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NOV. 15 2017, VOL. 47 NO. 10

y p s p y a a H Holid HOLIDAY GUIDE INSIDE


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On Urban Journal’s “What Can We Do About Our High Poverty Rate?”: How about taking

a look at things that have worked in the past? We keep acting like we haven’t found the solution, but I believe we have found solutions, and have abandoned them for not very good reasons. For example, the question of integrated education. My son attended the original Wilson Magnet School, from which he graduated in the late 80’s. I signed him up for this school, because it was everything I wanted for my son: diversity, city location, high standards, and freedom for students to follow their natural talent. I was proud to say my son attended Wilson Magnet and prouder yet on graduation day, when the seniors who had received a scholarship to higher education were called on by name to stand up and receive applause. Student after student after student after student took their turn at standing. Almost every student had received some kind of scholastic assistance reward (perhaps with the help of inspiring school staff?). Tears came to my eyes. Today, my son is successful and doing well. His three best friends today were in that same graduating class that night. They too are doing well. Let’s review what we’ve already done that at least started out with success, and then something happened. Have we been shooting ourselves in the foot? Let’s find out. JÖELLE VANBUREN

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What happened at College Town

On Chow Hound’s “Are You There, College Town?”: “College”

Town is a 20-minute walk from U of R’s undergrad campus. College Town is surrounded on one side by a cemetery (dead people don’t spend money), on one side by a hospital with its own cafeteria (more convenient for hospital workers), and on the other two sides by R-1 lowdensity residential. This is not enough residents for a critical mass of foot traffic. Goler House residents aren’t enough. If you look at the most successful walkable commercial strip in Rochester, Park Avenue, it’s surrounded by R2 and R3 (medium and high density) residential zoning. It’s not rocket science. This means that College Town could thrive if more residential units are added. It’s not doomed to failure. ADRIAN MARTIN

Truth is, a survey one or two years ago suggested that U of R students are more Rochester worldly than just the immediate College Town surroundings. They listed favorite brunch place as James Browns Place on Culver Road, nowhere near the campus. I’ve seen students get lunch at McCann’s Local Meats. So it’s not about them being lazy, it’s about them being discerning and adventurous. PETE WORTMOSS

The state of the Dems

On Urban Journal’s “The Nation Under Trump”: This editorial

was obviously written before Tuesday’s election, a lightning bolt through the clouds. In discouraging times, I think of a cartoon news anchor closing the broadcast with these words: “If you don’t like the news, create some of your own.” Clearly, many of our fellow citizens did just that on Election Day 2017. Our “happy anniversary” ought to be a clarion call for us to “go and do likewise.” RICHARD S. GILBERT

News. Music. Life. Greater Rochester’s Alternative Newsweekly November 15 - 21, 2017 Vol 47 No 11 250 North Goodman Street Rochester, New York 14607-1199 themail@rochester-citynews.com phone (585) 244-3329 fax (585) 244-1126 rochestercitynewspaper.com facebook.com/CityNewspaper twitter.com/roccitynews instagram.com/roccitynews On the cover: Photograph by Ryan Williamson Publishers: William and Mary Anna Towler Editor: Mary Anna Towler Editorial department themail@rochester-citynews.com Arts & entertainment editor: Jake Clapp Staff writers: Tim Louis Macaluso, Jeremy Moule Arts & entertainment staff writer: Rebecca Rafferty Music writer: Frank De Blase Calendar editor: Kurt Indovina Contributing writers: Roman Divezur, Daniel J. Kushner, Kathy Laluk, Adam Lubitow, Amanda Fintak, Mark Hare, Alex Jones, Katie, Libby, Ron Netsky, David Raymond, Leah Stacy Art department artdept@rochester-citynews.com Art director/Production manager: Ryan Williamson Designers: Renée Heininger, Jacob Walsh Advertising department ads@rochester-citynews.com New sales development: Betsy Matthews Account executives: Christine Kubarycz, William Towler, David White Classified sales representatives: Christine Kubarycz, Tracey Mykins Operations/Circulation kstathis@rochester-citynews.com Business manager: Angela Scardinale Circulation manager: Katherine Stathis Distribution: David Riccioni, Northstar Delivery City Newspaper is available free of charge. Additional copies of the current issue may be purchased for $1 each at the City Newspaper office. City Newspaper may be distributed only by authorized distributors. No person may, without prior written permission of City Newspaper, take more than one copy of each weekly issue. City (ISSN 1551-3262) is published weekly by WMT Publications, Inc. Periodical postage paid at Rochester, NY (USPS 022-138). Address changes: City, 250 North Goodman Street, Rochester, NY 14607. Member of the Association of Alternative Newsweeklies and the New York Press Association. Annual subscriptions: $35 ($30 senior citizens); add $10 for out-of-state subscriptions. Refunds for fewer than ten months cannot be issued. Copyright by WMT Publications Inc., 2017 - all rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, photocopying, recording or by any information storage retrieval system without permission of the copyright owner.

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URBAN JOURNAL | BY MARY ANNA TOWLER

Roy Moore, US culture, and the state of our politics It’s been fascinating to watch Republicans in Congress squirm as the stories about Roy Moore spilled out. It’s nice that Mitch McConnell now says he believes the women who have come forward, but it took days for him to jump off the Moore ship. You’ve got to wonder whether it was political risk, not the facts, that had become too hot. So Roy Moore has stepped into the spotlight with Harvey Weinstein, Leon Wieseltier, Louis CK, Bill O’Reilly, and the rest. It’s good that these stories are making the news, but there’s a danger that they’ll skew public perception. Sexual assault isn’t the behavior only of the rich and famous. Men of every stripe sexually assault and harass girls and women. Famous actors and teachers, bartenders and politicians, shortorder cooks and football players, college students and college professors: men of every stripe do it – because they think they have a right to. Because way too much of society views girls and women as objects to be viewed for pleasure, commented on, whistled at, catcalled at. Used. It’s in our culture. And our culture shames the accusers and protects the abusers, whether the abusers are presidential candidates – Democrats as well as Republicans – who can further special interests or college professors who are bringing in research dollars. Down in Alabama, Roy Moore is defiant, not surprisingly, and there still seems to be plenty of support for him: His accusers “made up their stories.” The accusations are “politically motivated.” An Alabama state legislator insists that “you can’t be a victim 40 years later” and suggests that if their stories are true, the women ought to be prosecuted for keeping silent all these years. The Republican party chairs in two counties say they would support Moore even if he is guilty. A minister said he wouldn’t believe the stories unless he saw proof. I hope all this publicity about the rich and famous leads to real change – in the way we raise boys and girls, in the way movies and television portray women, in expectations that adults in the fraternity world have toward college frat boys, in the expectations of college administrators toward faculty and students, in the way men view the abusive behavior of their male friends and colleagues. I hope. But right now, I’m not optimistic. We’ll see what happens when the Celebrity Abuser stories stop. And by the way: It shouldn’t have taken the terrible publicity about Roy Moore and sexual abuse to horrify Republican leaders.

It’s good that these stories are making the news, but there’s a danger that they’ll skew public perception about sexual assault.

This is the man who, as chief justice of the Alabama Supreme Court, installed an enormous monument to the Ten Commandments in the lobby of the state judicial building and refused orders to remove it. The monument was taken out under a federal court order, and Moore himself was removed from office. Nine years later, he ran for justice again, and won – and was removed from office again after ordering state judges not to issue marriage licenses to same-sex couples in defiance of the Supreme Court’s decision on same-sex marriage. Moore has called for criminalizing homosexuality. He has said Muslims shouldn’t be allowed to serve in Congress. He has suggested that the Old Testament predicted the World Trade Center attack and that the Newtown school shooting happened because the country has turned away from God. This is the approach Roy Moore would take to Congress. These are the principles he would use as he voted on legislation affecting immigration, social justice, education, health care, foreign policy, criminal justice, Supreme Court appointments. And while both the president and Mitch McConnell backed Luther Strange in the Alabama Senate primary, as soon as Moore became their party’s candidate, they embraced him. Only when the assault allegations stayed in the news did McConnell turn his back on him. And the White House is still hedging. This is the state of the nation right now. rochestercitynewspaper.com

CITY 3


[ NEWS IN BRIEF ]

Advocates: fund services that protect children

A coalition of children’s advocates, faith leaders, and medical professionals are urging Monroe County officials to better fund services that have been proven to help prevent child abuse. County Executive Cheryl Dinolfo was set to submit her 2018 budget proposal to county legislators on Tuesday, and in advance of that, the coalition called on the exec and the legislature to restore $1.7 million worth of funding that has been cut from some of those programs since 2014. The programs in question include home visitation programs such as Nurse-Family Partnership and Parents as Teachers. Coalition partners collected 1,200 letters that they planned to send to county officials.

Judge says county has to pay towns

State Supreme Court Justice Scott Odorisi has ruled that Monroe County has to reimburse towns for unpaid property maintenance and demolition charges they tack on to tax bills.

News

Towns add the fees onto the bills when they have to board up or otherwise maintain delinquent and abandoned properties, or when they have to tear down dangerous structures. Monroe County reimburses towns for unpaid tax bills, but county officials decided in 2016 to stop paying for the maintenance and demolition charges. Irondequoit and Brighton sued, and Odorisi issued a decision in their favor. The county plans to appeal the ruling.

PRESERVATION | BY MARY ANNA TOWLER

GOP budget would hurt urban revival efforts

Reaching the end of a rough road

The state called it the Access 390 project, but most people probably referred to it as a series of expletives, because it routed snarling traffic over roads that were as rough as a logging path. Either way, it’s officially done. The Access 390 project basically reconfigured the I-390 ramps at State Route 15, aka West Henrietta Road; State Route 15A, aka East Henrietta Road; and East River Road. It also included new on- and off-ramps at Kendrick Road, a project that University of Rochester and local leaders lobbied hard for.

The Sibley Building, downtown Rochester: tax credits helped make the renovation and reuse of the former department store possible. FILE PHOTO

As Republicans wrestle with tax reform, much of the public attention has been on things like corporate taxes, middle-income taxpayers, and deductions for mortgage interest and state and local taxes. Lurking in one of the reform proposals, though, is a change that would have a major impact on Rochester and many other cities: elimination of the Historic Tax Credit. Under the 41-year-old federal legislation, owners of incomeproducing historic buildings can get a 20 percent income-tax credit to renovate them. And for owners of historic buildings in New York State, the legislation has been particularly beneficial: they can get an additional 20 percent state historic tax credit. “The state credit is tied to federal credit,” says the Landmark Society’s executive director, Wayne Goodman. “The only way you can use the state credit is if you piggyback on the federal.” If the federal credit dies, so does the state’s. The credits aren’t available to individual homeowners for work on

their own home, but there are major public benefits, and not simply from the jobs created for construction workers and craftspeople. Picture downtown Rochester with the Sibley building deteriorating year after year. Sibley’s transformation from a millionsquare-foot former department store into residential, retail, and office space is happening thanks to the federal and state tax credits. If it weren’t for the tax credit, says Goodman, reuse of Sibley’s wouldn’t be possible. Sibley’s is simply the largest of Rochester’s tax-credit buildings. There are numerous others: the apartments at the corner of Alexander Street and East Avenue, the landmark Stone Warehouse at 1 Mt. Hope Avenue, the Button Lofts on Monroe Avenue, the Eastman Dental Dispensary, and many more. The Landmark Society, the State Historic Preservation Office, the National Trust, and preservationists throughout the country are urging members of Congress to keep the tax continues on page 6

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Democrats have now won back-to-back countywide elections, so Baxter’s win isn’t “a one-off” or a fluke, says party chair Jamie Romeo. And Democrats have a growing enrollment advantage in the county, as well as the edge in an increasing number of suburbs.

POLITICS | BY JEREMY MOULE

Monroe Dems get a taste of victory Monroe County Democrats can win countywide and suburban races after all. Todd Baxter is now sheriff-elect and will take over for from Republican Patrick O’Flynn come January. He’ll be the second Democrat in countywide office, joining County Clerk Adam Bello, who was elected a year ago. Democrats had some big wins across the country last Tuesday, and the general narrative was that voters were rallying against President Donald Trump and Congressional Republicans. Monroe County Democratic Committee Chair Jamie Romeo says Trump has caused people to pay closer attention to politics and elections at all levels. But, she says, local Democratic victories were won through the ground-level work of local committees, candidates, and party volunteers. The party has now won back-to-back countywide elections, so Baxter’s win isn’t “a one-off” or a fluke, Romeo says. And considering that Democrats have a growing enrollment advantage in the county, as well as the edge in an increasing number of suburbs, “our county is moving in a good direction,” Romeo says. Pittsford provides a good example of what Romeo’s saying. Democrats have run town candidates before, and some have come close to winning; Democrats started

getting elected to the village board in 2013. This year, however, Democrats Stephanie Townsend and Kevin Beckford picked off two incumbent Republican Town Board members: Jared Lusk and Mary Gehl Doyle. Republicans had the enrollment advantage in the Town of Pittsford going into the 2016 elections, but the town went heavily for Hillary Clinton. And sometime over the past year, Democrats gained the enrollment advantage, though just barely. Democrat Howard Maffucci beat Republican Jason Rosenberg for the open seat 10th District seat in the County Legislature. The seat represents parts of Pittsford, as well as parts of East Rochester and Brighton, both of which have histories of electing Democrats. Numbers aside, Maffucci is a well-known and respected figure in the community, largely because of his service as the former superintendent of East Rochester schools. He’ll take the place of Republican incumbent Anthony Daniele, who has to leave the Lej at the end of the year because of term limits. In Henrietta, Democrats have had an enrollment advantage for about a decade, but they’ve struggled to win races there. That changed this year. Stephen Schultz unseated Republican Supervisor Jack Moore, while

Rob Barley and Michael Stafford bested Republicans John Howland and Kristine Demo-Vazquez. Both of the town board seats were wide open, since the incumbents decided not to seek reelection. Howland already represents most of Henrietta in the County Legislature. Some of the controversies around Moore surely helped the Democratic candidates. In particular: the recent findings by the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission that there was evidence to believe he discriminated against several employees. But the Henrietta Democratic Committee has spent the past several years building up an active grassroots organization, and this year that work paid off. Democrats were successful where they had strong, growing local committees that campaigned hard for their candidates, Romeo says. Henrietta and Pittsford had strong ground games, she says. They didn’t rely on ads, glossy mailers, or social media to get their messages to voters. Instead, candidates and volunteers connected directly with residents, friends, and neighbors, working the phones and knocking on thousands of doors. Clarkson Democrats did the same thing, and their town supervisor candidate, Jerry Underwood, narrowly defeated Republican

Todd Baxter FILE PHOTO

Paul Kimball, who had served as supervisor since 1984. Democrats offered some communities a choice where they previously hadn’t had one, Romeo says. And then party members made sure there were strong committees and substantial volunteer networks to go out and talk to potential votes about those choices, she says. At the county level, top Democratic leaders united and rallied around Todd Baxter, but the energized local committees helped bring him votes. As they campaigned for their town, village, and city candidates, they also campaigned for him, as did his own volunteers. continues on page 8

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CITY 5


Revival Efforts continues from page 4

Tax credits in Rochester have helped create affordable-housing units in the former Cunningham carriage factory in the Susan B. Anthony neighborhood. PHOTO BY JACOB WALSH

credit, and they’re urging voters to contact their representatives in Washington. For cities like Rochester – older cities with an abundance of buildings created for uses that no longer exist – loss of the tax credit would be particularly damaging. Among the tax-credit beneficiaries in Buffalo, for instance, is the massive HH RichardsonOlmsted complex, a former psychiatric hospital now transformed into a hotel and conference center. More than 600 buildings in Pennsylvania have been renovated with the help of the tax credit. The tax-credit program, said a headline in the Philadelphia Inquirer last week, “drove Philadelphia’s revival.” USA Today reports that Memphis and surrounding Shelby County have 74 tax-credit buildings. The credit was born as a bi-partisan program. Its prime movers in Congress were New York’s liberal Democratic senator, Daniel Patrick Moynihan, and the highly respected, conservative Republican representative from the Greater Rochester area, Barber Conable. But now it’s under fire from critics on the right and left alike, says Goodman. Conservatives think government is throwing money away and believe the private market should bear the brunt of the restoration costs on its own. Some liberals insist that the credit simply helps wealthy developers. (Liberals may take particular delight in pointing to one famous beneficiary of the federal tax credit: the Old Post Office building in Washington, DC, now lavishly restored and operating, with great publicity, as the Trump International Hotel.) Some of Rochester’s tax-credit buildings have been turned into market-rate or luxury apartments. But some – like the enormous Carriage Factory, tucked away in the Susan B. Anthony neighborhood, and the Mills III apartments in the High Falls area – have been converted to affordable or low-income housing. 6 CITY

NOVEMBER 15 - 21, 2017

A high-profile tax-credit recipient: President Donald Trump, who used the credits to restore and transform Washington DC’s Old Post Office building into the Trump International Hotel. PHOTO COURTESY MAXENCE PENIGUET

Holy Rosary Church and its campus, in the Edgerton neighborhood, are now the site of affordable housing and community services. If there’s no tax credit, says Goodman, eventually, some of these “white elephant buildings” are going to move into the public’s hands. When they’re left vacant for years, they deteriorate and have to be demolished. “And taxpayers pay for the demolition,” says Goodman, “and we have a vacant lot with no hope, no longer an energizing building” that can spur other development and contribute to the community. “It’s towns like Rochester and Philadelphia and Buffalo – take your pick,” says Goodman, “post-industrial, rust-belt communities,” that have benefitted most from the tax credit and will suffer most if the credit is eliminated. “It’ll impact New York City, but it’s not going to bring it to its knees,” says Goodman. “The economy is such that they’ll keep moving without it. Communities like Rochester, Scranton, Cleveland: Without the credit, it becomes impossible to do these buildings. And the cost is far, far beyond” the amount of the credit.


EDUCATION | BY TIM LOUIS MACALUSO

East students find that friendship is round It’s just before 8 a.m. at East Lower School, and the hallways of the sprawling school are fairly quiet. East Lower is the junior high school the University of Rochester created at the former East High in 2015. About a dozen students in teacher Amanda Donovan’s sixthgrade class begin their day with a peace circle, a staple of an educational approach called “restorative practices.” With little prompting, the students form their circle. School social worker Michelle Garcia asks them to say how they’re feeling that morning, using just two words, and she hands a bright yellow ball of yarn to the first student. As each student takes the ball and passes it on, the responses vary: “anxious and excited,” “happy and nervous,” “hungry and tired.” A couple of students shuffle their feet shyly and say nothing, then quickly pass the ball on. Others can’t wait for their turn to speak. East Upper and Lower Schools are just two of many in the Rochester school district that have turned to restorative practices as a way to encourage children to talk about their emotions and problems in positive ways rather than letting them cope with them on their own. Educators are finding not only that restorative practices reduces behaviors like fighting, but also that it’s a better alternative than a zero-tolerance policy when students misbehave. Research confirms that the harsher approach that swelled during the 1990’s resulted in soaring rates of suspensions and students dropping out of school, says Valerie Marsh, assistant director of the University of Rochester’s Center for Urban Education Success. Restorative practice draws on several disciplines – sociology, psychology, criminal justice, and education – with the aim of helping children and adults build relationships. In some ways, the practice resembles group therapy. The peace circles give people a safe way to speak and listen to each other, which can build empathy and compassion. Educators are using it to help students resolve disputes peacefully and reduce violence, which is frequently cited as the main driver of suspensions. But many teachers and administrators, including some in Rochester, weren’t exactly in a rush to embrace restorative practices. The concept is often couched in jargon like “organizational culture change,” and it conflicts with some teachers’ views of how students should behave in school. “Punitive discipline is the way we do things,” Marsh says. “It’s been institutionalized. But you have to pay attention to whether or not this has been effective.” Marsh has been studying restorative practices and how it’s been used at East Lower,

School social worker Michelle Garcia leads sixth graders at East Lower School in a peace circle before starting the day. PHOTO BY JACOB WALSH

East Upper, and World of Inquiry in Rochester and at New York City’s Leadership and Public Service High School. “Start with, ‘What are the goals?’” Marsh says. “If the goal is to remove the problem in the short term, then the student winds up going to detention or getting suspended. The problem has been removed.” But if the goal is to give every child a quality education, the problem has been made exponentially worse, she says. “Those children that get suspended typically get suspended often,” she says. “It’s not a oneoff. It’s mostly minority students, so now you have a discipline gap, between black and Latino students and white students.” Marsh looked at whether using restorative

practices reduced suspensions. While the results were favorable at all of the schools, the changes at East have been the most dramatic. “Disciplinary referrals and suspensions have dropped precipitously at East,” she says. Suspensions at East Upper dropped from 2,591 the year before the UR began to manage the school to 221 in its second year. Marsh says school administrators and teachers need to consider several things when moving to restorative practices. For instance, the whole school needs to buy in to the concept; it’s not something that can be just handed off to teachers. The entire school staff needs training in restorative practices and in preparing for the changes

the school will undergo. For instance, the practices can seem intrusive at first, taking time away from instruction. And more social workers may be needed. “There was a little chaos in the beginning,” says Joanne Larson, a professor at the UR’s Warner School of Education and associate director of research at the Center for Urban Education Success. “We did intensive training with teachers, but the school security officers, cafeteria servers, and janitors had a little training, but not enough. We had people saying, ‘OK, what am I supposed to do?’ And the kids thought, ‘You can’t suspend me? Wow; if you thought that was bad, watch this....’” Improvements are slow in coming at first, says Larson. And there will always be people, including teachers, who believe that restorative practices are too soft and that no one is held accountable. “There is a culture that says all these kids need is a good whuppin’,” Larson says. “But it’s been proven through 50 years of research that it doesn’t work.” Many Rochester school district children experience trauma in multiple forms, says Larson: hunger, neighborhood violence, the loss of a sibling or parent. When a student is having a bad day or misbehaving, it’s hard for teachers to stop what they’re doing and give that child individual attention, especially when several students need help that day.

Larson recalled an incident between a teacher and a student who came to class and seemed uninterested in doing any work. The teacher became frustrated and sent the student to the counselor’s office. After talking with the student, the counselor learned that the student had had a terrible experience that morning. “Of course, the teacher was mortified,” Larson says. “But that taught us that the question isn’t, ‘What’s wrong with you?’ It’s ‘What happened to you?’” Sometimes talking about what happened requires the teacher to take some responsibility for it, says Marsh. “And that’s uncomfortable,” she says. “That’s why I argue that restorative practices require a higher level of accountability from everyone involved.” Critics sometimes refer to restorative practices

as the “hug it out” method of conflict resolution, and they question whether it can help improve test scores and graduation rates. But Larson says the restorative practices movement is disrupting the cradle-toprison pipeline by keeping students in school. Before the UR became involved with East High, a student could be suspended for something minor like getting to school late, she says. “Now there’s a different response,” she says. “Maybe something happened at home last night or on the way to school. We want to hear, because we want you to be here.” rochestercitynewspaper.com

CITY 7


Election continues from page 5

In a sense, this year was a warm-up for 2018 and 2019. Next year brings Congressional mid-term elections, and local Democrats will be focused on retaining the House seat held by Louise Slaughter, as well as helping the party try to unseat Republican House Representative Chris Collins, a high-profile Trump supporter. Collins’ district spans parts of several counties between Rochester and Buffalo. At the state level, all of the Assembly and Senate seats are up next year. Democrats want to gain true control of the Senate; the party technically has the majority, but members of the Independent Democratic Conference and breakaway Brooklyn Dem Simcha Felder have an alliance with the Senate Republican leaders that keeps the GOP in power. And while Monroe County has more enrolled Democrats than Republicans, all of the State Senators representing it are Republicans. State and county Democrats will likely try to flip one or more those seats. The next big local election is in 2019, and the county executive, district attorney, and all 29 County Legislature seats will be on the ballot. County Exec Cheryl Dinolfo and DA Sandra Doorley are both Republicans, and even after Maffucci takes office in January, Dems will hold only 11 of the 29 Lej seats. The Democratic Party is going to have to recruit some stellar candidates if it wants to break the Republicans’ grip on county government. Baxter and Maffucci’s wins, combined with the suburban victories and Bello’s 2016 election show that the party is capable of winning, Romeo says. She hopes the successes and new energy among party members encourage more people to run or otherwise get involved in local politics. And though Romeo doesn’t mention it, the wins could help bring money in to the party, which it would need to some extent for the county exec race. Baxter’s victory in the sheriff’s race comes with a “but.” He was a Republican who switched parties for his run, and some progressives didn’t warm to him. Gary Pudup, a Greece resident who’s been active in the party, ran a write-in campaign so Democrats didn’t have to, as he put it, choose between two Republicans. But city voters favored Baxter heavily, as did voters in other Democratic strongholds such as Brighton and Irondequoit. In Greece, the Republican-dominated town where he served as police chief, he clobbered O’Flynn. Republicans otherwise performed well in Greece. Supervisor Bill Reilich, who’s also head of the county Republican Committee, comfortably defeated his Democratic challenger, James Leary. In the only contested Greece Town Board race, Republican William Murphy scored a decisive victory over Democrat Rumella Cameron. GOP candidates also beat back challengers in Mendon, Chili, and Perinton. And 8 CITY

NOVEMBER 15 - 21, 2017

Republicans held onto two Town Board seats in Sweden, preventing Democrats adding to the two seats they won in 2015. That is to say that the Republicans are still a strong force in the county, and particularly in the suburbs. And in any contested election next year or in 2019, they’re going to fight hard. Democrats will have to be ready to fight, too.

The city races

In the City of Rochester, there were no surprises, not in the race for mayor, the five at-large seats on City Council, or the school board. The winners of the Democratic Party’s September primary were the winners of all the races in today’s general election. Mayor Lovely Warren easily won reelection, defeating her three challengers: Republican-Conservative-Reform candidate Tony Micciche, Green Party candidate Alex White, and independent candidate Lori Thomas. (County Legislator Jim Sheppard, whom Warren defeated in the Democratic Primary, was on the ballot on the Working Families and Independence lines but did not campaign; nonetheless, he received about 14 percent of the vote.) In the City Council race, the winners were incumbents Jackie Ortiz and Council President Loretta Scott, former County Legislator Willie Joe Lightfoot, school board member Malik Evans, and newcomer Mitch Gruber, chief officer at Foodlink, winning in his first campaign for public office. The other Council candidates in this unusually heavy field: Mary Lupien, Working Families; Andrew Hollister, Republican, Conservative, and Reform Parties; Chris Edes, Libertarian and Reform; Shawn Dunwoody, Working Families; Pam Davis, Working Families; Matt Juda, Women’s Equality; Anthony Giordano, Green; and Ronald Ring, Green. For school board, the winners were incumbents Van White, the current board president, and Cynthia Elliott, and newcomer Natalie Sheppard. The fourth candidate was Beatriz LeBron, the only Latinx running for the board. Thanks to his election to City Council, Malik Evans has handed in his resignation from his school board seat, effective at the end of this year. Since he’s only half-way through his four-year term, one of the new board’s first jobs in January will be to appoint someone to fill his seat.

The ballot proposals

Like the rest of New York State, Monroe County voters said they want nothing to do with a constitutional convention. Approximately 80 percent of the county’s rejected the ConCon ballot proposition, slightly more than the statewide rejection. Voters here also mimicked the state in approving proposals related to the Adirondack Park and to pensions for public officials convicted of a felony related to their official duties.

For more Tom Tomorrow, including a political blog and cartoon archive, visit www.thismodernworld.com

URBAN ACTION This week’s calls to action include the following events and activities. (All are free and open to the public, unless otherwise noted.)

Ulrich discusses ‘Midwife’s Tale’

The University of Rochester’s Humanities Project will present “Reflections on Writing a Midwife’s Tale,” a lecture by Laurel Thatcher Ulrich on Friday, November 17. Ulrich is a history professor at Harvard who won the Pulitzer Prize for her 1991 book “A Midwife’s Tale.” Her quote “Well-behaved women seldom make history” was popularized on bumper-stickers and T-shirts. Ulrich’s lecture will be held at the UR’s Rush Rhees Library, at 5 p.m.

NOW focuses on Trump agenda

The topic for this year’s National Organization for Women’ state conference, in Rochester on Saturday, November 18, will be “Resist and Persist,” and guest speakers will be people who are resisting President Trump’s efforts. Among them: Congresswoman Louise Slaughter; State Assembly member Crystal Peoples-Stokes of Buffalo; State Assembly member Pamela Hunter of Syracuse; Rochester State Assembly member Harry Bronson; and Rochester Mayor Lovely Warren. The event, which is open to the public, will be held at Monroe Community College, Brighton Campus, 1000 East Henrietta Road, from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sliding-scale tickets are $15-$75. Lunch will be provided.

Film shows climate change devastation

The Rochester EV Accelerator and Citizens’ Climate Lobby will present a showing of the National Geographic Channel’s “Years of Living Dangerously” on Wednesday, November 15. The Emmy Award-wining TV documentary explores the effect of rising sea levels, water shortages, deforestation, historic droughts, and the accelerated rate of extinction these changes are having on many species. Attendees will also be able to test drive an electric car after the film. The event will be held at the Fairport Public Library, 1 Fairport Village Landing, from 6:30 p.m. to 8:30 p.m.


Dining & Nightlife

Olga Tzogas, owner of Smugtown Mushrooms, grows and sells a variety of mushrooms, offers grow kits for sale, and holds classes and workshops on identifying and foraging edible and medicinal mushrooms. PHOTOS PROVIDED

Consider the mushroom Smugtown Mushrooms 936 EXCHANGE STREET 690-1926; SMUGTOWNMUSHROOMS.COM OPEN BY APPOINTMENT ONLY [ FEATURE ] BY MARY RICE

The world of mushrooms is vast and diverse, yet it remains relatively unknown to many American consumers, says Olga Tzogas, founder of Smugtown Mushrooms. Tzogas says that most people are familiar with just a few types available in the produce aisle, such as white button, cremini, and portobella. Incidentally, all of those mushrooms are different-sized versions of the same species, Agaricus bisporus, Tzogas says. For more than 12 years, Tzogas has dedicated herself to identifying, foraging, and cultivating fungi for culinary and medicinal use. She first caught the mushroom bug as an MCC student while taking a course about the natural history of Rochester with Professor Steve Daniel, a founding member of the Rochester Area Mycological Association (RAMA). More than a decade later, Tzogas is a full-fledged mycophile and is occasionally referred to as the “mushroom matriarch” by her friends and colleagues.

Tzogas in 2011 opened Smugtown Mushrooms on Railroad Street near the Rochester Public Market. At present, Smugtown is settling into its new space at 936 Exchange Street but continues to supply mushrooms to several local restaurants and sells grow kits and supplies for home cultivation. A large part of Smugtown’s mission, however, is focused on increasing mushroom knowledge and appreciation. “Fungophobia is a real thing,” Tzogas says, noting that some people are apprehensive about eating mushrooms beyond the ones found at the grocery store, or object to mushrooms’ appearance or texture. The solution to that fear, Tzogas believes, is a wider awareness of and appreciation for the fungi kingdom. Smugtown grows and sells a variety of mushrooms that the average shopper has likely never encountered before: the mild, deep-purple wine cap; the shaggy lions mane, which has a texture and taste akin to crab; the delicate hen of the woods; and the firm and meaty king trumpet, which Tzogas says makes a convincing “faux scallop.” Along with providing a flavorful array of edible mushrooms for sale, Smugtown encourages people to get their hands dirty and forage for and cultivate their own mushrooms.

To that end, Smugtown offers a variety of classes and workshops. Tzogas estimates she’s conducted about 50 classes in the past year, both in Rochester and across the Northeastern United States. Topics range from identifying edible fungi in the wild to medicinal uses for mushrooms and athome cultivation methods. Though outdoor foraging workshops are over for the season, Tzogas says, you can always cultivate mushrooms indoors. The mushrooms Smugtown produces are grown in a laboratory setting, but anyone can get started growing fungi with Smugtown’s grow kits or other cultivation supplies. “You can grow mushrooms on your kitchen counter,” Tzogas says. Smugtown’s sawdust spawn allows you to do just that — just poke a few holes in the bag, water, and wait for your mushrooms to emerge. New mushroom growers may be unacquainted with fungal biology; luckily, Tzogas is a patient teacher. She explains how Smugtown cultivates mushrooms from the mycelium, a network of cells that exists underground beneath the “fruiting body” — what the layperson might call a mushroom. The mycelium is introduced to a substrate, which Tzogas says might be woodchips, straw, or sawdust. It gets to work consuming the

substrate and then fruits, sometimes several times depending on the species of fungus. At Smugtown, aspiring mushroom growers can choose from a variety of grow kits for both indoor and outdoor use. Along with the sawdust kits, Smugtown offers “plug spawn” — small wooden dowels already laced with mycelium that can be inserted into freshly cut logs and then placed in your garden. Though it may take a year for plug spawn to bear fruit, Tzogas says there are a number of reasons to have fungi in your garden, even if you’re not planning to eat them: Fungi help to break down organic matter, recycle nutrients, and reduce soil erosion. Smugtown has launched a fundraiser on gofundme.com to build out their new space, outfit it with the necessary equipment, and hire positions in cultivations and sales. In the meantime, Smugtown is open by appointment only, but you can buy its mushrooms at Hart’s, Abundance, and the Brighton Farmers Market, and eat them at area restaurants such as Cure, Good Luck, Fiorella, The Owl House, and Lento. Grow kits and supplies are available through Smugtown’s website, along with listings of upcoming events and workshops. rochestercitynewspaper.com

CITY 9


Upcoming [ AMERICANA ]

Music

Steve Earle & The Dukes. Friday, December 1. Smith Opera House. 82 Seneca Street. 8 p.m. $29.50-$39.50. thesmith.org; steveearle.com. [ ROCK ]

The Ben Miller Band. Wednesday, January 24. Funk ‘N Waffles, 204 North Water Street. 8 p.m. rochester.funknwaffles.com; benmillerband.com. [ ELECTRONIC ] Awolnation. Sunday, February 18. Roc Dome Arena, 2695 East Henrietta Road. 6 p.m. $31.25-$159. therocdome.com; awolnationmusic.com.

Evie Ladin & Keith Terry FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 17 ROCHESTER CHRISTIAN REFORMED CHURCH, 2750 ATLANTIC AVENUE 7:30 P.M. | $15-$22 | GOLDENLINK.ORG; EVIELADIN.COM [ BLUEGRASS ] This ain’t your daddy’s folk outfit. Evie

Ladin and Keith Terry play a very percussive style of old time music that incorporates a mixture of Appalachian clogging and hambone to accent the duo’s otherwise traditional approach to traditional music. It’s fresh and clean and original while somehow remaining classic. It’s infectious. — BY FRANK DE BLASE

Nathan Kay Group SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 19 BOP SHOP RECORDS, 1460 MONROE AVENUE 8 P.M. | 271-3354; BOPSHOP.COM [ JAZZ ] When you hear trumpeter Nathan Kay and his excellent quintet rip into a jazz tune, you would never suspect that all five of these musicians are students. And the tunes are so strong, you might think you’re hearing an obscure standard. But it really shouldn’t be surprising; Kay is an excellent composer, and Eastman School of Music students often go on to become headliners on the jazz scene. Joining Kay at his Bop Shop concert will be Sterling Cozza on piano; Rowan Wolf, saxophone; Andrew Dill, bass; and Matthew Bent, drums. $10 donation requested; $5 students. — BY RON NETSKY

PHOTO BY GUDMUNDOR VIGFUSSON

CITY is seeking a freelance Special Sections Editor.

Eager applicants should have editing and writing experience and a knack for edgy, often thoughtful stories. Email jclapp@rochester-citynews.com  with a resume and 2-3 writing samples.

/ JOBS

10 CITY NOVEMBER 15 - 21, 2017


[ ALBUM REVIEWS ]

[ WED., NOVEMBER 15 ]

Brendan Lake

ACOUSTIC/FOLK

“Childish Ways” Jelly Music, Inc. jellymusicinc.bandcamp.com

Survival of the Fittest Fest SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 18 MONTAGE MUSIC HALL, 50 CHESTNUT STREET 6:30 P.M. | $7-$10 | THEMONTAGEMUSICHALL.COM [ METAL ] It’ll be a hellaciously hard and heavy

night of music with this year’s Survival of the Fittest Fest. The show features local mavens like Diluted, Rip Open The Sky — don’t get it confused with the Christian rock album by Remedy Drive — one of my favorite hardcore bands, A Fitting Revenge, Undead Messengers, Plagues of Endeavor, and Symmetrical Defiance. — BY FRANK DE BLASE

‘British Buddies’ SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 19 FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH, 220 SOUTH WINTON ROAD 7:30 P.M. | FIRSTMUSE.ORG [ CLASSICAL ] It’s easy to see the thought-process

behind "British Buddies." First Muse Artistic Director Melissa Matson wanted to work with tenor Anthony Dean Griffey, who suggested a performance of Frank Bridge's "Three Songs for Voice, Viola, and Piano." Bridge was a teacher to Benjamin Britten, whose “Lachrymae” and “Folk Songs, Volume 6” appear on this program. Britten’s “Lachrymae” is a variation on English Renaissance composer John Dowland’s work, so of course Dowland’s “Lachrimae pavane” and “Piper’s Galliarde” will be performed. Rounding out the program is Bridge contemporary Ralph Vaughan Williams’ “Suite for Viola and Piano.” z$15 general; $5 student; $30 family max. — BY JAKE CLAPP

Spanish Guitar with Daniel King. Ox and Stone, 282

Yet another great release from the Lake brothers dynasty, this time from the flame-headed Temptators bassist, Brendan Lake. Lake’s solo album, “Childish Ways,” is 10 cuts — on CD and cassette — of prime rock ‘n’ roll beef, with Lake playing all the instruments and engineering it his own damn self. That way, nobody gets in the way of his curiosity, roots-y application, and at-times psychedelic aftertaste. The production is rabid, raw, and well done, and it’s most accurate in its portrayal of Lake’s affinity for unadulterated classic rock tones and grooves. Check out the somewhat flat charm from the out-of-tune — or alternately tuned — piano on “Misery Filled.” This whole project is beautifully filthy with its enthusiastic jangle pop energy fleshed out in Lake’s basement lair — and there are some underpinnings reminiscent of The Squires of the Subterrain. Cuts like “I’ve Grown Green” and the title track have a goofy, Beatles-esque or The Kinks-y playfulness and irreverence. This is all a window into what Lake is becoming as a musician, and will hold us over in the meantime. — BY FRANK DE BLASE

Uncle Ben’s Remedy “Not Far From The Tree” Self-released unclebensremedy.com

BLUES

Upward Groove. Temple Bar and Grille, 109 East Ave. 2326000. templebarandgrille.com. 10 p.m. JAZZ

Bossa Nova Bradley Brothers.

Record Archive, 33 1/3 Rockwood St. 244-1210. recordarchive.com. 5-8 p.m. Margaret Explosion. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 258-0400. thelittle.org. 7-9 p.m. POP/ROCK

Ron Gallo, Naked Giants, Dangerbyrd. Bug Jar, 219

Monroe Ave. 8 p.m. $12-$14. Thunder Body. Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. abilenebarandlounge.com. 8 p.m. $5.

[ THU., NOVEMBER 16 ]

Western New York hasn’t totally given up on rural charm. That is, if the second album by Uncle Ben’s Remedy, “Not Far From the Tree,” is any indication. The album opens up with a tightly accelerated, fouron-the-floor giddy-up. Lyrically, the songs are witty and full of self-deprecating humor, like on track two, “Money,” lamenting a woman that loves cash more than the singer, or on “These Beds,” which genuinely tugs at the strings of the hardest heart. UBR is tight and calls upon its members’ tenure as rockers in one form or another in its home town of Versailles, a stone’s throw from Buffalo. Though quite bluegrass-y in its instrumentation, Uncle Ben’s Remedy caries itself more on a rock band groove. The trick is in the band’s vocal tribulations that mash-up five part harmony with the punch of the gang vocals found in raunchy drinking songs. — BY FRANK DE BLASE

Alexander street. rochester ny. 287-6933. oxandstone.com. 6-9 p.m.

ACOUSTIC/FOLK Jim Lane. Murph’s Irondequoit Pub, 705 Titus Ave. Irondequoit. 342-6780. 8 p.m. Kelley Hunt. Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. abilenebarandlounge.com. 8 p.m. $25-$30. Steve West. Brown Hound Downtown, 500 University Ave. 506-9725. brownhoundbistro. com. 6-8 p.m. Travis Fitch. 585 Rockin Burger Bar, 250 Pixley Road. 5852470079. 5-8 p.m. BLUES

Hanna on 88. Mendon 64,

1369 Pittsford Mendon Rd. Mendon. (585) 433-9464. Every other Thursday, 6:30-8:30 p.m. continues on page 13

OUR

TO YOU

COMING NOVEMBER 22: AN EXCEPTIONAL, FOUR-WEEK ADVERTISING GUIDE TO U N I Q U E , L O C A L LY O W N E D R E T A I L E R S I N G R E AT E R R O C H E S T E R

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A D V E R T I S I N G I N F O R M AT I O N : B E T S Y M AT T H E W S , 5 8 5 - 2 4 4 - 3 3 2 9 , E X T. 2 7 rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 11


Get ready for the

Holidays

Music new life for old songs in synthesis with world music. We have no ambitions to create new Ukrainian folk music, but if this happens, I think we would not be ashamed of it.

At the best neighborhood wine and liquor store in town, we’ve got a tremendous selection of still and sparkling wines, liqueurs, brandies and whiskies for giving and enjoying. Just ask our staff for a recommendation. We'll be happy to help.

Can you describe your songwriting process?

We do not have a general recipe for creating music. Sometimes we are inspired by old Ukrainian songs that we discover; sometimes by a simple sound of an unusual musical instrument or new musical impressions. And then we sit down together and try to make some experiments. When writing, how do you know you are on the right track?

It is important that the finished composition satisfies all four of us. If someone does not like it, then this song will have no future. What are some musical styles that blend well with Ukrainian music?

Ukrainian music feels good in all modern genres. But it was rather interesting and productive for us to embrace the principles of classical minimalism. That has worked pretty successfully, in my opinion.

373 Park Avenue • 473-1937

What are some styles that don’t blend well? Ukrainian band DakhaBrakha, which means “give/take,” blends traditional folk music with modern genres for a unique globe-spanning sound. PHOTO COURTESY RIOT ARTISTS

There are no such styles.

DakhaBrakha’s long road

Where has been the most interesting place DakhaBrakha has performed?

DakhaBrakha MONDAY, NOVEMBER 20 KILBOURN HALL, EASTMAN SCHOOL, 26 GIBBS STREET 8 P.M. | $19-$29 | 274-3000; EASTMANTHEATRE.ORG; DAKHABRAKHA.COM.UA [ INTERVIEW ] BY ROMAN DIVEZUR

DakhaBrakha has found the Holy Grail in world music. The Ukrainian band of multi-instrumentalists — Nina Garenetska, Olena Tsybulska, Iryna Kovalenko, and Marko Halanevych — performs traditional Ukrainian songs in nontraditional ways, making compelling tunes by stitching together its native folk melodies with a grab bag of unexpected styles from all over the globe. The quartet layers its sound with otherworldly harmonies and fills the space with a wide variety of acoustic instruments. The result is both robust and minimalistic, and connects with audiences on an emotional level. DakhaBrakha has performed all over the world, including a celebrated show at Bonnaroo in 2014 where it was named “Best Breakout” performance by Rolling Stone. The band’s visual presence, like its songs, is powerful in its simplicity — the group’s roots as an avant-garde house band at the Dakh Theatre in Kyiv has shaped the image of the four costumed, seated performers, creating a mesmerizing expression of musical unity. DakhaBrakha is currently touring in support of its latest album, “The Road,” with a date at Kilbourn Hall on Monday, November 12 CITY NOVEMBER 15 - 21, 2017

20. CITY sent out a few questions via email, and Halanevych replied back. An edited version follows. CITY: What’s something you would like people to know about Ukrainian music? Marko Halanevych: The first thing is that it

exists. And at this moment it is going through a tremendous rise. Almost all forms of modern Ukrainian music are being renewed with new, talented performers. I’m absolutely sure that the world will come to know a lot of interesting music from Ukraine. How does your music reflect your ideals?

We are inspired by the musical culture of our planet, and use musical instruments and motives from all over the world. Therefore, we are cosmopolitan in certain ways. At the same time, it is important for us to save and cultivate our own traditional culture. We try to balance these ideas together. What was the origin of your group wearing hats and your costumes?

DakhaBrakha has a theatrical origin. Our costumes were created precisely for performances in the Dakh Theater in Kyiv. Our costumes are a mix of different ethnic styles, like our music. Is DakhaBrakha only a musical group, or are you trying to re-create Ukrainian folk music?

The folk music that we use was created a long time ago — some of these songs have a preChristian nature. Our creativity is more like an experiment with an old music. This gives a

Once our speleologist friends invited us to perform a concert in Viola’s Cave in the Crimean Peninsula. To get there it was necessary to go down 25 meters with the help of ropes and special equipment. And our instruments were delivered the same way. There were incredible acoustics, humidity, and it was pretty cold. But the experience was interesting. Where, would you say, are DakhaBrakha’s best audiences?

We are happy because DakhaBrakha has very good audiences all around the world. We are welcomed in places including New Zealand, Malaysia, and the United States. However, we are very glad to perform in Ukraine, in front of our friends and relatives. What would you say has contributed to your group’s success?

An important key of our group’s success is the strong folk foundation — that was taught to the female members of this group by their university lecturers and from teachers during their stay in children’s musical groups. Equally important is the work at the Dakh Theatre in Kyiv under the leadership of Vlad Troitskyi. He was the person who gave us the enthusiasm and courage to experiment with folk material. Up to this day he remains our spiritual advisor and guide.


CLASSICAL

Eastman at Washington Square. ,. esm.rochester.edu/

community. 12:15-12:45 p.m. COUNTRY

Don’t Know Jack. Via Girasole Wine Bar, 3 Schoen Place. Pittsford. 641-0340. viagirasole.com. 7-10 p.m. VOCALS

RIT Singers: Fall Concert. Allen Chapel, Schmitt Interfaith Center, RIT, One Lomb Memorial Drive. 585-4752411. rittickets.com. 7 p.m. JAZZ

Eastman Jazz Ensemble. Kilbourn Hall, 26 Gibbs St. esm.rochester.edu. 8 p.m. POP/ROCK

Katie Preston and Friends. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 258-0400. 7-9 p.m. Tough Old Bird, Northwoods Wendigo, Brind’Amor. Bug Jar,

219 Monroe Ave. 8 p.m. $7.

[ FRI., NOVEMBER 17 ] ACOUSTIC/FOLK Adrian Legg Live. Trumansburg Conservatory of Fine Arts, 5 McLallen St. Trumansburg. 607-387-5939. 7:30-9 p.m. $20.

Ruckus Juice Jog Stompers, The Buffalo Brass Machine.

PHOTO COURTESY DANIEL RIFF

INDIE POP | LAURA WOLF Fans of singer-songwriters with classical music predilections will find a lot to like in Laura Wolf. Part-cello exploration, part-folksy rumination, the multi-instrumentalist’s songs, like the excellent “Body Part,” feature dense but inviting textures, with plenty of percussive flair. Wolf’s debut EP will be released later this month. If you like national acts like Sam Amidon, Andrew Bird, and My Brightest Diamond, as well as artists originating in the Upstate New York region such as Mikaela Davis and Jordan Morton, you should tune in to Wolf’s music. Wolf is playing as part of a showcase, hosted by Floated Magazine, of female-fronted acts, including Lizdelise, Roses & Revolutions, and Madeleine McQueen. Laura Wolf performs Monday, November 20, at the Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Avenue. 9 p.m. $10-$12. bugjar.com; laurawolfmusic.com. — BY DANIEL J. KUSHNER

Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. abilenebarandlounge.com. 9 p.m. $8.

JAZZ BLUES

Miller & The Other Sinners.

The Penthouse at One East Avenue, One East Avenue. 585.752.2575. penthouseroc. com. 8 p.m. $15. Red, Fred and Weems. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 2580400. thelittle.org. 8-10 p.m. CLASSICAL

The Rochester Early Music Festival Gala Concert. St.

Anne Church, 1600 Mt. Hope Ave. 755-2271. musicaspei. org. 7:30-10 p.m. $20. The RPO Marimba Band. Ingle Auditorium at RIT, 1 Lomb Memorial Drive. 585-4754121. rittickets.com. 8 p.m. $5-$10. Tuba Miriam. Kilbourn Hall, 26 Gibbs St. esm.rochester.edu. 8 p.m. VOCALS

The Jersey Tenors. Downstairs Cabaret at Winton Place, 3450 Winton Place. 325-4370. downstairscabaret.com. 8-9:30 p.m. Opens Nov. 17 through Dec.9. An Opera/Rock mashup that blends Opera classics alongside Queen, Journey, Elton John, and more. $30-33.

Chris Ott. The Argyle Grill at

Eagle Vale Golf Club, 4344 Nine Mile Point Rd. Fairport. 377-2452. eaglevale.com/ argyle-grill. 6-9 p.m.

Fred Costello & Roger Eckers Jazz Duo. Charley Brown’s,

1675 Penfield Rd. 385-9202. charleybrownspenfield.com. Vince Ercolamento. Immanuel Baptist Church, 815 Park Ave. 473-7664. immanuelrochester.org. 7 p.m. Donations encouraged. POP/ROCK

Coup de’Villes. 585 Rockin

Burger Bar, 250 Pixley Road. 5852470079. 8:30-11:30 p.m. $5. Ethos Unplugged. Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. abilenebarandlounge.com. 5:30 p.m. Jam for Justice. Buta Pub, 315 Gregory St. (585) 563-6241. metrojustice.com. 8 p.m. Benefit concert and art auction for Metro Justice. Featuring Her Dad’s Banjo, Vanishing Sun, and DJ Alykhan. $10 donation.

Mad Hatter Masquerade Turkey Bash Party. Rochester

Riverside Convention Center, 123 E. Main St. 223-0999. skycoasters.com. 7:30 p.m.-midnight. Featuring performances by The Skycoasters, Gary Lewis, The Playboys, and Hall Pass. $12$15.

The Splings, Bedroom Hijinks, Matt Bent, Little Cake. The

Yards, 50-52 Public Market. masterhandrecords.com. 8 p.m. $5.

Stephen S. Reardon Benefit Show. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe

Ave. 8 p.m. Live music by PToE, Fox 45, The Crooked North, Mike Brown. $5-$10.

[ SAT., NOVEMBER 18 ] ACOUSTIC/FOLK The Lonely Ones. Little Theatre Café, 240 East Ave. 258-0400. thelittle.org. 8-10 p.m. continues on page 14

The Krooks, Anonymous Willpower. Firehouse Saloon,

814 S. Clinton Ave. 319-3832. thefirehousesaloon.com. 8:30 p.m.-1 a.m. $5. rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 13


CLASSICAL

Brass Guild. Kilbourn Hall, 26

Gibbs St. esm.rochester.edu. 8 p.m. Directed by James Thompson. VOCALS

The Jersey Tenors. Downstairs Cabaret at Winton Place, 3450 Winton Place. 3254370. downstairscabaret. com. 8-9:30 p.m. and 4-5:30 p.m. Opens Nov. 17 through Dec.9. An Opera/Rock mashup that blends Opera classics alongside Queen, Journey, Elton John, and more. $3033. JAZZ

The Daniel Bennett Group Benefit Concert.

First Presbyterian Church of Honeoye Falls, 27 N. Main St. 624-2160. firstpresbyterianhoneoyefalls. org. 7-9 p.m. $12.

Fred Costello & Roger Eckers Jazz Duo. Charley Brown’s,

1675 Penfield Rd. 385-9202. charleybrownspenfield.com. Ott & Davis. Via Girasole Wine Bar, 3 Schoen Place. Pittsford. 585-641-0340. viagirasole.com. 7-10 p.m Via Girasole Wine Bar, 3 Schoen Place. Pittsford. 641-0340. facebook.com/ events/330670090737480. 7-10 p.m.

PHOTO BY ROMAN DIVEZUR

ROCK | THE TOMBSTONE HANDS The Tombstone Hands is a slow churn of rock ‘n’ roll burn dedicated to preserving the rock of ages. The trio plays like it’s the last garage band on Earth, always kicking it off with Link Wray’s “Rumble,” in honor of the man who first revved up his electric guitar. Established in 2009, The Tombstone Hands is Steve Litvak on guitars; Dennis Jones on bass; and drummer Brian Peet. After Jones rejoined the group last year, The Tombstone Hands has re-emerged from the crypt to perform its own rendition of instrumental garage punk influenced by eras gone by.

Dais, Kodivk, False Accusations, Chrmr. Bug Jar,

The Tombstone Hands performs with American Acid and The Keelers on Wednesday, November 22, at Rosen Krown, 875 Monroe Avenue. 8 p.m. $5. 270-5869; reverbnation.com/thetombstonehands. — BY ROMAN DIVEZUR

Friendsgiving Party and Dance with The Brothers Blue. Abilene Bar & Lounge,

The Jersey Tenors. Downstairs

POP/ROCK

219 Monroe Ave. 8 p.m. $6.

153 Liberty Pole Way. 2323230. abilenebarandlounge. com. 7 p.m. All donations to Western New York Coalition for the Homeless. Featuring The Dady Brothers, Susanna Rose, Bob Bunce, and more. Bring new socks, undies, or toiletries. $5-$10. Jumbo Shrimp. 585 Rockin Burger Bar, 250 Pixley Road. 5852470079. 8:30-11:30 p.m. $5.

[ SUN., NOVEMBER 19 ] CLASSICAL

British Buddies. First

Unitarian Church, 220 S Winton Rd. 271-9070. FirstMuse.org. 7:30-9:30 p.m. Chamber music by British compatriots Ralph Vaughan Williams, Benjamin Britten, and Frank Bridge. $5-$30.

Cabaret at Winton Place, 3450 Winton Place. 3254370. downstairscabaret. com. 3-4:30 p.m. Opens Nov. 17 through Dec.9. An Opera/ Rock mash-up that blends Opera classics alongside Queen, Journey, Elton John, and more. $30-33. JAZZ

The Nathan Kay Group. Bop Shop Records, 1460 Monroe Ave. 271-3354. bopshop.com. 8 p.m. $10. RIT Jazz Ensembles Fall Concert. Ingle Auditorium at

RIT, 1 Lomb Memorial Drive. 585-475-4121. 1 p.m. POP/ROCK

Liar’s Moon. Little Theatre

Compline, performed by the Schola Cantorum. Christ

Café, 240 East Ave. 2580400. thelittle.org. 7-9 p.m. Terr Family & Friends. Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. abilenebarandlounge.com. 7 p.m. $10.

Geneseo Symphony Orchestra & Festival Chorus. Wadsworth

[ MON., NOVEMBER 20 ]

Church, 141 East Ave. 4543878. christchurchrochester. org. 9-9:30 p.m.

Auditorium at SUNY Geneseo, 1 College Circle. Geneseo. (585)-245-5516. 3 p.m.

Greece Baptist Church Community Concert Series.

Greece Baptist Church, 1230 Long Pond Rd. 225-6160. greecebaptistchurch.org. 7-9 p.m.

Nazareth College Symphonic Band and Wind Symphony.

Nazareth College Linehan Chapel, 4245 East Ave.,. 3892700. naz.edu. 3-4:30 p.m.

14 CITY NOVEMBER 15 - 21, 2017

VOCALS

BLUES

Hanna and the Blue Hearts Duo. Little Theatre Café, 240

East Ave. 258-0400. thelittle. org. 7-9 p.m. JAZZ

Rochester Guitar Club’s “Give and Take” Presentation. The Red Room, 1010 East Ave. 7-9 p.m. A presentation by internationally known guitarist Greg Chako.

TRADITIONAL

Barbara B. Smith World Music Series: DakhaBrakha. Kilbourn Hall, 26 Gibbs St. esm.rochester.edu. 8 p.m. $19-$29. POP/ROCK

Lis de lize, Roses & Revolutions, Madeleine McQueen, Laura Wolf. Bug

Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 8 p.m.

[ TUE., NOVEMBER 21 ] CLASSICAL

Tuesday Pipes. Christ Church, 141 East Ave. 454-3878. esm. rochester.edu. 12:10 p.m. JAZZ

Grove Place Jazz Project. Downstairs Cabaret Theatre, 20 Windsor St. 325-4370. downstairscabaret.com. 7 p.m. Featuring a different set of Eastman School of Music Students and other area jazz artisans every Tues. $10. POP/ROCK

Beatles Unplugged with Don Christiano. Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. abilenebarandlounge.com. 7:30 p.m. $3.

Citizens Against People, American Terrorist, Loft Wing, Loaded Goat. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 8 p.m. $6-$8.


rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 15


Culture / MUSIC

Adam Savage and Michael Stevens in "Brain Candy Live." PHOTO BY MATT CHRISTINE PHOTOGRAPHY

Food for thought Book by Dale Wasserman Music by Mitch Leigh Lyrics by Joe Darion

“Brain Candy Live” TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 21 AUDITORIUM THEATRE, 885 EAST MAIN STREET 7:30 P.M. | TICKETS START AT $38 | 222-5000; RBTL.ORG [ FEATURE ] BY MARY RICE

Friday, Nov. 17th | Saturday, Nov. 18th 7:30pm Sunday, Nov. 19th 2:30pm MCC Community $8 | General Admission $10 Recommended for Mature Audiences Tickets available at www.monroecctickets.com 16 CITY NOVEMBER 15 - 21, 2017

“Brain Candy Live,” an educational show, combines two big names in science entertainment. Adam Savage, the editor-in-chief of Tested.com and former co-host of “Mythbusters,” and Michael Stevens, creator of awardwinning YouTube channel Vsauce, have created a live stage show that’s billed as “a two-hour play date with Walt Disney, Willy Wonka, and Albert Einstein.” The interactive performance will be at the Auditorium Theatre on Tuesday, November 21. “Mythbusters” ran for 14 seasons on the Discovery Channel and featured Savage and his co-host, Jamie Hyneman, testing the validity of urban legends and myths — among them, if it’s really better to stand in a doorway during an earthquake and if it’s actually possible to

smell fear. Vsauce, which Stevens started in 2010, has more than 17 million subscribers on YouTube and produces episodes with topics such as “What if the Earth stopped spinning?” and “Which way is down?” Stevens told CITY during a phone interview that he met Savage through their respective agents, and they immediately clicked. “We were both fascinated by the same things,” he says. “We realized there’s a lot of stuff we want to do that requires being live. On TV, you can’t bring people on stage to hold stuff, you can’t meet and greet people, you can’t build big things live in real time.” The two began brainstorming ideas for an interactive show that would bring the demonstrations on “Mythbusters” and Vsauce to live audiences. Together with director Michael Weber, Savage and Stevens turned their ideas into a two-hour theatrical performance. “Brain Candy Live” has already made appearances at some 40 cities during a spring tour that included New York City, Los Angeles, and Chicago; its fall tour has scheduled stops in 24 cities including Rochester.

The most difficult part of creating the show, Stevens says, was deciding which topics to cover and which demonstrations to do, as he and Savage are curious about a wide range of subjects. Eventually, the team decided to base “Brain Candy Live” loosely around the properties of air. “It’s free and surrounds you all the time,” Stevens says, adding that he and Savage thought they knew a lot about air until they had to start explaining it to others. Stevens hints that the show involves leaf blowers, hairdryers, and about 750,000 ping pong balls. Stevens stresses that “Brain Candy Live” involves no fancy scientific equipment — just everyday items and raw materials like pipes and boards. “You can do a lot of really cool things with what you have at home,” he says. The “Brain Candy Live” team are DIYers. Stevens describes himself as an “autodidact” and says that when it comes to learning new things, he can’t stop researching until he feels like he knows something well enough that he can explain it to others. “Brain Candy Live” wants to hammer home the message that being curious and learning is not for eggheads only, Stevens says. Though every show contains all of the same information, each is a little bit different due to audience participation. At the end there is time for audience members to ask questions. Stevens says the Q&A segment is one of his favorite parts. “The questions are so incredibly weird,” Stevens says, noting that topics range from time dilation to black holes or his own personal favorite element on the periodic table. During one show, he remembers working out how long it would take to boil a cup of coffee just by yelling at it (the answer is 7 years, he says, but only if the coffee doesn’t lose any energy). When asked what audiences should know before attending “Brain Candy Live,” Stevens says they should be ready to “contagiously catch curiosity,” adding that “you’re going to leave with more questions than you came with.”


2017 HOLIDAY GUIDE

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GOOD TIME FOR PEACE ON EARTH

[ INTRODUCTION ] BY JAKE CLAPP

We say it every year, but we hope you take some time to relax and enjoy the holiday season. So much is crammed into a short two months — Thanksgiving, Hanukkah, Christmas, Kwanzaa, Solstice — and we know holiday overload and burn-out is real. Still, we’re sure you can find 20 minutes for yourself in the morning before all of the buzzing gets you down. To help give you some peace amid the chaos, this year’s Holiday Guide is here with a few entertaining and (we hope) helpful articles. We always suggest good tea and coffee — or spiked eggnog, ‘tis the season after all — to pair with the information you’ll find here. Sure, a good carol is timeless, but you’ve heard them all before. Change up the pace with the history of seven holiday-themed songs written by regional artists (on page 20). Also, be sure to check out the story online at rochestercitynewspaper.com to hear the music. The news is never-ending, and taking it all in can be pretty overwhelming. But there are some manageable ways to locally help out during the holidays, and maybe improve our corner of the world just a little bit. On page 24, we outline a few specific activist organizations that have volunteer opportunities right now. Are you someone who goes nuts for holiday lights and massive front yard displays? Or maybe you have one yourself or want to start one. Check out page 28 for a feature on a group of Rochesterians who won’t let a Rochester winter (or a bad fuse) dampen their enthusiasm for a good holiday display; you might find some tips. The small gifts (stocking stuffers; party presents; an extra) can often be the last items on our lists. On page 32, we highlight five local artists and online shops that offer interesting buttons, jewelry, and other small gifts. And on page 34, you’ll find a list of holiday-related events leading up to the New Year (we’ll have a separate New Year’s Eve calendar in print at the end of the year). Send us season’s greetings and let us know how your holiday celebrations are going at rochestercitynewspaper.com or on Facebook (facebook.com/citynewspaper), Twitter, and Instagram (@roccitynews).

INSIDE MUSIC........................................ 20 A WINTER'S BLUES PLAYLIST

VOLUNTEERISM.. ......................... 24 ACTIVATING GOODWILL

DECORATIONS............................. 28 THE LIGHTING CREW

GIFTS......................................... 32 THE SMALL THINGS

EVENTS ..................................... 34 On the cover: Photograph by Ryan Williamson Publishers: William and Mary Anna Towler Editorial department themail@rochester-citynews.com Arts & entertainment editor: Jake Clapp Calendar editor: Kurt Indovina Contributing writers: Daniel J. Kushner, Kathy Laluk, Rebecca Rafferty, Martha Clement Rochford

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Art department artdept@rochester-citynews.com Art director/production manager: Ryan Williamson Designers: Renée Heininger, Jacob Walsh Advertising department ads@rochester-citynews.com Sales Representatives: Christine Kubarycz, Betsy Matthews, Bill Towler, David White Operations/Circulation kstathis@rochester-citynews.com Circulation manager: Katherine Stathis Business Manager: Angela Scardinale Distribution: Andy DiCiaccio, David Riccioni, Northstar Delivery Holiday Guide is published by WMT

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A WINTER BLUES PLAYLIST

Katie Preston wrote the song "The Poinsettia Song" back in 2012. She performs with the The Abominable Snowband routinely during the holiday season. PHOTO BY JACOB WALSH

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Seven Rochester songs for a different kind of holiday mood [ MUSIC ] BY DANIEL J. KUSHNER

Our ears are used to being inundated with cheery holiday music: old standards, popular radio hits, beloved and positive hymns, and everything in between. But in the Rochester area, many musicians have taken to writing holiday songs with a less-than-traditional tack. Whether it’s going on a bizarre Christmas-y tangent, celebrating a more obscure holiday tradition, tackling a serious social issue, or simply lamenting the winter weather, Rochester songwriters seem to go about the festive season differently — and melancholy is very much in the mix. Far from a comprehensive listing, below is a sampling of seven holiday and winterrelated songs written by local musicians. And head online to rochestercitynewspaper.com to hear the music. Freak folk mastermind Seth Faergolzia’s “Oh Holy Crismas” is likely the weirdest holiday song you’ll ever hear, and that’s a high

Seth Faergolzia created the weird "Oh Holy Crismas," which is about Santa packing it in and moving to Alaska. PHOTO BY JACOB WALSH

compliment. Released as a quirky music video in 2012, Faergolzia sing-speaks his way through an alternative story about how Santa Claus decides to quit his annual giftgiving duties to get trim, live in Alaska, and prevent wealthy businessmen from drilling

for oil. If it sounds too nonsensical, that’s the point: “Santy claws keep scratching on my back / In the morning by the dozens with my sister and my cousin / I am warding off the Santa Claus attack / Oh holy Crismas.”


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Ben Proctor of The Crooked North. The band's new song, "Sing Noel," is about addiction contrasted by the joy of singing Christmas music. The song will be out in 2018. PHOTO BY JACOB WALSH

You can find the song at 23psaegz. bandcamp.com. Watch the video by searching “Seth Faergolzia — Oh Holy Christmas” on YouTube.com. “Christmas Eve” was the first song written

by folk artist Susanna Rose. The 2015 track could be about holiday depression, but the lyrics seem to suggest a deeper winter of discontent: “On Christmas Eve, she fell and screamed / Lay down on broken glass / She gets unhappy so fast.” The slowed, almost plodding chord progression — brightened by the song’s delicate harmonies — seems to take on a new, hopeful resolve with the closing lyrics. “Now I’m grown up, I’ve had enough / Not going back home, I’ll call on the phone: ‘Merry Christmas.’” Listen to “Merry Christmas” at susannarose.bandcamp.com. “Merry Christmas, Arpad Miklos,” from

the album of the same name, was released on Christmas Day 2014, but its sound and lovelorn message are evergreen. Written by singer-songwriter Jake Bellissimo under the moniker Black Tar Heroin, the vocals have a confessional, stream-of-consciousness sensibility, as they meander over a twinkling electric guitar, busy bongos, and a dreamy cello. “I’m trying to figure out what it feels like to cry underwater / Hold my hand, wish me a Merry Christmas so I don’t go under.”

22 CITY HOLIDAY GUIDE 2017

There’s something deeply sad about it all, but Bellissimo sings with enough beautiful honesty to lift the mood. Take at listen to “Merry Christmas, Arpad Miklos” at drunkwithlove.bandcamp.com. Katie Preston of the indie rock band Pleistocene also released her holiday tune, “The Poinsettia Song,” on YouTube in 2012. “I wrote this song about one of the unsung heroes of the holiday season,” Preston says. Performed by The Abominable Snowband, the charming song taps into oddly neglected holiday subject matter while managing to sound like a delightful, rediscovered 1950’s TV commercial: “So here’s my song of valid praise / Sing it on a snowy day / And all will see that Christmas is not the same without poinsettias.” You can watch a performance of the song by searching YouTube.com for “The Abominable Snowband — The Poinsettia Song.” And check out The Abominable Snowband’s 2013 four-song EP at theabominablesnowband.bandcamp.com. Written in the month of February, Avonbased musician Jesse Sprinkle’s acoustic “Blankets” from 2015 has a serious lo-fi, “bedroom recording” ambiance. “That song specifically is about dealing with snow in Rochester,” Sprinkle says. “I was trying to find poetic and positive ways to vent my


[frustration] with the temperature that month and the constant snow.” Though it isn’t a holiday song per se, it’s hard not to get into the spirit of “peace on earth and goodwill to men” when the singalong breaks out: “There’s a blanket of love, and there’s a blanket of good / But this blanket of snow, it don’t feel like it should.” You can hear “Blankets” at jessesprinkle.bandcamp.com. One doesn’t necessarily think of Americana and roots rock straight away when it comes to the winter season, but The Cabin Killers —The Slack Tones’s front man Aaron Lipp, Kerry Lipp, and members of the recent bluegrass outfit Mulberry Soul — made it work in a big way with “Winter Blues.” Clocking in at 10 minutes, hazy electric guitars blaze and bleed through a shuffling, midtempo rhythm. The result is both subtly groovy and atmospheric. The last track on the Naples-based band’s 2014 selftitled album, it comes off like the musical anecdote to seasonal affective disorder: “Even when the winter’s holding down the spring / Still the sunshine, still the sunshine / Keeps on singing his song.” Listen to “Winter Blues” at thecabinkillers.bandcamp.com. “Sing Noel” is an upcoming song by

bluegrass and folk outfit The Crooked North, written as part of a musical trilogy about opioid addiction. The subject hits close to home for the song’s writer, Ben Proctor, whose cousin and childhood friend both passed away after battles with addiction. “I was exploring different ideas and I just had this image of someone struggling to sing a Christmas song as their life was in shambles from addiction,” Proctor says. “I started singing ‘First Noel,’ and it just turned into this cry for mercy, and it seemed to fit the story really well.” There is “a shared metaphor of getting high and singing Christmas music” that worked well, Proctor says. “I’ve heard people say that getting high on opioids was like going home; it feels like this deep sense of arrival. Christmas is a foil to the addiction and helps demonstrate how tragic the character’s isolation is.” A deceptively simple folk song that may ultimately be called “Last Noel,” the depth of feeling is abundant: “Oh you’ll never understand / Till an angel takes your hand / And shows you how to sing Noel / You’ll never understand / Till the song comes to an end, and here I am / At the bottom of the well.” “Sing Noel” will be released in 2018, but in the meantime you can find The Crooked North’s music at thecrookednorth.com.

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ACTIVATING GOODWILL

Volunteers with City Roots Community Land Trust outside of New City Cafe. The group has volunteer opportunities for grant writers. PHOTO BY RENÉE HEININGER

Practical and personalized volunteering tailored to Rochester issues [ VOLUNTEERING ] BY REBECCA RAFFERTY

Taking in the endless waves of the world’s bad news can feel like drinking a toxic cocktail of existential anxiety and powerlessness. It’s easy to get overwhelmed by the volume of problems, or to feel impotently furious about mal-distributed resources and strong whiffs of corruption. And it’s tempting to tune out; stress is slowly turning us into binge-watching Netflix noodles, while bureaucracy does its molasses waltz around the issues. But even the best-intentioned politicians can’t fix everything, and while calling them about the issues close to your heart is important, people don’t have to wait for them. By getting directly involved, volunteers gain a close-up understanding of the problems. And by getting to know vulnerable citizens, you acknowledge their dignity while becoming personally invested in making the community healthier for everyone. You don’t need to have a lot of money or resources to have an impact — your time and willingness are the most important things. Consider your skill set and the issues that resonate with you, and find some points of connection between what you know how to do and what you’d like to see done. Then just 24 CITY HOLIDAY GUIDE 2017

show up for something. If this smacks of anticapitalism, well ... *wink, nudge*. Here’s a few specific ways to get involved and some resource sites for additional volunteer opportunities. If you want to serve your community but are short on time, check out the sidebar for a way you can help out that won’t ding your schedule too hard. Drive victims of police brutality to their court dates. In addition to offering transportation,

the cops-and-courts-watching grassroots organization Enough is Enough fulfils a number of other roles: Volunteers attend court proceedings for cases of police brutality; the group is forming a citizen study of local police (importantly, repeat-offender officers) and how the courts handle these cases from beginning to end; and it’s working to overturn legislation that protects dirty cops. A match for those who: have a vehicle and a flexible schedule; are hip to the second half of the “one bad apple” phrase. Connect: enoughisenough.rocus.org. Sign up for a shift with Take Back the Land and help defend a homeowner from

eviction. Some of our neighbors have had a life circumstance lead to the repossession of their house. While enmeshed in legal battles to work out a repayment agreement, the bank might get the sheriff to enforce the eviction. So the homeowner goes to work each day to earn the money to pay the bank, unsure if they’ll return to find their locks changed. Volunteers with Take Back the Land simply offer a watchful presence that discourages the eviction, keeping families in their homes and buying time for the legal advocates to work it all out. A match for those who: have a flexible schedule; know that housing is a human right. Connect: takebackroc.rocus.org. Escort patients on their way to Planned Parenthood. It’s become a cultural cliché

that sad, judge-y people stand outside of PP, forming a frown-filled shame brigade armed with graphic propaganda pictures meant to discourage women from entering the building. That’s a lot to deal with, whether you’re there for a check-up, for prenatal care, for a mammogram, or yes, to terminate a pregnancy. Volunteers can give a calm,

If you don’t have spare time in your life to volunteer, there are still ways to help out others. Make care kits to keep in your car’s glove compartment to hand out to panhandlers. Typical kits are a sealable plastic bag filled with snacks like energy bars or cracker packs, hand warmers, gloves, socks, hand wipes, or other useful items. The Internet is full of ideas for contents, and you can get together with friends to assemble the kits. And many organizations accept donations of items specific to their mission. Browse the list here: communitywishbook.org/ volunteers_needed.html


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friendly presence from the parking lot to the lobby, and keep an eye out for any threatening behavior from protesters. A match for those who: have Tuesday or Thursday afternoons open; are kind but vigilant and won’t get baited by verbal abuse. Connect: Visit plannedparenthood.org/ planned-parenthood-central-western-newyork and click the “Get involved” tab.

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parked at the Rochester Public Market, where on market days you can assist in sorting leftover produce collected from the farmers who vend there. Some of the food gets composted, and some is used by Food Not Bombs, a group you can join each Saturday afternoon in preparing healthy meals that are served on Saturday evenings at St. Joe’s House of Hospitality.

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Featuring the best For many, homeless shelters are an abstract idea. In reality, there are people invested in making them more of a community than a mere roof overhead. St. Joe’s House of Hospitality needs volunteers for its night shelter , which involves welcoming people and providing assistance as needed. A match for those who: can spend the night away from home; know that homelessness is everyone’s problem. Connect: Email James at rochestercatholicworker@gmail.com or call 232-3262. saintjoeshouse.org.

Childcare volunteers are needed at The Crisis Nursery, which is a program of the

City Roots Community Land Trust is specifically looking for a web designer and grant writers, and in general for people

Know of specific volunteer opportunities? Join the discussion by leaving a comment on the online version of this article. For more opportunities to volunteer year round, check out CITY’s Urban Action column and our activism section of the calendar in the print paper and online at rochestercitynewspaper.com.

to come learn about the organization and spread the word. City Roots is a nonprofit organization that owns city property and aims to improve the quality of neighborhoods while keeping housing permanently affordable. The group holds a general interest meeting on third Thursdays, from 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. at 441 Ministries (441 Parsells Avenue). A match for those who: have design, grant writing, or other useful skills; know that rent is too damn high. Connect: info@cityrootsclt.org or visiting cityrootsclt.org.

Center for Youth that provides temporary care to babies, toddlers, and children up to age 14 during family crises (such as medical emergencies, domestic violence, and homelessness). Apply if you’re 16 years or older to work four-hour shifts in a childcare setting. A match for those who: love kids and have a patient personality; know that it really does take a village. Connect: Email Kathy Cummins at kcummins@centerforyouth.net for more info.

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rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 27


THE LIGHTING CREW For these creative, industrious people nothing — not even a Rochester winter — can dampen their enthusiasm for building holiday displays [ FEATURE ] BY MARTHA CLEMENT ROCHFORD

On an early morning 10 days after Thanksgiving 2016, Paul Hoevenaar is checking the lights at the Polisseni home on Beauclaire Lane in Perinton, one of Rochester’s must-see holiday displays for more than a decade. Every day through Christmas he’ll swing by the house to make sure everything is working. On this particular morning, a Santa traveling by hot air balloon is pitching precariously toward the driveway, and a golden angel with beating wings is listing on the lawn. A strand of colored lights blinks out. Hoevenaar smiles. “Every day, it’s something,” he says. Wanda Polisseni is an icon among local outdoor display makers, and her home draws hundreds, maybe thousands of people every season. She’s been decorating for decades, since her adult grandchildren were babies. “I love everything with lights,” she says. “I like whimsy for the kids, also traditional and religious decorations.” Hoevenaar points out Polisseni’s custommade, rotating stand that secures a large, live Christmas tree. Polisseni replaced a menorah

28 CITY HOLIDAY GUIDE 2017

that burned out last year. And she’s added a lamppost with a single green light to commemorate veterans. “There’s a little bit for everybody,” she says. Another focal point is the lifesized, vintage Santa believed to have once been on display at Macy’s in New York City. There’s also an Amish buggy — pulled by a 5-foot-tall horse made of driftwood — given to Polisseni by her son, that she fills with presents. Across Rochester, neighbors are lighting up their homes for the holidays and testing the limits of their imaginations and their amperage. A few seasoned experts explain how they do it, and why. David Dunning is the Chili Town Supervisor and a serious holiday lights enthusiast. His massive display includes several pieces he made himself with quarterinch steel pipe and self-taught welding skills. Dunning’s show includes animation and static displays, LED and incandescent lights, trees, figurines, and inflatables. “Of just about anything and everything that’s available, I

have at least one,” he says. He had to build a bigger shed to store it all. Samantha Viveiros in Greece was inspired by a neighbor’s display, and has been building her own, with her husband Nick, for four years. Their first year, they purchased Little Tikes houses and made them up into Santa’s workshop and Mrs. Claus’s Sweets and Treats. “They didn’t hold together in the snow, so we took them down,” Viveiros says. She has replaced Santa’s Workshop and eliminated smaller features that blew into neighbors’ yards or got buried in the snow. “In the last few years we’ve tried to find things that are a little bigger, a little more durable … Most things are not made to withstand Rochester weather,” she says. Two weeks before Christmas, Michael Schoepfel’s neighbors in Penfield zoom past his house at the end of their daily commute. But at 6 p.m., his home is transformed by vibrant lights that stream and flash in changing colors and patterns. “Everything you see has been programmed,” Schoepfel says. The outline of the house, arches across the snow-covered lawn, a row of trees, and a small herd of deer

illuminate in an elaborate choreography of lights timed to music. That’s when the traffic slows. Starting and maintaining a substantial holiday lights display is no small task. Dunning, between making his own decorations and installing everything himself, is exhausted by the time everything is arranged. Viveiros and her husband juggled last year’s installation with caring for a newborn baby. Schoepfel started this season by making multiple trips to his basement to flip the circuit breaker and keep the show running, while he tried to find the source of a ground fault. Polisseni’s collection has grown so large, she has to trailer it in from a storage facility in Ontario County. But they all keep going. Experience is a terrific teacher, and they’ve all learned a few things along the way. Test everything. “There is nothing more

frustrating than turning the display on Thanksgiving night and seeing that six or seven bulbs on the peak of the roof are out, and you’ve got to get back up there,” Dunning says. His emphatic advice is “test before you put things up.”


Hoevenaar tests Polisseni’s display every morning, “because I’d rather come during the day when I can find the plugs — they run all over the yard — then come by at night when I get a call that something’s out.” Check your amps. Schoepfel advises anyone

starting out to choose LED or pixel lights. He says, “A lot of the older lights are not energy efficient.” Dunning has shaved hundreds of dollars off his electric bill by changing to LED lights, which “are a little more expensive but require a lot less energy,” he says, and spare homeowners “the electrical modification you’d otherwise have to do.” Viveiros has had issues with “power blowing” and had to upgrade the electric panel. “We were overloading breakers, so we had nights where half the display wasn’t on,” she says. “We’d have to go out there and unplug things — unplug one thing and turn it back on — did it stay on or was it going to blow again? It was a game.” Any outlets that are outside must be ground faulted, and Dunning firmly advises

against trying to run extension cords from a regular outlet. “They will get snowed on, they will get wet, and water is not good with electricity.” Watch the weather. Dunning and Hoevenaar both try to get decorations installed on the roof and high eaves before winter sets in. During the season, things get wet, and they short out. “There have been years where I had to bring a shovel out and dig the snow away to try to find out why something doesn’t light; if maybe an extension cord separated,” Hoevenaar says. Wind is an issue, too. Polisseni’s rotating Christmas tree blew over the first week it was up. “Most nights we have to do a once-over, and pick up the things that have blown over,” Viveiros says. Be nice to your neighbors. The introduction to the audio portion of Schoepfel’s animated light show gives visitors tips on how to be considerate of the neighbors — dim the headlights and don’t block driveways. Dunning’s neighbors kid with him that “they don’t have to turn the lights on at night

because my house lights up the neighborhood,” he says with a laugh. Hoevenaar says, “We appreciate the patience of the neighbors, especially right around Christmas when they’re trying to have their own get-togethers and we have this massive traffic tie-up.” Polisseni knows that December is a long month for people on Beauclaire: “Traffic can be backed up, and sometimes I’m waiting to get to my own house,” she says. “I really appreciate my neighbors, and I try to do something nice for them.” Is it competition or contagion? With displays

getting bigger and bolder in neighborhoods across Rochester, it’s natural to wonder if there isn’t a little rivalry among neighbors. But Schoepfel got started with the help of a neighbor, and other people have stopped by to ask Schoepfel how to get started. “We’re not competing,” Polisseni insists. “That’s not the spirit of it!” Viveiros encourages newcomers to join in. “You don’t know what you’re going to start; if you do it, your neighbors might get involved as well, and then your street becomes this amazingly festive place.” Holiday displays are expensive. A metal frame

Santa’s sleigh with lights can run $400 on sale. LED lights are efficient but pricey, and items get damaged and need to be replaced every season. Electric bills can skyrocket, and sometimes power must be upgraded to support the shows. Displays also require a lot of hard work, from collecting, creating, and setting up the displays and maintaining them every day to breaking them down in January. Even storage is a big commitment.

So what motivates people to keep going? “I’ve had kids stop at my house and bring me a plate of cookies to say thank you, and leave hand-written notes in my mailbox,” Dunning says. “It’s really heartwarming. I’ve had people tell me they go out of their way on the home from work, just to drive by my house.” Polisseni lights up when she talks about how a friend’s granddaughter who visits her house “knows where Santa lives!” In the days before Christmas, cars are backed up to Turk Hill Road waiting to drive by her house. “I love the excitement the kiddies have, and I love to see the busloads of senior citizens and people with special needs. I want to see the smiles on their faces.” “The kids who drive down here and hang out the windows and go ‘look at that!’ is payment enough,” Hoevenaar says. He adds that Polisseni “loves kids…she’s out here on Christmas handing out candy canes with her family.” Viveiros reminds people who decorate their homes to enjoy their own displays. “Be sure to take it all in,” she says. “And at night when you have people driving by, go out and say hi to them. It’s such a happy thing to do: bringing joy to people.” Dunning and his wife do take it in. “My wife and I get in the truck just before Christmas and we drive — we spend 6 hours or better just driving around to look at the lights,” he says. “We’ve been out to Farmington, Webster, just to see the displays. We always go to Wanda’s house.” Most displays will come down right after the New Year. Polisseni leaves her lights on for a day or two after, “and if it’s frozen,” she says “they may be up for a while.” This is Rochester, after all. ILLUSTRATION BY RYAN WILLIAMSON

Join us for Rob Linton’s 15th Christmas Eve Celebration DECEMBER 24th LIVE from 8 p.m. – 12 a.m. We take requests, play great holiday jazz, blues and big band music! ROCHESTER’S 24 HOUR JAZZ STATION STREAMING LIVE 24/7/365 AT JAZZ901.ORG rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 29


At Christmas time As we welcome The One who inspires us We wish Peace on Earth for All May the prayers of the People Spoken in the words of many faiths Rise up to The Creator And bless us every one.

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/ MOVIES 30 CITY HOLIDAY GUIDE 2017


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THE SMALL THINGS From repurposed circuit breakers and maps to punk buttons, check out these five artists and online shops for interesting stocking stuffers [ GIFTS ] BY KATHY LALUK

It can be tricky trying to find that right small item to pop into a stocking or give to a coworker or acquaintance. Sure, you can buy something from the dollar bin at Target (and hey, I’m not knocking that choice; I’m guilty of it myself). But this holiday season, consider looking to local businesses that satisfy that need by churning out beautiful, vintage, or just plain quirky odds and ends that will be truly unique and appreciated. Have a go-to local shop for small, last-minute gifts? Leave a comment below this article online at rochestercitynewspaper.com.

Circuit Breaker Labs

For more than a decade now, Amanda Preske has been turning circuit boards and other old hardware into works of art. “It started when my brother gave me an old circuit board that didn’t work anymore,” she says. Preske, who has a background in chemistry and a love for art, took the tiny pieces and suspended it in epoxy resin. After the viral content website Upworthy featured her work last year, Preske saw sales skyrocket. Soon, she was making necklaces, cufflinks, earrings, pins, and key chains for people around the world. Many of her pieces — at first glance — can appear to be a subway map or just an intricate design of lines and dots. “I love that you can’t tell where it came from when you look at it,” she says. Only about 30 percent of old electronics are recycled, on average — something Preske says she wants to change. She, with the help of a few assistants, currently works with local businesses and colleges to re-purpose their old, unusable electronics into her artwork. 32 CITY HOLIDAY GUIDE 2017

Pieces range between $20 and $40 and can be bought online or at several local craft shows. You can find Circuit Breaker Labs online at circuitbreakerlabs.myshopify.com or at facebook.com/circuitbreakerlabs.

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Rochester’s Most Unique

LIVE MUSIC VENUE all — of the art, which ranges from dark and unusual to classic pieces featuring Rochester icons. The shop incorporates the Flower City logo into many of its pieces, mixing the star design into a skull, an octopus, flowers, and Susan B. Anthony. In addition to prints on paper (and even slabs of wood), users can request buttons of their favorite designs. MakabreArt can be found online at etsy. com/shop/MakabreArt.

Making the Nest of It

Denise McGuire says her life was changed by a clothespin. It happened shortly after her kids (and foster children) had all left home and McGuire was looking to start her own new chapter in life. “I suddenly had this big gaping hole and needed something to fill the time,” the longtime teacher says. “I just started creating things and started helping friends with weddings, and before I knew it, it turned into a business.” McGuire uses patterned paper, fabric, and maps to customize clothespins (from the tiny to the chunky), paper clips, buttons, and Christmas ornaments. McGuire defines her style as mixing colors and patterns in ways that feel vintage but with a modern twist. One of her designs made the front page of Etsy shortly after she opened her shop in 2011. “It made me realize the potential of something that was so simple,” she says. The holidays and wedding season are her busiest times, she says. Many brides and grooms request custom pins to hold up photos or place cards. She’ll often use maps to personalize the items with locations that are important to the couple. Like Circuit Breaker Labs, McGuire recycles — a lot. “I hate throwing things out,” she says. Every little scrap goes to use, from the pieces themselves to the packaging (all handmade). McGuire also makes sure some of her items are priced low enough for young children to buy as gifts for parents or teachers. “There’s nothing like the excitement a kid gets when they’re using their money to buy something for someone special,” she says. Find McGuire’s work at etsy.com/shop/ MAKINGtheNESTofIT.

Lemmy, dangling cigarettes from their mouths; comic books; punk icons; “I Hate the 90’s”; and a (self-explanatory) X-rated run Teen Set timed with an issue featuring Ron Jeremy. A couple of solo buttons go for a more topical approach — “zombie” Nancy Reagan, and Johnny Cash featuring the viral phrase “Cash me outside.” You can find Teen Set selling buttons and zines pretty cheap at different places around Rochester, or online at etsy.com/ shop/rochesterteenset.

Wolfgang Vintage Wares

This husband and wife duo selfdescribes as treasure hunters in what others often consider “trash.” Justin and Sarah scour through second-hand shops and garage sales for items to rescue from a dusty corner and either polish up or revamp into something totally new and inspired. In their Etsy store, Wolfgang Vintage Wares, they have nearly 50 vintage buttons — from old movie buttons for “Indiana Jones” and “Mrs. Doubtfire” to phrases like “Bald is beautiful” and “Let’s get together.” Since they’re constantly hunting for new material, their stock and offerings vary. Wolfgang Vintage Wares can be found at etsy.com/shop/ WolfgangVintageWares.

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National Teen Set Outsider

Rochester punk zine National Teen Set Outsider has been around since 2010 and in recent years has branched out into a small buttons business. A lot of the pins are produced in sets: “Cool Smokers” has a range of celebrities, like John Waters, Britt Ekland, and

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rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 33


HOLIDAY EVENTS

As more holiday events are announced, keep up with an updated version of this guide and CITY’s online events calendar at rochestercitynewspaper.com. Have an event you’d like to add, send us an email at calendar@rochester-citynews.com.

[ CALENDAR ] COMPILED BY KURT INDOVINA

Ongoing [ ART ] [ GLASS WONDERLAND ] Family-friendly holiday showcases and activities throughout the museum. Nov. 16 through Jan. 2. Free. Corning Museum of Glass, One Museum Way, Corning. 607937-5371; cmog.org [ SPECIAL EVENT ] Holiday Music and Light Show More than 100,000 individual LED lights will light up, synchronized to music for an indoor light show. 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Nov. 25 through Dec. 17. $2. The Garden Factory, 2126 Buffalo Rd. 247-6236; gardenfactoryny.com [ SPECIAL EVENT ] Festival of Trees Design and display a holiday tree, wreath, basket, handmade jewelry, or other home decoration to be loaned through exhibit or donated for auction. Continues through Dec. 3. $5. Granger Homestead Museum, 295 N. Main St., Canandaigua. 3941472; grangerhomestead.org. [ SPECIAL EVENT ] Yuletide in the Country Tours Tour groups will be led through a reenactment of the winter months of 1849 in the village. Times and dates vary through Dec. 17. $19-$25. Genesee Country Village and Museum, 1410 Flint Hill Rd, Mumford. 294-8218; gcv.org. [ THEATER ] “A Christmas Carol” The musical adaptation of the Charles Dickens classic. Through Dec. 24. No shows Monday and select Tuesdays; show times vary. $12.50$84. Geva Theatre Center, 75 Woodbury Blvd. 232-4382; gevatheatre.org. [ KIDS EVENT] Polar Express Train With a short stop at the North Pole to pick-up Santa. Trains depart every hour and 15 minutes, from 11:45 a.m. to 6 p.m. Nov. 25 through Dec. 17. $35-$50. Medina Railroad Museum, 530 West Ave. 7986106; railroadmuseum.net. FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 17 [ SHOPPING ] Holiday Bazaar Arts & Crafts Sale Women’s Council hosts its 47th annual holiday sale

featuring 200 elite fine artists and craftspeople. Continues through Nov. 19. $5. Rochester Museum and Science Center, 657 East Ave. 697-1944; rmsc. org. SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 18 [ SPECIAL EVENT ] Crafts at Christmas Create holiday crafts based on 19th-century celebrations. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Genesee Country Village & Museum, 1410 Flint Hill Rd., Mumford. $10. 2948218; gcv.org. [ MUSIC ] Friendsgiving Party and Dance with The Brothers Blue Benefit for the Homeless Community. Featuring Dady Brothers, Susanna Rose, Teressa Wilcox, Bob Bunce, and more. Also includes beard contest. 8 p.m. $10; $5 with the donation of new socks, undies, or toiletries. Abilene Bar & Lounge, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230; abilenebarandlounge.com SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 19 [ RECREATION ] Turkey Classic The YMCA’s 34th annual five-mile race and one-mile family walk to celebrate the season. 8:10 a.m. and 9 a.m. 111 E. Jefferson Rd, Pittsford. $15-$35. 385-4665; rochesterymca.org. [ DINING ] Vegan Give Thanks Dinner Featuring live music, family activities, and networking. Advanced registration required. 6-8 p.m. $22-$27. 540WMain, 540 W. Main St. 420-8439; 540westmain.org. WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 22 [ MUSIC/DANCE ] “The Nutcracker” Wednesday, Nov. 22, 7 p.m.; Friday, Nov. 27, 2 p.m., 7 p.m.; Saturday, Nov. 25, 2 p.m., 7 p.m.; and Sunday, Nov. 26, 2 p.m. $15-$104. Kodak Hall at Eastman Theatre, 60 Gibbs St. 454-2100; rpo.org. [ DANCE EVENT ] Thanksgiving Eve Silent Disco 9 p.m.-1 a.m. $10. The Penthouse at One East Avenue, 1 East Ave. 752-2575; penthouseroc.com. THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 23 [ DINING ] Thanksgiving Day Buffet

34 CITY HOLIDAY GUIDE 2017

A feast with Hidden Valley Animal Adventure. 11 am.-4 p.m. $24 adults; $12 children ages 5 to 10. Reservation required. Hidden Valley Animal Adventure, 2887 Royce Rd., Varysburg. 535-4100; hiddenvalleyadventure.com. [ RECREATION ] Wedge Waddle Three-mile walk and/or run around the South Wedge. Give thanks and donate a pair of new socks to St. Joseph’s Hospitality House. 10 a.m. Free. Meets at Abundance Cooperative Market, 571 South Ave. wedgewaddle.com. FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 24 [ KIDS EVENT ] Thanksgiving Break Activities Events for all ages while school is out of session. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Through Nov. 30. Free. Corning Museum of Glass. One Museum Way, Corning. 607937-5371; cmog.org. [ SHOPPING ] Don’t get Malled – Shop Small More than 25 local artists, working studios, and items for sale from the makers themselves. Continues Nov. 25. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Hungerford Building, 1115 E Main St. thehungerford.com [ SPECIAL EVENT ] Black Friday Meet & Mingle Buffet-style, vegan-friendly, gluten free dinner. Advanced registration required. 6-8 p.m. $15-$18. 540WMain, 540 W. Main St. 420-8439; 540westmain.org. [ SHOPPING ] Holiday Festival of Crafts Natural fiber women’s clothing, wooden bowls, furniture, kitchenware, and hand woven treasures and more. 10 a.m.- 5 p.m. Continues through Nov. 26. $2. The Harley School, 1981 Clover St. 554-3529; folkartguild.org. SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 25 [ DINING ] Breakfast with Saint Nick A pancake breakfast alongside a meet and greet with St. Nick. 9 a.m., 10 a.m., 11 a.m., 12 p.m. $15; registration required. Genesee Country Village and Museum, 1410 Flint Hill Rd., Mumford. 538-6822; gvc.org. [ THEATER ] “All She Wants for Christmas” It’s Christmas Eve and Mrs.

Claus is home waiting for Mr. Claus. Cocktails at 6 p.m.; dinner at 7 p.m.; performance at 8:15 p.m. $40. Hidden Valley Animal Adventure, 2887 Royce Rd., Varysburg. 535-4100; hiddenvalleyadventure.com. SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 26 [ SPECIAL EVENT ] Holiday Pet Photos 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Other dates include Dec. 2 and Dec. 3. Lollypop Farms, 99 Victor Road, Fairport. 2231330x139, lollypop.org/ petphotos. [ SHOPPING ] Holidays at the Market 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Continues Dec. 3 and Dec. 10. Rochester Public Market, 280 Union St. 428-6907. cityofrochester.gov/ holidaysatmarket WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 29 [ MUSIC ] Holiday Music for Horns Eastman Horn Choir will perform seasonal brass music directed by W. Peter Kurau. 12-1 p.m. Free. Hochstein Performance Hall, 50 N. Plymouth Ave. 454-4596; hochstein.org. THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 30 [ DINING ] Candlelight Nights Thursdays Wine and hors d’oeuvres over a candlelight dinner, with a souvenir wine glass. Thursdays, Nov. 30 through Dec. 21. 6:30 p.m. $14. Deer Run Winery, 3772 West Lake Rd., Geneseo. 346-0850; deerrunwinery.com. [ SPECIAL EVENT ] Park Avenue Holiday Open House Horse-drawn wagon rides, shop sales and specials, holiday activities all night. 5-9 p.m. Free. Along Park Ave. parkavenue.org. FRIDAY, DECEMBER 1 [ SHOPPING ] Holiday Boutique Artisans and crafters in the museum. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Continues Dec. 2. $7. Museum of Wayne County History, 21 Butternut Street. 315-9464943; waynehistory.org. [ THEATER ] “Meet Me in St. Louis” A live radio play adaptation of the classic Judy Garland musical. Through Dec. 17. Fri. & Sat. Dec. 1, 2, 8, 9, 15, 16,

7:30 p.m. Sat. & Sun. Dec. 3, 9, 10, 17, 2 p.m. $15-$23.50. The Lyric Theatre, 440 East Ave. 256-0444; the-lyrictheatre.ticketleap.com. SATURDAY, DECEMBER 2 [ SPECIAL EVENT ] 51st Anniversary of Kwanzaa A shopping celebration with unique items, art, clothes, accessories, crafts, Kwanzaa kits and more. 11 a.m.-7 p.m. Baobab Cultural Center, 728 University Ave. 563-2145; thebaobab.org [ KIDS EVENT ] Christmas at Hidden Valley Breakfast and pictures with Santa, kid’s workshop, and gift show. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Continues Dec. 3. Reservations requested. Hidden Valley Animal Adventure, 2887 Royce Rd., Varysburg. 535-4100; hiddenvalleyadventure.com. [ SPECIAL EVENT ] It’s a Wonderful Life in the South Wedge & A Handmade Holiday Featuring carriage strolls, family activities, food trucks, and more. 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Star Alley and Abundance Cooperative Market, 662 and 572 South Ave. And Handmade Holiday vendors will be located in the German House and St. Boniface Church, 315 and 330 Gregory St. baswa.org [ KIDS EVENT ] “The Nutcracker” Preview Preview performance of New York State Ballet’s “The Nutcracker.” 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. Included in museum admission. Strong National Museum of Play, 1 Manhattan Square Dr. 263-2700; museumofplay.org. [ SPECIAL EVENT ] Wintercraft Open House & Holiday Sale Crafts, holiday shopping, and letterpress, ceramic, and book art activities. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Free. Flower City Arts Center, 713 Monroe Ave. 244-1730; geneseearts.org SUNDAY, DECEMBER 3 [ MUSIC ] Prism Holiday Concert Nazareth’s Saxophone Ensemble, Brass Ensemble, Chamber Orchestra, and others will perform holiday music. 3-4:30 p.m. Free. Linehan Chapel, 4245 East Ave. 3892700; naz.edu.

[ MUSIC ] “A City Sings for the Season” The charity concert will give donations of food, money, and toiletries to the Rochester Area Interfaith Hospitality Network. 3- 5 p.m. Stardust Ballroom, 41 Backus St. Free. rossings.org [ KIDS EVENT ] Holley Trolley Rides Decorated for Christmas, an 89-year-old trolley will give rides to attendees. 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Continues Dec. 10 and Dec. 17. New York Museum of Transportation, 6393 East River Road, West Henrietta. Nymtmuseum.org. [ SPECIAL EVENTS ] Annual Chanukah Happening Chanukah Bazaar with vendors, food sold by Social Action Committee. 9 a.m.12:30 p.m. Free. Temple Sinai, 363 Penfield Rd. 203-1200; jewishrochester.org MONDAY, DECEMBER 4 [ MUSIC ] “Music to Warm Your Heart” Concert Works by Falla, Tchaikovsky, Handel, and more, performed by Penfield Symphony Orchestra. 7:30 p.m. $15. Penfield High School, 25 High School Dr. 872-0774; penfieldsymphony.org. TUESDAY, DECEMBER 5 [ SPECIAL EVENT] Candlelight Night Live music, carolers, horsedrawn wagon rides, visits with Santa and the lighting of village Christmas trees. 5-8 p.m. Village of Pittsford. villageofpittsford.org. WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 6 [ SPECIAL EVENT ] USY Hanukkah Party 7:30-10:30 p.m. Free. . Temple Beth El, 139 Winton Rd. South. 473-1770; jewishrochester.org. THURSDAY, DECEMBER 7 [ MUSIC ] Bill Kirchen’s Honky Tonk Holiday $20-$25. Lovin’ Cup Brews & Bistro, 300 Park Point Dr. 2929940; lovincup.com. FRIDAY, DECEMBER 8 [ THEATER ] “The Grinch” Dr. Seuss’ classic tale retold through dance. Presented by the Mossa School of


Dance. Fri. & Sat. Dec. 8 & 9, 7 p.m.; Sun. Dec. 10, 2 p.m. $12. Cobblestone Theatre, 1622 State Route 332, Farmington. 398-0220; cobblestoneartscenter.com. SATURDAY, DECEMBER 9 [ KIDS EVENT ] Breakfast with Santa Breakfast in the Rocky Coasts Gallery with sea lions and polar bears and Santa and take home a goody bag. 8:30 a.m.12:30 p.m. Continues Dec. 10, Dec. 16, and Dec. 17. $5$15. Seneca Park Zoo, 2222 St. Paul Street. 336-7200; senecaparkzoo.org. [ FILM ] “National Lampoon’s Christmas Vacation” Part of The Little Theatre and Fright-Rags’ Saturday Night Rewind. 9:30 p.m. $9. The Little Theatre, 240 East Ave. 258-0400; thelittle.org.

[ MUSIC ] Tuba Christmas Tradition Christmas carols performed by a mass lowbrass choir of 150 tuba and euphonium players. Conducted by Jeremy Stoner. 4 p.m. Free. Kodak Hall at Eastman Theatre, 26 Gibbs St. 274-1000; rpo.org. SUNDAY, DECEMBER 10 OrKIDStra Holiday Special: “The Snowman and The Bear” Two animated winter classics will projected on the big screen and accompanied live by the RPO. 2 p.m. $14-$40. Kodak Hall at Eastman Theatre, 26 Gibbs St. 274-1000; rpo.org. TUESDAY, DECEMBER 12 [ THEATER ] “A Christmas Carol: The Musical” Based on the classic 1983 movie. Tues.-Thurs., Dec. 12-14, 7:30 p.m.; Fri., Dec. 15, 8 p.m.; Sat., Dec. 16, 2 & 8 p.m.; Sun., Dec. 17, 1 & 6:30 p.m. $38-$78. Rochester

SATURDAY, DECEMBER 16

TUESDAY, DECEMBER 26

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 29

[ SPECIAL EVENT ] Hanukkah Candle Lighting Minyan Night 6:30-8:30 p.m. Free. Temple Beth El, 139 Winton Rd. South. 473-1770; jewishrochester.org.

[ KIDS EVENT ] Reindeer Run Reindeer Run, a family-friendly race. 5k begins at 8:30 a.m. and Kids Race, 9:20 a.m. $10$20. Blue Cross Arena, 100 Exchange Blvd. runsignup. com.

[ SPECIAL EVENT ] Umoja A part of the 2017 Kwanzaa Festival. 6-9 p.m. Free. Baobab Cultural Center, 728 University Ave. 563-2145; thebaobab.org.

[ SPECIAL EVENT ] Ujamaa A part of the 2017 Kwanzaa Festival. 2-5 p.m. Rochester Museum Science Center, 657 East Ave. 271-4320; rmsc.org.

WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 27

SATURDAY, DECEMBER 30

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 15

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 21

[ MUSIC ] Holiday Voices A selection of holiday classics performed by the Cobblestone Players. Includes wine and hors d’oeuvres. 7 p.m. $15. Cobblestone Theatre, 1622 State Route 332, Farmington. 398-0220; cobblestoneartscenter.com.

[ SPECIAL EVENT ] Chanukah Party Temple B’rith Kodesh collaborates with the Third Presbyterian Church for a holiday party. 12 p.m. Temple B’rith Kodesh Atrium, 2131 Elmwood Ave. 2447060; tbk.org.

[ SPECIAL EVENT ] Kujichagulia: Kwanzaa Family Fun Day A part of the 2017 Kwanzaa Festival. Noon-5 p.m. Included in museum admission. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. 276-8900; man.rochester.edu.

[ SPECIAL EVENT ] Nia A part of the 2017 Kwanzaa Festival. 2-5 p.m. Free. Gantt Center Gannt R Center, 700 North St. 428-7149; ganttcenter.org.

Auditorium Theatre, 885 E Main St. 222-5000; rbtl.org.

[ DINING ] Chanukah Dinner & Shabbat Celebration Buffet dinner at 5:30 p.m. Shabbat service at 1 p.m. $8$15. Temple B’rith Kodesh, 2131 Elmwood Ave. 244-7060; jewishrochester.org.

[ MUSIC ] Gala Holiday Pops Features carols and joyful melodies, plus singer Denzal Sinclaire. Thurs., Dec. 24, 7:30 p.m.; Fri., Dec. 22, 8 p.m.; Sat., Dec. 23, 2 & 8 p.m. $24$110. Kodak Hall at Eastman Theatre, 26 Gibbs St. 2741000; rpo.org.

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 28 [ SPECIAL EVENT ] Ujima A part of the 2017 Kwanzaa Festival. 2-5 p.m. Free. Wheatley Library, 33 McCree Way. 428-8212; cityofrochester.gov.

SUNDAY, DECEMBER 31 [ SPECIAL EVENT ] Kuumba A part of the 2017 Kwanzaa Festival. 6-9 p.m. Free. Memorial AME Zion Church, 549 Clarissa St. 546-5997; memorialamez.org.

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 35


36 CITY HOLIDAY GUIDE 2017


Arts & Performance Art Exhibits [ OPENING ] The Clover Center for Arts and Spirituality, 1101 Clover St. The work of Carl Chiarenza. Through Jan. 1. Opening reception Sun. Nov. 19, 12 p.m. Also featuring work by Connie Hindero, Neal McDannel, and Anne Marcello. 473-3200. clovercenteroffice@ gmail.com. theclovercenter.com. [ CONTINUING ] 1570 Gallery at Valley Manor, 1570 East Ave. ‘Tis the Season. Through Jan. 1. Artwork and crafts by Cheryl and Don Olney. 5468400. EpiscopalSeniorLife.org. 540WMain, 540 W. Main Street. The Art of Briell Giancola. Through Nov. 30. 2D and 3D mixed media by Briell Giancola. 420-8439. 540westmain.org. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 5th Annual Rochester Crop Circle. Featuring work by Brian Blatt, Jesse Amesmith, and Rachel Farley. 454-2966. bugjar.com. Central Library, Children’s Center, 115 South Ave. 2017 Art of the Book Exhibit. Through Dec. 31. Featuring the art of the book: artists books and altered books. Create Art 4 Good Studios, 1115 E. Main St., door 5, suite 201. Sphere in the Box. Through Nov. 18. Photographs by Bart Howard. 210-3161. Susan@createart4good.org. createart4good.org. Davison Gallery, Cultural Life Center, Roberts Wesleyan College, 2301 Westside Dr. Angle of Repose. Through Dec. 16. Opening reception Nov. 10, 5-7 p.m. Artwork by Colleen Buzzard. 594-6120. roberts.edu. A Different Path Gallery, 27 Market St. Brockport. Paper, Fabric and Sisters. Through Nov. 30. Artwork from two sisters. 637-5494. differentpathgallery.com. Flower City Arts Center, 713 Monroe Ave. From the Seeds of Cucumber Alley. Through Dec. 21. Celebrating 40 Years of Photography. A display photographs by volunteers and staff. 271-5920. rochesterarts. org.; Good Things.. Come in Small Packages. Through Dec. 21. An exhibit and sale dedicated to small, finely crafted ceramic art. 271-5183. rochesterarts.org. Gallery 384, 384 East Ave. Visions are in the Eyes of the Beholders. Through Nov. 26 Visual arts media by Lisa Cook, Tim Fuss, Margaret Miyake, Jeno Horvath, and more. Geisel Gallery, Second Floor Rotunda, Legacy Tower, One Bausch & Lomb Place. Photogenic Rochester. Through Nov. 27. Photography by Sheridan Vincent. thegeiselgallery.com. GO ART! Seymour Place, 201 E Main St. Batavia. Cabel and Zen. Through Feb. 3, 2018. An exhibit of Photography and Illustration by Jim Burns. 343-9313. ghallock@goart.org. goart.org. iGalleryKathyClem, Anderson Arts Building, 250 N. Goodman St. Destiny. Through Dec. 1. Multimedia installation by Kathy Clem and Martha Schermerhorn. 764-5589. iGalleryKathyClem.com.

PHOTO BY KEVIN PATTERSON

OPERA | ‘MRS. PRESIDENT’ As trailblazers in the American fight for women’s rights go, Victoria Woodhull is likely the most underrated. An indispensable historical figure, Woodhull was the first woman to run for the office of United States President — all the way back in 1872. And yet school textbooks and other documentary narratives have by-and-large neglected her story. Woodhull is the subject of a 2012 opera — composed by Victoria Bond with a libretto by Hilary Bell — that will be presented this week by The Lyric Theater CoOPERAtive. Woodhull’s story has sociopolitical relevance today, both here in Rochester as the home of Susan B. Anthony and to our nation as a whole, which has yet to elect a woman to the highest office in the land, more than 140 years after Woodhull’s run. Presented as part of the centennial celebration of women’s voting rights in New York State, the production will feature soprano Valerie Bernhardt as Victoria Woodhull. “Mrs. President” will be performed on Saturday, November 18, at The Lyric Theatre, 440 East Avenue. 7 p.m. $25-$50. 256-0444; lyrictheatrerochester.org; mrspresidenttheopera.com. — By DANIEL J. KUSHNER Image City Photography Gallery, 722 University Ave. Backroads. Through Nov. 26. Photography by Phyllis & Gary Thompson and more. International Art Acquisitions, 3300 Monroe Ave. Iconic Women. Through Nov. 30. Original figurative work by Contemporary artist Issa Shojaei. 264-1440. internationalartacquisitions.com. Loud Cow, 13 Pine Hill Road. Spencerport. Place Makers. Through Nov. 18. Art by Jappie King Black and Allen Topolski. Main Street Arts, 20 W. Main St., Clifton Springs. Sacred Curiosities. Through Nov. 17. Sculpture, painting, and drawing by 13 regional artists. 315-462-0210. mainstreetartsgallery.com. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. Wendell Castle: Remastered. Through Dec. 31. The first to showcase the digitally crafted works of Wendell Castle. 276-8900. mag.rochester.edu. Mercer Gallery at Monroe Communtiy College, 1000 E. Henrietta Rd. Indigenous Environmental Activism in Art. Through Dec. 14. Showcases how Indigenous artists are raising awareness of environmental issues. 2922021. monroecc.edu.

My Sister’s Gallery at the Episcopal Church Home, 505 Mt. Hope Ave. Remembrances. Through Dec. 10. Opening reception Thurs. Nov. 16, 5-7 p.m. A display of watercolors by Pam LoCicero. 546-8400. EpiscopalSeniorLife.org. Nazareth College Arts Center Gallery, 4245 East Ave. Print Club of Rochester Annual Members Exhibition. Through Nov. 17. printclubofrochester.org. NTID Dyer Arts Center, 52 Lomb Memorial Dr. HOAG/25 YEARS. Through Nov. 18. Multiple media, retrospective exhibition of artwork by Lee Hoag. 4755333. rit.edu/ntid/dyerarts. Oxford Gallery, 267 Oxford St. Continuum. Through Dec. 2. Artwork by Jean K. Stephens and Chris Baker. Patricia O’Keefe Ross Gallery at St. John Fisher, 3690 East Ave. ELEMENTS. Through Jan. 5. Artists reception Fri. Nov. 17, 6-8 p.m. Recent works by Jappie King Black, Bill Stephens and Bill Judkins. Penfield Arts Center, 2131 Five Mile Line Rd. Tree Hugs. Through Dec. 14. Through Pen and ink artist Kristina Hutch Matthews. 764-3493. penfieldartscenter@gmail.com. penfieldartscenter.com.

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Dance

Brockport students perform “Set and Reset/Reset,” an homage to a Trisha Brown piece. This work will be staged as part of this year’s “Danscore” program. PHOTO BY MATTHEW LEOMAN

Dance re-volution Danscore THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 16, THROUGH SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 18 THURSDAY AND FRIDAY PERFORMANCES AT HARTWELL DANCE THEATER, 350 NEW CAMPUS DRIVE, BROCKPORT SATURDAY PERFORMANCE AT HOCHSTEIN PERFORMANCE HALL, 50 NORTH PLYMOUTH AVENUE, ROCHESTER 7:30 P.M. | $9-$17 | BROCKPORT.EDU [ PREVIEW ] BY DANIEL J. KUSHNER

The College at Brockport’s Department of Dance has a long history of hiring teachers who are professional artists with years of experience performing and choreographing modern dance. The department celebrates its 50th anniversary this week with its annual Danscore performances. According to the department interim chair James Hansen, the landscape for dance in higher learning looked different at the time of the department’s inception at Brockport. “In most departments across the country at that time, they were run by 38 CITY NOVEMBER 15 - 21, 2017

people in physical education programs,” Hansen explains. At The College at Brockport, professional dancers staked their claim in academia by founding a dance department that included its own touring company — Danscore — made up of faculty members. Five decades later, Brockport continues its tradition of bringing downstate professional dancers together with aspiring students looking to professionally break through. According to Assistant Professor Stevie Oakes, this community of in-house professionals helps link the collegiate community with the dance community at-large. “This year’s Danscore provides only the best examples of how that kind of integration benefits the students and the local community,” she says. The upcoming Danscore performances serve as a showcase, a vital snapshot of where contemporary dance has been in the past 30plus years, and where it’s headed now. The real coup of the program for the Brockport dance community is its reimagining of the late choreographer and dancer Trisha Brown’s “Set and Reset” as “Set and Reset/Reset.” Professor Emeritus Jacqueline Davis garnered the grant

Brockport needed to successfully stage the work, which is the linchpin of the performances. In addition to benefiting from the expertise of Associate Professor and Graduate Program Director Mariah Maloney — who was a member of the Trisha Brown Dance Company from 1995 through 2002 — the students learned the choreography and tools necessary to execute it from Vicky Shick, an original cast member from the 1983 premiere at Brooklyn Academy of Music, as well as Iréne Hultman, who served as Brown’s understudy. Maloney recalls five rules for “Set and Reset” as established by Brown: “Keep it simple, act on instinct, stay on the edge, work with visibility and invisibility, and get in line.” She characterizes the resulting dance as “small layers that accumulate group choreography through improvisation,” akin to the classic matching cards memory game. The choreography in the original “Set and Reset” is highly expressive and fluid, featuring Brown’s exciting technique in tandem with a more traditional approach as danced by an artist well-versed in classical dance. The contrast is beautiful,

particularly in the tension that it creates. Looking back at her time working with Brown, Maloney has fond memories herself. “I had the opportunity to become the most articulate artist I could possibly become,” she says. “Her material, her process, her choreographic devices — they’re inviting. Trisha grew up in the northwest rainforest, in Aberdeen, Washington. I grew up in Alaska. Her material made me feel at home and it made me want to be able to do it so much better, every time I did it.” Hansen says the bill’s various dances aren’t connected by theme, but by their “current, postmodern” aesthetics, and that the unity hinges on Brown’s “Set and Reset.” “Trisha Brown was the emergence of postmodernism, and the majority of the rest of the work is the most current examples of how postmodernism exists in the dance world,” he says. “So I guess that’s the connective thread — how postmodernism has evolved over time.” Hansen doesn’t mince words in explaining the strengths of Brockport’s dance department that will carry it into the future. “Jump ahead 50 years, and I would say that we are still continuing to be revolutionary, in that we have on faculty the most current and cutting-edge dance artists and philosophers that exist,” he says. Some of the large, older, and reputable conservatories — at Juilliard, SUNY Purchase, and North Carolina School of the Arts — “were founded by and continue to have instructors who are 70, 80 years old, who are not current in their investigation of the form,” he says. “Our department is all cutting-edge, young people who are pushing boundaries.” Maloney cites the additions of Jenise Anthony, who specializes in African dance, Julia Berrer, formerly of Doug Varone and Dancers, and ballet dancer Jennifer Weber to the Department of Dance faculty as part of a vital shift in focus. “The reset that’s happening in-house at The College at Brockport Department of Dance is that we’ve had new faculty come in and senior faculty retire and transition to new locations,” she explains. “And so, I feel like this performance for Danscore this year is evidence of both the history and the absolute deep roots of creativity that this department has always had, and the rigor, and it’s honoring the new possibilities with the new faculty.”


Tower Fine Arts Center, SUNY Brockport, 180 Holley St. Thinking About Drawing. Through Dec. 8. Curated by Jim Morris. Work that demonstrates ideas and processes related to drawing. 395-2787. brockport.edu.

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We’ve got a bonus feature online from Adam Lubitow. / MOVIES

Call for Participants [ MON., NOVEMBER 20 ] Sing with the Rochester Oratorio Society. 6:30-9 p.m Asbury First United Methodist Church, 1050 East Ave 473-2234. rossings.org.

Art Events [ SUN., NOVEMBER 19 ] Harvest Dinner featuring Madrigalia. 12-2 p.m. The Clover Center for Arts and Spirituality, 1101 Clover St 4733200. clovercenteroffice@gmail. com. theclovercenter.com.

Comedy [ THU., NOVEMBER 16 ] Melanie Comarcho, Talent, and G-Funk. 7:30 p.m. Comedy Club, 2235 Empire Blvd Webster Thurs.-Sat. Nov. 16-18, 7:30 p.m. Fri. & Sat. Nov. 17, 18, 10 p.m theitsjustcomedyclub-com. seatengine.com. Preacher Lawson. 7:30 p.m. Comedy at the Carlson, 50 Carlson Rd Thurs.-Sat. Nov. 16-18, 7:30 p.m. Fri. & Sat. Nov. 17, 18, 10 p.m $12-$15. carlsoncomedy.com.

PHOTO BY LUCA BAGGIO

RECREATION | STAR PARTY The crisp, cold air that’s finally arrived in Rochester may not be welcome to some, but it’s perfect weather for stargazing. At RMSC’s after-hours Star Party, amateur astronomers and extraterrestrial enthusiasts alike will get to use telescopes to get a clear glimpse of the Milky Way, Summer Triangle, and thousands of stars. Experts will be on hand to help you pinpoint constellations, star clusters, nebulae, and even double stars. The event is well-timed: The annual Leonid meteor shower is expected to be at its peak this weekend. If you have binoculars, you’re encouraged to bring them. Star Party takes place Friday, November 17, from 5 p.m. to 10 p.m. at Cumming Nature Center (6472 Gulick Road, Naples). Tickets are $3 per person or $10 for a family (free to RMSC members). 374-6160; rmsc.org. — By KATHY LALUK

[ TUE., NOVEMBER 21 ] Backdraft II: Laughdraft. 8-11 p.m Firehouse Saloon, 814 S. Clinton Ave. 902-2010. thefirehousesaloon.com.

Dance Events [ WED., NOVEMBER 15 ] Kizomba Dance Classes. 6:307:30 p.m Roc Kizomba Studios (Fedder Building), 1237 E Main Street $15-$50. 7381782. rochesterkizomba@ gmail.com. rockizomba.com. [ MON., NOVEMBER 20 ] International Folk Dance Club of Rochester. 7:30-10 p.m. JCC of Greater Rochester, 1200 Edgewood Avenue Located in JCC’s Dance Studio. Circle line couple dances from around the world. Beginners welcome $7-$8. 315-926-5652. jccrochester.org.

Theater Annie the Musical. FridaysSundays RAPA, Kodak Center, 200 W. Ridge Rd. Through Nov. 26. Fri. Nov. 18, 24, 7:30 p.m. Sat. & Sun. Nov. 19, 25, 26, 2 p.m 254-0073. RAPAtheatre.org. Big Fish. Nov. 17-18, 7:30-10:30 p.m. and Nov. 19-18, 2-5 p.m. Wayne Central High School, 6200 Ontario Center Rd . Ontario Center $11-$12. 315-791-2066. agebhardt@wayne.k12.ny.us. neighborhoodactingcompany.com. Coriolanus. Through Nov. 18. MuCCC, 142 Atlantic Ave Through Nov. 18. Thurs.-Sat. Nov. 16-18, 7:30 p.m $19. muccc.org.

PHOTO BY JOAN MARCUS

THEATER | ‘FUN HOME’ When it opened on Broadway in April 2015, “Fun Home” made history as the first musical to feature a lesbian protagonist. The production, which is an adaptation of the 2006 graphic novel of the same name by Alison Bechdel, chronicles the author’s relationship with her closeted gay father and her own coming out journey. While it’s been lauded for its heart-rending plot and unconventionality, “Fun Home” is particularly exceptional because it is the first show written by a solo female to win the Tony Award for Best Musical (2015). Composer Jeanine Tesori and writer Lisa Kron also became the first female writing team to win a Tony Award for Best Score. Auditorium Theatre, 885 East Main Street. Tuesday, November 14, through Thursday, November 16, at 7:30 p.m.; Friday, November 17, at 8 p.m.; Saturday, November 18, at 2 p.m. and 8 p.m.; and Sunday, November 19, at 1 p.m. and 6:30 p.m. Tickets begin at $33. 222-5000; ticketmaster.com. — By LEAH STACY rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 39


Movie Theaters Searchable, up-to-the-minute movie times for all area theaters can be found at rochestercitynewspaper.com, and on City’s mobile website.

Movies

Brockport Strand 93 Main St, Brockport, 637-3310, rochestertheatermanagement.com

Canandaigua Theatres 3181 Townline Road, Canandaigua, 396-0110, rochestertheatermanagement.com

Cinema Theater 957 S. Clinton St., 271-1785, cinemarochester.com

Culver Ridge 16 2255 Ridge Rd E, Irondequoit  544-1140, regmovies.com

Dryden Theatre 900 East Ave., 271-3361, dryden.eastmanhouse.org

Derailed

Eastview 13

“Murder on the Orient Express”

Eastview Mall, Victor 425-0420, regmovies.com

(PG-13), DIRECTED BY KENNETH BRANAGH NOW PLAYING

Geneseo Theatres Geneseo Square Mall, 243-2691, rochestertheatermanagement.com

Greece Ridge 12 176 Greece Ridge Center Drive 225-5810, regmovies.com

Henrietta 18 525 Marketplace Drive 424-3090, regmovies.com

The Little 240 East Ave., 258-0444 thelittle.org

[ REVIEW ] BY ADAM LUBITOW

Director Kenneth Branagh attempts to reinvigorate the splashy, old-fashioned whodunit with “Murder on the Orient Express,” the latest adaptation of the classic Agatha Christie novel (Sidney Lumet’s 1974 version, starring Albert Finney, being the most famous). Branagh has crafted a lush, solidly made film, though it doesn’t otherwise do much

Movies 10 2609 W. Henrietta Road 292-0303, cinemark.com

Pittsford Cinema 3349 Monroe Ave., 383-1310 pittsford.zurichcinemas.com

Tinseltown USA/IMAX 2291 Buffalo Road 247-2180, cinemark.com

Webster 12 2190 Empire Blvd., 888-262-4386, amctheatres.com

Vintage Drive In 1520 W Henrietta Rd., Avon 226-9290, vintagedrivein.com

to distinguish itself. While the film may please fans looking for a straightforward adaptation of Christie’s work, most will likely be left disappointed by how sedate it all feels. In addition to directing, Branagh also takes on acting duties, starring as Christie’s most beloved character, the brilliant Belgian detective Hercule Poirot — self-professed “greatest detective in the world.” After solving a case in Istanbul, the investigator heads back to London, accepting a friend’s offer of a last minute seat on the titular luxury train. But duty comes calling when one of the passengers suddenly turns up dead in the middle of the night. When an avalanche derails the train, the travelers are left stranded with a murderer amongst them, and everyone’s a suspect. The film boasts, as they say, “an allstar cast,” including Johnny Depp, Michelle Pfeiffer, Daisy Ridley, Penélope Cruz, Josh Gad, Willem Dafoe, Judi Dench, Olivia Colman, “Hamilton” star Leslie Odom Jr., and Derek Jacobi. As Poirot interviews the passengers one

Kenneth Branagh in “Murder on the Orient Express.” PHOTO COURTESY 20TH CENTURY FOX

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/ JOBS 40 CITY NOVEMBER 15 - 21, 2017

LO L HE

by one, everyone is given a moment or two to shine, though it’s not enough time for most characters to leave much of an impression. Still, a few stand out: Pfeiffer clearly relishes her role, and Ridley remains a captivating screen presence. Of the minor players, Tom Bateman has a lot of fun as the train’s playboy owner. Depp’s presence is a rather unfortunate reminder that despite the appearance that Hollywood is attempting to clean house, it’s mostly remained silent when it comes to the accusations that have been swirling around him for some time. I don’t think it’s giving too much away to say that Depp’s character — an Al Capone-esque gangster named Ratchett — is the victim that the murder plot hinges upon. As such, the plot makes for oddly satisfying viewing for anyone like me who’s grown tired of seeing Depp’s face on the big screen with far too much frequency. Too often Branagh The Director seems too in love with Branagh The Actor, keeping the spotlight on his own fussy, flamboyant performance. There’s also references to a backstory involving the detective’s long lost love that are clumsily shoehorned in. Around the fourth time Branagh started looking mournful while gazing at a framed picture, and whispering, “Katherine…” I’d had more than enough. As ostentatious as Branagh’s performance is, he still manages to be upstaged by his character’s truly ridiculous moustache. Tasked with making the story feel modern


Growing up is hard to do “Lady Bird” (R), DIRECTED BY GRETA GERWIG NOW PLAYING [ REVIEW ] BY ADAM LUBITOW

without updating the setting, screenwriter Michael Green (“Blade Runner 2049” and “Logan”) attempts to add some subtext through the ever-so-slightly more diverse cast, threading in undercurrents of the era’s backward race and class politics. Sporadically the film lurches into an action scene (or the occasional fisticuffs that pass for action in comparison to the relatively snooze-y scenes they fall between), but they’re ineptly staged, making it impossible to tell who’s doing what to whom in relation to where. Their clumsiness is especially odd considering that Branagh’s capably handled much more elaborate action sequences in “Thor” and “Jack Ryan: Shadow Recruit.” Still, the film mostly looks great, and the production design by Jim Clay captures the posh feel of luxury travel in the 1930’s. Branagh embellishes things with long, showy tracking shots that are fun to watch, but never really help give a sense of space to the film’s enclosed locations. Shooting with 65mm film cameras, he aims for an epic feel, filling the movie with endless shots of the train whooshing through snowy mountain landscapes. But their overlyCGI’d nature renders them considerably less impressive than they should be. As “Murder on the Orient Express” chugs along toward its somewhat contrived conclusion (even Agatha Christie enthusiasts usually admit the solution to this particular yarn doesn’t rank among her most inspired). The plot never works up the energy to create a modicum of tension or suspense, so it never feels like the fun, closed door romp it might have been. (Or maybe I just want more “Clue” in my murder mysteries.) Where most such tales aim for a mounting sense of paranoia and suspicion, this one just sits dead on the tracks.

Movie audiences have recently gotten a number of great coming-of-age stories, and now “Lady Bird” takes a place at the top of that heap, delivering an unfailingly honest, hilarious, and warm-hearted depiction of growing up in California in the early aughts. Making her solo directing debut, actor Greta Gerwig tells the story of Christine McPherson (Saoirse Ronan), a Catholic high school senior in Sacramento, circa-2002. Christine, who prefers to go by her “given name” of “Lady Bird” (“I gave it to myself, it was given to me by me”), lives in a modest home with her mother, Marion (Laurie Metcalf ); her recently laid-off father (Tracy Letts); and her brother, Miguel (Jordan Rodrigues), and his girlfriend, Shelly (Marielle Scott). Lady Bird can’t help but look at her classmates’ mini-mansions with envious eyes, as her family’s financial strain has subtly colored the way she views the rest of the world.

Saoirse Ronan in “Lady Bird.” PHOTO COURTESY A24

As high school comes to an end, Lady Bird is faced with choosing a college and deciding what she wants to do with her future. She’s unsure what that entails, but positive it requires getting as far from her hometown as possible. Over the course of the year, Lady Bird has experiences that check all the boxes we expect from a teen film: prom night, the first fumbling explorations of sex, growing apart from her best friend (the fantastic Beanie Feldstein) to try her hand at hanging with a cooler crowd. She even finds two potential love interests: enthusiastic, sensitive theater kid Danny (Lucas Hedges), and the too-cool-for-school bad boy Kyle (a pitch-perfect Timothée Chalamet). Despite their familiarity, these situations are imbued with enough truth that they never feel less than achingly real. As you might expect from an actorturned-director, Gerwig gets some fantastic performances from her cast. Ronan demonstrates once again that there’s nothing she can’t do, and she gives Lady Bird’s clumsy attempts at expressing herself an endearing quality no matter how selfish she’s being. As a writer and director, Gerwig has a clear affection for her characters, investing them with a rich inner life. Her script is filled with hilarious, sharply-written, and carefully observed details — she even finds an unexpected poignancy in Dave Matthews Band’s “Crash Into Me.” Capturing the feeling of being desperate to leave home and get on with “real” life, “Lady Bird” is both a delightful portrait of youth and a loving tribute to Sacramento (like her main character, Gerwig grew up and went to a Catholic high school in California’s capital city). Smart, funny, and deeply heartfelt, it’s one of my favorite films of the year.

“Wonderstruck” (PG), DIRECTED BY TODD HAYNES NOW PLAYING

Todd Haynes isn’t a director typically associated with the family film genre, but he does well with “Wonderstruck,” bringing the same eye for impeccable period detail that made films like “Carol” and “Far From Heaven” such sumptuous pleasures. “Wonderstruck” contains two separate storylines told through two distinct styles. The first is set in 1927, and follows a young, deaf girl named Rose (Millicent Simmonds). With an unhappy home life, Rose turns to the movies as an escape, eventually running away in search of a beloved silent film star (Julianne Moore). The second plotline is set in 1977, and follows Ben (Oakes Fegley, “Pete’s Dragon”), a boy whose mother has recently passed away. As if that weren’t bad enough, he’s struck by lightning, an accident that causes him to permanently lose his hearing. Ben never knew his father, and with only the name of a bookstore as a clue, he sets off to find him. Working with the great cinematographer Ed Lachman, Haynes shoots Rose’s story in black-and-white, in the style of a silent film. Ben’s scenes have a burnished yellow glow, and look like they could have been shot in the 1970’s. Haynes cuts between the two plots, as both children head to New York City searching for a place they belong, their journeys eventually leading them to the Museum of Natural History. “Wonderstruck” is a dazzling sensory experience, full of sights, sounds, and textures to create a tactile lived-in world. There’s a connection between the two stories, and they build to a lovely, emotional climax. Haynes takes his time providing answers, but the journey to get there is often spellbinding.

A VIDEO SERIES ON ROCHESTER'S RICH COMMUNITY OF ARTISTS ROCHESTERCIT YNEWSPAPER.COM rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 41


Disney’s High School Musical Jr.. Sat., Nov. 18, 3-5 & 7-9 p.m. and Sun., Nov. 19, 2-4 p.m. Greece Odyssey Academy, 750 Maiden Ln. $8$10. 966-5336. John.Klein@ greece.k12.ny.us. greececsd. org. The Mikado, or the Town of Rochacha. Sundays, 2-5 p.m. and Through Nov. 18, 8-11 p.m Salem United Church of Christ, 60 Bittner St Through Nov. 19. Fri. & Sat. Nov. 17, 18, 8 p.m. Sun. Nov. 19, 2 p.m. Directed by Wayne Vander Byl 232-5570. offmonroeplayers.org/. Mrs. President the Opera. Sat., Nov. 18, 7 p.m. Lyric Theater, 440 East Ave $25$50. lyrictheatrerochester.org.

Community Activism [ SAT., NOVEMBER 18 ] Food Not Bombs Sort/Cook/ Serve Food. 3-6 p.m. St. Joseph’s House of Hospitality, 402 South Ave. 585-2323262. Resist and Persist! NOW New York’s Annual Conference. 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Monroe Community College, 1000 E. Henrietta Rd $15. 212-6279895. nownyc.org.

Festivals [ SAT., NOVEMBER 18 ] Rochester Mini Maker Faire. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Rochester Riverside Convention Center, 123 E. Main St A familyfriendly showcase of invention, creativity, and resourcefulness, and a celebration of the Maker

movement $12-$40. 4786898. rochester.makerfaire. com.

required $22-$27. 4208439. info540westmain@ gmail.com. 540westmain.org.

Film

Recreation

[ THU., NOVEMBER 16 ] Design is One: Lella & Massimo Vignelli. 7-9 p.m. Main Street Arts, 20 W. Main St., Clifton Springs About the life of two of the world’s most influential designers 315-462-0210. mainstreetartsgallery.com.

[ WED., NOVEMBER 15 ] Park Avenue Food Tours. 11 a.m.-2 p.m. and 2-5:15 p.m Park Avenue Food Tours, Park Avenue Three hour walking food tours in the Park Avenue neighborhood $57-$59. 363-2340. info@ flowercityfoodtours.com. flowercityfoodtours.com.

Kids Events [ FRI., NOVEMBER 17 ] KinderZoo Safari Time. 10:15-11 a.m. Seneca Park Zoo, 2222 St. Paul St $5-$7. 336-7213. senecaparkzoo.org. [ SAT., NOVEMBER 18 ] In Another Galaxy Weekend. Nov. 18. The Strong National Museum of Play, 1 Manhattan Square 263-2700. museumofplay.org.

Holiday Holiday Bazaar Arts & Crafts Sale. Fri., Nov. 17, 5-9 p.m., Sat., Nov. 18, 9:30 a.m.-5 p.m. and Sun., Nov. 19, 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Rochester Museum and Science Center, 657 East Ave. A juried arts & crafts show with five floors of displays throughout the RMSC campus rmsc.org. Vegan Give Thanks Dinner. Sun., Nov. 19, 6-8 p.m. 540WMain, 540 W. Main Street Advanced registration

Special Events [ WED., NOVEMBER 15 ] 2017 Healthcare Innovations Conference. 7:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m. RIT Inn & Conference Center, 5257 W Henrietta Rd. $75. 273-8199. hanys.org. [ THU., NOVEMBER 16 ] Pittsford Food Tours. 11 a.m.-2 p.m Schoen Place, 10 Schoen Place Walking food tour in Pittsford Village/ Schoen Place $57. 3632340. pittsfordfoodtours.com. [ FRI., NOVEMBER 17 ] Mata Hari & Magic. 8 p.m.midnight. Photo City Improv & Comedy Club, 543 Atlantic Ave Magician performance by Garrett Thomas and Kozmo $20. 530-312-0253. [ SAT., NOVEMBER 18 ] After Hours at the Seymour Library. 7-10 p.m. Seymour Library, 161 East Ave., Brockport Celebrating the 200th Anniversary of the Erie Canal. Wine & hors d’oeuvre;

For information: Call us (585) 244-3329 Fax us (585) 244-1126 Mail Us City Classifieds 250 N. Goodman Street Rochester, NY 14607 Email Us classifieds@ rochester-citynews.com EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY

All real estate advertised in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act, which makes it unlawful, “to make, print, or publish, any notice, statement, or advertisement, with respect to the sale or rental of a dwelling that indicates any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin.” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under the age of 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertisement for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. Call the local Fair Housing Enforcement Project, FHEP at 325-2500 or 1-866-671-FAIR. Si usted sospecha una practica de vivienda injusta, por favor llame al servicio legal gratis. 585-325-2500 - TTY 585-325-2547.

42 CITY NOVEMBER 15 - 21, 2017

Land for Sale WOODED UPSTATE NY land with LAKES, PONDS & STREAMS being liquidated NOW! 20 tracts! 2 to 41 acres! 50-60% below market! No closing costs! Owner terms! 888-905-8847 NewYorkLandandLakes.com

Home Services Arilla PLOWING Inc. Arilla PLOWING Inc., 585-413-6821

craft beer tastings; music; and more $25. 637-1050. seymourlibraryweb.org. Annual Gratitude Faire. 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Lightways Community, 31 Market St, Brockport 281-8670. lightwaysjourney.com. Day of Hope: Veteran’s Outreach Fundraiser Event. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Record Archive, 33 1/3 Rockwood St. Live music, food trucks, benefiting three homeless shelters 244-1210. recordarchive.com. DeafBlind Coffee Chat. Third Saturday of every month, 10 a.m.-1 p.m The Marketplace Mall, 1 Miracle Mile Share DeafBlind experiences, culture, and resources. Sign language students welcomed 286-2318. Homelessness: Reach Fundraiser. 11 a.m.-2 p.m. First Universalist Church of Rochester, 150 Clinton Ave S Guest speakers include chronic homelessness social workers, live music, silent auction, and more 546-2826. ReachAdvocacy.org.

Ave. A brief ceremony to honor those who have been murdered as a result of transphobia 662-3785. crcds.edu.

[ SUN., NOVEMBER 19 ] Rochester Childfirst Network Mad Hatter Tea Party. 1-4 p.m. Irondequoit Country Club, 4045 East Avenue All proceeds benefit Rochester Childfirst Network $60. 8027841. irondequoitcc.org.

[ SAT., NOVEMBER 18 ] Clawhammer Banjo Master Class: Evie Ladin. 12-1:30 p.m. Bernunzio Uptown Music, 122 East Ave bernunzio.com.

[ MON., NOVEMBER 20 ] Transgender Day of Remembrance Memorial Ceremony. 5:30-6 p.m. Trillium Health, 259 Monroe

[ WED., NOVEMBER 15 ] Every Bed a Puddle of Dakin and Pus!. 6-8 p.m. Rochester Academy of Medicine, 1441 East Ave Exploring the Diary

[ TUE., NOVEMBER 21 ] Brain Candy Live: Adam Savage and Michael Stevens. 7:30 p.m. Auditorium Theatre, 885 E. Main St. $28-$141. 800-745-3000. ticketmaster.com.

Sports [ SAT., NOVEMBER 18 ] Rage in the Cage 2 Live Amateur MMA. 5-10:30 p.m. Main Street Armory, 900 E. Main St. Proceeds of the show to be donated to the Breast Cancer Coalition of Rochester $25-$45. 2029607. rochesterfights.com.

Workshops [ THU., NOVEMBER 16 ] Old Timey Jam. Every third Thursday, 6:30 p.m. Bernunzio Uptown Music, 122 East Ave bernunzio.com.

Culture Lectures

of a Rochester Volunteer Nurse During the Great War $10 donation. 922-1847. [ SUN., NOVEMBER 19 ] Lecture Series: Chant on Steroids. 8:15-8:45 p.m. Christ Church, 141 East Ave Professor Honey Meconi will discuss the music of Hildegard von Bingen 454-3878. christchurchrochester.org/ christ-church-music-program. Sunday Forum: Serving the 25th District. 9:45-10:45 a.m. Downtown Presbyterian Church, 121 North Fitzhugh Street 325-4000. office@ downtownpresbyterian.org. downtownpresbyterian.org.

Literary Events [ SUN., NOVEMBER 19 ] Rochester Poets November Reading. 2:30-5 p.m. Legacy at Clover Blossom, 100 McCauley Rd. Featuring poet Dane Gordon 260-9005.

Museum Exhibit [ WED., NOVEMBER 15 ] The Science of Ripley’s Believe It or Not!. Through Jan. 2, 2018. Rochester Museum and Science Center, 657 East Ave. Through Jan. 2. Collection of intriguing objects and astonishing artifacts from Ripley’s Believe It or Not!. rmsc.org. Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: Secrets of the Sewer. Through Jan. 1, 2018. The Strong National Museum of Play, 1 Manhattan Square Through Jan. 1 410-6365. museumofplay.org.

Classifieds Automotive

For Sale

#1 ALWAYS BETTER CASH PAID for most Junk Cars, Trucks and Vans. Any condition, running or not. Always free pick up and usually same day service. Call 585-305-5865

17” COMPUTER MONITOR Dell flat screen and keyboard, $20 Tom 585-266-3518

Auctions

B O C C E

HIGH CHAIR GRACO excellent condition $15 or best offer 585436-7726

2 TECHNIC SPEAKERS SBCR-77,

S C A R

E N O L S H O B O

T A C O S

A N O D E S

O F F N E O M

P A S L O R E E R A S G E T S

3 speaker system in each 30” with cabinet. $35 each Tom 585266-3518 BROWN WOOD SHELF open in back. 3 ft long, 28” high $15.585-880-2903

S E D A A C E L A P U F F I S S A D E T E N O T I N A E E T A B A T E R E L E D C E A S E T A S T E A K H A G E S T O N

N D A E A S C O N A F R U S S U L E B A M S T L A A S E T T N E E S

A L A I

N A A L R P C

T R O N

E G O N

D E K E

M I L N E

A D E N T

R E S A T

continues on page 46


Find your way home Real Estate Section

HomeWork A cooperative effort of City Newspaper and RochesterCityLiving, a program of the Landmark Society.

IN PRINT AND ONLINE CLASSIFIEDS

ROCHESTERCITYNEWSPAPER.COM

Newest House on the Self Storage block in Rochester!

Life is better with a porch

• 24 hour per day, 7 days per week Security and Access. • Coded Gate entry system • Well lit and fully enclosed facility. • Online move-in and payments available. • Clean, brand-new buildings • 300 storage units from Locker size to 20x40 size. 20x40 units have an overhead door as well as a side door, making it perfect for small Contractors, Landscapers, Boats, RVs, Cars, etc.

261 Ravenwood Avenue The deep front porch anchored by square tapered columns at 261 Ravenwood Avenue welcomes friends and neighbors alike, while its generous roof overhang and wide-plank railing offer a bit of seclusion from which to watch summer unfold or rain fall on this tree lined street in the heart of the 19th Ward.

Two convenient locations! 600 West Broad Street & 1037 Jay Street, Right off of 490! Let us help you get moving!

The glass paned front door leads from the porch directly into the central and cozy living room. The warmth of the skinny oak flooring pairs well with the dark stained trim, massive crown molding, and high ceiling. These features continue into the formal dining room and reveal the true character of this 1920 colonial, boasting 1,557 square feet. Aside from a couple of newer sliding windows in the kitchen and sleeping porch, the original double hung and fixed wood windows have stood the test of time, some with weighted pulleys still intact. Red paint in the small kitchen off the living room catches the eye. The connecting butler’s pantry provides supplemental cabinetry and leads to the dining room and an enclosed porch with backyard access.

585-235-3943 www.chestersstorage.com

312 STATE STREET

In the Historic High Falls District of Downtown Rochester

THIS IS WHERE YOU’LL WANT TO LIVE! Unique and Contemporary Floor plans | TOWNHOUSES AND FLATS Heat Included • Call 454-5710 for Application and Tour

Greece; 3065 Mt Read Blvd. $84,900 Townhome, part of Pine Ridge Townhome development. Features; Private Driveway, ATTACHED GARAGE, Bright/Open floor plan, Living room w/cathedral ceilings, skylights & corner fireplace. Updates; 2007 thermopane windows/sliding glass patio doors. New counter tops 2013. New Furnace, A/C, & Water Heater (2016). All kitchen appliances included. Patio doors lead to large private fenced-in patio. Remax Realty Group 585-218-6802

Adjacent to the living room, the partially open staircase is the architectural highlight of the home, featuring a large square newel post complemented by square balusters, and leads to the bathroom and three bedrooms upstairs. Pine floors, wooden panel doors, brass hardware, and mainly unpainted trim are charming touches. The sleeping porch is accessed through a back bedroom, while the master, located up front, extends the full house width and has a staircase

to the partially finished attic. Renovate the bathroom? Maybe, but the clawfoot tub and wooden medicine cabinet could be incorporated into the design. The basement houses the utilities, workbench, laundry chute, sewer connections for a potential second full bath, and separate stairs for egress to the partially fenced backyard that is ripe with potential. The detached single car garage is extra wide, albeit in need of a door. Close to parks, universities, and highways, this house is ideal for a handy first-time homeowner. With a thorough cleaning, fresh paint, and some TLC in the kitchen and bath, you will feel the pride for this house that your new neighbors feel for theirs. Though the beauty of the 19th Ward emanates not just from the variety of historic houses, but also from the character of its residents, who together form one of the city’s most active community associations through which they support neighbors in need, organize yearly events, and direct the development and rehabilitation of this culturally and economically diverse southwesterly neighborhood. If you too want to live by the Ward’s motto, ‘Urban by Choice’, contact Gary Thompson of Hunt Real Estate at 585672-1660 for a showing of this listing offered at $73,200.

by Jason Salter Jason is a Landmark Society member and lives with his family in Swillburg.

Ryan Smith

NYS Licensed Real Estate Salesperson 201-0724

RochesterSells.com

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 43


EMPLOYMENT / CAREER OPPORTUNITIES Employment AIRLINE CAREERS START Here –Get trained as FAA certified Aviation Technician. Financial aid for qualified students. Job placement assistance. Call AIM for free information 866-296-7094 LaBella Associates, D.P.C. Mechanical Project Engineer, Rochester, New York. Develop engineering project plans in accordance with established engineering project management standards. Use mechanical engineering principals to implement multiple gas and utility infrastructure projects. 25% national travel, primarily within New York State. Send resume to Michele Ebenhoch, 300 State Street, Suite 201, Rochester, NY 14614, attn: job #1446.Mechanical Project Engineer, Rochester, New York. Develop engineering project plans in accordance with established engineering project management standards. Use mechanical engineering principals to implement multiple gas and utility infrastructure projects. 25% national travel, primarily within New York State. Send resume to Michele Ebenhoch, 300 State Street, Suite 201, Rochester, NY 14614, attn: job #1446. SENIOR CAREGIVER NEEDED Looking for a caregiver take care of my elderly man so if you are interested to learn more about the job. leonardo666llc@outlook.com Systems Management Planning, Inc. seeks Principal Collaboration Systems Engineer. Bach or equiv degree in Comp Sci, IT or rltd tech field. 5 yrs engg exp w/: Unified Communications/Cisco Collaboration tech, advanced systems analysis techniques and methodologies, quality of service rltd to IP Telephony/Video, system level troubleshooting, and relevant exp serving as lead implementation engineer

for large accounts. 3 yrs exp designing, implementing relevant Unified Communications and Collaboration environments on global level. CCIE Collaboration cert, background/ref checks, driver’s lic reqd. Up to 50% travel to customers in New England and NY State reqd. May telecommute and report as needed to headquarters in W. Henrietta, NY. Submit resume to: http://smp-corp.hrmdirect.com/ employment/job-opening.p?req =645884&&internal=2819&no hd#job VISITING ASSISTANT PROFESSOR Of Media Management at St. John Fisher College. We invite applications for a full time faculty member to teach applied media research, analytics, media economics, advertising, strategic communication, and business communication at the undergraduate and graduate level. Qualifications: Doctorate preferred. M.S., M.A., or M.B.A. considered. Previous industry and teaching experience also preferred. Position begins Fall 2018. Applicants from diverse groups encouraged to apply. Apply: https:// jobs.sjfc.edu/applicants/jsp/ shared/frameset/Frameset. jsp?time=1510194408469 or https://jobs.sjfc.edu/

Volunteers BECOME A DOCENT at the Rochester Museum & Science Center Must be an enthusiastic communicator, Like working with children. Learn more at http://www. rmsc.org/Support/Volunteer Or call 585-697-1948 CARING FOR CAREGIVERS Lifespan is looking for volunteers to offer respite to caregivers whose loved ones have been diagnosed with early stage Alzheimer’s Disease. For details call Eve at 244-8400

CATHOLIC FAMILY CENTER is seeking a volunteer with graphic design experience to help with fliers and signage for multiple events this summer and fall. Flexible schedule. Please contact cgill@cfcrochester.org or call 2627044. Contact Urban League Of Rochester today to become a mentor to the youth in our community! Email Charisma Dupree at cdupree@ulr.org to get started. MEALS ON WHEELS needs YOU to deliver meals to YOUR neighbors in need. Available weekdays between 11:30 AM and 1:00 PM? Visit our website at www.vnsnet.com or call 274-4385 to get started!

Join our sales team!

City Newspaper is seeking a confident, enthusiastic, high-energy person for advertising sales. Sales experience essential; media sales experience a plus. Send resume to: btowler@rochester-citynews.com

OPERA GUILD OF Rochester needs a volunteer to assist with newsletter publication, and event helpers for the annual recital and opera presentations. For details see home page at operaguildofrochester.com. SENECA PARK ZOO Society seeking volunteers and docents for ongoing involvement or special events. Roles available for all interests. Contact Volunteers@ senecazoo.org to learn more. ST. JOHN’S HOME s looking for volunteers to transport residents on Tuesday mornings to and from Catholic Mass within our home. Please call volunteer office at 760-1293 for more information.

Career Training AIRLINE CAREERS begin here – Get started by training as FAA certified Aviation Technician. Financial aid for qualified students. Job placement assistance. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance 800-725-1563 (AAN CAN)

THE BAY VIEW YMCA IS HIRING! Before & After School Program Assistants

Must have experience working with children. Ability to work in a team environment and positive attitude required. Must be 18 years or older. For more information contact Terrence McElduff at 341-3215 or terrence.mcelduff@rochesterymca.org

Lifeguards

YMCA or Red Cross certified lifeguards needed for permanent shifts. For specific times and more information contact Phil Baretela at 341-3218 or phil.baretela@rochesterymca.org

O L L E H

Custodians

This position is accountable for maintaining the cleanliness, sanitary conditions and general maintenance of the facility, both inside and outside. Must be 18 years or older. For more information contact Curtis Angel at 341-3225 or curtis.angel@rochesterymca.org

THE BAY VIEW FAMILY YMCA

1209 Bay Road, Webster, NY 14580 • 585-671-8414 www.rochesterymca.org/bayview EOE/M/F/O-V

44 CITY NOVEMBER 15 - 21, 2017

/ JOBS


Rent your apartment special third week is

CUSTODIANS/ CLEANERS

FREE

FOR B OR C SHIFT POSITIONS.

We have multiple full time openings.

Place your ad by calling 244-3329 ext. 23 or rochestercitynewspaper.com Ad Deadlines: Friday 4pm for Display Ads Monday at noon for Line ads CITY is hiring a freelance Special Sections Editor

B shift (2:30 -10:30) or C shift (10:30 -7:00).

12 months per year

Eager applicants should have editing and writing experience and a knack for edgy, often thoughtful stories.

$10.00/hr. plus a shift differential of $.65/hr. (B Shift) or $.90/hr. (C Shift). Excellent health, dental and retirement benefit package.

Email jclapp@rochester-citynews.com with a resume and 2-3 writing samples

Apply online at http://www.eastiron.org (Employment) - EOE

/ JOBS

HR POSITIONS AVAILABLE AT UNIVERSITY OF ROCHESTER Human Resources, at The University of Rochester, is currently recruiting for two open positions in its Administrative & Employment Services area.

/ NEWS Mary Cariola Children’s Center is hiring staff to work in the residential, community and school programs. These opportunities are both Part Time and Full time. • DIRECT SUPPORT PROFESSIONAL / RESIDENTIAL AIDES • TEACHER AIDES • SPECIAL EDUCATION TEACHERS Additional positions posted at www.marycariola.com

Secretary: Pupil Personnel Services Belfast Central School is seeking qualified applicants for a Secretary: Pupil Personnel Services. For more details and how to apply visit: www.caboces.org “Regional Recruitment” | EOE

Mary Cariola is a NYS licensed school for students with disabilities, serving students Pre-K to 21

Sr. HR Assistant – Disability Coordinator • Interprets & communicates leave policies & procedures (STD, LTD, WC, FMLA, PFL, Sick Leave, Vacation & PTO) to faculty and staff; • Provides administrative and customer service related to Leave processes • Evaluates eligibility & entitlements • Produces reports and audits claims • Requires an Associates’ degree and three years’ related experience, or an equivalent combination HR Assistant – Data Entry Team • Responsible for data input of hires, transfers, promotions, and other life cycle changes in HRIS for University • Requires strong computer skills (HRIS preferred), excellent attention to detail, and the ability to work with minimal supervision. • Requires 2 years’ post HS education and 2 years’ HR experience, or equivalent combination. Data entry and HRIS experience preferred Apply online at www.rochester.edu/jobopp Disability Coordinator: Apply to Job Posting 204783 Data Entry Team: Apply to Job Posting 204266 EOE • Minorities/Females/Protected Veterans/Disabled

1000 Elmwood Ave., Suite 100, Rochester, NY 14620 (585) 271-0761 Follow @CariolaCareers on social media

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 45


> page 42 COFFEE POT - 6 cup French press Bodum. never used $10 585259-9590 END TABLE - Living room, real wood, wicker bottom shelf, great sixe $45 585-880-2903 EXOTIC HOUSE PLANTS, indoor, 10 plants 2 for $3 585-4905870

GRACO INFANT SEAT good condition - like new $20 or best offer 585-436-7726 HAMILTON BEACH - food processor $12. 585-225-5526 INFANT ARM’S REACH Cosleeper, attaches to side of parents’ bed, excellent condition $49 pr best offer 585-436-7726 KID’S BIKES - one with training wheels $8 each or BO 585-225-5526

METAL DESK - on wheels, as hole for computer or lamp cords. 32” w. also lower shelf, room for a chair $15 585-880-2903 PHONE FAX PRINTER Machine $20 Tom 585-266-3518 SNOW TROWER - Brand new never used John Deere, dual staged 1028E, Original cost $1,500 sell for $1000.00 Divorced. 585-293-1115

STROLLER - GRACO Coach ride model, very good condition $40 or best offer 585-436-7726 TAN WOOD SHELF DVD, book, has a ledge in back to hold DVD, 28” lomg, 29” tall, shiny finish $15 858-880-2903 TOPOGRAPHIC MAPS - A complete set of NY State, For hiking, hunting or finding your house on them! $8 each or BO for set. 585-746-7054 TOSHIBA DVD 5-DISC changer. VG condition with remote $25 Other musical equipment available Tom 585-266-3518

Miscellaneous We are the University of Rochester Medical Center’s Vaccine Research Unit.

We do Clinical Trials of Investigational vaccine and pandemic flu vaccines. CITY Newspaper has been instrumental in helping us find people to participate in our clinical trials. Their Graphic Designers get copy back to us quickly and do a great job. Our ads look professional and sharp! Christine Kubarycz always stays in contact with us and makes sure that if we need an ad to go in it gets in even if it is right at the deadline or even beyond. The majority of people we get from newspaper ads come from CITY Newspaper and the cost is lower than other print ads available out there. Thank you CITY Newspaper! We couldn’t do it without you! Barbara Mahoney-Walker, Recruiter July, 2017

“CITY Newspaper plays a vital role in our marketing campaign. Because it is such an integral part of the fabric of downtown living, we feel it is essential to our efforts to build brand recognition for our apartment communities. In addition, the special publications they produce (Summer Guide, Annual Manual, Jazz Festival Guide, etc) are excellent opportunities to increase our visibility not just within the city limits, but across the region as well.” Timothy B. Schmid Director of Residential Properties KONAR MANAGEMENT CORPORATION

DISH NETWORK- SATELLITE Television Services. Now Over 190 channels for ONLY $49.99/mo! HBO-FREE for one year, FREE Installation, FREE Streaming, FREE HD. Add Internet for $14.95 a month. 1-800-3736508 (AAN CAN) NEW AUTHORS WANTED Page Publishing will help you self-

publish your own book. FREE author submission kit! Limited offer! Why wait? Call now: 888231-5904 (AAN CAN) SAWMILLS From only $4397.00MAKE & SAVE MONEY with your own bandmill- Cut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship. FREE Info/DVD: www. NorwoodSawmills.com 1-800578-1363 Ext.300N

Adoption LOVING FAMILY - from Europe, looking to adopt a baby into home filled with happiness, security, unconditional love. We wholeheartedly welcome a child of any race/ethnicity. Please contact Chantal, Geoffrey and big brother Noah, through our NY adoption agency! 1-914-939-1180 adopt@ foreverfamiliesthroughadoption.org

Home & Garden Professionals

PREGNANT? CONSIDERING ADOPTION? Call us first. Living expenses, housing, medical, and continued support afterwards. Choose adoptive family of your choice. Call 24/7. 877-362-2401

Jam Section BRIAN S. MARVIN Lead vocalist, looking for an audition to join band, cover tunes, originals and has experience with bands 585259-3717 CALLING ALL MUSICIANS OF ALL GENRES the Rochester Music Coalition wants you! Please register on our website. For further info: www.rochestermusiccoalition.org info@rochestermusiccoalition.org 585-235-8412

Mind Body Spirit line ads MAKE THE CALL TO START GETTING CLEAN TODAY. Free 24/7 Helpline for alcohol & drug addiction treatment. Get help! It is time to take your life back! Call Now: 855-732-4139 (AAN CAN)

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Legal Ads [ LEGAL NOTICE ] NOTICE OF PUBLIC AUCTION Pursuant to New York’s self-service storage facilities lien, NY Lien Law § 182 et Seq., on November 28th, 2017 at 12:30pm, PS Orangeco Inc. will sell at a public auction to be held at Public Storage facility located at 1693 East Ave, Rochester, NY 14610. The following units: A022 - Otis Allen – 2003 GMC Envoy – Last 4 of VIN #: 3241 All sales are subject to cancellation. Public auction terms, rules, and regulations will be made available prior to the sale. PURCHASES MUST BE MADE AT THE TIME OF THE SALE WITH CASH ONLY. All goods are Sold “AS IS” and must be removed at time of sale. Notice posted November 14th, 2017 PS Orangeco Inc., a California corporation, 701 Western Avenue, Glendale CA 91201, (818) 244-8080. [ NOTICE ] 122 Winterroth LLC Arts of Org. filed SSNY 10/3/17. Office: Monroe Co. SSNY design agent of LLC upon whom process may be served & mail to POB 30071 Rochester, NY 14603 General Purpose [ NOTICE ] BBPY Properties LLC Filed 10/4/17 Office: Monroe Co. SSNY designated as agent for process & shall mail to: 30 Embassy Drive, Rochester, NY 14618. Purpose: all lawful [ NOTICE ] Christopher Haitz LLC, Arts of Org. filed with Sec. of State of NY (SSNY) 10/19/2017. Cty: Monroe. SSNY desig. as agent upon whom process against may be served & shall mail process to 5549 Clinton Street Rd., Bergen, NY 14416. General Purpose. [ NOTICE ] Craul Properties LLC Arts of Org. filed SSNY 10/13/17. Office: Monroe Co. SSNY design agent of LLC upon whom process may be served & mail to Christopher L Ruff 12 Southcross Trl Fairport, NY 14450 General Purpose [ NOTICE ] Creme De La Creme Diamonds LLC, Arts of Org. filed with Sec. of State of NY (SSNY) 10/17/2017. Cty: Monroe. SSNY desig. as agent upon whom process against may be served & shall mail process to 2250 West Ridge Rd., Ste. 300, Rochester, NY 14626. General Purpose., Arts of Org. filed with Sec. of State of NY (SSNY) 10/17/2017. Cty: Monroe. SSNY desig. as agent upon whom process against may be served & shall mail process to 2250 West Ridge Rd., Ste. 300, Rochester, NY 14626. General Purpose. [ NOTICE ]

To place your ad in the LEGAL section, contact Tracey Mykins by phone at (585) 244-3329 x10 or by email at legals@rochester-citynews.com

ERPilates, LLC, Arts of Org. filed with Sec. of State of NY (SSNY) 7/31/2017. Cty: Monroe. SSNY desig. as agent upon whom process against may be served & shall mail process to Ethan Richardson, 21 Lynwood Dr., Rochester, NY 14618. General Purpose.

Kr Partners, LLC Arts of Org. filed SSNY 9/27/17. Office: Monroe Co. SSNY design agent of LLC upon whom process may be served & mail to 90 State St #700-40 Albany, NY 12207 RA: S I Mahalakshmi Cheruvu 146 Greystone Ln #5 Rochester, NY 14618 General Purpose

[ NOTICE ]

[ NOTICE ]

GJH Investigation Services, LLC, Arts of Org. filed with Sec. of State of NY (SSNY) 9/21/2017. Cty: Monroe. SSNY desig. as agent upon whom process against may be served & shall mail process to 2 Ryder Cup Circle, Pittsford, NY 14534. General Purpose.

LEGAL NOTICE CBETHNK CONSULTING, LLC notice of formation of Limited Liability Company (LLC). Articles of Organization filed with Secretary of State of New York (“SSNY”) on September 28, 2017. Office location County of Monroe, New York. SSNY designated as Agent of LLC upon whom Process against it may be Served and post office address SSNY shall mail copy of process to CBETHNK CONSULTING LLC, 247 Wyndham Rd, Rochester NY 14609. Purpose: Any lawful purpose permitted under LLC Law.

[ NOTICE ] GRAY-BLEIBERG INVESTMENTS VIII, A CALIFORNIA LIMITED PARTNERSHIP filed an Application for Authority with the Department of State of NY on 10/19/2017. Jurisdiction: CA, and the date of its formation is 6/1/1991. Office location in NYS: Monroe. The Secretary of State of NY (“SSNY”) is designated as agent upon whom process against it may be served. The address to which the SSNY shall mail a copy of such process is: c/o Andrew Tickle, 793 S. Goodman St., Rochester, NY 14620 The address in its jurisdiction if required or the office address: 793 S. Goodman St., Rochester, NY 14620. A copy of the Arts. of Org. may be obtained from CA Secretary of State, 1500 11th St., Sacramento, CA 95814. The list of names and addresses of all general partners is available from the Secretary of State. The purpose of the LP is any lawful act [ NOTICE ] Groskin Group LLC, Arts of Org. filed with Sec. of State of NY (SSNY) 8/14/2017. Cty: Monroe. SSNY desig. as agent upon whom process against may be served & shall mail process to 400 Oakdale Dr., Rochester, NY 14618. General Purpose [ NOTICE ] HILTON GRANGE LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 10/12/17. Office: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to the LLC, 20 West Beach Drive, Hilton, NY 14468. Purpose: Any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] KAD Specialty Foods LLC, Arts of Org. filed with Sec. of State of NY (SSNY) 10/18/2017. Cty: Monroe. SSNY desig. as agent upon whom process against may be served & shall mail process to 17 Lianne Dr., Rochester, NY 14626. General Purpose. [ NOTICE ]

[ NOTICE ] Maars Traders LLC Authority filed SSNY 8/10/17 Office: Monroe Co LLC formed DE 6/28/17 exists 16192 Coastal Hwy Lewes, DE 19958. SSNY design agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served & mail to 1036 Tallgrass Ln #C Webster, NY 14580 Cert of Regis Filed DE SOS 401 Federal St #4 Dover DE 19901 General Purpose [ NOTICE ] MDJ Advantage LLC, Arts of Org. filed with Sec. of State of NY (SSNY) 9/15/2017. Cty: Monroe. SSNY desig. as agent upon whom process against may be served & shall mail process to Law Office of Anthony DiNitto, 2250 West Rd., Ste. 300, Rochester, NY 14626. General Purpose. [ NOTICE ] MONTRALLO KAMEN ASSOCIATES LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with the SSNY on 10/03/17. Office: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to the LLC, 20 West Beach Drive, Hilton, NY 14468. Purpose: Any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Name: CJC PIZZA LLC. Arts. Of Org. filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 10/17/2017. Office Location: Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to: C/O CJC PIZZA LLC, 45 Exchange Blvd., 6th Floor, Rochester, New York 14614. Purpose: Any Lawful Purpose. [ NOTICE ] NOTICE AND BRIEF

STATEMENT OF NATURE OF ACTION CONSUMER CREDIT TRANSACTION SUPREME COURT OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF MONROE Index No. 2017004721 M&T Bank, Plaintiff, -against- ILONA D. MATTHEWS, individually and as heir-at-law to the Estate of HELEN D. MATTHEWS (deceased); LEON MATTHEWS, III, individually and as heirat-law to the Estate of HELEN D. MATTHEWS (deceased); VERITA MARY MATTHEWS, individually and as heir-at-law to the Estate of HELEN D. MATTHEWS (deceased); ALL UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES AND PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVES OF HELEN D. MATTHEWS AND ANY OF HER SUCCESSORS IN RIGHT, TITLE AND INTEREST; et al., Defendants. TO THE DEFENDANT(S): LEON MATTHEWS, III, individually and as heir-at-law to the Estate of HELEN D. MATTHEWS (deceased) and ALL UNKNOWN HEIRS, DEVISEES AND PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVES OF HELEN D. MATTHEWS AND ANY OF HER SUCCESSORS IN RIGHT, TITLE AND INTEREST, et al. YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED and required to serve upon plaintiff’s attorneys an answer to the complaint in this action within twenty (20) days after the service of this Summons, exclusive of the day of service, or within thirty (30) days after service is complete if the Summons is not personally delivered to you within the State of New York. The United States of America, if designated as a defendant in this action, may answer or appear within sixty (60) days of service hereof. In case of your failure to answer, judgment will be taken against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. Trial is desired in the County of MONROE. The basis of venue designated above is that the real property, which is the subject matter of this action, is located in the County of MONROE, New York. NOTICE: YOU ARE IN DANGER OF LOSING YOUR HOME IF YOU DO NOT RESPOND TO THIS SUMMONS AND COMPLAINT BY SERVING A COPY OF THE ANSWER ON THE ATTORNEY FOR THE MORTGAGE COMPANY WHO FILED THIS FORECLOSURE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU AND FILING THE ANSWER WITH THE COURT A DEFAULT JUDGMENT MAY BE ENTERED AND YOU CAN LOSE YOUR HOME. SPEAK TO AN ATTORNEY OR GO TO THE COURT WHERE YOUR CASE IS PENDING FOR FURTHER INFORMATION ON HOW TO ANSWER THE SUMMONS AND PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY. SENDING A PAYMENT TO YOUR

MORTGAGE COMPANY WILL NOT STOP THIS FORECLOSURE ACTION. YOU MUST RESPOND BY SERVING A COPY OF THE ANSWER ON THE ATTORNEY FOR THE PLAINTIFF (MORTGAGE COMPANY) AND FILING THE ANSWER WITH THE COURT. The foregoing Summons is served upon you by publication pursuant to an order of Hon. Daniel J. Doyle, Justice of the Supreme Court of the State of New York, signed on the 18th day of October, 2017 in Rochester, New York and to be duly entered in the MONROE County Clerk’s Office, in Rochester, New York. The Nature of this action pertains to a note and mortgage held by Plaintiff on real property owned by the above named defendants as specified in the complaint filed in this action. The above named defendants have failed to comply with the terms and provisions of the said mortgage and said instruments secured by said mortgage, by failing and omitting to pay the balance due and owing and the Plaintiff has commenced a foreclosure action. Plaintiff is seeking a judgment foreclosing its mortgage against the real property and premises which situates in the Town of Gates, County of Monroe and State of New York and is commonly known as 58 Cheshire Lane, Rochester, New York 14624 and all other relief as to the Court may seem just and equitable. DATED: October 27, 2017 SCHILLER, KNAPP, LEFKOWITZ & HERTZEL, LLP BY: WILLIAM B. SCHILLER, ESQ. Attorneys for Plaintiff 950 New Loudon Road Latham, New York 12110 Telephone: (518) 7869069 49775-1 [ NOTICE ] Notice is hereby given that a license, number 3159970 for beer, wine and liquor has been applied for by the undersigned to sell beer, wine and liquor at retail in a hotel under the Alcoholic Beverage Control Law at 120 East Main Street, Rochester, County of Monroe for on premises consumption. 120 EMS Management, LLC d/b/a Rochester Riverside Hotel d/b/a Legends [ NOTICE ] Notice is hereby given that an alcohol beverage license, pending, has been applied for by the undersigned to sell Liquor, Beer & Wine retail in a Restaurant under the Alcohol Beverage Control Law at: 27 W Main St Webster NY 14580 - On Premises Consumption Liquor License for Ploty’s Home Town Tavern Inc / dba Ploty’s Home Town Tavern [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of GDK Consulting LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) on 10/11/2017. Office location: Monroe

County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 315 Westminster Road Rochester, New York 14607. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Lago Trucking, LLC. Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY)10-06/17 Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 780 N. Clinton Ave, Rochester, NY 14605. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of The Campany Group LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 09/28/2017. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 916 Works Rd Honeoye Falls NY 14472 . Purpose: any lawful activities [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of 296 HAZELWOOD DM LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 8/28/2017. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 35 Rolling Meadows Way, Penfield, NY 14526. Purpose: any lawful act [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of 362 BROADWAY LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 9/20/2017. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 375 Averill Ave., Rochester, NY 14620. Purpose: any lawful act. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of 44 FALSTAFF DM LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 8/28/2017. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 35 Rolling Meadows Way, Penfield, NY 14526. Purpose: any lawful act [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Autumn Winds LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 11/08/17. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 116 Janes Road, Rochester, NY 14612. Purpose: any lawful activities.

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[ NOTICE ]

Notice of formation of Blue Collar CoWork, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 9/26/2017. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 2548 Manitou Rd., Rochester, NY 14624. Purpose: any lawful act

Notice of Formation of ESTransport LLC. Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 02-15-17. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to the LLC at P.O. Box 93007 Rochester, NY 14692 . Purpose: any lawful activities

[ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Brighton Consulting Associates, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/30/17. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o The LLC, 3445 Winton Place, Ste. 228, Rochester, NY 14623. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Brighton Property Management, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/30/17. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o The LLC, 3445 Winton Place, Ste. 228, Rochester, NY 14623. Purpose: any lawful activity.

[ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of FAIRPORT CANAL, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/13/17. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, 16 N. Main St., Pittsford, NY 14534. Purpose: Any lawful activity [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of HUMUS BELT LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 10/25/2017. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 378 ROCKINGHAM ST, ROCHESTER, NY 14620 . Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ]

Notice of formation of CLOUD GRIFFIN HOLDINGS, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/20/2012. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 45 Exchange Blvd., 3rd Fl., Rochester NY 14614. Purpose: any lawful act.

Notice of Formation of INTED- International Student Recruitment Group, LLC. Articles of Organization filed with the New York Department of State on September 29, 2017. Its office is located in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent upon whom process against the Company may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of the process to: 3349, Monroe Ave, Suite 102, Rochester, NY 14618. The purpose of the company is any lawful activity

[ NOTICE ]

[ NOTICE ]

NOTICE OF FORMATION of Community Learning Systems LLC. Arts. of Org. filed Sec’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 9/27/2017. Office Location: County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 113 Gregory Park, Rochester, NY 14620. Purpose: Any lawful purpose.

Notice of formation of JRB Properties, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 9/26/2017. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 2548 Manitou Rd., Rochester, NY 14624. Purpose: any lawful act

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[ NOTICE ]

Notice of Formation of EDGEVIEW DENTAL, PLLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 08/03/17. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of PLLC: 2384 Monroe Ave., Rochester, NY 14618. SSNY designated as agent of PLLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Corporation Service Co., 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207-2543. Purpose: Dental practice.

Notice of Formation of KROEGER DRIVES LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/18/17. Office location: Orleans County. Princ. office of LLC: 249 Ingersoll St., Albion, NY 14411. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful activity.

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Legal Ads > page 47 [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of LANKA WEB SERVICES LLC. Art. of Org. filed with SSNY, 10/10/17. Office: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to, 1270 Thistlberry Ln, Webster, NY 14580. Purpose: Any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of LATTA HOME IMPROVEMENTS LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 9/26/2017. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 2474 Latta Rd., Rochester NY 14612. Purpose: any lawful act. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of MCG Helping Hands LLC Art. Of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) February 21, 2017. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to the LLC at 325 South Union St. Spencerport NY 14559 Purpose: Any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of MELVILLE GREELEY DM LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 8/28/2017. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 35 Rolling Meadows Way, Penfield, NY 14526. Purpose: any lawful act [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Napora Property Management, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/10/17. Office location:

Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 762 Maple Drive, Webster, NY 14580. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of NAPWEST LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/2/17. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 186 Vineyard Drive, Rochester, NY 14616. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] NOTICE OF FORMATION OF NOVAT SHORELINE LLC Articles of Organization filed with Secretary of State of NY (“SSNY”) on 10/12/2017. Office in Monroe County. SSNY designated agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to NOVAT SHORELINE LLC, 8 NORTH MADISON PARK, ROCHESTER, NY 14608. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of Ogden Heavy Equipment, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/26/2017. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, c/o 4 Turner Dr., Spencerport, NY 14559. Purpose: any lawful act. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of River Fox, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/19/2017. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 54 Valley View Dr., Brockport, NY

To place your ad in the LEGAL section, contact Tracey Mykins by phone at (585) 244-3329 x10 or by email at legals@rochester-citynews.com

14420. Purpose: any lawful act. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Rochester Kettle Corn LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 10/25/2017. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 36 Cranbrooke Dr Rochester NY 14622 . Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of RONSON TRUCKING LLC Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/19/17. Office location: Orleans County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Corporation Service Co., 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207. Purpose: Any lawful activity [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Sixpack​ V ​ olleyball LLC.​ Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) August 14,​​ 2017​. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 1049​​Hamlin​​ Center​​Rd., Hamlin, NY 14464. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of SLAY BEAUTY BAR, LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 5/6/2016. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, 346 East Ridge Rd., Rochester, NY 14621. Purpose: any lawful act [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of SMART START CHILDCARE & SAFETY TRAINING LLC. Art. of

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Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 3/31/17. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to the LLC at 633 Ridgeway Av. Roch. Ny 14615. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of The Root Seller LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 08/02/17. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 2361 Wait Corners Rd Panama, NY 14767 . Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of THORN STREET PROPERTIES LLC Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) on 10/20/2017. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 530 VOSBURG ROAD, WEBSTER, NY 14580. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of TL Properties, LLC, Art of Org filed with Sec’y of State (SSNY) 11/3/2017. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of PLLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 292 Hamlin Center Road, Hilton, NY 14468. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Your Barber, LLC. Arts of Org. filed with Secy. Of State of N.Y. (SSNY) on 7/24/2017. Office Location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 37 Faraday Street, Rochester, NY 14610. Purpose: any lawful activity.

[ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of THE OPEN SKY GROUP, LLC Appl. for Auth. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/06/17. Office location: Monroe County. LLC formed in North Carolina (NC) on 02/14/06. NYS fictitious name: TOSG-NY, LLC. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Corporation Service Co., 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207-2543. NC addr. of LLC: 1421 E. Broad St., #305, FuquayVarina, NC 27526. Cert. of Form. filed with Secy. of State, 2 S. Salisbury St., Old Revenue Bldg. Complex, Raleigh, NC 27603. Purpose: Any lawful activity [ NOTICE ] NSRE Holdings, LLC, Arts of Org. filed with Sec. of State of NY (SSNY) 10/20/2017. Cty: Monroe. SSNY desig. as agent upon whom process against may be served & shall mail process to 3485 Big Ridge Rd., Spencerport, NY 14559. General Purpose. [ NOTICE ] Raz Vicerabin LLC Arts of Org. filed SSNY 10/19/17. Office: Monroe Co. SSNY design agent of LLC upon whom process may be served & mail to 178 Waverly Pl #2F New York, NY 10014 General Purpose [ NOTICE ] RNR Renovation, LLC Filed 9/28/17 Office: Monroe Co. SSNY designated as agent for process & shall mail to: 465 Parma Center Rd, Hilton, NY 14468 Purpose: all lawful [ NOTICE ] Rochester Property Services LLC Arts of Org. filed SSNY 2/12/16. Office: Monroe Co. SSNY design agent of LLC upon whom process may be served & mail to 228 Miramar Rd Rochester, NY 14624 General Purpose

[ NOTICE ]

[ NOTICE ]

Notice of Qualification of MYRDDIN PARTNERS LLC Appl. for Auth. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/10/17. Office location: Monroe County. LLC formed in Delaware (DE) on 08/02/16. Princ. office of LLC: 125 Tech Park Dr., Rochester, NY 14623. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Corporation Service Co., 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207-2543. DE addr. of LLC: 251 Little Falls Dr., Wilmington, DE 19808-1674. Cert. of Form. filed with Secy. of State, Div. of Corps., John G. Townsend Bldg., 401 Federal St., Ste. 4, Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: To provide product development support to independent software vendors, e-device OEMs

ROXANNE A. LOWENGUTH, DDS, MS, PLLC (PLLC) filed Arts. of Org. with NY Secy. of State (SS) on 9/12/17. PLLC’s office is in Monroe Co. SS is designated as agent of PLLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS shall mail a copy of any process to PLLC at 2401 Monroe Avenue, Rochester, NY 14618. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Secret Ingredient Cupcakery, LLC (“LLC”) filed Articles of Organization with the NY Sec. of State (“SSNY”) on 6/28/17. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall forward service of process to 16 Derrick

Drive, West Henrietta, NY 14564. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Sesto Synergy LLC (LLC) filed Arts. of Org. with NY Secy. of State (SS) on 9/27/17. LLC’s office is in Monroe Co. SS is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS will mail a copy of any process to 936 Exchange St., Rochester, NY 14608. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE } Notice of formation of Klein and Coh LLC Arts. of Org. filed with the Sect’y of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/09/17. Office location, County of Monroe. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Alyssa Cohen, 110 Covington Rd, Rochester, NY 14617. Purpose: any lawful act [ Notice of Formation ] 17 Lockwood LLC (“LLC”) filed Articles of Organization with the NY Sec. of State (“SSNY”) on 11/8/17. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall forward service of process to 417 Sundance Trail, Webster, NY 14580. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] Bernard Birnbaum Companies - LLC (“LLC”) filed Articles of Organization with the NY Sec. of State (“SSNY”) on 8/22/17. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall forward service of process to 2850 Clover Street, Pittsford, NY 14534. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] Birnbaum Real Estate LLC (“LLC”) filed Articles of Organization with the NY Sec. of State (“SSNY”) on 7/19/17. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall forward service of process to 2850 Clover Street, Pittsford, NY 14534. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] Hops and Hemp - LLC (“LLC”) filed Articles of Organization with the NY Sec. of State (“SSNY”) on 10/10/17. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall forward service of process to 2850 Clover Street, Pittsford, NY 14534. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION ]

NOTICE OF FORMATION of Borderland Advisors LLC, Articles of Organization filed with Secretary of State of NY (SSNY) on November 3rd, 2017. Office location: Ontario County. SSNY designated as agent upon whom process against it may be served. The address to which the SSNY shall mail a copy of any process against the LLC served upon him is C/O the LLC, 66 Cobble Creek Rd. Victor, NY 14564. Term: perpetual. Purpose: any lawful act or activity for which LLC’s may be organized under the NY LLC Law. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] Notice of Formation of Zapzter, LLC. Articles of Organization filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on October 11, 2017. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to principal business location: The LLC, 128 Chadbourne Road, Rochester, NY 14618. Purpose: any lawful activity [ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] Redemption Management Services, LLC filled articles of organization with the New York Department of State on 01/17/17. Its office is located in Monroe County. Recardo Cunningham is designated as agent of the Limited Liability Company upon whom process against it may be served and a copy of any process shall be mailed to PO box 23372 Rochester New York 14692. The purpose of the Company is any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] Rite Care Child Development Center L.L.C. filed Articles of Organization with the New York Department of State on October 16, 2017. Its office is located in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent of the Company upon whom process against it may be served and a copy of any process shall be mailed to 32 Yorktown Dr, Rochester, NY 14616. The purpose of the Company is daycare. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] Venture 8, LLC (“LLC”) filed Articles of Organization with the NY Sec. of State (“SSNY”) on 8/29/17. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall forward service of process to 2850 Clover St., Pittsford, NY 14534. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] Whitney Hill Farm LLC (“LLC”) filed Articles of

Organization with the NY Sec. of State (“SSNY”) on 10/17/17. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall forward service of process to 2500 Whitney Road East, Fairport, NY 14550. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF 337 UNIVERCITY LIVING, LLC ] The name of the Limited Liability Company is 337 UniverCity Living, LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the New York Secretary of State on 10/16/07/2017. The office of the LLC is in Monroe County. The New York Secretary of State is designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. The Secretary of State shall mail a copy of such process68 Meadow Cove Road, Pittsford, NY 14534. The LLC is organized to engage in any lawful activity for which an LLC may be formed under the NY LLC Law. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY ] The name of the LLC is CP 671 Park Ave LLC. The Articles of Organization were filed with the NY Secretary of State on 11/3/17. The LLC office is located in Monroe County. The NY Secretary of State is designated as the agent of the LLC upon whom process may be served, and the address a copy shall be mailed is 135 Corporate Woods Ste 300 Rochester NY 14623. The LLC is managed by a manager. The purpose of the LLC is any lawful business. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LLC ] 49 Bay Street, LLC has filed articles of organization with the New York Secretary of State on 11/3/2017, with an effective date of formation of 11/3/2017. Its principal place of business is located in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent upon whom process may be served. A copy of any process shall be mailed to 49 Bay St., Rochester, NY 14605. The purpose of the LLC is to engage in any lawful activity for which Limited Liability Companies may be organized under Section 203 of the New York Limited Liability Company Law. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LLC ] Advantiv Group Consulting, LLC has filed articles of organization with the New York Secretary of State on 10/10/2017, with an effective date of formation of 10/10/2017. Its principal place of business is located in Monroe County. The


Legal Ads > page 48 Secretary of State has been designated as agent upon whom process may be served. A copy of any process shall be mailed to 110 Thornell Rd., Pittsford, NY 14534. The purpose of the LLC is to engage in any lawful activity for which Limited Liability Companies may be organized under Section 203 of the New York Limited Liability Company Law. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LLC ] Joseph R. Properties L.L.C. has filed articles of organization with the New York Secretary of State on 10/11/2017, with an effective date of formation of 10/11/2017. Its principal place of business is located in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent upon whom process may be served. A copy of any process shall be mailed to 100 Timarron Trail, Rochester, NY 14612. The purpose of the LLC is to engage in any lawful activity for which Limited Liability Companies may be organized under Section 203 of the New York Limited Liability Company Law. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF TAG ALLIANCE, LLC ] Art. of Org. filed with SSNY 11/3/2017 Office Location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated Agent of LLC to whom process may be served. SSNY may mail copy of process to 91 CLARDALE DRIVE, ROCHESTER, NY 14616. Purpose of LLC: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF WILBOS, LLC ] Wilbos, LLC (the “LLC”) filed Articles of Organization with NY Secretary of State (SSNY) 11/1/17. Office location: Monroe County, NY. Principal business location: 3 Fitzmot Glen, Pittsford, NY 14534. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 3 Fitzmot Glen, Pittsford, NY 14534. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ Notice of Intent to Acquire Property ] Under Article 5, Section 233.aa of the New York State Education Law, The Memorial Art Gallery of the University of Rochester hereby asserts its intent to acquire title to the following property: Objects: American or European, three partial flutes, wood with metal fittings; American, framed photo of Edward G. Miner, 4 7/8 x 3 3/8 x 9/16 in.; American or European, neogothic style four-panel folding screen, wood; American or European, relief panel with angels, plaster, 12 x 39 3/8 x 2 5/8 in.; American,

three-pronged hay fork, American, wood; seated female figure, Mexican (Colima?), ceramic, 7 11/16 x 5 1/4 x 3 11/16 in.; Egyptian, mummy mask, wood, 17 5/8 x 11 5/16 x 3 7/16 in.; American or European, upholstered swivel chair, wood with fabric seat, 29 7/8 x 17 15/16 x 15 7/8 in.; American or European, butter knife, silver plate, 7 1/2 x 15/16 x 1/4 in.; American or European, carved figure of Jesus, wood, 11 13/16 x 9 3/8 x 6 1/16 in; American or European, table with arched supports, wood, 30 5/8 x 69 5/16 x 26 9/16 in.; Homer Ledford (American), two dulcimers, 1968, butternut and walnut, 33 ¼ x 10 ¼ x 3 in. and 33 ½ x 6 9/16 x 2 15/16 in.; European, platter or paten with embedded 1737 scudo from Italian States, brass, 18 3/16 diam. x 1 15/16; American, four string ukulele, 1960s?, cherry wood, 33 3/16 x 9 5/8 x 3 ¼ in.; Middle eastern? two-panel hinged screen, wood with inlay, 64 15/16 x 35 7/16 x 1 9/16 in.; American or European, octagonal column, grey marble, 48 1/8 x 17 1/2 x 13 3/8 in.; Pre-Columbian, rattle vessel with figure, ceramic, 19 5/8 x 15 3/8 x 15 3/16 in.; American or European, toy candelabrum, glass, 2 9/16 x 1 15/16 x 1 1/8 in.; American or European, cross and beads, ivory, 21 7/8 x 2 3/4 x 1/4 in.; American or European, relief with satyrs and putti, plaster, 12 13/16 x 19 13/16 x 1 15/16 in.; J. Guernsey Mitchell (American), Bust of a Man, bronze, 8 7/16 x 3 7/16 x 2 1/4 in.; Royal Worcester (British), melon-pattern creamer, 1886, porcelain, 2 3/4 x 5 3/8 x 4 in. (7 x 13.6 x 10.1 cm); Taylor Brothers (American) barometer, metal and glass, 14 3/16 x 2 3/16 x 1 5/8 in.; American or European, After JeanAntoine Houdon, bust of Louise Brongniart, ceramic, 18 1/4 x 11 7/16 x 7 3/8 in.; American or European, bookstand, wood, 9 3/16 x 12 7/16 x 12 in.; Nymphenburg (German) plate, porcelain; American, long-beaked decoy on a stick, wood, 9 9/16 x 5 9/16 x 9/16 in.; Gien (French) bowl, 1868-1871, ceramic, 4 1/4 x 10 1/2 x 10 1/2 in.; American or European, miniature china cabinet, wood, 15 7/16 x 9 x 4 1/8 in.; Italian, Thorwaldsen cameo “book” collection, plaster in paste-board cases; Pre-Columbian, effigy head vessel, ceramic, 13 5/16 x 10 in.; American, standing easel in Eastlake style, ca. 1875, ebonized wood with light-wood inlay and gilt decoration, 82 5/16 x 26 7/16 x 6 13/16 in. Paintings: Russian, Virgin and Angels, tempera and gilt on panel, 11 5/8 x 8 3/4 x

To place your ad in the LEGAL section, contact Tracey Mykins by phone at (585) 244-3329 x10 or by email at legals@rochester-citynews.com 7/8 in.; American, twelve paintings of houses on glass; Mourges, still life of sheet music and fruit, oil on board, 8 1/8 x 9 13/16 in.; Robert Schulze (American), The Duel, acrylic on canvas, 18 x 24 in.; Andrews (American or European), The Fortune Teller, oil on canvas, 27 13/16 x 32 7/8 in.; August Kutterer (German), Prinsengracht in Amsterdam, 1929, oil on canvas, 20 15/16 x 25 13/16 in.; American, landscape with figure seated on a rock, oil on canvas, 24 15/16 x 29 15/16 in.; J. Whitehorne (American), portrait of a man, 1873, oil on canvas, 36 1/4 x 29 5/16 in. Works on paper: Various artists, American and European, 103 World War I posters and 4 World War 2 posters; American or European, fan with classical figures, gouache on paper with mother-of-pearl sticks, 11 5/16 x 20 9/16 x 13/16 in.; American or European, three fabric labels, paint and embossing on paper; Charles Goodall & Son (British), two sets English Cathedrals Quiz Cards, each 13 1/2 x 3 7/16 in. (34.3 x 8.8 cm); Terry Haass (Czech), Forges du Diable, 1959, etching; Haag (American?), Warrior, 1954, woodcut or linocut; Hilda Morris (American), Tuesday’s Guest, 1962, lithograph; Carl Morris (American), Red Floe, color lithograph; Oliver Herford (American), Study for “How the Lion Became King,” ink and graphite drawing; John Sartain (American), George Washington and his family (after Edward Savage), 1840, engraving; Currier & Ives (American), The Life of a Fireman, 1861, color lithograph; Kurt K.Feuerherm (American), Mendon, 1962, pastel, ink and paint on paper; seven color lithographs by William Nicholson (British), ca. 1900: Sir Henry Hawkins, Prince Bismarck, H.R.H. the Prince of Wales, Cecil Rhodes, Lord Roberts, W. E. Gladstone, H. M. the Queen; 32 photomechanical reproductions after drawings by Charles Dana Gibson (American), ca. 1902; Nicolas de Staël (French), Mediterranée, serigraph; Arthur Willmore (American), A Halt in Yosemite Valley (after Albert Bierstadt), engraving; European, Milano - Corso Vittorio Emanuele, aquatint and etching; Gino Severini (Italian), Composition, 1955, color lithograph, 21 15/16 x 15 1/16 in.; Spanish missal page, ink and color, 20 1/4 x 14 7/8 in.; Simkha Simkovitch (American), Island Beach #1, 1933, lithograph Asian art: Chinese, lantern, wood, painted glass, tassels, and metal armature, 26 15/16 x 22 1/16 x 22 1/16 in.; Chinese or Japanese, relief carving of Buddha

and attendants, stone, 24 15/16 x 13 13/16 x 5 7/8 in.; Japanese, pair of six-panel folding screens (mountain landscapes with houses and figures), paint on fabric, 60 11/16 x 133 1/4 x 9/16 in. and 41 x 177 in.; Chinese or Japanese, two-panel folding screen, carved and painted lacquered wood, 72 3/8 x 63 15/16 x 5/8 in.; Thai, head of Buddha, bronze, 6 3/8 x 2 1/8 x 2 1/4 in.; Indian or Sri Lankan, seated Buddha, bronze, 8 1/2 x 6 11/16 x 3 1/16 in.; Japanese, miniature weapons and instruments, ivory, each 4 5/16 in.; Japanese, circular box, ivory, 7/8 x 1 3/8 x 1 3/8 in. (2.2 x 3.5 x 3.5 cm); Japanese?, pair of triangles, ivory, each 1 9/16 x 1 9/16 x 1/16 in.; Japanese, mace head, ivory, 1 1/16 x 1 1/16 x 1 1/16 in.; Chinese, gaming chips, mother of pearl, each 1 1/8 x 1 5/8 x 1/8 in.; Chinese or Japanese, picture frame, ivory, 4 3/4 x 3 3/16 x 3/8 in.; Japanese, four-case inro, lacquered wood, mother of pearl, ivory inlay, metal disk, and silk cord, 10 1/4 x 2 1/16 x 13/16 in.; Japanese, nineteen fabric stencils (katagami), 19th century, mulberry paper, each about 10 x 16 1/2 in.; Japanese, pair of tall vases with floral design, porcelain, 14 7/16 x 6 3/4 x 6 3/4 in.; Hiroshi Yoshida (Japanese), graphite drawing of a temple, 1940, and Ogura, a Mill, graphite with watercolor If you claim and can demonstrate ownership to this property, you must contact the museum in writing to make arrangements to collect the property; send correspondence to Kerry Schauber, Curatorial Department, Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Avenue, Rochester NY 14607 (or kschauber@mag. rochester.edu). If you fail to do so within one hundred eighty (180) days, the museum will commence proceedings to acquire title to the property. If you wish to commence legal proceedings to claim the property, you should consult an attorney. [ NOTICE OF SALE ] SUPREME COURT COUNTY OF MONROE WELLS FARGO BANK, N.A., Plaintiff AGAINST DOUGLAS N. DUMOND, et al., Defendant(s) Pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale duly dated October 05, 2016 I, the undersigned Referee will sell at public auction at the Foreclosure Auction Area, Hall of Justice- Lower Level Atrium, 99 Exchange Boulevard, Rochester, NY 14614, on November 27, 2017 at 1:00PM, premises known as 6 PACKET BOAT DRIVE, FAIRPORT, NY 14450. All that certain plot piece or parcel of land, with the buildings

and improvements erected, situate, lying and being in the Town of Perinton, County of Monroe and State of New York, SECTION 152.12, BLOCK 2, LOT 7. Approximate amount of judgment $94,008.67 plus interest and costs. Premises will be sold subject to provisions of filed Judgment for Index# 2013-1112. Sarah E. Wesley, Esq., Referee Gross Polowy, LLC Attorney for Plaintiff 1775 Wehrle Drive, Suite 100 Williamsville, NY 14221 49477 [ NOTICE OF SALE ] SUPREME COURT STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF MONROE ESL Federal Credit Union, f/k/a Eastman Savings and Loan Association, Index No. 2017-3832 Plaintiff, Dave W. Kane a/k/a David W. Kane; ESL Federal Credit Union, Defendants Pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale dated October 23, 2017, entered herein, I, the undersigned, the Referee in said Judgment named, will sell at public auction in the Foreclosure Auction Area, Hall of Justice Lower Level Atrium, 99 Exchange Boulevard, Rochester, New York, in the County of Monroe on November 30, 2017 at 10:00 a.m., on that day, the premises directed by said Judgment to be sold and therein described as follows: ALL THAT TRACT OR PARCEL OF LAND, situate in the City of Rochester, County of Monroe and State of New York, known as 46 Lyncrest Drive, a/k/a 10 Southampton Drive, Rochester, NY 14616; Tax Account No. 075.571-39. Said premises are sold subject to any state of facts an accurate survey may show, zoning restrictions and any amendments thereto, covenants, restrictions, agreements, reservations, and easements of record and prior liens, if any, municipal departmental violations, and such other provisions as may be set forth in the Complaint and Judgment filed in this action. Judgment amount: $57,271.02 plus, but not limited to, costs, disbursements, attorney fees and additional allowance, if any, all with legal interest. DATED: October 2017 Deborah Indivino, Esq., Referee LACY KATZEN LLP Attorneys for Plaintiff 130 East Main Street Rochester, New York 14604 Telephone: (585) 324-5767 [ SUMMONS WITH NOTICE ] Index No. I2016014378 RJI No.: Assigned Judge:Hon. Daniel J. Doyle, J.S.C. SUPREME COURT STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF MONROE CITIZENS BANK, N.A., Plaintiff, -against- VEVILYN ANDREWS a/k/a VEVILYN GASSER, MICHAEL GASSER a/k/a MICHAEL D. GASSER, PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF NEW

YORK by and through the Commissioner of Taxation and Finance, THE CANANDAIGUA NATIONAL BANK AND TRUST COMPANY, and “JOHN DOE #1” through “JOHN DOE #12”, the last twelve names being fictitious and unknown to plaintiffs, the persons or parties intended being the tenants, occupants, persons or corporations, if any, having or claiming an interest in or lien upon the premises described in the complaint, Defendants TO VEVILYN ANDREWS a/k/a VEVILYN GASSER and MICHAEL GASSER a/k/a MICHAEL D. GASSER: YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED and required to serve upon plaintiff’s attorneys an answer to the complaint in this action within twenty (20) days after the service of this summons, exclusive of the day of service, or within thirty (30) days after service is complete if the summons is not personally served upon you within the State of New York. The United States, if designated a defendant on this action, may appear or answer within sixty (60) days of service. In case of your failure to answer, judgment will be taken against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. The basis of the venue designated is that the mortgaged property is located in Monroe County. Dated: October 27, 2017 COOPER ERVING & SAVAGE LLP Albany, New York BY:/s/Michael A. Kornstein Michael A. Kornstein, Esq. Attorneys for Plaintiff 39 North Pearl Street, 4th Floor Albany, New York 12207 (518) 449-3900 TO: VEVILYN ANDREWS a/k/a VEVILYN GASSER and MICHAEL GASSER a/k/a MICHAEL D. GASSER: The foregoing summons is served upon you by publication pursuant to an Order of the Hon. Daniel J. Doyle, Justice of the Supreme Court of the State of New York, dated the 19th day of October, 2017, and filed with the complaint and other papers in the Office of the Clerk of Monroe County. This is an action for foreclosure of a mortgage made by Vevilyn Andrews a/k/a Vevilyn Gasser and Michael Gasser a/k/a Michael D. Gasser, to Citizens Bank, N.A. in the original amount of $64,000.00 with interest, dated November15, 2001, recorded November 15, 2001, in the Monroe County Clerk’s Office in Liber 15791 of Mortgages at Page 42. The relief sought is the foreclosure of the mortgage lien and the public sale of the mortgaged premises and in case of your failure to appear, judgment may be taken against you extinguishing any interest or judgment lien you may have in the mortgaged premises. The premises indexed in this action are described and commonly known as 225 Long Acre Road, City of Rochester,

Monroe County, New York (Tax Map No. 091.3100001-004.000). A complete legal description is as follows: **See Schedule Annexed** Dated: Albany, New York COOPER ERVING & SAVAGE LLP October 27, 2017 BY:/s/Michael A. Kornstein Michael A. Kornstein, Esq. Attorneys for Plaintiff 39 North Pearl Street, 4th Floor Albany, New York 12207 (518) 449-3900 SCHEDULE A DESCRIPTION OF MORTGAGED PREMISES All that tract or parcel of land, situate in the City of Rochester, County of Monroe and State of New York, which in a certain subdivision map recorded in the Monroe County Clerk’s Office in Case A-3 of Maps and known as “Seneca Ridge Tract” is distinguished as Lot No 56, said lot fronts 43 fet on the south side of Long Acre Road as shown on said map. [ SUPPLEMENTAL CITATION ] SURROGATE’S COURT, MONROE COUNTY THE PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK, By the Grace of God Free and Independent File No. 2015-1116/D TO: Terrance Brett-Cordell, whose whereabouts are unknown, if living, but if dead, his distributees, legal representatives, assigns, and all persons who by purchase or inheritance or otherwise, claim or claim to have an interest in the Estate of Irvin LaPaul Bennett, Jr. A petition having been duly filed by Elena F. Cariola, Esq., on behalf of Frank B. lacovangelo, Esq. Monroe County Public Administrator, who is domiciled at 10 Autumn Wood, Rochester, New York 14624, United States. YOU ARE HEREBY CITED TO SHOW CAUSE before the Surrogate’s Court, Monroe County, at Room 541, Hall of Justice, 99 Exchange Blvd., Rochester, New York, on December 14, 2017, at 9:30 o’clock in the fore noon of that day, why the account of Frank B. lacovangelo, Esq. Monroe County Public Administrator a copy of which has been served herewith, as Administrator, DBN of the estate of Irvin LaPaul Bennett, Jr., should not be judicially settled and fees and commissions be approved accordingly. Dated, Attested and Sealed,November 3, 2017 Hon. John M Owens, Surrogate, Mark L. Annunziata Chief Clerk, Frank B. Iacovangelo, Esq., Gallo & Iacovangelo, 585-4547145, 180 180 Canal View Boulevard; Suite 100, Rochester, New York 14623 NOTE: This citation is served upon you as required by law. You are not required to appear. If you fail to appear it will be assumed that you do not object to the relief requested. You have a right to have an attorney appear for you, and you or your attorney may request a copy of

the full account from the petitioner or petitioner’s attorney. [ SUPPLEMENTAL SUMMONS ] SUPREME COURT OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF MONROE Plaintiff designates MONROE as the place of trial situs of the real property Mortgaged Premises: 47 CHURCH HILL ROAD HENRIETTA, NY 14467 Section: 189.2 Block: 1 Lot: 16 INDEX NO. 20176910 NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE LLC, Plaintiff, vs. ERNESTO ORTEGA, if living, and if she/he be dead, any and all persons unknown to plaintiff, claiming, or who may claim to have an interest in, or general or specific lien upon the real property described in this action; such unknown persons being herein generally described and intended to be included in the following designation, namely: the wife, widow, husband, widower, heirs at law, next of kin, descendants, executors, administrators, devisees, legatees, creditors, trustees, committees, lienors, and assignees of such deceased, any and all persons deriving interest in or lien upon, or title to said real property by, through or under them, or either of them, and their respective wives, widows, husbands, widowers, heirs at law, next of kin, descendants, executors, administrators, devisees, legatees, creditors, trustees, committees, lienors and assigns, all of whom and whose names, except as stated, are unknown to plaintiff; PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK; UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, “JOHN DOE #1” through “JOHN DOE #12, “the last twelve names being fictitious and unknown to plaintiff the persons or parties intended being the tenants occupants persons or corporations if any having or claiming an interest in or lien upon the premises described in the complaint, Defendants. To the above-named Defendants YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED to answer the complaint in this action and to serve a copy of your answer, or, if the complaint is not served with this summons, to serve a notice of appearance on the Plaintiff’s Attorney within 20 days after the service of this summons, exclusive of the day of service (or within 30 days after the service is complete if this summons is not personally delivered to you within the State of New York) in the event the United States of America is made a party defendant, the time to answer for the said United States of America shall not expire until (60) days after service of the Summons; and in case of your failure to appear or answer, judgment will be taken

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Legal Ads > page 49 against you by default for the relief demanded in the complaint. NOTICE OF NATURE OF ACTION AND RELIEF SOUGHTTHE OBJECT of the above caption action is to foreclose a Mortgage to secure the sum of $133,816.00 and interest, recorded on June 10, 2011 in Official Record Book 23701 at Page 464, of the Public Records of MONROE County, New York, covering premises known as 47 CHURCH HILL ROAD, HENRIETTA, NY 14467. The relief sought in the within action is a final judgment directing the sale of the premises described above to satisfy the debt secured by the Mortgage described above. MONROE County is designated as the place of trial because the real property affected by this action is located in said county. NOTICE YOU ARE IN DANGER OF LOSING YOUR HOME If you do not respond to this summons and complaint by serving a copy of the answer on the attorney for the mortgage company who filed this foreclosure proceeding against you and filing the answer with the court, a default judgment may be entered and you can lose your home. Speak to an attorney or go to the court where your case is pending for further information on how to answer the summons and protect your property. Sending a payment to the mortgage company will not stop the foreclosure action. YOU MUST RESPOND BY SERVING A COPY OF THE ANSWER ON THE ATTORNEY FOR THE PLAINTIFF (MORTGAGE COMPANY) AND FILING THE ANSWER WITH THE COURT. Dated: November 1, 2017 Westbury, New York RAS BORISKIN, LLC Attorney for Plaintiff BY: DANIEL GREENBAUM, ESQ. 900 Merchants Concourse, Suite 106 Westbury, NY 11590 516280-7675 [ SUPPLEMENTAL SUMMONS ] SUPREME COURT OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF MONROE Plaintiff designates MONROE as the place of trial situs of the real property Mortgaged Premises: 125 SARANAC STREET ROCHESTER, NY 14621 Section: 091.69 Block: 4 Lot: 14 INDEX NO. 2017-005384 U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, Plaintiff, vs. JOHN LEISTEN SR. AS HEIR AND DISTRIBUTEE OF THE ESTATE OF JOLENE A. LEISTEN, any and all persons unknown to plaintiff, claiming, or who may claim to have an interest in, or general or specific lien upon the real property described in this action; such unknown persons being herein generally described and intended to be included in the following designation,

namely: the wife, widow, husband, widower, heirs at law, next of kin, descendants, executors, administrators, devisees, legatees, creditors, trustees, committees, lienors, and assignees of such deceased, any and all persons deriving interest in or lien upon, or title to said real property by, through or under them, or either of them, and their respective wives, widows, husbands, widowers, heirs at law, next of kin, descendants, executors, administrators, devisees, legatees, creditors, trustees, committees, lienors and assigns, all of whom and whose names, except as stated, are unknown to plaintiff; UNITED STATES OF AMERICA – INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE; NEW YORK STATE DEPARTMENT OF TAXATION AND FINANCE; PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK; MATTHEW LEISTEN AS HEIR AND DISTRIBUTEE OF THE ESTATE OF JOLENE A. LEISTEN; JEFFREY RUST AS HEIR AND DISTRIBUTEE OF THE ESTATE OF JOLENE A. LEISTEN; SABRINA LEISTEN AS HEIR AND DISTRIBUTEE OF THE ESTATE OF JOLENE A. LEISTEN; JOHN LEISTEN, “JOHN DOE #2” through “JOHN DOE #12, “the last twelve names being fictitious and unknown to plaintiff the persons or parties intended being the tenants occupants persons or corporations if any having or claiming an interest in or lien upon the premises described in the complaint, Defendants. To the above-named Defendants YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED to answer the complaint in this action and to serve a copy of your answer, or, if the complaint is not served with this summons, to serve a notice of appearance on the Plaintiff’s Attorney within 20 days after the service of this summons, exclusive of the day of service (or within 30 days after the service is complete if this summons is not personally delivered to you within the State of New York) in the event the United States of America is made a party defendant, the time to answer for the said United States of America shall not expire until (60) days after service of the Summons; and in case of your failure to appear or answer, judgment will be taken against you by default for the relief demanded in the complaint. NOTICE OF NATURE OF ACTION AND RELIEF SOUGHT THE OBJECT of the above caption action is to foreclose a Mortgage to secure the sum of $45,979.00 and interest, recorded on July 9, 2002, at Liber 16394 Page 0359, of the Public Records of MONROE County, New York, covering premises known as 125 SARANAC STREET ROCHESTER, NY 14621. The relief sought

50 CITY NOVEMBER 15 - 21, 2017

To place your ad in the LEGAL section, contact Tracey Mykins by phone at (585) 244-3329 x10 or by email at legals@rochester-citynews.com in the within action is a final judgment directing the sale of the premises described above to satisfy the debt secured by the Mortgage described above. MONROE County is designated as the place of trial because the real property affected by this action is located in said county. NOTICE YOU ARE IN DANGER OF LOSING YOUR HOME If you do not respond to this summons and complaint by serving a copy of the answer on the attorney for the mortgage company who filed this foreclosure proceeding against you and filing the answer with the court, a default judgment may be entered and you can lose your home. Speak to an attorney or go to the court where your case is pending for further information on how to answer the summons and protect your property. Sending a payment to the mortgage company will not stop the foreclosure action. YOU MUST RESPOND BY SERVING A COPY OF THE ANSWER ON THE ATTORNEY FOR THE PLAINTIFF (MORTGAGE COMPANY) AND FILING THE ANSWER WITH THE COURT. Dated: August 11, 2017 RAS BORISKIN, LLC Attorney for Plaintiff BY Hedva D. Haviv, Esq. 900 Merchants Concourse, Suite 106 Westbury, NY 11590 516280-7675 [ SUPPLEMENTAL SUMMONS ] SUPREME COURT OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF MONROE Plaintiff designates MONROE as the place of trial situs of the real property Mortgaged Premises: 79 WESTCHESTER AVENUE ROCHESTER, NY 14609 Section: 107.39 Block: 2 Lot: 53 INDEX NO. 17-3199 U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, Plaintiff, vs. NANCY L. JOZWIAK, AS ADMINISTRATOR AND AS HEIR AND DISTRIBUTEE OF THE ESTATE OF ROBERT MOYER A/K/A ROBERT A. MOYER, JR.; any and all persons unknown to plaintiff, claiming, or who may claim to have an interest in, or general or specific lien upon the real property described in this action; such unknown persons being herein generally described and intended to be included in the following designation, namely: the wife, widow, husband, widower, heirs at law, next of kin, descendants, executors, administrators, devisees, legatees, creditors, trustees, committees, lienors, and assignees of such deceased, any and all persons deriving interest in or lien upon, or title to said real property by, through or under them, or either of them, and their respective wives, widows, husbands, widowers, heirs at law, next of kin, descendants, executors, administrators, devisees, legatees, creditors,

trustees, committees, lienors and assigns, all of whom and whose names, except as stated, are unknown to plaintiff; SCOTT L. MOYER AS HEIR AND DISTRIBUTEE OF THE ESTATE OF ROBERT MOYER A/K/A ROBERT A. MOYER, JR.; STEVEN P. MOYER AS HEIR AND DISTRIBUTEE OF THE ESTATE OF ROBERT MOYER A/K/A ROBERT A. MOYER, JR.; JACK D. MOYER AS HEIR AND DISTRIBUTEE OF THE ESTATE OF ROBERT MOYER A/K/A ROBERT A. MOYER, JR.; JAY A. MOYER AS HEIR AND DISTRIBUTEE OF THE ESTATE OF ROBERT MOYER A/K/A ROBERT A. MOYER, JR., if living, and if she/ he be dead, any and all persons unknown to plaintiff, claiming, or who may claim to have an interest in, or general or specific lien upon the real property described in this action; such unknown persons being herein generally described and intended to be included in the following designation, namely: the wife, widow, husband, widower, heirs at law, next of kin, descendants, executors, administrators, devisees, legatees, creditors, trustees, committees, lienors, and assignees of such deceased, any and all persons deriving interest in or lien upon, or title to said real property by, through or under them, or either of them, and their respective wives, widows, husbands, widowers, heirs at law, next of kin, descendants, executors, administrators, devisees, legatees, creditors, trustees, committees, lienors and assigns, all of whom and whose names, except as stated, are unknown to plaintiff; NEW YORK STATE DEPARTMENT OF TAXATION AND FINANCE; UNITED STATES OF AMERICA – INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK; BRIANNA HEAGNEY; JOHN DOE (REFUSED NAME), “JOHN DOE #3” through “JOHN DOE #12,” the last twelve names being fictitious and unknown to plaintiff, the persons or parties intended being the tenants, occupants, persons or corporations, if any, having or claiming an interest in or lien upon the premises, described in the complaint, Defendants. To the above-named Defendants YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED to answer the complaint in this action and to serve a copy of your answer, or, if the complaint is not served with this summons, to serve a notice of appearance on the Plaintiff’s Attorney within 20 days after the service of this summons, exclusive of the day of service (or within 30 days after the service is complete if this summons is not personally delivered to you within the State of

New York) in the event the United States of America is made a party defendant, the time to answer for the said United States of America shall not expire until (60) days after service of the Summons; and in case of your failure to appear or answer, judgment will be taken against you by default for the relief demanded in the complaint. NOTICE OF NATURE OF ACTION AND RELIEF SOUGHT THE OBJECT of the above caption action is to foreclose a Mortgage to secure the sum of $73,638.00 and interest, recorded on June 1, 2001, at Liber 15424 Page 0146, of the Public Records of MONROE County, New York, covering premises known as 79 WESTCHESTER AVENUE ROCHESTER, NY 14609. The relief sought in the within action is a final judgment directing the sale of the premises described above to satisfy the debt secured by the Mortgage described above. MONROE County is designated as the place of trial because the real property affected by this action is located in said county. NOTICE YOU ARE IN DANGER OF LOSING YOUR HOME If you do not respond to this summons and complaint by serving a copy of the answer on the attorney for the mortgage company who filed this foreclosure proceeding against you and filing the answer with the court, a default judgment may be entered and you can lose your home. Speak to an attorney or go to the court where your case is pending for further information on how to answer the summons and protect your property. Sending a payment to the mortgage company will not stop the foreclosure action. YOU MUST RESPOND BY SERVING A COPY OF THE ANSWER ON THE ATTORNEY FOR THE PLAINTIFF (MORTGAGE COMPANY) AND FILING THE ANSWER WITH THE COURT. Dated: August 22, 2017 RAS BORISKIN, LLC Attorney for Plaintiff BY: Hedva D. Haviv, Esq. 900 Merchants Concourse, Suite 106 Westbury, NY 11590 516280-7675 [ SUPPLEMENTAL SUMMONS ] SUPREME COURT OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF MONROE Plaintiff designates MONROE as the place of trial situs of the real property INDEX NO. 2017-7889 U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, Plaintiff Vs. RONALD CAVIGLIANO, if living, and if she/ he be dead, any and all persons unknown to plaintiff, claiming, or who may claim to have an interest in, or general or specific lien upon the real property described in this action; such unknown persons being herein generally described and intended

to be included in the following designation, namely: the wife, widow, husband, widower, heirs at law, next of kin, descendants, executors, administrators, devisees, legatees, creditors, trustees, committees, lienors, and assignees of such deceased, any and all persons deriving interest in or lien upon, or title to said real property by, through or under them, or either of them, and their respective wives, widows, husbands, widowers, heirs at law, next of kin, descendants, executors, administrators, devisees, legatees, creditors, trustees, committees, lienors and assigns, all of whom and whose names, except as stated, are unknown to plaintiff; NEW YORK STATE DEPARTMENT OF TAXATION AND FINANCE; UNITED STATES OF AMERICA – INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE; TOWN OF IRONDEQUOIT; ROBERT CAVIGLIANO; RALPH CAVIGLIANO JR, ‘’JOHN DOE #1’’ through ‘’JOHN DOE #12,’’ the last twelve names being fictitious and unknown to plaintiff, the persons or parties intended being the tenants, occupants, persons or corporations, if any, having or claiming an interest in or lien upon the premises, described in the complaint, Defendants. To the above-named Defendants YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED to answer the complaint in this action and to serve a copy of your answer, or, if the complaint is not served with this summons, to serve a notice of appearance on the Plaintiff’s Attorney within 20 days after the service of this summons, exclusive of the day of service (or within 30 days after the service is complete if this summons is not personally delivered to you within the State of New York) in the event the United States of America is made a party defendant, the time to answer for the said United States of America shall not expire until (60) days after service of the Summons; and in case of your failure to appear or answer, judgment will be taken against you by default for the relief demanded in the complaint. NOTICE YOU ARE IN DANGER OF LOSING YOUR HOME If you do not respond to this summons and complaint by serving a copy of the answer on the attorney for the mortgage company who filed this foreclosure proceeding against you and filing the answer with the court, a default judgment may be entered and you can lose your home. Speak to an attorney or go to the court where your case is pending for further information on how to answer the summons and protect your property. Sending a payment to the mortgage company will not stop the foreclosure action. YOU MUST RESPOND BY SERVING A COPY OF

THE ANSWER ON THE ATTORNEY FOR THE PLAINTIFF (MORTGAGE COMPANY) AND FILING THE ANSWER WITH THE COURT. Dated: November 6, 2017 RAS Boriskin, LLC Attorney for Plaintiff BY: HEDVA D. HAVIV, ESQ. 900 Merchants Concourse, Suite 106 Westbury, NY 11590 516280-7675 [ SUPPLEMENTAL SUMMONS ] SUPREME COURT OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK, COUNTY OF MONROE –NATIONSTAR MORTGAGE LLC,D/B/A CHAMPION MORTGAGE COMPANY, Plaintiff, against SUSAN GUY, AS HEIR TO THE ESTATE OF STANLEY C. LAMPERT, JR.; RONALD LAMPERT, AS HEIR TO THE ESTATE OF STANLEY C. LAMPERT, JR., PATRICIA BULMER, AS HEIR TO THE ESTATE OF STANLEY C. LAMPERT, JR.; UNKNOWN HEIRS TO THE ESTATE OF STANLEY C. LAMPERT, JR., any and all persons unknown to plaintiff, claiming, or who may claim to have an interest in, or general or specific lien upon the real property described in this action; such unknown persons being herein generally described and intended to be included in the following designation, namely: the wife, widow, husband, widower, heirs at law, next of kin, descendants, executors, administrators, devisees, legatees, creditors, trustees, committees, lienors, and assignees of such deceased, any and all persons deriving interest in or lien upon, or title to said real property by, through or under them, or either of them, and their respective wives, widows, husbands, widowers, heirs at law, next of kin, descendants, executors, administrators, devisees, legatees, creditors, trustees, committees, lienors and assigns, all of whom and whose name, except as stated, are unknown to plaintiff, SECRETARY OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT; NEW YORK STATE DEPARTMENT OF TAXATION AND FINANCE; UNITED STATES OF AMERICA; and JOHN DOE AND JANE DOE #1 through #7, the last seven (7) names being fictitious and unknown to the Plaintiff, the persons or parties intended being the tenants, occupants, persons or parties, if any, having or claiming an interest in or lien upon the mortgaged premises described in the complaint, Defendants-Index no. 17-6219. Original filed with Clerk June 16, 2017 Plaintiff designates Monroe County as the place of trial. The Basis of Venue is that the subject action is situated in Monroe County Premises: 52 New Gate Dr. Henrietta, NY 14467

TO THE ABOVE-NAMED DEFENDANTS: YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED to answer the Complaint in this action and to serve a copy of your answer, or, if the Complaint is not served with this Summons, to serve a notice of appearance on the Plaintiff’s Attorney(s) within 20 days after the service of this Summons, exclusive of the day of service (or within 30 days after the service is complete if this Summons is not personally delivered to you within the State of New York); the United States of America may appear or answer within 60 days of service hereof; and in case of your failure to appear or answer, judgment will be taken against you by default for the relief demanded in the Complaint.. NOTICEYOU ARE IN DANGER OF LOSING YOUR HOME – If you do not respond to this summons and complaint by serving a copy of the answer on the attorney for the mortgage company who filed this foreclosure proceeding against you and filing the answer with the court, a default judgment may be entered and you can lose your home. Speak to an attorney or go to the court where your case is pending for further information on how to answer the summons and protect your property. Sending a payment to the mortgage company will not stop the foreclosure action. YOU MUST RESPOND BY SERVING A COPY OF THE ANSWER ON THE ATTORNEY FOR THE PLAINTIFF (MORTGAGE COMPANY) AND FILING THE ANSWER WITH THE COURT. We are attempting to collect a debt. Any information obtained will be used for that purpose. The foregoing summons is served upon you by publication pursuant to an order of the Honorable Daniel J. Doyle dated October 20, 2017. The object of this action is to foreclose a mortgage and covering the premises known as 52 New Gate Dr., Henrietta, NY 14467 located at Section 176.15, Block 2, Lot 23 Pincus Law Group, PLLC, George J. Weissinger, Esq. Attorneys for Plaintiff 425 RXR Plaza Uniondale, NY 11556, 516 699-8902 [ Talle Contracting, LLC ] Talle Contracting, LLC filed Articles of Organization with the New York Department of State on 4/20/17. Its office is located in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has been designated as agent of the Company upon whom process against it may be served and a copy of any process shall be mailed to Terrell Prince 437 Columbia Ave Rochester New York 14611. The purpose of the Company is Any lawful purpose.


Fun [ NEWS OF THE WEIRD ] BY THE EDITORS AT ANDREWS MCMEEL SYNDICATION

Good-Natured Weirdos

Three teenagers from Rahway, New Jersey, who call themselves the Rahway Bushmen, have been discouraged from their signature prank: dressing up as bushes and popping up in Rahway River Park to say “Hi!” to unsuspecting passersby. NJ.com reported in October that the Union County Police Department warned the Bushmen that they would be arrested if caught in action. The high school students started by jumping out to scare people, but decided to soften their approach with a gentler greeting. “We were trying to be harmless,” one of the Bushmen said. “It’s more or less an idea to try to make people smile.” But Union County Public Information Officer (and fun sucker) Sebastian D’Elia deadpanned: “It’s great until the first person falls and sues the county.” Or puts an eye out.

Animal Troublemakers

Pilots were warned of “low sealings” at Wiley Post-Will Rogers Memorial Airport in Utqiagvik, Alaska, on Oct. 23 because of an obstruction on the runway: a 450-pound bearded seal. Meadow Bailey of the Alaska Department of Transportation told KTVA-TV that the city, also known as Barrow, was hit by heavy storms that day, and airport staff discovered the seal while clearing the runway. However, staff are not authorized to handle marine animals, so North Slope Animal Control stepped in, using a sled to remove the seal. Bailey said animals such as musk ox, caribou and polar bears are common on the runway, but the seal was a first. About two dozen car owners in the Nob Hill neighborhood of Snellville, Georgia, were perturbed in late October by what they thought was vandalism: Their cars’ side mirrors were being shattered, even in broad daylight. Finally, according to WSB-TV, one resident caught the real perpetrator: a pileated woodpecker who apparently believes his reflection in the mirrors is a rival. Because pileated woodpeckers are a protected species, neighbors had to get creative with their solution. They are now placing plastic bags over their side mirrors while the cars are parked.

Smiles, etc.

Undignified Death

Nathan William Parris, 72, met his unfortunate end when a cow he was trying to move turned against him at his farm in Floyd County, Georgia, on Oct. 25. Parris was pinned against a fence by the recalcitrant cow, reported the Rome News-Tribune, which caused him severe chest trauma. First responders tried to revive him, but he was pronounced dead at the Redmond Regional Medical Center emergency room.

Ironies

Workers at a Carl’s Jr. in Santa Rosa, California, were busy filling an order for 165 Super Star burgers for first responders to the Fountaingrove area wildfires on Oct. 26 when a grease fire broke out in the restaurant. The fire started in the char broiler and then jumped to the exhaust system. Franchise co-owner Greg Funkhouser told The Press-Democrat the building was “completely torn up. ... We made it through the big one, only to get taken out by this.” When the person who placed the order arrived to pick it up, he saw six Santa Rosa Fire Department trucks in the parking lot and left, so Funkhouser handed out free burgers to “anyone around.” A Henrietta, New York, gifts and oddities store earned its name on Oct. 24 when a garbage truck rolled between two gas pumps and across a road to crash into the 200-year-old building where the store had opened in June. Jeri Flack, owner of A Beautiful Mess, told WHAM-TV that her building is “wrecked in the front so bad that I can’t open back up.” Witnesses say the truck driver pulled into a spot at a Sunoco station across the street and got out to use the restroom. That’s when the truck rolled away and barreled into the business. Sunoco employee T.J. Rauber said, “I see a lot of crazy stuff up here, but I ain’t never seen nothing like that.”

Puzzle by J. Reynolds

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[ LAST WEEK’S SOLUTION ON PAGE 42 ]

[ LOVESCOPE ] BY EUGENIA LAST ARIES (March 21-April 19): Show how much you care. Your enthusiasm will make a difference when it comes to meeting someone special. Love at first sight is possible, and a romantic situation can spring up out of nowhere. Get out and enjoy life, and love will find you. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Romantic opportunities are apparent. Join in the fun or attend an event that interests you, and you will come across someone similar. Share your ideas and life plans, and something unusual will develop. Short trips will be romantically engaging. Don’t be reluctant to make the first move.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Love can come in many different forms. Don’t let confusion set in when dealing with co-workers or someone who may have ulterior motives or already be involved with someone else. Caution is in your best interest when it comes to affairs of the heart. CANCER (June 21-July 22): Make an effort or you’ll miss an opportunity to find true love. Attend reunions or make a point to friend someone from your past through social media and see what transpires. Love is highlighted, but if you don’t participate in life it will be hard to capture.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Love can hurt if you are emotionally attracted to someone who isn’t into you or already with someone else. Cut your losses and work on self-improvement and doing things that will be conducive to meeting people who are free to get into a oneon-one relationship. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Your actions will speak louder than words when it comes to intimate relationships. A unique bond will form with someone if you are affectionate, flirtatious and eager to try new things. Be a self-starter and you’ll attract someone who is willing to mirror your every move.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Your words will resonate with someone you feel a connection to. A passionate conversation about your ideas, beliefs and lifelong goals will lead to serious thoughts about making an effort to see this individual more. Don’t procrastinate. If you like someone, make a commitment. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Your unusual likes and dislikes will attract someone who is just as unique as you are. An intense and passionate approach to life will encourage a connection that is exciting and holds your interest. Engaging in physical challenges together will ensure you are with someone compatible.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Think matters through before you say something you may regret. If you pursue someone based on chemistry, you are likely to be disappointed when it comes to how well you connect intellectually. Opt to indulge in conversation before you let intimacy take over and create an illusion. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Don’t feel you have to make a snap decision when it comes to love. Slow down and take time to see who best fits into your lifestyle and plans for the future. The wrong partner will limit your chance to advance. If you aren’t certain, don’t make promises.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Have a checklist when it comes to serious partnerships. Refuse to let anyone push you into something you don’t want to do. Back away from anyone who is indulgent or exhibits excessive behavior. It may be fun in the beginning, but it will become taxing as time passes by. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Romance is on the rise. Your lust for life and love and experiencing new people, places and pastimes will open your heart to people from all walks of life. Enjoy exploring different backgrounds and traditions, and you will meet someone eager to mix your different lifestyles together.

rochestercitynewspaper.com CITY 51


52 CITY NOVEMBER 15 - 21, 2017

CITY Newspaper, November 15 - 22, 2017  

Greater Rochester's Alternative Newsweekly