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EVENTS: FIRST FRIDAY, GREAT BOWLS OF FIRE 21 FILM: “STONE,” “INSIDE JOB” 28 ART: REVIEW: PAUL BRANDWEIN @ GILDED SQUARE 24 DINING: REVIEW: MAX AT THE GALLERY

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URBAN JOURNAL: JUAN WILLIAMS LESSONS

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CROSSWORD, news of the weird 39

Stranglers • Yellowbirddd • Carl Ludwig Hübsch • Clay Jenkins • Score! • My Sweet Patootie • and more music, page 12

NOVEMBER 3-9, 2010 Free

Greater Rochester’s Alternative Newsweekly

Vol 40 No 8

News. Music. Life.

That’s always their first question, ‘What’s going to happen to my parents?’” NEWS, PAGE 6

ARTWalk out of ARTWalk. NEWS, PAGE 5

The Boulder controversy. NEWS, PAGE 5

City-county water deal pending? NEWS, PAGE 4

Classical musicians crack the code. CLASSICAL, PAGE 20

FEATURE | PHOTO AND STORY BY FRANK DE BLASE | PAGE 10

Local recording studios: laying down their lives There are those spots in a song — those elusive cracks between the notes, the intangible vortex where the magic resides — that ultimately make a good song great. Bands try to create that magic, and studios try to capture it. Yet there’s no map, no incantations, no clues, no pixie dust. Most fans tend to focus on the Rochester music scene from a live-show perspective. It’s one thing to assemble a band and bang out a show, it’s another to harness the energy and creativity and lay it to tape. Often up-and-coming bands don’t live long enough to make a record anyway. But for those that do survive the

myriad quirks and hurdles that come with the pursuit of artistry and glory, there are plenty of recording studios in our mid-sized city just waiting to give them a shot at immortalizing their sound. Local recording studios offer bands comfort and guidance, as well as a host of modern or vintage technology. Many, if not all, are run by people passionate and personally invested in the recording field, and even though technology continues to shift and home studios have become more affordable and thus more prevalent, the professional recording studio will endure. That’s because the pursuit for magic persists.


Come and celebrate our

10 TH Anniversary

with us!

Saturday, November 13

ENJOY A GLASS OF SPUMANTE AS A SPECIAL THANK YOU FOR ALL YOUR SUPPORT. Part of the proceeds of our anniversary celebration will be donated to the Breast Cancer Coalition.

Open Mondays during December

Mail We welcome readers’ letters for publication. Send them to: themail@ rochester-citynews.com or The Mail, City Newspaper, 250 North Goodman Street, Rochester 14607. Please include your name, address, and daytime telephone number. Letters must be original, and we don’t publish letters sent to other media. Those of fewer than 350 words have a greater chance of being published, and we do edit for clarity and brevity. You can also post comments on specific articles on our website: rochestercitynewspaper.com.

Working stiffs and their votes

RESERVATIONS SUGGESTED

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 City

NOVEMBER 3-9, 2010

Regarding Ron Netsky’s “Labor’s Love Lost” (October 13): I have not read “Stayin’ Alive: The 1970’s and the Last Days of the Working Class,” but the title of that book alone raises two questions regarding Jefferson Cowie’s ability to discuss workers and work with any semblance of knowledge. First (and this may come as a shock): there IS still a working class. I am a member of it, everyone I work with is a member of it, the people sitting sleepily behind most of the oncoming headlights I pass at 5 a.m. every weekday are likely members of it. I’m not talking about “labor” and I’m not talking about “jobs”; I’m talking about work. I’m talking about doing what you don’t necessarily love doing (and maybe hate doing) and maybe cursing at the alarm clock every time it rings but then getting up and getting dressed and getting to the place where you do it. Whether it’s lifting steel or filing papers or milking cows or anything else: if you do it for the money and you can be kept on or fired depending upon performance, I call it work. And though it might not be obvious, there are a lot of us doing it. Ron Netsky asked Mr. Cowie: “Why do working people vote against their best interests?” Put yourself in the shoes of a working person, someone who lifts things all day, or deals with impossible situations all day, or does anything that requires true effort all day. Then imagine that lasting your whole lifetime. Then think about the government (Democrats and Republicans and Independents) that takes your money, something you’re trading your life for. Then consider the insult in the question: “Why do working people vote against their best interests?”

What bothers me most is that you would never have the guts to separate people into any other group and pose this question. If you changed “working people” to “blondes” someone would’ve found it offensive and tossed it. I’m going easy on you here, but you get the picture. That’s all I’ve got, other than to say that if Cowie’s dad had written a book, I bet a lot of us would’ve found it fascinating. MICHAEL JONES, FARMINGTON

Working class: not ‘the last days’

I appreciate the profile of Jefferson Cowie by Ron Netsky (“Labor’s Love Lost,” October 13). A few observations, however, to place that article in a larger context: First, the class politics of the New Deal were damaged long before Nixon when McCarthyism purged unions, academic institutions, and popular culture of supposed “communists” and left-leaning cultural workers in the 1950’s. That oppressive shadow lingers today so that socialism remains a dirty word. Second, it is not accidental that politicians have a hard time actually saying the words “working class” and substituting some kind of amorphous “middle.” This category obfuscates the real differences between the powerful and powerless, those few with many choices, and the many with limiting circumstances. Third, without any significant media attention, some of us have pushed back against this deliberate erasure through the formation of working-class studies in the academy and community, labor, and academic affiliations. Yes, the working class have multiple cultures — expressed through literature, music, photography, murals, films, etc. — people’s cultures, not corporate-determined pop culture. (Bruce Springsteen is the heroic and poetic exception.) Working-class studies is not, by the way, white studies. Fourth, in explaining the political shift claimed by Cowie, Netsky writes: “As Democrats began bringing more women, minorities, and youth to the party, Republicans took advantage by appealing to the working class.” Well, are there no women, minorities, and young of the working class? It’s a false dichotomy and assumes that hard hats and a macho swagger somehow define the working class.

Fifth, as someone born and raised in the working class, I want to emphasize the value of that identity, the ethos of shared struggle and mutuality that is my cherished legacy. The right wing and Republicans still have not figured out how to appropriate those values. Finally, I welcome this cover story and hope that it will coax City to cover labor issues as it has in the past, remembering, though, that people are more than their jobs. JANET ZANDY, ROCHESTER

From our website

On Mario Danielle and the eagles’ nest on his Irondequoit Bay property: Although I

understand Mr. Daniele’s desire for a return on investment, we are not talking about just “a bird,” and not just “an endangered species.” This is the bald eagle ... the very symbol of our country. Where’s the patriotic duty to respect and protect this priceless creature? The Fed’s 330-foot buffer is a joke, a compromise (deal?) between politicians and corporate interests. These birds require miles of untrampled space. There’s a reason why they are endangered: that space is getting destroyed 330 feet at a time. I’ve seen more bald eagles in short visits to Canada than I have in a lifetime in the USA. Maybe we’ll have to eventually swap our Eagles for Maple Leafs. BRIAN M.

On a report by the Institute for Research and Education on Human Rights indicating that white nationalist groups are connected to the Tea Party movement: “We’ve seen the signs

at Tea Party rallies, depicting President Obama as Hitler.” Really? As a rule? And you didn’t manage to notice all the “Bushitler” signage only a few years ago? “And we’ve listened to some of the extremist views that are unmistakably racist.” Really? And as a journalist you can’t manage to reference any of them or produce quotes from tea party speeches? Is it possible they might be imaginary projections? Fearmongering is at the very least unbecoming, and often a sign of desperation. CRAIG H.

News. Music. Life. Greater Rochester’s Alternative Newsweekly November 3-9, 2010 Vol 40 No 8 250 North Goodman Street Rochester, New York 14607-1199 themail@rochester-citynews.com phone (585) 244-3329 fax (585) 244-1126 rochestercitynewspaper.com Publishers: William and Mary Anna Towler Editor: Mary Anna Towler Asst. to the publishers: Matt Walsh Editorial department themail@rochester-citynews.com Features editor: Eric Rezsnyak News editor: Chris Carrie Fien Staff writers: Tim Louis Macaluso, Jeremy Moule Music writer: Frank De Blase Music editor: Dale A. Evans Calendar editor: Rebecca Rafferty Contributing writers: Casey Carlsen, George Grella, Susie Hume, Laura Keeney, Kathy Laluk, Michael Lasser, James Leach, Ron Netsky, Dayna Papaleo, Rebecca Rafferty, Saby Reyes-Kulkarni, Todd Rezsnyak, Annie Rimbach, Mark Shipley, Rob Sickelco Editorial interns: Jesse Hanus, Caitlin Shapiro Art department artdept@rochester-citynews.com Production manager: Max Seifert Designers: Aubrey Berardini, Matt DeTurck Photographers: Frank De Blase, Matt DeTurck, Michael Hanlon, Jeffrey Marini Advertising department ads@rochester-citynews.com Advertising sales manager: Betsy Matthews Account executives: Tom Decker, Annalisa Iannone, William Towler Classified sales representatives: Christine Kubarycz, Tracey Mykins Operations/Circulation info@rochester-citynews.com Circulation Assistant: Katherine Stathis Distribution: Andy DiCiaccio, David Riccioni, Northstar Delivery City Newspaper is available free of charge. Additional copies of the current issue may be purchased for $1, payable in advance at the City Newspaper office. City Newspaper may be distributed only by authorized distributors. No person may, without prior written permission of City Newspaper, take more than one copy of each weekly issue. City (ISSN 1551-3262) is published weekly by WMT Publications, Inc. Periodical postage paid at Rochester, NY (USPS 022-138). Send address changes to City, 250 North Goodman Street, Rochester, NY 14607. City is a member of the Association of Alternative Newsweeklies and the New York Press Association. Subscriptions: $35.00 ($30.00 for senior citizens) for one year. Add $10 yearly for out-of-state subscriptions: add $30 yearly for foreign subscriptions. Due to the initial high cost of establishing new subscriptions, refunds for fewer than ten months cannot be issued. Copyright by WMT Publications Inc., 2010 - all rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, photocopying, recording or by any information storage retrieval system without permission of the copyright owner.


urban journal | by mary anna towler

Juan Williams lessons The Juan Williams saga has been analyzed to death, so forgive me for dragging it out again. But I keep mulling over a couple of subtexts to the story. One has to do with public radio — specifically, National Public Radio. NPR fired Williams, as the world now knows, because on Bill O’Reilly’s rant-fest on Fox News, he said he gets nervous on airplanes when he sees passengers wearing “Muslim garb.” NPR said his comments were opinion, not objective journalism, and they violated NPR’s standards. Is NPR trying to be too squeakyclean-objective? In the current New York Review of Books, Bill McKibben touches on that question. NPR’s Morning Edition and All Things Considered, he writes, “are the second- and third-most-popular radio programs in the country,” behind Rush Limbaugh’s. But that success, he says, “has tended to wash out some of the distinctiveness.” McKibben quotes former All Things Considered senior editor Brooke Gladstone: “As they become the primary news source for more and more Americans, public radio newsmagazines are restricting their own ability to move listeners. Like physicians in medieval times they seek to balance the four humors (so as not [to] be too choleric, sanguine, phlegmatic, or melancholy) by bloodletting. Public radio newsmagazines are looking a little pallid these days, because the passion has been drained off.” As a result, says McKibben, some listeners have sought other, livelier news sources. The same thing is happening on television, where some viewers have moved from straight-news programs to those with clear opinions: O’Reilly on the right, Jon Stewart on the left. NPR’s big shows like All Things Considered “suffer from some of the same constraints that plague other parts of elite American journalism,” McKibben writes. “They aim for a careful political balance — one academic study found their list of guests slightly to the right of The Washington Post and ‘approximately equal to those of Time, Newsweek, and US News and World Report.’” That, writes McKibben, is “not a particular interesting place to be.” Clearly, NPR — like PBS — is invaluable. And its supporters must fend off yet another attack from conservatives. But it will have to find a way to stay interesting while it strives for that nebulous thing called journalistic “objectivity.”

If we can’t talk about our own prejudice — if concern over political correctness mutes our own honesty — what then?” The other Williams issue: what we do about

prejudice in America. Best I can tell, Williams didn’t express a personal opinion. He stated a fact: he feels nervous when he’s on an airplane with people in Muslim dress. He’s not alone. Thirty-seven percent of the people responding to a recent Poll Position survey said they don’t feel comfortable on a plane “if several Muslim men are among passengers.” This is prejudice, springing from ignorance. But what do we do about it? We’ll have to do something, because our increasing diversity is a given. We can treat that diversity as a strength, a resource, something to celebrate. Or we can try to eradicate it, pushing those who are different to conform. Education, of course, is key. But if we can’t talk about our own prejudice — if concern over political correctness mutes our own honesty — what then? “If we are to solve any of the interpersonal problems we have in this country, including the fears that some non-Muslims have of Muslims, we must begin by being honest about our feelings,” a reader wrote to the New York Times recently. “NPR’s action reflects an attitude of political correctness that makes such honesty impossible….” “Sometimes a confession of prejudice is part of a larger reflection on the perils of prejudice,” wrote William Saletan on Slate. “Admitting such fears doesn’t make you a bigot,” wrote Saletan. “Sometimes, to work through your fears, you have to face them honestly. You have to think through the perils of acting on those fears. And you have to explain to others why they, too, should transcend their anxieties or resentments and treat people as individuals.” As CNN political commentator Donna Brazile said at the height of the Juan Williams controversy, “We should have this conversation.”

rochestercitynewspaper.com

City 


[ news from the week past ]

Brizard gets new contract

Following months of negotiations, the Rochester Board of Education reached an agreement on a new, three-year employment contract with Superintendent JeanClaude Brizard. Brizard will get an annual salary of $235,000, which is an increase of about $10,000 over his current contract. The new contract begins on January 2, 2011, and ends on June 30, 2014. The vote was 5 to 2, with board members Cynthia Elliott and Allen Williams voting no.

Downtown youth center planned A downtown recreation center for teenagers is in the early planning stages, says Heidi Zimmer-Meyer, president of the Rochester Downtown Development Corporation. Interest in the center is coming from downtown businesses, and stems from a series of public disturbances involving youth on East Main Street near the Liberty Pole.

Malgieri joins Hillside

Former Deputy Mayor Patty Malgieri will replace Sarah Amering as president of Hillside Work-Scholarship Connection. The program, founded by Robert and

Danny Wegman in the late 1980’s, is designed to help students stay in school and to learn workplace skills and responsibilities. Malgieri’s start date is January 7, 2011.

News

Richards appointed deputy mayor Mayor Bob Duffy appointed Corporation Counsel Tom Richards as the city’s deputy mayor. Richards replaces former Deputy Mayor Patty Malgieri, and his name has been raised as the city’s next mayor. Richards recently registered as a Democrat, but declined to say whether he wants the job. He assumed his new role in City Hall on Tuesday, November 2.

WATER | BY JEREMY MOULE AND TIM LOUIS MACALUSO

City, Water Authority in talks

The rumor mill seems to have gotten ahead of itself. Word was going around last week that City Council was about to sign off on an agreement to sell or transfer the city’s water system to the Monroe County Water Authority. Council never got any such proposal, but there is some truth to the rumors.

Fair elections fit

Monroe County Democratic Committee chair Joe Morelle told his party’s candidates to withdraw their participation in the Monroe County Fair Election Practices Committee. Morelle says the panels have been imbalanced and biased. Rochester League of Women Voters and Interfaith Alliance officials countered that the panels have been fair, that hearings have been conducted by the rules, and that all decisions have been unanimous and included at least one Democratic vote.

Deputy Mayor Tom Richards says the city’s water system is old, but has been well-maintained. Photo by matt deturck

“I wouldn’t say it’s any closer than we were a couple of months ago,” Deputy Mayor Tom Richards says. “But I don’t want to be cute: it’s true.” The city and the Water Authority are discussing a deal, he says, for the city to transfer its system. The two parties haven’t settled on how that would happen, however: would the city lease the system to the Water Authority, for example, or sell it? The city and the Water Authority had a water-sharing agreement that lasted for decades. That long-term agreement expired in 2008, and officials have extended it on a yearly basis since. The city system’s age concerns some officials and that may be

an incentive to offload it. The possibility of a major line break is a big concern, officials say, and the city might not be financially prepared to fix it. The system is old, Richards says, but it’s been well-maintained. It will always require improvements and maintenance, he says. The talks initially drew scrutiny from environmentalists and Democratic county legislators, largely because of the city-owned land around Hemlock and Canadice Lakes. Much of the city’s water supply comes from Hemlock and Canadice. Environmentalists feared that if the Water Authority acquired continues on page 8

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NOVEMBER 3-9, 2010


I know how much sweat, money, and maybe some blood was poured into this building by the community in order to make it what it is. So I do understand that their knee-jerk reaction will be, ‘Well, we would love this place to stay a coffee shop.’ [ Rabbi Asher Yaras ]

NEIGHBORHOODS | BY CHRISTINE CARRIE FIEN

THE ARTS | BY TIM LOUIS MACALUSO

Betting on Boulder

Artistic differences

The first thing that strikes you at Boulder Coffee’s Genesee Street location, besides the large console TV right by the entrance — old televisions are Boulder’s signature set pieces — is the size. You could drop a skateboard at the door, kick it up to speed, and ride all the way to the painting of the aged-but-steely Wonder Woman at the back of the coffee shop and you’d say you had a pretty good run. “Six-thousand square feet has always been more than I really needed,” says Boulder owner Lyjha Wilton. “Even if I had a really good day with a lot of people, it still felt slow because people can spread out so much.” Wilton says his shop was supposed to kick off the rejuvenation of the Brooks-PlymouthGenesee intersection when it opened two years ago, but that hasn’t happened. Proof, he says, is the seven empty storefronts across the street. Now he’s hoping that a move across Genesee Street into a smaller space will be the transformation trigger. “It’s been lonely for two years,” Wilton says. “So this is my way of trying to get the ball rolling again.” But the move is not sitting well with the 19th Ward Community Association. Boulder has quickly become an anchor, a welcome mat to the neighborhood, members say, and

City Hall and ARTWalk of Rochester, the nonprofit group that initiated the original trail of art and reconstruction along University Avenue, have ended their collaboration on the second phase of the project. The change, officials say, should not harm the multimillion dollar project. | ARTWalk would not comment on the split, but tensions between the involved parties have been building for months. A big concern for some early ARTWalk members was a decision to change the grassroots culture of ARTWalk, which emphasized the work of local artists. Disputes developed over direction and art selection. | “There’s been an attempt over a while to try to figure out the right role for ARTWalk of Rochester, the original organization,” says City Council Vice President Elaine Spaull. “The role and the extension project just don’t fit.” | ARTWalk Extension, originally referred to as ARTWalk 2, received federal funding to expand the art trail farther north on University to the Memorial Art Gallery, and along North Goodman Street to Village Gate. | The expansion also includes South Goodman Street to East Avenue and the museums. | ARTWalk is an outdoor museum that has received national attention, and is widely credited with spurring the redevelopment of the Neighborhood of the Arts.

Rabbi Asher Yaras. Photo by Jeff marini

the move could destroy that. They’re also concerned that public access to Boulder’s current building will be restricted, and they say that some community leaders pulled a fast one by allowing Boulder to make such a major change two years into a 10-year agreement. “What we’re losing, we think, is a lot more than what we’re going to be able to gain,” says J.B. Afoh-Manin, president of the association. The Boulder building is being purchased

by the University of Rochester Chabad House, an organization that caters to Jewish students. Activities include religious services, dinners, and social-justice events. The group currently meets in the Lattimore Road home of Rabbi Asher Yaras, who is co-director of Chabad House. continues on page 7

Cost of War IRAQ TOTALS — 4,427 US ser-

vicemen and servicewomen, 318 Coalition servicemen and servicewomen, and approximately 98,585 to 107,594 Iraqi civilians have been killed in Iraq from the beginning of the war and occupation to November 1. American servicemen and servicewomen killed from October 16 to 24: -- Pfc. David R. Jones Jr., 21, Saint Johnsville, N.Y. AFGHANISTAN TOTALS — 1,359

US servicemen and servicewomen and 820 Coalition servicemen and servicewomen have been killed in Afghanistan from the beginning of the war and occupation to November 1. Statistics for Afghani civilian casualties are not available. American servicemen and servicewomen killed from October 20 to 29: -- Staff Sgt. Kenneth K. McAninch, 28, Logansport, Ind. -- Spc. Ronnie J. Pallares, 19, Rancho Cucamonga, Calif. -- Spc. Steven L. Dupont, 20, Lafayette, La. -- Sgt. 1st Class Charles M. Sadell, 34, Columbia, Mo. -- Staff Sgt. Aracely Gonzalez O’Malley, 31, Brawley, Calif. -- Spc. Thomas A. Moffitt, 21, Wichita, Kan. -- Sgt. 1st Class Phillip C. Tanner, 43, Sheridan, Wyo. iraqbodycount.org, icasualties.org, Department of Defense SOURCES:

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City 


HEALTH CARE | BY TIM LOUIS MACALUSO

City schools focus on healthy minds There are Student and Family Support Centers in 15 schools, where counseling is available. If a student’s needs exceed the care available at the center, a referral is made to an outside agency. Social workers provide a link between the schools, parents, and the community, says Carmen Garcia, community mental-health specialist with St. Joseph’s Neighborhood Center. Her organization is one of the district’s referral agencies. “These kids’ issues are really adult issues,” Garcia says. “It’s no longer, ‘I broke my curfew and I’m in trouble.’ It’s ‘mom and dad are fighting and I can’t go home.’ Teaching is not just about the A, B, C’s anymore.” Students know when something is so troubling at home that they should involve a teacher or counselor, says Audrey Cummings, the district’s director of social work. “They’re saying, ‘help me,’ but they don’t want anything life-altering to happen to their parents,” Cummings says. “That’s always their first question, ‘What’s going to happen to my parents?’”

Many of the students seen by psychiatric nurses Mary Ellen Dennis (left) and Carla Blackmon (right) show symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder, they say. Photo by matt deturck

Living in poverty takes an emotional toll on many city school students. It can be so debilitating that it threatens their education. The Rochester school district provided mental-health services to 17 percent of its students during the 2009-2010 school year, and it has developed an elaborate network of services to help these students. It’s a side of education in city schools not often seen or discussed, even though the need for mentalhealth services has grown exponentially over the last two decades. Consider the startling results of a 2007 survey of 4,200 city school students in grades 9 to 12. More than 25 percent of the students surveyed said they felt sad and hopeless for more than two consecutive weeks during the prior year. Ten percent say they had attempted suicide. And more than 40 percent said they had engaged in a physical altercation. Most city schools have a nurse on staff to handle everyday medical complaints — stomach ailments, headaches, and minor injuries. But the district also has seven school-based health centers which provide a comprehensive range of medical and mental-health services. The health centers and their staffs are provided by outside agencies, including the University of Rochester Medical Center and Rochester General Hospital. The health center at East High School looks like a typical doctor’s office: it has a waiting room with magazines spread across end tables, and a rack filled with dozens of wellness brochures. Providing medical care to East’s students is obviously an important part of the health center’s services, says Kim Urbach, a URMC nurse practitioner and director of the center.  City

NOVEMBER 3-9, 2010

But the mental-health component is critical, she says. Approximately 30 percent of care provided at the center, Urbach says, is mental-health care. “There are some students that no matter what is happening to them, they come to school and leave it outside,” she says. “They’re dealing with it somehow. But a lot of the kids can’t do it, and they have trouble concentrating on their school work.” East’s health center has two URMC psychiatric nurses, Carla Blackmon and Mary Ellen Dennis, who provide a full range of mental-health support. That could mean helping a student through a crisis, or providing ongoing counseling. Students can walk in at their convenience, though some are referred by teachers and administrators. Many of the students they see, Dennis says, show symptoms of post traumatic stress. “If you ask any of these kids: have you ever seen a violent offense, or do you know someone who was a homicide victim? You’ll see the numbers are high,” she says. But it goes beyond that, Blackmon says. When people think of PTS, she says, they tend to think it’s related to a specific incident. “But there’s chronic stress for many of these students,” she says. “Poor housing, domestic violence, sexual abuse, and parents who may be unemployed — it’s ongoing for them.” Personal safety is another concern, Urbach says. Students often say they don’t feel safe in their neighborhoods, or getting to and from school. The success of school-based health centers is well-documented. Students

are 10 times more likely to seek help for substance abuse, show significant declines in depression, and are less likely to consider suicide when they have access to a school-

Reliance on mental-health providers has School-based health centers provide mentalhealth services to hard-to-reach populations, says Kim Urbach, director of East High’s health center. Photo by matt deturck

based health center, according to research from the NYS Coalition for School-based Primary Care. School-based health centers have been developed in districts across the country over the last decade. The Rochester school district plans to expand one of its existing centers and add two more. The key to the health centers’ success is proximity and easy access to care. Students don’t need special transportation because the health centers are located in the schools. And cost is not an issue. No one is turned away for lack of health insurance. Students don’t have to wait days or weeks for an appointment. They often have a pre-existing relationship with the health center nurses and trust them. And their privacy is protected: students can talk freely about whatever issues are bothering them. (A few exceptions exist where parents must be notified.) But the health centers are not the only way the district provides mental-health services to students. Officials also rely on a contingency of psychologists and psychiatrists, and there is at least one social worker in every school.

risen dramatically in recent years. A survey of the district’s principals showed that mentalhealth services for students is second only to classroom resources as a priority. Most parents are also extremely receptive, Cummings says. “I can count the parents on two fingers over 28 years who didn’t want me to see that their child received services,” she says. “We don’t have resistance from parents.” District officials are careful to ensure that mental-health services are not seen as the doorway to child protective services. “We’re trying to make emotional health as natural and as important as preventive medical care,” says Marjorie Lefler, coordinator of the district’s human service systems. But funding is always an issue, she says. Trying to target high-needs schools with the limited funding available has created a patchwork quilt of services that requires careful coordination, Lefler says. And since some of the mental-health services are tied to grants and outside agencies, there are limits to what the district can do. It’s the reason, she says, there isn’t a school-based health center in every school. “It always comes down to money,” Lefler says.


Betting on Boulder continues from page 5

“I believed for a very long time that this would be the perfect neighborhood for us to move to,” Yaras says. “We have to be as close as possible to the university.” The Boulder building is just a short distance from the footbridge that connects UR and the 19th Ward, whereas Yaras’s house is about a mile walk from UR. Chabad House caters to at least 400 to 500 students every year, Yaras says. And he says the presence of students will help rejuvenate the neighborhood. “There’s going to be a lot of traffic,” he says. “For the greater benefit of the community, I do believe that this move is a good move.” Although the public won’t have the same access to the building as they currently do, Yaras says, people will be able to reserve meeting rooms at Chabad House.

The sense you get is that Afoh-Manin and

other members of the 19th Ward Association feel betrayed by Wilton and by the Sector 4 Community Development Corporation, a neighborhood development group that sold the building to Wilton. A restriction in Wilton’s deed said that any change in the building’s use within 10 years required the CDC’s prior written approval. The CDC granted that approval at a recent meeting. The CDC’s vote does not reflect the will of the neighborhood, Afoh-Manin says, and Wilton’s move calls into question his commitment to the 19th Ward. “They say they’re going to move across the street,” Afoh-Manin says. “I have no reason to disbelieve them but for them going back on their word now.”

The community has invested emotionally and financially in the Boulder building and some neighbors say they feel like they were used. “I know how much sweat, money, and maybe some blood was poured into this building by the community in order to make it what it is,” Yaras says. “So I do understand that their knee-jerk reaction will be, ‘Well, we would love this place to stay a coffee shop.’” Wilton says he will sign a seven-year lease in the new building. Boulder will take five of the seven storefronts, and Wilton hopes to convince one of his tenants — Napa Wood Fired Pizzeria — to open a shop there. (It would be Napa’s second shop. The first is in the South Wedge.) Subway is also close to coming on board, says City Council member Dana Miller, president of the CDC board.

What’s the difference between a $50 haircut and a $20 haircut?

“We can potentially fill this retail space in one shot, and the building across the street won’t be vacant,” he says. “It’ll still be occupied, but in a different way that also brings more students into the neighborhood. It seems like a win-win for the community if that works.” Wilton says the move won’t happen until sometime next year. He’ll rent his current space while he renovates his new spot across the street, so he doesn’t anticipate closing for more than a couple of days. “My intentions are good,” Wilton says. “I’m not trying to do anything sneaky or to get anything over on anyone. I’m reinvesting in the neighborhood. I still think that my commitment is obvious.”

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City 


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Water Authority continues from page 4

the surrounding land through a takeover of the city’s system, the land may be sold to developers. Environmentalists were concerned about the quality of the water supply. The state owns the land now, which has tamped down those fears. But environmentalists have other worries, too. The Webster water plant is being built on the Lake Ontario shore, not far from the Wayne County line. Water Authority officials have consistently argued that the plant is needed as back up should something happen with the Shoremont plant in Greece. It’s also needed to meet peak demand, they say. “What the Monroe County Water Authority has done is ensure a ready supply of water for areas east of Rochester,” says Peter Debes, vice president of the Rochester-area Sierra Club chapter. The new plant would let the Water Authority switch over parts of Monroe County that receive Hemlock-Canadice water to Lake Ontario water, he says. That would free up more HemlockCanadice water for towns south of Monroe which, in turn, could fuel development, he says. Environmentalists and Democrats in the County Legislature have other issues around a transfer. Past Water Authority scandals, including a former director who allegedly received unearned pay and benefits, indicate a lack of oversight, they say. They also worry about a management operation they see as a Republican patronage mill. Debes also finds it problematic that the city would unload a money-making asset. A sale may plug a budget gap for a year, he says, but the city loses the recurring income. Hugh Mitchell, a Sierra Club member, says there are some benefits to a transfer: the city would no longer have to pay for upkeep, for example. The authority is also efficient, he says, and has been regularly investing money in its reserves.

For more Tom Tomorrow, including a political blog and cartoon archive, visit http://thismodernworld.com

Urban Action This week’s calls to action include the following events and activities. (All are free and open to the public, unless otherwise noted.)

Will education reform deliver?

The UR’s Warner School of Education will present “The New Political Economy of Urban Education: Neoliberalism, Race, and the Right to the City,” a lecture by Pauline Lipman, University of Illinois professor of educational policy, at 7:15 p.m. on Monday, November 8. Lipman says that the education reform movement that focuses on privatizing education and holding teachers accountable will result in increased inequality and racial segregation. The event will be held in the Rush Rhees Library.

Forgiveness as a path to peace

Nazareth College will present “Forgiveness, Reconciliation, and Peace City

NOVEMBER 3-9, 2010

making in Abrahamic Religions,” a discussion at 7 p.m. on Monday, November 8. Susan Thistlethwaite, senior fellow at the Center for American Progress and professor of theology at Chicago Theological Seminary, is the keynote speaker.

Building peace at the Tent of Nations

Immanuel Baptist Church and several faith organizations will sponsor “Daher’s Vineyard and Tent of Nations,” a discussion with Daoud Nassar at 7 p.m. on Thursday, November 4. Nassar, a Palestinian farmer near Bethlehem, owns land surrounded by Jewish settlements. He has turned down millions of dollars for the land and chose instead to establish an institute focused on building peace through arts, drama, and education. The event will be held at Immanuel Baptist Church, 815 Park Avenue.

Discussing the Vietnam War

Nazareth College will hold a discussion with the Rochester chapter of Blue Star Mothers at 7 p.m. on Monday, November 8, regarding Tim O’Brien’s book “The Things They Carried.” The book about the Vietnam War was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize and is part of the Fall Read program with Writers and Books. The discussion will be held in the Nazareth Arts Center.

A vision for Canandaigua Lake

The Finger Lakes Land Trust will present findings from a new report, “A Vision for the Canandaigua Lake Watershed” at 7 p.m. on Thursday, November 4, at Bristol Harbour Resort, 5410 Seneca Point Road in Canandaigua. The report is an 18-month evaluation of the lake’s watershed resources and their value to quality of life in the region.


Dining well seasoned. The BLT — applewood smoked bacon, baby arugula, and tomato dressed with basil aioli on toasted brioche — tasted good, but it looked like it had been assembled by throwing the ingredients at the bread from across the kitchen. Leaves of arugula fell out of the sandwich on the way to the table, and the overcooked bacon hung over the edges of the bread. The flavor was fine. The presentation was sloppy. That’s where things stood two Thursdays

The Monte Cristo sandwich (left) and BLT (right) at Max at the Gallery. PHOTOS BY JEFF MARINI

The difference a week makes Max at the Gallery Inside the Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. 473-6629, maxrochester.net Lunch Tuesday-Friday 11:30 a.m.-4 p.m., brunch Saturday-Sunday 10 a.m.-3 p.m. [ REVIEW ] BY JAMES LEACH

I picked Max at the Gallery for review this week in part because it was a sure thing: with any of the restaurants that bear the Max name you can be certain you’ll have a good, perhaps even great, experience. The brand, established by chef and restaurateur Tony Gullace with the opening of Max at Eastman Place in 2002, stands for good service and dependable quality. So when I took my family to the Memorial Art Gallery for brunch a couple Sundays back, I was anticipating something special. I’d read the menu in advance and had already placed my order in my mind before ever setting foot in the door: fried chicken and waffles for me ($15), a croque madame ($13) for my wife, and some fruit for my 5-year-old dining companion, who would inevitably end

up eating half of my entrée, too. It was just past noon when we sat down and our very friendly waitress told us that they kitchen was already down to its last order of fried chicken. I scooped it up quick. I want to tell you that brunch was great, but it wasn’t. While we waited for our entrees, a waiter delivered popovers to the table, placing them carefully on our bread plates with a pair of shiny tongs. Warm and a bit too crusty on the outside, the popovers were cold — almost frozen — inside, clearly not made fresh that morning. When it arrived, the chicken, too, seemed less than fresh, the coating soggy rather than crispy and much darker than I would have expected, as if it might have been dunked in the fryer again to freshen it up. The waffle underneath it was nearly flavorless. The only thing that saved it was the pepper and maple syrup-infused butter drizzled over the top. The worst offense, though, was the fresh fruit cup — a measly cup not even half full of under-ripe chunks of melon and pineapple for $4. On the other hand, the massive croque madame was worth every nickel. A traditional croque madame is not much more than a grilled ham and cheese sandwich topped with

a fried egg. Well done, it’s delightful. The chef at Max took his inspiration from another sandwich, the Monte Cristo, and put his ham and Gruyere sandwich on French toast before sliding the requisite egg on top. Although the menu claimed that the sandwich was topped with mornay sauce (cheese sauce, to those of us who don’t quote from Escoffier regularly), the chef instead finished the dish with a peppery, rich country gravy — a nice complement to the other ingredients. Brunch can be hit or miss, and I had high hopes for my second visit for lunch several days later. But here, too, things were uneven. The squash soup ($3 cup, $7 bowl) we ordered had a nice combination of flavors and just the right amount of ginger and spice, but had the consistency of pumpkin-pie filling. The French onion soup, one of the simplest soups to make well, was a disaster: cloyingly sweet, sitting in a syrupy dark-brown broth that tasted overwhelmingly of sherry, I couldn’t eat more than a few bites. We also ordered a BLT ($9) and a patty melt ($11). The melt was fine, if a bit overdone, well grilled on a good seeded rye bread. The housemade chips on the side were crunchy and

ago. The review was written up and ready to send in, when I heard from a friend of a friend that the restaurant had a new chef. Rather than trashing a restaurant based on old news, I decided to see what sort of difference a week and a new chef could make. I hadn’t been seated for more than a few minutes before I overheard a lady at the next table kvelling over the quality of the quiche, praising its custard-like texture and flavor. One of her companions was waxing lyrical about her salad. Around me, I noticed that the tenor of the dining room had changed from previous visits: people were smiling, the volume of conversation was a bit louder and more energetic than I’d heard it before. Something had clearly changed. In the interest of fairness, I ordered more or less the same meal I had had the previous Thursday: a BLT, and a cup of French onion soup. Claiming indecision, I also ordered a cup of the tempting-sounding curried lentil soup. The lentil soup arrived first, and it was every bit as good as I had hoped. French lentils, carrots, onion, celery, and a bit of turnip, along with bits of savory ham in a screamingly fresh stock seasoned with just enough curry to complement but not overwhelm the other ingredients. The onion soup was also delicious, sporting the right ratio of caramelized onions to salty, rich broth with just a hint of sherry on the finish. The multigrain crouton and a sprinkling of chopped chive for color were a nice touch, too. The real revelation, though, was the BLT, which looked like it had been assembled with a spirit level and carpenter’s square and then cut with a laser. It was almost too pretty to eat and stuffed full of perfectly cooked and selected ingredients — a thick layer of crisp but not overdone bacon, beautiful deep red tomatoes, golden-brown slices of toasted brioche. Then I noticed that the chips were still hot from the fryer. What a difference a week makes.

rochestercitynewspaper.com

City 


LOCAL MUSIC STUDIOS WEATHER— AND IN SOME CASES EMBRACE — THE RISE IN HOME RECORDING [ FEATURE ] BY FRANK DE BLASE | PHOTOS BY FRANK DE BLASE

There are those spots in a song — those elusive cracks between the notes, the intangible vortex where the magic resides — that ultimately make a good song great. Bands try to create that magic, and studios try to capture it. Yet there’s no map, no incantations, no clues, no pixie dust. Most fans tend to focus on the Rochester music scene from a live-show perspective. It’s one thing to assemble a band and bang out a show, it’s another to harness the energy and creativity and lay it to tape. Often up-andcoming bands don’t live long enough to make a record anyway. But for those that do survive the myriad quirks and hurdles that come with the pursuit of artistry and glory, there are plenty of recording studios in our midsized city just waiting to give them a shot at immortalizing their sound. Local recording studios offer bands comfort and guidance, as well as a host of modern or vintage technology. Many, if not all, are run by people passionate and personally invested in the recording field, and even though technology continues to shift and home studios have become more affordable and thus more prevalent, the professional recording studio will endure. That’s because the pursuit for magic persists. “It’s not like you can go to the store and buy

a can of recording magic,” says Chuck Irving, guitarist for the local band SLT, which recently recorded its new album, “Gone Dead Gone,” at Holt Studios in Mt. Morris. You can, however, go to the electronics store and, for a nominal stack of greenbacks, create your own

home studio with programs like Pro Tools and Garage Band. Does this mean the big adios to the big studio as we know it? Is this technology the professional studio’s nemesis? ACME Recording Company’s Steve McNally doesn’t think so. Actually, he’s all for it. “I think it’s great,” McNally says. “You can’t compete with it. We have to embrace it.” Yet McNally still believes in the superiority of the pro studio. Bands can woodshed with the home gear, but when it comes to the final product, you stick with the people who know what they’re doing. Projects that start on some band member’s laptop eventually wind up at his studio. “First people do stuff at home,” he says. “Then they bring it here.” Robert Blackburn owns Blackdog Recording at 120 East Avenue. He saw this rise in home recording coming. “I saw it when I was working at the studio at The House of Guitars,” says Blackburn. “It was half-inch and D-88s, and then I saw Pro Tools IV come in. Once I saw that I said, ‘That’s the future of music,’ and I knew it was going to grow exponentially from there, meaning that it would eventually be in your home.” All it would take, he figured, was for the price to go down and the software to get better. But Blackburn never worried home studios would ever replace professional studios. “I think it has definitely changed the music business,” he says. “But I must say, I think that 1 percent of everything that’s homegrown is really amazing, and 99 percent of it is less than that. It’s a way to express yourself and experiment

being an engineer at home. And when you want to do it right, you go into a real studio, where there are real pre-amps and real engineers and real speakers and a real room and a real sound — and then you make a record.” The obvious beneficiaries of the upswing in

home-recording technology are the bands, although it has also led to some unexpected complications. And that’s where the pros have to step in and add a helping hand. “If you look at [home recording] as a pre-production stage, yes, I think it’s helpful,” says Dave Anderson of Saxon Studios on East Main Street. “But I also know it’s very difficult and time consuming for people to record their own material. It’s a distraction from the creative process; it can be counterproductive.” “In some respects it has hurt business,” says Tony Gross, founder and owner of GFI Productions, a studio located in Ontario. “But in other respects it has made things really, really better. We have young bands coming in with better templates of songs.” It all goes back to the magic, and as ACME’s McNally stresses, that starts with the performance. “A lot of the bands are already planning how they’re going to fix [a song] in the mix,” he says. “They’re already planning on using the technology, they’re not so concerned with getting those great performances. I’ve always felt [recording] is 90 percent psychological, 10 percent technical. And you’ve got to try and explain to them to get a good performance, then we’ll worry about the voodoo later.” When McNally was coming up, the studio itself was a magical place. “When I was a kid, and first went into recording studio, it was like going to church,” he says. “I mean, you took your shoes off, you didn’t touch anything. Today, not so much. There are more and more

studios. I don’t think the reverence is there.” According to Blackdog’s Blackburn, the recording process starts even before a band picks ups its instruments. “Everybody thinks they’re always ready to record,” Blackburn says. “And they’re absolutely certain they’re gonna cut it right the first time. And I think if they looked at the history of recording, they would see that it’s completely the opposite. The Stones would spend weeks in the studio and it would suck, suck, suck — and then all of a sudden an album would be there. I try to mention the word ‘pre-production’ to people and they run for the hills, all of them.” The search for that ineffable recording mojo

is one of the chief factors a band considers when choosing a studio. All the studio heads we spoke to said that the No. 1 attribute a studio can have over and above the latest and greatest gear or the coolest vintage gadgets is a comfortable atmosphere for the artists, and honesty. One of the benefits of recording in a smaller city like Rochester is that its studios are all run by locals, most of them career musicians themselves who got into recording out of a love of music and an interest in pursuing the magic for themselves. Tony Gross founded GFI Productions in 1981 when he was signed to A&M Records. “I was spending all this money in other studios,” he says. “So I started a home studio. Music was a part of me. It’s all I ever wanted to do. I didn’t want to go to college, I didn’t want to do anything. I wanted to be a rock star.” GFI has worked with and helped develop countless acts from Rochester, and others from around the globe. Artists like Jeff Buckley, Johnny Thunders, Mick Taylor, Trey Anastasio, and Gilby Clarke have all darkened GFI’s doors. Tony Gross (left) founded GFI Productions (right) in Ontario in 1981, when he was signed to A&M Records. “Music was a part of me. It’s all I ever wanted to do,” he says.

10 City NOVEMBER 3-9, 2010


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McNally started ACME in the upstairs bedroom of his house out of physical necessity — he’d had enough with hauling his B-3 organ ands assorted keyboards to and from sessions. “I was doing all kinds of session work in other people’s studios and I got tired of carting this stuff around. I don’t play the mouth harp, you know. It was just easier, it made sense. The original studio wasn’t about getting “You can’t compete with it,” Steve McNally of ACME Recording Comany customers.” pany says of the home-recording movement. “You have to embrace it.” Anderson also launched Or does he want to recreate the record live? Saxon in his home in 1985 “A live show,” says SLT’s Irving, “especially as a playground for his own musical projects. for a rock ‘n’ roll band, is about energy. It’s Anderson’s years behind the console and as a about that moment, that kind of transcending musician in bands like The Projectiles and the thing where you want to take people where globe trotting Riviera Playboys has made him an excellent producer, something critical to the you’re going. You want their head in the sky, you want this super transference of energy so recording process — something some bands they walk out of there totally stoked. The CD, overlook or take for granted. the recording — that’s your artifact. They’re “It takes many years to develop a good, two different art forms. When you’re recording critical ear,” Anderson says. “It’s not just a matter you can craft it. It’s the difference between the of knowing the latest program on the computer. movie and the screenplay.” No, you have to go back in time: you have to The music industry has a tendency to understand the history and the evolution of throw up its hands every time there’s a new recording, because some of your most soughtadvancement in technology — records to after equipment today is from the 1930’s, 40’s, cassettes, cassettes to CDs, analog to digital, 50’s, 60’s, and 70’s. Often, I just automatically and beyond — as if it’s finally going to do the wear the two hats. Because if I was simply business in. But the music abides, its artists adapt. engineering, I would have to sit and wait to be Rarely does one style or technology get replaced told what to do. And that’s not going to happen. entirely. And there is yet to be technology that People need guidance and some direction.” can completely harness the magic. “We’ve got a lot of voodoo,” McNally says. The recording process also comes down to “But we don’t have a soul button. When they how the artist sees himself, and what he’s get that, we’re all out of business.” trying to accomplish in the studio. Does he

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NOVEMBER 5TH HIGHLIGHTS: 25 venues open NEW! Art Writing • Geometries at Rochester Contemporary Art Center • Celebrating the Arts at Nan Miller Gallery • Everything in Time: Maximalist Works at Visual Studies Workshop Gallery • Poetry reading by Sally Bittner Bonn at Greenwood Books • New fall artworks by Patricia Hill at Rubinos

PARKING:

East End Parking Garage on Scio St. for central parking. Parking is also available at most venues.

rochestercitynewspaper.com City 11


Upcoming [ POP/ROCK ] 98PXY Jingle Jam w/Bruno Mars, 30H!3, Travie McCoy, Sara Bareilles, etc. Wednesday, December 1. Blue Cross Arena, 1 War Memorial Square. 6 p.m. $30.95-$41.25. 800-7453000, 98pxy.com.

Music

[ POP/ROCK ] Less Than Jake, The Supervillains, Off With Their Heads Monday, January 31. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N Water St. 7 p.m. $16.50-$20. 800-745-3000, waterstreetmusic.com. [ WORLD MUSIC ] Ladysmith Black Mambazo Saturday, February 26. Nazareth College Arts Center, 4245 East Ave. 8 p.m. $40$70. 389-2170, naz.edu/artscenter.

Yellowbirddd Wednesday, November 10 Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 8:30 p.m. | $7-$9 | 454-2966

[ INDIE-FOLK ] Yellowbirddd is the stage name for mild-

mannered singer/songwriter Liam McCormack. This Brooklyn-by-way-of-Boston lone wolf plays frail and beautiful with profound melancholy. If you dig the stuff Chris Whitley did before he checked out, Yellowbirddd is for you. DIY to a fault, McCormack books himself coast to coast and all of his music is available for free download from his website yellowbirddd.com, or bandcamp.com. Yellowbirddd shares the bill with Autumn In Halifax, Forest City Lovers and Viking Moses. — BY FRANK DE BLASE

Bob Dylan & His Band Saturday, November 6 RIT Gordon Field House, 149 Lomb Memorial Dr 8 p.m. | $30-$47 | 475-4121 [ ROCK/FOLK ] For close to 50 years Bob Dylan has

maintained immense cultural, critical and mainstream success, a feat likely unmatched by any other living musician today. His influence in multiple genres is readily apparent, and many of his songs have been recorded hundreds of times by other artists. From his seminal 60’s-era folk albums up to his late-90’s renaissance (which continues to this day), Dylan has shown that intricately crafted songs and strong musicianship can trump flashy outfits and studio tweaking. Dylan is a singer-songwriter whose popularity and reach spans multiple generations of music fans with his good ol’ fashioned rock and roll. — BY TODD REZSNYAK

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12 City NOVEMBER 3-9, 2010


Wednesday, November 3 [ Acoustic/Folk ] PJ Elliott. Miceli’s, 1011 Rt 31, Macedon. 986-2954. 7-10 p.m. Free. Ralph Louis. Lento, 274 N Goodman. 271-3470. 7:30 p.m. Free. Tom Gravino. Cafe 54, 54 W Main St, Victor. 742-3649. 6 p.m. Free. [ Blues ] Tony Gianavola. Beale Street Cafe, 693 South Ave. 2714650. 6 p.m. Free. Watermelon Slim. Dinosaur Bar-B-Que, 99 Court St. 3257090. 10 p.m. Free.

Black Label Society Tuesday, November 9 Main Street Armory, 900 E Main St 6 p.m. | $35-$40 | ticketmaster.com [ METAL ] Back from a blood-clot scare that derailed his

last tour, Zakk Wylde and his Black Label Society are back full throttle. Wylde is the personification of metal guitar. From his depths-of-hell chug to the reverse-hand harmonics, Wylde’s guitar playing is a thundering, blistering blast. And Wylde looks like he sounds — menacing, ominous, foreboding, like a Viking biker or something out of the Apocalypse. His playing is brilliant and instantly recognizable, flashy yet substantial. Perhaps better known as Ozzy Osbourne’s guitarist, Wylde is especially suited for BLS, where his prowess and intensity really shine. Clutch, Children of Bodom, and 2 Cents open the show. — BY FRANK DE BLASE

Taiko Project Saturday, November 6 Wadsworth Auditorium, SUNY Geneseo 8 p.m. | $6-$16 | 245-5873 [ WORLD MUSIC ] The Japanese taiko drum traces

back to 500 B.C. TaikoProject, a group of JapaneseAmerican taiko drummers founded in 2000, is relatively new, by comparison. TaikoProject bills itself as using “unconventional and innovative concepts to expand artistic boundaries.” The group’s performances utilize traditional taiko drums, such as the Ohiradaiko drum, which is 5’ in diameter and weighs 330 pounds. But the group spins the traditional instruments and rhythms into a blend with hip-hop choreography, multimedia, and pizzazz. — BY PALOMA A CAPANNA

Clem Burke of the Stranglers at Lovin’ Cup Friday, October 29. PHOTO BY FRANK DE BLASE

They need to knock out a few walls [ review ] by frank de blase

Friday night was one of those perfect rock ’n’ roll nights. Rochester legends SLT and English punk-rock legend Hugh Cornwell shared the Lovin’ Cup stage for an unforgettable show. Having just released “Gone Dead Gone” — essentially its first album, if you consider the new line-up — SLT put on an incredibly tight, zero-frills set. The sound was mixed perfectly (MDG, my man, take a bow), which is critical for a band that has so much riding on singer Matt Sabo’s clever, lyrical deadpan. I’ve always known guitarist Phil Marshall is capable of anything with the guitar, and it was particularly cool to see him cut extra-loose, seething and shredding with no brakes. The group essentially highlighted the new album in its entirety except for one classic, “Beautiful You,” from the Luke Warm days. You can still feel the warmth after all these years. I love this band. Cornwell followed and pounded out two amazing sets of music. Coming on full-throttle in a trio setting — featuring

Clem Burke on drums and Stephen Bishop on bass — Cornwell played in his signature textural-riff guitar style. The man uses effects as emphasis and mood, and when he cops to plain ol’ twang it’s vicious and unavoidable. The band played to a crowd that looked like another Scorgie’s reunion. The second set was The Stranglers’ 1977 “Rattus Norvegicus” album played front to back in its entirety. Tunes like “Peaches” and “Hanging Around” had the Lovin’ Cup overflowing with bobbing heads. You needed a shoehorn to get into Abilene Saturday night to hear Bobby Henrie and The Goners. It looked like “Caligula” in there as I had kind of forgotten it was Halloween eve. The band looked and sounded sharp — and nobody can pull off a Paul Burlison thump ’n’ twang fill better than Henrie — but there was no room to dance. They need to knock out a few walls in that joint. Keep booking bands like the Goners in there, and that’s just what’s going to happen.

[ Classical ] Live From Hochstein. Hochstein Performance Hall, 50 N Plymouth Ave. 4544596. 12:10 p.m. Free. RPO. SUNY Brockport-Tower Fine Arts Gallery, 180 Holley St, Brockport. 395-2805. 7:30 p.m. $8-$15. Trudy Moon. Geneva on the Lake, 1001 Lochland Rd, Geneva. 800-3-GENEVA. 6:30-9 p.m. Free. [ DJ/Electronic ] Bad Wolf: 50s & 60s Vinyl Bop. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 454-2966. 10 p.m. Free. DJ. Blueroom, 293 Alexander St. 730-5985. 8 p.m. Free. DJ. Woody’s, 250 Monroe Ave. 730-8230. 9 p.m. Call for tix. DJ. Westside Sports Bar & Grill, 1600 Lyell Ave. 4587888. 9 p.m. Call for tix. DJ. One, 1 Ryan Alley. 5461010. 10 p.m. Free. DJ Cosmo. Bay Bar & Grill, 372 Manitou Rd, Hilton. 392-7700. 10 p.m. Free. DJ Fat Daddy Buck. Roost, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. 3211170. 8:30 p.m. Free. DJs Jared & Mario B. Venu Resto-Lounge, 151 St Paul St. 232-5650. 9 p.m. $5. DJs NaNa & PJ. Vertex, 169 N Chestnut St. 232-5498. 10 p.m. $3-$8. continues on page 15

FEATURED ARTIST NIGHT SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 6

JESSICA OPHARDT 1PM-5PM

Hand painted children’s clothes & children’s acrylic paintings Thurs, Fri, Sat 10-8 • Sun 10-3 • 585.370.0076 632 N. Winton Rd., across from the Winfield Grill

rochestercitynewspaper.com City 13


Music Brass workout Clay Jenkins Wednesday, November 17 Kilbourn Hall, 26 Gibbs St. 8 p.m. | $10 (free with UR ID) | 274-1100, esm.rochester.edu [ PROFILE ] BY RON NETSKY

A sign hanging in Clay Jenkins’ office at the Eastman School of Music reads: “Trumpet is not like an athletic event, it is an athletic event.” The sign was a gift from a student, but the words are Jenkins’. “I run, I eat right — it’s a challenge,” says Jenkins. “I always tell my students: being healthy helps your trumpet playing, and being a trumpet player helps your health. It is very physical and very athletic.”

Jenkins recently returned from New Zealand, where he spent 10 days performing the Miles Davis/Gil Evans treatment of “Porgy and Bess.” There are not too many endurance tests for a trumpet player more difficult than this late-1950’s masterwork. “I really enjoy it,” says Jenkins. “It wasn’t written to play live so it’s really challenging. You’ve got to be in shape to do those things because it’s like an hour-long concerto. It’s on your mouth constantly the last 20 minutes. There are no breaks. If you get tired you’re sunk.” Jenkins is putting together another challenging repertoire for his upcoming concert November 17 at Kilbourn Hall. He’ll be joined by Eastman colleagues Harold Danko on piano, Rich Thompson on drums, and Jeff Campbell on bass. The group will also

boast a special guest, one of the hottest tenor saxophonists in New York, Tony Malaby. Jenkins was born and raised in Lubbock,

Texas, the birthplace of Buddy Holly, but he doesn’t have much to say about the city’s most famous musician. “I never knew 2 cents about Buddy Holly; I was not so much into rock and roll,” he says. In fact, Jenkins’ family might as well have lived on a different musical planet, the one where every man plays a trumpet. His dad, a professor of industrial engineering at Texas Tech University, played trumpet in swing bands. During World War II, he played in the McDonnell Douglas band with Buddy Rich. His older brother also played trumpet. And one day, when Jenkins was 11, “my dad didn’t ask me, he just said, ‘This is the day we get you a cornet.’” (A cornet is a more child-friendly member of the trumpet family.) Growing up he listened to albums by Al Hirt, Doc Severinsen, and Louis Armstrong. Later, when horn bands like Blood Sweat & Tears came along, he gravitated toward them. Early on his dad took him to see the Stan Kenton Orchestra; a decade later he would be playing in it. Jenkins attended North Texas State University. Now called University of North Texas, it’s the largest music school in the country. He was in good company. Keyboard wizard Lyle Mays, bassist Mark Johnson, and drummer Steve Houghton were among his classmates. “I was a late bloomer,” says Jenkins. “They sounded amazing in the mid-1970’s.” By then he was listening to hard-core jazz: John Coltrane, Miles Davis, Lee Morgan, Freddie Hubbard, and Clifford Brown. After graduating, Jenkins was

Renowned trumpet player and ESM professor Clay Jenkins has played in many big bands, and recently performed a grueling version of “Porgy and Bess” in New Zealand. PHOTO PROVIDED 14 City NOVEMBER 3-9, 2010

freelancing in the Dallas area when he heard that trumpeter Tim Hagans had left Kenton’s band. He was offered a chair in the trumpet section and he stayed for two years. “He let us play,” says Jenkins. “He wasn’t a great soloist, so he’d let young guys play. The music was very Wagnerian, it wasn’t the swingin’est band.”

Life on the road in the late 1970’s wasn’t easy, but Jenkins, fresh out of school, loved it. “I lapped it up. Every day was Friday night. We’d go out January 10 and play until Christmas. The money was terrible but hotels were cheap,” he says. Jenkins was just getting started in the world of legendary big bands. Next came a stint with the Harry James Orchestra. “He was a great leader and a great player, but it was very nostalgic,” says Jenkins. “It wasn’t really swing, it was dance music. We played the same tunes every night and he played the same solos. I never played any solos. He was an old-school leader; he’d stare at you if you missed a note.” Restless, Jenkins left to join Buddy Rich, a bandleader with perhaps the most notorious reputation in jazz. “Buddy would scream and yell but I liked Buddy a lot. It was challenging,” he says. Aside from one black player in Rich’s band, those bands were all white. His next experience in the Count Basie Orchestra was different. “I was one of the few white guys in Basie’s band but they treated me with the utmost respect.” By 1983, when he joined, Basie had died. Among the band’s subsequent leaders was one Jenkins was thrilled to work with, Thad Jones. “Aside from Miles he was my favorite trumpet player.” Jenkins quit the band to raise a family in the mid-1980’s, but he soon found himself at the first rehearsal of the Clayton-Hamilton Jazz Orchestra. He was in the trumpet section with a legend, Snooky Young. Jenkins and Young (now 91 years old) are still in the section together. He tours internationally with the band and values the fact that Eastman is flexible and supportive. “They’re so great about treating us like artists,” Jenkins says. Despite his teaching schedule, Jenkins is

busier than ever. In addition to his work with the orchestra he has collaborated on projects with his wife, a dancer, he plays with several faculty groups at Eastman and he runs a record company, Jazz Compass, with three other musicians. Last year, while on sabbatical, he recorded three CDs, including an organ project, “Four,” with Reggie Thomas; a quintet record with Joe LaBarbera; and his own album, “The Good Sign,” which will be released shortly after his upcoming Kilbourn concert. “There’s so much negative in the world,” says Jenkins. “We’ve got to look for good signs.”


BREAKFAST • LUNCH • DINNER

Wednesday, November 3 [ Jazz ] Kurt Johnson Trio. Bistro 135, 135 W Commercial St, East Rochester. 662-5555. 6 p.m. Free. Lindsey Holland w/Rick Holland Quintet. Tala Vera, 155 State St. 546-3844. 8 p.m. Free. Robert Chevrier. Brio Wine Bar & Grill, 3400 Monroe Ave. 5867000. 6:30 p.m. Free. Simply Jazz Quartet. Ciao Baby’s BBQ, 421 River St. 621-5480. 7 p.m. Free. The Margaret Explosion. Little Theatre Cafe, 240 East Ave. 232-3906. 7:30 p.m. Free. [ Karaoke ] Karaoke. Roost, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. 321-1170. 9:30 p.m. Free. Karaoke. German House-Keg, 315 Gregory St. 303-2234. 8:30 p.m. Free. Karaoke. Dub Land Underground, 315 Alexander St. 232-7550. 10 p.m. Free. Karaoke. Elite Bar & Grill, 398 W Main St. 527-8720. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke. Pineapple Jacks, 485 Spencerport Rd. 247-5225. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke. Jose & Willy’s, 20 Lake Shore Dr, Canandaigua. 3947960. 8:30 p.m. Free. Karaoke. Lemoncello, 137 W Commercial St, E Rochester. 385-8565. 8:30 p.m. Free. Karaoke. Applebee’s-Fairport, 585 Moseley Rd, Fairport. 4254700. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke. Mayfields Pub, 669 Winton Rd N. 288-7199. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke w/DJ Bonitillo. Flat Iron Cafe, 561 State St. 454-4830. 10:30 p.m. Free. Karaoke w/DJ Flyin’ Brian. Tap Room, 364 Rt 104. 265-0055. 8:30 p.m. Free. Karaoke w/Debbie Randyn. Merchants Grill, 881 Merchants Rd. 482-2010. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke w/Mark. Flipside Bar & Grill, 2001 E Main St. 2883930. 8:30 p.m. Free. Krazy Karaoke. Monty’s Korner, 355 East Ave. 263-7650. 9.30 p.m. Free. Rochester Idol Karaoke. Tom’s Original, 364 State Rt 104. 2650055. 7 p.m. Free. [ Open Mic ] Acoustic Open Mic. Pub 511, 511 E Ridge Rd. 266-9559. 8 p.m. Free. Open Country Jam. Sandra’s Saloon, 276 Smith St. 5465474. 7-10 p.m. Free. Open Jam w/Big Daddy Blues Band. Deweys, 1380 Lyell Ave. 254-4707. 9:30 p.m. Free. Open Jam w/Grand Canyon Rescue Episode. Abilene, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. 8 p.m. Free. Open Jam w/Justin Gurnsey. Jukebox, 5435 Ridge Rd W, Spencerport. 352-4505. 10 p.m. Free. Open Jammin’. Spot Coffee, 200 East Ave. 613-4600. 7:30 p.m. Free.

Open Mic. Boulder Coffee Co, 100 Alexander St. 454-7140. 8 p.m. Free. Open Mic. Dr’s Inn Grill & Tap Room, 1743 East Ave. 2710820. 5 p.m. Free. Open Mic w/Jam Shack Music. Stoneyard Bar & Grill, 1 Main St, Brockport. 637-3390. 9 p.m. Free. Open Mic w/Steve West. Muddy Waters Coffee House-Geneseo, 53 Main St, Geneseo. 2439111. 7-10 p.m. Free. [ Pop/Rock ] Jumbo Shrimp. Marge’s Lakeside Inn, 4909 Culver Rd. 323-1020. 6 p.m. Free. Molly Hatchet w/Joey T Band. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N Water St. 325-5600. 8 p.m. $15-$20. Mosaic Foundation w/The Sam Snyder Trio. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N Water St. 3255600. 8:30 p.m. $5-$7. Mr Gnome w/The Celebration of Man. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 454-2966. 9 p.m. $6.

Thursday, November 4 [ Acoustic/Folk ] Veterans Day Celebration. Smith Opera House, 82 Seneca St, Geneva. 315-789-2221, thesmith.org. 2 p.m. $27.50. John Akers & Elvio Fernandes. Easy on East, 170 East Ave. 325-6490. 8 p.m. Free. Mark Fantasia. Village Pub, Chili Center Plaza. 889-4547. 9 p.m. Free. Paul Strowe. Cottage Hotel, 1390 Pittsford-Mendon Rd, Mendon. 624-2929. 7-10 p.m. Free. Reggae Night. Elite Bar & Grill, 398 W Main St. 527-8720. 9 p.m. Call for tix. [ Blues ] Beale Street Blues Band. Pane Vino, 175 N Water St. 2326090. 8 p.m. Free. John Bolger. Beale Street Cafe, 693 South Ave. 271-4650. 7 p.m. Free. [ Classical ] Eastman at Washington Square. First Universalist Church, S Clinton & Court Sts. 274-1400. 12:15 p.m. Free. Rochester Medical Chamber Orchestra. UR Medical Center Flaum Atrium, 601 Elmwood Ave. 749-1795. 5 p.m. 5 p.m. Tom McClure. Geneva on the Lake, 1001 Lochland Rd, Geneva. 800-3-GENEVA. 6:309 p.m. Free. [ DJ/Electronic ] DJ. Pelican’s Nest, 566 River Street. 663-5910. 5 p.m. Free. DJ Big Reg. Liquid, 169 St Paul St. 325-5710. 9:30 p.m. Free. DJ Biggie. McKenzie’s Irish Pub, 3685 W Henrietta Rd. 334-8970. 9 p.m. Call for tix. DJ ET & DJ Proof. Tribeca, 233 Mill St. 232-1090. 9 p.m. $5$10. DJ Jestyr. Soho East, 336 East Ave. 262-2060. 9 p.m. Free. DJ Jestyr. Hush Nightclub, 359 East Ave. 506-2851. 10 p.m. Call for tix.

DJ Matt. Roost, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. 321-1170. 7:30 p.m. Free. DJ Mike Dailor. Vertex, 169 N Chestnut St. 232-5498. 10 p.m. $3-$8. DJ Provide & Friends. Lovin’ Cup, Park Point @ RIT. 2929940. 9 p.m. Call for tix. DJs Designer Junkies, Etiquette, Ginnis. One, 1 Ryan Alley. 5461010. 10 p.m. $3. DJs Moreno & Andy Fade. Flat Iron Cafe, 561 State St. 4544830. 10 p.m. Free. Soul Sides Record Listening Party. Good Luck, 50 Anderson Ave. 340-6161. 9 p.m. Free. Thursday Night Shakedown DJs. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 4542966. 11 p.m. Free. Tilt-a-Whirl Drag Show. Tilt Night Club, 444 Central Ave. 232-8440. 11 p.m. & 12:30 a.m. $2-$8. [ Jazz ] Bill Dobbins / Mike Kaupa Duo. Grill at Strathallan, 550 East Ave. 461-5010. 7:30 p.m. Free. Jazz Dawgs. Bistro 135, 135 W Commercial St, East Rochester. 662-5555. 6:30 p.m. Free. The PTSD Project. Hochstein Performance Hall, 50 N Plymouth Ave. 454-4596. 7:30 p.m. $10-$50. [ Karaoke ] Karaoke. Panorama Night Club, 730 Elmgrove Rd. 247-2190. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke. Goody Goodies, 6108 Loomis Rd, Farmington. 7422531. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke. Pineapple Jacks, 485 Spencerport Rd. 247-5225. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke. Blueroom, 293 Alexander St. 730-5985. 10 p.m. Free. Karaoke. Carey Lake Bar & Grill, 959 Penfield Rd, Walworth. 315-986-1936. 4 p.m. Free. Karaoke. Jukebox, 5435 Ridge Rd W, Spencerport. 352-4505. 7:30 p.m. Free. Karaoke. Applebee’s-Penfield, 1955 Empire Blvd, Webster. 787-0570. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke. GridIron Bar & Grill, 3154 State St, Caledonia. 5384008. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke. California Brew Haus, 402 Ridge Rd W. 621-1480. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke w/DJ Smooth. Clarissa’s, 293 Clarissa St. 4542680. 8:30 p.m. Free. Karaoke w/George, King of Karaoke. Temple Bar & Grille, 109 East Ave. 232-6000. 8 p.m. Free. Karaoke w/Summer Bob. Shorts Bar & Grill, 35 N Main St, Fairport. 388-0136. 10 p.m. Free. continues on page 16

Gourmet Quality at Diner Prices

Michelina’s Italian Eatery & Bar SPORTS NIGHT

NFL NHL NBA Drink Specials at The Bar

LUNCH

Monday - Friday 11:00 to 3:00

DINNER

Monday - Thursday 4:30 to 9:30 ‘till 10 Friday and Saturday Closed Sundays for Private Parties

Catering Available for All Special Occasions!

Gift Certificates Available!

2811 DEWEY AVENUE. 663-2745 SUN & MON 7am-3pm • TUES-SAT 7am-9pm

2700 West Henrietta Rd. | (585)424-3040

WIN TICKETS

Tickets to Pittsford Musicals Production of Annie Register to win a Family Fun Pack, good for four tickets. Deadline for entries is Tuesday, November 10th, 2010 at 5PM.

Send entry to: Annie C/O City Newspaper, 250 N. Goodman St., Rochester, NY 14607 or fax entry to: 244-1126

Name: Address: City/Town:

Zip

No reproductions. One entry per household. Sponsored by Pittsford Musicals and City Newspaper.

Daytime Phone: Email: Entrants’ e-mail addresses will be automatically added to the City Newspaper Weekly E-Newsletter.

rochestercitynewspaper.com City 15


Thursday, November 4

Top 40 DJ. Blueroom, 293 Alexander St. 730-5985. 10 p.m. Free.

Karaoke w/Tim Burnette. Sevens, Rt 96, Farmington. 924-3232. 8-11 p.m. Free. Rochester Idol Karaoke. Landing Bar & Grille, 30 Main St, Fairport. 425-7490. 9:30 p.m. Free. [ Open Mic ] Open Blues Jam w/Alex D & Jimmie Mac. PJ’s Lounge, 499 West Ave. 436-9066. 9 p.m. Free. Open Jam. Pub 511, 511 E Ridge Rd. 266-9559. 8 p.m. Free. Open Jam w/Beau Ryan & Amanda Ashley. Firehouse Saloon, 814 Clinton Ave S. 244-6307. 9 p.m. Free. Open Mic. Standard Lounge, 655 Monroe Ave. 473-2447. 9 p.m. Free. Open Mic. Towpath Cafe, 6 N Main St, Fairport. 377-0410. 6:30 p.m. Free. Open Mic Night. Boulder Coffee Co-Brooks Landing, 955 Genesee St. 454-7140. 7:30 p.m. Free. Open Mic w/Dave McGrath. TC Hooligans-Greece, Greece Ridge Ctr. 225-7180. 6 p.m. Free. Open Mic w/Jed Curran & Steve Piper. Flipside Bar & Grill, 2001 E Main St. 288-3930. 8:30 p.m. Free. Rochester Ukulele Support Group. Bernunzio Uptown Music, 122 East Ave. 4736140. 7 p.m. Free. [ Pop/Rock ] An Early Ending w/Where The Ocean Meets The Sky. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N Water St. 325-5600. 6:30 p.m. $10$12. Be Glad & Dunn. Westside Sports Bar & Grill, 1600 Lyell Ave. 458-7888. 9 p.m. Call for tix. Jeff Elliott. Irondequoit Ale House, 2250 Hudson Ave. 544-5120. 5 p.m. Free. Jimmy Lane. Six Pockets, Ridge Hudson Plaza. 266-1440. 7 p.m. Free. Procedure Club w/Cavalcade, Light Feelings ft Travis J Johansen. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 454-2966. 8:30 p.m. $6-$8. Seth Faergolzia. Havana Moe’s, 125 East Ave. 325-1030. 9 p.m. Free. Watkins & the Rapiers. Little Theatre Cafe, 240 East Ave. 232-3906. 7:30 p.m. Free.

Friday, November 5 [ Acoustic/Folk ] Mark Fantasia Band. Panorama Night Club, 730 Elmgrove Rd. 247-2190. 6 p.m. Free. Paul Strowe. Tap Room, 364 Rt 104. 265-0055. 8 p.m. Free. Roger Eckers/Fred Costello Duo. Luna Piena Bistro, 546 Merchants Rd. 288-0067. 9 p.m. Free. Rusted Root w/Adam Ezra, Tinted Image. Main Street Armory, 900 E Main St. 2323221. 7 p.m. $22.50-$25.

[ Hip-Hop/Rap ] MC Chris, Schaffer the Darklord & James Kurdziel. Genesee Community College, 1 College Rd, Batavia. vcbello@genesee. edu. 6:30 p.m. $5.

ACOUSTIC SWING | My Sweet Patootie

As Tanglefoot alumni, guitar fingerpicker Terry Young and fiddler Sandra Swannell cut their teeth with that revered Canadian roots-music band. With their own duo, My Sweet Patootie, Young and Swannell have explored the boundaries of swing, producing a melding of big band rhythms and country blues stylings into what they affectionately call “hayseed jazz.” My Sweet Patootie is just plain fun, using humor-laced lyrics and a passion for the personalities they author to let listeners literally swing their blues away. Satirical and lively, the duo mines the deep musical ethos of small-town Ontario province. My Sweet Patootie performs Saturday, November 6, 7 p.m. as part of the Heartland at Home Concert series. The show is at a private residence, so reservations are required. $15. 328-3103, heartlandconcerts.org. — BY RYAN WHIRTY Sore Thumb Radio Live Broadcast w/Jeff Cosco. House of Guitars, 645 Titus Ave. 544-3500. 10 a.m. Free. Tom Gravino. Tandoor of India, 376 Jefferson Rd. 427-7080. 7 p.m. Free. [ Blues ] Billy Joe & the Blues Gypsies w/Dave Riccioni. Six Pockets, Ridge Hudson Plaza. 2661440. 6-9 p.m. Free. Gap Mangione & the New Blues Band. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. 381-4000. 8 p.m. Free. Groovement. Beale Street Cafe, 693 South Ave. 271-4650. 7 p.m. Free. [ Classical ] Andrey Pisarev. Rochester Institute of Technology-Ingle Auditorium, 1 Lomb Memorial Dr. 475-2411. 8 p.m. $5-$20. Bewitched, Bothered and Bewildered. Nazareth CollegeWilmot Recital Hall, 4245 East Ave. 389-2700. 7:30 p.m. Free. Broadway Baby! Eastman Theatre-Kodak Hall, 60 Gibbs St. 274-1100. 8 p.m. Call for tix. Jewel Hara. Geneva on the Lake, 1001 Lochland Rd, Geneva. 800-3-GENEVA. 6:309 p.m. Free. John Ballings. Hedges, 1290 Lake Rd, Webster. 265-3850. 6:30 p.m. Free. Musica Spei Early Music Festival. St Anne Church, 1600 Mt Hope Ave. musicaspei.org. 7:30 p.m. $5-$15. [ Country ] Karen Star. Sandra’s Saloon, 276 Smith St. 546-5474. 9:30 p.m. Free.

16 City NOVEMBER 3-9, 2010

Tommy Brunett. Record Archive, 33 1/3 Rockwood St. 2441210. 6 p.m. Free. [ DJ/Electronic ] DJ. Blueroom, 293 Alexander St. 730-5985. 8 p.m. Free. DJ. Coach Sports Forum, 19 W Main St, Webster. 872-2910. 9 p.m. Call for tix. DJ Andy Fade. Flat Iron Cafe, 561 State St. 454-4830. 10 p.m. Free. DJ Annalyze. Hush Nightclub, 359 East Ave. 506-2851. 10 p.m. Call for tix. DJ Cedric. Vertex, 169 N Chestnut St. 232-5498. 10 p.m. $3-$8. DJ Dream. Nola’s BBQ, 4775 Lake Ave. 663-3375. 10 p.m. Call for tix. DJ Fat Daddy Buck. Roost, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. 321-1170. 8:30 p.m. Free. DJ GI. Liquid, 169 St Paul St. 325-5710. 10 p.m. Free-$5. DJ Jon Herbert w/DJ NickL & Marshall Vickers. Tapas 177 Lounge, 177 St Paul St. 2622090. 10:30 p.m. Call for tix. DJs Freddy Colon & Bobby Bass. KC Tea & Noodles, 363 S Goodman. 271-1420. 10 p.m. Free. DJs Peter Pizzutelli, Ease, Papi Chulo. One, 1 Ryan Alley. 5461010. 10 p.m. $3. Reggaeton w/DJ Carlos. La Copa Ultra Lounge, 235 W Ridge Rd. 254-1050. 10 p.m. Call for tix. Salsa Night w/DJ Javier Rivera. Tango Cafe, 389 Gregory St. 475-0249. 9 p.m. $5. The Almighty NYAC DJ Crew. Dub Land Underground, 315 Alexander St. 232-7550. 10 p.m. Free.

[ Jazz ] Alana Cahoon. Grill at Strathallan, 550 East Ave. 4541880. 8:30 p.m. Free. Bobby Dibaudo. Bistro 135, 135 W Commercial St, East Rochester. 662-5555. 6 p.m. Free. Madeline Forster. Little Theatre Cafe, 240 East Ave. 232-3906. 8:30 p.m. Free. Marco Amadio. Brio Wine Bar & Grill, 3400 Monroe Ave. 5867000. 8 p.m. Free. Mark Cassara. Pane Vino, 175 N Water St. 232-6090. 8 p.m. Free. Paul Gaspar & Friends. Tala Vera, 155 State St. 546-3844. 8 p.m. Free. Ryan T Carey & El Rojo Jazz Band. Thali of India, 3259 S Winton Rd. 427-8030. 7-9 p.m. Free. Todd East Trio. Bistro 135, 135 W Commercial St, East Rochester. 662-5555. 9 p.m. Free. [ Karaoke ] Karaoke. Flaherty’s, 1200 Bay Rd. 671-0816. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke. Village Pub, Chili Center Plaza. 889-4547. 9 p.m. Call for tix. Karaoke. Goody Goodies, 6108 Loomis Rd, Farmington. 7422531. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke. Pineapple Jacks, 485 Spencerport Rd. 247-5225. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke. Deweys, 1380 Lyell Ave. 254-4707. 9:30 p.m. Free. Karaoke w/Karaoke King. Jeremiah’s Tavern, 1104 Monroe Ave. 461-1313. 11 p.m. Free. Karaoke w/Summer Bob. Shorts Bar & Grill, 35 N Main St, Fairport. 388-0136. 10 p.m. Free. Karaoke w/Tina P. Norton’s Pub, 1730 N Goodman St. 2663570. 9 p.m. Free. [ Open Mic ] Open Jam w/Ryan Barclay Trio. The Pultneyville Grill, 4135 Mill St, Pultneyville. 315-589-4512. 8:30-10:30 p.m. Free. Open Mic. Rochester Institute of Technology-Java Wally’s, 90 Lomb Memorial Dr. 475-2562. 9 p.m. Free. [ Pop/Rock ] 7 Sense. Lemoncello, 137 W Commercial St, E Rochester. 385-8565. 9:30 p.m. Free. After Five. McGhan’s, 11 W Main St, Victor. 924-3660. 9 p.m. Free. Catch 22. Panorama Night Club, 730 Elmgrove Rd. 2472190. 10 p.m. $3. Danny & the Rebel Rockers. Rab’s Woodshed, 4440 Lake Ave. 663-4610. 10 p.m. Free. Dirty White Boys. California Brew Haus, 402 Ridge Rd W. 621-1480. 10 p.m. Call for tix.

Fishbone Soup, Johnny Bauer. Johnny’s Irish Pub, 1382 Culver Rd. 224-0990. 5 p.m. Free. Frequency. GridIron Bar & Grill, 3154 State St, Caledonia. 5384008. 9:30 p.m. Call for tix. Grand Canyon Rescue Episode, This Other Life. Abilene, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. 5:30 p.m. Free. Hungry For Love: Sanctus Real, Leeland, The Afters. Roberts Wesleyan College-Athletics, 2301 Westside Dr. 800-4614485, roberts.edu/clc. 7 p.m. $20-$30. No Drama Mamas. Towpath Cafe, 6 N Main St, Fairport. 377-0410. 8 p.m. Free. Sam Deleo. Perlo’s Italian Grill, 202 N Washington St, East Rochester. 248-5060. 6:3010:30 p.m. Free. Sirsy w/Jujuba. Lovin’ Cup, Park Point @ RIT. 292-9940. 9 p.m. Call for tix. Soma Slumber w/Break The Silence, Dear McBeth. Water Street Music Hall, 204 N Water St. 325-5600. 6:30 p.m. $10-$12. The Lonely Ones. A Different Path Gallery, 27 Market St, Brockport. 637-5494. 8-9 p.m. Free. Velvet Elvis RT Birthday Show w/Man vs Moon. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 454-2966. 9 p.m. $5. [ R&B ] Old School R&B. Elite Bar & Grill, 398 W Main St. 5278720. 9 p.m. Call for tix. Soul On Tap. Dinosaur Bar-BQue, 99 Court St. 325-7090. 10 p.m. Free.

Saturday, November 6 [ Acoustic/Folk ] Acoustic Alchemy Review. Jasmine’s Asian Fusion, 657 Ridge Rd, Webster. 216-1290. 9:30 p.m. Free. Drum Playing Competition. House of Guitars, 645 Titus Ave. 544-3500. 10 a.m. Free. Giana Caliolo. Women’s Coffee Connection, 681 South Ave. 442-2180. 5 p.m. Free. Honky Tonk Dance Hall w/The Skiffle Minstrels. Harmony House, 58 E Main St., Webster. 727-4119. 8 p.m. $12. Kinloch Nelson. Little Theatre Cafe, 240 East Ave. 232-3906. 8:30 p.m. Free. Latin Band. Tapas 177 Lounge, 177 St Paul St. 262-2090. 11 p.m. Free. My Sweet Patootie. Heartland at Home Concert. 328-3103. 7 p.m. $15. The MacGillicuddies. Abilene, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 2323230. 9:30 p.m. Free. Tim Yeung, Michael James Lasaponara. House of Guitars, 645 Titus Ave. 544-3500. 4 p.m. Free. Tom Gravino. Thali of India, 3259 S Winton Rd. 355-8206. 7 p.m. Free. [ Blues ] Bill Brown. Brown Hound Bistro, 6459 Rt 64, Naples. 374-9771. 7 p.m. Free.

Luca Foresta & the Electro Kings. Beale Street Cafe, 693 South Ave. 271-4650. 7:30 p.m. Free. Rockin’ Robin & the Bucket of Blues. Rab’s Woodshed, 4440 Lake Ave. 663-4610. 10 p.m. Free. [ Classical ] Broadway Baby! Eastman Theatre-Kodak Hall, 60 Gibbs St. 274-1100. 8 p.m. Call for tix. John Ballings. Hedges, 1290 Lake Rd, Webster. 265-3850. 6:30 p.m. Free. Roberts Wesleyan College Community Orchestra. Roberts Wesleyan College-Auditorium, 2301 Westside Dr, Chili, NY. 594-6008. 7:30 p.m. Free. [ DJ/Electronic ] Big Dance Party w/DJ Jon Herbert. Tilt Night Club, 444 Central Ave. 232-8440. 10 p.m. $3. DJ. Goody Goodies, 6108 Loomis Rd, Farmington. 7422531. 9 p.m. Free. DJ. Straight Home Inn Bar & Grill, 688 Lexington Ave. 4580020. 9 p.m. Free. DJ Big Reg. Venu Resto-Lounge, 151 St Paul St. 232-5650. 7 p.m. Free. DJ Bonitillo. Flat Iron Cafe, 561 State St. 454-4830. 10 p.m. Free-$5. DJ Darkwave. Vertex, 169 N Chestnut St. 232-5498. 10 p.m. $3-$8. DJ Ease. Hush Nightclub, 359 East Ave. 506-2851. 10 p.m. Call for tix. DJ Fat Daddy Buck. Roost, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. 321-1170. 8:30 p.m. Free. DJ Howard & Mega Mix. Island Fresh Cuisine, 382 Jefferson Rd. 424-2150. 9 p.m. Free. DJ Jestyr. Soho East, 336 East Ave. 262-2060. 9 p.m. Free. DJ Wiz. Liquid, 169 St Paul St. 325-5710. 9:30 p.m. Free-$5. DJs Richie Salvaggio, Kalifornia. One, 1 Ryan Alley. 546-1010. 10 p.m. $3. R&B DJs. Tribeca, 233 Mill St. 232-1090. 9 p.m. $5-$10. Shotgun Music. McGhan’s, 11 W Main St, Victor. 924-3660. 9 p.m. Free. Top 40 DJ. Blueroom, 293 Alexander St. 730-5985. 10 p.m. Free. [ Jazz ] Bruce Johnstone Quartet. Grill at Strathallan, 550 East Ave. 4541880. 8:30 p.m. Free. East End Jazz Boys. Havana Moe’s, 125 East Ave. 3251030. 9 p.m. Free. Janet Beanman. Bistro 135, 135 W Commercial St, East Rochester. 662-5555. 6:30 p.m. Free. Jazz Cafe. Monty’s Korner, 355 East Ave. 263-7650. 7:30 p.m. Free. Jazz at Jazzy’s. Jasmine’s Asian Fusion, 657 Ridge Rd, Webster. 216-1290. 8:30-11 p.m. Free. Mario Gallelli. Lemoncello, 137 W Commercial St, E Rochester. 385-8565. 9 p.m. Free.


Roger Ecker’s Trio. Don’s Original Pub, 2055 Fairport Nine Mile Point Rd. 377-1040. 8 p.m. Free. [ Karaoke ] Karaoke. The Galley Restaurant, 94 S Union St, Spencerport. 352-0200. 8 p.m. Free. Karaoke. Sully’s Pub, 242 South Ave. 232-3960. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke. 140 Alex, 140 Alexander St. 256-1000. 10:30 p.m. Free. Karaoke. Pineapple Jacks, 485 Spencerport Rd. 247-5225. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke. Mickey Flynn’s, 196 Winton Rd. 288-7070. 9 p.m. Free.

Karaoke. Straight Home Inn Bar & Grill, 688 Lexington Ave. 458-0020. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke. Temple Bar & Grille, 109 East Ave. 232-6000. 10 p.m. Free. Karaoke w/Andy & Kim. Norton’s Pub, 1730 N Goodman St. 266-3570. 10 p.m. Free. Karaoke w/Debbie Randyn. Merchants Grill, 881 Merchants Rd. 482-2010. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke w/The Tin Man. Shorts Bar & Grill, 35 N Main St, Fairport. 388-0136. 10 p.m. Free. [ Pop/Rock ] Bob Dylan and His Band. Rochester Institute of

Technology-Gordon Field House, 149 Lomb Memorial Dr. 475-4121. 8 p.m. $30-$54.95. Boneyard, Steel Kingdom, Minds Wide Open. California Brew Haus, 402 Ridge Rd W. 6211480. 10 p.m. Call for tix. Brick City Limits. Lovin’ Cup, Park Point @ RIT. 292-9940. 7 p.m. Call for tix. Dark Hollow. Dinosaur Bar-BQue, 99 Court St. 325-7090. 10 p.m. Free. Going For The One (Yes Tribute). Lovin’ Cup, Park Point @ RIT. 292-9940. 9 p.m. Call for tix. SLT CD Release Show. Montage Music Hall, 50 Chestnut Plaza. 232-1520. 8 p.m. Call for tix.

Soft Black w/The Vacant Lots, Seth, Bad Kids. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 454-2966. 10 p.m. $6-$8. Virgil Cain. Johnny’s Irish Pub, 1382 Culver Rd. 224-0990. 8 p.m. Free. Zero Gravity, Polluted Moon. Coach Sports Forum, 19 W Main St, Webster. 872-2910. 9 p.m. Call for tix.

Sunday, November 7 [ Acoustic/Folk ] Arlo Guthrie w/The Burns Sisters Harro East Ballroom, 155 N Chestnut St. 8 p.m. $45. dansmallspresents.com.

By God’s Grace Chorale Event. 111 N Chestnut, 111 N Chestnut. 797-5151. 4 p.m. Free. Celtic Music. Temple Bar & Grille, 109 East Ave. 232-6000. 7 p.m. Free. Dave McGrath. Carey Lake Bar & Grill, 959 Penfield Rd, Walworth. 315-986-1936. 4 p.m. Call for tix. Old Time Music Night w/Richard Berman. Greece Baptist Church, 1230 Long Pond Rd. 225-6160. 7 p.m. Free. PJ Elliott. Bay Street Hotel, Bay St, Sodus Point. 315-4832233. 9 p.m. Free.

923 Portland Ave. 266-7030. 2:30 p.m. Free. Candlelight Concert. Christ Church, 141 East Ave. 4543878. 8:30 p.m. Free. Carillon Salute to Veterans. University of Rochester-Rush Rhees Library, Library Rd. 671-7297. 2 p.m. Free. continues on page 18

[ Classical ] Baroque & Early Sonatas for the Flute. St Andrew’s Church,

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Sunday, November 7 Ella Cripps. Geneva on the Lake, 1001 Lochland Rd, Geneva. 800-3-GENEVA. 6:309 p.m. Free. Going for Baroque Organ Recital. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. 276-8900. 1 & 3 p.m. Free w/admission. Jenny Valitalo/viola. Lutheran Church of the Incarnate Word, 597 East Ave. 244-6065. 7:45 p.m. Free. [ DJ/Electronic ] DJ. Westside Sports Bar & Grill, 1600 Lyell Ave. 458-7888. 9 p.m. Call for tix. DJ. Pelican’s Nest, 566 River Street. 663-5910. 10 p.m. Free. DJ Selecta Preece. Blueroom, 293 Alexander St. 730-5985. 10 p.m. Free. Old School DJ. Clarissa’s, 293 Clarissa St. 454-2680. 8 p.m. Free. [ Hip-Hop/Rap ] R&B HipHop Spring Edition. Cafe Underground Railroad, 480 W Main St. 235-3550. 8 p.m. $5-$10. [ Jazz ] Bill Slater. Woodcliff Hotel & Spa, 199 Woodcliff Dr. 3814000. 11:30 a.m. Free. Jazz Night. Lovin’ Cup, Park Point @ RIT. 292-9940. 7 p.m. Free. Len Massineo. Lemoncello, 137 W Commercial St, E Rochester. 385-8565. 6 p.m. Free. [ Karaoke ] Karaoke. Dub Land Underground, 315 Alexander St. 232-7550. 10 p.m. Free. Karaoke. Jose & Willy’s, 20 Lake Shore Dr, Canandaigua. 394-7960. 8:30 p.m. Free. Karaoke w/Brad London. Willow Inn, 428 Manitou Rd. 3923489. 9 p.m. Free. [ Open Mic ] Acoustic Sunday w/Fred Goodnow. Brown Hound Bistro, 6459 Rt 64, Naples. 374-9771. 11 a.m. Free. Open Country Jam w/Randy. Sandra’s Saloon, 276 Smith St. 546-5474. 2-6 p.m. Free. Open Jam w/Bodega Radio. Jukebox, 5435 Ridge Rd W, Spencerport. 352-4505. 5 p.m. Free. Troup Street Jazz Jam Session. Beale Street Cafe, 693 South Ave. 216-1070. 6 p.m. Free. [ Pop/Rock ] Hardcore Showcase: Election Day, Rational Animals. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 454-2966. 7 p.m. $5-$7.

Monday, November 8 [ Acoustic/Folk ] Amanda Ashley. Lemoncello, 137 W Commercial St, E Rochester. 385-8565. 9 p.m. Free. Mandy. Shorts Bar & Grill, 35 N Main St, Fairport. 388-0136. 9 p.m. Free. Sean Patrick Taylor. Dinosaur Bar-B-Que, 99 Court St. 3257090. 10 p.m. Free. 18 City NOVEMBER 3-9, 2010

CLASSICAL | Score!

Back in the day live music used to accompany the films screened in the space now known as Little 1. Go back in time this Sunday with a performance by the Rochester Philharmonic Woodwind Quintet and a movie produced by the Eastman Kodak Company in 1926. The event will start at 1 pm with an hour of movie music, including a tribute to MGM and “The Tango Lesson.” The program will end with a rare public screening of “The Flute of Krishna.” Eastman-Kodak captured the dance created by Martha Graham in the 1920’s, performed by five of her students at the Eastman School of Music. The movie represents one of the earliest uses of color in film. The RPO Woodwind Quintet has arranged music for this screening as inspired by the film. The event will be a time capsule to the Rochester performing arts scene of the 1920’s, and is a fundraiser to benefit the Little. Score! takes place Sunday, November 7, 1 p.m. at Little Theatre, 240 East Ave. $20. 258-0400 ext. 400, thelittle.org. — PALOMA CAPANNA Sore Thumb Radio Live Broadcast w/Jeff Cosco. House of Guitars, 645 Titus Ave. 2240990. 8 p.m. Free.

Karaoke w/Walt O’Brien. Flipside Bar & Grill, 2001 E Main St. 288-3930. 9 p.m. Free.

[ Classical ] Eastman Philharmonia. Eastman Theatre-Kodak Hall, 60 Gibbs St. 274-1100. 8 p.m. Free. Monday Nights with the RPO. SUNY Brockport-Tower Fine Arts Gallery, 180 Holley St, Brockport. 395-2805. 6 p.m. Free. Trudy Moon. Geneva on the Lake, 1001 Lochland Rd, Geneva. 800-3-GENEVA. 6:309 p.m. Free.

[ Open Mic ] Open Jam w/Refreshunz. Clarissa’s, 293 Clarissa St. 2323430. 8 p.m. Free.

[ DJ/Electronic ] DJ. Pelican’s Nest, 566 River Street. 663-5910. 5 p.m. Free. DJ TW. Roost, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. 321-1170. 7:30 p.m. Free. Manic Mondays DJs. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 454-2966. 11 p.m. Free. [ Jazz ] Anthony Giannavola. Lemoncello, 137 W Commercial St, E Rochester. 385-8565. 7 p.m. Free. Crescent City Connection. Tango Cafe, 389 Gregory St. 4750249. 9 p.m. $3-$5. White Hots. Little Theatre Cafe, 240 East Ave. 232-3906. 7:30 p.m. Free. [ Karaoke ] Karaoke. Roost, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. 321-1170. 9:30 p.m. Free.

[ Pop/Rock ] Hank & Cupcakes, Rearview, Kenan Bell, Biker Daughter. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 4542966. 7:30 p.m. $7-$9. Pro-Am Open Jam. German House-Keg, 315 Gregory St. 442-6880. 9:30 p.m. Free. Skycoasters. Granger Homestead, 295 N Main St, Canandaigua. 394-1472. 6 p.m. $10-$25.

Tuesday, November 9 [ Acoustic/Folk ] Jeff Elliott. Norton’s Pub, 1730 N Goodman St. 266-3570. 5-8 p.m. Free. Johnny Bauer. Cottage Hotel, 1390 Pittsford-Mendon Rd, Mendon. 624-2929. 7-10 p.m. Free. [ Blues ] Buford & Smokin Section. Dinosaur Bar-B-Que, 99 Court St. 325-7090. 10 p.m. Free. Teagan Ward. Beale Street Cafe, 693 South Ave. 2714650. 7 p.m. Free. [ Classical ] Eastman Faculty Artist Series: Don Harry/tuba. Eastman School


of Music-Kilbourn Hall, 26 Gibbs St., Rochester, NY. (585) 274-1100. 8 p.m. $10. Tom McClure. Geneva on the Lake, 1001 Lochland Rd, Geneva. 800-3-GENEVA. 6:309 p.m. Free. Veteran’s Day Musical Tribute. GPAS, 800 Long Pond Rd. 234-5636. 7:15 p.m. Free. Veterans Day Carillon Concert. University of Rochester-Rush Rhees Library, Library Rd. 6717297. Noon. Free. [ DJ/Electronic ] DJ. Pelican’s Nest, 566 River Street. 663-5910. 5 p.m. Free. DJ Fat Daddy Buck. Roost, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. 321-1170. 8:30 p.m. Free. DJ Javier Rivera. Flat Iron Cafe, 561 State St. 454-4830. 9 p.m. Free. [ Jazz ] Carl Ludwig Hubsch`s Longrun Development of the Universe. Bop Shop, 274 N Goodman St. 271-3354. 8 p.m. $15. Mark Viavattine Duo. Bistro 135, 135 W Commercial St, East Rochester. 662-5555. 6 p.m. Free. [ Karaoke ] Karaoke. 140 Alex, 140 Alexander St. 256-1000. 10:30 p.m. Free. Karaoke. Pineapple Jacks, 485 Spencerport Rd. 247-5225. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke. McKenzie’s Irish Pub, 3685 W Henrietta Rd. 3348970. 8 p.m. Free. Karaoke. Westside Sports Bar & Grill, 1600 Lyell Ave. 4587888. 9 p.m. Call for tix. Karaoke. Applebee’s-Gates, 2120 Chili Ave. 426-7630. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke w/Karaoke King. Jeremiah’s Tavern, 1104 Monroe Ave. 461-1313. 9 p.m. Free. [ Open Mic ] Hotel Noize. Dub Land Underground, 315 Alexander St. 232-7550. 6-9 p.m. Free. Open Jam. Mo’s Mulberry St, 191 Lee Rd. 647-3522. 8 p.m. Free. Open Mic Night. Lovin’ Cup, Park Point @ RIT. 292-9940. 9 p.m. Free. Open Mic w/Beau. Sully’s Pub, 242 South Ave. 232-3960. 10 p.m. Free. Open Mic w/Rapier Slices. Clarissa’s, 293 Clarissa St. 4542680. 7-11 p.m. $3-$5. Open Mic w/String Theory. Johnny’s Irish Pub, 1382 Culver Rd. 224-0990. 8 p.m. Free. Talent Night. Mamouche, 384 East Ave. 325-5010. 7 p.m. Free. [ Pop/Rock ] Amanda Ashley. Lemoncello, 137 W Commercial St, E Rochester. 385-8565. 7 p.m. Free. Black Label Society w/ Children of Bodom, Clutch, 2Cents. Main Street Armory, 900 E Main St. 232-3221. 6 p.m. $35-$40.

JOIN US THIS WEEKEND

Don Christiano w/A Little Help from My Friends: The Beatles Unplugged. Abilene, 153 Liberty Pole Way. 232-3230. 7-9 p.m. Free. Lord Jeff w/Many Mansions, Cavalcade, Tom Evanchuck. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 4542966. 9 p.m. $6-$8.

FOR THE OPENING OF THE

DICKENS

FESTIVAL!

Wednesday, November 10 [ Acoustic/Folk ] PJ Elliott. Miceli’s, 1011 Rt 31, Macedon. 986-2954. 7-10 p.m. Free. Ralph Louis. Lento, 274 N Goodman. 271-3470. 7:30 p.m. Free. Tom Gravino. Cafe 54, 54 W Main St, Victor. 742-3649. 6 p.m. Free. [ Blues ] Bobby Henrie & the Goners. Dinosaur Bar-B-Que, 99 Court St. 325-7090. 10 p.m. Free. Tony Gianavola. Beale Street Cafe, 693 South Ave. 2714650. 6 p.m. Free. [ Classical ] Eastman Trombone Choir. Eastman School of MusicKilbourn Hall, 26 Gibbs St., Rochester, NY. (585) 274-1100. 8 p.m. Free. Live From Hochstein. Hochstein Performance Hall, 50 N Plymouth Ave. 454-4596. 12:10 p.m. Free. RPO Honoring Our Heroes Concert. Eastman Theatre-Kodak Hall, 60 Gibbs St. 428-5990. 8 p.m. Free-$5. Trudy Moon. Geneva on the Lake, 1001 Lochland Rd, Geneva. 8003-GENEVA. 6:30-9 p.m. Free. [ DJ/Electronic ] Bad Wolf: 50s & 60s Vinyl Bop. Bug Jar, 219 Monroe Ave. 4542966. 10 p.m. Free. DJ. Blueroom, 293 Alexander St. 730-5985. 8 p.m. Free. DJ. Woody’s, 250 Monroe Ave. 730-8230. 9 p.m. Call for tix. DJ. Westside Sports Bar & Grill, 1600 Lyell Ave. 458-7888. 9 p.m. Call for tix. DJ. One, 1 Ryan Alley. 5461010. 10 p.m. Free. DJ Cosmo. Bay Bar & Grill, 372 Manitou Rd, Hilton. 392-7700. 10 p.m. Free. DJ Fat Daddy Buck. Roost, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. 321-1170. 8:30 p.m. Free. DJs Jared & Mario B. Venu Resto-Lounge, 151 St Paul St. 232-5650. 9 p.m. $5. DJs NaNa & PJ. Vertex, 169 N Chestnut St. 232-5498. 10 p.m. $3-$8. [ Jazz ] Linsdsey Holland w/RHQ. Bistro 135, 135 W Commercial St, East Rochester. 662-5555. 6 p.m. Free. Robert Chevrier. Brio Wine Bar & Grill, 3400 Monroe Ave. 5867000. 6:30 p.m. Free. The Margaret Explosion. Little Theatre Cafe, 240 East Ave. 232-3906. 7:30 p.m. Free. [ Karaoke ] Karaoke. Roost, 4853 W Henrietta Rd. 321-1170. 9:30 p.m. Free.

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JAZZ | Carl Ludwig Hübsch

Tuba player Carl Ludwig Hübsch’s Longrun Development of the Universe can sound positively melodic when it wants to. But Hübsch and his cohorts, Wolter Wierbos on trombone and Matthias Schubert on saxophone, often prefer to veer off into outer space, producing sounds that their instruments didn’t know they could make. All of these men are top practitioners of the European experimental music tradition, rooted in equal shares of the American (Sun Ra) and European (Stockhausen) avant garde. If there were sounds at the development of the universe, these are probably not too far off. Carl Ludwig Hübsch’s Longrun Development of the Universe plays Tuesday, November 9, 8 p.m. at the Bop Shop Atrium, 274 N Goodman St. $15. 271-3354, bopshop.com. — BY RON NETSKY Karaoke. German House-Keg, 315 Gregory St. 303-2234. 8:30 p.m. Free. Karaoke. Dub Land Underground, 315 Alexander St. 232-7550. 10 p.m. Free. Karaoke. Elite Bar & Grill, 398 W Main St. 527-8720. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke. Pineapple Jacks, 485 Spencerport Rd. 247-5225. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke. Jose & Willy’s, 20 Lake Shore Dr, Canandaigua. 3947960. 8:30 p.m. Free. Karaoke. Lemoncello, 137 W Commercial St, E Rochester. 385-8565. 8:30 p.m. Free. Karaoke. Applebee’s-Fairport, 585 Moseley Rd, Fairport. 4254700. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke. Mayfields Pub, 669 Winton Rd N. 288-7199. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke. Lovin’ Cup, Park Point @ RIT. 292-9940. 8:30 p.m. Call for tix. Karaoke w/DJ Bonitillo. Flat Iron Cafe, 561 State St. 454-4830. 10:30 p.m. Free. Karaoke w/DJ Flyin’ Brian. Tap Room, 364 Rt 104. 265-0055. 8:30 p.m. Free. Karaoke w/Debbie Randyn. Merchants Grill, 881 Merchants Rd. 482-2010. 9 p.m. Free. Karaoke w/Mark. Flipside Bar & Grill, 2001 E Main St. 288-3930. 8:30 p.m. Free. Krazy Karaoke. Monty’s Korner, 355 East Ave. 263-7650. 9.30 p.m. Free. Rochester Idol Karaoke. Tom’s Original, 364 State Rt 104. 2650055. 7 p.m. Free.

Open Country Jam. Sandra’s Saloon, 276 Smith St. 5465474. 7-10 p.m. Free. Open Jam w/Big Daddy Blues Band. Deweys, 1380 Lyell Ave. 254-4707. 9:30 p.m. Free. Open Jam w/Justin Gurnsey. Jukebox, 5435 Ridge Rd W, Spencerport. 352-4505. 10 p.m. Free. Open Jammin’. Spot Coffee, 200 East Ave. 613-4600. 7:30 p.m. Free. Open Mic. Boulder Coffee Co, 100 Alexander St. 454-7140. 8 p.m. Free. Open Mic. Dr’s Inn Grill & Tap Room, 1743 East Ave. 2710820. 5 p.m. Free. Open Mic w/Jam Shack Music. Stoneyard Bar & Grill, 1 Main St, Brockport. 637-3390. 9 p.m. Free. Open Mic w/Steve West. Muddy Waters Coffee House-Geneseo, 53 Main St, Geneseo. 2439111. 7-10 p.m. Free.

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[ Open Mic ] Acoustic Open Mic. Pub 511, 511 E Ridge Rd. 266-9559. 8 p.m. Free. rochestercitynewspaper.com City 19


Classical

Eastman Professor Patrick Macey recently cracked the code of a baffling Renaissance motet; Musica Spei will perform the piece at the Early Music Festival this Friday. PHOTO BY PALOMA cAPANNA

Finding the solution in silence 10th Annual Rochester Early Music Festival Friday, November 5 St. Anne Church, 1600 Mt. Hope Ave. 7:30 p.m. | $5-$15 | MusicaSpei.org [ PREVIEW ] BY PALOMA CAPANNA

It sounds like an episode of “History Detectives” gone classical. Professor Patrick Macey, chair of the musicology department at the Eastman School of Music, comes upon a song by 16th Century French composer Jean Mouton with notes of vocal parts that seem to collide into dissonance. It takes Macey three years to solve the composer’s riddle to create a harmonious interpretation of the score, and he does so just in time to include the interpretation as part of the upcoming edition of the annual Rochester Early Music Festival, taking place this week at St. Anne Church. Macey’s original assignment involved the work of French composer Josquin des Prez (c. 1450-1521). The early 1500’s was the high Renaissance period, a time of kings and queens, of marriages for political empires, of popes who conferred blessings. 20 City november 3-9, 2010

It was a time of King Francis I and Pope Leo X. And from 1502 to 1520, another French composer, Jean Mouton (c. 14591522) was in the midst of it all, working under the patronage of the king and under an honorary appointment at the Vatican under the pope. In his work on pieces by Josquin, Macey came upon the “Antequam comedam” of Mouton. “I noticed that the tenor part in the second half of the motet did not fit well with the other four voices, and it created several prominent dissonances with them,” Macey says. His curiosity was piqued, and he returned to study the Mouton when he completed his work on Josquin. “Mouton was described by a contemporary that ‘his melody flows in a supple thread’ — facili fluentem file cantum edebat,” Macey says, referencing a quote he read and translated from a 1547 text, Heinrich Glarean’s “Dodekachordon,” a treasured volume from the collection at the ESM Sibley Music Library. Macey figured that because Mouton was known for his smooth, flowing melodies, the dissonances in the score of the “Antequam comedam” simply didn’t make sense. Macey explains that in its day, the motet was a complex kind of work. A song might be taken from peasants in the countryside

and blended with a Latin text, perhaps inspired by a Bible passage. The motet was a type of chamber music, often played after super or sung in the smaller chapels of the nobility; it was more intimate than a performance for masses in cathedrals. The basic structure of the “Antequam comedam” motet is a traditional French song “Je ris et si ay la lerme” (translated by Macey from the old French: “I laugh, yet I have a tear in my eye”), sung by a single tenor, while the sopranos, altos, bass, and additional tenors sing different Latin passages from the biblical story of Job. The riddle came in the instruction by Mouton to the singers to “be foolish when time or context demand.” The instruction was reinforced by the lyrics, which include, “Have I not kept silence?” — a passage wherein Job is speaking to God. The answer to the riddle of the dissonances was to not sing the score as literally printed upon the page, but, instead, to not sing the last word — or note — of each line. The result was a beautiful, flowing melody and a piece completely consistent with the works of Mouton, Macey says. Macey took his discovery to Stephen

Marcus, music director of Musica Spei, a choral group formed in 1995 to focus

on sacred, unaccompanied choral masterworks of the 15th, 16th, and early 17th centuries. Musica Spei is also responsible for the annual Rochester Early Music Festival, now in its 10th year. Marcus was thrilled with Macey’s discovery. “Musica Spei has performed a lot of music with mathematical puzzles, backward canons, hidden composers’ names — Renaissance music is full of these,” Marcus says. “But we had never seen anything like this before.” The Early Music Festival itself brings together a number of groups and soloists from the early music community in Rochester. This year’s festival will include Baroquen Bones, Eastman Collegium Baroque Orchestra, and Eastman Collegium Viol Consort. Also on the program will be vocal and instrumental soloists, including Colleen Liggett (soprano), John A. Morabito (organ), Sophia Gibbs Kim (flute), with Bonnie Choi (harpsichord) and Deborah Fox (baroque guitar). The festival will be presented in “prism” format, with the musicians surrounding and standing among the audience, performing from the balcony, side chapels, and central aisle of the church. The program will feature works from composers ranging from Johann Sebastian Bach and Antonio Vivaldi to William Byrd and Sixt Dietrich. Dr. Joseph Finetti, chair of this year’s festival, described the festival venue of St. Anne Church as “lovely for this kind of music — warm, live, subtle, and very gentle for the sounds of early instruments.” Finetti is passionate about early music, and says of music in general, “What we hear today is not just something that sprang from rock and roll 20 years ago, or from somebody’s brain or fingers on the keyboard just last night. It’s all built. It’s a grand pyramid. When you hear something today, it was based on this grand tradition that started many centuries ago.” After nearly five centuries, Mouton’s “Antequam comedam” will find its modern voice through Musica Spei at the upcoming festival. For Macey, there is a certain joy that the piece has been properly revived. At a rehearsal of Musica Spei on October 25, Macey, for the first time, heard Mouton’s piece performed with live singers. “It was great,” said Macey, a broad smile coming across his face. “It sounded just great.”


Art Exhibits [ Openings ] “A Documentation of Dutch Culture,” creative writing and photographs by GCC and SUNY Brockport students Thu Nov 4. Genesee Community College Lobby Arts Gallery, 1 College Rd., Batavia. 1 p.m. 343-0055 x 6814, genesee.edu. “Nature and Nurture: Mothers, Daughters, and Sisters,” group show Thu Nov 4. Penfield Arts Center repARTee Gallery, 2131 Five Mile Line Rd. 5-8:30 p.m. 586-5192, penfieldartscenter. com. “Boots & Shoes: Variations on a Theme” Fri Nov 5. The Shoe Factory Co-op, 250 N. Goodman St., Studios 212 & 215. 6-9:30 p.m. studio212@shoefactoryarts. com, shoefactoryarts.com. “Celebrating the Arts” Music and dance inspired artwork by local and international artists Fri Nov 5. Nan Miller Gallery, 3450 Winton Place. 6-9 p.m. 292-1430, nanmillergallery.com. Cellist performance. RSVP. “Celebration of Color” by Ruth Haas Fri Nov 5. Renaissance Art Gallery, 74 St. Paul St. 6-8 p.m. 423-8235, rochesterrenaissanceartgallery. com. “Everything in Time: Maximalist Methodologies by Media Artists” Fri Nov 5. Visual Studies Workshop, 31 Prince St. 6-9 p.m. 442-8676, vsw.org. Call for appointment: 944-9220 “The Finger Lakes: Glimpses of Paradise” by John Francis McCarthy” Fri Nov 5. Image City Photography Gallery, 722 University Ave. 58:30 p.m. 482-1976, imagecityphotographygallery.com. “Flash of the Surreal.” photography by Laura Prochilo Fri Nov 5. Gallery @ Equal=Grounds, 750 South Ave. 6-8 p.m. gallery@ equalgrounds.com. “Holiday Joy” by Joy Naegler Fri Nov 5. Rochester Medical Museum & Archives, 333 Humboldt St. 4-7 p.m. 9221847, viahealth.org/archives. “Holiday Show” featuring Maggi Bartlett & Nancy Topolski Fri Nov 5. Crocus Clay Works Gallery, Hungerford Building Door #2, Suite 225, 1115 E. Main St. 5-9 p.m. 469-8217, crocusclayworks.com. “Judy’s Travels,” paintings by Judy Soprano Fri Nov 5. Finger Lakes Gallery & Frame, 36 S. Main St. 4-7 p.m. 396-7210. “A Life Reviewed: George Eastman through the Viewfinder” photos by Emma Powell and “Eat a Peach” photos by Lisa Asamucci Fri Nov 5. Booksmart Studio, 250 N. Goodman St. 6-9 p.m. 1-800761-6623, booksmartstudio.com. Lisa Zaccour and Other Aritsts Fri Nov 5. Main Street Artists’ Gallery and Studio, The Hungerford, 1115 E. Main St., Door 2, Studio 458. 5-9 p.m. suzi@suzizeftingkuhn.com. Live jazz 6-8 p.m. Patricia Hill Fri Nov 5. Rubino’s, 1659 Mount Hope Ave. 5-7:30 p.m. 271-0110, rubinos.net. Rochester Art Club: Joy Argento, Joan Dwyer, Peggy Martinez, and Christine Waara Fri Nov 5. The Hungerford, 1115 E. Main St. Door 2, Studio 437-439. 6-9 p.m.

ART EVENT | First Friday

November seems to be photography exhibit month, but that’s not the only media Rochester has in store for you this First Friday. The monthly city-wide gallery night is held by non-profit, university, and commercial and indie art venues in Rochester, where we all trot about from station to station, filling our eyes and ears with what’s new and exciting in our community. On Friday, November 5, 6-9 p.m. (and sometimes later) you can check out art openings, poetry readings, and musical performances in various locations. Visit firstfridayrochester.org for a list of this month’s participating venues, and check out all the flyers in cafes and such for more events happening the same night. Here are just a few: Equal Grounds coffee house (750 South Ave, gallery@ equalgrounds.com) will host an opening reception for “A Flash of the Surreal,” an exhibition of high-contrast black-and-white photography by Laura Prochilo, 6-8 p.m. “Simplicity” is another photo show of work by the Community Darkroom Monitors, which opens at the Community Darkroom at the Genesee Center for the Arts and Education (713 Monroe Ave, 244-1730) 7-9 p.m. The Gallery at the Record Archive (33 1/3 Rockwood St., 244-1210) presents works from the “Dreams” series by D.C.based photographer and painter Tré, with a reception 6-9 p.m. featuring music by Tommy Brunett. And at Image City Photography Gallery (722 University Ave, 472-2005), John Francis McCarthy shows us “The Finger Lakes: Glimpses of Paradise” and signs books 5-8:30 p.m. On the new-gallery front, we have painting, sculpture, photography, and more in the “Shoes and Boots: Variations on a Theme” show at the Shoe Factory Art Co-op (250 N. Goodman St., studios 212 & 215, shoefactoryarts.com), a new art collective made up of local artists Jim Mott, Beth Brown, Russ Lunn, and Heather Erwin, and featuring a multitude of local artists, including the work of Michael Rivera (pictured). The 6-10 p.m. opening reception will also feature live “sole” music, and guests are encouraged to sport their favorite footwear. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY suzi@suzizefting-kuhn.com. “Sermon on the Mount II,” work by Richmond Futch Fri Nov 5. A.R.T.S. Gallery at Aviv Café, 321 East Ave. 6-10 p.m. 729-9916. “Sculptural Ceramic and Photography” work by Cheryl Hungerford and Jeanne Sozio Fri Nov 5. A Different Path Gallery, 27 Market St., Brockport. 6-9 p.m. 637-5494, differentpathgallery.com. “Simplicity” work by Community Darkroom Monitors Fri Nov 5. Community Darkroom Gallery, 713 Monroe Ave. 7-9 p.m. 2715920, geneseearts.org. “Size Matters: An Exhibit of Large Scale and Small Works” Fri Nov 5. FourWalls Gallery, 34 Elton St. 6-9 p.m. 442-7824, fourwallsartgallery@gmail.com. Tré Fri Nov 5. Record Archive,

33 1/3 Rockwood St. 6-9 p.m. alayna@recordarchive.com. Work by Debora Bartlett Fri Nov 5. Bead Breakout, 2314 Monroe Ave. 6-9 p.m. 271-2340, beadbreakout.com. Work by Joyce D. Cordone, Sally Moses, Bud Prince, Dennis Revitzky, and Dodie Twohig Fri Nov 5. Carriage House Gallery, American Association of University Women (AAUW) Art Forum and Gallery, 494 East Ave. 6-9 p.m. 244-8890, aauwrochester.org. Webster Art Club’s Fall Show Wed Nov 10. Webster Public Library, 980 Ridge Rd, Webster. 6:308:30 p.m. 265-2194 [ CONTINUING ] 1975 Gallery at Surface Salon, 658 South Ave. Through continues on page 22 rochestercitynewspaper.com City 21


ART EVENTS | Craft Shows & Sales

Get a jump on holiday shopping while supporting local indie arts and crafts businesses. Over the next two months, you’re going to see a multitude of shows and sales, beginning this week with a couple of small shows. The Mayday! Underground show will return on Saturday, November 6, 10 a.m.-4 p.m., this time in the Village Gate atrium (274 N. Goodman St.). More than 50 indie designers will offer their wares, ranging from eclectic jewels to paintings, ceramic birdhouses to letterpress items, steel pipe industrial candelabras to comics, tiny felted animals, and much more. Admission is free, and early birds get free swag bags. For updates, information, and to preview the goods, visit the blog at maydayunderground.wordpress.com. Hand-woven fashions, furnishings, and fine art goods, along with jewelry and other fine crafts, will be offered Friday through Sunday, November 5-7, at the Weaver’s Guild of Rochester’s Holiday Sale. The event takes place Friday noon-8 p.m., Saturday 10 a.m.-8 p.m., and Sunday 11 a.m.-5 p.m. at Clark Lodge in Brighton Town Park (777 Westfall Rd.). The admission and live musical entertainment are free; for more information visit weaversguildofrochester.org. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY

Art Exhibits Nov 12: “Cinemonstrum! A Celebration of Movie Monster Mythology.” Tue-Thu 12-8 p.m., Fri 11 a.m.-7 p.m., Sat 10 a.m.4 p.m. 1975ish.com A Different Path Gallery 27 Market St., Brockport. Nov 5-30: “Sculptural Ceramic and Photography,” work by Cheryl Hungerford and Jeanne Sozio. Wed-Fri 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Sat 10 a.m.-6 p.m., Sun 10 a.m.-4 p.m. 637-5494, differentpathgallery.com. American Association of University Women (AAUW) Art Forum and Gallery 494 East Ave. Nov 9-Dec 31: Annual Members Exhibit. | In the Carriage House Gallery: Nov 530: Work by Joyce D. Cordone, Sally Moses, Bud Prince, Dennis Revitzky, and Dodie Twohig. By appt.only. 2448890, aauwrochester.org. Artisan Works 565 Blossom Rd. Through Dec 31: “Fade to White” Photography/Video Installation by Michael Rivera | Fri-Sat 11 a.m.-6 p.m., Sun Noon-5 p.m. $8-$12. 2887170, artisanworks.net. A.R.T.S. Gallery at Aviv Café 321 East Ave. Nov 5-30: “Sermon on the Mount II,” work by Richmond Futch, Fri 6-11 p.m., Sun 8 a.m.1 p.m. 729-9916. Bead Breakout 2314 Monroe Ave. Nov 5-30: Work by Debora Bartlett. Tue-Sat 10 a.m.-6 p.m., Mon & Wed 10 a.m.-9 p.m. 2712340, beadbreakout.com

Books Etc. 78 W. Main St., Macedon. Through Dec 14: “3 Visions: The Work of Marie Starr, Till Fritzsching, and Richard Lacey.” MonThu Noon-5 p.m. 474-4116, books_etc@yahoo.com. Booksmart Studio 250 N. Goodman St. Opens Nov 5: “A Life Reviewed: George Eastman through the Viewfinder” photos by Emma Powell and “Eat a Peach” photos by Lisa Asamucci. Mon-Fri 9 a.m.-6 p.m.; Sat 10 a.m.4 p.m. 1-800-761-6623, booksmartstudio.com. Chait Fine Art Gallery 234 Mill St. Nov 9-Dec 12: “Structural Sponteneity” watercolor abstractions by Stu Chait. Fri 6-9 p.m., Sat-Sun 12-4 p.m. schait@ chaitstudios.com. CIAS Dean’s Gallery Frank E. Gannett Hall, Room 1115, Rochester Institute of Technology. Through Dec 31: Photographs by Carl Chiarenza. Mon-Fri 9 a.m.-5 p.m. rit.edu. Community Darkroom Gallery 713 Monroe Ave. Opens Nov 5: “Simplicity.” | Through Nov 14: “Original Stain: New Alternative Imaging.” Mon 9 a.m.-9:30 p.m.; Tue-Thu 9 a.m.-6:30 p.m.; Fri closed; Sat 10 a.m.-5:30 p.m.; Sun 11 a.m.-3:30 p.m. 2715920, geneseearts.org. Crocus Clay Works Gallery Hungerford Building Door #2, Suite 225, 1115 E. Main St. Nov 5-27: “Holiday Show” featuring Maggi Bartlett & Nancy Topolski. Tue-Wed 5-8 p.m., Sat 10 a.m.-3

22 City november 3-9, 2010

p.m., or by appointment. 4698217, crocusclayworks.com. Davison Gallery at Roberts Wesleyan College 2301 Westside Drive. Through Nov 6: “Howe, Jacque, Merrit & Zakin: Clay Works.” | In the Northeastern Seminary, Through Nov 15: “A Global Portrait: Ink Wash Drawings by Barbara Stout.” Mon-Fri 11 a.m.-5 p.m.; Sat 1-4 p.m. roberts.edu. Finger Lakes Gallery & Frame 36 S. Main St. Nov 5-28: “Judy’s Travels,” paintings by Judy Soprano. Mon-Wed 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; Thu 10 a.m.-8 p.m.; Fri 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; Sat 10 a.m.-4 p.m. 396-7210. FourWalls Gallery 34 Elton St. Nov 5-Dec 17: “Size Matters: An Exhibit of Large Scale and Small Works.” Thu-Fri 2-6 p.m.; Sat 1-5 p.m. 442-7824, fourwallsartgallery@gmail.com. Gallery @ Equal=Grounds 750 South Ave. Nov 5-30: “Flash of the Surreal.” photography by Laura Prochilo. Tue-Fri 7 a.m.-Midnight, Sat-Sun 10 a.m.-Midnight. gallery@equalgrounds.com. Gallery Salon & Spa 780 University Ave. Through Jan 3, 2011: Linda Hermans and Paul Schramm. Tue-Thu 11 a.m.-8 p.m., Fri 11 a.m.-7 p.m., Sat 9:30 a.m.-3 p.m. Contact 2718340, galleryhair.com. Genesee Community College Lobby Arts Gallery 1 College Rd., Batavia. Nov 4-Dec 6: “A Documentation of Dutch Culture,” creative writing and photographs by GCC and SUNY Brockport students. Normal college hours. 343-0055 x 6814, genesee.edu. George Eastman House 900 East Ave. Nov 6-Jan 16: “All Shook Up: Hollywood and the Evolution of Rock n’ Roll.” | Nov 10-Dec 15: “Sweet Creations: Gingerbread House Display.” | Through Jan 23: “Taking Aim: Unforgettable Rock ‘n’ Roll Photographs Selected by Graham Nash.” | Tue-Sat 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Thu 10 a.m.-8 p.m., Sun 1-5 p.m. $4-$10. 2713361, eastmanhouse.org Gilded Square Picture Framing & Gallery 714 University Ave. Through Nov 12: “Garden of Desire” by Paul Brandwein. Tue-Fri 11 a.m.-5 p.m., Sat 11 a.m.-3 p.m. 461-2808, gildedsquare.com. Hartnett Gallery University of Rochester, Wilson Commons. Through Nov 14: “(in)securities & exchange” by Heather F. Wetzel. Tue-Fri 11 a.m.-7 p.m.; Sat-Sun Noon-5 p.m. 275-4188, blogs. rochester.edu/Hartnett. Image City Photography Gallery 722 University Ave. Nov 3-28: “The Finger Lakes: Glimpses of Paradise” by John Francis McCarthy.” | Through Nov 31: “Inspiration and Transformation,” photography by Betsy Phillips, Richard Harvey, and JFK/AJVK. Wed-Sat 11 a.m.-7 p.m.; Sun noon-4 p.m. 482-1976, imagecityphotographygallery.com. International Art Acquisitions 3300 Monroe Ave. Through Nov 30: “The Nympheas” series by Linda Kall. Mon-Fri 10 a.m.9 p.m.; Sat 10 a.m.-6 p.m.; Sun Noon-5 p.m. 264-1440, internationalartacquisitions.com. Kinetic Gallery SUNY Geneseo 1 College Circle. Through Nov 11:

“Parabolic Path” by Caol Nickol. Mon-Thu Noon-8 p.m.; Fri Noon5 p.m.; Sat 1-3 p.m. kinetic@ geneseo.edu. Little Theatre Café 240 East Ave. Through Nov 12: Claire Mann. Sun 5-8 p.m.; Mon-Thu 5-10 p.m.; Fri-Sat 5-11 p.m. 2580403, thelittle.org. Memorial Art Gallery 500 University Ave. Through Jan 2: “Psychedelic: Optical & Visionary Art Since the 1960s.” | Through Dec 12: “Episodes from an Unwritten History: Claude Bragdon and Fritz Trautmann” in Lockhart Gallery. | Wed-Sun 11 a.m.-5 p.m., Thu until 9 p.m., $4-$10. Thu night reduced price: $6 from 5-9 p.m. 276-8900, mag.rochester.edu. Mill Art Center & Gallery, 61 N Main St, Honeoye Falls. Through Nov 27: “September Art Crescendo 2010” Gallery Members Exhibition. Mon-Fri & Sat 11 a.m.-3 p.m., Fri 11 a.m.-8 p.m. Free624-7740, millartcenter.com. MCC Mercer Gallery 1000 E. Henrietta Rd. Through Nov 28: Director’s Choice: Ed Murr Illustration | Through December: “Tribute to Hip Hop” Mural by Carmello (Melo) Ortiz.| Sibley Window Project (East Ave.) Torell Arnold “Bee-cause Art Means the World to Me.” Mon, Wed, Fri 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; Tue, Thu 10 a.m.-7 p.m. 292-2021. Nan Miller Gallery 3450 Winton Place. Through Dec 1: “Celebrating the Arts” Music and dance inspired artwork by local and international artists; Rochester City Ballet’s Cinderella costume on display. Mon-Sat 10 a.m.-5 p.m. 292-1430, nanmillergallery.com. Nazareth College Arts Center Gallery 4245 East Ave. Through Nov 13: Nazareth College Department of Art Faculty Exhibition. Tue-Thu 1-4 p.m., Fri-Sat 1-8 p.m. 389-5073, naz.edu. Nazareth College Casa Italiana LeChase Lounge 4245 East Ave. Through Nov 12: “Forma” by Teri Giuliano. Mon-Fri 8:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m. 389-2469, casa@naz.edu. NTID Dyer Arts Center 52 Lomb Memorial Dr. Through Nov 19: “Nancy Rourke: Expressionist Paintings” and “Uzi Buzgalo: Wealth of Hands, A Mixed Media Exhibition.” Mon-Thu 9:30 a.m.4 p.m.; Fri 9:30 a.m.-7 p.m.; Sat 1-3:30 p.m. 475-6884, ntid.rit. edu/dyerarts. Oxford Gallery 267 Oxford St. Through Nov 27: Charles Houseman and Ray Easton. TueFri Noon-5 p.m; Sat 10 a.m.-5 p.m. 271-5885, oxfordgallery.com. Penfield Arts Center repARTee Gallery 2131 Five Mile Line Rd. Nov 4-Dec 23: “Nature and Nurture: Mothers, Daughters, and Sisters,” group show. Wed-Sat 1-5 p.m. 586-5192, penfieldartscenter.com. Record Archive 33 1/3 Rockwood St. Nov 5-30: Tré. Mon-Sat 10 a.m.-9 p.m., Sun noon-5 p.m. alayna@recordarchive.com. Renaissance Art Gallery 74 St. Paul St. Nov 5-27: “Celebration of Color” by Ruth Haas. TueSat 11 a.m.-5 p.m. 423-8235, rochesterrenaissanceartgallery. com.

THEATER | Festival of New Theatre

If you’re looking for something new on stage, this week Geva Theatre Center launches its Festival of New Theatre 2010. Running Thursday, November 4, through Sunday, November 14, the series will feature a mix of new works by local and national playwrights, some of them still in the development process. “…And So it Goes,” by Aaron Posner, is a play adapted from the earlier stories of Kurt Vonnegut, known for his darkly comedic science-fiction novels. The piece runs Thursday, November 4, and Saturday, November 6, at 7 p.m. Popular local drag performer Kasha Davis (pictured) will dish out lessons in life, love, and looking fabulous in “An Evening with Mrs. Kasha Davis, International Celebrity Housewife,” by Ed Popil. The show runs Friday, November 5, at 7 p.m. A twisted story of an ambitious journalist scoring the interview of a lifetime with serial killer Arthur Shawcross, Lori Marra’s “Mystic Castle” will take the stage Wednesday, November 10, at 7 p.m. The plays will be presented in an informal, script-in-hand format, and followed by a discussion with the playwright. All take place at the Nextstage at Geva Theatre Center (75 Woodbury Blvd). Tickets are free, but reservations are required. For more information call 232-4382 or visit gevatheatre.org. — BY CAITLIN SHAPIRO Rochester Contemporary Arts Center 137 East Ave. Through Nov 14: “Geometries” Recent Works by Christopher McNulty and Andy Gilmore. Wed-Sun 1-5 p.m., Fri 1-10 p.m. 461-2222, rochestercontemporary.org. $1. Rochester Medical Museum & Archives Nov 5-Dec 17: “Holiday Joy” by Joy Naegler. MonFri 9 a.m.-4 p.m. 922-1847, viahealth.org/archives. Rochester Regional Community Design Center Hungerford Complex/E. Main Business Park. Door 3B. Through Nov 30: “Slow & Steady,” photographs by Christin Boggs. Mon-Fri 8:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m. 271-0520, rrcdc.com. The Shoe Factory Co-op 250 N. Goodman St., Studios 212 & 215. Opens Nov 5: “Boots & Shoes: Variations on a Theme.” Call for hours. studio212@shoefactoryarts.com, shoefactoryarts.com. SUNY Brockport Tower Fine Arts Center 350 New Campus Drive, Brockport. Through Dec 12: “Variable Editions and Peripheral Illuminations,” Printmaking and Bookmaking Exhibit. Mon-Fri 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; Sun 1-4 p.m. 395ARTS, brockport.edu/finearts. SUNY Geneseo Lederer Gallery 1 College Circle, Brodie Hall. Through Dec 4: “El Sauce/

Nicaragua.” Mon-Thu 12:303:30 p.m., Fri-Sat 12:30-5:30 p.m. 243-6785. SUNY Geneseo Lockhart Gallery McClellan House, 26 Main St., Geneseo. Through Dec 4: “From the Permanent Collection/New Acquisitions.” Mon-Thu:12:303:30 p.m.; Fri-Sat 12:30-5:30 p.m. Closed for Thanksgiving Break Nov 23-28. geneseo.edu. Tapas 177 Lounge 177 St. Paul St. Nov 2-30: “El Espiritu de Chiapas” photo exhibit by Deb Smith and Deborah Benedetto. Mon-Sat 4:30 p.m.-2 a.m., Sun 5:30 p.m.-2 a.m. 262-2090, tapas177.com. Visual Studies Workshop 31 Prince St. Nov 5-Dec 16: “Everything in Time: Maximalist Methodologies by Media Artists.” Thu 5-8 p.m., Fri-Sun noon-5 p.m. 442-8676, vsw.org. Call for appointment: 944-9220 Webster Public Library 980 Ridge Rd, Webster. Nov 6-Dev 4: Webster Art Club’s Fall Show. Mon-Thu 10 a.m.-9 p.m., Fri 10 a.m.-6 p.m., Sat 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Sun 1-4 p.m. 265-2194. Williams Gallery 220 S Winton Rd. Through Nov 15: “Endangered Us!” by Margot Fass. Mon-Fri 9 a.m.-2 p.m. 2719070, rochesterunitarian.org. Williams-Insalaco Gallery 34 at FLCC, 3325 Marvin Sands Dr.,


S E RV I N G

Canandaigua. Through Nov 19: “Mostly Bowls,” Ceramics by David MacDonald. Mon-Thu 8:30 a.m.-9 p.m., Fri 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m., Sat-Sun noon-5 p.m. 3943500 x7369, gallery34@flcc.edu.

GREAT FOOD NIGHTLY 5-10PM ••••MUNCHIES•••• ••••PANINIS &•••• SANDWICHES ••••BUFFALO•••• DRUMSTICKS

Theater

“6 Guitars.” Ongoing Downstairs Cabaret Theatre, 20 Windsor St. Fri-Sat 8 p.m., Sun 3 p.m. $27-$32. 325-4370, downstairscabaret.com. “...And So It Goes.” Thu Nov 4-Sat Nov 6. Part of the What’s Next: Festival of New Theatre. Geva Theatre Center, 75 Woodbury Blvd. Thu & Sat 7 p.m. Free; reservations required. 232-4382, gevatheatre.org. “The Arsonists.” Fri Nov 5-Nov 21. Bread and Water Theatre. 243 Rosedale St. Fri-Sat 8 p.m. $6$12. breadandwatertheatre.org. “Carry It On.” Through Nov 14. Featuring Maureen McGovern. Geva Theatre Center, 75 Woodbury Blvd. Wed Nov 3-Thu 7:30 p.m., Fri 8 p.m., Sat 4 & 8:30 p.m., Sun 7 p.m., Tue 7:30 p.m., Wed Nov 10 2 p.m. $22$59. 232-GEVA, gevatheatre.org. “Cindy Miller: I’ve Got the Music in Me.” Ongoing. Downstairs Cabaret Theatre, 20 Windsor St. Wed Nov 3 7 p.m. $29-$36. 3254370, downstairscabaret.com. “Drinking Habits.” Fri Nov 5-Nov 21. Greece Paint Players. Golden Ponds Restaurant & Party House, 500 Long Pond Rd. Fri-Sat 6:30 p.m., Sun 3 p.m. $27/includes dinner. 225-2419, 865-9742. Eastman Opera Theatre: Triple Bill of Chamber Operas. Thu Nov 4Sat Nov 6. Featuring Hindemith’s “Hin und Zuruck (There and Back),” Ward’s “Roman Fever,” and Heggie’s “To Hell and Back.” Kilbourn Hall, 26 Gibbs St. ThuSat 7:30 p.m. $10-$20. esm. rochester.edu. “An Evening with Mrs. Kasha Davis, International Celebrity Housewife.” Fri Nov 5. Part of the What’s Next: Festival of New Theatre. Geva Theatre Center, 75 Woodbury Blvd. Fri 7 p.m. Free; reservations required. 232-4382, gevatheatre.org. “The Grand Duke (or, The Statuatory Duel).” Fri Nov 5-Nov 14. Off-Monroe Players. Salem United Church of Christ, 60 Bittner St. Fri-Sat 8 p.m., Sun 2 p.m. Free. 234-0500, offmonroeplayers.org. “Guys & Dolls.” Fri Nov 5-Nov 13. A Magical Journey Thru Stages. Upstage 3, 875 E Main St, 3rd Fl. Fri-Sat 7 p.m., Sun 2 p.m. $12. Stages@MJTStages. com, 935-7173. “Inherit the Wind.” Thu Nov 4-Sun Nov 7. NTID Performing Arts. Panara Theatre, RIT. ThuSat 7:30 p.m., Sun 2 p.m. $5-$7. rit.edu/ntid/theatre. “Judith: A Parting from the Body.” Thu Nov 4-Sat Nov 6. The Opposite of People Theatre Company. University of Rochester - Drama House. Thu & Sat 8-9 p.m. Free. kburritt@ u.rochester.edu. “Little Red’s Most Unusual Day.” Sat Nov 6-Sun Nov 7. Children’s opera by Mercury Opera Rochester. Harley School, 1981 Clover St. Sat-Sun 2 p.m. $5

KIDS EVENT | Rochester Children’s Book Festival

When I was a young’un’, one of my favorite special events at school was the annual book fair. On Saturday, November 6, 10 a.m.-4 p.m., the fortunate children of Rochester can attend the ultimate book fair. The 14th Annual Rochester Children’s Book Festival will take place in the R. Thomas Flynn Center on the Monroe Community College Brighton Campus (1000 E. Henrietta Rd.), and will include activities, storytelling, and book signings with 40 children’s book authors and illustrators.

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This year’s featured authors include award-winning fantasy and science-fiction author Jane Yolen, and picture-book author and illustrator Mark Teaque. Admission and parking are free, and books will be available for purchase. Stories vary from spies and traitors to polar bears, and you can check out local author Vivian Vande Velde’s take on Red Riding Hood, or Julie Cummins’ story about local daredevil Sam Patch. For more information and the program schedule, visit rochesterchildrensbookfestival.org. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY children under 13, $15 adults. mercuryoperarochester.org. “Little Women.” Thu Nov 4Sat Nov 6. Mercy Auditorium, 1437 Blossom Road. Thu-Sat 7:30 p.m. $8-$10. mbianchi@ mercyhs.com. “Macbeth.” Through Nov 13. Shakespeare Players of Rochester. MuCCC, 142 Atlantic Ave. Thu-Sat 8 p.m. $5-$15. muccc.org. “Marc Salem’s Mindgames.” Ongoing Downstairs Cabaret Theatre Center, 540 E Main St. Fri 8 p.m., Sat 5 & 8 p.m. $27-$32. 325-4370, downstairscabaret.com. “Menopause: The Musical.” Fri Nov 5-Sun Nov 7. Rochester Broadway Theatre League. Auditorium Theatre, 875 E Main St. Fri 8 p.m., Sat 2 & 8 p.m., Sun 2 p.m. $37.50-$47.50. 800745-3000, rbtl.org. “A Murder Is Announced.” Sat Nov 6-Nov 14. Footlight Players. Masonic Hall, 133 S Union St, Spencerport. Sat 7:30 p.m., Sun 2 p.m. $10-$12. 225-6163. “Mystic Castle.” Wed Nov 10. Part of the What’s Next: Festival of New Theatre. Geva Theatre Center, 75 Woodbury Blvd. Wed Nov 10 7 p.m. Free; reservations required. 232-4382, gevatheatre.org. “Orifice: A New Play.” Fri Nov 5-Nov 7. The Opposite of People Theatre Company. University of Rochester - Drama House. Fri & Sun 8-9 p.m. Free. kburritt@ u.rochester.edu. “The Sunshine Boys.” Fri Nov 5-Nov 20. Penfield Players. Penfield Community Recreation Center, 1985 Baird Rd, Penfield. Fri-Sat 8 p.m. $12-$15. penfieldplayers.org. “Tortoise and the Hare.” Sat Nov 6. TYKEs: Theatre Young Kids

Enjoy. Jewish Community Center, 1200 Edgewood Ave. Sat 1 & 3:30 p.m. $11. 461-2000 x235, tykestheatre.org. “Tosca.” Sat Nov 6. Smith Opera House, 82 Seneca St, Geneva. Sat 7 p.m. $16. 315-789-2221, the smith.org. “Willy Wonka.” Fri Nov 5-Nov 13. Artists Unlimited. German House Theatre, 315 Gregory St. Fri-Sat 8 p.m., Sun 2 p.m. $11-$12. thegermanhouse.com. “The Wizard of Oz.” Thu Nov 4-Sat Nov 6. Best Foot Forward children’s theater company. Jefferson Road Elementary School, 15 School Lane, Pittsford. Thu-Fri 6:30 p.m., Sat 3 & 6:30 p.m. $6. 398-0220, bestfootforwardkids.com. “Young Frankenstein.” Tue Nov 9-Nov 14. Rochester Broadway Theatre League. Auditorium Theatre, 875 E Main St. Tue-Thu 7:30 p.m., Fri 8 p.m., Sat 2 & 8 p.m., Sun 2 & 7 p.m. $32.50$64.50. 800-745-3000, rbtl.org. Young Writers Showcase. Sat Nov 6-Sun Nov 7. Part of the What’s Next: Festival of New Theatre. Geva Theatre Center, 75 Woodbury Blvd. Sat-Sun 3 p.m. Free; reservations required. 2324382, gevatheatre.org.

Auditions

Erotic Nights. Sat Nov 6. Seeking male and female poets, dancers, musicians, visual artists, and comedians for Erotic Nights series. Equal Grounds Coffee House, 750 South Ave. Sat 7 p.m. 442-5432. Geneseo Community Players. Wed Nov 10-Tue Nov 11. Holds auditions for “Don’t Dress for Dinner.” Wadsworth Auditorium Rm 21, SUNY continues on page 24 rochestercitynewspaper.com City 23


Art

Auditions

hinting at the capacity for creation present in all of nature. Almost the inverse of this work is “Lower Depths,” a three-dimensional square, its interior receding inward toward the wall, each smaller square is slightly cocked to create a spiral staircase effect. Sculpted and painted forms emerge from the center. “I love form, space, and color with equal intensity,” Brandwein says. “The two pieces titled ‘Portal’ demonstrate this best. In the past I have called related pieces ‘Yoni,’ referring to Hindu images of a cosmic vulva/womb.” “Red Portal” and “Blue Portal” are fraternal twin shield-like shapes, glowingly painted with crackling, fiery energy emitting from central objects of a distorted square and an oval. Deliberately yoni-shaped is “Crucible,” where the physical universe is forged. Hot colors on the rippled surface peak toward the center, which drops off into negative space, in which float variously sized spheres. The oval form minimizes at the bottom, and wire trails whip-like to the ground. Viewers of Brandwein’s wall-mounted work

“One Man Band” by Paul Brandwein, part of “Garden of Desire” now at Gilded Square. PHOTO PROVIDED

Nice niche “Garden of Desire” By Paul Brandwein Through November 12 Gilded Square Picture Framing and Gallery, 714 University Ave. 461-2808, gildedsquare.com. Tuesday-Friday 11 a.m.-5 p.m., Saturday 11 a.m.-3 p.m. | Free [ REVIEW ] BY REBECCA RAFFERTY

Look around: there’s genitalia everywhere. No, really. Nature makes good use of the well-designed forms because they’re useful, and the architecture of the world is literally rife with those very familiar, blush-inducing forms. Many folk are conditioned to think that if you see penises and vaginae (LOL) in innocent objects, you’re suffering from a dirty, perv-y, mind, but you’re really just seeing the lusty world for what it is: a place of desire and generation. Paul Brandwein’s sexy and sacred sculptures are the kind of work that draws the viewer in aesthetically and holds them conceptually. His most recent exhibition, up at Gilded Square Picture Framing and Gallery, is entitled “Garden of Desire,” and 24 City november 3-9, 2010

is full of his characteristically colorful, bold, and beautiful ceramic and mixed-media sculptures that smoothly blend the sacred and the so-called profane, and nod to the associated concepts in both. Brandwein treats the sexual forms as sexual forms, “but there is something deeper to the work than mere arousal,” says the artist in his provided statement. He operates with a higher focus on those forms as archetypes, considering and celebrating such universal issues in natural experience as metamorphosis, desire for and fear of union, mystery and the pursuit of it, revelation, and joy. His works resemble hearts, tongues, genitalia, and more, but refer to micro- and macro-cosmic patterns found throughout the physical world. In his statement, the artist calls this small,

12-piece body of work “a union of disparate elements finding connection,” and cites the explosive “One Man Band” as an example of challenging himself to make the elements work together. The piece is an earth-colored and textured ziggurat of stacked squares. The earthen piece is bursting with bright, playful objects resembling tree branches or antlers, tongues, tails, bubbles, clouds, and more,

will birth a million spiraling associations. The pale, round fullness of the heartshaped “Ripening” is divided, peach-like, by a central, low slit, which is rimmed in bubblegum pink and lined with little nubs like magnified fruit seeds or taste buds. In the texture-heavy, rainbow-colored “Overreaching,” Brandwein shows off his colorist skills by pairing them just-so to create a subtle glowing effect, which gives way to a darkened crevasse. Below, a heavy, thick tail hangs down, ringed by more objects. “Fractal Heart” is a tongue-like form, with the lower tip shades lighter than the rest, reaching out slightly toward the viewer, giving the odd feeling of sentience. The texture coating the surface births bubbles, which birth tinier bubbles, and so on into presumed symmetrical infinity, as it goes with fractals. The work entitled “Bubbling Over” is mounted on a plaque-background with colors to contrast its 3D shape. A crimsonveined heart sprouts wiry vessels capped with bubbles, and a central top cluster of bubbles speaks of visible joy. Brandwein’s 12th work — currently in the window of the shop — is nearly undetectable in the mist of all the color bursting from the walls, due to its absence of hue. “Original Nature” is a small plank of gessoed wood with 20 tiny ceramic mounds mounted in a grid, each heavily textured, but bereft of color. The spirally objects resemble pods and clumps of dirt, raw materials of nature, and as studies, hold the quiet mystery of future works of sensuality, joy, and trepidation.

Geneseo. Wed Nov 10-Tue 7-9 p.m. blfeuerst@rochester.rr.com, geneseocommunityplayers.org. NTID Performing Arts. Mon Nov 8-Tue Nov 9. Casting deaf and hearing actors for production of “Prelude to a Kiss.” 1510 Lab Theatre, RIT. rit.edu/~w-npart. 6:30-9:30 p.m.

Art Events [ Wed., November 3 ] Workshop: Advanced Fusing Techniques and Slumping. More Fire Glass Studio, 80 Rockwood Pl. 242-0405, morefireglass.com. 6-8:30 p.m. $175 + materials, registration required. [ Thursday, November 4 ] Rochester Art Supply Trade Show 2010. High Falls Fine Art Gallery, 60 Browns Race. 546-6509, fineartstore.com. Trade show floor open from 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Roche Pastel presentation 6-8 p.m. Free admission, registration required for presentations. [ Friday, November 5 ] “Boots and Shoes: Variations on a Theme.” The Shoe Factory Art Co-op, 250 N. Goodman St., Studios 212 & 215. 732-0036, shoefactoryarts.com. 6-10 p.m. $1 suggested donation. Art and live “sole” music and spoken word. Fine Craft Show Preview Party. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. 276-8910, mag.rochester.edu. 7-9 p.m. $45-75, registration required. Includes admission to show on Saturday or Sunday. First Friday Citywide Gallery Night. Various. firstfridayrochester.org. 6-9 p.m. Free. [ Friday, November 5Sunday, November 7 ] Annual Holiday Sale. Crocus Clay Works Gallery, 1115 E Main St. 414-5643, crocusclayworks.com. Fri 5-9 p.m., Sat-Sun 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Free admission. Featuring guest artists Maggi Bartlett, Dragon Mesmer & Nancy Topolski . Weavers’ Guild of Rochester Holiday Sale. Carmen Clark Lodge, Brighton Town Park, 777 Westfall Rd. weaversguildofrochester. org. Fri 12-8 p.m., Sat 10 a.m.-8 p.m., Sun 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Free admission. [ Saturday, November 6 ] CP Rochester’s Artisan Show and Sale. 3399 Winton Road South, Henrietta. cpcommunications@ cprochester.org, cprochester.org. 9-5 p.m. Free admission. Celebration of Artworks and Artisans. RAPA, 727 East Main St. terrynotes@yahoo.com. 12 p.m. $2-5 admission, some ticketed events. Gourd Birdhouses Workshop. Ganondagan State Historical Site, 1488 State Rt 444, Victor. friends@frontiernet.net, 742-1690, ganondagan.org/workshops. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. $25-30, registration required. Ages 16+. Labors of Love Craft and Food Fair. Atonement Lutheran Church, 1900 Westfall Rd. 442-1018. 9:30 a.m.-4 p.m. Free admission. Mayday! Underground Crafts + Art. Village Gate, 274 N Goodman St. maydaycraft@aol.com. 10 a.m.-4


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p.m. Free. 50+ vendors; be free swag bags filled with handmade items for the first 50 shoppers. Metal Printing Workshop. Booksmart Studio, 250 N Goodman St. 1-800-761-6623, booksmartstudio.com. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. $225, registration required. [ Saturday, November 6Sunday, November 7 ] 10th Annual Fine Craft Show Sale. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. 276-8900, mag. rochester.edu. Sat 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Sun 11 a.m.-4 p.m. $5-10 includes gallery admission. [ Sunday, November 7 ] Mural Dedication Event. Lift Bridge Book Shop, 45 Main St, Brockport. 637-2260, liftbridge. com. 11:30 a.m. Free. What’s Up: New York, New York. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. 276-8900, mag. rochester.edu. 2 p.m. Included with gallery admission: $5-10. [ Monday, November 8Wednesday, November 10 ] Watercolor Workshop with Peggy Martinez. Rochester Art Club Studio, 1115 E. Main St. peggymartinez.net. Call for times. $120-135, registration required. [ Wed., November 10 ] Artist Talk by Geoffrey Alan Rhodes. Visual Studies Workshop, 31 Prince St. vsw.org. 7 p.m. Free. Especially for Educators: Shapes. Memorial Art Gallery, 500 University Ave. 276-8971, kdonovan@mag.rochester.edu. 4:30-7 p.m. $30, registration required. Workshop: Advanced Fusing Techniques and Slumping. More Fire Glass Studio, 80 Rockwood Pl. 242-0405, morefireglass.com. 6-8:30 p.m. $175 + materials, registration required.

Comedy [ Wed., November 3 ] Comedy Legend Gallagher. Sanibel Cottage, 1517 Empire Blvd, Webster. 671-9340. 8 p.m. $25. [ Thursday, November 4Saturday, November 6 ] Claude Stuart. Comedy Club, 2235 Empire Blvd, Webster, NY 14580. 671-9080, thecomedyclub.us. Thu 7:30 p.m., Fri-Sat 7:30 & 10 p.m. $9. [ Friday, November 5Saturday, November 6 ] Armistice Day Sketch Comedy Show. The Hungerford Theatre, 1115 E. Main St., Suite 248. meghan@stfortuneproductions. com. 9 p.m. $5-$7. [ Sunday, November 7 ] Comedians for Breast Cancer. Rochester Institute of TechnologyIngle Auditorium, 1 Lomb Memorial Dr. info@riproc.com, riproc.com. 8-11 p.m. $5. [ Monday, November 8 ] Laughin’ Cup Comedy Competition. Lovin’ Cup, Park Point @ RIT. lovincup.com. 8 p.m. Free.

Dance Events [ Thursday, November 4 ] Rochester City Ballet In-Studio Open Rehearsal. Rochester

KIDS EVENT | National Toy Hall of Fame Induction

The National Museum of Play grew from Margaret Woodbury Strong’s fascination with the dolls and trinkets that she began collecting during her world travels as a child. The museum is home to the National Toy Hall of Fame, which currently holds 44 toys, including the famous Mr. Potato Head, Candyland, and Play-Doh. This Thursday, November 4, at 10:30 a.m. the hall will induct two more toys into its ranks. Nominees for 2010 include the dollhouse, Pogo Stick, Magic 8 Ball, chess, Lite Brite, playing cards, Cabbage Patch Kids and more. A weekend-long celebration will follow the induction, with activities including the world’s largest Etch A Sketch, a working replica of the toy more than 8’ tall with a more than 6’-wide screen created by the Ohio Art Company. With it, Tim George, nicknamed “Mr. Etch A Sketch” for his meticulous creations, will also be there to show of his techniques through Monday, November 8. The National Museum of Play is located at 1 Manhattan Square. Admission costs $9-$11; all weekend events are included in general admissions fee. For more information visit museumofplay.org. — BY CAITLIN SHAPIRO City Ballet, 1326 University Ave. 461-5850, dtretter@ rochestercityballet.com. 6:30-8 p.m. $10, registration required. [ Sunday, November 7 ] Clark Dance 40th Anniversary Performance. St. Thomas Episcopal Church, 2000 Highland Ave. 4425988, elizabethclarkdance.com. 3 p.m. $5-9.

Dance Participation [ Saturday, November 6 ] NYC’s Gordon Webster Band and Swing Dance. Rochester Museum and Science Center, 657 East Ave. info@groovejuiceswing. com, groovejuiceswing.com. 7:30 p.m.-midnight. $15. Beginner swing dance lesson 7:30-8:30 p.m. No partner necessary. Rainbow SAGE’s Fall Dance. Downtown Presbyterian Church, 121 N Fitzhugh St. 244-8640, gayalliance.org. 5:30-10:30 p.m. $5.

Kids Events [ Thursday, November 4 ] Music from Around the World. Highland Library, 971 South Ave. 428-8206. 2:30 p.m. Free. All ages. National Toy Hall of Fame Induction Ceremony. Strong National Museum of Play, 1 Manhattan Sq. 263-2700, museumofplay.org. 10:30 a.m. Included with museum admission: $9-11. Wildlife Defenders Presentations. Cumming Nature Center, 6472 Gulick Rd., Naples. 374-6160, rmsc.org. 11 a.m. $5.

[ Thursday, November 4Saturday, November 6 ] “The Wizard of Oz.” Jefferson Road Elementary School, 15 School Lane, Pittsford. 398-0220, bestfootforwardkids.com. Thu-Fri 6:30 p.m., Sat 3 & 6:30 p.m. $6. [ Friday, November 5 ] Kids’ Kitchen: Chinese Cooking. Tops Cooking School, 3507 Mt Read Blvd. 663, 5449, topsmarkets.com. 6-8 p.m. $15, registration required.

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[ Saturday, November 6 ] “Tortoise and the Hare.” Jewish Community Center, 1200 Edgewood Ave. 461-2000 x235, tykestheatre.org. 1 & 3 p.m. $11. 14th Annual Rochester Children’s Book Festival. Monroe Community College, 1000 East Henrietta Rd. rochesterchildrensbookfestival. org. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Free admission. Kids’ Kitchen: Soups and Sandwiches. Tops Cooking School, 3507 Mt Read Blvd. 663, 5449, topsmarkets.com. 10 a.m.noon. $12, registration required. Science Saturday: All About Watersheds. Rochester Museum and Science Center, 657 East Ave. 271-1880, rmsc.org. 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Included in Museum Admission: $8-10. Science: Test Tube Wonders. Lift Bridge Book Shop, 45 Main St, Brockport. 637-2260, liftbridge. booksense.com. 11 a.m. $8, reservations required. Ages 8-12. Tomie dePaola’s Strega Nona The Musical. Nazareth College Arts Center, 4245 East Ave. continues on page 26 rochestercitynewspaper.com City 25


Kids Events 389-2170, boxoffice.naz.edu, artscenter.naz.edu. 11 a.m. and 2 p.m. $12-17. [ Saturday, November 6Sunday, November 7 ] “Little Red’s Most Unusual Day”. The Harley School, 1981 Clover St. 454-2100, rpo.org. 2 p.m. $5-15. [ Tuesday, November 9 ] Anime & Manga for Teens. Parma Public Library, 7 West Ave, Hilton. 392-8350. 3:30 p.m. Free. All Ages. Junior Friends. Gates Public Library, 1605 Buffalo Rd, Gates. 247-6446. 4 p.m. Free. All Ages. Kids’ Book Club. Henrietta Public Library, 455 Calkins Rd. 3597092. 4:30-5:30 p.m. Free, registration required. Grades 3-5. [ Wed., November 10 ] Books & Bites Teen Book Discussion. Great Northern Pizza, 640 Jefferson Rd. 359-7092. 6:30-7:30 p.m. Free, registration required. Ages 12+. Childrens’ Workshop: Book of Dreams. Genesee Center for the Arts & Education, 713 Monroe Ave. 271-5183, geneseearts.org. 6-7:30 p.m. $40-50, registration required.

Lectures [ Wed., November 3 ] Light Works! Your Local Metaphysical Group Presents Tarot Basics with Gloria Thayer. Brighton Town Hall, 2300 Elmwood Ave. lightworks@ frontier.com. 7 p.m. $5. Rochester & Geneseo in Solidarity with Nicaragua: “All Roads Lead to El Sauce.” Downtown Presbyterian Church, 121 N Fitzhugh St. 7686277. 7 p.m. Free. [ Thursday, November 4 ] “A Vision for the Canandaigua Lake Watershed.” Bristol Harbour, 5410 Seneca Point Rd., Canandaigua. fllt.org. 7-8:30 p.m. Free. “Geography of the Burned Over Distrirct: The Shakers” by Michael Boester. Mendon Community Center, 167 N Main St, Honeoye Falls. 624-6060. 7:30 p.m. Free. “Sjogren’s Syndrome: More Than Just Dryness” with Andrea Coca, M.D. Pittsford Community Library, 24 State St, Pittsford. 582-6114. 7 p.m. Free. Alzheimer’s Association Caregiver Education: “Aging, Dememtia, and Alzheimer’s Disease.” Rivers Run, 50 Fairwood Dr. 760-5400, alz. org/rochesterny. 1-3 p.m. Free, registration required. Alzheimer’s Association Fall Community Forum: “Care and Maintenance of the Hospitalized Brain.” 1st Floor Auditorium, Monroe Community Hospital, 435 E. Henrietta Rd. 760-5400, alz. org/rochesterny. 6:30-8 p.m. Free, registration required. Everybody Talks About it! Climate Talk with Scott Hetsko. Henrietta Public Library, 455 Calkins Rd. 359-7092. 7-8 p.m. Free, registration required. Wish You Were Here Travel Photography Lecture: Eirik Johnson. Dryden Theater, George Eastman House, 900 East Ave.

Book Reading: Genesee Reading Series: MJ Iuppa and Kitty Jospe. Writers & Books, 740 University Ave. 473-2590, wab.org. 7:30 p.m. $3-6. Poetry Reading: Spoken Word Poetry Slam & Open Mic. Tango Cafe, 389 Gregory St. 271-4930. Sign ups are taken throughout the night. Event starts at 8 p.m. Free. 389 Gregory St. Sign Ups begin at 6:45pm.

271-3361, eastmanhouse.org. 6 p.m. $6-10. [ Saturday, November 6 ] Rochester Academy of Science 37th Fall Paper Session. RIT CIMS Building 78, Lomb Memorial Dr. 802-8567, rasny. org. 8 a.m.-2 p.m. Free. [ Sunday, November 7 ] Greece Baptist Church Forum featuring Kathy and Bruce Beardsley. Greece Baptist Church, 1231 Long Pond Rd. 225-6160 or greecebaptistchurch.org. 11 a.m.noon. Free. [ Monday, November 8 ] “Using DNA to Trace AfricanAmerican Ancestry: The Science Behind the Roots Project.” Finger Lakes Community College, 4355 Lakeshore Dr, Canandaigua. 7851325. 7 p.m. Free. A Panel Discussion By Blue Star Mothers. Nazareth College Arts Center, 4245 East Ave. 3892993. 7 p.m. Free, donate new articles of clothing. College Prep Series Presented by Kaplan: The College Application Essay. Penfield Public Library, 1098 Baird Rd, Penfield. 3408720, penfieldlibrary.org. 7-8 p.m. Free, registration required. Eldersource Panel on Caregiving. Lifespan, 1900 S. Clinton Ave. Tops Brighton Plaza. 244-8400 x112, lifespan-roch.org. 5:30-7 p.m. Free, registration required. Holistic Moms: Children of Now. Christ Episcopal Church, 36 S. Main St., Pittsford. holisticmoms. org. 6:30 p.m. Free. Members of the Rochester Philharmonic “Family” Speak About a Musician’s Life. 395ARTS, brockport.edu/finearts. 6 p.m. Free. Rebecca Gilbert, flute. [ Tuesday, November 9 ] “Fair Trade 101” with One World Goods. Finger Lakes Community College, 4355 Lakeshore Dr, Canandaigua. 785-1695. 4 p.m. Free. Author Seth Rogovoy. Dewey Hall 2-162, University of Rochester, River Campus. 2755378. 6 p.m. Free. Open Letter Reading the World Conversation Series: Ledig House Roundtable. HawkinsCarlson Room, Rush Rhees Library, University of Rochester River Campus. rochester.edu/ threepercent. 6 p.m. Free. Pauline Lipman: “The assault on public education: What’s behind it and How Do We Respond?” School Without Walls, 480 Broadway. mailto:dhursh@warner.rochester. edu. 7 p.m. Free. Secrets to Website Marketing with Michael Bloch. Penfield Public Library, 1098 Baird Rd, Penfield. 340-8720, penfieldlibrary.org. 7-8:30 p.m. Free, registration required. [ Wed., November 10 ] “Winston Churchill on the Great 1914-18 War” A Talk by Gene Kramer. Barnes & Noble Pittsford, 3349 Monroe Ave. Bibliopphile Society 244-2505, oldscrolls. com. 7:30 p.m. Free. Alzheimer’s Association Presents: Creating a Comprehensive Plan. Webster Goodwill Store Community Room, 50 Webster Commons Blvd. 232-1111. 10:30-11:30 a.m. Free.

26 City november 3-9, 2010

SPECIAL EVENT | Great Bowls of Fire

I get two distinct urges when the first cold snap of the season hits us. First, I enthusiastically unpack my sweaters, and then I very impatiently await my mother’s first batch of chili. Folks with a talent for making that cozy, delicious meal tend to keep their recipe cards close to their vests, and are a bit on the competitive side: chili is one of the most popular competition dishes. Fulfill your seasonal epicurean fantasies by attending the 7th Annual Great Bowls of Fire Chili Cookoff, and support the Genesee Center for the Arts and Education while you’re at it. The tasting and competition takes place Saturday, November 6, 4:30-8:30 p.m., at the Genesee Center (713 Monroe Ave.), and costs $20 per person or $60 for a family of four (two adults, two kids under age 12). The chili will be provided by local restaurants, with live tunes by Tin Can Set. As a bonus, the beautiful handmade pottery bowl you’ll be given for your sampling is yours to take home. Tickets are available at area Wegmans, at the door of the event, and online at geneseearts.com. For more information, call 244-1730. — BY REBECCA RAFFERTY Alzheimer’s Association Educational Seminar: “Seminar for Understanding Alzheimer’s Disease.” Alzheimer’s Association Education Center, 3rd floor, Monroe Community Hospital, 435 E. Henrietta Rd. 760-5400, alz.org/rochesterny. 6:30-8:30 p.m. Free, registration required. Leadership Talk by Retired Kodak Manager and Major General Dennis Lutz. Rochester Works, 255 N. Goodman St. augustgroup.org. 9 a.m. Free. August Group general session. The New Health Care Law: What is Means to You. Lifespan, 1900 S. Clinton Ave. Tops Brighton Plaza. 244-8400 x112, lifespanroch.org. 5:30-7 p.m. Free, registration required. “Missing Mansions: East Avenue Then and Now.” Morgan-Manning House, 151 Main St, Brockport. 637-3645, brockportny.org. 7:30 p.m. Free.

Literary Events [ Thursday, November 4 ] Book Discussion: “The Things They Carried” by Tim O’Brien. Rush Public Library, 5977 E. Henrietta Rd. 533-1370. 7-8:30 p.m. Free, registration required. Poetry Reading: Poet Nancy Baird. Writers & Books, 740 University Ave. 473-2590, wab. org. 7 p.m. $3-6. Poetry Reading: Todd Davis “The Least of These.” Golisano Midlevel Gateway, St. John Fisher College, 3690 East Ave. M.J. Iuppa 3858412. 7:30 p.m. Free, registration required. [ Friday, November 5 ] First Friday Readings & Performances. Writers &

Books, 740 University Ave. 473-2590. 6 p.m. Free. Poetry Reading: Sally Bittner Bonn. Greenwood Books, 123 East Ave. 325-2050. 7 p.m. Free. [ Saturday, November 6 ] Book Signing: Saturday Author Salon: Eric Evans “Anatomy of a Cratedigger.” Lift Bridge Book Shop, 45 Main St, Brockport. 6372260, liftbridge.com. 2 p.m. Free. [ Sunday, November 7 ] Book Discussion: Andrew Harrison “Love Your 84,000 Hours at Work.” Central Library, 115 South Ave. 428-8304. 2 p.m. Free. Book Discussion: Richard Reisem: “Historic New York: From Sea to Shining Lake.” Charlotte-Genesee Lighthouse, 70 Lighthouse St. 621-6179, geneseelighthouse.org. 2 p.m. $4-5, registration required. Poetry Reading: Matt Shakleford and Ed Scutt. Books Etc, 78 W Main St, Rt 31, Macedon. 4744116, books_etc@yahoo.com. 4-5:30 p.m. Free. [ Monday, November 8 ] Book Discussion: “Fourteen Friends’ Guide to Elder Caring.” Greece Baptist Church, 1230 Long Pond Rd, Greece. 7605470. 3-4 p.m. Free. Book Group: 1st Annual Lift Bridge Book Club Bash. Lift Bridge Book Shop, 45 Main St, Brockport. 637-2260, liftbridge.com. 6:30 p.m. Free. All area book clubs welcome. [ Tuesday, November 9 ] Book Group: Unitarian Universalist Book Club: “You Don’t Have to Be Wrong for Me to Be Right: Finding Faith without Fantaticism” by Brad Hirschfield. 637-2260, liftbridge. com. 6:30 p.m. Free.

[ Wed., November 10 ] Book Group: Women Who Love to Read: “Hope and Other Dangerous Pursuits” by Laila Lalami. Lift Bridge Book Shop, 45 Main St, Brockport. 637-2260, liftbridge. com. 7 p.m. Free.

Recreation [ Thursday, November 4 ] Rochester Nordic Ski Club Meeting. Buckland Park Lodge, Buckland Park, 1341 Westfall Rd. 586-5205. 7 p.m. Free. [ Saturday, November 6 ] Canandaigua Wine Walk. Finger Lakes wineries. downtowncanandaigua.com/ events/winewalk. 4-7 p.m. $5 for glass, free sampling. East End Grocery 5K Run. 4 Meigs Street and East Avenue. groceryrun.org. Registration at 7 a.m. 5K starts at 8 a.m. $10-16. GVHC Cobbs Hill/Washington Grove HIke. Top of Cobbs Hill by communications bldg. Derek 475-0923. 1 p.m. Free. Easy 4 mile hike. Rochester Orienteering Club Trail Run. Mendon Ponds Park, East Lodge. roc.us.orienteering. org. 50km - 8 a.m., all others - 9:30 a.m. $15-25. Trail run with options for 5km, 10km, 20km, and 50km. Rock ‘N’ Roll Train Ride. Departs from Maple Ave., Victor Village. 315-209-1029, pat@palomaki. org, friendsoftherailroad.org. 4-7 p.m. $40. 21+. Wetland Wildlife Hike. Sterling Nature Center, Off 104 East, Sterling. 315-947-6143. 1 p.m. Free. [ Sunday, November 7 ] GVHC Durand Park West Side Hike. Golf Course, Lot, Durand Eastman Park, Kings Highway, Irondequoit. John C. 254-4047. 1 p.m. Free. Moderate 5 mile hike. Step It Up For A Cure: 5K Walk for Pancreatic Cancer Research. Goergen Field House, University of Rochester, River Campus. stepitupforacure. org. Registration at noon, walk begins at 1:30 p.m. $5-25. [ Tuesday, November 9 ] Hill/Speed Workouts. Fleet Feet Sports, 2210 Monroe Ave. 697-3338, fleetfeetrochester. com. 6 p.m. Free.

Special Events [ Wed., November 3 ] Lecture by Author Jud Newborn. Nazareth College-Shults Center, 4245 East Ave. Chris Mancuso at cmancus4@naz. edu. 7 p.m. Free. Panel Discussion: The Literature of War. Writers & Books, 740 University Ave. 473-2590, wab. org. 7-9 p.m. Free.

Rock ‘N’ Roll Movies: “Jailhouse Rock.” Dryden Theater, George Eastman House, 900 East Ave. 271-3361, dryden. eastmanhouse.com. 8 p.m. $5-7. Terra Andina Chilean Wine Tasting. Lovin’ Cup, Park Point @ RIT. lovincup.com. 6-8 p.m. Free. Winter Farmers Markets. Cornell Cooperative Extension-Rochester, 249 Highland Ave. 461-1000, mycce.org/monroe. 4-7 p.m. Free admission. [ Wednesday, November 3Thursday, November 4 ] Tent City. The College at Brockport, Union Mall by the flag poles, 350 New Campus Drive, Brockport. choy1@brockport.edu, houseofmercyrochester.org. Set up Wed 8 a.m., event through Thu 4 p.m. Free, donations accepted. Spreading awareness about homelessness. [ Thursday, November 4 ] “The Things They Carried:” A Presentation by Tim O’Brien. University of Rochester-Interfaith Chapel, Wilson Blvd. 275-4092. 7 p.m. Free. Live from NY’s 92nd Street Y: Alan Dershowitz and Bret Stephens. Jewish Community Center, 1200 Edgewood Ave. 461-2000, jccrochester.org. 7:45 p.m. $8-15. Reel Mind Screening of “Ordinary People.” Central Library, 115 South Ave. thereelmind.com. 2-4 p.m. Free. Speaker: Daoud Nazzar Director of Tent of Nations. Immanuel Baptist Church, 815 Park Ave. 381-3018, ejohns11@rochester. rr.com. 7 p.m. Free. [ Friday, November 5 ] “Telling Tales:” A Presentation by Tim O’Brien. Monroe Community College Theatre, Building 4, 1000 E. Henrietta Rd. 292-2534. 12-1 p.m. $7, free to MCC students/ faculty/staff. Association of Fundraising Professionals: National Philanthropy Day Awards Luncheon. Rochester Riverside Convention Center, 123 E Main St. afpgv.org. 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m. $50-60, registration required. Astronomy General Meeting. Rochester Institute of Technology, Gosner Hall A-300, Lomb Memorial Dr. Lori Englund 3345744. 7:30 p.m. Free. Church Women United’s World Community Day “Building the Beloved Community.” 342-2790. 9:15 a.m.-1 p.m. $3, includes bag lunch. Featuring speaker Rev. Dr. Richard Myers, Coalition for the Beloved Community. Federation of Social Workers Human Services Worker of the Year Awards. Rochester Riverside Convention Center, 123 E Main St. fsw-union.com. 11:30-1:30 p.m. $25, registration required. First Friday Chant. Natural Oasis 288 Monroe Ave. aumhealing@ yahoo.com. 7-9 p.m. free, donations gratefully accepted. Kid-friendly. Laura Mercier Open House. Waterlily, 2383 Monroe Ave. 4425140. 3-5 p.m. Free admission. Rochester Business Alliance’s Top 100 Program. Rochester Riverside Convention Center, 123 E Main St. 256-4612,


RochesterBusinessAlliance. com. 12-1:30 p.m. $60, registration required. Screening: Gays in the Military Why NOT Ask to Be Told! Baobab Cultural Center, 728 University Ave. 563-2145, thebaobab.org. 7 p.m. Free, registration required. [ Thursday, November 4Friday, November 5 ] Director John Curran in Person. Little Theatre, 240 East Ave. 285-0400, thelittle.org. 6:30 p.m. $15. Film screenings, discussion, and awards. [ Saturday, November 6 ] “60s Laser” Show. Rochester Museum and Science Center, 657 East Ave. 271-1880, rmsc. org. 9:30 p.m. $9-10. No children under 5. 19th Annual Adoption Conference: “Walk This Way: Paths to Permanancy.” Bay Trail Middle School, 1760 Scribner Rd., Penfield. 350-2501, cspinell@ hillside.com. 8 a.m.-4 p.m. $79, registration required. 8th Annual Rochester Women’s Expo. Dome Center, 2695 E Henrietta Rd, Rochester, NY 14467. rochesterwomensexpo. com. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Free admission. Centering for Wellness Meet ‘N’ Greet. Bagel Bin Cafe, 2600 Elmwood Ave., Brighton. 4614475, bagelbin@frontiernet.net. 10 a.m.-noon. Free. Great Bowls of Fire Chili Contest. Genesee Center for the Arts & Education, 713 Monroe Ave. 2441730, geneseearts.org. 4-8:30 p.m. $20/person or $60/family. Holidays at the Vineyards Featuring Flour City Pasta. Casa Larga Vineyards, 2287 Turk Hill Rd, Fairport. 223-4210, casalarga. com. 1-4 p.m. Free. Irondequoit Community Center Craft Show & Sale. 154 Pinegrove Ave. Noreene Pearl 336-6070. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Free admission. Murder Mystery Dinner Train Ride. Arcade & Attica Railroad, 278 Main St., Arcade. 492-3100. 4:30 p.m. $40, registration required. Sam Club, Private Eye in “The Case of the Malted Falcon.” Native American Veterans (LLNCS). Ganondagan State Historical Site, 1488 State Rte 444, Victor. ganondagan.org. 12-2 p.m. PUNS 3rd Annual Holiday Gift Market. Pittsford United Nursery School, 123 S. Main St., Pittsford.

pags4@me.com. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Free. 20+ vendors and homebased businesses. Revealing the Strengths of Learners With Autism. Nazareth College, 4245 East Ave. 3892947, naz.edu/education/ childhood-education. 8:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m. $20-30, register by 10/29. Rochester Audio Consortium Meet-Up. 1169 Pittsford-Victor Rd. Suite 100, Pittsford. info@ rochestermeetup.com. 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Free. Compare equipment and listen to what people bring; theme is DIY. Rockin’ Bowling Party. AMF Empire Lanes, 2400 Empire Blvd., Webster. 341-3215, rochesterymca.org. 2-5 p.m. $13 or $60/family of 6. Saturday Evening Telescope Viewing. Rochester Museum and Science Center, 657 East Ave. 271-1880, rmsc.org. Dark until 10 p.m. Free. Weather permitting; call ahead. Screening of RIT School of Film and Animation Annual Honors Show. Little Theatre, 240 East Ave. 2580400, thelittle.org. 12-3 p.m. $5-6, free to RIT students, faculty, staff. Tails of Success Grand Opening Celebration. Depot Plaza, 999 East Ridge Rd. darcy@ tailsofsuccessny.com. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Free. Unity Night: “Experience This: Theater to Free Your Mind.” Rochester Baha’i Center, 693 East Ave. monkgeorge@yahoo.com. 6:30-9:30 p.m. Free. “Backyard 101” Event. Penfield Community Recreation Center, 1985 Baird Rd, Penfield. 3408655, penfield.org. 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Free. [ Sunday, November 7 ] Bridal Fair. Genesee Country Village & Museum, 1410 Flint Hill Rd, Mumford. 538-6822 x247, gcv.org. 2 p.m. Free admission. Fall 2010 Record Show. Bop Shop, 274 N Goodman St. 2713354, bopshop.com. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Free admission. Family Pet Portraits with Santa. Cracker Box Palace Farm Animal Haven, 6450 Shaker Rd, Alton. 315-573-1519, crackerboxpalace. org. 12-4 p.m. $10 each or $25 for 3 portraits. Global Day of Jewish Learning. Jewish Community Center, 1200 Edgewood Ave. 4610490 x 252, jewishrochester.

org. 9 a.m.-4:45 p.m. $18, teens free. $8 lunch available. Greyhound Rescue Group 8th Birthday Party. Hydroacoustics, 999 Lehigh Station Rd., Henrietta. 1-877-211-1451, greyhoundadopt.org. 1-3 p.m. Free admission. Holidays at the Vineyards. Casa Larga Vineyards, 2287 Turk Hill Rd, Fairport. 223-4210, casalarga. com. 11a.m.-3 p.m. Free. Long Season Winter Farmers’ Market. Brookside Community Center, 220 Idlewood Rd. info@ brightonfarmersmarket.org. 1-4 p.m. Free admission. Rochester Civil Rights Front Meeting. Equal Grounds Coffee House, 750 South Ave. civilrightsfront.wordpress.com, rochestercrf@gmail.com. 5 p.m. Free. Score! RPO Woodwind Quintet and Screening of “The Flute of Krishna.” Little Theatre, 240 East Ave. 258-0400 x400, thelittle.org. 1 p.m. $20. Benefits the Little Theatre. [ Monday, November 8 ] Fall Shopping Spree. Temple B’rith Kodesh, 2131 Elmwood Ave. 244-7060, tbk.org. 7-9 p.m. Free admission. Fossil Meeting. Brighton Town Hall, 2300 Elmwood Ave. Stan 461-1272. 7:30 p.m. Free. Green Party of Monroe County’s Monthly Meeting. Flying Squirrel, 285 Clarissa St. greenpmc34@ yahoo.com. 7-9 p.m. Free. NextGen Rochester’s 2nd Annual Meeting. Geva Theatre Center, 75 Woodbury Blvd. Cynthia Pacia 271-4100. 5:30-8:30 p.m. Free. Panel Discussion: Blue Star Mothers. Nazareth College Arts Center, 4245 East Ave. 389-2993. 7 p.m. Free. Public Meeting on Route 590 Changes. Eastridge High School, 2350 E Ridge Rd. morelle.com. 5-7 p.m. Free. [ Monday, November 8Friday, November 12 ] Four Freedoms Week/The Clothesline Project. St. John Fisher College, 3690 East Ave. 385-8378, diversity@sjfc.edu. Various Times. Free. Speakers, Safe Zone training, visits by religious and activist organizations, more. [ Tuesday, November 9 ] Cell Phone Accessibility Fair. ABVI-Goodwill, 422 S. Clinton Ave.

abvi-goodwill.com, 232-1111. 3-6 p.m. Free. For people who are blind or visually impaired. Hors D’Oeurves to Impress for the Holidays. The Culinary Center at Vella, 237 PittsfordPalmyra Rd. 421-9362 x805, vellaculinarycenter.com. 6:30p.m. -9:00p.m. $65.00 per person. Interfaith Kristallnacht Commemoration. Temple B’rith Kodesh, 2131 Elmwood Ave. 2447060. 7 p.m. Free. Medicare 101. Lifespan, 1900 S. Clinton Ave. Tops Brighton Plaza. 244-8400 x112, lifespanroch.org. 5:30-7 p.m. Free, registration required. The Women of The Necklace & $1 Million Education Club. Mann’s Jewelers, 2945 Monroe Ave. jchristensen@e2ny.org, womenseducationclub.com. 6:30-8:30 p.m. Free, rsvp. [ Tuesday, November 9Wednesday, November 10 ] Movie Test Screening. Pittsford Plaza Cinema. 585-214-4594, luckythemovie2011.com. 7-9 p.m. Free. “Lucky” by Rochester’’s own Christopher J. Wilmot. [ Wed., November 10 ] Documentary Screening: “TEN9EIGHT Shoot for the Moon.” Little Theatre, 240 East Ave. 285-0400, thelittle.org. 6:30-8 p.m. Free. Sam Adams Brew Ha Ha. Lovin’ Cup, Park Point @ RIT. lovincup. com. 8 p.m. Free. Weavers’ Guild of Rochester Meeting. First Baptist Church of Rocheser, 75 Allens Creek Rd. weaversguildofrochester. org. 9:45 a.m. meeting, 11 a.m. progra.m. Free.

Sports [ Friday, November 5 ] Rochester Amerks vs. WilkesBarre. Blue Cross Arena, 100 Exchange Blvd. amerks.com. 7:35 p.m. $18.25-26.25.

Accompaniments. Tops Cooking School, 3507 Mt Read Blvd. 6635449, topsmarkets.com. 7-9 p.m. $20, registration required. Class: “No Meat, No Dairy, No Cooking, It’s Live/Raw Food.” The Culinary Center at Vella, 237 Pittsford-Palmyra Rd. 421-9362 x805, vellaculinarycenter.com. 6:30-9 p.m. $65. Genesee Valley Calligraphy Guild. Lutheran Church, 1000 N Winton Rd. gvcalligraphy@gmail.com, gvcalligraphy.org. 7:30 p.m. Free. [ Thursday, November 4 ] Adult Demonstration Class: Holidays in the Crockpot Part 1: Thanksgiving. Tops Cooking School, 3507 Mt Read Blvd. 663, 5449, topsmarkets.com. 7-9 p.m. $20, registration required. Baby Signing Class. Lift Bridge Book Shop, 45 Main St, Brockport. 637-2260, liftbridge. booksense.com. 6:30 p.m. Free, registration required. Eden at Home: Creating Quality of Life for Care Partner Teams. Lifespan, 1900 S. Clinton Ave. Tops Brighton Plaza. 244-8400 x112, lifespan-roch.org. 5:30-7:30 p.m. Free, registration required. [ Friday, November 5 ] Non Profit Works Presents “How Grants Work.” Brighton Town Hall, 2300 Elmwood Ave. mail@nonprofitworks.com, nonprofitworks.com. 9 a.m.-noon. $50, registration required. [ Saturday, November 6 ] Bread Baking Basics Series. New York Wine & Culinary Center, 800 S Main St., Canandaigua. 394-7070, nywcc.com. 1-4 p.m. $80 for two classes, registration required. Fundraiser with International Makeup Artist Robert Jones. Doubletree Hotel, 1111 Jefferson Rd., Henrietta. Vickie Durfee 7373367, vdurfee@marykay.com. 9 a.m.-5:30 p.m. $60.

Workshops

[ Saturday, November 6Sunday, November 7 ] Combat Papermakers Workshop for Veterans. Visual Studies Workshop, 31 Prince St. karen@wab.org, combatpaper.org. 12-5 p.m. Free to vets of all wars, registration required.

[ Wed., November 3 ] Adult Demonstration Class: Special Occasion Sides and

[ Sunday, November 7 ] New York Wines vs. the World. New York Wine & Culinary

[ Sunday, November 7 ] Rochester Amerks vs. WilkesBarre. Blue Cross Arena, 100 Exchange Blvd. amerks.com. 5:05 p.m. $18.25-26.25.

Center, 800 S Main St., Canandaigua. 394-7070, nywcc.com. 12:30-2:30 p.m. $40, registration required. [ Monday, November 8 ] A Cornucopia of Cooking: Happy Healthy Thanksgiving. Cornell Cooperative Extension-Rochester, 249 Highland Ave. 461-1000 x 0, mycce.org/monroe. 6-8 p.m. $25-30, registration required. Sing, Sign, and Play with Your Baby. Henrietta Public Library, 455 Calkins Rd. 359-7092. 6:30-7 p.m. Free, registration required. For babies ages 6 mos-2 years with adult. [ Tuesday, November 9 ] Adult Demonstration Class: Dining Out Healthier. Tops Cooking School, 3507 Mt Read Blvd. 663, 5449, topsmarkets.com. 7-9 p.m. $20, registration required. Living Alone: Survive and Thrive on Your Own! House Content Bed & Breakfast, 388 Mendon Center Rd., Honeoye Falls. Gwenn Voelckers 6247887, gvoelckers@rochester. rr.com. 7-9 p.m. $125 for 3-part workshop. [ Wed., November 10 ] “Save Energy, Save Dollars.” Cornell Cooperative Extension-Canandaigua, 480 N Main St, Canandaigua. 394-3977 x409 and 425. 7-9 p.m. Free, registration required. Hands-On Surf and Turf Fondue Party. Tops Cooking School, 3507 Mt Read Blvd. 663, 5449, topsmarkets.com. 7-9 p.m. $25 class only, $35 with wine tasting, register. Nutrition Class: Supermarket Shopping Tour. Breathe Yoga, 19 S. Main St., Pittsford. 248-9070, breatheyoga.com. 6-7 p.m. $20, registration required.

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Film Times Fri Nov 5 – Thu Nov 11 Schedules change often. Call theaters or visit rochestercitynewspaper.com for updates.

Film

Brockport Strand 637-3310 89 Main St, Brockport DUE DATE: 7:15, 9:20; also FriSun & Thu 5:10; also Sat-Sun & Thu 1, 3:05; MEGAMIND: 7, 9; also Fri-Sat & Thu 5; also SatSun & Thu 1, 3; PARANORMAL ACTIVITY 2: 7:10, 9:10; also SatSun & Thu 1:10, 3:10, 5:10.

Canandaigua Theatres 396-0110 Wal-Mart Plaza, Canandaigua DUE DATE: 7:15, 9:20; also Fri-Sun & Thu 5:10; also Sat-Sun & Thu 1, 3:05; HEREAFTER: 7, 9:25; also Fri-Sun & Thu 4; also Sat-Sun & Thu 1:15; JACKASS 3: 7:15, 9:15; also Fri-Sun & Thu 5:15; also SatSun & Thu 1:15, 3:15; LIFE AS WE KNOW IT: 7:10, 9:10; also Fri-Sun & Thu 4; also Sat-Sun & Thu 1:30; MEGAMIND (3D): 7, 9; also Fri-Sun & Thu 5; also Sat-Sun & Thu 1, 3; PARANORMAL ACTIVITY 2: 7:10, 9:10; also Fri-Sun & Thu 5:10; also Sat-Sun & Thu 1:10, 3:10; RED: 7, 9:15; also Fri-Sun & Thu 4; also Sat-Sun & Thu 1; SAW 7: 7:15, 9:15; also Fri-Sun & Thu 5:15; also Sat-Sun & Thu 1:15, 3:15; SECRETARIAT: 7, 9:20; also Fri-Sun & Thu 4; also Sat-Sun & Thu 1; SOCIAL NETWORK: 7, 9:20; also Fri-Sun & Thu 4; also Sat-Sun & Thu 1:15.

Cinema Theater 271-1785 957 S. Clinton St. LEGEND OF THE GUARDIANS: OWLS: Fri-Sun 4:30; WALL STREET: MONEY NEVER SLEEPS: 8:40; YOU WILL MEET A TALL DARK STRANGER: 7.

Culver Ridge 16 544-1140 2255 Ridge Rd E, Irondequoit  DEVIL: 1:55, 4:45, 7:55, 10:35; DUE DATE: 1:40, 2:20, 4:40, 5, 7:10, 9:40, 10:10; FOR COLORED GIRLS: 1, 1:30, 4, 4:30, 7, 7:30, 10, 10:30; HEREAFTER: 1:10, 4:05, 7:15, 10:05; JACKASS 3: continues on page 30

In the prison of the self [ REVIEW ] by George Grella

“Stone” (R), directed by John Curran Now playing

In its opening sequence “Stone” establishes an inexplicable strangeness and a permanent ambiguity that permeate all the subsequent action. A young man watches a golf match on a small black-and-white television, signaling a past in the 1950’s or 1960’s, ignoring the wife who puts a drink in his hand and takes their daughter upstairs for a nap. When she comes down and tells him she’s leaving him, he goes to the daughter’s room and threatens to throw

the sleeping child out the window, an act that defines the marriage for the rest of the film. When the picture reopens in the present day, the husband, Jack Mabry (Robert De Niro), a parole officer about to retire, and his wife Madylyn (Frances Conroy), still together, live without any hint of communication. They apparently spend most of their spare time attending church, reading the Bible, and sitting side-by-side on their front porch, drinking steadily and silently while regarding the unexciting landscape of rural Michigan. At one point, late in the movie, without any provocation, the usually vague Madylyn calmly decants a gush of gross obscenities at her impassive husband, suggesting the accumulation of hatred over the decades of their disastrous marriage. Jack’s only real communication occurs on his job as a parole officer in a prison, where he encounters the most dynamic character in the film, a prisoner who calls himself Stone (Edward Norton). Desperate for release after eight years of a sentence for

Robert De Niro and Edward Norton in “Stone.” PHOTO COURTESY OVERTURE FILMS

arson, the agitated and defiant prisoner challenges Jack in a number of ways, sparring with him verbally, sneering at the notion that Jack may be any less guilty of a crime. In a further effort to win release, Stone also encourages his sexually voracious wife Lucetta (Milla Jovovich) to seduce Jack, a ploy that succeeds but also predictably ruins what Jack may regard as his life. With that small cast of characters and a relatively simple plot, the picture moves through a series of two-person episodes, as if it were initially conceived as a play. The script adds a further dimension of meaning with themes far more important than the personal and emotional connections among its people, straying into some curious considerations of faith. The director constantly emphasizes the presence of religion in Jack’s life — attending church, reading the Bible, and constantly listening to an endless stream of dull, smug sermons on a religious radio station. While Jack meets with his minister and in effect confesses a lack of any belief, his prisoner searches for solace and ultimately discovers something like a spiritual awakening in reading a sort of neo-Buddhist tract. Following the descriptions in his reading, he seeks and finds a kind of minor mystical epiphany that changes his attitude toward his situation, his crime, even his wife; the experience dampens his anger and brings him a modicum of peace exceeding Jack’s unacknowledged desperation.

RIT’s School of Film and Animation

PLAYING THIS WEEK

NOVEMBER 5-11

Stone

Nowhere Boy

Conviction

Waiting for Superman

Inside Job

Jack Goes Boating

240 EAST AVE. • ROCHESTER, NY 14604 • WWW.THELITTLE.ORG • (585) 258-0444 28 City november 3-9, 2010

ANNUAL HONORS SHOW featuring the Best Student Work from the past year

Join us for the one and only screening

Saturday, November 6th, noon-3pm The Little Theatre | 240 East Ave.

Tickets are $6 general public $5 for college students with ID RIT students and faculty are free with valid ID.


Money matters [ REVIEW ] BY DAYNA PAPALEO

“Inside Job” (PG-13), written and directed by Charles Ferguson Opens Friday

The picture’s odd, muted, and mostly undeveloped meditation on spirituality and belief conflicts strangely with the configuration and behavior of its characters. The people really never make much sense and their actions and motivations remain mostly unclear. Though full of silences, it rarely achieves a convincing visual statement of its emotional and intellectual content. In a number of intercut but regrettably pointless scenes — Madylyn playing poker with a bunch of heavy drinking friends, Jack stopping his car to hit a golf ball into a farm field, for example — “Stone” displays the several disconnections of its people, all pursuing different lives, but never really achieves anything like a meaningful explanation of their behavior. After all the relationships disintegrate in one or another disaster, at his retirement party a drunken Jack pours out a series of obscenities that mirror Madylyn’s earlier insults, but the action and the speech require some kind of motivation within the context of the character and the particular action. Despite the predictably competent performances of Robert De Niro and Edward Norton, who exemplify the best in two distinct generations of movie actors, “Stone” never catches fire or throws off the kind of sparks most viewers should expect. The puzzling characters, the cryptic subtexts, the episodic narrative, the obscure hints of religious concern combine to produce a fragmented and unsatisfying work, a film that never really makes sense of its subjects.

You know, I’ve really tried to wrap my mind around both the art and science of economics, but anything beyond P.J. O’Rourke just makes me sleepy. For those who don’t have much money, the topic can seem dry and abstract, and that’s what made comprehension so tough for a lot of people when the economy went belly-up in the fall of 2008. The typically hyperbolic media reported on the AIG collapse and the Lehman Brothers bankruptcy using unfathomable numbers in the billions, and though everyone looked concerned, it just sounded like more upper-class hubris gone awry. Wealthy hands would be slapped and executive heads would roll, but John Q. American would still have to get up tomorrow and go to work. Well, turns out the opposite was true; no one actually got punished except the working class, and Charles Ferguson’s riveting documentary “Inside Job” breaks down how the economic crisis happened, who was responsible, who tried to prevent

Learn how Wall Street screwed America in the new Charles Ferguson documentary, “Inside Job.” PHOTO COURTESY SONY PICTURES CLASSICS

it, and, most blood-boilingly, who could have but didn’t. Ferguson, you may recall, is the scholar-turned-filmmaker who tackled another hot-button issue with 2007’s “No End In Sight,” which exposed the occupation of Iraq as a creeping rash of mismanagement from the top on down. But if you’re geared up for more partisan finger-pointing, you can forget it: “Inside Job” makes it clear that blame for the recession transcends political affiliations, as our elected officials display an inexcusable ignorance by putting their trust in the wrong people over and over again. Ferguson patiently builds his case with charts, news footage, and interviews, tracing our current quagmire to the Reagan administration’s kickstarting of financial deregulation, which essentially allowed investors to take risks with your money. We stop off for the savings and loan debacle of the 80’s, 1998’s overtly illegal merger of Citibank and Travelers, and the internet boom/bust of the early 21st century. We hear sickening tales of corporate fraud, bribery, and money laundering. All of these combined to create a ticking time-bomb of insatiable greed that found investors making dicey decisions with your money and insuring themselves against your losses, with no repercussions of their own. This would eventually lead to the government’s $700 billion bailout package of 2008, because the faltering companies were simply too big to let fail. But the exploding bubble wasn’t a complete shock to everyone; plenty of economists did the math and figured out that, as in any heist, someone would eventually be left holding the bag. Interviewee Raghuram Rajan, formerly of the International Monetary Fund, recalls being jeered as a Luddite by former treasury secretary (and current Obama advisor) Larry Summers in September of 2005 after presenting a paper suggesting that this pervasive practice of risk without penalty could lead to a “catastrophic meltdown.”

And former Governor Eliot Spitzer appears on the brink of a Clinton-like rise from the ashes as he relives his attorney general days taking aim at Wall Street corruption, though he politely demurs from passing judgment on their, shall we say, illegal vices. What’s not surprising is who declined to be interviewed for “Inside Job”; former and current power players like Federal Reserve chairs Greenspan and Bernanke; treasury secretaries Summers, Rubin, Paulson, and Geithner; as well as all of the top financial executives, whose platinum parachutes stand in stark contrast to their customers’ freefall of debt. These men — and they are mostly men — could have answered for their decisions and perhaps provided some balance to the discussion. There are several interviewees, like Columbia dean Glenn Hubbard and professor Frederic Mishkin, who are put in the position to defend the financial industry’s stubborn lack of foresight, but their reactions veer from blank to defensive to aggressive, and Ferguson’s cutaway edits as they’re confronted with conflicts of interest or failures to disclose do them no favors. An agitating call-to-arms like “Inside Job” naturally causes us to wonder what we can do to ensure this financial havoc doesn’t happen again. The answer? Besides controlling your debt, not a damn thing. You did everything right, entrusting your faith and savings to knowledgeable, paid professionals who essentially worked for white-collar crime syndicates. None of them will likely ever be prosecuted. As a matter of fact, a great many of the people responsible now have cushy academic appointments, meaning the next generation is learning from their questionable wisdom. And the man who was elected on a mandate of change continues to be counseled by the very same individuals who constructed the failed system. Your only defense is to educate yourself, and “Inside Job” ought to be required viewing.

DON’T LOOK BACK Thursday, Nov. 4, 8 p.m.

In 1965, Bob Dylan was touring England, and Subterranean Homesick Blues was climbing the U.K. charts. D.A. Pennebaker’s cinema verite classic captures Dylan’s performances with stunning clarity and force. Equally fascinating are off-stage events — interviews, rehearsals, and wranglings — in which Dylan displays his now-iconic persona. (D.A. Pennebaker, US 1967, 96 min.)

METROPOLIS — THE NEW RESTORATION Friday, Nov. 5, 8 p.m.

Movies for movie lovers, 6 nights a week. Rock ’n’ Roll

In a city of the future, slaves toil for a ruling class living above in an urban utopia. Two young idealists hope to unite the workers and bring the worlds together. Director Fritz Lang’s prescient vision of an urban world in disarray has been digitally restored to its original length. (Fritz Lang, Germany 1927, 150 min., Digital Projection)

Back by Popular Demand!

Film Info: 271-4090 l 900 East Avenue l Eastman House Café—stop in for a light dinner or dessert before the film. l Wi-Fi Hotspot l Sponsored by rochestercitynewspaper.com City 29


1:50, 4:40, 7:35, 9:55; LIFE AS WE KNOW IT: 1:25, 4:15, 6:55, 9:35; MEGAMIND: 2:10, 4:50, 7:20, 9:50; also in 3D 1:20,4:10, 6:50, 9:20; PARANORMAL ACTIVITY 2: 1:35, 2:15, 4:35, 5:05, 7:05, 7:50, 9:25, 10:25; RED: 1:05, 3:50, 6:40, 9:30; SAW 7 (3D): 2, 4:55, 8, 10:20; SECRETARIAT: 12:55, 3:55, 6:45, 9:45; SOCIAL NETWORK: 1:15, 4:25, 7:25, 10:15.

Dryden Theatre 271-3361 900 East Ave *NOTE: Film times for 11/311/10* JAILHOUSE ROCK: Wed 11/3 8; DON’T LOOK BACK: Thu 8; METROPOLIS: THE NEW RESTORATION: Fri 8; AROUND A SMALL MOUNTAIN: Sat 8; BORN TO BOOGIE/WELCOME TO MY NIGHTMARE: Sun 7; THE CAMERAMAN: Tue 8; TOMMY: Wed 11/3 8.

Eastview 13 425-0420 Eastview Mall, Victor DUE DATE: 1, 1:40, 4, 4:40, 7, 7:40, 9:30, 10:10; FOR COLORED GIRLS: 1:15, 4:15, 7:15, 10:15; HEREAFTER: 1:25, 4:25, 7:30, 10:25; JACKASS 3: 1;55, 4:35, 7:35, 9:45; also in 3D 10:20; MEGAMIND: 1:20, 4:20, 6:50, 9:20; also in 3D 12:50, 1:50, 3:10, 4:50, 5:30, 7:20, 7:50, 9:50; PARANORMAL ACTIVITY 2: 2, 5, 8, 10:35; RED: 1:35, 4:55, 7:55, 10:30; SAW 7 (3D): 1:45, 4:45, 7:25, 9:40; SECRETARIAT: 1:05, 4:05, 7:05, 9:55; SOCIAL NETWORK: 1:30, 4:30, 7:45, 10:30.

Geneseo Theatres 243-2691 Geneseo Square Mall DUE DATE: 7:15, 9:20; also FriSun & Thu 5:10; also Sat-Sun & Thu 1, 3:05; HEREAFTER: 7; also Fri-Sun & Thu 4; also Sat-Sun & Thu 1:15; JACKASS 3 (3D): 9:25; MEGAMIND (3D): 7, 9; also Fri-Sun & Thu 5; also Sat-Sun & Thu 1, 3; PARANORMAL ACTIVITY 2: 7:10, 9:10; also Fri-Sun & Thu 5:10; also Sat-Sun & Thu 1:10, 3:10; RED: 7, 9:15; also Fri-Sun & Thu 4; also Sat-Sun & Thu 1; SAW 7: 7:15, 9:15; also Fri-Sun & Thu 5:15; also Sat-Sun & Thu 1:15, 3:15.

Greece Ridge 12 225-5810 176 Greece Ridge Center Dr. DUE DATE: 12:10, 12:40, 2:30, 3,

Film Previews Full film reviews available at rochestercitynewspaper.com. [ OPENING ] AROUND A SMALL MOUNTAIN (2009): Octogenarian nouvelle vague legend Jacques Rivette directs this quiet film about a lonely traveler (Italian filmmaker Sergio Castellito) who falls in with a troubled circus troupe in the mountains of Southern France. With Jane Birkin. Dryden (Sat, Nov 6, 8 p.m.) 30 City november 3-9, 2010

4:50, 5:25, 7:30, 8, 10, 10:30; FOR COLORED GIRLS: 1, 2:50, 5:10, 7:50, 10:20; HEREAFTER: 1:10, 4, 7, 9:55; JACKASS 3: 1:15, 4:15, 7:45, 10:25; also in 3D 9:45; LIFE AS WE KNOW IT: 1:35, 7:25; MEGAMIND: 12:30, 2:50, 5:10, 7:50, 10:20; also in 3D 12, 1:30, 2:20, 3:50, 4:40, 6:50, 7:20, 9:30; PARANORMAL ACTIVITY 2: 12:20, 2:40, 5, 7:40, 10:15; RED: 1:25, 4:30, 7:10, 9:45; SAW 7 (3D): 12:50, 3:05, 5:20, 7:35, 9:50; SOCIAL NETWORK: 4:35, 10:05.

Henrietta 18 424-3090 525 Marketplace Dr. CONVICTION: 1, 4:10, 7:10, 9:50; DUE DATE: 12:20, 1:20, 2:50, 4:20, 5:20, 5:20, 6:50, 7:50, 9:20, 10:20; also Fri-Sat 11:45; FOR COLORED GIRLS: 12:40, 1:30, 3:40, 4:40, 6:40, 7:40, 9:40, 10:40; HEREAFTER: 1:05, 4:25, 7:25, 10:25; JACKASS 3: 12:15, 2:35, 4:55, 7:20, 10:05; also in 3D 9; also Fri-Sat in 3D 11:35; LIFE AS WE KNOW IT: 1:15, 7:35; MEGAMIND: 2:30, 5:05, 7:30, 10; also in 3D 12:30, 1:10, 1:40, 3, 4, 4:30, 5:30, 6:30, 7, 8, 9:30, 10:30; also Fri-Sat in 3D 11:50; PARANORMAL ACTIVITY 2: 12:25, 1:25, 2:25, 4:15, 5:15, 6:45, 7:45, 9:10, 10:10; also Fri-Sat 11:30; RED: 2:25, 5:10, 7:55, 10:35; SAW 7 (3D): 2:20, 4:45, 7:15, 9:45; also Fri-Sat 11:55; SECRETARIAT: 12:45, 3:45, 6:35, 9:25; SOCIAL NETWORK: 12:50, 3:55, 6:55, 9:55; TOWN: 4:50, 10:15.

also Sat-Mon & Thu 12:45; INCEPTION: 4:20, 7:30; also Sat-Mon & Thu 12:25; OTHER GUYS: 2:05, 4:35, 7:15, 9:45; also Sat-Mon & Thu 11:35 a.m.; STEP UP 3: 7:35, 10:05; SWITCH: 2:35, 5:05, 7:45, 10:15; also Sat-Mon & Thu 12:05; TAKERS: 2:25, 4:55, 7:25, 9:55; also Sat-Mon & Thu 11:55 a.m.; TOY STORY 3: 2, 2:30, 4:30, 5, 7:05, 9:35; also Sat-Mon & Thu 11:30 a.m., 12.

Pittsford Cinema 383-1310 3349 Monroe Ave. CONVICTION: 12:10, 2:25, 4:50, 7:20; also Fri-Sat 9:45; DUE DATE: 1;20, 3:30, 5:45, 8; also Fri-Sat 10:15; HEREAFTER: 1:25, 4:10, 7; also Fri-Sat 9:40; INSIDE JOB: 12:15, 2:35, 5:05, 7:30; also Fri-Sat 9:55; LIFE AS WE KNOW IT: Fri-Tue 1:35, 6:50; MEGAMIND (3D): 12, 2:15, 4:30, 6:45; also Fri-Sat 9; MORNING GLORY: WedThu 1:50, 4:20, 7; RED: 2:05, 4:40, 7:10; also Fri-Sat 9:30; SECRETARIAT: Fri-Tue 4; also Fri-Sat 9:15; SOCIAL NETWORK: 2:05, 4:55, 7:40; also Fri-Sat 10:10; STONE: 12:25, 2:45, 5, 7:15; also Fri-Sat 9:25.

Webster 12

292-5840 2613 W. Henrietta Rd. ACTION REPLAYY: 4, 6:55, 9:50; also Sat-Mon & Thu 12:30; CASE 39: 2:15, 4:45, 7:40, 10:10; also Sat-Mon & Thu 11:45 a.m.; DESPICABLE ME: 2:10, 4:25, 7, 9:30; also Sat-Mon & Thu 11:50 a.m.; DEVIL: 2:45, 5:10, 7:50, 10;

888-262-4386 2190 Empire Blvd. DUE DATE: 12:40, 3, 5:30, 8; also Fri-Sat 10:30; also SatSun 10:30 a.m.; FOR COLORED GIRLS: 1:45, 4:40, 7:30; also Fri-Sat 10:20; also Sat-Sun 10:45 a.m.; HEREAFTER: 4:15, 7:10; also Fri-Sat 1, 10:05; also Sat-Sun 10:05 a.m.; JACKASS 3 (3D): 1:20, 3:40, 5:55, 8:20; also Fri-Sat 11; also Sat-Sun 11:15 a.m.; LIFE AS WE KNOW IT: 2, 4:30, 7:05; also Fri-Sat 9:50; also SatSun 11:30 a.m.; MEGAMIND: 12:15, 2:30, 4:50, 7:15; also Fri-Sat 9:30; also in 3D 1:10, 3:30, 6:15, 8:30, also in 3D Fri-Sat 10:45; also in 3D SatSun 11 a.m.; PARANORMAL ACTIVITY 2: 12:50, 3:15, 5:45, 8:10; also Fri-Sat 10:50; also Sat-Sun 10:15 a.m.; RED: 2:15, 5, 7:40; also Fri-Sat 10:10; also Sat-Sun 11:45 a.m.; SAW 7 (3D): 12:30, 2:45, 5:15, 7:50; also Fri-Sat 10:40; also Sat-Sun 10:10 a.m.; SECRETARIAT: 1:30, 4:05, 7; also Fri-Sat 9:40; also Sat-Sun 10:20 a.m.; SOCIAL NETWORK: 12, 7:20; WALL STREET: MONEY NEVER SLEEPS: 3:50; also Fri-Sat 10.

BORN TO BOOGIE/WELCOME TO MY NIGHTMARE (1972/1975): The first in this glam doublefeature is Ringo Starr’s concert documentary about Marc Bolan and T. Rex, while the second, hosted by Vincent Price, stars the quintessential showman Alice Cooper in his trademark horror show. Dryden (Sun, Nov 7, 7 p.m.) THE CAMERAMAN (1928): This silent classic, rife with physical comedy and outrageous set pieces, stars the great Buster Keaton as

an ambitious cameraman hoping to impress a cute MGM employee with his work. Dryden (Tue, Nov 9, 8 p.m.) DON’T LOOK BACK (1967): D.A. Pennebaker’s famous documentary chronicles 23year-old Bob Dylan’s 1965 tour of England, just as he switched from acoustic to electric, though not to everyone’s liking. With Joan Baez and Donovan. Dryden (Thu, Nov 4, 8 p.m.) DUE DATE (R): The dream team of Robert Downey Jr. and Zach Galifianakis star for director Todd

The Little 258-0400 240 East Ave.  CONVICTION: 6:40, 9; also SatSun 12:30, 3; INSIDE JOB: 6:50, 9:20; also Sat-Sun 12:10, 2:50; JACK GOES BOATING: 9:10; also Sat-Sun 3:20; NOWHERE BOY: 7:10, 9:30; also Sat-Sun 12:40, 3:10; STONE: 6:30, 9:40; also Sat-Sun 3:30; WAITING FOR SUPERMAN: 7; also Sat-Sun 12:20.

Movies 10


Phillips (“The Hangover”) in this odd-couple-road-movie-comedydrama about one man trying to get home for the birth of his first child and another man mourning the loss of his father. Brockport, Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece, Henrietta, Pittsford FOR COLORED GIRLS (R): Tyler Perry assembles an all-star cast, including Janet Jackson, Kerry Washington, Phylicia Rashad, and Whoopi Goldberg, for his adaptation of Ntozake Shange’s acclaimed 1975 play, a performed collection of poems dealing with issues affecting women of color. Culver, Eastview, Greece, Henrietta INSIDE JOB (PG-13): Charles Ferguson’s blistering documentary explores the causes and fallout of 2008’s devastating economic collapse, paying particular attention to who caused it and who could have prevented it. Little, Pittsford JAILHOUSE ROCK (1957): In his most beloved film, sexy, swaggering Elvis Presley plays a teenager in the pokey for manslaughter who becomes an overnight singing sensation then forgets the little people who got him there. Dryden (Wed, Nov 3, 8 p.m.) MEGAMIND (PG): Will Ferrell voices the title character in this animated feature about a supervillain who tries a new direction after finally defeating his nemesis, Metro Man. Also featuring Brad Pitt, Jonah Hill, Tina Fey, and David Cross. Brockport, Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece, Henrietta, Pittsford METROPOLIS: THE NEW RESTORATION (1927): Back by popular demand is this digital mending of Fritz Lang’s sciencefiction classic, incorporating 20 minutes of recently discovered footage into this futuristic tale of two lovers hoping to unite their differing classes. Dryden (Fri, Nov 5, 8 p.m.) NOWHERE BOY (R): Aaron Johnson (“Kick-Ass”) stars as young John Lennon in Sam TaylorWood’s biopic about the future icon’s formative years at college and art school, including his first meetings with Paul and George. Co-starring Kristin Scott-Thomas and David Morrissey. Little [ CONTINUING ] CASE 39 (R): Renée Zellweger stars in this horror thriller as a social worker caring for a young girl (Jodelle Ferland, “Tideland”) whose troubles extend into the supernatural realm. Costarring Bradley Cooper and Ian McShane. Movies 10 CONVICTION (R): Two-time Oscar winner Hilary Swank stars in the true story of Betty Anne Waters, a single mother and high-school dropout who puts herself through law school in order to try and overturn her brother’s (Sam Rockwell) unjust murder conviction. Henrietta, Little, Pittsford DEVIL (PG-13): Brothers Drew and John Erick Dowdle direct an

M. Night Shyamalan story about a group of people trapped in an elevator who slowly realize that the Devil is among their ranks. With Bokeem Woodbine, Chris Messina, and Jacob Vargas. Culver, Movies 10 HEREAFTER (PG-13): Clint Eastwood directs three distinct ruminations on mortality that screenwriter Peter Morgan (“The Queen”) takes his time in weaving together. Starring Matt Damon, Cécile de France, and Bryce Dallas Howard. Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece, Henrietta, Pittsford INCEPTION (PG-13): Christopher Nolan’s follow-up to “The Dark Knight” is this ambitious thriller centered around a squad of thieves who use modern technology to steal from people’s subconsciouses during the dream state. With Leonardo DiCaprio, Joseph Gordon-Levitt, Ellen Page, Marion Cotillard, and Michael Caine. Movies 10 JACKASS 3D (R): Hey, “Avatar”! Watch and learn as Johnny Knoxville, et al., use the third on-screen dimension to its fullest, funniest, and most crotch-pummeling potential. Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece, Henrietta JACK GOES BOATING (R): The feature filmmaking debut of Phillip Seymour Hoffman is this character study about a limo driver (Hoffman) drawn out of his lonely existence through a blind date with a funeral-home employee (Oscar nominee Amy Ryan, “Gone Baby Gone”). Little LEGEND OF THE GUARDIANS: THE OWLS OF GA’HOOLE (PG): Zack Snyder follows up “Watchmen” with this animated adaptation of Kathryn Lasky’s books about a young barn owl, kidnapped and brainwashed, who escapes then returns with his friends to defeat his former captors. Featuring the voices of Abbie Cornish, Helen Mirren, and Sam Neill. Cinema LIFE AS WE KNOW IT (PG-13): Katherine Heigl and Josh Duhamel topline this romantic comedy about two attractive singles who become caregivers to an orphaned girl. But they don’t like each other... OMG, what will happen? Canandaigua, Culver, Greece, Henrietta, Pittsford THE OTHER GUYS (PG-13): “Anchorman” director Adam McKay helms this buddy-cop comedy about two mismatched NYPD desk jockeys (Will Ferrell and Mark Wahlberg) tackling a case that even the department hotshots (Samuel L. Jackson and Dwayne Johnson) won’t touch. Movies 10 PARANORMAL ACTIVITY 2 (R): More creepy “found footage” in the vein of the 2009 smash, and filmmakers have somehow been able to keep a lid on the plot. Interesting... Brockport, Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece, Henrietta RED (R): Retired and Extremely Dangerous: Morgan Freeman, John Malkovich, Helen Mirren, and Bruce Willis star in this adaptation of Warren Ellis’ 2003 graphic novel about a group of

old-timers dragged back into the spy game after one of them is threatened. Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece, Henrietta, Pittsford SAW 3D (R): Whatever. Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Geneseo, Greece, Henrietta SECRETARIAT (PG): This feelgood tale stars Diane Lane as housewife Penny Chenery, who took over her ailing father’s stables and joined with eccentric trainer Lucien Laurin (John Malkovich) to race the 1973 Triple Crown winner. With Scott Glenn and James Cromwell. Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Henrietta, Pittsford THE SOCIAL NETWORK (R): Director David Fincher’s adaptation of Ben Mezrich’s “The Accidental Billionaires” explores the hotly contested birth of Facebook from three different perspectives. With Jesse Eisenberg, Andrew Garfield (he’s the new Spider-Man), and Justin Timberlake. Canandaigua, Culver, Eastview, Greece, Henrietta, Pittsford STONE (R): Edward Norton reunites with his “Painted Veil” director John Curran for this psychological thriller about a convicted arsonist who enlists his gorgeous wife (Milla Jovovich) to ensure his release at the hands of a soon-to-retire parole officer (Robert DeNiro). Little, Pittsford THE TOWN (R): Ben Affleck’s second film is a gritty crimedrama in which he also stars as a robber in love with the bank employee (Rebecca Hall, “Please Give”) who might be able to identify him. With Oscar nominee Jeremy Renner and Emmy winner Jon Hamm. Henrietta TOY STORY 3 (G): The second sequel to Pixar Animation’s cornerstone finds Woody, Buzz, and the rest of the playthings shipped off to a day care center, where they get into scrapes and teach more lessons. Featuring the voices of Tom Hanks, Tim Allen... you know the drill by now. Movies 10 WAITING FOR “SUPERMAN” (PG): Big buzz surrounds Oscarwinning documentarian Davis Guggenheim’s (“An Inconvenient Truth”) searing exploration of the public education system through the stories of five kids hoping for better schools. Little WALL STREET: MONEY NEVER SLEEPS (PG-13): Michael Douglas reprises his Oscarwinning role as greed aficionado Gordon Gekko, now an ex-con trying to rebuild his life in these dicey economic times. Co-stars Shia LaBeouf as a struggling trader engaged to Carey Mulligan (“An Education”) as Gekko’s estranged daughter. And, yes, Oliver Stone directs. Cinema YOU WILL MEET A TALL, DARK STRANGER (R): Woody Allen’s latest is (surprise!) a Londonset comedy-drama revolving around the romantic kerfuffles of two married couples. Starring Josh Brolin, Naomi Watts, Anthony Hopkins, and Antonio Banderas. Cinema rochestercitynewspaper.com City 31


Classifieds For information: Call us (585) 244-3329 Fax us (585) 244-1126 Mail Us City Classifieds 250 N. Goodman Street Rochester, NY 14607 Email Us classifieds@ rochester-citynews.com

to everything. Available immediately. Priced from $595. Call 585-383-8888. EAST AVE/PARK: Two-Bedroom $715, Avail 12/1. Carpets, includes heat, hot water, cooking gas. Laundry, parking available. Pets Allowed. Bus at door. Walk to Wegmans, World Gym, bank, dry cleaner, restaurants. 4732473. EAST AVE/PARK: Studio $590. no/ pets). Avail Now. Carpets, heat, hot-water, gas. Laundry/ parking. Bus at door. Near Wegmans, Gym, bank, restaurants. 585-473-2473.

EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY

All real estate advertised in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act, which makes it unlawful, “to make, print, or publish, any notice, statement, or advertisement, with respect to the sale or rental of a dwelling that indicates any preference, limitation, or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin.” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians, pregnant women and people securing custody of children under the age of 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertisement for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. Call the local Fair Housing Enforcement Project, FHEP at 325-2500 or 1866-671-FAIR. Si usted sospecha una practica de vivienda injusta, por favor llame al servicio legal gratis. 585-325-2500 - TTY 585-325-2547.

Apartments for Rent CULVER/PARK AREA: One bed­ room, 2nd floor, hardwoods, fire­ place, kitchen, one car parking,

basement storage, no pets, no smoking. $625 plus 1 month deposit+ security. Includes all util. 244-4123 DOWNTOWN GIBBS/EASTMAN Theatre area. 1&2 bedrooms. Bright, cheerful, nice neighbors, laundry, convenient

LARGE FURNISHED ROOM Quiet home. Utilities and off street park­ing included, on busline. Senior services, if needed. South West. Call 585328-2771 MONROE AVE AREA STUDIOS $275-$350, parking, includes all. 585-235-5562 MONROE/ ALEXANDER AREA One bedroom, 2nd floor, Living room/ kitchen combination. Quiet, coin laundry. $475 includes all. 330- 0011 ON PARK AVE with quiet offstreet parking, close-to boutiques & res­taurants, large 1 bedroom. First month free to qualified applicants. $815 includes heat, & 24 hour maintenance 585271-7597 ON PARK AVE. Near East Ave. Charming First Floor, 1-bdrm, den, large kitchen, formal dining,

INDUSTRIE LOFTS Chic. Modern. Hip. Massive. New.

Come view these unique gigantic lofts and enjoy superior downtown living in these exceptional homes.

Amenities Include: • Private garage with elevator to lofts • European-style kitchens with all Stainless Steel Appliances • Boutique style bathrooms w/ custom tile • Bamboo floors • Huge Walk-in closets • Private fitness center • Wireless internet • Cozy media room • Laundry • Boutique hotel style lobby • On-site management $1200 - $2000 per month for spacious, brand new 2-3 bedroom lofts

Call 585.413.4462 to schedule a showing, or e-mail lofts@industrielofts.net

www.industrielofts.net

32 City november 3-9, 2010

hard­woods, heated sunporch, laundry. Quiet. No Pets. Nonsmokers. $795/month +utilities. 585-392- 7428 PARK/BERKELEY Great Location. Large 2br+den, remodeled kitchen, large living area, year round sun porch. Located in Park Ave, café/ boutique scene. Parking Provided $850+. First and last month free to qualified renters with 14 month lease. Call 585271-7597

Commercial/ Office Space for Rent UofR/ AIRPORT AREA Brick mixed use building. 6,000 square feet of stores/office plus apartments. Owner must sell due to illness. Owner financing, no banks needed. 383-8888

Houses for Rent HOUSE FOR RENT/ ROCHESTER: Nice 3bdrm home with an enclosed porch and large lot. $695/mo plus utilities & security. WOTB. Call Cornerstone 607-936-1945. See our complete listings at www. homesbycornerstone.com.

Houses for Sale 741 ADMIRALTY WAY Webster - Gorgeous lake and sunset views! The HOA maintains exterior of this home. Dock Included. Doug (585)210-8585 www. stonypointwebster.com BR3/ 2.5 Bath $333K HOMES FOR SALE Pittsford/ Bushnells Basin 3 Homes on fabu­lous 3 acre park-like yard. Beautifully updated, 1800’s large main house &+ 2 smaller homes which are leased for $24,000 per year (Great In-Law Home). Owner must sell due to age & health 585383-8888

Land for Sale LAND LIQUIDATION. 20 Acres $0 Down $99/mo. ONLY $12,900 near growing El Paso, Texas, Guaranteed Owner Financing, NO CREDIT CHECKS! Money back Guarantee. FREE Map/Pictures. 800-755-8953 www.sunsetranches.com (AAN CAN) STATE LAND FARM Sacrifice - Nov.13th Absolute sale- Large tracts starting at $19,900 Buildings/ Fields/ Woods/ Ponds Call to regis­ter (888) 905-8847 IT’S HERE!! NYS FALL LAND SALE Oneida, Oswego, Madison, Chenango, & Lewis Counties. Over 150 Properties! 7 Acres Riverfront- $29,995. Cranberry Lake Woods- 42 Acres on Water. WAS: $229,995. NOW: $139,995.

Adirondack River- 16 Acres on Water. WAS: $129,995. NOW: $79,995. Tug Hill-MontagueHunting Land 25 Acres w/ Timber - $34,995. Free Closing Costs. Call NOW! 800-229-7843 www. LandandCamps.com SOUTHER TIER FARM Liquidation 20 acres Abuts State Land $39,900 Distress Sale. Beautiful farm, great location on quiet country road. 1st time offered. Must sell quickly. (888)864-6105

Shared Housing ALL AREAS- ROOMMATES. COM. Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http:// www.Roommates.com. (AAN CAN)

Vacation Property DISCOUNTED WATERFRONT PROPERTIES: The vacation prop­ erty of your dreams awaits at Corbin Hall or Olde Mill Pointe, two of the finest waterfront communities on Virginia’s Eastern Shore. Choose a waterfront lot with access to Chincoteague Bay and Atlantic Ocean, a property overlooking the water or a private, wooded site. Spend time sailing, swimming, fish­ing, exploring, shopping or


Place your real estate ad by calling 244-3329 ext. 23 or rochestercitynewspaper.com Ad Deadlines: Friday 4pm for Display Ads Monday at noon for Line ads relaxing at the community center pool. Properties are 1 to 3 acres, with ocean access, low taxes, great schools, mild climate, spectacular natural views and unique site amenities. Incredible opportunity to buy today at yesterday’s prices. New owners have lowered prices to sell quickly. Starting prices: Waterfront $75,000, Pond $55,000, Interior $30,000. Call (757)824-0808, e-mail rbowden@grandbayproperties.com, or web www.corbinhall.com, www. oldemillpointe.com.

Adoption ADOPT: Happily Married, loving couple will provide warm home, ed­ucation, good upbringing, and hap­ piness to your baby. Expenses paid. Contact Patty and Greg. www. pattyandgreg.com 1-888-497- 4431

Automotive CA$H 4 CAR$ Free Towing of your junk cars and vans. $50-$5000 or donate to our Children’s Charities. 482-2140 DONATE VEHICLE: Receive $1000 grocery coupon, Noah’s Arc, Support no kill shelters, research to advance veterinary treatments. Free towing, tax deductible, non- runners accepted 1-866-912-GIVE DONATE YOUR CAR! Breast Cancer Research foundation! Most Highly rated breast cancer charity in America! Tax Deductible/Fast Free Pick Up. 1-800-379-5124 www.cardonationsforbreastcancer. org (AAN CAN)

$50 - $5,000

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WANTED Free pick up of any unwanted model, any condition. Top Cash for certain models, running or not with free pick up.

Financial Services CASH NOW! Get cash for your structured settlement or annuity payments. High payouts. Call J.G. Wentworth. 1-866SETTLEMENT (1-866-738-8536). Rated A+ by the Better Business Bureau. GOT A JOB but NEED More Money? Struggling with $10,000+ in credit card debt? Settle Your Debt NOW! Increase your income! Free Consultation & Info 888-458-7488 (AAN CAN) NEED EXTRA MONEY? Start by Reducing Your Credit Card Debt! NO Upfront Fees. Settle Your Debt & Increase Your Income! Free Consultation & Info 888449-7416 TIRED OF BEING In Debt? Decrease Your Debt-Increase Your Income. $10K+ in Credit Card or IRS Debt New laws Have Passed to Protect You! Free Consultation 888- 452-8409

HomeWork A cooperative effort of City Newspaper and RochesterCityLiving, a program of the Landmark Society.

For Sale BACKHOE 1969 Case 580 CK Backhoe, Excellent Condition! 40 hp Diesel construction king. Extend -hoe, $ 7,800/BO 585-727-4849. BED FRAME TWIN headboard, footboard, rails sturdy metal frame VGC $30.00 585-392-5127 COPIER (HEWLETT PACKARD) Office Set Pro (1150C) Works very well (uses color and black ink) $49 Staples carries ink 585-880-2903 DESK CHECK WRITER with ink supply $40 585-654-9480 DOG & CAT HOUSES kennels, porch steps, do it yourself kits. Quick assembly 585-752-1000 $49 Jim KITCHEN MOP Libman kitchen floor roller mop w/brush (refill sponge #02011 available at Walmart,Ace,Tops, etc) $5/OBO 261-1798 LEATHER SECTIONAL REDUCED. 3 piece leather sectional purchased 10 months ago. Spagnesi Italian leather. Dolce blue (blue/grey). Must sell - too big for new house!! Call AL at (585) 208-3902

continues on page 35

Alpine Influence

2562 Highland Avenue In the early 20th century, the most popular American residential architectural styles were based on historical precedent, creatively recycling traditional European and early American models. Here in Rochester, neighborhoods of the era feature many houses loosely patterned after English Tudor estates and American Colonial townhouses. Every now and then, homeowners looked farther afield for design inspiration. Spain, France, and Italy supplied design inspiration for some owners and architects. The original owners and designer of the house at 2562 Highland Avenue, meanwhile, had a very specific and uncommon source in mind: the Swiss chalet. The use of Swiss design motifs, while unusual, was not unprecedented. The 19th-century architect and author Andrew Jackson Downing, whose pattern books were very influential in shaping American architectural taste, introduced the style in this country in his 1850 book, The Architecture of Country Houses, where he noted that the style would fit best “in a bold and mountainous country.” Highland Avenue is hardly mountainous, but the setting is bold in its own way. Running from Mount Hope Avenue on the west to Clover Street on the east, this street is like an architectural museum, dotted with rare and eye-catching gems. The house at 2562 Highland in Brighton rubs shoulders with handsome Tudor and Colonial Revival houses, and is across the street from a house that resembles a miniature French chateau. Historic maps indicate that the house was built around 1920. Distinctive Swiss features

include the board-and-batten wood siding, the jerkinhead roof, and the flat, cut-out patterned balustrade on the second-story balcony. Also of note are the house’s many diamond-paned leaded-glass windows, which are in fine condition. Even the matching two-car garage has leaded-glass windows! The interior of the house displays a characteristic 1920s layout, with a side hall, wide living room, and sun-drenched sunroom. Narrow-plank oak floors are in excellent condition, and original tile floors remain in the sunroom and vestibule. The sunroom is particularly appealing, with banks of leadedglass windows overlooking a sheltered side yard. The large eat-in kitchen and pantry offer plenty of storage and workspace. On the second floor are four generously sized bedrooms, two of which have double doors opening to the front balcony. The large basement offers finished space that could be a large office or playroom, as well as unfinished space for storage, laundry, and perhaps a workshop. The back yard is well designed for private outdoor living, with an attractive patio and small lawn. Highland Avenue, which is fairly busy farther west, is a quiet, residential street here, offering a peaceful and private setting. Measuring 2,661 square feet, the house is offered at $254,500. For more information, contact Maureen Toombs of Keller Williams Realty at 585-362-8527. By Katie Eggers Comeau Katie is the architectural historian at Bero Architecture PLLC.

305-5865

rochestercitynewspaper.com City 33


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www.allanelectricinc.com Beautiful Bathrooms By Anthony Craftsmanship is the key to a quality work. One company does it all. Average Bathroom 5, days complete. Design and Problem Solving . References, Call for a free estimate, 334-1759 Emergency no. 330-8389 34 City november 3-9, 2010

Stand-by Generators Service Changes Exhaust Fans Trouble Shooting Hot Tubs Swimming Pools Cable TV & CAT 5 Wiring Custom Lighting & Wiring Security Cameras Telephone & Intercoms Trenching

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Rent your apartment special third week is

FREE > page 33 LOVE SEAT, SPANISH from 1970’s Pink & Purple, No rips $49 585880-2903 RUG with pictures of Moose, large, can hang on wall Great gift. $45 585-880-2903 SUPPORT VETERANS OUTREACH Purchase a $5 raffle ticket to win a Charlie Daniels Custom Signature Hat. Proceeds benefit Veterans Outreach Center. Drawing 11-10- 10. Tickets on sale at all Canandaigua National Bank Locations SWINGING SHUTTER WOOD DOOR. Like in Cowboy movies, 5’ 5” tall, 2’ 2” wide (pantry, closet) $35 585-880-2903

Garage & Yard Sales MOVING SALE Sold House! Clothes, art, decor items. neon, tv, fabric, Christmas, tent, tools & more. No appliances. 150 Sanford St.Sat & Sun Nov 6 & 7th 9am-4pm

Groups Forming DIFFERENT DRUMS GAY GIRLS OUT. Like minded women, pre­ serve America’s Constitution, stand strong against socialism, Vote the liberal fascist bums out! Conversation and fun. 585-5942699

BASS OR KEYS WANTED 3 piece original hard rock band wants bass/ keys to start gigging. Please ask to hear samples of our work and be creative! Mweek82@ yahoo.com BASS PLAYER NEEDED for es­ tablished Industrial Rock Band gear provided 585-621-5488 CALLING ALL MUSICIANS OF ALL GENRES - the Rochester Music Coalition wants you! Please register on our website. For further info: www.rochestermusiccoalition. org. info@rochestermusiccoalition. org. 585-235-8412 DREAM ENGINE seeks musicians for musical/poetry artist collabora­ tion. Blues/jazz/funk/rock influenc­es. All instruments. Talent, creativ­ity, improv skills required for non- commercial, performance art en­semble. Practice Tuesday nights. Chris 585-472-9971 DRUMMER LOOKING FOR working blues band. Experienced and will­ing to travel. Text Bob @585-705- 3142 or leave message 585-473- 1654 JOE E. & THE JAM FACTORY in a special free concert at the Great great House of Guitars, Saturday October 23, 6pm KEYBOARD / SYNTH PLAYER needed now for local established rock cover band. No rental or utility fees. Please call 585-621-5488 LOOKING FOR LEAD GUITARIST, rhythm guitarist, & bass player, cover tunes, originals must be reli­able, dependable. Looking for seri­ous musicians 585-473-5089 smokefreeBrian, Mr. Rochester, Rock Star MEET OTHER MUSICIANS Looking for musicians & male sing­er to Jam & play out, coffee shops & private events Call 585-266-6337

Jam Section

MOTOWN REVUE, “PROMISE”. Musicians needed for 50s/60s/70s Motown Show!!! Keyboards and Drums!! For more info and an audi­ tion, call 585 202-8890.

2 TROMBONE PLAYERS NEEDED to play with one of Rochester’s Finest Big Bands. Must read. (Great Charts). Able to rehearse every oth­er Wednesday 585-442-7480

MUSICA SPEI Rochester’s sacred Renaissance group. is seeking ex­ perienced singers for the upcoming season. Call Alexandra at 585-4159027 or visit www.musicaspei.org for more details.

ROCK BAND NEEDS GUITARIST Bass Player and Drummer. Practice space needed. Rehearse new music and play occasional shows 585-482-5942 THE CHORUS OF THE GENESEE (CoG) has openings in all voice parts. The CoG performs a wide va­riety of musical styles from barber­shop to Broadway, to patriotic and religious. All ages. Contact Ed Rummler at 585-385-2698. VOCALIST LOOKING FOR MUSICIANS to learn original music for studio and for performance. Equip & Trans and available even­ings. Guitar, drummer. keys, horns Contact Bobbie 585-328-4121 585-234-1324

of $750. For more information, visit www.rochestervictoryalliance.org, or call 585.756.2329 to schedule an appointment.

Mind Body Spirit WILL YOU FIND THE ONE? Find out with a FREE Psychic reading! 1- 800-905-0681 (AAN CAN)

Miscellaneous WIN CHARLIE DANIELS HAT Custom Signature Hat, Raffle to benefit Veterans Outreach Center. Drawing 11-10-10. Tickets ($5) on sale at all Canandaigua National Bank Locations

Looking For... IF YOU’RE A GAY, bi, curious, or versatile kind-of-guy, age 18-45, and HIV-negative, you may qualify to take part in an important medical research study at the University of Rochester Medical Center. Participants will be paid an average

ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from home. *Medical, *Business, *Paralegal, *Computers, *Criminal Justice. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if

Place your ad by calling 244-3329 ext. 23 or rochestercitynewspaper.com Ad Deadlines: Friday 4pm for Display Ads Monday at noon for Line ads qualified. Call 866-858-2121 www. CenturaOnline.com

active, educated readers for only $995 by advertising in 110 weekly newspa­pers like this one. Call Jason at 202-289-8484 This is not a job of­fer. (AAN CAN)

Music Services BASS LESSONS Acoustic, electric, all styles. Music therory and com­position for all instruments. Former Berklee and Eastman Teacher. For more information, call 413-1896

Schools HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA! Graduate in just 4 weeks!! FREE Brochure. Call NOW! 1-800532- 6546 Ext. 97 http:// www. continentalacademy.com (AAN CAN)

Notices HEAT OR EAT - you don’t have to choose! Call MCLAC NOEP at (585) 295-5624 to find out if you may be eligible for Food Stamps. Call be­fore your heating bills eat up your grocery budget! This institution is an equal opportunity provider. Prepared by a project of the Nutrition Consortium of NYS, USDA/FNS & NYSOTDA. GAIN NATIONAL EXPOSURE. Reach over 5 million young,

Top Ads ELEMENTARY TUTORING: NYS K- 6 Certified Teacher looking to work with your elementary student by ac­tively engaging them in the learning process. Tutoring services available weeknights and weekends. Contact meaghanssmith@gmail.com

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P LY M O U T H S P I R I T UA L I S T C H U R C H Together We Are One

2 9 V I C K PA R K A RO C H E S T E R , N Y

Sat. Nov 6

Monte Carlo Night

6 PM-10 PM. With silent auction.

Sat. Nov 13

Psychic Fair

11AM-7PM, free admission, crystals, stones, oils, readings: $15/10 min.

Sun. Nov 21

A workshop with Robert Egby, noted author and medium:

SPIRIT RESCUE: THE ULTIMATE HEALING 1PM-4PM, $35 prepaid, $40 at door

Sunday Services

10:30 AM

All Message Service & Free Spiritual Healing Third Weds ~ 7 PM ~ Séances ~ Classes ~ Gallery Reading ~ For more information and schedules www.plymouthspiritualistchurch.org Robin Higgins, Pastor ~ Phone: 585.271.1470

rochestercitynewspaper.com City 35


I’m very pleased with the calls I got from our apartment rental ads, and will continue running them. Your readers respond — positively!” - M. Smith, Residential Management EMPLOYMENT / CAREER TRAINING

Employment DANCERS: PT/FT, Earn BIG $$$$, 18+, no exp. necessary, Tally Ho, 1555 E. Henrietta Rd. Roch. Call 585-303-0550 DRIVER- NEW PAY PACKAGE! Van and Refrigerated. Great Benefits! Flexible Schedule! 98% No- Touch Freight. Steady Miles. CDL-A, 6 months recent experi­ence. 800-414-9569 www. driveknight.com MYSTERY SHOPPERS Earn up to $100 per day. Undercover shop­pers to judge retail & dining estab­lishments. Experience not required Call 800-488-0524 SOUTH BREWPUB Is seeking a passionate, technically gifted, team oriented brewer to develop and lead our brewing efforts. Responsibilities will include: equip­ment selection and installation, and managing day to day brewing op­erations. Training at an accredited brewing school and/or a minimum of several years practical brewing

experience is desired. Apply to: mf.southpawbrewpub@gmail.com $$$HELP WANTED$$$ Extra Income! Assembling CD cases from Home! No Experience Necessary! Call our Live Operators Now! 1-800- 405-7619 EXT 2450 http:// www.easyworkgreatpay.com (AAN CAN) AIRLINES ARE HIRINGTrain for high paying Aviation Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified- Job Placement Assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance (866)296-7093 ATTN: DRIVERS! Top 5% Pay! Excellent Benefits Latest Technology. Need CDL-A & 3 mos recent OTR. 877-258-8782 www.meltontruck.com EDITOR/ PUBLISHER FOR ORTHODOX WEEKLY: Oversee all aspects of publication (sales, edi­torial and online - www.TheJewishStar.com.) Must be able to manage sales staff, develop relationships w/ advertisers and community

leaders. Familiar with 5 Towns/ Brooklyn Orthodox com­munities. Salary, incentives, health plan, 401K. Send resume w/ salary requirements to: JewishStarSearch@aol.com PAID IN ADVANCE! Make $1000 a Week mailing brochures from home! Guaranteed Income! FREE Supplies! No experience required. Start Immediately! www.homemailerprogram.net (AAN CAN) SALES MANAGER, DIGITAL/ SPECIALTY PRODUCTS Responsibilities Include: Overseeing advertising sales for our websites, training newspaper print sales team, cold calling, prospect­ ing, qualifying, presenting, rela­ tionship building. Knowledgeable online marketing concepts. Richner Communications, Inc. publishes 27 community newspapers and shop­pers. Compensation package in­cludes salary, commission, bonus plan, health plan, 401K, more. Send resume w/ salary require­ ments to ca­reers.richner@gmail. com

ADVERTISING SALES OPPORTUNITY SEEKING ONE OUTSTANDING SALES PROFESSIONAL. MUST BE ASSERTIVE, OUTGOING, SMART, IMAGINATIVE AND CONFIDENT. SALES EXPERIENCE AND PROVEN RECORD OF SALES ACHIEVEMENT A MUST. NEWSPAPER/MEDIA SALES A DEFINITE PLUS. SALARY PLUS COMMISSION PLUS BENEFITS.

SEND RESUME TO: Betsy Matthews, City Newspaper, 250 N. Goodman St., Rochester, NY 14607 OR EMAIL TO: bmatthews@rochester-citynews.com

$38,943 PER YEAR DOE Immediate Opening. Processing re­funds. Work from home. FT/part- time. No experience needed. Start Mon. 1-800-3133951 (AAN CAN)

Volunteers ADOPTED ADULTS WANTED! Adoption Resource Network at Hillside is looking for a few adults who were adopted to volunteer for the AdoptMent program. AdoptMent matches adult adoptees with children who are somewhere in the adoption process. AdoptMent youth and adults meet as a group and individually for one hour a week from September until June. Training and support are provided. If you are interested, please call or email Jennifer Casatonguay at 585- 350-2526, jcastong@hillside.com.

COMPEER IS SEEKING volunteers to mentor adults. Form a lasting friendship through our E-Buddies, Compeer Calling, or One-to-One Mentor Programs. Vehicle needed, training/support provided (Contact: Renee Bryant, 546-8280, rbryant@compeer.org) COMPEER’S “50 PROMISED” CAMPAIGN is underway! Volunteers needed to mentor youth experiencing parental incarcera­tion. Spend rewarding time each month doing fun activities. Vehicle needed, training/support provided. Laura Ebert/Compeer lebert@compeer. org 585-546-8280 Ext-117 EBAY VOLUNTEER NEEDED to as­sist in eSales Department at Volunteers of America. Ebay expe­rience required: photography and writing. Antiques knowledge help­ful. Call Mary Kay 585-698-1538 LITERACY VOLUNTEERS OF ROCHESTER has several 1 hour preview sessions scheduled for anyone interested in becoming a tutor. No prior teaching experience

Cellular Sales A Premium Verizon Wireless Retailer Looking for experienced

Sales Representatives Submit resume to: www.cellularsales.com/opportunity or call 1-888-915-6624

is required. For info call Shelley Alfieri at 585-473-3030 MEALS ON WHEELS Needs Volunteers! Do you have an hour and a smile? Deliver meals during lunchtime to homebound neigh­bors. Interested? Call 7878326 to help. SCHOOL #12, 999 South Ave is looking reading and math volun­ teers, English and Spanish, now through June. Training Provided. Call Vicki 585-461-4282 TALENTED PRINTER /GRAPHIC ARTIST needed to donate services. Volunteer time to design new bro­chure for new fibromyalgia support group. Send samples & contact info to: jacolyn_fibrosupport@hotmail. com THE LUPUS FOUNDATION OF GENESEE VALLEY welcomes vol­ unteers to help weekly, monthly or once a year. We match your inter­ests with our projects. Each volun­teer makes a difference. Call Eileen 585-288-2910. VOLUNTEERS NEEDED to assist with praise and worship. Living Waters Fellowship is a Christ cen­tered non-denominational church in the early stages of development. Individuals, groups, and musicians are welcomed. Call 585-957-6155. WEBSTER - If you are interested in helping children and adults with de­velopmental disabilities during ther­apeutic horseback riding lessons contact Kim Kennedy at (585) 340- 2016 or kkennedy@ heritagechristianservices.org.

Business Opportunities DO YOU EARN $800 in a day? Your Own Local Candy Route! 25 machines and candy All for $9995. 877-915-8222 All Major Credit Cards Accepted!

Dear Christine, I just wanted to express my utmost gratitude to you and the City Newspaper. I recently ran a help wanted ad with you and not only was it less expensive but I received more applications and people of better caliber. Great Job! Thank you very much for all that you do. Mark Augusty Canandaigua Chrysler Dodge Jeep 588.394.3440

Giving you the qualified applicants you need for less! 36 City november 3-9, 2010

Career Training DRIVER TRAINING CDLA: Tractor Trailer Learn to Earn $35- $45,000 per NTTS grad employers, D.O.L.,A.T.A., National Tractor Trailer School, Liverpool, NY www.ntts.edu EARN $75 - $200 HOUR. Media Makeup Artist Training. Ads, TV, Film, Fashion. One week class. Stable job in weak economy. Details at http:// www. AwardMakeUpSchool.com 310364-0665 (AAN CAN)


Legal Ads [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of THE STOWE LAW FIRM LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/07/10. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of PLLC: 52 Nichols St., P.O. Box 116, Spencerport, N.Y. 14559. SSNY designated as agent of PLLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the PLLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Practice law. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of PCAM, LLC. Authority filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 09/24/10. Office location: Monroe County. LLC formed in California (CA) on 12/17/ 04. Princ. office of LLC: 125 E. Main St., Rochester, NY 14604. NYS fictitious name: PCA MANAGEMENT, LLC. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to c/o Corporation Service Co., 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207-2543. CA addr. of LLC: 11101 Lakewood Blvd., Downey, CA 90241. Arts. of Org. filed with CA Secy. of State, 1500 11th St., Sacramento, CA 95814. Purpose: Management services. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of LiquidPixels Europe, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/05/10. Office location: Monroe County. Princ. office of LLC: 9 Royale Dr., Ste. 103, Fairport, NY 14450. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the addr. of its princ. office. Purpose: Any lawful ac­tivity. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF CURTIS LLC ] The name of the Limited Liability Company is Curtis LLC Articles of Organization were filed with the New York Secretary of State on 10/ 1/2010. The office of the LLC is in Monroe County. The New York Secretary of State is designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. The Secretary of State shall mail a copy of such pro­cess to 20 English Woods, Rochester, NY 14616. The LLC is orga­ nized to engage in any lawful activity for which

an LLC may be formed under the NY LLC Law. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY ] Notice of formation of limited liability company (LLC). Name: Monarch Senior Living LLC. Articles of Organization filed with Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on September 20, 2010. New York office location: Monroe County. Principal business location: 860 Hard Road, Webster, New York 14580. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of any such process to: 860 Hard Road, Webster, New York 14580. LLC is to be man­aged by one or more members. LLC is orga­nized to engage in any lawful act or activity for which limited liability companies may be or­ganized under the Limited Liability Company Law. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Baxter Farm Market Properties, LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 9/9/10. Office lo­cation: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 3846 Westside Dr., Churchville, NY 14428. Purpose: any lawful ac­tivities. Latest date 12/31/ 2099. [ NOTICE OF ORGANIZATION OF VOILA PRODUCTIONS ] Voila Productions, LLC was filed with SSNY on May 13, 2010. Office: Monroe County, SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. P.O. ad­dress which SSNY shall mail any process against the LLC served upon SSNY: Voila Productions, LLC, 455 South Goodman Street, Rochester, New York 14607. Purpose is to en­ gage in any lawful activity [ LEGAL NOTICE TREE IN THE SKY LLC ] Notice of Organization: Tree in the Sky LLC was filed with SSNY on 9/22/ 10. Office: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. PO address which SSNY shall mail any process against the LLC served upon him: 3 Jenna Way, Rochester, NY 14623. Purpose is to engage in any lawful ac­tivity.

[ LEGAL NOTICE NOTA SPECIAL NEEDS APARTMENTS, L.P.] Notice of Formation: NOTA Special Needs Apartments, L.P. was filed with SSNY on 10/15/ 2010. Office: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. Principal busi­ ness address and PO ad­ dress which SSNY shall mail any process against the LLC served upon him: 1931 Buffalo Road, Rochester, New York 14624. The names and addresses of each gen­ eral partner are available from the Secretary of State. The partnership is to dissolve no later than 12/31/2110. Purpose is to engage in any lawful activity. [ LEGAL NOTICE ] RHOFSTRA CONSULTING LLC, a domestic Limited Liability Company (LLC) filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on October 13, 2010. NY of­fice location: MONROE County. SSNY is desig­ nated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of any process against the LLC served upon him/her to THE LLC, 2232 REDMAN ROAD, BROCKPORT, NEW YORK 14420. General purposes. [ LEGAL NOTICE ] Notice of formation: Qmetrics Clinical Services, LLC. Articles of Organization filed with SSNY 6/29/2010. Location: Monroe County. SSNY is desig­ nated as agent upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of pro­ cess to: C/O Qmetrics Clinical Services, LLC, 140 Allens Creek Road, Rochester, NY 14618. No specific dissolution date. Purpose: Any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY ] Notice of formation of limited liability company (LLC). Name: Antonelli Storage Facility, LLC. Articles of Organization filed with Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on September 15, 2010. New York office location: Monroe County. Principal business location: 22 Foxboro Lane, Fairport, New York 14450. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of any such

process to: 22 Foxboro Lane, Fairport, New York 14450. LLC is to be man­aged by one or more members. LLC is orga­nized to engage in any lawful act or activity for which limited liability companies may be or­ganized under the Limited Liability Company Law. [ NOTICE OF ORGANIZATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY ] The name of the Limited Liability Company is Milaura LLC (the “Company”). The Articles of Organization of the Company were filed with the Secretary of State of New York on June 7, 2010. The office of the Company is located in Monroe County, New York. The Secretary of State of New York has been designated as agent upon whom pro­cess against the Company may be served. The address to which the Secretary of State shall mail a copy of any such process is 1655 Elmwood Avenue, Suite 215, Rochester, NY 14620. The business purpose of the Company is to en­ gage in any lawful activity for which a limited liability company may be orga­nized under Section 203 of the New York Limited Liability Law. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY ] SMITH AUTO SALES, LLC has filed Articles of Organization with the Secretary of State on September 13, 2010. It’s office is located in Monroe County, New York. The Secretary of State has been designat­ ed as agent upon whom process against it may be served and a copy of any process will be mailed to: The LLC, P.O. Box 6, 899 Ballantyne Road, Scottsville, NY 14546. It’s business is to engage in any lawful activity for which limited liability companies may be or­ ganized under Section 203 of the New York Limited Liability Company Act. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LLC ] JMS II Associates, LLC has filed articles of or­ ganization with the New York Secretary of State on October 12, 2010 with an effective date of for­mation of October 12, 2010. Its principal place of business is located at 254 North Avenue, Hilton, New York in Monroe County. The Secretary of State has

been designated as agent upon whom pro­cess may be served. A copy of any process shall be mailed to 254 North Avenue, Hilton, New York 14468. The purpose of the LLC is to engage in any lawful activity for which Limited Liability Companies may be or­ganized under Section 203 of the New York Limited Liability Company Law.

GREATWHALE LLC, Art. of Org. filed with Sec’y of State (SSNY) on 10/18/ 10. Office Location: Monroe County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of pro­ cess to: The LLC, 10 Watchet Lane, Fairport, NY 14450. Purpose: Any Lawful Purpose.

[ NOTICE OF FORMATION ]

[ NOTICE ]

Name: Laurentide Enterprises LLC (LLC). Articles of Organization filed with New York Secretary of State (SSNY) October 15, 2010. Office of LLC is located in Monroe County, NY at principal business loca­tion of 20 Concord Drive, Pittsford, NY 14534. SSNY designated agent of LLC for service of pro­cess. SSNY shall mail a copy of process served against LLC to 20 Concord Drive, Pittsford, NY 14534. LLC purpose is to engage in any activ­ ity authorized by NY law. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] Notice of Formation of SaaS Solutions, LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with Sec’y of State (SSNY) on 08/24/10. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to LLC’s princi­pal business location at 1163 Pittsford-Victor Road, Pittsford, NY 14534. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY ] PRISM AMC, LLC (“LLC”), has filed Articles of Organization with the NY Secretary of State (“NYSS”) on OCTOBER 13, 2010 pursuant to Section 203 of the NY Limited Liability Law. The office of the LLC shall be located in Monroe County, NY. The NYSS is designated as the agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served, and the address to which the NYSS shall mail a copy of any pro­cess served on him against the LLC is 84 Broadmoor Trail, Fairport, NY 14450. The purpose of the LLC is to engage in any lawful act or activity for which limit­ed liability companies may be formed under the law. [ NOTICE OF FORMATION ] Not. of Form. of Limited Liability Company:

4 ME THEN MY BOYS, LLC a domestic Limited Liability Company (LLC), filed with the Sec of State of NY on 9/10/10. NY Office location: Monroe. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom pro­ cess against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of any pro­cess against the LLC served upon him/her to The LLC, 816 Goodman St. S, Rochester, NY 14620-2524. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] NOTICE OF FORMATION of Pignato & Merkley DDS, PLLC (“PLLC”) Art. of Org. filed with NY Secretary of State (“NYSOS”) on 1/17/2007, pursuant to Limited Liability Company Law Section 1203. A Certificate of Amendment changing the PLLC’s name to Gregory A. Merkley, DDS, PLLC was filed with NYSOS on 9/22/ 2010. Office location: Monroe County. NYSOS designated as agent for PLLC upon whom pro­cess against it may be served. NYSOS shall mail copy of process served to: 2086 Five Mile Line Rd, Penfield, NY 14526. Purpose: any lawful ac­tivities. [ NOTICE ] APOTHEGM JEWELRY, LLC (LLC) filed Arts. of Org. with NY Secy. of State (SS) on 9/2/2010. LLC’s office is in Monroe Co. SS is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS shall mail a copy of any process to LLC’s principal business location at 311 Melrose Street, Rochester, NY 14619. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of, HEALTH NETWORK, LLC Art. of Organization filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 7-22-10. Office of Location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall

mail copy of pro­cess to 620 Park Ave. Ste 199, Rochester, NY 14607. Purpose: Any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Ink Management LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 8/9/10. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of pro­cess to 306 Affinity Lane, Rochester, NY 14616. Purpose: any lawful ac­ tivities. [ NOTICE ] ENERGY EFFICIENCY SPECIALISTS LLC (LLC) filed Arts. of Org. with NY Secy. of State (SS) on 9/ 22/2010. LLC’s office is in Monroe Co. SS is des­ignated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS shall mail a copy of any process to LLC’s principal business loca­ tion at 781 Harvard St., Rochester, NY 14610. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of UTMOS ATMOS LLC, Art. of Org. files Sec’y of State (SSNY) 10/01/10. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of pro­cess to P.O. Box 16301, Rochester, NY 14616. Purpose: any lawful ac­ tivities. [ NOTICE ] Not. of Form. of Richmond Funding LLC. Art. of Org. filed with SSNY 8/17/10. County: Monroe. SSNY is desig­nated Agent of LLC to whom process may be served. SSNY may mail a copy of any process to LLC, 1690 Lyell Ave Rochester, NY 14606. Purpose: any lawful ac­tivity. [ NOTICE ] NOTICE OF FORMATION of 2755 Penfield Road LLC (“LLC”) Art. of Org. filed with NY Secretary of State (“NYSOS”) on 9/27/ 2010, pursuant to Limited Liability Company Law Section 203. Office location: Monroe County. NYSOS designated as agent for LLC upon whom process against it may be served. NYSOS shall mail copy of pro­

cess served to: 2755 Penfield Road, Fairport, NY 14450. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of MONROE LAKE LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 9/16/10. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 2608 Route 112, Medford, NY 11763. Purpose: any lawful ac­tivity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of Tower Assets Newco III, LLC. Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 10/ 1/10. Office location: Monroe County. Principal business address: 4091 Viscount Ave., Memphis, TN 38118. LLC formed in DE on 12/18/08. NY Sec. of State designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, registered agent upon whom process may be served. DE address of LLC: 1209 Orange St., Wilmington, DE 19801. Cert. of Form. filed with DE Sec. of State, 401 Federal St., Dover, DE 19901. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Manhattan Fine Properties LLC filed Articles of Organization with NYS on September 28, 2010 Its principal of­fice is in Monroe County, New York. Steve Nothnagle has been des­ignated as its agent and the post office address to which the Secretary of State shall mail a copy of any process against it is c/o the Company, 4889 Culver Rd. Rochester, NY 14622 Purpose: any law­ful activity [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Dewey Apartments, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/7/10. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: The LLC, c/o Sammy Feldman, 3445 Winton Place, Ste. 228, Rochester, NY 14623.

cont. on page 38

rochestercitynewspaper.com City 37


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> page 37 Purpose: any lawful act or activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of The Baxter Family Farm Market, LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 9/9/10. Office lo­cation: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 3846 Westside Dr., Churchville, NY 14428. Purpose: any lawful ac­tivities. Latest date 12/31/ 2099. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of 4653 Lake Avenue, LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 7/ 28/10. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to c/o 36 W. Main St., Ste. 500, Rochester, NY 14614. Purpose: any lawful ac­tivities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Healthful Design, LLC, Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 10/1/10. Office location: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of pro­cess to CSC, 80 State St., Albany, NY 12207, the Reg. Agt. upon whom proc. may be served. Purpose: any lawful ac­ tivities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation INTERACT COUNSELING LCSW PLLC Arts. of Org. filed with SSNY 10/14/10. Off. Loc.: Monroe Cnty. SSNY designated as agent of LLC whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o The LLC, 2136 Penfield Rd., Penfield, NY 14526. Purpose: all lawful activ­ities. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Napora Cleaning Services L.L.C., Art. of Org. filed Sec’y of State (SSNY) 8/2/10. Office lo­cation: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may

38 City november 3-9, 2010

be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to Roman Napora, 5 Balsam Lane, Penfield, NY 14526. Purpose: any lawful activities. [ NOTICE ] LEVERAGING TECHNOLOGY SOLUTIONS LLC, a do­ mestic Limited Liability Company (LLC), filed with the Sec of State of NY on 9/30/10. NY Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom pro­cess against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of any pro­cess against the LLC served upon him/her to The LLC, c/o John J. Sack, 11 Silent Meadows Dr., Spencerport, NY 14445. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] BROTEA CONSULTING, LLC, a domestic Limited Liability Company (LLC), filed with the Sec of State of NY on 9/30/10. NY Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is desig­ nated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of any process against the LLC served upon him/her to The LLC, 132 Eagle Feather Circle, Spencerport, NY 14559- 1495. General Purposes. [ NOTICE ] Regional Defense Services, LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 9/24/2010. Office in Monroe Co. SSNY design. Agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of pro­ cess to The LLC 1007 Lehigh Station Road Henrietta, NY 14467. Purpose: Any lawful ac­tivity. [ NOTICE ] SATRIALES LLC (LLC) filed Arts. of Org. with NY Secy. of State (SS) on 10/ 14/2010. LLC’s office is in Monroe Co. SS is des­ignated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SS shall mail a copy of any process to LLC’s principal business loca­ tion at 670 Trabold Rd., Rochester, NY 14624. LLC’s purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] DEL CONTE SERVICES, LLC

Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 10/20/2010. Office in Monroe Co. SSNY desig. agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to 608 Hillside Ave., Rochester, NY 14610, which is also the principal business loca­tion. Purpose: Any lawful purpose. [ NOTICE ] DITMAX LOGISTICS LLC, a domestic Limited Liability Company (LLC), filed with the Sec of State of NY on 10/8/10. NY Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is desig­ nated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of any process against the LLC served upon him/her to Valerie A. Butler, 8470 Ridge Rd. West, Brockport, NY 14420. General Purposes [ NOTICE ] 2308 MONROE AVENUE, LLC, a do­ mestic Limited Liability Company (LLC), filed with the Sec of State of NY on 9/28/10. NY Office location: Monroe County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom pro­cess against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of any pro­cess against the LLC served upon him/her to The LLC, 18 Delancey Ct., Pittsford, NY 14534. General Purposes [ NOTICE ] The Fsw Group LLC Articles of Org. filed NY Sec. of State (SSNY) 7/ 21/2010. Office in Monroe Co. SSNY de­ sign. Agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to Gary O’Connor 81 Highview Dr Spencerport, NY 14559. Purpose: Any lawful ac­tivity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Qualification of Washing Equipment Technologies, LLC. Authority filed with NY Dept. of State on 10/22/ 10. NYS fictitious name: WET, LLC. Office loca­tion: Monroe County. LLC formed in CT on 10/8/10. NY Sec. of State desig­nated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: c/o CT Corporation

System, 111 8th Ave., NY, NY 10011, regd. agent upon whom pro­ cess may be served. CT and principal business address: 201 Boston Tpke., Bolton, CT 06043. Cert. of Form. filed with CT Sec. of State, 30 Trinity St., Hartford, CT 06106. Purpose: any lawful activity. [ NOTICE ] Notice of Formation of Ackerman Land and Minerals LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State on 10/20/10. Office location: Monroe County. Sec. of State designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: 1279 Pittsford-Mendon Rd., Mendon, NY 14506. Purpose: all lawful pur­ poses. [ NOTICE ] Notice of formation of limited liability company (LLC). Name: SALESSOURCE TRAINING LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Sec. of State of N.Y. (SSNY) on April 18, 2010. Office lo­cation: Monroe County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to: Daniel Maslich, 302 North Goodman Street, Suite 403, Rochester, New York 14607. Purpose: any lawful ac­tivity. [ NOTICE } Notice of Formation of Mendon Properties Group LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with NY Dept. of State on 9/29/10. Office location: Monroe County. Sec. of State designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served and shall mail process to: 1273 Pittsford-Mendon Rd., Mendon, NY 14506. Purpose: all lawful pur­ poses. [ NOTICE] Notice of Formation WINDSONG MARRIAGE & FAMILY THERAPY PLLC Arts. of Org. filed with SSNY 10/22/10. Off. Loc.: Monroe Cnty. SSNY designated as agent of LLC whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o The LLC, 2136 Penfield Rd., Penfield, NY 14526. Purpose: all lawful activ­ities.


Fun

[ rehabilitating mr. wiggles ] BY neil swaab

[ news of the weird ] BY CHUCK SHEPHERD

Modern Mummies: New York City artist Sally Davies offered in October the latest evidence of how unattractive today’s fast foods are to bacteria and maggots. Davies bought a McDonald’s Happy Meal in April, has photographed it daily, and has noted periodically the lack even of the slightest sign of decomposition. Her dog, who circled restlessly nearby for the first two days the vittles were out, since then has ignored it. (Several bloggers, and filmmaker Morgan Spurlock, have made discoveries similar to Davies’.) Food scientists “credited” a heavy use (though likely still within FDA guidelines) of the preservative sodium propionate but also the predominance of fat and lack of moisture and nutrients -- all of which contribute to merely shrinking and hardening the burger and fries.

Compelling Explanations — Maybe Just Safekeeping It for a Friend:

Raymond Roberts, 25, was arrested in Manatee County, Fla., in September after an ordinary traffic stop turned up a strong smell of marijuana. At deputies’ behest, Roberts removed a baggie of marijuana from his buttocks, but when the deputies saw another plastic bag right behind it (containing a white substance believed to be cocaine), Roberts said, “The weed is (mine),” but “(t)he white stuff is not ....” — Firefighter Richard Gawlik Jr. was terminated by Allentown, Pa., in August for abusing sick leave after he posted his daily golf scores on a public website during three days in which he had called off from work. Allentown firefighters’ contract allows them up to four consecutive days’ sick leave without a doctor’s note, and given their shift schedule of four days on, four days off,

a four-day, undocumented sick call effectively means a 12-day holiday -- a pattern that describes 60 percent of all firefighter “sick” days, according to an analysis by the Allentown Morning Call. (Gawlik’s union president said the union would appeal and that “playing golf was well within the guidelines of (Gawlik’s illness).”) — Woody Will Smith, 33, was convicted in September of murdering his wife after a jury in Dayton, Ky., “deliberated” about 90 minutes before rejecting his defense of caffeine intoxication. Smith had claimed that his daily intake of sodas, energy drinks and diet pills had made him temporarily insane when he strangled his two-timing wife with an extension cord in 2009, and made him again not responsible when he confessed the crime to police. (In May 2010, a judge in Pullman, Wash., ordered a hit-and-run driver to treatment instead of jail, based on the driver’s “caffeine psychosis.” Some doctors believe the condition can kick in with as little as 400 mg of caffeine daily -- an amount that, given America’s coffee consumption, potentially portends a skyhigh murder rate.) — An Iowa administrative law judge ruled in September that former police officer William Bowker of Fort Madison deserved worker’s compensation even though he had not been “laid off” but rather fired -- for having an affair with the wife of the chief of police. Although the city Civil Service Commission had denied him coverage (based in part on other derelictions, such as sleeping and drinking on duty and refusing to attend a class on search warrants), the judge ruled that Bowker’s dismissal seemed too much like improper retaliation for the affair.

[ LAST WEEK’S SOLUTION ON PAGE 35 ]

[ LOVESCOPE ] BY EUGENIA LAST ARIES (March 21-April 19): Romantic opportunities aren’t likely to be gratifying this week. Frustration and limitation will be due to added responsibilities and problems that crop up with people you thought you had something in common with. Single is good for now. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): An old lover will show interest if you reconnect. Keep what transpires out in the open to avoid any sort of repercussions later on. Honesty will play a major role in how long a relationship will last. Romantic good fortune is apparent.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Being overanxious will be your downfall when it comes to love. If you push too hard or come on too strong, you will end up attracting the wrong kind of attention. With a laid back, laissez faire attitude, you will be the one who is pursued. CANCER (June 21-July 22): Socialize and put your emphasis on being entertained as well as entertaining. You will promote not only love but the promise of commitment. Change of status and direction are apparent as a result of a love connection.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Join in and be a participant but don’t make any promises that may tie you to one person or another. It’s best to play it cool and enjoy everyone’s company equally until you are in a better position to choose one particular person to be with. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Get into the swing of things. Make plans, travel and, most of all, get involved in any activities that interest you. Love and romance are highlighted this week. All you have to do is be receptive and make yourself readily available.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Stop thinking about someone you loved once upon a time and do something about it, if you still feel the same. Pick up the phone or send an email and, before you know it, you will be in a position to reconnect or to let go once and for all. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Follow your intuition regarding a relationship. A change of pace will help you relax and realize what you want and need from a personal partnership. A change in status will also bring about unlimited opportunities in other areas of life.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): A change in your personal life will leave you feeling down and left out. Look at the positive not the negative aspect of what’s unfolding and you will know what to do and when. Lovers come and go but friends are there forever. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Remember your past and call upon the experience you have had with love relationships. There is a strong attraction building between you and someone you can’t stop thinking about. Don’t be afraid to make your move. Take action.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Stick to the things you need to take care of and take a pass on love or anyone coming on to you. You need to figure out what you want out of life before you decide to get mixed up with someone who may or may not fit into your plans. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Talk is cheap but can also lead to all sorts of opportunities when it comes to future plans, commitment, and building a life with someone special. Love is in the stars and connecting with someone who shares common interests is a plus.

rochestercitynewspaper.com City 39


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November 2-9, 2010 - CITY Newspaper  

Feature: Local recording studtios News: Mental health in schools | Dining Review: Max at the Gallery | Music: Clay Jenkins | Classical: Roch...

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