a lost treasure, I get this tingle up my spine,” he says. “And when you know somebody put time into designing clues that need to be figured out, there’s something so exciting about the combination of emotional excitement and the intellectual engagement of trying to solve that puzzle.” Though Kelley now lives in Los Angeles, he spent ten years in New York City, toiling in finance and commercial

Kerry Knuppe and John Ruby in “Solver.” PHOTO COURTESY EMPIRE BUILDER PRODUCTIONS

real estate before deciding to redirect his energies and focus on his longtime passion for filmmaking and writing. Spurred on by receiving an award for one of his early screenplays, Kelley in 2014 founded a production company, Empire Builder Productions, with his friend and creative partner, John Ruby. Together they came up with the story for “Solver,” the company’s first feature. The film follows Luke (played by Ruby), a young professional who returns to his hometown after his grandfather vanishes under mysterious circumstances. Visiting his grandfather’s cabin, Luke reunites with a childhood acquaintance (Kerry Knuppe) and gradually uncovers a trail of clues that lead to a global conspiracy with ties to the infamous, top secret CIA mind control experiment, MKUltra. Like the inventive contraptions that fuel its plot, the film maintains a pleasingly handcrafted feel. Kelley talks enthusiastically about the process of creating the film’s many puzzles and devices, which he proudly notes were designed as practical effects, and really work. That attention to detail is reflected on screen, supported by strong performances and some striking rural New York cinematography. But for all its mysteries and treasure hunting thrills, “Solver” at its heart is a story grounded in the idea of finding one’s roots, a theme Kelley says made the project perfect for filming in his former hometown. “I wanted to bring it back to an environment that resonated with me emotionally. I wrote what I knew,” Kelly says. “I know New York City and I know Upstate New York, and the dichotomy between those felt symbolic of the evolution Luke goes through.” Along with director Xandy Smith, Kelley and Ruby set about finding talented local crew members to incorporate into the L.A.-based crew they’d brought with them, making the production a truly collaborative process. Kelley is thrilled with the results of those efforts, and hopes

that “Solver” is just part of a growing trend that finds more films making the choice to shoot in the area. “I’m proud of what we accomplished, and happy that we were able to make it in Rochester,” he says. “I’m hopeful and inspired by the idea that more films could come to Upstate New York, and that the birthplace of film could again become a place that’s known for cinema and movie-making.” “Solver” will premiere on Friday, January 12, 6:30 p.m. at the Little Theatre (240 East Avenue), and will screen again at 3:30 p.m. on Sunday, January 14 at the Cinema Theater (957 South Clinton Avenue). Kelley will be in attendance to participate in a Q&A following both screenings. The film will also be released on iTunes and Amazon on January 23, just in time for National Puzzle Day.

Coming Attractions:

Grab a few drinks and schmooze with other local filmmakers when the Rochester Association for Film Arts and Sciences

(RAFAS) holds their monthly networking event on Thursday, January 11, from 6:30 to 9 p.m. at The Toasted Bear Tavern & Grill (689 South Avenue). rafasny.org. On Monday, January 15, the Visual Studies Workshop (31 Prince Street) pays tribute to Martin Luther King Jr. with a program of short films, headlined by the premiere of “Train of Thought,” a video installation from VSW grad Rashaad Parker, with live music from the Ryan Johnson Project. 5 to 7 p.m. $5 suggested donation. vsw.org. Find out what’s brewing in the local non-fiction filmmaking scene during the year’s first monthly meeting of the Rochester Documentary Filmmakers Group, on Thursday, January 18, at 5

p.m. at the Little Theatre (240 East Avenue; thelittle.org). Have information about an upcoming film event or screening? Send details to adam.lubitow@gmail.com.

PSST. Is it worth a thousand words? Check our art reviews from Rebecca Rafferty.

Looking to be a better ally? Stay up to date with our coverage of racial & LGBTQ issues. / ART / NEWS

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 25


Classifieds For information: Call us (585) 244-3329 Fax us (585) 244-1126 Mail Us City Classifieds 250 N. Goodman Street Rochester, NY 14607 Email Us classifieds@ rochester-citynews.com EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY

All real estate advertised in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act, which makes it unlawful, “to make, print, or publish, any notice, statement, or advertisement, with respect to the sale or rental of a dwelling that indicates any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin.” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under the age of 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertisement for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. Call the local Fair Housing Enforcement Project, FHEP at 325-2500 or 1-866-671-FAIR. Si usted sospecha una practica de vivienda injusta, por favor llame al servicio legal gratis. 585-325-2500 - TTY 585-325-2547.

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HEY! Thanks for reading.

Join the discussion on social media.

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Jam Section BRIAN S. MARVIN Lead vocalist, looking for an audition to join band, cover tunes, originals and has experience with bands 585-259-3717 CALLING ALL MUSICIANS OF ALL GENRES the Rochester Music Coalition wants you! Please register on our website. For further info: www.rochestermusiccoalition.org info@rochestermusiccoalition. org 585-235-8412 GROOVY, JAZZY, FUNKY new group in search of a Keyboard player. Playing Winehouse, Badu, daft punk. Practice in Irondequoit Mondays @ 6. 2ndstreetsymphony@gmail.com

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/ NEWS 26 CITY JANUARY 10 - 16, 2018


PSST. Out of touch? Out of tune? See our music reviews from Frank De Blase.

HomeWork A cooperative effort of City Newspaper and RochesterCityLiving, a program of the Landmark Society.

Graduate to Colgate

84 Colgate Street The 19th Ward neighborhood in the city’s southwest quadrant has so much going for it—high quality, yet affordable historic

housing stock, intact historic streetscapes, a diverse population, an active and engaged neighborhood association, and proximity to Genesee Valley Park, University of Rochester, and downtown. It’s a great urban neighborhood in which to put down roots

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and settle into a great historic house at a reasonable price. Located on a quiet dead end street that backs up to School No. 16, 84 Colgate Street is a typical 19th Ward

Find your way home with TO ADVERTISE CONTACT TRACEY TODAY! CALL 244-3329 X10 OR EMAIL TMYKINS@ROCHESTER-CITYNEWS.COM

American Foursquare. With an asking price of $64,995, it has plenty of potential to work with. 84 Colgate has had just two owners over its 100-year history, leaving it in good condition for its next family. Much of the original

Greece; 3065 Mt Read Blvd. $84,900 Townhome, part of Pine Ridge Townhome development. Features; Private Driveway, ATTACHED GARAGE, Bright/Open floor plan, Living room w/cathedral ceilings, skylights & corner fireplace. Updates; 2007 thermopane windows/sliding glass patio doors. New counter tops 2013. New Furnace, A/C, & Water Heater (2016). All kitchen appliances included. Patio doors lead to large private fenced-in patio. Remax Realty Group 585-218-6802

character of the home remains latent, waiting

At the rear of the house, the sizeable kitchen could be completely upgraded for a new, modern look or could be left as is with a fresh coat of paint or a new countertop and still be perfectly functional. The former pantry area offers enough room for a dining table. Off the kitchen, you’ll find a full bath—a rare luxury in a house of this vintage. The stairs to the second floor are also carpeted but likely have hardwoods beneath. Upstairs, you’ll find two bedrooms, a second full bath, and a third room that was converted from a bedroom into a kitchen decades ago. This room offers flexibility; the most recent owner used it as a second floor laundry but a new owner could use it as an in-law suite or could convert the space back to a third bedroom. A large sleeping porch offers expansive views of the backyard and a perfect spot to enjoy morning coffee or a good book during the warmer months.

for a new owner to make it shine. To start, the home offers a nearly full width front porch, which appears to have always been enclosed. It has loads of windows, a built-in bench, and

The unfinished attic offers space for storage or the potential for finishing. Outside there is a two-car garage and a tidy urban backyard.

a beadboard ceiling. Stepping through the original wood and glass door, you enter the

Ryan Smith

front hall. To the left is the living room, which is

NYS Licensed Real Estate Salesperson 201-0724

attached to the dining room. Both rooms are

RochesterSells.com

carpeted but original hardwood, narrow plank

Find your way home Real Estate Section

Rochester floors are visible beneath, waiting for you to unveil them. The majority of the historic wood windows remain in these rooms and throughout the house. Original solid wood doors are also present throughout.

This 1,366 square foot home in the 19th Ward neighborhood is listed for $64,995 with Bob Malone of Howard Hanna Real Estate Services. Contact Bob at 585-733-7729 to learn more. by Caitlin Meives Caitlin is the Preservation Planner at The Landmark Society.

IN PRINT AND ONLINE CLASSIFIEDS

ROCHESTERCITYNEWSPAPER.COM rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 27


CITY Newspaper presents

EMPLOYMENT / CAREER OPPORTUNITIES Employment Accountant (Rochester, NY) Prepare, examine/ analyze accounting records, financial statements, or other financial reports to assess accuracy, completeness & conformance to reporting and procedural standards. Report to management regarding the finances of establishment. Establish tables of accounts/ assign entries to proper accounts. 40hrs/wk, Bachelor’s in Business Administration or related req’d. Resume to BSW, Inc., Attn. Jisung Choi, 1060 E Ridge Rd, Rochester, NY 14621

AIRLINE CAREERS START Here –Get trained as FAA certified Aviation Technician. Financial aid for qualified students. Job placement assistance. Call AIM for free information 866-2967094

Contact Urban League Of Rochester today to become a mentor to the youth in our community! Email Charisma Dupree at cdupree@ulr.org to get started.

Volunteers

MEALS ON WHEELS needs YOU to deliver meals to YOUR neighbors in need. Available weekdays between 11:30 AM and 1:00 PM? Visit our website at www.vnsnet.com or call 274-4385 to get started!

CARING FOR CAREGIVERS Lifespan is looking for volunteers to offer respite to caregivers whose loved ones have been diagnosed with early stage Alzheimer’s Disease. For details call Eve at 244-8400

Join our sales team!

City Newspaper is seeking a confident, enthusiastic, high-energy person for advertising sales. Sales experience essential; media sales experience a plus.

Mind • Body • Spirit

TO ADVERTISE IN THE MIND BODY SPIRIT SECTION CALL BETSY AT 244.3329 x27 OR EMAIL BETSY@ROCHESTER-CITYNEWS.COM

OPERA GUILD OF Rochester needs a volunteer to assist with newsletter publication, and event helpers for the annual recital and opera presentations. For details see home page at operaguildofrochester.com. SENECA PARK ZOO Society seeking volunteers and docents for ongoing involvement or special events. Roles available for all interests. Contact Volunteers@ senecazoo.org to learn more.

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ST. JOHN’S HOME s looking for volunteers to transport residents on Tuesday mornings to and from Catholic Mass within our home. Please call volunteer office at 7601293 for more information.

Send resume to: btowler@rochester-citynews.com

Show and lease apartments to prospective residents, process, approve or deny rental applications in accordance with the Tenant Selection Plan, Marketing Plan, Compliance Programs and all applicable laws and regulations.

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NEWS


Legal Ads [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of AHV HOLDINGS LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/3/2017. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 375 Averill Ave., Rochester, NY 14620. Purpose: any lawful act [ NOTICE ] 127-129 Randolph LLC Arts of Org. filed SSNY 11/21/17. Office: Monroe Co. SSNY design agent of LLC upon whom process may be served & mail to Po Box 30071 Rochester, NY 14603 General Purpose [ NOTICE ] 55 Electric LLC Arts of Org. filed SSNY 12/12/17. Office: Monroe Co. SSNY design agent of LLC upon whom process may be served & mail to Po Box 30071 Rochester, NY 14603 General Purpose [ NOTICE ] Articles of Organization with respect to Ambassador Transportation, LLC, a New York Limited Liability Company, were filed with the Secretary of State of the State of New York on December 1, 2017. The County in New York State where its office is located is Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent of Ambassador Transportation, LLC upon whom process against it may be served, and the post office address to which the Secretary of State shall mail a copy of any process against Ambassador Transportation, LLC served upon him or her is 7272 W. Henrietta Road, West Rush, New York 14543. There are no exceptions adopted by the Company, or set forth in its Operating Agreement, to the limited liability of members pursuant to Section 609(a) of the Limited Liability Company Law of the State of New York. Ambassador Transportation, LLC is formed for the purpose of operation of a limousine service and for all other lawful activities that may be conducted by the Company. [ NOTICE ] Chianfoni & Brockler, LLC filed Articles of Organization with the New York Department of State on November 29th, 2017. Its office is located in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent of the Company upon whom process against it may be served and a copy of any

process shall be mailed to 984 Monroe Avenue, Rochester, NY 14620. The purpose of the Company is retail herbal store. [ NOTICE ] Daniel Green Construction, LLC Arts of Org. filed SSNY 11/27/17. Office: Monroe Co. SSNY design agent of LLC upon whom process may be served & mail to Daniel Green 74 Sheffield Rd Rochester, NY 14617 General Purpose [ NOTICE ] Enalas Holdings LLC filed articles of organization with the New York Secretary of State on 11/30/2017 with an effective date of formation of 11/30/2017 and a name change to Fulcrum Holdings LLC effective 12/4/2017. Its principal place of business is located in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent upon whom process may be served. A copy of any process shall be mailed to 14 Vantage Dr., Pittsford, NY 14534. The purpose of the LLC is to engage in any lawful activity for which Limited Liability Companies may be organized under Section 203 of the New York Limited Liability Company Law. [ NOTICE ] GADIR LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 11/7/2017. Office in Monroe Co. SSNY desig. agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 550 Latona Rd., Ste. D-419, Rochester, NY 14626, which is also the principal business location. Purpose: Any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Group 14621 Community Association, Inc. has submitted request to New York State to apply for designation of a Brownfield Opportunity Area. Nomination and any supporting documents can be obtained at our office located at 1171 N. Clinton Ave, Rochester, NY 14621 [ NOTICE ] J. Madeline’s Quilt Shoppe LLC, Arts of Org. filed with Sec. of State of NY (SSNY) 11/27/2017. Cty: Monroe. SSNY desig. as agent upon whom process against may be served & shall mail process to Attn: Manager, 73 Parkmere Rd., Rochester, NY 14617. General Purpose. [ NOTICE ] Kislev Holdings LLC Arts of Org. filed SSNY 12/6/17. Office: Monroe Co. SSNY design agent of LLC upon whom process may be served

To place your ad in the LEGAL section, contact Tracey Mykins by phone at (585) 244-3329 x10 or by email at legals@rochester-citynews.com & mail to POB 30071 Rochester, NY 14603 General Purpose [ NOTICE ] L&L General Construction LLC Arts of Org. filed SSNY 12/15/17. Office: Monroe Co. SSNY design agent of LLC upon whom process may be served & mail to 19 Trotters Field Run Pittsford, NY 14534 General Purpose [ NOTICE ] Lakeview Building, LLC Arts of Org. filed SSNY 11/17/17. Office: Monroe Co. SSNY design agent of LLC upon whom process may be served & mail to 217-45 Hempstread Ave Queens Village, NY 11429 General Purpose [ NOTICE ] Normandy River Estates, LLC Arts of Org. filed SSNY 11/8/17. Office: Monroe Co. SSNY design agent of LLC upon whom process may be served & mail to 1120 Sw Shorebrook Dr Normandy Park, WA 98166 RA: Aveon Realty Management, Inc. 32 Hampton Oval New Rochelle, NY 10805 General Purpose [ NOTICE ] Notice of Form. of GT4 PROPERTIES, LLC (the “LLC”). Art. of Org. filed with Secretary of the State of NY (SSNY) on 11/8/16. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC c/o United States Corporation Agents, Inc., 7014 13TH AVE, SUITE 202, BROOKLYN, NY 11228. Purpose: any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Stowe Enterprise LLC; Art of Org filed with Sec’y of State (SSNY) 12/27/2017; Exist Date: 1/1/2018. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 52 Nichols Street, Spencerport, New York 14559. Purpose: Any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of 151 Saratoga, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/27/17. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, c/o Sammy Feldman, 3445 Winton Place, Ste. 228, Rochester, NY 14623. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of 845-491 SOUTH &

GOOD HOLDINGS LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/3/2017. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 375 Averill Ave., Rochester, NY 14620. Purpose: any lawful act [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Aerial Imageworx, LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 09/26/2017. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 10 Briar Patch Rd, Rochester, NY 14618 . Purpose: Photography. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of AST Ventures, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/12/2017. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 793 S. Goodman St., Rochester, NY 14620. Purpose: any lawful act [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of AUTOMATED BOOKS, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/20/17. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Bernadette S. Davis, 5B Myrtlewood Drive, Henrietta, NY 14467. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of BDM REAL ESTATE MANAGEMENT, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/22/17. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, 38 Quail Ln., Rochester, NY 14624. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of BILLINGS DEVELOPMENT, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/15/2017. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, PO Box 22743, Rochester, NY 14692. Purpose: any lawful act [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Cinema Theater of

Rochester LLC. Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) Nov. 21, 2017. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 43 Seager St. Rochester NY 14620 . Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of DEANA LAWSON LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/22/17. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 170 Waring Rd., Rochester, NY 14609. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity

Notice of Formation of KATCom, LLC. Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 11/24/17. Office in Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 320 Washington St N, Suite 101, East Rochester, NY 14445. Purpose: any lawful activities.

Notice of formation of NBREW ENTERPRISES LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/13/2017. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 689 Regina Dr., Webster, NY 14580. Purpose: any lawful act

[ NOTICE ]

[ NOTICE ]

Notice of Formation of Kedimar LLC, Art of Org filed with Sec’y of State (SSNY) 12/1/2017. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to Northwest Registered Agent, LLC, 90 State Street, Suite 700, Office 40, Albany, New York 12207

Notice of formation of NBSS Enterprises, LLC (the “LLC”). Articles of Organization filed with the NY Secy of State (“SOS”) on 11/17/17. The office of the LLC is in Monroe County. SOS is designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SOS shall mail a copy of such process to 63 Thatcher Rd., Rochester, NY 14617. The LLC is formed to engage in any lawful activity for which an LLC may be formed under the NY LLC law.

[ NOTICE ]

[ NOTICE ]

[ NOTICE ]

Notice of Formation of DO Enterprises of NY, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/20/17. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o The LLC, 59 North Main St., Hoyeoye Falls, NY 14472. Purpose: any lawful activity.

Notice of formation of LJF PROPERTY HOLDINGS LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/6/2017. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 11 Gillet Rd., Spencerport, NY 14559. Purpose: any lawful act.

[ NOTICE ]

[ NOTICE ]

Notice of Formation of Elite Mind Technologies, LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 11/13/2017. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 4566 Hemingway Hwy, Hemingway, SC 29554. Purpose: any lawful activities.

Notice of formation of MDM MAC Properties Farmington LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/6/2017. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 1000 Sanford Rd. N, Churchville, NY 14428. Purpose: any lawful act

[ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of GRAY CABIN LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/13/2017. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 1111 Ogden Parma Townline Rd., Spencerport, NY 14559. Purpose: any lawful act [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of JAMES CARS OF GREECE LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 08/17/17. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Frank W. Tessitore, O’Donnell & Tessitore LLP, 76 Bedford St., #38, Lexington, MA 02420. Purpose: Any lawful activity

[ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Mizrahi Equities LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 12/27/2017 Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 241 Lark St. Rochester, NY 14613 Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of MR. GADGET ENTERPRISES LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 1/18/2008. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: PO Box 60694, Rochester NY 14606. Purpose: any lawful act. [ NOTICE ]

[ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of NEW VINE INDUSTRIES LLC. Art. of Org. filed Secretary of State of NY (“SSNY”) 12/26/2017. Office location: Monroe Co. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 24 Winthrop St., Rochester, NY 14604. Purpose: any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of RALLOD LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/19/17. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 18 Esternay Ln., Pittsford, NY 14534. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of ROC HEALTH & WELLNESS CENTER, LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 11/17/2017. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to ELISSA L JOHNSON 32 WEBBER CIRCLE ROCHESTER, NY 14626 . Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of ROC MANAGEMENT LLC. Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) December 18, 2017. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to the LLC at PO BOX 24340, Gates,

NY 14624. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of The Law Offices of Kevin D. Fitzgerald, PLLC Art of Org filed with Sec’y of State (SSNY) 12/7/2017. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of PLLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 7 Caywood Lane, Fairport, New York 14450. Purpose: Practice of law. [ NOTICE ] NOTICE OF FORMATION OF TOMANDA PROPERTIES, LLC Articles of Organization filed with Secretary of State of NY (“SSNY”) on 12/12/2017. Office in Monroe County. SSNY designated agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to TOMANDA PROPERTIES, LLC, C/O THOMAS S. GRAFF, 31 TYNEDALE WAY, NORTH CHILI, NY 14514. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of Turnkey Automation Solutions LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/29/2017. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 211 Black Walnut Dr., Greece, NY 14615. Purpose: any lawful act. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Tuxedo Corner, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/17/17. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 9 Bramblewood Circle, Rochester, NY 14624. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of WILY HOLDINGS LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/1/2017. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 375 Averill Ave., Rochester, NY 14620. Purpose: any lawful act [ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of Plaza Street Fund, IX, LLC. App. for Auth. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/29/17. Office location: Monroe County. LLC formed in Missouri

cont. on page 30

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 29


Legal Ads > page 29 (MO) on 11/21/17. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the MO address of LLC: 9237 Ward Parkway, Ste. 230, Kansas City, MO 64114. Arts. of Org. filed with MO Secy. of State, 600 West Main St., Jefferson City, MO 65101. Purpose: any lawful act or activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of PORTRAIT STUDIO LLC Appl. for Auth. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/27/17. Office location: Monroe County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 12/11/17. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Corporation Service Co., 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207-2543. DE addr. of LLC: 251 Little Falls Dr., Wilmington, DE 19808. Cert. of Form. filed with Secy. of State, John G. Townsend Bldg., 401 Federal St. Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: Any lawful activity [ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of Rochester-Dewey FDS 715464, LLC. App. for Auth. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/6/17. Office location: Monroe County. LLC formed in North Carolina (NC) on 3/6/17. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Capitol Services, Inc., 1218 Central Ave., Ste. 100, Albany, NY 12205. NC address of LLC: 106 Foster Ave., Charlotte, NC 28203. Arts. of Org. filed with NC Secy. of State, 2 South Salisbury St., Raleigh, NC 27601. Purpose: any lawful act or activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of TLH BEAUTY LLC Appl. for Auth. filed with Secy. of State of NY

(SSNY) on 12/19/17. Office location: Monroe County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 11/14/17. Princ. office of LLC: 100 Chestnut St., Ste. 1803, Rochester, NY 14604. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the princ. office of the LLC. DE addr. of LLC: c/o Corporation Service Co., 251 Little Falls Dr., Wilmington, DE 19808. Cert. of Form. filed with Secy. Of the State of DE, Div. of Corps., John G. Townsend Bldg., 401 Federal St., Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: Any lawful activity [ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of WATCO SUPPLY CHAIN SERVICES, L.L.C. Appl. for Auth. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/29/17. Office location: Monroe County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 11/21/14. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Corporation Service Co. (CSC), 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207-2543. DE addr. of LLC: c/o CSC, 251 Little Falls Dr., Wilmington, DE 19808. Cert. of Form. filed with Secy. of State, 401 Federal St., Townsend Bldg., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: Freight brokerage services and any other lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] RED BARN MANAGEMENT, LLC Arts of Org. filed with Sec’y of State (SSNY) on Nov 9,2017. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to 9 Aldwick, Fairport, N.Y. 14450. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Roc Photonics LLC (LLC) filed Arts. of Org.

To place your ad in the LEGAL section, contact Tracey Mykins by phone at (585) 244-3329 x10 or by email at legals@rochester-citynews.com

with NY Secy. of State (SS) on 12/11/17. LLC’s office is in Monroe Co. SS, as designated agent, will mail copy of any process to the LLC to 141 Mulberry St, Rochester, NY 14620. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] SIMCONA LIGHTING AND VALUE ADD SOLUTIONS LLC (LLC) filed Arts. of Org. with NY Secy. of State (SS) on 12/27/17. LLC’s office is in Monroe County. SS is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS shall mail a copy of any process to LLC’s principal business location at 275 Mt. Read Boulevard, Rochester, NY 14611. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Steven Braun, LLC Arts of Org. filed SSNY 11/9/17. Office: Monroe Co. SSNY design agent of LLC upon whom process may be served & mail to 3 Red Plank Way Rochester, NY 14624 General Purpose [ NOTICE ] The Vaeth Group LLC Arts of Org. filed SSNY 9/27/17. Office: Monroe Co. SSNY design agent of LLC upon whom process may be served & mail to 20 Mt Eagle Dr Penfield, NY 14526 General Purpose [ NOTICE ] Tune Yourself, LLC Filed 12/19/17 Office: Monroe Co. SSNY designated as agent for process & shall mail to: 5 Sheldon Drive, Spencerport, NY 14559 Purpose: all lawful [ NOTICE ] W26 SAG LLC (LLC) filed Arts. of Org. with NY Secy. of State (SS) on 12/19/2017. LLC’s office is in Monroe County. SS is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS shall mail a copy of any process to LLC’s

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30 CITY JANUARY 10 - 16, 2018

principal business location at 26 Saginaw Drive, Rochester, NY 14623. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity. [ Notice of Formation ] Paragon Compliance, LLC (“LLC”) filed Articles of Organization with the NY Sec. of State (“SSNY”) on 12/11/17. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall forward service of process to P.O. Box 217, Pittsford, NY 14534. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ Notice of Formation ] Trailynn Victor LLC (“LLC”) filed Articles of Organization with the NY Sec. of State (“SSNY”) on 12/19/17. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall forward service of process to 3349 Monroe Ave., Suite 334, Rochester, NY 146185513. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LLC ] 898 Ridge Road LLC filed articles of organization with the New York Secretary of State on 7/17/2003, with an effective date of formation of 7/17/2003. Its principal place of business is located in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent upon whom process may be served. A copy of any process shall be mailed to 8 Skytop Lane, Pittsford, NY 14534. The purpose of the LLC is to engage in any lawful activity for which Limited Liability Companies may be organized under Section 203 of the New York Limited Liability Company Law. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LLC ] 960 East Ridge Rd, LLC filed articles of organization with the New York Secretary of State on 12/11/2017 with an effective date of formation of 12/11/2017. Its principal place of business is located in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent upon whom process may be served. A copy of any process shall be mailed to 104 Angels Path, Webster, NY 14580. The purpose of the LLC is to engage in any lawful activity for which Limited Liability Companies may be organized under Section 203 of the New York Limited Liability Company Law. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LLC ] Moonlighting on Edisto LLC filed articles of organization with the New York Secretary of State on 12/7/2017

with an effective date of formation of 12/7/2017. Its principal place of business is located in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent upon whom process may be served. A copy of any process shall be mailed to 21 Hillsboro Rd., Rochester, NY 14610. The purpose of the LLC is to engage in any lawful activity for which Limited Liability Companies may be organized under Section 203 of the New York Limited Liability Company Law. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LLC ] Parkside Professionals, LLC filed articles of organization with the New York Secretary of State on 01/02/2018 with an effective date of formation of 01/02/2018. Its principal place of business is located in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent upon whom process may be served. A copy of any process shall be mailed to 17 Charter Oaks Dr., Pittsford, NY 14534. The purpose of the LLC is to engage in any lawful activity for which Limited Liability Companies may be organized under Section 203 of the New York Limited Liability Company Law. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LLC ] Straight Edge Construction Group, LLC filed articles of organization with the New York Secretary of State on 01/04/2018 with an effective date of formation of 01/04/2018. Its principal place of business is located in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent upon whom process may be served. A copy of any process shall be mailed to 850 Saint Paul St., Ste. 17, Rochester, NY 14605. The purpose of the LLC is to engage in any lawful activity for which Limited Liability Companies may be organized under Section 203 of the New York Limited Liability Company Law. [ SUMMONS WITH NOTICE ] SUPREME COURT STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF MONROE Index No. 17/8665 RJI No.: Assigned Judge: Hon. Daniel J. Doyle, J.S.C. CITIZENS BANK, N.A., Plaintiff, -against- John Roe and Jane Roe, said names being fictitious and unknown to plaintiffs, the persons or parties intended being all unknown heirs-to-law and nextof-kin of Larry R. LaDue, deceased, late of the Town of Greece, County of Monroe, State of New York, PEOPLE

OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, and “JOHN DOE #1” through “JOHN DOE #12”, the last twelve names being fictitious and unknown to the plaintiffs, the persons or parties intended being the tenants, occupants, persons or corporations, if any, having or claiming an interest in or lien upon the premises described in the complaint, Defendants. : TO UNKNOWN HEIRS of LARRY R. LADUE: YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED and required to serve upon plaintiff’s attorneys an answer to the complaint in this action within twenty (20) days after the service of this summons, exclusive of the day of service, or within thirty (30) days after service is complete if the summons is not personally served upon you within the State of New York. The United States, if designated a defendant on this action, may appear or answer within sixty (60) days of service. In case of your failure to answer, judgment will be taken against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. The basis of the venue designated is that the mortgaged property is located in Monroe County. Dated: December 19, 2017 COOPER ERVING & SAVAGE LLP Albany, New York BY:/s/Michael A. Kornstein Michael A. Kornstein, Esq. Attorneys for Plaintiff 39 North Pearl Street, 4th Floor Albany, New York 12207 (518) 449-3900 TO: UNKNOWN HEIRS of LARRY R. LADUE: The foregoing summons is served upon you by publication pursuant to an Order of the Hon. Daniel J. Doyle, Justice of the Supreme Court of the State of New York, dated the 27th day of November, 2017, and filed with the complaint and other papers in the Office of the Clerk of Monroe County. This is an action for foreclosure of a mortgage made by Larry R. LaDue, deceased, to Citizens Bank, N.A. f/k/a RBS Citizens Bank, N.A. in the original amount of $69,000.00 with interest, dated May 2, 2013, recorded May 3, 2013, in the Monroe County Clerk’s Office in Liber 25072 of Mortgages at Page 158. The relief sought is the foreclosure of the mortgage lien and the public sale of the mortgaged premises and in case of your failure to appear, judgment may be taken against you extinguishing any interest or judgment lien you may have in the mortgaged

premises. The premises indexed in this action are described and commonly known as 112 Willowbrook Road, Town of Greece, Monroe County, New York (Tax Map No. 060.42-1-21). A complete legal description is as follows: **See Schedule Annexed** Dated: December 19, 2017 COOPER ERVING & SAVAGE LLP Albany, New York BY:/s/Michael A. Kornstein Michael A. Kornstein, Esq. Attorneys for Plaintiff 39 North Pearl Street, 4th Floor Albany, New York 12207 (518) 449-3900 SCHEDULE A DESCRIPTION OF MORTGAGED PREMISES ALL THAT TRACT OR PARCEL OF LAND situate in the Town of Greece, County of Monroe and State of New York known and described as Lot 82 on a map of Willowbrook Subdivision as shown on a map filed in Monroe County Clerk’s Office in Liber 49 of Maps at page 35. Said Lot 82 fronts on the east side of Willowbrook Road, and is 50 feet in width, front and rear, and 150 feet deep, according to the dimensions shown on said map. [ SUPPLEMENTAL SUMMONS AND NOTICE ] THE STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF MONROE Index #2017/7708 Date Filed: 12/27/2017U.S. Bank National SUPREME COURT OF Association as Trustee successor in interest to Wachovia Bank, National Association as trustee for GSMPS 2004-1, Plaintiff,-against- Silvia Quiroz, if she be living or dead, her spouse, heirs, devisees, distributees and successors in interest, all of whom and whose names and places of residence are unknown to Plaintiff, CACV of Colorado LLC; The United States of America acting through The Secretary of the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; State of New York; and “JOHN DOE”, said name being fictitious, it being the intention of Plaintiff to designate any and all occupants of premises being foreclosed herein, and any parties, corporations or entities, if any, having or claiming an interest or lien upon the mortgaged premises, Defendants. PROPERTY ADDRESS: 108 Petrossi Drive, Rochester, NY 14621 TO THE ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANTS; YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED to answer the complaint in this action and to serve a copy of your answer, or a notice of appearance on the attorneys for the Plaintiff within thirty (30) days after the service of this summons, exclusive of the day of service. The United States of America, if designated

as a defendant in this action, may appear within sixty (60) days of service hereof. In case of your failure to appear or answer, judgment will be taken against you by default for the relief demanded in the complaint. TO THE ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANTS: The foregoing Summons is served upon you by publication pursuant to an Order of the Hon. Daniel J. Doyle, a Justice of the Supreme Court, Monroe County, entered December 27, 2017 and filed with the complaint and other papers in the Monroe County Clerk’s Office. NOTICE OF NATURE OF ACTION AND RELIEF SOUGHT OBJECT of the above captioned action is to foreclose a Consolidation and/or Modified Mortgage (hereinafter “the Mortgage”) to secure $32,475.00 and interest, recorded in the Monroe County Clerk’s Office on April 15, 2015, in Book 26072 of Mortgages, page 535 covering premises known as 108 Petrossi Drive, Rochester, NY 14621 a/k/a Section 091.83, Block 3, Lot 64. The relief sought in the within action is a final judgment directing the sale of the premises described above to satisfy the debt secured by the Mortgage described above. Plaintiff designates Monroe County as the place of trial. Venue is based upon the County in which the mortgaged premises is situated. NOTICE YOU ARE IN DANGER OF LOSING YOUR HOME IF YOU DO NOT RESPOND TO THIS SUMMONS AND COMPLAINT BY SERVING A COPY OF ANSWER ON THE ATTORNEY FOR THE MORTGAGE COMPANY WHO FILED THIS FORECLOSURE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU AND FILING THE ANSWER WITH THE COURT, A DEFAULT JUDGMENT MAY BE ENTERED AND YOU CAN LOSE YOUR HOME. SPEAK TO AN ATTORNEY OR GO TO THE COURT WHERE YOUR CASE IS PENDING FOR FURTHER INFORMATION ON HOW TO ANSWER THE SUMMONS AND PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY. SENDING A PAYMENT TO YOUR MORTGAGE COMPANY WILL NOT STOP THIS FORECLOSURE ACTION. YOU MUST RESPOND BY SERVING A COPY OF THE ANSWER ON THE ATTORNEY FOR THE PLAINTIFF (MORTGAGE COMPANY) AND FILING THE ANSWER WITH THE COURT. Dated: October 27, 2017 Frank M. Cassara, Esq. Senior Associate Attorney SHAPIRO, DICARO & BARAK, LLC Attorneys for Plaintiff 175 Mile Crossing Boulevard Rochester, New York 14624(585) 247-9000 Fax: (585) 247-7380 Our File No. 17064270#93909


Fun [ NEWS OF THE WEIRD ] BY THE EDITORS AT ANDREWS MCMEEL SYNDICATION

Awwwwwwww

When 5-year-old TyLon Pittman of Byram, Mississippi, saw the Grinch stealing Christmas on Dec. 16 on TV, he did what any civic-minded citizen would do. He called 911. TyLon told Byram police officer Lauren Develle, who answered the call, that he did not want the Grinch to come steal his Christmas, reported the Clarion Ledger. Develle made TyLon an honorary junior officer and had him come down to the station on Dec. 18 to help her lock away the Grinch, who hung his head as TyLon asked him, “Why are you stealing Christmas?” Although the green fiend apologized, TyLon wouldn’t release him from the holding cell. Police chief Luke Thompson told TyLon to come back when he’s 21, “and I’m going to give you a job application, OK?”

Wrong Place, Wrong Time

In Gilgandra, New South Wales, Australia, on Nov. 29, sheep shearer Casey Barnes was tramping down wool, and her father and boyfriend were working nearby, when her long, curly hair became caught in a belt-driven motor. Horrifically, the motor ripped her scalp off from the back of her head to above her eyes and ears. Barnes was flown to Sydney, where doctors performed an emergency 20-hour surgery to save her scalp, but were ultimately unsuccessful. Barnes will have artificial skin attached to her head instead, reports The Sun. A GoFundMe page has been established to help with her medical bills.

Self-Absorbent

The Tea Terrace in London is offering a new way for customers to enjoy themselves -- literally. On Dec. 16, the shop began selling the “Selfieccino,” an image of the customer’s face in the frothy topping of either a cappuccino or a hot chocolate. Patrons send an photo to the shop via an online messaging app, and the “Cino” machine takes it from there, reproducing the picture with flavorless food coloring in about four minutes. “Due to social media,” shop owner Ehab Salem Shouly told

Reuters, “the dining experience has completely shifted. It’s not enough anymore to just deliver great food and great service -- it’s got to be Instagram-worthy.”

An Engaged Citizenry

Pam Bisanti, a 31-year resident of Mount Dora, Florida, has approached the city council more than once about the speeding traffic along Clayton Street, where she lives. On Nov. 27, Bisanti made good on her threat to take matters into her own hands if the council didn’t by wielding a handmade sign reading “SLOW DOWN” as she stood next to the roadway during rush hour wearing her pajamas and robe. “The mothers up the street who send their kids down to the bus stop should have every expectation that those kids will be able to cross Clayton without being killed,” Bisanti told the Daily Commercial, saying she plans to continue her protest until the city takes action. “I am frustrated, angry and fed up. There needs to be a solution sooner than later. Remember that vision of me in my pajamas,” she added.

Unclear on the Concept

Melissa Allen, 32, was arrested on Dec. 19 after attempting to shoplift more than $1,000 in merchandise from a Framingham, Massachusetts, Target store, reported the Boston Globe. On hand to help in the arrest were more than 50 police officers who were at the store to participate in the annual “Shop With a Cop” holiday charity event. Joanie Mathews was terrorized for hours on Nov. 14 by a large pig that wandered into her yard overnight and spent the day destroying the lawn and biting Mathews three times before trapping her in the cab of her truck. “She would circle the truck ... and I would jump in the back seat and I was like ‘Go away, pig!” Mathews told NBC-2 TV. Mathews finally called law enforcement, and it took three Lee County sheriff’s officers to wrangle the testy porker. “It was just hilarious because the pig fought them every which way,” Mathews said. No one, at press time, had stepped forward to claim the pig.

[ LAST WEEK’S SOLUTION ON PAGE 26 ]

[ LOVESCOPE ] BY EUGENIA LAST ARIES (March 21-April 19): Consider what you really want. Develop your own goals and standards before you join forces with someone else. In order to build a relationship based on equality, you need to know who you are and what you want. Personal growth will lead to a high-quality connection. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Step up and display who you are and what you have to offer. Love interests will soon make a move to infiltrate your space and get to know you better. Personal unveiling of your likes and dislikes will weed out anyone that doesn’t live up to your standards.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Indecision will work against you when it comes to love. An inconsistent attitude will frighten potential partners and give way to those more interested in playing mind games or a cat-andmouse chase mentality to love and romance. Protect your heart and be mindful of others. CANCER (June 21-July 22): Participate in life and you will find someone who grabs your interest. Getting involved in activities and events that you find engaging will lead to someone you find perfect in every way. Be ready to make a move and charm whoever interests you.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Too many changes or inconsistencies will be distracting. Be wary of anyone enticing you to take part in something that is asking too much of you, your pocketbook or your time. If there is no balance or a lack of moderation involved, take a pass and keep looking. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): You know what you want, so go get it. The person who makes you feel at home and shares your opinions and beliefs will help you build a stable future. You’ll know instantly if you meet your perfect match. Don’t hesitate to make a promise to commit. Romance is encouraged.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Consider your motives before you agree to something you may not be as into as the person making the offer. Money cannot buy love or bring you long-term happiness. If you don’t feel it in your heart, don’t lead someone on. Look for a partner, not a keeper. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): You’ll find it difficult to contain your feelings. Step out of your comfort zone and bare your heart and soul to someone you think is pretty special. The proposal you offer will bring you one step closer to exploring and building the life you’ve only envisioned in the past.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Chemistry will only remain intact if you have something else in common with the person you feel drawn toward. Slow down and find out what lies beyond the initial excitement before you jump into a one-on-one that will bind you before you have a chance to reconsider. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): You’ll attract attention no matter where you go or what you do. Your confidence and responsible attitude will make those you encounter feel safe and comfortable. The opportunity to choose a partner is apparent, but don’t expect it to be easy. Do your due diligence and you won’t be sorry.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): It will be easy to make a mistake when it comes to affairs of the heart. Before you find that you have feelings for someone who isn’t available, make a point to walk away from any temptation. Don’t mix business with pleasure or jeopardize your reputation. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Taking action and making a difference to a cause you believe in or changes you want to see in your community will put you in a great position to meet and develop a relationship with someone like-minded. An open mind and heart will open the door to romance.

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32 CITY JANUARY 10 - 16, 2018

CITY Newspaper, January 10 - 16, 2018  
CITY Newspaper, January 10 - 16, 2018  

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